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Full text of "Rochester in 1904"

0eHESIlERrl904 



fXonoreestonal library 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



0DD?7T5flt,3a< 



'he liOCeiESTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 







gass F \iq _ 
BookJi^lB 



54 



..^^S 



Rochester 

in 1904 




1902 • 1903 



ROCHESTER CHAMBER 
of CO M M E R C E Publishers 







U ^ /^ /^M/iu 



D. of D. 



ffKi'inin.ijs 



Rochester's Be 
Rochester in 1!J(I4 . 
The Naming- of Rochester 
Rochester a City of Homes 
Rochester's Millinj,^ Interests 
Rochester's Nurseries 
New Street Cleaning System 
Rochester's Shoe Industry 
Charlotte Life Saving Station 
Rochester's Park System 
Bishop Thomas A. Hendrick 
What to See in Rochester 

Certificate of Incorporation 

William Leach 

Chamber of Commerce Bv-La 

Officers for 1903 . 

Standing Committees for liHI.S 

Members of Chamber of Conn 

In Memoriam 




^ 



^ XjU^xt^.-^^'W^ 



Fdi-trait 



:is B. 



I Hill n 
Brews 



Portrait of ex-President Ht 

Chamber of Commerce Buildint; 

Looking North from Chamber of Commerce Biiiklini. 

Looking East from Chamber of Commerce BuililiniJ- 

Looking Northeast from Chamber of Commerce Biiil 

A Group of Rochester's Picturesque Streets 

Lake Avenue in Winter 

In Genesee Valley Park 

Upper Falls, Middle Falls. Lower Falls 

Driving Park Avenue Bridge — Gorge of the Genesee 

Four Rochester Club Houses . 

V. M. C. A. Building— National Theatre 

The Old Liberty Pole Corner— New Masonic Tem] 

Five New Rochester Homes 

L'pper Falls of the Genesee River 

The " Castle " . 

Reservoir Highland Park 

Driving Park Avenue Bridge and Gorge 

Water Cart System for Street Cleaning 

Assembly Hall, Chamber of Commerce 

Life Saving Crew and Drill 

Yacht Irondequoit . ... 

On Trout Lake — Seneca Park East 

Four Scenes in Seneca Park East 

Exchange Street, Corner State and .Main Streets 

Two Views Genesee Valley Park 

.Soldiers and Sailors' Monument, Washingto 

Four Catholic Churches 

Catholic Young Men's Association 

Three Bridges .... 

As the Brick Church will Appear 

Site of Sibley, Lindsay & Cnrr's New Depa 

JIain Street, Looking West from St. Paul S 

New Public School, No. 23 . 

New Plant of the Pneumatic Signal Compan 

New Water Tower ... 

Six Club Houses, Irondequoit Bay 

New Building of the Rochester Trust and S, 

Entrances to City Cemeteries . 

Stecher Lithographic Co.'s New Building 

Color Sergeants, 9th Infantry. U. S. A. 

Office Building, Rochester Distilling Co. 

New Henrv A. Stnmg Building 



Alii 



Bank 



AmeriL-an Fruit Product Cc 
Archer Manufacturing Co. 
Barnard & Simonds Co. 
Bausch & Lomb Optical Ci 
Beadle & Sherburne Co. 
Brewster, Crittenden & Co. 
Brewster, Gordon & Co. . 
Brewer, H. S. . 
Brewers Exchange, The . 
Brown Brothers Co. 
Buell, George C, & Co. 
Buffalo, Roch. &• Pittsburgh 
Burke, FitzSimons, Hone & 
Central Bank 
City Realty Co. 
Clark, Milton, Co. 
Commercial Bank 
Commercial Correspond. ,Scli 
Co-Operative Foundry Cn. 
Cunningham, James, .Son & 
Curtice Bros. Co. 
Cutler Manufacturing Co. 
Duffy Malt Whiskey Co. 
Eastman Kodak Co. . 
East .Side Savings Bank, Th. 
Ellwanger & Barry . 
Empire Moulding Works 
Ernst, Louis & Sons . 
Fidelity Trust Co., The 
Flour City National Bank, Tli, 
Ford, C. P., & Co. . 
GarHeld, C. F., Real Estate 
(Jenesee Valley Trust C<>, 
Genesee Optical Co. . 
German-American Hank. Tin 
Gottry, .Sam, Carting Cn. 
Graves, II. H. . ' . 
Ham C. T., Manufacturing ( 
Higgins, I-:. K. . 
Howe i^ Rogers Co. 



Huljl,ard & Eldredge Co. 

Huther Bros. 

Ingmire &- Thompson 

.Jeffreys . ■ . . 

Knciwlton & Beach 

Langslow, Fowler Co. 

Likly, Henry, & Co. 

Martin, J. W., & Bro. 

Mason Bros. 

Mathews & Boucher . 

McCurdy & Norwell Co. . 

Mechanics Savings Bank . 

Merchants Bank 

Monroe County Savings Bank 

Moore, John C. 

Morse, Wm. B., & Sons 

National Casket Co. 

N. V. Hydraulic-Pre.ss Brick C 

( )aks & Calhoun 



H( 



rhe 



l'<.wcrs Hotel, 
Present, Philip . 
Reed, E. P., & Co. . 
Rochester Bo.x &• Lumber 
Rochester Candy Works, 
Rocliester Carting Co. 
Rochester Dry Goods Co. 
Rochester Gas & Electric 
Rochester Germ'an Ins. ('• 
Rochester Savings Bank 
Rochester Telephone Co. 
Roch. Trust and Safe Dcpc 
Sciantom, Wetmore (.>;■ ('.> 



M. 



Co 



ds:i 



Beir & Gormly 
Perkins & Ca>. 
-Vire Works Co. 



158 
111 
136 
108 
81 
150 
100 
138 
95 
155 
145 
130 
124 
94 
148 
146 
148 
120 
128 



INDEX TO ADVERTISP:MENTS— a;/////«,Y/ 



Stecher LithoKraphic Co. 


151 


Van Keri{h Silver Plate Co. 


Stevens, J.. Arms & Tool Co. . 


]■-'/ 


Van Hoesen, F. P. 


StrasenburKh, R. J.. Co. . 


134 


Vredenburt; & Co, 


Teall & Sons .... 


1311 


Waterman, L. E., Co. 


Telford, W. H 


IL'H 


Weaver, Palmer & Richm..n.l 


Traders National Bank 


85 


Weston, John P., Co. 


Union and Advertiser Co., The 


133 


Woodbury Whip Co., The 


Utz &• Dunn .... 


!H) 


Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co. 


Vacnum Oil Co. 


114 





ArknnUilri>amrut<i 




jHE tlianks of the Chamber are hereb 
have b\ their generosit\ anil helpfuhie; 
sible. Especially are the\' due 

To Mr. Frank VV. Page who furnishe 
from which the photo-engravings were mai 
lo, 12 ami 14. 

To Mr. Ernest Hart for engraving of 
the Brick Church, found on page =,2, as 
it will appear when completed. 

To Messrs. Thomas A. Smyth ami 
Edmund J. Burke for photographs. 

To Mr. Charles F. Crandall for archi- 
tect's drawings of new business buildings, 
pages 159 and 160. 

To Messrs. Webster & Albee, pho- 
tographers, for courtesies. 

To Mr. Charles Van Voorhis for 
photograph of Yacht Irondequoit, page 40. 

To the Union and Advertiser Coni- 
pan\ who di(.l the mechanical work, and 
did it well. 

It is hoped and believed that " Roch- 
ester in 1904," circulating in Chambers of C 
and Public Libraries in all parts of the world 
advance the best interests of the city'which we 1 
all take an honorable pride. 



tended to all who 
ade this book pos- 



the photographs 
found on pages 




■y^^, 









11! i'* 

''-mtk '^** 



O STAND on the roof of the Chamber of Commerce 

T building to-da\- and survey the vast area of factories, 

I warehouses, and innumerable manufacturing structures 
that stretch out from a central point towards the outl\ing 
districts, in which are the mansions of the rich ant! the 
homes of thousands of our industrials, it seems like a 
phantasm of the imagination to think that one hundred 
years ago the location now occupied by one of the most impor- 
tant commercial cities in the country was nothing but primeval 
forest, in which, close to the location of what is now the " four 
corners," was the first feeble evidence of a coming industrial 
development, in the shape of Ebenezer Allen's grist mill. 
Although as early as 1726 the liritish had established a station at 
Irondequoit, to enable them to secure the trade of the Western 
Indians, to the exclusion of the French, there was not the slightest 
approach to a permanent settlement until after Sullivan's army, 
in 1779, had intimidated the hostile Indians, and the Revolutionary 
War was ended, when settlers ventured here and braved the malarial 
vapors which prevailed in this section at that period. The first 
movement towards settlement was the purchase from Massachu- 
setts, by Phelps and Gorham of a tract of land in this section, 
and in 1789 the disposal of one hundred acres of land to Eben- 
ezer or " Indian " Allen, on condition that he build thereon a saw 
mill and grist mill. It may be fairly said that Rochester owes its 
origin to this "Indian" Allen, a character at once unique, dramatic 
and romantic. Possessing many traits of the savage, restrained 
only by the moral qualities inherited from more civilized ancestors, 
Allen was capable of meeting emergencies of pioneer life in the 
wilderness by measures and conduct that in more civilized regions 
would have placed him in danger of severest penalties. Being 
practically monarch of all he surveyed, he was a law unto him- 
self, and held sway over all the Indians who lived in the neigh- 
borhood, marrying as many wives as he wished, and committing 
other deeds contrary to law. "V'et his unique personality was of 
great value to posterit)-. A less courageous man would have 
abandoned the project of remaining amid savage foes on the one 



Rochesterinl904 II 

liaml ami malarious marshes on the- other. Had he weakened, 
it mi<;ht have prevented the settlement of Rochester for many 
years. With all his faults, Allen was much respected by the set- 
tlers, as they came to the locality later on. He was kind-hearted 
and liberal as long as his purpose was not crossed, and aided 
materially in settling up the country, by sawing wood and grinding 
corn for the nev\comers, and aiding them in various other ways. 

The first log house ui what was to be the city of Rochester was built 
m 179b, near what was then called the short falls, by Josiah Fish. 
The short falls was situated where the Aqueduct now stands, and 
was blasted away when the latter was built. In 1796 the families 
of Elijah Kent, Simon and Thomas King, Eli and Zadok 
Granger settled at Fall town, afterwards called Hanford's Landing. 
In 1806 Elijah Howe built a log house where the George Ellwanger 
residence now stands. In 1807 Charles Hanford built a block 
house, the first well constructed dwelling within the city limits on 
the west side, and the next year built a sawmill with race, this 
being the beginning of Brown's race. 

In 1808, Enos Stone built a sawmill at the east end of the short fall, 
and in 1810 he and Jacob Miller settled there. In 181 I, Enos 
Stone built the first frame ilwelling on the east side, and in 1812, 
Hannibal Scrantom built the first frame dwelling on the west 
side. In the meantime. Colonel Nathaniel Rochester went to 
Dansville, built a flour mill, paper mill, and a sawmill there ; 
retaining his interests in this locality. In 1818 he made Rochester 
his permanent home after having made a map of the village lots 
adjacent to the upper falls, many of which he sold. 

This was Rochester's starting point. The first school in the city was 
taught in 18 13 by Huldah M. Strong. The first schoolhouse was 
erected in 18 14, on the site of the present Free Academy building 
on Fitzhugh street. In 1814 the first Rochester free schools were 
organized, and a board of etlucation elected, with Levi A. Ward 
as President, and J. F. Mack as Superintendent of schools. In 
1827 the first High School building was erected, and after some 
financial troubles, there was a re-organization in 1835, and with 
Rev. Chester Dewey, as Principal, the school took a high rank 
among the educational institutions of that time. Rochester's first 
lawyer was General Vincent Mathews, who came here soon after 
Colonel Rochester. In 1812, Abelard Reynolds was appointed 
Postmaster ; and the first mail delivery between Rochester and 
Canandaigua was established. In the same year, a bridge costing 
$I2,CX)0, was built across the Genesee River, where A'lain street 
bridge now stands. De Witt Clinton visited Rochester about this 



Rochester in 1904 13 

time, anJ wrote concerning it : " There is a great trade between 
this country and Montreal in staves, potash and flour." Potash 
was one of the main industries at that time, and the flour made 
in those days made a reputation for Rochester which has increased 
as the years have passed. 

In 1814 there were about fifteen houses of ail kinds in the settlement, 
besides three stores, one grocery, one blacksmith shop, one saddler 
shop, one tailor shop, one law office, one flour mill and two saw 
mills. Flour was first made for shipment in 1814, but it was n<it 
until the close of the war with Great Britain in 181 5 that several 
hundred barrels were shipped to Montreal. In 1818 the shipments 
had increased to 26,000 barrels. The shipments were mostly from 
Irondequoit Landing. The first pioneer trailer at Charlotte was 
Erastus Spaulding, and his vessel was captured during the war. 

The first tavern was opened b\ Abelard Re\nolds, the first census was 
taken, the first stage line was started between Rochester and Can- 
andaigua and the first wedding ceremony in Rochester was that 
between Jehiel Barnard and Delia Scrantom, in 181 S- 

In 1816 many new settlers came and a number of new buildings were 
erected, in short — Rochester began to boom, and from that period 
the rise of Rochester to a place of commercial importance was 
very rapid. It was in this \'ear that the first 4th of July celebra- 
tion occurred in Rochester. Strange as it may seem at this date, 
the chief feature of the day's programme was a sham battle. No 
doubt the orator of the day made a sensation by the vehemence of 
his utterances against England and it goes w-ithout saying that 
there were bonfires, and much quaffing of beverages according to 
old time custom. It was only three years before this that the first 
religious meetings had been inaugurated in the tailor shop of Jehiel 
Barnard. In 1 8 14 Rev. Comfort Williams preached regularly for 
several months, and finalh' became pastor of the Presbyterian So- 
ciet\-. In 181 7 came into existence the first fire company. In 
1820 the first United States district court in Rochester was pre- 
sided over by Judge Roger A. Skinner. In 1821 the first county 
court for Monroe County was convened. The first bank in the 
state outside of New York City to receive a charter was the Bank 
of Rochester which was incorporated in 1824. The Bank of 
Monroe was chartered in 1829, the Rochester Savings Bank in 
1 83 1, and the Rochester City Bank in 1836. 

In 1826 the first daily paper between the Hudson river and the Pacific 
ocean, called the Rochester Advertiser was started. In 1827 the 
first directory of Rochester village was published and in 1834 the 
first directorv of Rochester City. 



Rochesterinl904 15 

In 1823 the first Canal Aqueduct \v.^^ completed at a cost of $83,000, 
ami the canal w.i^ opeiieii troin end to end. Rochester sent out 
its first load of Hour, 500 barrels, by canal boat. This was the 
opening up of an enormous milling business in Rochester, which 
soon became known as the Flour City on account of its milling 
industry and the tine i]ualit\ of its proilucts. 

In those early days the people had an immense amount of enjoyment 
in their daily lives that those of the present day know nothing of. 
There were few social restraints, people lived naturally, healthfully 
and enjoyed many sports that are now out of reach. The canal 
passenger packets and the mail coaches brought the news and the 
guests at intervals, and their arrival and departure were not un- 
mi.\ed with a glamor of romance. When it is considered that 
only a few years previous the Seneca Indians were scattered about 
the Rochester settlement, and had held their pagan festival — the 
sacrifice of the dog — the earl\ period of Rochester's commercial 
development may be said to have been tinged with the traditions 
of the Red man. In those days there was an element of danger 
in the lives of the settlers that gave spice to existence. The 
comic element also must have entered largely into their occupations 
and social functions. One has onK to compare our present con- 
veniences for visiting friends at night by means of the electric cars 
to the primitive method our forefathers in Rochester had recourse 
to in returning to their homes at night by lantern light, over 
muddy roadwa\s and through woods infested with wild aniinals. 
That the \ouths and maidens of primitive Rochester made the 
most of their opportunities to ofier mutual assistance goes without 
saying. In those old days, too, the tavern bar-room was a most in- 
teresting and instructive place. It was at once the club, lecture hall, 
theatre and general meeting place for gossips. On wintr\ nights, 
when the huge stove was red hot, the men of the village used to meet 
to pass away their evenings in story telling and laying plans for great 
undertakings, and the drinking was accompanied by less of the 
disagreeable features that obtain to-day. There was a cosiness, 
too, in the family parties, a jovialit\' and old fashioned hospitality 
which is absent in the artificial methods of entertainment which 
has been decreed by fashion for parties of the present da\ . In 
short, people lived closer to nature, were more sincere in their 
friendships and business relations. A common bond of sympathy 
bound society, which, happily, was controlled largely by leaders of 
high character and the noblest impulses. Rochester may be 
thankful that the founders of its industries were men of honor and 
imbued with stront; religious con\ictions. 



Rochesterinl904 17 

The year 1840 may be said to have been the great transition period in 
Rochester's industrial development. The enlarged canal had 
opened the way for commerce. The Auburn and Rochester railroad 
was built and over it went the first carload of wheat in that year, 
and very soon afterwards railway passenger traffic was established. 
Four years later the first telegraph office was opened here by the 
New York, Albany and Rochester Telegraph Company. In 1847 
the first coal for foundry use was brought here by Jonathan Child. 
Gas was introduced for business places and dwellings in 1848, and 
the streets were first lighted by gas in 1849. In this decade were 
brought into practical use in premature form all the agencies that 
were to develop Rochester's industries. The progress was rapid 
and unparalleled in the history of American cities. To-day one 
has only to glance at our principal street at night to behold the 
splendid achievements in tall buildings, magnificent store windows, 
first-class pavements, and brilliant illumination. 

■What would our fathers of 1830 have thought had the\' been told that 
in a generation or two Rochesterians would be able to talk with 
friends in Buffalo or New York by means of electricity ? Or that 
we should be able to unprison voices in wax cylinders or photo- 
graph a man's skeleton through his clothes and flesh ? A realiz- 
ing sense of Rochester's wonderful progress from primeval forest 
to a position of a city of the first-class can be obtained by looking 
at the halftone pictures in this book, and comparing what he 
there beholds with the first grist mill of poor " Indian " Allen 
situated in the wilderness. 





HE population of Rochester is at present about 200,000. 
It has 120 churches, 8 hospitals, and some 2,750 manu- 
facturing establishments. The employees in factories and 
workshops are estimated at 53,000. There are over 24 
fire companies, with a system of extension in hydrants, 
apparatus, and employees, the latter numbering about 225, 
There are about 200 policemen : and the average death 
rate for the past five years is only 14 per 1,000. The city has an 
area of 11,365 acres; there are 325 miles of open streets and 
126 miles of improved streets. It has an excellent electric 



Rochesterinl904 19 

Street car system of lo? miles, tappint^ varidus other s\stenis 
with ramifications that extend to or are in process of extension 
to Buffalo, and Niagara Falls on the west, Syracuse and the 
intervening towns on the east, Auhurn, Canandaigua and inter- 
vening towns on the south. These trolley lines are destined to 
be very rich sources of revenue to the merchants of Rochester, 
providing rapid transit to a prodigious area of produce raising 
country within a radius of lOO miles from our city, enabling 
farmers and stock raisers and th'eir families eas)' access to Roches- 
ter and its mercantile houses, theatres, churches and social circles. 
The advantage of this cannot be correctly estimated, and will 
continue to increase in importance, as the extension of the trolley 
s\stem expands from year to year. Rochester has about 280 
miles of water pipes, about 230 miles of sewers. Eleven steam 
railroads enter the cit\ . Ten bridges span the Genesee River 
within the city limits. 

The Genesee river is capable of producing 50,000 horse power, about 
10,000 of which by electricity is now in use. The matter of 
securing the full power capacity of our illimitable water resources 
is a subject that will continue to engage the earnest attention of 
the Chamber of Commerce as it has done in the past. 

Rochester enjoys the purest water supply for liomestic uses of an> 
cit\ in the United States : its Hemlock lake s\stem delivering 
22,000,000 gallons daily. It is hoped to reserve this water ex- 
clusively for household use by securing an adequate supply of 
other high grade water for manufacturing purposes, which should 
be of such a quality that in case any accident happened to the 
Hemlock conduits, the water for manufacturing supph' might be 
temporarily used for domestic purposes with a minimum of risk to 
health. The Chamber is mindful of the fact that the life of 
water conduits is limited. There is a danger of pin-hole perfora- 
tions after a certain period of service, and it would be foll\- to 
close our eyes to the fact that sooner or later there must come 
conditions of corrosive breakage that would place the city in dan- 
ger of a water famine. In such a case, it would be difficult to 
control the action of the ignorant portion of our population, who 
in such an emergency would content themselves by dipping their 
buckets into the canal to obtain water for domestic use. The 
danger of such a course is obvious from a sanitary point of view. 
The Chamber will not lose sight of this great menace to Roch- 
ester's prosperity and health, and will strenuously advocate any 
reasonable and economic measure to place Rochester in an abso- 
lutely impregnable condition in so far as its permanent water 
supply for domestic and manufacturing use is concerned. 



Rochesterinl904 21 

As the health of a city lar^t-I\ dcpc-mls upon tlu- opportunities t;iven 
its inhabitants for the enjoNinent of fresh air and recreation, it is 
with pride that it can be stated that our city is equipped with one 
of the best park systems in the countr\-, views of some of which 
are given in this volume. These parks contain an area of 696 
acres, and are at once places of refreshment and instruction, con- 
taining as the\' do over l,200 varieties of shrubs and foliage, and 
larger trees of almost every known species, such a variety indeed 
as could onlv have been obtained in such a great nursery center as 
Rochester and its vicinity. During the summer months free 
public band concerts are given twice a week in two of the parks, 
the inauguration of which, in 1901, can be credited to the 
Chamber of Commerce. The coal consumed ui and shipped 
from Rochester annually amounts to over 360,000 tons of anthra- 
cite, and 640,000 tons of bituminous. Over $50,000,000 is 
invested in manufacturing and the wholesale trades, and the value 
of annual manufactured products exceeds $70,000,000. The 
receipts of the postolSce for 1903 were $619,785.95. The annual 
increase for the past 10 years has averaged $30,000. It is the 
first city in the world for the production of photographic appa- 
ratus, optical instruments and nursery stock, the third cit\- in the 
Uniteil States in the manufacture of clothing, fourth city in the 
manufacture of boots and shoes, the combined amount of products 
of the two latter industries alone being over $17,000,000 annualh-. 
It has the largest preserving establishment, cider and vinegar 
factory, lubricating oil plant and button factory- in the world. 

The educational advantages found in Rochester are of the best. The 
city boasts of 38 public schools, with an average daily attendance 
of 19,000 pupils, supervised by 674 teachers. A Normal Train- 
ing school, attendance 794. A High School, attendance 1 502. 
(Another High School, with same capacity, building.) A 
Mechanics Institute with over 4000 students. A University with 
270 students. Wagner Memorial College, and the Rochester 
Theological Seminary, under the control of the Baptist denomi- 
nation. There are also 18 parochial schools, 2 academies for 
girls, I academy for boys, and St. Bernard's Theological Seminary. 

Rochester is in proximity to some of the most charming summer 
resorts in the State They are too numerous to particularize. 
The most popular are on the shores of Lake Ontario and Ironde- 
quoit bay. These are reached by electric and steam car service, 
and include Ontario Beach, Summerville, Windsor Beach, Sea 
Breeze, Forest Lawn, Glen Haven, Newport and Manitou Beach. 
The more distant resorts are Sodus Bay, Conesus Lake, Hemlock 



Rochesterinl904 23 

Lake, Silver Lake, to say nothing of the resorts that can he 
reached hy crossinti; Lake Ontario into Canada, and the facihties 
offered for excursions to the Thousand Islands. 

The Church accommodation of Rochester affords opportunities for the 
exercise of every denominational faith. There are 17 Baptist 
churches, 2 Christian, 2 Congregational, 3 Evangelical, 2 Evan- 
gelical Association, i Holland Christian Reformed, 6 Jewish con- 
gregations, 13 Lutheran, 14 Methodist Episcopal, i Free Metho- 
dist, 14 Presbyterian, I United Presbyterian, 12 Protestant Epis- 
copal, I Reformed Church in United States, 17 Roman Catholic 
churches and a Cathedral, I Second Adventist, i Unitarian, I 
LIniversalist, besides a church each for Christadelphians, Church 
of the Stranger, First Church of Christ (Scientist), First Spirit- 
ual Church, People's Rescue Mission, Rochester Italian Mission, 
Second Church of Christ (Scientist). 

The Hospitals of Rochester include St. Mary's, City Hospital, Roch- 
ester Homeopathic Hospital, Rochester Hahnemann Hospital, 
Infant's Summer Hospital, new Municipal Hospital for contagious 
diseases. There is also a State Hospital now being enlarged. 

The Library accommodations of Rochester are excellent, and con- 
tinually in process of extension. The Reynolds' Librar\ con- 
tains over 50,000 volumes, the Central Library, over 35,000 
volumes, the University of Rochester over 39,000 volumes, the 
Rochester Theological Seminary over 11,000 volumes, the 
St. Bernard Theological Seminary over 11,000 volumes, the 
Fourth Appellate Division Law Library about 25,000 volumes, 
the Powers Law Library over 10, GOO volumes. In this cursory 
review of modern Rochester, the mind is again instinctively 
reversed to the past, and cannot fail to recognize the marvelous 
manner in which the city progressed with leaps and bounds from 
a condition of primeval simplicity and aboriginal control to that of 
a great and powerful manufacturing city. Its past cannot fail to 
be an augury of its future. Great as has been its progress hitherto 
Rochester's vast resources are practically only in the first stages of 
development. Nature speaks to us with commanding emphasis to 
utilize her gifts. She has supplied us with every conceivable 
facility for industrial and commercial progress and the enjoyment 
of existence to meet the most fastidious requirements. Nothing 
has been withheld to make human life in this city by the exercise 
of common sense and high moral principle enjoyable and pros- 
perous to the fullest extent. It remains only for our leading 
citizens to get together in frequent council to devise the way and 
means for Rochester's development in accordance with twentieth 
century enterprise. 




'^m'^ms^^ 




HOL'CjH most people are aware of how Rochester came 
b\ its name, there are many who will read what the late 
John H. Rochester had to sa\- upon the subject in a short 
article published before his death. We quote the followinir 
as a sort of memento of deceased : " Many people think 
that our city Rochester was named after the ancient Epis- 
copal city of Rochester on the Medway in the County of 
Kent, England. But this is not the case, it having been 
named after one of the original proprietors, Colonel Nathaniel Rochester. 
In 1802 Messrs. Rochester, Fitzhugh and Cornell purchased the so-called 
' Hundred Acre Tract,' comprising the central part of the west side 
of the river of the present City of Rochester. The settlement was 
called Genesee Falls until its creation as a village by act of the Legis- 
lature in April, 1817, under the name of Rochesterville, which name was 
changed by a subsequent act of the Legislature in 1819 to the present 
name of Rochester. 

" The word Rochester is from the Sa.xon Hroff-crastus — meaning a 
camp b\' a swift stream : hrofT, a contraction of the Britain dwr-bryf and 
Roman durobrivis — meaning a swift or running stream, and crastus, a 
camp, the latter being the same word as the Latin castra, and the English 
cester or Chester as in Winchester, Gloucester, etc. Hence the name is 
singularly appropriate, our city lying upon such a swift stream as does the 
English city of the same name, the Medway being about the same size of 
our own Genesee river, and having like it a rapid and turbid current. 

"Another derivation of the name is given by the recognized English 
authorit}-, Bede, as Hroff-castris, the camp of Hroff, who is supposed to 
have been a Saxon chieftain, but in the writer's opinion, fortified by care- 
ful investigation, the former is the true derivation." 




R 



(^CHESTER is pre-eminently a cit\ of homes. The palaces 
of the rich and the cottages of the industrial classes are 
seen on every side. The majority of our people own their 
homes, which accounts largely for the permanent prosperity 
of our city. There is implanted in the human breast a 
natural inclination toward the possession of some permanent 
ding place — some spot called home and fireside, and no 
other city in the world having the same resources offers 
better advantages for a man to own a home of his own than Rochester. 
The reason is simple, for our city has a greater diversity of industries 
than any other place of its size, and all can find employment with 
opportunities for advancement b\' the exercise of industry, prudence and 
patience. Rochester is so situated as to afford ways and means for the 
best kind of living. It is among the healthiest cities in the United States, 
and in its environs land can be obtained so cheaply in desirable residence 
localities, that the industrial population can obtain lots for building, and 
it is an easy matter for them to arrange for the building of homes upon 
terms that are equitable and easy of payment by monthly instaUments. 
The three important factors in a city's development — street cars, an 
excellent water system and electric lights are available throughout the 
greater portion of our territory. No city in the Union has better facili- 
ties for religious and secular growth. Our climate is most invigorating, 
our surroundings most productive in flowers, fruits and cereals, so that 
our markets are always supplied with the choicest and freshest vegetable 
productions. The rapid current of the Genesee carrying away to a 
great extent the impurities necessarily attendant upon a large community- 
adds greatly to the healthfulness, while its waterfalls materially enhance 
the beauty of the city. Such is the city now numbering 200,000 souls, 
and which offers most advantageous opportunities for securing that 
dearest spot on earth — sweet home ! 



-Pochester's 



A^ 



mmm*^^''" > 



NTERESTii 





iiulnstr\ of R()chcst(_-r dates back to 1790 when 

Tj P'henezer Allen erected the first mill of one run of stone. 
In the year 1 807 the second mill was constructed, also 
consisting of one run of stone. The latter eked out an 
existence, and in the year 181 2 was purchased by Francis 
Brown & Co., and enlarged for the manufacture of flour. 
During the succeeding years several new mills were added 
to the list, and during the period from 1836 to 1840 some 
eighteen to twenty mills were in successful operation. Rochester then 
became the largest milling point in the country ; the quality of the flour was 
unsurpassed, which entitled it to the appellation of the "Flour City." Little 
advance was made in Rochester milling, however, until 1870, when the 
purifier came into use. This little machine thoroughly revolutionized the 
art of milling. Then came that invention of George Motley — the wheat 
splitting machine — which he ran so successfully in his mill in this city. 
Next came gradual reduction and the chilled iron, the porcelain and the 
corrugated roll, and eventually the improvement of the bolting apparatus, 
the centrifugal reel. Although Rochester has been partially eclipsed as a 
flouring center by the developments in northwest Minneapolis, the Flour 
City has not gone back ; it has kept even with the times, and is turning 
out more flour now than diu-ing any period of its history. All of our 
mills have adopted the roller system, and the quality of their product 
cannot be beaten. The Rochester millers are turning out as fine a 
quality of flour as is produced anywhere in the United States, and are 
giving Minneapolis a hard rub. (^ur mills are equipped with the latest 
and best improved machinery. A great advantage possessed by Rochester 
is her fine water power. She has also advantages over every other milling 
point in being in so close communication with the seaboard, which 
enables our millers to lay their product at the doors of their customers in 
one quarter the time it would take to get it from the west. 

The opportunities for the future extension of the milling business in 
Rochester are great. The expansion of our country, the opening up of 
new territory to cultivation and population, is providing new markets for 
Rochester's justly celebrated brands of flour. The struggle of the north- 
west to eclipse Rochester in the milling business reached its climax years 
ago, resulting in our city holding its own as a flour producing center. 



westers /yursems 



^t^HlMiiffims€?|gM^-> 




OR atiriciiltural purposes, the country that environs Roclies- 
ter can hardl\ be surpassed, being rich in alluvial deposits, 
well watered, rolling, and consequently healthy and easily 
drained. These features have been taken advantage of for 
many years in growing seeds and fruit trees, industries that 
have attained a wonderful magnitude. 

Through years of experience, it has been discovered 
that the seeds propagated in this climate are remarkably 
hardy and prolific, and under naturally favorable conditions the great 
industr\ has grown. By the perseverance and energy of those concerned, 
Rochester has become widely known, and has been of incalculable bene- 
fit to the entire country, by the dissemination of agricultural and horti- 
cultural literature, as well as the distribution of seeds, plants and trees to 
the most contiguous as well as the most remote points. The magnitude 
of the business conducted in this branch of trade has assumed gigantic 
proportions, engaging not only an immense capital, but the attention of 
thousands of workers in all departments. The pioneer nurserymen of 
Rochester were George Ellwanger and Patrick Barry, who established 
themselves in Rochester in 1838. Other nurserymen having under cul- 
tivation many score of acres are Brown Bros., Chase Bros., Irving Rouse 
and Glen Bros. There are upwards of thirty nurserymen in and about 
Rochester. Many seedsmen also make Rochester headquarters, notably 
James Vick's Sons, Mandeville & King Co., and Briggs Bros. & Co. 
For a period of forty years or more Rochester has been famous 
not only throughout the United States, but all over Europe, as a nursery 
center. For many years Rochester possessed the only nurseries of 
an\' size in the United States. The first trees sent to California in 
1849 and 1850 were from the Rochester nurseries, and sent across 
the isthmus of Panama on the backs of mules. They also sent the 
first trees to Oregon, and now California sends her fruits all over 
the United States and Europe. So the Rochester nurseries have 
supplied Japan, Australia, New Zealand, South America, and nearly all 
parts of the world where trees can be grown. In an article written by 
Patrick Barry, Esq., of this city, in 1888, he said, in regard to the nursery 
industry: "I find to-day on the list of the Nurseryman's Association 
reported in 1887 for Rochester, thirt\-four nurser\men and sixteen dealers 



R o c h e s t e I 



33 



in trees. The latter are men who bu\- their stock from the nurseries and 
send out men to sell. These si.xteen dealers employ probabh' not less 
than 2,000 men. The thirty-four nurseries, man\ of which are very 
small, employ from 300 to 3 or 4 men each in their nurseries, and about 
2,000 as travelers, making a total employed in the business of probably 
4,000 men. One peculiarity of the nursery business is that the stock is 
nearly all produced on the ground by labor. Very little is expended to 
purchase raw material from abroad. Some commercial houses will do an 
annual business of millions of dollars and yet not employ so much labor as 
one of the small nurseries. The moral influence of the nursery business 
is a distinguishing feature of it. Its tendencies are all good, and that is 
more than can be said of some industries. That our country has made 
more rapid advancement in fruit culture and horticulture than any other 
country in the world is due in no small degree to the efiforts of nursery- 
men, and particularly to the Rochester nurserymen, who have sent their 
skilled missionaries by the thoLisand all over the country urging people to 
plant trees, plant orchards and vinevards, enrich the country and beautify 
their homes." 

The nursery industry of Rochester has done more for bringing our 
city into honorable and favorable repute throughout the world than can 
be easily estimated, and every firm and individual engaged in it have 
reason to be proud of their past achievements, and may look forward with 
confidence to a future of continued prosperity and more extended oppor- 
tunities. 





HE Water Cart S\stcni, for street cleaning, which is 
destined to come into general use, was invented hy a 
Rochesterian and first put into practical use in the summer 
of 1900, when Oxford street, between East avenue and 
Park avenue, was subjected to the new process. 

Commissioner Grant, who was then in charge of 

streets, witnessed the first trial of the plan. The original 

proposition was to drive two water carts used for street 

sprinkling, abreast with valves wide open. It was noted that the flood 

of water on the street filled the gutters with a swiftly flowing stream, 

and cleansed the street completeh'. 

The residents of the street assumed the cost of cleaning once or twice 
a week by use of the water cart. One man with a cart using full water 
pressure, accomplished the work in about three-quarters of an hour at 
comparatively small expense. This system has been in operation here 
during the past four years. An account of it was published in the local 
papers in 1901 with some remarks by the Commissioner of Public Works 
who doubted whether it could be used successfully in cleaning broad 
streets. The fact is it had never been tried in Rochester on broad 
thoroughfares until a firm from St. Louis appeared here with the same 
system that had been operated in Rochester so long. Air pressure has 
been added to the natural pressure of a full tank of water in the 
St. Louis machines making the stream stronger, and three wagons 
abreast are employed with six horses and six men. This system of street 
cleaning is far superior to the dangerous one of using broad revolving 
brooms which create clouds of dust often of a poisonous nature. The 
streams of water cleanse the streets very thoroughly and flush all im- 
purities down to the gutters to be carried off by the sewer. 

The system will no doubt become popular and be adopted by all 
cities as the best street cleaning device ever used, and the credit of its 
invention and its first practical use belong to Rochester. 







the 



OR a period of nearly forty \ears Rochester has heic 

F eminent position of beinj; one of the great centers fo 

manufacture of boots and shoes in America. There are 
only three or four cities that surpass Rochester in the shoe 
trade. Although the shoe manufacturing industry has 
largely increased in the West during the past few years, it 
is a remarkable fact that tluring the past decade and more 
the establishment of new concerns for the manufacture of 
shoes has been a marked feature in the industrial growth of Rochester. 

All the old style shoe firms have either gone out of business or have 
been reconstructed on Twentieth Century principles of doing things. 
The newest kinds of machinery and the most skillful operators are 
secured by all the Rochester factories from time to time. 

Rochester is noted for the production of women's shoes and holds 
second place in the United States in their manufacture. Philadelphia 
alone is ahead of us in point of quantity but not in that of quality. 

In addition to women's shoes the Rochester output includes the best 
lines of misses', youths', boys', children's and infants' shoes, which are 
marketed in every large city on the Continent. 

The Rochester shoe factories pay better wages than those of an\ 
other city in the United States. This is also accounted in the absence 
of strikes. There are 70 factories in Rochester, many of which are small 
concerns, making what are called cacks or soft soles. Over $3,000,000 
is invested in the shoe industry in Rochester, and nearly $2,000,000 in 
wages are annually paid to employees. The value of the shoe product 
in this city is officially stated to be about $7,000,000 per annum. 




T was largely through the instrumentaiitv of the Chamber 

of Commerce that the U. S. Government was induced to 

suitably reward heroism displayed by the members of the 

Life Saving Station at Charlotte. After initiatory action 

taken by the Chamber, Hon. J. B. Perkins, member of 

Congress from the Monroe District, was requested to bring 

the matter to the notice of the proper authorities in 

Washington and he, with characteristic zeal and alacrity, 

succeeded in securing the recognition of the government to the heroic 

deeds performed by the Charlotte Life Saving Crew as the following 

letter e.\plains. 

TREASUKY DEPARTMENT. 

Ofice o) the Gen. Superintendent of Life Saving Service, 

Wa.shincton'. I). C. 




HON, .lAMES B. FERKIWS, 

Rochester, X. V. 

.Sir — H;ive the honor to forward to you to-day by United States Express, 
nine jfold medals awarded to the keeper and crew of the Charlotte Life .Saving 
Station, as follows, in recognition of their services in rescuing on December 15, 
1902, four men and one woman from the wrecked schooner John R. Noj'es, 
which was lost on that date on Lake Ontario: George N. Gray, keeper; Lester 
D. Seymour, surfman ; Ira S. Palmer, surfman ; W. Vernon Downing, surf- 
man ; Frank B. Chapman, surfman; Delbert Rose, surfman; Jlial E. Eggles- 
ton, surfman; Charles Eastwood, surfman. 

There is also enclosed a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury to each 
of the rescuers reciting the services for which the awards are made. This is 
the case to which j'ou called the attention of the department soon after the 
disaster. I would thank you to see that both the medals and letters are de- 
livered to the persons named and their receipts for the medals forwarded to this 
office. Respectfully, 

S. I. KIMBALL, 

General SuferintenJent. 

The letter from the Secretary of the Treasury accompanying the 
medals gives a description of the services rendered on the memorable 
occasion which reads more like a romance than an event in real life 

It describes the terrible winter weather which had frozen the harbor 
tug in the ice up the river — the proceeding eight miles by land with the 



Rochesterinl904 41 

life boat — the deep snow and otiier obstructions — the dela\ in getting 
forward by railway — the Captain's forethought in telegraphing for sleds — 
the journey of four miles through drifts of snow at night — the burning of 
signals — the unsuccessful row of a mile in the pitch darkness and return 
to shore — the burning of Asten Coston signals — the few hours' rest for 
the life savers awaiting for daylight — the subsequent launching of the 
h'fe boat and rowing twenty miles in a rough sea under awful con- 
ditions and in a freezing wind — the eventual arrival at the wreck and 
rescue of the imperiled crew of the fast sinking schooner. 

The concluding paragraph of the Secretary's letter reads as follows: 

" Thrciughout all tile tryiiii,^ circunistaiKi.-s you l)<>ie yourself bravely, with 
discretion, great skill and sound judgment. Your foresight in ordering a tug 
frorn Oswego, telegraphing for teams to be in readiness at Lakeside, sending a 
lookout to the windmill, and your great care to provide yourself with ample 
compass bearings, evidenced remarkable prudence and sagacity — qualities most 
essential to a keeper— while your unflagging zeal and persistence in the face of 
great personal peril, showed that you took no selfish thought of your own 
safety. I find great pleasure in acting as the medium for the award of the 
accompanying medal which is designed to bear te.stimony of extreme and heroic 
daring in saving lives from the perils of the .sea. 

Respectfully, 

L. M. .SHAW, 

Secretary. ■• 





mttrs 





HE NEED of large areas of land for park purposes in cities 

Tl is no longer a debated question. It has been proved be- 
yond the shadow of a doubt that the more parks a city has 
tlie more moral is the population. Parks mean better 
health, better morals, more legitimate pleasure for the 
people. It is a clearly demonstrated fact in very many 
large cities that the creation of large or small public parks 
has been wise from a financial point of view. Invariably 
and necessarily the value of real estate in the neighborhood of newly- 
opened and completed parks steadilv increases. 

Rochester is peculiarly fortunate in its park possessions, and their 
distribution. The city itself, save in its commercial district and the 
central streets at and near the four corners, is a park in reality, so beauti- 
fully wooded are its avenues and suburban streets. Lake Avenue, East 
Avenue, PKmouth Avenue and other thoroughfares are so rich in trees 
and lawns that it seems like a waste of time to go into the country for 
scenic beauty. It is all within our gates. Our park system is but a 
carrying out on a bigger scale for the use of the people, of the same 
beauty cultivation as seen in the avenues mentioned. 

There is perhaps no finer territory for park purposes an\ where than 
that which lies between the lower falls of the Genesee and Lake 
Ontario. The inhabitants of Rochester, of course, do not appreciate the 
beaut\ and grandeur of the scenery because they are used to it from 
infancy. But strangers who come here are simply amazed that Roch- 
ester possesses within its jurisdiction such magnificent natural landscape 
conformations as are seen in Seneca Park. It would seem as though 
nature in primeval days had anticipated the conversion of this section 
into a grand recreation ground, for she left ever^'thing calculated to 
delight the eye, the mighty falls, the deep gorge in which is written 
history of the geologic formation, taking the student back hundreds and 
thousands of years, the wooded cliffs embracing many species of timber 
and undergrowth of great variety, vistas of river and lake from eminences 
that enrapture the artist and inspire the poet — all came readv made from 
the prolific womb of Mother Nature. 

Akin, in point of beauty is Highland Park, situated on an eminence 
that commands a panoramic view of great magnificence, including the 



city of Rnchc^tt-r ami a radius of coutur\ t-.\tctuliii!i to the horizon on 
every hand. Here is Rochester's jjrand botanic display, cidtured by the 
genius of our best nurser\inen and landscape gardeners in which can be 
seen a greater variety of out-door specimens of herbage and flora than can 
be found in any other park in the United States. To the south of this 
arboretum is situated Genesee V'alley or South Park, possessing a 
character of beauty differing from those spoken of. Here we behold the 
silvery Genesee winding through the meadows and woodlands on either 
side. On the east bank of the river the land is adorned with woods of 
ancient trees for a space of several acres, beneath the shade of which, in 
summer time, bands play periodically for the benefit of the visitors. 
There are many winding paths leading to the river and meadows where 
sheep and deer graze, beyond which are more woods. On the west side 
of the river are the canoe club and other houses, the golf links and base 
ball grounds. The opportunities for diversion are many, boating and 
canoeing being a favorite, while those of lesser growth patronize the 
merry-go-round or gambol on the green and play games of childhood. 
In the center of the most frequented spot is situated the house of enter- 
tainment where may be had rest and refreshment at moderate figures. 

Rochester has other parks that, of late, have grown to be beauty 
spots that not only embellish the city, but provide breathing and resting 
places quite near the homes of the people. The Park Commissioners 
have cultivated every foot of ground that has come under their super- 
vision. We might mention the Plymouth Park, a small enclosure, but 
most beautiful in the picturesque and cultivated taste displayed in its design. 
Franklin Square is another, beauty spot where venerable trees give 
plenteous shade, and the lawrTs are decked with floral splendors. The 
park known as Jones Square is another exquisite breathing place on the 
north side of the city. Brown's Square is another large space of park- 
like proportions, nearer tlie center of the city, where ancient trees afford 
shade and beauty in the midst of mercantile and railroad activity, giving a 
pleasing contrast to the work-a-day surroundings, and a pleasant place in 
which to linger awhile. There are other pretty spots that have come 
under the careful supervision of the Park Commissioners who deserve the 
highest praise for what they have done in the past, and are continuing to 
do, to make Rochester one of the most delightful cities in the world in 
which to earn a livelihood and enjoy to the fullest extent all those benefi- 
cient privileges which nature so freely gives to those who carry out her 
plans by intelligent co-operation. 



The appointment by the late Pope 
Leo XIII of Rev. Thomas A. Hendrick 
of Rochester to the Bishopric of Cebu, 
PhiHppine Islands, meets with the heart\ 
approbation of the American people. He 
will be one of the four American prelates 
to whose hands the crisis in the Church of 
the Philippines has been confided by the 
Pope and to whom our government will 
look as interpreters to the Catholic Philip- 
pinos of the honorable intentions of 
the United States towards its new- 
citizens. Speaking of the appointment 
of Father Hendrick, a New York paper said 




He 



of the strong 

men who never seek office or honors because office and honor seek them, 
and as a rule rather late in life, because office and honor belong mostly to 
the mediocre." " The Rochesterian " in the Post Express, speaking of 
the appointment, said, "Of Father Hendrick who is to be bishop of 
Cebu it may be said that he will represent loyalty to America and even 
to the misguided statesmanship which gave us our distant conquest ; and 
as he is in some respects a thorough politician, he will make the prestige 
of his position felt in public affairs, when there is need for interference. 
He will be true none the less to the interests of the church to which he 
belongs, and as he is a man whose heart is with the poor and whose 
instincts are against oppression he will become the staunch friend and 
counselor of the people of his diocese, not only in what concerns 
spiritual afifairs but in regard to their civil rights. There are three 
threads in the tangled skein which each of these new bishops has to 
unravel — the strand of loyalty to America, the strand of allegiance to 
Rome, and the strand of duty to his flock. Let us hope that none mav 
fail to clear away the snarl and twist them into a triple cord of unity." 

Thomas A. Hendrick was born in Penn \'an fifty-four years ago. 
He began his preparation for the Roman Catholic priesthood in Seaton 
Hall College, New Jersey, after receiving the education afforded by the 
schools in the vicinity of his birthplace. From Seaton Hall he went to 
St. John's College in Fordham and from thence to St. Joseph's Theo- 
logical Seminary in Troy, N. ^'., where he was ordained on June 7th, 
1873, by the late Bishop Wndhams of ( )gdensburg. Then he came to 




Hlr^^Cll Sacrimriit 






Rochesterinl904 49 

tin's city as assistant rector of St. AIar\ 's parish. He was afterwards 
priest at Charlotte, and Union Springs, and in 1 891 became pastor of 
St. Bridget's Church on Gorham street. Last year he celebrated his 
silver anniversar\- of his ordination. He was appointed by the Legislature 
a member of the State Board of Regents in 1900, to succeed the late 
Rev. Father ALilone of Brookl>n. Father Hendrick is held in high 
esteem by both Protestants and Catholics in Rochester. His activity in 
charitable and philanthropic work along non-sectarian lines has been 
almost as conspicuous as his church work. He was largely instrumental 
in organizing such societies as the Law Enforcement League and the 
Committee of One Hundred, the general purposes of which were to 
suppress vice and save the young from ruin. He was especialls active in 
the work of the Humane Society and in the Society for the Prevention 
of Cruelty to Children, of which latter he was President. He has the 
reputation of being a brilliant writer on philanthropic subjects. He was 
greatly criticised for the attitude he took regarding the higher education 
of women, claiming that it had a tendencx- to wreck a woman mentally 
and physically. Father Hendrick was consecrated Bishop of Cebu in 
Rome in August, 1 903. 

ST. MICH.AELS BELLS. 

The noisy city streets grow calm. The vibrant sweetness of their voice 

When at the vesper hour A message seems to bring, 

A benison falls like a balm To bid the hearts of men rejoice. 

From yonder fretted tower ; The souls of men to sing ; 

A song of sadness and of love The tuneful pleadings fall like dew. 

Upon the twilight swells, While in the heart there swells 

The golden-throated music ot An anriphonic response to 

St. Michael's bells. St. Michael's bells. 

O solemn bells ! thy music fills 

The earth with joy benign ; 

O pleading bells! thy music thrills 

With peace and love divine ; 

And so, when the long day is o'er, 

And on the world there dwells 

A brooding calm, I listen for 

St. Michael's heWs. — Ror/usIn- PuH Expr.-ss. 



JtD se^j^^, 




Chamber of Commerce— Main Street East, corner of South 
Avenue. 

County Buildings— South Avenue, take South Avenue car. 

Cemeteries— Mount Hope, take Exchange Street or South 
Avenue car. Riverside, take Charlotte car. Holy Sepulchre, take 
Charlotte or Lake Avenue cars. 

City Hali, and Court House — Main Street West, corner 
Fitzhugh Street. 

Clubs — Genesee Valley, East Avenue and Gibbs Street. Rochester, 
East Avenue. Eureka, Clinton Avenue North. Whist. Fitzhugh 
Street. Rochester Athletic, Clinton Avenue North. 

Culver Park — Baseball Field, take University Avenue car. 

Drives — East Avenue. Lake Avenue to Seneca Park West and 
Charlotte. St. Paul Street to Seneca Park East and Sinnmerville. 
Plymouth Avenue to Genesee Valley Park. ALain Street East and 
University Avenue to Rochester University. 

East High School — Alexander Street, take Main Street East or 
University Avenue car. 

Federal Building — Post Office, Custom House, etc., corner 
Church and Fitzhugh Streets. 

Falls of the Genesee — tapper Falls, best seen from Piatt Street 
Bridge, take Lake Avenue or St. Paul Street car. Lower and Middle 
Falls, best seen from Driving Park Avenue Bridge, take Lake Avenue or 
St. Paul Street car. 

Hospitals — City, take VV^est Avenue car. St. Mary's, take West 
Avenue car. Homeopathic, take Monroe Avenue car. Hahnemann, 
take South Avenue car. Infants' Summer, Ontario Beach, take Char- 
lotte car. 

Kimball's Conservatory — Take Jefferson Avenue car. 

Masonic Temple — Clinton Avenue near Main Street. 

Nurseries — ElKvanger & Barry, take South Avenue car. Brown 
Brothers, take Brighton car. Chase Brothers, take L^niversitv Ave. car. 



DKSMK IVM W.WU.VNG 
1\r/7lMS BIUCK CltlTRCn 
J lUJTCtt, W/.HNfM. AftCIKTrxn.' 



^: 






^-^■^f^ 

U 




\p|)c:ii- 



Rochesterinl904 53 

Office Blii.UINGS— Powers, Main ami State Streets. Granite. 
Alain Street East and St. Paul Street. Wilder, Main Street VV'est and 
Exchange Street. Chamber of Commerce, Main Street and South 
.Avenue. German Insurance, Main Street West. Cutler, East Avenue. 

Pl'Rlic Libraries— Reynolds, Spring Street, take Plymouth or 
Jefferson Avenue car, (Branch reading; room, ll8 Reynolds Arcade). 
Central, South Eitzhuijh Street, take University- .Avenue car. Law, 
Court House. 

Public Parks — Genesee Valley, take Plymouth .Avenue car. 
Highland, take South Avenue car. Seneca Park East, take St. Paul 
Street car. Seneca Park West, take Lake .Avenue car. 

Railroad Stations — New York Central, West Shore, Northern 
Central, Toronto and Hamilton, Central .Avenue, take Central .Avenue 
or Clinton Avenue or St. Paul Street car. Buffalo, Rochester and 
Pittsburg, West .Avenue. Erie, Exchange Street or South Avenue car. 
Rome, Watertown and (^gdensburg. Lake Avenue car. Pennsylvania, 
West Avenue car. Lehigh Valley, South Avenue, take South Avenue 
car. Rochester and Sodus Bay, Main Street East or Sodus Bay car. 

Reser\-Oir — Capacit\, 22,000,000 gallons, in Highland Park, take 
South .Avenue car. 

Soldiers' .Monument— Washington Park, take Monroe Avenue 
car. 

State Hospital — For the Insane, take South Avenue car. 

St. Bernard's Seminary- Boulevard, take Charlotte car. 

Su.MMER Resorts — Ontario Beach and .\Lanitou, New \'ork 
Central Railwav or Charlotte car. Summerville, Summerville car. (jlen 
Haven, Glen Haven car. Sea Breeze. Sea Breeze car. 

Theological Seminary- East Avenue, corner Alexander Street, 
take Park Avenue car. 

Theaters — Lyceum, Clinton .A\enue South. National, ALain 
Street West. Baker, Fitzhugh Street. Cook, South Avenue. Empire. 
-Main Street East. 

LiNUERSIT^' OF Rochester — University .Avenue car. 

Weather Bureau (U. S.)— Federal Buildmg, Church and Fitz- 
hugh Streets. 

\'ouNG Men's Christian Association — South .A\enue, corner 
Court, take South or Monroe .Avenue car. "^I'oung Women's Christian 
.Association, Clinton Avenue North, take Clinton .Avenue car. Catholic 
"*»'oung Men's Association, Chatham Street, take North .A\enue car. 

Zoo — Seneca Park East, take St. Paul Street car. 




^rRTincAieor W 

iNCORPOR/iir 




E, the undersigned citizens of the United States of America, 

Wand residents of the Cit\' of Rochester, in the State of 
New York, desiring to form a corporation pursuant to the 
provision of an act passed b.\- the Legislature of the State 
of New York, May 3, 1877, entitled "An act to provide 
for the incorporation of Exchanges or Boards of Trade," 
and the several acts extending and amending the same, DO 

HEREB'^' CERTIFY : 

First — The corporate name of said Company is "Rochester 
Chamber of Commerce." 

Secorit/ — That the objects for which said company is formed are to 
foster the trade and commerce of the City of Rochester ; to protect 
such trade and commerce from unjust and unlawful exactions : to reform 
abuses in trade ; to diffuse accurate and reliable information among its 
members as to the standing of merchants, and other matters ; to produce 
uniformity and certainty in the customs and usages of trade ; to settle 
differences between its members, and to promote a more enlarged and 
friendly intercourse between merchants. 

Third — The said Company shall have no capital stock. 

Fourth — That the term of existence of said Company is to be fifty 
years. 

Fifth — That the number of trustees who shall manage the concerns 
of said Company is thirty-five. 

Sixth — That the names of the trustees for the first year are, Hulbert 
H. Warner, William S. Kimball, Frank S. Upton, Henry Michaels, 
Henry B. Hathaway, Lewis P. Ross, Charles J. Hurke, Henry C. Brews- 
ter, Arthur S. Hamilton, David M. Hough, Cjeorgc C. Buell, Alexander 
M. Lindsay, William H. Gorsline, John H. Chase, .'\rthur G. Yates, 
William C. Barry, Isaac Wile, Eugene T. Curtis, William N. Oothout, 
John W. Goss, Frederick Will, E. Frank Brewster, Clinton Rogers, 
James Vick, Sidney B. Roby, Lewis Chase, Harvey W. Brown, Granger 
A. Hollister, Sylvanus J. Macy, James W. Gillis, Rufus K. Dryer, 
Edward W. Peck, Thomas B. Griffith, Charles AL Everest and 
J. Alexander Hayden. 

Seventh — That the name of the city and county in which the 
principal office of said corporation is to be located is the City of Rochester, 
County of Monroe, in the State of New York. 



Rochester 



In witness whereof, we have hereum 
lav of June, 1888. 



H. H. Warner 
VV. S. Kimball 
Henry C. Brewster 
Henry Michaels 
Henry B. Hathaway 
G. C. Buell 
T. B. Griffith 
D. M. Hough 



VV. C. Barry 
Arthur S. Hamilton 
John W. Goss 
Chas. J. Burke 
E. Frank Brewster 
Harvey W. Brown 
J. H. Chase 
A. Ai. Lindsay 



The certificate was filed with the Secretary 
Cleric of Monroe County on July 2(1, 1888. 



nur hands, this fifteenth 

Sylvanus J. Macy 
Chas. M. Everest 
Clinton Rogers 
Eugene T. Curtis 
.Arthur G. Vates 
W. H. Gorsline 
Frank S. Upton 

J as. VV. GiLLIS 

of State and with the 



^^ 



Mil Ham ?X[rarh 



/^•'HE portrait o£ the late William Leach, an esteemeil memlier <if the 
fl. Chamber of Commerce and prominent business man of this city, will 
^"^ be recognized by his many friends as an excellent likene.ss. Deceased 
was born in England and after completing his education became an 

officer in the British army, 

serving abroad with dis- 
tinction. Later in life he be- 
came interested in chemistry 
especially in that branch per- 
taining to the coloring of 
fabrics, such as perfected in 
India and other countries 
visited. Leaving the army, 
Mr. Leach came to America, 
and founded the Rochester 
Dyeing Company twenty-five 
years ago and built up a large 
and prosperous business witli 
dye house at 81 Stone Street 
and office and store on Main 
Street, East. Mr. Leach was a 
gentleman o£ fine attain- 
ments, gentlemanly bearing 
and genial and courteous de- 
portment, and his death is 
deeply regretted by a wide 
circle of friends. He is sur- 
vived by his wife, one daugh- 
ter and one son. 





h^?^0f^'i 



B\-LAW5 



Article I— BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Section l. The management (if the concerns of the .Corporation 
being vested in fifty-four Trustees, with full power and authority to 
promote the objects for which it is organized, such trustees shall consti- 
tute and be known as the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 2. The Trustees shall be elected b\' ballot at the annual 
meeting of the corporation, of whom l8 shall serve for one year; i8 for 
two years, and i8 for three years, or until their successors shall be elected 
and qualified, and their official term shall begin on the first day of January. 
In case of the death, resignation or disability of any Trustee, it shall be 
in the power of the Board to fill such vacancies for the remainder of the 
official term. 

Sec. j. The Board of Trustees shall enact such rules as may be 
deemed e.xpedient for the government of the Corporation, not inconsistent 
with the terms of the Statutes and existing by-laws. 

They shall hold regular meetings each month, except the months of 
Juh, August and September, on Thursday afternoon at 4:.^0 o'clock, 
preceding the regular monthlv meeting of the Corporation, which takes 
place on the first Monda>- evening of the month for the transaction of 
any business brought before them. They shall, at their first regular 
meeting, appoint the Standing Committees for the ensuing year. 

The\' shall, at the annual meeting, make to the Corporation a full 
report of its affairs and condition. 

In case any member shall absent himself from three consecutive 
meetings of the Board, without proper cause, his place may be considered 
vacant, and the Board shall be at liberty to fill such vacancy in the manner 
provided. 

Article II— OFFICERS 

Section i. The officers of the Association shall consist of a 
President, three V^ice-Presidents, a Secretary and a Treasurer, all of whom 
shall be residents of the City of Rochester, over the age of twenty-one 
years, and, excepting the Secretary, elected from the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 2. The President and Vice-Presidents shall be elected by 
ballot at the annual meeting of the Corporation, and shall hold their 
offices for the term of one \ear, or until their successors are elected and 
qualified. 



Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall be elected by the Board of Trustees 
at their first regular meeting each year, and shall hold his office for one 
year, or until his successor is elected and qualified. 

Sec. 4. The Secretary shall be appointed b\ the Executive Com- 
mittee, and receive such compensation as the\ shall agree upon, and shall 
serve during the pleasure of the Committee. 

Sec. 5. The official terms of all officers shall begin on the first day 
of January. In case of the death, resignation or disability of any officer 
of the Corporation, it shall be in the power of the Board of Trustees to 
fill such vacancies for the remainder of the official term. 

Article 111 — DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT 

Section i. The President shall preside at tlie meetings of the 
Corporation, and the Board of Trustees. He shall, at the annual meet- 
ing of the members of the Corporation and at such other times as he 
shall deem proper, communicate to the Corporation or to the Board of 
Trustees such matters and make such suggestions as may, in his opinion, 
tend to promote the prosperit\- and welfare, and increase the usefulness 
of the Corporation. He shall receive all bonds given to the Corporation, 
and shall deposit the same with the Rochester Trust and Safe Deposit 
Company, and shall also perform such other duties as are necessarily inci- 
dent to the office of President of the Corporation. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Sec. 2. In the absence of the President, the Vice-Presidents, in the 

order of their seniority, shall have all the powers and perform all the duties 

of President ; and in case of the absence of President and Vice-Presidents, 

the Board of Trustees shall designate one of its members President firo tern. 

SECRETARV 
Sec. 3. The Secretary shall, under the direction and control of the 
Board of Trustees, keep, regularly entered in proper books of record, 
true and accurate minutes of all votes, acts and proceedings of the Asso- 
ciation, Board of Trustees, Executive and all other Standing Committees ; 
issue all notices that may be required by the by-laws. President or other 
proper authority, and at the annual meeting report the transactions of the 
Corporation for the previous year. The accounts of the Corporation 
shall be kept by the Secretary in proper books belonging to the Corpora- 
tion, which books shall be at all times open for examination by the Board 
"bf Trustees or any committee of said Board. He shall take charge of 
the seal, books, papers and property of the Corporation, attend the 
rooms of the Corporation during business hours, and shall devote his 



Rochesterinl904 63 

entire time ami attention to tiu- interests of the Corporation. He shall 
collect all moneys due to the Corporation, giving proper receipt therefor 
and pay the same over to the Treasurer without delay. He shall keep a 
complete list of the names and addresses of all the members of the Cor- 
poration. He shall conduct and keep proper records of all the corres- 
pondence of the Corporation ; furnish the Chairman of each Committee 
a copy of the resolutions whereby the Committee was appointetl, and 
with any matter or matters, together with all papers relating thereto, that 
may have been referred to such Committee. 

TRE.'VSL'RER 

Sec. 4. The Treasurer shall receive all moneys from the Secretary, 
giving his receipt therefor, and shall disburse the same only upon the 
written order of the Executive Committee, countersigned by the Secre- 
tary. He shall carefully preserve all vouchers for the payment of money 
and securities of every kind belonging to the Corporation. He shall 
render a report of the annual meeting of the Corporation, which report 
shall be audited and approved by the Executive Committee before present- 
ation, and shall report at such other times as the Board of Trustees may 
direct. He shall give a bond in a penal sum, to be fixed b\ the Board of 
Trustees, for the faithful performance of his duties, such bond to be 
procured from a duly organized Fidelity or Guarant\ Compan\-, and 
paid for b\' the Corporation. 

Article IV— COMAH TTEES 

STANDIXC; COMMITTEES 

Section i. There shall be appointed each \'ear b\ the Board of 
Trustees the following Standing Committees from the members of the 
Corporation, each committee to consist of nineteen members, including 
a Chairman, who shall be chosen from the Board of Trustees, viz: 

No. I. On Manufactures and Promotion of Trade. 

No. 2. On Railroads and Transportation. 

No. 3. On Public Improvements. 

No. 4. On Statistics and Publication. 

No. 5. On Legislation. 

No. 6. On Postal Facilities, Telegraphy and Insurance. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Sec. 2. There shall be an Executive Committee, consisting of the 
President, the three Vice-Presidents, the Treasurer of the Corporation 
and Chairman of Standing Committees. 



-GENERAL POWERS AND DUTIES OF 
COMMITTEES 



EXECUTIVE COMMIT 



Section i. The Executive Committee shall, subject to the con- 
trol of the Board of Trustees, have general control of the rooms, 
property and finances of the Corporation. It shall act as an Advisory 
Committee to the Secretary and direct the preparation of the annual 
report of the Board. It shall make all purchases, audit all bills and 
claims against the Corporation, and direct their payment if approved. 
It shall report, at each regular meeting of the Board of Trustees, the 
state of its finances. It shall appoint the Secretary of the Corporation, 
and fix the amount of all salaries and compensation for services. It 
shall consider all nominations for membership, and report the same 
regularly to the Board of Trustees, and in general, be charged with the 
advancement of all the general objects of the Corporation. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
Sec. 2. Excepting as otherwise expressly prtjvided by the B\-Laus, 
each Standing Committee will have power to adopt regulations for their 
own government and procedure; to declare a vacancy after three suc- 
cessive absences of a member thereof, and to order and arrange for the 
convenient discharge of their duties, by correspondence or through Sub- 
Committees, or otherwise. It shall be the duty of every Standing Com- 
mittee to examine into and to make report upon all matters referred to 
them by the Board of Trustees ; and an\' Standing Committee may also 
consider any question relating to the special work of such Committee 
and report their views upon the same to the Board for its consideration. 
All Committees shall report all propositions or actions to the Board of 
Trustees, for its concurrence or dissent, and no Committee shall have 
power to bind the Corporation to concur in the action of any such 
Committee, unless specifically directed so to do. 

Article \q— MEMBERSHIP AND DUES 

MEMBERSHIP 

Section i. Any person, firm, or corporation, recommended b\' the 
Executive Board and elected by the Trustees of the Chamber of Com- 
merce shall become a member of the Association. 

Sec. 2. All applications for membership of the Corporation must 
be made in writing, contain a statement of the occupation and qualifica- 
tions of the applicant, and be addressed to the Executive Committee 
for consideration. If the Executive Committee approve the application 
they shall report the same to the Board of Trustees for election at any 
regular meeting. If the applicant shall be declared elected, ami within 



66 Rochesterinl904 

thirty (lavs aftt-r bein;: iiifdnmnl of such election shall pay to the Sec- 
retary of llie Association tiu- regular liues and sign the Constitution 
and By-Laws, such applicant shall, thereupon, become a member of 
this Corporation, and receive a certihcatt' of membership. 

Skc. .?. An\' member of this Association may be expelled b\' a 
majority vote of all the members of the Board of Trustees, provided that 
the Executive Committee shall recommend such expulsion. 

Skc. 4. Any member in i;ood standint;, and not being in arrears to 
the Corporation, ma\ withdraw upon filin<r with the Secretar\ a written 
notice of his intention. 

Skc. V Each membership shall be entitled to but one vote, hut no 
member in arrears for dues shall be entitled to vote. 

Skc. 6. The interest of a member in the property of the Corpora- 
tion shall cease and determine upon the determination of his membership, 
either b\ death, expulsion or resignation. 



Skc. 7. I'he annu.il ilues of the Corporation shall be twent\- dollars, 
pavable to the Secretar\ on the first ila\ of Januar.\' in each year, and all 
members failini; to pay the same within three months from the date on 
which they are due shall be deemed to have relinquished their member- 
ship, and the same shall be forfeited, and such parties shall thereafter be 
admitted onI\ as new applicants. 

Artici.k \!1— MEEriNC;S AND QUORUM 

Shction I. The annual meeting and election of the Corporation 
shall be held on the first Monday of December in each year, at eight 
o clock in the evemng, at such place as the Board of Trustees may desig- 
nate. Notice of the time and place of such meeting and election shall 
be given b\ publication of the same in one or more of the daily news- 
papers of the City of Rochester, and posted on the bulletin board in the 
rooms of the Corporation for at least ten days previous to said meeting 
and election. And if for any reason such annual meeting shall not be 
held on the first Monday of December, it shall be the duty of the Pre.si- 
dent to call such meeting within two weeks thereafter, in the manner as 
stated above. 

Skc. 2. The Corporation >hall hold regular meetings on the first 
Monday of each month, excepting December, July, August and Septem- 
ber, at 8 o'clock p. m., for the consideration of such subject matter as 
may be directed by the Board of Trustees, an<l no business other than 
that named for said meeting shall be entertained, even though unanimous 
consent be had. 



Sec. 3. Special meetings of tiie Corporation may be called at any 
time upon the request, in writing, of the President, Executive Committee, 
or twenty-five members of the Corporation, addressed to the Board of 
Trustees, and specifying the purpose thereof, provided said Board in session 
shall approve of such call b\ a majority' present and voting. Notice of 
such special meeting shall be given by mailing a cop\ of the same to each 
member of the Corporation at least two days previous to said meeting, 
which notice shall state the specific object for which the meeting is called, 
and no business shall be considered or transacted at such special meeting 
other than that named in the call therefor. 

Sec. 4. The Board of Trustees shall hold regular meetings on the 
last Thursday of each month, at 4:30 o'clock p. m., for the transaction 
of regular business. 

Sec. S- Special meetings of the Hoard of Trustees ma\- be convenetl 
at any time by order of the President or E.xecutive Committee, or upon 
the written request of ten members of the Board, addressed to the Secre- 
tary, and upon such order being issued, or written request made, it shall 
be the duty of the Secretary to call such meeting, provided that one day's 
notice by mail of the time and object of the meeting shall have been 
given to each member of said Board, and also provided that no other 
business except that designated in such call and notice shall he acted 
upon. 

Sec. 6. Whenever the day fixed for holding any stated ineeting of 
the Corporation or Board of Trustees shall fall upon a legal holiday, the 
meeting shall be held on the dav following. 

Sec. 7. Thirty members of the Corporation shall constitute a 
(]uorum at any regular or special meeting thereof. Twelve members of 
the Board of Trustees, five members of the Executive Committee, and 
five of each Standing Committee, shall constitute a quorum of each 
respectively. 

Sec. 8. At the regular November meeting of the Board of Trustees, 
the President shall appoint a committee of seven members of the Chamber 
(not of the Board of Trustees), whose duty it shall be to present the 
names of candidates to be voted for at the next annual meeting of the 
Chamber. The names of the candidates so selected shall be posted upon 
the bulletin board at least ten days previous to the annual meeting. .Addi- 
tional nominations ma\ be posted o\er the signatures of fifteen members 
of the Chamber at least fi\e tlays previous to the annual meeting. No 
names of candidates not so posted shall be considered at such annual 
meeting. 



Articlk VIII— ORDF.R of BUSINESS 
Skctiov 1. At all reirular nn-t'tiiifis of the Board of Trustees, the 
order of busines-. shall he as follows: 

1. Roll Call. 

2. Reading of Minutes. 

^. Readinji of Conuiiunications. 

4. Official Reports. 

5. Reports of Standing Committees. 

6. Reports of Special Committees. 

7. Unfinished Business. 

8. Election of Members and Officers. 
<). Miscellaneous Business. 

This regular order of business may at an\ meeting be temporaril\ 
suspended by a vote of t\\o-third> of the members present. 

Skc. 2. The order of business at all annual meetings of the Cor- 
poration shall be prepared b\ the E.xecutive Committee, who shall file 
the same with the President and post a cop\' on the bulletin in the 
rooms of the Corporation at least ten days previous to such meeting. 

Sue. ^ In all cases in\()l\ing points of Parliamentary Law, not 
provided for by the Constitution or B\-Laws, Robert's Rules of Order 
shall be accepteil as authority. 

Article IX— SEAL 
Section i. i'lu- Corporation shall have a Seal with suitable device, 
containing thereon the name and date of the formation of the Corpora- 
tion, which shall be in charge of the Secretary, and shall be affi.xed by 
him only to certificates of membership, unless otherwise instructed to 
a(fi.\ the same by order of the Hoard of Trustees. 



Articlk .\ LIABILITY 






Shction I. No officer, committee or member 
or other person shall contract or incur an\ debt 01 
poration, or in any wa\ render it liable, unless auth 
of Trustees or E.xecutive Committee. 


of t 
, bel 
ori/.e 


he Corporatii 
lalf of the C 
d by the Ho: 



Article \I— AMENDMEN'LS 
Section i. These By-Laws may be altered, amended or added 
to by the affirmative vote of at least a m:ijority of the members voting 
at any meeting of the Corporation, in tlie call for which notice of the 
proposed change shall be given; provided that any such alteration, 
amendment or addition in specific form shall have been first approved 
bv a majority of the Board of Trustees present at a meeting of said Board. 



( 

^m^. 



M<i 







thomas h. ih'xn. 
john craic, i'owkr^ 
(;k()K(;k h. phrkixs, 
(;k()K(;k v. ro'i-h, 

BKX.IAMIX K. niASK. 
.lOHX M. IVKS. 



l^resident 

First Vice-l'iesideiit 
SeLdiul Vice-Fresidfiit 
'riiii-d Vice-President 



t x r I- u t i li r (t u lu mitt i r 



II. H. H 



KORCK H. PrCRK 

p.. M. Stehhe: 

•ORC.K C. Ht'EI.l 
•I-tS A. SlMI.EV 



John Crak; Powers 
Benjamin E. Chase 
Loris N. Stein 
Chari.es J. Brown 



li II a r ^ ii f II X u it t r r s 



Charles K. Bayliss 
Fred H. Beaeli 
Charles J. Brown 
.1. V. McClint.-ek 
B. K. Chase 
C.. Clay Cnx 
T. B, Dunn 
Charles P. F.,rd 

Henry B. Halhaw; 
I-. W. M,>„re 
I'aniel B. Murphy 
Ce-MyeJ. Oaks 
firirt B. Palmer 
\.. P. Koss 
K. B. Sherburne 
Kufns A. Sil)ley 
F. A. Steelier 



\Vi 



Ba 



Creor^e C. Buell 
William F. Balk: 
Herman Behn 
!■:. Frank Brewst. 
Milton Clark 
C. C. Davy 
Miehael Doyle 
A. B. Lamberton 
Henry S. Mackie 
Ceorjre II. Perkir 
.1. Craiji Powers 
ICdward W. Peek 
<:eorj;e I.. Primn 
H. H. Rieh 
IrviuK- Rouse 
Clinton Rogers 
•ieor.ije F. Roll, 



William C. Barry 
Henry C. Brewstei 
Robert A. Badger 
.John Bradley 

William P. Davi.s 
John Fahy 
H. B. Craves 
C. 1-. CarHeld 
Harold C. Kimball 
Joseph Michaels 
E. C. Miner, Jr. 
Philip Present 
Louis X. Stein 
J. B. M. Stephens 
\ . M. Smith 
Ceorije B. Watkins 
A. C. Yates 



JUH\ B. M. SlEPHtNS. Ch 

George W. Aldridge Charles E. 

William F. Balkam Nathaniel I 

Henry C. Brewster Henry B. i 

Edgar N. Curtice Abram J 1 



Moses B. Shant/, 
George H. Smith 
Rufus A. Sibley 



iJJamifarturrB aufi Jiirmmitioii nf Sraiir 



John F. Alden Albert B. Ease- 

John N. Beckley Charles M . Ev 



JJublir 3/mpriitirmrtita 



C. J. Broivn E. A. Fisher 

Henry C- Brewster George G. Fost 

Edward Bausch C i'. Ford 



George Weldon 



ffiailruahs aiiii (iraiispurtatiun 



Horace C. Brewsl 
William C. Barry 
H. P. Brewster 

E. F Brewster 

J. DeWitt Butts 
E. N. Curtice 
Michael Doyle 



Daniel B Murph) 



E. G. Miner. Jr. Thomas B. Ryde 

George H. Perkins George F. Roth 

GriH D. Palmer R. B. Sherburne 



IIiiBtal jfarilitira, Srlryraphy am^ .fdiBiiraiirra 



3>tatistira and ^iibliratir 





R, B. Sh 


F.KBLRNK. 


n,,-c 


/«,r,„^„ 


L. W. 


Moore 




Henr 


y P. Neu 


Georg 


e Motley 




E. V 


V. Peck 




B. Murp 




J. C 


Woodbu 


Henry 


S. Macki. 




Jame 


s E. Wol 



BkiiWN. Cha 



H- H. Pryc 
W. H H 



Harold C, Kimball 



Achuns, Dr. K. A. ... 
Adler, L., Brothers & 

Aiken head, \V 

Alden, .John F 

Aldridge, Hon. deori 

Alliance Bank 

American Brewini; C< 
American E.xpress Co 
Amsden, Frank .1. &• 
Andrew.s Printing Co 
Anstice. .lo.siah, &• Co 
Ashley, E. F 



I'liysician 41.S Powers Bldjr. 

Co Manufacturers Clothing 92 St. Paul St. 

Tallow Renderer 60 Front St. 

Iron and Steel Bridge Mfr 301 Powers Bldg. 

re \V 757 Powers Bldg. 

Ilobart F. Atkinson, Pres't. . .183 Main St., East 

p. c. Loebs, Pres't 250 Hudson Ave. 

H. C. Hacock, Gen'l Agent. . . 103 State St. 

Son Bankers and Brokers 4 Main St. , West 

W. B. Hale, Manager Aqueduct St. 

Hardware Castings 220-238 N. Water St. 

Insurance 202-206 Granite Bldg. 



Babeock, H. H., &■ Co 
Bache, .1. S., K- Co.... 

Bacon, B. H. Co 

Barhite, .tohn A 

Barnard & Sinionds C 



. . .Coal Dealers 5 Main St., West 

. . .Bankers & Brokers, Max Brickner, Res. Mgr., Pow( 

. . . Medicines 187 West Ave. 

. . . Lawyer 19 Main St. , West 

. . . Chair Manufacturers Lower Falls 



Barnum , N. C 23 Portsmouth Terrace 

Bartholomay Brewing Co .... Frederick Cook, Pres't Cor. St. Paul it Vincent Sts. 

Barlow, William K., & Co .... Insurance Agents 16 State St. 

Bausch, E. E., & Son Ojiticians 6 Main St., East 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. . .Mfrs. Optical Instruments 515 St. Paul St. 

Bayliss. Charles E Gen. Agt. Mutual Life Ins. Co., 207-209 Granite Bldg. 

Beadle & Sherburne Co Wholesale &• Retail Dry Goods, 142-154 Main St., East 

Beckley, J. N., Pres't T. H. &■ B. R'y Co., and Pres't Pneumatic Sig. Co., Beckley Bldg. 

Begy, J. A. Co Mfg. Chemi.sts 512 State St. 

Behn, Herman Pres't Bolton Shoe Co 165 N. Water St. 

Belcher, Dr. William W Dentist 48 Clinton Ave.. South 

Bell Telephone Co., of Buffalo, Alvin 11. Dewev. Dist. Mgr.. .77 N. Fitzhugh St. 
Bennett, B. G., (Jen. Agt. North Western .Mutual Life Ins. Co., Granite Bldg, 

Bennie, Charles B Freight Agt., North. Cent. R'y, 103 Wilder Bldg. 

Best & Waddell Gas & Electric Fi.xtures 24 Exchange St 

Bickford Bros Upholsterers, Furniture, etc. . .50-52 State St. 

BickfordShant/.Co.,Wholesale& Retail Furniture &• Bedding. Ill Main St., East 

Bingeman &■ Baxter Manufacturers Buttons 202 Court St. 

Binswanger, Max Fancy Dry Goods 40 St. Paul St. 

Blauw & Brickner Drug Co. . .Wholesale Druggists 60 Mill St. 

Block. Otto Architect 815 Wilder Bldg. 

Booth, .lames E Pres't Monroe Co. Sav. Bank. 35 State St. 



Boykin, C. T 

Bradstreet Co., The 

Brewer, II. S 

Brewster, Crittenden & C< 
Brewster, Gordon &• Co. . 
Brewster, Hon. Henrv C. 



.Manager Prudential Ir 
..I. H. Smith, Sup't . . . 

.Real Estate Agent 

.Wholesale Grocers. . . . 

.Wholesale Grocers 39 N. Water St. 

.Pres't Traders Nat. Bank 45 State St. 



.218 Powers Bldg. 
.412-420 Granite Bldg. 
.35 Hobart St. 
.44 St. Paul St. 



Rochesterinl904 70 

Brewster. H. P Tnljacconist 77 Main St., East 

Brooks &• xMurphy Stock Brokers 16 State St. 

Brown & Poole Lawyers 33.S Powers Bldg. 

Brown Brothers Company Nurserymen Brighton, N. Y. 

Brownell, F. A Photographic Apparatus 333 State St. 

Buedingen Manufacturing Co. , Paper Box Mfrs 53-55 Piatt St. 

Bnell, George C Wholesale Grocers 37 Exchange St. 

Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railway Co 46 West Ave. 

Burke, FitzSimons, Hone & Co., Wholesale & Retail Dry Cr..ods, 122 Main St.. East 

Burr & Starkweather Agricultural Implements 43 Stone St. 

Burrit, S. D Jeweler 104 State St. 

Bush, Seth, J. T M.gr. United States Life Ins. Co.. .405-406 Wilder Bldg. 

Butts, J. DeWitt Lawyer and Real Estate 16 State St. 

Callender. B. Franklin The Franklin Crayon Co W2 Birr St. 

Carson, William & Charles H . Stone Contractors 54 Plymouth Ave. 

Castle, Wilmot, & Co Specialty Manufacturers 17 Elm St. 

Central Bank Benjamin E. Chase, Pres't. . . .Wilder Bldg. 

Chapin, L. S Stained Glass Works 90 Exchange St. 

Chase Brothers Company Nurserymen 1 Pitkin St. 

City Realty Co C. C. Clark, Pres't 54 N. Fitzhugh St. 

Clark, Milton Insurance 407 Cham, of Com . Bldg. 

Clark, W. N., & Co Canned Goods, Preserves, etc., Hollenbeck St. 

Clark, C. S Pres't Com. Corr. Schools ... .27 Church St. 

Cleary, J . P Chief of Police 137 Exchange St. 

Clum. P. A., & Co Brass Foundry 575 Lyell Ave. 

Cogswell, P. J Brighton, N. Y. 

Cohn, H. C, & Co Mfrs. Men's Furnish'g Goods. .216 Andrews St. 

Colby, Charles E Wall Paper 57 State St. 

Commercial Bank Charles H. Babcock, Pres't. . .47 Main St., East 

Cooley, William H Lawyer 812 Powers Bldg. 

Co-Operative Foundry Co Mfrs. .Stoves and Furnaces 15 Hill St. 

Cramer-Force Co Bag & Paper Warehouse ... .53 Main St., East 

Cross Brothers Co Leather 114 Mill St. 

Crouch, Charles T., & Son Co. Lumber, Doors, Sash, etc 99 West Ave. 

Crouch, Wesley Proprietor Powers Hotel 36 Main St., West 

Curtice Brothers Co Canned (Joods Curtice St., near .St. Paul 

Curtis & Curtis Insurance Lawyers 16 State St. 

Cutler Manufacturing Co Mfrs. U. S. Mail Chutes Cutler Bldg. 

Dake, Dr. W. E Physician S6 Clinton Ave., South 

Davis, J. G., Co Millers Brown's Race 

Davis, William P. Mach. Co. .Machinery & Machinists' Tools. 130 Mill St. 

Davy, Cassius C Lawyer 2 East Side Sav. Bank Bldg. 

Davy, Hon. John M Justice Supreme Court Court House 

Day, Harper R Real Estate 31 State St. 

Deininger Brothers Bakers 392 North St. 

Donovan, P. J Plumber 705 Lake Ave. 

Doyle, Michael, & Co Evaporated Fruits 26 White St. 

Dresser, George B Stockbroker 311 Wilder Bldg. 

Drew, Allis Co., The Directory Publishers 729 Powers Bldg. 

1 )ugan & Hudson Shoe Manufacturers 175 N. Water St. 

Dunn, T. B., Co Perfumers Ill N. Water St. 



74 



:hester in 1904 



Kastman Kodak C Ph»t<.j{rapliic Supplies 343 State St. 

East Side Saving's Baiil< Benjamin K. Chasu, I'res't. . . Main St., E. & Clinton Ave. 

Eastwood & Son, William, Co. Hoots and Shoes 176-180 Main St., East 

Ellwanffer it Barry Nurserymen 286 Mt. Hope Ave. 

Ely, Franklin I'.. Cen. Ajjt. Home Life 317 Powers Bldg. 

Empire MouldinK Works Mann tact iirers Mouldings 60 East Ave. 

Enjrert, CeorRe, & Co C.al .306 Exchange St. 

E<iuitable Life As.snrancc S.a-..l. W. .Moore X- Wm. H. Barnes, 706 Granite Bldg. 

Erie Foundry Co Iron Founders 330 Lyell Ave. 

Erie Railroad Co..(;eorj;e A. Bowman, IJiv. FreiRht Agent. .35 Court St. 

Ernst. Louis. & Sons Hardware & Cutlery 129 Main St.. East 

Everest, Charles M Vice-Fres't Vacuvim Oil Co. . . . 11th floor Cranite Bld_4. 

Fee Bros. Co Licp.ors 21 N. Water St. 

Fisher, Edwin .X City Engineer 52 City Hall 

Fisher &■ Fisk Plumbing, Heating and Gas Fitting. .Triangle Bldg. 

Fisk, Chauncey -M . , &■ Bri> Merchant Tailors 138 Main St. , East 

Flour City National Bank Walter B. Duffy, Pres't 32 State St. 

Flower City Brewing Co Brewers and Bottlers 440 Lake Ave. 

Ford, C. P., &- Co Mfrs. Boots and Shoes 12 Commercial St. 

Ford &■ Enos B.-inkers and Brokers 203 Wilder Bldg. 

Foster & Co Piano Manufacturers 60 Commercial St. 

I-'oote, Nathaniel Lawvcr 12 Roch. Sav. Bank Bldg. 

Fritzsche, Frank, &■ Son Hides and Skins 62 Front St. 

Friederich, A., Jt Sons Co. . . .Contractors 207Ellwanger& Barry Bldg. 

Fry, E. R Florist 74 Cottage St. 

Fuller, George R.. Co Mfrs. Artificial Limbs . . . . 15 South Ave. 

Fulton, Newell C Clerk Ai)i)ellate Court Court House 

Furlong, Henry .\I Stock Broker 117 Powers Bldg. 

Galusha Stove Co Manufacturers of Stoves 167 Court St. 

Gars(m, U. .M Clothing Cham, of Com. Bldg. 

Garson, Meyer & Co Manufacturers Clothing 70 St. Paul St. 

Garfield, C. F Real Estate Broker 9 Exchange St. 

Gates, George G .Stock Broker 12 N. Fitzhugh St. 

Genesee Brewing Co Brewers and Bottlers 345 St. Paul St. 

Genesee Valley 'I'rust Co Exchange St. 

German American Bank Frederick Cook, Pres't 19 Main St., West 

Gihhs, Charles S.... Harness and Horse Furnishing Good.-i..l59 State St. 

Gillies Lithographic and Printing Co.. The 42 Stone St. 

Glen Brothers Xurserymcn 117 Cutler Bldg. 

Glass. Waller M Lawyer 909 Wilder Bldg. 

G..ldwater. N., &■ Bros. . .Men's Furnishing (7oods 134 St. Paul St. 

Goodberlet, .1 . R Trunks 88 State St. 

G.iltry, Sam, Carting Co Truckmen 11 Exchange St. 

Graeser, Wm. V., Co .Manufacturers of Fine Furs ..31 Clinton Ave., South 

Graham Machine Co., .1. S 9,30 Lyell Ave. 

Graves, II. B Furniture, etc 78 State St. 

( ;riesheinH-r \- d Clothing lOi; \[ai,i st. , East 

llagen. A. T., Co Star Palace Laiindrv 55 North St. 

"•""• ^ '• '''■• ^'fH- *-'• ^^Irs. Lamps and Lanterns . . .731 Oak St. 

"■""''■ " '' Mk'i-- Remington Typewriter Co. .42 Main St.. West 



Rochesterinl904 75 

Hamilton, ,l..hii H. . . Cmnty Treasurer Cmirt Huuse 

Hamilton, R. A Croeer 44-4(3 Main St., East 

Harris, Edward Real Estate 15 Savings Bank Bids. 

Harrison, Hon. Henry Collector of Port U. S. Cvtstom House 

Hathaway &• Oordon Ale Brewers OS'S. Water St. 

Hayes, \Vm, I) Dist. Mgr. Travelers Ins. Co. .512 Granite Bldg. 

Hamlin, F. H Viee-Pres't Genesee Valley Trust Co. .21 Exchange St. 

Harned, B. C Restaurant and Bakery 157 Main St., East 

Henry, J. P Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express. 47 State St. 

Hershey, S. B Pres'l and Mgr. Am. Lyceum Union. .228 South Ave. 

Hickey & Freeman Co ' 143 St. Paul St. 

Higgins, Edward F Boarding and Livery Stables. .84-90 N. Fitzhugh St. 

Higgins, E. M., Co., Wm. .1. Gucker, Sec'y-Treas., Li(]uors & Cigars, 18 Main St. W. 

Hinds, J. A., Co Corona Flour Mill Murray St., near Otis Sta. 

Hollister Lumber Co Lumber and Coal 316 N. Goodman St. 

Holtz, Louis & Sons Manufacturers Clothing 82 St. Paul St. 

Horton, L. L., & Co Produce Shippers 627 Cham, of Com. Bldg. 

Hotchkiss, James L Lawyer 203 Cham, of Com. Rldg. 

Howe, Jacob Bakery 13 N. Fitzhugh St. 

Howe & Ro,gers Co Carpets, Oil Cloths, etc SO State St. 

Hewlett Bros Rubber Goods 55 Main St., East 

Hoyt, David Sec'y & Treas. Monroe Co. Sav. Bank. .35 State St. 

Hubbard & Eldredge Co Manufacturers Fancy Chairs. .West St., cor. Lyell Ave. 

Hunt, C. L County Clerk Court House 

Hunt, J. K Manufacturer Paper Boxes 190 Mill St. 

Ingmire &• Thompson Undertakers (54 Clinton Ave., S.iutli 

International Seed Co W. P. Audrus, Sec'y 55 Park Ave. 

Jeffreys, L. A Undertaker 56 East Ave. 

Jenkins & Macy Coal 100 Cutler Bldg. 

Johnston, James Insurance Agent 147 Powers Bldg. 

Jones, J. Emory Iron Founder and Machinist . .Brown's Race 

.lones, W. Martin Lawyer 1136 Granite Bldg. 

Judson (iovernor Co (iovernor Manufacturers Brown's Race 

,. ,, , ,^ ( Pres't Roch. Electric Signal Co 107 State St. 

kaelber. J. George ... '^ 

t Gen'l Mgr. Roch. Light & PowerCo.l3 Graves St. 

Katz, Abram .1 345 East Ave. 

Kelly, J. Miller Pres't Standard Brewing Co. .Cataract St. 

Kennedy, John W Household Art Rooms 43 East Ave. 

Kimball, Wm. S., &• Co Branch Am. Tobacco Co .34 Court St. 

Kimball, Harold C Tru.stee 127 Cham, of Com. Bldg. 

Kinney, John F Lawyer 208 Ellwanger &■ Barry Bldg 

Knapp, Homer Contractor, Builder & Real Estate . .53 Triangle Bldg. 

Knopf, Joseph Clothing 129 St. Paul St. 

Knowlton & Beach Paper Box Machinery Mfrs ... 29 Elizabeth St. 

Kohlmetz, Charles E Architectural Wrought Iron Works.. 178 N. Water St. 

Kondolf Bros Ice 104 Main St., East 

Lamberton, Hon. A. B Real Estate 184 Main St., West 

Langslow, Fowler Co Chair Manufacturers 63-67 South Ave. 

Larzelere, H. L Architect 634 Granite Bldg. 

Lawless, David T Paper Manufacturer 124 S. Water St. 



76 



1904 



Lawyers Co-Open 
Lee, Or. .lolin M. 

Lee. .lesse S 

Lehijfh Valley R. R. C< 



liiif,' Cci Aqueduct BUIk- 

. I'liysician and SurKeon 179 Lake Ave. 

.Underwear 82 Main St., East 

.M. P. Howell, City Freight Agt.312 Granite Bldg. 



Lent, Geor},'e A Real Kstate 445 Powers BIdg. 

Likly, Henry, &• Co Trunk &• Bag Manufacturers. .155 Main St., East 

Little, A. I' Mfr. Typewriter Supi)lieM 409 Powers Bldg. 

Lowenthal. Max, & Hrotlier. . . Mtrs. Knit Goods 422 Clinton Ave., Soutli 

Ludekens. Emil Lawyer 827 Cham, of Cora. BhU 

Luther, John, & Sons Co Carpenters and Contractors. . .162 North St. 

Lvceum Theater Co 82 Clinton Ave. , South 



Mackic Piano, Organ \- Music l 

Mandery, .lo.seph .1 .\ 

Mandeville &• King S 

Martin, John \V., & Brother . Piano 

Mason Brothers Prop' 

Mathews & Boucher Hard 

Maurer, (Jeorge C . I Estate of ) . ( "iroce 



.11. S. Mackie. Pres't 100 State St. 

^on's Supplies 158 South Ave. 

dsmen 187 Main St., East 

nos. Organs, etc 73 State St. 

>f Swiss Laundry 94 Exchange St. 

ire 26 Exchange St. 

and Steamship Agts. .149 Main St., East 



McClintock, J. Y 

McCord, Gibson & Stewart 
McCurdy & Norwell Co 

McGreal Brothers 

McLennan, I). J 

Mechanics Savings Bank . 

Merchants Bank 

Michaels, Stern & Co 

Millman's Sons 

Millspaugh & Green, C. S 
Miner, K. G., Jr., Pfaudlci 

Minges, K. Leo 

Mingle, Harry B 

Moll, Maurice 

Jloloney Brothers Co. .... 

Monroe Brewing Co lohn F. Bartels, 

Moore. Henry .1 Blank Books am 



. .County Engineer 534 Averill Ave. 

. Sporting Goods 85 Main St., East 

Wholesaled Retail Dry Goods. 285 Main St., East 

. . Liipiors 25 North St. 

. .Tobacconist 276 Main St., East 

..Charles M. Everest, Pres't 18 Exchange St. 

. .P. R. McPhail, Pres't 125 Main St., Ea.st 

. .Clothing Manufacturers 77 Clinton Ave., N( 

..Fruit, etc 292 Main St., East 

Kellogg, Mgr. D.&H. Coal Co.. 9 State St. 

\'acuuni Fermentation Co 126 Cutler Bldg. 

- I'o.il 1 lealcr N.Goodman cor. M;i 

7 East 42d St. , New V. 

. . Musician 125 University Ave. 

. .Manufacturers Shoes 6 Jones St. 

res't 855 Clinton Ave., N 

'rinting 69 Stone St. 



nSt.E 
irk Cit\ 



Moore & Beirs 

Moore, Willard K 

Moore, S. P 

Morgan Machine Co . . . 
Morse, William B. & .So 

Morse, C. IL & .Son 

Moseley & Motley Millini 
Myers Advertising Agenc 



Manufacturers Clothing 125 St. Paul St. 

Banker 39 State St. 

... Lawyer 1010 Wilder RIdg. 

H. \V. Morgan, Mgr 46 Piatt St. 

> . . . Lumber Dealers S2 West Ave. 

Rubber Stamps 13 South Water S 

t'o.. Millers Mill St. 

Suburban Newspai)er Advertising. 35 Trust Bldg. 



National Casket Co. 
Nei.lhardt, C. \- Co. 
Nell Brothers cV Ken 

Neun, Henry P 

N. V, C. &• H. R. R. 
New ^■ork Hydraulic 
Newberry, C. K., I'n 
Newcomb, Thos. W. 



B. ]■:. Chase, Treas 

Harness Manufacti 

Marble Workers... 

Paper Box Manufai 

to Geo. H. Daniels, ( 

I'rcss Brick Co., E.J. Burke 
p. I. S. Disbrow Box Factor 
Shoe Manufacturer 



r 124 Exchange St. 

s 112 St. Paul St. 

238 State St. 

er 131 N. Water St. 

. A Grand Central Depot, N. V 

^n. Mgr. 27 St. Paul St. 

7 Aqueduct St. 

251 SanfordSt. 



Rochesterinl904 77 

Oaks, Ceorije ,1.. Oaks &• Calhoun, .Millineiv, Fancy GikhIs . .117 .Main St.. ICast 

O'Grady, Hun. J. M. E Lawyer 212 ElhvangercX: Barry Blclg. 

Osgood & Davis Patent Lawyers 804 Wilder Bldg. 

Otis Elevator Co 198-210 Commercial St . 

Otis, Lyman M City Assessor 20 City Hall 

Palmer, Charles H Cashier Traders Nat'l Bank. .45 State St. 

Palmer, C. M Real Estate 319 Powers Bldg. 

Parrv, Samuel R.-'P^P'^'" ^^"^ ^°^^ Panting Machinery. | j.jj j.^.^^^ j.^^ ^. g _^„^^,^ ^^ 

' (line and Pasteboards ' 

Pearson, C. \V Grain Shipper 607 Wilder Bldg. 

Pennsylvania Railroad Co 81 West Ave. 

Piatt, J. Mills Architect 921 Chamber of Com. Bldg. 

Powers, J. Craig Powers Bldg. 

Present, Philip Wholesale Jeweler IDS Chamber of Com. Bldg. 

Price & Palmer Co Fish and Oysters 115-117 Front St. 

Primrose, George L., Mgr. S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co 507 Chamber of Com. Bldg. 

Proseus, F. W., Dr Dentist 238 Monroe Ave. 

Protective Life Association. . . .George A. Oliver, Asst. Sec. . .247 Powers Bldg. 

Pryor, H. H Deputy Comptroller 9 City Hall 

Pulver, Theodore S City Clerk 31 City Hall 

Rafter, George W Civil Engineer (i2 Kenwood Ave. 

Reed, E. P., &• Co Manufacturers Shoes 179 St. Paul St. 

Rhees, Rush, D. D., LL. D. . . .President L^niversity of Rochester 

Rich, H. H Real Estate 918 Chamber of Com. Bldg. 

Riley, Wm. S., Brewster, Crittenden &• Riley, Wholesale Butter & Eggs, 288 Exchange St. 

Ritter, Frank Dental Manufacturer 565 St. Paul St. 

Rock Asphalt Pavement Co 31 Insurance Bldg. 

Rochester Box & Lumber Co - Cor. Piatt & Warehouse Sts. 

Rochester Brick & Tile Mfg. Co., W. H. H. Rogers, Pres't & Treas., 243 Powers Bldg. 

Rochester Business Institute 134 South Ave. 

Rochester Candy Works 407 State St. 

Rochester Carting Co 162-164 Andrews St. 

Rochester Car Wheel Works Leighton Ave. 

Rochester Distilling Co 81 Lake Ave. 

Rochester Dry Goods Co 156 Main St. , East 

Rochester Fireworks Co 402 Main St., East 

Rochester Gas & Electric Co. .W. L. Cole, Sec'y 84 Andrews St. 

Rochester German Insur. Co. . H. F. Atwood, Sec'y 19 Main St., West 

Rochester Lens Co Dr. G. B. Gilbert, Mgr 65 Atlantic Ave. 

Rochester Lime Co Manufacturers Lime 209 Main St. , West 

Rochester Railway Co Hon. Frederick Cook, Pres't. .267 State St. 

Rochester Savings Bank Thos. H. Husband, Sec'y 47 Main St., West 

Rochester Trust & Safe Deposit Co., J. Moreau Smith, Pres't. .25 Exchange St. 

Rochester Telephone Co Chas. E. Stinson, Gen. Mgr. .59 Stone St. 

Rodenbeck, Hon. A. .1 Mayor Rochester, N. Y. 

Rosenbloom, Morris Wholesale Jeweler 143 Main St., East 

Ross, Lewis P Boots & Shoes at Wholesale. . .60 St. Paul St. 

Rothschild, B., & Co Clothiers 149 St. Paul St. 

Rouse. Irving Nurseryman 981 Lake Ave. 



best 



Sadler. 1 k-nry ,1 Law\ cr 907 Wilder Bld.t;. 

Sargent & (Ireenleaf L'^-k Manufacturers 178 Court St. 

Sehlegel, Frederick & Sons . . . Florists 770 South Ave. . 

Schlegel Mfj?. Co., Carriage, Hear.se & Casket Trimmings. . .27 Canal St. 

•Schminke, G. &C Furniture Makers 137 Main St., East 

Scott, diaries A Patents 726 Granite Bkl.^. 

Scrantom, Wetniore ^- Co Books and Stationery 21-23 State St. 

Searle, H . S Real Estate 466 Clinton Ave. . North 

Security Trust Conipauv Edward Harris, Fres't 103 Main St., East 

Seel, .1. A c;rocer 293 Main St., East 

Shant-/., M. H. Co.. Button Mfrs., H. K. Elston.Sec. & Treas.309 Cox Bldg. 

Sheldon, M. B Proprietor Hotel Gerard Exchange St. 

Shumaker, .loliu T Mechanical Engineer Whitcomb House 

Sibley, Hiram, E.state of Real Estate 25 Triangle Bldg. 

Sibley, Lindsay & Curr Co. . . .Wholesale & Retail Dry (ioods. 132-136 Main St., East 

Siddons, .lohn Co.. The Copjjer & Galvan. Iron Work. 61-65 N. Water St. 

Sill Stove Works Manufacturers Stoves 524 Oak St. 

Sloan, Samuel &• Co Plumbers' Supplies 24 Exchange St. 

Smith, Beir & (lormly Whole.sale Dry Goods 37 St. Paul St. 

Smith, Perkins & Co Wholesale (Grocers IS Exchange St. 

Smith, Hon. George Herbert . . Lawvcr 74 German Ins. Bldg. 

Smith, W. W Dentist 63 East Ave. 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co. Roy 11. .larrctt, Mgr 36 Exchange St. 

Smyth, Thomas A Sec'y Pneumatic Signal Co. . .412 Beckley Bldg. 

Solomon Brothers & Lempert. Manufacturers Clothing Cor. St. Paul & Central Ave. 

Spader & Perkins Stock Brokers 134 Powers Bldg. 

Spencer, Nelson E Lawyer 809 Wilder Bldg. 

Stace, W. A Tailor 29 State St. 

Stacy, (). T., Co Confectionery Manufacturers. .152 Clinton Ave.. North 

Stahllmxlt. Edward A.. .Mgr. Roch. Hill Posting Co., & Roch. Sign Co., 19 Mill St. 

Standard Sewer Pipe Co 8 Caledonia Ave. 

Standard Electric Construction Cn., Electrical Contractors. . 14 N. Water St. 

Stecher Lithographic Co 242 N. Goodman St. 

Stein-Bloch Co .Manufacturers Clothing 140 St. Paul St. 



.Steitz, G. W. & Son ... 
Stephens, Hon. J. B. .\ 

StenzeL Charies 

Stem, Charies & Co. .. 

St.ine, H. I). Co 

Stone, L. L 

Strasenburgh, R..I. Coi 
Straus, Marcus \- Co... 
Strowger, Walter S. .. 
Sullivan, William H.. . 
Sumner, Dr. Charies R 
Sutheriand, Hon. Willi 
Swift, T., & Son 



■ath: 



Millers, Irving Mills 

Commission Merchant. . . 
Manufacturing Chemists. 
Tailors' Trimmings 



.405 Granite Bldg. 
.Court Hou.se 

.21 Andrews St. 
.Brown's Race 
.108 Cox Building 
.1.56-160 West Ave. 
.77 Clinton Ave., Ni 



itor 51 Brighton St. 

■cr 347 Powers Bldg. 

ii-ian 33 Clinton Ave.. 

•er 911 Wilder Bldg. 

Leaf Manufacturers 72 Spring St. 



aylor, Hn.the 
call &■ Scms. 
egg, A. Geor; 
honuis, Fran 



.... .Manage 
rmometer an 



"hiug i^i: C< 
eter Mfrs.. 



.130 State St. 
.29-35 Elizabeth St. 
. 139 East Ave. 
.105 Piatt St. 
.4 State St. 



Rochesterinl904 7< 

Tliompsnn, Thos. C, Jr Stalilt- 26 Plvracuith Ave. 

Thorns, C. M Real Estate 129-131 Powers Blcl.i;. 

Todd, Bancroft &• Co .Shoe Manufacturers 176 X. Water .St. 

Trotter, C. \V. & Sons Furnaces, Ranjies, Etc 7 East Ave, 

Union &■ Advertiser Co \Vm, F. Balkain, Treasurer. . .22 E.xchange .St. 

Union Trust Co F. W. Zoller, Secretary 25 State St. 

United .States Express Co M. \V. Foreman, Agent 61 State St. 

Vacuum Oil Co 1100 C.ranitc Bldg, 

Van Hoesen, Frank F Wall Paper 43 Main St., East 

Vetter, August Prop. Vetter Desk Works 58 River St. 

Vickery, John W Architect 905 Cham, of Com. Bldg. 

\'ogt Mfg. & Coach Lace Co. .Casket &- Carriage Trimmings. 332 St. Paul St. 
\'redenburg &- Co Printers 228-236 South Ave. 

Wackerman, Geo. W Oxygen Gases 50 South Ford St. 

Wadsworth, Hei-bert Avon, N. V. 

Walter, J. A. P., & Son Fire Marshal 41 City Hall. 

Watkins, George B W. H. Glenny & Co 192 Main St., East 

Weaver, Palmer & Richmond . Hardware, etc 33 Main St., East 

Wegman, Andrew .1 Printer and Engraver 29 N. Water St. 

Wegman, William J Mattress Manufacturer Ill Mill St. 

Weis & Fisher Furniture 445 Clinton Ave. , X. 

Weldon, George & Co Paper Hangings 113 Main St., East 

Weller, Dr. J. L Dentist Elwood Bldg. 

Werner, Hon. William E . . . . Justice Supreme Court Court House 

Whipple, George C Furniture 136 Main St. , West 

White, Hon. Thomas E Judge Municipal Court 35 City Hall. 

White, Charles F Salesman Ill N. Water St. 

Whitmore, Rauber & Vicinus. .Stone Yard and Contractors. .279 South Ave, 

Wile, Julius M Mgr. Security Trust Co 103 Main St., East 

Wilkins, Herve D Music Teacher 543 Powers Bldg. 

Wilson, J. C City Assessor 20 City Hall 

Wood, Lawrence & Xeel Co. . .Shoe Manufacturers 286 Central Ave. 

Woodbury Whip Co Whip Manufacturers Ill Allen St. 

Woolworth, F. W. & Co F. E. Ward, Mgr 114 Main St., East 

Wolcott, James E 471 Mt. Hope Ave. 

Wray. Henry & Son Brass Founders 193-195 Mill St. 

Wright, W. (j.JGen.Agt.U.S.HealthandAccidentlns.Co., 1^,3 p„„.^,, r,,,^ 
t and Washington Life Ins. Co ' 

Yates. A. G Roch. Savings Bank Bldg. 

Yawman tV Erbe Mfg. Co Office Furniture 340 St. Paul St. 

Yost, Charles H .Auctioneer 5 Sophia St. 



InMemoriam 




5Jantrs ai Iflnnbrrs nf tlir ISnrljralrr (!ll|am- 

brr nf Commrrrr hilin ^ir^ ituriny 

titr grarii 19112 trnh 1303 



(Tliamurit (I. lUxuiMiuirlh. fflau r. 19D3 
IJtIliam Krarh. jiuur 5. 19112 
Milbn 31. Mmihcinlle. jihu, u. 19112 
Albrrt QIpijii, A,.rii 2.1. 1911.! 
ilamrs A. ^iniiB. a.,i,, 25. igm 

*amUVl ^hiaU. grptrmbrr 1. 1903 

Sabift iH. (^illr^llu, *.-,iirnihrr 9, laiiri 

*aiU|I.Um (i). ifliUiUr. &rj,trmhrr 13. 19113 
ilulnt ^. ^^^\m\ *rptrmlur Hi. imi3 

Cliarlrs a. ifiam. *ri,i.-miui 23. 19113 



Clef 



is the , __ 
Keytothe\ /SlTUAT10N 

You 
ine. 



reckon every 
Trom the clef line 



IJ- 



Steinway 
Pianos 

STANDARD OF 
THE WORLD 



Steinway and 

of the. 



'masTE>^|ituation 



) value and price of 



n-eii its aim and ambition to n 

If you would know the t 

:lass of goods a store sells. Th 



The Best is not Lowest in 

Price, but Che digest 

ill the End. 

The long and successful career of 

"THE OLD HOUSE'- can be largely 

attributed to the fact that it has always 

^present pianos of the highest grade. 

rade condition of a store, ask as to the 

is applies to pianos the same as dry goods. 



SATISFACTION IS A SILENT SALESMAN: WE GUARANTEE 
THE PIANOS WE SELL TO GIVE PERMANENT SATISFACTION 

/cV LEADING MAKES TO SELECT FROM 



OKI in5trument> of all other makes taken in exchange at 
their hill xahie, on Steinnav lliano^ 



''The Oil! House" 

J. W. Martin S'Bro, 

73 State Street, 

Sign of the Drum 
BoTHTHo-fEs, V+9'' ROCHESTER, N. ^' 





city 
Realty Co. 

ot ROCIIHSTKR 

Corner N. Fitzhuch 
AND Church Streets 

('ll\KIIS r Cl \KK 

C;i.o. C. Hri;i.r. 

Frkdkrkk W. ZOI.I.KR 

Cii.MAV N. Phrkins 

Ki.iiRiix.i; I.. .\i)AM> 

TKl.KI'll ON i;S 1993 



DWELLINGS 

. BUSINESS 
BUILDINGS 

MAN'FACTURING 
POWER PLANTS 

APARTMENT 
HOUSES 

LOTS 

We havf the^c, uell di-tribiitecl 
throughout the citv. Will sell at 
low prices, and on terms to suit, 
or will rent to desirable tenants. 




Rock est er Savings 'Bank 



\ CORPORATE 




"-'k 



mmi I i 



ifpirrn'nni;,^ 



"^SM^^ 



RESOURCES 
JULY 1, 1903 
$20,916,543.53 

SURPLUS 
JULY 1, 1903 
$1,888,145.23 



MoiifV loaned on boml 

n I mortgage, in sums of 

«o and under at live 

tour and one-lialf per cent. 

Deposits made on or 
lietcire the third day of any 
nionth draw interest from 
the hrst of the month. 



OFFICERS 

James B r a c k e tt, 
HoBART F. Atkisson, ist Vice-President 
Frederick Cook, 2d \'ice-President 
RuTis A. SiBLEV, 3d Vice-President 



1903 

President 

EnwARi) Harris, Attorney 
Henry S. Ha\fori), Treasurer 
Tho.mas H. Hlsband, Secretar 



TR USTEES 

James Brackett Rufus A. Sibley Hiram W. Sibley 

Edward Harris Granger A. Hollister Albert H. Harris 

Hobart F. Atkinson Halbert S. Greenleaf Erickson Perkins 

Frederick Cook James S. Watson Josiah Anstice 



Thomas W. Finucane 
Harold B. Brewster 
CJeorge Eastman 



Largest HOME FURNISHING House 
BF/IWEEN NEW ^ORK AND CHICAGO 



)rT£ 




'^'->^. 










FURNITURE 

CARPETS 

DRAPERIES 

CROCKERY 

LAMPS 

STOVES 

KITCHEN 
UTENSILS 

CLOCKS 

PICTURES 



i 



Our model 9-room house, furnished complete, is located on the fourth floor. This 
s an object lesson in artistic home furnishing, and visitors are delighted with it. We 
jive you a cordial invitation to come and see it and take a look through the entire store. 






IREATJ'I '/low'"'^! fpRKUirni fHO/AET^^ 

^Si Cfel k^!&^ liSlL^t^ti 



H. B. (^iR.W'ES 



Staii:. .M.\rkkt a 

.Mn.i. SiRFi-'is 

K. 



Main ENTRASch 
78 STATE STREE'T 



State and City Depositary 



Traders National Bank 

ROCHESTER, NEW ^ORK 

43 A\D 45 State Street 

CAPITAL, $250,000.00 SURPLUS, $650,000.00 

OFFICE RS 

HENRY C. BREWSTER, President 
CHARLES H. PALMER, Cashier 
CARROLL E BOWEN. Asst. Cashier 
EDWARD D. CHAPIN, Supt. Safe Deposit Vaults 

DIRECTORS 

Henry C. Brhwster, puMdem 
John F. Alden, Charles H. Palmer, 

American Bridge Company Cashier 

George C. Buell, Clinton Rogers 

George C. Buell & Co., Wholesale Gmcers Howe & Rogers Co., Carpels 

Charles P. Ford, D. D. Silly, 

C. p. Ford & Co., Shoe Manufacturers Altorney at Law 

Frederick C. Loebs, Eli M. Upton, 



Safe Deposit Vaults 



absolutely FIRE AND 
BURGLAR PROOF 



"Exceptionally large and secure, with ample 
accompanying conveniences for box renters. 
'ISecure storage for papers or more bulky 
valuables at reasonable rates. 

Thoroughh' equipped for prompt and efficient service in every depart- 
ment of Banking Business. 

Interest paid upon Special Deposits. 

Inquiry invited from those seeking new or additional banking facilities. 

Especial attention accorded to ladies and those unaccustoineil to trans- 
actint: business. 



WE DKAL EXCLUSIVELY IN 

Carpetings & Draperies 




H(3\\ E & Rogers Co. 

<S(), cSL' ciT S4 State St. 
ROCHESTER, N. V. 




|B0XlAf1D|LUMBER!CO|i 

\ ^ ALL KINDS •* \^ iiJ^X^SPECIflLTT *'! '-> 



'^,^'^\^ 
.^^f 



- ROCHESTER ■ N v Y 



Alliance Bank 

CAPITAL, $275,000 SURPLUS, $175,000 

RESOURCES, $5,000,000 

I\IIR1S1 IMin ()\ tlRlIIU \lls ol DEPOSIT 
\\ns\\I\(,s \c<.Ol\Is \l 1>RI \ Ml l\c, RATES 




ilSIillll 

1 1 1 T 11 ; ijiiSI 




OFFICERS 

HoBART F. Atkinson, President John P. Palmer, First Assistant Cashier 

James G. Cutler, Vice-President Charles A. Elwood, Assistant Cashier 

Albert O. Fenn, Vice-Pres't and Cashier Charles L. Barton, Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 



U. Fenn J 

E. Anele J 

John C. Wo 



The test of tiitie is the true test 
of all things. For more than a 
half century ( 54 years to be exact I 
"Burke's" has been located at the 
same spot and has followed the 
original principles laid down for 



gun 



thi: 



bus 



customer now gains from 
this vast experience. In every 
(juarter of the trade territory tribu- 
tary to Rochester a well-founded 
impression is that one's purchases 
jnav be best made at "Burke's." 
We have gratifyingly met every 



Our welcome to store visitors 
is not gauged by the size of their 
purchases. Uniform courtesy is 
extended to all who enter our store 
—no matter whether their pur- 
chase amounts to five cents or five 
hundred dollars, or whether they 
merely come in to look around 
and get posted. To have thou- 
sands of people speaking good 
words for our store is the best 
advertising we can do, and for it 
we find we can depend upon the 
civilitv and attentiveness of our 
emplovces. 



Our 

Specialty is 
Dry Goods 
that 



WHOLESALE. RETAIL 



Satisfy 



Burke, Fitz Simons, 
Hone & Co. 



The Flour City National Rank 

of ROCHESTER, N. V. 




CAPITAL 

$300,000.00 



SURPLUS 

$150,000.00 



* 



DESIGNATED DE- 
POSITARY OF THE 
UNITED STATES, 
STATE o/NEW YORK 



CITY of ROCHESTER 



\Vm. C. Barry, ist Vice-Pr 
E. Frank Brewster, 2d Vi( 



OFFICERS 

Valter B. DiKKV, President 

ident Peter A. Vav. Cashii 

-PrcMdent Edwin W. Birton, - 



CSeorge ElUvanger 
Charles W. Weis 
John J. L. Friederich 
Alexander B. Hone 
S. F. Jenkins, Jr. 



DIRECTORS 

J. B. Perkins 
E. Frank Brewster 
Wm. C. Barry 
Joseph T. Ailing 
Levi Adler 



Rulus B. Sherbi.ri 
Walter B. Duffy 
W'ni. L. Ormrod 
\Vni. F. Balkan! 
CJe... L. Eaton 




'firs rr~sir^^ 



SB 




I 



Genesee Valley Trust Company 

'1\ Exchange Stref-.t 



CAPITAL, $300,000.00 SURPLUS, $100,000.00 



Largest Resources Relative kj Liabilities of 
ANi Trlst Comi-anv in Wesiern Xeu York 

Accepts and Administers all JManner of Iriists 
Pays Interest FOUR PER CENT. Even Months 

(WHETHER OVER OR UNDER $8oO) 



Executors and Adm 



stended to de 



HENRY C. BREWSTER, Presitient FRANK H. HAMLIN, .st \ice-Pr 

CHARLES H. PALMER, 2i.\ Vice-President ami Secret.iry 



of a Bank is thr Cha, 



of thr Men ivlio Di 



DIRECTORS 



WILLIAM H. ADAMS, 


ALE.\A\D£R B. LAMBERTON, 


Justice Supreme Court. Cananjaigua, N. V. 
JOHN F. ALDEN, 

American Bridge Company. 
CHARLES E. ANGLE, 


Trustee East Side Savings Bank, 
President Park Commission. 

FREDERICK C. LOEBS, 

President American Brewing Co. 

W. HENRY MATHEWS, 


Treasurer Moseley & Motley Millini; Co 
I.EO BLOCK, 

Stein-Bloch Company. Wholesale CImhina, 
CARROLL E BOWEN, 

Assistant Cashier, Traders National Bank, 


President Rochester Printing Co 

Director Central Bank. 
WILLIAM S. MORSE, 

Wm. B. Morse Lumber Company 
CHARLES H. PALMER, 

Cashier Traders National Bank. 


HORACE C. BREWSTER, 

Brewster, Crittenden & Co.. Wholesale Grocers. 


CHARLES E. RIDER, 

Manufacturer Wood Mosaic Floo 


HENRY C. BREWSTER, 

President Traders National Bank. 


CLINTON ROGERS, 

Howe & Rogers Co.. Carpets and 


GEORGE C. BUELL, 

George C. Buell Sr Co.. Wholesale Grocers. 


JOHN S. SHEPPARD, 

Capitalist, Penn Yan, N. Y. 


J(3HN M. DAVY, 


DARRELL D. SULLY, 


Justice New York Supreme Court. 


Attorney, Director Traders Natio 


NATHANIEL FOOTE, 


ELI M. UPTON, 


Foote, Perkins & Havens, Altorneys. 


Miller, Director Traders Nat,., na 


ERANK H. HAMLIN, 


VALENTINE WHITMORE, 


Pres't Canandaigua National Bank. Canandaigua 
THOMAS B. DUNN, 

President Chamber of Commerce. 

President T. B. Dunn & Co.. Mfrs. Perfumes, Etc 


Director Merchants Bank. 
Whitmore, Rauber & Vicinus. C 
JAMES E. WOLCOTT, 
Capitalist. 


CHARLES P. FORD, 


WII.I.IS E. WOODBURY, 


C P Knr.l C. . Inc. Shoe Manufacturers 


M.TchanI 




I'nnal>ul Entrancf ClILER Hl'II.DIXG 
CJenkrai. Okmcks of the 

ClITLKR MANUFACTURING CO. 



U. S. Mail Chute, Cutler Mailincr System 



Hi ii.i>:>,(;s in (.'< 



loTi-i.s, Pi Hi.ic Krii.i)isc;s, Apartments and Ofe 
)\ WITH Tin: II. S. Krke Collection Serv 



Th e Central 'Bank 

of R () C H E S T E R 



Office, Wilder Building 

Bank Open from io a. m. to 4 v. M. 

SaTIRDAIS Cl.lJSE AT 12 



CAPITAL, ----- $200,000 
SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS, 160,000 

OFFICERS 

BENJAMIN E. CHASE, President 
GEORGE WILDER, Vice-President 
JOHN H. GREGORY, Cashier 

DI RECTORS 



Benjamin E. Chase 


\V. II. Matlieus 


Wi 


liam Pitkin 


Frank S. UiUon 


Har.iUI P. Brexvster 


Ber 


lard Dunn 


Charles E. Hovt 


William A. Sutherland 


Joh 


n P. Bouman 


Erickson Perkins 


George Wilder 


loh 


1 H. (iregory 


Tohnson I. Robins 


Wm. R. Peters 


Ed^ 


yard G. Mine 



Ne^v York Correspondents : 

Fourth National axd National Park Banks 

Metropolitan Trust Co. 

Foreign Drafts issued on all parts of the world. 

Letters of Credit available for foreign travel. 

Interest allowed on special deposits. 

We respectfully solicit the accounts of Corporations, Firms, and In- 
dividuals, and are prepared always to furnish such depositors with business 
facilities consistent with their balances and standing, 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENT FOP LADIES 



National Casket Company 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



B. F:. chase, Treasurer 




22 DIS'IRI BATING DEPOTS 



AI.HAW, N. V. 

Ai.i,i::(;iii:\v, \>.\. 

BALTIMORE. Ml). 
I'.OSrON, MASS. 
m'Fl AI.O, \. V. 
BK()(.)K1,\\. N. \ . 
ClIICAlJO, II. I.. i3, 
NASinil.I.K, IKX- 
IIOHOKKN. N. J. 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. (2) 
NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
ONEIDA, N. Y. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 
WILLIAMSBURG, N. Y. 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
SCRANION, PA. 



Mechanics Savings Bank 



i8 EXCHANGE STREET 

R O (' H E S r E R , X E \V \" O R K 




i'M''iw^i 



&■ t] 




'^ 





In 


ere< 


t allowed 


on 


aocHi 


Its 


of $800 


and 


iin.ler 


at 


the rate 


of 


4 per 


cen 


t. per ann 


,m. 


On ac 


<Ul 


nts exceei 


ing 


$Soo, 


3'-' 


per cent 


on 


uliole 


ace 


oLint. 




M 


3ne> 


loaned 


on 


bond 


and 


mortgage 


in 


Mims 


of 


$10,000 


and 


under 


at 


5 per c 


ent. 


( )ver 


$10,000 at 


4'- 



OFFICERS 

Charles M. E\erfst, President 
J. |. Bausch, ist Vice-President Arthlr Lietchford, Sec'y and 

William R. Seward, 2d Vice-President Hale & Bronk, Attorneys 



TRUSTEES 

Wni. R. Seward Jas. H. Boucher CJeorge Weldon 

S. G. Hollisler A. P. Little Louis J. Ernst 

Jerome Keves Charles M. Everest Wm. B. Hale 

John J. Bausch W. J. Curtis William Karle 

Wm. E. Sloan 



WEA\ ER, PALMER & RICHMOND 

?i, 3.?. .?S Main St. East 
12 AND 14 Ml I.I, Street 

:::Tr.!n. Hardware 



, t^^fe© — 



Sl>eci(il .l/^rnciis : 

CORDAGE 



COI.UM 

Ropes arid Binder Ti 
OLIVER CHILLED PLOW 



COODELL CO.— Apple Parcis 

BATCHELLER & SON'S CO 

hay and Manure Forks. 




Artistic Builders' Hardware 

Fine 
Mechanics' Tools 

Table and Pocket Cutlery 

House Furnishing 
Goods 

Agricultural Implements 

Dairy Supplies 

Poultrymen's Supplies 

Fruit Evaporators' Supplies 



C. JEWEIT MFG. CO. 



Rochester Trust and Safe 
Deposit Co. 




Located in their 
Fire Proof-Blildixg 

Ko. 25 ExcHAXGE Street 

ROCHFSTER, NEW YORK 

CAPITAL, $ 200,000.00 
SURPLUS, 800,000.00 

RESOURCES, 14,000,000.00 



Desiirnateil bv Order of tlie Supreme C' 
as a Legal Depository. 



Authorized to act as Executor, Adiiiini; 
trator, Guardian. Trustee. Etc. 



INTERESr ALLOWED 
ON DEPOSITS 



Loans made on Approved Securities. Will 

draw Drafts on Europe, and issue 

Letters of Credit. 



SAFES RENTED IN BURGLAR-PROOF VAULT 



J. MOREAU SMITH. Presidem V. MOREAU SMITH. Secretar 

R. C. WATSON, Assistant Secretary 



The Red Cross Victor Range 

COMBINATION 
GAS AND COAL 

A S T U D \- IN PLANISHED STEEL 
A TRIUMPH OF ROCHESTER MECHANISM 



CO-OPERATIVE FOUNDRY CO. 



V O R S A 1. E H V 

H.Lkstek, 156 Main St. W. cor. Washington Kenneov & Co., 22 Soutl. Avenue 

H. \i. Craves, 74-76-78 State St. cor. Market J. H. Brown, 372 Nortii St. cor.Woodward 

F. J. Hr.\vek, 385 Jay St. cor. Childs Wm. Rohr, First Avenue cor. Central Park 

C;. K . Harker, 402 State Street I,. J. Marlhand, 488 Main Street, East 

W. A. McCoRMicK, 528 State Street Ciiari.e.s Shui.tz, 672 Clinton Avenue, N. 

Kraisneck & Vaixmzi, 307 Lake Avenue A. (ioi.OMAX, 175 Joseph Avenue 



ESTABLISHED 1868 INCORPORATED looi 

S. G. Curtice, President 

E. N. ClRTlcE, Vice-President and Treasurer 

R. A. Badger. Secretary 



CURTICE BROTHERS CO. 

= Preservers = 

CANNED FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND 
MEATS, JAMS, JELLIES AND PRESERVES 
TABLE DELICACIES 

Blue Label Ketchup and Soups 



ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



MATHEWS & BOUCHER 

Wh.ue.aie AM) Rrtaii. 

Hardware Merchants 




Tr P m M 



T i^: S ^ 




BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS 



MANUFACTURERS' 
SUPPLIES 



HOUSE FURNISHING 
GOODS 



HORSE BLANKETS 



AGRICULTURAL TOOLS 



TINNERS' SUPPLIES 



SKATES AND 
SLEDS 



OIL CLOTHS 



JSl 



26 Exchange St. 
rocmf.ster, n. y. 



Geurge C. Buell a. Bvriin Smith W. H. Avereli 

ESTABLISHED 1844 

George C. Buell & Co. 

IMPORI'ERS AND 

Wholesale 
Grocers 

37 AND 39 EXCHANGE STREET 

AND 30 AND 32 IRVING PLACE 



ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 
AND AUBURN, NEW YORK 



II'arclirji,si\ Erie Canal Corner South Washington Street 

Branch House. 152, 154 AND I s6 StaTE StREET, AuBURN, N. ^'. 



Eagle Brand 

MEANS HIGH QUALITY 

TEAS 

COFFEES 

SPICES 

EXTRACTS 

CANNED GOODS 












ESTABLISHED 1826 

Smith, Perkins & Co. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 
AND IMPORTERS OF 

TEA and COFFEE 

OUR COFFEE ROASFING PLANT IS EQUIPPED 
WITH THE LATEST AND BEST MACHINERY 

SMITH, PERKINS & CO. 

15 Exchange Street 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 











BROWN BROTHERS COMPANY 

Continental Nurseries 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 







l.'X 



M^ 




FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES, 

HARDY FLOWERING SHRUBS, VINES, Etc. 

LANOSCAHF. WORK A SPECIALIV 

NKw (;r()unds laid out 

AM) OLD ONES REMODELED 



./(;/:\rS If.lXTI:!) E I 1: R Y II 1 1 h H K 



H. Austin Bre» 



Brewster, Crittenden & Co, 

IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE GROCERS, 
AND DEALERS IN FIELD SEEDS 



?-- '''- 




44, 46, 48 and 50 ST. PAUL STREET 
16, 18, 20 and 22 MORTIMER STREET 



ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



ROCHESTER'S 
COMPLETE 



Book Store 



T 



WO VIEWS ar 



largest Book Store be- 
tween New York City 
and Chicago — tliat of 

SCRANTOM, 
WETMORE 
&~COMPANY 

wliicli is located in the 
famous Powers Build- 
ing, with entrances on 
both State and Main 
streets. 

In addition to Books, 
this long-established 
firm does a large biisi- 




Stationery 

Leather Goods 

Pictures and 
Frames 

School Supplies 

Office 
Supplies 

Games and 
Sporting Goods 



SOCIETY AND 
COMMERCIAL 
E N CJ R A V I N G 



RETAIL BOOK nEPARTMENT 




SECTION OF WHOLESALE SAMPLE 



Scrantom, Wetmore & Co.'s 



BOOK AND STATIUXERV 
ESTABLISHMENr 



W WHOLESAL^RETAlfiapR 




F^. P. Van Hoesen 
Papers 

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES 
MOULDINGS AND 
WINDOW SHADES 



43 and 45 Main Street, E. 



SMITH, BEIR 
& GORMLY 



DRY GOODS 
NOTIONS 
AND MEN'S 
EURNISHINGS 



37 Axu 39 St. Paul Stree: 
ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



" ill 



fi 



mm 



I , 



ESTABLlSHEn 1844 



THE LARGEST MAKERS OF 

Fine Trunks 

IN THE WORLD 




VISITORS 10 ROCHESTER ARE CORDIALLV INVTTED TO CALL 
AND SEE US 

Retaii. Salesrooms 

155 [Main Street, East 



Henry Likly & Company 



(vYKLL AVENL'E 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



AS GOOD AS ANY 



BETTER THAN MANY 



THAT MEANS 

OUR SHOES 



^HTd 




.# ' 1 ^■VT•'•'■• 









E. p. Reed & Co. 

SHOEMAKERS for WOMEN 



ROCHESTER, N. Y 
St. Paul and River Sts 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Alexander BIdg. 

19TH St. e- 6th Ave. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 
147 Fifth Ave. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

5:13 Market St. 



W. A. HlBBARI), Jr. I.. O. El.DREDGE FrED S. MlI.I.Efl 



Hubbard & Eldredge Co. 






^'1 

I I M 1 i ( 8 '' Ml' I i 



i 






Fan 


cy 


Rockers 

3^ 




Cor. 


LvEi.L Avenue 




AND 


West Street 


ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



M. n. Knoui.ton 



Fred H. Beach 



Know LTON & Beach 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Paper Box Ahi chin cry 




'1\\-[\S Elizabeth Street 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



3 G O S W E L L ROAD, L O N D C) N 




All of the dark-room fuss and bother is 
removed from photography hv the 

Kodak 

way of picture making. Better results than 
the old way too. 

Anybody can make good pictures, now 
that the Kodak Developing Machine has 
abolished the Dark-Room. 

Kodaks, $5.00 to $75.00 
Brownies, $1.00 and $2.00 

Kodak Developing Machines. $2.00 to $10.00 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

KOCHESIER. N. V. 

(:al,iloi;„e. Jnr al the d>al,r's „r hy mail. 



The Fidelity Trust Company 



Powers Biildixg 




CAPITAL 

$200,000.00 



SURPLUS 

$150,000.00 



^^^ 



TRANSACTS 
A GENERAL 
r R U S T 
COMPANY 
BUSINESS 



LEWIS P. ROSS, President JOHN CRAIG POWERS, Secretary 

DIRECTORS 



Rufus K. Dryer 
James E. Booth 
Waller VV. Pew 
L. L. Williams 



Arthur T. Hagen 
Joseph Michaels 
John C. Woodhu 



Erbe 



FIRST PRINCIPLES 

If oil saves power, it follows that 
one sort of oil saves more than another. 
What saves most? That depends on 
circumstances. Oil that is good for 
one place is not good for another. 
That leads to this conclusion : If a 
competent person studies machinery 
and makes an oil exactly right to lubri- 
cate this, another exactly right to 
lubricate that and so on; then you can 
get the oil that saves most power in 
your work, whatever that work may be. 

Now power is costly and oil is cheap. 
But if oil saves power, the oil that saves 
most is extremelv profitable. And the 
man that puts within your reach the 
particular oil that saves the most power 
in your business is saving you part of 
the cost of that power. So that oil is 
vastly more than oil; it is power. You 
are buying power by the gallon of oil! 
The little money you pay for oil is 
multiplied over and over again, if you 
get the right oil. If there is a right 
oil for you, somebody makes it. 

VACUUM OIL COMPANY, 

Rochester, N. Y. 




Rochester Gas and Electric Company 

115 







Patrc 

I 


NizE YoiR Home 


Institution Before 
IGN Companies 






The 


R 


ochest 


er 


Ger 


man 






Insurance 


Company 










OFFICE 






Co.Mi'Aw's Building, 

Cash Capital 

Reserve for Re-Insurance 

Reserve for Unpaid Losse 

NET SURPLUS 

Gross Assets 


Main Street 


w 


EST, CORNER 


Irving Place 

. $200,00000 
725,337.36 
109,852.87 
509,280.22 


STATtME.\T. JL 

s an.l Other Liabi 


„ies- 


. $1,544,470.45 


' 


UGENE H, SATTERLEE. V 
F ATWOOD. S,.cr,tari. 


.--- 


OOK. I 


albrecht vogt. 


Id Vice-President 




ROCHESTER CARTINC; 
COMPANY 



ROfHtSHRCARrtVifo 
SAFE 

BOILER.MACHINERY 
fREIGHTATOrURNITURE 

MOVERS 




Offices 162-164 Andrews St., and 24-48 N. Washington St 



John C. Wuodbl rv J. Wesley Kingston Charles E. Crouch 



Secy and Tre 



The Woodbury Whip 
Company 




; R \ i)f •, AND Styles 



BUGCiY, TEAM. DROVERS 
RIDING A 



s'o^co^^H Whips 



Rochester, New ^' ( > r k 



ROCHESTER TELEPHONE CO. 



ST( 


) N E S r R E E • 


", ROCHES 


IE R, 


N E VV 


YORK 


Oz 


7V' 6,000 


Telephones 


Connected 


Mo 


DERX, Independent Telephone 


Plant 


\VF. HAVE CONNECTIONS WITH 
POINTS IN WESTERN NEW VliRK 


OVER 

I N C I. 


ONE HUNDRED 
TDING BUFFALO 



James Cunningham, Son S? Co. 



BUILDERS OF 



FINE HEARSES, CASKET WAGONS, 
AMBULANCES, COACHES, LANDAUS, 
BROUGHAMS AND CABRIOLETS 



\\\ H.\\ i; A NIMIIIK Ol SIldND-IIAM) HEARSES AND 

carria(;es wiiiLii we are offering at reason- 
able PRICES. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

I'llOTOGK.II'IIX ,IM) D/uSCItll'IIOXS M.III.ED ON APPLICATION 



FACTORY: 

ROCHESTER, N. Y 



Rochester Real Estate 



BOUGHT, SOLD, EXCHANGED, 
AUCTIONED AND LEASED 



PROPERTIES MANAGED AND 
RENTS COLLECTED 



LANDS AND BUILDINGS 
APPRAISED 



MONEY LOANED 
FIRE INSURANCE PLACED 




Manufacturing Buildings and Sites on 
Railroads, Canal, Etc. 

Factories erected on 10 to 20 years 
lease at reasonable rental. 



COTTAGE HOUSES 
For Sale-$1.000 and Upwards 
For Rent— $8 Month and Upwards 

FLATS 
For Rent— $5 Month and Upwards 



2}i STORY HOUSES 



For Sale— S2. 000 and Upwards 
For Rent— $20 Month and Upwards 



LONC; DISl'ANCl 
BELL 

3 1 4 



CFGarfield 

REAL ESTATE COMPAMY. 

9 EXCHANGE ST-CARFIELDBLDC. 



ROCHESTER 
PHONE 



Rochester, tlie Power City, presents a splendid field for the 



The 








Brewers' Exc 


h 


an 


ge 


of Rochester, New '^ 


'ork 






307 Ellwanger & Barry 


Building 




HENRV B. HATHAWAY, President 


Excel 


live Coir 


iiiilli-e 


MATHIAS KONDOLF, Vice-President 




]. Miller Kelly 


JOHN C. ENDERS, Treasurer 




John B 


RADLEV 


JAMES MALLEY, Secretary 




John F 


Bartels 



The Powers Hotel 



THE POWERS 
BUFFET 

28 Main St., West 



^ 



THE POWERS 
RESIAURyXNT 

?2 AlAix St., West 




WESLEY' OROUC'H, Proprietor, R ( )CH Ks 1 I. k, X. V 



Rochester 
Dry Goods Co 



Department 
Store 



156 TO 166 MAIN STREET, EAST 
Rochester, N. Y. 




The 
John Siddons Company 

Roofing 

STEEL CEILINGS 



Ct)PPKR AM) c;.\I.VAMZED IRON 
to K NICK WORKS 



(il, (k), (iS North Water Street, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Ingmire & Thompson 



UNDERTAKERS 



C m m e re i a 1 "B a n k 



47 Main Street, East, 



Rochester, N. Y 



Okhce HoiRs, lo A. M. TO 4 P. M. 




' 1s^ tfiiii.ii..8iSM^ 



CAP IT AIL, $200,000 
SURPLUS. $150,000 



OFFICERS 

CH\^. H. BaBCUlK. 



H. Austin Breuster, 

ist Vice-Presicient 



Henry D. Stone, 

2d Vice-President 



Thomas J. Swanton. 
Casliier 



DIRECTORS 



H. A. Brcwsr 
H. \\\ Davis 
Hciity D. Sti> 
R. M. Myers 



C H, Bab 
1,. P. R.is! 
Henry VVi 



1RKESP()N1H-NT, AMERKAX EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 

Interest Allowed on Special Deposits 
Foreign Drafts Issued on all Parts of the World 




^T 



^m 



iiii 



mm. 



^ 



The Basis of any Office System must 
be a Simple, Efficient Method 

of Filing Correspondence ^^ 

The original Shannon System (made solely by us) provides— ^J^ 
not merely instant location of any paper — but also positive Safety V^ 

ind Unlimited Capacity. Our catalogue No. 30-K takes up this subject ^^^iL\ 
in detail. May we send it to you ? 



%,.- 



YAWMAN & ERBE MFG. CO. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
LOOK UP OUR NEAREST BRANCH : 



"YandE' 
Rapid Roller 
Letter Copier 



provides the only safe, 
sure way of copying cor- 
respondence. Shows every 
correction or alteration. 
Strong — speedy — easily 
operated. Write to-day 
for catalogue No. 33 



W^SggHHM- 




H 


uther Bros. 




Mai.uta.turers ..f 




Saws 


.,ul 


'.a.en, DcUlO H C C7 (1 S 




229 is 231 Mill Strec-t, 

ROCHtSTKR. N, V, 




■li T II P II A' /;■ S 



Wm, S. Morse 


& Sons 


LUMBER 


DEALERS 


i^ 


Rochester, New York 



DUFFY'S PURE 
MALT WHISKEY 




Medicine for all Mankind 



WRITE FOR FREE BOOKLET 



DUFFY MALT WHISKEY CO. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



Archer Manufacturing Co. 

P-MENir BARBER, PH/\TRS P'-'^NO 

DFNI 1ST Gf SURGEON '"^^^^^^^^'^ STOOLS, Etc. 
Our Neu Hc.lestal Barber fliair 

The ROCHESTER No. 50 

Revolving and Reclining Mmements. 



Revolving, Reclining, Ball Bearing 



Special Slylrs of MIRROR CASES. 

Our New Dental Chair, No. 10, "■-' "- 
ROCHESTER, N. W 




F E. RDCEB 



Snow Wire Works Co. 

MANIF.^CTURERS OK 

Pf^ire Goods 

OE EVER^' DE SCRIP EI ON 



Bank an.l Ortice Railinf;^, Elevator Cars and EncloMires, Brass a.ul Iron CJrille 
and ulher Artistic Metal U'ork 



SEETEES, CHAIRS, 
WIRE EENCES 



FLY SCREENS 
A SPECIALTY 



"() TO S4 E.xcHAXCK Street, ROCHESTER, N. V 

Boll, Telephones c,u,. 



m 



ss^p?^5?5^r"5;?-^^sw 



STEVENS 




OUR FIREARNtS have been useil anil indorbed b> hunters and 
marksmen everywhere for almost half a century. This indi- 
cates the degree of accuracy and 'reliability embodied in the 
ii'l "Stevens." This name branded on an arm means guarantceci for 



We manii 



a complete line of 



RIFLES, PISTOLS and SHOTGUNS 




J. Stevens Arms O. Tool Co. 

p. O. Box 3701, 

Chicopee Falls. Mass. 



Ask for 




Chocolates and Bon Eons 



The Rochester Candy Works, 



407 TO 4i;^ State St. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y 



Philip Present 



iriiolcscllc 

Jeweler 



Silver Ware 



Optkai. Cioo: 



First Floor of the 
ChainlH-r of Commerce Buildini; 



New Departures in Messenger Service 

In addition to regular messenger ser- 
vice in vogue for some years in Roches- 
ter, I wish to call your attention to neiu 
departures in which I am able to serve 
the people of this city. 

I. I furnish a boy in uniform to call 
for and escort your children to and from 
dancing school, children's parties or 
other entertainments. 

II. I will furnish a young gentleman 
to escort ladies in the evening to theatre 
or society functions, in citizens or even- 
ing dress. 

III. I furnish boy in uniform to con- 
duct ladies about the city and carry their 
packages. 

IV. I furnish a caretaker for the 
home in the absence of owner and family. 

V. I furnish a boy in uniform, young 
lady or woman to stay with the aged or 
little children. 

V'l. I will furnish a boy in proper 
dress to attend door at receptions and 
weddings. 

VII. I furnish you an umbrella when 
caught in the rain. 

Roth i'h„n.s 3407 w. H. TELFORD 



Beadle & Sherburne Co, 

138 to 154 MAIN ST. EAST 

R <) c H 1-: s r i<: r , N e w \' o r k 








Dry Goods House Furnishings 

Garments Upholstery 

MilHnery Draperies 

Shoes Rugs 



m^m 



««» 



Special Blank Books to order 

High Grade Printing and Stationery 




JOHN C. MOORE 



OUNDED 1839 



69-71 STONE STREET, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



"^r 



Teall & Sons 
Caterers 

Parties, Weddings, Receptions, Banquets Club Entertainments, 
In or Out of the City. Full Service. Modern Features. 



HALL FOR PRIVAIE DANCES, DINNER PARTIES, ETC. 



TEALL &^ SONS 



.59 EAST AVENUE 



ROCHESTER, N. ^" 



^^WTJi^L !§J©ff ;K., :$^op,©©;Q 







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This Editi 


on of 

TK k 

4- 

ED IN 
V BV 
AND 

( CO. 




Job Department 


"R O C H K S 

I x 1 9 

WAS EXECUT 
ITS ENTIRET 
THE UNION 
ADVERTISE! 


C A T A L O G U E S 
BOOKLETS 
FOLDERS, CIR- 
C U L A R S AN D 
OTHER WORK IN 
ARTISTIC STYLE 




t THE- J 

OWOHAADTEiMRCO. 

w 

A Symlnit «/ GonJ Pnntini^ 








H O M E 
PHONE 
3 5 2 


BELL 
PHONE 
Man, 145 














Art Dcpa 


rtmcnt 




Show J 

POST 
WIN 
AND 
DES 
ESTI 
TH 


Department 


E N G R A \ I N G S 
IN HALF-TONE 
AND LINE FROM 
D R A W I N G S 
P A I N T I N G S 
AND PHOTOS 


ERS, STANDS 
DOW CARDS 
HERALDS- 
I G N S AND 
MATES FOR 
E ASKING 



R. J. Strasenburgh Company 




MautifactHriiig 
Chemists 



VVHOLESAl 
DEALERS 



DRUt;S 
CHEMICALS 



SURGICAL 
INSTRUMENTS 



156 -i-o 160 West Ave., 



ROCHESTER, N. Y 



Trees 



FRUIT TREES, SMALL FRUITS, mdud- 
iwr GRAPES; ORNAMENTAL TREES, 
EVERGREENS AND FLOWERING 
SHRUBS frjr public and private o,roinuh : 
SHADE TREES jm- stnrts: HARDY ROSES, 
HARDY PLAN rS, CLIAIBERS, Etc. 

Our btaiitifully illustrated catalogue contains accurate 

and trustworthy descriptions of the choicest 

ami is replete with practical hints indispensable 



.ill be mailed FREE on appli 



Ellw ANGER & Barry, 

Mf. Hope Ntirsn/i's, 
isHiu ()\i;r 6o Years. ROCHESTER, N. Y 



Bre\\\ster, Gordon & Co. 



ESIABLISHEn I S 7 3 




Wholesale 
Grocers & 
Importers 



ROCHESTER, N E W^ ^ O R K 



H. A. Langslow V 



Langslow, Fo^^ier Co. 





>Vfe"leach\6u Free^^ 

And Help You 



Have Done 



EVEKV youiiK man or womnn who wishes to succeed in business life, will be interested 
in the achievements of the six young men and women whose portraits we show here. 
Their experience is that of as many hundred more who have obtained a thorough 
business education by our methods, and have been placed by us in paying positions. All 
large business houses complain that they cannot secure competent bookkeepers, account- 
ants and other help. Moderately good people are plentiful. Experts are in demand. 
We teach you to be an expert, and fit you for an expert's salary. Our courses are the most 
complete and systematic in existence. They were prepared by experienced business men 
to suit modern business needs. So perfect is our system that we are willing to teach you 
bookkeeping, accounting, and business methods, at home, without loss of time or money, 
and allow you to pay your tuition fees out of your earnings, after we have placed you in a 
paying position. No other school will do this. We can. because to be 



a C. C S. graduate, is to be recognized as competent, and we have little 
difficulty in finding good positions for our graduates. We maintain em' 
ployment bureaus in 200 cities and hive representatives all over the country 



WeTeach By Mail 
Book-keeping Shorrhand 
Business Arirtimeric Typewriring 
Rapid Cdlcularins Penmanship 
English ^LerrerWriring Commercial Law 



1?^ 



WALTER D TAYLOR of Eln 



MR JOSEPH F 



of North Adan 
U orker He 
oa e of Ajithon 



DATIb of 61 North 7th 

10 ouRh an i your p an of 

e ce ent one I ant to 

on you placed me n ath 

McOahnsSutarRea ery LompanyotPh ladelpUia 

Tliere o ea on hj you a 



w thout the kno led^e g ned from the CCS 

[6] MR CLAKEN E E BAKER employed by 
Eartlett F azer&Compa y bankers a d broke 8 
ot 7 Ne V street New York C tj has been se 
t es promoted to respons ble pos t o and 



as ell Hundreds ore of our 
A VALUABLE BOOK FREE 



COMMERCIAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS, 

140 SCHOOLS BUILDINGS, ROCHESTFR, N. 



FIRMS, CilKPOR.^TIONSand HUSINHSS MKN ^ 
petent and reliable office assistants by writing to us. 
mend competent people only, whose references are 



McCurdy 6? Nor^^ell Co. 

THE DAYLIGHT STORE 

Women look to this store for fashion— and McCurdy's is the Mecca for those who appre- 
ciate its exclusiveness. To buy a hat, a garment, silks, dress goods or anythmg else here 
is equivalent to getting the best produced for the money. 

WE USE SPECIAL PAINS IN 
CHOOSING OUR STALES 

Selecting only the very best things from the very best makers— our buyers are experts in 
their various lines and are constantly on the lookout for the late style points and ideas so 
that ivhen the article comes from McCl'RUv's you are insured THE top notch of quality 
AND THE FASHIONABLE TOUCH DESIRED BY THE REFINED DRESSER. 

This Store is now showing the fall things that smart fashion makers 
have endorsed as correct — the things that will be worn by those 
who know how to dress. 



The Best i)i Merclmiidise 
(It MeCurdv's 



Rochestc/s Best Store 



Louis Ernst & Sons 

12;)-i;u Main Street, E. 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Mechanics' Tools, Builders' Hardware 

Manufacturers' Supplies 

Cutlery 




Busy men have too many 
any but the best pen. 

We will guarantee to prov 
can be suited with 

\\aIernuins(IdealFounlaiii'Pen 

^'our dealer will fulfil our guarantee to the extent ot 
offering with absolute confidence a pen for signature;,, i 
bookkeeper's pen, a stenographer's pen, which togethei 
with our manifolding pen will cover the entire range ot 
office requirements. 

These pens have action similar to the popular Falcon 
pen and we can even furnish the identical Falmn nib-, 
if desired. 

In addition to peculiar pen points to suit the indi 
vidual, all our pens are fitted with our new spoon feed 
which absolutely regulates the flow of ink so that the 
pen never skips or floods. 

Bt'ivare of imitations. 

Pu.rchase throLigh your home dealer, writing us w lu ii 
you are not served satisfactorily. 

L. E. WATERMAN CO. 

Main Oftice, 173 Broadway, NEW YORK 



Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. 

M ANL FACTURERS 

OPTICAL LENSES 

OF ALL KINDS 




Photographic Lenses, Field Glasses, Microscopes, 
Laboratory Supplies and Chemicals 



OCrKS O.v REQUEST 



ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



BOSTON FRANKFURT am GERMANY 



John T. IVeston Co. 



The Stein Mausoleum on o[-i[iosite paj;e, was liesigneJ atul built by us. 

material is fine cut Westerly granite (the best stone in the world for 

nirpose). The interior is Sienna marble. The altar, seats anil crypt 

Its are of pure white marble, beautifully carved. There is room for sixty 

ials. It is the costliest and handsomest tomb ever bin'lt in this section, 

I is a work of art. 




inil.DERS OF 



Mausoleums, Monuments, Headstones, 

desk;ners of mantels and workers in 
tile, marble interiors, slate, bronze, etc. 



Jge7its for the FAMOUS GrUEBV Th.E 

44 Clixtox .\\ExiE, South Rochester, N. Y 



VanBergh Silver Plate Co. 



^fi'j '' ' /[• ,»s1] ^0| (i^'- i 

'il'M^:, iijii y m m i 




We have recently opened 
a New Vork office at Nos. 7 
and 9 Warren Street, with 
MR. GEO. J. FISHER as 
Manager 

We have a complete line 
of samples there, and would 
be pleased to have you call 
and look them over 

Make your headquarters 
with us and have your mail 
sent in our care. We have 
a desk especially for the use 
of the trade ; also a sten- 
ographer in attendance. 



Factory ,a.\u AI.ain Ohich, ROCHESTER, NEW ^ORK 



C. p. FORD & CO. 

Manufacturers of 
Ladies', Misses' and Children'- 

F/)/r Shoes 

RotTiESTKR, New ^'ork 



GRAND PRIX 

AWARDED 

Paris Expo,srrioN lyc.o 

M.ANUI'.ACTURERS ANI 
K-XPORIERS 



Spect.acles 
Eve Gl.asses 
E.4R Trumpets 
Artificial Human Eyes 



Genesee 
Optical Co. 



Main Street, East 
Telephone 893 



ISTON WESLEV BISSELI. 



Monroe County Savings Bank 

33 AND 3s State Street 
Rochester, New York 
I N C O R P O R A r E D 1850 

RESOURCES, July 1, 1903, $15,921,698.83 
SURPLUS, - - - 1,602,219.80 




OFFICERS FOR 1903 
James E. Bddth, President 
RfFUS K. Dryer, Vice-President David Hinx, Secretary and 

Alexander M. Lindsay, Vice-President Wm. B. Lee, Attorney 

TRUSTEES 



G.-orgc Ellwatige 
Oei). G. ClarksoM 
Cyrus F. Paine 



Edward VV. Peck 



American Fruit Product Co, 



CAPITAL, $2,000,000 



CDNTRdi.i.iNc Leading Brands of 



Cider, Cider \'ine<j;ar, Bottled Cider 
and E\ap()rated Apples 



PRINCIPAL DFFICE AND PLACE OF BUSINESS 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Oaks & Calhoun 



IMPORTERS, JOBB 
A\D RETAILERS 



MILLINERY 

Fancy Goods 

NOTIONS, LACES, GLOVES 

,/;■/ EmI/rodu-ry Materials, Etc. 



117 Main Street, East 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



The East Side Savings Bank 

Cor. Main St. E. c5 Clinton Ave. S. 
R o c n E s T E R , New ^' ( > r k . 

Young Alafi 
Young IV man 

You desire success. You can obtam it. A great aid 

■ IS ready monev. The East Side Savings Bank will not 

only help you save it, but pay you interest as well. 

Men cuid Women of Middle A^c 

Know by experience that money is a necessity. 
That it buys bargains always and everywhere. 1 hat 
it comes to'and stays with the thrifty and none other. 

Men nnd If'onien of Aire and E xperience 

Know that absolute safety alone insures an income. 
This The East Side Savings Bank gives. 

Tlie ONLY BANK IN ROCHESTER DOING 
BUSINESS EVENINGS 

Every Monday Evening from 7 to 9 o'clock 

Monev puts a roof against the "rainy day." Stares 
want out 'of countenance. Assures success and secures 
a competence. 

UPKN AN ACCOUNT TO-DAY 






New York 
Hydraulic- Press Brick Co. 

FRONT BRICKS 

IN ALL C O L t) R S 



FIREPLJCES 

The front bricks used in the brick residences sliown on 
page 26, were furnished by this t'ompany. 




::;;,'::;:;•:.,.,.„ ;.',;;:::::. 


(XT. Stacy Co. 


CHOCOLATES 


csf BON-BONS 


For Ike hinvst Retail TraJr 


it 


IS2 TO 160 Clinton Ave., N. 


KO('IIi;srER, N. V. 



Oshurn House 

Fred. W. Kohmax, 

Mana.er 



RATES: 
%'l and $2.50 Per Day 



OsBURN Hotel Company, 

ROCHESTER, N. V. 



THE GERMAN -AMERICAN BANK 
OF ROCHESTER HAS A CAPITAL 
OF $500,000.00, SURPLUS OF $750,- 
000.00 AND DEPOSITS EXCEEDING 
$3,500,000.00. IT OFFERS INDI- 
VIDUALS, FIRMS AND CORPORA- 
TIONS EVERY FACILITY AND AC- 
COMMODATION CONSISTENT WITH 
SOUND BANKING. INTEREST IS 
PAID UPON SPECIAL ACCOUNTS 




SAM (.01 FRY CARTING CO 

FLRNIILRE am/ PHMJ MOI I k' 



Mason Bros. 






I I 1 1 PII()\ I 14 (( 

;)3-5)9 ExCHy\NGE St. ROCHESTER, N. Y 



Barnard & Simonds Co. 

ROCHESTER, 
NEW YORK 

MAKERS OF 

Fine 
Chairs 

DINING 

OFFICE 

CHAMBER 

11,11. 1. 

LADIES' DESK 

SLIPPER CHAIRS 

ROCKERS 

SlPKk/OR IX STYLE, C XSTR ['CT/ (J \ JKD FINISH 




Buffalo, Rochester S? Pittsburgh Ry. 

THE DIRECT ROUTE 

Betiieen 

ROCHESTER and PITTSBURG 

New and Elegant Equipment, Cafe and Reclining Chair Cars ( Seats 
Free), Pullman Sleepers, Fast Time, Superior Service. 



For Tickets, Time Tables and Fiirthei Iii(o.ma 
ninsiilt the nearest Agent of tlie t'ompany, or ad 



(iKo. v.. Merchant, 

Ctn ' I Siipi//nteni/eiit 



Edward C. Lapey, 

Gen' I Passenger J gent 



ROCHESTER, N. Y 




^ redenburg & Co. 



^J r t u t i u n 
21 1 1 lui y r a V •? i " y 
t niualituiii 
U^ i u M It i\ 



HICiH-CLASS CATALOGUK 
WORK A SPECIALTY 

228-2,^6 SOUTH AVE. 
Rochester, New York 



M3rW 



^SFBf%m 






A. T. HAGEN, .... President 

D. M. COOPER, . . Vice-President 

J. D. F. WHITBECK, Secretary and Treasurer 



% s 



.'•i^U 







Merchants "Bank 

of ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



CAPITAL, $100,000.00 



SURPLUS, $100,000.00 



Particular care i;ivcn to business aiul personal acc.uints 
Interest allowed on Special Deposits. 




OFFICERS 

PFRCY R. NUPH.AIL, President GEO. WELDON. -nl Vlce-Pr 

1 HOM \S J DEVIXE, Vice-Pre.i<lent JOHN C. RODENBECK, Ca 



DIRECTORS 

George W. -Archer Percy R. McPha.l George Wel.ion 

William N. Cogswell (ieorge H. Perkins \ . F. W Intmore 

Thomas J. Devine V. Morean Smith .Adolph Sp.ehler 

Nathan Levi Frank A. Ward 



Insure with the 




Mik 


OLD LINE A 




-c^JJ^^^^^Ml 


STOCK m 


P 


HHb 


COMPANIES |H 




^^^^^^B 


REPRESENTED BY ^^^| 




^^^^^^^H 


Milton Clark Co. ^ 


l< 


^d^^^ 


OVER ^P 


» 


^^^^Ir 


$99,()()(),()0() Assets 


^ 


m^^ 


Companies' Cash Assets 




New Hampshire Ins. Co. of N. H. 




$3,779,570.00 


Westchester Ins. Co. of N. Y. 






3.300,598.00 


London and Lancashire Ins. Co. of Eng 


anL 




2,746,215.00 


Potomac Ins. Co. of Washington, D. C. 






575,521.00 


Hanover Ins. Co. of N. Y. . 






3,795,167.00 


American Ins. Co. of N. J. . 






4,455.064.00 


Security Ins. Co. of Conn. 






1,284,785.00 


North River Ins. Co. of N. Y. 






1,000,843.00 


Williamsburgh City Ins. Co. of N. Y. 






2,390,737.00 


Traders Ins. Co. of Chicago 






2,673,612 00 


Northern Assurance Co. of England 






3,423,231.00 


German Ins. Co. of 111. 






4,184,360.00 


Prussian National Ins. Co. of Germany 






930,372.00 


Farmers Ins. Co. of Pa. ... 






824,252.00 


Orient Ins. Co. of Conn. 






2.110,911.00 


Assurance Co. of America, . 






608,395.00 


Dutchess Ins. Co. of Poughkeepsie, 






744,806.00 


Colonial Assurance Co. of N. Y. 






574,572.00 


Aetna Life Ins. Co. (Liability Departm 
Total 


enti 


59,609,691.00 


$99,012,702.00 


Offices: 405, 407, 409, 411 Chamber of 


Commerce Bldg. 


Rochester, N. 


Y. 





(^all (iiid see the 
Exclusive Line of 
PICTURES 

tiiid 

FRAMES 

suitable for 
Wedding Gifts. 

^» (is/furs lire ll'ilcaint. 

A Empire 
j Moulding Works, 

60 f^ast Avenue 



Factory Sites 


a 


Specialty 




H. 


S. BREW 

Real 
Estate 


ER 


, 


2S Powers Huildin 


t;. 




Rochester, N. V. 




\ Office 
Rochester Phones: ; ^^^^.^^ 


399 

nee 468 









1 




ESl'ABLISin- n 1S54 




^ ^ ^ 


JEFFREYS 
ilntirvtahir 


S6 EAST A\'KNUK 
Rocii !• sii: R, N. V. 









ShS 




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