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Full text of "Ripley County's part in the world war, 1917-1918"

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940.410 
In2w 
1455042 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 00724 6157 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/ripleycountysparOOripl 




SPIRIT OF THE FLAG 

In the hope of the wonderful blossoming time, 

That the coming of Freedom should bring to the earth, 

Was the fag of our fathers unfurled in the days 

When the storm of the world gave our nation its birth. 

As the starry flag waves see new meanings unfold! 

All the azure and rose of a beautiful morn 
In our standard is lifted to bloom like a flower 

That at last from the centuries' waiting is born. 

'Tis America's flag that's the hope of the race; 

'Tis America's freemen are calling it out 
In a cry that will ring like a bugle at dawn, 

And at length from all nations bring ansivering shout. 

Let our flag, then, wave on with its spirit of truth, 
And the watchword entwined in its every fold 

Be the glorious words, "Elevate, elevate all!" 

For the promise of Heaven these pregnant words hold. 

O America's manhood, awake to your rights! 

Learn to read what the flag and its spirit must be. 
Clear your eyes of the mists that are blinding them now, 

And 'wash clean in the ether the flag of the free! 

— Elizabeth Stewart Ross. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART 
IN THE WORLD WAR 



1917-1918 



COMPILED UNDER THE DIRECTION 
AND CENSORSHIP OF THE 



RIPLEY COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



EDITED BY 

MINNIE ELIZABETH WYCQFF 

COUNTY WAR HISTORIAN 



Batesville, Indiana 
1920 



ISHING CO. 



1455042 



DEDICATION 

To the Ripley county soldiers and sailors, living and dead, 

who wore the khaki or the blue, and thus offered 

their lives, one and all, on the altar of their 

country's service in its hour of need, this 

record of their county's and their own 

activities during the World War, 

is gladly, reverently dedicated. 

June 1, 1920. 



COPYRIGHT 1920 

MINNIE ELIZABETH WYCOFF 

BATESVILLE. INDIANA 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



INDEX 



PART I 

Hoiv We Kept the Home Fires Burning 

Page 
General Narrative 13 

Red Cross Report 25 

Council of Defense 42 

Liberty Loans -. 49 

Woman's Committee, Third Loan 59 

War Savings Movement 60 

Food Administration 66 

Food Conservation 72 

W. W. C. of Batesville and Laughery Township 74 

Armenian and Syrian Relief 76 

Knights of Columbus 77 

Y. M. C. A 82 

Y. W. C. A 84 

Library War Service 85 

Fuel Administration 87 

Liberty Guards 91 

Liberty Girls 97 

War Mothers 100 

U. S. B. W. Reserve 105 

Soldiers' Employment Bureau 112 

War Labor Board 113 

Four-Minute Men .•: 115 

Fourteen-Minute Women 116 

Educational Propaganda 116 

Child Welfare Work 117 

Ripley County Draft Board 119 



PART II 

With the Boys "Over Here" and "Over There" 

Page 
First Division 128 

Second Division 130 

Third and Fourth Divisions 132 

Thirtieth Division 133 

Thirty-Third Division 137 

Rainbow Division 137 

Ordnance Repair Service 140 

Total Casualties of the A. E F 141 

Air Service 142 

Hospital Service 145 

Headquarters Service 146 

Military Police 148 

Supply Service 148 

Musicians 149 

Miscellaneous 150 

As Told in Many Letters and Narratives 159 

(a) William Robinson's Story 178 

(b) Our War-Prisoner's Story 180 

(c) An Engineer's Story 198 

(d) Diary of Everett Hart 201 

(e) From Our Y. M. C. A. Man 219 

Our War Nurses 223 

A Final Round of Army Shrapnel 229 

(a) An English Family's Record 245 

(b) A History of Service, 53rd Infantry 247 

Our Medal Honor Roll 253 

Citations 262 

Gold Star Honor Roll 265 

The Almost Gold Star Honor Roll 300 

Tribute to Ripley County's Dead 305 

Honor Roll of Service Men 311 

Wa: Poems 376 

Addendum 387 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Part I 

Page 

Red Cross Officers 26 

Council of Defense 43 

Float in Batesville Parade 48 

J. A. Hillenbrand, Liberty Loan Chairman 50 

Liberty Loan Chairman No. 1 53 

Liberty Loan Chairman No. 2 57 

Canfield's Drum Corps 59 

Naval Band, Great Lakes, III 63 

Eureka Band, Batesville Parade 68 

Airplane Landing 69 

War Exhibit Train 71 

Edward Laughlin's Airplane 73 

War Exhibit 75 

Liberty Guards, Co. "B." 90 

Liberty Guard Officers, Co. "B." 95 

War Mother Officers 99 

War Exhibit Train 118 

Fair-Grounds Hail 127 



Part II 

First Division Men 131 

Second Division, F. A. and Seventh Division Men 135 

Rainbow and Sixth and Seventh Division Men 139 

Miscellaneous Group 143 

Thirtieth Division Men 147 

Ninety-First Division and Machine Gun Battalion Men 151 

Medical Officers, No. 1 156 

Medical and Dental Officers No. 2 160 

Army and Navy Commissioned Officers 163 

Ordnance, Q. M. C. and Headquarters Men 167 

Thirty-Seventh Division Men 171 

Marines and Musicians 175 

In a Dugout in France 178 

Our War Prisoner 180 

Thirtieth to Thirty-Ninth Division Men 181 

Miscellaneous Service Men 185 

M. P., Eighty-First to Eighty-Fourth Division Men 189 

Engineers 195 

Coast Artillery 205 

Air Men, Engineers, Remount Men 213 

Military Officers 217 

Our Y." M. C. A. Secretary 219 

Army Nurses ■-•• 226-228 

Navy Men 230 

Hospital Service Men 236 

Special Service Men 238 

Two Methods of Travel 249 

Medal Honor Roll 253-260 

Citations Men 261-3-4 

Gold Star Men 265-304 

Mrs. Neil McCallum 305 

Batesville War Memorial 311 

War Exhibit Views 374 

S. A. T. C.'s and Miscellaneous Service Men 375 



PREFACE 

It is with due recognition of the importance of 
an accurate and complete record of Ripley county's 
war activities in the recent great conflict, both at 
home and with the boys in camp, on battle-field or 
in the navy, that this little volume has been care- 
fully compiled. No effort has been spared to make 
it reliable as an authentic record of our two and 
more years' participation in the World War. 

Thanks are due to the county chairmen of the 
various war organizations for their reports. Also 
to the War Mothers for their help in collecting the 
soldiers' and sailors' service records for the state 
and county honor rolls. Thanks are due to each 
of our five county papers for their help in carrying 
notices, articles and so forth in connection with the 
collection and publishing of our history. Mr. Harry 
Monroe of Batesville deserves special credit for 
furnishing practically all of the war pictures for the 
book aside from individual photographs. 

If an historian had been put to work at the be- 
ginning of our part in the war, we should doubtless 
have kept a few things that are lost to us. But it is 
believed that the essentials remain and will prove to 
be entirely trustworthy as a record of Ripley coun- 
ty's World W T ar service at home and abroad. 

Minnie Elizabeth Wycoff, 

County War Historian. 



FORE WORD 

Ripley county lies in the southeastern part of Indiana. It is sepa- 
rated from Ohio by Dearborn county, a width of about fourteen miles, 
and from the Kentucky boundary by Ohio, Switzerland a'nd Jefferson 
counties, a distance of twelve to fifteen or twenty miles. It is bounded 
on the west by Jennings county and north by Decatur and Franklin 
counties. It is irregular in shape, being about twenty-seven miles by 
nineteen miles in extent north and south, east and west, respectively. 
Its area is two hundred eighty-eight thousand acres, and averages from 
nine hundred to eleven hundred feet in elevation. It is drained princi- 
pally by Laughery Creek with its tributaries, which crosses the central 
part of the county, and flows east between Dearborn and Ohio counties 
to the Ohio river. Otter Creek, Old Kentuck and Little Graham 
creeks drain the western and southern parts of the county. 

The first permanent settlements were made in 1814-15. The early 
settlers were nearly all pioneers from Kentucky, Ohio and Pennsylvania. 

There are no very large towns. Batesville, in the northern part of 
the county, with a population of less than three thousand, is the largest 
town. It has city government, and is situated on the Big Four railway 
not far from half the distance between Indianapolis and Cincinnati. 

Milan and Osgood, on the B. & O. R. R., near the center of the 
county, are the next two towns in size and importance. Holton, on the 
B. & O., Versailles, the county seat, five miles south of Osgood, Sun- 
man, on the Big Four, near Batesville, Napoleon, Friendship, Cross 
Plains and New Marion, are the other principal small towns, ranging 
from three hundred to nine hundred in population. 

Farming is the chief industry. Much attention is given to dairying 
and poultry raising. Saw-milling and flour-milling are important occu- 
pations. 

Furniture, coffins, coffin-metals and mirror glass are manufactured 
at Batesville. There is also a garment factory and a baby-shoe factory. 

Milan has a veneer mill. 

The population of the county is about twenty-one thousand. There 
are only a few very wealthy people in the county, and not a large num- 
ber of extremely poor. The greater number of Ripley county citizens 
are prosperous, progressive, and patriotic. They are proud of their 
Civil War record. Two Grand Army Posts still survive at Batesville 
and at Versailles. In every parade held during the World War the 



14 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 

G. A. R. veterans were made a feature, it at all possible. Four Ameri- 
can Legion Posts have been organized to June 1, 1920, at Versailles, 
Osgood, Milan and Batesville. 

Commissioned high schools are held at Batesville, Milan, Versailles, 
Osgood and Holton. Certified high schools at Napoleon, Sunman and 
Delaware. 

In education, industry, intelligence and thorough Americanism, 
Ripley county ranks with any other county having its parallel of natural 
advantages. It has sent teachers, editors, authors, artists, statesmen and 
soldiers forth to serve their country and mankind. Its soldiers have shed 
their blood in every war of our common history since the organization 
of the state and its admission into the Union in 1816. Now, at the 
close of the World War and the opening of the new year of 1920, a 
record of its activities during the war seems fitting and eminently proper 
as a special memorial to those who offered their lives that the peace 
and prosperity of their homeland should be secured. 



PART I 

HOW WE KEPT THE HOME FIRES 
BURNING 

On March 26, 1917, a number of citizens met in the courthouse 
at Versailles to discuss plans for co-operating with the State and Federal 
Governments in a general movement for preparedness. Dr. Tony E. 
Hunter was made chairman of the meeting and Frank Thompson sec- 
retarv. Addresses were made by Judge F. M. Thompson, Senator R. 
H. Jackson, Prof. Hale Bradt, Dr. R. T. Olmsted and Prof. P. V. 
Voris in favor of organizing all the resources of the community to pre- 
pare for the defense of the lives, property and rights of our citizens. 

The chairman appointed a Committee of Public Safety with author- 
ity to appoint such other sub-committees as might be necessary. A second 
meeting was appointed for Friday evening, March 29th, for the purpose 
of organizing a company for military drill. The general government 
everywhere was organizing to protect bridges, railways and public 
buildings. 

A detachment of the Third Ohio National Guard Regiment was sent 
to guard the bridges of the B. and O. Railway near Delaware and Hol- 
ton in Ripley county. Guns had been mounted along the Ohio River 
ports. The soldiers pitched their tents at the High Bridge near Osgood, 
and near Nebraska Station at the bridge west of Holton, and proceeded 
to do picket duty day and night. 

The first armed ship to sail from an American port was sunk on 
April 1st, near Brest, France, by a German U-boat, without warning, 
and with the loss of about twenty men ; this, occurring the day before 
Congress met, changed the attitude of some of the peace-at-any-price 
representatives. 

On April 7, the day following the President's declaration of a 
state of war between this country and Germany, in accordance with a 
call of Governor Goodrich and the Indiana Committee on Food Pro- 
duction, meetings were held at the courthouses in every county seat of 
Indiana. About two hundred citizens attended the meeting at Ver- 
sailles at 1 :30 p. m. Professor Anderson, of Purdue University, ad- 
dressed the audience, explaining some of the ways in which food produc- 
tion could be increased without increasing the acreage, namely, by test- 
ing and treating seed before planting. 

County Superintendent Chas. R. Hertenstein explained the reason 
for the hurriedly called meeting, that of economic preparedness made 
necessary by our entrance into a great war, the duration of which no 
one could foretell. He quoted the Governor in saying: "Next in im- 
portance to the men who go to the front, to defend the honor of the 

(IS) 



16 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

nation, is the conservation and the production of the food supply, and the 
men who perform this task are no less patriots than the men in the 
ranks." 

State Senator R. H. Jackson read a letter from the Governor ex- 
plaining the shortage of potatoes and wheat already existing in America, 
the poor outlook of the 1917 wheat crop of the world, and the great 
shortage of cattle and hogs of the United States. Statistics showed that 
we had fifteen million more people than ten years before and ten mil- 
lion less cattle. A set of resolutions outlining the situation and plan- 
ning for a patriotic organization was presented by a committee appointed 
to draft them. 

These resolutions declared the loyalty of the citizens of the county, 
their recognition of the menace in the German attitude, their condem- 
nation of the ruthless submarine warfare as declared and carried out by 
Germany, their recognition of the gravity of the food situation of the 
world, and the duty of all citizens to take immediate steps to prepare 
for any and all possible emergencies. They were unanimously approved 
and adopted. 

The organization was planned to include the entire county and 
named accordingly, "The Ripley County Patriotic Food Association." 
The following officers were elected: President, John A. Hillenbrand, 
of Batesville; vice-president, Edgar Smith, of Milan; secretary, E. J. 
Bryant, of Benham. It was agreed to complete the organization by 
townships as rapidly as possible. The resolutions on food production as 
presented by the chairman of the committee were as follows: 

"Resolved : Whereas, The United States is facing the greatest short- 
age in food supplies that this country has ever known, and has entered 
what promises to be the most strenuous conflict our country has ever 
been engaged in ; and, 

"Whereas, Our nation looks to Indiana for its full quota of men to 
prosecute this great war, and for more than her share of food to main- 
tain our army and navy, and civilian population, and realizing that the 
man who grows food is no less a patriot than the man who shoulders a 
gun, that the citizens of Ripley county adopt the following measures in 
order to stimulate food production and to conserve our resources to the 
fullest extent. In order to accomplish this end we feel the necessity of 
organizing our county with committees to further all branches of pro- 
duction and to aid in the conservation of food products." 

Indiana was the first state in the Union to take steps to handle the 
food situation, though papers throughout the nation were carrying arti- 
cles on the seriousness of the problem. Governor Goodrich conceived 
the plan and appointed a State Committee on Thursday, April 5, which, 
in forty-eight hours, had the counties organized. 

The following committees had been arranged at Ripley county's 
meeting: Corn Production, Potato Production, Home Garden 
and Vegetable Crops, Food and Live-Stock Production, Dairy 
Production, Home Projects for Boys and Girls — namely: Corn, Pig, 
Poultry, Garden and Dairy Clubs. Food Conservation Committees, 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD W AR 17 

and sub-committees on each subject were planned and immediately or- 
ganized during the following week in the eleven townships of Ripley 
county. 

The county papers came out the week after April 6 with cuts of 
the Stars and Stripes and the pledge of allegiance on their front pages. 
The state superintendent asked that the schools be opened with this 
pledge and the singing of the "Star-Spangled Banner," which was gen- 
erally observed for a time. Patriotic meetings were held all over the 
county; that at Batesville, on April 23, being one of the largest. A 
parade, in which the various lodges and the school children took part, 
formed the main feature of this meeting. Three bands played for the 
march, and about thirty-five hundred people were in line, carrying flags. 
Homes and public buildings were decorated all over the city with flags 
and bunting. Flag poles were raised at many school houses throughout 
the county and at the courtyard at Versailles. 

The bells on all public buildings rang at nine o'clock p. m. on Mon- 
day, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings of the week of June 
11 to 17, to mark the progress of the First Liberty Loan. They were 
tolled at five minute intervals each, four times on Monday, three times 
on Tuesday, twice on Wednesday, and once on Thursday, reporting in 
this way the number of days left in which to buy bonds. As the tolling 
bells echoed from town to town on the quiet evening air, it came home 
to all, young and old, rich and poor, high and low, that we were all a 
fundamental part of the mighty world struggle, whose battle-fields lay 
along the borders of France and Belgium. That upon us, as civilians, 
the future of the world depended as truly as upon the men in uniform 
who should go forth to those bloody fields. 

Mrs. A. H. Beer, of the Ripley County Council of Defense, Mrs. 
Lyttleton Reynolds and Mrs. C. S. Royce, all of Versailles, were sent 
as a committee to Greensburg, on Tuesday, July 10, to hear the plans 
of Mrs. Mary Boyd, of Indianapolis, who was the head of the Woman's 
Department of the Indiana Council of Defense for Knitting Socks for 
Indiana Soldiers. The state had asked Ripley county to furnish ninety- 
five pairs of socks before September 1, 1917. Indiana was the only state 
having such a commission at that time. Other states planned to watch 
Indiana, and, if the plan succeeded, to adopt it also. Each soldier was 
to be furnished with four pairs of hand-knit socks. 

Mrs. Beer called a meeting at Versailles, on July 21, to instruct the 
women of the county in the work, and to hand out the material. This 
was apportioned by townships and the work was completed in a short 
time, one hundred five pairs being furnished. The Council of Defense 
gave out the required knitting needles and instructions with the yarn. 

The socks were found to be entirely satisfactory but the method of 
distribution became such a difficult problem that the further work of 
equipping the soldiers with woolen garments was left to the Govern- 
ment and to the Red Cross. The Ripley County Council of Defense, 
however, locally, at the request of the Red Cross women of the county, 
in September, 1917, agreed to furnish a s\ffeater to each Ripley county 
soldier. 



18 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

On the same date as the "sock meeting" at Versailles, July 21, which 
was also National Draft Day, a district meeting of Red Cross workers 
had been held at North Vernon, Jennings county, Indiana. This meet- 
ing was instructed by Mrs. Belmont-Tiffany, of New York City. Mrs. 
Tiffany had organized the New York Red Cross workshops in 1914, 
and efficiently supervised them up to the entrance of the United States 
into the World War. Indiana's call for an organizer was met by Mrs. 
Tiffany's coming in person to supervise the establishing of Red Cross 
workshops in every part of the state. 

The membership organization was practically completed in every 
township during May and June. 

Mrs. Minnie E. Wycoff, of Batesville, was appointed county su- 
pervisor of Red Cross work by the executive board of the Ripley County 
Chapter and went to North Vernon on July 21 as chapter represen- 
tative. Several other Red Cross members from Osgood and Holton 
were at the meeting. Mrs. Tiffany showed the hospital garments to 
be made; explained the requirements and gave details of organization. 
In the afternoon she gave a most inspiring address, relating the history 
of the Red Cross, and showing the terrible, immediate need of the armies 
on the battle-fields. 

During the months of August and September the Ripley county 
Red Cross shops were organized and opened in every community except 
those of Washington and Delaware townships, which failed to organize 
till the spring of 1918. The Delaware Junior Red Cross was organ- 
ized in the winter of 1917, however, under the leadership of Miss Hazel 
Edwards. 

The Council of Defense, accordingly, asked Mrs. Wycoff, as super- 
visor of the Red Cross work, to take the management of the sweater- 
knitting for the home boys also. The work was given out to the Red 
Cross branches during November and December, 1917, the aim being 
to send the sweaters as Christmas gifts. One hundred and seventy-six 
pounds of khaki yarn was bought at an average of three dollars per 
pound. From this yarn one hundred ninety-three sweaters were knit 
and given to the Ripley county soldiers. J. F. Lochard, president of 
the Council of Defense, accompanied by Mrs. Lochard, and George 
Sparling, of Osgood, took the largest consignment in person. This 
went to Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky. All the first selective men in 
the county were sent to Camp Taylor for training. The other sweaters 
were mailed by parcels post to various camps, nine going overseas to 
boys in the First and Forty-second divisions, which had already sailed 
for France in July and November, respectively. About two hundred 
fourteen names were on our service list at Christmas, 1917, but it was 
impossible to secure the addresses of all the volunteers and regulars, 
though the Council of Defense asked, through the county papers, for 
the names and addresses of all enlisted men. A further Christmas treat 
was supplied to all soldiers from the county who could be reached, by 
boxes of fruit, jellies and home-made "eats" of many kinds. The county 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 19 

tried to leave nothing undone to make our first "War Christmas" as 
cheerful as possible to the boys in camp. 

By request of the War Recreation Committee, the five Ripley county- 
newspapers were sent weekly to the training camps. The editors kept 
mailing lists of local service men and mailed the papers individually to 
them throughout the period of the war. Families and friends also for- 
warded papers and subscribed for absent soldiers and sailors that the 
boys might know, not only the home news, but the reports as to how the 
"people back home" were supporting them through the Liberty Loan, 
Red Cross and other agencies. 

This first Christmas brought its gloom to the county, also. In the 
early spring, shortly after America's entrance into the war, two of our 
boys had died in camp: Charlie Sandifer, of Benham, at Norfolk, Va., 
and Adlai Wilson, of Milan, at Columbus, Ohio. In December oc- 
curred the first death in battle of a man from our county, when James 
Alva Francis, of Osgood, went down with the destroyer Jacob Jones, 
torpedoed off the coast of England, December 6, 1917. This casualty 
was confirmed at Christmas time, and two boys were sent home on 
Christmas day from Camp Taylor, for burial : Eugene Deburger, of 
Versailles, and William Lindauer, of St. Magdalene, both having died 
of pneumonia. Several others were seriously ill at Camp Taylor, and 
the unprecedentedly severe winter made the rigors of camp life unex- 
pectedly serious. 

The draft board had worked incessantly during the summer and fall 
sending all the men the camps could accommodate during September and 
October. Various drives for funds, Y. M. C. A., Library, Y. W. C. 
A., Red Cross, and so on, went forward without cessation. The Lib- 
erty Guards organization was begun at Batesville in November, with 
A. B. Wycoff as county organizer. Food laws were being passed by 
the national organization and put into effect by the local executives in 
every county. Men were enlisting in the army and navy or marines 
every week. The service flag with its one, or two, or three blue stars 
began to shine from windows everywhere. At the beginning of 1918, 
as already noted, Ripley county had five gold stars on the service flags 
of as many saddened homes. 

A War Relief Association was organized at Versailles in November, 
1917. The plan was to pledge at least one thousand members who 
should pay fifty cents each month toward a war fund so as to save the 
time and energy required in conducting so many separate campaigns. 
The work was divided by townships but the solicitors failed to secure 
the necessary number of signatures, and the movement came to nothing. 
The idea, however, was not relinquished, and the County Council of 
Defense later requested an appropriation from the county funds. The 
organization for handling this appropriation was called the United 
War Work Campaign Committee, of which T. H. Thompson, of Milan, 
was chairman, and Robert Borders, of the same place, was treasurer. 
In this campaign Ripley county contributed $22,841.52 towards the 
$170,500,000 fund, which was divided nationally as follows: 



20 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Y M C A $100,000,000 

Y. W. C. A 15,000,000 

National Catholic War Work (K. of C.) 30,000,000 

Jewish Welfare Work 3,500,000 

War Camp Community Service 15,000,000 

American Library Association 3,500,000 

Salvation Army ' 3,500,000 

The money turned over to this committee by Mrs. Laura Beer, 
treasurer of the Ripley County Council of Defense, was $20,000, re- 
ceived as follows : 

Versailles $ 533.36 Johnson Tp..., $1,548.68 

Washington Tp 890.92 Brown Tp 1,661.92 

Shelby Tp 1,803.86 Franklin Tp 1,332.85 

Milan 586.28 Otter Creek Tp ., 1,884.61 

Jackson Tp 968.51 Adams Tp 2,312.50 

Sunman 493.09 Laughery Tp 843.32 

Batesville 2,037.34 Delaware Tp 1,049.85 

Center Tp 1,016.68 Osgood 1,036.83 

Donations received and accepted : 

C. V. Smith, Chairman Versailles and Johnson Tp $ 253.40 

H. L. Akers, Chairman Brown Tp 327.78 

J. F. Holzer, Chairman Shelby Tp 139.40 

Geo. Laws, Chairman Franklin Tp 495.26 

W. R. Castner, Chairman Otter Creek Tp 118.69 

Clinton Shook, Chairman Jackson Tp 233.30 

L. A. Burns and Geo. C. Bos, Chairmen Adams Tp 513.10 

M. F. Bohland, Chairman Laughery Tp. and Batesville 401.50 

V. A. Wager, Chairman Osgood and Center Tp 273.50 

Victory Girls of Ripley Co 17.10 

Interest on deposit 68.22 



Total receipts $22,841.25 

The funds paid by townships were apportioned according to tax- 
ation. 

Payments were made by the treasurer, Robert Borders, to the state 
treasurer, Stoughton A. Fletcher, as follows: 

December 28, 1918 $10,000.00 

January 20, 1919 12,000.00 

March 11, 1919 768.22 

April 15, 1919 70.00 

Cash Credit of U. W. W. C, October 18, 1919 3.03 

The U. S. Public Reserve was organized with the following town- 
ship chairmen : 

Center township, George Sparling; Brown township, Frank Sieker- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 21 

man ; Adams township, E. R. Behlmer ; Delaware township, Fred 
Smith; Franklin township, Thomas H. Thompson; Jackson township, 
Jacob A. Meyer; Johnson township, Walter Smith; Laughery town- 
ship, John Nickol; Otter Creek township, D. C. Yater; Washington 
township, Ora Peters; Shelby township, John Holzer. 

The object of this movement was to secure a list of men available 
for war industries in Ripley county so they could be indexed and classi- 
fied to be held in reserve for vacancies in the industrial institutions 
where most needed, and best fitted to perform the work required. Ship- 
building was the main industry requiring men at that time, and a num- 
ber of Ripley county men were sent into the work. A few went into 
airplane service at Dayton, Ohio, and the Automobile Wheel Works, 
at St. Mary's, Ohio. 

The Lutheran churches of the county made a special collection 
among their members to help raise the national fund of $750,000 re- 
quired for their plan to look after the welfare of their members serv- 
ing in the army and navy. 

Meanwhile various disturbing reports came out in the newspapers 
every week. A large herd of hogs in a nearby county were poisoned by 
being fed ground glass. The hoof-and-mouth disease broke out among 
cattle. Foodstuffs seemed to be tampered with occasionally, with a 
view to poisoning, no one being able to discover the persons responsible 
for these alleged acts as they were usually not proven. 

County meetings were held from time to time. September 26, 
1917, the Council of Defense called a meeting at the courthouse in 
Versailles, at 2 p. m. This was one of a group of meetings addressed 
by John Chewning of Rockport ; Homer Elliot, of Spencer; John F. 
Riley, of Hammond, and John W. Spencer, of Evansville. It was for 
the purpose of planning and inspiring more thorough organization for 
all lines of war work. 

The appointment of the county Four-Minute Men was announced at 
this meeting as were several important committees on organization. 
Speeches were made by the ministers of the county who were in attend- 
ance. Each told how he was inspiring and upholding patriotism in his 
own congregation by service flags, news from the front, and so forth. 

In October, 1917, the Council of Defense sent out a call to all land- 
owners to sell or give away waste timber for fuel as the scarcity of coal 
threatened to cause much distress. Many people bought wood to help 
out the short coal supply for their stoves and furnaces. A number of 
farmers were glad to give away tops of trees from their timber lots for 
the work of cleaning the ground, so that many people, unable to pay 
the high cost of wood and coal, were able to secure fuel in this way. 

The Christmas mail for 1917 had no restrictions other than the reg- 
ular postal regulations, except that parcels for overseas men had to be 
mailed by November 15 to insure delivery by Christmas. The zeal of 
families and friends in sending numerous and large packages of gifts 
caused such a congestion in the New York postoffice, through which all 
foreign mail had to pass, that the last packages were not cleared out 



22 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

until the following June. This condition led to the opening and inves- 
tigating of five thousand packages by the postoffice department. It was 
learned through this investigation that a large part of the gifts were 
unnecessary or undesirable, so that a regulation was passed early in 
1918 restricting the mailing of any package to an overseas man without 
a request for the articles by the man himself. This request had to be 
O. K'd. by the soldier's superior officer. Postmasters were instructed 
to receive no packages without this written request. For the Christmas 
of 1918, arrangements were made for the Red Cross to handle the pack- 
ages for overseas. Committees were appointed in each branch to care 
for this work. Regulation boxes, three by three by nine inches, were 
sent out. The weight was limited to thirty-two ounces. Every box had 
to be inspected, wrapped and sealed by the Red Cross. As in 1917, they 
were to be mailed before November 15. Only one box could be sent to 
each soldier. To insure this result, the soldiers were issued coupons 
which they mailed to their mothers, sisters, sweethearts, or whomever 
they wished. So many soldiers could not be reached in time with these 
coupons, or failed to send them after receiving them, that the Red Cross 
was later instructed to issue coupons to relatives and friends upon their 
affidavits that but one box would be sent to each soldier. The time was 
extended to November 30, and the last packages were mailed on that 
date. Practically every boy and girl overseas was sent a Christmas box, 
some being sent more than one, after all, since the coupon plan made it 
possible for a box to be sent from more than one Red Cross branch, when 
friends and families did not find it convenient to confer on the subject. 

With the sailing of transports in the early spring, the draft activity 
was resumed, twenty-four men leaving for camp on March 29, 1918, 
thirty-one on April 26, fifty-three on May 27, forty-nine in June, and 
so on until the signing of the armistice stopped the call for men. 

In February, 1918, a mass meeting of all war organizations of the 
county was held at Versailles, special attention being given to Red Cross 
and food conservation work. This meeting is reported in detail in the 
Food Administration report. 

A county meeting of women war workers was held at Osgood on 
March 21, 1918, the main purpose being to prepare for the women's 
part in the third Liberty Loan. On April 6, 1918, the third loan was 
started with patriotic meetings everywhere to celebrate America's entry 
into the World War and win the loan in the shortest possible time. A 
parade with historic floats was made the feature leading up to the 
speeches in the larger towns. 

On April 18, 1918, the county was shocked by the sudden death at 
Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Miss., of Med. First Lieut. Tony E. Hun- 
ter, of Versailles, who had succumbed to influenza-pneumonia, later 
recognized as a forerunner of the terrible plague to spread over the 
world during the year, reaching America in the early autumn of 1918. 
Practically his entire regiment, the 149th Infantry, was in quarantine 
and several deaths resulted. Thornton Roberts, of Elrod, who had died 
of the same disease at Camp Gordon, Georgia, was buried at Green 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 23 

Chapel at the same hour as Lieutenant Hunter at Versailles. Later, 
about the middle of May, Edward Hudson, of New Marion, succumbed 
to the same malady at Camp Sevier, North Carolina, and was sent home 
to Shelby township for burial. 

On May 12 a memorial was held at the Union Chapel, in Sunman, 
in honor of our first soldier killed on the battle-fields of France, Cor- 
poral Kenneth Diver, who was reported, "Killed in action, April 28, 
somewhere in France." A few weeks later a second overseas telegram 
reported Harry W. Smith, of Pierceville, killed in battle on May 29. 
A little later on a third message told of the death in battle of Gilbert 
Sutherland of Napoleon. 

Every week more and more families received the little printed card, 
"Arrived safely overseas," and signed with their soldier's name. 

The newspapers began to publish long casualty lists as the spring 
offensive developed into the summer's fighting. Names, forever to be 
uppermost in many minds, began to be heard : Chateau-Thierry, St. 
Mihiel, the Hindenburg Line, Verdun, Meuse-Argonne, Sedan. Yet 
from July until late in September no new Ripley county names ap- 
peared among the killed. Then they began to come in until fifteen 
names had beeen reported "killed in battle" and the final overseas num- 
ber rolled on until in February, 1918, it rounded to twenty-two. The 
terrible influenza epidemic, beginning in September, 1918, and continu- 
ing throughout the winter, brought our full total of casualties up to 
forty-two. 

Memorial day, 1918, was peculiarly appropriate as a day of mem- 
ories: "Lest we forget," being the burden of the sentiment voiced. 

The Red Cross began presenting memorial brassards of black cloth 
with heavy gold cord stars to the parents of soldiers and sailors who 
were making the "supreme sacrifice." 

As every one knows, until July, the tide of war had rolled on stead- 
ily toward Paris. The world read anxiously from day to day for the 
magic word of a turn in the German advance but it was not until the 
Fifth and Sixth Marines of the dauntless Second Division helped to 
turn the tide at Chateau-Thierry that their onward march was checked. 

From July until the armistice was signed, on November 11, 1918, 
our own Ripley county boys helped to carry the flag victoriously for- 
ward from point to point, finally to march triumphantly across the 
Rhine. 

July 4, 1918, was used by the nation as a special rally day. Every 
community had its speakers and programs. Community singing was 
urged and the nation sang, not only the old patriotic songs, but the new 
songs to which the boys overseas were marching to battle. The Presi- 
dent's message was read at all these meetings, the "Star-Spangled Ban- 
ner" and "America" were sung as opening and closing odes and the flag 
saluted by orders of the local Councils of Defense. 

In April, 1918, blanks were sent out for registering the women of 
America for war service. Committees were arranged in each locality 
in Ripley county and several hundred women were registered for dif- 



24 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

ferent kinds of work, nursing, Red Cross, emergency, and so on. These 
cards were sent in to county and state headquarters and filed for future 
use. Several months were required to complete the filing of the cards 
and the coming of the epidemic followed so quickly by the close of the 
war, prevented much practical result from this registration. The effort 
proved, however, the loyalty of our women who came forward to offer 
either full or part time, as it was possible for each to do, in whatever 
service she was able to perform. 

Among the many educative features of the war were the exhibit 
trains sent out along the railways to show captured guns, equipment 
and war relics of all kinds. A most interesting collection was shown 
at Batesville, in April, 1919. 

The moving picture theaters showed war films and war-story films 
throughout the entire period of the war. Some of the most interesting 
and educative films sent out by the War Propaganda Department of 
the Government, that came to Ripley county, were Ambassador Ger- 
ard's "My Four Years in Germany," "The Kaiser, the Beast of Ber- 
lin," and the "Sinking of the Lusitania." 

German helmets, coins, small arms, and so on, were sent by indi- 
vidual soldiers as souvenirs and many of them were put on public 
display. 

The agricultural work of the county was influenced by various or- 
ganizations. The food clubs, pig and poultry clubs, and so on, were of 
more or less effect in different communities. War gardens were culti- 
vated in connection with many schools and in most of the towns waste 
ground was reclaimed for cultivation. More intensive methods were 
studied and adopted. E. L. Shoemaker was county agent until the 
spring of 1919, when he was succeeded by Calvin M. Griffith. A dem- 
onstration of farm machinery was held at Batesville, in April, 1919, as 
a culmination of interest developed during the war, principally. Many 
boys of the Boys' Working Reserve worked on farms during vacation 
and even for short periods were dismissed for emergency work during 
school terms. 

Smileage books were planned in the spring of 1918, named from 
their resemblance to railway mileage books. Each contained a number 
of tickets to chautauqua and other entertainments to be given at the 
various cantonments and were sold to relatives and friends at home, who 
mailed them as gifts to the boys in camp. This work in Batesville was 
ably managed by Mrs. Bertha Behlmer, who sold seventy-five one-dollar 
books, the largest number reported from any one town. These pro- 
grams were part of the work carried on carefully by the government to 
give the boys wholesome entertainment as a counteraction to the evils 
of camp life as illustrated in the history of armies in all ages. Exhaus- 
tive Government reports, as well as those of individual workers, prove 
that the American army is the cleanest and healthiest of any in the 
world or the history of the world. 

The last county war-work meeting in Ripley county was held at 
Versailles on September 28, 1918, in connection with the town's annual 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 25 

Fall Festival and A. H. Beer's Pumpkin Show. An aeroplane, No. 
39329, from the Dayton, Ohio, flying fields, visited the county during 
the day, coming to Batesville at 9 a. m., where it alighted for a short 
visit. After distributing Fourth Liberty Loan literature in liberal show- 
ers over the city it proceeded to Osgood, stopping there over the noon 
hour. In the afternoon it circled over Versailles during the parade, 
dropping its pamphlets like snowflakes. This parade was led by the 
Batesville Liberty Guards in their new regulation uniforms and equip- 
ment, followed by the Batesville Liberty Girls and Batesville Boy 
Scouts. The fourth large feature of this memorable parade was the 
Ripley County Red Cross marching by branches and auxiliaries, all in 
their striking uniforms of white with red crosses on the simple white 
head-dresses, each unit distinguished by its own banner, while individ- 
ual members carried small United States flags. 

Captain Guest, of the English army, gave the principal address of 
the day. 

The following week the "flu ban" edict was announced by the health 
authorities at Indianapolis, and all public gatherings were at an end. 

On November 8 the first unverified report of the signing of the 
armistice spread from coast to coast. Bells rang, whistles blew, and 
the wildest joy reigned for a few hours until it was learned that the 
celebration was premature. With the actual signing on November 11, 
however, the joy bells broke forth again and rang for hours from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific. Factory whistles blew. Parades were formed. 
Every conceivable noise-making device contributed to the uproar. For 
one day the nation went mad. Riots in cities and camps occurred. In 
Ripley county the enthusiasm- reached the highest point since the begin- 
ning of the war. Yet among the laughing, shouting people were those 
who cried or went about quietly with white faces, for not all our boys 
were to come home. Twenty-two lay buried in France, some of them 
in that very "Flanders Field where poppies blow, between the crosses, 
row on row." Others lie in the family burying grounds of the county, 
and there is no community that has not its gold-star hero. Every town- 
ship gave its quota of lives to the cause of human liberty. 

By townships they are as follows: Brown 7, Adams 3, Otter Creek 
1, Washington 4, Franklin 6, Jackson 2, Shelby 7, Laughery 3, Dela- 
ware 1, Center 3, Johnson 5. 

Following the armistice the winter of 1918 saw the war relief work 
going forward. The boys began returning to their homes in Decem- 
ber, but demobilization could not be accomplished in a short time. 

The Army of Occupation had to remain along the Rhine until peace 
was finally signed by Germany on June 28, 1919. 

The Victory Loan was made in April, 1919, with the ringing of 
happy bells and the grateful knowledge that this loan was to help bring 
our boys home. Red Cross activities were turned from hospital work to 
refugee relief. 

Memorial day, 1919, was used as a special day for remembering the 
World War dead. Fitting services were held throughout the county, 



26 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

the returned soldiers everywhere being invited to wear their uniforms 
and take part in this first national Memorial day for their fallen com- 
rades. 

The Council of Defense, town boards, and individuals began to 
plan memorials. In Ripley county, the first memorial tablet was placed 
in position at the city hall in Batesville, on May 29, 1919. It con- 
sists of a metal scroll carrying the names of Batesville and Laughery 
township's honor roll. This is framed in a heavy black wood case, 
colonial style, glass-covered in front, the supporting posts topped by 
two gilded eagles with hovering wings. The memorial contains one 
hundred seventy-one names. 

On Armistice Day, 1919, a welcome home was given by the city fire- 
men of Batesville, and a tree planted on North Park avenue for each 
soldier of the town or township who had given his life in the war, 
namely, for Hugo Prell and John Bland, killed in battle, and Roy 
Fruchtnicht, who died in camp during the epidemic of influenza. 

Various townships held Welcome Home days throughout the sum- 
mer and autumn. Brown township gave two days during the Friend- 
ship annual fall festival. A part of the 83rd F. A. from Camp 
Knox, doing field recruiting duty, attended and gave an extra military 
touch to the occasion. 

The County Welcome Home was given at Osgood on September 
26, 1919. A parade of uniformed returned soldiers and sailors, and 
a feast of which the main feature was the famous Kentucky burgoo, 
were the striking points of the celebration. About three hundred re- 
turned soldiers and sailors took part in the day's festivities. Many 
soldiers were still in camp and overseas,- but comparatively few who 
could do so failed to attend. 

Franklin township set memorial trees for its gold-star men in the 
Pierceville Memorial Park in September. The men so honored there 
were: Harry W. Smith, Earl Downey, Philip Levine, Samuel Heis- 
man, Chris Endres and Roy Raney. 

The various organizations of the county continued their work so 
long as any call for their activities existed, the Red Cross enrolling for 
civic service as the war service was concluded. 

Surely for all who toiled at home, in workshop, in field, at new 
and old tasks, as well as for those who went forth to battle, there came 
a vision that must remain forever. A vision, not of men working, 
each for himself, against all other men, but a nobler vision of each 
working for the good of all the rest, and all striving together mightily 
for the shining goal pointed out by the seers among them. The symbol 
they set for us to follow is the flag and each forward step adds a new 
meaning, until at last "government of the people, by the people, and 
for the people" may be perfected. 

The "meatless" and "wheatless" days, the "gasless" Sundays, the 
restriction of building except of necessity, the general conservation of 
all standard products of food, fuel and clothing, the numberless Red 
Cross benefits, the earnest striving forward to produce more, save 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 27 

more, and give more, both of time and service, than before the war 
was thought possible, lifted our people into a clearer atmosphere where 
not what you can win for yourself but what you can do for the general 
good is the measure of a man. 



History of Ripley County Chapter A. R. C. 

Written by Clarence H. Andres, Chairman 

"But the right is more precious than peace and we shall have to 
fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts. 

"To such a task we can dedicate our lives and our fortunes, every- 
thing that we are and everything that we have, with the pride of those 
who know that the day has come when America is privileged to spend 
her blood and her might for the principles that gave her birth and hap- 
piness and the peace which she has treasured. God helping her, she can 
do no other." 

(From President Wilson's address to Congress April 2, 1917.) 

When President Wilson, as the spokesman of the American people, 
in concluding his war message to Congress on April 2, 1917, pledged 
the lives and the fortunes of his countrymen to the task of bringing de- 
mocracy to the oppressed people of Europe, not all of us then appre- 
ciated and fully understood the significance of those memorable words. 

When a few months later we began to accompany our sons, our 
brothers and our sweethearts to the railway stations, there to take 
leave of them and bid them God-speed previous to their entrance into 
the military and naval service of our country, the President's words 
took on a greater somberness and their real significance literally stamped 
itself upon our very hearts. No one but those who witnessed the scene 
enacted when a mother or sister said a last goodbye to a son or brother 
who was about to be enrolled in the service of his country, could 
really appreciate the significance of that grim word — war. 

We had been reading in our daily papers since that fateful August 
4, 1914, when Germany declared war on Belgium, about the horrors, 
the suffering and the misery that had become the lot of the stricken 
people of those European countries engaged in the war against German 
aggression and Prussian arrogance. We had been reading about the 
privations and the hunger endured and the sacrifices that were being 
made daily by those men, women and children who were doing their 
utmost to stay off a merciless foe intent upon despoiling their country, 
their homes and the things that were dear to them, and we devoutly 
hoped and fervently prayed that our country would be spared the 
horrors of war and that we would not be called upon to enter the 
blood-stained arena brought into being by the Kaiser and his war lords 
across the sea. 

However, it soon became apparent that our army and navy would 
have to put an end to what diplomacy had tried to avert — war. The 





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1. G. A. Bass, Treasurer Red Cross. 2. Minnie E. Wycoff, Supervisor Red Cross Work. 3. 
Clarence H. Andres, Chairman Red Cross. 4. Neil D. McCallum, Red Cross Secretary. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 29 

events that preceded our country's entry into the world war are now 
a matter of history — events with which every citizen of our country is 
now familiar. 

The American people, as a whole, were slow to believe that Ger- 
many, or rather the men at the head of her government, were almost 
entirely devoid of honor. We at first believed the war in Europe a 
strictly European affair and early in the struggle declared to the world 
our neutrality, never, however, for an instant denying ourselves the 
right to trade with the belligerents in accordance with the customs, 
usages and provisions of that rule of action that prescribes for the con- 
duct of nations, known as international law. 

The United States did all in its power to keep out of the world 
conflict and on several occasions President Wilson endeavored to 
bring about peace between the warring nations; however, the war was 
to go on and we were to become one of the belligerents. It seemed that 
despite our efforts to keep out of the conflict the Almighty who shapes 
the destinies of men and nations and who had endowed our country 
with strength and vigor and lofty ideals had decreed that America be- 
come a party in this struggle so as to save the world's civilization. 

As early as 1915 it became evident that Germany or the Central 
Powers had the United States infested with thousands of spies who 
until the moment the United States declared war on Germany, con- 
centrated their efforts on destroying grain elevators, arsenals, ammuni- 
tion factories and in spreading propaganda which would create sym- 
pathy for Germany among the citizens of the United States. 

The history of submarine operations by the Central Powers is one 
long record of outrages perpetrated on American citizens and American 
property; a succession of protests of the United States headed by 
President Wilson, and of assurances and promises made and later 
violated by the German and Austrian governments. 

The sinking of the Lusitania, in which one thousand one hundred 
ninety-eight lives were lost, of which one hundred twenty-four were 
Americans, aroused the fire and the fighting spirit of America. A 
series of outrages perpetrated against Americans and American prop- 
erty widened the breach and when, after President Wilson's warning 
to Germany to discontinue her submarine policy, Germany announced 
on January 31, 1917, her intention to sink all vessels in the so-called 
"war zone" around the British Isles, the United States government 
on February 3 severed diplomatic relations with Germany, Count von 
Bernstorf, the German ambassador, was handed his passports, and 
Congress on April 11th declared that a state of war existed between 
the United States and the Imperial Government of Germany. 

Almost immediately America' began to mobilize her men, her money 
and her natural resources so that we might quickly put an end to the 
gory spectacle being staged in Europe. Numerous slogans were phrased 
and came into existence almost overnight. It was said, "Men and 
Money Will Win the War," "Food Will Win the War," "Ships Will 
Win the War" — all of which proved true. 



30 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Although \\z had been reading about the wonderful work being 
done in all of the war-ridden countries of Europe, we did not at first 
realize the scope and magnitude of the work that had been undertaken 
by the American Red Cross which, as an institution, previous to our 
country's entry into the war, was of comparatively small proportions. 
When a few weeks later the American Red Cross announced its inten- 
tion to establish a chapter in every county of every state in the Union, 
Ripley county was among the first in the state to answer the call. 

On May 31, 1917, the first steps preparatory to getting a chapter 
of the Red Cross in Ripley county were taken when the following per- 
sons met and signed a petition for a charter for the organization of Rip- 
ley County Chapter, the charter being issued a few days later. The fol- 
lowing are the original petitioners: Mrs. H. C. Canfield, Mrs. W. J. 
Gelvin, Mrs. G. M. Hillenbrand, Mrs. A. W. Romweber, Mrs. Wm. 
Wessel, Mr. George A. Baas, Mr. Frank Walsman, Mr. Neil McCal- 
lum, Mr. Edward F. Brockman, Mr. Clarence H. Andres, all of 
Batesville. 

The following officers were elected : Chairman, Clarence H. An- 
dres; vice-chairman, Frank Waisman ; secretary, Neil McCallum ; 
treasurer, George A. Baas. 

Branches and auxiliaries were established in the remaining ten town- 
ships in quick succession in about the order given below: 

Napoleon Branch — Chairman, Perry N. Brown; vice-chairman, 
Harry W. Behlmer ; secretary, Dr. E. E. Heath ; treasurer, George W. 
Schmidt. 

Versailles Branch — Chairman, Mrs. Clara A. Henderson; vice- 
chairman, J. Francis Lochard; secretary, Mrs. Ida R. Lochard; treas- 
urer, Walter H. Smith. 

Osgood Branch — Chairman, V. A. Wager; vice-chairman, Mrs. J. 
S. Bilby; secretary, Mrs. G. M. Beldon; treasurer, Miss Lou E. 
Stansbury. 

Milan Branch — Chairman, Mrs. H. C. Puffer; vice-chairman, Mrs. 
J. H. Bergdoll; secretary, Mrs. W. E. Lewis; treasurer, Robert 
Borders. 

Sunman Branch — Chairman, Mrs. Ruth Ahrends; vice-chairman, 
Mrs. Lurenia Robinson; secretary, Miss Alma Wetzler; treasurer, L. 
A. Bruns. 

Holton Branch — Chairman, M. R. Scott; vice-chairman, Naomi 
McClure; secretary, Irene Ward; treasurer, O. P. Shook. 

Cross Plains Branch — Chairman, Thomas R. Humphrey; vice- 
chairman, John Fuller; secretary, H. J. Miller; treasurer, D. G. 
Gordon. 

New Marion Branch — Chairman, Mrs. Vina Bovard ; vice-chair- 
man, John Holzer; secretary, Edward Fischer; treasurer, Hayes 
Schaffer. 

Elrod Branch — Chairman, W. G. Fleming; vice-chairman, Mrs. 
Wm. Gloyd; secretary, Ruby Elrod; treasurer, John T. Elrod. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 31 

Delaware Branch — Chairman, Mrs. Herman Menke; vice-chair- 
man, Mrs. Ada Dole; secretary, Rhoda M. Schmidt; treasurer, Mrs. 
Mary Koechlin. 

Morris Branch — Chairman, B. H. Kroenke; vice-chairman, John 
M. Zillebuehler ; secretary, Emma Walsman ; treasurer, Geo. C. Bos. 

The First Red Cross War Fund Campaign 

(June 18-25, 1917) 

The period of time beginning Monday, June 18, and ending Mon- 
day, June 25, was selected by the National Red Cross for the purpose 
of conducting a campaign to raise one hundred million dollars, of which 
amount the state of Indiana was required to raise one-half million. 
Ripley county with a population of approximately twenty-one thousand 
was given a quota of $6,500. This, at first, seemed to be an exceed- 
ingly large amount to ask of the people of this county; however, the 
chapter proceeded to organize the county with a view to raising the 
amount asked for, if at all possible to do so. 

Previous to this the Batesville chapter conducted a membership 
campaign on Memorial day in connection with the demonstration ar- 
ranged for that day by John A. Hillenbrand, chairman of the Liberty 
Loan, and succeeded in enrolling three hundred and twenty-five 
members. 

Chairman Andres appointed an executive committee of five to act 
with him in conducting the war fund campaign and the chairman of 
each of the branches then established in Ripley county was requested 
to appoint a like number to act with him in conducting the campaign of 
that particular branch or township. Some days previous to the open- 
ing of the campaign a letter was addressed to every minister in Ripley 
county. The ministers were asked to read it from their pulpits, the 
letter being an appeal to every man, woman and child to make a contri- 
bution to the Red Cross war fund. To further the publicity of the cam- 
paign a publicity committee consisting of Charles Thompson, of Ver- 
sailles; Richard Beer, of Osgood; Peter Holzer and Neil McCallum, 
of Batesville, was appointed to have charge of the newspaper publicity 
connected with the raising of the amount required of Ripley county. 
Below is a copy of the report submitted bv Chairman Andres on July 
5, 1917: 

Total funds in bank as follows: 

Batesville $2,903.69 

Versailles 778.00 

Holton 850.75 

Osgood 776.45 

Milan 802.00 

Sunman 765.50 

Napoleon 200.00 

New Marion 98.00 

Total.: $6,354.39 



32 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

The Cross Plains and New Marion branches had but recently been 
established and had not yet completed their campaign for the war fund. 
Ripley county made an excellent showing and her people again demon- 
strated in a practical manner, as they had so often done before, their 
patriotism and loyalty to our country. 

During the early part of August, 1917, the chairman of the chapter 
appointed Mrs. Minnie E. Wycoff, of Batesville, chairman or super- 
visor of sewing and hospital supply work, which selection proved to be 
a most fortunate one. Due credit will be given Mrs. Wycoff for her 
devotion and her zeal in the work of the Red Cross in the latter part 
of this article. Mrs. Wycoff proceeded to organize the women of the 
county and she met with ready responses everywhere. 

While the war opened up many fields of activity for the patriotic 
women of our country, none appealed so strongly as the work of the 
Red Cross. This was only a natural condition. Sentiment and the 
mother instinct prompted this. It was the Red Cross that took the place 
of mother in the training camps, on the transports and even on the bat- 
tle-field. It was the Red Cross that nursed the boys back to health, 
eased their pains and provided all those little comforts that mother was 
wont to provide for her boys at home. And did someone not praise the 
Red Cross in those beautiful and sentimental words, "The greatest 
mother in all the world?" 

Under Mrs. Wycoff's direction Red Cross shops and sewing rooms 
were established in every part of the county and it was but a short time 
until the good women of Ripley county were supplying more than their 
quota of hospital garments and supplies. 

The first shipment of garments and hospital supplies was made dur- 
ing the month of September following, and the shipments continued 
with due regularity from that time on until the war came to an end. 

Mrs. Wycoff also organized the Junior Red Cross in the county. 
This work was begun in September of 1917. The Junior Red Cross 
had a large membership and under Mrs. Wycoff's direction did excel- 
lent work. Its activities are more fully discussed in another chapter 
of this book. 

THE RED CROSS CHRISTMAS MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN 

This campaign, like the war fund campaign of some months pre- 
vious, was national in its scope. It was conducted under the direction 
of the chairman and the other officers of the chapter. Preparations for 
the so-called drive were begun by the chapter the last days of November. 
The campaign began December 17 and closed Decmber 24, Christmas 
eve, 1917. The purpose of the campaign was to add ten million new 
names to the membership roll of the Red Cross. "Every American 
home a Red Cross home," was the slogan. Ripley county chapter was 
asked to add enough new names to its membership roll to bring the total 
up to four thousand five hundred. 

For this campaign each of the branches effected an organization 
which in turn appointed solicitors so that a thorough canvass could be 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 33 

made and every person be given an opportunity to become a member of 
the Red Cross. One dollar was the price of a Red Cross membership. 
The result of the Christmas membership campaign was as follows. 
Total number of new memberships secured: 

$1.00 $2.00 Branch 

Membership Membership Total 

Batesville 828 8 836 

Sunman 439 11 450 

Holton 377 6 383 

Versailles 290 5 295 

Napoleon 264 30 294 

Osgood 229 7 236 

New Marion 177 1 178 

Milan 157 2 159 

Friendship 97 .... 97 

Cross Plains 6 2 8 

Total for county 2,864 72 2,936 

It will be seen from the figures given above that two thousand nine 
hundred thirty-six new names were added to the membership roll of the 
county, making a total membership of more than six thousand, not in- 
cluding the Junior Red Cross. 

SECOND RED CROSS WAR FUND CAMPAIGN 

This campaign, like that waged for increased membership, was na- 
tion wide. The campaign was to last one week, beginning May 20 and 
ending May 27, 1918. Its purpose was to raise one hundred million 
dollars for war work. Ripley county's quota was $9,000. The chair- 
man of the chapter appointed Mr. Michael F. Bohland, of Batesville, 
as the campaign manager. Mr. Bohland began his work with a vim 
and a vigor that presaged certain success at the outset. Mr. Bohland 
began his campaign after appointing the following committees: 

Executive Committee — Clarence H. Andres, Batesville; Ruth E. 
Ahrends, Sunman ; Perry N. Brown, Napoleon ; Rev. M. R. Scott, 
Holton; V. A. Wager, Osgood ; Mrs. John Bergdoll, Milan; Mrs. 
Vina Bovard, New Marion ; Bertha McCoy, Benham ; Thos. R. 
Humphrey, Cross Plains; Miss Grace Ricketts, Friendship. 

War Fund Committee — Will J. Gelvin, Batesville; C. J. Doll, 
Batesville; W. W. McMullen, Sunman; George C. Bos, Morris; Clin- 
ton Shook, Napoleon; W. P. Castner, Holton; James H. Noyes, Os- 
good; Carl V. Smith, Versailles; John Holzer, New Marion; John S. 
Benham, Benham ; Marshall Spangler, Friendship ; Jesse Jarvis, Cross 
Plains; Fred Schmidt, Osgood; Henry Voss, Milan; Fred Lamb, 
Milan; George Laws, Milan. 

Speaker's Committee — Rev. M. R. Scott, chairman, Holton ; A. B. 
Wycoff, Batesville; Thos. E. Wilson, Osgood; Rowland H. Jackson, 



34 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Versailles; James H. Connelley, Milan; F. M. Thompson, Versailles. 

Finance Committee — George A. Bass, chairman, Batesville. 

Publicity Committee — J. H. Letcher, chairman, Milan Commer- 
cial, Milan; Peter Holzer, Batesville Herald, Batesville; Donald Mc- 
Callum, Batesville Tribune, Batesville; Richard Beer, Osgood Journal, 
Osgood ; Chas. Thompson, Versailles Republican, Versailles. 

Woman's Committee — Mrs. Luella Butler, chairman, Osgood. 

List Committee — H. C. Canfield, chairman, Batesville; George M. 
Hillenbrand, Batesville; Mrs. A. W. Romweber, Batesville; Mrs. V. 
W. Bigney, Sunman ; Thos. Laws, Milan ; Dr. R. A. Freeman, Os- 
good ; John A. Spencer, Versailles. 

Below is the quota assigned to each township : 

Adams $ 975.00 

Brown 800.00 

Center 875.00 

Delaware 500.00 

Franklin 925.00 

Jackson 475.00 

Johnson 925.00 

Laugherv 325.00 

Batesville 1,025.00 

Otter Creek 750.00 

Shelby 1,000.00 

Washington 425.00 

A series of meetings was held in all the townships of the countv. 
The campaign closed with a county meeting at Versailles, on Sunday 
afternoon, May 19, the Batesville Liberty Guards giving an exhibition 
drill, and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Horace Ellis de- 
livered the address. Also Mrs. Alice French, president of the War 
Mothers of Indiana, spoke in the interest of the War Mothers. 

Soon after the close of the campaign, Chairman Bohland was able 
to report that Ripley county had subscribed her full quota of $9,000.00. 
The people of Ripley county had again shown in a substantial manner 
that they were backing up our boys on the firing line. 

CHRISTMAS ROLL CALL MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 

The signing of the armistice on November 11, 1918, had brought to 
a close the great World War and the people of America were asked by 
the American Red Cross to show their gratitude for this memorable day 
by universally becoming members of the Red Cross. Those persons who 
already had a membership were asked to renew it ; those persons who did 
not have a membership were asked to buy one during the week of De- 
cember 16-23. 

The chairman of the chapter appointed Wm. D. Robinson, of Ver- 
sailles, to act in the capacity of county manager for the roll call drive. 
Mr. Robinson effected an excellent organization and made a splendid 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 35 

showing although he was greatly handicapped in his efforts on account 
of the epidemic of influenza which was raging so terribly in different 
parts of the country at that time. 

The following report is copied from current issues of the county 
newspapers: 1455042 

''The 1918 Red Cross Christmas roll call membership campaign in 
Ripley county resulted in the obtaining of 5,546 new members or re- 
newals, which, with the life and patron members who joined during the 
organization campaign, gave the Ripley County Chapter of the American 
Red Cross a total membership of 5,631, exclusive of the membership of 
the Junior Red Cross. 

W. D. Robinson, of Versailles, acted as county campaign manager 
and Mr. Robinson had every cause to feel gratified by the results, for 
the campaign throughout was conducted under very adverse conditions. 
The weather conditions were such as to work a hardship on the solici- 
tors, especially throughout the country districts, and some sections of 
the county were under the influenza ban, so that the various township 
campaign managers and their committees were to be congratulated upon 
the results obtained under such adverse conditions. 

In Laughery township, Rev. Schreiber was in charge of the cam- 
paign in Batesville and Rev. Flautz of the campaign in the township. 
The latter was assisted by George H. Goyert and the trustees of St. 
Paul's congregation. Each of the city ministers appointed a committee 
from his congregation, the Bethany committee being appointed by 
Thomas Patterson. Rev. Schreiber appointed an executive head from 
the ministerial body for each ward in the city and we publish the result 
in Laughery township as reported by the various war and precinct 
chairmen. 

BATESVILLE BRANCH 

Ward One — Rev. L. A. Schreiber. 

Annual members 259 

Magazine members 10 

Ward Two— Father Adalbert Rolfes, O. F. M. 

Annual members 352 

Magazine members 22 

Contributing 4 

Ward Three — Rev. A. Langendorff. 

Annual members 231 

Magazine members 21 

Contributing 2 

Precinct One — Rev. H. Flautz 

Annual members 232 

Magazine members 32 

Contributing 1 

1,166 
3 



36 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Life members 44 

Patron members 2 

1,212 
CROSS PLAINS BRANCH 

(Including Benham and Friendship Auxiliaries) 

Annual members 416 

Magazine members 4 

420 

DELAWARE BRANCH 

Annual members 299 

Magazine members 13 

312 

ELROD BRANCH 

Annual members 227 

Magazine members 3 

230 
HOLTON BRANCH 

Annual members 490 

Magazine members 10 

500 
Life members 10 

510 

MILAN BRANCH 

Annual members 481 

Magazine members 4 

485 
Life members 5 

490 
MORRIS BRANCH 

Annual members 275 

Magazine members 3 

278 

NAPOLEON BRANCH 

Annual members 288 

Magazine members 18 

306 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 37 

NEW MARION BRANCH 

Annual members 394 

Magazine members 3 

397 
OSGOOD BRANCH 

Annual members 447 

Magazine members 3 

450 
Life members 10 

460 

SUNMAN BRANCH 

Annual members 442 

Magazine members 18 

Contributing member 1 

461 
Life members 7 

468 
VERSAILLES BRANCH 

Annual members 537 

Magazine members 4 

541 
Life members 7 

548 
RED CROSS SEWING AND KNITTING 

Batesville branch was organized into auxiliaries for convenience in 
work as follows : 

St. John's Auxiliary — Chairman, Mrs. Dora Fischer. 

St. Louis's Auxiliary — Chairman, Mrs. G. M. Hillenbrand. 

Knitting Committee — Chairman, Mrs. A. W. Romweber. 

Catholic Girls' Auxiliary — Chairman, Miss Rose Meyer. 

St. Mark's Auxiliary — Chairman, Mrs. Henrietta Wessel, until her 
death, February 1, 1918; Mrs. Gus Behlmer; later Mrs. Henry Schu- 
macher. 

C. O. U. Girls' Auxiliary — Chairman, Edna Richter. 

First M. E. Auxiliary — Chairman, Mrs. Ed Schultz. 

First M. E. Girls' Auxiliary — Chairman, Miss Sophia Nickel, Miss 
Ethel Schultz. 



38 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

New Salem Auxiliary— Chairman, Miss Carrie Thackery. 

Bethany Auxiliary — Chairman, Mrs. Bertha Behlmer, Mrs. Henry 
Bauman. 

Wesley Chapel Auxiliary — Chairman, Mrs. Ida Winsor, Mrs. Em- 
mett Mann. 

Auxiliaries in other places were organized as follows: 

Napoleon Auxiliary, Jackson township, Mrs. Mary Letzler, chair- 
man. 

Titusville Auxiliary, Shelby township, Mrs. Pearl Titus, chairman. 

Delaware Auxiliary No. 1, Fink's church, Mrs. Mary Menke, 
chairman. 

Friendship Auxiliary, Friendship, Mrs. Mary Koechlin, later Mrs. 
Ketenbrink, chairman; Miss Clara Otto, secretary; later Miss Grace 
Ketenbrink. 

Benham Auxiliary, Mrs. Bertha McCoy, later Mrs. Lizzie Hyatt, 
chairman; Miss Lola Dollens, secretary. 

Pierceville Auxiliary, Franklin township, Mrs. Belle Tinder, chair- 
man. 

Green Chapel Auxiliary, Washington township, Mrs. Bessie Shep- 
herd, chairman. 

Stringtown Auxiliary, Washington township, Mrs. Alice Gault, 
chairman. 

Craven's Corner Auxiliary, Mrs. Lottie Craven, chairman, Mrs. 
Craven succeeded Mrs. Fleming as branch chairman of Washington 
township in October, 1918. 

JUNIOR RED CROSS AUXILIARIES 1917-1918 

Batesville Juniors — J. F. Hoing, chairman; director of work, Miss 
Jennie Elmore; 190 members; $47.50 dues; refugee garments made, 25; 
supplies, 27 pieces. 

Osgood Juniors — Miss Leona Stewart, chairman; 45 members; 
$11.25 dues; refugee garments made, 29; hospital bags, 31. 

Delaware Juniors — Hazel Edwards, chairman; 59 members; $14.91 
in treasury ; hospital supplies made, 30 ; sweaters, 5. 

Tanglewood and Cedar Creek in Johnson township, Mud Pike and 
Laughery Bridge in Delaware township, Bates Ridge in Brown town- 
ship, organized Rural School Junior Red Cross auxiliaries. Chloe Bra- 
ley, Margaret Smith, Emma Gault and Grace Showers, Mary Mul- 
ford and Lelia Smith were the respective heads of these smaller aux- 
iliaries. 

CHAPTER SCHOOL COMMITTEE JUNIOR RED CROSS, 

1918-1919 

Chairman and supervisor, Minnie E. Wycoff. Tora McCallum, 
Mrs. G. M. Hillenbrand, Mrs. Anna Wachsman, associate members. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 39 

1918-1919 SCHOOL AUXILIARIES, JUNIOR RED CROSS 

Batesville — Miss Leona Stewart, director of work; school commit- 
tee, Anna Wachsman, Sophia Nickel, Flossie Ward, Leona Stewart, 
Catherine Mann, J. F. Hoing. 

Batesville Juniors, 1918 and 1919 report — Twenty-seven new mem- 
bers; dues, $6.75. 

Osgood — Chairman and director, Mrs. Mercy Bilby Humphrey; 
no new members; no dues. 

Milan — Chairman and director, Mrs. W. E. Lewis; 93 members; 
$23.29 dues. 

Delaware — Chairman and director, Miss Hazel Edwards; 51 mem- 
bers; $21.95 in treasury. 

Napoleon — Chairman and director, Miss Violet Toph; 85 mem- 
bers; $7.06 dues from new members. 

Sunman — Chairman and director, Miss Frona Alexander; 76 mem- 
bers; $19.00 dues. 

New Marion — Chairman and director, Mrs. Goldie Michel; 44 
members; $5.75 dues. 

Holton — Chairman, Wilbur Furlow ; no report. 

Batesville Parochial School Committee — Chairman, Mrs. G. M. 
Hillenbrand; 55 members; dues, $7.00 from new members. 

Laughery Bridge Juniors — Chairman, Mary Mulford; 5 members; 
$1.25 dues. 

JUNIOR RED CROSS REPORT OF WORK DONE IN THE 
COUNTY FROM SEPTEMBER, 1917, TO JUNE, 1919 

Batesville Junior Red Cross — Hospital supplies, 127 pieces; refugee 
garments, 46; wool scarfs, 10. 

Mud Pike Junior Red Cross — Hospital supplies, 35 pieces. 

Tanglewood Junior Red Cross — Hospital supplies, 12 pieces. 

Osgood Junior Red Cross — Hospital supplies, 230 pieces; refugee 
garments, 215 pieces. 

Milan Junior Red Cross — Hospital supplies, 199 pieces; refugee 
layettes, 6, equaling 210 pieces. 

Delaware Juniors — Knitted garments, 12 pieces; hospital supplies, 
80 pieces; refugee layettes, 5, equaling 175 pieces. 

Cedar Creek Junior Red Cross — Knitted articles, 15 pieces. 

Napoleon Junior Red Cross — Hospital supplies, 24 pieces. 

In 1917-1918 the Junior work consisted entirely of sewing and 
knitting. Sweaters, wristlets, scarfs, rugs and wash cloths were the arti- 
cles knitted by Ripley County Juniors. 

Infant layettes, dresses and underwear for children, capes, skirts for 
women, handkerchifs, property bags, ice-bag covers, aprons, caps and 
operating leggings were made by different auxiliaries. Also pillow cases 
and towels. 

The layettes were made principally during the vacation of 1918. 
Each layette consisted of thirty-five pieces, making a full supply of 
clothing for an infant. The layette included a knitted hood and 



40 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

bootees, blanket, cape, extra hood, slips, gowns, shirts, bands, diapers, 
bag of sundries and wash cloths. Sixteen complete layettes were made 
by the Osgood, Milan and Delaware Juniors. 

The Junior work planned for the winter of 1918-1919 was almost 
entirely prevented by the epidemic of influenza which closed our schools 
for weeks and months at a time, beginning the first of October, just when 
the rural schools were opening, and not disappearing entirely until the 
schools were closing in the spring. The main work for the year was 
the Modern Health Crusade, the supplies being furnished by the Anti- 
Tuberculosis Association, the pupils being organized into crusade units. 
About five hundred children in Adams, Jackson, Shelby and Franklin 
townships won the different buttons given as rewards in health chore 
work. Otter Creek township organized, but accomplished nothing 
further. An assignment of five hundred handkerchiefs was completed 
by the auxiliaries organized the year before, but no further work could 
be attempted. Complete reports on the health crusade work can not be 
secured as the epidemic demoralized all organization and made con- 
sistent and reliable records an impossibility. 

The Juniors were called on for help in all regular Red Cross drives, 
in the various entertainments given to raise Red Cross funds, in all forms 
of war activities, in parades and public programs. 

The Delaware Juniors were especially active, giving entertainments 
to raise funds and in giving drills in patriotic programs. The final Red 
Cross rally in connection with other organization rallies at Versailles, 
on September 28, 1918, just before the "flu" ban descended like a pall 
on Indiana, found the Ripley County Juniors at the height of their en- 
thusiasm. Delaware and Milan Juniors carried banners and had their 
special part in the parade. With the beginning of the armistice on No- 
vember 11, 1918, and the long siege of "flu" lasting into the spring, the 
organizations found themselves unable to execute what they had planned, 
and what they would have done under normal conditions. 

All children of school age are eligible to membership in the Junior 
Red Cross, twenty-five cents paying the dues. They are allowed to wear 
the regular Red Cross button. Children over twelve are eligible to reg- 
ular Red Cross membership, and, as is well known, no age bars one from 
this regular membership. 

SUMMARY OF WORK OF RIPLEY COUNTY CHAPTER 

AMERICAN RED CROSS, FROM MAY, 1917, TO 

JULY, 1919 

Knitting — Sweaters for Ripley county soldiers, 193; sweaters for 
Red Cross, 301 ; helmets for Red Cross, 46; wristlets for Red Cross, 60 
pairs; mufflers for Red Cross, 28; wool socks for Red Cross, 1,814 
pairs; stockings for refugee children, 392 pairs; ambulance robe, 1; 
wash cloths, 270; scrub rugs, 292; hoods in infant layettes, 26. Sewing: 
Surgical bandages, 740; hospital garments, 4,167; hospital supplies, 
7,512; refugee garments, 1,832. Second-hand clothing, 6,831 garments; 
second-hand clothing, 8,410 pounds weight. Nuts for gas defense, 576 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 41 

pounds. Comfort kits and cases for soldiers, 1,087. Liberty guards, 
90 pairs leggings. Second-hand linen shower, 319 pieces. Nurses 
through influenza, $499.60; local relief, $9.43. 

Among the women who deserve especial credit as knitters are Mrs. 
Elizabeth Webster, Mrs. Elizabeth Alexander, Mrs. Ruth Ahrends, all 
of Sunman; Mrs. Elizabeth Hunter, of Milan; Mrs. Magdalena Price, 
Mrs. Hedwig Schrader, Mrs. Elizabeth Hammerle, Mrs. Margaret 
Schiller and Mrs. John Hillenbrand, Sr., all of Batesville; Mrs. 
Amanda Cooper and Mrs. Anna Black, of Cross Plains; Mrs. Josina 
Brinson, of Titusville; Mrs. Louisa Siekerman and Mrs. Jane Gilland, 
of Friendship; Mrs. Mary Michel, of Delaware; Mrs. Philip Seelinger, 
of Holton; Mrs. G. W. Cox and Mrs. Catherine Kenan, of Osgood. 
All these ladies are either elderly or infirm, or especially burdened with 
other duties, as in the case of Mrs. Ahrends, who was chairman of the 
Sunman Red Cross branch. Mrs. Siekerman and Mrs. Gilland are 
war mothers, as are also Mrs. Ahrends, Mrs. Schrader, and Mrs. See- 
linger. Several of them knit for the soldiers of the Civil War. and 
eight of them are widows of Civil War veterans. 

The nation's most gifted writers will pen for the benefit of those 
who come after us the story of America's activities during the great 
World War. The pages of history will record imperishably the brav- 
ery and the gallantry of the American men who covered themselves with 
glory while fighting under the Stars and Stripes at Chateau-Thierry, 
in the Argonne, in France and in Belgium. A splendid tribute will be 
paid by historians to the men who upheld the traditions of the American 
navy while performing its task of ridding the sea of the submarine so 
that millions of their comrades in arms might cross the sea without 
mishap to give battle to the Hun. 

Our fighting men themselves, together with the people of all the bel- 
ligerent nations, will always pay homage to the American Red Cross 
nurse who left home, relatives and friends to brave the dangers and 
hardships of war and pestilence and disease so that she might take the 
place of mother in the cantonment, upon the battle-field and in the hos- 
pitals behind the firing line. 

The local chapter is justly proud of Ripley's "Roses of No Man's 
Land": Miss Bertha Greeman, Batesville; Miss Vivian Wiebking, 
Napoleon; Miss Martha Delay, Holton; Miss Caroline Maffey, Milan. 

AN EXPRESSION OF GRATITUDE 

The services rendered by those good women, who, under the direc- 
tion of the state chapter of the American Red Cross, came to our county 
to nurse and care for those of us stricken during the epidemic of influ- 
enza that raged so terribly and so relentlessly in parts of Ripley county 
during the closing months of 1918, will for all time be remembered and 
appreciated. 

The chapter acknowledges its gratitude to the following nurses in 
particular: Miss Esther Parsons, Miss Nell Vernon, Mrs. Payson 
Miss Lillian Vogelsang, Miss Bertha Custer. 



42 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

WORDS OF APPRECIATION 

To serve in the capacity of county supervisor of sewing and hospital 
supply work required a woman possessed of executive ability, good judg- 
ment, pleasing personality, a full understanding of the necessity and 
magnitude of the work contemplated, and, above all, a woman in sym- 
pathy with the spirit of the times, so that she might enthuse and inspire 
those with whom she would come in contact so as to create in them an 
ardent desire to do a worth-while service. 

The good work done by the women of Ripley county is in a large 
measure due to the inspiring leadership and untiring efforts of Mrs. 
Minnie E. Wycoff, of Batesville. 

While many persons in the county were, by reason of their activities 
in Red Cross work, entitled to receive a Red Cross medal or badge, the 
committee on awards voted that honor to Mrs. Wycoff alone — a sig- 
nal distinction and honor for an exceptional service rendered. 

CONCLUSION 

The foregoing is a brief history of the activities of the Ripley County 
Chapter of the American Red Cross during the great World War. 

It was written not to extol or praise the deeds of those persons who 
participated in the work that the Red Cross in Ripley county accom- 
plished, but for a greater and worthier purpose: to make known to 
those who will come after us that the men, women and children of 
Ripley county who were not privileged on account of certain circum- 
stances to take their places with the boys on the firing line did their full 
duty to the men who wore the uniform of our country, and we cherish 
the hope that our posterity will learn and realize through the medium 
of this short history of Red Cross activities in Ripley county, that we, 
like the good Americans of a previous generation, love America and the 
things that she stands for, and that we, like the boys who engaged and 
defeated the Hun in battle on land and sea, were at all times willing to 
give our all, if need be, so that, in the words of the immortal Lincoln, 
"government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not per- 
ish from the earth." 

Home Service Section of Red Cross 

Peter J. Holzer, of Batesville, as the Red Cross home service secre- 
tary, appointed sub-committees in all the larger towns to aid in giving 
local relief, information and help of any kind to all enlisted men and 
their families. 

The greater part of the work was confined to tracing out missing 
Liberty Bonds, securing payment of delayed allotments or wages, and 
in locating missing soldiers and sailors, or ascertaining, if possible, why 
the letters written to soldiers were not received by them. So many 
things caused confusion in the delivery of mail that many soldiers failed 
*o receive any mail during months of overseas service, and many times 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 43 

the families at home failed, likewise, to hear from the soldier between 
the two cards announcing, first, his safe arrival overseas, and second, 
announcing his safe return to the United States. 

The close of the war brought an increase of duties to the home serv- 
ice section, which sent out questionnaires in the spring of 1920 to all sol- 
diers and sailors covering every possible point on which the Red Cross 
could continue to render service, feeling that unless personally reminded 
some of the men would fail to realize that the home service section was 
designed for peace as well as war service. 



Council of Defense 

J. F. LOCHARD 

When the dark war clouds that hovered over Europe for almost 
three years began to drift towards the American continent and it be- 
came evident that we could no longer keep out of the awful conflict that 
was devastating Europe, plans were being worked out at Washington 
as to the best methods to be pursued for the welfare and protection of 
our country. 

An organization known as the National Council of Defense was 
created, whose business it was to carry from Washington to the people 
the messages and measures of the National Government and to transmit 
back to Washington the real conditions that existed throughout the rural 
districts and cities of the nation. An organization had to be formed that 
extended from Washington down to the school district in every com- 
munity. Hence, the National Council of Defense in Washington, the 
State Council of Defense at the capital city of each state, the County 
Council of Defense in each county seat, the Township Council of De- 
fense in each township and the school district organization in each school 
district made it possible for the Government to get to the people all its 
plans for the carrying on of the great war and to get back to Washing- 
ton a report from the people. Through this organization it was possi- 
ble for the Government at Washington to keep its hands upon the pulse 
of the nation. 

In the building up of this organization, appointments were made so 
that all classes might have a voice in the council rooms. The County 
Council of Defense of Ripley county, Indiana, consisted of the follow- 
ing named persons, who were designated and appointed by Judge Robert 
A. Creigmile, judge of the sixth judicial circuit of Indiana, and ap- 
proved by Governor James P. Goodrich of Indiana, namely: Anthony 
W. Romweber, of the city of Batesville, a representative of the manu- 
facturing interests of Ripley county, Indiana; Harry W. Behlmer, of 
Napoleon, a representative of the merchants; Oliver P. Shook, of Hol- 
ton, a representative of the millers; Fred W. Kline, of Milan, a repre- 
sentative of union labor; Ed. G. Abbott, of Milan, a representative of 
the agricultural interests; Mrs. Laura Beer, of Versailles, to represent 
the women's interests, and J. Francis Lochard, of Versailles, to be a 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 45 

general representative of the county. J. Francis Lochard was desig- 
nated as the chairman of the county organization. 

The County Council of Defense held weekly meetings at the court- 
house in the town of Versailles, Indiana, all members of the organiza- 
tion serving without any compensation. They gave their active support 
to all war work in the county and assisted in every way possible to pro- 
mote the sale of all Libertv Loan bonds, war savings stamps, the rais- 
ing of funds for the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A.. Y. W. C. A., K. of C, 
and all other activities, keeping in mind all the time that their principal 
duty was to keep the people informed of the Government plans in the 
war and transmitting back to Washington a report of the true condi- 
tions that existed in the county. 

No organization can get very far without some finances, and steps 
had to be taken to secure the necessary funds for carrying on the work 
of the organization. The first money the Council of Defense secured 
to finance its work was borrowed from the Versailles Bank on a note 
signed by the members of the Council of Defense. Other funds were 
furnished to the Council of Defense by the Ripley County Council, 
making an appropriation out of the county treasury of the county. 

Mrs. Laura Beer was selected as the secretary and treasurer of the 
organization in the county and her reports as such show that she has 
received the sum of $1,946.08 and made disbursements to the amount of 
$1,946.08. 

We desire to quote, for the benefit of our readers, the following 
tribute to the Council of Defense system by Grosvenor B. Clarkson, 
director of the Council of National Defense, which will give you the 
details of the work that was to be done through this organization: 

"Here at home there have been armies, too, and they have performed 
a marvelous task. They were created without mandates ; they were 
welded into cohesive form by suggestion rather than by order ; they were 
galvanized from beginning to end by the mighty force of voluntary co- 
operation ; and they went into the home stretch with a power which 
nothing could have stopped. These were the armies of production — 
production not alone of guns and steel plates and soldiers' shoes, not 
alone even of visible things, but production of energy, of thought that 
made the sword a flaming thing of optimism to offset the stupid pes- 
simism of people who criticized but had nothing tangible to contribute, 
of the immortal spirit of 'carry on,' of above all, unification. For it 
has only been within the past year that this nation has completely real- 
ized that after all it is, properly introduced to itself, but a partnership 
of one hundred million persons. Out of all this has grown one of the 
great lessons of the war to America : the interdependent of social ef- 
fort, the effort which in the last equation must keep a nation wholesome 
in peace and which must furnish the continuing tireless force behind the 
cutting edge in time of war. This, then, though it is stated loosely, was 
our task here at home. 

"In the vast work of unification, in the carrying from Washington 
to the people the message and measures of the National Government, 



U RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

and in the transmission back to Washington of the moods and aspira- 
tions of a people at war, the council of defense's system, with its more 
than one hundred and eighty thousand units set down in almost every 
hamlet of the country, played a definite, stirring, and highly fruitful 
part. One of the phrases with which Congress created the Council of 
National Defense is this: 'The creation of relations which will render 
possible in time of need the immediate concentration and utilization of 
the resources of the nation.' It was under this authority that the na- 
tion-wide council of defense system was brought into being, just as it 
was possible as well as necessary for the council under the same author- 
ity to bring about the mobilization of our industrial, labor and scientific 
forces for the national defense. 

"On May 2, 1914, the Council of National Defense called in Wash- 
ington a conference of the states. From this meeting, which was ad- 
dressed by the President of the United States, by the chairman of the 
council, and by several members of the cabinet, sprang the council of 
defense system as we now know it. Co-operation was established be- 
tween the state divisions of the woman's committee of the Council of 
National Defense and the work was everywhere got under way. It 
consisted, in the first instance, of explaining and transmitting to all com- 
munities of the country the policies and the programs of the various fed- 
eral departments and war agencies. Educational propaganda necessary 
for the proper emphasis of war measures essential to victory was pre- 
pared in Washington, and through the Council of National Defense 
forwarded at once to the state councils of defense and to the state divi- 
sions of the woman's committee, where immediate decentralization of 
the message to be conveyed or of the work to be done took place. In 
this way the council of defense system served in the mobilization of 
resources and materials, and it stirred the communal conscience, and, by 
extension, the national conscience, to a realization of the problems inci- 
dent to the winning of the war. With the personnel almost wholly 
voluntary throughout, the original machinery became an extensive and 
elaborate mechanism, but one which has always stood up under the 
stress and strain put upon it, no matter how involved and taxing the 
task. Today, the council of defense system comprehends one hundred 
and eighty-four thousand four hundred units, made up of state, county, 
municipal and community councils of defense. 

"Under the direction of the Council of National Defense at Wash- 
ington, composed at the top of its structure of six members of the cabi- 
net, headed by the Secretary of War, the work went forward. Toward 
the end of the war, the direction of the work was, as you know, con- 
centrated into the field division of the Council of National Defense un- 
der the chairmanship of Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior. 
The programs of the War, Navy, Agriculture, Interior and Labor De- 
partments, the Food and Fuel Administrations, the Shipping Board, 
the U. S. Employment Service, the Children's Bureau, the Bureau of 
Education, the American Red Cross, the National War Savings Com- 
mittee, the several Liberty Loans, the Commission of Training Camp 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 47 

Activities, and the various other official and recognized agencies united 
in the common task of war, were sent in complete form to the states 
and there made clear to the communities and translated into action. 

Many of these programs, and more especially those involving the 
exercise of extraordinary powers or the responsibility for handling im- 
mense funds, required the creation of separate machinery, which, 
radiating from the national center to the small localities, would concern 
itself exclusively with the fulfillment of the special program of the 
administration and be directly and fully responsible therefor. In the 
creation of this special local machinery, the councils of defense and the 
divisions of the woman's committee bore a large part. To your prompt 
and effective aid the remarkably quick and yet wholly sturdy growth of 
the Food Administration, Fuel Administration, the United States Em- 
ployment Service and other great war administrations and agencies is 
in large measure due. Even those established departments, which, like 
the Department of Agriculture, had already spread a network of local 
agencies over the country, were through your assistance enabled to make 
this network rapidly finer, more complete and ready to meet the strain 
of war. Your aid to these Federal departments and administrations, 
however, by no means ended there. You provided to them facilities 
and assistance which were needed by all alike, first by one, and then by 
another, and which therefore could be provided with economy only 
through a central organization, and you have made available to them 
resources and public co-operation which no special agency alone could 
command. Your extensive publicity organization, which, because it 
was always at work and at work everywhere, was unparalleled in the 
effectiveness and extent of its contact with the press and in the vigor 
and completeness of its speakers' bureaus ; your contact with the people 
themselves through your community councils, and your complete en- 
listment, organization and leadership of the women of America, have 
been a mighty source of power from which arose much of the strength 
of these local Federal bodies. In addition to bringing these local 
Federal agencies together in your state and county war boards, you 
have fused their energies and those of the state into one harmonious 
and effective power, and have brought into their councils the viewpoint 
of the state and locality, which increased the effectiveness of each or- 
ganization through leading to a closer adjustment of programs to local 
needs and conditions. 

In such of the great war programs as did not inherently require the 
creation of extensive local machinery, you have assumed the full con- 
duct of the work. You have thus saved to the nation, at a time when 
economy was vital, the tremendous expense of creating elaborate new 
administrations, ramifying in ever-increasing multiplicity throughout 
the land ; and you have made possible the conduct of brief and im- 
mediate emergency tasks when lack of time, as well as inordinate ex- 
pense, would otherwise have made impossible the provision of the ex- 
tensive organization requisite to meet the brief but imperative need. 
Almost without additional expense or the creation of additional or- 



48 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

ganization, you have, under the leadership of the War Industries Board, 
regulated and curtailed non-war construction through the action of 
tribunals sitting in every county in America. You have conducted for 
the Children's Bureau its children's year program by creating a special 
organization extending to counties, towns and even school districts. 
You have relieved railroad congestion through extending and facilitating 
motor transportation. You have brought to the people a message of 
economy and thrift and have made practical application thereof through 
supervising the solicitation of funds by voluntary war agencies and co- 
ordinating their work in the interest of economy of resources and 
effort. You have aided existing social agencies to meet the strain of 
war and recruited thousands of nurses to fill the emergency need of the 
hospitals at home. You have met the problems of housing in centers 
where intensification of war work has led to congestion. Through 
speakers and the press, through personal contact, through community 
singing and the organized fellowship of war workers in community coun- 
cils, you have aroused throughout the nation a desire for service; you 
have brought before the people an intelligent vision of how that service 
could best be rendered, and you have upheld their faith and enthusiasm 
throughout the trying months of the war, thus winning the high title 
of being the special guardians of civilian morale. The strength of your 
organization and your prompt and effective execution of Federal pro- 
grams and requests led President Wilson, on October 26, 1918, to 
request of every department or administration in Washington, when 
they were considering the extension of their organization or new work 
to be done in the states, 'to determine carefully whether they can not 
make use of the Council of Defense system' through the Council of 
National Defense in Washington. 

"Not only in the execution of Federal programs, however, have you 
rendered distinguished service. From their origin, councils of defense 
and divisions of the woman's committee have been vigorous and re- 
sourceful in devising independent programs and independent amplifica- 
tions of Federal programs, to meet the peculiar needs and to make avail- 
able for national service the special resources and opportunities of their 
states. 

"Your work and the democratic nature of your organization have 
also led to great permanent benefits. You have awakened a nation- 
wide interest in the welfare of our children, in the assimilation and 
Americanization of our foreign born, in healthy group recreation and 
social expression and in wise non-partisan community organization. 
You have made the communities sensible of their own needs and op- 
portunities and strong in action to meet them. You have developed the 
means of translating the new interests which you have aroused into 
effective action, and the work which you have done and the organiza- 
tion which you have established may fittingly be maintained as perma- 
nent monuments of the war. 

"Thus during the war you have, on a non-partisan basis throughout, 
strengthened and upheld the hands of the Federal Government, you 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



49 



have made available to it the great resources of your state and you have 
brought the people to the Government in effective and understanding 
service." 

TOWNSHIP COUNCILS OF DEFENSE 

The Township Councils of Defense were organized in October, 
1917, by a committee appointed by the County Council of Defense. 
The members of this committee were A. B. Wycoff, Peter J. Holzer 
and M. F. Bohland of Batesville, who traveled throughout the county 
helping the various townships to perfect their local organizations. 

It was the duty of these township councils to receive all war news 
and propaganda from the County Council of Defense and distribute 
it to the people of their township. To organize committees for work 
on all Liberty Loan, Red Cross or other drives for funds; to arrange 
for public meetings and to report any disloyal acts or talk that might 
occur among the people. This last was a rather delicate duty but 
was handled very tactfully by the various councils. A number of mis- 
taken citizens were called before the County Council occasionally for 
examination, but only one or two prosecutions were made in the county. 
These failed to convict, thus proving the mass of Ripley county people 
to be thoroughly American or open to reason. No overt acts were com- 
mitted in the county at any time, and a very small number of people 
failed to respond to the various national calls for money and men. 
Ripley county's quotas in the various drives were usually oversubscribed, 
and the amounts raised in minimum time. There was no real resistance 
to the draft, and the war work was carried on in all sections, promptly, 
efficientlv and harmoniouslv. 



frr.V" J 




Float in Liberty Loan Parade, April 6, 191S, Batesville 



Liberty Loan Report 

J. A. Hillenbrand 

When on April 11, 1917, Congress, in response to President Wilson's 
message of a few days previous, declared that a state of war existed 
between the United States and the Imperial Government of Germany, 
the people of our country began immediately to mobilize the nation's 
resources in order to quickly put an end to Prussianism and all that the 
term then implied. 

The citizens of Ripley county without exception were immediately 
in accord with the spirit of America; they, like those of the other 
counties of the great state of Indiana, began to enter upon those activi- 
ties decreed by the officials of our Government as essential so that we 
might soon bring to a close the awful carnage across the Atlantic. 

When, through the operation of the Conscription Act passed by 
Congress in April of that year, the youth of the land began to don the 
khaki, it at once became apparent to the more practical and far-seeing 
patriot that money, money and more money would be necessary to 
properly equip the boys who were to wage a righteous war to make 
the world a decent place to live in. Consequently, when our Govern- 
ment made known its plans to finance the war, patriotic citizens, with a 
practical knowledge of economics and finance, began to mobilize their 
workers and the money of the country in order to make it possible for 
our Government to put the "doughboys" on the firing line, sustain and 
keep them there until they could successfully finish the job. 

Ripley county did its full part in helping to finance the war. The 
various Liberty Loans became a series of successes and in order that 
future generations may know that the citizens of Ripley county who 
remained at home did their full duty to the boys who wore the uniform 
of their country, it is well that a record be made of their activities and 
their sacrifices. Therefore, this brief history of the five great war loans. 

Probably the first work done in connection with the financing of 
the war in Ripley county was the action taken by the Hillenbrand 
interests of Batesville, when during the first days of May, 1917, they 
addressed a circular letter to their some six hundred employes urging 
the purchase of the war bonds about to be issued by the Treasury De- 
partment and expressing a willingness to advance to any employe who 
was not then financially able, the money with which to avail himself of 
the opportunity being offered by our Government. 

John A. Hillenbrand, of Batesville, president of the Hillenbrand 
Company, and at the time president of the First National Bank of that 
city, was appointed state chairman to serve as chairman for the first 
Liberty Loan for Ripley county. 

(50) 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



51 



THE FIRST LIBERTY LOAN 

(May 14 to June 15, 1917) 

The first organization meeting was held at Batesville, on May 29, 
1917, at which were present representatives of the various banks of 
the county. Upon the recommendation of County Chairman John A. 
Hillenbrand, C. F. Childs, state chairman of the Liberty Loan Dis- 
tribution Committee for Indiana, appointed the following local chair- 
men for Ripley county : 

Christ Nieman, Sunman ; Wm. Leslie, Osgood ; C. W. Laws, 
Milan; Charles H. Willson, Versailles; George W. Schmidt, Na- 
poleon; Wm. P. Castner, Holton ; E. T. Coleman, Cross Plains; 
Wilkie Lemon, Friendship. 

Ripley county, with a population of a little more than twenty-one 
thousand, was assigned a quota of two hundred and sixty-three thousand 
six hundred dollars. This on a basis of eight per cent of the total bank- 
ing resources of the county which at that time amounted to $3,295,000.- 
00. The banks of the county were asked to make the solicitation and 
distribute the bonds and each bank was given a quota based upon its total 
banking resources. The bankers were asked by Mr. Hillenbrand to 
call a special meeting of their board of directors and arrange for each 
bank employe as well as each bank director to devote at least one-half 
day of that particular week to soliciting Liberty Loan bond subscriptions. 

The total subscriptions up to Thursday, June 7, amounted to 




John A. Hillenbrand 



52 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

£96,000, five hundred forty subscribers having pledged or subscribed 
for that amount. On June 14 the county chairman reported a total 
subscription of $110,200. On June 21 the total subscriptions amounted 
to $177,050, with nine hundred subscribers. When the county chair- 
man submitted his final report on the first Liberty Loan it showed that 
the people of Ripley county had subscribed for $177,050 worth of 
bonds, falling short $86,550 of the county's allotment. While, as will 
be seen from the figures, Ripley county did not subscribe for her entire 
quota of bonds of the first issue, Chairman Hillenbrand expressed his 
satisfaction with the showing made and complimented the people of 
Ripley county very highly. 

Below is the quota assigned to each of the banks and the amount 
of subscriptions taken: 

Quota Bonds Sold 

First National Bank, Batesville $21,360 $33,650 

Batesville Bank 47,760 30,000 

Sunman Bank 28,800 30,000 

Milan Bank 20,570 22,250 

Riplev Countv Bank, Osgood 52,000 15,000 

Versailles Bank 28,880 12,050 

Farmers' National Bank, Sunman 17,870 9,000 

Napoleon Bank 16,400 9,000 

Holton Bank 13,840 6,000 

Friendship Bank 10,640 5,000 

Cross Plains Bank 11,520 2,600 

Osgood Bank 11,360 2,500 

$177,050 

Not only did individuals purchase the bonds but they were also taken 
by fraternal societies and organizations of divers character. 



THE SECOND LIBERTY LOAN CAMPAIGN 

(October 1 to October 27, 1917) 

The campaign for subscriptions for bonds of the second Liberty 
Loan issue began in Ripley county on Monday, August 1, 1917. Ripley 
county was assigned a quota of ten per cent of her banking resources, the 
quota being $380,000. John A. Hillenbrand, of Batesville, who was 
again appointed to serve as county chairman for the second Liberty Loan 
in Ripley county, appointed the following as the local chairmen : 

Charles L. Johnson, cashier Batesville Bank, Batesville; John H. 
Wilker, cashier First National Bank, Batesville; Louis Bruns, cashier 
Sunman Bank, Sunman; John Minger, cashier Farmers' National 
Bank, Sunman; George W. Schmidt, cashier Napoleon Bank, Na- 
poleon ; Wm. C. Leslie, cashier Ripley County Bank, Osgood ; B. L. 
Vawter, cashier Osgood Bank, Osgood ; F. M. Laws, cashier Ver- 
sailles Bank, Versailles; T. W. Laws, cashier Milan Bank, Milan; 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 53 

Wm. P. Castner, cashier Holton Bank, Holton ; D. G. Gordon, cashier 
Cross Plains State Bank, Cross Plains; Wilkie S. Lemon, cashier 
Friendship Bank, Friendship. 

The county chairman also in this instance requested the local chair- 
men to appoint committees to assist them in the work of getting sub- 
scriptions for bonds of the second Liberty Loan issue. 

Below is the quota, the number of subscriptions taken, and the total 
amount of bonds subscribed for as reported by Chairman Hillenbrand 
on November 1, 1917: 

No. of Sub. % of 

Subscribers Bank Quota Taken Quota 

51 Ripley County Bank, Osgood $66,500 $24,050 36 

640 Batesville Bank 60,000 80,000 133 

146 Sunman Bank 40,000 67,500 164 

131 Milan Bank 37,500 37,500 100 

51 Versailles Bank 37,000 28,000 76 

214 First National Bank, Batesville.. 30,000 52,250 165 

44 Farmers' Natl. Bank, Sunman.... 24,000 14,600 61 

50 Napoleon Bank 20,500 15,100 74 

85 Holton Bank 19,000 22,500 118 

41 Osgood Bank 19,000 12,500 66 

52 Cross Plains Bank 14,500 14,500 100 

75 Friendship Bank 13,500 12,000 90 

1,586 $380,500 

As will be seen from the foregoing figures, Ripley county exceeded 
her quota in the amount of $500. The total number of subscribers 
was one thousand five hundred eighty-six. 

THE THIRD LIBERTY LOAN CAMPAIGN 

(April 6 to May 4, 1918) 

John A. Hillenbrand, who had served as county chairman for the 
first and second Liberty Loans, was again appointed to serve as the 
chairman for the third Liberty Loan campaign in Ripley county. At 
a meeting held at Versailles on March 27, 1918, at which the county 
chairman presided, the Woman's War Council was extended an invita- 
tion to participate in the campaign. The following persons were ap- 
pointed to serve as chairmen for their respective townships: 

Sunman and Adams township, Louis A. Bruns; Delaware town- 
ship, Fred Smith; Osgood and Center township, Wm. Leslie; Shelby 
township, Wm. A. Green; Versailles and Johnson township, Frank M. 
Laws; Otter Creek township, Wm. P. Castner; Washington town- 
ship, W. E. Smith; Brown township, D. G. Gordon; Milan and Frank- 
lin township, T. W. Laws; Jackson township, George W. Smith; 
Batesville and Laughery township, Charles L. Johnson. 




1. Darius G. Gordon. Cross Plains. 2. Louis A. Bruns, Sunman. 3. Nora B. Gookins. Napoleon. 
4. John Minger, Sunman. 5. Wm. Castner, Cashier Holton Bank. 6. Brainard Vawter, Osgood. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 55 

Ladies' Committee: Delaware township, Mrs. Henry Gookins; 
Jackson township, Mrs. Emerson Behlmer; Johnson township, Mrs. 
Carl Smith; Otter Creek township, Mrs. D. C. Yater ; Adams town- 
ship, Mrs. W. W. McMullen; Center township, Mrs. V. A. Wager; 
Laughery township, Mrs. Neil McCallum ; Brown township, Miss 
Martha Winkler; Shelby township, Miss Georgiana Spears; Franklin 
township, Mrs. Walter Beer. 

Publicity Chairman: Mrs. Peter Holzer, Batesville. 

Committee Chairman: Mrs. Luella Butler, Osgood. 

Secretary-Treasurer: Mrs. B. L. Vawter, Osgood. 

Ripley county was assigned a quota of $330,000. The report made 
public by Chairman Hillenbrand on April 18 was to the effect that the 
citizens of Ripley county had purchased bonds of the third Liberty 
Loan issue in the amount of $415,500. On April 19 the county 
chairman received a telegram from the manager of the Chicago Federal 
District asking that an effort be made to raise an oversubscription in 
the amount of fifty per cent, thus making a new quota of $495,000. On 
Thursday, May 16, there was published in the county papers Chairman 
Hillenbrand's final report, a copy of which is given below: 

Quota Subscribers Sales Per cent 

Sunman $ 8,500 94 $42,950 505 

Batesville 34,000 623 92,250 275 1/3 

Versailles 9,000 60 21,700 241 1/9 

Jackson Township 16,500 127 31,550 191 1/5 

Johnson Township 25,500 124 46,900 184 

Brown Township 28,000 248 46,300 165 1/2 

Laughery Township 14,500 170 32,000 158 

Milan 10,000 75 15,750 157 1/2 

Washington Township 14,500 55 20,650 142 3/7 

Delaware Township 17,500 165 24,250 138 1/8 

Osgood 17,500 151 23,100 131 

Franklin Township 22,500 74 28,850 128 

Adams Township 38,500 256 48,650 127 

Shelby Township 30,000 114 35,500 118 1/3 

Center Township 17,000 66 17,300 101 

Otter Creek Township 31,500 253 38,200 121 1/4 

$335,000 2,655 $557,600 166 1/2 

Ripley county was the thirteenth in the state to oversubscribe her 
quota and ranked sixteenth among the counties of the state in the 
amount subscribed over and above that quota. 

THE FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN CAMPAIGN 

(September 28 to October 19, 1918) 

On August 26, 1918, John A. Hillenbrand was again selected as 
chairman of the fourth Liberty Loan campaign of Ripley county. He 



56 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

met with the bankers of the county at the courthouse at Versailles to 
effect an organization for this campaign. Provision was made to or- 
ganize each township by school districts, and committees were appointed 
to solicit subscriptions for bonds in each of these districts. The cam- 
paign in Ripley county began on Saturday, September 28, and lasted 
but a few days. The persons who served as chairmen in the various 
townships during the third Liberty Loan campaign were reappointed 
by County Chairman Hillenbrand to serve in the same capacity for the 
fourth loan, with one exception: Fred R. Papenhaus, of R. F. D., 
Osgood, was appointed chairman for Delaware township to succeed 
Fred Smith, who was unable to serve. 

The quota assigned to Ripley county was $750,000. The time set 
apart for the fourth Liberty Loan campaign in Ripley county was the 
occasion of a visit of an airplane to Batesville, Versailles and other 
parts of Ripley county, probably the first airplane that visited this part 
of the state. Its visit created a great amount of interest with resultant 
increased enthusiasm and contributed materially to the success of the 
fourth Liberty Loan. Below is a report of the fourth Liberty Loan 
campaign in Ripley county: 

Quota 

Batesville and Batesville Bank 

Laughery Township $1 13,000 

First National Bank, Batesville 

Sunman and Adams Township 88,800 

Farmers' National Bank, Sunman 

Sunman Bank 

Versailles and Johnson Township 86,800 

Versailles Bank 

Brown Township 73,900 

Cross Plains Bank 

Friendship Bank 

Osgood and Center Township 72,600 

Osgood Bank 

Ripley County Bank 

Milan and Franklin Township 68,900 

Milan Bank 

Otter Creek Township 56,500 

Holton Bank 

Jackson Township 41,300 

Napoleon Bank 

Delaware Township 38,900 

Shelby Township 75,900 

Washington Township 33,600 



Subscribers 
505 


Amount 
$ 76,300 


265 


68,000 


174 
248 


37,300 
65,400 


357 


106,950 


162 
142 


40,550 
39,350 


119 
281 


27,500 
92,500 


441 


99,159 


393 


74,500 


165 


46,050 















$750,200 3,252 $773,559 
Subscriptions taken from persons living 

in surrounding counties 86 19,200 



3,166 $754,359 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 57 

THE VICTORY LOAN 

(April 21 to May 10, 1919) 

For this loan Ripley county was assigned a quota of $550,000. The 
campaign was begun in Ripley county on April 21 and ended by night- 
fall of the same day. Very little effort was required on the part of the 
chairman and his organization of Liberty Loan workers to "finish the 
job." On April 3 Chairman Hillenbrand addressed a letter to the 
people of the county through the press, making it known that the same 
persons who had made the solicitation for subscriptions to bonds of the 
fourth Liberty Loan issue would make the canvass for the Victory Loan. 
While the banks of the county expressed their willingness to subscribe 
for practically the entire quota assigned to Ripley county, the chairman 
insisted that the people of the county who had so generously subscribed 
for bonds of previous issues at a lower interest rate be given an oppor- 
tunity to purchase the Victory Bonds. A report giving the number of 
subscriptions and amount of bonds sold by each bank in the county 
follows : 

Subscriptions Amount 

Batesville Bank 269 $100,500 

First National Bank 162 73,000 

Cross Plains Bank 44 28,800 

Friendship Bank 77 57,100 

Holton Bank 55 27,750 

Milan Bank 172 80,100 

Napoleon Bank 70 26,500 

Osgood Bank 56 30,000 

Ripley County Bank 125 92,150 

Farmers' National Bank 77 40,050 

Sunman Bank 163 76,600 

Versailles Bank 103 58,300 

Totals 1,373 $690,850 

SUMMARY OF THE FIVE LOANS 

Report of the number of subscribers and total amount subscribed by- 
each bank in Ripley county for the second, third, fourth and fifth loans 
floated by the United States: 

Amount Number of 

Loans Subscribed Subscribers 



Batesville Bank, 


1 


(Not on record) 




Batesville, Ind. — 


2 


$75,000 


640 




3 


61,000 


486 




4 


76,500 


511 




5 


101,000 


160 




1 Chas. L. Johnson, Batesville. 1. Wilkie S. Lemon, Friendship. 3. Wm. A. Green, Trustee 
Shelby Township. 4. Wm. C. Leslie, Osgood. 5. F. M. Laws, Cashier Versailles Bank. 6. Thos. W. 

Laws, Milan. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



59 







Amount 


Number of 




Loans 


Subscribed 


Subscribers 


First National Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record ) 




Batesville, Ind. — 


2 


52,250 




158 




3 


50,500 




362 




4 


68,000 




275 




5 


92,000 




155 


Cross Plains Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record) 




Cross Plains, Ind. — 


2 


14,500 




227 




3 


26,550 




150 




4 


33,800 




133 




5 


37,250 




43 


Friendship State Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record) 




Friendship, Ind. — - 


2 


12,000 




75 




3 


20,500 




120 




4 


39,350 




188 




5 


57,100 




80 


Holton State Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record) 




Holton, Ind. — 


2 


20,000 




76 




3 


45,000 




250 




4 


74,500 




393 




5 


30,000 




87 


State Bank of Milan, 


1 


(Not on 


record) 




Milan, Ind.— 


2 


35,000 




140 




3 


65,000 




191 




4 


99,150 




441 




5 


84,400 




211 


Napoleon State Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record) 




Napoleon, Ind. — ■ 


2 


15,000 




43 




3 


27,750 




150 




4 


46,050 




333 




5 


26,500 




90 


Osgood State Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record) 




Osgood, Ind. — 


2 


12,500 




43 




3 


20,900 




115 




4 


27,500 




125 




5 


30,000 




60 


Ripley County Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record) 




Osgood, Ind. — 


2 


28,000 




52 




3 


63,000 




272 




4 


92,500 




604 




5 


92,150 




125 


Farmers' National Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record ) 




Sunman, Ind. — 


2 


14,600 




44 




3 


48,000 




102 




4 


37,300 




175 




5 


45,000 




82 



60 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Versailles Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record) 




Versailles, Ind. — 


2 


28,000 




57 




3 


65,150 




233 




4 


106,950 




357 




5 


58,300 




113 


Sunman Bank, 


1 


(Not on 


record) 




Sunman, Ind. 


2 


68,000 




146 




3 


86,800 




362 




4 


65,400 




248 




' 5 


111,250 




345 



While much credit is due the various banks of the county, the 
members of the various soliciting committees, the speakers, and, in fact, 
all those persons who took an active part in the campaigns, the success 
of the five great war loans in Ripley county is due primarily to the 
patriotism and loyalty of our citizens. Ripley county, as stated else- 
where in this article, did her full duty in backing up the boys on the 
firing line, and our children and children's children will in the years to 
come have just cause to feel proud of the achievement of those who will 
then have gone before them. 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S COMMITTEE FOR 

THIRD LIBERTY LOAN 

State Chairman: Mrs. Fred H. McCulloch, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Township Chairmen: Jackson township, Mrs. Emerson Behlmer; 
L.-.ughery township, Mrs. Neil McCallum; Brown township, Mrs. 
Carl Smith; Otter Creek township, Mrs. D. C. Yater ; Adams town- 
ship, Mrs. W. W. McMullen; Center township, Mrs. V. A. Wager; 
Laughery township, Mrs. Neil McCallum ; Brown township, Miss 




Can ft eld's Drum Corps — Liberty Loan Parade, Batesville, April 6, igiS. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 61 

Martha Winkler; Franklin township, Mrs. W. A. Beer; Shelby town- 
ship, Miss Georgiana Spears. 

Approximate number of workers, one hundred twenty-five. 

Total amount of bonds sold by women during the third 
Liberty Loan in Ripley county, $141,050. Total amount sold by 
women in the state, $23,623,750. 

A county conference for the purpose of organization was held at 
the assembly room of the library at Osgood, April 24, 1918. Mrs. 
Moll and Mrs. Brigham, of Indianapolis, gave interesting and inspiring 
talks on why and how to organize Food Clubs and Woman's Liberty 
Loan Committees. 

After each township chairman appointed her assistants, these 
committees then met and co-operated with the men's committees of 
their townships for final formation of local plans for the drive from 
April 6 to May 4. The women's committees assisted at all Liberty Loan 
meetings, distributed Liberty Loan literature and posters throughout 
their districts, and did their part to instill the spirit of the Liberty 
Loan in their community. Our county four-minute women also re- 
sponded nobly at various times, giving four-minute talks in behalf of 
the loan at the theaters and other meetings. 

Opportunity for greater and more valuable service knocked at 
our doors, and wide did we open the doors since the enlarged vision 
of our responsibilities made us move forward with greater determina- 
tion to meet the obligations that awaited us. The financial report was 
made possible because the wonderful women of our county were so 
eager to do Liberty Loan work, for they realized, as only wives, mothers 
and sweethearts could, that the necessary equipment of our vast army, 
both overseas and at home, could not be supplied without selling the 
loan to the people. The women of our county carried on this work 
willingly without counting cost or sacrifice, feeling it a sacred privilege 
to have so small a part in helping their boys and their country. 

This same spirit and splendid results would have prevailed during 
the fourth loan if the women's committees could have secured the co- 
operation of the men's committees, which they justly deserved. 

Mrs. Luella Fink Butler, 
Chairman of Woman's Liberty Loan Committee of Ripley County. 

War Savings Movement 

Neil D. McCallum 

With the preparations for war assuming gigantic proportions, and 
the absolute necessity for greater and greater speed in the preparations, 
the expenditure of money by the billions to equip and maintain our 
fighting forces was found necessary, and it became the business of the 
Treasury Department to seek every available source of keeping its 
coffers replenished, that the work of mobilizing, training and caring 



62 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

for our soldiers and sailors might not be hindered, but move on speedily 
and steadily that the war might be won in the shortest time possible. 

Through the Liberty Loans a great part of this money was raised, 
but the Treasury Department, not knowing how long the war might 
last, nor how much money might be needed ere it ended, instituted a 
plan known as the war savings plan, by which it hoped to encourage 
economy and thrift in every home, and to teach the small wage earner, 
who wished to contribute to the great cause, and who found it not 
possible to spare from his earnings a very large sum at one time, but who 
could, by economy and industry, manage to save a little from time to 
time, thus materially aiding his government and giving him a profitable 
investment besides. 

It also hoped to call to its aid in this great war savings movement 
the school children of America, and enlist their services by inculcating 
in them, through their teachers, habits of self-denial and economy with 
their little earnings and spending money, that every penny might be 
turned into this war savings fund to help win the war. 

Briefly, the plan was as follows: Upon payment of 25 cents for a 
thrift stamp, a card with sixteen spaces for pasting sixteen 25-cent 
stamps was given you. When you had purchased sixteen thrift stamps, 
or $4.00 worth, you were entitled to exchange your card full of thrift 
stamps for a war savings stamp, by paying in addition a slight sum, 
this depending on the month of their purchase, according as their inter- 
est accumulated each month. This stamp would be worth in five years 
$5.00. Or, if you had the price of a war savings stamp on hand, you 
might buy it outright, without purchasing any thrift stamps, or, any 
person might buy as many as he chose, up to $1,000 worth, the maximum 
amount any one person might own. 

Immediately upon announcement of the plan by the government, the 
thrift stamps and the war savings stamps were placed on sale at the 
postofHces, stores, banks, and numerous public places, rural carriers 
playing a prominent part in their sales in rural districts. 

In December, 1917, their sale began, and in every part of the 
country people responded liberally, for not only were they giving the 
use of their money to their country, but they realized the war savings 
stamps were a safe and profitable investment. The Government hoped 
by these small contributions to raise two billion dollars in a year's time 
or up to January 1, 1919. 

Organizations of states and counties began immediately and John A. 
Hillenbrand, who was also serving as county chairman of the war 
savings movement for Ripley county in December, 1917, began 
to organize Ripley county for the sale of its quota of war savings 
stamps. 

Mr. Hillenbrand appointed the following committee to serve with 
him : J. Francis Lochard, Versailles ; O. R. Jenkins, Osgood ; Charles 
Hertenstein, Versailles; William McMullen, Sunman ; Davidson Yater, 
Holton ; Thomas Laws, Milan ; G. A. Baas, Batesville. They planned 
to start their campaign for sales immediately after January 1, 1918, 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 63 

though in a number of places in the state the campaign began in 
December, 1917, but Ripley county was not organized to begin ear- 
nestly at that time, although the sale of stamps was fairly launched in 
most parts of the county. 

On December 29, 1917, the employes of the Hillenbrand interests 
of Batesville met and organized a war savings society, pledging 
themselves to systematic saving; to refrain from unnecessary expendi- 
tures; to encourage habits of thrift and to invest their savings in war 
savings stamps. This step on their part encouraged greatly the sale of 
stamps, not alone amongst themselves, but amongst the people of Bates- 
ville and vicinity. 

While it had been planned by the county chairman and his com- 
mittee to inaugurate a campaign for the sale of stamps on a large scale 
immediately after New Year, 1918, the terrible blizzard and continuous 
cold weather throughout January made it impossible to attempt an 
organization of the entire county that could be relied upon to give 
effective service, so there was a lull in the movement, although the sale 
of stamps everywhere possible was going on. 

When the weather became fit, the big drive for large sales began 
in March, 1918, when Mr. Hillenbrand and his committee began the 
organization of each township. 

Riplev county's quota of war savings stamps to be sold by January 1, 
1919, was $389,040, or $20 per capita. Up to March 1, 1918, through 
the various postoffices, banks and schools of the county, a total sum of 
$53,948.70 worth of war stamps had been sold, or about 14 per cent 
of the county's quota. 

With each township organized the members of the various com- 
mittees went to work with the usual zeal exhibited by the people of 
Ripley county, and by general publicity, by advertisement, by public 
meetings, through the postmasters and the rural carriers, and through 
the schools, the sale of stamps began in earnest, the end of March 
showing the total sales for March of $27,523.93 and a total of all 
sales to date of $81,372.63. 

On May 1, the sales for the period to that date showed a total of 
$102,824.67 or about $5.31 per capita, whereas $20 per capita was the 
quota assigned. 

On April 1, 1918, Mr. J. D. Oliver, state chairman, appointed 
John A. Hillenbrand, chairman of the Fourth Congressional District 
in addition to being chairman of Ripley county. Niel McCallum was 
appointed vice-president of the Fourth Congressional District. Mr. 
McCallum visited every county chairman in the district and in several 
of the counties assisted the county chairman in getting the county 
organized. 

The Fourth Congressional District was composed of eleven counties, 
Bartholomew, Brown, Dearborn, Decatur, Jackson, Jennings, Jefferson, 
Johnson, Ohio, Ripley and Switzerland. With this additional task 
before them, the chairman and vice-chairman set out, not only to make 



64 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



their own county of Ripley do its duty, but the counties of this district 
as well. 

On May 6, 1918, a district meeting was held at Seymour — it was 
a representative gathering of all the districts in the state, chairmen, 
committeemen, postmasters and all those vitally interested in putting 
over the sale of war savings stamps being present to exchange their 
views and opinions, and to glean from their fellow workers various 
plans and devices for effecting sales of stamps. 

Joseph D. Oliver, director, and Frank E. Herring, vice-director of 
the war savings stamps movement in Indiana, were both present at the 
meeting, and presented before their co-workers the decision of the 
Government to try to raise the two billion dollars by July 1, 1918, in 
sales or pledges, instead of extending the time up to January 1, 1919, as 
had been originally planned. Therefore, it was agreed at the meeting 
that every county should begin, without delay, a strenuous campaign 
for raising its full quota as soon as possible. 

Ripley county being thoroughly organized, undertook the task im- 
mediately, and during the first week in June a campaign was con- 
ducted in every township with the following results: 

Adams $ 8,131.61 

Brown 12,668.25 

Center 9,056.00 

Delaware 352.00 

Franklin 8,077.00 

Johnson 410.00 

Jackson 4,777.00 

Laugherv 13,846.50 

Otter Creek 4,478.25 

Shelbv 4,000.00 

Washington 3,500.00 

Total $77,306.61 




Jackie $' Hand, Victory Loan, 1919, Great Lakes, Illinois. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 65 

The Government now decided to close the campaign for the war 
savings stamps on June 28, 1918, and President Wilson and the 
governors of all the states issued proclamations designating Friday, 
June 28, as War Savings Day, upon which date all were expected to 
purchase stamps or to pledge themselves to do so to the full extent of 
their ability, that the entire quota for the county, the state and the 
Nation might be met on that date, thereby doing away with constant 
solicitation for sales. 

Extensive and thorough preparations were made by Mr. Hillenbrand 
and Mr. McCallum for this climax to the campaign, not only in 
Ripley county, but in the district as well. A program in compliance 
with requests from the Government was carried out in every school 
district and at every meeting place on that day, as follows: 

1. Reading the Proclamation of the Governor of Indiana. 

2. Reading the call from the State Director of the Indiana War 
Savings Committee. 

3. Announcing the unsold \ quota for the year of war savings 
stamps for the township or school district or other division in which 
the meeting was held. 

4. Reading the names and the amounts on such pledge cards as 
had been filed for credit to the June 28 drive by those who, for justifi- 
able reasons, could not be present at the meeting. 

5. Reading the names and listing the amounts on the pledge cards 
of those present. 

6. Adding the amounts of all pledge cards by a committee of three, 
of whom the secretary should be chairman, and announcing to those 
assembled whether or not the quota had been met. The total sum 
pledged was immediately to be telephoned or telegraphed to the county 
chairman. 

7. Appointing a committee of five, of whom the presiding officer 
and secretary should be members, to compile a list of property owners, 
wage earners, taxpayers and others included in the call who were not 
present at the meeting, and who had not previously filled out and 
delivered pledge cards to authorized solicitors or war savings repre- 
sentatives, the list to be prepared as soon as possible; the original to be 
sent to the state director and a copy filed with the county chairman. 

8. Community singing of "America" or "Star-Spangled Banner." 

9. Dismissal. 

The day was a very significant one, for it became practically 
obligatory upon every taxpayer and wage earner to purchase, or pledge 
to purchase stamps if he did not wish to be classed as unpatriotic. 

Every citizen had been sent a notice previous to War Savings Day 
designating the place he was to report that day to pledge the amount 
of his purchase, providing he had not already pledged an amount upon 
solicitation. The zeal, the earnestness and patriotic endeavors put 
forth by the large group of willing workers in this "finish" campaign 
for war savings stamps bore good fruit, for when the totals were 
compiled, following the "big War Savings Day", Mr. Hillenbrand 



66 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



was gratified to learn that Ripley county had kept up her "over the 
top" reputation, figures showing that with her year's quota of $389,040 
to be met, old Ripley had, with cash sales and pledges a total of $423,- 
206, having exceeded her quota by $34,166. 

During the week previous to and on Friday, June 28, a total of 
$233,410 worth of stamps were sold or pledged, the following showing 
the apportionment assigned each township, the amount of sales and 
pledges, and chairmen of each : 







Cash Sales 




Township 


Quota 


and Pledges 


Chairmen 


Adams 


$ 21,011 


$ 25,190 


Louis Bruns 


Brown 


18,011 


26,665 


Wilkie Lemen 


Center 


20,584 


22,000 


O. R. Jenkins 


Delaware 


11,136 


12,905 


Henry Bultman 


Franklin 


17,512 


21,890 


Thomas Laws 


Jackson 


11,614 


16,045 


Harry Behlmer 


Johnson 


21,011 


19,040 


Chas. Hertenstein 


Laughery 


30,751 


37,810 


G. A. Baas 


Otter Creek 


16,729 


12,365 


Davidson Yater 


Shelby 


22,190 


27,000 


Dr. Cramer 


Washington 


8,695 


12.500 


Edgar Smith 



Total 



$199,244 



$233,410 



Not alone did Mr. Hillenbrand and Mr. McCallum have the satis- 
faction of seeing their own county exceed her quota, but the Fourth 
District, of which Mr. Hillenbrand was also chairman and Mr. 
McCallum vice-chairman, as a whole made a wonderful showing, 
ranking second in the districts of the state, which is very creditable, 
considering the resources of some of the counties of the district, and 
Ripley county ranked fourth in the state and second in the district. 

One of the counties of the Fourth District, Johnson, bears the 
distinction of being the first county in the United States to exceed its 
quota, getting this honor by a slight margin only, as Ohio county, in 
the same district, was a strong contestant for this honor, and, small as it 
is, made a brilliant record for war savings stamp sales. 

In recognition of the splendid work done in Ripley county during 
the campaign, a letter of commendation was received from Mr. J. 
Oliver, director of the Indiana War Savings Committee, to the local 
newspapers, as follows: "As director of the Indiana War Savings 
Committee, I should like to give public expression through your 
columns of my earnest appreciation of the untiring efforts of County 
Chairman John A. Hillenbrand and his zealous co-workers in the 
war savings campaign, and particularly the special effort which 
culminated in the drive on June 28, when your county was one of the 
first to go "over the top" and reach its goal. I congratulate the resi- 
dents of Ripley county on the enthusiastic and patriotic manner in 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 67 

which they have responded to the call of duty, and I would especially 

urge your county organization be not allowed to disintegrate, but be 

kept together to the close of the campaign. Sincerely yours, J. D. 
Oliver, State Director." 

Thus, while the sale of war savings stamps did not end with this 
campaign, the solicitation for sales practically ceased with the June 28 
drive, and through the rest of the year pledge cards were redeemed and 
investments constantly made by those who had money to spare. 

Ere the close of the year, November 1 1 brought a great change in 
the outlook for America and for the world, and the war savings stamps 
movement was lost sight of in the coming of peace and the return of 
the soldier boys. All faces eagerly turned toward the scene of conflict 
waiting for the ships that arrived day by day with their precious cargo 
of America's bravest and best, whose dauntless courage and bravery 
was, in a large measure due to the power "behind the guns" in which the 
little thrift stamps and its "big brother," the war savings stamp, played 
their parts with as much skill and success as did the larger Liberty 
Bond, and the small investor, proportionate to his earning capacity, 
merits as much gratitude from his nation and her defenders as the 
holder of larger investments, all, both little and great, a mighty force 
"behind the lines" for their country and their God in the establish- 
ment of peace. 



Food Administration 

The war in Europe had so affected the food supply of the world 
that long before the entrance of America into the World War, we had 
felt the need of conserving our resources for ourselves, as well as to 
supply the needs of the warring nations. With the declaration of a 
state of war between America and Germany on April 6, 1917, the food 
situation in many ways became acute. Herbert Hoover was sent to 
Belgium to try to save the oppressed people from starvation. It became 
our immediate duty as an ally to feed, not only the Belgians, but the 
rest of our European allies as well. We had at once to raise, feed and 
equip an army of several million men. These several million men had 
to be taken from our fields and factories, as well as from desks and 
offices. That meant a shortage of productive labor from coast to coast. 
Fewer hands on the great northwest wheat fields ; fewer hands in the 
mills, in the workshops, everywhere, while, at the same time, the output 
of our fields must be multiplied as much as possible. To meet these 
sudden gigantic needs, various plans had to be made. Our best 
trained men were called from everywhere to help in the crisis of our 
affairs. To meet the food situation, a Food Administration Bureau 
was created at Washington which labored to learn how to save what 
food we already had and to increase production as efficiently as possible. 
Sunday, July 1, 1917, was set as National Food Conservation Day. 
All ministers were asked to preach on the subject in their various 
churches on that day. 



68 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

In August, 1917, the President fixed the minimum price of wheat 
for the 1917 crop at $2.20 per bushel. The price for the 1918 crop 
was set at $2.00 per bushel. 

Food pledge cards asking housewives to observe certain strict con- 
servation rules were sent out for signature. The first, somewhat loose, 
general plan of appeal did not succeed as had been hoped. The women 
did not sign the cards in any great numbers. They did not under- 
stand the necessity for doing so. Also, many feared they might pledge 
themselves to respond to unknown demands. So very few signed 
pledges went back to Washington that a better plan for securing the 
support of the women of America had to be worked out. New methods 
of instruction and distribution of the cards were carefully planned. 
Meetings were held to explain the need, the entire necessity for the 
strictest conservation of food. To feed our soldiers already pouring 
into the cantonments and overseas the people at home must sacrifice 
and save. To win the war in the shortest possible time with the least 
expenditure of our own men, we must feed the allied soldiers so that they 
might hold the trenches and share the fighting with our men when they 
should finally be ready. These plans eventually developed into a house 
to house canvass and the Food Administration cards were hung in 
practically every home in America. These cards pledged the house- 
wives to follow all rules of the Food Administration as they should 
be given out from time to time. Recipes for using wheat substitutes, 
fat substitutes and sugar substitutes were printed and distributed broad- 
cast. The three great food staples had to be conserved if the war was 
to be won against the Central Powers. 

State administrators were appointed, who in turn appointed county 
administrators. J. H. Bergdoll, of Milan, was appointed for Ripley 
county. 

A mass meeting was called by the Council of Defense at the court- 
house in Versailles, on September 26, 1917, for the purpose of organizing 
more intensely along various lines for war work. 

Groups of speakers had been sent out by the state to address these 
meetings, which were held over a period of a few days, the state being 
divided into groups of counties. Decatur, Ripley, Dearborn and 
Franklin counties constituted one group. The speakers sent to these 
counties were John Chewning of Rockport, Ind., Homer Elliot of 
Spencer, Ind., John F. Riley of Hammond, Ind., and John \V. Spencer 
of Evansville, Ind. 

The four-minute men were appointed at this meeting, at which all 
war organizations were represented. The speeches gave plans for 
closer organization and data, and plans to be used in making addresses 
and completing this organization work. 

Meetings were held all over the county during Septembr, 1917, b> 
Oscar Swank, a hog-growing expert, who explained how to produce more 
hogs in the shortest time and with the least amount of labor and capital 
possible. Pig clubs were organized, and the various towns made new 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 69 

rules allowing pigs to be fed within the town limits under certain 
regulations along sanitary lines. 

The United States Food Administration Law was passed on August 
10, 1917. Its purpose as outlined was as follows: "To provide for 
security and national defense by encouraging the production, conserva- 
tion of supply, and control of distribution of food products. Its hopes 
were threefold : To so guide the trade in fundamental food commod- 
ities as to eliminate vicious speculation, extortion, hoarding and waste- 
ful practices, and to stabilize prices in the essential articles. 

Second : To guard our exports so that against the world's shortage 
we retain sufficient supplies for our own people, and to co-operate with 
our allies to prevent inflation of prices. 

Third : That we stimulate in every manner within our power the 
production and saving of our food in order that we may increase exports 
to our allies to a point which will enable them to properly provision 
their armies and feed their people." 

Mr. Bergdoll was appointed as food administrator in December, 
1917. He immediately announced in the five county papers the purposes 
of the Food Administration, and toured the county as rapidly as possible, 
calling on all dealers in food commodities and establishing a mailing 
list so that each could be notified promptly of changes and new regula- 
tions as they were issued by the Food Administration. 

Milk dealers were notified not to advance prices without permission 
of the county food administrator. 

Flour and sugar were to be handled until further notice, as follows : 
Only one-eighth to one-quarter barrel of flour could be sold at one time 
to consumers in towns and villages. Only one-quarter to one-half 
barrel of flour to consumers in country districts. 

Sugar could be sold to consumers in towns and villages only in two 




Liberty Loan Parade, Fair Grounds, Batesville, April 6, iq/8, Eureka Band. 



70 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



or five pound lots. To consumers in rural districts only in five or ten 
pound lots. 

A mass meeting of retail grocers was held at Osgood, Friday, Janu- 
ary 11, 1918, at 1:30 P. M., to elect a delegate from Ripley county 
to the Federal Food Administration at Indianapolis, on January 15. 
Will D. Vayhinger of Osgood was elected and attended the meeting. 

The papers and magazines were filled with war-time recipes. One 
famous sample provided for an entire meal in one dish as follows: 

"Dried Peas With Rice and Tomatoes. — One-half cup rice, two cups 
peas, six onions, one tablespoonful salt, one-quarter teaspoon pepper, two 
cups tomatoes. Soak peas over night in two quarts of water. Cook in 
this water until tender, add rice, onions, tomatoes and so forth, and 
cook twenty minutes." 

On February 2, 1918, the following flour rules were put into effect: 
One sack of twenty-four and one-half pounds to one family at one time. 
Substitutes in equal amount at same time. Barley, buckwheat, corn 
flour, corn meal, corn starch, corn grits, hominy, oatmeal, potato flour, 
rice, rice flour, rolled oats, soy beans, sweet potato or rye flour were all 
allowed as substitutes. 

Records had to be kept to prevent hoarding. Millers were not per- 
mitted to sell in different amounts. 

Tuesday of each week was set aside as meatless day. Monday and 
Wednesday of each week as wheatless days. No wheat flour could be 
used on these days except in soups and gravies, or as a binder with corn 
meal or other cereal breads. 

One meatless meal and one wheatless meal was to be observed every 
day. No pork was to be served on Tuesday or on Saturday. Fish, 
poultry and eggs could be used instead. Every day was to be a fat and 
sugar saving day by making less use of both. 




Plane 3932Q, Fourth Liberty Loan, September 28, iqiS. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 71 

All this conservation was asked to be given voluntarily by the 
people of the United States. The signatures to the pledge cards prom- 
ised to conform with these rules and the Government hoped to escape 
taking coercive measures. 

Another county conference was held at Versailles, on February 13, 
1918. The schools of the county were dismissed so that the teachers 
and as many pupils as possible might attend. These meetings were not 
easily held, as the winter of 1917 and 1918 was the most severe in our 
history, the storms of December 8th and January 12th continuing 
two weeks in each case with several feet of drifted snow, zero weather, 
sleet and wind, causing unheard of hardship owing to scarcity of coal 
and food. Owners of timber had been asked to sell or give away all 
available tops, branches and refuse timber as fuel and had thus aug- 
mented the coal shortage to some extent. 

Mrs. J. H. Bergdoll had been appointed as chairman on home eco- 
nomics and conducted an interesting session in demonstration of her 
subject at this February meeting. 

C. H. Andres, as Red Cross chairman, showed moving pictures of 
Red Cross work at the Austin theater. 

The Versailles Red Cross served dinner to the crowd and added 
to their local Red Cross fund in this manner, as well as serving 
war dishes, breads and so forth, in line with food conservation plans. 

Miss Elinor Barker talked on "Food Conservation," addressing the 
crowd in the afternoon. Judge Sample gave the main address on the 
"Help-Win-the-War Slogan" topic. A returned Canadian soldier fur- 
nished the war experience talk. 

A woman's war workers' meeting was held at Osgood, at the 
public library, on March 21, 1918. 

The Council of Defense had appointed the following chairmen : 

Enrollment and Women's Service, Laura Nelson, Osgood. 

Food Conservation, Laura Nelson. 

Food Production, Mrs. J. A. Hillenbrand, Batesville. 

Child Welfare, Mrs. W. W. McMullen, Sunman. 

Liberty Loan, Mrs. Luella Butler, Osgood. 

Red Cross and Allied Relief, Mrs. F. M. Laws, Versailles. 

Health and Recreation, Mrs. C. W. Gibson, Batesville. 

Maintaining Existing Social Service Agencies, Monta Royce, Ver- 
sailles. 

Educational Propaganda, Sophia Nickel, Batesville. 

Publicity, Mrs. Peter Holzer, Batesville. 

Special Committees, Mrs. James Hazelrigg, Napoleon. 

Chairman, Fourteen-Minute Women, Monta Royce. 

List of Fourteen-Minute Women: Mrs. Pearl Copeland, Ver- 
sailles; Mrs. Luella Bilby, Osgood; Mrs. G. Herman, Osgood; Mrs. 
J. H. Bergdoll, Milan; Mrs. May Laws, Milan; Mrs. Minnie E. 
Wycoff, Batesville; Mrs. Tora McCallum, Batesville; Mrs. Sherman 
Gookins, Napoleon. 



72 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



These women were called together at this time to receive the plans 
for their special lines of work. The meeting was particularly for the 
purpose of instruction for the Third Liberty Loan drive and for special 
food conservation plans. 

On May 23, 1918, flour and sugar cards were issued by the Food 
Administration. One and one-half pounds of Hour and three-quarters 
pound of sugar were allowed for each person for one week. Twenty- 
five pound lots of sugar for canning purposes only were to be sold. 
This time penalties were fixed for failure to comply with these rules ; 
a $5,000 fine or six months in jail were the extreme penalties imposed. 

On and after July 15, 1918, all wholesale egg and poultry dealers 
had to have a license. This included all retail and country grocers and 
hucksters who bought eggs from farmers for sale to commission men or 
shippers. Licenses were secured from the License Division, Law De- 
partment, United States Food Administration, Washington, D. C. 
After that date all eggs had to be candled ; every case had to contain the 
license number of the dealer, name of dealer, and date on which eggs 
were candled. 

These rules were issued by the Indiana Egg Dealers' Association at 
Indianapolis. 

Wholesale egg dealers were not allowed to buy from unlicensed 
dealers. No cases were allowed to be shipped without the certificate con- 
taining license number and name of dealer with date of candling of eggs. 

The sale of eggs on the loss-off basis was abolished. 

On July 5, 1918, the following beef order was issued to hotels and 
restaurants : Beef, except steaks, may be served in any order from 1 1 
A. M. to 2 P. M. on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Steaks 
may be served from 2 P. M. to 10:30 P. M. on Tuesday, Thursday and 




War Exhibit Train, Batesville, JQIQ. 



klPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 73 

Saturday. By-products, such as tongue, liver, heart and so forth, can be 
served at all times. No beef under five hundred pounds weight was 
allowed to be used. 

As the wheat crop of 1918 was harvested and turned into the mar- 
ket new regulations were issued as follows, on August 29th : 

Four parts of wheat flour to one part of substitute flour should be 
used by every one. No limit as to amount of flour purchased was made. 
All bakers and consumers were compelled to use the 80-20 per cent 
rule in baking. 

The amount of sugar allowed to each person had been reduced to 
one-half pound per week for a short time during the fall of 1918. The 
amount of canning sugar to one family was finally limited to twenty-five 
pounds, though many families, buying in twenty-five pound lots, had 
used up to one hundred or more pounds before this order was passed. 
The final canning regulations allowed but ten pounds at a time, 'up to 
twenty-five pounds total to each family. 

The sale of canning sugar was suspended entirely in October. 

Restrictions on the sale of all foodstuffs were removed after the 
signing of the armistice in November, 1918. Consequent restrictions 
and regulations belong to the after-the-war period. 

The people of Ripley county proved, as a whole, to be adaptable and 
truly patriotic. But few violations of the food laws were discovered. 
A number of arrests for the hoarding of sugar and flour were made at 
different times but the intent of most of our citizens was to obey the 
Food Administration regardless of inconveniences involved. No real 
suffering because of these laws was reported. The larger number of 
people were glad to "do their bit" in this, as well as in other ways. 

The final work of the Food Administration in 1918 was a meeting 
at Versailles, on Friday, November 29, for the purpose of organizing 
food clubs throughout the county. 

During the summer of 1919 the shortage of the sugar supply caused 
a resumption of duty by the Food Administration to control the prices 
and to receive an equitable distribution of the available sugar. 

Coun ty His to ria n . 
FOOD CONSERVATION 

"To minister to those in need, 
To bravely meet life's toil and care, 
To bind up stricken hearts that bleed, 
To smile though days be dark or fair; 
To scatter love and live the good — 
This is the crown of womanhood." 

The war brought a very clear and powerful emphasis to the word 
"Conservation." And in August, 1917, our country had already seen 
the immediate need of conservation of food, so I was asked by the 
County Council of Defense to take up the work of distributing the food 
conservation pledge cards throughout Ripley county for our women to 
sign. 



74 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 



Every woman who signed a card pledged her willingness to conserve 
all she could in her own kitchen to the best of her ability. The 
twentieth day of February, 1918, 1 was officially appointed by H. E. 
Barnard, Federal food administrator of Indiana, to act as county presi- 
dent of United States Food Clubs. The organization plan of the clubs 
was to appoint township presidents, and each township president to or- 
ganize food clubs and appoint food club presidents, thus making a 
thoroughly organized community. 

The township presidents were as follows: 

Center township, Mrs. E. Maud Bruce. 

Johnson township, Mrs. Monta Royce. 

Laughery township, Miss Sophia Nickel. 

Adams township, Miss Myrtle Stille. 

Delaware township, Mrs. Herman Menke. 

Jackson township, Mrs. Ada Myers. 

Shelby township, Miss Georgiana Spears. 

At the meetings of these clubs, literature furnished by the state was 
distributed among the ladies and these leaflets contained recipes on how 
to save the wheat, meat and fats. Our four-minute women did a noble 
work in our clubs, too. Only seven townships in our county organized 
these clubs, but practically every woman in the county received litera- 
ture, as every school child was given literature to take home. 

At this time our sorrows were akin and prompted our desire to do 
for others. By these little acts of service there was a network of friend- 
ship woven throughout our county. I can not refrain from expressing 
my sincere gratitude for the splendid assistance you women of Ripley 
county have rendered. It was your efforts and those of others associated 
with us that made possible the proud record of Indiana and helped to 
cause the defeat of the arch enemy of civilization. 

Mrs. Laura Row Nelson, 
President of United States Food Clubs of Ripley County. 




Aeroplane and Pilots, Batesville, September 2g, igiS. 



Woman's War Work Council of Batesville 
and Laughery Township 

The ever-growing demands made upon women for service of every 
kind in the work behind the lines led some of the women of Batesville 
to a discussion of the advisability of forming some sort of organization 
for war work. 

Accordingly, in pursuance to call, a number of the women of the 
city met at the city hall on the evening of January 7, 1918, for thd 
purpose of effecting such organization. 

Miss Sophia Nickel acted as temporary chairman, and, after ex- 
plaining the purpose of the meeting, a permanent organization known as 
the Women's War Work Council of Batesville and Laughery Town- 
ship was formed, with Miss Sophia Nickel as chairman, Mrs. A. W. 
Romweber, vice-chairman, and Mrs. Niel McCallum, secretary-treas- 
urer. An executive board, composed of the above-named officers and four 
women appointed by the chairman, Mrs. Will Gelvin, Mrs. G. M. 
Hillenbrand, Mrs. H. J. Walsman and Mrs. A. E. Wachsman, was 
formed, its duties being to consider and discuss the various problems 
concerning war activities as they presented themslves, and to decide on 
the manner of procedure. 

Realizing that canvassing the city for various drives, distribution of 
cards, literature and pledges would be one of the main tasks which 
the women would be expected to perform, the city was divided into 
districts, with a chairman for each district, she to appoint the members 
of her own committee to serve with her in whatever work was assigned 
to them, and with these appointments made, the organization was com- 
pleted and proved to be a wonderful help in conserving time and energy 
and in maintaining promptness and efficiency in war work. 

The following are the names of the district chairmen appointed : 
Mrs. Ida Goldschmidt, Mrs. E. B. Schultz, Mrs. E. E. Taylor, Mrs. 
Russell Downey, Mrs. Joseph Boehmer, Mrs. Henry Schumacher, 
Mrs. Henry Behlmer, Mrs. Wesley Schultz, Mrs. M. L. Samms, Mrs. 
Will Behlmer, Mrs. John Puttman, Mrs. A. T. Nutter, Mrs. William 
Wessel. 

The latter, Mrs. Wessel, was suddenly taken away by death, and 
Mrs. Puttman and Mrs. Nutter resigned for various reasons, Mrs. 
Puttman's place being filled by Mrs. Will Barnhorst. The other 
two places were left vacant and the remaining eleven chairmen took 
over the entire work. 

The women performed their part of the Liberty Loan drive with 
splendid success; distributed food conservation material from time to 
time; carried out the child welfare movement, conducted the registra- 
tion of women, holding a special public meeting previous to registra- 
tion day for an explanation of its requirements; took complete charge 
of the Red Cross drive in May, 1918, and finished the canvass in one 
day, more than raising their quota. 

(75) 



76 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Whatever war activity was required was first submitted to the 
members of the executive board, who agreed on the plan of carrying on 
the work, and the various women chairmen of the city carried out the 
instructions of the board faithfully and well, all working together in 
perfect harmony, to the end that Batesville ranks high in efficiency and 
in her systematic method of performing her war duties, no small part 
of which is due to the willingness to serve, the ability to do, and the 
patriotic zeal and fervor of her womanhood. 

(Signed) Mrs. Xiel'McCallum, 

Secretary War Work Council. 




liar Exhibit, Batesville, iqiq. 



Armenian and Syrian Relief Drive in 
Ripley County 

Campaign Week — -January 25 to 31, 1919 

The peoples of the world have learned to look to the United States 
of America for leadership in ideals and morals, for fighting forces when 
great questions of right and wrong confront them, and for money and 
supplies when they find themselves in need. 

Our country, after deciding on the path of duty, was not slow in 
responding to every call made upon her. She gave freely of her choicest 
manhood and of her money and furnished the balance of power which 
defeated a world enemy. When the call came from the Near East for 
the persecuted and starving Armenian and Syrian peoples, America 
heard and heeded the call. 

The quota for the United States in this drive was thirty million 
dollars. Indiana's quota was six hundred twenty-nine thousand and 
one hundred seventy-two dollars, and Ripley county's quota was three 
thousand three hundred dollars. Our county has been as prompt in 
meeting her obligations as our country. Ripley county contributed 
promptly and liberally in this drive. Mr. George A. Baas, of Bates- 
ville, was appointed county treasurer. The following chairmen for 
the townships were appointed and quotas assigned as follows: 

Amount 

Quota Received 

L. A. Bruns, Sunman, Adams Tp $470.00 $478.15 

Fred R. Papenhaus, Osgood, R. F. D., Delaware Tp.. 175.00 175.00 

B. L. Vawter, Sunman, Center Tp 345.00 346.00 

E. B. Schultz, Batesville, Laughery Tp 485.00 755.50 

Thomas H. Thompson, Milan, Franklin Tp 325.00 325.00 

James Hazelrigg, Napoleon, Jackson Tp 165.00 189.50 

Wm. F. Wilson, Butlerville, Shelby Tp 300.00 304.75 

W. D. Robinson, Versailles, Johnson Tp 345.00 349.00 

H. A. Cass, Holton, Otter Creek Tp 315.00 315.00 

Wm. Meyer, Dillsboro, Washington Tp 145.00 153.00 

W. S. Lemon, Friendship, Brown Tp 280.00 280.00 

The above report also gives the amount received with an oversub- 
scription of three hundred seventy dollars and ninety cents. For the 
splendid results I am indebted to the township chairmen, the support of 
the county newspapers, as well as the liberality of our citizens. 

Will J. Gelvin, County Chairman, 

Armenian and Syrian Relief Drive. 
(77) 



"Everybody Welcome" 

M. F. Boh land 

On October 12, 1492, Christopher Columbus dared to cross the 
dark and turbulent waters of the Atlantic and plant for the first time 
the cross of Christianity on American soil. Some thirty years ago, a 
number of Catholic young men in a small village of Connecticut banded 
themselves together and called themselves the "Knights of Columbus." 
Their purpose was to so live that the great work accomplished by 
Christopher Columbus might not perish from the earth. Their ideal 
was to emulate the example of their noble patron as nearly as practicable 
and to live the lives of true Christian and Catholic young men in every 
respect. This organization, which originally numbered approximately 
twenty-five, now has a membership of half a million, and is one of the 
greatest religious organizations that has ever been founded. 

During the terrible trouble with Mexico, prior to the World War, 
the officers of the Knights of Columbus established recreation and rest 
camps along the Mexican border, for the sole purpose of entertaining the 
boys in khaki. Eagerly these noble sons of America welcomed the op- 
portunity to serve. They had the organization and the resolution to 
accomplish great things. They cheerfully bore all expenses without any 
assistance. These recreation and rest barracks became extremely popular. 

When the United States entered the World War, the Government 
officials called upon the organization to assist in taking care of the boys, 
in conjunction with the Salvation Army, the Young Men's Christian 
Association, and the Jewish Relief Association. Eagerly they arose to 
the occasion. Buildings were erected at practically all the cantonments 
and army and navy camps, and men of sterling ability were placed at 
the head of these stations, so that the boys were properly taken care of 
at all times. At no time during any period of the war work performed 
by the Knights of Columbus were members of the organization the only 
ones who participated or who received consideration at the recreation 
places, but "EVERYBODY WELCOME" was printed in large type 
on the buildings. These buildings were not alone built at all possible 
places within this country, but the K. C. followed the boys across the 
seas into strange lands, and there took care of their every possible need, 
both temporal and spiritual, not only having huts at the places where 
the boys received their final training, but they followed them into the 
front line trenches and there served delicacies to the boys who were so 
ready and willing to follow the Stars and Stripes. 

The organization saw that it was going to be put to an extra- 
ordinary expense and so they made an appeal to each and every loyal 
Knight of Columbus for assistance and called for a million-dollar war 
fund. This sum was to be raised by a personal visit and soliciting of all 
Catholics for contributions and all members of the organization for 
subscriptions in addition to the regular two-dollar membership assess- 
ment. 

(78) 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 79 

The Knights of Columbus Council No. 1461, Batesville, Indiana, 
was called upon to assist in raising the sum of money necessary to carry 
out the project. At the time of the first drive, Batesville Council had 
a membership of one hundred and twenty-nine, which meant the raising 
of approximately double that amount. The Grand Knight, Michael 
Benz, Jr., called a meeting for discussing ways and means to raise this 
money. Plans were outlined by which each and every member of the 
organization was asked to make a voluntary contribution for the amount 
which he could readily give for the purpose without embarrassment. 
The members of the Batesville Parish were also invited to assist in 
raising the quota. Anthony W. Romweber, lecturer of the council, 
was appointed general manager of the drive. Literature was dis- 
tributed to the members of the council, and on Sunday, July 22, 1917, 
the members of the council and the good people of Batesville Parish 
responded most nobly and $485.00 was raised in this one day drive, 
approximately double the amount called for. Throughout Indiana 
$93,000 was raised in the same manner and on the same day. 

In the months following, the work on the K. C. buildings progressed, 
a large number of new secretaries were appointed, great quantities of 
supplies were purchased, and about the first of May the amount which 
had been subscribed in such a short time was utterly exhausted and more 
money was an absolute necessity. The splendid men directing the war 
activities voted that another war fund be raised. This was sanctioned 
and met the approval of the Secretaries of War and of Navy. It was 
realized at this time that the war was a fight to the finish and that it 
would require large sums to defeat the enemy. Sixteen million dollars 
was asked for in the second drive, which took place May 5-12, 1918. 
Batesville Council was again called upon to raise a substantial portion 
of this vast amount. Oldenburg, in Franklin county, owing to the 
large number of Knights of Columbus who belonged to the Batesville 
Council, was added to the list of Catholic parishes from which to raise 
this sum of money. Anthony W. Romweber was again appointed 
general manager of the drive. The following committees were ap- 
pointed : 

Oldenburg — George Holtel, chairman; August J. Hackman, Jr., 
secretary and treasurer; Rev. Hugh Staud, Bernard J. Kessing, Paul A. 
Munchel, George Munchel, Harry Burdick, William Hoelker, Leonard 
Blank, Frank Heppner. 

Morris — Charles J. Bramlage, chairman; Rev. Michael Wagner, 
John M. Zillenbuehler, George F. Siefert, Maurice Volz, John Prickel, 
Henry Reuter, Harry Gauck, Thomas Riehle. 

Napoleon — Edward Buckley, chairman; William Bruns, treasurer; 
Rev. John C. Rager, Fred Wagner, Henry Mehn. 

Osgood — Jacob Young, chairman ; O. R. Jenkins, Rev. George 
H. Moss, George Dopp, John McEvoy. 

Milan — Charles N. Peters, chairman; Rev. George H. Moss, 
Horace King. 

St. Nicholas — Edward Retzner, chairman; Rev. John Rapp, Frank 
Federle, Anthony Forthofer. 



80 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

St. Magdalene — Dr. John H. Hess, chairman ; Rev. George J. 
Schiedler, Alex Miller, Dr. Fred Kremer, Lawrence Miller, John 
Kremer. John Reibel. 

St. Pius — Bernard Puente, chairman ; Rev. John Rapp. 

Batesville — C. J. Doll, chairman; C. H. Andres, assistant chairman; 
Herman J. Obermeier, treasurer; Rev. Adelbert Rolfes, John H. 
Boehmer, Frank Thiel, John A. Hillenbrand, August Hackman, George 
M. Hillenbrand, Aloys M. Roell. 

The following quota was assigned to the various parishes under 
the jurisdiction of the Batesville Council: 

Church Membership Quota 

Oldenburg 1,057 $ 39.00 

Morris 527 219.00 

Napoleon 321 133.00 

Osgood 224 93.00 

Milan 80 35.00 

St. Nicholas 315 131.00 

St. Magdalene 400 166.00 

St. Pius 115 48.00 

Batesville 1,175 488.00 

Total quota $1,750.00 

The campaign was on. A large number of prominent people 
throughout the country regardless of creed endorsed the movement and 
subscribed to the fund. The success of the drive may best be expressed 
in a survey of the following results from the various parishes: 

Oldenburg $1,070.00 

Morris 251.39 

Napoleon 146.75 

Osgood 133.40 

Milan 114.50 

St. Nicholas 145.00 

St. Magdalene 200.00 

St. Pius 33.00 

Batesville 1,08'1.60 

Versailles 12.00 

Total subscription $3,187.64 

Without effort, without a committee soliciting funds, the good 
people of Versailles contributed $12.00 to raise the amount. Every- 
body helped put this drive over, not only the members of the Knights 
of Columbus and members of the various Catholic churches, but non- 
Catholics as well, responded most nobly to the cause which they felt 
ought to receive the commendation and support of every loyal American. 
It was a plan of gigantic magnitude for such an organization to under- 
take. Every loyal citizen saw the need of recreation work and was 
pleased that the Knights of Columbus had taken up a branch of the 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 81 

work. They all felt satisfied that with the great struggle in Europe at 
its height, the boys not only needed religious but also the recreational 
advantages. For that reason, if for no other, the drive was so popular 
and so readily put "over the top". For every dollar sent into the 
organization one dollar and one cent was turned over to the manage- 
ment of the organization, showing that the Knights of Columbus were 
not actuated by a mercenary desire but believed that too much could 
not be done for the vast sacrifices that were being made in Europe. 

The Knights of Columbus shared in the benefits of the united war 
fund campaign and received a certain portion of the amount received on 
the drive, but it was not a separate Knights of Columbus drive, but 
was connected with seven other organizations, viz: 

National Catholic War Council, K. C. 

Jewish Relief Board. 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

Young Women's Christian Association. 

Salvation Army. 

American Library Association. 

War Camp Community Service. 

Again the good people of Ripley county responded most generously. 
The vast sums of money which were delivered to the supreme officer of 
the Knights of Columbus, under the leadership of the supreme knight, 
James A. Flaherty, was expended with but one idea in mind, and that 
was for the welfare of the boys who were doing the fighting for the 
"stay-at-homes". 

Not one cent of the money delivered to the organization was wasted. 
Vast quantities of supplies were shipped across and nothing went to 
waste. At the close of the war the Knights of Columbus had established 
two hundred and fifty recreation halls, and over one thousand secre- 
taries constituted the personnel of these establishments. In the home 
camps and cantonments over three hundred buildings were erected in 
army camps and naval stations. The hospitals and barracks were 
superintended by three hundred and fifty secretaries. No charge was 
made for anything received at these stations. Stationery to write to 
the folks back home was distributed most generously. Entertainments 
of all sorts were a portion of their daily routine. The best speakers, 
actors and entertainers were secured to give their talks and sketches. 
Baseball and all athletic sports were open for their enjoyment. Quite 
a large number of the soldiers were Catholics and for these the Knights 
of Columbus provided chaplains and places of worship. The chaplains 
did noble work in the front line trenches, not only for those of their own 
denomination but for all those who needed spiritual help and guidance. 

Immediately after the armistice was signed the Knights of Columbus 
organized employment bureaus in all the large cities and secured em- 
ployment for the vast number of returning soldiers. In this way the 
Knights of Columbus showed their true metal in assisting the boys to 
get back to their proper stations in life. 

Batesville Council No. 1461 Knights of Columbus has lost nothing 
through its splendid war work. It materially assisted in raising Ripley 



82 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



county's quota in the five Liberty Loans, the war stamp campaigns, the 
Red Cross, the Young Men's Christian Association, Jewish Relief and 
Armenian campaigns, and it practically handled the first drive in Ripley 
county's quota by itself. At the beginning of hostilities, in April, 1917, 
the council had a membership of one hundred twenty-nine and at the 
present time it has a total membership of two hundred thirty-three, be- 
ing one of the strongest fraternal organizations in the county. That 
in itself is ample payment for its part in helping win the war. The 
following members were in the service : 



Hugo M. Benz, B. M. 2d cl. 
Sgt. Leo M. Benz 
Sgt. Grover M. Benz 
Pvt. Randolph Benz 
Pvt. Peter J. Berger 
Sgt. Walter J. Bierbusse 
Q.-M. Sgt. Francis J. Blank 
Pvt. Leonard Blank 
Sgt. Walter W. Bloemer 
Pvt. Louis F. Boehmer 
Pvt. Frank N. Burst 
Pvt. William E. Burst 
Pvt. William B. Dietz 
Pvt. Walter J. Dirscherl 
1st cl. Pvt. Frank B. Eckstein 
Pvt. Henry W. Eckstein 
Corp. Harry A. Engei 
Pvt. William M. Ensinger 
Pvt. John P. Faust 
Corp. Daniel J. Foley 
Sgt. J. Frank Gauck 
Pvt. Charles H. Gauck 
Pvt. William Gindling 
Pvt. Richard O. Gutzwiller 
Corp. William A. Gutzwiller 



Pvt. Jacob J. Hoff 

Peter Karbowski, 2d. cl. fireman 

Sgt. Joseph F. Lindenmaier 

Pvt. Sylvester Lindenmaier 

Corp. August L. Merkel 

1st. cl. Pvt. Frank H. Meyer 

Pvt. Joseph B. Meyer 

Pvt. Cornelius J. Miller 

Pvt. Herman Moormann 

Corp. Lawrence J. Nickol 

Sgt. William L. Nordmeyer 

George C. Oilier, 1st. cl. seaman 

Pvt. William P. Orschell 

Pvt. Joseph W. Oswald 

Pvt. Theodore J. Reibel 

Pvt. John J. Sahm 

Sgt. 1st cl. Arthur J. Schene 

Pvt. John H. Schoetmer 

Pvt. Anthony Stein 

Pvt. Albert F. Tekulve 

Pvt. Harry J. Waechter 

Pvt. Vincent Frank Walpe 

1st cl. Pvt. Florentine Weigel 

Corp. John H. Wernke, Jr. 

Sgt. Joseph Wintz, Jr. 



The name of the Knights of Columbus organization will be seen 
through the vista of years as a beacon light, peering through the dark- 
ness of war, and its name shall be cherished and its work praised in the 
centuries to come. No greater honor, no more fitting praise can be 
given to these noble Knights than 

"Mid shot and shell, on field, on trench, 
The Knights e'er bore their part, 
To help console, relieve, aye save, 
They strove with hand and heart. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IC.1R 83 

'Tis more blessed to give than receive; 

'Twas this the Master taught; 
They gave all, refused fee or price, 

With love their gifts were fraught. 

Their huts were ever open wide ; 

None barred, all creeds were one, 
To toil, to serve, for God and Flag, 

And e'er till victory won. 

Hand in hand with every man 

That sought to aid the cause, 
Their deeds were done for liberty, 

Justice and freedom's laws. 

Man's brotherhood shall nearer be 

If service prove our aim ; 
As blessed Peace bids all rejoice, 

Go seek it in His name." 



Y. M. C. A. Reports 

The first call for Y. M. C. A. funds was sent out in May, 1917. 
The organization had already demonstrated its worth as a moral force 
among men of all ranks on the Mexican border, in the United States 
and on the battle-fields of Europe. The Nation's military leaders issued 
an immediate call on the Y. M. C. A. when war with Germany was 
declared. The burdens placed upon it drained its resources so that a 
new fund of $3,000,000 was at once needed. Ripley county's allotment 
was between $500 and $600. 

The Christian men of Versailles met on Sunday, May 13, and 
elected as county chairman Hale Bradt of Versailles, and as treasurer, 
Charles L. Hyatt of Versailles. A. H. Beer was assigned to organize 
Johnson township; Hale Bradt, Washington; Howard Akers, Elmer 
Livingston and Lewis Arford, Brown; C. L. Hyatt, Hale Bradt, C. S. 
Royce and F. M. Thompson, Shelby; W. D. Robinson, Franklin; 
Charles R. Hertenstein, Jackson; Francis Lochard, Laughery; Clint 
Carnine, Delaware; Rev. T. J. Hart, Center. 

The Laughery township apportionment of $100 was raised in two 
hours on Monday morning. 

May 27 was set as Y. M. C. A. Rally Day in Ripley county. Hon. 
Rollin Turner of Greensburg addressed the men at the M. E. church in 
Versailles. At the same time a woman's meeting was held at the Baptist 
church, which was addressed by Professor Wiley of Greensburg. 



84 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Hale Bradt, Ripley county Y. M. C. A. chairman, reported a total 
of $756.15 turned in on the fund, with one township not yet reported. 
Five hundred dollars only had been set as Ripley's quota. 

A permanent organization was effected, to be known as the Ripley 
County Y. M. C. A. Co-operative Society, the officers elected for the 
drive to serve as officers of the organization. 

The final report, June 7, 1917, on this first Y. M. C. A. collection 
will be of interest : 

Johnson .' $ 89.50 

Brown 91.25 

Washington 25.00 

Shelbv 59.50 

Franklin 81.50 

Otter Creek 60.00 

Adams 101.50 

Tackson 48.00 

Laughery 100.00 

Delaware 26.35 

Center 100.00 

Total $782.61 

Final total $799.11 

A county meeting was held at Versailles on November 4, 1917, to 
organize for a second drive for Y. M. C. A. funds. The national 
quota was for $35,000,000. Indiana's share of this quota was placed at 
$350,000. W. D. Robinson was to succeed Hale Bradt as chairman in 
Ripley county, Mr. Bradt resigning to go into the army Y. M. C. A. 
work. 

A second rally meeting was held at Versailles on Sunday, November 
18. D. E. McCoy was elected as county treasurer. A rousing program 
of speeches, music, and oratorical readings stirred patriotism in the 
hearts of all who could crowd into the auditorium. The reports on the 
fund were as follows: 

Adams township $ 613.15 

Brown township 262.80 

Center township 421.85 

Delaware township 292.00 

Franklin township 401.55 

Jackson township 222.15 

Johnson township 390.75 

Laughery township 853.05 

Otter Creek township 352.50 

Shelby township 325.50 

Washington township :.... 135.10 

Total $4,270.53 

The direct object of this second campaign was to raise $5,000,000. 
Ripley county was in the Fifteenth District, which included Decatur, 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 85 

Shelby, Ripley, Franklin, Switzerland, Ohio, Dearborn, Rush, Jefferson 
and Jennings. These counties were asked jointly to raise $58,000 of the 
fund. 

H. P. Scott, Y. M. C. A. secretary at Greensburg, was put in 
charge of the campaign. It was planned to enlist ten thousand boys 
who would agree to earn and give at least ten dollars each, by April 1, 
1918. 

This additional money was required by the rapidly expanding work 
of the Y. M. C. A. in the cantonments and in the camps in France. It 
was estimated that it would require $750,000 to heat the "Y" huts in 
France during the winter of 1917. The total fund for the year was 
to amount to $35,000,000 by June 30, 1918. 

Subsequent calls for the Y. M. C. A. funds were met by the United 
War Work Fund so that the special Y. M. C. A. organization had no 
further work to do. 

The names of the township chairmen as permanently organized are 
as follows: 

Adams township — Chris. Kassendick, L. A. Bruns, Sunman. 

Brown township — Darius G. Gordon, Cross Plains. 

Center township — Rev. Ora Cox, Osgood. 

Delaware township — Elmer Bode, Osgood, R. F. D. 

Jackson township — William Borgman, Batesville, R. F. D. 

Johnson township — A. H. Beer, Versailles. 

Laughery township — A. B. Wycoff, Harry Schwier, Batesville. 

Franklin township — Dr. Bine Whitlatch, George E. Laws; treas- 
urer, Robert Borders; secretary, J. H. Connelley. 

Otter Creek township — Prof. C. E. Limp, O. P. Shook, H. A. Cass. 

Shelby township — Hayes Shaffer, New Marion. 

Washington township — W. E. Smith, Milan. 

Y. W. C. A. War Fund 

Mrs. Margaret Ruoff of Osgood was appointed to serve as county 
chairman for raising the Y. W. C. A. war fund quota. The total 
reported for the first drive ending January 31. 1918, was: 

Adams township $ 58.35 

Brown township 12.15 

Center township 100.00 

Delaware township 5.25 

Jackson township 52.15 

Johnson township 61.10 

Laughery township 52.00 

Otter Creek township 81.00 

Washington township 17.30 

Franklin township 48.25 

Shelby township 8.50 

Total $496.05 



86 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

One hundred thousand dollars was assigned to Indiana. Five 
hundred and seventy-five dollars was given as Ripley county's quota. 
The figures will show we need not be too proud of our record here, as 
we did not reach the quota. 

Mrs. Ruoff resigned from the chairmanship of the work in the 
spring of 1918 and Mrs. A. V. Harding was appointed to succeed her. 
Mrs. Harding distributed a large amount of educational matter through- 
out the county, but, owing to the large number of other collections, 
meetings, etc., with the final epidemic of influenza, checking all work, 
no other drive was initiated by the Y. W. C. A. until the spring of 1919. 

At this time Mrs. E. H. Woodfill of Greensburg was made district 
chairman of the group of counties surrounding Decatur. She ap- 
pointed Mrs. Tora McCallum and Mrs. Minnie E. Wycoff of Bates- 
ville as a committee to carry on the new drive for funds in Ripley 
county. The assessment was for $221.00. Mesdames Wycoff and 
McCallum, having too many duties already, asked Mrs. Luella Bilby 
of Osgood to take up the work for the county. The Salvation Army 
drive was on at the time, and for various causes Mrs. Bilby was unable 
to launch any campaign, and the district chairman, finding the same 
difficulties in other parts of the territory, suspended the request and the 
fund was never raised. 

The purpose of the Y. W. C. A. fund was to look after the welfare 
of Red Cross nurses, laundresses, operators, and other women workers 
about the military camps, and that of the women workers in munition 
and other war work plants. Also to keep up Base Hospital Y. W- C. A. 
huts in the war zone for nurses, and to look after destitute women and 
children of the war stricken regions. 

Hostess houses were built at the different cantonments where 
soldiers could receive and entertain their visitors. These houses were 
built on the general army plan, with a large reception room or parlor, 
dining rooms and upstairs bedrooms. A piano and other musical instru- 
ments, books and magazines and games were supplied. Here the 
mothers, wives and sweethearts of the men in service could meet their 
soldiers in the atmosphere of home. They proved to be a source of 
much real good in many ways. 



Library War Service 



When the United States was drawn into the "world conflict", and 
our Government was busy building ships, aeroplanes, weapons and 
ammunition, and men were being trained at the cantonments, it was 
realized that something more was needed to make our soldiers efficient 
fighters. 

"The morale of the Army is the hidden force which uses the 
weapons of war to the best advantage and nothing is more important in 
keeping up the morale than a supply of really good reading for the men 
in their hours of enforced inactivity." — Henry Van Dyke. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 87 

It was realized that it was as important to supply our men with 
suitable recreation and diversion in lonely moments, and to give them 
intellectual and moral stimulus as well as physical training. 

In order to supply this need every librarian was called upon to 
collect books, and to see that a portion of the library funds be turned in 
for use in establishing camp libraries for our soldiers. Batesville had a 
library organization (for the purpose of establishing a library) but no 
funds. So the people were asked to donate books — books they had 
read — books of their own library, also magazines. A goodly supply of 
magazines came in, and these were immediately sent on by mail. The 
book drive was not very successful and resulted in but a half dozen 
books. 

While the book collection was a help, it was soon found that to 
establish the libraries, and put in a supply of books, money was needed. 
The Government asked the American Library Association to assume 
responsibility' and a million dollar library war fund drive was launched 
September 24-29, 1917. Of this, Indiana was asked to supply $125,000, 
and Batesville's quota was $105. Committees were appointed in the 
various churches to aid in this work. Every dollar donation was a book 
plate donation — which meant that every one that gave one or more 
dollars would be given book plates on which their name and address was 
written. Plates were pasted in the books, which made the books more 
like personal messages from folks back home. 

This collection amounted to $130 in a short time. This drive was 
followed by what may be termed a continuous book drive, for it was 
necessary to replenish the libraries, for besides the many new men that 
were continually streaming into the service, there were wounded men 
that needed books next to surgical care and nursing. So more books 
were collected, and in May, 1919, twenty-one books were sent to New 
York. These, no doubt, found their way to hospitals, where there were 
so many convalescing soldiers. 

Sophia C. Nickel, Librarian, 

Batesville High School Library. 

OSGOOD CARNEGIE LIBRARY REPORT 

The librarian at Osgood, Mrs. Clara B. Jones, distributed in Os- 
good and vicinity one thousand two hundred and fifty leaflets on "Food 
Conservation" at the beginning of the war work in 1917. 

When the call for books for the soldiers' libraries came from the 
state two hundred and twenty-five books were donated. 

Ten dollars was given to the soldiers' library fund at a later date. 

The assembly room was open at any and all times for the use of 
war workers. It was used for thirty-six public meetings by the Red 
Cross, War Mothers, Liberty Loan committees and so on. The library 
was made the central meeting and distributing point for all war activi- 
ties of Osgood and Center township and also for many of the county 
meetings not held at the county seat at Versailles. 



Fuel Administration in Ripley County 

H. J. Walsman 

Owing to the shortage of coal occasioned by the extraordinary de- 
mands of all industries, the demand of all shipping, both by land and 
sea, and the drain on the working forces of the mines caused by the 
miners either volunteering or being conscripted into the military service, 
this country in the spring and summer of 1917 came face to face with a 
fuel problem such as had never been thought or dreamed of before. 

A tendency on the part of the coal producers to advance prices during 
the spring and summer caused the Government to create and set in 
motion a piece of machinery known as the Federal Fuel Administration, 
whose office should be to control the production, distribution and price 
of coal and coal products used for fuel. 

During the time this machinery was being created, the public was 
repeatedly advised through the public press not to buy coal at the prices 
prevailing, as the prices would be lower as soon as the distribution would 
pass under the control of the Government. Acting upon this advice, 
consumers who ordinarily bought and stored their winter's supply of 
coal during the months of spring and summer, made no attempt to 
secure coal, and the distributors and producers, not knowing what the 
attitude of the Fuel Administration would be as to price and manner 
of distribution, made no provision for an accumulation to take care of 
the demand which of necessity would come in the fall and winter. 

The months of the summer of 1917 passed by with possibly only ten 
per cent of the usual number of conumers supplied with coal ; fall came 
on and still the uncertainty of the fuel problem remained. Such con- 
sumers as in desperation were willing and anxious to secure coal at any 
price during the months of September and October could not be supplied 
ow T ing to the fact that distributors and producers had no stocks on hand 
and the demand on the mines and transportation by the war depart- 
ment prevented coal coming into the dealers' hands in any but very 
limited quantities. 

By October 20, the Fuel Administration machinery had reached such 
a stage that a national administrator in the person of Dr. H. A. Gar- 
field had been selected and appointed. Each state was to select a state 
fuel administrator, and for some reason there was considerable delay 
in the selection of the administrator for this state ; but, finally, the ap- 
pointment of Evans Woollen, a banker of Indianapolis, was announced, 
and later events proved that no better selection could have been made. 
Each county was to have its county fuel administrator, who was to bo 
recommended to the state administrator by the County Council of 
Defense and the business organizations of such county. The selection 
and appointment of H. J. Walsman, of Batesville, as the administrator 
for Ripley county was made on November 1, thus completing the 
machinery for this county. 

(88) 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 89 

The Federal fuel administrator most wisely laid down very few 
fixed rules governing the state and county administrators, and in this 
state no ironclad rules whatever were made by the state administrator, 
but rather, in conferences called for the purpose, he consulted with the 
county administrators as to their ideas in handling matters pertaining 
to the state as a whole, and put it up entirely to the county adminis- 
trator to handle the affairs of his particular county. This proved to be 
a most effective way in disposing of some matters which might have 
proven rather preplexing had they been handled otherwise. 

Scarcely had the county fuel administrators been appointed, and 
before they had an opportunity to familiarize themselves with their 
duties, the rigors of winter set in and the cry for fuel became most 
urgent. Most of the dealers in the county were out of coal and now 
the arduous duties of the county administrators began. Application 
blanks, guarantee bonds, and such other printed matter as was neces- 
sary was furnished and immediately placed into service and the limited 
quantity of coal allotted to the Fuel Administration by the Government 
began to be distributed on orders approved by the county administrators. 

About December 1, winter set in in earnest with a heavy snow that 
did not entirely melt away for nine weeks. During the entire month 
of December the thermometer ranged considerably below normal and 
with the beginning of the new year matters grew more serious, and 
the climax was reached on January 12, 1918, when, after several days 
of heavy snowfall, the thermometer dropped to a record-breaking level, 
in some instances as low as twenty-five to thirty degrees below zero. Sat- 
urday, January 13, will go down in history as the coldest and most dis- 
agreeable day experienced in many years; the high winds, prevailing all 
night of the 12th and continuing all day of the 13th, drove the light 
snow into every crack and crevice, thus adding to the discomfort of those 
who were unfortunate enough to be out of fuel. 

The towns and villages in the lower end of the county were more 
fortunate than those in the northern part, owing to the diligence of 
the dealers in securing coal through the offices of the county fuel ad- 
ministrator wherever it %vas possible and also on account of being able 
to secure more wood for fuel. Batesville, with a larger population and 
practically no wood to rely on, reached a very critical stage several 
times. Fortunately, the public and parochial schools had early in the 
season filled their coal bins, and these were called upon by the county 
fuel administrator a number of times to supply families who were 
entirely out of fuel. This coal was furnished in hundred-pound lots 
only to those who had secured permit cards from the fuel administrator. 
Owing to Oldenburg's close proximity to Batesville, the people of that 
community naturally looked to the Ripley county administrator for help 
in their time of distress. Through the generosity of some of the manu- 
factories and the general spirit of unselfishness in the hearts of all the 
people, Oldenburg was helped and the heating plant of the academy 
was kept from freezing and the school enabled to continue without 
interruption. In many cities and towns of the state the schools and 



90 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

churches were compelled to close for several weeks on account of not 
being able to secure fuel ; but in every instance where the aid of the 
county fuel administrator was sought, ample fuel was provided, so no 
school or church in Ripley county was compelled to close on that 
account. 

The conservation of every pound of coal became so essential through- 
out the country that an order was issued by the Federal fuel adminis- 
trator calling for lightless nights and heatless days. This order applied 
to all manufacturing plants not engaged in making war materials or 
foods as well as to all mercantile establishments, stores and offices. It 
is estimated that millions of tons of coal were saved by the elimination 
of the electrical advertising displays and the excessive lighting and heat- 
ing of business houses in the large cities and the closing of business 
houses of all kinds on Sunday and Monday for a period covering about 
a month. The saving was not so material in Ripley county since the 
fuel consumed in generating electricity for advertising purposes was a 
very small matter, but the business people of the entire county entered 
into the spirit most heartily, and almost without exception conformed to 
the ruling without pressure being brought to bear. To further assist 
in conserving fuel, the churches in several of our cities and towns volun- 
tarily united their services, thus eliminating the necessity of heating the 
individual churches. 

During the period of excessive snows and unusually cold weather, 
the fuel administrators in nearly all counties were extremely busy, and 
in most counties gave their entire time looking after the fuel problems 
by correspondence, telephone, automobile and afoot. Despite the most 
desperate conditions ever prevailing along this line, there is no record 
of any life being lost directly as a result of not having fuel. 

Osgood, Holton, Pierceville and Milan, on the Baltimore and Ohio 
Southwestern Railroad, were most fortunate in having men as dealers 
who co-operated most heartily with the county administrator, and 
through their very conservative distribution of the coal secured for them 
by the county administrator, were able to assist a number of inland 
villages. Sunman dealers were kept reasonably well supplied with coal 
by the fuel administrator and at no time was there any real shortage. 
Morris, unfortunately, not having a regular dealer who was familiar 
with the workings of the fuel administration, experienced a fuel short- 
age, compelling the closing of her schools for about three weeks. Within 
twenty-four hours after this condition was reported to the county fuel 
administrator, a car of coal was placed on the tracks at Morris and 
was being unloaded. 

Batesville, the largest city in the county, presented a more perplex- 
ing problem and the most difficult to handle. Owing to the very limited 
amount of coal available for distribution, the county administrator issued 
an order that no family be supplied with more than one thousand pounds 
of coal at one time, and under no condition should coal be unloaded 
where a supply of approximately one thousand pounds was in the bin 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



91 



of the consumer asking for coal. This worked a hardship on the dealer, 
but proved to be a most equitable way of distribution, since it placed the 
poorest family on an equal footing with the wealthiest in securing fuel, 
and, since the prices were fixed over the county, there was little oppor- 
tunity for grafting had the inclination been there. 

February brought relief when the weather moderated somewhat, 
the deep snows gradually melted, shipping became easier, the mines were 
able to produce more coal and the coal famine of the winter of 1917 and 
1918 became history, never to be forgotten by those who passed through 
it. 

The demand for gasoline, owing to the increasing number of air- 
planes, tanks and army trucks, caused the Federal fuel administrator to 
issue an order prohibiting the use of automobiles on Sundays for a 
period of about six weeks during the summer of 1918. This order 
seemed to work a greater hardship on the people of this county than 
any issued heretofore, and the old horse and shay were again brought 
into prominence. 

The machinery of the Fuel Administration was kept intact until 
February 28, 1919, when the state and county administrators were 
released from their duties, and although this service did not call for the 
donning of the khaki or any other uniform, it was considered as one of 
the important factors in winning the World War. 




Batesville Liberty Guards, 2nd Prov. Co. 



Liberty Guards 

A. B. Wycoff 

Jn every country and at all times, the strong arm of the law on 
which governments rely as the last resort to enforce their mandates and 
to guard the rights of citizens, has ever been armed force, and this is 
as true in democratic America as it has been in the autocratic govern- 
ments of the world. The President of the United States has always had 
at his command the army and navy, and he is by virtue of his office, 
the commander in chief of these forces. Each state likewise maintains 
a state militia of armed forces which serves as the strong right arm of 
the state governments, under direction of the governors of the states, 
enforcing obedience to the law, and safeguarding law and property 
wherever and whenever local officers are unable to do so. 

Soon after the World War began, the state militia of Indiana 
as a part of the National Guard, came under command of officers of 
the Federal Army, and were utilized for guard duty and other services 
where industries or property or lines of transportation were in danger, 
and also along the Mexican border, and later on the National Guard 
was made a part of the Federal Army. It was no uncommon sight 
as one went about the country near railroad bridges or industrial con- 
cerns, to see members of the National Guard doing guard duty, and the 
State of Indiana, like other states, found herself without a state militia 
or other armed force to afford protection to life and property within the 
state after August, 1917. 

As a part of the great system of National, State and County De- 
fense, the governors of the several states requested that there be or- 
ganized and framed in each community military companies to be known 
as the Liberty Guards, who should be subject to the call of the governor 
for military service within the boundaries of their respective states only. 

The County Council of Defense named A. B. Wycoff as the county 
organizer of Liberty Guards in Ripley county and the first organiza- 
tion meeting was called by him in Batesville on the 26th day of Novem- 
ber, 1917, for the purpose of organizing a company to consist of not 
less than fifty men with three officers. Men between the ages of eighteen 
and forty-five years were eligible for enlistment as Liberty Guards. At 
this organization meeting thirty-six men of eligible age enrolled. A 
second meeting was called on the following Monday evening, Decem- 
ber 3, 1917, to perfect the organization and complete the quota of the 
company. The meeting was an enthusiastic one, a number of business 
men of Batesville being present, who, though they were too old for en- 
listment, assisted the county organizer very materially by their presence 
and their encouragement. At this meeting the enrollment was in- 
creased to sixty members. The choice of officers consisting of a captain 
and first and second lieutenants, was left to the company. Allen Sykes, 
who had served in the Spanish-American War, was unanimously elected 
captain and Harry Pohlman and Oscar Gonder, each of whom had 

(92) 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 93 

served in the navy, were chosen as first and second lieutenants, re- 
spectively. Captain Sykes then took charge of his company and gave 
the boys a practical talk on Military Discipline and Army Regulations, 
following which the company was given a preliminary drill. The numer- 
ical strength of the company was gradually increased until in a short 
time it numbered ninety recruits. 

During the winter season that followed, the Fair Grounds Hall 
was secured as a place for drill, and as often as twice each week during 
the severest of weather of that winter, Captain Sykes marched his com- 
pany to the drill hall for instructions and drill in the manual of arms. 

The regulation muster roll and oath to be subscribed to by the mem- 
bers of the company was not procured by the county organizer until 
about the first of January, 1918; and on January 4, 1918, at a regular 
drill meeting, Captain Sykes requested the members of his company to 
sign the muster roll. Every member of his company stepped forward 
and signed his name, and on that date the oath prescribed for the 
Liberty Guards was administered to the entire company. The muster 
roll was filed with the chairman of the military section of the State 
Council of Defense and upon its receipt Batesville, having organized and 
filed with the State Council of Defense the second muster roll of Liberty 
Guards in the State of Indiana the Batesville company was designated 
as Second Provisional Company of Liberty Guards, and thereby became 
a part of Indiana's state organization for defense. 

Captain Sykes appointed as first sergeant Harlan Hoffman, and 
as sergeants, Adam Fehlinger, Neil McCallum and Alvadore Beck. 
On January 14th corporals were appointed as follows: Roy Bauman, 
John Wintz, Herman Heidt, Philmer Ward, Grover Martin, Russel 
Downey and Anthony Blank, thus making a complete quota of corporals. 
On February 25, 1918, the members of the company, under the direc- 
tion of Captain Sykes, held a business session at the city hall, at which 
time by-laws were adopted and a council of administration, consisting 
of Lieutenant Harry Pohlman, Sergeant Neil McCallum and Corporals 
Joseph Wintz, Russel Downey and Harry Sitterding, as treasurer, and 
Joseph Wintz, as secretary, was appointed. 

By the diligent efforts of the Council of Administration the Bates- 
ville company of Liberty Guards procured sufficient funds through con- 
tributions from public-spirited citizens to purchase uniforms for the 
entire company at a cost of approximately one thousand dollars. To 
make their uniforms complete, it was necessary that they have leggings. 
Suitable material for these were purchased and the women of Bates- 
ville met in their Red Cross sewing rooms, where they labored so un- 
tiringly during the entire period of the war to carry on their part in 
making the world safe for Democracy, and night after night, during the 
first week of April, 1918, they worked away until the bolts of cloth 
provided them were converted into ninety excellent pairs of leggings. 

On April 6, 1918, when Batesville launched its Third Liberty Loan 
campaign, the Batesville Liberty Guards appeared for the first time in 
full uniform, and as they marched along the streets under a beautiful 



94 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

silk flag, presented to the company by Mrs. Margaret Hillenbrand, 
they showed the excellent results of the efforts of Captain Sykes and 
his faithful guards in the progress they had made in preparation for 
any emergency that might arise at any time where trained men would 
be needed. 

On Sunday, May 12, 1918, the Liberty Guards went as a unit to 
Sunman to participate in a memorial service for Corporal Kenneth 
Diver, who had been killed in action in France, the guards firing a 
military salute and sounding taps as a part of the memorial service. On 
May 21, a firing squad and bugler from the company, under command 
of Corporal Joseph Wintz, went to New Marion, by request, to 
participate in the funeral service of Private Edward Hudson, who had 
died of pneumonia at Camp Sevier, South Carolina. 

It may be explained here that the governor of Indiana had issued a 
request that no soldier be buried in the state of Indiana without military 
honors, and where other soldiers were unavailable for that purpose, the 
Liberty Guards were asked to take part in funeral services. 

On Sunday, May 19, the Batesville Guards went to Versailles to 
attend an out-door Red Cross mass meeting. An exhibition drill was 
given on the streets of Versailles, and on their return home, on the 
streets of Osgood. An enthusiastic welcome was given them at both 
places. Here again the company's Council of Administration with its 
eye ever on the company's business interests, turned to account the 
cordial greeting that was given them by taking up a collection, the 
liberal contributions received being applied on indebtedness incurred for 
uniforms and equipment. 

Memorial Day is from its very nature a day of memories, but on 
May 30, 1918, people realized, as they had perhaps never done before, 
the full significance of what that day meant, and the people from 
Batesville and elsewhere throughout the country, turned out en masse to 
do honor to their country's dead. The Liberty Guards took part in 
the ceremonies of the day, giving exhibition drills on the streets and 
acting as an escort for the Civil War veterans to St. Clair's Hall, where 
memorial services were held. 

On June 6, 1918, Captain Sykes, with County Oragnizer A. B. 
Wycoff and Sergeant Niel McCallum, attended a meeting at the court- 
house at Versailles for the purpose of effecting an organization of a 
company there. At that meeting a number of Versailles business men 
and county officers were present and assisted in perfecting the organiza- 
tion. At that meeting thirty-two men of eligible ages signed the muster 
roll. Officers elected were as follows : Carroll Schwier, captain ; Floyd 
Marsh, first lieutenant; Fay E. Winsor, second lieutenant. Here 
again Captain Sykes gave the new company a wholesome talk on the 
subject of military discipline and methods to be followed in training 
the company. With due justice to the company that was organized at 
Versailles it might be said that it was a more difficult problem than at 
Batesville, for the reason that there was an insufficient number of men 
of eligible age in close proximity to Versailles to form a complete com- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 



95 



pany. Efforts were made to organize small units throughout the county 
in the hope that these units might unite in forming a complete company 
at a centrally-located point. But, on account of the immense amount of 
work that was confronting everyone in the rural districts, little progress 
was made in that direction, the unit formed at Versailles being the only 
one in the county other than at Batesville. 

The following oath of service for Liberty Guards was signed by all 
recruits : 

"The subscribers hereto, each one for himself, swears to bear true 
faith and allegiance to the United States of America and to the State 
of Indiana; to serve the said state against all of her enemies and to obey 
the orders of -the Governor of the State of Indiana or those whom he 
may delegate with authority, and to abide by such rules and regulations 
as he may prescribe for the government of the said Liberty Guards, for 
and during the time of the war with the Central Empires." 



MUSTER ROLL OF BATESVILLE LIBERTY GUARDS 



Allen L. Sykes, Captain 

Harry Pohlman, First Lieutenant 

Oscar Gonder, Second Lieutenant 

Harlan Hoffman, First Sergeant 

Adam Fehlinger, Sergeant 

Neil McCallum, Sergeant 

Alvadore Beck, Sergeant 

Roy Bauman, Corporal 

Joseph Wintz, Corporal 



Herman Heidt, Corporal 
Philmer Ward, Corporal 
Grover Martin, Corporal 
Russell Downey, Corporal 
Anthony Blank, Corporal 
Walter Boese, Corporal 
Alvin Johnson, Musician 
William Parsons, Musician 



Francis Blank 
George Bloemer 
George Wernke 
Edward Wernke 
David Wheeldon 
Byron Winsor 
George Wintz 
Monroe Wonning 
Paul Wycoff 
Cecil Castor 
Max Gibson 
Albert Wagner 
Albert Bischea 
John Romweber 
Elton Kramer 
Carl Fischer 
Herschel Dickey 
Raymond Fehlinger 
Michael Benz, Jr. 



PRIVATES 

Wilbur Fruchtnicht 
Edward Fritsch 
Charles Gauck 
Richard Gehrich 
Elmer Gibson 
Clarence Greeman 
Charles Green 
Clarence Heidt 
Elmer Heidt 
Albert Huffmeier 
Elmer Huneke 
John Kirschbaum 
Earl Kleiner 
Henry Kleiner 
Harry Kreusman 
Richard Lightner 
Dr. Albert T. Nutter 
Joseph W. Oswald 
Charles Shook 



Glenn Lutes 
Harold Schlicht 
Walter Mapel 
Arthur Smith 
Melson Wachsman 
Leon Pohlman 
John Sitzman 
Orval Rayner 
Clarence Moody 
Irvin Fichtner 
Roy Hart 
Emil Siebert . 
Carl Stockman 
Wilbur Schwier 
Charles Wesler 
Gusta Holowadel 
Jesse Moody 
Wilbur Kyle 
Earl Mapel 



96 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Edward Kreuzman 
William Wernke 
William Brummer 
William Burst 
Joseph Burst 
Louis Cook 
Arthur Cramer 
Stanley Dietz 
Ed Drinkuth 
Ed Fecher 
Daniel Foley 
Roy Freeland 



Fred Shane 
Christ. Smith 
Florantine Weigel 
Albert Weisenbach 
Joseph Lindenmaier 
Francis Fischer 
Walton Sidell 
Clarence Meyer 
Oscar Yorn 
Chester Robinson 
Walter Freeland 
Clarence Heitz 



George C. Oilier 

Edward Reverman 

Everett Schein 

Harry Sitterding 

Charles Stott 

William Barnhorst, 
Honorary 

Peter Holzer, Hon- 
orary 

Clarence H. Andres, 
Honorary 



The history of the Versailles Liberty Guards has two distinct phases. 
As noted in the first paragraph of Ripley county's war activity, the 
preparedness meeting at Versailles, on March 26, 1917, appointed 
Friday evening of the same week as a date on which to organize a 
company for military drill. Mr. Hale Bradt, of the Indiana Y. M. 
C. A., who had taken military training at the University of Nebraska, 
was appointed drill-master and worked hard to teach the rudiments of 
soldiering to the boys and young men who enrolled promptly. Mr. 
Bradt's services with the Versailles Home Guards, as they were called 
at this time, ended with the close of the current term of the Versailles 
High School, of which he was one of the instructors. Mr. Bradt offered 
his services to the army, but being debarred from military duty because 
of his age, was later accepted as a Y. M. C. A. secretary, and after a 
tew months' training was sent overseas, where he served for thirteen 
months, iirst with the Second Division for a vtcrt time, then with the 
I'ourth Division, 




Liberty Guard Officers. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV A R 97 

Frank N. Marsh of Versailles did his best to keep the Home Guards 
together after Mr. Bradt's departure. Many of the men who had been 
drilling volunteered or were called into the army in a short time, how- 
ever, so that this first phase was virtually ended. 

With the organization throughout the state of the Liberty Guards 
to take the place of the National Guard troops sworn into the Federal 
service on August 1, 1917, Mr. Marsh saw an opportunity to renew the 
Versailles organization. He was commissioned by E. M. Wilson, state 
chairman, and later by A. B. Wycoff, county organizer, to recruit a 
company at Versailles and the neighboring towns. This work was begun 
in the winter of 1917-18 and culminated in the organization of the 
Versailles unit on June 6, 1918. 

Mr. Marsh's appended report covers the main points in the story of 
the Versailles Guards. 

"The W r orld War was on and seemed to be getting nearer and 
nearer every day, and our county, like most of our country, was without 
protection, and when the people realized this they began to get busy. 
The Government had already issued a call for one hundred thousand 
men foi the first line of defense; eight hundred of this number to enlist 
for the navy, and one thousand for the army from Indiana. 

"William E. Huntington of Osgood was notified by Secretary of 
War Baker to go on and recruit a company of one hundred and Mty 
men for the infantry from Ripley county. 

"Guards were sent from the Third Ohio Volunteers to guard the 
bridges on the Baltimore and Ohio Railway, east of Osgood, and west 
uf Holton. By this time love of country was soaring high and Old 
Glory foated on every breeze. 

"On March 26, 1917, a meeting was held at the courthouse in 
Versailles to organize for defense. A committee of public safety was 
appointed, and Friday, March 29, was set for an organization meeting 
and military drill. 

"About thirty young men joined the company and began drilling 
under Prof. Hale Bradt. All able-bodied men of military age were 
invited to join, and many did. It was arranged that Tuesday and 
Friday nights be used for drill, meetings to be held in the courthouse, 
and for a short time the company was strong and well drilled, but many 
left us for the camps. Then Governor Goodrich issued a call for two 
hundred Liberty Guard companies in Indiana, and E. M. Wilson, state 
chairman military section, asked Frank N. Marsh to secure fifty or more 
names, and he, under the direction of A. B. Wycoff, county organizer for 
the Liberty Guards, organized a company at Versailles, on June 6, 1918, 
under the leadership of Captain Carroll Schwier. They made a good 
company, but owing to the draft robbing us of our men, we were nevei 
assigned to a regiment and were never disorganized. We are still 
'touching elbows and holding up the flag' so far as any official action 
has been taken." 



98 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



MUSTER ROLL OF VERSAILLES GUARDS 



Floyd Marsh, First Lieutenant 
Clarence Stevens, Sergeant 



lay Winsor. Second Lieutenant 
Carroll Schweir, Captain 



Harry Ricketts 
Morris Stevens 
Charles Hyatt 
Virgil Robert* 
Denver Harper 
John DeBurger 
Frank Strubbe 
Frank Spencer 
William Young 
Romuald Beckett 
George L. Schweir 



PRIVATES 

John Hehe 
Delza Adkins 
Walter H. Smith 
Leonard Eads 
Leonard Jackson 
Arthur Eulett 
Frank Marsh 
Omer Dobson 
John Lane 
Guy Marsh 
Charles Curran 



Nan Stevens 
Porter Harper 
Russell Warum 
Harry Thompson 
Russell Ballman 
Earl Young 
Edward Ballman 
Otto Talbot 
Floyd Raney 
Wilbur Bradt 
Ben Licking 



Liberty Girls 

Mrs. Neil McCallum 

With the boys of draft age practically all in the Army or Navy, the 
young girls of the city of Batesville were having rather a lonely time of 
it and with the organization of the Liberty Guards in the city, the spare 
time of the remaining few boys was taken up with drilling, so the 
girls were at a loss as to what to do for recreation. 

Finally, when it became known that the Liberty Guards were to 
give exhibition drills at the Osgood Fair in July, of 1918, sixteen girls, 
or two squads, decided that they would try their hand at drilling with 
the guards, and if they made any progress, they would accompany the 
guards to the Fair. 

The sixteen girls were: Florence Krieger, Flora Goyert, Esther 
Goyert, Martha Goyert, Elnora Burst, Elnora Oilier, Hilda Bauman, 
Agnes Gringle, Audrey Samms, Alleen Samms, Ezraetta Holzer, 
Geneva Weigel, Verna Severinghaus, Helen Buchanan, Norma Schlicht 
and Cleona Gauck. 

On Thursday evening, June 11, they held a preliminary drill, and 
so apt were they to learn, and so prompt to obey commands, that they 
were asked to lead the guards in the parade, and by diligent application 
they were considered by the guards as sufficiently well-trained to take 
part in the exhibition drill at the Fair. 

Appearing in full uniform, khaki in color, they made a fine showing 
and were the center of attraction all day at the Fair. They began their 
service for Uncle Sam by taking up a collection to buy regulation 
uniforms for the guards. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 99 

Encouraged by their success at the Fair, the sixteen girls inspired 
more girls, to the end that on the evening of July 30, 1918, a meeting 
was held at the city hall for the purpose of perfecting an organization. 

Twenty-two girls responded to the call for a meeting, and they 
formulated their organization along the lines of the Liberty Guards — 
electing officers and a council of administration. An exciting contest, in 
friendly spirit, ensued for the office of captain, the candidates being Miss 
Florence Krieger and Miss Flora Goyert. The first ballot resulted in 
a tie vote. Four guards present were called upon to decide the contest, 
their votes also showing a tie. So a penny was tossed, Miss Krieger 
winning and receiving the rank of captain, Miss Flora Goyert, first 
lieutenant, and Miss Hilda Bauman, second lieutenant. 

The council of administration consisted of the Misses Elnora Oilier, 
Elnora Burst, Esther Goyert, Geneva Weigel, and Cleona Gauck, who 
attended to the business affairs of the company. 

A monthly dues of ten cents was taken, and a fine for the same 
amount for absence from weekly drill was assessed. 

Captain Sykes, of the Liberty Guards, appointed three members of 
the guards to drill the girls, and thus began the career of the organiza- 
tion known as the Batesville Liberty Girls. They drilled faithfully and 
persistently ; all purchased their own khaki uniforms and made a fine 
appearance on dress parade. 

On September 21, 1918, they gave a dance for the benefit of the 
Red Cross, also giving an exhibition drill on that occasion, which was 
greatly appreciated. A large crowd was present, and the girls were 
pleased to be able to turn over to the Red Cross, $115.00 for their 
efforts. 

On September 28 a monstrous patriotic celebration was held at 
Versailles, and both the Liberty Guards and Liberty Girls were on the 
program for exhibition drills. The girls acquitted themselves in a 
splendid manner, drilling under the command of their own officers, and 
many were the compliments heard from the large crowd that witnessed 
the exhibition. 

Thirty-eight girls in all were members of the organization: 
Captain, Florence Krieger; First Lieutenant, Flora Goyert; Second 
Lieutenant, Hilda Bauman; Elnora Burst, Helen Buchanan, Cecelia 
Becker, Margaret Bettice, Viola Behlmer, Henrietta Bohnert, Catharine 
Daniels, Clara Fisher, Rose Firsich, Cleona Gauck, Agnes Gringle, 
Esther Goyert, Martha Goyert, Mildred Goyert, Ezraetta Holzer, 
Stella Kaiser, Marie Kaiser, Johanna Luesse, Marie Luesse, Edna 
Lambert, Elnora Oilier, Bertha Richter, Audrey Samms, Alleen Samms, 
Camilla Sitzman, Norma Schlicht, Lorena Wagner, Philomena Weigel, 
Geneva Weigel, Elsie Kessens, Adeline Thiel, Emma Thiel, Pearl 
Bohnert, Eva Karl and Verna Severinghaus. 

The girls were thoroughly organized, not only for the pleasure they 
obtained through drilling, but for whatever assistance they might render 




1. Mrs. Flora Sparling, War Mother. 2. Mrs. Luella Bilby, W. M. Scriptor. 3. Mrs. Emma 
Connelley, W. M. Treasurer. 4. Mrs. Ida Wager, W. M. Registrar. 5. Mrs. Mary Wagner, W. M. 
Auditor. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 101 

in any way towards furthering the interests of the various local or- 
ganizations in winning the war. But before they had the opportunity 
to make their organization accomplish their purpose, the armistice 
was signed on November 11, 1918, and the Liberty Girls were only 
too glad to doff their khaki uniforms and make preparations to welcome 
home the gallant sons, whose absence meant so much to them, for 
friends, neighbors, brothers and sweethearts were included in the list 
of absent ones. 



War Mothers 

The War Mothers of Ripley county were organized by Mrs. Flora 
Sparling of Osgood, who was appointed by the State Council of Defense 
as the county war mother. Mrs. Sparling received her instructions and 
a copy of the constitution and by-laws of the society from Mrs. Alice 
French of Indianapolis, state war mother, and who was later elected 
national war mother. 

The organization meeting was held at the Public Library in Osgood, 
June 8, 1918. The War Mother's Council officers were elected as 
follows: War mother, Mrs. Flora Sparling, Osgood; scriptor, Mrs. 
Luella Bilby, Osgood; registrar, Mrs. Ida Wager, Osgood; historian, 
Mrs. Minnie E. Wycoff, Batesville; treasurer, Mrs. James H. Con- 
nelley, Milan; auditor, Mrs. May V. Wagner, Osgood. At the Holton 
meeting in October, these officers were all re-elected for 1919. 

The purposes of the organization were explained by Mrs. Sparling 
as follows : The encouragement of f raternalism among the mothers of 
the soldiers and sailors of America in the World War ; co-operation 
with all war-work organizations, such as the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., 
K. of C, and so on ; also, the collection and preservation of historical 
material. 

The model program adopted for all meetings of the War Mothers 
was used at this first, as at all subsequent meetings, of both county and 
township councils. The meetings were opened by the singing of 
"America", a prayer and a scripture reading. A literary and musical 
program of patriotic sentiment followed, with special talks and discus- 
sions on the work of the War Mothers, and were closed by repeating the 
Lord's Prayer in concert, or occasionally by singing the "Star Spangled 
Banner." Always by singing the new stanza of "America" as part of the 
closing. 

Councils were organized in each township under the direction of 
the County War Mothers' Council. Mrs. Lily Hicks, Napoleon, was 
appointed war mother of Jackson township; Mrs. Hattie Copeland, 
of Cross Plains, of Brown township; Mrs. Philip Seelinger, Holton, 
of Otter Creek township; Mrs. Perry Brown, New Marion, of Shelby 
township; Mrs. H. H. Gookins, Osgood, R. F. D., of Delaware town- 
ship; Mrs. James H. Connelley, Milan, of Franklin township; Mrs. 
Clara Powell, Sunman, of Adams township; Mrs. Charles Curran, 



102 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Versailles, of Johnson township; Mrs. E. E. Taylor, Batesville, of 
Laughen' township; Mrs. J. H. Noyes, Osgood, of Center township; 
and Mrs. Rose Konkle, Elrod, of Washington township. 

Practically all the mothers of Ripley county service men were 
enrolled in the eleven councils. Meetings were held monthly in both 
county and township councils. 

The second county meeting was held at Sunman on July 12, 1918. 
The third, at Versailles, on August 3d. The fourth was at Holton, on 
September 30, and proved to be the last general meeting during the 
war as the "flu" ban was pronounced the following week by the Indiana 
health authorities, closing all public meetings of even' kind. This was 
not lifted until in December, by which time the signing of the armistice, 
the ravages of the epidemic, and the inclement winter weather prevented 
any thought of county gatherings. 

A county meeting of the War Mothers was called at the Osgood 
Public Library on Lincoln's birthday, February 12, 1919. Mrs. 
Elizabeth Carr, state war mother, of Indianapolis, explained the plan 
of financing the histories of the World War that the War Mothers 
were planning to publish. The scheme was to purchase a printing 
establishment on the co-operative plan, and by doing all printing for 
the organization, to become self-supporting. The shares were to be 
sold in all counties throughout the state so as to distribute the initial 
expense. It was hoped that the sale of the histories would enable the 
association to clear off all debts and perhaps pay sufficient dividends to 
balance the interest on the money invested. A committee from Ripley 
county was sent to Indianapolis later to investigate the stability of the 
plans before undertaking any sales in the county. It promised well, but 
perhaps because of parallel organization through the State Council of 
Defense of historical committees in each county for the collection and 
preservation of historical material, the War Mothers' plan was finally 
abandoned. 

Mrs. Minnie E. Wycoff, as county war mother historian, was 
appointed by the Council of Defense as chairman of the county war 
history committee to collect the historical material and compile the 
county history. The county historians were also requested by the State 
Historical Commission at Indianapolis to send copies of all material 
collected in the county to the state committee. 

This appointment was made in February in connection with the 
organization of the members of the Council of Defense into county 
historical commissions. Since the War Mother historians had already 
been appointed in the various townships they were asked to assist in 
collecting the service records of the soldiers and sailors. This proved 
an arduous task. The list of names had never been accurately worked 
out. The draft board had a list of selective men, but the volunteers, 
regulars and sailors could only be learned by a house-to-house canvass. 

Mrs. Lurenia Robinson of Sunman worked on the records of the 
service men in Adams township. She was most nobly assisted by Mrs. 
Alma Lang of Morris, who completed the work at that place. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 103 

Mrs. May Wagner, as Center township historian, was asked by 
Mrs. Sparling to also turn in the general report and biographies of the 
war mother county officers. 

Mrs. Jennie Overturf of Holton was historian for Otter Creek 
township; Mrs. May Koechlin of Delaware for Delaware township; 
Mrs. H. G. Bergdoll of Milan for Franklin township, and Mrs. 
Anthony Meyers, Versailles, R. 3, was war historian of Shelby township. 
The other five townships having failed to continue their meetings 
through the winter, were unable to help in the work. The county his- 
torian received the service record blanks from the State Historical 
Commission and the work was begun in March of 1919, the township 
historians turning their work over to the county historians on September 
1. No single township was completed at this date, and the work had 
proved very difficult in some localities. One chief difficulty was in the 
circumstance that so many men on being discharged went to various 
places for employment and could be reached only by mail. 

Laughery township was found to have more than one hundred and 
seventy-five names on their honor roll. Brown township had a list of 
ninety names, Adams an equal number, and several other townships not 
far below the same. The totals had to be worked out bit by bit as 
new names and addresses could be discovered. This delayed the work 
so that the roster was not completed until late in November. Mrs. 
Wagner did very conscientious work and was fortunate in having some 
specially distinguished soldiers on her list as had Mrs. Robinson at 
Sunman. Laughery township claims some specially interesting stories 
among its veterans also. 

Every one of the eleven townships gave names to the gold star honor 
roll, so that in every township there are mothers who are carrying the 
full burden of war. 

Mr. J. F. Lochard of Versailles, chairman of the County Council 
of Defense, attended the February meeting of the War Mothers, and 
explained the plans being considered by the council, draft board and 
county commissioners for the erection of a memorial at the county seat 
in honor of the Ripley county boys who had given their lives in the 
war for world democracy. It was proposed to erect a monument, 
memorial building, or suitable tablet. The co-operation of the War 
Mothers was asked for this work. Plans were made to this end, and a 
committee appointed to consult with the other organizations interested 
in the memorial. 

This conference of War Mothers and Council of Defense as to a 
memorial to be erected at Versailles in honor of the Ripley county 
service men resulted in accepting plans to place a series of tablets on 
the north wall of the courthouse giving the names of all men from the 
county, with a special scroll for those who died in the service. 

Action on this matter was anticipated by the local draft board's 
petition to the county commissioners for an appropriation for this 
purpose. This petition was presented to the board of commissioners on 
February 3, 1919. It prayed for the establishment of the memorial "in 



104 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

commemoration of the heroic services and sacrifices of the Ripley county 
heroes in the great World War, and as a further mark of tribute to 
those who gave up their lives." 

During the war period the councils specialized on different forms 
of work. The Milan council gave their time to knitting for the Army 
and Navy. The Holton and Sunman councils knit but also made and 
sold quilts to raise funds for special purposes. Sunman council planned 
to put up an Adams township memorial containing the names of all 
service men from that township. The expense of such an undertaking 
proving too great, they finally decided to erect a memorial tablet for the 
five Sunman soldiers who died in camp and on the battle-fields of 
France, namely, Kenneth Diver, Coy Sunman, Clifford Pohlar, Samuel 
Heisman, and Christ Endres. This council gave a Fourth of July 
picnic that started their fund with the sum of one hundred and thirty- 
two dollars. Holton amassed a considerable sum of money but planned 
no specific use, holding it for future developments. Osgood council 
cleared two hundred dollars on a supper and bazaar and donated half 
the money to the local Red Cross branch. 

On October 24, 1918, a petition was framed by the county war 
mother officers asking the Council of Defense to request the sounding of 
"taps" every evening throughout the continuance of the war as a call 
to a few moments' remembrance and prayer for the safety of our boys 
by sea and by land, in camp and on battle-field. Because of the 
epidemic of influenza, which was developing at the time the order was 
given, it was not observed to any great extent. The signing of the 
armistice ended the fighting before the custom could be well established, 
but the significance of the idea, making the nation one with its fighting 
men, stands for a beautiful sentiment. 

At the Holton county meeting, on October 3, 1918, a committee 
consisting of Mesdames Ida Wager, Luella Bilby and May V. Wagner, 
was appointed to write letters of sympathy from the organization to the 
families whose sons had made the supreme sacrifice. Owing to the 
difficulty of learning the names of all, the letter was also published in 
the county papers so as to reach every one who had given up a soldier or 
sailor on the altar of world freedom. 

The following resolution was adopted at this meeting also: "Re- 
solved, That we, as War Mothers of Ripley county, do not want peace 
declared until Old Glory shall be planted on German soil and 
Prussianism shall be put down forever." 

When the last Red Cross quota of sewing and knitting was sent out 
in February, 1919, the Osgood branch, owing to epidemic conditions, 
felt unable to take the work. In this emergency, Mrs. Bilby appealed 
to the War Mothers to take the knitting of the stockings for the 
Belgian children. They responded at once, and accomplished the work 
in the given time. Since the work was under the management of the 
Osgood branch, and the War Mothers were practically all Red Cross 
members, the work was credited to the Osgood Red Cross, but the 
credit fox accepting it must go to the Osgood War Mothers' Council. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 105 

Whatever might be done along any line of war work was considered 
every War Mother's privilege and special duty. To so keep up all war 
work at home that the boys at the front should have every possible 
necessity and as many comforts as might be, could be accomplished in 
only one way, as Kipling aptly phrases: 

"It wasn't the individual, 
Nor the army as a whole, 
But the everlastin' team-work, 
Of every bloomin' soul!" 

The head war mother, Mrs. Flora Young Sparling, was born 
March 13, 1868, on a farm near Osgood, Indiana. Mrs. Sparling 
taught in the public schools for several years before her marriage. Her 
son Clarence entered the army in September, 1917, and rose to the rank 
of lieutenant, serving in the 84th Division. Her daughter Olive was 
trained as a nurse at the Deaconess Hospital, Cincinnati. Mrs. 
Sparling gave her heart to the war mother organization, and proved a 
worthy leader. She was also active in Red Cross work. 

Mrs. May V. Wagner, auditor, was born at Fort Frankfort, Ky., 
January 9, 1873, where her father was stationed while serving in the 
regular army. Mrs. Wagner is the mother of eight children. A son, 
Jerome E. Wagner, enlisted in the World War, and was one of the first 
to participate in the fighting "over there", being in the famous Rainbow 
Division. He won distinction on the battle-field and was awarded the 
Distinguished Service Cross, and the Croix de Guerre, by the French 
Government. Mrs. Wagner "enlisted" as soon as war was declared to 
"help win the war", and worked in the Red Cross, and Knights of 
Columbus Council for war work, as well as with the War Mothers. 

Mrs. Ida Kenan Wager, registrar, was born May 7, 1865, at 
Olean, Indiana. Mrs. Wager was chairman of the packing committee 
of the Red Cross branch at Osgood, and superintended the pressing, 
folding, packing and shipping of all finished work to county headquarters 
at Batesville. Mrs. Wager's son Kenan served as a corporal in the 107th 
Ordnance Depot, and also as musician for nine and one-half months. 
She was also the efficient chairman of the Third Liberty Loan drive for 
Center township. A brother, Clyde Kenan, is a veteran of the World 
War; also a nephew, Irving Harding. 

Mrs. Luella Cox Bilby, scriptor, was born at Holton, Indiana, 
January 5, 1842. She is the mother of four children. One son, Walter, 
enlisted with the marines and was ready to sail overseas when the 
armistice was signed. Mrs. Bilby was chairman of the Center township 
Red Cross, and was an untiring worker in the cause. She was one of 
Ripley county's fourteen-minute women, making trips to various points 
and giving talks on food conservation. 

Mrs. Emma L. Connelley, treasurer, was born in Washington 
township, Ripley county, Indiana. Her father was Samuel Grimes, and 
she was married to James H. Connelley in 1887. Mrs. Connelley is the 
mother of five children. Her son, Bertram W., enlisted and served in 
the Spanish-American War, and another son, Paul C, in the 38th 



106 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Division for eighteen months in the World War. Mrs. Connelley was 
an enthusiastic worker as chairman of the Milan War Mothers' Council, 
as well as in the Milan Red Cross branch. 

Mrs. Minnie E. Wycoff, War Mother historian, was born at Cross 
Plains, Indiana. Her father's family trace their descent from the 
earliest history of America. Her father, John A. Stewart, was a Civil 
War veteran, having served as one of the youngest members of the 137th 
Infantry. Her grandfather, Michael Sellers, and an uncle, William F. 
Stewart, and many cousins of her father's were soldiers of this war, 
three having given their lives in the great struggle. 

Mrs. Wycoff was educated in the schools of Brown township, 
Ripley county, and at Moores Hill College. She has taught in the 
schools of Brown, Delaware, Otter Creek and Jackson townships, and 
in the Versailles and Batesville schools, having been substitute teacher in 
Batesville during the last several years, in connection with other work. 

Her only son, Paul V. Wycoff, enlisted in the World War, in May, 
1918, and became a corporal in Battery F, 38th C. A. C. He was 
discharged in December, 1918. 

Mrs. Wycoff's own war work consisted of serving as director of 
woman's work in the Ripley county Red Cross Chapter, as supervisor 
of Ripley County Junior Red Cross, War Mother historian and chair- 
man of the Ripley County Historical Committee. 

The War Mothers, like the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
is destined to be an honor organization for the perpetuation of memorial 
and historical material and associations. The proudest badge our women 
can wear will be the War Mother's button. Those buttons mean not 
only service of self, but giving of what is dearer than any true mother's 
own life, her son's, to battle for the cause of human right. It will be 
fitting to close this report with the added stanza of "America", sung at 
the close of all war-time War Mothers' meetings : 

"God bless our splendid men, 
Bring them safe home again, 

God save our men. 
Keep them victorious, 
Patient and chivalrous, 
They are so dear to us, 

God save our men." 

The U. S. Boys' Working Reserve in Ripley 

County 

O. R. Jenkins, County Director 

In an agricultural county like Ripley, where democracy reigns and 
is ever safe, work is a cardinal virtue and the labor supply is self-regu- 
lative. Here the spirit of "neighborliness" prevails and co-operation for 
getting things done is real and sincere. When a hole is made in the 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE JVORLD WAR 107 

ranks of labor it is filled quickly and almost automatically. Extra and 
unusual demands are taken care of locally ; everyone speeds up and does 
extra work, with the result that there is little demand for help from 
the outside and when the need is great there may be found a little 
surplus labor to send elsewhere. 

In such a community it was only natural that when the call for 
"boy-power" was sent forth during the war we found that practically 
all of the boys were already working. The most frequent answers to 
the question: "Are you already employed?" were that the boy was 
either working at home on the farm or working for some neighbor. 
The task before our branch of the "Boys' Working Reserve" was not to 
put the boys to work or to teach them how to work, but to make them 
realize their importance in the position they already occupied — to make 
them speed up to war-time demands. Just how much influence the 
Working Reserve had can not be determined, but it can be said to the 
everlasting credit of the boys in Ripley county that they worked hard 
and faithfully to fill the gaps left by those who had gone to war. 

Because they were already busily engaged in work at home and were 
afraid that they might be taken somewhere else to work, many of the 
boys hesitated in joining the Boys' Working Reserve and quite a few 
did not join at all. Most of the aid to the county director in enrolling 
the boys and impressing upon them the importance of their best efforts 
wherever they were needed came from the high school superintendents, 
and much crdit is due them for the success of the United States Boys' 
Working Reserve in this county. Altogether, two hundred and eighty- 
seven (287) boys were enrolled. Most of the boys in the country kept 
their old jobs on the farm where they were most needed. The boys in 
towns who were not regularly employed in industrial pursuits offered 
their services to farmers during the busiest seasons. 

Bronze service medals bearing the great seal of the United States 
were awarded to one hundred and sixty-five boys in the county who 
furnished a verified report showing that they had performed their duties 
faithfully during a period of sixty days or more. Many others who 
worked just as hard did not receive the badge of honor because they neg- 
lected to report. No doubt many of the boys were too modest to set 
forth their deeds or looked upon the Boys' Working Reserve a little 
scornfully because they had been doing men's work before the Boys' 
Working Reserve was organized. However, all of this is unimportant 
and negligible, for the boys did their part and production in Ripley 
county was kept at its normal height, or above, during the entire period 
of the war. 

To forget the good work of the boys at home would be almost as 
great a sin as forgetting the heroic deeds of the older boys abroad. Let 
us always reserve a place in the pages of history for the boys who filled 
the shoes of working men gone to war. 

BOYS ENROLLED IN U. S. B. W. R. 
Name of Boy Address Award 

Junior L. Aikins Dabney 

Harold Abplanalp Osgood, R. F. D. 3 B.B. S.B. 



108 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Clyde Adkins ". Versailles B.B 

Franklin Adkins Versailles 

Lawrence Adkins Versailles 

Delza Adkins Versailles 

Benjamin F. Adkins Osgood B.B S.B. 

Edward G. Bessler Batesville 

Harry Black ..Versailles 

Edgar Burton Friendship 

George A. Bostic Holton, R. F. D. 2 B.B. S.B. 

Wiley Braley Versailles 

Harry W. Ballman Versailles 

Emmett T. Bodenberg.... Osgood, R. F. D. 1 

Charles G. Benham Benham, R. F. D. 1 

Ervin C. Brunner Napoleon 

Elmer P. Burton Holton '. B.B. S.B. 

Albert Bauer Batesville, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Edward Bergman Batesville, R. F. D. 4 

Johnnie S. Bell Osgood, R. F. D. 4 B.B. S.B. 

Alfred Bokenkamp Cross Plains 

Lester Brown Osgood, R. F. D. 5 B.B. S.B. 

Ravmond Black Osgood, R. F. D. 3 

Ravmond W. Butts Osgood, R. F. D. 3 B.B. 

Wilber E. Bradt Dillsboro 

Romuald Beckett Versailles 

Max Bryant Benham B.B. 

Albert M. Bishea Batesville B.B. 

Walter Bilby Osgood B.B 

Leo Bavlor Batesville, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Albert C. Bedel Morris B.B. S.B. 

Emmett L. Carpenter Nebraska 

Alva Earl Curran Versailles 

Kenneth R. Coolev Versailles, R. F. D. 3 B.B. S.B. 

Willard F. Cox Holton B.B. S.B. 

Clarence Cook Batesville B.B. S.B. 

Jake B. Cook Batesville B.B. 

Frank S. Cole Versailles B.B. S.B. 

Leonard B. Cole New Marion 

William E. Cripe Dupont, R. F. D. 2 

Forest F. Craven Moores Hill B.B. S.B. 

Walter Cottingham Milan B.B. 

Lowell F. Clapp Pierceville B.B. 

Charles E. Corson Osgood B.B. S.B. 

Earle Connelley Milan 

Cecil W. Castor Batesville 

Roy Clark Holton 

Zerl R. Dorrel Batesville B.B. S.B. 

Ramon Dudley Holton B.B. S.B. 

Russell Duncan Dillsboro B.B. S.B. 

James T. Demaree Versailles B.B. S.B. 



..B.B. 


S.B 


..B.B. 


S.B 


..B.B. 


S.B 


..B.B. 


S.B 


..B.B. 




..B.B. 


S.B 


..B.B. 


S.B 


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..B.B. 


S.B 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 109 

Everett DeVer Milan 

Carl R. Dietrich New Point, R. F. D. 1 

Percy Demaree Versailles 

Elvin Davis Batesville 

Harry E. Davis Batesville 

Walter Devine ..Holton 

Lester J. Ertzinger Sunman, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Edwin J. Einhaus Batesville 

Tracey Edens Holton 

Francis Eden Osgood B.B. S.B. 

Estol R. Ellerman Versailles 

Harold Eaton Milan 

Walter D. Einhaus ....Batesville, R. F. D. 1 

Arbia Einhaus Batesville, R. F. D. 4 

John S. Ellison Dillsboro, R. F. D. 3 

Clem A. Feldman Osgood, R. F. D. 3 

Dilver Frakes Friendship 

Elmer F. Fischmer Batesville, R. F. D. 4 

Walter Fletcher Milan, R. F. D. 2 

Arthur Ferguson Versailles, R. F. D. 3 

William J. Fischmer. Batesville, R. F. D. 4 

Fred Flick , ..Holton 

Everett Fox .Holton 

Kennie Ferguson Versailles, R. F. D. 3 

Wilbur S. Furlow Holton 

Herma Fisher Versailles 

Harold Fruechtnicht Benham 

Wilmer F. Greenham Moores Hill, R. F. D. 1 

Edward Gander Sunman, R. F. D. 1 

Enos Gookins Osgood, R. F. D. 1 

Daniel Gilland Osgood, R. F. D. 1 

Charles Gander Sunman 

Maxwell Gibson Batesville 

Harry L. Graves Osgood, R. F. D. 4 

Gallagher Griffith Holton 

Harry Hunteman Versailles, R. F. D. 3 

Nihl Hastings Delaware B.B. S.B. 

Joseph L. Heitz New Marion 

Virgil M. Hull Letts 

Ernest E. Hiner Napoleon 

Clarence W. Hiner Napoleon 

Robert Huntington Pierceville 

Denver Harper Versailles 

Clarence E. Harris Holton 

Leo Harris Holton 

Virgil Hudson Holton 

Wilkie Huntington Friendship 

Clarence Hicks Napoleon 

Virgil W. Hartley Osgood, R. F. D. 2 B.B. 



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110 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

William T. Haas Madison, R. F. D. 9 B.B. S.B. 

Irving Hunter Versailles B.B. S.B. 

Joseph R. Harrel Cross Plains, R. F. D. 1 B.B. 

Horace Harding Osgood B.B. 

Joseph P. Hill Pierceville B.B. 

Clarence H. Hutson Batesville, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Edgar L. Hayes Versailles, R. F. D. 2 B.B. 

Forest Hyatt ...New Marion B.B. S.B. 

Horace Hazelrigg Napoleon B.B. 

Rufus Huntington Osgood, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Elmer Heimsath Napoleon B.B. 

Raymond Jobst Osgood, R. F. D. 4 B.B. 

John H. Johnson Batesville, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Clyde Jackson Pierceville B.B. S.B. 

Rishel Jackson Versailles 

Lafe Johnson Batesville, R. F. D. 1 

Eldon E. Jackson Versailles 

Marshall Jackson Versailles 

Henry C. Koehne Versailles, R. F. D. 1 

William Kemper Osgood 

Gilmore Kelley Osgood B.B. 

Elton Kramer , .Batesville 

Robert J. Kirch Madison, R. F. D. 9 B.B. S.B. 

Albert C. Karl Batesville, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

John N. Kieffer New Marion B.B. S.B. 

Charles J. Kieffer Holton, R. F. D. 3 B.B. S.B. 

Henry LaFollette Dillsboro, R. F. D. 1 

Elmer Lochard Versailles 

Harry Leasure Dillsboro, R. F. D. 1 

Harry C. Laswell Cross Plains 

Raymond Littell Holton 

John F. Lenen Napoleon 

Carl R. Lomatch Cross Plains 

William Lafary Osgood 

Henry Lafary Osgood 

Clemence Linkmeyer Friendship 

Carl Linkmeyer Cross Plains 

Fred Lienhoop Holton 

Frank C. Livingstone Milan 

Clifford Lindsay Canaan, R. F. D. 1 

Roy V. LaFollette Dillsboro 

Elmer Laws Milan 

Wilbur H. Lampert Sunman, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Raymond H. Lattire Milan, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

John H. Maxwell Madison, R. F. D. 1 

Lawrence M. Muir Osgood, R. F. D. 2 B.B. 

Raymond J. Miller Holton, R. F. D. 3 

Everett S. Merhley Sunman 

Julius Meisberger Holton B.B. S.B. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 111 

Jacob Massing Osgood, R. F. D. 4 B.B. S.B. 

Floyd G. Marsh Osgood, R. F. D. 2 B.B. S.B. 

Guy Marsh Osgood, R. F. D. 2 B.B. S.B. 

Arthur Marsh Osgood, R. F. D. 2 B.B. S.B. 

Gilbert Murray Osgood, R. F. D. 3 B.B. S.B. 

Fred A. Miller Holton, R. F. D. 3 B.B. 

Louis E. Miller Holton, R. F. D. 3 B.B. S.B. 

Edward J. Miller Holton, R. F. D. 3 B.B. 

Garland McClure Holton 

Ivan McCoy Benham, R. F. D. 1 B.B. 

Raymond McCoy Benham B.B. 

Fletcher W. 'McClure.... Milan B.B. 

Aaron J. Negangard Milan, R. F. D. 1 B.B. 

William W. Neel Holton 

Leonard Newman Napoleon 

Jonathan Overturf Holton, R. F. D. 1 B.B. 

Alfie Pratt Osgood, R. F. D. 2 B.B. S.B. 

Daily K. Perkins Butlerville, R. F. D. 1 

Frank Pratt Osgood, R. F. D. 1 

John G. Perkins Butlerville, R. F. D. 1 

Rufus R. Powell Milan 

Fredus Preble Dillsboro, R. F. D. 1 

Victor Peters Milan, R. F. D. 2 B.B. S.B. 

Samuel Peaslee Versailles, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Leonard J. Pieper Dillsboro, R. F. D. 3 B.B. S.B. 

Herman Reed Madison, R. F. D. 9 B.B. 

David Runner S unman 

Everett Richter Osgood, R. F. D. 2 B.B. 

George W. Rosebrock Holton B.B. 

Otto Rosebrock Holton 

Nelson Reckeweg Osgood, R. F. D. 1 B.B. 

Roscoe Rubbe Holton B.B. S.B. 

Dalbert Richardson Butlerville, R. F. D. 1 B.B. 

Joseph Reynolds Holton, R. F. D. 2 B.B. 

Roscoe S. Rayner Holton 

Roy Raney Pierceville B.B. 

Howard L. Reamer Friendship B.B. 

Herschel A. Raney ....Osgood, R. F. D. 2 . 

Floyd Raney Osgood, R. F. D. 2 . 

John H. Rohlnng Osgood, R. F. D. 3 . 

James H. Rork Holton, R. F. D. 3 . 

Elmer A. Rheinfrank Osgood, R. F. D. 3 . 

G. Gilmore Reynolds Osgood, R. F. D. 3 . 

Robbie O. Rayner Dabney 

John A. Romweber Batesville B.B. 

Albert Swingle Versailles B.B. S.B. 

Kennie F. Spears Holton, R. F. D. 3 B.B. 

Ollie John Smith Milan B.B. 

William R. Smock Cross Plains, R. F. D. 1 B.B. 



B.B. 


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B.B. 


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B.B. 


S.B 


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112 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Thomas Stevens Moores Hill, R. F. D. 1 

Harry Swingle Versailles 

Joseph Stout Dillsboro, R. F. D. 1 

Delbert Showers Osgood, R. F. D. 4 

Omer E. Sheldon Milan 

Leroy Sarringhause Napoleon 

Jacob R. Sheldon Madison, R. F. D. 10 B.B. 

Donald Shepherd Holton 

William R. Shadday Versailles, R. F. D. 10 B.B. 

Walter D. Shadday Holton, R. F. D. 3' B.B. 

Harold Stork Osgood, R. F. D. 3 B.B. 

Frank Schmaltz Delaware : 

Earl Franklin Stevens Versailles 

Ernest W. Schutte Batesville B.B. 

John Shoopman Morris B.B. 

Arthur Schroeder Osgood, R. F. D. 3 B.B. 

William Smock Cross Plains 

Charles M. Smith Versailles 

Raymond Shook Milan 

Wilbur Siebert Batesville 

Wilbur Schwier Batesville 

Russell Schuck Sunman 

Ervin Schorling Batesville, R. F. D. 4 B.B. S.B. 

Clarence H. Schantz Osgood, R. F. D. 3 B.B. S.B. 

Amer J. Schorling Batesville, R. F. D. 4 B.B. 

Farrel Schockley Milan B.B. 

William W. Strobel Batesville, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Durbib Schroeder Osgood B.B. S.B. 

Uiie Smock Osgood B.B. 

Edward Schmidt Osgood, R. F. D. 3 B.B. S.B. 

Harold Steinmetz Milan B.B. 

Selwin Shook Holton B.B. 

Arthur Scott Holton B.B. 

Amos E. Schmidt Dillsboro, R. F. D. 1 B.B. 

Richard B. Talbott Versailles B.B. 

Leslie E. Thompson Holton, R. F. D. 2 B.B. 

Paul Truitt Osgood B.B. 

Harrv Thompson Madison, R. F. D. 10 

Walter Truitt Milan B.B. 

William Thiel Batesville 

Oakley C. Vanosdol Dabnev B.B. S.B. 

Clyde Vankirk Batesville, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Philip E. Vanosdol Dabnev B.B. S.B. 

Leland L. Volmer Osgood, R. F. D. 5 B.B. S.B. 

George H. Volge Batesville, R. F. D. 4 B.B. S.B. 

Isaac Vanosdol Holton, R. F. D. 2 B.B. S.B. 

Harold C. Voris Versailles 

Earl Voss Milan B.B. 

William L. Wolford Osgood, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 113 

Robt. Chas. Wagner Osgood, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Virgil Wilson Batesville B.B. S.B. 

Clarence Wullner Milan, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Walter Wirth Batesville, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

William H. Westerman..Osgood, R. F. D. 4 B.B. 

Clyde L. Wagner Osgood, R. F. D. 1 B.B. S.B. 

Russell Walker Milan B.B. 

Melson Wachsman Batesville 

Albert Wagner Osgood B.B. 

Charles H. Wagner Osgood, R. F. D. 5 B.B. 

Charles Wilson Butlerville, R. F. D. 5 

Ralph Wilson Milan 

Everett C. Walton New Marion 

Irving N. Wright Holton, R. F. D. 2 

Charles Wagner Osgood 

Floyd Young Holton B.B. 

Earl W. Young Milan, R. F. D. 2 B.B. 

Willard M. Adam Madison, R. F. D. 10 

Lester Ertzinger Sunman 



Soldiers' Employment Bureau 

Mr. George Sparling of Osgood was appointed as a volunteer 
worker in Ripley county, to see that all returning soldiers and sailors 
of the county found employment. 

The plan adopted by the United States Department of Labor was 
to send the soldier's card to the Federal director of the employment 
service in the state to which he expcted to return. An agent of this 
bureau was in every camp receiving returning soldiers whose duty it 
was to collect these cards. They stated what sort of employment the 
soldier desired, if he had a job awaiting him, or not. The soldier's 
home address was sent to his State Board, which, in turn sent it to the 
respective county volunteer worker where the boy expected to return. 
It was the duty of this agent to see what kinds of work were to be 
obtained, and get satisfactory employment for all soldiers and sailors 
needing or wanting it. In the latter days of demobilization a letter was 
sent to the discharged soldier giving him the name of this county agent 
so that he might apply to him on his return home. 

One hundred and twenty-five names in Ripley county were sent to 
Mr. Sparling. He found work for forty of these, the larger number 
not requiring any help. Those that had homes wanted to stay at home 
and visit for a while, and, gradually, all were employed without needing 
to consult him. 

No record was kept of the names of the soldiers benefitted in this 
way. The state board sent out a soldier representative over the state 
in the fall of 1919 to inquire into the situation and found practically 
no unemployment anywhere in the state. 



Labor Situation in Ripley County 

M. F. BOHLAND 

Chairman of the Community War Labor Board of Ripley County 

When the United States entered into war with Germany in 1917 
the Department of Labor deemed it necessary that a survey of the labor 
situation be made at once. The United States Employment Service was 
created to handle more efficiently the problem of supplying labor to war 
industries of the nation. The Department of Labor at Washington 
appointed a Federal director of labor in each and every state and located 
at the state capital an assistant director, as a protection to communities, 
as well as to facilitate the actual recruiting of labor. W'ar Labor Boards 
were formed, each consisting of three members. 

The duties of the War Labor Boards were not executive, but as far 
as possible they were to keep themselves informed as to the general 
labor situation in their respective communities. They were also to 
co-operate with the county director, enrollment agencies, and all the 
district organizers in recruiting labor on any specific call or order. The 
district organizers operated out of the Federal state director's office and 
co-operated with the county director, Community War Labor Board, 
and the district employment office. They were to cover such territory 
as was allotted to them by the assistant federal director of the state 
for the purpose of supervising and perfecting the recruiting machinery 
of the Public Service Reserve. 

Immediately after the order was issued for the appointment of a 
Community War Labor Board, the Ripley County Council of Defense 
was called upon for assistance to name the board. M. F. Bohland of 
Batesville was named as chairman, and George W. Johanning and 
George W. Baas of Batesville were named as members of said board. 
Upon their appointment they had a number of meetings and took a 
survey of the labor situation in the county. A complete list of the 
drafted men who had not qualified for service or passed the examina- 
tion of the local board, was made for the sole purpose of placing these 
men in plants operated by private concerns which had contracts for 
supplying the government with materials for properly conducting the 
war. This list of rejected men was carefully scrutinized and a number 
of men were sent to the various munition plants and places of industry 
where the Government had contracts. 

In order to handle the situation more efficiently, sub-committees 
were appointed in every township of the county. These committees 
were as follows: 

Adams — Louis Sieg, George C. Bos, August Franke. 

Brown — Samuel Siekermann, John Heitmeyer, Sam Ellermann. 

Center — Louis Wagner, William Smith, George Ashman. 

Delaware — Fred Schmidt, Herman Hailman, Edward Koechlien. 

Franklin — Thomas L. Thompson, Thomas Fuller, Henry Kramer. 

(114) 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 115 

Jackson — Charles Abplanalp, James Hazelrigg, James L. Newman. 
Johnson — Charles L. Hyatt, John A. Spencer, William Hunter. 
Laughery — M. F. Bohland, George Johanning, George Baas. 
Otter Creek — Davidson C. Yater, Virgil F. Stegner, H. B. Cass. 
Shelby — William Ferguson, Hays Schaffer, George Wagner. 
Washington — Edward Abbot, Parker Fleming, Fred Lamb. 

Labor was not to be conscripted in the various communities but was 
supposed to be voluntary. A number of calls were made upon Ripley 
county for war industries and were all taken care of. On account of 
the fact that about ninety per cent of Ripley county is devoted to agri- 
cultural pursuits, it was not asked for labor such as other communities 
could more readily furnish. 

The labor situation throughout the county during the period of the 
emergency was never at any time in great danger. In a number of 
instances the furniture factories of Batesville were short of labor and 
immediately secured the services of a large number of women and girls 
in the vicinity to take the place of the men who were called upon to do 
their duty. A large number of the women responded most nobly to 
this call and cheerfully took up the work where the men left off, not 
only for the purpose of obtaining employment themselves but for the 
purpose of keeping established industries in operation. 

One of the features worthy of note is the fact that at no time during 
the war was there any discontented or dissatisfied labor within the 
bounds of Ripley county on account of wages or other conditions. 

After the daylight-saving law was passed, a number of communities, 
Batesville in particular, took a survey of the war garden situation and 
any vacant lots were apportioned to the laboring men, who established 
war gardens and made splendid success along those lines, keeping their 
minds occupied along domestic lines and away from the horrible warfare 
which was being enacted in Europe. 

Immediately upon the cessation of hostilities on the battle-fields of 
France and other allied countries, the United States Employment 
Bureau, through the Community War Labor Board, turned its channels 
into a different course so as to secure employment for discharged 
soldiers. All returned soldiers who could not be reinstated in their 
former places made application to the War Labor Board for positions 
of like character in other communities. These names were sent to 
different communities which had need of men in that particular branch 
of labor and they usually received employment. In this way the Com- 
munity War Labor Board performed splendid service. In the majority 
of cases of discharged soldiers from Ripley county, practically every 
man, was reinstated in his former occupation at an increased salary. 

The Community War Labor Boards are at the present time (1919) 
working in conjunction with the Free Employment Bureaus of the state 
and are now still in full operation, taking care of the boys returning 
from the camps and the front. 



"Four-Minute Men"Report 

F. M. Thompson 

When war was declared between the United States and the Imperial 
Government of Germany, it became necessary immediately to mobilize 
the physical, mental and spiritual powers of this country. Sudden 
changes were to be made which, under the excitement existing, was a 
very difficult task to perform. 

Following closely upon the declaration of war, the advisability of 
passing a selective-service law was taken under consideration by Con- 
gress. This was a radical change for the people of the United States, 
and, quoting from the Provost Marshal's report to the Secretary of 
War: "The administrative history of the United States disclosed a 
consistent popular, adherence to the principle of voluntary enlistment, 
if not a repudiation of the principle of selective compulsory military 
service." It became necessary at once to educate the people, for many 
at the time were debating the necessity for entering into the great conflict 
at all, and it was necessary to reach the masses of the people at once to 
get them to thinking along right lines and to submit to all demands made 
upon them. So the "Four-Minute Men" were selected. 

The original plan of organization was as follows: "The written 
endorsement of three prominent citizens — bankers, professional or 
business men — written on their own stationery in a prescribed official 
form was required for the nomination of a local chairman. These 
endorsements were forwarded to headquarters in Washington, together 
with the proper form of application for authority to form a local branch 
with the privilege of representing the Government, in which application 
the number of speakers available was stated. 

F. M. Thompson of Versailles was selected by the Government as 
county chairman of the "Four-minute Men," with instructions from 
the Government to "choose such men as are fully capable of the work 
assigned them, whether speaking or committee work. Secure men who 
are certain to abide by the standard instructions of the department, 
rather than those who will insist on their own variation of the plan, 
and so forth." 

The following named persons were selected by the chairman : 
Thomas E. Willson of Osgood ; A. B. Wycoff and M. F. Bohland of 
Batesville; James H. Connelley of Milan; Harry W. Thompson of 
Versailles, and Rev. M. R. Scott of Holton. 

These men made many talks at the theaters in the county, and 
assisted in all the calls made by the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A. and the 
K. of C. for aid in carrying on their war work. The "Four-minute 
Men" also spoke at many times and various places throughout the 
county at the many gatherings held during the war period. The list 
was extended to include the following names: J. S. Benham, Benham; 
S. E. Ellerman, Friendship; J. M. Pate, Cross Plains; J. Smith, Dew- 
berry; Ora Lamb, Elrod ; Irvan Blackmore, Milan; George Brewing- 
ton, Milan; Roy Kirk, Shelby township; Ora Downey, Otter Creek 
township; D. C. Yater, Holton; William B. Goyert, Batesville; U. T. 

(116) 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 117 

Boice, Delaware ; M. F. Holman, Osgood ; J. W. Chaplin, Osgood ; 
J. M. Belden, Osgood; G. W. Smith, Napoleon; William McMullen, 
Sunman; F. A. Galbraith, Sunman ; Charles Doll, J. W. Mackey, 
D. McC^ilum, Batesville; Maurice Volz, Morris. 

Every minister of the county was appointed on a public morals 
committee. They were expected to serve wherever needed, not only to 
look after religion and morals, but to further patriotism in whatever way 
they might as public speakers and workers. They were to make four- 
minute addresses whenever required. 

FOURTEEN-MINUTE WOMEN 

The Fourteen-minute Women of the county were appointed by 
Mrs. Laura Beer of the County Council of Defense. Their work was 
chiefly in the Third Liberty Loan campaign and in the organization of 
food clubs throughout the county. The War Mothers availed them- 
selves of the opportunity of using those on the list who were also 
members of their organization. The first three women on the list were 
the most active as Fourteen-minute speakers: Mrs. Monta Royce, 
Versailles; Mrs. Pearl Copeland, Versailles; Mrs. Luella Bilby, 
Osgood; Mrs. Sherman Gookins, Napoleon; Mrs. May Laws, Milan; 
Mrs. Tora McCallum, Batesville; Mrs. Minnie E. Wycoff, Batesville; 
Mrs. Rilla Scott, Holton ; Mrs. G. A. Herman, Osgood; Mrs. J. H. 
Bergdoll, Milan, is the complete list. 



Educational Propaganda 

Sophia C. Nickel 

Now that the war is over and apparently everyone rejoicing over the 
victorious close, it is almost difficult to recall the ignorance regarding 
the war, and the state of apathy that existed at the beginning, and for 
months after. It was this condition that started the activities of the 
educational department of the Indiana Council of Defense (woman's 
section). The object was to educate the women and children as well 
as the men regarding the causes of the war and its significance to 
America. It was rightly believed that enlightenment would dispel the 
apathy with the ignorance. 

In December, 1917, Miss Sophia Nickel, of Batesville, was ap- 
pointed as county chairman, to organize the county so that definite 
authoritative information might be spread. This was to be done 
through schools, women's clubs, or organizations and neighborhood 
meetings. Appeals were sent out to the school children to get them to 
see that they, too, had a part or share in the great war, and that one 
important thing for them to do was to remain in school and do their 
best. These came from the state before Ripley county was organized, 
so they were distributed to the schools through the aid of County 
Superintendent Charles R. Hertenstein. 



118 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Another plan the women's section had was to present educational 
moving pictures regarding the war. Films were secured which were to 
be used throughout the state, each county chairman arranging for their 
use in her county. These pictures were highly recommended, so the 
Ripley county chairman, with the help of others, arranged to have them 
shown at Batesville, after which they were to be shown in the other 
towns of the county. But the pictures shown at Batesville were an 
absolute failure. The man sent out by the women's section to show 
the pictures had procured other than the designated films. Just why 
has not been satisfactorily explained. He claimed he wanted better 
ones. The films he used were from the Pathe exchange. Inquiries were 
made and they stated with apologies that by mistake old films had been 
handed out. The explanations did not satisfy but investigation to fix 
the responsibility was futile. 

The meeting was held at St. Clair's Hall, where the pupils of both 
public and parochial schools were gathered, besides a large number of 
adults. The disappointment and chagrin of the audience and those who 
had arranged the meeting was immeasurable. There were two saving 
features, however — the singing of the patriotic songs by the school 
children, and a short address by Mr. A. B. Wycoff. Both were an 
inspiration and a patriotic stimulus. 

To overcome the disappointment, a patriotic play was given at the 
Lyric Theater several weeks later. Though not satisfactory, it was 
the best that could be given, for at the time all war films were in great 
demand. 

Owing to the failure of the pictures and other difficulties, the county 
was never thoroughly organized. A number of suggestions were sent 
out to the township chairmen who had accepted chairmanship, but no 
reports were received. 

The following chairmen served in the townships that were or- 
ganized: Laughery, Miss Carrie Thackeray; Center, Mrs. C. C. 
Strang; Jackson, Mrs. Ed. Waters; Delaware, Miss Emma Gault ; 
Adams, Mrs. Mary Dreyer; Washington, Mrs. Will Fleming. 



Child Welfare Work 

Mrs. Zena McMullen 

In 1918, in response to an appointment of the National Child's 
Welfare Committee, I accepted the chairmanship of Ripley county, and 
organized the townships by appointing the following township chairmen : 

Adams township — Mrs. Zena McMullen. 
Brown township — Mrs. P. J. Laswell. 
Jackson township — Miss Alice Hicks. 
Laughery township — Mrs. Anna Wachsman. 
Shelby township — Mrs. Pearl Titus. 
Franklin township — Mrs. George Laws. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



119 



Otter Creek township — Mrs. Olive Pickett. 
Center township — Mrs. C. C. Strang. 
Johnson township — Mrs. Tena Thompson. 
Washington township — Mrs. W. E. Smith. 
Delaware township — Mrs. Herman Menke. 

During the month of April, every child in the county under six years 
of age was examined, in each voting precinct, by the doctors, assisted by- 
various sub-committees. The children were weighed and measured for 
the purpose of ascertaining if they had any defects, and were treated for 
same. If parents were not able to have the child treated, the committee 
took charge of it. 

The following conditions were found in the various townships: 

Adams — 212 children examined, 37 defective. 
Brown — 144 children examined, 5 defective. 
Jackson — 114 children examined, 7 defective. 
Laughery — 211 children examined, 14 defective. 
Shelby — 186 children examined, 8 defective. 
Franklin — 125 children examined, 2 defective. 

Otter Creek 1-1 children examined. 

Center — 159 children examined, 37 defective. 
Johnson — 195 children examined, 23 defective. 
Washington — 63 children examined. 
Delaware — 1-4 children examined, 10 defective. 
Total number of children, 1,494. 

Of the number defective, the larger number had some sort of throat 
trouble, generally enlarged tonsils; very few had any serious trouble. 




War Exhibit Train. 




Work of Ripley County Draft Board 

Congress passed the United 
States Draft Law on April 25, 
1917. On April 27th, Governor 
Goodrich, of Indiana, selected the 
men who should act as members of 
the draft boards in the various 
counties of the state. Sheriff 
Frank F. Wildman, County Clerk 
Josiah P. Day and Hon. Donald 
McCallum of Batesville were 
named for the Ripley County 
Board.. This board met on Tues- 
day, May 1, at Versailles and ap- 
pointed the precinct registration 
boards. 

The township trustees, by virtue 
of their office, each became a mem- 
ber of the precinct board where he 
resided. The boards were named 
as follows : 

Johnson township — Precinct 1, 
William R. Griffith, Versailles ; 
precinct 2, Louis G. Arford ; pre- 
cinct 3, Hale Bradt, Dillsboro, 
R. R. 1. 

Washington township — Precinct 
1, R. P. Lamb, Milan; precinct 2, William E. Smith, Milan. 

Brown township — Precinct 1, Frank Siekerman, Friendship; 
precinct 2, John Benham, Benham ; precinct 3, P. J. Laswell, Cross 
Plains. 

Franklin township — Precinct 1, Henry Kramer, Milan; precinct 2, 

Ben Priente, Delaware R. R. 1 ; precinct 3, William F. Bagot, Milan. 

Shelby township — Precinct 1, John F. Fox, Holton; precinct 2, 

William A. Green, Versailles, R. F. D. ; precinct 3, Dr. M. F. Kramer, 

Holton, R. 3. 

Otter Creek township — Precinct 1, Davidson Yater, Holton; pre- 
cinct 2, Chalmers Fox, Holton. 

Jackson township — Precinct 1, Charles Steuri, Napoleon; precinct 2, 
William Snider, Osgood, R. F. D. 

Adams township — Precinct 1, Edward Retzner, Sunman ; precinct 2, 
George F. Siefert, Morris; precinct 3. George Sieg, Spades. 

Laughery township — Precinct 1, Henry Pohlman, Batesville, R. 4; 
precinct 2, ward, 1, E. E. Taylor, Batesville; ward 2, Quirin Vonder- 
heide, Batesville; ward 3, Ed. C. Timmerman, Batesville. 

Delaware township — Precinct 1, H. H. Gookins, Osgood; precinct 
2, Fred A. Schmidt, Delaware. 

Center township — Precinct 1, Thomas E. Jones, Osgood; precinct 2, 
Charles F. Murray, Osgood; precinct 3. John H. Schmidt, Osgood. 

(120) 



Adj.-Gex. H. B. Smith 






RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 121 

The registration was to be completed within fifteen days after the 
organization was set in motion. It was estimated that seven million men 
would be registered. State election systems already organized did the 
work, using the voting precincts for recording the men. Registration 
cards were distributed by the census bureau. Five days were allowed for 
the registration itself. Within thirty days the roll call was to be com- 
pleted. 

The training camps began opening May 14th. The enlistment of 
eight hundred volunteers for the Navy from Indiana was completed on 
May 2, 1917, the call having begun on April 1, 1917. Though the call 
was filled two days before the limit, no check was made in enlistments. 

The army bill was signed by the President on Friday, May 18. 
June 5th was set for Registration Day, the registering to be completed 
between the hours of 7 A. M. and 9 P. M. All male citizens between 
the ages of twenty-one and thirty-one years were required to register ex- 
cepting men already enlisted in the fighting forces of the United States. 
The punishment for failure or refusal to register was fixed at one year 
in prison. 

The President decided that one member of the draft board should 
be a physician. Because of this ruling, Dr. Harry Nelson of Osgood 
was appointed by Governor Goodrich to succeed Donald McCallum of 
Batesville as a member of the Ripley County Board. 

The conscription boards of the state were called to Indianapolis the 
last week in May to receive the necessary cards, blanks and instructions 
for conducting the registration on June 5th. 

The registrars of the various township conscription boards were 
asked to come to Versailles on May 26th, to receive supplies for the 
registration on June 5th. 

The day passed off quietly in all parts of the county. There was 
practically no opposition to the registration, and, so far as known, no 
one qualified failed to register. The total number of registrants was 
two thousand one hundred and sixty-five. A blue card was given each 
registrant, showing he had performed his first duty to his country. 

The registration cards were all turned in to the Conscription Board 
on June 6th, receipted for, and all cards accounted for. 

These cards had all been numbered serially as they were filled in by 
the registration boards from one to the number of men registered, two 
thousand one hundred and sixty-five. 

Three copies were made of all cards as they were numbered. This 
work occupied the board for two or three weeks following Registration 
Day. 

Sergeant Hays of Greensburg was sent to Versailles as a recruiting 
officer on June 21st, for the purpose of securing enlistments for the 
Army, registration forming no preventive to subsequent voluntary 
enlistment. Single men between the ages of eighteen and forty were 
accepted. 



122 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

The Ripley County Board was permanently organized on June 30. 
Commissions bearing that date and signed by the President were sent 
to each member of the board, which met and elected officers for further 
administration. Sheriff Frank Wildman presided at this meeting by 
virtue of his office. It was called to order at 10 a. m., Saturday, June 
30, 1917. The roll was called and oaths of office administered. Josiah 
P. Day was elected clerk, Frank Wildman, president of board, and 
Dr. Nelson, surgeon. The work of numbering the cards was continued, 
the board meeting every day. Instructions not being well understood, 
the board went to Indianapolis, on July 30 and 31, for instructions 
from the State Conscription Board. 

The National Draft Day was set for July 21, 1917, at Washington. 
The numbers from one to ten thousand were written on slips of 
paper and placed inside black capsules. These were thoroughly mixed 
in a large transparent glass bowl and then drawn out one at a time. 
The order in which these numbers were drawn out, decided the order in 
which the registrants should be called to service. The first number 
drawn at Washington was 258. This number was held in Ripley county 
by Floyd Brown, of New Marion, Shelby township. By coincidence it 
was also the first number drawn later from the available list for the first 
call from the county. Floyd Brown was thus, in two ways, the first man 
in Ripley county called to the colors under the Selective Draft Law. He 
left for training camp in the first five per cent call, September 7, 1917, 
and died on the field of honor in France in the battle of the Hinden- 
burg Line. 

Ripley county's first quota was for one hundred and fifty-four men. 
The population of Ripley county, according to the latest census, was 
nineteen thousand four hundred and fifty-two. The first quota for 
Indiana was twenty-nine thousand nine hundred and seventy-one; two 
thousand four hundred and ninety-four men had been enlisted in the 
National Guard, and five thousand nine hundred and forty in the Regu- 
lar Army between April 2, 1917, and June 30, 1917. The aggregate 
total of men in these two units was twelve thousand four hundred and 
nine. This left a net quota of seventeen thousand five hundred and 
seventy men for Indiana's first call. 

Ripley county got only twelve credits out of these enlistments, a 
large number of our boys having failed, on enlisting at their places of 
employment, to understand that their permanent home address should 
be given. This caused the county to send a larger number of selective 
men than would otherwise have been called for in the first quota. 

The board worked during the first week of August, at arranging 
the numbers according to the key furnished by the Provost Marshal 
General's master list. On August 7, 1917, the work of notifying regis- 
trants to appear for examination was begun. Twice as many men 
were summoned as were needed for the first call to allow for exemp- 
tions because of dependents or physical unfitness for military duty. 

August 20, all registrants approved physically and not exempted, 
were certified by the board and the names sent to the State Board at 
Indianapolis. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 123 

On August 3, some appeals on exemption were taken from the 
local board to the Third District Board. 

These exemption boards were organized by districts. The members 
were appointed by Governor Goodrich, the appointments being approved 
by the President. 

The members of the Third District Board were as follows: 

Otto Ray, labor representative, Indianapolis, Marion county. 

W. W. Washburn, agriculture representative, Crawfordsville, 
Montgomery county. 

E. Vernon Knight, industry representative, New Albany, Floyd 
county. 

Ernest W. Layman, doctor, Terre Haute, Vigo county. 

Lucius B. Swift, lawyer, Indianapolis, Marion county. 

Seven days were allowed after examination by local boards, for the 
filing of exemption claims. All registrants had to be examined before 
the local board and passed upon as to physical condition. 

Grounds for exemption were as follows: 

Resident aliens without first papers were not subject to examination. 

1. County or municipal officers. 

2. Custom house clerk. 

3. United States mail employment. 

4. Skilled worker in arsenal or navy yard of the United States. 

5. Certain other employment by the United States (under certain 
conditions). 

6. Licensed pilots. 

7. Marine in actual employment. 

8. Married men with dependent wife or children. 

9. Widowed mother, dependent. 

10. Aged or infirm parents, dependent. 

11. Father of motherless children under sixteen. 

12. Brother of orphan children, dependent, under sixteen. 

\3. Members of religious sects whose creeds forbade participation 
in war. 

Ten days were allowed after filing exemption claims to file proof. 

Judge F. M. Thompson was appointed as county appeal agent to 
handle the claims for the board. 

The duties of the county appeal agent were: To appeal from any 
deferred classification by a local board, for and on behalf of the United 
States, which, in the opinion of the appeal agent, should be reviewed by 
the district board, to care for the interests of ignorant registrants, and 
where the decision of the local board was against the interests of such 
persons, and where it appeared that such persons would not take appeals, 
due to their own non-culpable ignorance, to inform them of their rights 
and assist them to enter appeals to the district board. 



124 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

It was also the duty of the appeal agent to suggest, when justice 
required it, that a case be reopened; to impart to the local board any 
information which should be investigated. Also, as the case might be, to 
give such information to the district board. 

The first five per cent of selective men left Osgood for training at 
Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky, on September 7, 1917. 
They were: Floyd Brown, New Marion; Earl Hyatt, Benham; 
William Gilland, Osgood ; Clarence Sparling, Osgood ; James W. 
Gookins, Napoleon; Arthur Schein, Batesville, and Leo Benz, Batesville. 

The friends and relatives of these seven young men, accompanied by 
brass bands and with waving flags, accompanied them to the train at 
Osgood, and said "Good-by", with tears and handclasps, and, as the 
train pulled away from the station, with a final cheer. They were our 
first men to be sent. Many of our boys had been enlisting in both army 
and navy for three years. A few had gone with the Canadian army. 
Our regulars and National Guard men had become a part of the new 
National Army for overseas' service, but there had been no chance to say 
a general "Good-by" to them as they had slipped out one or more at a 
time. Our first chance came with the departure of our first drafted men, 
and the good-bys, tears and cheers were for all those who had gone 
before as well. 

On September 15, 1917, a county farewell was held at the Osgood 
Fair Grounds for the next forty per cent called to entrain for camp, on 
September 20. About three thousand people attended this demonstra- 
tion. The order of march from the Osgood Library to the Fair 
Grounds was as follows: County Council of Defense, County Con- 
scription Board, Eureka Band of Batesville, Conscripted Men, Red 
Cross and the general public. Eighty-eight Red Cross women in 
uniform were in the parade, the larger number being members of the 
Osgood branch of the Ripley County Red Cross. "America" and the 
"Star-Spangled Banner" were the opening and closing songs as they 
continued to be throughout the war at all patriotic meetings. The 
address at this farewell was by Rev. Thomas H. Nelson, of Indianapolis. 

Fifty-seven men left in this second call, on September 20. 

The third group left Osgood on October 4, 1917. There were 
thirty-one men in this group. 

In November, 1917, new regulations were issued from Washington, 
restoring all registrants to their original status and canceling all ex- 
emptions and discharges. All examinations were ordered to begin 
again. Questionnaires were sent out in November, 1917, to all 
registrants, work on them to begin on December 5, 1917. 

A board of three doctors and three lawyers was appointed additional 
to the regular Conscription Board to help in this work. Judge Robert 
Creigmile of Osgood, M. F. Bohland of Batesville, and F. M. Thomp- 
son of Versailles were the lawyers appointed. Dr. Holton of Holton, 
Dr. J. M. Pate of Milan and Dr. G. T. Beckett of Versailles were the 
physicians appointed. 

Five per cent of the questionnaires were sent out daily until the list 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 125 

was exhausted. Seven days was allowed for each registrant to fill his 
questionnaire, Sundays and holidays not included. 

Two hundred and twenty Ripley county boys were estimated as the 
total number in service in January, 1918. Of these, ninety-five were 
selective men. 

The cantonments being rapidly built throughout the United States, 
could not accommodate more men than were sent into them by October, 
so that no more calls were issued until April, 1918, when the weather 
permitted the use of more tents. Also, when transportation overseas 
began emptying the cantonments, room was made for further conscrip- 
tions. 

Pneumonia had been prevalent in many of the camps during the 
winter and many units were in need of replacements. 

Thirty-one men were called into service from Ripley county, on 
April 26, 1918. On May 23, ninety-five more were called. Twelve 
men were sent to Purdue University in May for special training and 
forty-nine were called into general service on June 27. 

On June 5, 1918, the second registration was held for all men 
becoming twenty-one years of age, subsequent to the first registration on 
June 5, 1917. One hundred and three were registered. The same 
system for registering, numbering and drawing was used as for the first 
registration. 

On July 24, seventy-eight more men were sent to the training 
camps. Up until June, 1918, voluntary enlistments had been permitted. 
At that time all enlistments were denied to men of draft age. 

In April, 1918, Josiah P. Day resigned as clerk of the Conscription 
Board, and Fulton Leslie of Versailles was appointed in his place. Mr. 
Leslie failed to serve, and on June 24 Rowland Jackson of Versailles 
was given the appointment. Mr. Jackson was made clerk of the board 
as Mr. Day had been, and served throughout the continuance of the 
board's term of service. Miss Florence Beer of Versailles was made 
stenographer for the Conscription Board on May 1, 1918, and served 
until December 10 of the same year. 

A Legal Advisory Board was appointed in June, 1918. The mem- 
bers were A. B. Wycoff of Batesville, James H. Connelley of Milan 
and William S. Huntington of Osgood. 

The duties of this board were: To be present at all times during 
which the local board was open for the transaction of business either at 
the headquarters of the Local Board or at some other convenient place 
or places, for the purpose of advising registrants of the true meaning 
and intent of the Selective Service Law and Regulations, and of assist- 
ing registrants to make full and truthful answers to the questionnaires. 
The entire legal force of the county, assisted by justices of the peace 
and notaries did volunteer service in filling out the questionnaires issued 
to the men who registered on September 12, 1918. 

There was little opposition to the draft law. Many exemptions 
were asked, but many asking exemption later waived claim and responded 
loyally to the country's call. At the beginning, many tried to evade the 



126 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

draft, because they did not understand the causes of the war. Others 
feared crossing the submarine-infested Atlantic. Most were willing, 
some anxious, to go. The greater number took it as a matter of course, 
and went to do their part unflinchingly, whatever that might prove to be. 
Many married men went. Others were not allowed to go because of 
dependent families. Many young men, physically unfit, bitterly re- 
gretted their inability to go. 

Seventy-eight men from Ripley county were called into the service 
on July 24, 1918. Twenty-five were called in September, five having 
gone on August 1. 

On August 24, 1918, a third registration was held for all men 
having reached their twenty-first birthdays since the second registration 
on June 5. Twenty-three were registered in the county, bringing the 
total registration up to two thousand two hundred and eighty-one. 

A fourth registration was held on September 12, for all male 
citizens between the ages of eighteen and forty-five, inclusive. Two 
thousand and thirty-five men were registered in this draft. Question- 
naires were at once sent out, all being out by October 1. 

Twenty-six men were called to entrain for camp in October, but 
because of the influenza epidemic, the call was postponed from time to 
time, until finally, on November 11, 1918, they entrained at Osgood 
for Cincinnati. About 1 1 a. m. the news was confirmed over the 
wires, from one end of America to the other, that the armistice had been 
signed. Sheriff Wildman telephoned to Cincinnati for the boys to return 
to their homes, which they did in the evening. 

Meanwhile the work on the questionnaires had been much inter- 
rupted by the epidemic. The questionnaire board at Batesville sus- 
pended work for a few days and resumed under conditions designed to 
lessen the spread of the disease. 

The Ripley County Draft Board made its final report to Major 
Balzell, at the state board headquarters, on April 1, 1919. 

All books and records were boxed or crated and shipped to Wash- 
ington as ordered by the National Government. Duplicate reports 
were sent to Indianapolis and to the War Department at Washington. 

A list of all supplies had been kept, which was reported on exactly. 

The Government had furnished typewriters, which were sold, the 
money being turned back to the United States Government. 

The board was not held under bond, their oaths of office and the 
responsibility of the individual members being considered sufficient 
guarantee. 

The last official act of the board was to petition the county com- 
missioners to make an appropriation for a suitable memorial to all 
service men of the county and a special tribute to those who gave their 
lives. 




t5 



PART II 

WITH THE BOYS "OVER HERE" AND 
"OVER THERE" 

So nigh is grandeur to our dust, 
So near is God to man, 
When Duty whispers low, "Thou must" , 
The youth replies, "I can" . 

— Emerson 

Ripley county had a number of men in service in the Regular Army 
and Navy when the World War began in 1914. With the progress of 
the war a few more joined from time to time, anxious to get into the 
world adventure, many desiring to be ready in case of America's finally 
going in. When the call for navy and army recruits was issued in 
March, 1917, there was a general response in Ripley county. It was 
universally felt to be more creditable to volunteer than to wait to be 
drafted. 

With the declaration of war on April 6, 1917, William S. Hunt- 
ington of Osgood, who had served in the Spanish-American war began 
actively organizing a company in Ripley county. With the passing of 
the draft law a few weeks after war was declared, the entire plan of 
enlistment was changed. No companies were to be organized, but the 
new army would be built up by the operation of the selective service 
law. Many boys who had signed as members of Huntington's Com- 
pany, at once enlisted in various branches of the army. 

Under the regulations of the draft law, men with families were 
discouraged from enlistment and the larger number of Spanish-American 
veterans resigned themselves to civilian instead of military service. 
Charles Morrow of Sunman was the only veteran of this war who 
served in the World War from Ripley county. He served as a corporal 
in Company M, 12th U. S. Infantry in the Spanish-American campaign 
of 1898 and entered the World War as a private in Company C, 304th 
Field Signal Battalion, 79th Division with the A. E. F. in 1918, serving 
six months overseas. 

As a result of these various enlistments our boys served in almost 
every division of the A. E. F. The greater number, however, were in 
the 30th and 84th Divisions. The divisions in which they saw the great- 
est amount of service were the 30th, 42nd or Rainbow, First, Second, 
Third, Fourth, 37th, 29th, 33rd and 38th Divisions. 

FIRST DIVISION 

The First Division consisted of the 15th, 18th, 26th and 28th Infan- 
try Regiments with the necessary supporting units. It was assembled at 
New York and sailed for France in June 1917, landing at St. Nazaire, 

(128) 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 129 

the 28th Infantry being the first American Troops to set foot on 
foreign soil. The division was trained at various camps, by the Alpine 
Chasseurs, the famous "Blue Devils" of France. They were sent into 
the trenches in October, 1917, in the Toul Sector. The first American 
offensive was led by this division at Cantigny. An eye witness of the 
battle, a Red Cross nurse, says: "The boys stuck little American flags 
in their guns and many of them fastened the scarlet field poppies of 
France in their helmets and went forward singing all the popular army 
songs. No wonder they were invincible." 

The First Division's service record reads: "Trenches from October, 
1917. Suffered first German raid in April, 1917, Company F, 16th 
infantry, losing first Americans killed and first American prisoners; 
Cantigny in May; St. Mihiel, August 10-September 15; Meuse- 
Argonne, July-September. A detachment of the First Division was 
sent to Paris for the Bastille Day parade on July 14, 1918. They were 
a composite company, most of them destined to die in battle a few days 
later at Soissons, rejoining their regiments on July 16. They suffered 
their greatest loss at Berzy-lezec on July 2, losing 56 officers and 1,760 
men. Engagements at Compeigne Forest, Montrefagne, Missy Ravine, 
Missy-Aux-Bois, Paris Roads, Soissons, Ploissy. are points in this offen- 
sive. They fought in October at Montrafagne and adjacent points, 
marching on November 6 to Sedan. The 28th Infantry reached the 
extreme point reached by the left flank of the American Army in this 
operation. After the armistice on November 11, 1918, the division 
marched through Luxemburg into Germany, crossing the Moselle river 
on December 11 and to Coblenz on December 12. Served here in the 
Army of Occupation till September, 1919, when they returned to the 
United States. The stories of the 16th and 28th Infantry, First Di- 
vision, are of a special interest to Ripley county people as so many of 
our boys served in these two regiments, four of them being on our 
gold star honor roll. 

The 16th Infantry has a Civil War record. It was serving on the 
Mexican border when the First Division was organized for overseas 
service and sailed with the division from New York on June 10, 1917, 
landing at St. Nazaire on June 25-26, 1917. 

It was the second battalion of the 16th Infantry that marched to 
Paris with Pershing on July 3, 1917, and stood with him at Napoleon's 
tomb. Paris received them with flowers, cheers and kisses. The eager 
French women wiped the perspiration from the soldier's brows like so 
many St. Veronicas on the road to Calvary, surely an apt comparison, 
as so many of the Sixteenth were to die sooner or later for the cause of 
mankind, as Christ had done before them. 

The historian of the 16th Infantry sums up the division's history in 
these words: "The Invincible First! First to arrive in France; first 
in sector; first to fire a shot at the Germans; first to attack; first to 
conduct a raid; first to be raided; first to capture prisoners; first to 
inflict casualties ; first to shed its blood ; first in the number of casualties 
suffered (Second Division claims this also) ; first to be cited in general 
orders; first in the number of division, corps and army commanders and 



130 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

general staff officers produced from its personnel. The Sixteenth was 
trained in the Gondrecourt area and at Demange. They were visited 
during training by Marshals Petain, Joffre and Castelman; also by 
President Poincare. 

The famous first raid was on Company F of the 16th Infantry, on 
the night of November 3, 1917. One sergeant and ten men were taken 
prisoners by the Germans. James B. Gresham of Evansville, Ind. ; 
Merle Day from Glidden, and Wm. B. Enright of Pittsburg, were the 
three men killed. A monument has been erected by the French in 
Lorraine to commemorate this raid. It was dedicated one year later, 
November 3, 1918. 

The Sixteenth's service record reads: "Hike to Sorcy, Toul sector, 
Broyes sector, Cantigny (where Harry W. Smith was killed), Coulle- 
mille, Soissons, St. Jacques sector, St. Mihiel, Souilly (visited here by 
Secretary of War Baker), Verdun Woods, September 27, Cheppy, 
Charpentrv, Meuse-Argonne, October 4; Exremont (where Hugo 
Prell and" Milton Whitham were killed), Hill 272, Cote Maldah, 
Sedan, Luxemburg, November 29; Grevemancher, November 23. De- 
cember 1 (first time Americans marched onto German soil), the 18th 
Infantry led the way along the east bank of the Moselle, 16th on west 
bank, crossing the Saar into Germany, December 12." 

SECOND DIVISION 

The Second Division, typical of all the rest, was organized as 
follows: Headquarters Company, Second Division, Headquarters 
Troop, Fourth Machine Gun Battalion, First Field Signal Battalion, 
Second Engineers, Second -Ammunition Train, Second Supply Train, 
Second Mobile Ordnance Repair Shop, Second Company Military 
Police, Mobile Veterinary Unit No. 2, Machine Shop Truck Unit 
Nos. 303 and 363, Railhead Detachment, Salvage Squad No. 2, Bakery 
Company No. 319, Sales Commissary Unit No. 1, Delousing and Bath 
Unit No. 17, Clothing and Bath Unit No. 320, Mobile Laundry Unit 
No. 326, Postal E. F. Army P. O. No. 710, 2nd Field Artillery 
Brigade, 12th Field Artillery, 15th Field Artillery and 17th Field 
Artillery, 3rd Brigade, composed of the 9th Infantry, 23rd Infantry 
and 5th Machine Gun Battalion, 4th Brigade, 5th and 6th Marines, 
6th Machine Gun Battalion. 

Major-General Omer Bundy, Major-General Jas. C. Harbord and 
Major-General J. A. Lejeune were commanders. The first served from 
November, 1917, to July 14, 1918; the second from July 15, 1918, to 
July 28, 1918; the third from July 29, 1918, to end of the division's 
service. The division sailed for France in October, 1917, and went 
into the trenches on the Meuse near Verdun in March, 1918. Its 
personnel was mostly from the Middle West. The officers were nearly 
all experienced regular army men. After six weeks with the French at 
Verdun the division was given a sector of its own in the Eparges region. 

In the second week of April, under cover of night, about five hundred 
Germans, dressed in American and French uniforms and speaking 




1. David Hughes. 2. William Jolley. 3. Waldo Michel. 4. Albert Tekuloe. 5. Chas. C. Shuck. 
6. Henry Gaurman. 7. Edw. Bohlke. 8. Robert Coffee. 9. Wm. Robinson. 10. Frank B. Bruno. 
11. Everett Daily Paugh, 12. Corporal Wilber Burns. 



132 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

French and English, penetrated in and through the lines. Two com- 
panies of the 9th Infantry found the enemy around and behind them 
before the deception was discovered. A heavy fight ensued and the 
lines were cleared by daybreak, sixty-seven dead being left behind by 
the Germans, scores of others limping or being carried back to the enemy 
trenches. 

On May 30, 1918, the entire division of twenty-seven thousand men 
was hurried in trucks to intercept the German attack rolling toward 
Paris. They rode one hundred miles in the trucks to the Paris-Metz 
road, then made a forced twelve-mile march toward Chateau-Thierry. 
On June 4 the Americans took over from the exhausted French a twelve- 
mile front, leaving no reserves between themselves and the Marne. 

Nearly two weeks of bitter fighting ensued at Belleau Wood, which 
was full of machine gun nests. The town of Vaux was occupied by 
artillery. The division held the road to Paris for five weeks. They 
attacked the enemy again at Soissons on July 16 after a very brief rest. 
A summary of their service record is: 

Verdun Sector, March 12 to May 14, 1918; Chateau-Thiery, May 
31 to July 9, 1918; Soissons Offensive, July 18 to July 20, 1918; 
Marbache Sector, August 9 to August 20, 1918; St. Mihiel Offensive, 
September 9 to 16, 1918; Champagne Offensive (Blanc Mont), Sept. 
30 to October 9, 1918; Meuse-Argonne Offensive, October 30 to No- 
vember 11, 1918; March to the Rhine, November 17 to December 13, 
1918; Army of Occupation, December 1, 1918, to June 15, 1919. 

The division captured about one-fourth of the entire number of 
prisoners taken by the A. E. F., one-fourth of the total number of guns, 
and suffered about one-tenth of the total number of casualties. 

The divisional total number of prisoners is twelve thousand twenty- 
six men. This division received more citations and decorations than 
any other. The 9th and 23rd Infantry have records from the War of 
1812 and the Civil War. The 2nd Engineers were the famous "Fight- 
ing Engineers." 

The division sailed from Brest on September 1st and reached New 
York for the great victory parade with the Composite Regiment on 
September 10th. The insignia of the Second Division — the star and 
Indian — is the creation of a truck driver who succeeded so well in 
decorating his truck that his idea was adopted by the whole division. 
The insignia of the entire army were an outgrowth of use and necessity 
as a rule. A picture is more easily seen and read than any other means 
of designation. It is also more appealing to the soldier. 

THIRD AND FOURTH DIVISIONS 

The Third Division included the 4th Infantry. Gilbert Sutherland 
of Napoleon, Ripley county, was killed at the Aisne while serving in 
Company G, 4th Infantry, Third Division. 

The Fourth Division was known as the "Lost Division," as so little 
was said of it because of lack of exploitation, not lack of service. Hale 
Bradt, Y. M. C. A. secretary, of Versailles, was with the Fourth Di- 
vision on the front and in Germany. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 133 

THIRTIETH DIVISION 

The Thirtieth Division — -"Old Hickory" Division — counted the 
largest number of Ripley county soldiers destined to see service in the 
great war. They were mostly transferred from the Eighty-fourth Di- 
vision, 335th Infantry, Company A, to the 119th and 120th Regiments 
of the Thirtieth Division, which was made up of the 117th, 118th, 119th 
and 120th Infantry, 120th Machine Gun Battalion and other necessary 
units to form a division. The division was formed at Camp Sevier, N. 
C, and sailed from Boston May 17 and 18, 1918. The convoy was 
met by a submarine a few days out from England and the fleet changed 
its course, landing at Gravesend instead of Liverpool on June 4, 1918. 
After three days' rest at Dover, they crossed to Calais and went to 
Eperlocques for a month's training. Then they "hiked" to Belgium by 
way of Watteau arrd Lyms and relieved the British between Ypres and 
Kemmel Hill. After seventeen days in the trenches they went back 
to Watteau for four days' rest, returning to the trenches for twenty 
days. Went over the top on the nineteenth day, August 31, 1918, and 
captured the city of Voormezeele, taking several prisoners and machine 
guns. Louis Boehmer of Batesville was wounded in the shoulder by a 
shell in this action. 

The division left Belgium September 5th and went by box cars to 
Roelle Court, France, where they were attached to the British Second 
Army. They were trained here till September 17th, when they moved 
further south, reaching Tincourt on the twenty-second. On the twenty- 
third they took over the front line trenches from the Australians. All 
moving was done under cover of night to avoid airplanes and shell 
fire. The Thirtieth Division held these positions till September 29th. 
On that date, with the Twenty-seventh American Division on the left 
and the Forty-sixth British Division on the right, the Thirtieth Division 
assaulted the Hindenburg line. The line at the point of attack curved 
in front of a tunnel at St. Quentin. It was considered impregnable by 
the Germans for the following reasons: The Hindenburg line, curving 
west of the tunnel, consisted of three main trench systems, protected by 
vast fields of heavy barbed wire entanglements, skillfully placed. This 
wire was so heavy that the American barrage fire of thirty hours' dura- 
tion, preceding the attack, had damaged it but little. The lines had 
been strengthened by machine gun emplacements of concrete. It con- 
tained at this place a large number of dug-outs lined with mining 
timbers with wooden steps leading down to a depth of about thirty 
feet and with small rooms capable of holding from four to six men each. 
In many cases these dug-outs were wired for electric lights. The large 
tunnel through which St. Quentin canal ran was of sufficient capacity 
to shelter a division. This tunnel was electrically lighted and filled 
with barges, which were used as sleeping quarters by the Germans. 
Connecting it with the Hindenburg trench system were numerous 
small tunnels. In one case a direct tunnel ran from the main tunnel to 
the basement of a large stone building which the enemy used for bead- 
quarters. Other tunnels ran from the main one eastward to Bellicourt 
and to other places. This complete subterranean system with its hidden 



134 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

exits and entrances unknown to the Americans, formed a most complete 
and safe method of communication and reenforcement for the German 
sector. The Sixtieth Brigade, the 119th and 120th Infantry (where 
the Ripley county boys belonged), in front, with the 117th and 118th 
Regiments as support, attacked this line by assault at 5 :50 a. m., 
September 29, 1918, on a front of three thousand yards, capturing the 
entire line over that area, and advancing, took the entire tunnel system 
with the German troops therein and the cities of Bellicourt, Nauroy, 
Riqueval, Carriere, Etricourt, Guillame and Freme, advancing four 
thousand two hundred yards, and defeating two enemy divisions of 
average quality, taking as prisoners forty-seven officers and one thousand 
four hundred thirty-four men. Coy Sunman, Lee Ashcraft and Leora 
Weare, all of Ripley county, were killed in this attack. Cornelius 
Miller and Carl Mistier were wounded. The dead were picked up 
and buried on October 2nd near where they fell, about two hundred 
yards to the right of St. Quentin, the chaplains reading the burial 
service. 

On October 2nd the division marched back to Herbecourt, about 
fifteen miles from St. Quentin, but were almost immediately marched 
back to take over the same sector near Mont Brehain on the night of 
October 5th. The division attacked each day from October 8th to 11th, 
advancing seventeen thousand five hundred yards and capturing about 
twenty-five little towns, among them Busigny, Blancourt, St. Souplet 
and La Rochelle. One thousand nine hundred eighty-nine men from 
eleven German divisions were captured, with several hundred machine 
guns. The Thirtieth Division was relieved on October 11th and 12th 
by the Twenty-seventh American Division. Chris. Endres was killed 
October 10th on this offensive by a wound in the neck, either machine- 
gun bullet or shrapnel, and Edgar Woolley was severely wounded. On 
October 12th the division marched five miles back of the lines and 
reorganized their companies. On October 16th they returned to the 
front and took over the same sector again at the same place as before, 
being the right half of the sector temporarily held by the Twenty- 
seventh Division. They renewed the attack on the enemy on October 
17th, 18th and 19th. On October 17th sixteen men in one platoon 
were gassed. This number included Frank Burst, John Bland and Sam 
Heisman of Ripley county. Only about fifty of Company M had been 
left to go into this fight. When the division was finally taken out of 
the fighting on October 19th only eight were left on duty in Company 
M. The 120th Regiment was cited for gallantry and their colonel, 
Colonel Minor, was decorated. The gas attack on October 17th is 
described in detail: 

"The gas was coming over all the time, not strong enough at first to 
be alarming because, being on the advance we wore our masks only 
about a half hour. The German barrage consisted almost entirely of 
gas shells. When we reached the Laselle river the accumulation of 
gas overcame the company. Quoting Frank Burst, who survived: 'I 
was badly burned and blind about nine or ten days from inflamed eyes. 
Was moved in an ambulance about five miles to the railway station 




1. Gustave Kalb. 2. Joseph Keene. 3. Sergeant Morris Robinson. 4. Edward Ruhl. 5. Colum- 
bus Wagner. 6. Glenn Sheets. 7. Alfred C. Papenhaus. 8. William Bateman. 9. Charles Duncan 
10. David Powell. 11. Charles L. Roepke. 12. Frank Prakel. 



136 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 

and at midnight loaded on an open car and sent to No. 1 South African 
General Hospital at Rouen. Was here about fifteen days, then was 
sent from Rouen in an ambulance and by train to Le Havre and across 
the channel to Southampton, England, to United States Base Hospital 
No. 40, Camp Taylor Unit from Lexington, Ky. Remained here till 
New Year's day. Went on January 1 to Winchester to be examined and 
was returned to Company M, 120th Infantry, at Le Mans, France.' ' 

The division sailed for the United States from St. Nazaire on April 
1, 1919, the One Hundred Twentieth Division on the transport Martha 
Washington. They arrived in Charleston, South Carolina, on April 
13. Quoting a 120th soldier: "From the time we began prepara- 
tions to return to the United States in January we were de-loused twice 
a week. We had the process again at Camp Jackson after landing at 
Charleston. The process of delousing is this way : Two rooms are 
used. You leave all your clothes in one room and take a hot shower 
bath in the second room. While this is being done the clothes are 
thrown into a large tank and steamed. They are removed from the 
tank and returned to the soldier, having been tagged for identification. 
He puts them on again, damp and hot from the steaming. The soldiers 
were given new clothing after the relousing process. Head lice were 
avoided by the regulation enforcing close-cropped hair." 

In summing up the Thirtieth Division's record, the following points 
are noted: "In Belgium, raiding or night patrol parties went out almost 
every night. Sixteen or twenty-four men under a sergeant or corporal 
composed the parties. They were selected as they happened to volunteer, 
one group one night, another the next. The barrage fire on September 
28 and 29 was said to be the heaviest ever laid down by the Germans. 
In the thick of the fight it seemed the end of the world had come. I 
couldn't think or feel. My mind seemed paralyzed. I just went on and 
on." 

The number of prisoners captured by the Thirtieth Division from 
September 29 to October 20 was ninety-eight officers and three thousand 
seven hundred fifty men. The number of men lost in the same period 
was three officers and twenty-four men as prisoners, forty-four officers 
and four thousand eight hundred twenty-three men wounded and killed 
(including slightly wounded and gassed) ; 1,792 rifles, 72 field artillery 
guns, 426 machine guns and a mass of other materials were captured 
in this offensive by the Thirtieth Division. 

Thanks were received by the division from mayors of liberated cities 
and civilians, as follows: Becquigny, 330; Busigny, 1,800; Escanfort, 
81; Brancourt, 5; St. Beuin, 175; Montbrehain, 9; St. Souplet, 450; 
Molain, 5; Ribeauville, 2; LeHaie Meuneresse, 24; Mazingheim, 1. 
Total, 2,902. All officers received special mention for bravery, division 
officers being decorated. 

The division consisted of National Guard troops from North and 
South Carolina and Tennessee, augmented by selective draft men from 
Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and North Dakota, who have the credit with 
the Twenty-seventh Division and Forty-sixth British Division of break- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 137 

ing the Hindenburg line. As expressed by F. H. Simonds in American 
Review of Reviews, November, 1918: "We have not had a Waterloo, 
much less a Sedan. Neither seems on October 21 even remotely possible 
in the present operation. What we have had is a military decision of 
the war. That decision was had in the Hindenburg line." Sir Lloyd 
George, British Premier, said : "The smashing of the great defensive 
system erected by the enemy in the West, and claimed by him to be 
impregnable, is a feat of which we are justly proud and for which the 
Empire will be ever grateful." — From letter to Sir Douglas Haig, 
October 9, 1918. 

THIRTY-THIRD DIVISION 

The Thirty-third Division was a part of the Second Army and were 
mostly Illinois National Guard troops. They were trained for over- 
seas service at Camp Logan, Houston, Texas, from September, 1917, 
until May, 1918. This division was made up of the 129th, 130th, 131st 
and 132nd Infantry, 58th Field Artillery Brigade, 108th Field Signal 
Battalion, 108th Sanitary Train, 108th Ammunition Train, 108th 
Trench Mortar Battalion, 108th Mobile Ordnance Repair Shop, 122nd, 
123rd and 124t!i Machine Gun Battalions. 

They were the first Americans to fight with the Australians or side 
by side with the British. They went into their first battle shouting 
"Lusitania". Companies C and E of the 131st Infantry and Companies 
A and G of the 132nd Infantry received special mention for bravery in 
the attack of July 4, 1918, four officers and fifteen men receiving British 
decorations bestowed in person by King George on August 12, 1918. 

Their service record names the following battles : Amiens, Hamel, 
Mons, Chipilly Ridge, Gressare Wood, Toul Sector, Verdun, where 
they were the first American division to hold a part of the front line, 
Meuse-Argonne, Montfaucon and Bois des Forges. The 131st and 
132nd Infantry, with the 124th Machine Gun Battalion, known as the 
Sixty-sixth Infantry Brigade, captured both last named places in three 
hours and thirty-three minutes on September 26, 1918. They claim 
the distinction of being the only American division that attacked on 
schedule time. 

Their final fighting was at St. Mihiel on October 23rd, 24th and 
25th. The division saw service with the First, Second and Third 
Armies, marching to Germany after the armistice by way of Luxem- 
burg. Their pseudonym was the "Prairie Division". 

RAINBOW DIVISION 

The Rainbow Division was organized according to an idea of 
Secretary of War Baker to select the pick of the National Guard regi- 
ments. The Infantry regiments chosen were the 1 65th from New 
York, 166th from Ohio, 167th ("Wildcat Regiment") from Alabama, 
168th from Iowa with the 149th Field Artillery from Illinois, 150th 
Field Artillery frqm Indiana, 151st Field Artillery from Minnesota, 
and the 155th Field Artillery. The regiments were recruited in their 



138 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

home states and assembled at New York, where about half the division 
paraded at Garden City, the first tactical division assembled and 
reviewed after the declaration of war. They represented twenty-six 
states and were named the Rainbow because of a remark while the 
selection was being made that a "line drawn on the map of the United 
States to indicate the division would form a rainbow in shape". It 
proved to be a happy appellation and the Rainbows were perhaps the 
most famous division of the A. E. F., owing partly to the manner of 
their organization, and a little to the name itself. The division was 
trained a short time at Camp Mills, L. I., and sailed for overseas duty 
on October 18 and 19, 1917, from New York. They were the third 
division to sail, the First and Third divisions having preceded them, 
the Second going at nearly the same time. Fifty-six thousand men sailed 
at this time, slipping out to the transports quietly in the night and out 
of the harbor at five a. m. The convoy consisted of two destroyers and 
the cruiser Seattle. One U-boat was met on the tenth day out, but no 
difficulty resulted. One ship, the President Grant, turned back because 
of bad boilers and followed a few days later. The division landed at 
St. Nazaire and was sent to Camp Coctquidan, Brittany, for training 
in one of the oldest artillery schools in France. 

They went into the trenches in Lorraine on February 21, 1918. 
Their first casualty occurred on March 17. Their first raid was on 
the first, second and third of May. Their service record is: Lorraine 
trenches, February 21 to June 21, 1918; Champagne, in July 14, 15, 17, 
18, 1918; Chateau-Thierry, July 25 to August 10, 1918; Ourcq and 
Vesle Rivers, August, 1918; St. Mihiel, September 7-24, 1919 (this 
was the first all-American victory) ; Meuse-Argonne, October 7 to 
November 11, 1918; Coblenz-Neuenhaar, Germany, until April 1, 1919. 

On April 13, 1919, President Poincare and Premier Clemenceau 
brought a special message of appreciation and affection to the division, 
waiting transportation at Brest, from the people of France. The 
division sailed on April 18, 1919, on the Leviathan. The ship narrowly 
missed a floating mine when nearing New York. They were met in the 
harbor by Welcome Home committees from the various states repre- 
sented. Each state welcomed home its particular regiment with a special 
day of celebration, in which the main feature was the parade of the 
unit in full war outfit. The 150th Field Artillery's day of triumph was 
on May 7, 1919, at Indianapolis. The day was made a state Welcome 
Home for all returned soldiers, sailors, and marines of Indiana. Trans- 
portation was paid for the men by their counties. Ripley and Dearborn 
counties furnished ribbons with the counties' names as badges of distinc- 
tion for their men. Special trains were run over all railroads to 
accommodate the thousands of returned soldiers and sailors who went 
to Indianapolis to share in the day's festivities. As they had marched 
to battle in France, once more the service men of the state marched 
through the Arch of Victory, the Court of Honor, and back again, the 
150th Field Artillery completing the line of march and going on to the 
Grand Central Station to entrain for Camp Taylor. 




1. Virgil McClanahan. 2. Freeman Deburger. 3. Dallas WHittaker. 4. Harry R. Saminghaus. 
5. Casper Hankins. 6. Fred H. Nedderman. 7. John C. Ward. S. Chester J. Nauert. 9. Louis 
Walters. 10. George W. Hillman. 11. John R. Murdock. 12. Robert N. Handle. 



140 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD W Ak 

ORDNANCE REPAIR SERVICE 

The ordnance repair shops of the American Expeditionary Forces 
were located at Mehun, rather Beauvoir near Mehun, on the main line 
of the Paris and Orleans railroad. The buildings covered an area of 
twenty-two acres. Thirteen buildings were constructed, eight large 
shops and five smaller ones. They were of steel frame construction, 
with corrugated iron siding and roofs with rubberoid covering. Six of 
the large buildings were of the monitor type, bolted together instead of 
riveted, so that they could be moved in a short time if necessary. The 
laundry was of frame construction, roofed with corrugated iron. 
Packed earth floors were used in all buildings except the administration 
and laundry, which were floored with concrete. 

There were one hundred and thirty acres of parking area connected 
with the buildings. Enemy and allied caissons, limbers, guns, salvage, 
and materials of all sorts not convenient to house were stored in this 
parking place. 

Gun shops Nos. 1 and 2 covered a total floor space of two hundred 
and ninety-four thousand square feet. Gun Shop No. 1 had five ten-ton 
cranes and one fifteen-ton crane. Gun shop No. 2 had seven ten-ton 
cranes. This shop was never quite finished as part of the materials for 
it were lost on a torpedoed ship and the armistice was signed before 
other materials could be secured. 

The reamer shop was between gun shops 1 and 2. Its floor space 
was forty-three thousand, two hundred square feet. It was fitted with 
lathes, grinders and two motor generator sets. It also was never com- 
pleted. 

The artillery repair shop covered one hundred and thirteen thousand 
square feet. It was fitted with lathes, planers, boring mills, shapers, 
millers, and gear cutters, down to the finest precision machines. About 
two hundred of these machines in all were installed and operated. 
Four ten-ton cranes were used here. 

The small arms shop had a floor space of one hundred twenty thou- 
sand square feet. One-fourth of this space was used by the optical repair 
division. This shop was fitted with work benches and tables for hand- 
work. It contained four large steam boilers, several batteries of buffers, 
a battery of sand blasts and a number of pickling vats for tearing down, 
pickling, polishing, and oiling of small arms. Gravity rollers were 
used throughout to handle all work. 

The forge and foundry shop covered thirty-nine thousand, two hun- 
dred square feet of space. It contained twelve furnaces, three steam 
hammers, two drill presses and a few other miscellaneous machines. 

The woodworking shop occupied sixty-four thousand square feet of 
floor space. Warehouses 3 and 4 covered twenty-four thousand square 
feet. The administration building used ten thousand four hundred 
square feet of area. It had five department offices, a drafting room, 
and printing shop. The bathhouse and laundry covered one thousand 
nine hundred and twenty square feet of floor space. 



Ripley county's part in the world war 141 

The whole system of shops was planned in July, 1917, under the 
management of Col. D. M. King, as there were no existing shops for 
the necessary repair work located in France. Three officers went to 
France in September, 1917, and submitted the plans to General 
Pershing. The first shipment of materials was made on October 22, 
1917. Colonel King with thirty-five officers sailed for France in 
February, 1918. The enlisted personnel had already sailed to as large 
a number as it was possible to dispatch at this time. 

The building continued until the signing of the armistice, thirty- 
eight in all having been planned. Chinese workmen were employed 
here during a part of the time. A number of French girls worked in 
the shops also. 

The shops at Mehun were made the concentration point for all 
ordnance units in June, 1918, except those assigned to special divisions. 
One thousand and forty-four men were working in the shops in 
November, 1918. 

After the signing of the armistice on November 11th, the work was 
concentrated on the cleaning of guns, crating, packing and shipping of 
arms to the United States, also of enemy and allied artillery, salvage, 
etc. No further buildings were erected except as necessary for making it 
into an evacuation camp. The men were also employed in repairing 
railways. , John Lawless, Ashel Ewing, Moses Curran, Samuel Elliot 
arid Frank Plantholt were among the Ripley county boys who worked 
in the ordnance repair shops. 

The shops were located on the old Roman road built by Julius 
Caesar, when he conquered Gaul before the birth of Christ. Joan of 
Arc made her famous charge and led her troops along this road. A 
large statue of the famous heroine stands at Mehun and she is much 
revered by the populace. 

TOTAL CASUALTIES 

Total casualties by division of the American Expeditionary Forces, 
killed, wounded, missing in action and prisoners: 

Second 24,429 Thirty-fifth 7,745 

First 23,974 Eighty-ninth 7,093 

Twenty-eighth 14,417 Thirtieth 6,893 

Third 16,356 Twenty-ninth 5,972 

Thirty-second 13,630 Ninety-first 5,838 

Fourth 12,948 Eightieth 5,133 

Forty-second 12,252 Thirty-seventh 4,303 

Ninetieth 9,710 Seventy-ninth 3,323 

Seventy-seventh 9,423 Thirty-sixth 2,397 

Twenty-sixth 8,950 Seventh 1,546 

Eighty-second 8,300 Ninety-second 1,399 

Fifth 8,280 Eighty-first 1,062 

Seventy-eighth 8,133 Sixth 285 

Twenty-seventh 7,940 Eighty-eighth 63 

Thirty-third 7,860 

The total battle casualties of the twenty-nine divisions that fought 
are two hundred and forty thousand one hundred and ninety-seven. 



Air Service 

Henry Eads of Versailles was one of the first Ripley county men 
enlisted in the air service, entering the aviation branch of the Navy on 
May 26, 1917, and being sent to France in October, 1917. After seven 
weeks at a French aviation school in Paris he was sent to Dunkirk, 
where he remained till August 10, 1918, when he was sent to Zeebrugge, 
Belgium, to assist in preparing an aviation base. This was still uncom- 
pleted at the signing of the armistice. 

Dunkirk was under shell fire during the entire time of the war, 
being attacked by air, sea and land. Raiding and observation parties 
went out every night except on stormy nights when air work was 
impracticable. There were only one hundred and twenty-five men in 
this naval air force. It was never increased but was kept up by replace- 
ments. Fourteen men were lost from the unit in all. They used French 
and English planes for their work. The entire camp at Dunkirk had to 
be constructed after their arrival. On one occasion Henry Eads' plane 
fell three hundred feet, injuring his knee, but he was otherwise un- 
harmed. At another time his lieutenant went up in Henry's place. 
The machine fell into German hands and the aviator with the lieutenant 
were prisoners until after the signing of the armistice. 

Fred H. Baas, John Wernke, Lawrence Nickol, Roy Fruchtnicht, 
Frank Walterman and Joseph Lindenmaier of Batesville were all sent 
as selective service men to the aviation repair depot, Speedway, Indian- 
apolis, Indiana, for training in July, 1918. They were sent here because 
of being wood-workers or tailors for the fabric department. Their 
first work was constructing airplanes, twelve new Curtiss machines 
being completed. Later, the repair work absorbed all their time. The 
Speedway repair depot was the largest aviation repair center in the 
United States. All the flying fields in the eastern half of the United 
States sent their planes here for repairs. 

The framework of the wings was made of spruce and fir cut in the 
northwest wood-cutting camps. The wood was selected for its light- 
ness and toughness. The wooden frame was then covered with canvas 
sewed on by hand by the soldiers in the fabric department. The pro- 
pellers were made of walnut because of its denseness and hardness. It 
was used for gunbarrel stocks for the same reasons. The propellers are 
cut something like oars for a boat, disk-shaped as to surface, and in 
size about six feet long. The propeller is used like the crank on an 
automobile to start the machine. When the plane rises, the air catches 
the propeller and keeps it moving. If the propeller stops, the machine 
falls instantly. The engine can be shut off while in the air, but must 
be started again before the propeller stops. 

De Haviland and Espano-Swede, with the Curtiss, were the ma- 
chines used, the first and third proving most successful. Liberty motors 
were used in the De Haviland. 

The squadrons were organized for overseas service, four hundred 
having gone from the camp before the armistice. A squadron consisted 

(142) 




1. Arthur Schein. 2. Albert Lambert. 3. John Kreuzman. 4. Mike Vonderheide. 5. George 
Oilier. 6. Collis Huntington. 7. Floyd Jarvis. 8. Robert F. Herin. 9. Nick Prickel. 10. Frank 
Strothman. 11. Earl Arndt. 12. Frank Eckstein. 



144 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

of one hundred fifty men, including all necessary repair workmen, cooks, 
officers, and so on. Insignia used was the wing of an airplane, with 
green hat cords. 

Ralph Hyatt of Versailles served in the aviation section of the 
signal corps as electrician. He was assigned to balloon service, finally 
being assigned to the 26th Balloon Company. He was sent overseas in 
April, 1918, but was still in balloon school when the armistice was 
signed. The work of the balloons was to observe the enemy positions, 
movements and so on and report through the switchboards on the ground 
near the artillery units. There was a telephone in the basket of each 
balloon which was connected through the switchboard with the battery 
commanders. French-made balloons were used at first. Later, 
American ones, mostly made by the Goodyear Rubber Company at 
Akron, Ohio, were used. The sausage balloon was the type required. 
They were about thirty-five or thirty-six meters long and about one- 
third as wide. Hydrogen gas was used to fill the balloons. It required 
two hundred cylinders of gas, each containing one hundred and ninety- 
two cubic feet to fill a balloon. The cost of filling one was about twelve 
hundred dollars. 

The baskets were four and one-half feet square by five and one-half 
feet in de^th, made out of bamboo, tough and light, suspended from the 
rigging of the balloon by ordinary hemp or cotton ropes. Captive 
balloons were held by a cable attached to a motor truck; they were 
called captive because of being fastened. Occasionally a cable broke 
and one escaped. If an observer was in the basket he could let out 
the gas and come down slowly if within the Allied lines. If not within 
a reasonable distance of the American lines the balloon was abandoned, 
the observer jumping out in a parachute. Every man who made a para- 
chute jump was given the Croix de Guerre, whatever the reason for his 
jump. 

There were twenty-three balloon companies in active service. Each 
carried extra balloons, three at least. One was used at a time, and in 
case of loss another was immediately sent up. Forty-two balloons were 
destroyed by German shell-fire and bombs from airplanes. Only twenty 
seconds was required for the explosion and burning of a balloon when 
hit by an inflammable bullet. The observer was in the greatest danger 
as his falling parachute might be ignited by a spark from the burning 
balloon. Each company had five observers and a ground officer who 
directed the maneuvering of the balloon and had general charge of the 
field. The balloons were "put to bed" when not in use. A "bed" was a 
cleared space in the woods, camouflaged so as to be hidden from enemy 
observation. The ground had to be cleared of roots and stumps so as 
not to tear the balloon. The woods not only offered hiding for the 
balloon but protection from the wind. If there was no convenient 
woods a shelter was built by using branches of fallen trees. 

The aviation mail service was typical of the system used in the 
entire American Expeditionary Forces. Alva Bronnenberg of Versailles 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 145 

served as a clerk in this service at aviation headquarters at Tours, later 
in postal and express service at Bourges, France. The mail for this 
section came from New York to Bordeaux, France, and then on to 
Tours, or Bourges, being distributed from there to all parts of the 
service. Soldiers' addresses were kept by a card-filing system kept at the 
central records office. All mail for a regiment was delivered at head- 
quarters and distributed to the companies by mail orderlies. Each com- 
pany had its own orderly who delivered the mail to individuals. If any 
mail was not delivered because of absence of the soldier it was returned 
to the central postoffice and the card system used to locate the individual 
addressed. The units were being constantly moved from place to place. 
Soldiers were killed, wounded or sent to the hospital because of sickness. 
Some were made prisoners. These things prevented the accurate com- 
pilation of the cards. Each soldier's address was supposed to be kept 
corrected to date but the failure of commanding officers to report 
promptly when changes were being made accounted for much of the 
delay in delivering mail. 

Notification of change of units was sent in by telegram but changes 
of address in personnel had to be sent in by officers in writing. Con- 
sidering all the duties of the central postoffice perhaps they were not so 
neglectful. Similarity in names, similarity of names of units, and care- 
lessness of soldiers themselves in ascertaining and sending correct 
addresses to their friends were some of the reasons for non-delivery of 
mail. If each soldier had included his serial number in his address 
fewer mistakes would have been made. Some mail was lost in trans- 
portation from various causes, including the sinking of vessels and the 
shelling of railways. 



Hospital Service 

A large number of Ripley county men were enlisted in the medical 
department of the army, serving in base and field hospital work. Some 
served as ambulance men, first aid, litter bearers, hospital orderlies, 
nurses, cooks, and so forth. Litter bearers were sent out at intervals 
of a few hours both day and night during battles to carry in the 
wounded. The litters were made of canvas with a pole at each side. 
Bearers went in on foot or crawled on hands and knees when necessary 
to avoid shell fire. Shells could be avoided by falling to the ground if 
they were being fired at different heights as they were always aimed at 
certain objectives. Every wounded man was carried to the field hos- 
pital as soon as possible. After treatment they were sent on in 
ambulances or by train to the base hospitals. After the armistice, the 
sanitary service men transported all sick and wounded from the camp 
hospitals to the base hospitals. Badly wounded men were at all times 
taken to the base hospital as soon as possible. Many of these hospitals 
were located in England, others as far from the battle-field as practical. 
Men able to walk to the first aid stations were allowed to do so, thereby 
leaving litter bearers to help more seriously wounded comrades. 



146 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

The wounded men belonging on the Pacific Coast were sent home 
by way of the Panama Canal. New Zealanders and Australians were 
sent home the same way. At least one hospital ship a month passed 
during the war, many more being sent through after the armistice. 
Ships constantly brought the wounded men who could not be returned 
to their regiments, back to the United States before as well as after the 
armistice. 

As many as eleven thousand patients were cared for in some of the 
base hospitals during the war. Twenty-one thousand men were handled 
from October 1 to November 20, by the 162nd Field Hospital at 
Cheppy, France, during the Argonne drive. This hospital, relocated at 
Longwy, received a large number of prisoners of all nationalities return- 
ing from German camps after the armistice. All were in very poor 
condition from lack of food, unsanitary conditions and so on. 

Headquarters Service 

George Engel and Frank Gauck of Batesville served throughout the 
war at general headquarters of the American Expeditionary Forces at 
Chaumont, France. George Engel worked as a clerk in the library 
section. The work here was to send out training manuals on methods 
of trench righting. They made their own pamphlets and sent them out 
to all branches of the army. Theirs was the first organization of the 
kind at general headquarters. 

Frank Gauck was in the statistical and personnel department. He 
organized casual companies and sent them in and out of camp or hos- 
pitals as the case might be and took care of all small detachments from 
general headquarters, attending to pay, quarters and rations. The work 
was varied, and many exciting incidents occurred. The location of 
Pershing's headquarters was kept secret from the general public, but it 
was bombarded by airplanes practically every night. A big ammuni- 
tion "dump", as the storage places were called, was at Choncerey, six 
kilometers from Chaumont. This was the largest ammunition "dump" 
of the Allied forces and was the object of the bombing. German 
propaganda was also distributed by these airplanes, consisting of dodgers, 
circulars and cards asking such questions as: "Why are the Americans 
fighting? You can't win the war." 

Part of this personnel work was the burying of the dead who were 
killed or died of disease at Chaumont. Nine were put into one grave. 
The bodies were placed in wooden box-shaped coffins. Base hospital No. 
90 was at Chaumont on the banks of the Marne. About one thousand 
graves were located there. Burial on the battle-field was, of course, 
different. The bodies were rolled in blankets as coffins were not to be 
had. The Grave Administration Company attended to the burials, and 
made records. One identification tag was left attached to the bodv and 
one used on the marker at the head of the grave. Each grave was 
marked by a small wooden cross which carried the name and organiza- 
tion to which the soldier belonged with the date of death, also his army 



1. Frank Battisti. 2. Harry Zurline. 3. Albert Bodenberg. 4. John Henry Meyer. 5. Carl A. 
Mistier. 6. Edgar Wooley. 7. Harry Gortemiller. 8. Martin Smith. 9. Anthony J. Rosfeld. 10. 
Martin Prickle. 11. Fred A. Pohlar. 12. Lonnie Johnson. 



10 



148 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

serial number. Big glass wine bottles were used at Chaumont to secure 
the identification. The names, with other information, were written 
on slips of paper and sealed in the bottles. 

The General Headquarters Battalion consisted of four companies, 
A, B, C and D. D company was sent to Tours in the supply service. 
Companies A, B and C were in the zone of advance, general head- 
quarters being inside the danger zone. Tours was in the safety zone. 

Supply Service 

The supply service saw to the furnishing of all supplies for the army 
— food, clothing, ammunition and all kinds of necessary war supplies. 
A number of Ripley county men served in different capacities in the 
supply service. The trench drivers, carrying ammunition and food to 
the front-line trenches, had some of the most hazardous and difficult 
work of the war to perform. The roads were constantly shelled by the 
enemy so that much detouring across fields had to be made and both 
roads and fields were constantly torn by shells. Horses, wagons, and 
mule teams were also used in the transportation of supplies. The men 
were organized into wagon companies or truck companies as the case 
demanded. 

The 114th Supply Train got its first training in cross-country work 
by driving Dodge and Liberty trucks from Detroit, Michigan, to 
Baltimore, Maryland, carrying parts of motors and motor trucks. 
Washington commended this unit as doing the most efficient work of 
that kind. 

Military Police 

A few Ripley county men served in every department of the many 
parts of the army, a number being enlisted in the military police service. 
It formed a very necessary and interesting department, being to the 
army precisely what the police system is to cities and the country at large. 
Their duties were to look after traffic, handle prisoners of war, keep 
order among the soldiers, and, in connection with the civil authorities 
of the towns, to maintain order among the civilians in their association 
with the soldiers stationed among them. 

Some of the military police were given special assignments with the 
civil authorities and secret service work in running down "boot-legging," 
thieving and other crimes occurring among soldiers or civilian population 
about the camps. 

In France, the military police had to maintain traffic conditions, 
serve as guides in the trenches and guard all prisoners. All captured 
soldiers were turned over to the provost-marshal, who corresponds to 
the chief of police. The military police was also called upon to carry 
dispatches and serve as runners from one army unit to another. The 
provost-marshal was a colonel in rank ; assistant provost-marshals were 
captains. Major-General E. M. Lewis was provost-marshal general of 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 149 

the entire American Expeditionary Forces. He was commander of the 
38th Division at Hattiesburg, Miss., while they were in training at 
Camp Shelby but he was sent to France ahead of his division and made 
provost-marshal general. 

A guide's specific duties were to show the officers through the 
trenches and to lead new troops in for replacement and relief. They 
had to study out their maps to learn the routes. According to the num- 
ber on duty, the military police lost a higher percentage of men than 
any other unit. There were two hundred military police to every 
division. The prisoners were kept in stockades built about seventy-five 
feet square. A guard was assigned to each of the four sides. Two rows 
of wire fencing about ten feet apart fenced the enclosures. The posts 
were about ten feet high, with an incurving brace at the top. About 
forty strands of barbed wire was used. The guards' beat was between 
the double line of wires. Tents were stretched inside the stockades on 
boarded-up bases about five feet high. 

Two kinds of prisoners were held in the camps, general and sum- 
mary. The general prisoners were tried for serious offenses by courts- 
martial and sentenced when convicted to a Federal prison. They were 
never out of the prison except under a heavy guard, manacled and 
sometimes shackled. The summary prisoners were tried for various 
light offenses and were usually taken out in squads to police the camp. 
This meant cleaning and doing the general dirty work of the camp. 
A. W. O. L.'s were usually punished in this way. 

Brightly Severinghaus of Batesville served in the criminal investi- 
gating department of the military police in France. He was detailed to 
assist in locating the three Y. M. C. A. defaulters or thieves, as they 
used various means to secure the money they afterwards stole. All 
three were captured and sentenced to the Federal prison at Fort 
Leavenworth. Much of the criticism of the Y. M. C. A. in France 
originated in these offenses. There was no department of the army that 
was free from crooks, as enlistments were made from all classes of 
society and not even the Y. M. C. A. escaped its share. These three 
men stole an aggregate of two hundred and ten thousand francs, or 
about forty-two thousand dollars. This one investigation chanced to be 
of peculiar interest and importance to the American people. 

Musicians 

A number of our boys having musical ability became members of 
various military bands. Amos Wesler, Leonard Miller and George 
Karl of Batesville, Russell Sutton of Milan, and Kenan Wager of 
Osgood were among those assigned to this service. The 112th Infantry 
band won in a contest with three other bands in March, 1919, and 
were sent on a compensation trip to Monte Carlo from LeMans, France, 
by way of Tours, Lyons, and Marseilles. They attended the opera "La 
Tosca" in Monte Carlo and went by automobile into Italy for a short 
trip. The gold medal won in another musical contest was presented to 
the band leader. Bands from seven other divisions took part in this con- 



ISO RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 

test. The 112th Infantry belonged to the 28th Division. The military 
bands were of great value to the morale of the army, as music has ever 
been to all armies. When the 5th and 6th Marines marched to battle 
at Chateau-Thierry singing "Over There", full-throated to its swing- 
ing measure, it was a thing to assure them of victory as its confidence 
shattered the enemy's advance. The bugler sounded all calls to the 
army, reveille, retreat at sunset, "taps" at bedtime, marching calls and 
the final "taps" as the last sound of farewell over a comrade's grave. 
The drums beat time for parades and marches into battle and out of 
battle, and in final triumphal processions through the streets of Paris, 
London, New York, and Washington, and on to the many state capitals 
and county seats and home towns, as the disbanding millions of the 
American Expeditionary Forces were finally welcomed home. 

Miscellaneous 

Many famous historical places and scenes were visited or witnessed 
by the Ripley county men in the World War. Monte Carlo, as one 
of the famous show places of the world, has been described by many of 
them. One boy summed it up by saying it was an ideal place to go for 
a honeymoon — though his honeymoon waited for him in America. All 
who saw Monte Carlo agreed that after the trip was made they under- 
stood why the country was known as "sunny France". The larger 
number of the American Expeditionary Forces will remember only a 
sunless France dripping rain over seas of mud day after day, until they 
almost forgot there were ever any intervals of sunshine, for the fighting 
was done in northern France and Monte Carlo is in the south. 

St. Amelia, France, is an historic place, where Napoleon once 
quartered his whole army in hiding in its subterranean caves. The city 
is built over caves on a hillside. These caves are cut into chambers 
from solid stone, tiers on tiers of rooms along underground passages. 

Cathedrals and churches everywhere proved to be of greatest inter- 
est. The churches of Europe are its shrines in many ways. A com- 
munity's history, its art and religion have been centered and embodied in 
its church. In mediaeval times the church was its only permanent center 
and refuge. So it results that the most striking and historic buildings in 
most places of Belgium, France, and even England, are the churches. 

Belleme, west of Paris, took the boys who visited it back to the 
time of Christ in its historical legends. It was founded by the Gauls. 
The first Chateau of Yves de Creil was partly destroyed by the English 
Count of Warwick in a battle in the fifth century. It contains an 
ancient chapel built long before that time. The moat and castle en- 
trance with part of the chateau's first wall are still there. St. Sauveur 
church at Belleme was built in the fifteenth century. It contains paint- 
ings of St. Catharine, an "Adoration of the Shepherds" and a Mignardo 
in one of the chapels. In the St. Thomas Chapel there is a painting 
called "Apparition of Christ", by Salviati. In the Chapel of Our Lady 
are fragments of a stained glass window by Rubens. A "Descent of 



1. Harry Fischer. 2. Ed. Rimstidt. 3. Sergeant Walter Morrison. 4. Charles Massing. 5. Earl 
C. Kleiner. 6. Benjamin G. Johnson. 7. James H. Fisher. S. Clyde E. Grow. 9. Charles Sembach. 
LO. Dale Jams. 11. James Shook. 12. Harry Wullner. 



152 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

the Cross", painted by DuFresne in 1669, is in the main part of the 
church. St. Martin, a little town near Belleme, has a church built in 
the tenth century. An interesting church was visited on the Rhine, 
near Coblenz. The path leading to it winds up the face of the cliff 
and makes arduous climbing. It is called "The Way of the Cross" and 
statues and shrines mark the resting places. 

Winchester, England, Glasgow, Scotland, various castles and his- 
toric points in England and Ireland were visited by the passing troops, 
as well as the great cities of Paris and London, and the ports of Brest, 
Nazaire, Bordeaux, Calais, LeHavre, and Marseilles. A castle was 
pointed out at one place in France as the home of Richard Coeur de 
Lion, while king of England and part of France. In England, Oliver 
Cromwell's old castle, and some interesting old schools, ruins and forts 
were visited as opportunity offered. 

A Ripley county boy seems to have had a share in almost every im- 
portant undertaking of the war. Several of our Coast Artillerymen were 
ordered to Italy, but the signing of the armistice prevented their taking 
part in the fighting there. A number of Franklin county soldiers who 
received their mail on a Batesville route served in Italy in the drive 
across the Piave River. Howard Smith of Brown township served in 
the Northern Russia Expeditionary Force on the Murman Coast and 
southward six hundred miles into the interior. His unit, the 44th 
Engineers, were five months in the Russian service after serving seven 
months in France. Less than one thousand American soldiers saw 
service in both France and Russia. The ships used by this expedition 
were so covered with ice during a part of the time as to resemble the 
frozen-in ships of the polar expeditions. 

John Schraub of Olean, Brown township, of Company E, 320th 
Infantry, 80th Division, was transferred to the United States Mission, 
interior of Germany, and sent on detached service to Quedlinburg, near 
Berlin, from January 15, 1919, to the end of August, 1919. This 
mission consisted of two hundred and fifty men and seventy-eight 
officers. Their work was to feed, clothe, repatriate and send home 
Russian prisoners of war held by the Germans. The funds were 
furnished by the inter-allied nations. They were specially commended 
for this service by the governments concerned. 

Our boys were well represented in the Engineering Corps, working 
on roads, railroads, trenches, camps, telephone and telegraph lines, docks 
for the landing of ships, bridges, hospitals, and so on. Civilian workers 
of all nationalities were employed in this construction work and were 
under the control of the engineering units. One piece of work accom- 
plished by the Eighteenth engineers was the light railway and the build- 
ing of bridges between Metz and Verdun. 

William D. Spencer of Versailles served in the Veterinary Corps, 
being in France for eight months at Veterinary Hospital Fourteen, 
located at Lux. 

A number of our men served in the Quartermaster's Corps, among 
them being Walter Bloemer of Batesville, who took part in the cross- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S TART IN THE WORLD WAR 153 

country truck driving between Detroit and Baltimore during his final 
training. We sent one Y. M. C. A. man and almost claim credit for 
two more who served as chaplains — Rev. Otis McMullen, who was 
pastor of the Sunman Union Chapel, but whose home was at Blue 
Ridge, Indiana; the other was Rev. Perry Gibbs, whose wife was Miss 
Flora Newman of Laughery township, but they were not residents of 
Ripley county at the time of his enlistment. 

The experiences of our soldiers and sailors in the various battles 
and incidents of the war can best be told in their own words where 
these letters and stories have been available. So many interesting 
accounts are included in our men's various records, it is difficult to 
make a selection from the thousands or more without writing a volume 
to contain them all, which should certainly eventually be done. 

William Wernke of Batesville, who fought at the Argonne Forest, 
in Company G, 115th Infantry, 29th Division, describes his experience 
as follows: "On October 8, 1918, we went 'over the top' at 6:30 
a. m. at Molbruck Hill. Our regiment brought in about two thousand 
prisoners this first day. The advance continued on the next day when 
We 'dug in' for the night. 'Digging in' and establishing a line means 
digging holes for shelter about three feet deep, large enough for two or 
three soldiers to occupy each one. The advance began again on the 
tenth, going on for two or three days, when we established a second line. 
Stayed about three days on this line. On the fifteenth we were called 
to take over another sector from the 116th Infantry, who were badly 
shattered. We held this sector for two days. From here we went back 
to the supporting lines and rested four days. I was then sent on combat 
liaison, that means keeping connection on the line between the different 
companies, carrying messages so as to keep all moving together. Also 
keeping in contact with the divisions on the right and left. Remained 
on this work two days and was then sent back to supporting lines. 

"This fighting was all in the woods after the first day which was in 
the open till 5 p. m. The forest consisted of all kinds of deciduous 
trees, the largest trees the American soldiers had ever seen. The Ger- 
mans had held the Argonne Forest so long they had built board walks 
and club houses and had brought many pianos to the various dugouts. 
They had cut the small trees and branches and piled them into dense 
barricades among the larger trees. These extended everywhere, broken 
only by intersecting roads. The ground covered by these woods was 
hilly and rough. 

"The barrage fire put over by the American artillery in advance of 
the infantry was used to clear away this rubbish so the foot-soldiers 
could follow up the attack. German machine gun nests were located 
in every part of the woods and several German divisions were quartered 
there, possibly thirty thousand men. The infantry fighting was done 
with rifles, hand grenades and revolvers, the enemy being about thirty 
yards from the advancing Americans. No real hand-to-hand fighting 
occurred. The casualties were very heavy, some companies coming out 
with only thirty or forty men left. The enemy fire against the Amer- 
ican and French was continuous from machine guns and heavy artillery. 



154 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV A R 

The 115th lost several men killed, and only ninety were left off the 
casualty list. A company's full strength was two hundred and fifty men. 
The 115th had only two hundred and fifteen. Company G got three 
decorations for the Argonne fighting, two French crosses and a citation 
bestowed upon two sergeants and a lieutenant." 

Earl Kleiner of Company D, 361st Infantry, 91st Division, whose 
home is at Batesville, describes the infantry weapons: "We used Enfield 
and Chau-Chau automatic rifles of French make that fired fourteen 
shots without reloading. The Enfield fired five shots. We also used 
hand grenades and rifle grenades. The rifle grenades were fired from 
a tube fitted over the end of the gun, a cartridge carrying out the 
grenade in its passage. The squads using these were called rifle 
grenades or automatic rifle squads, according to the weapons used. 
Liaison squads were half of them runners, carrying liaison messages, 
the other half throwing hand grenades. A platoon usually consisted of 
six squads of eight men and a corporal, though not always of the same 
formation. A company has four platoons, the size of the platoon de- 
pending upon the number of men available. Our unit was held as 
support behind the front lines from October 31 to November 7, 1918, 
in the Lys-Scheldt offensive. We were under shell fire only four days. 
We had orders to 'go over the top' on the morning of November 11th 
to take the city of Adenaard, Belgium, which was still held by the 
Germans, but were halted on the morning of November 10th because 
of the pending armistice. We moved into Adenaard after the retreating 
Germans on the evening of November 11th and stayed there until 
November 18th. The refugees began coming through the lines on the 
morning of November 11. They were extremely destitute, being very 
insufficiently clothed. Most of them found their homes destroyed. 
They had no funds, so a bread and soup kitchen was opened for them in 
the Hotel de Ville. For shelter the refugees were quartered in cellars 
and other parts of large, empty buildings such as stores and warehouses. 
The soldiers cleaned up the city of Adenaard while occupying it. The 
streets had to be cleaned of refuse such as brick and plaster which was 
hauled outside. Church property was moved from places of storage in 
the convent back to the churches not destroyed. Nearly all the churches 
were destroyed or seriously damaged. Only one of about five or six 
churches was in good condition. Windows were all broken out every- 
where by the shock of German shell fire. One very large church had 
been used as an observation tower and the Germans had machine guns 
and one-pounders up in the tower from which they had been .firing on 
the Americans. 

"Another stronghold in this city was the Belgian prison, a brick 
building enclosed with a three-foot thick wall. The Scheldt river cuts 
the city in two parts, the prison being opposite from the main part of 
the city. The bridges had all been mined by the Germans, and these 
mines were thrown as soon as the Americans entered the city. They 
were rebuilt later. An American soldier was buried close to the gate 
of the prison. He was shot by a German sniper. He was an Illinois 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD Jl.lR 155 

boy, formerly of the 335th Regiment, 84th Division, as I was before 
being transferred to the 91st after reaching France." 

George Thiel of Batesville served in Battery D, 146th Field 
Artillery, 41st Division. Extracts from his letters and papers sent 
home tell the following story: "Was enlisted as a volunteer at Walla 
Walla, Washington, on September 11, 1917. Trained a short time at 
Camp Mills, Long Island, New York, and sailed from Hoboken, New 
Jersey, on December 24, 1917, going by way of Halifax, Novia Scotia, 
to Liverpool, England. A northerly route was used, passing near Green- 
land. The fleet consisted of seven ships. Our route through England 
went by way of Camp Morn Hill, Winchester, to Southampton and 
then to LeHavre, France. Went by rail to Camp De Longe near Bor- 
deaux for training under French officers. We used 155 mm. Grande 
Porto Filloux guns. Completed training at Libourne, Gironde. Was 
sent to the front on July 4, 1918. The 66th Artillery Corps became the 
Corps Artillery, First Army Corps, First Army. We marched to advance 
position along the Marne and fired our first shot at Chateau-Thierry on 
July 11. Our two major offensives were the Champagne-Marne on 
July 15-18 and the Aisne-Marne from July 18 to August 6. The last 
shot in this campaign was fired on August 11. 

"The regiment was assembled at Bois de Chatelet near Bouvardes 
on August 12. After cleaning and overhauling our guns we went to 
Ville-sur-Marne. We began operations at St. Mihiel on September 12. 
Marched to Blencourt near Verdun on September 19, battalions being 
stationed at Bois de Swiy. Began firing in the Meuse-Argonne offensive 
at 11 p. m., September 25 and remained in continuous action until 
November 11, our last firing positions in the advance being near 
Montigny, from where we fired on Stenay and other points on the east 
bank of the Meuse. We crossed the Meuse at Dun-sur-Meuse on the 
morning of November 1 1 and established the regimental post at Brande- 
ville. Began the march to the Rhine on December 2, 1918, going as a 
part of the Third American Army. Crossed the French-German 
frontier on December 11, going by way of Luxemburg. Crossed to 
the east bank of the Rhine on December 31, occupying the towns of 
Greuzhaven, Nauort, Stromberg, Kaan, Alsbach, Wirscheid and Ses- 
senbach. Positions were selected for the defense of the Coblenz 
Bridgehead in case of further hostilities. 

"The 155 mm. G. P. F. gun is a French long range rifle of com- 
paratively recent invention, the first one being made in July, 1917. In 
traveling position it weighs about fourteen tons, and fires a projectile a 
little more than six inches in diameter and weighing about ninety 
pounds. Each gun costs about $40,000 and each round of ammunition 
about $95. Regimental equipment cost about $3,000,000. While at 
the front the 146th Field Artillery fired seventy thousand rounds at a 
cost of about $6,500,000. It was a motorized unit, the guns being 
carried at the front by a large French four-wheel drive tractor weighing 
nine tons. The regiment was equipped after reaching Coblenz with 
ten-ton Holt caterpillar tractors. The personnel and material was 




1. First Lieutenant C. D. Ryan. 2. First Lieutenant Francis I. Row. 3. First Lieutenant E. E. 
Heath. 4. M. L. Samms. Captain Medical Reserve Corps. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 157 

transported in trucks, automobiles and motorcycles. It required two 
and one-half hours for the brigade to pass a given point, traveling at 
normal speed of ten kilometers per hour. When in column on the 
march, the distance from front to rear of the regiment was about ten 
kilometers. The troops ate turnips and cabbages planted by the Germans 
as they occupied the evacuated territory, finding the fresh green food a 
treat. 

"We found the Germans using bread and meat tickets, and having 
only black bread hard as a stone. They wore socks that had been 
patched so much they were all patches. They had had no new wool for 
four years. The American soldiers received more meat for one person 
than an entire German family got for a whole week. The Germans 
smoked leaves off the trees in lieu of tobacco. 

"The Army of Occupation took morning hikes of about four miles, 
took boat rides up the Rhine and long walks in the woods for recrea- 
tion. The Y. M. C. A. planned excursions on the Rhine and furnished 
reading material. Three or four hundred soldiers went on a single 
trip, the Y furnishing the boat and all expenses. We went as far as the 
French Bridgehead on the trip 1 took in February, 1919. We especially 
admired the vineyards on the cliffs and the many castles along the way. 
The regimental band went along to furnish music. The Y had shows 
every night, also boxing and wrestling. Cigarettes, cocoa and cakes 
were free. We visited a noted German pottery at Hohr which was 
near where the 148th Field Artillery was located. These two regiments 
were called the 'Artillery Tramps,' as they fought wherever needed, 
being about the only American unit using large guns. The C. A. C. 
was just reaching France when the armistice was signed." 

Arthur Cramer of Batesville served in Battery C, 53rd C. A. C, in 
Railway Heavy Artillery. This unit used fifteen and five-eighths inch 
guns, 400 mm. They required seventy-two hours to mount, so were 
moved on railroads for this reason. They fought at St. Mihiel fifteen 
days in September, 1918, then returned to Haussimont and prepared 
to go to Italy for further service. The signing of the armistice pre- 
vented the carrying out of these plans. 

The regiment was stationed about five kilometers behind the lines, 
for firing and Battery C was not reached by the enemy fire. Battery D 
had two guns blown up. Battery C fired six hundred rounds in the 
fifteen days at St. Mihiel, using a two hundred-pound powder charge to 
each round. They were protected by gun pits, easel pits six or seven 
feet deep, and recoil pits five feet deep. 

Trench-mortar batteries were an important part of the Coast 
Artillery. The trench-mortars were short guns mounted on small 
platforms and were to be used in the second line trenches. Like the 
machine gun companies they were called the "Suicide Batteries." Harry 
H. Marsh, of Versailles, was a member of the 304th Trench Mortar 
Battalion, Company C. 

Byron Winsor of the Fiftieth C. A. C, Headquarters Company, 



158 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

was at Brest, France, reaching there on October 21, 1918. His regi- 
ment's main service was on roads and railroads. They also worked in 
stone quarries, saw mills, cutting lumber for cantonments and board 
walks, cared for horses and dug graves when needed. 

When President Wilson arrived in Brest on December 13, all the 
soldiers in Brest lined up in single file on either side of the road from 
the docks into the city where the president and his party were to pass. 
He was met by the Mayor of Brest with a reception committee accom- 
panied by Miss Margaret Wilson, who had been singing to the soldiers 
at the Y. M. C. A. at Pontanazen Barracks. 

About forty thousand school children of Brest went to meet 
President Wilson on his arrival, singing "Hall, hail, the gang's all 
here", accompanied only by a French Drum Corps. A Red Cross 
secretary of the Lake Division, reporting the same incident said that 
happened to be the only American song they knew and they supposesd it 
to be our national anthem, judging by the way the soldiers had used it 
in the camps. The receiving line stood from 12 o'clock until 4 p. m. 
The soldiers stood at attention while the President and party, consisting 
of General Pershing, Mrs. Wilson, Miss Margaret Wilson and the 
receiving committee, about seven cars in all, passed through the double 
line from the docks to the city. 

The stone wall at Pontanazen Barracks was a part of the strongly 
fortified fort used by Napoleon for headquarters during part of his 
campaigns. 

Benjamin Johnson of Laughery township, served in Machine Gun 
Company, 362nd Infantry, 91st Division in the Lys-Scheldt offensive in 
Belgium, from October 31 to November 11, 1918. His story carries 
some interesting points not told elsewhere. 

"Our first job on entering any French town was to clean it up 
according to the ideas of the American Army. The boys called their 
trips in the French box cars. 'Hog Excursions.' They were packed, 
thirty to thirty-five men to one car. Half could sit down, half had to 
stand in the small car. They were shut in without lights and struggled 
to know who should sit down next. Sometimes they saw British and 
French soldiers in passenger coaches, though the Americans seemed 
never to ride so. 

"A machine gun company had twelve guns, one gun to each squad of 
nine men. Each squad had two mules with drivers and one supply cart. 
One cart carried the gun, water can, oil, tools and extra parts for the 
gun. The supply cart carried the boxes of ammunition. The complete 
number of men in a machine gun company was one hundred seventy-two, 
mess sergeants, cooks and all. The officers were a captain, first lieu- 
tenant and two second lieutenants. There were six cooks, one mess 
sergeant and twenty-four 'mule skinners' in charge of a sergeant, and 
one saddler to keep the harness in repair. The 'mule skinners' took 
care of the mules and drove the carts. The carts, with drivers, were 
left in the rear when the place of attack was reached and the guns and 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 159 

ammunition carried to the front by hand. The men carried automatic 
Colt revolvers for personal defense. 

"When we were getting ready to come home our captain told us to 
pack up our personal belongings, such as comfort kits, sweaters, and so 
forth, in Red Cross boxes and marked accordingly for shipment. The 
English refused to land these boxes unless a duty were paid. The 
Americans refused to pay on principle and the result was that the com- 
pany lost the boxes." 

Some American cavalry units were sent to France, but the Ripley 
county cavalrymen remained in service on the Mexican border. There 
were a number enlisted in this department of the army, including Harry 
Engel and Raymond Firsich of Batesville. Their work was the patrol 
of the Mexican border. This meant an occasional skirmish or raid. 
In a fight at Juarez, thirty-five Mexicans were killed with no American 
casualties. On another occasion, four troops of cavalry went on a 
"hike." Four officers and two privates strayed across the line and were 
captured. They were missing for eight days. No raiding party was 
ordered, but a detachment went out ostensibly to "hunt deer," and 
"shoot them if necessary." The hunting party returned with the six 
men. They had been found tied to a post in a small house. A number 
of Mexican guards were killed in the rescue and the house was burned. 
This occurred near Auga Preta, Mexico. 

John Kreuzman of Batesville, being a baker by trade, served with 
the 306th Field Baking Company. He served overseas from November 
1, 1917, to April, 1919. He gives a brief but interesting account of his 
work : 

"Our company was the first to bake white bread in France. When- 
ever we found a French bakery we used their ovens, which were new to 
all of us. You build your fire right in the oven and spread it all over 
the oven to have even heat, and after it is burned out, you pull the 
ashes out and put your bread in. Our field ovens were put up in five 
minutes and torn down in two minutes. Each oven has three chambers 
and each chamber holds six pans of bread. The bread we made was 
called field bread, one loaf weighing twelve pounds. The amount our 
detachment of thirty-six men turned out in twenty-four hours was 
thirty thousand pounds. Our company was second on the list for having 
the best record up to the time we left France." 

As Told in Many Letters and Narratives 

Number One 

"I was sent to Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky, on 
September 20, 1917. Was put in the Depot Brigade, was there eleven 
days and was then transferred to Company A, 335th Infantry, 84th 
Division. We were trained about six months, then sent to Camp 
Sevier, Greenville, South Carolina. Were there about three weeks and 
were then sent to Camp Merritt, New Jersey. There we received our 




1. Captain I. A. Whetlatch. 2. Captain H. P. Butts. 3. Captain M. Joseph Coomes. 4. 
Captain L. T. Cox. 5. Captain (Dr.) George Withrow. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE UORLD WAR 161 

clothes for sailing overseas. On the seventeenth day of May we sailed 
from Boston, Massachusetts, to New York, from there to Halifax. 
Were there two days, then sailed for France, arriving there the fifth 
day of June. Edgar D. Wooley." 

Number Two 

"After our arrival in France we stopped at a camp at Calais, dis- 
posed of some of our clothes, cleaned up our rifles and had some drilling. 
After leaving Calais, we 'hiked' for five days, stopped for a few days, 
drilled some and hiked for four days longer. Arrived at Mils, where 
we got two weeks' drilling, then we made our way to the front at 
Ypres, which was called the Flanders front. Was up at the front for 
twenty-six days. Came back for some rest and more drilling. Was 
back five days. Returned to the front and went 'over the top' a few 
times. Came back, went to St. Quentin and went 'over the top' there the 
29th of September. I was wounded about 7 :00 a. m., lay in a German 
trench until ten o'clock that night before I got first aid. Was carried 
back by two of our men to first aid station. Was carried by four Ger- 
man prisoners to Castally clearing station ; was there two days, was 
sent to the Sixth British General Hospital and was there two weeks. 
My wounds were dressed there. Was sent from there to Pantion, 
England ; was there two days, then was sent to Portsmouth ; was there 
about three months before sailing for U. S. A. Sailed from Liverpool, 
England, December 8 ; went to Brest, France, for coal and sailed for 
U. S. A., arriving December 16 in good condition. 

"Edgar D. Wooley/' 

"June 23, 1918. 
"Dear Mother: 

"Was very glad to receive your ever welcome letter the other day — 
was more than glad to hear from you. Yesterday in line of duty I 
burned my right hand, so I am having my friend write this letter. 1 
am now in the hospital, but I think I will be out soon. I will be able 
to write soon. From your loving son, Emmett Demaree." 

"June 30, 1918. 
"Dear Mother: 

"Will write a few lines. I am still in the hospital but am feeling 
fine and will be out again in a day or so. My face is pretty badly burned 
but looks all right. I was afraid my eyes were affected but they weren't. 
I received a big letter from Elza. He is getting along O. K. Also a 
letter from H. Geisler. A letter from Delia today. We had some big 
rains this week. The Red Cross must be doing fine. Some ladies 
from Hampton came out last night and brought us flowers and ice 
cream. They treat us fine here in the hospital. I have been in a week 
today. I heard Delza Demaree was gassed — don't know how bad. We 
are real close to Hampton. This country must be awful hot in summer, 
but I don't mind hot weather at all. Tell Carrie and the children to 
write. I suppose berries will soon be ripe. They are ripe here. This 



162 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

is an interesting field as the planes fly most all the time. Well, mother, 
don't worry, as I am feeling fine. I will close, hoping to hear from you 
soon. Your loving son, Emmett Demaree/' 



"Somewhere in France, November 5, 1919. 
"My Dear Mother: 

"Will write tonight to let you know I arrived in France O. K. and 
am feeling fine. I hope you folks received my overseas card all right. 
I intended writing before, but we have been busy getting settled, but we 
are moving again tomorrow. I wrote while on board ship. I stood 
the trip fine and didn't get seasick at all. I never imagined there was 
so much water. The waves were twenty or thirty feet high. We had 
good food on the way over and now the eats are better. We get candy 
and tobacco issued to us. The Y. M. C. A. is certainly doing great 
work over here. They have tobacco, toilet articles, cakes, hot cocoa 
and eats to sell cheaper than in the United States. They also teach 
French, have religious services and games, also movies and everything 
to keep the boys in good spirits. Can you imagine seven thousand men 
feeding from one kitchen ? They do it here. Some of the people wear 
wooden shoes and they drive oxen. The women work like men. They 
drive one horse in ahead of the other. The scenery is beautiful. It 
has rained all of today. The grass and crops are pretty and green. Is 
Elza in Kentucky? I expect it is beginning to get cold back home 
now. It is funny to see the children scrambling over the American 
pennies. I suppose you were surprised at my letters before I left the 
other side, but our letters were, and still are censored, so I couldn't 
tell you. Did you get my package from Langley Field ? I bought three 
bonds before I left the States. Those over here wear a gold service 
stripe on the left sleeve. I hope to get one. I like over here fine, so 
far. I have been in charge of quarters today — that is, cleaning up 
around. I had a detail of three fellows. The boys say it rains about 
every day here, but we have plenty of good clothes and a slicker. We 
can wear our steel helmets in a rainy time. I told the sergeant in 
Langley to mail you my bond which I have paid for. I am in a good 
squadron and getting along fine. I don't want you folks to worry for 
we are well fed and taken care of. Write soon and tell me all the 
news back there. Don't expect letters very often, as it takes a good 
while for it to reach you. With love to all, 

"Corporal Emmett Demaree, 
"499th Aero Squad., A. E. F." 



"Dear Friends: 

"I will try to describe army life at Fort Brown. This is a small 
town of about fifteen hundred inhabitants, which consist mostly of Mexi- 
cans. It is very hot and dry here but we get the breezes from the Gulf 
and that cools it off somewhat. 




1. Ensign Horace E. Hunter. 2. Second Lieutenant Joseph Lewis Hyatt. 3. Naval Lieutenant 
Albert E. Schrader. 4. Second Lieutenant H. E. Behlmer. 



11 



164 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

"We have to get up every morning at five o'clock, and then we start 
to drill at 7:15 and drill (mounted) until eleven o'clock, when we 
groom our horses. Then comes the best thing of all, dinner, and then 
we are off duty until two o'clock. Then we go out to drill, but we do 
not have it so very hard in the afternoon. We drill two hours, then 
we come in and get ready for retreat. They have inspection every 
evening, at retreat and all those who have dirty rifles go in the awkward 
squad which drills one hour and a half after supper. There are very 
few w r ho have dirty rifles, because they have plenty of drill in the day 
time. After we have supper we are through for the day. We have to 
be in bed at eleven, which is called 'taps,' and if you are not in by that 
time, they take your name and either give you ten days' stable police 
or kitchen police duty, but I would rather have the kitchen police 
because you can eat all you want. 

"Well, I think I will close for this time. I remain, 
"Yours truly, 

"Walter Francisco, 
"16th Cavalry Co., Troop H, Brownsville, Texas." 

"Brooklyn Yards, N. Y., April 7, 1919. 
"Dear Mother and All: 

"I received your letter dated April 1, 1919, yesterday. Sometimes 
a letter from home reaches me in two days, but it makes no difference 
how old they are, anything from home or vicinity is almost sacred. 

"I got the Journals, and my, what a lot of news they contain ! Most 
all the boys I know are being discharged. Some of them are Thaddeus 
Brenton, Paul Day and others. It seems funny to read in the papers 
about Private and Corporal so and so, because I know them by Paul, 
Russell or whatever their name is. Too, in the navy everybody is just 
plain Jack and every officer is sir, and not a lieutenant or captain. 

"Mother, I told you I was on one of Uncle Sam's best ships but did 
not describe her. She cost $21,000,000. She is the only ship of her 
kind being run altogether by electricity. She has twelve fourteen-inch 
guns, twenty five-inch guns, several three-inch guns and smaller arms. 
The fourteen-inch guns comprise the primary battery and the five-inch, 
the secondary. The cost of firing the guns is great, but in war you know 
cost does not count. It is efficiency, or the one who wins is the one 
who can deliver the goods in the shortest time. To fire a fourteen-inch 
gun it costs $749.00. Three of them are fired at once, so the real cost 
is $2,247.00. We call this a salvo. 

"On board we have a working station. I work in the discharge office. 
We have a fire station. I am in the fire control division and have a fire 
plug to open. We also have an abandon ship station. I abandon ship 
in motor sailor two, second trip. The funny part is that the men in the 
first trip are taken quite a ways from the ship and then have to jump 
overboard and swim till the boat comes after us. Then we have a 
general quarters station. This is our battle station, and that is the 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 165 

most important, because the other stations are to make us efficient in 
battle. My station is on a delicate instrument called a spotter. The 
ship rolls, and what I do is to look through a telescope and catch the 
middle of the roll. Then the ship is level and the guns are fired. We 
practice here in the yards. We have a machine which rolls the wires. 
If you make a hit, the bell rings. I made eight hits out of ten shots 
yesterday. 

"Having a great deal of liberty now and we are getting ready to open 
the baseball season. The 'Y' and Jewish Welfare Club sent us sixty 
bats, one hundred balls and forty gloves. There is a park in the yards 
where we practice. We also have infantry drill twice a week. The 
fleet gets in from Gautaunama Bay, Cuba, next week. The U. S. S. 
Pennsylvania is flagship. Oh yes, the Idaho, just launched, came in 
yesterday from Philadelphia. That is her home port. She is S. O. P. 
ship now. That means senior officer present. We have been S. O. P. 
all the time. She has Rear Admiral Coonz aboard. 

"Am sending you two snapshots taken the day the 27th Regiment 
paraded in New York. Had some pictures of myself taken, only $12.00 
a dozen! 

"Mother, I read over the affidavits now and pick out the most 
urgent cases of dependency. We have a three per cent allowance now. 
We have two hundred cases filed and our percntage calls for twenty- 
one men in May. It is queer how the navy took picks of the country's 
men and their people are most all cripples and have rheumatism and 
are so old, generally forty or sixty. What must be the condition of the 
people of those rejected? I don't blame them for getting out if they 
can. We are glad to get back. 

"With love, 

"Ralph Croxton." 



"November, 1918. 
"Mother, I was looking over my diary last night and find that 
this will be my last letter to you during my first year in the navy, for 
the time is drawing near which will make it a year since I joined. When 
I think of the many things so new to me that have happened, I know 
some of them will interest you. Although I told you many things 
when I was home in January, I am going to give you a short synopsis 
of my navy career. I look at my rookie days in quite a different light, 
anyway, now. 

"I joined the navy, you will remember, November 22, at Indian- 
apolis. At first they told us we were going to Norfolk, but sent us to 
Great Lakes training station instead. The two boys I was sworn in 
with are gone — one is serving three years at Portsmouth naval prison 
for stealing; the other has deserted and can not go home. The former 
was eighteen and the latter fifteen. I was twenty-one. 

"Our time at Great Lakes was short, although it seemed long to us. 
We were there five months to the day. I went the regular route — 



166 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

first, detention three weeks; next, real camp, and then outgoing camp. 
I was in Camps Farragut, Perry and Ross, as you remember by my mail 
addresses. At Great Lakes they have nine camps, and this winter in- 
tend to keep one hundred thousand there all the time. 

"It seems that whatever we do in life, we imagine our lot is the 
hardest. So it seemed then ; but now it is a pleasure to think over our 
petty joys and sorrows. These are some of the things I think of when 
thinking of my time as a rookie: Snow shovels, swabs, sick bay, in- 
spection for liberty, breaking up of Company E, the crack company in 
drill and losing my furlough paper, also drill, and the way we used to 
parade when the girls came to camp Wednesday afternoon, which is a 
half-holiday in the navy. 

"Well, we were very glad when we got orders to move to Camp 
Ross. We imagined we were old salts and sang and halloed at the 
other sailors all the way over. There we had another inspection and got 
our last two shots in the arm. We had already received three besides our 
vaccination. 

"In three days we took train enroute for New York, the wonderful 
city we had heard so much about. There were one hundred and ten of 
us and we had three cars to ourselves. We sure did try ourselves on 
the way. We threw pillows, sang, put the porter under the fountain, 
etc. We left the lakes at eight o'clock and reached Brooklyn Navy 
Yards the next day at four o'clock. Our stay in the Morse receiving 
ship was short and the next day a tug took us to Ellis Island. It is 
just across from the Statue of Liberty. It is the place where immigrants 
land when coming to the United States. They also take the soldiers 
returning from the front there for inspection. The next thing was the 
separation. We were lined up for ship drafts and twenty-three of us 
were sent to the U. S. S. Northern Pacific, a transport. This was 
a sad parting, although we had only been together five months. The 
book of Uncle Tom's Cabin came to my mind and I thought of the 
bitter partings taking place in it. We came aboard our ship and were 
there from five-thirty until six when she sailed. She looked like a mon- 
ster to us, but is small compared with others I have seen since. She is 
speedy, though, and many people you meet have heard of her and her 
record return trip. We have carried many noted men and women. 
Last trip we took Secretary of War Baker to Europe and have him 
returning this trip. Some others are Vanderbilt, Senator Lewis, Miss 
Irene Franklin Green (actress), and Senator Chamberlain. 

"I have made seven trips across now, or in other words, have 
traveled as much as two times around the world. Many times I get 
blue and downhearted, but I know at the same time it is the greatest 
experience in my life. France is a beautiful country. We can not see 
much of it in war times, but talk to people who have. We pass through 

a beautiful bay on entering B , France, which is said to have eight 

entrances. The people are so funny and are regular beggars. A 
Frenchman told us the reason of so much begging was because the 
American sailors didn't care as much for their dollars as the French did 
their centimes (one one-hundredth of a franc). 




1. Lee Kremer. 2. J. Frank Grauck. 3. George Engel. 4. Baird F. Cox. 5. Walter Bloemer. 
6. Arthur Webster. 7. Robert Vandolah. 8. Lonnie Manlief. 9. John Lawless. 10. Samuel Elliot. 
11. Clinton Meister. 12. Russell Pendergast. 



168 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

"We have our times to be on watch, which is generally four hours 
on and eight or twelve off. I have done several things on board. I 
was on deck, an idler, mess cook, messenger, helmsman, and am a signal 
man now. It is all great but when the war is over I want to get out 
of the service. Uncle Sam pays all he can, but we can't save money 
in the service. Hoping this gives you a better idea of myself in the 
service and apologizing for its length, I close till I hear from you. 
With love and affection, 

"Your son, 

"Ralph L. Croxton." 

"We had a submarine scare on the way over to France. It was 
sighted one morning about two-thirty. We were lucky and got away 
from it before it had time to do its work, and after that everything went 
smoothly. We pulled in the harbor about ten o'clock a. m., May 18, 
and landed at two-thirty p. m. Then we marched to the rest camp 
known as the Old Napoleon Barracks. Were there five days then 
were marched to the train at Brest and sent to St. Nazaire. We all 
got a glimpse of the first-class coaches we had to ride in. They were 
marked '40 men or 8 horses.' I think all men that were overseas were 
acquainted with them. After we were sent to St. Nazaire we were put 
to work driving trucks and cars. I did convoy work from St. Nazaire 
to northern part of France most of the time. Sometimes when men 
were scarce we were sent up to the liner with rations and ammunition. 
On September 12th I had a chance to go while the St. Mihiel drive was 
going on. I saw many sights while up there. After that did not visit 
the front any more. In December we were sent to the Paimport 
forest to haul wood for the Army of Occupation. We hauled wood 
till April then were sent to Clisson to move troops that were coming 
back from the front to come home. June 24 we were relieved of duty 
and sent to St. Nazaire. After three days' rest I sailed for the United 
States, June 28, the day peace was signed. 

"Russell Pendegast." 

"Cohons, France (Camp Chamberlain), 

"November, 1918. 
"Dear Friend : 

"Will write you a letter, endeavoring to give you a little idea of our 
battalion's trip to France. 

"On October 17 we rolled our heavy packs, leaving Camp Colt, 
Pennsylvania, at ten p. m., for Camp Mills, Long Island, twenty miles 
from New York City, arriving on the eighteenth, tired but content. 
After a strict overseas physical examination and close checking and re- 
newing of our equipment, we again rolled packs and left at six a. m. 
Sunday for embarkation for New York, arriving at eleven same morning, 
swinging out at five p. m. toward the deep blue Atlantic ocean. 

"Must admit many of us did not enjoy much of the trip, owing to 
seasickness. To add to our discomfort everyone was compelled to wear 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV A R 169 

life preservers when not in their herths, and a 'flu' mask or gauze 
over the nose and mouth with considerable discomfort. Good results 
followed, we having only a few influenza cases and only one death on 
board. When not seasick, I enjoyed the trip exceedingly, watching the 
waves as they tossed our big White Star liner, Megantic to and fro, 
and our convoy, containing twenty-three additional ships carrying troops 
and provisions, all in close proximity, was an interesting sight. A large 
American cruiser and a couple of submarine chasers furnished addi- 
tional protection, together with the one — or even two six-inch guns on 
each merchant ship. Weather was fine, and the sea smooth the greater 
part of the distance. 

"October 31, after an eleven-day voyage, the Megantic arrived at 
Liverpool and we disembarked at three p. m. and started a six-mile 
hike through the streets of Liverpool to an English rest camp with our 
sixty-pound pack, and which we found located adjoining a park on a 
high hill and called 'Knotty Ash,' a small city of tents. After stam- 
peding the always present and deeply valued 'Y.' tent, with its low 
price and high quality 'eats, soft drinks and smokes,' we collected at the 
outskirts of the camp to inspect the 'natives,' especially the 'fair ones.' 
Later two regiments of colored infantry passed by to their own re- 
served section. With their splendid-playing fifty-piece band, richly em- 
broidered regimental colors, flanked with an American flag, they marched 
proudly by. We later learned they were only six-weeks' trained 
Georgia negroes, indicating our purpose to supply the allies plenty of 
men quickly. 

"Early the next morning, November 1, as we boarded a small, old- 
style English passenger train reserved for us, with first, second and third 
compartments, holding eight persons, five of these to each four-wheeled 
car, a British military band played 'Yanks Are Coming.' King 
George's personal letter was given to each soldier, and we started across 
this tight little isle, one hundred and seventy-five miles. Saw enroute 
some very fine and well-cared-for farming country, quaint, interesting old 
villages and large manufacturing places. Arriving at six in the evening 
at the ancient city of Winchester, we detrained and hiked the steepest 
of hills and away over a three-mile muddy road to another rest camp, 
'Winnall Down.' After spending two days and nights in comfortable 
barracks, we left Sunday, November 3, for Southampton, some twenty 
miles distant, where we left at six o'clock on the speedy little American 
coast ship, 'Yale' (twenty-three knots), for LeHavre, France. Be- 
fore embarking we saw the monster ship Olympic, sister ship to the ill- 
fated Titanic, pull out for New York. It surely created a strong 
desire in us for the good old U. S. A. As a rule, soldiers and civilians 
never share trains or boats. 

"November 4th we disembarked from the Yale and climbed the 
four-mile hill of LeHavre to the English-operated rest camp, 'LeHavre 
No. 1.' Two interesting days were spent among soldiers of every na- 
tion, including German war prisoners, watched by us with keen interest. 

"November 6th, midnight, found us starting for our last long ride 
for the American front near Belfort, in the doughboy's Pullman — 



170 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

a French stock car of eight-horse capacity — forty live American soldiers 
amply filled it as diner and sleeper with all unoccupied space adjoin- 
ing the rain-absorbing roof. Three days and nights of starts and stops 
were consumed in the two hundred and eighty-six mile ride, the mess 
car sending forth an occasional loaf of dry bread and can of 'bully beef 
to be carefully divided 'one to four.' But we all enjoyed the wonderful 
scenery of the trip — passing through the quaint, centuries-old villages 
of stone houses, the far extremity of the famous Marne battlefield, with 
its grave-dotted fields and woods, some being mounded and railed off 
within a few feet of the railroad bed — a French soldier receiving burial, 
if possible, on the spot where life blood ebbs. Thursday found us at 
historical Longres. 

"Friday, November 8th, we changed cars for an eight-mile ride to 
the tank center of the American Tank Corps in France, Camp Chamber- 
lain. On arriving we found an American-constructed camp of wooden 
barracks, water works, railroad switches, and stone roads, with other 
improvements being made. Nearly the whole division of ten thousand 
highly trained drivers, auto mechanics, machine gunners, making up 
the tank corps, are here trying their pet monsters. The capacity of the 
barracks being filled, we were marched about two miles beyond to a 
French village located in a deep hollow of some two hundred buildings, 
and called 'Commune Cohons.' Founded some six hundred years ago, 
Cohons was built with the house and barn under the one roof made of 
stone slabs and twenty-four inch stone walls with an occasional small 
window and fireplace in the house part. The peasant farmers always 
live in these small villages scattered over the country-side from three 
to six miles apart, and you never see a farm house along the road as in 
America. We were made as comfortable in the vacant houses and barns 
as it was possible in a community where no improvements could be dis- 
covered to have been made since its construction. We have one con- 
venience provided by nature in the small clear streams that run down 
our four or five streets or roads to a large mill race operating at one 
time an old grist mill built one thousand years ago and now used for a 
mess hall and barracks. While the French farmer has his all intensely 
cultivated garden surrounded by moss-covered stone walls, his agri- 
cultural methods seem primitive to us. They have finely bred cattle 
and horses, but driving their horses one in front of the other, or tandem 
style, even three or four horses for plowing or hauling purposes must 
have many disadvantages in contrast to our style of team work. They 
are exceedingly thrifty and everyone works, old women watch the cows 
(no fences to speak of) and carry bundles of 'faggots' in a basket at- 
tached to their backs, that the family use entirely for firewood and 
occasionally the small four-cover stove gets such wood. The surround- 
ing hills with their stone walled terraces, and richly cultivated gardens 
and vineyards, capped with small groves, gave a pleasant contrast to the 
crowded dingy villages with no stores and two or three French cafes. 
One chateau grounds, constructed before our Revolutionary War by 
twenty-cent per day labor, rising up a steep hill in thirty-foot wide 
terraces with moss-covered retaining walls with its fruit trees, vineyards 




1. Joseph Lucas. 2. Grover C. Fox. 3. Charles Sullender. 4. 01 Ian Salvers. 5. Archie 
Downey. 6. Frank Hillman. 7. Joseph Grossman. 8. Raymond 0. Reuter. 9. Eddie Byard. 10. Frank 
Peaslee. 11. Allan Richard Losh. 12. William A. Gindling. 



172 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

and beautiful groves was especially admired as outrivaling any park 
in our cities. 

"The wonderful avenues or roads of France winding in easy slopes 
in every direction with their large, beautiful trees on either side, lend 
great charm and interest to the landscape that is so easily viewed from 
the many high hills that continuously break the plateaus of this section. 
Constructed of a peculiar easily crushed native rock and natural sand-clay 
cement, some on the lines of the old Roman highways, others being 
Napoleon's famous military road, and the balance the Government's 
national highways — all kept in most excellent repair in peace times — 
place France in the front rank for autoists. 

"We are still continuing our training to keep fit and pass the time 
till the happy day to 'roll packs for home' arrives, with reveille at six- 
thirty, mess at seven, physical exercises at eight, 'squads east and west,' 
till eleven, two hours for rest and eating and one o'clock our afternoon 
hike, returning by three. The rest of the day is 'bunk fatigue' or play. 
A sample of our meals is: Breakfast, rice or boiled cornmeal mush, 
condensed milk, prunes, bacon, bread and coffee; a Sunday dinner, boiled 
beef, tomatoes, mashed potatoes, gravy, bread, butter, apple rolls with 
sauce, coffee. All have keen appetites, but 'seconds' suffice for our 
hungry ones. The Government certainly takes care of the feed and 
equips its soldiers in a manner contrasting favorably in comparison with 
others. 

"While many of us believe we have all received our share of a 
soldier's hardships — marching and eating in the rain, cold, sleet and 
mud, snugly sleeping adjoining thoroughly and always damp stone walls, 
with resultant coughs, colds and aches that without superwisdom would 
perplex our ever watchful surgeon to diagnose regardless of fear or 
favor, and then impartially distribute one of the Government's 'three 
varieties' of pills, so readily distinguished by color — we are all glad to 
have been to 'the front' in the land of sacrifice, fame and glory, beauti- 
ful France— if not all of us could 'go over the top.' 

"Very sincerely, 

"Private Alfred J. Wood, 

"Company B, 304th Battalion, 4th Tank Corps, 

"A. P. O. 714, A. E. F., France." 

"I have been ^sked by many to write a story of my experiences while 
in the service of Uncle Sam, and although I make no claim as a story- 
teller or writer, I shall endeavor to give a word picture of a soldier's 
life in training as well as under fire. 

"During the early months of last year I enlisted, and left Dayton 
for Ft. Thomas, Ky., where I got my first impressions of the art of 
making soldiers from peace-loving civilians. I was at this station but 
a few days, during which time I received the preliminary instruction in 
the gentle (?) art of warfare, and had issued to me a suit of regulation 
khaki, spring style. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 173 

"I shall always feel that they were in a hurry to get me to Europe, 
because in less than two weeks I was transferred to Camp Wadsworth, 
near Spartanburg, S. C, and began training in earnest at a rifle range 
in the mountains. There were many others like me there, and it seems 
we must have been apt pupils at the fighting business (probably be- 
cause we were Irish), for in about one month we were pronounced fit 
to proceed to the battle zone, and were given our overseas equipment, 
consisting of about eighty pounds of freight. 

"We were marched to waiting trains and started for Camp Mills, 
N. Y. From here we went to Hoboken, N. J., to await our trans- 
port. It was ready to take us across long before some of us were ready 
to go, but as I had enlisted for the purpose of 'going over,' I was con- 
tented when at last we marched through the pier and aboard our ship, 
the 'Juliana Princess.' Before going on board, we were all given 
printed post cards which said : 'The ship on which I sailed has arrived 
safely overseas.' These we were permitted to sign and address to rela- 
tives and friends, and when the ship landed on the other side, the au- 
thorities at New York placed them in the mail. I suppose if the ship 
had gone to Davy Jones' locker, the lot of cards would have been kept 
as souvenirs. As a means of identification, each man wore around his 
neck two metal discs on which were stamped his name and a number, 
these discs being referred to by the boys as 'dog tags.' 

"I shall never forget the feeling that came over me as we steamed 
out of New York harbor, escorted by tugs, and as the outline of the 
Statue of Liberty faded in the distance I said silently, 'Goodbye every- 
body, goodbye everything,' for I was now bound for the scene of the 
world's greatest conflict. 

"There were several ships in the convoy and, of course, we were 
escorted across by torpedo boats, destroyers, and so forth, to protect us 
from the U-boats. We had regular drills on board while going across, 
and each man was assigned his place in case we were torpedoed. When 
we reached the 'danger zone' every man put on his life belt, and we 
were constantly on the alert. No lights were allowed, not even a cigar, 
or a cigarette. Personally, I expected to see a periscope bob up in front 
of us every minute from the time we left New York till we landed, but 
nothing of the sort happened, and after about ten days we weighed 
anchor at Glasgow, Scotland, and I got my first view of this beautiful 
country. 

"After a brief stay here, we went by rail to Winchester, England, 
where we spent two days in a rest camp. After spending the time in 
getting rid of our 'sea legs,' we again boarded trains and proceeded to 
Southampton, England. Here we were taken on board British troop 
ships and started across the English channel for France. I assure you 
that on this trip across the channel I was terribly seasick, and felt that 
if I lived through it the war wouldn't have any terrors for me. After 
fourteen hours we landed at LeHavre, France, and here I began to 
realize just what hardships and privations meant to a soldier. We were 
camped about five kilometers from town, in camouflaged tents, sur- 



174 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

rounded by barbed wire. There were many military police to keep the 
men from drinking wine, which was plentiful and cheap. 

"Leaving LeHavre, we passed through Bricon, near Chaumont, 
where General Pershing had his headquarters; then on through Valin- 
court to Audreville, which was our headquarters. Here we drilled in 
hand grenade, and rifle grenade practice, also automatic rifle practice. 
Then we were drilled in skirmish or open warfare. We also practiced 
at St. Martin, the whole division being engaged. 

"From St. Martin we were taken in trucks to Vagney, in Alsace- 
Lorraine, on our way to Bresse, but owing to a change in orders we 
were kept at Vagney for two days, where we again practiced open war- 
fare in the mountains. 

"Having received our new orders by this time, we were taken in 
trucks to Kruth, which is a typical German town, in the Vosges moun- 
tains. A strange sight here was to see the women washing clothes in 
cold water on stones in the public pools. We pitched our 'pup' tents 
at this point and enjoyed an elaborate menu of hard-tack (made in 
Dayton), 'monkey meat,' 'slum,' and corned beef. We left Kruth on 
Sunday morning for the cable-head, which we reached at nine o'clock. 
Here our packs were carried up the mountain on a cable, but we were 
obliged to 'hike,' and after six hours of mountain climbing we reached 
the top of the cable. 

"It was absolutely necessary to rest here for a short time, and at ten 
o'clock Sunday night, in a downpour of rain, we started with our packs 
for the dugouts, where we arrived at four o'clock the next morning, after 
going through a barrage which the Germans laid down to cut us off. 
This was my hrst real taste of what the war was like. We rested in 
the dugouts for two days and then left for the trenches in Alsace- 
Lorraine. Arriving there in due time, we took our place in the trenches. 
By the aid of field glasses I could see the Rhine river and the German 
cities of Colmar and Mulhausen. 

"We had lots of company in the trenches, as there were hundreds 
of rats and millions of 'cooties.' This was a quiet sector, and we lived 
in dugouts, about twenty-one men to a post. Three men stood guard 
during the day, and all were on guard at night. Food was carried to us 
from the kitchens, which were in the rear. We had outposts in the 
woods, which were block-houses surrounded by barbed wire. There 
were openings in the walls, about six inches wide, through which we 
shot. 

"We had many close calls from three-inch shells, as the German 
trenches were only about three hundred feet from ours. An amusing 
incident happened one evening as we were eating supper. The Germans 
sent over a gas cloud and, of course, we dropped our 'chow" and put 
on our gas masks. One of our cooks became so confused that he grabbed 
his Red Cross bag and pulled it over his head. Before we could get 
him harnessed in his gas mask he was almost suffocated. Owing to 
the fact that the citizens of most of the towns were chiefly French, we 




1. Ernest Hess. 2. Charles Wagner. 3. Steven Shorten. 4. Rollin Hess. 5. Delzie Demaree. 
6. Claude Bronnenbero. 7. Peter Schneider. S. Leonard Miller. 9. Amos Wesler. 10. Walter Messner. 
11. James T. Kinnett. 12. Raymond T. Fox. 



176 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

did not shell them, but could have done so easily, as we were near 
enough to hear the German bands and see trains moving in the towns. 

"One night we had an Italian doing guard duty. Suddenly he heard 
some sort of noise, shot twice, and then called out: 'Halt! Who goes 
there?' He evidently did not want to take any chances. 

"After guarding sixteen days in the trenches, we were sent back to 
the cable-head to rest, but the Germans kept us busy with their artillery. 
We lost some men during this time, but the number was small. Later 
we were sent to the trenches in a different part of the line, and here 
things were more lively. We went over the top one night to get prison- 
ers, and penetrated to the German second line trenches. We did not 
meet much opposition, took no prisoners, and lost only eight men. I 
was slightly wounded by a piece of shrapnel and was sent to the field 
hospital for serum, and then to another hospital farther back. My 
wound kept me out of the line about two weeks. 

"I was now considered a seasoned warrior, so they sent me to the 
Argonne region. Imagine, if you can, marching toward a battle front 
and while twenty miles away hearing the roar of the artillery, every step 
bringing you nearer. As we marched on and on, the thunder of the big 
guns grew louder and louder until it seemed one continual roar, the 
ground under our feet trembling as in an earthquake. But we had 
grown accustomed to it by this time, and marched on up to our position 
as though there was not a shot being fired. 

"I went into the line on September 26. It was hell on earth. We 
started in with six hundred thousand men. Dead and wounded soon lay 
in piles all around us, some Americans, some Germans. Men fell all 
around me, and I began to feel that I would be next. I confess that I 
was rather scared, but a scared Irishman can fight if necessary, and I 
did my best for Old Glory. Three of us lay in a shell hole for a long 
time fixing a jammed machine gun, but when we got it in working order 
— well, there were some Germans who wouldn't bother us any more. 
Even here in the face of death, the Yankee nerve was displayed. As 
the big shells from the German guns came whistling through the air, 
some doughboy would shout : 'Oh, hell, that bird hasn't got my name 
on it,' and would pay no attention when it struck near him and ex- 
ploded. It was not uncommon to hear a bit of familiar song amidst the 
din of battle, and the morale of our boys was one big surprise to the 
Huns. 

"We lived on reserve rations (hardtack) and it was necessary to 
take it from the dead Americans, as none could be brought up to us. 
We drove the Germans out gradually, and the Marines had a big part 
in the driving. After being in the lines two times here, I was sent north 
through Grand Pre and Buzanchy. About fifteen miles from Buzancy, 
at a little village called Stonne, I was gassed. This ended my fighting 
days just before the armistice ended the war. I was sent to the Old 
Glory hospital at Verdun, a beautiful city on the Meuse river. All the 
buildings there were of stone. Next I was sent to a hospital at Soulley, 
then on a Red Cross train to Mont Dore. The latter is a sporting town, 



RIFLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 177 

with large hotels and gambling houses or casinos, and beautiful stone 
chateaus. 

"At Mont Dore I was put in Class B-2 by the doctors, and sent to 
St. Aignon, through Verzon and Bourges. The central postoffice and 
record office are at the latter place. Here I was held in a camp where 
accommodations for the wounded were lacking. Christmas day I slept 
on a blanket in the mud and snow. St. Aignon is a large classification 
camp, and here I was put through the 'cootie' machine, an affair where 
all apparel is sterilized by steam; then through the 'mill,' where I was 
examined and reclassified by a doctor. Then I was given a new uniform 
and back pay, which made me feel better. At this camp twenty-five 
thousand men were fed in one hour and the food was good. 

"On December 27th I was sent to Brest with a casual company of 
one hundred and fifty men and two officers, representing all divisions. 
At this time conditions were terrible. We had to wade knee deep in 
mud to and from the kitchens, and often would not go to our meals be- 
cause of the mud. This refers especially to Kitchen No. 5, where the 
Eighty-third Division Infantry was fed. At places in the mud boards 
were laid on top to make it better to walk on, or in, but one night one 
man fell off this 'duck board' and it was quite a job to get him out. 

"January 7th I sailed from Brest on the transport 'Pueblo' for the 
good old U. S. A. Part of the voyage was rough, waves going clear 
over the vessel. We passed the Azores on Sunday, January 12, and 
could see the little white houses and green fields, which were a beauti- 
ful contrast to the shell-worn ruins of France. We could also see the 
American submarine base on a large island of the group. 

"On January 21st we sighted the Statue of Liberty, and it was an 
inspiring moment in my life. We landed at Hoboken, N. J., and were 
taken to Camp Merritt, the most beautiful camp I saw while in the 
service. We were given twenty-four hours' leave in New York City, 
and took in all the sights. The people treated us royally, and 1 had 
five big meals — real meals — that day. Then I started back toward 
Dayton, passing through Elizabethtown and Philadelphia, where the 
Red Cross gave us a splendid dinner; Baltimore, Washington and other 
eastern cities, arriving at Camp Sherman at night. Here I received my 
discharge on January 28, and reached Dayton February 1. 

"During my stay in France I did not learn the word for water but 
as everyone else drank wine, I did not want to change their customs, 
so I did also. I had a great trip, but I am cured. Sherman may have 
been right about the Civil War but he didn't begin to define this one. 

"I found the spirit of brotherly love stronger than religion with 
the boys facing death in the trenches. In answer to the numerous 
questions, and without malice or prejudice, I must say that the Red 
Cross and Salvation Army did more for the boys in our division than 
all other organizations combined. I am glad to be back with my loved 
ones, but in spite of all I saw over there, if Uncle Sam ever needs me 
again, 'Red' Handle is ready to go. Robert Handle." 




William Robinson's Story 

I belonged to the 16th Infantry, 
Trench Mortar Battery, and am 
glad to say that I can call myself 
one of Pershing's men. We sailed 
from Hoboken June 14, 1917, and 
for the first few days every one 
was too sick to care whether we 
ever reached Europe or not. 
About half way across we were at- 
tacked by a submarine and were 
fired on once, but the torpedo 
missed us by about thirty yards. 
Outside of this, our trip was un- 
eventful, and we arrived safely in 
France at St. Nazaire on June 26, 
1917. 

We were in St. Nazaire two 
weeks, and it was there I saw my 
first German prisoners. On the 
14th of July we moved on, and 
landed in Gondrecourt, July 16th, 
remaining there two weeks. From 
Gondrecourt we moved to a little 
town named Abendville, and it 
was there that I first heard the 
sound of the cannon. We spent 
about a month and a half in this 
little town, and were undergoing hard training all the time we were 
there. Then we had another short move to Demange, where we finished 
our training, which consisted of drilling, signaling, throwing hand 
grenades, shooting trench mortars, digging trenches, building dugouts, 
etc. 

About the middle of October we made our first trip to the 
trenches, but to a quiet sector, called a rest sector by both the French 
and Germans, where they sent their tired troops. For the first two 
weeks there were no men killed or wounded, and nothing exciting 
happened, but on the morning of the third of November the Germans 
made a raid and took twelve of our men prisoners, wounded five and 
killed three. These three men were the first American soldiers killed in 
the war. Private Gresham of Evansville, Ind., was one of them. 

After thirty days in the trenches we went back to Demange, where 
we maneuvered for one month. Some of the severest hardships we had 
to undergo were endured in that month, for it was December and 
bitterly cold. On the 16th of January we started for a "real-for-sure" 
live sector, which was a three-day hike. On the first day out it rained 
all day, but that night as luck happened, we found a good place to sleep 
— a haymow full of hay. We laid over in that town one day, and con- 

(178) 



In a Dugout 
Wm. Robinson, Wilbur Bruns and 
a Comrade of the 16th Infantrv. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 179 

tinued our hike on the following day, but that was not so bad, for the 
weather was good. The next day we landed at the front. From the 
middle of January to the middle of March we stayed there, and nothing 
very exciting occurred, though we did lose quite a few men. I took part 
in two different raids. After two months we went back to a rest camp, 
and were there three weeks, when the Germans started their big spring 
offensive at Amiens, and we were called up there. 

For one day and two nights we rode on a train, in cars which were 
marked for "40 homines et 8 chevaux", of which every one heard in 
due time. In the two days after we unloaded from the train we hiked 
seventy miles with only bully beef, sandwiches and coffee once a day. 
Four men dropped dead on the trip. Then it seemed as if Foch decided 
he did not need us after all, for he had us back in reserve for two weeks, 
after which we marched to the front and took over a sector to the left 
of Amiens on the Picardy front. This was what was called a "pas bon" 
or no good sector, for there was artillery fighting going on all the 
time, and if you exposed yourself at all you would probably be blown to 
pieces. We had a great many casualties during the four weeks we 
stayed there, and then we were sent back behind the lines for five days, 
where we were maneuvering and getting ready to make an attack at 
Cantigny. 

We made the attack at Cantigny on the morning of the 28th of 
May, and I will try to give you a little idea of how we went "over the 
top". The last thirty minutes before the zero hour, which is about 
6 :30 a. m., are very trying moments. I will tell you frankly I was 
scared — so scared that it seemed I must be yelling and showing my fear 
to all the rest. Everyone else appeared perfectly calm, and 1 thought 
I must be the only shaky one, but I finally asked the fellow beside me if 
he was scared, and he said: "Yes; are you?" I naturally admitted that 
I was, but about that time our artillery barrage started and there was 
more or less excitement, so that we began to lose our terror. This 
artillery barrage lasted about half an hour, and then we got word to 
go 'over the top'. From then on things happened so thick and fast that 
there is no use in trying to describe them. Unknown to us the wheat 
field near by was filled with our men who had been lying down in the 
wheat, and when we came out to go over the top they also rose up from 
the wheat to accompany us. It was a wonderfully impressive sight to 
see this wheat field suddenly alive with men, whose bayonets glistened in 
the sunlight as they advanced with us. Where we went over the top 
was about two hundred yards to the right of Cantigny, and I saw no 
live Germans at all, although we passed by many dead ones. We lost 
only one man, our lieutenant-colonel, who was shot through the neck 
and died a few hours later. The Germans were in dugouts in Cantigny, 
and our liquid-fire men had to give them shot in order to get them out, 
when the men with the bayonets either killed them, or took them 
prisoners, the Germans themselves being given their choice as to which 
they preferred. We took three hundred and fifty prisoners out of the 
town, and there were about that number of Germans killed in the 
place. We established our new line about half a mile on the other side 

12 



180 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



of Cantigny, an advance of about a mile and a quarter. Up to that 
time we met no resistance whatever, but there they had direct range on 
us with their machine guns, and they knew how to use them. We had 
four men killed and possibly fifty wounded before we could get dug in to 
a new trench. 

The Germans counter-attacked eight times in the next forty-eight 
hours, but failed to drive us out. We were there four days before we 
were relieved, and after being relieved we went back behind the lines 
for a week, then came back and relieved a French regiment on the 
left, staying there until the 5th of July. Our whole division was then 
relieved by a French division, and we went back behind the lines for 
five days, where we were loaded onto trucks, and after a trip of a 
day and two nights in the trucks we were back on the Soissons front 
ready to take part in the big drive that started July 18th. I can tell 
nothing about that drive, for on July 17th I got orders to report back to 
the United States, so I missed that. The reason I was sent back was 
to help train a new army which was to have been organized in October, 
but which was cancelled when peace was declared. 

Sergeant William Robinson, 
Headquarters Co., 16th Infantry, First Division. 



Our War Prisoner's Story 

I was born in Osgood, Ripley 
county, Indiana, in 1897. At the 
age of nineteen years and ten 
months, I enlisted in the Third 
Ohio National Guard, at Osgood, 
Indiana, on June 8, 1917. I 
stayed at Osgood and guarded the 
High Bridge till the last part of 
July, then we were called to Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. There we were put 
in the 148th Infantry, 37th Di- 
vision. We were there for about 
three weeks, then we were sent to 
Camp • Sherman, Ohio. I was 
there for three days. Orders came 
to send sixteen men to the 166th 
Infantry, 42d Division, and I was 
one to go. I went to Camp Perry, 
Ohio, and joined the Rainbow 
boys there. I was there three 
weeks. Then we got orders to 
go to Camp Mills, New York. 
We staved there till the 28th of 
Dallie Kelley October, 1917, then we set sail 

for France. Landed at Brest on 
the 12th of November, then we went to a town called Me-Ligney 





1. William Wernke. 2. Daniel L. Hull. 3. Cornelius Miller. 4. Frank Burst. 5. Louis Boehmer. 
6. Clarence Siekerman. 7. Florence Fischer. S. William J. C. Werner. 9. Henry L. Lindauer. 
10. Chester Cole. 11. Edward Thomas. 12. Roy Hunterman. 



182 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

There we stayed for a short time, slept in barns and it was cold. Had 
no tobacco, and just half enough to eat. The reason for this treat- 
ment was that the government had very few troops over there and the 
Red Cross and Y. M. C. A. had not got fixed up yet. We hardly ever 
saw any of them. We left there for a town called Noidant, where we 
did our little training, as we hadn't got much here in the states. We 
stayed here until some time in January, 1918, when our help was needed 
at the front, so we packed up to go. We walked for six days in snow 
knee deep and slept in barns. When awaking of a morning we filled 
our shoes with hay and set fire to the hay to thaw them out, or we 
would never have got them on. 

In the latter part of February we hit the front. Went to the Toul 
front and lost a few men. Stayed there for nine days, then got orders 
we were to be relieved. We were happy, but when the night relief came 
they were shelling us so that the captain said, "Boys, get out the best 
you can," so we started. Some were killed, some weren't. I was lucky. 
The next two days we walked a long way back. The captain said : 
"Boys, we are going still farther back for a rest." Well, we waited for 
two days, expecting to go back, but orders came to get us back to the 
front as quick as possible. It meant walk, for that is the way we 
traveled over there. We started, and two days brought us on the front 
again. Well, it was so hot up there with Germans that they held us 
there one hundred and ten days. We sure lost a lot of men. I was 
gassed slightly a couple of times. June 20, 1918, we left for the 
eastern part of Champagne front, better known as the Marne. We 
were to stop a big German offensive, which was expected. We stayed 
there about three or four days, and orders came for us to move out and 
go down to the left of Chateau-Thierry. We went. The French were 
in the front line so we took the second line trench. They were about a 
mile apart. Right behind the front line were two tank guns. Orders 
came to put about thirty men on the tank guns, and in case the Germans 
attacked not to retreat. I was one of the thirty to go on the guns. 

On the night of July 14, the Germans started to throw a big 
barrage on us, also lots of gas. About 5 o'clock a. m., July 15, the 
Germans came over. They were coming on a sixty-five-mile front all 
along, and there were lots of them, too. They had lots of machine guns. 
Bullets were flying everywhere. Soon as the French in the front line 
saw them, they all gave up and were made prisoners. About 6 o'clock 
the Germans were on us, just thirty of us. The rest of the Americans 
were a mile behind us. We opened fire on them. They had us sur- 
rounded. They outnumbered us about twenty to one. They were 
capturing us one and two at a time. We were fighting to the last 
minute; finally they got me. There were seven more they hadn't got yet. 
They disarmed us and kept us heavily guarded until they got the rest. 
There were about seven or eight of our boys killed, but if we killed one 
German we killed fifty. When we were made prisoners the enemy 
had already advanced back to the rest of our comrades. We could look 
back and see them. Then they started us back with guards cursing us. 
There were two Americans with us that could talk German. When 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 183 

they got us back they had so many French prisoners that our own 
artillery was firing back there, killing them a dozen at a time. We had 
to dig holes and put the bodies in and get in on them and tramp them 
down with our feet — some job. Nothing to eat for three days. They 
lined us up one day and picked me and two more boys to go back for 
information. We had it pretty good while trying to get information, 
but after that it was awful. They separated us and sent me and a boy 
from Columbus, Ohio, together. They sent us to a French and English 
prison camp, where we worked on railroads, unloaded coal and all such 
work. From daylight to dark it was work, rain or shine, Sundays the 
same. English soldiers were dying off like sheep. We dug holes and 
put them in, then all the soldiers would say the Lord's prayer, and all 
throw a handful of dirt on them, then cover them up three and four in 
one hole. They died from starvation. I thought my time was coming 
any day, but kept up the best I could, waiting for a better day to come. 
I was in six or seven different camps. I was in Limberg and 
Domstadt, Germany. Finally we heard that firing was stopped at the 
front on the 11th of November. On the 12th we were not awakened to 
go to work so we slept late. We were sleeping on the ground all the 
time in a big stone house with three barbed wire fences around it. 
When we went out on the 12th there were no guards over us. Just us 
two Americans there. We had not seen another American since we 
were captured. We felt like brothers, so when we saw no guards over 
us, I said, "Let's start and walk back or we will die here," so we 
started. We walked a day and a night before we hit Belgium. We 
were all right, then. They gave us something to eat and we rested 
overnight, and set out on foot for France. We walked three more days 
and three nights. At last we reached Givet, France, and there met 
Americans. They sent us to Paris. We were there four days, then 
sent to Blois to a casual camp. We were there three days, then they 
sent us to a hospital. There we were forty-five days, then we went to 
LeMans, France, and stayed there until the 91st Division was coming 
home, then we were sent to it to come home. We left St. Nazaire on 
March 23d for the good old U. S. A. We landed at Hoboken, N. J., 
on the 1st of April. We were sent to Camp Merritt, N. J., where we 
stayed twelve days. From there we were sent to Camp Sherman. I 
and the boy that was prisoner with me were together all the time. We 
came to Camp Sherman together and on the 23rd of April we were 
discharged together. We clasped hands and bade each other good-bye. 
He went to Columbus, Ohio, and I came to Osgood, so here I am in 
dear old Osgood. 

Dallie Kelley, Osgood, Indiana, 
Co. I, 166th Infantry, 42d Division. 

"We left Camp Taylor about 3 p. m. in the afternoon and marched 
to the train which started east at 6 p. m. We went through North 
Vernon, right up the B. & O. through Osgood, and just kept on going 
east. Believe me, it sure was pretty hard to go right through my old 
home town and not know you'd ever see that dear old spot again. We 



184 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLt> WAR 

landed in Camp Merritt. Were there three days, and got our overseas 
equipment. They got us up one morning about two o'clock and we hiked 
about seven miles to the Hudson River and got on a ferry boat which 
took us to Hoboken, and landed us on the pier. Here we went on the 
old steamboat, Henry S. Mallory. That was September 6, 1918. 
Stayed in the harbor two days. A little tug then pulled us out to open 
water. In a few hours the old U. S. A. faded away and it was 
fourteen days till we saw land again. Land never before looked so 
good to me. We left Hoboken with one battleship, two submarine 
destroyers and four troop ships. When out about five and a half days 
we were met by five troop ships, and five destroyers from Newport 
News, Virginia, also bound for France, so we had nine troop ships, 
seven destroyers and one battleship in our fleet. We were attacked by 
four submarines before we got across, so you know we had some excite- 
ment on the way, but believe me, those wonderful little destroyers did 
their work well. Five of them went ahead of the ships on the watch 
for subs. You couldn't see them except the "crow's nest" on the mast 
and then you had to use powerful glasses. I was on lookout in the 
crow's nest three times. I got to see one of the subs that attacked us; 
saw it just as it came up out of the water. 

The ship I was on carried oil for the destroyers. When one would 
run out of oil they would tie on behind our ship, and the oil would be 
run from one to the other through a big hose. While we were oiling 
one we would be out there in the sea for about eight or ten hours with 
the waves tossing us around while the rest of the ships went on. It 
sure would look pretty lonesome when they would go over the "hill", 
out of sight. It would take us about half a day to catch up with them. 
We landed at Brest September 21, and camped there a week. My 
tentmate and myself were both big fellows. Each soldier carries one- 
half of a tent and two go together to put one up. As there wern't 
barracks enough to go around, I was among those who had to use the 
tents. Well, when we got our packs in the tent and ourselves in too, I 
didn't have room for my feet, so I had to leave them sticking out of 
the end (ha, ha!). That worked all right except it rained eight days 
out of every week in Brest, so I was almost up against it. We were 
shipped from Brest to St. Aignan, mostly in box cars, the eight horses, 
forty-men kind. About three days before my company went to the 
front I was sent to a hospital for fourteen days." 

Casper Pherigo, 

Savenay, France, February 17, 1919. 
Mr. Editor and Friends: 

"I am going to write you about a trip I took. On February 3rd I 
received a furlough to St. Malo, which is about one hundred and fifty 
miles from where we are located. I landed at St. Malo at 5:30 a. m., 
February 4th, and there I was taken care of by the Y. M. C. A. people. 
About two hundred and fifty soldiers took that trip the same time I 
did. From St. Malo they took us across the river of Ranee to the city 
of Dinard. It is located on the coast of the Gulf De St. Malo. It is 




1. Gilbert Goycrt. 2. Dal Spencer. 3. Curtis Watters. 4. Oscar Carl Horn. 5. Henry McKinley 
Smith. 6. William Drake. 7. Harold Nieman. 8. James Brooks. 9. Howard Heitmeyer. 10. 
Kenan Wager. 11. Emil G. Born. 12. Leedom Andrews, Ensign, U. S. N. 



186 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

noted as a great summer resort for the English and it certainly is a 
grand place. It has the nicest beaches that I ever saw. There is a 
Y. M. C. A. building located on the beach of the Ranee river and the 
tide comes in there from the gulf. I have been in a number of "Y" 
buildings but nothing compared with this one. It is built of the finest 
stone and marble. 

We were taken to hotels that were run by the Y people but taken 
care of by the French, and must say we had service. The beds we had 
were great. It made me feel as if I was discharged from the army. 
The Y officers took us to different places. They took us first to St. 
Servan, across the river from Dinard and off the coast of St. Malo. 
St. Servan is a small island. The town is very old and also odd. It 
was started up in the year 400 and there are some of the old stone walls 
that were used for forts in the fifth century. The place was used to 
guard the town of St. Malo from the enemies. Most everyone has 
heard of the "Three Sisters of the Poor". On this island is where they 
first started in the year 704. This city is used now for the headquarters 
of the "Three Sisters of the Poor" of France. It does seem too strange 
to look at these old places and then to think of the fine places we have 
in the states. These people we call "Frogs" and it certainly is a fitting 
name. They are the same all the time and never think of any improve- 
ments. We spent about eight hours here and enjoyed the sights very 
much. 

A few days later we took a trip to an island called St. Michel. We 
took a boat to St. Malo, and from there took a frog train to this island. 
This place was started in the year 400 by the Monks. It was first used 
for the priests of France to go for a vacation and in the year 832 the 
people from the Isle De Jersey came there and ruined the place — 
completely wiped the buildings and walls off the island. The tide comes 
in around the island for seven miles and comes in faster than a horse 
can race. The base of the island contains seven acres and in the center 
is a rock that extends one hundred and fifty feet above sea level. In 
the year 850 a man called St. Michel came there, and he and a few 
Monks started to build the place up again, and they used part of it for 
prisons. In 1246 the English came to this place on the high tide and 
expected to capture the island, but the Monks were too well prepared. 
They captured two large cannons from the English and all the harm 
that was done was that a large hole was torn in one of the walls. The 
Monks placed these two cannons inside the wall where the hole had 
been torn by the English, and there they are to this day, still in the same 
position. In 1250 they built a platform at the top of the rock and it 
contains a four-acre space. There are four stories under this platform, 
and now there are five above. It seemed to me that there were a 
thousand rooms in the five stories. In some of the cells there were wax 
forms of the people that were in there as prisoners, and they had all 
kinds of old relics that a person could think of. I also met a friend of 
mine there, Private Karl. His home is near Batesville. It certainly is 
a treat when I can get to see some of my friends from home. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 187 

From there we went back to Dinard. I certainly did enjoy that 
trip. Nearly every evening we went to the Y building and took in a 
show or danced. They have real dancing there as they do in Bates- 
ville. On the 12th of February 1 left there and got back to camp 
February 13th. It was a great treat to take this trip but a person 
doesn't feel very good to get back to camp after such freedom. But at 
that I am enjoying life fine and am gaining in weight. We are fed well 
and have good officers, so what can a person ask for more while in the 
army? I am in hopes that I will soon be back in the states with my old 
friends. 

With best wishes to all, 

Sergeant Earl L. Papenhaus." 

France, November 17, 1918. 
"Dearest Folks: 

Just received your last letters and one from Abe Wonning. I was 
glad to hear from you and get all the news. I don't see why you didn't 
get my letters. I have written to you every week and sometimes oftener. 

Well, you all know that the war is over and I guess that everybody 
is glad of it. I guess you all celebrated it when you heard the good 
news. So did we. All the church and school bells and bands in France 
were kept busy. Everything is quiet at the front now. We used to 
drive and walk around without lights, but now we can have lights 
everywhere and can drive right up to the front line with big headlights. 

The Germans are turning some of our prisoners loose. Today I 
met hundreds of them on the road. I stopped and talked to some of the 
boys. They said the Germans did not treat them very good, especially 
with eats. Their clothes were made of paper and they looked very 
ragged. They sure were glad to get back. If Germany had not signed 
up she would have gotten what was coming to her, because things were 
all set along our front for a big drive. But I guess she got enough as 
it was. The German people are glad it is over. 

We are not very busy at present. I was away from my company 
for a few days evacuating patients from the field hospital to the base 
hospital, but now I am back again. We are turning in some of our 
cars. I don't know what that means but I hope it means that we are 
on our way back to the boat soon. According to news here now, I may 
be at home for my birthday celebration. Some say that we will be 
among the first and some that we will be among the last to go. We are 
with the regular army now, and I can't tell when we will start back. 

The following nine fellows are with me: John Schmidt, Al Fritsch, 
Al Popenhaus, Walter Hastings, Wm. Gutzwiller, Ferd Chaplin, 
Steingrueber and Stegemoeller. I stopped at a little town the other 
day to take a hot bath and met a fellow who used to work for Mike 
Steinkamp at Indianapolis. His name is Shenk. He knew Clifford and 
Uncle Will. At the field hospital I met a fellow who knew Mr. 
Botnev of New Bethel, where Mr. Botnev lives. He knew Mr. 



188 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Bretzloff, and his father helped build Mr. BretzlofF s house. I have met 
lots of boys who always know someone from Batesville. 

Was glad to hear that Henry is getting better. That "flu" must 
be awful. We have lots of cases too. So far I have been feeling fine 
and have a good appetite. I have plenty of warm clothes. I have 
rubber boots, overshoes, two pairs of shoes, three pairs of heavy gloves, 
and about six pairs of heavy socks and not very much to do. Time 
hangs heavy on our hands now. Chester Brockman is in the base 
hospital but I have never had the chance to meet him. Lots of the 
boys are hunting souvenirs. I could get lots of them but I don't think 
I'll bother with them. I may bring a few. I'll be satisfied to get home 
in good health. I could get lots of German helmets, but they are too 
unhandy to carry. 

Regards from all the boys. Your loving son and brother. 

Gilbert A. Goyert." 

Mesves, France, November 24, 1918. 
"As the censorship has been raised I will try to relate my trip 
across the Atlantic during war time. Some things happened which I 
will tell you rather than write them. August 6th we left the port of 
Newport News at 2 p. m. There were three ships in our convoy. 
Several days later we met three from New York. This made six boats 
in our convoy. I was on a Holland boat called Zeelandia that carried 
about eighteen hundred to two thousand men. The first few days of 
our trip the weather was hot ; toward the end of our journey overcoats 
came in to our comfort. Most every night the upper deck was covered 
with sleeping men. It was either because of the heat or fear of the sub 
that brought them on this deck. On leaving port several cruisers and 
an airplane accompanied us but returned after several days. As we 
went on the boat over the gangplank our names were checked and each 
man received his bunk and raft number. I was on the third deck or 
about even with the water line. No light was to be seen at night, no 
cigars or cigarettes could be smoked. The sailors took off their white 
and put on their blue uniforms. The vessels ran abreast one-fourth to 
one-half mile apart. We had drill at dawn and before dinner every 
day. The raft I was on was egg-shaped and held fifteen to twenty 
men. I'll never forget the first morning I was on that boat. I heard 
the electric bells ringing. At first I didn't know what for, then found 
it was for the raft-drill call. 

A life-saver is in each bunk, and these we had to carry with us all 
the time. When about half way across we carried our reserve rations. 
These were bacon in a bacon can ; our condiment can contained coffee, 
sugar, salt and four packs of hard tack. Three days before landing 
our convoy was met by cruisers and destroyers. A sausage-shaped 
balloon used for observation was suspended on one of the cruisers. A 
destroyer can make about forty miles an hour. Our course was a zigzag 
route. This was to prevent the submarine from following. At times 
these U-boats followed a convoy all day and at dusk or at dawn made an 




1. Lewis Walker 
H. Rupp. 6. Mose 
10. David Kirschner. 



2. Brightly Severinghaus. 3. Henry F. Kress. 4. Leslie Konkle. 5. Charles 
B. Curran. 7. Vincent Starke. 8. Lester James. 9. George U. Brown, Jr. 
11. Leo Benz. 12. James Watson Gookins. 



190 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

attack on them. August 18th we came to anchor in the harbor of 
Brest till the 22nd. As I wrote some of the happenings of my trip in 
former letters, I will only add that this morning our band 'played' 
another group of men out of camp. It won't be long before all the 
casuals will be gone from here and we will be lucky to get home with 
one of these groups. 

Musician Amos G. Welser, 
154th Infantry Band, A. E. F., 
Address P. O. 798, Via N. Y." 



Oberwinter, Germany, December 29, 1918. 

"Dear Old Neighbor and Friend : 

Will drop you a few lines as I now have the opportunity. Up to 
the present it was impossible to write, for since last February we have 
been almost continually on the firing line. I served about one hundred 
and ten days on the Lorraine front in the trenches. From there we went 
to Champagne, where on July 15 the Crown Prince launched his great 
offensive against us, trying to reach Paris. Life looked hopeless, but I 
never lost heart, but fought to check the masses of big Prussians that 
were approaching. For a time I thought all was lost but we stopped 
them. No Man's Land looked like a cemetery with those big Prussians 
biting the dust, cold in death. The French were fighting on both sides 
of this division, which was the only American division there. They said 
it was the heaviest bombardment the Germans ever put over. High 
explosives, shrapnel, trench mortars, 77's, one-pounders, and gas shell 
fell like hail. Never have I witnessed as much steel flying in all my 
life and for twenty-five kilometers behind us trying to cut off support 
and supplies. Airplanes would even fly over and shoot machine guns at 
us. We saved the day for France. Had we failed to hold them back 
they would no doubt have reached Paris. Our company had one hun- 
dred and six casualties, captured, killed, gassed and wounded, so you 
see how we were situated. From there we were taken to Chateau- 
Thierry on the Marne River, now called ''The River of Blood", where 
we had some more fierce fighting, of which you have no doubt read. 
Then the drive at St. Mihiel on the Toul front advancing fourteen 
kilometers in twenty-eight hours but pushing on five further or nineteen 
in all. The French had tried several times to retake this ground but 
failed with heavy losses. It was there I met Eddie Wildey, as his 
regiment was also in the drive. It sure was a happy meeting, but I have 
not met him since. Next was the final blow at Verdun on the Argonne, 
where a fierce battle took place, but the American heroes got them on the 
run and followed them almost day and night, until Sedan was reached 
where Napoleon III lost, but this time it was Germany that lost. From 
there we started on our long march across Belgium, Luxemburg into 
Germany and up the Rhine, where we are now. I sure have some 
terrible experiences to tell you when we meet. I have faced all the 
shot and shell, and never got a scratch, which only a few in this company 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 191 

can say. I saw the 28th Infantry in the final drive but was unable to 
find Eddie Wildey's company. Will close wishing all a Happy New 
Year. Your old friend, 

Corporal Harrison Reynolds, 

Co. 1, 166th U. S. Inf., Rainbow Div., A. E. F., France." 

Ft. Wadsworth, X. Y., xNovember 27, 1918. 

"Dear Grandma: 

Well, I'm back to New York and will soon be home. Am expecting 
to be there by Christmas anyway. We are getting a lot of honor that 
really belongs to someone else. You see we were all ready to sail for 
France on the morning the news came of the armistice signing, so we 
came here on a transport and in overseas uniforms, and every one who 
saw us thought we were arriving from France, and being the first to 
arrive they're going wild over us. We had a fifty-two-hour ride on the 
U. S. S. Martha Washington, which is one of the largest transports in 
use. It has made nine trips across. I didn't get seasick but a lot of 
them did. We were over a hundred miles out from land most of the 
trip and went far out of the regular course to avoid mine fields. They 
had out mine-sweepers all the time, and we had to keep on life preservers 
and all our clothes the whole trip. Twice a day the alarm was given 
to man the life boats and rafts, and we had to learn where to go and 
what to do in case of accident. You know the mines haven't been 
taken up yet, and many of them are Moating loose and can't be found. 

When we got into New York Harbor, ferries and passenger boats 
turned out of their courses to run parallel to us. Such yelling and 
waving you never heard or saw. And every bell and whistle in the 
harbor was doing its best. When we landed and got out on the streets 
it looked like the whole population of the United States was there 
throwing eats, confetti, and even money at us. We're to parade in New 
York tomorrow. Theaters and everything else is wide open to us. All 
you need is an overseas uniform to have New York at your feet. If 
you stop on a corner you have a crowd around you in a minute, asking 
questions. I'm going to have a forty-eight-hour pass beginning tonight. 
The "Y" here has invitations for five thousand of the 41st Brigade to 
spend Thanksgiving with private families in New York and Brooklyn. 
I don't know yet whether I will accept one or not. It's certainly 
heaven here for us but for all that, I'll be glad when I can come home. 
This letter will have to do for all my relatives at Versailles because I'm 
my own secretary and trying to write to every one today. 

Love to all. 

Your grandson, 

Paul Wycoff, 

Bat. F, 38th C. A. C." 



192 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Coblenz, Germany, January 31, 1919. 

"Dear Mother: 

Well, it is just ten bells, and I have about one hour for letter 
writing. I sent you a card or so since I landed here, but I never told 
you how I came to get this trip to Coblenz, Germany. 

You see, the Y. M. C. A. educational books are making a big hit in 
the Third Army, the Army of Occupation, and headquarters are at 
Coblenz, Germany. I told you in a letter a few weeks ago that we were 
very busy handling the Y. M. C. A. books. So last Monday morning I 
arrived at the office for duty at 8 :30 o'clock and as I sat down 
at my desk I saw a note saying that I was to act as guard and take a 
car load of educational books to Coblenz, Germany, and was to start 
from Chaumont Station at 4 p. m. Monday, so I had to hurry to get the 
baggage to the depot. I didn't do much work at the office. You can't 
tell what will happen, so the chief clerk sent a Yank from the stock 
room with me so it would not be lonesome on the trip. 

Our car was filled from top to bottom and end to end. Two- 
thirds of the car was Y. M. C. A. educational books, and the other 
third was taken up with our baggage. Our baggage consisted of two 
field cots, two straw-ticks, one comfort, eleven blankets, shaving outfits, 
towels, mess kits, and so forth. In eats, we had tomatoes, canned corn, 
jam, beans, bread, coffee, different kinds of meat and son on. We also 
had an alcohol stove so we could warm our food. Our outfit was 
complete. 

At 4 p. m. our car was ready to leave, but the American special 
was late so we didn't leave Chaumont until 10 p. m. Monday. Went 
to bed and in a short time were hooked on behind the American special, 
bound for Coblenz, Germany. Tuesday morning we arose and I acted 
as chief cook, and at seven o'clock our breakfast was ready. It was 
fine! Beans, bread, hot toast, tomatoes, and that good coffee. You 
know I like coffee. 

Arrived at Toul at 9 a. m. Tuesday. Was there until twelve noon. 
Then were bound for Coblenz again. Weather was very cold, snowing, 
but we would open the side door and peep outside to see how different 
things looked than at Chaumont. About fifteen or twenty kilometers 
fiom Metz our eyes were opened. Oh, how many beautiful homes were 
destroyed ! Not a single person to be seen in the towns except a few 
Yanks doing guard duty along the railroad. Talk about dugouts, 
trenches, wire entanglements, etc., of the Huns — we could see all from 
the train. Arrived at Metz at 5 p. m. — a nice city with strong fortifica- 
tions. 

While our train was taking water at Metz I talked to a German 
who said he would be eighteen years old in July. Had been in service 
twenty-one months. He deserted three times and the third time they 
let him stay home. Said all boys of fifteen and sixteen years had to join 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 193 

the army or be put in irons or in prison. He also said the famine had 
touched many families in Metz last year. Their family numbered 
seven besides the parents. Eats were so scarce that two of his little 
sisters died from starvation, one ten, the other six years old. We gave 
the lad a piece of bread and jam, for he was hungry. 

At 5 :20 p. m. we started moving again about forty miles per hour. 
The Germans have a wonderful railroad bed, and their trains are pretty 
nice, but nothing like the United States can build. Ate supper in our 
convoy car at six bells and had a little of everything. Arrived at 
Luxemberg at 11 p. m. but could not see much at night. To bed at 
eleven and had a good sleep. Wednesday morning I peeped and we 
were at a standstill in a freight station in Coblenz, Germany, so we 
dressed, ate, and then started to find the general headquarters of the 
Third Army. At 8 a. m. three trucks were there to unload the car of 
Y. M. C. A. educational books for the Third Army of Occupation. 
At 11 a. m. books were checked and all O. K. Then we were at 
liberty in Coblenz. 

We first looked for a hotel, and as we stepped out of the railroad 
station we spied the Hausa Hotel. Registered there, for it was near 
the depot. A fine hotel with good fare and soft beds. I felt at home in 
that soft bed, different from straw-tick. At 1 :30 p. m. we started 
taking in Coblenz. A fine city of fifty-six thousand population. Street 
car fare 15 pfennig per person, about one-sixth of a mark, and a mark 
is twelve cents at present, so you can ride all over the city for two cents. 

When we got down to the Rhine I opened my eyes because of the 
beautiful bridges, all kinds of them, and the scenery is grand, and there 
are many other special features that show why the Germans thought so 
much of the Rhine river. 

In the evening we went down to the Fest Halle, that is the building 
where the Y. M. C. A. have their headquarters. At nine, we stepped 
into a German cabaret and sure enjoyed the evening eating sandwiches, 
drinking lemonade with foam on top, and sat and smoked a few cigars 
and listened to the music, American pieces played by Germans on an 
accordion, zither and guitar. The waiters were German damsels with 
red cheeks, and they wore little Dutch caps and would try to sing 
American songs. We sure had a nice time. 

At ten we arrived at the hotel and "toot sweet" we were in bed. 
Next day we started on our sight-seeing tour again. Went down to 
see the Kaiser's palace and many other denkmals of him. They sure 
thought a good bit of their kaiser, but not so much any more. 

I bought many postcards which I am going to send ; a few pictures 
I'll send as soon as I arrive at general headquarters at Chaumont, 
France — for you and sister Cora. Also have other souvenirs but don't 
know whether I should send or keep them until I hit the United States. 
I sent you a package or two a few weeks ago, and if you received them 
O. K. I will send all I have in the way of souvenirs. 



194 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

There is a fine Red Cross canteen here at the railroad station, open 
from 6 to 12 p. m. seven days a week. All free — large fresh doughnuts, 
all kinds of jam, and cheese sandwiches, good coffee with milk and sugar, 
and "Beaucoup" chocolate and cocoa. The more you eat the better you 
like it. The Red Cross sure is making a hit in the American Ex- 
peditionary Forces, especially in the Third Army. 

It is 11 p. m. and I think I am going to "cochay", which means 
going to sleep, so will close, and tomorrow will mail postcards to you 
and others, for I'm sure all of you will be glad to get news from me 
while I am sight-seeing in Coblenz. Am in best of health and hope you 
and everybody are O. K. Good-bye. 

Your loving son, 

Private George J. Engel." 



"Somewhere in France, November 11, 1918. 

Dear Folks: 

It has been some time since I wrote last but could not get much 
chance sooner as we were on the go nearly all the time, and were at no 
place where we could get paper or get the letters censored. We were 
following the Germans and they were going so fast that it took lots of 
hiking to get up to their lines. 

We went over the top on November 6, and went seven kilometers 
and didn't find any of the enemy, but the next morning we met strong 
resistance, but it did not take long before we had them going again. I 
am taking a rest now as one of them managed to hit me in the right 
ankle and made me turn back. It is not very much of a wound as it 
did not break any bones. The machine gun bullet went through on the 
right side of the ankle near the ankle bone. When I was hit it did not 
hurt. All that I noticed was that something hit me and I looked and 
saw a bullet hole in my shoe. I wanted to go on at first but some told 
me to look after it ; when I pulled my shoe off I saw a hole through the 
side of the ankle. It is about an inch and a half from the place where 
it entered to the place where it came out again. I then pulled out my 
first aid package and tied it up and went to the rear. 1 had to walk 
about a mile to the first aid station which they established in a little 
town which we took in the morning. It was about two o'clock when I 
got hit. On my way back I pulled up a nice good turnip out of a patch 
the Germans had sowed and it surely tasted good, as I was hungry. It 
was the first raw turnip I had since I was over here. When I got to the 
first aid station I was looked after and the road was blown up near 
there, so the captain said if we could walk to the next town, which was 
about three miles off, we couW get an ambulance. So a few of us boys 
started to walk. My ankle was pretty sore by this time and I could 
hardly walk. But I was surely lucky, as some good engineer came along 
on horseback and let me ride his horse and he walked. When we got 




1. Ernest Hockersmith. 2. John Elmer Shaw. 3. Edgar D. Rea. 4. Henry Kumpart. 5. Alvin 
Cramer. 6. Cecil Brodbeck. 7. Roy Runner. S. Ray Spencer. 9. Harry Gault. 10. Joseph William 
Bentz. 11. William Goss, 12. Reuben Smock. 



13 



196 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

to this aid station I could not stand on my foot any more and stayed 
there all night. The next morning I was taken to another station and 
from there to a field hospital. Stayed there a day and was then moved 
to the hospital where I now am. Landed here night before last. Think 
I'll be sent to some base hospital today or tomorrow. My foot is a 
good deal better and I guess by the time this reaches you it will be 
healed. 

I met Bertha Greeman this morning. She is staying at this place 
but is in a different ward. She came through this ward yesterday morn- 
ing and I saw and thought of her right away. This morning after she 
was through with her work she came in. She surely seemed to be glad 
to see some one from our home town. Said I was the first one she had 
met. She surely treated me fine — went to the Red Cross and got me a 
sweater and brought me some candy, cakes, an apple, box of cigarettes 
and this writing paper. I think the apple, candy and this paper were 
some of her own. She wanted to do all she could for me and I am 
surely thankful to her. Call up her folks and tell them I saw her and 
that she is looking well and in good spirits and very cheerful. 

I hope and think that peace will be signed today according to rumors 
and if not I hope it will be very soon hereafter. 

I have a good appetite and am feeling fine aside from my little 
sore and hope you are all well. Will close with my love to you all. 
Tell the friends around there "hello" for me and that I think we'll 
soon come back to tell our experiences. Good-bye, from 

Private Henry J. Gausman, 

Co. F, 16th Infantry, A. E. F., 

Frist Division, France. 



Edinburgh, Scotland, December 22, 1918. 
"Dear Mother. 

Am leaving here for Liverpool tomorrow after a week spent in the 
picturesque highlands of Scotland. Leaving Liverpool on Monday, we 
took the train for Aberdeen, arriving there at 2 p. m. Tuesday after a 
rail journey of thirteen hours. We stopped Tuesday night at the 
Waverly Hotel and saw a good show at the Tivoli theater. Wednes- 
day we went out to see the town. First, we visited the Bridge of 
Balgownie, built in the year 800. It's still in good condition and is 
interesting chiefly from the fact that Robert Bruce led his army across 
it to the battle of Culloden. In a little stone hut at the foot of the 
bridge was a photographer's shop. Here we stopped and had our 
pictures taken in kilts, the one we wore being the dress uniform of the 
Gordon Highlanders. Will send you one of them when I get back. 
Then we saw the Cathedral of St. Machar, which was built in 1010. 
Entering this building, which, by the way, is still used for services, we 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 197 

saw the old baptismal fount, the stained glass windows and decorated 
ceilings which have stood for centuries. Next, we visited King's College 
and Manschal College and Museum. Wednesday night we stayed aga'n 
at the Waverly and Thursday morning went to the fish market. 
Aberdeen is a great fishing port and at the market we saw the ships 
unload their cargoes, which were promptly sold by auctioneers to the 
dealers. 

At noon we took the train for Edinburgh, arriving at four o'clock. 
Here we stopped over night at the American Welcome Club. Friday 
we organized a party of eight soldiers and sailors and secured a guide 
for a trip to. the lakes. In the afternoon we went through Edinburgh 
castle. We saw Queen Mary's room, the throne room, the crown and 
royal scepter of Scotland, the prison, the palace, and all the old cannons 
used in the sieges of olden days. The castle is situated on a high cliff, 
and, though centuries old, is in good condition. 

At 4 p. m. our party started for Glasgow. We stopped over night 
at the American Y. M. C. A. and added a few more to our party. 
Next 3ay we started for Tarbet, on the Caledonian railway. In our 
party there was one American girl, a Y. M. C. A. worker from Nyack, 
N. Y. After an hour's trip by rail through the Scottish mountains we 
arrived at Tarbet. Here we mailed a few cards at the postoffice and 
walked down to the banks of beautiful Loch Lomond. At the pier we 
took a little boat, the "Princess Patricia", and went about fifteen miles 
up the lake to Inversnaid. Here we got oft and took a footpath up the 
hill past the cascades and a beautiful waterfall. At the top we saw 
the ruins of an old Scottish fort and the graveyard where nearly all of 
the garrison are buried. We descended the hill and were met by two 
American Red Cross nurses, who joined the party. This made us 
twenty-five strong, and everyone an American, too. We then went into 
the Inversnaid hotel and had a wonderful dinner in the dining-room, 
which faced Loch Lomond and the Grampian range of mountains. 
From the table we saw the lake and the mountains, Ben Lomond and 
Ben Nevis. After the meal we had music for an hour in the drawing 
room and then lined up by the cascade for a picture of the group. The 
steamer returned at two, and then we took a thirty-mile ride on the 
most beautiful lake in the world. Leaving the boat at Balloch we again 
caught the train to Glasgow. We stayed only an hour and got another 
train for Stirling. Our guide took us to the Corn Exchange cafe for 
supper and then we scattered about to the various houses for the night. 
Four of us were with an old Scotchman and his wife and they enter- 
tained us in real Scottish fashion. They heated irons and put them in 
the beds to keep our feet warm, and in the morning we had tea and toast 
in bed. Nothing like that at home. Stirling is a very old city with 
about thirty thousand population. They have one street car line, the 
cars being pulled by horses. 

This morning we visited Cambuckenneth Abbey, where the body of 
James III of Scotland lies. From there we ascended a steep hill to the 
Wallace monument. This is about two hundred and fifty feet high, 



198 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

and in the rooms inside there is the sword of Sir William Wallace, also 
statues of Walter Scott, Robert Bruce, John Knox, and other famous 
Scotchmen. On the site of this monument, Wallace stood and watched 
the approach of the British just before he defeated them at the battle of 
Bannockburn. From the top of the monument one gets a sight of 
seven famous battle-fields, among them the field of Bannockburn, the 
sites of the battles of Stirling, Linlithgow and several others. We had 
lunch in town and this afternoon went through Stirling castle. There 
we saw the palace, dungeons, the House of Parliament, the first Scottish 
mint, and the room where Douglas was murdered by James III; also 
where James IV was kept during childhood. Mounting the parapet, we 
saw Queen Mary's lookout, the round table where the knights of old 
held their games, and the ladies' lookout where the court ladies watched 
the games. Coming down we passed through the wild animal den and 
the Ladies' Rock where guns were mounted when the castle was cap- 
tured. We also saw the stone where prisoners were beheaded. 

We passed through the only church of its kind in the world. It is 
separated in the center by a vestibule and in each end is a room and 
each Sunday services are held in each end at the same time. In the 
graveyards about the church, I found an old headstone with this inscrip- 
tion: 

'Our life is but a winter day, 
Some only breakfast and away, 
Others to dinner stay and are full fed. 
Large is his debt who lingers out the day — 
He that goes soonest has the least to pay.' 

We left there at four-thirty and arrived here at six o'clock. Tomor- 
row we are going to visit Holyrood castle and art gallery, Parliament 
House, and so forth. Start home tomorrow, and will report for duty on 
Christmas eve. 

Had a wonderful trip, and one I wouldn't have missed for anything. 
Am feeling fine and expect to be with you in about four months. Have 
a collection of souvenirs to send you as soon as I return. 

Your loving son, 

Hal L. Myers." 



An Engineer's Story 

"I entered the Army March 29, 1918, at Stanley, North Dakota, 
being stationed at Plaza as a railway telegraph operator and clerk. I 
was sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa, arriving there on Easter Sunday. Was 
assigned to Company C, 163d Depot Brigade. I remained there only 
two and a half weeks when I was transferred to Company G, 5th Depot 
Brigade, Signal Corps, Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas. Arriving there, I 
discovered I had the measles. I was immediately taken to the hospital. 
Was there two and a half weeks. A week later I was put in the over- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 199 

seas casual replacement detachment for service overseas. Expecting to 
move forward every day the whole unit was confined to the camp. On 
June 15, I left Ft. Leavenworth, arriving at Camp Merritt, N. J., on 
the 17th. Waited there for transport until the 21st, when I sailed on 
the Shropshire, arriving at Port LeHavre, on July 6th. The following 
evening entrained and went to St. Aignon, France, which was a few 
days' ride. Then marched out to Camp Cuddes and was assigned to 
Company B, 116th Field Battalion, Signal Corps. On July 16 I was 
promoted to corporal and a few days later was sent on my way to the 
5th Division. On July 25th I reached St. Die, the headquarters of this 
division. The following morning I was assigned to Company C, 9th 
Field Battalion, Signal Corps. Was detached to the 11th Infantry to 
help operate the different ways of communication, and went up to the 
trenches in the mountains on the same day. This was known as a quiet 
sector, but the enemy would bomb our front lines nearly every day, and 
the Boche aviators would come over, trying to locate our artillery and 
machine guns. One evening, about two weeks later, we surprised them. 
We opened up with some light artillery such as one-pounders and trench 
mortars; also included the machine guns. We were ready at a minute's 
notice to advance. In the meantime, the 6th Infantry, which was just 
on the left of us, went over and captured the town of Frapelle. The 
enemy in front of us had retired, so we did not advance. On August 
23d I left the St. Die sector and began a march toward the St. Mihiel 
sector ; marched at night and rested throughout the day. Stayed at 
Martincourt, a small town, for a few hours' rest, and on the evening of 
September 1 1 we marched up to the front and took our position in the 
trenches. 

I was laying telephone wire from the 11th regimental headquarters 
to the front until 1 a. m. September 12, when the thousands of pieces of 
our own artillery began firing over our heads. At 5 a. m. we started 
on our forward advance. We kept on going, and on the 15th we were 
relieved by the 60th Regiment. We moved back a few miles for that 
night and next day. We then started on our journey to the western 
front. Only marched a few nights until we were picked up by trucks 
and rode. We were held in reserve till we reached the town of Mont 
Faucon. Here I was sent back to headquarters to work with Company 
B, 9th Field Battalion, Signal Corps. Near October 14th I was sent up 
to Nantillois to lay a telephone line to Madeline farm. During the 
night our captain was wounded and taken back. We went on, but got 
lost, so we decided to wait till daybreak. We then started out and 
reached our objective, but were kept busy repairing our wires for the 
next few days. We then put in lines in and beyond Cunel into the 
forests of Bois-des-Rappes. Here we received orders to stop until rein- 
forcements were brought up. 

On the evening of October 27 our barrage started and lasted till 
the morning of the 29th, when we advanced again, capturing the towns 
of Aincreville, Clery-le-Grand, Clery-le-Petite on to Dun-sur-Meuse, 
where we crossed the Meuse river around November 5th. Then we 



200 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

went on through Milly on to Murvaux and put in lines from there to 
Brandeville. On the 10th I helped run a line on towards Louppy. The 
firing from the enemy broke our lines, and I was sent back to repair 
them. 

On November 11th I left Brandeville again repairing the wires. 1 
reached Louppy about nine o'clock. We were ready to make another 
advance, but soon received orders to stop, for the war was over. 1 rode 
back in a truck to Lyon that evening and remained there for nearly a 
week, when I went to Longuyon. Was there till December 1st, then 
went to Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, for nearly two weeks. Moved 
to Merl for a few days. From there to Esch, Luxemburg, and re- 
mained there till July 8, 1919, when we started for home. Reached 
Brest, France, on the 11th. Sailed on the United States ship Radinor 
on July 15th, reaching New York harbor on the 28th. Was sent to 
Camp Mills, L. I., N. Y., for three days. Then went to Camp Sher- 
man, Ohio, August 2d, and received my final discharge there on August 
4-th. Ora C. Ekgle, 

Co. C, 9th Battalion, Field Signal Corps." 



"April 6, 1919. 

"Some of my experience in the United States Army. I was em- 
ployed at Cincinnati with the Warner Auto Top Co. and was drafted 
into the service September 6, 1918. Was sent from Osgood, Ind., to 
Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky. 1 was turned down on the 
first examination on account of tonsilitis. Went to the base hospital 
and was there two weeks. After that 1 was put into Company 53, 
14th Battalion, 159th Depot Brigade. There I got my first experi- 
ence. I was given a uniform and had to drill every day. I was there 
for only a short time when the Spanish influenza broke out. One night, 
about six o'clock, they picked out a detail of soldiers to go to the base 
hospital to help take care of the "flu" patients. I happened to be on and 
had to go. We had to pitch our tents first, which we had to sleep in. 
Then we were put in different wards. 1 and another fellow were put 
in convalescent ward No. 10. There were one hundred and fifty sick 
soldiers there. The hours we had were from 6 p. m. to 6 a. m. The 
work we had was to help the nurses, that is, sponge the real sick ones 
with hot towels and wash them night and morning. We had to carry 
their meals to them three times a day. When one would die we had to 
wrap him up in two bed sheets, then go with ambulance to the 
morgue, and bring back the sheets. We made those trips quite fre- 
quently, for many died. A great many of the orderlies took the "flu," 
but 1 was lucky and didn't get it. 

Private Harry Gilland." 



Diary of Everett Hart 

Seaman on the Destroyer Yarnall 




Everett Hart 



Enlisted July 8, 1918, at In- 
dianapolis; was sent to Great 
Lakes Naval Training Station at 
Chicago, Illinois. Promoted to 
second class seaman on August 2, 
1918. Was at Camp Farragut, 
Great Lakes, for detention two 
weeks. Camp Perry for training, 
one week. Camp Ross, three days. 
Sent from there to receiving ship 
Commodore off Grant Park, Chi- 
cago. Trained here until Sep- 
tember 11, 1918. Sent then to 
receiving ship at Philadelphia; 
staved here in training until 
October 30, 1918. Stayed at 
anchor until November 29. 

November 29, 1918— Put the 
Yarnall into commission in Phila- 
delphia Navy Yards and went to 
Rhode Island for torpedoes, at 
Newport, R. I. 

Dec. 1 — Got torpedoes in New- 
port. Returned to New York on 
December 2. 



Dec. 3 — Moved from Hudson to North 
President. 



river to wait for the 



Dec. 4 — Led the convoy out of the harbor. Eleven destroyers, U. 
S. S. Pennsylvania, George Washington Transport, with the President. 

Dec. 5 — Sea rough. Part of the crew sick, as they haven't been 
out to sea for a long time. 

Dec. 6 — Still at sea. Still rough as thunder. 

Dec. 7 — At sea, rough. Nobody has had a wash since we left New 
York, and no prospects of getting any. 

Dec. 8 — The sea still rougher than ever. Can not walk on deck 
without holding to something. Six of the destroyers turned back to 
New York on December 6th. 

Dec. 9 — Left the convoy, increased speed from sixteen knots to 
twenty-five knots per hour and sailed for the Azores Islands to get oil 
and water. After leaving the convoy a few hours we broke down and 
were about an hour getting fixed up again. Arrived in the Azores at 
7 p. m. and took on oil and water. Having a few spare minutes there 

(201) 



202 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

the ship's company nearly all got drunk. We didn't have any liberty 
here; but one good thing, we had enough fresh water for a good bath 
and to scrub our clothes. 

Dec. 10 — At 2:30 p. m. we sailed from the Azores to join the con- 
voy again. We found the convoy about eleven o'clock a. m. and took 
our position and continued on our course to Brest. The sea was still 
very rough and those that drank most of the liquor were very sick. 

Dec. 1 1 — Still at sea. Everything went well but the sea was still 

rough. 

Dec. 12 — We were nearing Brest and expecting to get in next day. 

Dec. 13 — The long-expected day arrived. We met the fleet from 
Brest. Theie were nine battleships and forty-nine destroyers. All 
battleships fired twenty-one guns as a salute to the President. A few 
minutes later we met the French fleet. They also fired a salute. There 
were a few airplanes flying over the George Washington; also some 
dirigibles. Arrived in Brest at 3 :30 p. m. and anchored outside the 
breakwater. Lowered the motor sailor and about 8 o'clock we pulled 
inside the breakwater and moored to Buoy 3. 

Dec. 14 — Started to cleaning up the ship. Had liberty at 4:30 p. 
m. until nine o'clock. 1 went ashore and for the first time I stepped 
on foreign soil, which was very muddy, but I went around trying to 
see as much of the town as I could. After I had seen all I could, I 
went down to the Y. M. C. A. hut and stayed there until it was time 
to come back to the ship. 

Dec. 1 5 — About the same as yesterday, only we took on a new 
supply of water and oil, and then I had my second bath since we left 
the United States. 

Dec. 16 — Still moored at Buoy 3 and nothing much to write about, 
and nothing much to see. 

Dec. 17 — "Same old stuff" or S. O. S., whichever you want to call 
it. Work until 4:30 p. m., then liberty. 

Dec. 18 — Raining ever since we have been in Brest. 

Dec. 19 — Nothing of interest. Raining again, which is nothing 
new. 

Dec. 20 — This was a day we all loved to see, being pay day. I 
drew 180 francs, as we were paid in French money. Of course I 
didn't know anything about it at all. Anyway it amounted to about 
$33.00 in our money. When I went ashore and started to buy things 
I would pull out all 1 had and have them take all they wanted, but I 
soon got used to it, and asked for what 1 wanted and how much they 
wanted for it. You don't want to even let the French people take out 
what they want, for if they think you don't know any better they will 
take more than it is worth. 

Dec. 21 — Found it raining again, and nothing of interest to write 
about. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 203 

Dec. 22 — Rain again. We were told we could have seven days' 
furlough either to Paris or to London. I didn't care to go, so stayed on 
the ship. 

Dec. 23 — At 4:30 o'clock a party left the ship for London and 
Paris. 

Dec. 30 — Nothing has happened, only it is raining like h— 1. 

Dec. 31 — Some more rain. About 4 p. m. we got word to get on 
stores and proceed to Portugal to carry Admiral Dunn and his staff 
and a Portuguese prime minister. 

Jan. 1, 1019 — We left Brest for Oporto, Portugal, with Admiral 
Dunn, his staff, a Portuguese prime minister and a Portuguese officer 
who was going to be president of Portugal. The other had been shot 
about three days before this. We had a good day, only for one old 
friend — the rain. 

Jan. 2 — Arrived in Oporto, Portugal, about 1 :30 p. m. Here the 
Portugal officer and the admiral and his staff were supposed to catch 
a train for Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, but the Portuguese officer 
was afraid they would kill his party, so we had to take him on into 
Lisbon by water ; while at Oporto, the Bum-Bum boats sold us all the 
oranges we wanted. No liberty. We left here at 9 :30 p. m. for Lisbon, 
Portugal ; the seas as rough as h~l. Admiral very sick. 

Jan. 3 — About nine o'clock a. m. we arrived at Lisbon and tried to 
tie up to a buoy in the Tagus river, but the weather was so rough we 
couldn't do it. So we pulled alongside the dock. Liberty at 4:30. 
Shoved off about five o'clock, but some fellow in the deck force stole 
a five-pound can of butter the night before and all the deck force was 
restricted; no liberty for them. I was in the bunch. All went well 
till about nine o'clock, when a terrible storm came up and the ship 
was rocked like we were at sea. The motor sailor was tied up at the 
stem of the ship and it sank, but the lines on it were long enough to 
hold until we could get a larger one on it. We had lots of trouble 
and work trying to get her afloat again, but succeeded at about 3 a. m. 

Jan. -1 — My section rated liberty so, and quick as possible we 
cleaned up and went ashore. We had midnight liberty. Some of our 
sailors were mistaken for English sailors and got a pretty bad deal out 
of it. One fellow had his eye cut with a knife and his wrist broken ; 
some of the others had to pay a fine before they could get away. Some 
returned all right. Souvenirs — we sure had a hot time for our first 
liberty. 

Jan. 5 — Another happy day, being pay day. We got paid in Por- 
tuguese money. I had 22,000 sies — some money — but only $15 in our 
money. I went ashore again and sure had some fine time. They had 
some fine parks and squares, and their sidewalks were different kind 
of bricks. Their trolley cars were more like our own, and it seemed by 
this time like the Portuguese knew we were Americans, and when we 
wanted anything they would show us where to get it. When we told 



204 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

them we were Americans they would throw their arms around our necks 
and say, "Ah, Americano." 

Jan. 6 — Raining again. I mean still raining, not raining again. 
Nothing happened till liberty started. Everybody went ashore. Had a 
good time till eleven o'clock. 

Jan. 7 — Raining. Also in Lisbon. At ten o'clock shoved off for 
the Azores Islands. After we had gone about five miles, had some hard 
luck. We ran into a terrible storm. As we were trying to get things 
secured for sea all the first section were on the forecastle. When it 
began to get so rough the executive officer told us to clear the fore- 
castle. Lieutenant Smith was with us and we only lacked a little of 
being secured. Smith suggested that we stay over and we had to hold 
on to keep from being washed off the deck. Smith did not want to 
leave till things were secured. The executive officer told us the second 
time to come in, that there was another sea coming over. This t.'me 
I dropped everything and made for the door. The rest did the same, 
all but two seamen and Lieutenant Smith. One seaman's name was 
Arthur, the other Lindstrom. Smith and Arthur were washed over- 
board and never seen again. Lindstrom, having on a pair of sea boots, 
caught on one of the fire plugs and broke his leg. He was washed down 
the deck against one thing and another till his clothes were torn off, 
his arm bruised awfully. We searched about three hours for the men 
overboard, but found nothing of them. We went back to Lisbon to get 
a doctor for Lindstrom. 

Jan. 8 — Arrived in Lisbon about 2:30 a. m. and got a doctor for 
Lindstrom. After transferring him to the U. S. S. Tonopah, a mani- 
tor that was in there, for medical treatment, we shoved off about 10:30 
a. m. for the Azores Islands, the sea still rough as h— 1. We had two 
army officers aboard that were as seasick as dogs. No rain today. 

Jan. 9 — Arrived at Ponta Delgada, Azores, at 10:20 a. m. and tied 
up alongside the U. S. S. Dixie for repairs. The Bum-Bum boats came 
alongside with oranges and pineapples as cheap as dirt. Had a ball 
game. The Yarnall got beat. Xo rain today. Weather hot as July. 
Liberty at 4:30 p. m. 

Jan. 10 — Still at Ponta Delgada waiting for oil and the Dixie still 
working on us. Liberty, and baseball party shoved off at 2 p. m. for 
another game with the Dixie. Yarnall beat nine to four. No rain. 

Jan. 1 1 — Still in Ponta Delgada. Weather as hot as ever. An 
inquest was held over Smith and Arthur. Nothing seen or heard of 
their bodies yet and guess there never will be. No rain. About the 
longest time we spent without having rain since we left the States. 

Jan 12 — -Still at Ponta Delgada. Had beefsteak for dinner, but I 
had eaten so many oranges and pineapples that I didn't want any dinner; 
I was almost sick. Liberty at 1 p. m. ; also baseball practice. 

Jan. 13 — Still alongside the Dixie getting a new bridge built on our 
ship. Silll waiting for the oil tanks. 




1. Byron Windsor. 2. Jacob Schumacher. 3. Clay Updike. 4. Arthur Cramer. 5. Paul V. 
Wycoff. 6. Harry H. Marsh. 7. Clyde Woolery. S. Tom Bedunnah. 9. Allen Courtney. 10. Sec. 
Lieut. George H. Bailey. 11. Charles Myers. 12. Faye Eads. 



206 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Jan. 1-1 — Started painting the ship. Still in Ponta Delgada, getting 
plenty of oranges and pineapples. 

Jan. 15 — Still painting ship. She looks fine. Rained a little. 

Jan. 16 — Went alongside the Arethura, the oil ship we had been 
waiting for. Finished oiling ship about 7 :45 p. m. Spilled oil all over 
ship just after painting. The deck force raised h-1 about it. 

Jan. 17 — Got under way about 8 a. m. for Brest, France. Making 
about twenty-five knots per hour. Painting ship all day. Everyone 
expecting lots of mail at Brest. Have had no mail in nearly two 
months. I am sick today. Been in bed all day. 

Jan. 18 — Still on our way to Brest. Weather fine. Nobody sea- 
sick this trip. 

Jan. 19 — Arrived in Brest about 2 p. m. Sent a party ashore for 
mail. Returned with ten bags full. 

Jan. 20 — Still in Brest. Received another bag of mail. The rest 
of the furlough party came back today. 

Jan. 21 — In Brest and guess we will stay here for a while as the 
captain has gone to London. 

Jan 22 — S. O. S. No more mail. 

Jan. 23 — S. O. S. Same old stuff. 

Jan 24 — Ship looking good, as we have about got it cleaned up. 

Jan. 25 — Mr. Scholtz, our supply officer, went on a furlough. 
Only three officers left aboard. 

Jan. 26 — Sunday dinner: Chicken and apple pie. Liberty 9 
a. m. Rained all day. Hailed a while this afternoon. 

Jan. 28 — Rained again today. Turned a bit cooler. No mail 
yet. 

Jan. 29 — Rain — rain — rain ! One bag of mail today. Received 
word to prepare to make a trip to Belgium. Supposed to leave at 
3 p. m., but did not leave until 10:30 p. m. Captain not aboard. The 
executive officer had a h — 1 of a time getting out of the harbor. 

Jan. 30 — At sea. Passed Plymouth, England, at 5 a. m. Speed, 
twenty-five knots. Arrived at Dover, England, at 2 p. m. Stopped to 
pick up the captain and Assistant Secretary of the Navy Roosevelt. 
Liberty 4:30 p. m. until next morning at 7 a. m. 

Jan. 31 — The captain came ashore, but Assistant Secretary of 
Navy Roosevelt didn't. The weather cold and snowing. Liberty party 
at 4:30. Had lots of fun snowballing some girls. Assistant Secretary 
Roosevelt and staff came on board at 10:30 p. m. 

Feb. 2 — Left Dover for Ostend, Belgium. Sea calm but cold 
as old Billy. We dropped two depth charges. Ran into a heavy fog 
and had to slow down. Supposed to get in at 1 p. m., but it got so foggy 
we had to anchor at sea. Lowered a boat and sent the assistant 
secretary of navy and his staff ashore to Ostend. Boat returned O. K. 
Stayed anchored all night waiting for fog to rise. English Channel so 
full of mines we are afraid to run in the fog. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 207 

Feb. 3 — Got under way. Went to the coast of Belgium at 
Zeebrugge. Arrived there about 10:30. Liberty as soon as we were 
secured. We were the first American ship in a Belgian port since the 
war started. Liberty lasted until 12 o'clock p. m. All the boys visited 
the battle-fields and brought back enough high explosives to blow up 
h — 1 ! While we were out on the battle-fields we were throwing hand- 
grenades. Sounded like another war had started. 

The British blocked the German submarines in the harbor at Zee- 
brugge by sinking a ship across the channel. They also blew up a 
steel bridge. The British did some good work there. There were lots 
of graves there — they were everywhere. I saw the graves of three 
German officers and they had a mine placed upon them with these 
words: "May God finish England." 

Feb. 4 — Liberty today until 10:30 a. m. The officers made us 
throw away all the explosives so we didn't bring back any more, but 
we "busted" all the hand grenades we could find. Got under way at 
1 p. m. for Brest. 

Feb. 5 — Arrived at Brest at 2 p. m. and raining as usual. 
Received two bags mail from the U. S. S. George Washington. 

Feb. 6 — Still at Brest. Still raining. 

Feb. 7— S. O. S. 

Feb. 8 — Has got rather rough inside the breakwater. U. S. S. 
Tarbell left for England this morning. Guess she will have rough trip. 

Feb. 9 — Rougher than ever. Can't get ashore without getting wet. 

Feb. 10— S. O. S. Rough as Billy. 

Feb. 11 — Still in Brest. No mail from the states. Everybody 
seems to be feeling blue. 

Feb. 12 — Left Brest, France, for Plymouth, England, on our 
regular mail trip. Had a few passengers aboard. Arrived at Plymouth 
at 1 p. m. Liberty till 7 a. m. 

Feb. 13— Left Plymouth for Brest at 9 a. m. Speed twenty- 
five knots. Arrived at Brest at 3 :30 p. m. Received a little mail. 

Feb. 14 — Went alongside oil dock about 9:30 a. m. Finished 
oiling at 6:30 p. m. Tied up to Buoy No. 3 as usual. 

Feb. 15 — Went outside the breakwater and anchored to await the ar- 
rival of the President aboard the U. S. S. George Washington. He 
came on board the Washington about 1 1 :30 a. m. All the ships 
"dressed" and fired twenty-one guns as a salute. Left Brest at 12:30 
bound for good old U. S. A. We are only going as far as the Azores 
Islands. Standard speed, seventeen knots. Sea pretty rough. French 
fired twenty-one guns salute and returned to Brest about 3 :30 p. m. 

Feb. 16 — At sea and rough as h — 1. Had beans for breakfast. 
Some feed ! Most everybody seasick. 

Feb. 17 — So rough at sea the cooks can't cook anything to eat. 
Most every one sick anyway, and don't care for much. 

Feb. 18 — Still at sea; sea worse than yesterday. Doesn't seem like 



208 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

we can pull through at all. We sighted our destroyers that came to 
relieve us at 2 p. m. We turned back to the Azores about 10:30 a. m. 
but couldn't get in the harbor till next morning, it was so rough out 
there. Couldn't go to bed, and we had already been out in it four days. 
Had to wait till next morning to get into the harbor. 

Feb. 19 — Went inside the harbor about 8 a. m. Tied up alongside 
a Chink ship. Rough as thunder inside harbor. Played the Tarbell a 
game of baseball and beat her three to one. As we are back in the 
Azores, we have plenty of oranges and pineapples to eat. 

Feb. 20 — Still in Ponta Delgada. Played the U. S. S. Lea a game 
of baseball and tied score, one to one. Liberty till midnight. Moved 
alongside the U. S. S. Maumee to oil ship. 

Feb. 21 — Left Ponta Delgada for Brest at 3 p. m. Sea calm. 

Feb. 22 — At sea. Washington's Biithday; had a good dinner. 

Feb. 23 — At sea and Sunday. Had mutton chops for dinner. 
Reduced speed to fifteen knots. 

Feb. 2-1 — Arrived at Brest at 7 a. m. Went ashore for mail. Gut 
four bags. 

Feb. 25 — Still in Brest. Moored to the same old buoy. Rained. 

Feb. 26— Still in Brest. S. O. S. 

Feb. 27 — Went alongside the U. S. S. Bridgeport. Stayed about 
one hour and went back to same old place. 

Feb. 28 — Rained, of course. 

March 1 — Still in Brest and raining. Looking for more mail. 

March 2 — S. O. S. Rain — rain — rain. 

March 3 — Can't expect anything but rain in Brest. 

March 4 — Went alongside the U. S. S. Maumee to take oil. 

March 5 — Left Brest for Plymouth at 7 a. m. on the last mail trip. 
Had fifty cases of shoes, thirty barrels of oil, and many passengers. 
Arrived at Plymouth about 2 p. m. Liberty all night. 

March 6 — Left Plymouth for Brest at 8 a. m. Made thirty-three 
knots most of the way back to Brest. Fine weather. Arrived in Brest 
at 2 p. m. 

March 7 — Still in Brest. Tied up to a different buoy, No. 7. 

March 8 — Received one bag of mail. Taking on oil. 

March 9 — Left Brest to meet the President. Fine weather all day. 

March 10 — Still at sea; rather rough today. 

March 1 1 — Still at sea and rough. Destroyers in searching forma- 
tion looking for the George Washington. Sighted the U. S. S. 
Montana, and the George Washington at 7 p. m. Took our position on 
starboard side of George Washington. Standard speed fifteen knots. 

March 12 — Still at sea same position, heading toward Brest. Had 
general quarters collision and fire drill at 10:30 p. m. 

March 13 — Still under way. Speed eleven knots. At 4:30 wheel 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 209 

ropes jammed. Lost sight of convoy. Was picked up. Arrived at 
Brest 7 :30 p. m.. Anchored outside hreakwater till 9 :45 when we went 
inside. Tied up to Bouy No. 3 alongside U. S. S. Lea. 

March 14 — Still at Buoy 3. Took on water. Had captain's inspec- 
tion. 

March 15 — Same as yesterday. Had captain's inspection of the crew. 
Played U. S. S. Lea baseball. Got beat four to two. 

March 16 — Sunday morning. Had boat race with U. S. S. Woolsev 
and won by five boat lengths. 

March 17 — S. O. S. Only took on stores. 

March 18 — Took on some commissary stores. Oiled the Fanning 
for her trip home. 

March 19 — U. S. S. Fanning left for the states. 

March 20 — Same as before, only the crew drew small stores from 
the U. S. S. Bridgeport. 

March 21 — Took on a few stores. Had captain's inspection. 

March 22 — Captain's inspection of crew. 

March 23 — U. S. S. Leviathan came in with Secretary Daniels. 
The Secretary made a talk at the Y. M. C. A. for the boys. He told 
us we would all get home soon, but here we all stay. 

March 24 — Took on oil and stores. 

March 25 — Still at Buoy 3. Painted deck. 

March 26 — Painted ship. Took on officers' baggage. 

March 27 — Took on more officers' baggage; also two hundred and 
fifty men. Got under way at 6:30 a. m. for Spithead, England, U. S. S. 
Tarbell in the lead. Standard speed thirty knots. Anchored 6:45. 
Tied up alongside the Kaiserine and Tarbell. Transferred her men to 
a German ship and got under way for Southampton at eight forty-five. 

March 28 — Got under way at nine-thirty. Went alongside the 
Graf Waldersee, another Hamburg-American liner. Took five Ger- 
mans aboard our ship, but had to put them back on the Waldersee and 
await the arrival of the Tarbell with the crew for the German ship. 
Ten-thirty posted men on watch to watch the Germans. Eleven-thirty 
the Tarbell came alongside with the crew for the Waldersee. We took 
the crew of German sailors aboard and got under way at three-thirty. 
Tied up to the German ship, Cape Finisterre, put the Germans aboard 
her. Got under way and dropped anchor at 6 p. m.. Liberty at 1 1 
p. m. Went ashore at Cowes, in the Isle of Wight. Kaiserine Augusta 
Victoria got under way for Brest, France, with Old Glory flying at the 
top of the flagstaff. 

March 29 — Rough. Had to wait a while to hoist the motor sailor. 
Got under way at 9 a. m. for Southampton. Arrived at 10 a. m. Tied 
up to a dock. Shoved off at 10:30 p. m. Tied up alongside the Tarbell 
at 10:45. Tarbell shoved off, we tied to the dock. Captain returned 
from London. Took on two hundred and fifty officers and men. 
Shoved of for Cowes 1 p. m. Tied up alongside the German ship 



210 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Zeppelin 2 p. m. at Cowes. Transferred the men we brought to the 
Zeppelin. Took the Germans off her and put them on the Cape 
Finisterre at 4 p. m. Tied up to a buoy ; started to shove off a liberty 
party, but got orders to get under way again for Southampton. The 
Graf Waldersee shoved off for Brest. Got under way for Southampton. 
Arrived at seven-fifty. Tied up to a dock. Liberty till 7 a. m. 

March 30 — Six a. m., took on English pilot; 7 a. m., got under way. 
Speed twenty-five knots; 10 a. m., slowed down to twenty knots. Ar- 
rived at Harwich, England, at 10:45 a. m. Dropped anchor at eleven. 
Took on oil, also stores from the U. S. S. Chester. Libertv partv at 
5 :30 till 8 a. m. 

April 1 — Still at Harwich. Took on officers. Got under way at 
8 a. m. with, orders for all to wear life-preservers as we were going 
through the North Sea and there were at this time still twenty-seven 
thousand floating mines in there. Two English ships were with us. 
Speed, twenty-one knots. Bound for Wilhelmshaven, Germany. 

April 2 — Still under way. Sighted Helgoland at 3 p. m. Arrived 
Wilhelmshaven at 6 p. m. Anchored for the night. No liberty here. 

April 3 — Secured for sea. Took on German pilot at 6:45 a. m. 
Speed, twenty knots. Bound for Kiel canal. Steamed up the Elbe 
river. Arrived at Kiel canal locks, at 12:20 p. m. Tied up to docks 
till docks were opened at 12:40 p. m. Got under way and started 
through Kiel canal. Speed, eight knots. We were seven hours going 
through the Kiel. Sure were some pretty sights all through. Saw the 
longest bridge in the world across the Kiel canal. Tied up to locks at 
seven, till locks opened at seven-fifty. Got under way and tied up to a 
buoy at Kiel, Germany, at eight-thirty for the night. The motor sailor 
carried the inspection party ashore. Also a German officer we had 
aboard. 

April 4 — Left Kiel, Germany, at 6 p. m. Standard speed, thirty 
knots. Passed Copenhagen at seven-thirty. Arrived at Rugen Island 
11:30 a. m. Inspection party went ashore and returned at 3:45 p. m. 
Got under way at 3 :55 p. m. Arrived at Warnemunde at 7 p. m. ; 
till ten o'clock to moor ship. Kept the two guards on all night. 

April 5 — Still at Warnemunde, Germany. The Allied aircraft 
inspecting party went ashore to inspect air station. Under way at 
12 p. m. Speed, twenty-five knots. Arrived at Appenrade, Germany, 
and anchored at 5 p. m. Inspecting party went ashore at 5:30 p. m. 

April 6 — Left Appenrade at 6 a. m. Speed twenty-five knots. Had 
to slow down to pass through a narrow channel. Arrived and anchored 
at Flensburg, Germany, at 8:35 a. m. Inspecting party went ashore 
and returned at 9:45 a. m. Speed, twenty-nine knots. Later slowed 
down to twenty-two. Arrived at Copenhagen. Liberty at 8 p. m. The 
ship was open for visitors and hundreds of people visited the Yarnall. 

April 8 — At dock in Copenhagen; 10 a. m., went alongside British 
destroyer. Visitors came aboard until 6 :30 p. m. Got under way with 
the F58 and H. M. S. Curlew. Speed twelve knots. Very sorry to 
leave Copenhagen, for it was sure a fine place. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 211 

April 9 — Arrived at Kiel Bay, Germany, 7:15 a. m. Moored to 
buoy. Inspecting party went ashore at 9 a. m., returned at ten. Under 
way at ten-forty. Passed through locks at Kiel canal at ten-fifty. 
Steamed through Kiel canal. Speed, eight knots. Changed pilots and 
took on a German aviator. Passed through the Kiel canal into the 
Elbe river at 5 :50 p. m. Speed, twenty-five knots. Arrived and 
anchored at Liszt, Germany, at 11 p. m., close to the aircraft factory. 

April 10 — Allied aircraft inspecting party went ashore at 8 a. m. 
Returned to ship at 9:30 a. m. Under way at 9:45 a. m. Speed 
twenty-five knots. Passed Helgoland at 1 :50 p. m. Arrived at Bremen- 
haven, Germany, at 4 p. m. No liberty anywhere in any German port. 
Had to keep guards on to keep the Germans off the ship, as they want 
everything they can get hold of, soap especially. I was on guard. No 
one was allowed to talk to the Germans, but we would talk and trade 
with them on the sly. The other fellows and myself while on guard 
traded a can of lye for half gallon of beer. The Germans thought it 
was sugar and started to eat it. I guess it was very hot. Ha! ha! 

April 11 — Still at Bremenhaven. Inspecting party went ashore at 
11 a. m. The dock was crowded with people wanting to trade for soap. 
We traded some soap for a little dog. Inspecting party returned at 
5 p. m. Went through the locks at 6:15 and out to the British ship 
that was waiting for us outside. Speed, fifteen knots. Arrived at 
Wilhelmshaven, Germany, at 9:50 p. m. Took the German officer 
ashore. 

April 12 — Still at Wilhelmshaven. Rained all day. 

April 13 — At Wilhelmshaven. British ships left us today for 
Harwich, England. Sunday. No bread and nothing else much to eat. 
Will be glad when we can be where we can get something to eat. 

April 14 — Left Wilhelmshaven for Helgoland, Germany. Arrived 
there at 9:30 a. m. Left Helgoland at 12:30 p. m. Rough sea. Slowed 
down to three knots. Passed four floating mines. 

April 15 — Still at sea. Rough as h — 1! Supposed to arrive at 
Harwich at 8 a. m., but was ten hours late on account of rough sea. 
Passed a mine at 5 :48 p. m., not over thirty feet from ship. Arrived at 
Harwich at 7 :30 p. m. Tied up to a buoy. 

April 16 — Got some stores from H. M. S. Ganges. Weather rough. 
Liberty at 1 p. m. till 10 a. m. 

April 17 — Still at Harwich. Liberty at 1 p. m. until some time 
next day. Several of shipmates and myself went to- London and had 
nice trip. 

April 18— In London. Stayed at the Eagle Hut, Y. M. C. A. 
Caught the train at 9:15 for Harwich; arrived there at 1 :30 p. m. on 
Good Friday. 

April 19 — Still in Harwich. Pretty weather. Nothing happening. 

April 20 — Easter Sunday. I never spent as lonesome an Easter as 
today. Weather rough. Liberty 9 a. m. till twelve tonight. Captain 
returned aboard from London, where he has been the past four days. 



14 



212 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

April 21 — Left Harwich at 11 a. m. for Brest. Speed, two knots. 

April 22 — Arrived in Brest at 8 a. m. Tied alongside the U. S. S. 
Murray. Smith, Tarbell, Woolsey and Bridgeport getting ready to 
dress ship for a French celebration tomorrow. 

April 23 — In Brest. Dressed ship and painted also. Good weather. 

April 24 — Painted ship some more. Another nice day. 

April 25 — 'Nothing to write about, only another nice day, of which 
you don't see many in Brest. 

April 26 — S. O. S. Rained today. Still in same place. Bought a 
$100 Liberty Bond. 

April 27 — Sunday. Nothing to do only S. O. S. Rain — rain — rain. 

April 28 — At 12 p. m. received an S. O. S. call from some mine- 
sweepers and yachts; 12:30 a. m. we were under way to aid them for 
they were sinking. A message came from the U. S. S. James saying: 
"We are going down. Please come alongside and save my men." We 
went, but could not get alongside, for the sea was rougher than I ever 
saw it. This was about 4:30 a. m. We couldn't stay on the deck of 
our ship as the seas were coming over thick and heavy. Not long before 
this the U. S. S. Douglas sank. Don't know how many men went 
down with her. The U. S. S. Rambler lost one man overboard. One 
other ship sank and lost all her crew. We kept in sight of the U. S. S. 
James, expecting to see her sink. We didn't have much oil — hardly 
had enough to get back on at 8 a. m. We couldn't do good any longer, 
so we started for Brest. We arrived there at 9:30 a. m. The wind 
and tide blew us into the U. S. S. Rathburne and rammed two holes in 
the side of our ship. Had a h — 1 of a time trying to tie up. Took us 
till 12 p. m. We left the U. S. S. Murray with the ships that were in 
distress. The weather was awful bad all night, sleeting so you couldn't 
see your way. The U. S. S. James sank at 12:30 p. m. U. S. S. 
Marietta picked up a few of the crew. In all six ships were lost. At 
five-thirty the U. S. S. Tarbell and Woolsey went to the sinking ships. 
We were having the holes patched up in our bow. U. S. S. 
McDonough came in at twelve with four dead men from the ship- 
wrecks. 

April 29 — U. S. S. Tarbell and Woolsey did not do any good out 
there, as the men that were in the water had already been picked up, or 
drowned. 

April 30 — Rain — rain — rain. 

May 1 — -Some rain — not much. Moved to Buoy 6. 

May 2 — Left Brest at 7 a. m. for Plymouth, England. Arrived at 
Plymouth at 3 :30 p. m. Liberty 4:30 p. m. till 8 a. m. 

May 3 — Left Plymouth for Brest with 180 passengers, sailors, and 
marines for the German ship Imperator. Arrived at Brest at 5:30 p. m. 
Anchored outside. Took off our passengers, got under way at 6:15 
p. m., came inside of breakwater, tied up alongside of U. S. S. Bridge- 
port. 

May 4 — Sunday. Chicken-pie for dinner. Baseball practice in 
afternoon. 




1. Christie Fruchnicht. 2. Fred Follmer. 3. Charles W. Morrow. 4. Corporal Walter L. Birjney. 
5. Frank L. Lamppert. 6. Reuben Runner. 7. Henry Eads. 8. Isaac Hartley. 9. Howard Spantjler. 
10. Alva Bronnenberg. 11. Harry Hanking. 12. Albert Newman. 



214 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

May 5— S. O. S. Still at Brest. Nice day. 

May 6 — Working on decks and laying matting. Baseball team 
went ashore to practice. 

May 7 — Nothing happened today. Has been very nice day. Laid 
matting and finished painting decks. Shoved off Paris furlough party. 

May 8 — Baseball team played the U. S. S. Woolsey and was de- 
feated. 

May 9 — Put down rest of matting on forecastle. Secretary Daniels 
came in on the U. S. S. Corsair, the Bridgeport fired a salute and the 
French all dressed ship. Got mail from home. 

May 10 — Saturday. Had bag inspection. Received half bag of 
mail. 

May 11 — Rain again. The U. S. S. Murray and Smith left at 

8 a. m. for the good old U. S. A .and I hope we will be next. The 
little dog we got in Germany got lost in Brest Saturday when the boys 
had him ashore. Got him back today. Everyone glad to see him as 
they all like him. 

May 12 — A very fine day! The U. S. S. Hannibal left for Russia. 
The Seneca left also. Had stew for supper. 

May 13 — Still fine weather. Took on stores this morning. The 
U. S. S. Panther came and moored to a buoy. She is going to relieve 
the Bridgeport, which I guess will be going home soon. The U. S. S. 
Leviathan came in at 4 p. m. Had some mail aboard. I didn't get any 
mail myself. 

May 14 — Still in Brest. Tied up alongside Bridgeport. The 
U. S. S. America came in at 8 :30 a. m., but had no mail aboard for 
the Yarnall. Shoved another liberty party off for Paris at 4:30 p. m. 

May 15 — Still fine weather. No rain. Shoved off from alongside 
the Bridgeport at 12 m. and tied to Buoy 3, alongside the McDonough 
and Rambler. 

May 16 — Rained a little. A fine day, though. Took on stores. 

May 17— S. O. S. The U. S. S. McDonough left Buoy 3 and 
went alongside of dock to coal ship, for she is leaving for the U. S. A. 
on Monday morning. Battleship U. S. S. Oklahoma arrived in Brest 
May 15. 

May 18 — Nice weather. No rain. I went ashore — the first time 
for quite a while. The George Washington was due here at 2 p. m., 
but broke down outside and didn't arrive till 7 :30 p. m. We received 
one bag of mail from her, but I got none myself. 

May 19 — Another ship came in this morning with some more mail, 
but still I got none. The U. S. S. McDonough, supposed to start 
home today, is not under way yet. May do so later. 

May 20 — U. S. S. McDonough got under way at 7 a. m. bound for 
the States. The U. S. S. Rambler also got under way for the states at 

9 a. m. At twelve o'clock we got word to get under way, four of the 
other destroyers also did. Got under way at 3 p. m. Also the Wool- 
sey, Tarbell, Conners and Rathburne and proceeded on our way to 
Lisbon, Portugal. Sea not very rough. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 215 

May 21 — Same as yesterday. Still on our way to Lisbon. Had drill 
and fired machine gun. Was along coast of Spain for about three hours 
this afternoon. 

May 22 — Arrived in Lisbon 8 a. m. Better weather this time. 
Sure a beautiful place here. 

May 23 — S. O. S. Still at Lisbon. Liberty at 1 p. m. 

May 24 — Tied to the same buoy. Had two men stayed out over 
leave. One man off the Conners was shot and killed last night. We 
are at Lisbon to wait for those airplanes coming over. We will leave 
soon as they arrive. They are expected tomorrow. 

May 25 — Fine weather. No rain over here. Airplanes arrived 
last night at 5 :30 p. m. We got under way at 1 :30 p. m. We are 
supposed to go to Cape Finisterre, and take our position there at mid- 
night and wait for those planes. Arrived at Cape Finisterre at 1 p. m. 

May 26 — Still at Cape Finisterre, but we didn't anchor so far. 
Are making five knots an hour around here in the same place waiting 
for those planes. We fired all our big guns at 9: 30 a. m. Fired sixteen 
rounds in the four-inch guns and two rounds from each three-inch Y. 
guns — twenty shots in all. Had a fishing party at 5:30 p. m. from the 
deck. Some fished till 10 o'clock. Never got any fish, but we got some 
crabs in a net we made. 

May 27 — Still at Cape Finisterre. Had some gun drill this morn- 
ing and afternoon. Those planes haven't arrived yet. 

May 28 — Still at Finisterre. Under way all the time. Five knots 
an hour. Gun drill morning and afternoon. 

May 29 — At Cape Finisterre. Raining all day. The planes have 
arrived in Lisbon and soon as they leave there we can leave here and 
return to Brest. They may fly tomorrow. 

May 30 — Still at Cape Finisterre. Rained today. The NC-4, the 
plane we have been waiting for, arrived at 4:15 p. m. That relieves us 
so we are on our way back to Brest, making thirty-three knots. The 
NC-4 will complete her transatlantic flight tomorrow. 

May 31 — Arrived in Brest 11:30. Moored to Buoy 3, alongside 
Tarbell. Got three bags mail. Three more destroyers came in and 
moored to Buoy 3. 

June 1 — Still at Buoy 3. No mail. Took on stores. Nothing 
new, only nice weather. 

June 2 — S. O. S. Still in Brest. Taking on more stores. Getting 
ready to go home June 5th. 

June 3 — Still in Brest. Loaded on more stores. Started to oil 
ship at 2:30; finished at 7 o'clock. U. S. S. Leviathan arrived at 2 p. m. 

June 4 — Still in Brest. S. O. S. President hasn't arrived yet. 
There are five of our battleships out here. Two arrived this morning. 

June 5 — S. O. S. President not here yet. Fine weather. Not 
much rain. Captain Powell left us today at 11:15 a. m. He was 
captain of the U. S. S. Woolsey in command of the Fourteenth Di- 
vision. 



216 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

June 6 — Received word that the President will not sail till about 
the tenth of June. As \\:e were standing by to sail the fifth, we got 
orders not to sail till the tenth. The Leviathan sailed today at 9:30 
for the States. 

June 7 — S. O. S. Rathburne returned today at 2:15 p. m. The 
U. S. S. Dupont and Biddle left at 5 :30 p. m. for the States. The 
U. S. S. Rochester arrived here at 9:30 a. m. 

June 8 — Still fine weather. The U. S. S. Agamemnon arrived at 
9:00 a. m. with mail aboard. The Yarnall received one bag. Baseball 
party left the ship at 1 :30 p. m. Played the George Washington. Got 
beat twelve to nine. 

June 9 — S. O. S. Still in harbor at Brest, at Buoy 3. 

June 10 — Taking on stores, expecting to get under way Thursday 
morning. The U. S. S. Gridley got under way this morning at 7 :30 
a. m., going to Italy. 

June 1 1 — Still in Brest. The U. S. S. George Washington 
anchored out here. Fired a salute to Admiral Benson this a. m. as he 
went aboard the U. S. S. New York. He left the New York and went 
aboard the Orleans at 2 p. m. At three she got under way for the 
States with Admiral Benson aboard. The U. S. S. Great Northern 
arrived at 1 1 :30 a. m. with a shipload of soldiers from the States. 
Five of my shipmates and myself went outside the breakwater last 
night and went aboard the Imperator (German ship.) 

June 12 — S. O. S. Still inside breakwater at Brest. 

June 13 — Nothing new. At Brest. 

June 14 — The U. S. S. Edwards and three more destroyers ar- 
rived at 3 :30 p. m. from the States to take the place of these at Brest. 
Ball party went ashore and played the Edwards and won. 

June 15— S. O. S. 

June 16 — Went ashore and got more stores this morning. The U. 
S. S. Alwin and Conners, destroyers, left at 6 p. m. for the States. The 
rest of ships and destroyers in harbor gave them a good send-off. 

June 17 — The U. S. S. McKeen got under way at 7:30 a. m. for 
England. 

June 18 — Another happy day. It is pay day. No liberty at Brest 
as they are having a riot there. 

June 19 — Still in Brest taking on such stores as we need now and 
then. The McKeen returned from England at 9:30 a. m. 

June 20 — Standing by to go out for shore range, battle practice. 

June 21 — Got under way at 7 a. m. with the U. S. S. Woolsey 
and Tarbell going out for gun practice. The officers from each ship 
fired four rounds from the four-inch guns. Finished firing at 8:30 p. 
m. Started to Brest about nine o'clock. Arrived at 11 p. m. and 
moored to Buoy 3. 

June 22 — Crew is getting liberty from 9 a. m. till 8 p. m. 




1. Colonel A. E. Ahrends. 2. First Lieutenant C. E. Sparling. 3. First Lieutenant Porter Krick. 
4. First Lieutenant Harvey Wonnmg. 5. First Lieutenant Winfred B. Taylor. 



218 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

June 23 — Still in harbor at Brest. Received word at 7 :30 that 
peace was signed and they sure made some noise here! Didn't quit till 
midnight. 

June 2-1 — Standing by for Wilson to arrive today. Dressed ship 
at seven this morning. Took on stores at ten. Wilson not arrived yet 
at seven. 

June 25 — Still in harbor at Brest. No word of leaving yet. The 
George Washington got under way at 10:30 and went outside the 
breakwater. The soldiers are all loaded on her and ready to get under 
way soon as the President arrives. 

June 26 — S. O. S. Still inside harbor. 

June 27 — Still in harbor. Moved to Buoy 2 at 10 a. m. The U. S. 
S. McCalla arrived at 6:30 from the States. 

June 28 — Still at Brest. The McCalla moved from alongside us 
and moored to Buoy 3 at 2 p. m. Peace was signed at 2:15 p. m. 
President Wilson left Paris at 11 p. m. 

June 29 — Still inside harbor. All the destroyers went outside to 
stand by for the convoy at 9 a. m. Wilson arrived at 11 a. m. Got 
under way at 2 p. m., the Battleship Oklahoma leading the way, 
President aboard the George Washington. Ten U. S. destroyers, 
Yarnall, Tarbell, Woolsey and Wickes going home. The rest will 
return to Brest. There are some French ships and destroyers in the 
convoy, also. They will turn back after a hundred miles out at sea. 

June 30 — Still on our way. Everything going well, but sea a little 
rough. Passed the U. S. S. Great Northern at ten-thirty. Bound for 
Brest. 

July 1 — Sea calmer. Everything going well. Still on our way. 
Sea calm. Having fine time so far. 

July 2 — Same as yesterday. About half way home at 2 p. m. Have 
never had four days at sea better than these four days have been. It is 
getting rough though. 

July 3 — Still on our way. Sea rough as h — 1. 

July 4 — Sea so rough last night that no one could hardly stay in 
bed. Still the same this morning. We are just running into the Gulf 
Stream. 

July 5 — Still on our way. Sea calmed down today. The U. S. S. 
Woolsey fell behind last night on account of her oil, but she got oil 
later and caught the convoy at 8 :30 a. m. The President gave a speech 
aboard the George Washington yesterday evening. 

July 6 — Everything same as yesterday. Having a fine trip. Passed 
four United States destroyers at 9:15 a. m. The Woolsey and Wickes 
fell out of the convoy today. The Wickes was going to give the Woolsey 
oil. They haven't fallen in with the convoy yet. 

July 7 — The Woolsey and Wickes haven't caught us yet at 9 a. m. 
Still on our way, expecting to get in tomorrow at noon, July 8. Ran 
into heavy fog at 1 :30 p. m. Could not see the other ships in the con- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



219 



voy. Woolsey and Wickes not yet caught up at 3 :45 p. m. Slowed 
down to five knots an hour on account of fog. 

July 8 — Eight airplanes came in sight at 8:15 a. m. At nine we 
met the fleet, thirty-two destroyers, four battleships, being the Penn- 
sylvania, North Dakota, Utah and Delaware. Landed in the North 
river, New York, at 2:30 p. m. Dropped anchor at 4:15 in North 
river. Went ashore last night for a while. 

July 9 — Still anchored in North rivtr. I am not going ashore to- 
night as I am starting for home tomorrow. 

Total number of miles of voyage, 21,177. 

Dates— November 30 to December, 1918— July 8, 1919. 

Ports, 96. 

From Our Y. M. C. A. Man 

"I was accepted by the Y. M. 

C. A. for war work in December, 
1917, but because the Noblesville 
School Board — with which I then 
had a contract — would not release 
me, I was unable to go until 1918. 
After nearly a month spent in 
proving my fitness by attending 
the Princeton training classes and 
other meetings, I finally sailed 
from New York on May 28, and 
after seventeen days of rough voy- 
age, and submarine adventures, 
landed in Liverpool, on June 12, 
and eight days later I found my- 
self at Meaux, within a few miles 
of the battle line. I was with the 
"Y" organization of the Second 
Division. I was here only two' 
days when I was transferred to the 
Fourth Division and assigned to 
the 59th infantry regimental sec- 
retary. I was the first "Y" man 
sent to the Fourth Division, and 
I remained with it and with the same regiment until the division 
was ordered home, leaving my regiment on the 29th day of June. 
1919. This made a continuous service with one regiment of one 
year and one week. This record has few equals. 

On the 15th day of July, the German last big offensive was started 
and on the 18th my regiment was thrown against the German right 
flank. Our losses during the next three days were frightful. I was 
not allowed to be on the front for these three days, but visited the boys 
in the hospitals and took up a load of canteen stuff as soon as I was 




Hale Bradt 



220 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

permitted to do so, and arrived in time to march with the regiment 
to the relief of the Forty-second Division and engage the enemy as he 
was falling back on the Yesle river. Here, too, we had hard fighting, 
with many casualties. It was almost impossible to get supplies. I had 
to make long trips — sometimes fifty, or one hundred kilometers at a 
time, to get writing paper, and often had to carry it on my back, catch- 
ing rides on army trucks when I could and walking when I could not 
ride. Those who say that the "Y" was not on the front line did not 
stay near my regiment. Shells fell within a few rods of my tent almost 
daily, and men were killed and wounded within a few yards of me. 
Xor was I the only "Y" man there. There were many of them coming 
and going all the time. Our hands were tied to a great degree because 
there was so little transportation. The army requisitioned our trucks 
whenever it was felt that the needs of the situation demanded it. This 
was right, but it was not fair to say that the "Y" was not there and 
doing its best after its failure has been acknowledged to have been 
caused by other agencies. 

After we came out of the Yesle river front — August 12 — we had 
a short rest on the hills north of Chaumont. Here we were able to 
give the boys canteen and entertainment service. We had moving pic- 
tures, vaudeville and baseball. About September 1 we were moved 
upon the St. Mihiel front in preparation for that battle and following 
that to the Argonne, in all of which I never left the regiment except 
to get service for it. In St. Mihiel and the Argonne I was under fire 
almost continually for about a month. At one time some of my can- 
teen supplies were knocked over by an exploding shell while I was dis- 
tributing them into piles to be sent to the boys at night. All the ser- 
vice I was able to render at all was absolutely free during the fighting. 
This rule applied to all battles. After the Argonne my colonel, F. M. 
Wise, gave me a letter of commendation addressed to my "Y" divisional 
chief, -which I hold as a souvenir. 

After the Fourth Division was relieved and withdrawn from the 
Argonne front we had a brief time in a rest camp north of Toul and 
then were started on some long marches upon Metz. On November 
1 1 we were again within sound of the guns, and indeed, within their 
reach, too, had the Germans had enough ginger left in them to reply to 
the terrific artillery attack that we were giving them. During these 
marches I was with my regiment or on the road with a "Y" truck serv- 
ing the boys with hot chocolate, chocolate bars and cigarettes at the 
night camping places. 

During the five months of active service on the battle-fields and 
marches, I scarcely ever slept in a bed — other than my blankets — nor 
under any other shelter than my pup tent. I ate with the boys and 
marched with them. I never rode on a truck unless by so doing I 
could render better service to it. When the boys marched it was a 
hard and disagreeable march. It was only on our march into Germany 
that I, in obedience to mv battalion's orders — became attached to the 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 221 

officers' mess for my meals. During a great part of this time, and 
until we had been in Germany some time, I was the only "Y" man in 
the regiment. Part of the time I had one assistant and for a very 
short time before the beginning of hostilities, I had two. 

The march into Germany was the most severe strain on the boys. 1 
had dreaded the march for myself, feeling that I could not stand it, and 
as I had no furlough since leaving home (by our contract we were to 
have one week each four months) I asked to be allowed my furlough 
and rejoin my regiment at the completion of the march. But the "Y" 
was short of men and I was told to make the march. 1 made no pro- 
test and have been thankful that 1 was selected for this task. 1 be- 
lieve I was the only "Y" man in our division who marched all the way. 
I say all the way, for though I was sent to the hospital one day before 
the regiment reached its winter camp, that last day's march was really 
a retrograde movement and not forward. The other "Y" man who at- 
tempted the march died from exposure and was buried at Treves. He 
was Mr. John B. VanShaick, Huntington, La. 

One week in the hospital and I was back with my regiment in time 
to prepare and distribute to the boys of my regiment their Christmas 
boxes. Every Fifty-ninth soldier received a box containing smoking to- 
bacco, chocolate, cake and cigarettes or some combination of these. The 
boxes are labeled "From the Folks Back Home, Through the Y. M. 
C. A." 

The winter was full of disappointment. For a long time it was 
impossible to get supplies. The large armies were tasking the worn 
railroads to their capacities in bringing up the bare necessities of war. and 
the "Y" work had to be secondary. But after a while the tide turned. 
I had a real hut — fine big building with a corps of assistants so I 
was able to render service to the regiment. It was rare now that a 
day passed that we did not furnish service to every man in the regi- 
ment who needed it. A large part was free, but we always had some- 
thing for which a small charge was asked. 

At the time I left the regiment last June we had eleven "Y" secre- 
taries besides myself and our work was carried on in five well-organized 
huts, and they were all earnest workers, loved and respected by offi- 
cers and men alike. In fact, the good will and appreciation of the men 
was universal. I have felt that I was fully paid for all hardships and 
dangers incurred by the spirit of appreciation shown by the men. 

Hale Bradt." 

A few letters of appreciation are appended as follows: 

Brest, France, August 10, 1*^1 9. 
Dear Friend, Mr. Bradt: 

Just a few lines to let you know I am still among the living, in best 
of health, hoping this finds you the same. 

Well, Mr. Bradt, I guess it's your turn to laugh at me now, as I am 
still a soldier, and vou fellows are all home. Remember how I gave you 



222 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

the laugh in Valendar, Germany. Well, I have found out one thing 
sure, who laughs last laughs best. But cheer up, I will get home yet. 
Gee ! I was sure disappointed in Paris. A fellow came in one day and 
said he saw you in Paris. Right away I went to town and looked every- 
where but couldn't find you. I was sure sorry, as I wanted to see you 
bad. 

I've had some very nice times since I've been in this outfit. You 
know we have a good 'rep.' So they tell me. I saw moving pictures 
of the parade in London, and they sure looked good. You know we are 
waiting for General Pershing. We are going home with him. I sup- 
pose we will parade in America a couple of times before we are dis- 
charged. But I don't care; it's no use to care. I have to do it any- 
way. Now, Mr. Bradt, there is nothing much to write about this 
time. I want to see if you get my mail. Write when you get a chance 
and I will write again when I get to New York. Goodby and good 
luck. As ever, 

Private Thomas Launtz, 
Co. K, 3rd Army, Composite Regiment, A. E. F. 

September 11, 1919. 
Dear Mr. Bradt: 

Well, I am in the U. S. A. and we had a big parade in New York 
and have one more to make. That will be in Washington and then I 
think we will all get our discharges after the parade. 

Say, I am at Camp Mills, L. I., New York, and if you want to let 
me know anything you can write to this camp and I will be sure to get 
your mail. Soon as I get my discharge will write you. I can't think 
of anything more until I see you again. 

Your true friend, 

Private R. Novak. 

Connersville, Ind., R. R. 6, October 27, 1919. 
Mr. Hale Bradt: 

Dear Friend — Thought I would drop you a few lines as I was 
anxious to know if you had arrived home O. K., which I did. We 
landed in New York August 3, and I was discharged at Camp Sher- 
man August 8. Found everything fine at home and have been down 
in Missouri on a visit and back again. I seem rather undecided just at 
present. Don't know just what to do, but guess I will be back in the 
baking business soon, for that is about all I know. We are sure having 
some rainy weather now. Say, do you know anything about our his- 
tories that we bought and paid for over in Germany? I have never 
had a word about them, and we were supposed to get them a long time 
before this. 

Do you remember my losing our breakfast in the mud on the Vesle 
river? I guess you do, all right. 

I have heard several boys talking about the "Y" since I have been 
home and they say you could never see a "Y" man near the front, and 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 223 

right there's where I stop them to get in a few words and then tell 
them if they doubt me I can prove every word of it by a thousand 
different men if it be necessary, for I know where you were every day 
almost. I guess this is about all I can think of at present. I will close, 
trusting this finds you and all your folks as it leaves me in the best of 
health, and hoping to hear from you soon. I remain, 
Your slum-burning friend, 

C. O. Selby. 

Our War Nurses 

Ripley county's quota of war nurses was limited by circumstances 
to four. A number of girls entered training with a view to entering 
the army work but the war ended before their training was completed. 
Of the four two were in overseas service: Miss Bertha Greeman of 
Batesville and Miss Martha Delay of Holton. The two whose service 
was in the home camps only were Miss Vivian Wiebking of Napoleon 
and Miss Carolyn Maffey of Milan. A sketch of Miss Greeman's 
overseas work gives a glimpse of a nurse's part in the World War 
from a personal point of view. 

A WAR-XURSE'S NARRATIVE 

"Early in 1918 the daily papers, the Red Cross and other magazines, 
the men in pulpits and on the public platform, all were heralding the 
cry for more nurses. Those already enlisted and busy in the training 
camps were receiving letters from the nurses who had been sent over- 
seas begging them to do all in their power to be sent soon. 

As the weeks rolled by, detachment after detachment of nurses were 
sent from the various camps to the Nurses' Mobilization Station in 
New York City. Those not already members of an organized over- 
seas unit were here given their assignment. They were sent for quarters 
to one of the many smaller hotels which were being compelled to ac- 
commodate a certain number of military people. 

Let us spend one hot day together in New York. Breakfast at 6:30 
or 7 a. m. Roll call, either at the old Judson Church or at the regular 
headquarters at 8 a. m. At 9 a. m. be at a certain street to have 
your blue street uniform fitted. This probably meant standing at the 
foot of a line of one hundred fifty to two hundred women and awaiting 
your turn. After having gone through this ordeal once you began to 
think of the gray duty uniform, winter and summer hats, boots and 
shoes still to be fitted, until you wanted to cry out, "Oh, Lord, how 
long?" You rushed back to your hotel or hurried into some restaurant 
for your luncheon, in order to be at the Red Cross headquarters where 
you were given the "do and don'ts and must and must not's." Most of 
these lecturers were women who had never been overseas. They meant 
well but most of their instructions needed considerable modification 
when we got to the other side. 

From Red Cross headquarters you went to the armory to do your 
daily "squads left, squads right." Let me say right here that if any men 



224 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

ever deserved a Croix de Guerre it was those who had charge of the 
drilling of the nurses. The drill, however, did not end the day, for 
each day brought with it new and various duties. We were told that 
we must prepare to stay over there two years, and when night came we 
sat and pondered as to what we had better take in the way of necessi- 
ties, comforts and luxuries, and how to get them all into a thirty-six inch 
trunk. 

At last came the morning when our unit walked down to St. Paul's 
Cathedral for the usual farewell service, holy communion and the flag 
dedication. The next day we sailed, three of our number never to 
return. 

After a two weeks' ocean trip and forty-eight hours in England, we 
found ourselves in France. Here our unit was broken and thirty of us 
were sent on to an evacuation hospital. Only those who have traveled 
in France, either by the "Forty Hommes, Eight Chevaux" route, or 
on a straightbacked park bench in a second or third class compartment, 
can really picture this trip. No lights, water, or conveniences of any 
kind. At one time we traveled twenty-four hours without suitcases or 
rations, they having been put on another train through error. After 
what seemed a long trip we arrived at our destination. 

The hospital wards were buildings which at one time had been used 
by the French. The buildings, which were run down, were built much 
like those used in camps in this country. They were heated by one 
dilapidated stove in the center of the ward. Our boys had installed 
electric lights before we girls arrived, so we had that convenience at 
least. That is, if "Jerry" didn't happen to be overhead. 

Our own quarters were tents crowded with beds, but not enough 
to go around, a day and a night nurse occupying one together. The 
other furniture was either a pile of rocks or a small box on which to 
keep your suitcases out of the mud. It rained, more or less, the first 
forty-one days we were at that place, in the Argonne Forest region. We 
also possessed two smoky lanterns. However, just as soon as the big 
rush was over, fairly comfortable sheds were fixed up for us. __ 

The work of an evacuation hospital was to receive the sick and 
wounded from the first-aid stations and put them into shape to be sent 
back to a base hospital. This was usually done in forty-eight hours, 
though some of them had to be kept ten days or longer. The ambu- 
lances brought the soldiers direct to the triage or receiving room, and 
from there they went through the X-ray room. Here it was decided 
if they were to go direct to one of the regular wards, to the operating 
room, or to what was known as the shock ward to be stimulated and 
put in shape for further treatment. In each of these departments, dur- 
ing and after a big battle, long rows of stretchers could be seen. The 
patience and endurance of our American boys was a marvel to both 
doctors and nurses. 

The work did not stop with the signing of the armistice. For a 
month or more we received boys coming out of the lines, having influ- 
enza or other troubles due to the strenuous life and privations suffered. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 225 

Too much can not be said of the help we derived from the Red 
Cross. It was months before our trunks arrived and some never came 
and it was the Red Cross which furnished the warm clothing which 
prevented much illness among the nurses. 

The Red Cross canteen workers worked with tireless energy and 
many little delicacies for our extremely ill boys could not have been 
secured but for them. The Salvation Army and the Knights of Co- 
lumbus had no stations near us. There was a Y. M. C. A. within 
reach and it was through their generosity that we were able to give 
our boys such a splendid Christmas treat. Our work was with the 
able boys as well as with the sick and maimed. At our next location we 
were well supplied with the benefits of all the welfare organizations and 
the Knights of Columbus man with his smile and well-filled pack did 
not forget the nurses' desk when he made his hospital rounds. 

After there was no longer the need of a hospital at this place, our 
entire equipment and working force were loaded on a train and taken 
to the central debarkation camp. It reminded one very much of a 
circus train, except that our live stock consisted of only one cat and 
one dog and a small bottle partially filled with "cooties." This trip, 
which would have been made in this country in probably twelve or 
fifteen hours, took us nearly three days. 

After some delay our organization was placed in charge of the 
largest camp hospitals in the center, there being one other camp hos- 
pital and one base hospital. As each division was brought to the camp 
there would be a great influx of patients and busy days would follow. 
This was at the great concentration camp at Le Mans. As the pa- 
tients began to convalesce, and before another division moved in, oppor- 
tunity was given to some of the nurses to have their furloughs. 

Trips were taken to Paris, Versailles and other cities. Southern 
France, the Italian border, and the French Alps proved most interest- 
ing. Opportunity was given those who desired to see battle-fields and 
ruins they had not already seen. As summer came the work grew 
lighter and much time was spent out of doors on hikes and outings. 

Then came the word, "Get ready for Pershing's review." How 
cheerfully we washed, ironed, and pressed to get ready for the same, 
knowing that it meant "HOME." 



226 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Bertha Christine Greeman was 
born at Batesville, where she 
spent her childhood and early 
youth. She was a graduate nurse 
doing institutional work at Be- 
thesda Hospital, Cincinnati, when 
the war broke out in 1914. When 
America entered the great struggle 
she sought to enter the Red Cross 
nursing service and was accepted 
on March 5, 1918, taking her 
oath in the United States Army 
Nursing Corps on April 4, 1918. 

She was assigned to Base Hos- 
pital, Camp Lewis, American 
Lakes, Washington, for army 
training and served there until 
August 20, 1918. On this last 
date she was sent to the nurses' 
mobilization station at New York 
City to prepare for overseas work. 
Her unit, Emergency Unit, 
Group E, left Hoboken on the 
British ship Melita on the eighth 

of September, reaching Liverpool, England, on September 21st. 

They proceeded to Le Havre, France on the 23d, and were assigned 

to Evacuation Hospital 1 1 at Brizeaux-Forestierre in the Argonne for 

immediate service at the front. 

She was transferred on January 6, 1919, to Camp Hospital 101 at 
Le Mans, France, remaining on duty here until July. She left for the 
United States from Brest on the Aquitania on July 13, 1919, reaching 
Hoboken, New Jersey, on July 20th, after eleven months overseas. 

Her discharge was received on August 21st at her home in Batesville, 
she having been granted a long-delayed furlough. 




Bertha Christine Greeman 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



227 




Martha Greta Delay 



Martha Greta Delay was born 
at Holton, in Otter Creek town- 
ship. She was working as a path- 
ologist at the Paris Sanatorium at 
Paris, Texas, when the call for 
war nurses came, and enlisted on 
March 20, 1918, at Paris as re- 
serve nurse in the Army Nursing 
Corps. She was sent to Camp 
Lee at Petersburg, Virginia, for 
training, and embarked for over- 
seas duty from Philadelphia on 
the transport Northland on Juiy 
14, 1918, with Base Hospital 25. 

The unit reached Liverpool on 
July 31st, and crossed at once to 
France. They were stationed at 
Allery, France. Later, Miss 
Delay was transferred to Base 
Hospital 91, at Commercy, and 
finally to Evacuation Hospital 49, 
at Coblenz, Germany. 



She sailed for the United 
States on August 4, 1919, reaching 
New York on August 16th. She was discharged from the service on 
September 26th. Her overseas service covered a period of twelve 
months. After being discharged she returned to her former position at 
Paris, Texas. 



15 



228 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 




Vivian Esther Wiebking was 
born at Napoleon in Jackson 
township and was educated in the 
township schools. She studied 
nursing as a profession and was a 
graduate nurse when the Red 
Cross call came for army nurses. 
She was deterred for a time by 
home duties, but was inducted into 
the Army Nursing Corps in Feb- 
ruary, 1918, and sent to Fort 
Douglas, Arizona, for training. 
She served at the base hospital 
here until her discharge on De- 
cember 4, 1918. She was married 
to Lieut. O. W. Stacey in No- 
vember, his regiment being sta- 
tioned at the camp. After his 
discharge in the spring they first 
made their home in his native 
state, Georgia, locating later at 
Charlotte, North Carolina. 



Vivian Esther Wiebking 



Carolyn Maffey of Milan, 
Franklin township, was born at 
Manchester, Dearborn county, her 
parents later coming to Ripley 
county. 

She was graduated as a nurse 
from St. Vincent's Hospital, In- 
dianapolis, where she remained on 
duty. She was enlisted as a Red 
Cross Armv Nurse on September 
28, 1918, at Indianapolis. 

She was sent to Camp Meade, 
Maryland, for training and trans- 
ferred on November 3d to Fort 
McHenry, Maryland, where she 
served until discharged on Decem- 
ber 25, 1918. 




Carolyn Maffey 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 229 

A Final Round of Army Shrapnel 

From Camp Custer, Michigan : 

''There were sand-storms, whirlwinds, high winds that unroofed 
buildings and blew stones through windows at almost any time. The 
camp was near Battle Creek in northern Michigan. We were called 
out in the middle of the night during the winter to shovel coal for fires 
to prevent the bursting of the heating pipes and such things. There 
were eight inches of snow at Christmas." 

"On arriving in France I was assigned to duty as town-major. In 
this capacity I took charge of whatever town was assigned to me. The 
work consisted of making billeting reports, keeping the town thoroughly 
policed and being responsible for its sanitary condition. In short, most 
of the work was merely keeping books for the French people in con- 
nection with the A. E. F. Each property-holder was paid for the 
billeting of troops in accordance with the number of soldiers taken care 
of in his place. Men were billeted in barns as a rule, or in any empty 
room available, using for their beds the straw that was purchased from 
the French people. They were paid at the rate of five centimes a night 
for each soldier or horse. In our money this amounts to one cent a 
night. After three months of this I asked to be relieved in order to 
go back to my company so as to get into the drive for which they were 
preparing. This request was granted and I remained with my com- 
pany until after the armistice was signed, when I went back to the 
former work once more. 

"In Belgium we took part in the two Flanders' offensives and were 
there when the armistice was signed. We then hiked back through 
Belgium to Beaumont, France — a little beyond Dunkirk — and pre- 
pared for our trip home. 

"Sergeant Edwin Boese, 
"Co. L, 147th Inft., 37th Div." 

Chris Bokelman of Napoleon, of Company 8, 138th Infantry, and 
later of Company L, 140th Infantry, Thirty-fifth Division, served as 
a corporal on special military police duty in Paris from May 1, 1919, 
until August, 1919. 

He was one of the cordon of guards around the military cemetery 
in Paris on Memorial Day, 1919, and heard President Wilson's ad- 
dress on that occasion. He also served as guard at the palace at V er- 
sailles during the Peace Conference. 

"Enlisted May 10, 1917, at Cincinnati, Ohio, in U. S. Marine 
Corps. Trained in 23d Company at Paris Island, S. C, until last 
of July. At Quantico, Va . until last of October. Reached France, at 
Brest, on November 12, U'17. Trained at Bordeaux and helped build 
docks till February. Sent to Chaumont-la-ville for two months' trench- 
warfare training. Went into the trenches at Verdun the last of the 
month. Remained till May 30, 1918, raiding, trench digging, building 




1. Harold Hicks. 2. Bert A. Toops. 3. Raymond Harris. 4. George Bode. 5. William Busteed. 
6. Leo E. Hicks. 7. Jasper Ashcraft. 8. George L. Reuss. 9. Arthur P. Gringle. 10. Carey Toops. 
11. Pete Karbowski. 12. Hugo Benz. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 231 

r 

roads. Were under shell-fire and gas attacks almost continually, the 
gas coming over nearly every night. Had been assigned to 82nd Com- 
pany, 6th Marines, at Quantico, with Charles Gibson and Will Kreuz- 
man of Batesville. Had enlisted with them and Randolph Benz. All 
but Randolph went overseas together and remained in the same com- 
pany. We went into the Chateau-Thierry drive on May 31, 1918. 
Stayed in eight days, advancing slowly, doing hand-to-hand righting 
with bayonets, rifles and machine-guns — "sho-sho" guns, we called them 
from their French name. We marched back for rest while the infantry 
relieved us. They fell back the first night under the German barrage. 
The Germans rushed in and retook all that we had gained in the eight 
days. We were immediately sent back to relieve the Seventh Infantry. 
Went into battle about 8 or 9 a. m., June 8, and retook Belleau Wood, 
advancing about four kilometers. Continued for about twenty days, 
taking and holding the entire wood. Just beyond Belleau Wood, 
on June 23, I was wounded by a high explosive shell, through the left 
eye, left thigh, and both arms. Was doing outpost duty as gunner 
with a machine-gun company. Was fitted with a glass eye at Paris 
and invalided home. Was discharged from U. S. Marine barracks at 
Quantico, Virginia, on March 15, 1919. 

"Ernest Hess, 

"Friendship, Ind." 

"On June 6th the 82d Company went into the fight with two 
hundred fifty-two men. On the night of June 8, forty-seven men were 
left on duty at Belleau Wood." 

"Orderlies did nursing work in hospitals. Nurses gave treatments 
and made beds. Orderlies did the general nursing work." 

"In a storm on our way to France four sailors were lost overboard 
from a destroyer in the convoy fleet in the Bay of Biscay." 

"Were attacked three days out from Liverpool by submarines, and 
again on the record day from Liverpccl. Both times the subs were 
sunk. One of the transports was so much damaged it sank after reach- 
ing port." 

"We started out one night for the front with twenty-one ammuni- 
tion trucks. Returned with three. Managed to save thirteen of the 
damaged trucks. Five were gone. Bombs from airplanes, and shell- 
fire were the sources of danger to the trucks. The drivers defended 
themselves with rifles." 

"Had influenza on shipboard going over. Nine died and were car- 
ried on, being sent back for burial. Had about forty cases on board." 

"A barrage fire looked like a solid wall of flame behind, with shells 
screaming overhead." 

"Couldn't use our camp cookers. Not allowed to have fires. Noth- 
ing to burn anyway. Lys-Scheldt offensive." 



232 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

"Slept in deserted buildings full of rats, mice and spiders. Holes 
in roofs, rotting straw, dirt, old manure in the stables, the main fea- 
tures. " Belgium. 

"Refugees came into Belgium from behind the German lines, driving 
dogs hitched to carts, women harnessed in also, old people pushing 
barrows." 

"Couldn't use comfort-kits to advantage ; could get water only 
from shell-holes." 

"Little villages clustered about a church; small farms encircling 
the village. Fifteen or twenty minutes' walk between towns. They 
are sometimes in sight of each other." Belgium. 

The Mesopotamia was to sail at 6 a. m., November 11, 1918, with 
the 38th C. A. C. Wireless message received just after midnight an- 
nounced the signing of the armistice and sailing orders were can- 
celed. 

Camp Devens, Mass., was the first Army Camp to be swept by the 
"flu." It developed into an epidemic in September, and the soldiers 
died at the rate of five hundred per week for several weeks. 

"Were sent forward for the Metz drive. Stopped at Franers, 
France, on November 10. Remained till December 5. 140th Infantry, 
Thirty-fifth Division." 

"The 18th Engineers built the Bassens Docks, St. Sulpice storage 
yards, Perigeux yards and yards at La Rochelle, La Pallice. Companies 
A and E entered the advance zone, the former doing railway work at 
Etais and the latter near Is-sur-Tille. Ripley county had two men 
in Company E: Roy Runner of Milan, and Reuben Runner of Cross 
Plains. Lowness Runner of near Milan, in Dearborn county, and 
formerly of Ripley county, was in Company C. Frank Reibel of Sun- 
man, in Company F, and one Jefferson and one Franklin county sol- 
diers were in the same regiment." 

Clyde Grow of Napoleon received several bullet holes in his cloth- 
ing on the Flanders front, but no wounds. 

"Four aero squadrons were sent to Germany, May 1, 1919, to be 
ready in case of Germany's failure to sign the peace treaty. Sent to 
Nieume or Weissenthurm, left bank of Rhine. Were here till July 13, 
1919. Work here was truck driving, car driving, motorcycle dispatch 
work and mail carriers. Trucks carried wrecked planes known as 
'crashes.' 

"Albert Newman, Napoleon, Ind., 
258th Aero Squadron, Second Division." 

"During service at the front, cooks and K. P.'s carried meals to 
gunners at the guns during lulls in action. 

"Cook Chas. Myers, Napoleon, Ind., 

"Battery A, 52d C A. C." 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 233 

"Had the 'flu' at Municipal Piers, Chicago. Cadets were urged 
to keep on their feet as long as possible. School was dismissed and we 
were kept in the open air. Rowed boats in the hot sun in forenoon, had 
infantry drill, played football, anything to keep up perspiration, minds 
occupied and so forth. This treatment seemed efficient, as our casualty 
list showed the lowest percentage of any camp. 

"Horace Hunter, 
Ensign, U. S. N. R." 

Capacity of training camps: 
Camp Dodge, 50,000 men. 

Camp Taylor, 60,000 to 62,000. Barracks for 40,000 men. 
Reached its full capacity in July and August, 1919. 

"We got starvation rations through our first seven months' train- 
ing. Never had enough to eat. Had a good mess fund besides the 
government rations. Some mess sergeant must have got rich at our ex- 
pense." 

"We always had plenty to eat, good food, well cooked." 

"Our cook never did learn how to make cornbread. It was always 
raw in the middle." 

"Was slightly gassed at St. Mihiel. Two machine-gun bullets went 
through the canister of my gas mask but did not touch me. The loader 
of my gun was killed while lying beneath our gun. I was gunner. A 
piece of shrapnel went entirely through the loader's head. It is the 
nose of a shell, with the groove, and I have it for a keepsake. My 
gunner was to have been transferred the day before, but I had requested 
that he be left with me. 

"The Hotchkiss gun weighs 105 pounds and fires a shell the same 
as a 30-30 army rifle, 30-30 shells. The guns are carried to position 
on the shoulders of three men. One carries the gun (barrel and 
breech), another the tripod on which the guns_ are mounted for firing, 
a third the traversing head which fits over the tripod to hold the gun 
in place. The gun carriages are two-wheeled carts. The sergeant 
of the machine gun squads sights the guns, the gunners see they are 
kept sighted, and after the load is in, fires the gun. 

"Edward Rimstidt, Delaware Township, 
"Fifth Division, Machine-Gun Co., 7th Reg." 

Lieut. T. E. Hunter, of the 149th Infantry, Thirty-eighth Division, 
was the first of the Camp Shelby medical officers to plan decorations 
for the hospital grounds, and himself spent much time in putting out 
flowers and shrubbery. 

From Camp Sherman: 

"In spinal meningitis cases the patients had sometimes to be tied 
in bed. One was tied twenty-one days, then sent to the base hospital. 



234 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 

During the 'flu' the boys died so fast their bodies were stacked up like 
cordwood. Five hundred died in one night." 

A number of Ripley county men served as cooks during the war, 
some in hospitals, some in combat units. Scott Henderson of Ver- 
sailles says: "Our hospital was supposed to care for one thousand 
and forty patients, but we had as many as two thousand seven hundred 
fifty when the big battles were on. The officers moved out of the 
mess hall and turned it into a ward. We had one hundred eighty-five 
officers and soldiers in our hospital personnel with forty nurses. I 
cooked the entire time for patients, doctors and all." 

An M. P. says: "Was tied to the bridge of our ship four hours as 
lookout on the voyage over. Entire passage rough. (September, 1918.) 
Was sent into the first line at the Argonne as runner and guide at 
2:30 a. m., November 10." 

"Our ship did patrol duty off the Atlantic coast up to August 1, 
1918. Had one submarine battle off state of New York. No par- 
ticular results apparent. One running fight with a submarine off the 
coast of Ireland, on August 20, 1918, while crossing to England. Don't 
know if we got it or not. 

"Sailed to Portland, England, November 25, 1918, left on De- 
cember 12, with ten battleships and about twenty destroyers to help 
convoy the George Washington with the President on board into the 
harbor at Brest. Left Brest December 14, the ten battleships of the 
U. S. overseas fleet returning at that time to the U. S. A. 

"Hugo Benz, 
"U. S. S. Nevada. 

"Two submarines were sunk by our convoy destroyers on the voyage 
over." 

"A submarine attacked a coal ship between Brest and Lapalisse and 
sank the ship. The Worden, destroyer, picked up survivors. The sub 
passed under the Worden scraping the bottom of the destroyer. We 
chased it and dropped fifteen depth charges. We watched half a day 
but saw only oil on the waters. 

"We helped convoy over a thousand ships, transports and freighters. 
We also picked up an occasional airplane. 

"Peter Karbowski, 
"Fireman on the Destroyer Worden." 

The ordnance service in America handled the ammunition and 
guns, assembled, repaired, and shipped them to France. They gave a 
parade in New York in the Victory Loan campaign. Clarence Feinthel 
of Batesville drove a truck in this parade. His unit was at Hoboken, 
ready to sail when the armistice was signed. 

Paul Wycoff of Batesville fired the Ft. Wadsworth salute of twenty- 
one guns as President Wilson's ship, the George Washington, sailed 
out of New York harbor with her convoy on the way to France, De- 
cember 6, 1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD- WAR 235 

Arthur Gringle, Hugo Benz and Carey Toops were in service as 
sailors in the Grand Fleet in the North Sea and so witnessed the sur- 
render of the German fleet from the U. S. S. Nevada and Utah. 

"The allied ships formed in double battle line and the German 
ships sailed through at stated distances to the Firth of Forth, for the 
surrender." 

"Twenty to thirty insanity cases were sent to the hospital from 
Corozal, Canal Zone, every month, out of a unit of about twenty 
thousand men. The cause for so much insanity was not known, but 
thought to be from the excessive heat." 

"Seems like we've been overseas ten years." 

"The people of Germany would all have starved if the war had 
gone on a couple of years longer. You ought to be around our kitchen 
and see the kids fight over the slop." 

"Some kids hadn't enough clothes to dust a fiddle on." 
"I feel like I'd been away from home for ten years!" 
"It gets awful lonesome on the front without any mail." 
"I am kept busy watching an airplane fight and writing at the same 
time. A Hun plane flew so low the other day you could hit him with 
a rock. The cross on the bottom of his plane looked as big as the cross 
on the Catholic church at home. The allied planes have circles painted 
on them for identification." 

"Greuzhaven was one of the Rhine summer resorts for world tour- 
ists before the war. The German people are very deficient in knowl- 
edge of the U. S. A. The French and English were very strict on the 
Germans. Don't blame the French. Poor old France was sure torn 
up by the war." 

"The mud was so deep, sometimes the cooks had to wear rubber 
boots, shrapnel dropping all around." 

"Supplies were kept five or six miles back of the front. Aimed to 
keep out of reach of shells. Airplanes located them from time to time 
and notified the enemy artillery." 

"Shell holes were of various sizes, depending on the kind of shells 
used. Some were big enough to tumble a house into." 

"Was passing in a truck six or seven miles from Chaumont, north, 
toward the battle-lines when the top of a small hill was blown off by 
some high explosive. The truck was buried under the debris. It was 
dug out but was too crushed to be repaired. The soldiers escaped by 
jumping at the sound of the explosion. The driver was thrown out by 
the impact, but not seriously hurt." 

"Went to Camp Valdahon on the Swiss border, and were attached 
to an artillery school. 'Conducted fire,' teaching the officers in the 
Army of Occupation. One hundred came at a time for a month's 
course. This work was continued till May 1, 1919." 

From Battery B, 142d F. A., Thirty-ninth Division Record. 




1. Clyde Lostutter. 2. George Ake. 3. Dennis Israel. 4. John A. Schmidt. 5. Arthur Schene. 
6. Ted Wesler. 7. Manford Alexander 8. Earl L. Papenhaus. 9. Ferd A. Chaplin. 10. Wi'Uam 
H. West. 11. Roy Stevenson. 12. William Gutzwiler. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 237 

"Camp Morrison, Virginia, is the best camp in the States." 

• "Ft. Totten, Long Island, is the most beautiful fort in the U. S." 

"Our sleeping quarters at LeBourne, France, were in an old stone- 
walled shed, dirt floor. Slept on the floor rolled in our blankets. 
Some slept in the loft. It was a narrow, box-like shelf, two or three 
planks wide, close to the roof, entered by a trap door. Had to climb 
out feet first." 

"I was on patrol duty with an officer and three more men. We 
were sent out for information. When getting through two wire en- 
tanglements we found we could not get through the front wire so had 
to crawl along the front of it. The Germans spotted us and threw 
five grenades among the patrol, one for each man, I suppose. The 
lieutenant's leg was torn off by one grenade, and I had a scalp wound. 
The other fellows ran for cover, leaving us behind. I managed to 
carry the lieutenant into the lines, for which I received a citation. 

"Davis Wagner, 
"Headqtrs. Co., 120th Inf., Thirtieth, Div." 

"The French chose the Thirty-second Division for two drives on 
Soissons, the only American division that fought with the French. The 
division became known all over France as 'Les Terribles' Division. 
We broke the German lines, winning our insignia on the battle-fields 
of France, 'the arrow piercing the line.' During our six months on the 
front we were relieved only eleven days. Even during this rest period, 
we were within hearing of the heavy guns. Sixteen thousand rounds 
were fired bv our brigade on the Argonne in the last barrage when 
firing ceased at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh 
month of 1918. "Clifford C. Schomber, 

"Bat. D., 119th F. A., Thirty-second Div." 

The mosquitoes of the South were a pest to the various training 
camps of the Gulf States. They have been humorously described as 
being as large as horse flies,, and active in all seasons. The soldiers were 
furnished with nets to cover their cots while sleeping. They claimed 
the insects could bite through their uniforms with perfect ease and 
were expert in finding weak spots in the nets. 

William Bateman, 67th Field Artillery, was injured by being 
caught under a gun caisson which rolled down an embankment of fif- 
teen feet. He was crushed across the chest and most of his injuries 
were internal. He lives on a farm near Milan, on Rural Route 2. 

Summary of many soldiers: 

Y. M. C. A. — "All right in the south of France. All right in Ger- 
many. All right in the United States. Had too young men and 
girls in the personnel for efficient service, a few embezzlers. Women, 
instead of girls, should have served in the 'Y' in the war zone." 

Red Cross — "Fine." 

Salvation Army — "Fine." 

Knights of Columbus — "All right." 



238 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN TtlE WORLD WAR 




Lawrence R. Olmstead 



Sgt. Edwin Boese 



Lawrence Olmsted of the Aviation Branch of the Navy deserves 
special commendation. Born in 1884 he was not in the first draft. 
Being a married man with two children he was also in the exemption 
class of the second draft. Like many others, however, he was anxious to 
do his part in the World War. Being especially fitted by his training 
as a jeweler to do the fine adjusting required for the instruments used 
in the airplane service, he enlisted in that branch of the United States 
Navy on July 17, 1918. He was living at the time at Brownsville, 
Texas, but brought his family to his former home at Versailles, Indiana, 
and enlisted from his father's home, leaving his children to the grand- 
parents' keeping, while his wife, formerly Miss Marie Davis of Milan, 
also entered the government service. He was trained at Pensacola, 
Florida, and sent overseas the first of November, reaching Brest, France, 
just after the signing of the armistice. His ship, the Northern Pacific, 
remained in port a short time and brought her passengers back again, 
disappointed at not seeing foreign service after all- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 239 



"Dear Aunt and Uncle 



Somewhere in France, 

November 8, 1918. 



I am a truck driver in an ammunition train. Therefore, I have 
had an opportunity to see France. Today is the first day that I have 
been off of duty for two months. I have just finished a twelve-day trip 
across France in a truck. We stopped at a large city each night. Many 
of us stopped at hotels at night. I ate some real French fried potatoes 
and slept on a feather bed. 

The rural districts of France are beautiful with their fertile valleys, 
winding canals and grassy hills. But the townspeople do not seem to 
appreciate the beauties of nature or of the fine arts. They are too 
easily satisfied with what they have. 

The French can not understand the Americans. When the Ameri- 
cans first came over here the Americans walked and moved about so 
fast that the French thought that the Americans were zig-zag ( French 
for drunk). They think that all Americans are rich, therefore they 
charge us accordingly. One French lady expressed the thought by saying 
"They shovel gold in America." We are paid in French money. I 
have passed through the home city of Joan of Arc and I saw a statue 
which was erected in her honor in this town. 

We crossed a mountain range with snow-capped peaks. We froze 
our ears. At present I am billeted in a small town. There are five of 
us in one room, which has a bed built in the wall, a fire-place and a 
smooth stone floor. We have plenty to eat and plenty to wear. We 
have fresh beef and white bread. I have a pair of hip rubber boots and 
a leather jacket which is lined. 

All the land is owned by a count or lord. The lord lives in a large 
chateau and all of his tenants live in a large community or town. There 
are no rural homes in France. Each community has a large church 
with a town clock that chimes, a public school and a public wash-house. 
Water is piped from springs in the hills for the towns. The streets are 
narrow and winding, and all of the buildings are built of stone, except 
a few which are built of tiles. Even the roofs are built of thin stones. 
The houses and barns are always connected. The barnyard and the 
front yard are one and the same yard. The largest renter has the 
largest dung-pile in his front yard. The count does not have his land 
fenced in fields, therefore the women or children must take a stool and 
the dog and graze the cattle and sheep. They drive them in town at 
noon and put them in the barn. In the afternoon they must drive them 
out again. They always keep them in the stable at night. There does 
not seem to be any system about their fields. They have many sma' 1 
irregular fields in a five-acre plot with three or four different crops. I 
have never seen a corn field in England or France. Vineyards and 
sugar beets take its place. The land is fertile, tillable and the crops are 
good. 



240 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 

Their methods of labor are ancient. They use two-wheeled wagons 
exclusively, with two or three horses hitched one ahead of the other. 
The explanation for the use of the two-wheeled wagon is that in past 
years vehicles were taxed according to the number of wheels. They 
have large draft horses. They lead their horses. They use oxen. Some- 
times they work oxen and horses together. They have their oxen shod. 

The cradle and scythe are used chiefly for reaping crops. Occa- 
sionally I have seen a United States binder. 

They store their grain in the barns and thresh it on rainy days. 
Their threshers are about twice as large as a fanning mill. They are 
run by horse power. A boy ties the straw in sheaves as it is threshed. 
You can judge how fast they thresh their grain. I saw a Frenchman 
killing a hog today. He rolled it in a pile of burning straw to burn the 
hair off of it. All wear wooden shoes. Every community has two or 
more wine rooms. They never go for a day's work or journey unless 
they have some wine. No meal is complete without a bottle of wine. 
Water is not very good for drinking in France. 

The roads are fine for autos. The roads are wide and smooth with 
a row of trees on both sides of the road. 

Occasionally they have fruit trees along the road. They have piles 
of crushed stones along the road to fill up the ruts as they appear. All 
railroad crossings are blocked with iron gates to prevent railroad acci- 
dents. A family lives at every crossing to operate these gates. 

Wood is scarce in France. No one cuts a tree without government 
authority. Then when they cut them, they grub the stump out by the 
roots, the brush is tied in bunches for fuel. I have seen them take the 
bark off of logs for fuel. 

Fig trees, English walnut trees, mistletoe and holly grow abundantly. 

All railroads are owned by the state. The cars are very small. The 
limit of almost all cars is ten -tons. The passenger cars are of three 
classes. They are side-door Pullmans with five doors on the side of a 
coach which opens to five so-called state rooms. 

It looks good to see an entire U. S. A. train in France, engine, cars 
and crew all from U. S. A. 

We hope that we shall have "On earth peace and good will toward 
men" this Christmas in the true sense of the word. Hoping for that 
great day when the boys come home, 

Yours, 

Hale C. Pickett, 
Co. B, 315th Am. Train, A. E. F., U. S. A." 

Somewhere in France, 

November 20, 1918. 
"Dear Brother and All: 

How are you folks? I am all O. K. and hope you are all the same. 
Well, I must tell you I have been transferred two different times since 
I wrote the last letter. They transferred me to the Quartermaster's 
Department. I am now helping to load trucks with food at the ware- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 241 

house. I have been keeping account of stuff that goes out of here in a day. 
There are about seven or eight of us that have the job. The work I am 
doing is an easy job. There is always about eight or ten men with me 
that carry the boxes around. I sure have seen a lot of this country since 
Sunday. We got on the train Sunday morning about nine o'clock and 
stayed on till Monday night at nine o'clock. Surely did see some 
sights. I like this place fine; like it better than any place I have been 
yet since I arrived in France. I am getting good things to eat here and 
plenty of it. Don't you ever worry that I don't get enough to eat out 
here. Well, I don't think it will be very long till I can go back. They 
are transferring a lot out of the hospital now ; all that are able to stand 
the trip will go back first, that is the men that are in the hospitals, 
and it won't take them long to get them out. The talk is that they are 
going to start sending divisions in a few days. 

Well, Albert, what are you doing these days? How is the weather 
cut there this fall? It sure is fine out here. I don't think I ever saw 
such nice weather at this time of year. Have you heard of Willie lately? 
I haven't seen him since I have been here. I would like to see some 
of the boys from home and see how they are getting along. I haven't 
seen anyone since I have been in France, but I am getting along fine 
among strangers. We all act like we have known one another for years. 
Well, how is everybody out in Ripley; just like always, I suppose? How 
is grandpa and all the rest? Tell them all hello for me. Will close 
for this time. Home to hear from you soon. Haven't heard from you 
folks since I have been in France. I have been transferred so much 
I guess they can't make it catch up with me. Excuse bad writing. I 
am writing this in the Y. M. C. A. building and there is a kind of a 
show going on and singing and you might know what kind of a place 
it is to write. This is one place a fellow never gets lonesome. Write 
soon and tell all the rest to write. Will send you my new address in 
a day or so. I don't know my address yet. By-by, love to all. 

From your loving brother, 

Edward H. Swingle." 

Delzie Demaree of Benham served in the 74th Company, 6th 
Marines, the "Bloody Fighting Sixths." On April 13, 1918, the 74th 
Company was gassed at Verdun, very few escaping, only a dozen of the 
two hundred fifty men not affected. Six Indiana boys died from it. 
After recovering from the gas attack, Private Demaree suffered an 
ankle-wound at Chateau-Thierry on June 16th. Returning again to his 
company he suffered a second wound at Champagne on October 3d. 
The little toe of one foot was lost in this casualty. He was treated for 
the gas at French Hospital 27, and American Hospital 27 and Base 
No. 8, with Field Hospital 1. He was treated for the first wound at 
Base Hospitals 18 and 9. 

A machine-gun bullet was responsible for the second wound. He 
was treated this time at Evacuation Hospital No. 5, Bases 27 and 8, 
completing his hospital record at Portsmouth. Va. The company rec- 



242 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 

ords were lost at Chateau-Thierry and the men were not paid after 
February, 1918, and could not be properly discharged. 

"Left home on the twenty-first day of September, went to the local 
board at Connersville, Ind., where I had registered, and left there for 
Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., September 22, 1917. I left there on the 
twenty-ninth of March and arrived at Camp Sevier, South Carolina. 
on March 30, 1918. Left there on the eighth of May and arrived at 
Camp Merritt, New Jersey, May 11, 1918. From there went to Bos- 
ton, Mass., on the sixteenth of May, arrived the seventeenth of May, 
1918, at Boston. Left Boston for New York on the British steamer 
Miltiades, May 17th. Arrived at New York on May 18, 1918. 
From there we went to Halifax, Nova Scotia. Arrived there 
on the twenty-second of May, 1918. We left Halifax on May 24th 
and met the British destroyers on June 1st. Encountered first 
submarines June 2, 1918, at 5:30 p. m. ; five depth bombs were fired 
from warship. We were met by warships and three airplanes in Eng- 
lish Channel June 3rd. The following day we sailed up the River 
Thames and anchored in the channel of the Thames, opposite the 
city of Tilsbury, England. We were transferred from the steamer 
Miltiades to tug boat Edith and landed at a railroad station at Tils- 
bury, June 5, 1918; boarded a train there and arrived at Dover, Eng- 
land, June 5th. We boarded a transport at Dover June 5th and with 
another transport, three English destroyers and two airships we crossed 
the English Channel and arrived at Calais, France, June 5th at 9:15 
p. m. Had our first air raid that night and the second one the follow- 
ing night. We then went to No. 6 English rest camp at Calais and 
then in billets in the French village Lostray Watteau on June 11, 1918. 
On July 2d we went on a three-day hike. The first night we camped 
in the woods near the city of Cassel and the second night near St. 
Oamer, and on the third day went to our shelter (and were under 
artillery fire the first time on June 13th). Put up tents at Herzeile, 
France. Left there July 10th, crossed the Belgium border, went in 
billets near Watteau, left our billets and boarded a train at Provent, 
Belgium, July 15th, crossed the French border and went in billets in 
Louches, France. We left our billets at Louches and hiked to Audrick, 
France. There we boarded a train to Provent, Belgium, and went 
back into our old billets again near Watteau, July 21st. We left for 
the trenches on the Poperinghe front on July 25 at 8 p. m. We marched 
through Poperinghe, a city the Germans were still shelling. There was 
not a living soul in it. We entered the support trenches on the blue- 
line on the twenty-seventh day of July, then we moved to the front line 
trenches on the Poperinghe front and on the morning of July 
28th we moved in back of the lines and went into billets. On 
the twenty-ninth of July we again moved into the front of the blue- 
line trenches at Poperinghe. From there we moved to the front-line 
trenches on the Ypres front on the fifth of August. On the tenth of 
August we came out of the trenches and went into billets in the road 
camp near Watteau, Belgium. Five men were wounded. We left our 
billets again on August 16th for the support trenches on the Poperinghe 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 243 

front. From there we went into billets at Brandhock, Belgium. We 
left there the twenty-second of August and passed through Ypres, which 
the Germans were shelling at the time. We went into the reserve line 
on the Ypres front. On the night of August 26, 1918, we sent seventy 
car loads of gas into the horse-shoe bend in the line over the Germans. 
On September 1st we moved from Belgium Battery Corner to the front 
line trenches on the left hand side of Kemmel Hill on the Ypres front. 
On the night of September 3, 1918, I was wounded. 1 went to a field 
hospital and the following day I went to the C. C. S. Hospital, where 
I stayed until September 9th and then went to the General Hospital at 
Belon. On the thirteenth I crossed the English Channel to Dover, Eng- 
land, boarded a train for Dartford to the American Base Hospital No. 
37. After staying there nine weeks I went to Winchester and after 
five weeks there went to Southampton, took a boat and sailed for 
France and met my company at Virnie, France. Left Virnie on the 
nineteenth of December, and after a ten-mile hike, went into billets at 
La Bazege and hiked back to Virnie on January 2d. On February 12th 
we left Virnie and hiked thirteen miles to La Guierche. We left there 
on the thirteenth of February. We hiked fifteen miles to Le Mans to a 
French camp. We left Le Mans on March the fourteenth and arrived 
at St. Nazaire by railroad on the fifteenth of March, 1919. We left 
St. Nazaire on the thirty-first of March. On April 1, 1919, we 
sailed for the U. S. A. on the steamer Martha Washington, and landed 
at Charleston, South Carolina, where we took the train to Camp Jack- 
son. We left there on the nineteenth of April and arrived at Camp 
Zachary Taylor, Ky., on the twentieth of April, and reached home on 
the twenty-fourth of April, 1919. 

Anthony J. Rosfeld, 
Company K, 120th Infantry, 30th Div." 



"My first trip was made November 12, 1918, just after the signing 
of the armistice, and my ship had the honor of taking the last troops to 
France, and also sailed out of Bordeaux, France, homeward bound with 
the first troops direct from France, going home after the signing of the 
armistice, the date of sailing being November 23d, and we carried 
one thousand five hundred eighty-seven soldiers and one hundred seven 
officers, all of whom had been wounded and were just taken from hos- 
pitals and brought aboard ship. 

Arrived in the States after having had six days of the roughest 
weather I had ever before seen and don't know as I have seen the sea 
any more severe since in all of my subsequent trips. 

As to the rest of my overseas voyages will say that I only remember 
the ports that I made in France, which were Bordeaux via the Azores 
Islands, where we stopped and left mail for the Marine base, then went 
on to Bordeaux and got a load of troops. 

We made four successive trips to Bordeaux via the Azores; then we 
changed our foreign port to St. Nazaire, France, and then Pauillac and 
then Bassens, and last, to Brest, France. 



16 



244 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

I had two furloughs to Paris while in the service, the last heing 
the most wonderful of all, for I made a visit to the battle-fields and saw 
some of the most awful disasters of modern warfare. 

In the short time I was in the navy I made nine trips, all of which 
were made during the months from November 12, 1918, to September 
1, 1919. 

Floyd Jarvis, U. S. S. Sierra." 

John Simeon Smith, Company A, 18th Infantry, 1st Division, sent 
the mascot of his company home to his parents at Osgood. It is a 
French bull dog that went through the war with Company A, and is 
battle-scarred from many campaigns. His name is Buster. He seems to 
be the only live souvenir sent to Ripley county. 

"The 10th Ordnance Depot furnished full equipment for several 
thousand men of several divisions, who were actually on the firing line. 
After the war this depot played a very important part in the demobiliza- 
tion of the returning troops. We were well trained as fighting men as 
well as for handling the work of the depot. We trained several men 
to handle the ordnance property in several divisions. This organization 
finally became a part of the Purchase, Storage and Traffic Division. 

Kenan V. Wager." 

"While aboard the Northern Pacific we saw three enemy submarines 
from April to November. Shot at them but did not sink them. The 
strangest experience we had was running into a large black fish about 
sixty feet along. The speed of the ship kept it on our bow until it 
died. An old fisherman on board said it was worth five thousand 
dollars. During that time we lost a man overboard. He was securing 
a life-boat which had broken loose. We took up a collection and sent 
his wife and baby four hundred dollars and also bought a stone tablet, 
which was placed in church to his memory. 

We took Secretary Baker overseas, also the Peace Commission. 

Ralph Croxton, Seaman." 

"The DeKalb was once the German raider "Prince Eitel Frederick." 
After four days and a half of sailing in a storm, Reckoning Captain Jim 
Alger smiled contentedly as there loomed dead ahead of him the glimmer 
of the Ambrose Channel Lightship. The DeKalb didn't hit anything 
but the middle of the channel. 

The DeKalb had on board four hundred thirteen soldiers from the 
fighting ports, twenty-five marines, also from the fighting ports, fifty- 
four officers and six hundred fifty-seven sailors. "The worst storm the 
ship ever went through" was the verdict of every navy man aboard from 
Captain Alger down to the hardiest deck-swabber. The opinion was 
unanimous that the DeKalb had gone through the worst storms that 
any ship, any place, ever had gone through in the whole world. Some- 
thing approaching forty-five degrees was a common angle for the DeKalb 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 245 

to take when the going was at its worst. Dr. Judy and his assistant 
surgeon and orderlies clawed their way up and down among the in- 
jured men, helping to get the armless and legless soldiers back into their 
bunks from which the crazy lurchings of the ship had dumped the 
wounded men. 

One wave smashed a deck-house in and the next wave slammed what 
was left of it overboard. Lifeboats were stove in, funnels were bent 
until they looked as if someone had poured too much of the "hard stuff" 
■nto-them. One private remarked: "The old pond beat up this boat 

like it knew she was once a German." The DeKalb docked after 

this storm at Hoboken, N. J., on Friday, December 13, 1918. 

Irving Harding, Seaman." 

Entwined with Batesville's war memories is the story of Clark 
Henry. Left an orphan at an early age, he spent a number of years at 
the home of William B. Goyert at Cross Roads near Batesville, attend- 
ing the district school at that place, and working on the farm for Mr. 
Goyert. 

Being English by birth, he felt the call of his country in 1914 and 
enlisted at Liverpool, England, in the English army in March of that 
year. He was sent to France in the fall and served a short time in the 
trenches. He was discharged in December, 1914, for disability. 

In March, 1916, he re-enlisted — this time in the Canadian Rifles. 
In December, 1916, he was again in service in France, where he re- 
mained for four months. 

One evening a shell struck their rest camp and Clark Henry was 
buried in the debris. He was extricated alive but bruised and shell- 
shocked. He spent four months at an English hospital and was then 
returned to Canada, where he was discharged on June 29, 1918. Going 
to the home of his uncle in Indianapolis on furlough in May, he was 
enlisted by the Red Cross to help in the second drive for a national 
fund and told his war experience at many meetings throughout the 
state. He gave his story to the public at Batesville at a Red Cross 
benefit entertainment and visited at various times during the summer 
and fall of 1918 among his old friends and acquaintances in the locality, 
bringing wherever he went vivid pictures of war conditions. 

AN ENGLISH FAMILY'S WAR RECORD 

In 1883 an Englishman named Bliss bought a farm in Washington 
township, Ripley county, near Elrod, and brought his wife and four 
children to make their home there. These children were a daughter and 
three sons. They remained in America a few years, when, during a 
period of homesickness, Mr. Bliss rented his farm and returned to his 
old home near London, England. He remained in correspondence with 
his tenant, and a friend who acted as trustee for the American property 
until the family decided to return to America in 1905. 

During this interval of twenty years, four more children had been 
born to them; two daughters and two sons. The older children, who 



246 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

had grown to maturity, stayed in England ; the rest of the family re- 
mained in America, the younger members attending school near Elrod. 
The three older sons, Herbert, Frederick and Ernest, served in the 
British army during the Boer war in South Africa, in 1901, 1902 and 
1903. 

Herbert Bliss served in the British army in India later for two 
years; coming to America, he enlisted in the American army and served 
six years until discharged for disability resulting from injury received 
in the service, when thrown from his horse on the Mexican border. 

Frederick Bliss remained in the British army, seeing service in vari- 
ous parts of the world. His wife and one child are buried at Gibraltar, 
Spain. His son was buried in Bermuda. His youngest child was sent 
home to Bedford, England, after his wife's death. Frederick Bliss 
served in the World War as sergeant-major in the 2d Battalion, Bed- 
fordshire Regiment, until entirely disabled at the battle of the Somme. 
He was previously wounded at Hill 60, LaBassee, France, suffering 
fractured ribs and a broken right hand. At St. Eloi he was buried by 
an explosion, suffering severely from bruises and shell-shock. He re- 
mained in the hospital eight months after his casualty, returning to ser- 
vice with his right hand crippled and his crushed ribs not properly 
healed. At the battle of the Somme he was wounded by shrapnel on 
either side of the spine near the middle of his body. This completely 
disabled him for field service and caused his death, which resulted on 
July 10, 1919. He was buried at Chatham, England. 

Ernest Bliss visited America, but did not remain to become a citizen, 
though he took out first papers at one time. He was working in Canada 
in 1914. His younger brother, who was working in Nebraska, joined 
him at the entrance of England into the World War and they enlisted 
together on September 24, 1914, at Toronto, Canada. They were as- 
signed to Company 2 of the 14th Royal Montreal Regiment, both feel- 
ing that as Englishmen their place was with their country's flag. The 
brothers remained together until separated by the fortunes of war, which 
sent Ernest Bliss permanently from the front at Arras, August 28, 1918, 
suffering from paralysis caused by a fragment of shell. He remained in 
the hospitals of England and Canada until October, 1919, when he 
came to his sister's house at Versailles, Indiana, to convalesce in the 
atmosphere of home. His two sisters resident in the county are Mrs. 
John Lane of Versailles, and Mrs. Earl Gait of Washington township, 
near Elrod. 

The war service record of Edwin and Ernest Bliss reads as follows: 
Neuchapelle, March, 1915. Ypres, first gas attack, April 22, 1915. 
Held the lines at Rouchebourg and Festubert. Plveg Strait, Sanctuary 
Wood ( Ernest being wounded at Festubert in the thigh ; at Sanctuary 
Wood in the elbow, and again wounded at Rouchebourg), three times 
in all. First battle of the Somme, September 16, 1916; Vimy Ridge, 
April 2, 1917; Paschendaale, on the Ypres front; Lens, a series of small 
battles and raids. Arras-Amiens, August 9, 1918; back to Arras where 
Ernest was so nearly fatally wounded on August 28, 1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 247 

Edwin Bliss was wounded slightly at the Somme in September, 
1916, but was sent back to the service after recovery and remained until 
the armistice. 

Ernest Bliss received the British War Medal and the French Vic- 
tory Medal in recognition of his services in France and Belgium. 

Charles Bliss served in an Illinois machine gun company in the 
American army during the war but the armistice was signed too soon 
for him to see overseas service. 

Ripley county, in a way, claims these three brothers, as Ernest, 
Edwin and Charles Bliss's home ties are with the two sisters who live 
near their old home-place in Washington township, and the graves 
of their father and mother which are at Washington Church, near 
Elrod. Edwin and Charles coming to America as boys and attending 
school here, may be classed as Americans. The older brothers and sis- 
ters having always remained British subjects, only the younger mem- 
bers of the Bliss family can be classed as Americans. Their record is 
typical of the average English family at home in England, or in the 
process of being transplanted to a new country. 

The boast of the British, when discussing their record from Septem- 
ber, 1914, to November, 1918, is that "A handful of English soldiers, 
twenty-five thousand in number, held at bay the three million Germans 
before them." 

Comparing the allies, we see that the Belgian army held the first 
pass; their famous "They shall not pass" will echo down the ages. Next 
the French filled the breach and rolled back the advancing hosts starting 
again towards Paris. With the British beside them, these three armies 
held the way for almost four years until the American army in July, 
1918, with its cry of "Let's go," swept in with fresh life to the conflict, 
and the enemy was driven back to his own ground and disarmed. No 
one of the Allies claims all credit for the victory. It required them all 
to win. The valiant Belgians, the glorious French, the dauntless Brit- 
ish, the irresistible Americans fought together on the Flanders front 
the battle of humanity, the battle of "Democracy against Autocracy." 

A History of Service 

A BRIEF SKETCH OF THE TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS 

OF COMPANY D, 53d INFANTRY, REGULARS, 

6th DIVISION 

Left Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, Wednesday afternoon at 
six o'clock, June 26, 1918, traveling on special Pullman train, reaching 
Camp Mills, Long Island, Friday morning, 7:00 a. m., June 28th. 

Left Camp Mills, Friday afternoon, July 5th, traveling by train to 
Bush Terminals, South Brooklyn, boarded H. M. transport, Ulysses, 
and remained on transport for the night, leaving New York harbor 
Saturday morning, July 6th, getting under way with full convoy at 
10:00 a.' m. 



248 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Reached Liverpool, England, Wednesday, 8:00 p. m., July 17, spend- 
ing the night on transport, and went ashore Thursday morning, July 
18th, marching through streets of Liverpool to an American rest camp 
named Knotty Ash, on outskirts of city, spending the night of the 18th 
in camp and leaving on the morning of the 19th for another American 
rest camp at Winchester, England. The trip was made in third-class 
style on a British railroad. Reached Winchester in the afternoon about 
three o'clock and marched to a camp two miles distance from the city. 

Left camp at Winchester on the morning of July 22d, traveling by 
train to Southampton. Remained in dock shed there from morning 
of the 22d until about 6:00 p. m. same day, boarding small transport 
named La France, for the trip across the English Channel. 

Reached Cherbourg, France, at 6:00 a. m., July 23d, marched to 
rest camp five miles from the city and spent the night of the 23d, 
boarding French troop train "De Luxe" on the morning of July 24th, 
traveling on said train till late afternoon of July 25th, getting off at 
Bricon, France, and marched to permanent station, Colombey, reaching 
there at 1 :00 a. m., July 26th. 

Left Colombey, France, August 26th, traveling in French auto 
trucks to Saulxures, reaching that city on morning of August 27th. 

Left Saulxures morning of August 30th, marching to LaBresse, a 
distance of eight miles. 

Left LaBresse, 3 :00 a. m., September 3d, traveling by trucks to 
Oderon, where we stayed until September 8th, and then marched to 
Camp Boussat, reaching there in the afternoon and left the next morning 
for Camp Mounier, arriving late at night. 

Left reserve positions at Camp Mounier in the afternoon of Septem- 
ber 15th and went into the front line trenches, arriving late at night, 
taking over the Braunkopf sub-sector in the Benoit sector. 

Left Braunkopf sub-sector on the night of October 9th and slept in 
the woods near Metlach and left this place late in the afternoon of 
October 10th, arriving at Kruth about 2:00 a. m. 

Left Kruth October 12th and marched to Saulxures, arriving late 
that night. 

Left Saulxures on the night of October 27th, traveling by train to 
Camp Schillaz, reaching there on night of October 28th. Left that 
camp on morning of November 1st to take part in the great Meuse- 
Argonne offensive. March was from Camp Schillaz to Fateau, to 
Montplaiville, to place on November 7th and remained there until 
morning of November 10th, marching by way of Autruche to Mont- 
faucon, to Bailecourt, to Verdun, to Verdun battle-front, taking up posi- 
tion on Verdun front on the evening of November 14th. 

Left Verdun front, eight miles from the city on November 21st, 
en route to the 14th Training Area, the trip lasting till December 7th. 
The route was as follows: Verdun City, Seviryla-Fert, Waly, Auze- 
court, Nogeville, Perthe, Braucourt, Sommevoirs, Vill-Sur-Terr, Fon- 



RIFLE Y COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD W AR 



249 



taine, Juvancourt, Silvirerous, Gevrolles, Montmoyen and present sta- 
tion, Quemignyrot, Province of Cote'd Orr, France, reaching last named 
place late evening of December 7, 1918. 

Our next stop — the good old U. S. A., tout suit (too sweet). 

Data compiled by Corporal A. Schraut, company clerk, Company 
D, 53d Infantry. (All foreign rights reserved.) 



It may be a mansion — 

It may be a dump — 
It may be a farm 

With an old-fashioned pump. 
It may be a palace — 

It may be a flat — 
It may be a room 

Where you hang up your hat. 
It may be a house 

With a hole in the door, 



Or a marble hotel 

With a coon at the door. 
It may be exclusive, 

Or simple or swell, 
A wee bit of heaven, 

Or one little— WELL 
Just kindly remember, 

Wherever you roam, 
That Shakespeare was right, kid. 

There's no place LIKE HOME. 



— Curtis O. Watters, 
Cook, Co. D, 53d Inf., 6th Div., A. E. F. 



TWO METHODS OF ARMY TRAVEL 





Frank Foerster 



Clarence Feinthel 



250 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Clay Updike of Batesville served as company barber in Headquar- 
ters Company, 70th C. A. C. His most strenuous experience was on 
volunteer service in the hospitals as barber for the wounded. 

The Seventieth Coast Artillery was known as "Colonel Gary's Black 
Bears." They got this pseudonym from a small black bear, brought by 
the colonel as a mascot when the regiment was in training at Fort 
Wadsworth, New York. The cub was amiable so long as the soldiers 
petted him but bit any one severely when his ministrations took the form 
of teasing. They were unable to get transportation for their mascot 
when ordered overseas and he had to be left behind. They desired to 
adopt a righting black bear as their insignia but failed to get it officially 
registered as they were unattached to a division when the armistice was 
signed and only divisional insignia had been recognized. The bear for 
their insignia was designed by Jake Schumacher of Batesville, who was 
a member of Headquarters Company of the Seventieth C. A. C. 

The soldiers of the Seventieth Regiment, C. A. C, were stationed 
for a time where there were numerous French refugees, very much in 
need of food. Pending arrangements for securing supplies the boys 
divided their own rations with the refugees. The children were es- 
pecially favored by sharing in the soldiers' candy. 

Oscar Carl Horn of the 421st Motor Supply Train took part in 
the longest motor convoy in the A. E. F. This was from La Rochelle, 
France, to Coblenz, Germany, in February, after the armistice was 
signed. He was also in the largest motor convoy of the A. E. F., from 
Nantes to Romoerantin, France, in April, 1919. Two hundred eighty- 
six vehicles made up the convoy. 

Clyde C. Peters of Milan, who served as a private in Company K, 
34th Infantry, Seventh Division, gives the following typical service 
record: "Enlisted at Fort Thomas, Kentucky, on May 3, 1918. Was 
trained at Fort Thomas and Camp Forrest, Georgia. Was sent to 
Camp Upton, N. Y., to be sent overseas, but because of sickness was 
left behind. Was then sent to Camp Merritt, New Jersey, where he 
was given a new assignment in the Seventh Division and sent immedi- 
ately overseas. They were given intensive training in the fourteenth 
training area in France. They were sent to the front lines on Septem- 
ber 1st and reached the Puvenelle sector on September 9th. They 
were under fire here from German snipers, machine guns, artillery bar- 
rages and airplane bombarding. No advance was ordered until Novem- 
ber 9th. The regiment was formed in three waves. The first wave ad- 
vanced to the objective assigned them, and the second wave advanced 
through their lines to the next objective, and the third wave on through 
to the next objective. Thus it was a continual drive until November 
11th. Company K had only eighty-four men left on duty out of two 
hundred fifty." 

David Kirschner of Sunman, Adams township, served in Company 
G, 332d Infantry, 83d Division. This regiment was sent to Italy and 
fought at Vittorio-Veneto on the Austrian front from October 24th to 
November 4, 1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 251 

Rev. Joseph H. Honningford of the St. Maurice congregation at 
Napoleon since the war, entered training in August, 1918, as a Knights 
of Columbus chaplain, expecting to go overseas in November. After 
the signing of the armistice no more chaplains were sent over and he was 
assigned to other duties. He served as chaplain at Fort Tilden, Rock- 
away Beach, Long Island, New York, and at the naval aero station near 
there. He was privileged here to witness the construction and groom- 
ing of the giant seaplanes which later made the first transatlantic flight. 
He was acquainted with many of the men who made the "hop," es- 
pecially Lieutenant Hinton, the pilot of the NC-4, the successful plane. 
Rev. Honningford served later at Fort Riley, Kansas, and was dis- 
charged when the patients from the base hospital were transferred to 
Ft. Sheridan, Illinois. 

Thaddeus Brenton of Osgood, who served as second-class seaman, 
U. S. Naval Reserve, gives an interesting account of the epidemic at 
Great Lakes Naval Training Station : 

"Having been kept on station duty during my entire period of en- 
listment there is very little of interest which I can relate, but the great 
epidemic of Spanish influenza is bound to rank as one of the horrors 
of the World War. No one is so well aware of this fact as the men 
in the hospital service. 

"The thing seemed to seize the great naval station over night; 
coming all at once, unexpected and unannounced. Naturally they were 
not prepared. All the sick-bays filled ; the base hospital filled to the 
doors, and numerous barracks were transformed into wards. The ill- 
ness seized hundreds, thousands, at once. Every available well boy was 
detailed as a nurse, or put to work with the dead in the morgue, which 
was filled to overflowing. Every day freight cars, many of them, left 
Main Hospital with their sad, silent loads. The nearly-cured boys re- 
turned to their quarters to find their dearest friends 'gone West.' 

"The yellow flag flew over the station for six long weeks, and on 
the first "liberty" after quarantine was removed, how many, many 
vacant lines on the liberty list ! They passed far from the glories 
of the battle-field, but theirs is a cherished memory just the same. 
'They also serve who only stand and wait.' They answered God's 
call from under the Stars and Stripes." 

Emmett C. Blair of Osgood served as a sergeant in Company E, 
16th Infantry, First Division, of the A. E. F. He sums up a part 
of his service record as follows : 

"Was with the punitive expedition into Mexico from March 15, 
1916, to February 5, 1917. Left El Paso, Texas, on June 1, 1917, for 
Hoboken, New Jersey, bound for France. 

"When the armistice was signed on November 11, 1918, we were 
near Sedan, and, as the First Division was one of the lucky divisions to 
be chosen for service in the Army of Occupation, we started our march 
to Coblenz, Germany, the next day, November 12th. 



252 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

We stopped at Gravenmacher, Luxemburg, on the 23d of November 
to rest for a few days, and also at Cochem, on the Moselle river, for two 
days. It was here that I slept in a feather bed for the first time in 
nearly two years. From this place we continued our march to Cob- 
lenz, arriving there on December 12th. We crossed the Rhine into 
Germany on December 13th and marched on to Dernbach, arriving 
there the next day. The Sixteenth Regiment was stationed around di- 
vision headquarters at Dernbach and at Montabaur. We remained there 
until April 18, 1919. On account of the other divisions being ordered 
to the United States the First Division had to occupy more territory, so 
the 16th Infantry was ordered to Selters, Germany. This town had 
been occupied by the Thirty-second Division until ordered home. The 
First Division remained here until all the others had sailed for the 
United States, being in Germany a little over eight months. 

"On August 15, 1919, the first of the First Division started to en- 
train for Brest, France. The 16th Infantry left Selters on August 16th, 
arrived at Brest on the 20th, and sailed for America on August 23d. 
We arrived at New York on September 3, 1919, and paraded in that 
city on the 10th and in Washington on the 17th. On September 26th 
I got a three-months' furlough, the first since I had enlisted in May, 
1914." 

Roy Sage of Osgood, who served in Machine Gun Company, 120th 
Infantry, Thirtieth Division, was specially commended for bravery in 
an early part of the regiment's service, though his modesty prevented 
his giving any account of it in his service record report. 

Harry Gault of Delaware served as a sergeant in Company D, 17th 
Railway Engineers. His unit left New York on July 28, 1917, and 
landed at Liverpool, England, on August 12th. Their principal work 
was the enlarging and improvement of the port at St. Nazaire, France, 
making it one of the largest base sections. Docks were built and con- 
creted, railroads built, and a fine system of waterworks. 

The 17th Engineers, in company with the 12th, 13th and 14th 
Regiments of Railway Engineers, paraded in London on August 15, 
1917, while en route to France. They were the first American troops 
that ever paraded in London, and the first foreign troops to march 
through the streets of the British capital for over five hundred years. 

The most popular poem recited on all programs throughout the 
war was Wilbur D. Nesbit's "Your Flag and My Flag." 

Your flag and my flag, and how it flies today 
In your land and my land and half a world away! 
Rose-red and blood-red, the stripes forever gleam; 
Snow-white and soul-white — the good forefathers' dream! 
Sky-blue and true blue, with stars to gleam aright — 
The gloried guidon of the day; a shelter through the night. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



253 



Your flag and my flag, and oh, how much it holds; 
Your land and my land secure within its folds! 
Your heart and my heart beat quicker at the sight; 
Sun-kissed and wind-tossed, red and blue and white. 
The one flag — the great flag — the flag for me and you — 
Glorified all else beside — the red and white and blue! 

Your flag and my flag! To every star and stripe 

The drums beat as hearts beat and fifers shrilly pipe! 

Your flag and my flag — a blessing in the sky; 

Your hope and my hope — it never hid a lie! 

Home land and far land and half the world around, 

Old Glory hears our glad salute and ripples to the sound! 



Our Medal Honor Roll 

"We sent our boys to France, 

To fight in Freedom's name; 
We wanted them to do their bit. 

Without a thought of fame." 

[Extract from "The Service Flag," compiled by Mrs. May V. Wagner 
and recited at the service flag dedication at Cedar Creek M. E. Church 
in June, 1918. She is Corporal Jerome Wagner's mother.] 

Jerome Edward Wagner was 
born near Osgood, in Johnson 
township, Ripley county, Indiana, 
on June 10, 1899, where he grew 
up on his father's farm. He at- 
tended the Cedar Creek district 
school in Johnson township. He 
enlisted in the Third Ohio Na- 
tional Guards on June 13, 1917, 
and was assigned to Company I. 
Two squads of this regiment did 
guard duty at the Baltimore & 
Ohio High Bridge between Osgood 
and Delaware from April 1, 1917, 
until August 1, 1917, when the 
regiment was mobilized at Eden 
Park, Cincinnati, Ohio. They 
were sent to Chillicothe, and 
camped on a cornfield on the re- 
cently selected site for the new 
training camp to be known as 
Camp Sherman. A number of the 
Third Ohio Guards were trans- 
ferred here to the 166th Infantry, 
Company I being formed for the 




Jerome Edward Wagner 



254 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

new Forty-second Division, destined to become the famous Rainbow. 
The new unit was sent to Camp Perry, Ohio, for training and then to 
Camp Mills, L. I., for intensive training under French officers. The di- 
vision sailed on October 29, 1917, the 166th Infantry going on the trans- 
port Agamemnon, an interned ship, formerly named the Kaiser Wilhelm. 
They landed at Brest, France, on November 12, and were trained at 
Camp Coctquidan, the oldest artillery school in France. They were sent 
into the trenches for service in February, 1918, on the Lorraine front. 
The first shelling occurred on the night of March 9, followed by a gas 
attack on March 22. They captured and held a mile and a quarter of 
trenches evacuated by the Germans, near Luneville. The regiment 
received a letter of praise from General Gourand for one hundred ten 
days' continuous service in this sector. The next critical campaign was 
at Champagne, July 14 to 18, followed by eight days north of the 
Marne. They here drove the Prussian Guards across the Ourcq river, 
captured a number of towns, and twelve hundred prisoners with sup- 
plies and munitions. The division fought next at Chalons and at 
Chateau-Thierry, then at Vesle. Private Wagner was promoted to 
corporal after the battle of the Marne. At St. Mihiel, on September 
12, 1918, he was shot through the shoulder by a machine gun bullet and 
received shrapnel wounds in the head. Though severely wounded he 
directed his men against the enemy until the gun-nest was silenced. 
For this action he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and 
later the French Croix de Guerre. He was in the hospital five weeks, 
returning to his regiment in the Argonne Forest on November 8, 1918. 
His commanding officer asked for volunteers for a scouting expedition. 
Corporal Wagner volunteered, selected his squad of eight men and ad- 
vanced a half-mile before the lines. He was signaling back the Ger- 
man position when three machine gun bullets struck him in the leg. 
The advancing Americans passed over him and he was picked up by 
first aid men. He was taken to Cincinnati Base Hospital 25 for 
treatment. He was passed as a litter-patient through eight hospitals to 
Brest where he was to sail for the United States. He was taken seri- 
ously sick here and operated on for appendicitis. He developed both 
pneumonia and diphtheria and when finally sent to America on April 13, 
1919, he was helpless with neuritis. He was transferred from the de- 
barkation hospital at New York to Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, 
where he received his discharge on July 31, 1919. He was presented 
the D. S. C. at the same time, the entire personnel of the f jrt bein^ 
reviewed by him in the presentation ceremonial. The cross was pinned 
to his uniform by Lieutenant-Colonel Lake, the military band playing 
for the review. He was recalled to Ft. Harrison a few days later to 
receive the French cross for the same gallantry of action as cited hv 
General Gourand and signed by Generals Petain and Pershing. He 
was married on August 29 to Miss Elsie Murray, and went to Colum- 
bus, Ohio, to attend a government school for returned soldiers. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



255 




Andrew Nicholas Irrgang 



Andrew Nicholas Irrgang was 
born at Penntown, near Spades, 
Ind., on March 28, 1895, where 
he grew to manhood on his father's 
farm, attending the Penntown 
public school. He was called to 
his country's service in the selective 
draft on October 4, 1917. He was 
sent to Camp Taylor, Louisville, 
Ky., for training as a private in 
Company A, 335th Infantry, 
Eighty-fourth Division. He was 
sent with a detachment to Camp 
Sevier, S. C, about April 1, 1918, 
for further training, and transfer- 
red here to 120th Machine Gun 
Company, 120th Infantry, Thir- 
tieth Division. His regiment was 
sent to Camp Merritt, N. J., for 
overseas equipment and then to 
Boston, Mass., where they em- 
barked for overseas service on May 
17, 1918, on the transport Milti- 
ades. They landed in England on 
June 5 and went on to France 
within a few days. The 120th 
Machine Gun Company was trained at Nordlingham, France, until 
about July 1, when they were sent into service in the trenches 
near Kemmel Hill, Belgium, on the Ypres front. After the capture of 
Voormezeele, the division was sent back from the front for additional 
intensive training until September 17, when they were again sent into 
action on the Somme front in the campaign against the Hindenburg 
Line. Andrew Irrgang was promoted to corporal on August 4, 1918- 
At Bellicourt, France, in the battle of the Hindenburg Line, on 
September 29, 1918, he distinguished himself by gallant conduct, for 
which he was awarded three decorations, the Distinguished Service 
Cross by America, the British Distinguished Conduct Medal and the 
French Croix de Guerre. 

The 30th Division was brigaded with the British Army in thi* 
action. A certain point near St. Quentin had been repeatedly attacked 
by the British, but without success. Corporal Irrgang succeeded in cap- 
turing the machine gun nest with three guns and twenty-seven prisoners; 
turning the enemy guns and firing one thousand rounds, covering the 
advance of the infantry. He continued to lead his squad forward under 
terrific enemy fire. He was wounded severely by shrapnel in both legs 
and the right arm, all flesh wounds. He spent two months in the 
hospital, one week at Rouen near the battle front, the rest of the time at 
Reading, England. 

He sailed for the United States on the Cedric, December 14, 1918, 
reaching New York on December 23, and was discharged on January 



256 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



20, 1919, at Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio, returning at once to 
his home at Spades, Ripley county, Indiana. The Distinguished Service 
Cross was presented to Corporal Irrgang at Camp Sherman on May 22, 
1919. He was called to Chillicothe for the ceremonial. The entire 
personnel of the camp passed in review before him and the cross was 
presented by the general in command, the whole proceeding being 
entirely in his honor, as his was the only medal given at that time. 

The British Medal was bestowed by the Prince of Wales on 
September 22, 1919. About forty medals were brought by the young 
prince and the soldiers to receive them were invited to come to New 
York, transportation being furnished. Mr. Irrgang was unable to 
attend the ceremonial, and his medal was received by mail the following 
week. 

The Croix de Guerre was awarded for the same service in the 
spring of 1920, a number of medals being sent by the French govern- 
ment at the same time. The American citation reads as follows: 

"Corporal Andrew Irrgang, Machine Gun Company, 120th Infantry, 
distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in connection with mili- 
tary operations against an armed enemy of the United States at Belli- 
court, France, on September 29, 1918, and in recognition of his gallant 
conduct I have awarded him in the name of the President the Dis- 
tinguished Service Cross. (Signed) John J. Pershing. 
(Awarded on December 27, 1918.) Commander-in-Chief." 




William Alpheus Kreuzman 



William Alpheus Kreuzman 
was born at Georgetown, Ky., 
May 19, 1898. His parents later 
moved to Batesville, Laughery 
township, Ripley county, where he 
attended public school and as- 
sisted his father as a baker. He 
enlisted with Charles Gibson, 
Randolph Benz, and Ernest Hess 
in the U. S. Marine Corps of the 
Navy at Cincinnati, Ohio, on May 
10, 1917, going to the Marine 
Barracks at Port Royal, South 
Carolina, on May 18th, for train- 
ing. They were trained at Paris 
Island during May, June and 
July. Were sent to Quantico, 
Virginia, in August, for intensive 
military training, and assigned to 
82nd Company, 6th Marines, 2nd 
Division. The regiment sailed 
from Philadelphia on October 23, 
1917, on the transport Von 
Steuben and reached Brest, 
France, on November 12, 1917. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 257 

The training was continued at Bordeaux until January. They were 
then sent to Chaumont and later to Laville. An accident occurred on 
the voyage to France. When about halfway across, the Agamemnon 
collided with the Von Steuben, striking the forepart of the ship at 6 
p. m. on November 6, displacing the guns and destroying the lifeboats 
on the side. The ship was lashed up and avoided sinking because of the 
undamaged water-tight compartments. The crew and soldiers on board 
wore life-belts for the rest of the trip as a safety precaution. 

In March, 1918, the 6th Marines were sent into the trenches on 
the Meuse Heights near Verdun with the French and were later given 
a sector of their own in the Eparges region. The battles credited to 
the 6th Marines are: 

Verdun sector, March 18 to May 13, 1918. 
Aisne Defensive, June 1 to 6, 1918. 
Chateau-Thierrv, June 6 to Julv 12, 1918. 
Soissons, July 18 to July 20, 1918. 
Pont-a-Moussin, August 7 to August 14, 1918. 
St. Mihiel, September 11 to September 16, 1918. 
Champagne, Meuse-Argonne, October 1 to 12, 1918. 
Argonne-Meuse Offensive, November 1 to 11, 1918. 

The continuation of William Kreuzman's service record is: 

March to the Rhine, November 17 to December 12, 1918. 
Army of Occupation, December 12 to May 2, 1919. 
Composite Regiment, May 2 to September 25, 1919. 

Private Kreuzman was promoted to corporal in November, 1917. 
He received a citation for gallant conduct on November 1, 1918, near 
Bayonville, France. Corporal Kreuzman volunteered to reconnoiter a 
ravine which was infested by hostile machine guns, and went forward 
accompanied by "Red" Allen of New York as scout. They returned 
with sixteen prisoners, having silenced the guns. For this action he 
was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross on January 4, 1919. It 
was not received until March, as Corporal Kreuzman was absent on 
duty when other medals were presented at Vallandar, Germany. Charles 
Gibson received his cross on January 4th. Of the four boys who 
enlisted together in May, 1917, Randolph Benz remained at Quantico, 
Va., because of physical disability. Ernest Hess was wounded at 
Soissons, in July, 1918, and was never able to return to his regiment. 
Corporal Kreuzman received the Distinguished Service Cross at 
Lutesdorf, Germany. Secretary of the Navy Daniels pinned on the 
decoration in a special ceremonial for those unable to receive their 
medals at Vallandar, in January. He also received a citation and the 
Croix de Guerre from the French government for the same action on 
May 16, 1919, General Petain presenting the decoration. The whole 
division marched in review before the soldiers receiving decorations, and 
they were given every military honor. 



258 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Corporal Kreuzman and Private Gibson were chosen for the 
Composite Regiment, on May 10, 1919. This regiment was organized 
at Coblenz, Germany, as follows: Thirty-six hundred men in round 
numbers were chosen. From each Marine company, one sergeant, one 
corporal, and eight privates were selected. There were twenty-four 
Marine companies, making two hundred and forty marines in the 
regiment, Pershing's Own, as it was called. The other members of the 
outfit were chosen from infantry, artillery and other units of the Army 
of Occupation, so as to make a complete regiment, typical of the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Force. The men were selected on a basis of size, 
appearance, and so forth, to make as uniform and striking a composite 
as possible. The men were named by their officers and were drilled 
four hours daily. 

They left Coblenz on June 15, 1919, after exhibition drills, and 
parades at that place, and went to Paris, where they paraded in the 
French Capital, on American Independence Day, July 4, and again on 
French Independence Day, Bastille Day, July 14. These parades were 
viewed by representatives of the whole civilized world, and the rulers 
and generals of Servia, Montenegro and Czecho-Slovak, as well as the 
kings and presidents of the older countries of allied Europe. The third 
grand parade was in London on July 19. The regiment was reviewed 
by the Prince of Wales on July 18, himself a young British soldier of 
about twenty. Everywhere the greatest enthusiasm was shown by the 
assembled multitudes of cheering, flag-waving people. 

The regiment returned to Paris at the end of July, abandoning a 
plan to visit Italy. They sailed for the United States on September 1, 
1919, on the Leviathan, reaching New York September 8. 

The grand parade in New York was held on September 10, the 
Composite Regiment, commanded by General Pershing, leading the 
First Division. They were sent to Washington for their final parade 
before President Wilson on September 17. The marines were dis- 
charged at the Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, next day, Septem- 
ber 18, 1919, receiving their discharges one week later, September 25. 

Corporal Kreuzman also won the sharpshooter's badge, a distinction 
shared by several Ripley county soldiers, and valued, because awarded 
for skill in marksmanship. He entered a school of lithography at 
Effingham, 111., after his discharge from the army. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



259 




Charles Samuel Gibson was 
born at Morris, Adams township. 
Ripley county, Indiana, on May 3, 
IS'^8. His parents moved to 
Batesville, where he graduated 
from common school and entered 
high school, working in his 
brother's garage when out of 
school. He enlisted with Will 
Kreuzman, Randolph Benz, and 
Ernest Hess in the United States 
Marines at Cincinnati, Ohio, on 
May 10, 1917, going to Paris 
Island at Port Royal, South Car- 
olina, on May 18, 1917, for train- 
ing. Went to Quantico, Virginia, 
for further training in August, 
1917, and was assigned to 82nd 
Company, 6th Marines, Second 
Division. 

The Second Division embarked 
from Philadelphia on October 23, 
1917, the 6th Marines on the 
transport Von Steuben, and 
reached Brest, France, on Novem- 
ber 12, 1917. The latter half of the voyage was made precarious by a 
collision between the Von Steuben and Agamemnon, which disabled the 
former so much that the crew and soldiers on board wore life-belts for 
the rest of the journey. They were trained at Bordeaux until January, 
then at Chaumont and Laville until March, 1918. 

Charles Gibson and Will Kreuzman served together throughout 
the entire service of the 6th Marines, being always in the 82nd Com- 
pany. Neither was ever wounded or in the hospital during their 
twenty-three months' service overseas. Gibson served with Will 
Kreuzman through all the battles of their division, Verdun, Aisne, 
Chateau-Thierry, Pont-a-Moussin, St. Mihiel, Champagne, Meuse- 
Argonne, to the march to the Rhine and the occupancy of the Coblenz 
Bridgehead in Germany until May, 1919, when they were both chosen 
for the Composite regiment. 

Both won two medals, the Distinguished Service Cross and the Croix 
de Guerre. Gibson's citation recommends him for the decoration for 
volunteering to reconnoiter a ravine supposed to be infested with 
machine-guns near Bayonville, France, on November 1, 1917. He was 
with Corporal Screech, Gibson on the right, the corporal on the left of 
their advance. They used rifles and bayonets only in this raid. They 
were entirely successful in silencing the guns and taking several prisoners. 



Charles Samuel Gibsox 



17 



260 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Claude Williams was born near 
Holton, Indiana, on April 18, 
1893. He was working as time- 
keeper on the Baltimore & Ohio 
railroad when called to military 
service on May 27, 1918, by the 
local draft board at Versailles. 
He was sent for training to Camp 
Taylor, Ky., and later to Camp 
Greenleaf, Georgia. He was as- 
signed for overseas duty to Com- 
pany I, 120th Infantry, 30th 
Division, and embarked from Ho- 
boken on the Mauretania on 
August 27, 1918, arriving in 
Liverpool, England, on September 
3. He was sent on at once to 
France and took part as a 
stretcher-bearer in the battles of 
the Hindenburg Line — Bellicourt 
and Nauroy, September 29 to 
October 1, 1918; Premont- 
Brancourt, October 8 ; Busigny, 
October 9 ; Becquinquy, Bohain, 
La Haie, Menneresse, St. Martin 
Riviere, Muzingheim and Heights of Cotillai, October 17 to 19, 1918. 




Claude Williams 



He was awarded the British Military Medal on the following 
citation : 

"On October 11 and 12, 1918, during action west of St. Souplet, 
Stretcher-bearer Claude Williams displayed great devotion to duty for 
two days under heavy shell-fire, bandaging and carrying out the 
wounded. It was through this soldier's ceaseless efforts that many 
wounded men received immediate care which could not otherwise have 
been rendered. 

"Jas. G. Harbord, Chief of Staff. 
"By command of General Pershing." 

The medal was presented by the British government and approved 
by General Pershing. It was presented to the soldier at the Belgian 
Camp at Le Mans at 10:30 a. m. on February 18, 1919, by General 
Sir David Henderson of the British Army, authorized by the King of 
England, for bravery on the battle-field while brigaded with the British 
Army in the battles near St. Souplet. 

Claude Williams sailed for the United States on April 1, 1919, 
reaching Charleston, South Carolina, on April 13. He was discharged 
at Camp Taylor on April 25, 1919, and returned to his home and 
former occupation at Holton, Indiana. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 261 




Ora Engle 




Martin Hallforth 



Leo Hartman 



262 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



CITATIONS 

Martin Hallforth of Washington township wears on the left sleeve 
of his uniform an insignia given for extraordinary efforts by his 
battalion in repairing tanks at the French tank base. The citation 
was presented to Major Lathrop, battalion commander, and each soldier 
has a copy with the privilege of wearing the insignia. The decoration 
is of gold, crossed guns and a helmet in design. His service was in the 
Signal Corps. He was first assigned to the Second Motor Mechanic 
Regiment, 7th Company, which was later changed to Second Air 
Service, 7th Company, in July, 1918. The battalion worked eight and 
one-half months on the French tanks at Fontainebleau. The French 
government awarded the citation because of the amazing speed and skill 
with which the work was accomplished. 

Leo Lewis Hartrhan of Osgood was cited for bravery in carrying 
wounded through to First Aid Stations at Bois de Belleau, Belleau 
Wood, 1918. He wears a silver star for this citation. He was a 
member of the 80th Company, 6th Marines, Second Division. 

Corporal Ora Engle of Napoleon, of Company C, 9th Field 
Battalion Signal Corps, wears two silver stars for the following cita- 
tions : 

"All of Company C, Ninth Field Signal Battalion, displayed devo- 
tion to duty to the point of complete physical exhaustion during the 
period of October 14 to October 20, 1918. in laying and repairing 
telephone lines under heavy hostile bombardment at Madeline Farm 
and Cunel, France ( Meuse-Argonne Front). Dated November 30, 
1918." 

In a second paragraph seven enlisted men are cited in orders for 
distinguished conduct in action. One of these was Ora Engle, a private 
at that time. 

"All of Ninth Field Signal Battalion displayed exceptional bravery 
and devotion to duty on the afternoon of November 10, 1918, in 
assisting in the extension of Division Axis of Liaison from Brandeville 
to Leuppy, running the line under very heavy shell and machine-gun 
fire. Dated December 28, 1918." 

"In the Verdun Sector the foregoing men (44), all of Company C, 
9th Field Signal Battalion, displayed conspicuous gallantry and devo- 
tion to duty, maintaining in the face of enemy fire the several means of 
communication at all times." 

"All of the Ninth Field Signal Battalion performed invaluable 
service during the operations against the enemy in Bois de Rappes by 
laying lines from the Regimental Relay Station toward the front lines, 
in face of heavy artillery and machine-gun fire and gas." 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



263 




Sergeant Howard Sebring Smith 
of Cross Plains, of Company B, 
Forty-fourth Engineers, has two 
regimentai citations for service on 
the Murman Coast and in Interior 
Russia with the Northern Russia 
Expeditionary Force. One is by 
Major E. C. MacMoorland, oi : 
the American Exped i t i o n a r y 
Forces, the other by General 
Maynard, commander-in-chief of 
the British Northern Russia Ex- 
peditionary Force. 



Howard Sebrixg Smith 



John Elmer Schraub of Olean, 
who served in Company E, 320th 
Infantry, 80th Division, was sent 
to the interior of Germany on a 
special mission. He was specially 
commended for this service on 
August 11, 1918. 




Johx Elmer Schraub 



264 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 




Private Davis Wagner of 
Morris, who served in Head- 
quarters Company, 120th Infantry, 
30th Division, was cited for 
bravery in carrying his wounded 
lieutenant to a place of safety while 
himself badly wounded. 



Davis Wagner 

Frank Bruns of Company G. 28th Infantry, 1st Division, wears two 
silver stars for citations and the French Fouraguerre. 

Raymond Reuter of Ambulance Company 147, 37th Division, was 
cited for bravery in carrying wounded comrade through barrage fire to 
First Aid Station. Cited by General Farrison of 37th Division, by 
King of Belgium and by French general at Battle of Argonne. 

Ferdinand Chaplin of Ambulance Company 36, 7th Division, was 
cited by Colonel G. V. Fislc at Rogeville, France, for bravery in carry- 
ing in wounded men. 

The 13th Regiment of Marines was the first and only unit to 
receive a citation behind the fighting lines. This citation was given to 
the first and second battalions because of their splendid work in taking 
care of the sick during the epidemic of influenza. Raymond Demaree 
of Benham was a member of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 13th Division. 

The French Forraguerre was awarded all men in the 18th Infantry, 
1st Division. Albert Tekulve of the 18th, Company M, reports two 
bronze and one silver star as his share of decorations. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IVAR 



265 



Gold Star Honor Roll 



Henry Lee Ashcraft was born 
January 18, 1895, in Grant 
county, Ky. The family moved 
to Washington Township, Ripley 
County, Ind., locating near Milan. 
He was called to army service 
on September 20, 1917, in the forty 
per cent draft from Ripley county 
that later gave so many gold stars 
for the County's Honor Roll. He 
was trained at Camp Taylor until 
April, then at Camp Sevier, N. C, 
until the first of May, 1918. He 
was assigned to Company A, 335th 
Infantry, 84th Division, at Camp 
Taylor, and transferred at Camp 
Sevier to Company M, 120th 
Infantry, 30th Division. 

He sailed from Boston on May 
17, reaching France the first week 
in June. After a month's addi- 
tional training at Eperlocques he 
was sent to the Ypres front in 
Belgium, fighting with his regi- 
ment in all its engagements to St. 
Quentin, where he was instantly killed by shrapnel on September 29, 
1918. His body lies in the "Old Hickory" Cemetery at St. Quentin 
with Coy Sunman and Leora Weare, who were killed on the same day. 
Henry Schraub, Sam Heisman, Chris Endres, John Flick, Floyd Brown, 
John L. Bland, William Gilland, and Earl Hyatt are all buried near, 
making eleven Ripley county boys lost in battle from the 30th Division. 
' Lee Ashcraft had worked two years in Illinois before going into 
the army. He was a member of Junior Lodge at Dry Ridge, Ky. 




Henry Lee Ashcraft 



266 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 




Clarence Ray Beall 



Clarence Ray Beall was born at 
Tanglewood, Johnson township, 
on March 22, 1897. He was edu- 
cated in the Versailles schools and 
took teachers' training at Muncie, 
Ind., and taught his first school in 
Laughery township near Bates- 
ville, in the winter of 1917-18. 
He enlisted in the United States 
Naval Reserves as second-class 
seaman on June 3, 1918, at In- 
dianapolis. He was sent to Great 
Lakes Naval Training Station at 
Chicago. Was sent on August 27, 
1918, to the Naval Training Sta- 
tion at Puget Sound, Washington. 
He died of influenza-pneumonia 
on October 3, 1918, at the base 
hospital, Puget Sound, Naval 
Training Camp. His body was 
sent home for burial, and lies in 
Cliff Hill cemetery, at Versailles. 
He was married to Miss Edna 
Billingsley of Shelbyville, early in 
1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



26? 



John Lester Bland was born 
July 7, 1895. at Holton, Ind. His 
family lived at different times at 
Dabney. Friendship, Holton, and 
for a few years were out of the 
county, returning to Batesville, 
about 1916, from which place he 
was called to the colors on Septem- 
ber 20, 1917, in the forty per cent 
call of the first draft. He was 
sent to Camp Taylor for training, 
where he was promoted from 
private to corporal. He was as- 
signed to Company A, 335th In- 
fantry, 84th Division. With a 
detachment of other 335th men, 
he was sent to Camp Sevier, North 
Carolina, in April, 1918, to Camp 
Merritt on May 7, and sailed 
from Boston on May 17, 1918, as 
a member of Company M,. 120th 
Infantry, 30th Division. The Di- 
vision landed at Gravesend, Eng- 
land, on June 4th, and reached 
Calais, France, a few days later. 
After a month's training at Eperlocques they were sent to the Ypres 
front in Belgium, where they distinguished themselves at Kemmel Hill 
and Voormezeele. Their next work at the front was in France in the 
campaign before St. Quentin in the battle of the Hindenburg Line. In 
this offensive, the 30th Division lost eleven Ripley county boys, and a 
number of others were wounded. John Bland was gassed on October 
17, and died at General Hospital 74, on November 2, 1918. 

His grave is at Trouville, France, in the American plot of the 
British cemetery. His comrades speak of him as having been unusually 
intrepid and determined in his devotion to duty. 




John Lester Bland 



268 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART FN THE WORLD WAR 




Roscoe Ray Branham 



Roscoe Ray Branham was born 
at Osgood, Indiana, on March 5, 
1891. His parents lived three 
years in Gillett, Arkansas, when 
he was a small child, his father 
dying at that place. The family- 
then returned to Osgood, where 
Ray received a common school edu- 
cation. He enlisted in the regular 
army at Ft. Snelling, Minnesota, 
on October 5, 1914, in Coast 
Artillery Corps. He was as- 
signed to Headquarters Company, 
54th Coast Artillery Corps. He 
was trained at Ft. McKinley, 
Maine, until the spring of 1916, 
when he was sent to Mexico for 
service. After a few months' ser- 
vice he was sent back to Ft. Wil- 
liams, Maine. In December, 
1917, he was sent to Jacksonville, 
Florida, to attend artillery school, 
coming back to Maine in Febru- 
ary, 1918. His company sailed 



for France on March 16, 1918, on the U. S. Baltic, landing on March 
29, 1918. He was transferred on September 30, 1918, to Battery F, 
43d C. A. C. 

He entered Field Hospital 316 on October 19, and died October 21, 
of septic pneumonia. He was buried on October 23, 1918, in the 
cemetery at Vittel, Dept. Vosges, France. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



269 



Floyd Bernice Brown was born 
near New Marion, Shelby town- 
ship, Ripley county, Indiana, on 
October 10, 1895. He received a 
common school education and 
lived on a farm till he was called 
to military service. Before enter- 
ing the army he was married to 
Miss Bessie Gray of Osgood, Ind. 

He was called in the first two 
per cent draft, his number being 
the first drawn in Washington, 
and the first also in Ripley 
county. He was sent with Earl 
Hyatt, William Gilland, Leo 
Benz, Arthur Schein, Watson 
Gookins and Clarence Sparling to 
Camp Taylor on September 9, 
1917. They were assigned to 
Company A, 335th Infantry, 84th 
Division. In April, 1918, he was 
sent with a number of his com- 
rades to Camp Sevier, N. C, and 
transferred to Company C, 119th 
Infantry, 30th Division. He was sent to Camp Merritt on May 7, 
and embarked for overseas duty from Boston on May 17, 1918. 
The division landed at Gravesend, England, on June 4, and crossed 
by way of Dover to Calais, France. After six weeks' training in France, 
he was sent to the Ypres Front in Belgium until September 2d. After 
intensive training until September 17, the division made its famous at- 
tack on the Hindenburg Line at Bellicourt, continuing to St. Souplet, 
October 10th. 

He was killed by shell fire October 10, 1918, while advancing at 
St. Souplet as he stepped from behind cover of a tree. 

He is buried with the other 30th Division dead, near St. Souplet. 





. IMP 

M 9 ^Bhb^WA 



Floyd Bernice Brown 



270 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Earl Bronnenberg 
Hospital 28, 



Earl Bronnenberg was born at 
Chesterfield, Madison county, 
Ind., on December 24, 1896. His 
parents moved to a farm at Ver- 
sailles, Ind., in 1906, and he com- 
pleted his common school educa- 
tion at Versailles. 

He enlisted in the Regular 
Army at Indianapolis on February 
16, 1916, for seven years' service. 
He was trained at San Antonio, 
Texas, and served on the Mexican 
border until July, 1917, when he 
went overseas with Pershing in the 
First Division. 

When first enlisted he was with 
the 38th Regiment of • Infantry, 
but was later transferred to 
Quartermasters Corps, Wagon 
Company 100, as a first-class pri- 
vate. His service during the en- 
tire war was driving a mule team 
to an ammunition wagon ; also in 
hauling food and fuel. 

He died of pneumonia at Camp 
Nevers, France, on February 16, 1919. His body lies 




buried in the American cemeterv at Nevers. 



Forrest Clyde Bultman was 
born in Delaware township, Rip- 
ley county, on October 17, 1898. 
He lived on his father's farm until 
the latter's election as sheriff of 
the county, when the family moved 
to Versailles. Forrest graduated 
from the Versailles high school in 
1915. He entered the S. A. T. C. 
for military training at the State 
Normal School at Terre Haute, 
Ind., October 1, 1918. He con- 
tracted influenza-pneumonia and 
died at St. Anthony's Hospital, 
Terre Haute, on November 7, 
1918, the only member of the State 
Normal S. A. T. C. to fall a vic- 
tim to the epidemic. He was 
brought home for burial and his 
grave is at New Salem cemetery, 
near his home. A firing squad of 
the Batesville Liberty Guards at- 
tended the funeral service. 




Forrest Clyde Bultman 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



271 




Marcus Eugene Deburger was 
born near Versailles, Indiana, on 
March 8. 1894, and grew up on a 
farm, attending the district school 
nearest him, in Johnson township. 
He was called to his country's col- 
ors on September 20, 1917, in the 
first forty per cent draft and was 
sent to Camp Taylor for training. 
He was assigned to Company A, 
335th Infantry. He died at the 
base hospital at Camp Taylor on 
December 24, 1917, of pneumonia. 
His body was sent home on Christ- 
mas day for burial. His grave is 
at Shelby cemetery in Shelby town- 
ship. 



Marcus Eugene Deburger 



Emmett Demaree w T as born at 
Westfork, Shelby township, on 
May 1, 1893. He lived on his 
parents' farm near Westfork until 
reaching his majority, when he 
went West, taking a homestead in 
Montana. He enlisted in the avia- 
tion department of the Regular 
Army at Spokane, Washington, on 
December 7, 1917, as a private, 
and was assigned to Aero Supply 
Squadron 672 for training. He 
was trained at Kelly Field, Texas, 
at Camp Waco and Camp Morri- 
son and Hampton, Virginia. He 
was severely burned on the face 
and right hand by some sort of ex- 
plosion while at Hampton and 
feared the loss of his sight. He 
wrote no details as he wished to 
avoid alarming his mother. He 
embarked for overseas from 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, in Emmett Demaree 

October, 1918, and wrote from 
"Somewhere in France" on November 5th, as having just arrived. 




272 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



He was promoted to corporal on March 18, 1918, and transferred 
to Company 499, Aero Squadron, American service. He died of 
pneumonia at Base Hospital 101, St. Nazaire, France, on February 20, 
1919. His grave is at St. Nazaire in the American cemetery. 




RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



273 




Kenneth Leo Diver 



Kenneth Leo Diver was born 
at Sunman, Adams township, 
Ripley county, Indiana, on August 
16, 1895. He was educated in the 
Sunman schools and was working 
as airbrake inspector on the Penn- 
sylvania railroad at Richmond, 
Ind., when war was declared with 
Germany on April 6, 1917. He 
enlisted at Indianapolis, on May 
12, 1917, as a private and was as- 
signed to Company A, 16th Infan- 
try, First Division. He was 
among the first to volunteer from 
Ripley county in the World War. 
He joined his regiment at Ft. Bliss, 
Texas. He sailed with his divis- 
ion for overseas duty on June 10, 
1917, in the first American unit 
sent for overseas duty. 

The First Division went to 
France under the personal com- 
mand of General Pershing. They 
were trained in France, landing at 
The division was sent into the 



St. Nazaire on June 26, 1917. 
trenches in October, 1917. Private Diver was transferred to Com- 
pany D, 16th Infantry, and promoted to corporal in February 
1918. They served in the trenches throughout the winter and spring. 
The 16th Infantry suffered the first raid made by the Germans on the 
American army, losing a number of men from Company F, as prisoners 
and a few killed, including Private Gresham of Evansville, Ind., the 
first Americans killed in the A. E. F. 

Corporal Diver was killed by a shell April 28, 1918, near Mont- 
didier on the Picardy front. He died instantly from concussion and 
suffered no mutilation. He is buried near where he fell. 



274 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 




Earl William Downey 



Earl William Downey was 
born at Dabney, Otter Creek 
township, Ripley county, Indiana, 
on June 27, 1894. His parents 
moved to Dearborn county while 
he was still in school and he gradu- 
ated from the Aurora high school. 
He then entered Nelson's Busi- 
ness College in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and later worked as a stenographer 
in that city. 

He enlisted in the United 
States Navy as a fourth-class yeo- 
man on June 29, 1914, at Cin- 
cinnati, and was assigned after 
training to the U. S. S. Missouri," 
where he was serving when 
stricken with influenza-pneumonia. 
He was removed to the municipal 
hospital at Philadelphia, where he 
died on September 30, 1918. His 
grave is at Holton, Ripley county. 
He was married seven weeks be- 
fore his death to Miss Willa 
Elders of Vernon, Indiana. 



Wilbur Roy Duncan was born 
at Manchester, Ohio, on May 29, 
1888. The family later moved to 
near Elrod, Washington town- 
ship, Ripley county, Indiana, where 
they resided on a farm. He was 
drafted for military service by the 
local board at Versailles, on June 
25, 1918, and sent to Camp Sher- 
man, Chillicothe, Ohio, for train- 
ing. He was assigned as a pri- 
vate to Company F, 150th Infan- 
try, 84th Division. 

Was sent to Camp Merritt and 
on to Camp Mills about October 
1st. He was detained here because 
of an attack of measles. The 
measles was complicated with in- 
fluenza, which developed into 
bronchial pneumonia. He died at 
Camp Mills Hospital on October 
23, 1918. His body was sent 
home for burial and his grave is in 
Washington cemetery at Elrod. 




Wilbur Roy Duncan 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



275 



C hrist Fred Endres was born 
i, ear Sunmaii, Franklin township, 
Ripley county, where he grew to 
manhood on his father's farm. He 
was called to his country's service 
on October 4, 1917, in the third 
call of the local draft board at 
Versailles. He was sent to Camp 
Taylor for training and assigned 
to Company A, 335th Infantry, 
84th Division ; was sent to Camp 
Sevier, N. C, on the 29th of 
March, 1918. He was transferred 
to Company M, 120th Infantry, 
30th Division, and sent to Camp 
Merritt, N. J., on May 7, 1018. 
The division embarked from Bos- 
ton on May 17, 1918, for over- 
seas duty and landed at Graves- 
end, England, on June 4th, cross- 
ing to Calais, France, by way of 
Dover, England, during the next 
few days. After a few weeks' 
training at Eperlocques, the di- 
vision was marched to the Ypres 
Front in Belgium, where they served in the trenches about Kemmel 
Hill and ending in the capture of Voormezeele. They were then sent 
to France for more intensive training until September 17, when they 
were again sent to the front for the attack on the Hindenburg Line. 
He was killed in action on October 10, 1918, and is buried with sev- 
eral comrades near Vaux, Andigny, France. 




Christ Fred Exdrhs 



18 



276 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



John Louis Flick was born near 
Holton, Ind., on May 8, 1894. 
He grew up on his father's farm, 
getting his education in the Otter 
Creek township schools and Holton 
high school. He took teachers' 
training at the State Normal, 
Terre Haute, and taught in the 
Ripley county schools. He was 
called to military service October 
4, 1917, by the local draft board 
of Versailles and sent to Camp 
Taylor, Ky., for training. 

He was assigned as a private to 
Company A, 335th Infantry, 84th 
Division. He was sent to Camp 
Sevier, N. C, on April 1, 1918, 
and transferred to Company I, 
119th Infantry, 30th Division. 
He was sent to Camp Merritt, N. 
J., on May 7th and sailed over- 
seas from Boston on May 17, 
1918. The division reached France 
early in June, and went into 
training at Eperlocques. They were sent in June into Belgium to the 
trenches on the Ypres front. After serving at Kemmel Hill, and in 
the capture of Voormezeele, the division returned to France for 
further training. On September 17, 1917, they were again sent to the 
front in the offensive against the Hindenburg Line. This line was 
broken near St. Quentin, on September 29, in three hours' hard fight- 
ing. He was wounded on October 12 by a shell as he was advancing 
as battalion scout. He was struck in the side and head, and died Oc- 
tober 16, at the base hospital at Rouen, France. He is buried at Rouen. 




John Louis Flick 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



277 



James Alva Francis was born at 
Correct, Johnson township, Rip- 
ley county, Indiana, on December 
6, 1893. The family lived at vari- 
ous places in Ripley county, while 
he was growing to manhood. He 
was married to Miss Clara Stoner, 
of Osgood, to whom two children 
were born, Mildred Clara, born 
August 11, 1913, and Mary Mar- 
garet, born January 5, 1915. 

James A. Francis enlisted in the 
U. S. Navy at Louisville, Ky., on 
September 28, 1915, and was 
sent to Cincinnati and on to New 
York at once, for training. He 
was assigned to the destroyer Jacob 
Jones, as third-class electrician and 
was serving there when the ship 
was torpedoed by a German sub- 
marine off the west coast of Eng- 
land, December 6, 1917, with the 
loss of all on board except two men 
taken as prisoners. James A. 
Francis was among those lost, 

dying thus on his twenty-fourth birthday for the cause of American 

freedom. 




James Alva Francis 



Roy John Fruchtnicht was born 
in Adams township, near Bates- 
ville, on March 11, 1895. His 
parents later moved to Batesville, 
where Roy got a common school 
education. He went to work at 
an early age in the furniture fac- 
tories to help support his mother 
and sisters, the father having been 
killed in an accident. 

Roy was called to military ser- 
vice by the local board at Ver- 
sailles, in June, 1918, and enlisted 
in the aviation repair department 
at Speedway, Indianapolis. He 
was assigned to Aero Squadron 
821. 

He died at the post hospital, Ft. 
Benjamin Harrison, on October 
13, 1918, of influenza-pneumonia. 
His grave is in Huntersville ceme- 
tery, Batesville, Ind. 




Roy John Fruchtnicht 



278 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



William Edward Gilland was 
born in Jackson township, near 
Osgood, Indiana, on January 29, 
1894. He attended the district 
school and worked on his father's 
farm until called to military ser- 
vice on September 9, 1917, in the 
first two per cent draft from Rip- 
ley county. He was one of the 
first seven enrolled in the selective 
draft. He was sent to Camp Tay- 
lor for training and assigned to 
Company A, 335th infantry, 84th 
Division. He was promoted from 
private to corporal. In April, 
1918, he was sent to Camp Sevier, 
X. C, and transferred to Company 
K, 119th Infantry, 30th division. 
The division was sent to Camp 
Merritt, N. J., on May 7. They 
sailed from Boston on May 17 for 
overseas duty, landing at Graves- 
end, England, on June 4, going 
on to Calais, France, by way of 
trained a month or so at Eper- 
locques, then sent on a hike to the Ypres front in Belgium, where 
they served in the trenches at Kemmel Hill and captured the 
city of Voormezeele. Then to France for further training until Septem- 
ber 17, when they were sent to the Somme front. On September 29 
they broke the Hindenburg Line at St. Quentin in three hours' fighting. 

He was killed near St. Souplet on October 9, 1918, by a bursting 
shell, being hit in many places and instantly killed. His detachment 
had advanced nearly eleven miles that morning, meeting with only 
slignt casualties. Only a few shells had come over in the last three 
miles before he was hit. His grave is near St. Souplet, at Busigny 
cemetery, Nord, France. 




William Edward Gilland 
Dover, England. They were 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



279 




George Allen Gordon was born 
at New Marion, Indiana, on 
October 7, 1896. His parents 
moved later to Cross Plains, in 
Brown township, where Allen 
grew to manhood on a farm, get- 
tin/ a common school education. 

lie enlisted in the United 
States Navy as a seaman on June 
4, 1918, at Bloomington, 111., and 
he was sent for training to Great 
Lakes Naval Training Station at 
Chicago. 

He died of influenza-pneumonia 
at the camp hospital, Great Lakes, 
on September 26, 1918. His body 
was sent home for burial and his 
grave is in Salem cemetery, near 
Cross Plains, Brown township. 



George Allen Gordon 



Samuel Richard Heisman was 
born on January 27, 1888, at Sun- 
man, Ind. He grew to maturity 
on his father's farm, getting a com- 
mon school education in the Frank- 
lin township schools. He was 
called for military service by the 
local draft board at Versailles, on 
September 20, 1917, being one of 
the first forty per cent call. He 
was sent to Camp Taylor for 
training and assigned to Company 
A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. 
With a number of comrades he was 
sent to Camp Sevier, N. C, in 
April, 1918, where he was as- 
signed to Company M, 120th In- 
fantry, 30th Division. The divis- 
ion was ordered to Camp Merritt, 
N. J., on May 7, and sailed for 
overseas duty from Boston on May 
17. They arrived at Gravesend, 
England, on June 4, and crossed 
within a few days by way of Dover 




Samuel Richard Heisman 



280 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



to Calais, France. After a month's training at Eperlocques, they 
marched to the Ypres front in Belgium, where they served at 
Kemmel Hill and in the capture of Voormezeele. They were then 
sent into France for a few weeks more of intensive training and then 
sent to the front again, before St. Quentin on the Hindenburg Line. 

He was gassed on October 17, and died on October 28. He is 
buried at Rouen, France, in the British military cemetery. 



Edward Thomas Huelson was 
born October 3, 1894, near Hol- 
ton, Indiana, where he grew up on 
his father's farm. He was work- 
ing at Des Moines, Iowa, when 
war with Germany was declared. 
He enlisted in Battery B, 2d Field 
Artillery, Iowa National Guard, 
at Burlington, Iowa, on Decem- 
ber 15, 1917. He was in training 
at Camp Dodge until February, 
when he was transferred on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1918, to Company B, 
350th Infantry, Regular Army, 
and sent to Camp Sevier, North 
Carolina. He was transferred 
after arriving here to Company C, 
117th Infantry, 30th Division. 

He died of pneumonia at the 
base hospital, Camp Sevier, on 
May 17, 1918. His body was 
brought home for burial at New 
Edward Thomas Huelson Marion, Shelby township. A 

squad of the Batesville Liberty 
Guards attended the funeral and gave the full military service. 




RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



281 



Harry Melvin Hunter was 
born at Cross Plains, Ind., on 
January 22, 1896. He was called 
to military service on June 26, 
1918, by the local draft board at 
Versailles. He was sent to Camp 
Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio, for 
training, and assigned to Company 
B, 334th Infantry, 84th Division. 
He left Camp Sherman on August 
22. 1918. and embarked from Ho- 
boken, N. J., on September 1, 
1918, on the transport Aquitania. 
Arrived at Southampton, Eng- 
land, on September 9 and crossed 
to Le Havre, France, two days 
later. He was sent to St. Este tor 
further training. 

He died at the base hospital at 
Noyers, St. Aignan, France, of 
bronchial pneumonia on October 
20, 1918. His grave is in the mili- 
tary cemetery at St. Aignan, near 
that of Harry May of the same 
neighborhood. Letters describing 
the Memorial Day services at the cemetery on May 30, 1919, state 
that ten thousand persons were present for the impressive ceremonies. 
Photographs show the graves covered with flowers. Later: His body 
was brought to America in November, 1920, and buried at the M. E. 
Cemetery at Cross Plains in Brown township. 




Harry Melvin Hunter 



282 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 




Tony Edward Hunter was born 
at Versailles, Ind., on September 
5, 1878, and was educated in the 
Versailles schools. He taught 
common school in Johnson town- 
ship for a few terms and then 
studied medicine at Kentucky Uni- 
versity, Louisville, graduating in 
1904.' He was married in 1906 
to Miss Eva Stewart of Versailles, 
where he practiced medicine from 
his graduation until his enlistment 
in the army in 1918. Two chil- 
dren were born to him, Edith 
Virginia in 1912, and John Gil- 
bert in 1916. He took a special 
course in eye, ear and throat dis- 
eases at Chicago University in 
1914. 

He enlisted in the Medical 
Officers' Reserve Corps at In- 
dianapolis on June 21, 1917, and 
was commissioned First Lieuten- 
ant, M. R. C. He was given 
military training at Ft. Benjamin 
Harrison, Indianapolis, from August 6 to November 26, 1918. 
This training was very thorough, giving infantry drill and field hospital 
work, drilling the medical men for overseas service on the battle-fields. 
Then he was sent to Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Miss. He was assigned 
here to Sanitary Detachment, 149th Infantry, 38th Division. 

The regiment was fully equipped and waiting orders for overseas' 
service, having completed intensive military training on the rifle range 
at Hattiesburg. 

He was serving as ward surgeon at the Regimental Hospital when 
an epidemic of influenza prostrated about one-third of his regiment. 
Lieutenant Hunter was taken sick with influenza on April 12, 1918, 
developed lobar pneumonia and died at the Base Hospital, Camp Shelby, 
on April 18. His body was brought home for burial and his grave is 
in Cliff Hill cemetery, Versailles. He was a very active man, belonging 
to the local brass band, the local Business Men's Association, Knights of 
Pythias lodge, District Medical Association; also National Medical As- 
sociation, and was health officer for Ripley county when he enlisted. 
Any movement for the betterment of his community, his fellowmen, or 
his country had the ardent support of Dr. Tony Hunter. 



Tony Edward Hunter 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



283 



Earl Clifford Hyatt was born 
at Benham, Indiana, on April 18, 
1895. He obtained a common 
school education and worked on 
his father's farm. He was called 
to military service on September 
9, 1917, in the first two per cent 
call of selective men from Ripley 
county. He was sent to Camp 
Taylor, Kentucky, for training 
and assigned to Company A, 335th 
Infantry, 84th Division. He was 
sent to Camp Sevier, N. C, in 
April, 1918, and to Camp Merritt, 
N. J., on May 7th. He was 
transferred to Company I, 120th 
Infantry, 30th Division, while at 
Camp Sevier. The division sailed 
from Boston on May 17, 1918, for 
overseas duty. Because of sub- 
marine danger the fleet landed at 
Gravesend, England, instead of 
Liverpool, on June 4th, crossing 
in a few days by way of Dover to 
Calais, Erance. They were trained 
at Eperlocques during June, and sent to the Ypres front in Belgium 
in July. After the operations at Kemmel Hill and Voormezeele, the 
division was sent into France and trained until September 17 for the 
attack on the Hindenburg Line. The assault was made on September 
29th near St. Quentin. Earl Hyatt was killed on October 18 by a 
shrapnel wound in the head. He had worked all night with Claud 
Williams of Holton, Indiana, who testified to his gallantry in battle 
and his bravery in facing death to bring in wounded comrades, which 
was his last service. His grave is in France, near that of many others 
of the "Old Hickory" Division. 




Earl Clifford Hyatt 



284 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



court, St 
He 
France. 



John Kissell was born at Milan, 
Indiana, on December 23, 1893, 
where he grew up on a farm. He 
was drafted for military service on 
September 20, 1917, and assigned 
to Company A, 335th Infantry, 
30th Division. He was in train- 
ing at Camp Taylor, until April, 
1918, when he was sent with a 
number of other Ripley county 
boys of the 335th Regiment to 
Camp Sevier, North Carolina. 
Here he was assigned to Com- 
pany I, 120th Infantry, 30th 
Division. He embarked from 
Boston on May 17, 1918, reaching 
France the first week in June. 
After a month's training at Eper- 
locques his regiment was sent to 
the Ypres front in Belgium. He 
served with his regiment at Kem- 
mel Hill and Voormezeele in Bel- 
gium, at the battles of the Hinden- 
burg Line, St. Quentin, Belli- 

. Souplet, Montbrebain and so on. 

died of catarrhal pneumonia on November 6, 1918, at Amiens, 




John Kissell 



Philip Levine was born at Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, on August 31, 
1899. His father moved to Milan, 
Indiana, where as he grew up, 
Philip was associated with him in 
the hay and grain business. He 
entered the S. A. T. C. of Cincin- 
nati University October 1, 1918, 
and died at the Cincinnati General 
Hospital of influenza-pneumonia 
on November 7, 1918. He is 
buried in Cincinnati. 




Philip Levine 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



285 




Wm. M. Lindauer was born at 
St. Magdalene, Shelby township, 
on June 17, 1889. He grew up 
on his father's farm and, being 
the elder brother, assumed the 
management of it at his parent's 
death. The mother dying, also, 
he became the head of the family, 
there being younger sisters and 
brothers. 

He was called to military ser- 
vice in the forty per cent draft on 
September 20, 1917, and sent to 
Camp Taylor for training. He 
was assigned to Company A, 335th 
Infantry, 84th Division. He died 
of pneumonia at the base hospital, 
Camp Taylor, on December 23, 
1917. His body was sent home 
for burial and lies in the Catholic 
cemetery at St. Magdalene. 

Wm. M. Lindauer 

Harry Clifford May was born 
December 3, 1887, near Cross 
Plains, Ind. He grew to man- 
hood on his father's farm and re- 
ceived his education in the com- 
mon schools of Brown township, 
attending what is known as the 
Blackwell school. Being an agri- 
culturist, he later took some spe- 
cial courses in that line. 

He was called to military ser- 
vice on June 26, 1918, by the 
local draft board at Versailles, and 
sent to Camp Sherman, Ohio, for 
training. He was assigned as a 
private to Company B, 334th In- 
fantry, 84th Division. They were 
sent to Camp Mills, Long Island, 
New York, on August 21, 1918. 

He embarked for overseas duty 
on September 1, 1918, on the 
transport Aquitania and arrived 
at Southampton, England, on Sep- 
tember 9, crossing without delay Harry Clifford May 
to Le Havre, France. The di- 
vision was sent to St. Este for further training. 




286 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

On October 10 he entered Camp Hospital 26, suffering from in- 
fluenza which developed into lobar pneumonia. He died on October 
23, 1918. He was buried at Noyers, Loir-et-cher, France, in the 
American cemetery with full military honors as were all who died in 
the war hospitals. C. E. Ireland, chaplain of the 164th Infantry, con- 
ducted the service. He said: "In dying they still live and ever shall 
live in the coming world freedom. These dead shall not have died in 
vain." 

The following letter expresses the feeling of France for the Ameri- 
can dead : 

"My Dear Mrs. May: As it is Mother's Day (May 11, 1919) 
our chaplain has asked us to write a few lines to those of you whose 
privilege it was to give so much to the cause of right in this war. I 
would like you to know how we nurses feel about these boys of ours. 
In thinking back about them I can see always rows of smiling faces. 
Xo matter if there was pain and suffering, always a smile, always a 
willingness to make the best of everything. 

"On Easter Sunday there were services held in the cemetery, and 
the boys' graves were all decorated, each with a flower, by their com- 
rades. 

"Your son lies buried in a sunny spot, and twice a week the children 
of France decorate the graves with flowers, and I suppose so long as 
there are children of France it will be so. I am sorry I have not a 
picture of the cemetery for you. 

"Sincerely yours, 

"E. L. Marsh, A. N. C." 



Harry Hunter of Cross Plains was also buried at St. Aignan, 
Noyers, in the same cemetery. 

General Pershing sent the following letter (memorial) to all fam- 
ilies who lost their sons overseas, changing only names and regiments 
as required : 

"In memory of Private Harrv C. May, Company- B, 334th Infantry, 
who died October 23. 1918. 

"He bravely laid down his life for the cause of his country. His 
name will ever remain fresh in the hearts of his friends and comrades. 
The record of his honorable service will be preserved in the archives of 
the American Expeditionary Forces. 

"John J. Pershing, 
"Commander-in-Chief." 

Later: Harry May's body'yvas sent back to America and buried 
at Benham Cemetery in Brown toyvnship on November 3, 1920. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



287 



Edward Julius Marting was 
born at Cincinnati, Ohio, August 
27, 1892. Later his parents moved 
to Ripley county, Indiana, locat- 
ing near New Marion, in Shelby 
township, where he grew to man- 
hood. His parents moved again 
to Indianapolis after ten years' 
residence in Ripley county. 

He was called to the colors by 
the local draft board of Indian- 
apolis on October 5, 1917, and 
sent to Camp Taylor, Louisville, 
Ky., for training. He was as- 
signed as a private to Company E, 
334th Infantry, 84th Division. In 
November, 1918, he was trans- 
ferred to headquarters troop, 309th 
Cavalry, and later to Company C, 
55th Engineers, tank service. He 
was in training at Camp Tavlor 
until March 22, 1918, when he 
was sent to Camp Mead and was 
here transferred to tank service. 
He embarked from New York 
April 1, 1918, landing about two weeks later in England, where his 
training was continued at Camp Wargret, Wareham, Dorset. 

He was sent to the hospital at Dorset July 1, 1918, where he re- 
mained till September 12. He was then sent to American Base Hos- 
pital 3i, at Portsmouth, England, until October 23d, when he was sent 
to a rest camp in France in Casual Detachment No. 1, American Red 
Cross. He died at the hospital at Nevers, France, November 29, 1918, 
of spinal meningitis. His final illness began with an attack of in- 
fluenza. 

He was married before enlistment to Miss Cerelda Sands of Holton, 
Ind., who, with a baby daughter, Frances Laura, resided at Holton 
during his overseas service and remain to keep his memory green in 
Ripley county. His grave is at Nevers, France. 




Edward Julius Marting 



288 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 




Clifford William Pohlar was 
born near Spades, Indiana, on 
January 5, 1897. He attended 
the rural school at Penntown and 
worked on his father's farm until 
called to military service on Aug- 
ust 29, 1918, by the local draft 
board of Versailles. He was sent 
to Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, 
Ohio, for training. He died at 
the post hospital, at Camp Sher- 
man, of influenza on October 9, 
1918. His body was brought home 
for burial and he was given a 
military funeral by a squad of 
Batesville Liberty Guards. His 
grave is at Penntown, near the 
farm where he was born in Adams 
township. 



Clifford William Pohlar 



Hugo August Prell was born at 
Batesville, Ind., on June 18, 1887. 
He lived there until after his par- 
ents' death, when he went to work 
as a carpenter in Cincinnati, mak- 
ing his home still with his sister, 
Mrs. Wm. Giesen, at Batesville. 
He was called to military service 
in Cincinnati, on March 29, 1918, 
and went to Camp Sherman for 
training. He was assigned first to 
12th Company, 3rd Transport 
Battalion, 158th Depot Brigade. 
He was later transferred to Head- 
quarters Company, 329th Infan- 
try, 83rd Division. He was sent 
to Camp Merritt for embarka- 
tion. He sailed from New York 
on June 11, 1918, on the trans- 
port Grampian, arriving at Liver- 
pool, England, on June 24, 1918. 
He was trained at Ecomoy, 
France, during July. Transferred 
on August 2, 1918, to Company 
G, 28th Infantry, First Division. 
Was sent into action at Saizeras from August 2d to August 24th 




Hugo August Prell 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



289 



Fought at St. Mihiel, September 12th to 15th. At Meuse-Argonne from 
October 1st till October 6th. 

He was killed instantly by a trench-mortar shell on October 6th, 
and was buried where he fell in what is now the American plot at 
Exremnnt, France. 




Roy Raney 



Roy Raney was born January 
4, iOOO, at Cincinnati, Ohio. The 
greater part of his life was spent 
in Dearborn and Ripley counties. 
In 1909 the family moved to 
Pierceville, Franklin township, in 
Ripley county. He graduated 
from the Milan high school in 
1914, after completing his grade 
work at Pierceville. 

He enlisted as second-class sea- 
guard in the U. S. Navy at Rich- 
mond, Ind., on January 18, 1918, 
and was sent on July 9 to Great 
Lakes Naval Training Station. He 
took sick with influenza Septem- 
ber 20, 1918, and died September 
29, 1918. He is buried at Moores 
Hill, near Milan. The Milan 
High School adjourned in a body 
to attend the funeral. He was an 
honor pupil of the school and a 
general favorite. 



290 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Harrison Reynolds was born 
near New Marion, Ind., on De- 
cember 6, 1891, and grew up on 
his father's farm, attending the 
district schools of Shelby town- 
ship. He enlisted for military 
service at Osgood, Ind., in the 3rd 
Ohio National Guard while a de- 
tachment was guarding the Balti- 
more and Ohio bridges on April 
10, 1917, going to Cincinnati for 
induction. He was assigned as a 
private to Company I, 3rd Ohio 
Infantry, and later to Company I, 
166th Infantry, 42d Division, the 
famous Rainbow Division. He was 
trained at Camp Perry, Ohio, and 
at Camp Mills, N. Y., and was 
promoted during his service from 
private to first-class private and 
then to corporal. 

The division embarked from 
New York on October 27, 1917, 
Corporal Reynolds going overseas 
on the transport Agamemnon. They reached Brest, France, on 
November 12, 1917, and were trained about four months at Luneville. 

The most important battles of the Rainbow Division were Cham- 
pagne, Chateau-Thierry, Ourcq river, St. Mihiel, Verdun and Sedan. 
He marched with the division through Belgium into Germany, where 
they were stationed near Coblenz as a part of the Army of Occupa- 
tion. He wrote a long letter home about this time after the slackening 
of the censorship in which he rejoiced over the victory and the prospect 
of an early return to the United States. 

He died of an accidental injury on January 16, 1919, at Coblenz, 
Germany, and was buried in the American cemetery of that city. In 
August, 1920, his body was returned to the United States and he 
was buried beside his mother at Tanglewood cemetery, Versailles, Ind. 




Harrison Reynolds 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



291 




Thornton B. Roberts 



Thornton Burchfield Roberts 
was born at Elrod, Ripley county, 
Indiana, on June 22, 1895. He 
lived on his father's farm until 
1916, when he went to work on a 
farm in Iowa, where he also drove 
on a milk route. He was called 
to military service at Grinnell, 
Iowa, on February 23, 1918, and 
was assigned as a private to Supply 
Company, 350th Infantry, later 
being transferred to Camp Gor- 
don, Atlanta, Georgia. He was 
trained at Camp Dodge, Iowa, 
about six weeks in the 38th Com- 
pany, 10th Transport Battalion, 
157th Depot Brigade. 

Was taken sick on the way to 
Camp Gordon, of measles, and 
sent to the base hospital upon ar- 
rival. He contracted pneumonia 
and died on April 19, 1918. His 
body was sent home for burial at 
Green Chapel, Washington town- 
ship, on April 23, 1918. 



Charles Hall Sandefur was 
born near Shelbyville, Ind., on 
August 5, 1895. He was placed 
in an orphan's home at Shelbyville 
when a small boy, because of the 
death of his mother. He was 
taken from the home by a Switzer- 
land county family. For some 
reason of his own he decided to 
run away when about twelve 
years old. He traveled on foot 
along the Vevay and Cross Plains 
road and on toward Osgood, in 
Ripley county. Between Ver- 
sailles and Osgood he was met by 
Mr. William Dollens, of Benham, 
Brown township, who asked him 
to get in and ride. As a result of 
the invitation, the boy went home 
with Mr. Dollens to stay. He 
lived with the family as a son, 
though not formally adopted. 

He enlisted in the United 
States Navy on March 29, 1917, 




Charles Hall Sandefur 



19 



29. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



at Cincinnati, Ohio, in the Naval Reserves. He was sent for train- 
ing to Norfolk, Virginia. He died at the Naval Hospital at 
Newport News, on May 2, 1917, of measles and pneumonia. His 
body was sent home and his grave is in the Benham cemetery, Brown 
township. 



Henry Edward Schraub was 
born at Peoria, 111., on August 16, 
1894. His parents came later to 
Olean, Brown township, Ripley 
county, Indiana, where he grew to 
manhood on a farm, getting his 
education in the Olean public 
school. He was called to military 
service at Versailles on September 
20, 1917, and left with the first 
forty per cent call for training at 
Camp Taylor. He was assigned 
to Company A, 335th Infantry, 
84th Division. He was sent with 
a detachment of other soldiers to 
Camp Sevier, N. C, in April, 
1918. Transferred here to Com- 
pany M, 120th Infantry, 30th Di- 
vision ; was sent to Camp Merritt 
in May and sailed from Boston on 
May 17, 1918, on the transport 
Miltiades. Arrived at Gravesend, 
England, on June 4th and crossed 
to Calais, France. His training 
was continued at Eperlocques dur- 
ing the next month. In July he was sent with his division into 
Belgium to the Ypres front. He served in all the engagements of the 
Old Hickory Division, Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele and St. Quentin, 
on the Hindenburg Line. He was with Cornelius Miller, Martin 
Prickel, Leora Weare, Lee Ashcraft, Sam Heisman, Coy Sunman, 
John Bland and Chris. Endres of the same company, Company M, 
120th Infantry. Louis Boehmer, William Schneider, John Flick, Wm. 
Gilland, Carl Mistier, Rufus Myers and Frank Battisti were all Ripley 
county boys in adjacent companies. 

Henry Schraub was promoted to corporal in August, 1918, after 
going overseas, and served as a corporal throughout the battles of his 
division. He was wounded in action on September 29, 1918, and died 
on October 14, 1918. He is buried near St. Quentin in the American 
plot. 




Henry Edward Schraub 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 



293 




Harry William Smith 



Harry William Smith was born 
August 24, 1894, near Milan, Ind., 
where he grew up on a farm, get- 
ting a common school education in 
the Franklin township schools. 
He enlisted in the Regular Army 
on October 28, 1916, at Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. He was assigned to 
Company F, 28th Infantry, and 
trained somewhere in Texas. The 
1st Division, A. E. F., was made 
up of the 16th, 18th, 26th and 28th 
Infantry regiments and embarked 
for France under personal com- 
mand of General Pershing, and 
landed at St. Nazaire on June 25, 
1917, the first American troops to 
enter France, the 28th Infantry 
having also the distinction of be- 
ing the first regiment to disem- 
bark. They were trained at Gond- 
recourt and Treveray by the 
Alpine Chasseurs, the famous 
"Blue Devils of France." 

They were attacked by a Ger- 
917, but no damage resulted ex- 



man airplane on September 5, 

cept a hole in the roof of the supply building 

The First Division led the first American offensive at Cantigny on 
May 29, 1918, after several months' service in trench warfare and a 
number of successful slaughter offensives. 

Harry W. Smith was instantly killed at Cantigny on May 29, 1918, 
by a shell which also killed his lieutenant. His grave was made in 
No-Man's-Land on the battle-field near Cantigny. He served as a 
first class private. The following letter speaks of his worth as a soldier : 

"August 17, 1918. 
"Mrs. Nellie Smith, 
Milan, Ind. 
"My Dear Mrs. Smith : As company commander I received your 
letter in regard to your son, Harry W. Smith. He died as he lived — 
a man through and through, and doing his duty until the last minute 
of his life. I was close to him when he was hit, and can assure you he 
died as a real soldier should. Also, I can assure you that he was 
blessed with a quick death. His lieutenant died from the same shell. 
We had just captured a small village and the enemy artillery fire was 
very heavy. He was killed by this artillery fire on May 29, 1918. 
Many good men went down that day — but they were willing — and 
your son was a man — a real one ! 

"Very truly yours, 
"Foster U. Brown, 2nd Lieut., Co. F, 28th Inf." 



294 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Coy Robinson Sunman was 
born March 6, 1888, at Spades, 
Ind., where he resided on his 
father's farm until called to mili- 
tary service on September 20, 1917, 
in the first forty per cent call by 
the local draft board at Versailles. 
He was of English descent, and 
the Sunmans count many soldiers 
in their family history. He was 
assigned as a private to Company 
A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division, 
while in training at Camp Taylor. 
He was sent to Camp Sevier, N. 
C, in April, 1918, and to Camp 
Merritt, N. J., on May 7. On 
May 17, 1918, the division sailed 
from Boston for overseas service. 
He had been assigned at Camp 
Sevier to Company M, 120th In- 
fantry, 30th Division, the famous 
"Old Hickory" Division. This 
division was the first to break the 
famous Hindenburg Line, which 
they did near St. Quentin, on 
September 29, 1918. Coy Sunman was killed by a shell at Belli- 
court on September 29, in the advance on this attack. He was also 
struck by shrapnel, suffering several wounds. He was buried on 
October 2d, with Leora Weare of Versailles and Lee Ashcraft of 
Milan, of the same company. Frank Burst of Batesville, also of 
Company M, was a member of the burying squad. The graves were 
made near St. Quentin and are in the American plot of the British 
cemetery. 




Coy Robinson Sunman 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



29$ 



Gilbert Sutherland was born at 
Sadieville, Ky., on March 23, 
1896. At the death of his par- 
ents he was placed in the Protes- 
tant Children's Home at Coving- 
ton, Ky. He was taken from this 
home into the family of Thomas 
Morris, near Napoleon, Ripley 
county, Indiana, where he grew 
to manhood, receiving a common 
school education. After the death 
of Mr. Morris, Mrs. Morris re- 
sided for a time in Napoleon. Be- 
ing no longer young, and in some- 
what feeble health, she gave up 
housekeeping and went to live 
with a daughter. Gilbert went to 
work among the farmers near Na- 
poleon for a time and then went 
to work on a farm at Inavale, 
Nebraska. 

He was called to military ser- 
vice by the local draft board at 
Red Cloud, Nebraska, on Sep- 
tember 17, 1917. He was as- 
signed as a private to Company G, 335th Infantry, and sent to Camp 
Funston, Kansas, for training. He remained here until February, 1918, 
when he was sent to Camp Stuart, Newport News, Virginia. He was 
transferred here to Company G, 4th Infantry, 3d Division, and em- 
barked from Newport News on April 6, 1918, for overseas duty. He 
arrived at Brest, France, on April 15, 1918. He was killed in action at 
the Aisne on July 29, 1918. A comrade from Inavale, Nebraska, says 
that he was wounded earlier in the engagement, but insisted on "going 
over the top once more," meeting his death gallantly. 




Gilbert Sutherland 



296 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 




Alva Lee Vestal was born near 
Hicks, Ind., on September 28, 
1886. Most of his life was spent 
near Haney's Corner, Shelby 
township, Ripley county. He was 
married before entering the army 
to Miss Flora Lee of Canaan, 
Ind. He was called to military 
service by the local draft board at 
Versailles on October 4, 1917. He 
was sent to Camp Taylor for 
training and assigned to Company 
A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. 

He died after an operation for 
appendicitis at the base hospital at 
Camp Taylor on March 1, 1918. 
His grave is at Shelby church 
cemetery, Shelby township, Ripley 
countv. 



Alva Lee Vestal 



Leora McKinley Weare was 
born at Versailles, Ind., on Febru- 
ary 3, 1894. He was educated in 
the common schools of Johnson 
township and Versailles and took 
a special course in agriculture at 
Purdue University. 

He entered military service on 
September 20, 1917, in the first 
forty per cent call for selective 
men, and was sent to Camp Taylor 
in Company A, 335th Infantry, 
84th Division, for training. He 
was promoted from private to 
corporal after reaching France. 
Went to Camp Sevier, N. C, in 
April, 1918, and to Camp Merritt, 
N. J., on May 7, embarking from 
Boston on May 17, 1918. He was 
transferred at Camp Sevier to 
Company M, 120th Infantry, 30th 
Division. 

The division reached France at 
Calais by way of Gravesend and 




Leora McKixley Weare 



klPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



29? 



Dover, England, during the first week of June, 1918. After train- 
ing four weeks at Eperlocques they were marched to the Ypres 
front in Belgium. After seventeen days in the trenches at Kemmel 
Hill, rested four days, returned to trenches for twenty days, capturing 
Voormezeele on the nineteenth day. 

On September 17 the division was sent to the front line trenches 
before St. Quentin on the Hindenburg Line. They assaulted the line 
at St. Quentin on September 29th. 

Leora Weare was killed by a high explosive shell, being struck in 
the back and suffering a double fracture of both legs. He gave his 
chance of being carried to the rear to Carl Mistier, of Osgood, who 
was a member of his squad and was wounded about the same time. 
He was very careful for the welfare of his men as well as for the 
efficiency of their work. His grave was made on October 2d with Coy 
Sunman's and Lee Ashcraft's near St. Quentin. They lie in what is 
called the "Old Hickory Plot," American part of the British cemetery. 



Edward Lawrence Wildey was 
born near North Vernon, Jen- 
nings county, Indiana, on Decem- 
ber 17, 1918. He removed with 
his parents, a few years later, to 
Ripley county, locating near New 
Marion in Shelby township. He 
enlisted in the Regular Army at 
Indianapolis, on November, 1916, 
and was assigned to Company C, 
28th Infantry, at Ft. Ringo, 
Texas. He was sent to Prance for 
overseas duty with the First Divis- 
ion, which landed at St. Nazaire, 
France, on June 26, 1917, the 
28th being, the first regiment of 
the A. E. F. to set foot on French 
soil. They were trained at France 
in various places, being sent into 
the trenches for service in October, 
1917. The most important bat- 
tles of the First Division were Can- 
tigny, the first American offensive, 
Chateau-Thierry and Verdun. 

The 16th Infantry went "over 
the top" sixteen times during the time Edward Wildey was on duty. 
He was wounded by a machine-gun bullet in the right thigh at Soissons 
on July 19, 1918. Only seventeen men were left of his company in this 
battle. He was in a shell-hole with seven comrades for three days and 
nights without food or water. They were very weak from loss of 
blood and lack of food and water when finally taken to the hospital. 
His wound healed rapidly, however, and he soon rejoined his regiment. 




Edward Lawrence Wildey 



298 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



He was again wounded at Argonne, on October 5, 1918, a shrapnel 
wound in the same limb injured before, this time at the knee joint. 
He was sent back to the United States on December 5, 1918, landing 
at Newport News, Virginia, on December 23, 1918. He was sent 
to a hospital at Richmond, and to Camp Taylor, Ky., reaching there 
January 1, 1919. He had a seven-day hospital furlough on January 21, 
returning to Camp Taylor on January 28, after a few days at home in 
Shelby township. He died at Camp Taylor, on February 22, 1919, of 
influenza-pneumonia. His body was sent home for burial, accom- 
panied by the military escort sent in all cases by the army. His grave 
is at North Vernon in the family burying lot. 




Adlai Ernest Wilson was born 
July 13, 1897, at Dillsboro, Ind. 
He grew up on his father's farm, 
completed his common school edu- 
cation and entered Moores Hill 
College as a student in the scien- 
tific department. He enlisted 
March 5, 1917, in the medical 
department of the Regular Army 
at Columbus, Ohio. He went 
into training at Columbus Bar- 
racks, where he died on April 5, 
1917, of measles and diphtheria. 
His body was sent home for burial, 
and his grave is at Dillsboro. 
The family had moved into Ripley 
county, near Milan, some years 
before Adlai's enlistment. 



Adlai Ernest Wilson 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



299 



Milton McKinley Whitham 
was born near Cross Plains, Ind., 
on December 29, 1896. He lived 
on tbe farm where he was born 
until grown to manhood. 

He was working at Akron, 
Ohio, as a clerk with the Good- 
rich Rubber Tire Company, when 
he was called for military service 
on May 29, 1918. He' was as- 
signed as a private for infantry 
training at Camp Gordon, Geor- 
gia, until some time in July, 1918, 
when he was sent overseas from 
Camp Merritt, New Jersey, in 
a replacement company. 

He was assigned after reaching 
France to Company K, 28th In- 
fantry, First Division, and served 
at the battles of St. Mihiel and 
the Meuse-Argonne offensive. 

He was killed in action on 
October 5, 1918, at Argonne. His 
grave is in the American battle 
area at Vonziers, near Exremont, Ardennes, France. 




Milton McKinley Whitham 




Military Cemetery, St. Nrzaire 



The Almost Gold Star Honor Roll 

// seems fitting to include sketches of a few of our soldiers who 
have died since being discharged though their names can not go on the 
Gold Star Roll. 

William Walter Krummel was 
born June 4, 1889, near Spades, 
Ind., where he lived on the farm 
with his parents. He was called 
to military service on July 22, 

1918, by the local draft board at 
Versailles and was sent to Camp 
Taylor, Ky., and later to Camp 
McClellan, Alabama, for training. 
He was assigned to Battery B, 
25th Field Artillery, 9th Division. 

He was in the hospital at Camp 
McClellan, thirty-seven days in 
October and November, with in- 
fluenza, measles and pneumonia. 

He received his discharge on De- 
cember 12, 1918, and returned to 
his home in Spades, where he de- 
veloped pneumonia and died on 
February 17, 1919, of spinal men- 
ingitis developed on January 3, 

1919, from exposure due to 
weakened condition of system. He 
had had pneumonia a few years 




William Walter Krummel 



before entering the army. 
Indiana. 



His grave is at Penntown cemetery, Spades, 



300 



klPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



30l 



Chester Arthur Keck was born 
at Wellston, Ohio, on April 10, 
1899. His parents moved to Rip- 
ley county, Indiana, living at 
Milan and later at Delaware in 
Franklin and Delaware town- 
ships, respectively. 

He enlisted at Indianapolis, 
Ind., on February 21, 1918, as a 
private in the Motor Transport 
Corps. He was trained at Camp 
J. E. Johnston, Florida, and as- 
signed to Motor Truck 469, 
Motor Supply Train 418, 5th 
Army Corps. He was sent to 
Camp Stuart for embarkation and 
sailed from Newport News, Va., 
August 19, 1918, on the trans- 
port Aeolus, reaching Brest, 
France, on August 25, 1918. Was 
sent to the front without further 
training or instruction and served 
at Verdun, September 3-12, Sep- 
tember 16-26; at St. Mihiel, Sep- 
tember 12-16, and in the Meuse-Argonne, September 26-November 11, 
1918. 

Was with the Army of Occupation in the 3rd Army Corps, in Ger- 
many, from November 17, 1918, to August, 1919. Sailed for the United 
States on U. S. S. Troy from Brest, France, on August 10, 1919, and 
arrived at Brooklyn on August 20th. Was discharged at Camp Grant, 
111., on August 26, 1919. Private Keck was promoted to sergeant on 
March 5, 1919. 

He returned to his home at Delaware, Ind., after discharge, where 
he died on October 31st of tuberculosis. He was given a military 
funeral by a number of his comrades under the leadership of Harry 
Morrison, of Milan. 




Chester Arthur Keck 



302 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Jesse Otto Moody was born at 
Aurora, Ind., on April 2, 1897. 
His parents moved to Ripley coun- 
ty while he was a small boy, lo- 
cating finally at Batesville, in 
Laughery township. He was 
married to May Gregory of Bates- 
ville, to whom two children were 
born. He worked as a truck 
driver until his enlistment in the 
army on January 4, 1918, at In- 
dianapolis, Ind., in the Coast 
Artillery Corps. He was sent to 
Ft. Thomas, Ky., for one month. 
He was then sent to Ft. Moultrie, 
Moultrieville, South Carolina, 
where he was assigned to Battery 
B, 61st C. A. C. He came home 
to Batesville, Ind., on furlough in 
the latter part of March, 1918, 
and contracted pneumonia the 
following week. He was unable 
to return to Ft. Moultrie until 
August 1, 1918, where he was as- 
signed to the 6th Company, C. A. 
C, being unable to serve in the battery. He entered the hospital 
for treatment and was discharged at Ft. Moultrie on November 14, 
1918, because of physical disability. He lived at Batesville until July 
8, 1919, when he went to the marine hospital at Evansville, Ind., for 
treatment for tuberculosis. He remained here until November 8, 1919, 
when he returned to his home in Batesville. He died January 4, 1920, 
of tuberculosis. His grave is at Liberty, Ind., with his wife's people. 




Jesse Otto Moody 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



303 



Frank Morris Wentz was born 
on September 12, 1900, and spent 
his early life at Delaware, Ind. 
He was working on a farm when 
he heard the call of his country to 
her young men, and enlisted in 
Cincinnati on July 28, 1917, in 
the Air Service. He was assigned 
to Company B, First Anti-Aircraft 
Machine Gun Battalion. His 
training was given at Camp Sher- 
man, Chillicothe, Ohio, and at 
Camp Sheridan, Montgomery, 
Alabama, nine months in all. He 
was sent overseas on April 19, 
1918, and served in the battles of 
the Aisne-Marne offensive, the 
Somme, Meuse-Argonne, Toul, 
Verdun and St. Mihiel. He re- 
turned to the United States on 
April 23, 1919, reaching New 
York on May 6th. He was dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman on May 
23d and returned to his home at 
Delaware, Ripley county, where 
he again took up the work of farming. 

He was married to Edna M. Branham of Osgood on December 24, 

1919. He was injured by the felling of a tree and died on April 2, 

1920, the fourth Ripley county soldier to leave this life after being 
discharged and arriving safely home from a year's active service in the 
World War. 




Frank Morris Wentz 



304 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



Theodore Joseph Reibel was 
born at Sunman, Irid., on March 
26, 1894. He grew up at Sunman, 
serving as a rural mail carrier 
when he was called to military 
service on October 4, 1917. He 
was sent to Camp Taylor, Louis- 
ville, Ky., for training and as- 
signed to Company A, 335th 
Infantry, 84th Division. 

During the terrible winter of 
1918-1919 he suffered three severe 
attacks of pneumonia, and de- 
veloped as after effects rheuma- 
tism and a weak heart. He was 
discharged because of these disa- 
bilities on February 20, 1919. 

After recuperating a measure of 
health he resumed his former work 
as carrier on Sunman Rural Route 
3 until he was again stricken with 
pneumonia the first of May, 1920. 
He died at his father's home in 
Batesville on May 9, 1920. 

Prell-Bland Post of the Ameri- 
can Legion of Honor gave him a military funeral. His own mem- 
bership had been placed with a Cincinnati post before the organization 
of the Prell-Bland Post at Batesville. He is the fourth of our World 
War veterans to die from disease contracted while in the service. Those 
so dying surely gave their lives for their country, though only those who 
died in actual service can be placed on the Gold Star Honor Roll. 




Theodore Joseph Reibel 



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Tribute to Ripley County's Honored Dead 
in the World War 

The Gold Star Honor Roll! 
What tragedy lies concealed with- 
in these hallowed words ! What 
patriotic devotion, unselfish and 
unalloyed, they imply! What a 
language of heroism, of courage 
and of self-sacrifice they speak ! 
What intermingled feelings of 
sorrow and sadness, of love and of 
respect, of gratitude and of pride, 
of honor and of reverence they in- 
spire! 

Forty-two names crown Rip- 
ley county's Gold Star Honor 
Roll — representing forty-two pre- 
cious young lives — Ripley county's 
offering in the great World War 
on the altar of her country in the 
cause of freedom and of liberty! 

Forty-two homes whose family 
circles are broken by the grim 
fortunes of war, but forty-two 
homes whose vacant chairs, though 
now voiceless and silent, must 
ever speak to loved ones near, through blinding tears of grief and yearn- 
ing, of patriotic duty, gloriously and nobly performed — truly a healing 
balm for aching hearts! 

As we citizens of Ripley county pause in contemplation before this 
roster of our honored dead, our thoughts revert to those strenuous war 
times, not so far in the distant past, and in memory we live again with 
these gallant sons of ours, the days and weeks and months which they 
spent in defense of their country and their flag, and for whose honor 
and glory they so willingly suffered, so heroically fought, so gallantly 
died. 

Once more we hear the call to arms, the roll of drums, the blast 
of bugles, the tread of marching feet. Everywhere, East, West, North 
and South, resounds to martial music and from beyond the hills and 
over the mountains, through the valleys and across the plains, they 
come, these boys of ours, in eager, anxious response to their commander's 
call. Hamlet, village, farm, town, city — all brought forth their bravest 
and their best and gave them ungrudgingly to their country. 

We recall the parting hour, the fond handclasp, the tearful bless- 
ing, the mutual anxiety, the final farewell, as husband, son or brother 

305 




Mrs. Neil McCallum 



306 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

left behind the cheer and comfort of home and fireside and stepped into 
a future, known through the history of all times to be fraught with 
hardships and great danger. 

We go with the boys to the training camps where the great "trans- 
formation" takes place. We endure with them the rigid discipline, the 
hard work, the intensive training, the longing for home and mother and 
for the service of loving hands. We endure it all, for we see as if by 
magic, the civilian of yesterday become the soldier of today, don the 
uniform of his country, and, fully equipped and trained for the arena 
of battle, step forth into tomorrow — the greatest soldier in all the 
world — an American — ready for the challenge of the enemy. 

We follow them across the mine-infested seas, through the danger 
zone, where lurks the deadly submarine, on and on to France — once 
beautiful, sunny France — now running red with blood, torn by shot 
and shell, ruined beyond expression by the devastating hordes of the 
enemy — the vantage ground of mighty hosts contending for the rights 
of man against the iron rule of the tyrant master. 

We go with them on their long and weary marches, hungry, thirsty, 
miserable and exhausted ; we stand guard with them in the silent watches 
of the night ; we wade the trenches with them, knee deep in mire and 
water ; we lie down to sleep with the bare cold ground our couch, the 
snow our coverlet. We are by their side on the eve of battle ; but what 
pen can describe or mortal speak the thoughts of a soldier at this mo- 
mentous hour, when the morrow holds his life in its hands? We remain 
near them till the dawn, when reveille proclaims the hour has come. 

'Tis now the "zero hour" and we stand with the brave lads in 
No Man's Land. We hear the charge of "over the top" and then — that 
awful, indescribable scene — the battle rages ! We hear the deafening 
roar of cannon, the rapid fire of machine guns, the hissing of hand 
grenades, the bursting of shell and torpedo; and everywhere about us, the 
torturous liquid fire; the deadly poisonous gases, the dense battle smoke, 
with the seething mass of humanity in it all, renders us speechless by 
its f rightfulness — appals us with its horror! We stand awe-stricken that 
these boys of ours are in the midst of it ! 

And, finally, when the smoke of battle is lifted on the field of 
carnage, what a gruesome sight meets our gaze ! Wounded, dead and 
dying, the stretcher bearers, the ambulance corps and the Red Cross, 
hurrying to and fro on the battle field, gathering up the wounded to be 
ministered unto ; and reverently we bow our heads as one after one we 
see the martyred sons who fell in the great struggle, borne from the 
battlefield to be laid to rest by their comrades. 

And again we are in the camps in our own native land and stand 
beside the cots of the sick and dying in the hospitals of pain. We hear 
their cries of agony and suffering. We see them reach out their arms 
in anxious longing for the comforts of home, for the sweet touch of 
mother's hand, for the loving smile of their dear ones. We see them 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 307 

thus pass into eternity, denied the privilege dearest to their hearts of 
serving their country on the battle line, but her martyred sons, never- 
theless, for they represented her reserve force standing ready for the 
command to take the places of those who fell. 

Or, perhaps, we ride the ocean's wave, whose turbulent waters 
wantonly swallow up the young sailor lads, who through long days 
and weary nights, braved the storms and faced the dangers for our 
safety and happiness, only to find a grave in the bottomless depth of the 
sea. 

And now we keep faithful watch with the loved ones at home. 
Who can picture the anxiety of wife or mother during that long period 
of time, when, with trembling hand and quivering lip, she watched 
from day to day for tidings from her soldier son or husband ? Or who 
can know the long and sleepless nights she spent in prayer for his 
safety and his comfort ? Or the constant shadow of fear that hovered 
over her, that he might never return ? 

And when the message comes, apprising her of his death, who among 
us, who have not passed through this experience, can begin to compre- 
hend its significance? We see her as now she reads the message again 
and again. She is staggered by the blow, and when its full import 
reveals itself to her, we know that for her it means a heart broken with 
sorrow, a heart filled with grief, hopes blasted, ambitions blighted, 
dreams unfulfilled — ah, here is suffering worse than death! Here 
that anguish of spirit none can understand save those who have lost. 

These are the pictures our memories reveal, the tragedies they pre- 
sent in the contemplation of the awful holocaust of war, which gives 
Ripley county its Gold Star Honor Roll with forty-two martyred sons. 

Some lie peacefully sleeping with their comrades in Flanders' Fields 
in far-away France where they fell in glorious battle, or where they 
died from the effects of wounds or gas or disease ; others who died in 
camp in their native land are privileged to slumber quietly in the church- 
yard at home near their beloved ones, while the ocean holds within its 
bosom our brave lad who went down at sea. However death came to 
them, all equally served. 

Were tragedy such as this, the Alpha and Omega of it all, then 
nothing could compensate for the sacrifice of these noble young lives. 
Were the vacant chair, the vanished hand, the silent voice at the fireside 
gatherings the reminder of naught but the tragic fate of the absent one, 
then there is no comfort or consolation for the great loss sustained. 
Were there no balm of Gilead save in the sweet memories of the past, 
then 'twere a grief of despair indeed. 

But when out of the loved ones' grief and sorrow there arises the 
thought that these young men died a glorious death; that the same 
valor and courage which prompted the patriots of 1776 to endure 
the long and bloody siege, half-naked, half-frozen, and half-starving, 
but ever persevering, until they bought with their lives and their suffer- 

20 



308 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

ings, a Free Country for us ; that the same bravery and heroism which 
spurred the "boys in blue" of '61 on and on through four long years 
of untold misery and hardships to preserve that country; that it was 
the same patriotic fervor burning within the breasts of their gallant 
brave, that inspiried them to rally to the call of their country in her 
hour of danger to defend and protect her, when foreign foe threatened 
her destruction, then their great sorrow must be overcome with that 
greater feeling of pride and gratitude that they had such valiant sons, 
who, remembering Valley Forge and Yorktown, who, forgetting not 
Gettysburg and Appomattox, heard the voice of duty calling and failed 
not to answer, let the cost be what it may. 

When they further reflect that these, their hero lads, died to uphold 
the highest and best ideals of the race, to perpetuate the principles of 
American institutions, to win Freedom and Liberty not only for their 
own country but for the world, and Equality and Justice for all man- 
kind, their grief gives way to joy for the privilege that came to these 
boys to die the death of a patriot in the name of America, "the land of 
the free and the home of the brave." 

When the mothers and dear ones contemplate the wonderful crusade 
for righteousness, for His name's sake, in which the great army of 
which these heroes formed a part, were engaged, bringing untold happi- 
ness and joy to millions of oppressed peoples everywhere, would they call 
their sacrifices in vain? Or their grief the grief of despair? 

When they see these millions of oppressed and down-trodden people, 
who so long had been bowed beneath the yoke of the oppressor, freed at 
last from bondage, and the bright and happy faces of little children, all 
with the smile of hope, turned toward America and her beautiful Stars 
and Stripes, and, lifting their voice in joyous refrain, hear them sing in 
unison: 

"Lift up your eyes, desponding freemen, 

Fling to the breeze your needless fears! 

He who unfurled yon beauteous banner, 
Says it shall wave a thousand years ! 

A thousand years, my own Columbia ! 

'Tis the glad day so long foretold ! 
'Tis the glad morn whose early twilight 

Washington saw in days of old. 

What though the clouds one little moment 

Hide the blue sky when morn appears, 
When the bright sun that tints them crimson 

Rises to shine a thousand years? 

Tell the whole world the blessed tidings; 

Yes, and be sure the bondman hears. 
Tell the oppressed of every nation 

Jubilee lasts a thousand years!" 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 309 

Would not this song of rejoicing by a ransomed world, for a 
thousand years of peace for all mankind, made possible only through the 
death of those dauntless crusaders, be richest compensation for the 
great sacrifice made by those who sleep a hero's sleep and by those 
who made the costly offering? 

To us who have not known the meaning of such sacrifice as this, 
these forty-two shining Stars of the Gold Star Honor Roll speak a differ- 
ent language. They remind us of the debt of gratitude we owe to 
these fallen heroes — a debt we can never wholly pay — for the peace and 
contentment we enjoy in our homes and in our daily pursuits of life, 
because they and their comrades always stood between us and the enemy, 
protecting and guarding us with their lives. 

They remind us that the Liberty and Freedom purchased so dearly 
for us on the blood-stained fields of France, is a sacred trust placed in our 
keeping, and, as we hear again the words of the dying soldiers in 
France : 

"To you from failing hands we throw 
The torch ! Be yours to lift it high ! 
If ye break faith with us who die 

We shall not sleep though poppies blow 
In Flanders' Field." 

We stand with willing hands to catch the torch, and here, before 
this sacred roster of our honored dead, we pledge ourselves that we will 
hold it high ; that we will not break the faith, but that our treasure and 
our lives, if need be, shall ever be given, in defense of the principles and 
the ideals for which your blood was spilled ; that the country for which 
you died shall be sacred to us, a heritage, to guard and to protect with 
the full citizenship of America ; that we shall ever hold in reverence the 
memory of your unflinching bravery and heroic courage, even unto 
death, that we and our children and our children's children might 
enjoy the fruits of your sacrifices — contented, unmolested and free in 
our homes and at our firesides ; that your richest offering of all that 
you had, to save us a country and a flag, shall never be forgotten, but 
instead, shall serve as an inspiration to us to lift higher the standard of 
American citizenship ; to give first place in our lives, in our hearts and in 
our thoughts to America, her institutions, her ideals, her principles, 
her welfare and her progress; to guard her Freedom and her Liberty 
with a jealous eye, and to cherish forever sacred her flag as the emblem 
of Justice wherever it may float. 

This pledge we solemnly make and unless we fulfill it to the full 
extent of our powers, we hold ourselves unworthy of the sacrifices you 
made for us, and unworthy of citizenship in this great land of America, 
whose name has been enriched and ennobled by your valorous deeds, 
and has become recognized the world over as the foremost nation on 
the earth, because of the unselfish devotion and loyalty with which you 
and your comrades followed her flag to victory, championing the cause 
of humanity. 



310 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Your comrades returned from the war with laurels on their brow, 
proudly welcomed by a grateful nation and joyfully received by their 
loved ones whose fears and anxieties now were over. These, your com- 
rades, "carried on". They kept the faith with you. Shall we do less? 

But in the midst of our rejoicing at their return, at the cause, the 
victory and the glory, we are not unmindful of you, our unreturning 
brave, who could not share in the glad welcome home, nor in the 
supreme joy at the final triumph of our arms. This lends a tinge of 
sadness to our joy and happiness, and our smiles of gladness are 
mellowed with our tears. 

But through our tears we look up and forty-two bright Gold Stars, 
emblematic of our martyred sons, shine down upon us. And as the 
tide of years roll by, they will continue to shine brighter and brighter ; 
and, like the Star of Bethlehem which led the way to the new-born 
Prince of Peace, may these Gold Stars of our Honor Roll guide us on 
our way in the path of patriotic duty, towards the dawn of a new day 
for this great Republic of ours, whose grandeur, strength and power 
are due, in no small measure, to the men who died for her, for 

"These died that we might claim a soil unstained, 

Save by the blood of heroes ; their bequests 

A realm unsevered and a race unchained. 

Has purer blood through Norman veins come down 

From the rough knights that clutched the Saxon's crown 

Than warmed the pulses in these faithful breasts? 

These, too, shall live in history's deathless page, 
High on the slow-wrought pedestals of fame, 
Ranged with the heroes of remoter age ; 
They could not die who left their nation free, 
Firm as the rock, unfettered as the sea, 
Its heaven unshadowed by the cloud of shame. 

Ah, who shall count a rescued nation's debt. 

Or sum in words our martyrs' silent claims? 

Who shall our heroes' dread exchange forget — 

All life, youth, hope, could promise to allure 

For all that soul could brave or flesh endure? 

They shaped our future; we but carve their names." 




Honor Roll of Service Men 



ADAMS TOWNSHIP. 

AMBERGER, JACOB B., Corporal. 810th Aero Squadron. Eight months at 
Speedway, Indianapolis. June 26, 1918, to March 25, 1919. 

AHRENDS. ARTHUR EMMETT, Lieutenant Colonel, Adjutant of 81st 
Division, "Wild-Cat Division." Graduate of Military Academy, West 
Point, N. Y., in June, 1903. First garrison duty at Columbus Bar- 
racks, Ohio, in September, 1903, as Second Lieutenant in Co. F, 2nd 
Battalion, 20th Infantry. Service at various places, including two 
years in the Philippines. In World War served at Gettysburg, Pa., 
Camp Jackson, South Carolina, Camp Sevier, S. C. Overseas from 
July 30, 1918, to July 16, 1919. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on 
July 30, 1918. Was Captain at beginning of World War. 

ARNDT, EARL GREGORY, Corporal, Co. E, 156th Infantry, 39th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camp Beauregard, La., May 28, 1918, to August 22, 
1918. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to August 4. 1919. With 
Army of Occupation on the Rhine in Co. C, 23rd Regiment, 2nd Divi- 
sion from February 7 to July 15, 1919. 

BAAS, CARL EDWARD, Private 1st Class, 12th Co., 1st Regiment. 1st 
Division, Signal Corps, Aviation Section. Trained at Vancouver, 
Wash., from February 11, 1918, to February 4, 1919. Discharged from 
Camp Grant, 111. In Hospital at Vancouver. 

BARTLING, HENRY LOUIS, Wagoner, Supply Co., 36th Infantry, 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling. Minn., and Camp Devens, Mass., 
from May 23. 1918, to February 3, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
Ky. Had tonsilitis while in service. 

BAUERLIN, ARTHUR AUGUST, Private, Co. B, 40th Infantry, 14th Di- 
vision. Trained at Fort Riley, Kansas, Camp Custer, Michigan, Camp 
Edwards, Ohio, and Camp Sherman, Ohio, from May 23, 1918, to Jan- 
uary 18. 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman. 

BAUERLIN, CARL HENRY, Private, Co. A. 334th Infantry, 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman, Ohio, from June 26, 1918, until Septem- 
ber 2, 1918. Overseas from September 9. 1918, until March 15, 1919. 
At Camp Le Mans while in France. Discharged at Camp Sherman, 
April 14, 1919. Had influenza. 

BEER, LEONARD IRVIN, Fireman, U. S. S. De Kalb, transport service. 
Trained at Great Lakes Naval Training Station from July 29, 1918, 
as apprentice seaman until November 1, 1918, when assigned to the 
De Kalb. Discharged April 25, 1919. 

311 



312 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

BIGNEY, WALTER LEMUEL, Corporal, B Co., 1st Bn., 20th Engineers. 
Trained at American University, Washington D. C, from September 
28, 1917, to November 12, 1917. Overseas' service from November 26, 
1917 until May 7. 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky., 
May 28, 1919. 

BRUNS, WILBUR HENRY, Corporal, Headquarters Co., 16th Infantry, 
1st Division. Trained at Ft. Bliss, Texas, from May 8, 1917, until 
June, 1917. In Gondrecourt Area, France, from June 26, 1917, until 
October, 1917. Battles: Aisne-Marne. St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne. 
Sedan. With Army of Occupation near Coblenz, November, 1918, until 
July, 1919. Returned to United States or. August 10, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman, August 16, 1919. Had small-pox five weeks at 
Gondrecourt, France. 

BRUNS, FRANK BENJAMIN, Private, Co. G, 2Sth Infantry, 1st Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman, Ohio, from March 30. 1918, until June, 
1918. Overseas from June, 1918, until August 22, 1919. Trained abroad 
at Eccomoy, France, five weeks. Battles: St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, 
Sedan. With Army of Occupation, Coblenz Bridgehead, December 
13, 1918, to August 18, 1919. Returned to United States on August 
22, 1919. Discharged at Camp Meade, Md., on September 24, 1919. 
Has two citations and the French Forraguerre. 

BRUNS. EDWARD JOHN, Sergeant, 369th Bakery Co. Trained at Camp 
Sherman, Ohio, from June 28, 191S, to August, 1.918. Overseas from 
August, 1918, to August IS, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, 
Ohio, on August 25, 1919. 

BRUMPTER, FRED H., Private 1st Class, Co. C, 36th Infantry, 12th Di- 
vision. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn., and Camp Devens. Mass., from 
May 23, 1918, to February 1st, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky., 
February 15, 1919. 

BRUNNER, WATSIE OTTO, Corporal, 10th Co., Q. M. C. Trained at Camp 
Sherman, Ohio, from June 1, 1918, to May 20, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman on May 20, 1919. 

BUSALD, SAMUEL, Private, 1st Co., 1st Regiment. Ordnance Training 
Corps. Trained in Co. C, Ordnance Training Detachment at Val- 
paraiso, Ind. At Wm. L. Dickerson High School, Jersey City, N. J., 
six weeks, also trained at Camp Hancock. Ga. Promoted to Cook, 
November 12, 191S. Discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky., on February 
5, 1919. 

CUMMINGS, HERRELL, Corporal, Battery C, 70th F. A., 11th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky.. and at Camp Knox, Ky., from Septem- 
ber 6, 1918, until January 31, 1919. Discharged at Camp Henry Knox. 

DIVER, KENNETH LEO, Corporal, Co. A, 16th Infantry, 1st Division 
Trained at Ft. Bliss", Texas, from May 12, 1917, until June, 1917. 
Overseas from June 14, 1917. Battles: Picardy Front from Novem- 
ber until killed by a shell on April 27 1918. 

DRAKE, WILLIAM HENRY, Supply Sergeant, Co. C, 46th Infantry, 9th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Camp Taylor, Ky., 
and Camp Sheridan, Ala., from July 26, 1917, until May 12, 1919. 
Discharged at New Orleans, La., on May 12, 1919. 

DRAKE, JOHN HENRY, Private. Co. A. 335th Infantry, 84th Division. 
At Camp Taylor from October 20, 1917. until discharged in November, 
1918. 

DUPPS. PETER JOHN, Private 1st Class, Co. I, 334th Infantry, 84th 
Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, until August 
9, 1918. Overseas from September 2, 1918, until March 25, 1918. 
Transferred on October 3, 1918, to Co. D, 364th Infantry, 91st Divi- 
sion. Battles: Ypres Front, Lys-Scheldt Offensive. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, Ohio, on April 24, 1919. 

ECKSTEIN, FRANK B., Private 1st Class, Evacuation Hospital 27. 
Trained at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., and Camp Pike, Ark., from May 27, 
1918, to October, 1918. Overseas from October 26, 1918, to August 
30, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on September 17, 1919. 

ECKSTEIN. HENRY WUNEBALD, Private, Headquarters Co., 36th In- 
fantry, 12th Division. Trained at Fort Snelling, Minn., and Camp 
Devens, Mass., from May 23, 1918, to March 14, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Taylor, Ky., on March 14, 1919. 

FRITSCH, ALFRED FRANK, Ambulance Co. 34, 7th Sanitary Train. Med. 
Corps. Trained at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from April 30, 1918, to Au- 
gust, 1918. Served overseas from August 13, 1918, to June 18, 1919. 
Was at First Aid Station, St. Mihiel, thirty-three days, October 9 
to November 11, 191S. Returned to United States on July 1, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky., July 10, 1919. 

GAAB, PAUL JOHN, Private, Battery B. 67th F. A. Trained at Camp 
Taylor and Camp Knox, Ky., from September 6, 1918, until dis- 
charged at Camp Knox on December 19, 1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 313 

GINDLING, WILLIAM ANTHONY, Private, Co. C, 112th Supply Train, 
37th Division. Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Sheridan from 
April 30, 1918. to June. 1918. Overseas from June 27, 1918, to March 
16. 1919. Battles: St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest and Flanders Front. 
Returned to United States on March 27. 1919 Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, O., on April 17, 1919. 

GLAUB, NICHOLAS C, Private, Battery B, 25th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky., and Camp McClellan, Ala., from July 
22, 1918, to January 31, 1919, when discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky. 

GOLDSCHMIDT. WILLIAM JACOB, Private. Battery B, 142nd F. A. 
Trained at Camp Beauregard, La., from May 2, 191S, to August, 1918. 
Overseas from August 31, 1918, to February 9, 1919. Had influenza 
and pneumonia in Base Hospitals 33 and 65. Returned to United 
States on February 23, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, Ohio, 
on March 11, 1919. 

GRUNKEMEYER, BEN J., Private, Headquarters Co., 68th F. A. Trained 
at Fort Terry, N. Y., from April 2. 1918, to August 8, 1918. Overseas 
from August 8, 1918, to February 12. 1919. Discharged at Columbus, 
O., on March 7, 1919. 

GUTZWILLER, WILLIAM ALBERT, Corporal, Ambulance Co. 34, 7th 
Sanitary Train, 7th Division. Trained at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from 
April 30, 1918, until sent overseas on August 13, 191S. Served thirty- 
three days at the front near Metz. Alsace-Lorraine. At St. Mihiel, 
Puvenelle Sector, Moselle and Somme Defense, until November 11, 
1918. Had blood poison in left hand at Selaincourt, France. Re- 
turned to United States on June 18, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky., on July 9, 1919. 

HARVEY, HARRY CLIFFORD, Co. C. 329th Infantry. Trained at 
Camp Sherman, Ohio. (Failed to locate soldier so a.s to learn rest 
of record.) 

HOLENSBEE, ALBERT, Sergeant. Co. A, 335th Inf., 84th Division. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, to May 20, 1918. At Camp 
Hancock, Ga., from May 20, 1918, to January, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Taylor, Ky., on January 18, 1919. 

HORNIG. CHARLES MICHAEL, Private, Co. A, 331st Infantry. 83rd Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Sherman, April 26, 1918, to June. 1918. 
Overseas from June 5, 1918, to April 8. 1919. Trained at Le Mans, 
France. Suffered from rheumatism and broken arches in feet at 
Base Hospitals 82, 99, 123 and 100, Embarkation Nos. 1 and 25. 
Reached United States on April 20, 1919. Discharged at Fort Ben- 
jamin Harrison, Ind., on June 9, 1919. 

HUBER. NICHOLAS, Private 1st Class, 20th Co., -48th Engineers. Trained 
at Camp Dodge, la., from February 24, 1918, to May, 1918. Over- 
seas from May 22, 1918, to June 8, 1919. Discharged at Camp Dodge, 
la., on June 28, 1919. 

HUBER. ANTHONY F., Private, Headquarters Co., 326th F. A., 84th Di- 
vision. Trained at West Point, Ky., from July 22, 1918, to Septem- 
ber, 1918. Overseas from September 9, 1918, to January 31, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, O., on March 3, 1919. 

HUNEKE. WILLARD WILLIAM, Corporal, 16th Co., Motor Transport 
Corps, Q. M. C. Trained at Camp Johnston, Jacksonville. Fla., from 
July 28, 1918, to September 5, 1918. Overseas from September 5, 1918, 
to September 3, 1919. Stationed at Le Mans and Brest, France: Re- 
turned to United States on September 3, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Taylor on September 19, 1919. 

HUBER. JOSEPH ALBERT, Private 1st Class, Base Hospital 120, Med. 
Dept. Trained at Camp Greenleaf, Ga.. and Camp Beauregard, La., 
from May 27, 1918, to November 1, 1918. Overseas from November 
10, 1918, to June 28, 1919. Stationed at Tours. France, six months. 
Returned to United States on June 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, O., on July 18, 1919. Had measles at Camp Greenleaf, seven 
weeks. 

IRRGANG, ANDREW NICHOLAS, Corporal. Machine Gun Co., 120th In- 
fantry. 30th Division. Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky., from October 
4. 1917. until April 1. 1918. At Camp Sevier. S. C., until May, 1918. 
Overseas from May 17, 1918, to December 14, 1918. Battles: Kemmel 
Hill in Belgium, Hindenburg Line. Five wounds. Was awarded the 
D. S. C, Croix de Guerre and British War Cross for distinguished 
action. Reached United States on December 23, 1918. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman, January 20, 1919. 

KASTER, MICHAEL. Private, 38th Co.. 10th Tr. Bn.. 157th Depot Brigade. 
Trained at Camp Gordon. Ga., from July 25, 1918. to January, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Dodge, la., on February 3, 1919. 

KASTER, NICHOLAS, Private 1st Class, Co. I, 51st Infantry, 6th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor, Beauregard and Stewart from May 27. 
1918, to August, 1918. Overseas from August 18, 1918, to June 4, 1919. 



314 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Battles Meuse-Argonne, November 1-11, 1918. Returned to United 
States on June 4, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, July 10, 1919. 
KIRSCHNER DAVID, Private, Co. G, 332nd Infantry, 83rd Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman, March 23, 1918, to June, 191S. Overseas 
from June, 1918, to April 15, 1919. Served in Italy in battle of 
Vittorio-Veneto October 4 to November 4, 1918. Left Italy on March 

28, 1919. Reached United States on April 15, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, May 2, 1919. 

KRUMMEL. WILLIAM WALTER, Private, Battery B, 25th F. A., 9th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan. Discharged on 
December 12, 1918, at Camp McClellan after thirty-seven days in 
hospital with influenza, pneumonia and measles. 

KROENKE, HUGO CLIFFORD, Private. Co. D, Dev. Bn. No. 2, 158th Dep. 
Brigade. Trained at Camp Sherman, O., from June 26, 1918, until 
discharged on December 3, 1918. 

LAMPPERT. FRANK LEONARD, Private, Co. F, 22nd Engineers. Trained 
at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, April 9 to July 30, 1918. Overseas, July 
30, 1918, to June 30, 1919. Laid railway in Argonne Forest forty-two 
clays under fire. Returned to United States on July 12, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman on July 22, 1919. 

LOSH, ALLAN RICHARDS, Corporal, Co. I, 14 8th Infantry, 37th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sheridan, June, 1917, to May. 1918. Overseas from 
May 1, 1918, to May 8, 1919. Battles: Aisne-Marne, Chateau-Thierry, 
St Mihiel Meuse-Argonne, Flanders, "Verdun, Toul Sector. Returned 
to' United' States May S, 1919 — May 17, 1919. Discharged May 22, 
1919, at Camp Sherman. Re-enlisted. 

LUHRING, ELMER CHARLES, Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Purdue 
University, October 10. 1918. to December 19, 1918. Discharged at 
Lafayette. 

MANLIEF, LONNIE JOSEPH, Sergeant, Q. M. C, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 
84th Division. Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Sherman from 
September 20, 1917, to September 3, 1918. Overseas from Septem- 
ber 3, 1918, to July 13, 1919. Arrived in United States on July 22, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on July 31, 1919. 

MORROW, CHAS. WEIDLER, Private, Co. C. 304th Field Signal Bn., 79th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky„ Ft. Wood, N. Y., and Camp 
Meade, Md.. from May 21, 191 S, to July 6, 1918. Overseas, July 6, 
1918, to January 14, 1919. Battles: Argonne Forest, Champagne, 
Montfaucon, Verdun and St. Mihiel. Returned to United States on 
January 14, 1910. Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 2. 1919. 
Gassed and shell-shocked. In hospital at Bases 59 and 35 and at 
Blois- Camp Hospital 57, and Ellis Island Hospital after return to 
United States. 

MERKLE, AUGUST L., Corporal, Co. C, 36th Infantry, 12th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn., and Camp Devens, Mass., from May 
23, 1918, to March 15, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor. 

MESSANG, PHILIP. Corporal. Co. A, 42nd M. G. Bn., 14th Division. 
Trained at Camp Custer, Mich., from July 23, 1918, to July 12, 1919. 
Discharged from General Hospital 36, Camp Custer. 

NORDMEYER, WILLIAM LOUIS. Sergeant, Co. A, 335th Infantry, S4th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman from October 4, 
1917, to September, 191S. Overseas from September 4, 1918, to June 
17. 1919. Was at Officers' Training School until Armistice. Reached 
United States on June 30, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on July 
8, 1919. 

OSBORN, NIELD H., Seaman, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great Lakes, 111. 
Discharged because of physical disability after a short service. 

POHLAR, FRED ALBERT, Private, 120th M. G. Co., 120th Infantry. 30th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from October 4, 1917, 
to May, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to April 14, 1919. Battles: 
Kemmel Hill, Yyres, Bellicourt. Wounded at Bellicourt September 

29, 1918. In hospital for two months. Returned to United States 
on April 26, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 22, 1919. 

POHLAR, CLIFFORD WILLIAM, Private. 29th Co., 8th Tr. Bn., 15Sth 
Depot Brigade. Trained at Camp Sherman from August 29, 1918, 
until his death theie from influenza on October 9, 1918. 

POWELL. JAMES DAVID, Chief Mechanic. Battery D, 136th F. A. 
Trained at Camp Sherman, O.. from June 5, 1917, to June 27, 191S. 
Overseas from June 26, 1918, to March 12, 1919. Battles: Marbache 
Sector, Thrancourt, Puvenelle Sector from October 11 to November 
11, 191S. Returned to United States on March 24, 1919. Discharged 
April 10 at Camp Sherman. 

POWERS, EMORY HARRY, Sergeant, Co. C, 311th F. S. Bn., Co. K, 341st 
Infantry, 86th Division. Trained at Camps Jefferson and Grant from 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 315 

December 12, 1917. to September 9, 1918. Overseas from September 
21, 1918, to April 28, 1919. Returned to United States on May 9, 1918. 
Discharged at Camp Dix. May 15, 1919. 

PRICKEL, EDWARD ANTHONY, Private, Co. C, 140th Infantry, 35th 
Division. Trained at Camp Sherman and Camp Mills from June 26, 
191S, to August 31, 1918. Overseas from September 13. 1918, to April 
16, 1919. Reached United States again on April 28, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Taylor on May 8, 1919. 

PRICKEL, MARTIN, Private, Co. M, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from October 4, 1917, to May 
1, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to April 1, 1918. Battles: 
Kemmel Hill, Bellicourt, Vaux-Andigny, Bohain and Somme Front 
until November 11, 1918. Reached United States on April 13, 1918. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor on April 25, 1919. Was six weeks in 
hospital with "flu" in France. 

PRICKEL, NICHOLAS ANTHONY, Private, Co. E. 154th Infantry, 39th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard from May 27, 

1918, to August 6, 191S. Overseas from August 6, 1918, to April 28, 

1919. Battles: Argonne-Meuse Offensive. Returned to United States 
on May 14, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 23, 1919. 

REIBEL, ROMAN JOHN, Private, Motor Transport Corps. Trained at 
Valparaiso, Ind.. from October 11, 1918, to December 11, 1918, when 
discharged at Valparaiso. 

REIBEL, FRANK A., Private, Co. F, 18th Engineers. Trained at Camps 
Taylor and Grant from September 21. 1917, to March, 1918. Over- 
seas from March 14. 1918, to May 18, 1919. Reached United States 
on May 27, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on June 10, 1919. 

REIBEL. THEODORE JOSEPH. Private, Co. A. 335th Infantry, S4th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Taylor from October 4, 1917, to February 
20, 191 S. Had three attacks of pneumonia. Was discharged for 
resulting physical disability. 

RICHTER, EDWARD, Private, Ambulance Co. 34, 7th Sanitary Train. 
7th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor, Greenleaf and Ft. Benjamin 
Harrison from April 30, 1918, to November 30, 1918. Discharged at 
Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., on November 30, 191S. 

REUTER. RAYMOND FRANK, Private 1st Class,, Ambulance Co., 147th 
Infantry, 37th Division. At Camp Sheridan, Ala., from June 1, 1917, 
to June 28, 1917. Overseas service from June 28, 1917, to March 26, 
1919. Battles: Lorraine, St. Mihiel, Verdun, Argonne, two Flanders 
Drives. Gassed and shell-shocked. Reached United States on April 
4, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, April 22, 1919. 

REUSS, GEORGE LEO, Chief Gunner's Mate, U. S. S. Tacoma. Trained 
at Naval Tr. Station, Newport, R. I., from March 24, 1911. to assign- 
ment on Tacoma. Convoy service during World War. 

RIEHLE, ALBERT BERNARD. Seaman, U. S. S. New Hampshire. Trained 
at Camp Logan, Great Lakes Naval Training Station, 111., from April 
30, 1918, to assignment to ship. Hospital treatment at Camp Logan. 
Discharged May 20, 1919, at Pittsburg, Pa. Did transport duty, four 
months. 

RIEHLE, JOHN HENRY, 3rd Class Fireman, U. S. S. New Hampshire. 
Trained at Camp Logan, Great Lakes. 111. Had "flu" at Camp Logan. 
October, 1918. Did transport duty, four months. Released June 28, 
1919, at Pittsburg, Pa. 

RIEHLE. EDWARD I., Private, 29th Co.. 8th Tr. Bn„ :159th Depot Brigade. 
Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky., from March 29, 1918. to July 9. 1918. 
In hospital with lame ankle. Discharged July 9, 1918. 

RIEHLE, JOSEFH BERNARD, Private, Co. F, 212th Engineers, 12th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Devens, Mass., from July 29, 1918. to Feb- 
ruary, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, February 10, 1919. 

ROBINSON, MORRIS SMITH, Sergeant. Co. C, First Field Signal Bn., 2nd 
Division. Trained at Ft. Leavenworth, Kas., Ft. Bliss, Texas, and 
Camp Vail, N. J., from February 22, 1917. to December 24, 1917. 
Overseas from December 24, 1917, to April 21, 1919. Battles: Chateau- 
Thierry and Argonne Forest. Discharged February 1. 1919, at Camp 
Alfred, N. J. 

ROBINSON. FRANKLIN ROWLAND. Fireman, U. S. Navy. Trained at 
Great Lakes, 111., from July 29, 1918. Service at United States Naval 
Air Station at Guipovas and on Receiving Ship at Brest, France. 
Returned to United States on January 8, 1919. Discharged at Nor- 
folk. Va.. on February 26, 1919. 

ROEPKE, CHARLES LESLIE, Private, Battery F. 111th F. A., 29th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Jackson, S. C, from May 23, 1918, until 
July 22, 1918. Overseas from July 22, 1918, to July 13. 1919. Battles: 
Haute-Alsace and Argonne. Returned to United States on July 22, 
1919. Discharged August 1 at Camp Sherman. 



316 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

ROEPKE, LEROY, Private 1st Class, 31st Engineers, Co. I. Trained from 
enlistment on April 29, 1918, at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas. Overseas 
from June 7, 1918, to August 17, 1919. Service in various parts of France 
until after Armistice. In Germany from November, 1918, until August 
1919. Special service as interpreter. Discharged at Presidio, Cal., 
.September 2, 1919. 

ROHLS, GEORGE HERBERT, Private, 29th Co., 8th Tr. Bn., 159th Depot 
Brigade. Trained at Camp Taylor from March 29 until discharged for 
disability on April 1, 191S. 

ROSFELD, ANTHONY JOHN, Private, Co. K, 120th Infantry, 30th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 21, 1917, 
to May, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to March 31, 1919. 
Battles: Poperinghe and Ypres Fronts, Kemmel Hill. Wounded. Four 
months in hospitals, France and England. Returned to United 
States on March 31, 1919 — April 17, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, April 24, 1919. 

ROSFELD, CHARLES FRANK, Private, Battery D, 34th F. A., 12th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp McClellan from July 21, 1918, to discharge 
at McClellan on February 6, 1919. Was treated for influenza at Camp 
McClellan. 

SIEG, GILBERT D., Corporal. Supply Co., 36th Infantry, 12th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Snelling. Minn., and Camp Devens, Mass., from May 

23, 1918, to March, 1919. Treated for pneumonia at Camp Devens. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, March 11, 1919. 

SANDS, JOSEPH ANTHONY, Private, Co. L, 154th Infantry. 39th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard, La., from May 27, 1918, to 
August 6, 1918. Overseas, August 6, 191S, to April 14, 1919. Reached 
United States April 30, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 20, 
1919. 

SCHNEIDER, PETER V., Musician 2nd Class, Headquarters Co.. 25th F. 
A., 9th Division, Camp McClellan, Ala., from July 22, 1918, to Jan- 
uary, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, January 31, 1919. 

SCHNITKER, WILLIAM A., Private, Co. I, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier, October 4, 1917, to May 1, 191S. 
Overseas from May 17, 1918, to April 1. 1919. Battles: St. Quentin, 
Argonne Wood, Le Cateau Sector. Wounded, shrapnel through right 
jaw. Hospital treatment two months. Reached United States 
on April 13. 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on April 25, 1919. 

SCHOMBER, CLIFFORD CARL, Corporal, Battery D., 119th F. A., 32nd 
Division. Trained at Waco, Texas, Camp Custer, Mich, and Ft. 
McArthur, Texas, from September 19, 1917, to February, 1918. Over- 
seas from February 25, 1918, to April 24, 1919. Battles: Toul Sector, 
Alsace, Aisne-Marne, Meuse-Argonne, Oise-Aisne, Chateau-Thierry, 
Fismes, Juvigny, Mont Faucon. Returned to United States on April 

24. 1919. Discharged at Camp Custer on May 15, 1919. 
STECKER, JOSEPH H., Private, Supply Co., 2nd F. A. Trained at Camp 

Taylor from March 29, 1918, to April 2S, 1919, when discharged. Hos- 
pital treatment for asthma and heart trouble, six weeks. 

STEPHENS, ESTAL HENRY, Private, Medical Corps. Served at Walter 
Reed General Hospital, Washington, D. C-. from September 6, 1918, 
to November 21, 1919. Discharged at Washington, D. C. 

STEPHENS, ROY GEORGE WILLIAM, Ship-fitter 1st Class, United 
State Navy. Served at Newport, R. I., and at ELlis Island. N. Y.. 
from December 13, 1917, until assigned six months later to U. S. S. 
Wilhelmina for transport duty. Discharged August 14, 1919, at Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

STOHLMAN, LOUIS THEODORE, Private, 5th Co.. 53rd C. A. C. Trained 
at Fts. Hamilton and Wadsworth, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to July 
15, 1918. Overseas from July 15, 1918, to February 25, 1919. Battles: 
St. Mihiel. Returned to United States March 11, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman, April 4, 1919. 

STOHLMAN, EDWARD HENRY, Private, 44th C- A. C. Trained at Ft. 
Wadsworth from April 3, 1918. to July 15, 191S. Overseas from July 
15, 1918, to January 26, 1919. Battles: St. Mihiel. Returned to United 
States on February 4, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on Feb- 
ruary 22, 1919. 

STROTHMAN, FRANK, Private, Medical Corps. Trained at Camps Tay- 
lor, Ky. and Beauregard, La., from May 27, 191S, to August, 191S. 
Overseas from Augi'st 6, 191S, to September 15. i919. Discharged at 
Camp Taylor on September 25, 1919, from Medical Department. First 
Division. 

SUNMAN, COY ROBINSON, Private. Co. M, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Tayior and Sevier from September 20, 1917, to May, 
1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918. Battles: Yyres Front and 
Hindenburg Line. Killed in battle, September 29, 1918, at Bellicourt. 
France. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 317 

TANGMAN, FRED J., Private, U. S. M. C. Trained at Paris Island, S. C, 
from July 29, 1918, to October 15, 1918. At Quantico, Va., to Decem- 
ber 1, 1918. Assigned to 181st Co., 15th United States Marines in Feb- 
ruary, 1919. Service in Dominican Republic until August 22, 1919. 
Returned to United States September 3, 1919. Discharged Septem- 
ber 10, 1919, at Philadelphia. 

WAGNER, DAVIS J. H., Private Headquarters Co., 120th Infantry., 30th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from October 4, 1917, 
to May, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to April 1. 1918. Battles: 
Ypres Front in Belgium, Hindenburg Line, Montbrehain. Wounded 
at Bellicourt twice. Treatment in hospital at Rouen, France. Re- 
turned to United States on April 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor on April 24, 1919. Cited for saving officer's life. 

WARD, CHARLES WILLIAM. Private, Co. E, 312th Infantry, 7Sth Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to September, 
1918. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to May 11, 1919. Battles: 
Grand Pre. Gassed, October 4, 1918. In Base Hospital No. 3 until Oct 
29. 1918. Returned to United States May 11 — May 25, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, June 6, 1919. 

WETZLER, THOMAS EARL, Private, S. A. T. C, Purdue University, 5th 
Co. At Camp Purdue from October 9, 1918, until discharged at 
Lafayette, Ind., on December 19, 1918. 

II. 
BROWN TOWNSHIP. 

ASHCRAFT, BAYARD ORONGO, Private, 26th Co., 7th Bn., Military 
Police. Trained at Syracuse, N. Y., and Camp Merritt, N. J., from 
July 30, 1918. to January 4, 1919 Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., 
on January 4, 1919. 

ASHCRAFT, JASPER WILLIAM. F 2C, U. S. S. Agamemnon. Trained 
at Great Lakes, 111., from Mav 28, 1918, to October, 1918. Transport 
duty from October 6, 1918, to June 8, 1919. Eight trips. Had in- 
fluenza two weeks. Discharged at Pittsburg, Pa., on July 1, 1919. 

BOKENKAMP, HARRY JOHN, Corporal, Nov. Repl. Co., First Prov. Reg- 
iment, Ordnance Department. Trained at Lafayette, Ind., Camp Han- 
cock, Ga., and Erie Proving Grounds, O., from September 1, 1918, to 
April, 1919. Discharged April 19, 1919, at Erie Proving Grounds, O. 

BOKENKAMP, WILLIAM FRANK, Mechanic, Co. A, 57th Infantry, 15th 
Division. Trained at Camp Logan, Houston, Texas and Camp Pike, 
Arkansas, from May 23, 1918, to May, 1919. Six weeks in hospital 
with bronchitis and inlluenza, two weeks with mumps. Discharged at 
Camp Taylor, May 1, 1919. 

BROOKS, JAMES EDWARD, Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camp Taylor six months beginning September 20, 

1917. Sent to Atlanta, Ga., for guard training and then on duty 
at Savannah shipyards for twelve months. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, January 16, 1919. Hospital treatment for influenza. 

BROOKS, JOSEPH LESLIE, Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, until dis- 
charged, January 22, 1918, because of physical disability. Hospital 
record, two months. 

BROOKS, ROY ADEN, Private, Co. A, 4th Bn., Chemical Warfare Service. 
Trained at Fort Scrivener, Ga., and at Edgewood, Md., from May 13, 

1918, to January, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, January 24, 1919. 
BUTTE, WILLIAM ALVA, Private 1st Class, Co. B, 36th Infantry, 12th 

Division. Trained at Ft. Sneliing, Minn., and Camp Devens, Mass., 
from May 23, 1918, to June, 1919. Transferred to Headquarters Co. 
in April, 1919. In hospital eighteen days with measles. Discharged 
at Camp Taylor, June 23, 1919. 

CARTWRIGHT, MALCOLM FRED, Private, Co. C, 1st Regiment, Indiana- 
polis Tr. Det. Trained at Indianapolis and Camp Hancock, Ga., from 
June 14, 1918, to August 31, 1918. Overseas from August 31, 1918. 
to April 24, 1919. Reached United States May 6, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman on May 2"3, 1919. 

CAMERON, WALTER EMMETT, Private, Co. E, 16th Infantry, 1st Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to September, 
1918. Overseas from September 1 1918, to August 22, 1919. Battles: 
Meuse-Argonne. Marched to Germany; stationed at Dernbach and 
Neuenhaar until August 16, 1919. Left. Brest on August 22. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, September 25, 1919. 

CHAMBERLAIN, ORVIL FRANK, Private, Battery C, 10th F. A. Trained 
at Camp Jackson, S. C, from August 15, 1918, to January 7, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor. 



318 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

CONOWAY CARL CECIL, Private, Battery E., 72nd F. A., 11th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Knox from September 6, 1918, to Jan- 
uary 31, 1918. Discharged at Camp Knox. 
COPELAND ROBERT WILBUR, 1st Class Electrician, U. S. S. Dale. 
Trained' at Norfolk, Va., from October 22, ]912, until assigned to 
ship Served as Seaman, 3rd Class Electrician, 2nd Class Electrician 
and 1st Class Electrician. Ships: Submarine Severn; Battleships 
Olympia and Brooklyn and Destroyers Biddle and Dale. 

CORSON HOWARD RULON, Private, Motor Trans. Corps. Trained at 
Winona Lake and Indianapolis from October 15, 1918, to December 
11, 1918. Discharged at Indianapolis. 

COURTNEY, ALLEN JAMES, Private, Battery A, 55th C. A. C. Trained 
at Ft Caswell, N. C, from May 26, 1918, to September, 1918. Over- 
seas from September 22, 1918, to January, 1919. Battles: Argonne 
Forest In hospital for measles. Returned to United States on Jan- 
uary 11, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on February 1, 1919. 

DEMAREE, DELZIE, 74th Co., 6th U. S. Marines, 2nd Division. Trained 
at Paris Island, S. C, and Quantico, Va., from April 29, 1917, to Sep- 
tember 17, 1917. Overseas from September 17, 1917, to December 
19 1918. Trained in France at St. Nazaire and Damblain. Battles: 
Verdun, Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel, Champagne. Gassed and twice 
wounded. Returned to United States on December 19, 1918. Hos- 
pital treatment, eight hospitals in France, and at Portsmouth, Va. 

DEMAREE, RAYMOND, Private, Headquarters Det., 13th U. S. Marines. 
Trained at Paris Island, S. C, from May 4, 1917. to September 13, 
1918. Discharged at Quantico, Va., on August 5, 1918. Assigned for 
service to Co. F, 13th Marines. Overseas from September 13, 1918, 
to July 9, 1919. Returned to United States July 9 — July 18, 1919. 
Hospital record: Mumps and measles, May and June, 1917. 

DEMAREE, GLENN, U. S. N. R. Trained at Great Lakes, 111., and Min- 
neapolis, Minn., from May IS, 1918, to January 17, 1919. Released 
at Minneapolis, January 17, 1919. Service: Aviation Branch of the 
Navy. 

DAMON, EARL McKINLEY, Private, Battery C, 72nd F. A. Trained at 
Camp Tayloiv Westpoint, and Camp Knox, Ky., from September 6. 
1918, to February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Knox, February 1, 1919. 

DUNLAP, CARL FRANKLIN. Sergeant, Co. A, 45th Bn., N. G. Trained 
at Camp Taylor, Ky., from October 3, 1917, to December 31, 1918. 
Prior service: Four years and three months, Regular Army. 

ELSTON, EDGAR LAWRENCE, Private, Co. G, 364th Infantry, 91st Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to August 22, 
1918. Overseas from September 1. 1918. to March 5, 1919. Battles: 
Verdun Front, Argonne Forest. Had influenza in France, spent two 
months in hospitals. Sent to United States on March 5, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, April 12, 1919. 

EVANS, RALPH WHITNEY, Private, Headquarters Co., 11th F. A., Re- 
placement Division. Trained at Cincinnati, O., and Camp Jackson, 
Columbia, S. C, trom August 15, 1918, to January, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman. January 5, 1919. 

FISSE, GARRETT HENRY. Private 1st Class, Co. B, 9th Ammunition 
Train, 9th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from 
July 22, 1918, to February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, Feb- 
ruary 7, 1919. 

GARDEMAN, CHARLES HENRY FREDERIC, Private, Co. A. 335th In- 
fantry, 84th Division. Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 
1917, to October 29, 1917. Discharged for eye trouble at Camp Tay- 
lor on October 29, 1917. 

GORDON, GEORGE ALLEN, Seaman, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great Lakes, 
111., in Co. C. 2nd Regiment, from June 4, 1918. to September 26, 1918. 
Died of pneumonia at Camp Dewey, September 26, 1918, following 
an attack of influenza. 

GILLAND, SHERIDAN CLENDENNING, Private, Battery B, 142nd F. A. 
Trained at Camps Tavlor and Beauregard, from May 27, 1918, to 
August, 1918. Overseas from August 1. 1918, to June, 1919. Trained 
at Camp Coctquidan in France until November 19, 1918. Returned 
to America on June 8, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, June, 1919. 

GORTEMILLER, HARRY FREDERICK, Private 1st Class, Co. I. 120th 
Infantry, 30th Division Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from 
September 20, 1917, to May, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to 
April, 1919. Battles: Ypres Front, Kemmel Hill. Bellicourt. St. Sou- 
plet, Johncourt, St. Martin Riviere, Brancourt, Nauroy, Voormezelle. 
Wounded Hospital treatment at Trouville and Rouen. Returned 
to United States on April 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 
25 1919. 

HENSCHEN. CLAYTON FRED, Private, Battery D, 150th F. A., 42nd Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Jackson, S. C, and Camp Stewart, Va., from 
July 22, 1918, to September 30, 1918. Overseas from September 30. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 319 

1918, to April 18, 1919, with Army of Occupation in Germany from 
November 14, 1918, to April 5, 1919, at Neuenhaar. Reached United 
States on April 25, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 10, 1919. 

HEITMEYER, HOWARD LESLIE, Corporal, Ordnance Detachment, 138th 
P. A. Trained at State Fair Grounds, Louisville, Ky., Camps Taylor 
and Shelby from April 4, 1917, to September 6, 1918. Overseas from 
September 6, 1918, to December 13, 1918. Reached United States 
December 24, 1918. Discharged at Camp Taylor, January 11, 1919. 

HERIN, GEORGE DALLAS, Private 1st Class. 307th Repair Unit, Motor 
Transport Corps. Trained at Valparaiso, Ind., Pittsburg, Pa., and 
Camp Holabird, Md„ from July 1. 1918, to October, 1918. Overseas 
from October 19, 1918, to .Tulv. 1919. Influenza at Camp Holabird. 
Returned to United States July 11, 1919. Discharged at Mitchell 
Field. L. I., N. Y., July 18, 1919. 

HERIN, ROBERT FRANKLIN, Private, Battery B, 344th F. A., 90th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Lafayette, Ind., fromf April 27. 1918, to July, 1918. 
Overseas from July 4, 191S", to June. 1919. At Camp Hunt, near Bor- 
deaux in France, three months. Verdun, two months. Hundheim. 
Germany, with Army of Occupation six months. Returned to United 
States June 1, 1919. Influenza at Aix-les-Bains, France. Discharged 
at Camp Taylor, June 25. 1919. 

HERRINGTON, NORMAN EARL, Seaman, U. S. N. R. Trained at Great 
Lakes. III., from July 9, 1917, until release, 1918. 

HESS, ERNEST FRANKLIN. Private. 82nd Co., 6th Marines, 2nd Division. 
Trained at Paris Island, S. C, and Quantico. Va„ from May 10, 

1917. to October 29. 1917. Overseas from October 29 1917, to De- 
cember 24, 1918. Battles: Verdun, Chateau-Thierry, Belleau Wood. 
Wounded at Belleau Wood June 23, 1918, by high explosive shell. 
Four wounds, left thigh, both arms and left eye. Treated in Field 
Hospital and Base 34 and Base 38 at Nantes. Sent to Paris to get 
an artificial eye. Returned to United States from Bordeaux on a 
hospital ship, sailing on Christmas Day. In Naval Hospital at Ports- 
mouth, Va., after return. Discharged at Norfolk on March 15, 1919. 

HESS. EARL ANIE, Private, Co. I 3rd Ohio Infantry. Trained at Chilli- 
cothe, O., and at Montgomery, Ala. Discharged at Montgomery, Ala., 
on January 7, 1918. 

HUNTER. HARRY MELVIN. Private, Co. B. 334th Infantry, 84th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman from June 26. 191S. to August 
22, 1918. Overseas from September 1, 1918 until his death from pneu- 
monia, October 20, 1919, at St. Aignan, Noyers, France. 

HUNTER, BASIL EDGAR, Sergeant, Base Hospital 118. Trained at Camps 
Taylor and Mills from March 29, 1918, to November 11, 1918. Over- 
seas from November 11, 191S, to July 5, 1919. Returned to United 
States on July 16, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on July 23, 1919. 

HYATT EARL CLIFFORD. Private. Co. I, 120th Infantry. 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier. S. C-, from September 9, lbl7. 
to May, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918. Battles: Hindenburg Line, 
Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele, Ypres Front. Killed at Mazingheim, Somme 
Offensive, near St. Souplet, October 18, 1918. 

HYATT. GEORGE FLAVIUS, Private 1st Class. U. S. Hospital 3, Medical 
Corps. Trained at Camps Taylor and Greenleaf from May 27, 1918. 
until sent to dutv at hospital at Railway, N. J. Discharged Septem- 
ber 23, 1919, at Camp Taylor. 

HYATT, JOSEPH LEWIS. Second Lieutenant, Battery C, 325th F. A., 
84th Division. Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison. Camp Taylor, West 
Point, Ky., and Ft. Sill. Okla., from May 17, 1917, to September. 1918. 
Overseas from September 9 1918, to January 16. 1919. In Artillery 
School at Camp DeSouge, France, from September 29 1918. to No- 
vember 12, 1918. Returned to United States on January 16, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, February 13. 1919. 

HUNTINGTON, COLLIS PERRY, Seaman, U. S. N. R. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111., and Hampton Roads. Va., from May 3, 1918. to August 22, 

1918. Assigned to U. S. S. Kearsarge. training ship and coast patrol, 
on August 22, 1918. Transferred here to Q. M. Department. Sent 
to Receiving Ship at Boston and later to Machias Port, Me. Re- 
leased at Hingham, Mass., January 8. 1919. 

HURELBRINK, HENRY ERNEST, Private, Batterv A, 25th F. A.. 9th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 
1"918. to last of September, 1^18. In hospital at Camp McClellan from 
October to March, 1919. with influenza and pneumonia, resulting in 
empyemia. At Fort McPherson, Ga., for treatment from March to 
July. 1919. Sent home on furlough, not discharged. Tonsils were 
removed in latter part of September, 1918. 

JARVIS, DALE EDWARD, Private, Co. A, 362nd Infantry. 91st Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman from October 3. 1917, to Sep- 
tember 3, 1918. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to April 3, 1919. 



320 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Battles: Lys-Scheldt, October 31 — November 11. 1918. Returned to 
United States on April 14. 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 
1. 1919. 

JARVIS. FLOYD OTIS. Q. M. C. 3rd Class, U. S. Navy. Trained at Gr<»at 
Lakes, 111., from July S, 1918, until assigned to U. S. S. Sierra in No- 
vember, 1918. Eight trips to France on transport duty. Discharged 
at Pittsburg, Pa., on October 1. 1919. 

JACOBS. CLIFFORD HENRY, Private 1st Class, Base Hospital 53. Trained 
at Ft. Oglethorpe Ga., and Camp Greenleaf. Ga.. from February, 1918, 
to September, 191 S Overseas service not reported. Returned to 
United States in 1919. 

JACOBS, HERBERT HENRY. Private, Medical Department. 25th F. A. 
Trained at CaniD McClellan from July 22. 1918. to February 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor on February 5, 1919. 

KAMMAN, WALTER HENRY, Corporal, Motor Transport Corps. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and Knox. Ky.. from July 22, 1918, to April, 1919. 
In Base Hospital at Camp Taylor eleven weeks with influenza, pneu- 
monia, tonsilitis. scarlet fever and pleurisy. Discharged at Camp 
Knox, April 9. 1919. 

KETENBRIXK. ROY PHILMER. Corporal. Headquarters Detachment. 9th 
Brigade. 9th Division (25, 26 and 27th F. A.) Trained at Camps Tav- 
lor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to February, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Taylor, February 7. 1919. 

KINNETT. JAMES THOMAS. Musician. Headquarters Company. 335th 
Infantry. S4th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor Sherman and 
Gordon from September 20, 1917. to December. 1918. Discharged De- 
cember 20. 1918, at Camp Taylor from 6th Replacement Co. Treat- 
ment for far-sighted eyes. 

LICKING. HARRY, Private, Supply Co, 36th Infantry. 12th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn., and Camp Devens. Mass., from Mav 
23. 191S. to June 16. 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor. June 23, 1919. 

MAY. HARRY CLIFFORD. Private. Co. B, 334th Infantry. 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26. 1918, to September 1. 1918. 
Overseas from September 1, 191S. Died of influenza-pneumonia at St. 
Aiprnan, Noyers, France, on October 23, 1918. 

MAY, PAUL EDWARD. Private. G Troop, 2nd N. G. Trained at McAllen, 
Texas, from July 8. 1918, to November. 1918. 

MAY. WILLIAM HENRY. Private Co. A, 25th F. A., 76th Division. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and McClellan from Julv 22, 1918, to February 5. 
1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor. Had measles at Camp McClellan. 

McCOY. VERNE CLAUDIUS. Private 1st Class. Co. B, 87th Engineers. 
Trained at Camps Taylor. Ft. Harrison, Upton and Merritt from 
September 4, 1918, to January, 1919. Treated for influenza at Camp 
Humphreys. Va. Discharged at Camp Sherman, January 13. 1919. 
for disability resulting from sickness. 

McCLAIX. VERX, Private, Bat. A, 70th F. A. Trained at Camps Taylor, 
Westpoint and Camp Knox. Ky., from Sept. 6, 1918, to discharge on 
February 5, 1918, at Camp Knox. 

McGEE, ROY H.. Corporal, Co. A. 335th Infantrv. S4th Division. Trained at 
Camp Taylor from September 20 1917. to May 22. 1919. Transferred 
to Headquarters Co.. Camp Taylor in March, 191 S. Discharged May 
22. 1919. 

MORROW. HENRY BIRT. Medical Department Student. Trained at In- 
dianapolis from October 9. 1918, to December 11, 191S. Discharged 
at Indianapolis. 

NIEMAN. ALBERT JOHN. Private. Battorv A. 25th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to Feb- 
ruary 7, 1919, when discharged at Camp Taylor. 

NIEMANN, HAROLD HENRY. Private 1st Class Medical Department. U. 
S. Debarkation Hospital No. 1 at Ellis Island. N. Y. Trained at 
Camps Taylor, Greenleaf and Merritt from May 27. 1918, until August 4, 

1918. when assigned to Ellis Island, N. Y., at Debarkation Hospital. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, July 9, 1919, after serving until June 30, 

1919, at Ellis Island. 

NEIGHBERT, HARVEY CLAYTON. Private, 2nd Dev. Co., 334th Infantry. 
S4th Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918. to De- 
cember, 1918. Discharged at Camp Sherman. December 4, 191S. Had 
influenza and pneumonia from September 27 to November 17, 1918. 

OTTE. WILLIAM JOHN HENRY, Private 1st Class, Co. C, 40th Infantry. 
14th Division. Trained at Ft. Riley, Kan., Camp Custer, Mich., and 
Camp Sherman, from May 23, 1918. to September, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman September 25, 1919. Was in Marine Hospital at 
Cleveland, O., for twenty-seven days from powder burns on face 
and hands. 40th Infantry was attending a war exposition at Cleve- 
land. A powder explosion caused a box of bombs to explode caus- 
a number of casualties. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 321 

PEASLEE, LEONARD SAMUEL, Private, Co. A, Dev. Bn., No. 1. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and Beauregard from May 27, 1918, until discharged 
at Camp Beauregard. December 6, 1918. Had mumps, influenza and 
pneumonia. In hospital nearly three months. 

PEASLEE, FRANK LESLIE, Private. Battery F, 136th F. A.. 37th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman from April 30, 1918. 
to June, 1918. Overseas from June 28, 1918, to March 12, 1919. 
Battles: Marbache Sector. Meuse-Argonne. Returned to United States 
on March 12, 1918. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 8, 1919. 

PAUGH. WILLIAM EARL, Corporal Co. C, 36th Infantry. 12th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Snelling. Minn., and Camp Dcvens, Mass., from May 
°3, 1918. to February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor February 
10. 1919. 

PAUGH. EVERETT DAILY. Private, Co. M. 18th Infantry. 1st Division. 
Trained at Camp Lee, Virginia, from September 17 1917, to March. 
1918. In M. G. Co., 320th Infantry. 80th Division, until February 1, 

1918. Overseas from March 27, 191S, to March 25. 1919. Battles: 
Cantigny, Soissons, St. Mihiel. Argonne Forest. Twice wounded in 
hand and back, at the Marne. Gassed and wounded by high ex- 
plosive at Argonne Forest. In hospitals at Chantilly. Bordeaux and 
Limoges, France. Returned to United Slates on March 25. 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Dix, N. J., on April 12, 1919. 

ROGERS WILLIAM B., Private, Co. C. 28th Prov. Ordnance D^pot. 
Trained at Chamber -of Commerce, Indianapolis. Ind., and at Camp 
Hancock, Ga.. from June 15, 191S. to October, 191S. Overseas from 
October 4, 1918. to February. 1919. Returned to United States on 
February 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman March 1, 1919. 

RUMP, WALTER F.. Sersreant. Q. M. C, Utility Construction Division 
Trained from September 20, 1917. at Camp Tavlor. Served there in 
camp construction. Discharged on May 17, 1919. 

RUNNER, REUBEN RICHARD, Private, Co. E. 18th Railway Engineers. 
Trained at Camp Taylor six months from September 20. 1917. At 
Camp Grant six weeks. Overseas from March 13. 1918. to April 15, 

1919. Returned to United States on April 15, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman on May 10. 1919. 

RYAN, CHARLES DAVID. First Lieutenant, Medical Corps. Trained at 
Camp Wadsworth. S. C, from January 15, 1918. Served there until 
discharged February 10. 1919. 

SCHRAUB, HENRY EDWARD. Corporal, Co. M. 120th Tnfantry, 30th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20. 

1917. to May 1. 1917. Overseas from May 17, 1918. Died of wounds 
received on September 29, 1918. Battles: Ypres Front and Hinden- 
burg Line. 

SCHRAUB. JOHN ELMER. Private, Co. E, 320th Infantry, 80th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 191S. to September, 1918. 
Overseas from September 3 1918, to September 10. 1919. Battles: 
Verdun, St. Severin. On detached service to Berlin, January 15. 1919. 
to end of August. 1919. Returned to United States on September 10, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, October 14, 1919. 

SHOOK, JAMES CLIFTON. Private, Co. A. 362nd Infantry. 91st Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman from September 20. 1917. to 
September, 1918. Overseas from September 3. 191S, to April 14 1919. 
Battles: Lvs-Scheldt. Discharged at Camp Sherman. May I. 1919. 

SHOOK, CECIL EARL. Private. Co. E, 335th Infantry. 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from Jure 26. 1918, to September. 1918. 
Overseas from September 3, 1918, to January 3, 1919. Had influenza 
and pneumonia in October. 1918. Sent to United States for further 
treatment, January 3, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on Feb- 
ruary 4. 1919. 

SIEKERMAN. CLARENCE CLYDE, Private 1st Class, Co. A, 132nd In- 
fantry, 33rd Division. Trained at Camps Grant and Houston, from 
October 2, 1917, to May, 1917. Overseas from May 17. 1918. to May 
17, 1919. Battles: Amiens, Hammel Wood. Very Wood, Verdun, Ar- 
gonne Forest lines before Metz. With Army of Occupation at De- 
kirch, Luxemburg, from December, 1918, to May, 1919. Returned to 
United States May 17. 1919. Discharged at Camp Grant, May 30, 
1919. Shell-shocked, hospital treatment near Verdun. 

SIEKERMAN. WALTER, Co. E, 311th Infantry, 78th Division. Further 
report not secured. 

STEINGRUBER. EDGAR GEORGE CHAS., Cook. Field Hospital 36, 7th 
Sanitary Train, 7th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Green- 
leaf from April 30. 1918, to July 26, 1919. Overseas from August 13, 

1918, to May 27, 1919. Service at Puvenelle Sector October 9 — 'Jan- 
uary 7, 1919. Rogevelle from January, 1919, to May, 1919. Returned 
to United States June 8, 1919. Discharged at Camp Lee, June 13, 
1919. 

STEINGRUBER. OTTO BARNEY, Private. Motor Transport Corps. 
Trained at Winona Lake, Ind., and Indianapolis, from October 15, 



322 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

1918, to December IS, 1918. Discharged at Indianapolis, December 
18, 1918. 

SANDEFUR. CHARLES HALL, Seaman, U. S. N. R. Traine~d at Norfolk, 
Va., from March 29. 1917. Died of measles and pneumonia in Naval 
Hospital, Newport News on May 2, 1917. 

SPANGLER, HOWARD CHARLES, Private, 13th Balloon Co. Trained at 
Kelley Field, Texas., Ft. Omaha, Neb., and Camp Morrison, Va.. from 
February 3, 191S, to July, 1918. Overseas from July 10, 1918, to Jan- 
uary 10, 1919. Reached United States on January 21, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, February 11, 1919. 

STEVENSON, DALLAS LEROY. Private, Ambulance Co., 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from March 29. 1918, to July, 1918. Over- 
seas from July 8, 191S, to June 29. 1919. Battles: First Aid Ami). 
driver at Chateau-Thierry. Returned to United States June 29, 1919. 
Discharged at Mitchell Field, L. I., N. Y., on July 18, 1919. 

SMITH, HOWARD SEBRING. Sergeant. Co. M, 44th Engineers. Trained 
at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, lnd., from May 17, 1918, to July, 1918. 
Overseas from July 30, 1918. to August S, 1919. Trained at Angiers, 
France until November.- 191S. Sent on North Russia Expedition, five 
months. Returned to United States August S, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, August, 1919. 

SMITH, MARTIN HENRY. Private, Co. I, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Tavlor and Sevier from October 4, 1917, to May. 
1918. Overseas from May 17, 191S, to December 1, 191S. Battles: 
Ypres Front, Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele, Hindenburg Line. Wounded, 
September 29, in thigh and leg by shrapnel. Treatment in hospitals 
in France and England. Sent to United States December 1, 1918, to 
Debarkation Hospital No. 4, then to Base Hospital at Camp Grant. 
Discharged there January 4, 1919. 

TEBBING. WILLIAM GARRETT, Private, Headquarters Co., 25th F. A., 
9th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 
1918, to January 31, 1919. In hospital for influenza. Discharged at 
Camp Taylor, January 31, 1919. 

TEBBING, CHARLES HENRY, Wagoner, Supply Co.. 25th F. A., 9th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 191S, 
to March, 1919. Had influenza and pneumonia nine weeks. Dis- 
charged at Camp Grant, March 9, 1919. 

THOMAS, WILLIAM H., Private 1st Class. Battery B. 74th C. A. C. 
(Rwy. Artillery.) Trained at Forts Wadsworth and Hamilton, N. 
Y., from April 3, 191S. to September, 191S. Overseas from Septem- 
ber 23, 1918, to December 13, 191S. Discharged at Camp Sherman, 
January S, 1919. 

THOMAS. EDWARD HENRY, Private. Co. E, 127th Infantry, 32nd Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard from May 27, 1918, to 
August, 191S. Overseas from August 6, 1918, to April 27, 1919. 
Battles: Meuse-Argonne. Reached United States. May 5, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, May 23, 1919. 

VOR1S, AMZIE PETER. Private 1st Class, Co. A, 1st Bn., Ordnance Re- 
serve Corps. Trained at Ft. Scrivener, Ga., and Edgewood, Md., from 
March 13, 1918, to April, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 
5, 1919. 

VOGEL. CHARLES HERMAN. Private 1st Class. Co. D, 36th Infantry, 
12th Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn., and Camp Devens, 
Mass.. from May 23, 191S, to June, 1919. Had measles at Ft. Snelling. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, June 2S, 1919. 

WARD. JOHN CECIL, Private 1st Class, Co. C. 147th M. G. Bn., 41st 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard from May 27, 

1918. to August, 191S. Overseas from August 5, 1918, to February, 

1919. Battles: Verdun Front. Had influenza and pneumonia in Base 
Hospitals SS and 24. Sent to United States February 12, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, March 17, 1919. 

WARD, JOSEPH ELLSWORTH. Sergeant, Utility Det., Q. M. C. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from May 27, 191S, to February, 1919. Discharged 
February 14, 1919. 

WEST. WILLIAM HENRY, Private, Base Hospital 99. Trained at Camp 
Custer from August 29, 1918. to October. 1918. Overseas from October 
27. 1918, to May SI, 1919. Base Hospital 99 cared for eleven thousand 
patients, mostly convalescents. Was located at Hyeres, France. Re- 
turned to United States May 31, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, 
June 26. 1919. 

WEST, OTTO JOHN. Private. Batterv B, 2nd F. A. Trained at Camp 
Taylor and West Point, Ky„ from September 6, 1918, to March 28. 
1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor. Had bronchitis. In hospital two 
weeks. 

WESTMEYER. LOUIS FRED, Corporal, 5th Co., C. A. C. Trained at 
Fort Wadsworth, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to December, 1918. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, December 22, 191S 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 322 

WERNER, WILLIAM JOHN C Private, Co. G. 138th Infantry, 35th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to August 31, 

1918. Overseas from August 31. 1918, to April 19, 1918. Battles: 
Verdun Front, Somme Drive. Gassed on October 31, 1918. Rejoined 
regiment February 16, 1919. Had sprained ankle, four weeks' treat- 
ment in hospital, February and March, 1919. Reached United States 
on May 3, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 13, 1919. 

WHITTAKER. DALLAS TRENT, Private, Co. A, 19th M. G. Bn.. 7th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp MacArthur, Waco, Texas, from Mav 13, 
191S, to August, 1918. Overseas from August 18, 1918, to June 10, 

1919. Battles: Puvenelle Sector. Reached United States on June 21, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, June 28, 1919. 

WHITHAM, MILTON McKINLEY, Private 1st Class, Co. K, 28th Infantry, 
1st Division. Trained at Camp Gordon, Ga.. from May 29, 1918, to 
July, 1918. Overseas from July 14, 191S. Killed in battle, October 
5, 191S, near Exremont, France. 

WOLSTERMAN, EDWARD HENRY, Private, Headquarters Co.. 21st F. A. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from April 30, 1918, to December 13, 1918. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor. Had influenza three weeks. 

III. 

CENTER TOWNSHIP. 

ANDREWS, LEEDOM BOYD, Ensign, U. S. Naval Reserves. Trained at 
San Pedro N. R. Training Camp, California, from November 13, 1917, 
to June 5, 1918. On duty at Mare Island Receiving Ship, June 6, 

1918, to January 13. 1919. Assigned. January 14, 1919, to U. S. S. 
Oregon in Pacific waters. 

BEACH, WILLIAM. Private, Camp Crane Amb. Corps. Trained at Allen- 
town, Pa., from June 22. 1918, to February 1, 1919. Discharged, 
February 1, 1919, at Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa. 

BILBY, WALTER JASPER, Corporal, U. S. Marine Corps. Trained at 
Paris Island, S. C, and at Quantico, Va., from May 25, 1918. to Feb- 
ruary, 1919. Discharged at Quantico, Va., February 11, 1919. Served 
as drill instructor. Listed in Co. B. 3rd Separate M. G. Co., U. S. 
M. C. 

BLACK, PAUL McKINLEY, Seaman, 2nd Ciass, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111. and Puget Sound, Washington, from July 8, 1918, to Feb- 
ruary, 1919. Discharged at Puget Sound, February 15, 1919. 

BOSWELL, MORTON HARRISON, Private, Co. E. Am. Tr., 39th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from May 27. 1918, to August 30, 1918. 
Overseas from August 30. 1918. Returned to United States early in 

1919, and was honorably discharged. 

BROWN, GEORGE, JR., Private. Co. D. 333rd Infantry. 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to September, 1918. 
Overseas from September 1, 1918, to April 17, 1919. Battles: Verdun 
Front, October 15 — November 7. 1918. Reached United States on 
April 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 13, 1919. 

BLAIR, EMMETT CLYDE, Sergeant, Co. E, 16th Infantry, 1st Division. 
Trained at Camp Cotton, El Paso. Texas, from May 8, 1914, to June 
12. 1917. Overseas from June 14, 1917. to August 23, 1919. Battles: 
Cantigny, Montdidier-Noyon, Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne. 
With Army of Occupation at Dernbach and Selters, Germany, from 
November 12, 19lS, to August 16, 1919. Left France August 20, 1919. 
Reached United States September 3, 1919. Discharged September 
25, 1920. 

BRENTON. THADDEUS REAMY, H. A. 2, U. S. N. R. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111., from July 9, 1918, to January 28, 1919, when discharged. 
Had influenza at Great Lakes Naval Hospital. 

BRANHAM, RAY ROSCOE, Private, Headquarters Co., 54th C. A. C. 
Trained at Ft. McKinl?y, Me., Fort Williams, Me., and Jacksonville, 
Fla., from October 5, 1914. to March, 1918. Overseas from March 6, 
1918. Died of septic pneumonia at Vosges, France, October 21, 1918. 

BROKATE. JOHN HENRY, Private, Headquarters Co.. 123rd Infantry, 31st 
Division. Transferred to Co. L, 118th Infantry, 30th Division in 
France. Trained at Camp Wheeler, Ga., from June 24, 1918, to Oc- 
tober, 1918. Overseas from October 29. 1918, to March 15. 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, April 14, 1919. Influenza at Camp Mills. 

BYARD, EDWARD, Private, Headquarters Co., 148th Infantry, 37th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Montgomery and Lee from June 8, 1917, 
to June 23, 1918. Overseas from June 23, 1918, to March 15, 1919. 
Battles: Baccarat Sector, Avocourt Sector, Pannes Sector, Meuse- 
Argonne and Ypres Offensives. Returned to United States on March 
15 — March 23, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, April 21, 1919. 

21 



324 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

CHAPLIN FERDINAND ARNOLD, Wagoner, Ambulance Co. 36, 7th Di- 
vision Trained at Camp Greenleaf from April 30, 1918, to August, 
1918. Overseas from August 13, 1918, tc May 10, 1919. Battles: 
Argonne Forest. Cited for bravery at Rogeville. Returned to United 
States on May 23, 1919. Discharged at Camp Mills, N. Y., May 28, 
1919. 
CARTER, JOHN PAUL, Corporal, Co. A, 53rd Ry. Engineers. Trained at 
Camp Dix, N. J., from April 19, 1918, to June 9, 191S. Overs-as from 
June 9, 1918, to July 1, 1919. Injured in foot and arm while on 
duty in France. Returned to United States on July 12, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, July 19, 1919. 
CLINE, ARLEY M., Private, Laundry Co. 517. 1st Division. Trained 
at Ft Thomas, Ky„ from November 18, 1917, to March 28. 1918. 
Overseas from March 28, 1918. to June, 1919. Battles: Cantigny, 
Soissons. Returned to United States June 2S, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, August 19, 1919. 
CAPLINGER, JAMES LEROY, Sergeant. Motor Transport Corps, 336th 
M. G. Bn. Served in Regular Army, 1911-1913. Was wounded at 
Vera Cruz. Re-enlisted June 3, 1917. Trained at Camp Shelby until 
November, 1918. Sent to Camp Grant in 113th Co. M. P. service, in 
November, 1918. To Camp Wadsworth. on November 29, 1918. Dis- 
charged December 7, 1918, at Camp Wadsworth. Had pneumonia at 
Camp Shelby. ' 
CAPLINGER, WILBUR, Private, Co. A. 335th Infantry, S4th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, until discharged 
for disability on December 4, 1917. 
COX, MERRILL MILLER, Private, U. S. Marine Corps. Trained at Paris 
Island, S. C, from July 24, 1917, until assigned to U. S. S. Hancock 
for service at Galveston. Texas. Discharged at Paris Island, August 
23, 1919. Had a severe attack of pneumonia while on the Hancock 
at Galveston, in hospital eight weeks. 
CROXTON, RALPH LIONEL, Seaman and Signalman, U. S. S. Northern 
Pacific and U. S. S. Mexico. Trained at Great Lakes, 111., from No- 
vember 22, 1917, to April. 1918. Service on transport and on battle- 
ship; nine trips from April 25, 1918, to March 1, 1919. Discharged 
at Pittsburg, Pa., on June 28, 1919. 
DAY, PAUL E., Private 1st Class. Headquarters Co., 70th C. A. C. Trained 
at Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y., from Aoril 3, 1918, t-o July 15, 1918. Over- 
seas from Julv 15, 1918, to February 12, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, March 12, 1919. 
DAY, ROBERT EARL, Private 1st Class, I. C. O. T. S. Trained at Camp 
Grant from September 3, 1918, to January 10, 1919, when discharged 
at Camp Grant. 
DAMM, JOHN A., Private, 2nd Ind Light F. A., N. G. Trained at In- 
dianapolis two days in each week from December 8, 1917, to time 
of discharge at Indianapolis, April 15, 1919. Unit never sworn into 
Federal service. 
DISMORE, GLENN MARSHALL, Chief Mechanic. Co. C. 9th Ammunition 
Train. Trained at Chamber of Commerce. Indianapolis, Camp Sheri- 
dan and McClellan, Ala., from June 15. 1918, to February 7, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, February 7, 1919. 
ECKERT. WALTER, Private, 3S2nd Co., U. S. Marine Corps. Trained 
at Paris Island, S. C, from October 16. 191S, to February 28, 1919, 
when discharged at Paris Island. 
EWING, ASHEL E., Sergeant, 2nd Co., 6th Bn., Ordnance Repair Detch. 
Trained at Indianapolis from June 15. 1918, to August, i91S. Over- 
seas from August 31, 191S, to July 10, 1919. At Ordnance Repair 
Shops, Mehun. Returned to United States July 10, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman, July 2 5, 1919. 
FERATHER. DANIEL BRENTON, Mechanic, Headquarters Co., 159 Dev. 
Bn. Trained at Camp Taylor from May 27, 191S, to dischargs on 
December 24, 1918. 
FRANCISCO, WALTER BRENTON, Private, Troop H. 16th Cavalry. II. S. 
Regular Army. Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky„ and Ft. Brown. Texas, 
from June 3, 191S, to January 27, 1919. when discharged at San An- 
tonio, Texas. Hospital treatment at Brownsville, Texas. 
FRANCIS JAMES ALVA, Electrician 3rd Class, Destroyer Jacob Jones. 
Trained at Norfolk, Va., from September 29, 1916, until assigned to 
ship. Lost at sea when the Jacob Jones was torpedoed December 6, 

FREMDLING GEORGE AARON, Private, 29th Co., 8th Tr. Bn., lo9th 
Depot Brigade. Trained at Camp Taylor from July 22, 191S, to dis- 
charge on December 26, 1918. . 

GAITHER, LESTER ALBERT, Radio Electrician, U. S. Navy. Trained 
at Newport, R. I., and Harvard Radio School at Cambridge, Mass., 
from July 26. 1918, to January 14, 1919. Discharged at Cambridge. 
Throat operation at Chelsea, Mass., November 16— December 20, 1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 325 

GOSS, GEORGE, Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry. S4th Division. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1918, until discharged for dis- 
ability on February 4, 1918. 

GOSS. WILLIAM, Corporal, Co. B. 605th Engineers. 27th Division. Trained 
at Camps Taylor, Forrest and Upton from April 29, 1918. to June 1, 
191S. Overseas from August 1, 191S, to August 1, 1919. Battles: 
Chateau-Thierry and Argonne. Returned to United States on June 
1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on June 29. 1919. 

GRAY, DAILY WILLIAM, Private 1st Class, Headquarters Co., 70th C. 
A. C. Trained at Ft. Wadsworth. N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to. July, 
191S. Overseas from July 15th, 191S, to February 12 1919. Reached 
United States February 22. 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, 
March 12, 1919. 

HALLOWELL, WALTER STITES, Private, Battery F, 326th F. A., S4th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and West Point, Ky., from July 
22, 1918, to September 9, 191S. Overseas from September 9, 1918. 
to February 2, 1919. Reached United States on February 16, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, March 8, 1919. 

HICKS, LEO EDGAR, Radio Electrician 1st Class. U. S. S. Delaware and 
U. S. S. Seneca. Trained at Great Lakes, 111., from December 26, 
1917. Instructor at Great Lt,kes; Electrician at Chatham, Mass., 
Ottercliff, Me., Receiving Ship, Boston Marine Base, Shellburne, N. 
D., Tr. Station at Hingham. Mass., until assigned to ship and Naval 
Communicating Service, Washington, D. C. Released at Pittsburg, 
Pa., July 11, 1919. 

HANDLE, ROBERT NEVILLE, Private, Co. 4. 54th Infantry. Trained 
at Ft. Thomas, Ky., and Camp Wadsworth, S. C. from May 11, 1918, 
to September, 1918. Overseas from September. 1918, to January, 1919. 
Battles: Alsace-Lorraine, Argonne Forest. Suffered trench feet, 
shrapnel wounds and was gassed. Hospital treatment at Verdun. 
Returned to United States on January 7, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, February 1, 1919. 

HARDING, TILFORD IRVING, Seaman, 2nd CI., U. S. S. DeKalb. Trained 
at Great Lakes, 111., from August 27, 191S, to November, 1918, when 
assigned to U. S. DeKalb. Released January 21, 1919, at Pelham 
Bay, N. Y. 

HARTMAN. LEO LEWIS, Corporal, 80th Co., 6th U. S. Marines. Trained 
at Paris Island, S. C, and Quantico, Va.. from May 21, 1917, to Jan- 
uary, 1918. Overseas from January 19, 1.918, to July 29, 1919. Battles: 
Verdun Front. Toul Sector. Chateau-Thierry, Soissons. Wounded 
July 19 in right hip by high explosive shell. Gassed at Verdun in 
March. Sent to hospitals at Rouen for wounds. To Liverpool hos- 
pital for trench feet until November 20. Rejoined regiment by train 
at Rhinebrok«, Germany, on January 27, 1919. Stationed at Neuwied, 
Germany, for four months. Left Germany on July 23, 1919. Left 
France on July 29, 1919. Reached United States on August 7, 1919. 
Second Division paraded in New York City on August 9 and in Wash- 
ington, D. C, on August 12. 1919. (President Wilson led the parade 
of Marines in 1917 before going overseas.) Discharged at Quantico. 
Va., August 13, 1919. 

HUMPHREY, HENRY PHINEAS, Private, Co. 515, Motor Command No. 
44, M. T. C. Trained at Ft. Sheridan. 111.. Camps Merritt and Mills. 
N. Y., and Fifteenth St. Garage, New York City, also at Hoboken, 
N. J., from November 11, 1918. Had influenza-pneumonia at Camp 
Mills, N. Y., and diphtheria at Embarkation hospital, Hoboken, N. J. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 5, 1919. 

KENAN. CLYDE HARRY, Q. M. Sergeant, Q M. C. Trained at Columbus 
Barracks, Ohio, from March 7, 1914, to August, 1916. Sent to Colon, 
Republic of Panama, August 21. 1916. Furloughed to reserve, April 
9, 1919, at Ft. Amador, Canal Zone. 

KELLEY, DALLIE ANDERSON, Private 1st Class, Co. I, 166th Infantry, 
42nd Division. Trained at Camp Perry, O., and Camp Mills. N. Y., 
from June 8. 1917, to October. 1917. Overseas from October 29, 1917, 
to March 23. 1919. Battles: Toul, Lorraine Front, Champagne. Cap- 
tured by Germans on July 15, 1 91 S, and held prisoner until Novem- 
ber 11, 1918. Spent, two months in hospitals in France after re- 
lease by Germans. Left France, March 23, 1919. Reached United 
States April 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on April 23, 1919. 

KINDLESPARKER, BERT. Private. Co. A. 119th Infantry. 30th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Sevier from March 29 1918, to 
May, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 191S, to March 16, 1919. Badly 
burned in a gasoline explosion at Beaumont, France. Returned to 
United States March 16 — March 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, April 22, 1919. 

KESTLER, ERNEST LAWRENCE, Private, Battery B, 2nd Ind. Light 
F. A., N. G. Enlisted at Indianapolis, December 10, 1917. and trained 
there at the Armory two days in each week until discharged, April 
15, 1919. Not in Federal service. 



326 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

KRl'SE ALFRED. Private, Co. B. 605th Engineers, 8th Army Corps. 
Trained at Camp Forrest, Ga., from April 30. 1918. to September 20, 
1918. Overseas from September 20. 191S, to June 10, 1919. Reached 
United States on June 18. 1919. Discharged on June 26, 1919. 

KRUSE. FRANK FREDERICK, Private, 89th F. A. Trained at Camps 
Tavlor, Ky., and Jackson. S. C, from September 4. 191S, to March 
17. 1919. Discharged at Camp Jackson. Hospital treatment at Con- 
valescent Center, Camp Jackson. 

LEVI. WEBER. Second Lieutenant. Troop A. 8th Cavalry, 5th Division. 
Trained at Jefferson Barracks. Mo., from September 3. 1915, to Sep- 
tember 26, 1918. Service on Mexican border. Discharged on March 
7, 1919. 

LOVE. LEO CHESLEY. Private. M. G. Co.. 336th Infantry. 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 25, 1918. to September. 1918. 
Overseas from September 3. 1918, to June 5, 1919. Reached United 
States on June 12, 1919. Discharged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, July 
31. 1919. 

MOSIER CLAUDE. Private. Co. B. 5th Squadron, Air Service. Trained 
at Rolling Prairie. Ind., from October 15, 1918, to December, 1918, 
when discharged. 

McCLAIN. CLARENCE. Private, Battery B. 25th F. A.. 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22. 1918. to Feb- 
ruary, 1919. Discharged at Camp Grant on February 10, 1919. Hos- 
pital treatment for influenza at Camp McClellan. 

METER. VVLLIAM LEE, Private. Hospital Train No. 1. Jersey City. N. 
J.. Medical Department. Trained at Camp Taylor, Camp Greenleaf 
and Fort Sheridan from May 27, 191S, to October, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Dix, N. J. 

MISTLER. CARL ALBERT. Private, Co. M, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20, 1917, to 
May, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918. to January 7, 1919. Battles: 
Tpres Front in Belgium. St. Quentin Sector of Hindenburg Line. 
"Wounded September 29, 191$. Hospital treatment at Rouen. France, 
■Warminster. England. Winchester, England, Liverpool. England. 
Ellis Island. N. Y., and Camp Tavlor. Ky. Reached United States 
January 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor May 12, 1919. 

MOSIER. LOUIS BELMA. Private, 25th F. A. Trained at Camps Taylor 
and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to February 5. 1919, when dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor. 

MOST, ALBERT EMMETT, Private. Co. A, 309th Infantry. S4th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918. to September. 1918. 
Overseas from September 9, 1918, to July 1, 1919. Guarded German 
prisoners; built saw-mills; took care of five hundred kilometers of 
railway. Returned to United States on July 1, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman. Julv 18. 1919. Had mumps and "flu" at Base 
Hospital 34. St. Mais, France. 

MEYERS. ROBERT. Sergeant. Medical Department. U. S. Army. Trained 
at Camp Tavlor. Kv„ from March 29, 1918, to discharge at Camp 
Taylor on July 29. 1919. 

NOYES. RUSSELL JAMES. Sergeant. Co C. 12Sth Engineers. Trained 
at Camp Humphreys. Va.. from May 7. 1 91S. to October. 1918. Over- 
seas from October 2ft. 1918, to June 30, 1919. (Hospital treament for 
foot trouble.) Reached United States July 12. 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman. Julv 22. 1919. 

RADIGAN. ROBERT BERNARD. Seaman. U. S. S. Alabama. Trained at 
Great Lakes and Hampton Roads, from June 15, 1918, to September 
30, 1918. Discharged at Hampton Roads. 

REINKING. ELMER COURTNEY Frn ate. Co. B. 46th Bn.. U. S. Guards. 
Trained at Camp Taylor to October 2S, 1918. Sent to Ft. Riley. Kan. 
for guard dutv. Discharged at Camp Funston. Kas. on December 
11, 191S. 

ROW. IRVING FRANCIS. First Lieutenant. Dental Reserve Corps. 
Trained at Camp Bowie. Texas. Enlisted July 13. 1917. Received 
commission August 15, 1917. Called to active duty at Camp Bowie 
on September IS. 1918. where he spent ten months. Discharged at Camp 
Taylor, August 13. 1919. 

ROW. PERRY QUENTIN. Seaman 2nd Class, U. S. N. R. Trained at 
Great Lakes. 111., from June 20. 191S, to September 7. 1918. and at 
Indiana University from September 7, 191S, until released December 
20. 1918. 

SAGE. ROY, Private 1st Class, M. G. Co., 120th Infantry. 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Tavlor and Sevier from October 4, 1917. to May, 
1918. Overseas from May 17. 1918, to April 1, 1919. Battles: Ypres, 
Belgium; Hinderburg Line at Bellicourt, Cambraie. St. Quentin. 
Reached United States on April 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, April 24, 1919. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 327 

SELLERS. BENJAMIN HARRISON, Private, 29th Co., 159th Depot Brigade. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard from July 22. 1918, to 
April, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 8, 1919. 

SIMON, JOHN HENRY, Private, Co. A. 335th Infantry. 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, until discharged for 
disability, December 3, 1917. 

SMOCK, DON CARL, Corporal, U. S. Infantry. Trained at Camp Taylor 
from September 20, 1917, to December 20, 1917. At Camp Meigs 
to January 15, 1918. Overseas from January 17, 1918, to June 10, 
1919. Returned to United States June 19. 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, June 27, 1919. 

SMOCK, REUBEN HORTON, Private, Co. F, 2nd Engineers, 2nd Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from September 20, 1917, to February, 
191S. Overseas from February 27, 1918, to August 1, 1919. Battles: 
Chateau-Thierry, Aisne-Marne, Marbache, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne. 
With Army of Occupation in Germany eight months. Located at 
Engers. Returned to United States, August 1 — August 8, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman. August 15, 1919. 

SMITH. JOHN SIMEON, Sergeant, Co. A, 18th Infantry, 1st Division. 
Trained at Texas City, Texas, from May 2, 1914, to June, 1917. 
Overseas from June 12, 1917, to August, 1919. Battles: Montdidier, 
St. Mihiel, Aisne-Marne, Meuse-Argonne. Toul, Sizeares, Beaumont, 
Bosemont, Cantigny. Mont Sector, Chateau-Thierry. Wounded twice 
in left arm; gassed at Cantigny; with Army of Occupation in Ger- 
many from November, 191S, until August, 1919. Reached United 
States on August 18, 1919. Re-enlisted. 

SCHROEDER, IRVING HENRY. Private. 7th Recruiting Squadron Air 
Service. Was trained at Ft. Wayne, Mich., from August 15, 1918, 
to discharge there on January 28, 1919. 

SPARLING. CLARENCE EUGENE, First Lieutenant. C. A., 335th In- 
fantry, S4th Division. Trained in this unit at Camp Taylor from 
September 9, 1917, to January 5. 1918, when transferred to 3rd O. 
T. S. C. Commissioned Second Lieutenant June 1, 191S. Transferred 
to Inft. Replacement Camp, Camp Pike, Ark., then to 7th Co., S. A. 
R. D., in September. 1918. Sailed as commander of company on Sep- 
tember 23, 1918. Transferred in France to Co A, 1 61st " Infantry, 
41st Division. (Sunset Division.) Commissioned First Lieutenant 
and transferred to Yankee Division. Overseas from September 23, 
191S. to March 2S. 1919. Battles: Verdun. Returned to United States 
April 6, 1919. Discharged at Camp Devens. April 28, 1919. 

STONEKING, ELMER McKINLEY, Private, Motor Transport Corps. 
Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., from September 1, 1918. to 
April 11. 1919. when discharged. Five weeks of influenza-pneumonia 
at Indianapolis Training School. 

STUBBEMAN. ROBERT LAWRENCE. Private, Field Hospital Co. 115. 
114th Sanitary Train, 39th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and 
Beauregard from May 27, 1918, to August. 1918. Overseas from 
August 26, 1918. to June, 1919. Reached United States June 30, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 9, 1919. 

STUTIE. HARRY. Sergeant 1st Class. Q. M. C. Trained from June 11. 
1917. to May 10", 1919, at Camp Custer in Chemical work. Discharged 
at Camp Custer. 

SWAZY, HARRY, Sergeant, E. Co., 3rd Division Supply Train. Trained 
at Camp Cody, N. M. and Camp Travis. Texas, from December 3, 
1913, to April, 191S. Battles: Chateau-Thierry, Aisne-Marne. Slightly 
gassed, suffered pneumonia June 10, 1918. Eight weeks in hospital. 
Returned to United States on July 22, 1919. Discharged November 
6, 1919, at Camp Dix, N. J. 

TERRY. ROY STANHOPE. Private, Battery A, 25th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to dis- 
charge at Camp McClellan, on January 31, 1919. 

TOWNSEND. SANFORD BEVAN, Private, Indiana Limited Service. Served 
as army clerk on the White County Draft Board at Monticello, under 
Major George C. Baltzell. State Conscription Agent for Indiana. 
Served from September 7, 1918, to January 7. 1919, when discharged 
at Ft. Benjamin Harrison. 

WAGER, KENAN VELMORE, Corporal, 107th Ordnance Depot Co. Trained 
at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. and Camp Gordon, Ga., from June 4, 1918, 
to March 10, 1919, when discharged. Member of band. 

WAGNER, WILLIAM WEBER, Musician 1st Class. Headquarters Co., 25th 
F. A., 9th Division. Trained at Camp McClellan from July 22, 1918, 
to February 5, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, February 5, 1919. 

WILSON, THOMAS BENJAMIN, Private 1st Class, 4 63rd Co., U. S. Marines. 
Trained at Paris Island, S. C, from October IT, 1918, to discharge on 
January 18, 1919. 



328 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

WILSON". ADLAI ERNEST. Private, Medical Department, I". S. Army. 
Trained at Columbus Barracks. Ohio, from March 15, 1917, until his 
death there of measles and diphtheria on April 25, 1917. 

WILSON. WILLIAM DAILY, Private, S. A. T. C, Franklin College, Frank- 
lin, ind. Trained from October 1, 1918, until discharged on Decem- 
ber 21, 1918. 

WOOLEY, EDGAR DANIEL. Private. Co. I, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20, 1917, to 
May, 191S. Overseas from May 17, 1918. to December 8, 1918. Battles: 
Ypres, St. Quentin. Wounded at St. Quentin, September 29, 1918, 
machine-gun bullet through the mouth, knocking out seven teeth 
and ranging down through the lung. Hospital treatment. 6th British 
General Hospital and at Portsmouth, England. Reached United 
States December 16, 1918. Discharged at Camp Grant on January 
11. 1919. 

YATER, RUSSELL CHARLES. Corporal. 20th Co.. 5th Training Battalion, 
158th Depot Brigade. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, 
until discharged on December 7, 1918. 

IV. 
i DELAWARE TOWNSHIP. 

AHRENS. JOHN EDWARD. Private, Battery E, 70th C. A. C. Trained 
at Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to July 19. Overseas 
from Julv 15, 1918. to February 11. 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man, March 12, 1919. 

ASCHE. PHILIP FREEMAN, Seaman 2nd Class. U. S. Navy. Trained 
at Great Lakes. 111., and Hampton Roads, Va.. from May 13, 1918, to 
October. 1918. Overseas from October 24. 1918, to April 28. 1919. 
At Queenstown, Ireland, from November 15, 1918, lo April 25. 1919. 
Reached United States on May 7. 1919. Discharged June 20, 1919. 

ASCHE. CLARENCE THEODORE, Sergeant. Battery D. 40th C. A. C. 
Trained in Regular Army at Ft. Adams. R. I., in 1912-13. At Ft. 
Barrv, Cal., from Julv. 1914. to September. 1918. At Camp Upton. 
N. Y., September 15-1S. 191S. Overseas from October 18, 1918, to 
November 22, 1918. Returned to Camp Upton. November 22. assigned 
here to 40th C. A. C. Had gone overseas in Replacement Unit. Fur- 
loughed to Regular Army Reserve at San Francisco, October, 1919. 

BENTZ. JOSEPH WILLIAM, Corporal, 2nd Co., ISth Engineers. Trained 
at Camp Tavlor in Co. A. 335th Infantry, 84th Division, from Sep- 
tember 20, 1917. to January 1. 191S. At Camp Grant in 18th En- 
gineers until March 1. 1918. Overseas from March 14, 1918, to July 
14. 1919. Transferred at Brest. France, to Administrative Labor 
Bureau at Bordeaux, France. Served here until returned to United 
States. July 14 — July 23, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, July 
31. 1919. 

BODE. ELMER WILLIAM, L. E. R.. U. S. Naval Reserves. Trained at 
Great Lakes, 111., and at Harvard Uhiversity Radio School from Feb- 
ruary 4, 1918, until discharged at Cambridge, Mass., on February 
13. 1919. 

BODE. GEORGE OMER. Seaman. U. S. S. Vermont. Trained at Great 
Lakes. 111. from February 15, 1918, to October. 1918, when assigned to 
the Vermont. Served on U. S. S. Pastory, Transport, from January 
to September, 1919. Discharged September 24, 1919, at Pittsburg, Pa. 

BULTMAN. FORREST CLYDE. Private. Terre Haute. S. A. T. C. Trained 
at Terre Haute from October 7, 1918. until his death from pneumonia 
at St. Anthony's Hospital. Terre Haute, on November 7. 1918. 

BUSTEED. WILLIAM ERNEST, Petty Officer, U. S. S. Imperator. Trained 
at Great Lakes. 111., from February 8. 191S. to assignment to ship. 
Service, transport work from New York to Brest, France. 

COOK. ALEX HENRY. Seaman 2nd Class. U. S. Navy. Trained at Great 
Lakes. 111., from June 4. 1918, to release on February 26, 1919. Hos- 
pital record for influenza. 

COOK, NICHOLAS GEORGE. Private, U. S. Infantry. Served in Alaskan 
regiment. 

DUNBAR. EVERETT B.. Private. Air Service. Trained at special school 
at Indianapolis and Ft. Wayne. Mich., from August 15, 1918, to dis- 
charge at Ft. Wayne on January 22, 1919. 

EINHAUS. AMOR JOHN HENRY. Private, Batterv B. 74th C. A. C. Trained 
at Ft. Hamilton. N. Y.. from April 3. 1918, to September, 1918. Over- 
seas from September 23. 1918, to December 13. 1918. Reached United 
States on December 23, 1918. Discharged at Camp Sherman on Jan- 
uary 9, 1919. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 329 

ERTZINGER, GEORGE G., Private 1st Class, Headquarters Co., 36th In- 
fantry, 12th Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp 
Devens, Mass., from May 23, 1918, to June, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Taylor on June 23, 1919. 

FINKE. HARRY C, Private. Field Hospital 381. 321st Sanitary Train. 
96th Division. Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Wadsworth. S. C, 
from July 22, 1918, to discharge at Camp Taylor on December 30, 1918. 

FINKE, CLARENCE JOHN, Private, Evacuation Hospital 29. Trained at 
Camps Taylor, Greenleaf and Beauregard from May 28, 1918, to No- 
vember, 191S. Overseas from November 2, 191S, to June 28, 1919. 
Reached United States on July 8, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man on July 18, 1919. 

FOLLMER, FRED ALBERT. Private 1st Class, Field Remount Squadron 
337. Trained at Camps Taylor, Ky., Johnston, Fla. and Hill, Va., 
from October 4. 1917, to October 23, 1918. Overseas from October 
23, 1918, to July 5, 1919. Reached United States on July 15, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman on July 23, 1919. Had cerebro-spinal 
meningitis at Camp Taylor. 

FRUCHTNICHT. CHRISTIAN WILLIAM, Private, Field Remount Squadron 
323. Trained at Camps Taylor and Jos. E. Johnston from September 
20, 1917, to September 7, 1918. Overseas from September 7, 1918, to 
June 17, 1919. Reached United States on June 24, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman on July 9, 1919. 

GAULT, HARRY HARRISON, Sergeant, Co. D, 17th Railway Engineers. 
Trained at Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga., from June 16, 1917, to July, 
1917. Overseas from July 28, 1917, to March 11, 1919. Reached Unite'd 
States on March 25, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on Anril 
14. 1919. 

GRAY, THOMAS, Private 1st Class, Battery A. 25th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to dis- 
charge at Camp Taylor, January 31, 1919. 

GOOKINS, JAMES WATSON, Corporal, Co. A, 335th Infantry, S4th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman from September 9, 

1917, to September, 1918. Overseas from September 4, 1918, to April 
18, 1919. Trained in France at Camp d'Auvors and LeMans. Reached 
United States on April 24, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on May 
10, 1919. Main service was in training fresh troops at Camps Taylor 
and Sherman. Corporal Gookins volunteered ahead of his call and 
went in the first two per cent, draft from Ripley County. 

HARLAMMERT, HARRY W r ILLIAM, Cfofporal, Headquarters Co., 3rd 
Evacuation Hospital, Medical Corps. Trained at Camps Taylor and 
Greenleaf from May 27, 1918, to January, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman on January 11, 1919. 

HASTINGS, WALTER ELBERT, Private 1st Class, Ambulance Co. 34, 7th 
Sanitary Train, 7th Division. Trained at Camp Taylor and Ft. Ogle- 
thorpe, Ga., from April 30, 191S, to August, 1918. Overseas from 
August 14. 191S, to May 18, 1919. Reached United States on May 29. 
1919. Discharged at Camp Lee, Va., on June 3, 1919. 

HORN, OSCAR CARL, Corporal, 498 Motor Truck Co., 421 Motor Supply 
Train. Trained at Camp Jos. E. Johnston, Jacksonville, Fla., from 
June 14, 191S. to September, 1918. Overseas from September 17, 1918, 
to September 21, 1919. Reached United States on September 29, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Dix, N. J., October 4, 1919. 

JOHNSON, JOHN WILLIAM, Private, Headquarters Co., 70th C. A. C. 
34th Brigade. Trained at Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, 
to July, 1918. Overseas from July 14, 1918, to March 8, 1919. Reached 
United States on March 25, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on 
April 30, 1919. Hospital treatment at Angers, France, Base Hos- 
pitals 27 and 85. 

KECK, ASA NEWMAN, Fireman, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great Lakes, 
111., Hampton Roads, Va. and Bay Ridge, N. Y. from May 17. 1918, 
to discharge at Great Lakes on June 19,1919. 

KECK, CHESTER ARTHUR. Sergeant, Motor Truck Co. 469. Motor Supply 
Train 418, 5th Army Corps. Trained at Columbus Barracks, Ohio, 
Camp Jos. E. Johnston, Fla. and Camp Stuart, Va., from February 21, 

1918, to August, 1918. Overseas from August 14, 1918, to August 10, 

1919, Battles: Verdun, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne. Reached United 
States on August 20, 1919. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., on August 
26, 1919. 

KECK, DAVID IRWIN, Private, General Hospital No. 3. Trained at Camps 
Taylor and Greenleaf from May 27, 1918, until assigned to General 
Hospital 3 at Colonia, N. J. Discharged at Colonia on October 4. 191S. 
Mastoid operation of right ear while at Colonia resulted in disability. 

KEENE. JOSEPH BERNARD, Private, Co. D, 23rd Infantry, 2nd Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, to April 1, 191S. 
Sent overseas in Automatic Casual Replacement Co. on April 8, 1918. 
To that time had belonged to Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. 



330 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Sent to 2nd Division at Chateau-Thierry June 5, 1918. At Soissons in 
July Marbaehe Sector near Metz in August. St. Mihiel Offensive in 
September. Champagne Drive in October. Was wounded on October 4 
in the right hip with a machine-gun bullet. Was also gassed at the 
same time. Treated in Base Hospital No. 5, near Paris, Red Cross 
Unit and in Base Hospital 85 at Paris. Returned to his regiment at 
Vall'andar, Germany, on January 7. 1919. Left Germany June 15, going 
by train to Brest, France. L^ft Prance June 23, 1919. Reached Hobo- 
ken N. J. on August 4. Discharged at Camp Sherman on August 16, 
1919. 

KOECHLIN ROY CHARLES, 3rd Class Q. M., U. S. Naval Reserves. Trained 
at Great Lakes, 111. and Hampton Roads, Va.. from May 3. 1918, to 
October, 191S. Sent to Brest, France, on the Madawaska in October. 
Released March 7. 1919, at Philadelphia, Pa. Had mumps three weeks 
at Hampton Roads, Va. 

KREINHOP GEORGE ALBERT, Private 1st Class, Battery A. 26th F. A., 
9th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 

1918, to discharge at Camp Taylor on February 12, 1919. 
KREINHOP, WILLIAM HENRY, Private 1st Class, U. S. Army Base Hos- 
pital, Medical Corps. Trained at Camps Taylor, Ky., Greenleaf, Ga., 
and Green, N. C, from May 27, 1918, to March 17, 1919, when dis- 
charged at Camp Green. 

LUERS. CONRAD HENRY. Private, 2nd Co., Development Battalion No. 
1. Trained at Camps Taylor and Henry Knox, Ky., from July 22, 1918, 
until discharged at Camp Taylor on January 25, 1919. Over three 
weeks' treatment for influenza at Camp Taylor. 

MESSNER, WALTER MARTIN, Bugler, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camps Taylor and Camp Sherman from September 
20, 1917, to September, 1918. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to April, 

1919. Transferred to Co. D. 362nd Infantry, 91st Division in France. 
Battles: Lvs-Scheldt in Belgium. Returned to United States in 
April, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 1, 1919. 

NEDDERMAN. ELMER B., Private, Co. I, 131st Infantry, 33rd Division. 
Trained at Camp Beauregard, La., from May 27, 1918, to August. 
1918. Overseas from August 26. 1918, tc May 14, 1919. Reached 
United States on May 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman. June 
3, 1919. In Luxemburg with the Army of Occupation through the 
latter part of the winter and in the spring of 1919. 

NEDDERMAN. FRED H., Mechanic, Co. E, 51st Infantry, 6th Division. 
Trained at Camp Forrest, Ga., from May 1, 1918, to July, 1918. Over- 
seas from July 6, 1918, to September, 1919. Battles: Meuse-Argonne 
and Vosges Offensives. Was assigned to General Pershing's Com- 
posite Regiment, May 10, 1919. and took part with it in the parades 
in Paris, London, Brussels, New York and Washington. This regi- 
ment was chosen to represent the American Army, and Ripley County 
is proud to claim three of its members. Returned to United States 
September 8, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, September 27, 191S. 

PAPENHAUS, EARL LEONARD, Sergeant, Base Hospital 119. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from March 29, 1918, to October, 1918. Overseas 
from October 29, 1918, to July 6, 1919. Was located at Savonay, 
France. Base 119 was last used as an Evacuation Hospital. Re- 
turned to United States July 15, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on 
July 23, 1919. 

PAPENHAUS, ALFRED CARL, Private, Ambulance Co. 34, 7th Sanitary 
Train, 7th Division. Trained at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from April 
29, 1918, to end of July, 1918. Overseas from August 14, 1918, to 
June 17, 1919. Battles: Puvenelle Sector, October 10 — November 11. 
1918. Ambulance Companies established First Aid, Stations and 
were organized as litter-bearers, runners carrying messages, and 
as ambulance drivers. The wounded were carried to Field Hos- 
pitals and sent in Ambulances to Base Hospitals. This last was 
supposed to be the work of the Evacuation Hospitals. The Am- 
bulance Companies worked on >the battlefields. Reached United 
States on June 30. 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 10, 1919. 

RECKEWEG, NELSON HERMAN, Private. S. A. T. C. at Camp Witten- 
berg, Springfield. Ohio. Trained here from October 11, 1918, until dis- 
charged at Wittenberg Barracks on December 19, 1918. 

RIMSTIDT, EDWARD JAMES, Corporal. 14th Machine Gun Battalion 
Co. B, 5thDivision. Enlisted as private in the Regular Army, Feb- 
ruary 25, 1916. Trained at Camp Cotton, El Paso, Texas, in Co. F. 
7th Infantry, and also at Ft. Bliss, Texas, for eighteen months. 
Sent to Gettysburg, Pa., in June, 1917, then to Camp Green. S. C. 
Transferred here to Fifth Division. Trained at Camp Green until 
April, 1918. Overseas from April 12, 1918, to March 2S, 1919. Battles: 
In trenches, Aneuil Sector, St. Die Sector. St. Mihiel, Verdun. Wounded 
at Verdun, shrapnel thorough lower arm. Treated at American 
Base Hospital at Meves, France, until January 25, 1919. Sent then 
in a Casual Company to Cranes, France, and transferred to Co. H, 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV A R 331 

340th Infantry, 85th Division. Left France, March 28, 1919. Sent to 
Camp Upton and transferred to Transport Corps 378. Was slightly 
gassed at St. Mihiel. Two machine-gun bullets passed through the 
canister of gas-mask also. Discharged July 30, 1920, at Camp Upton, 
New York. 

SARRINOHAUS, HARRY RICHARD, Private 1st Class, Co. F, 51st In- 
fantry, 6th Division. Trained at Camp Forrest, Ga., from May 4, 
1918, to July, 1918. Overseas from July 6, 1918, to July 1, 1919. 
Battles: Argonne-Meuse Reserve. Returned to United States on 
July 6, 1919. Discharged at Camp Mills, L. I., N. Y., on July 15, 1919. 

SARRINOHAUS, GEOROE JOHN, Private 1st Class, Machine Gun Co.. 
36th Infantry, 12th Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and 
Camp Devens, Mass., from May 23, 1918, to February, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor on February 3, 1919. 

SCHMALTZ, HENRY EDWARD, Corporal, Co. C, 36th Infantry. 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn: and Camp Devens, Mass., 
from May 23, 1918, to February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
February 10, 1919. 

SCHUSTER, JOHN HAGEN. Private 1st Class, U. S. A. Debarkation Hos- 
pital No. 1. Trained at Camp Greenleaf. Ga., from May 27. 191S, 
until assigned to hospital. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 23, 
1919. 

SMITH, HENRY McKINLEY, Mail Clerk. U. S. Navy. Trained at New- 
port, R. I., from April 16, 1917. Not discharged but still in service 
in 1920. 

SHORTEN, JAMES WILLIAM, Private, Medical Corps, U. S. Army. Trained 
at Camp Sherman, O. and Camp Morrison, Va., from December 15, 

1917, until discharged at Lee Hall, Va., on April 24, 1919. 
SHORTEN, STEVEN N., Private. 55th Co., 5th Regiment, U. S. Marine 

Corps. Trained at Paris Island, S. C, from Feb. 4, 1918, to May 
23, 1918. Overseas from May 23, 1918, to June 20', 1919. Battles- 
Soissons, Chateau-Thierry, Meuse-Argonne Gassed, shoulder shat- 
tered by shell. Treatment at American Hospital at Bordeaux, France. 
Returned to United States on June 20, 1919. Furloughed on reserve, 
June, 1919. 

VOEGE. JOHN HENRY, Private, Battery B, 26th F. A.. 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to De- 
cember, 1918. Hospital treatment at McClellan for influenza two 
weeks in October. Discharged at Camp McClellan, December 16, 
1918. 

WATTERS. CURTIS ORLANDO, Cook, Co. D, 53rd Infantry, 6th Division. 
Trained at Camp Cotton, Texas. Camp Baker, Camp Forrest, Camp 
Wadsworth, Camp Grant and Ft. Leavenworth, Kas.. from June 24, 
1916, to July, 1918. Overseas from July 6, 1918, to June 6, 1919. 
Returned to United States on June 12, 1919, was with Punitive Ex- 
pedition into Mexico, August 1, 1916 — February 5, 1917. Discharged in 
November, 1919. 

WEBSTER. ARTHUR, Private 1st Class, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Taylor, Kv.. from October 4, 1917, to March. 

1918. Overseas from March 15, 1918, to March 7, 1919, with First 
Construction Co. Reached United S"tates again March 19, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, April 11, 1919. 

WENTZ, FRANK MORRIS, Private, Co. B, 1st Anti-Aircraft M. G. Bn. 
Trained at Camp Sherman and Camp Sheridan from July 28, 1917, 
to April, 1918. Overseas from April 29, 1918, to April 23, 1919. Battles: 
Aisne-Marne, Somme, Meuse-Argonne, Toul, Verdun, St. Mihiel. Re- 
turned to United States on April 23, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man, May 23, 1919. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 

ADAMS, WILLIAM LYNN, Quartermaster Aviation, 1st Class, Aviation 
Service, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great Lakes, 111., from July 3, 1918, 
until released at Great Lakes on December 31, 1918. 

ALLEN, ARTHUR LESLIE, Wagoner, Headquarters Co.. 70th C. A. C. 
Trained at Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to July, 1918. 
Overseas from July 15, 1918, to February 12, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, March 12, 1919. 

ANDERSON, CLAYTON HAZEN. Private Co. B. S6th Infantry, 12th Di- 
vision. Trained at Ft. Snelling Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass.. from 
May 23, 1918, to March, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on March 
14, 1919. 

AUSTIN. JOHN GROVER, Private, 3rd Co., 5th Bn., 1st Regiment, P. O. D. 
Trained at Camp Hancock, Ga., from June 15, 1918, to August, 1918. 



332 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Overseas from August 31, 191 S. to July 8, 1919. Was placed in 
Ordnance Department after the Armistice. Air Service until then. 
Discharged July 26, 1919. 
ACRA TOHN WESLEY, Private 1st Class, Base Hospital, Camp Taylor. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from March 29, 1918, until April 23, 1918. 
Served at hospital until discharg-ed on September 4, 1919. 

BAILEY GEORGE HIRAM, Private, S. A. T. C, Purdue University. 
Trained at Purdue and Fortress Monroe, Va., from October 9, 1918, 
to discharge at Ft. Monroe on February 8, 1919. Was promoted to 
Second Lieutenant, Coast Artillery Officers' Training School. 

BEDUNNAH ALONZO RAYMOND, Private, Battery B, 6th F. A. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from July 22, 1918, to December 13, 1919, when dis- 
charged. 

BEDUNNAH, THOMAS EDWIN. Private, Headquarters Co., 70th C. A. C. 
Trained at Fts. Hamilton and Wadsworth, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, 
to July, 1918. Overseas from July 19, 1918, to February 12, 1919. 
Reached United States on February 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, March 12, 1919. 

BELCHER, JAMES LAWRENCE, Sergeant, Co. E, 42nd Infantry. Trained 
at Ft. Bliss, Texas. Ft. Douglas, Utah, Ft. Logan, Col., Camp Grant, 
111 Camp Dodge, la., Picatuny Arsenal, N. J., Camp Devens, Mass., 
Camp Mills, N. Y., and Camp Upton, N. Y., from June 20, 1917, to 
discharge at Camp Upton on January 23, 1919. 

BERGDOLL, HOWARD GLENN, 1st Sergeant. Butchery Co. 327, Q. M. C. 
Trained at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. and Camp Jos. E. Johnston, Fla., 
from June 4, 1918, to July, 1918. Overseas from July 26, 1918, to 
June 28, 1919. Returned to United States on July 9, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Grant, July 21, 1919. 

BERGMAN, FRANK HENRY, Private, Battery A. 9th Division. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to discharge at 
Camp Taylor, February 12, 1919. Had influenza, pneumonia and 
rheumatism at Base Hospital, Camp McClellan. 

BERGMAN, GEORGE, Private, Headquarters Co., 70th C. A. C. Trained 
at Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to July. 191S. Over- 
seas from Julv 15, 1918, to February 12, 1919. Reached United States 
on February 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, March 12, 1919. 

BERGMAN, WILLIAM JOHN, Corporal, Co. B, 36th Infantry, 12th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass.. from 
May 23 1918, to June, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, June 23, 
1919. 

BOHLKE, EDWARD LOUIS, Wagoner, Co. B, 1st M. G. Bn., 1st Division. 
Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., from June 5, 1917, to October, 
1917. Overseas from October 31, 1917, to August 24, 1919. Battles: 
Cantigny, Soissons, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Sedan. With Army 
of Occupation in Germany from November, 1918, to August, 1919. 
Returned to United States August 24 — September 1, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Taylor, September 25, 1919. 

BORN, EMIL GEORGE, Sergeant 1st Class, Co. C, 346th Machine Gun Bn. 
Trained at Camp Lewis, American Lakes, Washington, from August, 
1917, to April, 1918. Overseas from April 15, 1918, to January 11, 
1920. Served in Paris in clerical work. Returned to United States 
on January 24, 1920. Discharged at Camp Dix, N. J., on January 31, 
1920. His transport, Northern Pacific, coming home rescued the pas- 
sengers and crew on the disabled Powhatan five hundred fifty-eight 
miles out from New York. 

BRANDT. FRANK JOHN, Private 1st Class, Co. B, 36th Infantry. 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass., 
from May 23, 1918, to March, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor March 
29. 1919. 

BRUCE, MURRAY LANG, Sergeant, 22nd Infantry. Trained at Ft. Thomas, 
Ky., from May 7, 1918, to July, 1918. Overseas from July 3, 1918, 
to February 28, 1919. Battles: Argonne, St. Mihiel. Was gassed 
in battle. Treatment at Essay, Toul, Rimacourt, Chatel-Guyox and 
Bordeaux, France. Discharged, April 25, 1919. 

BRUCE, STANLEY HARRY, Corporal, Co. F. 336th Infantry, 84th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to discharge, 
May 1, 1919. Transferred to Military Police, Co. B, 2nd Dev. Bn. The 
84th was called the Lincoln Division. 

BUTTS, PALMER HUBERT, Water Tender, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great 
Lakes from February 15, 1916, to June, 1917. Assigned to U. S. S. 
Cruiser Birmingham, convoy duty to France. Had scarlet fever and 
was operated on for appendicitis at Great Lakes in February and 
March. 1917. Discharged at Mare Island, Cal., on February 14. 1920. 

BUTTS, HUBERT PERRY, Captain, Medical Corps. Served three years 
in Hospital Corps, in Spanish War, Boxer Trouble in China, and in 
Philippines from 1900 to 1903. Received commission as First Lieu- 
tenant, Medical Corps on May 16, 1917. Assigned to Am. Train, 84th 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 333 

Division. Trained at Camp Taylor. Mustering duty of National Guard, 
South Dakota in July and August, 1917. Treatment at Base Hos- 
pital, Camp Taylor, for infection of throat and loss of voice, May 
and June, 1918.' Still in service 1920. 

BREWINGTON, ROBERT WILLIAM, Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at 
Valparaiso and Purdue University from October 9. 1918. until dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor on December 22, 1918. Had waived exemp- 
tion granted September 1, 1918, because of dependent mother. 

COFFEE. ROBRRT, Private, Co. F, 16th Infantry 1st Division. Trained 
at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to September. 101 S. Over- 
seas from September 1, 1918, to August 23. 1919. Sent in Replace- 
ment Unit to First Division. Battle: Sedan. With Army of Oc- 
cupation in Germany from November, 1918. to August. 1919. Reached 
United States on September 3, 1919. Discharged at Ft. Sheridan, 111., 
on October 29, 1919. 

CONGER WILBUR GLENN. Private, Mobile Hospital Unit 102. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and Sherman from March 29, 1918. to November. 
1918. Overseas from November 13. 1918, to March 6. 1919. Reached 
Fnited States, March 19, 1919. Discharged, April 7, 1919, at Camp 
Sherman. 

CONNELLEY. PAUL CURTIS, First Sere-eant. Co. B, 139th M. G. En.. 
28th Division. Trained at Camp Shelby. Miss., from June 1, 1917 to 
October, 1918. Overseas from October 6. 1918, to December S, 1918. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, January 8, 1919. 

CONYERS, JOHN WOODWARD, Private. S. A. T. C. Trained at Camp 
Purdue, Lafavette, Ind., from October 9, 1918, to discharge on De- 
cember 19. 1918. 

ENDRES. EDWARD HENRY. Private, Co. C, 36th Infantry, 12th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Ft. Snelliner. Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass., from 
Mav 23. 1918. to February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tavlor, Feb- 
ruary 1. 1919. 

ENDRES. CHRIST FRED. Private, Co. M. 120th Infantry. 30th Division 
Trained at Camps Tavlor and Sevier from October 4, 1917. to Mav 1. 
1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918. Battles: Ypres. Kemmel Hill. 
Voormezeele. Hindenburg Line. Killed near Vaux, Andigny, France, 
on the Somme Front on October 10, 1918. 

FELIX, ALVIN CLIFFORD. Private Air Service. Trained at Ft. Wayne, 
Mich., in Indianapolis Tr. Det No. 1, from August 15, 191 S, to dis- 
charge at Ft. Wayne on January 22, 1919. 

FERRTNGER. LOUIS JOHN, Water Tender, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great 
Lakes and U. S. S. Indiana at Ft. Monroe, Va., from May 15, 1918. to 
assignment to ship. Served on U. S. S. Santiago. U. S. S. Lake Tra- 
verse, Naval Base 29 and in Freight Transport. Discharged at Pitts- 
burg, Pa. on September 18. 1919. Treated for influenza at Bordeaux, 
France. 

FISHER, EVERETT, Private Co. I, 2nd Engineers. Trained at Camp 
Humphreys, Va., from Mav 23, 1918, to discharge at Camp Hum- 
phreys on February 17, 1919. 

FLETCHER, FLOYD RAYMOND, Private, Co. I, 119th Infantry, 30th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20, 

1917. to May 1. 1917. Overseas from May 17. 1918. to March 21, 1919. 
Battles: Voormezeele, Bellicourt, Nauroy, Beaucourt. Premont. Busigny, 
Becqugny, EsCanfourth, Hai Memeresse, Vaux, Andigny. St. Benim. 
St. Souplet, Molain, St. Martin Riviere. Ribeauville and Mazinghoim. 
Reached United States on April 2, 1919. Discharged April, 1919. 

FOX. WILLARD WALTER. Wagoner, Supply Co., 334th Infantry. 84th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman from October 6, 

1918, to September, 1918. Overseas from September 2, 1918, to July 
5, 1919. Service, worked on Convalsecent Camp at Le Mans, France. 
Returned to United States on July IS, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, July 25, 1919. 

FOX. CHRISS ADAM, Private, 3rd Co., 1st Dev. Bn. Trained at Camp 
Taylor from June, 1918, to discharge on January 25. 1919. 

FRANKEL. NATHAN, Private, Amb. Co. 34. 7th Sanitary Train, 7th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Greenleaf from April 30, 191S, 
to August, 1918 Overseas from August 14, 1918, to June 15, 1919. 
Service: Puvenelle Sector west of Moselle River, October 10 — Novem- 
ber 9 Defensive: Same sector, November 9-11, Second Army Offensive. 
With Army of Occupation at Coblenz. Germany, on detached service 
in Februarv and March, 1919. (Two ambulance companies were sent.) 
Reached United States on June 30, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor on July 10, 1919. 

FUERST, EDWARD FRANK, Private 1st Class, 5th Co., C. A. C. Trained 
at Jackson Barracks, New Orleans, La., from December 18, 1917, to 
discharge on December 18, 1918. 



334 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

FULLER. IVOR FRANK, Private, Battery F. 339th F. A. Trained at 
Purdue University Motor Mechanic Section, from April 27, 1918, to 
June 16, 191S, at Camps Mills, L. I. Had a major operation at Mitchell 
Field, L. I. Post Hospital. Was at Base Hospital at Mineola, L. I., 
before operation. Sent to Camp Merritt in Casual Battalion after 
recovery and returned to regiment at Camp Mills. Overseas from 
August 23, 1918, to January 19, 1919. Trained in France at Ordnance 
Training Center No. 3 at Claremont-Ferrand, France. Sent back 
to 339th F. A. in November, 1918. Left France on January 19, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor on February 22, 1919. 
GANDER, LOUIS CLEMENS, Private, Co. F, 2nd Bn., 22nd Engineers. 
Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, from May 6, 1918, to August, 1918. 
Overseas from August 12, 1918, to July 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, July 16, 1919. Had reached United States on July 13, 1919. 
GARRISON. LEE ARTHUR, Corporal, M. G. Co., 40th Infantry. Trained 
at Ft. Snelling, Minn., from June 21, 1917. Served at Ft. Sheridan, 
111., Camp Custer, Mich, and Camp Sherman, O. Discharged January 
2, 1919, at Camp Sherman. Had had service previously in Marine 
Corps. "While in the Marines had served on U. S. S. Kansas, Texas, 
Chester and Salem. 
GERRARD, GEORGE, Private, Co. B, 429th Regiment. Motor Service 
Transportation. Trained at Valparaiso, Ind., from August 28, 1918, 
to June, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 5, 1919. 
GERRARD, WILLIAM, Corporal, Battery A, 9th F. A. Trained at Ft. 
Logan, Col., Ft. McDowell. Cal., Schofield Barracks, H. T., from June 
28, 1917, to March 31, 1919, when discharged at Ft. D. A. Russell, 
Wyoming. 
GERRARD. FRED, Ordnance Sergeant, 1st Class, Cadre. 159th Depot 
Brigade, later 142nd Ordnance Depot Co. Trained at Camps Taylor 
and Henrv Knox from April 29, 1918, to discharge at Camp Knox 
on April 28, 1919. 
GROSSMAN. JOSEPH, Private 1st Class, 112th Am. Train. 37th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sheridan, Ala., from April 30, 1918, to 
June, 1918. Overseas from June 27, 1918. to March 21, 1919. Battles: 
Somme and Argonne. Reached United States on April 2, 1919. 

Discharged at Camp Taylor on April 14, 1919. Was slightly gassed 
twice in France. Had hospital treatment for mumps also. 
HARRIS, RAYMOND BRYAN, Boilermaker, U. S. S. Jason. Trained at 
Norfolk. Va. from January 18, 1917. to June 8, 1917, when assigned 
to ship. Overseas transportation service during the war. Enlist- 
ment will expire January 17, 1921. 
HEISMAN, SAMUEL RICHARD, Private, Co. M, 120th Infantry, 30th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20, 1917, 
to May 1, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918. Battles: Ypres Front, 
Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele in Belgium; Hindenburg Line. Gassed 
on October 23 and died at hospital in Rouen, France, on October 28, 
1918. 
HERBST. JOSEPH EDWARD, Corporal, Co. A, 337th Bn., Tank Corps. 
Trained at Camp Colt, Gettvsburg, Pa., from June 28, 1918 to October, 
1918. Overseas from October 27, 1918, to July 30, 1919. Reached 
United States on August 9. 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, 
August 15, 1919. With Army of Occupation in Germany from De- 
cember 16, 1918, to July 22, 1919, in Motor Transport Corps 815, 19th 
Provisional Motor Command. Headquarters at Bassenheim, Germany. 
HILLMAN GEORGE WASHINGTON. Horseshoer, Battery A. 150th F. A., 
42nd Division. Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison and Camp Taylor 
from May 8, 1917. to October, 1917. Overseas from October 18, 1917. 
to April, 1919. Battles: Lorraine Front. Returned to United States 
May 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on May 9. 1919. Was with 
Army of Occupation in Germany from December, 1918, to April, 1919. 
Marched through Luxemburg. 
HILL, JOSEPH PHILIP, Private, S A. T. C. Trained at Central Normal 
College, Danville, Ind., from October 21, 1918, to discharge on De- 
cember 14, 1918. 
HUNTER, RUSSELL EDWARD. Private. Motor Transport Corps. Trained 
at Valparaiso and Indianapolis, Ind., from August 28, 1918, to dis- 
charge at Indianapolis, December 11, 191S. 
HUNTINGTON. FRANK CORNELIUS, Private 1st Class, Base Hospital, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. Trained at Camp Taylor from March 29, 1917. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, September 2, 1919. 
JACKSON. HERSCHEL RAYMOND, Private 1st Class, Ambulance Co. 35. 
7th Sanitary Train, 7th Division. Trained at Ft. Thomas. Ky., Camp 
Greenleaf, Ga.. from May. 1918. to August, 1918. Overseas from 
August 14, 1918, to May 11, 1919. Reached United States on May 
23. 1919. Discharged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison on July 5. 1919. 
Treated in hospitals overseas for pneumonia and various disabilities. 
Treated at Camp Greenleaf for bad ankle before going overseas. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 335 

KAMMAN, CLARENCE HERMAN, Corporal, Co. D, 427th Tel. Bn., Signal 
Service. Trained at Burlington University, Vermont, from July, 1918, 
to discharge in January, 1919, at Camp Taylor. 

KOENIG, JOHN OSCAR, Engineman, 2nd Class, U. S. Navy. Trained at 
Great Lakes, 111., from May 8, 1918, until assigned to ship service on 
battleship and oil tanker. Discharged at Philadelphia on February 
26, 1919. 

KOHLMEIER, WALTER CHRIST, Corporal, Co. C, 17th M. G. Bn., 6th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky. and Camp Wadsworth, Ga., 
from May 4, 191S, to July. 1918. Overseas from July 7, 1918, to June 
3, 1919. Battles: Gerrardnier Defensive and Meuse-Argonne Defensive. 
Returned to United States on June 3 — June 11, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Taylor on June 24, 1919. 

KRICK, PORTER MONTGOMERY, First Lieutenant, Infantry. Trained 
at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., from May 13, 1917, and at Camp Han- 
cock, Ga. until discharged on December 13, 1918. Summary of train- 
ing: Enlisted at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, May 13, 1917. 
Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Infantry Officers' Reserve Corps. 
Assigned to 159th Depot Brigade, Camp Taylor, Ky., August 29, 1917. 
Remained here until May 28, 1918, when transferred to Camp Han- 
cock and assigned to Personnel work for several months. Trans- 
ferred then to Specialists' School as instructor in army paper work. 
Sent from there to Machine Gun School and qualified as Machine-Gun 
Instructor after three months' training, was then assigned to Main 
Training Depot, Machine Gun Training Center at Camp Hancock, 
from which organization was discharged. 

LAMPERT, CLARENCE WILBUR GEORGE, Corporal, 91st Co., Bn. H, 
U. S. Marine Corps. Trained at Paris Island, S. C from January 
9. 1918. to March 25, 1919, when placed on Inactive Service at Marine 
Barracks, Philadelphia, Pa. 

LAUBER, WILBUR LAWRENCE, Private 1st Class, Base Hospital 54. 
Trained at Camps Taylor, Greenleaf and Green, from May 22, 1918. 
to August. 191S. Overseas from August 15, 191S, to May 16, 1919 
Reached United States on May 2S, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman 
on June 12, 1919. 

LAWS, EDGAR DELAP, Private, S. A. T. C., University of Cincinnati. 
Trained at Cincinnati, O., from October 7, 1918, until discharged De- 
cember 20, 1918. 

LAWS, NOBLE ABBOTT, Corporal, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor, Hancock and Green, from September 20, 

1917, to June, 1918. Overseas from June 23, 1918, to June 19, 1919. 
Reached United States on June 26, 1919. Discharged . at Camp Sher- 
man on July 12, 1919. 

LEVINE, PHILIP. Private, S. A. T. C University of Cincinnati. Trained 
at Cincinnati, O., from October 9, 191S. until his death from pneu- 
monia on November 7, 1918, at the Cincinnati General Hospital. 

MAFFEY, CAROLYN. Nurse, Red Cross, at Camp Meade, Md., from Sep- 
tember 28, 1918, to Novemb?r 3, 1918, when transferred to Ft. Mc- 
Henry. Discharged here on December 28, 191S. 

MAFFEY, HARRY EUGENE, Private. Headquarters Co., 70th C. A. C. 
Trained at Fts. Hamilton and Wadsworth, N. Y.. from April 3, 191S, 
to July, 1918. Overseas from July 14, 1918, to February 11. 1919. 
Reached United States on February 22. 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, March 12. 1919. 

MAFFEY, ALBERT JOSEPH, Corporal, Co. I. 147th Infantry. 37th Division. 
Trained at Camps Sheridan, Ala. and Lee, Va. .from June 30, 1917, 
to June, 191S. Overseas from June 23. 1918. to March 17, 1919. Battles: 
Alsace-Lorraine, Meuse-Argonne, St. Mihiel, Yp|res-Lys, Belgium, 
First and Second. Wounded by shrapnel in left arm. Treated at 
Canadian Hospital No. 3 at Boulogne. France. Reached United States 
on March 29, 1919 Discharged at Camp Sherman on April 19, 1919. 

MAHLER, WILLIAM ARTHUR, Private, Training Battalion at Camp 
Grant, 111. Trained from September 3, 191S, to September 17, 1918, 
when discharged for disability. 

McKITTRICK. BENJAMIN HARRISON, Private, Co. H. Motor Transport 
Corps, Tr. Det. Trained at Winona Lake, Ind., from October 15, 1918, 
until discharged at Indianapolis, December 20. 191S. 

McNEW, DUFF. Corporal. M. G. Co., 36th Infantry, 12th Division. Trained 
at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass., from May 23, 1918, 
to discharge on June 23, 1919. 

NICHOLAS, RAYMOND EDWARD. Private, Motor Transport Corps, Val- 
paraiso Training Detachment. Trained at Valparaiso, Ind.. from 
September 14, 1918, until discharged December 11, 1918. 

PETERS, CLYDE C, Private 1st Class, Co. K, 34th Infantry, 7th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky. and Camp Forrest, Ga., from May 3, 

1918, to August, 1918. Overseas from August 17, 1918, to June 12, 



336 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

1919. Battles: Puvenelle Sector, west of the Moselle, October 9— 
November 9 (Defensive); same Sector, November 9-11, 1918 (Offensive) 
Reached United States on June 18, 1919. Discharged at Camp Custer, 
Mich., June 26, 1919. 
PLUMP, LESTER GEORGE. Private, S. A. T. C, Central Normal College 
Unit. Trained at Danville, Ind., from October 18, 191S, until dis- 
charged December 14, 1918. 
POHLMAN, FRED GERHARDT, Private, Battery C, 825th F. A., S4th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and West Point, Ky., from May 
27, 1918, to September, 1918. Overseas from September 8, 1918. to 
January 16, 1919. Reached United States on January 29, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor on February 13, 1919. 
RANEY, ROY, 2nd Class Sea Guard, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great Lakes, 
111., from July 9, 1918, until his death there from influenza on Sep- 
tember 29, 1918. 
REUTER, WILLIAM JULIUS, Private, Headquarters Co., 362nd Infantry, 
91st Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to 
August 23, 1918. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to April 3, 1919. 
Battles: Lys-Scheldt Offensive, October 31 — November 11, 1918. Re- 
turned to United States, April 14, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man. May 2, 1919. Itinerarv while in the service: At Camp Sher- 
man from June 26, 1918, to August 23, 1918. Ten days at Camp Mills, 
L. I., N. Y. By rail to Quebec, September 2. Embarked at Quebec 
on transport Saxonia, September 3. Reached Liverpool, England, 
September 17. By train to Southampton, over night there, then by 
boat across the English Channel to Le Havre, France. Waited at 
Dusillac for equipment two weeks. Kept up training. Sent to 
Allyansalles for ten days. Marched to Levigny. Traveled three 
days and nights to Ypres, Belgium. Detrained here and marched 
across the old Ypres battlefield to Most, Belgium, where was trans- 
ferred from Co. D, 335th Infantry, 84th Division, to the 91st Division. 
Marched on to Roylers, Isiehham, and so on for two days and nights 
to the Flanders Front, Lys-Scheldt Offensive. Remained here in 
open warfare from October 31 to November 11, 1918. At Adenaard, 
Belgium, on November 11th. Went to Mulbach, Oost-Veltin, from 
December 1 to January 1, 1919. Entrained at Rosebrugge and went 
to Le Mans, France, Charterais and so on to La Fuerte, St. Bernard. 
Marched to St. Cosmy. Stayed here until March 23. Entrained at 
La Fuerte, St. Bernard, for St. Nazaire, France. Stayed here ten 
days. Embarked on the transport Edward Luchenbach, American 
ship, on April 2, 1919. Sailed April 3. Reached New York, April 14. 
1919; disembarked at Hoboken, N. J. on April 15, 1919. Sent to Camp 
Merritt, N* J. for about a week, then to Camp Sherman and dis- 
charged on May 2, 1919. 
REUTER. EMIL OTTO, Private 1st Class. Co. B, 36th Infantry, 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Spelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass., 
from May 23, 1918, until discharged at Camp Taylcr, June 23, 1919. 
Injured leg by jumping off bank in bayonet practice and was in 
hospital for treatment six weeks in November and December, 191S, 
at Camp Devens, Mass. 
RIX. CHARLES EDWARD, Private, Co. G, 6th Infantry, 5th Division. 
Trained at Ft. McArthur, Texas, from August 6, 191S, to September, 
1918. Overseas from September 26, 191S, to March 5, 1919. Battles: 
Verdun Front. Brondeville. Wounded in left thigh by shrapnel. 
Hospital treatment at Royal, France. Reached United States on 
March IS, 1919. Discharged at Camp Dodge, la., March 27, 1919. 
ROBBINS, VERNON, Private 1st Class, Co. C, 113th Engineers, 38th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camp Shelby, Miss., from April 6, 1917, to Septem- 
ber, 191S. Overseas from September 14, 1918, to June 12, 1919. Service 
in France: Worked on roads, repairing pikes and so on in the St. 
Mihiel region from October 1st to November 11. Same work at Lyon 
for two months. Went to Germany in January. Did guard work 
near Coblenz for about four months. Left Brest, France, on June 
12, 1919, reaching Hoboken, N. J. on June 19, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, June 25, 1919. 
ROBBINS. CHARLES, Private 1st Class, Co. C, 113th Engineers, 38th 
Division. Trained at Camp Shelby. Miss., from June 5, 1917, to Sep- 
tember, 191S. Overseas from September 15, 1918, to June 14, 1919. 
Returned to United States, June 14 — June 19, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, June 28, 1919. 
ROBBINS GEORGE ALFRED, Corporal, Base Hospital Unit 118. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from March 29, 1918, to November, 1918. Overseas 
from November 11, 1918, to July 6. 1919. Returned to United States 
on July 16, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 23, 1919. 
ROBINSON, WILLIAM, Sergeant, Headquarters Co., 16th Infantry, 1st 
Division. Trained at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Mo., from May 
11 1917, until assigned to the Sixteenth Infantry. Overseas from 
June 14, 1917, to Julv 23, 1918. Battles: Toul, Amiens and Cantigny 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 337 

Sectors. Was sent back to United States in advance of his division 
to become an instructor in methods of trench warfare. Reached 
United States on July 31, 1918. Was discharged at Camp Taylor, 
Ky., on February 3, 1919. 

RUNNER, ROY, Private, Co. E, 18th Railway Engineers. Trained at 
Camp Taylor, Ky. and Camp Grant. 111., from September 30, 1917, to 
March 1, 1918. Overseas from March 13, 1918, to April 16, 1919. 
Service overseas: Building- docks, buildings, harbors and so forth, 
at St. Nazaire, France. Reached United States on April 28, 1918. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, May 10, 1919. In hospital at Camp Tay- 
lor one month with measles. 

SEEVERS, EVERETT AUGUST, Seaman 2nd Class, U. S. Navy. Trained 
at Great Lakes, 111., from July 20, 1918. to October, 1918. Sent to 
New York in October and did submarine patrol work at Brooklyn 
Navy Yard from October 5, 191 S, to November 26. 191 S. Returned to 
Great Lakes until discharged on January 21, 1919. Three weeks in 
hospital with influenza. 

SHAZER. CHESTER WILLIAM, Private 1st Class, Battery A. 70th F. A. 
Trained at Camp Taylor and West Point, Ky., from September 6, 
1918, until discharged at Camp Knox on February 5, 1919. 

SHOCKLEY. FRANK EVERETT, Private. Co. C, Motor Transport Corps, 
Valparaiso Training Unit. Trained at Valparaiso, Ind. and Ft. Sher- 
idan, 111., from August 8, 1918, until discharged at Valparaiso, De- 
cember 14, 1918. Had hospital treatment at Ft. Sheridan . 

SHOCKLEY, EARL. Wagoner, Battery A, 150th F. A.. 42nd Division. 
"Rainbow." Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison and Camp Taylor, 
from Mav 28, 1917, to October. 191S. Overseas from October 18, 1918, 
to April 25, 1919. Battles: Lorraine Front. Marched to Germany in 
November, remaining near Coblenz until April, 1919. Returned to 
United States on May 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 9. 
1919. 

SMITH, HARRY WILLIAM. Private. Co. F, 2Sth Infantry, 1st Division. 
Trained in Texas from October 2S, 1916, to June. 1917. Overseas from 
June, 1917. Killed in battle at Cantigny in the first American Of- 
fensive, May 29. 1918. 

SUTTON, RUSSELL NOBLE. Musician, Headquarters Co., 70th C. A. C. 
Trained at Ft. Wadsworth, Staten Island, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, 
to July, 1918. Overseas from July 15. 191S. to February 11, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, March 12, 1919. 

THOMPSON. THOMAS ALFRED. Musician. U. S. Navy. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111., from July 3, 191S. until released on March 22. 1919. 

VOORHEES, WALTER CLAYTON. Private 1st Class. Co. C, 10th Field 
Signal Bn.. 7th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Alfred Vail, 
from March 29. 1918. to August, 1918. Overseas from August 17, 
1918, to June 17, 1919. Battles: Puvenelle Sector west of Moselle, 
October 10 — November 9. Same Sector, Offensive. November 9-11. 
1918. Returned to United States on June 27, 1919. Discharged July 
5, 1919, at Camp Sherman. 

WITHROW, GEORGE ALBERT, Captain, Dental Corps. Trained at Camp 
Shelby, Miss, and Camp Green. N. C. from September 8, 1917. to May, 
1918. Overseas from May 19. 191S, to December 26, 1919. Went 
overseas with 77th F. A. Trained in France at Camp De Souge. 
Battles: Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel, Verdun Sector (Argonne). Hos- 
pital treatment at Base S7, Toul, France. November, 1918. and Camp 
Hospital 33 at Brest, France, for gas. affecting eyes and lungs. Re- 
turned to United States on December 26 — January 5, 1919. Discharged 
March 4, 1919, at Camp Meade. Md. Was graduated from Army 
Sanitary School at Longres, France, September 15, 191S. 

WHITLATCH. ARTHUR ALLEN, Private, S. A. T. C, University of Cin- 
cinnati. Trained at Cincinnati, O., from October 1, 191S, to discharge 
on December 20, 1918. 

WHITLATCH, IRVING ALCEDO, Major, Medical Corps. Trained at Ft. 
Benjamin Harrison, Ind.. from August 27, 1917, to November, 1917. 
Had been commissioned First Lieutenant on June 10, 1917. On 
December 5. 1917, sailed from San Francisco, Cal.. as member of 
Medical Exp. to Roumania. Recalled by wireless because of collapse 
of Roumania. Stationed with 20th U. S. Infantry, at Ft. Douglas. 
Utah, January 15 — June 30, 1918. At Camp Funston from June 30 
to November 24, 191S. Commissioned Captain M. C. September 9, 
1918. Surgical service in Base Hospital, Ft. Riley, Kas., November 
24, 1918, to February 19, 1919, when released at Ft. Riley. Com- 
missioned Major, M. R. C, April 9, 1919. 

WOOD, ALFRED JOSEPH, Private 1st Class, Co. B, 304th Bn, Tank 
Corps. Trained at Purdue Universitv, Lafayette, Ind. and Camp 
Colt, Penn., from June 28, 1918. to October. 1918. Overseas from 
October 20, 1918, to June 2S, 1919. Returned to United States. June 
28 — July 9, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, July 18, 1919. 



338 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

WOOLLERY, CLYDE SAMUEL, Private, Headquarters Co., 70th C. A. C. 
Trained at Ft. Wausworth, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to July. 1918. 
Overseas from July 15, 1918, to February 12, 1919. Returned to United 
States on February 12 — 22. 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on 
March 12. 1919. 

WULLNER. HARRY WILLIAM. Private, Co. C. 362nd Infantry. 91st Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 2fi, 1918. to Septem- 
ber, 191S. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to April 3, 1919. Battles: 
Lys-Seheldt Offensive in Belgium, October 31 — November 11. Re- 
turned to United States, April 3 — 14, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman on May 3, 1919. Moved from camp to camp in France after 
the Armistice, spending two and one-half months at St. Cornes, the 
longest period in one place. 

VI. 
JACKSON TOWNSHIP. 

ABPLANALP, JOSEPH NICHOLAS, Private, Battery E. 67th F. A. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and Knox, Ky.. from September 6, ISIS, to dis- 
charge at Camp Knox on December 20, 1918. 

ALEXANDER. MONFORD WILLIAM, Private 1st Class, Base Hospital 54, 
Medical Corps. Trained at Camps Taylor, Greenleaf and Stuart, from 
April 30, 1918, to August, 191S. Overseas from August 14, 1918, to 
May 16, 1919. Hospital 54 was located at Meves-Bulcy, a hospital 
center in France. Served here from arrival September 1, 1918. to 
April 25, 1919. Served as orderly and ward-master. In surgical 
ward while orderly. In meningitis ward after being made ward- 
master, November 15, 1918. Returned to United States on May 16 — 
May 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 13, 1919. 

BAUER. HENRY, Private, Co. C, 334th Infantry. 84th Division. Also 
in Co. F, 329th Motor Repair Shop Unit Trained at Camp Sherman, 
O., and Camp Holabird, Md., from June 26, 191S. to discharge at Camn 
Custer, Mich., on March 7, 1919. 

BODENBERG, ALBERT CHARLES, Private, Co. C, 119th Infantry, 30th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from October 4, 1917, 
to May, 1918. Overseas from May 17. 1918, to January 9, 1919. Battles: 
Poperinghe Sector. Dickebush Sector, Kemmel Hill and Scottish 
Woods Sector during July and August. 1918. Cambrian-St. Quentin 
Front, Peronne Sector and Bellicourt, September to October 19. 
Wounded October 19, near Bohain or St. Souplet, machine-gun bul- 
let in right hand. Treatment in Field Hospital 53. Canadian hos- 
pital one night, by Red Cross Train to Base 5 near St. Souplet for 
three days. Then sent to Southampton. England, to Alexander Hos- 
pital Unit 40. Transferred to Am. Hospital, at Portsmouth, England. 
Stayed here a month, then sent to Evacuation Hospital at Liverpool 
and put in C. Co., Casuals, for going home. Returned to United 
States on January 19, 1919. One week at Staten Island Hospital, 
then to Hospital 32, Chicago, for three weeks. Discharged, May 5, 
at Chicago. 

BOKELMAN. CHRIS. Corporal, Co. B. 138th Infantry and Co. L. 140th 
Infantry. 35th Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 

1918. to August. Overseas from August 31, 1918, to July 15, 1919. 
Battles: Argonne, September 28- — November 11, 1918. Was at Bon- 
court in the advance toward Metz on November 11. Transferred to 
police duty at Paris after the Armistice. Left France July 15, 1919, 
reached United States. July 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
August 2, 1919. Hospital treatment three times, influenza and had 
tonsils removed. 

BROWN. WILLIAM THEODORE, Mechanic, Battery A, 25th F. A., 9th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 191S, 
to discharge at Camp Taylor on February 5, 1919. 

BROWN, CLEM IGNATIUS, Private, Base Hospital SS. Trained at Camps 
Taylor and Greenleaf from May 27, 1918, to November 11, 1918. Over- 
seas from November 11, 1918, to July 10. 1919. Eight months service 
at Savonay, France. Returned to United States, July 10 — July 20, 

1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, August 1, 1919. 
BRUNNER, DENNIS JOHN, Private. Evacuation Hospital 27. Trained at 

Camps Tavlor. Greenleaf and Pike from May 27, 1918, to October, 

1918. Overseas from October 26, 1918. to August 19. 1919. Service 
at Le Mans, France, from December 15, 1918, to February 19, 1919. 
In Coblenz. Germany, with the Army of Occupation from February, 

1919, to August 10, 1919. Returned to United States, August 19 — 
August 29, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, September 4, 1919. 

BRUNNER. ANDREW JACKSON. Private, Dev. Bn. No. 1, 1st Co. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from July 22, 1918, to discharge on February 22. 
1919. Had influenza-pneumonia with abscess from infection, October 
2 — December 15. Had mumps, January 26 — February 10. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 339 

CASTER, CHARLES, Private, 70th C. A. C. Trained at Fts. Hamilton 
and Wadsworth, N. Y„ from April 3, 1918. to July, 1918. Overseas 
from July 15, 1918, to February 12, 1919. Returned to United States, 
February 12 — 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, March 12, 1919. 

CASTER, ROBERT RAY, Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, until discharged 
for disability on November 28, 1917. Treatment at Base Hospital. 

COX, BAIRD FAVILLE, Private 1st Class, Supply Co. 312, Q. M. C. Trained 
at Camp Jos. E. Johnston at Jacksonville, Fla., from December 14, 
1917, to June, 1E1S. Overseas from June 6, 191S, to June 27, 1919. 
Treated at Base Hospital 43. Romorantin, France. Returned to United 
States, June 27 — July 7, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, July 
15, 1919. 

COX LAFAYETTE THOMAS, Captain, Medical Corps. Trained at Ft. 
Benjamin Harrison, Ind. and General Hospital 25 at Ft. Benjamin 
Harrison until discharge. Enlisted August 19, 1917, as First Lieu- 
tenant, Medical Corps. Promoted to Captain on March 15, 1918. Dis- 
charged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, December 16, 1918. 

EBNET JOHN, Private, Co. D, 36th Infantry, 12th Division. Trained at 
Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass., from May 23, 1918, to 
February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, February 3, 1919. 

ENGLE ORA CHARLES, Private 1st Class, Co. C, 9th Field Signal Bat- 
talion, 5th Division. Trained at Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. and Ft. Dodge 
la., from March 29, 1918, to June, 1918. Overseas from June 21, 1918, 
to July 15, 1919. Service: Repairing- telegraph and telephone lines, 
establishing and operating same. Battles: St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, 
Verdun, in all, thirty-six clays in fighting lines. Marched to Luxem- 
burg City after the Armistice, to repair lines, also to Esch. Luxem- 
burg. Returned to United States, July 15 — July 28, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman, August 4, 1919. 

FOWL, GODFREY, Private. Battery B, 25th F. A.. 9th Division. Trained 
at Camps Taylor, and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to January 31, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor. 

GILLAND, HARRY, Private, 2nd Co., 1st Battery, 159th Depot Brigade. 
Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky.. from September 6, 1918, to discharge 
at same camp on December 22, 1918. 

GILLAND, WILLIAM EDWARD, Corporal, Co. K, 119th Infantry, 30th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 9, 

1917, to May 1, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 191S. Battles: Ypres 
Front in Belgium, Hindenburg Line. Killed by shell-fire, October 9, 

1918, at Bellicourt, France. 

GRIFFITH, HARLEY CLARK. Boatswain, U. S. S. West Arrow and U. 
S. S. Breese. Trained at Norfolk, Va. Did freight duty on the West 
Arrow, supplies to France. Convoy duty on the Breese. Discharged 
December 27, 1918. Had enlisted, May 28, 1918. Attended Officers' 
Training School from August 27 to November 27, 1917. Served in the 
Navy from June, 1910, to June, 1916. 

GROW, CLYDE ERNEST, Private, Co. G, 362nd Infantry, 91st Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26 to August 23. Overseas 
from September 9 to April 2. 1919. Battles: Lys-Scheldt, Flanders 
Front, Belgium. The 91st Division stayed at Remy. France, three 
months after the Armistice. Returned to United States on April 
2 — April 26, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 1, 1919. 

HARDEBECK, ALBERT BERNARD, Private, 29th Co., Tr. Bn„ 159th 
Depot Brigade. Four days at Camp Taylor from July 22 — July 26, 
191S. Discharged because of physical disability. 

HEATH. EARL EUGENE, First Lieutenant, Medical Corps. Trained at 
Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from September 1, 1918, until assigned to special 
duty at Camp Green, N. C, and at Walter Reed Hospital, D. C. later. 
Discharged from Walter Reed Hospital, Washington, D. C, on May 
27, 1919. 

HICKS, CLARENCE FOREMAN, Seaman, 2nd Class, U. S. Navy. Trained 
at Great Lakes, 111., from July 21. 1918. Served as Camp Guard at 
Great Lakes. Discharged on February 1, 1919. 

HICKS, HAROLD ALBERT, Q M. 3rd Class, U. S. Navy. Enlisted Feb- 
ruary 15, 1918, as apprentice seaman. Sent to Great Lakes, 111. 
and transferred May 1, 1918, to Naval Station, Brest, France. Pro- 
moted to seaman, May 10, 191 S. To Quartermaster 3rd Class on 
August 1, 1918. Assigned to U. S. Destroyer Winslow on July 3, 
1918. Did troop convoy duty from then until Armistice. Discharged 
at Newport, R. I. on August 12, 1919. 

HONNINGFORD, JOSEPH H., Candidate Chaplain Training School. 
Entered training at Camp Taylor on August 23, 1918, assigned to 
Fifth Training School. Applied for K. of C. Overseas on Septem- 
ber 14, 1918. Accepted and passports arranged for when Armistice 
was signed and no more chaplains were expected to sail. Served 
at Rockaway Beach Naval Aero Station and temporary duty at Ft. 

22 



340 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Tiklen, N. Y. Transferred to Ft. Riley. Kas., and then to Ft. Sher- 
idan, 111. Released from service on September 5, 1919, and returned 
to his home at Evansville, Ind. Sent to Napoleon, Ripley County, as 
Pastor of St. Maurice Congregation and became the first chaplain 
of Prell-Bland Post, American Leg-ion at Batesville. 

KRESS, HENRY F., Private 1st Class, 116th M. P. Co., 42nd Division; 
later in M. P. Co., 32nd Division. Trained at Camp Taylor from 
September 20, 1917, to April. 191S. Overseas from April 9, 1918, to 
May 1, 1919. Battles: Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Returned to United 
States, Mav 1 — Mav 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on May 
27, 1919. 

LAMB, ANDREW JACOB, Private, Co. A, 72nd F. A. Trained at Camps 
Taylor and Knox, Ky., from September 6, 1918, to February 3, 1918, 
when discharged. 

MEYER. JOHN HENRY, Corporal. Co. I, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20. 1917, to 
May 1, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to April 1, 1919. Battles: 
Ypres, Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele in Belgium. Hindenburg Line, St. 
Quentin, Bellicourt. St. Souplet. Returned to United States on April 
1 — April 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 24, 1919. 

MONTGOMERY. ROBERT JUNNER, Private, Co. D, 36th Infantry, 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling. Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass., 
from May 23, 191S. to discharge at Camp Devens, June 12. 1919. 
Injured at Camp Devens by truck running over foot when coming 
off guard duty. Foot broken in two places. Hospital treatment at 
Camp Devens, Ayer, Mass. 

MYERS. CHARLES. Cook, Battery A, 52nd C. A. C. Trained at Fts. 
Hamilton and Wadsworth. N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to July 15, 1918. 
Overseas from July 15, 1918, to December 22. 1919. Battles: Meuse- 
Argonne Front. September 12 — October 1, 191S. Sent to Haussimont 
to change to American guns. Had been using- twelve-inch Railroad 
guns, French twenty-four foot long guns. Still here when Armistice 
was signed. Stayed until December 1, 1918, then sent to St. Nazaire. 
Returned to United States, December 22 — January 3, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, January 24, 1919. 

NEWMAN. GEORGE HERMAN. Private, Co. A, 139th M. G. Bn., 38th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Harrison, nd. and Camp Shelby, Miss., from 
August 14, 1917, to October, 191S. Overseas from October 9. 1918, 
to March 13, 1919. Returned to United States on March 13 — March 
24, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on April 14, 1919. 

NEWMAN, JAMES ALBERT, Chauffeur. 25Sth Aero Squadron, Second 
Division. Trained at Ft. Harrison, Ind. and Camp Shelby, Miss., from 
cember 21, 1917. Had infantry training here at Camp Richfield. 
Air-service training at Davton. O., for four months. Overseas from 
August 18, 1918, to July 22. 1919. Battles: Belfort Front, Meuse- 
Argonne Offensive, October 29 — November 8, 191S. After Armistice 
located at Mannonville and Toul, France, until May 1, 1919. Sent 
then to Germany to be ready for action in case Germany should fail 
to sign the Peace Treaty. Located at Weissenthurm on left bank 
of the Rhine. Left here on July 13, 1919. Truck driving, touring 
car driving, motorcycle dispatch work and mail-carrier, was the 
work here. Trucks carried wrecked airplanes called "crashes." Re- 
turned to United States, July 22 — August 1, 1919. Sent to Mitchell 
Field, L. L, N. Y., for a week. Discharged at Camp Sherman. August 
12, 1919. 

PHLFUM. GEORGE, Private, Battery F, 25th F. A. Trained at Camps 
Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to March, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Grant. March 6. 1919. Had influenza and pneu- 
monia five -weeks in October and November at Camp McClellan, re- 
currence of the same two weeks later, in November. 

ROBERTS, CHARLES ROLLIN, Private 1st Class. 146th Co., 12th Bn., 
160th Depot Brigade. Trained at Camp Custer, Battle Creek, Mich., 
from August 30, 1918, to February 27, 1919. when discharged. In 
hospital six weeks at Camp Custer, in September and October with 
influenza and pneumonia. 

ROHLFING. OSCAR LEWIS, Private, Co. B, 605th Engineers. Trained 
at Camp Taylor, Ky. and Camp Forrest, Ga., from April 30, 1918. to 
September, 1918. Overseas from September 30, 191S. to June 10, 1919. 
Returned to United States, June 10 — June 18, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman on June 25, 1919. 

ROHLFING, GEORGE WALKER, Private, Co. E, 335th Infantry, S4th 
Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 23, 1918, to February 
12, 1919. Discharged on that date at Watervliet Arsenal. 

SCHAFFER. WILBUR WILLIAM, Private, 20th Co., 5th Tr. Bn., 158th 
Depot Brigade. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, until 
discharged for disability on July 17, 1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 341 

SEMBACH, CHARLES JOHN, Private, Co. F, 361st Infantry, 91st Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to August 26, 1918. 
Overseas from September 2, 1918. to April 1, 1919. Battles: Lys- 
Scheldt Offensive in Belgium, October 31 — November 11. Pour days 
in front line. Under fire all the time. After Armistice moved from 
place to place, staying three months at Belleme, France. Returned 
to United States, April 1— April 15, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man, May 7, 1919. 

SUTHERLAND, GILBERT, Private, Co. G, 4th Infantry, 3rd Division. 
Trained at Camp Funston, Kas., from September 17, 1917, to March 
1, 1918. Overseas from April 15, 191S. Killed at the Aisne Offensive, 
June 29, 191S. 

UPHAUS, HENRY HUGO, Private, Co. E, 120th Engineers. Trained at 
Arsenal Technical High School at Indianapolis, Ind., six weeks, be- 
ginning September 1. 1918. At Deaf and Dumb Institute three weeks. 
Discharged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison on December 17, 1918. Had 
influenza, hospital treatment. 

UPHAUS, ARCHIE ARNO, Private, 25th F. A. Trained at Camps Taylor 
and McClellan from July 22, 1918. to February, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Taylor on February 5, 1919. 

WIEBKING, VIVIAN ESTHER, Army Nursing Corps. Trained at Ft. 
Douglas, Arizona. Served there from December 2S, 191S, until dis- 
charged, December 4, 1919. 

ZURLINE, HARRY HERMAN, Private, M. G. Co.. 120th Infantry, 30th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from October 4, 1917, 
to May 1, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918. to April 1, 1919. Battles: 
Ypres Front in Belgium, Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele, Hindenburg Line, 
Bellicourt, St. Quentin, St. Souplet, Cambrai. Wounded, October 9, 
shrapnel in hand and shoulder. Treated at Red Cross Hospital 21 
about six weeks. Rejoined his regiment at Aslerube near Amiens, 
France, in December. Remained here until starting home. Re- 
turned to United States, April 1 — April 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Taylor on April 25, 1919. 

VII. 

JOHNSON TOWNSHIP. 

ALLEN, JESSE LEWIS, Corporal, Battery A, 25th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to Feb- 
ruary 5, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor. 

BENHAM. JACOB LEWIS, Private 1st Class, M. G. Co., 36th Infantry, 
12th Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, 
Mass., from May 23, 1918, to February 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Taylor on February 5, 1919. 

BALLMAN, JOHN F., Private, Co. A. Central Officers' Training School. 
Trained at Camp Grant, 111., from September 3, 1918, to January 29, 
1919. Had influenza in October. Discharged at Camp Grant. 

BECKETT, ROMOUALD RISK, Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Bloom- 
ington, Ind., from October 12. 1918, until discharged December 21, 
1918. Had influenza sixteen days in November. 

BEALL, CLARENCE RAY, Seaman, 2nd Class, U. S. N. R. Trained at 
Great Lakes. 111., from June 3, 1918, to August 27, 191S. At Puget 
Sound, Wash., until his death there from influenza-pneumonia on 
October 3, 1918. 

BRADT, WILBUR ELMORE, Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Blooming- 
ton, Ind.. from October 1, 1918, until discharged, December 21, 1918. 

BRADT, HALE FLETCHER, Y. M. C. A. Secretary, 4th Division. Three 
years of Cadet Training at University of Nebraska, prior to World 
War. Trained as Y. M. C. A. Secretary in New York City, enlisting 
May 5, 191S. Overseas from May 28, 1918, to July 19, 1919. Battles: 
Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel, Argonne. Six days' hospital treatment 
in Germany. With Army of Occupation from November, 1918. to 
July, 1919. Returned to United States, July 19 — July 29, 1919. Dis- 
charged at New York City, July 29, 1919. 

BRODBECK, CECIL F., Sergeant, Co. A, 350th Engineers. Trained at 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. and Camp Humphreys, Va., Camps Upton, 
N. Y. and Merritt, N. J., from June 4, 1918, to October 30, 1918. Over- 
seas until June 30, 1919. Service in the United States: Acting Drill- 
Sergeant at Camp Humphreys, Va., overseas' service at Camp Pon- 
tanezon, Brest. France. Returned to United States, June 30 — July 
10, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, July 18, 1919. 

BRONNENBURG, ALVA, Private, Headquarters Co., 2nd Regiment, Air 
Service, Motor Mechanic. Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky., San Antonio, 
Texas and Camp Hancock, Ga. from December 7, 1917, to March, 1918. 
Overseas from March 4, 1918, to June 12, 1919. Transferred first to 



342 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Aviation Headquarters, then to Postal and Express Service Organ- 
ization, Co. B. P. E. S. At Bourges, France, from September 14, 1018, 
to January 16, 1919, in Aviation Headquarters Postal Service. Was 
in Camp Hospital at Tours, France, four weeks with influenza and 
pneumonia. Camp Hospital 27, and at Base Hospital, Tours for 
three weeks. Also at Base Hospital 69 at Brest. Returned to United 
States as a casual, June 12 — June 22, 1919. At Embarkation Hos- 
pital at Newport News four days. Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 
5, 1919. 

BRONNENBURG. CLAUD, Bug-lev 1st Class, 37th Coast Artillery Corps. 
Trained at Ft. Wright, N. Y. from February 12, 1916, to October 16, 
1918. At Camp Eustis, Va. until November 10. Left Camp Stuart. 
Va. on November 10 on transport Pochonatas and started for France. 
After four days at sea was recalled and returned to Ft. Hancock, 
N. J. Discharged at Ft. Hancock, April 2. 1919. 

BRONNENBERG, EARL, Wagoner, Wagon Co. 100, Q. M. C. Trained 
at San Antonio, Texas, from enlistment on February 16. 1916. Served 
on Mexican border until June, 1917, going with Pershing on the 
Punitive Expedition into Mexico in the fall of 1916. Overseas with 
first detachment of A. E. F., June, 1917. Served throughout war in 
"Wagon Co. 100. Died of pneumonia at Nevers, France, on February 
16, 1919. 

BUCHANAN, CECIL R., Private, Co. B, 304 Ammn. Train, 79th Division. 
Trained at Ohio and Texas camps and at Camp Meade. Mil, from 
February 14, 1918, to Mav 15, 1919. Battles: Sector 304. Returned 
to United States. May 15 — May 30, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man, June 10, 1919. 

OOOMES, M. JOSEPH, Captain, Medical Corps. Trained at Camp Green- 
leaf. Ga. in September, 1918, and at Medical Officers' Training Camp 
at Base Hospital, Camp Jackson, S. C. in October and November, 
1918. Discharged at Camp Jackson, December 3, 1918. 

COX. OLLIE MARK, Corporal, 70th C. A. C. Trained at Ft. Wadsworth, 
N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to July, 1918. Overseas from July 15. 1918. 
to February 12, 1919. Returned to United States, February 12 — 
February 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, March 12, 1919. 
CURRAN, MOSES BREWER, Private. Battery E, 107th Regiment, 28th 
Division. Trained at Chamber of Commerce. Indianapolis and Camp 
Hancock, Ga., from June 15. 1918. to September, 1918. Overseas from 
September 1, 191S, to June 19. 1919. Trained in Ordnance Department 
in United States and at Mehun, France, until sent to the Argonne 
Forest on September 26, 1918, in 28th Division. Served here until 
November 9. Gassed on November 9. Hospital treatment at Base 
Hospital 6. 121, Camp Hospital 4 and Bases 88 and 119. at Savonay, 
France. Returned to United States. June 29 — July 10, 1919. Dis- 
charged on August 21, 1919, at Ft. Benjamin Harrison. Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 

DEBURGER, FREEMAN, Sergeant, Co. G, 64th Infantry, 7th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Bliss, Texas and Camp McArthur, Texas, from May 
11, 1917, to August. 1918. Overseas from August 18, 1918. to June 
9, 1919. Battles: Puvenelle Sector, Offensive. Returned to United 
States, June 9 — June 18, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 26, 
1919. 

DEBURGER, MARCUS EUGENE. Private. Co. A. 335th Infantry, 84th 
Division. Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, until 
his death there of pneumonia on December 24, 1917. 

DEBURGER. JOHN MANFORD, Private. Trained at Ft. Williams. Me 
and Ft. Thomas, Ky., in C. A. C. from November 26. 1917, until dis- 
charged because of physical disability on March 4, 1918, at Ft. Wil- 
liams. Me. 

EADS. FAYE, Electrician, Sergeant 1st Class. 6th Co., C8th Prov. Tr. 
Corps, C. A. C. Trained at Ft. Du Pont, Del., from May 4. 1917. to 
December, 1918. Discharged at Camp Sherman on December 17, 1918. 

EADS, FRANK. Private, Co. L, 2nd Infantry. M. G. Bn. Trained at 
Camp Dodge, la.. August 30, 1918, to discharge there on December 
17, 1918. Served as electrician. Had disability resulting from a fall 
in September, 1914, which placed him in limited duty list. 

EADS, HENRY EARL, Electrician, Naval Aviation Force. Trained at 
Pensacola, Fla., from Mav 29, 1917, to October 7, 1917. Overseas 
from October 16, 1917, to January 8, 1919. Service as First-Class 
Mach. and Naval Observer at Dunkirk, France, until August 10. 
1918. Attended French Aviation School at Paris from November 3. 
to December 26, 1917. August 10, 1918, went to Zeebrugge, Belgium, 
to prepare an Aviation Base, which was not completed when the 
Armistice was signed. Injured in three hundred-foot fall at Dun- 
kirk, June, 1918. Hospital treatment at Dunkirk, injury in right 
knee. Returned to United States, January 8 — January 24, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Receiving Ship, New York, March 14, 1919. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 343 

FIRTH. ROBERT AUSTIN, Private, Co. 11, 158th Am. Tr, C. A. C. Trained 
at Syracuse, N. Y., from August 5, 1918. until sent to Ft. Wetherell, 
Narragansett Bay, R. I., October 1, 1918. Trained here until De- 
cember 20, 1918. Discharged at Camp Sherman, December 26, 1918. 
Hospital treatment for "flu" at Syracuse in September. 

FISHER, JAMES HARRY, Co. D. 362nd Infantry, 91st Division. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and Sherman from September 20, 1917, to Septem- 
ber, 1918. Overseas from September 20, 1918, to May 18, 1919. 
Battles: Lys-Scheldt, October 31 — November 4, 1918. Treatment at 
Base Hospitals 85 and 69, and Field Hospital 52. Returned to United 
States. May 18 — May 29, 1919. Discharged at Ft. Benjamin Harri- 
son, July 7, 1919. 

FISHER, EBERT L., Private, Infantry. Trained at Camp Taylor from 
July 22, 1918, until discharged there, May 10, 1919. 

FISHER, HERMA ARLIS, Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Indiana State 
University, Bloomington, Indiana, from October 1, 1918, until dis- 
charged there on December 21, 1918. 

GORDON. WALTER SCOTT, Private, Co. G, 441h Infantry, 13th Division. 
Trained at Camp Lewis, Washington and Presidio, Cal., from May 
28, 1918, to March, 1919. Discharged at Camp Funston, Kas., on 
March 29, 1919. 

GORDON, WILLARD GLENN, Private, M. G. Co.. 153rd Infantry, 39th 
Division. Trained at Camp Beauregard, Alexandria, La., from May 
26, 1918, to August, 1918. Overseas from August 6, 1918, to February 
6, 1919. Trained at Meroux and St. Romaine, France, until November 
11. Returned to United States, February 26, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, March 4, 1919. 

HARTLEY, ISAAC OTIO, Sergeant, 828th Aero Squadron. Trained at 
Kelly Field, Texas, Selpidg Field, Mich, and Hazelhurst Field, L. I., 
N. Y., from December 4, 1917, to September, 1918. Overseas from 
September 1, 1918, to August 26, 1919. Service in France: Repaired 
airplanes at Verdun and Metz, 18 kilometers behind front lines. Re- 
turned to United States, August 26 — September 5, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Taylor, September 13, 1919. 

HENDERSON, HARRY, Corporal, Co. B, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 22, 1918, to September, 1918. 
Overseas from September 1, 1918, to April 17, 1919. Returned to 
United States, April 17 — April 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor. 
May 13, 1919. 

HENDERSON, SCOTT KELSEY, Cook, Base Hospital 54. Trained at 
Camps Taylor, Greenleaf and Green, from May 27, 1918, to August, 

1918. Overseas from August 14, 1918, to May 15, 1919. Located at 
Nevers, France. Hospital 54 was supposed to care for one thousand 
and forty patients, but sometimes had as many as two thousand, 
seven hundred and fifty, when the big battles were being fought. 
The mess hall was then cleared for patients. Personnel of the hos- 
pital numbered one hundred eighty-five, plus forty nurses. Returned 
to United States, May 15 — May 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man, June 12, 1919. 

HENDERSON, HOMER CLYDE, Wagoner, Co. A, 313th Infantry, 88th 
division. Trained at Camps Dodge, la. and Pike, Ark., from Sep- 
tember 18, 1917, to June 30, 1918. Overseas from June 30, 1918, to 
September 6, 1919. Returned to United States, September 6 — Sep- 
tember 15, 1919. Discharged at Camp Dodge, la., September 25. 1919. 

HOLMAN, WILLIAM EARL, Fireman 3rd Class. U. S. Navy. Trained at 
Great Lakes, 111., from May 6, 1918, to discharge there on March 28, 

1919. Did clerical work at Public Works Building, Camp Paul Jones, 
Great Lakes, in February and March, 1919. 

HOLBERT, WILLIAM DEVANEY, Wagoner, Co. B. 35th Infantry, 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass., 
from May 23, 1918, to February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor. 
February 3, 1919. 

HUGHES, CAREY LEE, Private, 33rd Co., 4th U. S. Marines. Trained 
at Paris Island, S. C, from May 12, 1917, to June 1, 1917. Served at 
San Domingo from June, 1917, to December 18, 1919. Service, sup- 
pressing revolutions and coast patrol. 

HUNTERMAN, ROY HENRY, Private, Co. C, 115th Infantry. Trained at 
Camps Taylor, Gordon and McClellan from March 29, 191S, to June, 
1918. Overseas from June 12, 1918, to May 12, 1919. Battles: Alsace- 
Haute Sector, "Verdun Sector, East of Meuse, October 8 — October 11. 
1918. Wounded by machine-gun bullet at St. Eloi, October 11, 1918. 
at Argonne. Hospital treatment at Nevers, France. Returned to 
United States, May 12 — May 26, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
Juno 2. 1019 

HUNTER, TONY EDWARD, First Lieutenant, Medical Corps. Trained at 
Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., from August 26, 1918, to November 26, 
1918. Assigned to 149th Infantry, 38th Division. Served with regi- 



344 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

ment at Camp Shelby, Hatticsburg. Miss., from November 26, 1917, 
until his death there from influenza-pneumonia on April 18, 1919. 
HUNTER, HORACE ELI, Ensign, U. S. Naval Reserves. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111., until October, 191 8. Went to Headquarters Navy Aux. 
Reserve at New York, October 3, J.918. Trained at sea thirteen 
weeks as junior watch officer on the S. S. Josiah Mason, oil-tank 
steamer, operating along the coast from Charleston, S. C. to Baton 
Rouge, La. and Norfolk, Va. To Officers' Material School at Pel- 
ham Bay Park, N. Y., on January 11, 1919. Graduated March 29. 
1919, as Ensign. Released at New York City, April 30, 1919. 

HYATT, RALPH ROMEO, Corporal, 26th Balloon Co. Trained at Kelly 
Field, Texas, from March 6, 191S, to April, 191S. Overseas from 
April 22, 1918, to June 14, 1919. Trained in France at Tours and 
Balloon School at Camp De Souge, near Bordeaux, from May 6 to 
November 9, 1918. Sent to Bettington. Germany, two weeks in April; 
one month at Bettange, Luxemburg. Returned to United States, 
June 14 — June 25, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 9, 1919. 

HYATT, FREEMAN ROBERT. Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Hanover 
College, Hanover, Ind., from September 24, 1918, until discharged there 
on December 16, 1918. Wag acting corporal when discharged. 

KONKLE. LESLIE LORINE, Private 1st Class. Co. A, 113th M. P., 38th 
Division. Enlisted in Indiana National Guard, June 3, 1917, and was 
trained at Rensselaer, Ind., in Co. M, 3rd Infantry, N. G., for five 
weeks, and one month at Ft. Benjamin Harrison. Transferred then 
to Battery D, 137th F. A., 38th Division, and sent to Camp Shelby, 
Hattiesburg, Miss. Transferred again after seventeen days here to 
Military Police. Completed training at Camp Shelby. Overseas from Sept. 
20, 1918. to Jan. 1:3, 1919. Transport was attacked by three submarines 
just before reaching Liverpool and had to be towed to port because of 
injuries. Battles: Argonne, as guide and runner. Returned to United 
States, January 23, 1919 — January 31, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, February 15, 1919. 

LAWRENCE, FRED, Private, Battery B, 72nd F. A., 11th Division. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and Knox, from September 6, 1918. until discharged 
at Camp Knox, February 3, 1919. 

LAWRENCE, HOWARD EARL, Seaman, U. S. N. R. Trained at Great 
Lakes. 111., from May £9, 1918, for four months. Service from Octo- 
ber, 1918, until released on May 28, 1919. 

MARSH, HARRY HOWARD, Mechanic, Battery D, 45th C. A. C. Trained 
at Jackson Barracks and Camp Nichols, New Orleans. La. and Ft 
St. Philip, La., from December 19, 1917, to July. 1918. Trained 
at Camp Eustis, Va. from July, 1918, to October 21, 1918, in Co. C, 
4th Trench Mortar Bn. Was sent to hospital with influenza on eve 
of sailing for France and assigned on discharge to 45th C. A. C. 
Overseas from October 21, 1918, to January 23, 1919. Returned to 
United States, January 23 — January 31, 1919. Discharged ■ at Camp 
Dix, N. J. on February 12, 1919. 

MOODY, THOMAS WILKIE. Private, Headquarters Co., 144th F. A., 40th 
Division. Trained at Camp Lewis, Washington and Camp Kearney, 
Cal., from June 3, 1918, to August, 191S. Overseas from August 18, 
1918. to December 23. 191S. Returned to United States, December 23, 
1918— January 4, 1919. Discharged January 26, 1919. 

OLMSTED. LAWRENCE RUSSELL, M. M. 1st Class, U. S. N. R. F., Avia- 
tion Branch. Trained at Pensacola, Fla., from July 17, 1918, to No- 
vember, 1918. Overseas first of November, 1918, landing at Brest, 
France. Was returned to United States on same transport. Northern 
Pacific, November 28 — December 7. 1918. Discharged at Pelham Bay, 
N. Y. on December 17. 1918. Hospital treatment at Pensacola, Fla.. 
for influenza in October, 1918. 

OWINGS, GUY ROLAND, Ship's Cook, 2nd Class, U. S. Navy. Trained at 
Great Lakes, 111., from April 20, 1917, to discharge at Great Lakes, 
July 10, 1919. 

PENDERGAST. HERSCHEL W., Private 1st Class, 29th Co.. Sth Tr. Bn., 
159th Depot Brigade. Trained at Camp Taylor from May 27, 191S. 
and at Camp Devens in 12th Division until December, 191S. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, December 30, 191S. 

PENDERGAST, RUSSELL GILBERT, Private, Motor Truck Company 423. 
attached to First Army. Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky. and Camp Jos. 
E. Johnston, Fla., from November 16, 1917, to May, 1918. Overseas 
from May 8, 1918, to June 2S, 1919. Battles: St. Mihiel. Drove truck 
to battle lines with provisions throughout engagement. Returned 
to United States, June 28 — July 9, 1919. Discharged at Camp Grant. 
111., July 18, 1919. 

PRATT, WALTER, Sergeant, Battery B. 34th F. A., Plymouth Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 191S, to Feb- 
ruary, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, February 6, 1919. Hos- 
pital treatment for influenza in November, 1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 3*5 

PRATT, JOHN, Private, Co. C. 379th Infantry, 84th Division. Trained at 
Camp Sherman from August 19, 191S, until discharged there, Jan- 
uary 2, 1919. Served as volunteer nurse through influenza epidemic 
in October and November, 191S. Five hundred died in one night. 
There were many spinal meningitis cases during the epidemic. Had 
the influenza himself, in October. 

PRATT, FERMAN HENRY, Private. 114th Arab. Co., 104th San. Train, 
29th Division. Trained at Camp Taylor and Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., 
from Mav 27, 1918, to August 20, 1918. Overseas from August 27, 
1918, to May 11, 1919. Battles: Alsace Front, St. Mihiel, Verdun. 
Served as a Utter-bearer, carrying wounded off the battlefields, under 
ifire. Returned to United States, May 11 — May 21, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman. June 4, 1919. 

ROSENGARN, MARTIN WILLIAM, Private, Co. B, 36th Infantry, 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn., from May 23, 1918, to Aug. 
1, 1918, when discharged for physical disability. 

ROSENGRAN, BENJAMIN BERNARD, Private, 29th Co., 8th Tr. Bn„ 159th 
Depot Brigade. At Camp Taylor from July 22, 1918, to July 25, 1918. 
Discharged for physical disability. 

SCHWIER, CAROLL ADRIAN, Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Taylor from October 4, 1917, to March 1, 

1918. Discharged for physical disability resulting from pneumonia. 
SMITH. EUGENE F., Corporal, 31st Squadron Motor Transport Corps, 3rd 

Prov. Regt. Trained at Vancouver Ba,rra,cks, Wash. Served in 
Spruce-cutting in northwest. Discharged at Camp Taylor, March 1, 
1919. 
SPENCER. RAY IRVIN, Electrician. Co. D, 113th Engineers. 38th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison from enlistment on June 1, 1917, 
to July 15, 1917, in Co. B, First Bn., Indiana Engineers. Sent to Camp 
Taylor until September 15, inspection work, building the camp. Sent 
to Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Miss., on September 15, 1917. Stayed 
here until September 6, 1918, training in different schools of engi- 
neering. Assigned to 3Sth Division. Transferred in France, No- 
vember, 1918, to 7th Division. Overseas from September 15, 1918, 
to June 12, 1919. Built barracks from September 28, 1918, to No- 
vember 6, 1918. at If-folle-Grand, France. Sent to Sanpigny one 
month to do electrical wiring, twenty-five miles from the St. Mihiel 
Front. The Engineering Corps was divided in France and sent on 
detached service to various places. Joined the 7th Division on Jan- 
uary 1, 1919. Sent to Trouvillc- and other places close to the Front. 
At repair shop at Ligny for one month. On detached service with 
the 56th Infantry during March and April, 1919. Rejoinod the 113th 
Engineers in April. Returned to United States, June 12 — June 19, 

1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman on June 25, 1919. 

SPENCER, WILLIAM DALGLEISH. Corporal, Veterinary Hospital 14. 
Trained at Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. and Camp Lee, Va.. from May 2, 1918, 
to October. 1918. Overseas from October 14, 1918, to June 16. 1919. 
Returned to United States. June 16 — June 27, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Tavlor on July 7. 1919. Hospital treatment for influenza at 
Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. in May, 1918. 

STEGEMOLLER, WALTER A., Private, Field Hospital 34. 7th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Greenleaf from March 29, 1918, 
to August 14, 1918. Overseas from August 14, 1918, to June 18. 1919. 
Battles: Puvenelle Sector west of the Moselle. October 10 — November 
9, 1918. Same Sector, November 9 — November 11, 1918 (Offensive.) 
Returned to United States, June 18 — June 30, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Taylor on July 9, 1919. 

STEGEMOLLER, FRANK LOUIS, Private, Evacuation Ambulance Co. 18. 
Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Greenleaf from March 29, 1918, 
to September 20, 1918. Overseas from September 25, 191S, to Mav 
30, 1919. Returned to United States, May 30, 1919 — June 10, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 19, 1919. 

SHEETS, GLENN. Private 1st Class, Co. A. 9th Infantry, 2nd Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor in Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division, from 
September 20, 1917, to December 20. Sent in Casual Co. to Camp 
Merritt, N. J., December 20 — February 17, 1918. Overseas from Feb- 
ruary 19, 1918, to May 15, 1919. Assigned to Second Division at St. 
Aignan. Battles: Chateau-Thierry. Wounded and gassed, mustard 
gas, on June 29, 1918. Treated at Base Hospitals 1 and 19, at Vichy 
to last of August. Base Hospital 51 at Toul, September. 191S, to 
May, 1919. Returned to United States, May 15 — June 2, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, June 14. 1919. 

STEVENS. RONMEY, Battery A. 232nd F. A. Enlisted at Ladysmith, Wis. 
Overseas several months. Hospital treatment in France for measles. 
Returned to United States in spring of 1919. Discharged. 

STEVENS, MORRIS CHRISTOPHER, Private, U. S. Marine Corps. Trained 
at Paris Island. S. C., from August 12, 1918, to October 26, then at 
Quantico, Va., until discharged there on January 30, 1919. 



346 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

SUTTON, WILLIAM LEE, U. S. Naval Reserves. Trained at Great Lakes, 
111., from June 3, 1918, to January 13, 1919. Trained first two weeks 
in Detention Camps, Farragut and D?wey. The rest of the time in 
naval drill or study at Camp Paul Jones and Radio School at Camp 
Perry. Sent to Cambridge, Mass., January 13. 1919, to Radio School. 
Released there on February 13, 1919. Had two weeks in the hospital 
at Great Lakes in October, 1918, with mumps. 

SWINGLE, EDWARD HENRY, Private 1st Class. Q. M. C. Trained in 
Co. D, 336th Infantry, 84th Division, at Camp Sherman, from June 
26, 1918, to September, 1918. Overseas from September 25, 1918, to 
August 8, 1919. Transferred to Quartermaster Corps at Le Mans. 
France. Service was checking supplies. Carpenter work from the 
latter part of April. Relurned to United States, August 8 — August 
17, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, August 24, 1919. Hospital 
record, measles at Camp Sherman, mumps at Le Mans, France. 

TAYLOR, FRED, Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. Trained 
at Camp Tavlor from October 1, 1917, to discharge for physical dis- 
ability on October 26, 1917. 

THOMPSON, CURTIS WILLIAM, Sergeant Base Hospital. Medical Det. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from March 29, 1918, to discharge on July 
22. 191. Did office work at Headquarters Office. 

UNDERWOOD, WALTER ADAM, Sergeant. Medical Detachment. Base 
Hospital. Trained at Camp Taylor from March 29, 1918, to May 23, 
1919, when discharged. Hospital record: Bronchitis in May, 1918. 
Service in hospital: Ambulance driver and ward-master. 

WAGNER, JEROME EDWARD, Corporal, Co. I, 166th Infantry. 42nd Di- 
vision. "Rainbow." Trained in 3rd Ohio Infantry, N. G., from June 
13, 1917, to assignment to 166th Regiment. Trained at Camp Perry. 
O. and a short time at Camp Mills, L. I., N. Y. Overseas from Oc- 
tober 29. 1917, to April, 1919. Trained in France, entering trenches 
during winter. Battles: Luneville, Chateau-Thierry, Cantigny, St. 
Mihiel. Fismes, Sedan, Argonne, Baccarat. Awarded D. S. C. and 
French Croix de Guerre for heroism at Seicheprey, France, Septem- 
ber 12. 1919. Wounded on September 12, 1918. Machine-gun bullet 
through the shoulder. Treatment in eight different hospitals, moved 
on stretchers. Besides the shoulder wound had three machir.e-gun 
bullets in leg, bavonet wound in abdomen and shrapnel wound in 
head. Returned to United States, April 13— April 23, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison. Ind., July 31, 1919. 

WALKER. ORVIL ROBERTS. Private 1st Class, Co. A, 309th Engineers, 
84th Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to Sep- 
cember, 1918. Overseas from September 9, 1918, to June 19, 1919 
Hospital treatment at Hospital No. 85. Montior, France. Returned 
to United States, June 19 — Tune 26, 1919. Discharged at Ft. Ben- 
jamin Harrison, July 23, 1919. 

WALKER, WALTER MARC, Private, Battery B, 26th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from .Tulv 22. 1918. to March 
8, 1919. Had five weeks in hospital at Camp McClellan. While there 
served as orderly for the Red Cross Nursing Service. Discharged at 
Camp Grant, 111., March 8, 1919. 

WALKER, LEWIS, Private, Co. C. M. G. Bn. 139, 38th Division. Trained 
at Ft. Benjamin Harrison and Camp Shelby, Miss., from August 25. 
1917. to June 1, 1918. Overseas from June 12. 1918, to July 3. 1919. 
Service: Sent to Train Police School in Co. 217, to Base Section 4, 
in Co. 249, for work. At intervals did police work all over France. 
This work consisted of guarding trains of supplies and so on, and 
seeing that they reached their proper destination. Had influenza 
at St. Aignan, Hospital 26. Returned to United States, July 3 — July 
13, 1919. Discharged, July 21, 1919, at Camp Sherman. 

WILLIAMS, ALBERT DARIUS, Fireman, 2nd Class, U. S. N. R. Trained 
at Great Lakes, 111., and Hampton Roads, Va., from May 31, 1918, to 
Julv 18, 1918. Assigned to battleship for further training, six weeks 
at Yorktown, Va. Sent then to Receiving Ship at Norfolk, Va., Sep- 
tember 1. 1918. Had influenza at Portsmouth, Va. in September. Dis- 
charged on December 4, 1918, at Norfolk, Va 

VIII, 
LAUGHERY TOWNSHIP. 

BAAS, FRED HENRY, Sergeant, S21st Aero Squadron. Trained at In- 
dianapolis Aviation Camp. Speedway. Indianapolis, Ind., from, August 
5, 1918, to discharge on March 21, 1919. Special service selection. 

BAAS. MILTON JOHN LEWIS, Private, Co. E, S. A. T. C.. University of 
Arkansas. Trained at Fayetteville, Arkansas, from October 5, 1918, 
to discharge on December 13, 1918, at Fayetteville, Ark. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 347 

BATTISTI, FRANK ROMAN, Corporal, Co. K 119th Infantry, 30th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, (o March 

26, 1918. At Camp Sevier, N. C. from March 26, 1918, to May 1 1918. 
Overseas from May 11, 1918, to March 22, 1919. Battles: Ypres, 8-15-'18 
to 9-4-'18. Bellicourt. 9-21-'18 to 10-11-'18. Busigny, 10-8-'18 to 
10-9-'18. St. Souplet, 9-16-'18 to 9-19-'18. Trench service: Flanders 
Front and Somme Front. Returned to United States March 22 — 
April 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 21, 1919. 

BBHLMER, HARVEY EARL, Second Lieutenant, Battery B., 34th F. A., 
12th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan and at Ft. 
Sill, Okla., from May 15, 1918, to discharge at Ft. Sill on February 7, 
1919. 

BELTER, HENRY JOHN, Private, Co. E, 115th Infantry, 29th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor, Gordon and McClellan, from March 28, 1918, 
to June. 1918. Overseas from June 15, 1918, to May 20, 1919. Battles: 
Alsace-Haute Sector, three weeks. Slightly gassed. Hospital treat- 
ment in October, 1918, at Remycourt, France, three weeks. Returned 
to United States, May 20 — June 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, 
June 17, 1919. 

BENZ, GROVER MARTIN, Sergeant, Battery A. 140th F. A., 39th Division. 
Transferred in 18th Division in August, 1918. Trained at Camps 
Taylor, Beauregard, Ft. Sam Houston and Travis, Texas, from May 

27, 1918, to discharge at Camp Travis on December 9, 1918. Hos- 
pital record, tonsils removed in August, 1918. 

BENZ, LEO MARTIN, Sergeant, C. D.. 317th M. G. Bn., 81st Division. 
Began training at Camp Taylor, September 9, 1917, in Co. A, 335th 
Infantry, 84th Division. Sent to Camp Hancock, Ga. for three months 
and transferred to "Wild Cat" Division. Overseas from July 30, 
1918, to June 8. 1919. Battles: Vosges Mts., St. Die Front, sixteen 
days. "Verdun, Meuse-Argonne Drive, fifteen days. Returned to United 
States, June S — June 18, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 30, 
1919. 

BENZ, HUGO MICHAEL, Boatswain's Mate, 2nd Class U. S. S. Nevada. 
Trained at Norfolk, Va., from April 16, 1917, to May 25, 1917, when 
assigned to the turret-gun crew of the U. S. S. Nevada. Service until 
August 1. 1918. patrol of Atlantic Coast. Had one submarine battle 
off New York State, no apparent results. Patrol duty in the English 
Channel from August 18, 1918, to November 1. 1918. Sent to the Firth 
of Forth. North Sea as part of the Grand Fleet until November 25, 
1918. The Nevada was in the double battle-line of Allied ships through 
which the German fleet sailed to the Firth of Forth to surrender. 
Had a second submarine fight near Irish coast while coming to 
English Channel in August, 1919. Convoyed with ten battleships and 
about twenty destroyers, the George Washington with President 
Wilson on board into Brest Harbor on December 12. 1918. Sailed for 
United States on December 14, 1918, the American Overseas Fleet re- 
turning at that time. Reached New York, 26th of December. Dis- 
charged, July 30, 1920. 

BENZ, RANDOLPH MICHAEL, Private, U. S. Marine Corps, Barracks 
Det. Trained at Paris Island, S. C. and Quantico, Va., from May 
18, 1917. to discharge at Quantico, March 18, 1919. Appendicitis 
operation at Quantico on January 28, 1919. 

BIERBUSSE, WALTER HERMAN, Regimental Supply Sergeant. 40th 
Infantry, 14th Division. Trained at Columbus Barracks, Columbus, 
O., Ft. Riley, Kas. and Camp Custer, Mich., from May 23, 1918, to 
August, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, O., on August 9, 1919. 

BLANK, FRANCIS JOSEPH. Q. M. C. Sergeant, Div. Headquarters, 19th 
Division. Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky. and at Camp Dodge, la., 
from August 31, 1918, to discharge at Camp Taylor, January 26. 1919. 
Statistics: Taylor reached capacity in July and August, 1918. From 
60,000 to 62,000 men were accommodated at Camp Taylor at one time. 
The barracks held 40,000. The rest occupied tents. 

BLAND, JOHN LESTER, Corporal. Co. M, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20, 1917, to May 
7, 1918. Overseas from May 17. 1918. Battles: Ypres Front in Bel- 
gium, Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele. Hindenburg Line. Bellicourt, St. 
Souplet, Busigny. Gassed at Busigny, October 17, 1918. Treatment 
at General Hospital 74. Died of pneumonia following gas, Novem- 
ber 2. 1918. 

BLOEMER, WALTER WILLIAM, Private 1st Class, Co. E, 114th SupDlv 
Train, 39th Division. Was enlisted June 3, 1917, in Troop H, 2nd 
Separate Squadron, Mississippi Cavalry, National Guard. Sworn into 
Federal Service, August 5, 1917, at Macon. Miss., -where enlisted. 
Trained at Jackson, Miss., until November 1, 1917. Then at Camp 
Beauregard, La., where he was assigned to 39th Division. Infantry 
drill here until June 19, 191S. Sent to Detroit, Mich, and trained in 
truck-driving. Drove overland from Detroit to Baltimore. Md. 
crossing Ohio, Pennsylvania and Maryland. Three trips. Used Lib- 



348 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

erty and Dodge trucks. Carried parts of motors and motor-trucks. 
Overseas from August 26, 1918, to December 20, 1918. Service in 
South Central France until November 13, 1918, when the unit moved 
to St. Aignan. Sent back to United States in 39th Division Cadre 
with company records, December 20, 191S — January 1, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Beauregard, La. on January 21, 1919. 

BOESE EDWIN HENRY, Sergeant, Co. L, 147th Infantry, 37th Division, 
drained at Camp Sheridan, Ala., from April 7, 1917, to June, 1918. 
First enlisted in First Ohio, N. G. Regiment transferred to 147th 
Infantry. Overseas from June 23, 1918, to March 15, 1919. Battles: 
Meuse-Arganne Offensive, September 26 — October 1, 191S. Flanders 
Offensives October 31 — November 4, and November 9 — November 11, 
1918. Divisional citation by Major-General Farnsworth. Returned 
to United States, March 15 — March 27, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, April 19, 1919. 

BOEHMER, LOUIS FRANK, Private, Co. I, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Tavlor and Sevier from September 20, 1917, to 
May, 191S. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to December 9, 1918. Battles: 
Ypres, Flanders Front. Wounded, September 1, 1918, fragments of 
shell 'in shoulder. Treated at C. C. S. Hospital at Dunkirk, 35th 
General Hospital at Calais, France; Base Hospital 37, at Dartford, 
Kent, England; Debarkation Hospital No. 3 at New York City, Base 
Hospital at Camp Grant, 111. Returned to United states, December 9, 
1918. Discharged at Camp Grant, March 29, 1919. Five comrades 
were killed by the shell that wounded Private Boehmer, and four 
wounded. Of the killed, one was a corporal. Of the wounded, one 
a sergeant. Two submarines were sunk by the convoys on the voyage 
overseas. 

BRACKENSICK, LESTER EARL, Private. Co. A, 335th Infantry, S4th 
Division. Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, to dis- 
charge there on November 19, 1917. Was treated at Base Hospital 
for heavy cold. Discharged because of resulting disability. 

BRETZLOFF AUGUST FREDERICK, Private, Supply Co., 36th Infantry. 
12th Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, from May 23, 1918, 
to August 11, 1918, and at Camp Devens, Mass. from August 11 to 
January 20, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, January 23, 1919. 
Hospital treatment for broken ankle, November 16 to December 8, 
1918. 

BROCKMAN, CHESTER BERNARD, Private, Base Hospital 54. Trained 
at Camp Taylor and Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from April 30, 191S, to 
August, 191S. Overseas from August 14, 1918, to May 16, 1919. Lo- 
cated at Meves Hospital Center, France. Returned to United States, 
May 16 — May 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 13, 1919. 

BURST WILLIAM EDWARD. Private, 20th Co.. 5th Tr. Bn., 158th Depot 
Brigade. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to discharge 
there, December 10, 1918. Had hospital treatment for influenza in 
October, two weeks. 

BURST, FRANK NICHOLAS, Private, Co. M, 120th Infantry. 30th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20, 1917, 
to Mav 6, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to April 1, 1919. Battles: 
Ypres Front in Belgium. Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele, Hindenburg Line, 
Montbrehain, October 5 — October 17. Gassed on October 17. Six- 
teen men of the platoon of twenty-five men were gassed. One was 
John Bland, also of Batesville, Ripley County. Treatment at Red 
Cross Hospital Station. Was burned and gassed, blind for about 
ten days from inflamed eyes. Sent about midnight of October 17 
by rail, to No. 1, S. African General Hospital at Rouen. Remained 
here fifteen days. Sent then to United States Base Hospital 40 at 
Southampton, England. Remained here until New Year's Day, 1919 
Rejoined regiment at Le Mans, France. January 7, 1919. Returned 
to United States, April 1 — April 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, April 25, 1919. 

CARTER, ARTHUR, Mech., Air Service. Aviation. Trained at Camp 
Grant, 111., from enlistment on December 19, 1917, to February 28, 
1918, because of camp quarantine. Sent March 1. 1918. to Taliaferro 
Field, Brownsville, Texas. Worked as expert mechanician and later 
at block-testing of aeroplane motors. Was sent from Taliaferro to 
Barron Field, August, 1918. Discharged there, March 29, 1919. 

CRAMER. ALVIN HENRY. Sergeant, Co. A, 18th Ry. Engineers. Trained 
at Camps Tavlor and Grant trom September 20, 1917, to March 4. 
191S. Overseas from March 14, 1918, to June 14, 1919. Transferred 
at Camp Grant to Eighteenth Engineers from Co. A, 335th Infantry, 
S4th Division. Put in Co. A, of the 18th Engineers at Genecourt, 
France, in April, 1918. Worked on American Docks at Bordeaux for 
six weeks. Sent then to Paris on detached service. Sent with 
Sixth Engineers, Casuals to lay light railway and bridges between 
Metz and Verdun. Here three weeks. Sent back to Bordeaux with 
a civilian field clerk and made out pay-rolls for civilian workmen. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 349 

all nationalities, who worked on the docks, for three or four months. 
Took a company of sixty enlisted men to work on a hospital at 
Neufchatel, for six months. Returned to United States, June 14 — 
June 25, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman. July 3, 1919. 

CRAMER, ARTHUR HENRY, Private, Battery C, 53rd C. A. C, 30th 
Brigade. Trained at Fts. Wadsworth and Hamilton, New York, from 
April 3, 191S, to July, 1918. Overseas from July 15, 1918. to Feb- 
ruary 25, 1919. Trained at Haussimont, France, until September 5, 
191S. Battles: St. Mihiel from September 5 to September 26. 1918. 
Fired about six hundred rounds. Returned to Haussimont and pre- 
pared to go into Italy. Were delayed by lack of a captain until 
Armistice was signed. Returned to United States. February 25 — 
March 11, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, April 4, 1919. 

DAVIS, ROY IRVIN, Private, Supply Co., 335th Infantry. 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from June 26, 191S, to August 20, 1018. 
Overseas from September 3, 1918, to about February 1. 1919. Had 
measles, mumps, pneumonia and bronchitis. Treated at Le Mans, 
France, from November 12, 1918, until February 1, 1919. Returned 
to United States, February, 1919. Sent to Grand Central Hospital, 
New York City for three weeks, then to Camp Wadsworth Hospital 
for one month. Discharged at Camp Taylor on May 17, 1919. 

DAVIS, ROLLIN FRANCIS, Private, Battery A. 26th F. A.. 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to dis- 
charge at Camp Taylor, February 5, 1919. Six weeks in hospital at 
Camp McClellan with measles and influenza. 

DICKEY, MERLE, Private, Battery A, 1st F. A., Regular Army. Enlisted 
January 21, 1915 . Sent first to Bat. A., Columbus Barracks, O., then to 
San Francisco, Srhofleld Barracks. Served three years at Honolulu, 
Hawaii. Returned to United States on February 15, 1918, and sent to 
Ft. Sill, Okla., in the 9th F. A. Served here as a wagoner, driving 
tractors and trucks in the army training-work at Officers' Training 
School. Released, February 15, 1919, in Regular Army Reserve. 

DIETZ, WILLIAM BERNARD, Private. Evacuation Hospital 27. Trained 
at Camps Taylor, Greenleaf and Pike, from May 27, 1918, to October 
15, 1918. Overseas from October 26, 1918. to August 19. 1919. Lo- 
cated at Meves Hospital Center, France, until February, 1919. From 
February 22, 1919, until August 10, 1919, at Coblenz, Germany, with 
Army of Occupation. Returned to United States, August 19 — August 
29. 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, September 4, 1919. 

DIRSCHERL, WALTER JOSEPH. Private, Battery B. 142nd F. A.. 39th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard, La., from May 
27. 1918, to August 14, 1918. Overseas from August 31, 1918. to June 
3, 1919. Trained at Camp Coctquidan, France, for seven weeks. Sent 
then to Camp Valdahon on the Swiss border and was attached to 
an Artillery School. "Conducted Are" teaching the officers in the 
Army of Occupation after the Armistice. A and B Batteries of the 
142nd F. A., Heavy Artillery, only were used in this work. One 
hundred officers at a time came for a month's course. Continued 
this work until May 1, 1919. From May 1 to May 22. turned in equip- 
ment, painted, camouflaged guns and so on. Returned to United 
States. June 3 — June 16, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tavlor, June 
24, 1919. 

EICHACKER, HOMER ADOLPH. Private. S. A. T. C. Trained at Butler 
College, Indianapolis, Ind., from October 5, 1918, to discharge there 
on December 6, 1918. 

EICHACKER, OSCAR CHARLES. Private, Battery A, 2nd F. A., Re- 
placement Unit. Trained at Camp Tavlor from July 20 to October 
24, 1918. Overseas from October 28, 1918, to June 29, 1919. Was 
still in port at Southampton. England, when the Armistice was signed 
Trained during the winter in various camps in France. Returned 
to United States, June 29 — Julv 11, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, July 22, 1919. 

ENGEL, GEORGE JOSEPH, Private, General Headquarters, A. E. F. 
Trained at Camp Taylor in Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division, from 
October 4, 1917, to March 3, 1918. Overseas from March 14, 191S, to 
June 18. 1919. Assigned to General Headquarters at Chaumont 
France, in Library G, Section 5. Took a consignment of books to 
the Y. M. C. A. at Coblenz in the Spring of 1919. Returned to United 
States. June 18 — June 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Mills, N. Y., on 
July 7, 1919. 

ENGEL, HARRY ADOLPH, Corporal, M. G. Co., 17th Cavalry, 15th Cavalry 
Division, 3rd Brigade. Trained at Camp Harry J. Jones, Douglas. 
Arizona, for twenty-three months after enlistment on May 10, 1917. 
Patrolling Mexican border, service. Discharged at Douglas, Arizona, 
April 13, 1919. 

ENSINGER, LOUIS ANTHONY, Private, Battery B. 25th F. A., 9th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky. and Camp Mc- 
Clellan, Anniston, Ala., from July 22, 1918, to discharge at Camp 
Taylor on January 31, 1919. , 



350 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

ENSINGER, WILLIAM MICHAEL, Private, Battery B, 25th F. A., 9th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and MeClellan from July 22, 
1918, to discharge at Camp Taylor, January 31, 1919. 

FAUST JOHN PHILIP, Private, Evacuation Hospital 27. Trained at 
Camp Taylor, Ky. from May 27, 1918, to June 15, 1918. Camp Green- 
leaf, Ga. to August 30. Camp Pike Ark. until October 22. Overseas 
from October 27, 1918, to April 10, 1919. Treated in hospital: Base 
103 at Dijon; Fr. Base 69 at Savonay to April 5. Base 65 at Brest, 
April 6 — April 10, 1919. Embarkation Hospital 3, New York City, to 
April 26. Ten days in Base Hospital at Camp Taylor. Had pneu- 
monia. Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 14, 1919. Returned to 
United States in Casual Co. 167, April 10 — April 19, 1919. 

FEINTHEL, CLARENCE JOHN, Private, Ordnance Department. Trained 
at Camp Bradley, Peoria, 111., from August 1, 1918, to October 1, 

1918. At Valparaiso Ind. for two weeks. At Raritan, N. J. to Octo- 
ber 14, 1918. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June, 1919. Handled 
ammunition and guns. Repaired, assembled and shipped them to 
France. Went to docks at Hoboken to sail for overseas but because 
of Armistice did not go. 

FICHTNER, EDWARD LOUIS, Private. Sent to Camp Sherman for as- 
signment and training on May 27, 1918. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man on June 5, 1918, for physical disability. 

FIRSICH, JOSEPH H., Private 1st Class, Co. F, 3rd Infantry, Regular 
Army. Trained at Eagle Pass, Texas, one month after enlistment on 
April IS, 1917. Served from May, 1917, to discharge, September 23, 

1919. at Ft. Sam Houston, Texas. Discharged at Camp Taylor. 
Service was Mexican border patrol. 

FIRSICH, WILLIAM JOHN A., Corporal, Co. E, 48th Infantry, 20th Di- 
vision. Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky., Camps Sevier and Jackson, S. 
C, Camps Stewart and Newport News, Va., from enlistment, October 
9. " 1917, to discharge at Camp Sherman on July 7, 1919. 

FIRSICH RAYMOND, Cook, Troop D, 7th Cavalry, Regular Army. En- 
listed September 26, 1917, and trained at Ft. Bliss, Texas, for six 
months. Service: Patrol work on Mexican border, rescue raids. The 
last one of importance, while in the service, was the rescue of forty- 
two American girls. Re-enlisted, June 11, 1919. Discharged at Ft. 
Bliss on June 11, 1920. 

FIRSICH, WILLIAM ALLEY, Private 1st Class. Medical Detachment. 
Trained at Camp Meigs, Washington, D. C, from March 3, 191S. No 
foreign service. 

FISCHER, HARRY JOHN, Corporal, Co. D, 14th M. G. Bn., 5th Division. 
Was first organized as Co C. 13th M. G. Bn., but changed to 14th on 
February 28, 1918. Trained at Eagle Pass, Texas, from May 4. 1917, 
to April, 1918. Overseas from April 12, 1918, to July 13, 1919. Battles: 
LaCude Sector and LaChapelle Sector, Vosges, June. July and 
August. 1918. St. Mihiel Offensive, September 12 — September 18, 1918. 
Argonne, October 11 — October 19, 1918; October 2,6— November 5, 
191S; November 6 — November 11, 1918. Marched to Germany, No- 
vember 24 — December 11, 191S. Billeted at Garnich and Oberkorn, 
Luxemburg, from December, 1918, to July, 1919. Returned to United 
States, July 13 — July 23, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, July 

30, 1919. 

FISCHER, FLORENCE LEO, Private, Co. B, 140th Infantry, 35th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 27, 1918, to August 23, 1918. 
Overseas from September 2, 1918, to May 20, 1919. Battles: Verdun 
Front, Daveness for twenty-one days. Marching toward Metz on 
November 11, 1918. Hospital treatment for sprained ankle, Febru- 
ary 22 to March 28 ,1919. Returned to United States ,May 20 — May 

31. 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, June 12, 1919. 

FOLEY, DAN JOHN, Private 1st Class, Battery B. 325th F. A., 84th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Taylor and West Point, Ky., from May 27, 

1918, to August 20, 1918. Overseas from August 26, 1918, to Jan- 
uary 16, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, February 13, 1919. 

FOERSTER, FRANK EDWARD, Sergeant 1st Class, Amb. Co. 8, Medical 
Dept., Regular Army. Trained at Columbus Barracks, O.. in In- 
fantry, 22nd Tr. Co., then at Ft. Hamilton, N. Y. and transferred to 
Medical Department. Trained here six months. Sent to Corozal, 
Panama, November 28, 1916. Assigned here to Amb. Co. 8. Served 
here until July, 1919. Had seven months' detached service at San 
Thomas Hospital at Panama City. Furloughed on Reserve, July 31, 

1919, at Camp Taylor. Returned to Ripley County by way of Ft. 
Randolph, Colon; San Juan. Porto Rico; Havana, Cuba; Jackson 
Barracks, New Orleans, La.; Camp Shelby, Miss.; Camp Taylor, Ky. 

FRUCHTNICHT, ROY JOHN, Private, 821st Aero Squadron. Trained at 
Speedway Aviation Park k Indianapolis, Ind., from June 28, 1918, until 
his death at the hospital at Ft. Benjamin Harrison on October 13, 
1918, from influenza. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 351 

GAUCK, CHAS. HENRY. Private, Co. B. 36th Infantry. 12th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass., from May 
23, 1918, to discharge at Camp Devens, December 6. 1918. Was 
transferred to Co. H, Motor Truck Transportation Service. November 
1, 1918. 

GAUCK, JOHN FRANK, Sergeant, Co. C, Headquarters Bn., General 
Headquarters. A. E. F. Trained at Camp Taylor in Co. A. 335th In- 
fantry, 84th Division, from September 20, 1917, to March 10, 1918. 
Did clerical work in Statistical or Personnel Office at Camp Taylor 
from October to March. Overseas from March 14. 1918, to June 20, 
1919. Trained at St. Nazaire from March 30, 1918, to April 3, 191S. 
At Blois four weeks. Sent to Chaumont on detached service from 
May 1, 1918, to June 16, 1919. Handled casuals at Chaumont. Formed 
casual companies and sent them in and out, took care of all small 
detachments from General Headquarters, paid them, looked after 
quarters and rations. Returned to United States, June 20 — June 30, 
1919. Discharged at Mitchell Field, L. I., N. Y., on July 12, 1919. 
Was on guard at Roosevelt Field when the R-34 came in. 

GAUSMAN, HENRY JOHN, Private, Co. F, 16th Infantry, 1st Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to September, 1918. 
Overseas from September 2, 1918, to January 20. 1919. Battles: Sedan. 
Wounded November 7, 1918, at Sedan. Machine-gun bullet in the 
ankle, slight flesh wound in the neck. Treatment at Red Cross Hos- 
pital 5 in Paris, and Base 5, at Paris. Returned to United States, 
January 20 — January 30, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1919. Was put in 16th Infantry, in France. Trained in Co. 
A. 334th Infantry, 84th Division at Camp Sherman. 

GEHRICH, RICHARD JACOB. Private, Battery B. 142nd F. A., 39th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard from May 27, 1918, 
to August 20. 1918. Overseas from August 31, 1918. to June 3, 1919. 
Trained in France at Camps Coctquidan and Valdahon. Returned to 
United States, June 3 — June 16, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
June 24, 1919. 

GIBSON. CHARLES SAMUEL, Private. 82nd Co., 6th U. S. Marines. Trained 
at Paris Island, S. C. and Quantico, Va., from May 18, 1917, to Oc- 
tober 23, 1917. Overseas from October 23, 1917, to September 1. 1919. 
Battles: Verdun Sector, March 18 — May 13, 1918; Aisne Defensive. 
June 1-6, 1918; Soissons, July 18-20, 1918; Pont-a-Moussin, August 
7 — August 14. 1918; St. Mihiel. September 11 — September 16, 1918; 
Champagne, Meuse-Argonne, October 1-12, 1918. Cited for gallant 
action, November 1, 1918, and awarded D. S. C. and Croix de Guerre. 
With Army of Occupation in Germany, November 17 — July 15, 1919. 
With Composite Regiment from May 10, 1919, until discharged. Re- 
turned to United States. September 1 — September 8, 1919. Discharged 
at Washington, D. C, September 18 at Marine Barracks. 

GOYERT, GILBERT AUGUST, Wagoner, Amb. Co. 34, 7th Sanitary Train. 
7th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Greenleaf from April 
30, 191S, to July 26, 1918. Overseas from August 13. 1918, to June 
18, 1919. Battles: St. Mihiel and Puvenelle Sector, thirty-four days. 
Kept on working after November 11, moving sick and wounded back 
from Field to Base Hospitals. Moved to Selaincourt, April 1. 1919, 
to May 7, then to LeMans. Returned to United States, June 18 — June 
30, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 10, 1919. 

GOYERT. HENRY WILLIAM, Private. Battery B, 25th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22. 191S, to dis- 
charge at Camp Taylor, January 31, 1919. 

GOYERT. CLIFFORD WILLIAM, 2nd Class Seaman, U. S. Navy. Trained 
at Great Lakes, HI., from August 13, 1918. to discharge on February 
26, 1919. Hospital treatment in October for influenza. 

GRASMICK. PHILIP, Private, Co. A. 335th Infantry, 84th Division. Trained 
at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to September, 1918. Overseas 
from September 2, 1918, to March 19, 1919. Hospital treatment for 
influenza at Base 16, Verdun in October. Returned to United States, 
March 19 — April 2, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman. April 23. 1919. 

GREEMAN, BERTHA CHRISTINE, Army Nursing Corps. Trained at 
Camp Lewis, Washington, from April 4, 1918, to August 20, 1918. 
Had enlisted in Red Cross on March 5. 1918, sworn into the Army, 
April 4, 1918. Overseas from September 8, 1918, to July 13, 1919. 
Service: Evacuation Hospital 11 at Brizeaux-Forestierre, Argonne 
and Camp Hospital 101 at Le Mans, France. Returned to United 
States, July 13 — July 20, 1919. Discharged, August 21, 1919, at Bates- 
ville, Ind. 

GREEMAN, EDWIN ALBERT, Sergeant, 159th Depot Brigade. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from July 23, 1918, to discharge there December 29, 
1918. 

GRINGLE, ARTHUR PAUL, Seaman, U. S. S. Utah. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111., from December 7, 1917, to assignment to U. S. S. Utah. 
Service; Coast patrol of the United States from early spring to early 



352 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

summer, 191 S. Foreign service from early spring of 1918 to Jan- 
uary 27, 1919. The Utah was one in the double lines of allied ships 
to witness the surrender of the German Fleet at the Firth of Forth. 
Returned with the Overseas Fleet to New York, December IB— De- 
cember 26, 1918. Discharged, January 27, 1919, at New York City. 

HANKING, HARRY ALVIN, Chauffeur, 74th Aero Squadron. Trained at 
Ft. Slocum, N. Y., from Julv 10, 1917, to August 8, 1917. Transferred 
to Ft. Wood, then Kelly Field, Texas, in August 13, 1917. Trained 
here until December 15. 1917. Overseas from March 4, 1918, to June 
16, 1919. At Concentration Camp, Morrison, Va.. from December, 
1917. to March, 1918. At Romorantin, France, until March 26, 1919. 
In charge of four locomotive cranes unloading all air-service sup- 
plies that came to France. Attended the A. B. F. University at 
Beaune, Cote d'Or, France, March 7 to June 7, 1919. Returned to 
United States. June 16 — Julv 2, 1919. Discharged at Camp Dix, N. 
J., July 10, 1919. 

HART, EVERETT JEFFERSON. Seaman 2nd Class, U. S. Destroyer Yar- 
nall. Trained at Great Lakes, 111., from July 8, 1918, to September 
11, 1918. Sent to Receiving Ship at Philadelphia until October 30. 
Assigned on that date to the Yarnall. Overseas from December 3, 
191S, to June 22, 1919. Returned to United States, June 23 — July 8, 
1919. Discharged at New York City, July 10, 1919. 

HEIDT, HERMAN WILLIAM. Carpenter's Mate 1st Class, U. S. Naval 
Reserve. Trained at Great Lakes, 111., from May 22, 1918, to March 
18. 1919, when assigned to the U. S. S. Santa Rosa, doing transport 
duty. Made three trips, two (o Bordeaux and one to St. Nazaire, 
France, bringing home troops. Discharged at Hoboken, N. J. on 
July 2, 1919. Hospital treatment at Great Lakes for influenza. 

HICKMAN, HENRY HERMAN. Private, Co. A, Section B, Motor Trans- 
port Corps. Trained at Rolling Prairie, Ind., from October 15, 1918. 
to discharge on November 1, 1918. Under required weight. 

HILLMAN, FRANK CHARLES, Private, Co. C, 112th Am. Tr., 37th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sheridan from April 30, 1918. 
to June 20, 1918. Overseas from June 27, 1918, to March 20, 1919. 
Battles: St. Mihiel and Argonne. Service: Driving ammunition truck 
to the front lines. Returned to United States, March 20 — April 2, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 14. 1919. 

HOENE. STANLEY HENRY, Wagoner. Battery E, 47th C. A. C. Trained 
from June 2. 1918, at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., about ten days; at 
Ft. Caswell, N. C, three months; Camp Eustis, a few days; Chauffeur 
at Fortress Monroe, four weeks. Camp Eustis again until Octobei 
21, 1918. Overseas from October 21, 1918, to January 31, 1919. Trained 
in France at Angouleme from November 3 to November 11, 1918. 
Went then to various camps until returned to United States Jan- 
uary 31 — February 15, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, March 
13, 1919. 

HOYER, DALLAS, Sergeant, Co. D, 40th Infantry, 14th Division. Trained 
at Camps Custer and Sherman and Ft. Riley, Kas., from May 23, 
191S, to discharge at Camp Custer, August 9, 1919. 

HORNLEIN, WILLIAM, Private, Co. K, 10th Infantry. Regular Army. 
Trained at Benjamin Harrison from August 29, 1917, until discharged 
there on February 4, 191S. 

HORSTMAN. EDWIN CHRIST, Private. Battery B, 26th F. A., 9th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, 
to February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., February 10, 
1919. 

HUNEKE. ALONZO JOHN. Private, 442nd Co., Bn. B, U. S. Marines. 
Trained at Paris Island, S. C, from October 7, 1918, to discharge on 
April 8, 1919. 

HUNEKE, ELMER CORDT, Private 1st Class, Battery B, 26th F. A., 9th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 
1918, to February, 1919. Discharged, February 10. 1919, at Camp 
Grant, 111. 

HUNEKE. IRVIN HENRY WILLIAM. Corporal, Co. A. 45th Infantry. 
Regular Army. Trained at Camp Sheridan, Ala. from June 4, 1918, 
to discharge at Camp Gordon, March 14, 1919. Re-enlisted at Camp 
Gordon in same unit. 

HUNEKE, CLARENCE, Private 1st Class, Base Hospital. Trained at 
Camp Taylor from March 29, 1918, to discharge on June 19, 1919. 

IDLEWINE, HARRY. Private, Battery A, 26th Field Artillery, 9th Di- 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 191S. to dis- 
charge at Camp Taylor on February 14, 1919. 

IDLEWINE, WALTER SCOTT, Private, Batery A, 26th F. A., 9th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, 
to discharge at Camp Grant, 111. on March 19, 1919. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 353 

JAMES, LESTER WARREN, Private 1st Class, Co. A, 384th Infantry, 
84th Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to 
September. 1918. Overseas from September 2, 1918, to August 23, 
1919. Battles: Meuse-Argonne. Returned to United States. August 
23- — September 3, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, September 25, 
1919. - 

JOHAXXING. LEROY BERTRAM, Sergeant, 20th Co., 5th Tr. Bn., 158th 
Depot Brigade. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to 
December 9, 1918, when discharged. 

JOHANNING, ALBERT HERMAN, Sergeant, Field Hospital 6, Medical 
Dept. Trained at Pts. Benjamin Harrison and Oglethorpe from 
September 5, 1917. to December, 191 S. Discharged at Camp Custer, 
December 28, 1918. . 

JEFFRIES, RUSSELL NEWTON. Sergeant. Trained at Camp Taylor 
from September 4. 1 91 S, to March 25, 1919, in 159th Depot Brigade, 
13th Co., 2nd Regiment. From March 25, in various detached com- 
panies until June 21, when sent to Officers' Training School until 
August 2, 1919. Discharged, August 7, 1919. Hospital record: In- 
fluenza in October. 

JOHNSON, BENJAMIN GODFREY, Private, M. G. Co.. 362nd Infantry. 
91st Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to Sep- 
tember, 1918. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to April 3, 1919. 
Battles: Lys-Seheldt, Belgium. Returned to United States on April 
3 — April 14, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 1, 1919. 

KALB, GUSTAVE, Private, Battery C, 15th F. A., 2nd Division. Trained 
at Pine Camp, Watertown, N. J., from September 6, 1917, to Decem- 
ber 12, 1917. Overseas from December 12. 1917, to July 28, 1919. 
Battles: Troyon Sector. Verdun, Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel, Cham- 
pagne, Soissons, Meuse-Argonne. Two months' hospital treatment 
for influenza. Returned to United States, July 28 — August 6, 1919. 
Discharged in July, 1920. 

KARL, WILLIAM FREDERICK, Chief Q. M., U. S. Navy. Enlisted, June 
17, 1912, at Cincinnati, O. Six years and ten months' previous 
service. Trained at Norfolk, Va. Service on U. S. S. Louisiana, 
battleship unit: U. S. S. Patuxent, Mine-sweeping unit; II. S. S. 
Martha Washington, transport unit; U S. S. Wm. A. McKenney, con- 
voy with Battleship Illinois unit; U. S. S. Francis B. Hackett. tug- 
boat unit. Battles: Vera Cruz, Mexico; Cape Haiten, Haiti, Cuban 
Pacification, and numerous submarine attacks during World's War. 
Still in service, 1920. 

KARL, EDWARD FRED JOHN. Private, Supply Co.. 36th Infantry, 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens. Mass., 
from May 23, 1918, to February, 1918. Discharged, February 10, 
1919, at Camp Taylor. Was operated on at Ft. Snelling for appen- 
dicitis on July 5, 1918, four weeks in hospital. 

KARL. GEORGE FREDERICK, Sergeant-Bugler. Headquarters Det., 
Army Service Corps. Trained from September 20, 1917. at Camps 
Tavlor and Sherman in Co. A, 335th Infantrv, S4th Division, until 
September. 1918. Overseas from September 4. 1918. to July 8, 1919, 
Transferred to Army Service Corps, April 1. 1919. Returned to United 
States, July S — July 18, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, July 
26, 1919. 

KARBOWSKI, PETER, Fireman, U. S. S. Worden. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111. and Philadelphia. Penn., from May 25, 1918, to July 9, 
1918. Overseas from July 21, 191S, to January, 1919. Assigned to 
U. S. Destroyer Worden in August, 191S. at Brest, France. Returned 
to United States. January 3, 1919. Discharged at Philadelphia, Feb- 
ruary 10, 1919. 

KESSENS, WALTER LEONARD, Private, Co. B, 36th Infantry. 12th Di- 
vision. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens. Mass., from 
May 23, 1918, to March 12, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, March 
19. 1919. 

KLEINER, EARL CHARLES, Private 1st Class. Co. D, 361st Infantry, 
91st Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to Sep- 
tember. 1918. Overseas from September 3. 191S. to April 3, 1919. 
Trained in Co. E, '335th Infantry, 84th Division. Transferred to 
91st after reaching France. Battles: Lys-Seheldt in Belgium, Oc- 
tober 31 — November 11. Returned to United States. April 3 — April 
15, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 6, 1919. 

KOPS, FRED JOHN, Private. Sent to Camp Sherman for training, on 
June 26, 1918. Was treated at Base Hospital, Camp Sherman for 
forty days. Discharged, August 10, 191S, for physical disability. 

KREUZMAN, JOHN ALFRED, Private. 306th Field Bakery Co., Q. M. C. 
Trained at Ft. Thomas and Svracuse, N. Y., from August 22, 1917. 
to October, 1917. Overseas from October 18, 1917. to April 20. 1919. 
Served at Nevers, Gievres, Angers, Langres-Marne. Montigny Leroi 
and Dijon. Returned to United States, April 20, 1919. Discharged at 
Hoboken, N. J., on May 9, 1919. 



354 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

KREUZMAN, WILLIAM ALPHEUS, Corporal. 82nd Co., 6th U. S. Marines. 
Trained at Paris Island, S. Q. and Quantico, Va„ from May 18, 1917, 
to October 23, 1917. Trained at Bordeaux, France, from November, 

1917, to January, 1918. From January to March, 1918, at Chaumont 
and Laville, France. Overseas from October 23, 1917, to September 
1, 1919. Battles: Verdun Sector, Aisne Defensive, Chateau-Thierry, 
Soissons, Pont-a-Moussin, St. Mihiel, Champagne, Meuse-Argonne. 
With Army of Occupation at Coblenz, Germany, from November, 

1918, to July 15, 1919. Awarded D. S. C. and French Croix de Guerre 
for gallant conduct in battle, November 1, 1918. Was a member of 
General Pershing's Composite Regiment. Returned to United States, 
September 1, 1919 — September 8. Discharged at Marine Barracks, 
Washington, D. C, on September 25, 1919. . Discharge dated, Sep- 
tember 18, 1919. 

KUMPART, HENRY W., Private, Co. A, SOth Engineers. Trained at 
Camp Tavlor from September 20, 1917, to March 20, 1918. Overseas 
from March 28, 1918, to April 18, 1919. Trained and worked at La- 
Rochelle. France, for thirteen months. Returned to United States, 
April 18 — April 25, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 10, 
1919. 

KUMPART, ALBERT HERMAN, Corporal, 3rd Regiment, Air Service, 
Co. 7. Trained at Camps Shelby, Hancock and Green, from Septem- 
ber 20, 1917, to June, 1918. Overseas from June 21, 1918, to June 21, 

1919, Trained in France at Orly Field, six months. Returned to 
United States. June 2 — July 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, 
July 14, 1919. 

LAMBERT, HARRY FRANK. Sergeant, Medical Department, U. S. Army. 
Trained and served at Ft. Thomas, Ft. Harrison and Camp Taylor 
from June 27, 1917, to discharge at Camp Taylor on September 27, 
1919. 

LAMBERT, ALBERT JOHN, Private, Co. C, 108th Engineers, 33rd Division. 
Trained at Camp Logan, Houston, Texas, from Julv 14. 1917, to May 
1, 1918. Overseas from May 8, 1918, to May 15, 1919. Battles: Meuse- 
Argonne, Bois de Forges. Served on the American Sector with the 
British Army from May 18 to August 24, 1918. From August 24 to 
September 26, with American Army in Troyon Sector. From Oc- 
tober 25 to November 11, Vaden lines. The Engineers' part in these 
operations was building roads and bridges, digging trenches and 
dug-outs and dressing-stations, putting up barbed-wire entangle- 
ments and so on. AVas sent to Luxemburg with the Army of Occu- 
pation. Returned to United States, May 15 — May 23, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Grant, June 8, 1919. 

LINDENMAIER. JOSEPH PETER, Corporal, 821st Aero Squadron. 
Trained at Speedway Aviation Park, Indianapolis, Ind., from June 
28, 1918, until discharged there on March 19, 1919. 

LINDENMAIER, SYLVESTER FRANCIS, Private, Co. C, 36th Infantry, 
12th Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, for three months, 
from May 23, 1919. At Camp Devens, Mass., five months. Discharged 
February 1, 1919. at Camp Taylor. 

LUCAS. JOSEPH SAMUEL, Private, Co. H, 126th Infantry, 32nd Division, 
and Co. A, 153rd Infantry, 39th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor 
and Beauregard from May 27, 1918, to August, 1918. Overseas from 
August 6, '1918, to April 28, 1919. Battles: Argonne, twenty days. 
Marched into Germany, December 1, 1918. Located at Thelhausen, 
about ten miles from Coblenz. Returned to France in box-cars, 
reaching Brest on April 23, 1919. Returned to United States, April 
28 — May 14, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 23, 1919. 

MARTIN. JOHN WILLIAM, Sergeant, Co. B, 60th Engineers. Trained 
at Ft. Benjamin Harrison from May 19, 1918, to June, 1918. Over- 
seas from June 28, 1918, to May 22, 1919. Attached to Signal Corps 
on special duty most of the time in France. After November 11 
returned to regiment and served as chief clerk., train-master and 
chief despatcher, military, for Est Railroad. Returned to United 
States, May 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, August 2, 1919. 
Hospital treatment, Bazeilles Sur Meuse for injury received in line 
of duty. 

MEER, BERNARD J. C, Corporal, Bat. B., 69th C. A. C, 33rd Brigade. Was 
trained at Fort Worden, Wash., from enlistment, April 22, 1914. Over- 
seas from August 14, 1918, to February 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Eustis, Va., August 25, 1920. Furlough on reserve June 1, 1919. 

MEISTER, CLINTON, Wagoner, Supply Co., 120th Infantry, 30th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20. 1917. 
to May 17, 1918. Overseas from May 23, 191S, to April 1, 1919. Service: 
Ypres Front in Belgium. Battles of the Hindenburg Line. Drove 
ammunition wagons to the firing lines. Returned to United States, 
April 1 — -April 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 24, 
1919. 

MEYER, EDWARD GEORGE, Wagoner, Supply Co., 68th F. A. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and Knox from September 6, 1918, to discharge at 
Camp Knox on December 26, 1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 355 

MILLER, CORNELIUS JOHN, Private ,Co. M, 120th Infantry, 30th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Tavlor and Sevier from October 4, 1917, 
to May 1, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to December 12, 1918. 
Battles: Tpres Front, in Belgium, Kemmel Hill. Voormezeele, Hinden- 
burg Line, Cambrai, St. Quenlin. Was in Corporal Ora Weare's squad, 
as was Carl Mistier, of Osgood. Wounded, September 29. shot through 
upper left arm. Hospital treatment, First Aid. American Hospital. 
Canadian Hospital at Brighton, England for eight weeks. Sent to 
American Hospital 33, Kentucky Unit, (trained at Camp Taylor), at 
Portsmouth, England, for two weeks. Returned to United States, 
December 12 — December 21, 1918. Discharged at Camp Grant, March 
1, 1919, after ten weeks in hospital at Ft. Sheridan. 

MILLER, LEONARD JOHN. Corporal, Headquarters Co., 103rd F. A., 
26th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman from October 
4. 1917, to August 20, 1918. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to 
April 2, 1919. With Headquarters Co., 335th Infantry, 84th Division, 
until after reaching France. Returned to United States, April 2 — 
April 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on May 13, 1919. 

MICHEL, WALDO ALBERT, Private, Co. C, 16th Infantry, 1st Division. 
Trained at Camps Sherman and Mills from June 26, 1917, to Sep- 
tember 2, 1918. Overseas from September 2, 1918, to August 3. 1919. 
Battles: Meuse-Argonne, fifteen days. With Army of Occupation in 
Germany from November 12, 1918, to July 23, 1919. At Dernbach 
until April, then at Selters until leaving Germany. Service: Clerical 
work in personnel department. Returned to United States, August 
3 — August 10, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, August 16, 1919. 
Trained in America in Co. D, 334th Infantry. Sith Division. Trans- 
ferred to First Division after reaching France. 

MOORE, THOMAS JOSEPH, Sergeant. Medical Department, Staff Corps. 
Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky. in Regular Army, enlisting September 
26, 1917. Service at Ft. Thomas. Hospital record for pneumonia. Dis- 
charged October, 1920. 

MOORMAN, HERMAN LOUIS, Private 1st Class, Acting Sergeant in Motor 
Transport Corps. Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky., in 29th Co.. 8th Bn., 
159th Depot Brigade Service at Ft. McPherson, Savannah, Ga. In- 
ducted, April 30, 1918. Discharged at Camp Taylor, January 16, 
1919. 

MOODY, JESSE OTTO, Private, Battery B, 61st C. A. C. Trained at Ft. 
Thomas, Ky. one month from enlistment, January 4, 1918. At Ft. 
Moultrie, Moultrieville, S. C, from February 1, 1918, until discharge, 
November 14, 1918. Developed pneumonia while home on furlouph 
in March, 1918, was unable to rejoin regiment until August 1, 1918. 
Treatment at Base Hospital, Ft. Moultrie, from August 1 to Novem- 
ber 14, 1918. At Marine Hospital, Evansville, from July 8, 1919, to 
November 8, 1919. Died, January 4, 1920. 

NARWOLD, GEORGE, Private, Battery A, 39th Division. Trained at 
Camps Taylor and Beauregard, La., from May 27. 1918. to A.ugust 14. 
191S. Overseas from August 31, 1918. to June 3, 1919. -i'rained in 
France at Camps Coctquidan and Valdahon on the Swiss border. 
Battery B, with Battery A were chosen to "conduct fire" in Officers' 
Artillery School at Camp Valdahon. One hundred officers from the 
A. E. F. came at one time for a month's course. Returned to United 
States, June 3 — June 16, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, June 24, 
1919. 

NEWMAN, HAROLD HERSCHELL, Private, U. S. Ambulance Service, 
Section 616. Trained at Valparaiso, Ind.. two weeks, beginning 
August 1. 1918. At Ann Arbor, Mich, in Signal Corps. Co. D, trans- 
ferred to S. A. T. C. At Ann Arbor University, Co. B, for two months. 
Sent then to Camp Crane, AlLntown, Pa., where assigned to Amb. 
Co. Overseas from November 13, 1918, to May 23, 1919. Stayed at 
Base Ambulance Camp at Ferriers, France, for four months. Left 
on March 3, 1919, for Germany, by way of Paris, Nancy and Stras- 
burg. Stopped at Mayence a short time to do ambulance work. Had 
been transferred to French Army on leaving Ferriers, Sanitary Service 
Unit 1564. Helped carry French wounded and soldiers back from 
the camps to base hospitals. Formed a convoy of about five hundred 
ambulances returning to Ferriers, a distance from five hundred to 
nine hundred kilometers. Returned to United States, May 23 — June 
4, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 17, 1919. Had influenza 
at Ann Arbor. Was also injured in the collapse of an old building 
there. 

NICKOL. LAWRENCE JOSEPH, Corporal, 821st Aero Squadron. Trained 
at Speedway Aviation Repair Depot, Speedway, Indianapolis, Ind., 
from June 26, 1918, to discharge there on January 23, 1919. Service: 
Building and repairing airplanes. 

OLLIER, GEORGE CHARLES, Seaman, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111., from May 12, 1918. for three weeks, then at Philadelphia 
for two weeks. Left Philadelphia, July 27, 1918; sailed August. 3 on 
the Leviathan: arrived at Brest, France, on August 11, 1918. As- 

23 



356 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV A R 

signed to the Buffalo, Repair Ship, and went to Naval Base 9, at 
Gibi>iltar, Spain, arriving August 19. Stayed here until December 
15, 1918. Returned to United States on U. S. S. Sherman, arriving 
at Hoboken, N. J.. December 31, 191S. Assigned to duty on the 
U. S. S. Dakota, transport; three trips. Discharged, May 31, 1919, 
at Philadelphia. 
O'NEAL, ROBERT NEWTON, Private. 6th Co.. C. A. C. Enlisted in Oc- 
tober, 1908, and served two years as company barber. Re-enlisted, 
December, 1911. Sent to Fortress Monroe, Va., for training in Coast 
Artillery. Served here three years. Re-enlisted in August, 1914, at 
Fortress Monroe and sent to Panama in January, 1916, stationed at 
Cristobal, Canal Zone, until discharged there, April 19, 1919. 

OSWALD, JOSEPH WILLIAM, Private, Headquarters Co., 336th Bn., Tank 
Corps. Trained at Camp Purdue, Lafayette, Ind. and Camp Colt, Pa., 
from June 28, 1918. to discharge on December 18, 1918, at Camp Tay- 
lor. Hospital treatment for influenza. 

PATTERSON, JOSEPH NATHANIEL, Corporal, Headquarters Co., 4th F. 
A. Trained at Camp Jackson, S. C, from July 20, 191S, to February, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, February 4, 1919. 

PEETZ, LEO GEORGE WILLIAM, Private, 159th Depot Brigade. At 
Camp Taylor from September 6, 1918, until discharged there for 
physical disability on September 11, 1918. 

PIERPONT, JOSEPH CLAUD, Private, M. G. Co., 57th Infantry, 15th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Logan. Houston, Texas, from May 23. 1918, 
to June, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, June 9, 1919. Throat 
operation at Camp Pike, Base Hospital. 

PLANTHOLT, FRANK JOSEPH, Sergeant. 3rd Co., 6th Bn., Ordnance 
Department. Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis and 
Camp Hancock, Ga., from June 15, 1918, to August, 1918. Overseas 
from August 30, 1918, to July 5, 1919. Service at Mc-hun, Ordnance 
Center. Returned to United States, July 5 — July 14, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, July 22, 1919. 

PRAKEL, FRANK. Private, Battery A, 134th F. A., 37th Division. Trained 
at Camp Sheridan, Montgomery, Ala., from April 30, 1918, to June 
14, 1918. At Camp Upton, N. Y., two weeks. Overseas from June 
28, 1918, to March 20, 1919. Battles: Marbache Sector, ten days; 
Pannes Sector, October 23 — November 11. Camped near Verdun after 
Armistice until February 25, 1919. Returned to United States, March 
20 — April 2, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 17, 1919. Had 
measles at Camp Sheridan, May 28 — June 13, 1918. 

PRELL, HUGO AUGUST, Private, Co. G, 2Sth Infantry, First Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman in Headquarters Co., 329th Infantry, 83rd 
Division, from March 29, 1918, to June, 1918. Overseas from June 
12, 1918. Transferred to First Division on August 2, 1918. Killed 
at Meuse-Argonne, October 12, 1918. 

RUHL, JOSEPH WILLIAM, Private 1st Class, Co. D. 36th Infantry, 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, Mass.. 
from May 23, 1918, to January 25, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, February 3, 1919. The 12th Division was known as the Ply- 
mouth Division. 

RUHL, EDWARD JOHN, Private, Medical Department, 3rd Bn., 23rd In- 
fantry, Second Division. Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Green- 
leaf from May 27. 1918, to September, 1918. Overseas from Sep- 
tember 1, 1918, to July 23, 1919. Battles: Meuse-Argonne, October 
1 — November 11, 1918. Marched with Second Division to Germany, 
located at Vallandar, near Coblenz, for longest period. Left Ger- 
many, July 15, 1919; left, Brest. France, July 23, 1919, reached New 
York City, United States, August 3, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man, August 14, 1919. 

SAMMS. MALCOLM LAYLE, Captain, Medical Corps. U. S. Army. Trained 
at New Haven, Conn., from June 27, 1918, to December, 1918. Dis- 
charged at Otisville, N. Y., December 11, 191S. 

SCHENE, ARTHUR J.. Sergeant 1st Class. Medical Department. Trained 
at Camp Taylor, Ky„ from September 5, 1917. Assigned to Base 
Hospital, Camp Taylor, until discharged, April IS, 1919. 

SCHEIN. ARTHUR WILLIAM, Sergeant, Co. A. 335th Infantry, S4th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Sherman from Septem- 
ber 9, 1917, to September. 1918. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to 
February 27, 1919. Trained in France at Mussedan until Novem- 
ber 1, 1918. Hospital treatment at Savonay. France, and Camp Tay- 
lor and Ft. Sheridan, U. S. A. Returned to United States, February 
27 — March 13, 1919. Discharged at Ft. Sheridan, 111., February 14, 
1920. 

SCHMIDT, JOHN ADAM, Private, Amb. Co. 34, 7th Sanitary Train, 7th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Greenleaf from April 30. 
1918, to August, 1918. Overseas from August 13, 1918, to June 18, 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 357 

1919. Battles: Meusc-Argonne Offensive, thirty-two days, litter-bearer. 
At Martineourt, France, from November 11, 1918, to March, 1919. 
In hospital at Martineourt in February for bronchitis. Returned to 
United States, June IS — June 30, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tavlor, 
July 9, 1919. 

SCHOETMER, JOHN HENRY, Private, Co. C, 27th M. G. Bn„ 9th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sheridan, Ala., from August 8, 1918, to discharge 
there, February 10, 1919. 

SCHRADER, ALBERT EP.NEST, Lieutenant, U. S. Navy. Trained at 
United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, from 
August 6, 1912, until assigned to U. S. S Annapolis, June 3, 1916. 
to June 24, 1916; U. S. S. Vermont. June 24, 1916, to October 20, 1916; 
October 29, 1916, to August 13, 1917, on U. S. S. Annapolis. Pro- 
moted from Midshipman 4th Class to Ensign, to Lieutenant, Junior 
Grade, to Lieutenant, January 1, 1918. Service in World War at 
Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, R. I., August 20, 1917, to Septem- 
ber 16, 1918. Convoy duty on IT. S. Destroyer Dorsey to Buncrana, 
Ireland, and Brest, France. Through early part of 1917, patro! duty 
on Mexican coast. In Presidential convoys, December, 1918, and 
March, 1919. Ordered to Adriatic Sea in April, 1919. 

SCHUMACHER, JACOB OTTO. Private 1st Class, Headquarters Co., 70th 
C. A. C. Trained at Fts. Hamilton and Wadsworth, N. Y., from April 
3, 1918, to July 15, 1918. Overseas from July 15, 1918, to February 
12, 1919. Sent to Artillery School five weeks at Angers, France. 
Sent in a detachment from the 70th to the 71st C. A. C. as instructor 
at Paillavaux, from October 1 to November 11, 191S. Returned to 
United States, February 12 — February 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, March 12, 1919. 

SCHUMACHER, PHILIP FRED, Sergeant, Air Service. Line 340, Sec. H. 
Trained at Kelley Field, Texas, from March 18, 1918, to June, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, June 19, 1919. 

SCHWIER, WALKER, Private, Battery B. 25th F. A., 9th Division. Trained 
at Camp McClellan, Anniston Ala., from July 22, 1918, to February, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, February 2S, 1919. 

SCHWIER, HOLDEN RAY, Private. Co. D, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to September, 1918. 
Overseas from September 1, 1918, to April 16, 1919. Returned to 
United States, April 16 — April 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
May 13, 1919. 

SEVERINGHAUS," BRIGHTLY GEO. FREDERICK, Private 1st Class, Co. 
M, 34th Infantry, 7th Division. Trained at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 
and Chickamauga Park, Ga. and at Camp McArthur, Texas, six 
months, from July 13, 1917. to August, 1918. Trained in various or- 
ganizations, Co. G, 53rd Infantry; Co. A, 20th M. G. Bn„ transferred 
to 34th Infantry, before sailing. Overseas from August 7, 1918, to 
August 19, 1919. Battles: St. Mihiel, Argonne, advance on Metz. 
Transferred to Second Army Headquarters, Department of Criminal 
Investigation after the Armistice was signed. Located at Toul, 
France. Sent on detached duty to Belgium with 287th M. P. Co. 
in June, July and August, 1919. Went by way of Metz and through 
Germany and Luxemburg. Returned to United States, August 19 — 
August 29, 1919. Discharged, September 5, 1919, at Camp Taylor. 

SHUCK, CHARLES A., Sergeant. Co. D, 28th Infantry. First Division. 
Trained at Ft. Ringgold, Texas, from April 28, 1916, to June, 1917. 
Overseas from June 14. 1917, to August 24, 1919. Trained in Gondre- 
court Area, France. Battles: Toul Sector, January 15 — April 3. 1918; 
Cantigny, May 23-30, 1918; Montdidier-Noyon. June 9-13, 1918; Aisne- 
Marne, July 18 — August 6, 191S; Saizieres Sector, August 7-24, 1918; 
St. Mihiel, September 12-16. 1918; Meuse-Argonne, September 26 — 
November 11, 1918. With Army of Occupation in Germany, from 
November, 1918, to August, 1919. Returned to United States, August 
24 — September 1, 1919. Stationed at Camp Taylcr in 2nd Co., M G. 
Bn. 

SHUCK. CHRIS THOMAS, Sergeant, Co. D 20th Infantry, Regular Army. 
Trained at Ft. Douglas, Utah, from May 6, 1913. Discharged, Feb- 
ruary 12, 1919, at Ft. Logan, Colorado. When first enlisted was 
sent to Ft. Shafter. Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. Furloughed to 
Regular Army Reserve, May 20. 1916. Recalled to active service on 
the Mexican border, July 5, 1916, until discharged in 1919. 

SHUCK. GUS JULIUS, Corporal, Co. G, 13th Infantry, 8th Division. 
Trained at Ft. McKinley, P. I., Camp Fremont, Cal., from Septem- 
ber 4, 1914. Embarked from Manila, Philippine Islands on July 15, 

1917, and trained at Camp Fremont one year. Was discharged a^t 
Camp Mills, N. Y., on July 12, 1919. 

SHOUSE, OSCAR BERNARD, Private 1st Class, 29th Co.. 8th Tr. Bn., 
159th Depot Brigade. Trained at Camp Taylor. Ky., from March 29, 

1918. Assigned to Medical Department and trained until discharged 
at Camp Greenleaf, Ga. Discharged at Camp Taylor, June 19, 1919. 



358 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

SIEBERT, GEORGE ADAM, Private, Battery F, 6th F. A., Replacement 
Unit. Trained at Camp Taylor from July 23, 1918, until discharged, 
December 14, 1918. Had influenza and pneumonia, from 3rd of Oc- 
tober to December 1, 1918. 

STARKE, VINCENT PETER, Private, M. G. Co., 333rd Infantry, 84fh 
Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to August 
20, 1918. Overseas from September 2, 1918, to April 6, 1919. Battles: 
Verdun Sector, October 25 — November 8. Returned to United States, 
April 6 — April 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, May 13, 1919. 

STEINKAMP, WILLIAM MICHAEL, Cook, 20th Co., 5th Tr. Bn.. 158th 
Depot Brigade. Trained and served at Camp Sherman, .Chillicothe, 
O., from June 26, 1918, until discharged on November 29, 1918. 

STEIN. ANTHONY, Private, Gas Defense Division. Trained at Syracuse, 
N. V. Recruit Camp and Lakehurst, N. J., from July 29, 1918, to dis- 
charge at Lakehurst, N. J., on December 12, 1918. 

STOCKINGER, CHESTER RAYMOND, Mech., Co. C, 40th Infantry, 14th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Riley, Kas. and Camp Custer, Mich., from 
May 23, 191S, to discharge at Camp Custer, January 22, 1919. 

TAYLOR, WINFRED BURNETT, First Lieutenant, Battery C, 327th F. 
A., 84th Division. Trained first in Battery B, 1st Ind. F. A., eight 
months as a private at Purdue University. Enlisted, May 11, 1917, 
in Officers Training Camp at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis. 
Trained here three months in 1st Battery, 9th Prov. Tr. Regiment, 
commisslonerd Second Lieutenant on August 15, 1917. First Lieu- 
tenant on September 6, 1918. Completed training in United States 
at Ft. Sill, Okla.. West Point Art. Range, Ky. and Camp Grant, 111. 
Overseas from September 8. 1918, to January 20, 1919. Trained at 
Camp de Souge, France. Returned to United States, January 20 — 
February 5, 1919. Stationed at Camp Grant, 111. 

TEKULVE, ALBERT FRANK, Private, Co. M, 18th Infantry, 1st Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918. to September, 1918, 
in 84th Division. Overseas from September 2, 191S, to August 23, 
1919. Transferred in France to First Division. Battles: Meuse-Ar- 
gonne, Defensive Sector .two weeks. With Army of Occupation at 
Mogendorf, Germany, from November, 191S, to August, 1919. Re- 
turned to United States, August 23 — September 4, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman, September 26, 1919. 

TEKULVE, ANDREW JOHN, Sergeant, 1st Co., 1st Regiment, Medical 
Department, 84th Division. Trained and served at Camp Taylor, Ky.. 
from September 17, 1917, to discharge at Camp Taylor, March 27. 
1919. 

THIEL. GEORGE BALZAR, Private 1st Class, Battery D, 146th F. A., 
41st Division. Trained at Camp Lewis. Washington, from Septem- 
ber 11, 1917. until December, 1917. Embarked from New York. De- 
cember 24, 1917. Overseas until June 15, 1919. Trained in Franca 
at Camp de Souge, January 7 to July 1, 1918. Battles: Champagne- 
Marne Defensive, July 15-18; Aisne-Marne, July 18 — August 6; St. 
Mihiel, September 9-16; Meuse-Argonne, September 26 — November 11, 

1918. With Army of Occupation in Germany, near Coblenz, from 
November, 918, to June, 1919. Returned to United States, June 15 — 
June 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp Lewis. Wash., June 29, 1919. 

TIMMERMAN, EDWARD CONRAD. JR., Private, 13th Co., 2nd Platoon. 
Q. M. C. Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky. and Camp Johnston, Fla., from 
July 2, 1918, to discharge at Camp Johnston on January 27, 1919. 

UPDIKE, HENRY CLAY. Private 1st Class, Headquarters Co., 70th C. 
A. C. Trained at Fts. Hamilton and Wadsworth. N. Y., from April 
3, 1918, to .Tulv 15, 1918. Overseas from July 15. 1918, to February 
12, 1919. Returned to United States, February 12 — February 22, 

1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, March 12, 1919. 

VANCE, JOSEPH JOHN, Seaman Cook, 2nd Class, U. S. Navy. Trained 
at Cape May, N. J., from March 20, 1918, to release, on September 
9, 1919. 

VIERLING, ELMER ANTHONY, Corporal, Co. K, 77th Infantry, 14th Di- 
vision. Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., from August 28, 1917, 
to July 29, 1918. At Camp Custer, Mich., to discharge there on Jan- 
uary 14, 1919. Treated at hospital for partial paralysis of right foot, 
during August, September and October, 1918. 

VONDERHEIDE, MICHAEL QUIRIN. Sergeant. Battery F, 3rd F. A.. 6th 
Division. Trained at Columbus Barracks. O., Laredo, Texas, Ft. Myer, 
Va., Camp McClellan, Ala., and Fort Sill, Okla., from May 6, 1916, 
to July, 1918. Overseas from July 13, 191S, to June 10, 1919. Trained 
in France at Valdahon, July 30 — September 30. 191S. Returned to 
United States, June 10 — June 19, 1919. Discharged at Camp Grant, 
June 4, 1920. 

WACHSMAN, MELSON JACOB, Private, S. A. T. C. Reserve Army Corps. 
Trained at Franklin College, Franklin, Ind., from October 15, 1918, 
to discharge there, December 21, 1918. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 359 

WAGNER, CHARLES FLETCHER, Private, 96th Co., 6th U. S. Marines, 
2nd Division. Trained at Paris Island, S. C. and Quantico, Va.. from 
July 31, 1918, to October 7, 1918. Overseas from October 7, 1918, to 
April 21. 1919. Battles: Argonne Forest. Marched to Coblenz, Ger- 
many in November, 1918. Remained there until April, 1919. Re- 
turned to United States. April 21 — May 7, 1919. Discharged at Quan- 
tico, Va., on June 20, 1919. 

WAGNER, COLUMBUS FRANKLIN, Sergeant, Battery F, 17th F. A., 2nd 
Division. Trained at Camp Shelby, Miss, in Co. F, 4th Infantrv, Ind. 
N. G., from September 20, 1917, to September 26, 1917, when "trans- 
ferred to 139th F. A., Supply Co. Transferred in June, 191S, to Re- 
placement Unit, 2nd Division. Overseas from June 8, 1918, to July 
23, 1919. Battles: Aisne-Marne, July 18-25; Marbache, August 9 — 
August 22; St. Mihiel, September 12-16; Meuse-Argonne (Champagne) 
October 1 — October 2S; Meuse-Argonne, November 1 — November 11, 
1918. Lost rank on transfer to Replacement Unit. Slightly gassed 
twice, no hospital record. Marched to Germany, November 14 — 
December 14, 1&1S. Stayed at Ehrenbreitstein until July, 1919, guard 
duty. Left Germany, July 15, 1919. Returned to United States, July 
23 — August 4, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, August 14, 1919. 

WALTERMAN, FRANK, Corporal, 811th Aero Squadron, Air Servioe. 
Trained at Speedway, Indianapolis, at Aero Repair Depot, from June 
28, 1918, to discharge there, March 22, 1919. Hospital record for 
operation. 

WALTERMAN, LEWIS ANTHONY, Corporal, 406th Motor Transport Corps. 
Q. M. C. Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, to De- 
cember, 1917, to 335th Infantry, 84th Division, at Camp Meigs, Wash, 
in Q. M. C, one month. At Camp Merritt S. J., eighteen months. 
Discharged. July 12, 1919, at Camp Sherman, O. Service: Truck- 
driver in Motor Co. 

WALSMAN, SHARON ROBERT, Sergeant, S. A. T. C. Trained at Dela- 
ware, 0., from October 1 to discharge there on December 19, 1918. 

WARD, PHILMER JOHN, Acting Sergeant, S. A. T. C. Trained at But- 
ler College, Indianapolis, from October 8, 1918, to discharge there, 
December 6, 191S. 

WEIGEL, FLORANTINE, Private 1st Class. Battery B, 36th Infantry, 
12th Division. Trained at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devpns, Mass. 
from May 23, 1918, to February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
February 19, 1919. 

WESLER, TED RAYMOND, Private, 4th Evacuation Hospital, Medical 
Department. Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky., Camp Greenleaf. Ft. Ogle- 
thorpe, Ga., Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., from October 8, 1917. to 
May, 191S. Overseas from May 10, 1918, to December 25, 1918. Battles: 
Champagne, Chateau-Thierry, Verdun. Wounded, November 2, 1918, 
north of Verdun by shell from long range gun, striking billet, 11:30 
A. M. "Wounds in right forearm and left temple. Hospital treat- 
ment, Evacuation 4, Base 13, Base 122 in France, at Camp Merritt, 
N. J.. Base and Walter Reed Hospitals, Washington, D. C. Re- 
turned to United States, December 25, 1918 — January 3, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, February 22, 1919. Volunteered for blood 
transfusion operation while in service. Such service was always 
volunteer work. Shell that struck billet was aimed at hospital. Three 
struck the billet. Five others fell harmlessly between village and 
hospital. Of fifteen soldiers sleeping in billet, two sergeants were 
killed; nine privates and one major were all severely wounded. Three 
were uninjured. 

WESLER, AMOS GEORGE, Musician, Headquarters Co., 112th Infantry 
Band, 28th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard in 
Headquarters Co., 154th Infantry, 39th Division, from May 27. 1918, 
to August, 1918. Overseas from August 6, 1918. to April 19, 1919. 
Transferred to 28th Division. January 24, 1919. Returned to United 
States, April 19 — April 30, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman. May 19, 
1919. 

WERNKE, WILLIAM, Private, Co. G, 115th Infantry, 29th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor. Gordon and McClellan, from March 29, 
1918. to June, 1919. Overseas from June 15, 1918. to May 11. 1919. 
Battles: Argonne Forest. Molbruck Hill, October S-18; Mollandville 
Farm, October 10-18; Precourt, October 11; Grand Martoguoct, October 
16; Capture of Etrays Ridge, October 23; Boise Belleu, October 26. 1918. 
Ready to advance to Metz on November 11. Returned to United 
States, May 11 — May 24, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tavlor. June 3, 
1919. 

WERNKE, JOHN HENRY, Corporal, 821st Aero Squadron. Trained and 
served at Speedway, Indianapolis, in Aviation Repair work, from 
June 28, 1918, to discharge there, on January 4, 1919. 

WINSOR, BYRON EWING, Private, Headquarters Co.. 50th C. A. C. Trained 
at Jefferson Barracks, Mo.. Ft. Caswell. N. C. Camp Eustis, Va., from 
June 4, 1918, to October 7, 1918. Overseas from October 7,. 1918, to 



360 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

January 31, 1919. Had influenza on voyage overseas. Returned to 
United States, January 31 — February 14, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, February 2S, 1919. Eight convoys and the transport 
Charleston all tired at a submarine near Brest, France, on the out- 
bound voyage, sinking it. 

WINTZ, JOSEPH, Sergeant. Trained at Camp Tavlor in 29th Co., Sth 
Tr. Bn.. 159th Depot Brigade, from May 27, 1918, to March, 1919. 
Transferred then to First Det., Billeting and Supply Div., Demobili- 
zation Group. Service: Training recruits until September, 1918. 
Guard duty until March. Mustering out after December 1, 1918. 
Hospital record, two weeks in Base Hospital in November, 1918. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, August 30, 1919. 

WOLTERS, EVERETT CHRISTIAN, Private, Co. M. 363rd Infantry, 91st 
Division. Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to Septem- 
ber 2, 1918, in 84th Division. Overseas from September 2, 1918, to 
March 19, 1919. Returned to United States, March 19 — March 29, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, March 23, 1919. 

WONNING, HARVEY HENRY, First Lieutenant. Trained at Camps Tay- 
lor and Jackson from May 16, 1918, to discharge at Camp Jackson, 
S. C. on December, 1919. Promotions: Private to Second Lieutenant, 
at Field Artillery Officers' Training School, August, 1918, to First 
Lieutenant, October, 1918. 

WYCOFF, PAUL VERNON, Corporal, Battery F, 38th C. A. C. Trained 
at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., Ft. Totten, L. I., N. Y., Camp Eustis, Va., 
Fortress Monroe, Va., Camp Stuart, Va., Fts. Hamilton anil Wads- 
worth, N. Y., from May 22, 1918, to December 14, 1918. Discharged 
at Camp Grant. 111., on December 23, 1918. Hospital record: Six 
weeks in Post Hospital, Ft. Totten, for mumps. Two weeks in Post 
Hospital, Ft. Hamilton, N. Y.. for influenza. Route from Jefferson 
Barracks to Ft. Totten: Illinois and Michigan, Detroit, Canada. Buf- 
falo, Pennsylvania. Returned from Ft. Wadsworth to Camp Grant, 
Rockford, 111., by same route. 

YOUNGMAN, JOSEPH JOHN, Private, 5th Co., C. A. C. and 68th Co., 
17th Bn.. 153rd Depot Brigade, at Camp Dix. Trained at Valparaiso. 
Ind., two weeks, from July 1, 1918. Two months at Camp Pratt. 
Pittsburg. Pa. Three months at Ft. Hancock, N. J., and one week 
at Camp Dix, N. J. Discharged in December, 1918. 

IX. 
OTTER CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

BEACH, MELVIN ALBERT, Private, 29th Co., Sth Tr. Bn., 159th Depot 
Brigade. Trained at Camp Sherman from August 29, 1918, to dis- 
charge there on December 16, 1918. 

BENHAM, HARRISON MORTON, Private 1st Class, Amb. Co. 3 4, Evacua- 
tion Hospital. Trained at Camps Taylor, Ky., Greenleaf, Ga., and 
Sheridan, Ala., from May 27, 1918, to November, 1918. Overseas from 
November 12, 1918, to April 24, 1919. Hospital treatment at Camp 
Greenleaf, while in training. Service: Ambulance work in France. 
Returned to United States. April 24 — May 8, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, May 24, 1919. 

BROWN, JOHN EVERETT, Private, Ord. Dct. Trained at Camp Taylor. 
Ky. and Camp Hancock, Ga., from May 25, 19'1S, to July 29, 1918. 
Sent to Penmiman, Va., for service at Dupont Powder Works. Dis- 
charged at Camp Grant, 111., March 22, 1919. 

BROWER, AVERY JENNINGS, Seaman Sec. U. S. Navy. Trained at 
Great Lakes, 111., from July 20, 1918, to November 1, 1918. Sent to 
Philadelphia Receiving Ship, one week. Embarked at New York, 
November 4, 1918, on the transport Orizaba. Reached St. Nazaire, 
France, November 13. Went to Brest, France, for one week. Then 
to Plymouth, England, and finally to Queenstown, Ireland, to serve 
at the United States Destroyer Base, United States Base 6, located 
there. Served here six months. Served a month on the U. S. S. 
Cape Finisterre. Released at Pittsburg, Pa., in June, 1919. 

BUCHANAN, JOHN, Private, Co. K, 147th Infantry, 37th Division. Trained 
first in 3rd Ohio, N. G. Assigned to 37th Division and sent to Camp 
Sherman for further training, then to Camp Sheridan, Ala. En- 
listed, June. 1917, at Holton, Ind. Trained until June 2, 1918. Over- 
seas from June 23, 1918, to March 6, 1919. Battles: Toul Sector in 
Flanders, Verdun Front. Wounded on September 28, 1918. Hos- 
pital treatment until discharge. Left arm removed at shoulder. Re- 
turned to United States in March, 1919. Discharged, March 23, 1919, 
at Atlanta, Ga. 

BURTON. HOLMAN HILLIS, Wagoner. Supply Co., 334th Infantry, 84th 
division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman from October 4. 
1917, to September, 1918. Overseas from September 1, 1918. to May 
24, 1919. Returned to United States on May 24 — June 6, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, June 20 1919. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 361 

CADY, CHARLES RUSSELL, Wag-oner, Supply Co.. 25th P. A., 9th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Tavlor, Ky. and Camp McClellan, Ala., 
from July 24, 1918, to March, 1919. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., 
March 8, 1919. 

CLARK, LeROY, Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Bloomington, Indiana 

University, S. A. T. C, from October, 1918, to December 21, 1918. 

Assigned to Co. D, 41st Infantry. Discharged at Bloomington, Ind., 
December 21, 1918. 

CLARK, OMER CHESTER, Engineer, C. A. C. N. C. S. Trained in 4th Co. at 
Portress Monroe, Va. Enlisted at New Orleans, La., December 19, 1906. 
Located at Ft. Crockett, Galveston. Texas. 

CARPENTER, GEORGE FREDERIC, Private, Battery D. 70th F. A., 11th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Knox, Ky., from Septem- 
ber 6, 1918, to discharge at Camp Knox, February 1, 1919. 

CASTNER, CHALMERS L., Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Franklin 
College, Franklin, Ind., from September 30, 1918, to discharge there 
in December, 1918. 

CASTNER, BRYAN JAMES, Fireman, U. S. Naval Reserve. Trained at 
Great Lakes, 111., in Unit B. Engineer's Force for one month, from 
May 28, 1918. At Hampton Roads, Va., for two weeks. Assigned 
to U. S. S. Dakota for service from July 21, ISIS, to July 15, 1919. 
Coast defense, New York to Norfolk, Va., south, and to Rockland, 
Me., north. Four months in West Indies and Panama Canal Zone, 
at New York and at Rockport, Mass. Released from service, July 
17, 1919. 

COLBERT, LAFAYETTE, Cannoneer, 25th F. A., 9th Division. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and McClellan, from July 22, 1918, to February 5, 
1919, when discharged at Camp Taylor. Hospital treatment for in- 
fluenza at Camp McClellan, October 19 — November 1, 1918. 

COLE, REX HYLER, Private, Battery 3, 72nd F. A., 11th Division. 
Trained at Camp Knox, Ky., from September 6, 1918, to discharge 
there, on February 3, 1919. 

CONOVER, ASA EGBERT, Private, S. A, T. C. Trained at Camp Winona, 
Winona Lake, Ind., from October 15, 1918, to discharge at Indiana- 
polis on December 6, 1918. 

DeLAY, CHARLES FREEMAN, Private, Ordnance Department. Trained 
at Indianapolis, Ind., Camp Hancock, Ga„ and Camp Lee, Va., from 
June 15, 1918, to January, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, Jan- 
uary 17, 1919. Hospital treatment for pneumonia at Camp Hancock. 

DeLAY, MARTHA GRETA, Army Nurse Corps. Trained at Camp Dee, 
Petersburg, Va., from March 20, 1918, to July, 191S. Overseas from 
July 14, 1918, to August 4, 1919. Stationed at Allery, France. Base 
Hospital 25; at Commercy, France, Base Hospital 91, and at Coblenz, 
Germany, Evacuation Hospital 49. Returned to United States, August 
4 — August 16, 1919. Discharged at New York, September 26, 1919, 
as Reserve Nurse. 

DOBSON, DAVID HENRY, Private, 39th Co., 20th Engineers, 141st Bn. 
Trained first in Co. I, 3rd Ohio Infantry, N. G., from enlistment on 
June 4, 1917. At Camp Perry, O. and at Chillicothe, O. Assigned 
to Co. I, 148th Infantry, 37th Division, at Camp Sherman, and sent 
to Camp Sheridan, Ala., for further training. Transferred to Engineers 
at Camp Sheridan. Overseas from February 22, 1918. Returned to 
United States, July, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 11, 1919. 

DOWNEY, ARCHIE, Sergeant, Co. I, 148th Infantry, 37th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman and Camp Sheridan, Ala., from May 21, 
1917, to May, 1918. Overseas from May 21, 191S, to March 17, 1919. 
Battles: Baccarat Sector, Avocourt Sector, Meuse-Argonne. Pannes 
Sector, Ypres-Lys. Returned to United States, March 17 — March 28, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, April 21, 1919. 

DOWNEY, CLARENCE BURTON, Private 1st Class, Medical Corps, 25th 
Engineers. Trained at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., Ft. Riley, Kas and 
Camp Devens, Mass., from enlistment, July 19, 1917, to January, 1918. 
Overseas from January 3, 1918, to April 7, 1919. Battles: Meuse-Ar- 
gonne. Hospital treatment for eyes and ear at Pontanazen, Kerhoun, 
France. Returned to United States. April 7 — April 17, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., June 17, 1919. 

DOWNEY, EARL WILLIAM, Chief Yeoman, U. S. Navy. Trained at 
Newport, R. I., from June 29, 1914, until assigned to U. S. S. Mis- 
souri, battleship service. Died of influenza-pneumonia at Phila- 
delphia, Pa., on September 30, 1918. 

EDENS, ROY HUNTER, Private, U. S. Infantry. Trained at Ft. Ben- 
jamin Harrison, Ind. and at Syracuse, N. Y., from July 29 to dis- 
charge at Syracuse, N. Y., for physical disability, August 8, 1918. 
Had just recovered from a severe case of typhoid. 



362 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

EDENS, ALVA ORAL, Sergeant, Co. E, 3rd Infantry, U. S. Army. Trained 
at Ft. Thomas, Ky., Eagle Pass, Texas, and San . Antonio. Texas, 
from April 8, 1917, to discharge at San Antonio, March 25, 1920. 
Mexican border patrol duty. 

ELLIOTT, SAMUEL ALBERT, Corporal, 6th Co., O. R. S. Detachment. 
Trained at Indianapolis, Ind., from June 15, 1918, to August 31. 1918. 
Overseas from August 31, 1918. to July 14, 1919. Served at Mehun 
in Ordnance Repair Shops. Returned to United States in July, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, July 25, 1919. 

ENSMINGER, SAMUEL WARD, Sergeant, Medical Department, U. S. 
Army. Trained at Jefferson Barracks. Mo., two weeks; Ft. Riley, 
Kas., for two months, from enlistment. June 12, 1917. Service at 
Camp Bowie, Texas, for one year. Discharged at Whipple Barracks, 
Prescott, Arizona, July 25, 1919. Was in hospital eleven months 
at Prescott for chest and lung trouble. 

FLICK, JOHN LOUIS, Private, Co. I, 119th Infantry. 30th Division, 
Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Sevier, from October 4, 1917, 
to May, 1918. Overseas from May 12, 1918. Battles: Ypres Front, 
Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele, Hindenburg Line. Wounded in action, 
October 2, 1918. Died in hospital at Rouen, France, October 16. 
1918. 

GROSSMAN, HARRY HENRY, Private, Co. A. 334th Infantry, 84th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Sherman, from June 26, 1918, to discharge 
there, on December 9, 1918. Hospital treatment for influenza in 
October. 

HALLETT, EVERETT McKINLEY. Private, Co. L. 147th Engineers. 
Trained at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, Ind., from Septem- 
ber 1, 191S, to discharge there, on December 14, 1918. 

HARRIS, LEO, S. A. T. C. Trained at Camp Franklin, Franklin, Ind.. 
from October 1. 1918, to discharge there, on December 21, 1918. Had 
influenza for three weeks in October. 

HILL, LOUIS JOHN, Private, Aviation Service. Trained at Camp Grant, 
111., Kelley Field, Eberts Field. Texas, and Wilbur Wright Field, 
Dayton, O., from December 15, 1917, to discharge at Wilbur Wright 
Aviation Field, January 28, 1919. Hospital treatment for malaria 
and influenza. 

HUGHES. DAVID HANNIBAL, Private 1st Class. Co. H, 16th Infantry, 
1st Division. Trained at Camp Sherman in Cos. A and B, 334th 
Infantry, 84th Division, from June 26, 1918, to August 20, 1918. Over- 
seas from September 3, 1918, to August 22, 1919. Transferred in 
France to 1st Division. Battles: Meuse-Argonne. October 25 — No- 
vember 11. With the Army of Occupation in Coblenz, Germany, from 
November, 191S. to August. 1919. Returned to United States. August 
22 — September 3, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, September 25, 
1919. Shared in the divisional citation of October 30. Also in the 
parades in New York and Washington in September, of the First 
Division, Composite Regiment and General Pershing and Staff. 
Served in Germany as bodyguard for General McLaughlin and Brig- 
adier-General Parker at Montabar. Spent three weeks in southern 
France on special Scout Duty, Intelligence Section, in October, 1919. 

HULL, ORAL PERRY, Private, Battery A, 26th F. A., 9th Division. Trained 
at Camp McClellan from July 22, 1918, to February, 1919. Hospital 
treatment for measles at Camp McClellan. Discharged at Camp Grant, 
111., February 10, 1919. 

HULL. GOLDEN GRANT, Private, Co. A, 153rd Infantry, 39th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard from May 27, 1918, to 
August. 1918. Overseas from August 6, 191S, to April 28, 1919. 
Crossed to France on the U. S. S. Huron, a former German ship in 
which the Kaiser had made two trips around the world. Reached 
France, August 18, 1918. Battles: Verdun, Meuse-Argonne, two en- 
gagements. Shrapnel wound in foot. Treated for influenza at Brest. 
For acute tonsilitis at Coblenz, Germany. Marched from Jametz, 
France, through Belgium and Luxemburg to Coblenz, reaching there, 
December 13, 1918. Left on Easter Sunday, April 20, 1919. Returned 
to United States. April 28 — May 14, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, May 23, 1919. 

HULL. ERCIE MARTIN, Private, Co. A, 129th Infantry, 39th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard from May 27. 1918, to 
July, 191S. Overseas from July 6, 1918, to April 9, 1919. Battles: 
Meuse-Argonne. Wounded by machine-gun bullet, scalp wound, Oc- 
tober 9, 1918. Returned to United States. April 9 — April 20, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 12, 1919. 
HULL, DANIEL LEROY, Private, Co. A, 118th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sevier from February 25. 191S, to June, 191S. Over- 
seas from June 5, 1918, to January 14, 1919. Battles: Paronne Sector. 
Wounded in left knee with piece of shell while in battle near Wal- 
lencourt. Hospital treatment at Rouen, France, and Netley Hants. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 363 

England. Returned to United States, January 14 — January 25, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., April 28, 1919. 

HULL, HOMER HOWARD, Private, Headquarters Co., 70th C. A. C. 
Trained at Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to July 16, 1918. 
Overseas from July 16, 1918, to February 12, 1919. Returned to 
United States, February 12 — February 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, March 12, 1919. 

ISRAEL, DENNIS, Cook, 162nd Field Hospital, 116th Sanitary Train, 41st 
Division. Trained at Carrington, N. D., from July 3, 1917, to Oc- 
tober 1, 1917, in C. F., 2nd Regiment. N. G. Transferred to Camp 
Green, Charlotte, N. C, on October 1, 1917, to 41st Division. Trained 
at Camp Green until October 30, 1917. At Camp Mills from October 
30 to December 12, 1917. Overseas from December 12, 1917, to April 
20, 1919. Trained in France at Gondrecourt until July, 1918. Service: 
Chateau-Thierry, five weeks; St. Mihiel, four weeks; Argonne, Oc- 
tober 1 — November 20. Hospital located at Cheppy in Argonne. 
Handled twenty-one thousand men in ten days at one period of this 
battle. At Longwy, France, after the Armistice, handled about 
twenty-five hundred patients in one week, wounded and prisoners, 
all nationalities, released prisoners coming in from Germany in very 
poor condition, starved and weak. Located at Echemach, Luxem- 
burg, during the influenza epidemic and at Prum, Germany, locat- 
ing finally at Ehrenbreitstein, Germany, from December 17, 1918. 
to March "31, 1919. Returned to United States, April 20 — May 7, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Dodge, la., May 21, 1919. Shared in First 
Army Corps Citation. 

JEFFRIES, TRACY THORNTON, Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Winona 
Lake and Indianapolis, Ind.. from October 15, 1918, to discharge at 
Indianapolis, December 9, 1918. 

JOLLEY, WILLIAM FLORIS. Sergeant, Co. E, 28th Infantry. 1st Division. 
Trained at Lafayette, Ind., Columbus Barracks, O. and in Texas, 
from enlistment early in 1917, to June, 1917. Overseas from June 
4, 1917, to November 30, 1918. Battles: Cantigny, Marne, Soissons, 
St. Mihiel, Tournc-lle, Verdun. "Death Valley" was at Cantigny 
from Villa Tournelle across a valley to the top of the hill, one and 
one-half miles long by one-fourth to one-half mile wide in extent. 
The fighting lasted four clays here, beginning with a Germain raid, 
May 27 — May 30, 1918. The opposing lines came within forty or 
fifty yards of each other, sometimes mingling as in the case of the 
stretcher-bearers among the wounded. A small wood was left un- 
hurt throughout this engagement. It was said there was an agree- 
ment to leave it unharmed. The dug-outs at Cantigny and Villa Tour- 
nelle, were furnished with chairs and a mirror as large as the wall 
of a room from a ruined chateau, after the battle. Private Jolley 
was twice wounded at Cantigny, flesh wounds in the upper right 
and lower left limb. Was in hospital from June 2 to July 15. At 
Soissons from July 21, about six weeks. At Base Hospitals 20 and 
and 68 in southern France and at Blois. Was returned to United 
States in Blois Casual Co. 303, November 30 — December 8, 1918. Sent 
to Columbus Barracks, Columbus, O. Served here until furloughed 
to Regular Army Reserve, November. 1919. 

LAWLESS. JOHN PATRICK, Private 1st Class. 3rd Co., 6th Bn., Ordnance 
Repair Shop Detachment. Trained at Indianapolis Chamber of Com- 
merce, from June 15, 191S, to August 15, 1918. At Camp Hancock, 
Ga., for about two weeks. Overseas from September 7, 1918, to July 
10, 1919. Service in Ordnance Repair Shops at Mehun, France, for 
ten months. Returned to United States. July 10 — July 19, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, July 26, 1919. 

LEMEN, HUBERT WILLIAM, Private, Motor Transport Corps. Trained 
at Indianapolis, Ind., from June 15, 1918, to discharge there, De- 
cember 18, 1918. 

L1TTELL. CLYDE LeROY, Private 1st Class, Battery A, 25th F. A., 9th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan. from July 22, 
1918, to February, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, February 5. 
1919. 

MARTING, EDWARD JULIUS, Private, Co. E, 334th Infantry, 84th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Taylor from October 5, 1917, to March 
22, 1918. Transferred to 309th Co., Headquarters Troop, then to 
Co. C, 65th Engineers, Tank Service. Sent to Camp Meade, Md. 
Overseas at Wareham. England, from July to September 12, 1918. 
Sent then to Am. Base Hospital 33, at Portsmouth, England, until 
October 23. Sent to France to a rest camp. Died at Nevers, France, 
November 29, 1918, of spinal meningiis. This record is included in 
Ripley County Honor Roll because of several years' residence here 
and marriage here. Also claimed at Indianapolis by parents who 
now live there. 

McCLURE, FLOYD WILLIS, Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Camp Frank- 
lin, Franklin, Ind., from September 30, 191S, to discharge there, on 
December 21, 1918. 



364 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

MILLER. CLARENCE GEORGE, Private, Medical Department. Trained 
at Camp Taylor, Camp Greenleaf, Ft. Sheridan, 111. and Camp Mer- 
ritt, N. J., from May 27, 1918. Discharged at Camp Sherman, Febru- 
ary 4, 1919. 

MURDOCK, JOHN R., Wagoner, Supply Co., 150th F. A., 42nd Division. 
Trained at Camp Mills, N. Y., from July 21, 1917, to October 18, 1917. 
Enlisted in Co 4, 4th Ind. Infantry, N. G., and transferred to 150th 
F. A. Overseas from October 18, 1917, to April IS, 1919. Battles: 
Luneville Sector, Bacourt Sector, Champagne, Marne Defensive, 
Aisne-Maine, St. Mihiel Offensive, Oise, Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 
With Army of Occupation in Germany, from November, 1918, to April, 
1919. Returned to United States, April 18 — April 27, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, May 9, 1919. 

MYERS, ROLLIE B., Fireman, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great Lakes, 111. 
and Portsmouth, N. H., from June 25, 1918. Assigned to U. S. S. 
Ohio and later to U. S. S. Southery at Portsmouth. Discharged there, 
February 19, 1919. 

MYERS, HALLIE, Sergeant 1st Class, Medical Department. /Trained 
at Ft. Thomas, Ky., Ft. Sam Houston, Texas, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma, 
Camp Meade, Md.. Camp Stuart, Va. and Camp Merrilt, N. J., from 
enlistment, May 7, 1917, to July 21, 1918. Overseas from July 21, 
1918, to September IS, 1919. Service with Medical Supply Depot Co. 
5, at Liverpool, England, until after the Armistice. Assigned then 
to Medical Storage Warehouse at Winchester, England, for three 
months. Later transferred to office of Surgeon, U. S. Troops, Liver- 
pool, England, as Chief Clerk, until sent back to United States. Re- 
turned to United States, September 18 — September 28, 1919, by way 
of London, England, 'Folkestone, England, Boulogne, Paris, and 
Brest, France. Dischargd at Camp Dix, N. J., October 4, 1919. Hos- 
pital treatment in Liverpool, England, for abscess of throat. 

OVERTURF, LIONEL EDMUND, Water Tender, U. S. S. Radford. De- 
stroyer, Pacific Fleet. Trained at Portsmouth, Va., Navy Yards, on 
the Battleship Illinois and at League Island Navy Yards, from De- 
cember 13, 1917, to July, 1918. Overseas from September 15 : 1918, 
to December 9, 191S. Had spinal meningitis at Brest, France. Re- 
turned to United States, December 9 — December 20, 1918, and con- 
tinued treatment at Portsmouth Navy Hospital and at Elizabeth 
City, Va. Assigned later to Destroyer, U. S. S- Radford and sent 
to Panama. Discharged, September 29, 1919, at Pittsburg, Pa. 

PICKETT, GLENN, Private, 2nd Ind Light F. A., N. G. Trained at 
Indianapolis Armory two days in each week from enlistment in De- 
cember, 1917, to discharge at Indianapolis, April 15, 1919. Unit was 
never sworn into Federal Service. 

PICKETT, HALE CLIFFORD, Wagoner, Co. B. 315th Am. Train, 90th 
Division. Trained at Camp Purdue, Lafayette, Ind., from April 27, 

1918, to July, 1918. Overseas from July 4, 1918, to May 28, 1919. 
Hospital treatment for fractured legi-bone. Returneid to United 
States, May 28 — June 9, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 1, 
1919. 

PHERIGO. CASPER, Private 1st Class, Medical Department, U. S. Army. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Merritt, from April 30, 1918, to Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Overseas from September 6, 1918, to June 8, 1919. 
Service: Embarked in Medical Replacement Unit 32. Assigned in 
France, first to Base Hospital 206, then to Base 94 and Camp Hos- 
pital 43, as mounted orderly. Treatment for mumps at Camp Hos- 
pital 43, in France. Returned to United States, June 8 — June 18, 

1919. Discharged at Camp Lee, Va., June 22, 1919. 

REA, EDGAR D.. Co. M, 4th Bn., 22nd Engineers. Trained at Camp 
Taylor and Ft. Benjamin Harrison, from April 30, 1918, to Sep- 
tember, 1918. Overseas from September 1, 1918, to June 12, 1919. 
Battles: Meuse-Argonne Offensive, September 26 — November 11, 1918. 
After November 11, maintained railroads at Ansanville, France. 
From January 29, 1919, to March 1, 1919, was on detached service at 
Baroncourt, France. From March 1 to May 1. was in Provisional 
Co. No. 1, at Spincourt, France. Returned to United States, June 12 — 
June 23, 1919. Discharged at Charleston, S. C, July 3, 1919. 

ROSEBROCK, WILLIAM HERMAN, Sergeant 1st Class, Q. M. C. Trained 
in Co. E, 334th Infantry, 84th Division, at Camp Taylor, West Point, 
and Camp Knox, from Octoher 5, 1917, to October 23, 1918. In 
Quartermaster Corps until discharged at Camp Henry Knox, March 
21, 1919. 

SANDS. ORAN JOHN, Corporal, Co. D, 78th Infantry, 14th Division, 
Trained at Ft. Riley, Kas. and Camp Custer, Mich., fron May 23, 
1918, to discharge at Camp Custer, January 29, 1919. 

SCOOPMIRE, JOHN OSCAR, Sergeant, Co. 2, 306th Mechanical Repair 
Shop Unit, Motor Transport Corps. Aviation Signal Corps, Q. M. 
C. Trained at Camp Meigs, Washington, D. C, from December 15, 
1917, to discharge at Camp Meigs, January 10, 1919. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 365 

SCOOPMIRE, THOMAS REED, Electrician, 3rd Class, Radio. Trained 
at Cambridge, Mass. in U. S. Navy Radio School, from June 7, 1918, 
to assignment to U. S. S. Illinois at Norfolk, Va. Discharged, Feb- 
ruary IS, 1919, at Hampton Roads, Va. 

SHAW, JOHN ELMER. Cook, Co. I, 22nd Engineers. Trained at Camp 
Taylor and Ft. Benjamin Harrison, from April 30, 1919. Battles: 
Argonne Drive. Returned to United States, June 2S — July 10, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 18, 1919. 

SHEETZ, ORLiESTER EARL, Private, 20th Co.. 5th Tr. Bn., 159th Depot 
Brigade. Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky., from June 26, 191S, to dis- 
charge for physical disability. October 15, 1918. Was in hospital 
at Camp Taylor sixteen weeks, after receiving typhoid inoculation. 

SIMPERS, RUSSELL, BEE, Seaman 2nd Class. U. S. Navy. Trained at 
Great Lakes Naval Training Station, from May 13, 1918, to June 
12, 191S. Service: At Patrol Station: U. S. N. A. Station, Pauillac, 
France; U. S. N. A. Station, L'Aber Uraeh; U. S. N. A. Station, 
Brest; U. S. N. A. Rep. Base, Eastleigh, England; U. S. N. Tr. 
Camp, Pelham Bay Park, N. Y. Discharged at Pelham Bay, N. Y., 
April 19, 1919. Had returned to United States, April 6 — April 15, 
1919. 

SMITH, GUY MELVIN, Private, Medical Dept., 120th Infantry, 30th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Greenleaf, from May 27, 1918, 
to August, 1918. Overseas from August 27, 1918, to April 1, 1919. 
Battles: Hindenburg Line, Bellicourt. Nauroy, Joncourt, Montbre- 
hain, Brancourt, Fremont, Busigny, Becquigny, Masingheim, St. Mar- 
tin-Riviere. Returned to United States, April 1 — April 13, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 25, 1919. 

SPROESIG, CLARENCE, Private, Battery B, 26th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to March, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111. on March 8, 1919. Hospital 
treatment for influenza. 

TOOPS, BERT A., Blacksmith, U. S. Navy. Trained at Newport, R. I., 
from October, 1919, to assignment to U. S. S. Louisiana. Served 
with the Convoy Squadron, operating with the transport service 
between Hampton Roads, Va. and Brest. France. Enlistment ex- 
pires, July 20, 1921. Was operated on for appendicitis at Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

TOOPS, CAREY A., Engineman, 1st Class, U. S. S. Utah. Trained at 
Great Lakes, 111., from November 23, 1914, to assignment to ship. 
Sailed with the Utah to Europe, August 30, 1918. Patrol duty, was 
assigned to the North Sea as part of the Grand Fleet and was in 
line to witness the surrender of the German Fleet at the Firth of 
Forth in November, 1918. Returned to United States in Overseas 
Fleet, December 14 — December 26, 1918. Discharged at Boston, Mass., 
November 22, 1919. 

VANOSDOL, JAMES, Private, Co. E. 18th Engineers, Ry. Trained at 
Camp Taylor in Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division, from Septem- 
ber 20, 1918, to January 10, 1918. At Camp Grant, HI., from Jan- 
uary 10, 1918, to March 4, 1918. Transferred in January to 18th En- 
gineers, First Army Corps. Overseas from March 4, 1918, to April 
14, 1919. Service: Building docks and so forth, at Bordeaux, France, 
for four months. Building railways at various places after that, 
for nine months. Returned to United States, April 14 — April 26, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 10, 1919. 

VANOSDOL. EMIL. Private. Co. C, — C. A. C. Trained at Camp Eustis, 
Va., from September 29, 1918, until December, 1918. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, December 22, 1918. 

WARMAN, ROLLA CLEMENT, Private 1st Class, Co. C, 113th Engineers. 
Trained at Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Miss., from June 5, 1917, to 
January, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, January 26, fl919. 
Underwent mastoid operation about March 1, 1918, which barred 
him from foreign service. After three months in hospital at Camp 
Shelby, was assigned to guard duty. Sent to Raritan, N. J., as 
patrol driver at the Arsenal. Was there when the great explosion 
occurred. 

WILLIAMS, CLAUDE, Stretcher-Bearer, Co. I, 120th Infantry, 30th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Greenleaf. from May 27, 1918, 
to August, 191S. Overseas from August 27, 1918, to April 1, 1919. 
Battles: Hindenburg Line, Bellicourt, Nauroy, Premont, Brancourt, 
Busigny, Bucquigny, Bohain, Le Haie, Menneresse, St. Martin Riviere, 
Mazingheim, Heights of Cottillian. Awarded the British Military 
Medal at Belgian Camp, Le Mans, February 18, 1919, by General 
Sir David Henderson, British Army. Authorized by King George of 
England, for bravery in the field. Returned to United States, April 
1 — April 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on April 25, 1919. 

SHOOK, SELWIN RAY, Private, S. A. T. C. Trained at Franklin Col- 
lege, Franklin, Ind., from Oct. 1, 1918 to discharge there, Dec. 21, 
1918. 



366 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

WOOLF, JOHN' W., Private, Co. C, 51st Engineers. Trained at Camps 
Taylor, Lee and Humphreys, from March 29, 1918, to July, 1918. Over- 
seas from July 1, 191S, to July 2, 1919. Service in France at Tours. 
Returned to United States, July 2 — July 17, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, August 1, 1919. 

X. 

SHELBY TOWNSHIP. 

ADAM, JOHN, Private, Headquarters Co., 148th Infantry, 37th Division. 
Trained a short time after enlistment on June 24, 1917, in Co. I, 
3rd Ohio Infantry, N. G., at Camp Perry and Camp Sherman, Ohio. 
Was transferred to 148th Infantry and completed training at Camp 
Sheridan, Montgomery, Ala. Overseas from June 23, 1918, to March 
14, 1919. Battles: Baccarat Sector, Avocourt Defensive, Meuse-Ar- 
gonne, Ypres. Gassed. Hospital treatment at Boulogne, France, 
for throat trouble. Returned to United States, March 14, 1919. 

ADAM, JAMES, Private, Supply Co., 14Sth Infantry, 37th Division. 
Trained first from enlistment on May 26, 1917, in 3rd Ohio Infantry, N. 
G., at Camp Perry, O. and Camp Sherman, O. Transferred to 148th 
Infantrv and sent to Camp Sheridan, Ala. Trained here until June, 
1918. Overseas from June 23, 1918, to March 16, 1918. Battles: 
Baccarat Defensive, August 4 — September 16. 1918. Avocourt De- 
fensive, 21st-25th September, 1918. Meuse-Argonne Defensive, Sep- 
tember 1 to October, 1918. Pannes Defensive, October 7 — October 16, 
191S. Ypres-Lys Offensive, October 31 — November 11, 1918. Re- 
turned to United States, March 16 — March 30, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, April 21, 1919. 

BAKER, "WALTER, Private, Co. A, 28th Engineers. Trained at Camp 
Meade, Md., from enlistment on December 5, 1917, to February, 1918. 
Overseas from February 10, 191S, to June 24, 1919. Battles: St. 
Mihiel, September 12-16, 191S. Returned to United States, June 24 — 
July 6, 1918. Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 15, 1919. 

BROWN, FLOYD BERNICE, Private. Co. C, 119th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier, from September 9, 1917, to 
May, 1918. Overseas from May 11, 1918. Battles: Ypres, August 4- 

10, 191S; August 17 — September 2, 1913. Bellicourt, September 29 — 
October 2: St. Souplet, October 9-10, 1918. Killed by shell-fire at St. 
Souplet, October l0, 1918. 

BROWN. CORNET, Private, Headquarters Co., 37th C. A. C, 41st Division. 
Trained at Columbus Barracks, O.. Camp Eustis, Va„ from March 

11, 191S, to November, 1918. Sailed from Newport News to Ho- 
boken, N. J., and was sent to Ft. Hancock, N. J. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, December 26, 1918. 

BROWN, GRANT, Private. Iowa Regiment, N. G. Trained at Camp Dodge, 
la., from April 27. 1918, to discharge on May 17, 1918. Not sworn 
into Federal Service. 

COLE, CHESTER, Corporal. Co. A. 139th Infantry, M. G. Bn. Trained 
first from August 13, 1917, in Co. L, 46th Ind. Infantry, N. G. Trans- 
ferred to 139th Regiment, and sent to Camp Shelby, Miss, for train- 
ing in 38th Division. Because of broken ankle was disqualified for 
overseas service and remained at Camp Shelby, training recruits. 
Was treated two months in Base Hospital, Camp Shelby, for the 
injurv, and two months in convalescent ward. Discharged, Novem- 
ber 23, 1918, at Camp Shelby. 

COSSINS, JOHN WILLIAM, Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Divi- 
sion. Trainer! at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, to dis- 
charge for physical disability on November 28, 1917. 

CRIPE, DAVID RILEY, Private, Headquarters Co., 70th C. A. C. Trained 
at Fts. Hamilton and Wadsworth. N. Y., from April 3, 1918, to 
July, 1918. Overseas from July 14, 1918, to February 14, 1919. 
Trained at Faneuil, France, for six months. Returned to United 
States, February 14 — Februarv 22, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man, March 12, 1919. 

CUNEO, JOHN ALFRED, JR., Private 1st Class, Co. C. 1st Anti-Aircraft 
Bn. Trained at Camp Sherman, Camp Sheridan and Ft. Wadsworth, 
from enlistment on July 25, 1917, to May, 1918. Overseas from May 
1, 1918, to April 25, 1919. Battles: Aisne-Meuse, Somme, St. Mihiel, 
Meuse-Argonne. Meuse-Moselle, Chateau-Thierry, Belleau Wood. Bat- 
talion commander was awarded the French Croix de Guerre in bat- 
talion citation. Treated in hospital at Camp Sheridan, Ala., four 
months for throat trouble. Returned to United States, April 25 — 
May 6, 1919. Dischargd at Camp Sherman, May 24.. 1919. 

DEARINGER, HERBERT NELSON, Private. Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th 
Division. Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, until 
November, 1917, when taken with measles. Treated at Base Hos- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 367 

pital for measles and pneumonia, which resulted in paralysis of 
right shoulder and left knee. Sent to Ft. McPherson, Ga„ for 
further treatment. Discharged, December 9, 1919, at Ft. McPher- 
son, Ga. 

DEMAREE, EMMETT C, Corporal, 499th Aero Squadron, American Air 
Service. Trained at Kelley Field, Texas, Waco, Texas, and Camp 
Morrison, Va., from December 7, 1917, to October, 1918. Overseas 
from October, 1918. Died at Base Hospital 101, St. Nazaire, France, 
on February 20, 1918. Had suffered a serious accident at Hampton, 
Va., which threatened to destroy eyesight, but had recovered. 

DEMAREE, CHARLES EVERETT, Private, Medical Department. Trained 
at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Mo., from July 12, 1918, to dis- 
charge there, on June 27, 1919. Service in Main Hospital. 

DEMAREE, ELZA HARRISON, Private 1st Class, Medical Department, 
Base Hospital 3 19. Trained at Camp Taylor from March 29, 1918, to 
October, 191S. Overseas from October 31, 1918, to July 6, 1919. Lo- 
cated at Savonay, France. Returned to United States, July 6 — July 
16, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, July 23, 1919. 

DILKS, ARCHIE, Seaman First, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great Lakes, 
111., from June 7, 1918, to discharge there on December 8, 1918. 
Hospital treatment in Main Hospital, Great Lakes, for twenty-one 
days for influenza. 

DONOVAN, ALBERT DARRAGH, H. A. 1st Class, U. S. Naval Reserves. 
Trained at U. S. Naval Base Hospital, Pensacola, Fla., from enlist- 
men, December 12, 1917. Suffered injury to hand, a broken metacarpal 
bone. 

DUDLEY, FRED ANDREW, Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from October 5, 1917, to January 25, 1918. 
Was treated ten weeks in Base Hospital at Camp Taylor for measles 
and pneumonia. 

FERGUSON, CHARLES W., Private, Co. E, 16th Infantry, 1st Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman in Co. A, 334th Infantry, 84th Division, 
from June 26, 1918, to September, 1918. Overseas from September 
2, 1918, to April 2, 1919. Transferred to 16th Infantry after reach- 
ing France. Treatment in Base Hospital at Vichy, France, for in- 
fluenza. Returned to United States, April 2 — April 11, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Sherman, April 28, 1919. 

FOX, RAYMOND THOMAS, Musician, U. S. Naval Band. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111. and Hampton Roads, Va., from May 18, 1918, to assign- 
ment to ship. Assigned to Aeolus, transport duty. Served in Fourth 
Regiment Band at Great Lakes, 111., Band of Naval Operating Base, 
Hampton Roads, Va. and Band and Orchestra on U. S. S. Aeolus. 
Discharged, September 20, 1919, at Pittsburg, Pa. 

FOX, GROVER CLEVELAND, Private, Co. I, 148th Infantry, 37th Division. 
Enlisted May 21, 1917, at Cincinnati, O. Mobilized at Eden Park, 
Cincinnati, August 1, 1917. Trained at Camp Sherman to SepterrT- 
ber 9, 1917. At Camp Sheridan, Ala. to Ivlav, 1918. Was at Camp Lee, 
Va. Overseas from June 20, 1918, to December 15, 1918. Battles: 
Lorraine Front. Argonne-Meuse, St. Mihiel and Flanders. Wounded, 
October 31. 191S, on the Flanders Front in Belgium, by machine-gun 
bullet. Operated on at Field Hospital, Mobile No. 9, then taken to 
U. S. Hospital at Boulogne, France, in November. Later to U. S. 
Hospital Base 37 at Dartford. England. Returned to United States, 
December 15 — December 26, 191S. Discharged at Camp Grant, April 
20, 1919. 

GREEN, ROBERT ALEXANDER, Horseshoer, F. A. Trained at Camp 
Taylor and Camp McClellan, Ala., from July 22, 1918, to discharge 
at Camp Taylor, January 31, 1919 . 

GREEN, LOUIS CLYDE, Corporal, 22nd Co., T. M. B., 2Sth Division. 
Trained at Camp Jackson, S. C, from April 6, 191S, to July 22, 1918. 
Overseas from July 22, 1918. to March 12, 1919. Battles: Argonne 
Forest, Fismes, Verdun, Lys-Schedlt in Belgium. Wounded, by shell 
in one leg. Returned to United States, March 12 — March 24, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, April 25, 1919. 

HARTMAN, ADAM, Wagoner, Co. I. 148th Infantry, 37th Division. Trained 
when first enlisted. June 29, 1917. in Co. I, 3rd Ohio Infantry, N. G. 
Transferred to 37th Division at Cincinnati, Ohio, and sent to Camp 
Sherman, later to Camp Sheridan for training. Overseas from June 
23, 1918, to March 16, 1919. Battles: Baccarat Defensive. Avocourt 
Defensive, Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Pannes Offensive, Ypres-Lys, 
October 31 — November 4, 1918, and November 9' — November 11, 191S. 
Returned to United States on March 16 — March 30, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman, April 21, 1919. 

HANKINS, CASPER, Private 1st Class, Co. L, 51st Infantry, 6th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Thomas, Ky., Camp Forrest, near Chattanooga in 
Georgia, from May 4, 1918, to July, 1918. Overseas from July 4, 
1918, to June 5, 1919. Battles: Gerardner Sector, Meuse-Argonne, 



368 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

thirty-two days in all. Hospital treatment for mumps and a few 
days, general sickness, at Camp Forrest, Ga. Marched to Germany 
in May, 19] 9. Stayed about a month. Returned to United States, 
June 5 — June 12, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 20, 1919. 

HEINRICH, SAMUEL CLINTON, Sergeant, Co. A, 4th Engineers, 4th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Logan, Vancouver Barracks, Camp Green 
and Camp Merritt, from June 2, 1917, to April 30, 1918. Overseas 
from April 30, 1918, to July 20, 1919. Battles: Aisne-Marne, Vesle, 
St. Mihiel, Argonne, Toul Sector. Returned to United States, July 
20 — July 29, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, August 6, 1919. 

HESS. WALTER, Seaman 2nd Class. U. S. Navy. Trained at Great Lakes. 
111. and Norfolk, Va., from July IS, 1918, to assignment to U. S. S. 
Constellation at Newport, R. I. Also had training in Boston Navy 
Yards. Discharged at Navy Demobilization Station, Pittsburg, Pa., 
on June 23, 1919. 

HESS, JACOB ROLLIN, Private, 45th Co., 5th Marines, Second Division. 
Trained at Paris Island, S. C, from July 14, 1917, to February, 191S. 
At Quantico, Va., about one month. Overseas from February 27. 
191S. to August 31, 1919. Battles: Chateau-Thierry, Soissons, Pont- 
a-Moussin, St. Mihiel, Champagne, Meuse-Argonne. Wounded, flesh 
wound in upper right leg, October 4, 1918. Had previously had slight 
wound in right fore-arm. Hospital treatment at St. Aignan, October 
4, 191S — February 1, 1919. Rejoined regiment at Bremscheidt, Ger- 
many, in February, 1919. Returned to United States, August 31, 
1919. Discharged, September 25, 191S, at Marine Barracks, Quant- 
ico, Virginia. 

HIGBIE, CLARENCE ARTHUR, Corporal, Co. H, 74th Infantry, 12th 
Division. Trained at Ft. Douglas, Utah, Camp Dodge, la., Newport 
News, Va. and Camp Devens, Mass., from June 7, 1917, to February, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on February 1, 1919. .Was in 
Co. H, 42nd Infantry, 3rd Division, at Ft. Douglas, Utah, but when 
sent to Camp Devens was transferred to 71th Infantry. 

HIGBIE, EDZA LEWIS, Corporal, Co. A, 4th Infantry, 3rd Division. 
Trained at Gettysburg, Pa., Camp Green, N. C. and Camp Stuart, 
Va., from March 5, 1912, to April, 1919. Overseas from April 15, 

1918, to November 1, 1919. Battles: Chateau-Thierry, June — July 14, 
191S. Champagne-Marne Defensive, Julv 15 — July 18; Aisne-Marne 
Offensive, July IS — July 22; St. Mihiel Offensive, September 12 — Sep- 
tember 14; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; September 28 — November 11, 1918. 
With Army of Occupation in Grmany from November 16, 1918, to 
September 20, 1919. Returned to United States, November 1 — Novem- 
ber 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Dix, N. J., November 14, 1919. 
Re-enlisted for one year. 

HOCKERSMITH, ERNEST EARL, Private, Co. F, 22nd Engineers. Trained 
at Ft. Benjamin Harrison from Mav 6. 1918, to July, 1918. Overseas 
from July 30, 1918, to June 30, 1919. Battles: Meuse-Argonne, Sep- 
tember 26 — November 11, 1918. Hospital treatment at Bases 64 and 
114. Returned to United States, June 30 — July 11, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman, July 21, 1919. 

HOLMAN, THEARLE BLANDEL. Private, Battery F, 71st C. A. C, 34th 
Brigade. Trained at Fts. Banks, Heath and Anderson, Boston, Mass.. 
from March 23, 191S, to July, 191S. Overseas from July 30, 191S. to 
February 12, 1919. Trained at Angers, France. Returned to United 
States, February 12 — February 22, 1919. 

HOLMAN, WILLIAM LUTHER, Private, Battery A, 73rd C. A. C, 40th 
Brigade. Trained at a Fort in Maine from July 12, 1918, to Sep- 
tember 25, 191S. Overseas from September 25, 1918, to January .8, 

1919. Trained in France at Haussimont. Returned to United States, 
January S — January 21, 1919. Accidentally wounded by gun explo- 
sion. Discharged at Camp Sherman, Februarv 11, 1919. 

HOLMAN. THOMAS CORNET, Private, 49th Co., 13th Tr. Bn„ 159th Depot 
Brigade. Trained at Camp Taylor from May 20, 1918, to May 2S, 
191S. Discharged at Camp Taylor for physical disability. 

HOLZER, CLEMENT M., Private, Battery B, 26th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camp McClellan, Ala., from July 22, 1918, to March, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., on March 8, 1919. 

HUELSON, ADOLPH, Private 1st Class, M. G. Co.. 120th Infantry, 30th 
Division. Trained at Camp McArthur, Waco, Texas, and Camp 
Green, N. C, from December 13, 1917, to June 16, 1919. Battles: 
Meuse-Argonne Offensive, October IS — November 11, 1918. Re- 
turned to United States, June 16, 1919. Discharged at Camp Dodge, 
la., June 30, 1919. 

HUELSON, JOHN FREDERICK, Private, 166th Day-Bombing Squadron, 
Air Service. Trained at Camp McArthur, Waco, Texas, and Camp Green, 
X. C, from December 13, 1917, to July 16, 1918. Overseas from July 18, 
1918, to June 16, 1919. Battles: Argonne-Meuse offensive, October 18 
— November 11, 1918. Returned to U. S. June 16, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Dodge. Iowa, June 30, 1919. 

HUELSON, EDWARD THOMAS, Private, Co. C, 117th Infantry, 30th Di- 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV A R 369 

vision. Enlisted at Burlington, la., in Battery B, 2nd F. A., Iowa N. 
G., on December 15, 1917. Transferred on February 23, 1918, to Co. 
B, 350th Infantry, and sent to Camp Sevier, N. C., where he was 
again transferred to 30th Division. Died of pneumonia at Base Hos- 
pital, Camp Sevier, May 17, 1913. 

JACKSON, RUFUS GORDON, Private, Battery F, 67th F. A. Trained at 
Camps Taylor and Henry Knox from September 6, 1918, to discharge 
at Camp Knox on December 20, 1918. Hospital treatment at Camp 
Taylor, five weeks for measles. 

JOHNSON, LONNIE A., Corporal, Co. I, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor in Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th Division, from 
September 20, 1917, to March, 1918. At Camp Sevier in 30th Division, 
from March until May, 1918. Overseas from May 17, 1918, to April 
1, 1919. Battles: Belgium: Ypres, Voormezeele, Kemmel Hill. Hind- 
enburg Line: Bellicourt, Nauroy, Premont. Busigny, Vaux-Andigny. 
Had hospital treatment at Brancourt, France, for influenza. Returned 
to United States, April 1 — April 13, 1919. Discharged at Camp Tay- 
lor, April 24, 1919. 

JORDAN, CLARENCE GILBERT, Private, Co. K, 115th Infantry, 29th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellon from March 28, 191S, 
to June, 1918. Overseas from June 13, 19] S, to March 12, 1919. 
Battles: Switzerland Border and Argonne Forest. Gassed, October 
16, 1918. Treatment at a Base Hospital in France. Returned to 
United States, March 12. 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, April 
28, 1919. 

KEIFFER, EDWARD. Private 1st Class, Base Hospital, Medical Dept. 
Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky., from March 29, 1918, to discharge there, 
June 10, 1919. 

KELLEY, WILLIAM ORVAL, Private 1st Class, Medical Det., 335th In- 
fantry, 84th Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman, from 
November 4, 1917, to September 2, 1918. Overseas from September 2, 

1918, to July 2. 1919. Trained in France at Mussidan. Returned to 
United States, Julv 2 — July 12, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, 
July 22, 1919. 

KRAMER, JOSEPH CASPER, Private, Batterv A, 26th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camps Tavlor and McClellan, from Julv 22, 1918 to March, 

1919. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., March 8. 1919. 

KREMER, JOHN EVERETT, Cook, Co. A, 335th Infantry, S4th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman, from October 4, 1917, to Sep- 
tember, 191 S. Overseas from September 2, 1918, to April 8. 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 7. 1919. Transferred in France 
to 91st Division. Battles: Lys-Seheldt, October 31 — November 11, 
191S. 

KREMER, LEE ANDREW, Second Lieutenant, Adjutant General's Dept. 
Detailed to Recruiting Duty at Detroit. Mich. Enlisted, June 6. 1917. 
Overseas from January 29, 1918. to August 30. 1919. Service: Casual 
Officers' Depot, Blois. France; Headquarters S. O. S.. Tours, France; 
Tank Center, Bourg (rear Longres) France: Headquarters, Third Armv, 
Coblenz, Germany. Returned to United States, August 30 — Septem- 
ber 14. 1919. Discharged. October 6, 1919. 

LINDAFER. WILLIAM M.. Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry, S4th Division 
Trained at Camp Taylor. Ky., from September 20. 1917. Died of 
pneumonia at Base Hospital, Camp Taylor, December 23, 1917. 

LINDAUER, HENRY LFO. Private. Co. A, 153rd Tnfantrv. 39th Division. 
Trained at Camps Tavlor and Beauregard, from Mav 27, 1918. to 
August 2, 1919. Overseas from August 6, 1918, to March 27. 1918. 
Transferred tn Co. F, 136th Infantry, 32nd Division. Battles: Verdun. 
"Wounded in shoulder bv shrapnel, October 3 1918. at Verdun. In 
Hospitals 86 and 108, Central France, for four months. Returned 
to Fnited States. March 27 — April 2, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man. April 29, 1919. 

MASSING, CHARLES ALBERT. Corporal. Co. A. 335th Infantry, S4th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sherman, from October 4, 1917, 
to September, 191S. Overseas from September 3, 1918, to April 3, 
1919. Transferred in France to 91st Division. Battles: Lvs-Scheldt, 
Flanders Front. Returned to Fnited States, April 3 — April 14, 1919. 
Discharged at Camp Sherman, May 1. 1919. 

MATTHEWS. LON. Private 1st Class, 4th Co.. 1st Tr. Bn„ Replacement 
Group. Camp Greenleaf, Ga. Trained at Camps Taylor and Green- 
laef, from April 30. 1918, to January 10, 1919. Discharged on that 
date at Camp Tavlor. 

MATTHEWS, ERNEST L., Corporal. Co. M, 119th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier, N. C, from September 20, 1917, 
to May, 1918. Overseas from May 12. 191S. to March 21, 1919. 
Battles: Ypres, August 4 — September 2, 1918; Bellicourt, September 
29 — October 2; St. Souplet, 9-20, 1918. Returned to United States, 
March 21 — April 3, 1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor on April 21, 
1919. 



370 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE IVORLD WAR 

McCARTY, OHARI.es. Private, Co. I, 148th Infantry, 37th Division. 
Enlisted in Co. I, 3rd Ohio Infantry. N. G., on June 7, 1917. Mob- 
ilized at 'Eden Park, Cincinnati, and trained at Camp Sherman for 
three months. Transferred to Camp Sheridan, Montgomery. Ala. 
Discharged there for physical disability, January 10, 1918. 

McMILLIN, WILLIAM DALLAS, Private. Medical Dept., 40th Infantry. 
Trained at Camp Custer, Mich, and Camp Sherman, O., from August 
30, 1918, to discharge at Camp Sherman, Fberuary 12, 1919. Had 
influenza, at Camp Custer. 

MILLER, LESLIE CORBIT, Private, F. A. Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky. 
in Light Field Artillery School, from April 30, 1918, until discharge 
there, January 4, 1919. Was operated on for hernia, six weeks in 
Base Hospital. 

MYERS. RUFUS CHESTER. Corporal, Co. M, 119th Infantry, 30th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier, N. C, from September 
20. 1917, to May, 1918. Overseas from May 12, 1918, to March 21, 
1919. Battles: Vpres, August 4 — September 2, 1918. Bellicourt. Sep- 
tember 29 — October 21, 1918; St. Souplet, October 9-20, 1918. Re- 
turned to United States on March 21 — April 3, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Taylor, April 21, 1919. 

NAUERT, CHESTER J., Private, 166th Infantry, 42nd Division. Enlisted 
in Co. I, 3rd Ohio Infantry, N. G., June 11. 1917. Trained at Camp 
Sherman and Camp Perry, Ohio, Camp Mills, N. Y. to November, 
1917. Overseas from November, 1917, to May, 1918. Battles: In 
trenches with French troops. Gassed in February, 1918, and suf- 
fered paralysis of right side. Hospital treatment at Rochelle, 
France, and Ft. McPherson, Ga., after return to United States. Re- 
turned in May, 1919. Discharged, November 3, 1919. 

NAUERT. FREDERICK JOSEPH, Corporal, Co. A, 335th Infantry, 84th 
Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from October 4, 
1917 to May. 191S. Transferred to 30th Dvision at Camp Sevier. 
Had influenza-pneumonia at Camp Sevier. Discharged there, No- 
vember 2S. 191S. 

PAUGH, CECIL JAMES. Private, 134th F. A., 37th Division. Trained 
at Camp Taylor, Ky., from April 30. 1918. to June, 1918. Overseas 
from June 23, 1918, to March IS. 1919. Battles: Marbache Sector, 
October 28 — November 11, 191S. Returned to United States, March 
18 — April 1, 1919. Discharged at Camp Grant, April 17, 1919. 

PERKINS, ORA ALVIN. Private, Co. A. 335th Infantry, 34th Division 
Trained at Camp Taylor from September 20, 1917, to January 11, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Taylor, January 11, 1919. 

REYNOLDS. HARRISON. Corporal, Co. I. 166th Infantry, 42nd Division. 
Unlisted. April 10, 1917. in Co. I, 3rd Ohio Infantry. Trained at 
Camp Perry, O and Camp Mills. N. Y., after being transferred to 
the Rainbow Division. Overseas from October 27, 1917. Battles: 
Ohampasve Chateau-Thierry. Chalons, Ourcq River, St. Mihiel and 
from Verdun to Sedan. After the Armistice, with Army of Occu- 
pation near Coblenz. Died of accidental injury, January 16, 1919. 
Was buried at Coblenz, Germany. Brought to United States and 
buried in full military honors by Leora Weare Post, American 
Legion, at Tanglewood Cemetery, Versailles, Ind., August S, 1920. 

RORK, CHARLES EDWARD, Private. Co. G, 360th Infantry, 90th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camp Dodge, la. and Camp Travis, Texas, from 
April 26, 1918. to June. 1918. Overseas from June 14, 1918, to Sep- 
tember 17. 1918. Hospital treatment, six months in France and 
three months in TT nited States General Hospital at Markleton, Pa., 
for heart and lung trouble. Discharged at Camp Grant. January 
25. 1919. 

ROYCE. HERBERT DANFORD. Private. Headquarters Co., 26th Infantry. 
Trained at Camp Green, N. C. and Camp Mills. N. Y., from April 
24. 1917, when enlisted at Walipton, N. D., in 164th U. S. Infantry. 
Was transferred to 26th Infantry after arrival in France. Battles: 
Toul Sector, February 2S — March 2S, 1918. Returned to United 
States, January 30 — Februarv 11, 1919. Discharged at Camp Dodge, 
la., on March 4, 1919. 

SALYERS. OLLAN LESTER. Private, Co. I. 14Sth Infantry, 37th Division. 
Trained first in Co. I. 3rd Ohio Infantry, N. G.. from enlistment at 
Holton, Ind., on June 19, 1917. Sent to Camp Perry, O. and assigned 
to 37th Division. Trained at Camp Sheridan. Montgomery, Ala., to 
June. 1918. Overseas from June 23, 1918. to February 1, 1919. 
Battles: Argonne Forest. Wounded at Argonne. September 30, 191S, 
machine-gun bullet, just below the knee Operated on at Base Hos- 
pital 35. at Myeres. France, for fractured bone. Returned to United 
States, February 1 — February 14, 1919. Treated in Walter Reed 
Hospital, Washington. D. C. 

STEWART, JOHN FRANKLIN, Corporal, Batterv B. 25th F. A.. 9th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan, Anniston, Ala., 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 371 

from July 22, 191S, to January, 1910. Discharged at Camp Taylor 
on January 31, 1919. 

STARKE, LEO HENRY, Private, Co. D, 36th Infantry, 12th Division. 
Trained from May 23, 191b, at Ft. Snelling, Minn, and Camp Devens, 
Mass., to discharge at Camp Devens, Mass., December 6, 1918. 

SULLENDER, CHARLES EDWARD, Corporal, Co. I, 148th Infantry, 37th 
Division. Trained first in Co. I, 3rd Ohio Infantry. Trained at Camp 
Sherman and Camp Sheridan, from October 9, 1917, to June, 1918. 
Overseas from June 23, 191S, to March 17, 1919. Battles: Baccarat 
Sector, Avocourt Sector, Meuse-Argonne. Was wounded in the right 
shoulder by a machine-gun bullet in the Meuse-Argonne Drive, close 
to the city of Montfaucon, France, September 29, 1918. Hospital 
treatment at Base 36 at Vittel, and Base 9 at Chattarean. Re- 
turned to United States, March 17 — March 2S, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, . April 21, 1919. 

SPELLMAN, NOEL. Enlisted, October 28, 1918. Failed to locat; for further 
record. 

VESTAL, ALVA LEE, Private, Co. A, 335th Infantry, S4th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from October 4. 1917. Operated on for 
appendicitis and died at Base Hospital, March 1, 1918. 

WILDEY, EDWARD LAWRENCE, Private, Co. E, 28th Infantry, First 
Division. Trained at Ft. Ringo, Texas, from enlistment in Novem- 
ber, 1917, until June, 191S. Overseas from July 15, 1917, to Decem- 
ber 5, 191S. Battles: Cantigny. Soissons. Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel, 
Verdun. Wounded, July 19, 1918, at Soissons, machine-gun bullet 
in right leg. AVounded again October 13. 1918, shrapnel wound in 
right leg at Montrefagne. Returned to United States, December 
5 — December 23, 191S. Reached Camp Taylor, January 1, 1919. Fur- 
loughed home for seven days, to January 21, 1919. Died at Camp 
Taylor, February 22, 1919, with influenza-pneumonia. 

WALTERS, LOUIS, Private, Co. H, 157th Infantry, 40th Division. Trained 
at Camp Kearney, San Diego, Cal., for eight months, from October 
2, 1917. At Camp Funston, Kas., for one month. At Camp Merritt, 
N. J., one week. Overseas from June 27, 1918, to December 24, 1918. 
Transferred to Co. L, 3rd Infantry, 28th Division. Battles: Chateau- 
Thierry, two weeks. One month in Hospital No. 3. Sent to guard 
prisoners, 40th P. W. E. (Prisoners' War Escort), in German prison 
camp near Bordeaux, France. Returned to United States, December 
24, 191S — January 6, 1919. Discharged at Ft. Logan, Colo. June 30, 
1919. 

WILSON, EARL, Private. Trained at Camp Sherman, O. and Ft. Sheri- 
dan, 111., from June 26, 1918, to discharge at Ft. Sheridan, Novem- 
ber 6, 191S. 

XI. 

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP. 

AKE, GEORGE McMAKIN, Private 1st Class, Sanitary Squad 45. Trained 
at Camp Columbia, Ft. Benjamin Harrison, and at Camp Sheridan, 
from July 15, 1917, to June, 1918. Overseas from June 28, 1918, to 
July 9, 1919. Battles: Meuse-Argonne, Ypres-Lys Offensive in Bel- 
gium. Returned to United States, July 9 — July 20, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Sherman, July 29, 1919. 

ASHCRAFT HENRY LEE, Private, Co. M, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Sevier from September 20, 1917. to 
May, 191S. Overseas from May 17, 191S. Battles: Ypres Front in 
Belgium; Kemmel Hill, Voormezeele, Hindenburg Line. Killed in 
action, September 29, 191S, near St. Quentin. 

BATEMAN, WILLIAM ALBERT, Private, Battery B, 67th F. A. Trained 
at Camp Knox, West Point, Ky., after three weeks at Camp Taylor, 
from August S, 191S, to discharge at Camp Taylor, December 20. 

1918. Injured by being caught under a gun caisson rolling down 
. a fifteen-foot embankment. Broken ribs and crushed chest. Treat- 
ment in Base Hospital at Camp Taylor for seven weeks. 

BENHAM, BERT. Private. Co. M, 379th Infantry. 95th Division. Trained 
at Camp Sherman from August 29, 1918, to discharge there on De- 
cember 11, 1918. 

BUSH, ALVAH, Private, Co. D, 148th Infantry, 37th Division. Enlisted 
June 30, 1917, in Co. I, 3rd Ohio Infantry, National Guard. Trans- 
ferred to 37th Division. Trained at Camp Sheridan, Montgomery, 
Ala., for nine months. Overseas from June. 23, 191S, to March 16, 

1919. Battles: Verdun Front and Toul Sector in Flanders. Re- 
turned to United States, March 16 — March 23, 1919. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, April 19, 1919. 

BURGGRAF, WILLIAM FREDERICK, Private, Co. B, 605th Engineers. 



24 



372 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Trained at Camp Taylor and Camp Hancock, Ga., from May 27, 191S, 
to discharge at Camp Hancock, December 24, 1918. 

COKAYNE, ROSS VON, Sergeant, Co. E, 31st Engineers. Trained at Ft. 
Leavenworth, Kas. and Camp Mills, N. Y., from April 24, 1918, to 
June 5, 1918. Overseas from June 5. 1918, to July 18, 1919. Service 
at Saumer, France. Returned to ("nited States, July 18 — July 31, 
1919. Discharged at Camp Pike, Arkansas, August 8, 1919, 

COXXELL, NORMAN WILLIAM. Private. Co. K, 5th Infantry, 17th Di- 
vision. Trained at Fi. Thomas. Ky. and Camp Beauregard, La., from 
enlistment on July 20, 191 S. to discharge at Camp Taylor, Ky. on 
March 31. 1919. Had typhoid fever in Base Hospital at Camp Tay- 
lor, three weeks. 

CRAIG, RUSSELL SHERMAN, Sergeant Field Artillery. Trained at 
Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22, 1918, to discharge at 
Camp Taylor, March S, 1919. Service as blacksmith. 

CRAVEN, CLARENCE C. Private, Battery B, 142nd F. A., 39th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard from May 27, 1918, to 
August, 191S. Overseas from August 31. 1918, to June 3. 1919. Re- 
turned to United States, June 3 — June 16, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Taylor on June 24. 1919. Service in France at Camp Valdahon. 

CRAVEN, LESTER DAVID, Sergeant. Co. B. 142nd F. A., 39th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor and Beauregard, from May 27. 1918, to 
discharge at Camp Beauregard on March 14. 1918. 

CROXTON, CLARENCE VIRGIL. Wagoner, Supply Co.. 25th F. A., 9th 
.Division. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan from July 22. 
191S, to February 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., March 
8, 1919. 

DUNCAN, CHARLES OSCAR, Private. Battery E. 329th F. A.. S5th Di- 
vision. Was first assigned to Battery F, 135th F. A.. 37th Division. 
Trained at Camps Taylor, Sheridan. Mills and Merritt, from April 
30, 1918, to August, 1918. Overseas from August 2. 191S, to March 
25, 1919. Battles: Alsace-Lorraine, Toul Sector, attached to Custer 
Division. Hospital treatment, six weeks at Base Hospital at Camp 
Sheridan for measles and pleurisy. Returned to L'nited States, 
March 25 — April 2, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman. April 30, 
1919. 

DUNCAN. WILBUR ROY, Private, Co. F. 150th Infantry. Trained at 
Camp Sherman from June 28 to September, 191S. Went to Camp 
Merritt, X. J. and then to Camp Mills, N. Y.. to embark for over- 
seas' service. Entered hospital at Camp Mills with measles, de- 
veloped influenza and bronchial pneumonia and died, October 23, 
1918. 

EATON. HAROLD LESLIE, Private. S. A. T. C. Trained at Hanover 
College, Hanover, Ind., from October 21, 191S, to discharge at Han- 
over. Ind., December 19, 1918. 

HADLFORTH. MARTIN FRANK. Sergeant. 7th Co.. 2nd Air Service Unit. 
Trained at Ft. Thomas and Camp Hancock, Ga., from enlistment, 
December 12, 1917, to February, 191S. Overseas from March 4, 1918, 
to June 9, 1919. Service: Six weeks at Chalons. France, trucks 
and truck locomotives; Fontainebleau. eight and one-half months. 
French tanks; Longres four and one-half months. Motor Transport 
Corps. Supply Depot. Hospital record, mumps at Camp Hancock, 
Ga., January 25 — February 8, 1918. Influenza at Fontainebleau, 
France, from November 26 to December 1. 1918. Returned to l'nited 
States, June 9 — June IS, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman. July 
1. 1919. 

HENSCHEX. JESSE MONROE, Private. Battery A. 26th F. A.. 9th Divi- 
sion. Trained at Camps Taylor and McClellan. from July 22, 191S, 
to discharge at Camp Taylor. February 12. 1919. Had measles at 
Camp McClellan. Was twenty-one years of age, April 6, 1917, the 
day the United States entered the World War. 

KISSELL, JOHN. Private. Co. I, 120th Infantry, 30th Division. Trained 
at Camps Taylor and Sevier, from September 20. 1917, to May. 191S. 
Overseas from May 17. 1918. Battles: . Ypres Front in Belgium. Kem- 
mel Hill, Voormezeele. Hindenburg Line. Bellicourt. St. Souplet. 
Busigny. Died on November 6, 191S, of pneumonia, "somewhere" in 
France. 

LANE. FRANK RAYMOND. Cook, 32nd Tr. Bn.. F. A.. Central O. T. S. 
Trained at Camp Taylor from July 22. 191S. until discharged there, 
on December 21, 1918. Had influenza five weeks in October. 191S. 

LA FOLLETTE, GEORGE BENJAMIN, Private. Battery B, 72nd F. A. 
Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky., from September 6. 191S. to Septem- 
ber 30. 1918. At Camp Knox. West Point. Ky., from September 30, 
1918, to discharge there, on February 3. 1919. 

LITTLE, WALTER CARBIX. Private. 4th Co., Sec. B.. S. A. T. C. Trained 
at Valparaiso, Ind., and at University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 373 

Mich., from August 1, 1918, to discharge at Ann Arbor, December 
10, 1918. 

LIPPERD, HILLIARD WILLIAM, Seaman, U. S. Navy. Trained at Great 
Lakes, 111., from July 3, 1918, to discharge at Philadelphia, Pa., on 
January 13, 1919. 

LIVINGSTON, EDWARD ALVIN, Private, Battery C, 4th F. A. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from July 22, 1918, to discharge there, on Decem- 
ber 17. 1918. 

LOSTUTTER, CLYDE DIBBLE, Private 1st Class, Base Hospital 54. 
Trained at Camp Taylor, Ky., Camp Greenleaf, Ga. and Camp Green, 
N. C, from May 27, 191S, to August, 1918. Overseas from August 
14, 1918, to May 16, 1919. Located at Meves, Bulcy Hospital Center, 
while in France. Served as orderly. Returned to United States, 
May 16 — May 28, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, June 16, 1919. 

McCLANAHAN, VIRGIL, Private, Co. F, 4th Infantry, 3rd Division. 
Trained from enlistment in June, 1917, at Camp Sherman, until as- 
signed to 4th Infantry. Overseas from April 15, 1918. Trained in 
France at Juzzencourt. Battles: Chateau-Thierry, Champagne-Marne 
Defensive, Aisne-Marne Offensive, St. Mihiel Offensive, Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive. Wounded in hip. Hospital treatment in France and Camp 
Sherman, Chillicothe, O. Returned to United States in summer of 
1918. Assigned to Co. G, 40th Infantry, at Camp Sherman. Discharged 
in November, 1920. 

MORRISON, PORTER DAVID, Private, Co. G, 3rd Infantry, Regular 
Army. Enlisted, April 9, 1917, at Ft. Thomas, Ky. Trained here and 
at Ft. Sam Houston, Texas, Eagle Pass, Texas, and Camp Funston, 
Kas.,to discharge at Camp Funston, on January 26, 1919. Was pro- 
moted to Wagoner in March. 1918. 

MORRISON, WALTER, Sergeant, Co. C, 12th M. G. Bn„ 4th Division. 
Trained at Ft. Thomas from enlistment, March 23, 1917, for three 
weeks. At Ft. Brown, Brownsville, Texas, for two months. At 
Camp Colt, Gettysburg. Pa., for six months. At Camp Green, Char- 
lotte, N. C, for six months. Overseas from April 29, 1918, to July 
21, 1919. Battles: Second Battle of Marne, July 18 — August 11; 
Meuse-Argonne, October S — October 19: First and Second Army De- 
fensive, near Metz; Toul Front, October 19 — November 11, 1918. 
Wounded near Fismes, August 11, 1918, shrapnel in left ankle. 
Treated at Base Hospital 25 at Allerey, France, for nearly two 
months. Marched to Germany, November 11 — December 3, 1918. by 
way of Luxemburg to Coblenz Area. Stationed at Cochen, twenty- 
five miles from Coblenz to April 10, 1919. Moved to the Rhine until 
July 1, 1919. Returned by train to Brest, France. Returned to 
United States, July 21 — July 29, 1919. Will be discharged in No- 
vember, 1920. 

MORRISON, HARRY ELWYN, Private, Battery B, 18th F. A. Trained 
at Camp Taylor from March 29, 1918, to October 31, 1918. Trans- 
ferred to Camp Jackson, S. C. and assigned to 18th F. A., Replace- 
ment Detachment. On November 8, transferred to 27th Overseas 
Battery, November Automatic Replacement Draft. Back to Battery 
B, 18th F. A. on November IS, 191S. Returned to Camp Taylor, De- 
cember 22, 1918. Discharged. January 2, 1919, at Camp Taylor. Hos- 
pital record: April 6 — August 24, 1918, acute bronchitis, pericarditis, 
rheumatism. Eye operation on May 18, 1918. Throat operation on 
August 9, 1918. 

PENN, HARRY FREMONT, Private 1st Class, 42nd C. A. C. Trained 
at Ft. Wadswcrth, Staten Island, N. Y., from April 3, 191S, to July, 
1918. Overseas from July 15, 1918, to February 5, 1919. Trained at 
Haussimont, France. Battles: St. Mihiel. Was sent overseas in 
July Replacement Draft. Returned to United States, February 5 — 
February 18, 1919. Discharged at Camp Sherman, March 10, 1919. 

PREBLE, FREDUS WALTER, Private, S. A. T. C, Motor Transport Corps. 
Trained at Rolling Prairie, Camp Interlaken, in Co. A., Tr. Det., 
M. T. C, from October 15, 1918, to discharge at Valparaiso, Ind., 
on November 21, 191S. 

ROBERTS, THORNTON BQRCHFIELD, Private, Supply Co., 350th In- 
fantry. Trained at Camp Dodge, la., from February 23, 1918, to April, 
1918. Sent to Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga. Developed measles in 
transit; entered Base Hospital on arrival at Camp Gordon; developed 
measles and died, April 19, 1918. 

RUPP, CHARLES HAROLD, Private, Co. C, 333rd Infantry, 84th Division. 
Trained at Camp Sherman from June 26, 1918, to September, 191S. 
Overseas from September 1, 1918, to April 16, 1919. "Was transferred 
in France to another regiment and sent into the trenches at Pont- 
sur-Meuse, Verdun Sector, October IS, and again on October 26. Re- 
mained at Pont-sur-Meuse until March, 1919. Returned to United 
States, April 2S, 1919. Discharged at. Camp Taylor, June 21, 1919. 

SCHORNICK, HARRY ALFRED, Corporal, Headquarters Co., 2nd Infantry, 
9th Division. Trained at Camp Dodge, la., from August 30, 1918, 

25 ■ 



374 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



to discharge there, in January, 1919. Was first assigned to 163rd 
Infantry. Hospital record: Influenza in October, 1918. 

SHELTON, ORLA, Cook, 6th Co., Dev. Bn. Trained in Cook and Baker 
School at Camp Taylor from May 27, 1918, to discharge there, March 
S, 1919. Hospital record for influenza. 

SHELTON, FRANK LEROY, Private, Supply Co., 27th F. A., 9th Division. 
Trained at Camp Taylor, three weeks from July 22, 1918. At Camp 
McClellan, from .August 14, 191S, to January 25, 1919. Discharged 
at Camp Taylor, February 4, 1919. Hospital record, influenza at 
Camp McClellan. 

VANDOLAH, ROBERT WAYNE, Private, Co. B, 112th Am. Tr., 37th Di- 
vision. Trained at Camps Taylor and Sheridan, from April 30, 191S. 
to June, ISIS. Overseas from June 27, 191S, to March 20, 1919. 
Battles: Baccarat, August 4 — September 16; Avocourt, September 
21 — September 25; Meuse-Argonne, September 26 — October 9; Pannes, 
October 11 — October 16; Ypres-Lys (Belgium). October 31 — November 
4; Ypres-Lys (Escaut), November 9 — November 11, 1918. Returned 
to United States, March 20 — April 2, 1919. Discharged at Camp 
Taylor, April 14, 1919. 

WILSON, JAMES WILLIAM, Private, Field Artillery. Trained at Camps 
Taylor and McClellan, from July 22, 191S. to January 31, 1919. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor. Hospital record: Influenza at Camp Mc- 
Clellan. 




Liberty Loan Parade, Speakers' Auto, Batesville, April 6, Jgi8. 




Camouflage War Exhibit Train. 




1. Freeman Hyatt. 2. Romnald Risk Beckett. 3. Nelson Reckeweg. 4. Leo Harris. 5 Philmei 
Ward. 6. Edgar D. Laws. 7. Harry Engle. 8. Geo. Karl. 9. Wm. F. Karl. 10. Clarence B. Downey 
11. Clarence Jordan. 12. Geo. H. Newman. 



A Few War Poems by Ripley County Writers 

THE FLAG IS CALLING 

April, 1917. 

Rise! Arise! The flag is calling, 

Foemen trample at our door! 
Peace is dying on the border! 

Honor sends us to the fore! 
Rise, O men, for love of freedom! 

Rise for rights of brother men! 
We must stand for right and justice, 

E'en though blood must flow again. 

Long we've waited, hoping, praying, 

Holding off the stain of war, 
As a mother guards her children. 

From the deaths that lurk afar. 
Long we've tried to keep our honor 

Safe upon its lofty throne — 
Honor now uplifts the colors! 

Guard ! Columbia, guard your own ! 

Loud we hear the colors calling, 

High above all other sounds, 
Calling East and West and rolling 

Far to North and Southern bounds. 
Yes, the country's call is ringing, 

Bidding men to rise and come ! 
For the Nation needs its millions — 

Hear you now the rising drum ! 

Rise, Columbia's men, undaunted ! 

Rise and save your Freedom's life! 
Keep the banner bravely floating 

Fair and clean above the strife ! 
Hark, your flag is calling to you ! — 

Flag of equal rights of men, — 
Calling all its free-born guardsmen ! 

Up! and meet that call again! 

— Elizabeth Stewart Ross. 



376 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD W A R ill 

THE ATONEMENT 

September, 1918. 

Hark, the god of war is marching! Hear the drum beat's loud alarms! 
High above the deeper thunder soars the bugle call to arms! 
Proudly wave the flags of battle o'er the hosts of marching men, 
Calling sons and calling brothers out to die on field and fen. 
'Tis the hand of Cain uplifted, calls the soaring bugles out, 
Calls the drums to beat the marches, calls for battle lust and shout. 
God of right and God of justice, stand beside the sons of peace! 
Bind the god of war forever, bid the blood atonement cease! 

Fruitful fields and fruitful valleys, golden glow of dawning day, 
Call to life, not death, oh brothers! Bend the knee and let us pray. 
God of Mercy, God of Kindness, stay thy scourging Hand of Might! 
We are paying full the tribute, lead us now into the light. 
We are fighting for our freedom, give us Victory once more, 
And we pledge our lives to triumph o'er the awful god of war. 
Blood for blood we know is flowing, until every drop is paid. 
Grant us now, oh God of Battles, that our last blood debt is made. 

Once the Prince of Peace descended, entered life through lowly birth, 
Lived and loved and fully suffered, preaching peace, good-will on earth. 
Yet today we miss the message of the brotherhood of man, 
Groping still within the darkness, seeing not God's perfect plan; 
Seeing not that Love must guide us, love of each for one and all, 
We are brothers; help us, Father, help us, lest again we fall! 
Lest again we make atonement, blood for blood a crimson tide, 
Help us now to live henceforward, brothers, working side by side! 

— Elizabeth Stewart Ross. , 

WAY DOWN IN INDIANA 

Way down in Indiana, that boasts her hundred years, 
There's a grist of quiet laughter, though near akin to tears. 
The reason for our merriment — Uncle Samuel ought to know — 
For down among us Hoosiers is where the old clothes grow! 

We're not exactly "scare-crows", we're not fastened in our place, 

Are all too busy hustling — scarcely time to wash our face — 

Should "Our President" come calling, we'd give him greeting and then 

say, 
"We're all abackin' of you, Woodrow — but don't stop here in our way! 

"See, our wheat is nicely growing, our fodder's in the shock; 
The good wife's in the kitchen — no, don't take time to knock — 
She's makin' apple-butter, the girls are at the churn ; 
Walk in and make yourself to home — but — don't let the apple-butter 
burn." 



378 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

Way down in Indiana every Hoosier's on his job, 

With "dodger" on the table and mushpot on the hob; 

And it's good to be a Hoosier, as everybody knows, 

And there's no badge of Honor, now, like the wearing of old clothes. 

Hoosier girls are fair and helpful, with cheeks just like the rose, 
Their "best dress" is "made over" and frost may nip their toes, 
But each is knitting for some laddie, across the ocean wide. 
Who, when the war is ended, will claim her for his bride. 

The woman who sports finery is not treated over-fond ; 

There's two questions: "How'd she get 'em?" and "Did she buy a 

bond ?" 
But the girl with dress "made over" is welcome everywhere, 
Nowadays she's called "the stuff" and needs no labeling "with care". 

Our matrons, they are comely and there's beauty, even grace, 
When they wield the mop or mush-stick and look you in the face! 
They're the mothers of our soldiers — one of their many charms — 
They've given heart's blood to the Cause — the boys once cuddled in 
their arms. 

Way down in Indiana — where the old clothes grow — 
We're proud of 'em as Lucifer — Uncle Samuel ought to know — 
With our aims and hopes all centered in our boys across the pond. 
Old clothes are marks of honor — ivhen the ivearer owns a bond! 

— Emma King Benham. 



WELL, WHY NOT? 

We're "Souvenir-hunters" — so they say — 

In that shell-pocked country "Over the way". 

Yes, we have had 'em, bullets and shells, 

Helmets, meerschaums — and all kinds o' spells, 

Cushions, 'kerchiefs and ribbons fine 

To among blond and dusky looks entwine; 

Post cards, and albums things gory, things grim, 

And canes that were cut from down-drooping limb, 

Near lordly castles all gray and old, 

By venturesome Sammy — but, behold ! 

We've risen above these — and who would not? — 

With our Toms, Dicks and Harrys right on the spot? 

When the Peace-Dove fluttered its winglets white, 

As the "Great Big Black Thing" scudded with fright! — 

So as to make the glad tidings most truly true, 

To the home-abiding, to me, and to you, 

Each Sammy must send to his own heart's queen, 

A German airplane or a submarine! 

— Emma King Benham. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV A R 379 



OUR BOYS WHO REMAIN "OVER THERE" 

Did they miss her when they ventured 
To cross the Golden Strand ? 
Did they long for Mother-comfort, 
For the touch of Mother-hand? 

Did they miss the Mother-pillow, 
Her dear, heart-throbbing breast, 
When they sought that deeper slumber, 
That long, unbroken rest? 

Did the soul glance 'cross the waters 
Of the great dividing sea? 
Did they hear the Mother praying, 
See her on her bended knee? 

Then, they knew her love unending 
Spanned all distance, all time, 
And her soul spoke theirs departing, 
With comforting divine. 

— Emma King Benham. 



THE SERVICE FLAG 

A beautiful little service-flag, 

Against the window-pane, 
We look at you and think of him, 

We never shall see again. 

He never was known in wealth or fame, 

He was just a soldier boy, 
Who went to fight for our country's flag 

Rich blessing to enjoy. 

But now he sleeps on the battle-field, 

He'll never more return. 
And — beautiful little golden star, 

Our hearts for him will yearn. 

We'll look on you with saddened hearts, 

The tears will come to our eyes, 
When we think of him who for you died, 

And is now in Paradise. 

— Opal Deburger. 



380 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

A WAR MOTHER'S SERVICE FLAG POEM 

We the service-flag unfurl 

For our sons and brothers through the world, 

Who to battle bravely muster 

To emblazon freedom's luster. 

Wherever they may be, 

They are revered in our memory 

By the service-flag with its stars. 

War shadows o'er our land have fallen — 

An enemy has assailed us — 

But our boys will fight 

With rifle and with blade, 

With shell and hand grenade. 

Our sons will never fail us, 

Old Glory shall ever float above us, 

We sent our boy to France 

To fight in Freedom's name, 

And we want him to do his bit, 

Without a thought of fame, 

To help defeat the Kaiser, 

In his shameful traitor's game. 

And for him a star is on this flag; 

He is just a lad, but we love him 

For the way he squared his boyish shoulders 

And lifted high a firm round chin, 

While he faced the highway 

And the distant battle's din, 

He is just a lad, but the bugle clear and sweet, 

And the drum's incessant beat 

Thrilled him to exalted manhood. 

America shall still be free, 

For a nation's brave defender, he 

Will prove a true and valiant soldier, 

We didn't raise our boy to be a coward, 

So when our nation called he answered clearly, 

"Oh, my country, I am coming". 

Our boys with shining swords, 

Shall defend our land from foreign hordes. 

So for them the service-flag unfold. 

For the service of their souls; 

For their hearts' supreme endeavor, 

They shall cross red fields of fight, 

To the peaceful fields of white. 

But our love forgets them never; ■ 

And when the war is over, 

A prayer to God we'll send 

Of thankfulness the war-clouds are scattered. 

When peace reigns supreme, 

The deeds of our heroes will ever be our theme. 

— May V. Wagner. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 381 



YOUR ANSWER 

What will you say, Sonny, 

What will you say, 

When the troopship brings you home — 

Kneeling at last by your mother's chair, 

You and your mother alone? 

What will you say, Sonny, 

What will you say, 

As she searches your face to see 

If the boy she gave to the country's call 

Is still her Sonny — free? 

Free of the taint of lust and drink, 
Free of all hidden shame, 
Free of the bonds that slave the soul — 
Her son — in heart and name? 



What will you say, Sonny, 

What will you say? 

Will your heart be full of mirth — 

Holding her close in your strong young arms, 

The mother who gave you birth ? 

What will you say, Sonny, 

What will you say, 

As her dear eyes turn to you — 

The Mother who guarded your boyhood years? 

Say, was she ever untrue? 

And now what anwser have you for her, 
Her fair regard to win — 
That for the faith she placed in you, 
You fought your fight with sin? 

What will you say, Sonny, 
What will you say? 
Will you answer — "Mother of mine, 
Look in my eyes, look in my heart, 
Yea, read them line on line ? 
Days of fighting in field or trench, 
Nights 'mid the city's lure, 
Battle by day, or battle by night 
I kept your son's heart pure! 

—I did." 

— John Adam. 
Headquarters, 148th Infantry, 37th Division. 



382 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

OUR COUNTRY 

Our cornerstone of Liberty was laid by master hands, 
On solid blocks of statesmanship our country firmly stands, 
While course on course of history we're adding year by year, 
Cemented by a people's love who all their lives hold dear. 

We're carving for Eternity, each one, his block of Fate; 
On how we carve and how we build depends this nation great; 
For one small flaw in workmanship will spoil a builder's plan 
And future storms of Time will test the work of every man. 

We're builders of America, our home, our country free, 
She may mean much to others, but more to you and me; 
In righteous cause, across the seas, our noble boys have gone — 
Our Flag and all its folds imply, they mean to "Carry On". 

— Lucy Roberts, Osgood, Ind. 

GO QUICKLY, MY LETTER 

Tune: "Flow Gently, Sweet Afton" 

Go quickly, oh letter, across the blue sea, 
Bear quickly this message to a soldier for me, 
A soldier who's lonely and longing to hear 
From home land and loved ones a message of cheer. 

REFRAIN 

We love you, our soldiers, wherever you are, 
Our love is not bounded by near or by far, 
Wherever you're bearing the "Red, White and Blue", 
The prayers of a Nation are ever with you. 

The home-fires are burning in cottage and hall, 

There's a place ever ready for one and for all. 

When war-clouds have scattered and Peace reigns supreme, 

The deeds of our heroes will e'er be our theme. 

REFRAIN 

We love you, our soldiers, wherever you are, 
Our love is not bounded by near or by far, 
Wherever you're bearing the "Red, White and Blue," 
The prayers of a Nation are ever with you. 

— Lucy Roberts, Osgood, Ind. 

AT LAST 

When at last world's peace is sounded 
And we finish all this grind — 
When we start upon the homeward trip 
To the girls we left behind — 
When we turn in all our ordnance 
And barrack bags so full ; 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD IV AR 383 

Sacrifice the month rotation 

Of good old Army "bull" — 

When we sing our last together 

And start out for the West — 

When we do our last fatigue work 

And leave the squadron pest — 

When the time has come and it's over — 

No more traveling to be done, 

And the Government has called in our haversacks and — 

Won't we miss the Army routine? 

Won't we miss the good old bunch? 

I'm thinking, well, backward; 

We'll be longing for the good old 

Times the boys had overseas, 

Traveling in box cars and sleeping on our knees. 

Yes, even cooties chasing 

And sleeping in the tents, 

And crapping by sevens for our last fifty cents. 

The traveling that we've done 

With the poor old squadron nut, 

Is much more than we'll ever do 

In the home civilian rut. 

But experience has taught us that 

Adventures, great or small, 

Will come if they are destined, 

Or they'll never come at all ; 

And if we've another war, the 

Good old bunch we've got 

Will join up in a body and be 

"Johnny on the spot." 

—Joseph B. Keene, Co. D., 23d Inf., A. E. F. 

A SOLDIER'S THOUGHTS 

As I retire each night to rest, 

On my little bed so queer, 
W T ith its poultry-netting mattress — 

(Tho' to me it's very dear) 
As I lie there in my slumbers, 

I often dream of home. 
My dreams are many in numbers 

Of the happy days to come ; 
That when the war is ended, 

We'll have gained what we intended, 
An everlasting peace ; 

And of when I may return, 
To those so dear to me, 

I never more shall yearn, 
To cross the deep blue sea. 

— Edgar G. Steingruber, Friendship. 



384 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

THE WISE MEN'S PRAYER 

Shut within a quiet cloister in the heart of London's rushing life, 
Seven wise men, old and hoary, ceaseless pray beyond the strife. 
They are of the chosen people, Israelites who know their God, 
Bending daily there together — long-white-bearded, sandal-shod — 
Looking not unlike the elders Moses led to Canaan's land — 
For the people call for prophets who will know God's guiding hand. 
And with faithful patience, born of endless toil and thought and love, 
Have grown fit to raise their prayers to Jehovah's throne above. 

Without, the war-god marches onward, ever onward in his might, 
Rolling war-trucks, blazing star-shells burning always day and night; 
Striking out the lives of millions caught within his battle fire; 
All the bloom of youth of many countries heaped upon the pyre — 
Dying men and dying nations, groaning in one mighty cry — 
While the death-rain pours upon them from the earth and from the sky — 
And no God seems yet to hear them, though they pray with bloody hands, 
Kneeling in the shackles of the war-god's white-hot iron bands. 

But the old, old men of Israel bend their seven hoary heads, 
Pausing not nor tiring not in the glow the raging battle sheds, 
Interceding daily, hourly, for their God to hear His own; 
Knowing as they pray, at last their plea will reach Jehovah's throne; 
Knowing surely, back of all the sorrow, all the pain and death, 
Back of all the dreadful horrors killing mortals at a breath, 
God is waiting, listening, for us all to turn again to Him, 
Leaving false gods strewn behind us 'mid the martial lust and din. 

"We have died, so many of us," pray the sages o'er and o'er again, 
"Going forth from life's allurements, leaving all our work as men, 
Leaving all our future offered on the altar-fires of death, 
All the glory life could bring us lost within one fleeting breath ; 
Leaving all, our flags to follow, be it weal or be it woe — 
God of Battles, stay the conflict, we are mad, there is no foe ! 
We are fighting brothers in the fog of age-long hate and wrong! 
Give us love, our Father, love, the godly right of weak and strong! 

"Hear us, Father, hear us, for we know that Love Thou art; 
Know that Good and Right, and Love and Light, can not be torn apart ; 
Know that all together build for Life and building thus will grow 
Past th' opposing force of Hate, which word names all that is our foe. 
Help us now, our Father, soon to see each other face to face, 
Clouded not by hate or malice, children of one mighty race, 
Holding hands toward each other, ready for Thy blessed peace, 
Ready for Thee, Lord, to bid all further wars forever cease. 

"Hear, Jehovah, hear us, as we bow within the choking dust; 
Thou alone art God, and Thou alone art wise and good and just. 
Peace, we pray Thee, give us now, Thy healing, loving bond of peace, 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD W A R 385 

Which we swear to keep forever sacred, sure, without release; 
Building new the ruined world Thou gave us, Father, Mighty God, 
Who hath left us now so long beneath the war-god's burning rod. 
Just Thou art and wise Thou art, but love alone Thy essence is : 
Bend Thou low and give to us at last a loving Father's kiss." 

So the seven wise men pray within the shadow cast by war, 
While the thunder-bolts of hate still are hurled abroad by Thor, 
Mighty war-god, loosened for a space, to scourge the world for guilt, 
Burning out the envy, taking blood for blood in sorrow spilt — 
Shriving souls to meet their Maker as they pass the trenches red — 
God of Nations, must we all lie on this altar of the dead ? 
Will it take the lives of all before the hate of man is done? 
All, before the prayers avail and peace at last is won ? 

— Elizabeth Stewart Ross. 



"WE'VE WON THE WAR!" 

"We've won the war!" chime the old farm bells, 

"We've won! We've won!" each the story tells! 

Each iron tongue wags merrily 

Across our land from sea to sea, 

And who, a braver story tells, 

Than the iron tongues of the old farm bells? 

Hark! Our country called: "We must be fed!" 

The Old World called: "More bread! More bread! 

Give us sustenance, O give us, for 

Food we must have if we win this war!" 

The farmer responded, his work-worn mate 

Toiled by his side, early and late. 

Wooed and won succor from Mother Earth's breast, 

Giving the great cause their first and best. 

They spread home tables with homely fare, 

To send their luxuries "Over There" — 

There to our boys in that blood-stained world, 

Who fought that our flag might ne'er be furled. 

O! the gaps in the line where our boys went through, 

Out of the old way and into the new, — 

Leaving the plow and the team (their pride), 

The hoe and the reaper, the chosen bride! 

And who took up their burdens — "put by tears," 

Adding the yoke to their own weight of years? 

Who but the farmer and his staunch mate, 

Their daughter, their schoolboy, early and late, 

Rain-washed, dew-drenched in early morn, 

Sowing and reaping, and hoeing corn — 

Back-break, heart-break, and rough handed all, 

But obeying that mandate, the world's Food-Call! 

This the victory that iron tongues tell 



386 RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 

In the gladsome chimes of the old farm-bell. 
Hark! Their glad tidings of grand work done! 
"We've won the War! We've won! We've won!" 
'Tis not the voice of one Liberty bell, 
'Tis thousand on thousand the glad tidings tell — 
Hear their iron tongues chiming a-near, afar, 
"We've won the war! We've won the war!" 

— Emma King Benham. 

MY STAR 

There's a little gold star in the window, 

Of the large house over the way, 
There's a big boy gone from the fireside, 

He's "somewhere in France," today. 

First appear'd a blue star in the window, 

Of course, he was ready to go 
When his flag and his country call'd him, 

He couldn't stay out, you know. 

I watch 'd it with fear and with pride, 

Till at last, it seemed, over night, 
The blue star changed without warning 

To a little gold star so bright. 

Now when folks are talking of war, 

To me, oftentimes, they will say: 
"You have no one to go — " but I'm glad 

I can think of the star 'cross the way. 

— Emily Humphrey Cline. 



THE STORY OF THE STAR 

Little gold star shining bright, 
Shining through the day and night, 
Though your home is not so far 
As the stars above us are, 
Tell, I pray thee, what you see, 
Tell, I pray thee, who you be. 

"If I can, that I will do — 
I was once a mortal, too. 
Once I was a mother's boy; 
Life to me was but a toy. 
I could take it, I could make it, 
I could lose it, or could break it. 
Never thought I of the morrow, 
Never dreamed I of the sorrow. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 387 

"Then, almost without a warning, 
Came to me another morning; 
Came to me in manner lowly, 
Touched my heart and whispered — holy. 
Now I'm something more than he 
Who with mortal eyes did see, 
For I see the mothers, bending 
On their knees, and prayers ascending. 

"Prayers toward the Throne of Peace, 
Petitions that shall never cease 
Till the cannons, grim and crushing, 
Forever stop their death-knell gushing; 
Till from veins no blood is seeping, 
Flesh and bones no steel is meeting. 
'Tis not common prayers they're prating, 
Nor a common answer waiting. 

"Yes, and there is more I've seen 
On the battle-fields of green. 
I have seen the soldiers lying 
Here and there, and many dying — 
Slowly dying, many dead, 
And their blood that once was red, 
Early spilled, and early cold, 
Makes a star of molten gold. 

"Do not mourn the ones who lie there; 
Sorrow not for those who die there. 
Well is known what they are leaving, 
No one knows what they're receiving. 
Your's the pain and bitter loss, 
Their's the gain and their's the cost. 
Through their deaths there is a birth 
Of a firmament here on earth." 

— Emily Humphrey Cline. 



RIPLEY COUNTY'S PART IN THE WORLD WAR 



ADDENDUM 

Mrs. Emma King Benham, of Benham, Brown township, may be 
called Ripley county's war poet. Having previously published a volume 
of verse under the title of "Wayside Flowers," Mrs. Benham had won 
a place among Indiana poets a number of years ago. Her war poems 
and songs would make a small volume in themselves. Of the entire 
number, a few, illustrative of different phases of our war record, have 
been selected for a place in the County War History. Mrs. Benham 
was also active in the Liberty Loan campaigns and personally sold ten 
thousand dollars' worth of bonds. She was appointed by the county war 
historian as the chairman of the war poetry committee to collect Ripley 
county poems for the State Historical Society in the spring of 1919. A 
few selections from other Ripley county poets have been made for the 
County History from this collection at Indianapolis, the aim being to 
use a limited number of productions to illustrate our county's part in 
the World War as voiced by its verse-makers, at home or abroad. 
Thanks are due Mrs. Benham for a comprehensive collection. Per- 
mission was obtained of the state historian, Mr. John W. Oliver of 
Indianapolis, to use these poems in our county history. 

The photographs of service men have been selected on a basis of ser- 
vice, every branch of the service being represented. In some cases no 
photograph was obtainable, so that a number, whose pictures should have 
been included, are not represented. Of those who are given a place 
in the book, importance and length of service has been the basis of se- 
lection in each branch. Our regret is that so many could not furnish the 
required photographs. A reference to locality has also been considered, 
so that every part of the county will find some of its own soldiers' or 
sailors' familiar faces. To have been entirely complete every service 
man's face should be in the collection. 



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