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Full text of "[Rock Valley family history collection : first series]."

Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Researcii Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/rockvalleyfamily08rock 



col 



Rock Valley College 

Educational Resources 

Center 



HINUEBER. DEAN, 1955- 



1 '. .V''! 



liii 



PLEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

Dear Contributor to the Wock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
Arnerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only <i 
few mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
access to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ***AA*ft*iVAA**i'.-;'f.VAAi":A**-.>:A:V:V'.- 

^ ,,. , * OFFICE USE coot 

I. Your name Dean Hmueber * 

Date of form November 19, iq?^ * (ID H ) 

'/. Your (,oiicge: Kock Val l ey (.0 liege (id II ) 

JTockTorcT, IlUnols 

*****AV.)VA)V)V)VA A .\A A)',- AA :'. A iV iV :'; AAA 

3. Clieck the earliest date for which you have been able to soy things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 ^ I8OO-I85O 

1850-1900 1900 or later 



k. Please check al I regions of the United States In which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived, 

X N ew England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna., N.J., Ma.) 

^South Atlantic (Ga., Fla., N.C., S.C.) x E ast South Central(La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , Ky 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., 0T<T7 ~ x E ast North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

Pacific (Cal., Washj ^(Hawaii, Alaska) HI. Wis.) 

^Plains (ND,SD,Neb. ,Kan. »Iowa, MB) 
5. Please check al I occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed In this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming Mining ^ S hopkeeping or small business 

^Transportation Big- Business ^ Manufacturing 



X P rofessions x Industrial labor Other 

6. Please check al I religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
In this paper have belonged. 

X R oman Catholic ^Jewish P resbyterian Methodist 

Baptist '^x E piscopalian C ongregational Lutheran 

Q uaker ^Mormon x O ther Protestant ^Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed In your paper? 

^Blacks Indians M exicans P uerto Ricans 

Jews Central Europeans I tal lans S lavs 

Irish ^British x N ative Americans over several generations 

^East Asian O ther 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

x Interviews with other F amI ly Bibles Family Genealogies 

fami ly members 

X Vital Records ^Land Records ^The U.S. Census 

X P hotographs M aps O ther 



II. FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Nam e Gustave C. Hinueber Current Residence 

If dead, date of death Feb. 25. 19S7"~ " 

Place of birth North leeds, Wis. ^^^^ , g. ^ Feb. I883 



Education (number of years): 
grade school 5 high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PUCE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Army Supply Sgt. Dates 1st Dates_ 

2nd Factroy worker Oates 2nd ^Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd D ates 

'(th Dates <«th Dates 



Re t i g I on 



Catholic 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. None 

Place of Marriage to your grandmotKer Not none ^^te 2-12 15 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age I8) by a stepfather or another relative give 

that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

6. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name ^^^^^ Hinueber Current Residence 



If dead, date of death k-Z-^ 

Place of birth Brockton. Mass Date of birth ^"^^"^ 



Education (number of years): 
grade school 6 high school vocational college_ 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

., (after leaving home) 

Ist ^^^^® Dates 1st Rockforcf Dates 



Pou]trv '=!hn-n SprinD;field 

2nd ^ouixry snop p^^^^ 2nd Dates 



3rd Oates 3r d ^ryan. Ohio ^ ^^^^ 

^th Dates At h D ates 

_ ,, , Episcoplainan 
Religion 



t Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather , , , . . 6aTE 

'^°^** i^al(<'a;t^S(!»fh»«6a«'W''tiil8 WiVi)? stepmother or another relative give 



A- I Siepqrandfalher (your father's side) 



Jav Pailey 

I I -Ir.ld. .I.UP of d«*tK 



Place of birih 



^ryan, Ohio 



Cduc.itlon (number of years) 
giade school ^ ^\g^ »chooJ_ 



Occupat lon(s) 
i^t Fainter 



Dates 



2nd Federal emnJoyee Dates 
3r d Landlord Oates_ 

4th Dates 



Re M q i nn 



X.- 



estant 



Current Residence 



l$t_ 
2nd_ 
3rd_ 
'4th 



Date of Blrth_ 
vocational 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
Rockfor(f^'«'* leaving home) 



Dates 



Sprinp"f ield 



Dates 



Bryan, Ohio 



Dates 



Dates 



folitlcal parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Am erican Leerion 



Flace of in»rr\Bgt to your grandmother" 



date 2-15-3; 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 



If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 



Current Residence^ 
Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational ^college 



Occupat ion(s) 

ls( 

2nd 

)rd 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



Dates 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



M I igioo 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 



Grnndfather (your mother's side) 

Edward F. Greenbere; _ . 

Name Current Residence 

If dead, date of death o-l^-^T^ 

ockford, Illinois . 6-1Q-1891 

Place of birth Date of birth ^ 



Education (number of years) ; 



grade school " high school vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home] 



»9t 



Factory worker pg^^j ,j^ Dates 



2nd D ates 2 nd D ates 

3rd D ates 3 rd D ates 

^th D ates 4 th D ates 

o , , , Evangelical 

Religion „^ , ^ ^ ^ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Motorcycle club 

Place of marriage to your grandmother Not Mknown date 6-I-I916 

Note: If your mother was raised by 8 SCBpfllfltr Ur insinir rClmlVB (tO S^^e 18) 
give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Alice H. Greenbere; ^ _ . . 
Name Current Residence 



If dead, date of death x-i^-ivoT 

Place of birth Rockford Date of birth 5-1^-1395 



Education (number of years) 
grade school " high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Housewife Dates 1st D ates 

2nd D atas 2 ft d D ates 

3rd D ates 3 r d D ates 

Re 1 1 g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs*^ sororities, etc. 

'' bewme: cluT) •■-■■;■■■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 

Place of marriage to your grandfathe r _ _ * **^* ._. ~" 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another r»i»H"» (tr? ;;; '.?J 
,!vc :h^; Jala wn (he oacK OT this page (D-2) 



A- 1 Slepqrandfather (your father's side) 

Jay Bailey 



N.inir ^^^^ 

I f <lr.Td. (I.itp of death 



1-^ r^ 



P Irtcc of birth 



rryan, Ohio 



Eddc.ition (number of years) 
grade school ^ high school 

Occupat lon(s) 



Current Residence 



1st 


Fainter Dates 


1st 


2nd 


Federal employee Dates 


2nd 


3rd 


Landlord pates 


3rd 


^th 


3 nor owner 

Dates 


IJth 


Rcl i 


qion '^^' ^'^^ estant 





Date of Birth_ 
vocational 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
Rockfor(:Pf'«'' 'eaving home) 



Sprinp-field 



Bryan, Ohio 



_Dates_ 
_Dates_ 
_Dates 
Dates 



Political parlies, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. ^"^ erican Legion 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 



date 2-15-3.' 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 



Nai^ 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth 



Current Residence^ 
Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational ^college 



Occupat ion(s) 
Ut 

2nd 

3rd 



_Dates_ 

Dates 



Dates 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 



Re I i g i on 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 



Dates_ 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Edward F. Greenbere; 
Name Current Residence 

If dead, date of death o-i:?-'/!"^ 

ockford, Illinois 6-19-1891 

Place of birth Date of birth ■ 



Education (number of years) 
grade school " high school vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 



!5t 



Factory worker pg^^ ,,j Dates 



2nd Dates 2 nd D ates 

3rd D ates 3 rd D ates 

^th D ates k th D ates 

_ , , , Evangelical 
Re II g ion 



Motorcycle club 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc._ 

Place of marriage to your grandmother Not Mknown date 6-I-I9I1 

Note: If your mother was raised by a SlBprilllier ur inULlier lelJLlVU (lU age 18) 

give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Alice H. Greenberg ^ > . . 

Name Current Residence 



If dead, date of death i-i^-ivoj 
Place of birth Rockford 


Date of 


birth ^-I'^-iaQS 


Education (numBe" of years) 
grade school ° high school 


vocational 


col lege 


Occupation(s) 

1st Housewife pg^es 


1st 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 


2nd Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


Rel iglon 


sororities, etc. 




Political party, cIvM or social clubs, 

bewine: clux) 








Place of marriage to your grandfathec 




date 



Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another r*i»«-iw» (tc :g* 1?,' 
,!-.-= :h«: Jala wn inc oacK OX this page (D'>2} 



C-l Sr epgrandf .ither (your mother's side) 



Nome 

I f 'If.id, <lc»io of d«ath 



I'l.i..- •.! I.iiili 

I •III! .ll i>HI (lilNllIx' r (TT yf.i I •, ) 

•|i.iil«* •.iliiMil lii<jli school 



Ottiip.it Ion (s ) 

1st 

?n.l 

3rd 



Dates 



Dates 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



Current Residence 



D.llc ol hi I (I) 



vocol ioniil 



to I Um)«' 



)st_ 
2nd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



3rd 



<tth 



Re I i g I ofi 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmothdr 



Dates_ 
Dates_ 
Dates 



datd 



0-? S tcpqr.indmothfr (your mother's side) 

N.ime 

I f (l<!jd, •iittr of death 



f'l.ici- of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupot ion(s ) 

Kt 

2nfj 

3rd 



Dates 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



Current Residence 



Date of birth 



vocational 



col lege 



Ist_ 

_2nd_ 

3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Re I i »j i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Dates_ 
Dates_ 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



CHIkPRbN of A & B ^or A- I or B-1} 

u.^ Robert C. Hinueber 
Name 

Place of birth Mirmeaplois" 

Number of years of' 5 chop 'l ) ti g 
Residence Rockford, 111 



your father's name should appear below 



* 



date 



7-2Q-1916 



T 



Number of~"cRTT3r6n 

Gus Hinueber Jr. 



Harltfil 



Occupatl,6rt "i^"^^ 



A(jL ' umiLa»L 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of school Ing 
Residenc e Roc k Falls" 

Number of children 



"3ate 



~ 



l*^ Occupatl6rt EdltbT" 

Marital Status Married 



f years of' schooMn 

_ Park Forest 




Karne Dorothy Sloan 

Place of birth 

Number o 

Res I dence 

Number of chl Idren 

Name "^^^^ Bailey 

P lace of bt rth 

Number of years of'. 'schooO'nQ " 

Residence EvanviIIe. In&T 

Number of cM Hdrerj L " 



TT 



date 
Occupation 



Marftal Statue MarfTCT 



bales lady 



date^ 

^ccupllTTdT-a^'CTrrr^cr 

tatus Marrt-eo ' 



^3^ Helen Dobson 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooHhg 
Res I denc e Bryan, Ohio" 

Number of chlldrdh 



Name 

Place or birth 

Number of years of school Ihg 

Res I denc e 

Number of children 



Name 

Place of birth '"" 

Number of years of schooling 
Res I dence 
Number of chl Jdr«n 



Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Res I denc e 

Number of chl Idren 



— — — — — <^8t e 

*"" Occupation 

^larttat Sbtus ^^^^^^^^ 

t fate 
"^ bccupatlon 

Marital Statu* 

mmiH. tl'te 

' Occupation 

larlta! Status "" 

"~d at e 
Occupation 
Marital Status 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence " 

Number of chl Idren 



date 



Occupation 
Ntrltfil Status 



10. Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooUng 

Residenc e 

Number o T CHI I U Wi ll 



dat e 
nfccupatTofT 



^jierital Sta t us 



dllLUREN i»l (. and (or (.-I, D-1)-your mothrr's nonni should appmr beUv* 

Evel.vn Hinuebe^^ 

vT'..r'.TTVrn: Ho(?.t- : !orff. I lllnMa .i..u. 3-2Q-1Q17 

Moiiiii'-i ..I /i-if . of ;.c>Hx>nn f) 1^^ Occupation office wcrk 
t^.--.i.i.-t.,..- Rockforrt- Marital Status Married 

Niiiiilirr ol ( h 1 IdrCn -^ 

u Halph Greenbere: 

I'l.M- ..r ImhIi Rockford date 1^^^_ 

N.jinJ.rr mI y.if. of schooling IZ Occupation ^"OP J^r- siaenx 

Hesi.kMce Rocki'ord Harltal Status Marnea 

Number fif ch i 1 dren ^ 

Keniiv Greenbere 

N .vm-. ^ 

Place uf birth KocKicra date 

Number ol years of schooling J- -^ Occupation P^lriltJi 

Residence Lakewood . L&ior^afl Mar i ta l S tatus Mai ' i ' lua 

Number of ch i 1 dren ^ 

Nome 

Pl.ie.- of l,ir(h date 



NijtnJ)i'i i<r ye.irs of schooling OccupatiOh 

Ml--, i deiir c Marl taT"Status 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



Nanie 

Pl.icr rjf birth date 



Number of ycors of schooling Occupation 

Kes i dence Marital Status 

HuniJjrr of ch I 1 dren 



N.ifm- 

Pl.Tce of bi rth date__ 

Number of years of schooling DccupatlOrt 

R«.s i dence Marital Status [ 

NumJjor of chi Tdren 



7. Nang 

Place of bi rib date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

He-.idcnce Marl tal Status 

Number of chi 1 dren 

Name __«_____—________«___»___ 

P lace of birth date 

Number of years of schooling OccupatlOrt 

Residence Marl tal Status 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



Name 

P lace of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Rei i dence Harl tal Status \ 

Number of chi 1 dren 



10. Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation" 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



s 

Your Father 

„ Robert Carl Hinueber Rockford, Illinois 

i^*'"^ Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death • — — — — ^— — — — . 

r ^, I. Minneapolis, Minnesoata „ ^^ -,01/ 

Place of b rth ^B,te of btrt h 7-29-1916 

Education (number of ^ars) —————————. 

grade school Q high school 3 vocational college ^ 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Account-nt Dates t^t Oregon ^Dates 

2nd ^Dates 2ndJ^^2lll£2f2 °*''** 

3rd Dates 3r d California ^O^t^, 

^th Dates I tth ^Dates^ 

l^'^^g^o" Episcopalian 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. ^^^^ ^^^^ 



I . I ) J I' , , . I ' ' . ii . j ii . i i i . I" 



Place of marriage to your mother uik^uh- ■ ■ ■■'■'' ■ ^ ate 12-'^-1942 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

u Evelyn Hinueber « i. n u Rockford 

Name . . Current Residenc e 

If dead, date of death 

Di * ^- .u Rockford ^ ^ r u. .u 3-29-191? 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number ofgyears) ^ 



grade school high school^ vocational ^college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

Office wor k <«<"'••• 'eaving home) 
1st Dates 1st D ates 

2nd Dates Sam fjr^< fis my father ^Dates 

3rd D ates 3r d D ates 

Religion_^ Episcopalian 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc* 

Place of marriage to your fathe r ^ ^^^ ^ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



E- 1 Stepfather 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth D ate of birth 

Education (number of years) —————————— ..,—____ 

grade school high school vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
• st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd D ates 

3rd Dates 3 rd D ates 

^th Dates i >th D ates 

R« I Igion -^— ^— .._.___ii___..__ 

PollticarTryPTTerrTTTrrTrrTWrTTl clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother D at< 

^■-2 Stepmother 



Name 






Date of birth 


1 f dead, date of death 
Place of hi rth 


— 




Education (number oT years) 
grade school high school 


__ vocational 
1st 




col lege 


Occupat ion(s) 

1st Dates 




PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 


2nd Dates 


2nd 
3rd 
sororities, 


etc. 


Dates 


3rd Dates 


Dates 


Re 1 i g I on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, 








Place of marriage to your father 






date 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

Paul Hinaber 



Naine 

P I ace of birth Rockford, Illinois 

Number of years of schoolin g 

Res i dence Ch^^a^u 

Number of ch i Idren 



19 



-KTe of birth 6-7-1947 

Occupatloi^^'O"^^^^"^^ bupevv-rsor 



Marital Status singTT 



Name Kay Hinueber 

Plac e of birth ROUkruid. IlUnoio ^^^^ ^f bl rth__12-29-1929_ 

Number of years of schooling . lb Occupation ^alfea 



Re b i den ce 

Number of chl Idren 

Name 

Place of bi rth 



"S 



rrrsR^cr 



Marital Status Sin^3:5- 



Dean Hinueber 
Vi/hlLllur. California 



Number of years of school lrig„ ~ TT 



Res i dence 

Number of chl Idren 

Name 

Place of birth 



DSt^of birth 12-23-19^5^ 
Occupation SLudunL 



Number of years of school Ing 
Res i dence 



Number of chl Idren 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



Date of birth 

Occupation 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Res i dence 



Number of chlldrert 



Date of bi rth 



Occupation 

Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of school ing_ 

Res i dence 



Number of chl Idren 



Marital Status 



Tate of b I rth_ 
Occupatioh 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school Ing_ 

Res i dence 



Number of chl Idren 



Date of birth 



Occupation 
"Rarital Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Res i dence 



Number of ch i Idrert 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth_ 
Occupation 



111. ASblC.NMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willincj) 

1 her(4)v donate this family history, along with all literary and adiinriiMrdtivc 
.Hjhts.'to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, depositod in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed Cl fl^!^ /-/^ ^<e^^g< 

Date /.^^2.:i2^ 



GENKALOGY CHART 



Gustave C. Hinueber 



Grandfather 



Robert C. Hinueber ^. 2-7-1883 

: 2-10-1953 



7-29-1916 
12-5-1942 



GT' 



li 
M 

; n 



iKifatliGr 



Groat: 9 r a n c i mc 1 1 h c r 

y 

15 

D 



lean R. Hinueber 



^" 12-23-1^55 
rriocl 

ed 



Edith Aobinson 



Gr'andmothcr 



M 
D 



Edward F. Greenberg B 



fGrandfathcr 
n 6-19-1-391 
,i 6-1-1916 

r;b-15-19^5 



Evelyn A. C-reenberg 



Mother 

B 3-29-1917 
M 12-5- 1^^2 
D 



Alice H. Anderson 
Grandmother 

B 5-li;-l395 
D 1-12-1963 



To Robert and Kvelyn for all t'aeir love and understanding 



The sources for this rr^aper are Robert and Evelyn Hinueber 



J 



1. 



Paternal Grandfather Gustave G. Hinueber 

Gustave C, ''INUEBER was born in February I883, in North 
LeedSr Wisconsin, he was the son of German parents having their 
origin in Germany. The Hinueber' 3 then moved to Sto Paul, 
Minnesoiba, the approximate date of this move is not known, 
Gus Hinueber 's family consisted of brothers Charlie and Louie 
and sisters Margaret and Tina. 

During Gus Hinueber 's life he held many jobs, he was a 
railroad man and also a policeman for a short period of time, 
Gus was a laboring man holding a job in Camp Grant, Illinois, 
and also a factory job in Rockford, Illinois, As a laborer 
his pay was not too high, nor was his rate of advancement, 

Gus was well regarded by his fellow employees, he is 
what one might call, "a good mixer," he got along veil with 
people. He was a good dancer, and unfortunately he did not 
know how to control alcohol, which later led to his divorce 
fror" his wife Edith, It appears that Gus and Edith never led 
an extremely happy life, because of the alcohol. 

Religion did not play a big part in Gus Hinueber 's life. 
Gu3 'iinueber served during the Philippine Insurection in 1893- 
99, in Cuba, during the Spanish-American War, 
Gus Hinueber "died in February 1958. 



Paternal Grandmother lidith Hinueber Bailey 

Edith R6BiN36ti was born in Brockton, Massachusetts on 18, 
February, 1336, She was the adopted daughter of the Robinson 
family. Edith Robinson married Gus Hinueber on 12, April 1915. 

Edith Robinson went through all the steps of nurses train- 
ing, up to graduation, but she did not graduate and regretted 
it later. Edith supplemented the Hinueber family income during 
the Depression with this nurses training, by going out on calls 
as a private nurse, she was very good at this as evidenced by 
her always being with these calls. Edith's nurses training 
came in handy when,»Rooert her oldest child, contacted pneum- 
onia. 

Edith was a small attractive women who was alwaysiii ffood 
health. Edith was always a super-emotional person. lidith 
Robinson came from the average working mans background. 
She was an average cook and house keeper, Edith had a 
profound love for playing cards even though she was not very 
good at it, but she enjoyed the socializing, that comes with 
almost any card game. 

Edith was an Episcopalian when Robert was young. 
Shb chanp-ed to Catholic when Gus Jr. and Dorothy went to 
Catholic school. After Edith's divorce from Gus Hinueber, 
she married Jay Bailey, who was a Prodestant. Edith and 
Jay moved from church to church, mainly because they liked 
to hear the sermons of certain priests. 
Edith Hinueber, after a prolonged illness, died on 2, April I969- 



Jay Bailey 

Edith HIiiUEBER divirced Gus HIHUEBER in 1935 or I936 
approximately. Jay Bailey owned ^ snjall noultry shop in 
in Rockfcrd, in which, Edith Hinueber was employed. It was 
after Edith's divorce from Gus, that the fondness between Gus 
and Edith surfaced, they were later married. Jay Bailey's 
home was in Bryan, ©hie. 

In order to nrovide irore support for his family, Jay 
joined the Illinois National Guard. As a result of World War 
II, the Illinois Unit was called into active duty. This 
forced Jay and Edith to move to Springfield, Illinois, where 
Jay served as a selective service a.srent. 

After the War, Jay and Edith moved to Bryan, Ohio, which 
was Jay's homesite. Jay's father passed away after World War 
11^4 Jay's mother lived with Jay and Edith for a period of 
time. Jay Bailey had two children from a prior marriage, 
Helen and Walter. Thb family relationship for the period of 
time that Jay and Edith lived in Rockford, was good and Helen 
and Walter joined the family unit without any upset. 

After Jay's return to Bryan, Ohio, he supervised some 
rental housing, which his fattier Hays Bailey had owned. 
Jay was also a house painter in his spare time. Jay Bailey 
was also a rember of the American Legion in good standing. 

Jay Bailey was more of a family man than Gus Hinueher in 
that he did more for and with the children. He would help the 
children with loans of money whenever they need it. 
Jay Bailey also graciously remembered the Hinueber children 
in his will, when he passed away in I969. 



Paternal Grandparents Family Life Together 

The Hinuebers were considered to be your average working 
man's family. Gus Hinueber was not a good manager of the family 
finances, and was always in debt, yet his pay was average for 
that time. 

Gus hardly, ever to6k his family on very many trips, 
because transportation in those days was not as good and you 
could not go as far or see as many things as you can today. 
Gus did have a love for baseball, which he transmitted to his 
children, Robert, Gus Jr., and Dorothy. The Hinuebers never 
attended any family reunions or social gatherings of this ■.:; 
nature, such as picnics. 

Edith Hinueber and her children attended the Episcopal 
Church regularly. Later because of some minor school diff- 
iculties, Gus Jrv and Dorothy attended Catholic school and 
ihen became Catholic. 

Gus Hinueber had a different kind of love for his family. 
He did not participate too much with them, rather he spent his 
free time with his friends. The Hinueber children were dis- 
ciplined jointly and Gus Hinueber did not spare the strap. 

In the early 1920 's the Hinuebers lived on 11th Street 
Road, just north of. Kishwaukee Road, on which two government 
farms were located. During this time Gus Hinueber was employed 
as a supply sargeant for the state of Illinois. As a result 
of Gus Hinueber 's job the family was constantly moving to 
different locations around Camp Grant, Illinois. 
After a change in politics the Hinuebers were forced to move 
to Rockford, Illinois, as Gus lost his job in a political 
sense. Gus Hinueber then took a job in a Rockford factory 
and the children went to school in the Rockford School 
System, The heightening of the. Depression of 1932 found the 
Hinuebers moving frequently with houses on 11th Street across 



P'-; t-plTK" <;' I'B 1~0 + K' 



46Bt iXC£]tyfr> 



blirto 



oiuriO 

■♦H 



from Southeast End Park and in the Hall-Benton-Crosby-Lone;wood 
Stree"t area, which is west, of the present day Rural Oaks Shopping 
Complex. 

The first automobile that the Hinueber's owned was a Ford 
Kodel-T Touring car. The first radio that the family owned 
was an Atwater-Kent with a goose-like neck for reception. 

In the Hinueber-Bailey family, Robert Hinueber, the oldest, 
is a graduate of the University of Illiijois in accounting, and 
is now a par-*"ner in Pollard and Wheeler, Harms and Elliott, 
Certified Public Accountants in Rockford. The second oldest 
is Dorothy Sloan, wife of Jack Sloan, who live i% P^^^ Forest 
Illinois. Dorothy was a member of the WAVES as a dental tech- 
nician. In Springfieldj Illinois she met Jack Sloan, they were 
later married. The Sloans have two boys Greg and ;v:ike. 
Next oldest is Gus Hinueber Jr., who is also a graduate of the 
University Of Illinois in 4ournali3mo Gus Hinueber Jr. is now 
married and lives in RockPalls, Illinois, Gus is now the editor 
of advertising flyers that are handed out door to door. 
Gus has children Katt, Mark, Peter, Elizabeth and Margaret. 
Walter Bailey is also a graduate of the University of Illinois 
in architecture, and is now married and living in Evansville, 
Indiana, where he is sales manager for a plastics company. 
Aalter has children Kevin, Paula, Jody, and Karen. Helen 
Bailey wai married at an early age then divorced. She is now 
married to Wayne Dobson. They live in Bryan, Ohio and have 
two sons Rodney and Huey. 



Robert Carl Hinueber 



Robert remembers the chores he had to do at an early as;e 
as being: Keepin? his room clean because his mother wa3 cons- 
tantly after him about this. Ke also had to chop wood for an 
old Army stove, which has mother was always hollering about, 
she complained that the stove had no rceans of temperature 
control. Robert also had to clean a dirt driveway when tlie 
Hinuebers lived in Camp Grant, Illinois, and also had tc 
cut the g-rass. When Robert was in high school in the Depression 
years he went to the landlord's farm to work off the rent that 
the family owed .the iBrtmaxotti . 

Robert Carl Hl!lUSB2R was born 29, July 19l6.inSt, Paul 
Minnes©ta= When the Hinuebers moved to Carap|Grsuit, Illinois, 
Robert attended New Mulford 3chool» At an early age Robert 
was given a rifle, and he used it frequently durin? his free 
time, with a good friend Halsey Smiths //hen the Hinuebers moved 
to Rockfcrd, Robert went to Turner School. 

It was at this time that Robert began to develop a love 
for baseballandd relayed on the school softball team. 
Robert then went to Lincoln Junior High., where he tried out 
for footballj but was too skinny and did not make the squad, 
Robert also played on the lightweight basketball squad at 
Lincoln, but did not get a letterc Robert played softball 
with pickup teams around Lincoln. September, 1931 found 
Robert Hinueber starting Rockford Senior High School, on Walnut 
Street f as a sophmore. As a sophmore Robert was on the light- 
weight basketball team, and as a junior and senior he was on 
the heavyweight squad. There was no high school baseball, at 
this time, as a result of this Robert t)layed with American 
Legion teams during f-e summer. It seems that the highlight 
of Roberts b?5seball cariFer, was when his American Legion team 
went to the state championships in Jacksonville, Illinois, 
to play in the state finals that year. At this tournament, 



the whole team really had a gcod time. After the games the 

teaT, would sneak into the swimming pool where they were staying 
for a quick dip. Robert Hinueber graduated from Rochford Senior 
High School in June of 193'(<'. 

After graduation Robert wen' into the "CCCj" which stood 
for the Civilian Conservation Corpc In this ccrp they did such 
Tobs as soil conservation and building fire roads in forests. 
This program was started under President Franklin Roosevelt 
in 1Q35. The salary for this job was JO dollars a month, 

Robert then p>irr>'i?d his college education at Indiana 
State College in Evansville, Indiana, He stayed at Indiana 
State for one year, before he had to return home because of a 
serious back injury, incurred in a scrub football game. 
This injury resulted in Robert's having to leave school for 
two years to recuperate. Robert began the University of 
Illinois in 1937. He graduated from college in 19^0 as an 
accounting raa^or. After Robert was married and livins at 405 
M. Longwood, he recieved his C.P.Ao certificate, which was in 
1^53. 



Maternal Grandfather Edward Frank Greenberg 

Edward Frank GREENBERG was born IQ, June I891 and died 
15, June 1955 four days before his 6i|-th birthday. Ufiward- 
started Kishwaukee School when he was 7 years old approximately 
and went through the eighth grade. Edward started working in 
a factory when he was about 1^ years eld, 

Ed Greenberg had two brother and a sister. Ed was the 
second oldest child in the family, his sister being the oldest. 
His sisters naff? was Anna, and his brothers names were Oscar 
and Elmer. Ed's mother and father were both born in Sweden 
and were 13 yrirs old vhen they came to the United States. 

On the whole n:"> family was just about average^ no more 
or less prominan't than others. One of Ed's favorite passtimes 
was fishin? on the Rock River. A favroite fish story of his 
concerned a fish so big, he could hardly carry it home, he 
practically had to drag it. Other passtimes that he enjoyed 
were ice skating and motorcycle riding. He belonp-ed to a motor- 
cycle club, and they used to ride all over on their motorcycles. 

All of F^'s uncles lived on the same block, of the same 
street, which was Eighth Avenue Court. They lived one right 
next to the otherc . Also on the same block lived Ed's paents 
John and Mathilda Greenberg. Edward Greenberg was not a very 
religious man, but he was confirmed in the Evangelical faith. 



Maternal Grandmother Alice Hilda Greenberg 



Alice Hilda iSHDEriSON was born on Ik, Kay 1895 and died 
on 12, January 1963. Alice was the daughter of John and fgu&t'sC 
Anderson, Alice Anderson had two brothers, John and Einar and 
two sisters, Esther ana Gertie, Alice's first home was on a 
farm in Belevidere. Alice attended a country scholl through 
the eighth grade. It was after this that the family moved to 
Rockford, Illinois. Alice did not attend high school and got 
a job working for iJational Lock Company soon after the family 
moved to Rockford. The only person in Alice's family to graduate 
from high school was her :younger sister Gertie. Alice loved 
ice skatinfT on Rock Aiver, and also loved any kind of dancing, 
Alice was not a very religious person but she did g;et confirmeci^- 
in the Evangelical faith. Thet. major chores that Alice partook 
in on the farm were helping her mother with the household .. 
chores and working in the fields, during plowing and harvesting. 



10, 



Maternal Grandparents Family Life Together 

Alice Anderson loved to dance, Edward Greenberb never did 
yet the ironic thing about all this is that th0y met at a dance. 
Together Alice and Ed enjoyed sleigh rides in the winter and 
riding motorcyclesj with \.lice in the side car in the summer, 
Ed and Alice also attended picnics and various other social 
gatherings with the motorcycle club, Edward Greenberg and Alice 
Anderson were married 6, June I916. 

Evelynn Alice Greenberg was born 29, March 1917, as 'he 
Greenberg's first child. The first house Evelynn knew was on 
Fifth Street, v/'iere a gr-ind'iiother lived upstairs in her own 
room. The next ten yo-vos brought two other boys to the family, 
first was Ralph in 1922, then came Kenny in 192?. Kight aftrr 
Kenny was born, the family started building a house on tenth 
Avenue, 

ThS Greenberg's loved to go on picnics with relatives 
and friends. Alice belonged to a sewing club and a lot of the 
picnics and birthday celebrations would be with these people,!' 
Sunday dinner -'.th relatives and cousins was a regularity with 
the Greenberg family. The Greenberg's enjoyed their summer 
vacations^ by camydng in *Visconsin, after they moved to their 
house on Tenth Avenue. Vlhen the family moved to the house 
on Tenth Avenue, they were within walking distance of Churchill 
Park. During t ^e winter Evelynn, Ralph, and Kenny enjoyed 
ice skating at the park. Thj Greenberg's were very friendly 
with their neighbors on Tenth Avenue, in fact all the neighbors 
on the block got together each year and had a picnic, Evelynn, 
Ralph, and Kenny used to play baseball in the alley behind the 
house on Tenth Avenue, or other games in front of the house, 

Ralph and Bvelynn graduated from Rockford Senior High 
School in IQ^O and 193^ respectively, Kenny graduated from 
East Hie;h in 194^1, 

Evelynn 's main chore was helping her mother with Kenny 
when he was a baby, and also helping to cock the meals. 
The boys, when they got older, helped their father outside 



■'01 



11 



with sucn chores as cutting the grass, and weeding the gardens. 
Both Kenny and Ralph were newspaper boys. The Greenbergs \.er£; 
considered to be your average American family. 

An average day inthe ireenberg househould would find the 
father the first up in the morning, followed by by mother then 
the children. Ed Greenberg would leave the house early in the 
morning and sometimes not return until after six p.m., Evelynn 
would leave next for school followed by her two younger brothers. 
The only time of day the whole family would meet would be at 
dinner time. The Greenoergs had many gardens during the Depre 
Depression, which xook up a great deal of the summer nights. 

A great deal of "che family time was spent listening to 
the radio, particularly to the Cub's games. Ralph and Kenny 
used to go to the Cub's games quite frequently with their 
parents. Evelynn used to like to stay hoive and play golf 
on the weekends. Holiday time would find the Greenbergs, 
with relatives, picnlcing in the summer, or gathering with 
relatives at someone's house in the winter. Family reunions 
were held on both sides of the family. Religion didnot play 
a big part in the family, but the children were always expec- 
ted to go to Sunday School. Most of the family decisions were 
made jointly by the father and mother. Thb disciplinarian 
in the family was the mother, vwho used the back of her hand as 
an enforcer. 

The first auto the family had was a Model-T Touring car. 
In 1024 the family got a I-'iodel*^ sedan with a self-starter. 

On the Greenberg side of the family are my uncles Ralr^h 
and Kenny, who live in Rockford and Lakewood, Colorado ^respect- 
ively. Ralph and Ad Greenberg are the parents of four boys, 
Neil, Denny, Barry, and Brian. They are also the prouo grand- 
parents of one grandaughter, Karen. Kenny and Darlene Greenberg 
have one sone^, Jeff '' 



12. 



Evelynn Alice Greenberg 

Evelynn Alice :;RE£liBERG was born 29. Jferctl' 1917. in 
Rockforc^ Illinois. When Evelynn started school she lived i^ 
her grandmother's house on ?ifth Street near Broadway. 

While living lihire jhe attended Brown School. She started 
there in first grade, since there was no kindergarten at that 
time. Brovm School has since been torn down. Evelynn then 
went on to Abraham Lincoln Junior High School, which was quite 
new at that tia.e , on Charles Street. Evelynn then went on 
to Rockford Senior High School for three years and graduated 
in 193^. 

The only club Ev"5j.ynn -was in was the commercia club for 
three years in high school. She was an officer in the club 
as secretary-treasurer. The club used to hold it's meetings 
Tfter school. Evekynn enjoyed being in the club becaues it 
was a lot o^ fun. The club was not a real social club because 
they never sponsored any dances or fund drives of any sort. 
Evelynn' s favorite subjesrt in high school was history. 
She also liKeJ to go to the high school football ^ajnes. ." 
which were played at Beyer Stadium, on Saturday afternoon. 

The majority of the time after school was taken up in 
walking home frorr; school. Afternoon dances were held at the 
school, which were attended by a lot of people, Evelynn* s only 
job during high school was babysitting for some of the neighbor's 
this always took up least Saturday nights. She also enjoyed 
ice skating at Churchill Park, which was not to far from her 
home on Tenth Avenue. PJvelynn also liked to dance and she 
would always arrange to go to the dances with her girlfriends. 

The downtown ^ost office which has recently been evacuated, 
was built d^:'ring Evelynn 's high school years. She recalls the 
entire school heinp; excused to watch the cornerstone layin? of 
that building. East and Vest High Schools were built a few 
years after this, during the Franklin Roosevlt administrations 
"New Deal". 



My Parent's Life Together 



Evelynn Green\"-?r^ and Robert !iinueber knew each other 
from Rockford High School, but they never went out with each 
other in high school. "Phlfe Easter vacation of 1935 is v.'hen they 
became reacquainted at ^ dance, and Robert saw Evelynn a ccuple 
rr.orec bimes before he had +o return to college a1 Indiana Central, 
The couple did not exactly go together at first, because Robert 
was away at school and Evelynn was working in Rockford, 
After awhile the two of them began what one could call a formal 
cour + ship. Robert p-raduated from college in 19^0 and then he 
had to go in f^e Anry nnd the twc of them were seperated again, 
Evelynn Greenberg ^nd Robert Hinueber were finally married 12, 
December 1942. They had a small wedding, with #just the two of 
them, because it was during the time of war, so they were married 
in Oregon where Robert was stationed. 

In ■"'"•'^6 long courtship that ensued for Robert and Evelynn, 
they »^id such things together as golf, dancing at a place ciiJLed 
Rainbow Gardens near Belevidere, and goin^ to baseball ?ames, 
inteitherChicago or Rockford. They also enjoyed going to Lake 
Geneva, and going to some of the big ballrooms for d^.ncinff in 
Chicago, such as the Aragon Ball Room, Evelynn went down to 
college while Robert was there and went to some football games. 
Robert and Evelynn have three children, Paul, who was born 
June 7. 1947* Kay, who was born December 29th, 19^9, and Dean, 
who was born December 23rd, 1^5» The chores the children 
would grow up to do are: Paul and Dean would help their father 
with the outside work, such as grass cutting, and washing the 
car and painting. Kay would mainly help her mother with the 
inside f^^eneral cleaning of the house. One story will always 
be remembered by the Kinuebers, and that is, the wa^ Kay would 
run for the bathroom when it was time to do the dishes and come 
out just in time to see the rest of the family finishing up 
the dishes. 



Ik 



Thi homes the family lived in are Lanninp; Drive Whittier, 
California, 405 North London Avenue Rockford Illinois, also 
in Van Nuys, California and 1321 Northfield Avenue Loves Park, 
and at our present addeess of 2820 Pelham Road, Rockford, 

Illinois. 

Robert Hinueber is a partner with Pollard,- and v;heeler, 

Harras and Elliott, Certified Public Accountants in Rockford. 
Evelynn has held various secretarial jobs such as, Prodestant 
Community Services, whore she is presently employed, Sh# has 
held other jobs wit'-' f^v.'edish- American Hospital and American 
Bank. Paul Hinaber; who had his last name changed prior to 
Seventh ^rade to make it easier for pronunciation. Paul has 
Held various jobs during the summers of his collep^e days, which 
were at tJational-Detroit, 8nd as a summer supervisor for the 
Park District. Paul is presently em-oloyed as a production 
supervisor for Cracker Jacs*-, „in Chicago, Kay, was a checkout 
girl at 'iilander Poods on Ruiml Street, and also wojgked as a 
park supervisor for the Rockford Park District, 3h^ is presently 
employed as a salesperson for Hunt-vVesson Fodds in Chicago. 
Dean Has worked as a stockboy for Hilander Foods and for 
Union-Hall, and is presently unemployed while attending Rock 
Valley CollcTe. The Hinueber's would be considered an averap:e 
middle class family. 

The daily routine would find Paul and Kay up and off to 
school, followed by father, and Dean and ?/,other would stay home. 
The family would not meet as a whole again until dinner time. 
This has since been changed, with Kay and Paul living in Chicap-Q, 
and only Dean Robert and Evelynn still living at home. 

The^iiamily has always celebrated the holidays of Christmas, 
Easter, and Thanksgiving together. During the summer whi,le 
my grandparents on my father's side were still living th# 
whole family would go to Bryan, Ohio for family renunions. 



15. 



Picnics rather than reunions were held on the Greenberg side 
of the family. 

Religion did not p^'.r.y a hie; part in the fainily life, 
although every Tnember of the family is a confirnied Episcopalian, 
T^e chupeh the family attends is Emmanuel Episcopal in downtovm 
Rockford, 

The decisions en daily family business were mad^; jointly 
between my mother and father. Ky father did the majority of 
the disciplinir^p' in the farpily, and as far as I can remember 
his punishments, "A-ore rore on the order, of groundin?' and cut- 
ting allowances, rather than spanking, 

Kay and Dean attended Bloom School, while Paul attended 
Windsor School while we lived in Loves Park, All -^hree children 
attended Lincoln Junior High School. vhile there Paul was on 
the swim.m.ing team, Kay was a cheerleader and Dean ran track 
and played intramural basketball. The Hinueber children all 
attended Guil:*'ord High School. While at Guilford Kay was a 
cheerleader for cne year, Paul v/as on the swimming and baseball 
tenms and Dean was on the track team for three years. Kay 
went to colle'^e at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois. 
She erraduated as a history major. Paul spent his college days 
at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin and graduated as a 
psychology major. 

The Hinueber family enjoyed many a summer vacation, at 
Shell Lake Wisconsin, we began going there when I was one 
year old and have been going there off and en ever since. 
Last summ.er we went up there with my Uncle Ralph and his family. 
The only other vacation that the family went on wa-; our trip 
to California in I965, The thino- I liked most about that trip 
was goinp" to all the baseball games. 



16. 



Dean Robert Hinueber 

Dean Robert 'HlNUEBER was born 23, December 1955. I-'iun 
T^resently a freshman at Hock: Valley College, and plan to 
fuirther my studies next year. 

I am actively invollflCd in The Big Brothers Association. 
I am a Big Brother to Mike iVicmillan of 113 i'orth Longwood. 
Kike is eight years old. 

1'^^ only lived in two houses in my life time, that I 
can remember. One waj at 1321 Northfield Avenue, behind Harlem 
High School in Loves Park. The other is at 282':) Pelhara Koad, 
my current place of residenee. I was very ^oun?- when the 
family moved to Rockford, from Whit tier where I was born. 



17. 



The only couple with two 
different wedding; days. 
Evelyn and Robert were 
originally scheduled to pe 
married, October 31st buo 
because Robert was in the 
>iospital with a back injury 
the we ding had to be post- 
poned until December S^h 



[Evelyn Greenberg, 
Lieut Hinueber 
Say Vows Dec, 5 




Ros-Mor photo ' 



Miss Evelyn Greenberg 



From Medford, Ore., has come 
news of the marriage of Miss Eve- 
lyn Alice Greenberg, daughter of 
the E. P. Greenbergs of 2317 10th 
avenue, and Lieut. Robert C. Hinue- 
ber, son of Mrs. J. W. Bailey of 
Springfield, formerly of Rockford. 
The service was read Saturday, 
Dec. 5, at the First Baptist par- 
.sonage in Medford by the Rev. W. 
A Dawes, and the bridal couple was 
unattended. Evelyn wore a soldier 
iblue frock with dubonnet acces- 
Isories and an orchid shoulder cor- 
sage. Immediately after the weadmg 
they went to Portland, Ore., for a 
khort honeymoon, rid now have, 
teturned to Camp White, Ore.,j 
Iwhere "Bob" is stationed with tnej 
(service command. 
r Both Evelyn and her husband are 
'graduates of Rockford high school i 
and he received his bachelor of 
iscience degree from the University! 
iof Illinois in 1940. He was in the; 
{college of commerce on the Illmij 
campus and was promient m ath- 1 
letics. , . 

E\'elyn is a former employe oi 
Helm's Machinists Supply company. 
Her husband entered the army m 
March, 1941, and was stationed for 
a while at Camp Croft, S. C. He 
took his officer's training at Fort 
Benning, Ga., and was advanced to 
|the rank of second lieutenant there 
ithis summer. Later he was trans- 
jferred to the infantry at Camp 
White. 



HINUEBER-GREENBERG 

The First Baptist parsonage in 

Medford, Ore., was the scene of the 

! marriage on Dec. 5 of Miss Eve yn 

■Alice Greenberg, daughter of the 

E F Greenbergs of 2317 10th flve- 

fnue 'and Lieut. Robert C. Hinueber, 

I son of Mrs. J. W. Bailey of Spring- . 

field formerly of Rockford. Rev. 

W A. Dawes officiated and the 

bridal couple was unattended. 

A soldier blue frock with du- 
bonnet accessories and an orchid 
■shoulder corsage was worn by E\'e- 
lyn for her wedding. She and thel 
groom spent their brief honeSTnooii 
in Portland and are residing^ at | 
Camp White, Ore., where "Bob' is, 
stationed with the service com-| 
roand. , , , 

Both are Rockford high school 
irraduates, and Bob received his 
( bachelor of science degree from the 
University of Illinois in 1940. He , 
was prominent there in athletics j 
land was enroUed in the college of? 
commerce. . , ! 

Evelyn was employed by Heim s 
Machinists Supply company. Her 
husband entered the army in 
March, 1941, and was stationed at 
Camp Croft, S. C, before taking 
officers' training at Fort Benning, 
Ga After receiving his second heu- 
tenant's bars there, he was trans- 
ferred this summer to the infantry 
(at Camp ^Vhite. 



\ Evelyn Greenberg 
! Will Be Bride Oi 1 
Lieut. Hinueber] 

When Mrs. E. F. Greenberg ofj 
2317 10th avenue entertained at a 
dinner party Wednesday evening, 
the hostess and Mr. Greenberg 
made known the approaching mar- 
"ia^e of their daughter, Evelyn 
/^lice, to Lieut. Robert C. Hinueber, 
son of Mrs. J. W. BaUey of Sprmg- 
field, formerly of Rockford. 

The 12 dinner guests found in- 
dividual corsages of gladiolus, 
chrysanthemums and oak leaves, at 
their places and tucked in among 
the flowers were scroUs inscribed 
with "Ev and Bob, Oct. 31." Evelyn 
I wore a wool frock of Shanghai red 
for the announcement party, and 
a bouquet o! autumn flowers cen-i 
tered the dinner table. 

The attractive bride-elect wiU 
travel west for the ceremony which 
is to be solemnized at Lieut. Hinue- 
ber's army post on October's last 
Saturday He is stationed as a- sec- 
ond lieutenant in the infantry at 
Camp White, Ore* 

Both Evelyn and her fiance were 
graduated from Rockford high 
school in 1934, and Bob received 
ihis bachelor of science degree from 
I the University of Illinois in 1940. 
He was in the college of commerce 
on the mini campus and was prom- 
inent in athletics. At Rockford. 
high school. Bob was a star basket- 
ball player. 

The future Mis. Hinueber is em- 
, ployed here by Helm's Machinists 
Supply company. Bob was called 
to army duty in March. 1941, and 
was stationed at Camp Croft, S. C. 
'for a time. He took his officers 



18. 



W0^'' "■■'^^y^ 



Class of Service 

This is a full-rate 
Telegram or Cable- 
cram unless its de- 
ferred character is in- 
dicated by a suitable 
symbol above or pre- 
ceding the address. 




ESTER^T " 
UNION 



A. M. WILUIAME 



NEWCOMB CARLTON 



NT-OvcmlnliiTclc 



LC-Dtftrr-a Cable 



NLT -Cable NigKc Utter 



Ship ReJlQxr«m 



The filing time shown in the date line on telegrams and day letters is STANDARD TIME at point of origin. Time ot receipt is STANDARD TIME at point o( destination 

5 ^^PM 5 



PRF264 7= ROCKFORD ILL 5 421P ; ^^^2 Dtc ^ 



LIEUT AMD MRS ROBERT H!MUEBER= 
JACKSOM HOTEL FR= 



41 



CONGRATULATIONS^^ LASTING HAPPINESS TO YOU BOTH> LOVE= 
MOTHER DAD RALPH AND KENNETHr^-' 



THE COMPANY WILL APPRECLA.TE SUGGESTIONS I-nOM ITS PATRONS CONCERNING ITS SERVICE 



Congratulatory telegram jent by the Ed Greenterg family to Bob and Ev. 



1?. 



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20, 



Famos Negro 
Scientist Dead 



TUSKEGEE, Alamaba, Jan. 6 
— (LP) — The world of science has 
lost one of its most eVninent 
characters-^a man who started 
life as a slave. Doctor George 
Washington Carver, the famous 
Negro chemist, died from, a fall 
he suffered 'a month ago. He 
was 79 years old. 

Doctor Carver's discoveries of 
usfs for sweet potatoes and pea- 
nuts saved the southlands when 
Chey petered out from too -much 
planting. And they added mil- 
lions to the south's annual in- 
come. 




w* 73rd >74th 75fh 76ti| ' 77th 78th 
"^ 1933-34 ;L935-36 193r-3S 1939-|Q 1941-42 1943-44 

'Republicans hn r gradually nai-;owed the margm of control held 
by Democrats injCongiess duung the past |0 jears of the Roose- 
Ivelt administration until now the elephar^ and tne donkey are 
I practicaUjvneck and neck in both houses. * fhart shows number ot- 
1 Democrats snd Republicans in past ave Cpngcesses and new 7Btn. 
t : t- ■ — 



^anKUn D. ..oosevelfs new Congress of .9^3 and tne aeath of 
Doctor George .Vashington Carver made the news of the day 
January 6th. l^^JS- 




* 



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Athletics 

Heavyweight Basketball 

Even though Coach Laude's heavies, 
composed mostly of underclassmen, 
were not very successful from the 
standpoint of games won, they will pre- 
sent an experienced, determined squad 
next season. 

John Pierce. 

December 8 
Rockford 16; Mount Morris 18 
This game, being the first of the sea- 
son, was a cause for us to be very ex- 
cited and over-anxious to win. Stasica 
was our bright spot and high scorer. 
Arthur Sadtler. 

December 15 
Rockford 19; DeKalb 33 
We went into this game with dyna- 
mite in our veins, determined to start 
our winning streak this very night. 
Hinueber was our scoring star. 

John Peterson. 

December 16 
Rockford 19; Morrison 17 
Being too over-anxious to win nearly 
caused us to lose. Near the end of the 
third quarter they overtook us, and 
only a last minute rally gave us this 
victory. 

Louis Castigmoni. 

December 22 
Rockford 16; Freeport 24 

We had high hopes that Ignatchuk. 
recently annexed to the squad, would 
be the missing link in our line-up; 
however, the crack shot quintet 
(juenched all our hopes. 

DoN.vLD Snyder. 

December 29 

Rockford 30; Alumni 32 

We were confident of our ability to 

overcome our rusty predec-essors, but 

Nelson of the opponents slipped in a 

last minute basket. 

Robert Hinueber. 

January 5 

Rockford 17; East Aurora 20 

It was a hard fought battle with 

Castiglioni and Ignatchuk high scorers 

for the Rabs while Hearny, flashy 

.Aurora center, led for the east siders. 

Carlo Branca. 

identification 



-Stasica shooting for a basket 
—Rockford chalking up two poiii 



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S E n 1 O R s 



FRANK GIERWIATOSKI 

Ncvt-r a nickname has been given this hul. All sorts of 
sports interest him greatly, and he enjoys watching athletic 
contests. His course in school has I.een a general ..ne. 

WALTER LAMONT GILMORE 

Orclieslra 2. 3. 4; Knui.iecriMt; 4; Student Conncil 2. 
•■Walt." an al.le nuinl.cr of the high school orchestra, 
brought home honors from th.- state orchestra meet. His 
favorite pastime is driving about with a carload of 
friends. 



WILLIAM WELDON GILMOUR 

"Bill" wants to become a printer. He likes golf and foot- 
ball, because he claims that the tighter and the good loser 
always come out on top. 

GERALD CLEMENT GLAIN 

"Jerry" likes to travel and to explore remote regions. 
He would like to visit "Little America" an, I actually see 
the place where Commander Ityrd liveii. He finds travel 
and nature magazines very interesting. 



DOROTHY EVLEYN GOFF. 

Although Dorothv entered K. H. S. late, her charming ways 
h.ive won many friends for her. Soft brown eyes and a 
winsome smile are a part of her pleasing personality. 

GEORGE HUGH GOODWIN 

George's sociology class is his favorite in high school. Among 
his pastimes, eating occupies a [irominent place; in fact, 
he usually lunches l,ef..re the third hour. 



MARGARET JOSEPHINE GOUGH 

liccause "Marge" likes all sports she belongs t.. the Kock- 
ford Ciirls' Physical Culture club. She lias a hobby of col- 
lecting antiques. Being interested in aviation, she hopes 



BARBARA GERTRUDE GOULD 

Fasces 2, J; Seco 3, 4; French .i. 4; Home Room treasurer 3. 
Barbara plans to enter the University of HIinois. Her 
favorite sport is ice-skating. Barbara would like to teach 
Knglish. She enjoys reading stories by Temple Bailey and 
Faith Baldwin. 



TOM GRAY 

National Honor Societv 4; Hi V 4; Swinui.ing 4. 
Tom chose swimming for his favorite sport. His anddlion 
is to obtain a scholarship for O.xford; there to take up a 
medical course and later branch into psychiatry. 

ALBERT STEAD GREEN 

Football 2; Track 2; Hi-Y i. 4; 8-5-3, 3, 4. 
"Abie" enjoys the study of animals as his hobby. He 
wants to attend N'ortlnvestern and in future years he 
would like to own a big department store. 



EVELYN ALICE GREENBERG 

Commmercia 3, 4. 

"Always have your lessons prepared." is Evelyn's advice 
to the underclassmen. High school has enabled her to meet 
and associate with many interesting people. 

DOLORES MAE GREENE 

.\ Cappella 4; Cllee 3, 4; German, secrctarv J, vice-president 
4; Fasces 3; Treble Clef 3. 

Although she is also interested in German, Dolores excels 
in music. Her soprano voice never fails to win applause, 
and her record shows that she is active in musical organ- 



MARJORIE LUCILLE GREENLEE 

.\Iarjorie loves typing and shorthand. With such a pleasant 
outlook on business, someone will some day have a perf.-ct 
stenograplier. She has a smile for everyone. 

ELIZABETH ANNE GREGORY 

.<--i-3. 4; A. B. I.. 4; Owl J; Fasce, .! 

Latin and chemistry were Khzabeth's f..vorite subjects 
She likes the teachers and pupils in those clas.,es. Hci 
favorite sport is swiniiuing. 



/"iii/r one hiimtrcii fifty 




S E n 1 O R s 



ROBERT KARL HINUEBER 

liasketball 2. 3, A; Cvrman 2, S. 

"Hine" will lie rcmemhered for his work on tlie li:isketl..-ill 
siiuail. He is interested in many sports, liut basketball is 
his favorite. 

IRENE ANN HIPPJ 

Amazon 2, 3; Tri-V , ., ,„ 

Irene is one of the ha|.|J -/^locky kifcU vsh.. lias "I.i 
and let live" as her nyA/i. Sli/} .ijoioys tennis and 
always a, 



23. 




GUNHIWO MARIE HOGLUND 

3, -1; Monitor 3. 

iht suspect, Gunhild is a very clever young 
Her honor-^il! grades and popularity have com- 
bined to make herVtoul days successful. 

:hA«D H^mB 

r KobeiV^niotto. Of all his studies 

' '"^'^S-'-'i'" ''' ^'^ favorite sporU 

HELEN^^5^[JE HOMMEWrt^ 

l^'ilH^has been a IWViVrS>Hc. and she is gen- 
PiySlyf herXrrriity-tiv^vpe and to take 



;<»XaRINNE ELOISE HOPKINS 

^TH C^'"l ■'. ■•; -\ma2on 2; 8-5-3, 3; Biology 4; Home Kooni vice- 
sTSA^aSl^resident 2. 

* >5NK^t'"-inne is a sweet young miss with blonde hair which she 
Vi l\,arranges charmingly. During her high school career, she 
^jjr->«„^V^JSv^juyed her work on the Owl staff very much. 

THEODORE ARTHUR HOPKINS 

Hi-Y 3, 4; Philos 2, 4. treasurer 3; Rab Authors 2, presi- 
dent 3; Walter Hampden 3, 4; Class Play 3; National 
Honor Society 4. 

Ted wants to go to Northwestern to learn to become 
a doctor. He enjoyed the study of I.atiu because he has 
Iwavs been interested in ancient Rome. 



LEON HOWARD 

Clee 2, 3. vice. president 4; Operetta 3, 3, 4; Football 2, 3. 
Music occupies quite a bit of Leon's time. His favorite 
club is the Glee club, and his favorite entertainment is 
dancing to a good orchestra. 

ROY BURTON HUDSON 

Burton displays the true tyiie of high school boy. He 
seems t.j enjoy everyone and everyone enjoys him. Friend- 
ships h;ive been most important to him. 



WILBUR LAVERNE HUDSON 

Wilbur has learned about the spirit of cooperation while 
in high school. He advises pupils to study harder, ffe en- 
joys listening to concerts. His favorite actress is Janet 
Gayr 



JUNE CHARLENE HUNT 

••[•orget all males" is June's parting advice to the Junii 
She likes to dance belter th.iii to do anything else. 



patie oiu- Imiuhcd fifly-foiir 



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%^on;fin4 of tk*l7«)tu^J]o/t» 
^ c» ^ ^ '^^me'n. 

tn accordance Uiliji t)j^ uni\J^r;^al^ractic«; of 

tljeiliol^ Cftlljolic u^uvdj,l)^tlje?Ugln^ on 

of ourVn^/; iM€ did administer 

C[on|trmation, 

€>i/t/of t1^e]^ot^;^|>irIt, 



So 

on_ 

in_ 



Paul £. Hinueber 



May 28, 1961 



Emmanuel Epixopal Church 



in t'he J)i ce/e: o|'Chicc^o 



©IjeDBWt^op jSTu^o^an 








iitjouna^n 3uta. i^ t^o follolu 0)ft^ 



U t'o U)or/(|ip ©od ^ben^^undot^iu 
Iji^ 0^urcl|; and to luor\ andpra^ and 
^ive for tfi^/jpread oj'^i/i^jn^dom. 





HOFFMAN, JOE C 1949- 



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,:^, ;NK; ^LlAS. c'Ln.: -. . the FRO: 

lY' h; story 



,- oi'jr, i r i jutor to ti"ic - / .-, ; - 

Sj l.-iol your fan. y .\...^^. / can oo na. mort „ ._ , , n; 

ric.ir, Ta.nilies, wo ar>, os.^inq you , •..; oui th< .ornib i- low. .il-. 

^ rr, ,..,.cs, .incj will ,u mji i ly r,i6(,c . .' .rUo an Index which v; ' .jr..iv 
;ebs tcj jusl liiose kinub of family ...storicb needeu. 



Your name Joe C, Hoffman 



0." 



Date of form |.« . -^ lAmi -^ • d // 



M<iy a , )97i,^ 



► 



? . Y .- , u r c o 11 c cj e : Ho C K^ J{LLiLL_L:Oj_' =-iL^ ( ' ' ' ''■' 

Roc l< f o rd , iTTT no"i s •■ 

1,. CiK.v ^ the earliest date for which you have oeci aole to b..^ tnir.|jS ooout , 
yo -r paper. 

Before 1750 175C-,300 1800-1 850 



X :850-1900 1900 or later 

^. ?'.>_ase check a 1 i regions of the United States i r, which memoers o. your f.. 
nave ciscussed in your paper have lived, 

New Englana (Mass., Conn., R.!.) Middle Atlant.c (N.Y,, ?eana. , N. 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., K.C., S.C.) ^East Soutn CentraULa. ,Mi.s:.. 

|^.^est South Central ;Ark. , N.X, , Tex., Ok.) cast North Central (Mic. ..o. 

Pacific (Cal., WasrJ (riawaii, Alaska) 
X Mid West (111, Iowa, Neb) 

5. Please check al 1 occupational categories in which members o. your family v. .... y<^- . . 
ciscussed in this paper nave found themselves. 

X Farming ^Kilning ^Shop^eeping or small business 

Transportation Big Business ^^'lanufacLur ing 

^Professions X . ndus trial labor x Other (stor.e mason, exalosive eng. ) 



6. Please check a 1 i religious groups to which memoers of your family whom ycu 
in this paper have belonged. 

Roman Catholic ^Jewish Presbyterian Mechodist 



^ ^Baptist Epi scopal ian Congregational ., Lutneran 

Quaker Mormon ^ Other Protestant ''^~ Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed In your pu^jc:r? 

German and German-American 

^Blacks inoians ^Mexicans ^Puerto Kicans 

Jews ^ Central Europeans Italians Siavs 



Irish British Native Americaf.s over several i.^^r.erat ions 
Eas t As i an Otner 



J. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other Family Bibles Famiiy Goi.t;..iog icb 
fami ly members 

Vital Records ..ufid Records ^The u.'_.. v:c(..ub 

X Photographs ^ Maps x Other 



. FAHI LY DATA 

1 A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name Her:n.ann George Hoff.-.ian Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death Easter 19^5 

Place of birth Seward, Ileb. Date of Bi rth J^ov 1^, 138^ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school 8 year shigh school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st farmer Dates 1909 1st (iuttenberg, iowa Dates 1999 



2nd factory laborer Dates 1927 2nd D:.tes_ 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates_ 

^th Dates ^th Dates 

Re 1 i g i on German Lutheran 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Democratic -^^^'^j' 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother ^ , , '. Z date TfwT 

Guttenoer '■ lov/a . 1909 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

^^"^ Clara LouJ-f.^ Drv^r- Current Residence 

If dead, date of death -^Vt-^ 

Place of birth Elkrort lov/a Date of birth ^'^^^ 3, I'^gO 



Blk^jort^ lo'.va 



Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ years high school vocational co". '.ege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Kousev.ife Dates I909 1st uuttenber,-;, Iowa 1909 Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd ^:ockford. 111 Dates 19^6 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 



4th Dates 'ith ^Dates 

Re 1 i g i on German Luther? r: 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. De:r.ocrrtic party 



Place of marriage to your grandfathe r guttenber^. iov/a DAT^ 1909 

^°^^'- tLHata^Sf'.*fhl^^Sa£g'S?\|(:f§ 3a|i^\A-^)f stepmother or another relative give 



i. 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Nome Henry Gasper Bailey Current Residence 

If dead, date or death Ouly 12, 1933 

Place of birth Bed Wing, -Minn. O^^e of birth 1890 

Education (number of years): 
grade school ; yp'^r high school vocat i onal college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
^st Gnmfflfircial fishing: Dates I908 1st clavton. Iowa Dates 1922 

2nd Sandpits Dates ^^22 jnd ^ubuoue, Iowa Dates ^^55 



3rd Ooinaercial fishi:- ^^^^^ 1931 3^^ q^^^^ 



itth ^ailrord q^^^^ 1933 ^^^^ 



Dates 



Re 1 i g i on t-rote s tant 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. De:nocr3.t3.c party 

Place of marriage to your grandmother Clayton, lov/a cia'ce TTT2' 

Note: If your mother was raised by a-VTepfa Lhcr 'Or anOTfTtJr f^t3Tr75-tTC~'age 18) 

give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Jeanette .lead C urrent Residence 

If dead, date of death -^ug ^^» I7o 3 

Place of birth ^one Rock, V.isc Date of bjrth i'6Q3 



Education (number of years) 
grade school ^ years high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) _ PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

, ,_ (after leaving home) 

1st Housewife Dates ■'■ 1st Clayton, Iowa Dates l?!^ 



2nd Dates 2nd Dubuque, Iowa Dates ^^5' 



3rd ^Dates 3rd Guttenberg, Iowa Dates -°?^' 

Religion Lutheran 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Ber.iocraoic rar oy 

Place of marriage to your grandfathe r Cl?ytda, lov-'g. d ate 1'12 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age Ib^ 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



CMLDREN of A & B (or A- 1 or 3-1) - your father's name should appear ijclov; 

Jame_g;:^y;ir>n^ Hoffman 



Place or Dirth ;-i]ttfinhpr ;•, lov;" date Julv H. 1110 

Number of years of schooling 11 years Occupation retired (factory laborer; 

Residence Rockford. ill ~ Marital Status widov/er (.narri ed twice; 

Number of ch i Idrcn Four 

N a me M ar ^g.ret Hoffman 



Place of birth Guttenberg, Iowa d ate • 1912 



Number of years or schooling none Occupati6n_ 

Residence deceased Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren none 

Name -i^e Roy Hoffman o^ iqik 

Place of' bl rth iiuttenDers, J-Owa date Aug ^/, ±^±y 

N^mb^rof velr sor scnoolin, H — — Occupatio n i^;^;^^^T^^^er 
Residence Ho ckford, 111 Marital ftatus -^^ years 

Number of chi Idren °t^^ 

Nam^ J-a Verne EarnestHoffman 

Pl.c c of birth bULleiiuei ' b, iom date ^^^ 3, 1918 



Number of years of schooling "''"'",. , Occupati Oh factory laborer 
Res i dence pnnkforri, ±11 M arital Status ^i years 



Number of chi Idren tv;o 



Name 



Place of bi rth ^^^^ 
Number of years of schooling OccupatiOn_ 
Residence Marital Status 



Number of clTTldren 



Name 

P 1 ace of birth d ate ^ 

Number of years of schooling OccupatiOn_ 

Residence '"'arital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 



PlAce of birth d^t® , 

Number of years of schooling Occupatioh_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children . 



Name ^_ 

P 1 a ce of birth .. J^^'^ 

Number of yp;^r^ of schooling " Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status__ 

Number of chi Idren 



Name , 

Place of bi rth ^^^^ 

Number of y^^r<, of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of ch i Idren ~^ 



10. Name 

Place of birth d3te_^ 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence I 'larital status 

Number of Ch! Idren 



iniLDREN of C and D (or (-1 n- i 1 , ■ 

\o, (. I, [) l)-y„„r molluM-'<. ,K,MK- should uppe.ir i.e 



N iiiK' Robert Bailey 

f ' 1 • I " ■ of i)i I III 'L:igyto n, lov/a 

NuinlxT rjf yc.ir', (.f ;.clK7,TT7r^ TT 

;;'■■'; '''•"^'-- dP.^.n...^ - — 

Niitiibcr nl children ~~ ~ 



ppe.ir DC low 

d.a.- ■ 1913 

OccupoL i on larmer 

Marital Status never married 



nonp 



N.iirif Helen He vers __^^ 

P I -'c^; of birUi Clayton, Iowa 
Number of years ol bchool ing To" 
Residence Guttenbers:. Iowa 
Number of ch i Idren five ~ 



date March 6, 19' 7 



Uccupat Ion iGctory laoorer 



Marl tal Status "? year- 



_ Nainc Raymond Bai ley 
P 1 a ce of birth 'Jlayton, lov/a 



Number of years ot" school ing 
Residence Eagley, V.'isc 
Number of ch i 1 dren fc 



N amc Gladys Gohde 

P 1 ace of birtli Clayton, , Io"wi~ 

Number of years ot' school Ing TCT 

Residence McGre q-or, lo'.va 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



Place ot birth Clayton, lov/a 



Number of years ot school ing 1 
Res i dence Cedar Ra riid 
Number of ch i Idren 



lov/a 



Name Grace Vi vian Hoffiaan 
Place of bi rth Clayuon, lov/a 



Number of years ot school ing 
Res i dence gockf nrd , Til 
Number of children "two" 



10 



Name Richard Bailey 

Place ot birth Clayton. lo^j^j" 



Number of years ot school ing IF 
Res i dence Dubuoue, lov/a 

Number of ch i Idren 



three 



Name 



li fiord Bailey 
Place ot birth Clayt on, Iowa" 



'dumber of years ot school Ing ID" 
^es i dence Dubuque, Iowa ~ 
;Jumber of ch i Idren ? 



Name Clarence Bailey (born d ead ) 

1' ' ace of birth Clayton, lovTa 

Jumber of years ot schooling 

;^esi dence 

dumber of ch i Idren ~" 



ilame 

'lace of birth 

lumber of years of schooling 

'esi dence 

^"'"t'er of children 



date March 21. I919 



Occupation factory laborer 
Marital Status / years 



date Hay 3, I92I 



Occupation factory 1- borer 

Marital Status " ye'crs ~ 



__ date Hay 27, I9 23 
Occupat ion I'sctory 'a borer 



Marital Status '■ years 



date Sept 27, 1923 



ecu pa t i on nousev.'ife 



Marital Status ^1 



date Feb 



1933 



Occupat iOn runs numane society 

Marital Status ^'^ years 



"date A ril 1, I935 



Occupation ^'^."^ ^- L(Jhyr 



Marital Status^ari'1-U Lwl 'y 



date 

Occupation 



Marital Status 



date 



Jccupat I On 



Marital Status 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

£1 



^ame 

Place 

'Jumbe 



of birth Knck-^r ^ d.' IL Date of birth Octn her )0 l9</C 

'Jumber of years of schooling g Occupati ^J^^^ Pr^ha^,.-.A nU .rc.r- 

Residence p/ LO^/fon Bra, h . Pl.r,^. Marital Status ,y.^rc./d ^Ij-cL "^ '^^ 

^lumber of children O 

'Jame ^. f) g- ^ ■ j"^ of-f m'a ^ 

Mace of birth K^eokuW . 1 u;a Date of birth Juj , 7, / ^7 /^ 

dumber of years of schooling ^ 3 Occupat ioF Tt^^'^-^;; (^j^ /r^^^ uJori^^er 

^es i dence KDLk^,,rdl ^ IL Marital Status 5 u^^rs 

'Jumber of chi Idren ^ '^ 



*lame 



'lace of birth ^Date of birth 

'Jumber of years of School ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status \ 

*Jumber of children 

*ilame 

'lace of birth Date of birth 

fijuraber of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 



^lumber of chi Idren 



^ame 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

Mumber of years of school ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ] 

Number of chi 1 dren 



Name 

Place of birth 'Ba'te of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling OccupatiOn_ 

Residence ~M a r i t a 1 Status 

Number of chi 1 dren 

Name 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Mar i tal STatus 

Number of chi Idren 



111. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family historv, along with all literary and administrative 
rights," to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed j Lv^ ^~ f^^'^ ^pAA^br-^:^:^ 

Date V^_Ji&^2^ 



Intcrviewr : 

Kildro 

V.Tote letters 
Immigration oj 
Albert 
Gladys 



fa.nil: 
schoo 

army 



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List of SourceG of Information 

Interviews: 

LaVerne Hoffuan Sockford, 111 

C-rrce Hoffman Rockford, 111 

Mildred Hoffman Kockford, 111 

Wrote letters to: 

Iinn.iijration and Naturalization Service in Nat'l Archives (no answer) 

Albert Dryer Missouri 

Gladys Ghode McGregor, Iowa 

other sources: 

Birth certificates 

confirmation papers 

Wedding licenses 

fa.nily photos 
school records 

array orders 



Introduction 

This paper ir an atte;.-^it to recreate, in c historical contort, 
a rnst history of :ny fa.aily. 

;iost of my information covers :ny father's side of the f-.aily, 
so consequently x will have more information on then than my i.;othor'i 
side. 

I too.: my paper as far back as the 1^70 's coverin,'^ my great- 
grandparents on my frther's side. being that both sides of his 
family migrated from Germany around 1870, they most likely came 
through ijllis island in riew ifork, but i didn't receive an answer 
to my request for information, so this can not be confirmed. 

iiy paper goes up to the present, but not into as much detail 
as the pact does. 



Casper Hoffnan 
Jr^aternal Great Gr-ndfather 
Eorn: I^ast PruGcia in loifO 
died: Guttonburrj, lov/a 1926 
Rclision: Gerrr.an Lutheran 
Socioecono.T.ic statue: middle class 
Occupation: Stone Ilason 

My great grandfather brought his faaily out of Gerrncny to the United 
States after the iJ'rrnco-Prussian War in the 1370 's. Ho had served in the 
Prussian or Gcruan array as a Captain during the v/ar. It is thought that 
he left Germany to take his faraily out of the conflicts he saw co :in-; fol- 
lov/ing the war . 

Once in the United States, he first settled in Seward, iMebraska. L^ter 
he aoved to lov/a where he took up his occupation as a stone mason, lie had 
learned this occupation while serving in the arny in Germany. 

As a stone raason he was quite capable and earned a substancial incone. 
'iTiere are still churches and schools .standing in i;lkport and Guttenburg, 
iowa that he built out of quarrey lime stone. 

r-ly Great Grandfather was an extremely proud and strong nsji who held 
litule faith in the banks of this new land. His famous line when asKed 
about his credit was, "ny name is Gasper Hoffman und 1 have mine col- 
laterol in mine pocket-. 

In his occupation as a stone ;nr.son he earned enough money to buy 
each of his three sons a farm in the uuttenburg area. 

Casper had five children, Henry, iiTederick, lizzie, Anna, and my 
grandfather Hermann George Hoffman. 



(i; 



'.vilhelm Jjrier (.Dryer; 

Paternal Groat urandfathcr 
tiorn: !ior;lcndburt'7, Geruiany l':'>bk 

Died: Guttenbur;";, lowa in 1950 

Kelisi on: German iiUtheran 

ijocioeconoiuic status: middle class 

Occupation: Explosive engineer 

My great (';^rai.dfc..ther migrated to the united states at a young ago 
with his fanily in 1 >70. xt is figured that v/ilhclm's father v/as trying 
to take his family away from the onco;aing vicr with i- ranee. 

After corning to the united iitates wilhelm's father changed the 
spelling of his last nane from Drier to Dryer to look more .'j^.icrican. 

There isn't too auch else Icnov/n about ^*ilheln(,v/ho later changed his 
name to |;d>illiara; except that when he grew up ho took up his occu-oation as 
an explosive engineer, ne married r-iarie iienke in 1333 r.nd settled in Klk- 
port, Iowa. 

wilhelm had nine children, iJlsie, ueorge, riinnie, illlie, Raymond, 
IjOu, V/illiam jr., Albert, and 'my grandmother (Jlara Dryer. 



(2; 



Marie tsenke 
i'aternal (ircat lirandiaother 
Born: Mrnchecter, xowa 1369 
Died: 1955 i^uttcnburc, lowa 
Kelicion: C-ornian iiutheran 
ijocioeconoiaic status: upper middle 
Occupation: housewife 

narie cenke married vdlhelm Dryer in lov/a. There is no other inform- 
ation available to me on her. 

i-iarie had nine children, j;;lsie, ueorge, riinnie, alllie, i^aymond, 
ijou, Viilliaiu jr., Albert, and ray greindmother ulara uryer. 



(3) 



Henry Casper Bailey 
Maternal Grandfather 
Born: i^od V.'inc, i-Iinn. IG90 
Died: Dubuque, Iowa 1953 
Eelicion: Protestrnt 
Socioeconomic status: lower class 
Occupation: laborer, co..imercial fisherman, hunter and trapper 

My grandfather went to school for only four years in Red V/ing, 
Minnisota. In I9OO his family moved to Clayton, lov/a, but he never 
went back to school. His family was very poor and he would do odd Jobs 
in the area to earn a fev/ pennies a day to help the frmily income. 

As a young man ray grandfather spent a lot of time riding the Trails 
to different places all over the United States and even Canada. He did 
this for a few years before returnin-: home to Clayton where he started 
hunting and fishing along the Mississippi tilver for a living. Fishing 
was a fairly popular occupation in Clayton since the Mississippi Kiver 
borders the town on one side. 

In 1911 his commercial fishing carried him farther up the Mississippi 
Kiver to McGregor, Iowa where he met Jeanette Head. At the time she 
v;as 16 years old and he 21. They courted for a year and v/ere married 
in Clayton, lov/a in 1912, v/here they made their first home. 



ik) 



Jeanette Head 
Maternal GrandrriOther 
Born: Lone hiock, Wisconsin 1395 
•tJicd: Dubuque, Iowa 1968 
Keli.sioi^: Lutheran 
Socioeconomic status: lower class 

My /grandmother was born in Lone Rock, V/isconin, a small tov/n of 
around 500 people, situated about fifty niiles due weot of Madison. 

At the age of tv/o years her family r.ioved to McGrefiOr, Iowa in 
1397. McGregor lies on the riississippi Kiver just wect of Prarie du 
Chi en, V/i scon sin. 

in McGregor ay grandmother attended just four years of element- 
ary school before quitting to help out the family. Being from a 
poor family of seven, she had to aid in the family's income. She 
done various jobs, baby sitting, ran errands and even sold bake goods. 

In 1911 she met nenry tsailey, a commercial fisherman from Clayton, 
Iowa. I'hey courted for a year and were married in 1912 when she was 
seventeen years old. 



(5) 



nenry Gosper liailey 

and 
Joanette Bailey 
Haternr-l Grandparents 
SocioeconD;.iic status: lower class 

After r^ettin^ narried in 1912, my grandparents :aade their first 
home in a snail five room tar papered house built by r/.y -randfathcr 
and Ms father, Samuel Bailey. The house was situated between the 
railroad tracks and the Mississippi Kiver. After the bprin^ thaw 
the river would raise and the house would get flooded., 'i'o prevent 
this from happenins anymore my grandfather and Samuel iiailey placec/ 
the house up on stilts. 

My grandfather continued to be a commercial fisherman until 1922, 
when he went to work in the sandpits in Clayton. 

m 1913 the first of their nine children was born. Even as 
poor as they were my grandfather didn't want my grandmother to work 
but stay home and raise the family. 

In 1931 the depression hit and my grandfather w-;s layed off when 
the sandpit was closed down. During the depression he went back to 
fishing and hunting to provide for his family. 

Times wore very hard during the depression, xho children often 
didn't have any shoes or had to wear shoes to small or to large for 
them. The lack of money also had an affect on the children in their 
schooling. Because of tjio lack of food they often v/ent without 
brealuast and only had a lard dcndwich to eat at noon. They - Iso 
had to walk a great distance along the trackc- with the cold wind 
coniing off the river during the winter. Also they often couldn't oa.y 



(6) 



the necesscry cupplies to do their school \'jot.\. The older children 
hcd to quit school in ear . y £;rade3, and ;;^o to v/orl': ond earn noney 
to support the f.aily income. 

Clayton had a welfare system, of vhich the mnyor •.vcs in chcr'-,e, »f. 
The food thr t was distributed v;a3 usually rr.ncid with wor;v.s and mold. 
Hy grandparents attributed this to the uayor who they said was crook- 
ed and uu'kinj a profit by selling the 2;ood food on the bl'ck :narkot. 

Burin.'j this tir,io my grandmother often -cteri as physican, educator, 
and disci pliner. Gince there wasn't any money, she would handle all 
the minor medical problems. At Christrars time she would even be 
Santa Glaus. She would repair old toys and paint faces on old dolls 
of the ^i^l^' Then she would carefully wrap them in what paper she 
could find and put them under the Christmas tree. 

In 1938 my grandfather went to v;ork for the railroad. Ke worked 
for them for a number of years, and left when he moved his fariily 
to Dubuque, Iowa. This was in 1955, and all the children had left 
hoiae except for the youngest Clifford. Once in Dubuque ho '^ot a job 
in a furniture factory where he made a mecTer income. He held this 
job until his death in 1958. 

After my grandfather's death my grrandraother moved to Guttenberg, 
Iowa. There she lived in a mobile home in the yard of her oldest 
daughter Helen. She lived there until her death in 19'o. 

During their lives ny grandparents were hard workJ.ng, but were 
unable to make a very large of aft increase in their socioeconomic 
status. 

My grandparents had nine children, IJobert, Helen, Raymond, Harry, 
Clarence (born dead), Richard, Gladys, Clifford, and ray mother Grace 
Bailey. 



(7) 



. Herrasnn George Hoffman 

Paternal Grr.nd father 
Born: Reward, Nebraclia l38/f 
Died: Guttenbers, Iowa 1956 

Beli^ion: German Lutheran (American Lutheran) 

Socioeconomic status: middle class or lower middle class after dep- 
ression 
Occupation: farmer, factory laborer 

Hy grandfather was born in Sev/ard, Nebraska of German immigrant 
parents. At this tine his father Casper, had a small farm. As my 
grandfather was grov/ing up on this farm he learnt his first occupat- 
ion. 

He attended school through the eighth grade in Seward, then had 
to quit because of the distance of the junior high school from his 
home . 

In around I9OO he along v/ith his parents and brothers and sisters 
moved to Elkport, Iowa. Once in Elkport his father returned to his old 
trade as a stone mason. Hy grandfather and his two brothers v/ould often 
help their father in his work. 

Around 1912 his family moved to Guttenberg, Iowa. Guttenberg is 
a small German tov/n situated on the IlississipDi i;iver in eastern Iowa. 
In this tov/n almost all German customs are follov/ed, esoecially at this 
time. Birth certificates, marriage licenses, confirmation certificates, 
etc. are all printed in German. Host families were either German im- 
migrants or first generation Americana. , so strict German upbringing 
was the rule. 

At the age of 23, in 1907 my grandfather met Clara Dryer another 
first generation German Ajiierican. They met in Klkport and courted for 



(8) 



two years before nnrrying in 19^9. They were married in a Gernan 
wedding in the Guttenberg German Lutheran Church. 



(9) 



c;lara Louise Dryer 
Paternal Grandmother 
Born: Slkport, Iowa 1390 
JJied: East Moline, Illinois 19 64 
Reli/jioii' German Lutheran 
SocioeconOiTiic status: middle class 
Occupation: housewife 

My grandmother was born in Elkport, Iowa, a small pocket of 
German /unericans in eastern iowa. There she attended r:rade school 
up to the eighth or ninth grade. She had to leave school then be- 
cause of the difficulty of seating to the ne::t higher school. 

She grew up with a strict German upbringing, with a close af- 
filiation with the local Lutheran church. 

Being from a fairs^ly well to do family, she never had to toke up 
a physical job, but v/ould often do part time work for extra money. 
Ho-^t of her time was spent at home helping to care for the younger 
raenbers of the family, aeccuse of this she learned to preserve food 
and make various jams and jellies. This would come in handy later 
in life during the depression of the 3-'s. 

At the age of seventeen in 190? she met nermann George Hoffman 
at an Elkport gathering. They courted for two years and were mar- 
ried in 1909 in Guttenberg, Iowa. 



(10) 



Hermann Ueorf;e uoffman 

and 
Clara Louise Hoffman 
Paternal Grandparents 
Socioeconomic status: middle class (.lower uiddle class after depression; 

After bein^ married in 1909, my c^andpcrents r.iadc their first 
home in a farm just outside of Guttenberg. ITiis farm was given to 
my grandfather from his father (Jasper Hoffman. 

iiy grandfather v/as a very industrious hard world.ng man. he v;as 
the only one of the three boys in his fcXiuily that his father had "iven 
farms to who made a success of it. However in 1927 he lost his farm 
because of his concern for other less fortunate members of the family. 
He had signed as co-signer on some loan for these relatives and v/hon 
they were unable to make the payments he had to. isecause of the amount 
of these bills he had to give up his farm to make good on them. 

After giving up his farm, he moved his family of three boys and 
v/ife to Guttenberg, where he got a job in a factory. There he earned 
fairley good wages for the day and his family was fairley well off. 

■ Hy grandmother was always a housewife from the time she was mar- 
ried. She raised three boys in the same manner she was raised, very 
strict, Kven though ray grandfather was the head of the house, she 
handled the house chores and discipline of their children, ny father 
told me her favorite way of correcting them was to send them out after 
their own willov/ switch. The smaller the switch they brought back the 
more she would use it. 

Pajnily life was fairely smooth up to the depression, which struck 
thera in 1931. In 1930 ray grandfather had bought a brand new car for 
around U750 and in I93I he was layed off his job. 



(11) 



uui'in.j the deprcscion ray srandfnther would liire hiiarolf out 
to local f ar icrs for payi.icnt in nroc'uce. Hy 'jrr.ndr.'iother would 
raise a large "arden in the backyard, bhe would can and pre- 
serve the produce she raised for use during the long winter montlis. 

As hard as the tiaes were there was still tiraes for fun. r.oth 
sides of the ftuily Uloffnan and Dryer) being German, they would 
often on holidays have big family gatherings along the MiGsissippi 
Kiver . Large, meals were alv/ays served for the holidays, and for the 
religious holidays the mornings were spent in the Lutheran church. 

Both of lay grandparents, as most of the people in Guttenbcrg 
backed Franklin Roosevelt when he took, of iic>-' . They hoped he would 
end the depression that had chsngod their life style so much. 

V/hen the war cajne it brought jobs to the peoTile in the i^rea. 
During the war years ray grandparents te;:iporarily moved to Rockford 
for employment in the large factories there. While in r;ockford 
th^ei" home was ramsacked and they lost many valuable papers (which 
I could have used in this report) and possessions. 

The prosperity after the war brought some new industries and 
revived some old industries in the Guttenbcrg area. Because of this 
my grandparents returned to Guttenberg after the weur in 19^5- 

My grandfather started workang for the Button factory, wr,ich 
was the largest factory in the area at 'the time, and worked there 
until his death. 

After my grandfather passed away my grandmother moved to Roci-:- 
ford where her three boys had moved fee- earlier. Her house and pro- 
perty were auctioned off in Iowa and she came to live vath her old- 
est son Raymond. 



(12) 



She lived off and or. with each of her boys until che v/as afflict- 
ed v/ith Parld.nson diseaae. She i ived in our ho..ie for a lon:^ time after 
she had it, but v/e were unaware of it. This caused many unha oioy events 
because jsrf my brother and I'^-s^ lackScrf\£ nov/l ed;'^e>-ebeut her condition. 
V,'e were younr; and didn't understand some of the things that this di- 
sease made her do. At the ti-.e it had even changed my opinion of her. 
She later moved in with her oldest son again. She stayed there until 
she 5ot so bad that she could no lon.-cr be taken care of by rny aunt. 
My father and his two brothers got to_^ethor with her physician and 
it became apparent that she v/ould have to be institutionalized. They 
then made arrangements for her to be placed in East Moline State Hos- 
pital in 1964. She was there for around eight or nine months before 
she finally died of the disease later in the year. 

My grandparents had four children, Raymond, Margaret (died at 
1-J- years of Rheumatic Fever), Le Roy, and my father La Verne Hoffman, 



(13) 



La Verne Z. Hoffman 
Father 

Born: GuttenberG, Iowa Oct 3, I9I8 
Koli.;^ion: Lutheran 

£ocioccono::;ic status: middle class 
Occupation: factory laborer 

My father was born in I918 in the family fan.i house, Just out- 
side of Guttcnber,'-, Iowa. The renson :;:y father v;as born in the 
house and not a hos\utcl was mainly because there v/eren't any hos- 
pitals around in that area at that time. 

Hy father began doing chores like 3hucld.ng corn, fetching fire- 
v/ood, etc., at the age of six. He spent much of his time '.vorid-ng 
with iiis grandfather, Casper Hoffman, who had corao to live with 
them a few years earlier, jlnother chore my father and his two bro- 
thers did, was to go along the railroad tracl: \vith a bucliet and 
pick up coal that had fallen off the trains as they went through 
town. They would have to use this to heat their home during the 
winter and also provide heat with which to cook with. 

At the age of nine in 1927 the family moved off the farm and 
into a fairley large house in Guttenberg. The house was situated 
at the base of a hill and beside two large oonds. There was -olenty 
of land in back of the house whore many kinds of bcrrys and fruits 
grew abundantly. The boys would also spend many hours o:: Ihe banks 
of the ponds and Mississippi iliver fishing for food. The pur.p for 
the house was situated about -} a block away so another very import- 
ant task for the boys was to fetch water. 

When the depression set in, in 1931 it more or less changed 
the life style of the family. It made it hard for my frther to go 
to school because he couldn't always obtain the books necessary for 



Uh) 



the class. Also because of the lack of inoney in the faiily ho had 
to qwit school in the twclvth .^rade to aid in the fa..,ily incoiuc. 

During the de-pressi.m when times were bad, (fntertninricnt was 
very scarce. One thinr^ that i.iy father and many youn,'^ men in the 
area did was to ^ilay "lU-ttenball". This my father explained to me 
was the same as softball today basically. Every business in the area 
had a team and it was a very [;rQat crowd nleaser. 

In 1936. after my father's oldest brother ?.ay.,;ond served his 
time in the GCC camp it was one of the other two boys turn to go. 
The duty fell on my father, and he had to quit school after hio - 11th 
grade to join. He was sent to McGregor, Iowa for training and camo. 
liis particuliar unit built erosian dams around McGregor and i?"t. Des 
Moines, iowa, to protect the local farmers. This was one of the Tiro- 
grans set up by i:!)^, to combat the depression and give neo-Je a 
chance to earn on their own. 

My father was-paj^d five dollars and twenty dollars was sent 
home to his parents each month. This was a six month progrcjTi. but 
my father reenlisted four times and stayed in for two years, from 
1936 to 193y« ''iy father told me that many' of the men he was in the 
CCC comp with were also drafted into the army with him in I94I. it 
v;as believed by many of these men that one of the purposes of the 
CCC v/as to organize men and prerjare them for enlistment in the array. 

My father was in the cjCC'g until 1933. After leaving the l;CC 
camp he v/ent to work in construction on soine other ■cCx< rirograms. 
He worked on such programs as the .niCAj doing highline construction 
and the fWA building school houses in i^lkader, iowa. Also through 
this program, he helped put a new highway in Luxember, Iowa. 

In 19^1 at the onset of the war, ray father was drafted. He was 
m various campaigns in iourope, including JNormandy and the ^^ttle of 
the ^Ige, finally ending up in Paris as the war ended. 

(x^ 



He rccei .'cd hits boot trainin,'^ in i''.r.ye ttevillo, r^.". ct i'ort L,r->!^p;. 

r-iy father first ..ict ray .nothor t^Grocc cailcy^ in 19'iO v/hilo r.ho 
v/as v/or;d.n^ in a sir.all .'grocery store in Ba,':;ley, wise, Afoer that 
fir!:t ...ecting they didn't see each other a^ain for r.l;noot a ye-r. 
At that time they met ar^ain and started dating rec^lsrly and were 
married in 19^3 in Kockford, xll. 



(16) 



Grace v. fiailey " 
.■•.other 

iiorii; Clayton, Iowa September 27, 1923 
Keliui*3n: Protestant 
iiocioeconoriiic status: lower class 
Occupation: Factory laborer and housewife 

lly mother was born in 1023 in olayton, iowa, when times were .'gen- 
erally ^ood for most Aiaericr.ns. This was not the case for her fa.dly, 
they were in the lower class even during these times. 

ahe was horn in the small family house situated between the rass- 
issippi Kiver and the railroad tracks. :iy mother was a middle child 
in a family consisting of nine children. 

iieing from a poor family, she had very few pleasures v;hile growing 
up in (Jlayton. what pleasures there were, were home made without fin- 
ancial aid. Much of her free time was spent along the river or along 
the railroad tracks, the only playground she and her brothers and sis- 
ters had. During the winter months, they would get their intertainmont 
from sledding down the slopes pn to the river. This was dangerous as 
most their enjoyments were and injuries were more or less common -jlace , 

The faiTiily life at home was usually pretty close, iseing thct they 
were relatively poor they had to be a very close nit fairdly to survive. 

My mother began school in 1929, just prior to the deoression. 5he 
went through school during the depression years, which made getting an 
education very hard. There was seldom enough money for shoes, clothe5 
or school equipment. She wou d have to go to school without any break- 
fast and have or.ly lard sandwiches for lunch. Because of these hard- 
ships along with the lack of money in the family she had to leave 
school after the tenth grade and help with the family income. 



(17) 



After lenvinr^ .-school, r.ho v/ent to wor:-- in a rw.ir.ll '^rocory ntore 
In noarby Ba;^ley, v;i.-;c,. It wan tliero th-:t in I9h0 nho firct i.iot 
LaVor;;e Hoff.ian. After thin first moetin'^ they didn't i.ioot n";ain 
until 19^4! almost a year l:;tor. This tirao they uct in Clayton at 
the hone of some of the Dryers, couGinc of La Verne Hoffman. At this 
time they began dating and v/ere married in June of 19^3 in Rockford, 
Illinois. 



(13) 



La Verne E. Hoffiuan. 

and 
Grace V. Hoffman 
Parents 
Socioeconomic status: middle cIdss after tiie 1950's 

LaVerne Kofirian and Grace Bailey were narried in Hockford, 111., 
in a little cnurch off of East Jefferson St, by i<everend Bannon. At 
this tine :ny father was home on leave from Frederichsbur ;, Va. . .iy 
mother was oresently employed at Colonial Bakei^y at 750 on hour and 
my father was malJ-n'^ v20 per luonth in the service. A^ the t. me of 
their "ettin^ narried my mother was living with Geor^je and Ci-ra Hoff- 
man, who had moved to r!ocl:ford for employment. After r^ettlrnr, married 
they lived va.th ray father's parents the before mentioned, until his 
leave was up. 

At troLs time my father returned to Fort Dix in New Jersey orior 
to boin,'; ship .ed over seas. Ily mother took a train out to Trenton, 
N.J. to visit ray f-^ther in October of 1943 for three days just before 
he shipped out for Europe. 

After setting out of the /o-my in October of 1;45 ray mother and 
father moved in v/ith his parents, v/ho had :;ioved bacl: to Guttenberg, 
Iowa by this time, for a few months. 

In 19^16 they moved back to Rockford and rented an apartment on 
Green St. At this time my father jot a job worl-a.ng at Kock.ford lietals, 

■oolishins and buffing soda cup holders and hub caps. At this time he 

y 

made the top wage they were paying, which was about CI. 25 ^er hour. 

Also in October of llho their first child Richard LaVerne Hoffman was 
born in Swedish Aiaerican Hospital. 

In 1943 my parents moved to Keokuk., Iowa, where -iSB got a job work- 
in;^ ct Electro Metals, where they made pig iron. In July of 1949 their 
second child Joe Curtis Hoffman was born in St. Joseph Hospital in 

(19) 



Keokuk, Iowa. The nrrao Joo wp- not t.:^..en froin the horsltol, but from 
vnrious fr.;'.iou3 nnort.o fi.'^uroG an Joe Louie, Joe Diinr,,^r-io rnd of c'-.urce 
a not GO athcTtic norr, -n in the form of my frither'.-; favorite br^rtcndcr , 

In Irtor l9^)-9 they moved b.-'Ci^ to kocuford, v/iicre my f.-'ther ,";ot 
a job \vor;vin5 at Tlotionol Lock, polis^iin,'^ and buffin;;. Alno in 
1950 ray mother started vvorkdnr: at Mid-State V.'ood Products on Seminary 
St. starting out at 753 per hour. in 1952 my fr;ther p;ot a job at 
Sundstrands v;here. he is still employed. After movinr^ back to Plockford 
my parents lived in a mobile home on i^eston and later built a house 
en the same lot. In 196?. they finally were more or less forced to 
move out of the home on Freston and purchased a house on ^Irthur Ave. 

Ky father was always the head of the house. Everything th: t was 
done in the house had to be cleared by him. Being a very honest oer- 
son, who always worked hard for a living just as his father nnd grand- 
father before hira, he was a strict enforcer of discipline. .4e r.lways 
made sure that my brother and I never came up with something that 
didn't belong to us and if v/e did he made sure it v/as returned exactly 
where v/e had picked it up. Also there was a strict sittin'^ arrange- 
ment at the meal table, with no nonsense going on v/hile the family 
was eating. 

Holidays were always celebrated with large meals and v;hat ever the 
traditions v/ere for that particuliar holid'ay. Often if it was a rel- 
igious holiday the morning would be spent in the Church of Christ lo- 
cated on Lincoln Par.; Blvd. 

My father was always a snorts fan and encourr.ged my brother and 
i to participate in all sports. This along with his strict upbringing 
kept my brother and 1 from getting into trouble while grov/ing up on a 
tough west side of Kockford. 



i20) 



in April of lOCo jwy brother v/a:^ :,iarricd c-nd also cnli;;tcd in 
the Marine Goriis. The ncxl year he v/ac in viot Ma-i whore he npcnt 
15 iiionthG. Ill January of 1963 1 enlisted in the Marine Cor -a and 
spent 11 nonthG in Viet I'.am in 1970. Thic is ;.iore or less tradition- 
al in t'ne iioffinan family, the boys servin.r; in the armed forces. 

Hy fiither and mother -re still presently livin[;j on /U'thur Ave 
and my father is still worlans at 3undotrands. ny brother ir;ichard 
hoffi.ian is a Probation Officer in i-'ort v/alton aeach, i'lorida. he 
graduated froia UIU with two years at Kocl: Valley OollCc'^e. Myself, 
Joe Hoffraaji, am married with two girls named Fenny and /Veredith, and /ny 
wife's najne'/Arlene. I 'a presently purchasing: a house on the west 
side of Kockford and aa employed at winnibago Juvenile Detention 
iiome . 



(21) 






; 

( 



Ibifth place of Henry bailey; 
\ 

V. ■ 

V 

) 



lUiVA 



k 

^ 



• Lone Kock (birth place of Oeanette Mead; 

^ \ 

srne Hoff- McGregor ** Prcrie du Chien i 

in CCC) Cleyton *l* Bagley (Grace Bailey first met Laverne Hoffihan; 

.. , /Gutzcnbers (birth -Dlace of La Verne Hoffaan) 

tn place ^ , - , 

irace iiailey; J \ 

* Luxeinbers,C</i^Gre La Verne Hoffman worlced under F'.VA r^r o'f?r ani ; 
Dubucue *,( where Jtiailey family last lived) •" 
X Wi^^ ^' 

v. 2ockfor(5 / 

\ (Hoffman fav.iily n;v.' lives; [ 



in':ADr7TARTT';RS 

FIRST UNITED STAWS Arc.IY 

Office of tho Commanding General 

APO 230 

9 May 19ii5 
SUBJECT: Comraendation of Major General Clarence R. Huebner, 04-552. 
TO : Major General Clarence R. Huebner, Ccxnmanding General, V Corpa, APO ''05. 

On this day which marks the conclusion of the fighting in Germany, I wish 
to congratulate you, your staff, and the troops of your command on your magnifi- 
cent performance. 

Since landing on the fiercely contested Omaha Beach nearly a year ago V Corps 
has made for itself an enviable reputation. After the broakrthrouch, it was your 
corps that closed and cleaned out the Argentan-Falaise pocket with such disastrous 
effect on the enemy. It was V Corps that sped ahead to liberate Paris and moved 
on without pausing to be the first to enter Germany. During the December coiintor- 
offensive your corps held like a stone wall at the Elsenbom corner. The courage 
and tenacity of your fighting men in that engagement marked a high point in the 
tradition of gallantry of our armed forces. Under your driving leadership V Corps 
raced across central Germany to capture Leipzig and pushed on to be the first of 
the western forces to meet the Russians at Torgau. 

Your own tactical ability, determination and inspiring leadership have won 
the respect of all who have observed you as both a division and corps commander. 

I desire to commend you on your outstanding performance and to extend to 
you and to your fighting corps my personal wishes for continued success. Please 
let your corps troops and divisions know that I am deeply appreciative of their 
accomplishments . 



(^,^yt^ ?/)U^^ 



COURTNEY y«. HODGES, 
General, U.S. Army, 
Commanding. 

201.22 (CG) Ist Ind. 

HEADQUARTERS V CORPS, APO 305, 18 May 1945. 

TO: Commanding Generals of Divisions, Commanding General, Corps Artillery, and 
Commanding Officers, Corps Troops, 

I desire to add my personal comraendation to that of the Commanding General, 
First United States Army. The outstanding combat record of the V Corns is due 
solely to the Individual effort, determination, loyalty, and courage on the oart 
of each ani every soldier who has served under this commnd. 




C. R. HUEBTER, 
Major General, U.S. Army, 
Commanding 



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HOPKINS, MICHAEL C 1955- 



' ■ .'rU 



LEASt USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

ear Contributor to the Wock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studyiny 
rrierican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
cw mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
ccess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ***)VAAAA)VAAyt*)'.;V-.VAAAAAAi\iV;V:V 

•/»//- * OFFICE USE CODE 

'• Yoiir name fflijhcU^ (^P<^{t?.^ " , 

Date of form ^, . . ^_ 7j . r.-.. , * (ID /f 



Kock V£l l ey College 
JoqVTo rd", Illinois 



2. Your (.oii(!qe: Kock Valley Col lege (id // 



*****>Wc)VAA AAA A ,\Ai\>VftA;\ AAA ;'.- A 

3. Clieck the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 _V__I800-1850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 

k. Please check al I regions of the United States In which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

^New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga, , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex,, OTTTr ' V E ast North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind 

^Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) ^"^ 111. Wis.) 

t^lalns (ND,SD,Neb.,K«n7rrowa, m) 
5. Please check all occupational categories In which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

^^ Farming M ining Shopkeeping or small business 

_TransportatIon B ig Business Manufacturing 

Professions Industrial labor Other 



6. Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussi 
In this paper ^ave belonged. 

y^ Roman Catholic J ewish ^Presbyterian _^, Methodist 

^Baptist Episcopal Ian C ongregational Lutheran 

^^uaker ^Mormon O ther Protestant ^Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed In your paper? 

^Blacks Indians M exicans P uerto R leans 

Jews C entral Europeans I tal lans ^Slavs 

yC I rish B ritish ><CN atlve Americans over several generations 
^East Asian ><f O ther 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

>< Interviews with other Family Bibles ^></aml ly Genealogies 

' fami 1 



ly members 

y^ Vi tal Records Land Records T he U.S. Census 

^^jPhotographs "^^fiaps th-- 



ler 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Nf"^ Jr-h r\ ,P. ^i>t(in'^ Current Residence S ^ Ccr ^ r^/ZJi y 

If dead, date of death ' / 

Place of birth h ,> J/^^^ J 6 j: J / Date of Birth S,ep^ //, /(■'^S 

Education (number of years): 
grade school ^X-. high school vocational col lege 



Occupation(s) PUCE OF RESIDENCE 

,. - (after leaving home) 

Ist T^u^c/l^M-, Dates P'j^? l at S y^ r,a ^ di ^^e^ Dates /^Q 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3r d Dates 3rd ^Dates_ 

^th Dates Ath D ates 

Religion fj^nO^^ Ca//?/\//C. 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of Marriage td your grandmotner / date ^ /)/J>/4'/) 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-)) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 



ame /yjA^H I d^ I J^'CV^.Jo ^ I Current Residence — ■ 

f dea<r. (^ate o^ death zi^A '~7'D2 "~ 

Place of birth Qjh<p£^ /UofiCOi^ y Date of birth \jot I ^ S./^9 A^ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school V^ high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 



' ' t rl^u'^jL' U^ it-^ Petes 



1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3r d Dates 3r d D ates 

'tth Dates Ath Dates 



Religion /2^ xK^^^^r? C^^fAD/fC 

< Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your grandfathe r ^^^:^^ J^ 6AT g /^ /}, X^./^/T 

'^°''- il^aTOt^Sfi»th»*6a«'*f**tiil? wie^^A-J)! »W"«^her or another relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 



N.inr 

I f ili'.id. tl.itr of death 



Current Residence 



Place of bl rih 



Educ.ition (number of years) 
qiade school high school^ 

Occupat lon(s) 

Ii,t 

2nci 

3rd 



Date of Blrth_ 
vocational 



col lege 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


'♦th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Re I i q i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc._ 
Place of marriage to your grandmother 



date 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 



• f dead, date of' deatK 



Place of bi rth 



Current Residence^ 
Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion(s) 
1st 

2nd 

3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Re I i g i on 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 



Current Residence 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name [J Q h 1) C Au'^S 

If dead, Jate of death /y]^, ^ f^^'} 

Place of birth G^da 'J^/ 1 Date of birth ^>7/7 ^9, /jP 77 

Education (number o^ years): ' 

grade school ><L. high school vocational college 

Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

^^ (after leaving home) 

^»t h^^XAyvA^M. P ates cUj^ X^,: )\iX. D ates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3 rd D ates 3 r d D ates 

^th D ates ^ tth D ates 

Religion /Y) d -I L o A i<i 



Igion /?^^// oAy 
itical parties, civil 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother ^.^.c^^y^ c^ T77 date r ^ .. . . 

Note: If your mother was raised by a s'lBti f ai ii e r u r i n oi r ii r r e l at i ve (lO ag e 18 )^^" '"^f ^ ^^ f 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 



Name fj/tncv { fC^^ ^ CfC ) /( U "^ S, C urrent Residence 

I f dead", date of death ~Ax^ '^ .A^ ^c) 

Place of birth R^. / U i'cU^Ul J^ / / D ate of birth ^^>^ /? / ^ 9 2^ 

Education (number ofP^ears) cy 

grade school ><r high school vocational college 

0ccupation(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
/" // .r /I / r (after leaving home) 
1 s t ^ fiJLr/ne/L ^ AP'MAf.UJiU-^ Bt^i OcU^ //r ^%t D ates 



2nd D atas 2 n d D ates 

3 rd D ates 3 rd D ates 

Religion /T^^S^q^/- 

Pol itical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



F^lace of marriage to your grandfatha> - 7o,^;;>>t^:t: 1-^^^^ d ate f^i^/(:> /Ry 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmotner or anotner r*i»ti«« ff? =;; \z) 
,!vc th^; Jala wn ihe oacK or this page (D-2) 



C-l Slepgrandf-^ther (your mother's side) 

Nun^ Current Residence 

If .Ir.id. <\Alr .)f death 

I* I. It. ..I l.iiili I). lie ol III till 

i •iili .il i<iii (iiiHiiliiT tif yr.i I ■. ) 
•l».iilf •.«liiM»l liiyii school vocolioniil ^loI It-in' 



Ottup.ll Ion («.) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Is I ^Dates Ist Dates_ 

7n.i ^Dates 2nd ^Dates_ 

3rd D ates 3r d D ates 

'♦th Dates kth D ates 

Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, f raternl ties, etc. 



PTjc«f of marriage to your grandmother d ate 

0-? S tcj)f|r.indmothfr (your mother's side) 

N.vne Current Residence 



I f (Urjd, <l.jt»- <J death 



f'l.itf of hln^i Date of birth 

Educdtlrxi (number of years) 
qradc- school ti i gh school vocational college 



Oct.jpot ion(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
I'. t Dates Ist Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


Ist 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

Re I i »j i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date" 



CHIkDRtN ot A & B ^or A~ I or Q-\) - your father's narne should appear below 



'. of birth rfT^iJp TFT 

\x of years of school mg < -- ir 



I . Name , ,^..>- , .^ ^ ,- ■..--■■ 

Place of birtli^^/r pTT""^ f/Y date />?6^ gA /\ /q s^ 

Number of years of schooling , ,.^0^ Occupatl6rt Vy/;x>>c /"(^^,^.J^ Z^^^ . 

Res I dence /L^ C t 4 o A (\ T/f Marital StatU8 j/yic^tAtr-^ 

Number of ch Tl dran & /f 

2- Name Jo a sjc^^^^S 4^//^-^ , .^-^-^ ,-. ^ /^/^ 

Place of birthjKr^t^^/^^y;;^ /y'^ 

Number of years of schoolin g f—zX Colh^u^ y^ J^cupatl6h <i.pMAyo/ p/lc r-^T<:r-> 

Res I denc e 0>Ac.yJU^ A'A . f/f M arl tan Status /TT^&^yto'r/ ^ 

Numbe 



/e_ 



3. Mame 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation^ 

Residence Marl'taH Statue 

Number of chl l^r«n 



*•• Name 

Place of bt rth 

Number of yea rs' oT "s'c'K'o'o 11 ng 



Res I dence 

Number of ch! Idren 



5. Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooHhg_ 

Res I dence 

Number of chl Idren 



S. Name _______ 

Place or birth 



Number of years of school Ihg" 

Res I denc e 

Number of ch 1 1 dren 



7» Name 

Place of birth 



Number of yea rs^ o? s choc 1 / nfl_ 

Res I denc e 

Number of chl ldr«n 



B. Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Res I den c e 

Number of chl Idren 



da te 
bccupatlbrt 
Marlf I Status 

ZIZZZZZII date 
' OcsupatTSrT^ 

Pifirltal Sta tus 

"Jatq 

__^^__^^__^ fccupatlon 
_ Marl'tsl Status 

' date 
Occupation 
Marital status 

d at e 
Occupation 
Marital Status 



9. Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence **" 

Number of chl Idren 



10. Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of achoollng 
Residence 



Number of CHI lUrwr 



Ncrltfil Status 



. dat e 
Occupation 



narital Status 



dat e 
Occupation 



IHILOREN i>( (. and D (or f- 1 , 0-l)-your mothrr's runio should apptvir lielow 



'•' r ..:,.■■ ^^^^, 

N>inilj>-| III /i-if . Ill '.clKMiMrHl 



l-r 



ll.ltO /0^-C,/ ?y ^'■//C> 



NiNoltri III I li I 1 (Iren 



^ 



J^ 



Marital Status /7^6v7/W<r^ 



I* I. Ill- III In I I il |'^<l-g-^A^?c-4 

NiiitilM'r 'il yt.ii ■. of schooling /— -^ 

"••• ' '''•"'-•^ <;~f,/f i^u^ l/.:y lf€ w 

Niiinbcr of rnildren O / 



" TTccupatlOn /fc/c t.<.4.£- <,<^>-^^ 
Marital Status yy-n^^^J'jr/ " 



yQ"^ ^yiyi^LJ rf 



H.Vf 



/yic^iojii Moc\j 



f Idce of l)!rth /st-^^^-t^, -^ 

Number of years of schooling J ~ ^ 7 t 

Residence ^()l/^ Pc^i /^ r// 



dateOcf ^S, ^9/^ 



Number of chi 1 dren 



"Occupation /72(UxUU^^ kUiynx. M aX 
Marital Status 7^>y<1^.^^ 



^ 



Niimiici ijf ye.irs of scnoolin 



-3Sti- >^^/ ^3 /^-^<^ 



Number of children 



g /-/Z C<Jtle<Le /-V Occupation ^cJ-t^gJ y^o>cX«- i^_ 



■^ 



ZX^ 



^Marital Statu 



i^Kn f^r7ri.ig^ 



i 



N.tnH* 

P I .icr of hi rlh ~ 

Numb»;i of yeors of Schooling 

Kes i dence 

Nuoitir r o f chi Idren 



Marital Status 



date__^ 

Occupation 



6. Nami- 

P I oce of birth 



Number of years of School I ng 

Ri.s i dence 

Numiicr of ch i Tdren 



Marital Status 



____ date 
bccupatlOh 



7. Nanc 

P lace of b I riFi 



Numbr r of years of schooling 
He-, i dcnce 



Number of ch i I dren 



_ date 

Occupation 
Marital Status 



Name 

P I ace of bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 



date 

Occupation 



Number of ch i 1 dren 



Marital Status 



Name^ 

P lace of bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Rei i dence 



date 
Occupation 



Number of chi idren 



Harital Status 



10. >*imn 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



date_ 
Occupation 



Number of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



Your Father 



Name 
I 



ame f)o n^ jO C H€)Pti/i_<L Current Residence ^a /Lh nd / ij— 

f dead, date of death ^-— ^ ^ ~ =* ' ^ 

of blrth^ ^Dete of birth //)a^ /^. /?^^ 

tlon (number ofyeTrsJ ^^-^^ ^^^ ^ 



Place 
Educa 



grade school / — fT 
Occupatlon(s) 



high school ^-/6 



vocational >^ c ol Iege_ 



lst^/^/?oyd-//,.wA-/ Dates /f4^^-^^ 1st, 

2nd1^/ ■r^rl/rlcjayy. Dates /9.^^J^3> 2nd_ 

3rd 7// ^c>..^^.^^ Dates /Uo - /9^^ 3rd_ 

^xh (^lo.<;j(l CnojuJ 7^6 D ates /9i9-/fy^\ xh 
Religion /' _. ^ ^ /^. /z_ /,> 



PUCE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



_Oates_ 
_Dates_ 
_Oate$_ 
Dates 



'9'°" /cjirnnr} A^r.7>/^r 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother ^VoVi^ >>>7 a, /?^;T/y / date /J,^^ Ij /9^^ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfath/ftr or anotner reiatTve give tnat data on/the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 



ame r)jl^/llC^ / AJe^/) /^ / /^ ^ Current Residence /Ltctro/2/'^ 

f dead, date of death ^,.^' 



Name 
I 



Place of birth (^y^^'^OCx^ 
Education (number of years' 



:n± 



high school f'-'/J- — vocational 



grade school /"^V^ 
Occupation(s) 

1st . ^(l/(J>>^ /^^c>U<_, Dates ifC^/— ^7 1st 
2nd Dates 2nd 

3rd 



Date of birth /:j /o /? /%^C 
col l< 



lege ,A^- V 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 



3rd 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



Re I 
Poll 



Itical party, civil or social clubs, 



sororities, etc« 



Place of marriage to your fathe r <r^<o^^^^>tjg_:'' 27// d ate /Ju ^ ^3l ^^^ 

NOTE: If you wet** raised by a stepmoth/Cr or anotner relative give that data or t/ie b'aci< of 
this page (F-2). 



E- I Sf pfjther 



I f itAd , date of death 



Place of birth D ate of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



OccupatlooCs) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd ^Dates 

3rd Dates 3 r d D ates 

^th Dates ^l»th ^Dates 

Religion — — — _________ 

Pol i t icaT pflr'Uei, di'vll fif SSiHI clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your iwother D at< 

P-2 Stepmother 



Name 








If dead, date of death 








Place of birth 




Date of birth 


Education (numter of years) 
grade school high school 


_ vocational 
1st 




col lege 


Occupat ion(s) 

1st Dates 




PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 


2nd Dates 


2nd 
3rd 

sorori ties , 


etc. 


Dates 


3rd Dates 


Dates 


Re 1 1 g I on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, 








Place of marriage to your father 






date 



o 

CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

Number of years of scfioonng V-yX ^y r.^ Occupatlon^ 

Res i dence /^^^/^y.; HaritalTt^uS ^ - /W -^ 



Number of chi Idren 

N.me /)^.//rs/ A? hLfih^^ 

P I ace of bl.^ /?J^r^^J^r^ , 

Number of years of 'schooling 



Date of bi rth 



Place of blYth z^.,^.,^^ i^^te or "'rtn yg ^ y^r^ 

Number of vear s of^XyiVn T / ^ i ^, TTTtTT; /^y OccupatlO,1 .///^ ^ c^ /^^/^^^ 

Residence J)^/I^C^/in Margtal Stdtus <^/yx<^/^ 1 

Number of children V--^- ' 



Pl.rrTTrbTTTT T ' y7 .::i/..^\) ^ ' D ate of b'rth ^; ^^ y 

Number of years of iXooTln'q \, ^ , 2^ ^-^^.'^"j-. /'^ OccupatlOrt^^/ ^-7/, /f $^ 

"-' = -^ence /?^^r^X.,nn Marital Status Sj.nff^ 

r of children 



Name_ 
Place 



Res i de 

Numbe 

Name__^ Jj^ /J^lfAj ^S 

Place of birth ^ ^r . J^ 



fe 



Place of birth /Z^r/l^j/rp 

Number of years of schooling f^/X— 

" ' ^ence /?^, . /rX;/? /o 

r of cnlldren — ■ 



Reside 
Numbe 



' OccupatTdr T ^^Jq/t O^i /S^ /f S / 
Marital Status <>^"^/t^ 



Name 

Place of bi rtK 

Number of years of school lng_ 

Reb i dence 

Number of childrfert 



Date of birth 

Occupatlbn 



Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of school I ng_ 

Res i dence 

Number of ch I Idren 



TJate of birth__ 

■ ■ • • Occupatioh^ 

Marital Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school lng_ 

Res i dence 

Number of chi Idren 



late of birth 

Occupation 



ITarltal Status 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school lng_ 

Res i dence ____— 

Number of chi Idrert 



Marltai Status 



Date of bi rth_ 
Occupation 



111. 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are williny) 

Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinoij^ 

Signed j 

Date 




PFDIGRFE CHART 



Jo An P \Uf^>^^ 



PonuU C' l4op^ 



iirried a^^ / 3 /? V^ 



Father 






)c[\a'^l l-lopJ^i/^S 



wBaKwrnmsmaaBmamnL 



Grandfather 



fireai (ir-indf-at...e" 



Greai Grandric-., 

B 
D 



/7]^^y/^^jeyJ^ 



Grandmother 

B 
D 



/IS 



[cQsm^^S J^xbso/i 



"--, 



ftg-n'^ 



jftt bsc*^ 



Mother 



Gr'andfather 

B 
M 
D 



/idi2e^<k[o/se>nJ 



Grandmother 
B 

n 



:3?rTa;r33rcTS?3SC:rai 







PFDlGRrE CHART 



)qI\^\ C/^'Jes 



Father 



Bon P-^ ^ i'"^. Z?*-^^ 






■■— ■nTIIHBIIPHIIWi m i I IIIIIII H— ■!! 



Grandfather 
B 



Ch ti<>4\ mcij^G^ ee^K 









y'^/^.'^?. ^ ^'^^ 



Grandmother 



4:^v 



7^V/g/e/^ ^otlo^ct 




"^^Mf^'^""^ 



Mother 



D J c\ 



I 1^ 



; 



I9V0 



Grandfather 

M 
D 




M 



i x iiii I y '■'"■■--^ ^J.^,■ ..:— ■'■■^:^.^r I 



Grancinx)thfir 



R CKc^ ^^,/UC 



^ GpeJ '^,('^^3 \ 




4 



List of Sources 

Mr* John P. Hopkins 

Mrs, Ida Bosecker 

Mr. Jon Hopkins 

Mrs. Marie Paulson 

Mrs. Alice Peterson 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald Hopkins 

Mrs. Hattie Ecklimd 



Problcass 

I did haY« a fdw probleva in tlio research of ny family 
history. I had sotee problems gattlng exact detail. Perhaps 
this prohlea is due to the fact ny parents are so young in 
their perspective il^arailies. They could not remember much 
about their grandparents. Both of my parents did not remember 
any of their parents early life. I had to dig back to Great- 
Grand Uncles and Atmts. and in en old family this is rery 
hard l^ecatzse many are deceased. 

Also I have be^ very limited in time for actual re- 
seftreh*. because we are in the process of moving to a new 
XoeAtion, I had a unic^ue problem getting information from 
an uncle. 



Its Jx&rA tor B» to write about ny grandparents sine* 
all but ona is daad. My mother's parents both died before 
I was bom and ay father's mother died before I really got 
to Irnow her* The only liring grandparent I have is toy 
father's father. 

My grandfather's name is John P« Hopkins. He was 
bom Septermber 11, 1895 in Oelcalb Illinoia* His parents 
nasaes were Michael Hoplcins and Mary (Casey) Hopkins. By 
the way, I was named after his father Michael, His parents 
were both bom in Ireland, 

My grandfather never re^aULly slteod out in the pair of 
then whenever they would visit, y\y grandmother was always 
the one who was doing all the talking, I naturally used 
to think she was the deolsicm maker. It was not until later 
when I was able to interpret these situations that I was 
able to tell he was the sain nan. 

My grandfather had foxir brothers and no sisters. His 
four brothers naises were ^aa»a, Charles, Henry and Frank. 
Frank died early in youth. They were all bom in Dekalb,. 
Illinois and lived their lives in America. His parents were 
very good to him and his brothers. They lived at 218 South 
Third Street for 22 years, 

Ifot much was exprecnsed to ne about his childhood ejteept 
one story ny father told me. My grandfather bought a horse 



«^ta h« was jrowts* T&e horsi was •Xderl?. Rt had «8«d 
hla hard earned tnoBvy which ha had eamad by delivering ntws- 
papara. He brought tha harav heaa and took It to a shad out 
haek far th« ni^t. The rvrf n9i$i vaoming that horse that ha^ 
had |«tat bought had dlad« Rjr grandfatJ^ar waa hurt, but ha 
laamad his f irat big huainasa-lika lasaon. 

Hia aiai ixx Ufa waa to boeoiao a first elass oeat man* 
Ha atartad baing a batehar when ha waa 12 jears old* Ha 
waa helping iceap the nei^l^erhood aeat looker clean* Ha 

was a sausage aaker imd.a^aiifitar uxi^to iMdt en tzt»le« He 
workad at thia for over 50 yaara* Ha also nanaged a seat 
looker for 13 years* His first job as a butcher lasted 6 years. 
He finailly settled ^estn and worked in Sycamore, Illinois for 
38 yaara. 

My grandfather got laarriad before World War I, but he 
waa not fortunate enough to aiaa tha draft. These years ha 
apant in the sarviea, ware tha roughest on hia marriage. 

B^ grandparmta met through an introduction by tars. Joe 
Obriva in June 191^. They wera both living in Dekalb at that 
tiaue. They were carried February 12, 19X7 in a catholic 
Cathedral. 



Ry grandBether's raa» la 6«mie« Hoplcins. Shft is vjr 
father's aoth«r« Sl&« strangely t&ottgh kaa tlw flftae naao as 
ny mothar. I did n&t ga^ vary naab ix^fonoation about har* 
Tha infonwBition I did raeeiva waa from a vary elderly lady 
nasiad Maria Paulaaa. Sha vas bqt grandmother* a slstar. fily 
graadmothar waa bem in Norway and cama to Asariea in 1913. 
Har fat)iar*8 nai^e was Rasama Jaeabaan and her mother's nana 
was Xdrina (olsan) ^aeebaaa, Har father migrated to tha 
United stataa in 19^. Kara ha sat up a husineso and worlcad 
a faw yaara. Ha got endttgh A<»iay to bring his faaiily over to 
tha Onltad States five years later, v>^. -^ 

Heir father bron^t up 3 ehildrati la Aaariea bat one 
died in Narvay, She died &t tha age of thirteen, isy grand* 
vather had a sister H&ria txiA a brother Rangvall. Their 
ehildhoeds vera full of love and lots of fan. My grandmother 
waa wall liked and had many friends. They lived in a very 
niea cottage setting home up in the mountains in Norway. They 
both want to aehool over in Norway and a few years in America. 
They did not attend much loora than early high school* My 
grandBother would clean a school teachers home for 25^. She 
woul4 scrub the floors wash the diahea and other houaehold jobs. 

They had a v«t7 traditional noirthem Scandinavian child* 
hood. Flaying up in tha feeuntaina was not iinceamon. The 
weather was loild, and when it snowed it seldom remained very 



long, vxettpt in th» nountalns «lMrt it wM eensid^rablj eold«r. 

Sh« Imd vaxxT f«HA n««»rlafl of the novntains, H«r and 
har sister took tfao eaVls esr ap to tha neantain tops* Thare 
was om plaeo oho reeallst ithora tha cabla ear travoXod ri^t 
throttf^ tho raouBtains. Sho still remoi^rs how cold that 
darvM up in tho oountains. 

My utnt 6an roiAoialaor goin^ doim to tho fish oarkot* 
Zt*s located in Bergen Norway, Placed along the side of the 
road* the market was saall emd alvsys erowdod. There you 
woald pick up fresh fish» flowers asid other goods« I gaass 
its still some what like that today. They sold such things as 
reindeer hides, Alaskan slippers and other northern fmr goods. 

My grandaother married lay grandfather on Fetnraary 12, 1917* 
It was a ehuroh wedding. Both of them were very religious. 
They were wed In Dekalb snd spent the early part of their liTOs 
thsro. They later moved to Syeaaore. He was a butcher and she 
was simply a housewife. 

lay grandmother was most special to me when I was a child. 
She would be so very nice to us. She was not strict towards us 
at all. She always brou^t us goodies whenever she visited. 
I always enioyad their visit and hated to see them leave. 

My grandmother diod from a series of strokes. She past 
away several years ago leaving me with only one grandparent. 

Their early aarriod life was good, except for those few 
years my grandfather was in the army. They had no trouble 
bringing up their ohildr«si except helping my Undo Jon through 
eollege. Ry father often thougbt he was spoiled because they 



«#T^ 80 Ivniant, I e«n tmdorstand this because they never 
treated m* to laad. 

Each of these two grandparents were t>rought up in a 
very luring home so it rubbed off fm. w ^d and is ttHtasane 
inflttence on tte« BSy parents like their parents* seareh iBore 
for the answer than the puhlshmtnt* 



My mother's fathers name was John C* Aves. He was bom 
April 29, 1877. His parents were Christina (Greene) Aves, 
and William Aves. Christina died in 1926 and William died in 
1929. I was \mable to find out their birth dates. Ky grand- 
father's grandfathers name was Predfiok Aves, he was bom 1818 
and died in 189^, His grandmother's name was Hannah 1 she 
was bom 183^ and died 189^^, 

.. There is a small thought I*d kind of like to brii^ up here 
however. Of Fredrick and Hannahs children who were all bom in 
GerBsany, 6 of 8 came to the United States. The other two re- 
raaindd to raise families in Germany. These two might have had 
families who might have fou^t against my grandfather and my 
father during World War I and II • 

I9y grandfather on my mothers side, died before I was bomi 
he died May 1953. Of all my relations I had the most difficulty 
getting information about his early life before marriage. I 
wish however to try to give a little insight to his personality 
to attempt to make up for the lack of early life detail. 

My mother recalls her father as a liberal minded man. 
He was not prejudice and he let her mother share in the decision 
maiking. My mother recalls a situation when her father demon- 
strated these qualities of being libersd. minded. He let my 
mother stay over night with a colored girl and her family. 
In those days such practices were seandeless and often frowned 
upoB. He also let her marry a Catholic, which in many families 



was not perBitt«4 at all. He hald little against his children 
and let them do what they wished. He let her go to college 
even though he did not think it was a girls place to go to 
school. I suppose its because her mother died so very young 
that ny mother got so close to h^r father. 



Ry grandmother on my mothera side was, Vina Majc (Rubeck) 
Ar«8. She was bom January 13* X692 at Beltidere, Illinois. 
She died January 2, 19^0 at Kingston, Illinois. Her father's 
name was Fredrick Willian Rubeck. He was bom Novenber 10, 
I858 in Germany. Her mother's name was Tamer Rebecca (Westfall) 
Rubeck. She was bom August 22, 1866 at Garden Prairie, Illinois. 
She died April 14, 1963» on Easter, at Highland Hospital in 
BeliVldere, Illinois. 

My grandmother had five sisters and three brothers, ono 
of which died when he was a baby. Their names were, from 
oldest to youngiBtat Roy, Hattie, Elmer, Ila, Ester and Alice. 
Hy grandmother was between Roy, the oldest and Hattie the third 
oldest. 

I received the inferiaation about my grandmother from my 
great Aunt Hattie and great Aunt Alicj^. 

For the chores my grandmother experienced a very similar 
life as my mother. She worked on a farm in Kingston. She 
di4 the common household jobs such as washing dishes, cleaning 
laundry, and cooking. Her outside jobs consisted of feeding 
the chickens, the cows and horses, and cleaning the bam. The 
field chores were mostly conducted by her brothers and father. 

After she graduated from iight grade she was able to tsUce 
on a job away from home. She went to work for a neighbor as a 
cleaning girl. She earned a small amoxmt, which she saved for 



1 



soall r«er«ati«m and Chris'tBas goodies. It was on this 
neighboring farm she net my grandfather. 

For fan my grandmother played baseball or a form of the 
game. Using a ball she and another member of her family would 
toss it back and forth. 

Recreation was not defined as well then as it is today 
especially on a farm. Simple things like going to church was 
considered very enjoyable. Picking up groceries and shopping 
in the near by town also was a joyous experience, B!y aunt recalls 
taking the horse and buggy to Genoa, Illinois t the nearest town 
for groceries. This trip often took three or four hours round 
trip. Small gatherings were special like, the Old Settlers 
Picnic held annually. Seeing folks and talking to nei^bors as 
well as family activities were considered fun and recreational. 

She met my grandfather while working for a neighboring 
farm master. She was eqttally employed at the same farm 4Bnd 
they eventually fell in love and got married. 

They were married February 10, I909, They were married 
in a house by Reverend William H. Tattle, Her sister Hattie 
and her brother Roy stood witness to the ceremony. 

Their early married life was simple. They owned and 
farmed his fathers farm in Kingston, Illinois. They workdd 
this farm together for about a year until their first child was 
bom, his name was William. Then came three girls, Ida^ Mabil, 
and my mother Bemice, 

They all helped on the farm and with total mutual partici- 
pation they kept their little 80 acre farm during *The Depressimi,* 



My grandisethor died at the age of 52. She had been in 
bed for a year -with heart problems* She was finally able to 
get around again after that year in bed when she died. She 
was in the kitchen one day and as she grossed the floor and 
sat tlown at the table and with her arms folded, she died 
suddenly. 

My uncle took it very hard as most of the other members 
of the family including my grandfather who took it quietly. 

Life carried on but my grandfathers health began to 
fail him. The girls all got married and Willie took control 
of the farm. My grandfather continued to remain on the farm 
while Willie ran it. 

The girls moved away to continue their lives and their 
new families. My miother remained at home throughout her 
college years and until she too got married. 

My grandfather died the same year my brother David 
was bom. He died of natural causes and ha: died in the 
hospital. 



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My fathers name is Donald Charles Hopkins. My father ^| 
was horn March 13, 192^ in Dekalb, Illinois. He was part of a f 
four part family j including himself, his parents (John and 



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{■■* 
.'.J. 

Bemice), and his brother (Jon), 1 

My father is probably as normal as any American can be. ,j 
He can be conservative or liberal which and whenever the 
situation warrants. He's always tried to instill patience and 
perfection In all I've ever tried to do. If I were doing 
some kind of art work and asked him for help or if, he just 
happened to be there* he'd give me a pretty tough time if it 
was not as good as it could be. 

He always choosses the man in a political campaign rather 
than the party. I also agree with this procedure. He is very 
good at the things he does. For example he can fix just about 
anything having to do with automobiles, electronics or any 
other mechanical problem. He is I suppose, strong willed, harsh, J 
but always pretty reasonable and helpful. 

He was bom in Dekalb, son of a butcher, who worked in 
Sycamore. The first hoBie my father recalls in which he lived 
was a four family apartment in Dekalb 

The apartment was on Ftak Street in Ddkalb. In -tibis. 
apartment along with the Hopkin's were the Capeharts, the Myers 
and the Cassers. 

This apartment was a large structure with two stories. The 
apartment had a large basement sectioned off into four equal 
parts I one for each family. 






The apaxrtnent ha lived In had three bedrooms a spacious ll 
living room, dining room and a kitchen and bath. His grand* p^ 
paxIfeoAs both lived In Dekailb In their own homes, so they did not V 
live with my father and his parents. ^^ 

My fathers household ^obs were very different from «3ir tj 
mothers. He did not have many dally jobs which left him and 4 
his brother plenty of spare time. He did however do the usual tl 
household jobs, take out garbage, clean windows, clean his room, 
do dishes, etc. His spare time was much more extravagant than 
my mothers. 

Ky father did not have It aWfully bad considering a 
national depression was raping the cotmtry and hurting millions 
of American homes. I*m not saying b^ grandfather was rich 
because after all he was just a butcher. Meat is fairly expen- 
sive during troubled times In our nation. He did however enjoy 

I- 
many pleasures that other ehildrep probably did*ntv Mis favorite 

things to dot and he still feels for themt were roller skating, 

riding his and his brothers bike and going to the movies along ;J 

with kicking cans down the street. 

Movies he recalls were 100 to 28{( and generally musicals. 
He remembers one in particular, Zlgfleld Follies. The Zigfield 
Follies were a series of musicals presented in a series. These 
series of musicals were very popular in the 1930*8. 

Roller skating also provided much of his pare time. He 
would race up and down the street and compete against others for 
eompetition. He reminds me he won many many times. He also 
remembers kicking the cans which were in the road. Perhaps 



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I 

I 

th«y were really wishing to play hoekey or socker. M 
Deispite his fun as a child ray father was brought up to respeet mf 

God and continue his educational fields. He went to a Catholic ^* 

school first grade, through eight grade. His grade school was ^| 

strict and fairly tou^ for eleaientary schools. He had a less ^1 
strict high school, "but it was tough also. Re ettc^ide^ Dekalb 
High School in Dekalb, 

My father quit school after his high school years. Shortly *i 

after he got out of High School my dad was inducted into the -I 

h 

armed forces. His brother also was drafted a few years prior jg 
to oy father's induction. My father was 18 years old. They 'I 
both served over seas during World War II. 

My father does not express many memories about the next 
3 and quarter years of his life, I can occasionally catch 
something he says about the war and war situations, which he 
vaguely explains to me. , My father almost lost his feet fighting 
in the winter in Western France and Belgium. He had an extreme 
case of frost bite which almost called for the removal of his 
feet from his ankles down, I can not perceive the things he will 
tell me once in. a while? for example we -were watching "Patton" 
which was on television, that night he was reminded from a few 
scenes how terrible it really was. He explained slowly how 
they'd spent days, weeks and months out in the fields. It was 
freezing cold in those fields during the winter months. They 
slept in fox holes which were not much more than ditches of mud 
and ice. He recalls for Christmas they received meat and a roll 



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and water. Meat was a real treat during war days out in battle, j 

■■ • 



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Another time he told bo about, was eonceming an English 



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soldier and a pair of woolen socks. If you got wet out in 'J 

the field* you were in for some eold times. It was wet and ^| 

cold during mueh of the time ny father spent in Europe. My ^1 

•'■j 
father came across a dead English Soldier with a pair of dry 1 

woolen socks a'ttached to his pack. I9y father took those socks tf 

for his free sing feet, |^ 

The war came to an end but not in time for my father. t| 

He came home in a hospital plane. His feet were frost bitten «3 
and he could not walk. They transported him from the fields f| 
to a. hospital in Western France to New York, Florida across ]1 

the mid-western states to California and finally home and ^] 

Rockford. i| 

He met my mother before he was completely out of the -I 

army, at that time he was stationed at Camp Grant and he visited (i 
Dekalb often. KJy mother recalls his visits as» "those days 
when all the service men were ccadng home and he was one that 
came in regularly for egg saliad sandwiches and me." She 
was working as a cashier. He dated her in Sycamore. This 
is where I say good-bye to my father as a bachelor and where 
he becomes a married man. 



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-;i 

Viy mothers nama is Bemioe P. (Aves) Hopkins* Hy mother 1' 

vas bom Pehraary 13^1926 in Kingston, Illinois* She was J 

part of a six member family including her parents (John, Vina) 1 

their oldest and only son (William), (Ida and Mabel) two '.* 

■'A 

daughters aged respect iyely. Jly mothers family was very *i 
widespread for example? William or (Wille as they commonly 

called him) was 16 when ray mother was bom. My Aimt Ida was ; | 

married when my mother was 8 years old. My mothers closest i 

sister is 7 and half years older than my mother* J 

Probably the most influential person in my life is my 1 

A 

mother. She has been a big factor in all I've ever done. She 
has been v^ry important in helping me choose the field I may 
pursue as an occupation. She's probably the strongest influence 
in all my families lives so far. 

My mother is often the go between in all the decision 
making in the household. She sets at the middle man between 
argttementa emd S3rmpathizes with both sides. She rarely thinks 
of herself in anything she does. She never expects favors or gifts 
for her unselfish efforts. She*s liberal minded perhaps its 
because she teaches elementary school and is exposed to young 
people's lives and problems. 

She gave me my most support last year when I attended Layton 
School of Art and Design, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This was my 
first try at College and I had to do everything myself and believe 



■• it was difficult. I wits extir«n«ly worried abotit i«y gradas •§ 

tha first few weeks of school. I was not doing very well at j» 

my studies. She gave me much needed moral support, I never 4i 

thought 1*A ever need. 1 did finish last year in school very 

well in fact. Layton School of Art and Design closed and then 

again she came to my rescue. She helped me decide where to 

g9 from there. She understands very well. Her feelings are 

geftuine and unique. Possibly the fact she was youngest in her ■'il 

family givers her an added feeling for younger people's lives. 

^ving gone through college herself she can get a glimpse of .' 

our problems and help us deal with them. She remembers ; 

things and uses them to bring us up. BIy mother is one of a v^ 

i 
kind and she'll always be forraost upon ray feelings where ever ' 

I go and what ever I do. Vz 

I j 
My mother lived all of her childhood on a farm. The *i 

farm rested upon 80 acres of land. She had diagramed her f|' 

farm one year and I reproduced it for this paper. The farm had 

eleven buildings including a farm house, a larcer bam, a f 

smaller Sam, a machine shed, chicken coop, hogs shed, a r^' 

■ M 
brooder, comcrib, garage, a grainery and an old chicken coop -l 

which was used for storage. 

The house itself had seven rooms downstairs including, 

kitchen, parlor, living room, dining room, 3 bedrooms and a 

i 
washroom. The upstairs had four bedrooms. J 

1 
My mother had to help with jobs on her farm since there <| 

was only one male of her family. She helped her sister Mabel J 

outside in the farmyard jobs. Feeding pigs, chickens, weeding ^! 

the garden and chasing cows were not uncommon things for her to do. 1 

if 



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ny Atmt Ida helped their mother. She mainly helped in farm fi 



She did help her mother inside with housework, but generally 

my km 

jobs. 



Her recreation was not elaborate, but it Is genuine and I 
think its neat. She wrote me a short paper which I'm going to 
quote in its entirety, because it'll give special feeling for 



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th» szaet situations. g| 

"Recollections of recreation and special day celebrations 1 

were home centered and basie. The reason for this obviously, 4 

was lack of monetary facilities since these were the days of ■■^i\ 

t 
national strain, namely the depression:;^, x , 

Fondest memories are those which included the participation > ' 
of the entire family. The get togethers, that included the / 
greates number of people, were family reunions held at a nearby 
park, a community affair named 'The Old Settlers Picnic", 
Christmas get togethers and school functions. 

Family reunions were seldom missed by anyone. The traditional 
meal was assemble by everyone bilging a sandwich euid a dish 
to pass. Activities for youngsters the meal included ball 
games, hide and seek, relays and the bike while the older folk 
remihis'ed times gone by. 

The Old Settlers Piei^ic was the biggest deal of all. 
Farmers hurried to have their crops harvested, women an^ ehildnui 
were especially ambitious to make sure the chores were completed 
so that attendence was certain at the two day two evening affair, 
A lunch was prepared and taken siztcft finances were too limited 
to feed a family of six. Thtf actl^rities which were so attractive 



■i 



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to partievilarly yotingstors wore tho carhival typo rides and ^^ 

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tho opportunity to soo soHoolaSrteft* .vlt*^s most certain that i« 

adults were more attracted hy the opportiinity to see and eonimmicate J 

with folks that perhaps had not been seen since the last "Old '1 

Settlers Picnic". In addition an afternoon 1>all^Lme oomprlced l! 

of the area sportsman attracted the men-folk. $'f 

School functions that helped to congregate people were 'J: 

■■1 

"Christmas prograias" in which all youngsters in your area ?* 

participated. Spring time closing of school would never have ^| 
been complete without an "All School Picnic" at which the 



I 



whole family attended. || 

Christmas at my home was a somewhat smaller affair, a 1 
family affair. Since Aunts and Uncles lived in cities, towns 1 ' 
and communities a distance away and travel hazardous, the immediate : 
family was left on its own. It was a gay happy affair, decorations % 
all over the hous, foods always on hand and simple but meaningful '1 
gifts. ^T 

Aside from the above mentioned affairs, a particular 
meaningful activity that was a yearly event in my home was the 
shelling of com. The chore was a necessary job but there was no 
dislike for it. The whole family sat in a circle, joked and talked 
and shelled com \mtil the job was completed. This provided a 
unity in the family that was fare in all other chores. 

Schooling for my mother consisted of elementary school, 
high school, and college. 

Her grade school years 1-8 were completed at country grade 
school, ICingston. Th^gs were onch more strict then and a little 
was tolerated. All eight grades were. under one roof and often 



olasses were going on at the saas time. Independent work was ^^' 

f. 

a nust daring those hours that one was not in a class. Her r 

favorite subjects were geography uid nmsie. The grading systea |* 

was numerical rather than alphabetical t for example an A might ||{ 

Savi been a 100, 1j 

My mother attended Kingston High School for fotir years, ^\ 

19^0«19^. She took up all of the basics to persue college. The' , 
High School was also strict and did not bend for trouble makers* 
If you were not in class you were either home or at assembly hall. 

In assembly hall, speaking was not permitted. She loved music 4 

and was in the school band. She played jMecdtone and tuba. ri 

She began college in the fall term of 19^ at Northern 'J 

Illinois University. She was a general science major and a ij 

mathematics chemistry minor. College to her seemed even h«rder ^| 

than high schools She wag in a dorm end in thos* days restriotixi^ i? 

I 



'**tro placed oa tliaea and tJi5f^0B- vMeh people 'xapt. In college J 
she played in th* band. She worked while attending college. ^ 



The first year of her schooling year she worked at storees and 



babysat. She had two years as a waitress at the dorms to help 






pa^ for her room and board there. The fourth and final job .1 
she had in her fourth year was student teaching in Aurora. Illinois. -^^ 
She met my father while she was in school working at a f 
drugstore in Dekalb, She recalls how he would come in and always 
order egg salad sandwiches. They went out together for sometime 
before they got married. This is where my parents lives begin 
and my mothers dingle life ends. 



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My moth«r and father were married August 13, 19^8 In H 

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l^yeanore, Illineis. They were manried at St. Marys Catholic ji 

Church. It wsis a snail wedding only the very intimate family Ml 



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were there. My mothers father and his family, my fathers mother . h, 
and father and my Unole Jon were present for the cremony. After r 

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they were married they came to Roekford, Illinois and they lived 



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on Grand Ave, for a year. In the sximmer of 19^9 they moved $\ 

to Loves Park, Illinois, They then resided at a home which they >i 

tfuilt. This house is still on First Streets directly in back N' 

of the Meadow Mart Shopping complex. Life was never easy for *;| 

my parents, but they got along. My father worked in Roekford f| 

as a movie projectionist while my mother stayed at home and was ^ 
a housewife. When they got married b^ father was making $66 dollars '^v 



a week and this was substantial enough then. Kly mother did not 
get a job until they moved to First Street, then she became 
a waitress part-time. My father remained a projectionest. 

My oldest brother (Dan) was bom in 1951 and was reared on 
First Street. BSy brother (David) was bom in 1953 and it was not 
until the summer of 1955» when I was bom, that my parents moved t<j 
a small 10 aeret farm. lilTy parents never farmed it much more than :] 

a family garden, but it had a farm atmosphere to me. The final 

■-' 

member of our family came to going in 1957« Her name was Tina 

and she was the only member of our family who spent all her happy '^ 

-■■j 
years at the Hart M* location. This 10 acres of farm land layed 

at the end of a long gravel road. This road was named Hart Rd« :i 



1 

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1 








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y€€^e^€^''/ih^.9^teiM/t'C/e<z^y^'»^ 



uigii^trimnng 



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^i''/M(^y/^e4^e^y^^^/^':^^/r/ 0J'^lxf^^ 






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f 

It was a dead end i^oad and oar hoase was at the road's end. /| 

At this time my father ws|^ a projectionist at a local f. 

A 

theater. He l)egan servicing televisions for H and H in Loves .| 



two years. This was always very special for vlb kids because 
we could always associate so well when ever we turned the 



because it was different working with teachers and in x>articular 
the students* He always had fun teaching them as much as he 
ceald about the equipment they were using. My mother in the 
mean time got a job working for the school system as an elementary 
teacher. She taught third grade at Ralston elementary school for 
a few years and then was moved to fourth grade. She's been 
teaching at Ralston school for 13 years. 

My home played a big role in iqy development. Hart Rd 
was everything to me, it was ray personSility, my strength and 
often times lead me spiritually. Whenever I needed peace and 
serenity this home gave them to rae« It isn't often I suppose 






Park. After a year or so ny father went back to working as 

a projectionist and was diong pretty well. He and my mother Vl 

decided that his job robbed him from the family so he quit and |* 

started to work at WTVO the television station in Rockford. if 

He was an audio visual technician and worked there for about i% 



I 

television on. He needed more aioney so he got his next job '<i 



at a factory as an electrician. He worked at John Barnes Co. J 

■I 
for several years and then his big break came. He was offered w 

a job working as a closed circuit technician at Northern Illinois % 

University. We still lived at Hart Rd. address and would live Ti 

there for 8 years to come. He liked his job at Northern Illinois i-t 






I 

ajoyei&B really loves and needs a heme as oueh as I did. It |^ 
was a beautiful place to grow up. It had tall trees, different i 

r, 

colored fields, streams and a few small buildings. 'j 

The building consisted of three homes two which were 'h 

■ M 
original an one which my parents built about eight years ago. ;i 

One old building was the very original building, it had a tile ^i 

roof and tiled outside with four rooms and no garage. Only name ^] 



I could find who lived there was Old Man Johnson. There was the A 

original building which we lived in for eleven yeairs. It had |j 

a dining room, a kitchen, a living room, a bath, a laundry il 

room and a very large bedroom, which we used as two at one time. || 

This building also had a garage, ^oioA «iy father latcj^made i| 

^^ 
into another bedroom, '1 

*1 
The newest member of the trio was ti-plex built in I966. ^| 

It was a huge with kitchen, dining room, living room, family ,'A 

room, utility room, two baths and four large bedrooms. Our i| 

home had 10 acres of land. We had about 4-. 5 acres of woodland - 1 

il 
and about 5.5 acres of open field, including the land our 

building rested upon. 

This year our land was purchased by the State of Illinois 

for continuation of Pierce Lake - Rock Cut Park Complex, We 

lost our home for public improvement. I lost a home that means 

more to me than anything else. That home holds me together 

soraethimes. 1*11 always go there to find myself and I hope 

1*11 always be welcome, 1*11 always be able to find that old 

Maple tree out back by the old baseball field. I can not 

even put ny feeling down to the way 1*11 surely miss that gravel i 

road and the home I love so well. ♦' 



il 



i 



^ 



living room, full finished basement and on© bath. 

My brothars are attending Collego, Dan is attending 



We live at ^206 Conet Dr. Rockford. Its much smaller ' ? 

-'■♦ 
of a house. It consists of - 3i bedrooms, kitchen, dining room, ^ 



the University of Illinois and David is attending North Central ^ 
College in Naperville, Illinois. Tina is going to graduate *| 
from Harlem High School and I'm attending Rock Valley Jr. M 

College, My parents are still at their jobs at Northern Illinois 
University and Ralston elementary school. 

Family histories are very large, I can illustrate this 
in a little story. My mother was talking to me telling me 
about the love she had for musical instruments and she said, 
"You've written so much and yet you never talked about this 
medal I got for being in the band." I could have written 
so much about so little yet it's hard to. Family history, so 
little so small, but perhaps I mentioned enough to make someone 
happy. 



H 



J 



HOUSEV delaine DAUN CORPIANV 193^- 



■i::ii;.fci',?iiH!'';:«m 



EASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

lar ContriljiJtor to the Hock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So thai your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studyinq 
crican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only .i 
wmintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
cess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ***A5V*A*)VAA*A>'.i\-AA**A**iV*:V:V'.- 

' * OFFICE USE CODE 

1. Your natnc Delaine Daun ffp^p;rAM * 

^•'^"^ "^ ^"'•' "^6, November 1974 * ^'^ " ^ 

2. Your college: Kock Vd I lev (.ol lege (10 H ) 

ITdckford, Illinois ''•■ 

* * * * * >V y,- )\ A )V >V A A A ;^ A A )V A A A A A ,V ;■; ;V A .' 

3. Clw-'ck the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

V B efore 1750 1750-1800 1800-1850 

X 1850-1900 1900 or later 



k. Please check al I regions of the United States In which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived, 

_New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) x M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga., Fla., N.C, SO.) ^East South Central (La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, Ky 



West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., 01(77 " x E as t North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

^Pacific (Cal,, Washj (Hawaii, Alaska) 111. Wis.) 

Mains (ND,SD,Neb.,K«n7rrowa, MB) 
S. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed In tills paper have found themselves. 

X Farming y M ining x S hopkeeping or small business 
Transportation Big Business Manufacturing 



^Professions x Industrial labor x O ther 

6. Please check al I religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
In this paper ^ave belonged. 

^Roman Catholic J ewish x P resbyterian 3^ M ethodist 

B apt ist E piscopal Ian C ongregational -x; Lutheran 
Quaker ^Mormon O ther Protestant ^Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians M exicans P uerto Ricans 

Jews C entral Europeans I tal lans S lavs 

Irish B ritish x N ative Americans over several generations 

^East Asian ^Other 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other F ami ly Bibles x Fami ly Genealogies 
fami ly members 

Vital Records L and Records T he U.S. Census 

X Photographs Maps Other 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Nam e Jesse Lee CORPIAN Currant Residence 

If dead, data of death 17. Aucnist 1956 

Place of bl rth Ellenboro. Wisconsin Data of Birth 24, August 1880 

Education (number of years): 
grade school ? high school vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Farming Dates 1 st Dates 

2nd Well-drilling Dates 2nd D ates 

3rd Dates 3rd D ates 

^th Dates ^th D ates 

Re I i 9 1 on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc.^ 



Place of Marriage to your grandfflOtKer date 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 

that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

6. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Eva HILLERY Currant Residence 



^"* Eva ^tmSY , ^ ,. 
f dead, date of daath__r|24. 



Place of birth Centerville. Wisconsin Date of birth June 1885 

Education (number of years): 

grade school ? high school vocational college 

Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st House Cleaning 0«tes 1st D ates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3r d Dates 3r d D ates 

'(th Dates 4th Dates 



Rel iglon 



t Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather . . ... DATF 
'^°'*- il^an;t^Sfi*fh»*6a«'8f*'t<l? PS^jS^^bj^a stepmother or anoth 



er relative give 



A- I Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

f^ ,„^ ^_^.^_______»«-_ Current Resld«nce__^ 

I f .if.Tfi- d.uc of death 

Pl.ice of blrih Oit« of Birth 



Ediif.it ion (number of years) I 

giade school high school vocational college |_ 

Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
l^t Dates 1st D ates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd J}ates_ 

kth Dates '»th Dates 



Re I i q i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc._ 



Place of marriage to your grandmothar ^ate 

A-2 Stepgrandmother (your fathar's side) 



Wafpg Currant Residence^ 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth ^Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational c ollege 

Occupation(s) ^ ' PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st D ates 1st D ates] 

2nd D ates 2nd D ates , 

3rd D atea 3r d D ates j 

I 
Re 1 i g i on r 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather ^Date 



3. 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 



Name Emest STEIN 

If dead, date of death 1930 



Current Residence 



Place of bIrth Euten, Oldenburg, Germany Date of birth 20, October 1868 
Education (number of years): 
grade school ? high school vocational college 



Occupat lon(s) 

»5t Lumber camps 



Dates 



1st 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving honrje) 



Dates 



2nd Carpenter 



Dates 



2nd Edgar, Wisconsin Dates 



3rd Farmer 



Dates 



3rd 



Dates 



kth 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



Re 1 1 g i on Presbyterian 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Democrat 



Place of marriage to your grandmothtffa Marathon Citv Wisconsin ^^ iqq- 

Note: If your mother was raised by a 8Ll it'T8 ff li T^U t Tf l UlM e r l eYynW (lU dy e l8) *^*^ 

give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Mary Jane STAGKPOLE 
If dead, date o^ death 19; 



Current Residence 



■ 954 



Place of birth chazy. New York 
Education (number of years) 
grade school ? high school 



D ate of birth ip. April 1874 
vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) 

I s t House vork 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1 s t Edgar. Wisconsin D a tes_ 



_Dates_ 

Dates 



Jrd 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



Religion PrgsfeYterJan -. ,^ 

Political party, cTvIl or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfathe r MarWthpn d^ tv. Wi Rronsin '' d ate Ib^z" 
Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or anotner reiaf-iv/» (tn >^> TBT~— 
,!.'£ th;;: J. la wit ine oacK or this page (D-2) 



C- 1 brepgrandfather (your mother's side) 



Home 

I f «Jeod, (lalp of d«ath 



Current Residence 



I'lic. mI l.i I III _^ 

I ilili .il i<Hi (iiiMiiliiT 'iT yr.ii •, ) 
• |i.iil«« -.jIiimiI liiijli school 



Octiip.ll lon(«i) 

Isl 

Pnd 

3rd 

'4th 



_Dates_ 

_Dates_ 

_Dates_ 

Dates 



D.ile ol III I ih 



vocol ion ill 



col loin" 



Ist_ 
2nd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



3rd_ 
'4th 



Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc._ 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 



date 



Dates 

Dates_ 

Dates 



D-? Stcpt)r.indmothiT (your mother's side) 



N.imc 

I f (U.'jd, <i.jt<" of death 



f'l.iti- of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupot ion(s ) 

IM 

2nd 

3rd 



_Date8_ 
_Dates_ 
Dates 



Current Residence 



Date of bi rth 



vocational 



1st 



2nd 



3rd 



Re I i fj i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates_ 

Dates 

Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Uate 



CHikDRtN ot A & B ^or A- I or b-\) ' ycur fathar's name should appear below 



f , Name Leila CORPIAN 
Place of bi rtii 



data 17. January 1905 
Cccupatldh Housevlfe 



Number of years of jchoollrtg *8 Occup>l.w. . — , 

Res I denc e Cassville, Wiscon sinMarltal Statu» Married-seoon g" 
Number of ch J idran 5 '" ' 



Name Una Mae CORPIAJL 
Place of bl rtlT 
Number of years of school _ 

Res I dence Boggpbel. Wisconai^ Marital St«tu8 Married 
chi Idren _ g 



^te 23. May 1907 

Occupatlbrt Hbusevife 



Number of~cl 



Marne W3j.lj.ain Cecil CORPIAN 

til gp^b. Wis<?9fi§4ft 
ars of schoom 



date 25. April 2909 



Place or Dlr ^ ^ 

Number of years of school Jftj 9 , "* Occupation Motel Owner 

Res I dence Ft.AtJginson. W i scons 'iR«'rTt'aT'l'titu> Married 
Number of chl t<^r«n 2 " 



Name Kenneth COR PIAN 
Place of bl rth 



date 13. October 1911 
TTccupatibrt Well-Drillfer 



Number of years of schooling 9' 

Resldence Boscobel, Wisconsin _ MaWtVl Status Mcurried 

Number of ch! idren , 7 



Name Evelyn CORPIAN 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schoojilfifl ' 8 

Res I dence Rockford, Illinois "~Pter I taT' "Status Married- fourth 

Number of chl Jdrdfl 5 



date 3. September 1915 
Oceupati6ii Hotisewife 



Name Vel ma CORPIAN 
Place or bl rth 



ihg 



Number of years of school 
Residence Mad ison. Wisconsin 
Number of" 



^disQn, 
chl Idren 



Harl'£«l 



"Tata 3, Septermber 1919 
"Sccupatlon Housewife 
Status Married- third 



'• Name Leland CORPIAN 

Place of birth Boscobel. Wisconsin dat a 6. October 1924 

Number. of yearF'o'f schooling ...."" Oectiip^tibrt 

Residenc e Dead Marital Statui 

y- Number of chl Idrcn "^ 

J. Name 

Place of birth J ^^^ ^ 

Number of years of schooling Occupatidrt . 

Residenc e HafTTal Status 

Number of chl Idren . . 

I. Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of achoelUn g Occupation 

Res I denc e W«rltcl Status 

Number of chl Idren ———————— 

0. Name 

Place of birth ' ' " '""' dat e 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residenc e """"^nRErrFaTTFatus _— 

Number of e ni mw.fr —- — ■■ —» "*'^'f«' *"="»^ 



CMILUREN ..I (. and (or (-1, t)-l)-your mother's runn: should apptvir beUiw 



'*•"" I ra STEIN 

'••••• '»r i.i'in. Edgar, Wisconsin 

"'••"•»••• ■•! /•■•If (if St Ii(x,l irifj ■ 



i<.-.i.i.-t.c.- Seattle. Washington 

N>niiiiri >tl « li I l(fr«?n 5 



N I. 
I' I. 



Ida STEIN 

;.r i.:,,t; — 



Edgar. Wisconsin 

Nijinl.i-r 'il yi-.irs of bchoolinq 

HfMiltiiee Dead — — — — 

Number f.f ch 1 1 dren 



3. w.v.„ Wally STEIN 

f idcc i<r f)i rth Edgar, Wisconsin 



Number i)( ye-ir s of school ing 
Residence Dead 
Number nf ch i 1 dren 



T 



<•. 



N.w Melvin STEIN 

^'•"" "^ i'^'^' Edgar, Wisconsin 
Numiifi ),f ye.irs of school i nq ' 

Ri'-. idenrc Arizona ' 



Number of rh i 1 dren 



Nan»- Mildred STEIN 

; '''\" "\^''^^^ Edoar Widr -^i^^iiir 
Numbei of years of schooling 
Hes i dence Wausau. Wisconsin 
NuiiiJ.fr of ch J Idren 3 



^' N.im.- Viola STEIN 

^ ' -^cc of birth Edgar. Wisconsin" 
Number of years Of schooHng 



Ri.s i dence Athens. Wisconsin" 
Numl)(.T of chi I^dren 5 



Nang oren STElNf 

Place .fbirth_ Edoar Wjsrr^SilH: 

^fr of /erirs of school fng 
Res i dcnce 
Numbe 



Numb* 



n: ch?f|.rr - gi'^-'-n .in 



r?V;^ 



STETNJ 



Name 

Place of Dirth p^^^^ ,j- ~: — 

N.-nber of vear s of^^cTiJj; ! ! n"j '^^"'^^ ^ 



years of scncxji mg 

"'^ ' ^g"ce Woodruff, wisf^;?;7^T;r 

Number of en 1 Idren i 



9. 



Nane Clifford STEIN 

Place o\ b.rth Edgar. wisconsiA' 

Number of years of schooUng 

Res i dence Dead - 

Number of cKI Idren -j 



10. Name 
Plac 



e ot^ 1 >^^jh'^g^^^^ ^ "g.Q^.^^ :T^ T N 



>.:::b\%^:f^::: .^.^^^uyi,r^ -in 



Res i dene ar^*. m^., ■' 

"tit Atk-inqr>n, Uiopnn^jp 

Number of children 3 



d.it,- 



26, May 1894 



Marl tars tat us Married-seor^nr^ 



ctatc 29, April 1896 
Occupation Housewife 



— ""'■'^•^ Status M^rr^^H^ 



._ date 23, October 1898 

Occupation Bartaer " 
Marital Status Married-^fi.. ;>nr^ ri 



date 16, November 1900 
Occupa 1 1 Oh Carpenter 
Marital Status Married 



_ date 6. Noveinb«>r ^Q^f 
Occupa tion House vi f g 



Marital Status Married 



date 6. December 1904 

Occupa 1 1 Ort Houseinife 



Marital Status Married 



date 9 November 1 gpf^ 

- OccupatlOn_^ndu^t;jri^l.I,abni 
_ Marital StatuSMafxisdzfiaCCaj 



date 27. January ;I90Q 

Occupation Industrial Labor 



arltal Status Married 



date 4. January 1911 



I 



— u , Occupation Industrial Labog 

H«rrtaT Status Married — 



date 13. March 191.? 



^ ,... Occu"pat i on Houseyife" 
Marital Status Married 



Maternal 



Name Gorman STEIN 



Place of birth E dgar, Wisconsin 



Number of years schooling 
Residence Dead 
Children 7 



^date 22. June 1918 

7 Occupation Laborer 



Marital Status Married 



icai ps: 



tHILOREN ..( (. and (or (-1, l)-l)-your mother's njnie should oppe.ir below 

**•"- Ir a STEIN 

'■'""■ "^ '■ > .'i. Edgar, Wisconsin ^i,,t,. 26, May 1894 

h::::::Z^^^ ^^ Washington M arital Status M^ry^^^g^^p^ J 

** '"" Ida STEIN . 

'■'••"■ ••'''•'"•' Edgar. Wisconsin elate 29. April 1896 

N..n,.., „, ,. .,■ o> schooling — — T7ccupa t lon ^ Hgusewife — 

Hrstijfiite Dead ^^^^^^^^^^^TSTrTTTT c * « » , . _ . 

N.«^cr >,f eh i l dren b ^^ Status MarrJPfi 

N.V.; Wally STEIN 

Place of hirth t.agar, Wisconsin date 23, October 1898 



^•^7 ■" ye.rs o school. ng ff ccuoa t l on iJarb^r 



"csKlencc Dead U«rlf«1 c»-i. : — — 

Number of children 1 Ma rTtaTStatus Married-s^Pr^r^r^H 

'•• waiw Melvin STEIN 

m'J ••"V'^'^' ,^^g^^', Wisconsin date 16, November 1900 

; :' "' ^^-'[^ ^' schooling Occu pation Carpenter 

!"J ? U U ^^°"^ . Mar i ta l S tatus H arri eS 

Nomber of rh I 1 dren l ■ 



I 
I 



Nanif Mildre d STEIN 

P I .icf of h I r tH 



6. N.imi- Viola STEIN 



Numl)er of ch i fdren fi 



7. Nanc 
PI 



"■c Oren STETfsf 
ace 'jl birtTi i 



Number of chlt?ren^ ' il^^^^n'^in _ _ Marital StatuSMarri^d-c^onn 



Name 



Place of birth Eda;.^ 



Number of ye.r s of^^cT^ci; ! ! n^J '^^"'^^' " date 27. January 1 QOQ 



Nar>e Clifford STKTM 

Place o/ birth Edgar. 

Number of years of school 

"evidence De ad ^^^^^^^,^., j.naust 

Number of chlPdrVn 9 ««ritaT Status Married 



I'^ir.AX^mi ^Ji, , t--"--^ " =ZZI ^»e 4 January ,.„ 
"eiidence Dead "^ — — n Occupatiort Industrial Labg 



'°- M:: eo f ^!,^7^-^gpp^ ^ "r.."^^^ ^^^^-f ^ ^^' 



""-ber^f year s If ^^^h - ootinY^" ' ^^" » ^ -—date 13. March 1911 

1esidencar»4. .^^. ,:. r^^ . „„._ Occupat lon Housewife 



'*«s I oenccir»*. »i.i • , -v.v,^J^^al lun rtouse; 

Number Of chl IdreV"''"^ ^^ '^'^^^^^ " - "'^^^ ' Status Married 



Maternal 

Name__Gorman_STEIN ^ 

Place of birth E daar. Wisconsin ^date 22, June 1918 

Number of yo^^^ ^.-hnollna 7 Occupation Laborer 

Residence Dead Marital Status_Jlarried 

Children 7 






"T: 






x-r».'>.^r 1 '.n'!-^ 






/our Father 



ame uf William Cecil CORPIAN Current Residence Ft. Atkinson. Wisco nsin 

f dead, date of death —————.«-—.—_«,—_ 



ilame 
I 



t>lace of birth Cobb, Wisconsin D ate of bfrth 25, April 1909 

iiiducatlon (number of years) ——.---—————— 

grade school high school 1 vocational ^college 

)ccupation(s) PUCE OF RESIDENCE 

'^ter leaving ho»ne) 



fZn d Rug Weaver Dates 1935-42 2n d D Ates 

brd Road Construction Dates 3rd Dates 



iiith Farme r D ates 1946 ^ tth D ates 

Methodist 



^e 11 g { on 



I , I I I I". I . .1 ... . ' . I ' . f i . ii . 1 



»olltical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, 0tc,_ 

Place of marriage to your mother DObUicjiafe; IdlTct ^ ^ • • d ate June 29. 1931 "7 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give tKat data on the back 
I of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name Hazel Josephine Olqa STEIN Current Residenc e Ft. Atkinson. Wisconsin 

If dead, date of death ' 

Place of birth Edgar, Wisconsin Date of birth 13, March 13 

Education (number of years) 
grade school 8 high school vocational ^college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Housewife Dates 1st D ates 

2nd Factory Worker Dates 2nd ^Dates_ 

3rd Truck Weigher Dates 3rd Dates 

Re 1 1 g I on Methodist 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etCc 



Place of marriage to your father rhi>yiy|i,o, Tr,t»- • ^ _ d ate 29 June 19^1 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the oack of 
this page (F-2). 



E- I Stepfather 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth n^^. ^, . , ^. 

cj ,,,-^ / I ■ 1 D ate of birth 

tducation (number of years) ^— -^^— — — — — .^— — 

grade school high school vocational 



col lege 



^""P''"^"^'^ ' PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

1st Dates 1st ^^^'"' '"^'"5_home) 



2"<^ Dates 2nd 

^''^ ^Dates 3rd 



pates_ 
Dates 



Dates 



ill Hgion ^"" ''' ^°^'«. 

Political N-'Mei, divll 61- ?6«iai clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your mother 



Date 



F-2 $tep<wother 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of hirth n^*^ ^r ki_»i. 

c. .. , I ■ - — ^ Date of birth 

tducation (number of years) ^— — —————— —. . 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PL^cE OF RESIDENCE 

1st Dates 1st ^^^'"' '"""^ ^°"*^ 



Dates 



2nd 



^Dates 2n<i 0^^^^ 

l^ ?,glon °'^"— ^'' '-^-K 

Political parly, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Mace of marriage to your father " — 3ate" 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

Name Duane William CORPIAN 

Place of birth Wausau, Wisconsin 
Number of years of schooling "" 

Res i dence Dead 
Number of ch i Idren 



Date of birth 14, June 1932 

_^___^__^^_^ Occupation 
Marital Status 



Name Delaine Da\in CORPIAN 

Place of birth Boscobel, Wisconsin 
Number of years of^ schooling 14 "* 

Residence Davis Jxinction, Illinois 
Number of chl Idren 2 



Date of birth 25. October 1934 

' Occupa t i on Student 

Marital Status Married 



Name Joyce Leah CORPAIN 

■p I ace of birth Oshkosh. Wisconsfn" 
Number of years of^ Schooling 16 



Res i dence Kingsport, Tennessee 

Number of chi Idren 1 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence 



Number of chi Idren 

Nan>e 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years of schooling 
Res i dence 



Number of children 

Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of school Ing 
Res i dence 



Number of ch I Idren 

Name 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Number of chi Idren 

Name 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years of school Ing 
Res i dence 



Number of chi Idren 



Date of birth 24^ Septem ber 193 6 

c c upatIon_ Teacher 

Married 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



bate of birth 

Occupation 



Date of birth 



Occupation 

Marital Status 



'gate of birth__ 

• ' Occupation 

Marital Status 



bate of birth 

Occupation 



"Rarltal Status 



Marital Status 



Date of birth_ 
Occupation 



ill. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willincj) 

1 hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and adminiMralivc 
nyhis/to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, depositod m tlic 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed Go£nji.yUi Bcm^^^ 

Date Novenaber^6jL^^l?74 



'.'li'c.'iiu. ■ , "t'ljci . . nin 



GENEALOGY CHART 



.aine Daun CORPIAN 



n 25, October 1934 
ried 28, November 19^9 

i 



Grandfather 



„ . B 24, August 1880 

William Cecil g OggJA^M 1964 



Father 

B 25, April 1909 
M 29, June 1931 

D 



WilliamGip CORPIAN 

\ Great grandfather 

Jesse Lee CORPIAN 



4, July 1856 



D 17, August 1956 



jjLinnie CULVER 

Great grandmother 



Eva HILLERY 

Grancimotner 



B Jvine 1885 
D 1924 



B 
D 

Henry HILLEgy,,. 

B 
M 
D 

Mary PERRY 



Wilhelm GOLDBAUM 



Ernest StEIN 



Hazel Josephine Olg; STEIN 



Mother 

B 13, March 1913 
M 29, June 1931 
D 



Grandfather 

B 20, October 1868 

M 1892 

D 1930 



Mary Jane Stac)cpol( 



Grandmother 



B 10, April 1874 

D 1954 B 

D 



- 33 - 



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Joshua N. C DLVER 

"b 30, NovemBer~T$08 
D 1892 
Henry M orton CULVtR 





Joshua Culver 


Timothy CULVER 


B 1750 


B IVVS 
no 





Gr . , Gr . Grandfather 
B September 1833 

D 7, May 1864 | Caroline C. TILLOTSON 
B December 1814 

Elizabeth THOMAS ^o^^l^-,-, r^,. i_ ,oc-a 
4;r.TGrr Grandmother ^^^'^ 22, December. .1863 

William HILLERY 



Gr., Gr. Grandfather 
D 17, October 1906 



Margaret CALVERT 



B 17, October 1834 



- 34 - 



SOURCES 

This paper was a much larger undertaking than I had 
anticipated. I was hampered by the fact that both sets of 
my grandparents are dead. My paternal grandmother emd ray 
maternal grauidfather were dead before I was born. Most 
of my information was obtained by interviewing ray parents 
and correspondence with two paternal aiants and one maternal 
avmt. Even though the letters were flying back and forth, 
there were several of ray questions they would not or could 
not supply the answers to, I found it amusing that even 
though I was able to obtain the name of the father of nty 
maternal grauidfather, V.io was an illegitimate child, neither 
ray aunt nor my mother knew the nairae of his mother. 

Genealogical information on my paternal side was secured 
from a cousin who has an interest in genealogy. 



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JESSE LEE CORPIAN 
Paternal Grandfather 

Jesse Lee Corpian vas bom in 1880 at Ellenboro, Wisconsin 
in Grant Coimty. He was the third child of Linnie and William Gip 
Corpian. Jesse had one brother, Lyman, and two sisters, Mayme euid 
Lulu. His fcunily was quite poor. He grew up on a farm near Beetown, 
Wisconsin. (See map page 31) As he grew older he worked out on 
other farms as a farmhand. Eventually he entered the trade of well 
drilling. At Potosi, Wisconsin he met Eva Hillery who was living 
with an avint cuid loncle and doing housework for others. In 1904 at 
the age of twenty- three, Jesse Lee Corpian married Eva Hillery. 



- 1 



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EVA HILLERY 
Paternal Grandmother 

I Eva Hillery was the third child of Henry and Mary Hillery. 

t 

She was born in Jxine of 1885 at Centerville, Wisconsin. Eva had 

three sisters j Lydia, Ora, and Mae and one brother,; Charles. Eva's 

father was killed in the mines when she was four and left her mother 

with five children to support. They had a very hard time. Eva's 

mother died a few years later leaving her family to live with one 

relative and then another. It was not a good life. Eva's brother, 

Charles, ran away as soon as he was old enough. They did not hear 

from him for over thirty years. As Eva grew up, she did housework 

in Potosi for various people to try to make her living. She lived 

with am aunt and uncle. She met Jesse Lee Corpian in Potosi at the 

age of eighteen. Several months later, in 1904, they were married. 



- 2 - 



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EVA AND JESSE CORPIAN 
Paternal Grandparents 

Eva Hillery euid Jesse Lee Corpicin were married in 1904 after 
a short courtship. Seven children were born to Eva amd Jesse) 
Leila on January 17, 1905| Una on May 23, 1907; Cecil on April 25, 
1909; Kenneth on October 13, 1911; Evelyn on September 3, 1915; 
Velma on February 8, 1919; Jind Leland on October 6, 1924. 

Jesse and Eva were destined to live in many places throughout 
their lives and Jesse was to engage in many varied occupations. They 
lived in several communities in the southwestern comer of Wisconsin, 
Some of these towns were» Mt, Hope, Highland, Fennimore, Wauzeka, 
Steuben, Boscobel, Oshkosh, Clyde, Woodman, Avoca, Potosi, auid Cobb, 
(See map page 31) They were average homes and sometimes quite crowded, 
At times Jesse's parents would live with the family. They would have 
their own rooms, but in the same house. Mining, farming, a second 
hand store, horse trading, barber, tavernkeeper, well drilling, and 
stump removing were some of the meuiy ways in which Jesse earned a 
living for his family, Eva was a very good housekeeper and ironer 
and sometimes would do work outside the home for extra money, 

Jesse and Eva had a very good relationship. Many times in the 
evenings Eva would read to Jesse or she would embroider >^ile Jesse 
played cards or gcunes with the children. Neighbors and friends often 
visited them or they returned their visits. 

Eva died in 1924 of a combination of childbirth and "brights 
disease." Her son Leland was taken care of by his older sisters until 
he died in 1925 of pneumonia, 

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Jesse raised his family alone until 1934 vhen he married a widow. 
Flora Karsten, ^o had two sons. Flora and Jesse lived all their 
married life in Boscobel, Wisconsin, ^fhey had a very stormy marriage 
involving many separations, a divorce, and a remarriage. 

Jesse became senile the last three years of his life and made 
his home with his daughter, Una. Jesse I^e Corpian died on August 
17, 1955. Flora Karsten Corpian died in 1960. 



- 5 - 



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WILLIAM CECIL CORPIAN 
Father 

William Cecil Corpian, better toiovn as Cecil, was the third 
child of Eva and Jesse Corpian. He was born at home, as were all 
his brothers and sisters, on April 25, 1909, in Cobb, Wisconsin. 
He had four sisters and two brothers. One brother died a few months 
after birth. His family led a kind of nomadic life moving from one 
home to another in the southwestern corner of Wisconsin, 

Cecil started to school at the age of six. Most of the 
children in his family completed the eighth grade. Six years of his 
schooling was spent at the one room school at Clyde, Wisconsin, It 
was a Bohemian neighborhood and there were a lot of fights. All of 
the teachers he had were women. It was not unusual for the teacher 
to have completed only one year of high school. Upon one occasion, 
the teacher was only a year older than some of her students. Cecil 
was taught reading, geography, arithmatic, music, writing, spelling, 
2md history. He completed grade school eind tooJc a few classes in 
the three room high school at Steuben, Wisconsin. 

Everyone in his family was expected to help with the chores. 
When he was six he was alredy helping milk cows, carry wood, clean 
bam and helping with the cross cut saw. Whenever possible the 
children attended Sunday School and church. Sometimes they would 
walk as far as two miles one way. Swearing was not allowed in the 
home. Baptisms were held in the church or at home. The minister, 
his family, and close friends and relatives would be invited to 
dinner afterwards. Weddings were held in the church with dinner 

- 7 - 






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served for friends and relatives in the home of the bride. There were 
funeral homes at that time and all funerals were held in the homes, 
also. 

Cecil's mother liked surprises and they had many surprise parties, 
Sometimes the grown-ups would have a dance in the home to celebrate 
someone's birthday. The children also attended but usually did not 
participate. Holidays were big celebrations. Friends and relatives 
would come for dinner, supper, and stay over night. 

The children made most of their own amusement. Card games, 
reading, fishing, and hunting were some of the ways they chose to amuse 
themselves. The family got their first phonograph in 1919. It was the 
disc type record made by Edison. The new phonograph drew a lot of 
company. They got their first car in 1919, also. It was a second 
hand Model T and they tipped it over the first day. Their first radio 
was purchased in 1926. 

Discipline was quite strict. Cecil's father, Jesse, disciplined 
the children. He usually gothis point across by the use of a razor 
strap. Cecil's parents made all their key decisions together as they 
had a very good working relationship. His mother died vrtien Cecil was 
fourteen . 

When Cecil was old enough to find employment for himself, he 
started working as a truck driver for a road construction crew. One 
week-end he went home with a friend he had made, Gilbert Stein. He 
met Gilbert's sister. Hazel. Several months later they began corre- 
sponding. Through the next three years their relationship grew. At 
the age of twenty- two, Cecil married Hazel Josephine Olga Stein in 
Dubuque , I owa . 



- 8 - 



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- 8 - 



ERNEST STEIN 
Maternal Grandfather 

Ernest Stein, an illegitimate child, was born to a blind 
inother in Euten, Oldenburg, Germany, on October 20, 1868, his 
father was a workman, Wilhelm Goldbaum, on the farm of Ernest's 
grandparents. His grandparents were well-to-do farmers. He had 
a twin brother, Henry, The twins were raised by their grandparents, 
They were not required to do many farm chores but mostly helped 
their grandmother around the house. They were baptized and con- 
firmed in the Evangelical Lutheran Church, 

In 1S85, when the twins were sixteen, an uncle brought them 
to the state of Wisconsin in the United States to avoid having to 
go into the Array, Ernest found work in the lumber can^s. Henry 
died of black diptheria when he was twenty-two. At the age of 
twenty-four, Ernest met Mary Jane Stackpole at a dcince. After a 
courtship of about three months, they were married in Marathon 
City, Wisconsin 



MARY JANE STACKPOLE 
Maternal Grandmother 

Mary Jeuie Stackpole was born in Chazy, New York on April 
10, 1874, She had four brothers and four sisters. The family 
resided in upper New York. It was mostly wilderness at that time. 
Her father, Paul, was a liimberman. He died of hardening of the 
arteries when she was fourteen. Mary Jane met Ernest stein at the 
age of eighteen at a dance. They were married a short while later. 



Picture 



Mary Jane Stackpole 
Age 68 



- 10 - 



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MARY JAiVE AND EEliNEST STEIN 
Maternal Grandparents 

Mary Jeuie Staclcpole and Ernest Stein were married in i-iarathon 
City, riisconsin, in 1892. They made their first home in iZdgar, 
(See map page 32) Edgar was a mill town in Marathon County, Wisconsin, 
All worlc in the cx>xinty centered around the lumber mills, Ernest got 
work in the lumber camps near surrounding communities , such as 
Schofield and Rib Falls, They were to have a large family » Ira 
arrived on May 26, 1894j Ida on April 29, 1896; Wally on October 23, 
1898; Melvin on November 15, 1900; Mildred on November 6, 1902? Viola 
on December 6, 1904; Oren on November 9, 1906; Gilbert on January 27, 
1909; Clifford on January 4, 1911; Hazel on March 13, 1913; and Gorman 
on Jvme 22, 1918. There was a total of four girls and seven boys. All 
the children were born at home. Each child received three given names. 
One name was given them by their parents and the other two names were 
the given names of the people who were their sponsors in baptism, 

Mary Jane and Ernest lived in several large home in Edgar, 
Ernest took up the trade of carpentry. They usually had a couple 
boarders to help with making a living. They also had a large garden, 
a cow, and several pigs. They belonged to the Lutheran Church and 
for a while the Lutheran minister would stay with them on week-ends 
as he had several small churches to alternate. 

In 1912 they bought a fsirm about a mile from Edgaur. In 1914 
they changed their membership from the Lutheran Church to the Pres- 
byterian Church. The sermons at the Lutheran Church were all in 
German and only Ernest could speak German. 

- 11 - 



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Ernest died in 1930 of a brain tumor and cancer of the liver. 
Mary Jane traded the farm for a house in Wausau, Wisconsin and thirty- 
five hxindred dollars cash. After the money was all used, she had to 
igo to work and found employment doing housework. She began corre- 
sponding with an old acquaintance, Thomas Arnold, from New York. He 
had heard of Ernest's death through her son, Gorman, who now lived in 
New York, 

Thomas Arnold asked Mary Jane to come to New York to marry 
him. They were married in New York in 1931 over the objections of 
some of her married children. Thomas was considerably older than 
Mary Jane and he died three years after their marriage. 

Mary Jane returned to Wisconsin where she sold her home for 
a small price to her daughter, Mildred and her husband, and the 
right to live in the home with them until her death. Mairy Jane 
traveled among the homes of her other children when she was not 
living with Mildred. She usually spent a month or two with each 
child. She died in 1954, 



- 12 - 






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HAZEL JOSEPHINE OLGA STEIN 
^k^ther 

Hazel Josephine Olga Stein was the tenth child of Mary Jcine 
and Ernest Stein. She was born on a farm near Edgar, Wisconsin, 
on March 13, 1913, At the age of six she started school at the 
Edgar Public School. It was a one mile walK to the eight room 
school where she studied reading, history, language, spelling, 
arithmatic, physiology (health), and agriculture. All the teachers 
Hazel had were women. She grew up mostly svirrounded by boys as her 
three sisters were from ten to seventeen years older than she. When 
her brothers went hunting, fishing, or swimming. Hazel went along. 
She was also expected to help with the chores on the farm. Milking 
cows, picking up stones from the fields, and cutting com were some 
of her jobs. 

The family considered themselves poor but they always had 
plenty to eat by raising livestock and farm produce. Clothes were 
not elaborate. Many of their clothes were "hand-me-downs" from 
relatives and friends. Svinday School was faithfully attended cind 
swearing was not allowed. From time to time relatives would come 
to stay with the family. Mary's brother, George, lived with them 
for quite a while — until his death in 1918. 

The family made most of their own amusement. They would 
fish, hunt, swim, sing, play piano, play games, wrestle, ice skate, 
or ski. Family picnics were a favorite. The whole family would 
get into the buckboard and ride five miles to the Big Rib River for 
an outing. Christmas was a special time. There would be a large 



- 14 - 



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family dinner with some of the married children coming home. They made 
pails of candy and pop corn balls. There was singing, guessing games, 
and sledding. Each child received one store boughten gift. 

Discipline was quite harsh in the family. The father had the 
'♦old country" school of thought on discipline and the temper to go 
with it. He was quite a selfish, self-centered man cuid it took very 
little to provoke an argument. If someone took the wrong piece of 
meat at the table, the argument began. 

As the sons grew older, a nightly argument accompanied by 
table pounding at the supper hour could be expected. The father, 
Ernest, would grab a piece of wood, a pitchfork, or anything handy 
to accent his side of the argument. Sometimes the father and one 
of the boys would resort to a fist fight. One source of contention 
was the fact the sons were Republicans and the father was a Democrat. 
Many heated discussions were held during World War I. The father 
Wcuxted Gerraciny to win the war. 

The mother was the peacemaker in the family; sometimes 
resorting to threatening suicide to calm her husband down. However, 
she, too, was quite harsh with the discipline. If the children 
misbehaved in any way, they were sure to get a taste of the "rips." 
The rrips" was a long flat piece of wood with three strips of leather 
attached to it. (See drawing below) 




In 1926 the^ family purchased their first radio. It had only 
one set of ear phones and only one person could listen at a time. 

- 15 - 



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The programs were mostly music. The first time Ernest listened to the 
radio he heard the song, "Oh Little Liza, Little Liza Jane." Because 
of the poor quality of the headset, he misunderstood and began singing, 
"Oh the Kaiser, the Kaiser Jane," much to the amusement of his children. 

Hazel's mother suffered many fainting spells and she missed a 
lot of school to take care of her mother when she was in eighth grade. 
Finally she quit a the age of thirteen before she completed eighth 
grade . 

When she was fifteen, her brother, Gilbert, brought a friend 
home for the week-end from Oshkosh where he worked. His name was 
Cecil Corpiaui and he was nineteen years old. Hazel was apparently 
attracted to him as three months later she wrote to her brother and 
asked him to have Cecil write to her. The correspondence and court- 
ship began. They went out for dates mostly with groups. 

At sixteen Hazel went to work in the basket factory in Edgar, 
Cecil proposed to her at this time but her parents thought she was 
too young. When she was seventeen. Hazel went to work for her sister, 
Viola, at Athens, Wisconsin. She cleaned house, cooked, and helped 
care for her sister's fast growing family. 

At the age of eighteen Hazel mcurried Cecil Corpian. 



- 15 - 



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HAZEL AND CECIL CORPIAN 
Parents 

I 

I Hazel Josephine Olga stein and William Cecil Corpian were 
married by a Justice of the Peace in Dubuque, Iowa on Jvne 29, 1931. 
Their witnesses to the wedding were just two passers-by. By this 
time Cecil had his own gravel truck auid was working at Cash ton, 
Wisconsin. Cecil and Hazel moved in with Cecil's brother, Kenneth 
auid Kenneth's wife, Leone, for about two months until they were able 
to rent two rooms in a house for themselves. The road construction 
work was to carry Hazel and Cecil to many different towns in Wisconsin, 
They bought a trailer house so they could be more mobile. 

On J\ine 14, 1932, Hazel gave birth to a son, Duane, at Wausau, 
Wisconsin. Hazel had convulsions during the delivery and the doctor 
had difficulty taking the baby. The baby was born with a vertebrae 
out of place in his back and was not well. It was a very difficult 
time for the parents as he was a lot of concern, care, and expense. 
He died at Boscobel, Wisconsin, at the age of fifteen months. He was 
buried next to his maternal grandfather at Wausau, Wisconsin. 

Another child was born to Hazel euid Cecil Corpicui on October 
25, 1934, at the home of his father and stepmother in Boscobel, 
Wisconsin. The birth was accomplished with the aid of Cecil's 
stepmother. Flora, as they were unable to obtain a doctor. The 
town had only one doctor and he was busy delivering twin girls at 
the time. The doctor. Dr. Freymiller, did come later. The child 
was a daughter and they named her Delaine Daun in close proximity 
to the name, Duane, they had given their son. 

- 18 - 



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Shortly after the birth of their daughter, Cecil and Hazel 
moved to Osh)cosh, Wisconsin. Cecil had been wor)cing for his 
brother-in-law, a construction contractor, and could not get him 
to pay him the money he was owed. It was a very bad time financially 
for everyone. There were bad feelings for many years because of 
this incident. Cecil sold his truck and gained employment at the 
Deltox Rug Company in Oshkosh. There, he was a weaver of rugs. 
They rented an apartment, only one of many they were to live in 
in Oshkosh in the next seven years. 

On September 24, 1936, another daughter was born to Hazel 
and Cecil. They named her Joyce Leah. They were to almost lose 
this child also. When she was five weeks old she had double 
pneumonia. The nurses told the parents she would not live but by 
some miracle she lived. 

In 1941, with the help of a friend, Cecil built a small two 
bedroom house in Oshkosh. It was very close to the County Fair 
Grounds. During World War II Cecil was classified 2A. When his 
name was called before the draft board he was in the hospital with 
pneumonia. Fortunately for his family, his name was not called 
again. To save on gasoline and rubber at this time, Cecil rode a 
bicycle to work as did many others. 

. After some time, Cecil worked his way up to foreman at the 
Deltox Rug Company but the factory was taking the toll on his health. 
The factory was located right over the lake at Oshkosh and Cecil began 
to be troubled with rheumatism. Some evenings his legs and feet would 
hurt so much, he would have to crawl around the house on his hands and 
knees. They decided he would have to change occupations. They sold 
their house in Oshkosh and moved back to Boscobel where they again 

- 19 - 



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lived with Kenneth and Leone for about two months, Cecil went back 
to work for his brother-in-law. Herb IXirner, Jr., of H. Turner & Son, 
trtio by now had a thriving business. 

Hazel and Cecil bought a trailer and started a pattern of 
living which was to comprise a major part of their life. During 
the school year Hazel and the girls would live in Boscobel. Cecil 
would come home on week-ends from wherever his road construction 
work took him. Sometimes he worked close enough to be home during 
the week one night. Occasionally he worked close enough to be home 
every evening. Hazel worked for two years a the Parker Pen Factory 
at Baraboo, commuting daily. Hazel had many health problems in 
1943 and 1944 and had several operations. With no insurance, this 
was a drain on their financial resources. In 1945 Cecil's work 
took him to IndieUia to work on a government construction project. 
The family moved their trailer to Indiana to spend the summer. 

In 1945 Cecil and Hazel decided they wanted to try farming. 
They purchased some livestock with their remaining savings and 
rented a farm near Spring Green, Wisconsin on halves. The owner 
was to furnish the machinery and farm. Cecil was to supply the 
labor cind livestock. It was not a good decision. Cecil and Hazel 
lost their savings. The owner was always late with bringing the 
machinery as he hcid his own work on another farm first. Prices were 
down. They sold out their livestock and moved back to Boscobel 
after one year, 

Cecil again went to work for H, Turner & Son, They were 
able to erect a little quonset type house with what they salvaged 
from the farm. They always managed to have enough to eat and 
cind to keep the childred dressed well. Although Cecil worked himself 

- 20 - 



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up to foreman, road construction vork: is seasonal, particularly in 
Wisconsin. Every winter Cecil would be without work from two to 
three months and they would have to draw on savings. The children 
grew up and completed high school. 

Delaine took an accounting course at Madison Business School, 
Madison, Wisconsin, in 1953. Joyce entered Platteville State Teachers 
College in Platteville, Wisconsin, in 1954. Joyce planned to teach 
science at the high school level and also minored in music. 

In 1955 Cecil had an accident which changed many things in his 
life. While working on a government construction project near Toarah, 
Wisconsin, he got a speck of dirt in his eye. He went to the local 
doctor in a town near the project. The doctor was not qualified to 
remove the dirt and damaged the eye. He also gave no antibiotics to 
combat possible infection. Cecil had to spend a month in the hospital 
while the specialists tried to save his eye. They finally had to 
admit defeat for fear the infection would spread to the other eye. 
The eye was removed. He was awarded ten thousand dollars by the state 
through workmen's compensation. Cecil and Hazel put the money toward 
a new house. Cecil went back to work and adjusted well to his loss. 
Their daughter, Joyce, married Gary E. Paar, a man she met in 
college, on December 21, 1958. Delaine married Larry House, a 
high school classmate, on November 28, 1959. This left Hazel and 
Cecil alone for the first time in many years. Cecil continued to 
work for H. Turner & Son as manager and foreman of a sand and gravel 
pit at Sussex, Wisconsin, near Milwaukee. Hazel was employed to 
weigh the trucks for the same company. They retained their new home 
in Boscobel where they spent their week-ends and a trailer they had 
located at Sussex where they spent the week days, 

- 21 - 



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I In 1964 Cecil decided the winter vor)c outside was becoming too 
difficult for him. They sold their home at Boscobel, their trailer, 
euid took what savings they had and invested the money in a motel at 
Ft. Atkinson, Wisconsin. It proved to be a very wise financial move 
and meeting the public in this capacity proved to be a very agreeable 
occupation for Cecil emd Hazel. They completed paying for their 
business in 1973, They plan to put it up for sale and retire. They 
want to buy a home near their daughter. Delaine, and enjoy their 
grandchildren. Travel is also in their plans. 



- 22 - 



aan br 



DELAINE DAUN CORPIAN 

Delaine Daiin Corpian was bom October 25, 1934 at Boscobel, 
Wisconsin, in the home of her paternal greuidfather, Jesse Corpian, 
There was no doctor to assist in the birth as the one doctor in town 
was delivering a set of twins. Her father's stepmother helped with 
the delivery. Delaine had one sister, Joyce, two years younger, 
and an older brother who died at the age of fifteen months. Shortly 
after her birth, her parents moved to Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 

Dd.aine started school at the age of four in Oshkosh Euid 
spent a year and a half in kindergarden. The school she attended, 
Lincoln Elementary School, had half grades. She was not allowed into 
first grade vintil she was six. Delaine and her sister, Joyce had 
just about every childhood disease which came along; imimps, German 
measles, measles, chicken pox, whooping cough, and scarlet fever. 
There was very little immunization at the time except for small pox. 
Everyone was quarantined for diseases. When the children had scarlet 
fever, their father, Cecil, was not allowed to live at home. He was 
forced to live with his brother-in-law or he would not have been 
able to go to work. This quarantine lasted six weeks. 

When Delaine was in third grade, her parents sold their home 
in Oshkosh and moved back to Boscobel, Wisconsin. Delaine had one 
month of school to finish before she would have been promoted to 
third grade in February of that year. Her school record showed 
second grade. Boscobel Public School did not have half grades and 
would not accept her in third grade. Delaine spent a year and a 
half in second grade. 

- 23 - 



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A pattern started in Delaine's family life ^ich was to continue, 
with the exception of one year, vintil her graduation from high school. 
During the school year. Delaine, her sister, cuid her mother lived in a 
house in the town of Boscobel, Grant County, Wisconsin. Delaine's 
father worked in road construction. He would spend week-ends with the 
family and the week wherever his work took him. Occasionally he would 
work close enough to Boscobel to come home once during a week or on 
rare occasions, every night. In the sununer the entire family lived in 
a trailer near the job where her father happened to be working. Most 
of the time these jobs were in the central or southwestern part of 
Wisconsin. Twice these trips led the family out of Wisconsin. One 
summer was spent in northern Illinois. 

During World War II in the summer of 1945, the entire fcimily 
lived near Charleston, Indiana where her father's work had taken him. 
It was an unusual summer for Delaine euid her sister. At the ages of 
ten and eight they were able to earn over forty dollars apiece to 
help pay for fall school clothes. There were so many men in Indiana 
on the government job location, the contractor provided a "cook shauaty" 
and a male cook for the men. Delaine and Joyce received twenty-five 
cents for wiping dishes, ten cents putting pies on the table, and ten 
cents for swatting flies. 

The core of Delaine's life was spent in Boscobel. Boscobel is 
a farming community along the Wisconsin River with an approximate 
population of twenty-six hundred people. The town is situated in a 
valley in the rolling hills of Grant County. The town has one theater 
and Delaine and her sister, Joyce, saw just about every movie which 
came to Boscobel. Her parents were quite permissive. 

The big treat was Saturday night in Boscobel, All the stores 
stayed open until ten o'clock. The farmers from the surrounding area 

- 24 - 






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would come to town to g^t their shopping done. The townspeople would 
come to town to visit. Often people would drive down the main street 
in the morning to find a good parking place and spend the day. Every- 
where theie were groups of people conversing with friends and neighbors 
they hadn't seen since last Saturday night. To walk down the street 
reminded one of walking elbow to elbow at a crowded country fair. 

In 1945, when Delaine was twelve, her family moved to a farm 
near Spring Green, Wisconsin. Delaine was not very happy about the 
move. She had to leave all her friends. Delaine auid Joyce attended 
a one room school house a mile from their farm home. The school had 
twelve students, including Delaine cind Joyce. Delaine was in sixth 
grade and took the identical subjects with the seventh and eighth 
graders including agriculture. The farm was not a successful venture 
for her parents and the family moved back to Boscobel after a year. 

Delaine's childhood and youth were very happy times for her. 
Although her family was of the lower middle class economically speaking, 
Boscobel was not a snobbish community. Her mother cuid father always 
saw that the children had presentable clothing and their friends 
were always welcome in their home. Although their parents seldom 
attended church. Delaine and Joyce attended the Boscobel Methodist 
Church faithfully. Every birthday weant a party of some sort. Both 
girls were very active in school organizations and held various 
offices within the organizations eind their respective high school 
classes, attended the class formals, and achieved scholastic 
success. Joyce was a cheerleader and Delaine, Joyce, and their mother 
attended all the basketball eind football games whether they were at 
Boscobel or in one of the surrounding communities. 

In her senior year Delaine attended the class prom with Larry 
Beattie. She was not aware then of the big part he was to play in 

- 25 - 



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her life. On May 21, 1953, Delaine graduated from Boscobel High 
School in an outdoors ceremony. Delaine was elected by her class to 
be a speeiker. 

As many young people today do. Delaine had a difficult time 
deciding what to do when she finished high school. She finally decided 
to attend Madison Business College in Madison, Wisconsin. She enrolled 
in the one year accovinting course. She still dated Larry Beattie cuid 
the relationship was becoming serious. By this time Delaine had 
learned that Larry Beattie was really Larry House. His real father 
had been shot when he was four. The stepfather had never adopted the 
children at the request of their paternal grandmother because she 
didn't want their last name changed. Larry had taken the name of 
Beattie at the suggestion of a teacher when he entered high school to 
save the numerous explanations one must make when your last name is 
not the same as your parents. 

In May of 1954 Delaine graduated from Madison Business College 
and secured a position as payroll accountant with the same firm her 
father worked in Boscobel, Wisconsin. In November of 1954 Larry went 
into the Army by voluntary draft for two years and was forced by law 
to use his legal name again. Larry was stationed in Germany and they 
maintained a steady correspondence. When he returned in 1958, he was 
employed by Da-Nite Equipment Co. of Rockford, Illinois as parts 
manager. 

After their "whirlwind" courtship of six years, Larry and Delaine 
decided to be married in November of 1959. Delaine took instructions 
and joined the Lutheran Church. In August of that year Delaiie moved 
to Rockford, rented a two room apartment, and secured employment as 
payroll accountant for Damascus Steel Products on Kishwaukee Street 

- 26 - 






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in Rockford. Delaine and Larry had saved enough money for a down 
payment on a home. They did not look for a house in Rockford as 
neither was very fond of city life. They found and purchased a three 
bedroom home on route seventy-two between Monroe Center and Davis 
Junction, Illinois. The home was three years old, had been lived in, 
but was not completely finished. Larry moved a folding cot into the 
house euid he. Delaine, and a friend of theirs, Peter Waltz, spent many 
evenings resanding floors, varnishing and painting. 

On November 28, 1959, Larry and Delaine were married in St. 
John's Lutheran Church in Boscobel, Wisconsin. As was the custom in 



Picture 



Larry and Delaine House 
November 28, 1959 

the community, they had a large ice cream euid cake reception following 

the afternoon wedding. That evening a wedding dance was held in the 

neighboring commijnity of Fennimore, Wisconsin. The bride and groom 

took a honeymoon trip to Texas. 

Larry and Delaine joined the Paynes Point Lutheran Church near 

Oregon, Illinois. Delaine found her job at Daunascus Steel Products 

- 27 - 



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unchallenging and sought new employment after eight months. She went 
to work for Micro Punch euid Die Co. which had a one girl office. The 
variety of work and responsibility was quite satisfying but she was 
soon to leaurn her employer had a problem with his nerves as a result of 
World War II service. He was quite difficult to wor)c for. She worked 
there for three years euid decided that was enough of that atmosphere. 
Delaine amd Larry planned not to have a family until they had their 
home mortgage paid. Delaine secured a job as accoxints payable clerk for 
the Reed Electromech Co. as they had not quite attained their goal. 
They had a burn the mortgage celebration in June of 1963. Delaine quit 
her job. 

On May 29, 1964 Delaine gave birth to a son, Kent Michael, at 
Swedish American Hospital in Rockford by Caesarean section. They were 
very happy with the child cuid planned to have another child. Kent 
was baptized at Paynes Point Lutheran Church with Peter Waltz as his 
sponsor. Peter had gone through school with Larry from the first 
grade through the twelth grade and through the high school years with 
Delaine. They held a large family dinner after the baptism. 

Travel and camping were major interests of Delaine cuxd Larry 
and they did a lot of both. They camped cuid traveled through thirty- 
two states and Canada at various times in their married life. In 
1968 they received an all expense paid trip to Bermuda through Oa-Nite 
Ecjuipment Co. where Larry is still employed. There were four other 
couples from the company who made the trip also. They like to go 
deuicing, play cards, and have friends in for dinner. 

It begein to seem that Delaine and Larry were not going to have 
cuiother child of their own even though the doctor assure them there 
was not anything medically wrong. Larry and Delaine started prelimi- 

- 28 - 



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nary adoption proceedings through the Lutheran Adoption Agency in Chicago. 
HoirevBr, God was good to them and before they had their first major 
interview for adoption. Delaine found she was again going to have a baby. 

This time a girl, Dguia Lynn, was born to Larry and Delaine at 
Swedish American Hospital in Rockford on October 1, 1968 by Caesarean 
section. Dana was baptized at the Paynes Point Lutheran Church with 
Larry's sister and her husband, Shirley and Emil Ward of Madison, 
Wisconsin, as her sponsors. The traditional family dinner was held. 

Life went along routinely with Kent entering kindergarden at 
Monroe Center Elementary School in 1969. In 1970 Larry and Delaine 
purchased a lot in Mariman Woods, a subdivision approximately one half 
mile from the home they owned. They felt they had outgrown their present 
residence. In February of 1971 they moved into their new home. Larry 
and Delaine also trainsferred their church membership to the Monroe Center 
Community Church, a nondenominational church, located in Monroe Center, 
Illinois. They felt they were not participating in the life of the 
church as much as they would like to due to the distance away of the 
Paynes Point Church, 

When Kent was in first grade. Delaine, as many other first grade 
mothers in the commxmity, helped for an hour a week in the first grade 
room. Althou^ Delaine liked the teacher personally, the inadequacy 
of Kent's teacher in such a responsible position, convinced Delaine that 
schools need better teachers. She was convinced she could do a better 
job. It gave her the "gumption" to start out on a goal which had always 
been somewhere in the back of her mind. Larry was very cooperative 
and enthusiastic about it and laid down only one restriction, no night 
classes. 

In the fall of 1971 she enrolled in a class at Rock Valley 
College with the determination to become an elementsuy teacher. In the 

- 29 - 



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1971-1972 and 1972-1973 years at Rock Valley she limited herself to one 
and two classes per semester respectively as Dana did not enter kinder- 
garden until 1973. Delaine is a full time student now and is working 
toward her goal. 



- 30 - 



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- 32 - 



GENEALOGICAL TIDBITS 
Paternal 

Joshua Culver Bom in 1750 Soldier in the Revolution 

Timothy Culver Born in 1775 in Massachusets 

Son of Joshua 

Soldier in War of 1812 

Levi Meriryman Culver. . .Brother of Timothy 

Levi Merryman Culver and Levi P. Morton, 
Vice President of United States 1889-1893 
were named after the saune man, 

Joshua N, Culver... Bom 30, November 1808 

Randolph, Portage County, Ohio 

Son of Timothy Culver 

Married Caroline C. Tillotson 

Had seven sons 

Moved to Harrison Township, Wisconsin 1846 

Died in 1892 

Line of descendants. . .Henry Morton Culver 

Linnie Culver 
Jesse Cor pi an 
Cecil Corpian 
Delaine Corpian 



Margaret Calvert and William Hillery were from Cornwall, England 



- 35 - 



4 wU r i^^-> isxiriaot/ 






•»*; V-tr I' I.' ■-■,:■, f- <ii f 



HOWARD, WILLIE FRANK, 1939- 



1 



|,EASE USt INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

|ar Contributor to the Wock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
ierican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
wminlues, nnd will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
cess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



A OFFICE USE CODE 



I, Your name (J///ie A. /Js ^:>^^cl t nn * \ 

I. Your coii(!qe: Kock Vfl II BY College ■'■ Co ^ ) 

ITockTbrJ*, Illinois 

*<t***A y.-)V A )V )V AA A ,'^ A A)V A A ~\ A A A h A A A 

3. Clif.'ck the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 1800-1850 

1850-1900 < 1900 or later 

k. Please check all regions of the United States In which members of your family whom you 
have discussed In your paper have lived. 

New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna., N.J., Va.) 

-^South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., TXT) X East South Central (La. .Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, Ky 
"V/est South Central (Ark., N.M., Tex., 01^7" East North Central (Mich. Ohio, Ind. , 
^Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawai I , Alaska) 111. Wis.) 

t'lalns (ND,SD,Neb. ,Kan. ,Yowa, MB) I 

5. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed In TKTs paper have found themselves. | 

X Farming Mining Shopkeeping or small business 

Transportation Big Business Manufacturing , 

^Professions Industrial labor y O ther 1 

6. Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
In this paper have belonged. 

^Roman Catholic Jewish Presbyterian / M ethodist 

X B aptist Episcopalian C ongregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon O ther Protestant Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks Indians M exicans P uerto Ricans 

Jews Central Europeans Ital lans ^Slavs 

Irish British N ative Americans over several generations 

E ast Asian O ther 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

Y Interviews with other ^Family Bibles Family Genealogies 

fami ly members 

Vital Records L and Records The U.S. Census 

^Photographs Maps O ther 



J FAMILY DATA 
A. Grandfather (your father's side) 



I f dead, date of death 3/ jg^J 



Current Residence 



ll^L^ 



Place of bl rth /!/?,> a^//^gg^'. 6-1?. 

Education (number of years): 
grade school 2 \^ high school^ 



Date of Birth ^y^yf^gu^^/ 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion(s) 

Ist /l^.v^/? 



2nd /^g^^.^^/ rj,^^ A^Aoa 

3rd 

iith 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates /.A A-^^ 1st .5^.^^^^. ^^. 



Dates^ 
Dates, 
Dates 



2nd_ 
3rd. 
itth 



Re I i g I on /^p/^d 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fratarnltlas, etc. >v/7a/^ 



Dates_ 

Dates 

Dates 



Dates 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother 7^^^^, y^,^^,,^ ^,^^ . ,-^^.^^^^^. ^ate^^ ^^ ^^^^ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 



B. Grandmother (your father's sida) 
If dead, date of death 



Place of birth f^j ^^^,o^,.i^rJ . &j. 



Currant Residence /t/^/?.^;^^ ii^^,- .^..-A-^^a^ 2"//. 
_^^^ Date of b\TX.h u^kJJ^^c^.^ 



Education (number of years): 
grade school y y/?. high school^ 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat i on (s) 

1 s t^^.^ /^Ac.'cA y Ac^^c ^ :^e. 
2nd P'^,^-^ M^.-J 



Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1 s ^ 3j.-^s^a ^j. ^Da tes_ 



kth 



Dates /f ^-/ 

Oates^/£_££i_ 

Dates 



2nd m, i£. J. jr,,. 



Ird-R^AL^J.jr,. 



Dates /5^y-r 
__Dates,2£ii- 



i»th 



Dates 



Religion /^^/^Xs/ 



t Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. A/^/yg 



Place of marriage to your grandfathe r^^^.^^^^^ ^^ DATE /,^ - /9^^ 

'^°^*- ll^arat^Sfi*fh»*6a«'«f**tii^? Pi?] Vj)f "•P'^ther or another relative gi 



A- I 



Siepgrandfather (your father's side) 



Current Residence 



n.mr 

If .l.-.ifl. 


-1. 

bl 

o ( 
chc 

onl 


ic of dea 
nh 


tT> 






Date of Birth 


Place of 








Ediic.it io 
giade s 

Occupat 1 

Ut 


number of 

K)l 


years 


) 
high school 




vocational college 


s) 




Dates 


1st 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 


2nd 








Dates 
Dates 
Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


)rd 








_ 3rd_ 
_i.th_ 


Dates 


4th 








Dates 


Religion 









Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc._ 



Place of marrlaga to your grandmothar 



"TilT 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your fathar't fida) 



I • 



I f dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth 



Currant Residence^ 
Data of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion (s) 
1st 

2nd 

3rd 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



lst_ 
2iid 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 



Dates 



3rd 



J)ates_ 
Dates 



Re 1 1 g i on 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



I 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Residence 



Name^/,^^ .T^.v^ Current 

I f dead, date of death ^-^y- /y-^-/ 

Place of bl rth 7Z</?jj// c:c,iM^^ /^j. Date of birth /.^ a/^^, /-sfy^ 

Education ( n umbe r o f ye a r s ) •: 
grade school b vai, >^>gh school vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving horrte) 
<9t F^A^^K Dates /;4 Isf/w^^// '^^vA jl^. ^&x.^%^^^(^„,^^ 

2nd ^^^^rA^.- Dates ^-^^-^-/ 2 nd -^^3^^^ ,^x. Dates g-^, ^ 

3rd D ates 3 rd D ates 

^th Dates '♦th Dates 



RellglonT^W- ^ 

Pol i tical parties, cTvTl or social clubs, fraternities, etc. M^^e^/c' 



Place of marriage to your grandmother -r: ,^,^ ,y ^-^ ^y /2^, ^ ,' . ^ate / 

Note: If your mother was raised by a SLBpfai l U r O f Y n UlMi r le l ai l VB ( tO a ge 18} 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name y^<,g. lac- flWl^M^ C urrent Residenc e 

I f dead, date of death /;^ -^ - yy — ^— — — — — — — — — — — — 

Place of birth y^/tp// (?e.cfL^/j D ate of h\rt\\ /9 JZ^e /^^r/ 

Education (number of years) 
grade school ^^/f^<,^t^^ high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

\^^ FaAM L^hz,A- /Jccc^c u:),-C D ates z./g \%t ~TTjox>r-// /':^.-^-lu /<'f'c^^^ D ates 

2nd D atas 2 ft d D ates 
3rd ^Dates 3rd ^Dates 



Re 11 g I on /5^^/y.; / /. 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, e tc « Ms^'ifi .^^a i^ lea /., )^> a^a/j . d^z/eJ 

Place of marriage to your granofatna rTVx'/;..-// 4'f^^/y' ^^^dc^^'^cr. ' •' ^ ^^^ Ufik/^OLdyj 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another r*iafi"« (t? 25; TsJ 



y • »v i.iia» 



Jai.a on cne oaCK Of this page (0-2) 



C-l Srepgrandfather (your n>other's side) 



Nome 

I f <)o.id. <\aif of d*!atK 



I'l.H. ••! Iiiilh 

I •liii .il !••>■ (iiimiluT 'iT y<ir J 
•li.i.lr -.ili.H.I I'iyI' school 



Oitupot l»)o(s) 

Is I 

?nd 

Ud^ 

kth 



Dates 



Dates 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



Current Residence 



D.ilc ol l>i I III 



vocol ion J I 



col lci)»' 



l5t_ 

2nd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



3rd 



'ith 



Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandtTK)thdr_ 



dat6 



Dates 



Dates 
Dates 



0-7 Stcpqr.mdmolhiT (your mother's side) 



N.ywe 

I f (lejd, <l.jlr of death 



Pl.iCf of bl rl U 
Education (number of years) 
grade- school high school 

Occupot ion(s) 

IM 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Current Residence 



Date of bl rth 



vocational 



col lege 



lst_ 

_2nd_ 

3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Re I i fj i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Dates_ 

Dates 

Dates 



Date 



CHIICPREN or A 6 B vor A- 1 or 8- ! ) ' your father's name should appear below 

Name ^7^^ v,^ f^g^^ A'ca,^A 

Place of birth_^„^ .^^ ^^^, daf^f ^^ ..^.^ /y,^ 

Resldence^A^v ^^. Marital Statut ^^^^/^^ 

Numbe r of en 1 1 oren //^ 

I ' ace of blrth^^^ .,^^^. d'te^^^^^.,^ 

Number of years of schoolin g y^y^ Occupat!6h/„. ...,■:-: 

Residenc e? .^/.7 .„. ^^^^H.r l t. l Sut u . /I;..,, ^"'"^•"^^ 

Number of chl Idren 4> 

Place of bl rth .^^/^... -^ y ^x date .yWv,^^ 

Number of years ot schoollrtfl y^y^ -— OccMpat^On ^^^^.^ 

Residence ^;^y c7^^^ /9/./ "arltal Statul ^^^r^;^/ 

Number of chl Idrtn / 

Name /^^ze// A-^g^f 

Place of birth ^p.y,,.fj^g date /W.v.^v 

Number of years of schooling ^^y^; Occupatlbrt ;^^^^^^//e 
ResldencepW ^e^/^..^.. /^„v Marital Status ^^^..^.y*'" 
Number of children / 

Name /^^. A //^^^ 

Place of birth .5^3^.^ ,^^ dat^ ^^.r^^,...^ 

R>r^;in^!-^'T/°/ '^""^''"^^j^i^^^ Oc^u^tl6rr7J^..^>.w 

Resldenc e^,y4W^;r7^, Marital Status ^7,v^^,v^ 

Number of chl Idr^h / _ -***— i— «-_— _ 

Place or blrth^^^-,. ^^. Jato .../..... 

Number of years of school I (l g\^ ^.^^ Occupatieh»/:,^^:-<^:-v' 

Resldence^^..//.W.^./. ^ ^^'^ Marital Status ... /ir ^ ^^'^ 
Number of children ^~ 

Place of blrth^^^^^^-^^. date.^-^_..^ ,^ .-, 

Number of years, of school I rtfl /s v^'/^ OccupatUhV^:;^^ L,.;^ 

Name 

Place of birth d ate 

Number of years of school! ng "^ ccupatfoh 

Residenc e Marital Status '' ' 

Number of chl Idren 

Name 

Place of bl rth — 1 . . ^^^^ 

Number of years of schoollrt g 'Occupattort 

•^e* ' dence Wrttal Status ^" — ' 

Number of chl Idren ' 

Name^ 

Place of birth d^jg 

Number of years of ichoollftg Occupation 

Residenc e HarH-* ! g«-. >r.. 

Number o r Ul ll U r w i "•ritai Status ^ 



CHILUREN •»! '. and D (or (-1, 0-I)-your mother's runic should appivir below 



I . N.H» 



I'l.n •• i.r I.I I til -y-r.y ^ , ' 



NMniii«-i 'if ■/♦•.If-, ol '.(. M(Xi I I rir| r ^^^ 
NiiHrfiri fil iliM(lr«n ^ 



.III 



' f^,K^fiVrt<'<i'<r.< /?^^ 



Marital Status ^^^xyl-V 



"•" j{<,g/v, ui^^i 



TTi.r, 



•''■ ri...it. ^ ,,,:..,•.-. w 

Nunii>«-r o! yi-.irs of school mq ^ ^ ^- 

Number nf cnildren _ 



Place (»r birtn "^^-^■^ ' 



Number of years of school inq 



"cs i«Jencc 
Numbe 



i > ^^ 



r of ch I Idren , 



P I .I...- ..r l.irth ^^^^/ V^ -v ^ 
Numl>ri i»r years of school inq / r 



Rf. iderir.c tC'--'.- ^/ 
NuMber «if rnildren 



^ jQ ,r<rt 



M^r of blrthJ27.^,r . ,,, 
Number of yeors of schooling 



Kes idence /iV , ,-^ 4 
Nuiii»)rr of children . -*> 



I. ICC of birth <c >-,^ , 3 



Number of years of, schooling /^, ,^^.^- 
NumJicr of ch i Tdren ^ 



Place of birth <-f^^ 



Number of^jtars of scnooTing 

Res i dcnce7| We. ^^;^^-^ ^^^ 
Number of children 2 



/r ,h<ff-ii 



8. Name 

Place of birth 

Number of ye<irs of schooling 



Res i dencc 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



3. Name 

P lace of bi rth 



Number of years of school Ing 

Reildence 

Number o f ~cTm"37err~~~~'~~~~~ 



10. Name 

P lace of birth 



Number of years of school Ing 
Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



Occupation /r^^^^.^-" 
Marital Status m^aaJ^J 



date ,^ ;Z.. Z^t-H 
TJ^ccupatToJT^^^^ZZZI 



Marital Status ^^^^.^^ 



Occupatibrt-/,^^,^,.-/, 



Marital Status v;^^^,^.'^ 



da te ;^^, v^^yA /f/^ 



Occupatlor;^^^/,^^^^/^^^^^^^ 
Marital Status <;;^ /^ 



date /. a{^»^^^/^^ /<^ X^ 

Occupat I Ort,V/r„.^ TF^^^,^ 
Marital Status ^^^.y./ 



- OccupatlOn^^^^^,^.^^y^ 
__ Marital Status ^,y^^/^^ 



date 



"T^ccupatlort 
Marital Status 



date 



_^__^__^ Occupat lOh 
Marital Status 



date 



_^^__^ Occupation 
Marital Status 



Your Father 



ame 75';^^v/> A^f^/f //i>,J^^rt 
f dead, date of death ' 



Name 
I 



Current ResMence /1/J,^^^ /^^. 



Place of birth 7f^^^.^^^g^V/^, 
Education (number of years) 
grade school 3 i//?js 

Occupatlon(s) 



high school 



_Date of birth ;?y ^....y /y/^. 
^ vocational H ya^ c ol lege_ 



1st A^^^ty^/i> 



,Dates^^f^' 



PUCE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st -S^^^^^, ^^, Dates ^;..:^^ 



Dates z?' v,^ 



2nd /^^/^^^ /,Ji>A/ce< 
3rd/'^^^/^^^_/:^v ,,fr.^A^^ Dates /^y^^. 

Dates 



2hd.^^^,£^j^ 



.SJZi 



ttth 

Re 1 1 9 1 on 



i»th 



^Dates /^^^ 
Dates f-yo-y 



Dates 



/K^/Ktf 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. A/o/^e 



Place of marriage to your mothe 
HOTE: If you were raised by a step 
of this page. (E-2) 



Your Mother 



tepfather or anotner relative give tnat data on the back 



><ame Lu.£ :/„. ^/^f-^^. Current Residence /J//,j^^ /^^. 

If deaa , date of death ' ' 



(number of years) 



Place of bi rth 
Education 
grade school _ ^ y ^^ 

Occupation(s) 

ist/i,,.^^^;/; 

2nd f^t/J^e^^ /.Ua/.^< 
3'-d y^/V ■ / 



Date of birth /-/ SeoJ^A^., /9j?d 



high school / y*?^ 



vocational 



col lege 



Dates /93D^ 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st ^^S5g>g^^. P^tes ^p,^^^ 



Dates /^^X. Ind^^^iC^J, T7/. 
,Dates^f/^^ 3rd ///A^.^£^. 



Dates /f »-^.., 
_Dates^^/^,^^ 



Re 11 9 
Poli 



tical party, ci 



vl 1 or social clubs, sororities, etc f/qA/c^ 



Place of marriage to your fathe r "7AMd// Acua//,> ' i^k', 

NOTE: If you were raised by a s t epmo the r o r ano the r re 1 a 1 1 ve g I ve 

I this page (F-2). 



that data on the Dacl< of 



E-1 Sf pf«thcr 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth D ate of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



0ccupatlon(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nci Dates 2nd D ates 

3rj Dates 3 rd D ates 

'iih Dates ^ th D ates 

R« llgion 

Polltica-r pifilieJ, divll t>r 50«lll clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother , D at< 

f-2 Stepmother 





Name 








Date of birth 




i 

9 
r 


If deaJ, Jate of death 

Place of birth 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupat ion(s) 

1st Dates 




__ vocational 
1st 




i 

i 


col lege 






PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 


Dates 


•• 
r 


2nd Dates 




2nd 
3rd 
sororities. 


etc. 




Dates 




3rd Dates 
R« 1 iglon 


Dates 




KoiiticaT parly, "cTvil or social c 


ubs. 












Place of marriage to your father 








date 





CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



'■ of b I rth j5^:s^t-x' <:^' 



Name 

Place _ 

Number of years 

Res ide 

Numbe 



r of years of school In 

ence^.^j/l^J. IT//. 
r of chi Idren J? 



:hoollng ^^ y^^. 



"PaTe of h\TX.h :i3M^a/.L /f 39 
Occupa 1 1 on ,<S^,//, v^^ A c^.: 



Marital Status ^^^^/^^ 



Name ^-/U/ AA^v^.?r ///'x5 



Place of birtti p^<^djr 4-^. 
Number of years of school Ing_ 

«eb i dence^/^y^, /g^ . ^ 

Number of cnlldren 7 



/^ y^.-i. 



Date of blrth /^-? />/^.^g/^ /^^/ 
Occupat i on M^;^ 



Marital Status -tPii/caeeJ 




„„„ v.. years or icnooiing <rv/a5. 

Res i dence/^:. v.gy /?^>.;^ H^. 

Number of ch I Idren ^ 



Date of birth^^^^.^^y4..^ /9^/Z 

Occupation ^T^^^/ A^Uca 



Marital Status Mjt^/zJek 



I of birth ''^^^ce/i , 



'£ 



Hame 

P 1 acr"5r Vlrtli ^3t^^^ ^^ 

Number of years of schooling ^ y/i-j 



Res i dence/:^,^9^/v /^cu.^;^ />. 
Number of children r5 



Date of b i r t h^j? :5^^^^U^ /96'V 
Occupat I on j,^,,, ^ ^ ^^;fe 
Marital Status ^^/y^,> ^ 



Name /^^/^y /-//>^^XjtI 
Place of brrth /fg^/7tf 



■f^c/Alcari, TT// 



riace or oirm /r^^y^^^^^ . . 
Number of years^or scnoolln 

Res i dence;^^,'i/^^^^r7/. 
Number of cnlTdrftn y 



ML^^Uil. 



Date of btrtU ^y ^/u /y /9^/-f 

Occupa 1 1 6n^^^^^/^ ^^^^ 

Marital Status ^/^^^^g.^ 



Name-^^^^v ^7g^V ,^/r^ 
Place of -birth ^^c/r/-i>^J. 



Number of yea 
Res i de 
Numbe 



rs of school 11 



r of years of schoo 
r of en I Idren 2 



JU^, 



\^^a, .... 



Date of blrth ;?^/^/ /7 y^ 

_ Occupa t i on /Tjr^. J.^^^ /^;^aA 

Marital Status ^^^^/^^ 



e of birth J^jn, ,// /^^u ^ J.y A-jr 
er of years of schooling 



Name 

P 1 ace 

Number of years o< 

Res i dence ^/..^^y ^^ 

Number of chi Idren ji/i,//c. 



/f y/!fi 



U^ft7of birth;^;?/g^././.^ /y^-/? 
Occupat I on^^v^^.^,-^^^.^ 



Occupat 1 or\ /^^^M^/fy 
TTarital Status cr/^c/^ 



Name f^/yjy?/,, /^y "^^^/v^^^y 
Place of bii^th .^^S5-^w ^^ 



. _. - ■ ■ . . ._^^ .^^'/^ ^^ 

Number of years of schooling (:Z yjg 'i 
Res i dence .V/Z^^v^,^^. 
Number of children / 



Date of b! rth /y ^5>,y^.vZ^^ /F^-.^ 

• Occupation ;^a^<^z>^//^ 

Marital Status yi^^>>^/^y 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

1 her(4)v donate this family history, along with all literary and ^<J'";^'y'^'"I-;j" 
n']hts. to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, depositod m the 
Roclcford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



Signed 

Date _Z^2-Ai£j/^.^-Ad.A.-..ll-f-y. 



ffl 



GENEALOGY CHART 



I", 



Father 

M/i'//' 5 7 
D 



Mother 



Grandfather 



Grandjmotner 






Grandfather 

B /^ ■*^^/ /ir-^y 
M 



Grandmother 
D 






Great grandfather 

B 
M 
D 



Great grandmother 

B 

D 



S R C E S 



flennie Irank Howard 1 atlier 

Lucile Howard Llothcr 

Annie Lee ..ashiniiton Aun"c 

Carrie Jones Aunt 

John Henry Jeanc Uncle 



ioREiwORiJ 



Even thou£;h the iniomation here may seem spase ior a 
lamily History toaCiiground, and some d^^tes may be incon- 
tradiction v.ith others, I vould lix>e to say this project 
has had quite an eiiect on ae. I never helore gave thought 
as to hov> little I ^mew about ay laaily, and as I searched for 
information, I was surprised ho\7 little they Colder member o.. 
the family) knev/ of the History oi our laiaily, jiay Paternal 
grt,ndmother passed away before I completed this project and 
the new awareness caused by this atjsignzient coupled with how 
little I knew about my grandmother had a profound impact on sie, 



Paternal Grandfather 



iuy Paternal Grandfather James Brantly, v.as a _anaer all his 
life ajad at one time ovmed his ovm farm land, in Brov.-nv/ood , 
Georjia, However, he lost his land through incurred debts 
and tv/o or three bad crop years, I never Icnev/ much ab^ut 
my Grandfather nor did his own children, I say thin because 
my c^uert for infonaation they could not tell me anything a- 
bout hie- background, I don't knov; his reason but n^ne oi 
his children were educated to any extent, not even to their 
present day standards ^or Blacks. Some guecs at their a^e 
and the others siaply have no idea. My lather told me ior 
instance that he arrived at his a^e when he was drafted in- 
to the iiavy. 

They also have no knowledge o.v him ever attending church or 
Religious Services, apprantly he did not trust or believe 
in Social Institutions, 



Paternal Grandmother 



l\y Grandmother Uinnie Lee Jaclcson v.-as "born the iVionth oi 
January (, i)he month ;7as her clioice). She clamed she v;cS hall 
Indian, but '. e never really knev. lor sure. She met my Grand- 
lather, v.'hen her mother died and she came to live with her 
married sister, v.'ho ax the ticie lived not to - ar fi'om my 
Grandfather fuiaily. Alter a shcrt courtship was married, 
luy Grandiiiother ..as hieved to ae about lourtcen or iilthteen at 
that time and iron tall:s with her, I think she lelt that her 
sister iorced her into marriage so she vvould'nt have to support 
her. 

i lovod my Grandmother very much and use to visit with her quiet 
often and \.e T.ould la gh and tal.. a lot but I never a£>ked her 
about her past und she never talked about it veiy auch. 
dhe passed avjay wi.ile c-sleep Ijovember 8, 1974 and as i have 
stated, i never realized hov/ little 1 knew about her until 
her death. 



MI PATERNAL GRAKDPARENTii LUE TOGETHER 



As i have stated my i^ra.ni-r rants met when ay grandiaother 
came to live with her married sifter and my ^rundprants 
aarri£i£e vras an econouic diciaion. After they were mcrried 
they continued to live v ith hip folks lor a nuuber oi years, 
I could »nt get any information as to how aiy 
Cirandfp-ther accquired his land, maybe it v/as left by his 
father. As near .-.i- I can li^sure he lo^'t it during the de- 
pression, luy Grandparents then moved to the area oi Terrell, 
County Geori;ia, where he qaw. his family worked as sharecroper^i 
and fai'uer labor? c, Houseing and living c-^nditions \,ere 
ci..ite primitive. Old wood irame houses vdth tin roofs Y/ere 
very cold in vrinter and the hot sun beaiain^ on tin roofs was 
some what imbrearable in the Summer months. 

My Paternal Grandparents lile together was one of 
hard work and survival, they reared their children ^ore often 
than not iroa their ^rhe c--ilclren; , ovai labor. 
My Grandlather died in the ISbO's and my Grandmother after 
his cieath, moved to Illinois, v;here she died iioveinber 8, 19V4, 



m lATHER 



Uy lather Bennie 1 rank Hov/ard, and I suppose you noticed 
the sunaame is di-lerent than his lathers, uo one scens 
to know v.hax happend here, but we do ha-ve noae 16 ca, 
Ly lather's criildhood -.vt^s one ol laoctly v:ork on the iar-i 
and very little ed Ci-tion, The only tiaie he attended 
school was when the weather 7;^s bad or in the I all oi the 
year v.-hen the crops were all in. 



I Could •nt ^^ez any information about ay Grc^nd parents caild- 
hoods, apparently there is no records iu either laoily, 
lay Liatemal (irandj-atiier was i~ ixan ol aanj'' talents. A farmer, 
Preac-ier, and a go between in his community ol the white and 
the blachr. iie was not a sharecroper he rented his land. 
There is a great different here. A person or 1 suould say 
lilack aan v,no had the ability to -ent kept his own books and 
records and he kuew v/hat hie profits v.ere, A sharecropers 
I'ecords v.ere kept by the land owner and when the crops were 
all in he just gave you what he v;anted, no question asked. 
lAy Maternal Grandfather v.as quite presperoue he, had four boys 
and he hired people to do fara labor xor nim, he seldom dia 
farm labor himself, althou£;h I suppose he did as a child, 

I say he, \;as a Preacher but I never i elt he 
was a hij^hly Kelijious person. He, soui;ht oi used the church 
to let the blacks people know what the white mans law was :or 
him. iny Grandfather v;as the ciiild oi a v;hite man, his skin 
was very lii^ht and he had ^reen eyes, utr'in^ly enoUt^h he al- 
ways drove a big automobile, and he educated his children to 
what ever extent they v.anted, Two dau£;hters went to Gollei^e, 
one, ^rauduated and one for two years. Alter his children £jreT»' 
up and le_t home he had to _ive up j-armini^-. He moved in vith his 
oldest daUi_hter where he lived until his death Au^just 28,1957. 



MY LiATERliAL GRAI'iDLiOTHER 



..iy Latenial Grandmother born June 19, 1337. la remembered as 
a very Uelisious person and a devoted mother by her children. 
They knovi little o^ her ciiildhood or background. I never re- 
ally ..new her .or I was very youn^, at the tiiue c-he died Dec- 
ember 3# 1944. iShe lived her liie mostly in the background ol 
her husband who as I understand v/.ts very protective of her. 



MY MATERNAL GRANDPARAi^Tii LI.E XOGLTHER 



liy Maternal Grandparents life together was one of plenty 
compared to my Paternal Grandparents. As I have stated my 
Maternal Grandfather was a very good provider .or his 
family, ne ov/ned lots o- cattle hogs and horses, smoiie 
houses of cured meat and molasses and grain. About all 1 
could oet from ay mother is tliat their life toi^ether ?/as 
one plenty, a very good life. 



UY MOIHioRii CHILDHOOD 



Liy Mothers Childhood was one o . average jor black children 
at that time. The diiferents bein£ she could attend school 
everyday il she lii:ed. If joxx did'nt v.iah to attend school 
you had to v/ork in the fields all day, if she attended 
school she still worked in the iield after school, 
£uy mother and father aet at school on one oi the lew days 
he could attend and eveiitu.elly they v='ere married. 1 ai^ht 
ac-d againct htr fathers Vrill, 



m PARENTS LUE togethlr 



My liother and lather met at a high school basketball ^i^me 
and a.ter a lone, but, diilicult courtship ^difficult because 
they lived miles apart). They were married December 11, 1937. 
I'hey lived v/ith my lathers parents ior tiuoe years. My Mother 
told me that condition were very crov;ded and there was veiy 
little privtcy. 

My Parents finally moved out to lara on their oim and their 
family began. ILy lather was drafted into the Kavy sometime 
during laorld War 11. At that time my v/as expecting her fourth 
child. 

After my lathers tour of duty with the liavy he moved the 
family to Kockiord, Illinois, Vihere v.e did quite well, hov;- 
ever my Liother and rather never could ad;just to city so they 
moved baok to Georgia, to the farm, i must aduit I think it 
was a very bad move. 

There v/as a time in the iiouth when a bi^- family could do 
quite well but then larming became more mechanize and there 
v/as no need ior the lar^^e family s, v/e began to catch hell. 
All the ,Lids old enough to v/ork at any job available had to 
to work. There v/as little time ior school. We just sort of 
existed irom year to year, Ue would work and live any place 
we could, it was a very hard li.e espescially alther living 
in Rockford, te moved back to Georgia in 19A9t and I did*nt 
get back until 19cO. 



MY LIxE 



I think l*ve pretty liuch deseribed my lile up to IS'^9, 
That's the year 1 caxie bacK to Illinois, I came back to 
Chicago, v.ith a cousin who had driven aouth to aii Uncles 
lurni-1. 1 lived there lor about 8 months. 1 could 'nt -et a 
TOO 1 moved to Kockiord, hov/ever 1 had met my future ?,-ife 
T/hile in Chicago who was Irom Alabama, After I found v/ork 
I would take the bus back to Chicago, every v.ce,v to see her, 
I think unhappinese with this situation caused us somewhat 
oi an eu.rly marriatie. We got married June 23, 19t2, And 
about two v/eeks later 1 was dralted into the Army for zyio 
years. 

After my Army duty 1 ceune back to Kocklord, and in 19^3, 1 
started v/ork lor Chrysl,er Corp, 1 cim nov. attending Uockvally 
Colledge on Veterens Benefits, 1 have two Ciiildren, A son 
five years old and a daughter lour years old. And we are a 
very hapi,y taiiily. 



HOXIE, NEIL J 19^19- 



EASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

ar Contributor to the t^OCk Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
erican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
M mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
cess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ***;'c;':>VA-A>VA;'tAA;'c-,'c-.VAAi':A*Vc:">A-.'c;V-,V 

^' OFFICE USE CODE 

1. Your name /l/£^J- /ybK/B * 

Date of form ^ _ ^^^ * (ID fl ) 

,/^i^. 3^i /77Y 

2. Your college: Hock Valley f.ol lege ■'■ (ID // ) 

Roc kTord, Illinois -• 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. • 

^Before 1750 / 1750-1800 I 800-1 850 

1850-1900 1900 or later ; 

! 

'4. Please check all regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you \ 

have discussed in your paper have lived. 

^New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) y/h liddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) ; 

^ South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., s'c.) y/ E ast South Central (La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K^i I 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., Ok.) ^ East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 

^4/ Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 

— ^ — 3 

5. Please check al 1 occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have i 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. j 

/ Farming Mining _L/_Shopkeeping or small business 

^ T ransportat ion ^Big Business Manufacturing 1 

^ P rofess ions y/ lndustrial labor y/T lther ' 

6. Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

V Roman Catholic Jewish ^Presbyterian ^Methodist . 

Baptist Epi scopal ian Congregational y Lutheran 

Q uaker M o rmon ^ O ther Protestant ^Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks Indians y/ M exi cans ^Puerto Ricans 

Jews Central Europeans Italians ^Slavs 

>y Irish y/' B r i t i sh \/ N at i ve Americans over several generations 
^East Asian ^ O ther 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

^Interviews with other Family Bibles ^Family Genealogies 
. f ami ly members 

1/ V i t a 1 Records Land Records T he U.S. Census 

^^P hotographs M aps V^O ther 



\ 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name Fg^MK BVAfe V-lo.>^J> 
If dead, date of death T^eCEM^R \ 



Current Residence 



Place of bi rth E^VAOoR)f\ , VOXV^Sf^S Date of Birth //f^ 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school \\ vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
, (after leaving home) 
Ist ^oAaW. mgy^jT Dates jf{it)^l^^C I st goa<F<bt^b , l^lllAPlSD ates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates 

kth Dates kth ^Dates 

«en9ion_2£oi2^iiV P^^^^^ ^^ZA Q\^ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. V^g'jrY\r^^ rn"T 



Place of Marriage to your grandmothe r j^^^^^^^^^^^,^ I^illNJ^tS ^ ^^^ HU^ 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 



B. Grandmother (your father's side) , . 



Name 14Mr\lAV\ Ul LHiajmSia (CAgLS6U^ C urrent 
If dead, date of death ^sForHBCK \^^'^ 



Residence 



Place of birth Qr.C^^(-.^lb , ^U 1 K\n\^ Date of bi rth (\lK^ l^T (^ .\R^^ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school SQ high school vocational col lege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

•A (after leavi ng home) . 

1st VcMJLt)£.\AllVg. Dates /y/^Vf^ 1st kof kFoPD . 1>ri/(^l.<)D ate 



2nd -^(NcWy VlorUpr Dates \q4-^/yj7 2nd 



s 
Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates_ 

4th Dates Ath ^Dates__ 

Religion Lix\Wran 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Y^^gJ^AOCRi\\ 



Place of marriage to your grandfather (^^l_\/ll^6l<^, ^IJ D^V^ \^ fl 



a. 



^°^^'' lLl°yatHP,*{h'^^^a£^''h^\i\2 pSli^^A-^)! stepmother or another relative give 



A- 1 Slepgrandfather (your father's side) 

N,,nie ^ Current Residence 

I f dead, djte of death 



Place of birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


iith 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates 

'•th Dates ^th Dates 

Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother ' date 

A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 

If dead, date of death "" ~ — — — — — 



Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational ^college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
'5t ^Dates ^s^__ ^Date; 

2"d Dates 2nd__ ^Dates 

3''d ^Dates 3rd ^Dates 

Re 1 i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 




I 3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Al-CNJZO ££(^£5T lAJ£5rhC!gf,LA^^ Current Residence 

If dead, date of death \QJ^3 '~~~~' " 

Place of b i rth ^laviMg-S^Q^ Date of birth QCT 1& \ fig>0 

Education (number of yearsji : 
grade school high school Y. vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

n I \ (after leaving home) 

^st^rm man ^^ates ist o(\\-\fr)ek\m Dates iqjn 

2nd ^hrtMdOjyZjT ^Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd rr£J^\ V}CsX\<iar D ates i^Vj2 -/^f ^3 rd ^Dates 

^th -mXi AC[\/^C ^Dates kth ^Dates 

Religion-Pn4^(7,^0^(\-V \ ■ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. A )(;cX\OC iCXJl V^' 



Place of marriage to your grandmother ^p\^!l i\ HpV^ A C PVUVFORHlA ^*^ 

bLHp r dL ii H r o r dnuitner THlai i vH ' (lo 



Note: If your mother was raised by a Step f aCHe r O F anut n e f Velat l VF ' (tO ag e l8t 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 



ame ^CS£mf\ iTAU^ (^9m\ZP\ C urrent Residence ^AMTA Hf\fl\^ PAUFi^RfJfA 

f dead, date of death ' 

Place of bi rth 16P^QUq^(lA^W^^^J ^ C (\UPa?^llA D ate of bi rth Jnklf, .Ol \ ^R 5 
Education (number of years) 
grade school ."'s high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

V \ \ „ (after leaving home) 

1st rmmV:)£rrf\Gaa ^oates ist OQA\Ur(\va ^oates 

2nd \(\\A.aAre.vexS ^Oates ^2nd ^Dates 

3rd UK>^jCa\ VOrK^r Dates y^^7fj7 3 rd Dates 

Religion ^ {\^^\\ C . \. 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. \j(Z]rAr-O.F(lA \r 



Place of marriage to your grandfather d ate klo\i?in ■ 14 I'j 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age 18) 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 



Name 

I f dead, date of deiith 



Pl.it.- ..I l.irUi 

f <liK.il imi (iitniilMT f>f yci i . ) 
•ir.iilr '.(iMMtl liiijli school 



Occupat ion(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 

Dates 



Dates 
Dates 



Current Residence 



D.ilc- of l>i rtli 



vocal i on a I 



ul Unje 



1st 

2nd 

3rd_ 

^ith 



"el i g I on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



date 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



1 



0-2 Stepgrandmother (your mother's side) 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of bi rt fi 

Education (number of years) 



grade school 
Occupat ion(s) 

I-.! 

2nd 

3rd 



high school 



Current Residence 



Date of bi rth 



vocat ional 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 



Re I i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your grandfather 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Date 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



CHItDREN of A & B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 

Name ^^(\l^E6 lA/AMvS VA(^V I £ 

Place of birth K,y Vrr.^r^\ 1 XL| kloUS date OlT 30 . IQl^ 
Number of years ot schooling |^ , Occupa t i 6h pcnXrAa (A (7 m rNW)P (=- 
Residence Oc^J^re^RC^ ^ Marita l $ta tusJaP^ P_V^\r^^ (^V^l^^r^e^ 
Number of ch i Jdren 4^ *r ^r^v-^v-t , ^ 



k. 



eof birthpr/kfARJ^;V:\\lV\ C.\€. d ate H^N J£S \C^^L^- 
"'■ °f years of schooling U, Occupati6h cyL><- >, 



Name 

Place 

Number of yeai 

Residence J^^/^^, ^ T^,,,,,,-, 

Number of children -, 



Name 

Place of bl rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Res I dence ' 

Number of ch i ldr6n '~~ 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooHng 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Res i dence 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of birth ' 

Number of years ol' school inq 

Res I dence 

Number of L\\ I llJrUM ■ 



: uccupation c/^^^ ^^..^^^.r 

.M-!tal Status yy^^^J:'"^ r^^^^^.r^ 



date 



_^__^__^_ Occupatibn 
Marital Status 



Marital Status 



^date 

Occupatl6h 



date 



_^__^__^_^ Occupatibn 
Marital Status 



"3"at< 



"occupation 
Marital Status 



Marital Status 



date 

Occupat iori 



date 

ITccupatioh 



Marital Status 



date 



____^__^___ Occupation 
Marital Status 



date 



Occupation 
"arltal Status 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C- I , D-l)-your mother's name should appear below 

'• '*r' ^r-' '^■'"^■' '-"^-^^ '-^^r/ 

Nu»J„.r ... yr.M-. o/sc h.n, I 1 ,.., - ^-^ / ,i^ ^V^, ^^ ^ ^ ^ Occun at ,on ' V'. ^^^. " 

Nu^ber o.^rrff^^lf^H^^^'^ Mant^l-Sla tus <^^^^,rr/ 



2. None 

P I ac f>f birth 



3. Nar« 

Place of birth 



Name 

Place of birth 



6. Name 

Place of bi rth 



7. Name 

Place of bi rth 



iO. Hamft 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years ot schooling g-ccun^TT^ 

'''^ "^*""_-^_ Marital Stat.,. 

Number of en i Idren ~ " — — ^ 



date 



Number of years o^ schooling -" ITccunaTT^ 



esidence —————__ ■ ^ i f 

M . \ — r-r-T-j Marital Status 

Number of children 



*•. Name 

Place of birth ~ ■ t 

Number of years ot sctiool i ng ~~ n^^,. r,^^-^ " 

Res i H^nro ^ . , Occupa 1 1 On 



Residence i3 r— — i — ^ ^ 

M..mi,- ( — T'-rj ■ ______ Man tal Status 

Number of children 



Number of years o^ schooling " " pr-/^'"^-.—- 

Residence n—, = Occupat.6rt_ 

u . , 1 1 1 Marital Status 

Number of ch i Idren — •:>i.dLU5 



Number of years of schooling — 7\ '^ff^- 

Residence ~a — • ^Occupation 

Number of children " — Marital Status 



date 



Number of years o^ schooling ~ — r, r- 

Residence — • — - Occupati(jn_ 

Number of ch ! Idren ^ Marital Status 



Name 

Place of birth ' ~ ■ 

Number of ye.rs of schooling " ■ r— '''''^^— 

Residence ,. Occupation 

Number of ch i Idren "^ 



Marital Status 



Name 

Place of birth " ■ ■ _ 

Number of years of schooling " " ^^'^ ,— 

Residence ■ OccupatiCrt 

Number of chi Idren" .Marital Status " 




Number of years of schooling ' K ''^^^- 

Residence — Occupation 

Number of children " ' ^""''^^^ Status_; 



Your Father 



Name .'TAPn^S, ^ . J-JniCtc Current Residence ^ncJ<'roX</.J'//, 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth /focJ(rc/?</ , IZ^/ ^ ^Date of birth /)(^ "^ , /^/9 

Education (number or years) 
grade school high school /X vocational ^college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

^ _j, (after leaving home) 

1st jr///A/^/< L£M^/y Dates /^p-M^f^ 1st 3o1{, L^UJ/y-/)/^/^ /^^<f D ates /^47 ' 



2nd Dates 2nd Ddtes_ 

3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates_ 

ijth ^Dates kx.\\ ^Dates 

Rel.g.on /UJA^J^j 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. ihf/^^C/^y^ 



Place of marriage to your mother ^ </i^v7A /Xf/f^/M^ /'Mj,/f: d ate ^"^^ ^ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another re Tat ive give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name i/(l'/A /V- /~/oX^I^ Current Residence AcCA^y9<Jr j -2,// 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth ^/fjl/J/) /pl/?l/^ (^^^ I^ate of bi rtb 4»^; /t^.;?,^' 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college ^^^/) 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

P (after leaving home) 
1st /h^^if CQ'Jt^ Dates /^v/^7 1st ^dl^ J^1iMJV/J/lL^ /^l^- D ates 

2nd <:^hM/ /(^^cACK Dates /^/— 2nd ^Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates_ 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. /Jf/^^C '^ / 



?\aceof ^^rr\^<,e toyour f^th^r ^/^,1/r/? X^^f/^ Y^^^^- \ ^^^^ "^"^f ."7^ 
NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 

this page (F-2). 



E- 1 Stepfather 



N3~>e 

\ '' Jead. date of death 



Place of birt h ^Date of birth 

Education (number of years) "~" ~ 
grade school high school vocational college 

OccupationCs) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
'^» Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd 



Dates 



3''<1 Dates 3rd Dates 

'*^*'.„ Dates _/4th Dates 

Re I i g t on -^ 



Political parlies, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your mother ~~ ~ ' ~~ Date 

F-2 Step«TK)ther 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth D^^e ^p ^irth 

Education (number of years) ' ""—"" 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLace OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 



-t^^te^ . 1st Dates 



Dates 2nd 



^rd^ Dates 3rd 

Re I I g I on ^^— — — __ _ 

Political parly, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your father ~ ' clatF" 



Dates 
Dates 



IHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

lame Si/^/\/ Arc^Jt^ 

'lace of bi rth <^/'> >n^/f//^ . ^'J^,.^ 
lumber of years of 'schooling 



les i dence 

lumber of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



Date of birth ^ /^J /^.j^ _ ^/^y 

Occupation ^i^ /9'^^ 



lame ^ /^/^/?/ /^X/g \^'^^./rl 
'lace of birtK /?j<:/<'F^pD rti. 
lumber of years of schooling ^ 



DlTe of birth /^^ /f ^(^ 
Occupat i on /^y„.^^J, ^J. " 



lumber of years of schooling _,_,__ 

;es i dence AJJ ju/i^k^^ /^, ,r..]u..,^ Marital Status /^^^^.ggr 

lumber of chi Idren ' g. 



ame A^^//. {J. /-Jax/e 



'lace of birth /Qr„ *c^^ri r//. 
lumber of years of schooling /,5 
les i dence /7octrb/^<y > -^'f- 



lumber of chi Idren 



-Q- 



of birth /Pac.,''/> 



lame 

•lace ____^_ 

lumber of years of s 



./^f^'/aft/ , ■^' 



chool in 



ies i dence Jig-^^ f./Ty ^ 7>,.-^>? 
Jumber of chi Idren ' h 



ZijL 



lame ^{^^ ^ • ^ ^-^ ^<^ [/-/c^/r^l 
'lace of birth ^cJ(thI</7 ^//, 



'^<.> ,^/^- 



lumber of years of schooling /X 



<es 
iumb 



i dence /2r>cJ:/^J . -^/Z." 
ber of children c 



^Date of birth <Z/'"^ //? <i^7 

__^ Occupa 1 1 on Styr/^^f 

Marital Status /V/f/C/C/^o^ 



Marital Status 



Date of birth ^d/. /9f/ 
Occupa 1 1 on ^7^^-. ,.,^-T 



t) r^'^/t-- 



Date of birth jQ^fp /^f? 

Occupation /y*,,^.^..^ y /r/^,^.e,^,'k 



Marital Status y^^/zj^,cicf 



'ilame 

' 1 ace of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

;^es i dence 



Number of chi Idren 



TaTte of bi rth_ 
Occupation 



Marital Status 



tl ame 

? 1 ace of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing_ 

f^es i dence 



Number of chi Idren 



Date of bi rth 



Occupation 



Marital Status 



^ame 

^lace of bi rth 

dumber of years of school ing_ 

^es i dence 



dumber of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth_ 
Occupat ion 



111. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed 



Date __2^^^-^^^2_^^a. 



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BIBLICGRAHiY 



Guinn, J.]'.. A^ Hirstor y of California, Historic Rocord ConpTny. 
Los Inciftles, Caiiforni-i, 190?. 

Hoxie, Jn-i'S. Interviews, I'^rch - april i'.>7^. 

Hoxie, L'^olie. Tho Hoxie FAinily . be.ittio and Company, Fortinnd, 
Ore(;;on, ly^'J. 

hoxie, imth. Inteirviews, March - April ly?^, 

Morrison, .'.n.'rio L, History of San Luis Obi a do Cou nt;yr and ivivironr. . 
Historic Record Gomp-iny. . Los Angeles, Olifomia, I9I7. 



'ri«<f^ I 



THE ONTIVEROS LINE 

I. Juin Pacifico Ontiveros 

The earliest known progenitor of this family line, Juan Pacifico 
Ontiveros was born in Los Angelos County » California, in 1782, It is 
not known when the Ontiveros line emmigrated from Spain to the New 
World, The only foference to his ancestors is a mention of a martial 
background. Juan Pacifico himself joined the Spanish soldiery early 
in life and as a reward for his services was granted a nine thousand 
acre tract of land in Los Angeles County, known as Cajon de San Quan. 
In I856, he sold the ranch and purchased the Tepusquot Ranch of nine 
thousand acres, in Santa Barbara County, California. Though he had 
thirteen children, the name of his wife is unknown. Two of his chil- 
dren were Patricio Ontiveros and Abraham Ontiveros. Juan Pacifico 
Ontiveros died at ninety-five in I877. 
ir. Patricio Ontiveros 

Patricio Ontiveros was bom March 17, 1826, in Los Angeles 
County, California, the son of Juan Pacifico Ontiveros. In I856, 
his family moved from Los Angeles County to Santa Barbara County, 
California, He married Serrano Leonor, a member of a prominent Cali- 
fornia-Spanish family. She died in I898 at the age of fifty-eight 
after bearing fourteen children. 

Patricio Ontiveros was a rancher for all of his adult life. It 
is noted that he was a member of the Republican Party and a Catholic 
who reflected deeply his Spanish background. 

Patricio's children vrere: 

1. Dalphinia, who married Geronimo Carranza. 

2. Rosa, bom February '? , 18^5, in Los Angeles County, California, 
wife of Feliz Carranza, 



3, Sarah, wifo of Miguel Carranza . It is interesting to note 
that these three sisters married three brothers, 

4, Natilia who remained sinfjle. 

5. Charles, husband of Virj^lnia Gonr.alos, 

6. Thomas, who married Paulina Gonzales, Again these two 
Ontiveros brothers married sisters. 

y. iviblo, who was unmarried, 
b. ,>ilo, also unmarried, 
9. Napoleon, unmarried. 
10. Leandro, who also remained xinmarried. Four other children 
died in infancy, 

THE C.lRR.-u-!ZA LINE 
I'. Joseph Carranza 

Joseph Carranza was born in Mexico, the date of his birth unknown. 
He was educated in Mexico and it was there that he married Agapite 
Toros. Ho then moved to San Bomadino County, California, around 
185^, whero at least one of his five children, Geronimo, was born. 
From San Bomadino, he moved to San Luis Obispo, California, and then 
returned to Mexico, living on a ranch in lower California. 

Joseph's daughter, Satumia married Felisciano Ruiz D*Esparza, who 
became governor of Lower California. When revolution overthrew the 
government-, Ruiz D'Esparza, along with Joseph Carranza, was forced 
into exile. Joseph Carranza and his family spent nearly two years on 
the desert island of Guadalupe before they were rescued and brought to 
San Diego. There Joseph died; the year is unkno^-m, probably around 
I873. Agapite Carranza brought the family to Santa Barbara County, 



California, in 1873. 

Joseph's children were: 

1, 3-^turnina. who marriod Folisciano Ruiz D'Esparza. 

2. Goronimo. (I85O - 1920) who mrriod Dolphina Ontivoros. 
J. F^aiz, married to Rosa Ontivoros. (I85I - 1915) 

I*. Kiguel, narriod to Sarah Ontiveros. 
II. Foil 7. Carranza 

Foliz Carranza was born on October ?A . IH5I, in San Luis ObVspo 
County, Ciiifornia. Dviring the first twenty years of his life h« 
shared In the adventure of his father, JoGoph. In the early 1870«s, 
Feilz settled on a small ranch near Sisquoc, California. He and his 
wife, Rosa Ontiveros, had seven children. He died around 1915. 

Feliz Carranza 'S children were: 

1. Jose, who married Erminia Carranza, his cousin. 

2. Gerardo, who was unmarried. 

3. Unez Albortina. 

4. Josef a Louisa, who married Alonzo Westmoreland. 

5. Pilar Felicita, who was unmarried. 

6. Odulia, who married Monte Dilie. 

7. Clorinda Rosa, who married Charles Howard. 
III. Josepha Louisa Carranza 

Josepha was bom on June 21, 1893, on a small ranch in the 
Tepesquet Canyon of Santa Barbara County, California. Her mother 
died when she was young, and her father took the family to Sisquoo, 
California. She received an Bth grade education and married Alonzo 
Westmoreland in 1919. 



Californi.n, in I873. 

Josopii's children were:- 

1. Giturnina, who narriod Fclisciino Ruiz D'Esparza. 

2. G^roniino, (I85O - 1920) who marriod Dolpt^ina Ontivoros. 
_}. F'^inz, marriod to Rosa Ontivoro.'?. (IB5I - 1915) 

4. Iliguel, marriod to Sarah Ontiveros. 

II. Foil 7. Carranza 

Fol^^r, Cirr&nza was born on October 21, l'"51. in San Luis Obispo 
County, CTilfornla, During the first twonty years of his life h*^ 
shared In tho adventure of his father, Joseph, In the early lB70*s, 
Feliz settled on a small ranch near Sisquoc, California. He and his 
wife, Rosa Ontiveros, had seven children. He died around 1915 • 

Feliz Carranza'S children were: 

1. Jose, who married Erminia Carranza, his cousin. 

2, Gerardo, who was unmarried, 

3, Unez Albertina. 

4. Josefa Louisa, who married Alonzo Westmoreland. 
3. Pilar Felicita, who was tinmarried. 

6. Odulia, who married Monte Dille. 

V. Clorinda Rosa, who married Charles Howard, 

III. Josepha Louisa Carranza 

Josepha was bom on June 21, 1893t on a small ranch in the 
Tepesquet Canyon of Santa Barbara County, California, Her mother 
died when she was young, and her father took the family to Sisquoc, 
California, She received an 8th grade education and married Alonzo 
Westmoreland in 1919* 



•THE LE/yU)IJ LINE 

Little is knoi-m about the Loamon lino, other than st-itistics, prior 
to Alonzo Westmoreland. The information available was collect ed by 
Alonso Wcotmoroland, 

I, Jacob Loamon 

Bom October 27, 1789, in Baltimore, Virginia, he married 
Sussannah M, Smith on October IB, I8I9, in Barron County, Kentucky. 
Sussannah was bom on March 1^, 18')1, in Tennessee. Jacob Loamon h-ad 
one known con, James G. Leamon. Jacob died on June 6, lb?!, In MetcalT 
County, Kentucky. Sussannah died on July 22, Ib/l. 

II. James G. Leamon 

Bom December 5. 1820, he died July 2tt, ltt95. He married M&ry E. 
Branstetter on November 19, IcWb. Mary was bom July 23, 1^28; she 
died February 2j), loy2. They had one known daughter, Melissa E. Leamon, 
IIX. Melissa Leamon 

Bom October 2'/, 185?, in Metcalf Coiinty, Kentucky, she married 
White W, Westmoreland. 

THE WESTMORELAND LINE 

I. White W. Westmoreland 

The first known member of the Westmoreland line. White W, 
Westmoi'eland, was bom on April 2, 18*44, in Tentressa, Tennessee. He 
Married Melissa E. Leamon on February l^, IbV^, in Metcalf County, 
Kentucky. They had seven children. White Westmoreland was a subsis- 
tence farraar. He died on March 20, lbb5; Melissa died on September 7, 
188?, in Metcalf County, Kentucky,' 

White Vfestmoreland's children were: 

1. Millard (1875 - 19^3) 



2. Ilircus (la76 - 1077) 

3. Tony R. (laya - 7) 

^. Aionzo E. (1879 - 1963) 

5. Dowey E. (1501 - Y) 

b. A. G. Blaino (lob3 - I89O) 

7. ASaral, A. (1UB6 - 1893) 
II, Alonso V/estmoreiand 

Alonzo Westmoreland was born on October It), lb79t in Kentucky, 
presumably In Hetcalf County, At a young age he was orphaned. Ho 
lived for a while with his mother's sister who treated him cruelly. 
After that he and three brothers moved in with his maternal uncle, 
John Leamon, who accepted the responsibility of raising him in spite 
of the fact that he himself was a newly married younfT man, iVlonzo 
was thus raised and received an education of approximately eleven 
yeats in Pensperville, Kentucky, 

Aroun<3 I90O, Alonzo foxind his way to California, riding the 
rails and talcing odd jobs . He worked in Los Angeles County as a farm 
hand and store keeper. In approximately 1905t ^® worked his way to 
Hawaii on a steamer. He returned to California shortly thereafter 
and married Josepha Carranza in I9I9, in Santa Maria, California, 
They had one child, Ruth Maxine, 

During the 1920's, Alonzo worked as a farm laborer and drofee a 
taxi between the small towns of the Santa Maria Valley, The taxi 
proualy bore the title, "Sta.ge'*, reminicent of the stJigecoach of a 
bygone era. His wife, Jose '.rorked throughout the 1920»S and I930's, 
first as a chambennaid, then as a laundress and housekeepjer, Alonzo 
2»ost his job at the beginning of the depression and because of his 
age was not able to find work until 19'^0 when he worked as a laborer 



on % T.il. ry hisp aI, Smi L'iir, Obinpo. T'l I'A^, ho was etiployoii it 
tho t)ost Tice in S'^nti Il'ri.i. ]{n rnt^rod aflor tho w^p an'l di^i in 
r^63. J'' ■ ,; fstmoreland wor'-:od at th'? pr,r,t office botwoen l'!*''*-'^' nn-i 
lo^iO, on niral delivery ro'ite. Sho corrontly re."ido3 it M? B. 
i:;'i-t Coo. Jtroet, Santa I'lria, California, 
JTI. R'l*" H. Westnorelanti 

Bern /prU 2?, VXl'], in Santa Ilario, Californin, the d.nno;htnr of 
Alnn^.o, i' th '/is rair.od a Catholic. Ilor '^irly r^choolin^ wr\r. in Dant4 
r.'ii'ia, C' 'ifornia, gnduatinr; from Santa Taria llinh School in l^'^^. 
Sho attei ' d Santa Maria J inior College and thon San Jose Statn Colle:^e 
i;h'3re sh" -niiuated with a .;.A. in iDdiic tlon in \0'^k» 

In 'l 'r-j, she mot Jaru'^ iioxlo at a U.30 function near S'Anta. M'.ria, 
They wor ,-.arried on Octob';i' l6, 19'(-3. Slio and hor husband lived in 
various iices, finally sGttlin(2; dovm in Rockford, Illinois, aft^r tho 
war, /Vf : r raising a family, she took a. t'sachinr: position in l95'-'» 
She is n ■■ " a second ;:^rade t'^acher at V/ort View T'.T err^ntary School in 
Rockford. (see Jamos E. Ho>:ie) 

TtVtL C.'vRL. ■: LINE 
I. Andr- Carlson 

Bor.. In Karlstad, Swodon, in l'-'^'\ ho immif^rated to tho Unitod 
St-ati^s in l833, to avoid I'andatory railit:;ry service. He settled in 
Rockford, Illinois, in the Seventh Street area. Shortly thoreaftor, 
he rriarri'. 1 Mary Birk, who vzas also a rec'^nt Swedish immicrant. 
Kary's f- .ily had changed thoir naMe to Dark wh^n they arrived in the 
United S' tes; she was boi'n Mary Jnhnsoi in l^''?, in VannD-md, Z'^in''.enx 

Anc!: .; worked in tho iv. per Stove C I'nany facl.ory in Rockford . 
Ho died : ■ 19^5. Mary C-rl'^on vrorkod ar; a chambermaid in var.if>;ii i;o:nr>">. 



and at Uoclrford C0II050. She dlod in l9'4-0. 
Androv: Carlson's children were: 

1. Jf^nny, who married Ed Monroe; she had seven children. She died 
in 1973. 

2. Huldio, who married Charles Mortensen; he died in the 1930'3 
from residual effects of poison gas he experienced in World War I, 
Huldie died in 1973. She had no children. 

3. Hannah - see below, 

^, Axel, a roofing contractor In Rockforti, remained unmarried. 
He died in I963. 

5. Oscar, a veteran of the Arterican force involved with Poncho 
Villi I married Evylen Redmon and had one son. H« died in 

1955. 

6. Harold, who married Florence , was a World War I 
veteran. He was a carpenter by trade and is now retired in 
Florida. He had two children. 

7. June, who married Bill Pollard. He died, and she then married 
Peter Gealey. Employed at the Illinois Central Railroad, she 
is now retired and living in Rockford, Illinois. 

II. Hannah Carlson 

Born August 6, 1892, in Rockford, Illinois, she was the daughter 
of Andrew Carlson. She was raised a Lutheran, and received a third 
grade education at Johnson Grade School in Rockford. After leaving 
school, she worked in a knitting factory. In I9I6, she married Frank 
E. Hoxie, whom she had met while demonstrating sewing machines. From 
her marriage until her husband's death in 19'^'lt she was a housewife. 
Daring World War II, she was employed by the Byrd Ring Company. She 
retired in 1957. That same year she and her sister, Huldie, went to 



Europe and visited bheir father's hometown in Sweden. Hannah died in 
1973. 

THE HOXIbl - lURTIN LINE 

Loslio R. Hoxie has published a f^enoology entitled Tho Hoxio Finiil.y » 

Three Contnries in Amorica . In this book Mr. Hoxie traces the Hoxie name 

b-ick to Lodoi-fich Hoxie, who was known to have lived in Sandwich, Plymouth 

Colony, in the year I658. Althouf^h all existing Hoxie families are pre- 

c 
sumod to be desended from this common progenitor, Leslie Hoxie has failed 

to find a direct connection with my immediate family. My earliest 
knox-m ancestor is James B. Hoxie, bom in 1855» 
I. James B. Hoxie 

James B. Hoxie was born in Erie, Pen nsylvania, in April, 1855, 
From Erie , he moved to Emporia , Kansas , where he worked as a rancher and 
a stagecoach driver. He married Mary E. Martin, in Topeka, Kansas, in 
ISO*^. Mary was born in Rockford, Illinois, in I8bl, and had beon em- 
ployed as a nurse. She accompanied a patient suffering from tuberculo- 
sis to Kansas, in search of a healthful, climate. It was there that she 
met her husband. Between I89O, and I896, James B'. Hbxie moved to Rock- 
ford, Illinois, where he lived on Stanly Street, and later on Horsman 
Street. In Rockford, he worked on various road and quarry operations. 
He had four children. He died in 1922, his wife died in 1931. 
James B. Hoxie 's children were: 

1. Lou J., born in I885, in Emporia, Kansas, married Adolph 
Torgerson in 192? in Rockford, Illinois. They had one daugh- 
ter, Virginia. 

2. May F. , bom in 188?, in Emporia, died in 191'+ in Rockford, 
Illinois , 

\, 



3. Frank E., born in I89O, in Emporia, Kansas, died in lyl'4-, 

in Rockford, Illinois. 
k, Lillian 0., born in I896, in Rockford, Illinois, m-irrled li-irl 
Andrews in Rockford in 1913« 

II. Frank E. Hoxie 

Born in Emporia, Kansas, in 1890, he was the son of Jamos D. Ho'tio. 
He was raised in a Protestant home. His family moved to Rockford, Illi- 
nois, when he was a younr^ boy. They settled in an Irish neir^hborhood 
in the Wo.it End, on Stanley Street. He w.ms educated at Franklin Grade 
School and Central High School where he completed the eleventh grade. 
Around 1910, he took a job as a saddle maker at Hess and Hopkins 
Leather Company in Rockford. He worked there until 1931? when he was 
laid off for two years. He returned to work in 1933 1 and remained there 
until his death. 

Frank Hoxie married Hannah Carlson on April 28, I9I6, in Belvidore, 
Illinois. They had two children. He was an excellent baseball player, 
playing on industrial teams, which were at that tine the equivalent of 
the minor league. He was also president of the Eagles Club, He died 
in December, 19'+!. 

Frank E. Hoxie 's children were; 

1. James E. - see below. 

2, Richard T., who was born on May 25, 192^, is a veteran of the 
European Theater of World War II, where he received the Purple 
Heart, He married Jean Martin and had one son, Robert. They 
divorced and he married Evylen Harkness ; they have one 
daughter, Dana. He is presently living in Morton, Illinois, 
employed by a wholesale ITorist. 

III. James E. Hoxie 

Born on October 30, 1919t in Rockford, Illinois, he is the son of 



Frank E. Hoxie. He attended Ellis Elementary School, Roosevelt Junior 
High School, and graduated from Rockford Central High School in 1938, 
His family was forcfid to take relief during; the depression. He 
worked odd jobs to help support himself. After graduating from high 
school, bo worked for his uncle. Axel Carlson, as a roofer. From 
there he wont to National Lock, and in 19'^'0, he became employed at 
the Illinois Central Railroad. 

In October, l'/+l, James Hoxie was drafted into the army. Ho 
was trained at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma, and finally wound up at Camp Hood, 
Texas, attached to the 606th Tank Destroyer Battilion. He was homo 
on leave attending his father's funeral when Pearl Harbor was attacked. 

His unit was put into desert training in preparation for the North 
African Campaign but was never utilized. In 19^+3. l^e was transferred 
to Camp Cook, California, where he met Ruth Westmoreland. They were 
married on October l6, 19^'J. He was sent to several other bases be- 
fore being shipped to Siapan Island in the Pacific Theater in May 
of 19'+5« He left Siapan in December, 1'9^^, after the end of the war. 

After the war, James Hoxie and his wife returned to live in 
Rockford, Illinois. They first lived with his brother on Knight 
Avenue, out in ly4-7i bought a house at 303^ Lawndale Avenue on the 
Northwest side. He still lives there today. He returned to the 
Illinois Central Railroad and worked there until lybO, 

He is a Catholic and a staunch member of the Democratic Party, 
He was a Democratic Precinct Committeem.an in I96O, and campaigned ac- 
tively for John F. Kennedy, 

Jamos Hoxie 's children were: 

1, Susan, who was born ftn February, 19'+5r-'9'l» died in infancy 
in August, 19'^5. 



2. I!ary Ruth, who was born on October 13, 19^^6, married Dennis 
G. Cook in 196*?. They have two chaldron, Timothy, and 
Ilatthew. She is active in a figure skating club, and is a 
fifpire skating judge. She and her husband currently live in 
Itilwaukoe, Wisconsin. 

3. Noil J., (see below) 

4. Julie E. , who vraa bom 4n October, 1951 f attended George 
Washington University in Washington, D.C. While living in 
Washingtbn, she worked in the office of Representative John 
B. Anderson from Illinois. She now lives In Icfwa City, iGwa, 
and is attending the University of Iowa, 

5. Ann L. , who was born in December, 1953 t married Ron Holm in 
1971. She now teaches music at Charlotte's Web School of 
Folk Music. Her husbsmd and she also perform as musicians and 
have produced an album. They live in Rockford, 

lY. Neil James Hoxie 

I was born on June 14, 19^9 t in Rockford, Illinois, and lived my 
early years at 303^ Lawndale Avenue in Rockford. I was baptized a 
Catholic, attended Summerdale Elementary School, Roosevelt Junior High 
School, Boylan Central Catholic High School, and graduated from Rockfoivi 
West High School in 196? . The members of my family were active traveters 
during that time. We visited California at least eight times by rail- 
road, riding on free passes obtained through my father's job. We also 
spent vacations in northern Wisconsin and Canada. 

After completing high school, I enrolled at the University of 
Illinois in Champa ign/Urbana but soon withdrew and took a job as a 
land sui^ey crewmember at Arnold Lundgren and Associates in Rockford. 
In the fall of 19&8» I attended Rock Valley College, but returned in 



'^u'iy ] '■ to Lundrcron*.' . T wis nrnftod into th*^ nr'^y in Vi^ust, 19^''>. 

Af U r tninini^; it Fnrt '^liss, Tn:->r>, nni Fort lyomr 1 ','ooH, 
ir;;Toiri, I .arrivn'i in SouLli Viotnm on Jinmry 'i-, l'^70, in'l itlich^d 
to iio^d^M. !-tors Compiny l"th isni-^in'»irin-: !'^i>-Tdfi nt Donf^ B". Thin, i 
-mil b-T ■ on the Cfintnl rmnt, iporoxim ' nly thirty mil.o:; sontli r.f 
jMia Trin ■ . Diirinp; my tour I took lnr>.vDr> to vinit tiinf^kok, HiailTnl, 
ind Tii p-'^ I , TTiwin. i lelt ''/l»tn.-im on llTrch 1/, I'J?' t altnr lilto'va 
months i'l '.-ountryand wan S'>]nrat,od from tho amy the sumo diy. 

On V .-il 3, 1971 f I '"^1'' ninrrlod to honoe LjTin Pernot. 

Aft' r rcturninr; to Lund-rron's for ovor --i voir, my wifo and I 'iuit 
work and ; lent the summer of 1973 in Europe. I an currently atteniinr; 
Rock Vail y College. 



SOCIAL HISTORY 

When my father brought his wife to Rockfcrd after World War II, 
then, alonr with millions of other ex-servicemen's families, settled 
do'.'m and -tarted to build lives for thomsolvps. He returned to work 
at the Illinois Central Railroad, bought a house, and proceeded to 
fill it with furniture, appliances, and children. Tlio important 
thin.^TS to my parents at that time were family stability and economic 
security. After the economic chaos of the 1930*s, and the social up- 
heavals of World War II, those seem to be relevant goals. 

Although my father worked hard, and my family was never desti- 
tute, we were never able to plan our budget too far ahead. My mother 
sowed and Icnitted, and used children's clothes circulated constantly 
around our neighborhood. We had a large garden in the back yard, and 
my mother home - canned the small crop for the winter. Our diet was 
sound, but plain. A major event was the occasional steak dinner, which 
never seemed to go far enough. 

My father worked hard around the house, making improvements. 
Over a period of time, he remodeled the upstairs, landscaped the yard, 
and built a garage. I helped on the latter project, although Fwas 
old enough only to offer marginal aid, Ih addition, I' somewhat reluc- 
tantly helped in the outdoor chores such as movring the grass and shove- 
ling snow. My three sisters hesitatingly shared some of the domestic 
work, but the majority was left to my mother. 

My mother is an elementary teacher by profession, but she never 
attempted to give us children any formal training at home. We never 
had a television when I was young; our early education consisted of 
family experiences. We were read volumes of faiiy tales and nursery 
rhymes. We spent hours in parks, developing an awareness of nature. 



and hivin - our inquiries answered as wrII as possible. Above -iTl , we 
w-?rf» list ned to, well ciro'i for, and lovini;ly disciplined. I consi- 
der t'nf s^ "ispocts of my i.'Tnily of ut-nost importance in the development 
of mv [ic." onalities ind inl-'H Inctual awamness. 

,!\ir I was onrollcd in 'jrad'i scViool in l^.'}'*-. 'ind thron-^hout. r-y 
school c"'-'^er, my parents did not oxort undo pressure on my ability 
as a stu :it. To bo sure, thoy wanted no to succood and T was at Cirit 
a |-nod a lovnr, but // tlr t-o was no rowird or punishment for ri-i'-ln, 
and ro^l ^ no pressure to '^I'cell . 

Oir inily is Catholic and I was baptized at an early -"Pie. I'/ 
exparionc > with reli^^^ion was attendinr; Catechism on Saturday and Gund^y 
Kass wit'"i ;ny family. Tho major force in determining the moral charac- 
ter of t: • children, however, was at home. Later in life outside in- 
fluonces .-ould come to bear, but as all young children, we learned by 
contact. 

All children anticipate holidays. At our house Easter meant 
colored ''-z;s, chocolate and baskets. Thanksgiving was marked by a 
gathering of relatives and the traditional turkey dinner. At Chi'^-t- 
mas, the ; ree was decorated, gifts exchin",ed, and the family again 
assfmblei for dinner consisting of Swedish dishes along with the nver- 
present t -rkey. 

Sun- 'r vacations were i time of nd---:"iture. My father rec4iv-d 
free rai ! -oad passes, and vto took advan1a-e of them by visiting my 
grand par' 'its in California. Needless to cay, the three day journoy v.'ith 
four small children was more of a fiasco than an adventure to my parents. 
The trir - , however, wore very enliiThtening to us children, 

Onc^ in Santa Maria our family kept quite busy engaging in acLi- 
vities ti:-it seemed exotic to a midwostern child. Wo swam in tho ocesn, 



combod tho beach, picked apricots, duj for clams, visited rolatives, 
and enjoyed a family barbequo featuring tortillas, beans, enjalatas, 
and huge steaks. We vfapo- always felt bad about leaving and coming 
home to what seemed like a dull Rockford. 

Of course we did not always go to California, Other summor va- 
cations wore spent camping in nofcthern Wisconsin with several trips 
to Canada. My father and I fished while my mother and sisters swam 
or relaxed in tho sun. 

I left the care of my family when I was drafted in 19^9 *t ago 
twenty. Although I have not lived at home since, I am still very 
close to my parents and feel very grateful to have been raised in 
their hone, 

Neil Jsimes Hbxie 



\ 



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(/9H- ) 









HULTMAN, LINETTE MARIEV 1956- 



I'. .IJ 



LEASE TYI'I': PLEASK PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
\M1I.Y HISTORY. 

ear ConLributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

1^ Sn rhat your family history can be made more useful to historians and 
ttit-rs studying American families, wc are asklnj? you to fill out the forms 
elow. 'I'liis will take you only a few minutes, and will bo easily made over 
nto an Index whicli will permit archive users ready access to Just those 
jnds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



1 . Your name Linette Hultman 



Date of form A pril 26, 1976 



Office Use Code 

(ID // ) 

(ID // ) 



Your college: Rock Valley College 
Rockford, Illinois 



Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 



Before 1750 
"18 5 0-1 900 



1750-1800 X 
1900 or later 



1800-1850 



Please check all regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 



X New England(Mass. ,Conn. ,R.I .) 

Va.) South At]antic(Ga.,Fla.,N.C.,S.C.) 

(Ea. ,Mlss. ,Ala. ,l'enn,Ky.) 



Middle Atlantic (N.Y., I' enna., N 
East South Central 



Wast South Central(Ark.,N.M.,Tex.,Ok.) 

^ East North Cen t ra 1 (Mi ch . , Ohi o , I nd . ) Pac i f ic (Ca 1 . , Wash . ) 

(Mawai 1 ,A1 aska) (111., Wise.,) 



Please chock .i 1 1 occupational categories in which members ol your 
family whom you have discussed in this paper hav(^ found themselves 



_X Fa rming 

T ransportation 

X Professions 



Mining 

Big Business 

Industrial Labor 



Shopkeeping or small business 

Manufacturing 

Other 



Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 



Roman Catholic Jewish Presbyterian Methodist 

Baptist Episcopalian Congregational x Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon X Other Protestant Other (name) 



7. What ethnic and social groups arc discussed in your paper? 



X Swedish Other Scandinavian German French 

Blacks Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans _ 

Jews Central Europeans Italians Slavs 

Irish British 



lia stern Ivu r op c 



Native Americans over several p, cncrations 



East Asian 



Other (Name) 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 



j^Interviews with other 
family members 

V ital Records 

X_Pho tographs X Maps 



Family Bibles 
Land Records 



Family Genealogies 
The U.S. Census 



Other 



FAMILY DATA 



Grandfather (your father's side ) 

Name K-rriRst. Hup-q Hm.TM/\N Current Residence deceased. 



Date of birth February 17. 1878 Place of birth uirika, Sweden 

Date of death January 19. 192^ Place of b ur ial Rpckf ord, -.■Ji nneha^ n , THinn^^ 

Kdaca t ion (numb e r of years); 

grade schools year high school vocational i yeax College 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Rock f ord. XL Dates 190^-19? ^ 

Dates 

D ate s 

Dates 




4th 



Religion Lutheran 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Republican Party 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother Minneapolis MM date Qntohpy 7 IQl^ |l 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another I 

relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-1) ' 

Grandmother(yourfather'sside) )' 

Name Jeanetta Belle RING Current Residence deceased ' 



Date of birth January 25. 1888 
Date of death December 



5. 1888 Place of b ir th Stillm an Valley. Ogle, Illinois U 

26, 19^9 Place of burial Rockford. Win nebago, Illinois 



Education (number of years): 

grade school 8 years high school 

college 



vocational 



1 y ear 



Occupa t ion (s ) 
1st Domestic 



2nd Clerical 



3rd Clerical 



4th Domestic 



5 t h Clerical 

Religion Protestant 



Dates iQ0Q-1Q1? 

Dates 1912-1914 

Dates i92'S-1929 

Dates 1929-1934 
_Dates 1934-1940 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Ist Rockford. IL Dates 1910-] 



2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


4 th 


Dates 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 
Republican P arty 



Place of marriage to your grandfather K±xineaJ. 



da t( 



7_1914_ 



NOTE: If your father was raised ( i o age 18) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on the back of this page 
(A-2) . 



A- 2 S tepgrandf a ther (your father's side) 



Name 



Current Residence 





Date of birth Place of birth 


1! 




Date of death Place of burial 






Education (number of years) 


1 




grade school high school vocational 






college 






, , PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
Occupa t ion (s ) / r^ i j ._ \ 
^ (after leaving home) 


% 




1st Dates 1st Dates 






2nd Dates 2nd Dates 






3rd Dates 3rd Dates 






4th Dates 4th Dates 






Religion 






Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 




Place of marriage to your grandmother date 




B-2 


S tepgrandmo ther (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 


1 




Date of birth Place of birth 


— 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school_ 

coll ege 



vocational 



Occupa t ion (s ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving homc>) 
Dates 



Dates 
Da t es 
Dates 



Rel Iglon 



I 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 4 

Name Carl Julius CARLSON Current Residence fjp niq a.RpH 

Date of birth March 21, 1889 Place of birth Fjaras, Sweden 

Date of death January 10, 1972 Place of b ur ia 1 Stil lman Valley, O gle, IL 

Education (number of years): 

grade school 8 years ^igh school vocational college 

OcLupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st l^armer Dates 1Q07-19S3 Ist s+.mman V^llpy TT. Dates 1907-X972- 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


4th 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates 



4th Dates 4th Dates 

R e 1 i g i o n Protestant 



Political parties, civil or social cTubs, fraternities, etc. 
Republican Party 



Place of marriage to your grandmo th er Rpckford IL da t e ja^n ary 29, 1914 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepfather or anotlier relative (to 
age 18) give that data on tlie back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Hilda Marie BENGTSON C urrent Resid ence Stillman Vall ey, Ogle , _IL. _ 

Date of birth February 4. 1891 Place of birth yjslanda, Swe den 

Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school s years bigh school A), ypa-rc; vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCl' 

(after leaving home) 
1st D omest ic D a t e s 1911-1914 1 s tstillman Valley .XL. •> a t e s „1911-.present 

.2nd Dales 

3rd Dates 



2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


4th 


Dates 


Religion Protestant 



4 th Dates 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Republican Party 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Rockford, W in nebafrn, TJ. '''T- '^' January -29^1914 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to 

'■K' H< gflve th»t dA-ta on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-2 S tepgrandf a ther (your mother's side) 



Name 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupa t ion (s ) 



1st 

2nd 

3rd_ 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



vocational 



col lege 



Ist 

2nd_ 

3rd 

Ath 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
D-2 S tepgrandrao ther (your mother's side) 

Name 

Date of birth 

Date of death 



Date 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



Occupa t ion (s ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Da tes 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



vocational 



c f ) 1 leg! 



.1st 
2nd 

.3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
D n t e s 



Rel Iglon 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



D a t C! 



6 

1LI_LDRE.N of A & B (or A-2 or B-2 ) - your father's name should appear below 

Name John Ernest Sanford HULTMAN 

^ ^ ^ ce of birthRockford^Wjmneba-o^Jl^d a t e October 20 . 191? 

Number of years of schoollngl l2 years c c u p .rTlT ^^^nical En^in^PT. 

I Residence Rockford, TT, ManTal S ta tus Marri ed 

Number of children two Death -t ^'t^^'^^'^ 

• N a m e JLAllian_Jeanette U lrlka Shold 

IMace of h i r t h ^ockfo^.,_Wi nnebago . II date November 3. IQ IQ 

Resid"n°'/?/L° tt"'*'^"''"^^^^^^" Occupationjn_structQr of Nursing 

Res idence Rockford. IL Marital Status Married 

Numb IT of children three Death 

^ •■ ' '" ^ Pauline Jane Pearson 

Place of birth Roc kford. Winnebago. TT, date March ^. IQ?? 

Number of years of schooling 12 years Occ upa t ion Honsew nf p 

Residence Rockford. IL Marital Status Married *^^'-^^ " " r^ 

Number of children_ two Death ___ 

N a m V 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling ~ O^cT^TuT^iT 

Residence Mar i tal ~S ta t us 

Number of children death 



Name 



Place of birt h date 

Number of years of schooling "_ c c u p a ri"7r^ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children ' J)eath 



Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling " (Tccupa t ion" 

Residence Marital Status ~ 

Number of children death 



Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence__ Marital Status_ ' 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling T jTcupation 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of chlldren_ death 



N a m e 



I'laci' of birth date 

Niimb.'r .>l years of schooling oT^^jT^ ri^n'"^_ ^ 

Residence ^ Marital Status ____ 

Numbi^r of children deatli 



Name 



Place of blrtli date 

Number of years of schoolingJl — --------_,,^^ 

Residence Marital Status 

NuiiihiT ol children dealli " " ' 



7' 

CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 

1. Name Vilf-rpd r-ust^v ClAPT.qnv 



Place of birthq.nnn,«n Vanpv, TT. date Ont.nhpy 3, 101? 

Number of years of schooling i? yp^-r^ Occupation Slerstri r.n^ C.nr^-^-.-r a.n+.n-r 

Residence ^tnim^T^ V.-:.npy TT, Marital Status Marri Pd 

Number of children thres death 

Name Linnea I'.arie Hultman 

Place of birth stillman Vallpv. TL da te January l-^. TQ?? 

Number of years of schooling 12 years Occupation^ 

Residence Rockford. TL Marital Status Ha rried 

Number of children two death 

Name Elmer 3arl CARLSON 



Place of birth Stillman Valley. IL date 1932 



Number of years of schooling none Occupation — 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 19'^3 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation^ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res 1 dene e Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Same 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children- death 



Name 

Place of birth _date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death . 

Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children\ death 



10. Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Ri-B idence Marl ta 1 S ta tus 

NtirobiT of children death 



Your Father 

Name John Ernest Sanford HULTMAN , Current Residence Rockford, Winnebago, I llinois 

Date of birth October 20, 1917 Place of b itth Rockford, Winnebago, I llinois 

Date of Death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade s chool 8 years h igh " school k- years vocational co 1 lege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
is t Mechanical Ena:ineer Dates 19'3')-present 1st Rockford. IL Da tes lQ47-pres. 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd Da t e s 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion Protestant 



Political parties, cM.vil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. li 

Republican Party , 

Place of marriage to your mother Stillman Valley IL date September 27. 19^7 ' 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name Linnea Marie CARLSON ^ Current Res idence Rockford, Winnebago, ininni 

Date of birth January 15, 1923 Place of b ir th Stillman Valley, Ogle, Illinois 

Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade s chool 8 years highs- s chool k years voca t ional co 1 lege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1 s t Industrial Labor D ate s 1941-194q 1 s t Rockford, IL D a t es iqU?-j>Te. . 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion Pro te stant 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 

Republican Party 



Place of marriage to your father Stillman Valley, IL date .qfiptpm b e-r ?7 , I QU'^ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page (F-2). 



E-2 


Stepfather 

Name 




9 




Date of birth 

Date of death 

Education (number 
grade school 

Occupation (s) 

1st 


of years) 

high school 

Dates 


1 

Place of birth 

Place of burial 
vocational college 




PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 




2nd 
3rd 
4th 


Dates 
Dates 
Dates 


2nd Dates 




3rd Dates 
4th Dates 




Rel igion 




bs, fraternities, etc. 




Political parties 


civil or social clu 








Place of marriage 
Stepmother 


to your mother 


Date 


F-2 




, 



Name 



Date of birth 



Place of birth 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



vocational 



college 



Occupa t ion (s ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 



.2nd 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 



Re 11 g 1 o n 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Flare of marriage to your father_ 



date 



10 
CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2,F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 

Name -R-ryan T^-rTiP?^+. Sanfr.-rrl HTTT.TMATJ 

Place of birth Rof^i^ford, Winn., TT, Date of birth May 3, 19S0 

Number of years of schooling 17 years Occupation Application E ngineer 

Residence Rnrkfnrd, TT. Marital S tat us Married 

Number of children two death 

Name Linette Marie HTJLTMAN 

Place of birth Rockford. IL Date of birth January 12. 19 5^ 

Number of years of schooling 1^ years Occupation Student 

Residence Rockford, IL Marital Status linpjle 

Number of children none death 

Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupatlon_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name ^ 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



[. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public Library, Rockford 
Illinois 



Signed (At^Jyy:£- ^J+uJ±/ mA^ 
D a t o imcu^ 3^ iq j (^ 



^ 



nFiJFaT.onv r:-:.i 



m^^: 



gffo ;,, 



"^'■^ 



,_nette Marie HULT^ 

^n : January '. 

rried: _ 

ed: 



'■JI'k i'atf-i, 



m 



X "■ Mil 
4fe. 




I 



GENE.AJ^OGY CHART 



„ John Rr nest .S.anf ord HULTMAN 



l^i nette Harle HULTMAN 



3orn: 

viarried: 

Died: 



January 12, 1956 



Father 

B - Octobe.r 20, 191? 
M- September 27, 19'+? 
D- - 



^ J^innea Marie C^LSOJ}!, 



Mother 

B- January 15, 1923 
D- - 



Ernest Hugo HULTMAH ., 



Grandfather 
B - February 1?, 1878 
M- October 7, 191^+ 
D- January 19, 192iJ- 



eanetta Belle (Nettie) RING 

i rr . - t T(t ,.. - . »..- I ,. - . ... rit i m i I .,1 LJ i y . j.i..t, J.», ii 



Grandmother 

B- January 25, 1888 

D- December 26, 19^9 



,.Ga.r:l. Ju.l.ius. CARLSON 



Grandfather 
B- March 21, 1889 
M- January 29, 191^ 
D- January 10, 1972 



Jphq.;^e;T. (MPSRSQW) .HUUMIj. 



B - April 25, 1847 
M - January l^^, 1877 
D - May 23, 1922 

Clara Christine PERSDOTTER 



B - October k, 1851 
D - October 1, I917 



John RING 



jnhn Hm.M (mm) 



B - November 20, I85I 
M- July 14- , I87I 
S D- March 1, 1925 



Gustava ^ (Augu sta) _ FELDT 
B- March 8, I851' 
D- April 6, 1922 
Carl Aron LARSON. 



Ka-jsa 



August FELDT 



Sarah 



B-Marcfh 28, 18^1-6 
M- February 2^4-, 1882 
D- After I8O7 



H ilda ,^ Marie BENGTSO)^ 



-^ 



Grandmother 

B - February ;+, I89I 

D - - 



B- August 16, 1852 
D- 1892 



Bej^gt SWEtTSON 



B- March 8, 186^4- 
M- - 
D- 1952 



Susanna, JOHNSON 



B- April 29, 1863 
D- 19'^9 



SOURCES 

My thanks toj My mother and father - Sanfor"! and. Linnea Hultraan 

My grandmother - Hilda Carlson 

V-y great uncle - FA Hinr (vhc ir, r-reat in more ^ra.ys 

than one) 

My three aunts - Rosalia Gailson 
Lillian Shcld 
Pauline Pearson 



JOHN PER (AMD^SON) TOLTMAR 

and wife 
CIAHA CmiSTINA PERSDOTT'UR 

John Anderson -.^as bom A^)ril 25 » iB^t-? in Dorhult, Sweden. He was 
married to Clara Christina Persdotter on Jamxary l>^'r, 1877. Clara was 
bom October ^, 1851 in Ostergotland, Sweden. Their only child, 
Ernest Hufro, was born on February 17t IB78. Since the United States 
was the "land of promise," John left his horaeland for America on 
^^arch 28, 18il. His destination was Hockford, Illinois where some of 
his cousins were livings;. 

On his trip from Sweden, John found many other passengers with 
the last name Anderson and thus John decided to chanf^e his name. 
Somewhere he had visited a place named Hult and fallen in love with the 
town. Because he was a man, John felt this should be a part of his 
name. He combined the name Hult vrith man and once in the United 
States, John Anderson became John Hultman. 

Havin/5 been in Hockford for one year, John sent for his wife 
and four year old son who were still in Sweden. They left for the 
United States on April 7, 18B2. Together once again, the Hultmans 
settled in a house at I603 Ei.;7:hth Street. John was a carpanter by 



KiunjirH (noemnu) fan mot 

•^^l tea 

spTgoBBSsn AurreraHt) ahajd 

■«if mH .iwA»wi. .J'lfrirc' ' ,^S i^xuA (nod asm aoertsJbnA nriol 

ttmi jnt&XC .V^X .'Vf vxiu^n^l. no Titob&rBl dnilairrfD bx«IO o^ bmtrram 

thiifto tXoo Tl»r<'i '^jjfiorantBioO nl r?8l ,4 rr»rfo*oO rrrorf 

M#«#8 teiitfC ai1# Mai^; .S'^SI ,^I txatrscfe^ no rrrotf asw ,o^H fBomX 

nc «9iYMiA rre^ tamlnmoii mlti Del nHol. ".sAimrtv '^o hn«I" edi aow 

1o saoe rx^ilM rIqiiIIXI ,irio1t4ooH sjiv noliMtt&39h ptH .U'SI ,SS. dotcsN 

.^afvtl mw Miieuuoo a^rf 
rt#l» vxsTvran&MF :i»d^ X'l'" Aoirol nrfoL ,a9bei»(i aoTl glTl »lrf nO 

.MMD clff •niuBdo oi telii9*b ndol aviii baa nosTsbnA onsn &bb1 9itS 

tU ot nl rmlUi bOM ilvH teaan aoalq a te^irlv barf arf rxMfwvao 

^m 1o iviV a atf blvoria mlti& tlt'i rrrfoL ,naa a saw m( ftavaoaH .rtwoi 

bailMJ «t^ al •one bna naa ditM iluH mum vdi ImnMmoo eH .eaan 

.naa^IirH arioL •mm09d noA^abaA nrfol. «e«^a^E 

t/f TOl Inaa futol. .laax ano tol bnrol;f3oH ni naatf ?«nivaK 

atii tmJ S^ml xw^ .a»b*M8 al UI&b a-xav oriv non bio raufx i»ol Ana 

•MMH^IiiH «l# .fllajia aovo Taril«>)oT .S88I «V X^xqA no aaia^C batinU 

Vf T»i >»TiS rfiWjftiZ CO^X ia aauorf a ni beXl^as 



trade both In Sweden and in the 'Jnited States. He bocanie a naturalized 
citizen November 1, 1888. 

After the death of Ernest's first wife, Clara and John helped 
to raise granddatighter liosalia. Clara Kas a ^-^ood woman, but she 
was a strict mother amd grandmother. When Ernest brought his second 
wife home to live, she found switches over every door which had been 
used by Clara to discipline Rosalia. An active member of the '^'irst 
Lutheran Church cf ^ockford, Clara died suddenly on October 1, 1917. 
After her death, John moved in next door with his son. 

John was a handsome old man with brown eyes and a beard. He 
loved his little grandchildren and even boui^ht his only grandson a 
pony. Although he liked to drink in his jrounger years, he did re- 
form as he grew older. John also like to chew tobacco but Yie broke 
this habit by chewing on celery. After givine; up his work as a 
carpenter, he vrent to work for the Stonefield and Evans Shoe factory 
as night watchman. Nettie, his da\i^hter-in-law, wotild pack him a 
lunch to take to work and often times he would save the piece of 
fruit and r^ive it to one of the grandchildren as a special treat. 
When John retired from the shoe factory, he decided he would like 
to live alone. Ue bought a piece of property and house in Winnebaf'O, 
Illinois, however, he lived there only a few weeks when he took ill 
ajid had to move back with Smest. John was sick about six weeks 
before he died on May 23, 1922. 



.88ar ,1 •xBdmoyo* nesiiio 
finot nrj' /'.xsxj ,sixv j^^xi r'.T;omS ^ rfia^b Mli 70^1 A 

n*»<f terf Hmtim mot xn^^ ^w^ ^sdsilws tmo^ ada ,avll oi^ efl«ri a^lv 

,vi,<tA ,j TMoioO no \Ia»wbta.'« J^iJ> jruIO ,ir:.)iy:x<>- io rfsii/dS B<aart^a>T 

oa airf 4^^ «ooi> J-xno ai tevoa mteL ,rUaaJb nead iWlA 

'soa aa>%a tnnatf riiiv iuw lx£o »aociKM»ri « ajw jtdaw 

.r vinm mid trty^iod amtm ttiM earxhLitiaimMXfi ^1&411 aid l^avol 

»naaiY Tvyaxa^ xiii al ioiob oi SmUil art t^SBOrtilA 'X^ioc 

f -<nu '>!' jtKf oaoaifo^ wads o^ •ill eaXa mlcl .i|»&£o mrxst ad cji sao) 

,. :''v* .'' -/• r-.ivis ^ttilA .ipcoXa» *!• niiiMado t<x ^id«(f »tii& 

vTGJo«^ u^ aXallaa«^e adi :co) jhtow «# isav ac( .-xainsqaaD 

a Mf.i r-io/eq: clu.'ow ,MAt<«f~trai/1j|insJb eJM ,aiii«H .fUMirfo^«v MAla aa 

7 adi a««B UuoM art aaaiU Aa-tlo Ms Ataw oi »Hmt o& d&aat 

iitlMUitxuas mtU )o aoo oi ii avjt^a tea itiad 

q 'i^i rj.i>ow 9n ■«- oaI aofia adi matgCl iwxl&wx ndoL oaidf 

: »»uot'i bof^ {.jy^ccrq to ao^iqf a MjMKxf aK .anoXa «wiX ot 

■u,: ^pOv »•■ nedw ajiaaK Mai a r.leo eradi tevlT or( .laroirorf i^ilOflJUXI 

F-^taaw xlm U*9tM jioia raw nrtol .J-aafrxH (Ut« ilOiad evo« oJ bai ta» 

,SS^i ^ 1^ no Jbaib art a^rolad 



BRKEST HTJGO H^JLTMAN 

IJmest Huc:o Hultman was bom I^'ebruary 17, 1B73, the son of 
John and Clajra Hultraan. He was born near Ulrika, Sweden and csime 
to the United States with his r>arents at a^e four. Attendimt the 
old Marsh School in Rockford, he found learning?: difficult at first 
since he knew little or no TDn^^lish. Completing eipchts yeai's of 
grsunmar school, he also attended Brown's Business Collei'^e in 
Rockford. 

On October 26, 190^+, ErrSe was married to Hilma Sword of 
Rockford. They settled in a house built by Srnie's fatlier located 
at 1127 fifteenth Avenue. Their only child, Rosalia Irene Prir5Cilla, 
was bom on November 27, 1905 . They had been married only three 
and a half short years wVien Hilma died on April 3, 1900 after a 
lin^erixv; illness. 

With a small daughter to raise, Smie moved in with hie parents 
who lived next door. John and Clara helped care for Rosalia until 
Smie reraaxrled. Introduced to Nettie Rin,°r by Charlie Wedman, 
Ernie soon realized he wanted her to be his wife. 



'•'ATTTjr.TM , :■-< t '.-:• 

MUK> btiM nmSmmc. ,M7Uhd\J Tumn nrod .nitntluH «xbID boM ndoL 

luoJ^lil) vtima»I tni nio 

to e-rr' f»IqmoQ .timllyr tn 

^'tmorS bebamtfA orXs •H .loo 

■^o trrow 

.»0n»vA ffin»«J ' 

.aaanXIi wrJhre'Vf-tX 
•ir 



x» 



JCHN (KSLM) ring 

and 

WIFE KAJSA 

John Helm was born in the early 1800 'n in '••reden. At about 
twenty-one years of &r.e he j^oined the army. During: his first week 
in the service the new recr'Jitr, vrere ordered to line up. As the 
commanding officer went down the line he found two men with the 
sarae last name, John lielra and Charlie 'telm. '.•ince they would not 
allow two men in a comoany with the sarae last name and findinf' the 
two men were not related, one name had to be champed. Pointinfr a 
finder at John, he told him from tlmt day forward his name would 
be Ring. Thus, John Helm became John Ring. John spent thirty- three 
years in the army patrolling the border between ?^weden and Norway . 
He was only able to visit his wife and family when p:iven a furloupch. 
After his many yeatrs in the service, John was given a small plot of 
land and a pension of twelve crowns per month by the government. He 
died at the age of sixty-five. 

John Ring wsis married to Kajsa who was from a large family. It 
was said that when Kajsa got together with her two sisters and talked, 
you could hear them all over the county. John and Kajsa held many 






■: 3T:x.r.v ffrc-Y^nsw^ 

brrv »Tftv -.T rjrrD' ■ :', f«ofvTe« sf(* ni 

' ' i»oi^o ffnltnsmmoo 

<T>n cii'O' Y""^ "o/T/ .mis" ')Xi-t:*<ic 'm^ «.i!?>' arioL ,*«A(T iRfiJ «■«« 

«r(i .- - ^ ^«j8X »■« •■ oIX« 

. '>-">'--/;n3 «d ©* fuRP /'CLGi ano ,iK>Jj:'.i;-- Tor. *)-T^tw uom ow* 

cw otiisn airf Ircciml ^«4 ^jstii «ail «±ff ' ' ' , :)L is. fy^H 

»mni-xtyltU tOBqa nriol " nrlot •WK>e<f » 'VtiK srf 

- f. la a*I>»w8 nie»vj©o Toirrorf *r(i vili/oiJi'^ vr-t^ :<n.T nl arumx 

rtiMM a fwis ««H fBtol ,«olTa»a vili^ nl atenx x"^" ^tii ratt'iA. 
-nrrravo^ » . r ^f„^^ .j,^ aawoxo •ytvwi Jo noienaq b Ikia JmmI 

•- ' • ■ " • :-.9jtfc 

iteiLi^ feu «»JBia <nri T»if rillw -xprlio^io^ Jon aat^tH norfv dariJ Lie; a«i# 
yjum bmt «at«l te« tirfol .x^mmo miJ t»vo II« m»r(t -uind bluoo t/ox 



children, however, only five lived past infancy. on John Has bom 
November 20, 1B51. Kajsa lived a lon^c life. She died while in her 
nineties bein^ blind the last nine years of her life. Since John and 
Kajsa could not afford to buy their own cemetery lot, they are buried 
separately on the lots of different friends. 



frwxJ --SI' octoL oo: -xon*^-* *8«I i->hvix c'^'h xi-co .tovhwoiI ,n»rcMirfo 
ficL. 9onir .01.11 -nri lo ai«#x •atn ia«I arf* bnild TUil»rf MttBtitn 



AUGU:1T FSLDT 

and 

WIPT5 SARAH 

Auprust i^'eldt waf? a tailor in ;'weden during the early 1800' s. 
Little is known about Au(?ust except that he Has a deeply religious 
man. He was married to a woman named Jarah and together they heid 
five children. Dauj^hter Gustava was born to them on T'arch 8, 1851. 



in* 

HAP A?! amy 

X \iiiit> »nj gnnuD n»neir< iti rtoLtMS x »«*« jnln "^ jrin^v^ 

f.^ v»f .7 iti i mgoi bns dsrcc' bMMn (usawir m at f«JtTXJuH «£w sH ,atm 
.^ (ianuM ffo mmU oS mod mmi MrmtavO ^nittnusti .amibllcte •vH 



JOHN x^ING 

and wife 

GUSTAVA FEIDT 

John Ring was bom November 20, IO5I in Tiydaholia, Hweden, the 
son of John ling and Kajsa. ;Te left Sweden at age sixteen to avoid 
the draft and went to Gemajiy where he haul heard there was much work 
on the farms. After working? there for a year, he returned to S^^edan 
to say good-bye to his parents. He left for the United Htater, with 
a group of thirty other Svr^e boys in 1870. After a twenty-one day 
boat ride, they landed in America. As soon as they arrived; a 
railroad a^-rent signed them up and they foviid th-emselves in New Jersey 
working on the railroad. When woi?c was completed there, they were 
all sent to Lockport, Illinois. Chicapo was still smolderinf; after 
the great fire when they passed through. 

It was while John was in Lockport that he sent for his sweetheart 
in Sweden. Guctava (or Augusta) Feldt was born on March 8, 18 5I to 
AufTUst and Sarah Feldt. The Ring and Feldt farallies had lived 
neighbors in Sweden. John and Gustava had attended school and been 
confirmed together. Gustava came to the United States in I87I and 
was married to John on July 'r of that same year in Lockport. 



reran avatpco 

ittrnt rtaOH !•«« V3«(# taawf tmi arf avMlw yiuHn*!) (N^ i-n«w £n« i^sri) arft 

XA^ 9C»^ tmmt B i»#!tA .C^X fli eyotf •tewB itMlto ^^itfi lo qmns « 
« ,ft»vi<ns itMfl lui ttooa a A .BdlrasA nl teJbruJ! xorii ,9btx &MOd 

-SI ,«T><f^ tetalqnoo a«w Jfxow fr»i"fV .Jbts<nlfin eff^ no ytiatywf 

rmi\L -n lltf9 omH tr\MohiO .eionlXXI ,i*x(xpfoo.I o;^ ^e? XI« 

.itvTcnili' t»aaj$^ x^*^ rrsdw •Til Saorn »iiS 
iiumitioev' airf lol frtaa e/f iadi i-roq^^ooJ nl ami nrfoL sXlrtw 8«¥ .+ T 

OS 'isruii ao mod ajw tbla/^ (ataofiftA «») mrjii^aixO .naJbrnrE; al 

■i=»jll iMvf MtClul iKTa'^ bOM yxifl •rlT .^M«^ r(«x«!? £n« iuT^wA 

Myfd* l]»An»Ma barf «Tj(MuDO-£m ndoL .rwtewe al 8T0(frf:aiun 

ttu. lS:iil at amSmtB te#lntt tiS o^ mmjao MrtimaO .imd^^T^S bmentYn^o 

.t90€[ihod ni lamx •<mo ^"^ ^® ^ T^<'^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^ brntrum ajar 



The group of thirty 3wedes weis still together and when word, came 
from some relatives that the work situation was good in Rockford, 
Illinois, they soon gave up railroad, vfork. H^tring that some Svredes 
would "be sirriving in Rockford and needing a good farm hand, a man 
named Alexander Ualker of Stillmaji Valley, Illinois decided to make 
a trip to Rockford and look the boys ov&ro Out of the group of 
thirty, he picked Jorm Ring to be his hired hand. That Jay Alexander 
rode his i-jorse back to 3tillraan Valley while John walked alonf^ side. 

Gustava and John set up housekeeping in the Hixon House on the 
east edge of Still man and with $2.50 worth of Ivunbsr, Johii rriade all 
the basic pieces of furniture they needed for the house. John worked 
for Mr. Walker for a timev ^-raJking from hir, heme to the fanri every day. 
John moved his family to another hone while he worked a year for 
a man i;anied .'hite. After the death of Mr. ialker, Mrs. Walker 
anked John to cone back and run the farm for her. John agreed gind 
the Rings moved and settled on the Vfallcer farm vrhere they remained 
until they moved to Rockford. It is sadd tl^t they were the first 
Swedish settlers of Jtillman /alley. 

Gustava and John were deeply religious and they helped to 
start the ?Vee Church in Jtillraan Valley. The :ling farm was a 
gathering place for the young people of the arsa and hardly a 
Sunday afternoon v/ould go by when there wasn't a fxoup playing games 
and having a good time. 



,tavMb«fl ffl Jbao9i aoM aolfsuilr: ;txcv eHi iadi asviJaXa^ •roc soil 

•ffoe Ijtff^ sol^aaH .jIsow iMOxXiiST en; •v«9» nooe x^f^ .aionilXI 

cuw « .ln«r{ mxMt Jbo«g| « r ' ^<ui irto^jtoofl ni ^nlviTXA od Mxwm 

•jlM A^ teMo*ft slcailXI ,\ . 8 )o -milM -nbtuoobLk fia i tt 

'x^ gifvnqi Mfi )o iuO .idvc e\oc' ^.ij ilookl Jbcus £n»l3looii oi qJhc^ « 

•x«>lnaEic»£A xttt iW .tearf iiiaJd aHf stf •# ^n-^H nrfoL Jbctablq art ,>[iTli{i 

.«*te iMtto te^ijv ofift AiidH x»J~rAV tumllUC o^ ai£>4Kf se^otf elii •kta 

wit a* •MwK Bttxf H mti4 itl ytiq— A — ' O ri qv iM orlAl. &n« «7«tMfD 

■r*^l i9iL£k ,tH !• tOmb oiif im&'iA .•&M< JbMwn turn m 

koM tevTiui i;:-c~ .:2MI lal aixsl adi nits' te« JicMtf •so9 o;^ adoL JhMlM 
fllilMil ^iMi- «»TM!y aoBal »ji£j|V •d* m teliiM iviA tevM mjifilfl iirf^ 
^9:til erii mMr t^li tarfl liiaB ai il »tmiiHt)ei\ o^ i^wofi ^adf Ubl«v 

M ami arxdi xRtft arfT .ysXXaV cmJXUI b1 iistudQ Mrt^ •tH rxMtfi 
m xtimmit hmm wtx» tti To •X^ioMr Arasfty •<{# ■xol aoiaXcr wrlradJaqi 

.»MJLi lkM9i « stil««d tmM 



Abundantly blessed, John and Gustava had eleven children. 
Victor was the eldest. Bom in 1873t he became a preacher and died 
in 1910 at a youjig a, '3. Carl Kiail (Ame) was bom in 18?^ and died 
January 10, I968. He and his wife, Ida, visited every state in the 
United Statest except Alaska, winning a trip to Haviaii in a contest. 
Alice (Olson) was the eldest daughter. She was bom in 187^^ and died 
in 19^1. Nauinie (Wedman) was born July 4, 18?9 and died June 2, 1952. 
Prank was bom October ^, 1881 ajid at a^e ninety-five, he and his 
wife still live in the home John am. Gustava built when they caine 
to Rockford. Godfrey was the only child who did not live past 
infancy. He was bom late in 1683 and died at the aip;e of nine months 
in 1884. ills death was caused by "brain fever. When someone would 
ask one of the childx-en how many children there were in the family, 
they would reply, "There were ten children and ther little Godfrey, 
but he didn't count." >Jd was bom December 18, 188^1-. He stayed and 
helped on the faim until his dad rehired and was a member of the 
Rockford police force for many years. Today at age ninety-one, "^^d 
still drives a car and works part time at Lloyd Hearing Aid Corporation. 
Mabel (Anderson) was bom in 1686 auid she died last yeao: in August. 
One of her tbaree children is Congressman John B. Anderson. Nettie 
(Uultman Djupstrom) was Iwm Jan'iary 25, 1888 and died December 26, 19^9. 
Arthur was the youngest son, bom I89I and died in 1971. The baby of 
the family was Lillian (Long) whio wels born January 22, 1892 and died in 1957. 



bmlh ins tm&amt'mi a •■BO«d ad «CV£i oi (rx«cl .^*M» wit asM soiol^i 

imXt fam ^^SI^X ni imtf eusv (•■A) Ii«i lo*^ *«^ ^¥Wo\ m iJt Oi^I a± 

«tt 4rt •^^^ rwv* b^tBtr ^l ,»XkM aid te« •» .Sd^X «0i ^iMoA 

«J— itiw M lU IttMMii oi fflrci s yiinalw tmabu^lA iqsom ^a»jr4a;j beJtJtali 

Imlb bam ^V6l fli *no6 aupr »il& .'x»Msv«i> ^a«l)I« tit »am (nocXO) oollA 

.^9£ 3 •miW teU> ixi« 9S^ ,*^ xlu^ treod am (naateu) •lna«^( .I4^X oi 

aifl in« Ml t«vil<-Y^nin a^ 1j9 inc Xd8X ,-^ -xacfuJoO naod bjsw ilaaan 

««■» t*<l* n**^ ^Xiiid svMiaaii Jbas a(io\. »imjn eiW ax evlX UUia aliw 

' --aq avlX ^«a |»±f> onw Mxna xi^io add^ aaw x«:clboO .Ircu'LiooU «# 

tsjncfl 'snii? to wf^m mtii ^a tetb tea C^^ oX e;t«X mod a«w ah .xooalttl 

'I OK aaoa«aa oadv ' .aav«% alaxi'" \tS JbaauAa aav r{i.fiai> aiii .^^6aX aJt 

.vIUNB) ttca ol 9rmm vsmM mrxbLttif> \/mm wod oaxbXiriQ acti lx> aao jiM 

•tai^Jbai) oX^iti owa Ina naaMir<9 a»^ amw axaffT" t^XiQrx Mf/ov "CKit 

fana *»vU« aH .4<68X tdL ladaaoa^ cmx^ a£i 'Xi> 4m1 jrurf 

aKi lo •»^aM « aaw in£ JbarXi^n; itau exi> xtj.n' jk:!.' r et^ 

6U ,8#To-xta«l« aj^ la YyaboT .aoasic rnaa "xolt aoxpl aolXoq iaoi^ic^o/v 

.noiMaogvaO blA i^xl-xmV btoLl in •mtt iraq ajCxow ina %a» a aavi^ llJUm 

twttMmi ttfc 'U*Y i««X Jbai^ a<to Ma 6961 aX xnod aaa (aoa-xaAoA) XatfaH 

•tHmin •flaavateA .tt oifol n amp in -nap 7 aX narxMiite aatali ?« <i lo aoO 

~ -xateaoaa kmlb imm 86iil ,i.S. txcv^>«^ mMf m** iaKyxlaqutu MmtLoh) 

bmtb baa X^8X tnio4 »iM»a i^aayumx acU aaw 



John was a strict "but loving father. He liked to read aind if 
the house 'becajoe too nolsj, it too'k just one word from his lips and 
ten lively children suddenly becajr.e ouiet. By 1913 most of the 
children hakd left home and since they were getting on in age, John 
a«l GuRtava decided to give up farming aM move to Rockford. To- 
f^ether with their daughter Nannie and her husband Charlie, they 
"built a tno family house at 125 Twelfth Street. After moving to 
Rockford, John took a job running the freight elevator at Ilechanics 
where three of his sons were wo3Cking. ¥hen two of the sons went to 
worit at Greenlee Brothers, Jcrfin began working there ailso. 

Gustava died April 6, 1922 leaving her husband and nine 
children. Lilly cared for her father until she was to be married 
and then "ettie, who had been recently vd.dowed, moved in with her 
four childrer. ?he took care of John until his death i-iairch 1, 1925. 
John never vrrote a vrill beca^ose he thaugHb his children were t-uch 
good Christians that there vrould be no problem dividing; the estate 
after his death. He was wrong and there v?ac such a disagreement 
that bn'other aM sister would pass on the street and neither would 
show recognition tov.'ard the other. The matter was settled in court 
but it took many years for the wounds to heal. The Ring Reunion was 
begun in the latter days and it in still an annual event. 



Am m^l^ mM mrA bream mio *m4 ^*(>o^ ^-^ «ic«^£oa oo^ e^iK^xf •eiH>f< > i .^ 

Mti .!• lao« CX^i X< kJ^laip ttHOAtf x^9&2«m nrxlitliric TXavXX OAd 

Mi9k 4«|B b2 «» yiNiiJB •'9W t*^ •ofiio ham atiod il«£ fsffrf nanMiite 

r-.r^-r-xf Mf fli# ««r tim Xiinv :ew1ijA ^tvri tcol butBO iXXiJ .rt->.L' . i-ri 

'iiw ai AwRM ^teMobiw x^Diiwort oootf Jb. " " -it^^K oaxU tea 

' " ^ 3izl liinu n<<oV Icr »aao jio^ .iwxWXdo «icA 

ri»v :>,j-rnii>(3 sfri if;)|infi5 art eawaoOTf ILtii* « •^a'lw tBv«»0 nri^l. 

'r\bvib asXcfc-x^ on ocT Mi/«w 9*B»H^ .fixl^ aia«£^«i?dO l)«OB 

..'»mi-^;;>A;Mr; « ftouB ocv viwid hsut Jiooan* <unr f»Jf »<li3Nl> nid ■Zftite 

MiMM :(arf#l«a Am J mrn x t m vrfi ito anav Htrom -xw^eta f<t« 'Swi^<rM itfrf* 

>xuoo ni A»iM»« a«t «»M«K arfT .twf^ Mil Amho# fWi.tlfnp»oprr w«te 



JSANETTA BELLE HITTC 

On Januaxy 25, 1888 a ninth child was; bom to Gustava and John 
Rinp;, it was a girl. Although they named hei' Jeanetta Belle at birth, 
she was called Nettie throughout her life. Bein^ one in a family of 
ten children, she never had to look far for somethin,°: to do or scnie- 
one to do it with. She was a good helper for her mothei- who was 
always busy with ten kids around. 

Nettie and her brothers and sisters attended school in Stillman 
Valley which v?as a three mile walk from their farm. If the weather 
was bad, they just stayed home. Hvery fall Kettie would have a 
haircut and get a nev dress for school. 

Living on a farm, Nettie and her brothers and sisters had to 
make their own entertainment. If they weren't cutsxde playinfr 
games, they were inside sinsrin/?' while sonieone accompanied on the 
old pump organ. Most of the girls had a talent for music and could 
play the organ. They also named the cows on the fairtn. All thirty- 
six cows were known by naiiia. 

As she pxew older, Nettie became active in the young people's 
group of the Free Church in Stillman. Her first job ira.s housekeepinf 
for a store owner in Stillman. 



nrfot bn 
tritrtr yum x^* 

i»( " jrii ■on'' .;a oeriii £ e/ 

.loorfoa rxo'i sarxfe wen ji >tts £a« ;; 
d^crxd Tmt bnm •tS&eY 

\9mttlJtfMStf 

i:q blo 

"imnA oaL ;. I.' 

ot iBT/"^ i»H .njuiIltSP. at tionann ntrr^ «(i& lo orwcrts 



In 1910 Nettie left the faxm and moved to Rockford where she 
stayed with her sister Nannie and brt>ther- in-law Charlie. She 
worked for a time as second girl in the homes of some of Rockford's 
wealthy residents. After attendin,r Brown's Business Collepre, Nettie 
went to work at the Free "^ewin^ Machine Company, At noon she would 
work in the cafeteria where she met many people. Nettie ^•ra.s parti- 
cular about men but when she :ras introduced to Ernie Hultman it 
must have been love at first sight. 



•ff& .•ZItsIC wAl-fll-^Mfdcntf iius •incuBM -xfki^Bi* i»d iltiv b»xs^ 

•l^i»l ,«9»IXoC xaaolatrfl a*nM«^ snlfnuM^ rat&lA .B&auhlB^t \dtt»mt 

....... . .iis^^AO •rf* nl jhtow 



ERNEST JWLTMAN AM) TreTTIE HULIIIAN 
kS MAN AND WIFE 

ExTiie and Nettie were married October 7, 191^« Before their 
marriage, Ernie attended the ?irst Lutheran Church and IJettie 
attended the S^'irst Svangelical ?ree Church. Although Ernie had 
gone with Nettie to Proe Church during their courtship, he vrould 
not be married in Free Church. Since Nettie >fould not be married in 
a Lutheran Church, they went to ?!inneax)olis, Minnesota and were 
married by Reverend Halleen. While in Hinneapolis, they stayed at 
the Nicholas Hotel. When they arrived at the hotel on their wedding 
night, Bmie was so proiid and happy he walked up to an old soldier 
sitting in the lobby and said^ "I would like you to meet ray new bride, 
Mrs. lamest Hultraaun." 

The newlyweds returned to Roekfoi^i where, with Rosalia, they set 
up housekeeping on fifteenth avenue. Their only son was born October 
20, 1917 in the eld city hospital. Ernie was so proud he bought 
Nettie a diamond ring ajid had her and son Sanford taken home in an 
ambulance- Although named John ISmest Sanford after his grandfathers 
and father, he was alway called by his middle name, Sanford ^ Also 
born to Nettie arnd Ernie were two girls. Lillian Jeanette Ulrika was 



bluCH Mf tqiria^-xifoo -xisrli^ istfilTaib do-airtO •OK^ o:r ai^^s' o^ 

nt tmtrxjm 4Mf ion Msiov •i^isK ftonie .il9X]:;rfO aen^ nt tmimuji -^ ion 

•«« tea attmemJM ,allo7MiiniM o;f in^w x«*^* .rfoTuifO n^xadiirJ c 

i» tari/KH xmetf .eiXofwaniH nf allifV .nasIltK IxrvxavaF ^(^ l«hrUH 

lyiiAAa* TiMli av I*tod erii i-« bavjhna x»f<i nertV .loiol? njiIorfoiH arfi 

"satftlfM AC« n< ol qv J^HT/iv arf Y<(^jd Jbna Ac/onn; op kmh alrnCS .irf^A 

,aftl-sf r9a x" ***' <^ '•'^ *''UX Jbdr.'row ^^ .Jbfae te« t*'''^ ^^ "^ :gfti:&tt» 

" .tumiZisV taaa-r' 

oatfoi^O rrjod »«» nea xXn« TlarfT .^iii'.ave. dfrnmi^ti re 7WTl«^f>?f«a«)rf gr; 

i:*-.'ijoe ad Inoi^ oa a«f •ttna .lstiK(ieoii \tlo btc ttt al VX^f ,0S; 

It (i*jbii bre'^iute no* ftrui T»rf fiMrf bu 91IV InooaiJS a '•iiiaW 

^•f^M bsxnnMP ftttnS artel fta— ft rf^irailtlA .aonAfi/rfiu 

Oftiik .I/xoIaac «a«an Blbtlm alti x<f b^lLso xmttlm mm M .larfi/r^ Ixta 

Mv mflrXV •i^anaal nAilXiJ .slrriit owt amv aimff bnt ai#i»H o^ cntotf 



born October 8, 1919 • Although she was named Vivian at birth, when 
she came home frora the hoFipital Graxjdpa Hultman couldn't pronounce 
the name correctly so they changed her name to Lillian aXter Nettie's 
sister. Pauline Jane was born at home on iiarch 6, 1922. 

i^nie made a good living and took good care of his faaiily. He 
was a salesman for Forest City Wholesale Grocery Company. He was a 
good salesman and everyone liked him. When hs went to south Rockford 
to do business, the Italians \«5uld offer him 'fine tliat they had made. 
Since he didn't drink but did not want to offend the people, he would 
have tham fill one of his empty sample bottles a.nd then told them he 
would drink it when he got home. He was not only a salesman b\it a 
speculator. After buying bankrupt stock, he would then sell the 
merchandise at a profit. He had a coffee and tea store on Seventh 
street for a time and obi^ining the secret recipe for Duke's polish, 
he had planned on Taanufacturing it- Also investing; in property-, his 
last bi^ investment was purchasing; stock in the Schuller and Glands 
Company shortly before his death. 

Nothing was too gocd for "mie's ■•rife and family . Even durins; 
VTorld vJar I when sugar \m.s being rationed, there was always sugar on 
the Hultman table, Hettie was a very stylish dresser. ?he always had 
the biggest hats, the fanciest high-buttoned shoes and the most beauti- 
ful dresses. The women of the neighborhood would wait for Mrs. Hultman 
to walk by to see what the latest styles were- 



«».tw ,AfTlC ^B lU^vl xm£t\ BJBM era ■ 

rtn f*ahtuoo (\AmiluH aqflfeurrr Irsin-jc: paj r..7z ^ro? rirj;:? nn.-j 

T'.cf: *w aflAl« »nllttfi«5 .TSisfs 
Ja^l Biri 10 s^Ko bco,; :..o- 'vta ytivil l?ooji s »&mm •iirrF 

blxiow ^t ,&»io*4 Mi# te»tt* «^ ^n«ir ;>oa bih ititi jmtih ^*nbib or. 
ad mm* Mo& mdi tn* e<%ltt94 ■Jq—n ^i«H» «/<! *(« mo LWi t»ti& svcii 
« Jwrf .ruMBaLae « i^Civ #011 mw «H .•MOrf io^ «iri timbi ^t :*xirtb blvm 
tU IE»9 tmtii IkfiMW mi ,i!oot* S^rukuuf anJhcud -xei-lA .io^A£MM!4a 

,MUm •*«3MI ^Drt miP^-^tarmtm t>tii yaJm.t»t^ bam mXt M ten itfti€ 

slRjir iwjR tallwrlof? arW nl *>o + ; z^.tasrtanuq em ina«M»vui jjlcf &9Mi 

'■ nli^ ««ro1«<f Y-f^wvte xn-«T«^' 

fie ru^M/A sv»^Li ««»' arcMil ,i»noiitn yiiatf ajw *c^<yfa «»rfv i x;i. IItov 
iiilfii' '^ ;tUH htiwir toorfsatfrfiilan adv^ !• a»«ow «r*T .9»matfti> hfi. 



The Hultmans happy life was short li'/ed, however. Cmie 
died suddenly on January 19, 192^1- of a ruptured appendix and com- 
plications, lie left hir3 Klfe, daughter RosaJLia, three small children, 
as well as many friends. He had been a leader in the First Lutheran 
Church, being a trustee and Sunday School superintendent.. Someone 
said of hira, "EzTiie always had a cir?;ar In his inouth but he iras the 
nicest tjuy I ever did business r-fith." 

TIow Nettie was left vfith full responsibility for four children. 
Srnle left her with a small life insurance policy, no will, his money 
tied up in investments and real estate and she soon found herself in 
financial difficulties. People told Nettie to put her children in an 
orphanage but thoy were her whole life and she T^fonldn't do it. In 
those days a widow had to go to court and le^lly fret custody of her 
children which 'lettie did. 

The <iay after the funeral Nettie took her children and moved in 
:Tith her father. Selling the hone on Fifteenth Avenue, she made a 
dov-Ti payment on a t^c family house at 301 Williams Park, With the money 
she received from rent, she vras able to keep up vrlth the payments. She 
stayed at home for a year but needinr more financial support, she found 
a job at Bloomquist*s Furniture Store. Her sister Nannie who lived up- 
stairs watched after the children. 

Nettie's father died in 1925 a«i \<hen his estate was finally settled 
two years later, she had to move. Together with Fannie, Charlie and 



~'F»i«0' j{»9»T.L J^O'^« >vew *'» i-4. ifUl^A.I : /J (SP-J CJU : -J. 

Mit •»■ 3<i -it^'i <1^MM Blri nl «K^ £ liMvi nxsMlA •JtmS" «jiM )« &!«• 
u$fr^u OT Ycrz. I ; UtA. tUt^ rt^l Mv ti^i^-' ' 

ns tU anhiliiry -a»ri i»^ oi oit^K Met •Xqmt*! ^fmtilisoHYiJth LalsutrnWi. 
' ' ^MupH »fte ttm 0'i2l •latim ttt 9nmi xtidt >titf gj^fiwiyn 

t;" .c >cv;';;r' j«j* yIX«|eX jbn« *3i;o3 otf -o:* oJ^ f«ri wof>t»» « «i^«fc 99^dt 

« atea mii* ,«mi»v/. <1in«»ei'ii'% no Morf mM ;MijtCr«r .tsMlt^ -sea: -uu. 

itZ .iiiiMtay •'^■t (l^iv 91 4PMI oi ttXtfA «uw *ft» firwx «q«1 tev£»9*T arfa 
teutfS «te .inx^qqEs ia/iajinn mom -^mibmrna tud «««« a -soft Miod i« Amdm^ 
-^ tevlX ortw aejirvaK w>ai« kbH .•rxni?. 9su^txai/i ft'iaUffMDoM #» <fat « 

taa oL:.z.^:LL ,eixuLB^ rl^iw <a»it#a90T .ava* o^ bmi «rr1a ,'xaMI roccx »v^ 



their Ron Haxnhall; Nettie and her family moved into a.r aTtartraent at 
Ikyy Gh.arles Street. They lived el^ht Tj'jople in a two hedroom apartment 
until Karshall was married in 1^33 to Margaret Djupstrom. 

When BlooiBquist*p went out of buf=lner;s around 1929, Hettie wag 
able to earn a living by doing the washiT^r for some wealthy families. 
In 193^^- Charlie get her a job at Carpetline on Sever.th Street. vn-!en 
Sanford graduated frcir. high school in 1935 ^^^ found a job, they moved 
to their apartment or VJilliaais Par'<. Hosalia was raarried. in lQ3i^ and 
Lillian started nurses training at Swedis^h American Hospital in 1937 • 

On Hay 29, V^\-0 Nettie '.ras narriec'. to G^ist Djupctrora. Gust was 
alvrays p;ood tc Tettie and once they were narried he wouldn*t let her 
wor*:. In 19'^!-2 ITettie contracted tuberculosis and wa? in the Rockfoid 
Municipal Sanitcrium for a half year. She wss not completely cured, 
but was allowed to ro hone if she would tal'e care of herself, 

Pauline >ras married in 19^^., Sanford in 19U?, Lillian i-n 19'»-8, 
and in the summer of 19^ TIettie and Gust visited Sweden. The climate 
of Sweden was hard on Hettie' s lun^. and shortly after they returned 
horae, she went back to the ?aritoriura. She was in the ss^nitorium from 
July 22 until she died December 2f>, 19^9. Nettie was a lovinfc, hard- 
working vicanan and she vra.s loved by her fanily and friendr. Gust had 
been Rockford's last Macksmith, retiring in 195^1-. He died on 
January 30, 1970 after a sliort illness. 



tm ftmmtmm^ «• <4ai t^rmm x^trntH -xm- .^- ..wj?>^ ,IX«rf«X0lf ewe rlodt 

-••«t«fpt<l ivimifrJiM o# CC^I ni telKua sew XlArfaxsM XUav 

b.^tah.j' ^4r^;.,j aaoB rnoli TfibAajm wH anittb "trf SffivH « inu» cv' -,-..-, 
- - .- ^ ""^ no e»iX^«^5»D M <Ar/ « •»«* 4nKgi «ilT6ffS 4»C9i ni 

fw. v>cr • K- w^ar nm AklmoSk ,Htm1 am^ZliV no iti9airtM9^ xtorf* oi 
-" ^tMiA lialbmiS, J« ?vx-tn Lss^ aevvin Jbotxe^a tviJtIIJUL 

.^ ^^.,^^ icsiD ot tehSMKT (MM 9i4^9Si O^VI ,9Si yJsH oO . .. 

; ',^^r.^.^ ,-.< f>9iTxaa •»!» •'eof'* *oao bam 0lti»A oi i<WB •wrtte 

.^--^^ «r«+^r<pp^ itjn mtm mdZ ^swix l6f*< « -reft fli«h»q*hi»2 X«?loueaitfl 

,1^ h-»'9J: ni Aqplooa f?>^l.tU b^Jtmm atr- aalJUj^n 

«Kn fc^^ i^x.'V - '* '•> — '-^'^ ^tmfJtaottasM ftri^ o# jfMrf ^/tsv sda .•aaii 

flai< iiuK> .i!!te»Jh:l tec xXlnft «Nf t^ A»voX a«r •rin bus tumon rntifaoafv 
•^ »».^ '^'^ -frxJtd-rx t/tt-iwJlaiiXrf ioaC a**»T3l»oH ommT 



JOHN iUR?rB?!T '^ATTFOPD HUT^TfTAF 

John 15mest Sanford war. born Octo'ber 20. 191? to IDmest and Nettle 
Hultrtian. The first few years of his life were happy ones. He would vrait 
for his father to pull up in their Model T sedan and give him a ride to 
the "bam behind their house which they used as a giaxage. Sanford went 
many places with his father. On Sunday he vrould go with him to First 
Lutheran Church and sometiiaes during the week he would go with while 
his father transacted business at one of the stores. 

The first sorrow came to Sanford 's life vrhen his grandfather 
died. Sitting in chair at the funeral he wasn't scared for his father 
was sitting with him. Two years later it was a different story. This 
time Sanford was scared for it was his fathex'*s funeral and he v?as now 
sitting, alone. He was only six years old when his father died. Gone 
were the happy times when the Hultmans would vacation at Waubesa and 
Larson's Lake. Sanfoiti had to grow up faster than a boy his age 
should have been expected to. 

Sanford started first grade Brown School but transferred to 
Jackson School after they went to live with his grandfather Ring. 
He went through fourth grade ^^ Jackson School finishing grade school 
at White School after his family moved to Charles Street. He went to 



Junior hi/':h at Lincoln and finished his fr)rraal education by )=-raduating 
Central Hirch School in 19?5« 

After nrradiiatin^ he was given a job at Greenlee Brothers -'here he 
still worTcf'. today as a mechanical en,5ineero ^ince he na?. no'.' ahle to 
help support hi-^ Tnother, they moved into the ti-ro-family house she owned 
on 'fillisims Park. 

lanford had attended the ?xrst 'Kvangelical Free Church vrith his 
mother and f^isters since the death of hi:-; father. He had many friends 
at FVee Church and quite a few ^irl friends, '-^hen he finally decided 
to •settle dOT-m and rret r^sxried, it -^as a blond '-.tfede from StilLnan 
Valley named Linnea Carlson who he asked to be his wife. 



CARL ARON LAH30N 

and td-f e 

HEDLENA CHRISTINA JOHAKSDOTTER 

Carl Aron Larson was bom March 28, 18^6 in Fjaras TIalland 
in Sweden, lie was a farmer and it is kno'-m that he played the 
violin. On .^ebiruary ^, 1382 he was married to Helena Christina 
Johansdotter. Helena t-ias also born in Fjaras on Au^st l6, 1852. 
To Carl ard. Helena were bom two daughters, two sons, and another 
child who died at an early age. 3on Carl Julius was born on 
March 21, 1839. Helena died in 1392 when Carl was just three 
years of age. Unable to raise the children alone, Carl sent his 
children to be raised by their aunt and uncle. In 1907 son Gaxl 
left for the United States and it was some time after that father 
Carl died. 



W A JflAO 

UBTTOarWAHOL - AlOjaH 

basllMH Bsruil al bi>8i ,QS dortal^ crxod amtt nooiMd narxk InaZ 

bM berzAlq »/f iJbii nvoiT^T at ii Jxib xsjirxs^ e asw dU .nei)ew3 al 

tatttiiivO «aeXsH oi bmtrxam aew sri S88i ,4>S x^uumfs'l aO .ailoiv 

•£^61 ,dX lair^A no mtrtail at arxod oaXji ajw «n»I*H .isiiobcnBrio^ 

:B(ti«nA fna ,anoa owi ,aTBl<1|kttftb owi rraocf e:D»w jsn»X«H tns la«0 oT 

fto mod aaw suiluL IxsO nor. .sjyi iclxse ae i« bo lb oriw Mirlo 

•mU ^atit am IimO rtMlw S^BI nl bttb BnsIsH .9681 .IS doxaX 

Bid &tx9P. IxbO ,enol£ nvxJ[>Xldo •ili eaten ol eXif^nU .9^ \o enati\ 

XosO noa T09X al .aloau ttia ttws nltii x^^ bealgt Bd ot aeiblitio 

•xariSsn tMdi T»il0 •mli •noa asM it txis amiMtS X»ilnU etii lol ^1«X 

.f)slf> X:i«& 



GARL JULIUS CARLSON 

Carl Jiilius Caxlson was bom to Carl and Helena Larson March 21, 1889 
in Pjaras Holland, Sweden. When his mother died, while he was very young, 
his father sent him to live with an aunt and uncle. His uncle was a 
cabinet maker or woodworker and Carl lived with than until he left 
Sweden. Also living with the family was the nephew of Carl's aunt 
whose name was John Caarlson. John also left Sweden and eventiially 
became Garl*s hired hand. 

Carl left Sweden at age seventeen arrivim; in the United States 
in the year 1907. He made his way to Stillraan Valley, Illinois and 
the home of Charlie Hambirrg. Charlie's brother had visited Stlll- 

TO 

man and returning to Sweden, Carl l^sd been encouraged ''make his 
home in Stillraan. He stayed with the He^burgs until he tarted 
working for Gilbert Smith near Holconb. Next Carl woiked for a 
man named Dan Wills, 'nfhile Dan Wills was in an institution for 
a short time after suffering a breakdown, Carl wa.s hesidraan on the 
farm and had Sd Ring help him. After leaving the V.'ills farm, Carl 
went to work for Haa Richolson on a farm neax Steward, Illinois. 
When Tom Richolson moved to a farm near Stillraan, Carl was able 
to renew acquaintances. 



tot' (Tl. J«AD 

0681 ,IS liaraK acmrxal Mftmff Ine JhoiO •# frratf ««* rroafrtBT aulXvl. I^uiO 

ts»v uw art •li/lw teib wl#«« aid n»dV .xMtewa ^taalloh ajnaf^ fli 
« •■« •Xoov alH .•lomr Ine incu nz dttv ev/X oi aiirf tnes iBttiJi'X mill 
ilaX ad IttoL- mmttt tUtv bevil LxaO ban tmi^tomboe m in lit Ham ianltf^o 
ifiiM e'X'xaO te w^rfqwi erfi asw xXi«Bl adi rfilw anivlX oaXA .n»tew8 
xXX.st/ir»T» tea fwtewS iJ»l otIm irrfol .noaXTsO mioL ajsn mauaa oaoffir 

.Inad terM b'X-xaO •sasowl 

m^atB te^inU arii^ cri jiAhri^REa n»«^iMnr«« a^vs #« imbmi?' ty»l Ixr' 

boM mtcalUl ,^XX«V lumlUtB ot \0n nltt •Jam •H .V09X «mv 

>XXilS te^laiv Iwrf nmritcrai a'alXxaifC .^TixtfiuH aiXxwiC lo •md 9tt* 

aX/^ 9'iac'' b!i-'Mn:L'or>r.9 neatl bad ItaO ,iia&a*8 oi :ainXfrxiii«i: bu ■•■ 

iai - -nKfasH adi riiiv te^fita aH .nMrntltse al Mod 

s -atfl te]how XxaO 1»K .rfaeoXoN xmn d:ti«5 J^cadXlC -xol lyxi^mr 

fit n^t^uSUmnt ita ni mbw aXXiW luQ mlltiV .aXXiW ruia tewM lUM 

0tlS no IT— (hid a«ir XxoC tmtohUmrtt » snXvalCloa -zoila aai^ trotlm m 

JCxsO .*?£! cXXlV «U jviItmX loilA .jiid qrXad TwrXR HI iMd tea km!) 

f I tbtmft9. trnm irx£\ » no ooaXodoXfl aoT -xo^ 3hKw oi inov 

9ltf^ nMr fT«0 .lUMdrXllS rtflon arxjA m oi Aavcw irooXorioiR ooT narfV 

. nooftA^nlJirpo« N»n»:r Oi^ 



Gaxl Has active in the Free Ghvirch of Stillman Valley as well 
as the youiv^ peoples ftxoxxp. A very handsome younfr man, nviny of the 
girls had their eye on him. Carl, however, had his eye on a jnoun^ 
woman who had recently come from Sweden ard it was Hilda Bengtson 
who he asked to be his wife. 



•fl# le HUH »ium lavet wwlwrl t»t A .qiMroi s«I^FO«r jhbioy •<<# m 

yoivt « 00 rt* >i^ 'M ,T>¥»wo d .XibO .B±rf ao vt* 'XJtadi iMd alxts 

■— tytff abXlH UK #1 fn« ns^- " -r~^ «jboo zlSnmon bait oriw aiwmr 



BSNGT 3WSNS0N 

and '.Tif e 
SUSANNA JOHNSON 

Bengt Swenson was "bom March 8, 1864 and his wife Susanna 
Johnson was bom April 29f I863. Bengt was a farmer all of his 
life. He was a poor nan and very religious. The family would 
go to church on Sunday but they would have to walk as they did 
not have a bu^y. Bom to Benf^ and Susanna were six children. 
Sva was bom September 15 # 1838; Hilda on February k, I891j 
Anna Lisa on January yi, 1394; Ruth on January 5. 1898? and then 
Gu'otav on Hay 1?, 1901; and Oscax vra.s bom September 8, 19CW-. 
Only Hilda left Sweden and moved to the United States. Susanna 
had two brothers and one sister living in Stiiiman Valley, Illinois. 
One son, Gustav, never married aJid is still living in the old home. 
Susanna died about 19'*'9 and l}en«rt in 1952. 



■iMZU 



AUUBMfC vliv F.hi btiM <tid6l ,6 rftncaK mod &sw aoeffowc Jt^isi: 

aiii le XIa ibkuiIl « b«n ^bix^S .C^)6l i^ ItsqA tnod ami noanrfoL 

btutm xllMM^ MfT .axn}±s^s^ t^iav isns rwa Tooq « bjiw ^H .•111 

lilli t*<1^ ** ^Umu •# •vjtti MxKw ifSfU iud ^AfxiL'S no rfsxudo Oit ag 

.orzMlrts xia rxB« aoiuhut^ tas ian*S oi naoG >XS!^ » »>nsci i<m 

- rxstritf*^ no JiftliK ; -x«d«»^e8 irxocf am mv2 

ff»rU jsui |0^ftl ,^ Txsuuil no ri^H |4^U ,IC TX^^M**^ no ssiJ «imA 

.<K>^I ,fi :c»rfnB;rq«8 nrotf tjew i&a^O fin* iXCXjX ,VI X*H no va/^uO 

MBaattat ,o9iai2 ta&tnU tit o& bavcm taa ttobamE i^I abllh \IaO 

.attnllll .x^XXaV n«iXIi^8 nt y^xtvJtl -mtala mm brut arxatitorrd o*tJ tati 

.MnH ft£o wtt 0i tfttrll Ltlta at bna batrxjm -nvvn ,ymtatjQ ^noa •oO 

.^191 al iame baa ^ifRI tuoda balb atmaaa^ 



HILDA MARIE BSircTSON 

Hilda. Kaxie Bengtson was bom February k, 1891 to '.>us2Lnna 
and Bengt Swenson. She •.ra.s born aM raised on a small farm in 
Vislanda, Sweden. Hilda attended a school near her home poing 
throiigh ei^t yearr, of j^rstde school and four years of high school. 
?he school was located close enougli so that Hilda and har brothers 
and sisters could ■•^aUr. home at noon for dinner. 

Bein^ somewhat independent and adventuresome, Hilda decided 
to leave her home and family arai move to the United States. 8he 
worked in the fields of stwie of the farms in Sweden to earn enough 
money to make the trip, and she also borroned some money fran her 
sister. Her mother l^iad two brothers ard. one sister living; in 
Stillman Valley, Illinois so when Hilda arrived in America, that 
was her destination. Ghe left Sweden or: her twentieth birthday, 
Februaiy i+, 1911., 

Arriving in Stillman Valley, Hilda stayed with her aunt and 
uncle iintil she found a job at the Osgood farm. She was house- 
keeper at Osf^ood's earning ^3*00 a week. After repayinp; her sister, 

she saved her money to purchase a wedding gown and linens. Often 
diirinfr the evening she would waLk to the Hia<T farm and visit viith 



jMuuHuic: ttt X^ei .*^ Tx*- 'tsaaC eloBM shLlV 

al msmt ILamn a no i»sijrt ixie morf &sir ^AH .fU»aa»«B ^^yxeQ boui 



■»ff 



Am >iiu« nd (Uiw tev^a aMiH ,t«XX«V aamJlltZ at anlvlrxA 



Gur.tava Rinf^. When it came time for Hilda to leave, Gustava would 
have her son Ed walk with her. As they neared Osjroods, Hilda would 
tell 5d that he had walked her far enough and he could pp back. 
Many of the youn^ women in Stillman were jealous of Hilda as it 
seemed some of the eligible bachelors had their eyes on her. One 
woman went so far as to accuse her of waiting purposely in the 
livery stable so Carl Carlson would give her a ride home from 
Stillman. Hilda didn't have many boyfriends but when Gaxl Garlson 
asked her to marry him, there was no doubt in her mind that he 
was the man for her. 



bloem MTM^uO ,trramt ecf jifxffH tl/i. Milt WMO $t fisrfV ....:, ^.^.i;^- 

hlsrot abllH ,«teosaO Jbaoswr >:Mlt bA .rwri rf^iw ilsH bS ao« "swi »T«d 

.iomd «% Mooo aW Ms (tPlvoa« tflt larf fviIXsw bad ti tj^Jt Vfi llmt 

tl a« «MiH )• 8tfor«9t *3t»w nsallltB, at n9mo» Jinufox «(^^ "^ Xf*^ 

MiO .TMf no ««nc» xttii bati wnalitoad •Mt^le »'^^ '^•^ ?««>« tenMa 

Mfi nl xlesoqrxu? :iiRiH«ir Ibo ^nrf •aoooa ol c^ ^w v,» &r»v fUMWw 

tfonA •aori •M? m tmd •vt^ Mbwit mMuCTte'^ ''-,«'-: ^.r. ..r^ =+o '\f3>Til 

^.■,,.W ^«V „^.,: ._^f^+ gjyif 



CARL CARLSON km HILDA BSflGrJON 
AS MAN AND WIPE 

Carl and Hilda were married January 29, 191^ in Rockford by 
Reverend Pearson. A few days before their marriage, they went to 
Bloomquist yiimiture Store and Agnew & Cole where they purchased 
all of their furniture and household floods for ^353 •9^' The 
newlyweds stayed with Frieda and Prank Anderson for a short time 
until they bepan farming: on the Bly farm. 

Shortly before the birth of their first child, the United States 
was drawn into Jorld War 1. Carl was not called upon right away to 
figrht because he was a farmer and married and by the time they 
would have needed him, the war was over. Born to Hilda and Carl 
on October 3, 1917 was their first son, Wilfred Gustav. A few years 
later they moved to another farm, the "30. " It was on this farm 
that their daufrhter, Linnea Heirie, was born on January 15, 192?. 
vhen Linnea was two years old, the family moved to the Gueld farm 
where Carl and Hilda remained until their retirement. It was here 
that son 31mer ras bom. He died at a^e thirteen months of pneumonia. 

Both Carl and Hilda were active aembers of the Pree Church in 
■^tillman and later in the Mission Covenant Church. Carl was trustee 



f«r£f<cruje Ysrf^ tmtU •loD A wmirA fcn« toitoi . eiu^lirtu^ iaJ'tr-rrodlS 

•«r t 10^ eJtiewa &rori»Rjiorf bn* ertuilmtfi ilsrfi "Jo II« 

mmli ^:sOil£ £ ^0"^ nofmlnA I'ner'i ban fibeJhr^ rf^lw fir<c«^8 aJb»«y:Iwwi 

.nasi x-C^ ^^ 10 ■uptKXB'i a«^*(f y*rt^ Xiimf 

»»*«;tS I»&laV tit .Wirio i^«Til xl*<li lo rfiiclrf •rf* woterf Yl-f^^OffS 

oi ^toaia ^itiJhc rr«qu bellao ion mtai X-zsO .1 'xsV blioW oitif nw^oi) mm 

^d^ eaii sdi t*' fn^ ftairrMi brus T»n:«) ii esv vd esusMMf irf^iH 

ItsO In« fMlH oi irxofi .:»yo aaw Tjm tit ,Jiiri iisiwsn •v«ri Mmm 

navt «•*) A .TjwtauD fwndXiW ,n«e iirxil tiMli bjw ^XPI ,C -x^dcioQ no 

■oaI aiiil no ajM il ' .06" e/fi ,«xb1 :i»f(tons oi tevow x»'^ i»i»L 

.t^Pl ,fl t'xaimaL no ertod bmh .•JhtsM aenalJ .voirf^Ab xtodi iarfi 

«T«1 UotfO vrli oi fcovofl Y-C^aaI o^^i ti»Xo otxjmij, ewi ajw oMUXla norfV 

•rrmi Kjr>! il .iaonrrlioa ilodi Ztitus bmnlsimr jiMfK fin/s IxeO ondu 

.staoBvn^ "to acfinoa nooirirli •>»« iA teJ^f> eH .trsorf ativ isnij^ no« ijvli 

MfS^ Mtt %• afsedflM ovlioji 97«v MbllH bns ItsO rtiof; 

••#wrxi ami XxsO .rfTwrfD iiuwovoO noisalN ilt ai i»$mI boM ammlSttZ 



for a time and Hilda '.ra,s a member of the Dorcas and >i omen's 
Missionary Societies, ohe was also a Sunday School teacher. Caocl 
was an honest, good -hearted man and he felt that if he couldn't pay 
for something, then he wasn't ^olnp to have it. He wasn't an ex- 
tremely strict father, but if one of his kids desex-ved a licking, 
they got it. Hilda was able to understand the 5np;lish lamma^e 
after livinfr in the United States for some time, but she never 
spoke it. When Wilfred was married in 19^+2, Hilda was forced into 
speaking English since Wilfred's wif^ Charlotte, could not under- 
stand Swedish. 

Wilfred and Charlotte live<i and helped on the farm until 
they star-bed farming on their own. They have three sons; Roj°:er, 
bom March 17, 19*+^! Russell, "bom March 16, 19^5; and David, born 
July 3, 1952. Vfilfred. ard Charlotte now live in r^tillman Valley 
idiere Wilfred is an electrical contractor. 

Hilda and Carl never enjoyed many of the conveniences found in 
the city while they were on the farm. Electricity cane to the farm 
about 19*^3 • The first automobiles owned by the family were a Motel T 
and then a Model A. There was a pump in the kitchen for soft water, 
but drinking water had to be csirried in from outside. They did, 
however, have an attached outhouse which wa„s a convenience not. en- 
joyed by many farmers. They raised cattle mostly and com and oats 
for feed. 



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i(af I'oAXmk) arf li tsAf li«l «m1 tea luut bm t t t m A -bMf% .taccMd na aaw 

-a» «a /*oMH •!! .#1 •▼£' '*■ '"-tcfh yamm ad naitf ,?^ifUaao8 tea') 

.snijiail a Aarwaal BhiH ..... a^ <»io 11 fwi ^iml^tTi totxis \lmmrst 

•jiatoifial ifallsBl aiU Ixia^antet/ o^ aXtfa tUM jJbiXiH .i-i i^o^ xa<li 

i»v«a «la it*^ «ftKi^ apoa tcolt aa^a^ii fiaiinU arfi ' " • ' -^ila 

•#nl Jbaaon^ aaw aAC^I ,S4>9X nl ItaXnoaa atsK fiat'' ' ' cxra 

•"wmimu ion feloao .s^^oIiartO ^s*^' ■ -'■— -'♦'^^ .,.. „^,*aqa 



:•-*» w V t i-' 



IfJ-au aruDl siii no btf ix^i .-.^ )-'^ 

,990fl laoon aavii avai< x»rfT .iw© xiedi " — '■ — *♦ - -. . . ,^.i- 

morf .tlraa tea ii4>91 ,^1 ri»ai# orotf .IXaan.-. r-v- ,>^ . o-xM rrxorf 

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Oi ixiuvi rii.wlnavnoo adi lo yo^m Aa^otna Tsvan X-xaO ftna jRbi^ . 

■sal arfi ai aaao ^^ioJCTioaia .aoal 9dS no o:e»w i;^<^ aXIdv xi-to ttt 

T XaioK a aaav xllms'i •di \d LaoHO aaXJitfoao^ua tnti tttTt .C^X ^ootfa 

.laiaa iloa -xol nadaiJJ artt ai qta^ a aaw arcarfT ./ XateM a narfi Jna 

,h:Jb xaifT ,9httitvo WKTfi at tmiruo fuJ o& bf' -»t- ^jit^txb #arf 

tea 99a0U»vrmo a aak rfolrfv aeuo^iro barf9«j.» ^* >7«a/1 ,rEayaw9<f 

.. — ,. ._- -'-'--r -'-^tf- hn-'.-r -'->'''^ — -— '* —- "d fja^ot 



Linnea was married in 19^7 and in 1953 » Carl and Hilda retired 
from the farm. They then built a house and moved to Stillman. In 
1957 they visited friends and relatives in Sweden traveling in an 
airplane for the first time. Retumin^r home, they' both agreed 
that things had cl"ianp;ed too much in Sweden and they could never 
live there. 

Life in the city vfasn't as scheduled as it had been on the farm. 
They could visit friends without having to worry about frettinrr home 
in time for chores. During warm weather they would tend to their 
large garden and Carl would often help on a friend's farm. In the 
winter Carl would catch up on his reading while Hilda would keep 
herself busy crochetlnf^. Carl read a lot and he had a ^od memory 
for remeraberinjpr even the small details of what he had read,, 

On JaJiuary 10, 19? 2, Carl passed away after a short illness. 
He left behind his wife, two children, five prandchildren and three 
great-rTrandchildren, as well as many friends. Hilda still lives 
in her home in ".tillman. Her four f^andsons are married and be- 
tween them they have blessed Hilda with six preat-grar^sons and 
three great-gramddau^hiers . Hilda's only f?:randdau^hter is still 
attending college. 



al .;:£jr. iar«0« JboA •Wl 3 iJLtuiS c i«t •fU JW:t2 

Itoo^rv diotf ton^ ^nm-. ■ *fi .««. . ^di -xol •(!(»I<fxis 

iwvs.-r ixTiraa YAtfi bcu asbamE rl tioxm coJ bo:»aailo hui s-naldt ia(i& 

MRff :>w at f^lyf^i iuotiJty 9tfs»Jt^ tl&±y bluvo x^sCT 

twmtftt ^^mte « vMt* X^im ib»iia«q Irc«D . . \:-x«ufxjil. oO 

••vJlX XLUa «ftUK .stMAMl -^fum 9* XIm «« ,r»rxlx(idDiKx«39-^«e^ 

-•4f btut fmirsjm wnm aaoclirunA srol «|iK .n—trii^ a4 »<>iod tibd mi 

bat. amtetDMx^mmfi ^* <(^^^ «hr>N ^aiii«X(f •vsrf y^c»<^ a*^ a »>o# 



LINNEA MARIS CARLSON 

Linnea Maxle Carlson wais bom Januairy 15, 1923, the danfrhter of 
Carl and Hilda Carlson. 3he was bom on a farm near Stillman Valley- 
called the "30.' Living on the farm tended to be a lonely life for 
Linnea. In the summer she would help en the farm, feedinf: the pip;s 
and chickens, driving the hay wa^^on, and helping her mother. As a 
young girl, Linnea viould follow her dad as he did the chores. By the 
ti-Tie it fi;ot dar!;, it ivas also time to milk the cows and since she i>ras 
afraid of the cows, Linnea would head for the house. 

Thrashing was always a fun time of tine year x^or therrj would be 
lot 3 of people around. Vacations were unknown of to most farm families 
but Carl would often take his family to Stillman on a Saturday nipht for 
Ice cream. Sometimes they would go to Rockford ana have foot-ionr 
hotdogs. The Fourth of July, li^asta: and Christmas were big holidays 
and Limiea would always ^et a new dress, iiemorial Day and the Sunday 
School picnic were also big events. 

Linnea attended both grade school and high school in Stillman 
Valley. She would usually wall? the two miles to school with her 
friend from up the roaid and if it was bad weather, they would pet a ride. 
Because she was in the pep band in hicch school, Linnea vrent to all the 



te :»trt7tfi&b arii tCS^^' ^fu>r(«L a^otf 8«w floaXtcaO sixain «enn: : 

YaliaV rear rrxorf luBv, ^ '>riH bos LibO 

a^q arfi ;yiii>»a'i ,inu>. r,xxiJ 

a aA .^ad^o qimi iiu Jbna 

ad.' nvoy, 

saM arte aoeia iaa u ■ ^ji tmiJ oai«. 

/nla 

sailiaa'i 

'VToI-iooi avati igna mmix aol 

law aaaiaixffC/ lir 
X^ nb wao . ina 

.ttinava Tito Of .: 
ruMlii^E Ai Xaarfaa di^ taj^ loodoe eitax^ iliod be>tiioS&e M»nrt^ 

■xmrt ilthi Xoc«i:>e oi aaXia cmS atU Mm t^Xaoau Ziliiow l "^ v 

.mktx a i»:i Umw tm^^ ,'xa<tfaaw iarf aaM il tf bam bman »ti.f qu mcrti fmaiil 

aif^ XIa oi ifiaw aannlJ .Xoorfoa ifnJM nl Bnatf q^q ecit nt aycw ada aHt/aoafl 



baskefball p;ames tliat were out of to-.irn. Arriving home late on Saturday 
night, she would walk to the Art Nelson home in Stillman and stay the 
night. 

Liiinea grajduated from high school in June of 19'*'1 and started 
working at the Tester Corporation in July. She lived honie and rode to 
HocI?:ford with another employee for the first year. Vfhen she began 
working the night shift, she found a room in Rockford and v;ould stay 
the week returning home on weekends. After spending a v.-eekend at home, 
Linnea would usually maJ:e it back to Rockford in tine for the evening 
worship service at the First Evangelical Free Church. Like many young 
women, she had her eye on a certain young man who also went to Free 
Church. Sanford Kultman must have had his eye on Linnea, too, for it 
wasn't long before they started dating. 



SANPORD HULTMAW AMD LIMNEA CARLSON 
AS MAN AND VilFE 

Llnnea and "anford were marrisd on September 27, 19^7 on the 
farm of Linnea's parent-^ iv. ^Itlllman Valley. They bad been enf^a.'?ed 
for about a year b\it had to vrait to ret narriefl. \jntil they found a 
place to live, Apart:nients and hOMses -were p.o hs,rd to find th^t 
people would look for the deaths in the parsr and then call and ask 
If they could buy or rent the deceaf^ed's residence. They live(3. in 
an apartment on Bouth Ghicar'O Avenue in Rockford until they purchased 
their hone at 2015 Charles Street in 195C. 

Bom to Linnea and Sanford on T'ay 3. 1950 vreis Bryan Ernest 
Sanford. A snail six and a half pound boy- he (^rew into a lar^re 
boy. Bryan T^ras a irraduate of "^ast Ificrh School and ^ock Valley Gollese. 
He majored in sociologj'" at Trinity Collefre in Deerfield, Illinois 
graduating; in 1972. He rras married to Joyce Carlson on June 5. 1971 
and he has two sons. Jeffrey Steven was born March 29 y 1973 and 
Gregory Bryan was bom July <^, 1975 • Bryan now lives in Rockford and 
is employed by Qaiacar. 

Sanford, like his mother, contracted tuberculosis and spent 
one year in the Hockford Municipal "lanitoriiom in 1952. Linnea took 



care of 3Tya,n during this time vrith the help of her ,^ood frisnd 
Mar^erite Strid. AlthoiOc-^h it took a considerable amount of time, 
Sanford regained his good health aM was able to return to work. 

It vas not until January 12, 195-'' that their second child, 
Linette Marie, wa- bom. '-fhen Linette was six monthr. old, Sanford 
became ill af:ain only this time with rheianatic fever. Altho\i(Th he 
vras confined to bed for aone time, life was not totally unbearable, 
Linnea would r^et Linette in her Jump-seat alon^r; r.ide of the bed 
with plenty of toj^R to keep her occupied. Linette would throw the 
toys on the floor and her dsA -rould pick them up a^ain and so they 
entertained each other for most of the da,y. 

Sanford and Linnea moved from their home on Charles Street in 
the fal?. of 1973 and now reside at 1664 Telemark Drive. They are 
both fine. Christian people loveci by family and friends. They pro- 
vided their children ^ith childhoods that were full of :=;ecurity and 
love and they never cease to love and support their crdldren and 
grandchildren. 

I, Linette Multman, graduated from F.ast Hi.r^h School in 197^ 
and I am now attending Rock Valley College. I plan to f:raduate from 
Rock Valley in May and attend Trinity Collef^e next fall. 



PERSONAL NOTE 

Researching and learning about my family's past has piiven roe 
a better graf.p of history. It has made events of the past more relevant 
for they v;ere thin(:;s vfhich Happened when someone that I can relate to 
was alive. The year 1917 is no longer just the year the United States 
was drawn into ?iorld War I, it is also the year my father was bom. 
The election of 190S had little meaning to me until M Rin^' said that 
he voted for Taft in the election of 1908. I can noi< relate to events 
of the past i'or my ancestors lived thorough those events. 

I'm now better able to understand my parents and why thsy act 
the way they do. i can now see why my father would never allo^r my 
mother to work while my brother and i were f^'owin<?; up. Having a 
parent uo vjatch over you while you're growing up is important and my father 
wanted to give us what he never had. 

I also recognize and appreciate tlie herita'T;e which my ancestors 
have given me. It is a herita.'^e of wealth, not of money, but of love. 
One of my aunts itiade the coinment, "If only dad had lived we might all 
be rich." I think we are rich, and I thank my parents for passine; the 
love on to me which :ras passed on to them from their parents. 



PICTURES ARE INCLUDED IN THE ORIGINAL 



U 11 I T 3 D 3 T ;. T E 3 J' A LI S R I C A. 
. Sa'--^T3 OF CCJIJTY OF 

ILLi:iOI3, Jinneoc..,jO 33. 

\h?j IT RE:;EivIB:i?.£D , Tha't; l/H the I'-'t '..-i.y of Uovma'ze-c in tht year of oux* 
Lord, One Thousand Eight Hiindi cd -",nd Eighty E--t,ht personally c-pjeared 
befors RU?"^ C. BAILEY, Pred._ding, Judge of sie County Court of gIig 
Coimty of '.7iai.Gb--1.5O c^iiG State aforesaid (':he .■.■--me bein^j a Cour'u of 
Recor', Laving and e2^erci3ine- corxion lav/ jurisdiooion, a ^oa.1 and a 
Clerl-:), anj. sitti-ig judicially for the dispatch of ousiness at the 
C:i"rt House, in the city of Rockforo., in the County aforesaid, John 
Hultman an alien born, free white male person, above the a?:e of Tv/enty- 
One Years, and applied to the said Court to be admitted to become a 
naturali:^ed citi-^en cf the United States of ixmerica, pursuant to the 
several -cts of Congress heretofore passed on that sulgject, and the 
•said John Hultman having thereupon produced to the Court record testi- 
mony sho'.vine that he has heretofore re'oorted hiriself and filed his 

h 

Itfeclaration of his Intention to hecorae a Citii^en of the United 3tate2, 
according to the provisions of the said several -^cts of Con,-?ress, and 
the Co'irt being satisfied as v/ell from the oath of the said John 
Eultnan as from the testimony of John Ilelson and Gust 0. Garlin ■."ho are 
•knc'.n to be citizens of the United States, that the '.:aid John Hultman 
has resided within the limits and under the jurisdiction of the United 
States, for at least five years last past, and at lea .t one year l6,st 
past within the State of Illinois, and that during the whole of that 
tine he has behaved himself as a m-;n of good nortil chc.ractsr, attached 
to the pri*.ciples contained in the Constitution of the United itates 
;ano. well disposed to the good order, v/ell being and happiness of the 
iS'ar.e, and tv.'o years and upward having elapsed since the vaid John 
Eultman re oorted himself and filed his Declaration of his Intention as 
'aforesaid, IT V/A3 ORDERED that the said John Hultman he "--emitted tc 
!,ta:-:e the oath to support the Constitution of the United States, and 
,;the usual oath -vhereby he renounced all allegiance and fidelit-y to 



;v :-7 forei.^n orince, yotentT.te, stuts and aoverei?;ni3y -'."hatever, and 
mors particularly "o Oscar 2nz i:ing of 3v/eden ancl Ilorv/ay vhersof he 
,v;£S her?,to-ore a subiect-, v;hich said OL.th havinj been adninistGrod 
to ths iaid Jol.n Plultia-in iDy t'r.e Clcrl: of said Court, it _.:. ordered 
b-T- the C3-.;rt that the said John Hultman he iidmitted to all ano singular 
the riirhts, privileges and i:-.nunitie3 of a naturali::ed citi.en of the 
United :t-dte3, i.nd that the _ar.s "be certified hy ^he Clerk of t}:i3 
Court, under the seal of said Court, acco:din?ly. 

Ii; 'JZiSZTiICir/ .niERSOi', I'he Seal of said Court 
i3 hereto affiled at the Cleric's Office in. 
the City cf Rochfor'., this Ist aay of 
llover/oer --. '^ . 1388, and of the Independ- 
ence of the United States the One 
Hundred and Thirteenth. 
3y order of the G^urt: 



i 



( seal) 



Marcus A. Ilorton 



Clerk 0^ the County- 
Court o:f V/inneh: go 
County, 



ST^TZ 0? ILLIi;0I3, ■) 

) 33. 
Winnehc'.jo County. 

I, Trunan Johnson, Clerk of the Gcimty Court v.'ithin and for 
said County and ^tate, and custodian of the Records thereof, do herehy 
certify that the ahove and foregoing is a true a,nd correct copy of 
the Record of the order of r^aid Court adinitting John Eultman to ■be- 
come a citi:3en of the United States. 

Ill TR3TIII0CY './H3R305', I have hereunto 
set my hand and affiled the Seal of 
said C^urt, at the Gtty of Rockford, 
this 11th. day of March -x. ^. 19.\1 





y^/ ;> j.^i-f-^.-u . v>rfz^^ y^^^U C l er k . 



■Rv 



lie 2uty. 



rPAY. AUGUST 26, 1807. 

i / ■ 
I ^ 



PAGE THP.E 



' r -J 



.- ^^ ^.-™.^ y-<^-^^ p"^^ p^ r'"'^ P^^-' 



Th3 H. Al. Chaimers stock wili be closed 



>nsisting of 



■■it 



^ In fact everything in the store. The entire stock wiJl be sold at le.s,, 
than wholesale prices, it will pay you to call and investigate; the sooner 
the better. Opening day. 



l 



TO-MORROW, o A. M. 

122 SC-'-'rl CHURCr-" 







k 



jBUYS 



CWAUIH!?:^ 



STOGI0 



Ernest H'lltmnn ii 
t' of Church Sli 



C'se Out Stock; 



■ft Grocery. 



l-EJmpM Kiiltman, formerly connect^| 
|a with Ui« Forcsl. City Wbolf'SiiIeS 
Gvorery company, has purchased the, 
H. ^r. Chalraera' grocery stock, andjj 
K'ili (iisposo.of ■the same at a \ovl^ 
price. ' ;'i 

I, Mt. Uriitnmn wii! conLIniie at Cha.l*j 
fcers" olrt' stand, on South Churchy 
6^,ct., until ih<; first of the monthiy 
liter which lie will move ti> Sevent:^^ 
Itvect, occupying th« store in Sveaj 
Stuslc hall, arijoinlnig the branch \y 
trnry Dchlrlne to diKpof'e of his; 

llork, Ml-. 1: I" '■'f-'- ^li* 

|am« at A 



'■•W 



CtiFhfct SI UK! 

OH 7TH ST. 



ICiiusI Ihiltiiwiii <;«ts l.in-i- on Sloi* 
ill S\.ii Mitsic H:ill lilixU I'loiii <'"'■ 
I,ilir:i!y lti);iril — l!iiys llu' Clml- 

■ iii.-iV .'•^(oik. 

Eriiost Hultnian. who \v;is fornior-- 
ly connoi Cfd with tho Fon-st Cily^ 
Mniolcsali^ llrocpry ("oinii:iny. has se-;. 
cured ii ieu!-e foi' the- ston; in the, 
Sv<>:v Music H:ill BlocU. lectiitly va-j 
ci'iteci bv W. A. Peterson, tlie tiiilor, ! 
and infnd.s to open a c-offee and toa,; 
store thera about Oct. 1. Ho sot the; 
le:rsr troiii tUo library boiird and it. 
will ((iiuiuuo until the expiration ot^ 
(he hoiud's lease on the lowjr lloor ot: 



the biiildiiin; 



Mr. Ilnltnian is thor+, 
iuted with the req\ilre'^ 
Imsinoss lie is entering^ 
a„,l ,1 ,1 1^ well .nofinalntod on Sov-g 
.ouih t-unei. ilo will eqiiiji hi.-^ slorejj 
Willi an Mllractivc lUorU a.ul the nioslj 
modern fixUires and Intends to niak^ 
a titron;; bid for luitronagn. *" 

INlr. Miillnian has jUKt purchase 



the ph'cl; or ■'' 
^roi!,.e sin.v .V 
which he Will 
be lore openiuf 



anit; 




I haTfl imrchasort the entire 
bsnkriii>l stock of H. M. Chal- 
mers CoffiH? and Spiro Mills and 
■aill. for llio ooiiiinu wpek K'jU all 
poods en hand ;u same low prices 
tiat have been prevailing during 
Oie past month, a bargain In 
everything in the store at less 
tJhan wholesale cost. Will give 
a few price.s rs a convincing 
proof: 

TEAS 

Oolong 60c Teas, lb 27c 

Ceylon Tens, 6Cc Tea, lb 27c 

English Broakfast 50e Tea, lb 27c 
Basket Fired Jap.in 50c Tea, 

per lb 25c 

Japan Siftings lb 12c 

SUNDRIES 

Japanese Cups and Saucers, 

up from 15c 

Japanese Creamers and Sugars, 

up Irom 24'-. 

Japanese Plates, up from . . .20c 

^ Jelly Giacscs. dozen 18c 

H Water Tumblers, dozen 20c 

I CROCKERY 

\* Gibson Soap Polish, 19c size.. 8c 

■•'i Glosa -Starch, ICc size 4c 

Ij! Cold Water Starch, 10c. size.. 4c 

n E-Z Stove Polish, 10c size 8c 

N Ground Ails;;icc. Pepper, Must- 
s' 3fd, Cloves, Gingrr, etc., 10c 

U\ iiio 7c 

l\ Extracts, ICc size 8c 

j^ Cracker Jack, 5c pkg 3c 

8 1 lb. Good Coffsc and Prcm- 
la lum ZAc 

jij Tho Mtorn wil! clo.s.- f-':itiirday 
« firenlMr. SVptin.lior 2V, wlicii Ib't 
U r^malnlnK hloi k will Imj moved. 

^ E. IT, HUT-TMAN, 




.s ,., „ «-«_4t «/ ft/ *" '. 'S)i.. 



xix. v/iutiuiers 




1 Imvt' piu'cliii.siMl the on 

[•tiro I>aiikrui)l. Stock oi' 11 
.M. ('linliiK'i'.s' C'olTcu antl 
♦Spiel- .Mill^ aiul will for tin 

r ('Vmiui;' wc.ik scU.jiU .u;otKlH 
on liiUKl at snino low ]moi; 

: that, lias liccn' iii'ovailin.s;' 
durhift' tht! ^'-Ai^t )!'->iUli. A 

\[ hai't^'aiii in c'("'i'vthinu' in iht 
.storti at less tlian whoh'sah 
cost. Will (|Uoto a ft'w lU'icos 

I asf cM^nAiiicin^' yroof. 

;> Ti:.\s. 

> OolonK. COc To.'i, nt, por ih UTo 

J Oi-ylon Tcii, OOr,' poi' lb., u(: . . . .27f 

t.Ennli.sh Krgakl'.ist, r.n.; Ten, at 
.IJuKkot Fin-a .l:qi;in, ijdc Tea, at 

I Japan Silllngs, I'er 11) tUo 

CItOCIvKItV. 

^Ja|)anos,e ('ii))S ,aiul S^iucov.s, 

\ip from 1."ic 

f .l:i|]:iiii's,' ('n';iini'iT :imi| Siifrar.'*, 

'. ll|) ll-DMl "•<• 

, j!il>iiniso ri:il0K. II]) from -<>o 

^\I'>lly (MussoK, per do/. IS<' 

Water Tiiniblcr.i, pi.T doz Udc 



.SlMHtlKS. 



Oibson Slovo I'oli.sh, 10c size, . .Kc 

filoRs .Shirrh, 10c .size Ic 

Cold Wiit'-M' .Siarcli, lOi! fiizn . . , . -Ic 

10-/. Slovo Poll.Kh, lOn siKO ;" «c 

^Ironnd Al'Ridce, I'epper, Cloves, 
[• MiiHlard, (ilUKer, elc, lOc alz ;, 7d 

' Kxf acts, i Or .size 8« 

,Prar;itL'r-Jaflt, r>c .slu" ;Je 

i\ 111. K<Ki<l ColTen iirid iireinlinn, iMe 



■ C. I!* PpIfMOT, 




A copy of the hospital bill for Ernest Hultman - 192^. 



cp;-^ 



.w 



^ rnl e Eiilti^ i inn - 




^tirkfotii, 311., _ 



Jan 25 192 4 



1 127 15th A73., 






12 Operating ^jozi 
19 Hosoital S3rvic3 

liedecine i Dressings 
-a"b oratory Tone 
Soecial Nurse Board 



Miss XicVols 
laiss Doyle 



AFTER 4 MONTHS 5 PER CENT INTEREST 



10 


00 




25 


00 




o 


50 




3 


00 




11 


15 


S51 


40 


00 




3S 


00 









95 



v+iqeoff 9ci& 



^•r^ 










s'i:\ ^/ wo SER. D'Cj), \ J- - 









,W»i5SJTifVi''' 



(A COPY OF HILDA MARIED BENGTSON CARLSON'S REPORT CARD. SHE WAS A VERY GOOD STUDENT 
AS THIS REVEALS) 



Bf g a ng s b e ty g 



Fran foIksk(>lfl'^ vid -;- '^ <r-> -^\^^^-^ 



socken, fodd den ^/^ /f^/ ^ 

At"^ undsrgitt afgftngsprofning med foljande vitsord: 



frill 






i ^Q:.^ (^^^ 



r^'^r 



har bevistat folkskolan harst^Jes i t/^ ff. dr.gar och denns 



Innanlasninj 
Spii\klaia 



'/^A >^^ ^ >'aturkunnighct 



Teckniiiii 



Biblisk historia tJ^eW^ f-e.^.^ ^i'^/Lcr,^^ Historia 
Katekcs c-^-^-^ -^zy -i^'^ ^/'A ^ 

Kattskrifning ... , c^^^fo^ -^-^^ye^ ^i^ c^K^a-^^,^^ 
. Uppsafsskrifniug c^ o <:^^ '^^-^^ 

Valskrifniiig ... 
>( Rakning 



■ans. 







4 — Gymnastik 

\ Tradgardsskutsel 



*!^" 



fk 



ft 






V^S'*?^, ^^ 



5>:.''-A--^^^: . 






.?^^-lj1 gT '"Iyr^nM^^;imf^1 ' N^ 



^!;ffl!'^!i!Hir 






"£::.\\ 's>^;9 / uop seh Dia / . i. - 






'■■•:J^^'%^ 



^^^ 



^^m^ 



S^^ 



(a copy of HILDA MARIED BENGTSON CARLSON'S REPORT CARD. SHE WAS A VERY GOOD STUDENT 
AS THIS REVEALS) 



f g an g s b g ty g 



fran folkskolP'^ vid ''-^<f'r>/^\,^^..^^ 



i c/^^ j.(^^.^t t<'^< 



socken, fudd den 4^/^ /f/9/ hai- bevistr.t folkskolan harstiles i t/^ (f. dagar ocli denna 

dpg nndsrgdtt afgAngsprofning med foljande vitsord: .. 

\ 

Biblisk historia e^^e-^ ^i-t^^e- ^/^ ^^ ^, ^ ^ Historia 

Katekcs 

Innanliisning ... >V^«-<^ .^^ ^,r- ^ i? A^ 

Spiiiklilia 6/0 ' " 

RiUtskrifning ... ,i>2«^<*^ 
Uppsatsskrifning 
Vjilskrifaiiig ... 




^ O ^-^—^ at.^-*-n.^!l!^ 



p ^ang (/ ^r c<C^ a^^i^,i:(C' 

'^ ^^^/'e^ ^^tr c^^-i^ a^-^-^- .ff/!^ f 

^ / ^V -'|— Gymnastik 

J Tradgardsskutse] 



Riikning c^/t<r-ir^' ^-^ti*^/^e^ j^,,^,^ i^^/r. ce-^-^^,-- 



Geonietii 
Gcdirrali 






For Flit r/'^r^r/^^^ ^(>c>C 

Fur UppfGrande cy<^ r> /r.^^ ^a-^^ 



^. 



z-( c.-r . f;>^e 



dc.i ^y-' 



19^^ 



Cy^i- i SkoIrA.Iot. 



C..V 



t J^€^. 



•^^z_/ 



I.iL'ire ,y<u skolan. 



>■ Mjsw^yuv'j^spirtwj- v-\'v^^f •-■*. ""^^j^ 



■•«r ■w-^-'*?-^ w r^ww Wv" ""5^* 'ir.W •. ri 'V'"- " '? : '«y g *g ' »w.M! 



Dtfl.-N:r ...M.. 



Infl.-N:r 



Flyttningsbetyg 

(for ensam person). 

2. _ __ .=. 

3. ar fodd den ^ 7%^'^^:'^^. ar . /^^/ ( <'z<-4'i<i>-<64".-x-. 



, ^ 



vaccinerad ^ 

_— . dopt, 



forsamling i 



'^li/t^.yyi-^r^i 



e^wMcT 



Ian, 



7. har inom svenska kyrkan konfirmerats och ager .^ 

8. har inom svenska kyrkan begatt H. Nattvard, 

9. ar till Nattvardens begaende oforhindrad 



i- £Xyf^ t)C 



kristendomskunskap, 



_"I^..medl5orgerli§r tonroendeT 



aktenskap .x^>?t^V^ 



15. -uau u m VflMipiilaig 

16. flyttar till //• ^-^t^>ri€/r>\n:<eL: joraMiling i. „__ jan; 

17. betygar K Z^yCtCii^^a^aL, forsamling i .^~^^:t?'>?r:<r^'?-« 

18. den V ^/'^^^ A^ Ii- 19/^ 




Ian 




Kyrkoherde _V p'jj'i'i; Uomniinij i gr . 



N:r g24 h. Uasse W. TuUberg^ Slc'-choim. — U.K. 



«'~^''~'' t-aHi ' ' '" ■ i-'iMj!'; Tf-!^ 



^ H M i 



"The undersi-ned will >ili al i "ibhc auction at the old Gueld farm, 
Ta.Ke Paynes Point blacklup road at the west edge of StiMman Val- 
ley, go west '2 mile, rfich south 1 mile; or IS miles south of Rock- 
ford. Watch for sale signs on 



THURSDAY, FEBRUi 



STARTING AT 12 O'CLOCK 
" . UNITED CHKISilAN CHURCH WILL SERVE LUNCH 

12 HEAD WHITEFACED STEERS— Weighing around 800 lbs. 

9 POLAND CHINA GILTS — Will farrow in middle of March. 

3 HORSES— One 9 year old, weighing 1800; team 10 and 12 
years old, weighing 3000 lbs. ' <j 

HAY & STRAW— 250 bales clover hay; 25 bales straw.' 

F\R"\I MACHINERY — 19*46 model M tractor, all overhauled 
la^t winter, has new tires and 2-row cultivator, looks and runs like 
ne » • IH power corn binder with bundle earner and motor; IH --row 
pu'-type corn picker; IH 3 bott. 14 in. plow; IH 8 ft. tanuem disc 
1 v-ar old; IH 8 ft. tandem disc; J.D. tractor manure spreader; M-M 
m";=nure spreader, on rubber; J.D. 999 corn planter; 2-row rotary 
hoe- endgate seeder; steel wheel wagon; wood wheel wagon; rubber- 
tired wagon; hay rack; IH 6 ft. horse mowerpNew Idea side deliv- 
erv rake; hay loader; 4 sec. dras: with folding drawbar; 2 sec. drag; 
J.D 10 ft. power grain binder; power 10 ft. weeder; 7o ft. endless 
drive belt; K&H 36 ft. elevator; 2 triple wagon boxes; Cowboy tank 
heater; 2 gas drums; rotary gas pump; wheel barrow; SxlO can%as; 
feed cooker; 3 10-gaL milk cans; 4 rotary hog feeders; 4-hole hog 
feeder; 6-hole hog feeder; 10-hole hog feeder; some chicken feeders; 
8-sal. electric chicken fountain; forks, shovels and other articles too 
nuT^erous to mention; Kitchen Home Comfort cookstove; kitchen 
cabinet; studio couch; 2 9x12 rugs and some other iiousehold goods. 

TERMS: The Illinois National Bank will extend their usual fav- 
orable credit ter.ms of 'A or more cash. 6 to 12 months time on the 
balance at 67c -simple interest with monthly payment-^. All pur- 
chases must be settled for day of sale. Buy what you want and sign 
your own .lote. -:- ' , 

CARl. J. CARLSON, Owner /e 

JOHN MAAS, .\uctioneer - / ' 

THE ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK & TRUST CO., Clerk 



This and the following page contains copies of the itemized bills 
for all of the furniture and household goods purchased by Carl and 
Hilda Carlson when they were first married. 



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tiilnmirillj 



EASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
^ FAMILY HISTORY 

jr Contributor to the Wock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
lijerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
fvmintues, and wi I 1 be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
:ess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ***A-.ViVAAAAAAA!'.-AAAAA*A*-.\iV-, 

/^ j / — v— / * OFFICE USE CODE 

'• Vour name ^rt./q^rl ^ .sJO^Cg^^ * , 

Date of form |0_lS?""^W *(ID H 



2. Your college: Kock Vall ey f-o liege (ID 1/ ; ) 

FoHford, IlUnois 

*1»***Vty.AA)lrAiVAA;cft)ViV*A;'.»VA)V:'c)Vft,V 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to soy things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 \ 1 800- 1850 

1850-1900 1900 or lateV 



k. Please check al 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

_New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) *^M Iddlg^Atl antic (N.Y., Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

i,^? 5uth Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) <^E ast South Central (La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, Kyi 
West South Central (Ark., N.M., Tex., Ok.') t-^-'tast North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 



u^ cific (Cal., Washj (Hawaii, Alaska) 111. Wis.) 

^^^•F Talns (ND, SD, Neb. , Kan. , Iowa, MS) 

5. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in thi s paper have found themselves. 

t^ arming Mining i^^^ opkeeping or small business 

^Transportation ^-^B ig Business ^Manufacturing 

^Professions fa^^ ndus trial labor Other 

6. Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
In this paper have belonged. 

^Roman Catholic ^Jewish P resbyterian Methodist 

t'^ffa p t i s t Episcopal ian Congregational ^^^"^Lu the ran 



"Quaker ^Mormon u».6 T^er Protestant Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks ^Indians ^Mexicans ^Puerto Ricans 

_Jews •"T Ten t ra 1 Europeans I tal ians ^Slavs 

Irish ^British Native Americans over several generations 



East Asian Other 



8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 



Interviews with other *^ Fami ly Bibles t^ Fami ly Genealogies 
fami ly members 
W^^tal Records Land Records The U.S. Census 






holographs i^'^aps Other 



FAMILY DATA 



Grandfather (your father's side) 

Nam e (JV, V ^ r -T'O. a £ pf 5 
If dead, date of death ) 9 <^ 7 "* 



Current Residence 



Place of birth jfi) |e^ C'O . Y^LL,^^'/, Date of Birth 7' .3 /" / S^^V 



Education (numbe^of years): 
grade school o high school 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat lon(s) 
1st p'QrKVlgK 
2nd 



PUCe OP RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates \^^<^. ;90 I st^/, r. j-LL,.o., O ^tesl^^tJ^J 



3rd^ 

Ath 



Dates^ 
Dates_ 
Dates 



2nd_ 

3rd. 
ijth 



Dates 

_Dates_ 

Dates 



Rellglon 6-Tsrw^t.^ ]j)(^^^J T L/cJ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. /| vi^/y^g.^ Lrc^n 



FT 



ace of Marriage to your grandmother ^^^/^ f^ J^T7 



date ^.c^.y^"^ 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 



B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name ff^^r^utrjte \Jc^ WTh>)<^<^ Cu 
If dead. dat<< of death [9 fa I 

Place of birth (^Q L Co JZL > 

Education (number of years); 
grade school ^ high school 



rrent Residence 



Date of birth | ^9^^ 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Oates_ 
Dates_ 
Dates_ 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st r^j U C . 1^- Dates lVhb i 

2nd Dates 



3rd_ 
'tth 



Dates 



Dates 



Re 1 1 g I o^ Vr^w^o;^ fl^tof^-'J C h^rc^ 
t Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfathe r (T^q/^ Y^:>>, . ,^ /_ DATE ' *!? ~ 9 "l^JJY' 
'^°^*- i^aHat^Sf!»fhl8(^Sa£g'8f^ill§ pa|i^A5^)f stepmother or another relative give 



A- J Stcpgrandfather (your father's side) 

N.intp '^ Current Residence 



1 f ilr.id, d.ilc of dea 
Place of bl rth 


til 






Date of Bl rth 


Education (number of 
grade school 


years 


) 
high school 




vocational college 


Occupat ion(s) 
1st 


Dates 


1st 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 


2nd 




Dates 
Dates 
Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


3rd 


Dates 


i.th 


^th 


Dates 


Re 1 i q i on 







Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



''lace of marriage to your grandmother " ' Ja" f « 

A-2 Stepgrandmothcr (your father's side) 

'*^"* „.___ Current Residence 

If dead7 date of death ^^^^""'T"" 



Place of birth^ Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocat lonely ^college 

Occupatlon(s) PLace OF RESIDENCE 

, (after leaving home) 

'5t^ D ates 1st 

2"«^__ D ates 2nd 

^'■''_ _. ^Dates ^__ 3r d 

Re I i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



3. 

irandfather (your mother's side) 

<ame ]Z. \ iV)Orf A^. AoIiH^Toa^ Current Residence I'^ronktlh S eg Ci^^Jkte^ 

If dead, gate of death 

>lace of birth Date of birth 1 '3 /^ i?^? 

•ducetion (number of years): , 

grade school high school V vocational ( - coHege / i 

lccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

11 ^ r\ \ (after leaving home) 
'»t l(f L-ly L..^^.> Dates l9^4-7/ lst h^.r. il. Oateslp/^ l?V;^ 

:nd ^Dates In dCrtf-j^ b/llt. /Vl/K/fo/^, D ates )9^^.:r^ 

Ird ^Dates 3r d ^^j^^-j- A i^ fi^ecA T^g^D ates ) 9^4-75' 

ith ^Dates kth ^u^RLi^ ^To G<^»j^.<^ D ates |97J? 

le I i g i on (xk U'^ o^ "»■> 

'olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

'lace of marriage to your grandmother ^ . y- p a^ ILL- date \Q "^ \ 

lote: If your mother was raised by a SllspfaiMer^r Bnumer PBlaclve (lO age 18) ' " / 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

irandmother (your mother's side) 

lame KuL R^ IL^ rV^ i lltr ^Current Residence C/^c,g^ 'j, j 

f dea'd, da^e of death "- ^^ 

'lace of birth Mtj J/>1g/-r.< IT/-' ^Date of birth 'V - / "•)?/( 

iducation (number of years) 

grade school (a high school vocational college 

lccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) , ^ 

St \)o^,shc Dates |Q|^S' i^/ 1st D^v./^ ZL Dates ) 9?/ "7 j^ 

!nd <?U> Ac-fo.^ Dates ] ^Lj I -i^j-j 2 n 6^,-^^^^ y^,/ Dates ) S'^V 

>rd D ates 3 r d D ates 

lellglon Rcfphi/h 

•olitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

hace of marriage to your grandfathe r [)iy^>^ \p L-' , d ate |V ? ) 

lote: If your mother was raised by a stepniother or another relative (to age 18) 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C- I S tepgrandf<ither (your mother's side) 

**'l"^ . -»_«_ Current Residence 

If fic'.ia, (Tatf of death 

'''•""'• v' ''i'"' . i).«n.' "I i.i.ii. 

I 'litl .1 1 i •Ml (liiiiiil>i- r of yci I •, ) ——————— 



■ l».i'l«' -.(liDol Iij(j|i school vocotional 



col \viw 



Octupatlon(^) PL;^^.^ q^ RESIDENCE 

, (after leaving home) 

'it Dates 1st 

^"ti Dates 2nd 



Dates 



Dates 



^'■d _Dates 3rd 

'•'^ Dates i«th 



Dates 
Dates 



Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your grandmother —————— j-^- 



0-2 Stcpqr,indmolhi?r (your mother's side) 

'1''^"* , , , Current Residence 

If (lejd, (iat«' of deatn 

Pl.icc of birth D3te of birth 

tducation (number or years) ■ 

grade school high school vocational 



col lege 



Occupotion(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

, . (after leaving home) 

'••t _Dates 1st 



Dates 



^""^ -—.tJates 2n d Dates 

^''^- Dates Jr d Dates_ 

Re I i g I on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Uat^ 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

Name 

Place of birth Pate of birth 

Number of years of schooling ~~ OccupatlOrT 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren ~"~~ — — «_ 



Name 

Place of birth bate of birth 

Number of years of schooling OccupatibfT 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of chll dren — — — — _ ______«_ 



Name 

Place of birth , . _ D ate" of birth 

Number of years of School ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren — — — — 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of school Ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren —————— 



Name 

Place of birth Pat'e of birth 

Number of years of school Ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of children ■ - 



Name_ ^ 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren — — — 



N ame 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status" 

Number of chi Idren — — — — — . 

Name 

Place ot birth Date of birth 

Number of years o^ school Ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ~~I~~ 

Number of chi Idrert — ~— — — — — — — — — — - 



111. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Si gned JAo^^^tJ^' I- /'11>i^<^y T 

Date )^- / "^py 



Id Laveme Jacobs 



n Jl 1211950 
rpifid 6/15/68 



mr-IGRFE CHAkT 



'B 9/22/1928 

H 6/15/19^ 
n 



JB t 



p 7/31/1894 

William Harvey Jacobs ^ , 3/9/1921 



Evert Johnson Jacobs 

Grand richer 



Fathe-* 



Evert J. Jacobs 

\ Great tsrandfcit.- sr 

In 1851 
\\\ ? 
D 1925 

Margaretha Munk 



n 1858 

D 19^ 
Alardus Van Bettings 

mg65 "'^^ ^^' ■ 

Marguerite Van Hettingae « 

Sranc.i.othsr j D 19^ 



B 1899 
D 1961 



Lena B, Frey 

t~-i860 — 

D 19^ 



Elmer Johnston 
Elmor Alexander Johnston;,^ 



j Grandfathsr 

JB 1/31/1907 
ffl t931 

Id 



Id ? 



j Jane Herberg 



Patricia Jane Johnston ; 



Mother 

B 1/8/1933 

D 



Ruby Belle Miller 

B Vl/1911 

D 



pi I960 



Clifford Alvin Killer 

h 5/971889 
!;; 1910 
!i 5/30/193^ 



^Ifeiude Sylvia White 
l; 9/27/1890 
D 5bll9e7 



Sources 

Grafstrom, Eileen 
Heaseldon, Patricia 
Jacobs, Leonard 
Jacobs, Marvin 
Jacobs, William 
Reid, Ruby 



Evert J. Jacobs and Margai^tha Munk 

Evert was bom in I851 and Margsiretha in I858, both in the vicinity' 
of Emden in the Principality olfSchleswig-Holstein. The town they called 
their home was Greitsiel, located near the junction of the North Sea 
and Holland. They talked little of their life before enmigrating to 
America. A few facts are known. The family included brothers and sisters, 
parents and Evert and Margaretha. All who could were employed on the 
dike building and repairing crews. Evert would tell his grandchildren 
of forming balls of mud and straw and constructing the dikes of these. 
The family was very poor and barely subsisted, a brother apparently was 
forced to beg by the circumstances. Evert sometimes related an illustra- 
tion of these circumstances. A portion of the workers pay was in the 
form of clothing which was badly needed but one time vhen Evert went 
to collect his pay and clothing he was turned away without recieving 
the clothes. After a family discussion Evert decided to protest this 
treatment and went to gain satisfaction from the town officials q This 
action was considered so bold that his family seriously feared he would 
be jailed for his impertinence. 

In 1870 or?! Evert was of prime age to be conscipted into the mil- 
itary . When he became aware of his impending military service he arranged 
for his family to leave Germany. A friend named Peter Hayengae had em- 
migrated to America and after a number of years of working was able to 
finance others passage to America. Arrangements were made for the house- 
hold to leave Germany, this was done over a period of five years from 
I870-l875o The members of the family who came to the German community 
in Ogle county were Evert and Margaretha, his parents, and her brother 
who had reached draft age and was eager to ^eave Germany. They arrived 
in Ogle County between I87O and 1875. They worked for about two years, 
repaid the passage money to Peter Hayengae, and saved eno\xgh to begin 



farming. During the early years in the dead of winter, and with no fuel 
for their stoves and no money to buy any. Evert was told of a man twenty 
miles distant vho was giving away coim cobs. Evert drove his wagon the 
twenty miles in harsh weather only to be refused the com cobs because 
of his expressed Protestantism. Evert's father, John Ho died in l873t 
just two years after arriving in America. In I883 Evert and Margareitha 
were persiiaded to move to South Dakota by railroad investors who were 
seeking to populate the area as an income source.. They settled in Scotland, 
South Dakota. The land contracted to them turned out to be in. a Russian 
community which caused friction for some time due to customs and language 
differences. In I885, while in South Dakota, his mother , Lebina West 
(or Westen), died. The farming venture in South^ Dakota was a failure 
and in 1886 they returned home to Illinois where they rebuilt their sav- 
ings and farmed until their retirement to Oregon. After their retirement, 
their son Evert operated the farm. They retired in relative comfort 
on continuing income from the farm they owned and rented out. They were 
devotly religious and were among the people vho founded the Ebenezer 
Reformed Church in the manner of worship they were used to in Germany. 
Evert retained no love of Germany and in fact encouraged his son 
\ttien he was sent to France to fight Germans in 1918. Evert died in 1925, 
Margaretha in 19^. 

Ala]*dus Van Hettingae and Lena B. Frey 

Alardus was bom in I865 and Lena in i860, both in Schleswig-Holstein. ' 
They emmigrated with their parents to the United States at about the same 
time and under the same conditions as Evert and Margaretha Jacobs. Alardus* 
family settled in rural Ogle County and Lena's near Forres ton. Alardus 



vorked as a hired hand for many years. As soon as he had enough money 
saved he vould buy land on the Brick Road near Oregon* He steadily ac» 
cumulated over two hundred acres and by 1912 erected the building includ- 
ing the house that would shelter three generations of his family* He 
was an austute buisness man and acquired yet another farm which generated 
income for his retirement. Alardus was reponsible for bringing many 
people to the United States from Germany. He was highly regarded by 
his neighbors for his piety, buisness sense, good hxunor, and generosity 
toward, prospective immigrants. The command of English never advanced 
very far partially due to the prominence of German in the community. 

Their children included Marguerite who married Evert Jacobs, two 
children who died at .in early age and a son Henry *rtio left home against 
his fathers wishes to go to college. He eventually became Chairman of 
the Board of Ginn and Co* book publishers. 

Alardus and Lena were active in Chxirch affairs where Alardus was a 
fine singer and organ player* They retired to a house in Oregon* Lena 
died in 19^ and Alardus in 19^* 



♦♦ 



Evert Johnson Jacobs 

Evert was bom Jtily 31, 189^ in rural Ogle Co\mty near Oregon at 

his parents home His parents h°ad been in the United Stated for about twenty 

years at the time of his birth. He attended school at the count^'^ school 

located near the "lighthouse" area, he completed eighth grade vdiich was the 

norm for the communiiy. In 191? he enlisted in the amy. His military service 

was marked by combat duty in France. (Material ccsiceming military service 

is included.) 

While serving in France he was infonned by his sweetheart that she 
found another man. This was an experience that was remembered by him 
for many years. In later years he would often speak of his war experiences 
but the stories invariably concerned humerous incidences such as some of 
his companions bartering with God before a battle, the trade usually in- 
volved foregoing various vices in exchange for safety, he related how the 
soldiers veiy seldom remembered the deal after the battle vra.s over. He 
sometimes related how eager his friends were to be granted leave to visit 
Paris and "whoop it up", this was an urge that was not shared by h^m. He 
wanted most to return home. 

After the war Evert worked for two or three years for the Carnation 
company in Oregon xintil he had saved enoxigh money to begin farming. 

Evert was a tall, powerfully built man who was known as the "strongest 
man in the territory". 

Marguerite Van Hettinga* 

Marguerite was bom in 1899, the third child and first daughter of 
fcmr children bom to Alardus and Lena B. Van Hettinga. She was bom in 
her parents home located on the Brick Road nesgr Oregon. Her sister Anna 
died in an influenza epidemic in 1923 at the age of twenty years.. Marguerite 
spoke of her frequently in later years, the sister were very close and 



Anna's death was a severe blow to Marguerite. 

It was common practice to fit girls with shoes that were too small 
in order to enhance their femininity, this caused Margetirite a great deal 
of problems later in life and she wore canvas shoes to decrease the discom- 
fort » 

She attended the local county school vrfiich was located ^ mile from 
her horaee She completed eight years of schooling. She was bilingual 
and was able to write in German. 

Evert Jacobs and Maruerite Van Hettinga 

Evert and Marguerite were married on March 9f 1921 at the Ebenezer 
Reformed Church, located on the German Church Road near Oregon, Illinois. 
For a short time they resided with her parents. In about 1923 or 2k they 
began farming on 100 acres which was owned by his mother. The farm was 
directly across from the Ebenezer Church. They operated on a shares system 
with "I of the crops and income as payment for the use of the farm. The 
farm income was supplemented by seasonal employment at canning companies 
in Rochelle. In 1925 or26 the first automobile was purchased which replaced 
the horse and buggy as their mode of transporation. All farm work was done 
without the aid of engine powered machinery. Evert was an excellent farmer 
and as soon as hisions were old enough to aid in more strenuous work they 
moved to a larger farm, this was the same one where Marguerite had been 
bom. This was the only time they ever changed residence. 

Evert acquired a reputation for breaking horses to farm work and 
neighbors would bring three year old horses to him to train. Inexchange 
for his efforts he would then have the use of the horse for one growing 
season. This anrangement spared him the expenses of foaling, feeding and 
possible early loss of the animals. One or two horses were owned by him 
on a permanent basis in addition to the horses he broke. When they began 



fanning on the Brick Road the farm vas in a state of overgrowth and under- 
productivityo Many years of very hard labor resulted in a viable farming 
livlihood. Six sons and one daughter were bom to them from 1922-32, Evert, 
Marvin, Lawrence, Leonard, William, Gerald Laveme and Joanne, The children 
were vital to the operation of the farm and shared in all duties. The boys 
shared a large bedroom on the second floor. The upstairs was not heated 
and the boys slept together for mutual warmth. During winter a glass of 
water left near the bed the night before would have become ice by morning o 
the hours the family worked were very long and leisure time was spent rest- 
ing at home listening to the radio or playing parlor games. The family was 
structured with Evert exercising primary authority and making all decisions. 
The farm provided most of the food consumed and they were able to remain 
relatively unaffected by such outside occurances as the Great Depression 
although a herd of cattle was lost to a tuberculosis epidemic at the 
height of the depression. Marguerite was capable of performing many of 
the most strenuous tasks of the farm in addition to her household respon- 
sibilities. She was known as a very fast cpmhusker, her sons remember the 
pain experienced whenever they inadvertently got in the path of flight of 
an ear of com being thrown into the wagon o The family regularly attended 
Church at the Ebenezer Reformed Church. The children were baptized there. The 
family was active in Church affairs. The children experienced no feelings 
of having been deprived or poor, they were very much like all of their 
neighbors in the respect of working hard and living without great need. 
Indoor plumbing wasn't installed until 1965« Evert was a strict disciplin- 
arian who tolerated no feedback. Marguerite 's identity in large part was 
absorbed into Evert 's although she was known by all as a perscai of outstand- 
ing character. 

Two of their sons served in the Second World War, Evert in Europe and 
Lawrence in the Atlantic. Evert III, Marvin , Lawrence, and William were 



8 



all married between 19^5 and 19^, Joanne in 1952. 

The home on the Birick Road was the scene of regular family get togethers 
which involved their children and fifteen grandchildren o In later years 
the farm was operated on a shares basis by Evert and sons Evert and Marvin. 
Major projects such as baling hay, shelling com, etc. were accomplished with 
communal effort on the part of Evert, sons, and grandsons. 

When William.* s marriage ended Marguerite often would spend periods of 
months assisting in the raising of the children and running the household. 
Evert became an avid baseball fan of the New York Yankees, Marguerite re- 
mained in good health until the year of her death of a heart attack at 
her home in 196I. She was bom and died in the same hovise. Evert lived 
alone and actively imtil his death in 196? of cancer of the liver. 

Elmore Alexander Johnstai 

Elmore was bom ai January 31 t 1907 in Seattle Washington. His parents 
were Jane Herberg and Elmer Johnston. The family name had been Johnston 
since the early 1900' s >Aien Elmer added the "t" to Johnson in order to 
distingTiish his family from the multitudes in Minnesota who were named John- 
son. The family returned to Minnesota, their original home in 1909« Elmore's 
father was a farmer in the area around lindstrom for the rest of his childhood. 
His father died when Elmore was a young boy. Until about 1930 Jane and her 
children Elmore and Eileen operated the farm. The family was athletic and 
accomplished outdoorspersons ; this being considered quite unusual for a rural 
fajsdly, 

Elmore moved to Dixon, Illinois about 1930, the reason for this move 
was apparently financial as the farm yielded little and there was little 
outside work for a young man. In Dixon Elmore,* who acquired the nickname 
"Swede", found employment with the utility company vrtiere he quickly became a 
foreman. 



Ruby Belle Miller 

Ruby was bom April 1, 1911 in Mt. Morris, Illinois at her parents home. 
As a child she lived in Mt, Morris until the age of nineo Sine early recol- 
lections inclxide trips about tovm in a cutter (small sleigh) drawn by the 
families St. Bernard. Her father was a blacksmith and was skilled at making 
unusual toys such as the cutter and harness for the dog. She had a sister 
and two brothers bom while in Mt. Monris, Robert, Joseph, and Dolly. She 
attended school at Adeline for about one year. The family then moved to 
Byron. All of these moves were for the purpose of the father being able to 
pursue a career as a blacksmith. The family moved to Rockford vrtiere her 
father began working for Rockford Screw products. At the age of fotirteen 
she withdrew from school in order to care for her grandparents who were ill. 
She lived with her grandparents for two years after which she returned home 
to her parents. During this period she was employed as a domestic by sev- 
eral Rockford hoxiseholds. 

Elmore Alexander Johnson and Ruby Belle Miller 

Elmore and Ruby were married in 1931 • THey made their first home in 
Dixon where they lived for less than a year. In 1932 they moved to Lindstrom, 
Minnesota. They lived with his family for a very short time which resulted 
in them moving because of frictions piroduced. They took up residence in a 
log cabin built atop an Indian Mound. They lived there for a matter of months 
until KLmore became ill with mumps. Ruby returned to Illinois fearfvil of 
the disease harming her unbom child. She lived in Mt. Morris with her parents 
until after Patricia Jane was bom^ she then returned to Minnesota. They 
lived in Minnesota for 2 to2i years during which time Richard was bom. 
Elmore moved the family back to Mt. Morris, Illihois where he was employed 
by the utility Co. Their 3rd child Gerald Eugene was bom while they lived 
in Mt. Morris. In 1936 they moved to Dixon vrtiere they lived together until 



10 



e 
1942, The family spent much time outdoors and the children diveloped ath- 

litieally. 

In 19^2 Elmore left the family and moved to Greenville, Mississippi. 
Elmore and Ruby were divorced in 19^5» In 19^5 Elmore raanried Viola Olson* 
Ruby and her children lived on in Dixon through 19^. During World Warll, 
Ruby worked as an inspector for a company manufactviring combat boots* In 
19^ Ruby moved the family to Oregon where she still lives. In 1956 she 
married William Reid. She is active in Church Affairs and is the Chtirch 
historian for the First Baptist Church of Oxygon. 

Elmore lived in Mississippi until about 1950 when he moved to West 
Palm Beach, Florida. In Florida he was actively employed as a lineman until 
1970 when he retired at the age of Sixty- three. He presently lives in 
Franklin, North Carolina where he pursues a hobby-career in gem mining, 
polishing and mounting. 



u 

William Harvey Jacobs 

Williain was bom September 22, 1928 in his parents home in rural 
Ogel county near Oregon. He wds the fifth son in a family that included 
four brothers and one sister, a brother having died of suffocation in 
bed during infancy. His father operated a relatively small farm 
where he lived for the first nine years of his life. His was only the 
second generation of the family to be bom in the United States so he 
was bilingual from his earliest years, learning English and Gentian con-^ 
currently. The German spoken by the family was referred to as Low German 
which was a Dutch influenced dialect. His generation is the last in 
the family to speak German. It is still used often vdien the family con- 
grgates whenever added clarity or generat;' onal confidentiality is desired. 
The family was strictly ordered with a great deal of difference shown 
tojolder members. It was considered a punishable affront to speak English 
in the presence of grandparents >riio possessed limited fluency in the 
English language. On one occasion, William was called to account by 
his father for addressing his maternal Grandfather with the pronoun for 
you rather than the defferential ye. The grandparents were called Opie 
and Okya, a type of German Grandma and Grandpa. His childhood routine 
was overwhelmingly centered upon the operation of the farm. The work 
was done with very little mechanical assistance. As the youngest boy 
William's (or Willie, his nickname) routine consisted of more domestic 
chores than his older, stronger brothers. Countless trips from ths wood- 
pile and well were made^ cattle herded to the bam each day for milking 
(he especially disliked carrying wood and water). Seasonal type chores 
were com husking/^ pickingj. shocking oats( tying the stalks into bundles 
preparatory to "thrfshing" the grain), cultivating com, weeding the 
crops. The work was hard for all in the family and all shared in its 
performance* 



12 

Willie is by far the smallest member of the familj' standing 5 "6", 
with his brothers each being 6 'or taller and of muscular physique. 

He attended the community grade school where for a time he per- 
formed the duties of fire building and sweeping the floor. Early years 
in school were marked by a lack of interest and achievment. High School 
saw better grades and stimulated an interest in history which remains 
today. 

The long hours left tiHla leisure time. Among family activities, 
high points came when his father would initiate an occasional family card 
game of " pitch", lotto( bingo), or bunco(a dice game). Sometimes his 
father would crack and pass out walnuts or his mother would pop popcorn, 
both of which were home grown as was almost all the family food. His 
first toy was a top that his father (Pa) had whittled from a thread spool. 
The first fajmily radio was purchased when he was nine years old. He 
loved to listen to the radio especially Jack Armstrong. 

Willie's first paying job was at the Paynes Point Store at the 
age of 1^. His duties included cleaning spitoons and stocking shelves. 
The wages he earned were turned over to Pa and were part of the farailie's 
incone. 

Willie was Seventeen when he bought his first car, a 1936 Ford, An 
engine from the Wards catalog, a custom paint job, and many hours of 
work were involved in making his first car a very special event. As 
a young man, recreations included movies and roller skating. 



13 



Patricia Jane Johnston 

Patricia was bom Januiary 3, 1933 at Freeport, Illinois, The family 
lived in Dixon. She vas the oldest of three children. She had two brothers, 
Richard Ij years younger and Gerald three years younger, 

Pat lived in Dixon for her first eleven years. The area of Dixon where 
the family lived was known as Dement-town, The family was very close at 
this time and all participated in playing games together and other activities 
as a imit, Pat remembers her mother playing hide and seek with the children 
and sliding in the snow, Pat was very adventurous as a small child and 
prone to wander away from the house. She attended Lincoln School in Dixon 
through the sixth grade. She did well in school while in Dixon, When she 
was eleven years old her father and mother separated withrer father leaving 
Dixon and moving to Mississippi, The family (minus Elmore the father) 
moved to Oregon, Illinois where Pat attended Sixth through Eighth grade. 
She attended Oregcm Community High School for one year through 1948, 

William Harvey Jacobs and Patricia Jane Johnston 

Willie and Pat met at the roller rink that was located in Oregon, 
Illinois in 1947» As Pat relates it, it was an embarrasing evening for 
her. She was seated in a car with a friend Joanne Jacobs \rfiom Pat knew 
from school, Pat- had been skating earlier and was telling Joanne about a 
guy who she said looked like a monkey. The fellow in question then walked 
up to the car and began talking to Joanne who tiimed out to be the "monkey's) 
sister. They dated for about <xie year. Their dates usually involved movies, 
skating, or family get togetheirs. They were manried on June 15, 19^ at 
the Ebenezer Reformed Church near Oregon, They made their first home in 
Oregon in the former house of his Grandfather Van Hettingae, Willie was 
employed at this time at Woods Brothers Manufacturing Co, in Oregon, Be- 
tween 19^ and 1958 they lived at fifteen different addresses. They incliJde 



l^f 



Oregon, rural Oregon, Byron, Ashton Daysville, rural Byron, and Rockford. 
Willie worked at many jobs in this time including two unsuccessful ventures 
into owning and operating Dry Cleaners. Six children were bom to Willie 
and Pat, Kristine Louise, January 12, 19^, Gerald Laveme, March 12, 1950, 
Scott William , June 22, 1952, Marlene Loree, October 20,1953t died Octo 
21,1953, Suzanne Patrice, January 20, 1955, Rober Douglas^, June 30,1956. 

The marriage ended in divorce in 1958. Patricia remarried in I962 
to Eric Heaseldon from Nottingham, England. They had a child Matthew Cei^en, 
bom in I9630 They were divorced in 1972. Pat currently lives in Rockford 
and is employed as a bookkeeper in the office of the County Clerk. 

In the divorce Willie was awarded custody of the five children. The 
pattern of life was much the same as before only minus Patricia. The family 
lived at six residences between 1958 and 1963. The pattern of employment 
was the same with Willie working at a succession of jobs. The children 
were cared for at various times by live-in housekeepers. Grandmother Jacobs, 
and during the last two years the older children. 

On January 3» 1963 their rented house caught fire. The oldest son 
Gerald awoke and detected smoke, he woke his father and all six in the family 
escaped the fire but lost all of their belongings. The children stayed with 
relatives for a short time. Within a month of the fire, an Ogle County 
judge niled that the children be declared wards of the county and placej in 
foster homes until such time as William could assume proper care and support 
of them. Gerald, Scott and Robert were placed in the home of Williant's 
older brother Marvin, rural Oregon; Kristine and Suzanne with another brother 
Lawrence also of rural Oregon. In August 1964, they were placed in other 
homes, Gerald to his Unid.e Richard Johnston, Kristine and Scott to Kings 
Daughter Childrens Home in Freeport, Suzanne to Edward Scott residence in 
Polo and Robert to the Gordon Carlson home in Rochelle. 

William remarried in 1972. He currently lives in Rockford with 



15 



his wife Delores and her three children from an earlier marriage. 

Gerald Laveme Jacobs 

In early 1950 William Jacobs and two of his brothers were each ex- 
pecting children soono Each wished to name his first son after the brother 
who died in infancy, bom March 11, 1931. On March 12, 1950 Gerald Laveme 
Jacobs was bom to Willie and Pat Jacobs. Pat didn't care for the name 
Gerald and on first sight of the baby exclaimed 'he's ray little Peter- 
Peter-Purapkin-Eater" the nickname Pete stuck and has been used almost ex- 
clusively since. 

Pete was bom in Oregon at the local clinic. His first home was at 
Rock River Terrace. When he was three the family lived at Ashton, Illinois, 
this is the time of his earliest recollections. From 1953 tol957» the 
family lived in Byron in a large farm house that has since been dismantled, 
Pete attended Kindergarten through 2nd grade at Byron Grade School. In 
1957 the family moved to Rockford where they lived from 1957-59. Pete at- 
tended three grade schools in Rockford due to his father's penchant for 
changing residences. In 1958 his parents separated. William and his five 
children moved to a farm house near Stillman Valley for about a year. In 
1959 Oregon became home for about a year and a half. Two houses in rural 
Oregon were home during 196liS:62. The second house near Oregon burned com- 
pletely in 1962. (this incident is related in the section on William). 
Pete attended Seventh and Eighth grades at Ghana Elementary School, he 
met Roma Hepfer while attending shool there. At this time he was living 
with his father's brother and family. In 1964 shortly before entering 
High School he was sent to live with his mother's brother, Richard Johnston, 
irtiere he lived through the high school years.* In writing this section of 
my family history, I experienced difficulty in remembering any facts con- 
cerning my childhood of a positive nature. The early years in Byron 



16 



ecmtain the only fond memories of play and family lifeo School was never 
very meaningful because of the constant shifting of residences and lack of 
tranquility and motivation; at home. Books were the main interest for most 
of my life, Diiring my school years I averaged 200-300 books yearly. 

Pete married Roma Geneve Hepfer on June 15» 1968, Both Pete and Roma 
attended Pillsbury Baptist Bible College inOwatonna, Minnesota during the 
1968-69 school year. They were both active in chvirch affairs before 
marriage at the First Baptist Oiurch in Oregon. Pete spent another year 
of theological training with the intention of becoming a minister. The 
2nd school was Faith Baptist Bible College in Ankeny, Iowa. During the 
2nd semester there the ministry was abandoned as a career for a number of 
reasons, chief among which was a growing conviction of dissatisfaction with 
the extreme fundamentalism being learned. On June 27, 1971 in Des Moine, 
Iowa, a Girl Anne Elizabeth was bom. Shortly after that the Jacobs 
returned to Oregon where Pete worked as a shipping and receiving foreman 
for a textile company in Oregon and Rochelle. From August 1972 through 
Jtily 1973, Pete traveled extensively throughout the coimtry, first as a 
member of the Socialist Workers Party Campaigning in behalf of the Socialist 
Workers Party candidates for Nationaliregional office. After the elections 
of 1972 he left radical politics and continued traveling. He returned to 
Illinois in the summer of 1973 and together with Roma and Anne moved to 
Florida with intentions of living and attending College there. Natalie 
Melissa was bom on March 6, 197^ at Hollywood, Florida. The Florida 
economy was experiencing a severe recession at this time and the family was 
foiled to return to Illinois where employment could be found. The family 
cunrently resides in Kings, Illinois. Gerald «nd Roam are attending college 
each pursuing social science disciplines. 



n sen:iini^ ^he enclosed certified copy of discharge for our fathor, i-VKHT 
ANHGEM JACCPP., T thou*^,ht I would , add to tlie information f^iv.^n on th^i 
ischarfTo. th9 copy doesn't show that ho was thn 5:on of f-:vr:RT and MARG- 

,RETHA (nee Wunk) JACOBS or that he was born 31 ■J'JIy l^'^'^- '"« ^^^ ^^^^^ 

m his physical description, I believe, except the decription of his hair 

?hich could be classified as bla-k rather i.han iH'ht. 

?he discharge shows his rank as Private, actually he was a Wagoner (private 
irst class )o 

le was drafted and inducted 27 April IQlR and initially stationed at 

Jarap Grant, Illinois. Along with other men of Ogle and surrounding counties, 

le was sent to Camp Funston, Kansas. Here, the 89th Infantry Division 

lad been activated and manned by men of the midwest. Thus it was nick- 

laraed the Midwest Division . Primarily, the civillian occupation of the 

sen was farmers 

Our father was first assigned to the 3^2nd Machine Gun Battallion of the 
89th, but received little if any training at Funston as a member of that 
unit. The division left for Carap Mills, New York and after only a short 
stay there. Pa left for Eurfpe on the U.S.S. Ma.iestic with his unit. 

On arriving in France, he was transferred to the supply company supporting 
the 355th Infantry Regiment of the a9th. The division took extensive 
(in that day) training preparing for combat. This training took place 
in June and July of I91B0 

In August, the division went into the line in the Lucey sector. It was 
said that this was the first American division to go into th? line as a 
total unit rather than by regiments » 

Each infantyy regiment had a supply company to bring ?uprlit^s to the front 
line. This would include ammunition, food and arms. Fa wai- used primari^-y 



s a teaT.sterj driving a team of horses pulling a wagon. 

e was now— EVERT JOHNSON JACOBS, Wagoner 209^214 
Supply Company 

355th Infantry Regt. ° 8Qth Division 
Allied Expeditionary Forces 

Ihortly after going into the line, the 89th took part in the St. Mihiel 
)ffensiveo Pa mentioned ©n one occasion that a shell landed near him 
>ut failed to explode, a "dud"c On another trip to the front lines, his 
supply unit came under fire. Sgt. Fisher ordered the men to abandon the 
wagons, unhiteh the team and ride out of the impact areA. In doing the 
ijnhitching, Pa give one of the horses a good rap with his hand and in the 

process, dislocated his thumb. 

i 

irhe 89th received casualties that matched some of the more celebrated 

Idivisions such as the 32nd Rainbow Division. One of the casualties of 

[the 89th was a regimental company runner, Shirley Tilton if Oregon. I'a 

said that to the best o^ his knowledge, Tilton was running a message (on 

foot) and tired, resting against a tree. Evidently, a German sniper shot 

him as he rested. Shot between the eyes, he remained in an upright sitting 

position, (it was said) and was found just that way, sitting. The American 

legion Post in Oregon is named in his honor. 

The division took part in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. Constant trips to 
the front line were being rr.ade by the Supply Company. While bqCk of the 
front lines. Pa was with others of his unit resting and washing up. In 
the act of shaving. Pa hoard the sound of a plane and immediately "flopped** 
when he heard the nl^inp was in a diveo ?he German aviator dropped "air 
bombs" right in the mid'Hr; of lh<- ^roup. Naturally, (while shaving) ^a 
was not wearing hi'- '^nr.al holmot. In a natural reflex action, he put his 



Lht banc to his head and flopped. A fragment of the explosive went 
hrough the palm of his right hand and continued into his forehead. This 
nocked him nut for a short while but when he recovered he found himself 
!ith a sight he never forgot. Men and horses were strewn about. He always 
■emembered the flesh color of the -open wounds i brown, 

'his was on the 5th of November in 1918. He spent Armistice Bay (November 
1, 1918) in the hospital, '"^'he army termed his wounds as "severe." 

le rejoined the division in occupation duties in Germany at Koblenz. 
luch to his chagrine, he performed military police duties in that city 
"or the rest of his tour in the army, 

:n »ay of 1919. he boarded the confiscated German liner Der Vaterland 
(re-named Leviathan) and returned with his unit tm the U,S, Arriving 
,Ln New York, he was shortly sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, 

I 

Phere, at tkh "convenience of the Government, Demoblization of Organizilini^, 

per Circuiar 106 W D (War Department) 1918". our father was discharged 

from active military service, 

I • L»J, J» , 

P,S. The supply company commander was a Captain Scherf of whom Pa always 
spoke ©f in high regard. 

P,S,S. The discharge shows no decorations. He was however awarded the 
Purple Heart medal for wounds received approximately 5^ years after the 
fact. He was entitled to two campaign ribbons; St, Mihiel and Meuse- 
Argonne . 
P.S.S. Pa always referred to the place of his wounding as "Tailly farms." 



f^i*,.^>-^ 



JOHNSON, GLEN RUSSELL 195^1- 



JEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

ar Contributor to the Kock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
erican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
w mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
cess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ***-;c:V5V-,';5V;VAAAA;'."';AA;V>VAAA:VA;V;V-,V 

^ _^^ . * OFFICE USE CODE 

'. Your name (V l Ek/' 1? s ] HM ^ QM '^ , 

Date of form l2' / / Q / 7 "-/ * (ID H ) 

2. Your college: Roc k Val le y College ■•■ (ID // ) 

RocT. f rd, niinms >'■ 

*****;'; )V iV Vc -,'t k -k A >V ,'t ~k k •,'.- k -k -k * -k k k k k k 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

Before 1750 1750-1800 I 800- 1850 

.^---^ 850-1900 1900 or later 

k. Please check al I regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

^New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K^ 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., Ok.) A---^ast North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 



/^'H 'aci f i c (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 

5. Please check all occupat ional categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

/^^ arming {^^"^ in ing _^^--^hopkeeping or small business 

/.^---T ransportat ion ^B i g Business ^Manufacturing 

; — P rofess ions i,^ — Tndus trial labor Other 

6. Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

/^^ oman Catholic ^Jewish ^>^P resbyteri an ^Methodist 

^Baptist Epi scopal ian Congregat iona 1 ^^^utheran 

Quaker Mormon OtVier Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks Indians ^Mexicans Puerto Ricans 

Central Europeans Italians Slavs 




ritish ^Native Americans over several generations 

Other 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

^^-^^ nte rviews with other Family Bibles Family Genealogies 

ami ly members 
Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 



Photographs ^Maps Other 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name fer U.5 T Lv ]QHM5Q k] 

I f dead, date of death 



Current Residence 



Qum. 



ag:Sg<C 



f/licK. 



Place of birth Xrar\ (f^Qun-^QllO {f[ick Date of Birth (^Q j-. j i%9^ 



Education (number of years): 
grade school M high school 

Occupat ion (s) 

ist___2G_L^ 

2nd 



vocational 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates \Q\6~ iQl"^ 1 st Xro i" \ n-\ 



QgliUr^ rOAlO Dates )Q|^-33 2nd_ 



Dates 
Dates 



3rd -[(xi\ (jinuer DatesjO^iZlil^i 3rd GfeC t^ |jQM lUi5CP ates 



Dates 



Religion LU-\;k Q- Pq IT^^ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



. "^e(puM 



\(aw 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother ^^^^ ^^-^^gp^,^^ ^ -j^^..^, pr|^^ ,y|j^d ate ^ c^ ,^7 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 



B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

I f dead, da'te of tJeath 



Current Reside 



nee ( V 



\x\r\r\<z6ec 



rOiiL 



Place of birth J,rnr\ ^\UEQ. nn\Ci\ . Date of birth C]cA \ ^, lQ f)l$ 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school ( "3^ vocational 

Occupat ion(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

iith 



col lege 



Dates 
Dates_ 
Dates 
Dates 



Ist_ 

2nd_ 
3rd_ 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Religion Lu'VK'^ratv m~-|Qr fvnari/^ ias@, J 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your grandfathe r p,,,^ / ,,|)^,,,.,^^^, . y^ ,y^^ DAY^ /. /'/ ,^/ / c; j^ 
°^^- ih^Hatl^Sfl»fhl^^§a£l'S?dtl'>^? $rgl%%^ stepmother or another rel^t I ve -^i ve 



A-1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

^''""^ ^ Current Residence 

If dead, dale of death 



Place of birth ^^^ Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupat ion(s) 

'st Dates 1st 

2nd Dates 2nd 

ird Dates 3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



_Dates 
Dates 



'*th Dates /jth 

Re I i g i on 



Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 
Place of marriage to your grandmother 



date 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

^t"* , _. . Current Residence 

If dead, date of death 

Place of birth___ Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion(s) 

^Dates 1st 

2"d _Dates 2nd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
,,, (after leaving home) 



Date; 



Dates 



^'''^ D ates 3rd 

Re I i g i on 



Dates 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Narne Al V/lU . i (l-H K\ 5 Okf Current Residence fO)mi fTyinrA LU^ Q |-^ L h .<.C ■ 
I f deaa , date of death ^^ 

Place of birth (gnr^rAQnOjeCtl-^vK CJl^C ■ Date of birth \ '^ll ( 6^ 

Education (number of years): ' ' 

grade school y high school vocational college 

Dccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
'St Z^QG^^K Date sy<?/^y-/4?,^/- Jst /T/^/g/?/- g /^. ^/jV' D ates 

2nd /r)/AJ^£ Dates /(^J/!^.-?y2 nd ^/75p//?/J McA D ates 

J'-d Ar/gf/r>B/Z Dates /C?^/-4n3 rd fr£/Ur/=: U/jf^C. D ates 

^t^ N^J^l^/ E'aU/Dm^JL.r <3P££ ^ Btes jQi^O- k th Ay'0£r/-/E/&LJ UJ/6C. D ates 

Religion J^UTMB/PAaJ ^ . ^^W 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. X.J^///t^C^H- I 

Mace of marriage to your grandmother /^^CP^AJC^ 60/:5C «^ate 3 /j /^U 

^ote: If your mother was raised by a s lap f a r Mg r p r an t jOie r r etai i vK (^ r o ag e 18) — ^ ' ^ '^ — -*- 

give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

jrandmother (your mother's side) 

W ;B.LRUCHEfrHCmR^'\ urrent Residence 

I f dead, date of death fQ^ff ——————————— ^—— 

'lace of birth /^fAlCf . /jlJ/,^ ^ D ate of birth ^/o? 4^/^ 5" 

iducation (number of years) ' ^- - - — 

grade school high school /,^ vocational Mii college ,^ 

)ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

1 / (after leaving home) 

1st f-aanA'zn Dates c^3-A<^ ist /=^/Qes/^jC/^ c^^ ^p j-r ■■ 

2nd /]nU^'3 qj/^e Dates ,^/^ ~^^ nd /:~^/L/C'/£: LU/ 6 (: D ates 

J rd ^Da tes 1 rd ^Dates 

Religion 7>r& .->ho j^ r fr^A 
'olitical party, civil or social c 



'clubs, sororities, etc. /f) ^rrj^ C/^/^T 



'lace of marriage to your grandfather ^/_r)>/y^AK£ UJ/:^P: d ate ,cg /> /JZ/ 

'<ote: If your mother was raised by a stepmotner or another relative (to age 18) • f ^ -• 

give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 

Name 

If d ead, date of " death " — ^'"''^''' R^^'dence, 



n.iU' of iii I III 



I' l.iLf 1.1 l<i I I li 

( <lilC.ll i'lli (mimiiIxt of" yen •. ) ~~" 

<Jf-nlc St hool liitih sr li.wil 

_ iiujn scnooi vocoL lon.il lolloix 

Occupat ion(s) 

1st n .. . (after leaving home) 
. Dates 1st 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
m« 
Dates 



2nd 
3rd_ 
^th 



Dates 2nd 



Dates 



_Dates 3rd 

Dates /4th 



_Dates 
Dates 



Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, et. 

f lace of marriage to your grandmother " — - 



"3aT( 



0-2 Stepqrandmother (your mother's side) 

If d ead, date of death " .Current Res.dence_ 



Date of bi rth 



Place of bi rth 

Education (number of years) ~ " 

^''^*^"" '^^°'^' ''iyh school vocational college 

Occupat ion(s) 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
Kt ^ (after leaving home) 

^^ , Dates 1st 



^"•^ . Dates ^2nd_ 

^''^ Dates 3rd 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



"e I i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

i^lace of marriage to your grandfather ~ " 



Date 



CHIbDREN of A 6 B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 



I. Name C-^Sf\(X^ e. ^ ("uVanft^ (^ k. i v^ a ^ , 

: ' ac e of fc^th ^^^/;^>xy>/)/..y;;_^yV!? d^re '^ \ /o/^oA 

Number of years^gt school i n g /^ Occupattbh /^;J,^ 



JmOX-i^i/ 



ars^f schoolin g /^ Occupatibh [AoU^O Au/~f< 

Residence /^^fi/-/^ 7 / ^ Harrtal Status ^>^ nnnjld "^ 



Name ^S^tj C^^.^Ctf^' ^^^.j 
Place of bi rth — ^''- ' "^ 



Number of yea 

Res i dence , ^^j. 

Number of chi Idren 



ars of schopT W^ 74:) 7 Occupa t i 6n T^kfOk I R V^J^ 

, ^OC/(¥orrl/ ^Harftal Status y>^^^ ^ .p' ' ^^ ' ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

I Idren ^ ^ 

• Name / ,^/^ ^jTu^/Q /-, -j p A ) / / 

Place Of birth "^^X ^/;-^^.^;^,^^ ^ date 6/o^/^/^Q . 

Number of veafs otTqhooitng ' Vn Occupat.bn AOu.-<Q UJ/^Q 

;::^^rof-^gffla; ^^^^ ^^FT^T^ 

<^^4 7-/9 ^/ ^. /?//A !^a K J ^ . 

or birth T-/^p/.////;:/;Wr);^ date /C?/;j/^2^ 

f of years,of schooling T^^ (Tccuoatlbh -f-^Jj r. » / 



t. Name /V, 

Number of yearj^of school i ng y/ " TTccupat I tt\ ' ^'jk'J, TiT) /2 i^f/p 

Residence jFnr ^/=rK£n Marital Status x ^^/^V^ V ^ ^^ ^^^^ 



N:;;er oP chiVdVIn ^^^ "^^^ nar.ta. status 7^^^/-^^,^^ — (fY^ft5CM , ^ 

^^^ <zo(Kx^(Xc\^r] 

Name ^^ , r /^ /^><;Af ^M / . ^ 

Place Of birth_^7,-,^ /T-/^,,^^,,^ date /O/yO/3/p 

Number of years of schoolin g / g^ 4- ^ Occupat bn 7^/.^^./.^ 1-^ ^ 

Number of chl Idren /-> *"* '^T-' 



QMJ??l<2/\-f 



Name 

Place of birth ~~3"ate 

Number of years of schooling OccupatTbn" 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren "" 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupatloh 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children 



Name 

Place of bi rth 'date 

Number of years of schooling OccupatTbh" 

Residence MaTTTal Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling OccupaTTort' 

Residence Marl tiTTTatus 

Number of children ' 



). Name^ 

Place of birth date 

Resid^n^ce V^^--^ ^^ school ing -QccupaTi^ 
Number of U l MU r B n — "arital Status 



I 



CHIIOREN of C .nd OJor C-l, 0-l)-y„or mother's „.„,e should appear below 



Numbc 
Nome 






Number of children ^^"'^' Status ^/;e^/ ,^ ^g^^-^/^— ^y 



3. Nane 
Place 
Numbe 



°\^''-^^ , \-^f^> ' -f - V ^ ^r date ^ / i / 7 \ 

r of years o/ school ng " "77,-^.. ^-TT: ^/ J / oJ =^ 

Residence rr— Occupation /^ 

Number of ch , Idren "" ^'"^^ Status_£2ii:gl ^y ^ ^^ ^ "^ 

Res i dence /fhrA'/^r^ T77 ' ^ > . c " "^^"P^t Ion .^ j, ^ \.,\^r^ 

Number of eh , I^Cn ^^^^"^ J^ ^ '" "^"' Status ^r^^^?^,\ r{ ^ ^ 

Place of bi rth ^ — / w J y < ' <~ / . 

Number of year s of sS^oVi^g ^^ ^^ ^ ^'/i,^' * 5— ^ate //-^//V/ 

Residence /T^^^^/^^^T^ 7-7-7 ^^ .i ■ . 1 .Q^^^P^tion /jg^ ^ c> /. C /^ 

Number of cC'Cfef ^^ '^^ ^^ ^ Marital Status y^^^f^Ttf^^ 



S. Name 

Place o 
Number 



7. Name 

Place of birth — ^ 

Number of years ot schooling -r^^^^—. 

Residence__ — _0ccupati6n 

Number of children ~ Marital Status_ 

8. Name 
Place of bi rth 



Number of ye^rs of schooling — k — ^^'? 

Residence — . Occupation 

Number of chi l dren Marital Status ] 



9. Name 

P lace of birth 



Number of years of schooling ' " '^V'^ . 

Residence — _ Occupation 

Number of children — Marital Status \ 



10. Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of school lng « '^^'^^_ 

Residence -r- °<^<^"P3tion 

''u-ber of children ^ ' ''"'""' '^'^^-'^J. 



Your Father 

Name firU.i/Of ^ JOH fJ60U Current Res i dence ^cK-firCJ , X^^- 

If dead, date of J6ath' ^ 



Place of bi rth 



"-L^o^ nOnun-k^iiiO rHic k . D ate of birth nc4. 5 . i Q ^1 

r of years) , 



Education (number of yeo. ^, 
grade school high school /J_ vocational y c ollege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

/I . ^ I I (after leaving home) 
1st Hlh rQrC^ Dates //S/ - /O/Jl 1 s t STy^/CGTfk D ates 



2n6 jY)ac/\ Op^rgior Dates / Q S ^ 2nd ((immonikWil^k bJli'C- ^^^^'- 

3rd Labor Dates /^^V - ^^ 3rd ^cK ^^^(A ^Dates_ 

^tU <^r/Ok LQy^r D ates /QS'^ - 4 th JJ ^Dates_ 

Da 1 t r% \ r\r\ i .^ \ ^ .* 



Religion L ii^K-^>^al^^ 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. \\<2,41Lk\s\\CQ^(^ 

Place of marriage to your mother ^ P^f,T^ ^Oty /7) )^^)^ . d ate Si//i/^' 
NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on "the back 



of this page. (E-2) 
Your Mother 



l(^fiNJIVJ A(3MU50O Current Residence ^0>C[(^V(\ /TLL . 



Name y ^ _ . 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Chj7?rVn()l(feZi/fl] U/^L> Date of birth 7\uk 'Ol% ^ t 9 ^ "5 
Education (number of years) (A 

grade school high school \ ^ vocational col lege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

, (after leaving home) 
1st (^aCj^rn^66 Dates /q-^-X 1st C/ljCnQn D ates 

^ ^AC}porQ-^^.r Dates / Q ^ j-^ j/j J~ror) /yha/)h/AJ ^Dat 

3 rd 7^ Si )(' QpeQ-fcr ^a tes /C?^- 3 ' /J(Z rd ~ /f^r/T/^rl^g/) Til . D 

Re 1 i g i on LOy-VK^-.'^Q VV 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



es 
ates 



Place of marriage to your father >C?7.-^ Ty^/^ Y'/Tr /D/r/V. date ^////f 4^/ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 



this page (F-2). 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C- 1 , 0-1) -your mother's rume should oppear he low 



Number of cR i 1 dr^n 



N.imJitT '>i ypor-. of sdiooHmj // Occupation '-^tz rO//'*^ ^TTrS^rv, ^ 

;:-l'"": ^l ^i^^<^^^ ^ (^ ^^^^ /W?.'! Marital s tatus ^V^^^Q^ ' ^ ' ^ ^-^^ ^ 

date .:^/Q/^ -K 
. :cupation ^yrn/fjis., 
M^TTtiT Status ^y;e^ /^ ^Cr//7 7:S- ^^^ 



Ploce of birth (^/j<p/^A.' 7rV(? jj date .^/c^/c^ ^ 

Number of years of schooling y^:) Occupation \rrn/r//^r^ 



Res i dence 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



;r of years of schooling (Jccuoation ' 



3. Nane_ 

Place ^ 

Number of years of schooling " Occupation 

Residence Marital Status (7> e rV n4- O /yn>^ ^ 

Number of ch i Idren -^"^ ^' 'V ^ ^^/P O* 



sr of years of schooling (/ Occupation Vrt/r^I/ rVt- 



>*. Name 
Place" 

Numbei v,. yco. ^ i^. -.^..uuimy ^J_ uccupatiOn y^^r/j/^ ^ HfJ^j / )P t^^ 

Residence /.Q/rl A/9jC f^' J-/ J .. Mar i ta ) Status /r,aV^^,iA^^^ ''' ^ 

umh»» r o f rh Hron — > ' W1 /^ I / '- t. .^ 



Number of ch i 1 dren -r> 



^ of birth M/>9/>or)>0^ ;^..d;/Z>; (X J. ^r . da te 7A^^/.^-^ 
or of years^of schooling ' / ^ Occupat ion y^/vy i; >^ ,.,. ^i 

6. Name 
Place 
Numbe 



S. Name_ 
Place 

Number of yearsof schooling ' /^~ Occupat ion yi/v> ^ ^ V," j^c^ 

?ror chilXe^T'"^'^'^'"^ ^// Marital Status ^r^ ^r/^yQr/^'^ 

. ^/{^THI TFA/ CU/rV\J<>J<T . . 

.ofb.rth /=-jaP/FA!rr UJ/<.r date //j>//V 

jr of years of schooling / ;2 Occupat ion /j^ . <^" . f. a^g 

Residence ^f^^Po^T Ld '^ Marital S tatus_>^ ^2^g^?^^ '^^ 

Number of ch i Tdren J^ — ^ '^' ' ' ^■'h- 



^ 



7. Name ____^ 

P lace of birth ~ ' ~~~ jatg 



Number of years of schooling ^Occupation 

Residence ——____ ^ . , j. 

Marital Status 

Number of cni Tdren 

Name 

P I ace of bi rth ~~~~~ ^^^^ 

Number of years of schooling Cccupation 

Residence Mar iTTT Status 

Number of ch i I dren ~ " " — — __ 



9. Name 

P lace of birth ~~ ■ " date 



Number of years of schooling OccupatiOrt 

Residence HaTiTTT Status 

Number of ch i Idren ~~ ~" 



10. Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling OccupatioTT 

'*«*''*«"" MaTTTal Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Your Father 



Name 
If dea3 



Q^'^'^Mf ^ ./^///C^^^/L^ Current Res idence TocK 4 PCJ , X^/-- 

, date of death ' ) 



Place of birth -L^0^ lT|nLLn^\0 IM I C k . D ate of birth Oe4 . 5 . I Q ^^ 

Education (number of years) ' 



grade school high school // vocational y c ollege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

/? • /- — / , I- (after leaving home) 
1st Hlh rOrce. Dates //^/-/yi7 lst S-p/^kOT/^ Dates 

Ind /fjQcA Op^rgjor Dates / Q S ^ 2nd ((j/VmorikkQl^k (jJ/ 3C - ^^tes 

3rd Aabnr Dates /QSQ -^^ 3rd '^mck^cd ^Dates_ 



^^^ ^r/Ok lay&r D ates /QS<^ - 4 th ^ 



Dates 



Religion ^ U-^K^PoK 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. rv^-fPCxA I iCQ ^V 



Place of marriage to your mother ypnf^TFr/C)Ty/7Vrff d ate ^/'/d/dW 
NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the oack 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 



Name vl(]^fiNJ(0 O(3MU50/O Current Residence '^0C[(^?(\ . XLL . 

If dead, date of death ■ ' ' 



ace of b i r th fhjVmnn U f^alfl] Ui^L . Date of birth ^^U ^^ ) ^^ ^^ 
ucation (number of years) A 

rade school high school \ ^ vocational col lege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Dates 



1st ^<^(jg/^/lg55 Dates /Q^Tk 1st CAyrnQH 

l ^LOporQ-^.r Dates / Q ^ J-^ j/J J^rC) r) /ylnO /)p JA J ^Dat 

3rd P Si )l QpeQ-fcr Dates /Q/,^-/4 ir6 - Tf^CJ^PO/m TLL . D 

Re 1 i g i on Lu-VKO-.^Q K 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



es 
ates 



Place of marriage to your father mS T^/C ('/T/ /D/r/J. d ate .^//3/^U 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the oack of 



you were raised by a stepmoth 
this page (F-2). 



E-1 Stepfather 

Name 

If dead, aate of death 



Place of birth ^Date of birth 

Education (number of years) "~~~~~~~ — ^— — 
grade school high school vocational col lege 



0ccupation(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Isl Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates ^3rd Dates 

^th Dates 'ith Dates 

Re 1 i 9 I on 

Pol i t i cai" Part les , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother Date 



F-2 Stepmother 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) "~~~~ 

grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates ^2nd Dates 

3rd Dates ^3rd Dates 

Re I I g I on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father date 



i 

CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name' should appear below ^ 

Name Or LE M 1?U 5 6 ElL Ao^D^nU ^ , 

Place of birth -^ncVro^n XL/ ' ~^'^. of birth Q/c^IQ/^ ^ 

Number of years^r sct>09,l ing ' /^ ■ " QccuoatiT^ ^/^^^^i- 

Res.dence fncJ^^ra' ^ LL . ^ Mar } t TTTtTtus O/ /7 0>^ ^^^ ^^'^ 

Number of children q] ' / ' — ■ — - 

Place of birth (SOcKJV^rri Date of birth /A/Sh 

Number of yea rs ^ sc^ipj^ ling ^^ Occupatio?; isi'uCf^T^l^ 

Residenc e ^r/^;^./-^ y /^ , Mar i ta TTE7tus ^/ ^oM^^^^^^^ 
Number of children Q 7 • — — 

Name 



Place of birth T^OC/rrnrn/ JTLL ■ Date of birth .^/^/d? 

Number of years of Schooling ' // Occupation "c^TTTFTe^'r 

Res i dence ^C A'/nr Cl J/ J. Marita mTt ^ \^y „GJ-3'^ ^^ ' 

Number of ch i Idren ' ,^ ■ 

Name /K/ZY) ^I/Z^SETJ-^ C /n^AJ^O/L/ 

P 1 aceoA'/rth^ ff)rP^n M'Y-Al. 

Number of yea^s of schooling /f' 



Number of ch i Idren ' (^ ^^ 

Date of birth cs?V///c$" iP 



/n ^ . , ^ Occupat i on <;^> ^g^/T?^ 



r of yeat^ of^sc^ooljng /n OccupaTTon ^ 

Res i dence ^r/V^/?V ^ZZ. Marital 'Statu's }^/^UG7^ 

Number of children ^ (^ ^^ >^^ 

Name 

Place of bi rth 0*^6 of birth 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of children — — - 



Name^ ^ 

Place of birth Pa'te of birth_ 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of ch i Idren ~~ 



Name^ ^ 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Residence Marital Stat^ 

Number of chi Idren 

Name ^ 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ZZZII 

Number of chi Idren ~ ~ 



Jil. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights/ to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois /J / 

Signed ..^-<C2i^/r) /fyl^Ul0f)f 

Date 




I 



f!ri.;tinc Ari'' -• ••:nn v.m ■ Icrii o?) 'i,.|,, m , I'JO] , 

■he S"ven!i' '"hiT i nC /■ h ht, l''il, v'Qrr' ' o 'n ;• to 
;■ ■ -115'i ("lanijla .'■)•', '- 

■li ■! to the U.:J. i a \^ ■ ■ , 

- ivr dcciiied to In;/ n. ' . ■ ' t-rjt c;. 

rn about thir, l,imf>. 'J'h': i j ••od in iron ■ iv' r 

until the firL'>t floor of ''o (n;.-'-. r-^rrn boune .'0.3 built, 
.'■iiortly after thoy movorl in (J ! i vcr. w:". born, l^yron , 
iiarf.e , Albert , aiHl Miri-' vor-. Ijorii bolv/een L89G and 
1900 . Kobert the yrMinf^est v/a;; lu^rn in ]/302. 

';'he firat floor of tbo hare houao v/ar; t'M" OTi'iy 
finicbcd part . It coiiniatod of a kitf^hon, pantry , 
inar-ter bedroom , Hinin/^ ronm , ; nl a hune living room, 
Peter had grand ideas but n'^ver seeraoiJ to have the 
time or money to f Irish Lheni , 'Vhen he pl.-^nn'^-l the 
house it v/as to ha^-e ei/';lit bedrooms on the r;r.conf1 fJoc-.r, 
only three were ever finird.ied. Christine shared a b dioora 
•■/ith her two sisters. 

j'eter was a v(;ry siriot fa i. her. '.'.'hen th'; v/loie 
family gathered a', the din in;- -'oora table for breakfast 
and r.Tjpper no one v/as allowed to speak except the 
grov.'iiiips. Peter and [Oamila each sat at one end of 
labl( \;ith th/-' boy:; on one sidf; and tlie girl:; on ll;-.' 
otlK.:-. Peters word was law an'i no one dared diaagrco. 



!' il:i made v.io.rt of li'^r f .■;;i Hi o:; clothOo and t.h'J 
r,\Ylv. verc tauf';ht at an early ai,e to hclo v;itn the 
cooki';; and scv/inr. Chrictine c •.celled in both. Each 
of the sons had his own list of chores to do every day 
such as chopping firewood , milking and feeding the 

c ov/s • 

Every Sunday the family went to the Presbyterian 
church in Iron River. Afterwards they went home and 
ate the big meal of the day. Little work was done 
and friends visited them often. They had no relatives 

in the U.S. 

Christmas was the big holiday of the year. 
Christmas Eve the family visited friends and cut their 
Christmas tree. Christmas day the tree was decorated 
and gifts were exchanged. 

At sixteen Christine moved in with a family that 
lived in Iron River so she could finish her High School 
education. To pay for her room and board she worked 
as a maid and governess for the family she boarded 
with. She was not treated as an equal by the new family 
and it was rather lonely. After she graduated in 1919 , 
she moved back to the farm . Later that year at a 
Social gathering in Iron River , Christine was intro- 
duced by a family friend to Gust L. Johnson. 



*;ust Lav;crcnno .iohnsou wa:; the Gocond non born to 
Ciistri'- A. John;'on n'vi Fiar^'o. lie v/;u; bor-n Ont. 1 , 1':'30 . 
-■Dnd Marf'e i ■■=';■'■ .rrotpri to l,bo U.,-. . G. 1^>''() , 
i (•:; h Hctllo'l in 'Ml i r;i (^o 1 'vn tb^Ny movo''! to Iron 
I'Our)' in , Miohir'n' a lof:''inr: nnd iron ore mjnr: boorM 
tov;ri. iiily wac Lho firnt l.torn , aTid Waller v/an tlie oidfr't 
:"on , Ted and Anna \.he yoiinf';(:!n t v/^^ro tv/inr;. 

(!u::tav v/ont inl.o a par t,n''r.'-h i {> v/i Ui 'Jfiarlco 
Ander,;on in 1898. '\']\<} Andornon Johnson build.inr; v/ac 
bniJ-l. across from t.ho Jolmron ii'^me on Horth l-ajn ot, 
Tv;o ; irds of the fir-nt floor nonrsinted of Aiulrroon & 
.Tohn:""'nG Grocery I: !''ancy Mcatr. . Tlie other shop taking 
up t''.'' otlier third was rcntod out. The oecond p-Hory 
had i ..'o apartment:!. Tn I'JOZ Gun lav bour;hx Anderaon out 
of thi! partnership. 

(rustav also ov/ncd a thour'.and acre farm. Only l.'^O 
acre^ v/ere cleared the rest v/u:; all timber, Tiiroui;h 
out I ;)e years Gus Lav acnnircd o*her pnrc^ls cf land 
arour.d tov;n. He al.':;o built a four flat apartnent house, 
and another house tliat he rcntf.d. 

'Che families life con.tered aro^.ind two tliirco, 
tho ;;•. tore and the J'^irst Luthrran Cliurch. The v/holo 
family v/as active in church of lairs . Gustav donated 
the land for the sanctuary in 1911. 

Anderson Pc Johnsons: Groro-y & (■'ancy Meats tecame 
very successful . It had four delivery wagons that. 
ope^" 1 ted in a fifty mile radius. 



^!KTt !j. v/'^nt ;^'! I'rn- '■•■ ilv fonrtli rTrado in hln 
■,c\iOo\.inr,. He quit f '^ \ior\'- in 'h'? i-itoro, Jill , Ted 
-n , were II ■' "i)!y ' (■r>''n rf.o frc-'. hlfh 



ncbo) ! 

[ 
the fr 
coni]= i 1' 
n.o o ' 

Gust. ■ 
Hive , 



n l')!"} at ncv'-ntcr-M Gu:-. ' Ti. v/rini. to v/mi-;- in 

on Mountain rninoo. He v;oi k od loi; Iho mi nine 

.V until r)1;. llf^ \Mnn ;; tar !,'.;d back at the ctore 

clivry v/apon drivrr. 

n 1919 GuGt L. Jolmrion vmg Introduced to (,'hri::t jr.e 

con at a Sooinl ^';a therin,'i; in Iron River, by .".ven 

n. Sven waa nn old friend of the Andre-'inonn and 

I. had met him from bin deli very route to Iron 



!'■ rr.ont.h n f U •• Gtr; I I, ;i'ii ''h r i :• |, i no trie' Mioy 

, ; . 'Im ■ ; 'If' 1 Lvf r;; P'ru'" to IrO'' iiiV'.r 

' :or!r;1 Mo for' him l.o ;;■ . ':Wri.! l i ne .fairly of't.'.Tt. 
i '^rlod .Juno I'3 , ^')''0 , in the I'M 'tjI, 
Lu+.h'' •■•in C'lnrc!) oi ! ^on liiuin ','■ i n , 

ii;!. ii. coui.i ini'^'l v;j. Mi tlic [-.rocory fleli.vry ron ' « 
.'it': :i!T'if^ Uk' i !' hoinn fl'Mvc: t}io-Gloro jn fi>if of. 
tb""' ' "o a|\'ir l-mon I;:: , TlT-Mr f ir:; I ' r;',) i. J '1 'IcTiavo" voo 
born ' rt. 30 , 19::1 . 

• n 1923 Gust L. and i-hrlo moved to Groon Bay , 
'.;isc "Gj.n v/hcre Guat drove a la>'i and ]?t.er a bus, 
Tliel:' second child Bruce waa bom in Green Bay on Karch 

in1926 they riovod back to the apartment in Iron 
HoTin f. in , and Guat L. went to work for Ford Motor 
Co. as a laborer. On June 28 , 1929 Lois was born. 
About this time Gust and Christine lost their savings 
that they had in the Commercial Bank because of its 
failure. Their other savings in the National Bank 
was returned after the Depression, 

The grocery store was never quite the same after 
the Depression. Gustav lost thousands of dollars by 
giving credit to store patrons who never payed it back. 
The mines closed down in Iron Moiintain , some to never 
open again. 



L - 



Gu3taf Andre v;a3 the second 3on. He was born on 
Oct, 5 , 1932. HiG being named Gust followed the 
tx-adiMon of the cocund son talrln/^ on the fathers 
name •nd the r.ranri f'.-i IherM r:'id'i!c name or initial, 
Jnfnp . t,!.o ,70nnr;er;t vis bor-n on Ont. 10 IS'J'i. 

n;'l L. advanrr- i fait\l.7 r-'ipidly ryX Ford Fiot.or Co, 
and ■■ 'Mi-lod lip .''-: fiiiof r.vi P'^r i n1,rndnn t of \,\\". T'ov/er 
rian'. Rccaune of }ijr5 por.il.ion Onr;t L. met llonry Yocf\ , 
ThoiP- •• Kdison and Mr. Fircoto.no v/hilo they toured the 
plant. 

TuGtav died iii 1953 i:v.'onty ycarG after hJ.r. v/ife 
died . T'ily inheri ' od the f an i i ;- house , v/al -i c^r tlie 
hone -hat was rented, Teddy and Anna co-ov/ned the 
store , Gust Ii, and Anna r.ol.d t!ie apartmont hoiiMc an.d 
:~pli' the money. Gnr:t L. reca'^yed all savinpc- , and 
eacli idiild recievod an equal :;.haro of tlie farn. 

In 1954 Gust Jr. and family moved to Quinnesec 
rich, three miles from Tr. I't. Gust's second coxisir 
AndrC'V Brynglson o.".]-:od him and the family to move .in 
and nre for him. Alter his dr-ath in 1958 Gui-t T,. 
inherited the twelve room hou -o in Quinnescc and his 
120 acre farm. He also recievod all of Andrews stor^ks 
anrl b'onds with the excojitinn of a small por'tion 
that v/as divided among Gur; t's ch.ildt.'en, Gur. I L. 
retj red in 1956 aflcr tlie For': plant jn Iron "onni.iin 
shut dovm. Since then Gust L, and Chris have traveled 
through out the U.r>. and Canada. 



T, ■ rvj Thonian 

- rilanch .lohncon-i Pn, tr rn" '," rn. ri'lf-i.thor 

A. V/i 'c - F,Gter 

13, \'l' I nb deocent 

n. c'' i 1'^ ren - 4 

D. F" !e - ( Henry Rosr; ) 

E. I-: ■•■Lba 

F. YjII 

G. * '"-rif - ( Ilo.ry Gloaoon ) 



1,1, -'aines Gloaoori 

I - Blanch Jolumons Ilaternal. Grandfather 

Ai, v; : .:'e - Margret Cunlngh-'un 

B, Irish descent 

C, c: i Id ren - 9 

D. F.rank 

E. r'!.- rtha 
P. KcJ;e 
G, E(iv;ard 
H. Tom 

I» Andrew 

J. Theodore 

K, * Mary - ( Grif Thomas ) 

L. Maggie 



III. Grif Thomas 

- Blanch Johnoons Father 

A. Bo-n 1/ "5 / 1867 V/aukau , V/in. 

B. M.-i-riod - M-i.ry Gloason 12 / 1 P. / 1802 

C. 0"i'U])ation - fnruif.T 
I), CM i Ldrcn - 8 

F,. K • ^ - ( Hoy (Vn'lr.on ) 

?. E. ' :jr - ( T'Mvrin HoorlMtifl ) 

n. n.v'yja - ( F,;!v/Mrfl Nicholc ) 

II. E' ari 

I. * 'lanch - ( Alvin Johnr.on ) 

J. U : ;1<: 

Ix'. I'or-thy - ( Tlioinac! Hnodonald ) 

L, E": I anor - ( Oris Mclaln ) 

TV, 'rank Jnhnrjon 

- Alvins Father 

A, \\' i. To - Elma 

B, Sv.-odish descent 

C, children - 8 

D, Vnlborg - ( R;i.ynold Oui.'vh ) 
TO. Rj la - ( Charles .Trnoot ) 

F. Alfred 

G, ■>= Alvin - (Blanch Tliortian ) 
H, Clifford 

I, Fi;rtle - ( Ualnh Cotter ) 
J. 1' 'rma - ( Romn Dan link ) 
K, a 1 osie - ( James Mckoy ) 



V, .'. ivi.n .1 ohtKion 

- ill;.) t.ornal Gran'.ifo.thor 
A. i:--'i 12/7/04 f;ornro.->nv/o," 1 t,b V; i neon;;- in 
: , i'! ■ V-! I,j on - 4 yc 'T's 
C". , 0'-'' jpationr! - Ic-i'-or inner , fnt-m^r ,aii'l li'.vy 

cn"l]'rnent opera t,or, 
J), R' 'ir:Lon - l.u t,1icr.in ]'nliticT.l I:art,y - Dnmocrat 
!■;. ?■. T-lori niinoli Tliom-i;; , Fl':rf!nc;e blll'cA 
. 1 . i'^irn 2 IVAliV) 
2. Oied 9/ / 6R 
5- fvnication , flnirOno'; hir-:h Sf;hool two ycirc. 

early , teach ore rolloge two years 
4. Oconpation - toaehcjr 

• 5. nfligion - preabytorinn , , I'-arty ~ Dcraonrat 

I 

J?* c'- • Iclron 6 

G, 7/(7/26 Roy K. - ( rinrgrr-t ) 

]I, 3/720 Franklin , died 9/15/ '16 

I. 4/.: 1/30 V/allace - ( Hazel ) 

J. '^/ /•52 Lloyd , died 2/6/33 

K. * ■/V28 /35 Joann -(Gustaf A, Johnson) 

L. Kathleen 1/31/41 - ( Peter V/itynski ) 



1 — 



IMlMlODTATi'; FAMILY 
VI. Gust A . Johnson 
- Father 

A. Born 10/5/32 Iron Mt. 

B. Education 11 yrs, 

C. Married , Joann Johnson 2/13/54 

D. Occupations - air force , laborer ^ brick layer, 
and Mason Contractor 

E. Religion (family ) Lutheran 

F. children 4 

* F, Glen 9/29/54 

G. Sheri 1/6/56 
K. Gus-t 3/2/57 
I. Kim 3/11/58 



-//- 









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.h 


'" 


> 



I, « 



■/^- 



s, 






IS 


•-I fol! 


-'iVT 


' ImilK al. 

■. ilit' liKlllI!. 

n ill |>f)(ii i 


1 lUO 

JiiM-; 


nm-is V M.s ].i 


1 '!*"? 


;, IM'I? 1 ■■ V.:' 

Mj M.MV 

r;i!ii< t(i 1 


1 'U 1. 

ui>it- 
1 in 






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■ i-- M>- •!■■' ■! by lii. wi- 
I t\< i> .'(Ills: 

H(i: liMid, 
;..,.. .... • I'd c^' Ivin) 

: '.• 1- ii; M I j>. A I \- i n 

.Uii'iiNon siiul Mvi. Oris 

' ViicLnin, I-Viu'o: Jlrs. 

■noroUiy» MiicUonald. 

Mrs. Hoy (Ka'.luyn) 

1. Mihvaukoo: Edwairi and 

■• \V. Tliomn<. FfMicc Also by 

•=r. Mrs. Mavtie Cotlinon. Kn- 

^^o. Oioson, nnd 31 p.and- 

cn, nvo of ^'lioni arc in the 

vi I'^'oriTS and two ftr»:at 

l-'unt-ral scrviros were hch\ from 
llir 3arni lioim- a( 2 iVcliu-k \'.v\'\- 
(1; y Mil iriiicjM, H>-\\ d'lni C. Wirk- 
•,|;;ii:n oii ii'ial,in,;r. Oniiii!' tile .<'r- 
vicc Mr:. WifK.slnini. l.oriia Wick- 
stii'i" auii I.-aRiinif H<'rklnn<) sanR 
•i-;!ilill \\f Gatlu-r Al tin- R.ivor" 
a;,.i 'T.ni.kijin This Way." 

l'al!i>i-ii"crs wore E(i\yin Hoap- 
hnui. Kdv.ard Nirhols. Ah^n John- 
son. Ori.s McLnin. Thomas Mc- 
D-m: 111 and Hoy Carh;on. all son.s- 
in-l:iv.- of I he dccra.<;od. Burial 
Wii.s in the Fence cemetery. 

In charge of Ilower.s were Mablc 

N'i'liol.s. Vcrna "J'iioina.s, Uori.s 

" ■ nas ind .Janet IIf>a',liind. 

• '/ndiiig rron\ r.-.ay weie Mi 

■'Tr;- Roy Cavl;i>n and tamily 

. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■- 'riionia.s 

"■\-c. i-o; 

.. Mai- 

: la vrs, 

? . Ilar- 

;; -bfrls, 

Pr.'.lt. 



--{ 






:i 




amlly, 




JOHNSON, LARRY RAY, 1955- 



LEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

i 

»ar Contributor to the Hock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
nerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
;w mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
;cess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

, SURVEY ***;lc;';>V;VAAAA*A-.'.--.':-.VAA>':A*yt;\AAA;V 

. ^ ^./>.i i ,. . ■' OFFICE USE CODE 

1. Your name Lh KK^ >J0N/^ SOhJ * 

Date of form '^ ( I D # ) 

2. Your college: R ock Valley (.ollege •■'•■ ( I D // ) 

Rockford, 11110015 >v 

*****;•; V; jV A -.V A -h >'; A ,V ;\ iV A- ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. / 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 \/ I8OO-I850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 



Please check al 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

^New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

_5outh Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) ^Easl? South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , Kvfc 



South Atlantic IGa. , Ma., N.C., S.C.; E asi? South CentraULa. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , Y.% 
"West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., Ol<77 ~ \/ East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 
"Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) ~^ (Tl , L':, ^ 



Please check all occupat ional categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 



V. 



Farming Mining Shopkeeping or small business 

Transportation /B ig Business ^Manufacturing 

^Professions \ j Industrial labor ^Other 

6. Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

Oman Catholic Jewish ^Presbyterian \/ M ethod is t y 

apt i St Episcopal ian Congregational y^Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon OFher Protestant ^Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks , Indians Mexicans Puerto Ricans 



3Z< 



^^^ T7_7Central Europeans Italians ^Slavs 

Irish sj B ritish Native Americans over several generations 
East Asian Other 



8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

y lnterviews with other \/ Fami ly Bibles Family Genealogies 

/ family members / 

'/ V i t a I Records \/ Land Records ^The U.S. Census 

^P hotographs i/W aps ^Other 



I, FAMILY DATA 

A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name ([{uC€^Ce Hlb^rJ QOhnSc'^ Current Residence 

i f dead, date of death , |^/\; ^C, IS(-;^' 

Place of birth ^dat&Of^, QJ i ^ ClG |\^ 6 1 1\. Date of Birth vjofQ 30, /'Hu^i 

Education (number of years): 
grade school (r high school Oofl^ vocational col lege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
ANiV\ilh)(f H£ (1OOL0 (after leaving home) 
1st (OCt'^^^^ioi^ Tirne) Dates Ist ^Dates_ 

2nd IClbrircr ~ haCtOfsj Dates 2nd ^Dates_ 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates_ 

'4th Dates kxh Dates 



Religion i7]t+hodl^ 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. (\Q,i\<< 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother (^'qc i<^V(^ fj _ |:((((\Jci$ ^ ^^l? (-( \^\'^'^ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) .^<^ (JeSt- LQI>-'^'^ ^'^' 

Name Arle<vJe ffllidVec^ 6cqUs, iohn5<;A Cur rent Residence £dc|feC4c<0 C^ i S C . 
I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth HoKQlVdQlc .U''"^*^ Date of birth ^\^^H '~^/ ' ^ ' "^ 

Education (number of years): „ 
grade school % high school^ vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 



Dates 



1st 5^'hoe ^Q^chCH Dates lst_ 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates_ 

kx.\\ Dates '♦th ^Dates_ 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. /IpflV 



Place of marriage to your grandfather KC-ci: '^C''<\ ■ ~ DATE! [j^ L /^/l^ 

'^°'^= ih%natPS^»fhl^^Ba£l'8?^tlSl? 3i|iV^)! stepmother or another relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 

Occupalion(s) PLace OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 



1st 

2nd 
3rd 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


i*th 



_Dates 
_Dates 
_Dates 
Dates 



Re I i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother - jg^e 

A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

^^"* Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death " "^ ~~ 



Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational ^college 

Occupation(s) PL^cE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
'^^ Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd 



Dates 



3''«1 ^Dates 3rd ^Dates 

Re I i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



3. 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

?^"^ A i^^^^''W. ^r('^^'^^^ ^"'■'■^"t Residence HdimlklJ. ^eCmodCL 

If dead, date of death i^ ym i i { 

Place of birth^ Date of birth /^C>7 

Education (number of years)* I / \ I 



(after leaving home) 

Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



grade school /]0N ^ high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PL^CE OF RESIDENCE 

^st lofmer ^Oates Ist 

2 n d iTlaSONJ __Da te s 2 n d 

3 fd ^Dates I rd 

^th __^ ^Dates hth 

Re 1 i g i on fcj/^ptlSt' 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. {\ (s a c> 

Place of marriage to your grandmother (^efrnoHa dater-.y-,^^^ 

Note: If your mother was raised by a bm[j r jl ll t! l U l a i lUL l m r r n l ai l W ( r o ag e ]B f^ ' ' ^ 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's, side) 

Name // / /c/d Qt SikeC , D^dj^^JOL C urrent Residence S^ CnwdcL 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth^ _Date of birth (juNc 2% I^J'J 

Education (number of years) ——————— 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
; C (after leaving home) 
>st nOd'i^ (jn€. Dates 1st ^Dates 

2nd D ates 2nd D ates 

3 rd Da tes 3 rd ^Da tes 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfathe r /-; r/^'/7?V/?/r d ate V/V /y/f 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age 1^ 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l Stepgrandf ather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 



l'l.ic«- ..I lii I Ih D.ili- ol l)iilh 

( (liK.it ion (niiinlxT of yi- , i . ) 
tjr.Hic \thiM»l hiijh scliooi vocotion.il LolltHjt' 



Occupation{s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


iith 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates 

'ith Dates ^th Dates 

Re 1 i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social ^clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother -— ^ date 

D-2 Stepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupat ion(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 





vocational 


col lege 
PLACE OF RESIDENCE 










Dates 


1st 


(after leaving home) 


Dates 


Dates 


2nd 




Dates 


Dates 


3rd 




Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political party , civil or sod a 1 c 1 ubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather ~~ Date 



CHILDREN of A 6 B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 

Name C.IOfeAJct. 77 yiohn'?on 

Place of birth fDUetOti . u^iS- date JOI^tlO^ /9Zl 

Number of years of schooling /j2- "" Occupatibh '-Ji\K(^/^^^i>itp h cc^'> 

S'lr of ch il dren ^ "--"^' Status ,^^^,^, — 



Name fjcM^ld fi) ■ Joh/)^0/) 
P 1 ace of b i rth C D&C^tO/^ "" 



, d at e OCTf ?0./y>0 

Number of years of schooling / Z. Occupati6 n txcy<<(TTf<r 

Residence Marital Status /hf^Eifn 

Number of ch il dren 4 "" //l/tf'f-'U} 

}. Name I^CflQClJ J ' Joh 0^/00 

Place of birth r^c:.ritT^/i^ ^ date iJec fO, /Q? 

Number of years of schooling / Q Occupatlb n j^'Cpff^/J 

Residence Marital Status iTiM'pifn 

Number of children _JJ. l-imUfil 

Name B^kl^e ^.^ohnSoP , jyfh , 

Place of bi rth (fDiJ-e^TC/o' /y^ d ate -^^ C'cf^ /9 3^ 

Number of years of schooling jQ Occupatl6h >/Cc'^«r- L)tV<^ 

^^^ ' ^g"^g M arital Status QlMlc/eO 

Number of ch i 1 a ren / 



Name ^cb^cf JchoSor^ 

Place of blrth COeeeWl^ tt7 date J<^>^S^ /f ^ 7 

Number of years of schooling {Q Occupation iQhCC'^r 

Res i dence ^Ovonjcn Marital Status Pl/^£,fi) 

Number of chi Idreh ^ 



Name P^tCl C/(L Jo^f]^OfO ^. (-jqcK , 

P I ace of birth tptCjirCJ)^ ^ J ate doij T^, l9^H 

Number of years of schooling /O Occupation a/^i^i$Vl)(!'c' 

Residence Marital Status AA££/<^z? 

Number of ch i Idren / 

Name Rlul/N ^^ rl^'^^^^^'f^ /V^^^" ; ./ ..., .^^^ 

Place of birth ' /& tO&^(ZTC/^ date ^'~'i ^ / '^^' 

Number of years of schooling /O Occupat i oh . f/cVX (> ;^* 

Res i dence Marital Status fi] f)fif^i c 

Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

P 1 ace of bi rth d ate 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



Name ^ 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



D. Name^ 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residenc e H ari tTTTFatus 

Number of Clll Idrmi " . 



CHILDREN of C and (or f-l D-H-w^Mr ™^n i 

" vor I. I, D U your mothcr'<, name should oppear below 

N.iiiw 



Nuna.cr of y.ir •, o/ scIuk. I i nq ^ 






d.itt^ 



Marital Status 



Occupal ion 



Number of years of school inq 
Residence //mU^CAJ j'ff^rVC'^- 
Number of ch i Idren ^/y" 



-^^ 



date 



7c cupa 1 1 on //^y; ^j^^ j / /Tv " 



Marital Status /y^/^g/ 



Place or birth ^ /h /Cnh.n/^ 
Number of year s of TcO Ing 



— „. 7^ai3,vji M,nooiing 



date 



Occupat iOn 
•larital Status 



JUl 



o. birth y rY/^fi^JfH ""— 

'^•^ ■■-— "' schooling ^^ 



'♦. Name 
Place 

Number of years o 
Res i dence 
Number of ch i Idren 



fate 



jM. 



J1J2/1± 



Occupation 5j)le< C(<^£t 

_".rital Status rh ^? , ff^ (<"' 



N rth nTTryTTrn 

Number of year 
Residence hr-,:,. 
Number of ch i Idren 



P I ace of birth n<.Lrh,:\-}A 

;ars of schooling / 

''^"''^^"« Hftn^iLm/O r^r'T^TM 

1 1 1 dren o 



L 



date 



H^3 



— . Occupation ^c< rc4-aC\J ' 

Marital Status /j.c ^oJ ^ / 



Name ^/CUV// f). Co^b, 

Place Of birth h(^/?lupn 



...... ocfLf/iuun 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Number of ch i Idren 



JL 



date , 1^^ 

,°"^P3 1 i on iitcyr7ciT (T 



jmi 



JiOL 



Marital Status /Jn'^^fFvk 



P I jr^iTTrTTTTu • ' ' ^ , - — _ - ^ 



Place of birth f,Cii',r> Jq p: 

'r of ye^rs of school ing 



Numbei w, yc^rs or schooling 

Res i dence Qi<,CI - /[^f C /V 7f " 

jmber of c h ! Idren /)c7)f^ 



:z 



date /ri/y^cd/c), ip l 

'ccuoat Ton ^ 



Numbe i 



Occupat lOn 
Marital Status 



Place ot bTrth A\-^'„,n/i 

Number of years of sc>>ool !ng . "J^ 



Residence ;^P/i^.'/5^ /^^/^U/ , ' ^^^.^V>i. V; .V 
Number of ch i Idren ^ "^ ^^-^ 



"da te jQeC 2'f, iq29 



3. Name yqv-;- f) Cr^' . khn^.on 

P I ace of birth "pTTIhTw — 



""^'"'^^ Status />,^^^,;^^ 



Number of years of school inq 7T" 

Residence /^ ^'ei. /^X /y — ^ 



Number of children ~7" 



date /fjfifCH 27 ^ /7^/ 

Occupat ion A/Ve a' - /f>0(i\ f/)77r-: i it 

Status Anv/./^/7 "* 



Marital Status IhM'/^^ P 



10. Name 
Place o 



Number of years of schooling" 
Residence 



date_ 
5ccupat ion 



Number of children 



Marital Status 



p 



Your Father 

Name DcAJ^Id 0)oCCl^ John^n Current Residence t-^^^^ ff}fiK jf 

I f dead, date of death — — — ^— _— _^.— ____ 



Place of birth tD&tf^TCf. ^^3^^ ^^ birth Qcf^ >0^ /9 ^ 

Education (number of years) ^ 
grade school o high school /2 vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

r\ /I ^ , /^/ /i lo/t/ (after leaving home) 
1st QiflC^ H€Lf Dates 1?^^ 1st Dates 



Ddtes 



2nd 5eiS\JlCf:!. Dates /y<^g ' /?^Y 2nd 

3rd /6t/^' D^^C Dates/^^W^^^ 3rd Dates 

^th ^ ^Dates kth ^Dates 

Religion ■p,eiHc0iyf 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. OenKCC^hc (iloh/ 

fr}cci^<^^ led CI ^^ . ■■■.■■. ■■ ./......- 

Place of marriagg^ to your mother P^x^RPnUQft : y ■ d ate ^j(..^fT.l r?5^ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the bacK 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name L00l5€ Hf^Ma Oi£)^h- Johh^O/^ Current Residence UV^'P ffttKt^L 
I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth^ Date of bi rth /^/^^^//^T, /'^^/ 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school /^ vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

, ^ 1^^- jQ ^ (after leaving home) 
1st nOO^euiji-C Dates I%1 1st Dates 

2nd (pchfoVcl 5i'0fe Qates^]^j2Zf^_^ln6 ^Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates 

Religion /?2iIiM;lt, 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your fathfer /jyV-V^t/7/t ^ d ate "• iT. 1 V'''^'^ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



E-1 Stepfather 

Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth^ ^Date of birth 

Education (number of years) ~~~ 
grade school high school vocational college 



0ccupation(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

^th Dates ^ith Dates 

Re I i g I on 

Pol i t i ca"f Part les , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother Date 



F-2 Stepmother 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd ^Dates ^2nd Dates 

3rd Dates ^3rd Dates 

Re I I g I on 

Political party, civil or social c lubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father date 



! of birth OrFufJ /flf rOieCe fSfiS-- , a/^/?/2/^ ^;/^/^ Date of birth /?6'^ / Y, /^>^ 
:r of years of schooling /^ Occupation '^yt C C<^ Vrffi-^ 
<^^-^ /a,/,^-, i^/xk?k- xrrrrrTr~rrT.... ^i.,.- ' — 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

Name f]f)kliei 1^6 Jc/?A?5g/l 

Place of birth /"r Lefi\Je./)J (^CBth . Kf^U5A9 DaFe of birth PfHPl^fS'Q- 

Number of years of schooling /^ Occupation 

Residence /}t'^) pLFj/fJC, 71 . Marital Status /?] fi^fJKi) 
Number of children /lO/!<e, 

Name JldoCct_ /^^ l\J Jo hO^O/) 

Place 

Numbei _ , _ , ^ , _.. 

Res i dence l{'i'^'^ PfiJ^K Marital Status '^/\)i-7^ 

Number of chi 1 dren irXCi^-^ 

Name LM-^^ /^' JOHh)ScrJ 

Place of birth f'p&iePfJ ,(^i^ D ate of birth ^eC /f /9 ff^ 

Number of years of schooling /if Coi/it;- <^ A/'^<-^ Occupation 

Res i dence U^O^^^ /v4^/r~ Marital Status 'bl/\J t'l^ 

Number of chi Idren /irii^ 

Name /C^ f^V ^^^ Johtl^Ory 

Place of birth K^CKfo^Q .-tl Dale of birth 7^A>. /2^ j^*^ 

Number of years of schooling ^Q^ ~ Hft^Le*^ Occupation 

Res i dence LpX^e^ fFhlK Marital Status ^i/^c'it 

Number of children /)c,]-^ 



Name 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of chi 1 dren 



Name 

Place of bi rth Date of birth_ 

Number of years of schooling Occupation^ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling OccupatiOn_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi 1 dren 

Name 

Place of bi rth DaTe of birth 

Number of years of school ing Occupation_ 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of children 



111. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

[ hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
"ights/to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 



I 

righ.^, „_ ...- - - _ 

Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



Signed >DihHu \m%W^^ 



# 



Date //Ml_/^fii- 



As FAR AS I HAVE BEEN ABLE TO GO BACK, ON MY MOTHER'S 
SIDE, IS MY GREAT GRAND PARENTS. MY GREAT-GRANDMOTHER WAS 

NAMED Mary Peters, she was born in England around 1850. 
She met and married John DeSilver on the Island of sir 
Michail, just off the coast of Portugal. Mow on my mother's 
Father's side, Sara Correa met and also married Joseph 
DeCosta on the island of Sir Michail. The occupation of 
BOTH John and Joseph was that of a farmer. From there 

THEY travelled TO BERMUDA TO WORK AS FARMERS, AND LATER 
after HAVING EARNED AND SAVED THEIR MONEY, THEY BOUGHT THEIR 

OWN LAND. Years passed and in 1897 Sara and Joseph DeCosta 
bore a son bearing the name Manual. A few years later Mary 
"and John DeSilver had a daughter named Hilda. 

Hilda and Manual were raised in Baptist homes and met 

ONE DAY while GOING TO CHURCH. FROM THERE THEY BEGAN DATING 
AND WERE MARRIED IN SEPTEMBER 1915. MANUAL AND HILDA BOTH 
HAD NO EDUCATION, THEIR YEARS OF YOUTH WERE SPENT HELPING 
OUT AROUND THE FARM DOING CHORES AND WHATEVER ELSE HAD TO 
BE DONE. 

AFTER THEIR MARRIAGE, MANUAL GREW TIRED OF FARMING AND 
THEY CAME TO NEW YORK C I TY , NEW YORK TO TRY TO EARN HIS LIVING. 
He was a CONSTRUCTION WORKER AND LOVED TO BUILD THINGS. 



Page -1- 



-2- 

HOWEVER, HE HATED THE CROWED CITY AND THE INCONSIDERATE 
PEOPLE. His DISLIKE FOR THE CITY WAS CLIMAXED ONE DAY WHILE 
WALKING HOME FROM WORK HE WAS HIT ON THE HEAD WITH A FLOWER 
POT THAT HAD FALLEN FROM ONE OF THE LARGE BUILDINGS. HE VMS 
GIVEN STICHES AND THOUGH HIS WOUND HEALED, HIS HATRED HAD 
REACHED ITS PEAK AND THEY MOVED BACK TO BERMUDA SHORTLY THERE- 
AFTER. WHILE IN New York they had a son they named Joseph 

AFTER HIS GRANDFATHER. THEIR SON DIED SHORTLY AFTER HIS 
BIRTH AND WAS BURYED IN NEW YORK. 

^iow BACK IN Bermuda, Manual decided to go into business 

FOR HIMSELF AS A MASON. IN 1917 ANGELINA WAS BORN, THEIR FIRST 
DAUGHTER, SOON TO BE FOLLOWED BY EMILY WHO DIED RIGHT AFTER 
BIRTH. Two YEARS LATER ANOTHER DAUGHTER WAS BORN, HER NAME 
WAS CmILY she, STILL LIVES IN BERMUDA AND IS MARRIED. IN 
1923 ESTER WAS BORN AND ALTHOUGH SHE TRAVELS A LOT SHE STILL 
MAKES HER HOME IN BERMUDA AND IS EMPLOYED AS A SECRETARY. 
NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE SAW THE BIRTH OF ANOTHER BOY GIVEN THE 
NAME JOSEPH, AFTER HIS DECEASED BROTHER AND HIS BRANDFATHER. 
Joe WORKS FOR THE ELECTRIC COMPANY AND IS A BOAT BUILDER IN 
HIS SPARE TIME. IN MARCH, TWO YEARS LATER CAME THE BIRTH 

OF Ernest soon to be given the nick name "sonny" and as far 

AS I CAN remember HE LIKED ICE CREAM. LILIAN WAS BORN IN 
1929 AND UNFORTUNATLY BORN CRIPPLED, HOWEVER, SHE HAB NOW 
OVERCOME THIS AND IS DOING QUITE WELL. MY MOTHER, LOUISE, 
WAS BORN IN 1931 AND EVERYONE JUST CALLS HER LOLLY. SHE 
WAS THE BABY OF HER FAMILY AND HAS BEEN BLESSED WITH FOUR 
BEAUTIFUL CHILDREN. 



-3- 



IVHEN MY MOM WAS NINE YEARS OLD, HER PARENTS SEPARATED 
AND SHE AND HER BROTHERS AND SISTERS LIVED TOGETHER WITH 

THEIR MOM. Three years later her mom left and it was just 

THE KIDS ON THEIR OWN. MY MOM WENT THROUGH SCHOOL AS FAR AS 
SHE COULD AND THEN TOOK A JOB AT THE MOVIE THEATER, THE ONLY 

ONE IN Bermuda at that time. It was there that she met my 
father and they were married september 7, 1950. 

i asked my mom if she ever experienced the depression, 
she said no because the island was small with not many incoming 
products so whatever they had, they always rationed anyway. 
as far as knowing about any wars she said yes for three reasons! 
Bermuda began to draft men into the army, many planes stopped 
there to refuel, and they began to find cans of bood goods 
on the beaches that were washed up on shore from sinking 
ships and ships unloading their cargo for various reasons. 

after almost two years of marriage in bermuda my father 
was transfered to kansas and it was there at fort leavenworth 
May 8, 1952 that my oldest brother Daniel was born. A couple 
years later and another transfer saw the birth of my sister 
Debbie at the Offutt Air Force Base in Omaha, Nebraska. From 
Nebraska he was sent to Greenland and my mom, brother and sister 
went to live near my father's parents in f.dgerton, wisconsin. 
After Greenland my father chose not to re-inlist and in 1955 

TOOK A JOB AT Tw I N DISC INC. WHERE HE STILL WORKS TO THIS DAY. 
WE HAD LIVED IN ROCKFORD FOR ONLY A FEW WEEKS WHEN I WAS 
BORN. SINCE WE HAD ONLY LIVED THERE A SHORT TIME AND OUR 



» ;: .-tT 



-4- 
FAMILY DOCTOR WAS IN EdGERTON. MON WAS TAKEN THERE AND I 

WAS BORN. In 1958, My little brother Kelly was born at the 

OLD ST.ANTHON's hospital ON THE MORNING OF JANUARY 12TH. 

Dan, my oldest brother is the Assistant manager at the 

WOOLWORTH's store in DES PLAINES. He and his WIFE, Pam, 
HAVE NO KIDS AND ARE CURRENTLY MOVING TO DES PLAINES. DEBBIE 
MY ONLY SISTER IS A SECRETARY AND PLANS ON GOING INTO THE 
REAL ESTATE BUSINESS AFTER HER MARRIAGE IN AUGUST. ME, I 'm 

just a young tennis buff currently enrolled at rock valley 
College with plans on going to western Illinois University 

NEXT FALL. KELLY IS A SOPHMORE AT HARLEM AND ANXIOUSLY 
WAITING FOR HIS DRIVERS LISCENSE. 

The JOHNSON name can be placed back to 1874 in a little 

TOWN called URKILLA, JUST OUTSIDE OF OSLO, NORWAY. IIDTTHAT 
TOWN LIVED MY GREAT-GREAT-GRANDFATHER JOHANN STENSBY WHO 

was a farmer. on his farm tobacco was raised. he had five 
childreo, three sons and two daughters. my great-grwbdfather 
Morris helped out around the farm until he took a job at an 
insane asyleum, where he worked until he was 18. morris was 
the oldest child being born october 31, 1874 and he somewhat 
cleared the path for one of his brothers and one of his sisters 
by coming to the united states first. he borrowed the money 
and came over here on a fishing boat. my dad told me that 
when he was yound, great-grandfather would tell him that he 
was scared and drunk the whole voyage. 50 when the captain 

OF THE SHOP ASKED WHAT HIS NAME WAS HE SAID " I'm JOHANN's SON". 
AND THE CAPTAIN TOOK THAT AS JOHANNSON OR JOHNSON. SO THAT's 



-5- 



HOW OUR NAMED CHANGED FROM STENSBY TO JOHNSON. MORRIS JOHNSON 
SETTLED IN STOUGHTON, WISCONSIN BECAUSE THAT's WHERE MANY OF 
HIS FRIENDS WNET TO SETTLE. HE MET ANNA SOPHIA GiLBERTSON, 
WHO WAS BORN IN OSLO, NORWAY AND HAD COME OVER AND SETTLED 
IN STOUGHTON. THEY WERE MARRIED JULY 24, 1895 IN STOUGHTON. 
LUTHERENWWAS THEIR RELIGION AND THEY HAD BOTH BEEN CONFIRMED 
BACK IN NORWAY. ANNA DIED IN HER HUSBANDS HANDS IN 1913. 
BLAIMING HIMSELF FOR HER DEATH, HER NEVER RE-MARRIED AND 

lived for 65 years after her death. however during those 
18 years of marriege they had produced nine children. two 
had died at birth. lidia was the oldest, then nora, mabel, 
Clara, Bill, Elmer, Clarbnce, who was my grandfather, Lee 
AND Bud. Clara and Elmer died at birth, when my grandfather 
was four years old his mother passes away. He was then raised 

BY his father and HIS TRREE OLDER SISTERS. MY GREAT AUNT 

Mabel told me "Kay", that was his nick name, "was always there 

when you needed him BUT HIS SPECIALITY WAS PUTTING THE COFFEE 

ON". Both Kay and his father Morris had very little education, 

SCHOOL WAS SECOND BEHIND HELPING OUT AROUND THE FARM. MAY 

Great-grandfather died ^PRIL 1967 at the age of 97. 

When Kay was 20 years old he married Arlene Boyles 
in Decmeber 1928 in Rockford. It was depression time and jobs 
were scarce and so for a few years he did just abount anything 
HE COULD. Until the works Progress ^DMlNlSTRATlON gave him 

EMPLOYMENT OF HELPING TO BUILD A SHOE FACTORY. V/HEN THE BUILD- 
ING WAS DONE, HE WAS THEN HIRED TO WORK IN THE SHOE FACTORY. 



-6- 



Meanwhile three sons had been born. Clarence Jr. or "hap" 
as he was and is called, then my father donald, next richard, 
Darlene, Robert and the twins Patrica and Pauline. Kay con- 
tinued WORKING AT THE SHOE FACTORY UNTIL HIS DEATH IN JANUARY 
1968. 

MY FATHER WAS BORN OCTOBER 30, 1930, A DEPRESSION BABY. 
The ONLY THING HE SAYS ABOUT THAT TIME WAS ROOSEVELT GAVE 

his father a job, put food on his table and kept them all alive. 
During the war, my father was only 12 years old so be worked 
at a dairy down the street from his house. he continued work- 
ing at the dairy until after he was out of high school when 
he then enlisted into the alr force in 1948. donald was raised 
with the methodist religion and thats the way he has raised us. 

His CHILDHOOD WAS RAISED BY SOMEWHAT STRICT WRENTS IN A TOWN 
OF ABOUT ONE THOUSAND AND REALLY NOT MUCH TO DO. V/H I LE HE 
WAS WORKING, HIS P ^RENTS TOOK MOST OF HIS PAY ONLY TO SPEND 
IT ON THEIR WASTEFIflLL NEEDS. AFTER JOINING THE SERVICE IN 
"48" WHERE HE MET MY MOTHER AND THEY WERE MARRIED IN 1950. 

During my interview my great aunt fMBEL Petersen, I talked 

TO HER ABOUT VARIOUS THINGS SUCH AS WORLD V/ABS , DEPRESSION 
AND THE Red SCARE. SHE WAS MARR I E : IN 1917 AND A YEAR LATER, 
HER HUSBAND LEO PETERSON WAS DRAFTED INTO THE ARMY. SHE RE- 
TURNED FROM ROCKFORD, TO EDGERTON TO LIVE WHILE THE WAS WAS 

going on. she told me about a song the germans used to sing 
in support of the german caqbe during •/.'.v.l. the irish and 
Dutch people hated the song and the Germans and great fights 
USE to take place between men and men and even their childres. 



-7- 

The Norwegians used to have to act as a neutral force to 
stop all the fighting. during the 1 920 ' s a family that lived 
ON FuRMON Street in Rockford was accused of being Communist. 
The people of the neighborhood formed a committee and questioned 
THE family. However no further action was taken, aunt Mabel 
loved F.D.R. and said he talked real nice. She served as a 
chairman for the election board form 1932-45, and claims to 
have voted for Roosevelt all those years. During the Bepression 
she did sewing and went out house cleaning while her husband 
did various jobs and worked ONi day a week at Ingersol Millyng 
Company. She said most things were steady around 1933. 
She described talkies as being "wonderful" and claims that they 
were one of the last ones to get a car, not until 1934. after 
Pearl Harbor everyone was unified in the war spirit and she 
realized that both her sons gene and jim would have to go fight. 
During the war she worked a Pierce Paper Company and when I 

ASKED her what THEY MADE SHE SAID "OH SOMETHING FOR SECRET 

MISSLES". 



JOHNSONV MICHAEL R 195^- 



* 



.EASE use INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

>ar Contributor to the Hock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
nerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
;w mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
:cess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 






5V 


rV-.V-VViAi 
(ID // 


-AAAA;'.-,'c 

OFFICE 


USE 


CODE 

) 








) 



2. Your college: Rock Valley (.o1 lege 

Rockford, Illinois 

*****;•: )•; A A Vc ;': ;V A A ,V A A iV **;';* V,- A ;',- A A A 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

/ B efore 1750 1750-1800 I 800- 1 850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 

^. Please check al 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

/ N ew England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

/ S outh Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K^ 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., Ok.) / E ast North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 

^Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 

5. Please check all occupat ional categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

y Farming Mining Shopkeeping or small business 

/ T ransportat ion B ig Business ^Manufacturing 

y P rofess ions ^ Industrial labor ^Other 

6. Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

/ R oman Catholic ^Jewish / P resbyterian ^Methodist 

^Baptist Epi scopal ian ^Congregational Lutheran 

^^uaker ^Mormon O ther Protestant ^Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Blacks V Indians ^Mexicans ^Puerto Ri cans 

^Jews C entral Europeans Italians / S lavs 

'Irish ./ British / N at i ve Americans over several generations 



East Asian Other 



!. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

/ Interviews with other y/ Fami ly Bibles Family Genealogies 

/fami ly members 
Vital Records tJe-jspQfl<2<3 Land Records The U.S. Census 

/ P hotographs M aps ^Other 



I, FAMI LY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name CV>e\\K V^c,^<c:>v-> -^oV\va<;.^wx Current Res i dence 3.vx^ .csva Ugke . €-^-vciA^s 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth QajTon. XL-I^I.VCi'S Date of Birth /?//P. 7,7 / ^ 6> 

Education (number of years): 
grade school £) high school *"} vocational college 



0ccupation(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

A (after leaving home) 

Ist O^CLA.^rrUA , Dates /fl, A 1 st /^^^ /J ^^o 1 D ates //X (^ 

Dates 



2nd K} K^ ^'o K^ Os k^ J^oeK. Dates I ^ .^4 2nd_ 

3rd Cpoee/^u STo.?e. Dates j ^ 3 _5 3rd Dates 

^th U f\\o lO Al L g J Dates /94-/ i»th ^Dates 

Re 1 i g i on Vlf^y^ ^ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. r*Anfl-s,^ CVo\n wM^MVic^r 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother (?~T7? I date v 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-l) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name LWyopA '\\U^ C j^nr^re,^ Current Residence lvNdvawNUv\< p> ^^.\r-.\^^ 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth 



U-^1t^ o,te of .-.nx fL/f /f/y 



Education (number of years): 
grade school & high school H vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
l5tfi..A\^ ^^v.\.(^ ...^c^.A r. . Dates 1st Dates, 

2nd un...^ ....;X. ....A \.c.\nc^ci Dates 2nd Dates_ 

Dates 3rd Dates 



3rd v<e,^^ V^ooW'=. C^^,^r^v^A- 

^thCAwp.- ^v. \rA.^* W..^,.^^<. Dates_ 

Religion_^;;^^>^3j^_ij2^^,^^j^3 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc._ 



'♦th Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Wy-^^LjCy.^^ DATE i ^., /y^d.. 

^°^^'- il^aHatPSfl»fh^^Ba£l'a?dtl'.i§ pifi^^A-^) f stepmother or another relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 



Ncinie 

I f dead, dale of death 



Current Residence 



Place of bi r th 



Date of Bi rth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

Itth 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


'^th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Re I i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 
Place of marriage to your grandnxsther 



date 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Current Residence 



Place of bi rth 



Date of bi rth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion (s) 
1st 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 



Dates 
Dates 



Re 1 igion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Place of birth /Oi-^-^(-j)U^^,l. Date of birth l-yVK^^/L I C /f/ f 

Education (number of years)i , y 

grade school high school y vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

/^ y ^ , , (after leaving home) 
1st /^ (M^^Cc^ ^^..t^ Dates //;? / 1st ^Dates_ 



2nd /cfc^J rr^dL^A^^ > Dates /9j^^ 2 nd /U^-cx^ vA-Aa-</ v^^ , D ates 

3rd 6%,nCP /UAr.o.^^'^l Too/^D ates /^<^ O 3 rd ^Dates 

'♦th ^Dates ^ijth ^Dates 

Religion ^c^^r. v^ Cr.^^^^V.c^ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. P'VwNV-ier U.)\A;b? EQc.\e'^ 

Place of marriage to you> grandmother Q i C ti date ^^ o\ io\'/ 

Note: If your mother was raised by a ! »lA^VjL l fe r ^l»r anoi tl H r r tf l ai l VK (tO ag e 18 )' '^'( ^"/' ^^ ' I 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name \l<^<v^c^ 9r. v^Nr> vn ^.k ^Current Residence Lua\ .ovvvV> o rg. 9A Vr<V^r,cr\ . 

If dead, date or death J 




Place of birth 

Education (number of years) "^ 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^Dates 1st ^Dates 

2nd (/iuJj.^ /LL/^J Dates 2nd Dates 



?nd^^^ XL^J 



3rd ^Dates ^3rd ^Dates 

Re] igion figmc^^/^r.-^v^riliT. 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. \,'M\\^ (^cjr,\(^^ 



Place of marriage to your grandfathe r /t?^ y V > v^ . ^ d ate /?) ^ ;^^ /^c^y ^ 
Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmotnerc^ another relative (to age 18) t y 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 



1*1. ic<- .il liirlh D.iU- ol hirlli 

F (liK .it i irii (riiiiiihf r of yr. 1 1 ■. ) 
tji'idp •.thoid hii 

Occupat ion(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

itth 



chdo 1 


VOCi 


it ion.i 








col 1 

ilDEN 
ng h 


ni(< 


Dates 


1st 


PLACE 
(after 


OF 
1 


re; 

eav 


CE 

ame) 
Dates 


Dates 


2nd 
3rd 
'<th 












— 


Dates 


Dates 


Dates 


Dates 


Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social ^clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother dat« 



0-2 Stepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date uf death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupat ion(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 





vocat 


ional 
1st 


col lege 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 




Dates 




Dates 


Dates 




2nd 
3rd 




Dates 


Dates 


Dates 



Re I i g i on 

Political party , civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



CHIkDREN of A 6 B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 



Name lovv-\^ \r^\-> vrvSo>o 
Place of bi rth 



rit^l status rririrnert ^ 



Residence (^S^/S^ (t^^^i^oc^ 6ct^ ^ Harfth] Status /T) 
Number of children :2 ^^^^ -^ 

Name J SQK Q. C^o Kj u S o J 

P ' ace of birth R6c.<,^pp(^ tz. j^ d ate nc< m XI l^bO 

Number of years of schooling )Q ^^^ Occupatidtv" -' 

Residence ^/on Aar^uP^ Marital Status -^ifear:^/),,,^^ ^^ /^ 

Number of chi Idren i ^ 



Name 



P » ace of birth f^oCK i^og Q~ date fl .ic( , 1 I ^ Q 3L 

Number of years of schooling " Occupation ^ 5ea n e. -t- a. ^ ^^ 

Residence |Oii K ' "b l^i^ a ^ K e-^ arl tlTTtatus ^^ ^ 

Number of ch i ldren / ~' 7 " '■ 

Name 

Place of bi rth d ate 

Number of years of schooling Occupati6rt ' """ 

Residence M arital Status 

Number of chi Idren — — — — — - 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Sta tus " 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of birth ~J ate 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

P 1 a ce of bi rth "d ate 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 

Name 

Place of bi rth date 



Number of years of schooling "Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



10. Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residenc e H ari taTTFatus 

Number of LlH lUryil ' _______ 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C- 1 . D-l)-your mother's name should appear below 

N„nrfM'r o> yr..r-. f.t scKoolinq ■ j :^ ^ Occupy tTotfy.-^.^, /k 

^^ ''"^r H'f. ^"^"'1^ ^" - ^^ ^^-'^^' S tatus_j^, ,_;^ ^ -''-^" 

Number nf children Q_ —^ 



Nome 

Place of hi '^th ^^^^ 

Number of years of schooling ftccupaTTSPr 

'^^^'^e"" Marital Status 

Number of children 



3. Name 

Place of birth 



5. Name 

Place of birth 



6. Name 

Place of bi rth 



7. Name 

Place of birth 



9. Name 

Place of bi rth 



Res i dence 

Number of chi Idren 



10. Name 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years o\ schooling (TccupatToT 

S«^:^^"«_^, Marital Status 

Number of children 



'♦. Name 

Place of* birth j^^ 

Number of years ot schooling Occupatibn 



N*^'^''"'f-r-n ^^rital Status 

Number of children 



Number of years ot schooling OccupatToIT 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children 



Number of years of schooling TTE^pation' 

J"'^^""—, Marital "Status 

Number of children 



Number of years of schooling ^OccupItTbi; 

Residence — — _~_ — _______ ^ ^— 

4, . , — r-m — Marital Status 

Number of cnilcfren — 



Name 

Place of birth ""date 

Number of years ot schooling g^upati^ 

Residence ^ ___>_^___ j 

., ^ , — , , , . ^^ Marital Status 

Number of children ""■ — ~ 



Number of years of schooling Occ upatioh 



Marital Status 



date 



Number of years of .chooi.ng g^^natip- 

'"^*^"" Marital Status " 

Number of children 



Your Father 

Name ^0 (->n vJo Jx.. v--5o a) Current Res i dence fcg / S" Co^O^^D dir>c^C 

If dead, date of death 

Place of birth K^oCKPoKgO JT/^/, ^Date of birth 0(x n-C. I ^ J9 ^^ 

Education (number of years) J" ^ 
grade school ^ high school V vocational ^college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

Q (after leaving home) 
1st Tcvipe r Qc ^ Dates j q q Q^ 1st ^Dates 



2nd GpQC^ OK ST'or'6 gLf^ ates I "^ M 9 2nd Ddtes 

3rd (^ a 3 STaT jo ,\J Dates \'\Sq 3rd ^Dates_ 

4th rOanfi q-g P Dates 1 ^ (^ 3 4 th ^Dates 

Religion J fo e 6 ft 0| 1^7^ a /O 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. K-^ >a Q_| u. (^ 



Place of marriage to your mother /^ c'-k-^-/_-^^^^ iX-,^i^ d ate Ct^ l5 / <^^ 5 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or arwtner relative give that data on-^he back 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name Do I oig_€S ( 3^u_ra&e-K:) cToKjuvSojO Current Residence 6^ /j^"^ Q-fi/^'OP' Q/rXj^'L 

I f dead, date of 'death 

Place of bi rth PoC-\< F ot^ €> Date of birth -S^^y t 3.3^ /9,?'^~ 

Education (number of years) , 
grade school ^ high school H vocational col lege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

. (after leaving home) 
1st 5e(ine-ta o u Dates )^^H 1st __Dates 

2nd " Dates / 9 (^ ^ 2nd ^Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd _Dates 

Religion CaTho//0 . , 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father fe^oq,l<^bg: C:>- T<-.z-- ' ' d ate ftgcA /<r. /9_C3 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on^he back of 
this page (F-2). 



E-1 Stepfather 

Name 

If dead, Jdte of death 

Place of birth ^ ^^^t® °f birth 

Educaticxi (number of years) ~ 
grade school high school vocational college 



0ccupation(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


'4th 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

^th Dates '4th Dates 

Re 1 i g i on 

Pol i t i cai* Part les , civii or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother Date 



F-2 Stepmother 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Dote of birth_ 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates_ 

2nd Dates ^2nd Dates_ 

3rd Dates ^3rd Dates_ 

Re I I g I on 

Pol i t i ca I party , civil or social c lubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father date 



HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

lame ro iClKn PJ^. Sohu^OA.' 

■ lace of birth \^oc J^p^qf2 O J: /^A DaTe of birth Ja fV. /^ 

Number of years of schooling -^ jq ^ g c>. r S Occupation Stuude^ji 

Res i dence 6?^/'r Oop^CajA HlOn'L'c. ^ Marital Status 

Number of children ______ 



Name P^j? jnci i 6 
Place of birth 



•3o K> "J S o O 



Place of birth i^o Q K r^ o r?. p Date of birth Sc. pj-, ^^ /Q f^O 

Number of years of schooling V OccupatiOh -^-^ -J 

Res i dence 0'^;$"' dot^OOfi ~Ci^r^Lf Marital Status — 

Number of chi Idren ———————— 



Name 



Place of birth ^Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

Number of years of school ing Occupat i6n_ 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

Number of years of school ing Occupat i6n_ 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of children 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth_ 

Number of years of schooling "" Occupation_ 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth Date" of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status_ 

Number of chi 1 dren 

Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of ch i Idrert 



,il. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willincj) 

erebv donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
,hts, to the Rock valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 



I he 

righ^^, ^« -..- .-•— ^ - 

Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



Signed /^y,^ (->^>o C^LvL^^/^^4^ 
Date ^.^^4^^:^_^^.^^v^^-^y- 



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In beginning this awesome task, of compiling information, 
I was amazed at the depth and the roles all people piay in 
history. We each have some general idea of our ancestors and 
their achievements and failures, but to probe one's family history, 
even to barely scan the surface of ancelitral documents, produces 
knowledge, pride and respect for the kind of men one's family 
has bred. Not necessarily famous or outstanding men, but good, 
sturdy, hard-working men. An interest in one's self, also develops 
while doing this type of research. Often I found myself thinking 
about what others might someday say of me and the times in which 
I live. A textbook version of history seems to highlight the 
important people and then discuss the times, because the important 
figures may not reflect the thinking or the actions of the times 
they are in. Men like Jean Jaques Rousseau, or Thomas Jefferson's 
personal philosophies were well beyond the way the average people 
acted during their lifetimes, and ideas they had, only found 
acceptance many years later. But the average man in his own shop 
or working beneath the sun tilling the soil, he reflects the times, 
for in his intellectual capacity he must conform to the will of 
others to survive, since he is part of the whole majority, a look 
at him could give us some information about that whole, and the 
average man unlike the leaders or philosophers of a time, has a 
direct line of communication to the masses since he is a part of them. 

The actual writing of this paper then, has proven to be a 
different kind of task. Faced with factual information, this paper 
may tend to read like a newspaper or more like a historical map. 



ni X-Biq slqoeq IIb asloi srit bos ri;fq9b Bti& &b bassma bbw I 

bnB enoJ^BeofiB nuo to B9bi lansnea smoa evarl r(OB» sW .YTCotalri 

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■•oi/boiq ,B^n«mL90b lBi;rt9orus lo eoBlni/a eri^ nsoa ^IsiBd o* nevs 

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aqolsveb obIb ."ilea 8**no ni d^aeiatni nA .nem s«-t3(Ttow-biBff .Y^iuta 

Sniilnirlt llaaxK bnuo\ I nsttO .rfoiBsaei to sqyt airfi^ :sinlob ellrfw 

riolrfw nl mrnalt art* bna am 1o ybb YBbamoe trf^im aierfto tarfw tuocfB 

9/1* triSlI/lSlrf of ame«8 Yio^alri lo noia-rsv jfoocftxst A .bvIL I 

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memlt adt lo snoi&OB Bfi& 10 ^nUnliit Btit *oeIla% ton Y»n agiujlt 

8*no«7«ll*l» aaworiT io ,uB»B8uofl asupBL naeL 9JtlI nsM .ni »T8 Y«rf^ 

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bnwol Yino ,bart ^acit BBebl broB tsamltatil ilatit anliub ba&oB 

qoilB nwo alri nl nam •sb^bvb 9f{t J-uS .lai^Bl 8ib9Y Yfuam 9onBtq900B 

,8«alt 9rti^ Btoaltai 9ri ,Ilo8 9rit anllll* nuB arit rftB9n9Cf i^nlif-iow to 

lo IIlw arft o* miolnoo teum art Y^-to«<TJ80 lBl/to9II9C^nl elrf nl lol 

iool B .Y^iiotam 9lodw atit lo *t«q al arf 9onla ,evlv-tu8 ot aiarfto 

atit bna ,9loriw taricf tuoda noltaaiolnl •moa au avis bluoo miti tB 

a ntui ,«fllt B "lo 8i9f(qoeoIiffq to siabBal arit a:Allnv nsm bsbi^vb 

•■•dt lo tiaq » al art aonla aaaefim ati& ot noitBoinuamoo lo 9nll ;t09'Tlb 

B ad at navoiq BBri .nari;^ laqaq altit lo anltl-xw Ibw^ob a/(T 

naqaq alri* ,nolta«rrolnl Ibw^obI ri;Mw baoaS .jIbbJ- lo bnl^ tnaTalllb 

,qB« iBOlioi^alri b a^il atom io laqBqawan b 93I II bB9T ot bna& Y"* 



and lacks any kind of real story. In it information of different 
segments of ray family has been lacking or plentiful, depending on 
the side one looks at. One side may appear more or less interesting, 
but each contributed to an important understanding of many peoples' 
lives and this alone makes the information worth remembering and 
recording. 

Paternal Side 

The Tilley side of my family had it's American beginnings in 
England during the religious persecution that took place there. In 
the l600's,King James' actions so enraged many religious dissenters 
that they left England and moved to Holland, where religious 
persecution was lacking, but still the new settlers looked for an 
open land where they could farm and build homes, and practice their 
religious beliefs. These desires prompted many of the dissenters 
and a handful of opportunists to obtain rights from the Virginia 
Charter Company to settle in the new world. The hardships endured 
during the voyage are well-known, and when the Pilgrims arreved, around 
forty of the men signed a document known as the Mayflower Compact. 
John and Edward Tilley signed the Compact. With their families 
they began to farm in New England and later their descendants 
moved westward across America, in search of wider spaces, and a 
new way of life. 

The new world the pilgrims moved into presented it's new 
residents with a very hard life. Colonies sprouted up and failed, 
Indism trouble arose £ind was met by violence. Trade lines were 
established with England but the expanse the goods had to travel 
must have been even more immense, taking the speed the ships 
could travel into consideration. But the colony must have prospered, 
and according to historical texts, was made a part of the Massachusetts 



fnmt»Vtib lo noiJ-Barxolni tl nl .yio^b Xb«t %o bnxof ^ns rjIosI bnjB 

no ^nibnaqeb ,Iuli^n«iq 10 ^isioal need ajs/l y-I^^a^ YRi ^o acfnemsaa 

,snit89i9tni a8«I no 9ttm issqqs ybr abis enO »iB ajiool sno able arft 

*aaIqoaq \ntM lo y^ibrui^siabfiii tfiBJ"3oqinl res o^ betvdlitcioo rfojss tud 

boM anlrfadm^nai rf;J"iow nol*«anolni sri* aa^Cam anola alrit bna aavll 

.j^nlb-rooan 

able Isma^BSl 

nJ asninni^tf naoliamA a'i^i b«ri Y-ti«Bl xm "^o a^-^s ^^-t-tiT arlT 

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ana^naaaib avoi^iXai Yn«m ba^i/te oa anoitofi '8d0«I> ^wtX«8*00dl atit 

sjioigllai siarfw .bnalloH o& bavom bna brueXjina d"1al xa^^ i"firi^ 

rta 10I baifool a^el&^ea wan arid- XIl;ra tu^ .anljlosl aaw noiJ-uoeaiaq 

liari* soifoMiq bt^s .aafliori bliud brua mial bXtioo Y»rf^ aiariw bnaX naqo 

aaa^naaalb ari;f lo YfiBic ba^qsooq aa-risab aeariT .alaiXacf 6uoi$iIei 

Alnlsil\' arit flioTl 8;>^risii nlB;tcfo od" a;r8inirf"xoqqo lo XulbriBri jb bna 

b0ivb(T9 aqlriaboari eriT .bXiow wan stit nl Bltt»e ot xriBqmoO latiariO 

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.toaqmoO lawoXlYBM afl;t- sb nworal i^neniuoob a bBn:^ie nsm erit lo y^io^ 

aaiXiflAl iletit lit IV .^oaqmoO a/<;t berrgle y«XX1T biawba bna nrfoXr 

a^nabnaoeab rlBtit t&aI bna bnaX^nS waVl al ir.osl ot njssa(^ yarii- 

a bna tSaoaqa aabiw lo ilonsaa nl tBOi-xamA aaoaoa bisyntB9w bavom 

.aliX lo Ysw wan 

wan a'^i b9tn9B9'tq otnl bavom amliaXlq 9tii bXiow wan ar'l 

«baXjLal bnB qi» baJ-i/OTqa eainoXoO »eliX biari Y"^«v g ci&lw atnebiaai 

•i«w aaniX abarrT .aonaXoiv x,<i t»m aaw bna aaoos elduoit oBlbnl 

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aqZria 9tli baaqa »tit ^iia^ ,aanaflini aiooi nava naad avBxi t8i« 

«banaqaoitq avBd ^eiai y'io-^^^o ^^^ ^^ .noiJ^Biabianoo oi-ni Xavai;}^ bXi/oo 

mttaautiommmali •At lo tOBq b abBM aaw «atxa^ Xaoiio^airi ot ^ibioooa bna 



Colony, and here contact is lost with the Tilleys until the early 
1800 's where Samuel Tilley and his family moved into the Ohio 
River Valley continuing the family tradition of farming and in 
this rugged environment a permanent home for the Tilley family 
was found, unlike Massachusetts, where no traces of the Tilley 
line live today. Other descendents were to leave of course, 
including ray grandmother's direct ancestors, but the Ohio River 
Vallay must have been a pleasant place to live for branches of 
the family grew up and lived there and made their own families, 
and life styles all along the side river. I managed to find a 
pair of newspaper clippings depicting one member of the Tilley 
family as a very important and able Chief of Police in a river 
valley town. My direct ancestors weren't destined to remain here, 
they traveled through the Mid-West and in the course of two generations 
had roamed this part of the country and had run-ins with Indians 
and out-laws alike. My grandmother seems to feel that her great- 
grandfather was indeed an outlaw, but what facts that were available 
only mentioned his final settling down in Minnesota and his taking 
of an Indian bride of the Sioux tribe. Their son, John Tilley 
remained in Minnesota and farmed in the St. Paul-Minneopolis area 
and on Sept. 21, 1889, John and Emma Francis Tilley had a son named 
William Tilley, my great-grandfather and who later would marry and 
have a child of his own, my grandmother. John later remarried, 
leaving his former wife and his child in Albany, where they had 
lived for a number of years. Emma, John Tilley 's first wife, and 
ray great-grandmother ( whom is still living), moved with her only 
child, at llihis time, under the protection of Clarence Moore, to 
Rockford, married Clarence and had two sons, Clarence Jr. and Warren. 
This family of two sons and a half-sister (my grandmother) moved 



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b^rom ('M/ftonbrtBia Yn) I9t8i8-1XBX< b bnB anoe o«t lo yXXoibI aiiff 



to Custer Avenue and built the corner house, which still stands 
and is still owned by the Moore's descendants, after Clarence Sr.'s 
death in i960. 

Meanwhile, William Tilley served as a corporal in the First 
World War and saw extensive action in Northern France sind Belgium. 
After the war he became a well-known baseball player and played 
professional tiil with a St. Louis team. He died a decorated 
soldier in 19^1 and was survived by his widow of a second marriage, 
his daughter (my grandmother), and two grandchildren, at the time, 
my father Tom and his brother. Jack. 

My grandmother Hazel met her husband to be, Chelis Johnson, 
dated, and were married and lived west of Rockford, farming and 
where my father s'J>ent the first six years of his life. My father 
vividly remembers the farm and the one room school house he attended, 
which still stands. 

Chelis Marion Johnson's families recorded history doesn't 
extend far beyond his own grandfather! Evidently continuing a 
heritage in farming in this area of the country, most Johnson^s 
were farmers with parts of the Johnson family still living in 
Stoughton, Wise, and Byron, Illinois, some of whom continue to farm. 

Marshall Johnson was born in the Byron, 111. area in 18 61 and 
grew up there receiving a minimum education but from wfekt I am told 
he was a competent farmer and continued to live off of a farming 
income, after his son Mathew Johnson was born, who also worked as 
a farmer. Financial problesas sent Mathew into Chicago where he 
worked at industrial labor and where he also met his future wife, 
Clair. Mathew continued to work in Chicago a short time, and then 
moved back to Byron, where they were married and where my grandfather 
Chelis, was bom. He has one brother, Chris and two sisters, Sara 



•bna^a LLXtB ilairtw .dat/od -xanrtoa edi^ tliuti hns et;n»vA 19&buO ot 
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,06^t ni tittt»b 

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,Mti^ •ifj' 4*6 .rwibliilobrarxs ow# bft« , (isrltoaiftians Yor) 'xstrfsMsb «tll 

• TioBL ,T»r(tO'srf Bill bruK nroT i^iI&bI tn 

,noam{oL aiiarlO «»cf ot bflBcfeu/{ leri j-sm I»8fiH tatStmtHbtmr^ x^ 

baa snijrxBl «biol3(3oH to tsew bAvil tTts beiiism bibw bos ^bBtmb 

ftLtB\ xM •eTiX eiri lo cibs^ xia taiil ari,!- ^-neqa iftd^B'i xm eiftilw 

tbBbrM^i^B •!< 9Sf/oj< Xoorioe /rooi eno ajt^ bnB mrusl Btit vxBdnmaiBi yXMyIv 

• abriBta Ili^a rfolrfw 

I'naaob Y'^o^airi babaooei adiiimat 8*(ToaArtoo noiialvi eila^O 

« Sniuoitnoo ^X^fi^^ivS iiBtitBthciBT^ cmo airi bnoxBd ibI bnBiXB 

mknoandoT* ;f8on ,x'^nuoo Brit lo bbir aldf nl sinirciBl ni miatatt^nH 

al :s^ivil Ilita xlixuBl: noaixrfoL Brit lo B&iBq rfi-iw aiairxal anaw 

•irzal ot Bunitnoo taoriw lo a«08 taXonilll trroiY^ bnB .osiW ,noi'<(s*S^fi 

brus Id81 fli AOiB •III (noT^S aiU' ni mod bbw noanrfoL IlBHerusM ^ 

blol acB I ^MAr BO^l ^Jjtf noitaoi/ba mumlalm n ^niv/aod? eisrfl qv wa^ 

ytLvssl « lo llo avli ot bBUttitnoo bna idnrtBl i^rrsteqmoo a aaw aif 

BB bailiow obIb otiyr ,rrxod bbw noenrloL wad^'aM noe aiil ^etla ,aflraoni 

•if aiaifw afSBOirfO otni werf^aW i-naa aaaXc^otq iBiocu^i'i .lam^XBt A 

,aliw B'wtiiJ. Blri tBa obXb Bil aiaxlw bna iod£;I XBi7:tBi;bni &b baiiow 

nedi- boa ,a«i^ ^'xortB a o^BolriO til iiom ot beunitnoo mBtl&afU .liBXO 

lafl^albna^ Xm avaifw boM LaiTxan aiaw yailt aiailw «noi\:3 o^ 3{oad baToa 

aiae •a^a#aia e«rt bna aiirfO ^iBdttmi ano aerl aH .irxocf aaiv .aiXajfO 



and Mary. Chelis took over the farm, and this was where he lived 
when my father was born. My grandfather's brother moved into 
Rockford and began work as an apprentice carpenter. Both sisters 
married men who owned farms. 

193^» the year my father was bom, was a Depression yesir, 
and to bolster the family's income my grandfather began a job at 
National Lock and soon after became part owner of a grocery store. 
He kept this job for five years and in 19^1 the Chelis Johnson 
family moved to N. Main St. where my aunt Sal was to be bom, and 
where my grandfather began a new job as a driver for Union Linen, 
a linen and towel supply firm located at the time on S. Main St. 
Chelis stayed with the company and eventually around 1950 became 
manager of the Rockford branch and held this position for 15 years. 
For most of this 15 years they remained in the home on N. Main St. 
They since have moved to Florida and gone into retirement. 

My greindiiKsther, Hazel, loves to garden and cook. She is a 
very outdoors tyi)e of jierson as is my grandfather. School has 
always been important to her and she reads extensively. She is 
definitely an animal ftover. Both grandparents are very content 
with the past as they view it, after raising three children and 
both are totally enjoying themsetves, basking in Florida sunshine. 



b»vll ©rf siftffw Bam nitlf hrm iflrwl »ti& leYo ifoo* Bil»r(0 .^rusM brus 

o*nl beroK i^rttnvS a'terftatbrurts x* •mod aair i9iitBt ym n9f1w 

«i»^ai8 if^oS •t^rmq^mo •oi;ta«'XQfcrs nB as jTiow niB^ocf (mtb b'xo't^ooH 

• awrrLBt b«fiwo orfw (lewr belinsm 

,'zsax nol8»»Tq»0 e ssw ,motf sbw lorfi-sl ym lAsy erf* i**C91 

i^B dot B rm?^ mA&BtbrtBT^ ynr emoonl B'yllmBl erlt ifttelotf o* bmm 

,91oSb yrt99«n:«k b lo Tsrrwo tiBq BAiBOBd tstlB noo8 briB iood ImtmttWM 

noBfcrioL 8lX»/fO »rtt 14^91 ni bnB »tb«y evil tol dot **^* ^<I«^ •** 

bnm ,mod 9d ot bbw LmZ fnuM ym »t9f{w ,fS nlBM .14 •# b^vom yliflutl 

•fisnlJ nolrrtJ lot iBrlrib b 8b dot ^t^n b ne:^Bd rwrftBlbfuiia Yw eiBilw 

• tC rIbM .8 no enit #rit ^b b9tB00l tnll ylqquB Iewo;^ brtB mnil b 

•OBoed O^^t bnuciB yllBXitfrrers brtB ynBqffroo »f(t rftiw bm^a&B »iIiM5 

.8'SB«y ?l lot nol^teori nltit biBd b/tB rtoruBTd biol3(ooH ©rCt to t»a aiUM 

•tC nla9f .H no onoff »/ft nl bBnlBmBi yarft aTcaafy ^i 8l^^;^ lo teow n»^ 

• trrMmiitsn o&al enoig brus Bbiiol? o;f bavom avBri donia yBiflP 

B 8l aifE .??ooo bftR rrsbTB3 o& aarol ^iBSeH tt^titombnBT^ yM 

•Brf Ioorio2 .laritfllbrtBTs ym el bb noartaq lo eqyt 8ioobti»e yi»T 

«1 ♦«(8 .yXavlBnad-xa Bbaat arfa bras i»rf oJ- tnB^ftoqml rrestf bybwIb 

tn^&noo yiav bib atneisqbnBis d;foS .tevo# iBmlrts roB ylatlrctlsft 

bfiB fidTbllrfo aaiEW- snlelBi ia;flB ^&l walv yarf* bb tajwi adt rtMMv 

.anldanva abliol^ nl :sf^UBBd ,89V»»amadi^ ^nlyotna yllistcJ^ aia ri&od 



Maternal Side 

Mary Romanek, my great -grandmother, was a child in a very 
large Polish family near Krakow Poland. As was the custom of 
the times , Polish families would save up their money and devote 
it to the oldest child. In her family Mary wsis the oldest child, 
so at an early age she was sent to America by herself to live 
with some distant relatives in Milwaukee. She still has relatives 
living in Poland and writes and exchanges gifts with them. 

Economic troubles abroad were prompting immigration to 
America and Polish people were numerous among the new immigrants. 
Receiving some education in Poland my Great-grandmother finished 
elementary school here in America, and later met Walter Romanek, 
himself a Pole whose parents had immigrated to America before 
his birth. He was a skilled machinist and through his early 
life he strove hard to improve his trade. He met and began to 
court my great-grandmother, but his proposal of marriage came 
only after a meeting with Swan Hillman, who offered Walter a job 
at his new factory, which Walter Romanek accepted auid became one 
of the first machinists at Rockford Skrew Products. The house they 
first began their family in is located on Ogilby road and is still 
owned by my great-grandmother. They became members of St. Stanislaus 
Parish in 1920, on Magnolia St., and sent thcee children to that 
school. St Stanislaus was also my grade school and I believe 
the school is operating today as iJart of a community grade ex- 
change program with St. Anthony's and St. Peter and Paul. 

The Romanek family has been a religous family. The two boys 



lo mo^BJjo •/ft asw aA .boftlo^ wosTbi)! ^uarr Y.^itas1 tleilol syxsl 

•tov»b brtB x^iOB xtexll qi> »vb8 Mi'ow a«iXijnsl ifBiXo? ,asmit wtt 

•iiXiilo itasMo Bxit Bcw ytaM Y^iiuil i0rf ril .blii^o ;f8eJbIo srij o& &l 

•vil ot llsBOBil x<^ MoliwmA oJ- ;fnsa asw ajia e^a \l'xa» na ^b oa 

asvitBlai aart IIi;fa ariS ••actfixawXlM ni aevitsXei tna^^sib aaoa tUibi 

.mmAt xl^iw atlia aadOBilotxa brut sa^iiw bas boaXo^ ni ^iviX 

ot noitsisinai ^i;tqino'xq a^iaw bBoicfa eelduoit oiaonooa 

• atfiBtqilflaii wan 9At snoous aiMyxaniin eiaw aXqoaq ileiXoSL baa at^tawrt^ 

ba/falail lexltonbnaniS-tBaif) xib bnnlofl at noi^^aoiiba a«ioa snlvlaoafl 

tTLBfiamofi isSImV taa lataX bna ,£oiiaAA ni o^afl XooiUa X'vUmmm^ 

a^olad BOiiaoA ot baJ-BOsXfflBii bed BtnsTBq aaorlw eXo^ b IXaaft^jf 

XliB* aiif if^iranrii^ bna tainixfaan bsLltilB b aaw eK •ii&ii6 mlii 

ot iTaaa<f brifi t9m aK .abao^ aiif evoigmi ot b-xari 9vorr;fe art alii 

aaiao a^iTzan lo Xaaoqoiq 8i/{ tuti ^iBritombnsi^^&Boi^ \m t^iu09 

dot ' 'zatXaW baiello odw «naaXXiH nawS liJ-iw snict'aam a latla xi«* 

•no aoAOsd boa b9;rqe3oa ianBsoB 18;^XbW ifoirlv/ (Y'^o^obI wan aiil i-a 

X»fU' •8t/oil •i(T •Bi^ouborA wan3(<2 bioliooH ta atainirfaam ta^il arlt to 

XXita ai bns baoi Y^Xi^ no balaaoX ai txl ^^XXctbI lietlt nagacf taxtt 

auaXalna^E •&& \o trndmrnm aawoacf x^ti"^' . laritombna'Xs-taa'Ta xci Yd b»n«ro 

taiU ot iiaibXl/lo aault tnaa btm ««t8 aiXonsflM no .OS^X ni ilalTa^i: 

aralXatf I Ima Xoo/loa abai^ x<i oaXs aa«r auaXainata tZ .Xoadaa 

-xa •bars x^lntamoo a lo t'xaq aa yabo^ snitaidqo ei Xoorfaa aift 

.Xuai*l bna oato'I .t2 bna a'tRArttnA .t8 iftiw nBTSO^ mj^mHo 

mxod owt a/fT .YXiaial auoalXai a naad aaif ^lioal M^navoH a/(T 



and one girl raised, all attended a Catholic grade school and each 
learned to speak Polish, both at school and at home. Both brothers 
and the sister, Verna, are alive today. Verna Ramanek was married 
in 193^f she would later be ray grandmother. 

When I spoke to each of my grandparents about the Depression 
the views I received were alike yet neither set of my grandparents 
knew each other until my parents met about ten years later. Words 
such as terrible, tight, very tight, seem to set out in my mind, when 
I remember talking to them. Both grandfathers and my great-grandfather 
Romanek found jobs most of the time during this period, but my 
gmadfather Jurasek, had to work for a short while with the Civilian 
Conservation Corps. Money was tight but all managed to feed their 
famalies. Pdiitically, in this period of time Roosevelt was 
considered a great man and president, according to my grandparents. 
The men seemed more aware of Roosevelt's involvement but both 
women were well aware of governmental policies in the 20 's and 30 's, 
almost as if it were a common practice for the men to come home 
and speak about the Depression, Roosevelt, and work with his wife 
and family. This appears even more so after speaking vti0i my 
parents about the Depression. Taking into account that they were 
very young, the knowledge both my parents have does fascinate me. 
The Depression must have been economically devistating, but disasters 
tend to bring people closer together, so you hear stories of unlimited 
credit in stores, systems of barter or exchange cropping up, women 
going to work and a further break down in rigid Vic tor ism ideals 
that still clung to American thinking. The Depression, I feel, 
brought many people and families together, Iknow here are two examples 
of closely knit families emerging from difficult times. 

My grandfather, Joe Jurasek's family also came to America during 



iioem btm looifoe •funs ollotltaO b bsbnatte Lis ,bBBlBn Iii^ Afio bns 

riBti&O'Bd ft^ofl ••■cm! tm bcm loorloa tm rltod ^limll&i jlB»qB o& bBtriBBl 

bBl-rxmrn sjnr itimmMR AfriaV .Y&bot evilB btb ^sniBV ,i9tBiB eilt brus 

• iBtitombrtmr^ ysr od letsl Muow eria ,4^?;^^ ni 

rroisasiqva 9fit tuo<i£ 8;fn9i«qbrui'3s ^m to riost) ot 9:}ioqB I neriW 

a^nrxacrboB^ X^ to tea 'xa/IJ'isn tsy eilila oieiw boviooerc I 8w»lv 'Witt 

aftvoW .79^b1 3'xa«y f»* tuodB t«n atrwisq ^ litrn* i9ff;fo f(3B« wsml 

naifw (bnlfii xm nl tvo tee o:r mesa ,trf^it yrsv .trtgl* ,9lcfiTX9t eb rfoua 

leKtBlftarxs-tBtf'XS ^ bres sitB tit atbrns^ litoS .merft ot i^WlBt iddmemei I 

Xn t«Kf ,boin»q aiift ^rtiiub Mrit erft lo teofli acfot bni/ol: ^fsftetc^ 

rtBlIlvlO arit ritiw sli/IW tiorfa b lot jfiow ot barf ,7(e8BTJLfL lafftflltbBm:^ 

alarit baal ot bassnam LLm turf tifs^lt asw YarroM .atrioO ffoltBirraarroO 

SAW tiavaaoo^ amlt lo boiiaq airit rtl .Y-i^J^Boi^i**^ .a^llaartrt: 

• atoasaf iwuiis ya ot ^ibtoooa ntneblBOTq brte itam tsaig a batabiBrroo 

iftotf turf tnamavlovni a'tlavaaooJT to ertawB aiojn bamaaa cmm arft 

,8*0C bna a*OS aift nl aaio/Ioq latneffimavoa to aoawa IXaw a^9w nanow 

a«o/i aaioo oi nasi ailt lot 9 9itaB'xq rroanroo b arcaw ti ti bb tsomis 

a%iw sill iltlw 3(rtow brta ,tl9v-e3ooH (noieaetqBCi a/ft tiroda ^[aaqe brra 

len ini^w ^i^faaqa iBttB oa aiom neve e'lsaqqa airfT .^IlfnBt bna 

anw x^it^ tarit tnuoooa otni i^rfl3(BT .noieaa^aG a/ft tuods atnaisq 

•a« atanioest aaob BVBti atno'Tjiq yot rftod 9Ti,bolwirni »tit ,^mroY ^rtaV 

mrtrnmBlb tud t^tnltBtmivb YXIaoimofroog naacf avB/f taum noi8B9'Tq9<T arft 

batjUiilnv to aaliota laaH ua^ oa .larfto^ot isaoXo aigoaq Tintnd ot bfiad 

nattaw ,qx/ Tiniqqorro asnarfoxa to latrzad to amatBYa isaiota ftl ftbtrio 

alaabi naliotolY bl^ii nl rtwob 3(aaarf 'rafftii/l b brrfi tItow ot :^t^ 

«Iaat I «noiBeaiqaa a<fT .^ni^fnldt rrBoliefflA ot -gnulo llliB tBtit 

aalqaaza owt b'sm btbA wovoCI .laiftasot eailinjil bna alqoaq YnAtr trl^ktia^ 

• Barait tlifoittlb atonrt snisiaaia aailimBt tltdi ylaaolo to 

aniii/b aoinamA o^ aMao oaXa yXjUuI a'^aaaTuL aol. .'xafltatbnB'xa x^ 



the economic troubles which beset the nation and the world at 
the beginning of the century. It was his parents which immigrated 
to America in I9OI and moved to Buckbee St. in the St. Stanislaus 
Parish area. There, they helped in raising the money and my great- 
grandfather actually helped in the building of the Church Parish 
Hall, and school. St. Stanislaus School still stemds, as does 
the house the Jurasek family first moved into* 

From what I was told second-hand from my grsmdfather Joe, 
about Poland, subsistance was how most people left their land. 
After scrimping and saving fare could be bought to bring the immigrants 
to America. Impressions of America were high in esteem and respect. 
Even though they weren't born in America, my grandfather tells me, 
his parents were strongly American. 

While in America, my grandfather and his two brothers and 
one sister were born. This was still a poor period in America so 
the early years of Joe Jurasek, Frank, Walt and Marion Jurasek, 
were ones of lean times and a hard life. His childhood was happy, 
finding pleasxire in the simple things children love, and he grew 
up content because of a warm home, into a strong industrious young 
man who found employment early inilife as an apprentice tool and 
die maker. He was so adept at his trade that he was given an 
exemption to World War II, active service just to work building 
munitions. All three Jurasek sons and Marion married and had 
children. All were members of the White Eagles Club on 15th Ave. 
Bowling, golf and baseball were the leisure activities of my grand- 
father and his brothers, and Frank still often places as a finalist 
in Rockford golf tournaments. It was during theis time that Joe 
met Vema Romanek and they dated during their high-school years. 
After graduation they were married and had one daughter who would 



tM bliom tit ham aoltjsn »iit t«a«d ifairiw aelduiyxt otaonoom •if;^ 

-tamn^ Vv bns ^MtOM wi^ yiieiBi ni Jb»ql»il Y«r[t ,9iedT ,&9iui riaioA? 

ilsiis^ iloruMiO •d^ to yiibliixf sd^ ni b*qla4l x^^&ui^^M tBtitalbaMr^ 

Bmob aa .abnsj^e ilitB looAoQ mjalalciMt loorios bus iIXaU 

»o^ni tavoffi ^arcil x^iaxfil TlaamitiL sM sauod «iU^ 

•eol> leitfBlbofi^ ^ Aoil bruul-bnoosa Mot sbw I tariw moiH 

• boBl tlatfS tT»l •Xqoeq tnoa wcwl asir aoaaitaladuB ,brtsIo^ tuoda 

atnarx^laml atit ^nitd ci ^if^uocf e<f bluco anat snivss btta :^lqaJLnoa 'satliA 

•t99qmark bna maatBa aX tl-^ltl •i9w aolrtaak le enoiaasiqa;! .BoiianA ocT 

«Mi «XI*t lA/fi^flbns'xa XM iBoiisoA ni niod fntfidw xdrtt rl^iioxU^ f»yS 

.rusoliafliA Y-tS'wi** »iew &tn»iiKi alri 

brui 8^M(l(rKf owJ- airt boa lerfJ^albnai^ Yin ,so<-xoflA ni eli/IW 

oa BoiiaoA nl boiteq looq a iXi^a aaw airiT .niocf snaw lac^aia ano 

.^aaa^vL noiiBl'l boa tlatt tirtai^ .ieaBiuIi »«L to Boaev; Xltaa ati& 

«Ycr<i"t e'W boo/(blido aiH «aliX boaii a bna aeoii^ nsaX lo aeno eiaw 

waiS aii bna ,9vol naibXirlo a:%altlt aXqmie aAt ttl aiuaaalq :^lbnll 

:^utrc auoltteubnl ^orcfe a o&nl lemori miaw a lo eauaoeKf tastnoo qu 

bam Xoot aoitna'xqqB na aa atillat yXiba tn»ta\,olqm» bauol otiw aaa 

tia navA^ esv a/1 ^a/lt abait airi ta iqaba oa asw aH *79jUff aib 

^IbXiiK/ Mlov ot tatit aoiviaa avl;fOB ,11 oaW bXioW ol noi;fqmfxa 

barl bna balTxaai noiiaM bna enoa iaBaruilM aaiiU XXA .snoitXmni 

• avA (tt^l no duXO aaXsaS atixfV atit lo a^adaaa a^aw XXA •ne':tbXirio 

obna-z;^ Xm lo aaitiritoa aivaial atlt aiaw XXacfaaatf brus ^o^ tytllvoS 

tallanit m ma aaaaXq naSlo ILlSa TLamrfi bna tanetltoiaS alii bna lodtat 

aoL imiU mmlt mlmtit yiiii/b aaw tl > a^namamci/ot IXo;^ biolitooH ni 

•aroMY Xoodoa-it^iil tlaiit -^livb ba^ab yc^tit bna Jlarumofi atnay &m§ 

biuom odm latd^ab ano bail bna baitxam otaw x^t^ noitaubai^ -xatlA 



later be the mother of my sister and myself. 

After six years as an apprentice tool and die maker, Joe 
Jurasek began a small partnership in a tool and die shop. He 
eventually bought his partners share of National Tool and Die, 
and began building and adding to his shop and business. 

Taking immense pride in his health and home as well as his 
family, my grandfather now spends mush of his time active outside 
and leisurlly relaxing fishing or at golf. Both my grandmother and 
grandfather are still active members in St. Stanislaus Parish and 
the White Eagles Club, and still remain devout Catholics. 

The Polish Catholics in St. Stanislaus take immense pride in 
their heritage and their religion. During the formation of thai 
community, ethnic centers grew up around the city, with a differsnt 
ethnic group predominating in hisown section. Each Catholic 
section tended to have it's own church. The Italian section 
contained and still surrounds St. Anthony's, and the Polish, St. 
Stanislaus, and since inter-ethnic welcomes weren't usually exchanged 
betweenssnae groups in the city,, the church became the sociil center 
of the ethnic community. 

Dolores Jurasek, my mother, was an honor roll student at St. 
Stanislaus aad at Washington Jr. High and received a monetary 
scholarship from the parish to help with tuition for the schooling 
that followed. She attended West High School where she met the 
oldest son of Chelis and Hazel Johnson, Tom. 

Tom's first ;jobs revolved around farming chores, which built 
a strong, hearty boy. The Johnson family's move to the city 
brought a new life and experiences to the young Tom Johnson and 
he finished elementary school by attending Marsh on Hoffman Blvd. 



9oL ,-r«3(sm 9lb bna I00& soltnatqqM ns sus s-XBey xla letiA 
•H .qoifa •lb brus loo^ b nl qiriBisntTJsq Ilsma b n£^9<f HbsbiuI 
,stC bnfi XooT I«noi;fBl1 Ito •^uufe atentiBq alri tri^auocf yJllBflrtrtsT* 
.B89niBucf bfi« qo/f» alff o* ^nlbb* brts jknibllud ne^^erf bn« 
»lif an il©w «B «ffiOff briB ritlBerf eirf ni Bbliq »err«mmi p.nijfeT 
•bia^vo STi^oic Miit p/ff lo ifaum ebn^qa won Tori^B'ibrtE-. , ,Yllm«l 
bfiB tBfitombnBrt^ x^ "ilos ta to snlriall ^nlxslni ■^ILiubIbI bna 

bruB rtaiifl*! Bt'filBlfiBtS .t8 ni s^ecffliain arltoB Illta ais leritBlbrurts 
.aolIoritBO twovab nlamei lilts brus .cfi/IO ael^Ba 9&lt(^ siTt 
ni sbiTi; sarreflnni as^Bt auBlairtBt x aolIorii'BO dBllol ariT 

M/ft lo m>l;fB«rfol Brit sni-ioG .nols^-l^«'x il»r<t bris ssBtiiarf ilorii- 
tnarrelllb b rftiw ^X^lo »/«■ bnirooB qtr waig BriBttno olnii&9 ,Ytlnwnnioo 
ollorftaO riosS .noito^a mroairf nl ^nltsniraobsiq qwoTg olrui&B 
nclfosB fTslljBtl 9'^T .rfyii;rfo nwo 8*tl svBrf 0* babnat rroltD^r' 
, tnA .tS abrruoTii/a Illcfa brx& bar 

b«sna/f9X9 Y-tliBi/ai; f*nBi9w earoolaw oin(itB~iBtnl sonle bnjs .auBlelrtB^S 
iBtrxBO Ijkloos artt attiBoacf /forri/rfo arf,t,,YtJlo erfrf- rrf eo-Lro'n aaaiaafraawtad 

• v/ : olmfta arfi- to 

.t8 t« *ne' oi lonoti ms aaw ,ia/li'oci yoi ^:fBBsnvh hbioLoC 

XrmSBr.i vlaoai bna rijlH .iL naf^nlriSBW tfi baa at/Blalnc^lS 

yTlIoc'sa 9iO" aol noltlu* ritlw qia/f o* rialiBq 9rit moil qiKaTLBioAbi 

Si ^ria aiartw loo/fog rf^lH taaW bBbna&fe .hawollol ^ffil^ 

.moT ,ao8n/foL laaaH brrB allaifO lo noa tsablo 

■rlnrxfll bniicrta bavlovai adot tartJl a'nroT 

vlf'^B^ rroanrfoL orfT .yo.^ Ytiaarf ,ano'Zfa a 



I .. I 



H'i0^9l'IBqY'^ 1:11 wan a trf^troncf 

btIIoP '8*tB Ycf loortOB YiBtrramalo barfalnll art 



Tom attended West High, which is where he and ray mother began 
dating. They were married in 1953 after graduation from high 
school. They moved to 13th St., where I was bom, Jan. 14, 1954. 
We later moved to Christina St.^ where I attended St. Stanislaus 
for seven years of elementary education. 

New job opportunities opened for Tom Johnson, he purchased his own 
semi-tractors and a number of trailers, and later obtained a job 
of reconditioning department manager at Frontier Ford. 

Six years after my birth my younger sister, Melodie was bom, 
and she now attends Marsh Middle school and is going to Byjlan 
Central Catholic High School next year. 

Politically"^! my father has tended to be Democratic, except 
during the Nixon Administration. He voted for Nixon but has his 
doubts lately about Richard Nixon's credibility. 

Both sets of grandparents spent most of their time in Reckford 
and fit well into the industrial framework of this dity. 

Their children married and had children of their own, and 
here too, conformity within the city of Rockford is seen. For 
in each case the family unit was influenced by the society 
around itl Scooling, elders* opinions and reading material, shape 
our outlooks on life, by looking at the past we can see how certain 
people, in this case, our family, were effected by where and how 
they lived, but also how they helped to make that society grow. 



•*^91 f^^l .rust ,friod bsw I »i9i1w ,.^2 Atti oJ- bevom Y»rfT .loorioa 

nwo ai/t ^esrioouq srl ^roanrtoL .^oT lol ben&qo eeiflnutnoqqo dot ^^^ 
dot A banlB^do riai^al brts » eial jtaat to 'xaunu/n a bna sto^osi^f-jtaraa 
•Mol iai<TTOTS J^a 'xa^^anan i'«!Worf-*xaq:»b jM^nol^ibnooat to 
,mod aaw aiboXaM tOad-aia lasnuo^ xpi d^ild ym Tta;flG siaaY x.J<-- 

ttMlt^ o^ ^loa ai bfifi ioorioa albbiM /{b'XbM Bbrmi'tB won aria bna 

.Tfiov: ^xan JLooriofi ffsiH ollo/t^jeO IjB-rtftaO 
i^qaoxa (Oi^arcoonaG acf oJ^ babna;*- Bsti -iBtitel Ym fg\;lJLsoi*lIoSi. 
ai/i aaif tud aoxlA tel ba^ov eH *^oitst:^8i^ixnbA. noxin e/l;f snirxirit) 
•YtJLIicfibaio B'noxiM b-xa/foiH ^uoda yX9;}^sI Btdueb 
broTaio^R nl oalt ilatlS lo taoai tnaqa eitci^i&qbnBT^ to etes iltoQ 

•\tib aldf lo sCxcmajBS'Xl Islitzubnl Btit ocTni Il9w ttl bna 

btia «nwo liadt \o naiblirio baxf bna baiTxam nsablixfo liarlT 

ToS ./taae ai b^otioofl lo Y^-t^ ©^^ nirf^iw x^ittiiolnoo ,ooJ^ sTtaif 

Yi'aiooa a/ft Yd baonaullni aaw t/.nir y-I^-^^abI Biif aaao ifoae ni 

agaifa 9lBl'i9tBm ^inibaarc bna snoiniqo ^siaLIa ,^JUo<yo2 I;M bnirota 

niai"iao trod aaa two aw ;^aaq adt tm ^niMooX Yd ^allX no bAooI&vo rxuo 

woA boM a-xadw YCf bataalla aiaw ,YXi«fil iiro ,»aao aidt nl ,ei.qoaq 

•wons Y^^Xooa t»ii& ajLoa ct baqlad Yad;f wod oala ;t-ud ,b9vil ym<^ 



JOHNSONV sally KAY, 1952- 



';''-'^lir)..l:yi 



PLEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

^ar Contributor to the «OCk Valley College Family History Collection: 

So thai your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
Aifierican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only .i 
few miniues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
access to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

I. SURVEY ***AAAA*AA***y;i\-.\A*A****AA* ■. 

* OFFICE USE coot 

I. Y"ur name ^nlly K. .Tnhnsnn 



Date '.f form November 26, I974 * ('0 H ) 

7. Your ujii(!c)e: Kock Va I lev (.ol lege (ID H ) 

IToickford, Illinois a 

***** )W; A A >V A A A A ,\ A A A A A .V A A A A AAA 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper, 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 I8OO-I85O 

X 1850-1900 1900 or latiT 



k. Please check a I I regions of the United States In which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived, 

_New England (Mass., Conn,, R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna., N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga., Fla., N.C., S.C.) ^East South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, Ky 



West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., OTTrTjc East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

Pacific (Cal., Washj ^(Hawaii, Alaska) HI. wis.) 

Plains (ND,SD,Neb. ,Kan. ,Iowa, MB) 

5. Please check all occupational categories In which members of your family whom you have 
discussed In this paper have found themselves. 

Farming Mining X S hopkeeping or small business 

^Transportation B ig Business _^ Manufacturing 

^Professions x Industrial labor O ther 

6. Please check al 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
In this paper have belonged. 

^Roman Catholic ^Jewish ^Presbyterian Methodist 

X B aptist E piscopal Ian y C ongregational y Lutheran 
Quaker Mormon x Other Protestant ^Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians M exicans P uerto R leans 

^Jews C entral Europeans I tal lans y^ S lavs 

Irish ^British x N ative Americans over several generations 

^East Asian ^Other 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other x F amI ly Bibles ^ Fami ly Genealogies 

fami ly members 
X Vi tal Records L and Records T he U.S. Census 

3cx Photographs Maps Other 



I, FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 



Current Residence 



Name Erik Warren JOHNSON 

If dead," date of death ^^^ yoh;;;;;;7y 3.938 

Place of birth qt.pn^t.nr'p, V^c,t.prxrnt1pnl)«f Of B'^th ^g 

Sweden "^r-MsT rItfT 

Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 9"th 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat lon(s) 

1st 

RuuKfuid Diiry Pwvg e 

■)^A Rockford Forging 
^no „ . •, m ? 

— Die a»d ' Tool ■ ' ' 

3rd 



Dates 



191^? 



PLACE or RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) ^ 

Ist Dates 191? 



Dates 1929-38 

Dates 

Dates 



2nd_ 
3rd_ 
i.th 



Dates 

_Oates_ 

Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fratarnltiat, etc.^ 
Place of Marriage to your grandmothe r Chicago, Illino: 



popiihl -ioan 



flate 3, July 19Ji^ 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age I8) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 



6. Grandmother (your father's side) 

ne Clara Marie ANDERSON 
deao, oate of death 



Name 
If 



Current Residence l6l9 Second Ave. 



Plac* of birth Merrill. Lincoln, Wisconsin Pate of birth 2^ November I896 

Education (number of years): 

grade school high school vocational x college 

"~~~~~~" — — — — nurses training 

Occupat i on (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 



Ist Visiting nurse 



(after leaving home) 
Petes 1920-21 Ist Chicago Illinois D ates 191^ 



2nd Registered nurse 

3rd 

^th 

Re 1 1 g I on Covenant 



Petes^ 
Pates_ 
Dates 



1922- 2nd Rockford, Illinoiaates 1922- 



3 r d Dekalb, Illinois D a t e s l.923 
itth Rockford, Illinoid )ates 1924 



t Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Republican 



place of marriage to your grandfather 



I 



Note: 



rhirflgh. in ItiniPi 



Tsrr 



'- il^aH;t^S(!*fh»«6a«'«f^ji^? Wi Vi)! "•P'^'^ 



3. July 19?^ 



er or another relative g 



i ve 



A- I Glep9raridfath«r (your fdlh«r's tide) 



N.iii»* 



Curront Residence 



Hlacc of 


"X 

b 

n 
Che 

oni 


IIP of daa 

rth 


Th—- 






Date of Birth 


Educ.it io 
grade s 


number of 
>ol 

s) 


years 


) 
high school 

Dates 


1st 


vocational college 


Occupat 1 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 


2nfl 
3rd 
'.th 








Dates 

Dates 
Dates 


_3rd_ 


Dates 
Dates 
Dates 


Rcliqion 











Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 
Place of marriage to your grandmotiiar 



date 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 



NaiT^ 

I f dead, date of deatl^ 



Place of bi rth 



Currant Residence^ 
Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat Ion (s) 

lit 

2nd 

)rd 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Ut_ 

2rtd_ 
3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



Re I i g i on 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Harry Emmanuel CARLSON Current Residence 3001 Bildahl Stree t 

f I f dead, date of death — ^ 

Rockford, Illinois 
Place of bIrth Rockford, Winnebago, 111. ogte of birth 31. August 190 2 
Education (number of years): — — — — — ^— — — __^— ___ 
grade school high school vocational ^^^ college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

,5t Bergstrom Bros. Grocery q^^^^ 1918-20 ,..3001 BiiSah*f i't""'"^ ^°"*Lr,^ 192U- 

nuLkfuia, nil " 

2^^ 7th St. Cash Grocery p ^^^^ 1920-26 ^ „^ ^^^^^ 

3^^ Rockford Naf 1 Furniturt ^^^,, 1927-303 ^^ p^^^, 

^^, Whitney Metal & Tool p ^^^^ 1 939-1 9^ ^^, ^^^^^ 

o , , , Covenant 

Re I I g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. BapnhiinQr. 



Place of marriage to your grandmothe r ^p^^tord. Illinois . <^«te 30 ^ Aug.^Js' 

Note: If your mother was raised by a SLBpfflllier Ur irTUlhir relJJllve (lO S^e \B) 

give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

^*'^ .HP-lpn Mar.ip JVinRETiT. ^Current Residence 

It dead, date of death p, . junp 1 Q7 n 

Place of birth Rockford. Tllinnis D ate of birth 18. August 190^ 

Education (number of years) 
grade school 6th high school vocational col lege 

Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1 s t Eekaberfe's Dry Goods D ates 1922-26 1st 3001 Bildahl St. D ates l924 

Rockford, Illinois 
2nd Montgomery Ward's D ates 1936-372 n d . D ates 



3rd Brooke Road Laundromat D ates 1952-67 3 r d D ates 

Re 1 1 g I on Covenant 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Republican 



Mace of marriage to your grandfatha f Hockitiybd^ iilitt(M5 ^ ^^ ^y,' ^"^' ^'^^'*' 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another r»i»fi"r (tc z^z 'S) 
xf'.wc Liiak oxa on cne DacK 07 this page (D-2) 



C- I Sr epgrandf ather (your mother's side) 

Ndine Current Residence 

I f <lc'«id, <laip of dftath 

I'l.in mI III I Hi I). lie of hiidi 

I )liii .il iii«i (iiiitiilx- r fif yr.i I ■. ) 
• li.iil«' -.cIkkiI liiyli schnol vocolionol colloiir 



Occiip.Ulon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st D ates 1st ^Dates 

?n(l Dates 2nd D ates 

3rd ^Dates 3rd D ates 

'♦th Dates ^tt h D ates 

Re I i 9 i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother d at6" 

D-? S tcpc)r.indmothfr (your mother's side) 

N.ime Current Residence 



I f (lt;j(i, <i,jtc of death 



fl.icf of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school ii i gh school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2n(j Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

Re 1 i fj i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date" 



— — — — ~ "1 B i; your racner's name should appear below 

Kr^\r. navid .TnhnF!9n 

lois data 3, March I92, 

nker 



Name 
P 



lace of b.rtli Rpckforri. Tl lJnois data ?. Mar-oh 1925 



Numbe 

Re 

Number of chl Idran 4 

Name Carl Arthur Johnson 

Place of birth 

Number of 

Res 1 denc e 

Number of chl Idren 



marpjod 



^yc^EI?H*W^ 



Mame 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence ' 

Number of cfil Jdren 



It. 



5. 



6. 



7. 



8. 



Name 

Place of bl rth ""^ 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Number of chl idren 



Name 

Place of birth "~" 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence__ " 

Number of chl Idrtn 



Name 

Place or bIrtK 

Number, of years of schooling 

Res I dence " 

Number of chllciren 



Name 

Place of birth "" 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence ' 

Number of chl ldr«n 



Name 

Place ot birth "^ 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I den ce " 

Number of chl Idren 



9. 



P' 



Name 

Place of birth "" 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence " 

Number of chl Idren 



Name 

Place of birth ••" 

Number of years of tchoollng 
Residence - 

Number o T U ll l UH ii 



Marital Status 



_occupati6n ':vi.:^::v:.n 



joajuUi&iL 



pnginper 



date 



Occupation 
narital Statui 



d at e 
" ^ccupatlbrt 
_Marital status "^ 

"" date 

Occupation 
narital Sta tus " 

"^ ate 
"T ccupatlen 
__ Marital Status "^ 

" date 
"^ Occupation 
, Marital Siat us 

"""d at e 
Occupation 
HarlFal Status "^ 



narital status 



. <**te 
'Occupation 



_naritai Status 



dac e 
HTccupatlon 



3. 



10. 



tHILUREN >>l (. and (or (.-I, D-l)-yoiir mothrr's rionto should opptvir liel<iw 
N.iiiii 



Elaine Harriet Price 

— R ock f o r d, 111. 



I' 1.1. ." ..T Ml III 

fliiitili<-t mI /f.ti-. oT >,c Ikx) 1 I ru| 

H.-. i.i.-!.. .■ Rockford, 111. 

Niimliri III ililldren 



^,^j,, 12, Sept. 1925 



lOLli g^i - ada|^3^|^3 , 3^^^^ 



Occupat ion 



S. 



Nil 



Catherine Marie Johnson 

,','.' TT-" — .^ — R oe kfordi — Ill « 

r I .M •■ III ii 1 1 ( ii 

Nijinltcr mI yi.tis of schooling 12 

Res i ck-nce Rockford HI' 

Number f.f ch i I dren 4 



N.T.i«:_ 

Place 



TTT^ff^ 



lizabeth Anfierson 



" .FnrkfJQrri. T1 

Number i>( years Or school i ng i c; 

'''^^ ' '*'"" ■ .Ror^ffnrri. T11. 

Number nf children p 



ni . 



1.11. 1- of Hirtn D/-v^'lri<tnr>H 



N.imi 
P 



Nunilici of years or scnool i ng ^5 



R.--. idei.r.c Villa Park, ill. 

Number <if children 



Nnnie 

P I .icr of hi rth ~ 

Number of years of schooling 

Kes i riencc 

N unbc r o f chl I dren 



N .imi- 

P I ace fjf bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

R«s i dence 

Number of ch i Tdren 



Nane 

Place of bi rt>i 

Number of years of schooling 

Re> i dcnce 

Number of chi 1 dren 



Name 

P I ace of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence ' 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



Nar>e 

P lace of bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Re*., i dencc 



Number of ch I I dren 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 



Number of chi Idren 



otofG manager 
marriod 



10, July 1930 



da t o_^ 

ITccupatlon^^ hnmpmRkPc! 



Marital Status marr-i^ri 



date 2?.. nntnbftr 19^-^ 

ITccupatl on schoolteacher 



Marital Status married 



Jate 27. Dec. 1934 

_^__^_^ OccupatiOri free lance movie 
Marital Status single directoi 



Marital Status 



date 

"Occupation 



_^^^ date__ 
OccupatlOrt 



Marital Status 



. date 
"Oc cupatlOn 
Marital Status 



^__ date 

Occupat loh 



Marital Status 



date 
OccupatlOh 



Marital Status 



date_ 
Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



Your Father 



* . Rockford, 111. 

Place of birth^ pnnkf nrri W^T> iii..,. . Til inni c, D ate of btrth 1. March 1 Q?'; 

Education (number of years) —————*«„ ^' ■ ■ ■ ■ ' ' 

grade school high school ^ipypn vocationil ^college 



Occupatlon(s) PUVCE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
'^^ Rpnlffnrri ForgiTie Dates i q/ji _ 1st 1808 R ural St. Dates 1951 

2h d 161 4 Second Ave. Dates 1962- 



Die& Tool 
2nd Dates 



3rd^ Dates 3r d D ates 

^th ^Dates <tth D ates 

Religion Covenant 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Republican 



Gideons, church board member 
Place of marriage to your nK)thtr ■Rbckf'birdj Illlndig''^" d ate dd, NoV' 1V31 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Itother 

Name Catherine Marie CARLSON Currant Residence I6l4 Second Ave. 

If dead, date of death " ■ :^ ^ KOCKiora, ixjl. 

Place of birth Rockford, Wihra^Jl'Il. Date of birth 1Q» July 1930 

Education (number of years) ——,—————————— 

grade school high school 12 vocational c ollege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

Penneys Dates 19'^6-W ,„ 18«8 RuA'i"ii .""""' 'j'^l 1951 



1st 



2n( grd Nat'l Bank Dates 19^8-49 2n d ^^^^ Second Ave. 3^^, 1952- 
3rd Rehnberg Jacobson'^a^^g 1950-51 3rd Dates 



Religion Covenant 



''°' '(^'AUfk\^^SkVr\^r&f^',^ ^'"^!.^^F£9i^'jA!,\^'Agf nbo8"P"^^^"^^ 



Place of marriage to your fathftr Rbckf ord/^Ill. '''''' ^ < ^*t^ '^^' J^°^' ^^51 

NOTE: If you wer* raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



E-l Stepfather 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth D ate of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade s choo I h i gh school vocational college 



Occupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd D ates 

3rd Dates 3 rd D ates 

^th Dates i «th D ates 

Rel iglon 

Polltlcai- pSHllei, dl\/ll 6r 56CISI clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother D at< 

F-2 Stepmother 



Name 










1 f dead, date of death 

Place of hi rth 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 




__ vocational 
1st 




Date of birth 
col lege 


Occupat ion(s) 

1st Dates 




PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 


2nd Dates 
3rd Dates 




2nd 
3rd 
sororities, 


etc. 


Dates 

Dates 


Re I iglon 




Koiltical parly, civil or social c 


lubs, 








Place of marriage to your father 








date 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

fj3^ Sally Kay Johnson^ 
.Plac e of blrth R^^^^J ' u^ ' ^i m- ' '- Qate of birth ^Q' October 1952 
* Number of years of schppJIng still in school Occupation 

Residence Rockfor°» -'--'-'•' Marital Status single 

Number of ch i Idren 

Name Chris David Johnson 

Place of birth Rockford. 111. Date of birth i. Sept. 1 Q';^ 

Number of years of schooling R-i-^n ;„ „ _, ^ OccupatlOrt 

Res i dence Rockford, 111. "^-^ ^^ ""^ a^rlta l Stat us sin gle 

Number of chl Idren "" 

Name Scott David Johnson . 

Placeof birth^T^Wford., 11,1. .^ . J^ ^^ birth 'J^^j^l^^^L. 

Number of years of School fng still in school Occupation 

Res i dence Pr.oirf^y.f^ Til- Marital Status single 

Number of cnllJren 



Name Kelli Marie JnhnQnn 

Place of birth PonV -p nr.H , T1 1 . Pate of birth ia, Nn^o,r,hor. i QA3 

Number of years of schooling f^tjll \r\ s^chqnl Occupation 

f<e s i den ce Rpnkf ord. Til. Marital Status alugls 

Number of chl Idren 

Nanie^ 

Place of bi rth Date of birth 

I Number of years of schooling .. "^ . 1 Occupation 

P Reb i dence Marital Status 

Number of childrert "" 



Name 

Place of birth Date of blrth_ 

Number of years of schooling Occupation^ 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of chl Idren 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling OccupatlOh 

Residence Marital Status_ 

Number of chl Idren 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth_ 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of ch i Idrert ' 



111. AbSir.NMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willincj) 

1 h(.>r(4)v donate this family history, along with all literary and ^^';';;';;';;;"^;r," 
n.jhls. to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited m the 
Roci<ford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed A/lJ' i 1 l. CVfjA^nLOJ&J^!^- - 
Date hi£-i^'±a±Ulu<^—^- k+.iiL/.':/ .... 



GENEALOGY CHART 



jA<iol^h JOHANSON 
Great grandfather 



Frilf Warran JOHNS CM 



Kric David JOHNSON 



Lly Kay JOHNSON 

r ■ 

"^ 20, October 1952 
rried 



Father 



3, March 1925 
23, November 1951 



Grandfather 

b18. May 1895 
M 3. July 1924 



B l?5b 

M 

D iq^H 

_JEniina 



D 23, February 1938 Great'grandmother 



Clara Marie ANDERSO: 

SkKamot ' ker 

B 2, November I896 

D 



B I'i v^4 
D i^ZO 

Day id. i^.. ANDERSON^ - 
b30, Sept. 1864 
M 16, Sept. 1893 
D 21, Dec. 1929 



Maria CARLSON 



B 18, Sept. 1866 
D April 1948 
John G. CARLSON 



Harry Emmanuel CARLSO i 



atherine Marie CARLS 



Mother 

B 10, July 1930 

M 2 3, Kiev,.-, n be, iq6 I 
D 



Grandfather 

^ 31, August 1902 
M 30, August 1924 







n 13, Dec. 1871 
^ 27, Feb. 1895 

D 



1929 



Selma E. OLIN 

3 12, Aug. 1870 
D 

Martin B. MORELL 



{elen Marie MORELL 



Grandmother 

B 18, August 1904 
D 8, June 1970 



^ 9, Dec. 1881 
M 

° 1938 



I4sk--G, HULTGREN 
r23, Nov. 1885 
D 1933 



LIST OF SOURCES 

Personal Interviews with family members 

Use of the family Bible 

Photographs 

Vital Records 

Newspaper) Articles 

Family albums and scrapbooks 



LIST OF SOURCES 

Personal Interviews with family members 

Use of the family Bible 

Photographs 

Vital Records 

NewspajwfeCi Articles 

Family albums and scrapbooks 



830HUOE SO T3IJ 

•Idia >cIimBl 9iit lo eaU 

sbioosH iB&iy 

9»LoifiA latliiiBqBWdVI 

aMoodqBnoB bn« eou/dlB y-^^'^fi'^ 



PART I 

A. My paternal grandfather- Erik Warren Johnson 

B. My paternal grandmother-Clara Marie Anderson 

C. My paternal grandparents life together 

D. My father-Eric David Johnson 



I TSAq 

noanriol. neiicW illtS. -leiit Blbnatg lBni9tBq yM .A 

noanmbnA sliMfH B^BlO-istifombriBr^ iBms&sq yM .fi 

noanrioL blvaQ oiia-i9/1d"*l yM .0 



Erik Warren was born to Adoph and Emma Johanson on May I8th 
in the year 1895* He was born in Stenstorp, Vast ergot land in 
Sweden. Here he grew up as a young man. He had one brother and 
two sisters. As he approached his teenage years his relatives 
were leaving the country for the United States of America. So 
at the age of eighteen after completing nine years of school he 
left his native home to venture across the sea into a new land. 
He came to Rockford and lived with an aunt beginning to establish 
himself in die sinking work. 

The rest of the family came later purchasing a home on Second 
Avenue so Erik moved in with them. At this time he was working 
at Rockford Drop Forge as a foreman. He became active in the 
First Mission Covenant Church joining as a member and involving 
himself in the progrsun by singing in the choir. His hobbies 
included driving a motorcycle, playing a guitar* and fishing. 
He was a friendly, well-liked fellow and to the girls appeared 
to be a good catch. In the early 1920*s he met Clara and their 
love for each other grew into the permanent committment of 
marriage. 



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• brusi wan a oi^ni aas erl^ Baoioa 9'wtnev ot emod evlfan alri tlel 

dailda^ae o/ snlnnl^ad tnum nfi Htiw beviX boa biolMooH ot amao oH 

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liartt bna aTaiO ta« 9ii 8*QS91 Y^iae 9({t nl .dotao booa a 9d of 

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. 9:B£i 11am 



On September l6th, I893 David L. Anderson married Maria 
Carlson, who had traveled to America from Sweden with David's 
mother, Clara Monson, upon the urging of her fiance David. They 
made Merrill, Wisconsin their home and began a family of their 
own combining their Swedish heritage with the ideas from the 
States they adopted. Mr. Anderson was a cement contractor 
and developed a good standing in the community of 10,000. A 
quote taken from a newspaper article illustrates this well^ 
describing him as having "won an enviable reputation for depend- 
ability and uprightness. " He also was an active member of 
Emmanuel Congregational Church and served as chairman of the 
congregation. 

Soon after David and Maria were married they moved into 
their own home which David himself had built. Here Clara Marie 
was bom on November 2nd in the year I896, the second to be 
born of seven. She had a very happy childhood having three 
sisters and two brothers although a younger brother died while 
very young. The friendly hospitality of the Anderson's was 
evident often with friends and relatives always welcome to stay 
with them for an extended period of time. Merrill was a quiet 
and friendly town one could proudly call home. It was a city 
of picttiresque parks located on the Wisconsin River. with the 
surrounding countryside dotted with farmhouses situated amid 
rolling hills. As one crossed over the stone bridge upon 
entering the city the big courthouse clock stood as a welcome 
landmark. Clara and her sisters used to walk several miles to 
go berry picking in the woods. They enjoyed the parades and fairs 
which were held annually. Swimming was good in the Prairie 
River within a block from home and walking along the railroad 



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tracks was a favorite pastime. 

The family activities centered around the church so Clara 
learned to respect and love God at an early age, disciplined 
according to Scriptural principles. 

When a sophmore in high school Clara quit school to take 
care of her mother who was ill. Later she wsmted to return 
to school to become a nurse so she left home for the big city 
of Chicago. At first it was lone some and she cried herself 
to sleep many nights wishing she was back home. But soon she 
found herself busy taking basic courses at North Park School 
needed for entering nurses* training. She was here one year 
and lived with the family of Professor Samuel Wallgren helping 
to care for the children. Then she entered Swedish Covenant 
Hospital and remained there three years until 1919 when she 
received her nursing diploma. She returned to Merrill where 
she was offered a position as head nurse at the hospital but 
she didn*t feel adequate enough to meet such a challenge just 
yet. Instead she ajid a friend worked at a resort as maids doing 
the housekeeping for the summer. In her leisure time she went 
horseback riding and went on boatrides. In the fall, she returned 
to Merrill working as a visiting nurse for the rich people 
who could afford such services. Caring for the sick, she lived 
in the homes with the families who treated her well making her 
feel as much at home as possible. 

With a close friend she moved to RockfordQ^" miles away to 
work at the recently opened Swedish American hospital which 



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needed personnel badiy. While living here she mat Erik aohnson 
through her friend and they began dating. Clara and Erik with 
another couple doubled many times, going on picnics, playing 
croqqet and attending the church functions and activities of the 
Young People's Group at First Mission Covenant Church. When 
the hospital became adequately staffed she moved to Dekalb, ner 
friend's hometown to work in the hospital there. However, her 
friendship with Erik continued to grow despite the miles between 
them. 



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rmaw^ad aallm »ti& etiaraab wcqj o* bouni&no^ AliS i^tiw qiriabnaiil 



Erik continued to see Clara. Having his own car, a convertible, 
he dfove to Dekalb often to visit. In the summer of 1924 they 
were married on July 3rd by Rev. E.G. Hjerpe in Chicago. Clara's 
mother was sickly at the time so Clara didn't want her to be 
concerned about wedding details. But the excitement of pre- 
wedding festivities didn't pass her by. Anna, her close friend 
planned an interesting progressive party and shower that was written 
up in the local newspap*pr. Clara's older sister Lily and Erik's 
brother stood up for them at the ceremony and later they had a 
lovely dinner in one of the elegant restaurants in Chicago. For 
the honeymoon they traveled north as far as Mineaqua, stopping 
in Merrill where the family had planned a party with close friends 
and relatives to congratulate the happy coupie. 

Returning to Rockford, they rented a home near Broadway. 
Here they lived for several years while Erik was working at Drop 
Forge. Several months later their first child, a son, was born 
whom they promptly named Br iff after his father. When there was 
not much work to be done at Drop Forge Erik and the family left 
for Detroit where he got die sinking work, later moving to 
Chicago for several months. 

Then they returned to Rockford to live at I6l4 Second Avenue 
the house Erik had recently purchased from his parents before 
they died. Here Carl, David's younger brother was born, five 
years after Eric David's birth. Erik began a die sinking shop 
of his own along with three other partners at I8th Avenue namioa' 



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the corporation Rockford Forging Die and Toil Company. However, 
Erik's health wasn't good in the years ahead so the family tohk 
a trip out West hoping the climate there would help but in 1938 
at the age of ^3 he died after a prolonged illness. 

So Clara had the responsibility of raising their two sons 
^,^as best she could. The family received an income from the shop 
so they were provided for well. When the boys grew up Clara re- 
turned to her work as a registered nurse at Swedish American 
Hospital for awhile. 

She became Granny when the grandchildren arrived and she 
has been a dear grandmother to each one of us. She is healthy 
and very active living in a house right across the street from 
us 1619 Second Avenue so she constantly has relatives dropping 
over to say hello and spent time with her, eager to munch some 
yummy homemade goodies like cookies or candy. 



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.^nBO -xo aeiilooo ejJil aaiboo^^ abanemerf ymmoy 



Eric was warmly received with love from the )iappy parents - 
Erik and Clara on March 3rd in 1'7^5« He was a round-faced, cuddly 
child which gave him an irresistibly cute look. Growing up as 
the son of Swedish parents he spoke Swedish fluently in everyday 
conversations as well as English. The neighborhood had lots 
of children to play with and Eric's backyard was large enough 
for a baseball diamond. The yard also had a number of trees* 
atlleast five apple trees, good for climbing so it was an ideal 
playground. The boys had plenty of space to romp around in and 
amuse themselves. 

Besides the family which numbered four when Eric's younger 
brother came, an aunt lived with them so David. which he came to 
be called quite often to lessen the confusion of having two 
Erics in the family, shared a room with his brother. The family 
also loved animals so there was always a dog or a cat or two who 
found a home here. 

Er^c had a typical boyhood with the relationship among the 
family close. Father and son both loved to fish so the family 
took trips up North often to spent the summers at Merrill staying 
with the grandparents. Holidays were spent with the family in 
true Swedish fashion opening Christmas gifts on Christmas Eve 
and having the traditional meal of lutfisk, korv, brown beans, 
rice pudding and root beer. Early Christmas Day morning found 
them in attendance at the Julotta service at church. 

Both David and Carl grew up in the First Mission Covenant 
Church attending Sunday School, church, and programs for their 



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liarit lol e«B'x^iq bna ^lioiutio ,Ioorto2 yabnwS yilbnatta rioiutiO 



age group being teaptized and confirmed there. Both parents felt 
it was their responsibility to raise their children according 
to Biblical standards, realizing- the significance the church 
could play in their lives as a place of instruction. 

David went to school at Jackson, Lincol», and East High. 
When his father died David beceime the man of the family and must 
have felt the new responsibility he had to face as the eldest 
son. He had a paper route for a year and then he got a part- 
time job after school and in the summer working at an auto 
repair garage. When he was sixteen, he began working at the 
shop where his father had been president earning 350 an hour 
at first. 

At eighteen he entered the Navy receiving his training 
in Idaho and San Diego. He was stationed in several different 
locations during World War II including the Admiralty Islands 
in Australia, the Solomon Islands, Philippines and China. When 
he was discharaged in 19^6 he returned to the States taking 
time off in the summer to go fishing in the area around Merrill. 
Returning to the shop he was working there while he once again 
became active in the young people's group at church. Through 
the activities the group had he and Catherine became acquainted 
and they began dating. 



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.noltouiiartl lo eafilq b bb aevll ^iefli■ ni yelq bluoo 

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.faiil ta 

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abnalBl \tlailiabA erit ^nlbuLoni II ibW blioW :^ni'iub anoliaool 

neriW .BnirfD bnB 8enlqqlllri<l .abnBlal nomoloa 9rlt ^axLattsuA nl 

^nlAai B9tatZ eM ot ban-xutai erf 6^1 (\i b9:^B'iB[ioaib bbw erf 

.IXl-jieM bmioxe seiB eri^ nl gnlrfall 03 o^ lenimua ©riJ ni llo emirf^ 

nia^a eono erf elirfw eieri.t s^-^^liow aaw erf qoria ©rtt ot snin'u;;fefl 

rf^oirfT .rfoii/rfo tB quoia a'sXqoeq ani/oY «rf^ ni evl&oa emsoed 

be^niaupoB enusoed eniterf;fBO bna erf bsrf quois ^^^^ aei^tivi^OB erf;f 

,^^lteb nB^«rf v«Ht bnB 



PART II 

A. My maternal grandfather-Harry Emmanuel Carlson 

B. My maternal grandmother-Helen Marie Morell 

C. My maternal grandparents life together 

D. My mother-Catherine Marie Carlson 



11 TflAq 

isrivs^oi" eliX 8tnf>TBqbn£na iBmetBUi yM .0 
nosirimX) eineM 9nii9rl*B0-t9rf:f'om yM .G 



On August 31st in the year 1902 a lively and growing family 
of five including Mom and Dad welcomed a new member into their 
home, Harry Emmanuel Carlson. The two older boys, Martin and 
Ed, and their sister Hilma were no doubt eager to hold the new 
little one and serve Mom as helpers. Born at home, Hsirry was the 
fourth child to be born to John and Selma Carlson and not to be 
the last. A younger brother and sister soon followed so the family 
of six adequately filled the four-bedroom house at 140? 20th Avenue. 

The house stood alone, situated so the view included miles 
of farmland with cornfields. Mr. Carlson worked for Mr. P. A. 
Peterson in the furniture factory where he assembled furniture 
pieces so this home was built by Mr. Peterson and Mr. Carlson was 
able to make payments on it gradually. The family was the first 
in the area but soon others came with as many as six children 
in a family so Harry, my grandfather had lots of playmates. The 
neighborhood must have been a friendly one because the people all 
shared a common bond of being of Swedish descent. Both Harry *s 
parents had come directly from Sweden in their early years. When 
anyone in the family was ill, the neighbors were always willing 
to help, coming to prepare meals amd help as needed. 

Harry had a happy childhood having fun as well as learning 
responsibility. Every member of the family had assigned chores 
so Harry spent several hours a week keeping the tall mulberry 
hedges trimmed on their two lots. He was also in charge of the 
chickens so his mother teasingly nicknamed him King of the Chickens. 
During the week he went to school but being mischievous he liked 
to play sick so he could stay home, tricking his mother by lying 



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brm nitiiM «axod loblo owt srlT .noaliBO Isunsmraa YtibH jemori 

«»n eri^ blofi o^ "xsase i^duob on eisw BotliH nstais lierft bnA tbS 

•di^ «Bw x'X'uM ««flior( tB nioa .a^sqlerl as noM 9Yn:98 bnjs eno eltd^ll 

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.A.*I .iM lol ba3i^ow noeliBO .iM .ablailnioo ri;flw bABlmifil lo 

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a'YiiBH dtofl .tnaoaeb f1albew2 lo ^iBd Jo bnod noimnoo b baiBda 

nadW .a^Bay yIibb iiar(;f nl nabawS noil xl&OBilb biboo bsri atneiaq 

^nllliw eyBwlB e-xaw 8^odrisien ericf «IIi sbw YlimBl Bii& nl anoyna 

,b9bBBn BB qlBti bna alBaa artaqaiq ot snimoo •qlad o& 

Snintfial aa Haw aa nul ^IvBti boorfblido y,qqBii b bad yiiBH 

aanodo ben^iaaB bmti YlimBl edt lo isdmeoi xiavS .Ytilidianoqaai 

XiiBdLum LIbS Br^& gniqaast Maaw b aiuod iB^avaa i^naqa y^ibH oa 

•tit lo asTSdo nl obLb bbw aH .8;foI owt ileti& no baflunint aa^bad 

.anaioidO Bdt lo ^lA mid bamansloin yl^^niaBat tadtom aid oe anesCoido 

bBiili ed auovaidoaim :^l9d &ud loodoa oJ^ J-naw ad ^aaw Biit j^iiuQ 

9fiixi X<i loiitom Blfi sni^foiit taaod \BfB bluoo ad oa 3(oia Y«Iq ot 



directly over the floor register until he got hot and dizzy. 
When school was dismissed for the day everyone found things to 
do possibly stopping by the grocery store for penny candy of 
licorice and butterballs. The boys headed for a baseball diamond 
with Harry playing on the White Stars team. The games were played 
on the diamond of the new PA. Peterson school. Sometimes it was 
fun to roller skate here too because the ideal course had good 
spaced landings and steps. 

Everyone was home by 6:00 p.m. when the family gathered around 
the supper table for the big meal of the day. What busy conversations 
must have taken place across the table amongp;the eight. The activities 
after supper included rounding up the neighborhood gang to play 
games like Drop the Hankerchief and All Couples Out similar to 
Hide and Seek until 9«30 or lOiOO under the street lights once 
it got dark. 

On Sunday the children went to Sunday School at First Mission 
Covenant Church. Then at 3*00 he once again attended Sunday School 
at the chapel in the neighborhoodnraowSouth Park Covenant. The 
parents felt religious training was important and based the home, 
life on the Bible and Christian instruction. Mr. Carlson came 
from a Baptist background and his wife was Lutheran. Sundays 
were special days when the work was set aside to observe and honor 
the Lord's Day. 

Holidays were spent with the family in the Swedish traditions. 
Christmas Day found them walking to church despite the heavy snow 
to attend Julotta service at 61 00 a.m. In the summer a big picnic 



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lo YbnBt) Ynnaq lol •iota ^©oois «rf* VJ anlqqots ylcf^ssoq ob 

bnofluiib IladttSBd is foJ. b9bJB«rf ayod ^ftT .dllBdi^ttud briB 9oltaotL 

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.aqsts bnm s^nlbnal beoaqa 

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dlnalq :!»ld s iBiomuB srit nl ,m,B O0«d ts 99lri9B B&toluZ bn9&&B ot 



was held on the farm of an uncle called Byron Bluff on South 
Main Road where as many as seventy-five to eighty relatives came 
to enjoy a leisurely summer day and the company of each other. 
Before the age of sixteen Harry found a job working in a 
factory making toys. Then he became a delivery boy for Bergstrom 
Brothers Grocery on I8th Ave. and 7th St. When he lived at home 
and worked he gave all his paycheck to his mother and got only 
500 back. This was all he needed, however, since he was well 
taken care of with food, shelter, and clothing. While working 
at 7th St. Cash Grocery the family moved to 325 So. Prospect St. 
so he made the move with them. But two years later he left to 
make a home of his own with his new bride Helen. 



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sfflBO ssvi&BlBi x&[i:gl3 of 9vil-Ytn9V98 SB xnsta sb s-xsrlw bBoH nisM 

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mo^tag^9d lol yod xisvllsh b gmBogd 9ri ngriT .ayoi" gnljlBra Yiotosl 

©fflori J^B b9vll 9r( nsrIW .t2 ritV bnB .9vA rid-81 no YigooaO Bis/ftoia 

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,tZ t09qaoi<I .o2 ^S^ ot b9Vom Y-tiniB^ stit yisooiO risBO »&Z ti&S ts 

ot tie! eri 19&b1 a^B9Y owt &uQ. .mgrit rltxw 9vom 9f{t 9bBm 9ri oa 

.n9l9H 9biid wen axri ti&iyt nwo axri lo gmori b s^Btn 



Helen Marie Morell was the first of thirteen children to be 
born to Martin and Ida Morell. She was born in the summer of 
190^ in the month of August on the 18th at home on Railroad 
Avenue. In the years that followed she became an experienced 
babysitter having six sisters and five brothers. Her mother had 
one miscarriage. Home was located on Railroad Avenue near the 
location of the Standard Furniture Company, the only house by 
the railroad tracks, Mr. Morell was a furniture finisher working 
inaa factory nearby. Both parents had come o.t Sweden years before. 

Her education never went beyond the sixth grade because 
she quit school to take babysitting jobs, working for rich people 
who could afford to pay her. Helen was a responsible and depend- 
able girl buying her own clothes with the »Qney she earned. As 
the eldest she did her best to contribute to the family helping 
with the housework and taking her brothers and sisters shopping 
on her day off to buy them clothes with her money. Despite the 
fact that the family was rather poor and her responsibilities -- 
were great, she was a happy person and had a cheerful outlook 
on life. 

Her parents were God-fearing and devout people but had 
little opportunity to socialize or attend church regularly. But 
the children were encouraged to attend and they went to both 
Salvation Army and Zion Lutheran. 

For approximately a year she worked as a housemaid and in 
1922 the family moved to 29^5 Bildahl St. purchasing five lots 
for 1^9 dollars. Once they moved here, Helen soon was hired as 



0.1 






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,B^1L no 
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a clerk at Eckaberg*s Dry Goods Store just dovm the street. Here 
her courting days began when Harry came to visit her one afternoon. 



Both Harry and Helen attended Young People's Society 
meetinf^ at First Mission Covenant Church. It was at an Ice Cream 
Social sponsored by the group that Harry first took serious notice 
of pretty Helen. Some time later he was helping his mother make 
a quilt when she mentioned that more cotton was needed. This was 
the perfect opportunity he thought to visit Helen at the dry goods 
store so off he went. They soon became attached to each o-^her 
and two years later were married. From February 1922 until their 
marriage they dated regularly. Every Saturday night found them 
doubling with another couple for an evening of good times. They 
loved to sing together for enjoyment, visit friends and stop at 
a restaurant for a snack. 

On August 30th in 1924 they were married by Rev. F.M. Johnson, 
the man who had married Harry's parents, in the home of a friend. 
Unlike most newly married couples they moved into their first and 
last home at 30OI Bildahl St. Harry had saved up 500 dollars 
and was able to have the ho\i?e built by a man who admired Harry 
for saving up such an amount for a young man. Of course they 
had little furniture to begin with besides a cedar chest, oak 
table and alot of boxes but they had time to purchase it in the 
years ahead. 

Helen continued to work part-time until the children came. 
Between 1925 and 193^^ four children were born to increase the 
Carlson family from two to six- three girls and one son. Harry 
worked a 7th St. Cash Grocery until 1927 when he left to run a 
bandsaw at Rockford National Furniture. In 1930 he was working 
under the government sponsored program - WorkdPfogress Administration 



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ncl^£.i^ainiabA aaan^altt^fioW - mat^oiq batoanoqa J^namnnavos Bdt tabmi 



doing some gardening and outside work in the parks and Sinnissippi 
greenhouse. In 1939 Harry secured a good job at V/hitney Metal 
and Tool in the shipping room as a receiving clerk. During World 
War II he was on guard duty there. Here he stayed imtil 1964 
when he retired after twenty- five years of service. In the 1950»s 
Helen wofcked as a sewing and alterations clerk and then in 1952 
became an employee of Brooke Road Laundromat where she rentined 
until 1967. 

In 1926 Harry got his first car, a 191? Ford for IS dollars. 
Then in 192? he bought a 192? Ford for 448 dollars with wore-spoked 
wheels. Harry, my grandfather remembers the radio as a feig box 
with open cover having ear phones to plug in. 

Once the grandchildren began coming Harry and Helen were 
affectionately known as Kormor and Grandpa. Monmor meant mother's 
mother in Swedish, grandpa has always enjoyed gardening, carpentry, 
and electrical work as his hobbies while Mormor enjoyed cooking, and 
sewing. Since 1948 they took their vacations up North to a lake. 

In 1964 they celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary. Several 
years later Mormor broke her hip bone while at the lake and the 
years ahead found her suffering setbacks and two strokes being 
in and out of the hospital. She died in 1970 but Grandpa continues 
to be well and healthy at 3001 Bildahl St. 



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»tZ IffBblia foot f» YfftlBarf brtB ILayt ad o^ 



Catherine Marie was born on July 10th in 1930, the second 
daughter to be born to Helen and Harry. She was a lively and 
good-natured young girl who added brightness and a zest for living 
to the Carlson family which soon grew to include another younger 
sister and brother. The house on Bildahl bustled with activity 
for the family now totaled six and with them lived Catherine's 
thjree aunts. ..,.., 

When Catherine was three months old the family acquired a 
dog whdch became her very own. Naming her dog Patches^ they 
grew up together and became good friends so it was a heartbreaking 
day when the d:og died. Catherine was sixteen so the attachment 
had been strong. But she had other interests too that kept her 
happily occupied. With brother, sisters, and neighborhood 
friends the favorite games were Kick the Can, Red Light, and New 
Orleans. She had lots of playmates including boyfriends from 
kindergarten up. 

The family had an average income considering these were the 
years of the depression so the money was spent wisely. She enjoyed 
playing with paper dolls making clothes from the pattern books 
that mother would bring home from the dry goods store where she 
worked. She also made clothes for her baby doll as well. With 
imagination she made a piano keyboard out of paper and as she 
listened to the radio she would pretend to play her piano. In 
seventh grade she was able to take real piano lessons which she 
thoroughly enjoyed. 

The children were raised according to Biblical principles 
in an atmosphere of love. The parents co-operatively disciplined 



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their children with Mom usually doing the talking with Father 
behind her. Catherine had jobs like the others in the family 
so she would help with the household chores particularly the 
dusting. Both parents felt it important to attend Sunday School 
and church so Catherine was active in the programs at First 
Mission Covenant Church. At a young age she was standing before 
the congregation giving her Christittsspiece for the annual 
Sunday School program. Of course she was scared but Dad had 
promis'^d her a box filled with her favorite candy-chocolate 
covered cherriesl This began a lifetime of church involvement 
using her musical talents. For several consecutive summers she 
went to the chiirch-sponsored camp for fun-filled weeks of activities. 

Holidays were spent at home with the family getting together 
with relatives for Christmas and occasional picnics. Family 
outings included trips to Chicago for a day. When Catherine 
was elever years old Dad bought a used Teraplane for the family 
car. 

At school Catherine was a bright and attentive pupil excelling 
in her work. The report cards she brought home consistently had 
good marks. At East High she was on the honor roll and inducted 
into the National Honor Society. But she still found time for 
extracurricular activities. While at Morris Kennedy she was a 
cheerleader in the eighth grade and as a senior at East she 
began dating the young man she later married. 

At thirteen she was working at Ken-rock Community Center 
for the summer as a playground supervisor receiving 150 an hour. 



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Her first part-time job was at Penney's^ here she was a clerk in 
the lingerie and hosiery department. From 19^8 to the fall of 
19^9 she was an employee of Third National Bank now the First 
National Bank working the bookkeeping machine as well as serving 
as a teller. With a friend she entered nurses* training at 
Swedish American Hospital but both remained there only six months 
when she got a job at Rehnberg-Jacobeen's as an office receptionist. 
She worked here for over a year and a half when she became the 
wife of Eric D. Johnson. 



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.fioanrtol, .a ol-xS lo 9l;iw 



PART III 

A. My parents life together 

B. My life-Sally Kay Johnson 



Hi THAq 



Actively involved in the young peoples program at First 
Covenant Church Dave and Catherine frequently participated in 
the saae socials held for the group. In 19^7 while munching on 
1^ doughnuts Dave took particular notice of Catherine asking if 
he might use her fingernail file. However it wasn't until April 
1st, 19^8 that they had their first date together attending the 
East High Dolphin Show. They dated steadily from this time forward 
when on March l6, 1950 they were engaged on a beautiful moon- lit 
evening. One and a half years later, November 23rd, 1951 they 
were married at First Covenant. 

After a honeymoon in Florida they returned to Rockford, living 
in an apartment at 1808 Rural Street for six months. While here 
they purchased their first television set which drew a crowd of 
friends the first nighty eager to watch this new invention. Then 
they moved to l6l4 Second Ave* i- where they settled permanently. 
Dave continued to work at the shop while Catherine kept busy as 
a homemaker. Soon they began a family becoming the parents to 
four children, Sally, Chris, Scott, and Kelli. Both have been 
very involved in church work since their marriage as members and 
serving as Sunday School teachers, youth counselors, and holding 
leadership positions. 

Both Mom and Dad have enjoyed their married life together 
and agree mutually that "the while thing has been funl" In I960 
Dad bought a farm and kept busy in his spare time planting soya- 
beans and corn having cows, horses and chickens to feed and buildings 
to repair. However this got to be too much work since we didn't 
live on it so it was sold in 196?. 



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•Vd^l nl bloe sbw ti oa tl no 9vll 



Beginning to collect antiques as a hobby, the pastime has 
now developed into a small business for Mom and Dad. Interested 
in a variety of articles especially cut glass and painted dishes 
they have accumulated enough items to open a shop of their own 
in the Jenny House on State Strv€f appropriately naming their 
shop Memory Lane. This has proven to be an interesting as well 
as time consuming enterprise but enjoyable work for them. 

Both of my parents love to travel so the family has been 
on many lovely trips. Mom loves historic sights so we've seen 
several famous spots including Williamsburg and Washington D.C 
Dad loves to fish as well as my brothers so we all have relaxed 
at resorts in Canada. 

They have been married twenty-three years and yet their love 
for each other is still clearly evident to me^growing dailyl 



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On October 2oth in 1952 my life as Sally Kay Johnson, began, 
the first child to be born to Dave and Catheiine. The years 
ahead found me growing up at l6l4 Second Ave. welcoming two 
younger brothers and a sister into the family. I have many pleasant 
memories of my childhood years receiving an abudance of love, 
patient instruction, and practical advice. Between church, 
school, and the neighborhood I had lots of friends. Favorite 
activities while in gra* school included gathering the neighborhood 
gang as pupils for my school, keeping kool-aid stands, and playing 
house in the dollhouse my father had built especially for me. 
In the summer I at^kended church camp on Lake Geneva and spent 
several weeks with ray gratimother in Merrill. 

Growing up in the church I was singing in the children's 
choirs and attending youth programs regularly. When I was in 
first grade I began piano lessons which I continued until high 
school getting my first taste of performing before crowds in 
recitals and piano competition. 

I earned my allowance by doing assigned jobs around the 
house always doing a little bit extra around the holidays to 
earn some money for Christmas shopping. I have always been 
disciplined with love by both parents upon Christian guidelines, 
so our family has revolved around Christian principles. 

Holid^s have been joyous, happy occasions getting together 
with both sides of the family for Thanksgiving and Christmas 
as well as picnics and birthday celebrations. On Christmas 
Day our family of 6 usually opens their gifts to each other 



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and have a delightful Christmas breakfast together. Weeks before 
we bake dozens of cookies and candy as well as breads. On 
New year's Eve we stay up until at least midnight to welcome 
in the new year having a late evening snack while a warm fire 
is roaring in the fireplace and the Christmas tree Mghts cast 
a cozy glow over the room. As a family we enjoy celebrating 
the events of the year creating a festive meal for Valentine's 
Dayt Easter, Fourth of July and birthdays. 

I followed in my father's footsteps attending Jackson, 
Lincoln* and East for my school education. In my senior 
year at East I held by first part-time job as a dental assistant. 
Then in the fall of 1970 I left Rockford for the busy city 
of Chicago to attend Moody Bible Institute located in the heart 
of the city. Here I remained for three years dropping out between 
by first and second years to work full time as a dental assistant 
in Rockford, tired of a rigorous school schedule. However I missed 
my friends and was eager to return within a year and complete 
my education, in the field of Christian education. Although 
the work was overwhelming at times I enjoyed the companionship 
of f Attends, finding restaurants to visit and places to see in 
the big city. As a member of Women's Glee choir I want on 
several tours as far as Florida, Canada, and New York. 

Durino; my second year I met a young man who was in several 
of my classes and we began dating. Our first date included 
watching a basketball game and taking an evening walk to the 
lake, the first of many walks we took while at school. We 
continued to see each other the entire time there until graduation. 

Ill ...^yjv year I was elected by the student body to 



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represent the women of the school on the Student Council co- 
ordinating the activities for the women in particular. 

In May of 197^ I graduated with honors and returned to 
Rockford. When fall came I found myself busy at several different 
things- teaching nursery school in the mornings as an assistant, 
cftlerking at Memory Lane and a Hallmark card shop part-time and 
taking a history course at Rock Vailey College. 

Of course, I have still been seeing my boyfriend Dave 
although miles separate us as he attends Trinity College in 
Deerfield but on November 24th, 197^ after twenty-one months 
£f dating I became his fiancee when we became an engaged couplel 
This is my life up to the present time. 



..aisiiiiiiM 



lllS SlS^ORY^^"'''" ''^'''' ^"''' '"'"''' ^' '"' ''°'^ "^ ^"^ S^^OND COPY OF YOUR 
ear Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and 
thers studying American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
^w. This will take you only a few minutes, and will be easily made over 
nto an index which will permit archive users ready access to just those 
inds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



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Date of for m /^ P(^ \\ ""7 , i g ^ 7 

(ID // ) 

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Rockford, Illinois 

Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 

Before 1750 1750-1800 1800-1850 



y 1850-1900 1900 or later 

Please check all regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

New England (Mass ., Conn. ,R. I . ) Middle Atlan t ic (N . Y . , Penna . , N.J 



Va.) South Atlantic (Ga . ,Fla. ,N .C . ,S .C . ) East South Central 

(La . ,Miss . ,Ala. ,Tenn,Ky .) y Wast South Central (Ark . ,N .M . ,Tex ., Ok . ) 

East North Central (Mich ., Ohio , Ind . ) Pacif ic (Cal . , Wash . ) 

(Hawaii, Alaska) _X (111 . . Wise.,) 

Please check all occupational categories in which members of your 
family whom- you have discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming X^ Mining Shopkeeping or small business 

Transportation Big Business Manufacturing 

Professions x' Industrial Labor X Other .^//<r/V?/^r^ 



Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 

X Roman Catholic Jewish Presbyterian Methodist 

Baptist Episcopalian Congregational X Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon Other Protestant Other (name) 



What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

y^ Swedish Other Scandinavian German French 

Blacks Indiana Mexicans Puerto Ricans Eastern Europ 



Jews y Central Europeans Italians Slavs 

"Irish British Native Americans over several generations 

East Asian Other(Name) 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other Family Bibles X Family Genealogies 

family members Land Records The U.S. Census 

A V italRecords 

)^ Photographs Maps Other 



i 



FAMILY DATA 2 

A. Grandfather (your father's side ) 

Name Ccij-. r; |(, f:,,; \ C^v^n:.— '. Current Residence 

Date of birth Aoco-.r -«.0, I g,h^ Place of b ir th U^c g>^,, , :^,^,^Aa^ 

Date of death a.....,-.t a^ . . :| -■ ^ Place of burial ':^Rt....^To/> C^^^-i^., 

Education (number of years); 

grade school B high school vocational - tiollege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Is 1 11«;,t^.n;sr So^sTgiS^r^ Dates t^v5 - I'i^b' Is t v;>iv "T^st Dates ihc ■> - ^■y/'j." 

2nd fV\i\\C^yxA^, Cv^T^?A.> AA.P ^ates I'^ii.'- .^Mi 2nd I J '^ ft^^ Dates 'I'g - lUS 

3rd f^/^cWiApT \j.nsr"AA.rj Dates ' Am -■< ■"'• 3rd 3-3/vc) ^T. Dates 'fji.-^ '1 i/ 

4th Dates 4th 1 'I St " pates h^H — » 

R e 1 i g i o n |^v-,Tv^^R.a/>^' 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



C - (.■ T ^ v\\ L r; v v •" ? >^ ^^ ' i - ( y, c »i -_ \ G.fc<-->s") i c-^pI e.- ' 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother Q>.. \ov'.i ^.- v . ri. date ^ '-■' ■j Sij i ^ i,^ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name SerlKo Cp'c-"i(//> £p><cKS':->^ Current Residence fiockJO'^d 



Date of birth vjAAu^-a-^ b". ^ ^ 'W Place of birth GoTgg>of<^ . S»~»>g<jj--> 
Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high; school vocational 

c o 1 1 e g e 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Kov-'jg ^egpfi- Dates n>0-''=[H 1st K^.^.g. Dates . ^<g -if)/ 

2nd Roctrr^rr! HciPiT^/ Dates ^y/Z-^y/a 2nd 7^" ^^ Dates 'I't-/'//^ 

3rd Dates 3rd s.^^c ; > -»"■ ., Dates ^>-^ - -^ ^ /??/e 

4 th Dates 4 th Dates 

Religion L-Tl^e-'^"^^ 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc.__ _ 



^ • O (:-, T -^--^ Tr'-xM''-'^ IC 



,jr,l Orpm ot Gci-c' le^VlPlcri- 



Place of marriage to your ^grandfather /3^^) ^£..'c«-f ;-/. date |-"^/y J'^ , \^^iQ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (i:o age 18) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on the back of this page 
(A-2) . 



A-2 S tepgrandf ather (your father's side) 



Name 



Current Residence 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 

c V. 1 1 e g e 



Occupation (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



"Rel igion 



Da tes 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



_lst_ 

_2nd_ 
3rd 
4th 



voca t ional 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

D ate s 

Dates 

D a t e s 

Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 

B-2 S tepgrandmo ther (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 



date 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school_ 

college 



vocational 



Occupa t ion (s ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 
Da tes 



_lst_ 
_2nd_ 
_3rd_ 
4 th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



C. Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name/T?/c/i/^e< /l^/lTo/> V^KlWr. Current Residence 



Date of birth \^>'^'^-^ iS'i^P. "? P^ are^ nf ^^ r f-h '^' ^e^ . 

—^ i V; ■ -^-' f rxace ot birth RA^t^tAJi^n J .ThWKy^.^ 

4| Date of death y^/v^ck H, <S(<^0 Place of burial lObhoUAok^^^ C>/vif ?>»/?>/ 

Education (number of years): 

grade school O^ high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

r , iia-iiio ^ (after leaving home) 

1 s t ^TOCKVARciS D ate s nofemo-? 1 s t CK\c»a.^c. D ate sJ^o^__JJ_c^ 

2nd fV\\ntr Da tes hc^ - I ^ c<t 2nd ^-^r•^'^^>' Dates flog- .^i-» 



3rd H»(jorrr5 'p,/:.^o C. Dates ■ uc - ^3^ 3rd ' i"'"' -•>' Dates i^i3 



4th r/^ATSto/> /Y\ncUvo^ Dates n3^-n60 4th Cc-^ -■ ;< q Dates / -7 5 i - /fVS 

Religion (_aTWc^C ' 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother Sr P.-t^.. »Ro t cu.^ ^, date r^; ■,,„j,a 7^ /y// 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepfather or another relative (to 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C-1) ■ 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

llame ff\fH^^ JoiepV\)A-e tii^tr}i>rf\ PeTro;.ki Current Residence rl o<^k fori! 



Date of birth /Ylogck i^ . t ^ 9 c/ Place of birth OGLCS6'f, tUl^lLjS 

Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school ^ high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st HouSP k>^.»Di>i(i Dates hog ~/9Ji 1st Ho>- .g s st.^ k.-.^ Dates i-}c<i-ii// 

2nd fiug5a/\ k^^itTina Co, Dates "'"/f"// - /</// 2n 

3 r d 1^6 X r/0-.Tc-<7 D ate s s/.c^/^/., 

4th Dates 



2nd 




Dates ^sii - 


A/. - 


.3rd 


Dates 




4th 


Dates 





R e 1 1 g 1 o n C/^T>^ot)c 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandfather St. P.-T.^f. il P^a. I Cht;j'ch Date ^/_c= T,q^t! 1, 'qfj 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to 
^fe' - '^> gStV^ <*«^*di«»-'oW' tWe back of this page (D-2) 



C-2 S tepgrandf ather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

Place of birth 



Date of birth_ 
Date of death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupation (s) 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of burial 



vocational 



col lege 



1st 
_2nd_ 
_3rd_ 

4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
D-2 S tepgrandmo ther (your mother's side) 

Name 

Date of birth 

Date of death 



Date 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



Occupa t ion (s ) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 
Dates 



Current Residence 
Place of birXih 



Place of burial 



voca tional 



college_ 



.1st 
2nd_ 

.3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandfather^ 



Date 



1 



CHILDREN of A & B (or A-2 or B-2) - your father's name should appear below 



1. Name CCj^RC.c^f^^r 

Place of birth Rcd^Por 



J0U/^Scv^ L-CsPt'S c - 



date QPP.lL .3. lc/,3 

JO< Occupation 



2. 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence RcrJi^Pc^A Marital Status mAF^Ric^n 

Number of children ^ Death 



Name 3 ^ Jo' lA Q dV\.-A3o •> 



Place of birth ftocKFc'-^c^ 



Number of years of schoolinj 



date lv.->^re/v)f^t-^ t3, iqltf 



Occupation 



Reside nc e 

Number of children 



Marital Status 



D e a t h /^e-*^ r v ^^\^ 



/9a^l. 



Name S (? \t f^ i^ Jc^U-^u-.n Q^aA^l 
Place of birth ^f?cck,^^i <j 



/ .3 



Number of years of schooling_ 

Residenc e ^^o<i\<tcp^} M arital Status 



date /yi/»v 6y '93Q 
Occupa tion 



Number of children 



Death aPKii >3, '9t^' 



ON a m e 3^*1 TtL j^^. U o/, <^ SC/^_ _ _, 
Place of" birthJ^eckfo&D. 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence /^ack:-^cn 



/■3. 



Number of children 



J4- 



d ate Dgc;gfvi^f^. J 6, t<^ (z 

ccupatio a_$VL£j;j2S^_£i__ 

Marital Status /y>/>^p ,f>.^! 

d eat h JimJ ^s ^ { - ' iU:^ 



Name 



Place of birth 

Number of years of schoolin; 



date 



Occupation 



Residenc e 

Number of children 



Marital Status 
Death 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling_ 
Res idence 



ccupatio n_ 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Number of children 



date 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



date 



Number of children 



Marital Status_ 
death 



Occupation 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Nombcr of years of schoolin} 



Residenc e 

Number of children 



Marl tal Status 
death 



Name 



Place of birth 

Number of years of schoolin; 
Residence 



date 



Occupation_ 



Number of children 



Marital Status 

death 



Occupa tion_ 



7 
CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 

1. Name Pllex. Yji,oMu-^ 

Place of birth a'cva:^..-.^ ^ ate ScYTB^df^ ^ Jy A//<^ /rxr<w<r<« 

Number of years of schooling /^ Occupation /Yt'^ihi^'.'iT' 

Res idence j^ , ii/<<<^ vj-'i(<-v Marital Status ^/»74/<^,<=t< ^ 

Number of children V death J^/^^:na^ fi^ I'^iS' % 

2. Name t^'AfT-tf^ V^ukvyS 



Place of birth g.^c kf^^.-.<i date /yiA.^^M >^"7, /^//V 

Number of years of schooling ^ Occupat ion L'Pnr,/>n'^f <^ f^O^ ox) Uea 

Residence M^i^-.^'^* rif». Marital S ta tus_^-vi,iiij;£j:i 

Number of children f.i death 

/^3/^ Name Cr fe y e v/ •' fv.^ ^ )/-^\ji;u:, <Jc^^ ^^^^ 

^— ^ Place of birth RccL .> g date D.^.^mA,.' ^> Z-^^? 

Number of years of schooling / V Occupation s.-iw^iPno^;/ 

Residence P,c<^^.rJ Marital Status />?/j^^ ,>>d 

Number of children // death 

A . Name >-'.:.,j^</ y^A^k^j 

Place of birth I'^f.cK Pl^.^ date AJc^'^.v/)i< /?i '^7-^7 ^ o/e-/'/«r« 

Number of years of schooling /J Occupation '^^^'"-^^ "^f-.n »o . 

Residence /.^.; A-»^eif\ C<*. Marital Status 3/^j^t 

Number of children death 

5. Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence__ Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death ^ 



Name^ 

Place of birth^ date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence_ Marital Status 

Number of children- death 



Name 

Place of birth ^date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation_ 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children v death 



10. Name 



Place of birth date_ 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



8 
Your Father 

Name R^ rT^ Sd ^^A JpJ^^^c-^ ^Current Residence tj<,,o Scvo.,.. T^.ck fr,^^ 

Date of birth [^^f^^r^^^^ \fc, /9.>?fc Place of bitth f^c^MFoq /-^ 

Date of Death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school g highschool C/ vocational ,. college r 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

n -r r 1? k_ (after leaving home) 

1st Hflfig, , -Yov,^i-^Sa>..M>'^'*'l 'ates /'7V7- /^^g Ist VvU.. (h,,,.,,, Dates A»7- /j^-^^ 

2nd CiTN nJ^ticAAi /^o/,/< Dates /yyy- /^i? 2nd -:;J /-/ //"^ f;- RKpO Dates w^i"- ifjT 

,3rd cJ^^tJ^'^^..., c.r. r^S'^'^' iiates /96P- /m 3rd /vc-J J^^,,. p^r,^. Y)ates ■ y ss-^y^J- 

Athif^cclrFoec) Jr..,.;^>^o - Da tes Z/^^-::^ 4 th Vf /c .W.- ^r/c. . ytyCAZ) - Dates A/^^--9 

R e 1 i g i o n ^u ~hf^/i^/ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother <;-. BOlO■^v^^t C^.,, .. date Ju->^ e-y ( ^ '-^ 



NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that dat; 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name G>c^,- \/ ^S'ue- jLuciU X^SlkuS Current Res idence W'^/g J^ v.^;r''^eie.-i- |?c c/n'/^c? J 

Date of birth <C.rr'f^^<r>^ y, /f^7 Place of birth ^d:ckfo^/2> 



Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade s chool_____g^ highr school V vocational ^^ college ^ 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Ist WoUv/Vlt^. t\o<P. Ch,<.>^:. Dates y/^7- 7/^7 1st /^--7 /^ /^,./..^ C>/. Da tes A./7- ■ W 

2nd Ckuo^/; Cov.^. cim/c ' Dates /^'y^ - /fV/ 2nd ^^.^■'7 / / '^' }l /?/<'fi> Hates >^:,y JvSy 

3rd CoP.^iV ^li^ic ' ' Dates /fV^- /H'/ 3rd /^or lT^^u) ^ Dates ."^rpi'/^'' 

4 th QroAdw'A.^ C l/yy/.c RKFO. D a t es /</s'/ — r 4 th Vy/'- j'tx^iggC/a --^ ' D a t es 'm —^ 

Religion Lv^tV^^rAA. 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, et( 



Place of marriage to your father ^T c^i .^ .,!•, Ci.^^.k date p^ ^^ c- , iyn 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the kack of this page (F-2). 



E-2 Stepfather 
Name 



Date of birth Place of birth 



Date of death Place of burial | 

Education (number of years) 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2 n d D a t e s 2 n d D a t e s 

3 r d D ate s 3 r d D a t e s 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your mother Date 

F-2 Stepmother 
Name 



Date of birth Place of birth 



Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school high school vocational college 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1 s t D ate s 1 s t D ate s 

2 n d_ D a t e s 2 n d D ate s 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your father date 



10 



CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2,F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 
Name Sfu^f /^,ch/>e/ CJcJ^/^Jo^ 



Place of birth ^n^tFreo Date of birth J^iy (i m£^ 

Number of years of schooling ij Occupation 



Residenc e j-lo r kP.-,^.' 
Number of children 



Marital Status s,Taj<: it 
death 



Name TrA/v/WU^ Jjs^^^ ^.ovv^c.^ 

Place of birth Dcm<<:.^.-'^ Date of b ir th i:^^, ,^^.,., <, < y^- s ~ 

Number of years of schooling / <^ Occupation 

Residenc e Htp iC/a .K 



Number of children 



Marital Status 5<Vi^>e 
death 



Name iVvenf' ^C£ ^o'-^i>-e- vJoU<>5 6/^ 

Place of birth 'Pc^uachc, Date of b ir th /t/^i.7.^^apK '^,lfS(, 

Number of years of schooling /S Occupation 

Residence '^ockCccO Marital Status Su^^/f 

Number of children death 



Name ChfTORO C^'.^'Ta <JoV/^^6 ^ 

Place of birth R(oc/</'o-'.n Date of b i r t h A^-^'^/i>/>^vp 7, /^6J 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence (^ fcrtfi-'c^J ^Marital Status 3 />7j/f 

Number of children death 



Name 



Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Occupation_ 



Number of children 



death 



Name 



Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Occupation 



Number of children 



death 



Name 



Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Occupa tion 



Number of children 



dea th 



Name 



Place of b ir th 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Occupation 



Number of children 



death 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public Library, Rockford 
Illinois . . 



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LIST OF SOURCES 

I. Interviews 

A, Certha tirickson Johnson Larson (grandmother) 

B, {,fery Petroski Yankus (grandmother) 

C, Bertil E. Johnson (father) 

D, Genevieve Yankus Johnson (jaotlier) 

II. Dociiments 

A. Birth Certificates 

B. Iriffiiigration Papers 

C. iilarriage Licenses 

D. Death Certificates 

E . Photographs 



BVfBjtVTtfcv 

('xsrliovtiiTsis) floeruJ xtouufcu ooejiotrzH suUttsU .A 

VMgffl aolcffi'XgJjianI .0 



PREFACE 

The follovdjig famil^j'- history has many dates in it. The accuracy 
of some of thein is approximated e.g. the d-'tes ■5\rhen both graddparents 
moved. This is due to the ar;iount of houses and the short period of 
time they lived in oach and also failure of memory in some cases. 
Although the inajority of homes frere listed I excluded the mention 
of the homes they lived at v/hile building new ones etc. for the 
reason that they lived ttere only three or four months at the most. 

Little is knoim about the early lives of both my grandfathers as tney 
died before I v^as born. V,i;at information that is there \ras obtained 
from the knowledge of isy grandmothers. 

The photocopies at the end ai*e various documents belonging to aembers 
of the family. The photogi'aphs are of direct descendants back to iiyr 
great grandparents, excluding ny great grandparents on niy father's 
side. 



^Ktjc^x u^T mil al a«^a£> jfum Bsd "c^o&alA xLbul sobmllol edT 

•Jn«iaqjji J rterim tatiab arii as.o ba^AoJbxoiqqfi ei o^iLt 1o qbob lo 

lo boti»<7 I'mlB ad.} fans aourorl lo inroos ed^ (X^ ^ :^ ^JuiT .bevon 

• ••aAd amoa oi x'tonaiu Ic aVfXial o«Is !Ma rfOAe oi VtvJLC x<)<^ ^"^^ 

nol^ttAn ^^ t bafauXaxs T ba^air c.•Y..^. ..AOMMf lo t^lrcotan asU d^odtlA 

&..C ... .:;^ aano osn sftlhl. .:m ia berril "Sfiiii eamod odt lo 

^^gtm •f^f ^'- ni+f*"-!^ T.-jn^ fn "Viifrfi^ vrrtn fyr:-iKi OBvtf Vriifi .■; Rif+ frri;::;nt 

DBdl aa BVafUali iiod lo earlX xfiAe sriJ ^uoda xnvctial ei alJ^tiJ 

baalaMo aav enad^ ai iarf^ noi<tasrxolxii ^a<f* •a'sod aa>f I dioloif boib 

.siaddOfiibnjs'zs 'Vt lo a^balxTufd etli^ sctl 

aiadaam oi laJLyKxIotf a^naatfoob i;-.^ ^. — ^ooo^rudq erlT 

^ oi Jiaad ataaliaaoeab <toeaib lo a'xa adqaiso^adq adT .^clJual edJ- lo 
a'ladial •ygK no •dna'saqbriso?. ieens x^ gaiixrloxs , einaiaqbrusn;^ ^foarQ 



Edgar Karl JOHNSON was born near V/aring, (Varing), 1-Vestergotland, Svreden, 
on August 30, 1888, His father left for Aioerica vihen he vfas one year old. 
His mother then moved in with her parents and young Edgar grew up v;ith his 
grandparents, mother, brother, Gottfrid, and a yovuag foster child that his 
mother adopted. 

He vfas very smart in school and the teacher persuaded him to go on to college 
but he had no money and couldn't go. After he quit school he went and worlaed 
on neighboring farms until he decided to move to Aiaerica. 

He arrived in America in 190^, going directlj'' 'to Rockford and lived with an 
■uncle here. His uncle got him a job in a furnitxore shop but he did not 
get the feel of wood and quit after a month. He started working in various 
machine shops around tavm until he got a job at Rockford ililling Machine Cq, 
which later became Sundstrand Corp. He vms working there whan he joined the 
Good Terapler's Lodge on Seventh St. (a temperance lodge), and met Bertha 
ERICKSON. 



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Bertha Cecilia EHICESON was born on January 5, l69ii, in Goteborg, Sweden, 
She v/as the daughter of Emmanuel Erickson, born l051i, a laason in Goteborg, 
and Yiilheminia Vallin, born in I85h, a clerk at the Grand Hotel also in 
Goteborg. Thay lived in a house on the side of a mountain that looked down 
onto the main part of the city and the -^cean. 

Vftien she was old enough Bertha started attending public school. The first 
tv:o years of school was called small school. From 8 a.m. to 5 p»m., six 
days a vreek children went to classes learning reading, writing, arithmetic, 
sewing or carpentry, and religion. After small school came first, second, 
third, fourth, fifth and sixth grades. In these years they would attend 
the same classes but also now tiiey vsould get one period of music a week, and 
attend gym class every day for an hour. In gym they would do vario\is exercises 
climb ropes, and vault over leather vaulting horses. Once a vreek during the 
yrinter the class ^irould vfalk davm. to the market and take their weekly bath. 
In the squares there would be a sauna bath, t/here they would sit arri sweat 
and then go into a swimming pool, svriM av/hile and then get out and that 
would be their bath. 

After school. Bertha, vrould have to go to the market and buy the family's 
dinner and food for the next day. This she did everyday because they had 
no iceboxes. 

Living on the mountain she became quite close v/ith the other children on her 
street and %vhen she vrasn't going to school in the slimmer Bertha and iier friends 
would either play in the mountains, siviin in the ocean, vratch the boys play 
soccer, or play vrhat they called "round ball", a copy of Aiiierica's baseball. 

Bertha did not finish all eight years of school. She quit after the fourth 
year to get a job in a sewing factory. She vrarked there two years uintil her 
brother- in- lav/- sent her a ticket to Anerica. In 1910 she secured her 



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immigration papers from ths pastor of her church and at the age of sixteen 
set sail on the Vernia for Anierica. Her sister's husband lived in Rockford 
but knev/ that the entry for immigrants vrere a lot easier in Boston than at 
Ellis Island so he sent her a ticket to Boston, V.Tien she arrived in Boston 
it took her only fifteen minutes to go tlirough the procedures. They checked 
her eyes, asked her is she had any I'elatives or a job to go to and if so 
checked if they had enough money and let her through. She v/ent directl;y' to a 
train that \vas going to Rockfoid, Fearing that she might get lost she never 
got off the train until she readied here. 

At a stopover in Buffalo, Bertha was sitting next to a v.'indovv -vvhen a young 
man came by and started talking to her. Living in Goteborg, v/hich -vras a vrorld 
trade center, she had picked up a feiiT scraps of English, VHien this young 
fellow started talking to her she replied vilth the only vrords she knew, yes, 
o,k. and you bet. After avrhile the felloy/ scratched his head and walked av;^ay 
in confusion, 

V/hen Bertha finally arrived in Rockford, she got a job keeping house for a 
Jewish family. Only earming ^32 a week vfith room and board, she quit after 
six months and found another family to -^TOrk for. Later in 1911, she started 
work at Rockford Hospital doing practical nvirsing and serving in the doctor's 
cafeteria. She vrarked tliere a little less than a year earning $S a week 
working eveiy day of the week. This is v/hen she met Edgar JOHNSON, 



OK 4i iB boa da'waio itad lo 'soiesq oiii ann!! ert8q«q noli»r»JiNP. 

i.' tomtit -x^H tssiiacuA lol aJbnaeV oiicf oo IIaq i«m 

aotaofl ol torlTSi wte osrfv; .no^sotl o^ ^eatoiJ^ s rod itnsa ed oe bnaltl ^±1£S 

OR ^. )s o^ dot ^ *<<> aevi,tAloi x^ t>*'^ ^^ ^^ ""^ baataa ^esnc^ ted 

B oi adS •d;g«ro'ali imd iel bait \aaosa 48tfO(ui had tttdt li Uioloarfo 

rtlBti «ld^ llo *08 

hi "ioQ al yLhrJLl .:c9ii o^ spJblX.Bi b0<hc»te bcu "^ etoBo asm 

i>iU.o>. 6. ,^ .:ii.. .JatlyiM lo aqi&^oe wol u qu b«nla±q bad orbv jtwtix^o abtni 

,«acal «U «/b^tor ^^o 9di tiiJtm bolXqart 9d> .' ? 

a lo"* fwt^'* 5nJtqe«3l dot « ^08 a«^ <f«olaIooH nl berrl- 

,« bififvf Jrwa MooTi riiJtw iMV a S$ gatA-M© t/wO .xLbMft d&twal. 

^ wte ,. . ul ^'Wir o;t xiClioal -u 'dl iMM atitnon xls 

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Harnr s ?5 -jnlfner? -'^^. ?. fTBrtt (»-«I <«I#^.H » mniii brnftow en3 .aln»d-elao 



Edgar Karl JOHNSON and Bertha Cecilia ERICISON were married by a Justice 
of the Peace in Beliidere, Illinois, on July 28, 1912. They had met a 
year earlier at the Good Tenplar's .[jodge but could not get married right 
a-aay. Bertha load to keep her job and pay back her sister for the ticket. 
TiThen they did get married they moved into Edgar's uncles apartment on 
Seventh Street. He vras going to move back to Sweden and needed to sell 
his furniture. Edgar took him up on the deal and they moved in. They lived 
there a fevi years until Ilargaret was born on April 2, 1913. Then the need 
of a bathroom forced thera to move to a house in Eighth Street. Tliere tliey 
lived until a house ivas built in x"rarit of theia and they had no front yard. 
With a grovjlng child they needed a yard so ttiey rented a second floor flat 
on Sixteenth Street. The floors Virere so cold v.dth just s'uOvg heat and 
Margaret caught the I'shooping cough so they moved to T\Telveth Avenue. This 
house had gas, electricity and a bathroom. Tliey lived -ohere for ten jears. 
While living there they had Sylvia, theia^ second child on September 13, 1916, 
She conti-acted diphteria during the vdnter of 1919 and died in February of 
1920. Tv70 years later Erna v/as born on Llay 6, 1922. 

In 1925 Edgar quit at Sundstrand's and started working as a milkman for 
Central Dairy. In I926 they moved to Fifteenth Avenue and then Bertil 
vras born on December 16, of that year. In 1928 they bought their first 
home. It vras on Bvranty -second Avenue. They lived there sijc years until 
the bank forclosed the mortgage on it in 1932. From then until I9U0 they 
lived in two different houses. In 19hO thgy bousjht their second house on 
South Fourth Street. They lived here nine years until they bxiilt a liouss 
on Ti'fenty -si;:th Street which was the end of vhe moving. 

Amidst all the moving around they vrere quite active socially. "Vfe vrere 
always busy on weekends" says Bertha. Being member of the Good Templar's 
Lodge there vrere alvrays picnics or gatherings eveiT" vreekend. These vrere 



-ji\t B ^ btimm fl^**. oJtXiaea adL^s■e bos lOSHHOl. litSt tv^b^l 

^ ,f^ b^tii y^a^n .SL' iX t» ^r. \ v'. ttl: momit'i sM ' 

*o8 &QC- -<i esboJ »*mXqpBe7 be tatXTJi© -laex 

i e.-f* •m'^ TB'&mi^ ted jloacf x»«I •«» ''•t "wl ^l"*"* o^ ^^^ ad^efl .-<cbmd 

no ^ alatm s'lagbS a^nl beYoo te^^'^ baltTtaca <^»a bib -<cailt nari^V 

£iee ol bebeen boa aabewg o^ ifosd eiroa o;^ lM»S b*^ ^^ .^ei;.t8 iffneTDc. 

'^v.»C ▼©•IT ,nt betooi ^^jMf^ bn» limb Mil n^ foocs tesh"^' .ou/Jin-ml «lri 

Gffl oi mmI:) b««ntol cio<rtcri:tc; 
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.>o oe » mm srtooS . . 

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to": amdiUF. '•'■^tJ iB3ba ^S^I nl 

CDO •auoa i3Cto&«« xltMiJ JA^iHud 'ij^ o,J^i al .i^^-^iai Ji-u^tdlUb okj nl bavll 

aavo t IlAw VVMIL on^i •''•'^ b0Jtl x>riT .io«>tt^8 jIiHuoH rl^tfo2 

.yttvtM wi^ to bn» «di ooir lio-t/nr i^Aon^S dJxia x^nowT no 

vtar r- i.9o< •vi^a* Y^r^^ haucnm goivoa axil ILb <tebJbiA 

' ^c ladtacM ., ^a "etaoBfaow no xn*^ 8-ia>iIs 



held in Cherry Valley where the Lodge ovmed some land near the Kishwaukee 
River. The faiaily v;ould hop into the 1920 Ford Sedan and take the only- 
paved road in tovm, Cliarles Street, arid ride to tixe picnic, vrnen the 
children vfere old enoiigh they would drive up to either Lake Delevan or Lake 
Geneva in souldiem Y/isconsin for ST/iiamii^, camping and picnics. 
In IQlil Edgar quit as milkman and \ras rehired at Sundstrands as a machinist. 
He Tforked there until his death Augiist 23, 1953. All the children had been 
married by that time. November 1955, Bertha married John L. Larson, a 
Swedish iimnigrant who lived in Chicago, -VThich she had met on a trip back 
to Sweden. Erna died April 3, 19^5, and John died iiarch 19, 1976. Bertha 
navr eighty-three years old still lives at l5l6 26th Street with her pet cat 
Smokey. 



ttmiitarrriMt^ tiU taaa html actoe beOKo ss^>oJ oad stotta yflllaW xnaiiO at hLod 
^£«B s vb»a bra»1 OSRI e od fkLxiw x^Jhuil odT •■wviH 

,.^s. Mt2 aalrtalO ^OHDi nl b«oi bsvaq 

"Mi o^vitL^ 6iiA^ 'iAtijlu oJ qu avlib fadO/ow xo^ti ffy/one bio srtam neihllds 

.^oiiialq bnfi yxicposo ^s^^lnajhra lol ntanoaalW nrcail^t/oB nl svsneO 

.^elaliisiflM « M atxistinbauZ Sb bemhleri «ar Imu uau^ha sa ^lup isab^ Itii^I nl 

oaed b«d antliilo wli HA •C^I ,CS ^w/s"A rftfaeb bM lHau enoiU: becltam eH 

ioad ((H# M ao iaa b«d »<l8 tioMw ^d^^BoltiO al bevlX oriir txtBTs^hml dslbevrB 

kditeS .dy^I ,91 riaruM belb adol. bos «^X ^C ItsqA btlb amS. .nebewe oi 

Ho J«q varf il#lir ^•eo^B lUdS dX^ ^ MTtX Ui^e bio 8tMX esorU-x^iisle noa 

mXEolomZ 



Bertil Edgar JOHNSON was born December l6, 1926, at St. Anthony Hospital 
in Rockford, Illinois. He lived on Fifteenth Ave. a short time until his 
family moved to 90? Twenty-second Avenue. He attended P, A. Peterson School 
on Eighth Street till lie was eight j'ears o3,d. The family moved to 1615 10th 
Avenue and then he attended Hallstom School on Seventeenth Avenxie. Amidst 
all the moving he ctaj-ed at ITallstrom School until he finished sixth grade. 
He attended Lincoln Jr. High School on Charles Street. vTien he vras twelve 
he started v/orking part time after school at a grocery store. He then found 
a job as cxirb hop at the Rockette Drive Inn on Fifteenth Avenvie next to the 
Rock River. The Rockette -was the first drive inn in Rockford and Bert vrould 
make fifteen cents an hour plus tips. On a good night he v/ould get thirty- 
five cents in tips he cou!l.d then buy tvfo hamburgers and a malt for an after 
work snack. During high school at East iligh, Bert worked suiraners at J. C, 
Penney and various industrial plants in tcnm including J. L. Clark. 

Graduating from East High in Januaiy of I9i45, Bert vsas drafted into tlis ia'siy 
on Marc'ix 21+, 19h$' He was sent to Cais^ Rucker, Alabama, and took infantry 
training. Ke vras sent to Okinawa in September, 19h$» Once there he was 
promoted to staff sargent and served in the medical supply depot. By tb:ls 
tine the vrar had ended and he was discharged December 6, 19)46. 

In January I9U7, he moved to Chicago to the Y.'l.CA. and started work at 
Harris Trust and Savings Bank. He vforked as a clearing house clei'k and 
his duties were to collect and separate the checks Dhe bank had taken in 
and tvrice a day go to tte clearing house and eixhange tiie checks ■■ri.th the 
appropriate bank. In September lS^li8, he moved back home and worked at 
City National Bank on Broadway and ,th Street as a teller and later in the 
Loan and Trust Dept. V/orking at the bank he met Genevieve YANKU3 in June 
of 1952 and •'./ere married J-une 6, 1953. 



loodoS flo«^Mi#9i^ vA •*! bttnsiii^ ttU .sirnavA fxiooos--'<Citoo\Vr ^QQ ot bovora ^inul 

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J«tttKA •«fM»^ lUuBeiaaTtS. co XooitoS looJallaH t>abn«^te ari atfti^ Ibn^ aunerA 

•irtMni dtxlB bmieJni.'i «1 Xiteu looriaS ffon^&II»H Is te'{Ate ad soivon adi XIb 

vwLemt ear ad imf? .^»e%t8 eaC'xadO oo loodo^l 4^^ •if. ixJtoonM iMbaa^^a sH 

bavol JMiU aH .9«>*8 xnoo^ « ^^ I<x»l98 leiliS aatd^ itaq yLblmow be^*xaJB ari 

wit o# Ama — laiiA xynaeJlLii no nnX rviia a^isoloon ad^ da qod diuo am cfoC > 

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-^ioifll 4«g| hLuow ari ^4:^ baoa * <sO •aqtd aiirlq luoxl oa adineo aaedlil aoiao 

xsdla tut lol ilJBH a i3aa nagiVKfBad <nrd x^d narid foluoo ari sqid ni ainao avll 

.0 .1» ds rxeoDDa baatsovr tteBi ,4siH daaS da looiioe dgiri yii'Xij'a .iloaaa iltRnr 

•3{ia£3 .J •!> ydbulonl imoi at aJnalq lAtiiaubal Btfoltav boa xmuwI 

ipnA •di oiaL bailardi anr J^cefi ,^X lo Y'X^^<i£l> ni ri^M dsa^ aotl soldauJbaiO 

VEdnalni :Jood bna ^aaarfafA ,inia(i;2 <iuO od inea aav &,: .^4^1 ,4^ rianuM no 

urn art amarid aaaO .^I ,ia(fBaiciae at cagHiJUO od inae aav &' .gaiiiiarut 

mtdi yfi .doqafr xXqqva laoibaa arid ni bavrtaa boa dnaaraa Hade od badonotKi 

•d«iPI ,d "wdBaaaa basrtariaeib saw al baa babrta bari law arid aotd 

if, ittof, bet-isiE baa .A.D.M.y arij od osaoJtiiO od bevon &a ^Yxi^'l v^cavaab nl 

boa italo aavori yttix^alo s ea baaliow e)-: .iaati aaaivaS bna dauiT aiioaH 

nl iHofad bari lUimd ariJ ailoaiia arid adaiaqee bna doaLCoo od aiaw aeJtdub siri 

arid 64Jtm nfaado add ag|aa<id:ca baa aauori yLtiaelo adJ od os lab a aojtwd boa 

da b«l*ao» boa anod stoaif bavw ari «8;ii?I lattaadqaS al ,Atiad adaiiqanqqa 

adi at ladal bna laXXed a aa daaid8 ridV boa xa»b«onn no inati laooidaM x^iO 

aw;. Hi 80XMAX aralraaaO doa ari jlnari edd da aobf-soW .dqaG datrxT bna oaoJ g 

• Cc^I (d acorl bairnaa artaw bna S^I lo 



Michael Anton YAIJKUS was born near Raseiniai, central Lithuania, on June l5, 
1887 • lie was the son of Joseph YANKUS and Katherine ROUDUS, who were 
farmers. As a boy he helped on the farm and neighboring farms doing chores. 
He had no formal schooling and learned what little he did by priests or 
tutors that wo\ald gather groups in the homes. His father, brother, and 
an xmcle moved to America when he vras a boy and his loncle later sent him 
a ticket in I906. Lithuania at the time was caught up in the Russian 
Revolution and they forbade anyone from leaving the country. There -was, 
however, someone \fho smuggled him out. So hidden in a hay wagon, like 
and a group of others vrere taken to Germai?y and from there sailed to Boston. 
H.e arrived in Chicago ivith his uncle and got a job in the stock yards. 
He worked in the packaging department packaging and putting the meat into 
the freezers. A few years later he moved to Oklahoma to live with his 
brother and father. Tlere they all v/orked in the mines digging coal. 
Mike and his brother Charlie sent their father back to Lithuania to take 
care of his wife. It was learned that Joseph later had one of his legs 
shot off during one of the uprisings in the country. 

There was a strike at the coal mines and so Mike and his brother retiu'ned 
to Chicago and the Stock Yartts around I908 or I909. The conditions at the 
Stock Yards then v/ere such, he decided to move to Rockford. He got a job 
at Haddorff Piano Con^jany v.-orking on soundboards for |8.25 a vreek. He was 
living here a year and then met iiary PETROSKI in June 1911 and later 
married her on November Z,,1911» 



il mLoau six! bam. ^^ 

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.Xaoo 8C' .-'-in otU ttl bsUtcm Lit xv' J sta'T .loriial bfU teASoid 



cji-xj^i: .. '113 o;.jfi 



Hfy great grandfather and grandmother were Joseph PETROSKI and Pauline MJVNKUS. 
Joseph was an immigrant from Lithuania who came to America during the l880»s 
and foimd a job mining in Oglesby, Illinois, At the aye of twenty-six he 
sent money back to Lithuania to have his relatives send him a v/ife. So in 
June of 1893 at the age of sixteen Pauline ilANKUS arrived in Oglesby. 
Having never seen or met each other they wed that same month and so began 
the start of a unhappy marriage. They never really loved each other and 
Joseph being an alcoholic created many arguments between the tvro. LdaiTied 
in the Catholic faith they lived together forty-three years until Jospph 
died in 1936. Pauline worked as a machinist at National Lock in her l?.ter 
years after the fauily moved to Rockford in order to support the family. 
She did not remariy, however, and lived until f.Iay 6, 1972. Slie was ninety- 
six years old. 

Inspite of the rough going, Joseph and Paiiline had nine children. The 

first child is my grandmother, Mary Josephine Elizabeth PETROSKI, Born 

March 19, I89U, nine months from her parents vredding, she lived her first 

fourteen years in Oglesby. V.lien the Catholic school in nearby Spring Valley 

was built, she attended it learning the basics - reading, va-iting, arithmatic, 

was 
and sewing. She quit going after she/confinned at the age of fourteen. 

She started vrcrking then as a housekeeper for one of the Jevfish families in 

Oglesby. She vrould scrub floors, do laundry, help prepare meals, and then 

clean up after them. Being Jewish, there were strict dietary laws and v/hen 

vrashing the dishes that contained fish, they v;ere vrashed last. To this day 

out of habit she still will not was the fish dishes with the others. 

In June, I9II, at the age of seventeen, she and a friend moved to Rockford 
to find better vrork. She lived and worked at the Chick Hotel on South Main 
Street for a short while. Slie soon moved in y;ith another friend who was 



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trntnL tmA al iaol laaotiaSA && islnJuioBm b as beahjow enili»1 .dC^X oi belb 

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,.bd[o encfiox xla 

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de*{ll oad bwil ade ^yc-ibbov atoetsq nod ao-il eri^tnooi «ahx fii^Ol «(?I dondl 

XkCXaV aoJb^S icrfnAec nl loodos olloddaO ari;^ oadW .-^aoTsO (U atso^ asa^hBvol 

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eair 
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oi aaiXfaaal dahnl. add lo aao ml ttaqaealaBtfod a aa amii snJbI'vw be&n&i^ adS 

oadi boa ,aXa«i tnaqertq qiail ,x'xfani/&£ ob ,8'xooll duioe bluow od8 .vcfeoIsO 

uadw bos mmal x^&t^^ &iil%tz ariaw ersBtii ^ciHtll•\t aniea .nadi taJrla qu naelo 

Xab ftidi oT ,iBel beriasw aru«r x*(i^ ,iiai'^ beaiBinoo darU" aadeib edi snJLdaaw 

.med^o a<U diiv aadeJtb dall •di aaw ^on IXiw /Xtde ade dldad lo ivo 

femUooH e^ k«««i faaal'tl a boA ada ,nao^neva« lo ags od^ d« <XI^-^ «aatfl. oI 

aim lifuoZ so I*^oR iloldO fnit im boolioir boa bavJtX ad8 ,Aim -i^iivi bnll oi 

e- ^ ^r»oifl rwdiona dltw ttl lurrota flooa '• ^ .' '*dw irtoiAn a -Ml daertd^S 



already living vdth a Lithuanian family on Rock Street and foiind a job at 
Durson Knitting Company on South Main Street. Y.'orking fifty-five hours a 
week at ten cents an hour she v/orked on raachines making stockings. Slie 
soon met fclichael YAMliUS and after five months of coirrtship they married 
on November 7, 1911 • 



boa lsvW8 HoqA no 

tyziS al. 



i 



IQH OVXl ISJlfi b(: 



Liichael Anton YAIWCUS and ilary Josephine PETROSKI were married on November 
7, 1911, at St. Peter and Paul Roman Catholic Church on Island Avenue and 
West Street. They had a small reception in his house follov/ing the ceremony. 
Nothing extravagant like some of the other Lithuanian weddings. Tlie: giiests 
vrould meet the night before and get to know each other and the next day they 
•would have a great time. 

Mary and liLke continued to live in the house at 17th Ave. near 9th Street. 
?jike was laid off at Haddorffs in January of 1912 because of a slight 
depression. T.to months later he ivas rehired and soon they moved to another 
rented home on Eleventh Ave. near Eighth Street. Here their first born, 
Alex YAIIKUS vras born on September 23, 1912. Ilaking fifteen cents an hour 
at Haddorffs, they got by enough to purchase a home in 1913. It was 
located on Fifteenth Street and they paid $2,000 for a brand new hoxise. 
On IJarch 27, 19lU, their second child, another son ^Valter YAIJKUS was bom. 
They lived in that house for another two years and then moved to a farm in 
Lfedford, Vlisconsin. They moved back to tovm after a year there and bought 
another house. A tvra story house on Sixth Street purchased for $6,000. 
They rented the downstairs. This house was their first house v/ith a furnace. 
They lived at this house for three years and then in 1921 they bought on 
contract another single family house at 2330 9th Street. They stayed in 
this house for nine years. Genevieve Lucille YANKUS was bora there on 
December 9, 1927, and three years later the last of four children, Leonard 
IBe YANKUS was born on November 12, 1930. 

In 1930, illke was laid off at Haddo'^ff's and couldn't continue making paym-^nts 
on the house. The person v/ho held the contract paid him $300 for the hoiise 
which they had paid in over a thousand dollars for. .Vith this money and 
vrtiat they had in the bank, iiike put a do\'m payment on a farm in Stillman 
Valley. 



b bns fei«<I .12 lA ^jUfK , 

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In the depth of the Depression the Yankuses, all but Walter vj-ho nioved to 
Chicago to work, moved to the farm. It \Tas only about sixty acres but 
they grew seme corn, raised some livestock and poultry. Mike and the 
oldest son, Alex, would also go to Rockford and unload railroad cars of 
coal and lumber for ^5 a car at Haddorffs. This iie didn't have to do for 
long because latei* in 1931 liike was rehired at Haddorffs and held this 
job until 1939 or 19ii.O when the company folded. V/hile on the farm klike 
would ride into tov«m v/ith a nearby neighbor to -work and Alex would ivork 
the feirm and help neighboring farmers and the others would stay home or 
go to school. They lived here for seven years just making a living. 

They again moved in 1937. This time to a house they built on Condon Rd. 
which is nine miles south of Rockford. ilike got a nevi job at Mattison 
Machine Company as a scraper. They lived on Condon Rd. for seven years 
Alex was married dji Liarch 1937 • Tiiey had survived the great Depression, 
The Yankuses moved back to toivn in 19ii5 to a r.ouse on Irving Avenue. Thqr 
lived there tvio j-ears and then moved back to Condon Rd. for a few more years. 
It became difficult for Mike to drive the distance to work and they bought 
a tv/o family home at 1303 7th St. He retired in 195u. .ike lived there 
until he died on iiarch 17, 19^0, while visitii^ his son V.'alter in Lfelbourne, 
Florida. He died of rheumatic heart disease at the age of 72. Maxy YAIJKUS 
is still living on 7th St. at the age of 83. Three of her children are 
still living. Alex died in January 19^5 of cancer. Leonard lives in 
Los Angeles, California, and Walter in Melbourne, Florida. She also has 
a grandson and great grandchildren (son of Alex) living in Florida. 



i ,i'BOw oi o 
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»M fi»-ii)X±iio tad Ito acm ' as» ad • £11^ mi 

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»&•* oala ada ,abitoS:% ,efrxvo -Y Ixta ^aJbrx'xolxi.aO ,«(iIoaaA aoJ 



Genevieve Lucille YANKUS vras born December 9, 1927, at 2330 9th St. 
She is the third child of Llichael and Mary Yankus. She had two older 
brothers, Alex fifteen years older and Walter tiiirteen years older. 

She lived on Ninth Street for three years until the family moved to the 
farm in Stillman Valley. 'iVhen she viras five and a half Genevieve started 
school at Kishwaukee Consolidated School, She had to walk tvro miles every 
day to catch a school bus that vfould bring her and the other students to 
school. The school itself had three major divisions. Students from first 
to fourth grade J fifth tlirough eighth grade and then three years of high 
school. In 1?]4.2 the school started cutting back the high school program 
one year at a time. In her first four years there irere only about six 
other students in her class. They learned reading, -vvriting, arithmetic, 
spelling . 

In the summer between foui'th and fifth grade, they started building the 
house on Condon Rd. so they aa-red to iier grandraother ' s iio;ise for that year 
Tfrtiile completing the hovise. She attended fiftii grade in Roclcford at Turner 
School. After the house was finished she returned to Kishwaulcee to finish 
shliool through tenth grade. She tban attended East High School for the 
last tvro years of high school, graduating in 19U5. The family then noved 
to i;02 Irving Ave. for a couple of years and she attended Rockford School 
of Business and achieved a medical secretarial degree. V,Tien the family 
moved back to Condon Rd. in September 19i;7 she moved to Chicago and lived 
with three other girls in an apartment on Union Street. She got a job at 
V/esley Memorial Hospital. The girls moved again to Arlington St. and she 
had another job at Chicago Comminity Clinic from 19h8 to 19^9. Again she 
changed jobs and moved to 1827 N. Keeler Ave. and found a job at the 
Corbett Clinic on Lake Street. She vrorked there for tvro years until she 
got an offer back in Rockford. Being a little tired of the hustle of the 



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xta ^xroda jJjjo enem aiatii vimex luol ivitl tiA al .eiaJt^ a ia ibox ono 

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• 8lLtLC«q|s 

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bavoB fiadi -^Lbnal axfl .^X at acdd-atrbais «Xoodo8 xls±d lo vt&sri oinf ival 

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bariX baa os«atnO o;^ beron ada Vil^X TodpiolqeS oi .bH oabooO od Aoad baroB 

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miJ ia dot « bauol boa .avA imLtH .M VS8X o.^ barom bna acfot bagaads 

ada ULttBi ataax omi lot anudi baofiow adS mioertiQ eail&i no sutniXO tim&ioQ 

mii lo aliatfri adtf la tMnti •Uill a yiiaB ,trtat)l9oii txl ioad lallo oa log 



big city she moved back with her parents, v,*io now lived at 1303 7th St. 
and started work for Dr. Stanley ^, Anderson. V.Tiile bringing the day's 
cash to the bank for the doctor she met Bert Johnson a teller at City 
National Bank and a year later they were married on June 6, 19p3» 



XH^ ^ «t£l9w • .K c^ziivM.. <;toR &nn arte vxtoob adi lol ibird odi oJ^ dcusu 
' -'' ^ . ■ rraiX, m beJtmaei «tem xtelS ta^ml laex ' txxs aiaaB X««aoliaR 



Bertil Edgar JOHNSON and Genevieve Lucille YANKDS were married June 6, 1953, 
at St. Bridget's Church in Loves Park, 111, They lived at 2219 Uth St. 
for two years \/here their first criild, Stuart itss born on July 19, 195U» 
Bert vras still v/orking at City National Bank when they decided to have a 
house built. They moved into the house at iU05 James Ave. in Iviay 1955, 
and their second child, Franklyn was born soon after on Deceniber 1, 1955* 
The house •'.vas built by Bert's brother-in-law, finute Carlson and his partner. 
Bert helped vfhen he could. Ttere was much to do around the house the first 
years. They planted the lavm, built a patio and inside they fixed up the 
basement. On November 9, 1958, Theodore their third son was bom. In I962 
Bert quit at City National Bank to work as a real estate sa].enian for Bldss 
Adelman Realtors and then for Bill D\irstock Realtoa:. On November 7, 1963 
theij* fourth and final child, Clifford, vras born. Vith four children the 
house on Janes Ave. was getting quite sfbII so they had another one built 
in 1965. In Jvne of the same year the family moved into a brand nei'j- house 
at h910 Sovereign Blvd. on the edge of Rockford. 

Earl,y in 1965 Pert quit selling real estate and started selling insurance 
with Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance where he v/orked until October I906. 
He then started as a salesman at Rockford Standard Furniture where be is 
still erployed. Genevieve returned to part time vfork for Dr. Stanley 
Anderson in 1955, and still does to this day. 

As the children grew older, vacations became a yearly thing vrith trips to 
a lake, or some area of interest. They purchased a camping trailer in 1970 
and took tiiree long trips out East and South. In September 1973 their 
oldest son, Stuart, "oecame ill v;ith viral encephalitis and as a result has 
suffered permanent brain damage and is linable to be cared for at home. 



xux;«. -Tuid sjaa in(£Aiat^ ^UJbda booooe lisri^ fans 
ic' .4a-<;^ cwo-u Oi^ v>.' sioL^. e&w d'xadT vhCtfod o4 cartir baqlad irtsB 

S^-^ . too ft«ar iu>a bvJM^ TttHit ^^vn/ii&^l (8^£ «f « w ii itM vTaK xiU ,^aeB»mmd 

/ . ;x;Jb:):iLfa Ilia tol «ftd.t (x!« e-soilMK oamUbA 

•Aw ■< w«l OmIvi .a^kh:; sat ^fnolHIO ^hlitrio Ifiotl baa ti^ttiol i£ef(^ 

aao %adJon8 bad x^li o8 XXjais »•' .9tA sensL a» M»od 

'^fli btfnm jJUmuH Mil 'am*^ «£<»« wi» lu amrl. o^ li 

.bnco' .bvIQ fl^otevoc Ul^U ^u 

•orr.- So^-m^ tes a^B^M X«n loillM ^±up drtoa ^I ni >c£:uia 

row •♦.'f 'rm.'^' . '. ; i >t » ' u rattl slt.I i!s0*iAi Auat;^o*wfoO riihf 
off 4b BE. as f>9<H 

^•<0ib zlsiS o& noob UMz bm «^I at aovtofn - 

o^ t':lii trhXo wrij a»if]dCi/io edi aA 

brf. tTvR'" ixro aqlo^ yiol •eott^ 3l«o;f taw 
•■RMd f^Tov^B ,frc»e ^m»hfo 
jiu e;>JtBfib nl09i inatumn 



Franklyn is at ilorthern Illinois University? at DeKalb, Illinois, mere he 
is to graduate in liay with a Bachlor's Degree in Accounting. Tne youngest, 
Clifford is attending Eisenhoirer lliddle School and is in eighth grade. 

The faj.dly becarae members of the Alpine Lutheran Ohurch in 1^65, and are 
still active members. 



arxB 1 ..•Kitiiis^ J lo B:i9ciB6m aroAOocf -^^Jtoutl exfT 



Theodore Edgar Johnson was born on November 9, I9i>8, at Swedish American 
Hospital in Hockford. At the time I lived at lUo5 James Ave. I vrent to 
kindergarten and first grade at Bloom School, The family then mov/ed to 
U9IO Sovereign Blvd. in the summer of 196i». i'rat fall I attorded A. C. 
Thompson School and irent there thiroiigh seventh grade. Iii 1971 to 1972 I 
attended the first eighthgrade class at Eisenhower Middle School. In tlie 
fall of 1973 I started East 'ligh School. I participated in the band, 
playing trombone, for all £ovx years, was a photographer for tlie Publications 
staff of tije Highlights the last tlu'ee years and was inducted into the 
Qviili and Scroll and tho National Honor Society in ray senior year, I 
Trorked the summer betvreen ay J\mior and Senior year at ilidvrest Camera 
part time ar.d in a warehouse -wiiere I loaded coffoe and restuarant supplias 
onto a truck all ay Junior year. In tha spring of I976, I started vrorking 
at V/ilson Tool Co. on Fifteenth Street, running errands, doing odd Jobs, 
and occasionally ru-miTig a maciiine, I am still -.roi'lcing there as of April 
1977, making t;2.50 an hoiir. 

In the fall of 1976, X started attendir^iii-ock Valley College working on an 
Associate Arts Degree. I cJirrently \iork at. a photographer for the Valley 
Forge and hope to major in photography at SoutiiKrn Iltnois University at 
Carbondale, Illinois. 



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.C .A oetxwi'ia 1 tsaniB silt ill .brXH nsioisvoi^ I' '4 

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sjamMO intmbJtil ie neex loinae bm lotiiiflt ^ aeenied naMnre arU btaltam 

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LIviA lo es eisdi BObfioir XXiie ms 1 •anliioain s yxinijrx '^XXaoolRBOoo bu 

.-moil CM 06. SI ytb(£ffl ,V?9I 

(U oo aotdiDw oss^oS XbXXa7 ]l90&{8fllba»iiA be&t&te I «dT9X ^ Ha^ sdi 01 

XaXlsY exli lol isdqsnsoicdq s d;A inow i^inaoriuo I .eetseCI sirtA eiAlooeeA 

is yfJLanmticAi nlooMLl a'Wituc'd i« '%dc^>':^oiodq nl notan oi sqod txia osTHo'i 

.alantJ.il ^slabaodtaD 



JONES, JERRY OWENV 19^3- 



PI.KASK TYI'l::: PLEASK IM.ACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT O E THE SECOND COPY OF YOUK 
FAMILY HISTORY. 

Dear Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

S n that your family history can he made more useful to historians and 
others studyln>', American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms 
below. This will take you only a few minutes, and will be easily made over 
Into an Index which will permit archive users ready access to Just those 
kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



1 . Your name ,T ffrry Ow ftn J-.m&s 



Date of form 



^0, lv7g 



Office Use Code 

(ID // ) 

(ID // ) 



Your college: Rock Valley College 
Rockford, Illinois 



Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 



Before 1750 
"1850-1900 



1750-1800 X 180 0-1850 
1900 or later 



Please check all regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

N ew England(Mass. ,Conn. ,R.I .) 



Va . ) 



Middle Atlantic(N.Y.,Penna., N..I. 

South Atlantic (r,a . ,Fla . ,N .C . ,S .C . ) East South Central 



(l.a . ,Miss . , Al a . , Tenn ,Ky . ) _J _Wast South Cen t r a 1 ( Ark . , N . M . , Te x . , Ok . ) 

_East North Cen t ra 1 (Mi ch . , Oh 1 o , 1 nd . ) Pac i f ic (Ca 1 . , Was h . ) 

(llawai I ,A 1 aska) X (111., Wise.,) 



Please check a 1 1 occupational categories In which members of your 
family whom you have discussed in this paper havi^ found themselves. 



X Fa rming 

X T ransportation 

X Professions 



X M i n i n g . X S hopkeeping or small business 

Big Business ". Manufacturing 

X Industrial Labor Other 



Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 



Roman Catholic Jewish -- Presbyterian 

Baptist Episcopalian Congregational 

Quaker Mormon 



Methodist 
Lu theran 



Other Protestant 



Other (name) 



What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 



Swed ish 

Blacks 

Jews 



Other Scandinavian X German v French 

Indiana Mexicans Puerto Ricans I-; a stern liuropt 



Italians 



Slavs 



X Irish 



Central Europeans 
British Native Americans over several generations 



East Asian 



Other (Name ) 



Tjglsh 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 



Interviews with other 
f ami ly membe r s 



Family Bibles -^ Family Genea logic: 
Land Records The U.S. Census 



_X V ital Records 

"< Photographs ^ 



Maps 



Other 



FAMl I.Y DATA 



A . Grandfather (your father's side ) 

Name J3..:e£ Q . Jjnes, or. Current Residence Lscpan^d 



Date of birth 139G Place of birth I'jilg Rose, 'Vls-Qnslsi 

Date of death 197? Place of burial Casr^alftn H^n^h^ry 

KducationCnumber of years); VjIIc' iOBC, Vi'ls cons In 
grnde school 8 high school_4_ vocational X tiolleRe 

-'ccupation(s) anT.T./el'lt ;^/'^ °^ RESIDENCE 

, , ^ , ^ , till hima of (after leaving home) 

^s t Fariilnr.- Dates ^-^^nl-h. 1st Wild RoHft . Da te s iqgg^T q7t; 

Vv Is cons in 
2nd Dates^ 2nd Dates 



3 r d D ate s 3 r d D a t e s 

4 th Dates 4 th Dates 

Religion Prrshy^prlan 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

yjelgh Club - ytasoni:; Lodge ~ 'rrn.ql.f^ nf v/nd ftn...» Chui-eh 

Place of Marriage to your grandmo ther Qshkosh. 'Msc. date 1922 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Enid Qyyens Jones Current Residence y, n r'^ .V.-iHft , Wi's'-nn s ln 

Date of birth 13ii£_ __Place of birth n^hVr^^h^ YMaconqin 

Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school 8 high s chool 4 vocational 

college 5 yrs. 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1 s t T? 3 che r D ate s IQIQ- 192g l s t 'Vii.j r^oe!», D ate s 1 922- 

VJisr.onsln 
2nd Housevjlfg Da tes 2nd Da tes 

3 r d D ate s ^ '^ <^___ '■• '^ ^ e s 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion Presbyterian 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 

Welsh Glub - Political Party ( No Frgference) 



I'lace of marriage to your grandfather Qsli koghj WIfjCt date TC22 

NOTii: If your father was raised 'io age 18) by a stepmother or 
another relative give that data on the back of this p.i;',e 
(A-2) . 



A-2 S tepgrandf a ther (your father's side) 



Name 



Current Residence 



Date of birth_ 
Date of death 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 

Cw 1 lege 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

Ath 



Rel igion 



Da tes 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



1st 

2nd_ 

3rd 

4 th 



vocational 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Da tes 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
B-2 S tepgrandmo ther (your father's side) 



date 



Name 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade school high school_ 

col lege 



vocational 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

Ath 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 

.2nd 

3rd 

4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandfather^ 



Date 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

N ;i 11 1! Eu gj Ja n sen 



Date of birth y^^p.^ 1^- I^Q^. 

Date of death June 9 . 19,45 

Education (number of years): 
grade school o high school 

Occupation(s) 

Is t Faraier 



Current Residence 
Place of birtf 



— De^«-a-3»d- — — ■ 



Place of burial How e iJe:n e lery 



Spring water Township 



voca t ional 



college 



2nd M a nu f aclrurin .' 



3rd Faraer 



4 th Fusinsss'nfin 



Dates 
Dates 
Da tes 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

1st Tov.n -if ?;rT^^nc;wQi->D iates 



Znd ponri ^,ii T.nr, 7;? q. . Dates 

_3rd Town of Springwa t j*^ tes_ 

4 th wilrl apse J 'Ai'c,^ Dates 



Religion >)ietboclst- 



PolJtlcal parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Republican - Leglomire. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother iw 



da t e_j^j^5 0,-4924- 



NOTl. : If your mother was raised by a stepfather or another relative (to 
age 18) give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 



Grandmother (your mother's side) 
Name I'.iarffaret A. Huff mag Jansen 

Date of birth June 9 . 1906 

Date of death 



Current Resi dence Yvjld Rpsft^ Wis. 

Place of birth_^^^5j^^_Q£-4^iiingJAiate^-Wis, 
Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school o high school 



voca t ional 



Occupation (s ) 
1« t HnnRewJ fe 



2nd A3aii 
3rd 

4th 



1 ries c 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



col] e g e 



PLACE OF RLSIDENCK 
(after leaving, home) 
.1 « tsUwm.-af-Spf4,n.rv^^ tW '' ^- 1? ?4r 19 2.6.. 

2nd VJild Rose Dal es 1926- 



3rd 

4th 



D a I c s 
Dates 



Religion Methodist 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



_Politic3_ l Par tx, ( ?^ o P r e f e re aae^-^^-V^mxeuxs- E q s t e-.m-.^4^^^^ 'laoiftns t.ux i 1 i a ry .. . 

Place of marriage to your grandf a ther a lid RoG S > Vvis. DaLeJijne 9,^1924 

NOTE: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (lo 

•K' - "H^ gtve th»t d»ta on th'e back of this page {\)-2) 



C-2 S tepgrandf a ther (your mother's side) 

Name „^ Current Residence 

Place of birth 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupa t ion (s ) 



1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of burial 



vocational 



college 



_lst_ 
2nd_ 

.3rd. 
Ath 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Da t es 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 

Political parties, civil or sociAl clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
D-2 S tepgrandrao ther (your mother's side) 

Name 

Date of birth 

Date of death 



Date 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



Occupa tion(9) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Current Residence 
Place of birXsh 



Place of burial 



voca t iona 1 



col lege 



Ist 

2nd 
.3rd_ 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDKNCL 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



R e 1 1 g i o n 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



6 

CH ILDREN of A & B (or A-2 or B-2 ) - your father's name should appe.ir below 

1 . Name Ja i!* 3 Orval Jnnes, Jr. 

Place of birth -^r^iyi ^,,^^ ^ ■ ^ ,, date Sept. ".3, 1925 

Number of years of s choo llng:l_j_2 Occ upa t lon !;^^ ,. , i no; ■ [ ■ nno:.- criver 

Residence ] ,p p. 5. .g pj a; d Marital Status 

Number of children ihree Death J-^ly 19.. 1907 

2 . Name a a y ^arct Jo g c 3 E:ne r i ck 

Place of birth V.ild Rose, ''.isc. date 1927 

Number of years of schooling 16 Occupation Teacher - Houaewifc 

Res i denre ptur g'30n ''^^y , .. 1.:. . Mar i ta 1 Status ^igr.lsd 

Number of children -] Death — - 

3 . N a me Pes 3 Jjnes Mberg 

Place of birth ■/»' lid aOS e , V.' 3- s . date 1955 

Number of years of schooling 16 Occupation lesch.-x-' 

Res 1 dence N' pnn.tionee Falls Marital Status ,.ia n- 1 ;c 

Number of children_ 4 Death — — 

'1 . N a m e '^^-.h^rl .T.inf. p. 

Place of birth VJild los!^, '"A '^ , date 19 g 5 

Number of years of schooling 12 ()ec:upation Fa TmeT* 

Residence ,. I"! d .1 j jf? j ' . 1 ;:; . Marital Statu s ^;ar•I^ j gd 

Number of children__ _^ death 

3 . Name John Jones 

Place of birth •.VJld Rcsr , '.Vls. date 1929 

Number of years of schooling 12 Occupation Farme r 

Residence ' . lid . ios*? . "., is . Marital Status ^": q r r I '■ d „ 

Number of children 5 l)eath 

S . N a me p^vid J Ones 

Place of birth Wild TiO-'^e, '.7l3 . date 1955 

Number of years of schooling 1 :' Occupation ^&1l, gpDr 1:g1; j-Or^ 

Residenc e !Te v.' ^": '.^''^ori ^i i nn 1 " M aritai Stat us "-- - tit led 

Number of children __7^ death 

^- ^^^"1*-^ Ann J one.? TTOtr, 

Place of b i r t h - ^ -• -j^ ri ;.; ^ g •» '.', ' ^ date t ' '^o 

Number of years of schooling 14 Occupation Eouggwif ^^ 

Residenc e S "^.- J j3 e , J'"' . Ma rital Stat us '. ai'r'ed 

Number of children ',_j death__ „ 

i! , Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Mar i ta 1 S ta tus 

Number of children death 

) . Name 

Place of birth date 

Number el years of school inj; Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

T'iumber of children death 

) . Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status _ 

Nuiiiher el children death 



7 
CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 

1. Name-pv.>^; T. ro.;5^?n . ,. Jiies ^ ^a 1 ten^f^r' 

Place of birth *-?T'.'. jf S^ : i.i --vt: fx ^te lee. 51, 1926 

Number of years of schooling VI Occupation FsinMng* 

Residence . 11 g .tJc. f . . ", - > larital Status ■,; :■ ■ '. -^ .^ 

Number of children death 

2. Name I-l ':: Jjnsea 



Place of birt h t ?-vr. -^ ** Spr in — .-n *: l ira t e 

Number of years of schooling 2_j Occupatio n: . n, . ; 1 -in 

Residence - '1 i^q- . W'". Marital Status ■ , ' ■ ' 

Number of children death 

Name .» •' - >■ r ."■,-, g »»-i 

Place of birth.-"' vic« '^'o date 



Number of years of schooling ]__ Occupation L:"!boratory TechnicJ 

Residence 5t?Vf:.3 rj'.>t, '.. 1 ' . Mar i tal Status ' :" 

Number of children N^n* death 



Name -'-lir! i ■■.-!ri'?ll :.: c Jjlt:ionc! 

Place of birth .. LlcJ .n03^, ";if. date A:J"i.q. 17). 10 4? 

Number of years of schooling ]/[ Occupatlor Houaewi 

Residence ;.??':^:'. , Tl Marital Status ... J.^lpd 

Number of children death 

Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marl tal Status 

Number of children death 



Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence__ Marital Status 

Number of children- death 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status^ 

Number of children death 

Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children\ death 



10. Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Ri-sldence Marital Status 

NiirabiT of children death 



E . Your Father 

Name . ^ ^ "^ Q. J'-'"'^^, J'^. ' Current: Residence Tie .-^t <^.<^ri 



I 



Date of birth ,^r, r.'^7 1-'"'" Place of birth ., j.' 



Date of Death Jily. i:- . i:-:? Place of burial JS7.rs9la.:. V"! -■^ ry 

Education (number of years) 

grade s chool ^ h igh ' school_j^ vocational co liege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Fni'iln Dates 1st "r.lc'. _, zrt , •', is . Da t es irM3-4'1 

2nd Tru3k ' riv^r Dates 2nd J'^liforni." Dates 1 '■-•''- -^ I 



3rd Dates 3rd Mid a03ff, 7.is. Da tes i:-^ '^-■':'"' 

4 th Dates 4 th Dates 

R e 1 i g i o n T re s by i: s .^ 1 a r, 



Political parties, cUvil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your mother yjld lOS'^ ",.ls. date r.'^r;. ."^l ^ 1?) ^i7; 

V NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 

F . Your Mother 

Baitenger 
Name P..V ■ ■1, r., .Tans-^n [,l^r,f:P.) Current Residence '. lld^03e. "Vis. 

Date of birth ;, . ^; n 1 ^' ' Place of birth :'. .'.n of 3pr la; v.'3 L 3r ,".. is . 

Date of death Place of burial 

Education (number of years) 

grade school ^ high? s choc 1__2 voca tional college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

Ist Kgjckhrf'r Box "o. Dates l953- 1964 1st •.lie .iosg. '/.is. Da tes l945-.<4 

2nd 'V"!.!?!! Furniture :?. Dates 1964-19S5 2nd Jallfornlg Dates io^4-45 

3rd .1 :.-: ^^^Ison I^'urs In;- Ho:!i* Dates i: 65- 19G9' 3rd '.7 lid ao.= e. 'jVIs. Dates lP •5-'54 

4 th •:olonigl rteat^or'^.-.t Dates l-- -3?- T^7C 4th rtjckl^r-d, II Da tes ly64-7.0 

Religion Methodist 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your father , . m ,. ;. - . ' ' - . date . _ J\ ^ 1943. 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the hack of this page (F-2). 



E-2 Stepfather 

Name J!, rles Daniel Baiter. 



Date of birth 



Date of death 



Place of birth' pr {-i^-. -, ■ s 
Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school__3 high school 4 



vocational 



college 



Occupation (s) 
1st 



Dates T 



2nd -' 

3rd 

4th 



Frof f s 3 1 "):i!'l r'lln' 
Religion '>thool3t 



Dates -I 


., 




Dates 1 


r-i 


"1 


Dates T 


- t 


^.T 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

1st Vv "i Id i> J ■; f , . J sD a t e s T .? -J G 



2nd_ 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 


Dates 


Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your mother 71 or !:''''■ 
F-2 Stepmother 
Name 



_D a t e J'iii. I'L' , 1: 



Date of birth 



Place of birth 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



vocational 



college 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 



2nd 
3rd 
4 th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Hlare of marriage to your father_ 



date 



10 
CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2,F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 

Name Mlli^i Jg :ic 3 Jong:: 

Place of birth .. IIC ..^Z'-:, ' , 1: . Date of birth :-./ 1' , l^'^'\ 

Number of years of schooling 17 Occupation 2^nk Offic er 

Residence .. - :^r :^ , II Marital Status . , c". 

Number of children 2 death 

Name jsnciy Jones 'Jon-'ar 

Place of birth ".'r. ' ,. .: - , ".'.r . Date of birth D . 1" . 1:46 

Number of years of schooling T_J Occupation HT'Mcv'fr^ 

Residence -^ '':■ -"i cd , IT Marital Status ' - " : I :' 

Number of children 3 death 

Name Jerr? Qyen Jones 

Place of birth ' M " . j:: , '. 1 g . Date of birth J ;c lo . 1^43 

Number of years of schooling 1 '' Occupation J-j^r'T^ ;■ '^lor p. 

Residence ,: J- .rjrd , II Marital Status ...n^'iicc 
Number of children ,2 death 

Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 

Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 

Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence _Marltal Status 

Number of children death 

Name _^ 

Place of birth Date of birth . 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children death 

Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence _Marltal Status 

Number of children death . 

ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public Library, Rockford 
Illinois ^, ^ 

Signed \J n/y^y [ j/mh 

D a t e /I ^]J} j2. : J \'^^(o 






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Jn.is-n, hid b.-rt;^ trj Ir)^ Tor -..cny y?ars 
■■_ " .T'.-csi-^t . Ta!: oil? ivsl^ 

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' :". . T .'V:ir.g t:?^;ot.h«r, we 

Mr inf :.r.ii-j t ion nbout the J^iifi^nc, 
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. " . • with thl;3 l2.i:.lj'. 
':■•■!''■'.-■', r.- r- ■?! ipp;.!ir;5 nnc"! pir.'turffs tIsd £.':ive -auch 
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- ■ - .;" . > 'Mis --..ill ujUMii -.k; •■■•■-; • ■,":_■; ..:.'.•;• 

T^:^ - .' .'lovis ii'.: ■ ■ , it' 3 good 

' . - , i ./ lihat sho'ws l;ij^iitr-.:' ,nnd fun, but nl 30 hof5 

p.nd tenrs. It perlDJnr. ' ' ' 

i'cvir f,'3:ai''i?o i.hn':. I hnve- cjinc to Inve 3nd tidjnirfc, bat it will 3l£o 

.s]v-.'-' ^;oa ■"':■; aro-T 'n 'Alsoonsin '•hat lv5s hisi^ory A-r-ltten t11 .-iTer 
The iTiDre rosonrcli I put into thJs, tbs :iiore T -jrew ;. o love 
' • ^ces and the •..cople that ''v^^ " pnrM;- of 't. The :!i':Jor i-.'^rt'or. 
^'T .l',;s rjtory >i;crr; plni^^ in !Vlld lio^r^, 'V'' irih'in s^^unt^, '^r.-" '■ 
•;h.? r3i:iil^- bi3t Ji-j' of Jerry Jonoo { '^nlJt^J«r nc-e-n ^jf V^l.^ conrj in -.v'.ll 
b ••! T.e 11 1 i OP e d late ■•-' ) . 

'iVnushnr^ Gountj 3 1 o ,-. -; t v: v: ia the :'.cntr3l part ,'.f ■■.'■ ,■!)■.'.•, 
vhis Ktiiry "'.'eg-ius when. ix. was a Sill y->u'"iij ^nu wnr. ^ v;o:>ded 'rvilder- 
rif.3.-.'. Th'-r ronk r. ;-. 1p ;, "^ '• .-■> podded in :/no vvind, tnd the wild fox 

du," hlr h:;!- .a;- f ^d, ?iih w^x'c ^.Isntll'ul na d ^ p^rt of tb'^ 

^.'-'■'i 1 ...,-. . . c'lrly GettiTJi. x'ijey nl'jo tr^i^pi^d oi:ter, 

Iv, ■ '■ ■ '^ , .h... , •'.irt'-n, 'ind lynx, a. id ':hey oepoaded on ..jfr for 

::j1C'j ->: ..-■■'- r ' , 

"nv. :\- Ivors laid out Wnu3hn:":i ?0';'f;i;y into to.vnrh!pn .Tr. d sectiDns 
'.n Ijfil, "jli.w/ .. the survey, pe jplo ■i.-^vo.c into ':he ';2urty l\^ 
].--^c ■ . ■ ^. Many of these enrly settlors vvors rtlrncted by frc^:^ 
l-nd; tacy :. .• hic nnd Nev.'YorU. Some of t.hs par'ly 'iielsn 

p- ;. "^ - ■ .:.,"-■, if'ny C;lr>'."> C:ii;ie qirootly fu"u:n 

';-.'-.. - -• . :^'np titles j:> 



. Indl 



'-■'■'' ' - : -• -•; ;;.j'/ . -^en they ca^ne Lo this new nror. ?!rst; ':i.?y 
■ii- ' " - ■ ' . ■ooncl they miif, t have ■.vood, but; !;h»»j' 

■n't hove too x.■i■^■^ trees, ';! c?x'i:ii.; Innd -.v' 5 
' 1' thoy wnntod hal^ Tor the livestock. 

r::.^-r' o3rly setl;!.: , . . ,, - -v '. :lonality, le.sv. 

- ■ , " .-- - . : -r and ^v3rk . . - . ■ ■ 

ri ■;.;,■. The .Toil v/ns -enerslly poor, liut the^ .a-vjs ?i livlnv; and 
'„ :■' "se- I'irje fn;iiille3. 

i-^ uh'j rDr'l^? dnys in tnc V.ll.-^ iioso ^verx, ih^^ only ;iis chin cry 
.;i ' " - - -' T'Jr.rior.s :vt:1 ■•,vr5s a hoo, nn ax, crcdlc, s ocyLhe and 
' ' „ .';,'. ^ .'" 1_ "■' ■ ,r, ^- -i' " ^ •?.nr' th'"; h^irvnst Look 

^ .'»• ■:■ 'i"."' ■■"!■■'■::, - ., , , .- . _^- ' .".^ -■r-->^ a^ n;;^c:3tors cici not 

1 - .J-. ;.^ J. ..■■;- . ;^-. -..u". ^j--„tle i-': T.icb ^(n ?;''-'^ ;^ 

':;■ - ".,Ild r-i03e. Tn? vi3.1n2ft ^rrew :-"~pi.''ly :'"jr' the yef>rG 

o.r i:,~: .- :iLiS2. in Mnrch of locJ? t;;?' villr^.re oo'it i l:i?-'^ Inrer- 
n'-.orr-a, two v,'-,-_i'.: '-:.■■.: ..Ir -^i.-s.iiith shops, ~ ohee':;r .fnf'.t ory , s liotr-l, 
nlli, ti-rnn.^ * -'.' t - " ', ;■., , ' 'ic s c.b.lnei. 3hop -wct Lair.r planned. 

Th^ C'". 'l : ■ ' ■ otfM'n I{?i ili'Onr'' ■^.iv,.e ■,:hroj£b '.VlTd Kosf 

1.1 ".r-l ■■'':' :.'^ " . --'(^it Kficct on th3 villr^o. r.lost of the bir 
I'M^ 1 d In^;"- or . . .i^<-(^-t vj-^;-'>' t'-.iilt shortlj' 'A^ccf-^^^'i-.v, 

To- . ■- .. "-. u3 rc n nnd 30« g h1.t ths Ti\.1C 

:.:•?." ., . _, '. .or 00:n;!iunicy ■....■ ;_:.i', ths 

•oun(;ry. E-^. . .-. . pilar su of 'J'o p'nople 

.'""-- '.-'•' ..ore vj.'^.'.i foor! t - 



1 ;i 






.ue;ti leas 'uirin n quTi'l-,sr seclilon, /'oren't tulte'^ fur tho 
• .-■■. -ihlnerii tlvit was t f^ .1:1.1 or.-nin^ 1.1 Idw*^ at; .^gricall-ure. l!,o:an 
1.1 -..vjis subm?^r-:--ln.'5l, :>\s u l:iae oolc Lo S'.ipi.ort "" fnrriily , 
. ' ^ . r.j ji' uheao f^ri.is v«f.'3r ' . .. - . 

jc!;od t.'fif' coanti'y side , soti'^ jC tho 1 inr;: purchnned ly 
- ' a 'ire 3 Si In [^ their far.Ti rioreage. ^'y GrnacfsShe." 

C. Jorn->f5 3r. ; ...■:.: j:.-3 ^.T the f :>j'Ciiii'Ote one t -.vho wore a^>^ls 
:r . T fi^'.ns to his ordinal, o^sj;. ii,3l , 

Tlte ys^=r or './.'", v.'t« a V'?"/ 1 .'ij. or-tnn "•. 5nu ^r- oud ': i.;:c foi' t;j^ 

vill.'.^r- ..:" "IIIC ;on'". It wfis .ct t'aip. t i:.'i<? th^t tliey celo- 
d their first 100 i'^ -? 'U' :.; . It. ••■^r-, ■-• ti:ne r''io\t thf'S!^ p-^npls 

J-; ■•■7:- I : ~: - . r-:-ill '-'cr r^nr^ly on-:;!:!-!!.- -g T: " '.he 



liv;-. 



■■11 ol:out th? f^;--" ( r "in^n^iiL th.it ny 
eii-..<.s-j it v.os these .Tond it *. jns f-^t shnii-ec" 
ies of tnnse people. To V,et'.er ur^cerctiin.^ 
^ ■ ■■ /'-^ V ';;'''0 •••one it l:;n3 ihnt the? h^id 



I'l. 



BTTTj.'.Mir sNTj ';it;,'\[i jc::^:s 



"r '::>-'•. -vonta exceijt ciiit Uiis caui'l c^ ,r : •-:■.). ::e ovrr* to chls ouunti-'y 
^i"-'i' -'"■ ■ •'■'n.'3'riire, vynles in 134.'. Tik- faiuily nil -ir-riijec! 

^ ''^''■' '-•■-'- -■";■'• ^'■"' ''"': ■ ■•' '-o ';::!•' --,,'-■ ^; j this country four- ,,eovz 

p:'.3-7l0U3l^. 

".ft"!:' *.:i9y " rr l V '^ •" , th<^7 se'j'Ted '.n 'V"; ikeshn :;j.vinty, '"is -; ^r. n In 



Ji\!vi^3 T). jor^c 



'•-J 1''^ oor'nal, Gi'eo b-i.'^renl; rn^nacH' ol her vns born in South '.V7l->c 
'' . - "--■> 1532. '.:iiC.i-\ ;io WMc n young " ^ ■- :,;..'.if=! ho l;hi£ cjxnlcj 
Tr m. ;-;rc'i.l,':'^n3]-;ic'3, VJ'-.les -1 ■:\ ■ . , Ms psi-^nts who nnop '.heir 
--'-'•- ' ■' ' ''- '^.e"'V I'jricl ^134:?) In Ot; :,•! ..-t , V/nusk'^shP rjounty, "v'lfjoonsln. 

I' W3S t.h'rr& on Novcnber 7, 1355 th^il he i;ook h!.r- vilfe, :'jr 
i'jrr^er Jaut? Roberts. Tt'ir;'.r -n ? r r- 1 n ,;_' =i provnu to bt^ n tr-ue uniijn 
"iir! t'-i^y IJv'H i:o;3Slbc5r for ovt 50 y'?r:r''- In conr:or(5 oiid pes.-ie. 

In 1057. t'lrty moved to S^-c i.n£v;o t cr, "'luch^i"; cr)unl;y rin- first 
l!^■^f -^lonr^ sxde ;,be pine Ri-vor n-nc Idlfvwild. 

In IbCn, thOj bouhbt -^ 163 icrs Vr.v.Xi (cor^t ^n? ^"3^.00) In 
tba t ...r jif iio.j" f.'j.'i ;iDbort II. itjbnrtn. Mr. iijbe;?ts wos Vn? 
bro:;b • - ':•;;■"'>- J;..:: i^ot:^-?';^ Jono;j. It Is "/cl" wjrth 
■I'lili'. ■ . - - . ■ '.; Jar? Ivobcr» Jon--;s rnd n br'Otb'^.f,. Dov'c' riob-rt?, 

wvbo .'":•: olf^.-itod asso.ably.-n.-^n fi'O-;. ',V':u.-:3 3h". 'bounty to the '-Vl scons in 
I.:- ^b. In;; are in 1353. 

.\ h'"in'3 A'^:. :; ji'io I L' i .;C ' ;" 'n " ' ' -" It b'^c bopn I no fnjiily bo;)ie 
von t inti j'i:ily Tor 100 y'^^r;:. \3 of now five ;^e:i';n t lo ns b<n\re 

,"•. r_eo D. Joa?i3 wnt --.f fil i-". tsd with che church frOTi bis infanciy 

■!■ -. . " ■ ^- ~ber of tbn fnll pr ivi 1 ':;_;e. inu •.'■.ont ln-;>r; r. 

loy^l an"^ ^^ ■ " - - . , . •re'. I'r: \-'^r, of /.,'■''- "iid v.enoe- 

r ■;■• . \ :_ ■ ' ■■ " '^ ^, ~ ' '"n-vj-red t" quench ^^■b3^ thai^ lf:nltc 

f^irf' ^■;i " ■■ ^ ' ' ' " ■ '- ' „ r him '■■'■■ ' ' ■'"'^ 

-l-::r)-j^ :■. : ^ " ' - ' ' ' '.'■."" - ■ '" ':r:r.i":1:-. ih<- 

■-:;:': . • ■ ' ■ ' ^ ;. i • of .. . . ^ '■ • . nn t o thn 



T'" ' ~ Tion '-."'_-- -.lO': '-jcr f.I'"s to him khnh iuuwod v;.-irMith 

"■"■■■, - - jhildren nnd eujoynd hcnslii"; Lliein. rivrry ': Inc 

. ■ ':ia fr'Oin town on ^ai.T horse rird V)UfT[;y, he . .^ :". 

^- .- -.ho neighbor's rind ^Ixc nil ■ ' '.-'a c-vn 1y . T'-.e 
■ ' :'«n knew cliis .ond w&uld always bo wnitini?- for hi'i;, ^IJlieri he 
. " -'^ . •: ■- r..-'. cling by tl'ie cicie of l;hft r.^fic' hft wjuld 3peed up the 
hor'St-r! thg p:\?'jend i:.; j-/'-;jn't coin^ ':o Suon, o\iddenlj , '.he horses 
'A' ere pulled to t hjlr "hIo oil :, hs kids /.-ould p-ather arou.id Vii'i 
"••■>jMiing .'^nd tril>:ir.r, 

j5;:-i?>s D. Jones v;=T3 c s*:ronn; :n9n ond had wurk^d h.ird '-11 his 
llfn. anc Lh:)Ui;h he hnd ^'.ons throufrh ^;,r nany hsrr^hlpt; v<hjch 
o,." r---i::;- ' - ■'•h pioneer J.np- 1 if f? , lie .■^t'lrted ou^, -jr hlc 33 T-d 

yp-nr vvlf '" ' " . "li--": I'Jst ni-"r;3 v-'^'.g n short 

.'ar'^t..lon. .".. i" ' " ■ . •;>:«!. 3 i.r-':vious Lo lilr, dmth he v;cnt out and 
foil .in ':h3 I""" "r-.:"^ured hlrj '.'_ " ^ -: . !Tc aufiCi-ed a rren L 

do^l .^f i.nic; for ..-n^ '"-^yo 'ind -, i -;. ; 5^ h: ;•- iii nil In :^aisl gug- 
■nistlnn. Jus': v. -.im-; hi:; condition :.nz in^'rovlrr, he p'^nard nway 
on "^f-bro-ry 1, "iTir,, The l-'iaedin en c:'i_)zc of :.ir d^-^bh v.-ns ctrohe, 
Mournin,- for '^:in •^''^nth v.'')s .node ..Tjr.h onjier v.'hsn the fi-iily 
:-e'nf>.V!h<^r f^d h'3 las!. .. ;rdr;,"He thor; h'^lie\Pth ahnll no', oa.-ie host':'." 

Fehra'sry <!':'. .-. l.n id to rsst in the CaerGolsoi 'Je-nstcry 

('.Vild i-(o->?, V.'io ■■. r^ c in) by tht> sidr. of Vila ■/■•ife who hp'" pnorpd 3v.'r;5^ 



jC3!^r:i oL'3vy:T:30ii 



Tl'^t: re id littl.^ kaown nbout; n;,' p?r,'j»rnal Or? f' t-Orea L GrfinC- 
.-/urehta, Jos^i^h dtc-vTwson iirid hia v.'if« liiiOry Jnt.'cis Srr.v.*.::s on. T.iir 
' ., - n^^: I ;.'n ■; r •:1s t;o find au !: waa trig t he was born In Irtl'^.c^c 
nric '■;■-; ■'.nrrif.d to hlc? wlfs In Wild r!o.-3<», , '.Via cons In. I '■'■ ■ anr-bl.! 
t D ri ncl 3 ay d n t 5 s .ir n cup:5 1 : ons , :*. s t , 



J.-WP.3 Vi. JOVF.S 

■,■■■■■: .Lcli v;^n :nj ;^ni:^rn^l, Gri-.r.l ar-Mncrp ;;hfir wos 

n ui'-^ .-t-n lilnt; his fnthrr (Jf-:nsn D.) h'-^ -.'V^^^'r^'' 



cliild .>: ;, ... neUhborc; to his fufcui'o wifr nn^^ t, ne fn ui"' Ic 
r: :.. .. .- ^ather ofLeii. t'.oth were farniinr fsTJ.!!--:-. On 'Anvch 4, 
1390 he WHo unltcc" '<:. ri ;■:■ o 3 •:,.'; ? to fillL;" Stevoiflon J-acc, dnn-'iMcr 
if Xr. r.nC Mrs. ," -./ : ■: ••.jh. Tv;o 3:^110 'AC-re "born uo then, 

T7-,-i -1 ,■; -• ,, s-K^i^. ;nar:'i>-i7<? ; tl''ey lived on the rni'Ti t'r;V. '-ils 
--1- T- . - ':^ nqnlr'^.O rr,-y\it;.-, Bo'-,h JQ!.":: i'. ■'^nd J^rrif-G D. 

I'. •" - "^hfi fa: ■ . 1:^ l:'.-nf? with \rr,'?Lr fr-;.:iies snr' the 

'.;:?: /'-"T ';'.'!'! V' I-'.. r:' , ■" '., viri.p; Quartern. 

I'hny nil ■■ • / ^ for'ii .'-nr! tbfvy .t11 worked lisrcl. 1'..cj 

x'c^ - ■' "^vec^r^,*^ In'jD.iie .-ind any ex':cr> .r.oney '""^.'s pu'" ".ack into tlie 
fipiii "■ G silo's Tid hnrn'5 'verc Chen built, 

C:: •" .. ^' '. : . • ■ „ id naourect :n?n r?rir] w?s lover! hy 

chl"!uv?ri. ']'2 left .."'.r.y ti-orlRinr.ri'S on toe f"''.'..'-ly r"i':u, but o!is 
v,-:: ". I.? 1CJ irt^nt «■! .. Onr- cny wr.ilo cleaning hir, c.hntr.-'3n in t'r.e 
h3-''r<--, it r) cclcl^i'i t-".lly went Oif and b"i «v/ -t l^.rfe hole In :ho 
y^ntx'y door.. T' ■"- -'h-'nor v;3?, never fixcc'. one th-- hole Is 3 til? th-orft 
to t h i i- d f". y , 

Al ic?^ Stov(=.n.'. :;n .Ton-o-; ' . "^ ' -pn 'born on June "'.'", 11"3 snc; '.»as 
":oi.'n in th^ ' '^ .1 . . ._" - .. -" :rir.ny .friends rnd v.a:; 'rjip^hly 

to oo:-jT :■)■■. .1 ..:....,. " ' , ' ' i oc wfi? ■ ' 



3'-;o -.'": -;laD ;-i fait!:iful wife nnf"! o loving]- 'iintliifr in h»r ^.>:if. S''.'; 
v,ent; throtinh the j^re^t tbllr.: nnrl reG;"-onn iV>tl. It irs of a '/jOiiU-a wl'.li 
''i'.-:-'v '' ' .vit her- raill.h in Cxod strong in':!! fl.v.n. 

3'-r pps-i'yd '"wnv ':• '. ':Vv-» r,'3ke S'-.* TIosplLal, OFjbkoah 'R' scon."; In, 
SViC hsd g-one thorc Lo undnr,\.;) na opera Hon for nomr; int^rrinl 
•^ rouble , tuL thf-. or.'^gl £;.rovcd f^:^! Ivscaucf* of her v/eok concIltLor. 
--iJ -'— '■•dvencS''"! statn of t!ie disease. 2>'.i9. wn ■?; biji-lrc'. o ": ■7:'>er;-- !«.: 



'- ;n<ifst!i,-r, Jornrr. D. J,-»-\^ : Sr. , . " ' lTi 13C-9 

■ " ^•'5i'i!i V.li"'' ' "•randfnlh'^jaj hr.o bought; :anny ^p.nvs l;e- 
-'"-■■ . " ..0 fnrm Lfi^i i.'een 3n Lh,;; rji.Lily f-^r thirty'- .seven ye-'. 
-J '.^i--^ ndfgfcV. •••• . - i-.Vjlrc! tfener.^tl on 1: o have. 1 Ivftd t.-isfe, 

'., '?r.indf!ir.;.e--' m^^l ..is future wlffi, Enid Owrhs Jon.cs in 
Ooh:...-'- '""Isc-jnoln. Thf-y hno .>' L :«n i blind C.n':,^ ?'. '<.) by - 
f r 5. •:•-;■. : ...." ..!^ Grf^nuaotherrj, Cnurlin/i; v..as clfrio')! i. In Vhosft •-^■'5;,i r 
''"■""-■• ' •" ' ■ "' I" ;!o-!^; ■•'^.■- ''j.-proxlms tr-ly 40 .:tiles n^.-nru nnr vrDvel 
-„ '■■ ' :. ;.„ ' i ■-'fnth'.- j,> did ni.nkr-r t;ne trip tbo'.ich ':\ien- 
?vv^r ■'■ - 111--. ;,r:,?'^ :-'.:..»: foiir ^ .-ti-s' fror:i Ui^'r fir?^ 



Tov !:h* .".'hole 
b?kc r^ ^ 



'.'J Irill.: :. i.^lr h:)nr;y:vioon. 'An?, 
: r ^r-cr'i'y r:. It wna 'it thsV. tl-tic 
\, ■ - ■•.tivity nnc t-b.e: silo's 
I'Lly 'chf>i-5fiftpr' 'vith 

i^ vers closed so hx'ie kiCG cjjIc: i_i,j Lo tae 
r'.-Te -rpre v.o potato dlg^-.frs in tho?r 

. ; nndrr.otbrrr. -uty to d ■' tb* cooklfi!^ 

.T T lot ''f bnL--inii nnc chf. : 

' . ." , ■'■'■' 'r- ■A""iS 'uavirifd, I brv?- 



winter ir'.onih^ of I'jCO •,vh'?M he '-vorked on 



: : the fli :■. 
'Stem part ", —\•.ny-^ ij.tunljy '-rj. 



o o n t u r'i' , f '' rm a j? r. 



■pl^'^ed of th< 



r" ' ''-' " r^ciuii'- i '^ino 'ther crops, Py thf ye^ir of 15-?:? 

■'".,"- " -i^- rnr.ns in Ihe ars-i-. lia net out to l.'uprcvc tho 

-"' ' . ■ ■ -■■,;-•' - plotci set out l"-;,' ihs I'n ivf r-5! Ity 

'' '" '" ■ 1 . -x ^eris, " ■' '* .' -:'?ver3l yf;?.rG oT 

' ' ■ ~ . ."^ r *.■'.** )' " '■ "1 '"".I "" ■" -"^ \ I ?■ ?* ')^ Go :i *n ^ r* t"' 1 •" X 

"" ' '". '.:oO":5, :■... \_ 1 " iC r:r5Mlts, S..i.'^!i ti'ii^rf wnp a fcfT..t 

I'. . : .• J- .:•. , ;!.. tiia?, t") ., , : i, hi.;; rons ■'/.^■■n frf»t:;inr: 
1- ■ •.■'slec3 in T--ir:iii\-)i "c6 it ahe ; le .?•"•?. r ■; r^' to 'iXi.nnd. Tlirjurh 
:...■.- i^rd woi^k of hiac'^lf nnr -.ir j;3n3, thev. v-e:'i. 'ible to Liuild up 
''he fnx'i so OS t.lvrj coul'" 1 Ivi: ver^' conir.^ir '.il' !■• . 

J,?'nf! ? G. JoiT^p, S:'. '.v.s nbls to 'rnjjy hie. rork tc ths enc ond 
1 . ." th.'; V.J ." ' _ ;-p«c-';. 'I'*, f'spie r i'-^ll 7 enj'iycd th* ji^ht ■;■ f tht 

Tr^.nd rne^nlf. " l'" .• . ' r. '. i*- cr.";ps riper( In i:!:3 

f'.-!^. ■'T^ r-}\so :■- \ ^ • tho n5nn on his fiv.rU«» lioiis 'irrck. 



Mv Crfi 



.-'75, ' ^^r■v'^.x■ rsslly 

srips of him. Vcfon^ •311c 



to SU 



V L ..i C i-C <t '-J-',. .1 



hf! coi-ilr! fL;-:'<"l^ --njoy life n,rtev v.'orkin/;; go hard all !ilc "j'f". 

T'y ■■-'•,<• in-, 1 ";i.nnrt:,-iol;her, Enlrl Owens Jjn«r v.a.s l;orri l.n icr.3 
"' ' " ■ -^ Oahknsh unt. '1 sh<?i T.^rried '.n 1322. 

She a.oSndftd Oshkos"n Hl^^h School, r:-nrlao ting In I'^l-:, nnc 
'i.f:. ^'. 'tended Sl;ni;G nor:r!3l Scliool of Oahkoah foi' tbrae jorrs. 
'.fU'-r ^_,.- ■ ' ". ".ja] Stn'o''^ N'Trfinl, sh.^: iv-sa thnrt qurlirisd for 
I '^■^chlri&. tl.-.- J .U' c fc yen.' of :;eaching was ap«n1; ?3 b TJlrinf ojo;.* , 
'Vie i'" onsiri, v;r.Lfih Yff'f; only fleveu :.iile'? froa ho-ne r.nd .isr srl'^ry 

oh" '■ ■ . \ .. ^_'-- , V'. , ■. ':.o Oshkosh by bus {n.:: trri'nc 

'ji^. two 3n " .' '" : " nnp) v.'lill'' r-'^^f"" v.-p-rr "ooc iTi thi*.' f^''!. 

^ul: C'r'.n;- ';'"e 'vi.-;^- • Iis it x:??. ^.li":;'' :i;if f ^r "lit . They hfid 

"!'■" '^: ~ ' '■■ " '. "." ' . ' y. 'A'eek : " .' .: j: " ■:;:•/ _■ ".;"(" ^h^Cl" 

■-:':.].■-:■ - \ ' - ' :---^y :::^.n to orlv thf:r. !.o Oaro Ty sli^-_^h, 

" i: Oriro thi^y v.r.-e ."~ . -^ I on ;jn intei'-uApn '■•rillsy '^st■ to 
0«V.:-.-''nh, rh^y hnc' yio^-'^d to sy^nd the v.'eek-r.nc *:h<^r'^, b'at by 
Sn t'.n"fh:y norril.nr cn^ -.v.':'; r.'.r: r r^por't ■.v.!s t;.nd ^n^'l another bli?.znr-d 
■.■v.Ts on ItG xoy. 3o v/heo i^ .rtort'jc' to nnow in th^ of-;-' mo on, th-^y 
c " ■- :■■ " .-^ '.:o loo'","? it • . .-r Ornx'O ^nd c^tch the ?:■ o* :ls>rl: tr'^.lr- 

h'3 ok 1-0 '"'.nr^c.O'" -■ . Thoif hnc ;];otten .;"ek to O:iro -oli'l^ht ond 
,-.-.■ ^ ■■'' " ■ "; tr.^in ■■Khan .7ieFjf'^;_"e or. we O'vcr thr '".'ir"?i th£ t 

thfl ':r')in "f'-": ' "■ ' " lo rfttlnc;; through the cnov; b^riks, 3o 

r' ^' •'.■ .- •- depot ' - . : ■ ' ■ i"P A.i^. v^'plt:i:if. Thf^ Ir 

■. : -^ !■ h ; - \ 'uli.' hr ^ ■ '. . . ■ ' - • -iilnr, 

V ■ " " ' ' :h^ f.ii^'r .;ot 'iin;le 

c'.M h ;-. ': - - ■ • ■ - ' -J h'-c t ■; : .: '. in t]:e cfivot ell 

nir.-it. 'Vh-:,-: i '■ " ^ ' "" ';h : '" ' find their ■■:n^ 



1- r, , ^ 






- "■ ■ - ; ■ . ^ ' . . ' ' '. - ' . .3 

V __ ■••,_" . ' "' vor-y ^c^ive at: l;h© r._'. "'f V'* ■:.'•,,' '.r 

";.:•;."'__ llvlnr ' '. *--— ^- .::';"h"3 n';.^ '^cr^r. '" "" ' ''^ 

■ " ' - - -fosr. -s'm spends 

1 ' Iv, Sac j.^ v- ry 3l;i'0fi£, ond v;oi.i(S?rful 

;■'-■/- "' ^'■■^nd out la -ny 'i-ilr.rl r. r? 

' ■ ' "'^y- ''^ ' : ' . '"..,. -■ '. - "^ , " " .-„ Gr^riClpar-crits 

i^.Oi-n y '"■"-■ Anni\-' -.^ '.. l-''". I'' ■■rrj i-eo^Z' '-' ■^■'■"^, 

i;h'-:, - r' ■; . ' - "1 : ^ viofci; were ...jlnL:" :Z out 

'; o cvf?.:-j ; , .. • '"11 -'li .'^--' olcti.!res v>'5T"e tf'ceri .u- cP 

■ •- " „ ■ ' , . ~ ' '^ ■ '/vsro han:-' .">v: ")' ll.s 



•j.vA Cj ... .:o.T';:~. i j.u 



3 C. Jon*n, J; 



u'>.i---3. i*>5i'!ti 



^ " -.iie*^ fjinr It r.sccsaary 
. , -' "I'lrsf^ in the; ^hcd 

^ . ' r It.-, oni-i- anc f^:-:'!.!' 






lil. J:-i*-, ,. -y. four cu":y 

-|_,., ^ „^^ /iuch :,h';t 
■ :-. -.-.■^ry i.'loat^ to hi'; Grnr.:";- 

, '"■■'"Id nrid toVrft .^ I'uip. M.?. 
.•■hen thi?- sgo. :? j.-in n p.-^sssc' 



,.^.(^ H.:r?b 1 ■ . rl-^n ;;h;:.-'ch all hi- lif*. 
, ' ., ; ■ ■■■sy^ 1944 -CiL. hn'n to l<?nvt 



^waOi'V'C; Oii J i^f „.';riCC; 



■ ^ nc- i^->]l*(;t in Vi/aush'^sra County, i. j-.-.n jf 

- , .s Ovvncc .' ^ ■'I'rftpd until 1953. 

v-?s T-'-ucklng Company unt;M 1?;65 
VetuTins ir^apital . ' , . .: :;:on3ln with 

..n tuinyr. Hi was opijro tciri on in Ghat^ip/enr am:, was cone idfii^eci 
' 1 . • ■ • lrgcr^v<56 snd another op?5rr'5 1 Ion 

■ ' ./ « .^ollov'/o-. If'' opffT'iLlon, h--^ In id in Q COM3 

■-■• : \, ^^, i~^-, 

"1- ' 'Vj- unf irtjo-ii.': ror l-ol,:i .ny fni^hsr- ind I Ur; fc '«•;■ ' ' " .. 

■ ;" ■ "■ '■ • ''..-■ 1 ■' '".'^vcr. He had passed j5v.-,?y at a r.-^ii'l; 

; -- ) "' , .jviat a teftn-a^tT. Bf^nvo 'nia death, 



Lhlr; 


:5! in 11'^ . 


iia r,. 


'T^ "niovec 


h!n 1 


:, V:: fnr ^:<?i 



• , ■ , . f , r^ ■■ i s t i» r' n n d I 
-■/j •:■ ■ : ■ _■ •-. us the Lri<itcrLnl 
.■n^, fr'!r;nd.'.' nnd v.'.'^a n fun-lovin r 
. c'-inr wit;, p'^opl- sue w:-:3 kuow;i in 



■IliTOHV 0? wr:L:jn oEl'il.K.iENT OF OSIMOSH 

i: \ ::•.■■ ^ ^ " it, or Oh;.ko/i': ]\--r' 

... ^, . . ' ~ , . : ne ',lv . ". ; " ■.■ ; - b'^lonr-l 

' ^ ''"■"* - _ ■ r --.i- I.': ■ ■^ 

I"; ■ ■' ■■ igl:?r nature 'oi-", J rapov u =..:.. . L". .:. .. ..'..'. 

:'■■"- - . . ;:., ^ hi^vfl:/ to Lhe •■v-^"' ■^h r-^r.^lr. And th»7 

' " ■ ■ ^.. ::\i. " " ill^ '.1 th^ :^ " -mlnr-if* Thf^- hoc" 

;•■>>,-■■ 'j - •'.'■-''- v'ith n :^*al ■jn*,q\j^<'il>jo' '. ■. 

•' -» ':•■;■ '.'I'.r '". 'r'" :":" 'Ir". T!"ray ^v'^lt t.helr yc^i ': '. on "."is 

'.::-.••■' J .■•■ , .■ ■ "■ , '5 ^-nlncti l,h?"5. f^ , : . ■ .-•' 

- ' " '- " ■ 'i.nuni on v.'it;}"i J/^sus, ';'h.vy ;;l!i:) 

hcl'.r. ' . ' - ■ / '-'f. ^\: ■■/ ■'■■•,-■ v.nole u.T-;xf «s /v 

peovl ^' \ - ...:.• -5 • "^ , T'or the';; '.d ssc;;^ eoi^ollcj 

'Ai'-'z ■.'' .', ' - .; 'n cc'- ^j o::'.llr ol ^ihe- cost of 

l""*"';. .'■'.: - ^li'jf^ vculi" cr':''? . n l LS"pj,. :> in trti^an one 

'■n ':';^-^ ...'■"' ' ". -wirlJ;. Tt i-.is from '.hi- t-sllfi-r *:hfl t 

'.''',' y 1-. ' • ':-.- '' \_ 7v?sloh:Jian Lo do' h'.3 l>r3t ^; 'i r'rif« 

'i- ..' ■.....'■ " ,^ ■■ , ■ iJh^sh. Many :u fch* ''/elsh 

"in !, lonnll !:y- i;-i "~ : ■ f' • - . ,; ?■ 1t-~'v rly i^'or^ugh bbf" c^','^.'; 

f:.' '.••;o- ;;r-l.\ ■ " ^ o:.- i^t cl :■ r-" L 5. .'a ?f Indapcvi<>nce than t)).:> 



'- '' - , . . " ry rinu suppnr-tera of thfn 

ion is u V.'lllis:.! Lloyc! GarrinDn. 



\ . •■ .'■ . / ' . -;lejcc i..-«n3 of 1'. 

.-■ ulis Joni lloaL ion to iii:jt.irf- fr^etdoni ';o Uio slave 
■ effect; ■ ' -■■ -■ -'\ r , _■, 

'.■• .1 - ' :. .;.c.:i. : or:.r:C^ to t'un itr the Fr:. ~ 'v "i. :;; . The 'svl-h :^ 3 ci:c. 
::?n 'vr : . for 'r/.'i in l:o''jh Instsnoisa, Kfi.--!r -hot .!n v'":-^ "I'^itior 
,j^ T-r.,- .,.,.: -'•-,., ,- , •..,._ .^ ^^ j.^,_, ^0 vern-riPnl in pnying I?--- 

V ' " ' . . ■ • i^s prcinisr '!;.-'ir!v.iO a r;prlou? !"•.""■ 

T •■■-•-- :'t3ly for ju■sUc•^ 0110 C"'^'^ ■■-.-'.;: 

■- . ■'"--," -.•-■- '^-?3 \, acrf^-lo. Aftrr 

■ ■- , ' ■"'.'_; .-•nc Il^Of:? v/lvin the ccfc-'Sft 

"■'■ '" ' " . "^ ■_ ■ 'ri d^nr.:-r; thft If/el'i.h 

', "■ ' • . '" ' ": • 7'*Ti jn.riinn' Harrison. In tho 

'- ' "■ " ' ■ - - ' : b.'s'j policy '.'/hsn tho. 

K'h:'\^ •'.'Tl'^r In ^" . !••• i^olc! '.]o1.1or- was 3 nuef-;t Ion. 

Vi'hen tho f 'Hi. ".'^ ' . ^^o celi;lr'3 In Osl-iliosh bh?y ^ound 
".It" Indinnn cLill ■.•'nnosrino on Lhe lino, ilj./j/h pr.v3£,f;s hnd 
l^'St their- r :. ;: ■; •;hf Isncl, they vvcrr still slow to l*nvp It 

... .J-. J . , . .. ^ , J.. . . J. r J.'!: ^.IL.. . .1.5, i '^ri->. J i' , ^C Cliff I 

■:v:ck:-! ": ' , ■ her vvild rrr^ntures v/zrr co-n-rijnly ;;csr. 

^1 : ' , " ' " L^'." ■■;■ ' " ^ " svirn'^c; va th c'v.t- 



' ' ■ . •■'.x", <'. hri: nlc f''-v;n 

:il3 ua-j , 

^ .aent v.gg jn thft -'VisLftrn half of 'ihc-: 
rcn Ivnlf of the lorn of Utic . ' . 
:on,-;ir;. T''en it sxtendeo b^yoncl tl'ni CJut;-j'-:-n 
1 ■.'" ini", n !.'_-ie *: own:, of 5ilJorncio and 



rh t.own :;.::'.:;:i' 



l' --1 '/• .-1 .1 -^ 



T' 



Is 



■ , ■■-'^■-■r t'., ..! ,^. "f Nfp.n.n'-i ■-■-■'''■ \- 

"■ ' ' ■ ••: ■■■'. "^-r"" --f Ln":r 'Vlnn<^ "^n^o , 
t '.'.z no^j^:! sncl, "nd on itc v;est siclf 

'"''X i'lv?r? join ^Tv'ethnr, TLir, loke 
<..' 1'"" -iil^s ;-"f-f. T'-i- 'L . ol nis ck V;olf 

■'•■'';, ,3 011th r.i 'L.:-jr ci'.y of Osljkosb; 

if Utica, and Llcorado r->uth of yekiml. 
'„ if b.;i-koGh i;o thi n» Ighl.or':.^ jc; of 
^, ■ ■. !il.dst of lbs sn u t"!cM.cia!< in 

."■".irect J on. TIt? first r:*vci^ mile.': 



tn, nnd buttci^ 10 ^f.rJ:r. The bfsl 



s paid ^,1.50 



„".'" . .'Ubh; Lhe br.nf: '- , " 

"r.-^t: |•^rol■,or \vo\s p?5id r. . ll-ifs nad o '■/■', 

. V^ 'r,he C#lniaan V/ar wag fought and whuol; 
Lot-^ly to :|1:1.00 find (i.1.50 n bushel. ThI,;: ■; np v.; 
, -.y Wlcootifiiin. farm?! ." . ' ■. ' ^ 

■ ■ . ,• -'j!. irjr; of iihf; V."5 ;•• nnrl the p'-.Tilc of 



r>: i"- , :'j scringe, 3tfi,5" bnnluio i' ""3 "'i Lh fl.;''-. Hi jUS 

' • . - ■ ' _ v.-rvi.-?' In '^j.rculfi t ion. '"'nou^ih '.■■•.-:r-'* v/3s 

:"; -. '^ " _,.sr, ..i-: ^ ■ .; KC-3r'ee nnc th(^' Intar'Vot vry '■:*i:^'-- 

Ti-o-u "! '^ \.-) '"' ' ,' \ T: ' " '■'1''? vf-'O '^ C':^|^r.';.:;''- ioi'i r^vj": fir.Qricl-'?! 

',h^ ■■;•'■' ,''( :, .il: •• .-.c, I .onficftccc In each oth'r; r.r.J thfij 

f--:i"1.j 1 •:=n''d L'-. -i :;, .-ther vrithoat any kind of r-i^celpt - n? 
::.»ntlon or r':i!;c, , but r*"^ .ihin^j: d ovi^r. ;!atr> t:;(» old =:onlc kwC. •"fi 'i '■"'': - 
owr- th'- :^old to t;he nno 'n need Df iV. 

.\riot^"i*r' '.ntsr^.L-; t In^ ?iSi^<:-'i'; of th?;;:'"- Oshlco-^h settlers wss 
th;- T- ■•'■.1 or t,h?',r C.30G. First t'lsy ■.-•■oulrl build n f:»lck and 
rnort^:- voult vjith " r- ."■ ■,"•.'< ^ilnV; i:i'^v<;.r. I:i this v?.\\lt thr ro'.i£'h - 
bo. V - f' ^;l^^l:i^d, " . Ide t;he rough box the oasknt '■•n.s pl?-c*d. 

rhi' :•" ,- ':^'^"' ^n.-;id-nblf-- coop'^ratlon anonf; th-:; nelghborc of th» 
iOur:i-:; fn.rJ.l^ ;. ■ ^■-.': j.-i th".;i vay. One neighbor went 

.•o to-.va T: • wont t:-. the quorry for -h': fist 

sl^h :;.r :' ^ - - ■ - third went for the sfind and l.j lu- for 

tt'.'" Kirrt'^r'. It ^\"-T: .11 MO iv'osssnry "-o hifc ". :noson t.o d.- 
nsc^r:.-, or-y ".-"'bor, M.\ '.bin !'.^i to bo d.'nf, quickly ant" In ■■ cliort 



rhl?, in rnn-jlusion, shows hov; th*» "v'clsh sfttl^.rs of Oshkos'* 
'.,'-' .J baHl.s. Tij^.j vcrr -. proud, i^ol 1 - ltv..j3 ceoplr; 
.■-•.''• ■"■" ', rcjTcy to t^! ve n hclpin; :- , . '.h'; iie-c-d/. ■ - - >^ • 
■■ l.'ird working farvners thot put In a^Ji'i^ hour-s jusl ti 



:- ■■■■ I: i'l. _ ■ tlic./ :voulcl v:te, ns ..uc .i:rn, foi- the i^.-n of their 
•b:*"'^. i' i '."::•■ e ".-ere very ^oot" ..i»v'j nnc! I «.r. extr^jitifly proud to 



[J lintcrnnl Gren C-i!i'*.n t-Oreg t; Gr.nnr'p'-ireiits liv*:"! in An£;?.l3ey> 
.:jr? i^.Ti'cnl.ri uf Hu p-h Ovvrns who hsd I'o.ne '.;o 



'.kTLLI.'iJ.i a!i;> i\!. ■.li.J/iiilii JON';; 



"'."flfr, '^ n»^'"j:- ,. "• , tri^. to Am ■'T- r 1 c a . Th'^y a'pi'S ':he pnrents 






'iV'j.ll';^ cciolvf 



ordn Ln.*»,d ;n Inin I: ->. v ■ 1*1 - 'Ti'/ Or-: '■ t- 



j.'e-.rip':T'?ncft ir. cstiiir 
i';iis v;-^?:; tli^TSi said 

. :: "■■ ' ■- ^t flv'J^a': 

:.Lnf!noe r.l-:cge 30 yer.rs 
•rid, ■'■!,;.■ '. .-" you c:;;n 



ii II. J." e, 



to 



' ^ ;.;'; hoisd by U3 after' dt)..; . ' .■;••; In 

' ' ' = r . . J ■ ;';.*v«renc. ■ Dav?.d 

~jull:ea, I x-eeoll uVo rf-a^rk;: .■■ - ^ ^'. "■"' . 'i • '. . 
- ;iin shooting bl:xck.blrcl3 nnc! killtnr a little hri:-":- 
■' :i.^!3t. He fell sorry fir '-.r.e ILk,":!?: ''."\ 

.- " "■ ■ .3S btrln^ ■« !. f:b tib* "olOv^lctlrns , 

, . . ,.T- I,i i.'^].."^" '.'•' '^oT" -:v; in,;;; o'lf blar^k 
-■ . / ^ • • " . . ; ■ . ' ^f * llvl:i ' 

... '.r^'\,. T :- ■.' -. jji'K^ upon ohr "ViT^^ 
. . .- • ;" '. -: ':..'-) t tiff her, arid fiiL.ollj ?!■,•'> killed 
^.i,. .:. . ,.•:,." ."..>,..,i fro.n ijhe Ijfi: Qncl 3";i'J, Vvcll, we 
i^lda'c .•■ c? So. are rr.nny with t Sjippreac* , l-j.^vinr others 
■> , ■;":i'- ''^'~y • ^it «■ iib:^r'' 'n ']"■«• vLctOiy "'nf jjl Dry nt 



^'-rc.3 snjvv 



■-^f th<= 



: yfniis WPG n vory 3trjn{;;, 
;^h :i-'r9l-3 .9n..i wnntsn ethers 

■-- " 11 :-.'- : if-. 

-^ 'r- ,: y ohhrr ways. 
- , , ' ■ ■ S;:hnol wfis 



' ' . ". •.,..■11 you c. littl* abnut lii>ii to ijhow 

1 ■ ' - - .^encie my Trrwa t-Qi''fc nt G-r?Ji)Clf -sthcr could h'--'.-^ 

~^ i ■ ". ■ . 'h vOwens Jr. wns a ^nlnlTt'ir- fin'i atarvod '. o 

■^ ■" ■' ■ '~. ■ ■■ . -ined In th- It Conv(»iitiori Jrn« ?, 

-. ~/~''". ;■ -:' : . . Shftphsi'd Bnrn?. ' - . T Jojacy, '-'il fioonn la 

■y . - '■' ...- liibofftd in fidelity soA sucoftsa. He waa ^ though':- 

' .': .1.-. v.io?: ..i^n qri:"' lovcir] the success oi th« cause in all Its 
;rr':r. va^li nil pui-ity, Ii« woa 9lso skilled in aiu.'jir;, the '.vjr>k of 
the S.iiiooj Sohoo'' . !: ''Tii : r^ri^e ?nc ;!:ilr;sl jnnry zocl^z'iss, so thai, 
;,iittl:ij^ nil things tj£5tliiT, i*: '"Of; fclt thifc bis vnl--^ In iruVllc 
'•• V-' ■•" ' ': •■■"!!3 v.-^ir-y grc^l, ThiT shjw;; thot th(= f-?!*-, •:ful cL«'jcon, 
!TU;2h Ov:?n." 3r. , vvhs such .-'i strong snci kOO'""'' ■nnn thnt his influe.'jcc; 
wars rani-fio ja to his r^.jn :■■■:> th':;t ne l^t-'r be(.?..;;s q niai.ster ir.d 
L"i''!sr of co;.iruUni by Hffr. irs. 



JO HI;_riT:2SE_ 

JoVm ;>-- ' ■■ , . ■•■■r^inr^ ?7 , 1315 Jii 'r;-C'''yt" (:Vhl!,ft ^iO':,2r) , 

'.' - . . • ::' I ■ :•" . "I" ' • ':.l Isnbr 1. h Levis ;{?"■> se was 

! ;.~ht<--r of t>«org« Lev/Ts and h.T? .■'.fr- r;;at-rilchr;i-'d- liynon of 
•■•'•- ^' » " -' -J "J _- ^ - ■ 1 
...^ ^.^ tC-'iml .■;:r.''r5 l-Or'e a t Grand^jSi^enl s o.g.nfr to tr.ls cri.nLrv In 
C-^lj !''''np liiirijv i:i Flrjtr.i.xville , '-V'lkesL'arr* , sno rje^r.in^ Fer.ri.'L j'lv3''-5 



In :i::;y, Yy^v zhej sf.z'Ae.6 jii Sj-ici.lon 35 of iiv; Vidijh S«i:ul»- 
"■.•■•:'•, in OsblvD'Sli, Wi£c:)ns!n. Cn*! ~i' \:''.-i first Lrlps he t":'k nftfr 
ar-i-i'. '.. " " ■ ". i • : " ;•; vv-a? to Find du L-ic "'b'^r? iiC bou£;!i:; cii th:=- 
fur;: i i: .; .'- b.T ': j:.'l'1 j'lrid ther?, H^ was no', n'hls uo 1? :j' ;,i;jnh 
':■)'■: c ".';'■ ^ ' ■• "• '.-' • • '1^ ■J^'n'!: -'^s q sliovs, b'^d, 5 Lf^bl^, and -^ f^'.-; 
ch^=1 r-3. 

'^■;-.:r\:n'?::i rl^lldr^n "'t'I':^ born to John R'^-s** nnd h\3 vtlf*. Th?y 
',■••.1^ " noti'i'.ly kind fT.illy «nd stron.;/ f.-!''.! .Trs Ir. t;he c-:iur,p r.f 
T.jrist. ibwy V;.-*;-'' ..i.-.ibers ">?" Zor<r JhuroV •.•'.-r'; hi? vv^5 r.borl r t.-^r 
for n* Trly fc^i'ty __.*m'C. IT' w> • :■ -^ s'tronr .^n.! or.bivi .n'na in ri-v?ry 
ciri^l-:' ":\C in tb:^ ''ront -^n s f r^ r;r; r. r , 

J ,■ :.': ._ b ^', ".,bj nad h? difjd Oct..bcr ?o, 139-1. 



rOHN ■.)V;^^ITS 



o.y i-n,.;-'. " ., -^ Jr;.. .iv.fn V ri«r , John Ov;ens, .;^^:. bor.i 1;. /iv 
.f 'Jtlo'-. , :.. '■ . TJ54. ni2 porsnt:-- -r .,5 e-irl;/ ^.r t '.''.ors of 
'■'i, ri:':, ".i r . .'r-. HUi^:i Owens. 

■-';•- 1- ::be town jf U'jIcs uafcil 1509, -novlr.,:. - 

Osiikosh. He was ^1 .■n''..'iber r-inn a dft'scon of Stile.n Fr-e.':bv teri'>a ■>h'.jrch, 
■»/!y C-r'*-.t: 'Jr'^^rir :"■-■ - " ■- nloO 'n Imrjortant .mn in th* 'Ve'Loh 

S'* 1: tl ".r.-^r. I ~'f Osir.'OSh, 'Viricoas In, '\3 tiuR v;'--:s norln^ vl^cH) for 
t"/::f. 50th /Vriiiiverr3"'2ry of thr 3?tt ';!?! n'-nl ,. b? v>'^:: *lr!?t-r ': ■> ths 
'. "..Ti.iii'^ t;'a i; :. ivi'/.f j'.'jc nc'jss^Ty nm nj; =■■..■:? n t; s , "e w-ns '^l"'~> a 
benchnr n t Ev'^ th!';-.na Ii.^;lnol of Oahkosli ia ':;ie j's-rti of 1;."1 &.id 

Vt Gr^ol :r3nr:; -. ^ r, vzvj quLst, :;; jdo3 1, k Ind ::riC; 'Racily 

.r-Rn. H.T \v;.i:; very ff!ii;hral gj Lh* VJr^ls'i Cluir-^h that •.vns gt ':hat 
tine ver'j floui'' L-'^ninr;,. II wnuT'": ^* difricilt t" think of 3 life 
thai; -j-i^is aM'z const?int Had ..iOCd tciuLiful uhrin .;a ; hie life, i^e 
v'ia of a l,'rau<".r, 1 •'> n I * a t mtiir: T:ic n ^^crfsct ;^?ntle.i.aii ia 3II 
hi3 he ho ^i or. 

John OAc:n::i p-ssr^od nv^y Gt ':h^ ?a£P '^f 79 Tftpr a,-; illnesG of 
about .-T i---r. 

A.nn ^rpf,?! Ovro (■li-eut Gr'Gn:^:.;:thT) w^^ i;h» "."st of - fainlly 
of r:iurtf<*n chilor '.ri , born to John .nn'": Elizoh?th ilecs*. 5he v-.qs 
horn in the town of ■•■['m .-.n th" 13 th of 3-, pts-nh-^r, lc5-3. 



eoTf-'^' r''.jf;- 



' ' ' .. " ■ : ' : • ■ ., • rrir:uf! V , 

il-^r v> i Lh ',j.i contj,r-:!^flt Ion b' . ■ ^ 
;h?: book, but. 'would _^.r%3cii it ra l^e iclu .'. 
■.••;:ions v;prft vi^ry forcr,f',jl '-rad int •»;r-!:.? u '.n_ 



2'-.o.i.:y. m}FV::.:\h 






1 n :", ; . n r c^. 



- . ;'!•:'" L :- :■; Inn if; 
: 1-^ 1 1 d 1'' « '.1 v; f :• • Tv o rn 



^•'•''^'j '".'■- J"!*'' ^ ^":r. ^v^^-'yonr r^^fj f^rss Lp-r.":! thsir i^-^ij '^;;t1.*s 

~ n ' : - ' . ~ . ■ , : "•. perforiTi MTsm', Th^^. sftv'.n chllcrTi 

,„«,.,. :•■■•- .1 ':• -^ ■ - . ■ ■ -. . ^^ "nj tiir.rft w-:?s ?5lw3ys grsct 

:^-v^ ■ • ■.. ' ,-~. rh'^j ■- ' - ' .• ...vercoarr) nm, ^l.'i.i'ec; 

i.' " '■ ".■'''' - ' .', " ' -^ , ^f !;;.-ijL- ovi'n 3l«cs, 

^:;U^lin^:, ia ih* ■ ' . . . ^ .t fM/uil;^ also 1';^^; n Ijij ^1' C3.::pnay, 
Ga? of the i'nvgrilf i'ls t^u,;;:; s uurin^;. ;•■:. c-^ c-^^iy;; wv!f5 c^rrry ^ I:7kin^. 
The wliol? fn ..ll^' ; " ' ' '■ ' • ■■.\>v:'LC spfnd n^ny hours ;■ L 'jLis, 

Ih'^n ';rt»i"vvr:L'Gs , -i-v-: _ ^ ; _ ■''■ . ''h n p'cnLc l'.:nch. Thf 

fa.i'ly "f/as not ^v'-rl^^ r/^li_i:;U::r '. ; t '.lie chllorftn vj-;.'* rricuir-^w to 
nt'r'.cc" ounclay School sv^-ry Vi'";f.k. To Cn :/-.lr. '/.j-y b'^f'' uu '.v"lk 
1;':'o .:"''_' ' ;" • '■ '."■■,, " .''' " "" ncotinre bslo in "m old 3:;;iool 

-•1 ^ " /_„ .. . ■ '■ ""i?inr ; ■ - .;. .- '... .:.^,."r:r fo i-nr on tto\: ' ' . 
r.- ]- '-'■--': ■:■::- l-. ■::-. Ou^ :^:^u^ M - -;o s in IDIG .i.. 

. - ■ ^ •- ■ . . ' . ■ : . r.'ir first - ; 



" - " ■ ■ - ■ In l-h« y-iar 1025. 

S " .' ' ' ^ •' .■ -• . . ■ -■■ ill a'UTli^cl ■ ■ '"^ , ■•.i.y Cr"?Tt- 

• ats ficquii " - .: '..aurf'n t In VMld ii-:)iit» Tlwi' li^r^ 

■■':.:,; ,. ■ - ' ■ .ey bnught tbe I'-s h.'V.ir.t.;;!: , ■ , ■ they w-".:'" 

In uh'.s biLjiriCiSo lur r; v^liil'j, hhey sold i -.'\ . f 3r>j-ln,T, 

.'^-org8 H",j'. .. . , t.'ici for h.'iing i .".:-.i'.1n£ ;;.in n\\ liox-sss, 

.'■'.n^. , ' :. ■ rjo.aftone v, oulu try t.0 go pnal: Iruu on i '.iorsc i.je '.voul;" " . ■ 
1 " ;, Gbi:. II psss. .\l^o ia I'lts:" yc'^rs he Cvov. his oln MDd-,! T 'r 
:ii :''■". /.•■ - — —.-[•. n 5-- hf;; fj^fi clrovff lii:" 'nrsc •■^•n.'l cajr-t, H« was 

. :!. _, ' - . Z' ■ i: -V- -,-■-">,•■ ;'^',- -nrp of nis 3wn r;nc lihnt 

■ v/' V,, .:•:. "■;'"" ■'■.,.. . . „i '.via^^. W-.. n'^so h:id '^ 

\\zt?-^ •"' i";;. j.i'., ■ '"'..■";i. ■'.'ly Qrea!; Grsiial :....•• r . -1, n vrrry s^uo- 

l o::n. -if . ■'-; conic' si. t for houiT, with .•^r.^'on-, A-.^-.X. 

--z v:^" ■, : - " : ■■ . ; ''-il. ch v.;nv n T,':;e:c. woulc fnll If .it wne. 






n t tl 



rl.i! Oft , f ■^ : 



i."iri?" v.r •"ajoy?^:' t;.?ll;irir ntoat Ij-'p^-nro 
'^ '.\ i 1 C II o s 1- , Al 1 It ",;-;; p.." n i n I, ov, "i" me?* f^. 
'■':■ 'n n clrcl' !:•"."' V. in~. Ore o^.y, c^r.e 

:"'_ f» .'-I t'" f? 1 1 thfJ .\':r.'C\ 01 ; of hi? 

boiiib Ir. \ '; /xis'sr' of th« clrcl^c' :nen 
. ^ -: .'J t n vr r . All Liat on'! ann vvao "-.r.d 

..J ' " i^clllni:^ aDoa'o «;ns the robof? .ry 



--:■ " ': -):".] ?'.:-'[■: ' /"-J froni fcr^vni. Oi..*; of ,i1d 

".-..] '■-' '. ■' ■' ■^ .•n«».!ib<»r' jf this yoz'^n. "..." i? 

■' '. '. ' ' "'.'■. .1: ,,■ ■;■,.- arid th^ :'e un*nin<^ 

■ "', "F'i.sy", !;hrt robber thnl l ; . ':'" '' 

^ . ' - _„. ^ :'i'^.r;ori&l ' :^ " :• ' ,, „ ' ^ if t,srwa:-i:" , " 

■ ■' ■ -^ .\ ■-:ii-' "n 3n i;h« locnl cnin in uhc .lornlnr 
'::■-) Inj roG.'is Oil p^lGy'3 //rove. oh.-i L^ri: or ohe ev,::,inj;: ti.-':i'.n 
"")r ftjrjjy ^cir'c no-'^nfi ' "• ■ .c di^^ ■•'■^ s or K/isre shs c^jne 
."r ■■>::!. "v'^n to .'' ' ., : _', jol chlT'/i^-n ^'■, 111 vlsii". Psts;,'* 



nr- 2^u>;, iv-:^i r-t^ch" T^:?" 3r "0 



M IKK IE PIERCE HUPPyluN 



1374. Sh^ W'^s .i;:-)[ 



m :!.n 



Lurr. ', '■ ■ 
01 :l-.- ^ 



. :':i;'.' ',]•?. .'• ^Ti . r:> "^r. , wo.? boiTi 'larch ^f , 

' . ^ - / hour? ' ""' ' . ^ ■ ■ " ■ 

•)ted mo'iher ' ' 

u ch o,r lio r t^iias latvoi'ing m 1 ongc Ids Vivi'- ijU£;barid 
:. ■.: •nio''i?f-. r o'sya, 

. _ " . -.VTS v?ry rasciualiiac ^nd I '■o'jic 

■.', ■■ ^ :- ■ : ;r"5a'^;not]r.ej-- 

■ : . ; _ . . ■ - olc' p'';37i- •'^sc 

' . ■ ■ "'.',' -^kft , 3hft 

-■ - ^ ' .- '■■-i: linr '■'"I'i,' ."". ' ■'■ ' ^. ■■-.-.': 
: . '- " ■ ' ■ ■ 1 ""t vf-rj ;> Ick s :id was 

"' 7- • .^..^- t:hf:'y i-olc^ him 

■'".■'■ •' \ T '<:. " "r:;; n Ib-^y hoc no mIt'cIp 

■: ^ ' " ' ■" -f.;. . i'h:* c.~jz\:jv tolc' l;he;.: thr";; 

■' ' ' ^ sng'-.r, '.:j-it her- skin woald 
' ■• ■''•■ .".). ..■' t iierj £;r?;en wl 'j1i "rleck curlprG. 

-■ " ....-^ .. -.^ c i.u £e t ■^''ci'-y s.'ck th'Jt ni£:hh snd 



1 " " ■'".■>f.'h liftr riva anc her \e[[, -I'lift doctor told hf 

' .ht poison harl tr-nv-rlei'^ "' .'icjurh hi^r 

1. Gie-rt in .uiii»S'.5 i;'HO plr^ r.r^n one! . - ' ■ ' ' -. I'- v-" t 

• . -^tumt; ' ^ ■ ' . ■ . ■ 



■.hr-ii.Try '34 , 1. - n. 



^.;a.5/vuET A. niTPj'^f/vN Jai^s*:!: 



0^ Sprin^rot'^'r , ViiscovT.' f. 



3S4 rnc inarrlcfl I1u(to C. J.nnsen In 



,'h'-' t ,-!?):nf3 y^3i'. 



■ ■" ■ ^ ■ ; he I, nir"! . . '■ ^ ', Pht thst ?i^? 
■ w,»ar' Inter, ovi b«r 1?'/!:. l: ' . '5;hday , 
■ ■' . / - •■_•.-: I vryi\^ 1 :.V'- 1,:. tAiallon Umt 'A- 

^ . ■ ■ '"" -.unlvr rsr.vj r^rn'" h-r '59';'- 

1^ [, ' ' . .^.-i^e Lliry llv?.:!! n ':'. - C-.r^L" 

' ..p;-- -, ^. .•.^, ..■■ ::> • ■lioved to "/llci! uor^r , 

-..-.:. c', Hu^o J~;-::-»n, caf .uovsc" 
L^l^ IP ; '■ . 3^- .'^T-f^ri IjGc'r: Into iV-- '.'.'.Tin.:- •-'f 



; ?i.'r! on " 

'..•.. i n lie . - ' . ■ : 



-lUy U nhsnje^blA, '-"lk«tlvft, and sh« is 9 i^ervo^i? 

_ ;huic 1; clevis ion. Slfft is ^n .active 
., ^.v^g , -J ^ " lary of Che Anericon L' , ' ■ • 



ARD -^'.i) CAilOL'miZ V0 2<L JANSI^N 






^ " .. 1035. Sijir •.v^-i nl so born :ln 



r ■ -. ;: ■ ■.'. abr.ut Miy Gfent-C-i'fi« *; '';i'a:ir^par''n '-.a is Ro.re- 
v'h'ii: .'ty^ n. riou;- . W'; co know thnt; hi3 jjijln^l iip^na v\'03 Von 

.for ft.o:n.=, - " . .: .'.Id never soj-. h.? wi-;s forced to Is'JVC 

h'.s n--'ziv'. c'>j.;;:i,y . ■ . ■..■^. ■xf'z'^r this o-^ca.-niic.T- he 

■','k3 n^v«r !;?."- " . ■ ' ''.- - paj^t ar;c why h.? .'lad coii' ' j 
1 1 ■ 'i^r-'?. 

I'll-: V'".l„ ->' '.I' . ..1 "■.'-. T ■ \ ^- ■■-■■•' h l;:I is U:jr^ •: ;iS 

h?c 3f:rvcd s^ ii'i^i'.''* '.ii 1;. ,,^ ,1,; ■' '. , .""!'!.■;, '.:i Ihe :jivil 
wa.;' fr-i- ■• 3^1 :!■■ ^' G'. 

"'"''■ ...,"■.' ■-. . • _ T-'f-.^v. •i''_out my .:i3 fc e. rrinl Gr'?3 ; -Gr'Tt. t 

? r't ; >:>::;):: a:- :■ "• ' ' ". .- ■ -^' " hu;-r ••."r'^1 ■M'nv^ncnt -ut V'-c in 



;bJ f'^.ully ^ 



i. ".V^.::: an In in honor- o£ '..if 



^ OU' 



■.'*.? o';!id wr>R Gr'3nd:7iot Vi'?r' 



.(.'.•T^ ^^'u ULuICirl^ likl'LOVi^' J/iuoPiN 



n^rSuown, 



Vi^'::^n':^n ^'■.^t of 






_ , ^ . ;: c 1 crn 1 riiP n . . . .. ' 

c ooulc! pfay cash for 1 , 

, :"' - ^ - '■' ^.nzv ''V 'v..'..v,r)r. Th» fri'-nily t'^lls 



Cij'^i- r.a> 



Jar; 3 on:: Af r 
1 ;■) •; - " 



)ii nn-" , little work to Lt rour-.C, 

- - _ ^ ■ '- • ■ -.VlI.-^ i^os?. In 

-.- ^ '•, ..n't 3":ie torri. 

■- ■ :s still in opero:.'.o: 
■ i'-C ■-■---' -- 1; -i"' ":l5j - v'.^d nni :^j:-fr''i?d 

". °1 ' ..onr '-.'-n. J^i-p'i.-.tr/ v.as his firvh 



,t^ H-p !\>V-. ■ 



...J 'i.-'.:. ;: . . \ ' ■" ■ ' ■ ' :' 5prin^- 

, ■;■ :6e6 CiL-me Sohocr. Sciiocl. 

,,•: : -. :.'..: . . . . ' ' '^ITc! ^inj- ^6''•!:hodlsl: 

On ;>?C!^Tib^r 32, "".;■•" _. - ■ ; narrioc! to Js.iiffi C:"\ '■ J :"•.'•£, 
J;'. ~:\' ■.--1 joia^^ ;,:.'• Pr'ssby t'^rinn dhuroJi, ■-vrilch v^/ai^ '.'"- T'jith 

i'\! r^i:h'?r '/^n:: ijiilL^u Intn ^ ' :- :: ~ -; -■',■■: ' ^ Co j anc: ray 
.■■',''■•"■■ •■ " ■ '."■; ''- L '"' ■-' 'Orn := on j'oll:^\v'-*' Iv..;!^ Lo tvn'^rs h\ .■■: " 
i.'^z^'V. " . - : . . 1- .• y°ar'C o.r 1^1< 9nd 1S4&. 

". 11.' :i>: -■ .... 'Vou:^hor:5 Jrin^y. In 1;?3 

t/)f^ far:. ■ ■:. . ■..i\ . _■ . .i^^-c ia{;o tli^-^ tow;i jf 



Sr.r; di. 



? Orv^l Jon*;;:;, Jr. In De c f •i' ■ s r 1D64 nnd 
■- '.'.". in IC'VO end -vns ;!: i r i* 1 o d to 



\ joar^n, 



■i-jVA-iC'^ in l.h* '.ve.y ^h." 



■vlMIiir tli. 



.A\-lL^.r> DA'TTPiL T:;.TTTN'''TT;ii 



\ " ~ ■ ■ ' ^ ^f 'Vile' A- •■ . '' ' • '/cd to " ' ^ ' 

" ^ "■ ' ■■ ■■ ■ r ■> ■ ,„' , .: ■ , . 'le ak tf : 

; . u fli'&a. Aftwr* 

Lopp Sfihoo"! , 
'.' '■.;'■" .10;::-. ITl;;;;. School snd grgdustr-d from thf^re !.n 19 4-''., 

-.ly nu0.p-f8tli'-:!r Ihen !7r;;:'?rf:r' .iillitTr-j rervics ('Arvny) In Ausust, 
"•/lOG and aerved v'ih\ !:":■ . ••, ■.■n^l ullitory forcer, 1.n Jni-on 
'.m'.:!! 7''- ■: ' .1:t I'.-''. Afu'T h^* ccraclfted hi?, tsar 5.)i J'^pr.n, he 
nTa-^ :■ ,joi. •,•; VJll:^ ii . ' -^ c until S<?pf; Briber 1SI30 A'^n hs 

■■■^-' ■ ■ "' '" . " r^ ' ■'.'";« ^nc sex- vsc -■ '. ' :r • ; t:h Uhe 43Cth 

: ■ . ■. , _ . ■- ■ . •-- ,f'lor,T_ :t^ -ftturnc" 

"ur-3 w illi " " ' ^ .' ". ' ' r . - . 

1 '- '■ - , - ■ '.n. hli I'^c'-j :.- -"igain c-^tfV/c In 

" r ..." ":'''" '" I 'v" ■ " " /' " Tracking Coiipany 

•'-'' ■. - ,, • ;••■ '--'—-_ ~ ■ r^ ■:■:.;;- ^^-ijcjc:^ ;i3nl'.rir. In l^GC 

. ' ' ^ . ' ' "^ . . I ' - ' ■ 1-^\T[P r)r , -rh 1 -^K hf; :' ' 1 ' 1 



... .- 1- * ,-. (• 



'- I . J . ■ r '. r. , E'; .s J. d ? s "f-e Ln g ?. n c 1; 1. vc .r.? -a'oc r 
- TliiO ■.-■:■ ;ir~-^y Vo^.1''',e, \11 of hi? 



lok. He wc 



u.luin^ 



ev';ry wintci' 



J ■..':V.\{ 0, J0ivS3 
Li?;inoLox"- of this foriily McV. or-y. 



•-•..'. '. j.n V/nushorf! Soun'cy. !>jr1.ng t)-r*:' li.ns thr-.t v.-'- liv-c" on 
"'. "":■..:, I •:' '^ ':5r.f :'d D3i~p School --'.'Mcb was s s.arill count ry 3 :^Loq1. 
" ' ■■ , ^ '. ' --s fro-i: hOi'fie , 

it" ..^ ■•?? School v,;.;i ■^r Ca];- rieno' bh'' i; I ^h^ll n:-vsr 
for^^'o. Ir, ~ . r ohijol ai'ic ,''lf;'Vit c^ if f e r'-pJ: rraSfis were 

■:'iii£ht in t;jl:. . . :. - ~; , It ~l30 hnd 'JTily oTif'^ tench?!' "A"ho vvovald 
'nstrunh ^^IT 1,_: _;:■ ^ " ;. While one gra.'^ ' ,. ':o1i^ f.ns truotC'', 
1 : - ':lisr s-^Vfin ^r'Sdi^s vvoul'- 'v'vs to sit nnd •••.■? It th'-'.r t,',r."i. Th'? 
,;t n V(^i'„ • ' Ive '.V'-.^^' '■ - , .jiing but It r"/^ '^ n.': cf;.? 3' ry under- 
■;h > ir-ciin":! tfiiices of those '-'ii. 

I' ■ ' ' " ' ■ ^ r' r^t l^opp 3g-"oo1 th^t \vj father 

30l'' ^■ T'-:: ■-..,■ . •" . ',■--.(:■ rj the town of lillc^ i^osf;,. Wisconsin. 
TTt '-.-.^ t'-A^r. " o ' '' '■' tf-i^': ?iUQ tlist is the r'^TSo.i why \"z 

hod .v.o \ ■'id . 

" ^'" - T!-^^'' . Tvil" lion? '}rs> s Sobool, nnd thsn 
' "' .. ojlv:ol. I 'i Sj^-^oiillj- relish uiy ni^.!iori^s 
of high sohooL. ■ . ■ t!i3 hook 1-^.^rnlng, h.roblr rua o'li^-jv.in^/ 

ino pPip-'M^ ■.'.^"i" tl:, - , I at;:, fortar^tt enough to prrt.icipct? in 

':'"'- Cj:''it .. T - . ,' iiil'j in trc ck , , play f d third i-^re 

) ' ■ 1_ , gnsrd on th* bi sic? t ''"'"! ' tc"^..:. 

held -'".r;:, , ■ . ..i ' '.h-; chf^.ri^: ion ship " ". ' . "' ' 

:iy J " 1 .-.. 1 r Pr.d S'?nior ;.--t';, - ■ •' 'n 5*""!'-;d ploc^'^ '. ^" 

..'y 3?!nL0j ^- ., 1 t - , chossn to rci^ji ■- ■ . ,.j' n-:;hool in thf 



I --ntinus' 
■ ..- to "V'l' 



- ., nt th« dlatrl-- - . Tlv-ss -ic^, ca^jc -.hnt I sh.oll n'vej:' 

;'o: J^l. 

kVz-: J. ^ .,;';!: 5.ric frcni hl^h. school in 1966, I .^^ '; t^r.f^d ^Z^re./^r- 
'. ":- - 'j -'-' "-i'Oiidoas ': iu.i^ 'lD M ili;'/r.uir.e3 , 7v I scon 3 in r.r\6 'and vlcinr^s uf 
' '^ -' J. v^. ''.h". T>.J, Cnr-.M-.-: "...w^nrty -3 ;■: onp-. i'*nr r.chool nn^i 
I o-d fro-. ', .-^ '.n 1967. I -i:.!! b?;llev° ■. . ,, r- - : 

;;' '^r.^ri.uri^; ohnt I '::-u^ drnfl^'id in:; t ub %; Army hftforc I ;iad chv, cUaiiCC 

ji' ~i.. rliir C'-::rv.u^^ I v/33 fir:;-t; senl:, uo ForL C3:npbell, j.Lftauuu;-.y 
for -iiv '.. ■ ^ ] : tii-s InLnit \ Froai thcr?; I \'ri.s sp.i'; t;) r'lri '^:rdo.-., 
--,. .,. -t^ v;h"re I ■" ": L ' -i;' --d n co.:i-riuaio;:) t ' o;"is c :";1j 1 . Y':>::'l 7::i~c'^i'.\cs , 
',x.. ,j.ir? follrw.''^:^ ' ■: ■" rv/T rd, Puh it was -^l: IV/l?. !: l.:n?; v/h^n th? 

Tj If;'!!; in^;, La Vli". c " . 1. trj p.^r^k. , Tnd I vja3 3«;:"it ther^ ir. 

y^rch ,:.r ■•?■":, I Na.a fr-ovi ^^ncch of I9GG fci"!! th^^ fjTlor- 

!■■_ '.1-: - ' 1. /^ ■ ^ --3 !j'i?n sent to Ludvrlgsb'ir j, ■2-er::i»i\^ , 

I v.■;-^■-:d -ly Fonorobl;- l/'^rbT^c in ^^rch of 1971. 

7^"' "■ :".l..:: -ij csrv' . ■-:: I returned to Zh c j si n c ''i:^r\; orei:i-:-n, 

^j^l • 1- -.'■•, ITlin^l?; a ^o\ I bad tok^'^n y^"^- tlic!*^ .lontlis i,rior 
Lj .:iy ,":"^- . , l:h« Ann-, I ^^:v^ ■ -^ -t Ghry = l-.r for 

Ii' '.;■'"'.; ■■ "I u03 first int r-od'.ioed to riy wifr,. C-rtr-ien 

G'i:'.:i'^"i Jvn>?a, th; iT f:-*~;.G o'^ O'lrs. Su" ll\<id ' .1 

O^Vi':' : ■ ■ " ■- ■ 150 .i.Ll?3 ci\'ts.-j ill iiO;i:fordj 

nil:. - .. ■ ." ^ ' '_ - .: .see .Tiuch of c^'Ch other, 

^•■- i-V i.'U-\- - - ■::' , :, " ' i,n* ti'ip to 

' ' . '■■■■<*'"-i; wr ■ _"11 v;c wsr? .r.prricd Decr^rn'o.^T 17, "."1. ',? 

.-r,.; hrtv^ "■ _ J i'TcscI e( tares ycrirs old), and n son, C'ns'-y 



't:l^ . 1 ■ .:. . .'. ^ ■:'. S :..,'3lar Corporation nr.d "'.'.- .r":-;- 

■ "."' ■ ". .i.-)Ckf :irc , TlV:;Ti3 rnajijring in Aocour. 
■ - "■ I .... I '■' ■ . s'.£V,2rj SaiiGj' J-jnc3 

.. .Tord; and n l-ro'fcaer, Wi.llln.ii J^-af-s J..>nsa, 
■ ' .'.n Hock "or f] r^no Is c^r. 'jf 1.1 car ^l 'A\e: 

"i"l ^t: •■': loc-^t^d on Eos'. .1. „ ^._' ■ ' . 



F 

W7 
R6 



Rock Valley family history 
col lect ion. 



N. MANCHESTER, 
INDIANA 46962 



3 9696 0006 7879 7 
ROCK VALLEY COLLEGE 



^ . ill