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Rock Valley College 

Educational Resources 

Center 



DITTO, PATRICIA JEAN WALLIMGV 1927- 



I 



iEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

ear Contributor to the l^ock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
merican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
ew mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
ccess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY *A*-,V-.V5VVcA>':-.'cAy:5V-,'wV;VAA>'rAAy."V;V; 

■■< OFFICE USE CODE 

I. Your name Patricia Jenn V/allrn;- Ditto ' * 



Date of form ,.^,^ ^ ^ (^^,, * (ID // ) 

2. Your college: Rock Valley r.o llecj e •■ (ID // ) 

RockforcT, I I linois •• 

* >^ A A * ;V )■; ;V ;'; ;■: Vc ;VV; y. vV A J; ;V A ;•; v': A :V :•; ;■; ;■: A 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 X 1750-1800 I 800-1 850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 



*». Please check al 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

^New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) " M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

S outh Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C. ) ^East South Central (La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , Ky 

W est South Central 'Ark., N.M. , Tex., Ok.) - Ea-^t North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 

Pacific (Cal., Wash.J (Hawaii, Alaska) 



5. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming ^Mining ^Shopkeeping or small business ' 

Transportation Big Business ^Manufacturing 

^^ P rofessions X I ndus t r i a 1 labor v O ther Morse Trainer &: Driver 

6. Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussec 
in this paper have belonged. 

^Roman Catholic Jewish ^^ Presbyterian ^ Methodist 

^Baptist Epi scopal ian Congregat I ona 1 Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon OFher Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans 

Jews /- C entral Europeans Italians ^Slavs 

■'''■ I r i s h ■■ British '^ Native Americans over several generations 
East Asian Other 



8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

Interviews with other ^ Family Bibles ■'■ Family Genealogies 
fami ly members 
^ Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 
^Photographs ^\r Maps / Other letters 



I, FAMILY DATA 

A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name Elmer Ellsworth Wallinp" Current Residence deceased 

If d^^^JTlf^tT^ death JUly K-J,' ly^TS — — 

Place of birth Clyde, Ohio Date of Birth August -28, 1 87O 



Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high school vocat ional college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
,st Farmer- Lumber camp Dates 1890-1895 1st East Jordan Mi. Datesl890- 

Tyaiii 'driver — ' — — ■ ■ •— — — — — - — "T897 

2nd Tannery & Iron Foundr ^gtes 1897-1 908 2nd Mancelona, Mi. Datesl89?- 

^ T9^B~ 

3rd Farmer- Rented Farm pat-gg I908 -I9II 3rd St. Johns, Mich. Datesl908- 

^ _ __ T^Tx- 

/,jh Farmer- owner Qg^es 1911-1932 l^th Greenbush tuiishp Datesl9ll- 

^ C^iin t or; coanty ~ 1932 

Religion none "^^^ ^"t- Johns, Mi. 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Voted Republican 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother Clinton County, Mich. '^^'^%/2 8/1895" 



NOTE: If your father vvas raised (to age I8) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on tiie bnck of this page. (A-H 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Minnie A. Cleland (Crepes) Current Residence deceased 

If dead, date of death Feb. 3 1932 

Place of birth Greenbush Tov/nship Mi. p^^^ ^^ birth ^"1^ ^' ^^"^^ 



Education (number of years): 
grade school Q high school vocational ^^ college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaying home). 
'st Housewife & Mother Dates 1889-9 3 1st St. Johns, ich. D atesl89_0:i. 

2nd Cook in Lumber Camp Dates ^900-08 2nd ^^^^ Jordan, Mi. Datesl900-0, 
— — jiffat 'i cclo ffa i — hr±~. — 

3rdHousewife & Mother Dates ^908-11 .^^ Rented 80 acre Farmp^^.^^ I908 
^ . — _ _-. ^ T9TT 

4th Housewife & Mother pates 1911-193^th ^^^"^ '^^^^ ^'^' "^^^^^Dates icil- 
— ■ Mielf jrg&ft— "lc^j2 

Re 1 i g i on Methodist 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. ^^"^'^^ ^^P^^^^^^^ 



Place of marriage to your grandfather g;]^j^„^p^~o^^^f^M^^ 28, 189T 

'^°^^- ILHatHfl^Eh^^Ba^g'Sf^ttSl? $%ll\%^ stepmother or another relative give 



3. 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Nanve Robert B r uce Sc o ggins Current Residence deceased 

If dead, date oT'death FeWr TTTTJ^ 

Place of birth Gr eenfie ld, 111. Date of birth April 28, 1881 

Education (numBer 'of years): 
grade school ^ high school vocational college 







Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaviaq home) ^or^^ 

1st Hired Hand Farm \'^ork Sc Dates l896-19Q 2ist Green C ounty & Whrte D ates ^^j^ij^ 
Milkman, Stone"v?a"re" FlanxTToI^ker -Ti^a:l™ttrtr™ — ' —— -i^ 

2nd Farmer, Drove team of Dates 1905-19l<^nd Christian County, 111. Dates^^^^-lo 

horse's on irr7~Hiver LeavyT -TavTH-s-Cirtry-rSr^T^I^^^TrrTTd^ — - — - 

3 rd Trained & Drove Harn ess Dates 1916-1925 3 rd ^^ St. Joh ns, Mich. Dates ^°^^~^-^ 

Horses for Horse Onwers 
^th Ovmed, trained & raced Dates 1925-I93g> f4th Lima, Ohio D ates^^^^~^° 

harness horse si 
Religion Methodist 
PoliticaTTTrFlTrr-civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. LO-O-F. & Modern Woodman 

Repu blican 

Mace of marriage to your grandmother g-f; ^ Louis, MoT~ ~^ ' "^ate 5/3l7l902 

Note: If your mother was raised by a"TTgptlTi'rer~tTr''tri TOtr i'a r re laTl Vg '(' CO a^ e \Sf 

give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Cl ara Belle Chinn Current Residence deceased 

if dead, date of JgrtH "J^-^>"g^^^""" ~" .. ~ ~ ^ 

Kiace of birth Greenfield, 1x1. pate of birth '^^"^ ^' ^ 
Education (numBgr of years)' 
grade school high school Y"^^ vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

,s. Housewife " ,.„ 1902 „. GreenfMy; Jir'"^ ^^ j,,, 1902-16 

2nd Housewife & Mother Dates^903-19l^nd Q^^^^^^^^^' ^^^- D ates ^ ^^^""^^ 

3rd Housewife & Mother 0a^g5l9l6-23 3^^ Tawas City & Breckenri(^ |g^ 1916-23 

^ _ ^ „ Mi.& St. Johns Mi. 

Religion Methodist 

Pol i tical party,, ci vi 1 or social clubs, sororities, etc. D.A.R, & Rebecca Lodge 

Place of marriage to your grandTather St, Louis, Ko. d ate5/ 3Q/l$Q 2" 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmoTKer or another relative (to age To) 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2). 



tt> CHILDREN of A & B (or A- 1 or B-I) - your father's name should 



appear 



:low 



N a me Ruth V/alli _ng^_Burf;es_s 
Place of bi rthEast Joraarif 



Number of years of school ing 
Residence Roche ster Mi. 
Number of chi Id ran one 



nr 



giri 



date Feb. 19 1897 
.^_____^__ OccT^^ItTcfr-STTL^i'^tsry- 

Hari t'aFstatus v/idcJ^rCTT 



Name Marion Virgil Walling 

P 1 a ce" of "tl'i rtfTEast JdrciafT, jviich 

Number of years of school ing 



~B- 



Residence_Near St. John 
Number of ch*TT37en ^vo ^^TrTs 



'aa'te__Jan. 28, 1902 

OccupaTibn "K^irTY^e^rTarmer 



L.^'''i. M^TTtTTsTi'tus mrri(m~^TYr^ 



Name Ethyle Wal ling Foley 

P I ace of blTFR ETTst J or d"an7~nTT 



Number of years~of' schooling 5 
Residence Detroit, Mi. 
Number of ch I fBTen •^i^ " 



"~"" date Dec. 23, 1903 
_^___^__^__ Occu^TaTTbrT^^WtnTiJ^rH^ 
Marital Status wi^ov^^ — 



Name Betric e Walling (twin) 
Place~o7TT?FF r°"ga^t J tt-nTnT T^Tr: 
Number of years of' school ing 
Residence 



"date April I906 



Number of ch i Idreri 

Deceased 6 rtny ti. S(JlH . I 906 
NameBernice Walling (twin) 
p I a cTZV~b ! r t h i'.'a-gT-5T3Ttr57r-t~twtrr) 

Number of years of "schooHng 

Residence 

Number of chi Idrcn ' 



~_~~ Occupat 1 6rt 
^iari taPTtatus 



date April I906 



_^__^___^_^ Occupat i6n 
MaTkal Status 



Deceased 6 mos. 
Mame 

Place of birth ~ 



1906 



Number of years of schoolTng' 

Residence 

Number ofTh i Idren 



aate 
^ccupaTlon 



"MaTTtaT Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth "~ 
Number of years of school 
Res i dence 
Number of chi Idren 



1 ng 



TTarTtaTTFa t u S 



date_ 

Occupat iort 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~ 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



date 



O'ccupation 
Marital Status 



3. Name^ 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren ~ 



- tJate 
Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



0. Name 
Piac 



of b i r th 

Number of years of school inq 

Residence 

Number of^CtTnUren 



date 



_^__^^_^_^ Occupation 
Marital Status 



** Lewis Crepes (Walling) son born Aug. 12, I89I, Previous marriage. Was not 
legally adopted, but has always used the name Walling. 



Y our Father 

Name Iterion Virgil Walling Current Residence ^'^^ Johns, Mich. 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of 'birth Antrim County, E. Jordan Michio ate of birth Jan. 28, 1902 
Education (number of years) "" ~~ * 
grade school " high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
IstHirP d Hand ^ milVmnrP ates 1923-1925 1st Rice Farm near Dates 1923-1925 

2n^°H§uie^ d^'Uci^'^-^^^^ltes 1925-1927 2nd East St. Johns O^tes 1925-192? 



3rd Farmed for Shares Dates 1927-1 9 39 3rd Fa rm n ear Ovid, Mi. Dates 1927-1939 

Fa-rTfi^ uasn Kelr^ "i 9^9-1 9^5T~- ■STjTmTT^SnTr'm'rT^TriTSl M i . T939^T'9ST~ 

Jtth Farmed ovm Farm D ates l9^1-1968 / 4th Farm Five miles N. D ates 19^^1-1968 

Re 1 igion ° "^T^ Johns, 7^ii. ~~ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Bingham Grange, I.O.O. F. 

f aRonip. T, nrigp , Jolly Mix e r Dinner-Dance Group , Sleep y-Hollow Conservation Club. 
ace of man- 1 age to your motTier ^ j x.-; Rpyoids , MibhT ' d ateMay ^ 1 2, 1 925 ^ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on tne back 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name Edith Irene Scoggins Current Res'Jence St. Johns, Mich. 

If dead" date of death • ' ' ' 

Place of birth Green County, 111. Date of bl rth April 1 , 1903 
Education (number ot'^yearsf 
grade school 8 high school ^ vocational col lege 4 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Teacher Dates l923-1925 1st St. Louis, & St. Johns MiD ates l923-1925 

2nd Housewife Dates l925-1927 2nd Ea st St. Johns Mi. D ates l925-1927 

"HParms 
3r d Housewife & Mother Dates l 927-1 9^4-1 3rd Ovid& St. Johns Mi Dates 1927-19''-j-l 

^Teacher ~" TWr-rsEW Five miles N. St. Johns 1 9^+1 - 1 9^8~~ 

Re 1 i g 1 on Methodist ^^ "Mi. 

^Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Eastern Star, Rebecca Lodge, 
p^o+- v>^r.r-^ ri^^-i- ^ -p c 4- T 1 . u- club, Jo 1 1 v M Ixe T s ,' Retired Teachers Assoc 

Place of marriage to your father Big Kaplds, Mic Ti . d ate May 12, 1925 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another" rel at i ve give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 

St, Johns' Library Board Mamber 



..HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, r-2) - your name should appear below 



Patricia Jean Walling Ditto 



Name 



Place of birth St. Johns I'vlich. " Date of bi rth Jan. 17, 1927 

Number of years of school i~ng Sixteen Occupation Registered Nurse 

Residence Rockford, 111 Mari taPStatus Married 26 years 

Number of ch i 1 d reT r"one adopted daughter Elaine 

Name Marianne Virgilene V/alling Tatroe 

Place of birth St. Johns, IWTVch. DaTe of birth April 1929 

Number of years of schooling Seventeen Occupatioh Masters Degree Edu cation 

Res i dence Deceased May 11~, 1970 Marital Status married 23 yrs til de ath 

Number of ch i Idren four ~ 



Name • _________^_______________ 

Place of bi rth ' Date of birth 

Number of years of School ing Occupat i on 

Res i dence Hari tal Status 

Number of children 



Name 

Place of bi rth Dafe of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupat i On 

Res i den ce Ha r i t^ Status 

Number of chi 1 dren 



Name 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren ■*= 



Name 

Place of bi rth Date of birth_ 

Number of years of school Ing Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupat iOn__ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of ch i I dren """^ 

Name 

Place of birth DaTe of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence ^ Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



111. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family dTft willing) 

I hereby donate this family historv, along v/ith all literary and administrative 
rights/ to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



Signed ^ ^U^4 

Date //y / 7 <^ 



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NOTE ON SOURCES 



Robert Walling: Walling Geneology Chart 

Great Grandfather's Civil War Records 

Letter written by Grandfather V/alling 
- Clinton County records 

Family Bible 

Letter 

Personal interview 
Ruth Walling Burgesst Personal interview 
Lew Walling: Personal interview 

Marion V/alling: Personal interview 

Edith Scoggins Walling: Personal interview 

Letters 
(j Family Bible 

Pictures 

Newspaper articles 

Obituaries 
Genevieve Scoggins Gilson: Personal interview 

Grandparents marriage certificate 

Pictures 
Carson Scoggins: Letter 

Laura Scoggins Doane : Letter 
Virginia McMullen: Letter 



It is an unusual coincidence that my father Marion Walling 
met my mother Edith, w)-.ile delivering milk, exactly as my 
maternal grandparents met. 

My earliest recollection of my family life was a very happy 
child living on a farm. This farm was owned by a Mr. Stone and 
father farmed on shares. It was located in Clinton County, 
Duplain township, approximately two miles north of a general 
store and gas station called Shepardsville on Shepardsville Road. 
We had milk cows, a good team of horses, and father raised hogs, 
and sheep. Mother raised chickens for eggs and eating. She also 
sold eggs to neighbors along with butter we churned by hand. This 
was known as Mother's "butter and egg" money. The farm was very 
stoney and I remem.ber Dad broke many a plow point getting the 
fields ready to plant He raised hay, corn whe-.t, rye, and 
beans, some as animal ::\.ed and some as a cas'.. cicp. 

Though my parents married and lived through the great 
depression, I do not recall it being a difficult time at all. 
Mother carr.^ed on her family traditions of making holidays and 
birthdays a special occasion. We always had a Christmas tree and 
exchanged gifts. We celebrated holidays with the Scoggins 'Clan' 
Grandfather, aunts, uncles and cousins, gathered together, at 
which time there v;as gifts exchanged. 

My father was not tolerant of mother attending church services 
or various religious functions, although they frequently attended 
commamity church suppers. fAy sister and I attended Sunday School 
and Summer Rible School with neighbor children. 

^^, pp,r-ent? mMv not b^vr. had much ronoy, howPver they seemed to 
enjoy life, reading many periodicals, listening to the radio and 



playing cards v/ith friends. Mother belonged to a ladies bridge 
croup. Both parents likod to dance, and cnce a month they 
attended a pot-luck dinner dance ^-'.roup at Ovid, iviioh. A small 
orchestra played for the dancp. Both my siRter and I were .left 
at home with a baby sitter. Usually a neighborhood teenager who 
received tv/ent-five cents for the entire evening. 

Later, soinetirne after my Grandmother Walling died, Grand- 
father Walling came to live with us. "He helped Dad with the 
milking chores and farming. Prior to that time Kother and Dad 
took into our home, a young adolescent named Jim. he came from 
an orphanage and was something like a foster child. Jim attended 
school then helped father with milking the cows and other 
farm chores. 

Mother and Dad first moved to this farm a few weeks before 
I was born, January 17, 1927. Approximately two years and ten 
v.-eeks later my sister i^arlanne v^'as born. We lived at this lo- 
cation until I was tv.l-- years old. I -+-:-- --■-oo] at age 
five at a rural one-room school called Little Brick School. My 
sister Marianne started there two years later. We walked to school 
two miles daily in all weather. Mother, having taught prior to 
her marriage, was on very good terms with our teacher, which no 
doubt v/as to our advantage. We seem^^d to receive above average 
marks in all subjects, reading, v/riting and arithmetic. We were so 
fond of school, we often played school during summer vacations, 
arguing over v/ho would be the teacher and who would be the student, 

During this time our formal education was supplemented with 
piano and dancing lessons. We were often called on to display 
our lack of talent before various club members, friends, and 
relatives. These lessons were paid for by iviother's 'butter and 
egg' money. 



As children Marianne and 1 had certain re-'sponsibili ties, 
pets to feed, dogs and cats, lambs to raise, and other chores. 
We fad the chickens and gathered the eggs. It was also our job 
to churn the butter. 

As a family, in our earlier years, we enjoyed camping 
trips and vacations. Later my parents owned cottages on lakes 
in northern Michigan. A favorite pass time was popping corn 
and playing games, such as authors, flinch, old maid etc.. 
We had our favorite radio programs we listened to after school 
and on Saturday mornings. We attended movies on Saturday after- 
noons. Father especially liked going to movies. My parents 
favorite vacation was their annual deer hunting trip to north- 
ern Michigan. They usually went with father's older brother Lew 
and his wife, his sister Ruth and her husband; or with my mother's 
sister, Genevieve, and her husband. While my parents were deer 
hunting, my sister and J wou.ld be left v;ith a neighbor near by 
■in order to ccnti.,^. o^^.^ul attendance. 

Through our pre-teens and during our teens, we belonged 
to various 4-H clubs, 'Ce learn-:^ 1 tc sew, food preparation, 
and animal husbandry. Sometimes mother was our 4-H leader. 
One or two summers we went to 4-H camp. I did not care for 
camp as there were too many mosquitos. 

The Stone farm had a large wooded area, v/ith Maple trees. 
One of the fondest childhood memories is of going with my 
father on periodic rounds to collect the sap in the buckets. 
Bundled up in our warmest clothes, boots, mufflers, and mittonc, 
we du.mped the pails of sap into ten gallon milk cans pulled 
over the ground on a horse-dra\^^ sled. The cans full of sap 
were poured into a lar^rc shallow rr>n p.y^'^ b-'ipd ■^\-^v -. v;5rv ^^t 
wood fire until it was Maple syrup. The syrup was ladeled into jars 



or sealed in gallon cann, labeled, and sold, reserving some 
for home use on pancakes, or frenoh toast. 

These same woods were our nature trails during the spring, 
summer and fall. Mother taught us to observe, recognize and 
enjoy the beauty of wild animals, birds, and flowers living 
and growing there. V/e often collected wild strav.berries, black 
berries, and goose berries. Mother preserved the fruit in 
jars and made some into jam. We alv/ays had a garden, raising 
lots of fresh vegetables. We also had an apple orchard. We 
ate fresh vegetables and fruits, all summer long, canning the 
surplus for winter use. Because we had good nutrition, eating 
fresh vegetables and fruits, and a good supply of protein from 
milk, home slaughtered meat, eggs, and foul, v/e were a very 
healthy family. Marianne and I had our share of childhood 
diseases, measles, chicken pox etc. but no complicatios. It 
was a good thing we wer- healthy, as there was ro money for 
doctors. (Besides fath... intensely distrused doctors.) 

Though we were a small family we had many playm.ates and 
friends with neighbor children. We also had frequent visits 
from relatives, aunts, uncles, and cousins. 

One of the greatest gifts we received from our parents 
was a sence of sharing. I recall times when illness or mis- 
fortune had befallen a neighbor or friend. Mother would take 
a casserole of food or some home baked goodies to that less 
fortunate person. Dad would lend a hand with what chores 
needed doing, until the people were back on' their feet. They 
(my parents) set the example of living the Christian belief 
of helping one another, and my sister and I carried on that 
tradition in our own marriages. 

When I was in seventh grade, we moved to a farm in Clinton 
County, north of St. Johns, Mich. It was ovmed by a Mr. Tyson. 



)on! 



Living there I attended Marshall School, another rural ono-ro* 
buildinc, with grades one thru eight. I graduated fro-ii eigth grade 
there and went on to ninth grade at St. Johns High School. 
, At this time mother's divorced cousin Pauline sent her 
-daughter, Virginia to live with us. Virginia lived with us from 
age four until age twelve. She was like another sister. 

In the spring of 19^1 my parents bought their first farm. 
It was Iccar.ed approximately one mile south and one mile west 
of the Tyson farm. My mother resumed her teaching career that 
fall. She was 38 years old. She had not graduated from college 
so continued courses in education while teaching. She received 
her B.A. degree in Kducation from Central Michigan University 
at age 53 in 1956. 

After I graduated from high school i worked as a nurses 
aide at St. Johns Clinton Memorial Hospital. I could not enter 
nurses training until January 19-'j5 when I reac) ed age 18. I 
lived at Hurley 'lospl'^d School of Nursing dormitaory in Flint, 
Mich, for three years. I finished my required work, wrote and 
passed the Sxate Board exams for Registered Nurses. I went to 
work, for an Oral Surgeon, Dr. Crockett, March 20th, in Lansing, 
M:.ch, I lived in a small apartment, three blocks from the 
doctors office, and continued to live ther after I was married. 
It was during my last year in nursing school I met- an engineer- 
ing student and World War II veteran, Fred Ditto. He was attend- 
ing General Motors Institue in Flint. We were married in St. 
Johns Methodist Church, May 1, 19^8. Fred graduated from college 
June 1950. I continued working as an office nurse, and worked for 
a general practitioner, Dr. Frank Bevez, until our daughter was born. 

Wo had bought ou"»" fi-rr-:t bor^'^ in t'^-^ -c;;'^',.' ■• ■ -i-' 
Lansing and lived there until Fred ]eft General Motors and 
took a position with Sundstrand Corp. Machine Tool Div. in Kockford 



We l-ve6 in Rockford. 111. iroin 1955 until Sept. I96I, v/hen 
Sundstrand transferred ur to Sunnyvale, Calif. We lived in 
Calif, until Sept 1968. Fred was again transferred to Mich. 
We chose Farmington , -a subi-rb of Detroit, as our resedenoe. 
.Our dauf^hter tlaine graduated from North Farminston Hip-h, June 
1970. She is employed as a pharmacist's assistant at Browns Drug 
Co.. She met her future husband during her senior year in high 
school. She and Greg Stephan were married June 30, 1973. Greg- 
is an accounting student at Wayne State University in Detroit. 

My only sister Marianne married Donald Tatroe September 194?. 
Don was attending Michigan State University. She had completed 
a cosmetology course after high school graduation, and was em- 
ployed as a hair dresser until her husband graduated from college. 
Following graduation, Don was Music Director at Holt High School. 
He returned to college to get his Rasters degree in education 
administration, and became principal of Haslefi- High School for 
two years. Ho •'-.ce-'^;d his doctorate degree i- r^ucation adminis- 
stration from ^nchigan State U. in 1955 had a position of Assist- 
ant Superinxendent of Schools at Warren, Mich. While living there 
my sister started to college at Wayne State U. . She graduated six 
years and two sons later. At this tim.e they were a family of six 
as they had two older children, a daughter Dob. born March 2?, I951 
and a son Kevin born May 30, 195^. The other two sons were Philip, 
and Mark. 

My sister and I were very close and enjoyed each other's comp- 
any. On May 11, I970. through a tragic accident,! lost my sister, 
Marianne, my brother-in-law. Don and three nephews, Kevin, Phil 
and Mark. My neice Deb was 18 and attending Michigan Stae U. at ' 
the time. She graduated from M.S.U. June 1973 and teaches element- 
ary school in At.ianta, Ga, 



I have followed my nursing carrer, work5ri{^ jn doctors* 
offices, and in hospital Sj except when our dar<.p:hter was born 
until she was eleven. I attended Standford University for a 
refresher course and resured my nursing career in 1965. It was 
after my husband was transferred from California to Michigan, 
I decided to take courses Icadinp; to a bacheloi degree in nursing. 
1 earned sixteen credits at Oakland Community College in Farming- 
ton, Kich. then transferred to .Rock Valley College after my 
husband was transferred to Rockford, by Sundstrand Corp. Hope- 
fully J will be accepted at N. I.U. for the fall term 1975 to 
continue my course and obtain 3 B.S degree in Nursing. 

Through-out our married life we have traveled extensively 
through the United States. Either with my family or with my 
spouse I have traveled through every state except Texas and 
Alaska, Fred has been to the Fhilj pines during V/,WII and since 
employment with Sundst'>"and has traveJ.od to Australia, Athens, 
Greece, Paris, France J.r.j; London, This summer I am taking 
the European History Tour through Rock Valley . . 



Tl'^rough personal interviews and correspondence I learne^d 

■many thin5:s about my paternal grandparents, Clinton County, Micl'i, 

record's shov; they both had previour; marriages. Grandfat'n.er 

Elffier Welling, ap:e ?,3, first married Flora Laplian, age 1? in 

1893, ^he died of Tiiberculosis , some months later Feb, 189^-^. 

No children were born of this union. Grandmother Minnie Wallinfr 

had first married Lewis Crepes at age 17, 1888, Of this union 

a daughter, Ruby was born July I89O and son Lewis Aug. 12, I891. 

That Vv'inter a flu epidemic took Grandmother "s husband, her 

18 months old daughter Ruby, and her father Luther Cleland. 

This left Great Grandmother Cleland and Grandmother Crepes 

-IP 

V/al-ling both a wid(;v/, i/ne later with, an iriTuni, f.on, 

Elmer V/alling and Minnie Cleland Crepes v.'ore married Sept- 
ember 28, 1895. From personal interviews with my father and 
aunt, this was a m.arriage of convenience. My father stated 
that Grandfather lacked tolerance toward his step-son Lewis, 
and never showed affection toward his wife • or .any of the 
children. He v;as a stern, industrious, and later became a very 
angry man. On the other hand, Grandmother V/alling was very 
■affectionate, giving an abundance of love and affection to 
compensate their father's lack of same. She was discribed as 
;!:.^-ing a happy and ■:anny disposition. I re:iionbor very jitoio ci 
her as J was five years old y;hen she died, I do recall that 



,,y,e g?ve us cockips, candied orP,n3e peel an^ other >,or.em.d8 
gocdlo-, wher^ever ny pister and I visited her hom^, T am 
cert-in she v^as cnntinually gratefiu. to my grandfather for 
providing a home for her and her yoimg son from a previous 

marri age . ■ ■ 

My father discribed life as one of work oriented with 
little, if any time for fun. Grandmother was a religious 
woman hut subjugated her religious rract^ee to her husband's 
lack of toleranee toward any formal religion. Therefore my 
father learned to believe in the Bible and Christian religion 
through grandmother and no other source. Religious holidays 
were not celebrated in any way. Father said they never had a 
Christmas tree, or ga-e and reeieved gifts during holidays 
or birthdays. 

It was apparent they were living during "hard times". 
Grandfather took his bride and step-son to live on a farm 
near East Jordan, Mich. (A farm great-grandfather Virgil 
Walling had received from the U.S. government as part pay- 
ment of..his Civil War Veterans bonus.) Th-y lived in a tar- 
papered shack, papered inside with newspapers, to keep out 
the cold. My father, his older sister Ruth, and younger sis- 
ter Ethyle, Bernice and Betrice, were all born here. The 
160 acres of land was heavily wooded with white pine. My 
great grandfather, my grandfather, and nis oromers, axl 
earnpd a living by working at various jobs in th- logging 



biji?innr,s. My "father di>-crihod thi^ ] i f p p^ "hnrd winter-time 
work". Some of t,he 3_ogging was done in the r.y.'qmps s.nd could 
only be worked nurin.^ the win tor. The sjx-hovi^e t-^nms v;ere 
sharp-s'nod v/ith a r^peeial shoe to walk on ico while pi'll.ing 
hv)p;e •BobRledFi ' lo?.ded witli lo^^s. The logs v-ere stacked beside 
the river until spring, then dumped into the Jordan River and 
floated to the lumber mill. After th^ lo";s v/ere guided down 
river there were celebrations called "Lumberjack Picnics" 
with all sorts of contests and feasting. Father recalls one 
of his uncles received several prizes for 'Burling* logs. This 
was a contest between two m.en twirling logs underfoot .in the 
Mill pond to see who could stay on the log and who would be 
dumped into the icy vpt--r. 

After the farm v/as cleared it was planted. However the 
soil was of such poor qhplity it only produced potatoes, 
oats, and hay. Father said a team of horses was a real asset 
and were well-cared for as this team meant the family lively- 
hood. These teams of horses were used for farming and to haul 
logs for the lumber industry in northei-n Michigan. At that time 
a good team cost ^300,00 and set of harness $65.00. This was 
rather higli considering the annual income v/as seldom more than 
$2000.00. (per family) 

J 1 -f'ri -1 v-y +v.n ly •'.'h nir^ T Y\ <r '"• "^ f!"' '"^ s v^s r^rud"' '-ly'l : ;er) ''.'ore tou.'r}''., 
working hard during the week and drinking and fighting on 



Saturday nights. Grandinothei- Walling cooked meals in the 
lumber camp for the lumberjacks to supplement their income. 

After the lumbering industry dwindled, Grandfather Walling 
moved the family to Mancelona, Mich, where he worked in a 
.Tannery and an Iron V\forks (foundry) until 1908. When my father 
was sax, he remembers moving to a rented farm east of St. Johns, 
which grandfather farmed for three years. In I9II Grandfather 
purchased a 20 acre farm. The county records show it was located 
Ni N.W-i SWi of section 32 T 8N R2w 19i acres, in Greenbush 
■ township. (The |a nw corner was a cemetary. ) The land price 
listed as $l600 and his personal worth as $75.00, 

Groat Grandmother Malora Todd Walling died January I911 
of acute appendicitis, in East Jordan, where she is buried. My 
father recalls that no members of his immediate faily attended 
her funeral because the snow was deep and travel impossible. 
In 1914- Grandfather Walling purchased additional l^n^^ ' 
-djacen-^ -- +he far- bought I9II. The ^^(^r, fo-h crops were 
potatoes, corn, milk cows and pigs. Gr-^/ifather prM his taxes 
by working his team of horses to build state roads. My fr+her's 
older sister, Ruth wanted to continue her education beyond grade 
school. (8th grade) very much against Grandfather Walling's 
wishes. However she compromised and milked her share of cows 
at five in the morning before walking several miles to High 
School. My father attended the Greenbush school, discribed 
as a white wooden building Consisting of one large room, a 
stove in the center of the room for heating the building. 
He finished the eigth grade there. 

From that time on, father went to work in the fields, 
plowirg and planting, helping his father farm fo>- ^. i ^^--r-rr. 
.'^ r Tr:v?mbers ci^ping wood for cooKing and heating, during 
the winters. There were kerosene lamps for light and to read 



by, an<< out door plumbing. 

My father left his fathers farm as Boon as he reached the 
age of 21, to work on the Rice Dairy Farm, west of St. Johns, 
He milked cows, and delivered milk in St. Johns Michl,";an. (it 
v/as while delivering milk, he met my mother, v/ho v^as teaching 
school and living with her fami]y.) Soon after he went to v;ork 
for Rice's, Great Grandfather Virgil Walling died in an old 
soldiers home at Traverse City, Mich. My father attended his 
funeral February 1923, and father said "Grandpa Virgil's" 
body was carried to the cemetary on a horse drawn sleigh, 
followed by two sleighs full of morners. 

A eousin Robert Walling has traced the Walling family 
back as far as eary 1700' s. The records show one ancestor, 
James Walling was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and is 
buried in Conn. As yet the immigrant ancestor has not been 
traced. We do know they were of English decent. 

The Todd-Wai: .ir,-- Heu'tjon is an annual even\,. All decend- 
ents from Virgil Walling and Malora Todd marriage gather on 
the third Sunday in July. There is a big picnic dinner, with 
much talking, games for the younger set and lots of fun. My 
cousin Robert reminded me that I will not be able to attend 
this years reunion as I plan to be in Europe at the time. 



tEsle&n^ed Wo!-;ian hiad Been'j 
> iii Pcor Heaith fcr Years; 
I Leaves 4 Chiidren 

i ■ ! 

/ JTinnie Clslnnd. c!au2;htcv of Alice n 

•aiicl LUiher Clt'land. was born in\\ 

iGrc^i-ibush township. Clinton coun- H 

itv. Julv 3. IdTl anti passed away at?. 

|her hi'mc nc.ir Elsie Feb. 3 1S32, She[; 

hvas iniitpd in n-.an-iagc to Elmer r 

hvalling Scutcmbiu- 8, 1895. Be?.idc-5f; 

5her loving hu.sband. she leaves to i' 

fpiriiiin her four children: Lewis ofj 

tEh' f . JIariou cf Sheparctsville. Mr.s. B 

lEthel Folov of Royal Oak, Mrs. Kutht 

JEurToss Oi Pon'.iac, raid seven grand- 1 

■'cwruien. Also an aged mother. Mrs.? 

Alice Clf land, one sister, Mrs. C. .1. s 

Richmond, two biolhers, Orbie andlj 

fClaud. I 

Mrs. Vv'ainnrr althonah in- pcorg 

health for many years, had the sun- 1 

niesL and most cheerful dispositisn |; 

and v.as never heard to complain. | 

She v.a.s a lovin^ wife and moth-j"| 

or and unusually fond of her grand- Ji 

chilcFrcn. One could not visit wiihij 

her long without h.-r telling you of j 

soire little incident or saying of [• 

iof theirs that was dear to her. [i 

I Ker last sickness was of short , 

i duration, onlv a few hours of suf - J 

lY'-ins when she v;as called home. I 

*| rincra; s.rvicrs were roniucied; 

i f--oiii the home just soutii o: Ei-Je j 

Snturdav. Feb. 5. 1932 by Rev. L. A. 

jl Fi'her. Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Fiz- i 

iBBil .';anc, and she was laid to restj 

Lin t r.fe F-.i reka temetei-y. ^jj 



CARD OF THANKS ' '-^ 

We wish to fhauk all who so kindly 
assisted us iu the loss ot our dear 
wife and mother. Rev. Fisher, for his ; 
comforting words, the singers, Mr. 
and Mrs. Fizzell, and '-Mr. and Mrs. . 
Carter for their kind assistance. ^ 
Elmer Availing and children* ' 
. _ ^^iA 









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GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS SERVICE 

ORDHR FOR PHOTOCOPIES . 

CONCERNING VETERAN 

(Soe reverse for explancfion) 



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I i DEC 1339 



DO NOT WRITE IN TH'S ;>.>.ACE 



RECEIPT NO. 



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SEARCHER 



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INSTRUCTIONS 

1. FILL OUT THIS FORM AS FULLY AS YOU CAN. You may not have all the informa- 
tion called for by the form, but since we often have files for several veterans of the 
same name, the more information you are able to give the greater will be the likeli- 
hood of a successful search in our records. 

2. Use a separate form for each veteran. 

3. Enclose one dollar, preferably a money order or check payable to GENERAL 
SERVICES ADMINISTRATION. 



4. Mail completed form with remittance to: 

General Services Administration 
National Archives and Records Service 
The National Archives Building 
Washington 25, D. C. 



.Z ?. & ■ 



I. NAME OF VETEMN (Full name.^lOst name first) 

6 c:> 
Walling, George Virgil 



IDENTIFICATION OF VETERAN 



2. NAME OF STATE-)FROM WHICH HE 
SERVED // 



Ohio 



Civil 



<. BRAN'~" "•' •..HIC HE SERVED 

I ^1 INFANTRY | | CAVALRY 

□OTHER 



n 



ARTILLERY 



5. UNIT IN WHICH HE SLRVED ("iVame o/ regimen! or numier, com- 
pany, etc) 



(with Shermans I^'arch to the Seal) i I 



6. KIND OF SERVICE 
I 7J VOLUNTEERS 



7. IF SERVICE WAS CIVIL 
WAR (Check) 

[^ UNION 



D 



CONFEDERATE 



NOTE - If you checked "Confederate" in item 7, you need NOT fill in the following items: 



e, VETERAM S PLACE OF BIRTH 



Ohio 



10. VETERAN'S PLACE OF DEATH 



Kent County, Michigan 



9. DATE OF BIRTH 



1 No^^Kber 18^^6 



' ' . DATE, OF DEATH 



2l February 19^3 



12. FILE NUMBER OF PENSION OR BOUNTY LAND RECORD 



13. PLACE(s) where he LIVED AFTER SERVICE 



Mancelona, Kich. 
St. Johns, Kich. 



M, IF VETERAN LIVED IN A HOME FOR SOLDIERS, ENTER LOC AT ION CCily Old Sta/e; 

Grand Rapids, Kich. 



15. NAME OF WIOO* OR OTHER CLAIMANT FOS PENSION' 0=? pr;'»lTY UNO 



(d. 20 January 1911; Kelora Wallinp) 

BE SURE TO ENTER YOUR MAILING ADDRESS IN THE BLOCK TO" 



I 

THE LEFT. | 



NAR M^?''^ 288 



€y— 

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 
NATIOHAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS SERVICE 

EXPLAHATIOM OF ORDER FOR PHOTOCOPIES 



/^-\ 



r ■ . n 



L J 



Please use the other side of this form to order photocopies of records relating to a person who 
served in the United States or Confederate Armed Forces. We can furnish photocopies relating to 
the following subjects: 

a. United States (not State) pensions claimed on the basis of service before World War I; 

b. United States (not State) bounty lands claimed on the basis of service before 1856; 

c. United States military service performed after 1774 and more than 75 years ago and Confed-" 
erate military seivice. (NOTE - We do not have information relating to military service ren\ 
dered before thj Revolutionary War.) ^ 

Send us the completed form with one dollar. If you send more than one form at one time, your :e- 
mittance should be for as many dollars as you send forms. Each order will be handled separately; 
so you may not receive all your photocopies at the same time. Be sure to enter your name and 
address on each form. 

If we find a pension or bounty-land warrant application file which we believe relates to the person 
in whom you are interested, we will send photocopies of the documents we think most likely to be 
of interest to you. If no pension or bounty-land warrant application file is found, we will furnish 
copies of the military service record if one is available. If we do not find a file that appears to 
pertain to the person in whom you are interested, we will refund your money. 

The military service records rarely contain family information. Furthermore, the record of a man's 
military service in any one organization is wholly separate from the record of his service in any 
other organization. We are ordinarily unable to establish the identity or nonidentity of men of the 
same name who served in different organizations. If you know that a mun served in more than one 
organization and you desire copies of his military service record, a separate form and one cicllo'- 
fee should be submitted for the service record in each organization. 

Additional copies of this form will be sent to you on request 









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Certificate Xi>. ' ''. 



Sin, 



3-402. 



U.S. r .:.i -:iC '^ - 

DETi:OlT, 



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^ g;,Cvpur:hn.tn:l .of live %nitxx<>x^ 

^-J.:..\ BUREAU Ol-" PENSIONS, 

Washiiigfuu, D. C, JiuuKirij 7/7. 1S9S. 



lib foniHtrdi II a to llic /ji'uxioii icjeiil the (wcculcd roiirhrr foi* r/iji/r luwf 
(Itiiiilcrly j)aijinciit /ilrn.se faroi- nir Inj ret urniiii; lliis circiiUir to liiui }ritii< ^ 
re/jlics to the qice.stiojt-.s eniimcrd i i I licloic. 

' ' \i. I icspactfuJli/. 




mix loner. 



Firstt. Arc yoii married? If so, plc.''/!0 state your wifo'ri full naiiio and her maiden name. 

Answer. (^eAr ^^^H^^ /-&^^ ^. . i^.?/^— ^ \ 

S'fovd. Whii. where, and b}' whom were you married ? 

Tluid. What record of iiii,:'r;a>,'e (^xi.s(s? 

Aiuurr. \y- '.; - ''■.>T r-rCy^-^lr^^^^r^...- ^^ ..^^^^7 

fturiti. Wore yoj r/iviouKly married? If so, pleas., state the name of yoi. • 10^;.;^ r wife and the 
date ..n' pl.ioo of her.^oatkor divorce. 

Answer. -TuO .^ \'l... ::z.±^:..--^-'.'S'.-l .:':^.ZZ ' . .' -'^:?-... , 

.. V;''i llave you any children livir.j:^? If so, please, state their nauie.s and the dates of their birth. 

.■6 7X.J fay^J^^ J^^:'^^-^.yy^ /f'/^y.Q^^t^L^^^^ 

Date of reply,. f7<<./---»^U- 'V isn ^ „ . '^ - 







A^rito notliiD;: a\>ovo this lii 



•<At-000.) 



//o./^-^.l^i^. • " - - - - —-^ — ... 

i,n' r. ^^/- . Bureau ok Pensions, "" '— — - 

^^-^1^/p hJS)_^Aj^^.L.^u. Washington, D. Cj^/Cc^i ...Aji , IS.^.Pj.. 

I Siu: 

It is alleged tli;it>W^— TT:^.*'?^^., _.„ „ cnlistod .j^yj^'j ..^..?/. , isi-^'i. 

and served iis ;i.j^-wv-, ii-. Co.-'T/ , 0..9.1 Tu'g't S/^Aj .ll.tr. -y}/... 

. idso as a . .. iis Co , Kcir't 



anil was .liscliai-cd at ^.:^y&^^.^.?r'^..V^;j^./. "'.."........:...... r., L/y^.Mfr..... /.P.j , IS e 5^. 

Ii V. \\\sn \\\\(-<'K-i\ \\\\\\ \\\\\\ii in\ i\\\U -aX. . C^'f >^/^^ 



on (.1- ahout .//i^^.—r——. -—r... . IS^ JT/, lio WHS disabled by /^<^.«r-'^^^^/..'?^^-'*^'--^ mJ^<^^^ 



and wa.- treateil in li().s]iii..i- \iliicli .' , i.^f.-^, n.ations. and dates of treatment aro as follows: . 



In e„.>e. of tlic above-named soldier the War Depaitnicut is requested to furnish an ollicial statement of tlit 
snrolii::. .ii, diseliarge, and reeonl of serviee so far as the same may bo apijlieable to the foregoing allegatioii 
tojretlier witli full medieal iii.^co. Please give the rank he held at the time he is claimed to have incurred the 
lisabi! dleged, and if records show that he Mas not in lino of duty during that period, let the fact bo stat-ed. 
Very respectfully, • ^ -^ 

,,,, . ^„ , Cormnissionf'.r. 

//. ■>,'■■ ." in Cliurrjc vf the 

JU'Cord and Pension Division, 

/ If'ar Jjejtartincii'. 

/ 



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SOLDIERS no::.i: tTtR 

727541 ACT I,!AY 

DROP^EPORT—rEXSIOXEK 



Pensioner 



;: Cert. Xo. 



V- 



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c . Or 

Service j^..y.. 

Class/...;-...:- ■ 



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Group 



LAW DIVISIOX 



., 192 



_ In the nbove-cle.scril.cd c.i.se a deolarniio'n filed 
J in tins Div-i..;or; indicates that .said pensioner died 



Per 



-, 10 

ir. P. ^\ lu.r.v, 

Chief, Law D'tvhh 



DISIJURSIXG I) I V IS 10 X 

MAR 1 5 IGP^ 



, 192 



Check ^o//^..S.A.^'A^. % <^p 

dated ^i^...^.^^.^..:^^ s^^^i^,^ y; 

returned hy po.^tma.ster with information that '\ 
uhovo-desciTufd jiensioner died .rrrrrr. ^~...«„. 



j 10.".-..-..., has been cauceled. 
Per'' ^/U^ _^_ 



E. E. AIiLu:!!, 
Dislursing Olerb. 



EIXANCE DIVISION 



192 



.1 ..^ J5ar.,i ^&-i,■;u! aj>o\e-de.scribed pensioner who 
was last paid a; die rate^of $.:..V^5_^.. per month 

to ^1 ' • ^' / "^ ' ""' . 

■-....-... ■..-.■.•..::. , 19 ^ has tlTiiSrdfty 

becndroppcd from tke-rol 1 because of ■ ^'c u I /.. 

■:^:.-^^^^}fZ^e> •_ 

^^ J^}cf^\inance Division. 



The Sco ,q-f':ins FAmily Soci a l His tory 

Great grandparents Anne Laurie Allen and John Scoggins 
married and had five children, Claude, Robert Bruce, Bert, 
Bonnie and Charles, Bert died of scarlet fever at age six 
and a few months later John died leaving Anne Gcoggins a 
widow with four young children to raise. My Grandfather 
Bruce, was eiiht at the time of his father's death. 

Great Grandmother Scoggins went to work cooking at a 
local hotel in Greenfield, Illinois, earning three dollars 
a week and brought home leftover food to feed hor children. 
She also did washing and ironing for people to earn addit- 
ional money. 

A great deal of responsibility was placed on the older 
children. They too, worked to supplememt the family income, 
Iv:y frandfather had helped a local farmer plan; potatoes and 
r-eceived a, "runt" pig as pay, Bruce and his older brother 
Claude, carried garbage from the hotel to feed this pig and 
raise it to market size. With money gained from the sale of 
this pig he bought more pigs to raise. The children planted 
a garden each spring at Great Grandmother's direction and cared 
for the garden through the season. They grew fresh vegetables 
as well as potatoes for winter use. 

Great Grandmother Scoggins, busy at her hotel cook's job, 
].eft the children on their own. Often times when she hoped the 
children were in school, my grandfather was hunting, or work- 
ing at some near by farm or even at the race track exercising 
horses. He loved horses and animals of all kinds. 

Grandfather I'^'^t scho?] pftor ccmr'j.^tin^ fourth rrad^, 



l^G assumed the full responsibility of an adult at age 15 and 
worked full time as a hired hand on a farm. He v;orked sun-up 
I'ntil late cveninp; for tv;elve dollars a month. Later he v/ork- 
ed as a delivery boy at Metcaf's General Store in Greenvile, 
111. and as a milkman on a regular milk route. The rig had a 
bulk tank with a pint and quart measure hanging near the spjcket 
for measuring the m.ilk into customers own containers. V/hile 
delivering milk he met my grandmother, Clara Belle Chinn, whom 
he thought the prettiest girl he had ever seen. They were 
married in St. liOuis, Mo. May 31 » 1902. Clara was sixteen 
and Bruce v/as twenty-one. They set-up housekeeping in Green- 
field, 111. v/ith the grand total of twenty-five dollars. 

Five children were born of the union, my mother Edith, 
Carson, Alan, Genevieve, and Ross, Four of the five were born 
in Green County, 111. Carson was born in Christian County, 111, 
on a farm betv/een TaylorsvJlle and Morrisonvll] e , Where grand- 
father was farming. 

Grand father Scoggins worked at various occupations and 
was an industrious hard working man. He v/orked a team on the 
Illinois River leavy. He also bought and peddled brooms, and 
crockery though out the surrounding country side. V/ith these 
occupations he managed to provide a living for his family. 
However he alv/ays returned to his first love, the "training and 
driving harness horses, He dreamed of one day owning, training 
and racing his own horses. He lived to see his dream come true 
and indeed became a famous driver, winning many races. 

With this occupation, the family moved from area to area. 
Mother attended High Street School ten miles from Carrollton, 
vrv^':' she v;as eleven yoars old in the r-ixth grade. .:ranaiai,hir 
moved the family to Michigan, first to Tawas City, then to 



^-■:r.\'yrirxa^r , '•r'^.erc n.other graduated Irom high sciiooi ly^l. 
My mother start^r^ 'to Central Michigan U. at Mt, Pleasant Mich, 
but did not complete her f^diication until many years later. 
Grandmother Scoggins died Jan. 192'4, so mother went home to 
live and started to teach school. Prior to that time she had 
taught first grade then eigth in Riverdale, Mich. My grand- 
parents were living in St. Jphns at the time of Grandmother's 
death. 

Grandmother Clara Chinn Scoggins was one of five children 
born to William P. Chinn and Annie Mclanahan. The other children 
werej Vena, liarry, Ralph, and Dorothy. Great Grandfather Chinn 
deserted his i'amily when my mother was six months old. Later he 
v/as located living in Denver, Colo. , working for A.T.frT.. He and 
his two daughters were reunited there sixt.een years later. 

Grandmother Scoggins mother Annie McClanahan v;as a very strict 
and religious person. She passed this strict Christian belief 
on to her children. Grandmother Scoggins continued this tradition 
m her own marriage, Both Grandparents were members of +^''eBreck- 
enrldge Methodist Church. Later they transferred their member- 
ship to the St Johns Methodist Church after buying a home 
and moving the family to this town. My mother is a member of 
this church and Fred and 1 were married there. 

I did not know m,y Grandmother Scoggins as she died January 15 1 
1923. Her death was caused from trichinosis. My Uncle Carson had 
the same dis-'ase but recovered. I am told that Grandmother 
Scoggins v/as a devoted wife and mother. She is de scribed as 
having been a tall v-/oman, about five feet eight inches tall, 
of Irish-German ancestory. She had. blonde hair and brown eyes. 

I remember my Grandfather Scoggins very v/ell. He was five 
foot nine, of ^eott '.-h-Trish ancestory, ]\ar^ biaci: v/avy naii' 
and very blue eyes, that twinkled when he laughed. I loved my 



Grandfather Scoggins very much. He was full of living, laughed 
a lot and could tell very funny stories. He v/as a happy man, 
alwj^ys v.'histling and singing. He esp'-^cially enjoyed coming to 
'the farm where we lived in Michigan, to go pheaKa.nt hunting, 
with my father. He had an excellant, v/ell trained golden 
retriever dog, that could point and retrieve small game birds. 
Grandfather vias very kind to people and animal r.;, gentle and 
loving. He understood both animals and humans very wel], , He 
died at the height of his career as a very successful horse 
owner, trainer, and driver. 







LD 



Veteran 
Driver 
Misjing, 

'"rms 15 the time of year when 
1 harness liovsemen pick uP the ^ 
slack In their lines aud begin t>^:>^ 
learn Just whal can be expected of, 
their charges in the long racn:", ' 
campaign that stretches through the 
suiraner. Preparations begun in Jan- 
uary have reached the stage v^here 
owners, tiainers and drivers are 
looking at v.orkouts with critical 
and analytical eyes. 
■ As the line forms for the testine 
sprints this sprinj there is a wide 
gap. Robert Bruce Scoggins. as keen 
a horseman as central jMichigau has , 
ever kiioT.n, won't report tl'.is year. 
The former Si. Johns resident died ^ 
rcbruaiT 3 at the age of 56. Des til. » 
rpiiv If. Mr. A-r.,--;;:';, at Wapakf.n- •■ 
" r.ta, O., v-her.c lie had organised ? \ 
ElaWe. The harnc-s r^rn-.r z'' '" ^'^^''■ 
a. fplendid and capable figure when 
death caine to him after a long il!- 
ncc5. 

Hundreds who read The State 
Journal knew Bruce Scoggins. They 
had become acquainted with hin» 
tlnough personal contact or by .see- 
ing him dri\-e horses over central 
; Michigan tracks for years. He not ^ 
only was one of the biggest winners j 
in the history of racing hereabouts, i 
but he was extremely popular and 
had a wide circle of well wishers. 
Succ«.« first came to ivir. Scog- , 
' eins when he brought out Don Mc- [ 
Giegor 2;07-";, a pacer, that wa.-. 
very prominent, that year. Racing iri 
a field that included Hamony Bell, 
. Harry Volo, June Hal, and others. 
■- Don McGregor v.-as piloted to a sur- 
: pri'e victory and \inuicated the: 
judgment of Michigan people v.ho 
were backing horse and Driver Scog- 
gins. Then followed a campaign that , 
was waged in Michigan, Ohio. lUi- 
noi.', and Canada. At the fairgrounds 
track; here the iiorse set, a record 
that itood for 13 years. 



R. SCOGGINS' boyhood days 
v.ere spent riding runnuig 
He 



M 



horses tlnough the southwest, 
knew horses vei-y well He was great- 
ly interested in T;el!-bred dogs aud 
always had one or two. Bird hunting 



February 23, 1938 



The Late R. B. Scoggins 

The death of Bnice ScoRgin?, reported in Tlie 
Horscm.^n issue of February 9th, was a severe 
shock to his many friends and relatives. Mr. 
Scoggins was well known as a good trainer 
and race driver, and his success dates back to 
1922 when ho brought out Don I\IcGrcgor, a pacer 
that was quite prominent at the overcoat meet- 
ing of that year at Cranwood, Ohio. In the 2:14 
pace he started against Harmony Bell, Harry 
Volo, June Hal, and several other fast pacers. 
The heats were three-quarter mile, and Harmony 
Bell was in.stalled big favorite at this distance, 
but Scoggins' friends from Michigan did not 
overlook Don McGregor, and at the end of the 
race they cashed their tickets. Mr. Scoggins 
never overestimated the speed of his entries to 
his friends and owners and on numerous occa- 
sions he had developed more speed than he had 
confessed. 

His boyhood days were spent with the runners 
in niinois, Missouri and Oklahoma. He was con- 
sidered a good jockey and his services were in 
demand on race day. Martha Hal 2:03V2, Eddie 
W. 2.02%, Billy Hal 2:07%, Hazel McGregor and 
Hazel McKlyo are some of the fast record horses 
that raced well for him in' recent years. In 
1925 was Michigan's leading race driver and 
raced the stable owned by Bert Eekert, of Lans- 
ing. The McGregor and McKlyo mares were 
owned by Mr. Eekert, and it was their con- 
sistent winning that put Scoggins at the top. 

At the time of his death he had a good stable 
organized at Wapakoncta, Ohio. Mr. Scoggins 
was born in Greenfield, Illinois, ir ■"??"' For 
the past two years he had suft'ered badly from 
acute heart attacks. The remains were taken to 
St. John, Michigan, for burial. The widow, Mrs. 
Belle Scoggins, will remain at Wapakoncta until 
she can dispose of the horses and racing equip- 
ment, after which she will return to her native 
state, Illinois. v,» I. '-• .• C. H. STATELER. 



Bill Hal 2:07=i: Hazel McGregor 
■>-08U; HaMl McKlyo 2:05', and 
Resolute 2:06'-.l. Riding behind these 
horses he became the stales pre- 
mier driver and began v.-mmg na- 
tional fame. Nothing pleased Mr. 
Scoogins more than to develop an 
a.nimal and lake it into the grand 
circuit to score triumphs, Last fa.l 
in the last race meet of the sc.'.son 
at Lexington. Ky., he piloted Eadic 
W., an extremely long shot, to a sur- 
prise victory in 2:02i,i. It was a fit- 
ting climax for his career and must 
have given him great satisfaction. 
He was always modest about the 
■horses he was driving and was care- 
ful never to mislead friends about 
the ability of the animah he piloted. 
Tiine and again he -~ct down a light- 
i !v regarded horse in front ct the 




^■^ 






IIITES HE!.n FEB. 6TH FOR 

WI'.LL KNOWN HOKSEMAN; 

LIVKO HERE 7 1'E.\1JS 



Robert Bruce Scoggins, 56, former 
St. Johns resident and well known 
race horse driver and trainer, died 
at Wapakoneta, Ohio, Tluirsday, 
Feb. 3, following an extended ill- 
ness. 

Scoggins was well known here, 
and many will remember his driv- 
ing at the local county fairs. 

Last fall at Lexington, Kentucky, 
Scoggins drove his last race and set 
a mark of 2:02'.! at llie Lexington 
track. 

Robert Bruce Scoggins. son of 
John and Laura Scoggins, was born 
in Greenfield. 111.. April 28, 1881. and 
even in his boyhood days his love for 
horses and dogs was an outstanding 
characteristic. In May, 1902. he was 
united in marriage to Miss Clara 
Chinn and to this union five chil- 
dren were born, all of whom survive. 
He was a member of the St. Johns 
Methodist church, having transfer- 
red his membership from Brecken- 
ridge when he moved his family here 
in 1?22, He was also a member of 

I the I. O, O. P. and Modern Wood- 

; men. 

; Soon after ho piftchased his home 

in St. Johns his wife became serious- 
ly ill and died in January, 1924. Four 
years later he married Mrs Belle 

■ Clanahan. who survives him tni;eth- 
er with his childi-en, Cn , on and 

' Alan Scoggins and Mrs. u. sn. wul- 
vour.g of Lansin.g, Ross of Hillsdali. 
and Mrs. Alarion Walling of Ovid. 
He also leaves a brother, Claude L. 
Scoggins of Hindsboro, 111., and sev- 
eral grandchildren. 

Although his work took him to 
several states Mr. Scoggins always 
considered St. Johns his home town. 
On Feb. 3 he suffered a severe heart 
attack and was rashed to Memorial 
hospital at Lima, Ohio, but passed 
away before his family could reach i 
jhis bedside. 

Funeral services were conducted 
by Rev, Earl Collins at the Osgood 
funeral home Sunday, Feb. 6. Mrs.. 
■Esther Stone sang and burial was 

.-made in Mt. Rest cemetery. 



'^'^■i:<:^iU:¥ . ■( ■ * '■ ■*'■ ■ ♦ ' ■ f 

Local horsemen were much shocked to hear of 
the recent death of R. Bruce Scoggins of Wapa- 
koncta, Ohio. Mr. Scoggins won a good race 
here at the fall meeting with the four-year-old 
pacer Eddie W. 2:02 ',4, by West Virginia Boy, 
giving him his record in this race. Mr. Scoggins 
was also here some weeks ago and made arrange- 
ments with Col. Henry N. Bosworth to train the 
trotting gelding Tronia Guy, 3, 2:12 and the two- 
year-old colt by Calumet Adam-Sister Volo. by 



terested in helping bo>s. He lavisiied \ as the :i=iu goe, 

affection not only on his own sons, 

but gave adrica and assistance to 

dozens of others whon» he cainc to 

knor. 

Pro'-iressing in his career, he dro^e 
Martha Hal 2;03: Eddie W. 2:02v;; 



„ Pa^i-. ..'C ....oL... o. 

the drivers as their straining horses 
s-.rclch for the wire— ell the glamor 
and thrills of the harness horse 
meetins; will be a bi; flatter for a 
year or so. En:ce Scoggias won i w: 
there. 



the last named liad shown a higli order of speed 
at the trot. 



DITZLER. THOmS EUGENE, 1939- 



LEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

mar Contributor to the Hock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studyinc) 
rnerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
ew mintues, and will be easily made over Into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
ccess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY " ***A****AA***ftAAA*****AA:V:V^ 

nn- r. . * OFFICE USE CODE 

1. Your name Thomas Eugene Ditzler * 

Date of form , . , * (ID # ) 

November 24. 197^ ,., ' 

2. Y<nir col l(!ge: Rock Vail evf-o liege >•• (ID// ) 

J^ockford, Illinois * 

******* AAA AAA A. '^AftiV Aft A AAA :'c AAA 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 
Before 1750 1750-1800 xx 1800-1850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 



^1. Please check al I regions of the United States In which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

New England (Mass., Conn., R.l.) xx M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna., N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.} East South Central (La., Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, Ky 



W est South Central (Ark,, N.M. , Tex,, Ol<7r " XX E as t North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

} Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 111. Wis.) 

Plains (ND,SD,Neb.,K«ri77rowa, MO) 

5. Please check all occupational categories In which members of your family whom you have 
discussed In this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming M ining x S hopkeeping or small business j 

Transportation B ig Business M anufacturing ; 

X P rofessions Industrial labor x O ther Carpenter 

6. Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
In this paper have belonged, ... 

Roman Catholic Jewish Presbyterian _xx Methodist 

Baptist E piscopal Ian C ongregational L utheran 

fc Quaker Mormon O ther Protestant Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed In your paper? 
Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans 






Jews Central Europeans Ital lans ^Slavs 

'Irish XX British Native Americans over several generations 



^East Asian XX O ther Germany 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your fami ly history? 

XX Interviews with other xx F amily Bibles ^Family Genealogies 

fami ly members 

XX Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 

XX Photographs Maps ja_Other Newspaper Clippings 



1 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's sida) 



Nam e Eugene Rolland Dltzler Currant Residence 

If dead, date of death Kovember, 1969 



Place of birth Stephenson County 



Date of Birth 



1878 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 

Occupatlon(s) 

Pharmacist 



National Institute of Pharmacy, Chicago, Illinoi s 
XX vocational college /^X/ 



Ist 
2nd_ 
3rd_ 
kth 



Datas ^-1-1897 

Pharmacist St Post Maste ipates 1910 
Dates 



PUCE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 1897 to 
1 st Freeport. 111. Dates 190ifr 



2n d Davis. 111. 



190^; to 
Dates 1961 



Dates 



3rd_ 
Ath 



Retired in 1961, 

Dates 



Dates 



Re 1 1 g I on Methodist 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Masons 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother Freeport 



date 



1901 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) From age 10, he was raised by his 

stepmother - Henrietta, 
Grandmother (your father's sida) 



Name Minnie Brau 

If dead, date of death 1917 



Currant Residence 



Place of birth Germany 



Date of birth 



1881 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school XX 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupatlon(s) 
jj^ Housewife 



2nd_ 
3rd_ 
4th 



Housewife 



_Oatos_ 
Dates^ 
Dates^ 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) . 1901 to 
jst Freeport, 111 Dates 190'i- 



2n d Davis, 111. 
3rd 



"" 1904"~to 
Dates 1917 



Dates 



Ath 



Dates 



Religion Methodist 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororlt!as, etc._ 
Place of marriage to your grandfather Freeport 



Note: 



DATE 1901 



' {^a^®aatl^S?!*fhS^Ba£g'a?*^«|(|g Sile^y?)^ stepmother or another relative g 



Ive 



I Slepgrandfather (your father's side) 



N.IIIK' 



Current Residence 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



1 r ilrnd, d.itc of Jea 


th_ 










■"! 


Place of birth 










Data of Birth 
vocational college 


1 


Ed(ic;ition (number of 
grade school 


yea 


rs) 
_hlgh s 

Date5_ 


chool 


— '**— 


Occupatlon(s) 
1st 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 


2nd 




Dates_ 

Dates_ 




_2nd__ 
— 3rd_ 


Dates 




3rd 


Dates 




Ath 




Date$_ 




_i»th__ 


Dates 




Rcl igion 















^lace of marriage to your grandmothar 



date 



2 Stepgrandmother (your fathar's side) 

Name Henrietta Brau Ditzler 



\ Name Henrierta ar 
If dead, date of death 



Currant Residenc e Davis, Illinois 



Place of birth 



Germany 



Date of birth 



1892 



Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high school 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion(s) 

I s t Housewife 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 1913 



Postmistress 



lst_ 

193i^ to 
Dates 1961 2rtd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 1918 to 
(after leaving home) Present, j 
Davis, 111. _0ates_197ft J 



Dates 



3rd 



J)ates_ 
Dates 



Re 1 i g i on Methodist 

Evening Star (Woaen's branch 
Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. of Masons) 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Davis, 111. 



Date 1918 



3. 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name George Allen Stilwall 

If dead, date of death 2-25-'5r 



Current Residence 



Place of birth Durand, Til. 
Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 



Date of birth 



4-22^-1883 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupatton(s) 
Ist Farm Hand 



Dates 



? to 
1909 Ist 



1909 to 
2nd Mechanic & Road Malnten^"6fte8 1935 2nd Durand, 111. 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) ? to 
Durand, 111. D ates 1909 



1909 to 
Dates 1951 



3rd_ 



Watch repairman 



Approx, 
Dates 1935 3rd 



Durand, 111. 



Same 
Dates House 



Dates 



Itth 



Dates 



Methodist 



Re 1 i g i on_^ 

Pol it IcaT parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother Rockford Til. date 2-1-1909 

Note: If your mother was raised by fl SLepmUlir ur 'inuillir rCllltlvn! (co age 1 8) 
give that data on the back of this page (C'l) 



, Grandmother (your mother's side) 

I xName Rosa Ellen Wheeler Stilwell 
l)lf dead, date of death i\-'2r=T^W 



Current Residence 



Place of birth Durand, 111. 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Date of birth 



9-24-1390 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupation(s) 

1st Houset-n.Ce 

2nd 

3rd 



1909 to 
Dates 1963 



Ist 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 1909 to 

Durand, 111. a tes 1953 

■~~~~~~~~~*~~~~~ 1953 to 



J)ate»_ 
Dates 



2nd 



Pecatonica, 111. 



Jrd_ 



Durand, 111. 



Dates 1961 

1§^1 to 
Dates 1968 



Religion Methodist 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfathe r RocKtoca, iii. d at e 2-1-1909 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another r«UM«» ^to :;s T?3 
,!ve th^; Jslo wn ens bacK or this page (D>2) 



< 



CHl4DRtNof A & B ior A- 1 or 9- U ' v'cur fathar's name should appear below 



Nf"w Irene Ditzler Quick 

Place of birth Davis. Ill 



data 



Number of years or schoorirtg Hl ^h Schoor OccupatUh. Housewife 
Residence Deceased HarTtaT StQtua 



Number of chl Idran two" 



Married Briar Quick 



Name Roll an d Eugene Ditzler 

Place o^ birth P^y^?. t. 1^1' 

Number of years of achooTtng High School 

Res I denc e Deceased 

Number of children Three 



~^at6 4-8-1907 



policeman, 

___________^_^________^ mechanic , 

Occupa 1 1 0^^ Harness "; shoe repairm an. 
arltal Statu? MarrieTlTazei I^ayola 5ti!Iwerf 



Marne Robert Ditzler ,;..,., 

Place of birth Davis, 111. date 1922 

Number of years of schooiing' C ollege " Occupation i^hotograoher, doI iceman, factory 

Residence Rockford. 111. Har/taTTtstufl Ma rried — 



^. 111. 
Number of chl Idran Two 



Name 

Place of bt rth 

Number of years of' schooling 

Residence 



Number of ch! Idren 



Name 

Place of birt h ""^ 
Number of years of' schooHng 

Res I denc e 

Number of chl Jdren 



Name 

Place or birth 

Number of years o^ schooilrtg 

Residence 



Number of children 



Name 

Place of birt h 

Number of years o^ school 

Res idenca 



Irtg 



Number of chl Jdren 



Name 

Place o 

Number of years of school Ing 
Residence 



^tT 



Number of children 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooJIng 

Residence 



Number of chi Idren 



Name ' 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schoyfTna 
Res I dan c e ■ 

Number of CHI l'U!ri.'(T ' '— " 



worker 




(HILURtN .,( L and D (or (.-I, D-l)-your mothcrS name should appear beWiw 



Erma Stilx/ell Becker 



il.i(« 



Mm.- .>ri.ir II. " Durand. 111. 

"'""'"■' "' /'••'>■■ or school I Mf) 7igh School Occupation Housewife 

'■'•••"''•'"-'■ German Valley. Til. Marital Status Married to Lei and Becker 



2-1-1910 



Niiiiilirr ol f.h i Idrcn 



None 



fj.nn.- Hazel Fayola Stllwell Ditzler 

(' ',"'• "T t.i I tfi Durand. 111. 

N.jiiili.r ol y..>rs of schooling High School 

f<e<, i lic-tice Deceased 

Number of ch I Idren 



date 12-3-1911 • '^ 

Occupation Housewife, telephone 



Three 



Ellen 
N .iriK: Freda/Stilwell Nyman 
Placc^of birth . Durand, IIU 
Number of years of school ing 
Residence Durand, 111. 
Number of ch I Idren 



Marl tar Status Married to Roll and 
Eugene Ditzler 



operator, 
bookkeeper 



High School 



date 
"5c c up at I on Housewife" 



Four 



Marital Status Married to Jay Nyman 



N 'i^' Doris Stilwell Sddv 

"'■ "' '''''^^' Durand. Ill 
Number tif years of schooling 
Ke'.i deuce Rockford , 111, 
Number of ch i Idren 



"cfat< 



Two 



High School Occupation Housewife & factory worker 

Marital Status Married to Rod Eddy 



Name 

P I ace of birth 

Number of years of school ing 

Kesidence 

Number of ch I Idren 



Marital Status 



date 
Occupation 



N<iff«' 

P I ace of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Tdren 



OccupatlOrt 
Marital Status 



Naiiic 

P lace of b i rth 

Number of years oi schooling 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



_ date 

"Occupation 
Marital Status 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren — — — — 



date 

Occupation 



Marital Status 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



date 



_ Occupation 
Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 



date__ 
Occupation 



Number of children 



Marital Status 



f 



Your Father 



Name Roll and Eugene Ditzler 

dead, date of death 10-19-1962 



If 



Place of birth Davis, 111. 
Education (number of years} 
grade school 



Current Resldancs 

Date of birth i^-S-igo? 



Occupatton(s) 

Shoe 
1st Harness & RepairmanP ates 



high school XX 
1928 to 



vocational 



col lege 



2nd_ 
3rd 



Policeman 



1933 
1^33 to • 
Dates 19^*5 



Highway Repairman D ates 
Mechanic 



19^*5 to 
1947 



4th 

•^^''g'on Methodist 



T^k/ to 
Dates 1961 



Ist^ 
2nd_ 
3rd_ 
i»th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 1932 to 
Davis, 111. D ates 1940 



Durand, 111. 



1940 to 
Odtes 1962 



Dates 



Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Masons 

' ll | ..llll . «|I M» l | . r i P . ' , 



Place of marriage to your mother ■ Illinois '^~" ' d ata 4, 1932 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or anothar ralativs give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 



Your Mother 



■•^me 



3me Hay.Pl Fflvnia f^tilw^n TliYTAe-.r- 

.f dead, date ofoaatn 

Place of birth 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Current Rusl dance 



Data of birth_ 
vocational 



col lege 



Occupation(s) 

1 s t Housewife 



Dates 



2nd_ 
3rd 



Telephone Operato Bates 



Bookkeeper 



Dates 



l3t_ 

2nd_ 

1953 to 

1962 3rd_ 



PLACE Of RESIDENCE I 

(after leaving home) 1932 to 
Davis, 111. Dates 1940 f 



Durand, 111. 



1940 to 
Dates 1962 



Dates 



Re 1 i g 1 on Methodist 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc« 



Place of marriage to your father Illinois | ''^^"^" ^"^^^ __date 4, 1932 
.NOTE: If you wero raised by a stepmoth'sr' oF*anotK'2r raTairi"vV"gTv3*"T!T"at data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



) 



li 

II 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



Name Lola Mae Ditzler Gaffney 
Place of bl rth 



RockEord. 111. 
of school Ing uif 



'umber of years of schooling High School 

Residence Durand. 111. Marital Status Married'to Joe Gaffney 



Date of birth 8-27-1932 
Occupa 1 1 cm Housewife 



Number of ch i Idren 



Six 



Name Kenneth Allen Ditzler 

Place of birth Rockford. 111. 

Number of years of schooling High School 

Res i dence Durand. 111. 

Number of chl Idren Three 



Date of birth ll-S-35 



^ Occupation Farmer. Detective 
Harltal Status Married to Lolita Tschabold 



Name Thomas Eugene Ditzler 
Place of bi rth 



" „ Rockford. 111. 

irs of school inq Hii 



Date of birth 5-24-1939 



Number of years of Schooling High School Occupation Car Wash Opera t<^. t ree 

Res i dence Rockford. 111. Marital Status Married to Janice L. timmer 

None Mahnke 



Number of chl Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Residence 



Number of chl Idren 



Marital Status 



Date of birth 

Occupation 



Nanje 

Place of bi rth 

^Number of years of school ing 
) eb i dence 



l)ate of birth 

Occupation 



Number of chl IdreH 

Name 

Place of birth 



Marital' Status 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Number of chl idren 

Name 

Place of bl rtfi 



"^ ' \ _ '"'Date of blrth__ 

'_,_______,___ Occupation 

Marital Status 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Date of birth 

Occupation 



Number of chi Idren 

Name 

Place of bi rth 



Marital Status 



Number of years of^ schooling 
Res i dence 



Tfarital sFa t us 



Date of blrth_ 
Occupation 



Number of chl Idrert 

j 111. ASSKiNMtNT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are williny 

ID 



1 hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and adiiiunstr.Jtivc 
ri(jhts,"to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



Signed /H^-z W^-^ ^ 
Date 



4 



lomas Eugene Ditzler 



p. May 
ried August 
d 



24, 1939 
24, 1963 



GENEALOGY CHART 



SEE WRITTEN HISTOEI FOR 
INFORMATION REGARDING 
GREAT, GREAT GRANDPARENTS. 



♦ Thomas Eugene Ditzler 



@ Eugene Rolland Ditzler 



(7)Rolland Eugene Ditzler 



Father 

B April 8, 1907 

M April 1932 

D October 19, 1962 



Hazel Payola St il well 



Mother 

B December 8, 1911 
M April 1932 

D October 19, 1962 

Legally changed name to Rolland 
Eugene (was Eugene Holland}. 

Grandfather E. R. Ditzler married 
Henrietta Brau in 1918 (Grandma 
Minnie Brau's sister) , 

Grandma Rosa Stilwell married Harley M> 
Davis in approx. 1953. He was bom 
February 3^ 1886; and died December 
14, 1972. 



Grandfather 

B 1878 
M 1901 
D 1969 



Great grandfather 

B October 25, 1838 

M 

D 1918 

Matilda Moothart 



Great grandmother 

B 1841 
D 1889 

Henry F, Erau 



Minnie_ Brau 
Grandmotlier 



BOr 



B 1881 
D 1917 



B 1850 
M 1874 
D 1930 

Anna Melster 



B 1855 

D 1931 Hallock 
Trudane / Stilwell 



B August 17, 1855 
George Allen Stilwell m July 18, 1882 
Grandfather j D August 4, 1944 
B April 24, 1883 
M February 1, 1909 
D February 26, 1951 ^.^^^ gj^^^ Collins 



B September 26, 1866 
D April 13, 1933 

® Ira Bert Wheeler 



Rosa Ellen IVheeler 



Grandmother 

B September 24, 1890 
D November 21, 1968 



B March 
M August 
D March 



30, 1859 

13, 1882 

1, 1932 



Harriet Elen Rice 



B April 3, 1852 
D December 16, 1912 



(41 Great Grandfather Wheeler married 
Margaret Prindle on August 13^ 
1920. She was bom April 12 j 
1863; and died November 14 j 1942. 



...J 



METHODS OF OBTAINING INFOK-IATION 



B7 inteirviewing the following: 
Sister: 

Brother: 

■1 
Aunt: 

Aunt: 

Grandmother: 

Cousin: 

Cousinr 

Uncle: 

Stevenson Gountj Courthouse. 

Winnebago County Courthouse 

Book entitled: 



Lola Gaffney. Durand, 111, 
Kenneth Ditzler. Durand, 111, 
Freda Nyman, Durand, 111, 
Erma Becker. German Valley, 111, 
Henrietta Ditzler. Davis, 111, 
Fern Ditzler, Freeport, 111, 
Lois Nath, Brodhead, Wis, 
Robert Ditzler. Rockford, 111. 



History Of Stevenson County 1970 

Published by the County of Stevenson 
Freeport, Illinois 



Family albums and scrapbooks, 



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% 



ROCKFORD MORNING STAR Sahirday, Dec. 28, 1959 • 3, 



Christmas Color 
Blurs for Soldier 



Comolidated New* Service 

DURAND — Chnstma* for Tom 
Ditzler, 20-year-old Durand soldier 
home on leave for the holidays 
isn't as colorful this year as it 
might be. , . ,. .- ^ 

Ditzler, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ro- 
land Ditzler, has lost the vision in 
his left eye- and most of the sight 
m the right, eye. during the past 
year. - '"- ^■■- - ■^,.. 

Doctors at Fort Benning, Ga 
where Ditzler is stationed, do not 
know what caused the mysterious 
loss, of sight, but- have discounted 
the possibility of cataracts, the 
army specialist told The Rockford 
Morning Star Thursday night. 

The eye difficulties began in Oc^ 
tober, 1958, while Ditzler was on 
field, exercises during his basic 
training.,- . -,r. ,> ... , - .,j ._, 

"One morning I woke up in the 
tent and everything was sort of 



■a-...^-"i:.^.''.ff<if.^ 



blurry," Ditzler said. He recalled ~ 
that the Sight m his left eje,v»as- 
completely gone by last Christmas, .v 
when he came home on convales- V, 
cent leave from Fort Gordon, Ga. . 

Last Oct. 27, he began expeci- -." 
encing the- same blurring in his '^~ 
right eye. Sight in that eye now is-J 
20-50, which means Ditzler is not.s:; 
able to discern features of persons -^ 
on a television screen. - — ■ "J 

Asked what he thinks about his 3 
future possibly- with little or no i 
sight, Ditzler replied, "I'm wor-^; 
ried about it."" ' ': -^ 

He said doctors fear that if his*? 
ailment can be cleared op, it '• 
might return later. ~ ■ ■,"'„?--£ 

'Ditzler; who talks calmly about 4 
his disability, described tiie fara- ^ 
ily's (Christmas tree in- their Du-<~^ 
rand home.. "It's mainly blurry."' 
It looks pretty - good though,'!, he 
said. ■' -■*'i-''. 



•5 



^ 



:*,.J;j 



Durand Soldier Loses 
Most of His Sight 

Cor^solidated N'ews Service 

DURAND — Christmas for Tom 
Ditzler, 20-year-old Durand soldier 
home on leave for the holidays, 
isn't as colorful this year as it 
might be. 

Ditzler, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ro- 
land Ditzler, has lost the vision in 
his left eye and most of the sightl 
in the right eye during the past 
year. 

Doctors at Fort Benning, Ga., 
where Ditzler is stationed, do not 
know what caused the mysterious 
loss of sight, but have discounted 
the possibility of cataracts, an 
army specialist said. 
Morning Star Thursday night. 

The eye difficulties began in Oc- 
tober, 1958, while Ditzler was on 
field exercises during his basic 
training. 

Ditzler, who talks' calmly about 
his disability, described the fam- 
ily's Christmas tree in their Du- 
rand home. "It's mainly blurry. 
It looks pretty good though," he 
said. 



c 



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L 



FAMnr HISTOHI 



Thomas E. Ditzler 
Rockford, Illinois 

Thomas Ditzler was bom in Rockford, Illinois on May 2U, 1939, 
At this time, his folks were living in Davis, Illinois, 

When I (Thomas Ditzler) was 1 year old, we moved to Durand, Illinois 
where I lived for 28 years. I attended Diirand Grade School and also 
Durand High School while residing there. Upon completion of high school, 
I became employed at Barber-Coleman Compajoj in Rockford, Illinois. I worked 
there from May, 1957 to August, 1958, After this period, I went to 
the Army recruiters office and joined the Anry. (This was in August, 
1958) 

I had my first real upset while I was in training at Fort Leonard- 
wood, Missouri, I was on a night training session, when a flare exploded 
very close to me, I thought eveiything was all-right at the time, but 
several days later I had very little vision in my left eye. I was hos- 
pitalized for several months and released for further duty since the 
doctors thought my condition was stable. Approximately one year later 
while I was at Fort Benning, Georgia, the same thing happened to my right 
eye. I was hospitalized again for about 8 months this time. The doctors 
labeled my condition (Chororetinitis) which simply means hemorraging of 
the eyes. 

After I was discharged I took up residence with my folks in Durand 
again. Since my eyes were very poor, I didn't seek any employment at this 
time, (This was in July, I960.) 

Later that summer, while on vacation at Lake Mills, Wisconsin, I 



met my wife to be. 

On October 19, 1962 I had another tragedy. My folks, who worked in 
Rockford, Illinois, were involved in a car accident while on their way 
home. They were both killed, and I was suddenly left alone. 

I was receiving some compensation from the Veterans Adminisyration 
for the loss of my eyesight, but it wasn't enough to sv5>port a household. 
At this time, I stsurbed a car-wash in Durand. I did fsiirly well, since 
there wasn't any competition in this field. Also I had two fellows who 
boarded with me and the rent they paid really helped. On weekends I 
would return to Lake Mills, Wisconsin where I had purchased a house trail- 
er on the lake. It was very relaxing and also meant that I cotJ.d see 
my wife to be. 

She (Janice L Mahnke) was from Milwaukee, Wisconsin and her parents 
also had a house trailer at the same park. We dated for several years 
and were finally married on August 2U, 1963. We resided in Diirand for 
five years and then moved to Rockford, Illinois. At this time I was 
employed by a tree contractor and trimmed trees for the Utility company 
there. 

In June, 197U I was declared legally- blind by the Veterans Adminis- 
tration and was terminated by ny eiaployere When this happened, I wjnt 
to th^ blind center at Heinz hospital in Chicago, Illinois and became 
evaluated for some further training. When all ray tests were evaluated 
the Veterans Administration suggested that I attend college. At this time 
I'm attending Rock Valley College in Rockford, Illinois. 

My father, Holland E, Ditzler was born in Davis, Illinois, He 
attended both Grade School and Davis High School there. Upon completion 
of high school, he worked for his father in the drug store. Several 
years later he started his own shoe repair and harness repair business. 

Approximately 1930 he met Hazel Stillwell who had been employed as 







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a housekeeper. They became married in 1932 and had three children. 

In 19^0 they moved to Durand, Illinois . 

From the harness shop and shoe repair shop, he became employed by 
the city police department in Freeport, Illinois. I can still remember 
very well, hearing him tell about his experiences with Chicago hoodlems 
during prohibition. (Especially the time when John Dillinger traveled 
through Freeport, enroute to Chicago.) Dad told me that the police force 
was instructed by their commissioner, to get out of the way and Just let 
him travel through. I guess John Dillinger had more fire-power in his 
little caravan than the whole city of Freeport. 

Approximately 19h^, he became employed by Winnebago county highway 
department. I believe this was just for a couple of years, then he be- 
came employed at Globe Imperial Company in Rockford, Illinois. He had 
a Job as a die-caster,, This paid quite well (l think close to $100 weekly) 
but was fairly dangerous. 

In 1950 my father also experienced a tragedy. He had to have his 
left hand amputated due to being caught in a die-cast machine. The word 
has it, that another fellow accidently tripped the machine, not kno^d.ng 
that iny father was there. 

After losing his hand, he became time keeper and safety director at 
Globe Imperial. 

My mother. Hazel Ditzler (Hazel Stilwell) worked first at being a 
hoTisewife and a mother. After we three kids were in school she became 
employed at the telephone office in Durand, as a telephone operator. 
When the small telephone compare merged with the large, her Job was phased 
out. 

She then, became employed at Globe Imperial Corporation in Rockford 
Illinois . (Perhaps a little pull somewhere.) She was a bookkeeper 



r. 




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//^AJ-R/jer-TA JL) frxj^sTK st-^jl/^ t^ js-s/ 2>jss /aj T-z^fs /^annx 



EUGENE R. DITZUER. R. PH. 
DITZUER'S PHARMACY 



TEU. DAVIS t009 



DAVIS. ILLINOIS 



£'-^-l)/rz./,£'RS "SuSJ/VAiS Oy5'7?-2> 



^^,,K^U^ >^J^>«^*^#'-xt4<t:Zfc^yO 



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and a company first-aid nurse, I believe this would have been in 1953 • 
They seemed to be very happy at this time and were doing quite well 
financially. There were no house payments and the only thing they seemed 
to be worried about at all was me (Thomas Ditzler) and how my eyes were 
getting along. 

In October, 1962 tragedy struck again. This was the car accident in 
which they both perished. 

My grandfather, Eugene Holland Ditzler was bom in Stevenson County 
in Illinois, but I'm not sure where. Some think it was Pearl City, but 
there doesn't seem to be a birth certificate available. 

He attended grade school and high school in Freeport, Illinois but 
didn't complete high school. Instead, however, he went to work for a 
coTiple of doctors as their clerk in a drug store. Later he attended 
National Institute of Pharmacy in Chicago, Illinois, Upon becoming 
licensed in 1897 he purchased a drug store in Davis, Illinois. (This 
was approximately 190U) He also built a new house there at this time. 

He became married 3 years previous to this to Minnie Brau, also from 
Freeport, Illinois, They had 2 children and were very happy. 

E. R. Ditzler, as his business card implies, also served as a doctor 
when the emergency arrived. He would treat bum cases and etc., as I 
imagine most dimggists did at this time, when doctors weren't available as they 
are now. 

He was a very strong church and masonic member in Davis. (Quite a 
small town gentleman.) 

As history sometimes repeats itself, tragedy strikes again, E, R, 
Ditzlers wife, Minnie died at the age of 36 in 1917. She supposedly died 
from a heart and kidney ailment. 

At this time, Henrietta Brau, Minnies sister, came to Davis from 
Freeport to keep house for E.R, She took care of E. R. Ditzlers children 




3:> /rcje^K da£A^ V9<i^ 



^■^i^yjs ^js-^:3>jsrf — STje-pr. /9d/ 




^X^ :^4^^ '-^'■<i^^*^->^ 



[Ditzrers^nonore'^'^ 

. ' ,The.I)8via^ Busin«asmen's. Assoc- 
iation-, honored Mr. and' Mrsi-Eu- 
gene Ditzler on Tuesday evening, 
SeptyiS; at dinner at the Mayflow~ 
er in Rockfoid. - ^ . 

There were 31 present at the din- 
ner, ;The group presented Mr. Ditz- 
ler. a tie clasp and Mrs. Ditzler- a 
bracelet and a corsage, -i^ .-■->-*;: ij 

Mrsr. Ditzler retired from her job 
as postmistress'of Davis on August 
31 and Mr. Ditzler has retired from 
his' business as. pharmacist, : "• . ? 

Mr. Ditzler 'nras honored for his 
B7 years of service as the register- 
ed pharmacist of Davis. Six years 
prior to operating his own- busi- 
ness, he worked with Dr. J. - H. 
,Staley and Dr. W. B. Caldwell, twa 
; noted surgeons; He was- also post^ 
master of Davis, for 23 years..;. y^| 

Mrs^ Ditzler was honored forh'er- ' 
27' years- in- postal:. work;. For the 
last 15'years she was postmistress 
in Davis; '"' ,';'-'^'"t-.''<> t . •;-i.-.i-a;.^>^^ 

The Ditzlers have two sons, Rob- 
ert of Rockford and Rollin of Dq,-^ 
rand.. They- have given much to the- 
community^ and are- sure to be mis-^ 
sed.^-;-y-- :„,■.:;'■■":'" 
■ Mr and Mrsi^ Ditzler donated the 
ground, ta^theconununity. on. which, 
the monuments to- veterans- now 
stands. A committee headed by 
Mrs. Ditzler, with the help of the 
general : public and Boy Scouts, 
made this- monument a part of the 
community, dedicated to those who 
served, oui— country ^-ia__war.,^and 
peace;, :^~^''-^^^::L<r''-^"'i:^i^'^^ix 



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like they were her own and eventually, both her and E. R, became very fond 
of each other. They became so fond of each other that they were married 
in 1918, Four years later, in 1922, they had a son, bringing the total 
to 3. 

E, R. Ditzler retired in I96I , having served the community of Davis 
for 6U years. 

He died in I969 at the age of 91. 

My stepgrandmother, Henrietta Ditzler (Henrietta Brau) was bom in 
Germany in 1892, Her father, Heniy Brau came to the United States in 
1893. She has no birth certificate and since she was only 1 year old, 
she can't remember the name of the town in Germany. 

Henrietta lived with her parents, Henry and Anna in Freeport, 111 - 
inois until she went to Davis to keep house for E, R. Ditzler. 

When the children were all raised, Henrietta decided to help out 
E, R. Ditzler in the drug store. There was a soda fountain, post office, 
and drug store, all in the same building. 

In I93U, Henrietta became postmaster of the post office there. 
She worked hard and was acknowledged for her many achievements. In I96I, 
both E. R. and herself retired and sold the business and post office. 

She still resides in Davis, Illinois at the age of 82, 
My greatgrandfather Henry Brau and great grandmother Anna Brau (Anna 
Meister) both were bom in Germany. Henry Brau was bom in 1850 and Anna 
was bom in 1855. 

They were married in l87li in Germany, Henrietta says the reason 
he came to the United States was to get away from the wars. 

Henry was a cabinet maker and secured employment in Freeport, Ill- 
inois in this profession. He died in 1930 and Anna died in 1931. 

My great grandfather Thomas Eugene Ditzler was bom October 25, I838 



g .n vi l w ■l l ^ l ll l^lJ I )l^ l |lJ l .■y || .l ll ll^^^l]^l^»jJM ■ ^l w p ' ' ^m» i )UkyiJilgm." ' -^>*':"" ' a ^ W"'^" « 'va g i ! J^ "l i""i - ii" m ^}.'"MfJv^ W .' . ' .' ' " '"' T i.-k ".W; "! ■ . ' .'»■ f. ' F -- 




.._ „., ■ - --..^i^&ii:;^ 



In Pennsylvania. Several years later, his family moved to Stevenson County, 
The only information I can get about him is that he was a farmer, and mar- 
ried Matilda Moothart, who was from Stevenson County also. Matilda was 
bom in l81a, and died in I889. T. E. Ditzler died in I918. 

Mathias Ditzler, Thomas E. Ditzler' 3 father, was bom in Wurtemberg, 
Germany on January 28, l8l2. He came to the United States in I8l5, when 
he was just three years oldj and settled in Berks County, Pennsylvania. 
In Pennsylvania, he met Rachel Babb, who was bom on October 26, I8l5. They 
were married on January I6, 1837; and moved to Stephenson County, Illinois, 
in I8I4D. The only information I have about Mathias is that he was a farmer 
and a caiTpenter, Mathias must have been very good at his occupation since 
he supported their 11 children, I can't find a date however, as to when 
either one of them died, 

FMIir HISTOEZ OF MI MOTHER, HAZEL DITZLER (STILviELL) 

George Alan Stilwell was bom on April 2U, I883 in Durand, Illinois, 
He was a farm hand for Ira Bert ^Vheeler , who farmed about 3 miles east 
of Durand. This was his first, known occupation. Being a farm hand 
probably doesn't soimd like much, but it was probably the most iinportant 
occupation my Grandfather had, for he met his wife to be on that very 
farm. 

Her name was Rosa Ellen TiVheeler, daughter of Ira Wheeler, She was 
bom on September 2ii, I89O, 

George and Rosa were married February 1, 1909 and moved to Durand, 
Illinois where they purchased a house and lived in that same house all 
their lives, 

George Stilwell, at this time, became employed by the Winnebago 
County Highway Department, Not only did he work on road maintainance, 
but he moonlighted on the side as a mechanic. He did a lot of motor 



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overhaul and also repaired windmills. 

In approximatelj- 1935, trage<t7' also struck George Stilwell. He got 
a severe case of Arthritis in his legs and was confined to a wheelchair 
for the rest of his life. 

At this time he started a new occupation as a watch repairman, I 
can remember very well, as a child, going to his house and watching him 
work on watches and clocks of all sizes. The constant click, click, 
click, just about drove ma nuts. He was a very outspoken man, but I 
can remember that he loved us kids very much, I loved him very much 
also, with one exception. Grandfather loved to chew snuff and thought 
it would be veiy funny to see what I would do, when offered some. Nat- 
urally, I took some, I can still hear him laughing, as ray face was turn- 
ing green. He nearly fell out of his wheelchair. It wasn't nearly as 
funny though, when my mother found out where I got it, 

George Stilwell died in the River Bluff Nursing Home on February 
26, 1951. 

Rosa Ellen Stilwell, wife of George Stilwell, was at this time left 
all alone. Not for long though. My mother decided that she should come 
and live with us. We lived in Durand also, and were a veiy close family. 
Grandmother rented her house and moved in with us. My father gave her 
the whole upstsiirs of our house, so that she could have a little privacy 
and entertain her friends, for she had many. 

There was one friend that I remember more than any other she had. 
His name was Harley M, Davis, He was bom on February 3, 1886, He was 
an old friend of George and Rosa Stilwell's, He would come to our house 
to see Grandmother, and when he did, he always brought flowers or candy. 
This went along for some time and they became quite fond of each other, 
I can remember hiding behind the door and watching them kiss goodnight, 
Harley even caught me once, 

Harley and Grandmother were eventually married in 1953» 



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,^?^'MBS.;TJH- STn,WELl;^>;^; 

k.-'Durand, : Ap-lt, 13— Funeral 'seM 
ices for Mrs. .I'x-u vane H. StlUwell, 
66, who died at her home here Wed- 
:nesday morning, will be held at 2 
p. m.' Friday at the Durand M..E. 
church. The Rev. E. K. Hester will 
Officiate and burial will be In, Shir- 
land cemetery. ' V \-' - , fi 
"^Mrs, StilweU.,the former Aiinnie 
Collins;. was born Sept, 28, 1866, and 
on^ulyiill. 1882, was united immac- 
rlagtfswlth Truvan* StUwelLi The. 

'.j g , i ft i r. J ■ -- . 



7<uJ>/tAj£ i»n^ /y7/A^Aji£ ST/je.i4j/rji/. 



couple- observed their golden wed-j 
■ding- aniaversary last summer.' ' ! 
, j-Besides her husband, Mrs.' StU-' 
.weUJs survived by three sons, Allen 
of Dtirand, Roy of Bucklin, Kans,, 
and-Percy of Clinton, Wis.; a sister;. 
Mrs. Ida Johnson, of Milwaukee,, 
t i!^^-' '^«> l^lf sisters, Mrs. F. Meng' 

I'-|aad Mrs. Ada Belmont, both of Chl- 
|||eago; two half 'urothers, Thomas^ 
I I^ColIins of .Chicago and Fred ColUnst 
\ ,t>' RocWordr ten -grandchildren and 
\ one great grandchild. Two children 
T. H. STIL-WELL-DIES t 

^Trudane Hallock Stilwell, 88, died 
Monday- i^^ Shirland . .vrhere he had 
, resided all of his. life. He was born 
'there-Aug. 17, 1855. .■> , 

•'1* In- June, 1882, he married Minnie 
'^EUen Collins, -who died in 1933. He 
J IS survived by three sons, George' A. 
J Durand; Roy of Rockford; and Percy 
J of Clinton, Wis.. 

r Funeral rites were held at 2 p. m. 
Wednesday at the Chapin funeral 
home with the Rev. Kenneth C. 
Thompson, pastor of the Durand 
Methodist church, officiating. Bur- 
, ial was in Shirland cemetery. " 

* * "^"■^ ' — ' ■ — '■ -■ -kib^-'... 



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■E"4terment;wasat^3eth^^ 
.teijrlXgMrs.'-iWhedez'./waslTW^^ 
ana'^ayoraDly;?.J:nown5.ai^d^inEi 
mother, i-and .pkmdi (neighbor, =dSiU 




^^^^A'^^ 



Harley owned a farm on Winnebago Road, near Winnebago, Illinois. Off 
to the country goes Grandmother and her newly wedded husband. Since I 
was a city slicker, I really thought this was swell. After all, this 
gave me a chance to help milk the cows, help with the harvest, and also 
served as a place where I could spend a good share of my summer vacation 
from school. 

In 1961, Harley and Rosa decided it was time to retire. They sold 
their small farm and moved back to Ihirand in the house which Grandmother 
still owned. 

Rosa Stiwell, (Davis) died on November 21, I968 and Harley died U 
years later on December lli, 1972. 

Trudane Stilwell, father of George Stilwell, was bom on August 
17, 1855. The only information I have on him is that he was bom in the 
Durand area and lived there all his life. He actually lived in Shirland, 
Illinois, a very small town east of Durand. His grandchildren tell me 
that he liked to hunt and fish a lot and that's about all they know. 
Trudane married Minnie Ellen Collins on July 18, 1882. Minnie was bom 
on September 26, I866. 

Minnie Stilwell (Collins) died on April 13, 1933 and Trudane died 
August k, I9UU. 

Ira Bert Wheeler, father of Rosa Wheeler, (Stilwell) was bom on 
March 30, 1859, in La Crosse, Wisconsin. He came to the Durand area when 
he was just several years old. 

Ira Wheeler married Harriet Elen Rice on August 13, 1882. Harriet 
was bom on April 3, 18^2 in Laona Township, north of Durand. 

Ira and Harriet purchased a fam^ on what is now, IVheeler Road, east 
of Durand. He was considered a veiy prominent farmer in that area. 

Harriet died on December I6, 1912. At this time Ira remarried a 
woman known as Margaret Prindle on August 13, 1920. Margaret was bom 



:^%iIRj^ BERT WHEELER DIES '| 

'^t'^Mr.: Ira Bert Wheeler died suddenly 
on, Tuesday inioming of >? heart at4 
. tack at his home east of. Durand. Mr.j 
"Wheeler was 72' years and. 11 months 
: old at-'the time of his death. ," ,;; - 
IrlHe.was^horn.in La Crosse, Wis., on 
! March 30.::1859.-^He came. to. Durand 
■Vhen .he- was,- a .boy. .Mr. Wheeler- 
■' married Ellen Rice Aug. 13, 1882. J 
vShe preceded hira in death on Dec. 16>^ 
' 1912. To this union three children, 
I were bom, Zina, who died in infancy, 
t Harry Wheeler and Rosa Stillwell. 
[.'Mr. Wheeler was married to Mar- 
garet Prindle on'AMT. 13, l92a. " 
•C.Mr. Wheeler is also survived by 
one sister,, Mrs: Rosa Stain, Palo Alto, 
Calif., and' one brother, Simour, Ven- 

ice,'Calif.,,,-.-V-''' -■-"'■ ' ' ■ 
.-Funeral services will be held at the 
Bethel church at 2:30 o'clock this af- 
ternoon -(fith Revt.E. K. Hester offi^ 
^ating.j;Burial will be in the Bethel 



i 



IMargaret Wheeler 

A'ord was received here y^terday 



by Mrs. James N. Carroll, 726 Kll- 
bum avenue, o£ the^death of her 
sister, Mrs. Margaret A. Wheeler,] 
a former resident ot Rockford, at 
her home In Tustin, Cal, Nov. 14. 
iMrs, Wheeler was bom April 12, 
"1863, at Plattsburg, Neb., and had 
lived In Rockford several years be- 
fore going to California eight years 
ago. 

; Surviving besides the sister here 
iare a son, W. J. Guyer of Chicago; 
.a daughter, Mary A.. Walters of,' 
■^Santa Anna, Cal; two brothers, G.I 
. W. Harris of Retnbeck, la., and Kj 
E. Harris of Capron; and several! 
:^eces and nephews. . \„J 



( 



on April 12, I863. 

Ira VJheeler died on March 1, 1932 and Margaret died on November Hi, 
19U2. 

SUMMARI 

When I first received this assignment from my history instructor, I 
knew it would take a lot of research and homework, and it certainly has. 
However, as my wife and I started on the project, we found it very hard 
to put aside. It's very hard to explain, but one's history can be very 
exciting, I've found out information that I would never have known, had 
it not been for this assignment. Not only is it interesting, but it 
brings a person in contact with his or her whole family again. Usually, 
this only happens at funerals and such, and this is a real shame. 

Hopefully, this family history report, will be half as interesting 
to the people reading it as it has been to the person writing it. 

Thomas E. Ditzler 

Student: Rock Valley College. 




J^u.7^/9a>j? ^T^orrt /9y^ ^cxJT/JL T//JSf?f l>JPAiT// /^ /9dJZ, 




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j^lVITHLx} zJiJlOTTRS OCCUKS j 



*.Tc? -'Second' ;lUlln?, Btatlwi holdup i 
Tvithiii a-;twenty-four;:vhpiiriT>eriod 
ovefsthe^trweek -end tookVplace : at 
8:30 o'clock Saturday evening, when 
two- bandits entering the- Shell. Oil 
company, stationiftt Si Galena- And 
W.'". Spring street .'.-^xobbedt- r George j| 
;3o1eader; ',the:jaitendant^bf:-'$2t).p8 j 
and '^walking -west rfin-cSptSiig; street ij 
, made .^thelr, .escape vJa7, a- <jir-Taiter -ii ] i 
:pigtol.Aattl e:ylto:aJB.'.13ittl^r parkii 

■soTrth"bq!^Ut.ej-26;i-.^'-4.tj,^^i;'g^^^ 
tk BolMder . was ;behJdlng-'p,ver ,'♦ Tnap I 
■6pt 'jL .stable "rjust; -inslde^f the'^'.dbtei 
assisting '■> a ; commercial ■-• insurance !| 
f, traveler- from -Jillnnwoliyni tracing* 
■it^hlBa^yay' when' h* -was ''tibnlrbnted| 
■hylth'i. two:bai«Ut»";ttandlng'4n 'tticj 
:tiparway.-^'One:«bher,'-^h'3ini^>lM 
[haijdv^dressed-'Bolender J:.:-';Oive --TOi 
•iSreur^^'jicU" t*\iTSolenderirJiiTew,JSthS 
nioney,-,on;ai^' table''n»*lcliil3^^;ca<«> J 







^g^EeSf -th^robber -amd . 



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"' 3^i^wKthC.>toaowlBte'ein>^3l^ 
. jtw3'l)aiMUtsxtwalldngyjwwt-CiDrt^^ 

; J^6^fiere;ltanM3t^ogetsii"r«bn,'ot ■ 
: :$n]2U|ml-;?X<)jrerst,'<pqlJc^^^ 

;■ :'B«iant;::?wae;-filttt£g:!iaT*^?iinrf^wlth? 

. ipanJon-',«n\^Sprliig{strMt-sto^' " 

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■ ?gitIJ«fi;,tefc;p»Vindi5&.'twn'-yc^^ 

U CSb??fe^est.to:Si^^;i3i%6^to''^ 







^^^^Ml^ 



Ernst Lieberman 
*•""'"• -- -"Trn 

CHIEF HIGHWAY ENeiNEER 



_ STATE OF ILLINOIS 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND BUILDINGS 

DJVISION OF HIGHWAYS 

II II rti .-■.■■-■ -ftp, niiiBimn 

r >*i n ii nnio a Mi-^l5?i3ifi6, director 

SPRINGFIELD 



fiobt, Kingei 



IN YOUR REPLY f>LEASE 
REFER TO FILE: 



February 1, 1933 



S^sjj^^ 






mm 



-¥- 






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4P ::■ - 



Mr. R. E.I Ditzler, 
Davis, lilinois. 



Dear Sin 



,.«„;, 1 1°^ ^® hereby notified of 

your appofntment as Maintenance Patrtlraari 
on MamteAance Section #242 at /^"^^"^ 
salary of $100.00 a month, effective 
February 2, 1S33. 

w^+vtr ^^1®^®^ ^^"^ ^^ touch at onie 
SiS. Ti?'- ^- ^°^f^' District Engin<.er, 
Dixon, Illinois, who will give you 

eqSp^entf"'''°"' ^^. ^'''^^ ^^^ necisBary 



.....Js!^' 



Very truly yoiors. 



Chief Highway Engineer. 



^ 





o > 



coo "ly/A^JfKSAJT TV VMS 






. ^.>.-'is. 




The name of Roland fitzler was added to the roster ot 
thousands of workmert' wKcyhave^niade great sacrifices as 
they stood by factorjff^machines. • 

Pitzler is pictured above atfew 
moments- after an. operation -was 
performed upon Jiis hand by-two 



surgeons who had to cut it pff in 
order to free the toiler froziK'the 
maissive die casting machine.' 

He resides in Durand<andihas 
three children. The accident- oc- 
cxu-red at the Globe- Imperial 
Corporation at 2029 Kishwaukee 
street. The man had just start- 
ed to work on the , night shift 
which begins at 3 p.m. 

The first-aid car, manned -by 
Traffic Officers Holmberg and 
Foster, had answered a call' to 
the .'factory and upon their ar 
rival there they found they could 
not extricate the victim- 



griiesomely with the oil and 
waste heneath the cold idle ma- 
chine. The doctors quickly ad- 
ministered a sedative to Pitzler 
whose whole body had become 
like a giant tootache as he pa- 
tiently waited for ; assistance to 
come. 

While the machinist stood con- 
scious, the surgeon deftly sever- 
ed the mangled member from the 
man. Quickly washing the wound 
with a disinfectant the doctors 
bandaged the stump which a 
few minutes before had been 
the wrist of the worker. 



/9^o 



'their car, they called headquar- 
ters and Captain Roy Johnson 
ordered the desk sergeant to call 
a physician on Broadway and 
ask him to be standing on the 
corner when the captain arrived. 

The doctor left an office full 
of patients- to comply with the 
police request. '. He hurried out 
with his clothes on his arm and 
his medicaJ kit 'in one han3. 

Rushing 'into* the factory,' he 
saw felloW workers of Pitzler 
shuddering; at. the sight' of the 
man whose hand had Been 
greedily drjiwn into the machine, 
A cold sweat.w'as on the faije^of 
the victim who had not fainted 
or passed out, although he was 
suffering excruciating pain. A 
grayish color aged the man so 
that he looked at least 65. A 
downtown doctor also arrived at 
the' scene. 

Warm human blood mixed 



c 



As our ., V photographer, 
Brady, took ■ the picture, 
Globe worker 'Avas being L 
ed to ■ the police ambu 
stretcher. The , accident 
never lost , eonsciousnes 
screamed in pain but compl 
that his firigerl which had 
left in the .factbry machine 
hurt him." " ■; 

Only twice d«i he let a p 
whimper pass 'through hia 
swollen lips. At the hospil 
was necessary to cut two 
inches off his wrist. ^ 

Pitzler was locked in the 
chine nearly . an hour befoi 
could oe extricated. Someoi 
the plant found a bottle 
stuff that is forbidden to In 
and forced a huge slug dow 
man's throat before the m«j 
men arrived. 

They injected over a 
cocaine in the worker's ami 
fore they started the grisiy ij 






■■'"^,: 



'~1 



CERTIFIED COPY OF A RECORD OF BIRTH 




I HEREBY CERTIFY that^tbe attached is a true and correct copy of the record 

of birth oi..A<^^<h^--^^^ 

as made from the,j5riginal certificat^of such birth now on file in this office in accordance 
with the law requiring reports of bikhs, stillbirths ancLdeaths in Illinois. 

Signed j)df:A..T5..viLra!<?r?^^ 

Addresl _ -.^.^^rf^^^l^r^a^^ 



/<y 



Date. 



:jk^.....^..z:..rzz^j^ 




( 



-*- i '(By flazel SMlwell)*^^:; ' 
Who .cared for tI)Q fate of our country, 
When'Wr liiitory ha'd harcjly begun? 
H0-W«ff*|nanT^YJi<?'- loved hia^ti^jf, 
And'hip' name 'was Washington. ' 

:>V-- '-..;^ '^■■*=" ■ ^--r^- 

Duringhia" early maphood ;- 3- 
i Of hard, work, he had hia sha-e, '^ 
He fought w^U in the Revolution?' ^ 
Of himself he wias \inaware. ;.. ^ 

He led his'sufFering. army ^„ ... 
Whose feet were blookV and bare; 
And o,n one cold December night, 
They crossed the Delaware, 

He was victorious many timggj . 
And many reve-enced Vis name. ^^ 
At Princeton and at*^iepton '" . 
As a le§d^, he gained much f aiifie, 

His army \vintere<l at Valley Forge, 
Wheg hope' wa3 very dim. -? ' 
His soldieySj yere quite down-hearted ^ 
But were' encou- aged greatly by him. j^ 



Yes, he was a wonderful leader, ■; 
And he helpecf (0 win the war.."' 
He then became our President^ ^ 
When the hard time was o'er, • 

He proved to be a gpod one, - 
For bp started our country right. 
1 Oh, that we had moie leaders -x;- 
1 With his courage, W'll» an4 ^^^ '■ 

1 ■ o '■ — 



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/LZL^^^^- ys___ 




THE WAR MEMORIAL: Excerpts from the July 
28, 1967, "Davis Leader" tell the story of the war 
memorial: "In 1937 next to Ditzler's Pharmacy 
stood an empty lot with only the shell of a building 
on it. In 1938 the Eugene Ditzlers, owners of the 
pharmacy, purchased this lot, removed the aban- 
doned building, and donated the front 40 feet to 
the village of Davis to be used for the erection of a 
memorial honor roll. 

"The honor roll was erected through funds donat- 
ed by villagers and stood proudly in this spot for one 
year. At the end of this time, the names which had 
been engraved on it began to wear off, and soon it 
ceased to serve the purpose for which it had been 
erected. ... In 1956 concern over the condition of 
the honor roll became so great that a committee was 
formed and a fund was started for the purpose of 
erecting a new memorial. . . . Mrs. Eugene Ditzler, 
was chairman. ... A donation of $100 from the 
Davis Athletic Association got the ball rolling, fol- 
lowed by a gift of S300 from Northern Illinois Tel- 
ephone Company. 

"With these funds as an initial payment, the com- 
mittee in 1957 selected and purchased a solid cast- 
bronze plaque at an approximate cost of $950 to re- 
place the worn honor roll. . . . Less than twelve 
weeks before the village planned to celebrate its cen- 
tennial anniversary $550 was needed. More than 
$550 was raised. 

"The remainder of the fund was placed in the Da- 
vis bank. From lime to time money from this ac- 
count has been used to maintain the landscaping 
around the memorial. . . . The 48-star flag which in 
1957 flew over the monument was dedicated by the 
Davis Masonic lodge. . . . Just before Davis Days, 
1967, the committee's original chairman, Mrs. Ditz- 
ler, saw the need for a fifty-star American flag to 
replace the original forty-eight-star one. A new flag 
which had flown over the Capitol Building in Wash- 
ington, D.C. was obtained by Congressman John 
Anderson, who announced his intention to dedicate 
the flag during Davis Days celebration. However, at 
the last minute he was unable to attend and Mr. 
Ransom Bradley performed the dedication cere- 
mony." 

The Davis centennial celebration look place July 
24 to 27, 1957, with a week of parades, programs, 
displays and so on, detailed in the centennial book. 
William Brault was chairman. One of the events 
was the planting of the centennial tree in soil to 
which had been added gift samples of earth from all 
forty-eight states, the District of Columbia, and the 
future stales of Hawaii and Alaska. The centennial 
book, "Covered Wagons to Station Wagons," has 
already been mentioned. 



CONTEMPORARY DAVIS: The last half-century 
of business in Davis has been characterized by more 
than the usual number of long-enduring ownerships. 
The Davis Cheese Factory was opened in 1919 by 
Royal Eichelberger who still owns it. 

The Clover Farm Store was begun in 1919 by 
Ralph Benning and continues as the Davis Grocery, 
owned by Mrs. Chester Afilerbaugh. 

Owasso J. Bulicofer was in business for over sixty 
years, first with his grocery store, and after 1920 
with his service station. He also was president of the 
bank for over a quarter of a century. 

The longest period during which one man ran one 
business was 1904 to 1962, the years that Davis was 
served by Eugene Ditzler in his drug store. The busi- 
ness is no more, but w s once one of the basic neces- 
sities in the village. 1 s description of it, in the files 
of the Stephenson County Historical Society, recalls 
the dependence of the village on its drug store. 

Mr. Ditzler was born in Pearl City in 1878, stud- 
ied pharmacy in Chicago, and worked as an appren- 
tice in Pearl City and in the store of A. C. Fye of 
Davis. After clerking in a number of places and 
working in Freeport for doctors Caldwell, Stealey 
and Snyder, he returned to Davis and bought Mr. 
Fye's store in 1904. The store had been begun by 
Mr. Fye in 1891. 

Mr. Ditzler put in a soda fountain in 1906; moved 
to a new building in 1916; added the post oflice to 
his duties in 1917, and for fifty-eight years knew and 
served his neighbors with the intimacy which is re- 
served in small communities for the doctor, the 
druggist and the minister. His responsibilities often 
resembled those of the other two professions. He 
had once as a clerk refused to sell strychnine to an 
eighteen-year-old girl only to have the proprietor 
sell it to her "to kill rats," and discover a few hours 
later that she had taken it herself. His rule against 
selling poison or chloroform resulted in Mr. Ditzler's 
having as an act of mercy to chloroform countless 
sick or injured pets for their owners. 

He had to give first aid in emergencies and to 
help in many other ways. A man came in one eve- 
ning and asked for aspirin, describing his pain. Mr. 
Ditzler told him he probably had appendicitis and 
took him straight to a Rockford hospital where at 
three o'clock in the morning surgery saved his life. 

Mr. Ditzler used to buy herbs such as ginseng and 
even grew that herb in his yard for a while. With 
tiles and molds over a hundred years old he manu- 
factured suppositories and pills. Using his own 
formulas he mixed liniments, cough syrups, lotions, 
tonics, and the like. 



Sometimes there were communication problems, 
such as when a little girl said her mother had sent 
her for a box of "gloria divine." 

"How does it come?" 

"It comes in a can." 

More questions until a light dawned and Mr. 
Ditzler sent her home with the required chloride of 
lime. 

He was often called out in the night. His home 
was conveniently near the store. One night soon aft- 
er he had gone to bed he was aroused by an old 
farmer from four miles out in the country who had 
come to town with a German neighbor. The passen- 
ger went home with another neighbor, but the Ger- 
man farmer had come, as was his occasional habit, 
to make a night of it at the saloon. His light farm 
wagon had no other seat than a rocking chair with 
the rockers sawed off, and was drawn by a team of 
fat, patient gray work-horses. 

About one in the morning Mr. Ditzler was awak- 
ened by a loud racket. As usual, someone had helped 
the man into his wagon and untied the grays to 
take him home. But they had turned the corner by 
Mr. Ditzler's house too sharply and the harness had 
caught on the round knob of the Ditzler corner 
fencepost. Mr. Ditzler talked in soothing German to 
the confused man and his unhappy horses. As soon 
as they were released and started on the right road 
they plodded home and arrived in safety. 



DAVIS EARLY BUSINESSES: Doctors: May- 
nard, Grey, Stabeck, Hamil, Fisher, Brenneman, 
E. A. Benton, K. T. Rostad, and Alden Smith. 

Shoemakers: Joseph Gibbons, John Kropf, Mr. 
Wendt, William Caldwell, John Schmitt. 

Blacksmiths: Joseph Afflerbaugh, Nelse Ende, 
Dan Walkey, Barney Moorberg, Martin Johnson, 
Charles Long, Ende and Gearke. 

Wagon makers: Thomas Hayes, Frederick Buti- 
cofer, C. G. Mayer. 

Carpenters: Henry Diemer, Isaac Diemer, Wil- 
liam Green, Henry Ritter, Daniel Wenzel, Michael 
Pauly. 

Hotel keepers: David Bollman, Michael Pauly, 
Aaron Gold, Philip Orth. 

Lumber dealers: George Osterhawt, Mr. Keller, 
Ashton Cross. 




The Dovis depot of the CM. & St.P. Roilroad in 1908. It hos 
been torn down like most rural town stations. 



Druggists: A. C. Fye, Dr. Stabeck, Dr. Brenneman, 
Mr. Brethaupt, Kunz and Lindley, Mr. Alberstad, 
James Blackmore, Eugene Ditzler. 

Stock dealers: W. Arnsmeier, A. Woodring, 
Thomas Bond, Michael Meinzer, D. Bollman, Mr. 
Morris, O. H. Hazard, William Arensmeier. 

Clothiers: Martin W. Kurtz and L. B. Markel, 
Orth and Company, G. W. Becker. 

Brick manufacturer: Michael Meinzer. 

Grocers: Martin W. Kurtz and L. B. Markel, 
Samuel Cornelius, Jacob Orth and Company, Mr. 
Crary, and Mr. Allen, J. O. Patter and Company, 
Mr. Barloga and Mr. Wendt, G. W. Becker. 

Painters: J. S. Afflerbaugh, Charles J. Liljequist. 

Harness makers: Thomas Cronemiller, Truly 
Brothers, J. S. Williams. 




_■ IBM 



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U(w 4nd saw almift*WA2*?j|nli 

irig from this irear'^f -ilHe^ featatf; 

I rant of E;:H:!£{ean^'. '1' H6 /i^fmie^ 

I diately ' ddilii^ :hl8 ^clotbea "^^and 



Mble^I: loss' l^xi^jilno^iifiaSraiic^*^ 




ce^feil oriXthe > etst'^a^drrB. ;s-'M. 
M<Jri&y *B ? Store bultding'^ .'6ii;^ the 



the . Wbodih^ft' Mil), alid Mrl^d^ , 

CroWt^et sciiifred tem^Jfi^^uai^. 

r th4buitdin^; hb\^^cUpifea 



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N;incy M. Wheeler, an early settler 
intliir. vicinitj p;issed away at the 
himii.' of her son. Hert Whi eler. l^ist 
Kridav, Jan. 5, 1900, aged 68 years, (> 
aioiit lis and 1 1 riayji. 

; She had heen a resident of this 
coiintv for about forty years. Sept. 
7.. 18o0 she WHS united in marriage to 
Ira Wheeler, who prf ceded ner to the 
{jraye July 17, 1868. There were born 
of this .union(. four children, all of 
whom survivtl her'. About ' si.x ye.i rs 
ayo she came to make her hotiie " ith 
her son Bert. Where she departed tin •. 
life. She was a most amiable l;iii> 
and well anil favorably known 'in ih - 
v'cinity. The funeral was lield Inan 
the house to the Bethel chui cb SuiuU'y 
morninL' at 11 o'clock, Kev. C. .\. 
Ga(;e officiatin;f, and inlerment was- 
made in the adjaceiit chori-hvanl, ' 






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DOLAK, JULIE JOV 1957- 



PJ.KASK TYI'I': I'LEASIC PLAt:!': THHSE SHEETS AT THE FRONT O E THE SECOND COPY OK YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY. 

Dear Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

S n that your family history can be made more useful to historians and 
a tilers study 1 I))', American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
below. This will take you only a few minutes, and will be easily made ovet" 
Into an index which will permit archive users ready access to Just tliose 
kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



Your name 



Date of form 



Ji;-Lie 



flpi\ I oto, itTb 



Office Use Code 

(ID #_ ) 

(ID // ) 



Your college: Rock Valley Co l lege 
Rockford, Illinois 



Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 



Before 1750 
1850-1900 



1750-1800 

1900 or later 



1800-1850 



Please check all regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

y N e w E n g 1 a n d ( M a s s . , C o n n . , R . 1 . ) -■ Middle A 1 1 a n t i c ( N . Y . , I' e n n a . , N . . 1 
Va.) South Atl an t ic (Ca , , Ela . ,N .C . ,S .C . ) __.^__I'^ast South Centra L 
(l.a . , Miss . , Al a . , Tenn , Ky . ) y. Wast South Cen t r a 1 ( Ar k . , N . M . , Te x . , Ok . ) 

X E a 3 t North Central(Mich.,Ohio,lnd.) Pac i f 1 c (Ca 1 . , Wa s ii . ) 

_(llawai I ,A 1 aska) ^ ( 1 1 1 . , Wi s c . , ) 

Please check a I 1 occupational categories in which members o I your 
family whom you have discussed in this paper hav<^ found themselves. 



Farming 

Transportation 

Professions 



Mining 

Big Bus ines s 

Industrial Labor 



Shopkeeping or small business 

Manufacturing 

Other 



Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you iiave discussed in this paper have belonged. 



Roman Catholic Jewish j>- Presbyterian 

Baptist Episcopalian Congregational 

Quaker Mormon :" Other Protestant 



>: M ethodist 
;■: L u t h e r a n 
Other (name) 



What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Swedish Other Scandinavian German French 

Blacks Indiana Mexicans Puerto Ricans __ iCastern l.u 

Jews Central Europeans _Il;alians Slavs 

-r Irish British 



Native Americans over several generations 



East Asian 



Other (Name ) 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 



Interviews with other 

f ami ly memb er s 

Vi tal Records 

-_^ Photographs y_ Maps 



Family Bibles 
Land Records 



Other 



Family Genealogies 
The U.S. Census 



FAMILY DATA 



Grandfather (your father's side ) 

Name ■Jj/j c,^ fi^r/i^ rd prJa k Current Residence (^ jec.fJo rti ^ F'i^>'.rir 

Date of birth ^(.^ i y -r, I9r.'r' Place of birth 



Date of death 



Edaca tion (number of years); 
grnde school g high school 

Oc!'upation (s) 



PJ^ace of burial 
vocational 



Cqol) t!.i fy I 1.M 



College 



2nd 

3rd 

Ath 



Dates 
Dates 
Da t es_ 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
_ls t rii, I.,' r I /^K- Dates 



.2nd PL ^prM^ flr.t- Dates 



3rd 



CI^Qi^utet _ Fir. 



4th 



Dates 
Dates 



Religion f^e^c.>\ gn^yf.t. 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

r>'? r^nrfc! f.r ^ S tr v I ..xvr f^^-r .s' (^ .-. , r, ;^ 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother ^nl.^-i iit, date ^^j^, y /7_^(\ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

N a me -: Sr-phir> ^L±}^wsh^ C urrent Residenc e Chd^ct t .^"joit^ci.. 



Date of birth_TT^^^ < ;-^ j? ^^. 
Date of death 



Place of birth CjuciX^^c^h.^-^ 

Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school "^ high school 

college - 



voca t iona 1 



Occupation (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDI'NCE 
(after leaving hiome) 
<o I . f 4 , ILL Dates 



1st 
2nd 



. .. r ,1,/ <f)r:?., » a t e s 

. _ 3 r d Cl' i^ruu.+^t ^ fir. . 1^ a t e s __ 
4th Dates 



Religion i^rs^.^ Cafhr,/.., 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

tiC/>locrq f'lC 1 



I'lare of marriage to your grandfather -^rcif-f , III date r^T^, I u ^ 1-9 "jo. 

NOTi:: If your father was raised ' i o age 18) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on the back of this pa;', e 
(A-2) . 



A-2 S tepgrandf a ther (your father's side) 



Name 



Current Residence 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 

c vj 1 1 e g e 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Religion_ 



Da tes_ 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



1st 

2nd 

.3rd_ 

4th 



vocational 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

D a t e s 

D a t e s 

D a t e s 

Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
2 S tepgrandmo ther (your father's side) 



date 



Name 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school 

c o 1 1 e g e 



vocational 



Oc cupa t ion (s ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



_lst_ 
_2nd_ 
_3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Da t es 
Dates 



Religion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 



n n t e of birth 



-fiujos J ?, y yo a 



Current Residence 
Place of birtl 



Da te of dcat h g^^j jq^ j ^,„, 



' ^V^UiiCfJ) c_s^_5..c^ ^J^i^ ._ 

Place of burial /^g uJ > < .; c ^ 0.^ I Lj^ 



Education (number of years): 
grade school S high school 

c c u p a t i o n ( s ) 

2nd_J 
3rd 



voca tional 



college 






4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



1st 

-2nd_ 

3rd 

4th 



L ^..i ;c >\ f i , C 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
D ate s 

Da t es 

Da t es 

Dates 



Religion p.-^ ,\hy tf r,o r, 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc: 



P'ace of marriage to your grandmother >Ln ^ i ^r c g , c.p ^ ; z.*^ date Fc^ (o, /7 4^ 

NOIM'. : If your mother was raised by a stepfather or anotlier rel.itive (t 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 



Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name .^r.■^Pp>^. ,,» .Ci hv^ / tVockf 

Date of birth tp,., .j<y^ )^c^.^ 

Date of death 



Current Res i dene e ^p ,^j,-f|,cf, c^ /u- 

Place of birth acm/ .-t»f ^ Cn. I L^- 

Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school ^ high school 



vocationa 1 / 



01 J- 



col] e g e 



Occupation(s) 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



1st 

2nd 

_3rd 

4th 



PLACE OF RF.SIDI'NCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dal e s 



Da I es 
Da t es 
Dates 



Religion ?f p ;^.^ -f^r.c ^ 

l't)litical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, c t c . c^pyjj^L; t;^ ^ 

Chufck f^f(^u^pi> /\l(Mv,f Hiui^LS-ts-^ . ■ 

Place of marriage to your grandfather / 1, ^)i^r\Ce C<-. , > ^^ Date ^^jb . (i , i ? i 3l 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (lo 

''^' "^ fiflve thflrt d*Ca on th'e back of this page (D-2) 



C-2 S tepgrandf a ther (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

Place of birth 



, 5 



Date of birth_ 
Da te of death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupation(s) 



1st 
2nd_ 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Da tes 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of burial 



voca t ional 



col lege 



1st 

2nd_ 

_3rd_ 

4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
D-2 S tepgrandmo ther (your mother's side) 

Name 

Date of birth 

Date of death 



Date 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



Da tes_ 
Da tes 
Da tes_ 
Dates 



Place of burial 



voca t iona 1 



coll ege _ 



.1st 
.2nd 
.3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



D a t c 



CHI 



-DREN of A & B (or A-2 or B-2 ) - your father's name should appear below 



Jl^ 



d a t e fioJ.f ^ I9y 



Name (;^MI.f.^ r,-^o.;,^.>- r^..ir, k 

Place of birt h ^- ).p4. ^j^ j^_ 

Number of years of schooling;^ 

RcsidencefVl, ^^f^^ < ak. Marital Status (Aatc.'e.X 
Number of children 3 Death 



c c u p a 1 1 o n ytoche / 



date 



Nam e LoiToif,^ Ann ^lo^.e 

Place of li i r t h^cj,,»f^ | 

Numbt'T of years of schoolinj 

Residence CK f wcvK f, P"b . Marital Status f^r. fC^d 

Number of children ]_ 



-tit- 



ccupat io n rv 



Death 



Name Lfiif^r lftfi-^>uf h<^lr, \^ 

Place of birth ,srfl/,«f . luu 



Number of years of schooling liiS!L 

Residencep/^,,„,.,ri ,^ iVj.ct, Marital Status f^ic..t(,ec( 

Number of children >y Death 



date fy)arch J^-,r7^y^. 

Occupation i >.s^<,f^ k r'/tp,v i, s +- 



N £1 m e 

Placi' of birth 

Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



d.i t (• 



c c upa t I o n_ 



Number of children 



Name 



Marital Statu s 
death 



date 



Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Reside n c e Marital Status 

Death 



c c M p fi t ion 



Number of children 



.N a me 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling_ 
Residence 



Occupation 



Number of children 



Mar i tal Status 
death 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Number of children 



Marital S t a t u s 
death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling_ 

Residenc e 

Number of children 



c c u D a t ion 



Marital Status 
death 



Name 

Place of birth da t e 

Number ot years of schooling 

Residenc e Marital Status 

r^'nmber of children deatli 



Oc (■ upa t ion 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling _ 

Res i li L' n c e Marital S I a I u s 

Nuiiilier of children death 



(• c upa t ion 



7 
CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 

1- Name 'p^ p hyrt- Ji\ Tc<: K ^ Cv jff s^ ,^ • , 

Place of birth /^...v^o^.- (\. , u i- date aV,/ -Xo. i9^ ^ 

Number of years of schooling j_^ Occupation Fq ri'^^^-Y' 

Residence jw-i II rouce Cc.;^^ Marital Status >'-h rrigc/ 

Number of children 3 death 



Name f^y^.u Cc.roU,^ C, ll<isp\'^ 

Place of birth Afii.ippnff Co ,:ti-t^ date j^^g. V, I71> 

Number of years of schooling /to"*^ Occupation ) ecxe Kg C 

Residence lJVoneoo /k.I- Marital Status /^n t r , ^d 

Number of children ^^i death 



Name Hiv, >iC^ !^, Lc.^,,\g CrlfkSpi^-^ 

Place of birth A^.j,-f.,c-e- C.c ^ txL date |T^g,g k ^. I9:\i'' 

Number of years of schooling i^ Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status i\a r.erl 

Number of children O death 



Name Al^,,^.f>,r, LMC.life C-, J^e^^/n/e hnll ah^r. 

Place of birth j.Q<...-, tP^c^e c'o. , I iJ^ date ^^Jy i;^^)9-^^ 

Number of years of schooling /^ Occupation Ct|iC<; »«.'o/K. 

Residence kgu-^ifho-ev'.lfg ^)i^i^ Marital Status />">Qf r ,cc( 

Number of children j;^_ death 

Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation^ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation^ 

Residence ^Marital Status 

Number of children.' death 



Name 

Place of birth _date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of children\ death 



10 . Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence ^ ________ Mari tal S ta tus 

Number of children death 



Your Father 



Name '.J , / 1 ,<•. ,>, ^vpo r^^ t- he In K ^^Current Residence |Vc ,; ;. (^,, / ^.^i 

Date of birth ^l,,,., •/ ^ | <f ^^ j Place of b irth 4:- ; .p)- ;,^. 

Date of Death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school ^ high school ■V 



vocational 



c o 1 1 e g e V ^ 



Occupation(s) 

^s ^ T^c f' ri c r 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Da tes 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st rToi,ef , Ji-A, Dates 



2nd ^r.fc, I Cv K ^ f^V.fK Dates 

3rd |>^,,, ,c. , I K'-- Dates_ 



4th ]>,i /p ^.,if , ij^i^ 



Dates 



,Ck foic' , /A/^ 



Religion ^^/.,a» (5.^ -t-h n I , cl 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. j^^ ^p c* r<^i\ r 



Place of marriage to your mother --Tr 1 . e t //, /_ date f^(^c . /X, /9-r( g 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 



Your Mo ther 



Name 



-Pldfy Co-fclyn r-.iipsp^ 



Date of birth J^^^^ y /^-^ > 
Date of death 



Occupation(s) 

1 s t j;£X(..eji£x— 



2nd_XiJjX«aLiiLiv- 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 



Religion pii.<<^^ i-t>f.G^ 



Current Residence '^,.,s,|g C.o _ Ikj- 



Place of birth A Cii;^' r f n c ^ c^q^ j^/^ 
Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school ^ highr school '-j 



vocational 



col lege V'" 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Of. K MicK Dates 



1st 

2 n d pp^f.c.^ J v^ D a t e s _ 

3rd p,.. )o■^. ... p , //./. Dates_ 

4th k^ek^\./rV , ;i.t^ Dates_ 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. f^f p ^. h/ ica^ . 

Fqciuify uti^/f's ) PT6,^ h. .n,QY c/uh — 

Place of marriage to your father r^c\i^^ ^ //^<^ date )9u^,Cj l Yj ]9'^C, 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the kack of this page (F-2) . 



E-2 Stepfather 
Name 



Date of birth 



Place of birth 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



voca t ional 



college 



Occupation (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



_lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



PLace of marriage to your mother 
F- 2 Stepmother 
Name 



Date 



Date of birth 



Place of birth 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



voca t ional 



col lege 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd, 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Da tes 
Dates 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 



-2nd 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Religion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your father 



date 



— /■* 



10 

CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2,F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 



Name rTul.^^^o. C^lc k 



Place of birth pr.vr.1 (\o k ^ i^ .c U Hate of birth -Tu/w .? /<?-?- 

Number of years of schooliflg y.:^ Occupktl'on 

Residence \\^ .q<> c* ,^ ^ l u. Marital Status S./i^-i^v 

Number of children death 

Name [>..., p( U 'ji i a m rAVoK 

Place of blrth i^^^^i 6<. k ^ >-m'. c ^. Date of birth he,-., /w y??/^ 

Number of years of schooling (J Occupation 

Res J dence jXpotTp (\-i ^^u- Marital Status S: ncK 

Number of children death ' 

Name Su5c\n Fnn^<.^'i | ^.->)Q K 

Place of birth i'^^yv, I C\c.K ^ fv>.'ck Date of birth ^Vai), I:j, . /9ijo 
Number of years of schooling /o Occupation 



Residence i^^tie Ci> I l c. Marital Status 3, /icj/g- 
Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Nam e 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Nam e 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Mar 1 ta 1 S ta t us 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



II. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public f.lbrary, Rockford 
111 Inois 

Signed .,.,J,. ,', g; ^ ^,v /vJcH:.Q, fcl- 

D a t o CJ j Tul . .1 -, Vo , / 9 yco 



■ , ' CONTENTS 

I. Introduction 
II. Sources 
III. Cienealogical Charts and Fact Sneets 
IV. The Families 

A. The Buchanans 
3. The Gillespies 

1". "■. r' 

C. Tae Stillwells 

D. The Brookes 
£. The Dolaks 



-. : Xl*:-; ^ tjnV .V, 



J- , r r ■ - ^- ,- . ~ ^ ;j 

-■- • .'"O'v ."f.'J 



IRTRCDUCTICW 

My farTiily is not rich or far.ous, but is very special 
to ne , and I slvz glad for the opportunity to record a small 
part of their history for my children has presented itself. 
I have tried to rive the history as accurately as possible, 
but I a" not infallable and realize I have made m.istakes. 
If any reader should cor.e across any I would gladly accept 
any corrections. 

I have started my report with my mother's fathers side 
of the famdly, the Buchanans and the Gillespies. From. 
there I pick up my m.other's mother's side of the family, the 
Stillwells and 3rookes . I then switch to my Father's side. 
Finally I have written my parents' and my history 



u^i'r '.'(.. . .T 



i ■;.;;r:;.:t^'.:: 



;.f'- 



; J '': ' 



'•r-.r^. :•' o'-o:; 



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o "- ■■■!'- c . I L 1 ■ [ f .■ 



SOURCKS 

I would especially like to thank these people for 
their aid in doinp; my father's family history: William 3. 
Doiik, Sophia Nitkoski Dolak, Lester Dolak and Lorraine Dolak 
Brown . 

On my mother's side: Josephine Brooke Jillespie, 
Randall and Dorothy Brooke, Helen and Lambert 'i'ustin and 
Herr an Brinkley, 

And of course rr.y mother and father who made it all 
possible . 

Other sources: 

Black, Bessie, Gemietaries of Lawrence County , Illinois 
(Interstate Printers and Publishers, Inc., Danville, 
Illinois, 1976) 

Buchanan, Maurice G,, Buchanan Ancestory , 1962. 

Com-bined History of Edwards , Lawrence , and VJabgsh 
Counties of Illinois , (J. L. McConough i: Co., Philadelphia, 
lB'-i3). 

Fischer, Philip Bf ooke . My Family Heritare, March 
17, 1965. 

Marriage Licenses of Lavjrence County, Illinois, 
1821-1 8L9 . 

MacLysaght, Edward. Surnarries of Ireland . (Irish 
University Press, Shannon, Ireland, 19691 

liichey, Hannah Buchanan. The Buchanan Linea^-.e Record , 
September 10, 1931. 

Selly, Paul and iMewton Bateman et . al. eds . The 
Illinois Histcridal and Lawrenc e County Biographical - 
Illustrated (Muse 11 Publishing Co., Chlcaro, 1910) 

UA>4-?d -3K+«5 Census of Lo^u-'fente Cou n -fy , -C*. (^ ( fJOi^ for 1830, 






'1:1 : 















.lE . -i' . 



r-, ' i:( L.L>1 '.''1 i.L. 



.1-! l> 



FACT SHEET 
THE BUCHAi^AK paT^ILY 

I. Jar.es Buchanan settled in Vir£^inia (1753-) 
II. John Buchanan settled in Hallifax, ixiovis Scotia (175a.) 
III. Willian settled in Lpncaster County, Pennsylvania (175a,) 
V/llliam married (?) Six children 
A. Betsey 
3, Jarnes 

C, C-eorge 

D, Archibald 

S, William married Ac;nes (?) 

F, John married Sara iJeilson, Jan. 7, 1779 

G. Victor (Karch 10, 1762-Aur, . 13, l5[|.3) 
Married Elizabeth Allison July 23, 1790 

1. William married ivathryn Trout -Eleven Children 

2. John (?) 

3. Thomas (Dec. 25, 179li-Nov. 26, 1376) married 
Elizabeth Anderson (Dec. 25, 1775-Dec 25, 1863) 

Harried Rebecca Tucker (Dec. 27, 178l-l'ay 8, l8[j_3) 

Six children 

1+. Elizabeth (Aug. 2l+, l802-April 7, 1835) 

Married Herman Bell. Six children. 

5. Walter (/"ur-. 9, l80l+-Jan. 31, l38l 

6 6. Victor, Jr. (Jan. 12, I6l2-Apr. 23, l86l 

Married Evelena Jones (Oct. 20,l806-Mar. 3, lS52) 
Nine Children 

7. Clara married Hat Pilsbury 

8. Mary married David Marny 

9. Rebecca married Andrew Galloway. Six children 



xa : 



< -. 1; 









:• ) nrcH, .b 



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I 



The Children of Thomas and Elizabeth Buchanan 

A. Robert A. 

B. John J. 

C. William T. (1830-1896) married Tabitha Crane Feb. 23, 
1853. Two children 

1. Dora 

2. Laura 

Married Martha Dennison (June 33, 1336-Mar. 23, 1859. 

3. Lawrence 
I4. . Mary 

5. Winfield 

6. Jonn Edgar 

7. Thomas C. 

8. MARGARET EYELYI^J (Jul 20, l871-May 2, 191^7) 
Married Robert Truman GILLESPIE ( I<love. 3» I863- 

19l|l) Three children. 

9. Victor 

10 . Aaron 

11. Eliza 

12 . Mary 

13. Eveline 
ll\.. Rebecca 



•!■■,■ 



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t'A y ." 'X -- i »■;' 



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f) JJf, • ■■ aV; 



The Children of Janes H. Buchanan 

A, Orenda iTiarried Dsvld Buchanan 

B, Lors married John Buchanan 

C, Hannah married ^iervey Richey 

D, Harriet married doward Armstrong 

E, James m.arried Nettie Doolittle 
P. Truman married Amanida Price. 

G. MARY ANGELINE (Dec. 18, 1^3 9- Jan. l3, 192k) 

married William GILLESPIE (Sept. l333-Apr. 16, 
1913) Mar. 23, 1859. Li^ht Children 



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THE 3RC0KE FAMILY 

The ? 3rooke family lived in Pennsylvania. I4. knovm children. 
A. Peter 
3. Ar.erica 

C. One daughter 

D. THCiiAS EDWARD 

Thonas Edward married Harriette Wood 
A. Infant died 
3 . John F . 

C. Frances 

D. Morgan 

e. Victoria 

F. Laura 

G . Emna 
K. Thoraas 
I. William 
J . John 

K. Hattie 

L. LTi-IAK UTTER (Sept. 12, I67I- iJov. 21, 19i|2) 

married Emma STILLWELL (Feb. 15, l875-Har. l!+, 1963) 

April 3, I89I1. Nine Children 
The Children of Lyman 3rooke 
A. Sadie (Mar. 2k, 1893-1975) 

3o Josephine Sibyl (h'ov. 21;, 1905) married Hugh Theron 
C-ILLESPIE (June 29, 1932 - Sept. 20, 1961) Feb 6, 

1932. Four children 

C. Donald Rayrcond (Aug. II4., 1908- ) married Edith Corrie 

D. Claudia Angeline (I-iay 7, 1912-) married Galen Fischer 

E. Harriette Frances (March 22, 1921-) 

F. Raymond 3rooke (1396-1896) 



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G. Stillwell Brooke (1901-1905) 
H. Cora Brooke (1903-1905) 
I. Infant 
The Children of JOSEPHINE SIBYL 

A. Robert Brooke Crillespie (l^iov, 26, 1932-) 

1. Robert Keith (Feb. 19, 1957-) 

2. V/illiam Bryan (June 13, 1959- ) 

3. Sara Ann (Sept. 12, I96I4.-) 

B. MARY CAROLYI^i (Dec. 7, 1933-) married Vjilliam 
Oeorge DOL-AK (Nov. ?, 1931- ) Auf . l3, 1956. 

1. JULIE JO (July 3, 1957 -) 

2. David V/illiani (Dec. iLj., 1958-) 

3. Susan Erances (Jan. 16, I960-) 

C. Prances (March 3» 1935- ) 

D. Martha Lucille (July 12, 1937-) married J, 

Webster Dollahan Mar. 3, 1958. 

1. Stephen J. (Nov. 16, 1958- ) 

2. Mary Margaret (Oct. 28, 1961-) 



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THE STILLWELL FAMILY 
John Stillwell married Hanna Stevens 

A. Samuel 

B. James 

C. Richard 

D. Martha 

The children of Richard 
A. Susan 
3 . John 

C . Mary 

D. JAKES (L6[j.3-1912) married Sarah Elizabeth Canedy. 
Eight children 

E. Maggie 

?. Two infants 

The Children of James 

A. John Howard 

3. E^r^iA FRANCcB married Lym.an Utter 3RG0EE $ept. 12, I870 
Klne children 

C . Minnie 

D, Lev/is 

E, James 

F . Kathryn 



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THE GILLESPIE PAKILY 

John G. Gillespie (1767? -Dec. 27, l8i;5?) married Mary 
Gray (1777? - Dec. I81i5?) Nine children 

A. Williajni 

B. Mary Ann 
G. Elizabeth 

D. Walter 

E. Ellen 
P. Samuel 

G. Jane (Sept. 10, l802-'4ar. 10, l37l+) married Walter 

Buchanan (Aug. 9, l80[|. -Jan. 31, l3Sl) Seven children 

H. Robert (Oct. 21, l30L?-Jan. 23,1355?) married Mary 
Perrin, Sept. 17, I832? 

1. Mary Elizabeth 

2. Rebecca 

3 . John 
ix, George 

5. Robert 

6. Leander 

7 . Edward 
9. Walter 

10. Adaline 

11. William (Sept. 7, l333-Apr. 16, 1913 married 

Mary Angeline Buchanan (Dec. I8, l339-Jan. k8, 192l| 
March 23, 1359. Eight children 

The Children of Willian: and Kary Angeline Buchanan 

A. Mabel 

B. Martha 



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C . Jane s 3 . 

D. Clara 

E. Charles 
P. Molly 
Cr. Lena 

H. ROBERT TRTKAM (Nov. 3, I863- Apr. 13, 19l)-l) 

Married Margaret Evelyn luchanan (Jul. 20, 1971- May 2, 
■ • I9I47) Dec, 31, 1996. 

1. Wallace (May, 1899-Sept. 25, 1899) 

2. Helen (Apr. 19, 1093 -) married Laxn.bert 
Tustin (I897-) Oct. 1825. 

a. Mar,1orie Ann (Jun. 19, 1926-Apr. 29, 196?) 

3. HUGH TriERON (June 29, 1902-Sept. 20, 1961) 
married Josephine Sibyl 3rcoke. Four children. 



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THE DOLAK J'ANILY 
George Dolak (I876-I969) married Anna Suca (? -Dec. 1932) 
A . Anna 
3 , Mary 

C. Lillian 

D. Heorge 

E. Andrev; 

F. Benedict 

G. WILLIAM SiiRNAx^D (July 5, 1905- ) married Sophia 
Nitkoski(June 5, 1906 - ) July 1+, 1930. 

1. Williair. George (iviov. 7, 1931- ) married I-lary 
Carolyn GILLESPIE (Dec. 7, 1933- ) Aug. I6, 1956. 

a. JULIE JC 

B, David V/illiam 

c. Susan Frances ■ 

2. Lorraine Ann Marie married Frederick Brown 
a, Frederick 

3. Lester Arthur \ fmarried Gloriella Yau 

a. V/illiam 

b . Thomas 

c . Ronald 

d. Gloriella Daniel 



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The JAST FAMILY 

I. John Jast - born and died in Poland. Brother to 
Salornia and Ilonorata 

II. SolorTiia. Born in Poland - Died in Joliet, Illinois 

III. Honorata Jast (? - 195*^^) married Francis I-iitkoski 
A, Sophia married William DCLAK 

Remarried John Kozubek. 

A. Catherine 

B. G-enevieve 

C. Michael 

D . Treorge 

E . Ilary 



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THE BUCHANAN FAMILY 

The history of the 3UCHANAN family can be traced as 
far back as 713 A.D, but the earliest BUCHAKAi^j in my 
family can only be traced to 1752 when V.'illiara BUCHANAN 
along with his two brothers John and James came to the 
United States from Scotland. V/illiam settled in Lower 
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. James settled in Vlrrinia, 
and John in Hallifax, Nova Scotia, Their parents' names 
are unknown. William BUCHAi^iAN had seven children, Betsey, 
James, Archibald, V/illiam, John, C-eorge, and Victor, 

Victor and his brothers John and V^'illiam m.oved to 
Port V/illiam in Gallatin County, Kentucky in 1790. 
Victor had married Elizabeth ALLISCN on July 28, 1790, 
before they left Pennsylvania. He had three sons by her, 
William, John, and Thomas. Thomas 3. Buchanan, the 
youngest son, was born in Trimble County, Kentucky, Decem- 
ber 25, 3r 97l4- . Soon after his birth his mother died. 
Victor remarried four years later to Rebekah (often spelled 
Rebecca) TUCKER of Shelly County, Kentucky. 

Because of^ title dispute with Aaron Burr over his land, 
Victor sold his possessions, built a keelboat, packed up 
his fam.ily and headed for Illinois. They moved down the 
Ohio River to the VJabash River and from there, up Raccoon 
Creek. He and his fam.ily moved inland and settled on 
160 acres of land in sections one and twelve of Lawrence 
County, Illinois. Victor bought his land from, the govern- 
ment at 11.25 an acre. The abstract of his land showed 



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that the offical deed was signed with the narr.e of the 
president, James I'-ionroe. This land has reraained in the 
possession of the heirs of Victor 3UCii.^NiAi.; , and 123 acres 
is now owned by my cousin Robert Keith GILLjiiSPIE. 

Victor BuCHAxIAN's first home in Illinois was a double 
log cabin. Years later one room was removed and a frame one 
was built in its place. 

Victor's son, Thomas 3, BUCHANAN, fought in the War of 
l3l2, serving three years. Upon returning home to Kentucky 
he married Elizabeth Al'IDERSOi of Shelby County, Kentucky on 
Kay 16, 1815. 

In l6lS, Thomas settled near Victor's homestead, 
Victor and Thom.as cleared the wilderness swamp and settled 
down as farmers until the end of their days. 

Thomas, a devout Christian, was one of the r.ain or- 
ganizers of the Pisgah Presbyterian Church in Lawrence 
County, He traveled around the country selling Bibles in 
his spare tim.e, 

Thomas had nine children, one of whom was William T, 
BUCHAKA.N. V/illiam T. was the third oldest born to Thomas 
and Elizabeth in 1530, He married Margaret Dennison (often 
spelled Denison) who was from another of the oldest pioneer 
farriilies in Lawrence County, Wllliair. T,, like nis father 
and grandfather, was a farm.er, Thom.as diect Iviovember 26, I676, 

•J amies H, BUCHAi^JAiJ was born February 8, I3l3 in 
Kentucky, He was a Salf brother to Thomas. He v/as a soldier 
in the Blackhawk War. As paym^ent for his service in the v;ar 



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he received l\.3 acres from the £overnment. ;ie also in- 
herited his father's land. He cultivated the land and was 
a farmer and stock raiser all his life. 

James married i-Iartha Knight of Ohio, daughter of 
farmer C-eorge 3. 13^'IGHT. Martha and James had thirteen 
children, Mary Angeline, their third oldest child, married 
William C-ILLESPIE. Mary had been a teacher in a local 
school before her marriage on /'arch 23, lo59. She quit her 
position to rear her faraily. Williara and Mary's son, 
Robert Trum.an married Martha and VJilliam T. 3UCHAiv[AN's daughter, 
Mar?raret Evelyn. 






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■_ .. THE C-ILL5SFIL FATilLY 

The earliest record of the GILLESPIE family dates back 
to a man nap:ed John G. Gillespie, believed to have been 
born in 176? in County Down, Ireland. John G. married 
Mary CRAY in Ireland. After their marria:;e they and their 
small son, Robert, who was six at the timie, irrj':igrated to 
the United States. They came over with tvjo other well 
known families of Lawrence County, the Seeds and the Irwins . 
In the course of the lonK Atlantic voyare their ship was 
wrecked. Fortunately they were rescued but m.uch of their 
cargo of valuable linen was lost. 

John first settled near Wheeling, Virginia in 1320 
but later raoved with his family to Lawrence County where 
he bought land fromi the governmient in section 22 of Dennison 
Township for '-'■!. 2^' an acre. He and his son cleared the 
wilderness and were farmers. John died December 27, 18L(.5 
and his wife died in December of iSl+S. 

Their son Robert was born in Ireland in May of l805. 
He had three brothers and five sisters, Robert o'Amed 120 
acres of government land and also land in Bridgeport, Illinois 

On September 17, I832 Robert married Mary (?) PEitRIN 
who had been born in Kentucky and reared in Missouri. Robert 
and Mary had ten children, three of whom died in infancy. 
Robert was a mem.ber of the Zion Methodist church of Lawrence 
County, 

V/illiam GILLESPIE, the oldest son of Robert and Mary, 
was born at the GILLESPIE homestead on September 7, 1333. 
'v>/illiam attended a local log, school as a boy. After his 
grade school years he attended McKendree College in 



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Lebanon, Illinois where he studied for a short while 
before it was necessary for hirr to quit on account of the 
death of his father on January 23, 1555 • 

V/illiarc and his brothers became partners, farming 
Robert's land until l356 when VJillian-! bought his own farm 
of 155 acres in section 10 of Dennison township. 'Ae was a 
very successful farmer and stockraiser. William married 
Mary Anfeline BUCHANAN on March 23, 1359. Togetner Kary 
and William cleared his land and built one of the finest 
hom.es in the county. The home was a frame house surrounded 
by a white picket fence. A red brick walk led up to the 
many windovjed house. .4. srcoke house and a red brick fruit 
house which was used to store the family's preserves and 
miilk still stands today. The barnyard was fenced in by a 
split rail fence. Mary and Williani took rreat pride in 
their yard and kept it immaculately clean. They also 
planted sugar m.aples along the road in front of their home. 
Only two of these trees stand today. 

The home itself was a two story house. My great Aunt 
Helen GILLLSPlJi TUSTIi'i remembers that the house had a 
beautiful banister that was "great fun to slide down when 
grandma wasn't looking." 

The house also had a beautiful parlor in it, Helen 
rem.em.bers . The narlor was a little used part of the homies 
in the yesteryears. .-lostly they were only opened up for 
weddings, funerals, and spring cleaning. 



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Kary's parlor had red flowered carpeting. The wlndovjs 
had heavy lace curtains which touched the floor and came out 
about a foot frora the window. The farally pictures and photo 
alburn were kept in this room. Two special pictures hung here, 
One was made out of feathers and tne prettiest was made out 
of human hair. It v/as in this house that yilliaru and I'-lary 
made their home and raised their five children. Three others 
died young, 

William C-ILLESPIt, in the fall of I676, was elected 
an elder of Pisgah Presbyterian Church, a position he neld 
until April 16, 1913. Since most of the Cillespies and 
Buchanans have attended (and still do) tnis church it is 
only fitting that I say a fevj v/ords about it. 

Pisgah was first organizes March 15, l835 under Rev. 
Isaac 3ennet with a total mem.bership of tairty two. The 
first church building- vxas a leg cabin. In lb5l a fram.e 
church was built v/itn funds from church members at a cost of 
^600. Helen Gillespie TISTIN recalls that the churcn pev/s 
wei'e divided in half. The right side was for tne women and 
the left side was for the men. If a man was courting, a t^irl 
he vjas allowed to sit on the women's side. 

In 1916 the third and present day cnurch vjas built. It 
IS a quaint red brick building that was built at a cost of 
;'12,D00. On the corner of this building engraved in stone 
is the nar:.e of the mierabers of the building corjr^.ittee , Robert 
GILLESPIE'S (V/illiam's son) nam.e is engraved there. 

My grandmother Josephine SROOrvS GILLESPIE attends Pisgah 
today. Tne mem.bership of the oldest church in the county 



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-7- 

has dwindled tc about the same nunber of rcerabers it had when 
it was first orj^'anized, 

WilliaiTi I'^-illespie ' s son Robert Trunan built his norae 
across the road from nis father's hoine on section 11 of 
Dennison township. He and his' father farraed the land to- 
gether all of their lives, 

Robert was an innovator in his own rit^ht. He had one 
of the first telephones in the county installed in his home. 
A set of batteries supplied electricity to his home, 

Robert raarried Margaret Evel^m BUCHANAN, December 31 > 
1896, They had three children Wallace, Hugh Theron, and 
Helen. The faraily was hit hard when Wallace died suddenly of 
a stomach ailment and then a(^;ain when Helen, aged five, contract- 
ed polio which permanently affected ner foot and leg. The 
family traveled to doctors all over the state trying to find 
one who could do something for Helen. Their search camie to 
an end however, when a doctor in St. Louis, Mo, told the 
family that nothing could be done and that she should never 
be operated on, 

Hugh and Helen attended the Buchanan school during their 
grade school years. Hugh attended St, Prancisville High 
School in St Prancisville, Illinois. Helen never completed 
high school as she became ill again, 

Robert GILLESPIE died April 13, 19i4-l. Margaret continued 
to live at hom.e until sne becam_e ill. Then she lived v.'ith 
Hugh and his familly until her death, 

Robert GILLESPIE had his fatner's homie torn down and he 
built in its place a new home for Hugh and Josephine BROOKE 
who were married February 6, 1932. During the depression 



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Hugh worked for his father for •■'l.OO a day. He also took 
a job workj.nr with the oil crews. (Oil had been discovered 
in Lawrence County in 1906. The Gillespies have several 
wells on their land.) 

Hugh and Josephine have four children Robert Brooke, 
ITary Carolyn, Kartha Lucille, and Prances Louise. The children 
all attended the Buchanan O^rade School and Bridgeport Hlph 
School . 

After Robert Brooke CILL^SSPIE returned frori the service 
in Korea, he famed v/ith Hugh. He built his hor:e in the 
same location as Robert T,Sold one, Hugh died in 1961. 
Robert continues to farra the land. Robert carried Sandra 
FOX and they have three children, Robert Keith, William 
Bryan, and Sara Ann. 

Kartha married J V/ebster Dollahan and they live with 
their two children, i.argaret and Steven, in Lawrenceville, 
Illinois. Prances also lives in the sane area. Mary 
CarolATi married Williara Creorge DOLAPI, the only one who has 
not remained in Lawrence County. 



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THE STILLVJELL FAKILY 

John Stillwell was a native of New Jersey. Later 
he noved to Kentucky. John , his wife Hanna STE^/iii\S, and 
his two sons, Sai':uel and Jaraes moved to V/abash County in 
Illinois about l3oL|.. He was one of the wealthiest men of 
the county and one of the oddest. 

John and his sons were farrtiers and stock raisers. 
They cleared and improved their one hundred acres of land. 
At the time John settled in Illinois the land w&s full of 
game of all sorts. Buffalo, elk, rabbit, fox, bear, wild 
pigs and wolves vrere quite abundant, or so much so that they 
often gave the earliest settlers much trouble by eating 
their grain and attacking them. 

Indians were also quite common at the time John 
built a small picket stockade for the protection of nis 
family. As the story goes, John was tending his cattle 
one evening in l3l5 when the Indians of the area went on 
the warpath. The Indians camped just one-half a mile away 
from John's headquarters. John decided at that point to 
let the cattle take care of themselves just in case the 
Indians "miight want old John's scalp," 

Gradually the settlers pushed the game and the Indians 
farther and farther v/est. Accoi?ing to the United States 
census of l350 Lawrence County alone had a population of 
6,121. These settlers cleared the land of its forests and 
planted its fertile soil with corn, wheat, and soy beans. 
The farm.ers' lives changed relatively little from the time 



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-10- 

of the first settlement of the county until the turn of 
the century or later. Farmers were mainly self sufficient, 
depending on the land for most of their needs. Farmers 
toiled endlessly with crude farm equipment. My o^/m grand- 
father Hugh T. GILLESPIE worked his land with a norse drawn 
plovj up until the 191x0' s. 

Jo'nn STILLV'/ELL was a great practical joker. Although 
he was one of the wealthiest men of the county, as stated 
earlier, he had a habit of only wearing his oldest and 
shabbiest of clothing. Once during a windstormi he lost his 
hat. From that time on he went bareneaded until such time 
as the old nat would have worn out. 

Another story connected with "Old John" was that 
one day a man by the name of George Flower told him hd'd 
pay him a quarter if he would tell him where he could find 
John Stillwell in order to buy somie cattle. John gave him 
the desired information and then demanded his quarter. 

The first Circuit Court was held in Edwards County, 
Illinois on July 11, l3l5. The first cases tried were the 
United States vs. John Stillwell, Ssmuel Stillwell, Patsy 
Stillwell and Hannah Stillwell, all for assualt and battery. 
It m.ust have been a wild family feud. The details of the 
case were not given only to say that John was found guilty 
and fined two dollars and court costs. Patsy and Hannah were 
exonerated from pay:'ng costs of suit, and Samael's case was 
thrown out. 

John STILLVJELL was also different from his fellow 
settlers in that he was the only one of two men of the county 
to own a slave. John's slave, Arrastead, had come with the 



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-li- 
st illwell family from Kentucky. Since Illinois was admitted 
to the Union as a free state, Arm.stead was set free but not 
until November 6, 1822. 

Richard STILLWELL, son of John, was born in l809 near 
Allendale, Illinois. He married I'iary Shearer (I3l6-l896) the 
daughter of Joseph SHEARER, a native of Ireland and later a 
farmer in Massachussetts and later in Illinois, 

Mary and Richard lived in Mount Carrcel, Illinois where 
in 1818 they built a two story frame house, one of the first 
of the times. They also owned several plots of land where 
their barn and livestock was keot . Richard and his wife had 
six children one of whom, was Jam^es STILL'.vELL. James Stillwell 
was one of the wealthiest men of Wabash County owning 1,500 
acres of land. 

James married Sarah iilizabeth GiJNEDY of Olive Green, 
Ohio in Wovem.ber of 1865. Their marriage was blessed with 
eight children two of whom_ died as infants. James was a 
farmer all of his life. Vj'hen he died he split up all of 
his land betvjeen his children. Their daughter Emma Frances 
married Lyman 3R0CKE. They are my great grandparents. 



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THE BROOKE FAMILY 

Thoraas Edward BROOKE, the earliest known 3rooke In 
our family, lived as a boy in Harrlsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Young Tom liked to bet on the horses. He was told by his 
father that if he bet on a certain Sunday he would be whipped 
when he got home. Thom.as, fourteen at the time, went to the 
races in spite of his father's v/arning. He won some money 
and with it he ran away from hom.e . 

Tom settled in Lawrence County, Illincis near St, 
Francisville . There he married Harriet Vvood. Together 
they reared six children until l36l when the 5th cavalry 
regiment was organized. Tom hastened to join up leaving 
his fam_ily behind. The cavalry engaged in various battles 
at Brovmsville, Port Gibson, Latchez, etc. Tom recalled 
that during one skirm.ish in a swamp his horse was caught 
in quicksand. Tom left him to sink while he rode off with 
a fellow soldier. He remembered hearing the horse neighing 
as he rode off, and he remembered how bad he felt about 
leaving him.. 

After the war, Tom returned hom^e and had six more 
children. In I676 he returned to Pennslyvania to visit his 
family. He went up to the home and looked in the window. 
There he found his fam.ily on their knees praying. He didn't 
go in but instead went to the home of his brother, Peter. 
Together they returned to their parents' hom.e. His mother 
didn't recognize the stranger but upon being told his 
identity fell upon him, kissing him. Tomb's visit was 
curtailed when he learned that his son Jam.es was ill. He 



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-13- 

hastened hoF^e only to learn that by that time the boy was 
well again. , ^ . 

Tom died of gangreen when he clipped his toenail too 
close and it became infected. His foot had to be removed. 
Three days after the operation he died. Mis foot was 
taVzen up from where tney had ijuried it in the garden, and it 
was buried with him. 

Tom's son, Lyman Utter BriCOrCE and Emma Prances STILLWELL 
were wed in the Allendale Christian Church after Sunday 
school classes on April 8, l89ii. They made their home on 
the land Emma had inherited from her father. Later they 
bought some additional land adjoining their farm. Their 
home V7as a large two story frame house with three bedrooms 
upstairs and a living room, bedroom,, kitchen, parlor, 
and dining room dovmstairs . Emraa and Lyman had nine cnild- 
ren. Their first two children died as infants. Then the 
three oldest contracted scarlet fever, and the serum that 
m.ight have saved them did not arrive in time. Two of the 
three died v/ithin a week of one another. The other children 
were also stricten with diseases. Jonald with diptheria, 
Claudia, with whooping cough, and Josephine with C-erman 
measles. Despite the illness in the family, Lyrr.anj^ and 
Emjraa never gave up hope . 

The children attended a one room schoolnouse. Liberty, 
The school had a pot-bellied stove in one corner and a -;ater 
bucket which everyone drank ou'l' of. There was a bell 
outside the schoolhouse which the teacher would ring two 
times. The first ring mjoent it was time to leave for 
school, and the second ring meant you had to be in your 



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-11;- 

places. The children studied ^--eneral subjects such as 
reading, writinr, languag-e, and arithmetic. 

After grade school Sadie, Josephine, and Donald 
attended Bridger.ort High School . The three drove to 
school in the family car each day. The other students 
drove either cars or bugf'ies. 

After high school Josephine, who is rny grandmother, 
went to a secretarial school in Evansville , Indiana, She 
worked for about eight years until she met Hugh C-ILLtjSPIE 
whom she \<ed on February 6, 1932. 

Lyman and Emma lived on their farm; most of their 
lives, but they later moved to a house in St. Francisville 
where they lived until their deaths. 



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THE DOLAK F/uMILY 

George DOLAK, my great grandfather was a Slavic 
immigrant to the United States in l892. The first sixteen 
years of his life had been spent in what is now possibly a 
part of eastern Russia. At the time his nomeland was part 
of the Austro -Hungarian Empire. 

When George was asked by the immigration officials his 
place of origin he put dovm Ungvarska. Lester DOLAK, 
George's grandson who has been trying to find where this 
region is asked one of his Czech friends who returns to that 
country every few years, to ask some of the natives of the 
country. He found that the name Ungvarska is a corruption 
of the Slovak word for Hungary eqaivilant to a person 
referring to Africa as "Niggerland . " 

During the iSyO's Slavs, who never had a nation of 
their own, but who had always been merely a subject peoole, 
were leaving the country for various reasons. George DOLxhK 
was a draft dodger from the Hungarian army. 

The name DOLAK is Slavic for dvjeller of the valley. 
Doe - meaning valley and - ak meaning dweller of. It is 
uncertain whether (-eorge made up the mane or if the 
imimigration put it down as he thousrht it sounded. Lester's 
friend could find no listing of that narce in two Czech 
phone '"^ooks, nor have we ever been able to find anyone 
other than the irjnediate fai'-iily with the narie. 

George DOLAK spoke no English when he immigrated. Any 
schooling he had had would have been in the old country. 
After being in the country he did learn to read and write 



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-16- 

Enf:lish, but ss he got older he reverted back to his 
native lanpuarre. 

George first settled in Penns|rlvanla to work in the 
coal m:^'nes. He then moved to Joliet, Illinois in 1900. He 
worked as an ironworker until late in his life. 

Joliet, then and up until about the time of the 
second world war, looked much the same. It was an 
industrial, immigrant town. The town was split in half 
by the Illinois Hiver. The west end of the tovm was vjhere 
the wealthy lived, while the east side was corriposed of 
the working class immigrants . The irrjiiigrants lived in 
their own ethnic groups. Lester told me that even when he 
was a boy "you could tell a -Derson's nationality by 
which -oarish he belonged to." 

Oeorge DOLA'< married Anna SuGA in 1902. They had six 
children. Anna born in 1903, Mary born in 1902, V.'illiam 
Bernard born in 1906, George born in 1909, Andrew born in 
1911, Lilliam born in 1907, and Benedict born in 1916. 
Anna died of a heart attack in December of 1932. Her 
daughter I*^ary took over the household in place of her mother, 
George had been reared in the Lutheran faith but had 
converted to Catholicism. His family attended the Catholic 
church and Catholic schools. 

V/illiam Bernard DCLAK, George's son and my grand- 
father, was born July I|., 1906. He lived in Coal City, 
Illinois as a boy. VJilliam attended area schools in Joliet 
until he was fifteen years old when it was necessary for 
him to quit in order to help support his large family. 



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-17- 

V/illiarti labored in the ironworks and steelrnills of 
•Toliet. rie worked, never takinr a vacation, for a mere 
50^ an hour. In fact, Sophia NITKOSKI and he were married 
on July Ij., 19 ^-) because it was the only day he could 
get off work. William worked as a steel press operator 
for many years. He advanced his position in the mills 
through shop e:xperlence, and in 1953 he became the shop 
superintendant, a position which he held until his re- 
tirement in April of 1968. 

Sophia NITKOSKI was born June 5, 1906 in Chicago, 
Illinois. Her parents Francis NITKOSKI and Honorata JAST 
had com.e to the United States from Poland for "better 
opportunity." l-/hen Sophia was five (?) her parents v/BBt 
back to the old country to visit family and friends. They 
stayed there nearly a year before returning to the United 
States. 'lATnen they did return, Francis was killed on his 
way to work. 'Waile crossing railroad tracks a train hit 
him. Honorata later rem.arried John KAZUBEK who had also 
imjriigrated from Poland. John and Honorata had five children, 
Catherine, Genevieve, i-'ichael, George, and Mary, 

Sonhia and her faraily were Catholics and the church 
exerted a very important influence on their lives. The 
Polish Catholics were noted for their large weddings and 
funerals. That was the timie vjhen the fariilies got together. 

Sophia had only a seventh grade education. Her 
parents decided to have her go to work at that tim;e and 
help out the family financially. 



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-18- 

The family, Sorihia remembers, got their first car in 
1921+ and their first radio in 1926. They also had an organ 
and victrola. Their house had electricity in it by 1920. 
It's interesting to note that my mother's home was wired 
for electricity until the 1950' s. 

Sophia first met V/illiara through his cousin at a 
dance. Five years later they were m.ai-ried. 

Sophia and William had "three wonderful children," 
to use my grandmother's words. My father V/illiam George 
was born in a hospital on I'.ovem.ber 7j 1931. Lorraine Ann 
Marie was oorn at hom.e in a second floor apartment as 
there was no one to take csre of Sill at the time. Lester 
Arther was born March 25, 19li2. 

All three children attended local Catholic schools. 
Discinline was quite strict taen. Lori remembers that you 
had to be sneakier with your notes than today. She also 
rem.em.bers that there was more organized activities 
connected with the schools than today and that all three 
children participated in the school's activities. 

My grandparents kept few books or magazines around 
the house. The children depended heavily on the school 
libraries for their reading materials, and all three of 
them have expressed their love for reading. 

3111y, as my grandmother calls my father even toda\^ , 
and Lori attended St. Thaddius Grade School and Joliet 
Catholic High School. Lester also attended the saiae high 
school. My father attended kindergarten as it was the 
depression and many teachers were hired to teach in order 
that more teachers could have ,1obs. 






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-19- 

In December of 1939, Sophia and William bought a 
small ;:rocery store. It was a family run enterprise. My 
grandmother clerked and manai^ed the store, Willian. v/orked 
in the steelmill all day long, and then returned home to 
work m.ore in the store. The living quarters of the house 
were behind the store. The Children of the fam.ily were 
required to work in the si3ore after school and on 
Saturdays. Lori recalls that the store m.eant a lack of 
privacy for her since they always had to be ready and 
dressed in case a customer needed their aido Lori and 
Bill were also required to do much of the housework while 
Sophia ran the store, 

Sophia and V/illiam sold the store in April of 1956 
when the department stores and big chain grocercies m.oved 
in and r^ade fam.ily operated businesses a thing of the past. 
That same m.ontn, the family mioved to the vjest side of 
Joliet to 1306 Douglas Street, Sophia and William resided 
here until V/illiam's retirement in April of 1966, A.t that 
tim.e they moved to Fnoenix, Arizona for a year, and then to 
their current residence in Clearwater, Florida, 

Bill, my father, never lived in the house on Douglas 
Street, At the tim^e of the miove he had been drafted into 
the arm.ed services, Ke took his basic training at Camp 
Roberts in California, Later he was shipped to a base in 
England and then to one in Gerrna'^ny , Bill enjoyed his stint 
in the army. This gave him: a cnance to see Europe, an 
opportunity he might not have had otherwise. Upon his 
return he attended Illinois State University in Bloomington, 



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-20- 

Illlnois where he received his BS degree in science 
education in 1956. 

Lorie attended Jollet Junior College and the 
"University of Southern Florida. She received her Master's 
degree in elementary education. She is now tof.cning 
science and Kath in a grade school in Clearx-Jater , Florida 
where she resides with her husband Frederick 3RGVii^! and their 
son Freddy, 

Lester went on to school at Johns H^opkins University 
in Baltimore, Maryland. There he received his Doctor's 
degree in chemistry. He received a Post Doctorate from 
Stanford University in California. Lester now resides in 
Plainwell, Michigan with his wife C-loriella and their 
three sons, t/illiam, Thomas, Ronald, and one daughter 
Daniella. There Lester vrords as a research chemist for 
the Up John Corporation, 

Mary GILLESPIE and Bill DOL/^-K met when they were both 
attending Illinois State University, i-lorm.al, Illinois vihen 
they were seniors . 

After graduation Mary took a teaching position at 
a grade school in Peoria, Illinois, te-ching fourth grade, 
for one year. Bill was finishing up his senior yesr and 
started work on his Master's degree. 

My parents were married August l8, 1956 in Joliet, 
Illinois at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church. At that 
time the Catholic Church vjould not recognize any miarriage 
not consec^rated by it. Also, my parents had to agree to 
raise their children as Catholics V7hich they have done. 
We were forced to attend church and catechism, class. This 



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-21- 

ended in a total rejection of the church by my brother and 
me, and iriy sister attends the Presbyterian Church with my 
mother. 

After their marriage, my parents moved to Royal Oak, 
Michigan, where they made their first home in an furnished 
apartment. Bill had accepted a position as a biology 
teacher at Madison heights High School, a position he 
kept from 1956-1960. I'ary taught one se;? ester. She had 
to quit '.''ue to me, her first born. 

Mary had three children in quick succesion. I was 
born July 3> 1957, David William^ was born December lii, 1958, 
and Susan x-'rances v;as born January 16, I960. All three of 
us were born at Beaumont dospital in iioyal Oak, I'lichigan 
and were baptized at the Shrine of the Little Flower 
Catholic Church, 

In i960 Bill decided to vjork on his Masters vjhich he 
had already started in Illinois before his marriage. 
Instead of m.aking up all the hours he already had Mary and 
he decided to move back to their home state and buy a homie . 
The house which they bought on Graceland Ave. was in a 
new district of Peoria, Illinois. 3ill had taken a 
teaching position at Piichwoods High School. We lived in 
this house until 1965. In 1965 Peoria deights school 
district in which Richwoods was a part, voted to become 
incorporated vjith the city of Peoria schools. The school 
teachers at the high school began leaving. Bill included. 

The faj'iily was on the move again, this time to 
Reynold's Drive in Paletine, Illinois. Bill continued 






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-2h- 

his science teachinr at Main V/est High School, Des Plaines, 
Illinois. He worked there for two years. In 196? accepted 
at teachin^^ position at Rocl: Valley Collere, Hockford, 
Illinois. V/e moved into our Rockford home on 3706 
Tennessee Drive in October of 196S. 

After several years of substitute teaching', Mary 
returned to work full time in 1969. She taught fourth 
grade at the New Millord Trrade School in ilew ICilfcrd, 
Illinois for two years. 

Our family again decided to move in -July of 1971 to 
our present home in Boone County. Ifary got a teaching- 
position at Lincoln grade school in Belvidere, Illinois. 
In 1973 sfie took a year's leave to get her Master's degree 
in education at Northern Illinois University in JelCalb, 
Illinois. Mary received her degree in the sumxier of 1971+. 
In the fall of 1971-'- she got a library position in the 
Kishwaukee and Logan grade scacols,in Selvidere. Mary 
alternates between the two schools. She teaches library 
skills to the students and sae has general library duties. 
Bill continues to teach life science at Hock Valley College, 

My childhood was spent moving from one tovm to an- 
other and jumping from one school to another. My parents 
moved from- Michigan to "^eoria, 111. when I was four. The 
kindergarten I attended v/as held in the basement of a 
wom.an's hom.e vjho lived a few doors down from us as the 
schools did not have kindergarten. Both David and I 
attended there. Then cam.e the trauma of first grade. I 



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-25- 

attended a '"■ptholic school, St. Vincent DePaul. I was 
scared stiff of rolng, so r:y r.otiier tells rae, David had to 
walk with me to school. My first ^-rade teacher was a nun. 
Sister Mary riaren. She was very nice, as I rembmber, 
compared to ray second ^rade teacher, I'rs . garr whom I hated 
from the day she rot mad at the class for talking', and she 
cancelled the prt project for the day. There vias very 
strict discipline at the school. The girls wore plaid 
jumpers, a red vjcollone in winter and a blue ctrfcn one in 
summer, and the boys wore dark pants. At lunch vie all ate 
in a cafeteria where m.others of the students helped. A 
teacher ruled over a table. Qrace was said before each 
meal, and there was no talking during the entire hour except 
for a five or ten minute snan. 

In 1965 the family moved to Paletine, 111. V/e lived 
in a split level home. V/e kids loved this home. It had 
trees on the property which vjere almost climbing size. 
There was also a green utility unit surrounded b7r evergreen 
trees. We used to climb on top of the thing and throv; crab 
apples over at the kids who lived in the house behind us. 
It was a great sport '. 

My brother and I walked each day to a public school 
Jane Addams . We had half day sessions as tne school we 
were later to attend was in the final stages of being built. 
"I'toen it was completed v;e rode a bus in each day. I attended 
the third and fourth grades at Virginia Lake School. 

Our Rockford hom.e, unlike the Paletine horie, didn't 
have an upstairs or any trees. All three of us, for once, 
attended the samie school, Rooling Green Grade School. I 



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-26- 

completed fifth and sixth grades there. I attended Lincoln 
Middle School in seventh rrade. 

In 1970 my mother found her dreari home. It is 
supposedly our last neve. V;e now reside in Boone Count;/ 
between HoCrCford and Belvidere. It's a large home situated 
on top of a hill vrith four acres stretching out in front of 
it and one acre in back. There were only a few homes in 
the area but in the last two years the area has built up 
trem.endously as the towns of Beltidere and x-iocki'ord ^:row 
tojjether. Our Belvidere home is much m.ore spacious than 
any of the others we have had. 

At Belvidere Junior digh School I spent the elj^hth 
grade year trying once a ain to establish f riendsnips . The 
following year I attended the Belvidere rli^h ^chool where 
I spent some of the happiest days of m.y life. For the 
first tire I became involved in school activities such as 
goin£ to rames and plays, French Club, and li-H. In Hay, 
1975 I graduated with honors from the high schccl in a 
class of 365. 

After the sum.mier of miy graduation I ap'.jlied to be an 
exchange student to France for six months and was accepted. 
It was the greatest event of my life. I spent the month 
of August, 1975 in Amboise, t'rance with 22 other exchange 
students touring the C-iateaujl of that region. Then I 
boarded a train in Paris for Fecamp, France where I spent 
two weeks with the Poree fam.ily. :lr. Poree ran a pastry 
shop along with his wife and daughter, Christine. Fromi 
i-ecam-p I was taken to Lille, a industrial town on the 
Belgian border. I stayed in riarcq-en-Baroeul, France, for 



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/La. ore (ice Coun-/y. T^^s nap (.-■'c^i pCici + ed in /9/o. 



Date.l: Se--)tpm'bfr 3, l^/M 
Tr . Filed: October ?6 , 19.''" 

TICTCR Bl'niIA!T.MI 

jA>'.i:S MOITHOS, President of thp United States of America, 
^O ALL ?': '^OK TIO:SE P'RESE::TS , SHALL COME, SKS3TI:TC}: 

KlIC' YK, Thst Vict'^r BuctL^.nan d" Oallntin County, Kentuck;', hrvin^ 

defORited in the 0-(?n°ral I-jid Office n Certifii-.ate of the Register 

of the Land Cffir^e at Vincennes, Indiana, ¥116**137 i-t appears thst 

full payment has be^^n nip-ie for Thie South Vest a'larter of Section One, 

ir. Tovmship Tvo North of Ran^e Twel-'e *''est, containing One Hundred and 

sixty acreR, situ^itpd in the State of Illinois, of the lands directed 

t'- be pcld at ^'in^ennec by the Act of Ccn,"r<^ss, entitled "An Act pro- 

\dding for the ssle rsf the lands of th- Ti'ITj-JD STa'^ES, m tne territory 

north vest if thp Ohio, and above the ..loath '.<£ Kent-icrv' -iver," ^ind of 

':h'"" Acts njnen'"r. tory of the same Tril-.rJi IS .>:- O'TEL, by the '^_te.i 3tf'*-e8, 

unto the said Tict';r Buchanan pnr* his n-^irs the quarter ;. - 1 ,r sect; t. a, 

n-(^ lanr" above de-cril-^d: 

TO HAVE AND ?C HOLD the said quarter lot or section of land, wita 

the ap'-j-artenances untc the said Victor Buchanan, his heirs and assi-ns 

forever . 

IN T5;STIM0NY '(^THSREOF, I have caxised these letters to be ua e 

PA7KN?, and the seal of CrENEPiO. L/JTD OFFICE to be here-unto rf fixed 

Gr''SK under ay hand at the City of Washington, the Eighth day of Ser- 

tember in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty 

three and of the INDEPENDENCE of the United States of America the 

forty ftirhth. 

By the President, James Monroe 

Oeo. Graham, Comraissioaer of the General 

Land Office. 
Recorded in "olunr- 5, 
pa/-e 4.-"6 3, P. 



S.'aIE of ILLIiiOIS ) 

) ss LAST WILL ec TESTAMJSITT 

COUlilY OF LA^,ffiJlL>:CE ) OF VICTOR BUCHaITAH, SE. 

Will Record A, page 113 

In the Narie of ^od. Amen. I, Victor Buchanan, Senr. now of 
the Coxinty of Lawrence pjid State of Illinois, being wea?< in "body, 
but of sound and disposing mind and memory and knowing that it is 
appointed once for man to die do make this ray last will and testa- 
ment in maimer and form following, that is to eay: 

Item Ist, I give unto my loving wife, Relieca, during her 
natural lifetime the one third of all my goods and chattels, lands 
and tenements now in possession aAd at her death the personal prop- 
erty (except what is hereinafter excepted) to be equally divided be- 
tv;een my two daughters, Elizabeth Bell and Rebecca &aloway. 

2nd I give and devise to my son, James, the farm on whirh I now 
reside containing one hundred and fifty-eight acres with all the farm- 
ing utensils thereon, likewise my clock and the colt of my young mare 
and, 

3rd l>ly v;heat, faji and large iron tooth harrow, I give to my two 
sons, Victor and Jaunes jointly. 

4th. I give to my son, Victor my small log chain with the third 
of the fruit of my orchard Tintil his own orchard bears fruit sufficient 
for his family use, 

5th My wagon I leave to my sons residing in this Cotuity for their 
mutual benefit. 

6th» I will and bequeath to my son, Wmiam, Fifty •'^ollarB and to 
Davie Marnoy, my son in law. Fifty Dollars to be paid by my son, James. 

Lastly. I do hereby nominate, constitute and appoint my wife, 
Rebecca, Executrix, and my Son, Victor, Executor, to this my last Will 
and Testament with full and necessary power to act and transact all and 
whatsoever may be necessary after my decease. 

In Testimony Viliereof, I have herexmto set my hand and seal this 
15th day of April, A. D. 1839. 

Victor Bvichanan (Seal) 

Signed and acknowledged by said Victor Buchanan as his last will and 
testament in our presence. ^ 

Alford H, Grass 
John H, Morris. 



DOMINGUE, TIMOTHY, 1955- 



EASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

ar Contributor to the Kock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
erican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
w mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
cess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY *** -;c -•; >V-,'r a ;V ;V AAA A A A A A A A A A A A ; 

OFFICE USE CODE 
1. Your name Tim Dornlna-ue a 



Date of form May 6, 1974 a ( | d // 



2. Your college: Roc k Val ley (.ol 1ec)e a ( i d // ) 

RockTord, Illinois a 

***** A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 I8OO-I850 

-'^ 1 850- 1 900 X 1900 or lateT 

'*. Please check al 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

.New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South^Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., sTcT) VlEast South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K>fc 



_West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., 01^.^) East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.j 
_Pacific (Cal., WasU) (Hawaii, Alaska) X Plain states (N. Dakota, etc. 



5. Please check al 1 occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

V Farming ^Mining X Shopkeeping or small business 

•^ T ransportation ^B i g Business ^Manufacturing 

y' P rofessions Industrial labor Other 



6. Please check al I religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 



i 



Roman Catholic ^Jewish ^Presbyterian ^Methodist 

sptist Epi scopal ian Congregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon X OTher Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians ^Mexicans ^Puerto Ricans 

^Jews ^Central Europeans Italians Slavs 



.'•"ish ^British - N ative Americans over several generations 

East Asian Other 



8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

y^ Interviews with other Family Bibles Family Genealogies 

f ami ly membe rs 

Vital Records Land Records ^The U.S. Census 

^Photographs ^^ Maps Other 



FAMILY DATA 
A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name ' '^ _ Current Residence 



I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth ol-cn ..c"-\:^ ; . Date of Birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school ^' high school vocational "0 college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) '^"'"' 

1st rice fartne"'" Dates 1 °7'^4--191 '^ 1st JrOivle^ , , Dates"' ' 



2nd Dates 2nd ^Dates_ 

3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates_ 

kxh Dates kx\\ Dates 



Re I i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother - ■ ' • date i^^ 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 

that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name - Current Residence 



I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth -ato\ -o c^, " . Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational col lege_ 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st ':Oi-iseTA^if , Dates "! 7U-I06 O 1st Cx-ov7ley . " -• . Dates_ 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates_ 

^th Dates 4th Dates 



Re 1 i g i on Catholic 

t Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather " ' ,, : ■. , DATf '' 

^''^^'- ih^natHfl»fh^^Ba£g'8?dtl^f§ pigi^U-^)! stepmother or another relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 



N.inic 

I f dead, dale of death 



Place of birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

'♦th 



Re I i gi on 



Current Residence 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


'♦th 



Date of Bi rth 



vocational 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE ,i 
(after leaving home) H 
Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 



date 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name ^^^ 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 



Current Residence 



Date of bi rth 



vocational 



col lege 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Date; 



Dates_ 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 
Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth itchell , So^,^th ^sl-ote Date of birth "'-""^ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

l5t ^lailropr^ vor>er Dates l"9°-l"0 5st -"-^^. " -rt\ ^-y-: D ates ^ : ^-1^^ ^? 

2nd -"-- Dates l"-5--'" 2 nd Dates 

3rd ^Dates ^3rd ^Dates 

'♦th Dates ^th Dates 



Re 1 i g i on - ^ '^' ■ " - ■^^-- 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your grandmother date 

Note: If your mother was raised by a iitap f ache r O F a n ot ti e r r e l ar t ve ( t o ag e I8t" 

give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name ' ' , , ^Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death ' <- <i 

Place of bi rth '--- ^ ' - -^-'--- => -- — ^Date of birth ■" ^ - 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

--^ ^/- ^(after Jeaving home) ^^„ , ^ 

■1st ho^^.se^nre Dates___f:f^ ^.^ ^^-^» ^out;^ "^ z' '' p ates ^^^-^? 

Znd Dates 2nd '^i®^^'^ , South r^Vct- Dates-''^"' 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates 



^el igion 




Frot«'^ 


t? ' 


soror i ties , 


etc. 












Political 


party. 


CI VI 


or 


social^ clubs , 
















'lace of marriage 
"lote: 1 f your mc 
give that 


to your 
ther was 
data on 


grandfather 
raised by a s 
the back of th 


tepmother or 
is page (D-2) 


another 


relat 


1 ve 


(to 


_clate 
"age 


'' 


18) 



C- 1 Stepgrandf ather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death ~ 

•'l.i(<- ..( I)iilh D.iU- ol hiith 

I (liK .1 1 i 'in (niiiiil)f r of yci t ■, ) ~ ~ 
'ir.idf .(hool hi(jh school vocotiunol coiloiH' 

Occupat ion{s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

'4th 







PLACE 


OF 


RESIDENCE ] 


Dates '" 


' 1st 


(after 


I 


saving 


home) 
Dates 


Dates 


2nd 








Dates 

- 


Dates 


3rd 








Dates ' 


Dates 


^ith 








Dates 



Re 1 i g ion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother ~ " ~~ ~~ date 

D-2 S tepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead , date of death — — — — — 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school liigh school 

Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 





vocat 


iona 1 
1st 


col lege 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 


Dates 1 

Dates_ 
Dates 


Dates 




Dates 




2nd 




Dates 


3rd 





Re 1 i g i on^ 

Pol i t ical party , civil or soci al clubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of. marriage to your grandfather * — — — 5aTe" 



CHILDREN of A 6 B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 



k. 



Name :-Iora ce Don- 
Pi ace~om7tF 



Number of years of school ing 
Residence • ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



date 
Occupat ibn 



Name I^avis i"om; 
Place of bi rth 



Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



"3a"t< 



Marital Status 



Occupation 



Name lUgen^ 
Place of bl rth . ^ 
Number of years of schoqUng 
Res I dence - -> ^^ ' 
Number of chi Idren ' 



Marital Status 



date 
Occupatlbn 



Name '^^^^y ^'^^• 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years_of school ing 

Residence ■ 

Number of chi Idren 



date 



OccupatiOh 
Marital Status :" 



Too.V 



Name 

Place of bi rth ' ' 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



date 



_^__^__^_^ Occupation 
Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



"Jate 

"Cccupat ion 



Mari tal Status 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupat iort 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



^date 

Occupation 



Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of' school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



date 



Marital Status 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school ing 

Res I denc e 

Number of Llll lllP«n 



date 



Occupation 
"an" tal Status 



■3_-19,<0 



CHILDREN of L and D (or r.-l, D-l)-your mother's name should appear below 



N.iinc 

fi.,-.~f hi, I 



Niiirih'T ol ycir % of school i ru) 
Rosidcncc '^ :.-,_' I "^r 

N umber of ch i Idren 



-Y-5 



dr)l( 



Occupat i on 



Marital Status 



N.jrnc Doroth y '.'hyn; 

P lace of bt rth 



;orair. 



Number of years of school i ng 
Res i dence ^ J '. , _-L_r 



date 

"Occupat ion 



1920 



Number of ch i Idren 



Mar i tal Status 



3. Name 



Cdith Vhy::: 



P lace of birth """ ~ 
Number of years of school i ng 
Res i dence ^ . j..^^ ' 
Number of chi 1 dren 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



5. 



Name 

P lace of b i rth 

Number of years of" school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 



Number of chi Tdren 



7. 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

P lace of birth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



9. 



Name 

P lace of bi rth ' ' 

Number of years of school ing 

Res i dence 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 



Number of children 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupat ion 



datt 



____^__^ Occupation 
Marital Status 



Mar I tal Status 



_ date 

Occupat ibh 



date_ 

Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



_ date 

Occupat i 6n 

Ma r i t a 1 S tatus 



date 

Occupat iori 



Mari tal Status 



date 



Occupat ibh 



Marital Status 



date 



iccupat ion 



Marital Status 



Your Father 

Name ^ Current Residence ^-'■^- 



I f dead, date of death 



'^-.-^-T - - - - .J .-■n]^ r. -t r,-i n 

Place of bi rth ". , • Date of bi rth . - 



Education (number of years) 



qrade school high schoo 
Occupation(s) 

,5t coT.muir,ications »y|J*- Dates ' ^'^ -'"'-''^ 


vocational 


col lege 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
-,„ ,.J_after leaving home) i-i-i ' '. 
1st ' ^ ' " Dates " ' 


j^jtublic relations Dates ''-'^^l-'" 


2nd ---'-'■'-■-, .. ; - 
, . "aiiover Park, 11"'.. 


D^tes 


Dates ^ ~ 


!,th leyor-Hanover r^r- oates-'*^'^ 
Religion Cat'/cl'- c-^i^ -re-^ 


K^. ..lizabeth 111. 
-aternities, etc. -publico 


Dates " 




'olitical parties, civil or social clubs, f 


ri Tjarty, 






Mace of marriage to your mother / ' 
JOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or 


■::■--' date 


■-. _ 


another relative give that data 


on the back 



of this page. (E-2) 

'our Mother 

lame Dorothy Whynig Current Residence "lizabeth , 111 

f dead, date of death ' 



'lace of bi rth > ^ :. :sl-c" Date of birth 

iducation (number of years) 
grade school _ high school vocational ^college 



S5C:TOOl 

lccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

st secretary Dates 1950-5^ 1st Chicar^ Dates 19 50-5" 

nd -^ -,~-A^. Dates 1952-no- 2nd 



Chi car ^ 


I 


1 "anover Farl:. 


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J 1-— '-^, :i^. ( 



rd Dates 3rd ' ' "" " ' ' ^ ' • ^Dates 

e 1 i g i on _ ^ 

olitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. ^-^^ ^- ^- 

lace of marriage to your father ' ' ' „ d ate VjAy ' 5"^ 

OTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



E-1 Stepfather 

Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth^ ^__ ^Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupationis) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

' (after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


ijth 



3rd ^Dates 3rd ^Dates 

^th Dates ijth Dates 

Rel ig ion 

Pol i t i cai* part les , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother Date 



F-2 Stepmother 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates ^2nd Dates 

3rd Dates ^3rd Dates 

Re 1 I g I on 

Political party , civil or socia i c lubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father date 



:HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



jame ■ 

'lace of bi rth :'"' 

lumber of years of schooling 

tes i dence ~ 

lumber of ch i Idren 



Date of bi rth 



1 n.ei 



Marital Status 



Occupation 



lame - 

'lace of birth 

lumber of years of schooling 

esi dence 



adopt r- 



Date of bi rth 



number of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



Occupation 



.omiriA'ue 



lace of birth 'Jriica-c, 

■umber of years of schooling 
esi dence ' ^"^^^ 



(adopted ] 

— rn 



Date of birth __^ 

Occupation 



Marital Status 



umber of chi 1 dren 



'ame .,-uiii-L:-_L..'^ 

lace of bi rth -t- 

uraber of years of school Ing 
es i dence ' , ~ 



(adopted) 



Date of bi rth 



umber of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



Occupat ion 



ame 

lace of bi rth 

umber of years of school ing 

es i dence ~ 

umber of chi 1 dren 



Date of bi rth 



Marital Status 



Occupat ibn 



ame 

lace of bi rth 

■umber of years of school ing 

28 i dence 



Tate of bi rth_ 
Occupat ion 



jmber of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



ame^ ^ 

lace of bi rth 

jmber of years of school ing 

;s i dence 



Date of bi rth 



Occupat I on 



1 c^c 



1 ^ . 1 C C9 



■jmber of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



ime 

iace of bi rth 

jmber of years of schooling 

's i dence 



Mar i tal sTatus 



Date of bi rth 
Occupation 



jmber of ch i Idren 



lii. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are vnlling) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights/ to the Rock Valley College Family History CoVlection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 




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Eiigene Domingue Sr. 

Eiigene Domingue Sr, ..came from a typical, poor 
Louisiana family. As a boy he did not even know what school was. 
When he TtrsLS old enough he started work In the rice fields, 
carrying water to the workers. His next job, which was a step 
up, foiind him taking care of the plow horses and oxen used In the 
fields. 

The Domingue name Is Spanish and French. Grandfather 
was the only boy out of a family of five, so It was up to him 
to carry on the family name. He was never In the service and 
barely knew World War I was going on. The only newspaper csune 
from Baton Roiige, which was 30 miles away frcffl Crowley, and It 
contained only local news. 

He always knew who was President, but probably never 
knew who was Vice-President. My grandfather's favorite saying was 
"If It doesn't fit, don't force it." 

It always amazed me how the people down in the swamps 
were so Isolated from the rest of the world. Much to my surprise, 
they did go on vacations, whenever they could. It was usually 
only a few miles from the gulf, where they would go crab fishing 
for two or three days. Being so poor, birthdays and Christmas were 
no big deal, but usually a big dinner with a cake was served.. 
The Domingue family was very religious. They attended the local 
Catholic church every Sunday. 



5!"1' ■.■■(■■ 



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There is a small family joke about my grandfather's 
childhood. It went like this: "He didn't see a highway until 
he was l4, and he didn't get his first pair of shoes \intil he 
was 17 f and then he tried to eat them and they didn't eat worth 
a damn." 



Anna Hebert 

Hebert is a true French (Cajun) name. Grandmother 
Domingue was lucky in the sense that she did not live on a fann 
and in that kind of an environment. She lived in the town of Crowley, 
Louisiana, and had none of the burdens of farm life. By no means 
did she live a sheltered life. All I really was able to find 
out about her childhood was that at an early age she did sewing, 
to help supplement her family's income. She was also a good 
cook. She would make things like coosh, coosh (ground corn meal, 
usually eaten for breakfast). Meatballs and rice was a big 
feast for the family. Turtels were also fixed in a niimber of 
delicious ways. A cookout would consist of boiled crab (freshly 
caught). Catfish was also a comman meal. How can we forget the 
biggest meal treat they had, gumbo. They made chicken gumbo, sea 
food gumbo, egg drop gumbo and virtually any kind of meat 
could be made into a gumbo. Rice was served with every meal. 
Dates and figs, and also prunes, were canned and stored for 
winter. 

It is not known for sure if grAndmother went to school, 
and if she did, it wasn't past the third or fourth grade. She 
spoke fluent French and learned English later. She always spoke 
with a french accent mixed with a southern twang. 

She was also a strict Catholic. Jim Crow laws were 
in full effect at this time. Blacks weren't thought of as being 



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evolved up to white standards, 



(For both my father's parents, all the Infoimation 
was based on just what my father told me. No 
records or family bibles were kept, recording"^" 
any dates. All they thought about was putting food 
on the table for today and tomorrow. They forgot 
about what happened yesterday, ) 



Eoigene Domlngue and Anna Hebert Domingue 

ffin 1904, Eugene Domlngue Sr, and Anna Hebert were 
married. My grandfather had 25 acres of land and a good size house. 
Houses In these days were built two feet off the ground because of 
the flooding. ^^ took 1^ years until the first son was bom, Horace, 
After that, four more children folloxfed. My father was the third 
child. It Is not knoT-m why he was named after my grandfather, but 
I guess it was b. ause they couldn't think of any more names. 

Back In those days the children were wormed, just like 

the animals, because they were always running aroimd without any 

shoes. The children had to take tiims getting up in the morning, 

to keep the wood stove going and also to put the coffee on. The 

coffee was made from a drip pot. 

At the dinner table, the father sat at the head of the 
II 
table and the mother sat close to the stove. The rest of the family 

filled in around the table and sat in the same seat each time. 

This was not because they had to but because it t:;^'3 a force of 

liablt. The two oldest boys and the two yoiingest boys had to share 

a room, while the only girl, Mary, occupied a bedroom alone. 

As soon as the children were old enough, they had to 

start helping the men in the fields, mostly by carrying the water. 

U.1 of the kids had to go to school. While in the second grade, 

Jene Jr., broke his arm and had it set. It was set wrong and therefore 

le was left partially crippled. Later the doctors wanted to re-break 

:he arm and set it right, but my father's parents couldn't see having 



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the arm broken for a second time. 

In 192^, my grandfather wen^ ' otally blind and remained 
so for the rest of his life. This put more pressure on the children 
and my grandmother, especially to be able to put food on the table 
every day. Even though he was blind, my grandfather remained the 
total leader of the family. My father remembers that he got some of 
his best beatings after his father went blind. An actual woodshed 
Has used for these disciplinary actions. 

The depression had no effect on the Domingue household. 
They barely knew it was going on. Most all of the few necessities 
of life, were hanu made. My grandfather's handicap of being blind, 
is one of the many reasons my father is so active to this day, in 
the Lions Club, because they do work for the blind. 

As the boys turned I8, they went into the army. All three 
of the oldest boys served over seas during World War II. The two 
oldest were stationed in Europe and Gene Jr. was stationed In Africa, 
because of his ami. He did not participate in the main line of 
fighting, but instead served as a communications officer, behind 
the line. 

Horace is now in Houston, Texas, work:^ag with computers 
for the telephone company. Before that he was in the army, for 20 
years to be exact, and when he retired he was given a good pension. 

Davis, the second oldest son, died in 196O in a skydiving 
accident. The main shoot did not open, so instead, he used the spare 
shoot, and as a result, broke his back. Before he died, he had been 
a draftsman in Los Angeles, California. He was married and had four kids, 

Mary, the fourth oldest, and only girl, never got married 
and lived with her mother xintil she died, in I96O. 



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Jack was the youngest and -"ms in the army for four years, 
He then went to x\rork In a factory, In Houston, TeX3s, ^rher^he ••/orked. 
Ai'ay up. To this day he is still an executi-/e in the factory. 



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Elsie Franck 

Elsie came from a very religious family. Her parents, 
being Dutch immigrants, weore Protestant. Her childhood was a 
very happy one. Her father owned a very neat and well kept 
farm. The worst thing that occurred during her childhood 
was probably the many rough South Dakota winters. 

Discipline vias no problem. Her father only had her and 
another daughter, Darlene, to discipline and they would shape 
up pretty fast when scolded. The two sisters grew up very 
close, and remained in close touch with each other for the 
rest of their lives. 

The only chores they had to do were light things, like 
picking eggs from the henhouse and feeding the chickens. They 
had a tame cow that they could ride. The only type of food they 
ate, that would be strange to us, is pheasant. That was a comman 
meal for them because it was so easy to hunt. 

Even though Elsie's father was not poor, neither of 
the children attended school. Formal was not that important to 
them during that time. Their mother taught them their numbers, 
and they also learned to read from the Bible. All of the 
decisions in this family, were made solely by the father. 



' .■ ,.-■< ■■rif. " '.;,f!d 



' . ■-■'•: :jt--'r -jV'i 7 






Frederick Whynia 

This is the only true "Black Sheep" of the family, 
rhe only things I have ever heard about him were very unflattery. 
Je drank, smoked and who knows what else he did. The only known 
Tact about him, was that he was bom in Mitchell, South Dakota, 
ie worked for the railroad, laying the track from the South 
aakota to Chicago run. 

From his earnings he got enovigh money together to purchase 
I small farm just outside of Ames, South E&kota, This is were 
lis future wife and children would make their permanent home, 
JUt it would not be his. 



:-n 






Elsie Franck and Fred Whynia 

As fate would have it, this very upstanding woman, and 
s near alcoholic, married in 1910. For the first eight years of 
their married life, Fred spent most of his time on the road. He 
later returned home, long enough to have three children: Bud, 
Dorothy and Edith. Since Fred was not aroimd alot of the time, 
all disciplining, decisions and child care was left to Elsie. 
She made all three children walk to school, four and a half 
miles away, every day. 

There v/as not a set arrangement made at the dinner table, 
even when their father was home. Newspapers were pretty good 
in this section of the country and people knew all they 
OTinted to know about politics, who was President and what he 
was doing in office. 

The depression effected the Whynia family greatly. My 
mother said it wasn't to bad in the susasftr months, but in the 
irlnter, they cotild not get all of the clothes and food they 
needed, in order to make a South Dakota winter bareable. 

After 1925 Fred Whynia took off for parts unknown, although 
le did send back money periodically. 

Bud, the oldest and only boy, finished high school and 
irent into the navy during the second world war. He is now a 
isalesnan for I.B.M., in Los Angeles, California. He is married 
lind has three children. 



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Itorothy, the second oldest, finished high school and 
then moved to Pierre, South Dakota, where she worked her 
way through secretarial school. She then moved to Chicago, 
Illinois, where she got a job with Central Watch Service. 

Edith, the baby of the family, married a very wealthy 
business man from Pierre. Her husband died after seven years 
of marriage and left Edith well provided for, for the rest 
of her life. 



Eugene and Dorothy Domingue 

From the army, Eugene went to Houston and became 
a detective for the Standard Oil Company. He then was a 
private detective. Next he moved to Chicago where he 
went to work for the Central Watch Service, which was a 
company that made burgalei* alarms. There he met Dorothy 
Whynla, who happened to be a secretary for the president 
of the co1|#''^y« After a short courtship, they got married. 
Soon after, they bought a house and five acres of land in 
Hanover Park, Illinois, My father had to commute back and 
forth to Chicago, which was 32 miles. He did this for the 
next twenty years. 

After four years of marriage they adopted four children. 
My father soon got interested in village politics and after 
gettingjbeatH.in one election, he soon became the mayor of 
Hanover Park, Being a -republican he was on first name terms 
with Senator Gramn and Governor Richard Outvie, He also 
met Mayor Richard Daley at conferences. Meanwhile my 
mother became a real estate agent, but she never really 
practiced. 

Homelife for the Domingues was a cross between the 
two fJarents families. My mother gave up her Protestant 
religion and became a converted Catholic. 

All four of the children had to go to a Catholic 
school, in the nearby city of Eligin, Since they lived on 



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Just a Jive acre farm, there was not much of a hardship to endure. 

When I was eight years old, I had ^"I^Ik* cows of my own. We had to 

eat a lot of food from the south, like egg drop gumbo, which my brother 

and I always referred to as slop drop gumbo. My father made all 

of the decisions concerning the family and also did all of the 

disciplining. 

My first recollections of the farm was that we could 
see farmland for miles and miles around us, until Hanover Park 
grew up around us. One incidence that made my family realize that 
they would have to reform to the new life style, was when my 
cows got out and ran all over the town streets. 

At this time, my father sold his farm, which was worth 
quite a bit, and the family moved into the town of Hanover Park. 
We had neighbors, and no privacy at all, which my family did not 
like. So my family next moved to Hanover, Illinois which is 
just outside of Galena. Dad bought a 36O acre farm, but after 
two years he got tired of farming. So he built a restaurant, 
bar and liquor store in Elizabeth, Illinois, Moving to Jo Etetvls 
county was quite a change for my family. For two entire years we 
were treated as outsiders. 

Linda, 23 » and the oldest child, moved back to Elgin 
and is currently a nurse's aid at St, Joseph's Hospital. 

Charlotte, 20, is still living at home and working 
in her father's restaurant, 

Tim, 18, after gradxiation frcm high school, spent the 
summer working at a girls riding camp during the day and cooking 
at his father's restaui^mt the rest of the time. Latter that summer 



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he moved to Rockford, where he is now r 'ring his way throtigh college, 
while also working for a local attorney Charles Thomas, He 
takes care of his farm. Kings Acres, and the many horses Mr. 
Thomas has. 

Gary, 17 » is a senior at Hanover High School. As of 
now he has no plans for the future. 



V DEBORAH ANN, 195^- 



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SOURCES 



W. P. Dor an 

Ida Dor an 
Anton Frit sell 
Addie Pri" sch 
Edv>rc-rd T. Dorrn 
Nancy Dor^n 
Renee Pritsoli 
Irene Treptow 
Le.\ira. Connell 



JAMES GOEDAIT DOEAN 

Jrraes Gordon Doran was born on March 30, 1866 in Toronto, 
Ontario, Canada.. He was the oldest child of James and Annie 
Doran, He hs.d three younger brothers tn.nd two younger sisters 
for which he was responsible to t&ke care of. 

He finished eight yearp of formal ecucr-'tion, but lat^^r in 
his life he studied and educated himself. He also was respon*^ 
sible for helping his brothers, both financia.ll.y and morally, 
to fiirther their educations. 

He moved to Buffalo, New York in the late nizieteenth 
century where he became a natixralized citizen. It is believed 
that he was a lumber salesman around this time. 

One of his brothers, George H. -iJoran, became the owner of 
the George H. Dora.n Piiblishing Comp'^ny of New York City. It 
is believed that this com.pany is now known as Doubleday .. 
Publishing Company. In the early twentieth century George got 
his brother a job as a. bookkeeper for Brock and Rankin Edition 
Book Binders in Chicago, Illinois. Ke then moved his family 
to River Forest, Illinois, i^he first "house was on Gale Avenue 
which wa.s a tv/o story house south ^^ the northwestern Rail— 
roa.fl tracks. vVhen his three sons were old enough to attend 
school, the family moved to the north side of the railroad 
tracks so that the boys would hot have to cross the trrcks to 
get to school, 'i'his ho^^se was a large nine room dwelling located 
on North Park Avenue. This house was located five block from 
the school. It wa.s the next to the last house on the street. 
Three blocks away was the First Presbyterian Church. 

James worked for Brock s.nd Rankin for over forty years 
rising from bookkeeper to secretary-treasvircr of the company. 

James was a qiiiet home-loving man who never p.-^rticip-'ted 
in public or religious a.f fairs. He was a strict Ca.nadian who 
raised his family in these traditions. He, believed th.'-Jt child- 
ren should be seen and not heard. He also enjoyed going to ' 



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the Palmer House on Smiday afternoons for dinner -in Irter ,yei"i?s 
He died on November 21, 1942 at the age of 76, 
Annie I'orc:n died in July, 1942 s.t the age of 77. 



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Y/ALTER FEANKIIN DORAN 

Wolter Frriiklin Doran vvf.s born on April 3> 1898 in 
3urr?lo, Nev/ York. He we.g the ^.Idg-g- fe. of three boys. While 
still an inf-'nt his frther rroved the frmily to River Forest, 
Illinois to the house on Gale Avenue. When the boys were old 
enough to attend school the f?mily moved to the house on 
North Park Avenue. 

There weren't mcny c^rs during the time he w.-ts growing up 
so his only means of trr.nsport^tion wer§ walking or riding a, 
bike. "Co get to downtown Chicago he hsd to wrrlk about two snd 
a half miles to the elevatec" tr- in in Oak Park, 

luring the suicmer the favorite pestime of v/ivitor ^-nd his 
friends was to go skinny dipping in "skunk hole" in the 
Desplanes River. In the winter time they h&d r- trbogm slide 
in the Doran's back yard that they used to slide dovm on their 
sleds. There wcs also a big liill in the forest preserve not 
far from his home that he used Utjiujj to slice dovm.. The 
Dorpn boys bIbo ov/ned c canoe which they pace led down the 
Desplanes River in. 

During his childhcod the f?i:ily took a vacation to Silver 
Lake, V/isconsin for a couple of weeks. Another vccation t^,5ken 
by the family was to Palenades P: rk in luichig-n for two weeks. 
The attracting features of this piece were burrows to ride 
and a berch on Lake i.iichigan. :; ;■, : j? ? . > 

Walter attended the River Forest Public School fron 
kindergarden through eight,^;grode . The school was five blocks 
Trom the house. He then had to wo Ik two and a half miles to 
attend Oak Park-River Forest Township High School . ■ ,: ?.-• 

After le-:ving high school he went to work rt the 
V/estem Electric Company inspecting loading coils for long 
distance telephoning. In a short time he became aspistant 
foreman of the department. His career was interrupted by the 
First World Wrr. He v/as the first person in the River Porest- 
OaK Park area to volmiteer for the Armed Forces. He was 
inducted into the navy on April 30, 1917. 






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4 

While stationed ot the Grei-t Lakes nrvo.l hcse he met his 
v/ife, Ida. She h^'d corne to Grei'.t Lakes one dny with friends 
to visit c. neighbor. Walter and snother man frora Oklrhomn r-!;- 
were "cutting up" near the car thr t she was in. Somehow they 
got to talking. 7/hen the visitors left to return home, Walter 
Jumped on the spare tire of the co.r and road to the gate with. 
them. On the way to the gate one of the ren in the cyr asked 
how. they could get into cirrp some da.y other than regular 
visiting cey. He told them that they could ask to see him and 
then they could get in c-t any time. He grve them his name and 
address. He did not rerli?;e that Ida vvas in the c?r ot the 
time. NoT too long after that he recieved ':■ letter from her 
which Wi'S the beginning of t-ieir romance. 

After six months in the navy he contr.-cted poliomyelitis. 
The doctors told h"i:n he'd n%^e wa.lk ?gc in, but one nurse 
refused to believe them. And as a result of her convictions 
he did walk agaija with an occassional a.ssistance of a cane. 
He, too, wr-s a fighter rnc refused to give up. During the five 
months he w:?s in the naval hospital Ida c-ame eV'. ry weekend to 
see him. 

On April 2, 1918, he was given a raedicr-l discharge. 

On July 26, 1919, Walter end l6o were married. Shortly 
aftei they were married, they took a five diy cruise rn Lake 
Michigan from Chicago to Sou St. Mrrie, Iv'ichigan and back. 
Prom then on they took a two week summer. vacation and traveled 
throughout Wisconsin, Minnesota and Canada by car. In 1943 
they took a train, boat, and bus trip to Ni^pa Palls and 
Toronto Canri da for seven days with their family. 

tue to his disability Walter W3s given special training in 
selling and advertising. He spent two years in college and 
majored in sel ing and advertising. After ler-ving college he .. 
went to work for the Wahl Eversharp Compr-.ny. He v/«s soon 
promoted to sales officn loanager. Then c?me the Grert Depres- 
sion and he lost his job. Like others during the depression 
he held various jobs until it was over. He then went to 
work for the Mantle Lanip Company until 1947. In. 1947 he decided 
to go into businear^ for himself. He bought a hardv/c^re store 



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in Ijlkhorn, Wisconsin. This -oroved to be " inistr-.ke j?nc he 
sold it in 1949. Prom Elkhorn the\i- moved to Loves pprk, 
Illinois. After e couple of jobs he went to work for Greonleo 
Brothers where he stt-yed until he retired in J?nu':r.y of 1959. 

After retiring they ):;oved to Punt.-: Gord?., Florida v/here 
they lived for eight yeors. In 196? they moved to NevviTort News, 
Virgini?.. After moving four times they hrvo settled into a 
■brick house on Longfellow Drive with their grind son, John. 



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■'■'''■ EDWAED S. TUIL 

Ecfwcrd v/c s born on October 23, 1868 in Reading, England. 
He was p member of the King's Guard and married Sophia Tibbie 
who was a lady's maid for Queen Victoria. They left England 
for the United Str.tes in 1895 with their two-yeir-olrl son 
Egbert ond a child on the wry. They settled ground ChicEgo, 
Illinois. What Edward did after arriving in this country I 
don't knov;. He did belong to a lodge cs.lled the Sons of St. 
George. ""*'"' ''' '^'''' '"'■ '' 

Sophia was born Jnnuf'ry 5, 1869, in Reading, Englmd. Sh; 
died on October 26, 1931- 



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IDA I^L&DEIINE (TULL) DORAN 

Ida Tull \vi?s born on June 18, 1895, in Cliicario, Illinois, 
^ke was the second oldest of the family. _, There were two younger brothers, 

Ghristmases seemed to be the favorite holic: y. Her . 
brother Bert elwiiys rsde rnzre they had a nice ChristEi?s- He 
would find something he thought woUld look nice on the tree 
rnd come horae and tell his mother, '^he would send hira brck to 
buy it. It was also a tradition in the iirdly to le.-ve so:.ie- 
thing for Sg.nty Glaus to ept. .^ ,-. 

At one time the family lived over a cigr^r store in y nice 1 

neighborhood. The men thc't frequented the store always bought ' 

the children ccndy. There wcs also a big feed barn nerrby 

where they used to go to loick out Pvjif lower sc^c ? to e^t. I 

Once when Ida was in the barn the ov/ner piat her up on one of ! 

the big v/ork horses and scared her. 

When she v/as nine .or ten she took Scottish dance lessons. ; 

Her girlfriend anc she used to ride tho elevted trein ; 

3 
on Sunday afternoons for a nickel. They also liked to go canoeing. i 

vYhen she was sixteen she attended a dance given b^;" the 

Sons cf St. George. The reason this particul&r dance stands y 

out in her mind v/as thpt her mother mede her a pink dress v/ith 

big rossettes on it. Rossettes were also v/orn in the hair ..•" | 

after it hrid been braided. She remembers going to the 

Boston Store in dov«itovai Chicago to buy the rossettes. 

When she wns sixteen she worked at Ifershall Fields r..i/kirig 1 

k ! 

hats. #hen they movtd to Riverside, Illinois she v^oi^d at | 

a dry goods store, i^fter a while she returned to Chicago ; 

where she worked Pt Foreman Brothers Bank as an adding machine 

operator ond worked there \intil a couple of months after 

her mprricge. 

Eight years after they were married their first child, 

¥ii.-Ti?,e v/as born. Two and a half years iJiter \iYillia.m was born 

follov;ed in another two j'"ears by Edv/ard. 

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WALTER F. ANI' IDA DORAN 

V/clter one! Idr were married on July 26, 1919 in Riverside, 
Illinois. For eight ye- rs tliej- were alone \Antil Marge was 
born on December 15, 1927. When she was two end a half yecrs 
old »Villiam w s born, on August 11, .1929. On Jmie 1, 1931, 
Edv/rrd \v3.s born. 

The frirdly was a ho.ppy one despite the hardships of the 
depression and Walter's handicap. 

Walter believed in bringing up his children in the strict 
Canadian way his father raised him. Howevor, Idr, would occas- 
sions-lly temper his strictness vvith her gentleness. She would 
punish the children on occassion, 

Wlien James loran died in 1942, a rift was erected in the 
lorr^n family. Walter and his twin brothers fought over the 
estate James had left. When things had been finally settled, 
Walter never spoke to his brothers again. 

Tlie'fs.mily always took vacations going throughout Illinois, 
Wisconsin, end Kichigrn. These vacations were always fun. 

They h've been raarried fifty-six ye-^rs now and are lookirg 
fowj^rd to a few r.ore. All their children are carried. They 
hrve nine grandchildren and one great-grandson. They live in 
a rid brick house in Newport News, Virginia. which they share 
with their oldest grandson, John. 

They still enjoy traveling. They go up into the Blue _j: 
Ridge Ivlountians, down to Florida, end to Rockf ord , Illinais, 

■Both are still quite rctive for tlieir oges. Ida tires 
easily due to heert problems and Walter now nnist use crutches 
when he must stand or v^Dlk a lor-rS distance. 



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EDWARI' THOI.'AS DORAN 

Ecw?rc! Tlionacs Doro.n v/ss born on Jiuie 1, 1931, in Oak 
Prrk, Illinois, '■'^e wy.s the youngest in the fii^mil.y. 

V/hen he was born the fsnily wss living Pt 812 II. H-rvey 
Avenue in Oak Fc^rk. It w?s an eight room house thst was 
rented. It had a screen in ^:orch thot the two boys usee! to 
sleep on when it wos hot. There v/l"s p- skf.11 grocery store 
on the corner. Ilost of the people living on this block h:d 
children and hence r.ost of his friends were close by. 

The fi=rnily then moved to 646 Hr-rvey Avenue. This, too, 
was an eight room house, but it vies boughten rather th:=n rented. 
The house hrd v screened in porch in the back end v suii 
parlor both in the front of the house and upstairs ^^t the br'ck 
The grtde school vvc.s kitty-ccrncr from the house. There was 
3. gTOcery store on the corner and- behind it vire r. fire station 
where he used to sit c nc to.lk to the firemen. In this neigh- 
borhood there weren't r.any children, but the house was only 
tv70 blocks fron the first one, 

Edward usee to play br sobs. 11 or footbrll deioending 
v^/hich one v/ss in serson. Duiring the winter rr.onths ke v/oiild 
play ping pong or other indoor ganies. Wiien he got older 
he o.nd his friends would go to the Chic- go Loop sometimes 
on Saturc;;'y nights. They woxild either go to the movie? or 
to the Arc?de. 

y/hen he was p.bout ten yer^rs old he delivered groceries 
end stock shelves for the grocer,y store across the street. 

After the United States entered into the Second '''orld 
V/ar the family used to entertain servicemen in their home. 
Marge liked men in uniform a.nd the family spent many nights 
driving around downtov/n Chicago for her. Edward's frther 
would invite soldiers from the U.S.O. club to :^:: ve diriiier 
with the family, especially during the holidays. 

Also during the Second ^^orld. '*''ar the farrdly took ^ trip 



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10 
To Niagrc Palls. They left Chic;go by train anc rrrived in 
f Detroit, Michig;:n. From there they took a bopt to Buffalo, 
Nev/ York. It v/rs en overnight cruise. There wPs b strong 
wind thJit night causing the bort to roll cnc the clothes 
to swing back cno forth on their hungers. Then they cr-ught 
a bus in Buffalo t'lrt tock them to Niagra Falls, Cc=nada . 
Thef fcrnily spent tliree de-ys in Nio^rcrr sight-seeing. There 
were no lights on ?.t night due to the blcck-out rcgul:ticns. 
From Niagra they v/ent by bus to Toranto, C?nac!c to visit 
some relatives. From there they returned to Chicago via 
the some route . 

Another vocation was spent at a csbin rt V/hiter Lrke, 
Wisconsin. This Wc s the first time they h^d ever stayed in 
one place for the entire two weeks. Here they v/ere :?ble to 
swim, fish, ; nd go bo- ting. 

At rge sixteen Sdwrrc herd a sur.irier job ; t Dormyer in 
Chicago. He pushed cartons of glsss bovv^els on v. two wheeled 
cart to the packing line. In the fall of th~t ye-?r the family 
moved to Elkhorn, Wisconsin. Here he worked in the Gamble's 
store his father bought ;~fter school rnd on Sr-turd-ys. They 
lived in a four roomed spsrtnent in the do\^'ntown aren. 

After the store was sold i-nA the fpraily n.-.oved to Loves 
Prrk, Illinois he worked as ? file clerk filing drawings. 
He then became e. drrftsmon ct Ingcrsols I.-illing ^n6 Machine 
Compcny. 

It was et an Ingersols picnic thct he met his wife, Nancy. 
It was the annuel oicnic and dcnce. Nancy's f--ther worked 
at Ingersols rnd she h?d come with him to the picnic. N^ncy 
pnd her sisters v/ere standing on the dance floor listening 
to the music v/hen Edward asked her to d nee . From then on 
they dated. They were married on July 12, 1952, after -^Vncy 
had completed nurses' training. In 1953» he was drafted into 
the army and sent to Korea where he drew charts end grafts. 
After being discharged from the army he returned to work at 
Ingersols where he worked for s short time. He then got 
a job as a hardware salesman st Bla cks-xHirdware ahdiGompmny 



11 

After several yerrs he went to work for Metal Pc-.lDri caters 
Incorporation ;3s an estimator for builders hardv/are. He then 
v/ent to work for his brother-in-lrw r>s o bookkeeper for Zrugg 
Brothers Excavation Coraprny. He nov/ works for a chcin of 
beauty shops es p bookkeeper. 



*X^*^^^7f^.-*^^X%^-->C^C-^-««* 



ANTON CHARLES PRITSCH 

Anton Cli-rrles Fritsch w: s born on Mry 25, 1861, in 
Reichenbach, Boliemia. He v\?as the son of the Biirgermeister of 
Karlsbad which wps p?rt of Austrir ct tlict tiire. He irirraigr-'tela. 
to this comitry in 1886. Here he net anc mrrriec K"therine 
Ecker. 

Kcthrine Ecker wcs barn on Jrnu^-ry 4, 1876, in M?ple 
Grove, Wisconsin. Her mother vn6 frther had emigrated from 
Germany near the Alsace-Lourine prea. 

They hrd "twelve cliildren eight sons anc'. four dc-ughters. 

Emil H. (Henry?) B. February 25, 1C98 I'. Decerroer 24, 1920 
Krlen rraia 3. OctooLT 11, 1899 

Cl&rence John B. April 7, 1901 1. receBiber,196l 
Alexander Thor.-'s B. June 27, 1903 
Anton (C?rl or ^olv:i) B. May 27, 1905 

Hubert Albert B. April 21, 1907 B. Janu-ry 20, 1969 
Norman William B. M?rch 25, 1909 
Ruth Phyllis B. February 25, 1911 
Liiura Ann B. April 13, 1913 
Francis Joseph B. June 17, 1915 
Renee Zita B. Ifcrch 11, 1917 
Rodney Chester B. Mpy 13, 1919 
Anton died December 6, 1952, at Wabeno, ''Wisconsin. 
Krthrine died November 14, 1957 at Laona, Wisconsin. 



***^--X4*^it-X-«^-^**^t->tXJ(-4f-K^-^ 



ANTON PRITSCH 

Anton Priy.sch wrs bom on May 27, 1905 in Wabeno, Wisconsin. 
He was the middle son of Anton and Katie. He w?s not given 
a middle name rt birth end later a.dopted the middle nomc of 
John for legal piorposes. Recient documents show thc^t his 
middle name may be Carl. 

They lived in a big white nine roomed house in the center 
of tomi. Anton Chcrles was believed to be s farmer or worked 
for the lumber company. The favorite games of the children 
were run my good sheep run, and liice and seek. They also 
enjoyed swimming in the old swimming hole. 

Anton went to school and finished the ninth grade before 
he quit. In Irter yesrs he educated himself, especially in 
the area of Americcn history. 

Before he was married he worked on a farm and as a lumber 
piler, the two main industries in thyt ares.. 

He met his wife, Addie, when she came to re::t -' room pt 
his mother's house. They v/err carried on November (?, 1930 
in Menominee, Michigan. 

Luring the depression he rerely v>/orked . He did do a few 
odd jobs but it was not enough to support his sm:-'ll f3.mily,9i*. 
His mother-in-law owned the local grocery store in th.^t smell 
town and extended credit to the family as well as giving them 
things from her garden. 

In 1942 he c.me to aockford to look for v;-*rk. He got a 
job as a school bus oriver and moved his family into the 
Blackhawk hoiising project. 

Once while changing the tire on the school bus the rim 
of the tire suddeiily flew up and hit him in the head causing 
a skull frscture. It also cause the deafness in his left ear. 

He finally went to work at Ingersols Milling anel Machine 
Company as a milling machine operator where he sto.yed until 
he retired in 1971 • 



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14 

V/hile he wbs working i-t Ingersols he r.oved his family to 
a snr-11 house on Maple Avenue v/here they lived until the early 
1960's. It was 9. pink house just down the alley from a Isrge 
supermorket. It had 9 large ■ screened in porch on the front 
of the house. In the eorly 1960's he had a house built in 
the Lp.kewood Hills subdivision just outside of Rockf crd . He 
was soon joined by his daughter Corol rnd her husband end Ifter 
by his son Bob v.nc his second wife. The house wci.s built on a 
corner lot with a view of the man made lake and another man 
made lake on the corner of their property. It, too, is ? pink 
house with brown trim. They still live here. 



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FRED GORDON 

Pred Gordon was iDorn on Novenber 4, 1874 in t'rrinette, 
Wisooxisin. He ni&rried Amanda Bebes.u in Seotember of 1906. 
Pred was believed to have been a brrber. 

On July 4, 1930, Pred wcs killed in rn cutomobil.e accident. 
He was riding v/itli liis son-in-lrw Louis wlien the c?r hit ?. 
sign post instantly killing him, ^e left ten children. 

Some time cfter his death Amanda remarried. She nrrried 
Provii.e Pratt c-.nd together they rc-n the local grocery store 
in ^oodman, Wisconsin. 

Provine died in the 1950' s. An-nda died on March 28, 
1973 pt the oge of eighty-seven. 



* * *t X « ^ -X -X- * X- « « « ^ 7-; « ^ x- * ^^ ^ 



ADEIE AURELIA (GORDON) PRITSCH 

Adciie Gordon wrs born on Janu?.ry 21, 1911 in Nefiec^u, 
Michigan. She was one of eleven children. They lived in 
Dunbar Vifisconsin for ywhile then moved to s. six roomecl house 
in Goodman, Wisconsin. 

Goodman is a sriic"..ll lumber town in northern Wisconsin. It 
is miles from any of its i;.cighbors p.nc is surrounded by b, 
dense woods. In the to\»m is s small Co.tholic church, a 
t;?vern, a.nd a small grocery store ovmed by Amnnds- and her 
second husband. 

The children 's.se to play hide 9:rid seek and baseball as 
well as go for hikes into the woods. 

When Addie was nineteen she went to Kathrine Pritsch's 
house in search of a room, l^erc she i-ist her husbend. They 
were ms.rried on November 8, 1930 in Menominee, Michigan. 

On Juit.e 22, 1931, tlieir first child was born. 

Due to the depression Acdie had to make her ovni clothes 
out of old ones. '^he also went to l.er mother's store to 
buy food on credit and took fresh vegetables and mi?.k from 
her mother's fF'rni. 

Lois \-\ias born on December 12, 1932. Crrol wf.? born on 
May 1, 1934 and Anton Robert was born on March 14, 1936. 
Anton Robert's na.me wa.s supposed to be Robert Anton, but 
the attending physician believed thrt the first born boy 
shouMCbe named after his father and entered the name on the 
birth certificate in reverse. Both Addie and Anton v/ere 
very upset, but could do nothing to change it. The family, 
hov;ever, called him Bob, 

In 1942 the family nioved to Rockford, Illinois where 
Addie worked for a munitions plant during *he war. After 
the war was over, ?he went to virork for Testers Corporation 
on the various phases of miking balsa glider planes. She 
retired from the company in 1969. 



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17 

She now enjojs her leisure tirae . Her end her hurb?nd 
either tyke short trips up into northern Wisconsin to visit 
her sisters or remains at home to putter ebout the j'-ard and 
house . 



*«^^-)^^^-7vX-^-^^XXv-e**^«*XX 



ADDIE ATvir^ ANTON PRITSGH 

Addie sine Anton were married on NoverulDer 8, 1930 ?.t 
Menominee, Ivlicliigsn. Their first child, Nancy, vros born 
June 22, 1931. Lois followed on December 12, 1932. Cf^^rol 
came next on M^y 1, 1934. Bob was last being born on LTrrch 
14, 1936. 

Adclie end Anton first lived in Goodm&n, V/isconsin. The 
lack of work in th^ t -•rec, finally drove Anton to seek work 
in Rockford, Illinois. When he founc v/ork he sent for his 
family one they settlec' in the Blackhewk housing pro^ject in 
1942. Ihe Blc,ckhi:.vi/k project was bLiilt strictly for tliose 
who were working for the w?,r effort. 

In 1949 the fe.mily ;r.oved to f. house on Mcple street. 
It wc'.s located next to c-.n o.lley which endet" in the parking 
lot of a locally ovmed supe.t-merket about a block awey. 

The family was close knit and iH remained in Rockford 
after marriage. The task of diciplining the children was 
equally shared. 

They kov/ live in a six room house in the Lrkewood Hills 
subdivision. Carol lives in a house rbout two blocks aw-^y. 
They have been married f o.t -'.y-six yef^rs now. 

They take r-n occassioncl trip into iiorthern Wisconsin to 
visit Acidic 's sisters. 



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NANCY JANE (PRITSGH) DORAN 

Nency Pritscli vvrs born on Jvme 22, 1931, in ":-beno, 
Wisconsin, She was the olcleat cliilcl of Anton -nc Addie. 

She lived in Wrbeno rnd Gocdrnrn until 1942 when the frrri^y 
moved to Rockford, Illinois. Here they lived in the Blrckh?v;k 
housing project. She took c:.^re of her younger "brother and sisters 
v/hile her nother "worked. 

The neighborhood was m?de up of people v/ho had roved from 
various parts cf the country to work in tlie f: ctories of 
Rockford. The children in tho neighborhood .:,r.iusec themselves 
by hiking inid picnicing i;. the nearby Blackh^wk p; rk on the 
Rock River. They also enjoyed bike riding and trips to the 
movi e s . 

Nancy worked first ct Prince Cc stle then :t the A&P 
supermarket - f ter scQiool until graduation from high school. 

In 1949 the ferily moved into a house on Mcple Street - 
In the fall of 1949 Nrncy entered nurses' training at the 
St, Anthony's School of Nursing. After three long ye;:rs 
she graduated ^ nd passed her st: te bcrrd exominations to 
become en R.N. 

luring her training she rttended one of the rmiLirl Inger- 
sols picnic with lier f:mil.y. Here she niet her futnr-' husbcnd. 
They dated throughout her j"unior and senior ye; rs in training. 

On July 12, 1952 Edwrrd Dorsn married Tf-ncy ir. Rockford, 
Illinois. They took their honeymoon at Niagra PrUs. 

Shortly i-fter their marric\ge Edwi-rd Wi-s drafted into the 

army. N&;..cy moved tc; Georgir- ne^tr fort Banning. She stipyed 

with him until he was shipped to Korea. She then returned 

to Rockford to live with her parents on Maple Street and to 
I 

work ct St. Anthony s hospital on the evening s]iift. 

On January 4, 1954, her first daughter, Deborah was 
born. The letters between Rockford and Korea carried news 
-smd pictures of the new child. Edward returned home in 1956. 



20 

They then novec"- to cai apartment on Hovvsrd Street. A short 
time later they moved to r.n apartment on Acorn Street and 
the second child, Edward Thomps, v/cs born. 

In 1961 they agcin moved to a house on Bi-.uier Street where 
they lived -until 1969. In 1968 their third child, Llichole, 
was born causingtihgm to search for r-nother house. They 
bought a house on Midwry Lrive where they live how, 

Nancy ret-urned to work in 1976 vt c nursing home on the 
east side of Rockf ord . 



** X-^ ^ A JfX *:- 5<- ^^ •» « X ^ ^ ^ « X 



EDWAED, AiCD NANCY DOPu^N 

Edward ond I'a.ncy were n-crried en July 12, 195? in a 
church in Rockford, Illinois. Shortly after they were mprried 
Edward wos drafted into the army« NG.ncy went with him t« 
Port Benning in georgis. ere they met another couple and 
spent msny of their long nigJits playing crrf.;-: with them. 

When Edword left for Korco., Ncncy ret^irned to Kockford 
to live with her parents. She went to v/ork as cii R.II. at 
St. Anthonj's hospiti-^1. Turing this time Deborah was born. 

When Edwcrc returned fron Korec, they rented rn rpLrtment 
on Howord Street. It wrs v. converted two story house. Below 
them lived tn older couple that owned the building. The 
older couple became known rs Grandma and Grsindpn Barnes. 

On December 21, 1957, Edv^ord Thom&s was born prompting 
a move to 616 Acorn Street. This wcs r four frnily apartment 
building. -^hey becc.me friendly with the couple thct lived 
above them. The two f:7.milies went on picnics ■::'-aC to the 
zoo together. 

In the early spring of 1961, the Dorans bought their 
first house on 1915 Bruner Street. It wrs a two story hrlf 
stucco-hclf wood house. Here they were surrounded by many 
friends. 

On December 1, 1968, Michele w?s born . little c.rly. 
She spent one month in the hospital before she could come 
home, './ith the addition of a,n extra member of the fai-iily, 
a new house was bought on 2212 Midway Drive where the 3r8,mily 
resides nov/. 

The dicipline is the fa.ther's responsibility in this 
family. 

Edward and Nancy have been merried almost twenty-four 
years now. 

They an joy trking car trips to Wevrport Nevv^s, Virginia or 
up to Menominee, Michigan to visit relatives. 

* ^-^ % ■;-'. -5^ ^ ^ ^^ ;; ii-/: ^r 7^ ^ x « * ^^ 



..ii 



DEBOR.\'H ANN PORAN 

I was 'born on Jpnurry 4, 1954 in Rockford, Illinois. I . 
£im the oldest of three children. 

I don't remember much o.bout the apartment on Howard Street. 
I do remember Grcrdm?. end Gra;;.dpa Barnes very well. I spent 
a lot of time in their apartment and on the swing on the 
screened in porch. 

Around the aprirtmcnt on Acorn Street I hrd r lot of 
friends to ploy with. The school was only about three blocks 
from the house. I attended kinderjiarden and one semester of 
first grade rt Haskell school. 

In 1957 my brother wrs born. Since the ^prrtment had 
ohly tv/o bedrooms I shored o bedroom with my b; by brother. 

In the spring of 1961 we moved to a two story house on 
Bruner Street, •'^^ere I hrd my own bedroom, even if it wr.s 
small. I h?d just enough room for n twin bed, night stf-nd, 
and desk. I also hPd one wfjll plr'stered v/itli pictLire of my 
favorite T.V. stcri: . 

In this neighborhood there v;ere p lot of kids about my 
age. I spent a lot of time playing cowboys with the boy 
to the south of us. ilcross the street were older boys who 
like to play war. I joined them in the capacity of ::■ nurse. 
My closest friend at thr t time was Mar?lyn who lived two 
block away on Quincy Street. At first our favorite game • 
w: s cowboys but with the spy crpzo becoming popular in 1965 
we e.d©pted th:^t rtyle of play. 'When we pt-.ssed the stage 
of acting out o-ur fantasies we then becs'.mc interested in 
Barbie do?.ls, Wishniks, and sewing cl'»thes for them.. 

I attended Welsh school which wos aboiit two blocks from 
the house. 'vVhen I gradus'ted from sixth grade, I attended 
Roosevelt Jr. High wldch was about a half m.ile away. Here 
I met my closest ond dearest friend, Denisc. V/e spent many 
hOTxrs crerting and writing about frntas/ worlds. It wfs 
one of our dreams to becomie i- writer. 



23 
After completing ninth, grsde I attended West Higli School 
which WPS ebout seven "blocks awc.y. In my jualor yep-r we 
moved to the house on Hidvry Drive, ^gcin I was o. hrlf r.ile 
from school, i^i^l^cli. ,/*^\j s«iM-. i^uj ^o^n ,h Oei.e>^6t^ oflHSf. 

My main objective in high school wp.s to graduate with 
the right course,-- to enter nurses' training. I graduated 
from high school in Jluic of 1972 one entered nurses' training 
&t RockforC. Memorial Hospiti'l in August of 1972. Here I 
spent three very long yerrs learning to be a nurse. Without 
the help of p.nother very good friend I doubt I woLilcl of made 
it. Michele ^xA I used to spend Pll of our free time together. 
We*d tnlk about anything anc' everything which I think gi^'ve 
us the relaxation wc needed. 

I graduated from training in May of 1975 . I ^'-iow work at 
Rockford Memorial Hospital as s.n R.IT. I attend Rock Valley 
Jvn.ior College on ? prrt tine bases in hopes of getting ray 
B.S.N, in the future. 

I now live in r three room apo.rtment on Canfiry Drive where 
I shall soon be joined by Denise at the end of May. 



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DRESSER, BENNETT RAY, 1955- 



F^ASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

r Contributor to the f^OCk Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
rican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
Jess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ***-,'c-,';;V;',-AAAAAA-;c-,';-.VA-,'c>':AAy:AA-,'r;V-,V 

* OFFICE USE CODE 

1. Your name Bennett Ray Dresser * 

Date of form -^ ( I D # ) 



2. Your college: Rock Val ley (.o1 lege ■•• ( I D // ) 

Rockford, Illinois -•-- 

*****;'; A ;V ,'c ;': ;'; -,'c )', A ,V ;'c ;V ;': )V ;'c ;', iV iV -.V ;',- A i; ,',- 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

X B efore 1750 1750-1800 1800-1 850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 



k. Please check al 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

X N ew England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) x M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 
X South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K% 
West South Central (Ark., N.M., Tex., OkTT" East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 



X Paci fie (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 

5. Please check al 1 occupat i onal categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming x M ining x Shopkeeping or small business 
^Transportation ^B i g Business ^Manufacturing 



X Professions X Industrial labor x Other 



6. Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

Roman Catholic ^Jewish x P resbyterian ^Methodist 

Baptist Epi scopal ian x Congregational x Lutheran 



Quaker Mormon x OtVier Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans 

^Jews Central Europeans Italians Slavs 



Irish British x Native Americans over several generations 
East Asian Other 



8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

x Interviews with other x Family Bibles x Family Genealogies 
f ami ly members 

Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 

x Photographs Maps Other 



FAMI LY DATA 

A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name Jasper Gilbert Dresser Current Residence 

1 f dead, date of death Sept. 30/ 1944 

Place of birth Clinton, Wisconsin Date of Birth July 25, 1885 

Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 12 vocational college 

Occupat ion(s) 

1st Farmer Dates 



t 



2nd Woodward Governor Co. Dates 

3rd City Employee Dates 

'ith Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


iith 


Dates 



Re 1 i g i on Presbyterian 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. npmnnra-h 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother Racine. Wisconsin ' ^^''^Ii2Z^_^£^_lQ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give" 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 



B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name ^(^j.th Pfitfirsfin .nrps.spr 

If dead, date of death-pp}-,y-TT^f-\7 1Q. 1 



Current Residence 

16.2 



Place of birth Racine. Wi cK-nn.c; i n Date of birth June 15. li^SQ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school 6th high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) 
1st 


Dates 


1st 


2nd 


Dates 


2nd 


3rd 


Dates 


3rd 


4th 


Dates 


4th 


Religion Lutheran 







PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Democrat 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Racine, Wisconsin DATE nov. 24. IQOR 
^°^^'' liLr^^tHP,*ihrf>a£^'hf'^tin $^l\%^, stepmother or another relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

N.inH?^ Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


^th 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates 

'♦th Dates ^th Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother ' datt 

A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational ^college 

Occupation(s) - PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^Dates 1st ^Dat< 

2nd ^Dates 2nd ^Date:_ 

3rd ^Dates 3rd ^Date:_ 

Re 1 i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



3. 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Jesse Ray Kennedy Current Residence St. Petersburg, Florida 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth Mystic, Iowa Date of birth April 14, 1901 

Education (number of years): 
grade school 3th high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Railroad WorBer ^Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Coal Miner ^Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd tVPA (Relief Program) Dates ^3rd ^Dates 

1935-1947 

Uh Machinist at W.F. John Dates ! 93O-I - o^^ th ^Dates 

Barnes Gisholt Machine and Tool 
Re I i g i on Christian Church' 
Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Denocrat, AFL CIO 

Place of marriage to your grandmother Corydon, IOWA date pg c^ 2 8.19 2~ 

Note: If your mother was raised by a (iltjpfaiHeP OF anuitlHr relartve (ro age ]S) ' ' 

give that data on the bacl< of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Grace Reay Cole Kennedy ^Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death Nov. 22. 19 71 

Place of birth Centerville. O^owa ^Date of birth .q^p^oTTiHg^r 9, 190 7 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 12th vocational college 

3ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
'1st Schoolteacher Dates -j.qoa 1st ^Dates 



!nd Advertising Manager- Dates 19^8 2 nd ^Dates 

Chas V. Weise 
1 r d Da t e s 3 r d ^Da t e s 

■el igion Christian Church 

I'olitical party, crvil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Church affiliated 

lace of marriage to your grandfather Corydon, Iowa d at q)ec. 28. 1923 

ote: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age 18) 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l 


Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 






Name 


Current Residence 




1 f dead, date of death 






I'l.K.- .,1 hi 1 Ih 


Dale of l)i nil 




1 (liK ,il i ofi (riuinlxT of y<'.i r ■.) 






'It.idr •,( hool li i 'jh school 


vocat i onal col loqe 




Occupat ion(s) 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 




Ist Dates 
2nd Dates 


1st Dates 




2nd Dates 
3rd Dates 
iith Dates 




3rd Dates 




^th Dates 




Re 1 i g i on 


, f ratern i t ies , etc. 




Political parties, civil or social clubs 








Place of marriage to your grandmother 


date 


D-2 


S tepgrandmother (your mother's side) 






Name 


Current Residence 




If dead, date of death 






Place of bi rth 


Date of bi rth 




Education (number oF years) 






grade school high school 


vocat ional col lege 




Occupat ion (s) 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 




1st Dates 
2nd Dates 


1st Dates 




2nd Dates 




3rd Dates 


3rd Dates 




Re 1 i g i on 






Political party, civil or social clubs, 


sororities, etc. 







Place of marriage to your grandfather Dat( 



CHIbDREN of A & B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 

NameNnrmap Euapne Drf^s.qpr 

Place of birth Clinton, Wisconsin date October 8, 1909 

Number of years of schooling 11 Occupation Dairy WorBer 

Residence Sharon, Wisconsin Marital Status Marrie3 

Number of chi Idren 3 — — 

Name Jasper Gilbert Dresser 

Place of birth Clinton, Wisconsin d ate May 7, 1911 

Number of years of schooling Engineering D dlccupati6n Efficiency Engineer 

Residence Deceased ^Marital Status Married 

Number of chi Idren 4 

Name pussell Elkins Dresser 

Place of birth Clinton, Wisconsin "" date February 16, 1913 

Number of years of schooling 14 + "^ Occupation Vice-Pres . United Meat Cutters 

Residence Deceased Marital Status Married 

Number of chi Idren 3 — — — 

Name Jgannette Marion Dresser Boyd 

Place of birth Clinton, Wisconsin d ate March 2, 1916 

Number of years of schooling 14 + Occupation Hofiiekmaker" 

Residence Gainsville, Florida M arital Status Married 

Number of chi Idren 5 " ~ ~~~ 

Name Eunice Olive Dresser Felton 

Place of birth Clinton, Wisconsin date March 2, 19 18 

Number of years of schooling 13 Occupation Home maker 

Residence Ft. Collins, Color .Mari tal Status Married 

Number of chi Idren 5 ~" — ' 

Name Richard Warren Dresser 

P ' ace of birth Clinton, Wisconsin ~? ate December 2, 19 2 5 

Number of years of schooling Masters + Occupation Director of F in. Aid and Place 

Residence Rockford, Illinois Marital Status Marrie d 

Number of chi Idren 4 "~ 

Name 

Place of bi rth ~ date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation ~ ' 

Res i dence Mari tal TTatus 

Number of chi Idren ~ ————————— 



Name 

Place of bi rth ^date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren ~ 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren ~" 



Name^ 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling OccupaTTon" 

HllitT'or^mVtr^ "^-'tal Status ; 



CHILDREN of L and D (or C- 1 , D-l)-your mother's name should appear below 



N.inir 



^''■'"' "f '''">' date 

Niinil.-r r,f ye.if, oF school i nq Occupation 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of ch I Idren ~~~~ 



9. Name 

Place of b i rth 



10. Name 

Place of bl rth 



Res i dence 

Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

P lace of birth ""■ date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence MarTTaT Status ' 

Number of ch i I dren —————— ___,^ 



Name 

Place of birth ~ ~ " ~ "" date 

Number of years of school ing — fTccupat iOn 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of ch i Idren — - - 



Name 

P lace of birth ~" ~~ ' ~ jate 

Number of years of^ school ing ~~ Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of ch i 1 dren ~ 



Name 

P lace of bi rth ~~ ~~ ~~ date 

Number of years of school ing ~~ OccupaTToh" 

Res i dence Marital S'tatus " 

Number of ch i Idren ' ~~~ 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~~~ ~ date 

Number of years of school ing Occupat iort" 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of ch i Tdren — — — ^ — _^__ 



7. Name 

Place of b i rth ~ ~" date 



Number of years of schooling ^Occupati6n 

Residence Marital StiuIT 

Number of c n i Idren '~~~' 

8. Name 

P lace of b i rth ~ """ — — — ^date 



Number of years of schooling OcFupatiorT 

^^^''<i^nce MarTETT Status 

Number of ch i Idren ~~ ~~~ 



date 
Number of years of schooling Occupatlbrt 

;^''^^"^« HariTn- Status 

Number of children ^ — " 



Number of years of schooling 0ccI7patiO~ 



Marital Status 



Your Father 

Name Richard Warren Dresser Current Residence Rockford, II 

If dead, date of death 

Place of birth Clinton, Wisconsin ^Date of birth December, 2, 1925 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college Masters+ 

Pccupation(s) 1-943-1963 PL^C^ Qp RESIDENCE 

(, summers, (after leaving home) 

1st Carlson Roofin/^ Co.oates 1st Dates 



2nd 'Teacher at Shabbon^ ates 194t-'-l'ji?J 2nd Ddtes 

3rd Teacher at Harlern pates l'^33-1965 3rd ^Dates 

Loves J^ariC, 11 l. ^^^ ^^^ Placenent 

itth Director of Fm. D ates 1 ghS-l q74- ^ th ^Dates 

Religion Presbyterian 

'olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Republican 



>lace of marriage to your mother Pnckford. T llinois d ate June 27. 1948 

lOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

our Mother 

lame Mary Lou Kenne d y Dressea;^ ^ Current Residence Rockford. IL 



lame Mary Lou Kennddv Dresser 
f deaa, date of death 



'lace of birth Rockford, IL Date of bi rth March 9 , 1929 

ducat ion (number of years) 

grade school high school 12 vocational col lege i + 

ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

-I o /t o n MO (after leaving home) 

3^Bookkeet)er 0^^^^ 194.-1.49,^^ ^^^^^ 



„d Secretary at ohaob gn^a^ lj4-J-l:J5 2nd ^Dates_ 

Vd ParaT5rofessional-.;^r4so^gi^^e5i.^^^^^ ^^^^^ 



e 1 i g i on Presbyterian 

olitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. pp-mihl i np-.r) 



lace of marriage to your father Rockford, Illinois d ate June 27, 19 4^8 

OTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



E-1 Stepfather 

Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat Ion (5) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd 
_3rd_ 
kth 



Date of bi rth 



vocat i ona 1 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Ath 

Re 1 i g i on 

Pol i t i cai* Parties , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Ml 



■^ 



Date 



F-2 Stepmother 



Name 



If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 



3rd 

Re 1 I g I on 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



vocat ional 



lst_ 

2nd 

3rd 



Date of bi rth 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



t 



Political party, civil or social clubs. 


sorori t ies , 


etc. 




i^' 








1 


Place of marriage to your father 






date 


1 



:HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



lame Diane MaraarRh nirf^^^^f^r- 

lace of birth pekalh. TtT 



■"lumber of years o 



f^ 



ool ing 



16 



;es i dence Rockford, IL 
^(lumber of ch i Idren 



Date of birth January 19, 19 51 
Occupation Teacher 



Marital Status Single 



ame Jefferv Jay Dresser 
lace of birth Dekalb, IL 



'umber of years of schooling 



es i dence Rockford, IL 
tumber of chi Idren 



15 



Date of birth July 8. 19 5 2 

Occupation Student at Wester n. IL 



Marital Status Single 



"ame Bennett Ray Dresser 



lace of birth Rockford, IL 
"umber of years of schooling 13" 

esi dence Rockford, IL 



umber of chi 1 dren 



^Date of birth Novenber 3, 1955 

, Occupation student at Rock V alley 

Marital Status Single College 



ame Donna Jeanine Dresser 
lace of birth Rockford, IL 



uraber of years of school ing iT" 

25 i den ce Rockford, IL 

'jmber of chi Idren "~~ 



Date of birth June 4^ 1957 

Occupation student at Rkfd. Guil- 
ford H.S. 



Marital Status Single 



ame 

lace of bi rth 

■jmber of years of school ing 

2si dence 

jmber of chi Idren 



Date of bi rth 



Occupation 

Marital Status 



ame 

lace of bi rth 

jmber of years of school ing 

;:s i dence 

Jmber of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



"5a"te of bi rth_ 
Occupation 



nme 

lace of bi rth 

limber of years of school ing 

• '■S i dence 



Date of bi rth 



Occupation 



limber of chi 1 dren 



Marital Status 



lime 

I ace of bi rth 

limber of years of school Ing 

Is i dence 



limber of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 
Occupat ion 



Hi. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights/ to the Rock Valley College Family Fli story Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



Signed ^^un/./^ ^^ /-^^^^-i 
Date y^ ^. /// /' 



7. 



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INTERESTING ANCESTORS 
of DRESSER FAMILY 

(English and Early American) 



The original founders of the Dresser family probably 
came from Denmark during the Danish invasion to England in 
the 9th century. They were among those who settled in York- 
shire about 876 A.D. There was a Henry Dresser living in 
Yorkshire in 1470 whose signature appears on several docu- 
ments . 

Dr. Christopher Dresser Ph.D., F.L.S., was the first 
Englishman to introduce Japanese art into English art fa- 
brics, wall-papers, carpets, china, and ceramic wares. He 
was a great enthusiast in the application of natural ele- 
ments in ornament, floral design, and oriental styles. He 
edited several authoritative works on design about 1830. 

Eliza Dresser married Moses Spofford, a descendant of 
an ancient Yorkshire family ancestor who sailed on the 
"Mayflower" to America. Eliza was married June 3, 1835 
and was a noted beauty of the period. 

Reverend Charles Dresser, Episcopalian minister of 
Springfield, Illinois, performed the wedding ceremony of 
Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd November 4, 1842. On January 
7, 1844 this same Reverend Charles Dresser sold his home 
in Springfield to Abraham Lincoln. This home is preserved 
in Springfield, Illinois. 



(1) 



Page 2 

FAMILY HISTORY 

1. Dresser 

2. Fraternal Great-Grandf ather: Weyburn Elkins Dresser 

3. Born: January 24, 1853 in Capetown, West Canada 

Married Izah Maria Patch, April 23, 1876. 

4. Died: February 18, 1839 (age 86) 

5. Children: Seven 

Clarence William 

Born: April 25, 1877-1947 

Married: Nellie Hall and secondly Mrs. Louise 
Barlow 

George Benedict 

Born: May 12, 1879 
Died: October 14, 1902 

Jasper Gilbert 

Born: July 25, 1885 
Died: September 30, 1944 

Marion Izah 

Born: August 30, 18 87 
Married: Leland Kelsey 
Children: Five 

Phoebe Maria 

Born: April 23, 1891 

Married: Frank Benedict 

Children: Two daughters, Frances and Elizabeth 

Paul Elkins 

Born: February 9, 1895 
Married: Gladys Coombe 
Children: One daughter, Helen Catherine 

Born: June 30, 189 8. Never married. 



Page 3 



1. Fraternal Grandfather: Jasper Gilbert Dresser 



2. Born: July 25, 1885 in Clinton, Wisconsin. 

Married Edith Peterson, November 24, 1908 at 
Racine, Wisconsin. (Discussion immediately follows) 

3. Died: September 30, 19 44 (age 59) 

4. Burial: Beloit, Wisconsin 

5. Education: Twelfth grade 

6. Occupation: Farmer; Employee at Woodward Governor 

Company, Loves Park, Illinois; City Employee 

7. Political Party: Democrat 

8. Religion: Presbyterian 

9. Leisure Time: Gardening, reading 

10. Lived on farm in Clinton, Wisconsin for 44 years. Forced 
to move during depression years. At his time of death, 
my father was 18 years of age. This played an important 
I role on my father's development. 



Page 4 



1. Fraternal Grandmother: Edith Peterson-daughter of 

Danish parents 

2. Born: June 15, 1889 

3. Died: February 19, 1962 (age 72) Rockford, Illinois 

4. Burial: Beloit, Wisconsin 

5. Occupation: Ran rooming house for students attending 

University of Wisconsin, Madison 

6. Education: 6th grade 

7. Religion: Lutheran 

8. Leisure time: Sew, cook, handiwork 

9. Political Party: Democrat 

10. Children: from Jasper and Edith 

Norman Eugene 

Born: October 8, 1909 

Occupation: Dairy worker 

Married: Ella Lowry, October 21, 1931 

Children: Two 

Jasper Gilbert 

Born: May 7, 1911 

Occupation: Efficiency engineer 

Married: Ilia Kiefer, April 23, 1936 at 

Clinton, Wisconsin 
Children: Four 

Russell Elkins: 

Born: February 16, 1913 

Occupation: Vice President Meat Cutters 

Union 
Married: Fern Ross at Winona, Minnesota, 

April 2, 1934 
Children: Three 

Jeannette Marion 

Born: March 2, 1916 

Married: Frederick Boyd August 21, 1937 at 

Madison, Wisconsin 
Husbands Occupation: Professor of Agriculture 

at University of Colorado 
Children: Five 



Page 5 



Richard Warren 

Born: December 2, 19 2 5 

Married: Mary Lou Kennedy June 2 6/ 19 48, 

Rockford, Illinois 
Children: Four 

Eunice Olive ■- 

Born: tiarch 2, 1918 
Harried: Mathias Pelton, Ph.D. Iviay 14, 

1938 at Kadison, ,Vis. 
Children: Five 



Page 6 



1. Father: Richard Warren Dresser 

2. Born: December 2, 1925 

3. Married: Mary Lou Kennedy in Rockford, Illinois 

June 26, 1948 

4. Education: Masters Degree plus 

5. Religion: Presbyterian 

6. Political Party: Republican 

7. Leisure time: Sports, reading 

8. Occupation: Factory worker. Roofer at Carlson Roofing 

Company in Rockford, Illinois; History 
teacher at High school in Loves Park and 
Sabbona, Illinois; Coached all major 
sports in fore mentioned high schools. 
Presently Director of Financial Aids and 
Placement at Rock Valley Community College, 

9. Organizations: Elder and Sunday School teacher at 

Bethany Presbyterian Church in Loves 
Park, Illinois. Basketball Official, 
Member of Illinois Financial Aid As- 
sociation, P.T.A. member for 12 years. 

10. Children: Four 

Diane Margaret 

Born: January 19, 1951 

Occupation: Physical Education instructor 

at Lincoln Middle School, Rock- 
ford, Illinois. 

Jeffrey Jay 

Born: July 8, 19 52 

Occupation: Student at Western Illinois 

University, Macomb, Illinois 
Major: Physical Education 



Page 7 



Bennett Ray 

Born: November 3, 1955 in Rockford, Illinois 

Occupation: Freshman at Rock Valley Communi- 
ty College. 

Major: Business Administration 

Religion: Presbyterian 

Leisure time: Sports, reading 

Accomplishments: Earned Varsity letter awards 
in track and football in high school. 
Involved in Student Government and was 
class officer. Awarded honor for speech 
given concerning responsibility as citi- 
zen. Member and officer in Letterman's 
Club. Gained award in football at Rock 
Valley College. 

Organizations: Member of Bethany Presbyter- 
ian Church. Affiliated with 
Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes, Boy Scouts. 



Donna Jeanine 

Born: June 4, 19 57 

Occupation: Student at Guilford High School, 
Rockford, Illinois 



Page 8 

1. Maternal Great-Grandf ather: Proctor Cole 

2. Born: May 27, 1873 Iowa 

3. Died: May 6, 19 4 5 in Centerville, Iowa 

4. Occupation: Tailoring and Managed Hotel in Centerville 

and Mystic, in Iowa 

5. Political Party: Rep\±)lican 

6. Leisure Time: Reading, solitary (cards) 

7. Religion: Christian Church 

8. Children: 

Grace Reay 

Born: September 9, 1907 
Children: Three daughters 

Helen Bernice 

Born: December 1, 1912 
Children: One daughter 



1 



P. C. COLE. 

CENTERVILLE. — P. C. Cole^ 
71, of Centet-ville died at -3 a. m.j 
Sunday following a heart atJ 
tack at his home, 1318 South IStht 
street. He had returned Thursday! 
after five days at the St. Joseph! 
hospital and was seeemingly much 
improved. He had been in failing 
health for nine years with a heart 
ailment and diabetes. He was a 
tailor by trade and when a young 
man was a meat cutter. He was 
a long time member of the Chris- 
itna church and had lived all his 
life in Centerville except for five 
years spent in Mystic. He was 
bom in Johns town.ship, northwest 
Of Centerville, May 27. 1873, the 
son of Sanford and Mary Jane,' 
Cole. He was married in Center-" 
ville to Mi.ss Eliz.'iheth A, Smip- 
son November 5. ]s;),t. Aft>:>r his 
first heart att:icl< nine years ago, 
he moved his tailm- shop into hisj 
home and continued work until 
four weeks ago. He was preceded' 
in death by one .si.ster and two, 
brothers. He is .survived by his 
wife; two dauulr i-rs. Mi-s. Ray 
Kfuni-dy of R'M:i.:i.,r(i and Miss 
Helen Cnl'^ of (.'< 'lUj viUi': three 
grandi:hil.!.M-n; .ml oui- .•»i--,ter. Mrs.. 
George KirchiiLiu of .Shivi.lan,- 
Wyo. The btjdy la at the Mdlcr 
funeral home. 

-__ _J 



Page 9 

1. Maternal Great-Grandmother: Elizabeth Ann Simpson Cole 

2. Born: July 20, 1875 in Plymoth, Pennsylvania 

3. Died: October 3, 1968 (age 93) in Madison, Wisconsin 

4. Occupation: Maintained hotel by means of cleaning 

rooms. Fed borders of hotel. 

5. Married: November 5, 189 5 in Centerville, Iowa 

6. Religion: Christian Church 

7. Organizations: Church Affiliation, Ladies Aid Society 

8. Political Party: Republican 
Father-coalminer in LaSalle, Peru, Illinois 



Page 10 

1. Maternal Great-Grandf ather : Daniel Fontaine Kennedy 

2. Born: March 25, 1874 in Mystic, Iowa 

3. Died: July 3, 1962 (age 88) Buried in Centerville, 

Iowa. 

4. Education: 6th grade 

5. Occupation: Farmer, Coal miner, plasterer, carpenter, 

bricklayer, (man of building trades) 

6. Religion: Congregational Church 

7. Political Party: Democrat 

8. Organization: United Mine Workers 

9. Leisure time: Fishing, music, natural musician (inclined 

towards string instruments i gardening 

10. Nationality: Irish-Scot 

11. Children: Three 



Page 11 

Maternal 

1. Great-Grandmother: Winnie Caroline Brosher Kennedy 

2. Born: June 9, 1875 in Coryden, Iowa 

3. Died: March 3, 1961 (age 86) Cause: Bone cancer 

Buried: Centerville, Iowa 

4. Education: 6th grade 

5. Family: One of six girls and four boys of Edward and 

Monerva Brosher 

6. Leisure time: Cooking 

7. Organization: Church affiliations. Quilting, Bee Club 

8. Religion: Congregational Church 



Page 12 

1. Maternal Grandfather: Jesse Ray Kennedy 

2. Born: April 14, 1901 on farm outside of Mystic, Iowa 

3. Education: Eighth grade 

4. Occupation: Railroad worker, coal miner, WPA (Relief 

I Program), machinist at W.F. John Bames and 

Gisbolt Machine and Tool in Madison, Wis- 
consin. 

5. Religion: Christian Church 

6. Political Party: Democrat 

7. Leisure time: Fishing, gardening, hunting 

8. Married: Grace Reay Cole in Corydon, Iowa 

9. Organization: AFL-CIO 



Page 13 



1. Maternal Grandmother: Grace Reay Cole Kennedy 

2. Born: September 9, 1907 in Centerville, Iowa 

3. Died: November' 22, 1971 in St. Petersburg, Florida 

(age 64) Cause: Cancer 

4. Religion: Christian Church 

5. Political Party: Repiiblican 

6. Education: 12th grade 

7. Occupation: Seamstress, school teacher at age of 16, 

advertising manager for Chas V. Weise in 
Rockford, Illinois and later in Madison, 
Wisconsin. 

8. Organizations: Church affiliated 

9. Leisure time: Sewing 

10. Children: Three daughters 

Elizabeth Ann 

Born: December 22, 1925 
Married: George Northsea 
Children: Three 

Mary Lou 

Born: March 9, 19 29 
Children: Four 

Barbara Jean 

Born: August 18, 1930 
Married: Sam Roskie 
Children: Two 



Page 14 



1. Mother: Mary Lou Kennedy Dresser 

2. Born: March 9, 1929 in Rockford, Illinois. Married 

Richard Dresser June 26, 19 4 8 in Central Chris- 
tian Church, in Rockford, Illinois. 

3. Education: 13 years plus 

4. Religion: Presbyterian 

5. Political Party: Republican 

6. Leisure time: Sewing, reading, swimming, ice skating 

7. Travelled in United States extensively. Has traversed 
to West Coast, East Coast, South, and to Canada. 

8. Occupations: Sales clerk, stock girl, bookkeeper, office 

secretary, paraprof essional at Windsor 
Elementary Grade School, Loves Park, 111. 

9. Organizations: Girl Scouts, Church Circles, Sunday 

School teacher. President Rock Valley 
College Faculty Women, active in P.T.A. 
for twelve years. 



Page 15 
CONCLUDING REMARKS 

Upon the finalization of compiling my family history 
I was able to come to some knowledgeable opinions. Through 
my families numerous generations, the period of time and 
the events occurring within that time definitely influenced 
those encompassed. Whether it be the Depression years 
that forced my Grandfather Jasper Dresser off his Clinton 
farm in Wisconsin, which he had resided for forty-four 
years; or a need for more income which forced my Maternal 
Grandfather Jesse Ray Kennedy to quit school after the 
eighth grade, in order to aid in the support of his family. 
Under such conditions it is understandable for an indivi- 
dual to attempt to readily satisfy his immediate needs 
and let the future fend for itself. Hard work was cer- 
tainly a means to an end, for both sides in my family. 
Education was pushed in my fathers family and not so 
extensively within my mother's family. Responsibility 
was quickly realized in each family. Discipline was 
another factor which definitely has had a marked effect 
on my parents generation and in my direct family. 

My father was greatly influenced toward gaining a 
higher education. Even though his father died, while ho 
was eighteen years of age, he worked his way through his 
college years. He worked for what he earned. This very 
idea is instilled within me today. Something gained 



Page 16 

through a minimal amount of effort, will not be well un- 
derstood and appreciated as if it were earned through 
accomplishment. Jasper Dresser, my Grandfather, a strict 
disciplinarian, set the mold for my present being. With 
the concern shown for my father, his actions are, in part, 
expressed through myself. 

My mother was not pushed into continuing her educa- 
tion. Her father hoped for my mother and her two sisters 
to marry and be content. Times were hard, as my Grand- 
father Jesse Ray Kennedy, often worked three jobs. This 
very fact directly played upon my mother. Her family, 
composed of three girls, was not close-knit. With the 
father working so frequently, disciplinary measures were 
often lacking. This differnece between the laxness ex- 
perienced by my mother and the strict measure known by 
my father has set my course of action as of today. It 
is not one of "do-as-I-please, " but rather "do-as-I-see- 
right . " 

Responsibility was quickly experienced in past years. 
It is not as fully understood or recognized as soon today. 
My Great-Grandmother Cole had my mother and her sisters 
cooking and cleaning for the roomers of the hotel, her 
husband and she owned. My father although being the last 
born in his family found that responsibility often times 
comes when one is least prepared. He did, however learn 
to accept responsibility and cope with its consequences. 



Page 17 

Responsibility is realized in our family today. Each 
member has specific duties which he or she is expected to 
do. 

As far as the celebration of wedding, special holi- 
days (Christmas and Easter), baptisms, and general gather- 
ings are concerned, my family was not one for the keeping 
of special traditions. This is not to say that they were 
less zealous or enjoyable. Reunions are still held, espe- 
cially on the Dresser side of the family. 

I believe that one of societies basic problems is 
the decay of the family. Communication is limited under- 
standing becomes lost, then members of the family become 
disjointed. Through the completion of this project, I 
fully realize that although events and time shape all 
families; patterns of thought, beliefs, responsibility 
and proper use of discipline have set a definite pre- 
cedent in my own family. 



DULNIAGEV JOEL FRANCIS ; 1956- 



I,EASK TYI'Il: I'LEASK PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
AMIEY HISTORY. 

enr Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useliil to historians and 
'hers studying, American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
I ■ 1 n w . 1' 1 1 i s will take you only a few minutes, and will be easily made over 
n I () an Index which will permit archive users ready a c i: e s s to just those 
iiuis of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



Office Use Code 



our name ^Ot.L h"rar\Ci S Uul m ga fc 



D .-1 t e of form 



(ID // 
(ID // 



Your c o 1 1 e s^ e : Rock Valley College 
Rockford, Illinois 



Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 



^Before 17 50 

t/" 1850- 1 900 



1750-1800 

1900 or later 



1800-1850 



Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in^your paper have lived. 

New England (Mas s ., Conn ., R . r . ) lX Middle A t Ian t i c (N . Y . , 1' en na . , N.. 

Va.) South At] antic (Ga . ,Ela . ,N .C . ,S .C . ) East South Central 

(l,ay;Miss . ,A1 a . ,Tenn ,Ky . ) _^^ Wcjst South Cen t r a 1 ( Ar k . , N . M . , Te x . , Ok . ) 

1/ East North C c n t r a 1 (M.i ch . , Oh i o , I nd . ) P ac i f 1 c (Ca 1 . , Wa s li . ) 

(Mawai 1 ,A laska) l/(in.. Wise.,) 



I'lease check a 1 ] o c: c upa 1 1 ona 1 categories in which members of your 
family whom you have discussed in this paper havr- found themselves. 



Farming 

Transportation 
es s ions 



y Iran 

(/ Prof 



Mining 

Big Business 

Industrial Labor 



Shopkeeping or small business 

Manufacturing 

Other 



Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you^iave discussed in this paper have belonged 



Roman Catholic Jewish Presbyterian 

Baptist Episcopalian Congregational 

Quaker 



Me thodis t 
Lu theran 



Mo rmon 



Other Protestant 



Other (name) 



What ethnic and social groups arc discussed in your paper? 

n a n l/ F 



Other Scandinavian 

Indiana Mexicans 



French 



Swedish 

Blacks Indiana _Mex leans Puerto Ricans f]astern i;ur(ip( 

Jews Central Europeans Italians Slavs 

Irish British Native Americans oii^r several generations 

East Asian Other(Name) ^tyO-'tti^i_y _ jX^-^-^Ctyk-^ 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 



Family Bibles 
Land Records 



Interviews with other 
family members 

Vital Records/ _^_ ^ - 

Photographs ^ Maps ^ Qt\\&r .MJMot^ TO /ixLOLZUui^ 



Family Genealogies 
The U.S. Census 



FAM1 LY DATA ^ 

A . Grandfather (your father's sid e ) 

Name ^fL^'i*^ Y* Du 'i ^^QQ-^ Current Residence _" 

Date of birth ^~ <^~l ' I ?^ I Place of birth -ga^^BS^a^ jUCCtLyCo-^^ /O-j . 
Date of death "~7"-/3 - /'^ 3C- "Place of huria T~UJaJ;li^J'tUcnJ-- A)iu^ ^/o^ 

Kdacation(number of years); y 

grade school high school ^ vocational -_ tiollege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Is t QAj^f^M^MCU Dates 1st 

2nd OU}AM^M^Jm^ oJ- Dates ^ 2nd Dates_ 

7-0 <^ Mcfffs- Co- 
3 r d /^ccJcc/C Qx>mpa ^'-^ D ate s 3 r d Da t e s 

4th Dates '^th__ Dates_ 

Religion (L^XJlO-dtly 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, e t c . j^^ 

Place of Marriage to your grandmo ther ^^^^g^ ^^^^ y^'y- d ate Joifu>e, ) ^7/ _ 
NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name r/onntt tll^T JJON / Current Residence COOjtj^ L^UmJ AM^ H CHA^ 

Date of birth l" 2--/0- / ^"1 ^ Place of birth M^VU >:Uj^iJUe^ , f^ZA^ ^QxMj 

Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years): 

grade school high school fO^'^ ^ylO-aJ^ vocational 

college 

Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDI'NCE 
, J . (afterleavlnghome) 
1 s t rpU-^vuJt^ Dates 1 s t D ate s 



2nd Moor-^'t) :^ i- JO t Dates • 2nd Dates 

3^rd lMi>'<-^uJ. Pu.^-^ HJ^'IJ- Da tes 3rd Da tes 

4 th Dates '^ th__ Dates 



Religion LOLXk.(kJuty 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. A~l^:u^MM<^ 



Place of 
NOT I': 



f marriage to your ^'rnniTf atUisv (AJ/tT^J^^!:^_/^ 

If your father was raised So age 18) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on the back of tliis page 
(A-2) . 



A-2 S tepgrandf ather (your father's side) 



Name 



Current Residence 



Date of birth_ 
Date of death 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 

College 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



Da tes_ 
Da tes_ 
Da tes_ 
Da tes 



Religion_ 



-1st 
2nd 

.3rd_ 
4th 



voca tional 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

D a t e s 

D a t e s 

Da tes 

Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
B-2 S tepgrandmo ther (your father's side) 



date 



Name 



Date of birth_ 
Date of death 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school 

college 



vocational 



Occupa t ion (s ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



_lst_ 

_2nd_ 

3rd 

4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Da tes 
Dates 
Dates 



Rel i gion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



Grandfather (your mother s side) o ^^ 4 

Name JZ gxA^O ^-^ 3-^XxX<> Current Residcnce__ ^^^^^"1 

Date of birth Place of birth 

Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years): 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) 

1st 

2 n d 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 


1st 


( 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
after leaving home) 
Dates 




Dates 


2nd 
3rd 
4th 




Dates 






Dates 


Dates 






Dates 


Dates 







Re 1 i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



P'ace of marriage to your grandmother_ date 

NOTE: Tf your mother was raised by a stepfather or another relative (to j 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C:-l) 

? I 

Grandmother (your mother's side) '^ 

Name f JLCU^ ^k m^yp St-r>J Current Residence C<LyKCulcuj.^;^ ^ AJumJ ^coX 

Date of birth Place of birth ^ 



Dateofdeath Placeofburial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school vocational college 

PLACE OF R1'.S1D1-:NCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 

l)al es _ 

Dates 

Dates 



Occupation(s) 
] s t 


Dates 


1st 


2nd 


Dates 


2nd 


3rd 

4th 


Dates 
Dates 


3rd 

4th 


Re 1 i g ion 







Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather_ Date 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relaLlve (to 
■g' -«^ g^ve that da^ta on th'e back of this page (D-2) 



C-2 S tepgrandf a ther (your mother's side) 



Name 



Date of birth_ 
Date of death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupation (s) 



1st 
2nd_ 
3rd_ 
4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



voca t iona 1 



college 



_lst_ 

2nd_ 
_3rd_ 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Da t es 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
D- 2 S tepgrandmo ther (your mother's side) 

Name 

Date of birth 

Date of death 



Date 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 



Current Residence 
Place of b irth 



Place of burial 



vocational 



col 1 eg( 



_lst_ 
2nd_ 

.3rd_ 
4th 



PJ.ACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Da tes_ 

Dates 

Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



D a t e 



6 

C HILDREN of A & B (or A-2 or B-2 ) - your father's name should appear below 

Name ^ud^lThJ fjJJAyTytL^ (ij lJ<M L'y\^ <:^-y^ 

Place of birth LUaJX^<Xl<A.^<^ ^^^ date Ju/y / / , ^ '^ °}^ /^-V^ 

Number of years of schooling;;^ J_^ Occupation 6^-ty- <,ut^^iM^ 

Residence lKQ>-cXi^ d j ^// Marital Status yie - /?n AJl^laU 
Number of children Y, Death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling _Occupation 

Res i d e n c e M arital Status 

Number of children Death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

R e s i d e n c e Ma rjtal Status 

Number of children Death 

Na me 



Placi' of birth d.itc_ 

Number of years o i' school ing Occupation 

Residence Marital Stat us 

Numbe r o f ch i Idr en death 



Name 

Place of birth __'l'ite ^____ 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Numbe r of children Do a th 

N ame___ 

Place of birth date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date __.^ 

Number of years of schooling Occupation^ 

Residenc e M arital Statu s 

Number of children death 



\ Name 



Place of birth ^___ date 

Number of years of schooling c c u p a t ion 

Res 1 dence Mar i ta 1 S ta tus_ 

Number of children death 



N a m I 



1 acr o f b 1 r th date 



Ni/ipiber ot years of school in); Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children deatii 



Name ______^_ 

Place of birtli date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status _ _ 

Nuiiibir ol children deatli 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 



Res Idence 

Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of children 



death 



_Occupation_ 



3. Name 



Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling_ 
Res idence 



date 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupa t ion 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schoolinj 



Residence 

Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation_ 



Name 



Place of birth 



Number of years of schoolinj 
Res idence 



Number of children 



date 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of children 



death 



Occupa t ion_ 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling_ 
Res idence 



Number of children. 



Marital Status_ 
death 



Occupation^ 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schoolinj 
Residence 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupa tion_ 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children^ 



Occupation 



death 



10 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling_ 

Res i dence 

Numb or of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Your Father 



^ame , JO^LicryJ UlaAUhJ /J^^^^'^^y r^u r r e n t Residence /^^'Q^^ ^^/t/1/■ ^^ ^ 



Date of blrth ^/y /// /^.j J Place of bitth liM^jjo-u^ , aJ^lJ ^A^^^ 



-A f. 



Date of Death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school ^ high school ^ vocational college -3 



Occupation(sl nj.. ) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

■(^ffUj^xM^ 7<>^r)(^^J^ J.^:J^ L/LX ^iaiAer leaving home) 

. .Is^t^ Dates 1st U)(^M^Cf0^-<ju.^ ^>i T)ari^s 

'^'•'•^d Jk^^ £4^.Y^IJ. Dates j2^^ 'T^-^L ln^ JaJoJ^uM-o^ fO -^f Pat^ 
3rd /y) <SLw^ <^^-v^^^^ D a t e s ^^ ' ^^ 3r( 



< H.tM' C'-y^^ui^XAyi I 



.^CL^^J,^, d-k^ Dates 



4th /'^AA^ycA^t C'^'y^^*^*r^ Dates 7^ ~ " Ut\\ /j^-iAf*-^^ , <./2j^'C-<^^- Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



. ^^Zl ^OcyUJUt^ 



Place of marriage to your mo ther 6<y«-'-'^ Ur c^ /K.V' jate r^AM^ U / *7 S'\^ 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 



Your Mother 
Name 



rio cner 

SlU-cA^ (h^ i*^ Current Residence ^^^>«^-/ <^^ 



Date of birth vju/<w 1, /9/^ Place of birth C<J<zMZLfi:Z^ /(J, ^ .. 

Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) ^ 

grade s chool ^L high" s chool / voca t ional ^ col lege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 



/if) J Cifi' "" i\ (arter leaving 

1 s t C*^<y^CA^ ^^<M^ D a t e s 1 s t AW ^Ipjl ^ ^, y, D 

2nd ^^JiAL^..^XZ<^ Dates InA^y^^^ ^j4^ ' D 

3rd ^CCM^eU^ ^ ^ ^^fJu^ Dates -jrA UA--^^^^^^ / ^-^ - D a t 

hth ^tCA^^ /Ujii/^y^^'^ Dates l,X.\x [i»U»A.t^^ /^^J^ pat 

Religion (LAjZl^e^4^ 



a tes 
a t es 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



^^^3=!=d^:^^?::<*_. 



Place of marriage to your f a t h e r ^6^^ ^/^-C 7^«-<-^ / t/^ Ci datey^/^*^ /^ /f^^ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the hack of this page (F-2). 



E-2 Stepfather 

Name 



Date of birth 



Date of death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupation (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



vocational 



college 



_lst_ 
_2nd_ 
3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Dates 


Dates 


Dates 



PLace of marriage to your mother 
F- 2 S Lepmo the r 
Name 



Date of birth 



Date of death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd_ 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Date 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



vocational 



CO 1 lege_ 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 



2nd 
3rd 
4th 



Da t es_ 
Da tes_ 
Dates 



Re ligion 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



i 



Place of marriage to your father 



date 



10 
CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2,F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 

.,..^.--., . fOy. q Date of birth ^^ ^^ , /^ ^ ' S 

Number of y>?^rs of schooliflg / O ^ <^ OlU^ Occupation .t<.rc^^ >i^ 
Residence {jiOLA^'.iM^fl , (^-L^ Marital Sta>tus —yO^C^^'^.'^ULc^ (^-^-t-t^^Xftow^ 

Number of children ^death "^ 

of birth ^yU^i^Zv^ My~ Date of birth /^a^^'j, /^ 5"3 

Number of j^rs of schpoling Occupa t ion ^o^^^^^xy C ^^Ji^.^ 

Residence ULu-U*^ , Q-^^^ Marital Status %2^<-<^ >^ , ^ 

Number of children -^i^ death — I 

Place o f^ b 1 r tli UcjSdut?^ ^ y % lt e of \> xx t\\. ULfi^f^ ^'^> /j ^^ 

Number of years of school^lng ^ /-? c c u p a t i o n ^-<,<^-r<-,.v6^j cc/- ^ (.tj.<,nj^i^ 

Res id en ce Cc6«^'<:^'»^/6^^L<>' Marital Status /y\,^..s^yx_^i,.jji / 7^^x3-?5^ 

Number of children / i?'C<< death 

Name ^ Jo-<J^ xJA^t.^:^ /CX ^'^^^^^^^'^j.^ 



Place of hxr x. ^locCUi.h^ K>'f Date of birth /ii^-C^f //, /^ ^ ^ 

Number of years of schooling / 3 Occupation .^-t^^g^ ...ta^caSI^ <f>0 

'Residence. /fjc-cJ-^-c^j .^Xi Marital Status /0-<<--'y<^ [^ ' 

Number of" children — death — 



€U^ r 30 , /fdTf 



Name /K/(^A(i,/xjP /^^^Cu^-^'^^ JX ^'-t*^.,^*..^^ 

Place of \i\xt\\ Cj^juiMJU^ .(^^ Date o'-f birth 

Number of years of schooling /^ Occupation r 

Res 

Number of children death 



iber ofvears of schooling /Q Occup. 

ilAence C'^^t^-t-ifrLJL/ (^-CiX Marital Status y^i<^C*^A* 
iber of children death 7 



Name j, .t^rL^^,.,^^^ ■ , , , 

Place o f b i r t h CAo-^-UtJi^ (^tU*) Date of birth PTu^/^y / 9 (> ^ 

Number of vears of schooling ^7 Occupation 

Residence C^CUxuJc^ , (Lf^ LC(J Marital Status A:>Cc~ eyCi^ 

Number of children death ^ 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



II. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
.j administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
" Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public Library, Rockford 

Illinois 








ca Q 



S-l M 0) 

o m -H 
m :" Q 



Part I 



Brief History of Erwin F. DULMAGE (Paternal Grandfather) 



Born - February 27, 1891 in Watertown, New York 
Died - July 13, 1936 in Watertown, New York 



My Grandfather, Erwin F. TIECHOUT, was adopted by Louis DULMAGE when 
he was 3 months old. His mother had died because a kerosene stove exploded and her 
clothing caught fire. My Grandmother (by adoption) was a very religious person 
(Catholic), and would probably be called a religious bigot in this day and age. 
Because of this religious bigotry, Erwin F. DULMAGE, was not allowed to participate 
with his real family, they were not Catholic so much of this part of the family 
tree has been lost. 

Early life consisted of living in a fairly good neighborhood. His father 
was a carpenter and small contractor. His mother, a very dominant person, did 
baking in her home. As a small boy he had a wagon and delivered the baked goods to 
his mother's customers. He was a normal boy who got into his share of trouble, like 
cutting clotheslines and upsetting "back houses." He went through school to the 
third year of High School. He was an avid sports enthusiast. His father had one of 
the first cars in Watertown which he learned to drive. He married Florence ANTHONY 
in 1911 in Watertown, New York in Sacred Heart Church. 

I don't believe the wedding was a popular one with his mother, as his 
wife lived on the wrong side of the tracks and was not as affluent as they were. 



r 'eW fir t 



itr,h I 



PART I - B 

Brief History of Florence ANTHONY (Paternal Grandmother) 

Born - December 10, 1894 - HarrisviHe, New York 

My Grandmother was born at home in a sod and log house in a remote 
area. Her parents Lena and Maurice ANTHONY were French immigrants and settled in 
that area to work in the marble quarry. He was a stone cutter. 

My Grandmother had three sisters and two brothers. Early in her life, 
about 8 years of age, her family moved to Watertown, New York. Her father worked 
in a casting plant as a core maker. . 

The family spoke French at home, but when guests came to visit, English 
was spoken. It was during the time when it was considered un-American to speak a 
foreign language. Her mother started one of the first hospitals in Watertown, New 
York that had an operating room. 

She attended local schools and completed 10 grades. She worked as a 
domestic when she was a teenager. She worked in the original Woolworth 5 & lOt 
store, it was called Moore's 5 and 10(t store originally. She was working at the 
5 & 10(t store when she met my Grandfather. 

She was married at age 17 and mothered 12 children, 7 boys and 5 girls. 
My Grandfather died when the youngest child was one year old. She again worked as 
a domestic until World War II came along. She provided five sons that were active in 
that War. She lost one son in the Air Force over France. 

She has remained active through the years. She has 41 Grandchildren and 
over 20 Great-Grandchildren. A recent family reunion in Watertown honoring my Grand- 
mother was attended by over 84 direct descendents from all over the country. This 
reunion was a highlight in her full and active life. 



PART I - C 

Paternal Grandparents Life Together 

My Grandfather Erwin F. DULMAGE and my Grandmother Florence ANTHONY were 
married in 1911. They had 12 children. 

My Grandfather worked with his father as a carpenter and they were well 
known in the Watertown, New York area for putting in steel ceilings which were the 
latest type of construction at that time. 

When World War I broke out, my Grandfather tried to enlist, but was turned 
down because he had too many children, (5) at that time. He left Watertown and 
went to Detroit, Michigan with his family to work for the Ford Motor Company who at 
that time were making Liberty Engines for aircraft. They lived there for four years. 
They returned to Watertown after living in Rochester, New York for a short time 
where he worked at the Kodak Company. 

Times were good, so with a large family, nine at that time, he decided to 
move to a small farm, 6 acres to raise his own food and have the freedom of the open 
spaces. There were no farm animals. He commuted to Watertown, 10 miles, to work 
every day. At one time he had two Model T trucks that he garaged in an old hay barn. 
The trucks were destroyed when the barn burned down, along with most of his tools. 
None of these were covered by insurance. 

Besides all the children at home, 8 to 10 at most times, because some of the 
older children would be living in the City looking for work or living with relatives, 
my Grandfather Maurice AflTHONY who had only one leg, lived with them. My Aunt and 
her husband also lived with them for quite some time. Most families had grandparents 
and married children living in the same house during this period. Old people's 
homes had not been thought of yet. 



PART I - D 
Page 1 



Brief History of Judson Bernard DULMAGE (Father) 

Introduction 

My father was born July 11, 1923 in Watertown, New York, a city of 
approximately 30,000 people, located in upper New York State near the St. Lawrence 
River and Canada. 

He was the seventh child in a family of twelve children, ten still living. 
Because his early life was so interrelated with his family that he felt the best 
way to relate his childhood would be to tell about the life style of that period 
and how he was involved. When he was four years old his family moved to a small 
farm near the village of Evans Mills, New York which was nine miles north of 
Watertown, New York. 

Life style in the late 1920's and early 1930's in a farm community in upper 
New York State - Evans Mills (Jefferson) New York, population 602 approximately. 

Setting : 

Residence: Seven (7) Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, Two Story House 

Heat: Kitchen Stove, Large Stove in Living Room 

Light: Kerosene Lamps 

Water: Well (approximately 30 ft. from house) Hand Operated 

Bathroom: Two Outside (two holer) 

Basement: Partial with sand floor, stone walls, sand bins, and 
open racks for food storage. 

A Typical Day's Events 

Winter Time (Normal temperature +32° to -35°F) Average 200 inches of Snow 

He got up very early. Everyone dressed by the kitchen stove. Had to take 

the hot water from the tank on the stove to thaw out the pump on the well to get 



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PART I - D 
Page 2 



water. Get stove going in living room. Go to the "back house" which was about 30 
yards from the house. Eat breakfast which consisted mostly of corn meal mush, 
oatmeal, or similar hot cereal. Wait for farmer taking his milk to the cheese 
factory with horse drawn sleigh to hitch a ride to school. School had 2 grades per 
room with one teacher, teaching both classes. 

Teachers punishing students by physical means was considered proper and 
usually meant the same when you got home. 

The High School was on the second floor with essentially one room for all the 
high school students. School was strictly reading, writing, and arithmetic. After 
getting home from school, the nightly chores of filling the wood bin (in shed), 
cleaning and filling the kerosene lamps, filling the water tank on the stove, and 
small jobs that needed being done before dark were performed. After supper, recreation 
was mostly card games, games pertaining to school such as arithmetic, or spelling 
games. 

The evenings were rather short and going to bed at 7 o'clock was quite normal. 
Before going to bed, everyone lined up for their hot brick which had bean placed in the 
oven earlier. These bricks were placed in bed with you usually at your feet to take 
the chill off. Sometimes you would place them in your bed a short time before going 
to bed as there was no heat upstairs. Beds were shared by two children, at least. 
This probably was a blessing in disguise as it added warmth. 

Weekends were spent gathering more fuel for the stoves, with ample time for 
ice skating on the creeks, sled riding, and most other winter activities. 

Spring Time 

Most of the time was taken up in preparing a large garden. This provided a 
great percentage of the food for the whole year so great care was taken in the 



PART I - D 
Page 3 



preparation. Neighbor farmers usually provided the plowing and fertilizer. Late 
spring was for wild berry picking which were mostly made into preserves. 

There seemed to be plenty of time for baseball. Nothing was organized but 
several kids would meet at someones farm and a game was played. Sometimes late in 
the spring, my mother would fix us a bag of flour, salt and pepper, bacon grease, 
and a frying pan, and we would stay all day fishing and eat our catch. Many times, 
we would spend many hours in the woods doing nothing but day dreaming. 

Several of the farmers had maple sugar distilleries. We would help them 
gather the maple sap which was then boiled in large open pans. We would boil eggs 
in the hot syrup and this was our lunch. Dessert was "sugar on snow" which is 
exceptionally sweet and good. 

Summertime 

The first week of summer vacation all the boys in the family got a complete 
haircut, bald, by my father. This could have been to get rid of hair lice along 
with staying cool . 

Each summer a large elm tree was cut down on our property to be used for the 
coming winter's fuel. This took the whole summer as it was a fill-in job when other 
jobs ran out. My Grandfather was in charge of this project and he was continually 
wanting us kids to get on the other end of the cross cut saw. Much of our time was 
spent in the olde swimming hole which was a creek that we had damned a short distance 
from home. Helping neighbor farmers with the hay and grain harvest was intermixed 
with just enjoying the summer. The farmers paid us off by letting us ride their 
horses and would usually feed us real good. Generally, the garden chores were layed 



PART I - D 
Page 4 



out the night before so as soon as these were done, we were free for the day, so 
usually these were done early in the morning. 

On hot sultry nights, the whole family moved outdoors, sleeping on hay 
mattresses covered by sheets. Late summer usually meant eating choke cherries by 
the hours until your mouth was so "caked" you could hardly talk. An apple orchard 
on an adjacent farm provided us with plenty of cider which we made by cutting up 
the apples in a food grinder and pressing the juice out by standing on the apple 
pulp and catching the juice in a flat pan. A good afternoon's work could get us 
nearly 2 gallons of cider. 

Fall Time 

Fall usually meant getting the food from the garden and preparing it for the 
winter months. Most of the vegetables were canned by my mother. Carrots, turnips, 
parsnips were buried in sand boxes in the cellar, and potatoes were put into large 
bins, also in the cellar. 

We trapped skunks for their skins so would set out our traps. A good black 
pelt would bring anyv/here from 35(t to 75<t. The pelts were stretched on boards to dry 
and when we had several of these, my father would take them into the City to sell. 
Most money earned went into the family funds. 

Food that we ate in order of most times served: 

1. Beans, baked 

2. Bean soup 

3. Pea Soup 

4. Goulash (macaroni & hamburg) 

5. Home made bread 

6. Fried home made bread 

7. Potatoes 

8. Turnips 

9. Parsnips (fried) 

10. Dandelion Greens (in season) 

11. Cow Slips (greens similar to dandelion, found in swamps, 

large leaf) 

12. Corn bread 

13. Garden veaetables in season 



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PART I - D 
Page 5 



Most foods were fried in bacon grease and lard was used for baking. 



HOLIDAYS 



Fourth of July 

Always a ball game and band concert in evening. Plenty of fire 
works (not organized). 

Thanksgiving 

Always spent with family. Sometimes relatives would come out from the 
city. Live turkey was purchased prior to Thanksgiving and had to be 
butchered and the feathers cleaned off, a job he always hated. 

Christmas 

Always spent with family. Sometimes relatives would come out from 
city on Christmas Eve. 

GAMES PLAYED 

Ollie, 01 lie Over (One team on one side of house throwing ball over to 
team on other side and if they catch it, they try to hit one of the other team with 
the ball). Baseball, High & Seek, Kick the Can, Rope Jumping. 

MEDICAL CONDITIONS 

He can only remember one time in nine years that a doctor came to the house. 
It was during a scarlet fever epidemic and a doctor was sent up to place the family 
under quarantine. 

The only doctor in the community was a Veterinarian who also substituted as a 
medical doctor. 

No one went to the dentist except under real emergency such as an extration. 



ow 



PART I - D 
Page 6 



Most of the medicine was given out by the Mother and Father. Whenever one 
got sick, an enema was the first thing given, followed by resting in bed with catnip 
tea, or oil of wintergreen. For "croup" or a "jery bad cold, a teaspoon of sugar 
dampened by kerosene along with mustard plasters on the chest changed ewery few hours. 
For cuts or bruises - iodine and if it became infected when the red lines would show 
on the arms or legs, a pollus of oatmeal was placed on the wound to draw out the 
poison. Oil was placed in the ears for earache. Cloves were placed in the tooth 
that was aching or rubbing the gum with drinking alcohol was also used. 

This was a period when families were ^ery close, the fight for survival was 
real, everyone was poor monitarily, but rich in so many other ways. 

Discipline was handled by Mother until about 12 years old, and then the Father 
took over. Discipline was quick and decisive - once over was forgotton - not always 
fair. 

My father moved back to Watertown when he was thirteen where all the modern 
conveniences such as running water, inside toilets, central heating, and electric 
lights were real items. 

His father died the following year. He attended public schools and was active 
in all sports especially football, basketball, and baseball. He worked having 3 
paper routes at the same time. Morning, Evening and Sunday. At that time the daily 
paper sold for 3t and the Sunday for 10(t. From these routes he was making approximately 
$4.00/week. This money went into the house and also to provide his clothes. He 
was always busy mowing lawns, caddying at the golf course, shovelling walks, and 
many other odd jobs. 



PART I - D 
Page 7 



He attended Watertown High School and continued his sports activities and 
work schedule. He led a very busy type life. He graduated from High School in 1941. 

He started work as an Apprentice Tool Maker at the New York Air Brake Company, 
In Watertown, New York at S5t an hour. 

In early 1943 he entered the Navy and was an Aerial Gunner on a Navy Torpedo 
Bomber (TBF) and flew off the U.S.S. Enterprise and U.S.S. Yorktown in the Pacific. 

After returning to civilian life following World War II, he entered Clarkson 
College of Technology v/here he pursued a Mechanical Engineering course. He continued 
his sports and was the last 3-letter man in college (football was later dropped). 

After leaving College he worked at several different jobs and in 1951 returned 
to the New York Air Brake Company as a Design Engineer. He remained there until 1956 
when he joined Pesco Products in Cleveland as a Project Engineer, a company who 
manufactured hydraulic pumps for missile and fuel pumps for aircraft. In 1972, Pesco 
Products was sold to Sundstrand Aviation, so he moved to Rockford and remained with 
Sundstrand as a Project Engineer. 

He was married to Sharlene SIVER in 1952 and they had six children. He was 
divorced in 1971. He remarried in 1972 to Frances SMITH. 

He continues to be active in sports and is considered a golf nut and still 
remains '^ery active. 

He feels that the period his life has spanned was exceptional in that there 
was such a transition. He was poor monitarily, but everyone was, so there was no 
jealousy. He feels the diversion of T.V., organized "everything" has taken away 



PART I - D 
Page 8 



some of the old fashioned ingenuity and active participation, everyone expects the 
ultimate all the time. 

My father felt he could not fail because as low as he started out, there 
was no place to go, but up. There was never the fear of failing. He believed in the 
old adage that hard and long work never hurt anyone. 

He purchased his first radio in 1941 soon after he started formal work. He 
purchased his first automobile in 1942, partners with brother, a 1938 Chevrolet for 
$425.00. The first television was purchased in 1954. 



PART II 
Page 1 



Brief History of Sharlene A. SIVER (Mother) 

My mother was born July 7, 1919 in Watertown, Jefferson, New York (same 
as my father) . 

Life Style in Late 1920's - early 1930's 
Setting 

Residence: 7 Rooms, 2 Bedrooms, Two Story House 
Watertown, Jefferson, New York 

Heat: Fireplace, Kitchen Stove, Coal Furnace 

Basement: Partial, Sand Floor, Stone Walls 

Light: Electricity 

Water: Inside Faucets 

My mother was the second in a family of five children, four still living. 
She lived in the City of Watertown most of the time except in the summertime. 
Then she lived in the country on a farm in Canada with her maternal grandparents. 
They must have been well off because the farm house was quite big and well kept. 
It had 5 bedrooms, a summer and winter kitchen, 2 parlors, and a large dining 
and living room. 

They had some 50 head of cattle and a few horses. They had the only car 
(Canadian made) in the neighborhood, and was comparable to the American made car 
Marnion, 



PART II 
Page 2 



At times while in the City of Watertown she would live with her paternal 
grandparents who owned a small grocery store called "SIVER'S" after the family 
uame. She would sometimes work there for some extra money - maybe $2.00 a week. 
This store also had a gas station with it, and it served some of the first 
cars in the town of Harrisville, New York. 

My mom was studious and at school she was in the upper 1/4 of her class. 
At home she would make games out of studying with her brothers and sister. 

She had her usual chores, cleaning around the house, running errands, but 
not too much different from today. 

When she graduated from Watertown High School, she decided to continue her 
education at a secretarial school in New York City called Onita College. While 
she attended this school she worked at "LARSON'S" a clothing store there. I guess 
she always had the latest style in clothes back then. 

After 3 years there she did some traveling to lower state New York such as 
Rochester and Syracuse. Then she went out to Chicago for a small vacation just 
to see the sights. She liked it there and lived there for about 4 months where 
she worked as a secretary for a small business. 

In 1945 (or so) she moved back to Watertown and got a job at the New York 
Air Brake as a secretary. She remembers quite a lot of women working there at 
the time in place of the men who went off to fight in World War II. She stayed 
there for about 5 years and this is where she met my dad. They were married 



PART II 
Page 3 



July 4, 1952 and bought their first house. My twin brothers Jay and Paul, Jeff, 
and myself were born in Watertown, New York and then they moved to Cleveland, Ohio 
where my brother Mike, and sister Denise were born. 

In 1971 she was divorced and stayed in University Heights, Ohio. She 
never remarried. She now is a secretary at Highland View Hospital in Cleveland. 

She bought her first car in 1938 for $100. It was an old green Ford. She 
bought her first radio RCA in 1947. 

She feels she grew up during a good time even though a part of it was 
during the depression, but she says she really doesn't remember it being too 
bad as there was always a meal and a home waiting. 

HOLIDAYS 

July 4th - Fire works weren't controlled as they are now especially up 
near Canada. 

Thanksgiving - Store bought turkey was had and this day was always spent 
with the family and would take place at the farm house in 
Canada, 

Christmas - Spent with family. A big mass at the church was held and not 
that many toys and presents were given out as today. 



VOlt> 



':iO- 






PART III 
Page 1 



BACKGROUND 

I grew up in a more modernized and settled America. Its higher standards 
of living, safer health standards, and increase in the average income per capita had 
changed day to day life drastically from the depression stricken poor of the 30's, 
to a prosperous affluent society of the 50 's. . ' 

I was born in Watertown, New York and moved to Cleveland, Ohio at the age of 
one month. I was raised in a middle class suburb of Cleveland, Ohio (called Maple 
Heights) up to the age of 9. In 1965 our family moved to an upper middle class suburb 
(University Heights) - upward social mobility. 

In 1974 (August) I moved to Rockford, Illinois to join my dad who had lived 
there for 2 years previously. I finished my senior year at Rockford 's East High 
School and am presently attending Rock Valley College, studying Liberal Art Courses. 

From the ages 1-17, I lived with my family (excluding my father who lived in 
Rockford from 1972). My family consists of 8 members. My parents, Judson and 
Sharlene, six children, five boys - Jay, Paul, Jeff, Joel, and Mike; and the youngest 
a girl , Denise. 

My childhood with my brothers and sister was fun, because we were somewhat 
close-knit, meaning we would stick up for one another when the time called for this 
to be done. • _ "' 

The following is a brief sketch of each member of my family and where they are 
at and what they are doing as of May 2, 1976. 

Dad - Age 52 (Born July 11, 1923) was born and reared in Watertown, New York. 
Went to Watertown High School and then entered the U. S. Navy during World War II. 



PART III 
Page 2 



After leaving the service, he went on to finish 3-1/2 years of schooling at Clarkson 
College in Potsdam, New York. He was active in sports, especially football, baseball, 
and basketball during his high school and college days. Moved to Milwaukee for a couple 
of years where he went into business for himself. Moved back to Watertown and landed 
a job at the New York Air Brake as a Design Engineer. In 1957 he accepted the opportunity 
to move to Cleveland, Ohio to work at Pesco Products a Division of Borg-Warner 
Corporation. He worked there for some 15 years and was transferred (because the plant 
closed) out to Rockford, Illinois to work at Sundstrand Aviation as a Project Engineer. 

He and my mother were divorced in 1971. 

Mother - Age 56 (Born July 7, 1919) born and reared in Watertown, New York. 
She graduated from Watertown High School. She continued her education in New York 
City at a secretarial school and worked at a clothing store. She later returned to 
Watertown to work at the New York Air Brake as a secretary where she met my dad. They 
were married July 4, 1951. She now lives in Cleveland, Ohio and works as a secretary 
at Highland View Hospital. 

Twin Brothers (Born May 29, 1953) 

Jay - He is very artistic and very creative which one can tell after looking 
at some of his paintings. He is also musically talented. He plays the guitar and flute. 
He attended Catholic School from grades 1-8 and high school 9-11. He never finished 
high school. He worked at a Car Wash, Solomon's Restaurant, and Home Hunters. He 
moved to Arizona for a time up until 1975 when he moved back to Cleveland. Jay presently 
lives in Cleveland, Ohio and works at Ellacott & Sons, a Greenhouse. 

Paul - Always seems to be logical and sensible. Has nicest and friendliest 
personality of all brothers (to me), because he's very even tempered. People find him 
easy to get along with. Attended Catholic School 1-8 and high school 9-11. He never 



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PART III 
Page 3 



finished high school. Plays and teaches piano and is '^ery good. Worked at a car 
wash, Sohio gas station, Manners Restaurant, Solomon's Restaurant, and at present 
manages a Large Wholesale Greehouse. Lives in Cleveland, Ohio together with Jay. 

Jeff - (Born April 10, 1955) Jeff was my closest brother, simply because 
of the closeness in our age. He was the first to finish High School. He's \ery 
friendly and even tempered although his Aries blood can get him angry at times. He's 
very involved in sports and received a scholarship for football in High School. Worked 
at a horse stable, Solomons Restaurant, and Kent the Florist. After High School, 
Jeff moved out to Rockford for the summer to work at Sundstrand. He then moved back 
to Cleveland and attended John Carroll University for a year. He quit and went to 
work at Rice's Car Wash. He visited Colorado for a time. Presently he works as a 
Salesman for a large furniture retail store. He married Kathy Rice March 1, 1975 and 
they now have a baby boy named Jeff, Jr. Jeff and his family live in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Me - (Born November 19, 1957) Last one of our family to be born in New York 
State. Lived and worked in Cleveland, Ohio up til the age of 17. Worked at (first job) 
paper route, Solomon's Restaurant, Sohio Gas Station, and Car Wash. Moved to Rockford, 
worked at Burger King, Painting curbs, and North States Gas Station. I attend Rock 
Valley College taking curriculum in Engineering. 

M ike - Shy and quiet. Youngest of 5 boys. Went to Catholic School 1-8. 
Now attends St. Joe's High School in Cleveland, Ohio. First to be born in Cleveland, 
Ohio. Moved to Rockford August, 1974 for one year. He went to Rockford's East 
High School as a Freshman. He didn't like it so moved back to Cleveland. He likes 
tennis, music, theatre. " 



PART III 
Page 4 



Dem'se - D.D. is the youngest of us and is the only girl, therefore she 
tends to be pampered by her mother. Her interests are in sports such as softball 
and basketball. She is very outgoing and I tend to classify her as a tomboy. She 
attends Gesu School, a Catholic grade school in University Heights, Ohio. 



PART III 
Page 1 



On the part of this report done on my father's life, the writing format 
dealt with each of the four seasons, primarily to show the variation and diversity 
of the chores and life style of a rural community in the 20 's - 40 's through 
the year. 

For me to follow this same writing format, I feel wouldn't be the best way 
to portray life of the 50 's - 70 's because our chores and life style didn't 
vary as much from season to season as my father's, due to America's higher 
standard of living. Also, we lived in the suburbs of the city and not in a 
small town rural section. Here is a glimpse of my life and family. 

Life Style in the Late 50's thru 60's in a Suburb of Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio 

Residence: Maple Heights, Ohio - 7 Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, 2 Story House 
University Heights - 9 Rooms, 4 Bedrooms, 3 Story House 

Basement: Full, Paneled 

Heat: Central Heating, Fireplace 

Light: Electric 

Water: City Water 

During our residence in Maple Heights we had a 7 acre wooded lot behind our 
house. (This now happens to be a highway.) We boys would spend most of our 
time back in the woods playing hide and seek, army, or baseball on the baseball 
field we made. During the Fall we organized our own block football team coached 
by a college student who was our neighbor. 



PART III 
Page 2 



We had our share of accidents from minor cuts and abrasions, to broken 
bones, to getting our heads "split open" by a rock or any other miscellaneous 
flying object. No problem was too catastrophic, thanks to modern hospitals 
which my father or mother probably didn't really get to use that often. 

Emphasis on the organization of family as a unit was more prominent then, 
than it is now, it seems. My parents were somewhat strict, because there was 
probably no other way to keep us under control. Spankings with "the belt" were 
commonplace up until we reached about 12 years of age. 

At dinnertime, every one was called, and everyone had his own place. We 
would be served or serve ourselves but never ate until the Blessing was said by 
my father. 

My mom and dad, especially my dad, would not tolerate a waste of food and 
everything was to be eaten. I'm glad for this because now I can eat and enjoy 
most anything. (Except parsnips and asparagus.) 

Sleeping space was arranged with the twins Jay and Paul in their own room, 
Jeff, Mike, and me in our own room, and mom and dad in their room. Later when 
Denise was born, she slept in our parents room until we moved to University 
Heights. Sleeping space was the same except Denise had her own room, and the 
twins Jay and Paul had their room on the 3rd floor. Later about (1972), when 
Jay and Paul moved out, there was of course more room. 



PART III 
Page 3 



All us kids went to Catholic school. Jeff and I are the only ones so 
far who have finished High School. Jay and Paul never finished High School 
and I blame it on the times. Students as well as all young people were 
demonstrating and drugs were something new. I feel it would have been more 
difficult staying in school then, than it was before or after this time period 
of the late 60's and early 70's. I guess they call this time the youth 
revolution. College demonstrations, sit-ins, radical changes in hair length, 
clothes, and music were signs of this time. This also was a time of awakening. 
The effect of these awakenings are still seen today in the movies, magazines, 
television, and books. Everything is now more candid and open such as the 
aspects of sex, violence, and some of the pseudo-comedy that mocks, harasses 
or puts down a certain someone. Again this all happened during the late 60 's or 
early 70' s, and I feel it was easy to get carried off with all these changes. 

When you compare my life and that of my parents who grew up during the 
depression, you can see how much easier I have it than they did. Maybe what 
we really need is another depression, although I hope it never happens. 

In conclusion, what I have done (through this report), is to look back on my 
life and those especially close to me, and have seen the different life styles and 
now see that my children will probably have a different life style than that of mine. 

I feel I know my family better and myself better and can appreciate more my 
life and the lives of my parents. 




Joel Dulmage 



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EBERSOLD, TAMARA J 



TRIPP, 1950- 



EASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

Car Contributor to the Hock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
Ajerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 

f4 mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
acess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY * * A -.'c -,V ;V ;'; >V )V ;V A Vc A ;'-- -.V -.V A ;V iV A A ^c -.'t jV ; 

■' OFFICE USE CODE 



Your name t.lArw V. \:;V^g.P^n\ 



Your college: H ock Val I ey (.oriecje ••• ( I D // ) 

RockTord, Illinois --'.- 

Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 X I8OO-I85O 

1850-1900 1900 or later 

Please check al I regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

^New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna., N. J. , Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K>i 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., Ok71 ~ East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 

^Pacific (Cal., Washj (Hawaii, Alaska) 



Please check al I occupat i onal categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming M ining )( S hopkeeping or small business 

^Transportation Y B ig Business ^Manufacturing 

X Professions X Industrial labor Other 

Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

^Roman Catholic ^Jewish X P resbyterian _j( Methodist 

^Baptist Epi scopal ian ^Congregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon OTher Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians ^Mexicans Puerto Ricans 

^Jews ^Central Europeans Italians Slavs 

Irish X B ritish ^Native Americans over several generations 

East Asian Other 



8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other _^^Family Bibles _)^_Jam\\y Genealogies 
f ami ly membe rs 

X Vi tal Records X Land Records ^The U.S. Census 

)( P hotographs __^_Maps ^Other 



? 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name AftiVAU^ ^. Tg\pp Current Residence ~\>/-crASFT\ 

If deaa, date of death JOf^oTA, lC14(« 



Place of birth S^^^K\(^^ Tw)^\x<^. 1\\ Date of Birth b^op, |7^ |^ 75 

Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high school ^ vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

^ (after leaving home) 

1st A4-|-0Rk^F.S^ ;^,V: / Dates 1^07 1 st "fie \o^(^f .?r ^ m Dates l^C;^ 

2ndPuVihV Ar\wi>raL<^tPttt^<? Dates 2nd ^' Dates 

3rd 'Police (V\AQ\s4gA-Ve Dates 3rd ^' '^ ^Dates 

^th Scf..?);^lo,rk^t^^?.\rWi Dates_Qci_na£. '^th,,,,^^^ Dates l^Hb 

Religion ^P^ as K-^Vf r mK\ , 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 'JPf pu.\Ql \(lV^t^. 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother pu' ^^/^ 2-[\ date A 1 v ^ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name I miynr M. -fiv?nU3/o"T^ ipp Current Residence l^f. gf ASL \'^ 

If dead, date of death S/n-\j (^ \'^lD 

Place of birth Hr^O A .IT^c^Wp. , T l\. Date of birth ApR.\ ^M \9.?^^ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high s choo 1 P^ vocational col lege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
<st V-Wl^eu^^Pc- (^^\£aF^ Dates 1st l^c UM^Fi>P^ LU Datesjq^ 

2nd gA\|s^AAUn nCfAXplfC^)) Dates 2nd '^ ^Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd » " Dates 



^th Dates Ath <» ^_] Dates [<^\ JQ 

Religion (nETU r^nt^T 

i Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Ul£pAbUftM^"^O(:'t0E Cf>. \-\\sfegir>il 

P^ace ofmarria^e to'your grandfathe r ^^ ^;,^,^^^ ^W. DATE A^g. i^ \^\\D 

°*^' ilia^°aata^Sfl»fhl^^Ba£g'§?'^tl(l? pifi^^^^^^) a stepmother or another relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

N.inic '^/A Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) .: a;^ PLACE OF RESIDENCE | 

(after leaving home) i; 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd ^Dates_ 

3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates_ 

kth Dates ^ith Oates_ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother date 

A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name "^//A Current Residence 



I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational ^college 

Occupation(s) ^ .ii ^ i-^J i^-'^ I , PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^Dates 1st ^^^^. 

2nd ^Dates 2nd ^Date:_ 

3rd ^Dates 3rd ^Date 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather ^Date 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name //n „____ Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth^ ^_______^_________^__ •'^te of birth 

Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


i»th 



3rd ^Dates ^3rd ^Dates 

'♦th Dates 4th Dates 



Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother date 

Note: If your mother was raised by a bltip r aiMe r O F anuihe r r e l ac l VH ( t O ag e 18)— 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) \/ 

Name /|A C urrent Residence 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth D ate of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^Dates 1st ^Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 



jra 










uac( 


;s 


jro 


1 








uaies 


^elig 
'olit 


ion 










;, sororities, 


etc. 










ical 


party, 


CI VI 


1 or 


social club; 














Mace 
Jote: 

1 


of marriage 
1 f your mc 
give that 


: to ' 

ither 
data 


/our 
was 
on 


grandfather 

raised by a 

the back of i 


stepmother or 
this page (D-2) 


another 


relative 


(to 


date 
age 




18) 



Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 

Name /r) Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 

I'i.H.- ..I hiilh D.tU- (.r birth 

I iliK ,1 1 i on (iMinilx- f oTyci t •. ) 
i|t.nlc '.(hool hi(jh school vocational col 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates_ 

2nd Dates 2nd ^Dates_ 

3rd D ates 3rd ^Dates_ 

'4th Dates '*th Dates_ 

Re 1 i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother date 



D-2 Stepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name /A Current Residence 

I f dead . date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number oF years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 





vocat ional 


col lege 


Dates_ 
Oates__ 
Dates 


Dates 


1st 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 


Dates 


2nd 




Dates 


3rd 





Re i i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



CHjJtDREN of A 6 B (or A- 1 or B- 1 ) - your father's name should appear below 

Name ^qK^ ^. ^^K^^ 

Place of birth -fe.Av^.r.i^'^fL^ XU date yVW\\ ^. \%^ 

Number "^v;;';' "^^"'-gf''"^ ^ ^i;, .T" 0^^"P^5 '^n tClf- CirA->H:Tc\i MuJ, ^uAV\. 
Res i dence7D5 5oVN^^^V l^^.\o,C^ERE,III Marital sTatus AWf^pTt^T) ' 

Number of en i Idren ^ 

Name 

Place of bi rth Ja'te 

Number of years of school ing Occupatidn ■ 

Residence Marital Status ~I~~~I~~~~^^"~^~"~' 

Number of chi Idren ' ^— — — — — — 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth d ate 

Number of years of schooling OccupatiOh 

Res i dence M arital Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooHng Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Name ^ 

Place of birth "J ate 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Mari tal Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of ch i Idren 



I : Name 

' P^at:e of birth ^ date 

' Number of years of schooling (Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



1 1 Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residenc e M arital Status 

Number of CH I IfllUII 



CHILDREN of C and D (or (.-I, D-l)-yoijr mother's name should appear below 



N.iini' 



T' 1 .11 <• of I) i r I h dal(^ 

Niirnh'T of yc.ir-. of school itirj Occupation 

Kr-s idcncc Marital Status ' 

Niimljor o( ch i 1 dren 



N.jrrif 



Number of chi 1 dren 



Number of ch i Tdren 



Number of chi I dren 



P I a ce o f b i r t h date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Mari taT Status 

Number of children 



3. Name 

Placeofbirth date 

Number of years of schooling ""S^ccupat ion 

Residence Marital Status 



k . N ame 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling ~ Occupat i on 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of ch i 1 dren 

5. Name 

Place of bi rth — — — date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of ch I I dren 



6. Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation" 

Residence Marital Status 



7. Name 

P lace of bi rth — _— ^^j.^ 



Number of years of school i ng " Occupat ibn 

Residence Marital StaTui" 

Number of ch i 1 dren ~~~~ 

Name 

P I ace of bi rth ^date 

Number of years of schooling Occupatiori 

Residence Mari taT Status 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of b i rth — — — ^^^^ 

Number of years of schooling Occupatidh 

Residence __"a''ital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren ~~~~~~ 



10. Name_ 

Place of bi rth ~ ~~~ ~~" date 

Number of years of school ing ~~~~ OH^patiOrT 

Residence ~~~ Marital Status " 



four Father 



^ame r^r^Vk^ ^ . 'Tg\ Op Current Residence ~Bt^AV)lOEPF > lil 

If dead, date of death' ' -, ^ 

''ace of birthl^pU^^^pQ^ , Xll ^Date of birth WtA<?rU.^. \^\L 

iducation (number of years) 
grade school g high school ^J vocational college ^ 

)ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

XV . (after leaving home) 
'st1^r>cUPnRa(^r,gM)0C^SVftpDates {^'hU- ?>^ 1st -firlo. t^Pf^F ^ XW Dates \q\L, 

'nd i\\)C.\^hC\nQ(^ Tales Dates V\?,9.- HI 2nd u n ^Ddtes 

ird ^?)y\ump<?c"h.^c,V(^ P\S5F^SQR Dates \'^HM -HS 3rd iv '^ ^Dates 

ith I|\^<Hft4^TsU Ka^m AvK-VW. D ates \qb7 ^ < 4th v> '^ Dates T>fPPSFKvt- 

el.g.on-p^^^^^^^P^,^^, 

olltical parties, ci^vi I or social clubs, fraternities, etc.'pFn.ihU-rtkv SAR lW>i.\E Ta. Ui^. 

Tace of marriage to your mother YV\^o^q Kf At); MiN3K^. ~d ate ^ftM 7 \cvq 7 

jOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
i of this page. (E-2) 

our Mother 

ame ^,-y\\F\ 1. £g\rW^k\~(^ipp Current Residence "fi/^Av^i Di-gf,^ XW 

f dead, date of death 

lace of birth~V^A^n;V V.\AVC^-S , H\VAk^ . Date of birth AvKVSf 7 \q^g 

ducation (numoer of years) 

grade school ^ high school ^\- vocational college ^ 



ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
st U.?,aKul 9,£g. Dates H^l-H(^ 1 s t_:;Bdkii2L£E^Jai ^Dates_il^|_2. 

-■ dT^ofJiur-\>;,Kj (A(^g {\^K\o Dates \<\'^<i -(p? 2nd .Dates 

rd Dates 3rd Dates 



;iligionT^^^\;)^-^^^.ft^) _ _^. ^ ^ 

>Mtical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. p^f;pur>UCt'\kL I) 4 KIaJ ■ . PoctO)& O)- 

lace of marriage to your father vnoctf^V^^-ft\:^;tV\^lon^ d ate ^\V^K; 7 |q ^ 7 

)TE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



E-1 Stepfather 



Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Date of bi rth 



vocat ional 



col lege 



Occupat ion (5) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


^th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



^th 

Rel ig ion 

Pol i t i ca1 parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your mother 

F-2 Stepmother 
Name 



Date 



a> 



If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Date of bi rth 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion (s) 



Vst_ 

2nd 



n .\ 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 

2nd 

3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



3rd^_^ 

Re ] I g I on 

Political party , civil or social c lubs , sororities, etc. 

___^ ^^ 

Place of marriage to your father 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



date 






)iiL- 






HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear bel 



lace of birth-B,-^o-;D^eF^^"TU: 

jmber of years or schooling |y 



•umbe 
es iden 
•umbe 



Date of birth ;i^\uP.^ IS^O 

Occupa t i on p,MAo.r>^| AA)A\.j<:t 



en ce Fl^iftV^ TcJsV^ "fero.sf Tr,. T.U Marital St7t u s MA-'gQ\fD 

r of chi Idren iNr^ v\p 



Jt^Oj^ 



f\\^^^ "V v^\fi P 



lace oT bi rth-^an.r\f e ( , tW 
jmber of years or schooling 



ii 



is i den ce 76S Ar.Vxo ^H RMo^^P<?^ T\\, 
■jmber of children k.V^)K.NF 



Date of birth_^o£iL3_lS^^ 

_ Occupation ' c,-t-u^>(Ot 
Marital Status ^iA.\6iP. 



lace of birth 

■jmber of years of schooling 

55 i dence 



■jmber of ch i 1 dren 
time 



i ace of bi rth 

limber of years of schooling 

hsi dence 



limber of chi Idren 

lime 

I ace of bi rth 



hmber of years of schooling 
1:5 i dence 



- hmber of chi 1 dren 

fime 

I ace of b i rth 



f'mber of years of school ing 
I s i dence 



■"^mber of ch i Idren 

- Nme 
Face of bi rth 



Smber of years of schooling 
Ps i dence 



-Nmber of chi 1 dren 

Nqie 

Pace of bi rth 



Nmber of years of schooling 

Ps i dence 

NTiber of ch i Idren 



Date of birth 

Occupati on 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth_^ 

Occupat ion 



Date of bi rth 



Occupation 

Marital Status 



Tate of bi rth_ 
Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 



Occupat I on 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 
Occupat ion 



lii. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

i I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights/ to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



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EDWIN L. TRIPP 
BETSY PETERS 



Edwin L, Tripp married Betsey Peters in Worl, 
England in April of 18/+2, and sailed from Bath, England 
with $100. dollars on their wedding night. They were 
on their way to the neighborhood of their friends, a 
Crittenden family in Boone County, Illinois, U.S.A. 
The Crittendens had been extolling the virtues of the 
land in their many correspondences. 

After six weeks of crossing the Atlantic by sailing 
vessel, they landed, Edwin and his wife then went 
overland to Detroit, Michigan and spent a couple of days 
there. After resting for the two days they then came 
across country to a spot just outside of the town of 
Bel videre, .Illinois arriving in August of 1845. They 
found the Crittenden place and staked out 120 acres 
adjacent to.lt. This property is on what is now Genoa 
road. On this 120 acres was an area protected on three 
sides by hills. Between the hills, in the valley was 
an Indian village of about 23 dwellings comprising of 
about 100 Potawotomi Indians. The Indians called this 
area Ho-She-Lah-Gah,and there flurished until their 
removal, 

Edwin filed his claim in Galena, Illinois, and 
paid $1.25 per acre for the 120 acres, and returned to 



to his homestead to prove up his claim. Tn eighteen 
months he was ab] e to acquire his patent from the United 
States government, 

A son, John Peters was born during this time on 
January, ?.9 ^^h3* Also in 1845» it seems that Edwin 
got into a scrape with the Indians that were living on 
his land, to the point where finaly a contingent of 
cavalry had to be summoned from Fort Howard Wisconson 
to remove the Indians, According to family folklore 
that the Indians were in the process of trying to 
coerce Edwin into marring on of the tribes womenwho 
had been widowed. The cavalry arrived a day short of 
the proposed wedding and removed the Indians to a 
reservation near Tama, Iowa, 

Edwin, a butcher by trade, worked in Chicago and 
commuted back and forth from his home to his place of 
business. The distance was so far in those days that 
he could not make regular trips home, but with every trip 
home he brought wagon loads of lumber that was used in 
the construction of the house that stands on the present 
site. This house was completed in i853. ^nd was constructed 
so soundly that there are people renting, and living in 
it to this day. . 

Edwin L, Tripp died on October 7, 190?, nine years 
after his wife had died, and only about one hour from the 
time that she had died. 



BETSY PETERS 

Betsey Peters was born in Somersetshire, England 
on April 11, 1815» She was married to Edwin L, Tripp 
in April of 18^2 and imraediatly thereafter came to the 
United States seeking to better their fortune in the 
new land of promise. 

During her life with Edwin she gave birth to five 
children, two of which died at a very early age, (there 
were no records pertaining to there deaths, except for 
cemetery records). There were three other children, 
John P., Anna E,, and Sarah A, Tripp. 

From what can be gathered from available information 
Betsy Tripp seemed to be a rather independent woman 
since she was left alon by Edwin frequently because 
of his trips to Chicago. At one time she was left alone 
for a period of about eighteen months and had to run 
the homestead by herself, 

Betsy Peters Tripp died in Belvidere, Illinois on 
October 7, 1893, nine years to the day prior to the 
death of Edwin, her husband, and was buried in the 
Belvidere cemetery. She was a member of the Belvidere 
Presbyterian Church and had attended regularly. 



JOHN P. TRIPP 
GEORGIE PHILBRTCK 



In the writer? search of the Tripp family there 
wasn't much information on John P. TriPT^.other than what 
could be obtained throufi:h talking to members of the 
family. At th^^ courthouFf' in Belvidere, no i-ecords 
could be found due to the fact that all records went 
back to 1877 and mysteriously stopped there. The writer 
did find obituaries, marriage licences, and records at the 
local ccemetary. '^he information about John P, Tripp 
contained here is based unon these finds, 

John P, Trirp was born on January 29, i8U3»in the 
house that was built when his father and mother first 
came to that region, the township of Spring, Boone 
county, Illinois, He was the first of three children 
and obtained his formal education in the schools of 
Belvidere, Illinois. After completing his years of 
education he spent his youth and the rest of his life 
following the occupation of farmer. 

On September 25, 1872, he was married to Olive 
M, Philbrick, and moved up the Genoa road and took 
up residence about a half mile from his parents farm 
to this union one son was born, and was named Arthur 
J. Tripp, At the birth of their son, Olive died, 
John morned her death for five years. 



On December 25, 1877, John P, Tripp married Georgie 
Philbrick, Olive's younger sister. They continued to reside 
on the farm home in Spring Township until the spring 
of 1903 when they moved to 415 West Hurl but Ave, in the 
town of Belvidere, Illinois, In a few short weeks after 
their removal to the city Georgie died. 

He was a wheelchair invalid for the last eight 
years of his life after h-nving both of his legs amputated, 

John P, Tripp died seventeen years after Georgie, on 
January 8, 1920, of a stroke. 



OLIVE PHTT.BRTCK • 

In trying to research Olive Philbrick, John P, 
Tripps first wife, the writer was unable to find any 
records. There were no records pertaining to her 
in the family artifacts or for that matter the records 
of the county (Boone), All that the writer has been 
able to come up with, is that she came to Boone county 
in 1855 from Standish, Cumberland County, Maine, Olive 
was born on December <?6 , l845t and married John P, Tripp 
on Seotember 25, i872. 

Olive died three years after she was married, 
during childbirth. 



GEORGTE PHTLPRTCK 

Georgie Phi] brick waa born December ?6 , '8i+3, 
in Standish, Cumberland County, Maine. Tn May of 1855 
the family moved to Boone County, Illinois, and took 
up residence three mi^ep south of Belvidere, on what 
is now called Pearl ."Street Road, 

Georgie was the younger sister of Olive Philbrick 
and so spent her early life at the Philbrick homestead. 

At the age of fifteen she started teaching school 
in DeKalb County, THinois. The next eighteen years of 
her life were spent almost constantly* in the schoolroom, 
either as a student in Belvidere or as a teacher in the 
schools of Boone County, She taught a few terms at the 
old brick school housethat used to be located on the 
South side of Belvidere, 

In 1870, she joined the Presbyterian Church of 
Belvidere and became a constant attendent, 

December 2.7^ 1877, she married John P, Tripp and 
lived on the farm southeast of Belvidere, on Genoa road 
until the Spring of 1903, when they moved to Belvidere. 

On May I3, '903, Georgie Tripp died at her place 
of residence, and was buried at the Belvidere cemetary. 



ARTHUR J. TRTPP 
LTNNTK BROWN 



Arthur J, Tripn w.^s born in Sprinp- Townshin or, 
November l?, ^S?"?, the eon of John P. Tripp. He attended 
the Sager Rural School, then coming tc Relvidere finished 
his education graduating from the Peividere High School. 
After completing this phase of his education he started 
studing law under local attorneys, and in 1907 he was 
admitted to the Bar at Ottawa, Illinois, During his 
practice of the law he war, appointed Public Administrater 
of Boone County by the 'governor of the state of Illinois 

Arthur J. Tripp married Linnie Brown in Chicago 
Illinois on August '?, 'I9l'^> ^nd went to live in the 
house that his father had lived in,(i^15 West Hurlbut Ave.) 
Three years later on March '5, '916, I.innie gave birth 
to a son, and they named him .John R, Tripp. 

Having exceptional abilities regarding Probate 
matters and in the settling of estates, he specialized 
in this line of work during his practice of law. 

In civic matters he served as city attorney, Police 
Magistrate, Corporation Council , President of the Bloods 
Point Cemetery Association, and was a charter member 
and trustee of the Boone County Historical Society, and 
a member of the Presbyterian Church, 



FoHowing all of these activities, and in recognition 
of his unusual executive ability, in l 9?2 , he was 
unanimously chosen the first secretary of the newly 
formed Belvidere Building and Loan Association, 

Under his leadership and management this institution, 
starting from nothing, grew steadily until he made it 
a million dollar association. 

During the trying times of the depression it was 
Arthur Tripp's policy never to forclose a mortgage except 
as a last resort; and in the hundreds of borrowers in the 
books of the association, this was necessary in only four 
instances. 

He so abJy managed this association that to investors, 
dividends were paid regularly all through the depression. 

Not all his interests centered around the Building 
and loan Association, however, Ac, a diversion, he took . 
great pleasure in the management of his farms, and in 
connection with this he had for a number of years, as a 
hobby, the raising of Bees in whicn he was most successful. 

He loved his family and his devotion to them was 
most pronounced. He was very proud of his ancestry and 
delighted in recalling the acomplishments of thoses who 
had gone before him, 

Arthur J, Tripp died on November 20, '9^6, of 
complication from diabetes and was hurried in the Belvidere 
cemetery. 



LTNNIE BROWN 

■. V Linnie Brown was born in Flora Township, Illinois 
on November 17, 1884, and completed her education up 
to the third year of high school. The writer has little 
knowledge of events prior to her marriage to Arthur J, 
Tripp. 

She enjoyed writ ting as a hobby, and even had some 
of her works published. Besides writting she was an 
expert at genealogy, and had her ancestry traced back 
to about li|00. 

She was the only member of the Tripp line that 
did not become a member of the Presbyterian Church, • 
She remained a Methodist to the day of her death. 

Sometime in the I950's she started suffering from ./ 
hardening of the arderies and by 1964 was completely 
incapacitated, After ."everial hospitals stays she 
finaly died on September 6, '970, 

She had been a member of the Boone County Historical 
Society and the Belvidere Ch-mter of the Daughters of The 
American Revolution, 

She was hurried in the Relvidere Cemetery, 



JOHN R. TPTPP 
ETHEI. 1 . ERTCKSON 



John R, Tripp was born in Relvidere, Tninois on 
March 5> 1916, and completed his years of education 
in the schools of ^elvidere, Tlllnois, Fe also completed 
to years of college through extension cources, while 
studinng law. 

After completing his education he went to work for the 
Rockford Morning Star, and worked there as a reporter from 
1936 to 1938. 

Tn 1938, after quitting his ,iob with the Morning Star 
he became an Abstractor of Titles, and followed this 
occupation until l9i+7» While he v/as an Abstractor of 
Titles, in 19^^, he was elected Belvidere Township Assessor 
and served from 19^4 to 1948, 

John R, Tripp married Ethel Erickson on January 7 
19^+7, at Moorhead, Minn, and took up Residence at the 
house that used to be his fathers, (Z|1 "^ West Hurlbut) , •; 

On July ?5, 1950 a daughter was born and was named ■ 
Tamara J. Trinp, later another daughter was born and 
was named Wendellyn, 

From I9ii8 to ^967, he was employed as an executive 
with Rockford Autotypists of Rockford, 

Tn 195'3, he moved his family to a house that 
they had had built at 705 John Street and are presently 



residing at this address. 

In 1967, he took a job with the Illinois State 
Highway Authority and is presently working at this occupation 

He had several interests away from his work, including 
The Belvidere Chapter of the Sons Of The American Revolution, 
Sertoma,and he is past president of the Boone County 
Historical Society, 

John R, Tripp is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church and attends regularly. 



ETHEL I. EKICKSON 

Ethel I. Erickson was born on June 7 1922, in Detroit 
Lakes Minn, and completed her education in the schools 
of that city. After completing her high school education 
she went on to finish her formal education with Detroit 
Lakes Business College, in 194'. 

Also in 194', she went to work for the United States 
Government, . and in 1942, was stationed with the Officers 
Candidate School in Fsirgo North Dakota. 

In 1944 She was transferred to the Alliance Air 
Force Base in Alliance, Nebraska, Tn August of 1944 
she was then transferred to Hill Field in Ogden, Utah, 
Tn September of '944, by request, she was transferred to 
Hickam Field, Hawaii. 

In May of 1946, she returned from Hawaii and in 
June of th^t same year met John R.Tripp, 

On July 7 '94'''^, they were married in Moorhead Minn, 
and took rof^idence in Pelvidere, Tlllnois, 

She is nast president of Ruriness and Professional 
Women^ Club, past Secretary of the T^oone County Historical 
Society, and is an active member of the Presbyterian Church, 



TAMARA J, TRTPP 
JACK T . EBERr,OT.D 



Tamara J, Tripp w^tb born on July P'5,1950, in 
Belvidere, Illinois, and recieved her education, through 
high school, in the schools of that town. 

In August of 1969 she stopped her education at 
Rock Valley College and moved to Hawaii, Later in December 
of that same year she returned from Hawaii and stayed in 
Belvidere for a week and then moved to Louisville, 
Kentucky,. 

In June of 1970 she returned from Kentucky and 
resumed her education at Rock Valley College for the 
remainder of the year, 

-■ . , In January of 1971 she transferred to Northern 
Illinois University and graduated from there in June ' ' 
of 1972 with a degree in accounting. 

In February of 1972 she met Jack L, Ebersold and 
they were married on March 17, 1973. 

She is presently eraplojied at National Lock, in 
Rockford, Illinois as a financial analyst, and is presently 
working on her Masters Degree in Marketing, 

She, like the rest of her family is a member of the 
Presbyterian Church, in Belvidere, 



JACK L, EBERSOLD • ,y^^ 

Jack L, Ebersold was born in Springfield, Missouri 
on May 30,1950 and completed his education, in the schools 
of that city. After graduating from high school he 
reg istered with the local draft board and was drafted 
Into the Army on April 2/+ 1970,. 

After after completing his basic training at Ft, 
Leonard Wood, Missouri he was then sent to Ft, Carson, 
Colorado, 

In January of 1971, he was transferred to South 
Korea where he completed his two years in the Army, 
In January of 1972 he was released from active duty and 
moved to Rockford, Illinois where he met Tamara J, Tripp 
in February of that same year, ' 

On March 17, 1973 they were married and are presently 
living three miles south of Belvidere, Illinois, on 
Pearl Street Road, 

Jack L, Ebersold is presently attending Rock Valley 
College, . ; . ; : ■ 



EBLING. DOUGLAS BURNS, 19^7- 



' 



ASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

r Contributor to the Kock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
rican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
ess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ***-;c-'w'c>V>VAAAAA-;.-:'t-.VywV5':A*AAA-,'c:V;V 

A ] O i ' '' OFFICE USE CODE 

1. Your name jj Q ^^^ I^X Ooigy £^b hn,n * 

Date of form ^ Q \Q1'^ * ^'^ ^ ^ 

2. Your college: Rock Val I cy (.oil eye -•■ (ID // ) 

Ro c k f rd~, iTTTn o i s 



***** •;.• ■!: -,V -,',' -A- -.'c -,': )'; >\ k A A ;V A A -,'.■ * A ;V ;'; ;V A ■,'.- 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 
X B efore 1750 1750-1800 1800-1 850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 1 



k. Please check al I regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

X N ew England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) ^ M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S . C . ) E ast South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K>i 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., Ok.) X. East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 

Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 



5. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

^-V Farming Mining '_C Shopkeeping or small business 

^Transportation Big Business ^5(^ Manufacturing 



X P rofess ions Industrial labor X. O ther 

6. Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

■^ R oman Catholic Jewish ^Presbyterian ^Methodist 

^ B apt i St _P^E pi scopal ian Congregational Lutheran 

^ Q uaker ^Mormon O ther Protestant X O ther 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? * 

^Blacks Indians ^Mexicans ^Puerto Ricans 

^Jews Central Europeans Italians Slavs 



Irish \ B ritish X" N at i ve Americans over several generations 
East Asian Y O ther 



8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

)^ Interviews with other Family Bibles y^ Fami ly Genealogies 

fami ly members 
^ Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 



Photographs Maps ^Other 



I 






FAMILY DATA 
A. Grandfather (your father's side) 



Name ^go fy^e COli^c. Current Residence OecCc?^ec/ 

I f dead, date of death 5" Qec /^S^S 

Place of birth QcA fc i J ^ /TI/cA.cjcn Date of Birth I ^ /Dare A I S' S C 

Education (number of years): 

grade school ^ high school Q vocational O col lege ^ 



lojr l%5 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

Q, , (after, leaving home) [^c£- Iq^S 

1st r n<3 'foc\fap h^f Dates ^^l<HIO-tqi£ 1 st (^iroij' Dates_ 

2nd C -^ /-f ~ Cm p layed ) Dates 2nd O^ciflio.^ fA.ck ^Dates 

3rd fhd-ioc\,'^plr,i, Dates /<?/i"- Ky7 3rd Dates 

^th C FcJ »^cto. Cc-^f~,U Dates Ath Dates 

Re 1 i g i on Kjons. 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother 0^4 re f OltcA <^n ' ^^^^ jS' ,^oc^ i^H 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Hllc^ Clem^ft Current Residence Qecf Ir^m j n^icl^ie^an 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth Ll i k6arci ^ Ccin^^ ll. ^^h^J Date of birth 3 Jan l-a^S^S 

Education (number of years): 
grade school J^ (P high school ^ vocational (D college Q 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

r> t<^oC>'l<^ll (after leaving home) /loj-- /tjjs 

1 s t fq rjce -Qcm^.s 0-^>c < UUo , fce r Dates 1st De-/fc.f Dates 

2nd ripc-fe CC, -K Dates 2nd iJecj/ jgo i n 



Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4th Dates '4th Dates 



Re 1 i g i on ^ piS:Ca p ^ion 



i Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



t^P'-i.i,cg>-j. ^Q<,{t(n ifar. [/aric^-t Ch^,ch C-io^fiS 

Place of marriage to your grandfathe r f)(^,j-ra\ f m'.cA,C)0^ P^^^ /£ ^/^^c^ iqTT" 

'^°^^= l^araa'tHP.»fhl^^Ba£l'8?dtl(f? pigi^^A-^)! stepmother or another relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 



N.inic 

I f dead, dale of death 



Current Residence 



Place of bi rth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

'♦th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Re I i g i on 



lst_ 
2nd 



3rd_ 
4th 



Date of Bi rth_ 
vocational 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Dates 
Dates 



Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 



■ date 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion(s) 
1st 

2nd 

3rd 



_Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Re 1 i gion 



Current Residence 



Date of bi rth 



vocational 



oi 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 



Dat 



Date 



Dat« 



} 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Kenodh (^laKr O' Uat^ Current ResidPnrP Dec^qxccl 
If dead, date of death ^g\$"ep igso 



lace of hlrth (^oc^^p,.Ls m.cL^'.. Date of birth / q To n H^^^ ' /^9 V 

.ducation (number of years): ~" ' — -^^ 

grade school <^ high school Q vocational Q college C 

■Occupation(s) PL^cE OF RESIDENCE 

. .. *V» ^ / ■ -*• I,. - (after leaving home) 

'^^ in^Ch,^,^f ^Datesj_^£rm£ 1st ^'c^q-^ ^e^d IzLi Dates ig^g- L^ 

•Znd Fac-fcy ^7)a nc,^enal ^0 r k D ates 1 9^3c- ISSl 2 nd 0e4ro,i m,.L^ ^., Dates jq/::?- .:>^ 

•3rd Precipe -f.6v, /7)^>,c ..^ef D ates iqn-;cjSo 3 rd Tcy/^c;/o ^ ^, ,. D ates mc-J7 

Wh C ^>--.^>^W/ rh.)|.,, rv,.cA.:ODates 4th /?oc£4o.-c:/ X//...^ D ates l<?J7^S-. 

*'e' igion ^ p ,£cc pa lia n 

'olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Rpui,/.con, (inciter,. XJ,r.Mer. ^^^T o.y C^oA ~ 

'lace of marriage to your grandmother /-' ^^, ] "Z, j ' A»ti — T~:= ■ 

lote: If your mother was raised by a ift^^ff U l g l " ^l^i^ 'a i ffl i yvr^^dL I vy (loag e 18 )'^ ^tfi^^l^ 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

'Irandmother (your mother's side) 

lame t j/C ~Xam BrcAO^f ^Current Residence Dcccas<iJ 

f dead, date of death Q /Q^^, l91l ~~ 

lace of birth ^qsxopg/.c /Tl/cA.ogn ^Date of birth po "To^o I f 9Q 

ducat ton (number of years) -" ^'^ ' ' 

grade school S^ high school ^ vocational Q college Q 

ccupation(s) PLace OF RESIDENCE 

(J 1^ __^ (after leaving home) 

t tJQ^'^g'X^fe Dates 1st ^^X^^\^ De4rc,t (W.c k D ates I q/i^-Jto 

pates 2nd "Toiecio OW.o Dates jq^c-?? 

Dates 3rd Roc^-fe.J ^[Ir^^ Dates 1^37-7/ 



eligion C\\t)^\r\af, ^Cien iiKt 

olitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc.^ ^ 

lace ot marriage to your grandfathe V <:^ r;^,,-^^^^^^^^^^ m,cA.....; d ate igre^TT^TF 

ote: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age TWji — ^ 



give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-1 Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 



I'l.ic- .,1 hi I Ih D.ilc ol hiilh 

I diit.it ion (niiiiihf r of yr.i r ■. ) 
ijt.idf? Mhool iii<)h school vocotion.il ^n)lloqe 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates_ 

2nd Dates 2nd ^Dates_ 

3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates_ 

i^th Dates '»th Dates_ 

Re 1 i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother d ate 

D-2 S tepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 



I f dead . date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st _Dates 1st Dates_ 

2nd ^Dates ^2nd Dates_ 

3rd _Dates 3rd Dates_ 

Re 1 i g i on 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



CHIbDREN of A & B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 



Name Da n ct lc\ Ckm eir /r ^3 / i\<i 

Place of birth Dcf4ro,f , m..A..^.. ' ~ date /g may l^il 

Number of years of schooling |B vrc' Occupation Toc.) \-f\.^ iX'c.htt 

Residence Qeu, bo, o JAc^i^.jriTrh Marital Status m q f r .'ecl 

Number of ch i Idren g 

Name CJrecra^ ^ A I /"oc^ ~I"r 

P 1 ace of birth De-frc . -}•/ micL^^cn date ^ ^ep 19/^ 

Number of years of schooling K ^: OccupatioA (-Jcx ^. -fc. / f^iJ ^.nis ira +<^ r 

Residence Qeuffcc/n /n ■ c A ■ <nc,/i M arital Status fyiorr.ec/ 

Number of chi Idren ^5 ~ 

-^ / r-""^ ~~ 

Name 6(yo(e FrgnC/S" ^i>/i^Q 

P 1 ace of birth Qe 4 f c . f m.c k. ^.o date ^^3 Te^ I <ifaO 

Number of years of schooling M.A: t\n Occupation r^Qcher 

Residence Koct|:4ofd Xil.ZlT Marital Status /r\o>r,€ci 

Number of chi Idren ^ - - - 

Name 

Place of bi rth ^date 

Number of years of school ing OccupatlOrt ~~~ 

Residence M arital Status 

Number of chi Idren ~ ' 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



/ Name^ 

Place of bi rth 3"ate 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



.1 Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of school Ing Occupatioh 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



. Name ^ 

Place of bi rth d ate 

Number of years of schooling Occupatioh 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



. Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Q.Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Residenc e M ari tTTTTatus 

Number of Llll lUrBri " 



CHILDREN of C and D (or f.- 1 , D-l)-your mother's name should appear below 

1 . ' Vj.iirir ' y(tQr\ raTf)cicK. G'Z-eaty 

f I.Mr of hi, III ^arX^pqj.'X^ r?l.cA.a.»rt do to I O i'ep Iq^C 

Niiiiihcr of y<-.ir', of school itig f^ ^. ^ j^ Occupation "iQctc, h€r~ 

Residence ^CcL^cici XH inou Marital Status Pla,f,ed' 

Number of ch M dren ^ 

2. Ninif J Qjie Cctfc i O Leciiy 

Place of birth TokJc C h.c ~" date H O^a-y MQq 

Number of years of schooling Occupat ion 
Residence Died ^ fhcjc |^^/ MaritaT Status 



Number of children 

3. Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marl tal ^Status 



Number of children 



Number of ch i Tdren 



Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

P 1 ace of birth daTe" 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Mar J tal ^Status 

Number of ch i 1 dren 

Name 

P I ace of b i rth ~ date 

Number of years of schooling Occupatibh 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of ch i Idren 



6. Name 

P lace of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 



7. Name 

Place of birth date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of ch i 1 dren ~~~ 

8. Name 

P 1 ace of bi rth ^date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ~ 

Number of ch i 1 dren ^— — . 



9. Name 

P lace of b i rth — — __ ^^^^ 



Number of years of school ing Occupatibrt 



Residence Marital Status 

Number of ch i Idren 



10. Name 

P lace of bi rth ~~ date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation" 

Residence Marital Status 



our Father 

ame 0\yae. Frqr>c/^ Skil,n<^ Current Residence ■^'ocjl -f orcjj X /in 

f dead, djte of death 

lace of birth Qe 4ro "> "f , /^ic. Jl.ggn ^Date of birth ,Q3 F^L Mo^O 

ducat ion (number of years) 

grade school ^ high school ^ vocational C^ ^college*/ 



ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE ft,^^-^r.^.Ae 

j_j (after leaving home) 

5t fro.Jc cx4 G^^n i.e/ci U/UeP ates | Q ^^^ - I 91^' 1st tLoeJi-ferC'}. X/I,»c,^ D ates 1 9V^- fioe>, f 

nd '^^"■t'l/ fl^'^'nZ-^,, C-. Dates jqi^ - (qjq 2nd Ddtes 



rd i>o.-Ju...,d fc^f.>.c. CV-.-. Dates |<{^(^- I t/fc, / 3rd ^Dates_ 



Dates 



th "Teaetigf Dates Wfc/- P.es^^f ^ th 

'Dlitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

^ep^bKcc»- Ph] Alphc^r^ei^ ' ■ ■ • • ' • ' • • • 

ilace of marriage to your mother Pccl-fc'4 j:l\> note d ate ^g ^uf f'^^^ 

DTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

')ur Mother 



lime^ 

■ dead 



\j€qn I ajr^<-><^ O' L^ciiy Current Res Idence {Coc/:; 4-of J . X'/lir^ciX 

ad, date of death "" 



Ilace of birth Cqj^J^q poi,s.. l7).c Lj^n Date of birth \c ^^p i<?30 

llucation (number of years) 
jrade school ^ high school n vocational (J col lege '^ 



(cupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE p^.f- ^rcXcTe 

(after leaving home) 
It Ho^Ag Oriv^n gJ. -for Dates (^'/J?- iq^S 1st ^ c c k 4\-r J ^ :ril,n<,.^ O ates (ql^- P^esenJ 

^d ^etf-C,npU<cl Dates \QiS 2nd Dates 

:d Teqcf^er Dates /qSg-pfg^e/^t Brd ^Dates 

F ligion ^piXCopq AoQ 

Flitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



€/3ct>jic«^o U^n\cinZ ^oc,e-ij/ 0/QR 

Pace of marriage to your fathfer ^ k'g-c k 4o rc| XJl i ho ..s d ate ^g rr\ar i'^'^H 

ME: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
I this page (F-2). 

11 



E-1 Stepfather 



Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (5) 
?st_ 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


^ith 



Date of bi rth 



vocat I onal 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



^th 

Re 1 i g i on 

Pol i t i ca"f part les , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Date 



F-2 Stepmother 



Name 



If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



vocat ional 



lst_ 

2nd 
3rd 



Date of bi rth 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home] 



3rd^__ 

Re 1 i gion ' 

Political party , civil or social clubs , sororities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your father 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



date 



HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear bel 

ame jJo^alciS Bi. i ns SLjir^r, 

lace of bi rth ^ {l^'cc j^-fcrci X /i: ,. /^ 

umber of years of school i ng {If 



es i dence ^<jck:4ofJ . Xtli>«.^ 
umber of ch i Idren 



ame J~oKn C/eme"ff" /g"^/.ocj 

lace of birth <cc fc 4o/d , -/i.J... 
jmber of years of schooling / <y 



5S i dence Qcct-^ord . IT /) .r>e.;^ 
jmber of chi 1 dren 



lace of birth 

jmber of years of Schooling 
55 i dence 



jmber of ch i Idren 



ime 

ace of bi rth 

iiraber of years of schooling 
I'S i dence 



Imber of ch i 1 dren 



hme 

I ace of bi rth 

hmber of years of schooling 

I si dence 



Imber of chi 1 dren 

hme 

lace of bi rth 



Imber of years of schooling 

I s i den ce 

Mmber of chi Idren 



^me 

Pace of bi rth 

Nuber of years of schooling 

Psi dence 



N Tiber of chi 1 dren 

Nne 

Pace of bi rth 



Nmber of years of schooling 
R; i dence 



Nnber of ch i Idren 



Date of birth H t^p r HI 

_ Occupation <,-i-Jclen-i' 
Marital Status C.n<.- | /e 



Date of birth 1 3^ -T^ I t')^ 

Occupation La l^rre. r 
Marital Status 'd'oc^)«s 



Date of bi rth 



Marital Status 



Occupat I on 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth_^ 

Occupat I on 



Date of bi rth 



Occupation 

Marital Status 



"Pa"te of bi rth_ 
Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



Date of birth 

Occupat I on 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 
Occupat ion 



HI. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family historv, along with all literary and administrative 
rights," to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois, 





^jril 



^ 



The vast majority of the research done on my family genealogy 
concerns ray mother's side of the family. Accordingly, this 
Family History Project will reflect that fact. 

I pm indeed grateful for my mother's assistance in the com- 
pletion of this TD^per. It was largely through the several 
hours of interviews with her that the essential core of in- 
formation presented here was gathered, V/ithout her coop- 
eration and enthusiasm this Proiect would be far less abundant 
and complete. 



-1- 

I - O'LEARY 

EVE JANE BRONNER (20 June 1892 - 2 August 1971) was born on a 
farm in Cass County, Michigan. Her parents were John Abram Bronner 
and Eliza Jane Quick. She was the third child and born rather l^te 
in her parents' life, her father being 49 and her mother 37 at the 
time. Her sister Mildred was 15 and her brother Fred 13 when she 
was bom. Eve Bronner was the only female relative among her fam- 
ily age proup (cousins, second cousins etc.) and it is primarily 
because of this fact that she received the best care in the family. 
Her childhood memories were pleasant and warm. 

Her father was born in Herkimer County, New York. He enlist- 
ed in the Union Array at age 18 and during the Civil War his family 
moved from New York to Cass County, Michigan. His family was 
proud of his military service, a feeling further enhanced by his 
active membership in the GAR (Grand Army of the Republic). This 
close association with the Union Army and the love of Abraham 
Lincoln accounts for the fact that the family was Republican, an 
affiliation that has continued to the present day. John Bronner 
was a farmer by occupation but never owned land while in Michigan. 

When my grandmother was about eight years old her father 
bought a small house in the village of Cassopolis, Michigan (pop- 
ulation then about 1200) . The house was located on the shores of 
Stone Lake, which played a big part in my grandmother's life. 
There was a bam, room for a large kitchen garden, a Jersey cov; 
(known for its rich cre«m) , several horses, a farmwagon, a sleiph 
and a buggy. Living in the same house was her father's mother 



-2- 



Karparet Bronner, who lived to be nearly ^0 years old; a bachelor 
uncle Charles (John's brother); a spinster aimt Mary (John's 
sister) and the three children of the immediate family. One of 
ray grandmother's dearest memories concerned her grandmother 
Margaret who, being deaf, said her prayers out loud ir both 
English and German. 

Such a varied age group of people under one roof all got 
along rather v/ell and each member had his/her own responsibilities, 
My Uncle Charlie was not the brightest man but was extremely kind 
to children and animals. He made sure the woodbox was filled and 
helped his brother John do the farm work. Charlie also took care 
of the chickens but owing to his gentle disposition v/as unable to 
kill them, a task he left for his sister-in-law. Mary helped 
with the cooking; my grandmother particularly remembered sausage 
making in the fall. As Mary grew older she became crippled but 
still did most of the family sewing. My grandmot'^ier' s uncle 
Prank, his v/ife Libby and their daughter Susan lived next door. 

John Bronner, a hired farm hand and part tenant farmer, 
planted a celery "marsh", grew ginseng root, tapped maple trees 
for sugar and cut and hauled wood in addition to grov/ing and har- 
vesting crops of com, wheat and oats. Eliza tended the kitchen 
garden and grew vegetables and flowers for which she won prizes 
at numerous county fairs. John Bronner was an avid reader (he 
particularly loved James Fennimore Cooper) although his formal 
education v/as marginal. He was a man of pleasant demeanor and 



-3- 



was hirhly resDected for his character and native wisdom. 

Eliza Jane Quick (5 May 1855 - 1 January 1926), alv/ays knovm 
as Jenny, was bom in Cass County, Michigan to Eliza Jane Spring- 
steen and Franklin Quick. Her mother died when she was born and 
she was raised by her mother's parents, John and Romelia Spring- 
steen. She grew up on her grandparents' farm in La Grange Town- 
ship in Cass Count;'^. Little else is known of her childhood. As 
remembered by my grandmother Eliza was an excellent cook and able 
to "set a fine table." She (Eliza) was a practical person with 
typical Victorian ideas of morality and very much a homebody; her 
home and family were everything to her. Eliza was mortally afraid 
of electrical stoiros. When such storms would arise, blankets 
v/ere hung over every window and the children all made to sit on 
feather beds as that would "ward off storms." This fear of storms 
was passed on to ray grandmother. 

The John Bronner home was a gathering place for his various 
relatives who lived in the vicinity. The women of the family 
would meet twice a year to sew and make clothes. Christmas was 
the big occasion of the year: John always played Santa for the 
kids, there was a great deal of eating, there were few and simple 
gifts and there was always a tree. 

My grandmother attended local schools in Cassopolls and pre- 
ferred having fun to doing schoolwork. Like her father she v;as 
an avid reader. The big event of her girlhood was the building 
of the Carnegie Library in Cassopolis. She and some girlfriends 
became interested in drama, staged plays in her father's barn 
(with his encouragement) and were soon in demand by local groups 



-d- 



for dramatic performances. My grandmother was alv/a;/"s good at 
dramatics and loved its every aspect. She would save money and 
see the many travelling road shows that played Cassopolis. She 
also loved the out-of-doors; her real passion was ice skating. 
In the summer she and her girlfriends swam and went on impromptu 
picnics. The highlight of the summer was the County Fair. 

As the "hahy" of the family my grandmother didn't do much 
housev/ork hut did help in the annual spring cleaning. Although 
her older sister clerked in a local dry goods store until she was 
married, my grandmother never held a paying job in her entire 
life. She attended school with one Kenneth G. O'Leary, an 
acquaintanceship that became a fairly serious romance in her high 
school years and would be one day consummated in marriage. 

KENNETH GLOVER O'LEARY (19 January 1894 - 25 September 1950), 
known throughout his life as Jack, was the first of three sons 
born in Cassopolis, Michigan to John Andrev; O'Leary and Grace 
Chadwick, Johin O'Leary was the son of Timothy and Elizabeth Burns 
O'Leary, both of whom were bom in Ireland and who emigrated to 
Canada because of the potato famine. John was their fourth child 
and born in Canada. Sometime around 1865 his parents moved to 
Marshall, Michigan. Very little is known about this family other 
than they were Catholics. John O'Leary became a tinsmith and 
moved to Decatur, Michigan to practice his trade; it was there he 
met Grace Chadwick. John O'Leary was a well-liked and gentle per- 
son and possessed a marvelous Irish tenor voice, a talent he put 



-5- 



to use as a soloist in church choirs. 

Grace Chadwick ( ?8 June 1S64 - IB April 1941) was the 
daughter of John Leonidas Chadv/ick and Marie Antoinette White, 
both of v/hom v/ere bom in New York State but met and married in 
Decatur, Michigan. John Chadwick v;as one of eleven children 
whose father Josiah ran a prosDerous inn at Avon, Nev/ York (see 
Chadwick) . Around 1855 along with several brothers John Chadwick 
came to Decatur, Michigan. He and his brother Evered started 
general retail clothing stores in Decatur and the nearby tovm of 
Lawrence. He married Marie V/hite in 1861. Marie was the daughter 
of Samuel and Sarah Ha\'TLes V/hite of whom very little is known. 
They did live a number of years in New York before coming to Mich- 
igan and it is probable that Marie had a good education (for that 
day) in that much attention was paid by her parents to the social 
graces, etiquette etc. In her old age Marie V,'hite Chadwick had 
the reputation of being somewhat proud and haughty. 

The John Chadwick family v/as Episcopalian. After the mar- 
riage of John and Grace O'Leary John gave up his Catholic faith 
and th.eir children were raised as Episcopalians, Soon after their 
marriap-e they moved to Cassopolis, Michigan where their son Ken- 
neth was bom. In the next three years a son Bums and a son 
Lawrence were also bom. Most of John and Grace's married life 
was SDent in rented apartments in the Goodwin Hotel in Cassopolis. 
Althoiigh money was never plentiful, by inclination and training 
Grace Chadwick associated with the "social elite" of Cassopolis. 
My grandfather was twelve when his father died of Bright 's Disease 



(hiph blood pressure), leaving his widow virtually penniless. 
All three boys v/orked at v/hatever jobs were available. My 
grandfather delivered papers, was messenger boy for a local 
telegraph office and taught himself to be a telegrapher. Grace 
Chadwick, an accomplished pianist, gave piano lessons and when a 
local movie theatre came to Cassopolis she played for the silent 
films. After finishing the first year of high school at age 
thirteen my grandfather was forced to drop school and work full- 
time. His mother, having an acquaintance with Mr. Studebaker, 
sent a letter of introduction with him when he went to apply 
for work in South Bend, Indiana, 25 miles from Cassopolis. Thanks 
to the steering of Studebaker, who advised Kenneth to opt for the 
machine shop instead of foundry work, my grandfather at the age 
of thirteen embarked on a life-long career associated v/ith machine 
tools. In a few years his mother and brothers followed him to 
South Bend where the two younger boys graduated from high school. 
Their mother continued teaching piano and playing in the theatre. 

From 1P09 to 1919 my grandfather worked in Milwaukee, Detroit, 
Indianapolis, Toledo and South Bend. These cities were particular- 
ly prominent in the country's growing industrial might, especially 
as it related to the automobile. They constituted the "pattern" 
machinists of that day followed in learning their trade. My 
grandfather was fascinated with cars and during one of his stays 
in Indianapolis he was a pit mechanic for the famous Barney Old- 
field. 

In the course of this "wandering" through the Middle V/est 






he lived in boarding houses and frecuently ate off free lunch 
counters that were available in saloons. He bought a Harley- 
Davidson motorc.^^cle, the great pride of his life prior to V.'orld 
V/ar I, and drove the bike when he would see his future wife Eve 
Bronner. 

\*/hen the United States entered V/orld V/ar I m.y grandfather 
was working for the Liberty Engine Company of Detroit, Although 
he enlisted in the Navy, the management of the company considered 
his services so essential that they obtained his deferrment from 
military service. The fact that he didn't serve in this war was 
one of the great disaDpointments of his life. In 1918 he and his 
recently married wife moved to Detroit where they shared an apart- 
ment with his mother, a less than ideal arrangement. 

After the war (1920) my grandparents moved to Toledo where 
my grandfather worked for the National Supply Company, a firm 
that specialized in oil well equipment. They remained in Toledo 
for the next sixteen years during which time he was promoted to 
the rank of factory manager. In 1920 a daughter Jean was bom, 
in 1925 a son died at birth and four years later another daughter 
Jane was bom only to die of pneumonia at the age of tv/o. The 
year 1931 also saw the passing of my grandfather's beloved brother 
Bums, who died of a blood clot resulting from appendicitis. 

Neither set of my grandparents was hurt much by the 
Depression, My grandfather O'Leary was employed throughout the 
Depression and although he took occasional cuts in pay v/as able 
to support his family as well as his mother in Detroit. His 



brother Bums had been employed as a Revenue Agent enforcing the 
Prohibition Act and at his death v/as a member of the FBI. The 
younger brother Lawrence was artistic in temperament and worked 
most of his life in the art supply and graphics field in Detroit. 
His final job before his death in 1958 involved graphic work for 
the then infant space program. 

The religious background of my mother's family is highly 
varied. My grandmother was brought up as a Baptist and my grand- 
father was raised as an Episcopalian, His mother was one of the 
early members of the Christian Science Church and after my grand- 
mother's marriage she, too, became deeply involved in the Christ- 
ian Science Church although she was not a member. My mother v;as 
raised with a sincere belief in God and a reliance in prayer but 
there was very little formal church affiliation/attendance. 

In 1937 Jack O'Leary and family moved to Rockford, Illinois 
to become Production Manager of the Ingersoll Milling Machine 
Company, a position he held until his death at age 55 in 1950. 
He was a member of the Tebala Temple Shrine, Rockford Rotary and 
a trustee of Rockford Memorial Hospital. Throughout his life my 
grandfather sought to make up for his lack of formal education 
by night school attendance on both the high school and college 
level, correspondence school and extensive reading on v/ide and 
varied subjects. A man of quick but forgiving temper and devoted 
to the work he did, he was respected by all who knew him. 

My grandmother was much like her mother in that her whole 
life was wrapped up in home and family. There was little social 



_q_ 



life outside the home. She created a home v/armed by her happy 
and loving disposition and made that home a peaceful and happy 
haven for her husband and daughter. 

Both my grandparents kept close ties v/ith Cassopolis because 
my grandmother's sister Mildred lived there. ITobody missed the 
annual trip to Cassopolis for Memorial Day, as that day represent- 
ed an unofficial "Iiomecoming Day" for those former residents v/ho 
had made their various ways into the world. 

My mother JEAN PATRICIA O'LEARY (10 September 1920 - Present) 
was born and raised in Toledo, Ohio. Most of her life she has 
been an only child; in fact she is the only remaining descendant 
on both sides of her family. My mother attended high school in 
Rockford and attended Michigan State University where she met her 
husband. After graduating in 1942 she lived with her parents on 
Oxford Street in Rockford. Phe worked at V/oodv;ard Governor 
Company first as a receptionist, then as editor of the company 
house organ and later as secretary to the president. Toward the 
end of World V/ar II she started her own business as a sub-sub- 
contractor making battery cases for walkie-talkies. She married 
Clyde Ebling in 1944 and after the war they settled on Kenmore 
Street in Rockford. 

Since 1958 she has taught school, first at Marquette School 
in Loves Park, Illinois, then at V/ilson Junior High in Rockford 
and presently teaches at East High School in Rockford. My mother 
obtained her M.A. Degree in History from Horthern Illinois 



-10- 



University in 1964 and has since completed 30 additional hours 
there. She has travelled widely throughout the United States 
and last year took two trips to England, Both parents possess 
considerable expertise on the American Civil V;ar and have num- 
erous hooks and manuscripts on the subject. Among my mother's 
hobbies are reading, travelling and sev/ing. 



-11- 



II - SBLING 

ALICE CLEMETT (3 January 188S - Present) was born in Liskeard, 
Cornwall, England. Her father, Thomas Clemett, was a stonemason 
by trade and was horn on Stokes Dalmar, Devonshire, England. Her 
mother, Rebecca Crago, was the daughter of Francis and Maria Par- 
sons Cra^o. 

Owing to the hard times in Cornwall, Thomas Clemett left his 
family in Cornwall and came to the United States around 1890. 
At first he lived with an uncle in New York City and worked a few 
months on the construction of the Brookl;>Ti Bridge. He then moved 
to Detroit and filed papers of citizenship in 1898. V/hen my 
grandmother was three years old Thomas had saved enough money to 
bring his family to Detroit, and most of the Ebling relatives 
live in that area today. For his remaining years Thomas Clemett 
worked as a stonemason in a large Detroit cemetery. Being a typ- 
ical Englishman he refused to work at anything except his chosen 
trade. During times of unemplo:>Tnent his wife took in washings to 
keep thinp-s going. The family, although poor, v;as very closely 
knit; the children always "observed propieties", v/ent to school 
and attended church ree^ularly. 

My grandmother didn't complete high school. She and her three 
sisters worked for the Parke-Davis Drug Company while still in 
their teens. Before the "car age" Detroit was a beautiful and 
pleasant place in which to live. Recreation consisted of picnics 
on Belle Isle, lonr v/alks along the Detroit River and perhaps a 
seat at a concert or play. Growing up near the Clemetts' house 



-12- 



was one George Ebling, later to "be Alice's husband. 

GEORGE EBLIITG (18 March 1886 - 5 December 1955) v/as the son 
of Peter Ebling and Margaret Young. Peter Ebling was one of three 
sons born to Carl and Mary Miner Ebling. Carl and his wife were 
bom in Germany and he was a baker by trade. 

Whether Carl ever came to America is not known but his three 
sons (Andrew, Michael and Peter) arrived in 1854 and settled in 
the village of Beaver, Michigan (since swallowed up by Detroit). 
Andrew and Michael prospered, owning a blacksmith shop and store. 
Both were elected to various village positions. Peter was neer-do- 
well; a painter by trade, he preferred to hunt and fish rather than 
work and was never a good provider for his family. His wife 
Margaret, also of German extraction, died a year after her son 
George was born. Peter later remarried and had two additional sons. 

George Ebling at an early age had to go to work to support 
himself and his family. ?Te sold papers, ran errands and later be- 
came a photographer's assistant, a position through which he learned 
his life-long trade. At age 18 he bought the house of his father 
and stepmother and when 25 married his neighbor Alice Clemett. My 
grandfather soon thereafter opened a photographic studio v/ith a 
friend in the Polish section of Detroit. 'vTien this enterprise 
folded he went to work at the then brand new Ford Motor Company, 
Soon he set up the Photographic Department of the Ford Motor Com- 
pany and headed this part of the Company until ill health forced 
his retirement in 1P44. He died of heart trouble eleven years 



-13- 



later. 

Politically speaking my grandfather was Republican and this 
affiliation has been carried down to his present-day descendants. 
He was not a church goer but encouraged his wife and three sons 
to participate in the Episcopal Church, Because his ovm boyhood 
had been marked by an undependable father he was all the more 
determined to give his family a home marked by stability and 
(moderate) prosperity. He had the eye of an artist but little 
artistic temperament. His wife was the practical, matter-of- 
fact member of the family v/hile he tended to be more of a dreamer 
and romantic. Such traits, however, never kept him from being a 
steady provider. Like my mother's parents, the George Ebling 
family v/as relatively unaffected by the Depression and less fort- 
unate family members were assisted wherever possible. 

While at the Ford Motor Company my grandfather's office was 
directly across from that of Henry Ford, Although they never as- 
sociated, there was an ill-founded rumor that my grandfather 
broke in Henry Ford's new shoes as they both had the same shoe 
size. My grandfather entered his photographs in many national/ 
international competitions and won numerous prizes but his own 
name was seldom attached to the photos, the glory going instead 
to the Ford Motor Company, He established friendship with V/illiam 
Henry Jackson, the famous photographer of the V/est and was 
acquainted with most of the well-known photographers of the day, 
including Margaret Bourke V/hite, He had no hobbies other than 
the enjo:;ment of a summer cottage near Ann Arbor, Michigan. 



-1^- 



CLYDE PMNCIS EBIING (23 February 1920 - Present) v;as the 
youngest of three sons born to George and Alice Clemett Ebling, 
Born in Detroit and raised in Dearborn, my father worked in 
Greenfield Village, Dearborn, as a guide during his high school 
summers. He also v/orked on the Ford Motor Company assembly line. 

After graduating from Michigan State University in 1942 
my father served in the Army as an enlisted man. During World 
War II he ser^/ed principally in the South Pacific, Upon his 
discharge in 1946 he and his wife Jean settled in Rockford. He 
has v/orked for the Greenlee Tool Company and the Woodward Governor 
Company, both of Rockford. 

Since 1962 he has taught school, initially at the junior 
high level and since 1967 at East Rockford High School. My 
father received his M.A. Degree in History from Northern Illinois 
University in 1964 and has since completed 30 additional hours 
in the field of history. His hobbies include reading and travel- 
ling. He has seen most of the United States and last year took 
two trips to England. 



-15- 



* My first known ancestor arrived in the United States around 
1640 and the last arrived around 1890. 
I will now continue with the oldest family. * 

III - QUICK 

Theunis Thomaszen Quick and Belljtgen Jacobus were married 
in Naarden, Holland on 9 March 1625. He was a mason by trade. 
Sometime before 1640 he and his wife came to Nev/ Amsterdam. 
The first known record of them in this country was the baptism 
of their daughter Hillegond in New Amsterdam on 20 November 
1640. The family prospered and owned some land. 

Their son Dirck Theuniszen Quick was baptized on 26 July 
1648. His wife Anna Kodje(?) died around 1702 in Kingston, New 
York. 

A son Jacobus Quick (birth date unknown) was bom somewhere 
in New York. He married Francesca Consales-Duk (b. 11 September 
1697). 

Their son Petrus Quick was bom in Rycster, New York on 28 
January 1728. Petrus married Johanna Consales on 17 November 
1748 in the town of Newton, Sussex County, New Jersey. They 
had eleven children. Petrus served both as a private and a 
sergeant in the Sussex County Militia during the Revolutionary 
War along with three of his sons one of whom, Manuel Quick, was 
probably named for his grandfather. Petrus died in 1806. Pis 
son Manual v/as the father of Peter Quick (mother unknown). 



-16- 



* From this point on events are more easily traced and verified. * 

Peter Quick was born in Newton, Sussex County, New Jersey 
either in 17R3 or 1784. On 12 August 1804 he married Nancy 
Leffler in Newton. They had three children hefore Nancy died 
sometime before 1811. On 29 December 1811 Peter married Mary 
Van Syckle also in Newton. A daughter was born around 1814; 
both mother and daughter died during childbirth. After the mar- 
riage in 1811 Peter took his family to what is now Wayne County, 
New York and acquired some land. After the death of his wife 
Mary he somehow lost his land (repossessed?) and returned to 
New Jersey where he married (3rd time) Ann Cook. 

Peter and Ann had eight or nine children. Sometime around 
182S they moved from V/ayne County to East Bloomfield, a small 
town in the Finger Lakes Region of New York. There Peter 
practiced the trade of a cooper. In 1836 the family moved to 
La Grange Township, Cass County, Michigan (then still a ter- 
ritory) . There was a thriving flour mill there - and a need 
for coopers. Peter's son Franklin was bom 6 April 1832 in East 
Bloomfield before they moved to Michigan. Franklin married 
Eliza Jane Springsteen on 13 August 1854. And at the age of 67 
Peter married for the fourth time to thirty-one year old Harriet 
Tinney. 

Eliza Jane Springsteen was born in 1834, the daughter of 
John and Romelia Colby Springsteen, Born in Cambria, Niagra 
County, Nev/ !"ork, Eliza v/as the oldest of six children. Her 



-17- 



father John was the son of Henry Springsteen and Eleanor Clark, 
Henry was bom in March 1780 and it is probable that his descend- 
ants go back to the old colony of New Amsterdam. After the V/ar 
of 1812 Henry settled in Niagra County and apparently prospered. 
In 1837 his family, along with John and his wife Romelia sold 
their holdings in Niagra County and moved to La Grange Township, 
Cass County, Michigan. Henry died 26 August 1838 and Eleanor 
followed on 6 June 1845. 

On A May 1855 Eliza Jane Springsteen Quick died giving birth 
to a daughter. The baby, named Eliza Jane after her mother, was 
raised by her grandmother Romelia Colby Springsteen. 

In April 1876 Eliza married John Abram Bronner. They were 
the parents of Eve Bronner, ray grandmother on my mother's side. 



-iH- 



IV - BRONNER 



Jacob Bronner (sometimes spelled Bruner) was born ca. 1717 
in the German Palatinate. He arrived in Philadelphia aboard the 
ship Drap-on in 1749. On 26 September 1749 he took the oath of 
allegiance to the King Of England and v/as naturalized 3 July 
1759. On 7 July 1768 he obtained the deed for 100 acres of land 
in what is now Herkimer County, New York located in the Mohawk 
Valley. Jacob married Elizabeth Straubeck (b. 1730) and they had 
eight children. Members of the Dutch Reformed Church, they farmed 
near the town of Stark in Herkimer County. During the Revolution- 
ary War Jacob served as an enlisted man in the Tryon County Second 
Militia Regiment under Colonel Jacob Klock. He also served in 
the Tryon County First Regiment under Colonel Samuel Clyde. His 
older sons also served in the Revolutionary V'ar. One of his dau- 
ghters, Sophrena(Sophronia) , was captured by Indians in a raid at 
Ft. Plain, New York on 2 August 1780. She was held captive for 
twelve years and as a result her mind and health were impaired for 
the rest of her life (see Enclosures). 

One of Jacob's three sons, Felix Bronner (b, 1770) married 
Eve Young, Felix died in July 1833 and his widow lived until 1854. 

Abraham Bronner, one of Felix's sons, was born in Herkimer 
County in 1803. He married Margaret Herdick and they lived on 
a farm called Pink House on Otsquako Creek in Herkimer County, 
Around 1864 Abraham and family moved to Penn Tovmship, Cass 
County, Michigan, Altogether Abraham and Margaret had ten children, 
Two of their sons, Felix and John Abram served in Company D, 152nd 
New York Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. Felix died in 



-iq- 



January 1865 in a Confederate prison in Florence, South Carolina, 
and John returned to Michigan where he married Sliza Jane Quick, 
mother of my grandmother on my mother's side. 



• 20- 



V - CHADWICK 

John Chadwick v/as bom ca. 1770 in Lancashire, England. He 
arrived at the Port of Boston in Aup^ust 1794. Sometime before 
179^ he married Mary (Polly) Swan. Mary Swan was the daughter 
of Benjamin Swan v/hose family can be traced to the year 1656 in 
the Colony of Massachusetts. 

John and Mary Swan Chadwick lived in Charlestown, Massachu- 
setts across the bay from Boston. According to property deeds 
he was a brickman. Six children were born to them - three boys 
and three girls. Sometime between 1807 and 1820 John and his 
family moved to York Township in what was then Genesee (now Liv- 
ingston) County in central New York. John Chadwick died 23 August 
1820 and Mary lived until 23 April 1863. 

Their eldest son Josiah married Dencey Maria (maiden name 
unknown). Dencey was born somewhere in Connecticut in 1802. In 
1829 Josiah bought land in South Avon, Livingston County, New 
York and began construction of an inn known as the Chadv/ick Tavern 
(which burned in 1924. In 1855 Josiah had portraits taken of his 
wife and eleven children; in my house today are two of those por- 
traits that were saved from the fire, those of Josiah and Dencey 
Maria Chadwick) . 

The Chadwick Tavern became a well-known hostelry on the road 
between Rochester and Geneseo. It served as a stage coach stop, 
store, bar, post office, and a place where political meetings were 
held. The inn contained a ball room so constructed that the floor 
rested on leather braces. According to tradition the Chadwick 
Tavern was well furnished and contained a sauare, rosewood piano. 



•21- 



The inn had an interesting sign: since many travellers on the 
road were on their way to Geneseo, the county seat, the north 
side of the sign featured a dapper gentleman on horseback along 
with the words "Going to Court." On the south side the same 
gentleman appears visibly dejected with the words "Coming from 
Court." 

In his lifetime Josiah Chadwick invested heavilj^ in land and 
in terms of the time was recognized as well-to-do. He served his 
community as highway supervisor, school auditor, postmaster and 
held various other civic offices, Josiah was originally a Democrat 
who became a Republican in I860, His wife Dencey died in 1861 in 
Avon, New York, 

In 1864 Josiah married a widow, a mother of twelve children, 
named Eliza Bradley, They were divorced three j-ears later. The 
divorce proceedings were kept secret as there was evidence that 
about this time Josiah had become mentally unbalanced. At the 
time of the divorce a brother, three sons and a daughter moved to 
Van Buren County, Michigan and Josiah was "shipped off" to live 
with one of his children. He died 26 October 1881 of a fall from 
horseback. 

His fourth child, John Leonidas Chadwick, was bom in 1832 
and had moved to Decatur, Michigan with his two brothers. The 
older brother V/illiam followed family tradition and became an 
innkeeper in Decatur, John and his brother Evered owned general 
dry goods stores in Decatur and in nearby Lawrence, 

On 19 September 1861 John Chadwick married Marie Antoinette 
White, Marie White had come to Decatur from Geneva, New York, 



■ 22- 



Her parents were Samuel and Sarah Ha^Ties V/hite. Samuel V/hlte 
was bom 31 October 1804 in Stonington, Connecticut and Sarah 
V/hite was bom 7 January 1802 in Palling, Dutchess County, New 
York. They were married 30 January 1825 in Burlington, Otsego 
County, New York. 

John and Marie Chadwick had two children - Grace Glover 
(b. 26 June 1864) and Dell (b. 1868). On 19 September 1871 John 
Chadwick died in Avon, New York where he had returned seeking 
medical treatment for an unknown illness. His v/ife died in 1911 
in V/arsaw, New York. 

Their daughter Grace Chadwick married Johm O'Leary in Decatur 
on 4 November 1890. One of their sons, Kenneth, was my grand- 
father on my mother's side. 



EHRLICH, MARY ELIZABETHV 1956- 



'''family HIsioRt''''' ''''" '"''' '""'' "' ''' '^'^' '' '^'^ ^^COND COPY OF YOUR 

ar Contributor to the Hock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
r>can fam.lies, we are askmg you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
.mm ues, ^"^ ^' " be eas . ly made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
:es5 to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY 



I. Your name Mary EHrllcit t '''''' ^^^ "^o^E 

Date of foTm NovemBeF"^5T~l974 ~^~" * {\D H ) 

'/. Your college: Kqck Val l ey College (ID // ) 

FocT<?brcr, Illinois a 

*l****''t)'c)VA)'cAi\)V)\.'oVA:VAA;V,V*Av';;Vft.'c 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. ' 

^Before 1750 X 1750-1800 I8OO-I850 

I85O-I9OO 1900 or later 

A. Please check aH regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived, 

^^"^ England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) x M iddle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna.. N.J. Va ) 

South Atlantic (Ga. Fla.. N.C., sTcT) ,__East South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. '.Tenn, Ky, 

West Sou h Central Ark., N.M., Tex., OTrTT X East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) ■^~ 111. Wis.) 

_Plain8 (ND,SD, Neb., Kan., Iowa, MS) 



5. Please check aH occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

•^ ''arming ^Mining X S hopkeepinq or small business 

T ransportation ^Big Business x M anufacturing 

X P rofessions X Industrial labor ^Other 

6. Please check aH religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

_X_Roman Catholic ^Jewish ^Presbyterian -y- M ethodist 

^Baptist Episcopalian C ongregatTonal X Lutheran 

^^uaker ^Mormon O ther Protestant ~ O ther 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians ^Mexicans ^Puerto Ricans 

-^^^^ _X ^Central Europeans ^ItalTanT Slavs 

Irish ^British Native Americans over several generations 

^East Asian ^ Other o 

^ ocaadmavian 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

_X_lnterviews with other X Family Bibles ^ Family Genealogies 
fami ly members ~* 

_j_Vital Records Land Records ^The U.S. Census 

;]{■ Photographs j£ ^Maps Other 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name Ma:£ iSmst EffilLICH 
I f dead, date of death 



Current Residence Nev/ Lenox. V;ill. TlllnolS 



Place of birth TCiP.inn .Tnhnarim-f , Date of Birth 3Q . NovQmber 1899 

Germany 
Education (number of years): 

grade school pt high school vocat tonal 2 college 



Occupat ion(s) 
'^^ faraiag 



(plating) 
if^ — MagJaiflg fr>pprr]t.i ng ^^^^ 

ijth 



Dates_ 
Oates_ 
es_ 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
^^^ gJUgasp. IlU^ois Dates JL929 



2nd Na-w T.anox. Illinois Dates 1931 

3rd ^Dates 

Dates 



Ath 



Religion ^^^.^^^ r.ffithnlir, 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother s^^ Mary's Churcii, Joliet, Il4 ate26, Septamuai 

^ j^^2 

NOTE: if your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the bacic of this page. (A-1) 



B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Maria Maygarltha BTTiffPTTM-f^HlT? 
If dead, date of oeatn 



Place of birth y-nai ai n^^ n-a 



rmany 



Current Residence Mm^ i.Anmr^ Tiiinni^ 



Education (number of years): 
grade school /. high school f:^ 

Occupat ion (s) 

'5t Social WQri£§r "^^^^ 



vocational 



col lege ^ 



2nd_ 
3rd_ 
^th 



(public JaealtJa nursa) 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Mmichan. Germany ^Dates_ 



Dates_ 
Dates 



2nd Naw York. New York Dates 1Q28 

3rd Gbicago, Tlllnois Dates j,9^9 

^th Wpvj T.«>nnT, TninoisDates IQ31 



I 



I Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather _,. ^ , ^, ,.. . OATCoa — ^TT — Z 777X7 

'^' ifiaTCt^ifl*fhl8(^8afl'8?«'t<^§ pa|i^^;^5^)f stepmother or another relative give 



A- I Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

N,i„»c Current Residence 

I f ilrnd. d.)tc of death 

Place of birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd D ates 

3rd Dates 3r d D ates 

ijth Dates '♦th Dates 



Re 1 i q i on 


, fraternities, etc. 


Political parties, civil or social clubs 






Place of^ marriage to your grandmother 


date 


A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 
Name 


Current Residence 


If dead, date of death 
Place of bi rth 


Date of birth 


Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 


vocational college 


Occupat ion(s) 

- ■ - t 1 

1st Dates 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Date 


2nd Dates 
3rd Dates 

Re 1 i g i on 


2nd Dates 
3rd Dates 

sororities, etc. 


Political party, civil or social clubs, 






Place of marriage to your grandfather 


Date 


- - . - ■ '-^^ -.C-.:. ,a. 


1 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

?n ea?. ' ^fi"lf"3J';i), ' ^^'■T'^""' """"' Residence „„,,,„,, ^„,„^.^ 

grade school 6 high school 

Dccupat lon(s) 



3. 



- ^^'^ °f birth T,^ n...K.,. i^n6 
vocational college 



'5t jj'aCtOrY WQ-Pl^^.-I;' 



'nd Plaster-Pain tar 

)rd 

ith 



_Dates 

_Dates 

_Dates_ 

Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
'st Eerie. P^r^q^Yl Y^"^ » Dates 

_2nd GenP.va, Tliip^^o, ^Dates_ 

-^ '"^ np.nalh Tllinn.-c^ ^Dates 



ellgion nnnR 

ol I t ical parties, c 



M^ 7inn,rrr^y>^ ^ Tlli nn-JQ D ates 



ivi I or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



date" 



Current Residence 



lace of marriage to your grandmother popu-fo ^ -p, , . ^ ^ . 

ote: If your mother was raised by a . LLpTd'l^ig^u . ^i i tet^, « Ul l ^^ ( lOaq e' s f^' ^P^-^^ J ^g ^' 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) ^ 

itandmother (your mother's side) 

f dead, date of oeatnin^ .T.nno.^. . n^j_ 

lace of birth p^,^^^^^ 

ducat I on (number of years) 

■jrade school p^ high school q 

:cupation(s) 

'^ Tngnantn-n ^r.-,.^^. "fTyrGB] D ates 



Date of birth 



^j'^j IIIIQIISt 1906 



vocational 



col lege 



i Saioa ■ cl e rk - 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



3rd 



_Dates 
Dates 



sororities, etc. 



"t'cal party, civil or social clubs, 

lace of marriage to your Grandfather ri , ^ , — j ^ — . ^ , ■■ 

'..: 1 1 yo.r Lh./wa, l,.:7l7:-^S^i^^ or ' aHerre l atlve {. -Z'j^'-^'^^^-^ 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 



N.jine 

I f dfrid. <lalp of de.ith 



Current Residence 



I'l.K.- i,\ l.i I I ll 

I 'liK .1 li I If I {iMiiiil)!' r of yr'. J t '. ) 
'|f .iilf •.( Iiool ll i (jli school 



Octiip.il if)n (s ) 

Is I 

2n(l 

3rd 



l).i((.- ol hi I til 



vocol i on;il 



CO 1 )ri|(" 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


i.th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



date 



D-2 S tepqrandmothctr (your mother's side) 

Name ______^_______^_^__ 

I f (lead , (late of death 



Current Residence 



vocat ional 



P I ace of h i r t h 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupat ion(s) 

I St 

2nd 

3rd 



Re I i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Date of bi rth 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates_ 
Dates_ 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



CmkOREN of A & B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 



Name 
Place 
Numbe 
Residence 



r of years of schooling -17 



date 11 iiugust 1932 
Occupa Ll6h Arcjiitect" 



^^^!'^^"'^':Vr>r.tr^R^'n]ngt,nn. ^larital Status Married 
^""'ber of Children a ^ -lAMy.^n.^^ 



Name 



J ' ^ce of b-irth-_jje,v Lenox. TUinois da'te 16. AaanBt IQ-^-. 

Number of years of schooling il ' — Occupation TesV^n^a^T. 

s;:;erof ^c^?tfrffl^ ' ^^ ' "-^^ ^ ^^^^^' ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 



J^^-^fiU-y^HSLIIin (difld as hr^ny: 13, July 193?; 

Place or., rtn-,^, ^.^-V^^^;^^ ^te ,. on.ni;.. 19^6 



Number of years of school In 
Residence 



Number of chl Idren 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Residence 

Number of chl Idren 



Name 

* Place o«- birth 

Number of years of schooHng 
Res I dence " 

' Number of chl idren 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school Irtg 

Residence 

Number of chl Idren 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence ' 

Number of chl Idren 



Name __^_ 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Res I den ce 

Number of chl Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Residence 

Number of chl Idren 



J. Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 
Residence - 

Number of Ull lUlBII — 



I 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



Marital Status 



date 
TTccupatlbrt 



date 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



""J ate 
Occupation 
_ Marital Status 

" date 

Occupation 
Marital Status 

'^"d at e 
Occupation 
Marital Status 



date 



_^__^_^___ Occupation 
Marital Status 



date 



Occupat I on 
narital Status 



CMILOREN of C and D (or (.-I, D-l)-yoiir mothrr's rioine should appoar below 
N..M..- Nanoy ElizabetJi LINDFQRS 

n.,.."or I. ir III Vinr.l:rnr>fi^ Tllinnis 
fiiMiilcr '(I Yi-.)t\ of sctioo I I ru) •) -p 



Niiinljrr f)l children /t^ 



- ''•'^*' 19, NnYflmher 1933 
Occupat I o" Housev,iifa 



Marital Status Mfflrrltd 



^ •'""' Murjorie iuu i LINDFQRS 

p I -,c'- T7rT,f r t>> Bocj^ford,, lilinQii 

Nurnhcr ol years of school Ing ■. q 

Residence ^o^litoT^f Illinoi s 

Number of cni I dren rj 



3. Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school i ng 

Res i dence 



Number of chi Idren 



Mari tal Status 



Tccuratf^^rt^^^**-^^ 



Hou s« wir » 



■ lA&ri>i&d 



date 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



'4 . N am- 

P I .H,p of hi rth 

Number (jf years of school ing 

Res i dence 



Number of ch i 1 dren 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupatibh 



5. Name 

Place of b! rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence 



Number of chi Idren 



date 



Occupat ton 
Marital Status 



6. Name ___^___ 

P lace of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Res i dence 



Number of chi Tdren 



____,_______,_^,__^ date__ 

Occupat I on 
Marital Status 



7. Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence 



Number of chi Idren 



date 

'Occupat I 6n 

Marital Status 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence 



Number of ch i Idren 



date 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



9. 



10, 



Name 

P lace of bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence 



Number of chi Idren 

Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of school ing 

Res i dence 

Number of chi Idren 



date 



' Occupation 
Marital Status 



—_—___— date 

Occupation 
Hari tal Status 



Your Father 



^f"^ .May 7;h1e-r.r. iTrTPTTrH 
If dead, date of death 



Current Res I dence Roclcf ord . Illinois 



Place of bi rth 
Education (number ofyears 
grade school ^ 



■Ja-.i , T.anr^■y T 1 1 i r, ^ ^ r, 



high school 



__Date of birth 16. August IQ.^ 
L vocational 2 c ol lege 



3ccupation(s) 

'St MaoMne operator Dates iq^i 



^"'^ Carpantar'si 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
^^^ i ^avy Dates iq^p.iq^^;^ 



Dates 1 9^] -19-)? 2nd ^flfi^fpT-fl. THinniR D^tes^.^^;^ 

^S S3.S ^(3.11 L 

''"'^ Test technioian Dates iq/:;^.iq^p 3rd 



^th ^Tfist «n;^i nsPT. Dates i qAo- 

leligion Homan Catholic 



'Jth 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



»olltlcal parties civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Church-HolY Nama Society 

n Athletic Booster Clu b (Bovlan Hjgli School) ' ' • • "^ ^ ^"^ 

'lace of marriage to your mother St. James. Roc^f nrcj 1 tVlinois datitl Q. Novamh^-r iT^ 
lOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relatrvegrve that dat a on the Ta!C ^^ ' 
of this page. (E-2) 



bur Mother 



lame 



cv- Elizahath T.TTvmT?npR 
f dead, date of death 



lace of birth Rpft|.f^p(^ TIT ^^^^^ 
ducatlon (number or years) 



Current Residence ^c.n.wrnr>c^ rn^n^.o 
_ Date of birth iq^ Wnvamh^r IQ-^^ 



grade school g 
ccupat ion(s) 



«t Sac.-pwt-.a-ry 

nd 



rd 



high school 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



vocational 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

'^t Nfflw T.finnT, Tllinnia ^^^^^ I9j6«1957 

2nd Bnr.lcf nrr^ , Tllinnig Dates ^^t;y_ 

3rd Dates 



Jlitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



iace of marriage to your father tj^ i \* = Tin - iatt 

ITE: If you were raised by a s teyn£>&^'"1-r JJoUe^^ V; 1 a t i ve give that dat J ' ^of fen^^^of^^^ ^ 



this page (F-2). 



E-1 Stepfather 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth^ ^__ Date of birth 

Education (number of years) ——————————— —^— __>_____ 

grade school high school ^vocational college 



OccupationCs) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates ^3rd Dates 

^th Dates ^ th Dates 

Re 1 i g I on 

Pol i t i cai" part les , civii or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother Date 



F-2 Stepmother 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Dote of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) ^^ PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

' ••' •■ (after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates ^2nd Dates 

3rd Dates ^3rd Dates 

Re 1 I g I on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your father date ~ 



LDREM of E and F (or E-2 F-2) - »o,,r „ u .^ 

\^> ^ i., r ^) - your name should appear below 

N ^™ — i.arv glizabath V-mpyTppj 
I ' ace o^ b'rth^^r--- ■^■^-.^^ 

Number of years of schooling i p_ 



Number of ch i M ren ^ 



TJ^e of birth 27. August 1Q66 
Occupa 1 1 on student 



_ Marital Status Singla" 



.Miph|aai aHRLICH (died as bahy.- ?*; juiy 1953) 

Oc< 
_______ Marital Status 



, Name 

,>Residence Occupation 

Number of ch I Idren 



N^-^ — SJiaron Maria H;m?TT.--x^ 
•Place of bi rth ~ ■ - 



u K f ^ RQCk-fnTrl. Tmn^-;.^ 

Number of years of achoollng ■,7^_ 
>Residencep^^^^,^ Til i nihil 
Number of ch 1 Idreri .mi... 



Occupa fron ' 



Marital Status 



■.SLagie 



Name Steven Max f^ffflTiTPK 
Number of years of school Ing 7 

!r!,'/'"'? fir/^"^''' ^^^^n-)is 

Number of childreri _ 



Date of bi rth 



Marital Status s^ng^^ 



birth lij Fflbriisry 1962 
Occupation 



Jf'*^ j;Og?Plf MinhaP.I TTHRTjn- 



Occupa tron ' ' 



Marital Status .sj ngU 



lace of birth' ^:::^r^r.^ r, V: . 
^lumber of years of schooVing /_ 
■f^es idence_g, ' ~ 

'lumber of cr 



nii nnifi 



Marital Status 



TJaTte of bi rth 
Occupa t ion 



■ ^, D » Q 9 iah 9 T 1965 



' Si a gl* 



''lac e o/^t T Mi^^^^^ ^' ^ aimLicij 

*<esidence xj^^i * j -r-i -. . . 

•lumber of ^^T l' fc^^' 1, 1 H no t <il 



Date of birth ^o - ^ , ^^ 
Occu pa?P(^-^^S^^^ ^0 9 



Marital Status 



' ain!i:i e- 



lame 

'lace ot' bi rth 

lumber of years of' school ing 

Residence 

lumber of ch i Idrert ~ 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 
Occupation" 



111. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY PIGtITS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed ^U^ EjxA^^JU 

Date II -^ 6z_l_ii 



Paul EHELICH 



Max Ernst i^HRLICH 



17, December 186 
5, February 1953 



Max ii-hlert EliRLICH 



:; 30, I\iovember 1899 ^ Pauline 'ATJTTKE 
.j.i26, September 1931 -—— .-—=..„. ^,... 



fi;,l6, August 1933 
5i-'19, November 1953 



J Maria Margareta 

L _. EiHEIWGLR., 

GraviU'notfi--- 

B7, January 1901 



, Mary 

.r^27, 

rricd 



Elizabeth 
■'""'"EHRLICH 
August 1956 



Raymond Bertil 



\vlU, October 1906 
ri5, April 1926 



■ Nancy Elizabeth 

' ^,.,..„_,..LINDEORS 

p 19, November 193;' 



Saima L/uQiY 



ifjry tt 



25, iiugust 1906 
[■' 10, January 19^1 



'H 1, December 1871 
'■ 5, Iv:ay 1955 
Michael b^HRII^IGER 
10, April 18o3 
. ^26, Jujie 1895 
:'■ 7, February 194^ 



■.Jonanna IL-.LNLS 
1^ 21, August 1873 
^'22, Ijay I90I 



August LINDFORS 
7 

— , ? 



Augusta SVENXSBSRG 



Matthew LA KEY 

P'" ■"" 



Mary Elizabeth 
SARPOLLA 
B 11, Deceaiber 187, 
D ? .195.4 



INFOPJ^^i^TIOW 

Interviev-ed: 

Mr. and .Mrs. Mux Ehriicli 
hexi Lenox, Illinois 

Mr. Raymond Lindfors 

Rockford, Illinois 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Ehrlich 
Rocicford, Illinois 

Wrote to: 

Hildegarde Bucher 

Hegensburg, Germany 

Martha Kille 

Herford, Germany 



I. P/iT-iRNAL Gi<^IJDFiiTHi.R : IvI^X LHITST _HRLICH 

Max i!.rnst Ehrlich was born to Paul Elirlich 
and Pauline Wuttice Lhrlich on November 30, 1899, 
in Kleinn Johnsdorf , Germany. He v«as the third 
child. He had tv^o older brothers, Paul and Wilfred. 
They were both killed in ;,orid Yvar I. After l-.lax 
Ernst, Elsa was born, then Karl, Martha, iirthur, 
and twins, VJilliam and Kurt. Max Ernst went to 
gradeschool for eight years and to vocational 
school for two years. He came to Chicago, Illinois 
(U. S.) in 1929. He moved to New Lenoi, Illinois 
in 1931. In New Lenox, he lived with friends and 
commuted to L;hicaj?,o to work. 



Paul i!.HRLICH 

'B 17, December 1869 

Al ? 

•r> 5, February 1953 



Ernst EH:\LICH 
T!lrs— Gfrainrf^triTC-r 



3 1841 
i 1886 



__ Max Er nst EHRLIC E 
My Grandfiitlier 
r6orr>-. 30, November 1899 

OVrr.fci.-. 26, September 1931 



jdis (;^ranamotJTSr 



1843 
1909 



^GottlLeb V;UTTI£ 
jTHs Grandfather 

B 25, September 1824- 
3 28, December 1915 



Pauline V.UTTKE 



His Mother 






B 1, December 1871 
•D 5, I^ay 1955 



te«— Grtrndffltrtill 

TJ 1845 
m 1905 



II. PA'iTRNAL GRj^NDMOTIER: FiARIA IIARGaWjlTA BaHRINGi^R 

Michael Johann Behringer married Johanna 
Haenle on June 26, 1895. Michael was a forest 
ranger. They nad seven cnildren: Max, I.laria Margaretha 
(died as a buby) , Marife , Margarets, Franzis^a, Johann 
Michael, and Martha, Their fourth child, Maria Margareta , 
was born on January 7, 1901, in Freising, Geriiiany. The 
family laoved frequently because of their father's 
occupation, lifter four years of schooling, Maria .. ,-• 
Margareta v;as sent away to a boarding scnool. ijfter 
high school she had five years of scnool (vocational 
training], bho v^as a social worker (public health nurse) 
before she came to >imerica. In 1928 she came to 
New York, New York. She moved to Chicago, Illinois 
in 1929, and New Lenox, Illinois in 1931. 



'I Ik; 



iinton BiHRINGSR 



Michael tTohann 
jl 5ifK-/ BEHRINGER 

lilO, iioril 1863 
i'.'26, June 1895 
|i7, i?'ebrubry 19^6 



Mv PaternaJ . \ 

Grandmother): 



Maria Margareta ! 
!„„. ^SHBINSEH I 

^7, January I9OI1 
B'-"''"* ^26, be Dt ember! 
Mirripd^ ' •=^1031 
Dif-J t==4i 



p 21, i^ugast 1863 
22, May 19 61 



:, 3, Ivlevy 1792 
Franz Xaver !"20, April I8I3 

^v'i.i(„^'i'-'''- I^-^^^^^^i^^I^'i : 9, September I86I 



, >;,, December 1815 'Anna Alaria 

10, Ivlarch 1857 
p 1, Kay 1888 



BUM 



I^flargareta HTIRL3R 
(iraiuimotner 

H 25, May 1624 
'^-i 16, Ivlay 1893 



Ivlaximiiiian H; 



.NLE 



!i U, Jans 1785 

Johann HURLER 
ii-:12, August 1785 
_!f!l6, November 1813 
I'OO, July 1853 

i<'ranziska KLING 

"i^j^Teptember 178.^ 
i^ 25, Juiy 1838 

Josef HAENLE 
,7,-3-i",-~i\t^^-lSOO--- - 
J!U, April 1823 



7, March 1875 



Pj 20, July 18^2 

(^^ 23, riUgust 1865 I 

j^i 5, >>pril 1904 [Johanna LIDL 

[.■'Z9V ™ e c'emfe f '1804 
•.)2, March 1875 



Johann B^iTER 



IFranziska BATER 

Tr ^ii'.ir^j 'tin' 



\? 14, October 1804" 
!' 1, February 1841 
._.|[. 5, May 1871 



G 27, February 1845 i Maria KAJ;IERLx-;XDER 

' 17, February 1905 - ■ •-•- ■ ■ 

'•1, March 1815 
'11, January 1690 



III. PiiTLRK/iL GR/iNDPARENTS : Tni;iR LIFE TOGETHER 

Mari« Iviargareta Behringer and Mkx Ernst Eiirlich 
met through mutual friends in New Lenox, Illinois. 
After they decided to get married, they started to 
build c. house. Their marri&ge took place at St. Mary's 
Catholic Church in Joliet, Illinois on September 26, 1931. 
They continued to build the house after their wedding. 
Vvhile building, they lived in the chicken house. In 
late October when the "dev. st&rted to come on the blankets" 
they put doors on the unfinished house fcnd brought the 
matresses inside. They brought tne five-hundred chickens 
in with them because it v>fas too cold outside. 

The average grocery bill for one weeK for two 
people was five dollars. Five dollors wortn of groceries 
filled at least four large bags, rork chops cost ten 
cents per pound. In 1932 and 1933 they traded eggs 
for groceries. 

Max and Margaret&'s three sons v;ere ail born in 
thier house. Tiieir first son, Paul Michael was born 
on August 11, 1932. Max Ehlert (my fatner) was born on 
August lo, 1933. Their tnird son, Rolf, was born on Octo- 
ber. 31, 1936 and died as a baby on July 13, 1937. 

My gr^-indparents owned a truck before they owned 
a car. Their first cur, a Plymouth, was Dought in 193^. 
Their first radio w'as an RC^i victor. They bougnt it in 
1939- Tne only raaio station was wlo. In 1952 they 

6. 



bought t, used television for one-hundred dollars. 

Max and Ivlargareta have spent aiot oi' time 
travelling. In 1949 Ivlargareta went, back home to 
Germany after being away for almost twenty- two years. 
She met Ivlax's family then for the first time. World 
\Var II was over but Germany was still demoiiohed. 
Max v.ont back to Germany in 1951 and met I/.argareta's 
family. Margareta went to Gernany again in 1957 w'ith 
her oldest son Paul, ^he ulso went to Germany in I960 
because her motner was ill. Her mother died in May of 1961. 

In 19o4 they travelled to Kew York to see the 
World's Fair, i^fter iviax and Margareta both retired, 
they decided to tarce a vacation and see tne world. 
They left in March of 19^6 and were gone for seven 
months. Thay started from San Francisco, California 
and vjent by ship to Hawaii. They went to Japan, India 
Egypt, and Italy. Tnen they went to Germany to visit 
their families. They also travelled tiirough France, 
Spain, Holland, and Belgium. Then they took a freighter 
back to Norfolk, Virginia and drove back home to 
New Lenox. 

In 1967 they travelled through Illinois and 
southern Wisconsin. In I968, Max's sister, Martha, 
came to the United States to visit Max and Margareta, / 
In 1968 they traveilea ten-thousand miles through the 
southern and western stetes. They camped in Texas, 
New :.iexico, i^rizona, and California. In i970 tney 
travelled to >ilaska by bus. 



In 1953 they bought land in v;ashington Island, 
Vv'isconsin. They travel to the island about twice a 
year. 

Today, Max and Margareta Ehrlich still live in 
New Lenox, Illinoj.s. They havb a large garden and alot 
of land to keep up. They have tvvelve grandchildren vvho 
keep them very buty a^so. 



IV. FATHER: Iv'i^X iHLi:.itT EHRLICH 

Max Ehlert Ehrlich was born on August 16, 1933, 
in New Lenox, Illinois. He haa one older brother, Paul, 
who v.as born on August 11, 1932. They xived on a oxnall 
farm. Max attended gradescnool in New Lenox. He walked 
one mile to school every day. ^fter atoending tnere 
for eight years, ne graduated in 19-47. Max v.ent to high 
school in Joliet, Illinois at Joiiet Township Kigii School. 
He walked one .;Ale to catch a train to Joiiet every day. 
He attended there for four years taking a college prepar- 
atory curriculum. He graduated in 1951. i-.fter graduating, 
he worked for seven months in a factory. Also, he 
was a carpenter's assistant for three months. 

In iipril of 1952 he joined the Kavy. He had 
basic training at the Great Lai^es Naval Training Center. 
In July of 1952 he wa^ sent to Guantanomo Bay, Cuba for 
eighteen months. After he got out of the Navy, Max 
attended trade school for two years. He studied Diesel 
and Automotive Engineering. 



RAYJ;:OND BLR TIL LINDFOKS 
S^ilxvla LiiKEY 



Raymond Bertil Lindfors was born on October 14, 
1906. Seima Lakey vvas born on August 25, I906. They 
both grew up in Rockford, Illinois. They were raarried 
on April 15, 192b, in Rockford. After getting married, 
Raymond and Saima lived in Minnesota with Raymond's 
family. By 1932 they had moved bacjtc to RocKford. 
Raymond was a plasterer-painter. 

Their first chila, ijancy Elizabeth (my mother), 
was born on on November 1-^, 1933. Their second cnild, 
Marjorie ^inn, was born on August 24, 1935. They lived 
on the second floor of a house. Raima's mother, , Mary 
Elizabeth Lakey, and Saima's two brotners, Hank and 
John, lived on the first floor of the same house. 

Raymond and £aima built a new house across the 
the street. K^iary Elizabeth Lakey died in March of 1954 
just before the house was finished. They moved into 
the house in Ivjarch of 1954. Saima died onjanuary ^0, 1961, 



10. 



VI. MOTHER: K^KCY LLL^.-iBETK LINDFORS 

Nancy Elizabetii Lindfors was born on Novembtr 19, 
1933 in Rockford, Illinois. She had one younger sister, 
Ivlarjorie, v^ho was born on /iugust 24, 1935. Nancy attended 
Jackson gradeschoolf or six years and Lincoln junior high 
school for three years. During this tiirie her sister 
had rheumatic fever and had to hospitalized for a year. 
Nancy attended East high school for three years v.here 
the majority of her classes were business courses. During 
high school, Nancy worked at V.'oolworth' s dime, store. 
During her senior year in high school she worked for 
the sales department of the Rockford Clutch Company. 
She graduated from ^ast high school in 1951. ^^fter 
graduating, she started to worrc at the ^imerican Insurance 
Company as a secretary. She worked there until she g.jt 
married. 

At tne age of nineteen Nancy converted from 
Methodist to Catholic faith. In their spare time, Nancy 
and her friends enjoyed bov.ling, roller skating, and 
going to movies. They walked often and sometimes too^ 
the bus. 



/(. 



VII. PARENTS: TKLIR ^IFi TOGi^Ti.^R 

Max Ehlert Ehrlich and Nancy Elizabeth Lindfors 
met through a mutual friend. They wrote letters to each 
other while Max was in the Nqvy, in 1953. Tney actually 
met in 1954. They began to build a house in New Lenox, 
Illinois (iVax's home tov.n) the summer before ohey planned 
to be mt^rried. Max's father and brother helped Max 
build the house. Max and Nancy got married on November 19, 
1955, at St. James Catholic Church in Hocicford, Illinois. 
After the wedding, they lived with Max's parents in New 
Lenox. Max continued to go to trade school until March 
of 1956, vvhen their house was completed, ^t this time 
Max worked at the International Harvester Company in 
Melrose Park, Illinois. They lived in this house for 
one und a half years. Tneir oldest child, Mary, was 
born v;hile they lived here on /iUgust 27, 195o, 

In July of 1957 J^iax applied for a job at the 
Rockford Clutch Company in Rockford, Illinois. He was 
chosen for the job. Max and Nancy moved to Kockford 
the same month. They lived with Nancy's parents until 
April of 1958 and then moved into an apartment. Tneir 
second child, Michael, was born while they lived here. 
He v^fas born on July 28, 195B and died only a few days 
later. Their third cnild, Sharon, was born on October 29, 
1959. In October of I96I, Max and Nancy moved into a 



/^. 



house. Their f.urth child, Steven, was born on February 15, 

1962. They had three., children after that: Joseph, on 

iiugust 2, 1964, Gregory, on Deceinber 5, 19o5, jaraes, on 

jiugubt 29, 1909. 



/A 



VIII. MY LIFE 

I was Dorn on august 27, 1956, in Joliet, Illinois. 
When I was one year old, my fatuer changea jobs and 
my parentb moved to Kocicford, Illinois. I started 
kindergarten at Hallstrom gradeschool but in tne 
middle of tiae year, my parents moved again ana I 
finished kindergarten az Sum^aerdale gradeschool. 
I attendeu St. Bernadette's Catholic gradeschool 
for eight year^. Then I went to Boylan Catho±ic 
highschool for four years. My first job was at 
Kockford Memorial Hosrital in the Housekeeping 
Department. I quit that job in September of 191U- 
It was daring that month that I started to go to 
Rock Valley College. 



6XXJ ni. viijd i.oofli;aeDj5' . as njcJi-jjisbni^i 

.locioasodi^ 3liD. . oai3i JDSiiainil 

.lii saw dt-t vj6.ix't "*iM .eiJ39Y ajjol ic'i iooxloeiig u 
;-,i.iq33jiadjjoH ^ri:f .■: : itiiiocisi/. l)io'i:looH 

oJ ov* oJ bs^JitiCla I Tft:lcl iictnom .:^ lub 8Bw jI 

/IIbV Jioofl 



ERICKSOM, PATRICIA ALINEV 1954- 



ASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR j 

FAMILY HISTORY ! 

r Contributor to the Hiock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
rican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
F^ mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
ess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY **A-,V-,V>W;A>VAA*5V-.V-,';--'cA>V>VAAyr-VA;V;V;V 

/) /] * OFFICE USE CODE 

1 . Your name f'<;v^fici6^ nl/nt- ^fic^k-jar^ * 

1. Your college: Rock Val 1 ey (.oriege •'■ (ID // ) 

Rockford, Illinois -•• 

*****;'; >'.- A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 1800-1 850 

y 1850-1900 1900 or later 

k. Please check all regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

X- N ew England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

^>^ S outh Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K>i 
West South Central (AViT. , N.M. , Tex., Ok.) East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 



>^ P aci f i c (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) y^ (Xaj^"- /iy>z-.,X.L 

5. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming Mining V S hopkeeping or small business 

)(^ T ransportat ion ^Big Business X M anufacturing 

X P rofessions )^ Industrial labor X O ther fr\ , n I'j^ry 

6. Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

Roman Catholic ^Jewish ^Presbyterian ^Methodist 

"Baptist Epi scopal ian Congregational X Lutheran 



"Quaker ^Mormon X ft febfeJ " Protestant K O ther M-h/'/zv/'/ '<5»-^v 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks Indians ^Mexicans ^Puerto Ricans 

^Jews ^C entral Europeans Italians ^Slavs 

Irish British ^ Native Americans over several generations 



East Asian Other 



i. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other Family Bibles Family Genealogies 

f ami ly members 

Vital Records Land Records ^The U.S. Census 

X Photographs M aps ^Other 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

\^ame f\lfc,\sc< ^o^^y^ij. uiiL.kj. 
I f dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high school (p 



Occupat ion (s) 
1st L (^ h i > t. 



Dates 



2nd T (Kt.\ d f) Vt 



Current Residence R. . ^ 1 Tr^^cy, ^-' 



Date of Bi rth 



vocational 



col lege 



3rd £>i)J\(iY 
i4th 



Dates M n 

Dates 

Dates 



PLACE or RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st cA, c .- 



2nd_ 
3rd 






Religion ■■■■/ i Ar<''^ : C^ (yJU '- /fl C^^J i}-^ ^' t^^O'j- Ut^^i^-^f 
Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Dates -'b/ 



J'i>Z 



dat( 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 



B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name // ,» , i ^ 

I f dead, date of death 



Current Residence ^ -^ i ^ , Tf^- <-y , J~l',v 



Place of bi rth 



Date of bi rth 



;r 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational col lege_ 



Occupat i on (s) 

1st Pr4oj ^ 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates ) 1M-?- 1st ^ . ^ / Dates 



-f^ 



I 2nd T C I ^pLf^ c- 



^ii 



3rd : 

4th 



SqUJ 7-.. 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



2nd_ 
3rd 



■- ./«•>-;/, J- ^ 



Dates 



}^ 



£12. 



4 th T i%- c y , X V ^'^ 



Dates 



Re I i g i on 



' > Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc._ 



Jiy^'-'-fi^W-'^-^^t. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 
Not 



"DATT 



ih^Hatl^Sf!»fh^^Ba£g'§?dtl(l§ 3i|i V^)! stepmother or anoth 



er relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

Njnx? Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth Date of Birth 



■H 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


i*th 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates_ 

i4th Dates 4th Dates 

Re 1 i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother date 

A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 



I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational ^college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^Dates 1st _D3tii_ 

2nd ^Dates 2nd ^Date__ 

3rd , ^Dates 3rd ^^3te__ 

Religion ^^ 1 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather ^Date 



3. 
, Grandfather (your mother's side) 

.<^^"* i. ; - -- ' - Current Residence 

If dead, date of death ' ~~~ — 



Place of birth i^ej.^/ Date of birth 

Education (number of^ years) : 
grade school high school vocational 



col lege 



■Occupation(s) p^^^^-^ 0^ RESIDENCE 

i,* / /) / I ^ -, (after leaving home) 

!st ^A^^'/c-.'^ /-' rs ■ ■-', ...-^ Dates -" ^ l = ^ ' ' n 



2nd P^ r 4 

■3rd 

'Jth 



Dates 


'^ 1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


/♦th 



Dates 
Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



"" Re I i g i on ' 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

_ Place of marriage to your grandmother ■ ' ' j^^^ 

Note: If your mother was raised by a !>LHp r dL ll t; i ur d ll ULllHI m l dl l Vt! (tO ag e 1 8^ 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

-Grandmother (your mother's side) 

^^""^ ' - _ , . . ^---^ - -/e ^- T C urrent Residence — 

I f dead, date of death /^ft,^ ———————_____ 

"Place of birth ' / / .^ .'■ u -/ -/ ,. ' '- ' p ate of birth ~ ■ >■ ■ " ^' 

Education (number of years) —————____ 
_ grade school__v high school vocational college 

3ccupation(s) PLaqe OF RESIDENCE 



(after leaving home) 

Dates 



■St a (jvt.ri\ eSS —A/- V ,^ .-V Dates ' /! { 1st 

I ■■ .■ ^^-l^ A^i A' ■ Dates 2n6 Dates 



i'"^ ^Dates 3rd 



Dates 



(el i g i on 

'olitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



lace of marriage to your grandfathe r 3^te — ~ 

iote: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age TST 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l Stepgrandf ather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead . date of death 



I'l.ic- n\ hirlh D.Ue ol" l)iilh 

I 'I IK .1 1 I Oil (iiiiimI)c r of yc.i r ■. ) 
'ir.idf' '.(liool hi<)h school vocal ion.il coihnje 

Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

'4th 



Dates 


1st 


PLACE 
(after 


OF 

1 


RESIDENCE 
saving home) 

Dates 


Dates 


2nd 








Dates 


Dates 


3rd 








Dates 


Dates 


i»th 








Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social ^clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother d ate 

D-2 S tepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 



I f dead . date of death 



Place of birtPi Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 





vocat iona 1 


col lege 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 




Dates 


1st 


Dates 


Dates 


2nd 




Dates 


Dates 


3rd 




Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political party , civil or soci al cl ubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



CHMtOREN of A & B (or A- 1 or B-I) - your father's name should appear below '*' 

Name 

Place of birth - date !^2^0 

Number of years of' schooling Occupatlbri rr ' ^ 

Residence 7 Mari t^TTTatus ' 

Number of ch i Idren ^ ~ — 



Name ^ . 

Place of bi rth ^te ■:!) zJ" )'*"^D 

Number of years o^ schooling ' , Occupatibh ' ■' " 

Residence ' .. , M arital Status ~" 

Number of chi Idren '^ — — — ^_ __ 



Name 



f'^ 



P 1 ace of birth date ' j j ^ I <> t ^ 

Number of years of schooling . , ~ Occupatlbn , 



Residence A - Marl tafTtatus 

Number of chi Idren "^ 



Name /i . 

Place of birth ~~date " i ^j C 



Number of years of schooling , "^ccupatTbh 
Residence ^- ■ M arltaMtatus ,; " 
Number of chi Idren ^^~ 



Name 

Place of bi rth " date 

Number of years of schooling Occupatlbn 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



!• Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren ~ 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupatlbrt 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren — — _ 



Name 

Place of bi rth ^date 

Number of years of schooling Occupattbh 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



) Name 

Place of bi rth " date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren " 



I' Name ^ 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling OccupaTfo^T 

. SCmierTf U lll U r y r, ^"-'tal Status ; 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C- 1 , D-l)-your mother's name should appear below 

N.IIMC 



f'l.M r of hi , Ih 

Niinihcr of yi-.ir ■, of school itK| 
RfV. i dcncc 



d.ilc , 



Occupat I on 



.> /. / nf->^ Xo 



Niimher of ch i Idren 



Marital Status 



N.jrne -I , - A^ , 

P lace of hi rth k .:) ( _ ^y r . 

Number of years of scho61 ing j 
Residence / < ,,. . 
Number of ch i Idren 



"S c 



Marl tal Status 



date ^-j^. c //,)■?? ^ 
Occupat I on j-y,- ,- ,' . r ■^ _, 



' , -' ? /y^ l H 



4i 



3. 



Name ^ . ^ 

P lace of bi rth "~~~~ ' ^ 

Number of years of school ing 
Res i dence 
Number of ch i 1 dren 



date 

5'ccupat iOn 



/ 'iSo 



Marital Status 



Name / , _, /■ ^ , ^ 

Place of bi rth ' , r - .' . ^ .. 
Number of years of schooling / ,'' y ^ 
Res i dence ' ,/ ' , .. ■ r ' , I 

Number of ch i 1 dren '? 



Marital Status 



date , . 
Occupation f, 



1%'ii 



-U^ 



^- <" ■' i'- '-0 



Name 

P lace of bi rth ^^^ 

Number of years of" school ing 

Residence 

Number of ch i Idren 



da te dyJ-J w^a^ A (--j^^^ J <■:- rU 



Marital Status 



Occupat ibh 



6. 



6) 



Name J^ ^ - • 

Place of bi rth " , ' ~~ 

Number of years of schooling /j- y f 

Residence / /, , 

Number of children ^ 



Marital Status 



date m, .:l I}, /,V/ 

Occupa t i on f ,- . ''.-..-- 



Name ' 

Place of b i rth 



iJl 



Number of years of schooling ) . ^ 
Res i dence k /,;..-/ 
Number of ch i Idren p 



I date ^e,^, ?, / ^ _^o 
Occupattbn ^/, //.<_/. 7c cL 
Marital Statu? ,, . . , / 



Name 

P lace of b i rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Res i dence 

Number of ch i Idren 



date 

Occupat ioh 



Mari tal Status 



9. 



10. 



Name 

Place of b i rth ~ ~~~ 

Number of years of' school ing 

Residence 



date 

Occupatibrt 



Number of ch i Idren 



Marital Status 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 



date_ 

Occupation 



Number of ch i Idren 



Marital Status 



'our Father 

lame Lv^ I flU^ & ric-k^a-^ Current Residence 4 ^'i-lk^^ l^oi fl I^J . T L 

f dead, date of death 

'lace of birth Cki C c- c\ p ^Date of birth M o \J > S , / f ^ | 

iducation (number of yeaf^s) 
grade school high school vocational — c ollege c<- Vr 

^ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

/L^K^jAr^^^) /fHiy^' (after leaving home) 

St fl1.v,n-L»^^r^ C^ Dates M 6^^-70 1st Al .Ct^- D ates 

C") • , „ i.' ■- :■ . 

tr\ dSi<LpJ f'^oe^ I^-^UJ. Dates -' :■ ■' " 2nd /C -u--!-^ . Ddtes 

ird Jpn-i/ l^i^,n.i-t-r- Dates ' ,"." o 3rd , .^ 



Dates 



ith iVe/'rp y /^^,n-Ae^' D ates .'•..- ^'♦th^^^ Dates / '( S V 

;e 1 1 g I on /? j . ., . ^ ^ • ,, , ,' •? to <i 

• . . . . . • 1 • > • 1 r- . . "T" / / -> 1 . ' J. /)l'l I 

olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. /-•>^"' ' -■ -' ■ ■.■ ' '■ ?/ 



te 



lace of marriage to your mother ; V ;.f d atl 

OTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

our Mother 

ame ^ ■ ,- /f] x ,. , ^ > ■< . ^i r re - *" Current Residence 'Palk^^ I^J . ^iJ,XL 
f dead, date of death 

lace of birth 6l (^ t n^„^,^ y Date of bi rth D^c.. .3, / '^ I Q 

ducation (number of yearsX 

grade school high school vocational col lege 



ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
St cjic^i Tt K< Dates ■ 1st ^Dates_ 



nd Dates 2nd ^Dates_ 

rd Dates 3rd Dates 



eligion__^_£_£__22__ l^Otlo{f^ o> 0^ .^yyt-fh- ChOyofl-f 

olitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. ^ ^ ;, . . ^ ■ ■ ■ ■ < .'.-■> . ■ ■ :-^ 

i ^ ■■ ''■'''^n-i / , .' ' ■ - 

lace of marriage to your father / ' d ate . . . l 

OTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



' 



E-1 Stepfather 



Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupation (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


iith 



Date of bi rth 



vocat 1 ona I 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



^th 

Rel ig ion 

Pol i t i cai* part les , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Date 



F-2 Stepmothe r 

Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



vocat ional 



lst_ 

2nd 

3rd 



3rd^__ 

Re 1 I g I on 

Political party , civil or social c Tubs , sororities, etc. 



Date of bi rth 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your father 



date 



HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



lace of birth ZcrkUrJ _ 



Umber of years of school Ing 
s idence 



Date of birth rio'.o. ^, /9S2 
Occupation » - _ / ' ' 



Umber of ch i Idren /[/^^ ^ 



Marital Status J , ,x^ l-e^ 



lace of birth l^^l-/ DaTe of birth j'^*^ , 1 , I "] S '■/ 

>jmber of years of schooling J\.pKinc,-e i'^ c^ile ^^ Occupation • - _ /^ V 

;s idence 

timber of chi Idren /lA^TZ " 



Marital Status J'/^,./^ 



Mn 



/}/n 



jfri'U'^J'o. 



ace 

jmbe 



of birth lU D ate of birth Z^ec- / 9 , If-ff 
r of years of school ing Jo'^A >k^.«^ /V CUile^ -c^ Occupation j /i^Je ^^ - H l^C 



^^r^ 



js i dence Pi.|k^^^ HJ, ^J^ckh-^^J Jtl- Mari^tal Status J, /y ^ /c_ 

jmber of ch i idren /i/^^^ ^ 



II ace of birth iii-J{ 



__^ Date of birth A/o^ / / 9 ^O 

iiraber of years of schooling J-/A Ci.rt~.JjL. - Oi^y^,,r H'-iL Occupation J-ft^a'ei^/ ~ 

l;sidence A^^/k>-^^ tt/ , fLo^kUrJ T.c Marital Status J','^c-le^ 

limber of children A/ck^ 



lime He.ddc'^ /I'Ury J^w e. ^nolcjc, 
lace of bi rth fllA 



Date of bi rth S'i 



hmber of years of schooling 7 "^u Cl/^Jj^-'Si. 
l!S i dence /'^ //v^^ tl^j , J.^k^.J. 2: ^L 

limber of chi Idren A/ o ^ p 



^"i. lUl 



'^'"'. 'i'l'- Occupation si^Je,,^ 

Mar i tal "Status -J i \ ^, I a^ 

^ 



lime 

I ace of bi rth 

hmber of years of school ing 

lis i dence 

limber of ch i Idren 



fme 

I ace of bi rth 

fmber of years of schooling 

Is i dence 



fmber of chi 1 dren 



"5a"te of bi rth_ 
Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 



Occupat I On 



Marital Status 



fme 

tace of bi rth 

fmber of years of schooling 

f 5 i dence 



fmber of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 
Occupat ion 



Jll. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights/ to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed f/f^^ouMC (^. LL 



Date 



f - /y- ^/ 



7. 



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Ax f ■:..,■ ■' ■■'■-' -y . PATRICIA A. ERICKSON 






May 6, 1974 



Interviewed: 

Gudrun M. Frese Erickson 

Paul A, Erickson 

Marie J. Richardson Erickson 

A. Howard Erickson 



ORDER 

££. 

1. Gr^nt Grandnarents — Grandfather's parents 

3. Alfonso Howard Erlckson--f ather* s father 

4. Great Grandnarents — Grandmother's parents 

5. Marie Jeanette Richardson — father's mother 

8. Married Life of A. Howard Erlckson and Marie J. Richardson 

12. Paul Alan Erlckson--f ather (the aboves son) 

14. Rev. Wllhelm Frledrlch Prese--mother' s parents 

15. Louisa Marie Aufj^uste Julie Ilse--mother*8 mother 

16. Gudrun Margarete Prese- -mother 

20. Married Life of Paul A. Erlckson and Gudrun M, Prese 



FIGUHE3— FIOfURliS 



Jo. page 

1. 1. Father's prrandnnrents. Picture taken of por^:T"ilt 

done In oil. Lato 1800' s. 

2. 5. Drawn by a stviient at Hnrlem HlP:h School In I'HO's. 

3. 6. Father's mother. Taken In 191? while in HIf'I School, 
U. 6. Father's moth-r. Taken In 197?. 

5. 7. Marie Richardson's 2nd Grade Teachrra C'^rt If lcate-1918 . 

6. 10. Father's parents. Taken in early IQ'^O's. 

7. 11. Father's parents. Tak'-n In D-^ceniber 1968. 

8. 11. (From L to R). My con'^ln, Lynn; Gudrun, my T.other; 

Aline; Howard, Jr.; and Mary Jane. 

9. 11. (On floor) Dan; Louls*^; Don; Patricia; and Barbara. 

(On couch) Grandma: Dad; Aline; and Julie. 
Dan, Don, and Julie are Aunt Aline' s children. 

10. 13. Dad. Taken In ig'^g. First picture given to my mother. 

11. 13. Dad. Identity nicture for Sundstrand' s. Taken In 

the 1950*s. 

1?. 15. Mother's mother. Taken in 19'^0's (?) ' 

1-5. 19. f".y mother and her sisters. (From L to R) . Iris; 
Irmhild; and Gudrun. Taken in I9?0»s. 

19. llother. Taken in 19''6. All children f^et a lare,e 
nretzel at the start of first ,3;rade. 

19. Aunt's country house (Inr-Te one) outside of Dresen 
where family stayed to avoid boinblno; in Berlin. 

19. (From L to R). Gudrun: Irmhild; Gerd; and Iris. 
Taken about 19'^'^ bef or " tmdrun came to the U.o. 

23. My parents cutting their weddlncc cake on Mov. 2'.', 1950. 

2"^. Sisters: Barbara; Louise; and Patricia. 195'^^. 

23. Mother and sisters, Barbara; Patricia: and L-ilse. 
Taken in early i960. 

?->, Present day fa!nlly--1972 . (Bottom) Paul; Hedda; 

Gudrun; (Ton) Louise; Barbara: Patricia; and Heidi. 



ol'i.AT ^?-.N;>r.'\P;.NTr (r.-xth-r-s side) 



:f ih.T d.M>,/il r('^.e"1^0I t ho i r n,.rat-ft. 



.iii, '•. th'>i v;;\;, h'-in in V*. j i n: >" Iap , ' •«( -1; n in i!!o'>. 11. . l-N-d 
.-. jr ; it L »-• ' > i ff.ui fiiu" t . ThcL(> f-' ini t 'li, \n i'c .uifl thoy iki. Aitiid. 
' i>^ K.. ' |M Ln 1''('7 ir '"'•^clen, '-".!)<: h-> 1 Vo Mr -ip out fT l,. (;•■'-] ..i 

'^ - ;...J ■' ^ '■:ht ♦^o !-^l < c - n? of ih< -,..,ri.jer cb 5 Idr ut' . 1I<m :'.t1..-,- 
' . , !) I L' ir in Ihu : ":• 'I'h A r ty. 

Tfi 1 ■ . Ihey f.-^mo If tfn- Un^i-:.! ,,(-.l.ijs, .Hid nov..<) to '' ' f' id, 
T-, iji;; ~ *. rhv yn i. ,i J'">b '" ,\ n i i -3 d'linj h')>(<;cKn. ' T: '"• ■ ■; : ■') 

'■ r. Lb ' r .Tiin^j to 10 at ni jht ''o - ^1 ,j wt'ek. A fow y'Trs i •'> s , tboy 
> Ml ,1 ;r , ry, Tn npfr '.>x i iiirv It'ly 1' '>7, tV>«*v bought ,\ ho'i'l i m '^;■l' il, 
. IV ' .Til f''i ten yo.Ti •• Tl'on tb.-y ■ c-ird >>t:1; to R<^c1 ford . nd 

i i v>' i ir 1. '^nd Avo. apcU t -h'pI in in 17. 

'>■>•'" j/-> ; ents vj«mh' Inihrrin vri! 'm: 1 i.Mirji d to lh<j :!'n . i ,:» 1 ! , i i'\riy, 
' hvj VOL. : fnr i:, U. PilH'.. They h-«I t-,v»- -.ors: Folkc- (''■■•v.,;), tid 

r,y ./..>!»'■ ib.r, Alff^n.o 'I'/jard Tricli-on. 



; .. '. ' OT-T1 <>M .'nn( ~, IM'K) ^n " 'i'fif ', T!. , ■,b'-- 'h '• ••■■' 

^ IT"' ■' Wi.. Vj^n !i-',t ••. I'-ui'>^ (;.r»dc he wont !'■> '.i ■ ^ .■ m -1, 

■'■ r- , . ■' ■ 'h-'}.' n''-fci, 'i?- '.vent t'> ••■J'l')' oil K i ■■'v'.'.Tukfr .jti<»"'. f--,;-) 

111'- .:■ h. j:>-.t 1(1 Ccnti'l llijh ' n..fii. 'VM-m (- . ti.i rU--; |ijvyi"i ' >n-- 

ii, h ..• 'ho LimJi'-. !',ht •;rr<M i:. l''l.7. 

in ■ -r M '..'., r !, ih:— > pcoMJ • ^^nj^j w ' i"! 'ho "jar, hi 'i'!--, « <-ixi 

'..'■ 'S :i;\tJ •■•>nt in 'nuth.-rii Tllin'.i', ♦ r t .f' •; 1 i t-'j i.oli'i; i— . 'or- ""'ir 

* -lii.'.n . i..^> WAS <,'xcn' *'d fron ^" iuh • > tw in lh. ■•.•xr hfriu? h ;.,•-; 
-.'.)!';, Ln i" h'O a (.Ific t ot . fn hL^Jh i^-h-'il, ho vjo-'ko'-l ,•.'-. ,i i ' • ; r 

t. , r> h-"A, , .. ■]r\y ff)i ! I U -^n h')tr , Dnah | 1 i njo '.'(ns pairf »in Sat-i, J ■ j- 
.^n-' liTT- .11'! r\ hair foi M-ertin". fYi "unday's ho work^rl .th ,;i_.h1: 
h'Mi <'iv i ', t cAh Jri^'tr for $0, driviiTQ peo^.le ufj to V.'inctt Lf 

* no • " or i nteros ttM? in huying lots thore. Fie .t l«5o worked for a 
coiitr.ictor for 45 hours .1 >vook At 05i^ an hour. 

It w'\i, .At Ccntr;»l lliyh School that he net Marie Jcanette 
Richardson. They were rriarried in JicT'l^-nbcr , 1919. 

He VTS a Republican until 1912 when he ran for Rockford County 
Coroner and lost. After that he voted a straight Democratic ticket. 

His parents were Luther in and ^o was he until World V>?ar TI when 
he hcciune a Methodist. In the I960' s he became a Unitarian. 



(..■■• ."^ (•■'•'.. I'Ar-l- N'T', (f.xlhot's siMo) 

\J r • r. . l£2_ ' b f' t ' ' . J ). 1 r r n t s . 

Ui-T notbor w.-^i, lW~r)lch. 

!k'i f.Alhcr vj-v:, Tt ,li«;h. ! Ir v..t^ tho t r ;< inmas tcr (not sure '■ f 
tbnf 1, the correct tit It) of tfu- t r.i i n that ran bet'vcrn KAnV,-\ki.>c 
.ind IlocVford. '•.'hpnpvor <^hp conlr), M;irio vjould rirfp on tht? tr.Tin, 
u[> frnnl vjLth tho f nndu'tor or in the < ahon ,e with h^r f.-\th r. The 
r.Thoose vvns her f.'xthcr'^ home .uvav from hone. He would live thrc 
\lenfj with the brnkemari as they went fron town to town. Tht tc. in- 
in.i-"-. ter ' i. job was diff< rent l)ack then than it is now. He had to 
kr.ow each one of the boxcars that wr re on the train, vjhere they had 
come from, what th«»y had inside, and where they were going. He 
kept all this information in his head because it was constantly 
changinj. He used to wear a large watch attached to his suit by a 
chain, and would judge the arrival and departure of each tra in v.hen 
not on them. 



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T" . 1 t s'- --■ t Alfo'v.o I!r.-vi-! r.^iu'-.^n. They .•.o.n r.Trrio' 
•nr, lU: . 



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Tb .j'i,tui't; <lv.'\v;n hr.inw wn ; ri.->fl.- '>y ono fT her -"-'MUr^: iL 
rlvi'f* !■ j'l :<cbonl v'h'M <- '..ht- "'.i -. ,» '■M'':^t it m t c tcachi r. T' , •<>■..• 
1 jv, cr-M" . LtiS two pOLrr ' i -h T bt- 1 i ^'^h- '-^e "mo'c wh i J <: in ''v^-.j 



\ 



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It f'nyb') .7*" bus In" 13 

If a ■- ■!tli?mf>n Phouli.1 ohoort^ 
To W8. il xiP'' I a Indy 

If th- l-'i-ly don't v^Vr-a? 
Cr to rrx-a : '-i little pl-^lnf^r 

; ; •) t e Tt-^rjnln-T all nt-iy knov; 
Is It -r/b ,'*r; bupln^nr 

If a ly h'is a b^nu? 



Ir; It nnyb- y'r; bui^ltu'rig 

But t ; rentlptnan'a. If sh^ 
Accents ano her ercourt 

Vih^rn ; -> doesn't chrtnce to br . 
l:i it '^nyb 'y*n business 

But th > 1 -idles. If she 
hides out • ' th other ladle.'? 

Or boirlnp; on the Sea? 



■-•.. J 



? Gubstsnr.e of our qufTry 

Slrtinly stated Would b« this: 
Is it nnybc^y's business 

What ■•: other's buslnf-rTs Is? 
' it is, o • If It Isn't 

We v.'oild surely like to kno'^ 
,t vo are certain if it Inn't 

There 'ire some who rnvle It so, 



V 



/. ^'O-^ ns i \r as a c^rn'^tlon bloora 

Mid a leath of frla^ / hsir 
Bedecl^-^d Ir a braid and ribbon prreen 

In a ■ .y of utmost c-rre. 
A smile so • ritrancinp:, a laurh so purn. 

And r- ' s so sn.nrklinr^ keen 
Unveils a vision of henvr'-i rilone. 

Which on earth Is £ T'ldera se«n. 
Sno is Jur; a Jolly schoei girl 

'.'.'Ith ' o.'-'y of blue and while 
Eut the hRj .!on7 between the two Is Just- 

jiS or "oct as natiu'es llrht, 
Che is soj ■ ^ to a narty •-"* 7 

In If ; than an ho'U' froni no'-r I 
I only rec- at that I can't be there, 

To df ne with so pretty a Frau. 



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T^ < •" ♦ •'jh<-n ■•■riv- at Cinti.Al Hi nb jchf'-l, .ind wnr^■ hm t-' 

\f- 'hoy vcri' mirifil, Gr.Tri'.Jjn nntinurr' on with hi'- ''!c>i;">- 

; i ' "^ , •J'"' nj lo the "nL\ci'.ity of Chicn'_io for bis pre-niod. Gr'^nrln,-* 
unr'-. "i .T ' ''*,Tns rrintiny n(j. c^s a proof re'»der. She ilso wnrVt'd 
for tho Telephone Cn . for $75 a week. Howard wpnt to the North 
'•.'». sttrn University of Medicine, and then to Anchor Hospital in 
".Tint Paul for his intern-, hip. Two ye.-^rs before hp became •> Dr., 
it was not necessary to yet an M.D. fJegrre. Marie, with a high 
school eduf'ation, tauyht second cjrade. Then Howard came back to 
f?ocVforc! 1o with his family and -^.et up practice in the Pla7a on 
Charles f.t. in the late 19?0's.. Marie was a r-uJistitute at Harlon. 

Thm' ..] ready had two childien, Af'f^ison Htnwnrd Hrickson vjhr> 
was horn .^n 1"20, and Mary Jane Eri^ksoi '"ho iv.vs born in Oc tobi j , 
!<)'»?. T'mn on Novenbor "j , l')T>n, my fathor "as born, I'aul Alan 
r.rickson. lie was th^- only chil() to be ''"ti in Chicago. They 
lived on r.aint Louis Ave. from 192« tu 19'' 4 when they moved to 
State St. '^ N'ovpTT',>)er 6, 19 ?0, they had their fourth child. Aline 
Clair Trickson, whom 1 am named after. 

During the Depression, Marie work> d as a maid and earned $.1 
a week. V.niile people still got sick, thpre was no money to pay 
Doctors, and Howard took his pay in vegetables and chickens, or 
whatever people could fine! to pay him. Alot went on credit. Tt 
wa3 dtiriny this tine that he earned much of tho respect people had 



''■^r h'li. Thi^r^ H'- I' ri,' pu'^ple jtill in Ivo-Vforil who xprncnh^T .nr\ 
-. sk a!jr.:i t htn. V'h i 1^. rrniy ".ic; not ar, scarce for then .'S i I was 
fn- . •,:: p, pi*-'» H^v-V st'll iti? !!f>r ir:i:>t cvt-ry n >w nil t^ n. Tn 

A •. ■ -hv ''..ni..ly ;nov«.iI *<i ji-vnt /~'Vc. 

', r; ■ ■>a'.vs). AilU-.i'Pi 11, lir; ^-.'..n x- tU'.Jit:'! to bo •» "'-c'-m art 
« ' .,' ' years to ioii^^. h:. !!»■ '^•i, 'x'Mi r!,,riie<l .•.nc' ("ivc'-- ) 

.vr.ii _';i, ,. »'p un* i 1 i'.'77 I>f >s Ji"'!Tj in Ari/rn,! ••/i1'' '^l 

• I :\> .in : '!vt cbi i.!T un , ! ai t in \\>7 i he nT>v»>'1 to Tsroai to ' :;,.> '. '''v 
!' :'"i l oiont. 

!'.\! J .no Ti i Cr.:.oM , liter 1H;«o y-nis of n('fh*C.''.i ' I •' i • " j, 
'"..-.m< " . 'J ! -. tere ' Nu-s- . '"bu ••(■jii.;'' {"?). Tur »ei n?"' r---. ' in 

''\ I ri ' , i I if^^. Tiioi L' ..ht> li^'i.-; v; i 1 b 'ifr lh!c{> chiJ ]rt..n. 

"j '''I'tt •'•'Ul ■■> . l.r i rVv-^'-t! , '•;( n ! to North Cnttil C-Hlijir <or 
•c-,'- yi-r* I , nnm<(' .\nl 'i-> . fivf i^Mlr.if. (See his p^l'-J n-' t'--" 
•Til- ;\L'.i h 1 L. H).T 1 r i^yt ''oj more i n f - ;, -i •. t '' on ) , 

"i' '". Hriil'soM '■jiMit It) col If J.' for thrc'" ye-ii .. ""if ".•..;. 

oi li V.n- •<::! thtrre and in h ; tjh :■•( ''.'>il. f-T her '.vr* ter b/->jle1.. S'"^ ',•'<; 
'i'.">r:ied . lui I'Ovetl tn T'lytona :"«:«<:'i, ri:)Tl'^,v. ^ihc h.T ;> tint- ■ .hi j Irtin , 
T:i ly72 he Hvorci.:.5 h\M hu«b->n!. In 1973 '.-hr* .narric! I'ol . i' l'.-- 

r>ii>iei . II ' *TV'c'.' in n,,j.'t oiK"v n(>c'!. . 

Ir. "■rch, 1961, ny 'jr-»n<?p'>ren1 1^ '•ovoH to PVi<:r>niN, A i - \ for 
a y'-^->r. Thon in Mvrch, i'^6? , ihoy r-'-vt d to a f.Tj.m onlr,i'Jo '. '' T;"'cy, 
Iv'" > . ;■! '-.plembe^, I'M/.), thej' cnm,' b-\ck to rf^.-kfof! ln a i bi.iie 
1h. j.r ^t : h wixidinn uii ve j >■-< ry . Our bo'tsc ■a'.'"; p.TcVcoii v ith ' . " ''--lends 
■^r\'} Tf'i '^ves. llowii! still -vovk ; -t the Votorrns l|o j it.-^'' in 
i'.^vil. , fowA. They h'^ i.h plan to oove br»rk to PocVforc' it tb.- onj 

of ij?.',. 



lAUL ALAN EKICKSON 

I'aui iv.-s horn nn :jnvf mVicr S, I'^'^n, th<> third of f r<u r chLldrcn. 
Tn hi.,-. '.."' on I nonth ho con t racled the Gtrtmn nc-\i,lt>s, which i ', hnld 
rr>,i">n:.iL' le for his lic.K fni's-^ . Il(.' w v. th< only rhild in \U<. family 
to b,- T>fM !. oatsiiJt- of Pnr':f(^rt^ , in >irncjo. (His parent ; h'-l -'ccidtM! 
•• h • ■» ix • 1- iir>r> for a rh.wujc). 1I.> 1 i "(mI on <">>int Lf)ti i :, A^' . for 
>n ■, fir;,' siK years. During th i '-. ti^.' he 'vna -voll knevn t n ihp la rly 
acrosc. t>'- rtrcct for hi:; streaHnj uv hor Irivcway and h'nj'ru cin 
th,- iN-vv« ' i-r^'Mjh outsidr h i r. second st^ry win-'low. He b<caTin- • c.hartor 
r,*,;m>ii 1 o' th'> ricthcsda Cliurch Cradle '^oll (of vihich rhiirch Me i -; 
' li II a • -ih,r) . 

Tn j ■14, the family iiovcd to State Strrct vjhore ))<; covild .attend 
lli'^hland 'c'iool. lU-fore it w.ifi '.no-'n that he w.a <^ hard of heirio'j, 
hr^ fiun'. first cjv-ide. ''.'IjLn hf- tciok it over .vrjain, th l5. tir;:- ,, i 

Frc'aan h'>ol, h i r. r!is\''ility wa'^ lii '^covered. In se-cond rj;a ;<., he 
/ittent?e'' i . i i.hvjnuV.eo <-.rhoril. For thitd cjrade he 'va;; sent to 1 ho 
J^, V.-.on ' h'.'-vl For the Deaf in Ja fV;.nnv i lie ";hen he v;r»H nine yea i ^ 
r.Id. He tayod for about thret; n'->nth , , .«nd then decidec! h(^ did'ut 
like it. ^o he paeketl hi. ba'j:; and h i t (-h-b i'.e'l homo, iellit)_: e-\ry- 
nvA- x'lho i\t him a rid<^ that ho -va s ' rnnnin^i away to home--n(jL. avay 
fror^ it'. After that he went back t'< Highland School. 

F.v'eo thon.cjh he liked r.vntrjmino and tried out every year f-^r ••ho 
te-.n in bnier and 'i(«nior High School (I'...st) , It was not ur M 1 has 
Junior y ar (11th nradr) that he ma-'e ih<- tcan. Thf>n he na-1 it 
M .J _ roj , -ted for fonr year'j, he: vyy. pro"ioted up to th^ var.i'y teara 
in hi . .'"nieir ypnr--bis first year r^n thr^ tear). Aftci' eat-pitg tho 
?.''. nilr^ •innihy rccot'l, hi^ originateri and was the first to : •vi-n tho 50, 



!I(' went int<-> compc t i 1 i on scjimTn i ny in the indivirlual mclly, r-fcUy 
rol.^y, Mst^rK-e rrnwl, HivLny, -ind his spoci;xlty, tho buttt-rfly, 
(;»A<'k tlicn it was cnliofl th<- broast stnli- with Ihp stitk' kick £\s 
th>- !;uttojly >Ai. now). 

Ii. 1910 he cnn r<nrnber when ho u';od to ride the bus bnck nnd 
forth lu .school nntl work. Tho fare was 3C' 

In iQ'H Paul, Howard, Jr., i\nd thoir fathor wont (Jown to 
C.ilifurnia <5n a campiny trip. 

Tn 1945 Taul <jot a job at a bakery which paid him 50>; to $2. 
He v.'ab i.-iving up his nonoy for a tr l[i vihich was cominvj up r'^nn. By 
19.;r. ho bad t^nniujh, air' iiavolcd by bon t to Lfn'!on , r.nyloni for tho 
i'» i". Oiy ,)i>:s. Haviny the l<v(n, hard look of an athel(>tt , !i" war, 
-b:. lo J"' rL'lht pn«-. < tfn; yunrc!. a---' yet dot-n to the p'-^o] jluTt; 

Ib^.- fMji 'i'rjrs wi.'ie <- la ii litcj. ATici 1 he niympirs wor<: cv.'s , !ie 
travele'' !i>'.'ii to Faris Li ror(> yoiiiy houn?. 

Tl .in I'l-l') whiji' h'' 'ua"-. Iiaininy foi an AAM nit e 1 't CI i';ano, 

'b ,! bi- •> > cMuybt. at midniyht c;'.' i iiir" i ny in 'he Fnirgr""nr'i r,'rl po'il. 
riin..,*.? i' '■a'- 'lii f i'-iil t le practic" h^s strikes '.'.hon oMicr \r pJe 
v.'-.'e t;o?' '-Mitly ye-1tiny in hL«; '•'.•. ly, !uj neode.l ,i tiru; v.ben ik 'ir.e v.as 
Ibnro t ■ 'jolher him. A''t'r be cas <.'"i.,;ht, b<: "-.pent * b ■ nii.kl ].:< 
Jail--lii , p- ii;nts vjoi-e tt t rotirird i'ib^>rc be 'vas. f"^ 

La '.■■•- ihcxt yo'r, be attendeiJ fJertb Central j , • ••: ' 
College. It was there that he met Gudrun 
Margaret e ' 



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■•> ••■iM' . •■■i-v;, .i.n'l'-^'. I L< r 1i< (U.rif?; ' til- I :':.->'■. oo< .,, 

.(• c' I ' •■ II'' In ,<"Ti i •'•! I \' ii<,'i'"i] ,\n ! !.«.'r:.'iini' /\ I'rrlcs1">n1 rw.".-i in 

I'TO. I VMS r-i'>\-."1 i't'tI'i < hur >.;'•• I" 'hMrv:*' ( <■<' (.iuJim ' ■■ [•'■;■ ! f'T 

■.jii ?f' I'xt'i, ,Mr' pi •< ), ui ' f in, I J ly .,;("ii1'') uTi in Piiii-:. M- 

■,'i " in : '■;'■'. (fni (.:h,i t:.n, :^,n (Jii:! > ij'i " r- T''}""''). 



'-•■.■, i >' y. "r . of fjr-T', .•■<:h"<>j . ';; . ' 11 ■ b - '■•(..•rit tr> ; - n. ■; ' 

vJv; ■ n;-. • i Mmt Iut foi 'u-r 'ni';'- m. ' '•(• l(>r-> ••■ i 1o >ny p- 1 j li •. "" pirty. 
'! •h'-y ' ', th. y ni'i'i* 'i"'e Tt-n V, il!i-! ir •'h'- \:<-\r . ..i:f' .itt'! i'^ 1960. 



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GUDHIJN MARfiARRTE FRESE 

Phe was born in Drosen, Germany on Der^^mher 3, 1930, last of seven 
rhilriren. Three of the seven bad HipH before she v/as horn. The first, 
Hedria prese, was born in May, IQIO and died when she was a year old. 
The second child, Grrd Fried rich Frese, was born on June iP, 19?0, in the 
came city as Hedda, Kolen Germany. He is now living in Augsberg, Germany 
and has four children. The third born, VJaldemar Frese, was born in 1Q?1 
and lived into his ninth year when he died because of faulty immuniT.ation 
in 1930. The next child, Irmhild Clair Frese, was born on March ?h , 
19?3 in Breslau, Germany, and is now living in El Monte, California. 
The fifth child, Helmut Frese, was born in the mid 19?0'a and died when 
he was three years old. The sixth child. Iris Margarets Frese, was born 
on March 13, 19?P in Dresen, Germany. She is now living in Beljnont, 
Mass. with her two ohiidron. The seventh born was Gudrun Margarete 
FrcoP, rri.v mother. 

My i'(^thrr was very p i r-k v/hen rhe wns a young child abc)ut tv/o vcn rs 
ol'l. SV' hnd a combination of the mumv" . cowpox, and r>nrev'ial i t i r. For 
six wee'-;: hn- mothe ■• had io carry h»^r n'ound and Ging to hr>r to Hf-.->p h^r 
qijiot. ■' ' was not thour-.hl, rhe wonlc! ru-uive. Rut che did I "J n V",^ the 
family r.'-ved to Berlin. H^ ' fnthe- wrp a Protestant minister nnl lie vms 
relocatr- several times before she was bo-^n. (This accounts ^o<^ the 
many dif''''^rent cities mentioned above.) 

Evn 7 summer the whole family would go on vacation to the P>''l.t)c 
Sfia, exr- .it the lest few yoors of the war when transportation v.-^.-: Lir.ited 
and dan'-' -ous. She can still remembe-" the clear blue wat^^r and tiie 
white s.v '1 that lined the beach. 



h*^ >>ii'-i' in n r^?.*? C'-nv v;ilh '•nii...i,'- .i^" ,Tn-'r <.hni io 1i r i — v-" 
,1«y rtr I- ■> -lan ofTicrr." I'" v/nr? rvt, r- ,', if,f>fl. V."n i I e he v-ts T'. ! ' •-> on 
i;io Tfp'-n r-ont, he wnr •■•'?11 '^mcc-.ti '.'^ I'yn 'A'^'^-i "'inos ' . II^" i---"- ■!"■." r 
cap'.r'T 11 .lu'-lpf, i.h'' var-, but vi^rn Hm f i p),i i Mr-; ntoppc<i in T-'^lT, he 
su ■■f>nrb: r-d his men vol u>i' n ' i ly. To i'r>«.p fropi bri n^ Pent, 1,o n ff'vnnlro- 
t.i'.t! ca " in Ar>-ire, }ie pi-el,enflo-i l.o br bMn'l, i-e;',^ '"'H ers oT Ihe qnir:!t 
rfi-tvrer f'1 nnp, at him. ]\\r, family 'li'i not her- -■ r'-om him rr-om T'fi'i to 
lf)')6. ' '■ 'Ml rnrldenly, h" ■••''o thr>'-e nt tbo door, home nn''^'^- 

'!'" • '-' ( Ibo v\T,r r-M.i ■ !oo -^ 1. ;-m- t«> hfii,-. ;.n ihc -hoi, t'.Tn.ily 
■■'-■■] 1 .. tol.vtivos '-'.mrry hoi''.,«; ;m; .ifTc '^f nrc'sv-n. F'-r-,! >■ ■.-••,-,r,(. 
•■■ i> i,c \ .^.•, TIi('i»? v;->-. i.<-i nuM 1 '>■ l- l, C'ly v;h>t yi' '■ ul' ' ' .. 1 or 
' ' '.. ■'['• I'o 1. '. *.ot.'C- b<:c.A!;;c ;hf» i",;> ; n ( ' , wiVl! ';i>fts {b<;r;><' '"-.•<'!), 
t^. ■^ t It"'-. , n.; clAmUlioii, j)ii:l,i."i iv! i(f>l.'f. "^'le houso in " r . Lri •(-•\b 
b''^ii'/( ii IV 'xni reroyni t. i or , My i-o^}mi ■» .mi"';"' j :i v.'hon t h «y v'cr • '. I i 
in ■■( X i 1 ' , • .■vkinq up in * hi? miii'Mi- of th..: rnght lo .■■n ■■. ir r.'>ij 
■ ' 1 ' r> , . ■' I Ihrc" 'ir fi>!.ii ti!-i<.:. in on." tvi yVi t , .'.nd risnfiiry ;'.<i.vii into 
t'-'^ h.'.ci-. I* for b'^iits ;* t A limf". '"^rr^- ' >' » v-'irn ^oilkLnq ,->.i(.;;)j t';e 

';,-!, 1, ,>f '■ ■iit! ;> l;-ir (f (J">j>. In:-,i?.- v;.,5 -:' 'fi\rirnf? 'i^y, "' icb 
t»;y ;Oi i'lv;r to ' Tlf! T,r,,hi}t! Io ';rhr-,.l.. Anothor dr^y tliiT;- •.'-!.;; 

u .-.ir ' ■ r ' ._• <iver riiT-iin vti'? cviyiM.- vms fut to w.\t.h. >! m' r 
jj^iwt w; oiptiirei •'"1 ny Tnolh"j Irir ] t.o r.j'tak *n hi-i (;-h b.u3 
*-■"»!.«-'-! Hn I i ,h in s-h^M)!), htit ho •.■.'"Juih'M: .•.n:.'«f'r". A fc.' it> ■' J < , <«>'» 
.lit ^~:oi ri v.?.£ Al'iior:,t b^-iton t" ''(■••lb ^M'-^\.i~.\ '■br [>'.";>]<• vr't .j ;,o 

injry c\ < *^'\'-n9 1h<-Mr b.c-n .cy bf^Mbvr). Tn l'>'5^, the r-niiy ■-^w'.'} 
b.-if.!-. to " I 1 in to t>o with thoir f^A ih. i , ^'h^ br>'1 btjf-n 'rnt b~> : U c«riior 
' f> |)rv;.>. > ' :'. h'o ibtir'b. 'Jhen tbt-y virrc .-xbout to yet off {be liiin 



in I- rlin, <h. Lr filbv ', (•im ii<^\nlly h.T<1 m)-^(> l.inft nf ;,i\-th i-^ • 
a'.jc'ut tho"-,.- ^hinj, , d i o>-.c-;.ei1 tl.o tj.Tin rastrrj ortJer-, , and joi .>ff 
iiTi tlu- • rmij j;i'!c of the '•r-vin. I'l^ni thry ivcro tjnno (i i;;t-\n' t; awiy, 
th^i' 'XiuiJ ■■'oar pi_^oplt scr e>ari intj In tho b.TcV'jrpanfJ ,\s the tr->in wrvs 
f oiny Innlv ! .ml rcibbid. '^o thoy c-c^jnd '.vith all thrir t>e' Ion" Lny::. . 
They v.-ort- slopped by ,\r\ Anerican polrlior, but after Gudrun ^-xplaLncd 
Tho sitviation, thoy wore allf>")«,'d to gn nn bono. 

iO-;o aiui 1947 were the worst years. There was no foorl to he 
found anywhere becauso of the Russian bloc;kdf!e on the city. Tf it 
v.'i^a't for the Ancrican air lift, m^iny wf»uld have starved. In 1946 
the people ate the food they wo\ilrl normally have planted tho next 
year for crojjs. V/hen 1947 came, there was nothing left. Tt was 
haztrdous for the planes to bring the food and coal in. Several 
times the planes missed the runway or hit the tall ayiartment buildings 
that '.urrounled the alrp')rt. fn tho p<ak of the airlift, th<' planer. 
r-iiu.^ ir 1 *he rate r>f on<> {)er minute. Many j^t^jple vc^n-" pavi'd. 

Tn ■'■'', '■ Gu'run graduated fro'n high schr:oi. The 'j';hi'oi -.y^tiin 
'^ !iff. nt in :"ci rany •♦ban over here. Tbrrc you go ffiur yvars to 
..•,-x,i,. .^,- ii .r.i__f r.-e c '»'-> t Lon . Then, if ynu can afff^rd [', yr>u r-.n 
(.ir,v,. .. ^ -ff, hiMh ,rh-!"l, ai).' 1 h"-! y • en 'n \ Hn i vc ; s i V/ . TI' 
c>;uiv.vl 't '■ f their hi-jJi 'w-hool is t'-i) yoarr, of ccllcjf heie. -o 
•"h<"n ">y • oih'-r '-.irin; 1 up ^.' >m> an cvhTny 'tuient, ';h<' <»?■. jiv.^n 
tb- opt 1- t'i-)ity te bav ridit for b.r fir'-l t'vo yrar"^ of r'JI'.-e. 
■-h,. ch n-^t to tale it, anfl siartod out fr<-- h in I'MO in ■'■•.;■>■ :v;ile's 

•!<v. th r ^'ral roll>g>>. Tt v,>a ', thete ^hc "et n-y f a • h" " . 

»T.., ., •♦hough thi. V had both -con <-a -h oihp'- around th' r-elT -e , 
-.b{>v f i ' 1 "lot en \ blind dale -unn'n'jly arrannr.d by a fr ]*•!•;] nf ny 






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r*.irri(v1 Lifi.. of 
PAUL ALAN r^RTCK'=;ON 

gudrm:; r!AR^\RF:TF, fre'^e 

I'aul nrt Judrun on a blind d.-\le when both wpro going to North 
Contr.il Cnllpye in thnir froshr.-'n yoar. When he y^ve her hi<; ID 
br.-xcL'lft in the summer of 105O, she not being sure of strnnye 
AiTicric.Tn customs, did not know that that me^nt they wore going 
steady. she continunef to yo out on <latt-r with othor guys. './li, n 
Taul found out he was angry but unrierstoorl tho problem. Thry became 
engaged on Soptem>)er 29, 1950 and wore married in Rockford on 
Ni'Vcmber 24, 1950. Ciudrun's father flew in from Germany and 
performed the? cerimony in German, then another pastor repeated it 
in Cnglish. Since her fathor fiid not speak English, Gudrun had 
to constantly translate the conversation bark and forth. Many times 
she caught herself speaking German or English to the wrong party. 
They had only that weekend for their honoymoon because they had to 
be back in school the following Monday, 

In 1951 they both quit school and moved to Rockton Ave. so 
Mom would be within walking distance of Rockford Memorial Mosp>ital 
where she was studying. Dad got a job working at a drug store. 
In 1952 ^udrun became a Registered Medical Technologist and started 
work part tine at the Hospital laboratory. On August 2, 1952, their 
fir'.-t ch i W1 was born, Louise M.-«. i li- Lrj'k-.on. Their second child, 
IV^rbara . -.tlrun nrM~l.son, "iho war- born on January 9, 19 34. Tho third 
'bi''-l v,OMi v,-as ML, I'attifia AILpo Pri'-Vson, on Decembi'r 19, j')'^-1. 
Iti i J'i'i, laul got a j'>b at r)Un(!strand' s in Pockford as a spray 



,,.n1.r ■ ■ ; '• I in^O ..;h'-M !•- )...,,.')■ ,. ;'<-oJ . oon .->tl.'t)' lit ''■ ■ -. 
AiT 1hJ I-, ■ U- ho '-OS ''<ilM) Tv)i;\t li;- liVn' >v ■. t - - j, ■ in t i rvj iir' 

-<;ii>^p. i'i'j on v.'cfl . n-'!. . tp? "->•■( ion . Cn ^•o^.J.^hor '' , i'.'' 
(■ 1-. :(i ''"^y) tbi- fnti'-th rhiJ! '■.'•■. 'o-n, l!.i.') Kri'-lini •, i 1- .on . 

Lcm; ■■ '^ -' viri-rxiJy :.t.iTt.Ml kiivl, r(j->'-'.-i ,\t John riclsft) Cr.--'. 
<-.'■>-. oi '• T of StTtc .'it.) in IT.-7, .uil 'V'th and I'.t t b'-'.nn Mi 1. r 
vr?U' . •>*'■' ' thnrc In 10''.'";, Thf> ii"^:i y""i;-, on Dot cmhf-i ^1, i' , , 
!i'-.'<h> y. I y .T-*nc I"rick<;'^n •.■•.•>;; horn, th - Ia^I fhil<l in "nr f'lnJly. 
!H><"'>-n |I<^ii!i arif' Hi ''' V v.'oi I' I'Orn, our fnriLly went tv '-• ton 
tfi v'i i ' '-i*; (ouihun ' ■- ••- L'.tcr) \'tr\ hi ^ t'<)0 '>oy-,. Ju^t bc'n'-.' "o 
li'1't T ■' • il fiTit nf tho t'>i> bunk l)',v! ,inff broke my jr\(v. I '■.:ti\ In 
'.lr-:lor •■■['h my he.T-1 wrr. p;- yl in ivhttc hnn^-lafjc ; . Thn t i <^ th'.' j-n.'y 

Ihiny I ! -»^^■ eVKT brol'.<-n. 

in , ' j'' r^r ' f)'l , '■v.ir '".^n i ! y ari,;!') ".'"nt on vr\<:r\ ti'm, Jr->»-'Ty 
Ihi- t 'vc; 'fiMiHjt-:; t rtt ho'-." ".' i 1 h t ris ■. t ,-.,? nr-inhhorr-. Th i •"- t \ n^ ■"■• 
t^^■^^'(?l^'; to Florida to \'i' it b'llli "^ • , •'-'th-.r';, sir.tcrs. 

Tn 'h,- ^n-^Ti' 1 !>;■ i'l -'I oiiv •■'■oli <'->mily ''rove out to i' i ft^rnin 
to x'l.-i'^ iy nnth<:'''r. sist'^r. W(> vi'.it*-! Di ',n; y Innc], antJ \'r,n* ;'■ 'tn 
t" ^K'xi' • "^1 .'» •■.hoppinfj -[^re". ^'y r<'.i In ^nu'jnlc? f ' • i*t;Tr"f.^ ji" jtit. 

\h '■^w trav('! ' *-"i..:c to '.'.le .'; > t.-^ ' s , .And .\ nunVicr '-C txwc'i 
to Gove '1 Dodyc au'1 ',«(h._>r ne''>rby c.-impg rounds for short ^• ' >. itons, 

>'y i!h(<r vH-nt back to G»:rr\nny to vi.;. it in 1957, lOui ("), and 
ill i-'^or). ^'y parents, I'l.irb and 1 ^lil wont to OtTninny .',nd thf i^u' rr..urid- 
imj arfe.j . ,.ii; a sort of 'ji iduntion f>r <■:.<.•:: t in i'j72 wh«.;n wi: -v.-iit 1 '"> 
tkiti njy ;i- . there. It 'vr^s then t?i,>t I'al, i?»jb An^l T fii.,l mr 1 our 

uiuit; o • !, tho 'Ji^rinan '-fficer. <Hi,. of hi;; yons, Jurycn, !iad como 
I'l A'niji A and '.'J.nt. tliin- iiuj a''out (oiii-yt.' hicre. 



'ut r h.ive lofl out v;horo r^ur f.Tmlly livcc) in my life. 
:>.\ ri) >n^ r '."cie burn, ■..<-. liv.-d -v t !16 South Prospect Streot. 
'voK :\1^>\. oT ki^.s in o"t nc i (j:i'n> ■ hoo'! .nu? thoy all camt: over 
'm u i; tf ii~>y in oar l-irw* ba ; '., y->rd. !'ar)' an-! T virrc In I'u 
jr->(.\' al , nhn r!(,'i<;ori, ipfl Ilt'i.H ■lai in thn ffr^t SfMm;.t<:i- r.-f 

n '''11 when ••.'o no\'c t to on i jircsi'ul location, ''•llv) r< 1' 

t>. , n '-f.-ro ol.i. "...rb ....1 T <,,''-.■ our liicycl.-, ha-l. ■ 

• ; ' li r. .-^hool for ".ir 1,t^ t yai Ml rf. Tho noxt y.nr v-- 

to .^^;,-.l ~ Lincoln Junioi ItLyh School v.hich woul-l have b«.>"n ' 

i'jo„k a>. '• if wc hadn't nr>vo), ]|< i''i ai»d II<'«If'a both •.>< nt to 

■ '• 'ol , ' o blocks av.ay r*-(jn '>ur iif>") huastj. 

!n. "at! of yoiny to Cju i 1 r-ird Sctiioj- Hioli '".diool "I'l^^n v '^ 
Lnl) 01'\ 'jra-Je, -ivrb and T Oitayrd at L;.njnin anr? boc.Ar:c j^art 
In'.t 0th (ix'ok' claj.s tht.ro. Tl'on, in 1969, vjo went to Gu i 1 f^ 
9ra(!u.Tt< ' in 1972. I-ouist- yradua'od fion^ thorc in 197'^ an' < 
to Pock "'iloy Colleut! in Roc 1: '"oj-<! , Illinois, ";h i ch i^rb and 
in 1972. I-ouisc wont there for thi < <• yoara and thon wont "n 
Sct'.her:! Illinois t.'nivcr-ity in Dicalb. 

In . '72 Ilcidl left lionm school to go into tho ntwly bvi 
iiisenho'. r ^!iddlo School on Spr ' ny Creek ivith He(ida f oilf>".' it- 
noxt yra t . 



Whon 
There 

to our 

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the 



EVANS. DENNIS L 19/|5- 



.I'.ASK TYI'L:: I'LI'ASK PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OK THE SECOND COPY OK YOUR 
lMIEY HISTORY. 

;ar Coniributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and 
ihi'rs studying American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
!low. This will take you only a few minutes, and will be easily made ovei' 
ito an Index which will permit archive users ready access to Just those 
inds of family histories needed. 



Your name Dennis L. Evans 
Date of form 5-19-76 



Office Use C o il e 

(ID //__ ) 

(ID // ) 



Your college: Rock Valley College 
Rockford, Illinois 



Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 



Before 1750 
1850-1 900 



1750-1800 

1900 or later 



1800-1850 



Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of 
your family wh(Tm you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

^N ew England(Mass.,Conn.,R.l.) 



Va . ) 



_Middle A 1 1 an t i c (N . Y . , P e nna . , N . .1 
South Atlantic(Ga.,Fla.,N.C.,S.C.) East South Central 



(La . , Miss . , Al a . , Tenn ,Ky . ) _J Wast South Cen t ra 1 (Ark . , N . M . , Tex . , Ok . ) 

_East North C e n t ra 1 (Mi ch . , Oh i o , I nd . ) Pac i f i c (Ca 1 . , Was h . ) 

(llawai I ,A1 aska) _X ( I 11 . , Wise.,) 

Please check a 1 1 occupational categories in which members of your 
family whom you have discussed in this paper havi^ found themselves. 

^ Farming X M i n i n g , X S hopkeeping or small business 

Transportation X Big Business X Manufacturing 
X^ Professions X Industrial Labor X Other 

Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 



Roman Catholic Jewish 

Baptist _Ep is copal ian 

Quaker Mormon 



Presbyterian X Me thodis t 

Congregational Lutheran 

pother Protestant Other (name) 



V.'hat ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper' 



Swedish Other Scandinavian German French 

Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto R leans l^astern lairopi 

Jews Central Europeans Italians Slavs ,; 

Jrish 
East Asian 



X British ^ Native Americans over several p.enerations 
Other (Name ) 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other ^ Family Bibles Family Genealogies 

family members Land Records JK^ The U.S. Census 

X Vital Records 



Photographs X Maps 



Other 



FAMILY DATA 



A . Grandfather (your father's side ) 

Name Rn.^innp; noMKLIN EVAMS Zcurrent Residence R. R. 2 DARLINGTON WIS 



Date of birth 12-08-84 



Date of death Living 



Place of birth R |jy.3-| Wald wink, Wj SC 
Place of burial 



vocational 



Col le Be 



Ednca t ion (numb e r of years); 
grnde school 5~8 high school 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st iVlachinist-Beloit Dates VgrJoug 1st Beloit Dates 1Q 

2 n d Gheesemaker 

3rd 



4th 



Dates Various 


2nd 

3rd 


Wise. 


Dates 






Dates 


Dates 






Dates 


4th 




Dates 







Religion None 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Darlington Euchre Club ( .dPninr nitir.pnq __ _ 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother Preepor t i 111 t^ate 1908 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18^) by a stepfather or another 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Margaret Rickey Current Res idence f)p>f>p^g^ a( j . 



Date of birth 1881 
Date of death 193^ 



Place of birth_JiaLiwiQt4- Wise -.- 

Place of burial_j2o_iixi±y_-Line--GeiiL^- Waldwic-k 



Education (number of years): 

grade school ? high school 

college 



vocational 



Occupation (s) 

Xst Homemaker 


Dates 


1st 


2nd 
3rd 


Dates 
Dates 


2nd 
3rd 


4th 


Dates 


4 th 


Religion ^ 



PLACE OF RESIDI'.NCE 
(after leaving Fiome) 
Dates 



D a t e s 
Dates 
Dates 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 
9 



Place of marriage to your gra 



nd father Free port , 111, date J^08_ 



NOTE: If your father was raised 'io age 18) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on the back of this page 
(A-2) . 



A- 2 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 



Name 



Current Residence 



Date of birth_ 
Date of death 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 

College 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Religion 



Da tes 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



_lst_ 
2nd_ 

.3rd_ 
4 th 



vocational 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

D a t e s 

Da tes 

D a t e s 

Dates 



i.L.llr.L 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother_ 
B-2 S tepgrandmo ther (your father's side) 



date 



Name 



Date of birth_ 
Date of death 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school_ 

college 



vocational 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



Da tes 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



1st 
2nd_ 
3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 



'olitlcal party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 
N a m e ALFRED DOUGLAS 



Current Residence 



-BEG EASED 



On t e of b 1 rth Jan 9, 1893 
Date of deat h_196 1 



_Place of hirth^j^^^ Q^^^^^^^^^^^ 

_Place of burial . _Dar 1- i n gt O n r-Wis^ 



Education (number of years): 
grade school 8 high school 

Occupation(s) 

1st Farmer Dates 

2nd Da tes 

3rd Da tes 

4 th Dates 



voca t i onal 



college 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st n«v.ii<,^4. Dates 



Darlington 



_2nd_ 
.3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc: 
NOiNE 



Place of marriage to your grandmother_ 



d a t ( 



NOT!'.: If your mother was raised by a stepfather or another relative (to 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 



Grandmother (your mother's side) 
Name JEJ^NIE MILLER 

Date of birth I898 



Current Residence iVIA DTt S'^N . W ISC 
P lace of birth 



Rural Dar lrington:- 



Date of death Living 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school 8 high school_ 



voca t ional 



CO 1 2 ege 



Occupation(s) 

] s t Wife 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



PLACE OF Ri^SIDl'NCE 
(after leaving home) 

Numerb-'ufe-in -W4sg. Dates 



2nd 
3rd 

4th 



Dal es 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion Protestant 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

None 

I n d f a t h e r "DW-^l. ». fv/ CT"^ ^ __ 



I) a t e 



Place of marriage to your gr; 

NOTE: if your mother was raised by a stepmother or another re I alive (to 

■'^' ^^ give that d»ta on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-2 S tepgrandf a ther (your mother's side) 



Name 



Date of birth_ 
Date of death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupa t ion (s ) 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



voca t ional 



college 



Ist 

2nd_ 
3rd_ 
Ath 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Da t es 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
D-2 S tepgrandmo ther (your mother's side) 

Name 

Date of birth 

Date of death 



Date 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
_Dates_ 
Dates 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Placeof burial 



vocational 



cf) 1 lcg( 



1st 

2nd_ 

-3rd_ 

4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



=1 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



HjJHU^N of A & B (or A-2 or B-2 ) - your father's name should appear below 



N a me iwilton Evan.R 

Place of birth Quba Cit y. Wise. date 2-27-09 

Number of years of schooling'^ « 



Residence Darlington, wWagital Status Single 
Number of children Death 



Occupation 



^Marden 



Nam e Gary.l£j__E v.3ns 

IM a c e o 1 1, i r t h _Qah3.__Q_ity , WISG d a t e 4-28-11 

Number of years of schooling 8 Oc c upa t io nCh eese- maicer 

Residence Darlin gton Marital Status Married 

. Q D eat h Lining ._ 



Nuinbi'r of children 



N '' me Byrdice (Evans) Gordon 
Place of birth Cuba city 



date l2-02-12 



Number of years of schooling 8 

Res 1 dence Madison» Wisc Mari tai s ta t us Married 

Number of children 1 



Occ upa t ion Wife 



Death Livi ng 



^ <■' '" •-■ l^aurvice Wa^ne _£vans_ 



Place of birth Holla ndale, Wisc» 

Number of years of schooling 8 

Warren, 111 

Z 



Residence 

Number of children 



d .1 I ^■_H'~A~1Q 

Occ upa t i on Numerous 



Marital Stat us M arr ied 

d eat h_lijr ing 



Name Avis (Evans) D o uglas 

Place of birth Hollandale, Wis c da te_ 2-1^-20 

8^ 



Number ol years of si-hooling 



R e s i d e n c e Miner al Point Wll.-sr i t a 1 Status _Married 

Number of children 5_ _ Death living 



Occupa t i o n Wife 



Name Bonnie (Ev ans) ivicKenna 
Place of birth Mineral PointT'Wisc 



date2-12-28 



~8" 



Number of years of scliooling_ 

Residence Lodi, WisC» Mari tal Status ^Marri ed 

Number of children 7 

Name James Nile 



Occupation Wife 



death living 



Place of birth Waldv;ick: date 5-23-26 

Number of years of schooling 8 Occupation Variou S 

Residence Darlington Marital Status Single 



Number of children 



death living 



Name 



Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

R e s i d e n c e 

Number of children 



date 



c c u p a t ion 



Marital Status 
death 



N a m e 

Place" of birlh 

Number ol years of schooling 



date 



Oc <■ upa t i (J n 



Res i d e n c e 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
dea th 



N , 1 ni e 

Place of birth __date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status _ 

Nuiiiiicr ol i-hildren death 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schoolinj 



Res idence 

Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number af years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of children 



death 



Occupation 



.■.i-r-^. 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling_ 
Res idence 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence ; 

Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 



Place of birth 



Number of years of schoolinj 
Res idence 



Number of children 



date 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of children 



death 



Occupation 



Name 



Place of birth 



Number of years of schoolinj 
Res idence 



Number of children. 



date 



Marital Status_ 
death 



Occupation_ 



isn.tii 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Occupation 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schoolinj 



Oc cupa t ion 



Residence 

Number of children\ 



Marital Status 



dea th 



10 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Numb I' r of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupa t ion 



Your Father 



Name WAYiMg Jvi. EVANS ^Current Residence barren, 111. 



Date of birth 4-^-18 Place of birth Hollandale, WJSC. 

Date of Death LIVING _Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school ^ high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Farm Labor Dates 1932 1st Darlington Dates 

2nd QC CORP S Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

^th Dates 4th Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, et( 



Place of marriage to your mother^ date 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mo ther 

Name Current Residence 



Date of birth Place of birth 



Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade s chool high;- school voca t ional co liege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 



2nd Dates 



3rd Dates 



4th Dates 



1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


4th 


Dates 



Religion 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your father date ^ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the hack of this page (F-2). 



9 



E-2 Stepfather 
Name 



KYnW 



Date of birth 



Place of birth 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



vocational 



college 



Occupation (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



_lst_ 
_2nd_ 
.3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Da te s 



Dates 


Dates 


Dates 



Rel iglon 



Political parties, civil or socia 


1 


clubs, fraternities, etc. 






Place of marriage to your mother 




Date 


F-2 Stepmother 
Name 






Date of birth 


— 


Place of birth 


Date of death 


Place of bur ial 


Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 


vocational college 


Occupatlon(s) 

1st Dates 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 


2nd Dates 
3rd Dates 


— 


2nd Dates 
3rd Dates 


4th Dates 


4th Dates 


Religion 


Political party, civil or social 


cl 


ubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father 



date 



10 
CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2,F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 

Name Gerald W. Evans 



Place of birth Darlington, Wise. Date of birth 8-31-i|-2 



Number of years of schooling 10 Occupation Assembler 

Residence BelvJdere , Ill. Marital Status Married 

Number of children 5 death 

Name Dennis L« Evans 

Place of birth ShUllsburg, Wisc pate of birth 5-26-45 

Number of years of schooling 1^ Occupation Claims Mana ger 

Residence Roclcf ord , 111. Marital Status Married 

Number of children 3 death 



Name Karen K. Evans 

Place of birth Darlington, Wis feate of birth 3-.27-47 



Number of years of schooling 12 Occupation Secretary 

Residence madison, Wig torital S ta tus S 

Number of children 1 death 

Name Betty Gail (Evans) S tocks 

Place of birth Darlington Date of birth 2-l6-$2 

Number of years of schooling 10 Occupation Wife 

Residence jViilton, tfisc* Marital Status Married 

Number of children 2 death 

Name David A. Bvans 



Place of birth Cuba City Wise Date of birth 2-2-5^ 

Number of years of schooling 12 Occupation Assembler 

Residence KenOsha, WisO larital Status Single 

Number of children death 

Name Jacqueline D» Evans 

Place of birth Darlington Date of birth 5Q5-6O 

Number of years of schooling In SChOOl Occupation 

Res 1 dence (Parents) Warren Mar ital Status 

Number of children death 

Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public Library, Rockford 
1 1 1 Inois 

Signed 
Date 



bei'^'n.' 



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DEDICATION 



TO THOSE OF US IH THIS AiWD FUTURE GENERATIONS TO COIViE, FOR A GREATER 
UNDERSTANDING AND APPRECIATION OF THOSE BEFORS. THIS WORK IS DEDICATED 



CREDITS 

Without the assistance of the following this work would not have 
been possible. 

Roscoe G. Evans Virginia Evans 

rtayne Li. Evans Alice Evans 

wilton Evans Avis Douglas 

.Nile Evsins Eleanor Mullen 

Caryle Evans Joan Kirwan 

Essie (Evans) Berg Rev. M. Collier 

Joe Evans 
i.iinnie Wing 
Cora Swallow . 
riilda Swallow 
Leonard Swallow 

There no doubt have been others un-named, however ther assistance 
has been greatly appreciated. 



THE EVANS HISTORY IN STORY 



As of this time I've been successful only back as far as my 
Great-great Grandfather Tom Evans. I have successfully located 
his wifes birth-place and the location of her parents graves 
and have surmised he in all probably came from the same area 
and expect to have that information shortly by way of the efforts 
of Reverend Michael Collier Vicar of Castleton, England. 

Gastleton is located approximately 20 miles West of Sheffield 
in Derbyshire, a noted leadmining region situated at the foot 
of the t'ennine Mountain chain. 

i speculate he was born in the 1820s and it is believed he 
died on April 16, 1852 near Mineral Point, Wisconsin. I 
should point out that at this point I have been unable to 
find his grave site or record of any kind locating him in 
this country however at the time of his death record keeping 
was atrocious. 

Tom supposedly met his wife Mary Heathcote while she was in 
the employ of the Tyra family of Castleton. Following their 
marriage sometime in the late 1840s or early l850s they came 
to Mineral Point, Wisconsin which at that time was a prospering 
leadmining area. It would appear that he was probably a lead 
miner from inference. 

Mary's parents were Rowland Heathcote born in 1788 and died 
on 2^ March I850, her mother ^\nne was born in 1792 and died 
on 14 April I860. They are both buried in the cemetary at 
the Castleton Vicarage. 

Tom and Mary had two sons Tom Jr. born 3-17-I85O and Rowland 
born 3-15-1852. Rowland was apparently named after his mothers 
father. Shortly after Rowlands birth his father Tom died the 
cause is a matter of conjecture but I was told he was on his 
way home from a pub in Mineral Point and froze to death after 
being caught in a blizzard. 

Following his death Mary wrote his parents from whom they had 
been receiving a stipend to advise them and they immediately 
requested she return to Englamd with the children which she 
refused to do su^d the stipend was subsequently cut off. 

I have attached a copy of the marriage certificate of Mary 
to a widower with two children by the name of George Swallow 
dated Jan 7th 1853. 

On i*iay the 8th ia67 the family homesteaded a farm north of 
Platteville, Wisconsin in Grant county. .The Swallow family 
still owns the farm and I have attached photos of their home 
and the graves of George and Mary located at the Fairview 
Cemetary near the farm. 

Tom Jr. was accidentally killed on 10-14-1853 from a blow of 
a corn knife from ox\q of his brothers. I have been unable to 
locate any information as to his birth or death in this country. 



Rowland didn't get along well with his step-father and left 
home when he was 14. Little is known of his activities after 
he left home however a letter from his aunt in England to his 
parents dated Id?? indicated he was in ill health which was 
attributed to his being away in the mountains. I've been told 
by the Swallow family they thought he was somewhere in the Smolcey 
Mountains. I would like to add at this point that I owe a 
great deal of credit to Leonard, Cora and Hilda Swallow who were 
kind enough to spend several hours with me on their farm and 
relate their memories of (Grandma Swallow) to me. They were 
also kind enough to entrust me with two letters from Marys sister 
dated lb?? and 1661. it was from these letters I was able to 
make the English Connection. Their sister Minnie Wing of 
i'latteville, Wisconsin was also quite helpful and spent several 
hours with me as well. 

When Rowlands mother married George Swallow he gained a step 
brother aind sister John sind Elizabeth. Following the marriage 
George amd i^iary had six children George Jr. born Sept 10, 53 
Louisa Feb, 2?, 55, Ann Oct 20, 56, Fred Aug 25, 60, Emma Dec 25 • 
62, and Frank War 28, 65. 

In approximately 1680 Rowland settled near Waldwick in Lafayette 
county Wisconsin euid married Amelia Rowe born in I859 to Dr. 
John Hannibal Rowe and Jemima (Skews) Rowe. Jemima was born 
on kar 6, I819 in Cornwall England ajid died on Jaui 16, I9OI. 
Jemima's parents were Peter smd Elizabeth Skews. 

Rowlajid and Amelia had 10 children, ? girls and 3 boys (see 
attached). Of the boys Joe never married, Jess married and 
moved to Wolf Point, iwontana and had two children Warren and 
iv.ary Lou. Warren married and has a son Chris and at this time 
I don't know the story on Mary Lou. Warren is a contractor in 
the ^olf Point area. My Grandfather Roscoe had 4 sons and 3 
daughters and of the sons only my father had children leaving 
my 2 brothers and I amd Warren in Wolf Point to carry on the 
family name. As of this date my brother Jerry has 2 sons and 
1 have 3 so it appears there will be lots of Evans' around 
in the future. 

i have been able to write much more detail on my father and 
grsuidfather and have devoted separate sections to them later 
on in this genealogy however I'll abbreviate for the purpose 
of the story their activities. 

Roscoe Conklin Evans was born to Rowland and Amelia Evans 
near Waldwick, nVisconsin. His father did farm work around 
the area. After attending grade school several years in 
Waldwick ne left home and went to Beloit, Wise as a machinist 
Chicago, 111. Arid Milwaukee, Wisconsin prior to returning home 
and marrying inargaret Rickey of rural Waldwick. He spent most 
of his working years in various cheese factories, ran a medicine 
wagon, worked in the mines, ran a pool hall, hotel and tavern. 

While living in Hollandale, Wisconsin my dad Wayne M. Evans 
was born. 



CHILDREN OF ROWLAND EVANS 



Carrie Dell Evans 7-l6- 

Joseph R. Evans 2-11- 

Roscoe G. Evans 12-08- 

Essie J. Ev8ins 12-13- 

kay Belle Evans 4-0?- 

iwamie Alice Evans 1-22- 

Lulu I. Evans 3-28- 

Jesse iH. Evans 7-l4- 

Goldie ivi. Evans 2-26- 

Fola A. Evans 9-06- 



81 married Rolando Cline 

83 never married 

84 married Margaret Rickey 
■86 married Henry Berg 

89 married Carl Weinbrenner 

■92 married Walton Reed 

■94 married Canute Saybo 

■96 married 

•1900 married Leonard Voss 

•03 married Seibert Lanseth 



CHILDREN OF ROSCOE EVANS 



Milton 

Carlyle 

Byrdice 

Wayne 

Avis 

Nile 

Bonnie 



2-27-09 never married 

4-28-11 married Alice Douglas 

12-2-12 married Bennett Gordon 

4-4-18 married Virginia Douglas 

2-14-20 married Howard Douglas 

5-23-26 never married 

2-17-28 married Fred McKenna 



R03G0E GONKLIN EVANS 



Grandpa Evans was born on December the 8th 188^ on a farm east 
of Waldwiclc, v\^isconsin to Rowland smd Amelia (Rowe) Evans. He 
was the third of ten children. 

In interviewing (Poppa) he remembered little of his early years 
but advised the first place he remembers living was on the Zol- 
linger farm east of Waldwick in a two story frame house. He 
specifically recalled the upstairs walls were unfinished and 
he used to throw his brothers and sisters shoes down the gap 
between the upstairs walls into the lower level of the house 
making it impossible to get them. 

He attended grade school at Waldwick (a small village) and 
can't remember how many years he attended. He (with a chuckle) 
recalled the time he and some school friends were on their 
way to school and came upon a skunk and killed it with a rock. 
After they killed it they forced their way into the one room 
school and drug it all over the floor. When their teacher 
arrived a search for the skunk was initiated and after a 
diligent search Poppa discovered it under the porch, making 
points with the teacher and school was dismissed for the day. 

He related that he could remember little in the way of social 
activities but advised when he was a child they had no way of 
getting around like we do now. His real interest seemed to 
be centered around hunting and fishing. 

The Spanish American War occurred when he was thirteen years 
old and he remembers it very vaguely. Recalls a big celebration 
when it was over. He further related he remembers a fella by 
the name of George Humbert of Waldwick who was in the Civil 
War and every Fourth of July he used to give a speech. 

Poppa recalls that life was a lot different then but they 
always got along. 

As a young man he left home and went to Beloit, Wisconsin 
and got a job as a machinist with Fairbanks Morse. He later 
worked in the same capacity at International in Chicago and 
Woods iv'iotor and Electric in Milwaukee. 

After being away from home several years he returned and married 
iviargaret Rickey of rural Waldwick in 1908. 

Following his marriage and while raising a fsunily of k boys 
and 3 girls he worked as follows* Wilkinson Mine East of 
Cuba City. Badger iviedicine Company (driving a medicine wagon 
around amd selling various medicines i flavorings, pots & pans 
etc. , Prairie Ghees Factory 3 years, Madison machine shop. 
County Line Cheese Factory 3'^ years, Cannon Cheese Factory, 
Broadway Cheese Factory, White Oak Cheese Factory, Fayette Tavern, 
and from 1943 to 1950 made American cheese at their _ present 
location retiring due to low prices and Federal impingement 
requiring the purchase of expensive equipment. 



MAURICE WAYNE EVANS 



Dad was born on the kth of April 1918 in Hollandale, Wisconsin to 
Roscoe and iv.argaret Evans and was the 4th of 7 children. 

xiis fathers various jobs resulted in numerous moves through-out 
Lafayette, iowa and Dane counties in Wisconsin and in 1932 he 
graduated from the Equal Rights Grade School in Lafayette county. 

rie wanted to go on to high-school but had to go to work to try and 
help support the family. 

In apjjroximately 1936 he joined the Civilian Conservation Corps and 
worked in various locations around the Rhinelander area making 
fire breads and other forestry type projects. Once a month he 
got paid and of his pay he got $5 '00 and his parents got $20.00. 

lie met my mother in 1939 in Darlington, Wisconsin at a dance and 
after dating a year they married making their first home on Ohio 
Street. During the war Dad worked in the lead mines and was exempt 
from the draft due to the nature of his work. 

In August of 1941 (31st) my older brother Jerry was born followed by 

me on i*iay 26, 1945. 

in the subsequent years my sister Karen was born March 1949, Gail 
October 51 » David Feb 5^ sund Jacqueline iViay 60. 

During that period of time we lived at eight locations as dad 
worked in various vocations ranging from magazine salesman to 
heavy equipment operator. 

At present my parents live in Warren, Illinois where my mother 
works in a factory and Dad works in a multi-capacity for Apple- 
Ganyon Lake near Apple River, Illinois. 



t"^?Lo ^AG£S represent 2 LETTERS WRITTEN TO MARY HEATHCOTE EVANS 
m'Lm T .^^ ^ ^^ ®^ ^^ SISTER HANNAH COLLIER. IT WAS THROUGH THESE 
THAT I WAS ABLE TO IViAKE THE "ENGLISH CONNECTION". 





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April 2, 1976 



Reverend Collier Dennis L. Evana 

Vicar of Castleton 1215 Pieldcrest Drive 

¥icarage Rockford, Illinois 61108 

Castle Street U.S. A* 
Castleton (Near Sheffield) 
Derby Shire, England 

Dear Reverend Collier: 

I am writing to request your assistance in providing any 
information you may be able to find on my great, great 
grandmother and grandfather. 

Mary Heathcote was bom on October 1, 1828 in Castleton. 
She app _ rently married my great, great grandfather, Thomas 
Evans, p'rlor to leaving England. They had two children, 
Thomas Junior, bom March 17, 1850 and Roland or Rowland, 
bom March 5, 1852 or I853. 

I have two letters from a Hannah Collier dated F^ibruary 
12, 1877 and another dated 1881 addressed to Mary Heathcote 
Evans. Mrs. Collier lived at Market Place Chapel en le Prith 
which I note is only a few miles from Castleton. Mrs. Collier 
was apparently a sister of Marys. 

Mrs. Colliers letters mention the following people: Uncle 
Robert, Cousin Tom Heathcote (died January 5th or 6th I88I) 
Brother John, Brother Frank, Aunt Cooks ley, and a Sister Rachel. 

According to the family elders, Mary cared for the children of 
a Mrs. Tim as a young girl and apparently met Tom Evans through 
the Tim family. Apparently after arriving here in Mineral Point 
Wisconsin, Tom died and his wife married a widower by the nam* 
of Oeorge Swallow. 

I searched for the grave of Tom for several years, however, we 
have no record what so ever of him here in this country. 

If you can find any Information what so ever to assist me in 
tracing the Evans and Heathcote family, I*d be most appreciative. 



-2- 



My grandfather is 92 years old and It would give me a great 
deal of satisfaction to provide him with the answers to the 
questions the fsunily has had relative to our ancestry. 

If I have indeed found the right Castleton, then I hope to 
visit there with ray family next summer. 

Your help will be greatly appreciated and I'd be most happy 
to reimburse you for your efforts. Return postage enclosed. 

Very Truly Yours, 



Dennis L. Zvans 



Rev M F Collier, Castleton Vicarage, Sheffield, S30 2WG 

Telephone 0433 20534 t ra-i, ^ ■ -, nmr 

15th April, 1576 

Dear I.'r. llvans, 

Thanl: you for yo-ur interesting; letter and request for ne to trj'- to 
trace tlie records of your great great grandparents. 

I am afraid that I csjnnot immediately give -jov. the information you 
7;ant as i.-'ost of oiir records fron St. Bdnund's Clmrcb are kept at Llatlock 
which is about twenty miles froir here. But after Easter I will he happy 
to see vrhat I can discover for you, 

I can say here and ncvr t!iat there is a grave stone in the church;^'ard 
for Ro-.7land Eeathcote wh" died on the 27th L:arch I85O at the age of 62 
and his Triie Ann who died on the 14th April I860, a^ced 66. These woiild be 
the parents of I.Tary Heathcote I presuT.e. There are also graves of the TYII 
family of Oastleton so you certainly have the right village. 

f 

As soon as I can find the tine I vrill certaD^y do ■^rhat I can to find 

out nore of 'iary's narriage to Thoi::as Hvans before they left Zngland. 



Yours sincerely, 

Castleton. 



sincerely, 

^ irriest Th Charge, 



Dernis L.r^vans, Ilsq. , 
■^.-.ov^r,-,^, Illi-nois, U.S.A. 



TiiE FIRST CORRESPONDENCE WITH ENGLAND SINCE I89I 
'^E.KU^m^ THE CONNECTION HAS AT LAST BEEN MADE. 



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April 5, 1976 



Dear Ms. Evans, 

I am enclosing a copy of the marriage record 
of George Swalldw, 

I hope it will be of help to you. So many 
of the old records are not recorded and I 
was surprised to find this one. 

There is a charge of $1,00 * ,Oii tax. 

Thank you. 



Sincerely, 

Mildred A, Jones 
xlegister of Deeds 
Iowa County 



i'^arie Rowen 
File Clerk 



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.— N;>-i.'; 'fibo i-':tlnr > f Slid Avin.-. 

. — ~ "i.- •o'..<: wlic-h l!iO renrri.iL'c wns Cf iiMr.i!. 



;1 — Th" p'aco. tow:; or townsliiji, and county, 
V. !;'.Te '.lie Uiairii'.co was consummated. 



-IH- A\lu'.t c'Tcmory consvimmalcd. 
->';■::. e 'T ^lers.':! proEouncing marriage. 
-K'.;i Ic'.iCC of person las! nnmed. 
---,>'i.-; '.'f ptrson signing tl.c certificate. 



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iviARRIAGE CERTIFICATE OF GEORGE SWALLOW 
AND ivlARY (riEATHCOTE EVANS) IOWA COUNTY 
COURT HOUSE 



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Lear Sir: I have checked our records of Death and the earliest one In The 

E-s is in 1S67 most all of our Vital records are in the 1369 to 1877 

^lot very many befor 1877. Cone of the marriages a-rp iq:;9 

Yours truly 

Mildred A. Jones Reg. of Deeds Iowa County 

Doc?£;eville , Wisconsin 53533 



BARRY DOUGLAS 

wiy research on the Douglas family at this point goes back as far as 

my great-great grandfather Barry. I don't know when he was born or 

where but it is rumored he came from Pennsylvsuiia and was probably 
born around ld35. 

He was married to Winnie ( ? ) Douglas and prior to l86l they owned 
a fsirm SW of Darlington, Wisconsin near Otter Creek located near 
the present farm of Art Peterson. 

iviy research on Barry has been extremely limited however time-permit- 
ting I'll pursue his past further. 

ALBERT DOUGLAS 

Born Dec. 2Gth, 1861 to Barry<i Winnie Douglas upon reaching maturity 
married Kate De Scent on March 3, 1893. 

They had 9 children, ^■ boys and 5 girls and purchased a farm near 
Barry's and follov/ing his death they sold their farm and took over 
the family home-stead. 

At this point I don't know what happened to the farm however it is 
no longer owned by the family however with 9 children to spfliit it 
up it mast have really caused problems. 

ALFRED DOUGLAS 
B 

Born Jan 9i 1893 to Albert and Kate Evans married Jennie Miller 
daughter of Charles Sc Rella Miller of rural Darlington in 1916. 
They had 6 children sind share-cropped in the Lsifayette County area 
while my mother was a child and subsequently divorced both later 
remarrying and having subsequent children. 

Alfred died in 1961 and is buried in the Darlington cemetary. 



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Rock Valley family history 
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ROCK VALLEY COLLEGE