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Full text of "Robert Burns, poet-laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning; facts substantiating his election and inauguration on 1st March 1787, gleaned from the Lodge records and other authentic sources"

i i 




ROBERT BuRNStKeScoTTiSH BARD. 

POET LAUREA T 
LODGE No. Z.CANNONGATE 
KILWINNING. 



A PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY 

OF THE 

FRAMED PRINT 

OF THE 

POET-LAUREATE OF LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING, 

WHICH "MET WITH THE APPROBATION OF THE BRETHERN," 24. JUNE 1802, 

AND HAS BEEN ON VIEW NEARLY A CENTURY IN THE LODGE ROOM, 

ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL, ST. JOHN STREET, EDINBURGH. 



Date of publication, 2gth October 1798, which is engraved on the margin of the print, but covered by the frame. 



Vide Part I., pp. u, 30, and 32. Part II., p. 20, etc. 




ROBERT BURNS 



POET-LAUREATE 



OF 



LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING 



FACTS 

Substantiating his Election and Inauguration 

ON 1ST MARCH 1787 



(Bleanefc from tbe %ofcae IRecorfcs ant) otber Hutbentic Sources 

BY 

HUGH C. PEACOCK 

PAST DEPUTE MASTER LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING; SECRETARY TO THE LODGE 1872-73 

AND MANY YEARS SUBSEQUENTLY ; 

PAST PRINCIPAL H AND PAST SCRIBE E ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER CANONGATE KILWINNING 

ETC., ETC. 

AND ASSISTED BY 

ALLAN M ACKENZ I E 

HISTORIAN AND P.M. CAN. KIL., NO. 2, ETC. 



PUBLISHED BY A UTHORITY OF THE LODGE 



PRINTED BY 
CHRISTIE & SON, 10 NORTH ST. ANDREW STREET, EDINBURGH 



MDCCCXCIV. 



PR 



PREFACE. 



T HAVE been asked by some of the principal Office-bearers, past and present, 
of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, No. 2, to write a few words by way 
of Preface to the statement of the evidence, compiled mainly by Brother 
Allan Mackenzie, as to the formerly undoubted, but recently controverted 
fact that Robert Burns held the Honorary Office of Poet Laureate of 
that Lodge. I have accordingly gone carefully through that evidence, which 
is so well arranged, so exhaustive, and I may add so conclusive, that it 
might well be left to speak for itself. " I propose, therefore, to confine my 
remarks to the most salient points in the evidence, and to the nature of 
the case sought to be made against the hitherto received tradition. And first, 
as to the positive evidence of the fact. Not, certainly, the oldest, but certainly 
the principal document in its support, is the Resolution passed on the 8th 
June 1815, and duly recorded in the Minutes of the Lodge, authorising a 
Subscription for a Mausoleum to Robert Burns, who is therein described 
as one " who had been Poet Laureate of the Lodge" This resolution was 
seconded by Charles More, who was a prominent official of the Royal Bank 
of Scotland, who had been Depute Master of the Canongate Kilwinning 
Lodge, No. 2, both before and in the year 1787, (in which year Robert 
Burns joined the Lodge as an Honorary affiliated member, and is traditionally 
alleged to have been also appointed Poet Laureate of the Lodge), and who 
had continued in unbroken connection with the Lodge from that time to 
the signing of the Minute of 8th June 1815. Surely, if any man must have 
known whether this statement of the resolution was accurate or not, that 



X. 

man must have been the seconder, Brother Charles More. But it does not 
stop there. At the time when this resolution was passed, the Lodge included 
amongst its members about one hundred persons, who had been members 
before and during the events of 1787, many of whom had continued members 
down to 1815. A number of those must in the nature of things have been 
present at the Meeting at which the resolution was passed. Moreover, this re- 
solution was sent round with a subscription list to all the members, so that 
it must have come to the knowledge of those members who were not present. 
Amongst the one hundred members referred to were many who knew Robert 
Burns intimately, including Louis Cauvin, Burns's French Teacher ; Alexander 
Nasmyth, who painted his portrait ; Lord Balcarres, Dugald Stewart, Sir John 
Sinclair of Ulbster ; Sir Hay Campbell, President of the Court of Session ; 
Dr. Andrew Duncan; Sir Henry Jardine, R. W. Master, 1790; Sir Charles 
Hope of Granton, President of the Court of Session, who survived till 1851 ; 
and many others. A Committee was appointed to carry out the object of 
this resolution, and on the 2nd January 1817, George Simson, Esq., Past Master 
of the Lodge, who appears to have acted as the Secretary, wrote to George 
Burnet, Esq., Advocate, R. W. Master of Canongate Kilwinning Lodge, as 
follows : " I beg leave to report to you that having been furnished by your 
Secretary with the sum of Twenty Guineas voted by the Lodge as a contri- 
bution towards the erection of a Mausoleum to the memory of our late Poet 
Laureate, Burns, I, in obedience to the instructions of the Committee, remitted 
that sum to the Rev. Dr. Duncan, Dumfries." From this it is evident that 
after eighteen months' publicity amongst all those most likely, nay certain to 
know whether the statement which constituted the express ground and plea 
on which their subscriptions were solicited was true or false, not only had 
none denied it, but the Lodge itself had formally ratified and adopted it on 
a second occasion by voting twenty guineas to the fund on this very ground 
and title. A goodly number of these hundred members must have been still 
alive in 1835, when Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd, was elected to succeed Robert 
Burns as Poet Laureate, and when at his initiation or on the occasion of his 
being made a Mason, he expressly acknowledged the compliment of being 
asked to succeed Robert Bums, and the Lodge toasted the memory of 



XI. 



Burns as " the last Poet Laureate of the Lodge" Nay, some of them, e.g. 
Sir Charles Hope were alive in 1845, when the Lodge resolved to commemorate 
the event by a Picture. All this is on record, nor is it contested that the 
tradition has been handed down continuously to the present time. 

There is, however, one piece of documentary evidence older than any of 
the above entries, though not, of course, as old as the memory and knowledge 
of the persons above-mentioned, who were all members and contemporaries 
of Burns in 1787. This is the engraved portrait of Burns still hanging in 
the Lodge, and which appears to have been placed there in the beginning 
of this century, within a few years of his death. That portrait bears a 
contemporary Inscription, describing him as Poet Laureate of the Lodge. 
This carries the documentary evidence of the tradition back to the very 
beginning of the century; but the evidence does not stop there. It appears 
that Brother William Petrie, who was connected with several Lodges, and 
down to a date shortly before his death in 1845, was one of the Tylers 
of the Lodge, bore testimony to the fact of having been present at the 
inauguration of Burns as Poet Laureate of Lodge No. 2. It is true 
that Brother William Officer rejects this direct and specific evidence, on 
the ground that as Petrie is not recorded in Grand Lodge Books as a 
member of No. 2, he cannot have been a member of No. 2. But in 
another place (see his letter of I2th January 1889) he himself demolishes 
his own argument by frankly admitting that " The registration of the 
members of the Lodge (No. 2) in the Register of Grand Lodge in the 
beginning of the present century was irregular." The same applies to the 
Minutes of No. 2 in the year 1787, and all the neighbouring years as 
Brother Mackenzie has conclusively shewn. 

Neither Brother Officer nor any other person has adduced a single 
fact to lead one to suppose that Brother Petrie was not a truthful person 
or that he had any motive to give false evidence. His evidence is in 
entire accordance with all the current of tradition and of authority above 
referred to ; and in the absence of any positive evidence to the contrary 
is worthy of confidence and respect. 

One remark falls to be made with regard to the whole of the above 



Xll. 



evidence. It is of a positive character, and is such as reasonable men are 
in the habit of accepting as sufficient in the absence of any positive evidence 
to the contrary. Is there any positive evidence to the contrary? None 
whatever. Those who, in recent times, have attacked the long received 
tradition, and in particular, Brothers Officer and Murray Lyon, rely wholly, 
not on the presence of any, even the smallest contrary evidence, but only on the 
absence of certain records, which, if they existed, would give contemporary 
corroboration to the positive evidence adduced. That this is no exaggeration 
will be seen at a glance, if we consider the principal arguments put forward 
by them by way of "disproof" of the received tradition. These are: 

1. No contemporary entry of the appointment in the Minutes of No. 2. 

2. Before such appointment the office must have been created ; and 

this could not be done without the consent of Grand Lodge. 
There is no entry of the creation, or of such consent. 

3. If created, it must be annual, and re-election must be annual : 

whereas there is no entry of any further election till 1835, when 
(as they allege) the office was created. 

4. Burns himself does not mention it. 

5. The testimony adduced to prove it is not contemporaneous. 

It is obvious that all this amounts to no more than pointing out what 
additional evidence would in their judgment place the tradition beyond all 
possible doubt. Not one of the five points, nor all of them together, is 
logically inconsistent with the truth of the positive evidence adduced. 

But let us look more closely at the five points seriatim. 

I. "No contemporary Minute of the appointment." 

This is plainly their principal, one may say their only material point. 

If such a Minute existed, where would be their case ? And yet, so 
far is such an entry from being necessary to satisfactory evidence of the 
transaction it professes to record, that in English Common Law such an 
entry is not admissible as any evidence at all of the transaction. The only 
use that could be made of it would be to refresh the memory of the person 
who had made the entry, as to his own recollection of the transaction 
which he recorded, and then only if he had been present at the transaction. 



Xlll. 



Brother Petrie's evidence, on the contrary, though given many years after, 
would have been admissible primary evidence of an eye-witness. No doubt, 
however, apart from legal rules of evidence, the absence of any entry is a 
suspicious circumstance, provided it appears that the books have been re- 
gularly and carefully kept. If it appears they have been irregularly and 
carelessly kept, such omission would carry no weight. Which, then, is the 
case here ? Brother Mackenzie has conclusively shewn by many instances 
that the Books of No. 2 were at this time most carelessly and irregularly 
kept. I refer for brevity to his statement, and will quote only one instance. 

The Hon. Henry Erskine is entered as elected to the chair on 24th 
June 1780, but no previous Minute exists to show that he ever joined the 
Lodge. This is the exact converse of Burns' case, where his admission as 
Honorary member is recorded, but not his appointment as Poet-Laureate. 
It is worthy of note that the omission to record the act of making a man 
a Mason, or of admitting him member of a Lodge, is a much more serious 
omission than the omission to record a merely honorary appointment within 
the Lodge, which is in no way essential to the practical working of the 
Lodge, and might fall into desuetude without affecting that working. In 
point of fact, not only after Burns's death was this office left unfilled, 
but twice or thrice after 1835, when Brothers Officer and Murray Lyon 
admit it was in existence, the Lodge omitted to fill it up, though careful 
to fill up those offices which are essential to the practical working and 
constitutional completeness of the Lodge. These omissions are duly shewn 
in a table of appointments inserted in Brother Mackenzie's statement. May 
I here be permitted to suggest that the admirable and scrupulously exact 
manner in which Brother Murray Lyon keeps the Books of Grand Lodge, 
tends perhaps to make him too exacting in his demands upon the past. 

2. " Before Burns could have been appointed, the office must have been 
created, and this required the consent of Grand Lodge, which has 
no record of such consent." 

This is merely an erroneous and very pedantic objection. Where is the 
rule of Grand Lodge forbidding any Lodge to appoint an Honorary Poet 
Laureate without previous solemn creation of the office with the consent of Grand 



XIV. 

Lodge 1 Moreover, it proves a great deal too much, and is in fact contradicted 
by Brothers Officer and Murray Lyon themselves. They both assert that 
the office was created in 1835, and has existed since then to the present 
time. They deny that it existed before the appointment of Hogg. Was 
the appointment of Hogg preceded by any " creation of the office ? " Is 
there any record in Grand Lodge of any previous application to Grand Lodge 
for its consent to "create the office?" Or do our incredulous Brethren 
suggest that such application and consent was doubtless made and given, 
though the officials of Grand Lodge omitted to record it ? If they don't, 
they give up this objection as untenable. If they do, why are they so ready 
to believe an unrecorded transaction which has no tradition and no vestige of 
evidence to support it, whilst they find it so impossible to believe an unrecorded 
transaction which has both evidence and tradition in its favour? If they 
answer " no such consent was asked or granted, because both Canongate 
Kilwinning, No. 2, and Grand Lodge supposed it had been obtained in 1787," 
this would still be fatal to the actual existence of the office ; moreover, they 
must admit that Grand Lodge assented to the truth of the tradition, and 
either thought its consent unnecessary, or that it had been given in 1787, 
though unrecorded, thus regarding the record as not essential nor conclusive. 
Moreover, Grand Lodge must have considered that such office did not cease 
to exist, though unfilled for more than 35 years, in other words, that it 
need not be filled up annually. 

3. " If created, it must be annually vacated and filled, whereas no further 
election till 1835." 

This is sufficiently answered by the remarks just made. No one took 
that view in 1835, nor since. The office had then been vacant at least since 
Burns's death. The refilling of it then by Hogg was public and notorious, 
and the power of the Lodge to refill it was unquestioned, and, I may add 
unquestionable. The Lodge has, since then, several times omitted to fill it, 
when vacant, and have afterwards filled it, as of right, and without question. 
The truth is, this objection also is both erroneous arid pedantic. It loses 
sight of the distinction between a mere honorary and non-essential office, 
and those which are essential to the proper constitution and working of a 
Lodge. 



XV. 

4. " Burns himself does not mention it." 

This objection is so trivial that it seems hardly worth answering, but 
as it is much insisted on, I may point out that they have not the least right 
to say Burns never mentioned it. All they can say is that in the very 
limited number of letters of his which have been preserved and published, 
such mention does not happen to occur. What sort of argument is that ? 
They suggest that Canongate Kilwinning, No. 2, was so distinguished a 
Lodge, it was impossible he should not have mentioned it at the time. Well, 
perhaps he did. How can they prove he did not ? But let me ask them 
this: In February 1787, they themselves admit that this distinguished Lodge 
did Burns the distinguished honour of electing him an honorary member. 
Where does Burns mention this fact ? And if Burns does not mention this 
honour, why should he mention the other? Perhaps, on second thoughts, 
they may suggest that the entry of February ist 1787 cannot be true, 
because, if true, Burns must have mentioned it ! That would at least make 
their argument consistent. 

5. "The testimony adduced is not contemporaneous" 

That depends upon what "contemporaneous" evidence means. If it 
means what it means in ordinary usage, in Courts of Law, or in historical 
evidence, then it is contemporaneous i.e. it is evidence derived from the 
assertions, or the acts of contemporaries who were, in a position to know, or 
who claim to have such knowledge. Brother Charles More and Brother 
Petrie are both of this class, and so are all those who were continuously 
members of the Lodge during 1787, and thence to 1815, nay, some of them 
to 1835, when Hogg was elected expressly as his successor, and even to 1845, 
when the picture commemorative of it was sanctioned. The meaning which 
our objecting brethren put on the word is singular. They say that Brother 
Petrie's testimony that he was present and saw the fact is not contemporary, 
because it (the testimony) was not given at the time of the occurrence itself! 
That the witness was there at the time is nothing ! The question is, did he 
give his evidence on the spot where and when the occurrence took place ! This 
sense of "contemporaneous testimony," is unique, and the laws of time and 
space and common sense are likely to keep it so. 



XVI. 

To sum up, there is a large body of evidence, direct and indirect, including 
the assertions, acts and conduct of those most likely to know and most 
entitled to speak and to be believed. There is a continuous, and, till recent 
times, unchallenged tradition resting on that evidence. On the other side 
there is no evidence to the contrary, but only an eager insistence upon the 
absence of certain additional evidence, mainly inadmissible in Law, even if it 
existed, and all of it such as not to present any logical contradiction of any 
part of the positive evidence in favour of the fact. It is not too much to 
say that nothing could ever be proved, if the absence of additional proof 
were admitted to countervail positive evidence of the fact. 

R. W. MACLEOD FULLARTON, 
Q.C. 

M.M., No. 2, P.J. W., No. 770, 
and Grand Bard, Grand Lodge of Scotland. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Copy of a Framed Print, bearing the Inscription, "Robert Burns, the Scottish Bard, 
Poet-Laureat, Lodge No. 2, Cannongate Kilwinning" which .has been on view in 
the Lodge-room nearly a century, ..... Frontispiece 

Copy of Brother Stewart Watson's celebrated Painting entitled, " The Inauguration of 
Robert Burns as Poet- Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning" \st March 
1787, . . . . . . Beginning of Part II, 

Key to Inauguration Picture, ...... Facing copy 

(Followed by Lines on Viewing the Picture). 



CONTENTS. 



PART I. 

PAGE 

INTRODUCTION, ........ v. 

I. LETTER TO THE PAST SECRETARY OF LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING 
requesting Evidence in Substantiation of " the Statements " he made 
regarding Burns, 7th February 1873, to Brother David Murray Lyon 
which the latter NOW asserts are unfounded, i 

II. REPLY, ......... 2 

III. COMMENTARY on Grand Secretary's Assertions impugning "the State- 

ments" contained in the Letter written by the Secretary of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning, 7TH FEBRUARY 1873, .... 4 

IV. FACTS WORTH KNOWING about the said LETTER, . . . .10 
V. "THE STATEMENTS" SUBSTANTIATED, . . . . .12 

VI. BROTHER D. MURRAY LYON'S FLUCTUATIONS OF OPINION with reference 
to Robert Burns having been Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning, ........ 43 

VII. ERRORS in "THE PRINTED COPY OF THE CORRESPONDENCE between 
" Brothers Allan Mackenzie, the Historian of No. 2, and William 
" Officer," which was submitted by Grand Secretary to Grand Com- 
mittee, 29th December 1892, ...... 46 



PART II. 

I. Extract from Proceedings of Grand Lodge, 2gth Dec. 1892 ~ V. r 

II. Statement by Past-Master Allan Mackenzie, ;' '" . ' '. '. . 3 

III. Review of the Minutes of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, from 24th June 

1786, to i2th December 1788, . 4 

IV. Verbatim Copy of said Minutes, . 12 
V. First Reference in the Records, 24th June 1802, to "Robert Burns, 

Poet Laureat of Lodge No. 2 Cannongate Kilwinning," . . 20 



IV. 

PAGE 

VI. Selected Extracts from the Minutes and Relative Documents of the Lodge, 
from Feby. 9, 1815, to Nov. 19, 1845, containing twelve additional 
References to the fact that Robert Burns was " Poet Laureat," . . 30 

VII. Copy of Correspondence between Brother J. Linning Woodman, C.S., and 
Brother Stewart Watson, Portrait Painter, the distinguished Artist who 
painted the Inauguration Picture now in the Board Room of Grand 
Lodge showing the great care with which Brother Watson procured 
"authenticated particulars" of a subject before painting it, . . 44 

VIII. A Word for the late Brother Stewart Watson, .... 48 

IX. Letter from Past-Master Wm. N. Fraser of Findrack and Tornaveen to 

Past-Master Allan Mackenzie, . . . . . -53 

X. Letter from Past-Master Thos. Drybrough to Past-Master Allan Mackenzie, 54 

XL Extract from Minute of Committee Meeting and Copy of Correspondence 
between the Secretary of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning and Bro. D. 
Murray Lyon, Ayr, 1873, ...... 55 

XII. The "APPOINTMENT" and "INAUGURATION" of Robert Burns, Poet 
Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, quoted from Bro. D. 
Murray Lyon's " History of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), 
No. i," 63 

XIII. Presentation to Grand Lodge, 2nd February 1863, of Brother Stewart 

Watson's celebrated Painting entitled, "The Inauguration of Robert 
Burns Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, . . .66 

XIV. Minutes of two Meetings of Canongate Kilwinning Committee, held 

respectively i5th and 27th December 1893, for the purpose of con- 
sidering the Evidence then produced regarding the Poet Laureateship 
of Robert Burns, ........ 67 

NOTANDA, ......... 72 

APPENDIX. 

Chart showing the Office-Bearers of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, each year, from 
June 24, 1784, to June 24, 1867. 

Supplement to Chart, showing Names of Members of Committee of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning each year, from June 24, 1784, to June 24, 1867. 

ERRATA. 



INTRODUCTION. 

CELEBRATED PAINTING which depicts the Inauguration of 

Robert Burns as Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, 
No. 2, Edinburgh, was presented to the Grand Lodge of Scotland thirty- 
one years ago, by the late much-respected Brother James Ballantine, Grand 
Bard, on behalf of the family of the late Brother SIR JAMES BURNES, M.D., 
LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S.L., F.R.C.P.E., Knight of Hanover, etc., and Physician- 
General of the Bombay Army, who was related to the Poet. 

Brother Sir James Burnes [otherwise designated the Chevalier Burnes] had 
long been a highly esteemed and active member of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 
He was the first Provincial Grand Master of Western India appointed on 
occasion of the celebration of the first centenary of Grand Lodge, 3Oth 
November 1836 and was ultimately appointed Grand Master of Scottish 
Freemasonry in India, which eminent position he held till nearly the end of 
his life. He died at Manchester on the ipth September 1862. 

Shortly before his death the late Brother Sir James Burnes expressed a 
wish to personally present the Inauguration Picture to Grand Lodge. Unfor- 
tunately, he did not live to carry out that wish, but his family lost no time after 
his decease in giving effect to the generous donor's purpose regarding the 
Picture, arid, accordingly, presentation of it was made to Grand Lodge in due 
form at the Quarterly Communication, held 2nd February 1863. 

The Inauguration Picture, received at that time by Grand Lodge, was 
at once placed on view in the Board-room, and there it has remained ever 
since. Appended to it then was, and still is, the following inscription : 

"THE INAUGURATION 

OF 

ROBERT BURNS 

AS POET LAUREATE OF 

THE LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING, 

EDINBURGH, ist MARCH, 1787. 



Presented by JAMES BURNES, K.H., F.R.S., &c. 
To the Grand Lodge of Scotland, 1862." 



VI. 



This valuable gift was then made to Grand Lodge in the full view of 
a numerous company, embracing many worthy, learned, and distinguished 
brethren, presided over by His Grace the Duke of Athole, K.T., &c., M.W. 
Grand Master ; and NOW, Brother David Murray Lyon, Grand Secretary, asserts 
that no such inauguration ever took place* and submits, " in the interests of truth, 
" as set against a fable, it is necessary that steps should be taken by Grand 
" Committee to have the inscription on the picture amended" ! 

He also submitted and appealed to the "Printed Copy of Correspondence " 
between " Brothers A. Mackenzie, the historian and Past Master of No. 2, and 
William Officer," Past Master of No. I, as "clearly" establishing his (Grand 
Secretary's) contention. Brother Lyori himself contributed two letters to that 
correspondence, in which he charges the Canongate Kilwinning Office-bearers of 
1873 with having furnished him with "unfounded" statements, etc., and which 
letters, with those of the Past Master of No. I, as is now shown, contain much 
apocryphical writing. 

It was pointed out to Grand Committee that no official information 
on the subject was vouchsafed to them, consequently Brother Mackenzie 
councilled delay, and undertook to produce whatever documentary evidence 
existed in the archives of Canongate Kilwinning Lodge on the subject of the 
Election and Inauguration. This was cordially acquiesced in, and the result will 
be seen in the following pages. 

In the first place, it was deemed proper to ask Brother Hugh C. Peacock, 
the Canongate Kilwinning Secretary of 1873, to substantiate "the statements," 
which Grand Secretary now so emphatically stigmatises as " unfounded ; " and, in 
the second place, to publish certified copies of the Minutes and other authentic 
documents of the Burns and Hogg periods, so that every Brother can judge of 
the matter for himself. 

Whatever the object of questioning the truth of the Inscription at this 
distant date may be, assuredly Grand Lodge, on learning full particulars, will 
impartially judge ; and it is earnestly hoped that this Inscription, hallowed by 
time rendered doubly valuable for the interesting circumstances connected with 
the record of such an historical event, as well as for the eminent and worthy 
names and memories associated therewith will be ordered to remain in its 



Vll. 



original state, so that no future historian, or any other writer, will think of 
mutilating such a precious heirloom to the Masonic Brotherhood as that Picture 
descriptive of "The Inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet-Laureate of The 
" Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, Edinburgh, ist March 1787," which now hangs 
on view in the board-room of the Grand Lodge of Scotland. 

A. MACKENZIE, 

P.M. Can. Kil., No. 2. 



1894. 



PART I. 



I. 
LETTER 

FROM 

BROTHER ALLAN MACKENZIE, 

Past Master of Lodge Canongate Kihvinning, and Member of the Special Com- 
mittee appointed by the Grand Committee to Consider and Report to Grand 
Lodge upon the whole question of the Inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet 
Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilw inning, 

TO 
BROTHER HUGH C. PEACOCK, 

Past Secretary, Past Substitute- Master, and Past Depute-Master, Lodge Canongate 

Kilwinning. 



17 ST. ANDREW SQUARE, 
EDINBURGH, zotk March 1893. 
H. C. PEACOCK, Esq., 

8 York Buildings. 

DEAR SIR AND BROTHER, 

Robt. Burns, 

Poet Laureate of Can. KiL No. 2. 

In Grand Lodge Proceedings you have no doubt observed that on 
Dec. last, Bro. D. Murray Lyon, Grand Secretary, submitted a statement to Grand 
Committee, in the course of which he asserts that, in 1873, the office-bearers of Can. 
Kil. Lodge communicated through you, as Secretary, certain " alleged facts which he 
unfortunately accepted as true, and in his History modified the opinion which he had 
originally formed" and that steps should be taken to have the inscription on the 
Inauguration Picture in the Board Room amended. 

In my reply to this extraordinary assertion, I undertook to produce whatever 
documentary evidence exists in the Lodge on the subject ; and, in order to bring up a 
full and complete report on the whole question, I shall be obliged by your furnishing me 
with the evidence upon which you made " the statements " contained in your letter to 
Bro. D. Murray Lyon of 7th Feby. 1873, and which he complains of as being 

" unfounded" Yours faithfully and fraternally, 

A. MACKENZIE, 

P. M. Can. KiL, No. 2, 
and " Member of the Special Committee 
" appointed to Consider and Report 
" upon the Whole Question? 



II. 
REPLY 

FROM 

BROTHER HUGH C PEACOCK 

TO 

PAST MASTER ALLAN MACKENZIE. 



ARGYLE CRESCENT, 
PoRTOBELLO, i6th November 1893. 

ALLAN MACKENZIE, Esq., 

Past Master Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, 

Etc., etc. 
WORSHIPFUL AND DEAR SIR, 

Thanks for your letter inviting my attention to Grand Lodge Proceedings 
of 29th December 1892, and requesting evidence from me in substantiation of "the 
statements " contained in my letter to Brother David Murray Lyon, dated so far back as 
7th February 1873, which he now complains of as being "unfounded." 

With respect to " the printed copy of the correspondence " between you and 
another member of the craft, which is referred to in said Proceedings of 2gth December 
1892 as having been submitted to the meeting held that date, I may remark that it is 
not altogether new. Much of it was contained in cuttings from The freemason, which, 
about four years ago, you enclosed to me with an invitation to take part in the discussion. 
You will remember that I at once called upon you and returned the cuttings, declining 
to add one word to what had been said. My reasons were, that, as you had entered on 
the correspondence in The Freemason on your own responsibility, in defence of what you 
had said in the History of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning regarding Burns, quite inde- 
pendently of, and unknown to me or any of the other office-bearers, therefore, such 
correspondence so far at least as I was concerned should remain wholly your own. 
Further, I remarked, it was evident to me that no good result to the one side or the 
other could accrue from discussing in any such desultory manner, throughout several 
years, a subject of the kind in a public journal : irregularly and at long intervals discussed 
quite as irregularly read by the average reader and the whole question never at any 
one period before him in a complete form, it seemed to me a sheer waste of time to 
follow up the discussion in The Freemason. 

Brother Lyon professed himself satisfied with the information communicated to 
him in my letter of 7th February 1873,* and gave effect to a portion of it in his History, 

* Brother Lyon's reply, dated Feby. II, 1873, is reproduced in Part II., page 61. 



which was published shortly afterwards in the year 1873 and then I fully believed 
that the question raised by the correspondence was settled. I did not expect that NOW 
I would have occasion to defend anything said in that 1873 letter, after so many old 
brethren who helped me with it are dead, and that Grand Secretary, in his recently 
acquired anxiety "to have the inscription on the picture" (of the inauguration) 
"amended," would complain to Grand Lodge in those Proceedings of 2gth December 
1892 (vide Part II., page i), that, so far back as twenty years ago, in that letter I had 
" laid a statement before him embodying alleged facts, which he unfortunately accepted 
as true, and in his History modified the opinion which he had originally formed " and, 
that in said Proceedings [still with respect to same letter] he " asserts that the statements 
made to him were unfounded." 

Fortunately, I am in a position to prove my case, independently of those old 
members now dead ; and, agreeably with your request, I have much pleasure in now 
furnishing, by the matter which follows this reply, abundant evidence to establish 
beyond any reasonable doubt or cavil the essential facts set forth in my letter to which 
you refer. 

It is my duty to add, that, with the very utmost respect and esteem for Bro. D. 
Murray Lyon, Grand Secretary ; for his attainments as a Masonic author as shown 
forth in his excellent " History of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), No. i " 
and for his well-known great knowledge of Masonic matters generally, I nevertheless 
claim to have a more intimate knowledge than he of the many books and documents, and 
other valuable memorabilia belonging to Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, and of its very 
interesting history apart from so much of it as has been published : such knowledge of 
mine being derived mainly from a continuous active membership of twenty-one years, 
during much of which time I have served the Lodge as Secretary. 

Therefore, while I very much regret having to express an opinion different from 
that of Grand Secretary regarding the question under notice, I feel it my bounden duty 
to the Lodge Committee of 1873, the Canongate Kilwinning Lodge of to-day, and the 
Craft in general, to distinctly deny, as I hereby do, Grand Secretary's belated assertions 
against " the statements made to him " in that letter of mine, written so very long ago as 
in the beginning of 1873, those assertions being utterly unwarrantable. 

Finally, I respectfully request that you will invite Grand Secretary to put his 
finger on any one statement in said letter of mine, essential to the question, which he 
claims to be unfounded AND PROVE IT. 

The evidence you ask for follows this letter. I am, Worshipful and Dear Sir, 
yours truly and fraternally, 

HUGH C. PEACOCK, 

Past Secretary and Past Depute-Master, Can. Kil. 
Proxy Master, No. 476. 



III. 
COMMENTARY 



ON 



GRAND SECRETARY'S Assertions impugning "the Statements" 
contained in the LETTER written by the SECRETARY of LODGE 
CANONGATE KILWINNING, 7th February 1873.* 



My letter, dated 7th February 1873, containing "the statements," of which 
-evidence is now requested from me, was written in the course of a correspondence which 
as Secretary of Lodge Canongate Kilwin ning, I had been instructed by the Committee 
of that Lodge to have with Brother David Murray Lyon, who was then resident in Ayr. 
I had been so instructed by reason of a report having reached Lodge Committee to 
the effect that, in the " History of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel) No. i, 
embracing an Account of the Rise and Progress of Freemasonry in Scotland," which 
Brother Lyon was at that time compiling, the commonly accepted association of Robert 
Burns to Lodge Canongate Kilwinning was discredited. 

Before entering fully on such evidence, I feel privileged to make a few 
comments on the assertions so freely advanced by Grand Secretary to Grand Committee 
on 2 Qth December 1892 impugning the statements contained in my letter. f 

Bro. Mackenzie calls my attention to the fact "that, on 29th December last, 
Bro. D. Murray Lyon, Grand Secretary, submitted a statement to Grand Committee, 
in the course of which he asserts that in 1873 the Office-bearers of Can. Kil. Lodge 
communicated through you, as Secretary, certain ' alleged facts which he unfortunately 
accepted as true, and in his History modified the opinion which he had originally 
formed,' and that steps should be taken to have the inscription on the Inauguration 
Picture in the Board-room amended." 

In the "Extract from Grand Lodge Proceedings, 2gth December 1892," Grand 
Secretary also asserted that, in the year 1873 [before my letter dated 7th February 1873 
was written, and before his History of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), No. i, 
was printed] he made "A MINUTE EXAMINATION OF CANONGATE KILWINNING'S 
RECORDS." In making such " minute examination " he would certainly, as an eminent 
historian, carefully examine the record dated ist February 1787, containing mention 

* A copy of that letter will be found in Part II., page 57. 

t The " Extract from Grand Lodge Proceedings, 29th December 1892," is given in Part II., page I. 



of the affiliation of Robert Burns. Brother D. Murray Lyon would also, quite as care- 
fully, examine the record of ist March 1787 the date which he knew was inscribed 
on the Inauguration Picture as being that on which the Inauguration ceremony was 
claimed to have taken place but in the latter record he would find that the name of 
Robert Burns is not mentioned. Nevertheless, Brother Lyon, in his response acknow- 
ledging receipt of my letter concerning Burns' inauguration, made no reference whatever 
to such omission.* 

Further, in the " Extract from Grand Lodge Proceedings, 2pth December 1892," 
Grand Secretary announced that, " in all statements and discussions in support of the 
story, the minute of the meeting at which the event is alleged to have happened has 
been kept out of sight. It is as follows " f [and the quotation of minute followed 
accordingly]. 

Grand Secretary apparently forgets, in casting such an unworthy taunt at brethren 
whose opinions happen to differ from his on such a matter, that, if the minute of ist 
March 1787 had ever been " kept out of sight" in the sense implied, which I deny, he 
has himself for twenty years contributed to the doing so. Bro. Lyon certainly noted that 
special minute when he made " a minute examination of Canongate Kilwinning^s records" 
BEFORE publishing his History of No. i. Nevertheless, throughout all his reference to 
Canongate Kilwinning and Burns in his History, Bro. Lyon studiously refrained from 
quoting that minute which he so prominently exhibits NOW, as if it were quite a recent 
and important discovery in Burns' literature. 

There is another aspect Of this part of the subject which Grand Secretary appears 
to have quite overlooked when making the inapplicable taunt about the minute of ist 
March 1787 having been "kept out of sight," but which must be perfectly obvious to 
any one perusing these pages, to wit, that, if the minute of ist March 1787 had con- 
tained any account of the election and inauguration of Robert Burns, I had no need' 
whatever to write that letter of 7th February 1873, which consisted of several pages of 
duly verified statements and quotations from minutes, and argument well founded upon 
them, in evidence of such election and inauguration. Had these events been recorded 
when they occurred, I would only have needed to quote the one minute of ist March 
1787 a few lines; [the minutes were brief in those days.] Bro. Lyon was quite 
well aware of all that Yet, in his comparatively recent change of front, he ostentatiously 
produced to Grand Lodge, 2gth December 1892, a copy of said minute of ist March 
1787, as if that settled the question ! 

On same occasion [29th December 1892], Grand Secretary submitted to Grand 
Lodge " the printed copy of correspondence," asserting that it "clearly established" his 
contention. That little work concludes with a letter from himself, dated i8th August 
1891, containing a copy of the minute of ist March 1787, which he states, in said 

* Copy of that response will be found in Part II., page 61. 

t The minute of ist March 1787 need not be reproduced here, because it appears twice elsewhere 
in these papers to wit, firstly, in the " Extract from Grand Lodge Proceedings, 29th December 1892," 
Part II., pages I and 2; and, secondly, in its proper order and place, along with other minutes of the 
Burns period, in Part II., page 14. 



letter, "has been studiously kept out of sight" He continues the subject with the 
following assertion : 

" The concluding sentence of the foregoing minute proves beyond question that 
no such event as the inauguration of Burns as Poet Laureate of Canongate Kilwinning 
took place at the meeting of ist March 1787." 

Not so: such self-imposed task of attempting to prove a negative remains 
unaccomplished. 

I comment more fully upon the minute of ist March 1787 in Part II., pages 
7 and 8, where it appears in its proper place, along with its companion records of the 
years 1786-7-8. 

The editor of "the printed correspondence," in letter VI. at page 44 of that 
work, with reference to the minute-book containing the record of ist March 1787, makes 
the bold assertion : " // is well and continuously kept" 

In absolute proof of the very reverse of that assertion being true, I respectfully 
crave a careful perusal and scrutiny of the series of minutes comprised within the period 
June 1786 to December 1788. They are faithfully reproduced in Part II., pages 12 
to 19. At a glance those minutes afford clear evidence of my statement, and by refer- 
ence to Part II., pages 4 to n, wherein those minutes are carefully reviewed, it will be 
seen in detail that the minute-book referred to has been very carelessly and irregularly kept. 

Those Canongate Kilwinning records of the years 1786, 1787, and 1788 stand 
forth very observably in the old minute-book as a melancholy memorial of neglected 
duties on the part of the Lodge Secretary during the eventful period of the Scottish 
Bard's frequent sojourns in Edinburgh. And yet, Brother Mackenzie's correspondent in 
The Freemason had the boldness to assert that those minutes were "kept with care!" 
Indeed, more than that, he asserted that "the minutes of the Canongate Lodge, at 
the period in question, were kept by a practising solicitor," as if, per se, that were a 
guarantee for carefulness, and as if such announcement should awe us into acceptance 
of the minutes at his (the correspondent's) valuation ; also, that " they appear to have been 
kept with care and ample fulness of detail!!!" The correspondent had the temerity to 
continue his undue praising of the "practising solicitor" who acted as Canongate Kil- 
winning's Secretary in 1787, by saying in support of the extraordinary assertion in the 
words now quoted, " The very minute, assuming Burns a member of the Lodge, illustrates this 
fact, for it bears evidence of careful revision, being partially erased in at least two places" 

The real fact of the matter is, that the " careful revision " the erasement has 
evidently not been done by the same bungling hand that laboriously composed the 
minute in its primitive phraseology ; but by some clever, neat-handed, supervising brother 
who had been ashamed of the Secretary's work. More upon this point will be found in 
Part II., page 5, also page 6, continued into page 7. 

Apart from various other irregularities which may or may not be less faulty 
I need only mention at this stage of the evidence one instance, namely, that in the 
minute-book professedly containing Lodge records of the years 1787 and 1788, there are 
blank pages left for many minutes of meetings of the Lodge and of Committee that never have 
been recorded, and, by such extraordinary instances of neglect, there has been lost all 



knowledge of events which occurred in the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning during eleven 
months of perhaps the most eventful and most interesting period of her history. Notwith- 
standing all that, Grand Secretary now, following up such unmerited bepraising of the 
1787 Secretary of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning as has been quoted, produces copy of 
one of those precious minutes, dated ist March 1787 just as precious and more imperfect 
than the minute of ist February 1787 from such a grossly defective record-book, as a 
proof that the election and inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate DID NOT take 
place ! 

Quite on same grounds Grand Secretary might assert that Robert Burns DID NOT 
appear in the Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, No. 48, on i2th January, 1787, when Grand 
Master Charteris gave the toast, "Caledonia and Caledonia's Bard Robert Burns," 
because the Lodge Secretary omitted to engross a minute of that important meeting, and 
because even the minute entered of that date in the St. Andrew's Lodge minute-book on 
behalf of Grand Lodge [which is framed quite in the " stick to the form " manner com- 
mented on by Brother James Marshall in his "Winter with Robert Burns," page 67], 
contains no reference whatever to " Caledonia's Bard." There is proof of the event 
notwithstanding. 

Quite on same grounds Grand Secretary might assert that the Lodge St. David, 
Edinburgh, No. 36, DID NOT elect Gavin Wilson to the office of Poet Laureate of that 
Lodge, simply because the Secretary had not recorded such event, and there is no 
statement in any of the minutes of that Lodge during all its history showing that Gavin 
Wilson had been Poet Laureate. Yet there is absolute proof that Brother Gavin Wilson 
was Poet Laureate of the Lodge St. David, Edinburgh. 

Quite on same grounds Grand Secretary might assert that the Town Council of 
the Royal Burgh of Linlithgow DID NOT admit Burns as a Burgess and Guild Brother on 
i6th November, 1787, simply because the Town Clerk of that ancient Burgh omitted to 
record such important event in his minute of that date, and because Burns never mentioned 
the circumstance in any of his writings. Nevertheless, it was proved on 4th January, 1859, 
that the Poet had such honour conferred on him, and that he duly received his 
burgess ticket, which was produced on the latter date. 

Reverting to my comments on the " Extract from Grand Lodge Proceedings 2gth 
" December 1892," I quote the following passage from that document : 

" As will be seen in the printed copy of the correspondence between Brothers Allan 
" Mackenzie, the Historian of No. 2, and William Officer, now submitted, Grand Secretary 
" asserts that the statements made to him were unfounded, and that it is clearly estab- 
" lished that the story of the Installation of Burns as Poet Laureate is a myth." 

These are utterly gratuitous and unfounded assertions by Grand Secretary. 

In the course of this evidence I shall expose many of the very gross errors con- 
tained throughout the fifty-three pages of adverse criticism of the Burns' Laureateship, 
occurring in " the printed copy of the correspondence," which Grand Secretary appears 
to consider a supreme authority on this question. 

Brother Mackenzie's correspondent concludes all he had to say by the letter 
dated i5th October, 1889, in which he made the following extraordinary assertion 



8 

respecting one of the statements which had special reference to the testimony of Bro. 
William Petrie, contained in my letter to Brother D. Murray Lyon, dated yth February, 

1873- 

"Coming from such a source it was accepted without enquiry as correct, and 
11 misled our eminent historian?* 

I may here point out that the author of the History of the Lodge of Edinburgh 
[Mary's Chapel] does not appear to have discovered any occasionto change his belief 
in Robert Burns having been Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning from such 
belief as expressed in his History, until the correspondence regarding the Laureateship 
had been continued some time in the columns of The Freemason, that is, until any date 
from November 1888 to January 1889. 

That correspondence was begun shortly after the publication in 1888 of Brother 
Allan Mackenzie's History of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, which contained a 
reproduction of my letter on the Laureateship, dated ^th February, 1873. It was begun by 
a letter appearing in The Freemason, dated i4th November, 1888 [pages 9 to 21 of " the 
printed correspondence "], calling in question what had been stated in my said letter as it 
had appeared in Brother Mackenzie's history relative to Robert Burns having been Poet 
Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 

Ere long Brother D. Murray Lyon, Grand Secretary, contributed to the discussion, 
in The Freemason, a letter, dated February i2th, 1889 \yide page 36 of "the printed corres- 
pondence"], in which he professed to discredit the fact of Burns having been Poet Laureate, 
and asserted that he, Grand Secretary, " made a serious mistake " in accepting the 
statements made in my letter to him of 7th February, 1873. Grand Secretary concluded 
his letter by ominously saying, " I shall take the first opportunity in my power of cor- 
recting the statement I then too readily adopted." 

In proof of those statements of mine relative to his comparatively recent 
change of opinion, I quote portion of a letter from Brother D. Murray Lyon, Grand 
Secretary, which appeared in the Scotsman newspaper towards the close of the year 1886. 
The letter was dated i4th December, 1886, and was printed under the headline 
" Was the Ettrick Shepherd a Freemason?" Grand Secretary answered the question in 
a very erroneous manner. In the meantime I need only quote one part of his answer, 
which is so far correct ; I shall give an account of the remaining part further on : 

" Hogg did become a Freemason, and his association with the Lodge Canongate 
" Kilwinning is at once peculiar and interesting. In treating of Burns' connection with 
" a distinguished Lodge in my History of Freemasonry in Scotland (1873), I wrote 
" 'The Laureateship is again referred to in the minute of i6th January 1835, which 
" ' records the restoration in the person of James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd, of the 
" 'honorary office of Poet Laureate of the Lodge, which had been in abeyance since the 
" ' death of the immortal brother Robert Burns.' " 

From this it is perfectly obvious that towards the close of the year 1886 Grand 
Secretary had a thorough belief in the fact that Burns had been Poet Laureate of Lodge 

* Quoted from page 66 of " the printed correspondence." 



Canongate Kilwinning, and there is no reason to doubt that he had continued "stead- 
fast in the faith " from the time of our correspondence in 1873, until certainly the date 
of said letter from him of i4th December, 1886, and very probably until he resolved to 
contribute his letter, dated i2th February, 1889, to the correspondence of The Freemason 
in support of the adverse views regarding the Laureateship contended for by the Past 
Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh [Mary's Chapel]. 

The story about the Secretary of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning having " MISLED 
OUR EMINENT HISTORIAN" was published last year in two varieties at widely different 
times, and from two very different sources. 

The following reproductions exhibit a singular resemblance between them : 



As Narrated by THE AUTHOR of " PRE- 
FATORY NOTE " to " THE PRINTED 
COPY OF THE CORRESPONDENCE." 

June 1892. 

" About twenty years ago Brother David Murray 
Lyon, then a well-known and active masonic student, 
agreed to write a HISTORY OF THE LODGE OF EDIN- 
BURGH (MARY'S CHAPEL), No. T, which undertaking 
ultimately resulted in his admirable ' History of Free- 
masonry in Scotland. ' At that time the writer was 
Master of that Lodge, and rendered some help to Bro. 
Lyon in the production of his History, and, while 
examining the minute-books and other writings of the 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, found that the Office 
of Poet Laureate had no existence in the Lodge during 
the Poet's lifetime, nor until many years after his 
lamented death, and that the Lodge's minutes were 
absolutely silent on the subject. 

" Bro. Murray Lyon having considered the matter, 
formed the opinion that Burns never was elected to, 
and never held the office of, Poet Laureate of the 
Lodge, and never was installed into such an office. 
His views becoming known to its Office-bearers, 
by their instructions the Secretary of the Lodge 
questioned the soundness of his opinion, and laid a 
statement before him embodying alleged facts, which 
he unfortunately accepted as true, and in his History 
modified the opinion which he had originally formed. 
As will be seen in this correspondence, 

he now states that the statements submitted to him 
were unfounded, and that it is clearly established that 
Burns never was elected or held the office of Poet 
Laureate of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, and 
that his " installation " never took place." 



As Narrated by GRAND SECRETARY in 

the "EXTRACT FROM GRAND LODGE 

PROCEEDINGS." 

2gth December, 1892. 

"The story of the inauguration was never chal- 
lenged until 1873, when the 



present Grand Secretary, while preparing his ' History 
of Freemasonry in Scotland,' 



and after a minute examination of Canongate Kil- 
winning's records, 



formed the opinion that Burns never was elected to, 
and never held the Office of, Poet-Laureate of the 
Lodge, and never was installed into such an Office. 
His views having become known to its Office-bearers, 
by their instructions the Secretary of the Lodge 
questioned the soundness of his opinion, and laid a 
statement before him embodying alleged facts, which 
he unfortunately accepted as true, and in his History 
modified the opinion which he had originally formed. 
As will be seen in the printed copy of the correspon- 
dence between Brothers Allan Mackenzie, the historian 
of No. 2, and William Officer, now submitted, Grand 
Secretary asserts that the statements made to him 
were unfounded, and that it is clearly established that 



the story of the installation of 



[NOTE. The Editor of "the printed copy of the 
correspondence," which was submitted by Grand 
Secretary to Grand Committee, December 29th, 
1892, prepared his readers for error by the extra- 
ordinary heading to his title-page, to wit, 

" BURNS, 

" POET-LAUREATE OF CANONGATE KILWINNING, 
"A MYTH."] 



Burns, 



as Poet Laureate. 



is a myth. 



IV. 

FACTS WORTH KNOWING 

About the LETTER Written to BROTHER D. MURRAY LYON by the SECRETARY 
OF LODGE CANON GATE KILWINNING, 7th February 1873.* 



At the time that my correspondence with Brother David Murray Lyon was 
begun, I had not been half-a-year Secretary of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 

Nevertheless, I have every reason to be gratified by the fact that, within two 
weeks after receiving Bro. Lyon's brief reply to me, dated 24th Jany., 1873, containing the 
imperative injunction, "COMMUNICATE AT ONCE," I had so thoroughly mastered the 
subject as to write him, on 7th February 1873, that letter which was cordially approved 
of by the Lodge Committee, and has been approved of by every impartial reader since 
then, and which is allowed to contain so far as it goes [in the absence, through gross 
neglect by the Lodge Secretary of 1787, of any record of the inauguration of Robert 
Burns as Poet Laureate], a well-reasoned and conclusive chain of evidence in support of 
the time-honoured belief that such event took place on the ist March 1787. The 
opportunity of contributing more information by letter was denied me. 

New as the matter was to me in the year 1873, I was careful not to be hurried 
into making any assertions on the subject without having obtained most satisfac- 
tory evidence regarding them ; hence it is, that in the whole argument throughout my 
letter, in its main lines, and wherein I make distinct and emphatic statements, that letter 
stands to this day and will stand in all time coming irrefutable. 

That letter was well founded mainly upon various records of the Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning, also upon the earnest and assured personal statements 
made to me by prominent old members hereinafter named, who formed the Lodge 
Committee, concerning facts communicated to them by brethren who had shared in the 
Lodge events of 1787, and further [by recognition and approval of said committee], upon 
Brother James Marshall's narrative in " A Winter with Robert J3urns," the testimony 
contained in which valuable little work has not been in any degree affected by all the 
strong assertions and weak arguments advanced by Brother Mackenzie's disputant in 
The Freemason, and reproduced in " the printed copy of the correspondence " submitted 
by Grand Secretary, 2Qth December 1892. 

Long as that letter of mine is, any reader may easily observe that the subject of 
it was not exhausted. It will be seen that I offered to communicate further, but Bro. 
Lyon did not give me the opportunity. In his response, dated nth Feb., 1873 (vide 

* A copy of that letter will be found in Part II., page 57. 

t Copy of the Correspondence occurs in Part II., pages 55 to 6l. 



II 

Part II., page 61), he said he recognised " the satisfactory nature of the evidence " which 
I had submitted, and would "have pleasure in giving effect to it " in his forthcoming work ; 
and, in answer to a request of mine [made with a view to further correspondence] for a 
copy or proof of what he intended saying as to Burns and the Lodge Canongate Kil- 
winning, he wrote "The delay which has occurred on your part prevents my being able 
to submit a slip of my remarks, the printers being close up to that particular part of my 
MS." Of course that closed the correspondence. I had no wish to press my attentions 
upon Bro. Lyon with a word more on the subject. 

Had not Brother David Murray Lyon in that very effective way cut short our 
1873 correspondence, I would gladly have supplemented the testimony given in my 
letter with a few interesting items which I had in reserve for his information. 
Certainly, the very first reference I was prepared to give would have been to the 
engraving of Burns as it appeared then, and as it appears now on the east wall of the 
Lodge-room, having the date 2gth October 1798 upon it, with the prominent inscription 
on its old-fashioned glass mount, in large Roman characters : 

" ROBERT BURNS, THE SCOTTISH BARD, 

"POET LAUREAT, 

"LODGE No. 2, CANNONGATE 

1 ' KIL WINNING. " * 

In the year 1873 that manifestly antique engraving of our " Poet Laureat" was 
prized very highly by old members of the Lodge and by many interested new ones, 
although I, for one, was not then aware of the reference to it in the minute of 24th June 
1802, which I afterwards discovered, and which I quote in Part II., page 20, of this 
evidence. 

Although the matter is dealt with conclusively in that part of the evidence, it is 
well to mention in passing, that I took some trouble during 1873, in communicating with 
old members of that time, with the view to acquire all available information regarding 
the engraving above described, and the answer from each brother was, that the engraving 
had been exhibited in the Lodge room as long as he had been attending meetings of 
the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 

Among those brethren whom I refer to as old members in 1873 were Past Master 
Dr Sam. Somerville of Ampherlaw, Past Master W. N. Fraser of Tornaveen, Past Master 
Thomas Drybrough, Past Depute-Master David Crawford, also Bro. Thos. Elder 
MacRitchie, whose recollections of the Lodge reached back to the year 1818, and others 
referred to elsewhere in these papers. During their early experiences of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning, they had learnt from brethren whose membership in the Lodge, and whose 
recollections pertaining to it, extended to the latter years of last century, that that treasured 
engraving of Robert Burns as " Poet Laureat " of Canongate Kilwinning, had been in 
possession of the Lodge since those old days, and such fact is obviously proved by the 
verbal testimony communicated from brother to brother in the manner thus narrated, 
independently of the proof given in Pa.rt II., page 20. 

* Vide Frontispiece. 



V. 

"THE STATEMENTS" SUBSTANTIATED 

WHICH WERE CONTAINED 

IN LETTER written to BROTHER D. MURRAY LYON, 
By the SECRETARY of LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING, ;th February 1873 ;" 

AND WHICH 

GRAND SECRETARY NOW asserts are " unfounded." 



In the "Extract from Grand Lodge Proceedings, 2Qth December 1892" \vide 
page i of Part II.], the following assertions have been made with reference to the letter 
which, as Secretary to Canongate Kilwinning, I wrote to Brother David Murray Lyon, 
7th February 1873 : 

GRAND SECRETARY'S ASSERTIONS. 

" The story of the inauguration was never challenged until 1873, when the present 
Grand Secretary, while preparing his ' History of Freemasonry in Scotland,' and after a 
minute examination of Canongate Kilwinning's records, formed the opinion that Burns 
never was elected to, and never held the office of, Poet Laureate of the Lodge, and 
never was installed into such an office. His views having become known to its office- 
bearers, by their instructions the Secretary of the Lodge questioned the soundness of his 
opinion, and laid a statement before him embodying alleged facts which he unfortunately 
accepted as true, and in his History modified the opinion which he had originally 
formed. As will be seen in the printed copy of the correspondence between Brothers 
Allan Mackenzie, the historian of No. 2, and William Officer, now submitted, Grand 
Secretary asserts that the statements made to him were unfounded, and that it is clearly 
established that the story of the Installation of Burns as Poet Laureate is a myth." 

In illustration of the thorough accuracy of the statements made in my letter of 7th 
February 1873, and the erroneousness of Grand Secretary's tardy assertions against 
them, I will now indicate the chief statements contained in that letter, accompanied by 
references to the various productions in proof of same. 

"THE STATEMENTS." 
i. In re BROTHER CHARLES MORE. 

1769-1818. 

One of the principal statements in my letter is with reference to Brother Charles 
More of the Royal Bank. It will be found in page 59 of Part II., lines 13 to 26. 

Proofs of the truth of my statement can be seen in pages 12 to 35 of Part II., 
more particularly in pages 12 to 15, pages 22, 29, 31, 32, and 33, also in the Appendix, 
comprising the Chart of Office-bearers, and its Supplement showing Members of 
Committee. 

* For copy of that letter vide Part II. page 57 : Copy of Brother Lyon's reply to it occurs in 
Part II. page 61, showing that he recognised "the satisfactory nature of the evidence" which I had 
then submitted. 



13 

Brother Charles More was Depute Master of Canongate Kilwinning from June 
1784 till June 1787. He was constant in his attendance at meetings of the Lodge during 
the Burns' period, and he signed, as Depute Master, every one of the minutes of that time to 
which any signature has been appended, as is proved by the minutes at pages 12 to 15 
of Part II. ; he was constantly a member of the Lodge Committee from 1784 to 1817, as 
is proved by authenticated particulars contained in the Supplement to Chart in Appendix ; 
and he was closely associated with Brother William Campbell, Writer to the Signet, and 
other eminent men, while this century was young, as may be seen at pages 21, 22, and 
pages 25 to 29 of Part II. 

He was the same Brother Charles More who, while still a Member of Committee 
in the year 1815, seconded a resolution relative to a subscription of twenty guineas 
towards a mausoleum to the memory of " the lamented Bard ROBERT BURNS," because- 
ROBERT BURNS " HAD BEEN POET LAUREAT TO THE LODGE." 

Proof of the fact that Brother Charles More seconded such resolution will be seen 
in the minute of " Meeting of the General Committee of this Lodge," held upon the 
8th June 1815, which is quoted in pages 31 and 32 of Part II. 

Grand Secretary has not ventured to impugn directly the clear testimony of 
Brother Charles More which connects and binds indissolubly the Lodge events of 1815 
referring to the memory of Burns with those of 1787, when the brethren had Burns 
present with them. Nevertheless, Grand Secretary does impugn by implication all such 
testimony in making his bald, unfounded assertions against "the statements" in my 
letter of 7th February 1873. 

But, it is undeniable, that, unless Grand Secretary can prove that Brother 
Charles More whom the brethren delighted to honour throughout so very many years 
had ever uttered an untruth, or deceived any person, or conducted himself in any other 
manner dishonourably, unbecoming a gentleman and a mason, the testimony given by said 
Brother CHARLES MORE on 8th June 1815 above referred to MUST BE ACCEPTED AS TRUE." 

Brother Charles More's testimony is of considerable value to Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning, and Brother D. Murray Lyon evidently thought so too when he wrote me 
nth February 1873, acknowledging receipt of my letter, vide Part II., page 61. In that 
reply of his (which closed the correspondence), he thanked me for " the very full state- 
ment" I had made, but asserted that he would "not require to alters, single sentence of 
what" he "had previously written," and pointedly added, "the report to which you have 
twice alluded must certainly have been exaggerated." Nevertheless, on the publication 
of his History of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), No. i, I found that Brother 
D. Murray Lyon had embodied minor items of information verbatim et literatim within 
the text matter of his book which were supplied to him in my letter of 7th February 
1873, while he carefully relegated the special information contained in said letter relative 
to Brother Charles More's important testimony [which had evidently escaped Brother 
Lyon's notice when making his " minute examination of Canongate Kilwinning's records "], 
to a laconic footnote in page 334 of his history. 

Brother Charles More's testimony to Robert Burns having been Poet Laureate 
of the Lodge, as above indicated, is conclusive. 



14 

2. In re BROTHER WILLIAM CAMPBELL. 
1787-1801-1849. 

Another of the chief statements in my letter of 7th February 1873 is with reference 
to "Brother William Campbell, Writer to her Majesty's Signet that is, an Edinburgh 
solicitor" as is carefully but very inaccurately defined in page 47 of "the printed 
correspondence," by the Editor of that compilation. 

I need not recapitulate the statement here ; it will be found in the copy of my letter 
at page 60 of Part II., lines 4 to 22. Much of my evidence in support of it is given in 
Part II., page 21, pages 25 to 29, and pages 41 and 21, also in page 49. 

Brother Mackenzie's Correspondent of The Freemason, in his undated letter repro- 
duced at page 48 of "the printed correspondence," says, regarding Brother William 
Campbell : " We are told that he was a travelling companion of the Poet's in 1787, when 
he was in his eleventh year ! and that at Auchtertyre, in 1787, he 'spent two of the most 
happy days !' Is it credible that Burns associated himself with, and made a companion 
and friend of, a child, and took that child as a companion on the long journey, which, 
by the way, was made on horseback ? " 

" But Brother Campbell's statement is contradicted by all the biographers of Burns, 
who state that he made this journey in company with Dr Adair only; and Brother 
Mackenzie himself, in his History (page 115), says the same thing. In Dr Adair's own 
account of it, he states ' Burns and /left Edinburgh together in August 77^7.* We rode 
by Linlithgow and Carron to Stirling. We visited the ironworks at Carron, with which 
the Poet was forcibly struck,' and so on. Brother Campbell's name is never mentioned 
as having accompanied them, nor is his presence at Auchtertyre referred to. The 
statement that Brother Campbell ' spent two of the most happy days with him ' (Burns), 
shows an intimacy between the two which would have led to some notice having been 
taken of Campbell by the Poet and Dr Adair in their writings, had such existed ; and 
the expression is not such as would have been used by one who was but a child when 
the intercourse to which it refers occurred." 

The author of that quotation " concludes his extraordinary flight of imagination 
thus : " If, then, it be untrue that Brother Campbell travelled with the Poet, as the 
minute of the Lodge states, no reliance can be placed otherwise on his testimony." 

What transparent sophistry is that of Brother Allan Mackenzie's Correspondent of 

The Freemason, in view of the incontrovertible fact that Brother William Campbell never said 

HOW, or WHERE, or WHEN, he travelled with Burns I Brother Campbell never said that he 

TRAVELLED FROM EDINBURGH TO AUCHTERTYRE with Burns. He never spoke of any 

journey ON HORSEBACK with Burns ! ! 

In corroboration of my words, I refer to the minute of meeting held i2th November 
1845, page 42 of Part II., wherein it is reported that Brother William Campbell, in 
seconding the motion with reference to the Inauguration Picture, said of Robert Burns 
that he (Bro. Campbell) "had travelled in his company, and spent two of the most happy 
days with him at Auchtertyre Castle, the seat of Sir William Murray." That is all that is 
"recorded in the minutes of Canongate Kilwinning, or has been alleged by me, as to 
Brother William Campbell having travelled with Burns. 

* Such journey of Burns and Dr Adair was not undertaken till October 1787. 



15 

Hence we find that the airy argument, and the illusory data upon which it was 
professedly founded as quoted from page 48 of " the printed correspondence " have 
originated solely from the fertile fancy of Brother Mackenzie's correspondent. 

In the endeavour made by Brother Mackenzie's correspondent of The Freemason to 
minimise the obviously valuable testimony of Brother William Campbell, much capital 
is sought to be made out of the circumstance of him having been in the year 1787 a 
boy, or, as is said by the correspondent, "a child," of only eleven years of age. 
He is referred to three times in the above brief quotation as " a child," of course, in 
order to impress the reader with a due sense of the extreme juvenility of the boy William 
Campbell, who was one of the company at Auchtertyre during the visit of Robert Burns. 

There was about that time another mere boy, called WALTER SCOTT [who 
cannot be spoken of as a child, although he was then barely four years older than 
William Campbell]. He once met Robert Burns, and, after an interval of forty-three 
years, wrote thus of him : * 

"I was a lad of fifteen in 1786-7, when he came first to Edinburgh, but had sense 
and feeling enough to be much interested in his poetry, and would have given the world 
to know him ; but I had very little acquaintance with any literary people, and still less 
with the gentry of the west country the two sets that he most frequented. Mr Thomas 
Grierson was at that time a clerk of my father's. He knew Burns, and promised to ask 
him to his lodgings to dinner, but had no opportunity to keep his word, otherwise I 
might have seen more of this distinguished man. As it was, I saw him one day at the 
late venerable Professor Fergusson's, where there were several gentlemen of literary 
reputation, among whom I remember the celebrated Mr Dugald Stewart. Of course, 
we youngsters sat silent, looked, and listened. The only thing I remember which was 
remarkable in Burns' manner, was the effect produced upon him by a print of Bunbury's 
representing a soldier lying dead on the snow, his dog sitting in misery on the one side, 
on the other, his widow, with a child in her arms. These lines were written beneath : 

" ' Cold on Canadian hills, or Minden's plains, 
Perhaps that parent wept her soldier slain ; 
Bent o'er her babe, her eye dissolved in dew, 
The big drops mingling with the milk he drew, 
Gave the sad presage of his future years, 
The child of misery baptized in tears. ' 

" Burns seemed much affected by the print, or rather, the ideas which it suggested 
to his mind. He actually shed tears. He asked whose the lines were, and it chanced 
that nobody but myself remembered that they occur in a half- forgotten poem of Lang- 
horne's, called by the unpromising title of ' The Justice of the Peace.' I whispered my 
information to a friend present, who mentioned it to Burns, who rewarded me with a 
look and a word, which, though of mere civility, I then received, and still recollect, with 
very great pleasure." 

* What is now quoted was written for Lockhart's " Life of Sir Walter Scott." 



i6 

Part of the above extract appeared in " Life and Works of Robert Burns," by Mr 
Robert Chambers, second vol., page 57, along with additional matter: from the latter I 
quote as follows : 

" Sir Adam Ferguson favours me with some particulars of the visit of Burns to his 
father's house on this occasion. It was the custom of Dr Ferguson to have a conver- 
sazione at his house in the Sheens* once a week for his principal literary friends. Pro- 
fessor Stewart on this occasion offered to bring Burns, a proposal to which Dr Ferguson 
readily assented. The poet found himself amongst the most brilliant literary society 
which Edinburgh then afforded. Sir Adam thinks that Black, Hutton, and John Home 
were amongst those present. He had himself brought his young friend WALTER SCOTT, 
as yet unnoticed by his seniors. Burns seemed at first little inclined to mingle easily in 
the company ; he went about the room, looking at the pictures on the walls. The print 
described by Scott arrested his attention ; he read aloud the lines underneath, but 
before getting to the end of them his voice faltered and his big black eye filled with 
tears. A little after, he turned with much interest to the company, pointed to the 
picture, arid with some eagerness asked if any one could tell him who had written those 
affecting lines. The philosophers were silent ; no one knew : but after a decent interval, 
the pale lame boy near by said, in a negligent manner : ' They're written by one Lang- 
horne.' An explanation of the place where they occur followed, and Burns fixed a look 
of half serious interest on the youth, while he said : ' You'll be a man yet, sir.' Scott 
may be said to have derived literary ordination from Burns." 

' Somewhere about the very day on which the interview above referred to happened, 
Francis Jeffrey, then a lad of thirteen, was going up the High Street of Edinburgh, and 
staring diligently about him, was attracted by the appearance of a man whom he saw 
standing on the pavement. He was taking a good and attentive view of the object of his 
curiosity, when some one idling at a shop-door tapped him on the shoulder, and said, 
* Ay, laddie, ye may weel look at that man ! That's Robert Burns.'"f 

Reverting to the Auchtertyre episode, it is worthy of note that Brother Mackenzie's 
correspondent, in his vain efforts to make out Brother William Campbell to have been 
untruthful, says in his letter of 1 2th January 1889 copy of which is in "the printed 
copy of the correspondence," page 30 : 

" We are told that Brother William Campbell, ata meeting of the Lodge on the 
1 2th November 18454 stated that he had ' had many opportunities of giving testimony 
in favour of the particulars referred to, that he had travelled in company with Hums, and 
spent two of the most happy days with him at Auchtertyre Castle.'" 

" Whether Brother Campbell met Burns as here stated I have no means of knowing. 
Certainly, he did not travel with Burns to Auchtertyre, and Burns, in his letters written 
from that place and elsewhere, makes no mention of this Brother." 

Brother Mackenzie's correspondent, according to the latter paragraph, professes that 
he had " no means of knowing whether Brother Campbell met Burns :" he ought not to 
forget that the " means of knowing " were contained in the paragraph which he had just 

* Sciennes. t Ex. The Scottish Nation, Div. iii. p. 511. \ Vide Part II. pp. 42 and 60. 



quoted, containing words from the minute of i2th November 1845, setting forth that 
Brother William Campbell " had travelled in company with Burns, and spent two of the 
most happy days with him at Auchtertyre Castle." The correspondent asserts that 
Campbell "did not travel with Burns to Auchtertyre." Brother Campbell never said he 
travelled with Burns to Auchtertyre. He may have done so nevertheless, but not 
necessarily from Edinburgh; and, as to the assertion that "Burns in his letters written 
from that place, and elsewhere, makes no mention of this Brother " it goes for absolutely 
nothing, as is proved by the well-known fact that Robert Burns never mentioned in any 
of his letters, or other writings, the very memorable and noteworthy incident narrated in 
the quotations given at pages 15 and 16 ante, of his having met "the pale, lame BOY," 
WALTER SCOTT. 

Relative to the bright times of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning comprised within 
the years 1801, 1802, and 1803, when Brother William Campbell was a prominent 
office-bearer, it is well to mention a few of the distinguished brethren frequenting the 
Lodge who were his associates. Among them all he was welcomed and honoured 
proved by the fact that, on the first annual election, 24th June 1801, after he became a 
member he was elected Senior Warden, and, on 24th June 1802, he was further honoured 
by being again elected to that office. 

I shall here only refer to the following brethren as his associates at that period : * 

HENRY BROUGHAM, Advocate, admitted to the Scottish Bar in the year 1800 ; 

joined the Lodge a few months before William Campbell was initiated ; 

practised several years in Edinburgh; removed to London, 1807; in 

1808 became a barrister in London, and ultimately Lord High 

Chancellor. Lord Brougham was the second member of Canongate 

Kilwinning who attained such eminence. 
JAMES BROUGHAM, Writer, who had been initiated in 1797, a brother of 

Henry Brougham. 
DR ALEXANDER ADAM, Rector of the High School; author of Roman 

Antiquities," etc.; initiated 1771. 
DUGALD STEWART, Professor of Mathematics; initiated 1775, an intimate 

friend of Burns. 
HONOURABLE HENRY ERSKINE, Advocate; R.W.M., 1780, who introduced 

Robert Burns to the Lodge, and to the elite of Edinburgh Society. 
JAMES GREGORY, M.D., Professor of the Practice of Physic in the University 

of Edinburgh. 

JOHN LEYDEN, Poet and Orientalist. 
JOHN HORNER, junior, York Place; E.P.R., April 1802. 

AND 
LEONARD HORNER, F.R.S., son of Mr John Homer, an Edinburgh merchant, 

and brother to above-named John Horner, junior, was initiated in 

Canongate Kilwinning while Brother William Campbell was still Senior 

* For office-bearers and a few other brethren who were Brother Campbell's associates, vide Part II. 
pages 20 to 29. 



i8 

Warden. He was at this time an intimate and valued friend of Lord 
Brougham, as also of all the other brethren above named. 

In Cockburn's " Life of Lord Jeffrey " much is said about his friend Leonard 
Homer, who is therein referred to as " the most enlightened and active of our citizens." 

In evidence that Brother Leonard Homer's masonic sympathies were not confined 
solely to the Canongate Kilwinning, it will be deemed of interest to mention that the 
Lodge Kirknewton and Ratho, No. 85, have a very handsome Bible in use at the 
present time, bearing the following inscription : 

To the Lodge 

of 

KIRKNEWTON AND RATHO, 

As a testimony of the regard 

Of their loving Brother 

LEONARD HORNER, 
Elected an Honorary Member 

Of their Lodge, 
3oth September 1803. 

As illustrating Leonard Homer's other associations with the above mentioned 
brethren and other eminent men at this time, it is mentioned in Cockburn's " Life of 
Jeffrey," that in 1803 a club was started, called "The Friday Club," of literary and 
social men. " The idea was Walter Scott's," and consisted of Sir Walter Scott, DUGALD 
STEWART, Sidney Smith, Francis Jeffrey, HENRY BROUGHAM, Francis Horner, M.P. for 
St. Ives, and his brother LEONARD HORNER. 

In Laurie's "History of Freemasonry," page 193, it is recorded that, "At the 
Quarterly Communication on 4th February 1822, a letter was read from LEONARD 
HORNER, Esq., Secretary to the Edinburgh School of Arts, thanking the Grand Lodge 
for the very liberal manner in which they had granted the use of the Hall for the 
accommodation of that institution." 

The work entitled " Cockburn's Memorials " contains statements with regard to the 
School of Arts, and to LEONARD HORNER having originated or opened that institution 
in the year 1821, thus " If not the first, it was certainly the second establishment of the 
kind in Britain. The whole merit, both of its conception, and of its first three or four 
years' management, was due to Leonard Horner. His good sense, mildness, and purity 
made it a favourite with the reasonable of all parties and classes." 

" Leonard Horner was Fellow of the Royal Society, President of the Geological 
Society, London, and for some time Warden of the London University." 

Of his literary compositions, the work for which he has been most esteemed is 
entitled, " Memoirs and Correspondence of Francis Horner, M.P., edited by his brother 
Leonard Horner, Esq., F.R.S." 

One day, in course of a walk that Lord Cockburn had with Leonard Horner on 
the Pentland Hills, between the two the idea was projected of the Edinburgh Academy. 
Thereafter they enlisted Sir Walter Scott, Henry Mackenzie, and others into the scheme, 
and within a few days the sum of ^10,000 was subscribed for it. The Academy was 
opened on ist October 1824. 



19 

The School of Arts, in the year 1851, adopted the title of The Watt Institution 
and School of Arts, which ultimately developed into the Heriot-Watt College, situate in 
Chambers' Street. One of the pieces of statuary on the portico of that building is a 
memorial of George Heriot, the other commemorates LEONARD HORNER. 

I have named only a few of the very distinguished men who were associates of 
Brother WILLIAM CAMPBELL during the eventful and brilliant period of the Lodge's history 
included in the first three or four years of this century. His companion office-bearers, 
who were all worthy brethren likewise, are chronicled in pages 28 and 29 of Part II., 
and still more fully in Appendix. 

Brother William Campbell was second son of Sir James Campbell of Aberuchil,* 
Baronet, whom Robert Burns visited when on one of his Highland tours ; was born 
1776; admitted a Writer to His Majesty's Signet, 1800; became a full member of 
Canongate Kilwinning, April i, 1801; had made such progress in masonry, that the 
brethren elected him Senior Warden on 24th June same year; re-elected, 1802. 
Married (i), 5th January 1804, Eliza, daughter of William Hunter, Esq., of Glen- 
ormiston ; and (2), 25th October 1820, Jane, second daughter of Hugh Cleghorn, Esq., 
of Stravithie, Fifeshire. He had an honourable career in his profession of almost half a 
century. He died 28th April 1849. 

The foregoing paragraph will doubtless prove interesting and instructive. From 
it and the previous matter it is seen that Brother William Campbell occupied a prominent 
position amongst men of the highest honour and integrity, and was much esteemed by 
them; therefore, unless Grand Secretary can prove that this respected brother ever 
uttered an untruth, or ever misconducted himself, or behaved otherwise than as a 
gentleman and a mason, the testimony borne by Brother William Campbell, in 1845, 
to Robert Burns having been elected and inaugurated Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning, MUST BE ACCEPTED AS TRUE. 



3. In re BROTHER WILLIAM PETRIE. 
1787-1845. 

The statement made in my letter to Brother D. Murray Lyon in 1873, relative to 
Brother William Petrie, appears in copy of the letter, at page 60 of Part II. ; it is brief, 
and had better be quoted here : 

" I have had conversation on this matter" (the Laureateship) " with a distinguished 
member of the Canongate Kilwinning, who has been connected with it for more than 
five-and-thirty years, and who stands high in the craft " [this brother, as explained in a 
footnote, was Past Master Dr Samuel Somerville of Ampherlaw.] " He knew Brother 
William Petrie of our Lodge, who had been present at the inauguration of Burns as 
Poet Laureate, and has heard from his lips many very interesting reminiscences of the 
Poet, and of events which had occurred in the Lodge when there in company with him." 

Past Master Samuel Somerville of Ampherlaw, M.D., who, in 1873 and onwards, 



* Aberuchil, in Strathearn, Perthshire, is distant only a few miles west from Auchtertyre, where 
Burns stayed two days. 



20 

communicated such information on repeated occasions to me regarding Brother William 
Petrie, was a highly esteemed and influential member of the craft. Not only had he a 
long-continued and loyal association with Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, through several 
of the chief offices to that of Right Worshipful Master, but, for years he was First 
Principal of the Canongate Kilwinning Royal Arch Chapter, for years held prominent 
offices in the Supreme R. A. Chapter, and took much interest in the Temple Priory of the 
Lothians, of which he was a distinguished member, as well as of other masonic Orders. 
He began his masonic career, October 14, 1840, in the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, 
and very many brethren of this and other Lodges and Orders have to this day pleasant 
recollections of him. Past Master Somerville had been an intimate friend of Brother 
William Campbell, W.S., who had spent two days with Burns at Auchtertyre. Past 
Master Somerville was present at the Canongate Kilwinning Lodge meeting along with 
all the other chief office-bearers, on i2th November 1845, when Brother William Campbell 
seconded the motion for having the Inauguration Picture painted. 

It was this worthy Past Master Somerville who communicated to me, in the year 
1873, the information which I gave regarding William Petrie, in my letter of 7th February 
that year. No person at that time would have thought of doubting Dr Somerville's 
word. He is now dead ; and the bald, unsupported assertion, to the effect that the 
" statement " concerning Brother William Petrie is " unfounded," does not come at this 
late period with a very good grace. 

I distinctly and emphatically re-affirm the statement made in my letter, dated 7th 
February 1873, regarding brother William Petrie, which was acknowledged, along with 
the other matter communicated, in the following words of Brother D. Murray Lyon's letter 
to me, dated nth February 1873 : " I recognise the satisfactory nature of the evidence 
you have submitted, and shall have pleasure in giving effect to it in my forthcoming 
work." 

Why did Brother D. Murray Lyon not object to Past Master Somerville's testi- 
mony while that worthy brother was alive ? 

The testimony given on this subject by the late Past Master Samuel Somerville, 
which I reported to Brother D. Murray Lyon in 1873, and now re-affirm, was, in its 
main features, set forth very clearly by Brother James Marshall in his " Winter with 
Robert Burns." At page 91 of that valuable memorial of the Inauguration, we are 
informed that the compiler visited Brother William Petrie in November 1845, accom- 
panied by Brother Stewart Watson, the artist of the Inauguration Picture. Brother 
Watson remarked that "he" (Brother Petrie) " would remember Robert Burns? The 
name operated like electricity;" . . . "and he reiterated Rabbie Burns! mind 
Rabbie ! I'll no forget him, puir fallow ! Eh, but he was the life o' the Lodge." 

More details of this interesting interview will be found in Part II., page 50. 

Brother Mackenzie's correspondent of The Freemason made a great mistake in 
attempting to disparage, or in affecting to discredit, .the matter he found at page 121 of 
Brother Mackenzie's History of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, containing a special 
reference to Brother William Petrie, as it had appeared in my letter of 7th February 
1873. The correspondent would have done wisely had he left the matter alone, but, 



21 

in his letter dated i5th October 1889, as may be seen at page 65 of "the printed 
correspondence," he quotes the statement of Brother Samuel Somerville of Ampherlaw 
from my letter, and goes on to argue from it as follows : 

" This statement, if true, would be conclusive of the question, for it expressly 
states that Petrie witnessed the act of inauguration ! But, like every other statement 
made in support of this contention, it does not bear the test of investigation. The 
statement was originally made in 1873, in a letter to Brother David Murray Lyon, by 
Brother H. C. Peacock, who was then, and for several years subsequently, Secretary of 
the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, and custodian of its records. Coming from such a 
source, it was accepted without inquiry as correct, and MISLED OUR EMINENT HISTORIAN." 

" Brother Peacock appears to have made the statement without the slightest 
inquiry, for Brother William Petrie was not, as he stated, a member of the Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning in 1787. He is neither recorded as such in the books of the 
Lodge nor in the register of its members in Grand Lodge." 

At this point in the quotation from the letter of Brother Mackenzie's corres- 
pondent I must protest against such loose assertions. I never alleged that Brother 
William Petrie was a member of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning in 1787. The words 
of that portion of my letter can be seen at page 60 of Part II. I refer therein to 
" Brother William Petrie of our Lodge, who had been present at the Inauguration of 
" Burns as Poet Laureate." Brother William Petrie was most assuredly " of our Lodge" 
because, without taking into consideration Brother James Marshall's statement in 
1845, at P a e 9 1 of " A Winter with Burns," regarding "William Petrie, who was 
initiated during 1787, and had acted as serving brother and as tiler to this and other 
Lodges during the greater part of the intervening period," he had most certainly been 
11 of our Lodge" for the reason which I prove that William Petrie and Robert Stewart 
were tylers to Lodge Canongate Kilwinning from the year 1835 to 1845. The evidence 
of this is beyond all possibility of truthful contradiction. I refer to the chart of office- 
bearers in Appendix for abundant proof of it with details. Any one who desires further 
satisfaction will find it in the Lodge records. It is possible that Petrie may have been 
only a "visiting brother" when he attended the various meetings in 1786-87 at which 
Robert Burns was present ; but it is quite probable that he may have been even then a 
member of the Lodge I cannot say. Some quidnunc might tell me that James 
Marshall did not state distinctly that Petrie was "initiated during 1787" in the Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning. I have nothing to do with that. On this question it is clear 
that the historian of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), and the indefatigable 
Past Master of that Lodge, who claims to have helped him in the history, have signally 
failed to prove that this statement of mine relative to William Petrie is " unfounded." 

The bold assertion made by Brother Mackenzie's correspondent, to the effect that 
Brother William Petrie is neither recorded as a member of Canongate Kilwinning " in 
" the books of the Lodge nor in the register of its members in Grand Lodge," is 
worthy of no consideration. Everybody knows the laxity with which entries were 
made in the minute books of Lodges during last century. Most of us in Canongate 
Kilwinning know that fifteen of our Right Worshipful Masters do not appear at all in 



22 

the records as to when they were admitted members of the Lodge. Yet, there can be 
no doubt that they must have been duly E.P. and R., or duly affiliated from some other 
Lodge, otherwise they could never have been promoted to the chair of Canongate 
Kilwinning. What, then, may we not assume as the fact regarding Brother William 
Petrie, seeing we have only in the minute-books the bare record of him as Tyler during 
the years 1835 to 1845, while we have reliable independent testimony from two sources 
that he was present in the Lodge at meetings during the year 1787? Brother James 
Marshall, who was personally well acquainted with William Petrie in the year 1845, 
vouched for him as having been " initiated during 1787." I leave that evidence as I 
find it in the " Winter with Robert Burns," and, despite the correspondent's over- 
confident assertions to the contrary, claim Brother William Petrie as having been a 
member of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, simply from the fact just stated, that in the 
records he appears year by year, from 1835 to 1845, appointed one of the Tylers of 
Canongate Kilwinning. Evidence of his election as one of the Tylers on 24th June 
1835 will be seen at page 40 of Part II. Before me, while I write, are the accounts of 
the Lodge Treasurer for the period -igth July 1839 to i5th June 1840; and, under the 
heads of " Discharge, Branch IX," " Tyler's Salaries," I find the following items, 
proving, independently of the minutes, Petrie's connection with the Lodge: 

" 1839. 

" Dec. 27. Paid Wm. Petrie half-year's salary to Christmas . . .1100 

" 1840. 

" Jany. 31. Paid R. Stewart half-year's salary to do. . 440 

" June 12. Paid do half-year's do. to 24th inst. . . 440 

" ,, Paid Wm. Petrie do. do. to do. . i 10 o 

" Sum . n 8 c." 

As already stated, the earliest record in the minutes of William Petrie having 
been one of the Tylers of the Lodge is 24th June 1835, but there is every reason for 
believing that he must have been admitted a member of the Lodge long before that 
period in regular form, and was frequent at Canongate Kilwinning meetings. 

Nevertheless, William Petrie does not appear recorded as a member, which circum- 
stance leads me to conclude that Brother James Marshall may be quite correct in the 
statement occurring at page 91 of the "Winter with Robert Burns," to the effect that 
"he, after the remit in November 1845, visited William Petrie, who was initiated during 
"1787, and had acted as serving brother and tiler to this and other lodges during the 
"greater part of the intervening period." Although William Petrie does not appear on 
record as one of the entrants or affiliates of the year 1787, that is not surprising after 
what is learned in these papers of the lamentable neglect of Canongate Kilwinning 
records during the years 1786, 1787, and 1788. 

Incidentally, in looking over one of the Lodge accounts of the year 1835, 
the following interesting items : 

" 1835. Feb. 6. Paid Wm. Petrie to get a white neckcloth, .010 
Paid for pair of Shoes and Buckles for Tyler, . o 9 6." 



23 

This extract from the records shows that William Petrie was connected with the 
Lodge prior to the date when he was first recorded as being appointed Tyler. 

Doubtless, if I could devote the time and attention required to exhume more items 
such as these from old accounts, old letters, and other material among the archives of 
the Lodge, much valuable information could be derived on this matter, which no amount 
of careful scrutiny poring over the minute books, upon which our two controversialists 
affect to rely so much, would ever reveal. 

Past Master Sam. Somerville of Ampherlaw, M.D., who frequently in the year 
1873 informed me of William Petrie's reminiscences of Lodge events which occurred last 
century, and especially of his having been present on occasion of the Inauguration in 
1787, was very regular in attendance at meetings of Canongate Kilwinning for several 
years before Brother William Petrie died (1845), an d therefore had many special oppor- 
tunities of acquiring information from him about old times in the Lodge. 

At page 66 of " the printed correspondence," Brother Mackenzie's disputant goes 
on to say, with reference to Brother William Petrie in 1787, as follows : 

" He was then a mere youth in humble circumstances. He was a TAILOR by 
trade, and he never rose in it, in so far as I have been able to discover, above the rank of 
a journeyman or operative. His social circumstances were very different from those (sic) 
who formed the membership of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. They were all (?) 
men of high social and professional position, and most unlikely to identify their associa- 
tions and surroundings with a youth of Petrie's stamp." 

The above much exaggerated affirmation so very confidently made as to the 
"high social and professional position" of all the brethren of 1787, is not likely to be 
favourably appreciated by the brethren of " professional position" or even by any brethren 
who may perchance \\a.\e patrician sympathies in the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning of 
the present day. 

Such a style of composition as I have now quoted was very different from that of 
Robert Burns ! His style, when descanting on such a theme, was this : 

"The honest man, though e'er so poor, 
Is king o' men for a' that." 

Past Master Somerville, of Ampherlaw, Past Master Thomas Drybrough, 
and other old members of the Lodge, who had known William Petrie well, placed 
implicit reliance in his statements relative to Robert Burns and old times in the Canon- 
gate Kilwinning ; also, Brother Stewart Watson, who painted the inauguration picture, 
and Brother James Marshall, who wrote " A Winter with Robert Burns," had likewise 
implicit faith in the words of William Petrie, as uttered by him in course of their inter- 
view, described at page 20 ante, otherwise the narrative of that interview would not have 
appeared in the " Winter with Robert Burns." 

Therefore, until it can be proved that William Petrie was not a truthful or not an 
honest man, I claim that his statements, as reported by Brother James Marshall and 
Past Master Somerville, must be accepted as true in every particular. 

I have proved throughout these pages that the strictures indulged in by Brother 



24 

Mackenzie's correspondent regarding William Petrie are absolutely " unfounded," so far, 
at least, as the reference to his association with Canongate Kilwinning is concerned. 

In contrast to the correspondent's vain and unworthy attempt to undervalue Bro. 
William Petrie, and to disparage the obvious worth of his testimony merely because it 
so happened that he was "A TAILOR by trade, and he never rose in it, in so far as 
/ [Bro. Mackenzie's correspondent] have been able to discover above the rank of a 
journeyman or operative," the following quotation from a valuable address which was 
delivered in Lodge "Quatuor Coronati," 2076 E. C., 4th March 1892, by Brother Sir 
Benjamin Ward Richardson, M.D., etc., etc., on " The Masonic Genius of Robert 
Burns," deserves special notice : 

" Robert Burns was in the twenty-third year of his age, and living with his 
father at the farm of Lochlea, in the parish of Tarbolton, when, on the 4th July 1781, 
he was entered an apprentice in the Lodge St. David, Tarbolton." 

******** 

" The brother who had the honour of thus ushering into the light of masonry 
our illustrious brother was one Alexander Wood, a TAILOR, of Tarbolton, and, on the 
ist of October of the same year, Burns was passed and raised." * 

It may be safely averred that Robert Burns never was, and never aspired to be, 
one of the " men of high social and professional position," " most unlikely to identify 
their associations and surroundings with a youth of Petrie's stamp." 

Reverting to page 66 of " the printed correspondence," I continue the quotation 
thus : 

" Brother Murray Lyon has very kindly, at my request, been at pains to examine 
the registers of Grand Lodge from 1736, the date of the institution of Grand Lodge, for 
many years downwards, and he has failed to find that Petrie was a member of any 
Lodge within the Edinburgh district within the period of his search." 

That laborious task, said to have been performed by Brother Murray Lyon, seems 
to have been quite an extravagant work of supererogation, because Brother Mackenzie's 
correspondent asserts that Petrie's age is "ascertained as having been twenty-one in 
1787, the date of Burns' alleged inauguration." Why then should Brother Murray Lyon 
have " been at pains to examine the registers of Grand Lodge from 1736" thirty years 
before William Petrie was born ? 

The reference in "the printed correspondence," p. 67, to William Petrie's age, is 
as follows : 

" Petrie's age is thus ascertained as having been twenty-one in 1787, the date of 
Burns' alleged inauguration, at which he is said to have been present. Now, although 
so young a man, it was perfectly possible, but I think unlikely, that he was then a 
member of the craft. The History of the Lodge, however, sets forth that he was 'of 
our Lodge,' and ' had been present at the inauguration of Burns as Poet Laureate,' 
that is, that he was a member o/ the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning in 1787. This vital 
statement is shown by the Lodge's records, and other circumstances, to be incorrect." 

Those assertions are very obviously wrong, and the conclusions deduced from 

* This event is narrated also in the " Life and Works of Robert Burns," by Mr R. Chambers. 



25 

them are most unwise and irrational. In my letter of ;th February 1873, I said that 
William Petrie was " of our Lodge." I repeat the statement, and have proved it. 
I never said that he was a member of Canongate Kilwinning in 1787. He may have 
been a member notwithstanding. He did not need to be a member to have been present 
at the inauguration. 

Continuing the quotation from page 67 of " the printed correspondence," we are 
told : 

" If Brother Petrie was ever a member of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, of which 
there is no evidence (?)," " his intimate acquaintance with that Lodge, if it ever existed, 
had ceased for many years prior to his death (?)." 

At this point I suspend quoting further on purpose to contradict, as I do most 
emphatically, the unauthorised assertions by Brother Mackenzie's correspondent that there 
is no evidence of William Petrie having been a member of Canongate Kilwinning, and 
that if he had been, " his intimate acquaintance with that Lodge had ceased for many 
years prior to his death" 

I have proved that William Petrie was one of the Tylers of Canongate Kilwinning 
till 24th June 1845, within a few months of his death. 

I continue the quotation from previous paragraph, thus : " for he held the 
humble office of Outer Guard or Tyler of the Lodge of Edinburgh for the long period 
of eighteen years, from December 1827 until his death in December 1845; it being 
thus shown that the fundamental statement that Petrie was a member of the Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning when Burns visited it and was inaugurated as its Poet Laureate, is 
untrue, the whole story, in so far at least as Petrie is concerned, is discredited, and falls 
to the ground." (!) 

I have established all that is stated in my letter of 7th February 1873 relative 
to William Petrie having been a member " of our Lodge," and to his having been 
present at the inauguration of Burns as Poet Laureate. 



4. In re THE EXTREME BREVITY OF CANONGATE KILWINNING MINUTES PRIOR TO THE 
YEAR 1789. 

The statement made in my letter of 7th February 1873 regarding the extreme 
brevity of the Minutes during many years of last century will be found at page 60 of 
Part II., and need not be quoted here. 

The remarks in that part of my letter are well supported by the testimony of 
Brother D. Murray Lyon in his excellent History of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's 
Chapel) ; in page 333 he says : 

" Our statement regarding what appears in the Minutes " [of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning] "on the subject of the Laureateship is founded upon a personal examina- 
tion of the minute-book. But while deeming it proper to give the result of that 
examination, it is equally right that we should state that the commonly received report of 
the circumstances connected with the Inauguration has never been discredited. The Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning is not singular in the omission from its records of facts which 

e 



26 

have come to be regarded as interesting features in its history. Its minutes at and for 
many years prior to the period of Burns 's attendance at its communications are brief to a 
degree ; and this may account for the infrequency of their allusions to Burns, who was not 
then the distinguished poet he afterwards became. It was only after his death that 
Robert Burns and his works were esteemed at their proper value, and only after many 
years that his memory was regarded with anything like the veneration accorded to 
it now." 

Another masonic author, in the year 1880, who published an ably-written 
sketch of the chequered career of a well-known old lodge, while endeavouring "to 
recall a few facts relative to its early history," said as follows : 

" The materials for such a purpose are unfortunately scarce, and those which 
exist are brief. It t's, indeed, questionable if Masonic Lodges two centuries ago, and down 
to a comparatively recent date, kept any record of their proceedings IN THE SENSE OF THE 
MODERN MINUTE-BOOK, and it is clear that if they did, it was not with very scrupulous 
care, either as to their completeness or their preservation." 

This same grievance of defective minutes had been similarly dealt with three 
years previously in the second of two lectures * which I delivered in connection with 
the Festival held 2oth December 1877, commemorative of the bi-centenary of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning. I quote the following passages from that second lecture : 

"As we advance in the second century (1810 and onwards) of Canongate Kil- 
winning, there is observable over a very extended period, in the Minute-books, a marked 
improvement in recording the minutes; they are of greater length, more liberal in 
details, superior in penmanship and composition. Each Secretary in turn, for the time 
being, appears to have been thoroughly impressed with the fact that he was writing the 
history of the Lodge, and seems to have done his duty with rigid scrupulousness.''! . . . 
"They (the minutes) stand forth in singular and instructive contrast to the curious 
laconism of eighteen words (sometimes less) which occurs so frequently as the record of 
a meeting during the previous generation." 

In evidence of the absolute truth of what is affirmed in those three quotations, on 
the brevity of Lodge minutes prior " to a comparatively recent date" I quote the following 
instances verbatim from the minute books of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning . 

[29 words.] "EDINBR. 5 June 1777 

" The Lodge met this Evening agreeable to the above adjournment and was 
properly constituted After having gone thrd their usual business the Lodge was adjourned 

to the 24 Current. 

[What business ?] 

* One of these lectures, delivered shortly previous to the bi-centenary night, was on "The First 
Century of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning " ; the other was on " The Second Century of Lodge Canon- 
gate Kilwinning," delivered shortly after that occasion. Lectures were given by other members, one 
each monthly meeting. The session was extended a month earlier and a month later than the usual period 
of November to April. A musical evening began the course, and, so far as I can remember, a musical 
evening closed it. 

t Ex gr., Bro. Taylor's compositions in 1815. Vide Part II. pp. 30, 31, and 52. 



.27 

[i 9 words.] S T JOHN'S CHAPEL. 6 July 1780 

" The Lodge being duly constituted &>the usual business being done was adjourned 
to the first Wednesday of August" 

[16 words.] "6 Sept. 1780 

" The Lodge duly constituted 6- the usual business over they adjourned to their 
next monthly meeting." 

[16 words.] "4 6V/. 1780 

" The Lodge was constituted 6- the business ended as usual adjourned to their next 
monthly meeting." 

[17 words.] "6^/71782 

" The Lodge having met 6- the business being finished it was adjourned to the next 
monthly meeting." 

[i 8 words.] 6 Navem. 1 782 

"The Lodge having met 6- the usual business being finished it was adjourned to 
the next monthly meeting." 

[18 words.] "4>ecem. 1782 

" The Lodge having met 6* the usual business being finished it was adjourned to 
the next monthly meeting." 

[24 words.] " October 2nd, 1783 

" The Lodge having met and being duly constituted and having gone through the 
usual business it was adjourned to the first Thursday of November." 

[25 words.] "Nov. 5, 1783 

" The Lodge having met and being duly constituted and having gone through the 
usual business it was adjourned to the first Thursday of next month." 

[30 words.] "7 Oct. 1784 

" The Lodge having met Brother Darling was elected Grand Steward for the year 
ensuing 6" the other business of the Lodge being finished it was adjourned till Thursday 
nth November." CHAS. MORE, D.M." 

Those quotations may be deemed enough of one kind ; therefore I pass on. 

From the extraordinary similarity of the laconic minutes above quoted, it seems 
as if a printed form would have been specially useful in saving an indolent or incompetent 
secretary the seemingly great trouble of writing much more than the date heading ; but 
it shows that the secretary of those times was simply following the example of the high 
authority set forth in the pages of his own minute-books by the minute engrossed therein 
on behalf of Grand Lodge recording a visitation. The formula rigidly followed on such 
occasions is facetiously and truthfully described by Brother James Marshall at page 67 
of " A Winter with Robert Burns," [and is referred to by Brother Mackenzie's disputant 
of The Freemason in his undated letter at page 45 of "the printed correspondence"] 
thus : " It was the duty of the Grand Secretary and Grand Clerk of Grand Lodge to 



28 

accompany the Grand Master in Visitations of Lodges, and on those occasions ' to insert 
in the books of the Lodge visited a minute of the fact, and this they did as if they copied 
it from a style-book in a regular stick-to-the-form manner.' Hence, you may "witness our 
hand" for a series of years in every Edinburgh Lodge, whoever was Grand Master, or 
whoever were present, or whatsoever were the sayings or doings or occurrences of the 
night.'" 

The word business stands prominently in each of the brief minutes now quoted as an 
unmeaning term, as signifying anything or nothing, perhaps comprehending a great 
deal, but perhaps comprehending nothing. No doubt, several plausible interpretations 
may be put upon the word. Certainly, it is surprising that men of business habits, who 
had occasion to write the minutes of those times, could have so expressed themselves, or 
could have continued using the stereotyped phrase in which the word " business " 
predominates, and is so misapplied. Hence do I say that the phrase introduced by an 
indolent and incompetent secretary, as a conclusion to the minute of ist March 1787 
" No other business being before the meeting the Lodge adjourned " has no special 
signification; it is of no value whatever to Grand Secretary in his vain endeavour to prove 
a negative by claiming, as he does, such statement as evidence that the election and 
inauguration of Poet Laureate did not take place on that date. All the preceding matter 
of the minute is a brief report in the usual hackneyed phraseology of members 
initiated, passed, and raised " since last meeting." That was professedly all the business 
before the meeting. There was " no other business." In the estimation of the model [?] 
Lodge Secretary of that time,* the inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate was 
an event altogether outside the routine work or " business " of registering the names of 
new members (which, apparently, he considered was all the " business " needful to be 
recorded), and was no more needing to be mentioned in the minutes than any of the 
other notable, social, and convivial events which were continually occurring during that 
very lively period of the Lodge's history. 

Quite akin to this branch of the subject are the following extracts from other 
records of those times, and these afford further evidence of the singular laxity that 
existed in the mode of recording minutes of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning during the 
period now under notice. 

Extract from Minute [concluding Paragraph and Postscript^ 

" ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL, 5 Decem. 1781. 

****** 

" The Lodge was closed with the proper ceremonies & adjourned to the first 
Wednesday of January next. 

JAMES HAMILTON, M.,/. 
CHAS. MORE, S.W.,/./. 
ROBERT HOPE, J.W.,/. 

" Thereafter, before closing the Lodge, Brother Thos. Brodie, of the Lodge of St. 
Luke, was assumed a member of this Lodge." 

* The model [?] Lodge Secretary of 1787 was the "practising solicitor" who comes in for so 
much unfounded laudation at page 33 of "the printed correspondence." 



2 9 

The worthy brother who composed this postscript, which exhibits such a very 
amusing contradiction in terms, was quite a prototype of the Canongate Kilwinning 
Secretary who recorded the minute of ist March 1787, and, like him, would also have 
ignored the Inauguration of Robert Burns as not being " business." 

Copy of Minute \complete in 49 words,] 

" ST JOHN'S CHAPEL 21^ Augt. 1783 

"The Lodge having met and being duly constituted the following Gentlemen 
vizt. Jas. Fortescue Esq, Mr. R. Wilson, and Lieut. McKenzie were all entered 
app c ? s and paid their dues to the Treasurer." 

Here occurs a considerable blank space in the minute ; after which comes the 
final paragraph, as follows : 

" The usual business of the Lodge being done it was adjourned to the first 
Wednesday of October. 

"THOMAS HAY, M." 

What was the usual business ? 

In the original minute, the word " October " is written over the word " November." 



Extract from Minute {concluding Paragraph and Postscript^ 

"ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL 5 Feb. 1789 

******** 

" The Lodge was visited on this occasion by several brethren from the different 
Lodges in this City & particularly by Brother Symes, Master of the Mary's Chapel. 

,, r> AT a " WILL DUNBAR M. 

" ROBERT Mom Secry 

" HENRY JARDINE 

"N.B. At this meeting Brother Adair presented the Lodge with a new sword 
to be used at entering Brothers which was accepted with thanks." 

This is an exceedingly apt illustration of the positive indifference which existed 
during last century to matters being recorded in the minutes, which, now-a-days, would 
at once be included in the regular " business " of a Lodge meeting. 

Brother Adair himself, however, was quite wide-awake to the need of keeping 
the Secretary up to his work, and made it understood that his gift to the Lodge should 
have been recorded in due form as part of the evening's business hence the " N.B." 



5. In re THE TESTIMONY RECORDED IN THE WORK ENTITLED "A WINTER WITH 
ROBERT BURNS," REGARDING LODGE EVENTS OF 1786-7, "WAS WIDELY 
CIRCULATED, AND NEVER CONTRADICTED." 

The above heading is a very brief rsum& of one of the statements contained in 
my 1873 letter. The full text will be found in Part II., page 58, first and second para- 
graphs. I adduce the following facts in support of the statement: 

On 24th June 1802, the approval by Committee, and "the approbation of the 
Brethern," expressed with regard to the framed print which had been " got for the 
Lodge" of "ROBERT BURNS the SCOTTISH BARD, POET LAUREAT, LODGE No. 2 
CANNONGATE KILWINNING," were transactions not done in a corner. The membership 
at that special time was large and influential ; the meetings of the Lodge were frequent, 
and the attendance was usually very numerous, many visiting brethren from other 
Lodges here and in distant lands being among the company, as is testified by the 
records : therefore, that quaint-looking framed print was very well known among the 
Craft then, bearing the above-quoted inscription in large characters upon it. It has 
been prominently displayed in the Lodge-room for very nearly a century, and the truth 
of that inscription has never been called in question by any one of the very many 
thousands of members and visiting brethren who have seen it during that long period. 

In the year 1815 the lists for subscriptions to the mausoleum fund were . 
distributed throughout the brotherhood of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, because of 
"the Lamented Bard, ROBERT BURNS," having been "a member and POET LAUREAT OF 
THIS LODGE." Those subscription-lists were specially directed to be presented to 
"every member" of the Lodge, as the records testify. Such instruction was carried out, 
and every publicity was given to the object for which the subscriptions were being 
collected ; and the fact was thereby proclaimed far and wide that Robert Burns had 
been Poet Laureate to the Lodge, such " Subscription, in order to contribute towards 
the erection of that work [the mausoleum], being the only manner in which they [the 
brethren] can testify their respect for the Memory of a Public Character so immediately 
connected with them, and who, on so many occasions, contributed so generally to the 
harmony of the Masonic Order, and to that of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning in 
particular"* Assuredly, such testimony as to the Laureateship which was published 
with those subscription-lists " was widely circulated, and never contradicted? 

In the year 1835, when James Hogg was elected successor to Robert Burns in 
the Laureateship, and when, three years later, a committee of highly influential 
brethren of the Lodge was formed on purpose to glean materials for a history of the 
Canongate Kilwinning, not a word was uttered against the fact of Robert Burns having 
been Poet Laureate. 

In 1845, when a picture of the Inauguration of Robert Burns was proposed to be 
painted, "authenticated particulars" relating to the Inauguration were asked for on 
occasion of the Lodge meeting held i2th November. The whole question was 

* Extract from Minute, gth February 1815, Part II., page 30. 



3 1 

discussed at that meeting and at the following one, when the said authenticated 
particulars were produced. These particulars had been so satisfactory that the 
R.W. Master himself seconded the motion, and it was "unanimously carried," 
empowering Brother Stewart Watson to proceed with the painting. The result was 
the production of that magnificent and justly-celebrated picture of the Inauguration, 
which for the past thirty-one years has been on view in the Board-room of Grand 
Lodge. Throughout this period, no brother mason, and no one else, has ever recorded 
a doubt regarding the Inauguration. 

Grand Secretary, in his newly-conceived opinions regarding Robert Burns and 
the Laureateship, does not appear to have considered that if the election and 
inauguration of Robert Burns never took place, or if there had ever existed any 
doubt on the subject during the early years of this century, there were always on the 
alert a few brethren sufficiently fond of a little lively discussion to have caught hold of 
any such suggestion, and to have made themselves heard regarding it, but no one 
ever raised such a question. 

There is evidence in the minute books, and in letters possessed by the Lodge, 
proving that throughout the first and second decades of this century several events 
occurred which disturbed the usual harmony of Can. Kil. Especially was this the 
case during the period from 1807, when the secession differences of Canongate 
Kilwinning and sister Lodges in Edinburgh with Grand Lodge began, till these were 
smoothed down. As one instance during that period, I may mention that, on 24th June, 
1809, on a motion by Past Master ALEXANDER J AFFRAY, upwards of seventeen brethren 
were visited with masonic censure "until they make satisfactory apologies for their 
conduct," for having " on many occasions behaved in a disrespectful manner towards 
this Lodge." 

A few other curious and unwelcome events occurred during those times, as 
appears by the minute books, letters, and other records still extant. On 3rd April 1817 
one brother was "expelled the Lodge" for his "unmasonic conduct," and others 
suspended from masonic privileges for a time. 

Several of those occurrences took place while the lists were being circulated for 
subscriptions to the mausoleum fund, and while the money was being collected in the 
years 1815, 1816, and 1817, yet not an objection had ever been heard of, and not a 
word was ever recorded against the universally-accepted fact that Robert Burns had 
been Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 

I bring forward those unpleasant narrations merely as aids to illustrating one 
special fact, namely, that, during the early years of this century, when there were very 
many living witnesses of Lodge events which had occurred during the Burns period to refer 
to, had there been the slightest room for doubt of the Laureateship of Burns, it is very 
certain that some industrious, well-meaning member, and his seconder, would have 
discovered it to be their duty to put a motion on record for an enquiry into the question 
of the Laureateship. In such case, the matter would assuredly have been discussed and 
recorded ; but no such business has ever appeared on any of the minute books of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning. 



, . 32 

Past Master Alexander Jaffray, above mentioned, along with his intimate friends, 
Brothers Charles More, William Ballantyne, and Alexander L. Robertson, took very 
active part in promoting the subscription towards fund for erection of the mausoleum to 
the memory of Robert Burns in the years 1815 and 1816, because Robert Burns had 
been Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 

Those brethren, and their connecting links and associations with the present time, 
form a strong chain of interesting and conclusive evidence in favour of the main fact set 
.forth in " A Winter with Robert Burns," thus : 

Past Master ALEXANDER JAFFRAY, Advocate, 1795 to 1820,* was initiated while 
the Poet was yet alive, and on same night as Brother Robert Moir, W.S., 
was installed R.W.M. of Can. Kil. Said Brother Robert Moir had been 
initiated ist Feb. 1787, same evening the Poet was affiliated; the last trace 
of him in the records is in 1 806. 

Brother CHARLES MORE, of the Royal Bank, 1769 to 1818, was Depute Master 
when Robert Burns visited the Can. Kil. in 1786 and 1787. He took part 
in all the lodge events of that time ; appears to have attended every meeting; 
and was on Committee from then till 1817. Vide page 12, ante. 

Brother WILLIAM BALLANTYNE, W.S., 1799 to 1819, was re-elected Depute Master 
24th June 1802, when Brother William Campbell, W.S., was re-elected 
Senior Warden, and when the framed print of Robert Burns as " Poet 
Laureat of the Lodge " met with " the approbation of the Brethern." 

Brother WILLIAM CAMPBELL, Writer to the Signet, 1801 to 1849, son of Sir James 
Campbell, Baronet of Aberuchil, Perthshire, whom Burns visited. Brother 
William Campbell spent two of his " most happy days " with Robert Burns at 
Auchtertyre, the seat of Sir William Murray, Baronet, and, at Lodge 
meeting on i2th November 1845, Brother Campbell seconded motion for 
painting Inauguration picture. Vide page 14, ante. 

Past Master ALEXANDER LAMBE ROBERTSON, Writer to the Signet, 1814 to 1863, 
was R.W.M. from June 1819 to June 1830, and again from June 1860 to 
June 1862 ; he was elected a member of Committee 24th June 1835, when 
James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd, was elected Poet Laureate in succession 
to Robert Burns. Past Master Alex. L. Robertson was an intimate friend 
and associate of Past Master Alex. M'Neil, Past Master Sam. Somerville of 
Ampherlaw ; Past Master W. N. Fraser of Tornaveen ; Past Master Thomas 
Drybrough, and Brother Thomas Elder MacRitchie. 

Past Master ALEXANDER M'NEIL, Advocate [not recorded], 1824 to 1855. 

Past Master SAMUEL SOMERVILLE, of Ampherlaw, M.D., 1840 to 1876. He was 
present as Immediate Past Master, along with the R.W.M. and other office- 
bearers, at meeting of i2th November 1845, when Brother William Campbell 
seconded the motion approving of the Inauguration picture being painted. 

Brother WILLIAM PETRIE, 1787 to 1845. Vide page 19, ante. 

* The two years noted immediately after each name, indicate the brother's masonic career. 



33 

Brother THOMAS ELDER MACRITCHIE, of Craigton and Dunork, W.S., 1818 to 
1875, was on the Lodge Committee along with Past Masters Sam. Somer- 
ville, W. N. Fraser, and Thomas Drybrough, when, as Secretary to the 
Lodge, I wrote, with their approval, the letter dated yth February 1873, to 
Brother D. M. Lyon, the statements in which are now being substantiated. 
Brother STEWART WATSON, Portrait Painter, 1828 to 1870. Vide Part II., 

page 48. 
Past Master THOMAS DRYBROUGH, 1843 to th e present time. Vide Part II., 

page 54. 
Past Master WILLIAM N. FRASER, of Findrack and Tornaveen, 1849 to the 

present time. Vide Part II., page 53. 

The above series of names presents the question, as it were, in a nutshell. Each 
of the brethren has testified to the Laureateship and Inauguration of Robert Burns, and 
each was more or less constantly in touch with the others, according to the duration of 
his masonic life, as indicated by the years noted immediately after each name ; all which 
is proved by the notes and other references given. 

Therefore, having all these facts on record, it is safely affirmed that the testimony 
afforded in the work entitled, " A Winter with Robert Burns," and by the brethren who 
gave their evidence in 1845, WAS WIDELY CIRCULATED AND NEVER CONTRADICTED. 



6. In re " IT WOULD BE PALPABLY WRONG TO SUPPOSE," "THAT THE MEN OF ACKNOW- 
LEDGED WORTH AND STATUS IN SOCIETY," WHO, AT THE MEETINGS HELD QTH 

FEBRUARY AND STH JUNE 1815, TESTIFIED TO ROBERT BURNS HAVING BEEN 
" POET LAUREAT OF THIS LODGE," HAD BECOME FOR THOSE OCCASIONS " MOST 
UNSCRUPULOUS AND UNTRUTHFUL." 

The statement, of which the above is a brief rendering, appears at pages 58 and 
59 of Part II., as it was given in my letter of ?th February 1873. 

Part of the letter written by Brother Allan Mackenzie to The Freemason, on 4th 
March 1889,* specially merits reproduction now, by reason of his appropriate remarks 
on this branch of the subject, and because of the significant reply given to it, which 
reply also I shall now reproduce. 

Brother Mackenzie having quoted in his letter the paragraph from Lodge 
minute of i2th November 1845, containing the words used by Brother William 
Campbell, Writer to the Signet, when he (Brother Campbell) seconded the motion in 
favour of having a picture of the Inauguration painted goes on to say : 

" And this is a specimen of the testimony which is characterised as ' baseless 
assertions.' Besides, he [Bro. Mackenzie's controversialist in The Freemason] virtually 
asserts that all the correspondence which was carried on between men occupying the 
highest legal status in society at and before 1815, and all conferences and committee 

* Vide " the printed correspondence," pp. 40 and 41. 



34 

meetings of the Lodge downwards, were concocted or ' promoted ' to launch and keep 
afloat a piece of imposition on the entire Craft ; that even all the men of honour and 
integrity who were connected with the Lodge, at the time, and for many years after 
1815, 'purposely suppressed' all particulars of the "tragic scene" * 

"The list of subscribers to the fund in 1815 contains the names of some distin- 
guished lawyers, and I am confident that " . . . " unless good cause was shown, 
no member of this profession would be likely to contribute, and therefore they must have 
known or believed that Robert Burns was umquhile Poet Laureate of Canongate 
Kilwinning Lodge." 

The statement of similar import contained in my letter of 7th February 1873, and 
the above observations in Brother Mackenzie's letter of 4th March 1889, remained 
unnoticed by Brother D. Murray Lyon. 

It was reserved to Brother Mackenzie's correspondent of The freemason to 
reply, which he did as follows : f 

" Brother Mackenzie appeals to me to say whether I think that the brethren, 
members of the Lodge, who subscribed in 1815 towards the erection of the Burns' 
mausoleum, would have given such subscriptions unless in the belief that he was the 
Laureate of their Lodge. My answer is that I think they would have done so /" 

Such is this modern Freemason's estimate of the conscience possessed by each of 
his distinguished brother masons of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning in the year 
1815! Nevertheless, in a subsequent letter to The Freemason, the same writer found 
it convenient to refer to those worthy brethren in the following manner : " They were 
all men of high social and professional position. 1 " 

I have much pleasure in also contributing the following extracts from Brother 
Mackenzie's able letter, dated 6th July 1889, which appeared in the columns of The 
Freemason, as well deserving of careful consideration. J 

" I may be permitted to add just one very important fact, which, it must be 
admitted, confirms and supports the question at issue. It is, that out of about one hundred 
members whose names appear on the records as having frequented Canongate Kilwin- 
ning Lodge for years prior to, and at, Burns' affiliation, and also subsequent to the year 
1815, 'when it was resolved to open a public subscription by the INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS 
of the Lodge in aid of the general subscription by the friends and admirers of THE 

LAMENTED BARD, ROBERT BURNS [WHO HAD BEEN POET LAUREAT OF THIS LODGE], for 

the erection of a mausoleum to his memory ' (vide minute, 8th June i8i5), search may 
be made in vain for the record of any exception having been taken to this proceeding, 

* This ludicrous reference to Burns' Inauguration as a "tragic scene," occurs in the letter from 
Brother Mackenzie's correspondent of The Freemason, dated I2th January 1889, reproduced at page 28 
of "the printed correspondence." The word "tragic" signifies "relating to tragedy mournful 
sorrowful calamitous fatal;" but why the word is made to do duty in relation to the Inauguration 
scene is a mystery. 

t What follows is quoted from undated letter in " the printed correspondence," pp. 50 and 51. 

\ Copied from "the printed correspondence," pp. 62 and 63. 

Vide also Part II., p. 31, also p. 30, and pp. 32 to 38. 



35 

or of any discredit having been thrown on the Laureateship, and there is no con- 
temporaneous evidence of any sort or kind to be found against the proposal [i.e., to 
open a subscription by members of the Lodge] in recognition of the office. 
" Amongst the members referred to above, mention may be made of 

Lord Balcarres,* .... initiated 1775, died 1825 

Louis Cauvin, Burns' French teacher, | . 1778, 1825 

Alexander Nasmyth, painter of the only authen- 
tic portrait of Burns in existence, . . 1777, 1840 

Dugald Stewart, 1775, 1828 

Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, 1771, 1835 

Sir Hay Campbell, President of the Court of 

Session, . . 1758, 1823 

Dr Andrew Duncan, Founder of the Edinburgh 

Dispensary, 1774, 1828 

Sir Henry Jardine Advocate, R.W. Master, 1790, 1782, 1851 

Sir Charles Hope of Granton, President of the 

Court of Session, 1784, 1851 
and many others to whom circulars containing the above resolution were sent" 

Of the many others referred to by Brother Allan Mackenzie, I need only name 
the following : 

Charles More, of the Royal Bank, Member of 

Committee, 1783 to 1817, . . . initiated 1769, died 1818 

Francis, seventh Lord Napier,! . . 1775, 1823 

Bailie George Spankie, Merchant, Treasurer, 

1783101803, . 1778, 1820 

James Sandilands, ninth Lord Torphichen, 

R.W.M., 1787-8, 1782, 1815 

David Steuart, Earl of Buchan, . affiliated or 1783, 1829 

Honourable Henry Erskine (initiation not re- 
corded), R.W.M., 1780-81, . . 1817 

Honourable William Gordon of Kenmure, after- 
wards Earl of Kenmure, . . . affiliated 1786, 1840 

Honourable Fletcher, Baron Norton, || . . initiated 1787, 1820 

And, 

William Campbell, Writer to the Signet,! . 1801, 1849 

* Alexander, the sixth Earl of Balcarres. 

t Son of Louis Cauvin, teacher of French, initiated 1752, died 1778. 

J Lord Napier laid the foundation stone of Edinburgh University, 1 6th November 1789 ; vide 
Laurie's "History of Freemasonry," p. 141. 

The Hon. Henry Erskine introduced Burns to the Canongate Kilwinning Lodge 1786, and to the 
eliti of Edinburgh Society about the same time. 

|| Baron Norton, P. and R., 1st February 1787, same night Burns was affiliated. 

*|f William Campbell was second son of Sir George Campbell of Aberuchil, Baronet ; was Senior 
Warden, 1801-2-3. Advocated painting of the Inauguration Picture, I2th November 1845. 



36 
7. In re "THE LODGE WAS A STRONG ONE IN THOSE DAYS [1815], AND, HAD EITHER THE 

MATTER OF BURNS* POET LAUREATESHIP, OR OF HIS FORMAL ELECTION TO THE 

OFFICE OF POET LAUREATE so LONG AND WIDELY KNOWN BEEN UNTRUE, THE 

CONTRADICTION WOULD ASSUREDLY HAVE BEEN KNOWN ALSO." 

The above statement and relative matter will be found in copy of my letter at 
page 59 of Part II. 

In support of such statement, I need only refer to section 5 of this chapter. The 
facts and arguments therein given apply equally to this section. 



8. In re JAMES HOGG, THE ETTRICK SHEPHERD, SUCCESSOR TO ROBERT BURNS, 
POET LAUREATE, LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING. 

The complete statement on this part of the subject, which occurs in my letter, can 
be seen at page 59 of Part II., last paragraph. 

The minute of meeting of Committee of the Lodge, held i6th January 1835, 
quoted at page 38 of Part II., affords incontrovertible proof that my statement is true ; 
nevertheless, Grand Secretary, without any discrimination, commits himself to the 
sweeping assertion that " the statements " contained in my letter to him of 7th February 
1873 are " unfounded." 

In connection with this matter, I shall now quote a letter from Grand Secretary, 
dated i3th December 1886, as it appeared in the Scotsman newspaper, wherein he gives 
an extract from his history of Lodge No. i, published in 1873. Giving such extract in 
that letter, proves that down to a comparatively recent period the date of his letter 
he believed that what he wrote in 1873, and as far back as 1863, acknowledging Robert 
Burns to have been Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, was founded on 
absolute fact. 

The letter with its headline is as follows : 

" Was the Ettrick Shepherd a Freemason?" 

" FREEMASONS' HALL, EDINBURGH, 
"December 13, 1886. 

"SiR, A writer in a leading masonic journal has this week raised a curious 
question as to Hogg's connection with the craft. He says 'It has been generally 
understood that the celebrated Scottish poet, James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd, was a 
Freemason, in consequence of his having held the office of Poet Laureate of the Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning, No. 2.' And to prove that Hogg never joined the fraternity, 
the writer quotes a letter from the poet to a member of that lodge, in which, writing from 
Altrive Lake, under date January 25, 1835, he says 'I am sixty-five years of age this 
night. I am not a mason, and never have been, having uniformly resisted the entreaties 
of my most influential friends to become one. I am, however, intensely sensible of the 
high honour intended me, which, coming to my hand on the morning of my birthday, 
has, I feel, added a new charm to the old shepherd's life. My kindest respects to the 
hon. master and members of the lodge, and say that I cannot join them, nor be initiated 



37 

into the mysteries of the art, for I know I should infallibly . . . And alas ! my dear 
John (Forbes), I am long past the age of enjoying masonic revels. I shall, however, be 
most proud to become nominally the poet laureate of the lodge, to have my name 
enrolled as such, and shall endeavour to contribute some poetic trifle annually.' 

" Hogg did become a freemason, and his association with the Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning is at once peculiar and interesting. In treating of Burns' connection with 
this ancient and distinguished lodge in my ' History of Freemasonry in Scotland,' 1873. 
I wrote 'The Laureateship is again referred to in the minute of i6th January 1835, 
which records the restoration, in the person of James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd, of the 
honorary office of Poet Laureate of the Lodge, which had been in abeyance since the 
death of the immortal brother, Robert Burns.'" The minute shows that while yet 
beyond the pale of the mystic tie, Hogg had been elected to office in Canongate Kilwin- 
ning * an unprecedented proceeding on the part of a Lodge of Freemasons, and one 
that exposed its members to the highest masonic censure. Alarmed at their position,! 
the officers of the lodge renewed their efforts to induce Hogg to exchange a nominal 
for a real connection with the craft, and they succeeded, under a dispensation from the 
then Grand Master Lord Fincastle, afterwards Earl of Dunmore. A deputation from 
the Canongate Lodge proceeded to Innerleithen on the 7th of May 1835, and in a 
special communication, held in the Cleikum Inn at St Ronan's, initiated their poet 
laureate into the mysteries of the ' royal art.' The shepherd is reported to have enjoyed 
with zest the harmony that followed his initiation, and delighted the brethren by singing 
one of his own songs ' When the kye comes hame.' 

" It is unfortunate that, while in May 1836, enrolling some two hundred entrants 
in the books of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, the lodge should have omitted to return 
the name of Hogg. 

" The Lodge Canongate Kilwinning will in a few days hold the third jubilee of 
the consecration of St. John's Chapel. It might then very properly pay a tribute to the 
memory of the Ettrick Shepherd, by having his name recorded in the official register of 
the Scottish craft. 

" Hogg died in November 1835. I am, etc., etc., 

" D. MURRAY LYON, 

" Grand Secretary:' 

Grand Secretary is mistaken in the statements which follow the quotation from 
his History. There is no indication whatever of the officers of the Lodge having become 
" alarmed at their position." That is a mere unsupported assertion by Grand Secretary. 
There was no cause for alarm. When the motion was passed at the meeting of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning, on i6th January 1835, relative to the Poet Laureateship, 
"Brother John Forbes, } in consequence of his being personally acquainted with Mr 
Hogg, was instructed to communicate to him this resolution." Nobody dreamt of James 

* The minute in question contains no mention of Hogg having been elected to office Vide 

Part II., p. 38. 

t An extravagant assertion. 

\ Brother John Forbes, Writer, E.P. and R. August I2th, 1825, was elected Treasurer in 1831,. 
and was thereafter a member of committee till 1839. 



38 

Hogg being elected Poet Laureate unless he were to be previously admitted a member of 
the Lodge. Everybody knew that the idea of proposing James Hogg as Poet Laureate, 
carried with it as a sine qua non his admission to membership, to precede his election to 
such office. The office-bearers of Canongate Kilwinning were all able lawyers, most of 
them very old masons. The admission to membership of the R.W. Master Alexander 
M'Neil, Advocate, happens to be unrecorded ; but he is mentioned in the minute of ztfh 
June 1824 as having been then elected a member of committee ; therefore, he must have 
been an experienced member of the Craft at that early time : he had been five years 
R.W. Master of the Lodge no one should in such case look on him as a novice in 
masonic law or custom. Brother John Forbes, Writer, the intimate friend and adviser of 
James Hogg, had been initiated, passed, and raised in the Canongate Kilwinning as early 
as the year 1825. Brother John Leslie, S.W., and Brother John Abercromby, J.W., had 
both been admitted members in 1828, and Brother Francis G. Souter, Treasurer, joined 
the Lodge in 1826 every one of them experienced masons. Brother Charles Mac- 
dougall, Advocate, the Depute- Master, and Brother W. B. D. D. Turnbull, Advocate, 
the Substitute Master, appear to have been constant in their services ever since joining 
the Lodge. These are a few of the officers of the Lodge in 1835 ; all of them, with one 
exception, experienced men of law: they were of high social as well as professional standing; 
most of them were also old members of the Craft, and not one of them was likely to be 
caught napping over a small matter of masonic law and procedure with which any tyro 
in masonry is familiar. The reputation of those very worthy masons on such a point of 
masonic jurisprudence is not likely to be damaged by the strictures of any critic of the 
present day. 

Grand Secretary is quite wrong in asserting, as he does in his letter of i3th 
December 1886 now quoted, that "the officers of the lodge renewed their efforts to 
induce Hogg to exchange a nominal for a real connection with the craft." Hogg 
never could have had a " nominal " connection with the craft, therefore to " exchange " it 
" for a real connection " was not in his power. The correspondence proves what I say. 
The tenor of James Hogg's reply, dated 25th January 1835, to the letter from his valued 
friend John Forbes, dated the 1 6th of same month and year, clearly shows that Brother 
Forbes had invited him to join the craft in Lodge Canongate Kilwinning and that 
invitation had been the special point in the letter from Brother Forbes to his friend the 
Ettrick Shepherd the Laureateship had been secondary, or made dependent on the 
first point being conceded. The offer at the close of James Hoggs letter was very obviously 
his own, spontaneously made in ignorance of Masonic law, and from a desire to oblige 
his friend and correspondent, John Forbes. Grand Secretary is in error also, asserting 
that the deputation " initiated their poet laureate into the mysteries of the ' royal art ;'" 
they initiated James Hogg. 

There is no evidence whatever in the Canongate Kilwinning records of there 
having been [as Grand Secretary asserts] "any dispensation from the then Grand 
Master Lord Fincastle, afterwards Earl of Dunmore," granted to empower a deputation 
from the Canongate Kilwinning Lodge to proceed to Innerleithen on purpose to initiate 
James Hogg. Lord Fincastle was not " the then Grand Master," as is shown in page 41. 

The procedure which was observed on such very memorable occasion is well 



39 

expressed by Brother Allan Mackenzie in his "History of the Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning," thus : 

" It will be seen that the refusal of Mr James Hogg, at this date,* even to join 
the Order, arose chiefly from a resolution to withdraw himself from public society. Never- 
theless, what cannot be considered otherwise than a most graceful compliment to the 
Craft, Mr Hogg, after mature consideration of the value of freemasonry, about three 
months afterwards, declared his willingness to join, and subsequent to becoming a 
member, frequently expressed himself more than satisfied with the fraternity, and looked 
upon the circumstances attending his initiation as marked by complimentary exceptions 
in his favour. 

" As circumstances prevented Mr Hogg from attending a meeting of the Lodge 
in Edinburgh, a masonic excursion was determined on, to go to Peebleshire for the 
purpose of initiating him into the order; but previous to doing so, a warrant, or dispen- 
sation, to constitute a Lodge there was obtained, and it is minuted that 

" ' At a meeting of the Committee of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, held on 
the first day of May 1835. The which day it was moved and unanimously approved 
of: That in consideration of the eminent character and acknowledged worth of James 
Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd, he be admitted a member of this ancient Lodge, and for 
that purpose a deputation, headed by Bro. Jas. Deans as acting Master, assisted by 
Bros. Anthony Trail and Alex. Mackie, as his Wardens, and other Brethren, do proceed 
to Innerleithen, or any other convenient place there, to open and hold a meeting of the 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, and to initiate the said James Hogg, or other gentlemen 
present on that occasion : For doing whereof this shall be your Warrant. 

" ' Given under our hands and seal at St. John's Chapel, Edinburgh, this ist 
day of May 1835, and of Masonry, 5835. 

" ' (S d ) CHARLES MACDOUGAL, D. M. 
" ' W. B. D. D. TURNBULL, S. M. 
"'JOHN LESLIE, S. W. 
" < A. MACKIE, Secy: 

" The ceremony was accordingly fixed for 7th May 1835, and on the morning 
of that day two of the Brethren, Messrs Adam Wilson and William Pringle, drove to 
Mr Hogg's House at Altrive Lake, when they found him prepared to mount his steed 
for the occasion. After being hospitably welcomed to the Banks of Yarrow, the party 
started on a short fishing excursion. Having arrived at the Cleikum Inn, St Ronans, 
the expectant Brethren were all introduced to him, and the proper paraphernalia having 
been brought from the city, the Lodge was duly constituted, and the three degrees 
conferred upon the 'Shepherd'; after which the Brethren sat down to a sumptuous 
repast in the Cleikum Inn, kept by Meg Dods. After the usual masonic toasts, the 
R.W.M. proposed the health ' of the newly initiated Brother JAMES HOGG,' and in so doing 
alluded to the remarkable circumstance of Burns having been the Poet Laureate of the 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, and said, that as the 'Ettrick Shepherd was universally 

* 2$th January 1835. 



40 

looked upon as the successor of that immortal poet in his poetic fame, so the members 
had felt the greater anxiety to enrol the name of James Hogg, Poet Laureate of the 
Lodge:" 

Passing over Brother Hogg's reply, and other particulars of this famous event in 
Scottish masonry which is so graphically told in Brother Mackenzie's History I 
conclude the quotation therefrom as follows : 

"Many other toasts were drunk, among which was 'the health of Brother 
Professor Wilson, the friend and patron of the Yarrow bard.' 

" The Ettrick Shepherd sang some of his own sweet lays, such as ' When the 
Kye comes hame.' Next day three of the Brethren went home with Brother Hogg, with 
whom they dined, returning delighted with his hospitality, and agreeable family and 
fireside. 

" Under the above date (yth May, 1835) it is minuted that 

" ' IN VIRTUE OF THE ABOVE DISPENSATION, WE, the undersigned Brethren, did 
this day meet within the Cleikum Inn, at Innerleithen, and there held a Lodge, at which 
James Hogg of Altrive Lake, the Ettrick Shepherd, was regularly initiated as an Entered 
Apprentice, passed a Fellow-Craft, and raised to the sublime degree of a Master Mason. 

" ' Given under our hands and seal this 7th day of May, in the year of our 
Lord, 1835, and of Masonry, 5835. 

" ' (Sd) JAS. DEANS, M. 

" ' ANTH. TRAIL, S. W. 

" ' A. MACKIE, J. W. 
" * James Hogg. 

"'James Burnes, M.D., H.E.I.C.S. ; 

"'Adam Wilson, Dan. M. Davidson, R.A. ; 

'"John Donald, Wm. Jeffries Dowlin, And. Sievwright, 

" ' Pat. Sandeman, Wm. Pringle, 

" ' John Forbes, C. Neaves, 

" ' Rob. Boyd, A. Mackie, Secretary: " 

From these quotations it is clear that the deputation from Canongate Kil- 
winning did not have occasion to proceed to Innerleithen to initiate James Hogg, 
" under a dispensation from the then Grand Master," as Grand Secretary asserted, but, 
the deputation did proceed on such errand under a warrant or dispensation granted by 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning herself, dated ist May 1835, which is duly recorded in 
the minute book. The concluding line is very definite, thus "For doing whereof this 
shall be your Warrant:'' 

Again, it is chronicled in the minute book of that time, that, " In virtue of the above 
dispensation? certain brethren who had formed the deputation, duly recorded the fact that 
on the yth May 1835 they had met at the Cleikum Inn, and there held a Lodge, in 
which the three degrees had been conferred on James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd. The 
minute is signed by fifteen of the brethren, and by James Hogg. 

Not a word occurs anywhere in the minute book, of " a dispensation from the 
then Grand Master." 



41 

Grand Secretary made another unfounded statement in his extraordinary story 
about James Hogg: because "the then Grand Master" was not Lord Fincastle, but 
the Marquess of Douglas and Clydesdale. The latter had been re-elected Grand Master 
on ist December 1834. According to recognised authorities, the Right Hon. Alexander 
Edward, Viscount Fincastle, was not elected Grand Master till 3oth November 1835 * 
six months after James Hogg had been made a Freemason. 

Further details regarding the initiation of the " Shepherd" will be found instruc- 
tive and agreeable reading, at page 200 and onwards of the " History of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning." 

In relation to this matter, I should mention that Brother George Gumming, Writer 
to the Signet, not recorded, like very many more brethren but who was elected Junior 
Warden, 24th June 1835, in the course of one of his many letters to me regarding 
interesting events which occurred in Lodge Canongate Kilwinning during those old days, 
gave some valuable particulars relative to James Hogg ; among others, he mentioned the 
special invitation from the Ettrick Shepherd's friend, Brother John Forbes, requesting 
the Shepherd to become a member of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, and various circum- 
stances connected with such an auspicious occasion. The gist of Brother Cumming's 
remarks may be here aptly expressed in his own words, thus : " His [the Shepherd's] 
initiation was quite an event in Scottish masonry." 

Returning to Grand Secretary's letter, above quoted, of i3th December 1886, 
and, in view of all the circumstances now detailed, it would be of much interest to 
know his authority for asserting that " a dispensation from the then Grand Master" was 
ever granted to, or ever acted on, by the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning with respect to 
the admission of James Hogg as a member of the Lodge. 



9. In re "AUTHENTICATED PARTICULARS" RELATIVE TO THE ELECTION AND INAUGURA- 
TION OF ROBERT BURNS AS POET LAUREATE, WERE ASKED FOR AND SUPPLIED 
DURING NOVEMBER 1845. 

This statement, as given in my letter, will be found at page 60 of Part II., and 
the Lodge Minutes to which it refers are quoted at pages 41, 42, and 43 of Part II. 

No other proof of my statement being well-founded is necessary. 

The "authenticated particulars" produced at the Lodge Meeting held ipth 
November 1845 pursuant to the requisition expressed at the meeting held a week 
previously were so very satisfactory that the R. W. Master, Archibald David Campbell, 
seconded the motion made on that date in favour of having a picture painted of the 
Inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate, and it was " unanimously carried." 

The question may be asked Why were those " authenticated particulars " not 

* Vide'W. A. Laurie's " History of Freemasonry," pp. 216, 217; also, "The Constitution and 
Laws of Grand Lodge," edition MDCCCLXXXVI., p. 139. 

g 



42 

recorded in the minute book ? My answer is, that the authenticated particulars produced 
to the Lodge meeting on igth November 1845 were so copious, that the brethren would 
never expect their Secretary to engross them in the Lodge minute book. It is enough to 
know by the minute of that date that those particulars were approved, and that the 
motion was " unanimously carried." 

It is not by any means probable that the particulars all duly authenticated 
which are now produced will ever be recorded in the minute book of the Lodge. 



These are " the statements " of which my letter to Brother D. Murray Lyon, dated 
7th Feb. 1873, mainly consist They are the only statements that are essential to the 
question, and are herein proved beyond any doubt or cavil. 



VI. 

Brother D. MURRAY LYON'S FLUCTUATIONS OF OPINION 

WITH REFERENCE TO 

ROBERT BURNS 

HAVING BEEN POET LAUREATE OF LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING. 



Brother Mackenzie's correspondent of The Freemason, in his letter dated i5th 
October 1889 reproduced in "the printed correspondence" which was submitted to 
Grand Committee by Grand Secretary, 2gth December 1892, asserts that I " misled our 
eminent historian " by the statements relative to Brother William Petrie, as contained in 
my letter of 7th February 1873. 

Grand Secretary himself makes assertions of a similarly depreciative nature in 
the extract from Grand Lodge Proceedings, 2gth December 1892, vide Part II., page i ; 
as also in " the printed correspondence " therein referred to, regarding " the statement 
laid before him," and " the statements made to him," by me in that letter of yth February 
1873, "which (he asserts) he unfortunately accepted as true, and, in Ms History modified 
the opinion which he had originally formed? 

It would be matter of some interest to know who had " misled " [?] Brother D. 
Murray Lyon ten years previously to my writing him, when he announced to the world, 
in The Scottish Freemason's Magazine of ist December 1863, very distinctly and 
impressively, his belief in Robert Burns having been Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning. 

The passage I refer to occurs at page 206, year 1863, of that magazine, and it is 
a very edifying quotation in the light of events, because therein Brother D. Murray Lyon 
truthfully, pithily, and eloquently asserts 

"The Royal Arch of St. Abb, under whose warrant Scotia's Bard was exalted; 
Tarbolton St. David, within the walls of which he first beheld the light ; Kilmarnock 
Kilwinning St. John, with whom he was linked by the tie of Honorary Membership, and 
to whom were addressed the stanzas beginning 

" ' Ye sons of Old Killie, assembled by Willie ; ' 
AND THE CANONGATE KILWINNING, WHOSE POET LAUREATE HE WAS, may all feel justly 

proud of their connection with Robert Burns." 

In that quotation Brother D. Murray Lyon designates Robert Burns as Poet 



44 

Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. As a rule, historians do not make such 
unqualified statements without proper investigation, and without being satisfied as to 
their truth. I am disposed to believe that Brother D. Murray Lyon, before lending the 
character and weight of his name to such an assertion, and committing his thoughts to 
an article in a public magazine, must have thoroughly sifted all available information 
on the subject. I will not assume that he accepted of the information he obtained 
regarding it without a belief that he had proof of its authenticity. 

What trust, what reliance, can be placed on the other assertions of Brother 
D. Murray Lyon, if I am compelled to believe that the assertion in question was made 
without due investigation ? 

It might be curious, if not useful, to briefly state the various changes or fluctua- 
tions of opinion which have taken place in the worthy historian's mind before he has 
arrived at the conclusion which he now holds on this important subject. To any one 
who considers this matter with care, it must strike him as a remarkable circumstance, 
that the " eminent historian " has had frequent occasion to change his mind. In fact, 
his changes of mind have been so sudden and so often as to be perplexing to his 
readers. 

In order to be exact, and to show the fluctuations alluded to, it may be as 
well to narrate those changes in detail. 

FIRST. The Grand Secretary himself informs us, in the " Extract from Grand 
Lodge Proceedings, 2gth December 1892," that his original opinion was, "that Burns 
never was elected to, and never held the office of, Poet Laureate of the Lodge, and 
never was installed into such an office." 

SECOND. On ist December 1863, in The Scottish Freemason's Magazine, Brother 
D. Murray Lyon wrote to the following effect : " The Canongate Kilwinning, whose Poet 
Laureate he was, may feel justly proud of their connection with Robert Burns." 

THIRD. Brother D. Murray Lyon, by his letter to me, dated 24th January 1873, 
in a qualified manner threw doubts upon the question of Robert Burns having been 
Poet Laureate, and challenged me to produce evidence in support thereof. 

FOURTH. On 7th February 1873, as requested by Brother D. Murray Lyon, I 
furnished him with the evidence required as to the Election and Inauguration of Robert 
Burns as Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning; and on nth February 1873, 
he replied to me, making the following statement : " I recognise the satisfactory nature 
of the evidence you have submitted, and shall have pleasure in giving effect to it in 
my forthcoming work." 

In the work referred to the History of Lodge No. T Brother D. Murray Lyon 
acknowledges, at the very commencement of his notice of " Burns and the Laureateship 
of Canongate Kilwinning," * that 

" Mr Fergusson of Craigdarroch was Master of Canongate Kilwinning at the date 
of Burns's appointment to the Laureateship of that Lodge. The Inauguration of the Poet 
to this office ii> the subject of a painting well known to Scottish Freemasons, executed by a 
member of the Lodge, the late Bro. Stewart Watson ; it also forms the subject of a 

* A title quoted from the Index of the History of No. i. 



45 

small volume entitled, ' A Winter with Robert Burns,' * containing biographical sketches 
of the Brethren whose portraits appear in the painting." 

Brother D. Murray Lyon must admit that such language is entirely his own, and 
that he is not indebted to me for any part either of the text matter or of the footnote 
relating to it from my letter of 7th February 1873. In that letter of mine I did not 
mention the name of " Mr Fergusson of Craigdarroch." Copy of the letter can be 
seen in Part II., page 57. More than that, Brother Lyon, in his reply, dated nth 
February 1873, acknowledging receipt of that letter from me, warned me thus: "I 
would take the liberty of saying, that while I shall embody the facts you have put 
me in possession of, I will not require to ALTER a single sentence of what I had previously 
written" 

Therefore, one portion at least of that which he " had previously written " must 
consist of the opening sentences of the notice now referred to of "Burns and the 
Laureateship of Canongate Kilwinning," with which sentences my statements had 
no connection whatever. 

Further, as showing Grand Secretary's long-continued faith in Burns as Poet 
Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, I quote the following passage from a 
letter of his dated 13^ December 1886, to The Scotsman newspaper, f He therein refers 
to "the restoration, in the person of James Hogg, the 'Ettrick Shepherd,' of the 
' honorary office of Poet Laureate of the lodge, which had been in abeyance since the 
death of the immortal Brother, Robert Burns.' " 

FIFTH. The latest confession of faith on the subject by Brother D. Murray Lyon, 
so far as I am aware, is that contained in the " Extract from Grand Lodge Proceedings, 
29th December 1892," wherein we find that after all those changes of opinion, he has 
travelled back to " the opinion which he had originally formed" which he asserts is 
" that Burns never was elected to, and never held the office of, Poet Laureate of the 
Lodge, and never was installed into such an office." 

* "The author of this work, Bro. James Marshall, was a Solicitor in the Supreme Courts of Scot- 
land, but afterwards emigrated to Australia, and carried on the business of an attorney in the city of 
Melbourne, Victoria, where he died in 1870." 

t Quoted in full at pp. 36 and 37. 



VII. 

ERRORS , 

IN 

" THE PRINTED COPY OF THE CORRESPONDENCE " 

WHICH WAS SUBMITTED BY GRAND SECRETARY TO GRAND COMMITTEE, 
DECEMBER 1892, IN SUPPORT OF HIS CONTENTION. 



In previous chapters I have exposed a few of the errors, both of assertion and 
argument, that occur throughout the letters written by Brother Allan Mackenzie's two 
controversialists, as reproduced in "the printed copy of correspondence." 

The errors are very numerous. I have no intention to load this work with a 
refutation of them all that would be too big a task at this time but, in what now 
follows, I shall exhibit and controvert a few of the most prominent of them which have 
not yet been referred to. 



i. PROCEDURE ALLEGED TO BE NECESSARY IN " CREATING AN ADDITIONAL 

OFFICE-BEARER." 

As a specimen of the plausible but erroneous style of controversy typical of the 
letters written by one of Brother Mackenzie's disputants, I quote the following lines from 
page 43 of "the printed correspondence," letter No. VI., written to The Freemason by 
the Past Master of Lodge No. i, who described himself as such in the "Prefatory Note" 
to that collection of letters. 

" I have set forth well-established contemporary facts and circumstances, in my 
opinion clearly showing that the office (of Poet Laureate) had no existence till 
1835. . . . 

" The office could only have been created by a written resolution passed by the 
Lodge creating an additional office-bearer, which would have been an alteration on its 
laws and constitution requiring the approval of Grand Lodge ; and had such a change 
been made, it would have been recorded not only in the minutes of the Lodge No. a, 
but also in the minutes of Grand Lodge itself. The minute book in which that resolution 



47 

ought to have been found is in existence. It is well and continuously kept,* and contains 
no record either of the creation of the office, of the Poet's election to fill such an office, 
or of his inauguration into it, nor of Grand Lodge's approval of the step. The minute 
book of Grand Lodge is also ominously silent on the subject." 

Was any law on the subject, as defined so elaborately in above quotation, 
" created " so far back as the times when the offices of Poet Laureate and Substitute 
Master were " created"? 

Let it be specially noted that the important office of Substitute Master of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning was "created" 24th June 1788, solely by the very simple process 
of naming John Millar, Advocate, as Substitute Master, in his proper place, along with 
the other office-bearers elected on that date. 

How is it then with other offices that have been " created " on equally short 
notice in Lodge Canongate Kilwinning ? 

By reference to the Chart of Office-bearers in Appendix hereto annexed, it will 
be found that the following offices have been "created" on the respective dates 
indicated, and in no instance has the creation been accomplished by the tedious and 
unwonted procedure above described in the quotation : 

Poet Laureate, . . Robert Burns, the Scottish Bard, . . 1787, March i. 

Substitute Master, . John Millar, Advocate, 1788, June 24. 

Organist, .... Robert Purdie, 1800, June 24. 

Chaplain, .... Fras. M'Nab, 1808, June 24. 

Senior Deacon, . . Archibald Horn, 1816, June 24. 

Junior Deacon, . . Malcolm M'Neil, 1816, June 24. 

,8,9, June ,4- 

Convener or Chair- (John Wilson, Advocate, " Christopher) Q T 
man of Committee \ North," | 1^35, June 24. 



Architect and Super- 
intendent of Works, 



David Rhind, 1836, Jany. 27. 



Master of Ceremonies, Andw. Dunlop, W.S., 1836, June 24. 

In like manner, pipers were introduced in the year 1889, and have been regularly 
allotted a place in the list of office-bearers elected each year since then. No "written 
resolution passed by the Lodge, creating an additional office-bearer " on such occasion, 
was ever recorded in the Lodge minute-book, and it may be safely concluded that 
" the minute-book of Grand Lodge is also ominously silent on the subject." 

Quoting further from " the printed correspondence," it will be seen in letter XI. 
the last of the series that Brother D. Murray Lyon, Grand Secretary, in respect of the 
Laureateship of No. 2, asserts that : 

" Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd, was the first of its Poets- Laureate, and he was 
made so in 1835." 

By such a pointed, but unsupported assertion, Grand Secretary quite ignores all 
the plausible story set forth in letter VI. of same series, descriptive of the procedure which 

* An unfounded assertion ; vide pp. 6 and 7 ante; also Part II., pp. 4 to II, and pp. 12 to 19. 



48 

Brother Mackenzie's other controversialist asserts is necessary in creating a new office- 
bearer. Oddly enough, that other controversialist himself ignores it when asserting, as 
he does, that " the office of Poet Laureate had no existence till 1835." 

Specially worthy of note in this connection is the fact that the only record of 
James Hogg having been elected Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning 
occurs in the minute of meeting held 24th June 1835, and that entry occupies a single 
line in the list of office-bearers then elected,* thus : 

"James Hogg, the ' Ettrick Shepherd' Poet Laureate." 

There is no evidence whatever of any communication having been made to 
Grand Lodge, nor of any sanction by Grand Lodge having been given to Canongate 
Kilwinning for " creating " the office of Poet Laureate in the year 1835. Such long- 
drawn-out procedure, involving " a written resolution passed by the Lodge creating an 
additional office-bearer," etc., etc., if it ever had been observed, was then quite un- 
necessary, for the good reason that Grand Lodge, and Freemasons generally who knew 
anything at all of Canongate Kilwinning, were quite well aware that ROBERT BURNS, 
the Scottish Bard [and not " Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd], was the first of its Poets- 
Laureate." 



2. INCONSISTENCY OF BROTHER MACKENZIE'S CORRESPONDENTS OF The Freemason. 

The inconsistency exhibited by the Past Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh 
Mary's Chapel, No. i, and by Grand Secretary in their letters since the year 1888 on 
the subject of the Inauguration of Robert Burns has been briefly referred to in pages 
7 and 8 ante. I shall follow up that reference now. 

The Past Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh Mary's Chapel, No. i who claims 
to have " rendered some help to Brother Lyon in the production of his History " of that 
Lodge, is the first of the two correspondents who, shortly after the publication of the 
" History of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning," wrote to The Freemason, taking exception 
to the reference in that work to ^ Robert Burns having been Poet Laureate of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning. 

Grand Secretary is the other correspondent: he contributed two letters to the 
series, one dated i2th February 1889, and the other dated i8th August 1891. 

Robert Burns and the Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh. 

The Past Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh in his first letter to The Freemason 
at page 16 of "the printed correspondence" expresses himself as follows regarding 
the visit of Robert Burns to Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, No. 48 : 

"The Poet was proud of honours paid him, and took frequent notice of them. 
On his visit to the LODGE ST. ANDREW, EDINBURGH, shortly prior to the alleged 
inauguration, he writes that the toast was given of ' Caledonia and Caledonia's Bard, 

* Vide Part II., p. 40. 



49 

Robert Burns,' and proudly records his gratification at the compliment. In like manner 
he records his honorary affiliation a few months later by the Eyemouth Lodge ; but, 
singularly, neither he nor the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, nor any one else, make 
any contemporaneous record of the great and exceptionable (sic) honour said to have 
been conferred on him by a Lodge of foremost distinction, at a special gathering of 
upwards of sixty of the most distinguished Scotsmen of the age." 

The above reference to that famous meeting of the Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, 
which took place " shortly prior to the alleged inauguration," is appropriately supported 
by testimony contained in the "History of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel)." 
In that valuable work the talented author the second of Brother Mackenzie's correspon- 
dents gives interesting details of certain Grand Lodge visitations to Lodge No. i. At 
pages 331 and 332, he mentions a visit to No. i which occurred towards the close o^ 
1786, and follows that with a telling narrative of the "special gathering" which took 
place in the Lodge of St. Andrew on i2th January 1787, thus : 

" 1786 : December 12. Francis Charteris, younger of Amisfield (afterwards Lord 
Elcho), the Grand Master 36th in succession, was accompanied by Alexander Fergusson 
of Craigdarroch, Provincial Grand Master of the Southern District. This was one of a 
series of Grand Visitations that were being made at the time of Burns's visit to Edinburgh. 
Through his attendance at some of these, and other Masonic meetings, the Poet made 
the acquaintance of the Earls of Glencairn, Buchan, Balcarres, and Eglinton ; Lords 
Elcho, Napier, Torphichen, and Monboddo ; Sir William Forbes, Sir James Hunter 
Blair, Professor Dugald Stewart, Henry Erskine (the celebrated lawyer), Henry 
Mackenzie (' The Man of Feeling '), William Smellie (the printer of the second edition 
of Burns's Poems), William Creech, and other luminaries in that galaxy of Scottish 
Craftsmen, of which he for a time formed the centre of attraction.* Writing to his friend 
and patron John Ballantine, the brother to whom he inscribed the beautiful allegory of 
* The Twa Brigs,' Burns gives the following graphic account of his reception at one of 
these Communications, held in THE LODGE ST. ANDREW, ON THE I2TH OF JANUARY 
1787 : ' I went to a Mason Lodge yesternight, where the Most Worshipful Grand Master 
Charteris, and all the Grand Lodge of Scotland visited. The meeting was numerous 
and elegant; the different Lodges about town were present in all their pomp. The 
Grand Master, who presided with great solemnity and honour to himself, as a gentleman 
and a Mason, among other general toasts, gave ' Caledonia, and Caledonia's Bard, 
Brother Burns,' which rang through the whole assembly with multiplied honours and 
repeated acclamations. As I had no idea such a thing would happen, I was downright 
thunderstruck, and trembling in every nerve, made the best return in my power. Just 
as I had finished, some of the Grand Officers said, so loud that I could hear, with a most 
comforting accent, ' Very well, indeed ! ' which set me something to rights again.' Mr 
Charteris, during his Grand Mastership, succeeded to the title of Lord Elcho, his father 



* Canongate Kilwinning was the mother Lodge of all those distinguished brethren, except two, 
and those two were affiliated members. Alexander Fergusson of Craigdarroch was at this time also 
R. W. Master of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 

h 



having inherited the Earldom of Wernyss. He belonged to the Lodge Haddington St. 
John, and was also an affiliated member of Canongate Kilwinning." 

[Then follows the notice regarding " Burns and the Canongate Kilwinning," the 
first two sentences of which are quoted at pp. 44-45 ante, and the whole of it in Part II., 
page 63.] 

Those are very interesting narratives of the well-known visit of Brother Burns, 
" Caledonia's Bard," to the Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, No. 48, on the i2th January 
1787, but there is no record in the minute book for the year 1787 of Robert Burns having 
ever visited that Lodge. 

The minute book is before me while I write, and I remark that the Secretary of 
the Lodge has not recorded any minute of the proceedings on the i2th January 1787. 

The only memorial of events which took place in the Lodge on that date is the 
minute recorded on behalf of Grand Lodge, accurately reproduced as follows : 

"Edm r . 12 Jan ry . 1787. 

" This evening the Lodge being duly constituted by the Right Worshipful Master 
Thereafter the most Worshipful Francis Charteris Esq r . junior of Amisfield Grand Master 
Mason of Scotland The Right Worshipful Fletcher Norton Esq r . Depute Grand Master 
P.T. The Right Worshipful Thomas Hay Esq Substitute Grand Master James Home 
Esq r and Gillies Grand Wardens/./. William Mason Grand Sec y . & 

Robert Meikle G d Clerk preceded by the Lodge of Grand Stewards in their proper 
clothing were pleased to favor this Lodge with a visit when he was received with that 
respect due to the dignity of his high office & distinguished rank and having taken the 
chair delivered a suitable charge to the brethren which was received with the highest 
tokens of applause & approbation. The Lodge on this occasion was visited by Brethren 
from the following Lodges, viz'. Canongate & Leith, Leith & Canongate, S*. James, 
Ruglen Royal Arch, & S'. Stephens Edin r ., To all whom the proper compliments were 
paid and due returns made." 

WILL. MASON G. Sec y . FRANCIS CHARTERIS G.M.* 

Ro. MEIKLE G. Clk. FL R . NORTON D.G.M././f. 

THOMAS HAY S te . G.M. 

JAMES HOME S.G.W. /./. 

ADAM GILLIS J.G.W././." 

It may seem extraordinary that Lodge St. Andrew which has acquired much 
fame by the Bard's visit possesses no record of that highly appreciated episode in his 
life. But even the Grand Lodge officials present on such an extraordinary occasion 
did not consider the presence of Burns, or the toast given of " Caledonia and Caledonia's 
Bard, Robert Burns," as business needing to be put on record, and possibly the Secretary 



* Francis Charteris was affiliated to Lodge Canongate Kilwinning in 1779 seven years before he 
became M.W.G.M. ; and Canongate Kilwinning was the mother Lodge of Fletcher Norton, Thomas 
Hay, and James Home, whose signatures are appended to above minute. 



of No. 48 might think, that, with such an example before him, there was no necessity for 
him to be at any trouble making a record of the proceedings. 

Evidently the Grand Lodge minute of izth January 1787 has been held to 
include all that was needful to be recorded " No other business being before the 
meeting." * 

Be that as it may, there can be no doubt that the Secretary of Lodge St. Andrew, 
on i2th January 1787, like the Secretary of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, on the ist 
March of same year [when the Inauguration of Robert Burns took place], must have 
been very easy-going, even neglectful, of his duties, as we view those matters now-a-days. 
Each of the two Secretaries seems to have considered the whole affair, wherein Robert 
Burns appeared such a conspicuous figure on these respective occasions, simply as a 
social event in which no "business" of a customary kind had been transacted, and 
therefore that it had no need to be mentioned in the minute. 

There is no minute recorded by the Secretary of Lodge St. Andrew after the one 
dated 27th December 1786, till that of the monthly meeting held gth February 1787. 

In passing, and while on this subject setting forth the perfunctory style of work 
accomplished by some secretaries of last century, and especially about the time of Burns' 
visit, it may be shown by the following illustration that Lodge St. Andrew could almost 
match Lodge Canongate Kilwinning for brevity of minutes. 

[23 words.] " 1786, ED R - 20'* November. 

u The Lodge Ed r - St. Andrew Being legally met & constitute Mr John Cummin 
was entered an Apprentice Mason & paid his fees Accordingly. 

GEO. MONTGOMERY, Master. 

AND W - SMITH, S.W. 

JA S - SAGE, Jun r - J.W.P.T." 

Towards the close of Grand Secretary's letter to The Freemason, dated iSth August 
j8 9 i, last of the series of letters contained in "the printed correspondence" (p. 71), he 
pretentiously displays a copy of the Canongate Kilwinning minute, dated ist March 
1787, with the following introduction: 

" In all statements and discussions in support of the story of the inauguration, the 
minute of the meeting at which the event is alleged to have happened has been studiously 
kept out of sight. It had better be published, and here it is : [See Part II., page 14.]. 

As I happen to be one of the brethren who made certain statements f in support 
of the fact that Robert Burns had been elected and inaugurated Poet Laureate of 
Canongate Kilwinning, which statements are fully substantiated in pages 12 to 42 ante, 
I feel privileged without further noticing the ill-advised and unfounded taunt to ask 
Grand Secretary why he, as an eminent historian, should commit himself to the adverse 

* Vide Can. Kil. minute of ist March 1787, Part II., page 14. 

f My " statements " were made in a letter to Brother D. Murray Lyon, as long ago as 7th February 
1873, copy of which will be found at page 57 of Part II. 



52 

assertions which he now does relative to " Burns and the Canongate Kilwinning," after 
having published in his history of No. i such a very attractive story about Burns and the 
Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, as is quoted in page 49 ante, for which story there is no 
authority in the minute book of that Lodge 1 

The little work which Grand Secretary refers to as "the printed copy of the corres- 
pondence," and which contains the narrative about Burns and the Lodge St. Andrew, 
quoted at pp. 48-49 ante, was submitted by Grand Secretary to Grand Committee as 
substantiating his contention about Burns and the Canongate Kilwinning so lately as 
zgth December 1892,* which testifies that at that date, he continued to believe the said 
narrative as quoted from his History of Lodge No. i. 

A very few days previous to that meeting of Grand Committee, Grand Secretary 
wrote [i2th December 1892] to Brother George Crawford, Right Worshipful Master of 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, a letter from which I am permitted to make the following 
quotation : 

" ist March 1787 is the date given as that on which Burns was 'inaugurated ' as 
Poet Laureate of Can. Kil. The Minute of the Lodge of that date shews that no such 
inauguration took place. 

" Your Lodge does not require to perpetuate a myth in connection with its historical 
recollections." 

Will Grand Secretary show a valid reason for taking so much trouble vainly 
trying to sever the connection of " Burns and the Canongate Kilwinning " so far as 
the Poet-Laureateship is concerned while he is "ominously silent "| about the very 
obvious discrepancies in his eloquent narrative of Burns and the Lodge St. Andrew? 

The two cases are quite parallel, in respect that neither on the ist March 1787 r 
in the minute book of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, No. 2, nor on the i2th January 
1787, in the minute book of Lodge St. Andrew, No. 48, is there any mention of Robert 
Burns ! 

On the question of discrepancies in the very interesting narrative regarding Burns 
and the Lodge St. Andrew, it is well to point out that in his letter to John Ballantine, 
which is quoted both by the Historian and the Past-Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh, 
Robert Burns did not say that he visited the Lodge St. Andrew. He begins his 
reference to the event thus : " I went to a mason-lodge yesternight, where the most 
Worshipful Grand Master Chartres and all the Grand Lodge of Scotland visited." \ 

Further, it cannot fail to be observed, as an odd coincidence, that the date of 
Burns' letter is omitted by both correspondents from their versions of the narrative. The 
letter was dated i4th January 1787, which was a Sunday, and the statement made 
by Burns as to time and place was merely that he " went to a mason-lodge yesternight? 

* Part II., page I. 

f This is one of the happy expressions invented by Bro. Mackenzie's correspondent, the Past- 
Master of No. i, and is given in his undated letter, marked VI., in the "printed correspondence," 
page 44. 

J Quoted from the "Prose Works of Robert Burns." W. & R. Chambers, 1839. Letter 
XXXIII., page 17- 



53 

implying the night of Saturday, the i3th January 1787. The meeting in Lodge St. 
Andrew took place on Friday, i2th January 1787. 

By the i4th November 1888 when the first letter of "the printed correspond- 
ence" was written to The Freemason there had been time for the author of it to 
discover that some difference of opinion might exist regarding the precise date of this 
visit "to a mason lodge," because our poet's letter was dated the i4th January i787 r 
therefore the writer of that first letter, like a " wary controversialist,"* adroitly avoids 
naming any specific date, and refers to the presence of Burns on such occasion thus : 
" On his visit to the Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, shortly prior to the alleged 
inauguration, he [Burns] writes that the toast was given, ' Caledonia and Caledonia's 
Bard, Robert Burns,' and proudly records his gratification at the compliment." 

Those observations are not made in any captious spirit; they are not made 
with any idea of casting any discredit on the universal belief in the narrative of 
proceedings which it is understood^ took place in Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, on 
1 2th January 1787, although the Secretary has omitted to record them, and even Grand 
Lodge minute of that date contains no reference to "Caledonia's Bard." No one r 
so far as known, has ever expressed any doubt whatever of the events having taken place 
as narrated. 

Such discrepancies or defects as I have noted in the attractive narrative of Burns 
and the Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, demonstrate that Grand Secretary and the Past 
Master of Lodge No. i have written on that subject in a much more liberal and friendly 
spirit than is characteristic of their references to the Inauguration of Robert Burns in the 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning on the ist March 1787, while the two instances so far as 
the main fact of each is concerned are precisely similar. 

Gavin Wilson and the Lodge St. David, Edinburgh. 

The extraordinary inconsistency exhibited by Grand Secretary and Brother 
Mackenzie's other correspondent of The Freemason, in their treatment of the well- 
known narratives, respectively, of Burns in Lodge St. Andrew, on i2th January 1787, 
and the Inauguration of Burns in Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, on ist March 1787, 
becomes more conspicuous according as the minute books of other Lodges are examined, 
and as attention is given to the careless manner in which, during last century, certain 

* The author of that phrase is the Past Master of Lodge No. I Brother Mackenzie's corre- 
spondent who used it very erroneously in his undated letter to The Freemason, marked VI. in " the 
printed correspondence," page 47, as follows : " I cannot help expressing the fear that he (Bro. 
Mackenzie) is not so wary a controversialist as the author of ' A Winter with Robert Burns,' for Brother 
Mackenzie gives particulars which enables one to check the accuracy of the statements in the minute 
which Brother Marshall more adroitly suppresses. " 

t The inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning was 
understood to have taken place on ist March 1787, as stated in my letter, dated 7th February 1873, se t 
forth in Part II., page 59, line 24, and erroneously commented on by the Past Master of No. I in his 
letter to The Freemason, dated I2th January 1889, reproduced in " the printed correspondence," 
page 29. 



54 

Lodge matters were recorded, while others were left unrecorded, precisely as is 
observable throughout the eighteenth-century minutes of the two Lodges above named. 

In this connection, my attention was drawn some time ago to a very interesting 
article which appeared in Part III., Vol. V., of the Transactions of the " Ars Quatuor 
Coronatorum." It is headed "Gavin Wilson, a forgotten Masonic Worthy," and is 
quoted from The Gentleman 's Magazine, of iyth April 1793. The article is valuable as 
affording another parallel to the Canongate Kilwinning minute of ist March 1787, by 
its references to the Lodge St. David, Edinburgh, No. 36, of which Lodge the said 
Brother Gavin Wilson was a highly-valued member. 

I shall merely quote the following sentences regarding Brother Wilson from the 
article as it appears in page 156 of the work above-mentioned : 

" He was a regular attendant at the Lodges of the Freemasons, and a warm 
friend of the fraternity. By his propensity for versifying and composing songs and 
short stories in rhyme, he contributed much to the social mirth and enjoyment of their 
meetings, and to the good humour and amusement of all companies where he came. 
He frequently sang and recited his own productions in the Lodge meetings from this 
circumstance he was elected Poet Laureate to the Lodge of St. David, at Edinburgh, of 
which he was a member.* After receiving this distinguished mark of honour, in the 
year 1788 he published a collection of his poetical performances under the title of 
' A Collection of Masonic Songs and entertaining Anecdotes for the use of all the 
Lodges. By Gavin Wilson, Poet Laureat to the Lodge of St. David, Edinburgh.' 
To this publication is prefixed a portrait of the author decorated with Masonic insignia. 
By people who were acquainted with him, I have been told that it is a very good 
likeness. It is drawn and etched by a very ingenious artist, Mr John Kay, engraver 
and portrait painter in Edinburgh." f 

Brother Gavin Wilson's book of Songs was advertised as being " In the Press " 
in the year 1787, and published shortly afterwards. His portrait by Kay, facing the 
title-page, is dated 1787, and that appears to be something more than a mere 
coincidence it suggests the very obvious conclusion that, as Gavin Wilson "was a 
regular attendant at the Lodges of the Freemasons, and a warm friend of the fraternity," 
he met Robert Burns during his frequent visits to the Canongate Kilwinning, and knew 
of Burns as her Poet Laureate. 

A copy of Gavin Wilson's " Collection of Masonic Songs " is in the Advocates' 
Library, Edinburgh, and it contains many pieces of interest. One is of special value to 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, being a dirge composed by Brother Gavin Wilson to the 
memory of Past Master George Drummond, which was sung at " a Funeral meeting " 
of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, held in the Lodge-room, 7th January 1767, "in 
honour of the memory of George Drummond, Esq., once Grand Master for Scotland, 
and late Master of this Lodge." An interesting report of this funeral meeting is given 
in the Canongate Kilwinning minute of 7th January 1767, portion of which is quoted 
at page 92 of the history of that Lodge. 

* No mention of such election occurs in the minutes of Lodge St. David. 

t Below the likeness, on left side, is engraved, " K. Fee'." ; on the right, " 1787." 



55 



No. X. (written in the year 1771) of Brother Gavin Wilson's "Collection of 
Masonic Songs," contains a laudatory reference to "the organ," and to the inspiriting 
effect of music as given forth from that effective instrument. The organ* in Canongate 
Kilwinning has for nearly a century and a half been a special attraction in the Lodge, 
and evidently was so to Brother Gavin Wilson, who found that it could "discourse most 
eloquent music." 

From these and other circumstances above mentioned it is evident that the Poet 
Laureate of Lodge St. David, No. 36, was a frequent visitor at meetings of the 
Canongate Kilwinning. 

In connection with these references to Bro. Gavin Wilson and his having been 
Poet Laureate of Lodge St. David, Edinburgh, I beg to subjoin the result of an 
examination of the minute books of that Lodge, made in order to glean such information 
regarding him as those records afford. The first allusion to him is in the year 1766, as 
follows : 

"21 October 1766. Monthly Meeting. 

" The Lodge being convened and properly formed B r - Peter Smith in name of 
" B r Gavin Wilson of St. Paul's Glasgow presented this Lodge with two handsome 
" large Leather mugs, of his own workmanship for which the Brethern unanimously 
" expressed their thanks by drinking his health, and also assumed him as a member 
" of this Lodge." (No signature.} 

The minutes of the annual election of office-bearers on St. John the Evangelist's 
days in 1767, 1768, and 1769 record that he was elected on each occasion one of the 
Stewards of the Lodge. The next reference is : 

"Monthly Meeting. 16 October 1770. 

. . . . " The Brethren were entertained with vocal music from B rs - Esplin, 
" Pillam, Downie & c - and the new song of St. David by Particular desire from 
" Brother Gavin Wilson. After the visitors were gone the Lodge unanimously made 
" choice of B r Gavin Wilson to be their General Stewart for the ensuing year." 

" (Signed) ANDREW BALFOUR, M r> " 

Brother Gavin Wilson was re-elected one of the Lodge Stewards on 27th 
December 1770; "cont d- Grand Stewart for the ensuing year," on i5th October 1771; 
re-elected one of the Lodge Stewards on St. John's Day in December 1771; and, 
finally, at an " Emergency" meeting on gth October 1772, it is recorded that he acted 
as Junior Warden pro. tern. With these exceptions, Gavin Wilson's name does not 
appear in the minutes of St. David's Lodge, and it is certainly a noteworthy circum- 
stance that his Laureateship was published to the world a few months after the date 
that Burns had been elected to a similar office in Canongate Kilwinning. 

* The organ, built by Sneitzler, of London, still in first-rate condition, was placed in the Lodge- 
room, in 1757, within a niche prepared for it opposite the R.W. Master's chair, by Brother James Fergus, 
Architect of the Royal Exchange, etc. By the time Robert Burns visited Can. Kil., the organ had been 
placed within the more convenient recess shown in the Inauguration picture, where it now is. 



56 

Proof of this is found in the following advertisement, which appeared in the 
Edinburgh Evening Courant newspaper of Saturday, isth December 1787 : 

" In the Press, and speedily will be Published. 

" DEDICATED BY PERMISSION 
" To the RIGHT HONOURABLE AND MOST WORSHIPFUL 

LORD ELCHO 
" GRAND MASTER OF FREEMASONS IN SCOTLAND 

"A COLLECTION OF MASONIC SONGS 

" AND 

" ENTERTAINING ANECDOTES 

" For the Use of all the Lodges 
" Ornamented with a Print of the Author taken from the Life by J. Kay 

"Bv GAVIN WILSON 
"POET LAUREAT TO THE LODGE OF ST. DAVID 

" Leg, Arm, and Boot Maker : 
" Inventor of Hardened and Polished Leather." 

Hence it is seen that very shortly after Robert Burns had been elected "Poet Laureat" 
of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning in the very same year, 1787 the news had been 
proclaimed to the world through the press in the above manner and otherwise, that 
Brother Gavin Wilson was "Poet Laureat to the Lodge of St. David," nevertheless, 
there is no record in any minute of the Lodge that Brother Gavin Wilson had ever been 
.elected to that office. Evidently such appointment had been considered outside the " usual 
business," as appears to have been the case on other occasions. 



Leonard Horner and the Lodge Kirknewton and Ratho. 

Through the kindness of Brother George Innes, a respected Past Master of the 
Lodge Kirknewton and Ratho, I am enabled to exhibit another parallel to the very 
incomplete minute of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, dated ist March 1787, in the 
minute of a meeting held by the Lodge Kirknewton and Ratho, No. 85, on 
3oth September 1803. By that minute it appears that even in 1803 there was a 
Lodge Secretary quite as forgetful of his duties as was the " practising solicitor " who 
was understood to be Secretary of the Canongate Kilwinning in the year 1787. 

Before reproducing the minute, I take occasion to explain that Brother Leonard 
Horner, a distinguished citizen of Edinburgh during the early part of this century, and 
who is specially referred to in page 18 ante as a friend of Brother William Campbell, 
Writer to the Signet, Senior Warden of Canongate Kilwinning, 1801 to 1803,* was 
affiliated a member of Lodge Kirknewton and Ratho on 3oth September 1803, as is 
very distinctly stated by Brother Horner in the inscription on a bible which he pre- 
sented to that Lodge, and which is quoted in said page 1 8 ante. Copy of a letter from 

* The same Brother William Campbell who, on I2th November 1845, seconded the motion as to 
painting the picture of the Inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate. 



57 

Brother Horner, and extract from subsequent minute of the Lodge, relative to this 
matter, are herein given under the head of Notanda. 

The odd part of the business is that Brother Leonard Horner is not recorded in 
the minute of 3oth September 1803, nor in any other minute, as having been affiliated 
from Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 

The minute referred to of Lodge Kirknewton and Ratho is as follows : 

" RATHO Sepr. 30'* 1803 

" The Lodge met and Constitute when James Kraft Simonsen of Norway,. 
Abraham Henderson, William Weir, & Geo. M c Laren were admitted Members, & 
paid their dues accordingly. 

Brother Simonsen paid . . . o 13 6 

Brothers Henderson, Weir, & M c Laren, 10/6 each." 

(No Signature.} 

Were Grand Secretary's illogical assertion regarding the Canongate Kilwinning 
minute of ist March 1787 for a moment to be entertained, then, by a parity of such 
reasoning, " the foregoing minute proves beyond question that no such event as the " 
affiliation of Brother Leonard Horner to the Lodge Kirknewton and Ratho " took place 
at the meeting of"* 3oth September 1803, which reasoning is manifestly absurd and 
untrue. 

Robert Burns and the Royal Burgh of Linlithgow. 

The inconsistency of those two brethren, the Historian and an industrious Past- 
Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), in ignoring the fact that the visit of 
Robert Burns to the Lodge St. Andrew, No. 48, on i2th January 1787, is not recorded 
in the minute book of that Lodge, while, by their vaunting reference to the Canongate 
Kilwinning minute of ist March 1787, they try hard to persuade their readers that the 
omission from that minute of any record concerning Robert Burns "proves beyond question 
" that no such event as the Inauguration of Burns as Poet Laureate of Canongate 
" Kilwinning took place at the meeting of ist March 1787," is further demonstrated by 
the following narrative of an episode in the Poet's life which is not generally known. 

This narrative comes as a very complete parallel to the Inauguration episode 
above mentioned, in respect that the great honour conferred upon Robert Burns on the 
special occasion in question was not minuted on the date of its occurrence, " and yet, 
" neithe r he , nor any of his friends, nor any of his biographers, take any notice of such an 
" event." f 

The narrative is as follows : 

On the 1 6th day of November 1787, Robert Burns of Mossgeil, Ayrshire, was 
made a Burgess and Guild Brother of the Royal Burgh of Linlithgow, but the easy-going 

* The two quotations in above paragraph are from Grand Secretary's letter to The Freemason, 
dated i8th August 1891. 

t A statement in re the Inauguration quoted from the letter written by Brother Mackenzie's 
correspondent to The Freemason, dated I4th November 1888. 

i 



58 

Town Clerk of that ancient and renowned burgh took no notice in his minute of the 
Town Council's business on that day, of the unusual occurrence he had witnessed, in 
which Burns figured so prominently. The Town Clerk doubtless considered the rare 
honour conferred on Burns was quite a complimentary or social affair quite outside the 
usual routine, and not " business" according to his acceptation of the term, just as the 
Secretary of Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, appears to have thought of the Burns' 
incident on izth January 1787, and as the Secretary of Canongate Kilwinning thought 
regarding the Inauguration of Burns as Poet Laureate on ist March 1787. 

That Robert Burns had been made a Burgess and Guild Brother of Linlithgow 
on 1 6th November 1787 that no record of such event had been made in the minute 
of the Linlithgow Town Council Meeting of said date and that his Burgess Ticket, 
bearing same date upon it, was produced and verified at a meeting of the Town Council 
of Linlithgow held on 4th January 1859 are indisputable facts, satisfactorily shown in 
the following copy of Excerpt from Minute of Council Meeting held on the latter 
date : 

" Excerpt from Minute of Meeting of the Town Council of the Royal Burgh 
of Linlithgow, held on ^th January 1859. 

" Alexander Thomas, Esquire, residing in Linlithgow, having been introduced 
to the meeting, exhibited a Burgess Ticket to instruct that our great National Poet, 
Robert Burns, the Centenary of whose birth is to be celebrated with such universal 
acclaim throughout the length and breadth of the land upon the 25th of January 
current, was duly admitted a Burgess of this Burgh upon the i6th of November 1787. 
Mr Thomas stated that this interesting and valuable relic was now the property of 
Neilson Mitchell, Esq., Merchant in Glasgow, a native, like himself, of the good 
town. 

" The Council, having inspected the Ticket and the impression of the Burgh Seal 
attached to it, and being fully satisfied of their genuineness, althrf no notice is taken 
of the admission in the Council Minute of the date it was made, arising, doubtless, from the 
practice that prevailed in the Burgh down to a comparatively recent period of parties 
being admitted by the Magistrates without any record of the circumstance being 
preserved in the Council Minute Books,* instruct the Clerk to subjoin a copy of the 
Burgess Ticket to this minute, and also to insert a Memorandum on the Minute Book of 
the date it took place that such an admission had been made, and that the Burgess 
Ticket had this day been produced to and verified by the Council. 

"The meeting further passed a vote of thanks both to Mr Mitchell and Mr 
Thomas for thus enabling them to preserve such gratifying evidence of the connection 
that existed betwixt the Burgh and Scotland's own Immortal Bard." 

* From this singular explanation, made in the year 1859, it is evident that the bestowal of a 
Burgess Ticket, even upon so distinguished a poet as Robert Burns, was not considered "business." 
Vide minute of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, March ist, 1787, Part II., page 14. 



59 



" COPY OF BURGESS TICKET granted by the Town of Linlithgow to ROBERT BURNS. 

" AT LINLITHGOW, the Sixteenth day of November One thousand seven hundred 
" and Eighty-seven years, 

"The which day, in presence of James Andrew, Esq., Provost of the Burgh of 
" Linlithgow ; William Napier, James Watson, Stephen Mitchell, and John Gibson, 
" Baillies, and Robert Speeden, Dean of Guild, COMPEARED, Mr Robert Burns, 
" Mossgeil, Ayrshire, who was made and created Burgess and Guild Brother of the 
" said Burgh, having given his Oath of Fidelity according to the form used thereanent. 
" EXTRACTED BY 

"(Signed) JA. TAYLOR, Clk." 




Notwithstanding the very plausible explanation given in the year 1859 by the 
Town Council of the ancient burgh of Linlithgow, as to the singular omission from 
their minute of meeting, dated the i6th November 1787, of any reference to Burns 
it does seem very odd that the Burgess Ticket should appear as if it had been 
" Extracted by Jas. Taylor, Clk.," from some record of the said Town Council. 

That all shows how indifferent even a Town Clerk could be during last century 
in rendering an account of what occurred at one of his most important meetings. 



3. EXCURSIONS OF ROBERT BURNS DURING THE SUMMER AND AUTUMN, 1787. 

The Past-Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), No. i, in his 
undated letter to The Freemason, pp. 48 and 49 of " the printed correspondence," has 
expended much time and labour unnecessarily in his references to a "journey" which 
Burns made in the year 1787. Throughout pages 14 to 19 ante, I have shown that, in 
the letter referred to, he has made most absurd and unfounded assertions concerning 
the boy William Campbell and "this journey." At this point I shall only quote the 
following words from it : 

"But Brother Campbell's statement is contradicted by all the biographers of 
Burns, who state that he made this journey in company with Dr Adair only." 
[Continuation of this quotation will be found at page 14 ante.'] 

Brother Mackenzie's correspondent cannot prove the assertion with which he 
begins that paragraph. Brother Campbell's statement is a very simple one ; it is quoted 
in the last paragraph of page 14 ante, and, instead of being "contradicted by all the 
" biographers of Burns," it is not mentioned by any one of them. 



6o 

Further, "all the biographers of Burns" do not "state that he made this journey 
41 in company with Dr Adair only," as will now be shown. 

On this subject of the excursions made by Robert Burns during the summer and 
autumn of 1787, I quote from "The Life and Works of Robert Burns," by Robert 
Chambers, appendix to vol. II., page 319, published 1886, as follows : 

" In previous narratives of Burns's life the events of the summer and autumn of 
1787 are to a serious extent incorrectly arranged. 

" Dr Currie represents Burns as returning from Mauchline to Edinburgh in June, 
and thence setting out on the West Highland ride which terminated at Dumbarton. 

There is no apparent evidence for his having returned at this time to Edinburgh." 

****** 

" The learned biographer is certainly wrong in placing the tour by Stirling to 
Harvieston with Dr Adair in August. Burns was at Mauchline till the 7th of that 
month, and on the 23rd he wrote a letter, dated from Nicol's house in Edinburgh. On 
the 25th he and Nicol set out on their post-chaise journey to the Highlands. It is very 
unlikely that Burns would have a ten days' tour between the 7th and 23rd of August, 
and so early as the 25th set out again over the same ground ground, too, which Currie 

represents him as having passed over for a first time in June." 

****** 

" What finally sets it at rest is a document, lighted upon since the above was 
written, and alluded to in the text, showing that Burns was a subject of legal proceedings, 
and made a personal appearance in Edinburgh on account of them on the i5th of 
August. Arriving in Edinburgh from Mossgeil on the 7th, engaged in these legal 
matters on and perhaps before the i5th, writing to Robert Ainslie from Nicol's house 
on the 23rd, and setting out on the post-chaise journey with Nicol on the 25th, there 
is no time for a ten days' tour with Dr Adair during this month. No such tour, there- 
fore, took place at that time. The early and middle part of October is the first clear 
space of time which will suffice for a ten days' tour ; it is also the first sufficient space 
of time prior to the setting in of winter, after which any such tour was not likely to have 
taken place." 

The foregoing is only one authority on the subject of the August and October 
excursions of Robert Burns in the year 1787 at variance with statements in "the 
printed correspondence," and, as already stated, that authority was published in the 
year 1886. In the following information, published so far back as 1871, I find a similar 
account of the circumstantial narrative of the several journeys as traced by Robert 
Chambers. It is quoted from " Chronological Summary of the Life and Writings of 
Burns," a chapter contained in " The Complete Poetical Works of Robert Burns," by 
William Scott Douglas. 

"MORE EDINBURGH LIFE, AND SUNNY-DAY RECREATIONS, 
[1787 AGE 28]. 

" AUG. 25. Northern Tour. [Sets out from Edinburgh in a chaise, along with 
Wm. Nicol, for Stirling and the North.] 

"AUG. 27. [The poet leaves Nicol for one day in Stirling, and proceeds 
to visit Gavin Hamilton's relatives at Harvieston, on the Devon.] 



6i 

" AUG. 28. [Journey resumed by way of Crieff, Tay mouth, Aberfeldy, Dunkeld, 
Blair- Athole, Killiecrankie, Fort-George, Inverness ; and back by Nairn, Forres, Elgin, 
Fochabers, Castle-Gordon, Cullen, Aberdeen, The Mearns, Montrose, Arbroath, Dundee, 
Carse of Gowrie, Perth, Strath earn, Invermay, Kinross, Queensferry to Edinburgh, 
where the travellers arrived on i6th September, after three weeks' absence.] 

" Final Excursion in October. [Re-visits Stirling and Harvieston in company 
with Dr Adair; Cauldron Linn, Rumbling Brig. Visits Mr Ramsay of Ochtertyre on 
Teith, and Sir William Murray of Ochtertyre in Strathearn ; also Mrs Bruce of Clack- 
mannan Tower.] 

" OCT. 20. [Returns to Edinburgh, and makes his residence with Mr William 
Cruickshanks, teacher, High School.]" 

A third authority is " The Complete Works of Robert Burns, with a Memoir by 
"William Gunnyon," published in 1873 by William P. Nimmo. It affords precisely the 
same information as do those two authorities already quoted, quite in opposition to the 
erroneous assertion of Brother Mackenzie's correspondent, regarding what he asserts is 
said by " all the biographers of Burns." 

A fourth authority to similar effect on the subject of the August and October 
excursions in 1787, is "The National Burns," edited by the late Rev. George Gilfillan. 

But, independently of all those testimonies, evidence exists from so far back a 
period as the year 1846 in the "Dedication" [Preface] of "A Winter with Robert 
Burns," where it is stated that Brother James Marshall, the compiler of such work, 
testified to the fact of Brother William Campbell, W.S., having said that he had 
been in "the company of Burns at Auchtertyre House, during the autumn of 1787." 
Brother Marshall was present at the meeting of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning when 
his friend Brother William Campbell so expressed himself. Further evidence, therefore, 
on this head is unnecessary to confute the reckless assertions of Brother Mackenzie's 
correspondent, the Past Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh, No. i. 



4. ATTENDANCE OF ROBERT BURNS AT MEETINGS OF LODGE CANONGATE 

KILWINNING. 

The Past Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), No. i, in his 
"Prefatory Note" to "the printed Copy of the Correspondence," dated June 1892, 
concludes his assertions thus : 

" It may be added, for what it may be worth, that, in the opinion of the writer, 
formed after an exhaustive examination of every available source of information, and a 
careful consideration of the associations and movements of the Poet during his visits to 
Edinburgh, there is nothing to lead one to believe that the Poet visited the Canongate 
Kilwinning Lodge on any occasion other than the one on which he received honorary 
affiliation." 



62 

In his first letter on the subject, dated i4th November 1888, the same writer 
said : 

" It is seen that he (Burns) could have attended, at the most, only three meetings 
of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning during the season 1786-87." 

A few lines further on, in same letter, he writes : 

" He (Burns) thus, during the Masonic season 1787-88, could not have attended 
more than two such meetings, if he attended any." 

In his letter to The Freemason, dated 6th July 1889, the correspondent made the 
following assertion : 

" I have already shown that Burns could have only attended the Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning on two, certainly not more than three, occasions." 

But afterwards, in same letter, the correspondent assured his readers as follows : 

" From my own researches / am satisfied that Burns attended one meeting only 
the February meeting of the Lodge in 1787." 

As a direct and effectual contradiction of those assertions made by the Past 
Master of Lodge No. i (Brother Mackenzie's correspondent of The Freemason), I shall 
do little more than refer to the extract from Minute of Lodge meeting, held Qth February 
1815, to be found herein at page 30 of Part II., in which the lamented Poet Laureate 
is referred to as " a public character so immediately connected with them [the brethren of 
Canongate Kilwinning], and who on so many occasions contributed so generally to the 
harmony of the Masonic Order, and to that of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning in 
particular" 

Further, as showing how very quickly after arriving in Edinburgh Robert Burns 
began his attendances at Canongate Kilwinning, the following extract will prove of 
interest. I quote it from page 282 of " Biography of the Hon. Henry Erskine, Lord 
Advocate for Scotland, by Lieut. -Colonel Alex. Fergusson," 1882 : 

" It was Mr Erskine who introduced Burns, on his coming to Edinburgh, to the 
Canongate Kilwinning Lodge of Masons, He had himself joined it about six years 
previously, and since that time had frequently occupied the chair at the meetings of 
this Lodge, which was especially resorted to by many of the leading Whigs at that time. 
Mr Erskine was the more ready to present his friend to the brethren, as he had, it is 
stated, ' seen by his poems that he was a person who would be quite at home in a 
Lodge.' " 

Robert Burns arrived in Edinburgh, 28th November 1786. 

" On the 7th December 1786, Burns wrote to his friend, Gavin Hamilton : ' My 
Lord Glencairn and the Dean of Faculty, Mr Henry Erskine, have taken me under 
their wing.'" 

There is a minute of the Lodge meeting held 7th December first of the season 
1786 also a minute on behalf of Grand Lodge on same date, but in neither of them 
is there any mention of Burns being present. That is not surprising after what we 



63 

learn of the neglect elsewhere in the Canongate Kilwinning records, also in the minutes 
of Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, because the minute-book of the latter body shows no 
mention of Robert Burns as being present at the great meeting of i2th January 1787. 

At page 278 of same work quoted, it is said : 

" The year 1786 is memorable as that in which Robert Burns made his debut 
in Edinburgh, an event closely connected with more than one member of the Erskine 

family." 

****** 

"The extreme cordiality of the reception which awaited Robert Burns on his 
arrival in Edinburgh, from a small group of congenial souls, is not difficult of 
explanation there was more in it than mere admiration for genius. Mr Erskine's 
sister had, as has been stated, been married in the preceding year to the Earl of 

Glencairn's brother." (Page 280.) 

****** 

" Creech the bookseller, too, who had been the travelling tutor of Lord Glencairn, 
and who was to be Burns' publisher, was not the least important of those whose 
acquaintance he made by means of this family coterie at the earliest stage of his 
Edinburgh career." (Page 281.) 

In my Review of the minutes of years 1786-7-8, at pages 4 to n of Part II., 
abundant proof is given out of the recorded minutes themselves reproduced in the eight 
pages which immediately follow that Review that very many other meetings of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning had taken place during the two-and-a-half years referred to, of 
which no record has been preserved. 

It will be obvious to any impartial reader of that Review, and those minutes of 
the years 1786-7-8, that there had been very many meetings of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning besides the very few recorded during that period, and, consequently, there is 
no reason to doubt what was said by the R.W. Master, George Simson, and acquiesced 
in by all the brethren present, at the Lodge meeting, held gth February 1815, that 
Burns on " many occasions contributed to the harmony of the Masonic Order, and to that 
" of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning in particular." 



5. ALLEGED FIRST MENTION IN CANONGATE KILWINNING RECORDS OF ROBERT 
BURNS HAVING BEEN POET LAUREATE. 

The Past-Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), No. i Brother 
Mackenzie's correspondent of The Freemason in his first letter, already referred to, 

said : 

"Until 1835 there was no such office in 'the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning as 
that of Poet Laureate." 

In same letter it is said : " The Poet is claimed not only as having been elected 
its first Poet Laureate, but as having held that office from 1787 until his death in 1796. 
The records of the Lodge, which I some years ago examined, give no countenance to 
this assertion." 



64 

And, further on, it is added : "It was not until 1815, twenty-eight years after 
the alleged occurrence, and nineteen years after the Poet's death, that any mention is 
made of the event." 

In answer to those misleading assertions, I will briefly remark that it is quite 
evident that the records of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning did not receive a very 
"exhaustive" examination by the said Past Master of Lodge No. i, otherwise he 
would have learned, if anxious about it, that the earliest record in Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning of Robert Burns having been Poet Laureate, so far as yet discovered, is 
the framed print of our first Poet Laureate, bearing the following inscription : 

" ROBERT BURNS, THE SCOTTISH BARD, 

"POET LAUREAT, 

"LODGE No. 2, CANNONGATE 

"KILWINNING." 

further, that the said Past Master of Lodge No. i had he been careful in his examina- 
tion of Canongate Kilwinning records, and desirous of the information should 
have discovered also, as I did, that the above-mentioned print was one of "four 
prints which were got for the Lodge," and which on 24th June 1802, "met with the 
approbation of the Brethern." 

Such entry in the record of Lodge meeting, held 24th June 1802, constitutes it 
the earliest reference in the minute books of Canongate Kilwinning to Robert Burns as 
Poet Laureate of the Lodge. 

The said Past Master of Lodge No. i should have also learned that the above 
noted print of Robert Burns, "Poet Laureat," contains the year of publication, 1798, 
engraved upon it, and, consequently, that it may have been exhibited in the Lodge- 
room even earlier than on 24th June 1802, though only approved on that date by 
"the Brethern." See frontispiece, also pages n and 20 ante, and Part II., pages 
20 to 25. 



6. GARBLED QUOTATIONS. 

Brother Mackenzie's principal correspondent of The Freemason the industrious 
Past Master of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel) in his anxiety to underrate 
the argument contained in my letter of yth February 1873, has made some extravagant 
assertions, and has mixed and misquoted passages from that letter in a most arbitrary 
manner. 

I shall confine my comments on this point to a certain portion of the letter 
written i4th November 1888 by the above-designated correspondent to The Freemason. 

The portion to which I refer appears in pp. 12 and 13 of "the printed copy 
of correspondence." In reproducing the same as follows, I also reproduce alongside 
it two paragraphs from widely separate parts of my letter of yth February 1873 



out of which the misquotations in question have been adroitly woven. These show 
at a glance how the garbling process has been accomplished : 



EXTRACTS from LETTER to Brother 
D. MURRAY LYON from Brother 
HUGH C. PEACOCK when the latter 
was Secretary of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning. 

7//z February 1873. 

[Vide Part II., pp. 57 and 59, also History of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning, pp. 117 and 120.] 



[Paragraph from beginning of Letter. ] 
" Had any doubt ever been previously thrown on 
the universally accepted connection of Robert Burns 
with the Canongate Kilwinning, the nature of your 
reference to it might be looked for in such a com- 
prehensive work as you propose to publish ; but, 
when it is considered that only now, when few of 
the living links! remain, connecting us with those who 
had often borne testimony to their personal ac- 
quaintance with Burns, and to their having been 
at meetings of the Lodge when he was there as 
its Poet Laureate, the tenor of your notice appears 
extraordinary. " 

*##**# 

[Paragraph front nearly the end of Letter. ~\ 
" It may be reckoned comparatively slender evi- 
dence to add to the foregoing, yet it may be re- 
marked as some satisfaction to know, that there are 
members of the Lodge at the present time 
who associated for years with those members who 
had the privilege of Burns' company in the Lodge 
when he wore the jewel of his office as Poet 
Laureate ; that, further, that jewel was also worn by the 
Ettrick Shepherd as Poet Laureate of Canongate Kil- 
winning, and it had the name of Robert Burns engraved 
upon it when the Poet Laureateship was conferred 
on him." 



EXTRACT from LETTER to The Free- 
mason by Brother MACKENZIE'S 
chief correspondent the Past Mas- 
ter of the Lodge of Edinburgh 
No. i. 

lAttli November 1888. 

"The allegation that Burns was elected Poet 
Laureate of the Lodge is further sought to be- 
supported by letters written by Brother Peacock, 
the Secretary of the Lodge, .to Brother Murray 
Lyon so recently as 1873, in consequence of hearing 
that Brother Lyon was, in his then forthcoming 
' History of Freemasonry,' ' to discredit ' the fact.* 
The reasons given in these letters amount to little. 
They are mostly assumed inferences from alleged 
facts, the accuracy of which is not known, and is not 
instructed. The chief reasons founded on are that 
Brother Marshall 'believed' in the inauguration, 
that his statement of the occurrence had not until 
then (1873) been questioned, that Brother M'Neill, 
the Master of the Lodge 1830-1837 'had no doubt 
whatever of the fact,' and that un-named old members 
of the Lodge f 



' had often borne testimony to their personal ac- 
' quaintance with Burns, and to their having been 
' at meetings of the Lodge when he was there as 
' its Poet Laureate, 



and that there are 

' members of the Lodge at the present time (1873) 
' who associated for years with those members who 
' had the privilege of Burns' company in the Lodge 
' when he wore the jewel of his office as Poet 
' Laureate,' 

which 'had the name of Robert Burns engraved 
' upon it when the Poet Laureateship was conferred 
' on him '. " 

(The concluding eight words were not printed in 
italics in the paragraph from which the quota- 
tion is made. The correspondent italicised 
them in his perverted extract, as above. ) 



* It was a mistake to discredit (t the fact." 

t Many of those, whom the correspondent designates "un-named old members of the Lodge," 
are faithfully portrayed in the Inauguration picture, and they are duly named and described in the 
instructive handbook to that picture, entitled " A Winter with Robert Burns." 

| A "few of the living links," in the year 1873, "connecting us with those who had often borne 
testimony to their personal acquaintance with Burns " are named in Notanda. 

k 



66 

The foregoing contrasted quotations clearly show that the correspondent, in what 
is professedly a quotation from my letter, connects a portion of one paragraph with a 
portion of another totally different paragraph, by adroitly introducing between them 
the conjunction "and" within the quotation marks as if it were mine. Not only so, 
but he has "studiously kept out of sight"* an essential clause of the second paragraph 
with regard to the Ettrick Shepherd, totally perverting the sense and meaning of the 
matter so misquoted, and he ingeniously connects the disjoined portions of that para- 
graph by the convenient pronoun " which." This appears to have been done " for his 
own purposes," f just as the same correspondent asserts when charging the late Brother 
James Marshall author of " A Winter with Robert Burns " with having been guilty 
of using a misquotation. 

Other misquotations, which have been arranged with equal ingenuity, so as 
to convey quite a different signification from what the author intended, are referred 
to elsewhere in these pages. 

7. CONCLUSION. 

The Laureateship. 

. . . " Until 1835 there was no such office in the Lodge Canongate Kilwin- 
ning as that of Poet Laureate." 

P. M. of Lodge No. i in Letter I., i4th November 1888. 

. . . "It is only in 1815 that the claim was, for the first time, put forward 
of his (Robert Burns) having been the Poet Laureate of the Lodge." 

Grand Secretary in Letter IV., i2th February (presumably 1889). 

Neither of those correspondents of Brother Mackenzie in The Freemason appear 
to have made adequate use of their boasted opportunities of examining Canongate 
Kilwinning records, otherwise they would have known of the framed print of Robert 
Burns our first Poet Laureate, which has been prominently exhibited in the Lodge- 
room for nearly a century, that it is one of " four prints " mentioned in the minute of 
24th June 1802 as having "met with the approbation of the Brethern," and that in 
all probability it had been placed in the Lodge-room before that date, because it was 
published in the year 1798. Those facts clearly confute the correspondents' misleading 
assertions. Vide frontispiece, also pp. n, 30, and 32 ante, and p. 20 of Part II. 

The Inauguration. 

" It was not until 1846 fifty-nine years after the alleged Inauguration that 
it was for the first time made known to the public." 

P. M. of Lodge No. i in Letter III., i2th January 1889. 

" The ' Inauguration ' was never heard of until then." 

P. M. of Lodge No. i in Letter VI., undated. 

* That is a phrase which occurs in Grand Secretary's letter to The Freemason, dated i8th August 
1891 ; p. 17 of "the printed correspondence." 
t In Letter VI., undated. 



6 7 

"While preparing my 'History of Freemasonry' in 1873, it became known 
that I discredited the story of the Inauguration. Statements were then made to me 
by the office-bearers of the Lodge, which I unfortunately believed assertions which 
subsequent investigation showed had no foundation in fact." 

Grand Secretary in Letter XL, i8th August 1891. 

To expose such unfounded assertions in addition to what is already advanced 
herein on the subject I need only now refer to the minute of Committee meeting, held 
i6th January 1835, an extract of which will be found at page 38, Part II. It will 
there be seen that the brethren were desirous that James Hogg should join the Lodge, 
and be appointed Poet Laureate in succession to Robert Burns. At the request of the 
Committee this resolution was communicated to the " Ettrick Shepherd " by his personal 
friend Brother John Forbes, as is proved by James Hogg's answer, wherein he says that 
he " cannot join them, nor be initiated into the mysteries of the Art " (vide page 39, 
Part II.). The minute goes on to say that Bro. Forbes was instructed " at the same time, 
" in name of the Master, Office-bearers, and Members, to invite his (the Shepherd's) 
" attendance at a full meeting of the Lodge" on an early date, "TO HAVE HIS BROW 

" ENCIRCLED WITH THE LAUREL WREATH, THE INSIGNIA OF HIS OFFICE." 

Those graphic concluding fourteen words prove most effectively that the 
Inauguration was no invention or "concoction," perpetrated in either 1845 or 1846, as 
is alleged by the correspondent. They prove that in the year 1835, ten years at 
least before the Inauguration picture was proposed to be painted and before the 
artist, Bro. Stewart Watson, had returned from Italy eleven years before the admir- 
able companion-work, entitled " A Winter with Robert Burns, was written the brethren 
of Canongate Kilwinning had ample knowledge of the laurel wreath having been a 
prominent feature in the installation of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate, and quite 
warrantably looked forward to James Hogg joining the Lodge, and being elected and 
inaugurated Poet Laureate, in same manner as had been his predecessor in that office. 

In the foregoing quotation from Grand Secretary's letter of i8th August 1891 to 
The Freemason he refers to " assertions which subsequent investigation showed had no 
" foundation in fact," as having been made to him in 1873 by the Office-bearers of 
Canongate Kilwinning. It would doubtless have been interesting to his readers had 
they been informed what was the nature of the " subsequent investigation " and when 
it was made, because, in a letter dated so recently as i3th December 1886, and published 
in the Scotsman newspaper, Grand Secretary distinctly expressed his belief in Robert 
Burns having been Poet Laureate of Canongate Kilwinning (vide pp. 36, 37 ante). 

The allegations have already been confuted which Grand Secretary makes 
against the "statements" said to have been made to him in 1873 "by the Office- 
bearers of the Lodge." 

Unfounded Charges. 

..." It was not until Brother Marshall directed his ingenuity to the matter that 
it was said that Burns had been 'elected' and 'inaugurated' into that office! It was 



68 

Brother Marshall and Brother Stewart Watson, the painter of the picture illustrating the 
alleged event, who, in 1845, conceived and originated the grand gathering of 1787." 

P. M. of Lodge No. i in Letter VI., undated. 

" We, besides, find him [Brother Marshall], for his own purposes, misquoting the 
minute of the Lodge of i2th November 1845, and making many assertions manu- 
factured for his story. It is thus impossible to acquit him of the charge of wilful and 
gross concoction." 

P. M. of Lodge No. i in Letter VI., undated. 

The industrious correspondent appears to have thought those serious charges 
could safely be made now against Brothers Stewart Watson and James Marshall, after 
forty-eight years have elapsed since their respective works The Inauguration Picture, 
and " A Winter with Robert Burns " were published, and after twenty-four years have 
elapsed since each of the worthy brethren had been laid in his grave. 

Did the correspondent reckon on there being no brethren in the Canongate 
Kilwinning Lodge now who would say a word in defence of those loyal and distinguished 
members and their services to the Lodge ? 

The charges are utterly preposterous. They are all bare assertions, and are 
obviously untrue. Brother Marshall's narrative of the Lodge meeting held izth Novem- 
ber 1845 was evidently written from his own recollecticn of the proceedings, and is doubly 
valuable on that very account by reason of him having been present on the occasion. He 
vouches for Brother William Campbell having then said that " he (Brother Campbell) 
had himself spent three of the happiest days of his life in the company of Burns 
at Auchtertyre House during the autumn of 1787." Brother Marshall is quite as likely 
to be correct in that portion of the narrative as the Secretary who minuted the statement 
that Brother Campbell said " he spent two of the most happy days with him (Burns) at 
Auchtertyre Castle." 

Burns had a busy time when enjoying, together with several other guests, Sir 
William Murray's hospitality at Auchtertyre House in October 1787. While being enter- 
tained on that occasion he was shown around the vicinity, and especially he was shown 
Loch Turit, which visit inspired him to write the sympathetic poem, entitled, " On Scaring 
some Water-fowl in Loch Turit, a wild scene among the hills of Oughtertyre." Among the 
company whom Burns met while under Sir William Murray's roof was the lady in whose 
praise he composed the song " Blythe, Blythe and Merry was She," a young cousin of 
his host, Miss Euphemia Murray of Lintrose, who eventually became the wife of Lord 
Methven, one of the judges of the Court of Session. During his stay at Auchtertyre 
Burns also wrote several letters. All such entertainment and literary work may easily 
have occupied more than two days. Brother Marshall's statement above quoted is better 
expressed and more explicit than that of the Lodge Secretary in the minute, and is 
perhaps more nearly correct. 



" It is impossible to believe that those convening and carrying through such 



69 

a demonstration (Inauguration of Burns) would have purposely suppressed all mention 
of it. But, singularly enough, this is what Brother Marshall asserts they did." 

P. M. of Lodge No. i in Letter I., i4th November 1888. 

"Indeed, the propounders of the theory in 1846 alleged that" . . . "it was 
resolved to suppress all record of the occurrence ! " 

P. M. of Lodge No. i in Letter III., i2th January 1889. 

. . . "and yet we are asked to believe that this tragic scene occurred, and 
that all record of it was purposely suppressed by its promoters !" 

P. M. of Lodge No. i in Letter III., i2th January 1889. 

" The minute was thus, according to Brother Marshall, purposely suppressed." 
. . . . "Had such a demonstration occurred it is impossible to believe that it 
could have accidentally escaped notice in the minutes of the meeting, which are 
still extant." 

P. M. of Lodge No. i in Letter VI., undated. 

By the frequent repetition of above charge against Brother Marshall and the 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, the correspondent appears desirous of ignoring the very 
obvious raillery contained in Brother Marshall's reference, in " A Winter with Robert 
Burns," to the Inauguration minute. Any impartial reader may see that a vein of 
playful sarcasm, at the expense of the illustrious trio, namely, Grand Secretary, Grand 
Clerk, and the facile, easy-going Secretary Mercer, of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, 
runs throughout all that Brother Marshall says concerning it. In his valuable handbook 
of the event, at page 66, he chronicles the following amusing particulars : 

" William Mason, Grand Secretary," ..." was a writer at the Bowhead, 
and held the situation of Extractor of the Decisions of the Supreme Court." . . . 
" Mr Meikle, by this time [ist March 1787] promoted as Assistant-Clerk of Court, was 
Grand Clerk of the Grand Lodge. This fat pair were, in their legal official capacity, 
accustomed to the use of words of strict style in all their writings, and they transferred the 
same dry formality in the exercise of their masonic duties. On the occasion of the 
grand visits, it fell to their province to insert in the book of the Lodge visited a minute 
of the fact, and this they did as if they copied it from a style-book in a regular 
stick-to-the-form manner. Hence you may 'witness our hand' for a series of years 
in every Edinburgh lodge, whoever was Grand Master, or whoever were present, or 
whatsoever were the sayings or doings or occurrences of the night. Wherever they 
happen to be for the time, you have invariably their grand scratchitaryships telling 
the identical tale that they told in St Andrew's Lodge on Friday, the \zth January 
1787, when Charteris pleased the Poet so much by acknowledging him as Caledonia's 
Bard.* Here it is : " [The minute has already been quoted at page 50 ante, and need 
not be repeated here.] 

* A specimen of similar kind of record proving Brother Marshall's words regarding the severe 
uniformity in style adhered to by the "fat pair "is given under the head of Notanda, being copy of 
minute of Grand Lodge visitation to Lodge Canongate Kilwinning on 7th December 1786. 



70 

It is worthy, however, of special remark as corroborating Brother Marshall's 
humorous statements that the Grand Lodge minute contains no mention whatever of 
Robert Burns having been present. After that instance of omission of the name of Burns 
from the Grand Secretary's minute of this celebrated meeting, the assertions quoted above 
from the correspondent's letters are worthless by way of argument. 

" A Winter with Robert Burns" is absolutely silent regarding any " tragic scene"* 
as having occurred ist March 1787, and in no part of that excellent work did the author, 
Brother Marshall, assert " that all record of it [the Inauguration] was purposely suppressed 
by its promoters," or even assert anything resembling such an absurd statement, as is 
erroneously maintained in above quotations by Brother Mackenzie's indefatigable corre- 
spondent. 

Brother Marshall had a complete knowledge of his subject, and appears very 
properly to have felt privileged to treat this particular incident jocosely relative to 
Brothers Mason, Meikle, and Mercer. He concludes his observations thus : 

" Brother Mason is characteristically represented viewing the Inauguration as 
rather calculated to ' hold up Adairis profession,' and ##//-masonic, and something for 
which there is no precedent in the books. It may be readily supposed that after a consulta- 
tion with the Grand Clerk and with Secretary Mercer as to a STYLE for recording such a 
fact, it would be finally resolved ' by three ' that the least said's soonest mended" 

"This fat pair" according to the drift of Brother Marshall's lively narration 
appear to have thought that, as there was neither law nor precedent for their guidance 
in preserving any record of the visit which it is understood " Caledonia's Bard" paid to 
the Lodge St. Andrew, Edinburgh, on i2th January 1787, they were justified in making 
no record of the visit in their minute of the proceedings in that Lodge ; nevertheless, " it 
may be readily supposed " that ere very long they had misgivings as to the propriety 
of their omission from that minute of all reference to " Caledonia's Bard ; " therefore, 
when Robert Burns was again the hero of the hour at a lodge meeting and that lodge 
the Canongate Kilwinning, on ist March 1787 the said "pair" were not likely to allow 
the Secretary of a daughter Lodge to score a point against them, by recording anything 
about Burns or the Laureateship, especially seeing his election was accompanied by 
such an " anti-masonic " ceremonial as that wherein the Poet had " his brow encircled 
with the laurel wreath, the insignia of his office." | 



In the pages immediately foregoing, there have been exposed only a few of the 
errors which occur in letters written by the Past Master and the Historian of the Lodge 
of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), No. i, as contained in " the printed copy of the corre- 
spondence," submitted to Grand Lodge by Grand Secretary, " in the interests of truth," 
on zgth DecemberiSgz. Other errors in those letters are disposed of elsewhere through- 
out this evidence, and especially in the sections, at pp. 14 to 25 ante, relating to Brothers 
William Campbell, W.S., and William Petrie, also pp. 44 and 48 of Part II. 

* A special reference to this peculiar expression occurs at page 34, ante. 
t Quoted from Lodge minute, page 38, part II. 



PART II. 




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LINES 

On Viewing Bro. STEWART WATSON'S Picture 

OF 

THE INAUGURATION 

Contributed 3oth March 1846, 

By WILLIAM PRINGLE. 



I. 

Bard of our hearts, beheld again on earth ! 
Not now, indeed, as oft through fancy's eye. 
Following the plough, or by the rustic hearth, 
Or 'mid the woods warbling thy melody : 
But in the shrine of Ancient Masonry, 
Among "the favour'd, the enlighten'd few," 
Who, by its " hieroglyphic bright," descry 
The wisdom hidden from the world's dim view. 

c 

II. 

Oh, ever blessed be that art divine, 

Which, with creative power, can back restore 

The living look, each lineament and hue, 

Of lov'd familiar faces now no more ! 

Honour'd the pencil that hath traced before 

Our eyes the imaged presence of the Bard, 

Whose name and fame have filled all space, and o'er 

His brow renewed the wreath fond Masonry's award. 



The author of the foregoing testimony to his faith in the Inauguration, and to his admiration 
of Stewart Watson's talented work, was Brother William Pringle, whose name appears on the Lodge 
roll as " William Pringle, Jun., Writer," E.P. & R., 1824, Feb. 5. He had been, therefore, an old and 
constant member of the Lodge in 1846. He was a member of Committee as early as 1827, Senior 
Deacon 1827-8, and Poet-Laureate 1854-1859. 



EXTRACT 



FROM 

GRAND LODGE PROCEEDINGS, DECEMBER 29, 1892. 

" Grand Secretary drew the attention of Grand Committee to the Painting in the 
Board Room purporting to represent the Installation of Burns as Poet- Laureate of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning, No. 2. This picture came into the possession of Grand Lodge 
on 2nd February 1863 as a present from the family of the late Chevalier James Burnes, 
and was acknowledged by Grand Secretary as a handsome donation. 

" The gift was accepted without question as to whether the event portrayed therein 
were real or imaginary. The story of the inauguration was never challenged until 1873, 
when the present Grand Secretary, while preparing his ' History of Freemasonry in 
Scotland,' and after a minute examination ot Canongate Kilwinning's records, formed the 
opinion that Burns never was elected to, and never held the office of, Poet-Laureate of 
the Lodge, and never was installed into such an office. His views having become known 
to its office-bearers, by their instructions the Secretary of the Lodge questioned the 
soundness of his opinion, and laid a statement before him embodying alleged facts which 
he unfortunately accepted as true, and in his History modified the opinion which he had 
originally formed. As will be seen in the printed copy of the correspondence between 
Brothers Allan Mackenzie, the historian of No. 2, and William Officer, now submitted, 
Grand Secretary asserts that the statements made to him were unfounded, and that it is 
clearly established that the story of the Installation of Burns as Poet- Laureate is a myth. 

" Attached to the original painting presented by the Burneses is the inscription, 
' The Inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet- Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, 
ist March, 1787.' This date is accepted by the Lodge as correct. In all statements and 
discussions in support of the story the minute of the meeting at which the event is alleged 
to have happened has been kept out of sight. It is as follows : 

"St John's Chapel, ist March 1787. 

" The Lodge being duly constituted, it was reported that since last meeting R. 
Dalrymple, Esq. ; F. T. Hammond, Esq. ; R. A. Maitland, Esq., were entered apprentices 



and the following brethren passed and raised . R. Sinclair, Esq. ; A. M'Donald, Esq. ; 
C. B. Clive, Esq. ; Captain Dalrymple ; R. A. Maitland, Esq. ; F. T. Hammond, Esq. ; 

Mr Clavaring, Mr M'Donald, Mr Millar, Mr Sime, and Mr Gray, who all paid their fees 
to the Treasurer. No other business being before the meeting, the Lodge adjourned. 

" Enterics, . . ^3 13 6 " Alexr. Fergusson, M. 

" P. and R., .666 " Chas. More, D. 

" Collected, i i o "Jo. Millar, J.W." 



" Grand Secretary submits that, in the interests of truth as set against a fable, it is 
necessary that steps should be taken by Grand Committee to have the inscription on the 
picture amended. 

" Brother Mackenzie said that it would be well for Grand Committee to ascertain 
whether the event really took place or not, and questioned its right to alter the inscription 
on any painting bequeathed to Grand Lodge. He explained that the friendly correspond- 
ence between Brother Officer and himself was, so far as he was concerned, undertaken 
on his own responsibility, and had not been officially recognised by Canongate Kilwinning, 
but that his history was only a compilation of some of its records. Further, that since 
Grand Secretary had brought the matter before Grand Committee, he had seen a 
document which bore strong evidence of the installation having taken place, and he knew 
ithat the Lodge No. 2 was in possession of other documentary evidence of a like nature. 

" On the motion of Brother Christie, Brothers William Officer, David Sneddon, and 
.Allan Mackenzie were appointed to consider and report upon the whole question 
.Brother Officer, Convener." 



ROBERT BURNS, , 

poet Xaureate of Olobge Canongate IRilwinning. 

This matter being of supreme importance to Lodge Canongate Kilwinning 
as well as to the Craft in general, and as it is most desirable 
that a full and complete Report of the evidence now available 
be submitted to Grand Lodge, Brother Allan Mackenzie, P.M., 
of No. 2, having conferred with the R. W. MASTER AND OFFICE- 
BEARERS of the Lodge begs to lay the following statements and 
particulars before the Special Committee appointed by Grand 
Committee to report. 

r4fc*r> 

ROTHERD. MURRAY LYON mentions in his " History of Free- 
masonry in Scotland," p. 333, that in the year 1873 he made a 
minute examination of Canongate Kilwinning records, and found 
that the Laureateship is referred to on 9th February and 9th June 
1815, and again on i6th January 1835. In point of fact, it is 
referred to in at least thirteen different Minutes and other Records.from 
1802 to 1845, f which the dates are 24th June 1802, 9th February and 8th June 
1815 (there is no Minute of 9th June 1815), nth and 24th June 1816, 2nd and 2nd 
also 8th and 8th January 1817, i6th January and 24th June 1835, and I2th and 
1 9th November 1845. Copies of those references are reproduced here, together 
with copy of inscription on portrait of Burns dated 1798. 

Grand Lodge remit mentions that Brother Lyon now asserts that the 
communication received by him from the Secretary of the Lodge in 1873 con- 
tained " unfounded statements " and " alleged facts." A reply to this extraordinary 
assertion is given herewith. 

The only other Office-Bearers now alive who took an active part on the 
Executive in 1873, namely, W. N. Fraser, Esq., of Findrack and Tornaveen, and 
ex-Councillor Thomas Drybrough, Past Masters, have also been communicated 
with, and copies of their replies are appended. 

Brother Mackenzie would here explain that the document he referred to 
in Grand Committee alludes to ist March 1787, and its contents are embraced 
in the communication received from Past Master W. N. Fraser, The word 
" installation," used by Grand Secretary, does not occur in the records of 
the Lodge during the period of Burns' lifetime. 




REVIEW 



OF THE 



MINUTES OF LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING 

From 2$tk June 1786 to \2th December 1788 inclusive. 



The various references to Robert Burns having been a member and Poet 
Laureate of Canongate Kilwinning, which occur in the minutes of the years 1802 
1815, 1816, and 1817, and in relative documents, were testified to by many 
worthy brethren of those times. 

A number of those brethren had been for many years active and constant 
members of Canongate Kilwinning. One of them had been admitted a member 
as far back as the year 1760, others respectively in 1767, 1769, 1774, 1778 (two), 
1781, 1784, 1787, 1795, 1799, 1800, and 1801, while Charles More still on 
committee during the years 1815, 1816 and 1817 and William Dunbar 
(" Rattlin' Roarin' Willie ") had been successively Depute Master while Robert 
Burns was attending meetings of the Lodge in the years 1786 and 1787. 

With such evidence as is found in the minutes of 1802 and 1815 
to 1817 regarding Burns having been Poet Laureate of this Lodge, it may 
at first appear strange that no reference to his election as Poet Laureate 
occurs in the minutes of 1787. On carefully inspecting the very few, 
imperfect, and brief minutes of this period, a verbatim copy of which is 
annexed hereto the omission may be quite easily accounted for. 

Those minutes show extraordinary negligence on the part of some one 
during the period 24th June 1786 to I2th December 1788. Within that time 
two and a half years eleven meetings only have been recorded. The Secretary 
signed only one of those eleven minutes : two of them have not been signed by 
any person. Conspicuously enough, one of those unsigned minutes is that of the 
Annual Election, 2^thjune 1787. Several of the minutes contain indications of 
other meetings than those engrossed having taken place, of which there is no 



5 

record. Two whole pages of the minute-book have been left blank, evidently 
with the intention of entering certain minutes therein at some more convenient 
season. Those blank pages occur between the minute dated 2nd August 1787 
and that of 24th June 1788 a proof that minutes of, at least, the six usual 
monthly meetings, November to April, of the session 1787-88, have been lost 
through most unaccountable laxity. 

In this connection my attention has been drawn to the following extract 
from page 33 of the printed correspondence referred to in the remit from Grand 
Lodge : 

" The minutes of the Canongate Lodge at the period in question were 
" kept by a practising solicitor. They appear to have been kept with care and 
" ample fulness of detail. The very minute, assuming Burns a member of the 
" Lodge, illustrates this fact, for it bears evidence of careful revision, being 
'' partially erased in at least two places ; " ^the crasement, however, being 
evidently made to allow of the change of two words in a slovenly-written report. 
No doubt the Secretary, who was elected in June 1786, was a solicitor -. 
or writer, as he is designated in the records and, no doubt the minute assuming 
Brother Burns a member of the Lodge is partially erased in at least two places, 
but the other statements in above quotation are erroneous very probably from 
an incomplete or hurried examination of the minute-book. 

By reason of such omissions as those referred to, very many brethren 
have never been recorded. This has been more notably the case in respect of 
several brethren who, successively, during the years 1788 to 1798, were elected 
to the Chair of Lodge Canongate Kilvvinning. There is no evidence whatever to 
show at what date the following Right Worshipful Masters became members of 
the Lodge. 

Bro. William Dunbar, W.S., R.W.M., 1788-89-90. 
Dr Thomas Cochrane, R.W.M., 1792-93. 
Dr William Farquharson, R.W.M., 1793-94-95- 
Hugh Smith Mercer, R.W.M., 1798-99, 1800-1. 
Other office-bearers of those times were likewise unrecorded. 

Much of this very gross negligence in minuting the business of Lodge 
Canongate Kilvvinning is clearly traceable to the period 1786 onwards to end of 
the year 1788. 

Matters had evidently reached a climax when, at a meeting on Decem- 
ber 1 2th 1788, at which Brother Dr Thomas Hay presided, a new Secre- 
tary was appointed. That Secretary was 'Brother Robert Moir, initiated 
1st February 1787, on same night Brother Burns was affiliated. A marked 
improvement is observable in the minutes from the time Brother Moir accepted 
office. He signed all minutes while Secretary, which none of the brethren who 
had officiated as Secretary or Acting-Secretary during the years 1786, 1787 



1786 June 24. 



1786 December 7. 



1786 December 7. 



1787 February I. 



and 1788 had cared to do. His faithful services were rewarded. He advanced 
through the several offices to the Chair, to which he was elected in 1795, 
remaining till 1798, then re-elected 1804. 

Ordinarily, it is expected that the Secretary of a Lodge is responsible 
for the minutes during the time he holds office, and that he acknowledges such 
responsibility by signing the minute of each meeting he attends ; but, throughout 
all that period of two years and a half 24th June 1786 to I2th December 
1788 the only minute signed by any one of the several brethren who respec- 
tively acted as Secretary, is that of 24th June 1786, which was signed by 
Brother John Mercer, who had been same day elected Secretary. By signing 
such minute Brother Mercer showed he was quite well aware of that part of his 
duty. His signature does not appear again anywhere in the minutes. 

In the opening paragraph of the Minute, dated 24th June 1786, readers 
are informed " that the Committee had passed Mr Spankie's Account from 2ist 
" June 1783 to 24th June 1786, the Ballance in favour of the Lodge being 
".10, 153. 4d." I beg to call attention to the fact that no minute of the Com- 
mittee meeting when sucJi account was passed has been recorded, and no comment 
is made, nor is any explanation given as to Bailie Spankie's long-winded account. 
Practically the Lodge has been left quite in the dark about that business. 

The first monthly meeting of the season 1786-87 was doubtless held in 
November as usual, but has not been recorded. 

The second minute of this series is headed " St John's Chapel 
" 7-h Decem r - 1786," when " It was reported that since last meeting John 
" Cathcart Esq., Jno. Hepburn Esq., Mr Burn and Mr Jones were entered 
" Apprentices." Those words are undoubted evidence that since previous 
recorded or monthly meeting there must have been at the least one meeting of 
the brethren when degrees were conferred, and when, perhaps, other events 
occurred, of all which no record has been preserved. 

Surely such mode of writing the minute of a meeting " Mr Burn and 
Mr Jones were entered Apprentices " is not creditable in a professional man, if 
it really was written by Brother John Mercer, solicitor, the Secretary. Who- 
were " Mr Burn " and " Mr Jones " among several others of like surnames, but 
without Christian names, on the roll ? 

In the next minute, dated 27th December 1786, a similar announcement 
is made as to members admitted " since last meeting" showing that a meeting or 
meetings of the Lodge had certainly been held, of which no record has been 
made. 

The fourth minute is the well-known one of February ist 1787, when " it 
" was reported that since the 27^ of Decem r - last, M* Burns, Mr Speid,. 
" M* Haig, M r Maule, M r Wotherspoon, Mr Moir," and others, were entered 
Apprentices, and that certain brethren, named in similar manner, were passed 
and raised " who all paid their dues to the Treasurer as also M r Alexr. Boog." 



The Secretary's ideas appear to have become very much confused as he 
wrote those words : such clumsy composition surely could not be the work of 
a professional man. 

" Mr Burns," Mr Spcid," " Mr Haig," ' Mr Maule," "Mr Wotherspoon 
" Mr Moir " ! no Christian name affixed to any one of those patronymics, nor 
intended to be affixed, because no space has been left for it ! no designation and 
no address given of any one of the new members mentioned in the minute ! 
Verily, the writer of this model minute of ist February 1787 whether he was 
a practising solicitor or not could not have felt impressed with the idea that 
he was " writing history." 

The well-known paragraph containing statement relative to the affiliation 
of " Brother Burns, a great Poetic Writer," is another instance of the inability of 
the author of this minute to fulfil adequately the duties of a Lodge Secretary. 
" Brother Burns " appears without a Christian name, although a " Mr Burns " is 
mentioned in preceding paragraph, but the easy-going Secretary or his deputy 
saw no need to waste valuable time filling in Christian names : it was 
obvious to the meanest capacity that as " Mr Burns " had just been initiated, and 
" Brother Burns " affiliated, they were different men, and that was sufficient for 
him. 

It is fortunate that " Brother Burns " is distinctly identified as "a great 
Poetic Writer." The Lodge is not named from which he was affiliated a 
very culpable omission. 

The minute " being partially erased in at least two places " may be 
" evidence of careful revision," as has been alleged ; so may be the word " for " 
which appears interpolated in the fourth line of the paragraph referred to, and 
so also may be the " & " introduced between the names " Mr Craigie " and " Mr 
L. Carnegie" in the preceding paragraph, but, notwithstanding all these evidences 
of the author's carefulness in trimming his laboured composition, it has a poor 
appearance in the end. What an extraordinary production it must have been 
before these emendations were made ! No wonder that the author of it, who- 
ever he was, did not acknowledge the work by appending his signature. 

We are informed that at this meeting of ist February 1787 " it was 
Reported that Since the 27^ of Decem r " certain thirteen gentlemen were 
entered apprentices and six brethren were passed and raised enough work for 
half-a-dozen meetings in the interval, but no record of them has been made. 

1787 March i. The minute of ist March 1787 opens with a similar announcement to the 

effect that " Since last meeting" certain three gentlemen were entered appren- 
tices and eleven brethren were passed and raised. In this, as in previous in- 
stances, the words " Since last meeting " obviously mean since previous monthly 
or recorded meeting. Therefore, it is clear that the brethren of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning in those days had a lively time of it with occasional or special meet- 



8 

ings, although no record ivhatever has been preserved of them except the names 
often only the surnames of new members reported at the monthly or other 
recorded meeting following admission. 

With such repeated evidence that meetings other than those recorded 
were continually taking place at short intervals, why is it contended in the 
printed correspondence that Burns " could have attended at the most only three 
" meetings of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning during the season 1786-87?" 
And this is asserted notwithstanding that in the minute dated 9th February 
1815 referring to " Robert Burns, who was a Member and Poet Laureat of this 
Lodge" he is spoken of as " a Public Character so immediately connected with 
them " [the brethren of Canongate Kilwinning] " and who on so many occasions 
contributed so generally to the harmony of the Masonic Order, and to that of the 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinmng in particular." 

I have a similar criticism to make on the minute of 1st March as on 
previous ones respecting the curt mention of new members, to wit, "Mr 
Clavaring, Mr M'Donald, Mr Millar, Mr Sime, and Mr Gray, who all paid their 
dues to the Treasurer." This manner of recording business by any one acting 
as Lodge Secretary was slovenly in the extreme, and shows that the author 
of the minute was tired of the whole business and wanted to be done with 
it as speedily as possible. Hence, in this, as in other minutes, he abruptly 
finished by repeating the convenient and stereotyped conclusion " No other 
business being before the meeting the Lodge adjourned." The Secretary's 
signature is awanting. 

It would be interesting to know what the Secretary or his deputy at those 
meetings considered as " business." 

Certainly, on this occasion the brother who acted as Secretary omitted to 
record that on a motion by Bro. Alexander Fergusson of Craigdarroch, Right 
Worshipful Master, Brother Robert Burns was appointed Poet Laureate of the 
Lodge. This statement has been attested by Past Master William Nathaniel 
Fraser of Findrack and Tornaveen, who was informed of the event by his 
brother-in-law the late Brother James Veitch, of Elliock, Dumfriesshire, who 
got the information from his cousin, Brother Cutlar Fergusson, of Craigdarroch, 
H.M. Judge-Advocate-General. The latter gentleman was assumed a member 
of Canongate Kilwinning on 25th June 1787, same evening that his father, 
Alexander Fergusson of Craigdarroch, R.W. Master, vacated the chair, and 
Lord Torphichen was elected his successor. 

The minute of Monthly meeting, held in April 1787, had been omitted 
The regular session was then, and is now, six months, November to April inclusive. 
Sometimes an additional monthly meeting was held in October, and sometimes 
one in May. 



1787, June 25 f The next record is that of 25th June 1787, when, we are told, "It was 

reported that since last meeting " certain five gentlemen were entered ap- 
prentices, and eight brethren were passed and raised. Here is another instance 
of negligence on the part of the office-bearer who had charge of the minute- 
book, in the fact that, since previous recorded meeting, there had certainly been 
meetings of the brethren when the business of conferring degrees had been 
transacted, and other events deserving mention had undoubtedly occurred, yet 
no record thereof had been made in the minute-book. 

The minute of Annual meeting, for election of office-bearers, dated 25th 
June 1787, remains in the minute-book without any signature. 

1787, August 2 Following the minute, dated 2nd August 1787, two whole pages of the 

book have been left blank presumably with the intention of writing therein the 
arrears of minutes on some other occasion. 

No other minutes were engrossed for nearly eleven months. 
Therefore, it is perfectly obvious that records of the following meetings 
of the Lodge whatever others, extra-monthly, or occasional were omitted, 
viz. : 

Monthly meeting .... November 1787. 

.... December 1787. 

Festival of St John the Evangelist . . December 27th 1787. 

Monthly meeting .... January 1788. 

.... February 1788. 

.... March 1788. 

. April 1788 

and no record has been kept of the Quarterly meetings of Committee during 
that long interval. 

1788, June 24 The first record which occurs after the two blank pages in the minute- 

book is that of the Annual meeting, on 24th June 1788, when " It was reported 
" that, since last meeting, Brother Daniel Stroble, junior, from Charleston, South 
" Carolina, was duly entered an apprentice, & Brother William Lehrie, of the 
" Roman Eagle, assumed as a member." 

At this meeting, " Brother Dunbar was elected Master, Brother Jardine 
" Depute Mastr Brother Millar Substitute Mast'* Brother Andrew Forbes 
" Sen' Warden B' John Mercer, Jun' Warden, B. Spankie, Continued Trea- 
" surer, Brother William Lehrie, Secretary." 

This is a very curious record immediately following the great hiatus in 
the minute-book and, consequently, in the history of the Lodge of almost 

ELEVEN MONTHS. 

" It was reported that since last meeting," &c. ! Did the author of that 
stereotyped and hackneyed phrase refer to the meeting held August 2nd in 



10 



1 788, November 6 



previous year ? or, to some unrecorded meeting held only a short time previous 
to minute of this date ? 

" B. Spankie Continued Treasurer Brother William Lehrie Secretary !" 
Hence it appears probable that Brother Lehrie, at some previous time within the 
period under review, must have been appointed Secretary, of which there is no 
record. 

If so, his being assumed a member must be a much older affair than it 
seems to be from this minute of 24th June 1788. The author of this historical 
record was very much to blame in not trying to express himself more clearly. 

Among the elections of this date is that of " Brother Millar Substitute 
" Masf" a curt and unceremonious mode of recording a noteworthy event. 

This is the first mention of such an office in the minutes of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning, and, like the election of Robert Burns to the office of 
Poet Laureate the work was accomplished, and the office was effectually 
" created " and established without the process detailed so carefully in pages 43 
and 44 of the printed correspondence. 

The minute of meeting, held November 6th 1788, is composed of very 
few words, and needs little comment. Brief as it is, the acting Secretary took 
special care to mention in addition to other " business " that " They, after 
'* spending a most social evening, adjourned till Festival of St Andrew." 

But the eventful Festival of St Andrew passed into oblivion no allusion 
to the proceedings is in the book. Perhaps the acting Secretary had only 
another "most social evening" to record, and "there was no other business." 
Perhaps, as was the fact with regard to many other occasions during the period 
1787 and 1788, the " business M of the meeting, and the acting Secretary's 
business to record it were alike forgotten. 

Several defects in the brief minute dated December 4th 1788 are so 
palpable, they will readily be discerned at a glance, and need no comment. 

The minute of committee, dated December 12, 1788, contains the 

1788, December 12 announcement, that " they elected Brother Lehrie to be Junior Warden in place 
" of Brother Mercer, who had gone abroad, and Brother Robert Moir to be 
" Secretary, in place of Brother Lehrie." 

Brother Mercer seems to have been very much " abroad " ever since 
accepting office in 1786 as Secretary, and at no time altogether at home in that 
position. The time when he took his departure is not mentioned. 

This, the last minute of the series under review, is without any signature. 

It is the only minute of a committee meeting recorded within the long period 
of two years and a-half. 



1788, December 4 



Committee Meeting, 



II 

From this analysis of the minutes of 1786, 1787, 1788, may be deduced 
the following conclusions, viz. : 

1. That, although the narrations in those minutes are extremly meagre 
and otherwise very imperfect, nevertheless, for the information contained in 
them so far as it goes, and so far as the language used is clear and unequivocal 
the minutes are quite reliable. exampli gratia The Affiliation of Robert Burns 
on 1st February 1787. 

2. That, in place of being an accurate and complete record of business 
and noteworthy events, those minutes are remarkably deficient, inaccurate, and 
incomplete : therefore, the mere fact that certain business or noteworthy events 
have been omitted from those, defective minutes is no evidence, whatever that such 
business or events did not occur, more especially when indisputable evidence to 
the contrary is produced from other sources. ex. gr. The Election and Inaugu- 
ration of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate on ist March 1787. 

Respectfully submitted by 

HUGH C. PEACOCK, 

Past Secy, and Past Depute Master Lodge Can. Kil. 
Proxy Master No. 476. 



COPY MINUTES 



OF 



LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING 

From 2^th June 1786 to \2.th December 1/88. 



Festival of St John ST JOHNS LODGE z^thjune 1786 

the Baptist 

The Lodge having met to celebrate the Anniversary of St. John the 
Baptist It was reported that the Committee had passed Mr. Spankie's Accot 
from 2 ist June 1783 to 24 June 1786. The Ballance in favour of the Lodge 
being 10. 15. 4. : the Vouchers were delivered and lodged in the Charter Chest. 

That at the Meeting it was proposed That Brother Ferguson should be 
continued Master, wc h being unanimously agreed to, he accordingly being re- 
elected. Proposed Brother More be Continued Depute Master B* W m Dunbar 
Wr to Signet, Sen* Warden, Jno Millar Advocate, Jun r Warden, Geo, Spankie 
Cont d Treasurer & Jn Mercer Secy. The usual Business of the Meet- 
ing being finished and after having spent the Evening with that fun and Good 
Humour which always attends the Meetings of that lodge they adjourned the 
Meeting. 

Alex r Fergusson of Craigdarroch ALEX* FERGUSSON M 

admission not recorded 
Charles More of the Royal Bank CH\ S MORE DM 

E. 1769 Feby 8 

William Dunbar W.S. \VlLL DUNBAR Sen' Ward 

not recorded 
John Millar Advocate J o MlLLER Jun War 

E.P.R. 1786 March 2 
George Spankie Merchant QEO SPANKIE Treasurer 

E. 1778 March 2 
John Mercer Writer J OHN MERCER SecT 

E.P.R. 1784 Nov r ii J 



ST JOHNS CHAPEL, jth Decemr. 1786. 

The Lodge being duly Constituted, it was Reported that since last Meet- 
ing John Cathcart Esqr J n o Hepburn Esqr M r Burn and Mr Jones were- 
entered apprentices, and Mr Spence, Mr Jones and Lord Torphichen were 
passed as fellow Craft and raised to the High degree of Master Masons and paid 
their dues accordingly. 

The Lodge was afterwards visited by the Most Worshipful Grand 
Master and other Officers of the Grand Lodge of Scotland. 

3 Pan^Ri. 14/6 ^ ^ s Meeting the undermentioned were assumed Members, viz* 

Collected 7. 15. The Right Honble The Earl of Errol, The Honble Mr Gordon of Kane- 

muir, Mr John Newal of Earlston, Captn Rollo Gillespie, & W> Campbell 
Esqr of Fairfield. 

After passing the Evening in a sociable and agreable manner the Lodge 
adjourned till St Johns Day. 
A1 , 3e7 ALEX* FERGUSSON M. 

C E",76 9 r Feb 8 C HA S MORE D.M. 



Minute [The next minute is that of the visitation, above noticed, by the 

of the Grand Lodge M w Grand Master and other Officers of Grand Lodge, apparently written 
by Robert Meikle Grand Clerk. The following Signatures are attached to 
the Minute. 

Francis Charter!* Jun r of Amisfield WlLL MASON G. Secy. FRANCIS CHARTERIS Junr G.M. 

shortly afterwards Lord Elcho rj n MTTTK-T T? fid fib- 

Aff from Haddington Lodge I 7 79 March 3 KO MEIKLE W Uk 

Lord Torphichen E 1786 March 2 TORPHICHEN D.G.M. 

D* Thomas Hay E 1774 Octr 12 THOMAS HAY St G.M. 

RVVM 1781 101784 Iun r GrW n 1782101784 

Subte Gr Master 1784 to 1798 
D r Tames Home^E 1778 Deer 2 JAMES HOME S.G.W.p.t. 

WM. MACKILLOP J.G.W.p.t] 



ST JOHNS CHAPEL, 27 Deer. 1786. 

The Lodge being Constituted, it was Reported that since last Meeting 
M r J. Seton & M r J. Hobman were Entered Apprentices and M r - J. Hobman 
Passed and raised, who paid their dues accordingly. 

2 Entries 29 This being the festival of St John the Evangelist the Lodge received and 

Collected 19 returned Visitations to the different Lodges in Edinburgh, and, after the usual 
f. I9 6 compliments were paid the visiting Lodges the Lodge adjourned till the next 
Monthly Meeting. 

Alex' Fergusson ALEX*- FERGUSSON M. 

Admission not recorded 
Chas More CHAS. MORE D.M. 

Ei76 9 Feby8 

John Millar JO MlLLAR Junr. J,W. 

E 1786 March 2 



ST JOHNS CHAPEL, ist Feby. 1787. 

There being no Meeting in January the Lodge met this Evening and 
being duly Constituted it was Reported that since the 27th o f Decent last the 
following gentlemen were Entered Apprentices viz* M r Burns, M r Speid, 
Captn Bartlet, Mr Haig, G. Douglas Esqr, E. B. Clive Esqr, Lloyd Lynn Norfolk, 
Mr Maule, M r Wotherspoon, Mr Moir, Mr L. Carnegie, Mr Archd Miller, 
M r James Buchan, and that the following Brethern were passed and Raised 
to the High Degree of Master Masons viz* M r Haig, Cap* Bartlet, Lloyd Lynn 
Norfolk, Baron Norton, M r Craigie&Mr L. Carnegie who all paid their dues 
to the Treasurer as also M r Alex*- Boog. 

Assumed The Right Worshipful Master having observed that Brother Burns was 

B* Burns the Poet for 

at present in the Lodge who is well known as a great Poetic Writer and a 

A 

late publication of his Works which have been universally Commended And 
Submitted that he should be assumed a member of this Lodge which was 
unanimously agreed to and he was assumed accordingly. 

7 3 pfssed & Rd '1 o 6 Having spent the Evening in a very Social, Affect & Brotherly manner 

Collected 2126 as ^' nQ meetings of this Lodge always have been it was adjourned till next 
22 ii 6 monthly meeting. 

not recorded ALEX* FERGUSSON M. 

E 1769 Feby 8 CHA S MQRE D-M> 



E 1786 March 2 j o M ILLAR Junr J.W. 



ST JOHNS CHAPEL ist March 1787 

The Lodge being duly Constituted it was Reported that since last meet- 

l ng R. Dalrymple Esqr F. J. Hammond Esqr and R. A. Maitland Esqr were 

entered apprentices and the following Brethern Passed and Raised R. Sinclair 

M E p&R 6 3 6 3 6 Es( l r ' A - McDonald Esqr, E. B. Clive Esqr, Capt Dalrymple, R. A. Maitland 

Collected J_i_ Esqr F. J. Hammond Esqr, Mr Clavaring, Mr McDonald, Mr Millar, Mr Sime 

,11 i o and Mr Gray who all paid their dues to the Treasurer. No other Business being 

before the Meeting the Lodge adjourned. 

not recorded ALEX* FERGUSSON M. 

E 1769 Feby 8 

E 1786 March 2 JO MlLLAR, J.W. CHAS MORE D 



Festival of St John 
the Baptist 



Lord Torphichen 

E 1786 March 2 
William Dunbar 

not recorded 
John Millar 

E 1786 March 2 
Lindsay Carnegie 

E 1787 Feb I 
George Spankie 

E 1778 March 2 



Dr Thos. Hay 
E 1774 Oct 12 



ST JOHNS CHAPEL zyhjttne 1787 

The Lodge having met to Celebrate the Anniversary of John the Baptist. 
It was reported that since last Meeting the following Gentlemen were Entered 
Apprentices viz* 

Cornet John Hart of the 6 tr Dragoons, Mr Schinimen, M r Jo Boader 
M.D. Mr Stewart and Mr C. Abercromby this Evening and the following 
Brethern passed and raised viz* Cornet Hart, M r Schinimen, Mr Boader, 
Mr Gardner, Mr Speid, Mr Witherspoon, Mr Moir and Mr Maule who all paid 
their Dues to the Treasurer. It was also reported that the Committee had 
passed M r Spankies Accounts from June 1786 to this date, the Balance in 
favour of the Lodge 6. I. 8J, the Vouchers were delivered and lodged in the 
Charter Chest. 

The Meeting proceeded next to the Election of their Officers when Lord 
Torphichen was appointed Master, M r William Dunbar Depute Master, M r John 
Millar, Senior, and M r Lindsay Carnegie Jun r Wardens, M r Spankie and 
Mr Mercer Continued, the former Treasurer and the latter Secretary. They 
also appointed the last with the present Officers together with Doctor Spense 
and M r Thomas Hay to be a Committee to manage the Affairs of the Lodge. 

Mr Fergusson Junr o f Craigdarroch and M r Frizzle of the Isle of Man 
were this night assumed Members. 

There were Several Visitations from the different Lodges which were 
returned. No other Business before the Meeting the Lodge adjourned till 

August. 

(No Signature to this Minute,) 



ST JOHNS LODGE, 2nd August . 
I787-J 
The Lodge being met and duly constituted Brother T. Hay reported 

last 

that since meeting he & some other Brethern of the Committee had taken 
A 

upon themselves to order 4. 4. to be paid to a Brother who was in such 
necessity as to admit of no delay, & therefore begg'd that he might receive 
the Sanction of the Master & Brethern of the Lodge for that order which the Master 
& Lodge highly approved of & returned thanks to the Gentlemen of the Com- 
mittee and to Brother Hay in particular for his proper conduct and friendly 
attention to the Brother in distress. 

There being no other business before the Lodge it was adjourned untill 



not recorded 
E 1769 Feby 8. 

E 1782 Deer 4 RWM 1790 to 1792 



WILL DUNBAR M r - p t. 
CHAS- MORE S.W. P. T. 
HENRY JARDINE J.W. p.t. 

[ The succeeding two pages of the Minute-Book are wholly blank\ 



i6 



GO 

T-H 
"SO 





- 






00 



^ 

8 



. 

f 









-S 

-s 



I 

SH 

o 

s 



s; 
I 



IS 



Wn> Dunbar, W.S. 
Not recorded 

Henry Jardine, 

Advocate 
E 1782 Dec 4 
John Millar,Advocate 
E 1786 March 2 

Andrew Forbes 
E 1786 March 2 
John Mercer, Writer 
E 1784 Nov II 

George Spankie, 

Merchant 
E 1778 March 2 

Wiliam Lehrie, 
Stud of Med. 
Aff d 1788 June 24 

D r Tho s Hay 
E 1774 Oct 12 

Alex r Fergusson 
Not recorded 

Cha s More 
E 1769 Feb 8 

E 1782 Dec 4 



ST JOHNS LODGE, 24 June 1788. 

The Lodge having met to Celebrate the Anniversary of St John the 
Baptist It was reported that since last meeting Brother Daniel Stroble 
Jun r from Charleston, South Carolina was duly entered an Apprentice ; & 
Brother William Lehrie of the Roman Eagle assumed as a Member. 

The meeting then proceeded to the Election of Officers when Brother 
Dunbar was elected Master, Brother Jardine Depute Mast r - Brother Millar 
Substitute Mast r -i Brother Andrew Forbes Sen r Warden Br John Mercer 
Jun r Warden B. Spankie Continued Treasurer Brother William Lehrie Secre- 
tary. They also appointed the last with the present Officers together with 
Br s Hay, Ferguson of Craigdarroch & Cha s - More to be a Committee to manage 
the affairs of the Lodge. 

Thereafter; Messrs Augustine Smith, James Box Young, James Moultrie, 
Thomas Marshall, Peter Ward from America, & Brothers James Robertson & 
John Dick, all of the Roman Eagle, with Brother John Bushby of St Lukes 
were assumed Brothers. 

The Petition of John Clark an Indigent Brother was received The 
Lodge allowed him Five Shillings. No other Business before the Lodge. They 
adjourned untill the first Thursday July. 

HENRY JARDINE D.M. 



Robert Darling 
P & R 1776 Nov 6 



EDINBURGH Novr6th 1788 

There being no meetings in July or August the Lodge met this Evening, 
and being duly Constituted Brother Darling was elected Grand Steward & 
Brother John Brown of the Lodge of St Davids was Assumed a Member. They 
after spending a most Social Evening adjourned till Festival of St Andrew. 



E 1782 Deer 4 



HENRY JARDINE D.M. 



ST JOHNS LODGE 
EDINBURGH Decemr $tk 1788 

The Lodge having met, it was reported that Brothers George Pitt 
Stevenson & John T. Shoof both of Maryland, & Brother Thomas James 
Virginia North America, with Brother James Makethick Adair, Tichfield, 
Northamptonshire, England, were all duly entered as Apprentices. 



19 

Thereafter Brothers John Abercromby Senior Warden of the Union 
Kilwinning Lodge at Charleston So. Carolina, Herman Lion of the Antient 
Lodge No. 53 of Liverpool, James Dewar, James Hay, John Oliphant, & 

all of the Thistle 

William Robertson were all Assumed Brothers of 
A 

No other Business coming before the Lodge, they after spending the 
Evening in a very Social Affect & Brotherly manner, as the meetings of this 
Lodge have always been, adjourned till 

E 1782 Deer 4 

HENRY JARDINE, D.M. 



EDINBURGH 12 December 1788. 

Meeting of 
the Committee The Committee of the Lodge having met Brother Thomas Hay Master 

in absence of the Right Worshipfull, they elected Brother Lehrie to -be Junior 
Warden in place of Brother Mercer who had gone abroad, and Brother Robert 
Moir to be Secretary in place of Brother Lehrie. 

No other Business coming before the Committee they adjourned. 

[No Signature to above Mimite.~\ 



I certify that the foregoing is a true Copy of all the Minutes of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning, contained in the Mimite-book from 2^th June 1786 to 
1 2th December 1788, inclusive. 

GEO. CRAWFORD, R.W.M., 

Lodge Can. Kil. No. 2. 
EDINBURGH, April 12, 1893. 



FIEST REFERENCE 




ROBERT BURNS 

Having been POET LAUREATE of the Lodge. 



On a prominent part of the east wall of Lodge Canongate Kilvvinning 
between the Master's chair and the Poet's corner hangs a very antique-looking 
framed print of Robert Burns, and, on the blackened glass mount below his 
portrait, is displayed in bright golden characters, the following inscription : 

" ROBERT BURNS the SCOTTISH BARD 

"POET LAUREAT 
"LODGE No. 2 CANNONGATE 

"KILWINNING" 

That singularly attractive old print of our great national poet was 
published on the 29th day of October 1798. 

It is one of four prints got for Lodge Canongate Kilwinning by the 
Committee, which were all duly approved by the Lodge on the 24th day of 
June 1802. 

It has been there exhibited on one of the walls of the Lodge room in the 
full view of very many thousands of visitors throughout the past ninety-one years, 
and no one of the visitors during that long period has ever called in question the 
fact which is so conspicuously proclaimed by the inscription on the picture that 
" Robert Burns, the Scottish Bard," had been " Poet Laureat " of Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning. 



21 



Naming them in the order of their publication the four prints are 

PROVOST GEORGE DRUMMOND, R. W. Master A.D. 1764 to 1766, published 17 , 

DR NATHANIEL SPENS, R. VV. Master A.D. 1778 to 1780, published 1793. 

ROBERT BURNS, Poet Laureat AD. 1787 to 1796, published 1798. 

H.R.H. GEORGE AUGUSTUS FREDERICK, PRINCE OF WALES, &c., "Grand 
" Patron of the Most Antient and Honourable Order of Free and 
" Accepted Masons " (Dedicated to the Grand Lodge of England), pub- 
lished 1802. 

In one of the following excerpta from the minute of Annual Meeting 1802 
occurs the first reference to those prints. The Lodge Secretary with that 
singular laxity which is so characteristic of his time in matters which had not 
been deemed strictly " business," and which therefore did not require special 
M> , description has quite omitted to name whom the four prints represent ; but 

5 years and 1 1 months ample proof is hereinafter given that the "four prints which were got for the 
after his death L o dg e ; and which "met with the approbation of the Brethern" on 24th June 1802, 
are assuredly the four briefly described in above list. 



First Reference 
in Can. Kil. records 

to 
ROBERT BURNS 

as 
" POET LAUREAT" 



Festival 

of St. John the Baptist 

June 24, 1802 



E 1787 Feb. i, same 
night when Robert 
Burns was affiliated 

E 1795 June 24 

Vide Minute dated 
9th February 1815 



P&R 

Vide Minute dated 

9th February 1815 
P&Ri8oi June 24 
EP&Ri8oi April I 
Vide Minute of Nov 

12 1845 
E 1800 Dec 27 
P&R 1778 Dec 2 
E 1778 Dec 2 
E 1760 June 23 
Not recorded but 

1780 June 24 

was "continued as 

"Steward" 
E 1760 June 23 
Not recorded 



EXCERPTA FROM MINUTE OF ANNUAL MEETING 1802. 

ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL, z^thjune 1802. 

***** 

" Brother ROBERT MoiR was called to the chair, and he proposed to the 
Brethern that Brother ALEXANDER J AFFRAY (late Rt. Worshipful Master) should 
be re-elected, which was agreed to with unanimous consent. Accordingly 
Brother J affray took the chair, and recommended to the Brethern that the other 
offices of the Lodge should be filled by the past Office- Bearers, which was. 
unanimously agreed to. viz. 

WILLIAM BALLANTYNE, Depute Master. 
JOHN RUSSEL, Substitute Master. 
WILLIAM CAMPBELL, Senior Warden. 
JOSEPH DIXON, Junior Warden. 
JOHN MORE, junr., Secretary. 
GEORGE SPANKIE, Treasurer. 
GEORGE MILNE, Grand Steward. 
ALEXANDER FORBES, Steward. 
GEORGE MILNE, Tyler. 
ABRAM STRACHAN, Assistant Tyler. 



22 



bide minute of Feb. 

1st, 1787, &c., also 

minute of June 8th, 

1815 

E 1787 Feb I 
P & R 1795 June 24 
Not recorded, but 

was sec. 1790 



P& R 1778 Dec 2 
E 1795 June 24 
E 1800 Dec 27 



" The Rt. Worshipful Master then proposed that the Committee for 
Managing the Affairs of the Lodge should consist of the Office-bearers with the 
addition of 

Brother CHARLES MORE. 
ROBERT MOIR. 
ROBERT SCOTT MONCRIEFF, and 
HUGH SMYTH MERCER. 

" The Committee recommend that a Seal should be got for the Lodge, 
and remit to Messrs Jaffray, Russel, and Curroll to project a proper device, like- 
wise that the fee for a Diploma should be seven shillings and sixpence sterling. 
They approve of four prints which 'were got for the Lodge, and they recommend 
that the Lodge should be Painted, and that new coverings should be got for the 

Tables. All the above mentioned has met with the approbation of the Brethern" 

***** 

" A very numerous attendance of the Brethern took place this evening : 
the Lodge was closed with regret after a night spent with the greatest harmony 
and delight, and to the heartfelt satisfaction of every Brother present. 
" JOHN MORE, junr., Sy- 

" A. JAFFRAY, M. 
Joseph Dixon, J.W." 



In evidence that the picture of Robert Burns now under notice was 
originally as it appears at the present time, with the inscription on it as quoted, 
and is one of the four oldest framed prints or engravings in the Lodge-room 
.of Canongate Kilwinning. I beg to submit the opinion of Mr David Reed, 
Printseller, &c., Rose Street, Edinburgh, a competent authority in such matters, 
who has made a careful examination of all the said prints, and expresses his 
judgment thereancnt in the following letter : 

OPINION OF EXPERT AS TO PRINTS. 

94 ROSE STREET, 

EDINBURGH, \zthjune 1893. 
Mr HUGH C. PEACOCK, 

8 York Buildings. 

Dear Sir, 

With reference to my visits to the Lodge-room of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning and to the Examination, which, on request of yourself and other Members, 
I have made of certain framed engravings there, I beg to report as follows : 

The four oldest prints or engravings that I found hanging on the walls of the 
lodge-room are 



23 

First : The print of GEORGE DRUMMOVD, bearing the following inscription 
in gold letters on the blackened glass mount : 

"GEORGE DRUMMOND ESQ., LORD PROVOST OF EDINBURGH 

" and 

" R.W.M. of CANONGATE KILWINNING LODGE 
"A.D. 1764-65." 

and, below the portrait, are engraved the words : 

" J. Alexander Pinxit 1752. A. Bell, Fecit, Edinr. 

"GEORGE DRUMMOND ESQ. 

" Late Lord Provost of the City of Edinburgh, and one of the Honourable 
" Commissioners of His Majesty's Revenues of Excise in Scotland." 

Note. In Redgrave's Dictionary of Painters and Engravers I observe that 
"Cosmo Alexander, Portrait Painter, practised in Edinburgh about 1750," and 
"painted portrait of Provost of that time," i.e. portrait of Provost George 
Drummond. 

Second : The celebrated print by John Beugo of Dr NATHANIEL SPENS, 
bearing the following inscription in gold letters on blackened glass mount : 

"NATHANIEL SPENS, M.D. 

" R.W. MASTER of CANONGATE KILWINNING LODGE 
"FROM A.D. 1778 to 1780. 

and, below the portrait, are engraved the words : 

" Painted by H. Raeburn. Engraved by Beugo." 

According to Catalogue of the Works of Sir Henry Raeburn, R.A., exhibited in 
the Royal Academy National Galleries, Edinburgh 1876, the portrait of 
Nathaniel Spens, M.D. was painted for the Archer's Hall in the year 1774. John 
Beugo engraved the portrait in 1793. 

This portrait is specially referred to in a small 8vo book in my possession, 
entitled "Picture of Edinburgh," published 1805, wherein Mr John Beugo is 
mentioned as one of the principal Edinburgh Engravers of that time, and it is 
there said " His full length of Dr Spens as an Archer is a fine print." In " The 
New Scots Almanack" for 1803-4, page 113, Dr Nathaniel Spens is named as 
one of the Brigadiers-General of the Royal Company of Archers, also as Vice- 
President of the Council of same Company. 

Third : The print of ROBERT BURNS, bearing the following inscription in. 
gold letters on blackened glass mount : 



24 

" ROBERT BURNS the SCOTTISH BARD 

" POET LAUREAT 
"LODGE No. 2 CANNONGATE 
" K/L J VINNING " 

and below the portrait are engraved the words : 

" Painted by Naysmith, Drawn by Skirving, Engraved by Paton Thomson." 

"ROBERT BURNS 

"London, published as the Act directs, October 29th, 1798, and sold by R. 
"Wilkinson, Cornhill, and A. Skelton, No. 23 Haymarket." 

The glazing of each of these three pictures has been done with the original 
-old-style crown glass, peculiar to the period ninety to a hundred years ago. It is 
bent and uneven in surface, unequal in thickness, greenish in tone, and varies in 
refractive quality. The blackening of the glass inside upon the broad gold bands 
in shape of a mount around the portrait, and on 'the gold lettering below it, was a 
.style much in vogue about that time. Further, the gold leaf then employed was at the 
least two-and-a-half times thicker than what is generally in use now for such purposes, 
'hence its continued extraordinary brightness in all the pictures under notice. 

The three pictures above described are thoroughly uniform both in kind of glass, 
with which nearly a century ago they have been glazed, and in the artistically filled in 
gold lines around, and gold lettering below, each portrait on the blackened border within 
the glass. 

Fourth : Print of GEORGE AUGUSTUS FREDERICK PRINCE OF WALES, &c., 
published June 4th, 1802, by the well-known printseller, Wm. Walker, of 31 Old 
Bond Street, London. 

This print has been very much neglected or wantonly defaced. It appears to 
have remained a long time without the protective covering of a glass or mount, 
and is therefore much begrimed by smoke and dust. The lower part of the 
portrait has at some time been torn across and the parts clumsily joined. There 
are evidences of more than one attempt at restoration or repair. The following 
quotation shews what remains of the inscription, and shews also, by the blanks, 
the parts in it that have been destroyed : 

" Drawn and Engraved by Edmund Scott. Portrait Engraver to their 

"His ROYAL HIGHNESS GEORGE AUGUSTUS PRINCE REGENT, &c. &c. 

" GRAND PATRON of the MOST ANTIENT and HON FREE and ACCEPTED MASONS. 

" Dedicated by Permission to the Grand Lodge cf England 
" by their Obliged and Obedient Servant 

" Edmund Scott 

" Published June 4th, 1802, by W. Walker, 31 Old Bond Street, Forest, Piccadilly ; 
" W. Austin, Russell Street ; and E. Scott, No. 7 Craven Buildings, Brighton." 






25 

The frame is obviously very old quite as old as the print. The glass is also- 
old, but not coeval with the frame and print. It is whiter and more regular on the 
surface than any glass in the other three pictures. From sundry evidences on the 
frame, I am of opinion that this print of George Augustus Prince of Wales was 
originally glazed and mounted in exactly the same manner as the other three 
pictures. One circumstance among others strongly supporting such conclusion 
is that all along the inside check or rabbet of the frame there are indications of a 
knife having been used to enlarge the space so as to admit a square of glass com- 
pleted in same style as in the other three pictures, which glass had been rather 
large, and which by reason of being painted black around the edges could not 
be reduced in size by cutting with a diamond, as clear glass could have been. 

With the exception of an engraving of the Earl of Moira probably added to the 
collection after he came to Scotland in 1803 all of the above described four prints are 
older by many years than any other framed print or engraving in the lodge-room. 



Yours faithfully, 



DAVID REED. 



BROTHER WILL M - CAMPBELL, 

AND A FEW OF HIS EARLY ASSOCIATES. 

The attendance of brethren at meetings of the Lodge about this time was 
usually very large, as is shown at page 22 in the concluding lines of quotation 
from the minute of 24th June 1802, and the following brief extracts, signed 
by Bro. Campbell, from minutes of meetings held shortly previous to that 
date. 

" 24/7* /tine 1801. 



. Jaffray 

E 1795 J un e 24 
John More junr. 

E 1778 Dec 2 
Willm. Campbell 

E 1801 April I 



" The meeting was very numerous." 

* * * 

"JoH.v MORE, junr., Secy-" 

" WILLM. CAMPBELL, Senior Warden." 



* * 

" ALEX. JAFFRAY, M. 



25 

" \6th November 1801. 
***** 

" Upwards of 100 of the brethren met at the Lodge this evening." 
***** 

(Vide Supra) JOHN MORE, junr., SecY- " ALEX. JAFFRAY, M. 

' WILLM. CAMPBELL, Senior Warden." 

Brother WILLIAM CAMPBELL, who signed the minutes above quoted, 
was re-elected Senior Warden, June 24th, 1802. 

He and the other worthy Brethren who comprised the " very numerous 
attendance" at the meeting of that date, formally approved of certain "four 
"prints which were got for the Lodge" one of these being the well known 
engraved portrait of the Poet, having on its antique glass mount the inscription : 

" ROBERT BURNS the SCOTTISH BARD 
"POET LAUREAT 

"LODGE No. 2 CANNONGATE 
" KIL WINNING " 

Several of the Brethren present on that occasion had enjoyed the company 
of the Poet Laureate at meetings of the Canongate Kilwinning. They all saw 
the picture of Robert Burns, with that bright attractive inscription appended to it 
as we see it to this day, and they all, by their ready approval of the "four prints 
which were got for the Lodge," as expressed in the minute of 24th June, 1802, 
acknowledged their belief in the fact, so prominently announced by the inscription, 
that he was " Poet Laureat " of their Lodge. 

Thus far it is amply proved that Robert Burns had been " Poet Laureat." 

There is ample proof also that Robert Burns, besides being duly elected 
to that office, was formally inaugurated " Poet Laureat," and that the Inauguration 
took place March ist, 1787, notwithstanding that the minute of that date 
written by an incompetent or indifferent Secretary contains no record whatever 
of the event. The Secretary, we are informed, was " a practising Solicitor." If 
so, he did not import his good business qualities into the Secretaryship of 
Canongate Kilwinning. (Vide pages 4 to 19 hereof.) 

In support of this statement relative to the Inauguration, I desire to draw 
special attention to the valuable fact that this Brother WILLIAM CAMPBELL, who 
was Senior Warden in the years 1801 to 1803, associated during that period with 
many brethren who had enjoyed the company of Robert Burns at Lodge meet- 
ings they subsequently testifying that Burns had been " Poet Laureat" of this 



27 

Lodge, as is indisputably proved by the minutes of meetings held throughout the 
years 1801-2 and 3, also 1815-16, and 17 and that he was the same Brother 
WILLIAM CAMPBELL, who, at a meeting of the Lodge on I2th November, 1845, 
seconded the motion " That Brother Watson have access to sketch the antique 
" and picturesque interior of the Lodge, with a view to his painting the Inaugura- 
" tion of Robert Burns as her Poet Laureate," on which occasion he stated that 
" he thought the proposition one deserving every support" that " he had been forty- 
" five years a Mason, and connected with this Lodge," that he had travelled in 
company of Burns, " and spent two of the most happy days with him at Auchter- 
" tyre Castle, the seat of Sir William Murray," and " he was happy that he had 
11 lived to second such an admirable motion" 

Brother Sam. Somerville of Ampherlaw, M.D., who was a member of 
Committee along with Past-Master Fraser, and Past-Master Thomas Drybrough, 
in the year 1873, when I was Secretary of the Lodge, and who took an active 
interest in my correspondence with Bro. D. Murray Lyon in January and 
February of that year was Immediate Past-Master of the Lodge, and was 
present along with Bro. Will m - Campbell and other old members at this meeting 
of 1 2th November, 1845. 

Further direct evidence that the Inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet 
Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, took place March ist, 1787, is given 
by Past-Master W. N. Fraser of Tornaveen. 

In considering this question of the Inauguration and the picture repre- 
senting it, there is one part of the minute of I2th Nov., 1845, above referred to, 
relative to the motion so cordially seconded by Bro. Willm. Campbell, which 
deserves special notice. It runs thus : " Brother Marshall was requested to 
" furnish the AUTHENTICATED PARTICULARS to a subsequent meeting, when the 
" motion should be disposed of. Meantime, it was unanimously entertained ; " 
and, in the minute of next meeting, ipth Nov., 1845, when the motion was 
brought up for disposal, the sequel is thus recorded : " The motion was seconded 
" by the R.W.M. (Bro. A. D. Campbell), and unanimously carried." 

Hence, it appears, that at those two meetings, held respectively on the 
1 2th and ipth November, 1845, the whole subject of the Election and Inaugura- 
tion of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate was thoroughly sifted, and the AUTHENTI- 
CATED PARTICULARS furnished to the meeting of ipth Nov. as directed 
proved to be so satisfactory that the R.W. Master himself seconded the motion, 
relative to painting the Inauguration, and it was unanimously carried. 

The signature of " WlLL M - CAMPBELL" appended to minutes of 1801, as 
above quoted, supplies absolute proof that that brother was the same William 
Campbell who was re-elected Senior Warden, 24th June, 1802, when the "four 
" prints which were got for the Lodge" "met with the approbation of the 
" Brethren" one of those prints being that of Robert Burns, "Poet Laureat" 



28 

already described, and absolute proof also that he was the same " WlLL M - CAMP- 
BELL" who signed the attendance book on occasion of the meeting, held \2th 
November, 1845, when he cordially seconded the motion (which was "unanimously 
:< carried") to the effect that the Inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate 
be painted by BrotJier Stewart Watson. 

In this connection the following memoranda are particularly worthy of 

notice, relative to a few of the office-bearers of the Lodge who were associated 

with Brother William Campbell, in the election which took place 24th June, 1802 : 

Brother ROBERT MoiR, who was called to the chair on said occasion, had 

been initiated in Canongate Kilwinning, February ist, 1787, same 

night Robert Burns tvas affiliated. He became an active and valuable 

member of the Lodge: Was appointed Secretary, December I2th, 

1788, just when a good Secretary was urgently needed, the minute 

book having been much neglected for nearly two years. [ Vide pages 

4 and 12.] Brother Moir served in several other offices, and 

ultimately became R.W. Master in 1795* 

Brother ALEXANDER JAFFRAY was initiated in Can. Kil., June 24th, 1795, 
while Robert Burns was yet in life, and when the above named Robert 
Moir was R.W. Master of the Lodge. He was most active in the 
years 1815 and 1816 in promoting the general subscription towards 
the fund for the "Mausoleum to the memory of Robert Burns, who 
" was a member and Poet Laureat of this Lodge" Vide minute, 
dated 9th February, 1815. 

Brother WILLIAM BALLANTYNE, Writer to the Signet, initiated 1799, was 
elected Secretary, Nov. 30, 1799, re-elected June 24, 1800; elected 
Depute-Master 1801, re-elected June 24, 1802, when the Print of 
" Robert Burns, the Scottish Bard, Poet Laureat, Lodge No. 2 Cannon- 
" gate Kilwinning" " met with the approbation of the Brethren,*' 
re-elected also Depute-Master in 1803, 4, and 5. He was a member 
of Committee until the year 1817, and, along with other old brethren 
now referred to, acknowledged the fact that Robert Burns was a 
member, " and Poet Laureat of this Lodge" by promoting the Mau- 
soleum subscription in the year 1815. Vide minute, dated 9th 
February, 1815. 

Brother HUGH SMYTH MERCER, Writer to the Signet, has not been 
recorded. This omission from the minute book is doubtless one of 
the very many instances of gross neglect which I have proved to have 
occurred during the Burns period. Vide reference to Bro. Mercer at 
page 5 hereof. The first mention of Bro. Hugh Smyth Mercer in 
the Can. Kil. records is very shortly after the period referred to in 
the list of office-bearers elected June 24, 1790, when he was elected 



2 9 

Secretary: was R.W. Master 1798, 1799, and 1800, and appointed 
a member of Committee at the meeting above-mentioned, June 24, 
1802, when the Print of the " Poet Laureat" was approved. 

Brother ROBERT SCOTT MONCRIEFF of Wellwood and Pitliver, recorded 
as P. and R. June 24, 1795 ; was elected Secretary 1796, J. W. 1797, 
S.W. 1798, and Depute-Master 1799 and 1800. At the meeting of 
June 24, 1802, he was elected a member of Committee, and well 
aware, therefore, that Burns had been " Poet Laureat." He continued 
on Committee with Bro. Charles More, and other old members, for 
several years afterwards. 

Brother JOHN MORE, jun., and Brother GEORGE SPANKIE, were both 
initiated December 2, 17/8. The latter was continuously in office as 
Treasurer from 1784 and throughout the Burns' period, and had 
therefore been fully cognizant of all proceedings during the time 

Burns attended the Lodge ; the affiliation of Burns, his election and 

. 

inauguration as Poet Laureate, and other attendances. 

Brother GEORGE MILNE was initiated as far back as 1760, still an office- 
bearer of the Lodge, and therefore equally aware of said proceedings. 

Brother ALEXANDER FORBES (not recorded), who was "continued as 
Steward" in 1780, was almost continually in office thereafter, and 
consequently was also quite aware that Robert Burns was an affiliated 
member, and had been elected and inaugurated Poet Laureate. 

AND 

Brother CHARLES MORE, of the Royal Bank, one of the Committee 1802. 
Initiated 1769. He was Depute-Master when Burns was affiliated, 
February i, 1787. His signature appears affixed to the minute of 
that date, and to the minutes of many of the other meetings which 
took place while Burns resided in Edinburgh. He also seconded 
one of the motions, passed 8th June, 1815, relative to the subscrip- 
tion for a Mausoleum to the memory of" the Lamented Bard, ROBERT 
" BURNS, WHO HAD BEEN POET LAUREAT TO THE LODGE." Vide 
minute, dated June 8, 1815. 

It is therefore evident that Brother William Campbell, and his early 
associates in the Lodge, " had many opportunities of giving testimony in favour 
" of the particulars alluded to" in the minute of I2th November 1845, regarding 
the Inauguration. 

Other matter which relates to this section is reserved for my letter to Past- 
Master Allan Mackenzie. 

Respectfully submitted by 

HUGH C. PEACOCK, 

Past- Secretary, and Past- Depute- Master Can. Kit., 
Proxy Master, No. 476. 



EXTRACTS 



SELECTED MINUTES 

AND OTHER RECORDS RELATIVE THERETO 
qth February 1815 to i^th November 1845 

Containing further references to Robert Burns, 
Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 



Second reference 

in the records 

to 
ROBERT BURNS 

as 
POET LAUREATE 

iS}4 years 
after his death 
Geo. Simson R.W.M 
E 1808 April 14 

1813 Junior Warden 

1814 R.W.M. 



Lodge Meeting 



ST JOHNS CHAPEL, yth Feby 1815. 



[After a few remarks by the Right Worshipful Master Geo Simson relative 
to other Business] 

It was also stated by the R. W. Master that he had observed a public 
Subscription had been commenced for the purpose of erecting a Mausoleum to the 
Memory of ROBERT BURNS w/io ivas a Member and POET LAUREAT OF THIS 
LODGE. That a printed Notice had been handed him under the Authority of a 
Committee of Subscribers appointed to manage the different matters connected 
with the undertaking pointing out the mode in which it was intended to proceed 
with the work &c. He then submitted to the meeting the propriety of the 
Lodge commencing a Subscription in order to contribute towards the erection 
of that work, being the only manner in which they can testify their respect for 
the Memory of a Public Character so immediately connected with them, and who, 
on many occasions contributed so generally to the harmony of the Masonic Order, 
and to that of the Lodge Canongate Kihvinning in particular, which motion was 
seconded by Worshipful BROTHER JAFFRAY, and, having met with the unanimous 
approbation of the Brethren, the Secretary was directed to furnish the Steward 
and Tyler with Subscription Lists in order to carry the views of the Lodge into 
execution. The Lodge was then duly closed and adjourned to the i/th instant 
P. TAYLOR Secy GEO. SIMSON M. 

Jn. Scrymgeour, Tyler 

E 1767 December 23 \A Copy of each of the Subscription lists referred to will be found on pages 35, 36]. 



Alex r Jaffray, Writer. 
E 1795 June 24 

1797 Secretary 

1798 J.W. 

1799 S.W. 
1801101804 R.W.M. 

and again in 1813 
Paul Taylor, Secretary 

E not recorded 

1805 June 24 Secre- 
tary on to year 1815 
181510 1816 Treasr. 

Thos. Ritchie Steward 

not recorded, but 
was Steward 1805 
and 1806 



Third Reference 



E 1808 April 14 
E 1795 June 24 
P. & R. 1806 Nov 20 
E. 1806 Nov 20 
E. 1813 Nov 29 
E. 1813 July 30 
E not recorded 
Sec 1805 to 1815 
E. 1769 Feby 8 

E 1814 Jany 6 
E 1813 Nov 29 



E 1801 Nov 16 
Ej78i Jany 3 
E 1799 Nov 17 



Paul Taylor Secretary 

E not recorded 
Secy 1805 & on to 
1815 continuously 



Geo. SimsonR.W.M. 
E 1808 April 14 



ST JOHNS CHAPEL 

At a Meeting of the General Committee of this Lodge held upon the 8th 
June 1815, PRESENT 

R.W.B r Geo. Simson 
W.P.M. ALEX* JAFFRAY 
D.M. James Harrower 
S.M. James Neilson 
S.W. Chas Stewart 
J.W. Arch''- Kennedy 
Secretary Paul Taylor 
Past D.M. CHARLES MORE 
Al. L. Robertson 
David Birrell 

The Right Worshipful Master * * * 

stated that he had directed the present meeting to be called for the purpose of 
taking into consideration whatever the Committee might deem of importance to 
the Brethren. The R.W. Master congratulated the Meeting on the full attend- 
ance of the Members and stated that while he had to regret that several were 
unavoidably detained he had full communications with some of them on the 
subject of the matters which would most likely fall under the notice of the 
meeting and was prepared to state in particular that on these subjects the 
following members of the Committee concurred in opinion with him viz*- 

Brothers John Lawson 

James Davidson and 
WILLIAM BALLANTYNE 

The attention of the Meeting was in the first place requested to the 
minutes of the General Meeting of the Lodge held on the 9*h February last at 
which it had been unanimously resolved to open a Public Subscription by the In- 
dividual Members of the Lodge in aid of the General Subscription by the friends 
and admirers of the Lamented Bard ROBERT BURNS [WHO HAD BEEN POET 
LAUREAT TO THE LODGE] for the erection of a Mausoleum to his memory. It was 
stated by Brother Secretary Taylor that the Subscription List had been presented 
to and received the Signatures of several of the Brethren, the greater part of 
whom had paid the amount of their Subscriptions, and those who had not 
would of course do so when called upon. That the sum subscribed, as nearly 
as could be stated with accuracy was about ,13 Sterling, but owing to the 
absence of several of the Brethren and other circumstances the list had not yet 
been presented to the whole, and there was reason to believe that when it shall 
have been so the above sum will be considerably increased. 

It was moved from the chair that, as taking into consideration the state of 



32 

tJie funds of the Lodge, the character of its members and the veneration in which 

all held the memory of Burns no sum below Twenty Guineas could with propriety 

be offered in aid of such an undertaking the Committee should authorise the 

Treasurer to make up from the funds of the Lodge whatever deficiency there shall 

be after the list has been presented to all the Brethren and that the sum of 2 1 

James Harrower should be transmitted to the Reverend Thomas Duncan, Secretary to the General 

1809 to 1815 DepM. Committee of Subscribers for the erection of 'the Mausoleum, which motion Jiaving 

Alex. Jaffray. Writer ^^ seconded by Brother Harrower was unanimously agreed to. 

And Brother J affray then moved that the R. W. Master should in the mean- 

1798 J.w. time write to the Reverend M r Duncan intimating the intention of the Lodge to 

Cha^More^of'lthe transm ^ ^ ie above sum after their Annual Meeting for election on the 24 th June 

Royal Bank when it was necessary that the resolutions of the Committee should be reported 

E 1769 Feb 8 to the Lodge, and that the Treasurer should continue his exertions to obtain 

1783 S.w. subscriptions from such of the Brethren as had not yet subscribed, which 

1784 to 1786 Dep M , . , , , , _ 

Bro.cha 8 More signed motion having been seconded by BROTHER CHARLES MORE, were also unani- 

the minutes of i Feb mously agreed to. 

and I March 1787, 

and many others ****** 

before and after that 

time 

Geo. Simson p JAYLOR Secy GEO SlMSON M 

E 1808 April 14 
Paul Taylor 
E not recorded 

Secy 1805 onwardsto . ___ 

1815 

Fourth Reference 

At a General Meeting of the Committee of this Lodge held on Tuesday- 

nth June 1816 

Present 
E 1815 STs'iI R.W.M. } R- W.Br George Burnett Master 



E 1808 April 14 I W.B' Geo Simson Past Master 

1813 JW J 

E 1806 Nov 20 W.Br James Neilson Subt M. 

E '1815 w ?8i6 & 17 Sub M } W.Br Alexr L. Robertson Sen' W. 

E 1814 Mar. 3., 1815 J.w. W.B. William Horn Jun' Ward" 

E. not recorded ^j 

1805 Sec. on to 1815 \ W.B. Paul Taylor Treasurer 

1815 & 16 Treas. J 

E 1795 June 24 1797 Sec 1798 J.W. 1 799 & 1800 S.W Br ALEXR J AFFRAY 

E ,1769 Feb 8, 1783 S.W, 1784 to 1788 DepM. ]}r CHAS MORE 

E 1813 Nov 29 Bf Chas Stewart 

E 1813 Nov 29 Br And* Robinson 

E 1813 Nov 29 B r David Birrell Secretary 



33 



Geo. Burnet 
E 1804 Nov 15 

David Birrell 
E 1813 Nov 29 



Fifth Reference 



E 1804 Nov 15 
E 1808 April 14 
E 1806 Nov 20 
E 1814 Jany 6 
E 1814 March 3 
E 1813 Novr 29 
E not recorded 



The Committee do further report their opinion that the Treasurer 
should be enjoined to advance out of the first ready funds in his hands the 
requisite sum to enable the Right Worshipful Master to remit to the Secretary of 
the Committee for the, erection of a Monument to the Memory of BURNS 
the sum of Twenty Guineas voted by the General Meeting in June last year and 
to make up the deficiency from the proper funds of the Lodge if the Subscrip- 
tions do not amount to that sum 

* # # # # 

DA BIRRELL Secy GEO BURNET 



E 1813 Nov 29 

E P & R 1814 March 3 

E 1816 February i 



FESTIVAL OF ST JOHN 
THE BAPTIST 

CANONGATE KILWINNING LODGE 

2i,th June 1816 
* * * * * 

[Brethren who were present and had been nominated to their respective offices]. 
Brother George Burnet R.W. Master 
George Simson Past Master 
James Neilson Depute Master 
Alex r L. Robertson Substitute Master 
., William Horn Senior Warden 
Andrew Robinson Junior Warden 
Paul Taylor Treasurer 
David Birrell Secretary 
Arch Horn Senior Deacon 
Malcolm McNeil Junior Deacon 

and 

Thomas Ritchie Steward 
John Scrymgeour Tyler 



Sec 1805 & on to 1815 



Pro Tempore 



Not recorded, but was Steward 1801; & 1806 



E 1767 Dec 23 

" All which being likewise unanimously approven of these Brethren were 
" installed in their respective offices with the usual formalities." 

The R.W. Master t;hen proposed that the Committee for managing the 
affairs of the Lodge should consist of the present and Past Office Bearers with 

the addition of 

Brothers ALEXR JAFFEAY 

John Spottiswood Lawson 
William Ballantine 
CHAS MORE 
Charles Nairne 
J. Lamb 
and William Tait 



E 1795 June 24 

E 1801 Nov 16 

P & R 1799 Nov 17 

E 1769 Febr 8 S. W. 1783 Dep M 1784 to 1788 

P. & R. 1814 Jany 6 

E.P.R. 1815 Dec 27 

E.P.R 1814 Jany 6 



34 



"a copy sent to every 
" brother" 



Geo. Burnet 
E 1804 Nov 15 

William Horn 
E 1814 Mar 3 

David Birrell 
E 1813 Nov 29 

Sixth Reference 
Committee Meeting 



E 1804 Nov 15 
E 1814 Jany 6 
E 1813 Nov 29 



Paul Taylor, Treas. 
E not recorded 
Sec. 1805 to 1815 



Paul Taylor, Treas. 
E Secy. 1805 

David Birrell 
E 1813 Nov 29 



Geo Burnet 
E 1804 Nov 15 

David Birrell 
E 1813 Nov 29 



After the election, the Secretary was directed to read the Minutes of tJie 
Committee of this Lodge of the II th current, and the same having been read 
met with the unanimous approbation of the Brethren, at the same time a motion 
was made that an extract should be printed and a copy sent to every brother be- 
longing to the Lodge within this city, in a particular manner the clauses 2, 4, 5, 
& 7 which motion being agreed to, the Secretary was enjoined to have the 
same printed and a copy sent to EVERY MEMBER OF THE LODGE with all possible 
dispatch. 



DA BIRRELL Secy 



GEO BURNET Master 
WILL HORN S.W. 



General Meeting of the Committee held in the Lodge room on 2nd 

January 1817. 

[Among the members present were] 

R.W. Brother George Burnet 

W. Brother Alex' L. Robertson 

W. Brother David Birrell 

The Secretary produced a sealed packet which had been left for him in 
the course of the day addressed to " Right Worshipful Brother George Burnet, 
" M. of Canongate Kilwinning Lodge, or the Preses of the Committee for the 
" time " which having been opened was found to contain a letter from W. Brother 
Simson Past Master apologising for his not being able to attend the meeting, 
and stating that having in consequence of the previous minutes of the Com- 
mittee and of the Lodge received from the Treasurer the sum of Twenty 
Guineas which had been voted in aid of the fund for the erection of a Mauso- 
leum to the Memory of ROBERT BURNS late POET LAUREAT OF THE LODGE, he 
had transmitted that sum to the Reverend Mr Duncan, Dumfries, Treasurer to 
that fund and had received a letter in return expressed in very proper terms of 
Gratitude to the Brethren, which letter he now reported to the Committee and 
requested that if it met their approbation it should be submitted to the Lodge 
at its first meeting and put up among the archives. 

The Committee approved of the conduct and suggestion of Brother 
Simson and directed that the above correspondence should be laid before the 
monthly meeting of the Lodge on the 8 th instant and in the meantime that the 
Treasurer and Secretary should be authorised to receive such subscripticns as 
the Brethren should tender and to apply the same in liquidation of the sum 
voted or paid from the funds of the Lodge in addition to the Subscriptions of 
the individual members thereof. 



DA BIRRELL Sec r y 



GEORGE BURNET P. 



35 



SUBSCRIPTION LIST, of which the following is a copy was prepared in 
terms of Minute of 9th February 1815, with the following addition: 

" The present list is therefore directed to be presented to EVERY MEMBER who will please to 
subscribe his name marking opposite the amount of subscription, and when paid at 
the time, or to be afterwards paid by him." 



NAMES 


Amount 
Subscribed 


Paid 


NAMES 


Amount 
Subscribed 


Paid 


Brother Simson M. P.T 


jj 


10 


6 




IO 


6 


W. L. Neilson P.T 





7 


6 


J> 


7 


6 


E 1808 April 14 














E. 3 rd Feby 1815 














Brother Jaffray P.M. 


ii 


7 


6 








Brother Chas More P.T. 


jj 


5 


99 


JJ 


5 


j) 


E. 24 th June 1795. 














E. 8 th Feby 1769 














Brother Harrower D.M. P.T 


jj 


7 


6 


jj 


7 


6 


Brother Fredk Coventry P.T. 


)i 


5 




y y 


5 


j ^ 


E. 6 th March 1806 














E. 9 th Feby 1815 














Brother Neilson S.M. P.T 


ii 


7 


6 


jj 


7 


6 


Brother Wm Douglas P.T. 


ii 


7 


6 




7 


6 


E. 20' h Novr 1806 














E. 24 th June 1801 














Brother Stewart S.W. P.T 


jj 


7 


6 


JJ 


7 


6 


Brother Dickie 


ii 


7 


6 








E 29 th Novr 1813 














E. 19 th Septr 1815 














Brother Kennedy J.W. P.T 





7 


6 


JJ 


7 


6 


Brother Dickson 


j> 


5 


ii 








E. 30* July 1813 














E. 29 th June 1809 














Brother Taylor Sec & Tr P.T. 


M 


7 


6 


JJ 


7 


6 


Brother Ballantine P.T 


jj 


7 




pj 


7 


6 


Not recorded but Sec. 1 805 to 1 8 1 5 














E. 17 th Novr 1799 














Brother Tail P.T. 


jj 


5 


jj 


JJ 


5 


11 


3r. Maclachlan 


j, 


IO 










E. 23 rd Novr 1802 














E. 14* Deer 1814 














Brother Miller P.T. 


>j 


5 


u 


JJ 


5 


>j 


Bror Robinson 


j j 


5 










E. 2"d March 1786 














E. 29 th Novr 1813 














Brother Armstrong P.T. 





5 


jj 


J) 


5 


> 


Bro Darwin 


; , 


5 










E. 6 th Feby 1803 














E. ii th Feby 1806 






" 








Brother Barr P.T. 


>> 


5 


M 


JJ 


5 


j> 


Allan Wight D.B. 


j 5 


5 






c 




E. 29 th Novr 1814 














E. 6 th Jany 1814 






'' 


" 


wf 


' y 


Brother Birrell P.T. 


j j 


5 


u 


JJ 


5 


>j 


3ro A. Robertson 


j , 


5 










E. 29 th Novr 1813 














E. 6 th Jany 1814 






" 








Brother Adair P.T. 


I 


i 


ii 


I 


i 


>> 


Bro Abm Armstrong D.B. 


I 


i 


i 


I 


I 




E. 4 th Dec. 1788 














E. 5 th June 1815 












?j 


Brother Nairn P.T. 


jj 


7 


6 


JJ 


7 


6 
















E. 3rd March 1803 




, 
























Brother Will Horn P.T. 


jj 


7 


6 


JJ 


7 


6 
















E. 3 rd March 1814 




























Brother Archd Horn P.T. 


11 


5 


j> 


i) 


5 



















E. 3 rd March 1814 




























Brother George Boyd P.T. 


I 


i 


jj 


I 


i 


u 
















E. I st Jany 1808 




























Brother Brooks P.T. 


jj 


5 





JJ 


5 


ii 
















E. 3 rcl Feby 1815 




























Brother Davidson 





7 
























E. 3 rd Jany 1781 




























Brother John Wilson 


jj 


5 
























E. 29 th Novr 1813 




























Brother Mason P.T. 


i) 


7 


6 


J) 


7 


6 
















E. 6 th Jany 1814 




























Brother M onalandj 


jj 


5 

























[/.$/ #.$ #foz/ completed was submitted to meeting of Committee on "2nd January, 1817.] 



[Printed Notice referred to in Minute of gth Feby. 1815] 
SUBSCRIPTION 



FOR 



H Mausoleum to be erecteo over tbe "Remains 



OF 



ROBERT BURNS 

In St Michaels Churchyard, Dumfries 

We, the Subscribers, agree to pay the sums annexed to our respective names in 
terms of the Resolutions of a Meeting held at Dumfries on 6th January 1814 

Subscriptions received by David Birrell Secy to Canongate 
Kilwinning Lodge 



David Nairne 

E. 7 March 1816 

J. Chisholm 

E. 29* Novr 1813 

Ludovick Grant 
E. 7 th March 1816 



Paid 



Sums collected to this x 
date (i8th Septem 1816) I 
as per other list by the j 
Treasurer & Secretary ' 



>, 7 6 
)i 5 



37 

Seventh reference Extract from Brother Simson's letter, dated 2nd January, 1817, to Brother 

Burnet, referred to in minute of same date : 

" I beg leave to report to you that having been furnished by your 
Secretary with the sum of Twenty Guineas, voted by the Lodge as a contribution 
towards the erection of a Mausoleum to the memory of our late Poet Laureate, Burns, I, 
in obedience to the instructions of the Committee, remitted that sum to the Rev. Dr. 
Duncan, Dumfries." .... 



Eighth reference COPY OF LETTER FROM DR DUNCAN. 

Submitted to Meeting of Committee 2nd Jany. y 1817, and Lodge Meeting" 

on 8t/i January, 1817. 

DUMFRIES, Deer. 31^, 1816. 

SIR, I am commissioned by my brother, who is one of the Secretaries to the 
Committee for conducting the affairs of the subscribers to Burns' Mausoleum, to acknow- 
ledge the very liberal contribution of the Canongate Kilwinning Lodge to their funds ; and 
in name of the Committee to request that you will communicate to the Lodge the 
grateful sense which the Committee must entertain of the approbation and confidence of 
that respectable Brotherhood. This tribute of respect to the memory of your LAUREATE 
is not only most interesting in itself, but must be highly gratifying to all the admirers of 
the Bard. 

I have this day caused the sum inclosed in your letter (twenty guineas) to be 
placed to the Treasurer's credit in the Bank of Scotland's office, and send a note of it to 
the provincial neivspapers, too late, however, for insertion till next week. 

My brother was obliged to go to the country without having it in his power 
to write this acknowledgment, but requested me to make his apology. I have the 
honour to be, Sir, your most obedt. Serv., THOMAS T. DUNCAN. 

Addressed outside 

GEORGE SIMSON, Esq., 

Writer in Edinburgh. 



38 

Ninth reference CANONGATE KILWINNINO LODGE 

8(A January 1817 

The Lodge having been regularly constituted by the Right Worshipful 

Monthly Meeting Master he requested the Minute of the Committee of the 2"d o f this month to be 
Geo. Burnet R.W.M. , , . , , . , 

E 1 80 Nov is re w " lcn having been done the same met the entire approbation of the Breth- 
ren and the Correspondence &c we re directed to be put up among the Archives 

of the Lodge. 

***** 

GEO BURNET Master 
DA BIRRELL Secy WILL HORN Senior Warden 



Tenth reference Minutes of Meeting of Committee of the Lodge Can. Kil. held in the 

A. McNeil Advocate Lodge room 1 6* January 1835 Brother R.W.M. A McNeil in the chair. 

Jt was proposed by the R.W. Brother M'Neil, Master, and seconded 



SM 1827 RWM 1830 by Worshipful Brother Turnbull Substitute Master that it was expedient that 

to 1837 

w B D D Turnbull the Honorary office of POET LAUREATE of the Lodge which had been in 
Advocate abeyance since the death of the immortal Brother ROBERT BURNS should 

E 1833 Nov 21 be rev j ve( j ) an( j t h at James Hogg " the Ettrick Shepherd " on whom his 

poetic mantle had fallen should be respectfully requested to accept the appoint- 
ment as the highest tribute to his genius and private worth which the brethren 
had it in their power to bestow which motion was unanimously and enthusias- 

John Forbes, Writer, tically carried. Brother John Forbes in consequence of his being personally 

\ i2Augi 25 ac q ua i n t ec i with M r Hogg was instructed to communicate to him this resolution, 

and at the same time, in the name of the Master, Office Bearers and Members to 

invite his attendance at a full meeting of the Lodge on Friday the 6 th day of 

February next at S'clock evening to have his brow encircled with the laurel 

Alex r Mackie Writer wreath the insignia of his office. The Secretary was directed to provide an enter- 
Secretary tainment suitable for the occasion, and on purpose to give additional interest to 

the Meeting to have in readiness the diplomas for the ten Polish Officers lately 
admitted members to be then formally presented to them. 

.1833 June 24 A MACKIE, Secy- 



Eleventh reference !8 3 5 Jany 24. Lodge Meeting. 

A. McNeil Advocate ~, ,,, , , -_ . ,.. __ ., . _, 

E not recorded, but The R.W.M. Master A. McNeil in the Chair. 

on Committee 1824 The Minutes of the General Meeting 01 the Lodge 27 Deer and Minutes 

of the Committee of i6th Jany having been read to the Meeting, the same were 

approved of. 

***** 

A. MACKIE Secy- 

E. 1833 June 24 



39 



Aff d 24 Jany 1834 

E March 4 1830 
E June 24 1833 
Aff d April 30 1835 



E June 24 1824 
Not recorded 
E 21 Nov 1833 
E March 25 1835 
Not recorded 
E Jany 7 1834 

E Feby 5 1824 

S W 1827-28 

E July 12 1825 

Not recorded 
E March 3 1802 



Agreeably to above directions to John Forbes on 16 January 1835, he 
wrote to Brother James Hogg and received the following answer : 

" ALTRIVE LAKE, January 25, 1835. 

" Dear Forbes. I am sixty-five years of age this night, I am not a 
" Mason, and never have been, having uniformally resisted the entreaties of my 
" most influential friends to become one. I am, however, intensely sensible of 
" the high honour intended me, which, coming to my hand on the morning of 
" my birthday, has, I feel, added a new charm to the old shepherd's life. My 
" kindest respects to the Hon. Master and Members of the Lodge, and say that 
" I cannot join them, nor be initiated into the mysteries of the Art. 

***** 

"JAMES HOGG." 

Subsequently, however, Hogg consented to join, and the ceremony was 
fixed for /th May 1835. The names of those Members who signed the Minute 
when he was E. P. & R., are : 

Jas. Deans, M., P.M. of Emulation Lodge, London, 
P.G. Sword Bearer Grand Lodge of England. 

Anthony Traill, W.S., Senr. Warden. 

A. Mackie, Junr. Warden. 

Jas. Burnes, M.D. (E.I.C.S.), LL.D., F.R.S. (whose 
Executors presented the Inauguration Picture 
in the Board Room of Grand Lodge). 

Adam Wilson, Writer. 

Dan. M. Davidson, R.A. 

John Donald. 

Wm. Jeffries Dowlin. 

Andw. Sievwright. 

Pat Sandeman, Merchant. 

Wm. Pringle (afterwards Poet Laureate). 

John Forbes, Writer. 

C. Neaves (afterwards Lord Neaves). 

Robert Boyd, W.S. 
A. Mackie, Secy. 

JAMES HOGG. 



Election, 2^th June 1835. 

Alex r M'Neill, Advocate 

Cha s M'Dougall, Advocate 

W. B. D. D. Turnbull, Advocate. 



R.W. Master 
Dep. Master 
Sub. Master 



40 

Robert Blackvvood, Publisher . . . Sen' Warden 

George Gumming, W.S. . . . Jun* Warden 

James Deans ..... Secretary 

Anthy. Trail, W.S. . . . . Treasurer 

Daniel M. Davidson .... Sen r Deacon 

John Gait Denniston .... Jun r Deacon 

William Jeffries Dowlin .... Inner Guard 

Rev d Hector Holm .... Chaplain 

John Miller, Advocate . . . . 1st Banner Bearer 

Timothy Bunton .... 2nd Banner Bearer 

James Hogg, the " Ettrick Shepherd " . . Poet Laureate 

Chas Fred k Gififord .... Master of Ceremonies 

John Donald ] 

r> , i c j . . . . Stewards 

Patrick Sandeman J 

John T. Surenne ..... Organist 

Committee. 

John Wilson, Advocate, " Christopher North," Chairman, E. Feb. 2, 1830. 

Alex. L. Robertson, W.S., Past Master John Leslie, Past S.W. 

Alex' M'Neill, R.W.M. James Logan, Past S.D. 

Chas. M'Dougall, D.M. Chas Anderson, Past J.D. 

W. B. D. D. Turnbull, S.M. Hector Gavin 

Rob 1 Black wood, S.W. Thos Knox Beveridge, W.S. 

George Gumming, W.S., J.W. Robt Stewart and ) Tylers. 

JT^ o 1*7 T> (Who were annually 

ames Deans, Secy. Wm Petne ) re . elected onward * 

Anthy. Traill, Treasurer tin l8 45)- 

George Ritchie, W.S. 



Office Bearers, 2^th June 1845. 

Brother A. D. Campbell . . . R.W.M. 

W. Mowbray .... D.M. 

E May 16 1843 ^ James Hunter, of Glencorse . . S.M. 

James Neilson .... S.W. 

Jas. Arthur Campbell . . . J.W. 

E June 24 1844 )f Chas Robertson . . . Secy and Treasurer 

E May 22 1844 Donald Cameron . . . S.D. 

Wm Scott Henderson . . J.D. 

W m Henderson . . . Inner Guard 

W m Porteous . . . ist Banner Bearer 

George Moncreiff . . . 2nd 



E Marcli 9 1836 

E March 3 1825 
E Feby 20 1836 
E Oct 14 1840 
E June 24 1837 
E Feby 28 1844 
Not recorded 

Twelfth reference 



Brother W. J. Pattison . . . M of Ceremonies 

John David Bell . . . ist Steward 

George W. Wemyss . . . 2d 

Robert Stewart . . . Tyler 

Committee along with the Chief Office-Bearers. 
m Edmonstone Aytoun, Prof, of Literature and Belles Lettres, in the 

University of Edinburgh, Chairman. 
Alex* M'Neil ..... P.M. 
Arch Smith ..... P.M. 

Samuel Somerville .... P.M. 

W. J. Pattison 
Edward Fraser, Advocate 
Robert Blackwell 



LODGE CANONGATE KILWINING 

St JOHNS CHAPEL, 12 Novembr. 1845 

Present Bro Arch<* David Campbell R.W.M. 

Sam 1 Somerville of Ampherlaw M.D. P.M. 

William Mowbray D.M. 

J. A. Campbell J. Warden 

Chas Robertson SecT and Treas r 

J. Macdonald 

W. Jeffries Pattison, 13 Albany St. 

W m Campbell, W.S. 114 Laurieston Place 

Patrick Sandeman, Merchant, Greenside Street 

John Gray Henderson, of Abbotsrule, Roxburghshire 

Hector Gavin, Engraver, Croft an Righ 

James Marshall, Solicitor 
Stewart Watson, Portrait Painter 
A. Murray of Edin r Celtic 

James Bell, Visiting Brother of Dunbar Castle 

Lodge " and various other Brethren " 
The Lodge was opened in the first degree by the R.W.M. 
The Minutes of the 24^ June 2O* h August and 7 ( h Oct. last read and 
approved of, 

The R.W.M. having made allusion to Robert Burns as having been a 
distinguished Member of the Lodge, 
Aff d i83oMarch4 Br Jas Marshall stated that he had come to this meeting to reintroduce 

E PR 1828 March 6 Br Stewart Watson initiated during winter 1827-8. This Brother, he said, at the 



E.P.R 1 840 March 26 
E. 1840 Oct 14 
E 1842 Jany 19 
E 1843 Dec 27 
E 1844 June 24 

E.P.R. 1837 June 24 

E.P.R. 1801 April 2, S.W. 1801 & 1802 
E.P.R. 1834 Jany 7. Was one of the Lodge 

Stewards 1835 when James Hogg was 

Poet Laureate 
E 1843, Nov. 15 
Admission not recorded, but he appears on 

Committee as far back as 1835, and 

Chairman of Committee 1840 
Aff d Hon. M. 1830 March 4 \ 
Full M. 1831 Oct. 18 J 
E.P.R. 1828 March 6. SW 1848-9 

SM 1850. Sec 1851 to 1867 



42 

commencement of his professional career as an artist, was patronised by Sir 
Walter Scott whose portrait he painted at Abbotsford, together with other works 
there extant. He was elected an Associate of the Royal Institution and after- 
wards went abroad. For some years past he has pursued his professional studies 
in Rome, and having returned to London, he wrote enquiring among other 
matters of the condition of Masonry in Edinburgh. In the course of some 
correspondence that followed, a subject occurred for his brush, the materials of 
which were chiefly to be derived from the records and traditions of their Lodge 
and he came now to follow up that purpose. Br Marshall quoted passages from 
minutes of the Lodge in reference to the attendances of Robert Burns in 1787, 
and laid on the table a motion " that Br Watson have access to Sketch the 
" antique and picturesque interior of the Lodge with a view to his painting the 
" Inauguration of Robert Burns as her Poet Laureate," the motion to be 
disposed of at an after meeting. He felt assured that the subject was worthy 
of the artist, the artist of the subject ; and the whole would be creditable to the 
Lodge. The Painting of a Masonic Lodge was a novelty, but the peculiarity 
of the event chosen was such, that in its execution the mysteries of the Lodge 
would not in the least degree be trenched upon. Years ago when he, 
Br Marshall, attended this Lodge he took chief interest in the reminiscences 
of old men connected with such events, but of these he feared few now 
survived. 

E 1801 April i Br William Campbell W.S. said that this motion had taken him by no 

greater surprise than delight. He had been forty-five years a Mason (and con- 
nected with this Lodge) and had had -many opportunities of giving testimony in 
favotir of the particulars alluded to. He thought the proposition one deserving 
of every support. He had never been in a Lodge Room with Robert Burns but 
had travelled in his company, and spent two of the most happy days with him 
at Auchtertyre Castle the seat of Sir William Murray. He was happy that he 
had lived to second such an admirable motion. 

Br Marshall was requested to furnish the authenticated particulars to a 
subsequent meeting when the motion should be disposed of, meantime it was 
unanimously entertained. 

* # * * * 

A. D. Campbell, W.S. CHAS ROBERTSON Secy & Tres' ARCHD DAVID CAMPBELL R.W.M. 

E 1840 March 26 j NEILSON S-W . 

JamesNeilson,b.b.C. 

E 1842 June 15 
Cha s Robertson 
E 1844 June 24 



43 



Thirteenth refer- 
ence 



EPR 1 840 March 26 
E 1842 Jany 19 
EPR 1837 June 24 
E 1842 Dec 27 
E 1844 June 24 



Aff d 1 830 Mar 4 

E P R 1828 March 6 



LODGE CANONGATE KIIAVINING 

ST JOHN' CHAPEL igt/t, Novun. 1845 

Present 

Bro Campbell, R.W.M. 
Mowbray, D.M. 
W. J. Pattison Acting S.W. 
,. Campbell Jr Wn 
Robertson Secy & Tre r 

Bro J. M. Salmon. Sir W m M. Napier Lodge 695 Donaghadee. W. F Stra- 
theam of Kirkwall Kilwinning, W. Ferguson and several other of the Brethren. 
The Lodge was opened in the first Degree by the R.W.M. 
The Minutes of last meeting were read and approved of. 
Bro Marshall then submitted the motion which was laid on the table at 
last meeting viz*. " That Bro Watson have access to Sketch the Antique and 
" Picturesque Interior of the Lodge with a view to his painting the Inauguration 
" of Robert Burns as her Poet Laureate." the motion was seconded by the 
R.W.M. and unanimously carried. 

Petitions were presented for admission from John Hunter, Esq r Drum 
House and James Graham Smith, Craigends, Stirlingshire, recommended by the 
R.W.M. and the Junior Warden also from John Stewart Esq.. 30 Hanover 
Street, recommended by the R.W.M. and the Depute Master. 

The Ballot having been taken for these gentlemen respectively they 
were duly initiated into the first degree by the R.W.M. 

The Lodge was then passed to the second degree by the R.W.M. when 
Bros James Savage, James Anderson, W m Ferguson, and Chas. J. Nasmyth 
were passed Fellow Crafts. 

***** 



CHAS ROBERTSON 

Secy & Trer 



ARCH DAVID CAMPBELL R.W.M. 
J. NEILSON S r W 



I certify that the excerpta at pages 21 and 22, and those at pages 30 to 43 
hereof, are true copies. 

GEORGE CRAWFORD, R.W.M. 

EDINBURGH, April 12, 1893. 



COPY of CORRESPONDENCE 



BETWEEN 



MR J. LINKING WOODMAN, C.S., and MR STEWART WATSON, 
Portrait Painter the artist who painted the Inauguration Picture showing 
the great care which Brother Watson took in procuring "authenticated 
particulars" of a subject before painting it. 



In the printed copy of correspondence, to which Grand Secretary calls 
attention, a letter appears from him under date i8th August 1891, regarding 
Robert Burns and his connection with Canongate Kilwinning, in which the 
following passage occurs : 

" The beautiful story of his inauguration appears to have been concocted 'in 1845-46, 
to supply Mr Stewart Watson (a well-known Edinburgh artist), a member of the Lodge, 
with a subject for a beautiful picture. Mr Stewart Watson also, it may be here remarked, 
executed two other similar paintings that of the Knight Templars and Supreme Royal 
Arch Chapter of Scotland in conclave, both of which, except as regards the features of the 
members portrayed, are purely imaginative.'' 1 

In connection with this quotation, and for the satisfaction of all interested, the 
following authentic information is here transcribed : 



No. I Mr Woodman to Mr Watson. 

loth March 1846. 

Mr Woodman presents compliments to Mr Watson, and, as instructed by the 
Installation Committee, has the pleasure to enclose a ticket of admission, for Mr Watson, 
to the ceremonial of to-morrow evening. 



No. 2 Insertion in the Edinburgh Evening Courant, by direction of Mr y. 
Linning Woodman, Registrar and Secretary, 2^th March, 1846. 

" THE ORDER OF THE TEMPLE. The interesting ceremonial of installing the Grand 
Master and Grand Officers of this religious and military order took place in the Music 
Hall on the evening of Wednesday, the nth inst. The hall was decorated with the 
banners of the knights, and stalls were arranged on each side for their reception, &c. &c. 
&c. Stewart Watson, a companion of the Order, who was present, has been requested to 
execute a picture commemorating the imposing ceremonial on the nth inst'' 



45 
No. 3 Mr Woodman to Mr Watson. 

17 th March 1846 

I have written a note to Sir D. Dundas, asking him to call for you, or to drop a 
note saying at what time he can be with you, so that you may sketch his portrait for the 
installation picture. Yours faithfully, 



No. 4 Mr Woodman to Mr Watson. 

Can you make it convenient to see the Reverend Mr Boyle, who officiated as 
consecrating prelate on the nth inst., next Friday? He generally comes into Edinburgh 
on the Fridays ; and if you can sketch him here on that day I shall write him a note on 
learning from you the hour which will be most suitable. St Andrew Square, \^th March. 



No. 5 Mr Woodman to Mr Watson. 

2Oth March 1846. 

MY DEAR SIR, I send ist, the order of procession on the nth March; 2nd, 
the names of the parties present, arranged according to rank. I have yet to furnish you 
with a note of the places in the hall occupied by the different parties during the 
ceremonial Yours faithfully. 



No. 6 Mr Woodman to Mr Watson. 

$th June 1846. 

I send the Great Roll of the Order of the Temple, Vol. I. ; and, accompanying, 
you have a list of those whose banners, &c., appeared at the installation, the manner in 
which the same were blazoned, &c. Yours faithfully. 



Note. All the other portraits were taken successively at periods to suit the 
individual convenience of members. 



Note. I was enrolled as a member in 1830-31. S. W. 



In the Records of the Order, dated I3th March 1848, it is mentioned 
that 

"A Letter from Prater Stewart Watson, dated 1st instant, mentioning 
the near completion of the Historical Picture representing the Installation of the 
M.E. & R. the Grand Master, on I ith March 1846, having been submitted, the 



4 6 

Chapter-General expressed a hope that arrangements might be made for 
Engraving a Picture which must prove so interesting and attractive to all 
Soldiers of the Cross, both at home and abroad. The following is an excerpt 
from Frater Watson's Letter descriptive of the Painting." 

' The point of action selected, and which appeared to me best calculated to 
' illustrate this subject, is after the Grand Master has been relieved of the Sword of State 
' by the Ex-Regent, Frater Callander, and received the Staff of Office from the 
' Preceptor, Frater Whyte- Melville, the officiating Prelate, the Rev. John Boyle B.C.L., 
' having advanced from the Altar, accompanied by the Crucifer and Deacon, is about to 
' place the Crown of The Order on the Head of the Grand Master. 

' In a few weeks I hope to have the Picture ready for exhibition to the Knights 
' and their friends, to whom due notice will be given. Through the kindness of Frater 
' W. B. D. D. Turnbull,* I am promised the use of the Rooms of the Antiquarian Society 
' for this purpose.' 

The foregoing letters and relative quotations illustrate the great care and 
truthfulness with which Brother Stewart Watson and his friends selected materials 
for his masterly historical work, " The Installation of the Duke of A thole as Grand 
Master of the Order of the Temple" which work has ever been universally accepted 
as a faithful representation of what actitally took place at the Installation ceremonial 
of nth March 1846: 

Could any photograph have shown forth the impressive scene as truthfully 
as that painting ? 

Correspondingly, certain minutes of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning already 
mentioned, and much valuable information contained in the " Winter with 
Robert Burns," prove that the artist and his friends took equal care in procuring 
"authenticated particulars" for his other very fine historical work, "The 
Inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning" 

As to the third of Bro. Stewart Watson's pictures under notice, namely, 
"The Supreme Royal Arch Chapter of Scotland in Conclave" very little need be 
said, as it has nothing to do with the question in hand. My sole plea for referring 
to it is because of Grand Secretary, in his letter of i8th August 1891 above 
quoted, having made the very strong and unprecedented assertion on the subject 

* It may be of interest to some readers to know that Frater W. B. D. D. Turnbull, Advocate, 

above mentioned, was for some time Substitute-Master of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. The following 

notice of him occurs in the minute of Committee meeting held i6th January, 1835 : " It was proposed 

' by the R. W. Brother M'Neil, Master, and seconded by Worshipful BROTHER TURNBULL, Substitute- 

' Master, that it was expedient that the Honorary office of POET LAUREATE of the Lodge, which had 

' been in abeyance since the death of the immortal Brother ROBERT BURNS, should be revived, and that 

'James Hogg, 'the Ettrick Shepherd,' on whom his poetic mantle had fallen, should be respectfully 

' requested to accept the appointment, as the highest tribute to his genius and private worth which the 

4 brethren had it in their power to bestow which motion was unanimously and enthusiastically carried." 



47 

of this and the Temple picture without any evidence whatever in support of it 
that " both of which, except as regards the features of the members portrayed, are 
purely imaginative" 

.The proofs are at once obvious and conclusive throughout these pages 
that the painting of the Knights Templar and that of the Inauguration of Robert 
Burns as Poet Laureate are assuredly NOT " purely imaginative." They depict 
FACTS, and for all we at present know it may be the same with the Supreme 
Chapter picture. 

After such distinct evidence of the accuracy of the events represented in 
these pictures, what ground is there for Grand Secretary's sweeping assertion 
against them ? 



The papers from which the foregoing interesting correspondence and 
relative quotations are copied were among the effects of the late Mr Stewart 
Watson when he died. Shortly afterwards [in the year 1870] the said papers 
were received along with various Canongate Kilwinning Priory, Can. Kil. R.A. 
Chapter, and other masonic documents, by the late Dr John Middleton, my 
informant, and by him placed in the repository of the Canongate Kilwinning 
R.A. Chapter, in the Lodge-room, St. John's Chapel, St. John Street. Dr 
Middleton was then, and for many years afterwards, First Principal of the 
Chapter, and the late Companion Stewart Watson had been for a long period 
one of its most diligent office-bearers. 

Respectfully submitted by 

HUGH C. PEACOCK, 

Past Sec. and Past Dep. Master Can. Kil. 
Proxy Master, No. 476. 



A WORD 

FOR THE LATE BROTHER STEWART WATSON, 

Painter of the Inauguration Picture now in the Board-room of Grand Lodge. 



Grand Secretary, in his letter concerning Robert Burns, at page 70 of the 
printed copy of correspondence, says : "The beautiful story of the Inauguration 
" appears to have been concocted in 1845-46, to supply Mr Stewart Watson (a 
" well-known Edinburgh artist), a member of the Lodge, with a subject for a 
" beautiful picture." 

Had such an extraordinary assertion been expressed in the lifetime of 
Brother Stewart Watson it would have been more opportune, because he and 
many of his friends would have at once answered it ; had it even been made in 
the year 1873, when Grand Secretary made "a minute examination of Canongate 
" Kilwinning's records," and partially discussed the Inauguration question with 
the Lodge Secretary, three years after Bro. Watson had passed away, many 
of Bro. Watson's intimate friends were still alive, and would have gladly given 
evidence on the subject. Even then there were such witnesses as could have 
testified to all the "authenticated particulars" referred to in the minute of 
November 12, 1845, relative to the Inauguration of Robert Burns. 

I had the privilege of being acquainted with Brother Stewart Watson. I 
visited him at his house in Broughton Park Cottage, and, up to that time, there 
never had been any question about the Inauguration picture, or the Inauguration, 
otherwise I would have taken very good care to get all available information from 
him regarding both. I am perfectly sure that he would never have allowed any 
"beautiful story" of the Inauguration to be concocted to supply him "with a 
" subject for a beautiful picture ; " he had no need to do so, because, indepen- 
dently of the documentary evidence at his hand as Secretary of the Lodge, to 
which I have made reference, it is proved in the foregoing pages that half a 
century ago about the time when the Inauguration picture was contemplated 
very much information relative to the Inauguration was available, and was 



49 

obtained by Brother Stewart Watson from old members and other brethren who 
had met Robert Burns, and enjoyed his company within the Lodge-room of 
Canongate Kilwinning. 

The late Brothers Sam. Somerville of Ampherlaw, M.D. ; Thomas Elder 
MacRitchie of Craigton and Dunork, W.S. ;* David Crawford, S.S.C. ; George 
Gumming, W.S. ;-f- Hector Gavin, and many others now dead, would very 
speedily have refuted any imputation expressed or implied as to the " story " 
appearing to be "concocted''' had such imputation been made by Brother Lyon at 
the time of his correspondence with me in the year 1873. 

Many brethren doubtless are aware that the talented artist who painted the 
Inauguration picture was Brother Stewart Watson, but comparatively few now-a- 
days know much more about him. It seems, therefore, on this occasion of 
writing on the subject of his finest and best known historical work which has 
afforded unmixed pleasure to many thousands of brethren all over the world 
that it is clearly due to the memory of Brother Watson to place on record some 
further notice of him than is to be found at the present time in any of the books 
or other chronicles of the Lodge. 

Brother " William Stewart Watson, Portrait Painter," is duly recorded as 
having been entered, passed, and raised in the Canongate Kilwinning on 6th 
March 1828. Incidentally, it may be mentioned that a picture of him as he 
appeared " in life's gay morn," hangs on the south wall of Lodge-room, between 
the organ recess and Junior Warden's chair. 

Such a circumstance as that of being a full member of the Lodge so very 
early in this century as the year 1828 afforded Brother Stewart Watson excep- 
tional opportunities of acquiring at first hand fully authenticated information 
relative to the Burns period in Canongate Kilwinning. It is amply proved in 
the foregoing and subsequent pages of this testimony, that in the years 1844 and 
1845 there were at least two old members alive, and attending meetings of the 
Lodge namely, Bro. William Petrie and Bro. William Campbell who gave 
incontrovertible evidence in favor of the election and inauguration of Robert 
Burns as Poet Laureate ; and it stands to reason that in the year 1828. among 
such a numerous brotherhood as there was then, a great many more must have 
been frequenting the Lodge who entertained Brother Stewart Watson, and other 
"new links" in the membership, with reminiscences of our first Poet Laureate, 



* Bro. Thomas Elder MacRitchie was on Committee in 1873. His membership began in 1818. 

t Bro. George Gumming knew the Lodge well in 1834 and onwards for a long time. He was J.W, 
1835 to 1837, while Robert Blackwood, Publisher, his intimate friend, was S.W. Latterly he resided in 
London, and I had a long and very interesting correspondence with him about old times in the Lodge, 
in the Chapter, and in the Temple Priory of Canongate Kilwinning. H.C.P. 

G 



50 

" the life of the Lodge," as Brother Petrie termed him. Hence was Brother 
Stewart Watson, above all others, the artist best suited to show forth on canvas 
the Inauguration of Robert Burns. 

In connection with this section of my subject, it will doubtless be of 
interest to many readers to narrate the following reference to Bro. William Petrie, 
as another instance additional to the one given in page 44 ante illustrating 
Bro. Stewart Watson's extreme conscientiousness in gleaning "authenticated 
particulars" of a subject before painting it, to wit, that, in November 1845, after 
the motion relative to the Inauguration Picture had been approved unanimously 
at the Lodge meetings held on the I2th and ipth of that month, Bro. Watson 
accompanied the author of the " Winter with Burns " on a visit to Bro. William 
Petrie, and quoting from that interesting work it is said, " William by this time 
" felt that, in the sad words of Burns, 

' The pale moon is setting beyond the white wave, 
And Time is setting with me.' 

" He mentioned that the Grand Lodge had kept on his salary, though he could 
" never more perform the duties which he had been accustomed to for more than 
" fifty years. On this Mr Watson remarked that he would remember Robert 
" Burns ? The name operated like electricity ; and, as if a string was touched 
" long unaccustomed to vibration, weakness, dulness, and inarticulation were 
"shaken ofif like dust in sunshine, and he reiterated, ' Rabbie Burns! Mind 
" 'Rabbie? I'll no forget him, puir fallow! Eh, but he was the life o' the 
" ' Lodge ! ' " 

Brother Watson was constant in his attendance at meetings, both of the 
Lodge and the R.A. Chapter Canongate Kilwinning, till within a short time of 
his death. He laboured with untiring zeal as Secretary to the Lodge, and in an 
equally responsible position in the Chapter for many years after accomplishing 
the magnificent picture of the Inauguration, with which his name will ever be 
remembered. He died at his residence, Broughton Park Cottage, Edinburgh, 
on 1 8th November 1870. 

A very acceptable and instructive tribute to his memory at this time will 
doubtless be an extract from the obituary notice regarding him which appeared 
in the Edinburgh Courant of Thursday, 24th November 1870, as follows : 

" Mr Watson was the son of Captain Andrew Watson. He was born 
in Edinburgh Castle in 1800, and belonged to a family to whom Scottish 
art owes much his uncle, George Watson, having been the first President of 
the Royal Scottish Academy, and his cousin, Sir John Watson Gordon, the last 
President. 

" Mr Stewart Watson's large picture of the Inauguration of Burns as Poet 
Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, which hangs on the wall of Grand 
Lodge, is a valuable picture, containing many most excellent portraits of eminent 



men who took part in that ceremony. His great picture of the Inauguration of 
the Duke of Athole as Grand Master of the Knights Templar, painted for that 
Society, is also much admired for truthfulness of portraiture and artistic finish. 
Among the last pictures which he exhibited in the Academy rooms was, ' The 
Cossacks of the Don Foraging,' which now adorns the walls of Ayton Castle. It 
is admitted to be a work of great merit and value. He has left a large collection 
of fine sketches and copies of Italian frescoes made during his long residence in 
Italy, which we understand will shortly be offered for public sale. He has also 
left two large pictures nearly finished one of which possesses great interest. It 
is illustrative of the domestic life of Sir Walter Scott, to whom Mr Watson was 
related, and with whom he was on terms of intimacy. 

" In the summer of 1824, Sir Walter Scott invited Mr Watson to spend 
some time at Abbotsford, and while there he, with the whole Scott family, 
enjoyed a pic-nic in the Woods of Abbotsford. He sketched a picture of this 
pic-nic, but never carried it out until near the end of his life.* The portraits are 
taken from likenesses of the Scott family, painted by him at Abbotsford on the 
occasion of that visit, and are exquisite likenesses of Sir Walter Scott, Lady Scott, 
their son Walter, Anne Scott, Mrs Lockhart, and her husband. The originals 
are in possession of Lady Scott of Abbotsford ; and in reference to them he 
wrote to the artist a letter, which, as it is characteristic of the great novelist, and 
has never been published, we take the opportunity of giving here : 

" ' MY DEAR MR WATSON, Your packet reached me in perfect safety, 
and the contents gave me great pleasure, both on account of the strong resem- 
blances of the miniatures and the style of execution. I am particularly pleased 

* A photograph of this very interesting picture of the Scott family hangs on the north wall of the 
Lodge-room, within two or three feet of Allan Ramsay's oil painting of William St. Clair of Rosslyn, 
First M. W. Grand Master Mason of Scotland, who was initiated, passed, and raised in Can. Kil., 1736. 

The following is a reproduction of the printed slip which was issued with each copy of the 
photograph when published : 

A REMEMBRANCE OF SIR WALTER SCOTT, BART. 



PAINTED BY THE LATE STEWART WATSON. 



Memorandum made in 1839 as to this Painting by Mr Watson. 

" Many years ago I received an invitation to visit Abbotsford, for the purpose of painting minia- 
tures of Sir Walter Scott and his Family. These miniatures are now in the possession of Lady Scott 
(Widow of Colonel Sir Walter Scott), through whose kindness fn placing them at my disposal I have 
been enabled to paint a picture. I had long thought of representing a scene which took place during my 
visit. Sir Walter, accompanied by Mr John Lockhart and the other members of his family, also a few 
friends then residing at Abbotsford, paid a visit to Newark Castle, for the purpose of showing that classic 
district to Miss Edgeworth. This party forms the subject of my picture." 

Note. The persons represented in the Photograph (beginning at the left) are Mr Archibald 
Constable, Mr James Hogg (the Ettrick Shepherd), Mr Lockhart, Sir Walter Scott, Miss Ann 
Scott, Mrs Lockhart, Lady Scott, Miss Edgeworth, Colonel Scott, Miss Scott (niece of Sir 
Walter), Miss Edgeworth's sister, Mr Charles Scott, and Mr Thomas Shortreede. 



52 

with my wife's picture, as her features and expression are not easily hit, and I 
think you have been very successful. I have no doubt that by continuing to 
bestow much pains (for that is everything in all difficult arts) you will soon place 
yourself high in your profession. My wife is greatly obliged by the two screens 
so beautifully pencilled, and begs me to make her best acknowledgements. I 
am not less obliged by your attention to my blazenry (sic] which is in no sort of 
hurry. If you look at it in a perfectly idle moment it is quite enough. Hogil 
nam Bo* will, I daresay, cast up among the Macfarlanes in due time. 
" ' I am, my dear Mr Watson, your obliged humble servant, 

" * WALTER SCOTT. 

" ' ABBOTSFORD, ^ih October.'' "f 

" ' P.S. I will be much obliged to you to look in upon the glass painter 
now and then.' 

" Mr Watson designed the embellishments of the library at Abbotsford, 
and among his papers are sketches by Sir Walter Scott of the arrangement of 
the coats armorial of the various families to whom he was related. Mr Watson 
was an ardent Freemason, and for nearly twenty years acted as secretary to the 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. His ever good temper and gentlemanly manner 
and disposition gained him the friendship* of all who had the opportunity of 
enjoying his society." 

Such was Brother Stewart Watson. 

This talented and much esteemed brother, with so fair a reputation to 
maintain unsullied, would never have availed himself of any such "beautiful 
" story of the Inauguration," as is alleged by Grand Secretary to have been 
"concocted," in order to supply him [the artist] "with a subject for a beautiful 
picture ! " 

Respectfully submitted by 

HUGH C. PEACOCK, 

Past-Secretary, and Past- Depute- Master Can. KiL, 
Proxy Master, No. 476. 



* This rendering by Sir Walter Scott of a well-known Highland saying is scarcely correct. A 
learned friend of mine has very kindly favoured me with the following correct version and explanation 
thereof : 

" Sir Walter Scott has written much bad Gaelic, and, in the present case, ' Hogil ' is his way of 
" rendering the genitive form of the proper word." 

" Togal na'm' Bo was one of the commonest of phrases, meaning the lifting of the cattle, and this is 
" the correct form of it. It had, no doubt, reference to the well-known habits of the Highlanders in 
" raiding the lands of their neighbours." H. C. P. 

t 1824. 



LETTER 

FROM 

PAST MASTER WM. N. FRASER of Findrack and Tornaveen 

TO 

PAST MASTER ALLAN MACKENZIE. 



41 ALBANY STREET, 
EDINBURGH, \2th April 1893. 
Mr ALLAN MACKENZIE, 

P.M. Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, 
17 St Andrew Square. 

MY DEAR SIR AND BROTHER, 

Robert Burns. 

Replying to yours of 7th instant, I beg to say that at the time the 
letter was written to Brother D. Murray Lyon, dated 7th February 1873, I cordially 
approved of it, and I approve of it now. It had the no less hearty approval of all other 
members of the Committee of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, among whom were the 
R.W. Master and the Past Master, Dr Sam. Somerville of Ampherlaw, Thomas Elder 
MacRitchie, W.S., of Craigton and Dunork, Past Master Councillor Thomas Drybrough, 
David Crawford, S.S.C., Past Master Thomas Alex. Hill, and Dr John Middleton, 
afterwards R.W. Master. 

I have read the printed correspondence and all that has been said against the 
facts set forth in the Secretary's letter of 7th February 1873, an d am surprised at so much 
being written against said facts to so little purpose. I adhere to the tenor of the 
communication sent to Brother D. Murray Lyon by the Secretary of Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning, in February 1873, as containing substantially the truth relative to Robert 
Burns and his connection with the Lodge. 

The following is a copy of the document you ask for, extracted from my private 
diary for 1853, viz. : 

" On the ist of March 1787, on the motion of Alexander Fergusson of Craig- 
darroch, Dumfriesshire, R.W. Master of Canongate Kilwinning Lodge, Brother Robert 
Burns was elected Poet-Laureate of the Lodge, an office which he held till his death in 
1796. When I was R.W. Master of Canongate Kilwinning in 1853 I received corrobora- 
tion of this well-known fact, from my brother-in-law, Mr James Veitch, Elliock, 
Dumfriesshire, and he had it direct from his cousin, Cutlar Fergusson, Younger, of Craig- 
darroch, who was present in the Lodge room on ist March 1787." I am, Yours very 

truly and fraternally, 

WM. N. FRASER, 

Past Master, Lodge Can. Kit. No. 2. 



LETTER 



FROM 

PAST MASTER THOMAS DRYBROUGH 

TO 

PAST MASTER ALLAN MACKENZIE. 



31 ROYAL TERRACE, 
EDINBURGH, zist August 1893. 
MY DEAR SIR AND BROTHER, 

I regret to learn from you that at this late time a hundred and 
six years since the Lodge "Can. Kil." was frequented by Robert Burns the Grand 
Secretary or anyone else should venture to call in question the time-honoured and 
universally admitted fact that Burns had been elected and inaugurated Poet Laureate of 
that Lodge. The letter which the Secretary wrote to Brother D. Murray Lyon, in 
February 1873, contains the main facts relative to Robert Burns' connection with the 
" Can. Kil." as they have been handed down to us by the thoroughly trustworthy infor- 
mation transmitted from brother to brother since these old days, and I heartily approve 
of that letter on reading it again. Half a century ago I became a member of the " Can. 
Kil.," and was R.W.M. from 1856 to 1860, and had constant association with many old 
brethren, whose recollection of the Lodge and its eventful history extended back to the 
early part of this century. All of these brethren were aware, and at various times in 
my hearing spoke, of Burns having been elected and inaugurated Poet Laureate. Many 
of them knew of the event from brethren who had actually been present in the Lodge on 
such occasion, and met Burns. Among the more prominent old members with whom I 
was intimate were Alex. Lambe Robertson, W.S., who was R.W.M. from 1819 to 1830, 
and who lived to succeed me and hold the Chair a second time, from 1860 to 1862; 
Alex. M'Neil, Advocate, was R.W.M. from 1830 to 1838, and who had been connected 
with the Lodge for many years before that; Professor Aytoun, R.W.M. from 1839 to 
1841, and P.M. Dr Sam. Somerville of Ampherlaw; Archd. D. Campbell; Archd. C. 
Mowbray; also Bros. Alexander Jas. Stewart, Hector Gavin, Jas. Marshall, Solicitor, 
and Stewart Watson, &c. All these brethren confidently believed in Burns having been 
Poet Laureate, and had good reason to give for their belief. Why, then, has Grand 
Secretary waited until all these old members were dead before calling the Inauguration 
in question? My esteemed friend and Brother, P.M. Wm. N. Fraser of Tornaveen, who 
held the Chair for years both before and after me, is still alive, and can give his reliable 
testimony to these, I think, indisputable facts of the Poet Laureateship. It is beyond the 
time now to call the matter in question. I am, my Dear Sir and Brother, fraternally 
and faithfully yours, 

THOMAS DRYBROUGH, 
Past Master, Lodge Canongate Kilwmning, 
Past Junior Grand Deacon, Grand Lodge of Scotland. 
Brother ALLAN MACKENZIE, 

P,M., Lodge " Can. Kil.," 

17 St Andrew Square. 



EXTRACT FROM MINUTE 



AND 



BETWEEN 

The Secretary of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning 

, AND 

BROTHER D. MURRAY LYON, AYR 
1873- 

Extract from Minute of Quarterly Meeting of Committee of the Lodge Canongate 
Kilwinning, held in the Lodge-room, Wednesday, January 15, 1873, 
instructing Secretary to write Bro. D. Murray Lyon. 

****** 

" Reference was subsequently made to the book announced as being in 
" course of publication by Brother D. Murray Lyon of Ayr, in which, according 
" to the report of a visiting brother in this Lodge, discredit is thrown upon the 
" commonly accepted account of the connection which Robert Burns, the Poet, 
" had with Canongate Kilwinning during his residence in Edinburgh in 1787. 
" The Secretary was desired to write Brother D. Murray Lyon on the subject. 
" The meeting then closed. 

" H. C. PEACOCK, J. SCHOPP, R.W.M." 

" Secretary. 



LETTER from Bro. HUGH C. PEACOCK to Bro. D. MURRAY LYON. 

" EDINBURGH, zyd January, 1873. 

" D. MURRAY LYON, Esq., Ayr. 

" Dear Sir and Brother, 

" I am directed by the R. W. Master and Office- 

Bearers of Lodge ' Canongate Kilwinning,' No. 2, to write you in consequence of 
a statement made lately in the Lodge by a visiting brother, to the effect that in 



56 

your forthcoming work, entitled ' HISTORY OF THE LODGE OF EDINBURGH 
' (Marys Chapel], No. I, Embracing an Account of the Rise and Progress of 
1 Freemasonry in Scotland,' the connection of Robert Burns, the Poet, with our 
Lodge is discredited. 

" In these circumstances it is my duty to inform you that there is ample 
evidence of the Poet's association with this Lodge as currently reported, and I 
shall be glad to be assured by you that the statement referred to is erroneous. 

" Yours fraternally, 

"H. C. PEACOCK, Secy." 



LETTER from Bro. D. MURRAY LYON to Bro. HUGH C. PEACOCK. 

" DALHOUSIE COTTAGE, AYR, 

"Jan. 24/73 
" Dear Sir and Brother, 

"Thanks for your note of yesterday's date. The statement to 
which you refer is scarcely correct. It is not my object to depreciate any Lodge 
in regard to its association with eminent characters. I have, in noticing Burns' 
connection with Can. Kil., stated the following FACTS : i. That B. was "assumed 
a member" of the Lodge Feb. i, 1787; 2. That Feb. 9, 1815, B. is designated 
(for the first time) POET LAUREATE of the L. ; 3. Can. Kil. records contain no 
evidence of B. being ekcted Po. L., or of his having been installed as such as 
represented in the Picture painted by Stewart Watson. But if you can show me 
proof that the Picture in question is a representation of what actually took place, I 
shall only be too glad to avail myself of the evidence. In my remarks on Can. 
Kil., I embrace a facsimile of its original Commission as a branch of Mo. Kil., and 
also give it full credit for the having taken the initiative in the erection of the Gr. L. 
of Scotland, and of its being the mother Lodge of St. Clair. My note on B.'s 
connection with Can. Kil. will be in the printer's hands in a few days. Com- 
municate at once. 

" Yours fraternally, 

"D. MURRAY LYON." 



LETTER 

FROM 

BRO. HUGH C. PEACOCK 

TO 

BRO. D. MURRAY LYON. 

[ This is the letter which was acknowledged by Brother D. M. Lyon, February 1 1 , 
1873, in the terms set forth at page 61, but regarding which he now, in the 
year 1893, complains to Grand Lodge that the writer "laid a statement 
" before him embodying alleged facts, which he (Bro. Lyon) unfortunately 
" accepted as true," and still relative to this letter " that the statements 
" made to him were unfounded"] 

" EDINBURGH, j(A February 1873. 
" D. MURRAY LYON, Esq., Ayr. 

" DEAR SIR AND BROTHER, 

" In reply to your favour of 24th ultimo, I beg to state, on behalf of the 
R.W.M. and office-bearers of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, that, although we fully 
believe, as you profess, that it is not your object ' to depreciate any Lodge in regard to 
its association with eminent characters,' and we have every faith in your desire to be 
impartial in your History of the Lodge of Edinburgh (Mary's Chapel), No. i, yet, the 
explanation contained in your letter respecting the notice therein of Burns and Canongate 
Kilwinning, I regret to say, looks very like a confirmation of the report of it, which had 
reached us ; and, from your mode of stating certain isolated facts, it appears after all that 
in your intended notice, the connection of ROBERT BURNS with this Lodge, as commonly 
reported, is discredited. 

" If I had that notice before me in full, as you purpose publishing it, I should 
know better how to reply, and we might be saved some correspondence ; but, with the 
statements regarding it as are given in your note, I shall nevertheless endeavour to 
answer you. 

" Had any doubt ever been previously thrown on the universally accepted 
connection of Robert Burns with the Canongate Kilwinning, the nature of your reference 
to it might be looked for in such a comprehensive work as you propose to publish ; but, 
when it is considered that only now, when few of the living links remain, connecting us 
with those who had often borne testimony to their personal acquaintance with Burns, and 
to their having been at meetings of the Lodge, when he was there as its Poet Laureate, 

the tenor of your notice appears extraordinary. 

H 



58 

"The work published in 1846, entitled ' A Winter with Robert Burns,' gives a 
faithful exposition of the picture of Robert Burns' Inauguration as Poet Laureate, and 
contains much interesting matter relative to the individuals portrayed therein, and the 
Poet's intimacy with them ; and, when the materials for that work were being collected, 
there were several members of the Canongate Kilwinning alive, having vivid recollections 
of the Lodge meetings of 1786-7, from whom much of the information was derived- 
Such testimony as those then living witnesses of the events of 1786-7, in the Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning, is not available to us now, but what they did testify to was WIDELY 
CIRCULATED AND NEVER CONTRADICTED. Their accounts of Burns and his intimate 
association with the Canongate Kilwinning, of his holding the appointment of Poet 
Laureate, and of his having been formally elected as such, were never doubted. Such 
a circumstance, therefore, is strong evidence of the truth of what is narrated in the 
' Winter with Robert Burns.' 

" It is well known that the author of that work investigated the subject it treats of 
very thoroughly, and from sources of information which may not now be open to us, 
especially, as just stated, from his intimate acquaintance with many of the old members; 
and that is shown by his own words and other evidence in the minutes, also, from having 
had the advantage of much historical information gleaned by a Committee of the Lodge, 
formed a few years previous to the date of his book, for the express purpose as defined 
in the minutes, ' of investigating the records of the Lodge, and to frame such an account 
(of the Lodge) as may seem to them most advisable.' That Committee consisted of Mr 
H. Jardine, Advocate, R.W.M. (son of Sir H. Jardine, R.W.M. in 1790), the D.M., Mr 
James Jardine, the Sub M., Prof. William Edmonstoune Aytoun, Mr Alexander L. 
Robertson, Writer to the Signet, and several others. Further, as one guarantee in 
favour of the truthful compilation of the work under notice, we have the status and 
well-known talent of its author ; and as another guarantee, we have the fact, well 
known to a wide circle of brethren, that the matter contained in it with which we have 
at present to do, had been certainly obtained from or based upon the minutes of "Lodge 
Canongate Kilwinning. No one has ever impugned the work in any way, or discredited 
its narratives ; and, now, after nearly thirty years of its existence, it seems past the time to 
attempt doing so. 

"In 1815 there must have been many among the brethren of a Lodge so strong 
in numbers who had either been associates of Burns, or well acquainted with those 
who had been in his company at their meetings ; and in the minute of pth February of 
that year the statement incidentally occurs regarding Robert Burns that he " was a Member 
and Poet Laureat of this Lodge" Certainly, if such designation could not then have been 
truthfully applied, and if the brethren of that time had not perfect faith in it, we are 
bound to believe that the minutes would not bear any such record. You say that, in 
your notice of Burns and the Canongate Kilwinning, you have stated certain ' FACTS,' and 
one of them is 'That Feb. 9, 1815, B is designated (for the first time) POET 
LAUREATE.' I trust to be excused pointing out that such a fact, set forth with any such 
emphasis, and standing alone, without qualification or further information of any kind 
relative to it, is not likely to convey the real truth to the reader. It may be the first 



59 

time the designation occurs in the minutes, but it would be palpably wrong to suppose, 
therefore, that Burns was only then for the first time termed Poet Laureate, unless the 
absurdity can be supposed that the men, of acknowledged worth and status in society, 
who took leading part in that meeting, had become for that occasion most unscrupulous and 
untruthful, and that the men, of equal position and character, who formed the meeting 
of 8th June 1815, when the Poet is again referred to as " the lamented Bard, Robert Burns 
(who had been Poet Laureat of this Lodge)" had likewise become equally dishonorable. 
The Lodge was a strong one in those days ; for a long period its members were 
exceedingly numerous, and, had either the matter of Burns' Poet Laureateship, or of his 
formal election to the office of Poet Laureate, so long and widely known, been untrue, 
the contradiction would assuredly have been known also. Brethren who attended those 
two meetings in 1815 can be shown by the earlier minutes to have been active members 
of the Lodge for many years prior to the close of last century. In particular, I may 
mention Alex. Jaffray (repeatedly elected R.W.M.), and Charles More, who had 
filled various prominent offices in the Lodge ; and here, regarding the latter brother, I 
may state one fact, which possibly you may have overlooked, namely, that in that minute 
of 8th June 1815, Brother Charles More seconds a resolution anent the Lodge's 
subscription towards the general fund then being raised for erecting a mausoleum to the 
memory of Burns, who is so distinctly, at this time, and by so many worthy witnesses, 
acknowledged as Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, and one, therefore, in 
whom the Canongate Kilwinning had a special interest. This Charles More, whose name 
occur? so prominently in the minute of&th June 1815, is the same whose signature as Depute 
Master is appended to the minute of \st February 1787, when Burns is affiliated, and to 
the following minute of ist March 1787, at which date it is understood the Inauguration 
took place. Indeed, Brother Charles More appears, by his signature to the Minutes, to have 
attended all the Meetings during the period of Burns' visits to Edinburgh, 1786-7. The 
Secretary, Mr Paul Taylor, who wrote those minutes of 1815, had held office for over ten 
years, and must have been fully conversant with reminiscences of the Poet and his con- 
nection with our Lodge, derived from the very men who had enjoyed the Poet's Society. 

" It may be reckoned comparatively slender evidence to add to the foregoing, yet 
it may be remarked as some satisfaction to know, that there are members of the Lodge 
at the present time who associated for years with those members who had the privilege 
of Burns' company in the Lodge when he wore the jewel of his office as Poet Laureate ; 
that, further, that jewel was also worn by the Ettrick Shepherd as Poet Laureate of 
Canongate Kilwinning, and it had the name of Robert Burns engraved upon it when the 
Poet Laureateship was conferred on him. 

" Incidentally, I may state also, regarding the foregoing matter, that in the minute 
of i6th January 1835, it appears a resolution was carried to the effect 'that it was 
' expedient that the honorary office of Poet Laureate of the Lodge, which had been in 
' abeyance since the death of the immortal BROTHER ROBERT BURNS, should be revived, 
' and that James Hogg, the " Ettrick Shepherd," on whom his poetic mantle had fallen, 
' should be respectfully requested to accept the appointment as the highest tribute to his 
' genius and worth which the brethren have it in their power to bestow,' which motion it 
is said ' was unanimously and enthusiastically carried.' 



6o 

" It is not much to be wondered at that reference to Burns does not occur more 
often in the minutes ; because, in the first place, the minutes for many years prior to 1789 
are few, while we know, from various sources, that meetings of the Lodge were very 
frequent, and those minutes are invariably brief, little else but a record of intrants, 
passings, and raisings, and generally written in a somewhat clumsy and negligent 
manner. Their brevity in some instances cannot be excelled, only a line and a half, or 
eighteen words, and this at a time, too, when there is every reason to believe that events 
worthy of note were frequent in the Canongate Kilwinning : secondly, at the time that 
Robert Burns was affiliated to the Lodge, and was elected its Poet Laureate, he 
was not the distinguished Poet that he afterwards became. Indeed, it was only after his 
death in 1796 that the man and his works were esteemed at anything like their value, and, 
only after many years, was his memory regarded with anything like the veneration 
accorded to it now. 

" I have had conversation on this matter with a distinguished member of the 
Canongate Kilwinning, who has been connected with it for more than five and thirty 
years, and who stands high in the Craft.* He knew Brother William Petrie of our 
Lodge, who had been present at the Inauguration of Burns as Poet Laureate, and has 
heard from his lips many very interesting reminiscences of the Poet, and of events 
which had occurred in the Lodge when there in company with him. Further, the 
member I refer to informed me that he also knew intimately Brother W m - Campbell, W.S., 
who was for very many years a member of Canongate Kilwinning, and who had similar 
recollections of Burns, and I find in the minute of meeting of i2th November 1845, 
which records matter connected with the project of painting the Inauguration, that 
this same Brother Campbell seconds the resolution ' that Brother Watson have access to 
sketch the antique and picturesque interior of the Lodge, with a view to his painting the 
Inauguration of Robert Burns as her Poet Laureate,' and adds, that he had ' had many 
opportunities of giving testimony in favour of the particulars referred to ; ' that he had 
travelled in company of Burns,' and spent two of the most happy days with him at 
Auchtertyre Castle.' It is recorded in this Minute also that Brother James Marshall, 
who proposed the motion quoted above, concluded his remarks by saying, that ' years 
ago, when he, Brother Marshall, attended this Lodge, he took a chief interest in the 
reminiscences of old men connected with such events, but of those, he feared, few 
survived.' Further on it is said, ' Brother Marshall was requested to furnish the authenti- 
cated particulars to a subsequent meeting, when the motion should be disposed of, 
meantime, it was unanimously entertained,' and, in the minute of next meeting, igth 
November 1845, when Brother Marshall brought up his motion as directed, we are told 
that ' The motion was seconded by the R.W.M. and unanimously carried.' 

" But, besides the unimpeachable oral evidence I have just adduced, I should add 
the instance of another eminent member of Canongate Kilwinning, whom I have the 
privilege of knowing,t and who has informed me that the late Mr Alexander L. 

* Past Master Dr Samuel Somerville of Ampherlaw. 
t Past Master Wm. N. Fraser of Tornaveen. 



6i 

Robertson, W.S. (R.W.M. of the Lodge, 1819 to 1830), and Mr Alexander M'Neill, 
Advocate (R.W.M., 1830 to 1837), whom he knew intimately, had no doubt what- 
ever of the fact of the Inauguration having actually taken place, and they must have 
associated with, or met many brethren who were present on the occasion. 

" Evidence so direct as this cannot be disputed. 

" I need add no more now, except that I apologize for delay in replying to your 
communication, occasioned by very great pressure of business, which certainly has 
prevented me giving this subject the attention it deserves ; but, should you be kind 
enough to favour me with a copy or proof of such notice of Burns and the Canongate 
Kilwinning as you intend publishing, I shall be very glad to write you again with 
remarks upon it. Yours, etc., 

" H. C. PEACOCK, Secy. 



LETTER 

FROM 

BRO. D. MURRAY LYON 

TO 

BRO. HUGH C. PEACOCK. 

\Being the reply which closed this Correspondence^ 

AYR, Feb. 11/73. 
" MY DEAR SlR AND BROTHER, 

I have to thank you for the very full statement you have made 
anent the Inauguration in name of the R.W.M. and other officers of the Can. Kil. 
I recognise the satisfactory nature of the evidence you have submitted, and shall have 
pleasure in giving effect to it in my forthcoming work. 

The delay which has occurred on your part prevents my being able to submit a 
slip of my remarks the printers being close up to that particular part of my MS. I 
would take the liberty of saying, that while I shall embody the facts you have put me in 
possession of, I will not require to alter a single sentence of what I had previously 
written. The report, to which you have twice alluded, must certainly have been exagger- 
ated. No one out of Ayr has seen the MS. on the subject as finally prepared for the 
printer i.e., before you addressed me on the subject. 

Again thanking you. I am, ever faithfully yours, 

D. MURRAY LYON. 

H. C. PEACOCK, Esq., 
Edinburgh. 



62 



OPINION OF A POPULAR HISTORIAN. 

"I HAVE given close attention to those pages [History of No. 2, pp. 117 to 126, 
and Letter quoted in pp. 57 to 61 ante] which refer to Burns' inauguration, and it seems 
to me silly for any one to go behind the evidence therein submitted. 

" I have been a student of history all my life, and I only wish that everything 
which is recorded as bona fide historical fact had half as solid a groundwork as the fact 
of Robert Burns being Poet Laureate of Canongate Kilwinning Lodge." 

Communicated by Brother Peter Ross, Author of " A History of Scottish 
Literature? " Scotland and the Scots? " The Songs of Scotland," etc., 
etc., also Past Master and Present Treasurer of the Scotia Lodge, No. 
634 F. and A.M., New York, 2^th October 1892. 



THE "APPOINTMENT" AND "INAUGURATION" 

OF 

ROBERT BURNS, 

POET LAUREATE OF LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING, 

Quoted from Brother D. Murray Lyon's <{ HISTORY OF THE LODGE OF 
EDINBURGH (MARY'S CHAPEL), No. i, Embracing an Account of the 
Rise and Progress of Freemasonry in Scotland," pp. 332, 333, and 334. 



" Mr Fergusson of Craigdarroch was Master of Canongate Kilwinning at the 
date of Burns's appointment to the Laureateship of that Lodge. The Inauguration of 
the Poet to this office is the subject of a painting well known to Scottish Freemasons, 
executed by a Member of the Lodge, the late Brother Stewart Watson ; it also forms 
the subject of a small volume, entitled, ' A Winter with Robert Burns,' * containing 
biographical sketches of the Brethren whose portraits appear in the painting. The 
minute of the communication held by Canongate Kilwinning in St. John's Chapel, on the 
ist of February 1787, contains a record of Burns's assumption as a member of that Lodge, 
in the following terms: "' The Right Worshipful Master having observed that Brother 
Burns was at present in the Lodge, who is well known as a great Poetic Writer, and for 
a late publication of his works which have been universally commended, and submitted 
that he should be assumed a Member of this Lodge, which was unanimously agreed to, 
and he was assumed accordingly.' The ist of March 1787 is mentioned by masonic 
writers as the date of the scene which has been portrayed by the artist. But neither the 
minute of that date, nor of any other during Burns's lifetime, contains any record what- 
ever of the existence of such an office as Laureate of the Lodge, or of that distinction 
being conferred on Burns. The first mention in Canongate Kilwinning minutes of this 
office having been held by the Poet is found under date gth February 1815, when the 
Lodge resolved to open a subscription among the members to aid in the erection of a 
' mausoleum to the memory of Robert Burns, who was a Member and Poet Laureate of 
this Lodge . . . and who had on many occasions contributed so generally to the 
harmony of the Masonic Order, and to that of the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning in 

* "The author of this work, Bro. James Marshall, was a Solicitor in the Supreme Courts of Scot- 
land, but afterwards emigrated to Australia, and carried on the business of an Attorney in the city of 
Melbourne, Victoria, where he died in 1870." 



6 4 

particular.' The Laureateship is again referred to in the minute of gth June 1815, and 
also in that of i6th January 1835, which records the restoration, in the person of James 
Hogg, the ' Ettrick Shepherd,' of the ' honorary office of Poet Laureate of the Lodge, 
which had been in abeyance since the death of the immortal Brother Robert Burns.' 

" Our statement regarding what appears in the minutes on the subject of the 
Laureateship is founded upon a personal examination of the minute-book. But, while 
deeming it proper to give the result of that examination, it is equally right that we 
should state that the commonly received report of the circumstances connected with the 
Inauguration has never been discredited. The Lodge Canongate Kilwinning is not 
singular in the omission from its records of facts which have come to be regarded as 
interesting features in its history. Its minutes at, and for many years prior to, the 
period of Burns's attendance at its communications are brief to a degree ; and this may 
account for the infrequency of their allusions to Burns, who was not then the distinguished 
poet he afterwards became. It was only after his death that Robert Burns and his 
works were esteemed at their proper value, and only after many years that his memory 
was regarded with anything like the veneration accorded to it now. Commendably 
proud of its traditionary association with genius, the Lodge has collected and preserved 
from oral testimony of an unquestionable character the testimony obtained by gentlemen 
of unimpeachable veracity, from Brethren who were personally known to Burns, who 
were present at his inauguration, and saw him wear the jewel of his office, evidence 
of the event under notice.* In addition to Burns, the Canongate Kilwinning has the 
honour of being associated with some of the most eminent names in Scottish literature, 
amongst whom may be mentioned John Wilson (Christopher North), James Hogg, 
William Edmonstone Aytoun, D. M. Moir (Delta), J. Gibson Lockhart (the biographer 
of Scott), Dr Hugh Blair (the eminent preacher and lecturer on Rhetoric and Belles 
Lettres), who were all Members of the Lodge. To these may be added the distinguished 
name of Henry, Lord Brougham. His Lordship was initiated in the Lodge Fortrose, 
Stornoway. ' Craigdarroch ' was the successful competitor for the relic of the drunken 
courtier of Anne of Denmark, contended for at Friar's Carse in 1790, as celebrated in 
Burns's ballad of ' Thfc Whistle.' " 

Relative to the foregoing quotation, attention is requested to the following 
observations : 

i. Brother D. Murray Lyon with reference to his notice (as above quoted) of 
41 Burns and the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning," asserted in his letter, dated nth 
February 1873, which is quoted in page 61 ante, that he would " not require to alter a. 
single sentence of what " he " had previously written." Now, the very opening sentences 
of the above narration, quoted from his History, contain expressions of a belief in 
" Burns's appointment to the Laureateship of that Lodge," as well as a belief in " the 
" Inauguration of the Poet to this office," and for those expressions he is in no respect 

* "Charles More, who, as Depute Master, signed the minute of Burns's affiliation in 1787, was 
present in Canongate Kilwinning in June 1815, and seconded the resolution anent the Lodge's subscription 
towards the Mausoleum." 



65 

whatever indebted to the Secretary of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. Such being the 
case, it is clearly evident that Brother Murray Lyon had his faith in the Laureateship 
and Inauguration of Robert Burns well established before he received the Canongate 
Kilwinning Secretary's letter of yth February 1873. Indeed, it appears by Brother 
Lyon's pointed assertion, to wit that he would " not require to alter a single sentence 
" of what" he "had previously written," as if he wished the Canongate Kilwinning 
Secretary to understand that his mind had been already made up on the subject, and 
that he was glad to receive such satisfactory confirmation in support of his opinion, 
more particularly, as he added, with emphasis, the comforting assurance " The report, 
" to which you have twice alluded, must certainly have been exaggerated." 

2. Specially deserving of note is the fact that the statement at the very begin- 
ning of Bro. Lyon's notice of " Burns and the Lodge Canongate Kilwinning," namely : 
" Mr Fergusson of Craigdarroch was Master of Canongate Kilwinning at the date 
" of Burns's appointment to the Laureateship of that Lodge," does not occur in 
any form in the letter he received from Canongate Kilwinning Secretary, dated 
7th February 1873. 

3. It will be very satisfactory if Brother D. Murray Lyon will point out the 
sentences which he "had previously written," and which he did "not require to alter" 
so that it may at once be seen wherein the Canongate Kilwinning Secretary is blamed 
for having " misled our eminent historian." 



PROCEEDINGS IN GRAND LODGE 



DESCRIPTIVE OF 



THE PRESENTATION 

By the late Brother JAMES BALLANTINE, Grand Bard,* on behalf of the 
Family of the late Sir JAMES BURNES, M.D., etc., etc., etc., 2nd 
February 1863, of Bro. STEWART WATSON'S Celebrated Painting, 
entitled 

THE INAUGURATION OF ROBERT BURNS, POET LAUREATE OF 
LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING. 



"GRAND LODGE OF SCOTLAND. 

" The Quarterly Communication of the Grand Lodge of Scotland was held in 
Freemasons' Hall on the 2nd February 1863. His Grace the Duke of Athole occupied 
the throne. Bro. Mann, R.W.M., No. i, acted as Senior Grand Warden, and Bro. 
M'Cowan, P.M., No. 3, as Junior Grand Warden. On the platform were Brothers Sir 
Alexander P. Gordon Gumming, Junior Grand Deacon ; James Ballantine, Grand Bard ; 
John Cunningham, President of the Board of Grand Stewards, etc., etc. 

******** 

' Brother James Ballantine, Grand Bard, presented to the Grand Lodge the 
painting of the Inauguration of Robert Burns as Poet Laureate of the Lodge ' Canon- 
gate Kilwinning.' Brother Ballantine explained that this painting had been the property 
of the late Brother Sir James Burnes, K.H., Physician-General of the Bombay Army, 
and that previous to his death it was the wish of Brother Burnes to make this presenta- 
tion. The Grand Lodge, after expressing their thanks to Brother Ballantine for the 
trouble he had taken in the matter, ordered the painting to be hung up in the Grand 
Committee room." 

* Author of the Scottish Novels, "The Gaberlunzie's Wallet" and "The Miller of Deanhaugh," 
also the well-known songs, " Ilka Blade o' Grass keps its ain Drap o' Dew," " Castles in the Air," etc. 



67 

COPY OF NOTICE 

Published in "Scottish Freemasons' Magazine" isf July 1863, of the Inaugura- 
tion Picture having then been placed in the position it now occupies. 

" HISTORICO-MASONIC PAINTING. 



" INAUGURATION OF ROBERT BURNS 

AS POET LAUREATE OF THE LODGE 

CANONGATE KILWINNING, EDINBURGH. 

ist March 1787. 



" It affords us peculiar satisfaction to state, for the general information of the 
Craft, that the above painting, executed by Brother Stewart Watson, Secretary of the 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, has now been permanently hung on the walls of the 
Grand Committee-room at Freemasons' Hall in this city, where it may be inspected 
by the immortal bard's admirers. It will be recollected by our readers that this 
painting was recently presented to the Grand Lodge of Scotland by the family of the 
late distinguished Brother Dr James Burnes, K.H., Physician-General, Bombay Army." 



INSCRIPTION ON THE PICTURE 

which Grand Secretary now desires should be " amended:" 



"THE INAUGURATION 

OF 

ROBERT BURNS 

AS POET LAUREATE OF 

THE LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING 

EDINBURGH, ist MARCH 1787. 

Presented by JAMES BURNES, K.H., F.R.S., etc., 
To the Grand Lodge of Scotland, 1862." 



MINUTES OF TWO MEETINGS OF CANONGATE KILWINNING COMMITTEE, 
HELD RESPECTIVELY I$TH AND 2?TH DECEMBER 1893. 

Picture in the Board-room of Grand Lodge of the Inauguration of Robert Burns as 
Poet Laureate of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 

Consequent on the action taken by Grand Secretary on 2Qth December 1892, in pro- 
posing to Grand Committee that the inscription on the above-named picture 

should be 

" amended " ! 
a Special Meeting of the Committee of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning was held in 



68 

St. John's Chapel, St. John Street, on Friday, isth December 1893, for the purpose 
of considering the whole subject, and of hearing read the correspondence between 
Brothers A. Mackenzie, Hugh C. Peacock, D. Murray Lyon, Wm. N. Eraser, 
and Thomas Drybrough; and of considering the Evidence submitted to the 
Committee by Brother H. C. Peacock substantiating the fact of Robert Burns, 
the first Poet Laureate of this Lodge, having been elected and inaugurated to that 
office ist March 1787. 

Present: The Right Worshipful Master presiding ; and Brothers James Drum- 
mond, P.M.; Allan Mackenzie, P.M. and Treasurer: Robert Bathgate, 
D.M. ; Geo. R. Kerr, S. W. ; Wm. Elliot, J. W. ; John Fairweather, Secy. : 
Thomas Cochrane, S.D. ; H. C. Peacock, Past D.M. ; H. B. Ezard, John 
Cubic, Robert Boyd, and John Jack. 

Printers' proofs and MS. master were produced, containing most of the facts 
gleaned by Bro. Hugh C. Peacock relative to this subject, and many of these were read 
by him to the Committee; but there being insufficient time in this one evening to 
consider the whole body of evidence submitted, the Committee agreed to adjourn till 
27th inst, when the subject should be disposed of. Meantime, it was arranged that 
printers' proofs of the remaining part of the evidence be furnished to each member of 
Committee prior to that date, if possible. The meeting then adjourned. 

JOHN FAIRWEATHER, Secretary. GEO. CRAWFORD, R.W.M. 



Picture in Board-room of Grand Lodge continued. 

At an adjourned Special Meeting of the Committee of Canongate Kilwinning Lodge, 
held within St. John's Chapel, St. John Street, on Wednesday, 2 7th December 
1893, for the purpose of concluding the business for which the meeting of i5th 
inst. was called. 

The R.W. Master, Brother Geo. Crawford, again presided; and there were also 
present Brothers Allan Mackenzie, P.M.; John Fairweather, Secretary; 
James Drummond, W.S., P.M.; Robert Bathgate, D.M. ; Thomas Cochrane, 
Geo. R. Kerr, Robert Boyd, and H. B. Ezard. 

The minute of Committee meeting, held on isth inst, was read and sustained. 

The remainder of the evidence brought forward and undisposed of at last 
meeting was now dealt with, and the Committee unanimously resolved as follows : 

"That the cordial thanks of the Lodge are due to Brother Hugh C. Peacock for the valuable 
mass of information he has so carefully gleaned, and for compiling the well-developed 
statement of the subject which he has now put on record. 

" That, beginning his labours in 1873, he then discovered and made known points in this question 
which possibly, but for him, might have remained in obscurity, or, at all events, could not 
be easily established at this date without his personal testimony ; and that much additional 
proof, throwing a flood of light on matters previously not veiy clear to the ordinary reader, 
has since been collected, and certain links have been discovered, by him, which form, with 



6 9 

those already published, a continuous chain of evidence which, it is believed, should satisfy 
any unbiassed judgment. 

"That the Committee are much gratified to observe that Brother Peacock has not hesitated 
to quote prominently all the strongest and most plausible arguments and assertions advanced 
by the Historian and the Past Master of Lodge No. i, who impugned the statements 
contained in what is now the famous letter of 7th February 1873, and he has effectively 
answered and confuted them." 

" That, further, a copy of each minute of the two Committee meetings held respectively on the 
I5th and the 27th of December 1893 be printed and appended to the-Evidence aforesaid, 
and that three hundred copies or more, if deemed necessary of the whole work be 
printed and published as speedily as possible." 

In this connection the Committee remark, as worthy of note, that on loth 
December 1892, only a few days prior to. the date of the meeting of Grand 
Committee, on the zgtii of that month, when Grand Secretary submitted that the 
inscription on the Inauguration Picture should be "amended" the Right Worshipful 
Master of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning addressed a letter of invitation to The Right 
Hon. the Earl of Haddington, then Most Worshipful Grand Master, respectfully 
soliciting his attendance with a deputation from Grand Lodge, on 27th January 1893, 
on which date it was proposed that the natal day of Robert Burns and James Hogg 
should be celebrated. 



The R. W. Masters Letter to the M. W. Grand Master. 

" ST. JOHN'S CHAPEL, 

" ST. JOHN STREET, 
" EDINBURGH, loth Dec., 1892. 

" THE RIGHT HON. THE EARL OF HADDINGTON, 
" Grand Master Mason of Scotland, 
" Tyningham. 

" MOST WORSHIPFUL GRAND SIR AND BROTHER, 

" The Lodge Canongate Kilwinning cordially invites your Lordship 
to visit them on as early a date as you may find it convenient. Friday, 2;th January 
1893, is suggested as a date on which the Lodge celebrates the anniversary of the 
birthday of Brothers Robert Burns and James Hogg, who were Poets-Laureate. 

"The record of visits by each Grand Master ever since the institution of Grand 
Lodge is continuous, and the members, considering the close connection which some of 
your Lordship's ancestors had with it for instance, Lord Binning having been initiated 
there in December 1768 look forward with pleasure to your visit as a most interesting 
event. I am, yours most faithfully and fraternally, 

GEO. CRAWFORD, R.W.M." 

The above letter was transmitted to Grand Secretary, with the following respectful 
request that it be forwarded to his Lordship. 



The R. W. Masters Letter to Grand Secretary. 

' 2 1 ST. ANDREW SQUARE, 

" EDINBURGH, ioM Dec. 1892. 
" DEAR BRO. MURRAY LYON, 

" Herewith I have the pleasure to hand you letter 

addressed to the M. W. Grand Master, inviting him to visit No. 2. The date suggested 
is Friday 27th Jany. ; but if this is inconvenient for his Lordship, perhaps the evening 
of the Grand Lodge Meeting on and February might be substituted. Yours very 
fraternally, GEO. CRAWFORD." 

The reply received by the Right Worshipful Master was as follows, and it 
contains a singular illustration of the futility of attempting to prove a negative in respect 
of the minute dated ist March 1787 : 

Grand Secretary's Reply to the R. W. Master. 

" FREEMASONS' HALL, 

" Mr GEO. CRAWFORD, " EDINBURGH, Dec. 12, 1892. 

" R.W.M., No. 2. 

" MY DEAR SIR, 

" I shall forward your invitation to the Grand Master. At 

the same time it will be my duty to inform his Lordship that Burns' connection with 
No. 2 lay in his having been assumed a member in 1787 (Feb. i). ist March 1787 
is the date given as that on which Burns was ' inaugurated ' as Poet Laureate of Can. 
Kil. The minute of the Lodge of that date shews that no such inauguration took 
place. 

" Your Lodge does not require to perpetuate a myth in connection with its 
historical recollections. 

"It is sufficient to be able to point to the fact that Burns was an affiliated 
member of No. 2. Masonic fables are at a discount now-a-days. Ever faithfully, 

" D. MURRAY LYON, 
" Gr. Sec." 

The Committee much regret that Grand Secretary should think it his " duty " 
to so express himself in answer to the respectful request of our R.W. Master, 
especially when they consider that on 25th January 1884, the occasion on which the 
late very worthy Grand Master the Earl of Mar and Kellie honoured the Lodge with a 
grand visitation, Grand Secretary then assisted and cordially fraternised with the 
brethren of our Lodge in celebrating the anniversary of Robert Burns and James Hogg 
as Poets-Laureate of Canongate Kilwinning. 

Further, the Committee find that the assertions and references in Grand Secre- 
tary's letter are entirely at variance with his own published statements, which have 



been widely circulated for years prior to, as well as subsequent, to the " minute exami- 
nation of Canongate Kilwinning's records," which he claims to have made in 1873, and 
on which, at this distant date, he professes to found his newly-acquired disbelief in 
Robert Burns as Poet Laureate of Canongate Kilwinning. 

In conclusion, the Committee have to record that no deputation from Grand 
Lodge attended the anniversary Festival on z;th January 1893. 

The meeting then closed. 

JOHN FAIRWEATHER, GEO. CRAWFORD, R.W.M., 

Secretary. Chairman. 



N O T A N D A. 



COPY of LETTER from Brother LEONARD HORNER to Brother WILLIAM 
CRAWFORD, R. W. Master of Lodge Kirknewton and Ratho, No. 85 
(vide Part I., pp. 17, 18, 56 and 57). 

" EDINBURGH, znd May 1804. 
"R. W. M., 

" I beg leave to present the worthy brethren of the Lodge 

of Kirknewton and Ratho this testimony of my regard for them. I request you will 
have the goodness to assure them of my warmest wishes for their prosperity, both as 
individuals and as Freemasons, and that I shall ever retain a lively sense of the honor 
they conferred on me by electing me an honorary member of their very respectable 
Lodge. I shall remember with much pleasure the agreeable hours I spent in their 
company, which I regret were so few ; but so soon as I shall return to Scotland I will 
take the earliest opportunity to renew my former pleasures amongst them. 

" I have the honor to be, 

" R. W. M., 

" Your mo. affectionate Bro r -> 

" LEONARD HORNER." 



EXTRACT FROM MINUTE OF THE LODGE KIRKNEWTON AND RATHO, No. 85, 
Brother William Crawford, R. W. Master (vide Part I., pp. 17, 18, 56 
and 57). 

RATHO, \%th May 1804. 

****** 

"The Right Worshipful Master read a letter from Brother Leonard Horner 
expressing in the warmest terms his affections to the Lodge, and desiring their 
acceptance of a Bible, which was accordingly presented : the Lodge, highly sensible 
of the honour conferred upon them by Brother Horner, order the Secretary to return 
him the thanks of the whole Lodge, and to assure him that the Lodge of Kirknewton 
and Ratho will long retain his present with grateful remembrance." 



73 

The foregoing copy of letter and extract from minute have been supplied to me 
through the kind courtesy of Brother William Borthwick, R.W. Master of Lodge Kirk- 
newton and Ratho, No. 85, and his friend Brother George Innes, a Past Master of that 
Lodge. 



A Glimpse of Past Times. 
THE CANONGATE KILWINNING ANNUAL ELECTION, 24th June 1863. 

" The Master, Brother Henry, who was re-elected, is supported by a good staff 
of office-bearers, among whom may be noticed Dr Winchester, D.M., Ebsworth, S.M., 
Dr Veale, S.W., Schopp, J.W., STEWART WATSON, Secretary, and others. We are 
sorry, however, to learn that ROBERT STEWART, the Tyler,* has resigned that post, and 
although Jamie Baikie f succeeds him, we cannot say we take kindly to the change. 
Robert is one of the oldest Brethren of the Lodge, and has been Tyler for over thirty 
years. He was present with the Canongate Kilwinning at Innerleithen when the Brethren 
went there to initiate the ETTRICK SHEPHERD. We are sorry to lose Robert, for a more 
honest, upright and conscientious man and Mason does not breathe. We trust yet to 
see him coming among his Brethren of the Canongate Kilwinning, and we hope often 
to hear him sing one of those droll songs which seem only known to the veteran Tylers- 
of the older Lodges." Extract from The Scottish Freemason's Magazine of ist July 1863. 



REMINISCENCES CONCERNING HECTOR GAVIN AND HIS FRIEND 
ALEXANDER CUNNINGHAM. 

Two links connecting recent times with the eventful year 1 787. 

A very loyal and useful member of Canongate Kilwinning for very many years 
was Brother Hector Gavin, engraver, Croft-an-righ. He is frequently mentioned 
throughout this work; especially I would note the reference in p. 40 of Part II., where 
he appears as one of the Lodge Committee in 1835, when JAMES HOGG was elected 
Poet Laureate in succession to ROBERT BURNS, also the reference in page 41 of Part II., 
where he appears as one of the brethren [among whom were Brother William Campbell, 
W.S., S.W. 1 80 1 to 1803, and my friend the late Past Master Somerville] at the Lodge 
meeting of i2th November 1845, who supported the motion for having the picture of 
the INAUGURATION OF ROBERT BURNS as Poet Laureate painted by Stewart Watson. 
Brother Gavin claimed to be a very old member of Canongate Kilwinning, and he was 
acknowledged as such by brethren in 1840, whose recollections of Canongate Kilwinning 

* Associated with William Petrie, Tyler, until 1845. 

f James Baikie was Tyler of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning until 24th June 1877. 



74 

extended back as far as the year 1814,* although Past Master Somerville used to tell me 
(1872-3), that when Brother Gavin was an active member, and attended meetings 
regularly, he was often twitted about the date of his admission not being recorded 
although such omission was not an unusual occurrence in the old minute books of 
Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. The earliest mention of him in the minute books is in 
1835, when he with other old members were appointed members of committee. Brother 
Hector Gavin was a very aged man when I knew him, but he was brisk and conver- 
sational, and his faculties seemed unimpaired. He was born 5th October 1784, died 
ist March 1874. Early in life Brother Gavin became acquainted with Alexander 
Cunningham an affiliate of Canongate Kilwinning from Lodge St. Luke's, 6th October 
ij-jg who was an intimate friend of Robert Burns. Brother Cunningham, originally 
bred to the legal profession, became a jeweller on the death of his brother; was a 
nephew of Dr William Robertson, the historian, and was related to the Glencairn 
family. Brother James Marshall speaks of him thus : " The instructive and interesting 
letters to Cunningham by Burns, show that the latter set a high value upon his critical 
acumen. To him he sent his earliest proof of his Tarn o' Shanter. To him he 
submitted his songs, down to the last. He admired Cunningham's voice and taste in 
singing." 

The punch bowl of Inveraray marble which belonged to Burns was presented by 
his brother Gilbert to Alexander Cunningham (figure No. 20 in the picture of the 
Inauguration), for whom Mr Hector Gavin, then a young man, engraved on its silver 
lim plate the following stanza : 

" O ye whom social pleasure charms, 
Whose hearts the tide o' kindness warms, 
Who hold your being on the terms 

'Each aid the others,' 
Come to my bowl, come to my arms, 

My friends, my BROTHERS." 

Burns. 



GRAND LODGE MINUTE recording Visitation to LODGE CANONGATE 
KILWINNING, Jth December 1786. 

[Copied verbatim from Canongate Kilwinning Minute-book, and referred to in p. 13 Part II.] 
This is a parallel instance of the "style-book" form of record in minute- 

* Alexander Lambe Robertson, W.S., a very intimate friend of Dr Samuel Somerville, was one of 
those brethren. He instructed Dr Somerville as to Burns having been elected and inaugurated Poet 
Laureate. Alex. L. Robertson was initiated 6th January 1814, when Louis Cauvin, Charles More, 
Bailie Spankie, Lord Torphichen, Baron Norton, and many other brethren who had associated with 
Robert Burns in Canongate Kilwinning were alive and taking interest in the Lodge. Brother Alex. L. 
Robertson was elected Junior Warden, 1815 ; Substitute Master, 1816 and 1817 ; R. W. Master, 1819 to 
1830; Chairman of Committee, 1838; R.W. Master again, 1860 to 1862. Such a brother as Alexander 
Lambe Robertson must have had a great influence in preserving through so long a period among the 
brethren a conscientious regard for, and a loyal and intelligent faith in, the history, memories, and 
traditions of the past in Lodge Canongate Kilwinning. 



75 

book of Lodge St. Andrew, No. 48, on i2th January 1787, which was quoted and 
facetiously commented on by Bro. James Marshall at the expense of " the fat pair " 
(vide Part I., pp. 50 and 69). 

S T - JOHN'S CHAPEL ith Dec r - 1786. 

" This evening the Lodge being constituted by the Right Worshipful Master 
Thereafter the Most Worshipful Francis Charteris Esq r - junior of Amisfield Grand 
Master Mason of Scotland The Right Honourable Lord Torphichen Dep*- Grand 
Master The Right Worshipful Thomas Hay Esq. Substitute Grand Master Jas. 
Home & William MKillop Grand Wardens P T William Mason Esq Grand 
Secretary and Robert Meikle Grand Clerk preceded by the Lodge of Grand Stewards 
in their proper clothing were pleased to favour this Lodge with a visit when he was 
received with that respect suitable to the dignity of his high office and having taken 
the Chair performed while there the usual and ordinary requisites observed on similar 
occasions The Lodge was visited by Brethren from the following Lodges viz. Marys 
Chapel, Canongate & Leith Leith and Canongate, Journeymen Masons, S t- Lukes 
Ruglen Royal Arch and the Royal Arch Lodge Edin r - To all whom the proper 
compliments were paid and due returns made. 

" WILL MASON G. Secy. FRANCIS CHARTERIS Jun r - G.M. 

"Ro. MEIKLE G d - Clk. TORPHICHEN D.G.M. 

THOMAS HAY S'- G.M. 
JAMES HOME S.G.W. p.t. 
W m - MAcKiLLOP J.G.W. P.T." 



THE "TEARFUL FAREWELL." 

" Adieu ! a heart-warm, fond adieu ! 

Dear brothers of the mystic tie ! 

* * * # 

One round I ask it with a tear 
To him, the Bard that 's far awa'." 

In the admirable little handbook (pp. 23 and 24), intended as a companion to 
Brother Stewart Watson's painting of the " Inauguration of Robert Burns," Brother 
James Marshall quotes the clever " versified note" sent by Burns to his friend, Mr John 
Mackenzie, surgeon, of Mauchline, and introduces a quotation with reference to it, 
thus : 

" Mr Chambers remarks that, when he was conducted to the lodge-room wherein 
all this took place, he ' could not view without strange feelings the little stifling cottage 
room in which a brotherhood, containing such men as Robert Burns and Dugald 
Stewart, had met to profess the maxims of a boundless philanthropy the place where 
the poet of human nature had taken that tearful farewell of his companions] of which, by 
the bye, ' the minute books contain no notice' " 



7 6 

" Burns, it is said [by Allan Cunningham], sung this song in the St James' Lodge 
of Tarbolton when his chest was on the way to Greenock; men are yet living (1834) 
who had the honour of hearing him : the concluding verse affected the whole Lodge." 

Other instances of omissions from minute books, more extraordinary than the 
above illustration, are set forth in pp. 48 to 59 of Part I., also in pp. 4 to 19 of Part II. 



"LIVING LINKS" IN THE YEAR 1873 WITH PAST TIMES. 

(Vide footnote, p. 65 of Part I.) 

In the year 1873 a "few of the living links" old Members of Canongate 
Kilwinning connecting times past in the Lodge with times then present, because of 
having long associated " with those who had often borne testimony to their personal 
acquaintance with Burns," were the following : 

Brother Thomas Elder MacRitchie of Craigton and Dunork, W.S. ; E.P. and R. in Lodge 

Canongate Kilwinning, 5th March 1818. 
Past Master Samuel Somerville of Ampherlaw, M.D. 
Past Master Thomas Drybrough. 
Past Master William Nathaniel Fraser of Tornaveen. 
Brother George Gumming, W.S., whom I corresponded with for several years, deriving much 

information from him about old times in Canongate Kilwinning. Brother Gumming had been 

Junior Warden in 1835, when James Hogg was elected Poet Laureate in succession to Robert 

Burns. 
Brother Henry G. Mapleson, Surgeon, E.P. and R., 7th February 1828. The last meeting of 

Canongate Kilwinning he attended was in the year 1875. He was born in Edinburgh, 1805, 

and died there 6th March 1876. 
Brother Hector Gavin, Engraver, Croft-an-Righ, a very old member of Canongate Kilwinning. 

He was born 5th October 1784, died 1st March 1874. Vide further notice of him in Notanda, 

P- 73- 

The four brethren at head of this list were members of Committee in 1873, when I was Secretary. 
All of the brethren above named learned the fact of Burns having been elected and inaugurated 
Poet Laureate from the brethren who had associated with him in the year 1787. 



SUBSCRIPTION BY THE ROYAL CALEDONIAN HUNT TOWARDS THE 
SECOND EDITION OF THE POEMS OF ROBERT BURNS, PUBLISHED 1787, 
REFERRED TO IN FOREGOING PAGES: 

How Authorities Differ! 

" Through my Lord's [Lord Glencairn's] influence it is inserted in the records of 
the Caledonian Hunt, that they universally, one and all, subscribed for the second 
edition." Letter from Robert Burns to Gavin Hamilton, Esq., Mauchline, dated Edin- 
burgh, December 7, 1786. 

" By his [Lord Glencairn's] interest it is passed in the Caledonian Hunt, and 
entered in their books, that they are to take each a copy of the second edition, for 



77 

which they are to pay one guinea." Letter from Robert Burns to John Ballantyne, 
Esq., banker, Ayr, dated Edinburgh, December 13, 1786. 

" The subscription was headed by half the noblemen of the North : the 
Caledonian Hunt, thro' the interest of Glencairn, took six hundred copies." Allan 
Cunningham's Life of Robert Burns, vol. I. p. xviii. 

"The second edition at last appeared in 1787. It was prefaced by a dedication 
to the Caledonian Hunt, and followed by a list of subscribers, amounting to 1500 
names, and accounting for 2800 copies." Gilfillatfs Life of Burns, Div. II. p. xxxviii. 

"The price was five shillings. The Caledonian Hunt took one hundred copies 
at a guinea the copy." Ibid. Div. II. p. xxxix. 

What is said on the Subject in Minutes of the Royal Caledonian Hunt, copied 
from a scarce work, entitled " The Royal Caledonian Hunt" published 
1871, /. 5. 

"The minutes of loth January 1787 contain the following entry: 'A Motion 
being made by the Earl of Glencairn, and seconded by Sir John Whitefoord, in favour 
of Mr. Burns, of Ayrshire, who had dedicated the New Edition of his Poems to the 
Caledonian Hunt : The meeting were of opinion that, in consideration of his Superior 
Merit, as well as of the Compliment paid to them, that Mr. Hagart should be directed 
to Subscribe for one hundred Copys in their name, for which he should pay to Mr Burns 
Twenty-five pounds upon the Publication of his Book.' " 



A Reminiscence of the Ettrick Shepherd, by Brother George dimming, W.S., 
Junior Warden of Canongate Kihvinning, in 1835 when JAMES HOGG 
was elected POET-LAUREATE. 

[Postscript from the late Brother Cumming's letter to Brother H. C. Peacock, 

of i gth February 1879.] 

" The Initiation of the Shepherd was quite an event in Scotch masonry. 

" He had been for a long time importuned about it, but would not listen to it. 
Some one had persuaded him that practical jokes of, sometimes, a dangerous kind,, 
were practised on the novice. At length, on one condition, the Shepherd consented,. 
viz. : That the Initiation should be at Peebles, near his house at Mount Benger, so 
that if he did meet with any harm, -he might be near his friends. 

" He had still, however, his fears. The great day at length came. But so little 
did he feel assured that all was at least of a flo/z-dangerous kind, that, just as he was 
being introduced into the Lodge, he said, in a most serious tone : ' Noo, for guidness" 
sake, mind that I'm a married man ! ! ! ' 

" I need not add that a hilarious evening crowned the Poet's admission. 

" G. C." 

L 



INTERESTING NOTES relative to His Grace George Augustus Frederick John 
Murray, Shth DUKE OF ATHOLE, K.T., etc., etc., and Most Worshipful 
Grand Master Mason of Scotland, who died on Saturday, the i6th 
January 1864. 

" The last meeting of Grand Lodge presided over by His Grace was the Quarterly 
Communication, held February 2nd of the past year, at which was presented to the 
Grand Lodge, on behalf of the late Chevalier JAMES BURNES, Br. Stewart Watson's 
celebrated picture of the ' INSTALLATION OF THE POET BURNS AS POET-LAUREATE OF 
THE LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING.'" 

Extracted from " Masonic Sketch of the late Grand Master, by Br. D. 
Murray Lyon " in Scottish Freemason? Magazine of ist March 1864. 

" The last appearance he made in the masonic world and how little did we then 
expect, as he warmly shook the hand which now indites these lines, that death was so 
near was in the Halls of THE CANONGATE KILWINNING, where he presided, the same 
urbane, kind-hearted, unaffected, and familiar gentleman and Brother, ready to listen 
to high and low, rich and poor, that has endeared him to us all." 

Extracted from Editorial in Scottish Freemasons' Magazine of ist 
February 1864. 

No one ever ventured at that time thirty-one years ago to call in question 
the truth of Robert Burns having been "appointed " and "inaugurated" Poet-Laureate 
of Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, as narrated in Brother D. Murray Lyon's ably- 
written History of Lodge No. i, pp. 332, 333, and 334. 

H. C. P. 



HUGH C. PEACOCK 

DIED 

15TH JUNE 1894 



It becomes a painful duty here to record the distress- 
ingly sudden death of Brother Hugh C. Peacock an 
event which happened on the evening of Friday, i5th 
June 1894, while on his way to the Annual Statutory 
Committee Meeting of the Canongate Kilwinning Lodge. 

It was his intention to report the completion of the foregoing Notanda indeed, the 
latter part relating to the death of the Duke of Athole was yet in manuscript. Our 
late Brother joined the Lodge twenty-two years ago, and down to the moment when his 
heart ceased to beat there was no one who laboured with greater earnestness for the 
Lodge, or who had its success more at heart; and it may be safely said that the time 
has not yet arrived when his services to the Lodge and the Craft can be appraised 
at their true value. 

A. M C K. 



A P P E N D I X. 



OFFICE-BEARERS AND MEMBERS OF COMMITTEE 

OF 

LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING 

1784 to 1867. 



C 



SI 



OFFICE-BEARERS OF LODG 

From 24th June 1784, when BROTHER ALEXANDER FERGUSSON of CRAIGDARROCH was elected R.W. Master, tc 

STJIRIrPJLiEiMIETJSrT, 



Compiled from the Minutes by Brother HUGH 



DATE. 


RIGHT WORSHIPFUL MASTER. 


DEPUTE MASTER. 


SUBSTITUTE 
MASTER. 


SENIOR WARDEN. 


JUNIOR WARDEN. 


TREASURE 


1784, June 24 


Alex. FergussonofCraigdarroch. 


Charles More. 




Alex. Law, Advocate. 


W. Anderson, Writer. 


George Spanki 


1785. ,. 24 


* Do. 


Do. 




Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1786, ,, 24 


Do. 


Do. 




William Dunbar, W.S. 


J. Millar, Advocate. 


Do. 


1787, Mar. I 














1787, June 25 


Lord Torphichen. 


William Dunbar, W.S. 




J. Millar, Advocate. 


Lindsay Carnegie. 


George Spanki 


1788, June 24 


William Dunbar, W.S. 


H. Jardine, W.S. 


J. Millar, Advocate. 


Andrew Forbes. 


John Mercer. 


Do. 


1788, Dec. 12 


t 








William Lehre. 


... 


1789, June 24 




H. Jardine, W,S. 


J. Millar, Advocate. 


Dr James M. Adair. 


Dr James Box Young 


George Spanki 


1789, Nov. 3 








William Lehre. 


Buchanan Hepburn. 




1790, June 24 


Henry Jardine, W.S. 


Dr Thomas Cochrane. 


William Lehre. 


Buchanan Hepburn. 


Robert Moir. 


George Spanki 


I79 1 . 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1791, Nov. 7 




Adair. 










1792, June 25 


Dr Thomas Cochrane. 


Dr W. Farquharson. 


Robert Moir. 


Dr John Stannet. 


Capt. Swindell. 


George Spanki 


1792, Dec. 27 


J Dr William Farquharson. 












1793, June 24 


Do. 


Robert Moir, W.S. 


Adair. 


Capt. Swindell. 


Robert Wilson. 


George Spanki 


1794. , 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Capt. Swindell. 


Dr Thomas Spens. 


Jas. Asplin. 


Do. 


1795. 24 


Robert Moir, W.S. 


Dr Thos. Spens. 


No Election. 


Jas. Asplin. 


Chas. Cuningham. 


Do. 


1796, , 24 


Do. 


Do 


Do. 


Chas. Cunningham. 


James Dickson. 


Do. 


1797, , 24 


Do. 


Chas. Cunningham. 


Do. 


James Dickson. 


Robert S. Moncrieff. 


Do. 


1798, , 25 


Hugh Smith Mercer, W.S. 


Election postponed. 


Do. 


Robert S. Moncrieff. 


A. Jaffray, Advocate. 


Do. 


1799, , 24 


Do. 


Robert S. Moncrieff. 


Do. 


A. Jaffray, Advocate. 


Geo. Buchanan. 


Do. 


1 799, Nov. 30 


... 












1800, June 24 


Hugh Smith Mercer, W.S. 


Robert S. Moncrieff. 


No Election. 


A. Jaffray, Advocate. 


Geo. Buchanan. 


George Spanki 


1801, , 24 


Alexander Jaffray, Advocate. 


Wm. Ballantine, W.S. 


John Russel. 


Wm. Campbell, W.S. 


Joseph Dixon, Writer. 


Do. 


1802, , 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1803, , 24 
1804, , 24 
1805, Feb. 7 


Do. 
Robert Moir, W.S.(Sec0nd Time) 


Do. 
Do. 


Joseph Dixon, Writer. 
James Lang, Writer. 


James Lang, Writer. 
W. Lang, Advocate. 


William Douglas. 
J. Lawson, W.S. 


James Dickson 
Do. 


1805, June 24 


Do. 


" Do. 


" Do. 


" Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1806, , 24 


John Lawson, W.S. 


James Lang, W.S. 


William W. Brown. 


Archibald M'Nab. 


Andrew Stevens. 


Do. 


1807, , 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1808, , 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


John Mill. 


1809, , 24 


Do. 


James Harrower. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1810, , 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Andrew Stevens. 


Do. 


James M-Donnell. 


Do. 


1811, , 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1812, , 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1813, , 24 
1814, , 24 
1815, , 24 
1816, , 24 


A. Jaffray, (Second Time). 
George Simson, Writer. 
George Burnet, Advocate. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

James Neilson, Writer. 


Do. 

John Neilson. 
James Neilson, Writer. 
A. L. Robertson. W.S. 


James M'Donell. 
Charles Stewart. 
A. L. Robertson,W.S. 
William Horn, Writer. 


George Simson. 
Archibald Kennedy. 
William Horn, Writer. 
Andrew Robinson. 


Do! 

No Appointmet 
Paul Taylor. 
Do. 


1817, , 24 
1818, , 24 
1819, , 24 
1820, , 24 


Do. 
Do. 
Alexander L. Robertson, W.S. 
Do. 


G. Douglas, Advocate. 
Do. 
J. Aytoun, Inchdairney 
William Horn. 


Do. 
William Horn. 
Do. 
C. Lumsden, W.S. 


Do. 

J. Hawkins,Advocate. 
C. Lumsden, W.S. 
S.F. Macintosh, W.S. 


J Hawkins, Advocate. 
William Tait. 
S.F.Mackintosh.W.S. 
Donald F. M'Kenzie. 


Archibald Hon 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


1821, , 25 
1822 , 24 


Do. 

Tin 


C. Lumsden, W.S. 


S.F. Macintosh, W.S. 


K. Mackenzie, Writer. 


Michie Gleig, Writer. 


Do. 


1823 Mar. 6 


LJQ. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Archibald Mars 


1823, June 24 

1 Sio A ft A 


Alexander L. Robertson, W.S. 

T-V 


Do. 


S.F. Macintosh,' W.S. 


Walter Dickson, W.S. 


Walter Dickson, W.S. 
John Moffat. 


'Archibald Mars 


1524, , 24 
1825, , 24 
1826, Feb. 2 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


G. Rutherford. 
Do. 


John Moffat, Su 
Do. 


1826, June 24 


Alexander L. Robertson, W.S. 


David Birrell, Writer. 


J. Russell, Advocate. 


Walter Dickson, W.S. 


G. Rutherford. 


David Brown, ^ 


1827, Nov. 15 


Do. 


Do. 


A. M'Neil, Advocate. 


George W. Maxwell. 


Robert Henry Listen. 


John Brown, W 


1828, June 24 
1829, 24 


Alexander L. Robertson, W.S. 
Do. 


David Birrell, Writer. 


G. Rutherford. 


James Thomson. 
Robert Henry Listen. 


George Ritchie, Writer 


John Brown, W 


1830, 24 
1831, Feb. ii 


Alexander M'Neil, Advocate. 
Do. 


Do! 

T-\ 


Do. 
Robt. Kennedy, W.S. 


George Ritchie, W.S. 
Do. 


A. Morrison. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


1831, June 24 

* * k.C 


Do! 


Do. 
Andrew Dun, W.S. 


Do. 
George Ritchie, W.S. 


Do. 

William Maxwell Gunn 


Do. 
Robert Reid, Writer. 


Do. 

John Forbes, \\ 



t s 

' I7Q2 December 2 R W 
I8?o' Tune 24 
3 ' JUnC 24> 






^ n meetm n 2 * th J une '7 8 5. but the Offices were continued the same as last yea: 
n'^ Co ee.-'' They elected Brother Lehre to be Junior Warden, in place of Brother Mercer, who h 



r ^ * ne abroad > Brother Dr Wil Farquharson, Depute Master, was elected R. 

C v mP f Brother Wimam Weir, Advocate, the Grand Lodge at Quarterly Communication of ist November 
OFFICES CREATED durinlahov^ JT D p W * S ? ' "They met accordingly, as above, on nth February 1831, and simply re-elected their Off 

ring above period-Poet Laureate, 1787 ; Substitute Master, 1788 ; Organist, 1800 ; Chaplain, 1808 ; Senior and Junior Dea 



L RT 



G THE 



CANONGATE KILWINNING, 

i June 1867, when BROTHER WM. N. ERASER of TORNAVEEN completed his Second Term of Office as R.W. Master, 



OIF 1 



EACOCK, Past Secretary and Past Depute- Master. 



SECRKTARY. 


POET LAUREATE. 


CHAPLAIN. 


ORGANIST. 


MASTER OF 
CEREMONIES. 


CONVENER OR 
CHAIRMAN OF 
COMMITTEE. 


TYLERS. 


H. Jardine, Advocate. 
Do. 






















A. Forbes & M'Leod. 


John Mercer, Writer. 


ROBERT BURNS. 










... 




... 




Do. 
Do. 


John Mercer, Writer. 
William Lehre. 




















A. Forbes & M'Leod. 

T~)n 


Robert Moir. 


... 


















J_/W 


Do. 


... 






















M'Leod. 


Hugh Smith Mercer. 










... 













A. Forbes & M'Leod. 


Do. 






















Do. 


William Robertson. 
























A. Forbes & M'Leod. 


James Asplin. 
Chas. Cuningham. 














- 










Mackay. 
Do. 


James Dickson. 
























Alex. Forbes. 


Robert S. Moncrieff. 
























Do. 


Alex. Jaffray. 


... 








' ... 














Do. 


George Buchanan. 
























Do. 


No Appointment. 
























Do. 


Wm. Ballantine, W.S. 










... 








M 








Do. 


... 








Robert Purdie 






.. 










Alex. Forbes. 


John More, Jun. 




















.. 




. 


G.Milne&A.Strachan. 


Do. 


... 
























Do. 


John Leven, Writer. 


... 




. 










.. 










Alex. Strachan. 


Robt. S. Cuningham. 


... 


















.. 






Do. 


David Brown. 










... 
















... 


Paul Taylor. 










... 
















Alex. Strachan. 


Do. 


... 










.. 














George Scrymgeour. 


Do. 


... ... 
























Do. 


Do. 


... 


Fran 


s M'Nab 




... 






.. 




.. 






John Scrymgeour. 


Do. 


... 










.. 




.. 










Do. 


Do. 


... 


NoE 


ction. 




... 
















Do. 


Do. 


... 
























Do. 


Do. 


... ... 








... 


.. 














Do. 


Do. 


... ... 








... 










.. 






Do. 


Do. 


























Do. 


David Birrell, Writer. 




















.. 






Do. 


Do. 


























Do. 


Do. 


... ... 








... 


.. 








.. 






Do. 


Do. 


























Do. 


Do. 


















.. 






Murray Michieson. 


Do. 


... ... 






















Do. 


Do. 












.. 










Charles Reed. 


Archibald Marshal. 


























Archibald Marshal. 












.. 












Do. 


... 








... 












John Macleod. 


Do. 


... 








... 












Do. 


... 


... 


William M. Gunn. 


... 










. 




Archibald Marshal. 




Rev. D. Ritchie, A.M. 


... .. 












John Macleod. 


Do. 


... 


Do. 















George Halkett. 


Archibald Marshal. 


... ... 


Rev. D.Ritchie, A.M. 


.11 11 












George Halkett. 


Do. 




Do. 


... 












Do. 


J. Saunders, Writer. 


... ... 


Do. 














Do. 


Do. 


... 


Do. 


... 


.. 










Do. 


James M'Millan. 




Rev. Thomas Brown. 














Do. 



J., Secy." (Henry Jardine, W.S., who had the honour of Knighthood conferred on him by George IV., in the year 1825). 
le abroad, and Brother Robert Moir to be Secretary, in place of Brother Lehre'. 

aster in his place. , , ._ . _ 

annulled this election of Office-Bearers, with the exception of the R. W. Master, and required the Lodge )ffice-Bearers, m room of those whose 

arers, and so they remained. 
1816 ; Corresponding Member in London, 1819. 



DATE. 


RIGHT WORSHIPFUL MASTER. 


1 
DEPUTE MASTER. 


SUBSTITUTE MASTER. 


SENIOR WARDEN. 


JUNIOR WARDEN. 


TREASURER. 


1832, June 25 
1833, 24 


Alexander M'Neil, Advocate. 
Do. 


Andrew Dun, W.S. 
Chas. M'Dougal. 


Wm. Maxwell Gunn. 
Robert Robertson. 


Robert Reid, Writer. 
Ladovic Colquhoun. 


John Abercromby. 
John Leslie. 


George Scott, W.! 
Peter Anderson, "W 


1834, Jan. 1 8 


... 




W. B. D. D. Turnbull. 








1834, Mar. 13 
1834, June 24 
1835, 24 


Alexander M'Neil, Advocate. 
Do. 


Chas. M'Dougal. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


John Leslie. 
Robt. Blackwood. 


John Abercromby. 
Geo. Gumming, W.S. 


Francis G. Souter. 
Anthony Traill. 


1836, Jan. 27 
1836, June 24 


Alexander M'Neil, Advocate. 


Chas. M'Dougal. 


James Jardine. 


Robt. Blackwood. 


Geo. Gumming, W.S. 
Chas. E. Allen. 


Anthony Traill. 


1836, Nov. 9 
1837, June 24 
1838, 23 
1839, 24 


Alexander M'Neil, Advocate. 
[Henry Jardine, Advocate. 
William Edmonstoune Aytoun. 


John Wilson. 
James Jardine, W.S. 
Do. 


James Jardine. 
Wm. Ed. Aytoun. 
Archd. Smith. 


Wm. Jeffries Dowlin. 
Henry Hagart. 
J. Blair of Glenfoot. 


Henry Hagart. 
James Blair. 
Alex. Cumine. 


And. Dunlop, W. 
Veitch Sinclair. 
Do. 


1840, Feb. 12 
1840, June 24 


William Edmonstoune Aytoun. 


Archibald Smith. 


J. Blair of Glenfoot. 


W. Jeffries Pattison. 


Henry Day Cockburn. 
Arch. D. Campbell. 


Veitch Sinclair. 


1841* Mar. 3 
1841, June 24 
1842, ,, 24 


James Blair of Glenfoot. 
Archibald Smith, Advocate. 


Geo. Gumming, W. S 
A. D. Campbell. 


And. Dunlop, W.S. 
Sam. Somerville, M. D. 


Arch D. Campbell. 
W. Henry Maclean. 
H. F. Maclean, W.S. 


Sam. Somerville, M.D. 
H. F. Maclean, W.S. 
Jonathan Bruce. 


Veitch Sinclair. 
John Wilson, M.I 


J 843> J an - 2 7 
1843, June 24 
1844, ,, 24 


Sam. Somerville of Ampherlaw. 
Do. 


Archd. D. Campbell. 
Do. 


W. Jeffries Pattison. 
William Mowbray. 


Alx. J. Stewart, W.S. 
Do. 


Do. 

James Neilson. 


Wm. Mowbray. 
Alex. C. Rankine 


T C A r Anr I C 












|| Donald Cameron. 


IO 4; **! 1 3 

1845, June 24 
1846, ,, 24 
184.7. , 24. 


Archibald David Campbell. 
Do. 
Do. 


William Mowbray. 
Do. 
Do. 


James Hunter. 
James Neilson. 
James Savege. 


James Neilson, S.S.C. 
W. J. Henderson. 
Chas. Robertson. 


Jas. Arthur Campbell. 
James Savege. 
George Moncrieff. 


Chas. Robertson. 
Do. 
Archd. C. Mowb: 


*-**T / 9 ft ^ 
1848, 24 


Do. 


James Savege. 


Alex. Penrose Miller 


Stewart Watson. 


J. D. B. Hay, Bart. 


Do. 


1849, ,, 25 


Do. 


No Appointment. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1849, Dec. 12 




Capt. Tames Hunter. 








... 


1850, June 24 
1851, ,, 24 


Archibald Cuthill Mowbray. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


Stewart Watson. 
J. D. B. Hay, Bart. 


J. D. B. Hay, Bart. 
Robt. C. Mackenzie. 


Wm. Fergusson.W.S 
T. E.G. Home, W.S 


William Watson. 
Stewart Watson. 


1852, 24 
1853, ,, 24 


Do. 

Wm. Nathaniel Fraser, S.S.C. 


Alex. James Stewart. 


Sir J. D. Wauchope. 
Alx. J. Stewart, W.S 


T. E. O. Home, W.S 
Wm. Wilkinson. 


John Ogilvy. 
Wm. Duncan M'Neil 


Do. 

Stewart Watson. 


1853, Aug. I 
1854, June 24 


Wm. Nathaniel Fraser, S.S.C. 


1f Lord Loughborough 
Do. 


Alx. j. Stewart, W.S 


Wm. Duncan M'Neil 


Patrick B. Simpson. 


Stewart Watson. 


1855, 25 


Do. 


Alex. Jas. Stewart. 


Wm. D. M'Neil. 


Patrick B. Simpson. 


D. Crawford, S.S.C. 


Do. 


l8<?6. Tan. q 






... 


H. M. W. M'Vitie. 






J* r J J 7 

1856, June 24 


Thomas Drvbrough. 


D. Crawford, S.S.C. 


Andrew Watson of 


Do. 


D. Woodburn Bowie 


William Hickmai 


1857, ,, 24 


Do. 


H. M. W. M'Vitie. 


Tor son ce 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1858, 24 
1859, , 24 


Do. 
Do. 


Captain Griffiths. 
Wm. Hickman. 


Dr Hall. 
Robert Stewart. W.S 


Michael Dowd. 
Chas. W. M. Muller 


J. Ziervogel. 
Wm. G. Henry. 


Do. 

J. C. M'Culloch. 


1860, , 24 


Alex. Lambe Robertson, W.S. 


Robert Stewart, W.S 


Ch. W. M. Mullen 


Wm. G. Henry. 


G. H. Ebsworth. 


Do. 


1861, , 24 


Do. 


Dr Jas. Winchester. 


Do. 


Thos. Alex. Hill. 


Do. 


T. Drybrough, 1 


1862, , 24 


William G. Henry, Merchant. 


Do. 


T. Alex. Hill. 


Geo. H. Ebsworth. 


Dr Henry R. Beale. 


Do. 


1863, , 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Geo. H. Ebsworth. 


Dr Henry R. Beale. 


Johann Schopp. 


Do. 


1864, , 24 


Earl of Strathmore. 


Do. 


Do. 


Johann Schopp. 


H. H. Brown. 


Do. 


1865, , 24 


Wm. N. Fraser of Tornaveen. 


Geo. H. Ebsworth. 


Johann Schopp. 


Wm. Moffat Gorrie. 


Geo. Melville. 


Do. 


1866, , 24 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


1867, , 24 


Conclusion of Brother W. N. 


... ... 




... ... 


... ... 


... 




Eraser's second term of office 














as Right Worshipful Master. 













* 1835, June 24. William Petrie and Robert Stewart elected Tylers. 

t 1838, June 23. This Annual Meeting was held on June 23rd 1838, as the 24th was a Sunday. During the proceedings, Brother Henry Jardine, R.' 

J 1840, June 24. Brother Hector Gavin's name appears in the minutes for the first time, on 2Oth June 1835, at Committee Meeting, as being nominate 

1844, June 24. Robert Stewart and William Petrie elected respectively First and Second Tylers. Last time Bro. William Petrie elected. He died " 

II 1845, April 15. Brother Donald Cameron was appointed interim Secretary and Treasurer, as Brother A. C. Rankine was leaving Edinburgh. 

H !853 J un e 24. Lord Loughborough, better known by his subsequent title, the Earl of Rosslyn, many years M. W. Grand Master Mason of Scotia 

OFFICES CREATED during above period : Convener or Chairman of Committee, 1835 ; Architect and Superintendent of Works, 1836 ; Master of Cerem 
that Office for several years ; no successor to him was appointed within the period ending June 24, 1867 ; therefore, it has been deemed 

NOTE. Senior and Junior Deacons who were " created " so recently as 1816 - also Banner-Bearers and Stewards, have been excepted from this Cha: 



SECRETARY. 


POET LAUREATE. 


CHAPLAIN. 


ORGANIST. 


MASTER OF 
CEREMONIES. 


CONVENER OR 
CHAIRMAN OF 
COMMITTEE. 


TYLERS. 


Tas. M'Millan. 




Rev. Thos. Brown. 








George Halkett. 


Anthony Traill, W.S. 


... 


... 


... 




... 


Do. 




... 






... 


... 


Robert Stewart. 


Alex. Mackie, Writer. 




... ... 


... ... 






Robert Stewart. 


James Deans. 


James Hogg. 
William Hay. 


Rev. H. Holme. 


John Surenne. 




J. Wilson, Advocate. 


* W. Petrie & R. Stewart 


James Deans. 


Do. 


... 


John Surenne. 


And. Dunlop, W.S. 


J. Wilson, Advocate. 


W.Petrie& R.Stewart 


... 


... 




... 


M. M. de Bartolimi. 






James Deans. 
Do. 


William Hay. 
Do. 




John Surenne. 
Do. 


Wm. Ed. Aytoun. 
P. C. Gibson. 


John Leslie. 
Alex. L. Robertson. 


W. Petrie &R. Stewart 
Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


... 


Do. 


Do. 


Alex. M'Neill. 


Do. 


Thos. Lewis Gibson. 




... ... 


... ... 


... ... 




... 


N. P. C. Lloyd. 


William Hay. 


Rev. Dr D. Ritchie. 


S. W. Strathie. 


P. C. Gibson. 


: Hector Gavin. 


W. Petrie &R. Stewart 


John Davidson, M.D. 
Do. 


William Hay. 
Edward W. Lane. 


Robt. T. Jeffrey. 


... 


Dr L. H. Thatcher. 
George V. Irving. 


Hector Gavin. 
Do. 


W. Petrie &R. Stewart 
R. Stewart &W. Petrie 
Do. 


Wm. Mowbray. 
Alex. C. Rankin. 


Edward W. Lane. 


Wm. V. T. Drury. 


... 


Col. Kinlochofkilrie. 


Hector Gavin. 
W. E. Aytoun. 


R. Stewart &W. Petrie 


Donald Cameron. 










... 


Do. 


Chas. Robertson. 


No Election. 


No Election. 




W. J. Pattison. 


W. E. Aytoun. 


Robert Stewart. 


Do. 


Francis Nicoll. 




... ... 


Wm. Lindesay. 


Do. 


Do. 


Archd. C. Mowbray. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


George Bell. 
James Neilson. 


... 


W. J. Pattison. 
Wm. J. Pattison. 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 
T~\~ 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


... 


Do. 


Do. 


JJo. 










Do. 


Do. 




Robt. C. Mackenzie. 


James Marshall. 


Rev. Andrew Bonar. 




Do. 


Do. 


Robert Stewart. 


Stewart Watson. 


N. J. Mansabuis. 


Do. 




Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


No. Election. 


R. W. Bonar. 




Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Stewart Watson. 


Wm. Pringle. 


R. W. Bonar. 




Do. 


Hector Gavin. 


Do. 


Stewart Watson. 
Do. 


Wm. Pringle. 
No Election. 


Rev. W. Arnot, D.D 




No Appointment. 
Wm. J. Pattison. 


Hector Gavin. 
Alex. Jas. Stewart. 


Robert Stewart. 
Do. 


Stewart Watson. 


... ... 


No Election. 




No Appointment. 


Dr S. Somerville. 


Robert Stewart. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Wm. Pringle. 
Do. 
Anthy. O'Neale Hay 
Do. 


Rev. Home. 
Rev. A. R. Bonar. 
Do. 
Do. 


... 


R. H. Wyndham. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Dr S. Somerville. 
Do. 
Thos. Drybrough. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


... 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Thos. E. M'Ritchie. 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


Do. 
Do. 


... 


Do. 
Do. 

T)n 


Do. 
W. N. Eraser. 
Do. 


James Baikie. 
Do. 


Do. 


Do. 


Do. 




U\J. 







I. elect, was announced as being " the son and grandson of two brethren who had filled that chair." , rnmTTlittpp on 2 . th Tane t&io 

r election on Committee, and he was elected accordingly on following St. John's Day. He was elected Chairman of Comm 
ember 21, 1845. 

^ 

iccessary to occupy a column throughout the Chart with that information. Offires herein recorded. 

Because of want of space, and because Brethren who have held any of those Offices have been usually promotec 



TO 

SHOWING 

MEMBERS OF COMMITTEE - 

OF THE 

LODGE CAN ON GATE KILWINNING, 

1^84 TO IS 87% 
Elected Annually on St. Johris Day, Midsummer. 



" Present Office-Bearers and immediate Past Office-Bearers, along with- 



1784 Bro. Sir Wm. Forbes of Pitsligo and Bro. 

David Stewart, Banker. 
1785 Offices were continued the same as last year. 

(Note by Bro. Henry Jardine, Secy.) 
1786 No mention of Committee in the Minute of 

this date. For other omissions during 

1786-7-8 (vide Review of Mimites, pages 

4/0 ii ante). 
1787 Bro. Dr Nathaniel Spens, and Bro. Thomas 

Hay, Surgeon. 
The Minute of this date has no signature 

attached to it, another instance of negligence 

as above, during the Burns' period, (vide 

pages 4 to II, ante). 
1788 Bro. Thos. Hay, Bro. Alex. Fergusson of 

Craigdarroch, and Bro. Charles More. 

1789 Do., do., do. 

1790 Do., do., do. 

1791 Do., do., do. 
1792 No names added to list of Office-bearers. 
1793 Bro. Thos. Hay, Bro. Alex. Fergusson of 

Craigdarroch, Bro. Charles More, and 

Bro. Wm. Dunbar, W.S. 
1794 Bro. Thos. Hay, Bro. Alex. Fergusson of 

Craigdarroch, Bro. Chas. More, Bro. 

Wm. Dunbar, and Bro. Henry Jardine, 

Advocate. 

1795 Do., do., do. 

1796 Bro. Thos. Hay, Bro. Chas. More, Bro. 

Wm. Dunbar, and Bro. Henry Jardine. 
1797 Do., do., do. 

1798 Bro. Thos. Hay, Bro. Chas. More, and 

Bro Wm. Dunbar. 

1799 Do., do., do. 

1800 Do., do., do. 

1801 Do., do., do. 



1802 Bro. Chas. More, Bro. Robert Moir, Bro. 
Robert Scott Moncrieff of Wellwood and 
Pitliver, and Bro. Hugh Smyth Mercer. 

1803 Bro. Charles More and Bro. Robert Scott 
Moncrieff. 

1804 Do., do., do. 

1805 Bro. Charles More. 

1806 Do. 

1807 Do. 

1808 Do. 

1809 Do. 

1810 Do. 

181 1 Committee " as formerly. " 

1812 Do. 

1813 Do. 

1814 Bro. James Davidson, Bro. Wm. Ballantyne, 

Bro. Charles More, Bro. John Lawson, 

Bro. David Birrell, and Bro. Andrew 

Robinson. 
1815 Bro. Alexander Jaffray, Bro. John Lawson, 

Bro. Wm. Ballantyne, Bro. Chas. More, 

Bro. Charles Nairne, and Bro. Andrew 

Robinson. 
1816 Bro. Alex. Jaffray, P.M., Bro. John S. 

Lawson, Bro. Wm. Ballantyne, Bro. Chas. 

More, Bro. Chas. Nairne, Bro. Dr J. 

Lamb, and Bro. Wm. Tait. 
1817 Bro. Alex. Jaffray, Bro. John Lawson, Bro. 

Chas. Nairne, Bro. Wm. Ballantyne, Bro. 

Chas. More, Bro. James M'Douell, Bro. 

James Harrower, and Bro. Nelson Hill. 

(Charles More died before next Annual 

Meeting. ) 
1818 Bro. Alex. Jaffray, Bro. James Harrower, 

Bro. George Douglas, Advocate, Bro. 

Nelson Hill, Bro. Scott, and Bro. 

Capt. Jas. M'Douell. 



8 4 



i8ig Bro. Simson, Bro. Harrower, Bro. Jaffray, 
Bro. Neilson, Bro. Ewart, and Bro. Law. 
Bro. David Plenderleath, London, ap- 
pointed Corresponding Member. 

1820 Bro. J. Aytoun of Inchdairnie. Bro. Wm. 
M'Kenzie of Greenyard, Mark Sprot of 
Garnkirk, Advocate, Kenneth M'Kenzie 
yr. of Hilton. Bro. David Plenderleath, 
London, re-elected Corresponding Mem- 
ber. 

1821 Bro. John Anderson, W.S., and Bro. Henry 
Gordon, Writer. 

1822 Do., do., do. 

1823 Bro. David Plenderleath and Bro. John 
Wightman. 



1824 Bro. Alex. M'Neill, Advocate, and Bro. 

George Walter Maxwell of Carruchan. 
1825 Do., with Bro. John Russell, Advocate. 
i826Do., with Bro. Ralph Kelloch, Writer. 
1827 Do., with Bro. Wm. Pringle, jnnr, etc. 
1828 -Do., with Bro. J. M'Millan. 
1829 Do., do., do. 

183000., with Bro. John E. Elliot, and Bro. 

John Forbes. 
1831 Do., Bro. John Richardson and Bro. Anth. 

Traill. 
1832 Do., Bro. John Leslie, Bro. Arch. Marshall, 

and Bro. John Forbes 

1833 Do., with Bro. Wm. Maxwell Gunn, etc. 
1834 Do., with Bro. T. Knox Beveridge, etc. 



" In addition to the eight Chief Office-Bearers, " 



1838- 

1839 

1840 

1841- 
1842 

1843 

1844 
1845 



1846 



-Bro. Prof. J. Wilson,* Convener, Bro. Geo. 

Ritchie, Bro. J. Leslie, Bro. J. Forbes, 

and Bro. H. Gavin, etc. 
Bro. Prof. J. Wilson, Bro. Hector Gavin, 

Bro. John Forbes, and Bro. Henry Glass- 
ford Bell. 
Bro. John Leslie, Convener, Bro. Anth. 

Traill, Bro. Robt. Blackwood, Bro. Geo. 

Gumming, W.S., Bro. Hector Gavin, and 

Bro. John Forbes. 
Bro. Alex. L. Robertson, W.S., Convener, 

Bro. Hector Gavin, Bro. A. Traill, Bro. 

J. Forbes, and Bro. John Wilson. 
Do., with Bro. A. M'Neill, Advocate, Con- 
vener, and Bro. Arch. Marshall. 
Do., with Bro. H. Gavin, Chairman, Bro. 

A. Marshall, and Bro. Geo. Gumming, 

W.S. 
Bro. H. Gavin, Chairman, and Bro. W. J. 

Pattison. 
Do., with Bro. H. Gavin, Chairman, Bro. 

Wm. E. Aytoun, f and Bro. J. Leslie. 
Do., with Bro. H. Gavin, Chairman, Bro. 

A. M'Neill, Bro. Wm. E. Aytoun, and 

Bro. W. B. D. D. Turnbull. 
Do., with Bro. Wm. E. Aytoun, Chairman, 

Bro. A. M'Neill, Bro. W. J. Pattison, 

and Bro. H. F. M'Lean. 
Do., with Bro. Wm. E. Aytoun, Chairman, 

Bro. A. M'Neill, Bro. Dr Samuel Somer- 

ville, Bro. W. J. Pattison, Bro. Edward 

Fraser, and Bro. R. Blackwell. 
Do., do., do. 



1847 Do., and Bro. W. B. D. D. Turnbull. 
184800., with Bro. Neilson, and Bro. Chas. 
Robertson. 

1849 D O., do., do. 

1850 Do., do., do. 
1851 Do., with Bro. W. Mowbray. 

1852 Do., with Bro. And. Aitken. 

1853 Do., with Bro. A. M'Neill, Chairman. Bro. 

Prof. Aytoun, Bro. Dr S. Somerville, Bro. 

H. Gavin, Bro. Wm. J. Pattison, Bro. 

Wm. Hickman, and Bro. A. B. Fleming. 
1854 Re-elected blank page, no election recorded. 
185500., with Bro. Prof. Aytoun, Bro. Dr Sam. 

Somerville, Bro. Anth. Traill, and Bro. 

Thos. Drybrough. 

1856 Do., with Bro. Dr S. Somerville, Chairman. 
1857 "Asp. List of "15 June, but not recorded." 
1858 Do., with Bro. Josiah Livingstone, Bro. 

Thos. Elder M 'Ritchie, and Bro. J. R. 

Stewart. 
1859 Do., with Bro. A. K. Morrison and Bro. J. 

Pender. 

1860 Do., do., do. 

1861 Do., do., do. 
1862 Do., with Bro. Alex. L. Robertson. 
186300., with Bro. Wm. Henry, and Bro. A. 

O. Hay. 

1864 Do., do., do. 

1865 Do., do., do. 
1866 Do., no additional names. 

1867 Conclusion of Bro. W. N. Fr user's second 
term of office as Right Worshipful Master. 



* Christopher North. 



t Professor of Literature and Belles Lettres. 



ERRATA. 



Part I., p. 8, line 29, for " I4th," read " I3th." 

,, ,, line 35, for "a," read "this ancient and." 
Part II., p. 3, line 19, for "24th June 1835," read "24th January 1835." 

,, p. 6, third marginal note, for " 1786, December 7," read, " 1786, December, 27." 

,, p. n, line 3, for "extremly," read "extremely." 

,, p. 29, final paragraph : "Other matter" appears in Part. I., pp. 14 to 19. 

,, p. 38, marginal note, Tenth Reference, for " E not recorded on Committee 1824," 
read " E not recorded, but on Committee 1824." 

,, p. 41, second marginal note delete. 

,, p. 48, third par, second Vme,for "house," read " home." 



ADDENDA. 

Being decision of the Grand Lodge of Scotland. 



THE foregoing "Evidence" was duly laid before the Grand Committee of 
the Grand Lodge of Scotland, and the result will be seen from the following 
Extracts from the Minutes of Grand Committee, and Quarterly Communi- 
cations of the Grand Lodge of Scotland. 

i. "At a Meeting of the Grand Committee, held on Thursday, the 26th 
" September 1895, 

THE BURNS PICTURE. 

" The Report by the Special Committee on the alleged Election and In- 
" auguration of the Poet BURNS as Poet Laureate of the Canongate Kil- 
" winning Lodge, was submitted. 

" After consideration of the Report, which had been printed and cir- 
" culated among the members of Grand Committee, the following Resolution, 
" moved by Brother James Drummond, and seconded by Brother James 
" Caldwell, was unanimously adopted : 

" Grand Committee having considered the Report of the Sub-Committee 
re the Picture in the Board Room of Grand Lodge inscribed : 

'THE INAUGURATION 

OF 

ROBERT BURNS 

AS POET LAUREATE OF 

THE LODGE CANONGATE KILWINNING, 

EDINBURGH, ist MARCH 1787. 



Presented by JAMES BURNES, K.H., F.R.S., etc., 
To the Grand Lodge of Scotland, 1862.' 

and 'Facts' brought before them anent the same, refuse to recommend any 
alteration on said inscription." 



11. 



2. At a Quarterly communication held in Freemasons' Hall, Edinburgh, 
on Thursday, the /th day of November 1895, "The Minutes of Grand 
" Committee were confirmed." 

3. At a Meeting of the Grand Committee held on Thursday, the 3Oth 
January 1896, " Grand Secretary tabled an application by Canongate Kil- 
" winning, No. 2, for assistance in the ' payment of expenses incurred by 
" that Lodge in printing certain papers in connection with the Burns Picture 
" case, recently before Grand Committee. It was resolved to remit the 
" matter simpliciter to Grand Lodge." 

4. At a Quarterly communication held in Freemasons' Hall, Edinburgh, 
on Thursday, the 6th February 1896, " On the motion of Brother J. 
" Dalrymple Duncan, Proxy Master, No. 37, seconded by Lieutenant-Colonel 
' John Campbell, Proxy Master, No. 43, it was unanimously resolved that 
" Grand Lodge relieve Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, No. 2, to the extent 
" of one-half of the sum expended by it in printing certain papers in con- 
" nection with the Burns Picture case, recently before Grand Committee." 

5. At a Meeting of the Grand Committee held on Thursday, the 2/th 
day of February 1896, " The following accounts were passed for payment 
" . . Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, No. 2, being amount voted in 
" aid of expenses in connection with the Burns Picture case, per resolution 
" of Grand Lodge, of date 6th February last, 50." 

This was duly paid to Lodge Canongate Kilwinning, No. 2. 

From the foregoing, it will be seen that Lodge Canongate Kilwinning 
have amply proved their case, and that the Inscription on the historic 
picture in the Board Room of Grand Lodge will for ever remain unaltered. 

The labours of the Lodge in this matter are now at an end. Our 
contention has been unanimously upheld our position in regard to ROBERT 
BURNS, " Caledonia's Bard," greatly strengthened, and in addition, our 
prestige raised in consequence of the attack made upon it. We do not for 
one moment regret that we have been compelled to defend our position, 
and now that all is satisfactorily settled, it will effectually prevent any 



111. 

attempt in the future to take from the Lodge that which it so highly prizes- 
its unique connection with that illustrious poet whose name is world wide, 
and whose fame rests in the hearts of humanity. Lodge Canongate Kil- 
winning, No. 2, is proud of its First Poet Laureate. 

ROBERT BATHGATE, R.W.M. 
JOHN FAIRWEATHER, Secretary. 

MAY 1896. 






?"*:; 





PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE 
CARDS OR SLIPS FROM THIS POCKET 



Peacock, Hugh C. 
Robert Burns 




UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LIBRARY