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Rock Valley College 
Educational Resources 



EVANS, THOMAS EDWARD, im 



K&ASE TYPE: PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COP Y OF YOUR 
FAMI LY H I STORY . 



Dear Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

Sn that your family history can be made more useful to historians and 
others studying American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
below. This will take you only a few minutes, and will be easily made ovel 
tnlo an index which will permit archive users ready access to just those 
kinds of family histories needed. 

1. SURVEY Office Use Code 

1 . Your name Judy A. Eva ns ( 1 D //_ I 

Date of f o r m ApH 1 5, 1976 

(ID // . ) 

2 . Your college: Roc k Valley College 
Rockford, Illinois 

'3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 

Before 1750 1750-1800 X 1800-1850 



1850-1900 1900 or later 



Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

New England (Mass Conn . ,R . I . ) Middle A tlan tic (N . Y . , Penna . , N . .1 . 

Va.) _ South Atlantic (Ca . , F 1 a . , N . C . , S . C . ) East South Central 

(La . , M i s s . , A 1 a . , Tenn , Ky . ) _J Was t South Central (Ark . , N . M . , T e x . ,0k . ) 

X East North Central (Mich. , Oh i o , I n d . ) P a c i f i c ( Ca 1 . , Wa s h . ) 

(Hawaii, Ala ska) (111., Wise.,) 

I'lease check a 1 1 occupational categories in which members ol you i 
family whom you have discussed in this [>aper have found themselves. 

X Farming X Mining X Shopkeeping or small business 

X Transportation Big Business y Manufacturing 

Professions X Industrial Labor Other Mechanics. Baker s 

Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 

X R oman Catholic _____ J ewish P resbyterian X M ethodist 

Baptist Episcopalian Congregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormo n Other Protestant Other (name) 

What ethnic and social groups arc discussed in your paper? 

Swedish Other Scandinavian X German X French 

Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans Eastern Kuropt 

Jews X Central Europeans Italians Slavs 



X Irish X British Native Americans over several generations 



East Asian Other(Name) 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other X Family Bibles X Family Genealogies 

family members Land Records The U.S. Census 

Vital Records 



__ Photographs X Maps Other 



FAM1 LY DATA 



2 



Grandfather (your father's side ) 

Name Edward C. E VANS Current Residence 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



1870 



1953 



Place of birth Athens County 

Place of burial Ohio 



Education(number of years); 
grr.de schoo 1 high school 

Occupation(s) 
l s t Grocery Stores 

2nd 

3rd 



vocational 



College 



4 th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



_1 s t 
2nd 
3rd 
A th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
_D a t e s 
Dates 



Religion unknown 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Republican 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother Unknown date 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Jenny KELLY Current Residence Deceased 



Date of birth _ 1875 
Date of death "T9W 



Place of birth 
Place of burial 



Unknown 
Helsonyille, Ohio 



Education (number of years): 

grade school jj high school 

college 



vocational 



Occupation (s) 
lst Housewife 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion Catholic 



1 s t 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Da tes 



Date s 
Da t e s 
Date s 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 

Republican 

Place of marriage to your grandfather 



da ti 



NOTE: If your lather was raised 'in age 18) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on t h c- back of this page 
(A-2) . 



A -2 Step^randf ather (your father's side) 



N a -. 



Current Residence 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 

college 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Religion 



Dates 
Dates 
Da tes 
Dates 



Is t. 
2nd 

. 3rd _ 
4th 



voca tional 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 

D a t e s 

Dates 

Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities , etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother_ 
B-2 S tepgrandmo ther (your father's side) 



date 



Name 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school 

coll e ge 



vo c a t i ona 1 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



Dates 
Da tes 
Dates 
Dates 



1st 
2nd 

_ 3rd _ 
4 t h 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Da tes 
Da les 



Re 1 i gion 



' o 1 i C 1 c a 1 party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



I) a I e 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

N a m v Michael Rohert MCBRIDE 

n.ite of birth February 16, 1882 



Date of death November 6, 1969 



Current Res id one e Deceased 

Place of birth McCarthy, Ohio 

Place of burial Loga n , Hocking , Ohio 



Education (number of years): 
grade school 8 high school 



vocational 



college 



Occupation(s) 
1st Mechanic 



Ma 

2nd Machinist 

3rd 

4 th 



Dates 1 900-1909 1st 

Dates 1 909-1962 2nd 

Da tes 3rd 

Dates 4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Logan » Ohio p ate s 1900-1909 

Columbu s, Ohio Dates 1909-1912 

Logan, Ohio Dates 1912-1946 



Lancaster, Ohio Dates 1946-1955 



Religion 



Cathol ic 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, c l c 

Democrat 

Place of marriage to your grandmother date 



NOTE: Tf your mother was raised by a stepfather or another relative (to 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 



Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Catherine Shor r 

Date of birth De cember 31, 1888 

Date of death 



Current Residence 
Place of birth |_p( 
Place of burial 



Oh in 



3hio__ 



Education (number of years) 

grade school X high school li 



vocational 



coll e g e 



Occupation (s) 

] st Housewife 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



PEACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Same as Husband Dates 



2nd 
3rd 
4 th 



Da I vr. 
Da t e s 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Democrat 



Plate of marriage to your grandf a ther_ Date 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another re I at ive (to 

Hi grive that data on the back of this page ( D- 2 ) 



C-2 S tepgrandf ather (your mother's side) 



Name 



Date of birth 
Date 01 death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupation(s) 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 

4 th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



vo cational 



col lege 



1st 
2nd 
3rd_ 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
D-2 S t e p gr a n dmo t h e r (your mother's side) 

N a m e 

Date of birth 

Date of death 



Date 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of burial 



vocal lona 1 



col lege 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4 th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
D a t e s 
D a ten 



Re 1 I gion 

Political party, civil or social dubs, sororities, etc 



Clare of marriage t o your grandfather 



Da t (• 



I 

CHILDREN of A & B (or A- 2 or B-2) - your father's name should appear below 

I . Name Ira Christopher EVANS 



Place of birth Nelsonvil le, Oh i o date 1903 

Number of years of schooling' Hig h School Occupation Sal es 

Res i dene e Detroit, Mich, m a r i t a i statu s Ma rried 

Number of children 0 Death 1945 

Name Catherine EVANS 

p l a c c o f birth" NeTsonvTFTe, Ohi o dat e 1904 



Number of years of schoolin g 8 0 c c u p a t ion 

Res idenceljpppr SanDuSky, Ohio Marital s tatus_Marri£d 

Number of children Q Death 



n a me Donald A. EVANS 



Place of birth Nels onville. Ohio date Oct. 1906 

Number of years of schooling High School Occupation Sales 

Res i dence Royal Oak. Mich. Mar j tal Status Married 

Number of children 5 Death 1970 

Name Charles Edward FVANS 

Place of birth Nelsonville. Ohio d 1 1 e_ Jan . . 26^ 1908 

Number of years of schooling . 9 yrs. . Occupation Ba ker . 

Residence Rockford, Ill inois m a r i t a l statu s_ Married 

Number of childre n 5 d eat h Ja n. 6, 1965 

Name Mary EVANS _ 

Place of birth NeTsonvflle, Ohio date 1910 

Number of years of schooling High School Occupation SeaitlStreS S 

Residence Columbus , Ohio Marital Status Marri ed 

Number of" children 0 . Death July, 19 66 

Name Jos eph EVANS 



lace of birth Nelsonville. Ohio date 1912 



Number of years of schooling Hi qh School Occupation Office W ork 

Residence B1 oomi nqburq , Ohio Marital status Married 

Number of children 12 death 1973 

Name Paul EVANS 



Place of birth Nelsonvi l le, Ohio d a t e 1914. 

Number of years of schooling Hi qh School Occupation jjrocer. 

Residenc e Dayton, Oh io m a r i t a l status Mar ried 

Number of children 3 death 1969 



Name Har ry EVANS 

Place of birth Nelsonville, Ohio date 1915 . 

Number of years of schooling Hiqh Sc hool O c c u p a t i o n_CjuinJx Audi tOr_ 

Residenc e Nelsonville , Ohio m aritai statu s Ma rried 

Number of children 4 death , 

Name Elizabeth EVANS 

Place "of birth Nelsbnvi 11 e , Ohi 0 date 1917 

Number of years of schooling HighSchOOl Occupation _ Housewife 

Residence Malta, Ohio _ Marital st at us _ Married 

Number of children 1 donth ~ 

Nam e 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation . 

R v s i d e n c e _ Mar 1 t a 1 S t i\ t us 

Number ol children dealli 



7 

CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 



. - Bernard F. MCBRIDE 



Logan, Ohio 



Place of bir t h 

Number of years of schooling College 



date Sept. 20, 1905 



_o ccupatio n Chemist 
Residence St. Louis, Mich. Marital Status Married 

Number of children 8 death 



date April 12, 1908 



Anna Margaret MCBRIDE 
i of birth Logan, Ohio 

Number of years of schooling 8th Grade Occupation Housewife 

e Hcckins County, Oh ftexital Stat us Married 

Number of children 5 death February 17, 1976 



Name Gertrude Catheri ne MCBRIDE 

Place of birth Columbus, Ohio date February 18. 

Number of years of schooling High School Occupation Housewife 

Residence F.cckford, Illinois Marital Status Married 



1910 



Number of children 



death - 



John W. MCBRIDE 



Place of birth Logan, Ohio 
Number of years of schooling 
Residence Kt. Pleasant, Mich. Marital 
Number of children 



date October 7, 1916 
High School Occupation Oil Fie lds 



1 



status M arried 
death 



Name Joseph E. MCERIDE 



of birth L ogan, Ohio" 
Number of years 

Res id e nee 

D- Number of children 



date May, 1919 



f schooling High SchooT 0 ccupat Ion 

Feoria, Illinois Marital status Married 



Sales 



death 



Name Robert Jay MCBRIDE 



Place of birth Logan, Ohio 



date Sept. 6, 1922 



CoTleae 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence LongBeach, Indiaf Mari'tal Status 
Number of children 7 death 



Occupation Trucking Indust ry, V,p, 
Married 



Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Re s i d e nc e 

Number of children- 



date 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 



Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence 



date 



Occupatio n 



Number of children 



Marital Statu s 
death 



Name 
Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children'. 



Occupa C ion 



death 



ir). 



N a me 

Place of birth 



Number of yearn of Hfhooling 

Kef) I d v n c e 

"i u il> »• r <>f rh 1 1 d r c n 



c);i 1 f 



Ma r i I a I Stat u h 
dea t h 



Oc ' upat ion 



Your Father 



N ame Charles Edward EVANS 



Current Residence 



Deceased 



Date of birth Jan. 26, 1908 



Date of Death Jan. 6, 1965 



Place of birth Nelsonville, Ohio 
Place of burial Rockford, Illinois 



Education (number of years) 
grade school X high school 



vocational 



college 



Occupation(s) 

1st Baker 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 1923-1965 

Date s 

Dates 

Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
l st Versilles, Ind. Dates 1933 



2nd Malta, Ohio 



Dates 



1934 



3rd Columbus, Ohio 



Dates 1937 



4th Omaha, Nebraska 



Dates 1944 



Catholic 



Religion_ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Independent 



Knights of Columbus 



Place of marriage to your mother 



date 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that da 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 



Your Mother 



Name Gertrude Catherine MCBRIDE 
Date of birth Feb. 18, 1910 



Date of death ~ 

Education (number of years) 

grade school X high r school 



Current Residence Rockford, IL 
Place of birth Columbus, Ohi o 

Place of burial 



vocational 



college 



Occupation(s) 

1st Housewife 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
lst Same as above Dates 



2nd 
3rd 
4 th 



D a t e s 
Dates 
Dates 



Re l i g i o n Catholic 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 

Independent 



Place of marriage to your father_ 



date 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that da 
on the back of this page (F-2). 



E-2 Stepfather 
Name 



Date of birth Place of birth 



Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 
• Je school high school vocational college 

Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Da t e s 2 nd D a t e s 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Re 1 i g ion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



PI i e of marriage to your mother Date 

P-2 St epmother 
Name 



Ditcofbirth Placeofbirth 



Dateofdeath Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1 s t Da t e s 1 s t Da t e s 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates_ 

3r d _ Dates 3rd Dates_ 

4th Dates 4th Dates 

Re 1 1 gion 

Political party, < i v i 1 or social clubs, sororities, etc . 



Plan- of marriage to your father 



(I a I c 



1 0 

CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2.F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 



Name Charles Robert EVANS 

Place of birth Malta, UMo Date of birth February 18, 1935 

Number of years of schooling 16 Occupation Accou n tant 

Residence NorthbrQOk, IL Marital Status Married 

Number of children 2 death - 



Name Mary Catherine EVANS 

Place of birth Columbus, Ohio Date of birth July 23, 1937 

Number of years of schooling 18 Occupation Principal 

Residence Joliet, IL Marital Status Single 

Number of children death - 

Name JoAnne Elizabeth EVANS 

Place of birth Columbus, Ohio Date of birth Jan. 4, 1940 

Number of years of schooling 16 Occupation Teacher 

Residence Wilmette, IL Marital Status Single 
Number of children death - 

Name Thomas Edward EVANS 



Place of birth Columbus, Ohio Date of birth Sept. 19. 1944 

Number of years of schooling 16 Occupation Accountant 

Residence Rockford, IL Marital Status Married 

Number of children 2 death 

Name Linda Suzanne EVANS 

Place of birth O maha, Nebraska Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 16 Occupation Housewife 

Residence Clinton, Iowa Marital Status Married 

Number of children 1 death 

Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 

Name 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public Library, Rockford 
Illinois 



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Sources 



Personal Interviews 

Gertrude C. McBride Evans, Mother of Subject 
Thomas E. Evans, Subject 

Linda Suzanne Evans Fleming, Sister of Subject 



Family Geneology 

Geneology of John Schorr, researched by Richard Till 



Part I 



Christopher EVANS, dates unknown, born in England in Wales. 

He moved to the United States in 1840. His profession was 
mining and he settled in the coal mining districts of Pennsyl- 
vania. He later moved to southern Ohio. He authored several 
mining books, including one that was used in classrooms, on 
mining procedures. His lifestyle and his wife's name was not 
uncovered in research. 

Edward Christopher EVANS, 1870 - 1953, born in Athens 
County, Ohio. 

Jennifer Koping KELLY, 1875 - 1940, birthplace unknown. 

Edward was raised in the mine districts of Pennsylvania 
and Ohio. He spent his lifetime working on the fringes of the 
mines. He owned several grocery stores in the small mining 
towns of southern Ohio. Each one went into bankruptcy after he 
gave out too much credit to the people, and then the mines 
closed. In his later life he operated a candy store and had 
the terminal for the local bus lines in Nelsonville, Ohio. He 
spent a lot of time with his grandchildren and enjoyed giving 
candy to them. His store was a must in any trip to southern 
Ohio. He did not practise any religion but set up his own 
values and morals and lived very strictly according to them. He 



( 



also stressed his wife's religion to them. Jennifer was adopted 
when she was very young by the Kelly family in Rock Island, Illinois. 
Her adopted father worked for the government arsenal in Rock Island. 
There is very little known about her real parents or what happened 
to them. The Kelly family was very religious and raised Jennifer 
as a Catholic. She could not, by law, become a Catholic until she 
was of age. She was very sickly and often was not able to 
raise her family. Jennifer and Edward were staunch Republicans 
and Edward ran for local congressman once, but was defeated. 
He was considered the head republican for the county and 
conferred with state and federal republicans during his later 
life. They had nine children, Ira Christopher Evans, Catherine 
Evans Fishbaugh, Donald Evans, Charles Edward Evans, Mary Evans 
Davis, Joseph Evans, Harry Evans, Paul Evans, and Elizabeth 
Evans. Five of the six boys and Mary Evans died of cancer. The 
other three are still living. 

The six boys were mischievous children who liked to play 
tricks. In fact, Charles Edward Evans had part of a thumb and 
two fingers missing from playing with caps. As a family they 
also pulled together, especially during the depression, getting 
work whenever and whereever they could. The whole family picked 
onions in the onion fields around Carey, Ohio. 

Charles Edward EVANS, Jan. 26, 1908 - Jan. 6, 1965, born 
in Nelsonville, Hocking, Ohio. 



Part II 



John SCHORR, dates unknown, born in Zaarbruck Alsace, France. 

A prominent citizen of the Department of Zaarbruch, Alsace, 
France, he came to the United States in 1835. This was at the 
insistance of his neighbors, most of whom were soldiers of 
Napoleon and restless under the rule of the reinstated Bourbons. 
He was to observe the United States and select a location for 
his neighbors. 

After passing through the flat lands of Perry, Fairfield, 
and the Pickaway plaines, he decided that they were not to 
his liking. In the Hocking Valley Ohio, he saw his fatherland 
again and three miles north of Logan, Ohio he "set his stakes". 
) On the highest hill in the township from whose summet can be 

seen a scape of country ten to twenty miles distant. With 
the valley of Hocking spread below, he set a stone marked with 
a cross for a church when his people had settled. Then he 
returned to the Old Country and in 1837, the colony of twenty- 
six families arrived to buy the land Herr Schorr chose. 

George SHORR, 1864 - 1946, born in Logan, Hocking, Ohio. 

Anna Jane FLUM, 1866 - 1944, born in Logan Hocking, Ohio. 

George and Anna were strict Germans who lived in southern 
Ohio all of their lives. Anna died in 1944 and George entered 
the hospital the week of the funeral and never left. He died 
in 1946. Their children include Mary Shorr, April 6, 1882 to 

i 

-3- 



( 



March 16, 1893; Edward Vincent Shorr, May 18, 1884, married to 
Monica Frances McGonagle. Gertrude Cecelia Shorr, December 20, 
1888 to --. Married to Michael Robert McBride. Joseph Lawrence 
Shorr, March 24, 1891. Married to Olive Susan Smech. Barbara 
Agnes Shorr, December 25, 1893 to January 5, 1930. Married to 
Charles Vere Dalton. Charles Leo Shorr, July 22, 1896 to --. 
Married to Edith Lenna Piper. John Henry Shorr, July 19, 1899 
to --. Married to Gretchen Maryanne Solon. Florence Anastasia 
Shorr, April 25, 1902 to --. Married to Robert Woltring 
Harrison. 

Michael Robert MCBRIDE, February 16, 1882 - November 6, 
1969, born in McCarthur Ohio. 

Catherine SCHORR, December 31, 1888 --, born in Logan, 
Hocking Ohio. 

Michael was a short Irishman with a temper and a taste 
for whiskey. He spent much of his younger life with his aunts. 
Catherine was a rather tall German, also with a temper, and a 
strict Catholic background. She controlled the household and 
the money for the family. Michael spent his early adult life 
as a car mechanic working in this new and unusual field. Most 
of the early time they did not own a car, but often took rides 
with their children to test his work. The kids got rides in 
most of the cars at that time. They then moved to Columbus in 
1909 at which time he became a machinist. Later they moved 



-4- 



back to Logan and spent the depression there. During the 1920 's 
Michael was also a whiskey runner for the bootleggers that abound 
in the Logan area. Local distillers were considered the best 
in the country and Straitsville whiskey often showed up as far 
away as Oregon and Washinton. There are still some of these 
bootleggers still living in the area. They made it through the 
depression with the cooperation of their children. After the 
children left home, they moved to Lancaster, Ohio. On their 
50th wedding anniversary, they purchased their first home in 
Sugar Grove, Ohio. This was several acres with 3/4 wooded. He 
had a large garden. Michael worked as a machinist until he 
was 74. He then was in an auto crash and then had to quit. He 
loved to read and spent his later years either reading or 
working in his garden. Kate as her friends call her, is still 
living in Logan, Ohio with a housekeeper. Their children 
are Bernard Frederick McBride, born September 20th, 1906. Married 
to Emma Elizabeth Franz. Anna Margaret McBride, April 12, 1908 to 
February 17, 1976. She was married to John Forman Kuhn. Ger- 
trude Catherine McBride, February 18, 1910 to --. She was 
married to Charles Edward Evans. John William McBride, Novem- 
ber 7, 1916 to --. Married to Blanch Anders, Patricia Coving- 
ton, and presently Juanita Stouse. Joseph Edward McBride, 
May 22, 1919, to --. Married to Madelyn Bennett. And Robert 
James McBride, September 6, 1922 to --. Married to Maxine 
Stine. 

Gertrude Catherine McBRIDE, February 18,1910- born in Col umbus , Ohio 

-5- 



Part III 



Charles and Gertrude, were married on August 21, 1933, in Logan 
Ohio. They immediately moved to Versailles Indiana, where Charles 
had a job in a small bakery. They lived in a hotel for the year 
or so which they lived there. They spent a typical life as a newly 
wed couple, meeting other people and enjoying the small town atmosphere 
in southern Indiana. They then moved to Malta, Ohio where their oldest 
was born. After one year they moved to Columbus , Ohio where Charles 
worked for a large bakery called Omar. They then spent 7 years here 
and purchased their first home. After Tom was born, they moved to 
Omaha, Nebraska, with Gertrude having to wait until the doctor would 
allow her to travel. After four years they moved to Rockford, 111. 
where Charles became a production manager of Rockford Bakeries , Inc. 
They first moved to 726 Locust St. in the northwest part of Rockford. 
They had a quiet life with the family being an important part of 
everyone's life. Charles spent 70 to80 hours working, so the family 
was very mother-centered. Because of the amount of work spent and 
the sucess of the business , they were in the middle-cless level with 
the bills paid and a comfitable life. Religion also was an important 
thread that ran through the whole life. The children were educated 
in local Catholic schools. All of the children were able to obtain 
a four year degree with Mary Kay completing her Master Degree. In 
1957 they moved to 420 Fairview Blvd. on the far east side of town. 
Charles died on January 6,1965 of Cancer. Their children were 



( 



Robert Charles Evans , February 18,1935 to -.married to Kathleen 
McDermott, Mary Caterine Evans, July 23,1937 to -,an Adrian Dominican 
Nun, JoAnne Elizabeth Evans .January 4,1940 to -,an Adrian Dominican 
Nun, Thomas Edward Evans .September 19,1944 to -.married to Judith 
Ann Engle, Linda Suzanne Evans .February 9, 1948, married to Charles 
Fleming. 



-7- 



c 



FISCHER, SALLY REOLA BREED, 1952- 



'LEASE. USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 



)ear Contributor to the Kock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
Uerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only .) 
rcw minlues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
>ccess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

I SURVEY ***rtrt********V.-ftA**ft*****:V:' 

* OFFICE USE CODL 

I. Your name Sally . R. BREED FISCHER 



Date of form „ a ( 1 0 H 

. November . 1974 

?.. Your (.o i lege: kock Va I l ey (,ol lege (ID // 

foTkTbrcT, Illinois 



* * * * * A * )V A A A A A A ,\ A A A A A A A A .V A A ft 

Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

X B efore 1750 1 750- 1 800 1 800- 1850 

1850-1900 ' 1900 or later 



Please check al 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

_jj New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Y M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, Ky 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., 0k.) Y East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) HI. Wis.) 

~~ ""Plains (ND , SD , Neb . , KanTJTowa , MB) 



5. Please check all occupational categories In which members of your family whom you have 
discussed In th I s paper have found themselves. 

X Farming x M ln ing x S hopkeeplng or small business 



X Transportation B I g Business Manufacturing 



Professions x Industrial labor Other 



Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

Roman Catholic J ew I sh x P resbyterian x M ethod! sty 

Baptist Epl scopal Ian C ongregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon x Other Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans 



^ ews X C entral Europeans I tal I ans Slavs 

"Irish X B ri t Ish N ative Americans over several generations 

'East Asian Other 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other X Fami ly Bibles X Fami ly Genealogies 
fami ly members 

X Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 

X P hotographs X M aps X O ther County History Books 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 



Name Prank pn, BREED Current Residence 

If deao, date onfcWtb 2Q . o n t, n w 1061 
Stockton Township 

Place of birth J 0 Daviess Gtv.. Illinois Data of Birth 1Qf , Tari „ aT . y 1fl Qn 

Education (number of years): 
grade school 0 high school vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st far.torv worker Dates 1912-1911.1 1 st Waterloo. Iowa Dates i g] p_i i 

2nd farmer Dates 191^-191x9 2nd Stockton. 111. Dates lgik-l r 

rural 

3rd Dates 3rd Sol Daviess County . Tl . Dates 19l5-U c 

^th Dates Ath Stockton, 111. Dates 19U9-6 3 

R « 1 ' 9 1 on a^.itai unUoH h.o thpen 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Republican 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother , date c q „ _ + 777"- 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 



Name Bertha E. HTNTZ Currant Residence 

If dead, date of death 20. October 196" 



Place of birth 0 Germany Date of bl rth 26. March 1891 

Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational col lege_ 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st House Cleaner Dates 1906-12 1st Waterloo. Iowa Dates 1912- 1 11 

rural Jo 

2nd Housewife Dates 1912-61 2n d Daviess bounty. 111. Dates 191U-U '"" 

3rd Factory Worker Dates 191+9-53 3rd Stockton, 111. Dates 19Ll9-6 3 

kth Dates *»th Dates l911i-15 

Re I i g I on Lutheran 



* Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Republican 



Place of marriage to your grandfather .......... DATE 



Note 



! Ka^°aatJ a Sfi»fh» a fta« , W d tA*? We 8 ^)? stepmother or another relative give 



I Stepyrandfather (your father's side) 

Current Residence 

I I Hate of death 



Pl.ice nf birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupat lon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd D ates 

}rd Dates 3rd D ates 

^ th Dates *qh D ates 

Rc I i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



ace nf marriage to your grandmother date 

2 Stepgrandmother (your fathar's side) 

Nar*e Currant Residence 



I f dead , date of 1 death 



Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupat ion(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st D ates 1st D ates 

2nd D ates 2nd D ates 

3rd D ates 3rd D ates 

Religion 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Current Residence 



Name A1hpT -+ w.^ MrKTT.T.TPS 

If deaa, date of death p-| ifa-r. 1 Q73 
Woodbine Township 

Place of birth , Tn rte v1ftSR nt.v.. TlUnnis Date of birth ?1 . December 1384 

Education (number of years): 

grade school § high school 1 jr ? vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st ice Business D ates 19 . - 1st Dates 
2nd Butcher & Car Salesman D ates 1912-15 2 nd D ates 
3rd 'Farmer D ates 1915-50 3 rd D ates 
*»th Butcher Dates 1956-59 frth Dates 



Religion Methodist -60 year ch urch choir member 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. cpubliC-m, member 

Ka vanaugh Lod^e "36 Aff & Aid and iviartha Jhapter, LiTitt' ' ul' "ti.u fiatjlerii ular 

Place of 1 marriage to your grandmother ne r n0 m e , .voodLine Twp., Jo l)avfo te 1 , June- 1 C ) 15 

Note: If your mother was raised by a rwpTETflBT W i n UL li e r r e l JL l VH ( to a ge 18) 

give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name J e an Mary BROWN ^ Current Residence 

I f dead, date of* death j T\, a . 1 4^ 
Woodbine Township 

Place of birth , Tn navies ntv.. TninMs Date of birth j r MaTV » h i^r 

Education (number of years; 
grade school high school 2 or 3 vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

. (after leaving home) 

l st Homemaker Dates 1915-Uo 1st --pt .. Elizabeth, 111. D ates 915-16 

farm in woodbine twp. 

2nd D ates 2 nd lizabeth, J .11. Dates 916-48 

3rd D ates 3 rd | D ates 

Re 1 I g I on Methodist 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Republican, 



Place of marriage to your grandfathe r' OodDir.v- C iv p' . 1 J o . Jav . uty id ate > ^ u "e '^'^ 
Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another r'»i«Mw» 1 ?J 

„Ivc Jo«.« un tne oac* or this page (D-2) 



I S I epg randf a the r (your mother's side) 



N.jine 

I f (It- .id, 'lair- of death 



N ... ..I liiiili 

I illll . 1 1 i • hi (in iinlif r 'if y . 1 ill) 

<i i .i.li' .. iii it ) l 1 1 i <j 1 1 s choo I 



<)c t up, 1 1 I on ( s ) 

Ut 

>.l 

3rd 

<Uh 



_Dates_ 
_Dates_ 
Dates 
Dates 



Current Residence 



I). llC llf I'll III 



vocal I una I 



co I logo 



1 s t_ 
2nd_ 
3rd_ 
*4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



"el i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Plac<" of marriage to your grandmother 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



date 



? Stc(if|r.indmothiT (your mother's side) 
Name 

I f de.jd, Hale of death 



Pl*cc of birth 

Education (number of years) 
qradc school h i gh school 

Occupot ion(s) 

I'.t 

?nd 
3rd 



Dates 
_Dates_ 
Dates 



Current Residence 
Date of bi rth 



vocat lona I 



lst_ 
_2nd_ 
3rd 



R»; I i 'j i on 

tical port/, civil or soc i al c 1 ubs , sororities, etc. 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



ac«* of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



CHILDREN ot A & b A~ I or B- I } ~ your father's name should appear below 



' • Name Rasnqp B. BREED 

Place of b.rtn T „ ^. visas r: t , Ynt update 17 January 1910 

Number of years of schoolin g 8 ,. Occupation retired mechanic 

Residence Ma^h^l 1 to wn . Towa Marital Status marrieT ~ 
Number of ch I Idren five ' ' 

2 ' Name Ea riene June BREED HUNT 

Place of birth Stockt on, Jo Davi e ss,, 111, d ate 4, June 1914 

Number of year's of 3 chbo H n g' 12*T nurses train Qccuoatlbn registered nurse 
Res I denc eRpckford. Illinois M arital Status widow 11 

Number of children three ——————————— 

3. Harne Carson Franklin BREED 

Place of b I rth Stockton, Jo Day., 111."— date 6, May 1916 

Number of years of schoolin g 12 Occupation tool & die MaKer 

Res I dence Stockton, Jo Day., 111. Marl tat §tatuS marrTSS" "" 

Number of chl tdren two ———————————— 

Name Murnice ■ Roma in BREED ■. : '. 

Place of b I rth Stockton , Jo Day., 11 1. " ' date 8, August, 1918 

Number of years oTs choo tin g'' TZ 111 ' ' ticcu pat 1 ort &>U^^ P ^ ' — 

Res I dence Stockton, Illinois Marital ftatus man lyu. 

Number of ch f idren two ~~™ 



Name Aleda Belle BREED ALBRECHT 
Place of birth Stockton, Jo Day. Cty., IlT.~ date 17, April 1920 
Number of years 0/ schooling TT" ' Occupation homenakei 

oDri)ng Green, 
children sixteen 



Res I dence oprflng Gre en , W isc JEb/? FsTa tus 
Number of 



S. Name Wa yne Elezer BREED 

Place or'"b I rth Stockton, Jo Pay., 111. "* <Tate 22, July 1922 

Number of years oY schooling ^ ' " dccupa'ti On farmer " " 

Residenc e T »*'\> Elizabeth , 'TTT'.""" Status married — 
Number of ch 1 1 dren three 



Name Verla Mae BREED STURTEVANT 

Place of bt rth__g^ockton," J'd' Uav., HIT " date 18, May 1924 

Number of years 'oT schooling ^ Occupation lactbry worker 

Res I denc e Savanna, Illinois ~ " HarHtfi! 5tatu8 mar ried 

Number of ch I Idren two *""~ —————— 



Name 

Place of birth ~ "" d ate 

Number of years of schooling Occupation" 
Residenc e MarTTal Status " 

Number of children — — 



Name 

Place of bl rth ' date 

Number of years of schoeiTng " "Occupation 

Residenc e Marital Status 

Number of chl Idren ———«—— 



0. Name 

Place of birth ' ■■.<■■ — 

Number of years of schooling Occupation" 
Res 1 denc e ~- — ~ iWIJ-a l i iV« »..« 
Number o f mi lU i m i ___«erltaT Status 



•<tN ul (. and 0 (or (.-I, [)-l)-your mother's name should appear below 



N. Ill II 

I I ,. .* 

M.IMll.' l 



.Reola. JSajci«a-feiajLLl£S_BHEED 

■ l /'-.ir . of scno 



(TTruj 



12. 



d.>lo 5j June 1922 



'' .Sural RH .flhfit.h. Illinois 

'•' 'hlldrcn three 



Occupat i on Home maker 
Marital Status married 



,T^n Mr>KTl.T.TPS GOPPERNOLL 

'I I In I (h J nn JMna .Tn FtlV - . T 



il.r f '. I y 
He «■ i drnce 
Numbc 



• •.II s of school I n< 



Dav 



111 



nq 12 



' " ^H 1 . 1 . stockton 
r of en i 1 dren three 



Illinois 



date 20, May 1924 



Occupation Homemaker 
Marl tal Status married* 



'« i «■ 

P I jcc of lj i r th 

of years of s choo ling 

Pes i dencc 



Number of r.h i 1 d ren 



rrrrrTrr, 



U. H.im,- 

PI. if 

Numiini uf ^ears of s choo 1 i ng 

Hr ■. i den re 

Number <if < h i 1 dren 



date 



6"c cupatl on 

Marital Status 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupa t i On 



Nan*- 

P I ,icf of h ! r t h 

Number of years of schoo 1 I ng 

Me s i den ce 



I <■ i of ch I 1 dren 



date 



Occupa t Ion 
Marital Status 



N.irnr 

P I .ice of birth 

Number of years of schoo ling 

Re* i dence 



NumLi.-r of ch i Td ren 



date 



becupat lOri 
Marital Status 



7. No-c 

P I ace of birth 

Nijmb#> r of /ears of school Ing 

Pe-. i dence 



Su-nber of ch i 1 dren 



_ date 
"Occupation 
Marital Status 



P I ace of birth 

Number of /cars of school Ing 

Pes i dence 

Number o f children 



date 



________ becupat I on 

Marl tal Status 



Name 

P I ace o r birth 

Humour of years of s choo ling 

Res ' dence 

Number of child ren 



10. Name 

P I ace of b I r i h 



."W ' o* ^ e a r s of schooling 

Kes i dencc 

Numbe r of ch i I dren 



date 

Occupat lOn 



Mar I tal Status 



date 
Occupat I On" 



Mar I tal Status 



Your Father 



Name Wayne Elezer BRSED 
I f dead, date of death 



Current Residence rural B^ Ra.beth, Illinois 



g+^irt»n Tr» navi peg H+y j ] ] ^ n ^ n Date of birth 22. July 1922 
Education (number of years) ' — 



Place of birth 
ducat ion (nu 
grade school 

Occupatlon(s) 



high school ^. 



vocat ional 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 



1st 


farit.nry worker, . , 


Dates 


1 940-4?. 


1st 


Stockton, Illinois Dates ; 


2nd 


Army Air Fornft 


Dates 


1942-4S 


2nd 


rural Elizabeth. ""Illinois Oates 


3rd 


Rarmer . , , 


Dates 


1943- pre sent 


3rd 


Dates 


Ath 




Dates 




«»th 


Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Republican, member Kavan^ugh 
tee #36 AF frAM. Elizabeth School Board, Committeeman' rat ' 'Jvb'od bi he Twp. ASCS 
Place of marriage to your" rural Elizabeth, Illinois 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather c 
of this page. (E-2) 



date 18. June 1942 
give that data on the back 



Your Mother 

Name Reola Marion McKILLTPS BREED 
If dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth Woodbine Twp ., Jo Dav. Gty., 111. n 
Education (number of years) 



Current Residence rural Elizabeth, Illinois 
Of birth 5, June 1922 



grade school 
Occupat ion (s) 

lst sflcrfitary 



high school ^ 



lona I 



co I lege 



2 n d homemaker 
3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates lQU0-4^ 1st Stockton. Illinois Dates 1 Q41 

Dates 191+2- pre set Dates 

Dates 3rd Dates 



Polltica l^y r e l vl l or socia l clubs, sororities, etc. Republican, Between the Bookend? 

Place of marriage to your father , „, , , ,, T , 
iin-rf- , r rural Eliabetn, 111, 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relatr 

this page (F-2). 



fixt.fmfii.fin 

date 18, June 1942 

Ive that data on the back of 



E- I Stcpf athc 



Name 

I f dead , date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat i on ( 5 ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



_Dates 
Dates 
_Dates 
Dates 



1 s t_ 
2nd 
_3rd_ 



Date of bi rth 



vocational 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



<<th 

Re 1 i g i on 

Pollticaf parlies, civil 6r" ?6£I81 clubs, fraternities, etc, 



Place of marriage to your mother 



Dates 
_Dates_ 
Dates 



Date 



F-2 S tepmothe r 

Name 

I f dead J date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat i on (s ) 

1st 

2nd 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



vocat lonal 



1st. 
_2nd_ 
3rd 



Date of bi rth 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



3'd^ 

Re I i g i on 

Po I 1 1 i ca r pa r t y , civil or soc I a I c lubs , sororities, etc. 
ace of marriage to your TTTKeT 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



date 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name 



appear below 



Name Mary Jean BREED MILLER 
Place of birth Free port, Illinois' 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence Monroe, Wisconsin 
Number of ch 



16 + 



151 



Name Sally R 0 ola BREED FISCHER 
P I ace of b i r th Freeport, Illinois 



Number of years of schooling T5" 



Residence Rockford, I llinois 
Number of ch M dren one 



Date of birth 5, January 1949 



Occupat J on teacher-homemaker 
Marital It atus married 



Name Darcy Waynette BREED 

Place of birth Savanna, Illinois 

Number of years of Schooling presently in Oth grade' 
Res i dence rural Elizabeth, Illinois'" ~~~ 
Number of ch i ? dren 



ite of birth 23, May 1952 

Occupation hometoaker 
* tat us married 



:e of birth 25, April 196I 
Occupation student 

Status 



single 



Name 

P lace of bi rth_ 
Number of years 
Res i dence 
Number of 



of school I ng 



TO 



: bi rth 

Occupation 



Name 

P 1 ace of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 
Res i dence 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of school i rig 
Res i dence 

Number of ch I Idren 



rth 



Name 

P 1 ace of" birth ' ~ 

Number of years of school Ing 
Res i dence 



Bate of birth 

Occupation 



Number of ch i 1 dren 

Name 

P 1 ace of birth 



tatus 



Number of years of schooling" 
Res i dence 



tat Ion 



Number of ch i 1 drert 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (I- 

I hereby donate this family histi 
rights, to the Rock Valley Col 1 e< 
Rockford Public Library, Rockfon 



you and your family are willing) 

-v, along with all literary and ai 
Col lection, depc 

, Illinois 



ni rn strati v<- 
1 ted in Un- 



signed 



Pi 



GENKALOGY CHART 



Lly Reola BSEED Fischer 



orn 23, May 1952 
arried 7/, August 1971 

ied 



jfavne Elezer BREED. 



Father 

B 22, July 1922 

M 18, June 1942 
D 



Frank Otis , BREED 



Reola Marion MCKILLIPS 



Mother 

B 5, June 1922 
M 18, June 1942 
D 



Grandfather 



B 19, January 1890 

M 4, September 1912 
D 20, October, 1961 



Bertha E. HINTZ 
Grandmother 



Elezer Everett BHEi 

Great grandfath 

b 1858 

M 28, April 1881 

D 191! 4 

1 Cecelia Viola HA.NLE 

Great grandmoth 

8 29, July 1861 
D 191+1+ 
Chrigtftphej.JHNTZ .. 
B 
M 
D 



B 26, March I89I 
D 20, October, 1961 



1900 



Augusta TESSMER 



B 24, March I858 

D 1928 



Albert Earl MPKIUTFB- 

Grandfather 
B21, December 1884 
M 2, June 1915 
D 21, March 1973 



,Jean Mary BfiQJflj 



Grandmother 

B 1, March 1888 
D 1, February 1948 



B I 8 te^nstar 18 

M 23, March 1881 
D 7, August 1945 



Louisa BORSCH 

B 6, September 18 
D 26, March 1933 



Afinm RRDIrfWn 



B April, 1848 
M 1. March 1882 
D 18, December 19 



Hannah EADIE 

B 27, August 1854 
D 4,, March 1938 



D -I 



Mfl rt^. & 

B 16, June 16 
D 15, March 1 
Oliver \ AN _ 



Mary " — 

B V'.sepTIFri 



*llen BREED 



B 27, Jan.l6 3C 



Elizabeth WH HELER 



M II4 , Nov. 1622 Agnes PRATCHETT 



■Allen BREED 
B 16UI 



John BREED 



Yinerva TRICh 



-1 



Wiiiiar. ?. Xf 



5#7 



*1 



3 2. Raj 

Samuel HIRST 
B 12, Pebrua 

. 

B ~ 7, A " ' 
Anirew BROWN 



1 -T-=!Q Fischer 



May 1952 

7, August 1971 



GENKALOGV CHART 



Wayne Elezer 3RSED 



!, July 1922 
M 18, June 1942 



Beola Marlon MCKILiIPS 



B 5. June 1922 
M 18, June 1942 



Prank Otis BREED 



I 19, January 1890 
1 4, September 1912 
'20, October, 1961 



Bertna E. HINTZ 



ndmotn 



B 26, March 1891 
D 20, October, 1961 



Grandfather 
B21, December 1884 
M 2, June 1915 
D 21, March 1973 



Jean Mary PH"WM 



1, March 1888 
1, February 1948 



Elezer. Everett BKEiD 

Great grandfather 

1858 
M 28, April 1881 
191U 

ICeceJia Viola MANLBI. _ 

Great grandmother 

B 29, July 1861 
Christopher . HIKE 



Rrarile 

-1T7T 



J M 

" D IS 



B 16, June 1835 
D 15, March 1891 
Oliver MANLBY 







Joseph BREKP 


B 1 1 , 

M 20, 
.& 23. 


Mar. , I7II4 
June. 1753 

Any. \ 1786 




ah BREED 


B 176" 1 






B 1H, 


February 1795 


M 12, "Dec, '1766 


Lv 1 i i a 


iBACOW 


M 

D 28, 


April 1877 


D 22, Aug. Il850 
Anna HTISCHISON 


B a bo 
D 


It 1723 


Lucy 


COLE 


B 1769 






B 19, 

D 22, 


January 1789, D 
September 1873 







Augusta Tg 



B 24, March 1858 
D 1928 
111 jam AJwrtKcKiLi.lPS 

B I S lyf.llfa,, 1«5( 7 

M 23, March 1881 
D 7. August 1945 



Louisa [jORSCH 



B 6, September I856 
D 26, March 1933 



Will i 



M 1856 
D 16, May 1895 
Amanla L. MILLER 
2, May IB 36 



D 1862 

Abigail FAWCETT 



D 21, Novembe 
Samuel HORS 



D 1856 

Abraham MILLER 



B 12, February 
M Mav 1851 

D 2k. March 1915 
Catharina HORSCH 



1871 
"TB1B" 



WAKEFIELD 



D 18, December 1921 



Hannah EADIE 

B 27, August 1854 
•d4., March 1938 



l8b,9, approx. 
ohn EADIE, Sr. 



;ember 1820 
;ember 1855 
:h 1899 



Mary STATHAM 

■B 22, September 1825 

D 10, March 191b, 



3, 

Cathe 



BATjIE 
nuury 1M20 



Thomas STATHAM 
B 19, October 1778 
M 1817 
D 19, October 1851 
Hannah HASLEM 



Anna ROLLS 



B 1», Oct. 16H] 
M 17, Dec. 1709 
D 1738 



Timothy BR"Fp 
B ' ' 1 

M-3, Mar. 1679 



Mary 

B l'\Sep.l671 



..11 enBRJSEI) _ 
B 27, JanTTETjO 



lilitabelV /WELLER 
a 

M ll|, Nov. 1622 
Allen BREED 



OUR BREED FAMILY HISTORY 



Agnes Pratchett and John Breed h L 3d a son, Allen, born in 
1601 in Westoninge, Bedford County, England. He married Elizabeth 
//heeler at Puiloxhill, Bedfordshire, England on Novemoer 1^., 1622. 
They had a son also named Allen who was born there on January 27, 
16 30. Allen, Elizabeth, and their son went to New England with 
Winthrop' s company and settled in Lynn, Massachusetts perhaps as 
early as I63O. (There Allen married again, a widow named Elizabeth 
Knight on January 28, 1856 3 

Allen (their son) was a husbandmen in Lynn and served in 

Kine Phillio's .Var. He married Mary (who died on September 30, 

1671), and their eldest son's name was Timothy (as in his father's 
will) who was also in King Philip's W .r and lived in Lynn, Mass. 
He married Sarah Newhall and they had a son Joseph, born on 
October 16, 1681, the eldest of eight children. (Tim remarried 
Sarah Bran in February, 1693 or ' 9iu) Joseph became a cooner living 
in Marblehead, Mass., marrying Anna Rolls (born or. October 17, 1688) 
in December 1709. They had a son, Joseph Jr. born on Karen 13, 
17lU,at ''arblehead, a son Samuel, and a daughter Mary (who was 
born on June 30, 1713 and married Benjamin Hutchison and they had 
a son Amos who was oorn in Lynn on August 18, 17U-3). Joseph Jr. 
became a shipwright in Charlestown, Mass. and married Hary Salter 
in Boston on May 20, 1736 and later married i-ydia Bacon (born 
about 1723) on June 20, 175^ at King's Chapel in Boston. Joseph 
ani Lydia had a son Joseph (III) and they lived in Charleston 
imt.il the town was burned by the British after Bunker (Breed's) 
Hill. Joseph put in a claim for the loss of his property which 
was also destroyed. He then moved to Weston, Mass. where he died 
on April 23, 1786. 



2 

Supposedly Joseph (III) (born in 1761) and perhaps his 
brother were Tories in the early 17 /CPs. 1 But after the British 
destroyed their father's barn and other property after Bunker's 
Hill, Joseph enlisted in the Continental Army thre^e times — 1777 , 
1779, and 1780. He married Anna Hutchinson (who was born in 1769 
to Amos Huchinson and his wife, Amos being the first cousin of 
Joseph) on Decemoer 12, 1786. at Hillsdale, New York where he lived 
for twelve to fifteen years. . The couple had a son Amos and one 
named Obediah who was born in Hillsdale on February 18, 1795 (my 
great, great, great grandfather), and probably other children. 
They moved to Butternut, Otseeo County for twenty years, and then 
liven in Truxton for fifteen years, and Joseph died in Lincklaen, 
Augsst 22, 18^0 (all the touns being in New York state). 

Obe iah settled in 0tse?o County with his naretits when cuite 
a y.o :r? man and there he married Lucy Cole also a native of i.'ew 
York. The. had nine children there, five. of whom were still living in 
1889 namely: Obediah (also snelled ^badiah nd ^oadioh) who was 
born in September 1% , 1815; Amos; Charles; Electa: and 3radley 
who was born on December 27, 183?.-^ Obediah, the father, was in 
the War of 1812 and came to Chicago when it w-.s but a small settle- 
ment of carins. His son Obediah probably proceeded his father in 
coming to Illinois in 1835 or 1837 startin^with a team, of horses 
traveling through. Canada, crossing the Rock River where Pockford 
is now situated (when at that time there was just on cabin). n e 
continued to Jo Daviess County were he assisted in the development 
of m ; nine? in the county which he did for seven years. He then 
"pre-empted the land comprising a part of his"farm paying one dol- 
lar and twenty-five cents ar acre in section two of Elizabeth 
Townshic.^ - He married n ary Cook on August 23» lfiUU ann the,, had 
thirteen children. ^ 



3 

Obidiah's brother, Charles, went to the same-county; sometime, 
perhaps with his father, and farmed near Pi tchervi 1 le con':ne to 
the county at the age of twenty-five and he married Catherine Smith 
in l8l|.9 and they had five chilar-en. 

Bradley was probably Obidiah* Sr. ' s youngest son (he is more 
than twenty-three years younger than Obidiah, Jr.). Bradley 
probably came to the county with his parents who, when they arrived 
farmed near Pitcherville (and. near his son Charles) a town which 
has long ceased to exist and in fact, no one knew where it had been. 
According to an old plat book of the county it was near the north- 
eastern border of Stockton Township (see map, pageB). ^ (The town 
of Stockton may have been further south ^t that time than it is 
presently). Bradley owned land in sections two and three of the 
townshin as did his father and Charles (this land is now situated 
on the northern edge of Ua5 Route 20 on the western edge of present 
day Stockton). Bradley married Martha Millett (who was born about 

Q 

June 16, 1835, around mid-19th century. In the Stockton Cemetary 
Obediah Breed, who died on April 28, 1877 at the age of eighty-four 
and his wife Lucy, who died at the age of eiehty four on September 22, 
l873f are buried near Bradley, who died on April 3, 1900 and his 
wife Martha, who died on March 15, 1893.^ 

Bradley and Martha had at least two children: Sueene (1853- 

1929) and he married Emma ( 18^7-1910) and both are buried at 

Stockton, and Elezer Everett Breed who was born in 1858. Elezer 
married Cecelia Viola Manley (who was born on July 29, 1861) on 
April 28. l88l in Rush, Illinois (see map. cage I ) and they are 

Q 

my great, sreat, grandparents . Her parents were Minerva Trickey 
and Oliver Austin Manley also inhabitants of Stockton Township 
where Oliver owned land in section eleven of the township, which 



k 

was very close to where Bradley's father's land was. 7 (Cecelia 

had a bro r her Otis, who was born in March of 1 1866 and married 

Kate Nadiff ( who died in 1922), and they had at least two sons 

Merle and Albert?) 'Otis war a participant in the land r':s l - when 

the government opened land for settlement in Oklahoma in 1900 

J 

and obtained title to three-hundred and twenty acres,) 

Elezer and Cecelia farmed around the villages of Warren and 
Stockton in Jo Daviess Cojnty and had four children, one oeing 
my arandf Jtther, Frank. (The Breed's marriage license page 5) 
(Their family picture pase 7) 

nterview with Beth Breed, member of the Dajghtere of the 
American Revolution, November 17, 197i|.. 

^All^of history before Obidiah, 3r. is from the Breed Famil 
Association in research for the DAR. 

^Figured date for birth from date of death and age on tomb 
stone in Stockton Cemetary. 

^■ Portrai t and Bi o grachi cal Al bum of Jo Daviess County , 111 . 
( Chicago, ill. , Chapman Brothers, Ibb9T7 P 653 . 
c 

-^ Hi s tory of Jo Daviess County , 111 . (Chicago: H, F. ^-etl & 
Company, Times Building, ld7ti ) , p7 7U5 . 

6 Ibid,p.777. 

^At las of Jo Daviess County and _the state of 111 . (Chicago: 
Warner - HTFFi ns and Berrs, 1 5 7 2 ) , p. 0. 

8 

Marriage license of Elezer and Cecelia Breed. 
^Tombstone? at Stockton ^emetary. 



I 



FRANK OTIS BREED, HIS CHILDHOOD 
(my paternal grandfather) 

Frank Otis Breed was born on January 19, 1890 to Cecelia 
Manley and Slezer Everett Breed on a farm between Stockton and 
Warren Illinois He had an older sister, n abel and an older broth- 
er, James and on July 6, 1897 another brother Clair was born.^ 

p 

There were also two children who died in infancy. 

Little is known of .Frank's childhood. His family thinks he 
went through the first eight grades at a country school near 
Warren in Jo Daviess County. During grade school and during his 
teens he probably helped farm at home. In about 1908 or 1909 
when Frank was about eighteen or nineteen, he became sick with 

h 

tuburculosis and went to a sanitarium in Oklahoma. 

Later he went with his brother, Jim who went.rto Wyoming -to 
farm near a town cai led ■ Hillsdale . James married 1-1 arie Cashnan 
and they Vd two sons, Everett and Paul, and a daughter, Dorothy. 
Clair also had two sons and a daughter and lived in Wisconsin ' 
Raoids, Wisconsin. Mabel married Hsnry Wixson and they settled 
in Jo Daviess County near what was once a village called Morseville. 
and -her and her husband had a son and a daughter. 

Elezer, like his son, also had tuburculosis and finally re- 
tired from farming when he became ill. He and Cecelia moved to 
Stockton where two year? later, in 19 ll|. , Elezer died and is buried 
in .Ladies Union Cemetary, Stockton. 

Cecelia was to live quite abit longer than her husband and 
get to meet all her grandchildren. She was a very religious lady, a 
faithful member and regular attender of the Evangelical United Brethren - Onrch • 
in Stockton which she joined in 1377 and in which Frank was also 
a member. She worked herd for the Ladies tJnion which she help . 



t 



6 

found, and was also a Sunday School teacher and a steward.^ She 
often traveled in the winter, but saw her grandchildren who lived 
near quite often and they remember her fondly. 

She eventually moved in with her daughter when she was no 
longer able to live alone. A newspaper article datec November 20, 
i31|2, stated how Celia (as she must sometimes have Deen called), 
was ill and her two sons from out of state, came to visit her. 
She d i% at the age of eighty-three at her daughter's home in 19kh 

after she had spent nearly -ier entire life in the Stockton Town- 

2 1 
shio yi»cinty. Her son Clair died on September 21, 1950. 

When Frank returned home from -Vyoming he probably did farm- 
work in the area. It is not known when he met his future wife, 
Bertha Hintz, but it was probably in 1911 or 1912. They either 

met through friends or nerhaps at a dance since Bertha liked to 

7 

dance alot, but r rank would never learn. 



••■Clair Breed's obituary from the Stockton Herald hews, Sent. 2 

1950. 

Cecelia Breed's obituary from the "StocKton Herald Mews , "I9/4.4. 

-^Interview with her grandson, Wayne Breed in Septeno^r, 197^.. 

^"Interview with her granddaughter , Earlene Hunt in Sept., I97U 

^Eleaer Breed's tombstone in Ladies Union Cemetarv, Stockton. 

^Newspaper article f rom"stockton Herald "ews", Novemoer 20, 
19I|.2 on Cecelia Manley's bein? ill. 

^Interview with Carson 3reed. her firandson on November 16. 197 



IT 7 

BERTHA E. HINT7, HER CHILDHOOD 
(my paternal erandmot^er ) 

Bertha E. Hintz was born on March 26, 1891 to Augusta Tessmer 
(who was born on March 2k, 18^6 in Germany) and Christopher Hints 
(also probably born in Germany) in Stettin (?) Germany (now be- 
lieved to be a part of Poland). Her father worked in a government 
owned stable as a manager and he and his family also: took care of 
a small plot of land of about five acres. ^ Here the,y raised vege- 
tables, pigs and probably other things. They had seven children: 
Elizabeth, Frank August (born on May 20, 1882), Anna Ddrthea Maria 
(born on July 1, I08I4.), Herman, Bertha, Martha (born in I89I4. ) , and 
Marie (born on March 25, 1897). Augusta wanted to bfing her 
family to America, but it is thought that Christopher did not want 
to go and in fact, felt he would not make the voyage. Possibly 
Augusta's relatives, the Tessmers who were living near Warren, 
Illinois, sponsored their voyage through their ch irch (helped raise 
money or something) and they started out when Bertha was nine years 
old, in 1900, But Christooher was right--he did not see the 
United States for he died on board ship. 3 His wife and family con- 
tinued on without their husband and father. Bert-ia told stories 
later of their crossing the Atlantic and how one Polish family 
always "stele" Marie, the youngest, because she was so cute. rt hile 
their father w^'s ill the older children would have to babysit, 
Marie while their mother cared for him. There was also a wealthy 
man aboard with his young granddaughter. Evidently she was not 
toilet trained, and whenever she soiled he would throw overboard 
her beautiful lace panties much to the amusement of Bertha and 
her f ami ly. k 

The Hintz' s probably came straight to their relatives in Jo 



Daviess County after reaching the United States and then lived in 

various homes around Warren. The younger ones attended school 

there until the eighth grade and learned English then. Marie and 

Bertha and perhaps others of their siblings were confirmed into 

the Lutheran Church in Warren.-' Marie and 3ertha were both eood 

artists and a couple members of the family learned to play tie 

accordian and were quite musical. 

Elizabeth had not come to the United States with her parents 

because she was already married in Germany and had children. But 

she lost her family in some kind of epidemic (influenza perhaps) 

and she came to America a few years after them. She married Frank 

Droose hereP-Her sister Ann, .married Wilhelm Broee in 1901, shortly 

2 

after they arrived and they had eight children. Herman married 
Emma Teccer.dorf and they had a lar^e family.''" Frank married and 
he died or. April 2), 19^9 and Marie, the youngest, married Emil 
Kant on. October 6, 1916 and they had four children: '-ore thy, 
Or ville, Viola, and Lois. Martha died at the age of twelve on 
°ctober 10, 1906. Augusta, their mother, remarried in about 
1908 to William Zunker in either Jo Daviess or Stephenson County. 

Bertha worked after eighth srade doing ho isework for the 
"well-to-do" Sround Warren. On .January 17. 1910 she save birth 
to a son she nnmed Roscoe B. 'who was born around warren/* 

None of Bertha's family is now living but they left aiot 
of children (grandchildren, treat grandchildren), many of whom 
live around the Jo Daviess County area. 

i 

~ Interview Sept, 197U with Carson Breed, her son. 
p 

Anna Hintz Broge ' s obituary. 



^Interview with Earlene Breed Hunt. Sept.. 197k. 
"letter from Verla Breed -turtevant, November, 197^. 
Interview with Emil Kant, October, 1T71;. 
Date from the family Bible. 



BERTHA AND FRANK BREED, their life together 
( n,y paternal grand parents ) 

Frank Breed and Bertha Hintz met in 191] or 912 and were mar- 
ried on September [>, 1912 in Apple River, Jo Daviess County, 
Illinois. They hail their pictures taken around the time thej were 
married and a bracelet Bert-, a is wearin" in hers was <?iven to her 
by Frank Probably a? an engagement or wed linrr present. 

For the first couple of year.'' of their marriage Frank, Bertha, 
ana her tor Ross, lived in Waterloo, Lowa where Frank worked in 
a factory. They returned to c 'o Daviess County in 1911; and lived 
in ar apartment above a store in Stockton fop a short while. 
Bertha's brother-in-law, Emil Kant, remembers visiting thei there. 

They scon moved to a farm sout: of Stockton where their first 
daughter was born, Earlene June, on June >• , 191li. She was a small 
baby, small enough to fit in a shoe box and earned the n'.ckt one 
Dolly which she still keeps today. This far 1 ": was owned by >-r. . feed 
Hermann whom Frank heloed with the far"- work and bertha k spt house. 
;Vhen Dol'ly was born he save Bertha a rocking chair to rock the 
baby in and later gave a small one to Dolly which she still has 
tod ay . 

They moved to another farm nearby ..here Mr, ■ rw.nr.ti 
Frank !?et started on his own. On this farm two sons were born: 
Carson Franklin on May 6,1916 and "irnioe homain on August 8, 1918, 
About a year after Murnioe was born they moved again, this time 
to a farm owned by Frank's ""other (though she never lived there) 
w'f ich he bought from her. Or: April 17, 1920 they had arof 
daughter, A led a He 1 I , on July 22, 1922 a son Wayne (my father) and 
Verla Mae, their youngest was born on "ay 18. 192i| . There are 
few details of their experiences their firs! few years of marriage, 



but w.i tb the ir sevon children they were plenty busy, no doubt. 
•V the tir.e Vorla wa: born Ross, now fourteen, had finis-hed eislith 
grade *nd worked as a mechanic and j n the trucking business for 
awhile. He lived at home part of the time. 

iVhile famine* they raised everything — ;ows, • orre • jhickens, 
:'h's and lucks. As the children grew :p they be^un ioin : '<: many 
of the chores. The boys did most of the' field wor* milking, and 
carrying wood although Dolly. bei rr-t one of the oldest; helped with 
haying before the younger boy? were hi it enough tc 'hey used teams 
of h: orses for field work, One ti?e when they wer" In .1'r.r water 
from the house well to the n i Murnice, t! e son who J ways seemed 
to be in trouble, decided to have their horse, Tops, pull a wagon 
with the water buckets or.. As Hum 5 ce was Leading '-. i - , he broke 
away from his grip and headed for Vorla. nis sister, who was 
playing nearby. fortunately the hocse missed her, but <o:/'j f : and 
broke the wagon. They also used the hors •<• to p ; 1 i their t. + •>- 
seated bufrgy which almost upsel one rainy night. One winter Carson 
and M irni :e were cleaning t ie b irr s and out now s * raw in for the 
cattle i n i the boys sot inte a lii tie f i*j , ht--Carson go? hit in the 
no?e . 1 1-a tor as he was choppin r ijood, Carson sot hit with 3 piece 
of wood--Ufrain in the nose. That night the boys w»r< trying t 3 
milk a cow which h^d just had a calf, Murnice told C irson ie was 
^ro • n - Into the ho ise to set some rloves, but, actually he had no in- 
tention of ret irning to help old the cow so she would no* : < ' ok . 
Carson ended up getting kicked — again in the nose and ..-at furious 
with his brother who ended ip having to milk the cow I 1 m self. Ber 
too helped outside, out stil] always put a good meal on the tablu 
for 'he large family. 

The airls also h id outside chores like es*?-Ruth'»ri ng and trur- 
denina thoush Verla said later she dislike-, faming excent for the 



gardening and baby animals. Berthu, their mom hid lots ol warden 
[which she enjoyed and kept anrd^nr evn in her later years J and 
she also earned hundreds 6f Jars of fruit ind vegetables <»ach year. 
They stored many ve ?et ables in thier dirt-floored basement where 
they would keep several months like carrot: , onions, and beets, etc. 
Bertha wo ild sew. for the girls and also matched aiot. The ■• ; r ' s 
were responsible for inuc o*' ' he hoisework--maki n?: beds every day 
and certain weekly chores such as s ; i Li k ' ne th< pun? every Frida 

Their house was rot too large, the boys shared a rou-i, as did the 
oldest girls, and Verla, ■.-.'hen she was young slept ii u room it 1 , 
ler oarents. They i .! a summer kitchen at one time so not to 
leat up the noise too much while cojuit g in the summer. They also 
lad a wood -ind coal burning stove in the living rc >m which was 
taken down In the spring and the room was on y used in the .. . er 
when guests came. Then in the fall awain the >ipes were painted 
with stove black, the furnace put back up, and lighted--!' or a few 
ho-.rs t*ierr whs always nlot of smolto in the ho so ' ron- the new 
paint being singed. In the winter they used the living room since 
the;, deeded the room, being in the house more. The pipes went 
through the girl's and their parents' rooms but the hoys were often 
-. ' f ?.old'. 

At ni rht in the living room, * e family ofter » 3d rd * iits'i . 
Their little terrier, Tippy, always danced in front, of i-'rank who 
t her let the doc get on a ci air an ■ coveit) him up with a sheeoskin 
coat. But as the hoys went to bed. especially C, .>*.-• or:, 'ho do if 
would try to sneak out of the room to go upstairs with him. He 
rarely mad-:- it past Bo rthu, who always told him to go !. a\ lown, 
but if be did he. ! dash upstairs ar>d into bed with Carson he' J go 
way deep into the covers. But every night Bertha world corne in, 



13 



> s : Carson if the clog was there (and Carson would pretend he 

whs sleepinglj so she'd lift the blankets off and there was the cog. 

In 1025, while route 78 was being built through Stockton, 
Frank war hiehway superintendent for two year.-.. They also bought 
their first car that year, a 102^ Ford for seven hundred dollar:;. 
In those cars the gears were in the floor pedel with 1 low, high, 
and neutral or, different levels. About the second time Frank put 
<•■,•■ car ir the corn crib they were usinp as a parage, he sfcoDned 
■ little too hard on the pedeJ and went, past neutral. He ironed late- 
Ly si outed, "Whoa, whoa J" to t.r. 1 o new "horse" to stop it! This %r 
went throusrht aloi,--tho younger nids took to ro school lifter it was 
n.-- ] oncer t m family car and eventually it, was converted into a 

W - '.in, 

rheir second dsr w« • a ur.ed tVn r ' ac "'pujik bought in Preeport, 
Illinois. Prank, not use to a manual shift, irove the car home in 
secon i ( h dr.i vo of about twenty-five miles) ant; when he sot home 

it was steaming away ind so was he thinking he had been sold a 

peal Lemon. As he was "cus in?" away at the ear. his son Carson 
told urn what had hap <ened and becan showint? him now ir worked and 
his dad then exclaime how much faster it went that way. 

Although bertha, having 1 i ved in ij err. any for r 're years, knew 
lerr'MM, .-'re tauc^t her children very little-- just n mbers and s few 
sayina ; • oer as; tonally s to them i n (}orrr.&n like "win Tannebaum" 
(which she also sang to her srandchi ldren inri i remember her singing 
"Still e is'j.-ht" to mn), Although her children now wish 'Sh would 
h3ve taur!- ». them more she •eoo-ihly did nor. because her nrothcr' s 
children ?ould barely speak lintrlis when they started schooi and 
she tho t that Was wror. *. She always told her nephews and nieces 
when they visited to "5peak Rnslishj" 



She did cnr.vorr.e in reman with her mother, Aug ista Zunker, 
w.p cane to live with them in 192b. They did this especially . hon 
they ' : nut wan the children to know what they were talking about. 
>\ >r ist.fi Li r ;al y sat in a certain spot in the kitchen and did patch- 

rk, 'in everlasting chore, and crocheted. In 19?.'! or so bertha 
] i :ame very ill and finally went to the hospital for in operation. 
T> en frrandrruj ZunBer would shout to the kids in German to je-l them 
to help with sunper, or whatever. Also at that time Prank had heen 
hurl and had a hi nod clot in hie. \ e cr 30 while his wife war in the 
Hi 0pn j t 1 his daughter Do'ly .:: j rnd for him. tihi le Bertha was Ln th( 
he;: t i t ?» 1 her mother passed aw-ty and Bertha war- in such a serioua 
condit Ion r.he war not told ri 'ht a ay ana did no*" go to the funeral. 
The children in school «fir«> called home that day and it must have 
Lid t ' mi : 

•'■ i-t broth ir (""rank ilsc came to 1'vo with them in about 

1910 and stayed several years. He was a b.i eater but not much of 
a worker. nr: day is he, hi i roti er-in-law Prank and some of the 
boy 3 were ". n the I 'rid c itting the corn t>y ha no ana saoc^it.^ it, 
ir. roe early sprinrr of the year, it started to rain. Uncle 

Frank a lid they better so h ••■ so * ley don't act struck by lightening 
but ' r rar.k ^reed said, you cat "">t struck by lightening in bed, 
but you still <?o to bed every n'rrht. The Breeds also visited 
Bertha's • - i a t i vf r sometimes ->rd si 1 the older ore? wo ild «nea« 
German- .jabber ■ nr? away • nd Bertha's husband would just s i t back ana 

T n the fall of the year, after the ni«s were sold the "a-ily 
1 , >s 1 nl ' • ' ' ■ 1 othi it.t f ron 

ordpr catalogs. The;, waited for the packages to arrive, all wrapped 
ur in heavv brown paoer. They then usor; the paper in mattresses 



as ins ilation. Every fall the kids would take clean grain sacks 
out to the cornfields and get their sacks full of husks (in the sum- 
mer they used straw) to put ifl the mattresses with the brown paper 
outside and covered with ticking. Then they often had a feather 
mattress on top of this. I remember Grandma's feather oeds in 
her upstairs bedrooms. Bertha was a very thrifty person, never l 
wasteful, and she let her husband take care of finances. 

The children do not remember the depression as beine all 
that bad since they always ate well and only had to buy essentials 
like suerar, salt. etc. They did leave their farm then though when 
they could not keep up with the payments. Havine such a bis family 
the kids were always busy. When Frank lived with them Murnice 
began learning how to play his accordian as did Carson who now en- 
joys playing his own home organ. Aleda Belle took lessons on the 
violin, but that instrument did not suit her or her to it perhaps. 
Once Murnice got an air rifle and hit n5.s older sister Doily right 
in the you-know-where and she wouldn't talk to him for a month. 

In 1930 Ross married and they h-d two sons, «James and Eunene, 
but they were divorced in 1936. At this time Dolly, Murnice, and 
Carson were in high school and the rest still attending x ankee 
Hollow School, aooit one and one-half ^iles from their here, as 
all the older ones had. Carson an-i Murnice were in the same class 
bee use Carson started a year late because he had yellow jaundice 
when he was six. Then when he did start Murnice missed his older 
brothe. r so much Erank sent him too, thinking he' d soon tire of 
it. Instead the opoosite happened—he really liked school and con- 
tin. :ed. Everv ni?ht Frank instituted a study h .. jr for the school-a? 
children. Murnice did euitevin school and always toox this oppor- 
tunity to reao a library book or anything other tnan schoolwork. 



He would hide whatever in his schoolbook, so hes father would not 
know. His siblings never told nowever, since their father Drobablv 
would have disliked that worse than "urrrce's extra reading. Fran 1 -: 
did most ot the disciplining in the household with words though 
and not spankings. Their children considered them quite strict 
parents. 

The school was a major entertainment center of that day, 
much as it is now for school .families. Their country school, how- 
ever, was also a church for awhile which they attended pretty regu- 
larly—either Sunday School or the worship service every week. 
After church there were occass i onally baseball g ,mes or picnics. 
They started attending the Evangelical Gnited 3rethen Church in 
Stockton where Frank was a member. There was also a Community 
Club which met at the school once a month on Friday nights where 
all the neighbors got together. Sometimes they had pot luck din- 
ners and at Christmas the children would say nieces, give plays, 
and have a grab bag. The fa mily also went to the Breed Re inior annua 
that was held until the 191+0' s and saw m ny of their relatives. 
This was held at different parks in the area, often in Kraoe * J ark 
in Freenort, and was sometim:s attended by a co -pie of hundred Breeds 

Stockton , the nearest town, was not much different in the 
thirties than it is today. They went to oand conderts there on 
Wednesday nights in the summer and did their shopoing there. The 
six youngest children all attended high school there. The older 
ones walked usually as they had to grade school though sometimes 
the oldesfe daughter. Dolly, would ride a horse and leave it at her 
Grandma 3reed's. The younger ones got to drive a c >r to school. 
Their subjects are subjects teenagers still take today. They also 
often visited their Gramd^a there , which they all enjoyed. 



n 

Earlene (Dolly) was the next to leave horr.e after Ross. After 
hif?h school graduation in 1932 she worked in Stockton keeping house 
for people and in 193U went to a ockford, Illinois to nurses training 
at the Swedish American Hospital. She received u er registration 
in 1937 ^nd worked at the hospital in oostectrics On June 6, 
1938 she married Linden Hunt (born or. February 7, 1917 in Unionville, 
Iowa) and they had three children: Joey Lynn, Terry *ayne; and 
Linda Larlene. 

In the late " thi rties the family raised another boy, Bertha's 
nephew who was just a toddler when he came. .Vhen his mother re- 
married and came to get him ne did not want to leave. Verla and 
rt ayne were the only ones home at 'his time and enjoyed 'cheir baby 
"brother". Carson and "urnice had graduated in 1935, and Murnice, 
who really never cared for the farm, started at Kraft's Cheese comoany. 
Carson farmed at home, then worked for a farmer, and in 1936, when 
his parents moved^ he took over their farm (which Frank had bought 
for one-hundred and fifty dollars an acre ana had sixty acres and 
also rented some more). Carson married on Octo_ber 18, 19 3°. to Jean 
Pohl and they had two children, Judy and Uary. Murnice also married 
that year on December 23 to Beth Hillary and the j too had a son 
and daughter, Jeff ard Jennifer. 

.Vhen fhey moved Verla had to transfer to another grade school 
called Soring Valley. Aleda 3 el le graduated in 193^ and s^e mar- 
ried Delmar Alorecht that August 25 and they farmed with Carson 
for awhile. All in all, the Alorechts had sixteen children; Sherry, 
3onnie, Arlon. Kenny, Virgil, Adela, ^avid, Duane, Kyle, Larry, 
Debbie, Wendy, Danny, ^athy ana Tim--a list my sister and I used 
to tr, and see who could finish first and if we rememoered everyone! 

Wayne graduated in 191+0 and Verla in 1914.2. She married Jack 
Sturt-ev tnt after working at the Savanna Army ^epot; on January 26, 



19U5 and they had two daughters, Vickie Rae and Jackie Kay born in 19U6 

and II4.7 »-^la '5"mom wanted her to have a big church wedding but 
Verla felt this would be too much for her mother. All the wed- 
dings were small, and Frank and Bertha discussed upcoming mar- 
rages with their chilrren except for Aleda Belle's s' nee she 
eloped for they thought her to young to marry. 

In 191+3 or so Bertha and Frank mov d to a farm near Schapville 
Illinois and now *-.here was just the two of them. In 19'.jb they 
again movec to u ent in Stephenson County, and this was to be their 
last farm for it was here Frank had his first of what was to be 
several strokes. J-n 19U6 he suffered his first stroke and lost 
the use of one of his arms and partial use of the on" les. The 
couole left the farm and moved to a house they purchased on East 
Queen Street in Stockton. From about 191+9 through 1953 or so 
Bertha walked to her job at ^twoods Factory. 

I remember my grandparents at this home. By the time I 
was old enough to remember them. Grandpa could novt walk without 
assistance and his soeech was imoaired. He was always a more 
quiet- man anyway than his wife who was a sood talker who most of 
their children taKe after, a trait which I too inherited. Bertha 
kept a garden in town and made a rock garden also. ohe always had 
many flowers outside around the house. Their house was small, a 
kitchen, liv'ne room, and dining room (which was used as a sewing 
room and later as a bedroom) and upstairs ware two small bedrooms. 
She made rues for some of her grandchildren one ai wnich-I still have. 

On October 22, 1961 Frank arid Bertha were found dead In t^eir 
home by their son, ^'urnice 1 . Aoparently tne, had been ill and had 
died a couole of days earlier on the twentieth. The coroner was not 
sure of the ca ise of deat h when his s -spicion of botulism:- (from home- 
canned food) was never confirmed by the laboratory tests. Bertha 



may have had a heart attack and Frank, wno the doctors a : hort while 
before this, did not know what was keepine him alive, may have 
died while trying to roach hor. Bertha once s -.id that her and 
her husband were a team, making decisions togetner and she believed 
if Frank died she would not live long af-er. The children consi- 
der their oarents a nroia ~i an honest, hard-working co iple and 
believe they had a fine, and enjoyable family lify. 



History taken from interviews with Frank and Bertha Breed's 
children: Carson, Dolly, Wayne and Murnice and from a letter 
from Verla. 

Birth dates from Family Bible , 

iFrank and Bertha's marriage license page 23. 



i 

WAYNE BREED, HIS EARLY LIFE 
(my father) 

Wayne Breed was the youngest son of Bertha and Frank Breed 

and born or. July 22, 1922 on their farm in Stockton Township, Jo 

Daviess County, Illinois. His middle name is Elezer after his 

Grandpa Breed, but he really never appreciatea the odo name and 

now generally uses the initial "E". Being a rather small boy and 

the youngest son he is said, by his brothers and sisters, to have 
n a 

gotten a little spoiled. He was (and is) a picky eater and as a 

child never wanted anything on his plate to touch and used a 

different spoon to eat different things with. He wouldn't eat 

peaches, because th^y were slippery going down, or jello, because 

he thought it was alive since it wriggled. He was also fussy about 

his belongings-would never sleep with his brothers or even let 

1 

anyone touch his bed." 

As '.a very young child he had rickets. At the age of seven 
or so he had ear trouble and eventually had a mastoid operation 
plus had his tonsils and aednoids removed at Sti Francis Hosoital, 
Freeport, Illinois. After ^is operation he stayed with his 
Grandma Breed for a short time, who lived in Stockton. Her grand- 
children always thought it was a real treat to visit her. She 
made the best blackraspberry jam in town and also made the largest 
suerar cookies with one huge raisin in the midnle. She was small 
in size and always wore the starchiest sun oonnets. aprons, and 
dresses and low-he«led shoes, with a button strap. She kept a neat, 
cozy home where Verla, Wayne's younger sister, st:yed quite often 
as a teenager and attended church with her as she quite religious. 

Wayne and Verla also clayed with their maternal T ranrimother 
who lived with their family when they were preschoolers. They 



£1 

would play mail carrier with a shoe box as the rail box. Their 

Grandma would read the "letters" in German, since that's all she 

spoke and they thought this was really funny since they could not 
2 

understand her. 

Wayne attended Yankee Hollow School about a mile walk from 
their home through eighth grade when he graduated top in his 
class. . .also bottom because he was the only one] The school had 
picnics and other activities. 

During his last year at Yankee Hollow some members of the 
family got scarlet fever ana the whole household was quarantined, 
someone even had to come in and milk the cows. Wayne was only 
sick a short while and ended up spending much of the several weeks 
sledding. They all had quite a few play things including ice 
skates, sleds, and a homemade wagon and they also went swimming in 
the summer in a nearby stream. Shortly before the end of eighth 
grade his family moved to a farm further from school and he had 
to walk ciite a distance to finish school that spring. 

In the early thirties, when Dad was about ten or so t his pa- 
rents crot their first, radio. Before this time they often visited 
their neighbors who had one and would listen all evening. 

He entered Stockton High School in 1936 and was a member of 
the Future Farmers of America and its dairy judging team through 
high school. For a co iple of years he joinedthe Glee Club and as 
a senior, acted in a play. He nest remembers being on the wrestling 
team in the lightweight division, starting in the ninety-five pound 
class as a freshman and as a senior wrestled in the one-hundred 
twenty-five or thirty-five class. His nicknum?, according to his 
yearbook, was "Pai".^ The class of 191+0 was the largest to gradu- 
ate from Stockton, up to that time, graduating about Si&ty. 



,22 

After graduation in June, 19i;0 ho worked at home for aw lie 
as he had done since he was a child--helping with the field work, 
milking,- etc. In January of 19U1 he began working at the ^raft 
Cheese Company in Stockton making boxes outside of the plant for 
thirty.-five cents an hour. After a week of that he moved inside 
and became a cheesemaker' s helper for which he got a raise. He 
lived at home while working there. At Kraft's he met his future 
wife who also was an employee. He and Reola HcKillips were mar- 
ried and lived from June, 131; 2 until October of that year in 
Stockton '.hen he joined the Army Air Force during World »^ar II. 

He enlisted in Galena, Illinois along with a friend, Carson 
Herring, who had graduated 'with him and who also got married the 
same day he did. Wayne was inducted at Des Moines, Iowa and with 
Cirson, left for basic training at Fort ^odge, Iowa, He was then 
stationed at Coffeeville, Kansas for a while and then was stationed 
at Eagle Pass, Texas for six months from November, 19U2 through 
May, 19Ll3. He saw his new bride at Christmas when she visited him 
and also had a three day leave in April. From Eagle Pass he went 
to the' Salt Lake City r . -Utah base for overseas training. Then he 
went to Mew York aboard a troop train that went through his home- 
town of Stockton. 

In June of 19i;3 he went to Glasgow, Scotland on the ship the 
"Queen Elizabeth" with about eighteen thousand trooos aboard. As 
they were crossing the Atlantic they were chased by U-boats. from 
time to time. He was all over England and finally stayed at 
Bobbinrrtorr Field, Herts County, England, near London. Here he was an 
airplane mechanic' or a "munitions worker for an air material squa- 
dron."^T l, ey were bombed by V-2 rockets several times but fortunate- 
ly, he- was not wounded. One day a friend visited him in a one-star 



A3 

general 's plane which they then took to London for a night on 
the town. TT i s outfit was later sent to a place near u xford where 
they set up a fighter base. 

On the day after VF Day, the surrender of Germany in the late 
sampler of 19l±$, his unit flew over some cities that had been . 
bombed including London; Calais. France; Brussels , Belgium; Antwerp, 
Germany and the cities that were once Cologne,. France and 
Dunkeroue, Germany and the Siegrie^ Line. He stayed another month 
in Encrland and on the trip home Japan^ surrendered . He returned 
to Stockton to live as a civilian once' again. h 

■^-Interviews with Earlene oreed Hunt and Carson Breed, ""ayne's 
siblings, Sept., 197*4-. 
p 

Letter from Verla Breed Sturtevant, Wayne's sister, Nov., 19711. 
""The Stockton Blackhawk-IQ^O" fron Stockton High School. 
^Newspaper article in 1^<|3 from the"Stockton Herald News*'. 
-'Most of history from interview with Wayne 3reed, Sept., 1971+. 



M 

HANNAH AND THOMAS STATHAM 
(my maternal sreat, great, great grandparents) 

Thomas Statham was born about Octooer 19, 1778 ne.^r Man- 
chester, England. He had either two brothers, Charles and James, 
or one brother named either Charles or James. In 1817 he married 
Hannah Haslem who was born in 1791+ in England and had two brothers 
and six sisters. For the next ten years they lived in and near 
Derbyshire, England and had five living children and two who died 
in infantcy. Their names were: Ann, Ellen, Elizabeth, Mary (who 
is my great, great grandmother) born on September 22, 1825, and 
Hannah. 

On November 1, 1627 the family started for the United States 
from Liverpool, England on the ship the "Great Britain." But a 
short distance out their sni- 1 collided with another vessel making 
it necessary to return to England for repairs. They began their 
journey again in January, 1828 and arrived at New York after more 
than sever, weeks of travel on March 17, 1828. They located in 
New York for fourteen years where five more children were born: 
Sarah, Jane, John, Martha, and Matilda, and another who died. It 
must have been a custom at that time to give the same name to two 
children when the first has died for it happened three times in 
this family. While in New York, Mary was converted to Protestanism 
in a revival. 1 In New York they lived in Albany, Utica, Oneida, 
and Caterafrus successively until in 181+2 when they went to Jo 
Daviess bounty, Illinois going through Chicago which at that time 
was a mere village. 

Soon they mov^d to a farm west of Elizabeth, Illinois in 
that county and built a reck house there and farmed the land until 



£5 



his death on October 19, 18^1 at .the age of sixty-three years. 

His wife, Hannah, stayed on the farm until her de^th on November 16, 

1866 and they are both buried at Evergreen Cemetary, Hanover, 

TIT • 2 

Illinois . 



^Mary Statham Eadie's obituary probably from the Elizabeth, 
Illinois paper of that time, around November 16, 1866. 

^Entire history based on an article in an unpublished 
pamphlet, Statham and Eadie-Stevenson CJeneologie s . 



BENJAMIN AND CATHERINE SADIE 
(my maternal great, great, gre^t grandparents) 

On January 3» 18^0 at u aroels, Scotland, Benjamin Eadie 
and Catherine Stevenson Hart were united in marriage. They both 
had had previous marriages. Benjamin's resulted with four 
children: Thomas, Robert, Mary, and "-ate) and Catherine had 
three (Robert, Martha, and Nanny) with her first husband, a Mr. 
Hart. 

Benjamin and Catherine were both probably born in the 1760's 
or 1790' s in Scotland. Catherine had three sisters and a brother. 
The couple lived in Scotland . all . of their lives it is believed. 

John (my great, sreat grandfather) was born to them on 
September 2, 1820 and a daughter, Ann Stevenson Eadie, was born 
around I832. She later married Thomas Burns and had seven children. 

The Stevensons believe their lineage and that of Robert 
Louis Stevenson are connected since both families came from Ren- 
frewshire, Scotland, but this has not been confirmed. 



Entire history based on an article in an unpublished 
pamphlet, Statham and Eddie-Stevenson Geneologies. 



MARY AND JOHN EADIE 
(my material great, groat grandparents) 



John Eadie, Sr. war, born on September 2, 1820 in Henlrew- 
shire, Scotland, the youngest boy of the family, and lived with 
or near his parents near Glasgow Scotland until he was twenty-two. 
(see page ) At the age of twelve he ended his education and 
herded cattle and later worked on a farm until the asp of seven- 
teen in 1837, at which time he beean working in limestone Quarries 
for the next five years. In the soring of I8I4.2 he set sail for 

the United States from Glasgow and landed at the New York harbor 

1 

about seven weeks later with aoout thirty dollars. He proceeded 
via the Hudson River and the Erie Canel to Buffalo and by the 
Great Lakes to Chicago. This was in I8I4.2 and they hac to do ible 
up teams to pull the wagons to come through Chicago where State 
Street is currently. From Chicago he went to Fulton County/ Illinois 
for four months and in February, , I8J4.3 he went to Jo Daviess County 
in that state, one of the later pioneer settlers. There he met 
Mary Statham, who had come to this county at the age of two and 
one-half with her family from ^nfland where she was oorn in 
Derbyshire on September 22, l825> (see page ). T'.ey were married 
on August 8, I8I4.5 (marriaue recorded at the-. County Court House, 
Galena, Illinois), and he continued workinc in the lead mines where 
he had b'-en working since he came to the county. 2 

In l8!i.6 they bought eighty acres of land from the government 
(section thirty-four) in E15zabeth Towship, Jo Daviess County. 1 
That ye-.r the couple also welcomed their first, ehiLd, Benjamin. 
John Eadie visiter) California in l0li9 returning about two years 
later by way of the Isthmus of Punanma Ho continued farming while 



3* 



eight more children, v"a most estimable family, - were born between 
181+8 and L86fi including: lilizabeth (later Mrs. Samuel wfhite of 
Elizabeth Township); Thomas ulitn ■ifWWM* — ifWWWPW I iiiB|i|HlTiM i , 

Hannah (my great grandmother); John Jr., Margaret A. (wo later 
became » vi rs. Wi Lliam Kraser and lived in Kansas); Robert (who lived 
near Thomas), Catherine S. (later was Mrs. ft-ate Arnold): and 
w/i lliam Wallace. (Their sen ■•tfohh J r., a merchant in Hanover, mar- 
ried UUve Craig who wag the great, great granddaughter of Daniel 
Boone. )^ In May 29, ,.1858 Mary h^adie joinea the Presbyterian Church 
of Elizabeth, Illinois and later joined the church at Hanover, 
Illinois wV-en they moved there. ^ 

In lfi69 the Eadies bought two hundred and seventy-two acres, 
section thi rty- three , in the^same' township~>al though they had a 
Hanover address. They had a f"lne residence and good stock buildings 
at this farm." In 1 87 1 John Sr. returned to Scotland and while 
there heard of the Great Chicago Fire. When he returned he Drought 
back the eldest four or five omhaned children of his sister, Ann 
(see pa ; TR ), to live with his family.^ 

On Mary and John iadie's fiftieth wedding anniversary on 
August 8, 1895 they could not get their family together for a 
celebration, but at Thanksgiving time, J n November 2b, 109b, they 
had a reunion witn all nine of their children present. Pictures 
were taken of the couple witn their children ano also of fif- 
teen of tieir :randchiluren (both pictures are in the possession 

of Reola Preed ) . Their chi dren cave them a family Bibi le and a 

13 

set ol parlor furniture. 

The couple retired in their later years and lived in the 
village of Hanover. On March 11, 139^, "the village of liar over 



was thrown Into a state of sympathetic excitement by the announce- 
ment that John Had i a , Sr. had fallen while on hi." wuy home from 
downtown and expired within moments." His obituary continues w.i th 
a very complete description of his death, an attack of "apoplexy." 
An t! at ti is Solid Republ ican - and pioneer .settlor of Jo ■ ' . v i es 3 
C( inty '' . . .was a man thoroughly devoted' to his family, and an 
earnest supporter of the Chrrsji an* religi on holdine membership in 
t! • Pirst resbyterian Church of this city (Hanover). Wis life 
was an excellent example representing the essence of the faith 
which he professed. He possessed great love for his native land 
and at the same time was a m st patriotic subject of his adopted 
country . " 13 • >" * 

Mary died on March 10, 1911; and is buried with her husband 
in the Everrrreen Cemetary, Harrover, Illinois. Her obituary states 
she was a most devoted mother even to her husband's nieces and nephews. 
"She was t he oldest settler in Hanover an the time of her death. 
Mrs. Sadie lived a life and possessed a character, denoting a 
close companionship with her Master." She went on missions of 

love no matter what the weather and her strenphtb of character en- 

12 

deared nop to everyone who ide her acquaintance. 



Portrait and Bi ographi es A lbum of Jo D nhess County , 1 1 1 i no i f , 
(Chicago^ 111. : Chapman Brothers^ THaTJ, p. 592 . 

p 

Statham ana Eadie-Stevenson Ceneolo^ies , an unpublished pam- 
phlet, 

^ History of Jp Daviess Cqyjity, Illinois, (Chicago: H. f. Ketl 
and Co., Times Building, I878), p. 7^6. 

'■'■The leneology 

5 

John Eadie s obituary, from the Hanover newspaper of that 
time, about ^arch 12, lb l ">9. 



3D 



°(}eneoloey . 

'Mary Eadie's obituary from the Hanover hewjjpaper, around March 1J, 

M i glory . of £o Davi cas County , p. 7'(6. 

9 

Seneolopy . 

Newspaper article probably from the Hanover newpaper about their 
anniversary dated around Nuvetnbor' 27 , 1890. 

^ L John Eadie's obituary. 
12 

Mary Eadie's obituary. 



ADAM AND HANNAH BROWN 
(my maternal great grandparents) 

Adam Brown was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in the month of 
April in l8U8--he never knew the exact date of his birth. His 
parents, Jean (Anderson) and Andrew Brown} set out for America 
with Adam, a small child of one and one half, an older sister, 
Jean, and an older brother, Janes. On the way across the Atlan* 
tic, as they were nearing the States, %s. Brown suddenly took 
ill, passed away on the shin, and probably was buried at sea. 

After landing in New York, the Browns proceeded westward 
and settled in Chicago, In a couple of years the elder Mr, 
Brown remarried and this broke up the family (Adam's family 
learned nothing more than this about his parents). In about 1Q5U- 
Adam was brought to Jo Daviess County, Illinois by a woman who 
was a member of the Eadie family of Hanover, Illinois in that 
county. (His obituary states he was an orphan when. coming to 
the county.) He lived with this lady whom everyone called "Aunt 
Grant", until he was old enough to make his own living by working 
on a farm. 

Around the age of twenty-one he desired to see the groat 
western country and he, accompanied by Benjamin Eadie of Hanover 
who was about twenty- three , set out for Montana, Idaho, and the 
mountains as pioneers in that part of the country. Mr. Eadie and 
Adam, in partnership, established an oxenteam freight line from 
the central part of Idaho to Butte and 3illings, Montana, They 
had as many as one hundred head of oxen at one time to pull the 
great lines of frei2ht wagons. Often the heavy wagons 'broke down, 
got stuck in mud, or upset on the narrow mountainous trails. And 



2 



it was on one of these trips that Mr. Brown was badly hurt and 
never fully recovered. The long trips of several hundred miles 
were only made v when /the seasons permitted. They would try to . > 
start only after the snow melted in the spring and the ground was 
settled. Then in the fall they had to be careful not to wait toe 
long before finding winter quarters. One winter Brown and Sadie 
lived in a cave, .or dug-out as they called it, which seemed quite 
comfortable from the way they described it later to their families. 

In 1881, after ten years in the freight business, Mr. Brown 
and his partner returned to Jo Daviess County. In the spring of 
1882 Adam purchased a farm south of Woodbine, Illinois. On March 1 
of that year he married Miss Hannah Eadie of Hanovei; the sister 
of his friend Benjamin. (Reola Breed hat? original marriage certifi- 
cate .y. Hannah was born on August- 27~' : 185U' neVr- fc-lirsbcth, Illinois, 
% daughter- of John and Mary- Eadie . ( see page ) and lived - there and. in 
ganover with .them before- her marriage. She was a seamstress at this 

Hannah and Adam Brown had four children all oorn at tneir farm 
near Woodbine: Harry Eadie was born on November 19, I883, Raymond 
J. was born on February 22, 1886, Jean Mary, my grandmother, was 
born on March 1, 1888, and Robert "•nderson was born on January 27 » 
18%.. 

The Browns farmed on that first farm for the rest of their 
lives. Adam was a great lover of fine cattle and they had many 
herds of them which were sent to the Chicago market. He also al- 
ways hud several teams of solenoid horses on his farm. 

Adam became very ill in the e^rly winter of 1921, and, although 
it seemed he might pull through, he passed away about six weeks 
later in FLnley Hospital in Dubuque, Iowa on December 16, 1921. 



33 

< 

His family was with him at the time of death. His obituary read 

that Adam was a "prominent farmer" and ". . .a respected citizen 

of the community and was held in high esteem by thore '.■.ho knew him." 

"His strength of character endeared him to everyone who made his 
3 

acquaintance; " 

After her husband's death, Hannah kept the farm going with 

•the help of her son Ray and hired hands. They also had a woman 

who lived with them in later years who worked in the house. Hannah 

was active in church, both the Presbyterian in Elizabeth, Illinois 

and the Woodbine Evangelical United Brethren where she taught Sunday 

School. My mother and her sister remember often visiting their 

grandmother on Sunday afternoons. They rarely stayed the night 

however because her house had no electricity until about 1933 and 

they had tc carry kercrene lamps around from room tc pock, a little 

if 

frightening to the young girls. Hannah died on March 1939 at 

the age of eighty-three years, six months and seven days. She and 

5 

Adam are buried in Evergreen Cemetary, Hanover, Illinois, 

' ' The Browns' sons all married: Harry married Anna Charlotte 
Dittmar on Ocotber llj., 1919 at Fulton, Illinois and they farmed 
near Derinda Center in Jo Daviess County. She died on March 22. 
1962 following a long illness and Harry is presently in the Eliza- 
beth Nursing Home, the only member of the family left; Ray stayed 
on the farm after his mother's death until he married H e len 3oevers 
on October 2k, 1914-6 in St. Louis, Missouri. They moved to her 
family home in t-ialena, Illinois and later built a house next door. 
She died on January 25, 1972 and he died on October 2k. 197U; Bob 
served with the army in 1918-19, married Edna Mouein on June 2k, 
X92% in Elizabeth and they had a son, William Robert born on April d. 



3<i 

1926 in Freeport, Illinois. They lived in Elizabeth until her 
death on December 23, 193U. Eob then worked in Rockford, Illinois 
for^while and on June 30, 19li6 he married Deloras Bartels. They 
lived in Dubuque, Iowa and she died there in February of 1963 and 
he on September 8, 197J±. William has married and has a son, Adam 
born in May, 1972, named after his great-grandfather. 

Although I did not meet my grandmother I knew all of my great- 
uncles Brown. During my childhood, most of the holidays, Easter, 
Christmas, etc. were celebrated with my mother's relatives and her 
uncles and their wives were there (until sickness made it difficult 
for them to come). Uncle Ray and uncle Harry were pretty cuiet men 
and Uncle Bob was the teaser. I do not remember Harry's wife very 
well but both of my other aunts were very nice ladies especially 
Aunt Helen who never had a harsh word for anyone, 

"'"Found his parents names on his marriage license to Hannah 
Eadie, March 1, 1882,, at Jo Daviess County Court House, Galena, 111. 
p 

Information about Adam's childhood, days in Montana, and mar- 
riage as told to Reola Mc^illips Breed when a senior in high school 
for a pap^>% by her mother, Jean Brown McKillips (her memories of 
her father' 1 , sprint, 19U0, 

^Ad am Brown's obituaries from area newspapers at the time of 
his death. December l8, 1921. 

^"Interview with Reola McKillips Breed, September, 197li. 

^Hannah Brown's obituary from Elizabeth Weekly News, March li , 1938 , 

Information about the thrown brothers from newspaper accounts 
of all of their marriages and obituaries for Raymond and Kel^n, Robert 
Edna, and Deloras, and Charlotte Brown. 



.-turn Is tt> be carefully Ullea out ana miacuen 10 mu renunni mui me .uama;t Llien.... xiiN l;<-„ 
$SVthe ]>l_<«- of the Oertl.lcnte which comes attached to the Licence, but Is IN ADDITION THER}^,,""" * 



ILillTOIS STATS SOAHL 0_T KKfiJCTK. 



eisiS of a Mar_iage tossif Clerk. 

Z-._.i_::r_;__./__ 



J^ZZ Jam« o/ GROOM, 

Place of Residence, 

Occupation, — 



-„.£.i£-&-j:s^3.^<,..5-. 



5. 
6. 
i . 
S. 
9. 

10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
U 
J.j. 



______i_L_--__.': 




X__..___7i__ 



S r ;* s >--■ _ < s <-/. 

Age next Birthday, L_L__ years. Color, ___fr_lkr^?£?. jKace, 

PZfice of Birth '. .^cjQtL^/ 

Father's Name, __:._____-./______. ____?£________:„__ 

Mother's Maiden JVame, __. 

Number of Groom's Marriage, 

Full JVame of BRIDE, 

Maiden JVame, if a Widow, 
Place of Residence, 

Age next Birthday, JUL .^years. Color, i 

Place of Birth, ,_4^.___L_..___.. 

Fu flier's JYa m e, fi&^f l M 

Mother's Maiden JVame, , \2ai. v „,/„ 

.\'d. of Bride's Marriage, _?.__*_._ ___-...._ _ . 

Married at ________________! _ _in, the County of 

■■- ? __«_?_______ and State of Illinois, the day of iSfe- 

II Itnesses to Marriage, J^t^'/s..M....£.(±..j£.{<J. LXa-M. ■ Z'.'.. 

N 11 —At Xos. s ami 13 state whether 1st, 2d, Jd, Mb. _c. Marriage of each. At 17 give names of subscribing witnesses to 
M-imaire Certificate. If no subscribing witnesses, give names of two persons who witnessed the ceremony. 

i?_^^^ . 18 VJ- 

■ '. : Hereby Certify that the infenrmctfgen accve giver, is correct, to the e'est 

r. -rs •- 1 - f ' (GBOOJf.) 



___?«ce, 

rx -J / 





-day ofJzMz£j& 18&L 



'L c^. X .< Set 

ourr. cf a J\£arriage 

\ _£ 



certify thai the above is a correct return cf a Jtfarriage solemnized, by me. 



>v . w._jfnc.- Oi Co., Pr-Crt. Frecport. 111. 






3«5 



JEAN MARY BROWN, Hr!R CHILDHOOD 
my maternal grandrontner 

•Jean Mary Brown was born to Hannah Eadie and Adam Brown on 
March 1, 1888 on their farm in Woodbine Townshio, Jo Daviess 
County, Illinois. She had two older brothers, Raymond and Harry 
and in 1892 another brother, Robert, was born. They all attended 
grade school at the //oodbine School, a one room country school. 
There is still a .Voodbine School which closed in the fifties and 
since has boon used as a church and meeting place, but it is be- 
lieved that when they wentithere may have been a different school, 
one of brick. 

In 1895 Jean, along with her family, attended her maternal 
grandparents fiftieth wedding anniversary celebration and she saw 
ali of her cousins, Jean never knew her paternal grandparents 
nor any of her cousins on her father's side. She quite often 
saw her mother's relatives especially a cousin named Ida who 
was herbage and lived in Hanover 'which was not too far away, 

Around 1908, while in her teens, Jean attended Spworth" Semina 
in i'ipworth, Iowa, this taking the place of high school. It is 
known she studied music there but it is not known what else she 
studied. She had many piano books (some of which I use today, 
since I am a nvusic major) and must have been a- fairly advanced 
player. Her p'arents had both a piano and an organ for her. 

She transferred from Rpworth to Upper Icwa University, in 
Fayette, Iowa. She apparently did not like the first school 
because she received post cards saying "nope you like it better 
at your new school." She kept one huse scrapbook especially 
made for post c-rds which was full by the time she married. She 



received cards from friends from the schools when she was home ar. d 

while at school got them from her brothers, relatives, und her 

husband- to-be . ^ At least one of her brothers also went away to 

school in Filton, Illinois. 

Until she was married when she was twenty-seven years old, 

she lived with her parents, except when s^e was away at school in 

Iowa. Sin.ce she had brothers she probably did not do alot of 

field work but did have her chores . ( perhaps" gardening and milking) 

In the house she helped with the housework, did much embroidery 

? 

work and textile painting. 



Scrapbook of post cards in the possession of Reola '"'cKillips 

Breed . 
2 

Most of history taken from an interview with Reola ricKillips 
Breed, Jean Brown's daughter. ( September , 197U ) . 



ALEXANDER AND ABIGAIL McKILLIPS 
(my maternal great, great, great grandparents) 

"In 1792 in County Down, England, Alexander McKillips was born. 
His father's ancestry is supposedly traced to an old Scotch fami- 
ly that settled in the north of Ireland. As a young man he emi- 
grated to America and became a farmer in Virginia where he met 
tflpid married Abigail Eawcett who was born in Bath County, Ireland, 
Her parents were natives of Wales and she probably came to Virginia 
with them as a young girl. 

Abigail gave birth to six children while they farmed in 
Virginia, In I83I4. the family went west and settled in Council Hill 
Township, Jo Daviess County, Illinois. While there, Indian and 
white renegades captured, beat, and tied Alexander. This sort of 
thing happened quite frequently in this areaat that time since it 
was still basically unsettled. 

The family eventually moved to Menominee Township, same county* 
Where he entered a claim, and lived there for some time. In lS5>2 
they left the farm and moved to Franklin Street in Galena, Illinois^ 
where they were buried after Abigail's death in l8£6 and his death 
in 1862. 

Alexander was tc have been a "man of strong and decided 

views' in politics" as a stanch Democrat and "a politician of much 

local fame." "'He was held in esteem for his abilities and many 
,2 

good qualities." 

Their children went their separate ways &3 they grew: Ben«- 
jamin visited Kansas and Missouri and eventually returned to Ill- 
inois settling in Clayton County with his wife and two -children, 
(he died ir. 1865>)J Alexander H&e lived near Kansas City, Kansas 



,-with his wife; Matilda Blackman lived with her' husband in St. 
Paul, Minnesota; Sliza J. Dryden died in Chicago in 1889; 
Emeline who married Melville Clemens and lived in Brooklyn New 
York; and William P., my great, great grandfather. ^ 



'5h 



■"•Interview with Verna Thomas Hutchison who was told the story 
'by her grandpa, Alexander McKillips' grandson, September, 197U-. 

Portrai t and 3iographica l Album o_f Jo Daviess County , 111., 
fChicago, rill. : Chapman Brothers, 1889), p. 1+33^ 

'.>' -^Majority of history Ibid., rtj.lij & • 

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31 

WILLIAM P. AND AMANDA McKILLIPS 
(my maternal great, great grandparents) 

Amanda L ; Miller was born on about May 2 or 3, 1836 to 
Abraham and Matilda Wakefield Miller (my great, great, great 
grandparents), the latter of English descent, who were natives 
of Pennsylvania. She married William P. McKillips in 1856 in 
Jo Daviess County, Illinois. William was born on January 1, I83I 
the youngest of six children in Warren Springs, Bath County, 
Virginia (now West Virginia). As a child of three or so. he went 
with his family to Jo Daviess County , Illinois, and received his 
education there (see page ). He moved to Galena as a young man 
and it was probably there that he met his future wife. While 
there he also made the acquaintance of the future hero U. S. Grant . 
William A. (my great grandfather), their first child, was born in 
Galena in 18 >7. 

In 1859 they moved near Weston, Illinois and started a pros- 
perous smelting business in Elizabeth, Township which they continued 
with for sixteen years. There, ten more children were born: Matilda 
in 1859 (who was remembered by her great-niece as a woman who 
often stretched her tales and also got things done rather slowly 
so that when anyone was not as quick as he thought they should be 
my grandfather, Albert McKillips (her great-nephew) would compere 

them to his, "Aunt Til') (She had a m i 1 1 i ne ty, in Elizabeth and late 

3 

in life married Robert Fowler); George in 1861 who later lived in 
Cherokee County, Iowa; Fannie in l863> Edwin (or maybe Edward) in 
186? who became a farmer in Woodbine Township; Ella A. in 1867; 
and Frank in 1869 who was member of the "Woodbine Silver Cornet 
Band when he was young ami Mary and Benjamin who died yo .n«r, maybe 
at birth. The children were all no have had much musical taste 



4^6 



and ability. 

On November 21, 1871 the family suffered the lose of their 

mother Amanda at the ace of thirty-five. Shs was said to have 

been "a true wife and tender mother and her loss was sincerely 

mourned, not only by hen own family, but also a largo circle of 
11 

friends. Since the younger children were unable to t Re cars of 

themselves the older ones, especially William and Matilda took 

care of them and kept house. Matilda took care of the household 

at least until her mid-thirties or longer. There was also a 

5 

Mrs. Woods who helped out. 

In 1872 William P. purchased a farm of one-hnndred -sixty acres from 
Illinois Ontral R>iTroad worth about four thousand dollars and 
the family moved to the new residence in I' 7U. which was located in 
Thomoson Township and he later added one hundred sixty-nine acres 
which were in Woodbine Township but nearby. The original farm was 
virgin soil (never- boon -plowed ) , but he "brought it to a high 
state of cultivation, and, with the fine residence and other build- 
ings he ' had )erected thereon, it (was) one of the oest properties 

6 

in the neishborhood . " In 1887 the house was totally destroyed by 
fire but scon another was built which he "elegantly furnished with 
everything necessary for comfort and convenience," 

For awhile Mr. McKill ips was the only representative ^merican- 
born citizen living in Thompson Township. He was a Rf publican 

8 „ 

with fairly independent political ideas. rie was a believer in 
Christianity but did not belone to a church. He served as a 
Highway Commissioner for five years and also as a school director. 
He also was a memoer of a Lodae in Elizabeth, Illinois. 

William P. moved to Elizabeth in his later years ?nd died 



h-i 



thorn on May 16 or 17, .i 895 at the arte of sixty-four years, 
four months, and seventeen days and is buried along with his 
.wife in the Elizabeth Cemetary.*^ 



■' Interview with Verna McKillips Hutchison in. Sept*, 19?:; as told 
to her by ner mother, Clara McKillios Tnomas (the great-niece), 

"Interview with Reola McKillips Breed in Gent., 1971,. an 
she remembered her father, Albert. 

-'Interview with Mrs. Hutchison, 
ii 

Port ra i 1 and Biographical Album of fo Davjp r: C ounty , 111. 
(Chicago: Chapman brothers, 11189 ) , p.~I;lh, "~ 

-''Interview with Mrs. Hutchison. 

^ Portrait and Bio era phi a I A] bum , p . l± 1 5 . 

7 Ibid. 

History of «Io Davie s.s bounty . Illinois. (Cnicago: H. F, Ketl 
& Co., Times Building, I878 ) , p. 792. 

9 

Most of history taken from n ortrai t and ^ • hi. --1 

10 

Tombstones for both William and Amanda McKillios in the 



Elizabeth Cemetary. 



CATHARINA AND SAMUEL HORSCH 
(my maternal great, great grandparents) 

Samuel Horsch was born on February 12, 1881 in Bavaria, 
Germany. Catharina (as spelled on tombstone though another 
source spells it Catharine) Horsch (her maiden name) was born 
on August 7» l830» probably also in Bavaria}" They were married 
in May, 1851 in Jo Daviess County (marriage recorded at that 
county court house) in Illinois after "they had voyaged across the 
Atlantic u cean together from Germany, 

..... .They first lived near Giiena, Illinois in that county and 

moved to Scales Mound later, a village about ten miles away. In 
1862 they, moved to one hundred and twenty acres in Woodbine Township 
in section 12, in the' same county. They continued to farm for 
■the rest of their lives. 

They had nine children: David, William, Mary, Louisa (my great, 
grandmother), her twin brother, August (who later married and was 
killed in a silver mine)2 Annie H., Samuel, Elias H. , and Fred- 
erick^ who was born ~in .1870, married-Marie (1881-1962) and he died 
In 191+3 and they are buried along side his parents in Woodbine). 

; 'Samuel died on March 21± t 1905?. The obituary said he was 
one cf the old residents of Woodbine and had been poorly for some 
time. His wife, Catharina died on January 7, 1913 and they are 
both buried in the Woodbine Cemetary 



"'" ■'■Date of her birth & their deaths on tombstone in Woodbine. 

^Interview with Verna Hutchison on October 25, 197U. 

^Most of information came from: Hi story of Jo Davi e s s Count y, 
Illinol s (Chicago: H. F. &etl Co., Times building, Ib?o), p. 773. 

fSamuel Horsch' s obituary from Stockton Herald h ews, 3-29-190^. 



LOUISA AN!) W LI I \K ?V-;KI! hi??. 
(my maternal «roat grandparents) 

William A. McKillips was born on June 18, 18^7 in Jalena 
and moved to Elizabeth Township (both in Jo Daviess County, 
Illinois) at the age of two near a settlement called Weston 
which no longer exists (see page ). lie once told one of his Grand- 
daughters that while liv ir.g there he watched the Home Guard drill 
in a field near his home called Green's Bottom and his mother 
cooked dinner for the men. These men may have been training for 
the Cicil War or perhaps this was after the war. William deci- 
ded he wanted to join the men so he could be a drur.rr.er boy be- 
cause the drummer boy in this outfit wore a nice coat with pretty 
buttons and he thought that would be fun to wear. He also 
hauled lead 10 Galena with his father from their smelt. This 
trip «->f about fifteen miles was a Ion? way with horses and the 
heavy load so they would have to stop along the way over night. 
All in all it was quite an exciting trip to him..^ His mother died 

when he was fourteen and he helped at home alot. Shortly after his 

p -2 
mother died the family moved to Woodbine Township. 

William A. married Louisa Horsch on March 23, l88l. She was 

born September 6, l8$6 in Thompson Township (see page ) «' The 

couple first lived on a farm in Woodbine Township and here they 

had their first child, a daughter, Clara, was born on October 17 f 

1882, Shortly after they bought another farm nearby. Here the 

couple had two sons--Albert Larl (my grandfather) and Harrison>fonroe 

born on Septv l£,l858« The family raised everything, just like most 

farms in the county~-chickens , dairy and beef cattle, pigs, hay, 

oats, etc. and farmin? at that time meant they were ail busy all 

of the tine. Its* known if William and Louisa attended school but 



William could read and wrote well. On the other hand_, Louisa 

had people read to her, although this might have been because 

she had poor eyesight in her later years. But in their family 

Bible there are some scribbles', which she made meaning she pro- 

1 

bably could not write. 

William and Louisa farmed until 1907-08 when they sold their 
farm, retired and moved to the village of Elizabeth on ^ain Street. 
Their farm home, (which was not at the time in possession of any 
McKillipsl burned down in 1973. Their children marri ed+--Cl ara 
went to high school for three years in Elizabeth and lived with 
her Aunt Matilda while attending. Clara married George Thomas 
(March 7, 1873- February 21, 1957rtSifee they had five daughters, 
Delma, Ila, Onita, Etha, and Verna > and a son George. Clara .. 
recently celebrated her ninety-second birthday at her home in 
Stockton. Illinois. Albert married Jean Brown (see page ). 
Harry married Ada Allen on October 21, 1913' they had one son, 
Allen, ( presently living^in California and he has two sons)and 
a daughter, Darlene (now Mrs. Melvin Schulz and they too have two 
sons), Harry died in the fall of. 1971. *t 

After his retirement William often helped his son Albert on 
his farm. .William had bought the farm, in 1911; for about one- 
hundred dollars an acre for a total of twenty-three thousand, 
seven hundred and fifty dollars for the two-hundred and twenty- 
six acres plus some old farm building?- Later William sold the 
farm to his son.^ 

In the early 1930's, Mrs, McKillips' health began to fail 
and she lost her eyesight completely. She died on March 26, 1933 
at the a??e of seventy-six yoars and six months, after a purlytic 



V5- 



"3 

stroke.-" William then went to live with his daughter on a farm 
outside of Woodbine and he died at her home on August 7, 19l|5.^ 
William and Lo.:isa are buried at the Elizabeth Cemetary near 
his parents. 



Interview with Verna Thomas Hutchison, the ^c^illips ' 
granddaughter^ as she remembered talking with her grandfather. 

1 ^Facts from William's childhood from For trai t and 3i opraohi c al 
Al bum of Jo Davies s C ounty , Illinois , (Chicago: Cnapman srotr.ers, 

TEJJTT p. TTFT 

^Louisa McKillins' obituary from an area newspaper at the 
time of- her death, March 26, 1933. 

^"Harry McKillips' obituary from the "Stockton rienald News" 
during the fall of" 1971. 

■^Tombstone of George Thomas at Woodbine Cemetary. 

"Interview with Reola McKillips 3reed in November, 197U (she 
had looked over the deed to the farm which -William had bought that 
now belongs to her and her husband.). 

William A. McKillips' obituary from an area newspaper at the 
time of his death, August 7, 19kS» 

^Tombstones at Elizabeth Cemetary. 



ALBERT EAR!, McKILLI' J S, HIS CHILDHOOD 
(My maternal grandfather) 

On' December 21, l88u. Albert Earl McKillips wa? born and, to 
his parents, was probably a welcome Christmas present since he 
was their first son, and as farmers, sons are always appreciated. 
He was born on a farm owned by his father situated in the northern 
part of Woodbine Township, Jo Daviess County, Illinois. We know 
little of his early years. He had an older sister, Clara, who 
once told her daughter of an important event which she remembered 
which occurred in about 1887.^* She was holding onto the hand of 
one of her parents and her younger borther, Albert was being held 
up to see the incredible machine--the first train from the East 
to come through woodbine!*" 

' ' In 1888 another boy, Harry, was born. The three attended 
Apple River School which still exists although now carrier- the 
name of Miller School, which was fairly .near their home. 
Albert completed the eight erades. after which he helped his father 
on the farm. At the turn iof the century farming definitely was 
alot more work and took more than one man to run. They raised 
the usual farm animals and crops raised in the area, dairy and 
beef cattle, chickens, pigs, probably oats r aorn'rand hay. 

Around 1907 he attenden school for awhile in Epworth Seminary, 
Epworth, Iowa. -His future wife also went there although its not 
cle'ar if they ever attended at the same time. Anyway Albert did 
not meet her there for he knew her most of his life as a neighbor. 
They must have courted for several years since they did not marry 
until he wis thirty-one year? old. 

Before his marriaee Albert farmed a farm in Woodbine Township 
that his father owned. He probably did this at the same time he 



c 

ran a small, but unusial double business with his brother, *iarry. 
An advertisement for it read (in about 191U ) , "McKillips Bros. 
Meat W arket-Agent for Studebaker and Maxwell Cars."3He also was 
in the ice business for awhile around this timo.^" 



-"Dateiof first train clarified in Elizabeth Centennial BooK, 
1968; r ■'" -• v-~. • - ".. - ~ ' ---U^r..;-!;, l~ 

2 . , 

Interview with Verna Thomas Hutchison, Sept., 197U as told 
to her by her mother, Glara McKillips Thomas. 

^A "magazine-like "Souvenier of Elizabeth and Hanover made 
in 1911* , p. 37. 

^Majority of history from interview with Reola McKillips 
Breed, his daughter, September, 1971+. 



• JEAN AND ALBERT . He KILL I PS , THEIR LIVES TOSET'IER 
(my maternal grandparents) 

Jean Mary Brown and Albert Earl McKillips were married on 
June 2, 1915 after a courtship of several years. They were married 
at her' parents' home with her relatives as guests. The paper 
said of the wedding, "Both of the contracting parties are well- 
known and highly esteemed in the vicinity of Elizabeth and Wood- 
bine. . . 'On their extended honeymoon they went to the "Great 
Exhibition in Calif ornia . and- many of the_western states where they 
visited many of both of their relatives. They too.c lots of pic- 
tures on their trip which are very interesting and in the pos- 
session of their daughter. , ". . 

They returned to Elizabeth where for a short while they lived 
in town in an apartment. In 1916 they moved to a fajmn three miles 
east of Elizabeth in Woodbine Township. Albert purchased the 
farm from his father (according to the deed he bought it in 1926 
and paid abo it the same price his father paid , in -191U , about one- 
hundred dollars an acre). In the early years at the farm they 
raised pigs, chickens, beef cattle, and milked about fifteen cows 
by hand. They also hid teams of horses for farmwork. Albert's 
father, William, helped out alot and they also had hired hands 
in the summer who lived with them. , '"• 

Their farm buildings were quite old and they soon began 
thinking of building all new buildings nearer the main road. They 
began in 1918 and the house was completed in 1919. It is a quite 
lar^e two-story frame house with four bedrooms upstairs and four 
rooms downstairs. They also built two barns and a hog house with 
the help'Of neighbors, a barn-raising (the house was built by pro- 
fessional carpenters). The old buildings were torn down and all; that 



now remains i 2 the basement and well and indentations in t'n ■- 
prround where the buildings had been. 

Neighbors often heloed each other then especially at harvesttir.e 
Neighbors also visited back and forth much more often than is true 
today, and the HcKillips knew many of their neighbors quite well. 
There are pictures of the men at the McKillips' farm with the 
machinery of the day. 

\- In 1922,' Reola iMarion (my mother), was born to them at their 
home. Their second daughter was born on Hay 20, 1921+. named Lois 
Jean. The girls attended school about' a mile away and they also 
helped with the chores and housework. They had no' sons and this 
trend was to continue when neither Reola or Lois had sons, f 

The Depression was not .terribly bad for them for they always had 

plenty to eat although they did have money troubles with their 

' • ■ ... . ./ ' 

farm payments as so many did at that time. 

" In ,1Q[;0 their eldest daughter graduated from high school and 

soon moved toa neighboring town where she worked. It was in this 

year they also purchased their first new car f jui ni i i lm i 1 1 1— paw ), 

Lois graduated in 19U2 and began working at the Farm Bureau in 
Elizabeth living at home. In 19146 Reola returned to the farm with 
her husband wh© began working with Albert. Jean and Albert were 
both very active in church affairs and members of the First 
Methodist Church in Elizabeth. Albert continued in the choir 
which he had joined about the time they were married. They were 
both quite interested in music and had a piano in their home most 
of the time. Jean played piano quite well although didn't, play s.o 
much as she grew older. Albert played the violin at one tine. 
Both of their daughters took oiano lessons as youngsters. 



Jean and Albert were both registered Republicans although they 
were not so active politically. 

In 191+6 Jean became ill and war confined to bed where she re- 
mained for the rest of her life. For two years her daughters 
and husband cured for her and she died of cancer on February 1, I9I4.8 
short one month of being sixty years old.-^ 

^""Elizabeth Weekly News" about their wedding and honeymoon. 

^Most of history from interview with Recla Breed, Sept., 197l|.. 

' -'"Elizabeth Weekly News", Jean McKillips'. obituary, February, 
191*8. 



61 

t 

REOLA McKILLI°S, H tr R EARLY LIFE 
(my mother) 

Reo'la Marion McKillips was born to Albert and Jean McKillips 
on June 6, 1922 in a house which her parents had just recently 
built.' She has lived on this farm about three miles from Elizabeth, 
in Woodbine Township, " Jo Daviess County, Illinois since that tine 
except for a few years after she graduated from high school. 

She had a younger sister, Lois, as a playmate ind also oc- 
cassionally saw some of her cousins. They were never crowded in 
their home having only four in the family and an eight-room house, 
When she was four years old the family took a trip to Kansas to 
visit relatives and they went in their Studebaker which had mohair 
cushions and vases for flowers between the front and back seats. 

She went to Terrapin Ridge School (currently a private resi- 
dence) which was a mile from their home near a main hishway. Lois k. §hv 
usually walked but occassionally got rides from the neighbors. 
'When it snowed heavily all the' neighbors would pitch in to shovel 
themselves out by hand. The McKillips only lived a mile from the 
hiehway and they were still sometimes snowed in for a week--the 
neighbors further down the road were often snowed in for two. 

They always wore cotton dresses with tan stockings to school 
which they disliked and even talk of them disgustedly today. To 
and from school in the winter they had snow pants or overhalls. 
Durins the depression the family received a pair of shoes from 
a "thoughtful" aunt and Reola's mother made her wear them to school. 

They got their first radio when Reola was about five years 
old--an Atwater-Kent that ran off a battery and had a bie horn 
on the top. She also remembers getting permenents with the elec- 
tric curlers of that time when each curler hooked up to an electric 



.5a 

wire and often you ourned your heaa! Lois and Reola seemed more 
fortunate than some, growing up in the depression, for in Reola's 
attic are many toys the girls recei ved--doll s and their acce- 
sories including a bed, swing,, chest full of clothes, and a buggy. 

At the age of nine Reola learned to milk by hand and is still 
at it though now they have machines. She even received a milkiha stool. 
At that time their herd consisted of about fifteen cows and they 
sold the cream for butter (until about 19l\.2 when they started 
selling all of the milk) and gave the milk to the pi^s. They did 
this so they did not have to worry aoout ref ridgerating the milk. 
The crirls also gathered eggs and' other chores. One time a cow had 
twins so their father gave each of the ?irls one--they named '•-.hem 
May ano June after the months they were both born in. They also 
had horses for teams for farm work which they learned to drive by 
themselves in the field and also rode sometimes. 

Be,ola and Lois also die hou sework-- du sting the mepboard every 
week, etc. and Reola had to make' a cake every Saturday (from scratch, 
of course and without an electric mixer) in case company would 
drop in the next day. Still today she does not like to mix things 
by hand because her mom m.jde her cream the shortening: and sucar so 
well. The girls were lucky though since their dad heloed with the. 
cishes'every night and they did not ha-<-e to (a reason that my own 
sisters arid I have used to try and get out of that terrible chore). 
On some Sundays the family went to Jean's mother's farm to visit, 
which was only a mile away. 

In 1936 Reola started hish school at Elizabeth and became a 
B student. During her sophomore year she was a cheerleader and 
all during high school attended many basketball games. She was 
in two school plays, a member of the Glee Club, and vice-presi- 



dent of her senior class. She usually rode to school with 
neighbors the first couple of years and then drove herself. and 
her sister Lois who started high sc 'ooi in 1938. During her time 
at home her family was auite involved with the Methodist Church 
in Elizabeth and attended regularly and Reola joined its choir 
while she was in high school. While in high school Reola also 
got to visit the big city of Chicaeo and some of her family's friends 
Who lived 'thar'.Q She graduated in June, 19U0 and that summer her 
family again visited Kansas. 

In November, I9J4.O. Reola began working as a secretary at 
Kraft Cheese Company in Stockton, Illinois. She lived at home for 
a year moving to Stockton to an apartment on Benton Street in 19/j.l. 
In that year she also met her future husband, Wayne Breed at drafts. 
They dated for about a year, going to movies at the Stockton 
theater and to dances at the"Paiace" in Galena, Illinois. They 
both enjoyed dancint? and became quite good partners for they were 
married in 19L|.2. 

History written from interviews with Lois McKillips Coppernoll'. 
Oct.,- 197U and Reola McKillips Breed, Sept., 197U-. 



ETHEL AND ALBERT McKILLIPS. THEIR LIFE' TOGETHER 
(ny maternal grandfather and step-f?randmother ) 

After his wife died in 191+8, Albert remained on the farm 
and his daughters and son-in-law lived with him. In 19i;9 the 
household welcomed the first grandchild-niece-and-daughter of 
Wayne and Reola. 

On March 5» 19$0 Albert married a widow, Ethel Mae Reed Fraser 
in. a cerempjiy held after the regular church service at noon in the 
First Methodist Church, in Elizabeth. The reception following was 
attended by two-hundred guests.''" Ethel Reed was born on January 19, 
1890 to Richard and Elizabeth Balbach Reed and grew up around 
Elizabeth, attend ing Hickory Grove School for eight years and 
graduating from Elizabeth High School in 1908. As a young girl 
she remembers doing her chores, milking, etc., and helping with 
the housework. She had one brother. Freeman and a sister Leone. 

She married ^ames H. Fraser in 1911. For awhile he worked 
for the railroad and he also managed the hatchery. They had one 
son, Harvey Reed Frarer born on August 11, 1916 and who, after 
graduating from Elizabeth in 193U was appointed to rfest Point. 
He now has a doctorate from the University of Illinois in theoreti- 
cal and apclied mechanics and is presently president of School of 
Mines and Technology in Rapid City in South Dakota, He was a oof- 
fessor at West Point and retired from the Army as a brigadeer gen- 
eral, He married Jean Mueller from Freeport, Illinois and they 
have three children: Dr. Harvey R. Fraser, Jr., presently living 
in California; Janet Hale (Mrs. David) (who has two children, Heather 
and David), and Joan Kay who is a student at Arizona State Univer- 
sity at Tempe, Arizona. Ethel's first husband killed by a train 
in l^hS. 2 



The newlyweds moved to her house in Elizabeth following a 
short trip. They had known each other through the church and to 
everyone seemed a most perfect couple — Ethel and Albert. 

One of the first things they did together was to help 

Albert's youngest daughter with her wedding. Lois married Gilbert 

CoDpernoll (born on January 10, 1921)) from Stockton, Illinois on 
3 

June 18, 19p0. They have farmed since that time and raised three 
daughters: ' 'Ann vTean, born on Hay 17, 1951 and is currently a 
graduate student at Western University, '"'acomb, Illinois; Sue 
Rebecca, born on May 8, 1952 and married Darrell Roberts in January 
of 1970—they are parents of two girls, Joan Lynn (born on June29, 
1970) and Jean Marie (born on June 18, 1971); and Gail Marie, 
born on April 30» 1953 and is presently a senior at WesternlH inOi5- 
Even though Ethel and Albert married relatively late in life, 
she was sixty and he was sixty-five, they had twenty-three beauti- 
ful years together. I. .remember my grandfather from the time he was 
about seventy-two, not even one-fifth of his life. Since' my 
grandmother died before I was born, Ethel is the grandma I remember 
and is she the perfect grandma, right down to the delicious sugar 
cookies and the bedtime stories she read us until s~e was hoarse. 
When she married Albert she already had two grandchildren of her o*)\ 
plus Albert had a granddaughter, find he soon had four more. She 
helped each time one of Albert's daughters had a baby, even when 
Reola and 'Wayne had their last daughter nine years after their second 
child, making a total of six granddaughters for Albert. Ethel and 
Albert often babysat for Lois and Reola especially as Reola lived 
only three miles away. I remember staying there on Saturday nights 
dancing with my older sister to "Lawrence Welk" and watching wre^t- 
1 ir.°r which, I 'learned later was a show my Grandma liked and not 
sc much Grar.dpa. 



At Christmas time my family always got together with ny 
mother's relatives at least twice — once .at our house on Christmas 
Day and , since my grandpa's birthday was on Dec-ember 21, we 
went to his house for a party before Christmas. He would often 
play Santa Claus only we always knew it because his hands, which 
showed alot of hard work, always gave him away. 

Ethel and Albert worked at the locker in Elizabeth from 19^2- 
19^1 and I remember once missing the bus at school and walking 
up to my grandparents (since they lived in town we always went 
there if we had to stay after school for meetings, etc. and my 
younger sister still does). They were working and since x could 
not get in I had to walk all the way to the locker. It was very 
cold that day and 1 was not dressed for the long walk. Grandma 
still remembers how cold I was when I finally found them. 

Albert also helped at the farm alot and still went out in 
the field when he was over eighty. They both came out almost every 
day in the summer to work and garden (and since my mother dislikes 
gardening she was glad to see them). Grandpa was also handy making 
things and we often asked him to mane storage places, desks, etc. 

In the 1970' s, Ethel and Albert started getting great grand- 
children ar.d again babysat occassionally . They have always been 
active memuers of the church and I remember them at churcL every 
Sunday, Grandpa in the choir in which he was a sixty-year member 
when he died. Albert had quite a sense of humor and often wrote 
poems for different occassions at church which were always inter- 
esting. He also got the job of mashin^ the potatoes at the church's 
annual Tirkey Suoper and always helped dry dishes. They took on 
the t 'ob of janitors for the church and Grandma still is employed 



as such. They both belonged to' the '-'artha Chapter of the Eastern 
Star which ahey attended regularly (Grandma still does) and Albert 
was a member of the Kavanaush Lod<?e ^36 AP &AM. Albert was very 
active even after he had some physical problems with dizzy spells 
and with his l^gs. They were always ready to help and often 
painted, wall-papered, you-name-it for their friends and relatives. 

On March 21, 1973 Albert died suddenly and he is deeply missed.^- 
Ethel is still a very active -person who seems ne er to get tired. 
My grandparents have had a great influence on my life and my son 
is now benefitting from all four of his grandparents plus a rrreat- 
graridfather and his Grandma Ethel. 



■'•"Elizabeth Weekly News" a marriage write-up of Ethel and 
Albert's wedding, March, 1950. 

p 

Interview with Ethel McKillips, November 17, 197L(.. 

^Marria^e write-up of Lois and Gilbert Coppernoll's weoding, 
"Elizaoeth Weekly "ews", June, 1950. 

Uob ituary of Albert McKillips, "Elizabeth Weeklv News", March 

1973. 



5S 

REOLA AND WAYNE BREED, THEIR LIFE TOGETHER I 
(my parents ) 

Reola Marion ^'cKillips and Wayne E. Breed were married at 
four o'clock on June 18, 19L|.2 at her parents home in Elizabeth 
Township, Jo ^aviess bounty, Illinois. Wayne's brother, u urnice 
and his wife, Beth, attended the couple. At this time they both 
were employed by Kraft Cheese ^ompanv. Stockton, Illinois. After 
a short wedoing trip to "ockford they lived in an apartment on 
Benton Street in Stockton. 

Reola cooked their first meal as newlyweds on June 22, 19U2 
and the sales ticket from the Stockton department Store where 
she got the groceries read: 3 chops-28^, craci<*;rs-12>zf, peas-10<2f, 
cake-29^, salt-9^, lard-20^, and pork and beans-lpcz' for a total of 
$1.33 plus 3^ tax. They lived in their first apartment from June, . 
until October of that year when Wayne enlisted in the 'army. He 
was away for almost the next three years. My mother moved to an 
apartment with a girl friend (who's husband enlisted with Tad) also 
on Benton Street. Mom and her friend visited their husbands at 
Del Rio, Texas when the' men were stationed at Eagle ^ass there. 
This was in December so at least Reola and Wayne spent "heir first 
Christmas together, but not the next two. Except for a three-day 
pass Wayne received in April, 19U3. they did not see each other again 
intil he was discharged in the sumner of 19q.5>. 

While he was away Reola joined a group called the Soldierettes , 
the wives and girlfriends of the men at war, in whicn they usually 
played cards although once they did roll bandages. In 19UU Wayne? s 
younger sister Verla who was working at the Army Depot in Savanna, 
I 1 1 inois , came to live with Reola and stayed for about one year. 



When Wayne returned the couple remained in Stockton for a few 
months and in the early part of 19L».6 moved to her parents furm 
where V/ayne began working with Reola's dad, Albert. In 191+6 
Albert bought milking machines which made that job much easier, 
so they could milk about twenty cows plus they had pigs, chickens, 
and beef cattle. In 1914.6 Reola's mother became quite ill and 
Reola and her sister^who was living there, cared for her until her 
death in 19U.8. It was also. in I9I4.8 that Wayne started on shares 
with his father-in-law. In 19I+9 the couple greeted their first 
daughter, 1-i ary Jean, who~was named after Reola's mother, Jean 
Mary. She was born on January 5> 191+9 and since her grandpa and 
aunt were living there besides her parents she had alot of atten- 
tion. 

In 1950 both Albert and Lois married and left the farm, al- 
though Albert still worked alot in the summer. On Hay 23, 1952 
Reola anc Wayne had their second daughter, Sally Reola, who, like 
her sister, was born in the Deaconess Hospital', Freeport, Illinois. 
The family also bought their first televicion that year which has 
become a part of their everyday lives. They built on to one of the 
barns that year also with the help of a nei'ghoor and relatives. 

For entertainment Wayne bowled once a week at the bowling 
alley for about ten years, from 1952-1962, or so. Reola was in 
a woman's card club, and they both learned to square dance. When 
the girls started school , there was much eroiny on in the household. 
They each were in I4.H and Brownies, at different times, Reola even 
being a leader in I4.H. The girls also started piano lessons when 
they were each around seven and continued with them throueh high 
school. These activities meant having to stay after school and 
Reola Clicking them up, a chajffering job she felt she was employed 



in by the time the girls were in high school. The school acti- 
vities keeo the whcle family busy attending plays, concerts (all 
of their daughters have been (and Darcy is) in the band, and the 
many other events the school sponsors. i^/ayne is a great sport 
fan of baseball and foofcball and attends most of the high school 
basketball games. He has served on the School Board for the past 
eleven years. 

Darcy Waynette (named after her father) was born on April 25, 
1961, nine years after their second child and who was supposed to 
be a boy like the first two "should have been." When she started 
kindergarten, Sally was a freshman and "ary Jean a senior, so they 
all went to school at the same time $0r only one year. Darcy is 
eurrently in eight srade at Elizabeth, is a cheerleader and an honor 
student. 

Reola joined the Home Bureau which is presently called the 
Jo Daviess n omemakers Extension in which she has held many offices. 
She is also a member of the Between the Bookends Book Club and 
the United Methodist Women. The First ''ethodist Church. is an impor- 
tant part of Reola' s life and she attends regularly and is involved 
in many of its programs. Both Mary Jean and Sally were in the 
church' s c^oir while they were in high school and they all parti- 
cipateiin its activities. Wayne is ' in t : :e Kavanaugh Lodge -36 AF&AM. 

Way re made improvements on the farm: installing a bulk tank,, 
in 1961. a-pipe line was added in 1963t and he has had built two 
Harvesters in the 1970' s. Wayne and Reola now owr. the fa^n which 
they started .buying in the early sixties. Wayne has been a member 
of various farm organizations including the Farm 3ureau, and a 
committeeman for Woodbine Township of the American Soil Conservation 
Service. Even though the work on the farm is much easier than when 



Col 

Reola and Wayne were children, there is still much to ue done. 
Reola has always helped with the miking, morning and hight, and 
they currently milk over fifty cows. She also has helped with 
field work although not so much now that they do not bail hay a 1 -' 
they used to. They always have help in. the summer including 
a "couple of .Vayne ' s nephews who lived with them in the fifties and 
for the past several years they have boys from Elizabeth in high 
school or college work. 

Mary Jean graduated from hierh school in 1967 f valedictorian 
of her class and then went to Illinois State University, Normal, 
Illinois where she graduated with a degree In special education 
in January. 1971. On February 13, 1971 she married Michael F. 
Miller from Warren, Illinoi s (born on November 19i|.9) at the 
First Methodist Church in Elizabeth. She taught at Galena, Illinois 
for two years and then they moved to Monroe, Wisconsin, their 
present residence. Mike graduated from Wisconsin Sta^.e University, 
Platteville, Wisconsin, in May, 1971 and since then has worked fur 
Production "relit Association in Darlington and Monroe, Wisconsin. 
When they moved to Monroe, Mary Jean -began teaching second grade 
at Orangeville. Illinois' s school. On August 3, 19714- the couple 
welcomed their first child, Nathan Michael, and she is currently not 
working . 

On June 18, 1972 Wayne and Reola celebrated their thirt yfif tfa. 
wed jing anniversary . wi th a "sure-rise" dinner and since that time 
have h-id two more. They enjoy their role as grandparents and are 
greatly appreciated as parents and grandparents. 



^Interview with Reola and Wayne Breed and from my memories 



%2 

SALLY BREED FISCHER 

Sally Reola Breed was born to Reola and /i/ayne iireed on 
^ay 23, 1902; I grew up on a farm outside of Elizabeth, Illinois. 
My childhood was pretty typical as far as cljbs and school goes. 
My parents and I took a trip to ^'est Point, New York when I was 
five, a trip I vividly remember plus we went to the Mid»-Atianti c 
States and MinnesotavMichilgan area on two separate trips with my 
older sister also. 

I graduated from high school in 1970 and started at Northern 
■■-llinois University, DeKalb, Illinois that September. Some of my 
summer jobs during college and high school included waitress, factory 
worker, and corn detasseler (a popular job with young teenagers 
since it only takes a few weeks out of the summer and the employ- 
ers will hire anyone over thirteen). I have also taken a class 
each at Highland Community College. Freer>ort. Illinois, and 
Kishwaukee Junior College, 1- 'alta, Illinois, I am a music major 
with an emphasis in vocal music. 

In January, 1969 1 met John Bruce Fischer who was a senior 
at Stockton High School at that time. We dated and were married 
on August 7, 1971. John was born on June 6, 19^1 to Stanley and 
Virginia Fischer at Freeport, Illinois, He graduated in 1969 
and also attended Northern. We lived in two apartments In DeKalb 
after we were married, a one-bedroom from September, 1971- June-1972 
and then we got a two-bedroom in which we lived until January, 1973. 
We rented the larger apartment because on February 12, 1972, 
3rian Michael Fischer, our first child, entered our lives. 
John graduated from Northern in January, 1973 a "d we moved to 
Rockford where he was employed by Pollard, Wheeler, Harms, & Elliot, 



SALLY BREED FISCHER 



Sally Reola Breed was born to Reola and wTayne -irec-d on 
May 23, 19^2. I grew up on a far:'. outsJ 

My childhood was pretty typical as far as cl.Jbs and school goes. 
My parents and I took a trip to l^est Point, New York when I was 
five, a trip I vividly remember plus we 'went to the Mid »-AtIanti c 
States and Minnesota-Michigan area on two separate trips with my 
older sister also. 

I graduated from high school in 1970 and started at Northern 
-"■llinois University, DeKalb, Illinois that September. Some of my 
summer jobs during college and high school included waitress, factor 
worker, and corn detasseler (a popular Job with young teenagers 
since it only takes a few weeks out of the summer and the employ- 
ers will hire anyone over thirteen). I have also taken a class 
each at Highland Community Colleee. Freenort. Illinois, and 
Kishwaukee Junior College, '''alta, Illinois, I am a music major 
with an emphasis in vocal music, 

In January, 1969 1 met John Bruce Fischer who was a senior 
at Stockton High School at that time. We dated and were married 
on August 7, 1971. John was born on June 6, 195>1 to Stanley and 
Virginia Fischer at Freeport, Illinois, He graduated in 1969 
and also attended Northern, We lived in two apartments In DeKalb 
after we were married, a one-bedroom from September, 1971- June-1972 
and then we got a two-bedroom in which we lived until January. 1973. 
We rented the larger apartment because on February 12, 1972, 
3rian Michael Fischer, our first child, entered our lives. 
John graduated from Northern in January, 1973 and we moved to 
Rockford where he was employed by Pollard, Wheeler, Harms, & Elliot, 



a CPA firm, In December 197 3 he oe^an his present joo as an 
accountant at Eclipse, Inc. Our son is nov; two and one-half 
and makes qjite an addition to our family. 

I am currently a parttime student at Rock Valley College 
hoping to continue at Northern soon and complete my decree in 
music eduaation. 



- 



SOURCES i 

I. Cemetaries 

A. Elizabeth, Elizabeth, 111. 

B. Woodbine, Woodbine. 111. 

C. Ladies u nion, Stockton, 111. 



II. Personal Interviews 



A. 


Wayne and Reola Breed 


( Sent. 


, 197U) 


parents 


B. 


Earlene Hunt 


( Sept. 


, 197U) 


father ' s sister 


c . 


Carson and 3ean Breed 


( Sept . 


and Nov 


. , 197U) father's brot^or 


D. 


Emil u ant 


( Oct. , 


197U) 


Fathe r 1 s ur c I e 


E. 


Verna Hutchison 






mother's cousin 


F. 


Lois Coppernoll 


(Oct. , 


1971+) 


mother ' s sister 


G. 


Ethel McKillips 


(Nov. , 


1971+) 


step-erandmother 


Letters 








A. 


Kerla St urtesrant 


( Oct. , 


197U) 


father's sister 



IV. Books 

A. Hi s tory of Jo Davies s County , Illinoi s (Chicago: H. F. 

Ketl 3c Co.. Tirr.es Building, l8?B')T~p".~"7U5 , 792, 71+6, 773. 
3. S o u v e n i e r of El i zabeh t - ■Hanover made in 1 9 ILj. or so, p. 37. 

C. For i~ rai t and Bi o zravh \ cal Al burn of £0 Davies s Cou nty , Illinois, 
( Chicaeo : Chapman Brothers, 1589 ) , p. Z+IU , U15 , £92, 3c63 ?. 

D. Atlas of Jo ^aviess County and the state of Illinois (Chbago: 
Warner - ^iy;rins and 3eers, ii'72), d. 0. 

E. Elizabeth Centennial Book, ?as_t To P resent , 1968. 

F. Farm Plat Book - Jo DavieBs CountyTRockf ord : Record Hap Pub.,) p.?. 

V. Le&ral Documents 

A. Marriage Certificates 3c Licenses. 

1. Hannah 3c Adam Brown 

2. Frank & Bertha Breed 

3. Elezer 3c Cecelia Breed 

B. Marriages Recorded at Jo Daviess County Court House, Galena. II. 
1. Samuel 3c Catharina Horsch 

P. John 3c Mary Eadie 

VI. Newspaper Articles 
A. Obituaries 

1. Samuel Horsch, . "Stockton ^erald "ews", 3-29-1T05. 

2. Jean 3c Albert "cKillics. "Elizabeth Weekly "ews", 
2-19U8^3c"3^'197 3 

3. Frank 3c Bertha Breed various area newspapers including 
'Preeport Journal Standard','"Elizabeth Weekly "ews ", "Stock- 
ton Herald news." 10-1961. 

I4.. Cecelia 3reed, "Stockton ^erald news", I9I4.I4.. 

5. Hannah 6c Adam Brown, "Elizabeth Weekly news" and others 
12-1920 3c 3-1938. 

6. William 3c Louisa ^cKillips "Elizaneth Weekly »ews" 
8-19U0 *3-1933. 

7. - T ohn 4c Mary Eadie area newspapers, 1899 3c 191U. 

8. Otis ^anley, "Stockton Herald News" 

9. Anna CHarlotte Jrown, "Elizabeth Weekly News", 3-1972. 

10. Ray 3c- Helen Brown, "Galena Gazette" 1-1971 3clO-197U. 

11. Robert Brown, "Galena Gazette" 9-197U. 

12. Edna Brown. "Elizabeth Weekly «ews'' 12-l§3ii. 

13. Deloras Brown. "Galena Gazette" 2-1963. 



(a S 



Newspaper Articles (con't.) 

B. Marriage Write-ups 

1. Hannah & Adam Brown, "Elizabeth Weekly u ews", 3-1882. 

2. Lois k Gilbert Coppernoll, "Elizabeth Weekly "ews. " 
6-1950. 

3. Albert & Jean "cKillips, "Elizabeth Weekly News" 6-1915. 
Ij.. Albert & Ethei McKillips, "Elizabeth Weekly ^ews " 3- 1950 . 

5. Wayne & Reola Breed, "Elizabeth Weekly News',' 6, 1914.2. 

6. Verla &, T acK Sturtevant, "Stockton "erald "ews" 1914-5. 

7. Raymond fc Helen Brown "Galena Gazette", 1Q1±6. 

8. Robert & Edna Brown, "Elizabeth Weekly Wens", 1925. 

9. Harry & Lottie Brwon, "Elizabeth Weekly "ews", 1919. 
10. Rob-^ 4 - fc Delocas Brown. "Galena Gazette", 19U6. 

C. Miscellaneous 

1. Article on John & Mary Eadie's %0th u/eddine Anniversary, 
Nov., 1895. 



'LEASE. USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND- COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 



)eor Contributor to the Hock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
ew mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
iccess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY ************* * * ********** v v 

* OFFICE USE CODE 

1. Your name Sfrerpharue., . Hsc^hef- * 

DM. of for. Wfli| ( ^ * (.Of ) 

2. Your college: Rock Val l ey (ol lege (ID // ) 

Fo ckTo rcT, 111 i n o i s " * 

****** ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

Before 1750 1750-1800 V 1 800- 1850 

1850-1900 __J900 or later 

Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

_j£_New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) X M iddle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna., N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S . C . ) East South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., 0k.) X East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawai i , Alaska) HI. Wis.) 

"p lains (ND, SD, Neb. , Kan. , Iowa, MO) 

5. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in th i s paper have found themselves. 

)( Farming M i n i ng ■ _Shopkeeping or small business 

Y~~T ransportat I on B • 9 Business Manufacturing 

X P rofessions Industrial labor ^ Other 

6. Please check a I 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

X Roman Catholic Jewish P resbyterian Methodist 

Baptist Epi scopal ian Congregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon OTher Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks Indians M exi cans Puerto Ricans 

Jews X C entral Europeans I ta 1 i ans Slavs 



^ Irish Bri t ish y( N ative Americans over several generations 
East Asian y{ Other 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

^ Interviews with other X ^ am ' W Bibles X Fam ' *Y Genealogies 
f ami I y membe rs 

Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 

Photographs Maps ^ O ther 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Nanwfcpgytft Lfj-scbef $c. Current Residence iQest St.Tfcxu^ 

If dead, date or death 

Place of bi rth St- ?Qu\ Oate of Birth Dee.. \S } l^o"! 

Education (number of years): 
grade school ffg/s. high school A urs. vocational o col lege o 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

'st defense. ^o.c4orc^ Dates eWorld LOav J 1 st Si. "?Olu\ ^ W\i r^r.. Dates fllo - k S 

2nd C.grp&rvVe-<- i builder Dates l^JS- holq 2nd MfssixVo. 3 W\ow\. D ates l%9 - (f j 

3rd Dates 3rd SV-"?oju\j M»i->r». D ates 

^ th Dates 4th Dates 

Re 1 i g I on Ccx+boUc 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. ^res^eTS 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother C(xledoniCL , Wu^. ^^JLn^JSl^ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name t)o\o-V-Ku PAaAay Tu.-y-.Wir Current Residence lc e ^> V N\ ■ r\ rs . 

If dead, datelof death ^ 

Place of birth CoAedor^o^, l^n^. Date of bi rth me _ 39 } ^O"! 

Education (number of years): HeacKtr 
grade school $ i|rs. high school ^ u^, vocatlonal_o col lege goaec^-e. 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st -fetxe-hec Dates he[ove 1st rv\o^reK&o.d Minn. Dates h^.e fi& 

2nd house, ioi-fe. Dates ;q 3o - now 2nd SI . TcxuJ ; Nlinn. D ates /^ft - 4fr 

3rd Dates 3r d [sc.\ , : } Mont Dates *? 4fr - l r i 

*th Dates frth ^ , ~?a l; g \\\ir>f\ D ates /^(Jj - nc . 

Religion CevfKol i c 



/ Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



flj psnd«rvt — DerrNocrcyt 

■ ace o 'marriage to your grandfathe r CtxleeWa . . M ,_ DATE j w 3 , ^ 3o 
le - ^aHa'tl^Ch^Safl'o^t^? pafe*^)? stepmother or another relative give 



I StepgranJfather (your father's side) 

Current Residence 

■ ■-I.). .I.j ic of death 



P lace of bl rth Date of Bl rth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupat ion(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



Dates 2nd D ates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

*»th Dates *Uh Dates 



Rc I i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



FT ace c marriage to your grandmother ' dat< 



2 S tepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death ' ; ■ 



Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational college 

Occupat ion(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st D ates 1st D ates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates_ 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates_ 

Re 1 i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name R AVV\CTuj R . i--g.^ou<: Aeat^ Current Residence uOVy\^. 'B-ec^T kcvKc \N\ t Y ^r\ 
I f dead, date^>f death 

Place of birth Date of bi rth CAcx^j l^, 1^ IP 

Education (number of years): ^ 



grade school ^ q^-, high school O vocational O college q 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Wmer Dates lSiO- 3b 1st Kivcp ] Dates iqao-3t > 

2nd Kcibove-T Dates 1^-3? 2 nd St . PcxlaL rAirsO*. Dates ( c /3k - 

3rd dfi.|g.r>^tL kxo^s'Lj Dates ul lOaf XL 3 rd L^Wita. Eear tWu^ ates f q.jg> 

*»th SYea ^or^r Dates lqjR-ryxo 4 th LOh>\e t*y<\c UaWd ^ v ^D ates iq3 f i - new 

Re I Igion CavKoiiC, 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Mace of" marriage to your grandmother Hu.qo fAio>o ^ ate TY\(Xl, =35 \°~d< 

Note: If your mother was raised by aTrep TjUli r U ? ' aT l ULUKr Hi l ai l VB (to ag e 18 )' ' 1 — >~ U — 
give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name 
I 



a me (Vv lc ud^ iW^oux Qu< qeanC urrent Residence^ 

f deaa, date of 1 death (n\qq, I?j |<h 39 

Place of birth iW^V^x 
Education (number oPyears) 



J)ate of birth Qci , 



grade school 'g C|rcxcU, high school g vocational o college o 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

lst hp"^^>\fr Dates /^-^ 1st o ( N\ 8> ^ Dates [c^. - 

2nd D ates 2nd St , ?fimU | N\,.^r>. Dates ffc f 

3rd Dates 3rd ixjhrU, Eec\<- RvCacK Dates jf/.3.p 

Religion C^vw,!,^ 

Political party, cTvTT or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your grandfathe r HuGr/ L Mi rvn, d ate ny a . 0*5. l r Hc 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmotner or another relative (to age 18)0 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l » epgrandf ather (your mother's side) 

Current Residence 

lead. 3ai >• ->F de.ith 



I' I H • n| l ii! 1 1 Ihlle <il 1 1 i i I 1 1 

i lilt ilimi (in mil)!- r 'if yi- 1 1 •. ) 

,r i !■• 'null hi(jli school vocational col loye 



Ottupat lon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

Dates 1st Dates 

Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

itl Dates ^th Dates 

"e I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



p loc<» of marriage to your grandmother date 



D-? S t epqr.indmo thr r (your mother's side) 

- Cq<x\irvoi Ui-Vc^< rv£.Cvii. Current Residence lv->V\rb- Sea-r WjA<£ 

I f ill-. id , il.if of death 

: ' 1 ' ' ' 1 r,i| lJuV\>ti 'RecxN- Uab. Wi^rv Date of bi rth Viqxl <2M l^O 
Education (number of years) ' ' 
qrad'. schoo I ^ c^r ■ h i gh school Q vocational Q col lege Q 

Occiipot ion(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

'■•t Kcmae^Ae, Dates Rso ■ n&^o 1st LoVub. &eo.y kcil<£_ Datesj^ 

WNi . 

Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

1 "i 1 Co WxC \ j ^ 

Po I i r i c jl pd r t i , civil or soc i a 1 c 1 ubs , sororities, etc. 



0] * r - p - - : i-'-ige to your g randf athe r , \ vVkc W--fry.^ f^Au^O Date Feb. ^ t l c l* 



CHILDREN of A 6 B (or A- 1 or B-l) - your father's name should appear below 
Name Qfj 



P 1 ace of b i rth ^ VbouiN , rWi 



Number of years of schooling ^ u vV cr:HfcT OccupatTSh 
Residence KodKknd . ,0i\ . Mar I tal TTatus 



Number of ch I Idren' 



Place 



V inch*- <- I Sdhm i ct ^ 
■ Ycu 



e of b PVth _ 
Number of years or school i ng QvvA'CjS 



a^l) NNiArv date bed.u \q^H 



' — c ■ ■ " 

Residences^. geA€<-, fN\;^ 
Number of children ^5 



Mlv^ s a V^\ °! cupati6n±k ^ > n^** 

Marital Status \y\Cx^ <\ \ f cl c 



max <r\€ ct 



Name 



Place df brrW^^v ^, TAi.rW " date M. ^ _ tfrTK* 
Number of years of schooling ^ Uvs , Co ,^ ,~ Occupation Ut'^ 

Residence^ Hr.L-sto ^ . Marl tal fet - - » 

Number of cnl Idren r£ 

Name "tlcty . 'T\r^mc^ T^LOC Ke <T 
Place of birth VoXTT TYli<\^ 



>tatus nrgy^fd 



Numbe 
Res Idence 
Numbe 



or birth ttXuA TYu date /\u,g , 

r of years of schooling j t^f, cc\Uioc Occupat 1 Oh_*T 
ence tVft morn . ^MV ^. M arital* Status mcCorV 
r of children q 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of schooHng 
Res I dence 



Number of ch I Idren 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Residence 

Number of children 



~d"ate 



Occupation 
Marl tal Status 



Name 

Place of bl rth ~° 
Number of years of school Ing 
Res i dence 



Number of ch I Idren 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupat I Oh 



Name_ 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence 

Number of ch I idren 



date 
Occupation 



Marl tal Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Res i dence 

Number of chi idren 



Marital Status 



. date 
Occupat Ion 



0. Name__ 

Place" of bi rth 



Number of years of school Inq 
Res Idenc e 

Number of CHI ttfT en — — — — — 



date 



"arlta 



Occupat Ion 
TFatus 



tEN and 0 (or (.- I , D-l)-your mother's name should appear below 

k&Q , b_____ r_jg__ . , N 

S* ?cui , <n> qjqZZ AJoo. cQ tsr ; 1^3^ 

.• !• i.f -.(.luwluu) i;vvv\, V->'.^W OaupJtion rruiul Ci^.tVe<" 
-. . ... , m> ° Mari tal " Status nrM\s;<--.cV 

e r «■ 1 1 child re n ' [_p 

vV^i C__^___ ~ date B&iA \\A C \^ 

irs of schooling Gp^rxd. h>aV^ X)cWa O ccu P at ' on Ko^v^nU. 

e if Kc.^^g -J\\. ^ Marital Status mc^vxjuicA 

cn ' I dreK ' ^ 

'■ace ■ s< ^u f > n^,^. 1 date , T)eC,, \Q) ' c ^<f 

if schooling gAgcl. WhK ACVyocM Occupation KOtAJ-ja.oo J-c. 
«cs i dencc i-k^.w.n . n\im,v>. * v Marital Status >v^, W^fi ^ 7 "" 

Number of children^ 

Na ™'___L t _^____. W^-t^-Ax fVAriy- 

r "' ^.~r\X_>J t fVutrrvo. date fTy^Ch. ^ 19 3 1 

of /ears of schooling ^ q/ic\cI_-- Occupation 

^ Marital Status 



Res i dence 

CK.\_v^ umbe ' " f chi1dren _ dUid'. cj^ZTjlqsf 

W- N *"* ^ frCWWf ^ £ ^ C__- s i_ _5 Sj 

_,ti ^ birth < M VW* t vTy r^n. date poo t j t [3_Q 

>rxi N mbei f ,e,irs of schooling ' V ^ Q^orVfc- (Jccupat i on ^ nUuoe uQi tlst 

M . ygxJt i^nn. Marital Status Q>^____________ 

Number of children ~V-> 



___. 



6. Nan* 



^ A^Y^M, fen L&____ __—__, _y_ . _ 

Mace of birth '0 ^ foiJ , V^WO, ' date J Uj ^l IRHN 

Number of /cars of school ing (-^ , V\» ah Sc.Vxi-^ Occupation K-n.oLi er.__p. Q P^ 

-V,.t^ h-.xK. HYr^.' Marital Status ^ ri ^ ' | 

Number of children /— i ' 



7. NdncJT\ 



Place -/TWth t>\>faxJi x YV>> t rs.o. date /| t A r , , || |Q__g 

• of schooling (_,cr>.<\. Vur^K 'Aooi Occupation ^ mCu q3E___— 
»--,id..y.r,e u> N ,ti, Wr.K^. YY\, . Marital Status mr,^, F d 

Si-ioer of children 



fT>6 <CL , C <WXU fcUU-0»\-.r 

' ' ; r ;-\ K-^-, r^^oT date rrw-K 31, l c (*U. 

Numbe- rears of schooling G-CQCi. hiQK ^-Wt Occupation VAOLodty < ^ > Ul, 
! r. ' Kr..^ \vj <rt n j MaritaT Status ^ t x b 

Number or children 

u I™ .? u ^^rwuj, v\a_va_c 

^ g o ^, . ,\, I'.-.r,, date Dei, K^g A 

of schooling | > j , & , Occupation WgIv:xm.mIc 

- v ' ,, I ' >,■ ,v _.- ^rital Status rv~ x , , <t L 

Numbe r ol i I d ren _____L 

NameMicW^ Lo\r> 

P'^'.c of birth ^ v 



- - ,,- , 



" , ^ Jir ' f ; , - Vm' 1 kv,.,m OcTITpatiof rTvOwfv^ S ■ 

-• ■ >: - ^ -■ _____L_____-Q ' MaTTTa I Status ^ tx < t U. 

'' of -ildrcn , 1 



Your Father 



Name fpeoccy k, KncW" Current Res i dence fe^ j 1^ d , ^jj , 

If dead. date* of death ' 0 

Place of birth Sr\ . IVjuuA , minn. Date of birth QcJ- . l3l f\ ^ 

Education (number of yearsj ' 
grade school ff* t ^aj^>. nI 9 n school r|/Wljurji.Wl vocational r> col lege A.| ( | r s, 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st mittou SetO.'gJL. Dates /QSN 1st -SI ."Tojuci t fAi r\Q> , D ates 

2nd -VecicWf Dates i c j5^ ' I 9^1 2n d B ■ WorvrxAcV uooari flV). D ates J 95^ - Sfe 

3r d Cm (uml>^ Dates 1 95 ~? -/ 95*? 3r d | .. V^c\W idry.. On, Dates '59 

»th ^uJWjul RAxln^ D ates flag - hQu3 h th { 0 id ^ CHrU^ . D ates /g/59 ' /„Q 

Re 11 g i on C Cc^U\u^ci' cty% rr\otVML<^ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. R.ocklfisd CV^G_rrrA\^e c (51 
Cj^cryfix cxi - Cftcx. Scoufc) KYfcUmxxl (Lop a rail g^^VaiTe^rv ^ _ 

Place of marriage to yodr mo the r uVfrufca. ' &Axr Uo&l. X^W nn- T d a te ftec. aio\lQ5^ 
NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the 'back 
of this page. (E-2) 



Your Mother 



Name 
If dea 



TcajOL fl.Uburacfu^^^W Current Residence ^^g\ r \ sfllj 
ad, date of death u 1 

'ace of birth S^.ynL^ mi^. Date of blrthAcuJ \^ \q3kl 

ducation (number of years) 

grade school <g Q^\g<±^ high school C ^\od un^sd vocational g c ollege q 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE C^^^A 

r, -5^ (after leaving home) \> 

lst ^Wm ed.fo -T.0 Dates j<? 5,3- (VnOTrxdMo Oo^ D ates - / <7fcj 



2nd W^u^luOv^il Dates iq^^-mC a»< * SWm |fT>»r\ > Crr^rrs, D ates flu*- Ilk'? 

3rd Dates £d Orsb .<- vm\Ic t C^Kv c, D ates IQLl-lU^ 

Religion ( (X^iC, ,. . , ° O u , i ri ' \ J| 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. |<pcKlCAa ~^ imdkcmu (-^AA^qi 

Place of marriage to your father t j^Ksts. RecA,r KcOKfi-v tr\\C\<\. d ate , Qlo . H ^ .5 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the 'back of 



this page (F-2). 



E- 1 Seep fa tie r 



s a ~« 

If Jea J , date of dea En 



Place of birth 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat i on ( 5 ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



^th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



I s t 
2nd 
_3rd_ 



Date of bi rth 



vocat i ona 1 



co 1 lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Re I i g i on 

Pol i t i ca"t" Part ies , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of -larriage to your mother 



Date 



F-2 StepTOthe r 

Nane 

I f dead , date of death 



Place of hirth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat i on (s ) 

1st 

2nd 



Dates 
Dates 



Dates 



vocat i ona 1 



lst_ 
2nd 
3rd 



Date of bi rth 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 



3rd 

Re I i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc, 
ace of narriage to your father 



Dates 



date 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



Name ^Wp\yijT>^ P*~\ . VvbcWc 
Place of bi rth At. , ^> ^ . 

Number of years of schooling Q. ^v^. 



T5aTe of bi rth Sept. 31, l^-SH 



Res i dence 

Number of c 



fears of school I l ng ^ , "Rock Oa\U ^ . Occupation St^cl^nt - CQttef r\a i>S 
pQcAl^d.-XW. ^ MaritaT^Ttus Si^ri/ 1 
;hi ldrerl) 'Q 4 



13. l^L 



P?ace^?i?tt ^,^ 0 r^Tc^^a. P\CaACJLxT » Date of birth Qudyj »u 

Number of years of schooling ^c^O 'Sr. \'rf\ V\ \cf> c -*kc > Occupa 1 1 on CjAefK c*V K^v r\€^b --SlwW 
RccX|o<d "T\V. Marital Status S> of^U. 



Res i dence 

Number of children b s q 

Name ^CXYnfiA^ ^ . Tu^C. W C 
P 1 ace of b i 



rth fccc>yL< VolQA^ OOQ^W.a^W ^ r>C^Date of bi rth Au^, t 3. l^b^ 

Number of years of schooling ScypW.vTYN K'qV\ SC\r\Coi Occupation f^h^tnt -C^Jrveora 

dence flccKlc\d ~X\\. Marital Status f-^ rx^L **y^O^< 

er of children^' O 



Res i 
Numbe 



Name vW\aCx- 1^ ■ \^cW-<" ,v v , G . 

Place of\ birth N^eA Wiva OfYvJ^. Date of bi rth A^O. ^ InloO 

Number of years of schooling i r\ <^tV\ ^AdJ^"""" Occupation Mud^T>t 

Res i dence (VxX fefdL ~XlV. V3 Marital Status S\ <\C^JL 

hit imhp r n 



Name 
Place o 



TTTTT FyCc V\4< > rxa , r>W .V, D * te of b.rth ^ec. <3t> . 

Number of years of schooling Q-rT Ewst" GrCJ^Su Occupation /Muldinrxt 

Res i dence ^QcXlovd , *° Marital Status S\ rsC^U. 

Number of chi 1 I dren ^ ^> 

Ma^e-^T^ ^^I^w". -TU. Pate of birth ^ ftfcCj 

Number of years of schooling rMJU^ccq AlVv^M Occupation * ^•k.-xrVLnr>t 

Res i dence Koefc ) r-,(t\ t T.U ^ Marital Status J\ r YV|W- 

Number of children^ A 



"\ rt h" ' ~~ ~~~~ Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status_ 

Number of chi ldren ' 

Name 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling ... Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of chi Idrert 

111. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed 

Date (^^AyBJd- • 



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Information in my family history was 
obtained through written quest ioneres as well as verbal 
communication. I wish to thank everyone who took the time 
to answer my many questions and fill me in on how my 
relatives live, in the present and past*. This paper will 
be stored in the Hockford Public Library in Hockford, Illinois, 
where it will be available to help any of my relatives, who 
might some day need to compose their family history. I 
will also be sending copies to my relatives, so they can 
read it and save it for future redernces*. This project was 
very interesting to do and proved to be very informative. 



The Fischer Ancestors 

Josephus Fischer was the first traceable descendant 
on which family history information was available. Josephus 
was born In Halbturn, Burgenland, Austria, which is near 
the Hungarian border. This is where he also died. Unf ortuneatly , 
no dates could be found stating when he was born or when he 
died. My great great grandfather was a carpenter and taught 
the trade in Halbturn. Josephus married Maria Himmel and, as 
far as I know, one child was born to them, Charles A. Fischer. 

Charles Fischer was born November 4, 1861 In Halbturn. 
He, like his father, was also a carpenter?. Charles married Catherine 
Long, daughter of George Long and Madelina Haas'. Catherine's 
parents were also born in Halbturn and no dates could be found 
for then*. 

Charles 1 wife, Catherine Long was born September 28, 
1868, in Halbturn. Catherine and her new husband, who was already 
an experienced carpenter, came to America in 1886, looking 
for a better place to earn a living. She was only 19 years of age. 
This marriage was blessed with seven children; four boys and 
three girls*. 

Charles A. Fischer Jr. was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, 
September 30, 1886*. He did not follow the occupation of his 
father and grandfather.) For Liany years Charles worked as a 
commission wan for the Armour-Swift Company*. 

Mary Fischer was bom March 29 » 1888. She was the 
first to marry, marrying into the Brayman family. After she 
married she became a housewife. 

Catherine Fischer was born March 2*f, 1890. She married 
Louis LaFavor on April 15, 1920. Catherine, besides doing her 
own housework, continued to do dressmaking and needle work for 



others after she was married?. 

The third daughter was born May 25, 1892 In St?. Paul'. 
Julia Fischer also married and for a while after she was married, 
she worked at a Job outside of her home. 

Paul L. Fischer was born July 8, 189 2 *. He died of 
pneumonia before he was one year old>. January 12, 1897 is when 
Emil Fischer was born*. He followed the family occupation, set 
by his father and grandfather, and became a carpenter. 

Just like his brother, father and grandfather, Joseph 
F. Fischer also became a carpenter*. He was born in St. Paul, 
April 12, 190?. 

The seventh child, and fourth boy, born to Charles 
and Catherine Fischer, was George Lawrence'. He was born December 
15» 1907'« My grandfather also followed in the footsteps of the 
Fischer men and became a carpenter, contractor and builder?. 

In the years to come George Fischer grew up in St. 
Paul and In June of 1930, he took as his bride, Dorothy Malay. 
This marriage brought them four children: George, Margaret, 
Jean and Tom. 

In the following pages the childhood and married 
life of George L. Fischer, my grandfather, was researched. 



I 



The Childhood of George L, Fischer Sr. 

My grandfather* George L'. Fischer, was horn December 
15, 1907 In St. Paul* Minnesota. His parents and their eight 
children lived in a house* located In St, Paul. 

After the sons and daughters married* they left home. 
My grandfather* s father lived with his daughter Julia* after 
his wife died. Then he went to live with his other daughter, 
Catherine* until he died. 

As a child* my grandfather never had a lot of toys 
or even a b$feycle. He wished most of all for a pony* which he 
never got, but was happy anyway. 

Things were quite ordinary in their family. They had 
a horse and buggy, but their father would take it for a week 
sometimes* when he went to another town to construct a house 
or barn. Then the only other transportation was the streetcar*. 

When he was 13, my grandfather started working, selling 
fruits and vegetables, for $?.00 a week, with 60 hours in the 
week. Then he worked in a hattery when he was 16, for $40.00 
a month, or 50 hours. He was allowed to keep the money, but 
paid for his own clothes and health care. At that time, the 
money he earned was able to buy a lot of merchandise!. 

During this time my grandparent » s parents got a car. 
The roads were in poor conditions and a trip of 35 miles was 
to much for one day*. Cars of that period had side curtains, 
so if there was a sudden change in the weather, like rain, the 
driver would have to stop and put these on. The Sundays were 
usually spent on a family picnic. A lunch would be packed and 
a fire made at the site to do the cooking. Other celebrations 
were done in the confines of the house and with members of 



Most of the sons in ay grandfathers family followed 
in the occupational footsteps of the men before them. The only 
one who did not become a carpenter was my grandfather's brother 
Charley* Everyone else became a carpenter. 

Usually regular seats were taken at the dinner tablet. If 
seating space was not available then the children waited until 
the adults were finished. 

Most of the children left home to marry or pursue 
a Job after the eigth grade. My grandfather left school after 
his sophomore year. 

In June of 1930 he married Dorothy Malay. 



The Malay Ancestors 



Thoroaf-' Flannery, born in 180?:, was carried to :1ary 
Millet. They both were bom In Ireland'. Mary died there In 18k7 , 
Her husband also died there in 1903» at the age of 101. TheJr one 
child, Mary Flannery was born in IQk?, in Mayo County, Ireland. 
Thomas and his wife, along x**ith their daughter , migrated to 
the United States. Thomas and his wife didn't like it and 
returned to their home in Ireland. 

Mary married a stone cutter, William Whiting, who 
was born in Tarringtcn, Sussex County, England in 1833* This 
marriage was blessed with one child, a girl, named j-iargaret 
Wlii ting. 

William Whiting was nine years old when his mother 
died and fifteen years old when he carjf? on a ship to Kovia 
Scotia. This was around 19^&. By the time the Cival War started, 
he was in New York and had enlisted in the New York infantry. 
His infantry was captured and sent to serve time in Libby prison, 
where all but eleven of the men died of dysentery. William 
Whiting was one of the eleven and was dismissed after being 
forced to s? c r« a paper statins that he would never again 
take up arms against the Confederacy. However, he came to 
Minnesota and reenlisted in the Minnesota infantry. There he 
fought in many battles, such as "Lock Out Mountain", in 
Tennessee. Abe Lincoln was his idol and he became a staunch 
Republican. 

William and Mary Whiting's one child, fiargaret, vaas 
born September 15, I865 in St. Paul, Minnesota*. As a child, 
Margaret was baptized and confirmed by the Archbishop of 
St. Paul. Archbishop Ireland is well known for his many speeches 
and Visits to neonle in Fn-rrvopan Cinnrtt.-r1 en. TTPlanrl snpr.1f1f.a11v. 



He talked about America, the promised land, and how everyone 
could have a new enriched life there. 

Mary Plannery Whiting died in 1905 in Caledonia, 
Minnesota. Her husband died there also, inl907'. 

Margaret Whiting married Robert Malay, who was born 
in Portage, Wisconsin on June 5, I867. Robert's father, Thomas 
Malay, was born in 1833 in Waterford County, Ireland. His wife, 
Mary Wrlgley, was born in Wexford County, Ireland. They 
migrated to Minnesota, from Ireland, in the mid 1830's. They 
had seven children. James was bora in 1859 and died in 1861'. 
Mary was born in 1861 and died in 19^. William was born in 
186^ and died in 1925* ae %s a carpenter. My great great 
grandfather, Robert Malay, was born in I867 and died in 1060'. 
Another son, Ben, was born in I876 and died in 19^5» The seventh 
child, John, was bom in I878 and died in 1928. He was a 
railroad worker. 

Their father, Thomas Malay, was a veteran of the 
CIval War. He was also a carpenter and followed the settlers 
west, always able to find work at the building trade. Thomas 
died in 1892. His wife, Mary, died fifteen years later in 1907. 

Their son, Robert Malay, and his bride, l«iargaret 
Whiting Malay, established their 1 ife together on a farm in 
Caledonia, Minnesota. Robert was not only a farmer. He had 
also worked for the railroad and been a carpenter. This marriage 
was blessed with ten children. 

William was born in 1889» He was a farmer until he 
died in 19^8* He never married. Mary was born in 1890 and 
she also never married. For many, many years Mary taught school 
in Caledonia. She lives with her younger brot-.her, on the farm 
her parents built in Caledonia. Margaret was born in 1892. 
She left home after she finished school and went to work in 



an office in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She later returned to the 
family farm and remained there until she died in 1969» 

Esther Malay was bom in 189^. She married into the 
O'Neil family and had two children. After her husband »s death, 
Esther returned to the family farm in Caledonia and lived 
there until her death in 1968. 

Agnes was born in I896. She also got married and had 
three children. Agnes Malay Colleran died in 1970. 

Another girl, Susan, was bom in 1898. She married 
Fred Buttel and had one child*. Susan died in 1928. 

The third boy, Robert, was bora in 190O. He never 
married and remained on the farm for his entire life. Farming 
was and still is his occupation?. Robert still lives on the 
farm, and with some help, is still maintaining it'. 

Cecelia was born in 1902 f . She married a man named 
Spenser and had no children. She and her husband currently live 
in Wisconsin'. 

Anna Malay was bora in 1905. She married Fred Buttel, 
who had previously been married to her sister Susan, until her 
death. They had six children. Anna currently resides in 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, where she has taught school for many 
years*. 

The tenth ohild and seventh girl was bora June 
29, I907;. Around 1920, the family farmhouse burnt to the ground. The 
children, who were young adults now, along with some other help, 
built another farmhouse on the same land. That farm is still 
in existence and is being occupied by my grandmother » s sister 
and brother, Mary and Robert Malyy. Dorothy, my grandmother, 
married George L. Fischer in June of 1930. They have four 
children, all of them are married. Dorothy and George Fischer 



currently reside In West St. Paul, Minnesota. 

More will be said about my grandmother, Dorothy Malay, 
in the upcoming chapter on her childhood as well as in the chapter 
on her married lifef. 

Memories of the times spent with my great aunt and uncle, 
Mary and Robert Malay, on the Malay farm in Caledonia, Minnesota, 
will be shared in the chapter on my childhood!. 



The Childhood of Dorothy Fischer 

Most of my grandmother's childhood was spent on 
the family farm in Caledonia, Minnesota. This is were she 
was born in June of 1907* 

The parents continued to live in their own home 
after their children left. One daughter, Esther, lived with 
her parents in their home, along with her two small children, 
after being widowed in 1931» 

My grandmother's parents slept in the first floor 
bedroom, while the second floor bedrooms were chosen by 
mutual agreement. With five bedrooms the household was not 
crowded. There were never any servants or boarders living 
with the family. 

Anyone, not attending school, was busy with outside 
farmwork or inside housework. Holidays were spent enjoying 
family dinners. Every Fourth of July the family went to the 
nearest celebration, which usually occurred at a town some 
seven or eight miles away. 

Sundays were usually spent attending the Catholic 
Masses and then big dinners of fried chicken, mashed potatoes, 
dumplings and lemmon pie, was enjoyed. Her mother always 
managed to have friends or neighbors over, besides her own 
family. 

Schooling was decided upon be my grandmother's 
mother. Occupational choice was left up to the individual. 
Marriage approval was sanctioned by both parents. Decisions 
concerning the farm were made by her father, while household 



1 

- 

I 



things were decided upon by her mother. 

My grandmother's mother was the disciplinarian in 
the family. Her father was an easy going man, who loved to read, 
and turned out all noise when he sat down to enjoy his literature. 

If table space permitted, children always ate with 
their parents. When quests came to dinner, they ate in shifts, 
as their table seated only 14*. It was comman to have two or 
three tables set and occupledat Thanksgiving, Christmas and 
Easter. 

My grandmother's older sister, along with her parents, 
helped my grandmother through college. Mature sons and daughters 
helped their parents with buying things like a cook stove, 
or any other needed replacements in the home'. The children 
who never married, and remained home on the farm, cared 
for their parents in their later years of life. 

The family was average in income, but there were 
no well to do members. Their wealth was in their health and 
happiness. The family farm was Inherited fey my grandmother's 
mother, from her mother and father. Robert, my grandmother's 
youngest brother, Inherited that farm and the upper farm, 
which their father bought for their oldest brother in 1909*. 

The children were taught to have great respect for 
the elderly. Her mother cared for her own parents, her husbands 
father and two elderly women, in their last Illnesses. This 
took a great deal of stamina and charity, because she also 
had a large family to care for. 

Jobs were not pushed onto any meraber of the family. 
The men never left the farm to find employment. Three women 
became elementary school teaohers, three went to Minneapolis 
to find employment and the others married. 



As a child, the only transportation ay grandmother's family 
had, was a buggy and the horses, or a sleigh, in the winter 
time. About 1923 the family got their first oar, a Ford. 

After high school and college, my grandmother 
taught school for four years, at a rural school. The first 
year she received 80 dollars a month, then $90 a month and in 
the last two years, $100. 

She met her future husband, George L. Fischer, May 
29, 1928, when he came with a former neighbor boy to visit'. 
They were married in June of 1930 & nd my grandmother left her 
family's farm to move to the big city, 5t. Paul, with her nev 
husband. 



The married Life of Dorothy and George Fischer 

My grandparents met an my grandmother's farm, In 
Caledonia, Minnesota. My grandfather was a quest of one of her 
brothers and during the upcoming years, spent much of his time 
their. They were married In Caledonia, in a Catholic ceremony 
In June of 1930f. Their first home was a little bungalow in 
St. Paul and It was built by my grandfather. 

Their first child, George Jr. was born October 12, 
1932*. They lived in this house until 1935* They then moved to 
another house In St-. Paul, on Ohio Street. By now they had 
added another child, Margaret, who was bom In December of 193^'. 
Another daughter, Jean, arrived two years later, In December 
of 19 36. 

They later moved Into a house, still In St. Paul, and 
built by my grandfather. This house was on Baker Street, and 
is the first of their houses that 1 am able to remember. 
A second son joined the family in August of 19^9« He was named 
Tom. 

My grandparents remained in Minnesota until their 
youngest son graduated from high school. He chose to attend 
a college in Mlssula, Montana, were my grandparents next 
made their home*. They remained here for a year and then returned 
back to St*. Paul, which is where they currently live*. All of 
their children have since married and started their own families'. 
My grandparents now have 16 grandchildren to keep track off. 
They frequently visit with their children and grandchildren 
who are spread agross the mid-west. 



I 



The Letoumeau Ancestors 



Cageat Letoumeau Sr. was born In Canada In 1846. 
He migrated to the United States when he was a child, 
approximately around the age of seven. He married Xarle Paul, 
who was born June 6, 1853» They had one child, Cageat Letoumeau 
jr. My great great grandfather, Cageat Letoumeau Sr., died at 
the age of 76, on March 10, 1922. His wife died April 14, 
1936, at the age of 82. 

My great grandfather, Cageat Letoumeau Jr., was 
bom August 18, 1870. He married Ida Paul, who was a second 
cousin to Cageat 1 s mother, Marie Paul Letoumeau. 

Ida»s father was Nelson Paul, who was bom in 1850. 
He died on January 2, 1922, at the age of 72* Her mother, Liza 
Lassar Paul, was born in 1852 and died on January 13, 1910, at 
the age of 53. 

When Ida Paul and Cageat Letoumeau Jr. were married, 
the union was blessed with 12 children. The first, Elizabeth, 
was bom in 1593* She carried her cousin, and they had two 
children. Elizabeth is currently living in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

The second child, Charley, was born in 1895. He 
worked for many years as a construct* on worker and also as a 
steel worker. He also married and had 3 children. Charley 
died in Kay of 1963 . 

Leo was bom in 1397* He died somewhere before 1Q08. 
Aurora Letoumeau was bom in 1899. She also died before 1908. 
(The exact dates for these deaths and the following ones, was 
not readily available.) Julius was born in 1801 and alt;o died 
before 1908. Alia and Alise were twins. They were bom in 
1903 and also died sometime before ly08. 



Marie, the eighth child bora to Cageat and Ida 
Letourneau, came in 19C5. She married into the Thlbeault family 
and has six children. She currently resides in St. Paul, Minnesota^ 

Sophie was bom in 1908. She married and had 1 childu 
St. Paul, Minnesota is currently where she and her husband make 
their hcnie. 

Anthony, my grandfather, was born May 19, 1910. He 
is currently a steel worker and married. . Re has ten children, 
and is nor living in White Bear lake, Minnesota. 

Lucille Letcumeau wis born in 1912* She Is currently 
living in St. Paul, is married and has six children. 

The tweljfth child, Louise, was born in 1915* She 
died June 2, 1966. 

Anthony R. Letourneau married Gertrude Thercux 
May 25, 1930. Four children blessed this marriage: Leo, Joyce, 
my mother, Yvonne and Donna. In the upcoming chapters, the 
childhood and tnarried life of my grandfather will be further 
researched. 



- 



The Childhood of my Grandfather 

Anthony R. Letourneau 

My grandfather, Anthony R. Letourneau, was born May 
19 t 1910 in Hugo, Minnesota, on a farm. He was a normal boy 
who had lots of fun amusing himself. He would always tease his 
sisters. "But that was Just a part of growing up," relates his 
sister Sophie. 

Grandpa loved music. His hobby was playing his violin. 
He never took a lesson, but rather taught himself how to play. 

He was also interested in horses. He liked to work 
with them around his farm. He also enjoyed working around the 
farm, helping his father. He continued to do this until he 
left home and got married. 

My grandfather went up to and completed the fourth 
grade. It was a country school with just one room. Everyday 
he, and his brothers and sisters, walked the 2| miles to school 
and then another 2\ miles back home. There were no school buses.. 

Only his parents and their children lived In the big 
farmhouse. The parents had their own room, while the girls slept 
together in one room and the boys together in another. At no 
time during my grandfathers childhood, were there servants or 
boarders living with the family. 

The day usually began for everyone ajf 6 a.m. The 
children would work until it was time to leave for school and 
then again when they came home, until 6 or 7 in the evening. 
After everyone quit school, usually between the fourth and eighth 
grade, they would start the farm work at 6 in the morning and 
work through until early evening. Everyone except the older 
ones who had a paying job would do this. 



- 



After dinner the kids would play ball or some other 
kind of a game. On holidays they would visit their grandparents 
or an aunt or an uncle. Then sometimes they would also entertain 
company at their farm. 

Visiting was a lot of fun for the Letourneau children. 
In wintertime there was always plenty of snow covering everything. 
The roads were never plowed. Their father owned a bobsled and 
two horses would pull the sleigh around with the kids In It. 

New Year»s Day was always a big celebration for the 
Letourneau family. Year after year on this day, all of the 
relatives would gather to feast and visit all day at my grand- 
fathers parents house. After the Letourneau family got to big 
for that house, the celebration was moved to a rented hall. 
More about this festive day will be told in the chapter on my 
mother. Weddings were also big celebrations, while baptisms 
were celebrated with a big family dinner. Funerals were Just 
a sad day were no one did anything. 

All key decisions in my grandfathers family were made 
by the parents. The children were disciplined by their parents 
and a good old fashion spanking on the rear always sufficed 
for punishment. When my grandfather's parents said no, that 
was the final word. No other adults were invloved In the 
raising of my grandfather or any of his brothers and sisters, 
only the parents had the say as to how the children were to 
be raised. Every child was the same to his parents and the rest 
of the family. No one was treated special or as a "Black Sheep." 

During meal time the father sat at the head of the 
table and the youngest one always sat between the mother and 
father. The rest of the children filled in around the table, 
with everyone having their own special place. When there was 



alot of company visiting, the children had to wait and eat later 
or sit around another table. The family was Catholic and mass 
was attended every Sunday. Grace was also given before each 
meal. 

The kids in the family were expected to help out 
at about the age of 5 or 6. They were expected to carry in 
water and wood for the stove, as well as gathering eggs from 
the hen house. My grandfather »s sister, Sophie, started milking 
a cow twice a day at 7 years of age. 

If any member of the household became ill, then every- 
one would take a turn to care for that person. 

Property was owned and managed by my grandfather's 
father. Women received no doweries when they were to be married 
and there was very little for anyone to Inherit. A son In the 
family might Inherit the farm or some land to build a house 
on. 

When a baby was born In the family it was treated 
Just like another member of the family. A child was considered 
a child, instead of a baby, as soon as he started school. The 
kids were expected to take on adult responsibilities at about 
16 or whenever called upon. 

Since the Letourneau children didn't go on to higher 
education, most of them had outside Jobs'. My grandfather was 
a farmer before and. after he was married. His sister Sophie 
went to work for a priest and a professor at St. Thomas College 
when she was 15. Another one of their sisters went to work in 
a bakery. 

Most of the kids married young and left their home 
and parents to start their own life. The girls all did their 
own housework after marriage. The parents remained in their 



own home after all of their children left, ky grandfather's 
parents moved from their farm in Hugo, Minnesota, to a house 
in White Bear Lake, after all of their children had left home. 

The parents would help the children out financially, 
only the children would have to find some kind of a job, in 
order to earn the money to pay them back>. 

Most of the sons followed their fathers occupation 
of farming. Once they got married they would start a farm of 
their own or a truck garden, where they raised potatoes and 
vegatables like com, to sell. 

There were no special attitudes towards aging. No one 
would care, so long as their heart and legs were good, so they 
could manage to complete all of the work that always needed 
to be done. 

Most of the children in my grandfathers house, got a 
Job at about the age of 16. These Jobs were usually worKing 
on the roads or in one of the big factories in a city like St. 
Paul or ilinneapolis, Minnesota. The money they earned would 
then be spent on things they needed. 

In May of 1930, my grandfather left home to start 
a life of his own, with his new wife, Gertrude Theroux Letoumeau. 



The Theroux Ancestors 



Peter Theroux married La3eth LaMctte. No dates could 
be found recording their birth. However, LaBeth was born approximately 
around 18^6. Peter Theroux died in 1915. His wife remarried two 
more times. She outlived all three of her husbands. She died 
in 19^ at the age of 93. 

Peter and LaBeth had seven children: Petsr; my great 
grandfather Adolphus; Adlore; Fredj Joe and Leonora. 

Adolphus, or more commanly known as ^dolph, was born July 
11, 1682. He married /nine Bemler in September of 1904*. Her 
parents were Anne Fosliay and John Bernier. Two children were 
bom ot this union, «nne and John. When these two children 
were very small, their father, John Bernier, died. John had 
his brother promise him that he would, marry his wife and care 
for his children when he died. 

Anne Bernier than married Joseph Bemier and four 
children were born of this marriage: Mary, Lydia, Stephanie 
and Joseph. 

Both Anne Bernier and Adolphus Theroux were raised 
on farms. Adolphus used to work in Little Canada, where he 
worked for a priest*. 

Through my grandmother's sister, Yvonne Patrick, she 
told me that their mother and father always made little Anne 
and John work very hard. Her step-father, Joseph Bernier, always 
had little Anne doing the work of a man. Anne didn't have to 
much schooling because it was very far away and they would have 
to walk for miles, through fields and woods. Anne and Joseph 
Bernier lived to celebrate their 50th wedding aniversary. They 
had a big celebration with another wedding in the church. 



Anne Bernler, who was bora July 11, 1882, then married 
Adolphus Theroux. Adolphus >ras 22 when he married and his wife 
was 18. They were never without a chaperone when they were 
dating. After they were married, they built their own home In 
Minneapolis, Minnesota „ 

Nine children were born of this union. The first. 
Hazel, was born in April of 1905. She is married and currently 
living in Simi, California^ 

Ida May >?as born in July of 1906. She died in January 
of 1972« She was married and had five children. 

The third, Rita, was born in 190?. She is married 
and has two children. Her parents, Anne and Adolphus Theroux, 
raised her son, Richard Streeter. The other son, Bill, was being 
raised by his other grandparents. 

Archie was born in September of 1911. He is married 
ard currently living In Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

My grandmother, Gertrude Theroux, was born in October 
of 1913. She married Anthony Letourneau, and had four children. 
On November 18, 1938, she died of pneumonia. 

Robert ftas bora in August of 1915*» He is married and 
living in Green Bay, Wisconsin. He has eight children. 

Yvonne was born in January of 1924. She is married 
to Fred Patrick and has four children. She currently resides 
In Yorktown Heights, New York. 

Donna Theroux was born in January of 1925. She Is 
currently living in Minneapolis, Minnesota and has two children. 

Theresa, the ninth child, was born in 1930. She died 
right after she was born. 

It is not really known for sure, but it is possible 
that the Theroux 1 s and Foshay»s came from Montreal Canada. 



Before that the ancestors cane fron England. 

The childhood and marriage of Gertrude Theroux will 
be discussed in the upcoming chapters.. Since jay grandmother 
died when my mother was very young, I asked my mother's, mother's 
sister, Yvonne Patrick, to describe the type of environment she 
and my grandmother grew up in. 



The Childhood of My Grandmother 

Gertrude Theroux Letoumeau 



My grandmother, Gertmde Theroux was born In October 
of 1913 » in Hugo, Minnesota. Her parents and their nine children 
all lived together on a farm in Hugo. 

After marriage, sons and daughters lived in their 
own homes. The parents did not live with their children, but 
Instead, in their own home. By the time my grandmother's sister, 
Yvonne was born, there wasn't any problem with living space, 
because most of her brothers and sisters had left home to 
get married. Yvonne shared a room with her sister Donna, and 
her brother shared a room with their nephew, Richard Streeter, 
who was living with them. For a time before and maybe after 
Yvonne was bom, the household must have been somewhat crowded, 
what with ttoelr parents and the nine children, all living 
under the same roof. 

There were no servants or boarders living with 
the family, as stated before, my grandmother's sister's son, 
Richard Streeter was living with and being raised by his 
grandparents. 

Most of my grandmother's childhood was spent on 
the farm. So it was early to bed and early to rise for all 
of the children. There were always a lot of chores for the 
children to do. 

The family had horses, cows, pigs and chickens and 
they also raised all of their food. The vegetables they raised 
were preserved for the coming winter. They also sold the milk 
for butter and cheese and received the rest of the value of the 
milk In money. Sometimes the money was very little. They 
raised all of the food to feed to the animals, and sometimes 



there v.as enough to sell. The family always had food to eat. 
My grandmother's mother made most of the childrens clothing 
when they were little. 

Her parents spent their spare time playing cards, 
with friends, or visiting other friends and relatives. 
Holidays were always spent with the family. 

Parents visited their married children and the 
children also visited their ps-rents after they had left home. 
When the children were little, it was great fun for then to 
go visiting, they always looked forward to it, and the good times. 
The family meant everything to everyone. When the children 
visited their grandparents 'chey always looked forward to the 
candy they would get. When they visited the elderly relatives, 
where there were no children, the kids would just have to sit 
and wait. When they visited their aunts and uncles, there were 
always a lot of children for them to play with. There was also 
a lot of good food every time they went visiting. When 
anyone went visiting, they were always expected to stay for 
meals and if it wasn't meal time, a big spread would still 
be put out on the table. 

Big family celebrations were always held, with the 
Fourth of July being a huge one. A big picnic was always held 
with everyone bringing food. There would also be fireworks 
and games with literally hundreds of relatives and friends in 
attendence. These big celebrations were held in different 
relatives homes every year, and sometimes it would be on or 
near a lakefront-. Family reunions were held all of the time. 
New Years Day was another big occasion, with visits that day 
to both grandparents homes. The whole week before the big 
New Years Day, was spent cooking. The daughters would spend 



the entire week before, at their mother's house, cooking. They 
then would freeze the food by placing It in the big screened 
in porch, saving it for the big day. 

The key decisions in the family were made by my 
grandmother's parents. They were not strict in this area 
and the children could usually persuade their parents to see 
it their way. 

My grandmother's mother made a lot of the decisions 
concerning the family buniness. Money -wan scarce and important 
matters were taker, care of first. Usually there was not enough 
money to go around. 

Her mother also did all of the disciplining. The children 
were spanked anytime they were out of line. They were also 
scolded a lot, but never by their father, always their mother. 
No one except the mother had a hand in the disciplining and 
rearing of the child.rer.. Also, no one was treated as a 
"Black Sheep." Everyone was treated fairly and equally. 

The children were always allowed to eat with their 
parents, but if there were to many guests, then they would 
have to est last. The children, however, were never chased 
away when guests came. They would always be allowed to sit 
and listen to the conversation. 

The parents expected, their children to help out at 
the earliest age possible, which was as scon as they were 
able to handle doing some kind of a chore. The children 
were always sent on little errands. 

Both the children and parents helped, each other 
financially, whenever they could'. In my grandmother's 
family everyone had a hard time supporting themselves. 

The mother usually always cared for the sick. 



Whenever a baby was to be born, the mother usually went to help. 
Everyone was helpful about caring for anyone sick. 

My grandmother's family later moved off the farm 
and into a house in L'.nneapolis, Minnesota. Her parents owned 
the house they built. Her father worked In the flour mills 
until he became ill and had to return to the country again. 
The family moved back into this house in the city, at a later 
time. 

The women of the family received no doweriea and a 
will was usually made, with the property being divided among 
all of the children. 

The children left home right after high school, if 
they went that far in school. Instead of embarking on a 
career, they would look for and take any Job available, 
because jobs were scarce at that time. My grandmother's sister, 
Yvonne, worked in a defense factory during this time, because 
that was were help was needed the most. 

The men in the family did not follow in their fathers 
line of work. As stated before, they took whatever job was 
avaiable to them. Until they were old enough to leave home 
and get a job, the women worked around the house. 

Neither the parents or grandparents had any influence 
on the occupational choices of their children. Whatever Job 
they could find was good enough. 

My Aunt Yvonne told me that one of her very first 
jobs was picking strawberries* She got bwo cents a quart and 
probably q&ade a dollar, which made her feel rich* She had to 
walk two miles to get there and another two to get back home. 

Children were not really expected to get a Job. 
However, if a Job came up and if they could be spared from the 
duties at home, then they took it. Most of the children 



I 



also contributed flnanciallyto the family. They all bought 
their own clothes as well as giving a good share of their earnings 
to their parents, to help pay off the mortgage on the house 
and also to buy furniture'. 

A young person was expected to take on adult responsibilities, 
such as working, very young. It was usually around the age of 
12 or 13 and the work done was around the house or farm. Adult 
responsibilities such as marriage was usually taken around 
age 17 or 18*. 

The older people In the family were always cared for 
and respected. When the elderly could no longer care for 
themselves, they usually went to one of their daughters houses, 
where they remained until they passed away. 

My grandmother^ family lived through both of the 
world wars. To the family, It seemed that there was always a 
depression. During the Great Depression my grandmother's father 
had all of his money and savings in a bank and lost it all. 

A period of prosperity came to the family after the 
second world war. Their mortgage was paid off and everyone 
had jobs. 

In May of 1930 my grandmother left home to start 
her own married life, with her new husband Anthony R. Letourneau. 



, 5»«TM I 



The Married Life of My Grandparents- — 
Anthony and Gertrude Letoumeau 



Anthony Letoumeau married Gertrude Theroux my 25, 
1930 In a Catholic ceremony in Hugo, Minnesota 1 . From 1930- 
1936 he was a farmer in Hugo. Later, he was a laborer and the 
family lived in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Their first child, Leo, was horn in St. Paul, Minnesota, 
November 25, 1932 f <> Joyce, their second, was also born in St. 
Paul, on April 11, 193^. They lived on the farm with their 
parents until 1936 » when they moved to ft house in St. faul. 
As a family they shared many happy times together. These will 
be related later in the chapter on my mother*. 

Their third child. Donna, bom December 10, 1936 
in St. Paul. Yvonne was born March 8, 1937 1 also in St. Paul>. 

In 193S the ftually moved to White Bear Beach, Minnesota, 
were my grandfather went to work as a Btefeland construction 
worker, which is current Job today* 

My grandmother died that year, November 18, 1938* 
of pneumonia. After her death my grandfather and two of his 
children, Joyce and Leo, went to live with his parents, Cageat 
and Ida Letoumeau, who were living in White Bear lake, Minnesota. 
Young Donna went to live with her Aunt Elizabeth, while little 
Yvonne went to live with their other aunt, Sophie 1 . The five 
of them were separated from each other until my grandfather 
married again, in 19^0» 

Anthony R,. Letoumeau and Marie Cardinal were married 
In a Catholic ceremony in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, on 
February 3, 194-0>. My grandfather and his new bride, lived in 
a big house, along with his four children. In White Bear Lake. 



This new marriage was blessed with six children;. 
The first child, Annette, was bom in St. Paul en November 1, 
194-0'. Anthony Jr. Joined the family in June of 19^4. He, like 
his sister and step-brother and sisters, was also born in 
St'. Paul, Minnesota. 

During the second world tear, my grandfather worked 
in the nearby defense factory. Eoth the depression and second 
world war were hard on the family, but their determination and 
strong family loyalty pulled them through. Soiae of the hardships 
they endured during this time will be related further in the 
chapter on my mother!* 

After the second world war, my grandfather went to 
work in an arris plant'. He had to work 10 hours a» day and seven 
days a week. He made £150 a week and no kind cf incoue tax was 
taken out of his payroll. 

The third child bom to Anthony and tSarie, bom 
In St. Paul on "arch 31 • 19^6 • She was christened Margaret, 
but is better known to everyone as Peggy*. 

Tragedy struck this family once again, this time in 
the summer of 19^&. At the age of eleven, young Yvonne Letourneau 
was stricken with strep throat and died, on June 8, 19^8* She 
would have entered the 7th grade in the fall. 

The second boy bore tc this couple was liichealv Ee 
was also bom in St. Paul, on August 11, 1948. 

Four years later another girl, Anita, was ^orn in 8t. 
Paul. This was October 21, 19$#« 

The tenth child born to my grandfather was Kichele, 
who, like all of the other nine children, was borr: In St. Paul. 
She was bom August 23, 1955* 

My grandparents still live in the same house they 



purchased In 19^0, right after they ;rere married. All but two 
of tne children finished hi.*h school, and all except one have 
married and started their own fanillest; My grandparents now 
have 31 grandchildren to keep track off. Even though my family 
is separated from them by one state, contact is maintained 
regularly through letters. 



The Childhood of George I/. Fischer Jr. 



October 12, 1932 Columbus Day, is when my father, 
George L. Fischer Jr. was born*. As a child he had many 
hobbles, amoung theme model airplanes, skiing and playing 
the piano. 

There were no other relatives living in the same 
house as my dad, his two sisters and brothers, and his 
parents, resided in the house. After the sons and daughters 
were married, they did not continue to live with their 
parents'. Everyone lived in their own house. Parents 
did not go and live with their children. 

In my father's house there were three bedroom's. 
One was occupied by my father" s parents, the other 
by my father's two sisters and the third by my father. 
My father was away at school when his brother Tim was born 1 . 
No servants or boarders lived with the family. 

The daily schedule usually found the children 
going to school and their father leaving for work early. 
He usually came home about six in the inning*. My dad 
spent his spare time doing some of his favorite things 
like skiing. Holiday's were usually spent at the Malay 
farm, were my dad's mother grew up. The family would 
also go on picnics and other types of outings. The 
family would go visiting and also receive visitors in 
their home. When my father was young, he spent alot of 
time at the Malay farm in Caledonia. Sometimes he would spend 
an entire summer, and during the school year he would 
go down for several weekend trips. Holidays like 
Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter were usually spent 
together In their home or on the farm in Calednia 1 . 

My father's fagher made all the key decisions 
concerning moving. Both, of his parents made the decisions 
concerning his schooling until he was in high school. 
Then my father made his own decisions. Occupational 
and marriage decisions were left solely up to my father. 

Only my father's parents had a say in the family 
way the children were to be disciplined*. A popular 
method was to place a naughty child, fully clothes, 
under a cold shower, or simply to send them to their room. 

Since my dad was the oldest and the only boy 

in the family for a long time, he said he could just about 
do anything*. Perhaps the family sufficient tittle for him 
describing his statues at that time can be best summed 
up in to the words, "Top Banana." 



During meal time everyone had a special place, 
with the father sitting st the head oh the table. When 
there w«s enough room, the children could also eat with 
their parents and guests'. Otherwise when guests were 
present and there wasn't enough room, they would have to 
eat at another table or wait and eat In a second shift. 

The children were expected to help out around the 
house whenever asked tot. They never had to contribute 
any money. They all received an allowance. My yather 
started working with his father. In the contracting 
business, around the age of 12. 

HI 8 parents did not help any of the children In 
college or business'. During breaks from school my father 
worked as a cook and dishwasher on a train, for 16 hours a 
day. The train ran from St. Paul, Minnesota to Chicago, 
Illinois, then to Seattle, Washington and finally back 
to St?. Paul. This Journey lasted for five days. 

My father did not follow the occupations of his 
father. In fact, my grandfather wanted his son to go 
to school and finish his education. Instead of being 
a carpenter*. 

During my father's childhood would war 2 occurred. 
The family still had some relatives living in Austria 
when Hitler invaded'. When my father was in high school 
he wrote letters to his cousins Martha, Maria and Herburt 
Lentsh, who were living Austria*. This proved to be 
great practice for his German. 

During the Great Depression my grandfather's work 
was affected, as was everyone's. He got a Job at the 
South St. Paul stockyards as a carpenter, maintaining 
the wooden fences, until it was profitable to resume 
self -empl oymen t '. 

When my father was 18, he bought his very first car. 
It was a Dodge convertible. The family bought a television 
set In the early 19*K)'s>. They were one of the first 
families in the neil^Borhood to own one. He and his 
sisters enjoyed watching the Kukla Fran an Ollie Show. 

After high school the Fischer children left home to 
begin their special interests. My father's sister, 
Margaret became a nurse, while his other sister, Jean, became 
an airline stewardess. 

In December of 1953 my father married Joyce Letourneau. 
For two years after that he was stationed at Ftf, Leonardwood 
Army Base In Missouri. 



The Childhood of Joyce A*. LeHIHIheau 



My mother , Joyce A. Letourneau, was bom April 
11 • 1934** For a few years she and her brother, Les, 
and their parents lived on a farm In Hugo, Minnesota* 
They then moved Into a house In St. Paul, Minnesota 
where my grandfather went to work as a laborer* 

Their house was large, with the parents having 
their own room and the girls sharing another. Les, 
the only boy, got a room to himself. 

After ray grandmother died In 1938 my grandfather 
and his son and my mother, who was only k, went to live 
with his parents Cageat and Ida Letourneau, who were 
living In a house in white Bear Lake, Minnesota*. One 
of my mom's sisters, $vonne, wentto live with her Aunt 
Sophie, while her other sister Donna, went to live with 
her Aunt Lizzie* The famllyremained seperated until 
their father remarried Marie Cardinal in 1940* The 
entire family then moved into a large house near the 
grandparents, on 4th Avenue In White Bear Lake 1 * My 
Grandparents still live in that house. Over the 
years ray mother gained six new step brothers and 
sisters 1 * The house was large enough so that usually 
two children shared a room. No servents or boarders 
lived with the family at any time*. 

The daily schedule of my mom's family usually 
began with the children going to school, their father to work 
and their mother remaining at hometo do the housework* 
The kids had chores to do around the house like wai.;r 
the dishes, or watching the younger kids*. My mom and 
her sisters and brother spent their spare times roller 
skating, ice skating, visiting relations or entertaining 
company)* At the age of 12 my mother spent her spare time 
delivering newspapers on her paper route*. 

My mother and her family would go visiting to their 
grandparents house, or any of the many aunts and uncles. 
They always went to see the relatives on birthdays or sp- 
ecial occasions. 

Once a year, on New Years' day, a traditional 
family gathering would be held*. It was an old French 
custom for everyone in the Letourneau family to gather 
en this day** It had been practiced as far back as my 
momsgreat granparents*. 

Everyone would gather at my mother's grandmother's 
house for breakfast*. There was usually a contest between 
the men, to see who could be the first one to arrive*. 



People would start arriving around 6 a.m. Who ever won the 

contest , being the first to arrive, was treated special all 

day. The families would stay the entire day, feasting and enjoying 

each other 1 s company*. The women would spend the weeks before, 

preparing all of the food. The food would then be placed In 

the screened In porch, where It was kept until the special 

day. 

On the festive day, the wen were fed first, then the 
children and lastly the women. This tradition continued to be 
held at ay grandmother's house, until the family got to big*. 
Then it was necessary for the family celebration to move Into 
a rented hall. 

My mother's father was the primary one to make all 
decisions in the family. If he was not home or available 
then his wife would. The decisions on family business were made 
Jointly by my mother's parent s>» 

The children were disciplined by both parents*. The 
father had the final decision or say on a matters A way of 
disciplining the family was by use of the razor strapr. 
There were no other adults involved In the raising or 
disciplining of the children^ 

Everyone In the family was treated equally and no 
rank was assigned to anyone. 

During meal time, my mother's father sat at the 
head of the table, with her mother sitting at the other end f . 
The children all had assigned places and usually always ate 
with their parents. When quests came, the children sat 
at another table or ate In a second shift. 

As soon as the children had a job and were earning 
regular pay, they were expected to help out. My mother had a 
paper route at age 11 and housecleaned for a lady when she 
was about 12. When she was Ih , she had a part time Job as a 
candy stripper at St*. Joseph's Hospital, in St». Paul. After 
she graduated from high school she took a full time job as a 
film editor in a St. Paul television station, KSTF. 

The parents did not help their children out in 
school or business!. My mother attended high school at a 
Catholic girls academy and had to pay for her tuition, books, 
uniforms, and busfare. When she was 16, she had to pay $10 a 
week to her parents during the summer, as well as buy her own 
clothes and other necessities. 

Sick members of the family were cared for by every- 
one In the family. Babies were well taken care of and treated 
like another member of the family. 

The children were expected to take care of their own 
personal needs and contribute to the house budget when called 
upon, which for my mother, meant contributing #10 a week for 
room and board-. 

My grandfather was exempt from World War II, because 
of his many children 1 . However, he did go to work in a defense 
factory* The family did undergo rationing during this time*. 
Such things like sugar, butter and nylons were scarce. The 
family would also save the lard to sell to the war department, 
which used it for ammunition. 

The family had a radio and the kids enjoyed listening 
to shows like Captain Midnight, Jack Armstrong, the Green Hornet, etc. 
These were all fifteen minute serials and the children would 
listen to them everyday. When the family got a t.v., the 
children enjoyed watching shows like Milton Berle, game shows and 

westerns*. 



My grandfather did own a car, but the children used 
bus transportation to take them where they wanted to got* 

My mother and her brothers and sisters were taught 
to always respect the elderly, and to help them when they were 
In need. The children had a very good relationship with the 
elders. 

After high school everyone usually left home to 
begin their own life. No one went onr to higher education*. 
In December of 1953 » ny mother left home to start her own 
life with her new husband*. 



I 



The Married Life of George and Joyce Fischer 

White Bear Lake, Minnesota was the setting December 
26, 1953* for th weddign between George L. Fischer Jr. 
and Joyce A. Letourneap. They met In the winter of 1952 
when my father was a door to door pots and pans salesman. 
He walked up to her door and pitched his campaign. My mom 
refused to buy anything and sent the pesty salesman away. 
However, the pesty salesman did not give up. He decided 
that If she wouldnjt buy anything from him than maybe she 
would accept a date with him, and so the relationship 
began. 

The summer after they were married my dad again went 
to work as a chef on a train. He took this Job because It 
was the only one available, since he still had his military 
service to fulfil. 

In September of 195^ their first child was born t 
Stephanie in St. Paul, Minnesota. That same year the 
three of them moved to Ft*. Leonardwood, Missouri, where my 
father began his two year military service*. It was here 
that their second daughter was born, Dorothy. This was 
July 13 t of 195&> At this time the family was living in 
a trailer. 

The family moved to Woodbridge, Virginia in 1957 
where my father became a sixth and seventh grade teacher 
at a school nearby Fairfax, Virginia. He had applied for a 
jobwith the C.I, A. and took this teaching job, while 
waiting for his clearance from the agency. The family 
was still making their home in a trailer. 

In my father became a C.I. A. analyst. At this time 
the family moved out of the trailer park and into a house 
in the same city, Woodbridge. Their third daughter, 
Famala, was bom at the time, in Georgetown, Virginia on 
Agust 13 1 1958*. 

The family then moved to Medfield, Massuchusetts 
where my father became a public relations man. Their fourth 
daughter, Julie, was born in Needham, Massuchusetts 
November 2, i960. 

In i960 the family once again moved*. This time to 
Annandale, Virginia, where my father took a public re- 
lations job with Farrington. 

Staaf ord, Connecticut was the next move for the family 
where my father took a job with a public relations firm in New 
York City, with all of her children in scholl my mother 
took a job as a librarian for Stamford Library. The family 
remained in Stanford for four years, until, in 19^7 they 
uprooted once again and moved to Centervllle, Ohio. My 
father was now a public relations man with NCB. Their fifth 
daughter, Georgia, was born in Kettering * Ohio, on 
Christmas Day, 196?. 



In 1968 the family came to Rockf ord where they bought a 
house on Spring Creek Road. George Fischer was employed 
by Sunstrand. as a public relations man. Their sixth child 
and sixth daughter * Gail, was bom in nearby St. Anthony 
hospital on June 30, 1969. 

The family bought some land just past Guilford and 
Mulford Road intersect! on | where they built their next 
hornet* Thfts was in 1972 and my father was wotklng with the 
Cherry Vale Development Company;. He left the firm last year 
and created his own advertising business* Creative Marketing'. 
The family still resides in the home they built in 19?2 . 
It Is situated back in some woods, where it is beautiful 
and very pleasant. 



The Childhood of Stephanie Fischer 

I was bom in St. Paul, Minnesota, on September 21, 
195^» We lived for a while in a house in the city before moving 
to Missouri, where my father was stationed in the army*. 

There are six children in my family and everyone 
is currently living at home, with my parents*. When I was young, 
and when there were only four children, I shared a room with 
my sister, Dorothy. My parents occupied another bedroom, while 
the two youngest shared another. Since we moved to Rockford, 
I have had a room of my own, and so has my sister, Dorothy. 
My two little sisters share a room, as do my two other sisters. 
We never had any boarders or servants living with us>. 

Everyone of the kids had their own little chore to 
do* be it emptying the trash or washing the dishes. AH of the 
children were responsible for their own room. This practice 
along with some others is still being practiced today. However, 
once the children were old enough, like after 16, they usually 
got a job and were relieved of some of the household chores. 
Everyone who had a job, kept the money earned for themself • 
They did not have to and still don't have to contribute any 
money to the household bud Jet . They were expected and still 
are, to buy their own clothes and necessities. However my parents 
are always willing to help their children out financially 

I am the first of the children to attend college. 
My father is paying my way and will do so for his other 
five daughters when the time comes. 

Since most of my childhood was spent moving to 
and from various eastern states, we were separated for many 



from all ofi the relatives'. Since moving to Rockf ord we get 
together with our relatives whenever possible. We usually 
gather with my paternal grandparents on Christmas, Thanksgiving 
or Easter. When I was very young all holidays and special 
occasions were spent together as a family or with some close 
friends. 

Up until we came to Rockf ord, the family usually 
spent their free time camping. We would go to some national 
park and spend a week or just a weekends This practice was 
discontinued after the family became to large*. 

My parents made all family decisions, jointly?. 
My dad and mom would discuss a move to another city or state, 
together. They also made the decisions on what schools their 
children would attend}. For three years my sisters and I were 
enrolled In a parochial school in Stamford, Connecticut?. 
Decisions about which college or what occupation the child 
will enter into has been and always will be left up to the 
child!. 

Children in my family were disciplined by both 
parents. A scolding or spanking usually was dealt out to 
any child who misbehaved. Only my parents had a say in who 
was to be disciplined?. No other adults were Involved?. When I 
was small, and when my father commuted to a new job in a 
different state, he would be gone all week and then return for 
the weekend. A chart with various chores and all four of the 
chlldrens nameswas made up and hung in the kitchen. Whoever 
did not execute one of the duties on the list was given a 
black mark in the appropriate bo*. When my father returned at 
the end of the week, the chart was produced and surveyed by 
my father?. Oh how I dreaded the time he would ask my mom for 



the duties chart. 

Everyone In my family has there own special seat 
at the dinner table* but this is merely oat of force of 
habit?. My mother likes to sit olose to the kitchen and 
my little sisters* while my father sits near the telephone. 
When there was just s&X- in the family, everyone could sit 
around the dinner table. Now that two more children are 
in the family* it is necessary for the two youngest to 
sit at a smaller table* near the big one*. When guests 
were being entertained* the children were never turned 
away. Usually if there was enough room, everyone could eat 
together*. If there wasn't* then the children would eat 
at another table or at an earlier time*. Now a days when 
guests oome* children under 16 are seated at another table* 
while those older are allowed to eat with the adults. This 
is especially practiced when all of the relatives gather 
for a holiday. 

My father owned and still does own all of his 
property!. Since I am the oldest and the closet one to 
ohoosing a career* I think it is safe to say that I will 
be following in the footsteps of my father. I plan to become 
a Journalist* hopefully writing sports stories. I currently 
am studying at Bock Valley* where, in May, I will graduate. 
Next fall, I will enroll at Northern Illinois University to 
pursue my studies. Presently I am also employed by Charles 
Thomas and his wife, as a governess, where I care for their 
seven young children when they need me. My family still resides 
in the house my father built two years ago, here in Rockfordfc 
I attended Lincoln Middle School and Guilford High School, 
before coming to RVO. I enjoy travelling and meeting people*. 



I 

, 1 

■ 

I 




■ 



he Anthony R. Letourneu family. 

My mother is the first from the lef 



Ky father and his two 
sisters, standing in 
front of their car. 






paternal "grandparents house 
M i s sula , Montana . 



My father's family one 
Christmas season.-. 





My paternal grandparents house^ 



The house George L. j-'is 
built. It is currently 
my father's parents re: 



FLUEGEL, CYNTHIA JAN, 1956- 



mSM TYPE: PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
1] I,Y H I STORY . 

lr Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can he made more useful to historians and 
[era studying American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
low. This will take you only a few minutes, and will be easily made over 
to an Index which will permit archive users ready access to just those 
nds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



Your namc^Cvrithia j an E-Uiagj&J 

Date of form A pril 26. 19/6 

Your c o 1 lege: Rock Valley College 
Rockford, Illinois 



Office Use Code 

(ID // . . ) 

(ID # ) 



Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 



X Before 17 50 

1850-1900 



1750-1800 

1900 or later 



1800-1850 



Please check all regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

X New England (Mass ., Conn . ,R . I . ) X Middle Atlantic (N.Y. , P e n n a . , N 

Va . ) South Atlantic (Ga . ,Fla . ,N .C . ,~S .C . ) East South Central 

(La . , Mis s . , Ala . , Tenn , Ky . ) X Was t South Central (Ark . ,N .M. , Tex ., Ok . ) 

East North C e n t r a 1 ( Mi ch . , Oh i o , i n d . ) Pacific (Cal . ,Wash . ) 

('Hawaii , Alaska) X (111.., Wise.,) 

Please check a 1 1 occupational categories in which members ol your 
family whom you have discussed in this paper have found themselves. 



Mining 
Bis Bus ines s 



X Farming _ 

X T ransportation 

Professions X Industrial Lab or_X__ 0 ther Municipal worker 



Shopkeeping or small buslnei 
Manufacturing 



Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 



Roman Catholic Jewish X Presbyterian X Methodist 

Baptist Episcopalian Congregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon __ 



Other Protestant 



Other (name) 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

X Swedish X Other Scandinavian X German French 

_ Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans Eastern Eur 

Jews Central Europeans Italians Slavs 



"Irish X British Native Americans over several generations 

East Asian Other (Name) 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history 



J£ Interviews with other 

family members 

X V ital Records 

j£ Photographs Maps 



Family Bibles X Family Genealogies 
Land Records The U.S. Census 



Other 



I 



FAM1 LY DATA 



2 



A . Grandfather (your father's side ) 

Name George Willia m ELUEGEL Current Residence Rockford, Illinois 

Date of birth Feb. 20, 1897 Place of birth Rock Island, Illinois 
Date of dea th 

K duca t ion (numb e r of years); 
grade school_g high school 

0 c upation(s) 



Place of burial 
vo c a t i ona 1 



college 



I s t Farmin g 



Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
.1 s t W-i srons-in Dates 1Q 



-1933^ 



:'nd Industrial worker Dates 1953-1962 2nd Illinois 

3rd Dates 3rd 

4th 



4 th 



Dates 



Dates ._L9i3.--p-r.esen 

Dates 

Dates 



Re 1 i g i o n Methodist 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother Wise . Rapids, Wi <&gt.e June 15, 1921 
NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

N a me Helena JAGOBSON C urrent Reside n c e Rockf ord , Illinois 

Date of birth O ct. 15, 1900 Place of b i r th Clark County, Wise. _ 

Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school g high school 

college 



vocational 



Occupation (s) 

1st School teacher Dates 

2nd Dates 

3 r d D ates 

4th Dates 



PLACE 0 F RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
.1 s t Wis consin Dates 



2nd II linois. 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 19J>3 .-present 

Dates 

Dates 



Religion Methodist 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your n r a nd f a t h e r Wise . Rapi ds, W i<£« t e . J une_ 2 1 _ 1 9.2 1 

NOTE: If your father was raised fio age 18) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on the back of this page 
(A-2) . 



A -2 Step^randfather (your father's side) 

N. ■-<.- Current Residence 

Date of birth Placeofbirth 



Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

ie school high school vocational 

Cw 1 lege 



Occupation(s) 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Da tes __2nd Da tes 

Dates 3rd Dates 

th Da tes 4 th Da tes 

Rel i 2 ion 



'olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

of marriage to your grandmother date 

3-2 S tepgrand mother (your father's side) 

Current Residence 



of birth Placeofbirth 



!ntc of death Placeofburial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school vo ca t i ona 1 

coll e ge 

PL AC E OK RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

1st Dates 1st Dates 

nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 3rd_ Dates 

Da tes 4 th Dates 



1 t i ( i 1 party, civil or h o > 1 a 1 < 1 ub h , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 



4 



Name Ari-hnr Wasrihiirn MEAD Current Residence Rnn kfor H, Illinois 

Date of birth Nov. 27, 1911 Place of b i r t hJ^g^rL B_y , Wise 

Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 
grade school 8 _high school 



vocational 



college 



Occupation(s) 

Is t Fireman 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Date s !934-1973 1s t Rockford. 111. D a t e s 1934-prP spni- 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



2nd 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



i- ■ Republican , 



Re 1 ig i on Pres hy r.p.r i an 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities 

the S hrine , - ... . 

Place of marriage to your gr and mo t h e r^ocjc fm_L>_IlJJ_l-Qi^ a t e . . Dec 3D_,_ 1934.- 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepfather or another relative (to 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Gladys Doris ALBERS Current Residence .Rnrkfnrd, .Illinois - 

Date of birth Aug. 20. 1910 Place of birth_c n1 > a go__Hl inoi _ 

Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 



grade school 



high school 



vocational 



coll e g e 



Occnpation(s) 
1st B ookk ee pe r 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after Leaving home) 
Datesl937-1962 iHt_Ro Q kj£Qrjd^_Ill J l)J t ^1934-presen 



D a t e s 
Dates 
Dates 



2nd 
3rd 
4 th 



Dal c s 
Da t v. s 
Dates 



Religion Prp shyrpri an — 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, c t c . Repu b 1 ican , ... 

___E__y__-n_St_t_-, a Mnthpr S t ndy - Gr__ip — 

Place of marriage to your grandfather . Date 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to 

H) g*ve tha_ data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C- 2 Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 

Naac Current Residence 

Date of birth P 1 a c e o f b i r t h 



Date oi death Placeofburial 



Education (number of years) 

crade school high school vocational college 



Dccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

Ls t Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Da t e s 2 nd Da t e s 

3 r ci Da t e s 3rd Da t e s 

4 th Dates 4 th Dates 

Re 1 igion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



of marriage to your grandmother D ate 

D- 2 S tepgrandrao the r (your mother's side) 

Current Residence 



D.itf of birth Place of birth 



Xitc n[ death Placeofburial 



Education (number of years) 

high school vocational_ college 

upation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Dates 1st Dates 



Da tee 2nd Da tes 

D ate s 3 r d D ates 

Dates 4th Dates 

R e 1 1 g i o n 

1 1 1 a ] party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



• Mar r lag< to your grandfather Date 



6 

CHI LP RE N of A & B (or A-2 or B-2) - your father's name should appear below 



Name Marjorie FLUEGEL 



Place of birth Neil lsvi lle . Wise. date Dec. 1, 19 28 
Number of years of school inj 
Residence 



Occupation 



Marital Status 



Number of children 



.Death 1930 



N ai "e ,_J____n FLUEGEL 

Place of birth Neill s vil le, W ise. . d a t e Nov . 4. 1926 

Number of years of schooling 12 Occupation Beauti cian 

Res i d e n c e Anaheim, Calif. M arital Status M arr ied 

Number of children 2 D e a t h 



N a m e .ten Hp 11 FT.1TF.GF.T. 



Place of birth Nei 1 Isvi 1 1e , Wise . 
Number of years of schooling 12 



date April 3, 1934 

Occupation 



Residence Phoenix, Ariz. Marital Status Married 
Number of children_ 4 Death 



N ;l m e Priscilla FLUEGEL 

Place of birth Neillsville, Wise 

Number of years of school in g 12 

Res idence Rockf ord , I l linois 

Number of children 3 



date Aug. 11, ±9A4. _ 

0 C c u p a t Ion Hou s ew Lf e 

Marital Statu s Mar ried 

deal h 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

N u mb e r o I children 



0 c c u pat i o n 



Marital Status 
Death 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling. 
Residence 



Occupatio n 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



N a me 

Place of birth 



Number of years of school in; 
Residence 



Number of children 



date 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling. 

Res i dence 

Number ol children 



0 c c u d a t ion 



Marital Status 
dea th 



Name . 

Place of birlh 

Number o I years of schooling 



date 



()c <: upa t ion 



Residence 



lumber of children 



Ma r i t a 1 Status 
dea t li 



N a me 



Place of b i r t h 



d a t e 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence _ Marital Status 

N umb it of children death 



(Ice ii p a t i o n 



7 

C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 



1 . Same Janice Rae MEAD 

Place of birth Rork-for.l Til date R»p r 2^ 1936 

years of schooling 12 Occupation Housewife 

tee Rorkforci Til . Marital Status M, qr ripd 

Number of children __3 death 

2 . N .1 ■ e 

Place of birth date 

: years of schooling_ Occupation 

ce Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

■.. of birth date 

Nuaber of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

ber of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

■ r of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Sane 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



N a m e 

Place of birth date 

if years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

■r of children death 



Place of birth date 

aber of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status_ 

'iuab'T o f children death 



Place of birth date 

years of schooling Occupation 

'■'<•. idence _ Marital Status 

'• . - < r o f ch 1 1 d r en » death 



10. Name 



Place of birth date 

Number o f ye;irn of schooling Occupation 

Ri'Hldtnre Marital StatU8__ 

Niinber of children death 



Your Father 

Name Wendell George FLUEGEL , Current Residence Phoenix, Ariz. 

Date of birth April 3, 1934 Place of bitth Neillsville, Wise . 

Date of Death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

vo c a t i o na 1 c o 1 1 e ge 



Occupation(s) 










1st Banker 


Da tes 


1952- 


1964 


1st 


2nd Car dealer 


Dates 


1964- 


1968 


2nd 


3rd Tavern owner 


Dates 


1968- 


1971 


3rd 


4th Retired 


Dates 


1971- 


present 


4 th 


Religion Mprhndisr 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
nnis Dates1955-I9fi 



2nd Wisconsin 




Political parties, c£vil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Republican 

Place of marriage to your mother Rockford, 111. date Oct. 15, 1 955 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name Janice Rae MEAD Current Residence p n g^r.P I,M-i n nfg 

Date of birth Sept. 26, 1936 _Place of birth Rockford, Ill inois 

Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade s ch oo 1 8 h ighrschoo 1 4 vo c a t i o na 1 c o liege 



Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Secreta ry Dates igs4-1971 1st Illinois Dates ^^.^ 

2 n d Housewife D ate s 1971- 2 n d S. Dakota D ate s 197 1-^ 

3rd Dates 3rd Minnesota Da . tes 197J3_-j^ 

4th Dates 4th Illinois Datesl974- 



Re 1 igi on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Republicans 
T.edgp.q T.adips' Hnl f Assnriarinn 



Place of marriage to your father Rnrkfnrr^ I llinois date Oct. .-15., L95_5 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the hack of this page (F-2). 



E -2 Stepfather 

Name 'Jayng Allpn KOm.F.R 



Date of birth .Tn 1 y TO, L&32 Place of b i r th Mad is on . Wise . 

r> .i t e of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
cradc school high school 4 vocational college 

Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st. Engineer Dates 1950- present 1st Illinois Dates 1950 

Dates 2nd S. Dakota Dates 197 1 

3 r d D ate s 3 r d Minnesota D ate s 19 73 

4th Dates 4th Illinois Dates 1974- 



Religion MPthoclist 



• Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Democra t , 

t hp Shrinp, Marhinp Tool Association 

e of marriage to your mother Yankfnn, S. Dak ota flate£ P p r . 14, HT' 

F- 2 S tepmother 

Name 



Date of birth Place of birth 

Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

le school high school vocational college 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

1 s t Da tes Is t Da tes 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

Dates 4th Dates 



f •• 1 I i o n 

'I'-il party, > i v i 1 or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father 



1 0 

CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2.F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 



Name Cynthia Tan FT.TTF.nFT. 

Place of birth Rnrkfnrd J Til. Date of birth Q c t . 12. 1956 

Number of years of schooling 14 Occupation Student 

Residence Rnsmp, Til. Marital Status Single 

Number of children death 

Name Lea An n FLUEGEL, 

Place of birth Rockford . 111. Date of birth july 21, 1960 

Number of years of schooling 1 Q Occupation 

Resi dence Roscoe . 111. Marital Status Single 

Number of children death 

Name Troy Arthur FLUEGEL 

Place of birth Rnr-lc ford , Til. Date of birth Aug . 9 , 1961 

Number of years of schooling 9 Occupation Student 

Re s i dence Roscee . , II 1 . Marital Status Single 
Number of children death 

Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation^ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth ' 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockf ord Public Library, Rockf ord 
1 1 1 i no i s 

A 



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When I was firs I ass ojeci Lr acini 

family history, it een c ti in ■•- - i.h e B t a> tu- 

ally I have to admi! i r< . i L kin en jo r ed ; Ic's 

unbelievable all the place where in forma t ioi is availab 
and everyone seems so 

Naturally, a project of this size is going t Lake a 
lot of time and hard work am m:>ne\ in some ai eas In 
the limited time I have had, I have tried to put the 
pieces of my family's his l t r { • > gical 

•rder , so that anyone interested nay make use of it and 
hopefully add on to it as the i 

I feel everyone at some time >r another should spend 
some time on this, maybe even p.ai a >bb> it. Af _e 
all, it is your his tor 



In preparing my family history, the following sources 
were used: 

1. Interviews 

2. Correspondence ; ) t a 

3. A family tree that 1 is be i passed liown to the 
present generation 

4. The Church of Sweden in Arvika, Sweden 

5. The court houses in Winnebago County, Illinois 
and in Clark Count Wisconsin 

6. Documents and pictures kept by family members 

I would also like to thank U e following peonle who 

were kind enough to answer a • correspondence and tal* 

with me about our family's ast: 

My mother, Janice K c 
My father, WenJel t- ' ie^el 

My grandparents, Mr. L Mrs Arthur Mead and Mr. & 

Mrs . George Fl.i ge 1 
A distant cousin, Mrs P -thur W< sl 



CYNThlA JAN FL1 EG EL 

At 9:08 a.m., October 12, L956, Janice Rae MEAD gave 
birth to me, Cynthia Jan FLUEGEL, at Swedish American 
Hospital in Rockford, Winnebago, Illinois. While 1 was 
being born, my Grandfather Mead was fighting a very large 
furniture store fire. The called him on the truck radio 
to tell him it was a girl. Four -ears later when my sister, 
Lea Ann, was born, my grandfather was at another large 
furniture store fire (a different store). It was a good 
thing my mother had a boy tl e next time or the three 
largest furniture stores in Rockford cocld have burned 
down in a five year period. 

February 17, 195 7, I was christened by Reverend J. Rod- 
man Williams at the First Presbyterian Church in Rockford, 
Illinois. At that particular chu cl . it is customary for 
the entire congregation to act as sponsors, so 1 do not 
have a godfather or godmother. 

My first home was at 1015 Will James Road, New Milford, 
Illinois. It was only a two bedroom home, but large enough 
for the three of us 

My father worked at City National Bank of Rockford and 
after I was born, my mother went back to work at Bartelt 
Engineering. At that time m mother '"a friend across the 
street, Delores Shives , took care oi me. She was very nice 
sold idn 1 1 mind a '. all. 



July 21, 1960, :ny si- te 6 i \\n was born. The- bouse 
seemed t > get a little sma Le then; since I '• ad to share 
my room with her. It even ot sma] Ler a year Later when 
my brother, Troy Arthur, -.a.' born (August 9, 1961). My 
parents also thought it was getting to smal] arid had started 
building a new one at 580'' Balboa Or ive , New Milford, Illi- 
nois. We moved into our new house December of 1962. I 
still had to share a bedroom with my sister, but the house 
was still so much bigger that we did not mind. 

I started New Milford virade School in 196 i . I really 
enjoyed going there, making. new friends and just the new 
experiences of going to school Jan Cottingham, who only 
lived about three blocks from my new house, and I became best 
friends all through grade school. But after sixth grade 
(196S) , my parents were divorcee' anci we moved to an apart- 
ment at 130 Flintridge Drive, Rbckford, Illinois. And 
after seventh grade Jan's family n >ved to Ft. Smith, Ark- 
ansas. There is quite a distance >e ~ween us, but we will 
always remain good friends 

Far seventh and eightl gi le , » went to Line o lr Junior 
High School. Lincoln was ei nev* to me and so t.l bigger, 
I really did not like it. 8 t L met Sue Cunnin.t am, wi tl •. n 
became my best frien !, and i far ed t • the surra -dings. 

After Lincoln Junior » i v . I w. ni on to East hi ph S hooi. 
That was even Li^.ei at le'.ist 1 ha m 

friend, Sue. Sue mo • . . ■ r t e i • • - . epe-te: 



Unfortunately , rfa •• t ecrer job t e- in 

St. Cloud , Benton, Miones las quarter of uy 

junior year, 1 went to Techui < I i Schoc ! in St. Cloud, 
Minnesota. The following .. m\ >arents bougt t a very 

nice, large home in t'u country . That mean t changing schoo 
again. My senior year I went tc a • el] Higl School in 
Sartell, Stearns, Minnesc 

ly the time I hat graduate i, .Va.ne had been offered an- 
other job back in the Rockford, Illinois area. My parents 
really wanted to be back in a familiar are a, so again we 
moved . 

Presently, we at e livii ; a t L 16 >8 Love Road, Roscoe , 
Winnebago, Illinois. riayne is z I E preside' t of Safeway 
Safety Products Corp., where i an Lsc en >loyed part time 
as a bookkeeper. I a;n also at ei ding Rock Valley College 
and will graduate fron there Ma 20, 19 '6. This summer 
I hope to work full time. Ir September, it will be back to 
school at the University of 5i jth F rrida in Tampa, F i ot . da 
where I hope to get my ba lie Lor'* degree in accounting. 



(the Jfirsi ^rrsbittcrintt Churrh 



'1/ 



ivorkf orb, 31lhtoi$ 



P< E V . J. RODMAN WILL IAN' 5, Ph, D. 
1226 HARLEM BOULEVARD 



s - 9 ft a • 



7 ebniTy IP, 195? 



Mr. and Mrs. Wendell ?lue^el 
1015 Will Janes Hoe^ 1 
Roekford, Illinois 

Deer Mr. end Mr?. Fluegel: 

It was a real orivilege for to pdminister the 
sacrament of baptism to your child, Cynthia Jan, 
on Sunday, February 17. I trust this ipy will always 
remain memorable for you rnd that, in "!e->endence on 
the grece of God, yon will bring uo your daughter in 
the nurture and admonit^n o^ the Lord. The respon- 
sibility is great; the rewPrd immeasurable. 

May God "bless you end your little cne. 

Sincerely yours, 
J. lodm^n Williams 



JBW:dg 



Xntional linn or SWichj 

of 

f|e r n n ii a ri\ * dxo o Is 

(This jJcrHfica tlrat 

taaa rlfrreo a mrmber 
af rife '-t chapter 

of the 

National lSonor Borirtu of Srronoanji ^rhools. 

mfmbfrsltip in which is basf-o nn 
Scholarship. Craorrship. ^rmicf. and ^Character. 

(f>iom at 

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WENDELL GEORGE FLUEGEL 



My father was born April 3, 1934 in Nei llsvi lie , Clark, 
Wisconsin . 

He grew up in ruraL Wisconsin on a small farm with his 
two sisters and mother and father. While living on the farm, 
he attended the Neillsville public grade school. In 1948 he 
graduated from eighth grade. Following bis graduation, 
Wandell and his family moved lo another farm in Wisconsin 
Rapids, Wood, Wisconsin In .Wisconsin Rapids, my father 
attended Lincoln high School and graduated in 195- . During 
his high school years, he played baseball and spent much 
•f his free time playing many different musical instruments. 
Ha seemed to have a natural talent in music. 

In 1952, after Dad's graduati »n , the Fiuegel's decided 
it was time to move to a mere i idus tr ialized area and etiose 
Rockf ord , Winnebago, Illinois. Trie/ moved to 1914 Burton 
Street, which happened to be jus: across from the Mead fam- 
ily, who had a daughter, Janice. Two years later, October 15 
1955, Wendell George FLUEGEL and Janice Rae MEAD were marrieu 
One story that was often told was that my father used to 
wash his car every day just so he would be sure to see Mom 
if she went outside. I bet be f ad cl e cleanest car in the 
neighborhood. At this ; Lm< e *>as \. irking ai City Natic ial 
Bank of Rockf ord . In L95' »a< ei t in the Army. But i 
turned out to be a si ort ' n< • ause it ey found that 
had Hotchkin's disease • eiv< in hon ra Le 

d ischarge . 



After returning home he went back to work at City Nation- 
al Bank of Rockford. After m\ parents were married they 
lived in a very small aparime.' t until they bought a small 
two bedroom home at 1015 *fill James Road, New Milford, 
Winnebago, Illinois. While living on Will James Road, they 
had three children, Cynthia Jan, Lea Ann, and Troy Arthur. 
After the third child was born, they decided to build a 
new heme (1962) at 5105 Balboa Drive, New Milford, Illinois. 
It was a very nice, large three bedroom home. 

In 1964, my father went into the used car business and 
also went to auctioneer school and did that on the side. 
In 1961, my Dad moved to Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
where he owned and operated a cocktail lounge. That same 
year ny parents were divorced. Not long after the divorce, 
■y father married Eileen Hess] ink. They had one child, 
Kimberly. In 1971, they moved to Phoenix, Maricopa, Ari- 
zona, which is where they presently live. 



GEORGE WIL1 U M l-U EG EL 



My grandfather, George ,i , iaii! Fi b'E EL, a- born 
February 20, 1897, in Rock Island, Rock Island, Illinois. 

He later moved to Wisconsin Rapids, Wood, Wisconsin. 
I am n»t sure of the dale his neve. 

June 15, 1921 at Wisconsin Rapids, Wood, Wisconsin, 
he married Helena JACOB: ON. They continued living in that 
area on a farm. They had fc Lidren, Jean, Marjorie 

(who died as a child), Wei and Prisciila. 

Around 1953, my grandfat e; moved his family to 1914 
Burton Street , Rockfur , , - lis. Then 

began working at Elco To he contin :e«i working there 

until he retired in 1962. 

Since then he's kepi h ii e f 3 wi zh i t'.e »d 1 o s 
around the house and they've nt ;om< :aveii s Tl 

spend much of the year ii < / Lzc a a ea - to n.y 
father's health and to vis: e i re Jea nd ,k i e 



HELENA JACOBSON 



My grandmother, Helena s 
children born in Clark Cc; nty, Wisconsin. She was bor 
on October 15, 1900, but her Lrthda; s cc lei. rated on 
October 16. There was some confusion, since the birth 
certificate is not obtai"ed until some Lime after the 
birth of the child in the rural c mmuniti.es. 

Due to the fact that I was not able to talk to my 
grandparents (they live in Arizona), */hat constitutes 
the part of her life that I do know is the same as her 
husbands except that she was raised Ln Wisconsin anu 
later became a school Lea. '.or. After her marriage to 
George William FLUEGEL. her teaching career was over. 



STATE OF WISCONSIN 

Cfrttfirat? of |8irt(] 

IMS IS 10 ( ERTin from the r 1 . i 1 Office of the Regis ter of De^ds 
Neillsville, Wis. that Helena Jacobson 



is a Female born m Oct. 15 1900 at Township of Sherwood 

v V. ..■ (Village or City) 

Clark 



[his rei ord ■ is filed October 9th, 1901 



•ffr"'" 1 ' 1 irrf^r _ Register of Deeds 




WISCONSIN M> u: 




.0 I vi 

How u>in»^ n n ' v. 

3. Birthplau ot ma-Miet / 
)f)tf\ Jdl(?ecrat Flutc,i\ \ . 
Neilhv, iUjM'fg. * 



CLE ARTY PE 

COUNTY OUTLINE 

WISCONSIN 

Scale of Miles 
map NO. 21: 



JOHN HENRY FLUEGEL and \W DA STEGEMAN 

To this date I do n;>t lave fortnati n on my 

father ' s family . 

John FLUEGEL, my great grandfather was born in Rock 
Island, Rock Island, Illinois In "875. 

His wife was Amanda STEGEMAN, who was al»o born in Rock 
Island, Rock Island, Illinois, September 4, U?77. 

loth are deceased, but as >f et, I have no dates as 
to when they died. 



HENRY FLU :GEL 



Henry FLUEGEL was my greai great iira if c He was 

barn in Germany. I do not ha e an da! s relati /. to 
Henry FLUEGEL and I was u. a'-.-ie 
wife . 



JACOB JAC >BSGN a d ANN I rE JENSEN 

Jacob and Annette were the pare ts of my grandmother. 

Jacob JACOBSON was born Ma ch Li., L8b0. He was born 
Jacob Lund, but as was cusL >mar\ in that dav, he took, 
his father's first name and a lue son n it, making his 
surname, Jacobson. he did this updp his arrival to the 
United States. 

Annette JENSEN was born October 27, I860. She married 
Jacab JACOISON in 1889 in Spaulding, Wisconsin. But I i is 
unable to find Spaulding anywhere on a map. 



TANS anti KAREN JENSEN 

loth were born in Norway In 1831. No oi er Lnfoj 
mation is ava ilable at this t i e . 



JANICE RAE MEAD 



My mother, Janice Rae MEAD, i\ _r; d Mr. 6c Mrs. 
Arthur Washburn Mead, September 26, 1936. She was born 
In St. Anthony Hospital in Rockford, Winnebago, Illinois. 

My mother was an only child and an only grandchild. This 
net only made her spoiled, but double spoiled. She went 
to Welch School for kindergarten through sixth grade. 
She then moved on to Roosevelt Junior High School and then 
Waet Rockford High School, where she graduated in 1954. 
Men had done very well all through school and had thought 
about pharmacy school. But since she was engaged to be 
married, she bypassed college and went straight to the work- 
ing world using her secretarial skills. Her first job was 
at Rockford Clutch, where she continued to work after she was 
married until she gave birth to her first child, Cynthia 
Jan, In 1956. 

After two years of rest she went back to work as a secre- 
tary at Bartelt Engineering until her second chili, Lea Ann, 
was born July 21, 1960. She worked part time at Bartelt 
after Lea Ann was born, but her third child, Troy Arthur, 
was soon on the way and born August 9, 196 1. 

It was a year after Troy's birth thai we moved into our 
new home at 5805 Balboa Drive, New Mi 1 ford , Illinois. My 
mother was then working part time for the Plumbers and 
Pipefitters Union as a secretary. 



In May of 1968, she a--c: mj father were divorced. She 
was again working full, time, moving (nto an apartment lo- 
cated at 130 Flintridge Drive, Rockford, Illinois, raising 
three children alone and coping with a somewhat new social 
life. 

In 1971, Mom met Wayne Allen Kohier. On September 14, 
1971, they embarked on a new life together. Since that 
tine, Wayne has been rather prosperous and they have never 
really lacked for anything and always had a nice spacious 
heme. Ther was only one problem, to improve himself, he's 
had to move around a Lot. So i i the Last four and a half 
years, we have lived in Vermillion, Yankton, South Dakota; 
Madison, Lake, South Dakota; Sartell, SLearns, Minnesota; 
Roscoe, Winnebago, Illinois. They presently live at 1 1608 
Love Road, Roscoe, Winnebago, Illinois and hope to be here 
for a long time. 



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( 



ARTHUR ./A KBJRK M.Aj 

My grandfather was torn in Gr$ n 3a , Brown, Wisconsin, 
on November 2 7 , L9 1 

When he was very • n a • , is fami] / mo ed to Rn ki rd, 
Winnebago, Illinois. he weni to Kishwaukee Grade Schjol 
and then graduated from Ro kf< rd Central High School. 
He was a very good basketball player there . 

He married Gladys A LBERS , December 30, 1934 in Rockford, 
Winnebago, Illinois. Just prior to that, he began working 
for the Rockford Fire Department. He worked there thirty- 
nine years. he retired Ln February of 1973, as Captain 
of the Rescue Squad. 

Since his retirement, my grandparents have just been 
enjoying life, traveling a Little bit, seeing the things 
they've always wanted t 



CITY OF ROCK FORD. ILLINOIS 

204 SOUTH FIRST STREET. ROCKFORO. ILLINOIS 61104 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 
WAYNE E. SWANSON, ChUf 
Bos. Phone 815/964-3327 



January 16, 1973 



RELEASE 



Captain Arthur V». Mead All Roland Avenue (wife; Gladys) 

Capt. Mead retired from the fire service, effective Feb. 17, 1973.' 

He has- served or. the Rockford Fire Department since .May. 11, 1934. •■ 

He was appointed Captain in Nov., 1951 and served on Engine Co. #3» 
he was transferred to Hook & Ladder Co. #1 in Dec, 1951 and was 
transferred to the Squad ; 1 in November, 195*5*, when the Squad was 
first put into service. He had served on the Squad since that 
time . 

Capt. Mead worked his last day on January 15, 1973. He will be 
on vacation until Feb. 17, 1973 and from then on he will be en- 
joying a life of retirement. 

Acting Chief Russell C. Fagerburg can be quoted as saying: 
"Capt. Mead has been a gentleman, an effective officer and we 
will reallv miss him on the .iob". 




Gladys Doris ALBERS 



( 



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e i ; r> r 



II 12 



WISCONSIN NO 




CLEAR TYPE 

COUNTY OUTLINE 
WISCONSIN 



10 JJ 12 I 13 I 14 



GLADYS >0R I S r LBERS 



My grandmother was born L( igo C >k . I . i oLs , 

August 20, 19 tO. She was n ris G id s aLBl' . but 
because of someone else ha l t< s m was 
changed to Gladys Doris ALBE S 

When she was very young, her family moved to Rockford, 
Winnebago, Illinois. She went c Land Grace School 

and then Rockford Centra 1 High ool. 

She net my grandfather at a girlfriend's birthday party. 
They were married December 30, 19 k. 

In 1936, they had their only daughter, Janice Rae . 
While Janice was going to sc iool , my grandmother worked 
as a bookkeeper at the Nihan and Martin Drugstore. She 
worked as a bookkeeper on and ->f' : until she officially 
retired when she was 58 in 1962. Since then, she's 
just been taking care of her home an J tier husband, which 
keeps her very busy. 



If 



PEE RtCEIPT NO. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS-DEPARTMENT O c PUBLIC HEALTH 
CERTIFIED COPY OF A DELAYED RECORD OF BIRTH 



STATE OF ILLINOIS nn AVm P«7?»r~-> r*7 — -.- 



PARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH 



(RECISTEI'LD .wvv.v. •• vtrinro 



ORIGINAL 

Site Fi i « No. ! 



L PLACE OF 

;«JITH: 



b.) CO'J'JTY 



Chi caqo , Illinois 



Co* 



M^Sti^ Gladys Doris Albers 



20 "tfe'f^ 1 

bey"] Year — 

20 l°!C 



I If yacr nam hu Wan shaita*) (swept by marriage) enter the name you are now known by In th 



Wh i re 



6. SEX: F er p a j e 



•.PATMOTt 

FTJLLNAMC; 


RudolDh C. Albers 


I 8. FATHER'S 
1 BIRTHPLACE: 


City or County 

3rerren 


State or Country 

Germany 


■.MOTHEJTS 

. WAIPEN NAME: 


Carol ine Wahlqren 


10. MOTHER'S 

BIRTHPLACE: 


C:ty nr Coun:y 

Varm 1 and 


1 Stito or Country 

Sweden 



fStfpHNUtfTs I hereby deoUre npoo oatfc that the above statements are true to the Wat 



(SEAL) 



ft.) Subscribed and sworn to before me this 



is i.^.-/ > daf of i ~ . I. 



f 



Rotary Public! 







APPLICANT! DO NOT WRITE BJLOW THIS LINE 



KINO OF DOCUMENT AND DATE MADE 





Application for Social Security 


. .. ... August 20, 1910 

. Ann nr hirth "IM": ° ' 




Acct. #353-18-4114 


D . , Chicago, Illinois 




Dated December 2, 1941 






P>Hirt „ Rudolph Albers 




mmmk ^Lena Wahlgrcn 



Affidavit of Sister 



Elsie Albers Wellnitz 



Ane or birth a w AUgUSt 20. 1910 



Chicago. Illinois 



5192 Welsh Road 



Rockford, Illinois 



Dated April 27, 1967 



Frither:. 

Mother: 



Rudo IphJH. Albers 

J±3 r 9J: ina (Lena) Wahlgren 



Aqe or birth date: 

Cirthplace: 



Agn nr birth date:. 
E rt'nltce: 



ACCEPTED AMD FILED AT SPRINGFIELD, FOR THE DIRECTOR 0 F 

6 C&jL* d Oy,<^i.- 



This record it valid only If it hat bee 



efted by nn.l file 



BUREAU OF STATISTICS — ILL NO'S 



,,/<..;<.,r cl Ih-aUh. <ir S7.,„„/ir \.VJ»i' 

HEALTH — SP«! N'C.^JjryD. 



VHfiK EBY CERTIFY THAT the' 'or. 
the original certificate of birth for the 
with the Deportment of Public (Weo/f!> / 



JUL 215 



: 1QC' 



SPRINGFIELD 



- 

■ 



> rre 5oorcr-c 



( 



ARThl'tf CLARK MLAD an< iLV ^BETH M. MILTZ 

Art r Clark MEA an< Lz ii stli M. MILTZ were my great 
gsra .d par en . s . 

Arthur MEAD w« ~ born R.o< kford on January 24, L876. 
After his mother dieo . he was adopted by a family in Rock 
Island and then moved Co Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he 
met and married Elizabei M. MILTZ on October 14, 1903, 
who was born January L, ! 88 1 . 

Soon after their only son, Arthur Washburn, was born, 
they moved to Rockford, Winnebago, Illinois. I'm not 
why, possibly bejajse of his work, which was road construc- 
t ion . 

Around 1942, his wife Elizabeth died and my great grand- 
father moved in with his son, my grandfather and Lived 
there until his death in Hav of 1952. 



Arthur Clark MEAD 





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JULIUS F ANt LIN MEAD 



Julius Franklin MEAD w< great great: grandfather 

He was born Co Adelia Ag sta SI UFELT and .v'ashi irn MEAD o 
August 28, 1852, in Fulton, New York. 

On October L3, 1872, Julius married Elma Cera WELLS 
in Hannibal, New York. Thev had i pui sons, Elbert S . , 
Thorret R. , Arthur C. and Earl 

On August 5, 1913 in Oakland, California be died and 
is now buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Roc^ford, .Vinnebago 
Illinois . 



ELMA CORA 'WELLS 

Elma Cora WELLS was Julius MEAD'S wife. She was born 
June 23, 1854, in New York, but the town is unknown. Sh 
died April 13, 1883 and is also buried in Greenwood Cerae 
Rockf ord , Winnebago, II li L« 



( 



WASHBURN MEAD 



Washburn MEAD was born October 2, 1820 in White Plains, 
New York. May 28, L845 in Cain, New York, Washburn 
married Adelia Agusta SHUFELT. They had four chiLdren, 
Emma Agusta, Sheldon Buttolph, Julius Franklin, and 
Daniel Washburn. 

Washburn died August 20, 1897 in Rockford, Winnebago, 
Illinois. His obituary read: 

"A long illness resulted last evening in the death 
of Washburn Mead at the home uf his son, 1304 South Main 
Street. He has been living with his son, D. W. Mead, the 
well known engineer, for tr.any years and had been sick for 
several months. The end was a release from suffer' ng that 
had become a burden . 

Mr. Mead was born at Whine Plains, Duchess County, New 
York, October 2, 1820 and spent - is boyhood days there. He 
was united in marriage to the wife who survives him, at 
Cairo, New York, May 28, L8-4 r > . He was engaged in the 
cabinet business for many years at Fulton, New Yor^. 

Mr. Mead was a most ex. e I L< nan., of careful habits 
and scrupulously conscientious 1 t had made <r. . friends 
here during his long resic ■ re and wi 1! be with leep 
regret that thev lea,-: »th. rhe c! ilc en who 

survive are Mrs. I". A. R s-e Sioux City, S. 3. Mead of 
Fulton, New York, and . ). Mead ! this c it \ 

The funeral will b« hi- • ' mwcr tn*', a. I 10: JO 

from the late : i s .<. • 




L A 

Washburn MEAD 



ADELIA A. US TA :■ > I 'ELT 

Adelia Agusta SHUFELT was born Hire'. 29, i32S 
Durham , Green County, New York. She married *fas burn 
MEAD May 28 , 1845 in Cairo, New York. 

Adelia Agusta ShUFFLT was the daughter of Mary (Polly) 
SEARS (daughter of Isaac SEARS) and John SHUFELT. 

Mary SEARS was born in Chatham, New York in 1788 and 
married John ShUFELT about 1813. John ShUFELT was born 
in 1792 in Rensselaer County, New Yo-k an died about 1830. 

On July 25, 1904 in Ajstin, Illinois also at the home 
•f D. W. Mead, Adelia Agusta SHU1 ELT died 



WALTER MEAD and P'i] .EMELIA Bl fTOLPl 



17tl is the year of Walter MEADS birth. He married 
Philemelia IUTT0LP11 in IS J after his first wife, Eliza- 
beth WINANS, died in 131b. Whether Philemelia BUTTOLPH 
died is uncertain, but Walter was again married to Betsy 
REYNOLDS . 

Walter's first wife Elizabi th WINANS gave him seven 
children, Tammy, Harriet, David, Mary A., Betsy L. , Smith 
W. and Rheuma. With his second wife, Philemelia BITTOLPH , 
he had four children, Wa Iter , da hburn, William and desle; 
There is no record of any children with his third wife, 
letsy REYNOLDS. 

Walter MEAD died in 1856. 



NATHANIEL M LA u m J MAR'fiiA BROWN 



Nathaniel MEAD was born in I 74b, jusr three years 
before his wife, Martha B'O/N Their raarri ig< t i - 

In 1765. Together they had fourteen children, Nehemiah, 
Martha, Nathaniel, Peter, William, Prudence, Anna, Tv!er, 
Walter, Abigail, Hannah, Elizabeth, Epenetus , an J Harvey. 
Nathaniel must have been lonely as an only child and 
did not want any of his children to be lonely. 

Martha BROWN died in :*18, but the death of husband 
ia not known. 



NATHAN l£L MEAD and PK DENCE WOOD 

Not much is known abo t Da Ld MLAD ' S son Nathan el 
Nathaniel was born Ln 1 ." : • » cir I narried Prudence .VOOD 
1745. They had one child, Nathani< L. But their home 
or date of death is not available. 



DAVID MEAD and \B1GAIL LEANE 

John MEAD'S son David M'AD was bom in lb65. he m.id 
his home in the town of Bedford, New York, where he was 
one of the resident proprietors in lb92. 

In 1707 David married Abigail LLV.NE. They had seven 
children, David, Charity, Rachel, Nathaniel, William, 
letsy and Anna . 

1727 was the year David MEAiJ died. It is not known 
what year Abigail LEANE dieu. 



JOHN MEAL) ind HANNAH P'TTKK 



John MEAD was bora in L6 14, in England. John came to 
the United States with his father, John, in !63b. When 
he was old enough, he settled in Horseneck Greenwich), 
Connecticut . In 1657, Hannah POTTER became his wife. 
They continued to live in Horseneck (Greenwich), Connecticu 
where they raised their eleven children, John, Joseph, Hann 
Ebenezer, Jonathan, Davie, Ber.jamin, Nathaniel, Samuel, 
Abigail and Mary. 

John MEAD died in 1699. The vear of his wife's death 
is unknown. 



WI'.LJAM MEAD 



On my mother's side I '.a >e traced iny family back to 
William MEAD, who is my great great great great great great 
great great great grandfather. William was born in 1600 in 
England. He married in ib23, but his wife is unknown. They 
had -fefe^y- children , Joseph, Martha and John. 

In April of 1636, William and his brother Gabriel, with 
their families, sailed from Lydd , County Kent, England to 
the Massachusetts Colony on the ship Elizabeth headed by 
Captain Stagg. William settled at We thersf ie Id , Connecticut, 
but in 1641 he moved to Stamford, Connecticut, where he was 
assigned a home lot and five acres of land. 



RUDOLPH CAR i HENRY r. ■ i AROLI.N KHLGREN 

Rudolph ALBERS , my . . K ^ran : ather, w - born in 
Bremen, Germany. His a o th< I lited States 

when he was a hoy. hi- . died an I I is fal 

decided to go back to Germany, so the children were then 
adopted by different families. I was jnabie to find the 
name of the family that <j .r . 

Rudolph was a grocery and delivered to a wea 1 ' h\ 

Chicago family. WhiLe delivering there he met Carolina 
WAHLGREN, who was one of the naids. The date was no'; 
available, but later the_\ a ried. 

Carolina WAHLGREN was born September 2., i 8 ~$ in Arvika, 
Sweden. Her father was a cabinet aker there. They later 
came to the United States . 

Rudolph and Carolina had dren , E sie, i id; 

Clarence, Earl an< Cai 



Henry AL1ERS was the Cat! e dJ Rsj k '.ax Hem 

AL1ERS. He was born in Germany. .r .1!. the Ln 

mat ion available at. this me. 




Kenry ALBERS 



Anna was born and lived \ . ca ... her hus- 
band, who's name I d< not ecu .. . p ; a cabi i< L naker . Some 
time after their children w'i re , tht *< e le : t al i 
in Sweden on the old A'ar ■ i< 



FOOR, NANCY JANE, 1956- 



PLEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 



j| Contributor to the Nock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
few miniues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
access to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY *************** A Aft* A*** A: 

* OFFICE USE CODE 

I. Your name /iz^aa,/ hcc/Z 



Date of form * (ID H ) 

) 



7. Your college: Kock Va I l ey f.ollecje (ID // 

]Tdck76 rd~, Illinois 

****** ft A ft ft ft A ft ft ,\ A ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

y B efore 1750 1750-1800 1800-1 850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 

U. Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) y M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga., Fla., N.C., S . C . ) E ast South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , Ky 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., 0k.) y East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) HI. Wis.) 

S 'Plains (ND,SD,Neb . ,Kan. ,¥owa, MS) 
5. Please check all occupational categories In which members of your family whom you have 
discussed In th I s paper have found themselves. 

y Farming Mining Shopkeeping or small business 

y T ransportation B 1 g Business Manufacturing 

Professions Industrial labor ,/ Other 



Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
In this paper have belonged. 

Roman Catholic Jewish y P resbyterian y M ethodist 

Baptist Epl s copal Ian Congregational Lutheran 



Q uaker y M ormon O ther Protestant ~ Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans 

Jews Central Europeans I ta 1 1 ans Slavs 

Irish British y N ative Americans over several generations 

East Asian Other 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

y Interviews with other Family Bibles y Faml ly Genealogies 

fami ly members 

Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 

Photographs s Maps Othe r 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

"f*^/^ C'Mtf r^Cpti Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death n'.^,-,,--* ,.,/ ,. / ,-. 

Place of birth fa,^, (■,,. r ,- U/ L . , Oat* of Birth J: „..,, ■ ,, t/ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school i- high school 6 vocational col lege /./- 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st r-Ak /„>• K. Dates ///^- 1 st ^ /r// g c y j^ : rj Dates 

2nd Dates / c /3$-/9(: / 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 



4th Dates 4th Dates 



R « 1 1 9 1 Q" Cirf&V/nn C'.hu.er.J-.(h 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. y./cr/./C /~r- u cc , /'V---^ ~ 

^ r Gj vt^X^ cc «ft a 1 ^ ^ a 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother ^> , , date 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name a/', a/a fa t^l/Ea d P.AeJe J Current Residence 



*ame N k , r ■ <f h> n.Ae ^y 
If dead, date of death \- ; .. / , /?7C 

Place of birth />„/✓,„, Cr.nf.ty D,(J/M/A Date of birth /,/• - , . .„ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school > : high school /- vocational col lege -/ 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st 7rt* J ' Data * J9/8+/ 9/ 9 lst //^_r/-, IndH/i/^ Dates_ 

2n d /JcuT^,, fr. Dates /9/9'/?^ / In6f / <*//-/■< y . > //y /■ Pates / - 

3rd , ,, , - ,,„/.- Dates / 3rd Dates 

4th Petes 4t h D ates 

Re 1 1 9 1 on 1 '>■-.> , , ■ . ■ / / - ■ y,. ,; 
i Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc, .. / n : 



°- marr,fl9C - ^ Y ° Ur 9 " ndf ' th<r f'<_^^- -T,, ^, PATE, 



: Ka^aitf^fh^SaW'fi^tjllg PUJ^K); stepmother or another relative g 



i ve 



h- I '• i epijr andf a ther (your father's side) 



I i rir.i.f, .I.i i c oF death 



Curront Residence 



P I ate of b I r i h 



Educ 1 1 i on (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Date of Bl rth 
vocational 



col lege 



Occupa t i on ( s ) 
I si 

2nd 

3rd 

tth 



Dates 
Dates_ 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd_ 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



_Dates 
Dates 



Dates 



Rc I i q i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 
ace of marriage to your grandmother 



TOT 



S tepg ran dmo ther (your father's side) 



I f dead, date of death 



p I ace of birth 



Current Residence 
Date of bl rth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupat Ion (s) 
1*1 

2nd 



_Dates_ 
_Detes_ 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 



Dates 
Dates 



Re I i g i on 



cal party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name /{.{,r, r^v x.vv.-) / ■ Current Residence 

dead, date of death - ■ .. _ 

Place of bl rth / - Date of birth - 3 

Education (number of years): 

grade school / ,- high school vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st C// is:, duu)f.<£ Pates / 1st Dates //y- 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3 r d D ates 3 rd P at e s 

^ th Dates 4th Dates 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st AS&'T -fan, \'.trr. Dates 1st Dates 

2nd />;> ftitrt* -7?''/ / 'jy-<tc : .>, P «t«» j 2 nd / •. , , , „ Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 



Re 1 I g I on ; , . - • 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfathe r d ate - 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another r»i»f i»« z~: TUT) 
"Ive that ^, tne oack of this pege ( D-2 ) 



Re I I g i on -Uy^^/QP 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. /■ - . ■ - r ' 

[hftecr. * 

Place of marriage to your grandmother date - , « 

Note: If your mother was raised by a Siep f ai l li r U > HIULHer ma l i ve (lU a ge l8t" ' '• 

give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

\ 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name /. ,,. . - ~~pAnrAlCc C urrent Residence 

I f dead, date of death . 

1111 

Place of bi rth J , D ate of bl rth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



C- I j i epgrandf athe r (your mother's side) 

Current Residence 

• ieaT. tlaip oT death 



ri i i, i . i ii d.i ic of Ui i Hi 

.I. ii i i mi fi i>ii,f r * » r y * * 1 * ■ ) 

s choo I vocotion.il col lego 



0Lcup.it lon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Dates 1st Dates_ 

?n<i Dates 2nd D ates 

.: Dates 3r d D ates 

klh Dates kth Dates_ 

"el i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Pljce of marriage to your grandmother d ate 

D-? S tepgr.indtnother (your mother's side) 

s.ime Current Residence 



I f dc jtl, .j,,t#- ,,f death 



>» Mnh Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 

school high school vocational college 



Dccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

• Dates 1st Dates_ 

- • Dates 2nd Dates_ 

1 '< Dates 3rd Dates 



'i 1 



cal v-i r ' / , civil or soc i a 1 c 1 ubs , sororities, etc. 



p 1 r i f r r > age to your grandfather Da te 



CHUPKEN or A & Mor a- i or tt- 1 ) - your father's name should appear below 

' • Name btM£l£j£ " c*l fc/,sr/ mt 

P lace of birth date 
Number of years of school Ing ' Occupation 

Res I dence Marl tat"sTatu»_ ■ ■ ~ 

£ Number of ch 1 Idren 

' " ame Q><rbtfa*L dcA,c rrr,2 
Place of blrth^^- 
Number of years of school Ing 



~' d ate f nfifcii 

years of school Ing /C . 0ccupatl6n 

Residence Marital StitM | ffl ^^ 
Numbar of chl idren 



2? r -^<^,/*^ 

P. ace of TTTtF^; ,,77r^nri 
Number of years of school Ing 



date 7/-7a, a 



Residence ^ r 

Number of chl Idren LW 



_ Occupatfon tA p ' ( ,* c ( .~>/»,»t K > \ 
Marital statut m/W^'i ) 



Name 

Place of" bt rth 

Number of yea rs~o1 r "s chob Ting" 

Res I dence " 

Number of cK I \ dren 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 
Res I dence 



Number of chHdrtn 



Name 

Place or' b I rth 

Number of years of school I dg' 

Res I dence " 

Number of chl Idren 



Name_ 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Number of chl Idren 



Name 

Place of bl rth ~" 
Number of years of schooling 

Res I den ce " 

Number of chl Idren 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence " 

Number of chl idren 



^ Name 



Place of birth "* 

Number of years of achoollftg 
Residence - 
Number o f t ill I U IBII 



d ate 
Occupatl on 
liar I ta I Sta t u s 

"""" date 

Occupation 
Marital Status "" 

"""g ate 
[Tccupatldn 
_ Marital Status 

. date 
_«_______ Occupation 

_ Marital Stat us 

d a t e 
Occupation 
Marital Status ~~ 



Marital Status 



. date 
Occupation 



nantai status 



date 
Occupation 



iHlluktN .,! (. and 0 (or (.-I, L)-l)-your mother's name should appear below 



"' " 1 "' rY)/>£<on> -ZnrJ 
f ii <>f '. c lux 1 1 I rv 

Mi--, i i|i .„ , /-> rsZs>r\ r. . 



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1 fi-<irs of schooling 



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Oicupat.on^ V/ , v , /o , V/> feg. 



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MarltaT S t a tus /> ,,,-/ 



date 



Eccupat I on 



Marl tal Status 



^ I jtc t . f I) I r t h 

ol year s of s choo I i ng 

Mes i iJencc 



• > n f rh i 1 dren 



Nam- 



P i .ii ■■ ,.r birth 

ol /e.irs of school i ng 

(<«• I den ( (_• 



Number of < h i I dren 

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I .ic- of 1) ! r (h 
Numbei of ye.irs of school i ng 

Kes i dence 



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N.ic- 



P I .ico of birth 

Number of /ears of school I ng 

Ri:s i dence 



■<f ch i Td ren 



M I ace r birth 

N, " ,ll ' r of /ears of schooling 

He s i dence 



<' r of ch i 1 dren 



p -i' e r,r birth 

Number /ears of schooling 

Res i dence 



Number of ch i I dren 



f 'ace o? b i rth 

' fears of school Ing 



Number of rh ! I d ren 



P I ace of birth ~~ 
Number of years of school Ing 
Residence 

of children ' 



date 



Marital Status 



Occupat i On 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupation 



date 



Marital Status 



TJccupat ton 



date 



Marital Status 



becupat lOrt 



date 



Occupation ~ 
Marital Status 



date 



Occupat I On 
Marl tal Status 



date 

Occupat f On 



HarltaT Status 



date_ 

Occupa t i on 
Marl tal Status 



Your Father 



^ame h,cL , <■ //>v \ /? Cf /c 

• dead, date ofdeatn ' 



Current Re s 1 den ca &>cxfO£d . 32/ mcrS 



J)ate of birth MA&ft . 

_ vocational c ollege jf - 



Place of blrth/v^-y, Tnchun^ 

Education (number of years; 
grade school high school ^ 

Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st rnf/A/f^jC ^J^ro/^ Ab ates /<foy J 1st /?co/Cfz/2d JXL Dates /Vj 7 



2nd,W-//i. , / 



Dates / ~l 6 2nd 



3 rd qry, /M fss> . . 5y. 5 Dates /9& 7 - ? 

Ath D ates 
Religion , ; ,. ^ „ , /A/> 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities 

Place of marriage to your mother fti/ye/Cr, XhcJ/tyiA, ' 
NOTE: If you were raised by a s tepfafche r or anoth* 



0Ates_ 
Oates 



Dates 



you were raisea by 
of this page. (E-2) 



Your litother 



Name LC y% OAr,r. xc.u- 
If dead, date of death 



C 



d a te ^Ju ^ j j>C /y4(.- 
latlve give that data on the back 



Place of birth //./■)/. ,<T/, , jr/rlAr,/-* 
Education (number of years) 
grade school £ high school 



Date of bl «"th_^^ 
vocational 



co I lege j 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st Ccp J -o.c 



Dates/^V7 vfj? 1st Lfly/?^ 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

ZrfJ sAn/) D ates /^y'/^/fJ/ 



2nd < ■ //-v 7> ' . - l ■ , / / - Dates //U/'/^jV 2nd / - 

3rd Dates 3N 



Detes / 9<S/-/f 7f 



Dates 



Re I i g I on ~V<y, / / -tfJEJfr* 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. CccU£<t ^.£c£/ry . J'^\J -^htC5 

date Ti 



Place of marriage to your father r>)Ae,rr, ttcT.Ana' " 
NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another rela 
this page (F-2). 



at data on 



Dn the back or 



♦ 



E- 1 Stepf <thc r 



Na^e 

I 1 Jead . date of death 



Place of bi rth 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat Ion (si 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



_Dates 
Dates 
_Dates 
Oates 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
_3rd_ 



Date of bi rth 



vocat i ona 1 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



•«:- 

Re I Igion 

Pol 1 1 1 ca-T PaVt TSi , civil of 5o£iai clubs, fraternities, etc. 
ace of marriage to /our mother 



_Dates_ 
_Dates 
Dates 



Date 



F-2 Stepmothe r 



Name 

I f dead , date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat i on ( s ) 
1st 

2nd 



Dates 
_Dates 

Dates 



vocat I ona I 



lit, 
_2nd_ 
3rd 



Date of birth 



3rd^ 

Re I i g I on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of narriage to your father 



date 



# 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



Girjhf n fr>n£Ah her* 

i of h i rth f>tJ,r.n <p r/,/,//i,^, 
;r of years of schooling /fi 



Name 
P lace 

^mber of yea 

Kes i dence M/snr 
Number of ch I 1 d 



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Name /j/^/U.y c/zfor, fcS* 

Place of blrth^/)^/^,., 
Number of years or schooling y * 



years of schbo 1 1 ng ^ 
Res i dence ecCf /ojer/ : Jcs.tt.rrt 
Number of child ren ' a/oa//. 



\ of b i rth /3v jf/rPcy 



Name 
Place 

Number of years of Schooling j_ 

Res i dence f?6a?&tPct TJ///Vn/^ 
Number of ch ! 1 dren a,'Y:A/'?, 



s or School 1 ng 7 



Name 

Place o 



^T^bTth Anr> 



Number of years of schooling^ 
Res i dence K J ec c:tc-/6:/ , JZ//./a»C/S 
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Name 

Place of birth ~~~ "~ 
Number of years of schooling 
Res i dence 

Number of children 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of school I ng_ 
Res i dence 

Number of ren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school t ng_ 

Res i dence 

Number of children 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~ 
Number of years of school 1 ng_ 
Res i dence 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



"Bate of bl rth f,< tsMjc 7, 

Occupat 1 on ' ;, .rj 



Marital Status ^/n6lt 



Date of bl rth Tu.ly. -3C . //Q"<£ 
Occupat i on ,;■,- , / >,/ 



Mar 1 tal Status j,.y, c 



_0ate of bi rth /lj>/e/Z 6. r^kJ. 

Occupation j^C/if 



Marital Status -j/nColil 



Date of birth M/^y^ 1, /9c>4 
t Ion 



Marital Status 



Occupation -^/oev? /- 



Date of birth 

Occupation 



Marital Status 



Date of b i rth_ 

Occupat ion_ 

Marital Status 



Date of birth 

Occupat Ion 

~ Marital Status 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth_ 
Occupat ion 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

1 herebv donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights^ " to the Roci Valley College Family History Collection, deposited m the 
Kockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Date '^^^^^^^?yA- 



GENKALOGY CHART 



focCjJ%£M£jLl.N. . ft. 
f Great qr andf ather 



/opg./v,/,/^ cove.. 



Father 



Mother 

D J 



Grandfather • M 

B JuNi, /S99 } _ 

M Ji-p^t-A/z /J, ' c oo lJ>£^z.dM)/.mfa 

D flu.&uSf' gjV, *7 Great grandmother 

b July ^i, /gta 

D Jul)/ j£ f /</jfj 

b 1>ep£rrrbt£ h <2&>& Jj 
M A/o \Ztmt>UC i, 'ZZi i; 
D ^tptttrrteMZ. *i rI 
B (\JcWOD~bCtC ft , /<?0t J £| 

D \ r ' - - ■ - ' 

B f£J>£uA£y £/j lie) j 



Grandmother 



Grandfather 

B Gas* fiu<ci&5f tgj ISSC 
M Oc-tvcxje A?0£ 
V> Octet* /<?V7 



Grandmother 



D 



II 



PR2TAC3 



I have trie^ to present my Family History as factually, accurately, and 
as interestingly as possible. Sorrve areas are weaker than others, as my 
parents can remember very little in some cases. My mother's family his- 
tory has been tracec. back to before the Revolutionary bar, but lost as 
relatives moved best. The Carvey Family History, found at the back of this 

History, a great-aunt ana I have been working on for almost five years. 

. 

I hope you will enjoy reading the story of Lhe heritage that, has been [, 

I 

passed down to me. It is one that fascinates me and one that I am very 

■ 

proud of, and I hopa that- someday, my children will be proud of it too. 



ORVLLL CLAIR FOOR 

Born; June 8, 1899 
Place of birth; Miami, county, Indiana 
Education; l6 years 

Occupations; farmer, teacher, principal of high school 
Diea; August 24, 1969 
Religion; Protestant 

Clubs; Masonic Lodge, President of Lion's Club 

! 

NINA KSTURAH CARVEY FOOR 

i 
I 

Born; November 18,1900 

Place of birch; Miami County, Indiana 

Education; 14 years 

Occupations; teacher, housewife, nurse's aide 
Diea; November 1, 1970 
Religion; Protestant 
Clubs; Eastern Star 

BILLLE CLAIR FOOR 



Born; March HI, 1924 
Place of birth; Macy, Indiana 
iuucation; 16 years 
Occupations; Engineer 
Reli 0 ion; Presbyterian 

Clubs; Jayce;s, Chamber of Commerce, Masonic Lo- O e, ASESA 



LIFE OF ORVILLE CLAIR FOOR 
TO MARRIAGE 

My 0 randfather, Orville Clair Foor, was born on June S, 1S99 in Macy, 
Indiana. His first six years of school were spent at Rabbit's Glory, a one 
room schoolhouse, a mile and a half from his home. He would either wall or 
ride a horse to school. For his next six years of schooling, he attended 
Macy High School. Along with going to school, my grandpa spent a lot of 
time helping to run his father's farm. 

My grandpa loved to rea- anything he could get his hands on, and a frieni 
of his once told my parents be hnew where every single item was in the Sears 
catalogue. He was very interested in cars, as they were just appearing on the 
scene when my grandpa v/as in high school. 

After graduation, and one summer of college training, my gran-father 
startea teaching at Five Corners, another one room schoolhouse. In audition 
to instructing students he cleaned the school and had to arrive early each 
morning to light the fire. Since he lived eight miles from the school, and 
winter snow v/as frequently several feet ^eep, he often ha., to leave home in 
the middle of the night zo make it to school in Lime to have a roaring fire 
in the stove when the students arrived. During this time he was making five 
dollars a week and had to supply his own coal oil. He continued to take colleg 
training courses during the summer, and eventually moved to Woodrow High School 
where he taught seventh and eigth gra-.es and was principle. This pattern of 
teaching in •.•inter, farming in summer continued for seventeen more years. 

Family get-togethers ^urlr.^ my grandfather's day were usually a little 
wild. My great-grandfather spoke gsrman and insisted that his children d. 
on these occasions just for the sake of irratatir.g relatives, or to be gener- 
ally ornery. 



LIFE OF NINA K3TURAH CARVEY 
TO MARRIAGE 



My grandmother, Nina Keturah Carvey, was bom on November IS, 1900 in 
Macy, Indiana , and was the youngest of fiva children. She was very close to 
her sister Pauline as she was closest in age, bing three years older. They 
were playmates and walked to school together. They also shared chores, as my 
great-grandfather owned and opperated a creamery. Being the youngest my 
grandma got spoiled more than the other children, but grew ur> to be a happy, 
sweet, talented girl. 

My grandmother attended Macy School for twelve years, and after gradu- 
ation went to Indianapolis to Madame Blake's Finishing School for Girls. 
She then went on to take some teaching training courses at North Manchester 
College. In this day, most women graduated from high school an- immediatly go 
married. My gran-ma and Aunt Pauline were really breaking with tradition to 
go on with their schooling. After a summer of preparatory training, my 
grandmother taught for one year at Akron, Indiana. At this time, her family 
was still a close one, an- still centered mainly in Macy, an.i would get to- 
ether frequently. Her parents were against smoking, drinking, an- playing 
cards, and were kin-, but strict with their children. All the kids were mem- 
bers of the Macy Christian Church at a very early age, and steady attendance v; 
demanded of them by their folks. 

All through her schooling, my grandma was fun-loving and enthusiastic, an 
had many friends. Being a very beautiful woman there was also a multitude of 
beaus. She ha- the pick of almost any of the young men in town, an- early in 
high school she decided that the man she wanted to marry was Orville Fcor. 



# 



# 



MARRIED LIFE 
OF 

NINA AND ORVILLE FOOR 



My grandparents, Orville and Nina started going together in high school. 
Since Macy was such a snail community, they had known each other since they 

were small children, ana over the years, the romance blossamed. My grandma 
haa been teaching school for one year and my granapa for three when they de- 
cided to get married, so my grandmother quit work to become my grandfathers 
wife. They married in Leiter's Ford, Indiana , went on a brief honeymoon, ani 
returnee to Macy, where they moved into the house they occupied until their 
aeath. They were very much in love and had a very satisfying relationship 
all through their lives, doth were eager to beconfe parents and were heart- 
broken when their first child, a little girl, died at birth. Two years la- 
ter however, my father was born and they soon had their hands full. At this 
time my grandfather was still teaching in the fall and winter, ana farming 2 SO 
acres in the summer. Four years after my father was born, another boy Kobert 
was born to them. My grandfather was a strict disciplinarian, but still loved 
to have fun with his boys, and my grandmother was a loving, generous mother. 

Their life was fairly pat t erne- for the next several years until 1951 when 
my grandmother went to a hospital to work as a nurse's aide. This was to be 
her job for the next twenty years. In 1-952, my grandpa was hit by a car while 
-riving a tractor, an- broke both shin bones. His leg was never completely 
back to normal, so he became semi-retired an- farmed only forty acres, for the 
rest of his life. 

My brother Steve and I would spend several weeks of ever,}' summer with my 
gran-parents, having fun on the fan.: and being spoiled rotten. 



My granoma would cook all of our favorite fools and let us stay up as late 
as we wanted and my grandpa would tell us 'stories and riddles and sing in 
his big bass voice. My granipa loved oranges, apples, poanutbutter , and ice 
cream more than anyone I know, and through our time spent on the farm, Steve 
and I developed early cravings, too. We had the time of our young lives 
helping to slop the hogs, chase the wild cats and shooting the bebe guns. 
Despite the mischief we got into our grandparents never tired of having us 
come to visit, am we could never get weary of going. 

My grandpa died on August 24, 1?69, and ~y grandma was left without th? 
partner sh? loved ro much. Sh n: sred him so leeply she was never again 
happy until her death on November 1, 1970. 



LIFE OF BILL FOOR 
TO MARRIAGE 

My father, Billia Clair Foor, was born on March 21', 19%, in Mac;;, Indi- 
ana. Ha was an ornery chili, but not a bad one, ana was continuously into 
mischief . He would have made an excellent pioneer or explorer as he was 
fearless, an- always trying new things just to see what the outcome would 
be. 

My aai went to Vtoodrow school until fourth grade ani then to Macy school 
where he played basketball in his junior ana senior years ani played the trum- 
et in the school ban-. He was a real practical joker an- together with friends 
kept the town in stitches. Their favorite trick was the time they tie- up a 

goat to a drinking fountain at school. After a three -ay weekend the stench 
was so bad that school was shut, down for several -ays. 

My aac was raise- curing the depression, but living on a far:., his family 
always haa plenty to eat. There was still a shortage of money, though and my 
dad was a sophmore in high school before his family ha- electricity. My dad 
haa a hand in running the far:, an- at the age of ten he was already -riving hor- 
ses on the spring tooth harrow. He would help in the fields in the summer- 
time ani feed livestock an- repair machinery year-round. 

When ray father was fifteen he decided he was O oing to make his fortune 
growing pickles an- spent four months planting weeding an- picking them. For 
this tedious, backbreaking work, my father made twenty one dollars. He still 
can't stand the sight of pickles even today. 

Immediatly after graduation, my -ai moved to Baltimore Maryland '..here he 
worked at Martin Aircraft Corporation. It was 1942, an- the war ha- begun. 



I 



I 



The next, year my iai got drafted, ana spent the next year in training at 

Biloxi, Ilississippi , University of Florida, Larado Texas, and Riversi-e, 

California. In September of 1944 he v:as sent to Inula with the Amy Air 
> 

Corps. After two months in India ana flying the "Hump" route, he was 
transferrer to Burma as a Lailgunner after half of his air crew i.'as killed. 
Ke v/as reassigned to the Office of Strategic Service, ani flew missions over 
China and Burma. The war ended and my sad left Burma in February of 1946 
ana traveler back to San Francisco by boat. V<hen he arrived there he phon- 
es ahea- to Lois Rose, at Purdue University, asking her to spend the weekend 
with he an- his parents at their farm. She agreed an- less than a month later, 
they were engaged. 



JOHN CONRAD ROSE 



Born; August 16, 1860 

Place of birth; Ohio 

Eduation; 6 years 

Occupation; Glass craftsman 

Die~; October 26, 1947 

Religion; Lutheran . * 

Clubs; AFL union for Craftsmen, Masonic Loige 

ADA LELORA PANCAKE ROSE 

Born; October 22, 1686 
Place of birth; Ohio 
Education; 6 years 

Occupations; Store assistant, housewife, Telephone operator 
Died; December 26, 1963 
Religion; Protestant 

Clubs; Travel-Bee, Eastern star, Business and Professinal V.'omen 

LOIS JANE ?-0SE POOR 

Born; October 14, 1925 

Place of Birth; Marion, Indiana 

Education; 14 years 

Occupations; Copywriter, Writer for Advertising sectin of Newspaper, Housewif 
Religion; Presbyterian 
Clubs; College Sorority, Jay-she es. 



LIFd OF JOHK COKRAD ROSS 
TO MARRIAGE 



My 0 ranafather, John Conrad Rosa, was born on August 18, 1SSO, some- 
where in the state of Ohio. He was the third of four children Lorn to John 
and Sarah Rosa. At the a 0 e of six, John moved his family to Marion, Indiana 
where he ana his eldest son, Henry workea in the Canton ^lass factory. When 
ha was eleven years of a^e, My grandfather's parents force- him to quit school 
and join his father and brother in the 0 lass trade. There was no machinery and 
all glassware was blown an- carved strictly by hand. My grandfather ha- to 
give all of the money he earne- to his parents who supposedly useJ soma to 
cover foo- costs of the family anc save^ the rest in trust funds for when the 
children were married. John Rose was mean, an^ very Canaan in his thinking. 
He believe- the man of the house shoul- controll the pursa strings. 

When my grandfather was fourteen, his mother died and John remarried, a 
women, Kary, much younger than he. She loved to spend money, and none of the 
Rose children ever saw the money that was to have been save- for them. None 
like^ her, and at the age of seventeen, my grandfather left horn? to live in his 
own apartment . 

My grandfather ha- a bit of the old germ an in him, too. He was a very 
stubborn man, who believe- in bearing ^ru-^es. For one period in his life, he 
iion't speak to his brother for sixteen years, an.* six iays a week, they work- 
ed side by side in the 0 lass factory. He worked at the factory from age ele- 
ven to a^e sixty-three, ruittin 0 only when he was too ill to continue work. 
Ihere was a twelve year period, though when he work e : in a truck fa:tory. 
During his first years away from home, with his steady job at Canton, my grand- 
father was a happy, carefree, fun-loving man, living the last healthy years of 
his life. But it was -urir; 0 this happy, healthy, time of his life that he met 
an- fell in love with I.ora Pancake. 



LIFE OF AJA LSNORA PAKCAKS 
TO MARRIAGE 



My granomother, A-a Lenora '(Nora) Pancake, was born on October 22, LSS6, 
somewhere in the state of Ohio. She was "the seconi of five children born to 
Nancy Jane ana Harvey Milton Pancake, '..hen my granomother was very youn 0 , the 
family movea to Warren, Inaiana, where ray great-grandfather was stuiying to 
become a Methodist minister. Soon after this time, the family mads another 
move, this time to Marengo, Inaiana, where harvey did his preaching. When 
my grandmother was twelve her father died of a sudden heart attack at the a^ 3 of 
thirty five. The family remained in Marengo for a year, and my grandmother 
quit school to work in a 0 eneral store and help support the family. Her older 
brother George haa left home to make his fortune in California, so Nancy Jane 
ana my grandmother were on their own to feea ana clothe a family of si;:. 

When my grandmother was thirteen, Nancy Jane movea her family to Marion, 
Inaiana where my granoma "worked as a telephone operator for the Inaiana dell 
System. Four years later, Nancy Jane married a widower, Addison Ellsworth 
Morton, who ha a three children of his own. Together they had two more, an; 
all the children got alon 0 as if they were true brothers ana sisters. 

Even though my granomother ha- workeo hard -uring her teenage years, she 
was a happy, optimistic young lady. Her parents were very rsli^ious people 
ana my grandmother haa a very -eep faith in Go-. She live! aL home with her 
mother an^ new father ana many brothers ana sistsrs, very happy ani very content, 
until the -ay she left home ana quit her job to marry John ConraJ Rose. 



MARRIED LIFE V 
OF 

JCK. AI'D KORA ROSE. 

My gran-parents , John and Nor; Ross wrrs • - rr- - ' cn October CS, 1906. 
They ware very happy together, worked hari ani s;v3i their ncney. They bought 
only what they eoul- affor- to pay for, and their house was the only thing 
they ever bought on loan. Even their Model T For., was paid for completely in 
cash . 

Four years after his marriage, v.hen he was twenty nine years old, my 
grandfather -ev elope- a severe case of asthma which stayed with him for the 
rest of his life. He really sufferer working over the huge fumic 5 in the 
glass factory. 

They were married for nineteen years before their first ani only child, my 
mother, was born. My gran-fath;r was forty five years ol-, and my gran -mother 
was thirty nine when they became parents, both were overjoyed ani love- my 
mother deeply. It must have been hard, though, for the two of them to ur.-isr- 
stand her, and my mom ha- to be quiet far more often than most children, so 
her father coul- get his much needed rest.. 

Throughout my mother's childhood, my grandmother had a wonderful sense of 
humor, an- './as always cheerful.. She was generous to a fault, and wouli Jo any- 
thing for anybody. She ha- a deep faith in Go- an- was continuously optimistic, 
bven during the -ark -ays of the -epression she believe- things were going to 
get better, ana -i- her best to make life happy and comfortable for her husbanu 
and chila. My grandfather '-/as a quiet, shy .nan, with a iry sense of humor, an. 
stron 0 feelings for his family ana home. He was ill much of the time during my 
mother's childhood, an- preferred to just stay at home. He was often grouchy and 



♦ 



I 

I 

I 

i 



an J hard to get along with, but he worked ten to twelve hours a day in a fac- 
tory, and was in too much pain to sleep at night, so this is understandable. 
Both of my grandparents were good, honest people, with a very deep love for each 
other. 

On October 26, 1947, my grandfather Rose .lied of cancer. Four years later 
ray grandmother married a widower, Glenn Stevens, who along with his wife had 
been close friends of my grandparents. They live- a very happy, fulfilling eight 
years together, until Glenn aied of a stroke in 195S. The next year my grandmother 
came to Rockford to.' live with us for four years. She died of cancer on Decem- 
ber ."6, 1963. 



THE LIFE OF LOIS JAKE ROSE 
UP TO HER MARRIAGE 

My mother, Lois Jane Rosa, was born October 14, 19.?5 in Marion, Indi- 
ana. She was an only ehil- ana live,, in a worla compose- mainly of grown- 
ups. Ker mother, father, two aunts, ana a cousin, all colle 0 e-age or ola- 
er ha- a hand in raising her ana keeping her out of mischief. 

My mom's ehilahooa v;as a happy one, but cue to the Depression, the fam- 
ily counta- on each other to supply the gooa times, for material pleasures 
were har- to come by. The family hac a piano and sang a lot, an. playea caris 
often, but they enjoyea each other's company so much, that there was always a 
O ooa time to be haa. My mother ooula fill books with the funny, outragous 
stories of her chil-hoo-, an- even toaay, my brothers ana sisters an- I nev- 
er tire of listening to her. 

Luckily, my granamother coula take in sewing ana earn some money, for my 
granafather was out. of work for two years during the -apression. They kept 
a garaen, ana cannaa vegetables ana fruits, ana my grandma was a marvelous 
cook, an- thrifty one, an- the family never went hungry. My grandpa ha- a 
fiarca, stubborn, German pri-a ana didn't believe in Welfare, so the Roses' 
were on their own. There were a lot of things the family went without, though, 
as my mom was in sixth ^ra-e before a furnace was purchase-. They got the 
first car when she was a sophmore in high school, which consecuencly, was also 
the year they installe- their first telsphone. 

dvan -uriaig the Depression, my granaparents were lucky to be better off than 
most. My grandfather relieve- in paying cash, ana therefore owe a no -ebts. 

My mother attan-e- Franklin 0 ra^c school, Martin 3oots Jr. High, an- 
I-.arion Hi^h. She maintained acove average graces in everything cut math. 



A favorite playmate of my mom's, all through school, was Betty, a little 
girl from down the street who was also an only child. They often took summer 
vacations together, or spent holidays with each other's relatives. 

My mother got an early exposure to travel with a trip to the World's Fair 
in Chicago, in 1933 » A trip to Niagra Falls in 1935, and an excursion to Ken- 
tucky the next year. 

My mom got her first job at the age of fifteen in a dimestore. She made 
fifteen cents an hour ana worked there for a year. She then moved to another 
.iimestore where she earned a quarter an hour. 

During my mother's hi 0 h school years it was the practice to go places in 
groups rather than in pairs, so my mom hac a multitude of friends of both 
sexes. World 'Jar II broke out while my mom was still in school, an J every 
boy thai, could fight went into the service. Th? majority of my mom's male 
graduating class was injured or kille in *Yz ::ar. I A '■.■as z sad graduation :ay, 
knowing many would never see each other again. 

To earn money to go to college my mother spent the summer after graduation 
working in a defense factory from three to eleven every day. She brought 
homw between twentyfive ana thirty ..ollars a 'week. 

Finuing a place to live when she filially got to Ball State, in Muncie, Indi- 
ana, presentea another problem for many a girl. The dorms, all of the:,:, were 
filled to capacity with soldiers in training. In fact, there were only three 
civilian men on the campus, an- according to my mom, two were so baa physically, 
even the army wouldn't take them. Zach student was responsible for finding his 
own room an- board, this was so expensive, that after one year of college my 
mother went back to work, for a year, in another defense plant. She worked from 
seven-thirty to five-thirty every -ay, ana made thirty five iollars a week. 



< 



( 



In the fall of 19A5i she was ready to start at Purdue. The war had just end- 
ed ana more ana more men were coming home ana crowding into the colleges and 
universities. Since Pursue was .still on the wartime schedule, my mom had to 
wait untill October to start her classes. In February Dill Foor came home from 
Burma, ana it was just a matter of weeks before my mother iecidsd to giv 3 up 
her name for my father's. 



MARRIED LIFE 
OF 

LOIS AKD oILL FOOR 

The romance between my mother anc father developed when both '..here very 
young. Both my father's grandparents and my mother's grandparents helped to 
build Macy Christian Church, and the friendship between the two families was 
haruaa down generation to generation. 

My uad was born ana raised in Macy, Indiana, ana my mom spent part of 
each summer an- all holidays at her grandparents farm, only three miles from 
his home. They would often play or go to movies together, an., all of my 
mother's cousins were jealous because my iad brought her caniy bars, as well 
as a 1 ! o" the atter.t-.cn My father once lost his tenderfoot 3cy Scout baige 
while playing in the hayloft of the bam with my mom, and her grandfather said 
he would sue the Foors if a cow found it and choke... 

Durin 0 hi 0 h school my parents had other boyfriends an- girlfriends an- 
saw little of each other, but just before my dad left for overseas -urin 0 
WWII, ha stoppea at my mom's home to say good-bye. They decided to write to 
each other, and by war's end, my mom was getting a letter 3 very or ever;.- other 
day, ana writing just as frequently to my dad. 

In Febuary of 1%£> my -a- arrive^ back in the United States in San Fran- 
cisco, an- immediately called my .:10m at Pur-ue telling her hs would pick her 
up at school two -ays later, on rhursday, an- to skip classes for two iays. 
Over twenty of my mom's friends also cut classes to meet my dad an- see them 
off to Macy where they spent the weekend. On their next meeting two week- 
ends later, my man an- -a- ieciaed to get marriei. They originally planned to 
wait for four years, until my -a- coul- get a college education, cut plans chan 
e-, and they marriei on July 20, 19A-6, five mohthes later. 



As houses were hard to come by just after the war, my parents first took 
a long honeymoon ana then Uvea alternately with both sets of their parents. 
A cousin finally renter them his farmhouse for care of the animals an- lan-, 
and my parents lived there until my daa was aceeptea into college. Due to the 
vast nuiiber of soldiers wanting an education, along with the normal stu-enl load, 
Purdue was overloaaea, ana my aaa went to 3all State in Muncie, Inaiana. 
My folks had an apartment in Karion, ana my aai commute a 70 miles every ^ay. 

My parents finally found a small house in Lafayette, Indiana, invite- 
some frienas to live with them, ana spent the next three years going to school, 
working, ana havin^ the time of their lives. They went out as often as they 
could affor- with friends, ana were experts on fin-in 0 ways to have fun with 
little or no money. From stories that are tola when they get together with 
loa frienas, the aays in Lafayette sour- wild ana woolly. My parents were young, 
in love, an- very, very, happy. 

After O ra^uation, Sun^strana off ere- my dad a job, and my parents moved 
to Roekfor- in Febraary of 1951. They live,, on Douglas Street for their 
first three years in Roekfor a. It was while they were here that they a -opt 3a 
my olier brother, Steve. He was born in October, ana my parents brought him 
home in February. Shortly after this, my parents move- to Cospor Avenue, and 
in 1956 a-opte- me. I was born in July ana came home in October. 3y parents 
now ha a the little boy ana little girl that ha- wanted so badly, ana we probably 
got i.iore love an- attention than any two ki-s in town. The four of us went every 
where to 0 ether, to movies, on trips, or just shopping. 

In 1959 we moved to our present address on Highland Avenue, and after eleven 
years at Sun-stran- ...y aad workea at Selvi^ere ?ro-ucts for several y_.-ars. Dur- 
ing this perioi that my little brother, Dave was bom . .very one was overjoyed 



E 

;:• 

t.- 

I: 



i 



at the aaaition to the family, an.: just as thrilled when two years later, in 
1964, my little sister Susie was born. 

For four years, between 19 £3 ana 1967, ray aai designed water polution co 
trol equipment, ana since then has been in business for himself leasing it 
through Smith Zoological Systems. Stove is a junior at Ball State this year, 
ana I am a freshman at Rock Valley Junior College. Dave is in the seventh 
graae at Lincoln Junior High, and Susie is in fifth graae at, Highland school 
where all four of us have attended. 

My parents hope to someday retire in Mexico, ana ar- still the happiest 
couple I've seen after twenty eight years of marriage. 



B 



4 



LIFE OF KAKCY JAKE FOOR 
TO PRESENT 



I was born on July 20, 195£ in Chicago, Illinios, aloptei by my par- 
ents, an j. came hone for the first time in October. We lived in the house 
on Cosper Avenue until I was three years old. Since there were no little 
girls in that neighborhood, my brother Steve was my favorite playmate. 
Just after my third birth-ay we moved to our present home on Highland Ave- 
nue. Since the house is fairly large, we often had company for Thanksgiv- 
ing, Christmas, ana the Fourth of July, an- our guests usually stayed for 
several days. Even mora frequently, though, we ^o back to Kacy, Indiana, for 
most of our relatives still live within a fifty mile radius of my daa's 
hometown. Family get to^ethers were always fun with a lot of laughter and 
joking. Since my parents are from small families, most of the relatives are 
my great aunts an- uncles, an- cousins, so we kids are always spoiled by at- 
tention whenever we get together. 

I joine-i my brother at Highland school when I was five. It was while I 
was in kindergarten that my brother Dave was 'born. I can still remember how 
excited I was when my _Lad woke me up at two in the morning to tell me. It was 
like a game to Steve ana I to feed an- watch Dave, an- we always ha- fun teas- 
ing an- playing with him. When" I was in thir- grade, my sister Susie was born 
ani by this time I was old enough to change diapers, an- really help to take 
care of her. She and Dave are very close, as they have always been and she can 
play football and baseball better than most boys. 

It was while I was in Junior High SChool, at Lincoln, when we took our fir 
real vacation. My -a- took the family to I. ew Orleans, and the trip was -oubly 
exciting, as we got to miss six -ays of school .for the excursion. 



The summer before I entered seventh grade at Lincoln Jr. high school, we 
took another trip out west ana up into western Canaia. We hai such fun together 
on these first excursions that t'rips together became annual happenings. The 
next summer we went through Lew England to eastern Canada. Our longest, ana 
favorite trip came while I was a freshman at East High School. V.'e spent three 
weeks at Christmas time in Mexico. V.'e all loved the warm, sunny weather ana 
friendly people, ana each others company. It was a vacation mixed with laughter 
ana fun, as all trips were, but we were much closer as we had no one to talk 
to but ourselves, because of the language barrier. 

While I was at East I participate- in plays an^ musicals, ana attended 
most athletic activities. I really enjoyed my four years there, ana was sorry 
to see it all ena with graduation. 

At the present time I am attenaing Rock Valley Jr. College, majoring 
in Secondary e-ucation, ana history, ana working at Highland Branch Library. 



I-IACY, INDIANA 



The small town of Macy, Indiana played an important part in the story 
of my heritage. My father, and his relatives back to the early nineteenth 
century maae their homes here, and my mother spent simmers ana vacations 
in Macy with her grandparents. The church was constructed by my great-grana- 
parents both on my mother's and father's si_;e of the family, ane uncles of 
my father constructed all the roa-s in the area. It was here generations of 
ancestors were born, met fell in love, married, arid iied, leaving their chil- 
dren to carry on the cycle. 

The town v;as originally called Lincoln but was changed to Macy as another 
larger town in Indiana was also called Lincoln. At its 'height, there was a 
town bank, hot3l, general store, tavern, hardware and -rug store, creamery, 
livery stable, and about 600 to 7C0 inhabitants. This was at the turn of the 
century. Many factors contributed to the downfall of Macy. Kith the invention 
of cars, Maey's bustling railroad business diminished, and farmers had easy 
transportation to other larg:r cities. Macy was two miles off the main high- 
way, an- thus off the main trade route. Findlly, during the depression, the 
bank- went under, an- more and more farmers took other business, along xdth bard 
ing into the surrounding cities. 

Today, Macy is little more than a ghost town. Buildings are boarding up, 
an- rotting, and more and more of Maey's citizens are leaving to find town's 
with more life, and a promise for the future, '..'e still own a farm in Mac..-, thi 
house my grandparents and parents grew up in, but now even it stands empty. 

In several years Macy, once a thriving farming community, with youn_, grow- 
ing families, will be nothing but an empty shell, full of yesterdays, void of 
tomorrows. 



g 



4 



S0UHC2S OF INFORMATION 



Much of the information 'I gathered, cams from talking with my parents, 
greataunts and great-uncles. These interviews, in person, by letter, and 
long distance telephone calls, helped me gather dates, and facts as well as 
the way of life my ancestors made for themselves and their families. 
I-iaps, and compiled family geneoligies were also a great help, but this his- 
tory coula not have been written without the hours of time various rslacives 
shared with me, helping to relay the information from memory to paper. 



I*?* 'Chicago * KE 



-rnudgu / .Niles I "■ ■ - ■- 

! East Chicago i 'Michigan City a /(S «^t *f \- 



MICHIGAN 



Hammond.* 



^.Gafy.,:^- LaPorte 

p Heights/ jGnffith 'Hobart | 
fj/k Forest ! . Valparaiso 
Crown Poim 



make fheii 



South Bend*... b£lkhart 



* of coo/ at a ,.. J 

• Houte 



el dthe top; 
«Ct to the ; 
1 is to a grr, 

. provides _ 
; United Si 
tore, and i 
of auton i 
. rubber g ( 

in Indian., 
WOempI 
ties. The 
terms o! 
Jl; petro,', 
stones. > i 
Albany. 



of Inc-.- 



t N 0 I S 



r Danville. 



Plymouth. 

^ c 
t 



-J- 



Logansport. Peru. 



West Lafayette.. 



'Lafayette 



N 



Crawfordsville 



Brazil. 
'Terre Haute 



.Goshen 



Kendallville. 

Auburn* 



Fort Wayne* 



Marjory % 



.Huntington 



Bluffton. 



Hartford City 
Portland 



N 



Muncie 
» 



Speedway. 
Indianapolis 
.Greencastle 

Greenwood. 



Lawrence 

.Greenfield 
• Beech Grove 



Franklin. 
'Martinsville 



• Bloomington 



: Washington 
* Vincennes 



.Princeton 



Evansville 



•Jasper 



^New Castle 

Richmond* 

Connersville 
Rushville 



'Shelbyville 
g JSreensburg 
Columbus 



• Seymour 



.Bryan 



Celina 

Grojvi Lake 

OHIO 



Franklin 
Middletown. * 

Oxford 

Hamilton 



Norwood 

Cincinnati. 

/* Covington^* 
J\ — 



Newport 



-Tell CI 



OarksviWe Je / fersonvi „e 
New Albany v-'V 

Louisville' SL Matthews 
.** • Shively s 
I 




KENTUCKY 



20 30 10 W>. 



Henderson \ 
*>"9»i BintiiiiM m« zo**m\<™ 'Owensboro 



$ Frankfort 
v.rniiiM. Lexington 



Harrodsburg» 



J,. • Elizabeth town 
D 



Danville 
E 



i 



OUTLINE 

Life 

Character 

Works 

Rank 

Character of Compositions 



Life and Works of 



Picture of Composer. 



LMalf-Penoy Size] 





2 - &-&£-^£tS& 




J-LC cZ <y: tt£ ±X_ - C U<j<-i. u'^^/t 




y ~ 




24- 



I ( 

T 
J> 

I 




1/ 




^ - - -^ ^ 




B/LL focC 
AN7> 

< 



A. 

■v 




3^ <2Z/!/a2 r<s^ 



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FRANCIS, SUSAN MARGARET HOTVEDT, 1952- 



■jyEASK TYPE: PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COP Y OF YOUR 
FAM I I.Y H I S TORY . 



Dear Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can he made more useful to historians and 
others studying American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
below. Th is will take you only a few minutes, and will be e a s i 1 v made o v e i 
Into an index which will permit archive users ready access to just those 
kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



Your name 
D ate of f 



SuS ftn [ \ 

o r m^y^ftch 01 ^ nib 



idiiLiS 



Office Use Code 

(ID // ) 

(ID If ) 



Your college: Roc k Valley College 
Rockf ord, Illinois 



Check the earliest date for which you have he en able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 



Before 1750 
1850- 1900 



] 750-1800 

1900 or later 



1800-1850 



Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of 



Middle At lan tic (N . Y . , Penna . , N . .1 . 
S .C.) East South Central 



Va . ) 

(La. , M i s s . , A 1 a . , T e n n , K y . ) 



Olawa i 



cuss 


ed 


i 


. r . ) 






la . , 


:; . 


C . 


Was 


t 


So 


Oh i o 


, i 


n d 


Wis 


c . 


,) 



entral (Ark. , N . M . , T e x . 
/ Pacific (Cal., Wash . ) 



Please check all occupational categories in which members ol youi 
family whom you have discussed in this paper have found themselves 



y Fa rm i ng 

T ransportation 

rofessions 



Mining 

Big Business 
Industrial Labor 



Shopkeeping or small business 

Manufacturing 

Other 



Please check a I 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 



Roman Catholic J ew i sh Presbyterian _Methodist 

Baptist __Ep i s co p a 1 i a n Congregational Lutheran 



Quaker 



Mo r mo n 



Other Protestant 



Other (name) 



7. What ethnic and social groups arc discussed in your paper' 



German 



j/swe d i s h 
B lacks 

Jews Central Europeans _ Italians Slavs 

Irish 



Other Scandinavian 
Indians Mexicans 



French 



Puerto Ricans 



British y Native Americans over several 

East Asian Other (Name) 



E a s t e r n Ku rnpi 
:ne r a t i o n s 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 
/interviews with other /Family Bibles / Family Genealogi 



family members 
yy ital Records 



Land Records 



The U.S. Census 



Photographs V Maps ■/ Other %<_R ApbcotNS ) '^»=) R \ e c 



I . KAMI L Y DATA 



2 



Grandfather (your father's side ) 

Name q |e*flYvW Qs\»r K fW Vv/Pcjt Current Residence Tw e'Avn 

Date of birth ^ftjl |J, | %7Cj Place of birth ^ap^ft^ T/>^w 

Date of death fret, s' , 7 Place of burial t)p4r,K ' T.r> u a 

E duca t ion (numb e r of years); 

grade school % high school Q vocational Q college Q 



Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Eagm&g Dates V'\[D' HH lst u'ftj I* . Dates \W, - {-\ [<\ 

2nd ^£jj±le, F A ftW/? Dates Hiq- jfUj 2nd ^Wh^fi Da t e * ~ I °l U ~[ 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 



4th Dates _4th _ Dates 

R e 1 i g i o n L ulhgBSH 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc .Re p u.bl ic ,ft>\ | 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother ly T ou: ft dateSf^Sf." \ 0 l1\£> 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to a g e J 1 8 ) iTy a step father or another 'J 
relative give that data on tlie back of this page. ( A - 1 ) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name SftftA tTu 1.1 A~Y> A 3u.v/g Current Residence ^ e c Qftj^l ^Xo.uZfL _ 

Date of birth.T ul M ,31. Place of b ir th ^cWulAu , IftuW 

Date of death Place of burial 0 



Education (number of years): 

grade school § high school vocational 

college X 



Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Te - h t 3 £ Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd Dates_ 3rd Da tea 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion LutlneaftYN 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc . 'Republics 



ifiL d a t e Sept. \C> ) l^tt) 



NOTE: Lf your father was raised [in age L8) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on the back ol this page 
(A-2) . 



S tepsrand f a ther 

Name 



(your father's side) 

Current Residence 



3 



Place of birth_ 
Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 

Cw 1 lege 

Occupation(s) 

1 s t Da tes Is t 

2nd Dates 2nd Da tes 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4 th Dates 4 th Da tes 

Re 1 i g ion 

'olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



vocational 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



e of marriage to your grandmother date 

5 tepgrandmo ther (your father's side) 

Current Residence 



Date of birth Place of birth_ 

into of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

school high school vocational 

coll e ge 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1 8 t_ Dates 1st Dates 

Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 3rd Dates 

D a t e 8 4 t h D a tes 

Re 1 1 g 1 o n 



Ideal party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



I 



Place of aarrlage to your grandfather Date 



Grandfather (your mother's side) ', 

Nam e ( Ro(a^ r\ Q 1tb SftLA Current Residence T> ^ r ^ N ec | 

Date of birth K\AiQ ■ it?, D O Place of b i r t \7&{ OL ^ Vu'nc^Tcv V .hSL .. 

Date of death AiAg . \°{ {<! £<j Place of b ur i a 1 <EW X X^AW^Tll. 

Education (number of years): 

grade school *g high school vocational <~J . ) c o 1 1 e g e 



Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^LWt<3K Dates hj>| ■ ■ ^ 1 s t R C< K T\fo < k! III. Dates fl^ - yq;-?, <g 

2nd flff,;-,^ ± \^yr^:U^LTr ates ^ ^ - l^nd fe,^ t ,, | A F) * Dates (1^ 

3rd f>rtoK Dates i^lV rl5 H 3rd < R 0c ,KTs UviH , TZ J /- Datesl ^H - ftM 

4 th Da tes _4 th _Da t e s_ 

Rel ig ionCAtUol'iC. 



Political parties, civil or social c 1 ub s , fraternities, uti: . Re j^uk} IxCf-LVX ^ 

Place of marriage to your g r andmo t h e r 'Rp C f\ Z^l A ^d ) X i I ■ daTe 3ulit 'Sl^'X-^ 

NOTE: Tf your mother was raised by a stepfather or another relative (to 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Vjaftfradel" f AtWm^ &MlE&^D (. Current Residence ^rr K T-slm .d t f 1 1 

Date of birth . »UmcL L , > £3-5 _Place of blrth^r K XsittW^ T ). 

Date of death ' ~~ Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school high school __vocational college <~l 

Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

( a Iter leaving home) 
1st Teftckpg Dates iq^ -1^X3 IstKocXTAinApt. Datestffl -JJUS 

2nd Dates 2nd Dales 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, e t c . ^ p i ic A >A 

-J^^O-S Qfrnh Ufo > QA& , fefti t&LjkuQ)t>R.&- 

PlaW" St marria'ge to your grandfather HcC- K~1>Ja^c\ ) III. ''at W« Sl.aTO 

NOTli: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to 

' K gflve th»t d*Ca on the back of this page (D-2) 



S t ep gr and f a th e r (your mother's side) 

Current Residence 

Date of birth Placeofbirth 



death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

crude school high school vocational college 



lccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Da t es 2nd Da t e s 

Dates 3rd Da t es 

4 th Da tes 4 th Da tes 

R e 1 i g i o n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



of marriage to your grandmother Date 

S t e p g r andrao t h e r (your mother's side) 

Current Residence 



r^t.' of birth Place of birth 



late of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

high school v o c a I t o na ] < • i > I Leg e 

ipation(a) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
I ' Dates 1st Dates I 

Dates 2nd Dates 

Dates 3rd Dates 

Dates 4 th Dates 

. 



i r t v , r I v i ] or social clubs, sororities, etc 



CHILDREN of A & B (or A-2 or B-2 ) - your father's name should appear below 

1 • Name A l1>Ys SeRg^e HotVfcd t 

Place of birth Ru-laeuiiW , date Aiu; SLyif ii^ 

Number of years o f s choJ) I i n g (Q^ Occupa t ion ffift&|pme VAferV tflYur 

Res i dence (jflj ifo^M r) Marital Status . l")^ R \ e c j 

Number of children <Q Death 

2 . Nam e Ke R T > '1 it Oru'i li e HsTV<ScVf fa H e «■ ) 

I' lace of lurth Rirlat^,^ Xcw^ ' date TV't 3.7,l^l H 

Number of years of J scliool ing Occupation TeftCnet? 

Res i dene 

e '^ n-K 4-S lAVV ' i , 1:11 Marll:aL Status Al^RRiecl 

Number of children ^ D e a t h — 



N a m e A | , , ,- Xft<>>r^, U OT^f ftl 

Place of birth gjrjag u'ia IV^ilft date AW. . l^] J; - ) 

Number of years ofJs ch oe? i n g j (j Occupation j e^c £ 

Res i dence QAf ifoKAi^ Marital Status /VjAQRied 

Number of children ^ Death 

Name 

P 1 ace o f b i r th . I e . . 

Number of years of schooling Occupal Lon_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death __. 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number ot years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children Death 



Nam e 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling_ 

Residence_ Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name_ 

Place of birth elate . 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

R e s i d e n c e . Ma r i t a 1 Statu s 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of bir t h d a t e , . 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children_ death i _ 

N a me 



Place of birth date . 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence _ Marital Status 

Number of children death 



N a me 



lace of birth date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i deuce _ Mar i I a 1 S t a t us _ 

Number ol children _ _deatli _ . 



7 

HILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 



Place of birth ^i.-j.y.t- I U date ^).^, , ^ , 1 ^^ , * 

Nur.ber of years of s cn oo 1 lng___|jj J 0 c c up a t i on tlQUS ^ ^ *' < 

lesid ^»v-j X)j, Marital Status .-^"M ^ t € d 

hi 1 Jren " death 

Sane 

Lace of birth date 

ears of schooling Occupation 

dence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



S .i r. e 

. of birth date 

ears of schoolin g 0 ccupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Same 

Place of birth date 

er of years of schoolin g 0 ccupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence M a r i t a 1 Stat us 

Number of children death 



N a 3 e 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Kuiber of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

f years of schooling Occupation 

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er of children' death 



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of birth date 

er of years of .schooling Occupation 

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of children death 





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Number of children-. death 



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Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

RtHldt-nre _Mnrital Status 

Nimbrr of children death 



Your Father 



Name RpRT.ut Grille flOl I' £ D 1 ' Current Res idence jR oc ,K X s/ftVK"! , J // 
Date of birth Dec , 3l7 / /9/W Place of birth Rldc^P PuQCj 1 XckjO A 



Date of Death ■ 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school g high school *-/ 



vocational 



coll e ge (q 



Occupation(s) 

1st Teache fi 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 11.3$ - i^^fr lst Rh>c_ h A RtK , v liYiM . Dates fl38 - ft</0 



2nd Ch±LllML£& >^'ff Dates Rfj i - / 9 9V 2nd P<*,^*crU . FU . Dates /?('V 

3rd £&mUpal Dates /9V^r)V9 3rd K UlfiVfJ , J//. Dates /f^ 

4th _2kflcil£jg Dates - /'^ 7<? 4th RocK I^'hrri i £li Dates, 

Religion LotheAfiY] 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc . // ep; jbA C 3 )1 } 



Place of marriage to your mo ther /^nv^dc'/^ F/ft. date /-"eh-- Q~j 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 



Your Mother 



Name /W>9/?/? EhiAbdk SfiLrl 
Date of birth /Uui .3 C\. 7 9,3 V 
Date of death — ' 



Current Residence t\£c.K T<,/^\^1 , I 1/ 

Place of birth Moll n 9 % T// 

Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school g high r school <y 



vocational 



col lege i_ 



Occupation(s) 

1st ffouse LCt re 

2nd He use, tu i f e 

3rd 

4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates frh /9 0.?-.l& lst P<,>SDCO/f) f Fifi Dates /??? - ?,<T 

.Date s /97S~- ^ 6 2n d RocKT ^Ifincj f ZV D a t e s ^5~- 

Dates 3rd Dates 

Dates 4th Dates 



Religion / tjtj\££fln 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc • f\pfi< >/)// C4t~) , 



Place of marriage tt> your father P^n Sr9i c/ *9 , / r /-9 . 



d a t e/-~eS. 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the hack of this page (F-2). 



9 



■ -2 $ t o r ' a t h e r 
Name 



Date of birth Place of birth 



Date of death P lace of burial 



Education (number of years) 

school high school vocational college 

-upation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Dates 1st Dates 



Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4 th Dates 4 th Dates 

R e 1 i g i o n 



'olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



PL.iv e of marriage to your mother Date 

F - 2 S tepmother 

Name 



of birth Place of birth 



Date of death Place of burial 

it ion (number of years) 

_high school vocational college 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

1 s t Da tes Is t Da t e s I 

Dates 2nd Dates 

r Dates _ '3rd Dates 

Dates 4th Dates 

Religion 

: > ' party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father 



<1 .iii- 



CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2.F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 
Name W _W„ tiDTl/f AT fati RO Al) 

Place t/f birth AV,r A ' Island i T./J Date of birth,: , . ( /y 

Number of years of schooling / y Occupation //oc, y^'/ /V- 

Restdence Sc/rtiiiiiA.'.Vq, X// Marital Status A)AfiRl'ed 

Number of childreh r ^ death 

Place of birth /f^ ■ fZ* Mnd . JL1 1 Date of birth , V,-^, ?/, 

Number of years of schooling Occupation /%->< >5C a. / />' 

Res i dene c Kckomfj > XncJ Marital Status /^QtRiFcJ 

Number of children r I death 

Name 5___) *)»*>aMef HOTl't DT (FfiAMCJS> ) 

Place of birr/h /fty-A jZs^Mid Date of birth ,T1. , j / SV. t 

Number of years of schooling / c / Occupation .Vq -,c a. /7V /- ^T oc/ € n 

Residence ^/)^/] , Z/ Marital Status A 7P/ € (i 
Number of children death — -- 



N ame 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth___ Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence _Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



N ame 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public Library, Rockford 
Illinois 



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SOURCE 



In researching this paper I think I used every available 
source. I started by digging through my parent's attic 
which is loaded with old diaries of various relatives. This 
is where I found the many photographs and news clippings also 
I am lucky in-so-far as I apparently had relatives who did 
not believe in throwing anything away! 

I also used the old family Bible that my Mother has to 
locate dates of births, marriages and deaths. However, I 
still could not locate some dates. 

I interviewed my maternal Grandmother, and that is where 
I got the information about her life, and my Grandfather and 
Grandmother's life together. I interviewed my Mother for my 
Grandfather's life before marriage, and my Father for my 
paternal Grandmother and Grandfather's life histories. They 
never were very talkative about their lives. 

There is also a book about Conrad Weiser that I was able 
to use for information on him. ("Conrad Weiser--Friend of 
Colonist and Mohawk"). Most of the other relative's lives 
I learned about from diaries and news clippings. 



I 



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MY 

FAMILY GENEALOGY 
Jacob Weiser = Anna 



1625-1694 



(1 ) Anna Magda li na = John Conrad Weiser = Anna Margaret TI] 



1660-1746 



John Frederick, Jacob, Rebecca 



Catrina, Anna Margaret, Anna Magdalina, Maria Sabina, 
John Coarad = Ann Eve. Geo* Fredrick, Christopher, John Fredrick, Barbara 
1696-1760 



Philip, Peter, Christopher, Jacob, Elisabeth, Margaret, Benj.(l), 
Samuel, Jabez, Aanna, Ben j . (2), Anna Maria = Rev. H.M. Muhlenberg, 
Fredrick = Amelia Zeller 174*5 



John Conrad Weiser 




Elizabeth Klinger 


1753-1804 




John Philip Weiser 






Catharine Malick 


1787-1863 




Catharine Weiser 


= Henrv Fasold 


1821-1885 





Catharine Louisa Fasold = Edward F. Bartholomew 



1848-193** 



1846-1946 



Netta C. Bartholomew = Knut T. Anderson 
1873-1960 



1869-1959 



Margaret C. Anderson ; Roland 0. Sala 



1898- 



1900-195 2 * 



Barbara E. Sala = Kermit 0» Hotvedt 



1924- 




1918- 



nne S. = Gene L. Schrom Katherine = Wm. Friz 
44 i I 19 46 [ 1952 

Andrew. Rebecca 
1970 1972 



Susan M. * Michael Francis 



Jeffrey. Gregory 
968 1970 



.■ r ■ v, - bio? j j t ""i:'oi ^^l^rri J isO 

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i 



FORWARD 



This paper deals with my family ancestry. I 
could not trace my roots back as far on my Father's 
side as I would have liked, as they emigrated from 
Norway sometime during the 1800* s, and they also 
changed their name several times. 

However, on my Mother's side I was able to go all 
the way back to the l600's. 

I discovered that I had quite a few relatives 
who were instrumental in the forming of our country t 
A great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather 
who was Pennsylvania's Indian Ambassador j a great-great- 
great-great-great-grand Uncle who was the Patriarch of 
the Lutheran Church of America; a great-great-great- 
great-grand Uncle who was a General in the Revolutionary 
War and fought at Yorktown; a great-great-great-great- 
great-grand Uncle who was a delegate to the Continental 
Congress and the first speaker of the United States 
House of Representatives, to mention only a few. 

I became very interested in my family genealogy 
while researching this paper and I hope the reader 
will also find it of some interest. 



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THE WEISER NAME 

Attempts to ascertain the meaning of the name 
Weiser lead to indefinate conclusions. One meaning 
is "the white one" (der Weisse) . Another is "the 
wise one" (der Weise)j or "one who does white washing, 
painting" (der Weisser); and "one who shows or points 
the wayj the supervisor" (der Weiser). Spelling 
is not uniform in early records. '"There are Weiser/ 
Weisser families in several sections of Germany, of 
Protestant, Catholic and Jewish origin.' 1 



(1) E. Schopf, "Hans Conrad Weiser, Father and Son," 
Blatter des altertumoverin fur den murrgou 
Nr. 49, Beilage zum Murrtal 



10-C 



JACOB WEISER 
1625-169^ 

The first Weiser in the lineage of whom there is 
a definite record is Jacob Weiser, who bore the office 
of Schultheiss, or magistrate, at Gross Aspach, 
Wurttemburg, Germany. 

The origins of the Weiser family are difficult 
to discern. The area of Gross Aspach was generally 
ravaged by the French in the seventeenth century, the 
town itself destroyed in l693t which fact accounts 
in part for the difficulty in obtaining records of 
the early generations of the Weisers. The parochial 
register begun in 1598 was burned on that occasion and 
the new one begun in 1693-169^, included information 
compiled by the pastor, toag. Erhard Hagelein, from 
the memories of the townspeople. Data on the early 
Weiser family is scarce. From the available evidence, 
a German scholar has concluded! "The Weiser family was 
a relatively well off and respected one, related to the 
best families in town, out of which the "tribunal" and 
the "senate" got it's members, often allied by marriage 
with the Sturmfeder Schultheissen and appreciated to 
have not only the town pastor but also the high patron 
Freiher von Sturmfeder as a godfather. It was a family 
which was not in want of forwards-striving, energetic, 
and strong personalities, who were entitled to a leading 
role." (2) 

(2) E 0 Schoph, "Hans Conrad Weiser, Father and Son", 
Blatter Des Altertumoverin fur murrgou 
Nr. 49, Beilage zum Murrtal 



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JOHN CONRAD WEISER 
1660-17^6 



John Conrad Weiser, the emigrant was born about 
1660 , in Gross Aspach. He married first, Anna Magdalena 
Ubelen, daughter of Hans Ubelen. They were the parents 
of fifteen children. 

John Conrad was a corporal in the Wurttemberg 
Blue Dragoons, which office he held until about 1700, 
when he became a baker, the position he occupied until 
he emigrated to America in 1709* 

On May 1, 1709, Anna Magdalena died suddenly due 
to an attack of Gout while pregnant for the sixteenth 
time. John Conrad left the community soon thereafter, 
June 2k t selling his property there to his eldest 
daughter, already married, and taking with him his other 
eight surviving children. They went to London, from 
which they embarked several months later for America. 
Their vessel, the "Lyon", landed at New York on June 
13, 1710. 

Almost as soon as John Conrad was in company of his 
fellow Germans, he showed qualities of leadership. 
In New York, the several thousand Palatine immigrants 
were bound to produce tar from the pitch of pine trees at 
camps near the Hudson River, about 100 miles north of 
New York Oity. The settlers were divided into five 



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villages, at first, and John Conrad was the headman 
of one. As such, he voiced complaints of his 
fellowmen before the Governor, Robert Hunter, who 
was caught in an impossible situationi the trees 
could produce no tar, the overseer of the Palatines 
(Robert Livingstone) was a scoundreli the Germans 
expected better conditions — food aplenty and land 
of their own. 

A military campaign in 1711 provided the occasion 
for the climax of the difficulty. One of the captains 
of the Palatine contingent was John Conrad Weiser, and 
when the soldiers returned from a futile march into 
northern New York, only to discover their families 
nearly starved, Weiser led the Palatines in a complaint 
before the Governor. The incident ended when Hunter 
lost his temper, and ordered the Palatines disarmed, but 
in the year following he released them to go where they 
pleased . 

John Conrad Weiser was one of a number of men 
deputized by the Germans to seek land at Schoharie, 
about fifty miles west of Albany, after sometime, the 
Germans were settled there in a collection of little 
"dorfs" or villages, of which one bore the name Weiserdorf 
(and today is Middleburgh) . Conditions were poor, but 
hard work began to make a home of this wilderness. Since 
the Palatines were squatters before the law (even if 
they made a purchase deal with the Indians) it was 
inevitable that there would be trouble. When the Governor 



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sent an agent to make deeds for the Palatines, they 
so mistreated him out of suspicion that the government 
eventually granted the land to others. 

Nearly crushed, the Palatines resolved to send 
Weiser and two others to London to appeal to King 
George I, a fellow German. This venture proved to be 
the most bizarre on which John Conrad embarked. 

Attacked and stripped by pirates enroute, the 
three men contracted so many debts in London they were 
thrown into prison. One of them died there, another 
returned to New York and John Conrad stayed behind, 
seeking in vain to establish the Palatines rights. 
After five years he returned to America, only to find 
his colony scattered. 

The remaining years of life found him in several 
places, never settled down, always following some scheme. 
He tried to purchase lands on the Delaware, but ran 
afoul the Proprietors of Pennsylvania. Late in life, 
after many years of silence toward his family, (I could 
not find why they had feuded j probably because he'd 
left them to fend for themselves whild he went on that 
five year romp in London!) John Conrad was discovered 
in upstate New York, not too far from old Livingstone 
Manor, his first home there. Conrad, his son, visited 
him, and later when conditions became dangerous he sent 
two of his sons to bring him to Pennsylvania, in May, 1?46. 



JOHN CONRAD WKESER 



John Conrad Weiser, the eldest son of John Conrad 
and Anna Magdalena Weiser, was given his father's name 
at birth, November 2, 1696 which took place at Affstatt. 
He became generally known as Conrad Weiser. 

Conrad emigrated to America in 1710, with his 
father, and shortly thereafter was placed in the 
hands of the Mohawks. From them he acquired the 
knowledge of Indian words and ways which launched 
him on the career that made his name known in the 
annuals of Pennsylvania and national history of the 
colonial era. 

On November 22, 1720, Conrad married Anna Eve Feck. 

Conrad is noteworthy for several reasons. He 
was Pennsylvania's Indian Ambassador, and a Jack- 
of-all-tradesi He was a farmer, and the owner of a 
tannery, one of the founders of Reading, Pennsylvania, 
a Colonel on active service during the French and 
Indian War, and the first President Judge of Berks 
County. That is Conrad Weiser in a nutshell. 

It is also written in family diaries that he 
bought books from Benjamin Franklin, and taught him 
all he knew about the Six Nations Indians. 

His first grandchild grew up to become the famous 
General John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg of Washington's 
staff in the Revolutionary War. 



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Conrad organized the intelligence service. During 
the black fall of 1755 » he was for a time Pennsylvanias 
main defense, receiving a blanket commission from 
the Governor to do whatever was necessary for the 
safety of the province. With a volunteer army he 
plugged the gap in the Blue Mountains and broke the 
force of the Indian Attack. 

There is much more about Conrad Weiser that is 
interesting, but this paper would increase to book 
size, and there are already several books written 
about the man - my great-great-great-great-great-great- 
grea t-grandf a th er . 

The one book I was able to locate and get some 
informqtion from is "Conrad Weiser - Friend of Colonist 
and Mohawk" by Paul Wallace. 



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HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG 



Henry Muhlenberg was born September 6, 1711 » 
at Einbeck, Hanover. He became a Lutheran Reverend, 
and organized the Lutheran Church of America. 

In 1743 Reverend Henry Muhlenberg met Conrad 
Weiser, and also his sixteen year old daughter, 
Anna Maria, with whom he fell in love. On April 22, 
1745 the Reverend Muhlenberg married Anna, and it was 
out of this marriage that came the three noteworthy 
leadersi General John Peter Muhlenberg, of George 
Washington's staff, who fought at the battles of 
Yorktown, during the Revolutionary Wan Reverend, 
Doctor Henry Ernest Muhlenberg, botanist and educator, 
first president of Franklin College (the Franklin and 
Marshall of today )i and Fredrick Augustus Conrad 
Muhlenberg, a delegate to the Continental Congress 
and the first speaker of the United States House of 
Representatives. 



i 



FREDERICK WEISER 



Frederick Weiser, second son of Conrad and Anna 
Eve, was born December 24, 1728 at Schoharie, New York. 
On December 3, 1751 Frederick married Amelia Zoeller . 

Frederick farmed the Weiser Homestead. He was 
also a County Commissioner of Berks between 1763 and 
1766. 

Frederick died November 15. 1773- I could find 
no date of death for Amelia. 



JOHN CONRAD WEISER 



John Conrad Weiser, eldest son of Frederick and 
Anna Amelia (Zeller) Weiser, was born April 16, 1753, 
on the Weiser estate at Womelsdorf. On November 12, 
1775, he was married to Elizabeth Klinger by his 
uncle Benjamin Weiser. She was born on March 10, 1756 
in Reading Pennsylvania. 

He served in the Revolutionary War in Captain 
Michael Wolf's Company, 1776-1780. He died September 
10, 1804, and Elizabeth died March 12, 1820. 



1 



JOHN PHILIP WEISER 



John Philip Weiser (May 13, 1?87 - Woraelsdorf, 
Pennsylvania) married Catharine Malick October 27, 
1811. She was born August 24, 1?88 in Augusta Town- 
ship. 

Philip, as he was known, was a farmer and 
extensive landholder in Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania, deeding a farm to each of his children 
in his will. He served as a Northumberland County 
Commissioner, 1841-1844, and donated a tract of land for 
the Eden Lutheran Church in 1844, where he and his family 
are buried. 



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CATHARINE WEISER 

Catharine Weiser (July 28, 1821 - Augusta Township, 
Pennsylvania, died May 12, 1885)* Catharine married 
Henry Fasold (September 11, 1819-1885) June 2, 18^2. 
I don't know very much about my great-great-great- 
grandfather except that he was a farmer. 



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1 1 

CATHARINE LOUISE FASOLD 

Catharine Louise Fasold (April 20, 1848 - Plum 
Creek, Pennsylvania) married Edward Fry Bartholomew 
(March 24, 1846 - Plum Creek, Pennsylvania) July 11, 
1872. 

My great-great-grandfather spent his life-time 
in education. He was a Principal at Kahok, Missouri 
High School I8?l-l874j a professor of Natural and 
Physical Science at Carthage College 1874-1883 i a 
professor of English Literature at Mount Morris College 
1883-I884j Professor Emeritus, 1929-1946; President 
of Carthage College 1874-1888» Vice President of 
Augustana College, 19H-1920. He studied at Berlin 
University 1894-1895; got his Ph.D. 1895 Augustana 
College; D.D. in 1888, L.H.D., 1912, L.L.D. 1930. 
He also was the author of several booksi "Outlines 
of English Literature"; "Relations of Psychology to 
Music" ; "Biblical Pedogogy". 



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EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW 
From a recent photograph taken in his study 



Augustana's 
"Grand Old Man 

Years Old 



Dr. E. F. Bartholomew, 
Beloved College Professor, 
Becomes a Centenarian 



By E. E. Ryden 
Editor of the Lutheran Companion 



T THE AGE of 100 years, he believes that he still 
has a mission to perform in the world, and hS 
is disconsolate over the fact that he has been 
retired as an active college professor! 

Born in Sunbury, Pa., March 24, 1846, Dr. Edward 
Fry Bartholomew, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, 
and English Literature at Augustana College, Rock 
Island, 111., will receive the congratulations of his 
friends next Sunday, March 24, in the spacious reading 
room of Denkmann Memorial Library at that institu- 
tion. And he may even give a little talk — at least, so 
he plans — just to celebrate his hundredth birthday! 

Two years ago, at 98, he conducted chapel exercises 
before the hushed assembly of Augustana students, and 
he has requested of President Bergendoff that he be 
given the same privilege on Maundy Thursday this 
year. At 97 he delivered a sermon at the Good Friday 
three-hour service in St. John's Lutheran Church, 
Rock Island, and a year earlier he gave the Easter 
message in Trinity Lutheran Church, Moline, 111. 

Work and Temperate Living 
Every centenarian has his own formula for achieving 

longevity, and Dr. Bartholomew also has his. It is 

work and temperate living. 

"I have avoided all extremes," he says simply. 

But healthful work is also an important factor, he 

believes, and even at a 100 years he is found at his 

desk every day, writing an occasional article in the 



same clear handwriting his students knew so well some 
thirty or forty years ago, or answering the numerous 
letters that come to him from distant friends and for- 
mer students. 

Four years ago he promised to write an article for 
the Lutheran Companion when he reached the age of 
100 years. And he kept his promise. "What Are We 
Here For?" he chose as its title, and he packed it full 
not only with sound Christian theology — for he is a 
Lutheran pastor as well as a college professor — but 
also with his homely Pennsylvania Dutch philosophy 
of life. Evidently remembering that the editor of the 
Companion is a member of the Augustana College 
board, the vigorous centenarian who abhors idleness 
wrote this: 

"The custom which prevails among school boards 
and operators of retiring teachers when they have 
reached a certain age is all wrong. The longer a teacher 
has pursued his calling, the better is he qualified for 
that office. If he is physically strong and mentally 
sound, he should not be retired just because he is old. 
The determining consideration should be, not age, but 
mental condition and physical ability. There are here 
in Augustana College some teachers who have been 
retired because they have reached the age limit, but 
the fact is that they are better qualified to teach than 
ever before. Ability to serve and not age should deter- 
mine their continuance in office." 



NETTA CORDELIA BARTHOLOMEW 



Netta Cordelia Bartholomew (April 13. 1873) was 
born in Clark City, Missouri and married Knut Theodore 
Anderson (September 10, I869) on June 16, 1897. 

My great-grandfather Knut, or K.T., as he was 
known was born in Fjellskafte Floda Socken Sodermanland , 
Sweden. His family emigrated to the United States in 
the 1800' s. He was the cashier and Vice-President 
of the First National Bank, Rock Island; Treasurer, 
of Augustana Lutheran Church. 

My Great-grandmother, Netta, had her B.A. and 
M.A. and was a member of the Board of Directors, at 
Augustana College. 



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ALEXANDER ASLACK HOTVEDT 



My Grandfather died some years ago, so the little 
I do know about his life before his marriage is based 
strictly on stories he used to tell my father. 

My Father's father, Alex, was raised in a large 
(10 children) Iowa farm family. Both his mother and 
father were born in Norway. I could locate no exact 
record as to when they emigrated to this country. 

Alex was third youngest in his family. They lived 
in a large farm house 7 miles out of Calmar, Iowa. 
The family farmed their land, and I believe they were 
neither poor nor wealthy, but probably average. My 
grandfather did not talk about his childhood very much, 
so whatever I could say about this would be merely 
assumptions. 

I do know, however, that he was something of a 
rogue, and he quit school after grade school. He was 
off to "find his fortune." 

During this time he proceeded to North Dakota 
where he "home steaded" 160 acres. (He later gave this 
land to my father and mother. They did not want the 
land so my grandfather sold it, whereupon oil was 
discovered there shortly thereafter!) 



-2- 



He and a friend lived in a sod house on his land 
in North Dakota until he got tired of that adventure, 
and moved on to the next. 

He traveled to Canada where he was a "Cowboy" 
on a ranch. He did this for a year or so, and then 
decided to return to Iowa. I know no dates for those 
escapades, but my father thought he was probably in his 
late teens and early 20 's. 

SARAH JULIANA JUVE 

My father's mother, was also from a large (11 
children) Iowa farm family. They were a rather well- 
to-do family as her father owned quite alot of land. 
They were a deeply religious, Norwegian Lutheran 
family. Sundays were spent (after church) visiting 
relatives for large Norwegian dinners. There also 
was quite a bit of Bible reading. 

Family life was traditional. By that I mean that 
the girls ( all 8 of theml ) did the cooking, cleaning, 
dishes, while the boys helped with the farming. The 
father was the disciplinarian, and made major decisions. 

Community life was important. Since they lived 
in the country going to "the city" was a fun event. 
There were County Fairs to attend and, of course, church 
functions. The town was a small one; perhaps 150 
people . 



i 



-3- 



ALEX + SARAH'S LIFE TOGETHER 

My Grandmother and Grandfather met when my 
Grandfather was a rural mailcarrier. 

He was 31 when they courted and married in 
September, 1910. My Grandmother was 22. Their eldest 
child jTony^ was born 2 years later. They lived with 
my Grandmother's parents for awhile and later bought 
a farm of their own where my father, Kermit, was born 
in December, 191 1 *, and their youngest, Alice, in 1919 • 

Their family life after carriage followed pretty 
closely to the way their family life had been before 
marriage . 

Religion played an important part of life. 
Church activities were looked forward to as social 
events. Sundays the family visited my Grandmother's 
mother some miles away. 

The family was well-off. Money was spent on 
necessities. My Father remembers always having a car 
and radio. The radio was the style that needed earphones 
in order to be heard. 

Family reuions were frequent, and they proceeded 
to be quite a huge gathering as the family expanded. 

In the meantime, my father's family moved to 
Decorah, Iowa. My Grandfather was, by then, into the 
cattle business only. The boys, Tony and Kermit helped, 



■ 

- 



1 1 

and they butchered their own cattle. It was a 
profitable business. 

The main sport at school was Baseball, and this 
was played in the cow pastures. The principle subjects 
at school were Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic, also 
Music and Art. 

My Uncle Tony seemed to follow in my grandfather's 
footsteps by being a rogue. He quit school after 8th 
grade and was always into trouble. He finally ended 
up going back to Mechanics School and became an Airplane 
Mechanic . 

My father, however, was more conscientious. He 
finished school, went to Luther College in Decorah, 
and then taught school in Blue Earth, Minnesota until 
World War II. He joined the Navy and became a pilot 
and Flight Instructor in Pensacola, Florida where he 
met my mother. 

My Aunt Alice was also more conscientious than her 
eldest brother, and she, too, graduated from Luther 
College in Decorah. 



-5- 



ROLAND OTTO SALA 

My Mother's father, Roland Otto Sala was born 
in the small town of Bloomington, Wisconsin, to 
Orlando and Ella Sala. His father (Orlando) was a 
Doctor with a good practice, and they were well-to-do. 
Roland was the only child of Ella's, but he had four 
half brothers of previous marriages whose mothers had 
died. Those brothers were much older and had left 
home by the time Roland was born. They, too, were 
Doctors. 

Roland and his parents lived in a large house 
in the town. Life went smoothly until Roland was 10, 
and at that time his father died. Their source of 
income gone, it was now up to Roland to support his 
mother. They got their food by his hunting, and things 
were not as luxurious as they had been. 

Spare time for Roland was spent working, although 
he still continued with school. 

His mother took whatever odd jobs she could to 
help her son. 

I don't think there was much time for sports or 
recreation for my Grandfather. 

After college (his half brothers helped put him 
through) he began Medical School to carry on the family 
tradition as his father and his grandfathers before 
him had done. (My great-grandfather was a surgeon 
during the Civil War.) 



! 

71*1 t : nr is Mo rioum 9*isw aiSiiJoid saorlT .baib 

■ 

3*w tntioH iiJ^i' ylntoorce tn»w aliu. .rtw;:*t f.it rri 

■ ' 
. ■ 

: 

- 



-6- 



When my Grandfather w-.s 22 he moved to Rock Island 
to take some courses at Augustana College, and this is 
where he met my Grandmother in 1922. 

IViARGARET CATHARINE ANDERSON 

My Mother's mother, Margaret Catharine Anderson, 
was born March 6, 1898 to Netta Catharine and Knut 
Anderson. Her father was the Vice President of the 
First National Bank of Rock Island, and they were 
considered well-to-do. 

She was the elder of two children, the younger 
being a brother, Paul. 

They lived in a large house in the town of Rock 
Island, Illinois. 

Margaret's father was a stubborn and silent Swede. 
The child-raising was left to ray Great-Grandmother, 
who was an intelligent and interesting woman. She was 
always busy with various interests. She served on the 
Board of Trustees at Augustana up until the time of her 
death in i960. 

Family life for Margaret was rather easy. They had 
all the luxuries such as radios, cars, and they were 
usually the first to get those new "contraptions." 

After school she and her girlfriends would usually 
go to the movies, or go over to one of the girl's houses 
for tea and crackers where they discussed the latest 
fashions or gossip. 



■ 

■ 

0 



Margaret did chores such as dishes and cleaning, 
whereas, she remembers Paul doing little or nothing. 
Paul was busy playing on the Basketball team in high 
school, and football in college. 

Family decisions about schooling or discipline 
were usually taken care of by my Grandmother's mother. 
My great-grandfather wanted little to do with the 
family raising. 

The neighborhood was a nice one - large stylish 
houses. They attended church regularly, and the social 
events were usually church-centered, and there were 
County Fairs. My Grandmother also remembers attending 
the street dances that used to take place downtown 
on Saturday nights. 

I don't think there were any major conflicts other 
than the usual spats that go on in a family. 

MY GRANDMOTHER AND GRANDFATHER ' S LIFE TOGETHER 

One rainy day my Grandmother, Margaret, was walking 
home from her^ classes at Augustana College, and was 
getting quite wet doing so. 

That was where my Grandfather entered the scene i 
luckily, with an unbrella. He offered very gallantly 
to walk her home under his umbrella. Thus began their 
courtship. 



- 

■ 

- 

- 

i ! 

■ 



1 1 

-8- 

Roland and Margaret dated for a year and a half. 
They married in July of 1923 • My Mother was born a 
year later, just as my Grandfather was finishing 
University of Iowa Medical School. 

They built an apartment building (The R.O. Sala 
Apartments) with an office on the ground floor for my 
Grandfather's medical practice, which was very successful. 
Of course my Grandmother didn't see as much of my 
Grandfather as she would have liked. 

During the Depression my Grandfather got paid 
in fruit, or food, or sometimes not at all. They did 
fine money-wise though, as my Grandfather was the 
examiner for the Veteran's Commission, and also for 
several insurance companies. 

During World War II Roland joined the Navy and 
the family moved to Pensacola, Florida. He was on 
active duty for five years and four months and ended 
the war as a Rear Admiral. 

He was Head Surgeon of the aircraft-carrier 
Princeton when it was hard hit during a sea battle with 
the Japanese. Even though he was injured by five 
shrapnel wounds, my Grandfather stayed on board to 
care for the wounded until the ship was blown in two. 
He used a sheaf Knife to amputate the leg of the Captain 
who was slated to take over command. 

He won the Silver Star for bravery because of 
these heroic acts. 



n 

- . 

■ 

I 

»nioa ruoipri bbbAS 



During this time my Mother, Barbara, had happened 
to meet my Father, Kerrait Hotvedt, who was a Lieutenent 
Commander in the Navy. He was a pilot and Flight 
Instructor at the Pensacola base. 

They married after dating two months, and a year 
after that my Father was ordered to the Pacific for 
a secret flying mission. His squadron, under his 
command, discovered the Japanese fleet near Midway 
Island, which led to the major battle between our 
forces and the Japanese. 

In December of 19^ my sister, Lynne, was born. 

After the war my parents moved to my Mother's 
hometown, Rock Island, Illinois. 

My Father went back to the profession of Education 
as a Principal in a Junior High School there, but later 
decided to go back to teaching, which he did. 

My other sister, Katherine, was born in May of 

19^6. 

My parents bought a large, old house on a hill with 
nearby woods and parks to make it an excellent stomping 
ground for children. 

I was born in July of 1952, in Rock Island where I 
lived (except for two years at Carthage College, Kenosha, 
Wisoonsin) until October 7, 1972 when I married Michael 
L. Francis. We then moved to Rockford where my husband, 
too„is a teacher. 



Two Rock Island Men Saved Off Carrier Princeton 




I 

I 



, A Pacific fleet cruiser pour? streams of water into the light carriqr U. S. S. Princeton, hit by Japanese bombs in the second -battle of 
the Philippine sea. The cruiser took Princeton personnel aboard and otherwise aided in relieving the stricken vessel. Two Rock Island 
men, Dr. R. O. Sala and Gunner's Mate Robert Trevor, were among ihose saved off the Princeton. (AP wirephoto from U. S. navy)." 



« 



Dr. Sala Telephones From 
Overseas; Gunner's Mate .A 
Taken on Board Destroyer 

"No matter what anyone else tells you, I'm all right 
now" — such was the relieving news received this, morn- 
ing by Mrs. Roland O. Sala in a transoceanic telephone 
message and a letter from her husband, Commander Sala, 
former Rock Island physician, who was head surgeon on 
board the aircraft, carrier U. S. S. Princeton, sunk Oct. 
25 after a clash with the Jap fleet near the Philippines. 
Island 



Another Rock Island man 
serving aboard the Princeton, 
Robert Trevor, gunner's mate, is 
safe on a destroyer with "a pair 
of pants, a pair of shorts and 
myself," according to a letter re- 
ceived this morning by his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Trevor, 
2222 Thirty-eighth street, this 
city. 

Action 'Rugged.' 

Commander Sala's letler, writ 



to last boat, just like taking an 
ordinary trip to the beach," wrote 
the commander. "The Princeton 
stayed afloat after we left and 
was sunk by our 'own fire. It 
could not have been salvaged." 

At the time of writing the let- 
ter. Commander Sala was. on 
board a destroyer with a group 
ot other officers. He related that 
their rescuers had been wonder- 
ten the day after the sinking, de- | ful to them, giving their beds, : 



scribed the action as "quite 
rugged." but added that nothing 
had happened to injure him per- 
manently. He managed to save 
his pocketbook, but with the ex- 
ception of the clothes he was 
wearing, lost a!.' his equipment. 

"I did i,/t get into the water, 
but left the carrier in the next 



wardrobes and toilet articles to 
the survivors. "And those who 
got off the Princeton had nothing 
but what was on their backs," he 
added. 

The Rock Island officer, whose 
residence is at 1907 Fifth avenue, 
this city, has been on active duty 
since July, 1940. 



'(I HIBSii©3sa|UB 
TOf IPi'imceton 

Three Illlnoisans who were 
aboard the aircraft carrier Prince- 
ton when she was sunk In the bat- 
tle of the Philippine Sea are 
among 400 iurvivora who have 
arrived In San Diego. Cal. 

They are Howard M. Boll, 29, 
Hampshire. II!., who also was 
Aboard the famed V. S. S. Hornet 
when she was sunk; Harold P. 
Thrashwer, 19, Jacksonville, 111., 
and the ship's medical officer 
Cradr. Roland 0. Sala, 1907 Fifth 
av., Rock Island. 

Crr.dr. Silo, rounded, used r. 
sheiaf kaife to amputate the leg 



gj$££ 




pommander Roland O. Sala, of Rock Island, among the 24 StS 
,>rs last leaving the aircraft carrier Princeton following its qc 
iction Oct.. 24 off the' Philippine coast, admires his new gr;,i1 
^hter, 2-week-old Lynne, whom he saw for the first time this 
."■•.s daughter, Barbara, was' rejoined last night by her hifc;- 
:. I .. ;utcnant Kermit Hotvedt, veteran of aerial action in ne 
ya.na islands. (Argus photo). 



Sala, Wounded 
~$y Shrapnel, Fights Carrier 
iFire; Among Last to Leav 

BY MARGARET KIRBY 

weakened by five shrapnel wounds, his life constantly 
ingered by exploding ammunition, Commander Rolr 
pala, former Rock Island physician, fought an jdl* 
^battle against fire and injuries on board the fire-, 
vcd, bomb-shattered aircraft carrier Princeton befi a 
illy evacuating with the last group of survivors C 
;is the ship sank off the Philippine coast. 
~iunander Sala, second Prince- I 



htinued from First Page.) 

:ifi4 theater, where he com- 
32 missions in eight months 
jve duty as pilot of a navy 
j Mariner patrol - bomber. 
:i 'returning home, Dr. Sala 
S that he was the grand- 
of a 2-week old girl, Lynne. 
| 'fast-moving carrier force 
:aded north for a diversion- 
. ;. tack on Luzon to safeguard 
) te invasion when 150 Japa- 
ilanes moved in to attack 
k group, related Command- 
: a. The lone Jap bomber, 
sneaked in through bver- 
fcies behind the Princeton's 
uig fighter ships, dropped a 
bomb on the. carrier, turned 
ip into a massive seaborne 
H ,\..iary bomb. 

Own Bombs Explode. 
~:ook only one Jap bomb — 
mished the rest of them," 
;d the physician. At the 
.f the strike he was in the 
oom. He felt the initial ex- 
i, then a second one 10 
cnut4s later. 

,alf hour after the first blast 
: a whangdoodler that 
xi our teeth out," said Com- 
r Sala. "It blew chairs and 
around the ward room and 
ji.- J. {he place with smoke. We 
iqvtd' the wounded out to the 
M-'et.sstle, then got them off the 
.is O'tto a destroyer. The crew 
r as evacuated by 10 o'clock in the 
iormng." 

" z those with minor injuries 
ed to be treated on the ship. 
> ■ injuries were caused by 
' runmunition which popped 
musly "like popcorn." Com- 
? Sala himself was hit in the 
■ ; :h by a fragment of bomb, 
cwy. .' A-Jieavy '-piece of sluv.p- 1 



•!•• «t r- • •- ;•• • 

Icnc^k'jdvUicfi Otv'Vii fb.fi 

...j J.bn uie ca-iif? ton 

fire-fighting party and w 
unceasingly pulling hoses ov< 
ship's side. The blaze was 
under control when the last i 
sion, caused by the firing < 
Princeton's own bombs, spl 
craft and blew off the stem. 

Two captains were on boa. 
carrier at the time of the 1 
ing. The relief captain, 
Hoskins, who was waiting 
the vessel docked to assume 
mand, lost his right foot i 
action, while the ship's 
mander, Captain William Bu 
er, was wounded slightly, 
all survivors had been pickc 
U. S. shells sank the fl< 
wreckage. 

Commander Sala was tak 
destroyer to one of the i 
forwai'd bases, then flown bj 
pital plane to Eniwetok and 
to Hawaii. His wounds hos 
ized him for two weeks. 

Travels 70,000 Miles. 

The navy surgeon estimate 
he has traveled som,e 70,000; 
in his six months of activ 
duty. During his last mori 
the Princeton the ship was:, 
attack almost every day, h 
clared. He holds campaign 
for participation in operatic 
the Palau, Mariana, Phil, 
and Nanseishopo islands a; 
Formosa, and during the s 
battle of the Philippines. 

Commanaer Sala, attach' 
the naval re-serve for 17 
was called to active duty in 
His orders regarding duty 
termination c£ his leave ai 
definite, but he believes th 
may be assigned to Philade 
Pa., as district flight surge< 
the staff of the Fourth nava 
trict. 

His son-in-law, Lieutenant 
vedt, who arrived only two 
after the commander, was a 
time within six miles of the 
geon in the Palau sector, aUl 
the two could not contact 
other. Lieutenant Hotvedt o 
corah, Iowa, was engaged i> 
trol, work durrffg the Ma 
campaign and' also : accoiup' 
ailli--iuliro«u;uie' bombini.' 



.Qrvivor to return to Rock Is 
smamed on. board the car 



whale boits before transfer," 

irith a party of 80 moH^made I t0 Thf tr iwl S ' ^,i„,. u 

f officer* and the salvaep The Rock Island doctor, h( . ... 
unt" " he e" plosion to end sur e con on the Proton. i? < 
tensions" blovv the sruV£l in S a 8 °- da >' leave with hls ' 
OSS5^«SSS'^'S& «X «t 1907 Fifth avenue. His f 
-.4^ »h«i in - ,aw - "eutcnant Kermit I 



SUSAN MARGARET HOTVEDT 



I was born July 18, 1952 in Rock Island, Illinois. 

When I was two my family moved to Florida for a very 
short time (10 months). My parents missed the snow in the 
winter, and the changing seasons, and weren't happy. Luckily, 
the house in Rock Island hadn't been sold yet, so we moved 
back to Illinois. 

I attended the pablic elementary school that my Father 
taught at, and I had him as a Science and Gym teacher in both 
Fourth and Fifth grade. 

I transfered to Villa de Chantal, a private girl's 
academy, after elementary school. 

One of the most important events of my life happened in 
i960 when my parents bought some property on a private lake 
in northern Wisconsin. When I was nine my parents and I went 
up to the lake so they could start building the cottage. My 
sisters were at the age where they would rather not leave 
civilization (and boys) to "rough it" in the back woods for 
three months. They stayed in Rock Island for the summer under 
the supervision of my Grandmother. 

I loved it up there from the first glimpse I caught of 
the sparRling blue water through the trees. The lake was a 
beautiful place for a child to learn about, and appreciate, 

Nature. Wildlife abound Deer would come clown to the building 

site at night when their curiosity got the better of them; 
Ducks and Loons would swim by the beach fromtj occasionally 
a Bear would amble by to see what was in the garbage, and at 



1 

I 

i 



night the wolves could be heard howling. There were only two 
other cottages on the lake, so neighbors were scarce. The 
nearest town is seven miles away. 

So, my summers were spent at the cottage, and when I was 
eleven my parents rented me a horse for the three months. It 
was a perfect place for harseback riding with many sand roads 
to explore. Each simmer we rented a horse, and I loved my 
summers of riding horses, swimming and enjoying Nature. 

I lived for the summers, but I enjoyed attending the 
Villa. The school was a Catholic one, under the supervision 
of an order of "Visitation" nuns. The nuns were not only our 
teachers, but also our friends. I benefited not only 
intellectually, but also emotionally by attending the school. 

My home life was happy too. I had become an only child, 
so-to-speak, when I was ten since my sisters had gone away to 
college. I missed them after they left, but I grew closer to 
my parents. My sister, Lynne, moved to Chicago after college 
to get a job, and in 196? both my sisters got married, when I 
was 14. I became an Aunt at age fifteen. 

I had alot of pets as a child, which I'm sure exasperated 
my mother. I can still remember her expression when I'd bring 
home another snake, lizard or mouse, but she was very patient. 

In 1968 my parents Dough t rr.e a beautiful Arabian nare, 
ana I finally hao trtax noise of my own I'd always dreamed about. 
In 19^9 I rode her in the "Rodeo QueenT contest in Hayward, 
Wis., which I won. 



-26- 



In June of 1970 I graduated from Villa de Chantal, and 
was accepted at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin. 

I met r.iy husband (Michael r'rancis) there, and we dated 
for two years. He graduated in May of 1972, and I withdrew 
from Carthage to marry him on October 7, 1972. 

We moved to Rockford, where i-.ike has a job as a teacher. 

My winters are spent going back to college part-time, 
and my summers are still spent enjoying the north woods of 
Wisconsin, where my husband and I now have property of our 
own. We camp on it in a tent during our summers, and my 
husband and Father built a screenhouse out of the trees we 
had cleared. We use this as our "dining and cooking area". 
(See pictures) We cook on a grill, carry our wateriin, and 
use a large size iee chest as our "refrigerator". Event- 
ually we intend to build our summer cottage there. 

That is my life in a nutshell. I found it hard to know 
just what to write, so I chose the events that are most 
special and important to me. 



FRENZ, DONETTE CAROL, 1956- 



• LEASE. USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 



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FAMI LY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name Tr-noHoni n\r rnv- l0 i m p^c^ Current Residence 



n * m , \ , S3 — r e Li 

I f dead, date of death 



, 



Place of bl rth -w^- qr . ; Tn - rir) - ^ Date of Bl rth - , ^ t A r ' 

Education (number of years): 
grade school 7; high school vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st - - - - Dates ' - 1 st r . : --- j - -. Dates 



2nd — — — — Dates 2nd " , " Dates y 

3rd 1 ^ Dates ^ , 1 3rd Dates 

frth Dates 4th Dates 

Re I I g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



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13' 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

8. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence --• : , ' 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth - M Date of birth ■ . ^ , ' - 

Education (number of years): 
grade school " high school ~ vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leavl ng home) 

1st Dates i ^ 1st , , DatesJ 

2nd Dates 2nd .Vise. Dates 1 ? 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates_ 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Re 1 1 g I on 



1 Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather . ... oaTE ~ T~ 

stepmother or another relative give 



M epgr andf ather (your father's side) 

« __________ Curront Residence 

1 ir.-i.l. .I.Mr of death 



Place nf birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
ijrode school high school vocational college 



.cupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
:>t Dates 1st Dates 



Dates 2nd D ates 

3 • d Dates 3rd D ates 

Mh Dates kth Dates 



R c I i g i on 



tlcal parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



FT ace of marriage to your grandmother""" " datt 

S tepgrandmother (your father's side) 

- * Current Residence 

l f dead , date of death 

ace of birth Date of birth 



i location (number of years): 
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(after leaving home) 
D ates 1st D ates 

l D ates 2nd D ates 

j <i D ates 3r d D ates 

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■' ace of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



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Name - Current Residence 

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Place of bl rth • • Date of birth ] : ' 

Education (number of years): 
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1 a t Dates 1st Dates 

2nd " D ates 2 nd D ates 

3rd D ates 3 rd D ates 

^th Dates 4th Dates 



Re I I g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



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give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

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Name C urrent Residence 

I f dead, date of 1 death 



Place of bi rth - D ate of bl rth 
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1st D ates 1st D ates 

2nd D ates 2 n d D ates 

3 r d D a t e s 3 r d D a t e s_ 

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Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



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Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another r«i»M... 77y 
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C-l j I epg randf a the r (your mother's side) 

N ' J,ne i— — Current Residence 

■ la, tlalr nt death 



I). tic of hill li 



I'l.lCI ..I I, Mil, 

i ilill il i'Hi ( 1 1 ■iiiilif r 1 1 T yi • i i , ) — — — — — — 

l » r ■•«>«• I lijyh school vocational a>llri|«> 



Octupiitlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

'•> l Dates 1st Dates 

?n(l Dates 2nd___ Dates 

Dates 3rd Dates 

'•t" Dates <Uh Dates 

"el i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother ' date 

D-? S tcpqr.indmother (your mother's side) 

N ' in * Current Residence 

I f dr.jd, 'i.jf <<f death — — — _ 



Pl.icc of h I r i h D ate Q f birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Dccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

' Dates 1st Dates 

z "d__ _Dates 2n d Dates 

' r<1 Dates 3 rd __ Dates 

•if.jl part/, c'vil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



' x ce 5 f ma r f I age to your grandfather Da te 



CH I kDR-N ot A & B ^or A- I or B- I ) 

.1 . „ .'-nn i,i i 



Name 



P 1 ace of birth 
Number of years of school Trig 
Residence y* nw 
Number of children 



-La. 



your father's name should appear below 

1 92^ 



T1 1 inn- 



Marital Status 



date 
Occupation 



1 



_ 



Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence .- ■-.bu rn, ' il f. c 



Number of children 



Marital Status 



elate ^ <■ , , 1 ; "7 
Occupation 



Ja. 



Hame furies .Tofrn Fyer.- 
P 1 ace of birth Mason Citv. Ii 



Number of years of" schooling 
Res I dence •■ c . v -p -> 
Number of chl Idren 



Marital Status 



date Oct. 
Occupation 



1 Q?9 



itor 



lurried 



Name '>.^--- 1" r ' u . 

P lace of bl rth n - o 



Number of years of school I ng 
Residence uburn. Wi; 



Occupation 



Number of chl Idren 



Marital Status CecT 



Name 

Place of birth ~ 
Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Number of chl Idren 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupation 



Name 

P I ace c>" bl rth 

Number of years of school Ing" 
Res I dence 



gate 
Occupation 



Number of children 



Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence " 

Number of ch I !dr«n 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupatloh 



Name 

Place of birth "* 
Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence " 

Number of chl Idren 



date 
Occupation 



Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of yea rs of' school I ng_ 
Res I dence 



Number of chl Idren 



Marital Status 



. date 
Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 
Res I dence 



Number o T t ill i U lBII 



"arital Status 



dace 
Occupation 



C- I btepgrandfather (your mother's side) 

Nome Current Residence 

I f <!<-.id. Halo of death 



I'I.h. ..i hit Hi I). iic ill' I > i fill 

I ill|< i I ion (niiiiil)i- r fif yr i I . ) 

;t ill- .(Inn. I liiijli school vocational col loyo 



dLtup.it Ion (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Dates 1st Dates 

?n,l Dates 2nd D ates 

•r : Dates 3rd Dates_ 

Dates *4th Dates 

°C I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



p ljc of marriage to your grandmother d ate 

D-? S t c()f|r.indmo the r (your mother's side) 

s.ime Current Residence 



I f (le.id. -l.-jf of death 



Pl.icc <>f hi nil Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school hi yh school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

. t Dates 1st Dates_ 

2nd _Dates 2nd Dates_ 

Jrd Dates 3rd Dates 

°r I i 'j i on 

• '../I uTrTy~, civil or soc T a 1 clubs, sororities, etc. 



D 1 ace o f r r ; age to your grandfather Date 



CHl.PR-N or fl 4 mor A-i or B- 1 j - your father's name should appear below 



I . Name 



- ->-■ , . • . 
Place ot bi rt'n 



— 



Number of years of "school Trig 

Residence , th , Marl tal Statu. 

Number of ch ITdren 



data y . 1 
Occupation 



i pvisor* 



2. 



Place of birth 



Number of years of school Ing 



Hate 



1 9-7 



Res I dence 
Number of children 



1 ■ Occupation " r " r " 

_Marital Status - 



3. Name 



I'ohn Frenz 



P I ace of birth - 
Number of years of" school Ing 
Res I dence "c-Vfoi 
Number of chl Idren 



date C 



'1? 



Lnoi. 



Marital Status 



Occupation 



he ade 







5. 



5. 



Name ■ ■ • • • - • 
Place of bi rth i'n 



T T t tl P. f 1 Pi 1 



Icr 



date 1 ' ' 

Occupation J 



Number of years of school lng__ Occupation 
Residence ^ . i : -, M arital Ttatus ar 'feTT 

Number of ch 1 1 dren 



Name 

Place of birth ~~ 
Number of years of schooling 
Res I dence 



Number of chl Idren 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupation 



Name 

Place ci bl rth 

Number of years of 1 school Ing 

Res I dence " 

Number of ch 1 1 dren 



Tate 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



Name_ 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Res I dence " 

Number of ch I ldr«n 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupation 



I. 



Name 

Place of bl rth *"" 
Number of years of school Ing 

Res I den ce " 

Number of chl Idren 



date 
Occupation 



Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence * 

Number of chl Idren 



Marital Status 



. date 
'Occupation 



Name 

Place' of birth 

Number of years of schooling 
Residence 

Number o f L lll 1 U > BI I 



dace 



Occupation 
nerital Status 



ilttLOKtN i > I (. and 0 (or f.-l, D-l)-your mother's name should oppe.ir below 



i i ,. ■•* i,r iii » i ll 

N> null*' i i|| /•• .1 r . 



IO(l I I fl(| 



M i ii'idr r ill i ren 



• 

" TTi fl J™ 

• J ,-.>i~, of school I nq 

e 

- f rh i 1 d ren 



i « 

' i jcv i.f fiTrTF 

i ■ >l yea r s of s chool i ng 

Hes i dencc 

N nbei "f children 



Nome i 

p i.. r !. ; r t K 



■< ill /ears or schooling 



Number < >\ < h i 1 dren 



- 



Nana- 

M,,(.r of l)i rlh 

H mbei of ye.irs of school 

kes i dence 



i nq 



N ■ <■ r ,)f child ren 

N.K « 

P I .ice of birth 



Numbei /ears of schooling 

Rr s i rlence 



■ if child ren 

None ■ 

v l ace of oirlh 



N'j"ihp' of /t*r~. of s choo 1 I ng 

Pe . i dence r • 



Mumbe f of chl Hren 



ilolo : ' 1 1926 



Occupation ,~ 

Marital Status 



Marl tal Status 



~ date _ ■ '.' °P , 1 ° "7 
Occupation i ' 



Marital Status 



date ie ''V'^'^ 1 1 1 °°° 
"Occupation " ' • ' 



Marital Status 



date •oy^mhe-r 1 0 . 1 °^ 
Occupa 1 1 on 



Marital Status 



date . M ,p.,,hpy 1 \ 
Occupation . ... t -. ; ~ 



Marltal Status 



date i: , h ^ 
Wccupat I On 



date 

Occupat Ion 



J - 



Marital Status 



P -i i» o'f b i r th ~ 
H'jmter of /ears of school ing 

A e •> i ■lence 



bee f ch I Mren 



p 1 ace of birth 

h i">o^ r of /ears' of s choo ling 

Be •. i den ce 



10. Na^ 

P 1 -»'.e of birth 



M.j'ntoer o' /ears of schooling 

Pesidence 

'«u-be r of C h ; I ^ ren 



_ date 

Occupat i On 



^ n t q 



Marl tal Status 



Har i tal Status 



date - 1 V 'V i 
Occupat I On , 



date 



, 19UI 



cupat I on 
RarTFal Status 



CHILDREN of C and D continued 



I. oris Jean Seibel 

Place of birth lubui " - ' Date 1 3, 

Number of years of schooling 1 ~ Occupation Far 

Residence Bloomer, "Tisconsin Marit; atus Married 

Number of Children ? 



Your Father 

Name ^ - Current Res I denc e? or >y f 0 v..- . " • • 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth — rp - u y t^-., 0 D ate of bl rth p r ; -, - 1 - 

Education (number of years) 1 ' 

grade school h i gh school u vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 



1st p 


Dates 




1st 




Dates 


1 ' ' " 










m .\ y Y 






2nd 


Dates 




2nd 




Dates 


1 . K - 


3rd 


Dates 




3rd 


T -Tn 1 p. nmh ° r ' /j.S f rf 


Dates 






Dates 




kth 


Rnp.Vfnrrl . Tllinols 


Dates 


1 



ne i i y i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother -n^p" V/ : M V^n kYr " '"" d ate- v iQf- 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the' back 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name ^ Current Residenc y or- .pro r Tl i i ]]ni p. 

If dead, date of death 

Place of birth i : h u ^-p . \H ^nnsin Date of birth ^ rivpr ,,v, A - r , -1 o 3 

Education (number of years) 

grade school ° high school .', vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 



1st 


Dates 


1 " 1 


1st Holr.omba. 'ij_s.c^ 


Dates 


19l|9-,g + - 


2nd 


Dates 


1 Q^n 


2nd Ror.kford. Illinois-. 


Dates 




3rd 


Dates 




3rd 


Dates 




Re 1 i g 1 on 












Political party, civil or 


socl al 


clubs , 


sororities, etc. 
















Place of marriage to your 


father 




1 r - r ~ ! WdO'i ? ^ r 


date- ov . 


1 1 1 1 Q 1 


NOTE: If you were raised 
this page (F-2). 


by a s 


tepmo :h 


er or another relative give that 


data on 


the' back of 



E- I Stcpf athc i 



Nane 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



_Dates 
Dates 
Oates 
Dates 



1 s t_ 
2nd_ 
_3rd_ 
4th 



Date of bi rth 



vocat i ona I 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



i*th 

Re 1 I g i on 

Pol 1 1 1 ca*f pflrt'i'es', civil t>? !82Ta7l clubs, fraternities, etc.^ 
Place of marriage to your mother 



Dates 

Dates_ 

Dates 



Date 



F-2 S tepmothe r 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of hi rth 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat i on (s ) 

1st 

2nd 



_Dates 
Dates 

Dates 



vocational 



1st, 
_2nd_ 
3rd 



Date of bl rth 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



3rd^ 

Re 1 i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 
ace of narriage to your 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



date 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



Name 



P 1 ace of b? rth 
Number of years of schoofl 



ng 



Res i dence 
Number of en I Idren 



Date of b i rth 
Occupat I on 



* 



Marital Status 



Name _ T ^ ^ - .... - ^ ren7 
Place of birth o_ ' I. 
Number of years of schooling 
Res i dence - • -.-,-.4 
Number of "chTTd" ren 



no; 



Date of birth 1_ 

Occupat i On 



19*6 



Marital Status ■ 



lerk 



lie l 



■~ .... 



Name - , - ■ 
P 1 ace of b 1 rth -> 
Number of years of School I ng_ 



Res i den ce - n -> - n n y C ~\ t 1 " i - n - 
Number of ch ! 1 dren none 



Date of bi rth , 1 

Occupation _ *"~ 



Marital Status 







Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of school I ng_ 
Res i dence 



Number of ch I 1 dren" 



Marital Status 



Date of b i rth 

Occupat Ion 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of schoot Ing 
Res i dence 



Number of children 



~b"ate of birth 

Occupation 



Marital Status 



Name 

P lace of b 1 rth 

Number of years of school I ng_ 
Res i dence 



Number of ch I 1 dren 



Marital Status 



D"a*te of bi rth__ 
Occupat I on 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~"~ 
Number of years of school Ing 
Res i dence 



Number of chi Idren 



bate of birth 

Occupat I on 



TTarital Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school 1 ng 
Res i dence 



Number of ch i I dren 



Marital Status 



Date of b i rth 
Occupat I on 



111. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

1 hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and admini strati vf 
rights/to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed 

Date 



t 



GENKALOGY CHART 



... 



ried 
d 



*.o vembe 



r 1 95< 



Father 

B 23, October 1 9-9 
Mlh, November 1953 

D 



Mother 



B ■ 



November 1 93" 
M V , 
D 



D2jad.Q2?icIc. John- FREW 
Great grandfather 



"■■ 



Grandfather 

B 1 6, January 1901 

M • , .T-.in^ 1 r ": 
D 



M 
D 



— — 



Grandmother 

B1 9, December 1 9 7 
D 



I: 



rt ou id FRAN 



Grandfather 

B 25, Way 19' 1 
M 1 9 j 1 ber 1 
D "7 . Novembe r 1 



Great grandmother 

B 25, January 1 87I4. 
D 

ha*l*s- - - - 

a 15, July 1883 

Ml)', February 1 C 7 
D 28, 4pril 1 95 p 



I i LCJ 

B .91 , October 1 886 
D 1 963 

. ■ nn, ,, [ 

B 1 Lf., June 1859 
M 30, March 1892 
D ? 6, March 1907 



Lillian. .KENYAN 

B 25, May 1 r ; : 
D 5 , \pril 1917 



Grandmother 

B15, September 19 5" 

D 



B , ' " "' " " 

Mir, February 19 
D ~ n . "arch 1917 



JiQfiiifi...Harie.t STUART. 

B5, March 1882 
D19, March 1965 



1 NTR0DTTCT7W 

The following Information T h^va obtained by -.'riflng 
letters to my grandparents and giving interviews. T ran 
into some difficulty as my grandparents did not remember 
a lot of the details. 

I have heard 3 lot about my family history, but I 
don't knoi«i if its true. Therefore I will not mention it 
in the bulk of this paper. However, I would like to 
mention one of the stories in this paper, because it 
sounds interesting to me. 

My Grandmother Prenz ' s maiden name is Hazel "rover. 
Her mother 0 -' maiden name was Helen Chapman. Helens' great 
great-grandfathers' brother was Johnny Chapman, alias 
Johnny ippleseed. \lbether or not this is true, It. has 
been passed down through the generations. 

also, my grandmother Prenz told me that her mother, 
Helen Chapman "rover did in fact trace our family history 
back to a man named Hopkins who signed the Declaration 
of Independence. 3ut, after sh^ died no one could find 
the family bible that contained all the information. 



FRFDFR'TCK FAR I I'/IT.H'RT-FJI PRSNZ 

Frederick John Fren?., my great-grandfather -;«*s born 
In 186]| in Hols tine , rmany. His wife, \ugusta Marie 
Bonschneider, was born in 1 p ?.' r in Porno ri us, Oerraany. 
They ^ct 1, ,.* ame --iv-'r to \merics on (-be mro ship. After 
landing in \meric?, they were married. 

Ti; starting their new life together, they bought a 
farr; in the county of Champaign in Broadland, Illinois. 
There, ir 19^1, my grandfather, Frederick Karl tiTilhelem 
Franz, wis born. Out of the nine kids, 5 boys and L|. 
girls, my grandfather was the fifth eldest. 

Fredoripk and Augusta had a fairly large farm in 
Illinois. Their house was big(Tt 'jar once a church, but 
someone had built it into a house), so the living quarters 
were never crowded . They were considered well -of .f in 
thai time as they always aid at least sixteen head of hors 
and about £00 acr»es of land. 

y-j grandfather went to little country school, °nd 
the only *port they played was a gar« similar to baseball 
(When you hit the ball, you had to run to one b< -.<: and 
then bacl; 4 o home again or you «ere out.) He rail school 
when he was in the eigth grade, and stayed ho- r. to help on 
the farro- 

Jhen my grandfather was thirteen years old, his par en 



sold their farm in T ' linois and moved noar Mason City, Iowa 
where the land was a 3 good, but cheaper*. There they also 
had a Large farm. Their new firm was one and a half miles 
from the county church. They were a vnry religious family 
and drove a wagon and team o.f horses to church every single 
Sunday. They also sent all the kids to Sunday school. 

Rach kid had special chores that he had to do. For 
instance, each hoy ha^l to take care of a four horse team 
plus feed and groom their own horse. Every moaning my 
grandfathers' Tat her would call all the boys down to 
work. He only called once however, if the hoys didn't 
come within five minutes they would hear their fathers 
footstep? coming up the stairs, and all go scrambling 
out the window. 

Swearing was as unforgivable sin in my grandfathers 
house. If any of the kids got caught swearing, they would 
not only get their mouth washed out. with soapj h>ut get it 
with the belt as well . 

Holidays were always looked forward to. On holidays 
either relatives would go to my grandfathers house, or 
my grandfathers family would go to one of the relatives. 
On the Fourth or Tuly, they would travel sixteen ^iles 
by horse and wagon to go to the Fourth of July celebration 

My grandfather continued to stay a 4- , his parents home 
and helo his iad vrifct the chores. In his f **e e I '-'«■', he 
would go on into town to visit v. is aunt and ancle. During 
that time, neighborhoods were quite small so everyone knew 



1 

the people who were in their neighborhood . Onr day while 
my grimdfahher wan over be bin uncle*, hi, wcl^ neighUr- 
hovl hari o g „t together. It. waa nt this ^« together that 
my grandfather met ry grnmbiothor, " T a : e ] nnr.de fit-over. 



•I 



This picture hras taken ten years ago, in r-'ason City, 
lowo. It s_ 3 a picture of my grandfather and his brothers 
and sisters. Thf 1 third mar frori the 3eft in my <*r another 
•t the time this was taken, they were all in Iowa for a 
Cx n< ral . 



Char] rT'ovfi" vis born on ruly V 3 , 1PP-3 in Oven town- 
ship, >r^o H-nrdc County, Town • Hif wife, Helen Orletta 
Chapman - - born in Chic on October ?1 , 1886. They vrera 
married on Febrmry 1.', , 1907 and nj grandmother , Hazel 
Maude (Trover, was born on December 1?, 1 9'' 7 . She has 
two younger sisters and one younger brother. 

V'j grandmother grew up in Rockford, Iowa. She went 
tc a rural school .ritb a total of fifteen or twenty kids 
in all. Her school had both a bays and girls basketball 
team. Ly grandmother wan in the chorus. 

Her family moved to Rockford, Iowa because her dad 
got polio and hac to be in town. While be was paralyzed, 
her mother took up practical nursing so that she could 
take care of bin. When be got over the paral i nation , 
they moved out into a farm just outside of town. 

While r.y grandmother was a child, her father worked in 
a meat packing pi art for twenty years . 'fte'" that ho went 
into iry cleaning. Y -■ didn't make much, hut enough to live 
on . 

Every once in a while they could afford to go to the 
movies. Co- of the first silent movies that •*■-• f.randriother 
went to <?f>e -r? rq.il<=>cl "The Shiek" starring Rudolph 
Valen tino . 



The children were puni ahed by both parents. My 
grandmothers father would usu the switch on the kid* , 
while U«r mother would make hhem nit: on o chair "i til the 
two kids who i^ere fighting kis3ed each other . 

Holidays uerfl special, but; they usually didn't go any 
:v. a^<» or have anyone over. Her noth^r would usually cook 
something speci il for the meals, but otherwise it was 
prel ty mxicb t.he same as always with Christ mas as an 
evception. On Christmas t.h** kids would get alot of present' 
They did not b^ve t.o do any chores. On Christmas Day they 
would rt ide into town to church. 

My grandmother graduated from the eigth grade and 
continued through the tenth grade. She had been sick in 
her sophmore year so in order to .graduate from tenth grade 
she had to go to Mason City t.o take an examination. 
Vbile she was there, she met my grandfather at a neighbor- 
hood get together. 



\ 




?! 



i 



THFIR 7 TP!' 1 TOOTCTTT'FR 

After my ^rnnd parents were married, they lived qt my 
grandf iVni'T'' dads r mi . They ran his farm for a couple 
years qrJ then derided t.o move into F-'ason f!ity. My 
grandfather ^ot a job at n sugar mill making fifty cents 
an hour . 

Tn 1 r? 5» my Aunt Marian was been, "oon fo] lowing in 
1927 my Aunt Helen was born. My d?;i, Charier John, was 
born in and five years later his youngest sister, 

Ruthie, war', born. 

In 1 c - ?9 my grandfather quit his job at the sugar mill 
and went to work at a junkyard for twelve dollars a week. 
When Ruthie was born in 1 93U he get a raise to twenty-five 
dollars a week. He would get paid partly in cash and the 
other part in "beck. 

Ml of their children were born in "iron Oity, low 0 
and my fire at-grandmoth-er we c the midwife. '"he pregnant 
womar d id not have any maternity clothes and usually had 
to wear co] bl e^ aprons. 

Phey got .their first, radio when fle isn was about fcwo 
years old It had seoerate speaker > and looked like a 
big tin bov. My grandfather bought it in a jewwlry shop. 
(Trie radio «i *> electric) Whan they were married in 1929 
my grandfather already had a car. 



One year my grandfathers urifel ' .from 'tfiscbnain, cane bo 
visii him. He wanted to a ell his farm Land for* o cheap 
pries to :'.y grandfather. A -r the time my grandfathers 
nlcar had been bothering him,. so ho decided to buy it. 
They moved to New \uburn, Vis cons in in 1 when my dad was 
el even ye irs r«3 d . 

Tn "Wisconsin my grandparents farmed, For a side job 
my grandfather again went to work at a junk yard. In 
195^ my grandmother '.ocw a housekeeper for some people 
who live in Chicago. They had a cottage up near New Auburn 
and would live up there every summer. During the summer, 
my grandmother would cook the meals, elean the house, and 
wash the cloth*";. 

Today, my grandparents are both stil 1 very much alive. 
My grandmother knits «*- crochets constantly. My grandfather 
no longer farms, but has a anal 1 garden for himself. He 
still sn^n li a couple hours a day working at the junkyard 
just for something to do. 

Just this last summer, we had a party ♦'or my grandpare 
because it. was their fi ftieth anniversary. Relatives from 
Iowa came that I didn't even know I hah 



It. 

This is a picture of my frrand parents taken about 
twelve years ago. It was taken out in their yard. 
They havtj lived in New Auburn, Wisconsin for the past 
thlrty-threo y«ars . 



II 



TRA GOULD PRANK 

p e t Joseph Frank was born on June 11;, 1859 in 
Buffalo, "V ; York. He was married on March It, 189? to 
Lillian Kenyan. Lillian was born on May ?$, 1 863 ir. 
Dekalb, Illinois. On Kay 1 Q ' ! ? my grandfather was born. 

'■Jhen if? was born his parents lived in Chippewa 
Falls, Wis '.onsin. : Ti f father, Peter, was a painter and 
paper hangar. Ira had two sisters and a brother: Caroline 
and tfillie were older thin Ira, and Lillian was younger. 

I ill Lin liked the country, so Peter agreed to move 
out to the country. But it was hard living out in the 
country because they had no running water and lived in 
a small log cabin. So for a couple of years they moved 
back and forth from the city to the country, depending on 
the time of year. 

Five years after Ira was born, in March of 1907, his 
father died. He was killed in a explosion in a log camp. 
Therefore, Lillian disiplined the ch il j^v! , usually by 
means of o switch. The family was poor, especially with 
Peter gone. I i 1 1 * an ^ot ~ insurance becavse of the 
mine blowing up, but it didn't last ver»y long. she- be- 

gan workin; by doing odd jobs around fcown, like housecleaning 
sewing, v ' ~ ': 'y"i '.ting, etc . . 

Irr* familv was uot verv religious, but politics were 



ve ry Important, rater Prank was r strong Reptibl loan; 
Mid coma election, he' always voted. 

In v n l: ho n public c chool In f.own. Tie ouj t school, 
though, before ha ;v> h through wJ I'.h the « i gth grade, and got 
i job at i farm near by. <Jh 1 lo going to school, enter- 
tainment consisted of school plays, football games, and 
school picnics. \t home everyone would .~it, around the 
:>rgan while Lillian played. Or special occasions, Lillian 
would take the kids to a silent movie, but this was very 
rare indeed. One of the major events '.jar. the Chippewa 
State County Fair, which is still a yearly event. Everyone 
in the family would try to enter something of their" ■into 
the exhibits. 

Though he emit school after the seventh grade, he 
read a lot . Like his father, Ira knew alot about politics 
and kept up to date on them. As he became older, Ira war. 
considered a very smart man. 

On Vpril. £, 1917, just before Tra turned fifteen, his 
mother died. Thar he moved in with his sister, Caroline, 
who lived in T\*ei<; /Vuburn, '/isconsin. He got a job in a 
nearby town called Bloomer at a pea factory. \fhile 
working ir. Ploomer he met David Netoalf. ITiey became good 
friends. On weekends they would go hunting and fishing 
up near David's hone. T'y grandmother, Trens Matoa^f, was 
David's sister, so when David brought Tra to his borne he 
mel my r 'arjHmo J 'he vi . 



This is a picture of Poter Frank, tujn firea^-Grandf ath 
p othar person in ' h<> pi r turn i ' Charley Prank, my 
andfnfchers stepbrother. Th.> picture wns t niton about 
phty year-? npo. 



•2 



L 




My Oreat-£,reat -great-granrtf ather , Dexter H r - tea] f , 
born' Ln 1 '*^5 ant ^ hi wife Rlisa Clark came from Brandon, 
^Ingl and and with a couple other families came ac cross 
the 'ountry in r covered wagon. They settled in 
Wisconsin and named the town Brandon after their hom<=> 
town in England. Dexter was a very talented man; he 
taught school, was in artist, and also a musician. Defter 
died in 1°3ir i>ci tuberculosis. 




v 



15- 



1 1* 



Oh <\u;;h;U ) ( , 1 0 6 9 E 3 ward Mo€o-?lf was bom. He was my 
grandmothers father . (Between Dexter Metcalf and Edward 
Mehcalf there ia s lost generation. T coul ln'fc find 'heir 
n9M'"!s or any dates). 

Both William Stuart and Elizabeth f'rofin were born in 
Ripor. Wisconsin near Brandon. William wan born on June 1|, 
1856 On March 5, 188? Elizabeth £ave birth to -a girl, 
^hoeb* Hariet Stuart, my Great-grandmother. Phoebe was the 
olde3t daughter and went to work in Brandon for the Metcalfe. 
That is whf rr she met my Great-grandfather, Edward Metcalf. 
They were married on February [(., 1900. 

My grandmother, Irene Laverne Metcalf, wan born on 
September 15, 1 9' '5 in Brandon, Wisconsin. Edward Metcalf 
had TP quite young and the doctor recommended them to move 
farther north for his health. To they happened to move 
to New Auburn, Wise onsin. Edward was a painter and plumber 
when they lived in Brandon. A.fter they moved up north, 
with the "hoep" of neighbors they built a lor cabin and 
thats where my grandmother spent, most of her childhood,. 
Edward passed away on March ?8, 1 91 7 when h« was only 
forty-eirht years o" 1 d . 



Here is a picture 
of the log cabin 
that they fins'', 
bui 1 t when they 
came from Brandon. 




Thort» wish 1 t a school up in that country when hhey 
piovfH up there from Rrandon so they went '. .» sohoo] for* i 
short, time in a n« ! ghhors hom»> . (Just until the school 
was built.) There were only fiv< or sin pupils in the whole 
school for quite :x fen years, wit}; my grandmother being the 
only gir] • TherH was no nhurch. The mininster used to 
come to fclie school house and have services. Later every- 
one got together and built the Hi gh Banks Church. 

My grandmother had four brothers and two sisters . 
Cne of her brothers iied when he was ten months old and one 
of her sisters died when she was eight months old. They 
both died of T n . Her two oldest brothers both had TR of 
the bone and have undergone various operations to remove 
some bones . 

They used to have a Tot of dances at the homes, when . 
she was a kid, other than school picnics once a year. On 
holidays relatives usually cmae to their houses. .Sometimes 
her- brothers would bring some of their freinds home with 
them. It was through he" brother, David, that my grand- 
mother met my grandfather, Ira Prank. 



1 &j 



(i'ahuu-t 



12* 



- ._...:>IV. 



This is i picture -»f Edward Me tea If, ,-ny i^^t 
grandfather. The woman standing with hi > j. 5 h ( v 
r. i ^ t e r . 





m 



'.A . 



I 
r 



MS v. * 




_jubR 1 _ ..... 

Cj oil Joaik ixo-t |uu>f nliacL 

Oou /uniiumi. lory 
n ft 



itJxo-ui. 



J)iAnru^iJx- |o*r, iJ-vt <icuj o 

Slojr^X -jot. jbkn luaix. 
(^uict ^yi the. i-xuxLi . 

' U ruL.j.inij iovj;.- . . . 



This pi'ctu're was 
taken in abouirt 
1963. Thia is a 
picture of my 
Ore at -grandmother 
Met calf. 



MRS. PHOEBE METCALF 

Bom March 5, 1882 
Ripon, Wisconsin 

Died March 19, 1965 
Town of Sampson 

"Services at the Island Lake 
Church of Christ 
Island Lake, Wisconsin 

Tuesday, March 23, 1965 
2 o'clock 

Rev. Gene Taplin, Officiating 
Singers : 

Rev. and Mrs. Gene Taplin 
Pianist: Mrs. Gene Taplin 
Hymns: "Good Night and Good 
Morning" and "Sometime We'll 
Understand" 

Pallbearers — Grandsons 
Eldon Metcalf 
Edwin Metcalf 

Keith Gunn 
Wayne Frank 
Robert Metcalf 
Dennis Metcalf 

Buried in Island Lake Cemetery 
Island Lake, Wisconsin 

Funeral Director — N. E. Rock 



THEIR LIFE rOGETHER 

On December 19, 1 9T ; Tra Gould Prank and Irene Laverne 
Ketcalf verr married. They lived with my gre at -grandmother, 
Phoebe Metr si f , until thro' r first two children Mere born, 
•"hon, they bought a piece of land of their own and put up 
a lop cabin.- T- T o *" everyone up in that country lived in 
log houses. My grandfather and grandmother cut the logs 
themselves and put up moat of the house themselves, all 
but the roof, which my grandmother was afraid to climb as 
she was expecting another baby. They lived there for about 
seventeen years or- more before they moved to a ] arger 
farm. 3y the time they moved to the larger farm, my 
grandmother had had eleven kids, (as of today they are all 
still living) . . 

Grandpa Frank worked out as a machinist, he also served 
on town boards, school boards, and farmed. They were an 
average family, for- the community in which they lived, and 
the money was used to buy their home and pay living e»> nses 
The family decisions were decided on by both grandparents. 
Gramon disciplined the kids more than my grandma did as 
she was more easy going 

The nearest town was New Auburn, which was about 
fourteen miles away. They had a little neighborhood store 
where they got most of their groceries. There was no 



£0 



doctor in I^ew Auburn f the nearest; one wjim j n Rloornor acme 
t tax&y tni Los away . 

My grand P« thor Prank died of -\ heart; -it. back pn 
November 1 95^ on Thanksgiving Day. 




He maketh me to lie down in 
green pastures: He leadeth me 
beside the still waters. 

He restoreth my soul. He leadeth 
me in the paths of righteousness 
for his name's sake. 

Yea, though I walk through the 
valley of the shadow of death, I 
will fear no evil: for thou art 
with me: thy rod and thy ataff 
they comfort me. 

Thou preparest a table before me 
in the presence of mine enemies 
thou anointest my head with oil: 
my cup runneth over: 

Surely goodness and mercy shall 
follow me all the days of my life 
and I will dwell in the house of 
the Lord for ever. 




Passed Away in Town of Sampson 
November 27, 1958 

Services at Church of Christ 
Island Lake, Wisconsin 
November 29, 1958 
2 o'clock 

Pastor Gene Taplin, Officiating 
Hymns: "Softy and Tenderly" and 
"Beyond the Sunset" 
Pianist: Mrs. Gene Taplin 
Soloist: Mrs. Max St. John 

Pallbearers 
Edmund Skaw 
Glen Mattson 
Rodney North 
Charles Muench 
Stanley Richardson 
Herman Brandstatter 

Final Resting Place 
Island Lake Cemetery 
Island Lake, Wisconsin 

Funeral Director — N. E. Rock 



i 




This is a picture of my grandfather 
on the day that they were married. 
Th-= picture was taken in front of 
my grandmothers childhood home. 




This is a n'ictxire of th<? 
log i-abin that my grand- 
parenta built. This was 
t~hoir fir>3t home. 




Paring the winter my 
^r and Pa bher sold f i re - 
wood to earn some e^tra 
money. 



OHWITiBS JOHN FHPNZ 

My rind, Charles John Fron?., '.-is born on October ?3, 
1 ??9 in I-: us on f\> ! y, Iowa. At the time lie was born my 
grandparents lived In Mason City. r rior to that time they 
had been running; i farm outside of town. When he was four 
or five they moved to Centra 1 Heights, about two miles 
outside of Mason City. Ele began school there at the 
Central Heights Grade School. While living in Central 
Heights both sets of grandparents lived within three blocks 
and three uncles had farms within three miles away. 

'/hen he was eleven years old, his family moved to New 
auburn, Wisconsin. \t that time he was in the sisth grade. 
He went to school at Long Lake Consolidated School. Ifter 
they moved to Hew 'nburr., they farmed my dad's great Uncles 
land because "ill they had was one hundred and sixty acres 
of timber. One summer my did made maple syrup and cut 
fsnc° posts for a job. 

Ho went to high school at New Auburn High School for 
two years ind then was sent to "hetek High School for 
two years. He played on the fort I all team for both schools 
After he graduated from high school, he went to '-'ork for a 
guy at a farm for about one and a half years. Phen in 1 
he joined the service. He got out in 1 05° and right after 
he got his discharge, h° met ny mother, ftrdis Prank. 



CHARLES JOHN FHF.NZ 

My d id, Charles John Frtin?., was horn on October ?3, 
19?9 in Ivuson City, Tom,-:. At the time he was born :ay 
grandparents lived in Kqgnn City. P rior to that time, they 
hid been running i farm outside of town, './hen he was four 
or five they moved to Centra 1 Heights, about two miles 
outside of Mason city. He began school there at the 
Central Heights Grade School. While living in Central 
Heights both sets of grandparents lived within three blocks 
and three uncles had farms within three miles away. 

'/hen he was eleven years old, his family moved to New 
Auburn, Wisconsin. \t that time he was in the sisth grade. 
He went to school it Long bike Consolidated School. After 
they moved to Hew Unburn, they farmed my dad's great Uncles 
land bee luse all they hid was one hundred and sixty acres 
of timber. One summer my dad made maple syrup and cut 
fenc° posts for a job. 

Ho went to h.igh --chool at Hew luburn High School for 
two years *nd then was sent to Chetek High School 1 fen 
two years. He played on the .football team for both schools 
After he graduated from high school, he went to ;, ci-H for a 
guy at a farm for about one and a half years. Phen in 191}.? 
he joined the service. He get out in 1 05° an J right after 
he got £is discharge, he met ny mother, krdis Prank. 




This is fi picture-! of my dad 
when he was eleven years old. 
This wis tnken in front of 

their house when they first 
moved to New Auburn, 'Wisconsin 



This is a picture of one of the 
houses my dad lived in. 



5? " 



3H 



Or, November IP, 1 93'" in the Town of Sampson, New Auburn, 
Wisconsin, Ardis Leone Prank was born. She was born in a 
lop carl' 1 with four rooms downstuirs end two rooms up in 
the attic. 

She started* school at six years old and went to a small 
one room country school. It was two and a half miles to 
school from her- house and all the kids had to walk to school. 
When she was in the first grade, my mother stayed with her 
Grandmother Metcalf because it was closer to school. She 
would cone home everyweekend and stay with hpr grandma all 
week. There were only four other ;.eople that graduated with 
her from the eigth grade. 

She went to New Auburn High School . '"he high school 
consisted of three class rooms, one assembly room and a 
separated building for Shop and Home Economics. The students 
weren't given the opportunity to choose any of their elases 
an" 1 girls ere not allowed to have gymnastics, There .'ere 
games and dances at school, but my mother M dr. ' t gc very 
often because it was fourteen rnile^ to school and the only 
'jay .she eoi^d get home ^as by x e school bus. VJben she 
graduated from high school there '.'ere only nineteen in her 
scr adi i a t ■? n class. 



Pho older kids had »..- help frith the r.hores in the b«irn 
My mother usually worked in t-b«> houso. t'.ho worked 1n the 
garder In the summer, Hi the diahen, ar.d cashed and troned 
clothes* Hp- mother made all or bhe kids' eT others. Her 
father so] 1 milk, trapped i.n the winter, mad panned minnows 
ir. the summer bo earn •-• >■ ♦ r<-. money. But, even with this so 
called 'otra money' the family was poor. My mother didn't 
get her first boughten coat until =\he was a freshman in 
high sch •>ol then her sister bought 5 t for her for a 

Christmas >ro sent . 

Right after graduation my mother got a job in Ho] combe 
Wisconsin as n li^e in housekeeper. She was a housekeeper 
for about eight months, them she got a job as a book keeper' 
in a cheese factory. While she worked there she stayed 
with her older sister. The rheesef actory went out of 
business after 9 year, so ray mom went to work at the 
He 1 combe Post Office. She was working there ••.•hen she met 
my dad at a dance. 



'while the mother of the groom | 
wore a navy blue suit dress with < 
navy accessories. The bride's ' 
grandmother wore a navy dress . 
with matching accessories. Car- • 
nattion corsages complimented ' 
their costumes. ' 

Immediately following the cere- > 
mony, a receptin was served in 
f church basement for "5 

t ; *i guests. A three tiered wedding 

\VhDDl>JUa I jcake. topped with miniature bride 

■ ■ "Ar 1 and groom, which was baked by 

FRANK — FRENZ j the groom's sister. Mrs. Bryce 

St. John's Lutheran Church at Hokins, centered the bridal table. 
Cornell was the setting for a Mrs. Duane Frank served the 
very pretty ceremony when Miss wedding cake and tool: care or 
i Ardis Frank, daughter of Mr. the guest book, 
and Mrs. Ira Frank of New Aub-! A pre - n uptial shower was giv- 
urn and Charles Frenz, son of, en by Janice Metcalf and Mrs. 
Mr.' and Mrs. Fred Frenz of New Erro i Huhn at Reynolds Resort 
Auburn pronounced their marri- for their many friends and rela- 
| age vows at 2 p. m. in a double tives. 
! ring- ceremony performer by Rev. ( - 

'. t, °, ~ \^ v Prpn7 ., A wedding dance was held in 

E. E. Frenzlow. Mrs. L. i^. rrenz-, => -d^,,;! 

, „. t or ,j n ,,,._ the evening at Salisbury Pavil- 

low was the organist and uvven ° 

Prenzlow was the soloist. | l0n ' 

The bride was beautiful as she After a brief honeymoon, the 

walked up the aisle on the arm couple will ur.ake their home in 

of her uncle. Harojd Metcalf. Holcombe, where they are em- 

who -ave her in marriage. Her ployed. The bride has worker at 

floor Tengtth gown was styled of tthe Holcombe postoffice for the 

chantilly" lace and nylon tulle, past three years. 

It featured a basque bodice of 

lace, buttoned to below the waist 

with satin buttons, long sleeves 

which ended in points over the 

hands and a high neckline. The 

hack featured tiers of ruffles. 

She completed her costume with 

a fingertip veil edged n'A'n la^e; 

held in place with a tiara of seed 

pearls. She wore a three strand 

pearl necklace, and matching 

earrings. As a gift of the groom 

she carried a lavender orchid on 

a white Bible, from which hung 

streamers with love knots and 

chrysanthemums. 

• The bride chose as her only 
attendant, her cousin, Janice 
Metcalf. who wore a turquoise | 
floor length strapless gown of| 
taffeta and lace with a bouffai.tj 
net overskirt. She wore a match- 
ing lace bolero and gauntlets. 
Her headpiece consisted of a' 
shoulder length veil which hung 
from a lace tiara. The brides gift 
to her attendant was d threj 
strand pearl necklace, bracelet 
and earrings. She carried a nose- 
gay bouquet of white chrysanthe-i 
mums and pink carnations. t 
Little Kay Hopkins. thel 
groom's niece, acted as flowerl 
girl. She wore a white satin I 
floor length gown with bouffant I 
I net overskirt and short puffed 
sleeves. She carried a small nose-,' 
I gay bouquet, similar to that of' 
the maid of honor. Her gift from! 
the bride was a pearl necklace] 
and bracelet. 

, The groom chose as h.'s at-j 
tendant. the bride's brother 
I Duane Frank. The men were at-; 
tired in conventional business 
suits. Errol Huhn and Brvce Hop- 
kins, brother-in-law of the cou- 
ple, served as ushers. All wore! 
carnation bountonnieres. The 
groom gave personal gifts to his! 
attendants. J 
'The bride's mother witnessed 
the ceremony in a turquoise crepe ' 
dress with black accessories. 



The World of Tomorrow is in tin. Hinds of the Children of Today 



m & 



.Jr 

j ~^ 

WISCONSIN 
STATE EOARD 
OF HEALTH 
MADISON 



Certificate nf lirth J&mstrattmt 



SItta tii In Certify that a registered certificate of the birth 
of your child his been filed and is now carefully preserved 
in the Official Records of the State of Wisconsin in the 
State Board of Health office at Madison. 

Name . . J-^r?va, _ _ ^J^^Jii- 

Maiden Name o 

Birth Place nf Child -P^r4!*jL^ 

Date of Birth -„rttL^t)-/-0- 

C. A. HARPER, 

Preserve THIS RECORD State Registrar of Vital Statistics 



PHETR 1 TP]'! TOGETHER 



V/hon my parents met, at a local dance, my dad had 
just got his discharge from the navy. They went together 
for i year then on November 1953* in Cornell, Wiscon 

sin my parents. Charles John Frenz and Ardis T.«one Frank; 
were married. They didn't, an on a honeymoon because 
they couldn't if ford it. 



married, my dad was working on the road, but he was layed 
off because of the time of the year. So when they were 
first married, he wan drawing unemployment. 

In August of 195^1 he came to Rockford, Illinois :to 
find a job. He vras hired at Menasha Woodenware . Two 
months later he sent for my mom to join him. 

The r. in March of 1955 ir y mother gave birth to a 
baby girl. They nanie'd hr-r Olenda Irene Prenz . When 
G 1 end a was born they moved to i house in Loves Park. 
Tn November o p 1 r 5*S on their anniversary, my mother had 
another baby, me. She n^med her Donette Parol 1?v, r.r:/ 
V/ith two kids, bhey decided to move again, and moved to 
a larger home in Cherry Vally. My parents had both 
been brought up in the county, so city life was not very 
pleasant, .b in 1957 they moved cut in the country. 




GANSENV DANIEL EDWARD/ 1951- 



KE'AS E TYPE: PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAM I L.Y II I STORY . 



Dear Con I r ib u to r to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can bo made more useful to historians and 
others studying American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
below. This will take you only a few minutes, and will be easily made over 
Into an Index which will permit archive users ready access to just those 
kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY Office Use Code 

1. Your name Daniel E. gansej (ID f ) 
Date of f orm March 26 1976 - 

(ID //_ . ) 

2. Your col Lege: Roc k Valley Col lege 

R o c k f o r d , 1 1 1 i no i s 

J. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 

Before 175 0 1750-180 0 1800-185 0 



18 5 0-1900 1900 or later 



Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

New England (Mas s . , Co nn . , R . r . ) M i d d 1 e Atlantic (N.Y. , P e n na . , N . .1 . 

Va.) South Atlantic (Ga. , F 1 a . , N . C . , S . C . ) East South Central 

( La . , Mis s . , A 1 a . , Tenn , Ky . ) West South Central (Ark. , N . M . , T e x . ,0k. ) 

E a s t North Central (Mich. ,0hio,lnd.) P a c i f i c ( C a 1 . , Wa s h . ) 

_(Hawail , Alaska) (111., Wise.,) 

Please check a 1. 1 occupational categories In which members o I your 
rami I y whom you have discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

Gas St' ti n 

X Farming Mining Shopkeeping or small busines 

Transportation _Big Business Manufacturing 

Professions Industrial Labor Other 

Please check al 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 

Roman Catholic Jewish Presbyterian Methodist 

Baptist Episcopalian Congregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon X Other Protestant Other (name) 



7. What ethnic and social groups arc discussed in your paper' 
Swedish v Other Scandinavian X German French 



Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans Eastern Eur< 



X Trish British Native Americans over several generation 



East Asian Other (Name) 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

^Interviews with other Family Bibles Family Genealogies 

family members _Land Records __The U.S. Census 

Vital Records 



Photographs Maps _0ther 



F AM I l,Y DATA 



Grandfather (your father's sid e ) 



Name Willis m G-ansen 



Current Residence 



Date of birth Feb, 19 lo9 9 Place of birth Brnkston 



Date of death Feb, 16 197 3 Place of burial fri ew luellary 

Educa tion (numbe r of years); 
grade school X high school 



X vocational 



col lege 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



4 th 



Dates 
Dates 
Da tes 
Dates 



2nd 
3rd 
4 th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
U a t e s 
Dates 



Re 1 i g i o n Catholj_ c 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. J^qjk 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother St. Anthon y , S date Oct, 4 1Q?1 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Marie Margaret Current Residence ._ 



Date of birth April 9 1900 Place of birth Bankston 
Date of death Oct, 25 1970 Place of burial New Mfilla-py 



Kducation (number f years): 

grade school 

college 



high school 3t; ' rt but National 



Occupation (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



1 s t 
2nd 

3 r d 

4 th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Date s 
D a t e s 
D a t c s 



Religion Catholic 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. ^one 



I' 1 a c e 



NOT E 



A- 2 Step^randfather (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 

D a t e of birth Place of birth 



D ate of death P lace of burial 



Education (number of years) 

ie school high school vocational 

Cw 1 lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
Dation(s) (after leaving home) 

Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Da tes 

?id Dates 3rd Dates 

4 th Dates 4th Dates 

Religion 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

• of marriage to your grandmother date 

B-2 S t e pgr andrao th e r (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 

Date of birth Place of birth 



Dateofdeath Placeofburial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school vocational 

col lege 



ipation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Da tes 1st Dates 



2nd_ Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd D a t e a 3 r d D a t e s 

'«th _ Dates 4th Dates 

Re 11 g ion 

! 1 t 1 f -i 1 party, < i v I 1 or social clubs, sororities, etc . 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 



4 



N a m e Th nmas D f>1 arm y Current Residence 



Date of birth_M axc j] x4> jJ&q . Place of b i r t h _ Lamot^ Iowa 

Date of death REpt , ?tt , 1966 Pla « of buri ^ Key-V,^-!^ 

Education (number of years): 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 



4 th Da tes 4 th_ Da t 

R e 1 i g i on___Q a thQlic 



e s 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc: 



P'ace of marriage to your grandmother St. A nthoney ' s date Fefo 8 , 19 16 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepfather or another relative (tu 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name fll^oh" Tfringle Current Residence 

Date of birth 2 6 1895 Place of birth Tj lizabgtfa — . — 

Date of death July 27 1963 Place of burial Key Wes t, Iowa 

Education (nu mb er of years) 

grade school ^ high school ^ vocational college 

Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

( a Iter Le a v i n g h orae ; 

1". xfctgmnb, HaLm^te* lst - - ,)alL>s 

7 n d Hous ewif e, Mother Dates _ _2nd Dales 

3rd _Dates 3rd Dates 

4th Dates 4th Dates 

Rel igion Catholi c 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather St. Anth on ey 'a Date gg-^ ^ 1916 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to 



H I 



gftve that d-ata on the back of this page (D-2) 



S t ep gr andf a th e r (your mother's side) 

Current Residence 

Date of birth Place of birth 



death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school vocational college 



lccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Da t e s 2nd Da t e s 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4 th Dates 4 th Da t es 

Re 1 i g io n 

olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother Date- 
Step g r a n dmo t h e r (your mother's side) 



Current Residence 



of birth Place of birth 



of death Placeofburial 



Education (number of years) 

sclioo 1 _h lgh school vocational _ <• <> I 1 e ge 

pat J n(s) PLACE OF RES I DENC E 

(after leaving home) 
Dates 1st Dates 



Dates 2nd Da tes 

Dates 3rd Dates 

• ' r Dates 4 th Dntes_ 



party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



■ ar rl age to your grandfather Date 



- your father's name should appear below 



Name -rp. rn- r,i Arisen 
Place of birt h pep, tr 



I o w a. 



d a t e 



Number of years of schooling" 
Residenc e Zwingle M arital Status 
Number of children 7 _ Death 



it. 1W22 

0 c c u p a t io n_jpp rmer 



of birth PeQ.it :, . Towa 



N a me 
I' 1 a c 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i de n c e n^snsdp, Tnwn Ma r i t a 1 Status 

N uinb e r of children 



date May 25 T 3.924 

12 Occupation Farmers [±£e 

X 



Death aftpt. k2 t 1M73 



Cyril 



Gap Ren 



Peo.stR , Io wa 



Nai 

l 1 lace o"f birth 

Number of years of schooling 
Res i d e n c e p P0Q + g ^ j own Ma r i t a 1 S t a t us_ 
Number of children Death 



02. 



date , 1l]1y n. 1£2£> 



Occupa tion 
-X- 



Fn nner 



G-aji&ea— 



N a 111 e 

P 1 a c ' oT bl r t h "j^os ta> lQya 
Number ot years ol schooling 
Residence 



Number of children 



d ;1 1 (! _ Jan- r -2-^-, -19 28- 

— 0c r 11 P ;l 1 1 0 11 Factory- -W-orker 

Marital Status 

dea th 



Name _Frrncis Gpnsen 

'lace of birth p eos ta, Ipwa 



Number ot years 

R e side n c c X'ubu oue , I owa 
Number of children 



c u a 0 : ■ ? — iuna 

of school in g_ 

Ma r i t a 1 Status 



date 



1930 — 

occupa 1 ionj acto ^ Worker 

Y 



.6 



Name 



Place of birt h p p n g t c 
Number of years of school in; 



-low 



X- 

Dea th 

date 



Residence Du bun ue , Iowa 
Number of children 



M arital Status 

c d eat h 



Occupa tion_ flettM ^ 
X 



Name William Gansen 

P 1 a ce of birth PeosTs , Iowa d ate 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence Peosta, Iowa Marital 

Number of children 5~ death 



0 ccupatio nFactory W orker 

S t a t u s X 



Name M 1 ry Lou lUcFncMin 

Place of birth Pfeost a, Iowa date 

Number of years of school ing_ 12 

'Vest Dubuque 



Residence 

Number o 1 children 



M arital Status 

3 death 



Occupat L o n_beauti ciaii 

" X 



Name Shirle y Eppler 
Place of birth Pe ostn , I owa 
Number ol years of schooling 



Residence D ubuque , Iowa 
N umb e r of children 



d a t e 

12 

Marital S t a t u s 
5 death 



Occupat ion 
X 



Housewife end Mother 



Nam e 

P 1 a c e of b ir th _d 

Number of years ol schooling 
Residence^ Ma r i I a 

N u 111b e r o I c h i 1 d r v 11 



Occupat ion 



S t a t 11 h 

dea I h 



7 

CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 



N a ■ e 



Place of birth Lamott 



Number of years of schooling 

Res idence To.'.- Citv Mar i t a 1 

Number of children 



^date March 1 7. 1916 
b 0 ccupation 



Status 
death 



Name 5d-.v-.-ri j. ?elar.ey 
P I .! ce of b i r t h Lamott 



Number of years of schoollng_ 

Residence Pnvhn Neti. Marital Status 

Number of children death 



date Feb. 24. l^lM 
IS 0 ccupation_ 



Name 



Place of birth 



T.f-r- T . ")Pl 'nipy 



TiBtnnt.t. 



d ate 

Number of years of schooling ]_r] 

Residence Hp-jsr '-v r- p i ri s Marital Status 

Number of childre n 4 



T u l y , -7 , 19X0 



death 



Occupation p nr -k Supar in t end en 
X 



Name ^nr--: ; . M ■ >- .-y 
Place of birth T.-^ott. 



.dat e Aug;. 1^1 



Number of years of schooling 

;.. R p. j P | j nwa M arital Status 



Number of children 



death 



Occupatio n ynrniRr 
X 



Name r 'hfi-.:.s ■!, TiPlpnpy 

Place of birth ], •■ dt.t, 

Number of years of schooling_ 

Residence ■■, T .y,,->rth , Toiv" 

Number of children A 



date M ., y j 0 t icj?? 



_12_ 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation^ 

-X 



ioxi- i£.oreni 



Place of birth -;..-it.r, 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence rain;uf-: , Joy-fa Marital Status 
Number of children q death_ 



__ d a t e ont .. 3 0 , 19 ?4 

12 Occupation carpenter 

JL 



Name K>rrf-t,ri ^i^hnrfi 

Place of birth ^. .. *^ 



date April 19 , 1S)^'6 Twin Pines 

Number of years of schooling ^aJ Occupation 

Idence -> n ,-,r ,-t; r..i.r-, Iowa Marital Status . , j ru 1 e 



Nu-iber of children 



death 



'JLX: — J: nf G;. nr-.F.r. 



N a m e 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence frppBU,-, I^ws, 

Nunbi-r of children a 



date Magch 26, 1^29 

■ ^q 0 ccupation 

Marital Status_ y 

(I e a t h 



4-£e~w4- Wlothe 



of birth 



N a n e 
Place 

Number of years of schooling _ 
Residence , , , , na 1{l ,,» a . „ iM .Marital 

N u mb e r 



date 
AO- 



Jur .fr JU , 1-^44 
Oc c up a L 1 o 



of children 



Status 



44- 



*nd Moth 



"' ine - UwbOjt — ..l ^ . w .fa 

Place of birth L-u . vjlt 



Number of years of schooling 



rj a I f 



0c C up a t Ion 



Residence Bank 8 ton , [owe Marital Status 

Number of chlldren_ 7 dea th 



HoubtJwife and 



Your Father 

Name Cyril J. G' risen ? Current Residence PeoF.tn, Tnw 

Date of birth Jllly ^, ig2£ Pia « ° f birth p PA ota a± H ome 

Date of Death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade s ch oo 1 ^ h igh schoo 1 a vo c a t i o na 1 c o 1 1 e ge 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st PsrmPT- Lahnrnr Dates -\ q/| c, tn 1 u / \ M 1st D a t e s 

Caradco 

2nd n-rnf tQin' n nt Dates lu/ix + n 1 qko 2nd Dates 
Mo on light ea at station xy |OXO iy>J — 

3rd Farmer (Shares) Dates to 1 ^ b , ] 3rd Dates 

fgarm 1 ?^ 161 " Dates tQ preg^h Uates_ 

Religion flPthnlin 



Political parties, c_vil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

VntRR Ap.onrrlingly 

Place of marriage to your mother st , .Tnhf 1 g date Aug, 11- 194 b 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name Hit- J- ne (^ela.ney ) Current Residence p eostr , _ Iown 

Date of birth Maxcjb 26 , 19?9 Place of birth Tymott, Iowa- • 

Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade s choo 1 ° high:- schoo 1 £ voc a t ional Arfrsfr Gffa f cfctlege 

Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(Woolvvorths ) (after leaving home) 
lst -S- took C ler ic Dates 194^ to 194< Mt Dates_ 

2nd N ei.sners Dates 19/|6 tQ ^jgd 

3rd Scmnatrcao (Glover ^ Dates, tn l9^rd 

4th Housewife frlvlother Dates 1949 on 4th Dates 

Religion_ C 1 tholic 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Independent 



Da tes 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your father at. doHn ' S Feo stP date Aug,. 11- r ._lQ4h. 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page (F-2). 



Stepfather 
Name 



Date of birth Place of birth 



Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupat ion (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2 n d D ate s 2 n d D a t e s 

3 r d Da t es 3rd Da t e s 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother Date 

F - 2 S tep mot her 
Name 



Date of birth Place of birth 



Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school vocational college i 

Occupa t ion (s ) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1 s t Dates Is t Da t e s 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4th Dates 4th Dates | 

Religion 



Political party, < i v i 1 or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of 



1 0 

CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2.F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 



Name , 1lll)y Arm Cia.n ah^n 



Place birth Tjuhnnue. Town 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence Dubuque, Iowa Marital Status 
Number of children £ death 



Date of birth Aug, 2b , 1M4<-) 
__12 Occupation f!ousewife &Glerk 



A 



Name Daniel Edward Gansen 
Place of b ir th Dubuque , Iowa 
Number of years of schooling^ 



Date of birth June 12 t 1951 

1_3 0 ccupation 

Residence zip ckford , Illinoi^ ar i tal Status X 
Number of children 1 death 



NameThomrs J. tonsen 



Place of birth Dubuque, Tnwa Date of birth 1ft, 

Number of years of schooling ]_2 Occupation y. ,-. t o ry .■ q -r k p r- 

Residence Epwor-th , TovM arital Status y 
Number of children ] death 



Name J'-mrj nhfiel (^nSRii 

Place of b ir th ymhiipiie Tn..: : Date of birth T1 e ^ . ? n , I'^S r ■ 

Number of years of schooling ]_2 Occupation ptn rv lab orer 

Residence penptp , Tnw;- Marital Status X j p ] p 

Number of children rmnp. death 

Name Dale CyrilGansen 

Place of birth uubuque , lowa Date of birth ^ e C- 22 > 1^5o 

scTfool 



Number of years of schooling ^ Occupation 

Residence ?eosta > Iowa Marital Status "Single 
Number of children none death 



Name Michael Patrick Gar s en 
Place of birth Dubuque, Iowa 
Number of years of schooling_ 
Res i dence pPeosta, Iowa 
Number of children none 



Date of birth May 6, 19 ol 

Ore upatlon &Cho ol + 

Cfibres 



Marital Status 
death 



single 



Name 

Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of children 



death 



Occupatio n 



Name 

Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Occupatio n_ 



Number of children 



death 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 



I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford PyfS^lic Library, Rockford 
Illinois 




a s w 

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(1) H t-f 



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LIST OF SOURCES 
ol. Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Gansen 

2. Mrs. Vvalt McPadden 

3. Mr. Harold Delaney 

4. Mr. Elmer Gansen 

5. Mr. William. Gansen Jr. 

6. Mrs. Donald Callahan 

7. St. John's Church 

8. Holy Family Church 

9 . The Courthous e 

10. The Cascade Pioneer 

11. Mr. Virgil Freyman 

12. Mr. Joe Thiesen 



Peosta, Iowa 

Dubuque, Iowa 
Dubuque, Iowa 
Peosta, I Q wa 
peosta, Iowa 
Dubur ue , I owa. 
Peosta, Iowa 
Peosta, Ibwa 
Dubuque , I owa 
Cascade, Iowa 
Dubuaue, Iowa. 
Bernard, Iowa 



I 

I 

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9 

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PART I Paternal Great Grandfather, Pete Gansen 



Pete Gansen, my father's grandfather was born on a farm 
soiuewhere in the eastern part of Iowa in the winter of 
1869, believed to be February. 

A farmer most of his life, he purchased a farm from 
Michael McCarthy and his wife on March 31, 1909 for 7200.00. 
The following described premises situated in Dubuque county 
describe that parcel of land. 

The Soitilih West £ of the South Westi of Section 27 and the 
South East % of the South East \ of Section 28, all in Town- 
ship 88, North of Range 1, East of the 5th P.M. containing 
80 acres more or less. 

Then on March 11, 1911, Pete Gansen purehased the following 
additional tract of land from Anastasia Hart; for S6200. 
In Dubuque county, the North West \ of the South West \ of 
Section 27 and that portion of the North East \ of the South 
East \ of Section 28, bounded on the east by North West \ of 
South West \ of said Section 27 and on the northwest by the 
North Cascade Road known as lot 1 of North East \ of South 
East \ of said Section 28 as said lot is platted in Plat 
book -2 on page 225 of records of Dubuque county, Iowa. 

All of said land being in Township 88 North, and in Range 
1 East of the 5th P.M. and in all, containing 62.99 acres, 
more or less. In all, these transactions represented 
approximately 500 acres, more or less. 

Pete Gansen was a farmer all of his life, and spent most 
of his savings purchasing additional land and raising his 
family. 

Margaret Elizabeth Roselip, born April 2^th 1871, to 
another rural eastern Iowa family became Peter 1 s wife. The 
wedding is believed to have taken place in the fall of 1890. 
Together on the farm previously described, they raised their 
family of four boys and one daughter. They were Gregory, 
Joseph, Katherine, Elmer, and William. 

The history of the Roselip f family has been unattainable , 
however the the Gansen family has been traced to the German 
descent. The name Gansen, originally comes from the G erman 

ove 



! 

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J 

. i 

i 

■ 



word "Ganse" which stands for goose. It has not been determin 
ed when the "n" was added to the original name, however it 
is possible that it was added at the Isle of Tear, or the 
place where all immigrants were screened before they were 
granted entry into the United States, A fact which adds to 
this belief is that the name Gansen, was not found in any of 
the phone books, I checked while stationed in Germany. The 
name "Ganse" was observed on several occasions. 

Getting back to Pete Gansen, his farm was located four 
miles from the small rural town of Peosta. Peosta's popu- 
lation was under 100, and it still remainsunder 300. At 
tat time, in the early 1900* s Peosta was a water stop for the 
steam engines. There was a stockyard and a feed mill where 
the farmers ,vould haul their grain with horses and wagons 
to be ground and mixed. There was also a general store and 
a Post Office under the same roof. The town even had it's 
own bank, the Bank of Peosta, which unfortunately was closed 
during the depression and never able to reopen. Eight years 
ago the bank was tore down. Before that time, it was being 
used as an apartment house. 

Pete would make his way into town approximatly once a week 
to pick up his mail and take care of any other business. 

On MarchjO, 19J9» Peter's farm became his wifes farm with 
love and affection. This was the wording of his will, and 
last testament. Peter Gansen died on March 26, 1939. 

Shortly afterwards, his wife Margaret divided up the land 
among their descendants. 

William Gansen, My grandfather received the '.Vest £- of 
South wast Section 27, and the South East i of the South 
east and Lot 1 of North east ^ of South east £ section 
26, all in Township Bti North, Range 1 east of 5th P.M. in 
Dubuque county, Iowa. This descibes 385 acres, more or 
less . 

Margaret Elizabeth Gansen (Hoselip), spent the remaining 
ten years of her life on the farm which was being operated 
by her sons. She died October lj, 1049. 



- 

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k 

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Part II Paternal Grandfather, William Gansen 

<illiam Gansen was born on Pexe Gansen' s farm near the 
town of Bankston on Fetouary 19, 1399. Bankston is approx- 
imately 16 miles west of Dubuque, Iowa. This area and the 
location four miles south of Peosta represents the rural 
setting in which William Gansen grew up and spent most of 
his life. His childhood was spent concentrated mostly a- 
round the farmwork and going to school. He graduated from 
high school in 1919, already determined to be what his fath^B 
was, a farmer. 

Out of high school, illi^m continued to work on farms 
for wages. This period during the twesnties, found many 
farmers earning good money. It also represents the intro- 
duction of the automobiles, which made it possible for 
William to drive to the big city of Dubuque, Iov/a, some 
16 miles away. Automation was also replacing the horses 
with tractors during tnis time, however the replacement of 
the horse for farm duties wos much slower than transportat- 
ion. 

William Gansen was a Catholic, same as his father. They 
attended Catholic high schools and William graduated from 
St. Johns in Peosta. 

Marie Theisen, a neignbor to the Gansen family in Bankston, 
"became William Gansen' s wife on October 4th 1921. They took 
their marriage vows at St Anthonies church in Dubuque. 
Marie also had been raised in the rural setting on a farm. 
Her education consisted of eight ye; rs grade school and just 
two ye- rs high school. 

Her parents wrce Mr and Mrs John Theisen, farmers from 
Bankstom. John Theisen was bomA April 9th, ld71, in Bankston 
also, presumably on his fathers farm. The only occup- tion 
John is thought to have encountered has been farming in 
Bankston. His wife, formerly a Miss <>anderscheid, v/as 
originally from Hew Hampton, however it is not known how the 
two of these people met. It is assumed, she died at an much 
earlier age than her husb;<nd John, who died November 27, 1933 



; 

. CIOX 

I 

i 

i 



So in the ye r 1921, Willi; m G- nsen and M? rie Margaret 
Theisen began their lives together. Marie was twenty one 
and " : illiam was twenty two. 

In 1939, Pete's home place was divided up among the sons 
and daughters. Viilliam (Bill) from that year until his death 
was involved in farming. This was the loction, some 

five miles south of Peosta, where Bill raised their f mily 
of five boys and four girls. 

They are listed from the oldest to the youngest 
Bernard Gansen, October 1922 Now living at Bernard or 

Zwingle, Iowa 

Mrs Florence Delamey, May 25th to September ^2, 1973 

Cyril J Gansen July 5, 1926 (my father) currently : t 

Peosta low.' 

Edward Gansen January 25, 1928 now living in Dubu 

Que, Iowa 

Francis Gansen Dubuque, low 

Mrs Ma let a Thumser Dubuque, Iowa 

William Gansen Jr. BHKSaKK, Iowa (Peosta) 

Mrs Mary Lou McFaddin Dubunue, Iowa 

Mrs Shirley Eppler Dubuque, Iowa 

Politically, the Gansen family has been predominately 
Democratic voters. The voting privelege has not always been 
exercised, however. If it was convenient, they voted. This 
facit hasn't changed much to the present day. 

In the earli nineteen fifties William, his wife, and the 
two remaining daughters left at home moved to College Street 
in Dubuque. It was at this time that he (Bill) deviled the 
farm between Robert Delaney, (his son in law), who was renting 
about two hundred and thirty ; cres; and Cyril Gansen (my 
father), who was working the remainder of the farm under 
shares. Bill worked at the Theisen Tire outlet in Dubunue 
during the fifties and into the sixties while also perform- 
ing the requirements demanded of a landlord. 

His wife (my grandmother) diedxKsfoKuxig!: October 25, 1970. 
The place of buri' 1 was the Nevv Mell? ry Cemet- ry, about 
three miles from the farm he raised his family on. 



i 

■ 



Approximately three years "before Marie's death, Their 
son in law, Robert Delaney moved off the farm to • farm he 
"bought near Cascade ..Iowa, and the youngest son of the William 
Gansen family, (William Gansen Jr) moved on the farm as a 
rentor. He also was employed at the Deere plant in Dubuque. 
My grandfather, William was no-.' working in the town of 
Dubuque, plus spending many hours on the farm helping William 
Jr get started farming. He eventually retired from his job 
at the tire destributor and spent most of his time keeping 
up the condition of the farm and his home in Dubuque. 

On February 16, 1973» William Gansen (my grandfather) 
died from an unstable heartbeat. This was just three days 
before his 74th birthday. He was laid to rest next to his 
wife p.t New Mellary Cemetary. 

His hame in Dubuque became the home in the country on the 
f i -rm, became the home of William Gansen Jr. and his home in 
Dubuque on College street was sold and devided up in the will 

An interesting fact concerning his will and last testament 
was the way in was worded. He had it wrote up so that the 
daughters would receive one share but that the sons would 
be gr nted two shares. 

He left property and monies to his descendents totaling 
well over 150,000 dollars. 



(The Gansen family and their history will be resumed with 
William Gansen' s secon oldest son, my father Cyril Gansen 
after my mother's family and history has been brought up 
the this time.) 



f • "' lalxoaqqA 

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1 



Part III Great Grandfather on my Mother's Side 

At this time it must begin with Thomas Delaney Sr. and his 
wife Bidget (Kirk) Delaney. A picture of the two of them 
feas "been dug up ansd sent to me for the purpose of this 
paper, nnd will be entered in the closing prges. Thomas's 
birthdate has been unattainable, however Bridget lfc>51 was 
born in the eastern state of Delaware. Unknown, is the date 
when her or her family moved to eastern Iowa. The possibil- 
ity even exists that Thomas moved from Delaware with Bridget, 
they did not exchange marriage vows until they were in 
Dubuque county, however, because they were married at St, 
Theresa's Church on February 28, 107b. The only occupation 
known, encountered by Thomas was farming. They made their 
living on a farm in the town of LamoAte, Iowa. 

THBy had three daughters and three sons. Their family pic- 
ture will be entered in the final pages. 

The exact size of the Delaney farm in Lamotte is not known* 
however there was a spring and some timber on it because 
Thomas produced some very good moonshine. His summertime 
hobby consisted of operating his own personnal still. 

Reported by an Aunt was the fact th- t Thorn s even ran for 
sheriff, one of the summers in the e- rly twenties. Hp died 
shortly -fter th t, sometime in the e- rly twenties. 

His wife, Bridget lived a few more years on the farm 
until her de th March 1st, 1926. 

An interesting tale about Thomas and a snake deserves 
a few senences in his history. It seems Thomas was loading 
hay on a wagon with a pitchfork, when a rattlesnake came 
out of the hay and slid down the handle ojg the fork. Thomas, 
keeping his cool allowed the snake to crawl all the way down 
his arm to the ground and luckily escaped getting bit. If 
this little incident hadn't happened, perhaps 15homas would 
have lived as long as his wife. 

The history now moves to Thomas Delaney Jr. (My Grandfather) 



- 

.awol ,^&tiujj3!iid lo .awot arU - ret jexbI js ac ;%nivil 



Part IV Thomas Delaney Jr (My Grandfather on My Mother's) 

(Side) 

Thomas Delaney Jr. was "born on his father's farm on Feb- 
ruary 24, Ib90. He grew up on the farm and went to school 
in Lamotte. 

The Delaney family stems from Irish descent. The first 
Delaney probably came over before the potatoe famine however. 
Thomas Delaney quit school before the eighth grade. His life 
from that time until his wedding las been forgotten oy every- 
one contacted, So his life will be continued after his wife's 
ancestors are brought up tothis date, February b 1 , 1916 

Pprt V. Henry Kringle 

Henry Kringle of German descent was bom in the eighteen 
seventies. He married Amelia Tregonning on February 16, 1692 
at Hazel Green, Wisconsin. They then came to Dubuque and mcde 
their home at 704 University Avenue. They were the parents 
of two children, Mrs Thomas Delaney and Mrs August Felder- 
man, Two daughters. 

Together, they celebrated their golden Wedding Aniversary 
On February 16, 1942. 

Henry died two ye rs after that in the fall. 
Amelia continued to live in Dubuque on ninth street. Some 
time in the early fifties, some of the neighborhood kids set 
fire to her garage and burnt it to the ground. Her sister 
Sil moved in with Amelia then, until her (Ameliaos), death 
March 19, I960. 

Her maiden name Tregonning stems from England. 

Their daughter, Blanche Kringle ■ ttended twelve years 
of school ana two additional years at a vocational school 
to gualify for her teaching job at the town of Lamotte. 
She taught eight grades , grade school at a little one room 
school near the fairgrounds in Lamotxe. She quit her teach- 
ing career hofiwee ever in the spring of 1916 ■ fter her 
marriage to Thomas Delaney, earlier that year. Her career- 
as a teacher ended after just a couple of years to allow 



her to r-'ise her family. 



Part VI Mr and Mrs. Thomas Delaney Jr. 

Thomas ..as horn and raise! in Lamotfce and his v.ife, the 
former Blanche Kringle taught school in that town, which 
explains how they might have met each other. 

After their wedding at St Anthonies Church in Dubuoue on 
February 8, 1916, thet moved to a farm three miles east of 
Peosta. It was here that they raised their family of six 
hoys and four i,irls. 

The Children from oldest to the youngest are Dorothy Delaney 
Edward Delaney , Elmer Delaney, Robert G-. Delaney, Thomas J. 
Delaney, Harrold J. Delaney, Kenneth R. Delaney, Jane Rita 
Gansen (my mother) Elizabeth Schmitt, and Nancy Potter. 
They attended a one room elementary school about one mile 
from their farm. It v/as part of the Dubuoue school system. 
When they reached high school, they attended the Catholic 
school of St John's in the town of Peosta, 

Thomas and Blanche spent most of their time farming 
and raising the family. Around 1950, after most of the fam- 
ily had moved aw y, Thomas retired from farming and moved 
into Dubuque, on eighth street. He bought a duplex and 
rented out half of the house to his daughter and her husband 
Mr and Mrs. Vernon Schmitt. 

Blanche Delaney (Kringle) experienced four heart failures, 
but her death was not caused bu a heart ailment. On July 27, 
1963, Blanche died from a. blood disorder. Blanche's death 
prompted Thomas to sell his home in Dubuoue and rotate rmong 
his children's homes, spending two weeks at everyones home 
before he would leave. He entered the SIH Nursing Pome for 
the Aged, in Dubuoue in the ye- r 1964 and died ■ pproxinr te- 
ly two ye- rs It ter on September 20, 1966. 

Mr and Mrs Thomas Delaney were 1; id to rest i t the Key 
West Ceiaetary, about two miles , r est of Dubuque. 



I 

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Part VII Cyril J Gansen ( My Father ) 



Cyril J gansen was born on his fathers farm nenr peosta 
Iowa, on July 8, 1926. He attended Dubuque County Brick 
Number 8 for the first eight years of his schooling. This 
was another one room, school teaching eight grades "by one 
teacher. For High School, he attended St John's Catholic 
High Schbol in Peosta. He received his high ;.chool Liploma 
here, in the year 1944. 

After high school Cyril or (Cy) continued to work on his 
neighbors farm and his brothers farm for wages. The work 
mainly consisted of field . ork • ind milking cows. He rude 
this his occup r ticn until 1948, three years 1' -..'hen he 
went to work as a craftsman at Caradco in Dubuque. This work 
consisted of building ioor amd window frmes. 

The same year he started work at Caradco, he married Jane 
Rita Delaney. Jane was the daughter of Thomas Delaney born 
on his farm near Peosta, March 26, 1929. Jane ; lso attended 
the same high school as Cy, a few years lehind him. 

J.- ne was employed as a stock clerk at Neisners in Dubuque. 
She quit that $ob to ..ork as a seamstress at Glovers, also in 
Dubuoue, Iowa. She was working here when she married Cy 
Gansen. 

They exchanged wedding vows at St John's parish in Peosta. 
The date was August 11, 1948. Cy's brther, Edward Gansen 
was the best man and Jane's sister, Betty Delaney was the 
maid of honor. 

After their marriage, Jane ouit her job at Glovers. 

Cy continued working at Caradco only two more years. AT 
this time, approxim; tely 1950, cy moved to Peosta on half 
of his fathers farm to work it in shares or as a sharecropper 
The farm he worked was approximately 180 acres, and he 
remained there until the present. However in the year 1964 
he started buying the land. 

<hen they were married, Oy was paying for an old 39 chevy. 
The car died on the way back from their honeymoon, and they 
rode half the way from Dodgeville Wisconsin to Dubuque behind 



a tow truck. The chevy continued to plague Cy with trouble 
"but he could not afford to buy a different one until 1955, 
when he bought a new Ford Fairlane. The 55 lasted ut bj i 
63 when they bought another ford wagon. From then, there 
has been four fords, a plymouth and two Chryslers. 

In 1949, on August 26th, Jane gave birth to Judy Ann Gan- 
sen. Judy, now living on Von Euren Street in Dubuque married 
Donnald Callahan July 15, 1967, and they have two children; 
Allen and Lisa. Her husband Donald works as a foreman for 
the roofing contra cters Giese's in Dubuque, Iowa. 

In 1951 on June 12th, Jane gave birfch to her second child. 
Daniel, (myself ) . My story comes later; 

December 16, 1952, Thomas J Gansen was born. Thomas now 
lives in Epworth, Iowa and works at the Coletex Plant in 
Dubuque. Thomas married Mavonne Reiff from Farley, Iowa 
august 17, 1973, and now they have one little girl, Nickol, 
born December 29, 1974. 

Then came Larry Michael Gansen, born December 28, 1956. Larry 
is currently living at home and working at Energy Plant in 
Montecello, Iowa. He is single. 

Next came Dale Qyril Gansen, born December 22, 195b, who 
is currently in his last yer r of high school. He said with 
a little luck, he may graduate this year. 

The last member of the Gansen (Cyril) family is Michael 
Patrick Gansen, who was bora May 6th, 1961. He is currently 
in 8th grade at Western Dubuque school. 

Cy and. Jane ere Catholics, the same as there parents Pnd 
attended the Holy Family Parish, next to the monastery in 
Dubuque county. This parish provided the religious background 
for all the children in Religion classes there every Sat- 
urday. 

They are currently building a new house on their farm 
near Peosta.(Box 250) Cy and his father built the previous 
farm house in the year 1950, 

my parents 



t 

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1 



Part VIII. The final part, mine, Daniek E Gansen. 

I was born june 12, 19 f j>l, at Finley hospital in Dubunue, 
Iowa. The second child Dorn to Mr and Mrs Cyril Gansen of 
Peosta, Iowa. I was raised on the form and ttended the 3ame 
one room gade school that my father attended, Brick JNo. 8. 
Un fortunately, the Brick No 8 was closed down in 1963 and 
the students were all transferred to Epworth Elementary 
school in Epworth, about seven miles' away but by route of 
the school bus, about twenty miles away. I finished 6th 
grade here, then attended .estern Dubuque Scool for the 
e remainder of junior high ( 7th # 8th) and also four 
years of high school, graduating in June of 1969. 

Aftee graduation, a cousin, Chuck Delaney and I came down 
to Belvidere to apply for jobs at the Chrysler plant. e 
were told we could start work that night until someone notic- 
ed wexs were still seventeen and not old enough, A close Est 
call. We both went back home and worked on ou father's 
farms until August when we came back' to Chrysler and started 
work. I worked at Chrysler and lived at a Mrs Hawkee's 
boarding house, a couple of miles south of the plant, until 
January of 1971. 

This was when I had to report to the Army. I was drafted 
into the Army at Des Moines, Iowa on the tenth day of Feb- 
ruary. From there I was transferred to Fort Leonard cod, 
Missouri for my basic training. The next stop became Fort 
Knox, Kentucky where I received advanced training in Se- 
connassaince or a scout. Upon completion of training here 
I was stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas after ? two week leave. 

One week before ehristmas of 1971, I receiced orders to 
report to the 3rd of the 63rd cav, 1st Inf Div, which was 
stationed in Augsburg, Germany. So Augsburg became my home 
for the next 13 months until I received the honorable lis 
charge the last week of January 1973. hile I was in Ger- 
many, the Olympics were taking place about ten miles away, 
which gave me an opportunity to observe some of the compet- 
ition. It also forced me and omr whole division to go on- 
alert when the Arabs killed a number of competitors. 



- 



After I Got out of the service , I reported back to Chry- 
sler within a month for my old job back. I have been employ 
ed there evere since. 

Before I went abroard to be stationed in Germany, I start 
ed dating my wife, Barb Koerperick who was living with her 
parents on a farm East ofl Dubuque about seven miles in 
Illinois. We became engaged February 14, 1973 and set our 
wedding date for January 19, 1974. My wife attended St 
Clara's Academy and vVahlett High School. Born November 4, 
1952, she graduated from Wahlert in 1970. 

The bridesmaids for our wedding were Judy Koerperick, 
Dorothy Schmitt, Judy Callahan, and Gail Shraeder. 
The Groomsmen were Tom Gansen, Chuck Delaney, Mike Koerp- 
erick, and Gary Schmitt. 

The vows were exchanged at St Columbkilles Church in 
Dubuque, Iowa . Father Banning performed the ceremonies. 

Two weeks before our wedding, I purchased the smr 11 two 
bedroom brick house located at the corner of North Sunset 
Ave, and School Street in Rockford. This is our present 
address. 

On October 10th, 1975 , we became the proud parents of 
a baby boy, Terry Michael Gansen, born at St Anthonies 
hospital in Rockford. Terry is now six months old nnd grow 
ing like a weed. 

That brings the paper up to date to the best of my obt- in 
able knowledge at this date. 



I 

. 90IU8 913 V9 0T»4ti f)9 

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: 

- 

.JdiimioS Y^tiiQ bos t XoiT9 

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GARLICK, SARA DEAN, 1956- 



R-E AS E TYPE: PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT 'I'll E FRONT OF THE S_ECONl) COPY OP YOUR 
?AMI I.Y H I STORY . 



Dear Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your Family history can be made more useful to historians and 
tliers studying American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
so low. This will take you only a few minutes, and will be easily made ovei 
■to an Index which will permit archive users ready access to just those 
kinds of family histories needed. 



S UR V E Y 



Your name Sara Gar lick 




Date oT form April ??, 197 ^ 

Your college: Roc k Valley Col lege 
Rockford, Illinois 

Check the earliest date for which you have been .able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 

Before 1750 X 1750-1800 1800-1850 



18 5 0-1900 1900 or later 



Please cheek a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

X New England (Mass . ,Conn . ,R . I . ) X Middle A t lan t i c (N . Y . , Penna . , N..I. 

Va.) South A t 1 an t i c ( Ga . , F la . , N . C . , S . C . ) X East South Central 

(ha . ,Miss . ,A1 a . ,Tenn ,Ky . ) '. x Wast South Central (Ark . ,N . M . ,Tex ., Ok . ) 

X East North Central (Mich . ,0hi o , I nd . ) Pacif ic (Cal . , Wash . ) 

(Hawa Li , Alaska) (111. , Wise . ,) 

Please check a 1 1 occupational categories in which members ol youi 
family whom you have discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming _M i n i n g S h o p k e e p i n g or small business 

Transportation Big Business Manufacturing 

X Professions Industrial Labor Other 

Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 

Roman Catholic _Jewish X Presbyterian X Methodist 

Baptist _Episcopalian Congregational Lutheran 

_Quaker Mo rmo n Other Protestant Other (name) jteStpration 

I love ment 

What ethnic and social groups arc discussed in your paper? 

Swedish Other Scandinavian X German French 

Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans Eastern Kurop< 



Jews Central Europeans Italians Slavs 

Irish British [ Native Americans over several generation: 



East Asian Other (Name) Scottish 

What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other Family Bibles; X Family Genealogies 

family members Land Records The U.S. Census 

X V ital Records 

X Photographs Maps Other 



[ . FAM 1 I.Y DATA 



2 



Grandfather (your father's side ) 
Name Pay Garlick 



Current Residence 



Date of birth Jim? 3, lob6 

Date of death .-August 9, 1966 

E due a t i on ( numb e r of years); 
grr.de school high school 

Occupation(s) 



Place of birth Hi lner , M or th Da k ota 
Place of burial Springfield, Kissmr i 



vocational 



college 



Is t in shoe factory 
2nd Painter 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 19J., - jgflg 1st Kenknk, T mjp Dates y ?n ,_irv; 



sideline was as 
3rd truck farmer 



4 th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



2nd tesHaiaes, Tim Dates 1906 - I960 

Mountain Home, 

3rd A rkansas Dates I960 - 1961; 

4th Springfield. Mo, Dates 196L.-1966 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Ha S nnS 



1913 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother p??s Moines. Iowa date Hay 15 , 
NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 13) by a stepfather or another 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 



Name ?dna Ma 3 Dean 



Date of birth May 5> 1^95 
Date of death May 23, 1970 



Current Residence 

Place of b i r t h Fort Dodg e j Xowa. 

Place o i burial jprinnfj p ldj Missou ri 



Kducation (number of years): 

grade school high school 

college ^ 



vocational 



Occupation (s) 
1st Secretary 



2nd Housewife 

3rd 

4 t h 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Da tes 



PL AC E OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1 s t see ajb-OVg t e s__ 



2nd 
3rd 
4 th 



Date s 
D a t e s 
Dates 



Re ligion Protestant 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



1' lace of marriage to your g r a nd f a t h c rJDeS K oines, XOWa dutu Hay I s -, } 1913 

NOTE: If your lather was raised fit) age 18) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on the back ol this page 
(A-2) . 



A - 2 Stepgrandf ather (your father's side) 



Name 



Current Residence 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 

Cw 1 lege 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



Religion 



Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 
Dates 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 



vocational 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 

Da t e s 

D a t e s 

Dates 



'olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother_ 
3-2 St epgrand mother (your father's side) 



date 



Name 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school 

coll e ge 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 

Re 1 i gion 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



vocational 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Grandfather (your mother's side) ', 

Name Jame s rtarr iSon Li n coln ingot ^Current Residence 

Hate of birth February 12, loo7 Place of birth near Keytesville, Missouri 

Date of death January Ij, 19 62 Place of burial Herdnn, Charitnn, I'issm.ri 

Ed uc.it ion (number of years): 

grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Is t Deputy Sheriff Dates 1st Zhtc.ntan. Ok la. Dates 1 901 _ 



2nd Carpenter Dates 2nd Old Herxlon, Mo. Dates 19 01 - 1923 

3rd Dates_ 3rd Compton, Calif. Dates 1928- 1929 

4 th Da tes 4 th Mendon, Mo, Da t es 1929 - 196? __ 

R e 1 i g i o n Protestant 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc, 

Democratic party 



Place of marriage to your grandmother Carrollton, MiSSouri da t^ March 16, 1910 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepfather or another relative (to 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name ^ffje McPherSon Current Residence 



Date of birth December 21, lao9 _Plac e of birth Old Mend on. Mi sj3_ur i 

Date of deat h P lace of burial _____ 

Education (number of years) 

grade school 3 high school ) ■ vocational college j 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESTDKNCK 

(after Leaving home) 

1 s t ^ank telle r . Dates 1908 - 1910 1st see above begin- Dates 

ning w/ Old Her. don 

2nd Housewife Dates 191 0 - _^ n<J Dales 

3rd Dates __ 3rd . Da 1 <■' s 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion Protesta nt 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Carrollton, Missouri Halt- March 16, .1910 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relai ive ( l o 

H ' gflve tb at data on the back of this page (\i-2) 



S t ep gr andf a the r (your mother's side) 

Current Residence 

of birth Place of birth 



Date of death Placeofburial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

. — - 1 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 



4 th Dates 4 th Dates_ 

R e 1 i g i o n 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother Date 

Step grand mother (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 



Dateofbirth Place of birth 



Dateofdeath Placeofburial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



voca t tonal co I 1 <.•)>,< 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd Da tes 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

U t h Dates 4 th Da t es 

Re 1 1 g i o n 

'ol it leal party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



HILDREN of A & B (or A-2 or B-2 ) - your father's name should appear below 



Name Ray Thomas Garlich 



Place of birth Qgg r.oin?Sj Iow a date Jun^ 13, 19 17 



Number of years of schooling; Occupation Plumber 

Residence DgS Moines, la. M a r i t a 1 Statu s Harried 

Number of children 1 ( nne) Death 

Nam e Boyd Harley Garli ck 



Place of birth D^s Hoines, Iowa d a t e October 9, 192 0 

Number of years of schooling Occupa t ion : ' n p1^r Tns.pect.nr 

Res i dence liana, California Marl tal S tatua QluaE cad 

Number of children 1 ( on? ) Death _- - - 

Name Dean Franklin Gar lick 



Place of birth Pea Iloines, Iowa date Ja'.uarv 2. 1927 

Number of years of schooling Occupa tion BlectronicS Te ch- 

Residence ^nckfnr n , T 11innis M arital Status Married nician 

Number of ch i 1 dren 2 ( two) Death 



N a m e 

Place of b i r th da ' l! _ 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Nam e 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

R e s i d e n c e M a r i t a 1 Stat us 

Number of children Death 



Name 



Place of birth date . 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 



Place of birth _date 

Number of years of schooling . _Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children . death 



Name 



Place of birth_ _date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation, 

Residence, _Marita 1 Status 

Number of children death_ : 

N a m e 



PI ace of birth ' di,tc 

Number ot years of schooling Oc <: upn t ion _ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death_ . 



Nam* 



Place of birth _. <l;lt( -' — - 

Numb*..- of years of schooling . Occupation 

Res i dence Mar i t a 1 SI at us 

Numb it ol children „ dl ' nl h 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 



Nasi 



mic (iacot) ^an-wal 



Place of birt h_^ 
Number of years of schooling 
Res idence ..?wt?r.. Kansas Marl tal 
Number of children J | Egg] 



date July 22, 1 912 

( tw?lv?) 0 ccupation 



housgwirg 



Status 
death 



warns 



date ,-jril 17, 1915 



Name Doris Jean (Shoot) ",.'?scot t 
Place of birth "?n-dpn t .iisscuri 

Number of vears of schooling 12 (twelve) Occupation hnnsr>wi f g 

s d n e . -1- .ill, Ga. Ma rital Stat us Carried 

Number of children 2 (Two) death 



Name Jar.-? ;2rri3tZ£(5hcot) Garlick 
Place of b ir th !l?ndon t Missouri 
Number of years of schooling 

Residence . Illinois Marital Status Married 



_d a t e unygmhpr Pi. 1927 



Uj (lourt^en) Occupation housewife 



Number of children 



( two) 



death 



Name 



Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling^ 

Res idence 

Number of children 



date 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation_ 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling_ 

Residence 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupatlon_ 



Name 



Place of birth 



d a t e 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



N umber of children 



death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling_ 

Residence 



Number of children 



date 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res 1 dence 

Number of children 



date 



Occupation 



Marital Status 
d e a t h 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence _Marital Status 

Number of children*. 



Occupa t ion 



death 



Place of birth 

iber of yearH of schooling 

Residence 

Number of children 



'J a t c 



Occupation 



Marital St a t us 
death 



Your Father 

Name Dean Franklin Garlick __Current Residence Rnckinrri. TITS -pis 

Date of birth January 2, 1927 Place of bitth Pes Moines, I rn-ja 

Date of Death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school . high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) 

Is t Service (Army) Da tes 19-U5 - I9h 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

. 1 s t )r>r, ; m- ^. Tot-jp D a t e s J ? 1,6 - 5 ? 



2nd Paint & Varnish Dates 19^2 , 1966 2nd Kansas City, lio. Dates 19^2 - 

oup^rvisor 

3rd ^lectroriiss Techrii- Dates 1966 - 3rd Rpckford. 111. Dates 1959 - 



4th 



Dates 



4 th 



Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n Protestant 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother pes Moines, Iowa date Hay ?£, 1950 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 



Name Jane Harriet (Shoot) Garlick 



Current Residence TVnr.kf nr H, Tllino^ 



Plac 



of birth Head on, Chariton, Missonri Bd^ggg of birth Moy^nber lk. 1927 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school 8 high; - school 



vocational 



college 



Occupation(s) 
Is t Secretary 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

am 



2nd S tu d en t 



3rd Secretary 

4th 




Religion Protestant 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Republi can party 

DARj Garden Club, Rachel Circle (chur ch) 

Place of marriage to your father 3^3 M oines, T nr;a 



d a t e May 26. .1250 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the hack of this page (F-2) . 



E-2 Stepfather 
Name 



... of birth Place of birth 



lite of death Placeofburial 



Education (number of years) 

school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd ^Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Re 1 i g ion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your mother Date 

F - 2 S tepmother 



Date of birth Place of birth_ 

Dnte of death Placeofburial 



lu at ion (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 

:upation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

Dates 4lh Dates 

Re 1 1 >;ion 



iral party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your father date 



10 

CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2.F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 



Name Reqina Jarre Garlic ! 



Place of birth pes Moines, Intra Date of birth December 19, 

Number of years of schooling 17 (s^yr-it^n) Occupation Teacher 

Residence Japan Marital Status Single 

Number of children death 

Name Sara Dean Gar lick 



Place of birth Kansas City. Ho. Date of birth 'ov?nj?r o. 19t6 
Number of years of schooling 13 (thirt?? ) Occupation Stu:/ 0 t 

Residence Rockfora, Illinois Marital Status Single* 

Number of children death 

N ame 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name _______ 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth _Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence _Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence_ Marital Status 

Number of children death 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public Library, Rockford 
I 11 inois 



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List of Sources 



Several members of my family have been interested in the 
family lines and have in many cases kept relatively good records, 
though often net in any orderly fashion. Much more genealogical 
research has been done on my mother's side of the family because 
of ancestors from the Revolutionary War, giving my mother and her 
sisters membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
Much of this research was done hy my mother's sister, Mrs. Doris 
Wescott. Many of the documents and a great deal of the family 
Xf«m cn the Sho*v sice of the family are available te mt as a re- 
sult of much hard work on her part. Genealogical research on my 
father's side cf tt» family las been res^rched mostly by ray grest- 
aunt, Ida A If or ,and by a cousin, Inez Burniiam. 

Other sources are some of my own personal memories and know- 
ledge, some stories from my one surviving grandparent, Mrs. Sffie 
Shoot, and innumerable talks and interviews with ay very patient 
parents, who I have discovered contain a greater store of knowledge 
than I ever realized previously. I have also included Some records 
of the immolate family and various photographs I have found both 
pertinent and interesting. 



Author's Personal Note 



tfhen I began this project, I iad no idea now much material 
Wji available to uz or how much 1 could still search out if I ever 
have at rjy disposal the time and the raoney to persue my lineage 
farther. As I continuec working, iiowever, I really becane inter- 
ested In it. I really got hung up on wnut I was learning about the 
people I came iron, }fy sister, aome now for a visit, am 1 were 
talking recently and we agseed that it was ratner sau to see and 
hear the evidence of the people that had come and gone?, the people 
c'.'Ct liif. ri.dstc- .*& long ago. To me, and to extend this one step 
farther, I feci a great sense ox lost that I never knew these rela- 
tives of nine, vhc sound so interesting and many that sound so nice 
that I know 1 vrould have loved them. 

To turn things around, 1 know that also I will never know l>. 
perhaps infinite number of my posterity. But it is interesting to 
think that maybe some day, one of my distant, future relatives will 
look ne up, 3ni perhaps this very record oi progress so far. I 
would very .uuch like to know uiac tney will be able to dig up about 
m---, and I very much hope also that 1 will leave behind something 
Worthwhile to dig up. 



Thonas GAR LICK and Sarah Ann <PAM 



Thomas GftRLICK and Sarah Ann ORAM wer^ my great grandparents on 
ray father*s side of the family* Vsry little is known of ">ither of 
thera. The only available inf orraaliua reveals that Thomas GARLIC' -.-as 
born in England and thet S^rah Ann GRAM was born in Canada. They were 
married in Canada yrui lived at one tine in St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada. 
They bowk! from there to liilner, Worth Dakota. Here, their two child- 
ren were born, Willie, in 1873, and my grandfather, Ray In 1866. The 
first child, Willie, died at the age of ten, before my grandfather was 
born. Sarah Ami CRAM died in 1891, when Ray uas only five years old. 
Thomas Garlick died in either 190? or 1908 in Keokuk, Iowa. 



i. 



Harley its: on DKAN and Cora Belle HuTBLLING 



ifcrley Judson DEAN, my paternal grandmother^ father, ins hern 
in low on November 28, 186?. He was married ore? before marrying 
Cora Belle Hotelling, though his for at wife's name is not. available. 
They had one son, William DEAN, who was raised by a family named 
Davis after Harley*s first, vrife died. He later took t,neir name, to 
be William DAVIS. While living in St. Louis, Missouri . ( he was 3 Street 
car conductor. On February 18, l89it, Barley married Cora Belle KO- 
*niLII.*0 in Sokts, Iaua« They had uro children. First was my grand- 
mother, ^vdna Mae DEAN, born in Ft. Dodge, Iowa in l8?5. The second 
•was Frank DEAN, born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1897. >ferley was 
killed in an automobile accident in Dps Moines, Iowa sn S< pteraber 12, 
1920. 

Cora Belle HOTSLUNQ was a very small Woman, under five feet 
tall, but always very assertive and businesslike. *!y father says she 
used to sit back on a streetcar seat and. cculi swing her legs with- 
out touching the floor. But as ar. eremple of her character, h?r fa- 
ther, William Jason H0IQI1XN0, (married to Hwriet Tcrrey) use-' to 
take Cora along to help him collect the accounts of people who awed 
him money. It yas unusual in this day arri ege for 0 woman to be in- 
volved |n boslness at all, Cora aaS a very intelligent Woraa/ij and 

had bet teaching orti.fi -far a "normal 45 or vaclier* ^ college. When 
cate 

her husband died,, she went back to work to pay off the few debts he 
left. She worked as a cream tester for the state of Iowa, plus rent- 
ing out sw33 of her property in Des Moines, Shs too died in an auto 
accident, as had her husband Harlsy. A nephew of hers was driving as 
they came back from Springfield, Missouri on September l£, 1937. 



The Methodist Church in Hebron, Wisconsin. William Jason iiOTBL- 
LENG and Harriet TCPJTiY were married here on June 1, 1373. 



OCT « 





TKi Lc-.il. 



(1« to r.) Bdia D»n Gas-lick grandmother)* Hwley Judson Dean, 
Ffcsr* Dsan, Ccvn Be 11^ Hobelling IV?ar:, and ,<ay Gar lick, (ny grandi'stiier) • 



Jam ShuOlS and J-fery (Polly) KtLSCK 

John SHOOTS vsaa born in i?55 in Barr.p3hir~ County, Virginia. In 
tne A&erican Revolution, he Jwsrved u*ith ths Virginia troops 33 a pri- 
vate. In 1780, ha married !&ry (PolJy) V'lLSJl, bom ir 1762. They 
had aix children, Kitty, Frederick, Susan, lialinos, William, and John. 
John (sr.) •lied in 1316 in Fayette County, Kentucky'. 

H5V. FR3DSRICK SHOOT and RB35GCA TAYLCP. 

Frederick Shoot *jas bora in 17? 4 in Lexington, Kentucky. On 
December 9, ioi5» he married Rebecca TAYLOR, born in Maryland in 1795. 
They had seven cluidren, the eldest ci vriion was my gr "rat-jreat-gra-.x.!- 
iather. He was Charles G. SHOOT, born lloverber 2?, 1818, The other 
children included Milton if., Jam* }■.., La. «ctte, ~~cline, Adeline, 
aiid Henry T. Frederick was a uiaiatar, probably a circuit rider , in 
the Restoration Hoveaent that began around 13 12. This taoveraent was 
to bring the cnurch back to sinpiicic.,/, back to ths New Testanent. The 
Diaciplaa oi Christ cane free this fcc\r£ceht. 1> wss evidently very 
higdly regarded in hi3 day, as is evident frcn an excerpt froa a book 
iO' T. P. Haley f Historical and "Ic^:.^ .;. , ;d-^l S'.tetcbts th? 5arly 

v;nurches r a.vi Jlon e -sr mc^-. ^ of the Christia; i C . . : :*c] I "'/^ luri, ■ 

pao<i3 H5-116. (Toi* excerpt included in original copy only.) He died 
in 1355 in Shelbyvill?., Missouri. 



DR, CH&RL3S u. SHOOT and SLftEftSBtH TIPTON 



fiy great-great grandfather # Dr. Charles G» SHOOT, wan born 

on i'Jovetiiber 2>, iSlC in Fayette County, Ke lucky, He ' -v. s - a lector* 
anu Harriet. Siiaabeth TIPTOE jn Jul,) r ; in --Cgett County, Illinois^ 

Elizabeth waa bora in Kentucky on February 13j 1320. Ha was one of tlie 
iouikisra the town of Sciim* ^-JLa^ouri, a small fcown In the northeast 
cor* Kir 3i the a^te* C 



7 



( 



7 



u 



According to the 1972 edition of the Rand-McIJally Road Atlas, the town 
has a population of 1,571*. 

Charles ant": Elizabeth produced a fairly large family of nine child- 
ren. They included the following: 



2!eli;:-.- Jatni 
Harrison 

Cinder ilia 
Henry clay 
James Lafayette 
fr id ?rick, Jr. 
Hedora 

Scaaa 



born February 27, 1839 

born liov^iber 10, b-l+O 

bcrr March, 1", 161+2 

born Nay 3, 1810* 

born October 21*, lSit6 

born Hay 29, 131*5 

born November 29, 1852 

born April 1, 1&55 

born September 1, 135? 



June lh, 1916 

April 11, 131£ 
IJovember 8, 1872 
October j, 1851 
September 1*, 1868 



July Hi, .1865 

Their second child, Harrison, was my great grandfather. 

Charier, died on October 29> l87ii in Burdland, Knox Co., Missouri, 
Elizabeth died on March 1, 1907 in Brashear, Adair Co., Missouri. 



£HgL_ — -£Z_— ~ZZ T^^-ls 

(Errttftrate of ifarriap 



STATE OF ILLINOIS, 
County of Edgar 



I CARL C. PATRICK, County Clerk in and for said County and State hereby Certify 

that Mr. Tharles G. Shoot 

Age next birthday, Place of birth, 



Fathers Name, Mother's Maiden Name, 

And Elizabe+h Tipton 



Age next birthday, Place of Birth 



Father's Name, Mother's Maiden Name, 

were duly married on the 5 th j a y Q f July? I838 

b v Isaac Elledge, as ap p ear8 0 f record in my office. 

Given under my hand and official seal this 5th 

day of November 19 55 

Marriage Rec *rd A 'age ■ . ,\ _ ' *-TT ■ : 



COUNTY CLERK 



__j'i'i| ! a , t.l,,.,;,,; „„ ^ iLfrto. "■ ■ : ^ |y 

1000 10-54 HOWLETT'S, PARIS, ILL. 



T > Grsat-Graat Grancbtetlwr Dr. Charles G, Shoot* s 
Tferrisc;? Liccnun 



Harrison SHOOT ana narriet BASH 

Harrison SHOOT, ay eternal great grandfather 4 was born on Novem- 
ber 11, 18U0 in La Belie, Lewis Co., Missouri. As a young mn $ he was 
j farmer, farming the family land belonging to ids father, Dr. Charles 
G. Shoot. On October 22, 1871 in Old Chariton, Missouri, he married 
Harriet B&SB. Harriet was born on October 2, Io>j in Connersville, In- 
diana. When Dr. Charles Shoot die J 187U, Harrison received nothing 
in the will, for the reason that he had had the use t the land for 
thes a years. However, the lard, too, was sold, and Harrison was left 
with virtually nothing. They moved and lived after that in Chillicothe 
Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri* and for & while i: Checotah, ~kla no- 
ma, iiarrison and Harriet produced a very large family, consisting of 
twelve children. They were, in order of age, ^tnie, Charles M., Olive ! 
Dora B.j Nellie L., Gracie 3., iriallace H», 51»ie F., James H. L«» 
Clara J., Bessie V., and Leslie H. Tiie total was nine wiria ana three 
boys. It was said of Harriet that she treated l*er hoys line cana- 
ries, or like "birds in a gilded cage". Only three bays out ox twelve 
children were probably hound to evoke that result in those tires, es- 
specially in a i'arner , 3 family. 

Iiarrison himself, though through had tiaes for part of his life, 
just loved to tease and joke. He aiSo iow'eu angel food cake, and 
called it "moonahin- ' because it was ^3 insubstantial. He died in 
Kansas City, Jackson Co., i'.issouri on June Ik, 1916, Harriet died in 
Hawthorne, L.A. Co., California. 



Ja?ies HcPHSRSOM and liancy 30Yl) 



James Mr.Ph«rson was born in Scotland on V&tGit 2£, lhlO. In 
America, he accumulated a fcaaisocta amount of land, on which ne farmed 
and raised animals. Or. iiarcn 1$, 1C>>, he Harried Ilancy Boyd, they 
bad nios children all togeusar, ihsy weae James j Henry '-.lay, Cath- 
erine, 'Uisa Jane, Wary Ann, ilancy ^llen, William (my great-great 
grandfather) , George, and John. These last theee boys were ail lost 
in the Civil War, in 1563. James provived for his survivors quite 
substantially as he owned nropert?/ i* both Madison Co., Illinois* 
(directly north of ?-ast St. Louis) and Logan Co., Kentucky (southern 
edge of Kentucky in the middle-western portion). In addition, he 
owned property in Butler Co., Kentucky, (north of Logan Co.,) and 
in his Will ha stated that none of this land should be sold until the 
sun ef 13.0,00 per acre could be attained, which was probably quite 
high for land prices In that day, though it Seems like a mere pittance 
today* The family finally actually lived in Iladison Co., Illinois. 
James diet there on October 20, iu79. Nancy died there also, only 
nine months before her husband. 



Hiliiaia KcPifBSON &nd Elisabeth ROGERS 

tfillian HcPHSflSOK was bom August 25, 1-336 while the family s;ill 

lived in Legnr Oc, Kentucky. lis was s big Scotsman, stprdirg 6n» tall 

sltx. gray eyes and dark Mir. tfe sarried *lisa>«?th Rogers, born Ir 

18kl,ifiTennessee. They had one Utile boy, James Hi 11? an, my great 

grandfather • In August of 1662. uhen the Civil liar was really getting 

going, William and oao of his brothers y;ant tc join up in their own 

town of Hero, Jiadison Co., Illinois* Tliey were all KUStered ir> on 

SepteWr 19, 1062, and all served in ths 117 Infantry— Cotapany "O". 

Carsp Butler, IU. 

The brother.? were probably lake sn aany others that joined up on both 
Sides expecting to whip ths eneisy in three months and cor.? home. For 
theae boyy, in three aonthi*, January through Harch of 1363, all were 
deed frcss the :m. The first vas George, a private, aged 20, who 
died on January k, 1863. The second -.ras Job::, also a private, a gad 
22, Who filed on February 3, 1663. Or. *%rch 12, 1863, William was sent 
hone on a disabled discharge for he was very ill. m? had had whet the 
niiitary doctor tensed "chronic diarhaa" for Seven or sight weeks, then 
pneutso i?.. They kept him until he was truly in deplorable shape, and 
on the raadicai section of the certificate for disability discharge, it 
ma Stated that he would yrobebiy die anyway, ife toe dysentery and 
paeu&imiaj and -jas finally paralysed be:: or- ha got hose. He died at 
home Seven days biter, on rfareti 1?, 18-53. After his death, his young 
aa: lived . it., the Jaiaes IWxsxa&'i fa:dly, Willian'S father* Eliza- 
beth died twelve years later at the age of 3h on June 22, 1875. 



Jawes William f-feFH5n3CE and ifatmah Anne LAWRSWCB 



James William KcPHFSSOK was the little boy whs went to live with 
his grandparents, Mr« &nu <-irs. James Mcpherson, he was nuch younger 
tfcati the other boys in the xanily, but was treated as the son oi this 
wealthy landowner, end vas very spoiled* lie had everything uone for 
him when he was young, and was given what woulc uve been his £ather*s 
?hare of the inheritance* , vhich included quit" a parcel ',-1 lend and 
noney. Therefore, si race he himself, Janes William, rras e landowner, he 
thfx'eht he .should also be a farmer. Here on that later. 

In the aeantiae, he fell in love with s very distant cousin, who 
was a hived girl for Janes McPherSen, Her nane was Hannah Anne tAW- 
KSNGB, Janes exposed this narriace, and so gave Janes W'illiaff. a new 
wardrobe and 100 yuid pieces so that he could go away and forget her. 
So he went away and "wore the clothes auad traveled and spent the 100 
gold pieces, but ne didn't forget Hannah, and caue no&e anu Berried her. 
Hannah haa come fraa a nice enough iariiiy, but was working as a hired 
girl because she was an orphan* Her parents had ciea when she was a 
young girl and this was the only way ^ supporting herself, do, Jar.es 
William narried Hannah Anne Lawrence, wi*o was barn near iloroj .-jadison 
Co., Illinois on April 25, 1863, on January 1?, l8o2« 

Jacies William and Hannah i*»d 3 larjj-s family of eleven children* 
They included Arthur, who died in infancy, Luis Ann, Us if. flay, Bessie 
"lien, Bffie (ay grandmother), Claude, Irene, Charles Frederick, James 
Lincoln, Ted Herbert, and liazel Sster. when Claude was 2 or 3, and 
Irene was only about 20 ~ 2- days eld, i^a 0 id e r>t girl, Lula Ann, 



happened to brint the measles houc during an epidemic and the whole fan- 
iXy got them* Hannah had to :'.ur* c . r. whole fanily including 2 very young 
beby With not even aspirin tr. keep the fever ,down» Claude and Irene 
both fror. the r-easles. 

Hannah had very fins ar.d beautiful ski n and she used to say it came 
trm fete steaK fror. banding ovrr tb? washtuba all the tir»«. Also, a 
story vn? told to ny mother abottt a tine when the family '.45s going to 
?*X33 in ,i wagon with a fan and mad? eanp about dusk, r^nnsh mada 
corn cakes for dinner with water from a nearby stream. There were snme 
left over ^:>r breakfast* When they broke the ccmcakes open ir. the 
morning, they -mt? very surprised to find that the strean water had had 
tadpoles in it and that setae vere baked inside the corncakes! 

Janes miliar. was a very handSeiae nan, with black hair and a red 
mustache* lie had deer very will educated while living with his grand- 
parents tut, as earlier stated, ha felt that he should be a farmer. tie 
had seae bad experiences and moved from one place to another, but could 
not auccee. will in the faming world. They Bent bo 'frxas, back to Ill- 
inois, to 'dissouri, and fi sally to Arkansas* But be dearly loved to 
hunt and fish ; which ray help to explain why he didn't succeed -jell in 
fatwing* He -^5 hard of terming, a trait that has unfortunately been 
handed ism through the. generations, Including; to r.y -1 other* Jonea 
#1 lilac died in Hen-ion, KiSSsiri, is? grajarln other's and Mother's none 
testa, an Hoverfbir £ a 1932. -fenneh died in Mender: a.'sc, on d ova: dber 30, 

1?44. 



Ray GftRLECK and Sdna Hae DEAN 



My paternal grandfather was born in Milnor, Sargent Co., -lorth 
Dakota on June 3, 1386. He via 5 a "bull headed" Englishman, with 
•wavy dark hair xfhen young (and almost entirely bald as he got older), 
and a very stocky 5 , 8" frame. He was very strong, especially his arns 
and hands and had an excellent physique. I can remember when I was a 
little girl and my grandpa and I would sit on the couch. He would fold 
his hands with his thumbs together, and try as I miynt, I could not 
pull them apart. I also got a real charge out of hin pepping his false 
teeth out at me just after he got them. He was quite a tease. 

He made his living as a painter and wall paper hanger, and ran a 
truck farm on the side, with the aid of the rest of the family. He was 
strong and good at his job, and also very mechanical, as my father is. 
fly grandfather, Ray, built the tractor th^y used on the farm. 

Taougn he had an excellent physique in general, lie had a limp as a 
result of a taunting accidmt when he was just a bojt. He was out hunt- 
ing with a step-brother (no one seems to knrw who it was) and the other 
gun went off accidentally, snooting my grandpa in the right heel. Almost 
the entire heel Done was destroyed, leavi-g him with quite a lirrp^ and 
finally with one leg Slightly shorter tnan the other. He wor^ Kangaroo 
leather shoes all his life because of this. They were evidently the 
most comfortable typ<* hie could find. 

Ray had be"n married once and divorced, but I cannot find out who 
his first wife vras. It evidently did not last long, and there were no 
children. As a young man, he W8S painting Harley .'jean's house, and 
met Harley' s daughter, Edna Mae, in the course of his work. They were 
married in Des Moines, Iowa on May 15, 1913. 



My grandmother, Edna Mae DEAN was born in Ft. Dodge, Iowa on lay 
1895. As a young girl, about 16 or 17, she attended a business college 
in Des Moines, Iowa and learned to type and to take shorthand. I remem- 
ber she always typed her letters, so she must have really like to type. 
She worked for a time before she married Ray. After that, she kept house 
and helped with the truck farm. She also had a greenhouse out back that 
Grandpa had built for her. She kept herself quite busy at the church, 
also, at that time, the Indianola Heights Christian Church. She w?s the 
superintendent of the Sunday School there for several years. A very 
skillful hobby Grandma had was crocheting. She did excellent work, and 
she crocheted a beautiful tablecloth, one each ior my sister and me. 

They had three sons: Ray Thomas, born June 13, 1917* Boyd Harley, 
born October 9, 1920, and my father Dean Franklin, born January 2, 1927. 
Ray Thomas Garlick married Madeline M?rkle, and they had one son, Ray 
Thomas, Jr., who is also Married now with two children. Boyd married 
Connie (I don"t know her maiden name) and they had one Son, who married 
and also had one son. Boyd and Connie are now divorced. Dean, my 
father, married Jane harriett* Shoot and hac. two children. But mare on 
us later. 

A f ter retiring and a few rore y^ars in Des MoineS, my grandparents 
moved to Maintain Hot-*, Arkansas, where they lived for 2 or 3 years. 
After that, they moved to Springfield, Missouri, i;h?re my grandfather 
die' of a heart attack on August 9, 1966. He enjoyed excellent health 
up till the nay he died. My grandmother beceme ill a couple years la- 
ter with cancer and was finally moved to a nursing home in Indianola, 
Iowa (near Des Moines, Iowa where my uncle Ray lives). She died there on 
May 23, 1970. 



James Harrison Lincoln SHOOT and Sffie McPtfiRSCN 



My grandfather, Janes Harrison Linciln SHOOT was born in a small 
settlement called Guthridge's Mill, which is no longer in existence, 
but was located near Keyetsville, Missouri* He was born on a farm there, 
and he always seemed to consider this part of the country hone. He was 
born on February 12, 1887. When he was lh, his family moved to Checotah, 
Oklahoma. James H. L. absolutely despised Oklahoma, and within a few 
months he went back to live with his uncle Marion Bash in Hendon, Ho. 
He became a carpenter, and a very good one, at that. 

On March 16, 19 10 he married Sffie McPHSRSON in Carrollton, Mo. 
They had three daughters. They were, Mary Bernice, born July 22, 1912, 
Doris Jean, born April 17, 1915* and my mother Jane Harriett^, bom 
November la, 1927, a gap of nearly 13 years between my mother and hrr 
next sister. Mary 3ernice married Uillard Glenn Manewal and had two 
daughters, Jan and Judy. Doris Jean married Charles Monroe Wescott, 
with whom she had two children., Marilyn, who was killed in an 3uto ac- 
cident just before her sixteenth birthday, and James William, born Oct- 
ober 3, 19246, ' , J 

a n. now narnec. himselfxor che second tine. Kjy mother 

narried Dean Franklin Gaxliok. They hau two daughters, Regira Jan-., and 
iara Dean (me). 

My grandfather was an excellent athlete and an especially cood has 
ball player. He taught my cousin, Vernon Kennedy, how to pitch, and 
Vernon went on to be a pitcher in the major leagues playinc fee- Chi- 
cago, Detroit, St. Louis, etc. One of his greatest joys in life was 
hunting and fishing, and he went every chance he got. He also enjoyed 
trap and ske?t shooting. My grandfather was very nusically inclined, wth 
a very nice tenor voice and he played the mandolin. In Mendon, he and 



.some other men had a small band called the "Yellow Cre^k Ramblers". (Yel- 
low Creek is located just outside of Mendon, Ho.) 

My grandmother, Sffie McPHSRSON| was born December 21, 1889, in 
Old Hendon, Missouri (located just a few miles from Mend on) . She was a 
pretty girl, only about 5*2" tall, and very intelligent. She liked 
school and was a member of the graduating class of 1909, the very first 
graduating class from the Hendon High School. From there, she went on 
to college in Rus.3e.Llvi lie, Kentucky for B year, then came home and worked 
as 3 baric teller. Unfortunately, she was teased for being so interested 
in schcol since most girls were not. She was especially interested in 
languages and took Latin and German in nigh school besides having an ex- 
tremely £ood kn owlidge of English. She ias a tremendous vocabulary, 
and to this day loves to work cross -word puzzles. (Grandmother is now 
86 years old.) After she was married, she kept house, was an excel- 
lent seamstress, and xitas a fanatic gardener. She raised both vege- 
table an - } flower gardens, and Gjtlnned many of her own fruits and vege- 
tables. See is also an excellent cook, arid seems to enjoy it. 

My grandfather and grandmother met in a rather strange way. when 
thej. were young, James H. L.'s brother used to court Sffie'S oider sis- 
ter, Lala, and Little James would used to come alonn and hide under the 
rosebush in the KfiPheraon yard. Whetner tney met then or later is un- 
knjrwn. 

My grandmother now loves to travel and goes all over the country 
by jet whenever she can. She has just recently been living with us for 
several months, and is now with my aunt Doris. Grandmother is one of 
the kindest, gentlest people I have ever known and I can honestly say 
titju 1 have never in my life seen her g p t angry or lose her . emper for 



any reason. She also is hard of hearing and is difficult fcc communi- 
cate with at times unless in quiet surroundings. Even x/ith the ag- 
gravation of her hearing loss, however, she is always calm , sweet, and 
helpful in any possible. 

riy graiiafathar developed a respiratory ailment later in life, pos- 
sibly emphysema. He had smoked since he was nine years old, which no 
doubt contributed t,o his difficulties. He died of congenital heart 
xailure on January k, 1962. 1-ty mother and 1 went down there from Rcck- 
frod when he was so ill. A neighbor and very good friend of the fa- 
mily, Luciie Larson, care to the train to pick us up (my grardraother 
never drove a car) and took us all tip to the hospital in Marceline. In 
the time it had taken to pick us up, Grandfather had died, ~ven though 
1 was only five 2'ears old, I can still remember the doctor sitting my 
grandmother clown and telling her out in the lobby. I bad gene in there 
with a picture of John F. Kennedy from the cover of Time magazine for 
my grandfather (he was a strong Democrat a d my motl>er was a strong 
Republican;, iieedless to say, I came back out of there with the same 
picture clutcned tightly in my hand. 



FUNERAL NOTICE 



JAMES H. SHOOT 

Passed away Thursday, January 4, 1962, at 
the age of 74 years, 10 m o n t h s, and 22 
days. 

Funeral from the Christian Church, Men- 
don, Mo., S u n d ay, January 7, at 2 p.m., 
Rev. Stanley Ray, officiating. 



The body will be at the Leipard Chapel 
until the funeral hour. 



My ffldt'srnal .crarvi-Oath^s funeral notice. 



Interment in Mendon Cemetery. 




Dean Franklin GARLICK and Jane Harritte SKOOT 



It la so difficult to write the histories of someone known in- 
tiriat'ly. It H3S difficult with ny grandparents, who I knew, but I 
know that I can never really do justice to reporting what I know of 
ray parents* for there are so many, nany small, everyday things that 
raean so much to me that I could never relate and would very likely not 
mean much to anyone else. Please bear with my feeble efforts* 

Ky father wr?3 the third son of Ray and Rdaa Dean GarHck, born on 
January 2, 1927 in Des Moines, Iowa. A3 a child and s young Tian., he 
vcrked helping his father with the truck .'arm they ran. My father in- 
herited ray grandpa's mechanical abilities, (to has told me that he 
fixed that old tractor So a»ny tines.... Nov, if he has the proper 
tools, he can fix altrost *nyth;.r.q mechanical, and even if he can't fix 
it, he kaQtf exactly her*' it works. It's amazinc. My father also is 
in excellent condition physically and a very good athlete. He enjoys 
skiing, skating, sxaissalng, ^o*.f , Softball, and nunerous other activi- 
ties including being an airplane pilot, which he dearly loves. He also 
enjoys hunting, though he hasn* t been on a hunting trip in several 
years. In the arr.r/, he l^ecane an er-gjert rarhsman with a rifle, with 
his hunting experience as a young nan standing hip. in jooi stead, no 
doubt. He used to hunt d^er with a bow and arrow, and was a good ar- 
cher. (He still is, I'm sure if he would just get going on it again! 
hint-hint.) 

In I9h?) he was drafted into the Army and at that time was in 
Japan, serving in the Army of Occupation. As previously stated, he 




My father, Dean F. Garlick, in high school 




3ack from hunting. 




ms an e:cpert marksman. When discharged, he returned to Des Moines, 
Iowa, and there held a series of odd jobs, as nost veterans did after 
the war. There also, he net my mother. 

One night when Jane was on the way to choir practice withe her 
friend, Opal, Dean and a friend Stepped on the way to est their dates, 
for they knew Opal» My mother didn't say muchj she didn't know tiicm. 
But the next weekend, when ny mother was out riding her horse, tney 
net again, talked, started going out , and 2v years later, were siar- 
ried. 

They were Harried on May 26, 19$C in the Park Avenue Pr 'S..y;?:ian 
Church in Des Moines, Ie»H8« They had two daughter Reglna Jane, on 
Deosfflber 1?, ip^i, and tie, Sara Dean, on November 2, lt'3'o. 

Hi' mother was bom or. Novenbsr 1U> 1927 j in Kendon, Missouri. 
She was like ire; sick often a:"? a Child and rather frail at that time. 
She 2lsc, i.: a very intellegxit vc*mn 2nd ^i-jcc,'-' scho-ai, still caking 
classes once in a -..-nils sinply for enjoyment and knowledge. She went 
to Drake university in DeS ;-bines, dcr»a for her first year and a half. 
Sne moved to Des HolneS after graduati on frost rteneior. High Scnoci to 
live with her Slater Joris and work to gzv ncney fcr school. She has 
alvrays 'had an excellent nind, ©specially for business. She runs the 
business aspect of ouz household, and !. *cps i r .peccable xecoras (She 
never throws anything away; the IRS can never prove us wring!) Her 
only weak points are chat she, too, is hard of hearing, and she is 
chronically late. My family and I have yet to understand it. 

Just after they were married, (less than a year), they bought a 
house in Des Moines. Uhen signing for the loan, the bank saic that my 
father dion' 'c ma.-ce enough to make payments. My mother told them that 



TO WED DEAN GARUCK 




Mr. and 11k 
Ja i es H irrison 
Shoot of 
Mendon, Mo., 
announce the 
engagement 

and 
approaching 
marriage of 
their daughter, 
Jane Harriett e, 
„ to Dean 
Franklin 
Gaiiiek, son 
of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ray 
t.arliik of 

llrs Mollies. 
MiSH Sliool 
attended Drake 
university and 
Mr. <iarli.k 
attended 
Industrial 
Training 
Institute in 
Chicago. 



Jfy Bother, Jane H» Shoot's engagement Pictur 



she, too, DBS working, which she was. What She neglected to tell 
then xras that she -was pregnant and would be working only a few more 
months. They got the loan, and the house. Just before my mother 
quit working, ttey decided to rent out the upstairs of the house. This 
turned out quite well, for the rent from this apartment made their 
house payments for them, with $2.i?0 a month left over! 

In 1952, my father, Dean, landed a job in Kansas City, Missouri 
as a paint department supervisor with the Seidlitz i'aint Company. So 
they moved to Kansas City and Lived 'Jaere until ir£?> when they came 
to Rockf ord, for Dean had a job with R ock ote-Va Xspar Paints. I san 
remember ry father ioing upholstery us a small sideline in his frea 
time, plus same painting and wall papering* which he. had learned from 
his father. Everyone says he should open his own repair service or 
the like since he is so mechanically inclined, and naybe Someday he 
will. From 1966 to the pr»s<»nt, h». has worked at Clinton Electronics* 

21y mother worked as a secretary with the Des Koines Static, • z > 
Company before she was married. Since then, she went bac'.s to work 
for a while after I was in school to help paj for a house for ay 
grandmother Shoot to live in after my grandfather died. She is new 
working again and as before, taking a class now and then* 

This past summer, to celebrate their 2$th wedding anniversary, 
my parents took a Caribbean cruise, which I think they enjoy- im- 
mensely'. ?tr whole family loves to travel, and this was the best 
gift they oould have given themselves. 

I have so Much more that I can say, but will close in saying that 
I have none of the standard teenage hassles with my parents. Vie have 



hac our rounh raonents of course, as aferyone does, but ior the moat 

part, they have done an exceptional job as parents and as people, and 

have wan both the love and respect of rany people, Including and es- 
pecially ny sister, Oina, and myself. 



and gumzi cHatxiion Skoc 

(Hi , i: p..- 

of the,:-. . 
Jan* : •> 

i ■ i 

- 

i 



Parents Vfcdding Invitatior 



Regina Jane GAT? LICK 



My sister, Pegina Jan*?, usually called Gina, was born In Mercy 
Hospital in Des Moines, Iowa on Decetfiber 19, 1951, in the midst of a 
virtual biizzsrd . So? Iws school now (she didn't especially like 
itbef or* college) and has her bachelor's degree in English Literature 
and her raster's d"gree in Asian Studies* She graduated from 'Guil- 
ford High School in I969. Since August of 15*75' » She nas been in 
Japan teaching English and learning more of the Japanese language* 
She is teased every once in a while abnut being a "professional stu- 
dent" . 

One of her greatest rwssi ens 5s travelling. She has been 3 great 
many places around the United States, plus Hawaii, Mexico, Puerto Rico 
and Japan. She is an excellent writer and has a great deal of ar- 
tistic talent* She enjoys dancing and the theatre and was in several 
plays and musics Is in high school and college. She has a sharp mind 
and at tines a sharp t ounce, a fierce sense of family loyalty, for 
she protected me many tines as a child. I'm sure she has a great fu- 
ture ahead. 




Sat a Dean G&RUCK 



Last but not least., is m>, Sara Dean Garlick, barn in St. Joseph 
Hospital in Kansas City, Kiss our i on November 3, iy'3'6. 1 was a sickly 
little chile and caused my parents many prchldms and medicai bills* I 
graduated from Guilford High School in the top 20 oui of about 65d 
students* I am in the r?cruit program at the Woodward Governor do. 
hare in town, with a guaranteed summer joe for sight years, thank 
heavens (with the employment situation the way it is now.) X enjoy 
business, money, people, and especially music* I sing, play five in- 
struments (sine) and an in = musical group iron my church, Bethssda 
Covenant, The New Revelations, Which for the past two springs nas 
done a concert tour of the Sast Coast. Vary enjoyable. Slat is why 
I an lii this ciai's, because I ca.ue to P.oci; Valley so that I could go 
on tour again, this year, and RVC'S spring break came at just the 
right time* I will be back down at fSU again this fall, and I am 
looking forward eagerly to my future. 




Ify sister, Ksgina, (left) ana as ;3aia> as children. 



GODARE, MARC I A LEE WERNET, 1949- 



LEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 



ear Contributor to the Kock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
merican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
ew mi n tues , and will be easily made ove r into an 1 ndex wh i ch will pe rmi t arch i ve users ready 
ccess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY * * * ft ft * -A- ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft 

~ - r> * OFFICE USE CODE 

I . Your name 

Date of form ^ <* f /I 7 </ t ( ' D * } 

1. Your college: Roc k Val ley College •'• (ID // ) 

Rockford, Illinois * 

***** * * * ft ft >v * * * ft >v * ft * * ft * * * ft * * -ft 
3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

V B efore 1750 1750-1800 1800- 1 850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 

'4. Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

j/New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Ma.) 

\/ S outh Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C. ) i^ East South Central (La. , Miss. ,A1 a. ,Tenn , 
i^W est South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., 0k.) y/ East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 
^ Paci f i c (Cat., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 

5. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

Farming Mining i/^Shopkeep i ng or small business 

Transportation Big Business (/^Manufacturing 

Professions Industrial labor i-^bther 

6. Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 



v/ Roman Catholic Jewish Presbyterian ^ M e thod i s t 

Baptist \/ Ep i scopa 1 i an Congregational Lutheran 
Quaker Mormon O the r Protestant Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans 

Jews Cenfal Europeans Italians Slavs 

u ^l r i sh British i/Native Americans over several generations 

Eas t Asian Othe r 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

1/ Interviews with other 1/ Family Bibles i/ Fami ly Genealogies 
f ami 1 y membe rs 

Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 

y Photographs Maps Other 



V 



. FAMI LY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name ^?rm t , n Udoj, U'erneV " Current Residence 



" d me (Merman uctus ^e'-ne-T 

I f dead, date of death Au.yl^j- j^gu 



Place of birth C^W ) Q^ lo Date of Birth OcU Ler , 

Education (number of years): 
grade school g e't^Mr high school ^ vocational col lege 4 [ov^r 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

<- / (after leaving home) 

lst^a/^ AVo.^yr Dates HtO- HVdst m^ci>- t Xk^( i 'ab ates 

2nd r<^cUr^ flAo^o^y r Dates ^ 2nd Dates 

3 rd Dates 3rd Dates 

* th . Dates i>th Dates 

Re 1 i g i on C &-4- U_ 6 ( | c 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. l\<g bo. tali c«a. ^ "B. PO. hL [ 

Mace of Marriage to your grandmother d ate ^~ ^ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name fMiUred El^keK. O'^rc^ U/ f rae-/ Current Residence 
If dead, date of death j ig3n 

Place of birth />UnCie ji-KcWu.a, Date of bi rth cTcj-^gr />5 , lg c ]Q 

Education (number of years): ^ 
grade school % ni 9 n school "4 ^ 1 vocational col lege Z Tu-'o 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

kill (after leaving home) 

iKcUvwt^ -ic^r/y^ r D ates l7/2-)f/ 3)st |\U K Cie , X k^,k ^ Dates fe^^/31 

2nd Kot^St; faj ,( <- Dates - 2nd Dates 

3 rd gX g c. u.-f-| CtJfV Dates /<?^- /^3 9 3 rd Dates 

^ tn Dates 4th Dates 

Re I i g i on C (xUyO liC 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc ^i^c < rA 



Place of marriage to your grandfather ~~, T ~~" K7y? — = -r— 

Note- If f nUna* ^K^a^n DATE vH c ke f,? 

tfial°^ta a SF! # fh^ a 8a£i'8f d tl(|§ ^J 8 ^) 3 stepmother or another relative give 



A- 1 StepgranJfather (your father's side) 



N tinic 


Current Residence 




If dead, date of death 






P 1 ace of birth 


Ua te or birth 




Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 


vocat ional 


col lege 


Occupat ion(s) 

1st Dates 


PLACE OF 
(after 

1st 


RESIDENCE 
leaving home) 
Dates 


2nd Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


'♦th Dates 


*4th 


Dates 


Re 1 i g i on 






Political parties, civil or social clubs, 


fraternities, etc. 










Place of marriage to your grandmother 




date 


Stpnnr^n Hnvi fhpr f ./nn r f afho r ' c c i Ack \ 

jLCf/(ji anuiiiuuici vy^ur rdUlci 5 S i oe j 






Name 


Current Residence 




If dead, date of death 






Place of birth 


Date of b i rth 




Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 


vocat ional 


col lege 





Occupat i on (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

lst _Dates 1st Date'. 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3 rd Dates 3rd Dates 

Re I i g i on 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Wajre£ Ariha-r Lerz-le.*- Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death (\^ r \\ 

Place of birth Lo^)5/jle ^gnWcjcy Date of bi rth 3nn<^ 11 , 1 %3 C \ 

Education (number of years) : *~ ~"~ ' ™ 

grade s chop 1 ff(e i'^kV ) high school ^({Wr) vocational col lege V (-Po^r ) 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

■ (after leaving home) 

1st aUor - f& -docv sa/d-s^/v. D ates I'lOb - /fr3 l st Teryt ^a.^ ^ D ates l^/S - /^a 

I 2nd 0-dv-g|4 l 5vn^ 5al<Stw,ak D ates H | 3 - 2 nd ft\g. k c i e ) _l Kg/ ( ^ D ates f < ?<3-3-/ < 7<^-> 
3rd |r\eu;ayfi pgr rnftKcvsr^d.WP ates fi/S --/%3 3 rd TuSC-OK. A r « e> * D ates [°\Z\-{ c iZL 

*»th Dates 4th Dates 

Religion Lu-fjveru. k. \o A\e |- cf i 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. fiet><^bl>c-6.^ A>tas<?n.s. jR 0 -roW PA/ 

jglV fng hS (LiuU, &a^4ry CKJp j TAeU. TkcHo, ' J 

Place 'of marriage to your grandmother Gr^o^f U rXTTTTT date 0c i. ^JS/^" 

Note: If your mother was raised by a ■ > itjp r a tn e r o r a r nnhe r r e l a ti ve ( t o a ge \8) 7 

give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 
Grandmother (your mother's side) 



Name /V\flH Locfcu-'QQC Current Residence 

If dead, date of death /^ uc ^ v |- l c ik,~7 

Place of birth P^rg T did^g Date of birth April fc5 , (gTO 

Education (number of years) ' / n 

grade school S^tkkV) high school ^ (four) vocat ion a 1 col lege V (-foi^rj 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

I 1 \ I (after leaving home) 

1st Cv^K^k 4 £^C he y Dates H/3~/f/S 1st Ycvu^ -L ^ ( <x- Dates \^3~\^i<J 

2nd rlpu.se Dates ^/-SW^^ n d Q?(eK E t y k, ] X H » ko/ s D ates I ^IV- 

3rd Dates ^rd~ rerre ^ Xk^ - a Dates H I £=3 



Religion A\eltvod [^f 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. fcepiiMi k. ^ K^pc-- C^cmun^ 

Place of marriage to your grandfathe r Gr£e^ cas/Zg.^if/^la date 2jT^J ZsCSE 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age 1 8) 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l 5 tepg randf athe r (your mother's side) 



Name 

I f dead . date of death 



Current Residence 



Pl.icr uf hi i Hi 
F 'luc.it i • in (mini 
'I i .iik* school 



Occupat ion (s ) 

1st 

2nd 

; . r : 

*Uh 



.f yen 



high school 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



I). Hi 



>l In i Hi 



vocal i on.i I 



oil ege 



lst_ 
2nd 
3rd_ 
*Uh 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your grandmother da te 



D-2 Stepgrandmother (your mother's side) 



Name 

I f dead , dat^ of death 
Place of bi rth 



Current Residence 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupat i on ( s ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



F*e I i g i on 

Pol i r ical p-irt,, 



Date of b i rth 



vocat i ona 1 



lst_ 
2nd 
3rd 



,i '.rial clubs, sororities, etc. 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



ace of marriage to your gran dfather 



Date 



CHILDREN of A & B (or A- 1 or B-l) - your father's name should appear below 
Name ^ ok K He>hn/ \J^rwe'{ 



date 



Place ot birth ///^ r ;> 

Number of years ot schooling / £) \j Occupation 3*1? 

Res i dence H- UJa yuc . ThJ,l /t . Ha 
Number of ch i 1 dren 



arital Sta t us /n^rhi'ec/ 



l ' Name A/prtnc^n Lga./^ kJet>K€~/ J 

P 1 ace ot birth A( g „ r , - e , x ^ , ^ n ^ d ate 6V, ^^/^/^ 
Number of years of schooling ,y ^ ~ Occupation ^/^yy^^ 

Residence SgJ Qd- G ■ g ffirTtal TtltuS A/^^ /W/ ^ r r ^ 

Number of chi I dren c/ ' ' " 



| Name 0 |p € y \ 
Place of bl rth 



1" rg. hC IS 



:hoo 1 1 ncf 



Number of years of sc., 
Res I dence Aji^h^lU, 
Number of children ~>f 



date 



y^i'^^ date /<? ,g / 

y (fa. Occupation hl g <^, 
Marital Status /j\*£^T?g/7 °^ 



I Name vO 



p,ace of birth ftin.Kc,^ j: M i^ Kgw date /f^2</ 

Number of years of schooling /£ {/ ^ ^ Tccupat 1 Oh fa^y/W^,, ^ - - /. ' 
Residence g^W, F>U & *,c Wff al l ta1 S tatus, ^ V ^< ^ 

Number of ch i 1 dren ' «s? — " 

Name /-Jglcgjr^ Uefrne.*/' 

Place of birth ,u u v\Ci f Iu(^k^l date / g £kC* 

Number of years of schooHrig • - Occupation — 

Residence q( ieA ^ Marital Status — 

Number of ch I 1 dren " — — — _ 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Residence 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



d"ate 

flccupat ion 



Mar I tal Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 
Res i dence 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



date 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school i ng 

Res i den ce " 

Number of chi ldren 



date 

Occupation 



Mar i tal Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school i ng 
Res i dence 

Number of ch i ldren 



date 



Occupat ion 
Marital Status 



). Name 



P 1 ace of birth 

Number of years of school ing 
Res i dence 



date 



Number of Ctrl l U r H ll 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C- I , D-l)-your mother's name should appear bel< 

N.imr k a \+€.y fit~4 Lut- /-(frz. /<£/- dr. 
* U \" " r TV,, c JTZmH j-r/.r/W,,^ date <fW ■ /6 , /9/6 

' ■ school i,n, // ;~ « Qccup^Tr ^ g^g 

lencc 3>ttf rt //i>r,7 /<? "~ ' 
Number of ch i 1 d rcn 



Marital Status />/^ t / , i'? c ( 



Name ///grl^ Lit-v K Lel^U*- iJe h K e 

'loco of birth >^.cW e- c date gCg / ; /SL , /<?/J> 
Number of years of schooling O^sHk . Occupat i on 7W< \ 72 , ; '<* Hea* u>A 
Residence UcrHhg5 1 „,■/,>, ,. Marital S tatus_i i /_^ £L1 _ : 
Number of ch i 1 dren "7"** 



Name 

P lace of birth 

Number of years of school i ng 
Residence 



Number of ch i 1 d ren 



<t. Name 

P 1 ace of birth 



Number of years of school i nq 
Res i dence 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



Name 

P I ace of birth ~~ 
Number of years of schoo 1 i ng 
Res i dence 



Number of ch i I dren 



6 . Name 

P 1 ace of birth 



Number of yea rs of schoo ling 
Res i dence 



Number of children 



Name 

P I ace of birth 

• of years of s choo 1 i ng 
Res i dence 

Number of ch i 1 rlrpn 



Name 

• • 7T< 

Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Number o ( children 



date 



Occupat i on 
Mari tal Status 



date 



______ Occupation 

Mar i ta I Status 



date 



Occupat i on 



Man tal Status 



date_ 

Occupa t i on 



Marital Status 



date 



Occupat iOn 

Marital Status 



date 



Occupat i on 
Mari tal Status 



Name 



Number ■,' /<■ ., r ■. of -, choo ling 
Numbe r of ch I I d ren 



. '< > ■'■ 



Place of birth 

'< ."•,<; r ',' f.,r: of -. ,.hoo 1 i ng 

Res i dence 

''■'■'tji-r of '.'.II dren 



date 



Occupa 1 1 On 



Marital Status 



date 



Occupat i On 



Marital 'a. it us 



I j if (after leaving home) 

<\ci,ZL/ne. sJ^sbo^ Dates e<xv\^ {^30^ 1st jW-z/ff Dates if -/ ? yj r 



5 

Your Father 

Name /Vf/yu^ Lolc/s /Ver/t g- / Current Residence 

If dead, date of death October Cr /c,&s> 

Place of birth /HahCif, j-Lnotia. Hcl, Date of b i rth 0c\ o b> e > ^G.H/^ 

Education (number of years 7 ' 
grade school ^ , high school <3 g A vocational colleg e 3 cyt 

Occupation(s) 5 PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

2nd cxc-l ye y\\ SI n c SaJaKa.n. Dates f ^ 3 C 1 - /^V^- 2nd -5a_ K Pr^kC , 5Q& ,g/,T. Dates /^^^ 

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/Va ^ ^- e -"'\ 10 Cm \ r Out - 
place of marriage to your 1 mother ' M^Tricfe; 3Tn,d iVk g_ d ate Ala^A /V 
NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 

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Name Current Residence Vmce-nne t) . J~ncL io-h.**- 

If dead, date of death Si^e. 

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Education (number of years) ' 
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Occupation(s) J PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

j . . • _ (after leaving home) 
lst lr.f Sr. iV.jv L.br^r^H, Dates -1^3 1st W/u+i ^ ] i- U^^a. Dates /*?<-//- 

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Place of marriage to your father /Hun'cie .X'ldii'a.n^ d ate />/^ ,. c / L 73 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 

Cr^^^ho^^ Co«.f. . . (it^plrt RcLuk>ldG',r\ St Ps+kfilTj AtcRoflt, S ^ 6jtf^K 

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If deac, jj:e of death 

Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat i on ( 5 ) 

1st 

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Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



1st 
2nd 
_3rd_ 
<4th 



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vocat i ona 1 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



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Political Parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



p lace of narriage to your mother 



Date 



F-2 S tepmothe r 
Name 

I f dead J date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat i on (s ) 

1st 

2nd 



3rd 



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Dates 
Dates 



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2nd 

3rd 



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PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
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Pol i t i ca 1 pa r t y , civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



FT ace of marriage to your father 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



date 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

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Number of years of schooling IQ £'c.k4-~ 



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Date of birth September 7, /16V 
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Number of ch i 1 dren 



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Number of chi Idren 



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Date of birth 



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Name 

Place o f birth 

Number of years of school i ng 

Res i dence _____ 

Numbe r of ch i 1 d ren 



Date of b i rth 
Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



Ii 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed 
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-2- 



S0URCE3 

Martha Letzler Wernet 

Marcelline O'Meara Mahoney 

John Henry Wernet 

William B. Wernet 

Assorted letters and documents 



-3- 

Norman Louis Wernet (paternal grandfather) 
Bom: October 10, 1883 in Canton, Ohio 
Died: August 1946 
Buried: Muncie, Indiana 

Education: Graduated Choate School, an eastern boys school; 
Graduated Ohio State University 

Occupations: Sales-service manager with Warner-Gear (now Borg 
Warner) in Muncie, Indiana; Took over the O'Meara 
sheet metal factory in Muncie, Indiana; Later 
returned to Warner-Gear in late 1920s 

Organizations: B.P.O.E. (Elks) ; Chi Phi Fraternity 

Religion: Catholic 

Politics: Republican (not active) 

Leisure: Euchre, golf, fishing, baseball 

Married.: Mildred Elizabeth O'Meara June 1913 in Muncie, Indiana 
Children: Four (sons) 

Mildred Elizabeth (O'Meara) Wernet (paternal grandmother) 
Born: October 5, 1890 in Muncie, Indiana 
Died: May 16, 1939 
Buried: Muncie , Indiana 

Education: St. Lawrence parochial thru sixth grade, Muncie, 
Indiana; seventh thru twelfth grades, St. Mary of 
the Woods private school, Terre Haute, Indiana; 
two years of Kindergarten Training School, 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Occupations: Kindergarten teacher around 1911-1912; housewife 
27 years 1913-1939; executive secretary 1930s 

Religion: Catholic 

Politics: Democrat 

Leisure :, Music , entertaining, cards, reading 
Travel: Throughout the U.S.A. 

Married: Norman Louis Wernet June 1913, Muncie, Indiana 

Children: Four (sons) 

(1) John H. Wernet , born 1914, gaduate of Indiana 
University; married Marjorie Shewmaker, also I.U. 
graduated; sales manager of a paint company in Ft. 
Wayne, Indiana; father of two children (1 boy,1 girl) 
both graduates of. I.U. son now in law school in 
Chicago , Illinois ; daughter married and living in Ft. 
Wayne; served as captain in the Army during World 



ll 



-4- 

War II 

(2) Norman Louis Wernet .Jr. (father) see page 

(3) Robert F. Wernet , born 1921, graduate of Purdue 
University; married Nancy Quinn,who attended Queens 
College, Long Island, New York; father of 5 girls (1 
a graduate of University of Louisiana, 1 a senior at 
University of Arkansas, 1 married and living in 
Australia, 1 in high school, 1 in kindergarten); vice- 
president and chemical engineer with Freeport Sulphur 
in Australia; served in World War II as a sargeant, 
1st class, in the Air Force, flew 25 missions in 
Africa and Italy. 

(4) William B. Wernet, born 1924, joined army at 18 to 
serve in World War II in the Army Medical Corps; 
married Cessia Pielock, a graduate of nursing school; 
father of 3 children (1 boy, 2 girls, son a graduate 
of Manhattan College and going to graduate school, 

1 daughter a graduate of University of Maryland School 
of nursing, married with 1 son, 1 daughter in high 
school); cardiology technician at Veterans Hospital 
in Boston, Mass. 

(5) Howard Wernet, born in 1926, died in infancy. 

Walter Arthur Letzler (maternal grandfather) 

Born: June 11, 1889 in Louisville, Kentucky 
Died: April 6, 1965 
Buried: Muncie, Indiana 

Education: Graduated Wiley High School, Terre Haute, Indiana; 

Recieved B.A. degree from DePauw University 1913 

Occupations: Worked way thru college selling cookware door 
to door; Terre Haute Post food advertising 
salesman; transferred to Terre Haute Star; went 
back to Terre Haute Post as business manager with 
stock options; general manager and part owner of 
Muncie Evening Press1924; left 1931-1936, while 
ill with T.B.; came to Muncie Press as advertising 
manager until Muncie Press and Morning Star 
merged at which time he became manager of both. 

Religion: Raised Lutheran became Methodist 

Politics: Republican 

Organizations: Muncie Mens Club, 33rd degree Mason, Rotary, 



-5- 

Deleware Country Club, Phi Delta, Theta Theta, 
Hoosier Press, Newspaper Editors and Publishers 
Association, Chicago Sons of Indiana 

Travel: Extensive throughout U.S.A.; Mexico; Europe; Canada 

Achievements: Many civic and newspaper awards 

Married: Mary Locltwood in Greencastle, Indiana, October 26, 1915 
Children: Two (1 son and 1 daughter) 

Mary Lockwood Letzler (maternal grandmother) 
Born: April 15, 1890 in Peru, Indiana 
Died: August 1965 
Buried: Muncie, Indiana 

Education: Graduated high school Peru, Indiana; recieved B.A. 

degree from DePauw University 1913; some courses 
at the University of Arizona 
Occupations: English teacher Peru, Indiana junior high school; 
teacher in Glen Ellyn, Illinois 19H-1915; 
housewife 1915- 1965 
Religion: Methodist 
Politics: Republican 

Organizations: Kappa Kappa Gamma, Psi Iota Xi,. American 

Association of University Women charter member, 
Conversation Club, Delphinian, Great Books, 
Deleware Country Club 

Leisure: Golf, reading, music, fishing, knitting, needlepoint, 
decorative gift items, flower arranging, gardening, 
board member of several charity groups, cards 
especially bridge. 

Achievements: Golf awards and bridge prizes 

Married: Walter Arthur Letzler in Greencastle, Indiana, 
October 26, 1915 

Children: Two (1 son and 1 daughter) 

(1) Walter Arthur Letzler, Jr. born October 16, 1916; 

died April 1, 1970; recieved B.A. degree from DePauw 
in 1939; married Dorthea Roberts; father of two 
children ( 1 son graduate of Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, married, 1 son , is an executive for 
I.B.M. in Detroit, Michigan; 1 daughter graduate of 
Miami University, works in marketing research for 
Procter and Gamble in Cincinati, Ohio); was among 



-6- 

1st drafted into Army during World War II; While in 
the service he was stricken with Multiple Sclerosis, 
a disease that attacks the central nervous system. I 
remember this disease slowly took its toll on him. 
He progressed from cane to crutches and was eventually 
confined to a wheel chair. He was a courageous man 
who never felt sorry . for himself and always exerted 
his fullest energy toward enjoying life. 
(2) Martha Linn (Letzler) Wernet (mother) see page 7 

Norman Louis Wernet, Jr. (father) 

Born: October 26, 1919 in Muncie, Indiana 
Died: October 6, 1968 
Buried: Vincennes, Indiana 

Education: 2 years of nursery school, parochial grade school, 
graduated Muncie Central High School 1937, attended 
Indiana University 1 semester, attended Ball State 
Teachers College 1 semester, attened University of 
Texas 1 year 

Service: Joined Navy in June 1942, served as chief petty 

officer, stationed in Brazil, recieved Purple Heart, 
honorably discharged in 1945 
Occupations: Sold weekly magazines door to door as a boy, 

worked in the classified advertising department 
of the Muncie Evening Press and Muncie Morning 
Star 1939-1942 and 1945-1947, advertising 
manager of the Vincennes Sun-Commercial 1947- 
1968 starting salary $50 a week eventually made 
over $10,000 a year. 
Religion: Raised Roman Catholic converted to Episcopalian 1953 
Politics: Republican but didn't always vote straight ticket 
Travel: Throughout U.S.A. and South America 
Leisure: Reading, fishing, cards, golf, wrestleing 
Organizations: Sigma Alpha Epsilon, B.P.O.E. (Elks), T.B.C. 

in high school, Y.M.C.A., Hi Y, Boy Scouts, 
Knights of Columbus, American Legion, Veterans 
of Foreign Wars, Harmony Society, Jaycees, 
Chamber of Commerce, Church Vestry for 10 years, 
Multiple Sclerosis Association, cheerleader 3 
years in high school 
Achievements: Head cheerleader senior year of high school, 



-7- 

President of T.B.C., Senior Warden of church, advertising 
award for special edition 1955, Vincennes University- 
byline award for outstanding editorial 1968, Honorary 
Demolay due to advertising, Red Cross award for outstanding 
service, board member of Harmony and Elks, Declined 
Jaycees outstanding service award twice because he felt 
others were worthier 

Married: Martha Linn Letzler March 13, 1945 in Muncie, Indiana 

Children: Four (2 boys and 2 girls) 

Martha Linn (Letzler) Wernet (mother) 

Born: October 12, 1918 in Terre Haute, Indiana 

Moved: Muncie, Indiana 1922 

Resident: Vincennes , Indiana since 1947 

Education: 1year of nursery school, graduated Muncie Central 
High School 1936, attended DePauw University 1936- 
1939, recieved B.A. degree from Ball State Teachers 
College 1941, recieved M.A. from the University of 
Illinois 1942 

Occupations: Librarian junior and senior high school in 

Whiting, Indiana 1942-1944, librarian and English 
teacher Blaine Junior High in Muncie, Indiana 
1944-1945, English teacher Lincoln High School 
Vincennes, Indiana 1964-1972 

Religion: Methodist changed to Episcopalian 1953 

Politics: Republican 

Travel: Throughout U.S.A. and northern Mexico 

Leisure: Reading, cooking, crafts, cards, music, knitting, 
swimming, flower arranging 

Organizations: American Association of University Women, Psi 
Iota Xi, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Episcopal Church 
Women, Vincennes Fortnightly Club, Kappa Alumni 
Association, Campfire Girls, Rainbow Girls, 
Queen Esther, Y.W.C.A., Methodist Youth Club, 
Tri Hi Y in high school and college, Pi Zeta 
at Ball State, Sewing Club, Episcopal Sunday 
school teacher and superintendent, Multiple 
Sclerosis Association 

Married: Norman Louis Wernet March 13, 1945 in Muncie , Indiana 

Children: Four (2 boys and 2 girls) 

(1) N.orman Louis Wernet III was born April 2, 1946 in 



-8- 

Muncie, Indiana. He moved to Vincennes, Indiana in 
1947, where he grew up and graduated 6th in his 
class from Lincoln High School in 1964. He recieved 
his B.A. degree from Indiana, University in 1968. 
After graduating from college he married Tammara 
Fraley,and they moved to Cleveland , Heights , Ohio, 
where Norman is a social worker for Cahyahoga county. 
He is active in the Episcopal Church and in his 
spare time sings with the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra. 
He was extremely active in school, church, and Demolay 
during high school while holding a part time job at 
the newspaper. His politics are Liberal Independent 
as veiwed in his lobby work in the Ohio state legis- 
lature for the welfare department. He has travelled 
throughout the eastern and southern U.S. In 1973 he 
and Tammy were divorced after a childless marriage. 

(2) Marcia Lee (Wernet) Godare , see page 9 

(3) Nary Linn Wernet was born September 7, 1954 in Vincennes, 
Indiana where she still resides with our mother. She 
graduated from Vincennes University, a junior college, 

in May. She will start Ball State University in 
Muncie, Indiana this fall. She is a member of the 
Episcopal Church, is a Sunday school teacher and has 
been in the choir. She enjoys reading, swimming and 
music. Throughout high school she was active in band, 
chorus, Girl Scouts and the drama. She belongs to 
Psi Iota Xi, and by attaining the Dean's List for two 
semesters she is in an honor faternity. 

(4) David Lockwood Wernet , affectionately called Lockie, 
was born October 28,1958 in Vincennes, Indiana where 
he still lives with our mother. He is an honor roll 
student in the ninth grade at Lincoln High School 
with aspirations to attend Annapolis for college. He 
is a member of the Episcopal Church, an officer in 
Demolay, a "asonic organization for young men, and 
until recently was deeply involved with Boy Scouts. 

He is a member of the Y.M.C.A., the high school track, 
basketball, and football teams, as well as the 
Vincennes swimming team. He has travelled throughout 
eastern, southern and southwestern United States as 
well as Mexico. He is an extremely busy young man, 



but one of his faviorite activities is singing which 
he does in many high school and community productions 

Marcia Lee Wernet Godare (self) 

Born: March 31,1949 in Vincennes, Indiana 
Resident: Rockford, Illinois since 1968 

Education: 2 years nursery school, graduate of Vincennes 
Lincoln High School 1967, presently a freshman 
attending Rock Valley College 

Occupations: Tourist guide in Vincennes, Indiana 1966-1967, 
housewife since 1967 

Religion: Episcopalian 

Politics: Liberal Independent 

Organizations: Girl Scouts, Tri Hi Y, Job's Daughters, Y.W.C.A 
Junior Fortnightly Club, Drama Club, band, 
church choir, Sunday school teacher, 4-H 

Leisure: Sewing, reading, music, walking, dancing, golf, 
cooking, swimming, poetry, camping 

Travel: Through out the U.S.A. 

Achievements: Delegate to Girl Scout Roundup 1965, several 
awards for arts and crafts, 4-H awards for 
cooking, Y.W.C.A. swimming ribbons, student aid 
certificate, awards for clarinet accomplishment 
Married: William Lee Godare in Vincennes, Indiana June 2, 1967 
Children: one daughter 

(1) Michelle Rene' Godare was born December 9, 1970 in 
Streetor, Illinois. We adopted her January 22, 1971. 



-10- 

Norman Louis Wernet 

Paternal Grandfather 
Norman Louis Wernet was born October 10, 1883, the second 
child of Louis John and Laura (Biechle) Wernet. Their first child, 
Howard, was born after their marriage in 1881 and died at the age 
of eight months. Norman's mother died in 1884 at the age of 29 in 
Canton, Ohio. 

Norman's father really had little to do with him. It is 
believed that Louis blamed Norman for the death of his wife Laura. 
Another bone of contention was that Norman wasn't too fond of his 
step-mother, Sophia (Baley). Louis was a prominent businessman in 
Canton, Ohio and was in the wholesale liquor business with his 
brothe-in-law Louis Miday. He was also the neighbor of President 
William F . McKinley and one of his campaign backers. 

Wernet is French and the family were winemakers in Alsace. 
There are buildings in Alsace today with the name on them. It was 
spelled Vernet until the Germans took over and changed it. Louis' 
father came to this country sometime in the mid 1800' s and settled 
in Ohio. 

Norman was raised by two aunts but I have been unable to 
gather the details. He was educated at eastern boarding schools and 
recieved his high school diploma from Choate School. He then went 
to Ohio State University, where he studied engineering and was a 
member of the Chi Phi Fraternity, one of the first college frater- 
nities in this country. After graduating from colleg he went to 
Muncie, Indiana to wrk for Warner Gear Corporation. Through a 
mutual friend he met Mildred Elizabeth O'Meara, a kindergarten 
teacher. 

Mildred Elizabeth (O'Meara) Wernet 

Paternal Grandmother 
Mildred Elizabeth (O'meara) Wernet was born in Muncie, Indiana 
on October 5, 1890. She was the oldest of the four children of 
Mary Esther (Tuhey) and Henry Francis O'Meara. She was two years 
old when the second child, Mark, was born. He only lived eight 
months, which caused great sorrow in the family. She was seven when 
the third child Miriam was and ten when Marcelline was bom. Being 
so much older than her sisters, she became very protective of 
them and practically adopted them as her "living dolls" which 
developed into a relationship of deep love and understanding. 

Mildred's parents were both first generation U.S. citizens. 
Both of their parents had immigrated to this country during the 



-11- 

"Great Hunger" of the 1840' s as the potato famine in Ireland was 
called. They were both the^youngest of five children, and while the 
O'Mearas settled in Buffalo, New York; the Tuheys established 
themselves in Muncie, Indiana. Tuhey is still a prominent family in 
Muncie both socially and politically having given the city two 
mayors. Both of Mary's parents were well educated, another point of 
distinction. Mary's family also helped establish the first Catholic 
church in Muncie, by holding mass for all parishoners at irregular 
intervals, when the priest came to town on horseback and stayed in 
the Tuhey home. 

Although Mildred's was only a family of three children it 
seemed much larger, because when her mother's older sister , Blanche 
(Tuhey) Griesheimer, died the O'Mearas took over the supervision 
of the four Griesheimer children until their father remarried. When 
they were older the went to boarding school, but their summers were 
spent with Mildred's family. 

Mildred's father was the owner, manager of the Muncie Boiler 
and Sheet Iron Works. He manufactured smoke stacks, boilers, and 
such, and he had a side interest in a plumbing company. The plant 
was not large, but they did most of the work of this nature in the 
area. At one point in his business career he had signed notes for 
two of his friends who went into bankruptsy. Although it took him 
sometime to do it, he paid off the notes to the last cent. When 
that was finally accomplished, the businessmen to whom he had been 
indebted gave a dinner for him at which they presented him with a 
brown cameo ring with gold flecks in it. This ring was proudly 
called "Father's Honesty Ring" by everyone in the family. 

Both of Mildred's parents were active in the Democratic party, 
although her mother was unable to vote until 1920. Mildred's uncle, 
Edward Tuhey, was elected mayor of Muncie twice on,the Democratic 
ticket. Mildred's father was also active in politics, serving as a 
councilman and on the board of public safety. 

Henry O'Meara's two older sisters, Mary and Anne, lived with 
the family. Anne died in the early 1900' s, but Mary was an 
autocratic, imperious, fun-loving, generous and kind woman with an 
obsession for cleanliness and neatness. There was also one member 
of the household with the status of hired help. There were several 
different ladies who worked for the family, and all were treated 
as helpers, not as servants. If she was white, she usually had her 
own room at the back of the upstairs. If colored, she generally 
lived in what was called "shantytown" across the tracks, and if she 



-12- 

had children, she brought them with her to play with the O'Mearas. 

The moral forces, or religion, aside from an occasional spank 
on the "behind", was the method of discipline in Mildred's family. 
The children were taught that it was a Sin to be disobedient, tell 
a lie, steal a marble, talk unkindly about others or use bad 
language. They were not only sins but also things for they would 
have to answer to God, as well as having to tell the preist in 
confession . 

Mildred's mother, by leading the children in the practice of 
the Catholic religion, was the binding force in the family. That is 
not to say that her father wasn't religious, he just didn't attend 
church much. Mildred's mother though, was a strong yet loving and 
gentle woman with her children. Most of her leisure time was spent 
driving a phaeton (a horse and buggy with fringe on the top) full 
of children to the park or to visit relatives or friends. 

By the time Mildred was of school age there v/as not only a 
Catholic Church (St. Lawrence), but also a parochial school. The 
school only went through the sixth grade, so she was sent to St. 
Mary of the Woods in Terre Haute, Indiana for the remaining two 
years of grade school and her high school years. Following that 
she studied two years at. a kindergarten training school in 
Indianapolis, Indiana. She had instruction on the violin at St. 
Mary's and continued that during her stay in Indianapolis. She 
had only taught kindergarten for a year in Muncie, when she met my 
grandfather, Norman Louis V/ernet. 

Norman and Mildred Wernet 
Paternal Grandparents 

Mildred O'Meara and Norman Louis Wernet, who was nicknamed 
Sara, were married in June 1913 in Muncie, Indiana. Norman's 
father and step-mother came to the wedding in a chauffeur driven 
automobile which was practically unheard of locally at that time. 

Mildred and Sam had a very gay and happy social life during 
the early years of their marriage, and Mildred v/as especially 
prominent in the civic affairs of the community. They were the 
parents of five sons: John, Norman Jr., Robert, William, and 
Howard. Except for Howard, v/ho died in infancy, the boys were all 
sent to St. Lawrence Parochial School during grade school and then 
to Muncie Central High School. They all were educated beyond high 
school, but this was interupted and later resumed after World War 
II. 

Their home was one of hospitality. In addition to all the 



-13- 

parties for their many many friends, Mildred and Sam were both 
very sweet, kind and generous to all the relatives. It was at 
their home that all the special holidays were celebrated by all 
the family, with friends dropping in and out and the children and 
their friends romping about. 

The great tragedy in their family was the death of their baby, 
Howard. He was a beautiful, healthy-looking child, about eighteen 
months old, when he was suddenly stricken with an extremely high 
fever and convulsions. The local doctors were baffled about how 
to treat him and recommended calling a specialist from Indianapolis. 
Sam hesitated because of the very high expence involved, but 
Mildred persuaded him to do it. The specialist brought with him an 
English nurse who had taken care of similar cases. She stayed at 
the house and she, Mildred and Sam were in constant attendance with 
the baby. Part of the treatment involved the use of both hot and 
cold applications. Sam took over the constant wringingiout of 
very hot bath towels, which had to be changed so frequently that 
it was an almost constant process. Little Howard only lived about 
a week after he was first stricken. 

About the same time as the baby's death Mildred's mother was 
forced to sell the family business. Sam had earlier left his job 
in the purchasing department at Warner Gear to take over the 
management of the Muncie Boiler Works. It was a business that was 
totally foreign to him, so he was very dependent upon the foreman 
of the factory to help him draw up specifications, to know how 
much and what materials to order, and even how to talk to customers 
about their particular needs. The foreman, after some years, 
decided that he could take over the business. He made Mildred's 
mother an offer and said if she didn't accept it he was prepared 
to go into competition with her, since he had secured finacial 
bacting. There was nothing to do but sell, so Sam had to return 
to Warner Gear with hat in hand. 

His grief over the baby's death combined with his discour- 
agement with business affairs at the beginning of the depression 
was the cause of Sam's starting to drink more than he should have. 
This, in turn, caused some estrangement between Mildred and Sam. 
Their social life deteriorated and Mildred became even more involved 
in community affairs. She was a very dynamic person who seemed to 
achieve success in whatever she undertook. Sam was an intelligent 
man but not agressive. He was considered a gentle gentleman with 
a quiet sence of humor and deep emotional feelings. 



When Sam's father died his estate was left in trust with the 
income from it going to his second wife during her lifetime. A 
lawyer cousin was the administrator of the estate and did some 
personal speculating with the money resulting in losses. 5am 
recieved little from his father, and this also must have been a 
frustration for him. His sons inherited what was left after Sophia 
Wernet died. 

Around 1930 Mildred went to work full time for one of the five 
Ball brothers of Muncie, Arthur. (The Ball's manufactured canning 
jars and made a fortune.) Her first project was the management of 
a dairy farm until she got it on a going basis. The second was the 
renovation and refurnishing of an old hotel he had bought (the 
health resort in French Lick, Indiana). After that she became sort 
of an executive secretary for him working on special projects in 
which he was interested. 

When Mildred went to work full time her mother, who the boys 
affectionately called Mammaw, moved in to supervise the household. 
They always had a maid, but Mildred wanted an older member of the 
family at home when the boys came home from school. Mildred's 
mother was very fond of Sam and she did stay with him and Bill for 
awhile after Mildred died, although eventually she went to live with 
her youngest daughter, Marcelline, in New York. 

Mildred was sick for a couple of years before she died of 
Hodgkins Disease on May 16, 1939. At the time of her death John 
was at Indiana University, Norman was at the University of Texas, 
Bob was in high school, and Bill was in junior high. 

After her death Bob joined the Air Force, and Norman came back 
to live and work in Muncie. Norman, Sam and Bill lived together 
until 1942 when Sadie, the hired girl, left and Norman joined the 
Navy. Bill also left home in 1942 to live with his Aunt Marcelline 
in New York during his senior year of high school. 

After the boys were gone Sam moved into a hotel. This was 
easier for him since he had been in failing health due to a heart 
attack since Mildred's death. When Norman and Martha Letzler were 
married and Norman had been discharged, they returned to Muncie to 
be near Sam. He died in August of 1946 but had lived long enough to 
see his first grandchild, my brother and his namesake, Norman Louis 
Wernet III who was born in April of the same year. 



-15- 

Walter Arthur Letzler 

Maternal Grandfather 
Walter Arthur Letzler was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1889 
after his parents, Jacob and Louis (Mauer) Letzler, moved there 
from Cincinnati, Ohio. He was their fourth child but the second of 
the three that survived early childhood. In July of 1885 his first 
sister, Lulu age 3, and brother, Jacob age 2, died within a few days 
of each other during a diptherea epidemic in Cincinnati. His older 
brother, Albert , was born in November of the same year, and two 
sisters Mary and Susan were born in Louisville in 1892 and 1894 
respectively. Mary died, shortly after Susan's birth> in 1894 in 
Cincinnati, where she had evidently been taken to prevent infecting 
the other children. 

Sometime during the 1890' s the family moved to Terre Haute, 
Indiana, where Walter's father opened his own business as a cabinet 
maker. The family's economic situation was not such that they could 
afford to pay for a college education for their children, but the 
children were encouraged to expand themselves to the fullest 
capacity. 

After graduating from high school Walter worked a year selling 
pots and pans door-to-door to save enough money to start college. 
He continued in this occupation while attending DePauw University, 
where he met Mary Lockwood. When they graduated in 1915 they parted 
with what was then known as an "understanding" of their intentions 
to marry. To suppliment his income in college he served as the house 
manager of his fraternity as well as the business manager of the 
school yearbook. After his graduation from DePauw Walter sold food 
advertisements for the Terre Haute Post. Later he transferred to the 
Terre Haute Star, where he worked in the advertising department. 

Mary (Lockwood) Letzler 

Maternal Grandmother 
At this point I am injecting a few historical factors in the 
background of Mary Lockwood. Her grandmother, Margret (Woods) Waite, 
had a great- great-grandfather, Joseph Woods. He had been brought 
to this country in 1728 at the age of 4 by his parents from Tyrone 
county, Ireland. Although his father and eight other brothers and 
sisters died enroute, he and his mother settled with an older 
brother, Samuel, in Phil idelphia. Around 1750 they all moved to 
South Carolina. There Joseph became quite wealthy and being an 
active Whig was appointed as a delegate to the First South Carolina 



-lb- 
Congress from the New Acquisition. He died in 1776 and on a silver 
plate on his casket are the words "Liberty or Death". His son, 
Andrew Woods, served under General Francis Marion during the 
Revolutionary War and later migrated to Ohio. 

Mary's great-great-grandfather on her father's side was also 

a Revolutionary War soldier, Andrew Jackson (not the president). 
Through this line they were also related to Charles Carroll, one 
of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 

Mary's father was William Wirt Lockwood, who as a young man 
had discontinued his education at Wabash College to enlist in the 
Civil a ar . h fter his tour of duty he worked in an Indianapolis, 
Indiana post office. While visiting reletives in Miami county, Ind- 
iana, he mentioned he wished to be married. Someone suggested he 
visit Mary Eliza Waite who was a school teacher twelve years his 
junior. He then remembered having seen her as a baby in her cradle. 
After they were married around 1869, William became superintendent 
of schools in Odell, Illinois. He decided to come back to Peru and 
bought into the Peru Republican, eventually becoming the sole owner 
and editor. 

Mary (Lockwood) Letzler was born in 1890 in Peru, Indiana and 
was the ninth of ten children of William and Mary (Waite) Lockwood. 
Her brothers and sisters and years of birth were Charles 1870, 
George 1872, Helen 1875, William 1876, Elizabeth 1880, Arthur 1882, 
Albert 1884, Edward 1887, and Dorthy 1893. The family lived in a 
large brick house on an acre of ground in a section north of Peru 
called Riverview. Although the older boys, Charles and George, were 
in college when Mary was born, the house always seemed full of 
people. All of the children were free to bring home anyone they 
wished. Their 1 s v/as a home of harmony, security, and plenty. 

While no one in the family expected luxuries, there was never 
any mention of not being able to afford things. The family kept 
two horses, a carriage and a buggy. Due to the system of magazine 
and paper exchanges the family took practically every periodical 
then published. Also at that time book publishers sent editors 
copies of all new books, therefore; their house became the best 
library in town. Among their collection was an autographed book by 
James Whitcomb Riley as well as an original " Bird Book " by James 
Audubon. Some other courtesies affored the editor's family were 
trip passes on the railroad and free tickets to all concert and 
shows. The family had little cash but could charge anything they 



-17- 

needed, because the merchants ran advertising to balance the 
accounts. The one luxury the family did manage was a hired girl 
who was made to feel like a part of the family. 

The basement was used as a storehouse. There were bins of 
apples, potatoes, sweet potatoes, pears, turnips and cabbage. There 
were shelves of jars filled with honey, jelly, canned fruits and 
pickles as well as barrels of cider which turned to vinegar, jugs 
of molasses, maple syrup, jars of lard, and barrels of sugar, flour, 
and crackers. The family raised chickens but most of their meat 
came from farmers who used this, produce and loads of wood to pay 
for subscriptions. Mary's mother baked frequently as evidenced by 
the pies, cookies and cakes always around. 

On Saturday nights the galvanized tub v/as brought into the 
kitchen. The wash boiler was kept filled with v/ater to heat, and 
everyone had a hot bath with a change of long underwear in the winter. 

On Sunday morning everyone was at Sunday school by 9:30 and 
after that, church. Mary's father led the Methodist choir for over 
30 years. Charles, George, Helen, Bess, and Arthur sang in it. Ker 
mother usually killed and dressed four chickens on Saturday night, 
which were fried or baked for Sunday dinner. Anyone could bring a 
guest for dinner but frequently would have to sit at the second 
table. Sunday night there v/as always baked beans, cold meat, pie or 
cake, and in the summer a great big freezer of ice cream. 

The amusenents were simple. In summer Mary played games with 
the other children and in the winter they all went sledding. Since 
their house was always full everyone read frequently. Sometimes 
Mary's parents would take a buggy ride and two of the children 
would go along. 

Mary's closest friend was Desdemona Bearss. Des had a team of 
black shetlands, a small carriage with fringe, and they spent many 
hours driving the ponies together. Mr Bearss also bought a brown 
Shetland, which no one but Mary rode. Another close friend growing 
up was Cole Porter. 

Mary's father was the undisputed head of the family and a 
respected community leader. Although Peru is now considered a small 
town, it was then an important railroad center as well as the winter 
headquarters for the Hagenbach and Wallace Circuses. The Lockwoods 
encouraged their children to have high morals and goals, and 
education was equally important. Two of Mary's brothers, William 
and Edward, helped establish the Young Men's Christian Association 



-18- 

in China. Another brother, George, followed in his father's foot- 
steps by establishing newspapers in Muncie and Marion, Indiana as 
well as the National Republican Magazine in Washington, D.C. He 
was also the author of " New Harmony Movement " about the Rappite 
settlement in southern Indiana, and also a ghost writer for 
President Herbert Hoover who invited him to the White House 
frequently. 

Mary's father died around 1906 from injuries recieved in a 
traffic accident. It seems that G-abe Godfrey, one of the chiefs of 
the Miami Indians, was a cab driver. One night when Gabe was drunk 
he ran into William's carriage and his injuries led to gangreene 
which caused his death. Since all of her other children had left 
home Mary Eliza moved to Greencastle, Indiana with her two remaining 
daughters, Mary and Dorothy. 

. While living at home Mary attended DePauw University, where 
she met Walter Arthur Letzler whom she dated off and on throughout 
her college days. They graduated in the same class of 1913 and 
went their separate ways. Mary taught grade school for a year in 
Peru and one year of junior high in Glen Ellyn, Illinois. 

Walter and Mary Letzler 

Maternal Grandparents 
In October 1915 Walter Letzler married Mary Lockwood, his 
college sweetheart, in Greencastle, Indiana. They went to live in 
Terre Haute, Indiana where Walter Jr. was born in October 1916 and 
Martha Linn, my mother, was born in October 1918. Around. 1918 they 
bought a duplex house so that Mary's mother, Mary Eliza Lockwood, 
could live next door. Later when the family moved to Muncie, Mary 
Eliza did also. In Muncie she lived in the same household due to 
an accident which caused her to use a cane, she wasn't able to get 
around as well. She viited her other children around the world but 
Walter and Mary's was her home until her death in 1927 at the age 
of 79. 

Sometime between 1915 and 1919 the Terre Haute Post asked 
Walter to come back, but this time as the business manager with 
stock options. In 1921 Mary's brother, George, was having financial 
difficulties with his paper The Muncie Evening Press. Since Walter 
had proven himself, George asked him to become general manager, as 
well as editor and part owner. Walter squarely accepted the 
challenge and moved to Muncie, Indiana ahead of his family in 1921. 
They followed in 1922, and moved into a large old farm house which 



-T9- 

they renovated in order to be near school, shopping, and work. 

In 1931 Walter became ill with tuberculosis and was given 
only six months to live. The worries of the newspaper business 
coupled with the countries financial situation at the time are 
presumed to have brought about his condition. Kis only hope of 
recovery was to have complete bed rest in a warm dry climate. To 
this end the family moved to Tucson, Arizona for five years coming 
back to Muncie for periodic visits. Frequently on these trips 
to and from Arizona they would take the long way in order to 
sight see. They probably lived on a smaller income during this 
period, but between stock dividends and a health insurance program 
that Walter belonged to (At the time Walter bought life insurance 
it was also possible to buy health compensation insurance of an 
equal amount.) the family had around a 310,000 annual income. While 
in Arizona their Muncie home was rented, because it would have 
been dangerous to leave it vacant with so many people starving and 
homeless . 

When Walter came back from Arizona, he served as advertising 
director of the Muncie Evening Press until it merged with the 
Muncie Morning Star. At that time he once again took on the reigns 
of both papers, a position he maintained until his retirement in 
1963. 

Walter and Mary lived a very active political and social life. 
They were both strong Republicans, supported several charities and 
were active members of the Methodist Church. If their children 
ever needed a financial hand, Walter made it clear that he was 
available; not because he thought his children needed it, but 
because he wanted to see them enjoy some of his own prosperity 
while he was still alive. 

As the years progressed they travelled more and more. While 
in Arizona they took advantage of the opportunity to visit northern 
Mexico. Regularly for many years they spent January and February 
fishing and relaxing with a regular group of friends in Florida. 
After they returned from Florida, during March, they would attend 
a newspaper publishers and editors convention in New York City, 
where they would nightclub and view the latest shows on Broadway. 
Around 1960 they took an extensive European tour, and at the time 
Mary became ill in 1963 they had arrangements for a world tour. 

Theirs was a prosperous life. They were always able to afford 
hired help. One girl, Annie, who had worked for them at the time 



they were planning to move to Muncie, asked to go along. Her 
father was a coal miner in southern Indiana, and she felt trapped 
in her situation. She moved along with the family but soon went 
her own way after obtaining employment as a telephone operator. 
There were a number of girls who came and left, and if she didn't 
live in her hours were 7:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M. Two girls on 
separate occasions worked and lived in while attending Ball State 
Teachers College. After Walter Jr. and Martha had left home Mary 
only needed part-time help, a couple days a week and on special 
occassions. For over 30 years they also had a regular handy man, 
who was known as Ernest. These people were treated as part of the 
family, paid well and aided financially if they needed help. Some 
were black and some were white but all were equal. 

Mary suffered from sciatica in 1949 and 1950 and was bedridden 
for nearly nine months. During this illness she became addicted 
to the morphine used to relieve her pain, and immediately upon 
realizing what had happened she went to the hospital to overcome 
her problem, which she did. Mary had a kidney removed in 1957, and 
Walter had a successful cancer operation in196l. Even though they 
had a few serious illnesses, they both enjoyed reletively good 
health; until 1963 when Mary had a nine hour gall bladder and 
cancer exploratory operation. The doctors found cancer of the 
pancreas and had to remove 2/3 of her stomach to achieve success. 
Her health quickly slipped to a low ebb. At that point, around 
Christmas 1963, Walter retired, something he vowed he'd never do, 
to take care of her. Towards the end of the year in 1964 it was 
discovered that Walter had lung cancer, and the doctors would be 
unable to operate due to his history of T.B. Although he underwent 
cobalt treatments to check the cancer, he died in April of 1965. 
For over a year their daughter, Martha, made regular weekend trips 
to be with her parents, who were able to remain at home with a 
housekeeper and nurses. Shortly before Walter died Martha came to 
stay v/ith her parents and to take care of them until Mary's death 
in August 1965. 



-21- 

Norman Louis Wernet Jr. 
Father 

Norman Louis Wernet Jr., the second child "of Norman and 
Mildred (O'Meara) Wernet, was born in Muncie, Indiana on October 
26, 1919. He was a relatively healthy child until the age of eight, 
when he had measles, mumps, and chicken pox during an overlapping 
period of time. This poor state of health led to rheumatic fever 
and a heart murmur. He was sent to a health clinic in Battle Creek, 
Michigan because of his heart and a shadow on his lung. Fortunately 
he didn't have T.B. assuspected and the heart murmur eventually 
cleared up. During this time he was forced to miss the third and 
fourth grades. To correct this situation he was tutored by a 
childless friend of the family, Mrs. Fred (Agnes) Jones. A friend- 
ship developed between them that lasted throughout her life. She 
was a warm woman who was very good with and very fond of children. 
She made it a point to visit all the sick children of her friends. 
Therefore, at the time she was tutoring Norman, she was also 
spending a great deal of time with Martha Letzler, his future bride. 

Norman was quite close to his three brothers, Jack, Bob, and 
Bill, considering the age differences. His youngest brother Howard 
died in infancy. His was a large Catholic family with a deep sence 
of religion and family unity. The rules of the Church were intri- 
cately woven into their daily lives. 

He went to nursery school for two years before attending St. 
Lawrence Parochial Grade School and then going on to Muncie Central 
High School. In high school he was very active in many groups and 
served as the president of T.B.C., a high school fraternity. He was 
also a cheerleader for all three years and served as the captain 
of the squad during his senior year. At that time he was known as 
"Wernie" Wernet and was game for anything. Most summers as a teen 
were spent at Camp Crosly, a Y.M.C.A. camp. Sometimes his parents 
rented a cabin in the Muncie colony on Tri Lakes in northeastern 
Indiana. 

Norman started college at Indiana University but had to drop 
out when he had an emergency appendectomy. He attended Ball State 
Teachers College while he was recuperating from the operation. He 
had always been bothered by allergies and hay fever. Therefore, 
sometime during the summer of 1938, while his mother was undergoing 
cobalt treatments at the Mayo Clinic, he accompanied her and under- 
went a sinus operation. The doctors reccommended he go to a 
southern climateto help his condition. He then attended University 



-22- 

of Texas until his mother died in May 1939. 

His mother's death was very hard on him as it also was for his 
whole family. She was an extremely dynamic woman and to lose some- 
one like that can be shattering to say the least. Norman was similar 
to her in many respects. He was also a dynamic personality, always 
the leader, sensitive, yet firm. He had a great philosophy, which 
was to live life to the fullest enjoying every moment. He also 
believed in having people laugh with you and not at you. This was 
evidenced by his robust, infectious smile and laugh that everyone 
found irresistible. 

Upon his return to Muncie, he started working for Walter 
letzler in the advertising department of the Muncie newspapers. 
Norman had always loved the newspaper business and especially the 
selling angle. As a young boy he sold magazine subscriptions door- 
to-door and had one of the largest routes in Muncie. He started 
dating Martha Letzler more frequently at this time for she was 
then attending Ball State and living at home. He lived with his 
father and youngest brother, Bill, until 1942 when he joined the 
Navy in June. He came home shortly in 1942 to attend his Grand- 
mother O'Meara's funeral for she had played an important role in 
his growing up. He became a chief petty officer and more specifically 
was the executive secretary of Captain Ivy, stationed in Brazil. 
He also flew on a few missions over North Africa. On one such 
occassion his plane was shot down over the Atlantic, and he 
recieved a purple heart for injuries he sustained. He came back 
to Muncie on leave in 1945 and married his life long friend and 
sweetheart Martha Letzler. 

Martha Linn (Letzler) Wernet 
Mother 

Martha Linn (Letzler) Wernet, my mother, was born in Terre 
Haute, Indiana on October 12, 1918. She was the. second child of 
Walter and Mary (Lockwood) Letzler. She had one brother, Walter Jr. 
who they all called Art. Theirs was a family of close relationships 
based on love and understanding. This was a family that hugged, 
kissed and cuddled unashamed. 

When she was four Martha's father moved his family to Muncie, 
Indiana. One of Martha's recollections of this time was the 
purchase of the family's first automobile. After the move Martha 
was so lonesome, not knowing any small children, that she created 
two imaginary playmates, Dese and Dice, who were her best buddies 
for years to follow. Martha's early childhood was plagued with 



-23- 

almost constant illness due to ear infections. This resulted in 
her being a very nervous and undernourished child until the age of 
nine, when after losing her hearing she underwent a double mastoid 
operation and regained almost perfect hearing and health. During 
this period of illness in her life she grew very close to her 
grandmother, Mary Eliza Lockwood, who lived with Martha's family 
until her death in 1927. 

After overcoming her illnesses Martha became an active, healthy, 
happy child. She was active in the Methodist Church and various 
school groups. She proved to be a bright student and her parents 
were looking forward to the day when she and Art would be going to 
DePauw University. 

Martha was virtually unaffected directly by the depression, 
but in 1931 her father was stricken with tuberculosis. She moved 
with her family to Tuscon, Arizona. Although her contact with her 
father was limited, because he was still at the contagious stage, 
he would communicate with the children through humorous letters 
which they in turn would answer. Martha's mother also tried to 
shield the children from the dire possibilities by creating an air 
of normalcy around the house and taking them on various outings of 
an exciting nature. 

Her brother, Art, graduated from high school in Tuscon in 1935 
and was to start college at DePauw on a Rectors Scholarship in the 
fall. Since her father's condition was on the upswing, her parents 
permitted her to live with their closest friends and neighbors, the 
Robert Burts, in Muncie; therefore, Martha could graduate with all 
her friends from Muncie Central High School. She had known Norman 
Wernet since nursery school, but they became better friends and 
dated some during her senior year of high school. 

After graduating from high school Martha started college at 
DePauw. She led a busy social life and was active in Kappa Kappa 
Gamma Sorority. When Martha was a sophomore and Art a junior, he 
went to Germany as an exchange student at the university in 
Freiburg. This was during the school term of 1937-1938 enabling 
him to witness some of Hitler's tyrany while living with a 
prosperous industrialist of the Third Reich. 

Martha graduated from Ball State Teachers College in 1941 and 
recieved her masters degree in library science from the University 
of Illinois in 1942. While attending Ball State and on weekend visit:-, 
home from the U. of I. Martha started dating Norman Wernet steadily. 
They had decided to marry but were waiting to see about Norman's 



draft possibilities when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. 

Martha was the librarian for the junior and senior high schools 
in Whiting, Indiana from 1942 to 1944. She quit at the end of the 
school year in 1944 because she expected Norman to be home on 
leave soon. While living in Muncie with her parents she was offered 
a teaching and librarian position in a junior high. She accepted 
this on the condition that no matter when Norman came home she 
could take a leave of absence and marry him. 

Norman and Martha Wernet 

Parents 

Norman Louis Wernet and Martha Letzler were married after a 
long courtship on March 13, 1945. They were wed by Norman's second 
cousin, Father Edward Sweigart, in the St. Lawrence rectory in 
Muncie, Indiana. Norman only had a thirty day leave before he 
would be sent to the west coast. They spent a short honeymoon in 
Chicago, Illinois and the remaining time visiting family and friends 
that Norman hadn't seen for three years. 

Martha stayed in Muncie because they assumed Norman would be 
stationed in the Pacific. But events enabled her to join him at his 
new post in San Francisco. They fell in love with the city and 
Norman lined up a job with an advertising firm. Upon his discharge 
in October of 1945 they went back to Muncie for a short visit. He 
realized at that time how seriously ill his father was, and he and 
Martha decided to give up their dream so they could be with him. In 
April 1946 Norman Louis III was born and in August Norman's father 
died . 

Norman worked for the newspapers when he came back to Muncie. 
The papers had been recently merged into a larger chain owned 
primarily by Eugene Pulliam. In 1947 a job as advertising manager 
opened on one of the other papers, The Vincennes Sun-Commercial in 
Vincennes, Indiana. They felt this was a good opportunity to move 
since there is definitely a stigma being married' to the boss' 
daughter. 

They established themselves solidly in Vincennes. Three of 
their children, Marcia, Mary Linn and Lockwood, were born there 
and Martha still resides there. Norman was active in several civic 
and social organizations as well as being a silent political leader. 
He couldn't afford to be too bold about his political inclinations 
because it would hurt his advertising 3ales. He was a dedicated news- 
paperman and advertising keeps the presses rolling. 



-25- 

Martha was also deeply involved with activities, social and 
civic, in Vincennes. She was able to do this even with a family of 
four children by hiring part-time help and by teaching her children 
the value of responcibility . She also taught her children how 
important it is to be involved and consequently they all were. 

Around 1953 they decided to join the Episcopal Church. Norman 
had been raised in strong Catholic family but became somewhat 
disenchanted with the Church while he was in Brazil. Although 
Martha was Methodist, she promised to raise their children in the 
Catholic faith. Sundays were busy because she would take Norman Jr. 
and Marcia to the Methodist Sunday school before Norman would take 
them all to the Catholic mass. On Christmas Eve 1953 he discussed 
his intentions with his brothers and his Aunt Marcelline in New 
York. They all understood his feelings and told him to do what was 
right for him. Martha and Norman became extremely active in the 
Episcopal Church and their children are also Episcopalians. 

The one charity that Norman and Martha put their whole heart 
into was the Multiple Scleosis Association. Martha's brother, Art, 
had been stricken by this disease while in^the service during World 
War II. They knew how important finding a cure was and threw their 
greatest effort into fund raising. It even became a family affair 
to work on the yearly campaigns. 

They were a highly emotional couple, and at anytime you 
could walk into anything in their home from hilarity, to tears, to 
anger. But flair-ups never lasted longand for the most part things 
ran on a pretty even keel. 

Martha started teaching in 1964 when Norman Jr. was a college 
freshman and Lockwood was in kindergarten. In April 1965 her father 
died and this was the begining of the most shattering five years 
of her life. Her mother died in August, after Martha had spent five 
months with her. Things started to return to normal. Marcia was 
married in 1967 and Norman was married in June of 1968. October 2, 
1968, Norman fell down the long flight of stairs in their two story 
house. He broke several ribs which led to the development of 
pneumonia and his death within five days. Martha's world fell apart, 
leading to a deep withdrawl from all that was familiar to her. Then 
as if this wasn't enough, her only brother, Art, died from a stroke 
in 1970. 

In 1972 Martha became seriously ill and when she recovered 
she realized all she had to live for. She has once again become 
active in her social circle and takes great pride in her children 
and granddaughter, Michelle. 



-26- 

Marcia Lee (Wernet) Godare 
Myself 

I was born March 31, 1949 in Vincennes, Indiana, the second 
child of Martha and Norman Wernet, and within two weeks I was 
christened Marcia Lee. My older brother, Norman III, was born on 
April 2, 1946 and for many years we shared great celebrations on 
our birthdays. We were very close as young children, taught to 
share and play together in harmony, but we did have some sibling 
rivalry. 

One of my earliest recollectons is the purchase of our first 
television sometime in 1952, therefore; we had a fairly large 
screened set. One of the first things we watched was the national 
political conventions, since my parents were accutely interested 
in the Republican campaign. 

I attended nursery school when I was three and four years old 
and started kindergarten when I was five, at which time my sister, 
Mary Linn, was born. With children of such wide age difference, my 
older brother and I were taught to carry our share of household 
responcibilities . It was pointed out that if everyone pitched in 
and worked together, we would have more free time to do the things 
we enjoyed most. This enabled my mother to take us swimming almost 
every afternoon throughout our summer vacations. 

My father was a very busy man, but he was the undisputed 
head of the family. Although he was gone alot and worked late, Sat- 
urday evening was devoted to my mother and Sunday was reserved for 
the family. We always went to church together, and after a huge 
dinner we would relax, go for a ride in the car, or possibly com- 
plete a project around the house. The maintinence of the family 
unit was stressed. We were encouraged to be busy but expected to 
be present for all three meals, where discussions on almost any 
subject might be heard. Despite Mother's involvement in community 
affairs and her teaching, she was always there when we needed her. 
She loved to cook and some of her greatest achievements were in the 
kitchen. We experienced a wide variety of well balanced meals, but 
baking was her forte'. It seems like homemade cookies, cakes, and 
pies were always in the oven. 

Our parents took pride in anything we did. We could choose 
our own goals but were expected to put forth only our best effort. 
We were appreciated as individuals, and our achievements were 
never compared. 

We were always told our house and our yard were for us to 



-27- 

play in, and- our friends were welcome anytime day or night. Pets 
were also welcome, therefore; we had the usual assortment of dogs, 
cats, turtles, fish besides an occassional odd fellow. Living in a 
large two story house enabled us to play upstairs, while Mother 
and Daddy entertained friends. 

We never lacked toys or facilities. As small children we 
usually shared a bedroom, but when we reached eleven we generally 
got a room of our own. Our privacy was respected, but doors were 
never locked and rarely closed. We were always welcome to hop in 
bed with our parents for an early morning chat, and it's not easy 
to get six people in one bed. 

As children we were closest to my mother's family, although 
we kept in touch with my father's family. Mother had only one 
brother, Uncle Art, about two hours drive away in Greencastle, Ind. 
His children, Art and Susan, were the same ages respectively as 
Norman and I, giving us a great deal in common. Granny and Grand- 
daddy Letzler lived about a two hour drive on the other side of 
Greencastle, therefore we would meet frequently for a delightful 
Sunday visit. Since Uncle Art had Multiple Sclerosis he had 
difficulty travelling. 

My father rarely took time off for a vacation, but we usually 

■Wo 

spent a week or*with Mother at my grandparents home in Muncie. The 
greatest joy of those visits was to climb in bed with our grand- 
parents early in the morning. We took turns sleeping with each of 
them. Granny would ask us about our current activities and future 
dreams, while Granddaddy would spin fantastic yarns that were still 
delightful to hear at the age of fourteen. 

For two weeks every summer from the age of nine through four- 
teen Art and Norman, and Susan and I would attend Y.M.C.A. and 
Y.W.C.A. camp together. Any long trips were taken to visit Daddy's 
brothers and their families, and they in turn visited us. In 1957 
we went to New Orleans to visit my Uncle Bob Wernet and his family, 
taking advantage of the opportunity to sight see through the South. 
In 1964 during the World's Fair in New York, all of Daddy's brothers 
got together with their families at Uncle Bob's, who was then living 
in Connecticut. That was the last time all four brothers got 
together and also the last time our family took a trip together. 
We saw many of the sights around New York and on our way home 
stopped by Niagra Falls. As we all stood looking at the Falls my 
father reminded Mother that it had only taken twenty years or so 
to get to their choice honeymoon spotj and she told him it was worth 



-28- 

the wait because things usually improve with age. With parents like 
that we couldn't help but all be incurably romantic. 

In 1965 sometime in March my mother went to stay with her 
parents who were both critically ill with cancer. Mary Linn and 
Lockie joined Mother in Muncie when school was let out for the 
summer. Daddy, Norman and I stayed in Vincennes, but made regular 
weekend trips to Muncie. During those few months I became what 
might be considered the assistant manager of the household in 
Vincennes. Any major problems were handled by my parents, but the 
general day to day situations were left to me. I was sixteen at the 
time. 

That same year I attended the International Girl Scout Roundup 
in Farragut, Idaho. I was one of seven delegates selected on merit 
from Knox county, Indiana. I spent ten days in a tent city of ten 
thousand girls from all over the world and learned a true appeciaticn 
of ,Girl Scouting ideals. On the way home our group took a side 
trip to tour Yellowstone National Park. 

In 1964 I met and started dating William Lee Godare, a Vincennes 
boy who at the time was a sophomore at the University of Florida. 
For awhile we had a long distance romance, but his mother became 
seriously ill in 1965 and he returned to school in Vincennes to be 
near her. We became engaged on Christmas in 1966 after his mother's 
death in October of that year. I graduated from high school in 
May 1967 and we were married on June 2, 1967. 

My parents gave us their blessing but were concerned because 
we were both so young. We had a short honeymoon in St. Louis, 
Missouri on our way to Ft. Worth, Texas, where we had plans to set 
up our first home. Home was a small trailer not far from General 
Dynamics Corporation, where Bill worked as a technical analyst on 
military contracts. In April 1968 Bill accepted a position with 
Sundstrand Corporation in their research and development group. 
One of our objectives in moving back to the Midwest was to be near 
Bill's brother, Robert, who was 13 and living with relatives in 
Vincennes. Unexpectedly, we were fortunate to be close enough to get 
home in a hurry when my father died in October 1968. 

In 1969 we sold our trailer and bought a house southwest of 

Rockford, and in 1970 Robert came to live with us. That same year 

Bill was promoted to the position of associate engineer. In January 

of 1971 we adopted a beautiful seven week old baby girl, who we 

named Michelle Rene*. She is now a happy healthy three year old 
Bob is engaged and attends Northern Illinois University as a 



-29- 

commuter student. 

Bill is basically the head of the household, but we always 
discuss any major decisions. Bill loves golf and we all spend alot 
of time on the course together. Michelle and I are members of the 
Episcopal Church. Ours is a quiet life. Although, we do go back to 
Vincennes frequently and try to maintain the strong sence of family 
unity that we were both raised in. 

Addendum 

Heirlooms : Henry and Mary O'Meara, my great-grandparents 
had a christening dress made for their first child, Mildred. It 
is still in beautiful condition, and all of their grandchildren and 
great-grandchildren have been baptised in it. Walter Letzler's 
family has a beautiful cradle the age of which is unknown it is at 
least 100 years. It too is in grand condition and was used for my 
mother, her brother, and all the children in my family. 

Celebrations : At least for the last 100 years on both sides 
of my family birthdays and holidays have been celebrated in grand 
style. On one's birthday they have nearly unlimited privileges. 
Church services play a large part in most holiday celebrations with 
a boisterous family get-together afterward. 

Tradition : All of these families discussed in this paper had 
a sence of strong family ties that still continues today. All 
have stressed education and especially for the women. They have 
had liberated women for over a century. Most important of all is 
that each of these families has had an accute consciousness of 
historical and political events present and past. 



F 

W7 Rock Valley family history 

R6 col lect ion . 

v.5 



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ROCK VALLEY COLLEGE