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Full text of "[Rock Valley family history collection : first series]."

Digitized by tine Internet Arcliive 

in 2010 witli funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Researcli Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/rockvalleyfamily15rock 



Rock Valley College 
Educationai Resources 



SOMERS, CHARLES W 1957- 



PLV.fvSK TYI'IC: PLKASI' FI.ACK THI'SE SIIKKTS AT THE FRONT OV Till'; S [■ CON 1 ) Cdl'Y OK YOl'K 
FAMl l,Y II I STORY . 

Dear Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

r,<i that your family history ran be ma do more iiselul to historians and 
others s t n d V I M )', American families, we arc .i s i< 1 ni; you to fill out the forms 
below. This will take you only a few minutes, and will be o a s i 1 v made o v e t 
Into an index wh 1 c li will permit archive users ready access to Just those 
kinds of family histories needed. 



survi;y 



Your name ( J cq-^Ia^ C^ ^P7>'g-6<-<;^ 
Date of form '7)/,7-0/7^ 

Your coll e (^ e : R ock Valley College 
Rockford, Illinois 



Office Use C o d e 

(ID //_ ) 

(ID // ) 



Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things 
about your family in your paper. 



Before 1750 



y 1850- 1900 



1750-1800 

1900 or later 



1800-1850 



Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

New Kng land (Mas s . , Conn . , R . I . ) ^ Middle A t 1 a n t i c (N . Y . , I' c n na . , N.J 

Va.) j/ South At 1 an t ic (Ca . , Fla . ,N .C . ,S . C . ) i: a s t South Central 

(l.a . , Miss . , A 1 a . , lenn , Ky . ) ^^ Wast South Cen t r a 1 ( Ar k . , N . M . , Te x . . Ok . ) 

X '"as t North C e n t r a 1 (M i ch . , Oh i o , I n d . ) \/ Paci t ic (Ca 1 . ,Wash . ) 
f llnwa i I , A I aska) |/' /111., Wise.,) 

Please check <\\^ o c- c ii pa t 1 n na 1 categories in whii-li members o I youi 
family whon? you have discussed in this [laper hav.- found themselves. 



farming 

Tr ans po r t a t ion 

Professions 



_Mining |/ 

Big Business ,/ ' 
Industrial Labor 



_S h o p k c e p i n g or small b u s i n e s i 
Manufacturing 
Other 



Please check a 1 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper have belonged. 



\/ Roman Catholic Jewish 

Baptist 

Ouake r Mo r mo n 



Episcopalian 



P resbyterian 

Congregational 



Method! s t 
Lutheran 



Other Protestant 



Other ( name) 



What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 



Swed 1 sh 
Blacks 

lews 

'l rlsh" 



Other Scandinavian _ 
Indiana Mexicans 



fJe r ma n 



F r e n c I 



i;a s t e r n I, u i' o p 



1' u e r t o R i c a n s 

Central Europeans ^ Italians Slavs 

British Native Americans over several r, e n i> r a L i on 



East Asian 



Other (Name) 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 



v' Interviews with other 
family memb e r s 

V ital Records 

y Photographs Maps 



Family Bibles 
Land Records 



Family (Genealogies 
The U.S. Census 



Other 



FAN1 LY DATA 
A 



Grandfather (your father's side ) 
Name l^J QulZm '^r^o^ ^ 



Date of birth 1/ 1-// \T' i, 
Date of death ^/ fc/^"7 



Current Residence 
Place of birth CjjJJj 



Kdacation(number of years); 

grr. de school Q high school Q vocational 

Oc !-upa t ion ( s ) 



_P_lace of burial f..^},iJ, s^ 



col 1 ege O 



, '(Ci.f ^-^A 



lst_ 



n 



3rd ^c^^^Y^ i ^^-Zw 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Date s //y.r-/f/3 1 s t /f^/^xA D a t e s f?'2^irsi 

Dates /"l/Z-f^'M 2nd f-'^J_^^f Dates /?3^~/^s- 



th 



Dates /?r^' ffJ'^" 3rd 
Dates 4th 



_D a t e s 
Dates 



Rel igion 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, et 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother ip,r<J.iXi . 
NOTE: If your father was raised (to a'"" ^'^^ 



r e la t ivi 



,, ,^,^ ^ d a t u _ 

ge 18) by a stepfathe 



'2/^ 



tather was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another 
o give that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name /^.'yu J^jUf (/^/^u.^ '^ trr^^" ^ Current Residence ^^^/- g/^/ fy^ 'y/^ __ 

Date of birth S^/Z^f /f'rl Place of birth f(o(J,LL 

Date of deatli Place ol burial 

Education (number of years) 
grade school r") 
college (^ 



liigh schoo] 



vocational ;^ 



Occupation (s) 
1st 



■^^IUL'^J^. 



PLACE OF ri;.sidi;n(;e 

(after leaving home) 
/^ r. ^t^W . Dates /?/-/- r^f 7 1st /r^^./u D-' t e s__/f/: 

2 nd /P^y^^ D a t e s _/1£±-jI12l__ 2 n d f^ ^, ^■J^/ D a t e s //]l-/fK< 

Dates_ 3rd 

Dates 



3rd 
4 th 



I ,\h a^.uJu -^/:7^ i).-j t e s /Tf^-/f7l. 



4th 



Dates 



Religion (^^^<;,W;^ 

Political party, civil o 



social clubs, sororities, etc 



I'lace of marriag.e to your gr.indlathcr /x'aiJ^U.Li. date /_fji^_ 

NOri'.: If your lather was raised [ < o a);e 18) by a ste[)mothi-r or 
another relative i; Ive that data on t li e back ol this [).i;'e 
(A-2) . 



A- 2 S tepgrandf a ther 
Name 


( 


yourfather'sside) 

Current Residence 


Date of birth 


er 


of 


Place of birth 


Date of death 


Place of burial 


Education (numb 
grade school 
college 

Occupation(s) 

1st 


years) 

high school vocational 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 1st Dates 


2nd 


Dates 2nd Dates 


3rd 


Dates 3rd Dates 


4th 


Dates 4th Dates 


Religion 


Political parti 


es 


y C 


Ivil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 






Place of marria 


ge 
( 

er 


to 
you] 

of 


your grandmother date 


B-2 S tepgrandmo ther 

N ame 


rfather'sside) 

Current Residence j 


Date of birth 


Place of birth 


Date of death 


Place of burial 


Education (numb 
grade school 


years) : 

high school vocational 


college 
Occupation (s) 
1st 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 1st Dates 


2nd 


— 




Dates 2nd Dates 


3rd 


Dates 3rd Dates 


4 th 


Dates 4th Dates 


Religion 


Political partv 


' 


civ 


11 or social clubs, sororities, etc. 






Place of marria 


ge 


to 


your grandfather Date 







G rand la til er (your mother's side) 

'^•""'-' fl^ //^ f_Myi^M/r/i Current Re s i d c n ce_/^^^2^ ^^ 



''-^£&&. 



a t e of b i r t h ('o/ l//90/ 
Date of death 



Place of birth _ 
Place of burial 



Kducatlon (number of years): 

grade school '^ high school__ ^J_ vocational O college O 

c c u p a t i o n ( s ) 

1st 'i^^..T^,^/J^,tn^ Dates_ /fZ^. 'j ^ 1st 



PLACE OF RESIDENCK 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



2nd 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Da tes 
Dates 



_2nd_ 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

I' o I i I i c a ] parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, (-■ t c- . 

l'!ace of marriage to your grandmother /^ ^<^<</^^<' ^^f _date )_T^Q 

NO'I'K,: If your mother was raised by a stepfather or another r (.■ I a t i v e (t 
age 18) give that data on the back o\ tills page ( C - 1 ) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name /L (.( L^^-^. /_y,ry>?^-i^t-^ Current Residence ^^^f^/x^..^^ 



Date of birth 
Date of death 



J-UL 



Place of birth f[/ Z/^ /^^ 

Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school^ high school_ 



vocational 



' o 1 ] e g e 



c c u pa t i o n ( s ) 

1st ' y^^^2^^ cJi^A ^i Dates ////^ " ^.y 1st 

2nd 1) a t c s 2 n d 

3rd Dates 3rd 

4 th Dates 4 th 



PLACE OF RL.SI DI.NCI-: 
( a iter 1 e a v i n ;■. ho m e ) 
Da 1 es 



Da I i-s 
Da t es 
Dates 



R e 1 1 g i o n 

Tolitii-al party, civil or social clubs, sororities, elc._ 



I' lace of marrla^',e to voiir grandfather J^^jr^d^_^^^</_ Dali- Jj Z.C 

NOTL: II your raotlier was raised bv a stepm'other or another nl alive (I 

■^' ^' ylve th»t d*ta on the back of this par.e (1)-;') 



C-2 S tepgrandf a ther (your mother's side) 



Name 



Date of birth 
Date o£ death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupation(s) 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd_ 
4th 



Dates 
Da tes_ 
Da t es_ 
Dates 



Religion 



Current Residence_ 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



vo cat iona 1 



col lege 



Ist 

2nd_ 

_3rd_ 

4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 
D- 2 S t ep grandmo t her (your mother's side) 

Name 

Date of birthj^ 

Date of death 



Date 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



vocational 



col lege 



Ist 
2nd_ 
_3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



R e 1 I g i o n 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



n a t e 



HII.DREN of A & B (or A-2 or B-2) 



\ 



Name /"^ .. ^:X^ /^/T, ^. J ir<?^My^ 
Place of birth ^'[^^ jj^c 



your father's name should appear belos 
"" date / ?2u' 



Number of years of schooling'" / 2-, 



K e s i d e n c e (^ J,,^/_^^_^ [J / ..■ M a r 1 t a 1 Status iaJuUc^: 
Numb u r o f ch i 1 dr e 11 'S Death 



c c u p a t i o n ^o^ r^ /^-yf^^, 



Name _^/^x. 

Place of birth /^^X7/ 



d a t e /' A^ 2.ii 



Number of years of schoolin 
Res i den 

N 



c c u p a t i o n 5"^.^^ii^j-»>— r^ 

es i d c ■ n c- e ///^^ y.^^ , /V/.^V;<^ Mar: tal S t a t u 3 -.^ifefc^ <:.-^, 
uinher of children Death '^ 



Mace 6i b i r t 



^^cv( ^,;r-y^x.^ . 



^ /fr^x.//.<. 



date /f^^ 7 



Number of years of schooling / Z- 

Residence /9..^*^/a^, t'/^y? ^ Marital Status 7?^ jl-i.,a^ 

Number of children < Death 

i> 1 a c . -'^h 1 r t \r~jr7^^7 ^ ~ 

Number ot years of schooling / -^^ 



c c upa t i o n "T^-^j- 






Residence ^^ ^r^ J J^r / -^ 
Number of children <> 



Occupal Ion /^..^.c^.^ 

Marital Statu s ^.l ys^-J^K^") 



d e a t ii 



Name 



lace of bifth .^ vC^/< 
Number of years of schooling 



date /f^/ 



Oc c upa t ion 



K e side n c e y J/^Ji^u^ , C^y^y' 

N u mil e r of ch i 1 d r v n 



Mar i t a 1 Status 
Death 



Jl^-^ 



^■- ^■<^3^,-<^ ;^ 



Mace of birth , / , ^/ (l^^ 



date 



'Jj^ 



Number of years of schooling / -p_ 

Residence ^y/^^^//.^ Mari tal Status p^, 

Number of children 2~ death /' / ;p /J 



Occupa tion 

^ 1 ;:. 



Name 

Place of birth 

N u mb e r of years of s c h o o 1 i n g_ 

R e s 1 d e n c o 

Number of children 



date 



Occupation _ 



Marital Status 
d e a t h 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of s c h o o 1 i n g_ 



Residence 

Number ol children 



Marital Status 
death 



Oc c uoa t ion 



Name 

Place of blrih date 

Number ol years of schooling 

Res i d e n c e M .1 r i t a 1 Status 

Number of childri'n deaLh 



c ( II pa I ion 



N a me 

P 1 .ice' of birth 



da t 



Number ol vears of schooling 

Kesidence _ Marital j; I a t u s 

NuiMhe |- o I cil i 1 ilreu dea I 



()<■(■ u pa I ion 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 
1 . N ame 



name x^ / ^^^ ^ , ^- 

Plac^of bftth 



date 



Number of years of schooling_ 

Residence /<^.r-r yfy> ■ ;^ Marital Status /^^^,t^-^9 

Number of c h i 1 d^r e n ^ 



Occupatio n / ^-^ 



death 



^■^.yr^ ^,r. 



6f blrt 



'^^^- 



.^■^A^^ 



-/ 



date 



-^l-J-L- 



Name_ 

Place 

Number of years of schooling ,^ Occupa t lon ^. - 

Residence y^ ■t^^^^.-f-/ Marital Status /P^ , ; <^<^ / 'V ' 



— y-^ — r '^ t ' I" ' - ' ^ — — - 

Number of children ^ 



death 



Name 



/^ 



— ^ ^^< . <^ 'T^^ ^/v/^ 



Place of birth /cT^.^vt^ ^ 



Number of years of schooling / ~Z_ 
Res i dence 



date /92.f 



/^ ■ rjf-< ^^ 



Occupation^ 



Number of chiTdren 



Name 



^:^ 



Marital Status /Lj^2^ aj^-U^' 
death 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Occupatio n_ 



Number of children 



death 



uj<4-^ 



^ 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 
Re s 1 du nc e 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of children 



death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling_ 
Res Idence 



Number of children. 



Marital Status_ 
death 



Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schoolinj 
Residence 



Occupation 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status_ 

Number of children\ 



death 



Oc cupa t ion 



10 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status_ 

Numb or of children death 



Oc c upa t ion_ 



Your Father 



Name '[^//(rc^^y^^-C ~)^,'u.'^ , Current Residence /,: .^J^ ::/ 

Date of birth / f ^^- f Place of birth Tj)-llJ? . J^ '^ J 

Date of Death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade schoo 1 'y" h igh school 7" voca t iona 1 c o 1 1 e ge_ 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1 5 t ■T.Jj.^.^y.yi^.--^ Dates /?rJ- T<{/ lst_ Dates 

2nd T7.x>^ ,^'^.^^ Dates /'^/-'-/'^^ 2nd Dates 

3rd (L/zA^. Dates//^z£__2kl 3rd ^ Dates 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion ^yr^y^ A^ 



Political parties, cB.vil or social clubs, fraternities, etc.__ 

Place of marriage to your mot her /z^y-t/'^O^'c^ date ifj/ . 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or anotlier relative give that data 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name (^ y:l.-\,■■^.^,~^,^^e^ <"ji>?-.-C(^^^_-- Current Residence ^^4tyf-r"J 



Date of birth /^Z.^ Place of birth /fV,^^^^-^ 

Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school "T' highvschool _<-^ voca t ional col lege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving', home) 

1 s t -n-yy-X^^ 

2 n d 

3rd 

4 t h 



Dates 


/?r2-7^' 


1st 


D a t e s 




Dates 


2nd 


Dates 




Dates 


3rd 

4th 


Dates 




Dates 


Dates 















Rel i g 1 o n ( ^T/a-i^'- -^ 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your father /^^V.^ ,x- -■ / date J ■? _jt<-y _. 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give t li a L data 
on the hack of this page (F-2). 



E-2 S tepf a ther 
Name 



Date of birth 



Date of death 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupation (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of birth 



Place of burial 



vocational 



college 



Ist 
_2nd_ 
_3rd 

4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Dates 


Dates 


Dates 



PLace of marriage to your mother 
2 S tepmother 
Name 



Date 



Date of birth 



Place of birth 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 



grade school high 


school_ 
Dates 




vocational college 


Occupation(s) 
1st 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 


2nd 


_Da tes 

Dates 

Dates 




2nd Dates 


3rd 


3rd Dates 


4th 


4th Dates 


Religion 


Political party, civil or 


social 


clubs , 


sororities, etc. 






Place of marriage to your 


f ather_ 




date 









CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2,F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 

Name /V^yw^^>-_^ 'S'^U--^ — 
P 1 a c e ' o'f birth /^^rj-i(^ -^ 



Number of years of schoollft] 

Residence /y.^^^ji^ Marital Status 

Number of children death 



Date of birth 17 -.<- ~' 

/ 5~" ccupatio n /HZ^l'-^-U'^J 



10 



Name ^ J ^.. .. /.rT^ry^j^^ 

Place of birth ^/P-^J'^.r^J-' Date of birth /7S^~/ 



Number of years of schooling / 

Residence /f^ v^_^^ r/ Marital Status 

Number of childr'en death 



Occupa t i o n yJ/z^^JjA-J 



Name 



r^^'Jy-u, 



Place of birth ^ <f,r'/'^ ^V Date of birth /"yfr 

Number of years of schooling / z. Occupation x-^z&^x/-^ 



Res i d e n c e /f^;Tr>A^^ -rv' 
Number o f chllaren 



Marital Status /, 
death 



-^-^ 



Name /^^n.^.^ 

P lace of birth yY'r^-^'-^ 



Number of years of schooling / S' 
Residence /f'r'^4.^^J Marital Status_ 

Number of children death 



Date of birth / 7/' 



c cupa t ion /^T^,^--^/-^ 



J^/" 



Place of birth /f^/r>^-^ 



Date of birth /7'^"^ 



Number of years of schooling ^, 

Residence j/^rzjLy^^rJ Marital Status <T^^^^ 

Number o f children death 



Occupatio n x^^'-rZjy- 



Name 



Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling_ 

Res i dence 

Number of cliildren 



Occupation 



Marital Status 
death 



N ame 



Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



_0 c c u p a t i o n _ 



Number of children 



death 



Name 

Plac.e of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling_ 
Residence Marital Status 



Occupation 



Number of children 



death 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History 
Collection, deposited in the Rockford Public Library, Rockfurd 
1 I 1 i no t s 1 I -"^ 

S 1 g n e d ( K - (< -Ao \f\ . Qfr P-uY 



In lat« 1686, John and Maria Feron« along with their 
daughter Clemencia, arrived in New York City. They had 
travelled all the way fr»rn Fabrlano, Italy, to start a new 
life in America, Knowing alaost no english, they lived in 
the Italian district 9f New York, amongst their own language 
and customs, John Fersne was able to get a Jab in one of 
the factorys, but the hours were long (60-70 hrs. per wk.) 
and the pay was literally pennies a day« Maria and Cle- 
mencia when she old enough (eleven yrs. ) also worked in 
factories. The hours were just as long and the pay Just as 
low as John's. 

Clemencia worked at the factory for several years, dur- 
ing which tiaae she had met a young Italian Immigrant by 
the name of Joseph Capriola, They eventually married in 
I89B, They both continued to work at the factory, but they 
were saving every penny they could so they could Join Jo- 
seph's brother in the little Mid-Western town of Rockford, 
Illinois, Before they could afford to move to Rockford, 
Clemencia had given birth to two girls and two boys: Lillian 
in 1900, Rose in 1902, Joseph in 1903, and Daniel in 1905. 
In 1906, the CApriolas made their Journey westwaed. After 
living in New York for nearly twenty years, corning to Rock- 
ford was almost like coming home. It was a small town like 






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theirs had been back in Italy. Joseph got a Job in a cabinet 
factory. The hours were'nt much better but he was making a 
little more money; almost ten dollars a week. Clemencla also 
had to work so they could feed the children. It is not known 
where she worked nor how much money she made, it was'nt too 
much. 

In 1908, tragedy struck. Three year old Daniel died of 
typhoid. Though the living conditions were better in Rockford 
than in New York, Rockford had its share of typhoid, smallpox, 
and typhus victims. 

When they were old enough, the other children went to 
work to help support the family. Like their parents they 
would get no formal schooling. The two girls. Rose and Lil- 
lian, got Jobs with the General Electric Company, Joseph his 
father at the cabinet factory. 

Political events had no meaning to the Capriola family. 
They were Just glad to be living in America. They felt that 
who ever was mayor, governor, or president would do a good 
Job, When World War I broke out in I9lkt their only concern 
was their reletives back in Italy. Even in 1917 when the 
United States entered the war it meant nothing to them. 
They thought that the President would take care of everything. 

In 1920, Lillian Capriola married a man by the name of 
Anthony D omino, Anthony D oraino was a native born Rockfordian 






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Df Italian origin. Lillian continued on at General Electric 
while Anthony worked at ono of the local stores. Their first 
child was born in 192^. It was a girl; they naaied her Mary. 
Things were going pretty well in the 1920's. Their second 
child, another girl, was born Carmella Clemencia Domino in 
August of 1928. A son, Joseph, was born in 1930. The De- 
pression was hard on them as it was on almost everyone. For 
the first time they took an interest in politics. It turns 
out they were avid fans of Franklin D, Roosevelt. Roosevelt 
took office in 1932 and things started to get better, Lillian 
and Anthony's marriage. They were evantually divorced in 1936. 

Lillian being a devout Catholic, sent her children to 
St. Peter and Pauls Catholic School. After completing the 
eigth grade at St. Peter and Paul's, Carmella attended Bishop 
Muldoon High School. Since it was an all girls school, to 
S'2e boys their own age, tht girls at Musdoon would have to 
visit St. Tnomas High School. St. Thomas was an all boys 
school and their basketball and football teans did'nt have 
any cheerleaders. Several girls, among them Carmella, vol- 
unteered to be their cheerleaders. When she was a senolr 
at Muldoon High School, Carmella and several friends his 
overnight in the school. Muldoon was run by Dominican Nuns 
and it so happened tnat the s&aic right they chos<? for bhcir 
escapade was the same night the Mother Superior from Michigan 
came to inspect the school. 1.i" Ciirls escaped detection by 






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hiding In a c 1 Bak rjom. 

My grandparents could'nt aff»rd t» send my mtther to 
Cftllege, but she took typing and shsrthand courses In highschsol 
Her first job was that of a secretary and she's still a sec- 
retary todayo For many years she worked for Attorneys David 
and Frank North. When North and North took on a partner, Larry 
Ohlsen, she quit because she was diong tne work 8f k.11 three. 
Her next Job was with Thomas, Thomas, and Thomas. She worked 
there for twa years but quit for a better Jab vith Attorney 
John Graves. Right now she m^kes appraximatly eight thouseand 
dollars a year. 

Mr, and Mrs. William J, Somers came to the United States 
In 1890. They were originally from Ireland, the County of Clare 
They came to the United States beleiving like many people that 
the street? were paved of geld and everyone was a millionaire. 
When they finally settled down in Creston, Illinois, they 
were far from being millionaires. They made their living on 
a small farm. They grew enough corn to feed their stock and 
still have a littls left over for them to sell. They also 
sold the fattened hogs and a few steers in Creston f3r what 
supplies they needed. In l893, they gave birth to two sons, 
Walter and Gayle. The next year, they had a daughter named 
Rose. As Walter grew up. It became apparent tnat he did'nt like 
farming. At the age of nineteen, he moved to Roche le where 



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he met L»retta Grace and started cturting her. Walter was'nt 
sure what he wanted t» do for a lining. Me had s»me money 
saved up, s» he opened a restruant. Two years later, with 
the restruant doing well, he married Loretta Grace, All in 
all, Laretta was to give birth to five sons: Walter, V/illiam, 
Jack, Charles, and George; also one daughter, ?^arietta. With 
the exception jf Charles, all the children were born in Rochele. 
While on a trip with her husband, Loretta gave birth to Charles 
in the small townsof Sublett, Illinois, in 1929, 

When the depression came, the restruant went out of bus- 
iness and Walter Somers and his family were forced t3 move to 
Rockford to seek employment. Walter Somers eventually gat 
a job at Woodward Governor in 1938. On« year later World 
War II broke out. The oldest son, Walter, (alss known as DeKe) 
Joined the Air Force in anticipation of U.S. involvement in 
the war, 'When the family first moved to Rockford in 1936 
they livedin a house on N. Church So,, n year lat»r they 
moved to another house one block down on the smae street. 
That house was to be occupied by members of the Somers family 
for a period of twenty-two years. Everyone was concerned by 
the war of course, especially since Deke, the oldest son, was 
in the Air Force. Deke was a pilot; he flew an amphlbioas 
aircraft called the PE-Y, Deke survived thr war, but was net 
to be the last of the Somers' boys to fight in a war. When 
the Korean wa** ^roke out, Charles, fourtn son of V/alter and 



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Lsretta, went t» Indiana to enlist In the Air F»rce. Because 
»f verlC05e veins he was rejected, W»t one to give up, he went 
t» the Chlcagn induction center »f the Marines where the phys- 
icals were'nt as thorough. He passed the physical and was sent 
to Pairs Island S, C. for boot camp. After two months training 
he was sent to Korea. He was stationed there far two years until 
he was discharged v/itn bn? rank Si ijucri sargent. Walter and 
Loretta were Catholics and dutifully sent their children to 
St. James. A r^sport card of ray father's shows that the tuitin 
was one dollar a mont*^. After Charles graduated from St, James 
he went to West High SchoDl, He had a hard time at West. He 
did manage to graduate, although it took him five years in- 
stead of four. He had friends who went to St, Thomas High School. 
Through these friends he met a young girl named Carraella Domino. 

They dated pretty steadily for two years until he went into 
the sevvice. He wrote her many letters and sent many pictures. 
When he got back to the States in 1953# he married her. They 
were married an August 21, 1951+. They lived in an apartment 
on 21st St, ftrthe first four years of their marriage. On 
July 7, 1955, their eldest daughter Denise was born. She was 
to be the first of five children,, I was born on April 22, 1937. 
I never knew my grandfataer on my fathers side. He died *n 
Ap*"*! ''■), 1957» A year after I was born, w msved into our 



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newly i3uilt heuse an Seward Ave., "he heuse is lacated only 
a half bl»ck f r am the then Thenaas Jefferson Jr. High Scno»l. 
Even th»ugh we were located less than two blocks frsm a public 
school, we attedned St, Edwards Cathslic School. All courses 
were taught by nuns who lived in the C9nvent across from the 
schoBl. At ST. Edwards, the students have to attned church 
services oefore class. Altogether "".hats six days of ci^urch 
a weekl The oldest ef «y y»unger sisters was born on March 
17» -'95s. My only brother was born on November 20, I960. 
One exciting thing that happened when 1 was three was the 
assassinateed, I can remember watching television and the 
network cutting telling of the assassinati en. 

ive always been an average student. The only time 1 
ever got straight A's was when I was in Fourth grade. My 
teacher was a nun who was hard of hearing and her eyesight 
was'nt to good either. When I was in fifth grade, I did what 
all boys the of 11 do; 1 ewnt to summer camp. It was al- 
right I guess. We did all the usual stuff; canoing, archery, 
cookouts, etc,. ^n -'xth grade I was a patrol hty. About 
that time i joined the boy scouts. I never made it past 
tenderfoot. My sister Colleen was a girl scout. She's the 
only one I know who got kicked out of the girl scouts. It 
seems she started selling cookies a day early. 

Dad had had several Jobs since he got married. The first 
Job he had was with Cadilla'- Glass. He was'-^^ ■^•'t'-'ied 
with that job and quit in »39 to become a truck driver for 






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the Schultz & Eirch C»., which is als9 kn swn as Flav»r-KIst, 
They make c»»kles and crackers. He was with that company 
from I960 ts 1966. in 1966, he started aut warkin^j an the 
assembly line at the Chrysler plant. After three years 9n 
the line, he became a qual ity-contr» ' receiving clerk. With 
the recession and all, many pesple were layecl olT at Chryslec. 
My father was retained, but now he's ba-'" »n the lin*. 

When I graduated ''rom St. Edwards Sch»»l, I went to 
Jefferson High Scaaol. I nevp.r had jisrc fun in schawl. 
DuriHij my freshman year at Jefferson, I met my now best fried. 
We did a lo^- of cfary things while at Jefferson. I remember 
when streaking was the craze. My friend decided to streak, 
so I drove the car. Another time we were standing by the 
'•sbt ■• the cafeteria kitchen. There was a rack by the door 
that was loaded with pies. The door was spen so we took a pie. 

My older sister Denlse went to Jefferson too. She majored 
In Spanish, v/ith a raenar in special ed . . She attened Rock 
Valley for two years and now is in her Junior year at NIU. 
My younger suster Colleen, is a senior at Jefferson. She 
also attends Rockford Beauty Acadamy. 

Grandmother Domino still lives here in Rockford, Bath 
her sister Rose and Brother Joseph are living here too. My 
Aunt Mary lives with her husband. And my uncle Joe also 
resides in Rockford with his wife and family. 



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STAHL, STEVEN RICHARD, 1955- 



•LEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 



)ear Contributor to the t^ock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
kmerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
ew mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
iccess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



1 . Your name 



Date of form 



S:tevgn Richnrrl ^tah^ 



May ^, 1974 



2. Your college: Rock Val ley (.ol lecje 
Ro c k f o r d~, iTTl n m s 



■'■• OFFICE USE CODE 



(ID #_ 

(ID // 



*I»***;':;VA;':;: AAAA.VAA;';AA;'cAV;AAAAA 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 -^ 1750-1800 1 800-1 850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 

k. Please check all regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

^New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C, S.C.) East South Central (La. , Miss. ,A1 a. ,Tenn , Ky^ 

W est South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., Ok.) X East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 
^Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) _x_ Mid^West (111., lowa) 



5. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 



X Farming 

Transportat i on 
Profess ions 



Mining 
B i g Bus i ness 
I ndus trial 1 abor 



Shopkeeping or small business 
Manufacturing 
Other 



6. Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 



Roman Cathol i c 
~Bapt i st 
Quaker 



Jewish X Presbyterian X M ethodist 
Epi scopal i an Congregational y Lutheran 
"Mormon OtVier Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 
I nd i ans Mex i cans 



Puerto Ricans 
I ta 1 i ans S 1 avs 



Blacks 

Jews X Central Europeans 

Irish X British X Native Americans over several generations 

East Asian Other 



8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other Family Bibles -jr^Family denealogies 



f ami ly membe rs 

_X Vital Records 

X Photographs 



Land Records 
Maps 



The U.S. Census 
TttuT 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 



Name 



f dead, date of death 



Lou is, St . a] a l 



Place of birth r^y,^ No+ho^l nn,^ p 

Education (number of years): 
grade school g high school 



Current Residence Winnebag:o. Illinois 

Date of Birth j^no 0<^ _ 1 ft«^ 

vocational college 



Occupat ion (s) 
'^t Parmer 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Dates 1902-1952 1 st Freeportt Illinois Dates igOZ- 



2nd 

3rd_ 

ifth 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



2nd Adeline. Illinois; Dates iq23 
3rd Winnebago, m inni n Dates ig-^ | 
^Ih Dates 



Re 1 i g i on Methodist 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Hone 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 



Preennrt. Illinois 



date-Lo_28_ll 



B. Grandmother (your father's side) 
Name 



Name rrrapg -[.^m^y^r- Pj-hahl 

If dead, date of death 



Current Residence Winnphagn^ T11-rnn-.c. 



Place of birth The fTetherl ?ind3 



Education (number of years); 
grade school 6 high school 



Date of birth May PI , 1 RQ;^ 
vocational college 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st Housewife 

2nd 

3rd 

'♦th 



Dates 1911 

Dates 

Dates 

Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Freeport, 111. Dates igOT 



2nd Adeline, 111. Dates 1923 

3 rd Winnebago, 111. Dates l931 

'4th Dates 



Re 1 • g i on Methodist 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. None 



ace of marriage to your grandfather Freeport, Illinois DATe ^ Qciober 2B, l^H 
^^- lh^aHatPSfl»fhg^Saf^'§?'^tl^f§ $^1%%^ stepmother or another relotiv, 



^'C q I vo 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

N.inic Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


'.th 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates 

iith Dates '»th Dates 



Re I i gi on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother date 

A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 



I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational col lege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st ^Dates_ 

2nd Dates 2nd ^Dates_ 

3rd ^Dates 3rd ^Dates__ 

Re 1 i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name l^r^wprd r-ir^kPT-nRn Mr^Lnr+v Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death November 18, 1954 

Place of birth m^^ Mil-fort^, Illinois Date of birth Anril 9. 1883 

Education (numoer of years): 
grade school 8 high school 4 vocational ^ col lege 



OccupationCs) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Ist Farmer Dates 1906-193 9st npw Milff^rdp Illinois Dates iqOto 

2nd Odd-Jobs (Day by Day) P ates 1938-1954 nd Guilford, Illinois Dates 191T 

3rd Dates 3rd Rockford, Illinois D ates 1920 

'4th Dates '4th Dates 



Re 1 i g i on Methodist 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Republican Party 

Place of marriage to your grandmother Wgw Miiford, Illinois '^ate 12-9- 11 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stHpTat n e r o r anotne r r e i ac t vg ( t O ag e 18) * 

give that data on the back of this page (C-1) i 

Grandmother (your mother's side) j 

Name R.gdip QjanP Vink^rs KcLartv C urrent Residence l( 

I f dead, date of death V\p,rr.h 31. 19^3 u 

Place of birth Calidonia, Illinois ^Date of birth ^^^7 ^5, 1390 \ 

Education (number of years) J 

grade school 8 high school 4 vocational col lege ^ | 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Ist Housewife Dates 1911-196|st New Milford, Illinois pates ig-^-' 



2nd Dates 



2nd ^^Uford, Illinois ^ates ^^^'' 



3rd Pates 3rd Rockford, Illinois Pates ^920 

Re I i g i on Methodist 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. PoT^nhl i <^nn Pa-rty 

Place of marriage to your grandfather t^j^, Mil f nrd . Illinois date 12-9-11 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age 1 8) 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l 


S tepg randf athe r (your mother's side) 
Name 


1 

1 
Current Residence 




If dead, date of death 

I'l.H.- .,1 hi 1 III 
1 'liK ,1 1 1 ( Ml (niiriilx- r ' j 1 ye. 1 1 '. ) 
'1 1 .kIc '. ( lioo 1 h i ijh '.choo 1 


D.itr of hi rlh ', 




vocot ion.il col \ci.]c 




Occupat ion (s) 

1st Dates 
2nd Dates 
3rd Dates 
'♦th Dates 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE | 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates i 




2nd Dates ' 




3rd Dates ; 




Ath Dates 




Re 1 i g i on 


\ 
f raterni ties, etc. 




Political parties, civil or soci aT c 1 ubs , 








Place of marriage to your grandmother 

S tepqrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name 

1 f dead, date u( death 

Place of bi rth 
Education (number of years) 
grade school liiyh school 


date ; 


D-2 


Current Residence 




Date of bi rth i. 




vocat ional col lege 




Occupat i on (s ) 

1st Dates 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 




2nd Dates 
3rd Dates 


I 
2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political party , civil or soc i a 1 clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather ~ "~~" Da te 



CHJitDREN of A t B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 

""^^ J±££ 

/ears of sch 

Number ofi^m^^^ 



Name Ma-r-r^ ( Marv^ Stahl Kloster 

Place or birth j?rP(^por-h. Illinois date January 19. 1 912 

Number of years of schooling 8 years Occupation Housewife 

Residence ,.„._,._^ "^ Aarital <;t.t.,. M^T^ffi^^^^^^ 



Married 



-4- 



Name -Lucv Stahl Viel 

I ' T"^'"'"^^ FrPPT^nYt. Illinois date j^n^R. IQT^ 
Number of years of schcJoiing 8 yeJTi Oc cupation Housewife 
Residence Wr^^^-^c^r^ ^Marital Status HarrTea 



Number of chi idren j^ 



Name 



Place of bTrth Freeport. Illinois date Apri l 30, 1915 

Number of years of schooling ^ yo^TT" Occupation Farmer 

Residence u^nneTaaco Jlarltal Status MarTiif 

Number of ch i Vdrin r ~~~ • — 



-6- 
Pl^ e of bi?^ ^- Ct^^^l2tl^A'^"VVn^^, 



w.„K °'°'^^^ p-TRPTty^^-- T11inn1s date February 2S, 1Q1 9 

Number of years of schoo'ling d years Occup ation ^x::. L.J I-, 

Residence 9^.^..^ jfeTTtiTTtatus Mar riSd ^^^'^^ ^ " 

Number of children -z " — ' ■ 



Name 



^por^.'^ld Stfih\ 

er 



Place or birth Ac^siine. Illinois date 

Number of years of sc' 



Adeline. Illinois date a^^^i pr tqp^ 

- _ schooling 8 ^re^^Y"" . . O^cupatidn Factory Worktx , 

Residence Winneha^n Marital Status MarrTid \ 

Number of cni Idren c *— v 

\ 

Name V}~<^-\^ Robert Stahl __>_ ^! 

\ ' ace of birth Winnphpfrn, Tll-inm-tn date August 26, 1926 J 

Re^^M^nce ^^^ °^ ;choorPng_^_^,^^^ Occupat lon^^^^^j^,^^,,^^, 3,^,^,1 

r^esiaence — Ptoyg^^ Mar ! tal Status Married 

Number of chi Idren 7 ■ 

^a*"^ Lflwr°ncg Albert otahl I 

Place of birth Freeport, Illinois date A^^g ust % 1932 ! 
Res?dencl ^'"'^ °' schooflng g " Occupation Mai'ntence Work 

Ml? I. I, -Pnnntnni-n-LLL Marital Status Married 1 

Number of ch 1 Idren ^^ ' ""—■' — *-''■= — 1 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~~date 

Number of years of schooling ftccupTtm^T 

Residence MaTTTal Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth ^^3^^ 

Number of years of schooling OccupirmFT 

Residence MaritTTTTatus 

Number of chi Idren "^ 



0. Name 

Place of birth 



Resid^ncI V^^^^"^ schooling -Qccupan^ 
Number of t ill I H r un ^narital Status 



CHILDREN of L and D (or f,- 1 , D- I) -your mother's nome should appear below 

[^•""•' Tihim-op -EvRlvn M cLarty Kloster | f 

-'■■■''-'•'' /'!''!' ^ ^' ^I'^ i^ fi:^ ^^" !"^ ^^''-^^^^^ — .,""" '-^— >-- ^s ^QT? 



N.inif Ruth IFilpgnor McLa rty Stahl (moth*r) 

PldC' of hiVih New MlTford mamp iif^mt) — ^j^^g April 16, ''914 

Number of years of schooling S^'^ars flccupalT^ HoUi^cW^ T * 

Residence Winnoba^O. IllinoJg Marital' Status WUrrl^d 

Number of children f, ' — 



3- ^'''"e Trv-'ng LaVerng WcLarty 



P lace of b I rtn 



Gi^-rifprd date K^rch 8. 3Q1Q 



ReTMence '""? °^ school in^g -, p ^,,^, — ^ ccupaTi^ MoTor Worked 

Residence V^'nnetagO, Illinois' Marital Statue 



y, , ; — •■( i.).^^yjH.t^yj* j-^.u.Lxxw...p naritai btatus Widower 

Number of ch I Idren ^ F-tuuwei 

Name Gladys I-Iarie McLart y Brick 

^'-^^^ ^^' ^'''^" .Rockfo rd date March 11, 1923 



Number of years ot schooling ±Z years - Occu pation HOuStiWire 
Residence Rpckford. IllinolS Mar i taT-St.t„s man led 
Number of ch i Idren V ~~ 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~ -~ ■ . 

Number of years ot schooling Ocr.un^T-TTTT 

Residence ~~ 

Number of ch i Idren ' ~~ 



Marital Status 



6. Name 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years of schooling g^THnatiQ- 

'"'•'^""-r-.^- Marital St.t,,. 

Number of children 



7. Name 

Place of birth 



I, , ^ . I . _^____ date 

Number of years of schooling ^Or rnr,Trr7:;r 

\K^r.\A^^.^ ^ ~ Occupation 



Res i dence 



»j..„t,„ c — I ' l l ~ Marital Status 

Number of childreTi - 



Name 

P I ace of birth ' ' ~ , 

Number of years of schooling ~~ TwTu,^:.^\T^ 

o„, : J ^ uccupat on 

Residence "— n r- — j- ^ ^ 

.. , ^ — r-r-j — Marital Status 

Number of children ^ 



9. Name 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years of schooling " — Orr , .n^tiA,. 

Rps;Hf.nr« ^ Occupation 



Res i dence 

Number of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



iO. Name 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years of schooling ' -r '^l^.^— 

Residence — rr—^ Occupation_ 

M. , , ■ I I ■ Marital Status 

■^u-^ber of children 



Your Father 

Name Henry S'^ahl Current Residence Winnebago 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Freeport. Illinois Date of birth April 30> 1913 

Education (number of years) 
grade school R ytt^^TFi high school Q vocational Q college Q_ 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
'st Farmer Dates iQ-:^o 1st Rpckford. Illinois Dates ig-^y 



2nd Dates 2nd Pecatonica. Illinois Dates 1944 



3rd Dates 3rd Winnebago. Illinois Dates iq56 

^th ^Dates kth Dates 

RelTgTon ., , , ~"! 7 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Democratic Party 

Place of marriage to your mother Dp-hiiqiief Tn wg d ate Sept. 7, 1<~>-^T 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Name Ruth 'Rleanor McLar-t^y Stahl Current Residence tfinnebago 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth ypg-w Milfnrd (Gamp Grant) Date of birth April 16. 1914 
Education (number of years) 
grade school 8 -years high school 1 year vocational ^college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Housewife Dates 1937 1st Rockford. Illinois D ates iQ'^^y 



2nd Dates 2nd Pecatonica. Illinois Dates 1944 



3rd Dates 3rd Winnebago. Illintis Dates 1956 

Re 1 i g i on_^ Methodist 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Democratic Party 

Place of marriage to your father Dubuque. lowa d ate Sept. 7^ l'^'^'^" 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



E-1 Stepfather 

Name 

I f dead , date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



OccupationCs) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

'tth Dates ^'tth Dates 

Re I igion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother Date 



F-2 Stepmothe r 



Name 



If dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

. (after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd ^Dates ^2nd Dates 

3rd Dates ^3rd Dates 

Re I I g I on 

Political party, civil or social c lubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father date 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



Name ITancy Ruth 3tahl Peter 

Place of birth Kocicford 

Number of years of schooling ']_2 years 

Res i dence Loyes Park, Illinois 
Number of ch i 1 dren 3 



Date of birth November 21, 1938 

, , Occupation HgunfiWlfft 

Marital Status Marrieo 



Name Carolsrn Lee Stahl Trickel 

Place of birth Hockford 

Number of years of schooling 12 years 

Res i dence Freeport, Illinois 

Number of chi 1 dren 2 



Date of birth April 26. 1945 



Occupation Housewife 
Marital Status Married 



ViriE;in*a Kay Stahl 



Name 

P 1 ace onTTrt F Rockford 

Number of years of schooling -[-t^ vpara 



^^^ ' '^^"^^ , W-Innfthagrn, Til ^•nn^g 



Number of chi I dren 



^^^^ °^ i^'^th March 22, 1 949 

, , Occupation Se^ptorlpl riprk 

Marital Status Single 



Name Debra Jean StaJil 

Place of hi rth ROCkford 



Number of years of schooling 13 years 

Res i dence Winnebago, Illinois Marital Status Single 

Number of chi Idren 



Date of birth September 13. 1953 

Occupat I on Warr^ HI PrV 



Name Steven Richard Stahl 

Place of birth Rockford 

Number of years of school i ng 



Number of children 



13 years 



Date of birth August 6, 195 5 

Occupation student 

Single 



Ma r i t a 1 Status 



Name Joann Sue stahl 

Place of birth Rocklord 



___^ Date of birth September 15, 195 6 

Number of years of schooling 12 years Occupation c^-^^^^p^^-f. 

Res i dence Winnebago, Illinois Marital Status Single 

Number of chi Idren 



N ame 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence 



Number of chi 1 dren 

[Name 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years of school ing 
Res i dence 



Number of children 



Date of bi rth 



Occupat I on 



Mar i ta 1 Status 



Mari tal STatus 



Date of bi rth 
Occupat ion 



111. ASSIGNMLNT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willincj) 

I liereby donate this family historv, along with all literary and administrative 
rights,' to the Rock Valley College hamily History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



kt^a- 



Signed >c\aI'<-.a >^i^. v 

Date __._^VK/tU A_^ill^. 







0- 


^i^'*' 


I 


4^° 1 




ir J 


"g 


<:^ ± 








•» 



fr 









cJ 



< 

1 

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d 

d 





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X 



page 3 

!• Garelt Stahl. ^;.,. 

2. Paternal great grandfather, 

3. Bom In 1841 in the Netherlands and married the 
former Myria Loogan bom in 1843 In the Netherlands 
died in 1893 at age 30 of tuberctaosia, 

4. Garelt was a farmer all his life and came to 
America in 1397 with his youngect eon Louis (my 
grandfather). Earlier in 1897, Garelt 's three other 
sons Lawrence, Carl and Albert came to America to 
look for fann work. ^ .? .y-iy *; 1-^ u?-- - ..v, 

5. Garelt Stahl died in the Preeport area of Illinois 
in 1902 at age 61 of tyjdioid fever. 

6. Garelt and Myria Stahl* s childera. 12 

5 daughters (names unknown) 

7 sons (3 names unkno\*n) 

Pour of the sons cane to America while the others 

staged behind with families of their own, fsunilios. 

1. Lawrence Stahl married the former Tina Debore. 

4 childem. ' 

a. Mary Stahl Doeden lived in Shannon, 111. 

b. Lawrence Stahl married the former Ruth 
Peterson, 2 sons 

David Stahl married the fonaer Pat 

Brown. 3 daughters 

Gary Stahl married the former Joyce 



nfbcu:I"S©.'io''&i4' mii at f^-SX ni cnroo' tte^t^oc-i j«iT<^l leaiol 
c-f r^'mo ttj-i s'ii'I bIu lis •ZB'/A'T.isl a risiv ;.Mo-t£.!) ,^ 

SX .in(^>ylr.(» ?. • ijii'-j •:i riX-SY^ Bo..- JX^Iiiv) ,'d 

{a-.or.'Ac.i.t (?®j2ck) eno.t-rijjsb ? 

.XIJ ,norif.in.d;- ni bJ5Vi:X a»os»ou Irffi^t.' vti/t^'^- ..s 

iii'l -lecncl eKt I>© inaec: X/terfS blYBQ 
iJovosL 'rf':jTr:l oxi-t Bsi^iecn Xtia^f-: -^it^wO 



page 4 

;. Al:-f Anderson. 4 chlldem 

atA- iQ^ Garelt Stahl married the former Evelyn 

^ ^'^ Baker, 2 chlldem 

Katrlna Nelle Stahl Sheltdon. 

Oarelt Stahl married the former Lois 

Lyford. 2 daughters 
d» Jenny Stahl Lameyer married ChrlB Lameyer. 

1 daughter '■^•^'■f-- ■^■-'- v-^i^^, ,:, ,..;>. '. 

Zatherjm Lameyer Poppin 2 daughters 
e» Grace Stahl Moth married Henry Moth. 

2 eons - :. 

Lawrence Moth 
Ernest Moth 2 daughters 
2, Carl Stahl moved out to South Dakota and 
married. 10 chlldem, 
a, Annie Stahl 
"b, Louis StpJil 

c, Gertrude Stahl 

d, Ben Stahl ■■'"'' ' ' " 

e, John Stahl • -. 

f , Lawrence Stahl 

g, Garelt Stahl 

^"^^ h, Carl Stahl ' '■ 
^'' 1, Mary Stahl 
j, Jenny Stahl 



page 5 

3« Albert Stahl married the former Tina Debore 
Sti^l (widow of hie older brother Lawrence), 
1 child 
Oferelt / a, Albert (Oppie) Stahl married the former 
Oct'j-j*«r- Tillie Sneak in 1930. 3 childem, -- ^ 
ril, 109'' ic« Albert (Skip) Leroy Stahl bom March 
aod l'!.^;- ;,i^>' 21, 1934 and married the former Eveljm 
•I, louls &t' Marie Hopkins bom March 3, 1938. 
in+ll tl«- x> 4 childem U- .■.vr:. :^ •.:•:, ■ ; , 
r^thcT --.t a,-' • i^ June Marie Stahl bom January 23, 
5- ^-o\\i& 'u.i^ Qf«: 1955 and is now a student at P.VC. 
^It'.-yi.ctt^o.^ c:^^^ Albert leroy Stahl torn December 
^". i.v ;.. . .: K-\ 7, 1962. ... . . 

i::cy bu' I.'. :: r Tiamy Leroy Stahl bom August 

Vini-*:t;: •, . . -:.. 2, 1955. 

?. -\i:)\ "••.•''■., «/ Tammy Marie Stahl bcm July 4» 

Xii .i^rK-;>r'-v ■■■ 1968, 

La.5!f 0! n- Thoodoro Stahl married tlae former 

K^'ii. vh.>r ^ -( Carol Jones. 4 childem 

.?.';.; rw^c?^, !•} Barbara Kay Stahl Little married «Joff 

/.■C-!it».'l /.'./■'?; Little. 1, ,> ."-', *.; •..,:.■ ■ .v 

r 4. Louis stahl bom Jtxne 25» 1383 and married 

* the former Grace Laneyer. 7 childem 3ee page 

6; Stahl, Louis. My paternal ^rrandfather. 



,(»oa0iR«rViJ. tsrito'x<f ^afclo alti to voJbiw) liieJ-Ci 

,tiiOi)XJtiii:' ?■ .CC^fl Ki iia&K2 ©iXXi-T 
lo-isi^! f?xoo XrteJ-B xct^i^l (qi^ci ) JtsoilA 

.c3CX ,r :;''riflM cxto<i aaiilqcli oii.sK 

todimof/l .TSoi Xi-z-.tS -^O'iel trt'^JI\ 

.tern, if A .cnod Xiictt; 'joioX 'cRiuiT 

,^ 'ilu\i aiod Idx-^i-B ©i-xsi-l Ytfosl 

,fiaex 

is.'jiol 9:;.:.' ivoi-fifis; liisJ"- etot'OatlT 
.'.''iQ-tXirio ^ .aoc'ot. XciaD 

>«xi-Jij; 



page 6 

1. Louis Stahl. lo,/,/ ; ,jr, i s i ^ j 

2, Paternal grandfather. 

5. Bom June 25» 1885 in the Netherlands the son of 
Garelt and Myrla Stahl, one out of 12 childem. On 
October married the former Grace Lameyer bom May 
21, 1893 in the Netherlands the dau^ter of Henry 
and Lucy Lameyer, -Ije. >'i'-r}\^-'- ;-'!'>-!r • -; 

4. Louis attended public schools in the Netherlands, 
until the 6 grade. He came to America with his 
father ?t age 14 in 1897, i^^- ; ^- .: <- 

5. Louis has been a farmer in the Winnebago and 
Stephenson county area until he retired in 1952. 

6. Louis and hie wife Crace live in a small house 
they built in 1952 locR+ed on Hosington Road in 
Winnebago Coimty, 

?• rflieh Louis and Grace were first married they lived 
in Preeport and then in 1923 they moved to Adeline, 
Later on in 1924 they rented a farm on hosington 
Road where their eldest daughter Harie now lives 
and owns. The Stahl 's in 1931 after leaving that 
rented farm moved across the road to njiother farm 
where they stayed until they built their small house 
in 1952 on the property of their daughter. After 
Louis and Grace moved to their present house their 
son Lloyd stayed on the farm with his family and 



a *>y>jRr 



'10 ac.3 &d-j- g.'-nsltef!^©!: ari^ a.f ?!88i ,'35 sityl. t/ioS ,^ 
iTO .n-tsfiXtvSo ""iX to two «f!0 .Xtlfii'i str{/. b'^-i j-IsiirO 

,n.bfrgX'x«ji.i--ii''i ^'M r;i aXoorf-^c aiXdaii' boba»>t^B ssiuaJ. »t^ 

£).:.■ o^;:i;'.if5a':.t*' Oi^a' r.i t9£:.*t«l c i-Jo^sd Esarf aluci »? 
.5ai;od X.I.jj!3ti ':• ni ©vll ♦ojRTt'ii G":Jtw ai;.! &j^ ei/'oJ .d 

flKotr-jiJiaoH no mts?: i^ Se+no's ^atW' >S<-"I ai no •x^&bI 

weifaff IlntsB "xi^JJv jiit/d" ■<?T»tfrf" lifiw ds-^s^s ■^ri;* iSTsrfw 
•:rsvt1t/ .x^fd'^nAib tieri* ^o '^pHstto^q eri* no Sc*?! ni 



page 7 

and farmed the land until 1967 when they moved to 

Seward, Illinoia, 

8, Louis and Grace Stahl*s chlldem, 7 

1. Marie (Mary) Stahl Kloster bom January 19, 
1912 and married Heik Kloster In 1953, Occupation 
Housewife. 4 childem P -v- . v -: ..- - -. 

a. Joyce Marie Kloster Stiles bom Sept- 
ember 11, 1938 end married on June 6, 1970 
Bob Stiles. Occupation Bank Secretary. 

b. Shirley Ann Kloster Cole l:;om February 

9, 1940 and married Lob Cole in February 
of 1961, Occupation Housewife. 3 daughters 

c, Linda Lou Kloster Brick bom Au^st 
12, 1941 and manried a man named Brick, 

d, Betty Jean Kloster Nordman bom Sept- 
ember 25, 1942 and married Bob Nordman. 
Occupation Housewife, 2 childem 

2. Lucy Stahl VI el bom June 8, 1913 and married 
on March 17, 1934 John VI el. Occupation House- 
wife. 1 child ' - 

a. Janice Lou VI el Reinders bom November 

10, 1938 and married J«hn Reinders in 
1959. 2 childem, ' 

3. Henry Stahl (father) bom April 30, 1915 
and married the former Ruth Eleanor McLarty on 



ct t^T^'iz ^^©ria- xrsriv YV f. S-ktasj bas&l ©fit to.'niijsl- bcufi 

,PI vTrtvf.'.l* m-Mj Ts^Bo.QI .WsJE f\ri«^) i*lt«H .5 

cnra.MMo« -^ .»'i:iwf>B.cioH 

-t^.-.'/Oi! aot&yiqUf>'jG .IfniV HfToL >?1?5 ,"I riof«K KO 

.m?>bLhio !5 .e?C^X 
?Xt.: .O,'^ IliflrA mod <i«..4^«l) Irf«!*S Tsri-iH .?:' 



page 8 

September 7» 1937. Occupation Farmer. 6 childem 
a. Nancy Ruth Stahl Peter bom November 
21, 1938 and married on December 10, I960 
Larry Peter. Occupation Housewife living 
in Loves Park, Illinois. 3 childem 

Caprice Kenee Peter bom September 

22, 1961. r-rx^r ^^■": ,. .^ 

Kar«i Lynn Peter bom Hay 12, 1966. 
Stephaine Ann Peter bom July 5, 1970. 
^. b, Carolyn Lee Stahl Trickel bom April 
v 26, 1945 and mai'riaa on April 16, 1966 
Arlo Trickel. Occupation Housewife living 
in i'reeport, Illinois. 2 childem 

Scott Arlo Trickel bom December 16, 
1968. 

Angela Lee Trickel bom February 19, 
1973. 
c. Virginia Kay Stahl bom March 22, 1949. 
t« Occupation Secretarial Clerk. 
j_,rj : a. Debra Jean Stahl bom September 13, 
1953. Occupation Ward Clerk. 

e. Steven Richard Stahl bom August 6, 

1955. Occupation Student at HVC. 

f. Joann Sue Stahl bom September 13, 

1956. Occupation Student at WHS. 



iaif0s»o'-q9o mod i^&&'l -3«ii<i ^oJ^iqAi^ 

,"^ jojj-?,i.O, mod X.«-|£!*5 Ivs.irfoJtH ftGkVfa.tS ,3 



page 9 

A- Margaret 3tahl Smith 1)0171 February 25 1 1919 
and married John Smith. 3 childem 

a. Larry Allan Smith "born ^eptemher 5» 
1943 and married the former Linda « 
1 dau^ter •-■' '-■^'^■^ ^ > "- -••- 

b. Robert Lee Smith bom October 16, 1944 
7» > and married the former Virginia Hun son on 
. nt September 14» 2 childem ^/.i* vcm:: 

c. Brenda Kay Smith bom January 7, 1954. 

5. Gerald (Bud) Stahl bom April 7, 1923 and 
married the former Mary Jane; Groves, 5 childem 

r, ,-i, t.>.T4T„ a, Pamela Jean Stahl bom October 13, 1950, 

3. Siofn '■■ b, Sharon Ann Stahl bom October 17, 1951. 
of irii,oTr-> c, Sandra Marie Stahl i)ei trick bom November 
i'oTT.;.'.^ Lm 25, 1952 and married Terry Dei trick. 2 

Iu2;''8 ' childem , ^,, 

in 10;;- d, iiugene Russell Stahl bom August 1954. 

4. " •• Cynthia Kay Stahl bom June ^9, 1958, 

6, Lloyd Robert Stahl bom August 26, 1926 and 
married the former Iris Watts, 7 childem 

cd hy the a. Patrica Ann Stahl Matlock bom June 6» 
Titicy br'.ni 1949 and married on May 8, 1970 John Matlock, 

5. .'.'erjry ,■ b, Vicky Jean Stahl Lawson bom August 2, 

6. I trry 1951 and married on August 26, 1972 Gregg 

Lavson. 1 son 



PXC'X , i v^fixsiQe'i xsxt/'f rf^iKiS .Criev^ ^<9T»^itfi.M «■?* 

,r •£tiidKS'>f''5<-S fttoci" 'iiJ'.tw^ fi&lSJ>. 7*r«!riT!u: .ic 
.^,__^^ ijiJiiiu. idinxpA od;!' f:'Gi'xT«K: b«s ?^€X 

13X18 c--iPX «V XiigA n-iort Xis^ (£M) l>X»l9-0 .c 

,0^21 t^-i i^ci'orf-yO .c«:o;< Ijifete fwaL ^iX^ijob^ ,j5 
•r^} ffaa-vTOli «toJ 3bX'.t*J:c?Ct IfLs-i'f- ©i'i«K s^lxttac »o 

at©i>Xi:rIo 
.3^(^X ,^^ e^if'-. mcci lifeS-H Y,/»X sMd-jn-^O .© 

.-^of.&sP. mii»l> OVQl if T^i cc b»J:'zi£iBG.' fcRs ^^t*X 

rl;^o•ID SWX rf^S imri^fA «o fc^iTtsw ftfte l^^l 

fK)e X ,«o8ws.I 



page 10 

X. ( c. James Louis Stahl horn August 17, 1952, 
rsrr d, Judith Kay Stahl bom September 15, 1955. 

1 daughter 

e. Candy Lee Stahl bom December 17, 1956, 
?^ '^ f , Eddie Lloyd Stahl bom December 17, 1956* 
*•'■« g. Carl Todd Stahl bom August 21, 1958, 
7. Lawrence Albert Stahl bom August 7, 1932 
and married the former Marge Holeton. 2 sons 

a. Terry Lee Stahl bom November 8, 1953, 
4» b, Ronald Gene Stshl bcm July 7, 1956, 

1, Henry Laneyer. t >jj* dts u: v'^; ^.^ .':■•-_ : ■>.: - 

2, Paternal great grandfather, '^ -r:-i.A;a ■• 

3, Bom November 15 » 1864 in the Netherlands the son 
of George and Grace Mullcr Lameyer and married the 
former Lucy Viel bom February 22, 1865 in the Kethex^- 
lands the dau^ter of Henry and Ellis Maas VI el and died 
in 1922 of a gall bladder operation, 

4, Henry was a farmer all his life coming to the Pree- 
port area from the Netherlands in 1907, Earlier In 
1907, their oldest son George came to America follow- 
ed by the father Henry and one of his sons. The mother 
Lucy brought the following 8 childem with her, 

5, Henry Lameyer died in the 1940' s, 

6, Henry and Lucy Lameyer' s childem. 11 



,-y':]\^\ ,Vi- ■^^'v^vyA vnoii Xdfii''-' siiirf*.! a^fflwT> ,o 

.J'-lfM , iS d-siascA :s^o(i fite;^'. &i«iT I-iSfO ,s 

.?ic' X ,V xl'Jl- rrsc<i Xif«s-S 9iTTj<3 &ijafic>t ^cf 

«»da 6oiT'sB.r; feri? 'i-t9v>»!;u3l •jollwi! ©cstC bits s-^iof*-? ^o 
-'s-oi!i>'eJl Qii& ni f^\)fil ^'.-S ▼T.s.tnri'.-j'? aprocf I®xv YOJ^'i T['=*cno!t 

♦ro r.t;S*to«o t»ii£>iild! tSjf^ s to s;S?I at 

-5e*:r^ siid- p^ v,.' irsioo vstiX a iff lie t&astJt'i « a«v T^angii ,^ 

at toj li-Ts;:. .V'">?X i-f &]f?!:ialT:*.;iJ©?i ff.i';? «c*rl S57S T^oq 

-oXXol *j^l-*y©<fiA c;l ^-'mo ®^4toef) isos i-aaI;Xo iladi ,VC^L 



page 11 

^» ^ 1» George Lameyer bom 1887 and married the 

'-« '* jTormer Mayme • 

':?* '■• a. Henry Lameyer married • 4 childem 

arvl T'^'" Ta» Hargaret Lameyer married, 
tc— w 2» Alice Lameyer Deiterman married IS^o Deit> 
"J'^ erman. 3 daughters • ■■■•'-■ "<• ■> < .j . .; 

T ^'lO 3, Henry Lameyer married , 2 childem 
-^i«'Ard ci a, Betty Lanieyer -^'Jt.- },■.- 'v: ;>;..> ... 
ArKi'li^T! t), Lester Lameyer, • ' - •• - - ■• 

-Vill 4, Grace Lameyer Stahl "bom May 21, 1893 and 

married Louis Stahl on October 28, 1911 » 7 
';•, childem. Seepage 6 (paternal /p^andmother) 
h*3r<s 5, Albert Lameyer married, 2 childem 
"iC-ir^-e, Tina Lameyer i'Yey married Richard Prey, 4 
daughters 
7» John Lameyer married Mar y 3 childem 

8. Harm Lameyer married Grace ^ , 5 childem 

9» Jennie Lameyer Deiterman married George Deit- 
erman, 2 childem 

Henry Deiterman married the former Sue . 

2 childem ^--^ ^<<ri: c v ' ^t . c.c- .- - . 
i'^4 Kstle Deiterman married, "' ~::\- 

10. Reika Lameyer married, 4 sons 

11, Annie Lameyer Bolnan Conly child bora in Araerica) 



•,>—>-. effr^M t;s'5):*xo"j: 
>:^«. 5: £ erf;) ;v . bott'iJir^ 'f$x®jyi3t.t ^c^stpf! .^ 
.ftel't-isffi 'X€--H;:s.nu8.i #»-xjs7>-t-'»8 ,cf 

sTKJtffi^itBsfc ?' .nasi'? 

R-i-efc'IU'O ?f ...^ ^^'LoJi jt>«>i'sasr.'! •T«»'^#a'Stl aMol ,T 

.(«oii»?jA ni moo Miro -^Xacl jcv.a?l«>ji -jissiwiadL «1imca ,11 



pa^ 12 

1, Edward McLarty* ",7: 

2, Maternal great-great grandfather. 

3. Bom Septemljer 26, 1814 In Argyllshire, Scotland 
and married tha fbmer Catherine Shaw "bom 1824 in 
Scotland and died January 24, 1841 at age 17, having 
one son John McLarty bom 1841 and died February 
1350 at age 9 in Barloo, Ohio. In 1844, in Ohio 
Sdward married the former Isabella McParland bom in 
Argyllshire, Scotland Hay 22, 1822 and die4 In Rockford, 
Illinois May 11, 1911, at ag« 89. > •. -o-.- 

4. Edward died in Rockford August 31, 1887 at age 73. 
5» iidward was a farmer and lived In Ohio before coming 
here to Rockford after leaving Scotland, All the 
ficXarty childera were bom in Celpre, Ohio, 

6, Sdward and Isabella HcLarty's childem, 11 

a* Joannet ricLarty bom March 4, 1845 and died 
July 20, 1847 at age 2 In Barloo, Ohio, 

b, Margaret Jane McLarty Drain bom May 18, 
1846 and died August 2, 1932 at age 86 in Vin- 
cent, Ohio, . — ..>f.>v*« 

c, Isabella McLarty Ferguson bom September 15» 
1848 and died November 1906 at age 58 in Rock- 
ford, Illinois. • )- \o-.-'^^s\:er ^'' . ' ' "'- - 

d, Edward McLarty bom October 28, 1349 and 
died August 17, 1861 at age 11 in Durcham, Ohio. 



f.i: f-.'sSf ri"jod' vmdb (ms.t&dii'.O -r«ac?o1t ^rfc*- ftei-ttij?-! ban 
'S^xiy-'Hd ,VX »':><s ;^jf; XAG-i' «^S '^•WircsL hsifo fens b«fcI;*-<x>S 

oLiO ak ^^bl «1 .ciiiO ,eoXT5-ra rl P 3ss ^r 0c!8I 

,i)io'l>IooK ni iteih hcLf SS8X .S-l'J ^^' bmsiLioQi: ^^lirfaiX^-iA 

'■^utaivo eaolfv^ oiisO n/ .b«viX bfra -I'^i'^'s^l .« a4»w M»w&?i *? 
Mit XTA „ii£JRXvOi^e gfs,hr**i tailiP, .'>?9t3fe><^ o* ^-larf 

XX ».<^'i:'ybiiii!:i a 'x^xsaoM .<?XI&d'seI tav, b^sMtHi ,d 

»8X ^;«r iwcdf «.t-8fa x&^a^B 9tt»^ te-wss^RK ,tf 

-aiV al 08 o-:vs ta SFCX ,*: tvm^A b»ib htm d*8X 

,<^X nedf<':':s;3-q*2 mtod aoao^'S©'? t;*^'®*^*^ AtXiediBsI ,? 
-:^coH oi 63 e^iS d^s dO^X tv>!fsavoIi b9i.b Jbit« mv6X 

.BJtoniXXI ,biot 

.oliiO ,cier(oii<I ai XX s^fs *jb I&8X ,VX i-ajjjyiA beli) 



pag« 13 



--.^1 



«, Walter McLarty bom January 16, 1852 and 
died November 9f 1919 at ag« 67 in Hockford, 
Illinois* 3e« also pag* 13 (maternal graat 
^ grandfather) -ij-^^ ■•■.'*--•>*-'.-,. „ .> » 

f, John McLarty bom October 27, 1853 and died 
Hay 2, 1932 at age 79 in Monroe Center, Illinois, 

g, Andrew McLarty bom June 25, 1856 and died 
August 8, 1861 st age 5 in Durcham, Ohio, 

h, Daniel P. McLarty born June 26, 1858 and died 

May 5» 1953 et aga 94 in Somerc Point, New Jersey, 

i» George G, KdiArty bom September 15 » 1860 

and died August 30, 1861 at age 1 in Durcham, 

Ohio. 

j, Janet Agnes McLarty Shepherd bom October 

7, 1862 and died November 11, 1915 at age 53 in 

Rockford, Illinois, 

k. Eliza McLarty bom July 12, 1867 and died 

August 30, 1867 at aga 1 month in Durcham, Ohio, 

1. Walter McLarty,^ ■" "'^ '-'..!■»*« ,., 

2, Maternal great grandfather, 

3» Bom January 16, 1852 in Belpre, Ohio the son of 
Edvard jmd Isabella McLarty and married the former 
Ella Kate Dickerman bom November 13» 1857 in Jcwett, 
New York the daughter of Joel and iiiunice Dickerman and 
died on August 31, 1920 in Rockford at age 62 of a 



^r..k(^f.ii£x ^taffirr,: Qonno'i' ni. PT sjv^ t5 S^fl «£ ■?«?• 
hztb bi'n dc?&X ,?S 9ncfl> mod •^d'TCiIn:M %f^ibfti\ ,3 

.ecii) fen:*? Scit I ^dS <>rt</X. ri-ioci ■?;;f*t«OD&K ,'<i l"itsx^.J ,xi 
,;t;j'-^d[n'^M nx I ®t^3 ta XtDSX ,0?: ^^a«3r/A .boi/? Sna 

.(rlontlXT .jyTCl-^fJO^ 



page 14 



gall bladder operation, 

4. Walter died in Rockford, Illinois on November 9, 
1919 at age 67 of tuberculosis. 

5. Buried in Cedar Bluff Ceaotary along side his 
wife ELla Kate. ^<-5-v:r -.^■rj-.J .::^■':. -• -^ . ■■ 

6. Walter xms a famer in the Rockford area after 
coming here from Ohio, Walter owned a farm on the 
land which is now called Camp Grant. Leaving the 
farm to his eldest son Bdwaird (maternal grandfather) 
in 1906, Walter moved to a farm near Cherry Valley. 
In 1908 Walter retired rmd moved to a house on East 
State street whore :tha Burger King is flow located. 

7. Walter and Ella Kate McLarty's childem. 3 

1. Edward Dlckerman MoLarty bom April 9, 1883 
and died November 18, 1954 at age 71, See also 
page 16 (maternal grandfather) 

2. Prank Jilarl McLarty bom 15, 1836 and died in 
1945 at age 59. See also page 20. 

3. Florence Eunice McLarty Hal.ley Konkle bom 
June 26, 1889 and is piresently 84. See also 
page 22. ">■■■'' • ^-^ " ■'■■■■■ ^ '• ' 

1, Joel Dickeraan, -; '•• - 

2, Maternal great-great-great grandfather. '' 

3, Bom 1735 and died 1865 and married the former 
Catherine Atwater, ,. - 



^.•: &T>^.q 



exii ©ftiP :'-.no.Cii ■'^•r.«J'ea©'J l'5:tii;? •Mb©-'.) ixl s^rT>fS[ *- 

.'tfh«X .©XfR ellv 

«*aS' 0:0 fiiTJs'i ". fcs-rrwo to.' IaW »o.?tfO «i<rti. «i&il jjatfTOO 

{■\9d&'-j.fH::»'r:. !.fiirm:^f:ia) h-amiM stjS ^bck.To eld 0^ 0i"«5l 

..of'-'aoc-r -»oll I3-? f rii'-' tS»«T.tj? <&d^ (TSsrlr v''0«TJ-a J5#.3d-fJ 

'^iiii o^^ »If *■»/', ta ^5(?X ^Sl te isa?: voi! haJ:.& t-afi 

i-c^ fe- ib hit*- dfifX ,?I rrtoif ^s^'^a-loM Xnn'^. ^usri ,'\ 

.cc f>st-Bc 03 Lb »ro ,e;? ©as ts ?ik??X 

c-norf oX-lricTi 7;!aII«P r^'V^-ZoK eeixttja hos-orror? .t" 

oe/.>'. :-'f?& ,^8 ''tXtaaagftrq a/ fen*. C^BX ^tJ?^"* eri-'U 

.naivxei^toio Xeots .X 

tfiia-xr-l: "^.n'.t ?>»i:"2T«.r b^s^ 20BI i6«fi:?5 f>ffii g??VX Je'ro^I .^ 



pag« 15 

4. Joel and Catherine Dickerman's childem, 1 

1, Joel Dickerman, -je :> 

2, j'-Iatemal great-great grandfather. 

3, Bom January 10, 1818 the son of Joel and 
Catherine Dickerman married the former Eunice 
Bailey bom 1819 and died January 3» 1887 at 

age 58» -."*<». ''iiVa' "Uricr^rn. '-Ic"-;-?' v '. ■■. y- - • 

4, After hie first wife's death, Joel married 
the former Helen Hammond on October 22, 1889. 

5, Joel died January 3, 1895 at a^e 77. 

6, Joel Dickerman* s ancestors came to the New 
England area in the late 1600' s and early 1700' s. 
All of the Joel Dickerman childem were bom in 
Jewett, New York. 

7, Joel and iiunice Dickerman' s childom. 8 

1. Putnam B. Dickerman bom July 1840 married 

2. Mnterri the former iinily Pick on September 12, 

3. hoxT. A 1865 and died August 31» 1919 at ae« 79. 
cf v/i<lt.yT 2. Micah L. Dickerman born June 8 1843 
:>»''}(* vVrfl married the former Prances HcLean March 
i'hxi^htr'.r 28, 1867 and died February 6, 1924 at age 80. 
and ileC 3. limaerrett Jane Dickerman Bailey bom 
1^63 at a October 9, 1846 and married Uorton Lailey 
(cr .'^maJ on February 14, 1367 and died April 23, 

^,, MvarC 1929 at age 82. . j :. -.:..- • .. •• 



^.e Vc?.oi ,-^ fSJBWiasL 5©ii> Sit': PX8X iTCoo Y«#i.ita«: 
PwiiiiBfu Xeot ,ilt.»»£s o'stll'i/ ta-fil old ^let^ »* 

ri .-corf *-;*"5v,'' irro0ilr> fiaensiloKI leol orfJ- ^o XI/i 

fe'.'-^-i^r Oi^^>I: '?;ii'L rrrcMi fBBr-l%*.ito i'a .'J! fis-cttf/i «X 

.CV J>,>« -^s 2X-vX ,X^ J^j/aiTii &axb Isfs-ii <!!dBX 
f>C;X « autil fi'joi rseters^sii? ia ,a. iisoirk ,=; 

>^siiii : flod-ioi-' voivtaK ijzifi «^0X ,C 'xa4otaO . 

•SO »s,e tjs CS^X 



page 16 

4. Mary Humpry Dickerman bom December 5» 
1850 and died August 26, 1852 at age 2. 

5. Carolyn Ambea Dickernan bom May 11, 
1852 and died Harcfi 22, 1867 at age 5. 

6. Elizabeth Sanford Dickerman bom March 
26, 1853 and died April 2, 1857 at age 2. 

7. Ella Kate Dickerman McLarty bom November 
13, 1857 married Walter McLarty February 10, 
1881 and died August 31, 1920 at age 62, 
See also page 13* (maternal great grand- 
mother) 

8. Cora Alida Dickerman Blackstock bom 
March 26, 1860 and married Richard Black- 
stock on August 14, 1901 and died May 27 » 
1935 at age 75. 

1, Edward Dickerman McLarty. 

2. Maternal grandfather, 

3» Bom April 9, 1883 in New Ililford, Illinois the son 
of Walter and Ella Kate McLarty and mairried the former 
Sadie Grace Vlckers on December 11, 1911 bom the 
daughter of Robert and Lucy Vickere on July 15, 1890 
and died in Rockford Convalescent's Home on March 31, 
1963 at age 72 of Parkinston diease. See also page 
(maternal grandmother) 
4, Edward died November 18, 1954 in 3v;edish Amerlcam 



p«g« 17 

Hospital after suffering a stroke 3 weeks before 
at hie home on Willard Avenue. 

5. Burial et Cedar Blviff Cemetary with his wife, 
Sadie and his parents, ,r. 

6. Edward graduated from Rockford Central High — 
School and attended Brown's Business College for 

2 years, ^i rurtT-. Ht>nA_.h} i cf^n . 

7. Edward was a farmer all his life in the Rockford 
area hcginning by himself in 1906 on his father's 
farm on Gamp Grant until he and his wife, Sadie , - 
and their two daughters Eunice and Ruth (ny Mother) 
were forced to leave -^t the beginning of World War I, 
The McLarty's then rented a farm in the Guilford 
area where their son Irving was boni. After the owner 
died Edward bought a farm located rit the corner of 
Springfield Avenue and Safford Roads across from 
what is now Page Park, formerly the Howard Welles 
farm, '<fnil» living on this farm their 3^^ daughter 
Gladys was bom. In 1938, Edward retired from farming 
and sold the farm, and moved to a house on 25*^ 
street. After retiring from farming Edward worked 
for Arlington Cemetary as a gravedigger and later 
worke* for a Coal Company in Rockford. Moving again, 
the McLarty's lived in a house on Elm Avenue in Loves 
Park, Later Edward and Sadie bought a house on Lawn 



,*jjnav,. i>ij(jll£tf flo •.'SOI-; airi *js 
,s't.fv id ill rftiw i^x^i^affioC' IttsLS. TedsD to JLsjtiiJa ,c 

xi-^iJi L&tinr-O fnclHOO/l moil bei-sxriifiT::-;^ ftiawM .3 
^cl «7^<3XIoC 33^aif30tL R^frvrn-ia b&bn^tia cn.« locrfoB 

^ic't?»oon -irft ni olii sir? iX« t«-ynfl'i b ssjv fiiA'wbS .? 

0«.CXaV h7<<voH ©rfi" ^^jX-iynriOi ,>h:i5? »5»fi^ won Bi ^jsdw 

T<^^t ii^aifs^*^ '■''^'C list's tnsl 8iri;t no %^,n}^tl ©XinV ,2itjb^ 

:R,rilnrf.3'i: ooft hi"? t-^*T Mav^bS (f'^PX iil .xnocf bjbv ex^&^XO 

^"^i?^ :<« itistrori a o& bavosn fir* ,5rj«^ axl* bloa f>iiB 

o*ilcv r;-ji«,'oo ?j,j3JLfiVi8l rioi? ?if<it£;f«i t!!!!^!:/- ,i^•©t;>■8 

fTv.vJ. iio ©sifC'f .•■; J'f(«i;od' ftiftaS frnr; rTewM ttstevl ,3lia? 



page 18 

Drive but moved for the final time to a house on 

Willard Avenue. Just before his death, he worked 

at day work, doing yard work for many people, 

8, Edward didn't travel much except down to Texas 

to see his son Irving who had been flown there from 

overseas with a gun shot woiind to his leg, 

9» Political Party- Republican. 

10, Edward and Sadie McLarty's childem, 4 

1. Eunice Evelyn McLarty Kloster bom November 
IS), 1912 in New Milford and raarried on Decenber 
15, 1934 Jake Kloster bom September 15, 1912. 
4 childem 

a. Ronald Gene Kloster- bom December 14, 
1940 and married the foritior V/anda Woodin 
on October 20, 1973. 

b. Roy La'/erne Kloster bom f'.oy 27, 1242 
and married the former Julio Lupps in 1964. 
1 child, 

Michael Roy Kloster born April 19, 

1965. 
Roy divorced Julie and married the former 
Norma Sitton in 1971, 1 child 

Gp.i'y Allan Kloster born September 

24, 1972. 

c. James Edward Kloster born Decenber 30, 



y-t «t:;;.fort' ft of '^(aii lv.nlJ. 9t^t 'toJ bsvoti &vd sivitC 
R??x;;^'? 0:^ i^-fo^ tcrf^oy.9 doiJiTi j!?>--//?t> t'n&l^ f3n:st^rb& .,B. 

.^ ..TT'^'.A./;! ) ■.^*-.;;v'-:.8J.dM 9i:.t»s8 bas> btfi»i«fM .CT. 

•14>JiK5VOil MOi:' TJ^fgu -iJi v:^'£AIoH JTTffa^^ ftOiflcS .1 

r.iboo:-! zb<-vii> Tocirol iJifi" Bril?ctAJi; has Oh^l 

Stjl ,?" 'i£"j^ mod 'xoieoIX j».'?nt' .el ^oH *cl 
.N^PI nt ^^qcriji ■^)t:.r!;;l T^mol; ®ri.t hnt'i-rs^ &rf« 

-rtr-io';. i,- O.I-?i.r;.r bits siXiO ^»^^•J:cvlD \;ofl 



page 19 

^^ Q 1948 and married the former Rowen* Craven 
]i32r ^^ ^*y 27, 1972. Occupation Farmer. 
.jo'jjf d. Darlene Joan IQoster Milroy bom Au^rust 
^fj^-i 28, 1951 and married Ray Milroy on June 
28, 1971. Occupation Secretary. . j/,- 

2. Ruth Eleanor McLarty Stahl bom April 16, 
1914 in New Milford and married on September 
7, 1937 Henry 3tahl bom April 30, 1715. 6 ,,^,, 
childem See also page 8. (mother) ;!,:;<;•* 

3. Irving LaVerne McLarty born March 8, I919 

in Guilford and on December 27, 1945 married the 

former Marie Alice Andersen born August 17, 

1920 and died June 22, 1973 of cancer. 2 childom 

a, Linda Marie McLarty Doty bom June 5 
1947 and married George Doty on August 
10, 1968, Occupation Housevrife. 2 childem 

Dawn Marie Doty bora August 11, 1970. 
Brlnn George Doty bom January 30, 
1973. - - - , ^ 

b, Raymond Irving McLarty bom December 
15, 1948 pnd married the former 3ue Lotzer 
on June 12, 1971. Occupation Teacher, 1 

1. rr child r'-, 

2. irot:i-;r 'V Mark Raymond McLarty bom January 16, 

3. LOT^. -;v -^ 1974. n ■ ■ 



91 «y>;:Q 

ij»v--3-i ■ /?nKvro>i a9i'"'xr.x ^at bis ti'i^ci bos &^9L 
.':•:■" ■.rx^'"i fit i&:<quQC? SV^.l ,TS TS^ fiO 

.^i'l-iiaio*?- no it*3':jA.tooO .IVC-C i^''^ 

d ,ri(I ,0?: li-iqA aiod Irifii-: ^t-i*^ T^^I ,V 
•?fCI ,f' rfo'^.«" tric'i 'E^JtbJoM &rr;»VaJ ^nivtl ,^ 
,TX S'QysJ'^A isnod ff««"i')'^5.a;\ sr- MA sjfsi*?^ wcnol 
■^ ^oyl. f£-rocf vrfoQ Y^ "sjstiof'' atnjKM nhnll ^ 

. .iVtrX ,J.X tfJif^t* xnctf xi^oQ •XTcai; mirAjCf 
,0?; v-z.feifncT. eiocf '^*ou 'j^io-^Ci .i--i^S 

.^:vi'X 

•:,"5'C!8.i»0<5Ci :v:o<1 Y«"*''i'^'i^''' ^niVlI r£i<>.nriJ.K:/i ,cf 

is-'^i:;foa *.!A- 'lemo't. »i^* fj^i-'nfira ba« r>?iex »?I 
i .ifdns&T oo-W^qiraoO ,XTt/I ,SX «!iirC. no 

hLtdo 



pag© 20 



4. Glsdys Marie McLarty Brick bom March 11, 
1923 in Rockford and married on August 17, 1944 
Joseph Daniel Brick bom December 27, 1912. 7 
chlldem, 

a, Sharon Marie Brick bom July 27, 1945. 
Occupation Techer. 

b, Thomas Joseph Brick bom September 17, 
1948 and married the former Laurie Hudson 
on August 22, 1970. Occupation Student. 

1 child 

Nathan Lax'O'enca Brick bom February 
15, 1972. 

c, Mary Sue Brick bom November 20, 1953. 
Occupation Student. 

d, John Daniel Brick bom February 9, 1955. 
Occupation Student at RVC, 

e, William James Brick bom October 13, 
1957. Occupation Student. 

f, Donald Hathev Brick bom June 6, 1961, 
Occupation Student. 

g, Gordon Edward Brick bom May- 11, I965, 
Occupation Student. 

1, Prank Earl McLarty. 

2, Brother of maternal grandfather. 

3, Bora May 15, 1886 in New Milford, Illinois the son 



pag« 21 

of Walt«r and Ella Kat« McLarty and married the former 
Bessie Grlsell Robinson born 1886 and is presently 
37. 

4. Earl (Prank) died in Rockford, Illinois in 1945 
at age 58, 

5. garl is buried In Arlington Cemetary. 

6. Earl was a farmer on the east side of Rockford 
near the Guilford area and before that in the Monroe 
Center area, 

7« Political Party - Republican, 

8, Earl and Bessie McLarty* s childern. 7 

1. Eugene Robinson McLarty bom May 1, 1913 
rnd died Au^^st 31, 191? .^t a^e 4 months., 

2, Donald V/alter ^TcLarty bom October 16, 1914 
and died April 14t 1915 at age 6 months, 

5. Luella Pearl McLarty Pepper bom Kb^ 11, 
1916 snd married Bob Pepper, 2 childern. 

a, Barbara Jean Pepper Cummings bom May 
16, 1941 rnd married Roger Curamlngs, 

b, John Pepper bom September 2, 1943 "Jid 
married, 2 daughters. 

_ .. Amy Pepper 

Darcey Pepper 
4, Prances June McLarty Green bom June 1, 1919 
and married Bob Groen, 2 daughters. 



pa^e 22 

a* Carol Ann Green bom July 19, 1954. 
Occupation Student. 

b. Margaret (Peggy) Elaine Green born 
May 1954* Occupation Student at RVC. 

5. Harold Burton McLarty born March 12, 1925 
and married ths former Bueleh Robinson in 1961* 
1 child 

a. Rex McLarty bom 1962 and died 1962. 

6. Raymond Earl McLarty bom March 4, 1926 and 
died May 20, 1926 at age 2 months, 

7. Alice May McJ^arty Pencock bom May 4, 1928 
end married Russell Peacock. 1 child 

a, Beverly Diane Peacock bom Axi^st 22, 
1951. 

1. Florence Eunice McLarty Ilalley Konkle, 

2. Sister of maternal grandfather. 

3. Bom June 20, 1889 in New Gilford, Illinois the 
daughter of Walter and Slla Kate McLarty and married 
on October 12, 1926 David Hallcy vho vras born in 1869 
and died September 14, 1942 at age 75. Florence later 
married on October 6, 1955 Clarence Konkle bom in 
1886 and died January 16, 1969. Florence is presently 
84 years old, 

4. Florence lived with her father and mother all her 
life until their deaths in 1919 and 1920. Being bom 



pag« 23 

on the Walter McLarty farm, now Camp Grant, vhcn in 
1906 she moved with her parents to the Cherry Valley 
farm after leaving the home place to ray ,i;randfather. 
Leaving in Cherry Valley for 2 years, her parents 
bought a house on East State Street, where the Burger 
king is nov7 locatsc!. After her father's death, her 
mother and herself shared a small house on Pearl 
Avenue. Moving from that house after her mother's 
death in the early 1920' s, she "bought a large house 
located on North Horseman vrhprc she was living at 
the time of her marriage to David, After David's 
def.th in 1942 ;:he continued to live in the large 
house until the early 1950' s v/hen she cold the house 
on North Horseman ?nd bou^t another large home on 
HufjPtaan Boulevard, Owning the home at the time of her 
aarriage to Clarence Konkle, she continued to live 
there "fter his death in 1969. In 1973 decieding 
the hoise 'ras too big, she had a sale of both the 
house and of most of the furniture she had collected 
over the years. Florence is now living in a 3 room 
apartment located on North Main, 

5. Religion - Presbjrterian. 

6. Political Party - Republican. 

7. Florence has trf'vcled with David to the south, 
east and west and with Clarence to the south, north, 
and vrest. 



page 24 

!• Robert Vlckers, 

2» Mat •mad. great grandfather. 

3. Robert married the former Lucy Horton bom in 
1865 and died in 1940 at age 75. Robert died when 
the childem were just young. Robert owned a farm 
out by Calldonia and when he died he left the farm 
to his wife, mcy for lifetime use of it. Lucy cr>ne 
from a family of six chidem Amos Horton, Floyd 
Horton, V/ert Horton, Grace Horton McEvoy, herself 
Lucy, and a yoxinger brother Wade Horton, Lucy having 
to support her three childem kept house for many 
people, one being my grandfather Edward thus intro- 
ducing her only daughter Sadie to him. After Robert 
Vlckers death Lucy married Doctor Van Voris of Rock- 
ford and If^ft the use .of the farm to her youngest 
son Robert, nfter her second husbsjid's death Lucy 
married Darwin Chandler for the third £j:i6 final time, 
iiftcT Lucy Chandler's death in 1940 the Vickers 
farm was sold, 

4, Robert and Lucy Vickero* childem, 4 

1. Asoy Vlckers bom 183_ and died at a^e 1, 

2. Sadie Grace Vlckers McLarty bom July 15, 
1890 In Calidonia, Illinois and married Edward 
Dickerman McLarty on December 9, 1911. Sadie 
lived on the farm in Cflldonla xxntil her marriage 



pag« 25 

to Edward when she moved to the farm on Camp 
Grant, She moved with Edward to Guilford, to 
the farm at the comer of Springfield Avenue, 
to the house on 25'*'^ street, the house on Elm 
Avenue, the house on Lawn Drive, and to the 
house on Wlllard Avenue, After Edward's death 
in 1954 she stayed on Willard Avenue for a 
short time and then moved to a trailer on 
the property of her son Irving (the land form- 
erly owned by Sadie's brother Raymond Vickors), 
After a fall in her trailer Sadie was placed 
in a nursing home and later transferred to the 
North Rockford Convalescent's Home where she 
she died on March 31, 1963 at age 72 of Park- 
inston diease. 4 childem See also page 16, 

3. Raymond Vickers married the former Agnes 
Martin irtio was a court reporter for inarjr years 
in the Rockford Court House, Raymond was a 
policeman for Rockford until he bought the farm 
where Irving McLarty now lives, Raymond died in 
1962. 

4, Robert Vickers bom 1899 and married the former 
Helen Philips a former school teacher, Robert 
like his father own father died in 1925 of a 
appendix operation when his childem were Just 



page 26 

young • 2 chlldtm 

Annabel Vickers bom 1923 and married, 

1 daughter 

Robert Vickers bom in 1924 and married, 
Helen Vickers after Robert's death married Harry 
Sudds of Holcomb and they have 2 daughters. 



pa^e 27 

1. Henry and Ruth E, Stahl. 

2. Parents, 

3. Botlr my mother and father come fr^rdfarm badcgroiinds. 
My father moving aroxind from Preeport, Adeline, and 
Winnebago until his marriage on September 7» 1937 

to the former ftith E, McLarty who had moved with 
her fsjnily from ITew Milford (Camp Grant), Guilford, 
and Rockford, Meeting for the first time at Henry's 
istrr Marie's house, who at that time lived up the 
road from the McLarty^ Fai^w • Eunice Kloster sister 
of Ruth lived ner?j* by also and she had married J vice 
Kloster the brother of the man Marie Kloster HemT^'s 
sister had mai*ried. Knowing each other for about 
a year Ruth and Henry go to Dubuque, Iowa to be 
married, 

4. Henry has been a farmer all his life stairting 
for his father at a very young age. Throughout the 
years my parents have lived on many farms with my 
mother being a housewife, 

5. In 1937, Henry worked far Dan Dow living in a 
small house for 2 years until they moved into a 
large farmhouse still working for Dow, This is 
where their first dau^ter Nancy Ruth was bom. 
Going out on his own the Stahl* s rented a farm owned 
by Prank Martin but only stayed a year. Leaving that 



paga 28 

they moved to a farm owned by Hank Moth where their 
their 2^^^ daughter Carolyn Lee was horn. In 1943 they 
were living on a farm owned hy Archie Smith but 
stayed there only one year. Leaving the Smlth*farm 
they moved to a f«rm owned by Howard Guilford aJIways 
nikfsnanjed "The SWAMP" because it had so much water 
on the land. While living there their 3 daughter 
Virginia Kay was bom. Leaving the Swamp, Henry 
moved to the Albert Peterson farmmwhere their 4*^ 
daughter Debra Jean and their first son Steven Richard 
(me) v;here bom. Due to illness Henry v/as forced to 
have a sale and then moved to the Harold Bridgeland 
farm for one year where their 5^^and final daughter 
Joann Sue was bom. Leaving that fann Henry moved in 
1958 to the Clarence Sherman farm. After working for 
7 years on the Sherman farm we moved in 1965 to the 
Harold Smith farm where we are presently living, 
6. Political Party - Democratic 
1^ Henry 8>nd Ruth StaJbl's childern, 6 
See Page 8. 

1. Steven Richard Stahl, 

2, Bom August 6, 1955 in Rockford, Illinois and is 
the son of Henry and Ruth Stahl, 

2, Graduated from Winnebago High School after attend- 
ing there all 12 years, lam now attending RVC . 



page 29 

I^y parents and their famili'ss have come from c 
long line of hard v/orking farmerse They would work 
six days a. week at long hours and then on Sunday 
would go around and visit their relatives. The 
families are run by the mother smd father and not 
"by a grandparent, aunt, or uncle. Nowadays there 
are very littl» tradition carried on. as I say each 
family "does thoir o\ni thiug". The family is always 
there to help but then again for the most part it 
is left up to the individual family, 
3TAHL-LAMEYSR (father's side of family) 

The tradition of naming babies after their 
parents and grandparents is quite conmon on mji father's 
side. The names Henry, George, Lawrance, Garelt, anl 
Albert are quite common for males among the older men. 
TH» names Jennie, Grace, Lucy, and Mary are common 
for tftie girl's. 

Both my father's parents came from the Netherlands 
but the name Siahl comes from the german langage 
getting me to suspect there was some german back- 
ground in it since my grandfather's family lived 
right next to the German boader. 

My grandfather attended a public school til the 
6'''^ grade and ray grandmother attended a Chrlstisn 
school til the 6"** grade. The School v;ent year round 



pag« 30 

and they "both wor« th« wooden shoes except on S\mday 
\ihwa. they had leather ones. My grandmother was very 
religious until She married my grandfather who was 
not. My grandparents met after coming to America 
and working on a farm near Preeport, Illinois snd they 
married October 23, 1911. Most of the dates and in- 
port ant history was nover written do^m. and sinca 
alot of tho older people are dead the Inforncition 
is lost. 
McLArcIY- VICKERS (nothar's side otf family) 

The ricLarty name is slowly clieing outj aftar 
having so atany people nameif McLarty. My grandfather's 
name comes from Scotland where h£s grandfather was 
born. My grandfather's mother Ella Kate Dicksrmssii 
McLarty comes from a family came to New England in 
the late 1600' s and early 1700' s from England. The 
Dickerman's have supposely had 3 books written about 
their history the latest one, I saw stopped at 1389» 
Ella Kate always had the proper table setting? ( 
(silverware with her name on it, chinaj and the 
oldest of family furniture and many things her son 
Edward and his wife, 3adle could not afford. Many 
of the furnishings the Dickerman's had went to 
Florence E. KcLarty (HALLEY,KONKLi^ since she lived 
v/lth her parents all the time. 



pa^« 31 



The only tradtlon which is from the McLarty's 
that is still going on is to have a picnic on the 
second An Jxme, The picnic started many yaars ago 
has been going on since as long as Aunt Florence 
Konkle can remomber. The picnic held at Blackha^^k 
Park has been narrowed down to Just the childem and 
grandchildem of ildv/ard and 3arl ( Prank) McLarty and 
to Aunt Plorenvo Konkle, The picnic has been post- 
poned !♦» irain and in 1973 canceled because of the 
illheasof Marie McLarty, The McLarty* s were ilethodist 
in faith "but nav^r attended church very afton. 

The Vicker's havo all died out except for may- 
be a few people down south who are unknown. The 
Vicker's history Is lil:« the otahl siie \Aore no- 
one wrote anything down and now they are all dead. 
My maternal grandparents meet when my grandmother's 
mother Lucy was cleaning house for my grandfather. 

Early in the 1920* s Robert (my grandmother's 
younger brother) moved into the farmhouse at Spring- 
field Avenue because Robert becaino sick and had no 
money so they had to rent out the farmhouse his 
father had left to his nother, Robert died in that 
house of anappendix operation in 1925» Helen his 
widow stayed on a while before lOving, 

My grandmother loved to collect nicknakes for 



P«€« 32 



and pictures for th« house instead otf going to a 

movie or theater as most people did in the 30 *s and 

40»s. 

STAHL (Henry and Ruth) 

Today, our family has no real tradtions it 
follows. Each one kind oilT goes their o\m. way. Each 
wedding, graduation, or child birth is something 
special but there is now tradition involed. 



STEVENS, TERRY PIARIEV .1955- 



PI.l'.ASK TYI'i:: IM.I'ASIC PI.ACI'; TIIKSF, SUKKTS AT THE FRONT 1' TIIK SKCOND COPY OK YiM'K 
FAM 1 I.Y II I STORY . 

De.ir Contributor to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection: 

S(i I hat your family history can hi' iiiailn more usclul to historians ant! 
others s t u tl y 1 II )', AtiU' r i c a n f a m I I 1 o s , wo arc asking you to Till out t lu' forms 
below. This will take you only a few minutes, and will bv- easily made ovei 
Into an index wh i ( li will permit archive users ready access to just tliose 
kinds of family histories needed. 



S U R V F, Y 



our name^I^£UjT2^ieV^3ff(i:)US 
ate of form -V- <J? ^- 7/^ 



Office Use Code 
(in II ) 

(M) // ) 



Your c o II e K e : Roc k Valley Col lege 
Rockf ord, I 1 llnols 



Check the earl iest date for which you have been able to say tiling.' 
about your family in your paper. 



Before 1750 
"1850- I 900 



17 50-1800 ^^ 

1900 or later 



1800-1850 



Please check a 1 1 regions of the United States in which members of 
your family whom you have discussed in your paper have lived. 

N e w !•; n )■ 1 a n d ( M a s s . , t: o n n . , R . 1 . ) j^_ Middle A t i a n t i c ( N . Y . , P e n n a . , N . i 

Va.) t^-^ South A tl an t ic (Ga . , Fla . ,N .C . ,S . C . ) Ilast South Central 

d.a . .Miss . , A 1 a . , Tenn ,Ky . ) _^ Wast South Co n t r a 1 ( A r k . , N . M . , T e x . , ok . ) 

Fast North C e n t r a 1 ( M 1 ch . , Oh i o , I n d . ) P a c i f i c ( C a 1 . , Wa s h . ) 

dlawa 1 1 , A 1 aska) ^.. ' ( U ^ . , Wise.,) 

Please che<-k all occupational categories in which members ol your 
family whom you have discussed in this i>aper havi' found themselves. 



-^ 



Mining 



Farming 

Transportation Big Business 

Professions Industrial Labor 



Shopkeeping or small busines 

Manufacturing 

Other 



It ess 

Please check all religious groups to which members of your family whom 
you have discussed in this paper iiave belonged. 

Roman Catholic Jewish __P r e sb y t e r i a n i^__Me t lio d i s t 

Baptist Episcopalian \, ' Congregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon Other Protestant Other (namo)__ ,^ _ 

What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

Swedish Other Scandinavian ^ C e r m a n ^Frcncli 

Blacks Indians Mexic;ans Pui'rto Ricans ___ . J--' ^ >- '" '' " '•"' 

Jews Central Europeans Italians Slavs 

\, Irish {, ' British Native Americans over several i', e n i.' r a t i on s 

East Asian Other (Name) 



What sources did you use in compiling your family history' 



_L Interviews with other 

family memb e r s 
l/Vital Records 



Family Bibles |- Family C.enea logics 
Land Records The U.S. Census 



j^P hotographs 



Maps 



Other 



KAMI LY DATA 






Grandfather (your father's side ) ^ . 

Name ^j fuDC /^: O t '-"Tr^^Vy^- Current Residence /// ^-> . _^ ^ „ ,. .^,,.. ,.^ 

Date of birth /^.c.- .11 / $ j Place of b 1 r th /^j ;,:j^ , (^/i( cnTjA (liV^^JUl Af^ 

Date of death ' Place of burial ' ^ ' ' ' 

Kducation(number of years); 

grnde school_J]; high school ■/ vocational college 

i)c (■ iipa t ion ( s ) 



Ist .KlrA^'XUtr/iC'u Dates 

2nd '/zt'l./Otl'^' Dates 

3rd (^/T7.<'lr4 ~t. Dates 

A t h L-i'L (1-/ L^-7<lXS- Dates J^^^'/-'^'' 



1st 

_2nd_ 

3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates -^^V ■5' / /i^4 t h 
• . I ft 



_Da tes 
Dates 
Dates 



R e 1 1 g i o n ■■^■Lc-<.Jt^LA^-tti<- •/ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of Marriage to your grandmothe r ;aC^ ^^ - ,-^ i^ ^ <^<;7 d a t t;,.;^^7y) ^/W.->j ) /9 .jj\ 
NOTE: If your father was raised (to age' 18) by a s t e p f a t her/or ITnother . 
relative give that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

Grandmother (your father's side) i 

Name "^l^rr J^; ^ Q. ^^/jfTTV-^-c Current Residence 0^^ /Xj.i< e\> 'XA. /^ I 



N a me /lyrt^^j, G. ^^/^fTTv-^-c C urrent Residenc e J<-^ /UA.< e\> 1)^<J:. 

Date of birth ^)'lacL S Z*^^/ Place of birth :>^U-^ /C<wv ^ . ^l^/- 

Date of death C' Place of burial 



lldu cation (number of years): 

grade school 5 high school *f- 

college 



vocational 



c c u p a t i o n ( s ) 



1 s t <Kltc^iAdLcJt£-^^D a t 

' nd Al~l-C^i:^-^*-<.jU.J D 



es 



3rd 

A th 



ates 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd 
_3rd 
4 th 



PLACE OF Ri;.SI ni.NCE 

(after leaving home) 

D a tes 



Dates 






Dates 
Dates 









Religion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 
I'laie of marriage to your g r ,i n d I a t li e r 'yi< a ■ /7i<^<-'\^i'' 



NOTi;: If your 1 a Mi c r was raised 'io age 18) by a stepmother ..r 
another relative j; 1 v t' ihat d.il.i on Ihr back ol this p.i/,i- 
(A-2) . 



A- 2 S tepgrandf a ther (your father's side) ^ ^ 

Name uV/ "c?-Lt<i. /C~ ^'y-/x^^T^\^ Current Residence '^^^y Au't--*-tJ v^^^- 

Date of birth /^jg^^c/j- "^ /'^^/■'S' Place of birth ('^ Xei'^ lax^^^ }\^',^y.^. 



Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number qf years) 

grade school j high school ■-/ vocational 

Col lege '/- 



Occupation(s) 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st .y-r,'/'~!.' /f/^^'iAU ^ y'Oates 1st Dates 

2nd ^^^i^c 1^ rx A_C<-^ Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd ^^^T^-i-;-? c <;TTx- Dates ' ^ '^--C ^c.' -'3rd ((^^-'-rix iy^ -;, Da tes V-.r^^ / 9 Oi 

^-_-,. ^ ^ - ■- — -p — «-. 

4th Dates 4th Dates i 



Religion ( ^/i \ u. <^^ ,t 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother ./^y^al r --' \ < ^ i date '7C ^Z''^^-yPO / 9 \ 

} 
2 S t epgrandmo ther (your father's side) t 

Name CurrentResidence 



Date of birth Place of birth 



Date of death Place of burial 



Education (number of years): 

grade s choo 1 high school vocational 

coll ege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4 th 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 




Dates 


2nd 
3rd 
4th 


Dates 




Dates 


Dates 




Dates 


Dates 





Re 1 i gion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



Grand lather (your mother's side) 



r r t n t R t- s i d t n c e 



n.itf of h\x\L\\ (V.pJ~ ^(O /OO^ Place of birth i^^ jj^c-tV '^^J^ ^_ 

Date of death 'T^tdLf -^^ HU-^ Place of burial, X<--<^'-^^'^ '^^ C ^-^'Kj. ^-^C' 

Kducation (number of years): 

grade s c h o o 1 j high school ^ vocational col lege f j^ ^/"^'^ 



c f u p a t i o n ( s ) 



is^ ^^-l^ 



rlt i -t 



2nd_ 
3rd_ 
4th 



- ^4fJ'-''-Mjj 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



s t_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 

Dates 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 



I'ol i^fical parties. 



i V i I or social club; 



f r a t c r n i t i e s 



^^X^l 



P ! a c t^/ o f marriage to your g r a n d m <j t h e r 

NOl'E: If your mother was raised by a stepfatlier or a no t li e r ' Ve I a t i v e ft. 
age 18) give that data on tlie back ol this page (C-l) 




'2i^/t/f 



Ci r ar. 1.1 r,io c 11 e r vyour moLuer s siue; 

Name f. j^^j -rf • //c<C<-^sJ^'""t--^\-'^-r i^^^:— J. C u r r e n t Res i dence 

Date of birth . ^,^r // /SvC Place of birth id -^^f^'^' ^*^' W <- f 

Date of death yJtV^/: oc\ I '^j ^ ::>'' Place of b u r i i\\:^,.yiJlr< c6ij A "^,^, JlT-^ 

Education (numbe'r of years) 



grade school_ 
Occupa t i on ( s ) 

1st ri^i.^^: 



1 n d 
}rd 
4 th 




Rel igion (_^y^ 



high school 

_ Da tes 

_ Dates 

Dates _ 

Dates 



vocational 



col 1 e g e 



1st. 
_2nd_ 
.3rd 

4th 



PLACE f)F RLS I DI:NCK 
(a I t e r 1 ea v i n )', home ) 
Da 1 es 



Dal cs 
Da I es 
Dates 



llJtcti^ 



I'olitloal par,ty, civil or soci, 



so r o r 1 t 1 



..._j^.^Li:if^:2^^ -^A—~-J-^ '^f-- I ^y 

I'lace o/f marriage to your g r a n d t a I h e r :_^<.;^.^. ^^^^i>, C^</_-.. "•> ^ '■ )&?//■ ^/ 



I your mother was raised by i ste'pmother or another rel.il ive ((■• 
'^■- ^' gl^ve th»* d-»ta on the back, of t li i ■; page (D-.'( 



/5'>/ 



C-2 S tepgrandf a ther (your mother's side) 



Name 



Date of birth_ 
Date o L death 



Current Residence^ 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school_ 

Occupation(s) 



vo cational 



col lege 



lst_ 
2nd 
3rd_ 
4th 



Da tes_ 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
_3rd 
Ath 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Da tes_ 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Religion 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your grandmother_ 
D-2 S tepgrandmo ther (your mother's side) 

N ame 

Date of birth__ 

Date of death 



Date 



Current Residence 
Place of birth 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 

grade school high school 



vocational 



col 1 cge_ 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Da tes_ 
Da tes_ 
Da tes_ 
Dates 



lst_ 

2nd 

.3rd 

4th 



PLACE OF RESLDKNCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Da tes_ 

Dates 

Dates 



R e 1 1 g i o n 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc._ 



Place of marriage to your grandfather_ 



1) a t e 



::njUmKK of a & B (or A-2 or B-2) - your father's nnme 



Name ^l Jt/LoL -^^^y/f^^/ Jj^^,,,.^ 

Place "fbirth,^-y^^g^^^~^^,3, ..,;.- /^ /g^z. 

R'^sidence_^^(^vliiA^,/4c[Marital Status 'oTlT /.,. -^Z^-^^ 

Number of-^tn5/?„fei^/^^ 



6 

should appe.ir below 



-fyl—^t^fC^ — , 






N a m e 

1' 1 .1 c e o f birth ]^ 

Number ot years of^TchoofrrH 



date 



Res i <I e n c- e__ 

Number of children" 

N a 111 e 

r 1 a c e of birth 



Mari tal Statu; 
D e a t [i 



ccupat ion 



Number of years of schoolini 



date 



Res i dene e 

Number of children 



_Mar J tal Status_ 
Death 



Occupa t ion 



Na nil' 

I' la re o f h 1 rlTi 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 



_.d at,' 

()(■(■ upa t ion 



Number of children 

Name _ 

I' lace of birtli 

Number ol years of school in 

K e s i il e n 

N un 



Marital Stat u.s 
d e a t h 



d a t < 



' r o I c h i 



d r en 



H Occupa t ion 

Mari t a 1 Status 

I) e a t h 



N a m e 



F' 1 a c e of birth 



Number of years of schoolin; 
Residence 



date 



Number of children 



Mari tal Statu; 
death 



c c u p a t i o n 



N a m e 



lace of birth 



Number of years of schooling_ 

R i-> s i d e n c c 

Nui-:ber of c h i 1 d r eTi 



date 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 

I' 1 a c c- of birth 

Number of years oT~s c h o o i i n g^ 



date 



Marital Status 
dea th 



R e s 1 d e n c e 

Number of child re rT 

Name 

1' 1 .1 > ■ , • of hTrTlT^ ~" 

N u iM b , . r o\ y e a r s of s .ToTTl TxTy, 

•^ '■'''' ^' "■■■ •-• Mari tTri "" S (T[ ViTT 

Numlirr of children de.iiji 



_ ()c c upa t ion 



date 



<)c t upa I i 1, 11 



N a mi' 

I' I ice of b i rth ^ "dale 

Number of years of schoolTng" " O.'r u ,;:7ri ., n 

'^''■' ' '''■'^''>' ^__ Marll.il Status 

N'lmb.r ol eh i Idren deal 1. 



CHILDREN of, C and D (or C-2, D-2)-your mother's name should appear below 

1. Name , At~kLx I ."^l-<-C— y/./r ^yJ^y.-^ ^ ' .^J^Zu-^ ^ 

Place of birth %::_,<, <.'.^v -^^f date sjk^jj' J '^, /'v ^7 ,/, 
Number of years, o:^ schooling /-J? ,^ Occupation /^( N— <<-^<. <;» 
Residence /T^^^/Vl^^'^ '<<^<, Marital Statu; 
Number of ch i l^ren y;, ., , JIc-c^- A ^HTl^ dea th 



■^ 



■ ,;c;y^ ?^^,,^i ,„^^ 



^^ 



f 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 



Residenc e 

Number of children 



Mar ital Status 



death 



_Occupation_ 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 
Res idence 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation_ 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schoolinj 



Residenc e 

Number of children 



Marital Status_ 
death 



Occupation 



Name 



Place of birth 



Number of years of schoolinj 
Residence 



Number of children 



date 



Marital Status 
death 



Occupation 



Name 



Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Number of children 



death 



Occupa t ion_ 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 
Res idence 



Number of children 



Marl tal S ta tus_ 
death 



_Occupatlon_ 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Occupation 



Number of children 



Marital Status 
death 



Name 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of children\ 



Oc c upa t ion 



death 



10 



N ame 



Place of birth 



date 



Number of years of schoollng_ 

Ri'S Idence 

N umb or of children 



Marital Statu s_ 
dea th 



Occupation^ 



E. Your Father 



Name 



l)r^h( It /i ^rXJ S/p/y^/^ Current Kesxdence ^C(lt4r: rx I ^ I li,f\-ic 
Date of birth ^OUrifoh^r A/,/fe^lace of b i r t h ^ eCj V P/( r I T// , n.-^^ 



Date of Death Place of burial 

Education (number ofyears) / .^■/ 

grade school -/ high school f vocational college (^?>'^ ', 

Occupation (s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

■^-4- ^ , ,/ (afterleavinghome) 

1 s t -^yZl^UU-'U'^ I bAVG - Dates \'l 4'C- 1st Dates 

2nd V^'tc^ ^<yijL\t^u~x{ ^ates ] '" 1 ST I 

3rd (^.(Xctuil^y UJLj^ 'r e s I ^"] Co f 1 '3 r d k^^ u. ■. 

4 th U^i^l/MV^'U ^ji^a^ at e s \ "\ Gp'-'i' -h.' '/ 4^' ^-^^^(-/'fe 

Religion /'OLCzA>-etL^'^~ 

Political parties, cB.vil or social clubs, fraternities, et c . / / I (If ^'^'"f) 




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OCDS/ :/^'/c/. Ji'lyJCf ._hnJ)t^ Cw^-.^rr/) ty^^^. ^ ^ ^,, 

' Place of marria^g^ to your mo the r/ f-^:>^-7^v,^,-^^ ///, date f )r uallher ^C , /9<V/r U 

i NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or anotlier relative give that d;it_a;! 
on the back of this page. (E-2) 

jt' 
?. Your Mo the r -l. 

Name Ac/:; //Vc;^ ( J^CJ f( lOnrl ) --■TeV>/?-C urrent Res i dence feV'-ZC/ty^ Tl i ifJCr^. \ 

Date of b i r t h ^ ,1 /r ill \\ i' I J. J9 y J ?lace of birth />;---A /'^/ r r / ^. F ////IrjS \ 

Date of death ___Place of burial -y. 

Education (number of years) / ' 

grade schoo 1 1 high;- s c h o o 1 ^-4 voc a t iona 1 co 1 1 ege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OK RESIDENCE 
-—^ r\ r. , ^ \ 1vv«..> ^ -b.*rUu// (after leaving hnme) 
1 s t 0.cg,(L.J'-v^ V k.L^^t^ " (U(X X.dh a t e s \ q 4 r ' 1^ ^^ Y^i < i 1 Dat 



f^ 



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2nd v^4^XL^c ..y.< -^<^t-i^' " Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

4th Dates 4th Dates 



Religion /)Utiv^c^T 



Place of marriage to your f a t he r / < J^!?' /?"/._ ■ i t il. tJatc UCL^ lV\b£j\ ^C^JJl 

NOTE: rf you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data 
on the hack of this page (F-2). 



E-2 S tepf ather 
Name 



Date of birth 



Place of birth 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school_ 



vo c a t io na 1 



college 



Occupation (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



Dates 
Dates_ 
Dates 
Dates 



_lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 
4th 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



R e 1 i g i o n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc 



Place of marriage to your mother^ 
Step mother 

N ;i m e 

Date of birth 



Date 



Place of birth 



Date of death 



Place of burial 



K due at ion (number of years) 
grade school high school 



'o c a t i ona 1 



CO 1 1 e ge_ 



Occupation(s) 

1st 

2nd_ 

3rd 

4th 



Da tes_ 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
1st Dates__ 



_2nd_ 
3rd 
4th 



Dates 
Da tes_ 
Dates 



Re 1 i g i o n 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc 



Place of marriage to your father_ 



date 



10 



CHILDREN OF E AND F (or E-2,F-2) -YOUR NAME SHOULD APPEAR BELOW 
Name / /JkJn J.r/i ^Zt^ i , Cr. \ O/IcI n ^'- ', 



I . I /////;r/d )ate of birth -.jLif)^^- l^ / ^J ^ '7 
Number of jrears ofschoolirtg / -7^ _^^^0c cupa t Ion hk r^- . f. , f^ 



Place of birth /'jf'-l' 



Residence //C(^N/f\' ill Mar 1 1 a 1 S t a t us /]! J^p P j ^1 / 
Number of children ^/ death 



Na 
P 



lace^^f blrth ;>/n(/; ,_/ /// Date of birth 7/ ; /( / W / J9 vJ^ 

Number of^years. of schooling / X Occupa tfion .A/;-//' , /^ \ -Qe 

Residence \('uA\c \(\ , Xli Marital Status P ] fjf (■• j,.' /\ 

Number of children ,3 death 

Name J^ | /] j^ f j ^^^ C /^ ^ ,- ^ ^ <- /n^^^ 

Place^of birth J( ; c Q l : <^rfi j . t //- ^^^^^ of birth . //, /// //, / /S ^' 
Number of ^ears of schooling /y Oc cupa t ii^n^^^^ , /i ;(c Drf jtr 
Residence ICCO k'-^r rd /// Mar 1 1 a 1 Status / J, 6 r /' < ' » ,^/ 
Number of children death 



Place o f ^ b i r t h ^, ^ _ ^ iV rrf _ 7//. D a t e o f birth J nOU 7. /y i.^- 

Occupatlon ''( ' l^'f /l 

\//^ ^-/ ■': ' 



Number of years of schoo ling /^ ^ 
Residence /P^ /)t~/c nj , /// Marital Statu; 



death 



Number of children 

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Number of years of schooling / ^ Occupation ^ ('/: / K 

Residence lcCjftjCU'p:'/ . T/l Marital Status :_ / /,. ' /? . 

Number of children death 



Name 



Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling^ 

Res 1 dence 

Number of children 



Occupat Ion 



Marital Status 
death 



Name 



Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Occupation 



Number of children 



death 



Name 



Place of birth 



Date of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence Marital Status 



Occupation 



Number of children 



death 



ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

T hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and 
administrative rights, to the Rock Valley College^ Family History 
(^1 1 1 I'c t i on , deposited In the Rock ford Public Mhrarv, Kockford 
1 1 1 i no Is 



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Inforraation 

I received most information for my faxaily history from my 
mother and ^andmother, luarie (Caralin^) Thomas. 

My grandmother was especially helpful by giving me interesting 
information on her side of the family, by lending me a boolt on the 
Biographical Reooril of Ogle Coiinty, Illinois, published in 189!D, 
which contained inf ox-mation on William Camling and Jacob Kappenman , 
my great-great-grandfathers and their families. 

iuy grandfather, Pranlc Stevens, provided me rith a boo';; 
History of the Juniata YcJJ.cj , t^eniisj-yvahia) , which contained 
inforraation on his father, Qliver Stevens and his mother, Lillie 
Jamison and their families, vrhich interested me much as I had 
never had much knovfledge of his family until doing mj'' familif^'s 
histor; . 

I<iy mother provided me with the history on her side of the 
family. I was able to trace the_Jaistoyy' bacic to my grandparents, 
the Hoverlands. Because both grandparents are deceased and my 
mother being their only child, I was able to collect information 
on their family by only my mother's memory. I was fortiinate to 
find several pictures of my great-grandparents, the 'i'homas' and 
some of their children, but I v.-as unable to find any information 
on my grandfather, George Iloverland's family, but I will still 
continue searching for the history of the Hoverland's and hope- 
fully extend this history someday. 



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The History of V/illiam Gamlinf; 

and family ^ . . , i 

Great- drec^i (Lrona^aiher C Po-i-K^rbS/de.j 

William Gamling was a native of Holland, "boru near Zealand, 
Aoigust 10,. 1842, but was only two years old when brought to 
America by his father. Gyrus Gamling, who was probably a farmer in 
the old \Torld and served for several years in the army of the 
Netherlands. In the United States he \7as employed as a day laborer 
and made his home near Grand Rapids, luichigan, where his death 
occurred about 1876. He held a membership in the Lutheran church 
in iuilwaiojcee , V/isconsin, and in political sentiment was a Republican. 
He had by his first wife one son, and by his second had thi-ee 
children. 

On first crossing the Atlantic the family located in Buffalo, 
New Yprkj^ where they made their home until William Gamling was six 
years of age, and the removed to Milv;au_icee , Wisconsin, where he 
vras .reared and educated in the public schools. At the age of 
fourteen years he left home and begaia the battle of life for himself, 
i.±c j-'irst employme^t being in the hay field, vrhere he vroriced for 
three months. He was only seventeen when he joined the boys-'in blue, 
enlisting in January, 1862, at Cold Sprongs, Wisconsin, in Gompany 
P, Second (Visconsin Calvary. The regiment first V7ent to St. Louis, 
r.iissouri, VThere it remained for about three months while being 
equipped, and then proceeded to Springfield, that state, -under 
' command of Colonel G. C. Washburn, while Company P was under the 

command of Captain Forest, The summer was spent in fighting 
■""bushwhackers on the road, from Springfield to Helena, Arkansas. 
Arriving in the later place in the fall of that year they vrere 
engaged in many skirmishes and also participated in the siege of 
Vicicsburg and in the battle of Jackson, L.ississippi. Returning 
to Vicksburg they were on garrison duty there during the winter of 
1363-64, and in the spring of the latter year went up the Red river, 
finally landing at Austin, Texas, where they vrere kent on the look- 
out for hostile tiexicans until the fall of 1365, when they were 
mustered out at that place and sent to Madison, Wisconsin. In that 
city l..r. Gamling received his discharge T)apers and arrived home on 



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Christmas. 

During the following winter he v/orlced as a day laborer, and 
then hired out to a farmer for a couple of years. He continued 
to make his home in Wisconsin until 1869, vrhen he came to Illinois 
and located at Rochelle , where as a teamster, he entered the employ 
of the Chicago and Iowa Railroad, then in course of construction. 
For seven years he followed teaming, three years of which time he 
was in the employ of Joseph Strom in delivering coal, and for the 
same length of time was with Liles Braiden, who was in the coal, 
lumber and ice business. In 1876 he purchased eighty acres in 
Roclcvale tovmship, to vyhich he added from time to time as his 
financial resoui^ces increased, including tracts of forty, forty- 
eight and eighty acres, he had a valuable farm of t\T0 hiondred and 
forty-eight acres, vfhich he placed under excellent cultivation 
and improved vtith good and substantial buildings, that stand as 
monuments to his thrift and industry. 

On the 23d of April, 1864, I-ir. Caniling was united in marriage 
with Miss Ivlary Colditz, who was born Kay 6, I846, a daughter of 
William and I.iina (Shmutzler) Colditz, in whose family were five 
children. Lr. and krs. Camling had seven children, namely: 
V/illiELA, Clara, Cj'-ru-s , Charles, James, Belle, and Harrison. All 
of the children were provided with fair coranon-school educations. 

In his political affliations Mr. Camlinp was a Republican, 
and he seized his f ellov/^-citizens as road commissioned three years 
and school director tvfelve years. 



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The History of Jacob Kappman 
and family 

Jacob Kappinan was born in Hohenzollern Prussia, February 23, 
1828, and was there reared to maniiood, but was self-educated in 
German as well as in the English language. Before leaviniT the 
fatherland he was married, in 1856, to Miss Iviary Schetter, who 
was also of German birth. In his native land he continued to 
carry oii farming until 1858, when he crossed the Atlantic and came 
direct to Illinois, joining his "brother, John Kappraan, who had 
located here a few years before, but later removed to South 
Dakota.' Mr. Kappraan arrived in Ogle county in October, I858, 
and at first rented land, which he piirchased a tract of forty 
acres.' The land had been broken, but no building erected, and 
his first hone here was a small house which he erected, i'o the 
further improvement and cultivation of the land he devoted his 
entire time and attention, but for a few years it was a hard 
struggle to support himself and family. As his financial resources 
increased, however, he bought more lend from time to time, 
until he ov/ned seven hiondred and forty-seven acres. His hor.ie 
farm, comprising two hiondred and forty acres, is improved with 
a comsiodious and comfortable residence, supplied with luxuries. 
Good bams and outbuildings were also erected, and the place was 
one of the most desirable in the locality. 

I.Ir. and lilrs. Kappman had a family of eight children, 
naraely: Adolph, Christian, Joseph, William, Christian, Lary, 
Susan, and Anna. 

In his political views I«Ir. Kappman was a strong Republican, 
and cast his first vote for Abrahara Lincoln in i860. He served 
as school dii-ector in his district for several years, but never 
cared for official honors. In religious faith he and his vfife 
vfere devout Catholics, ajid hel-oed to build the church of the 
denomination fit Seward. He was the possessor of a handsome 
property whicli enabled him. to spend ;;ir declining years in the 
^)lGas\irablc! enjoyment of his accuiniAlationa He came to thir: 
country in liiaited circumstances, and with no capii-m. started oirb 
in a strange land to overcome the difficulties in the path to 
prosperity. 



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The History of Oliver Stevens 
and family 

Oliver Wilson Stevens, of Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania, 
decends from an honorable Irish family that has contribiited 
by its valiant deeds and steadfast adherence to the Protestant 
religion much to the history of the Emerald Isle. There is 
scarcely a battle of note, since the first Irish kinfts , that a 
Stevens was not in the forefront , fighting for the cause that he 
deemed just. There was a Theodore Stevens, from Ireland, anong 
the Crusaders, and a John Stevens v/aged war in Prance under 
Heniry V. When he was complimented by Henry and called a 
"redoubtable Englishman," he modestly disclaimed being an 
Englishman, and said proudly that he was a native of Ireland. 
Prom this Jolin Stevens decends the Stevens family of Pennsylvania, 
of which Oliver Wilson Stevens is a member. 

David F. Stevens was bom in Ireland, April 6, I808, and 
died in Huntingdon coumty, Pennslyvania, January 15, I883. He 
immigrated with his family to the United States, and after locating 
in various sections finally settled at Satillo, Huntingdon 
covinty, Pennsylvania. He \Tas a man of means before leaving Ireland, 
and on selecting Pennsylvania as his place of abode he purchased 
two hundred and ten acres of lajid, which he cleared, improved, 
erected a dwelling and out houses thereon, and cultivated until 
the day of his death. After reaching the United States he became 
a naturalized American citizen, and thereafter took a keen 
interest in politics and all matters pertaining to the general 
welfare, not only of his o\Tn comm.unity, coixnty and state, but the 
country as well. He held the office of justice of peace for naxxy 
years, and became famous in that section for administering' justice 
impartially to all who came before him for petty misdemeanors. He 
was one of the influential men of his neighborhood, and was much 
esteemed by those who knevr him. He married, in Ireland, Elizabeth 
Fisher, bom June 21, I3l7, died in HTxntingdon county, Pennsylvajaia, 
June 28, 1838. Like her husband she was of a distinguished Irish 






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family vrhose deeds are recorded in liistor;/'. The ;^re at -grand father 
of Mrs. Stevens orip:inally v/ent from Scotland to Ireland, uhere 
he hoped to live a more peaceful life than it was possible to do 
at that time in England or Scotland. Scotland was torn assunder 
by clan feuds and England v^as in the throes of political revolution. 
In Ireland only, at that time, could peace be found for those who 
did not mingle in politics nor take part in the ever-recurrinf^ 
changes in the other two co-ontries. Children of David F. and 
Elizabeth (?isher) Stevens: 1. Jesse P., a butcher in Montana, 
where he died. 2. Jarnes H. , a retired farmer in Illinois. 3. Allan, 
a miner, in Bedford covinty Pennsylvania. 4. Harriet, married 
W. P. Grissinger, and lived at Mt. Union, Pennsylvania. 5. Joseph, 
a carpenter in Orbisonia. 6. David, a veterinarj'' surgeon in 
Illinois. 7. Kate, married Benjamin Horton, lived at Broad Top 
City, Pennsylvania. 3. Fletcher, lived in Rockford, Illinois. 
9. Oliver Wilson, of whom further. 10. Elizabeth, died in infancy. 
11. kartha, twin of Elizabeth, died in infancy. 

Oliver Wilson Stevens, son of David P. and Elizabeth (Fisher) 
Stevens, was born September 27, lo57, in Saltillo, Kvaitingdon 
co\3nty, Pennsylvania. He received a fair education in the public 
schools in Clay township, Huntingdon county, and on reaching adult 
age engaged in farming on the homestead, which he managed for his 
father. In 1890 he changed his place of abode to Spruce Creek 
to^Tnship, where he purchased forty acres of land, aftentard adding 
to it two hundred and sixty acres. He erected nevr and modern 
buildings and continued his improvements until he had one of tiie 
model farms of that section. He did a highly sucessful general 
farming, bringing his tillable acreage to a remarkable state of 
productiveness. He supported the Republican party with his 
franchise, and has served as school director. He was a member 
of the Presbyterian church, as was his wife, and gave it substantial 
support. He ranked as one of the leading men of his community, 
was progressive, generous, honorable and thorough going and esteemed 
by his neighbors. He married, February l9, 1885, Lillie Iiiay 
Jamison, bom December 2, 1865, in Center county, Pennsylvania, 
a daughter of John and Catherine (Carter) Jamison. Children of 
Oliver Wilson and Lillie Kay (Jaiaison) Stevens: 1. Neva Ethel, 



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born July 3» l3o6; married Clair Stev^art; lived in Juniata, 
Pennsylvania; no children. 2. Lula Catherine, "born Au.ciust.l, 
1333; married Harry Bathurst , lived in 3iniiin{rham, Pennsylvania; 
three children. 3^ Oliver, born November 17, 1892; died June 17, 
1894. 4. John Stewart, born November 29, 1394. 5. Pranl<:lin 
Beck, born Au^st 21, 1897. 6. 'fhelma Virginia, bom January 
13, 1901. 7. Alice Daisy, born September 20, I903. 

(I'he Jamison Line) 

John Jamison, father of Lillie kay (Jamison) Stevens, was 
born in Center county, Pennsylvania, karch 1, I832 . He was educated 
in the public schools of the day, and descending from a scholarly 
Scotch family he absorbed easily the knowledge afforded him in the 
primitive schools of that time. He engaged in farming at an 
early age in Center county; and in 1875, with his family he moved 
to Saltillo, Huntingdon covuity, where he engaged in the same 
occupation, continuing it until five years before his death, 
which occurred in November, I898. During the last five years of 
his life he vras the proprietor of a hotel, vrhich he ran success- 
fully. He married (first) Elizabeth Markle, by whom he had nine 
children. He married (second) Catherine (Carter) Bathurst, a 
widow of Reuben Bathurst , by whom she had two children. Catherine 
(Carter) Jamison was born in Center county, I.'iay 22, 1833. She 
was a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Bathurst) Carter. John 
and Catherine (Carter) Jamison were the parents of nine children, 
of whom Lillie Lay (Jamisoni) Stevens was the eldest. 

Joseph Carter, iuatemal grandfather of tire, Stevens, while of 
straight English descent, was borriwand reared in Center county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a man of wealth and influence, and was an 
iron master in Center county, where he lived and died at a ripe 
old age. He married Elizabeth Bathurst, born in Center covinty, 
and who died at Pine Grove Imills, where she was interred. Her 
father VTas Sir Lawrence Bathurst, who came from England to America 
in the early part of last century, located in Pennsylvania, and 
became a gentleman farmer. It is related of him that he grevr 
disgusted with the manner in which the laws v.'ere administered in 
England and dealddd to try the idea of dcmocx'acy as he sa\7 it in 



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the Unite.; States that he returned to iinglajid , disposed of his 
property, except that which was entailed, and sailed soon there- 
after with his family and servants to iLmerica.. He was an educated, 
culttired f;entleman, and soon after he established himself in 
Pennsylvania his nei£rh"bors recognized him as their leader. In 
taking out his naturalization papers he gave up his title and 
thereafter was known as Iwr. Bathurst. He reared his children in 
a democratic manner, although furnishing them with means for 
exceptionally fine educations which distinguished them from their 
neighbors. His decendants are among the prominent citizens in many 
portions of the state today. 



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karie S. (Gamling) Thomas 
Father's Side 

Larie Elizabeth Gamling v,'as bora Lay 3, 1901 on a farm in 
Leaf River, Illinois ovmed by her father William Gamling. 

Marie lived with her parents and did much of the farm worK 
and gardening along with sewing, quilting, and crocheting. She 
was an articulate seamstress and made much of the families clothing. 

In 1920, Marie married Prank Beck Stevens. They lived on 
the farm with Marie's parents. Prank took Larie to Pennsylvania 
to meet his family and he wanted to settle there, but she refused. 
A short time later, after the birth of their son, Arthur LeRoy 
Stevens, they were divorced. 

Marie continued living on her parent's farm with her son 
Arthur \Yntil the death of her parents. A year later Larie sold 
the farm and bought a house in Rockford, Illinois on Custer Ave. 
where she resided for two years. 

In 1949 Larie married 31va Hovcrland's cousin, Willis Thomas, 
a minister. They moved to Leaf River to live in the Christian 
Church parsonage, where V/illis preached. Larie and Willis were 
married by an old acquaintance, Rev. Pittman at Polo, Illinois. 

In later years, Marie bought a house in Leaf River where she 
and Willis still reside. They have lived their entire lifes 
together gardening both vegetable and flo\.'t;rc. 

Prank Beck Stevens 

Father's Side 

Franlc 3eck Stevens was bom August 21, 1397 in Center County, 
Pennsylvania. 

Pranic moved to Mt. Morris, Illinois in 1919 to work on a fana. 
He met and married Marie Camling. Frank took Marie back to 
Pennsylvania to meet his family and wanted his wife to settle there 
vfith him. To no avail, Marie refused and went back to live witli 
her parents and help work the fari:. 

Prank and Marie soon had a son, Artliur Leroy Stevens and were 
divorced a short time later. PranxC frequently flew his own plane 



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to the Camling farm to visit Arthur. 

After Pranic woriced the Mt. luorris farm, he quit and went 
into detective work in Des Koines, Iowa for the National Detective 
Bueau for a counle years and later went back to Pennsylvania to 
(Work in the Altoona Railroad shop. 

:- Prajo.: later bought a farm near Spruce Greek, Pennsylvania 
-on the side of a mountain. and remarried, but divorced again. 

Pranic nov; spends his vfinters in Florida and his summers back 
in Pennsylvania. 



Ge org's 3rovm Hoverland 
li'other's Side 

George Brovm Hoverland vras born October 20, 1886 in Leai River. 
George attended Horth Grove School and {graduated from Leaf River 
Higii School. He went on to Mt. Morris College for a year and had 
to quit and operate the family farm because of his father's ill 
health. 

Georfee married Nellie Highbarger at Seward, Illinois in 1912 
and they had a daughter, Genevieve, bom May 23, 1913. In 1915 
George's wife passed avtay while giving birth in which the baby 
died, also. George continued living on his parent's farm with his 
father until he remarried. He married Siva Thomas in January 29, 
1919. His father died after this marriage and he inherited farm 
land and a house. George and illva had one daughter, Lola, born, 
September 13, 1927. 

In 1923, they built a new house on the front lavrn of the old 
" ouse . Part of the old house was moved to be used for a chicken 
liouse and the rest of the old house was torn dovrn after the new 
one was built. George was one of the few fariners to have olectri- 
■iL;;;,'. He generated his ovni electricity v.'ith a Delco Light Plant 
.hick consisted of three rows of batteries charged with a motor. 

George was an avid sports 1^,1. spending his spare time fishing 
and hxinting. He was a member of the Odd Fellows Organization, 
affiliated with the Leaf River Sportsman's Club, served on the 
high school board and on the Light sville Cemetery Association 
for many years. 

George o\Tned a building in Leaf River that he rented out as 
an auto repair shop and gas station. He also had a house in 
Leaf River he rented out and in later years bought a second farm 
adjacent to his farm. He also o\med a house in Rockford, which 
^-e rented to Lola and her husband. 

George retired in 1944 only to have a tennant live on the 
second farra and do all the farming on both farms. George and his 
family continued living on the farm vmtil the sale of the farm. 

George and Elva purchased a home in Leaf River in 1965 and 
moved in it in 1966. He resided there till he died in 1963. 



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Elva I.:, (iiioraas) Koverland 
Liother's Side 

Elva Lae Thomas was bom, February 17, I836 in Adeline, 
Illinois. Elva attended Adeline schools. 

After the death of her father, Killard Thomas in 1303, she 
had to quit school after completion of the eighth grade and help 
the faraily v.-ioh ulic farming. 

Elva \Yas married on Ja^iuary 29, 1919 at the age of tvrenty- 
three to George Hoverlaiid an area farracr. Elva and George had a 
daughter, Lola, born, September 13, 1927. 

Elva was a member of the Evangelical Church Ladies Aid and 
later, the Leaf River Ladies Aid. She was a farmers wife all her 
life iHitil her husband* s r etirement v/hen they moved to Lear River 
and passed away in September, 1975. 



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The History of 
Lola Mae (Hoverland) Stevens 

Lola Mae Hoverland was born September 13, 1927 at home on 
the family farm near Leaf River, Illinois. 

Lola went to North Grove Christian School the first eif^ht 
years and went on to Leaf River High School where she graduated 
in 1945. Her father, George Hoverland was president of the school 
board that year. Georfre served on the school board for ei^-ht years. 

Lola went to the neighborhood church, the Evangelical Church, 
where sunday school, began at 1:30 p.m. and church began at 2:00 p.m. 
She attended many sunday night church f-unctions, such as potluck 
suppers, ice cream socials on the church lavm, and sunday night 
entertainment was provided by the people from surrounding churches. 
Lola's family in later years transferred to another neighborhood 
church, the North Grove Christian church of which her mother's 
cousin, Reverend VVillis Thomas was minister. Sunday school and 
church vfere held on sunday mornings. 

Satvirday night was a special night for her family, particularly 
in the summer time. The town was busting with dances and the 
merchants sponsored free movies on the side of a garage building. 
There would be acouple hundred people sitting along the curbs of 
the barricaded streets for the movies. There was always a popcorn 
machine in the street VThere a bag of fresh popcorn could be purchased 
for only five cents, and an icecream parlor where a large cone 
could also be purchased for only five cents. 

Basketball games and other school functions kept Lola very 
busy. Football was not organized tmtil the fall of 1945. In the 
early 1940's Leaf River had an excellent basketball team team, 
even defeating Rockford's Central High. Leaf River played regu- 
larly in the Route 72 conference. 

There were annual family reunions, which was the only means 
of icnowing cousins. 

Immediately after high school graduation, Lola's commercial 
teacher recommended her for a job as a billing clerk and typist 
at Kable News in Mt. Korris, Illinois where she worked until she 
married . 



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The History of 
Arthur LeRoy Stevens 

Arthur LeRoy Stevens was born on Ilovember 19, 1922 on a rarni 
near Myrtle, Illinois. He lived with his mother and grandparents 
on the fariii. 

Arthur attended kyrtle liethodist Church and Myrtle school 
for eight years and then went on to Leaf River High School where 
he graduated in 1940, going on to Coyne Blectrical School vfJicre 
he ('graduated in 1941 as an electrician. 

Art}iur enlisted in the Air ]?oz*ce the day after his tvtentyeth 
birthday, NovcmbGr 20, 1942. He vrent through training detachment 
of- tho Air Force at .Hiram College, Hirarn, Ohio and he ccwipleted 
equivlancy tests of two years college. He vrent to Army Air Force 
Pilot's School until he daraaged an ear drum at high altitude 
while in trainixag and wentl on to complete radio, electronics, 
and radar school and vroriced in the radar experimental lab until 
the end of World War II. He received a honorable discharge on 
February 1, 1946. 

Arthur went back to Leaf River after the war where he met his 
wife to be Lola Hoverland. 

Arthur L. Stevens and Lola Ivi. (Hoverland) Stevens 

Arthur L. Stevens and Lola lu. Stevens were married November 
30, 1946 in the Leaf River Ghristiaji Church. 

Arthur and Lola moved to Rockford, Illinois and lived in a 
house on South Forth street owned by the bride's father. They had 
three daughters while living there, namely: Linda Lou, born in 
1947, Cynthia Sue, born in 1948, and Janet Lee, bom in 1950. 
They bought their first house on West State and had twin daughters, 
namely: Terry fcarie aiid Cherie tlae , bom in 1956. 

Arthur worked in various shops for about four years and was 
not content at malcing a family living working in shops. He took 
the test for the Rockford Fire Department, which he nassed and 
went on tho Department in Jvme , 1951. Re -served as a firefigliter 
for twelve years and the last ten years as a driver engineer 



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uioil he i^e-tired in 1D73. While on .the Piro Department he tool: 
the Slectrical Coiitractors test, a5^d passed. Ke later started hie 
o\7n business knovm as State Electric, which he still ovras. Arthur 
and Lola also o^vned acouple apartment houses and a svuomer cabin 
on Long Lake near Spooner Wisconsin where the family enjoyed their 
sTomraers. 

In 1966 the Stevens bouglit a house on Highland Ave. where 
they still reside. In 1970 they bought a campground in Spooner, 
Wisconsin, which ^ras piirchased not only as a business, but a place 
to enjoy summer months avray from the city. 

i'he Stevens enjoyed several hobbies together such as flying 
planes o\'med by Arthur, , motorcycling, scuba diving, camping, 
boating, snovimobiling, skiing, and raising registered Irish Setter 
dogs. 

Arthur became a member of the Masonic Lodge in the early 1953' s, 
the Consistory, the I'ebala Temple and later both Arthur and Lola 
joined the Order of Eastern Star in V/imiebago, Illinois. 

Lr. and krs, Stevens originally were the first to get petitions 
signed for pushing a junior college in the Rockford area and now 
the results show Rock Valley College. 



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ARTHUR L STEVENS I 6 I 67 01 5 CORPORAL 
k266lH AAF BASE UNIT MC CLELLAN FLD CALIFORNIA 

Army of tl?0 ltnifi?D #fat5?s 

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SEPARATION BASE 

MC CLELLAN FIELD CALIFORNIA 

I FEBRUARY I9Jj6 



RFCORDER'S 
OFFICE 



STATE OF ILLINOIS I gg^ 
OGI.K COUNTY ) * 

FILED FOR r<ECORD THE X^-DAY OF..-.^. 

^J^£^Ud^ A D If^^ AT //..r.. . ^ ... 

0'CLOCK..X.-.^M., AND RECORDED IN BOOK ./..... 

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^ ' _^._j^;2^^(fi«.**?_..-.RECORL)ER 
DEPUTY RECORDER 



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ERNEST J FREESE 
MAJOR AIR CORPS 



S. C. THOMSON 

Physician and Surgeon gyRON ILL 



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Terry Elarie Stevens 

Terry Marie Stevens was born May.?, 1956, six lainutes before 
her twin sister Cherie Mae at Swedish American Hospital in Rock- 
ford, Illinois. 

Teriy attended Highland, Lincoln, and Guilford school, and 
is presently enrolled part time at Rock Valley College and working 
part time for Rockford Cleaners. 

As a child she was kept busy with piano lessons, and spent 
several years studying Ballet, tapdancing, acrobats, and gymnastics 
and in 1968 she vfas initiated into the Rockford Order of Rainbow 
Girls. 

Terry v^as baptized by her step grandfather, V/illis Thomas at 
Ilorth Grove Christian Church near Leaf River, Illinois. She was 
a member of her family's chtirch, , Grace United Kethodist Churcli. 

Terry spent the svunmers with her family at their cabin in 
Spooner, Wisconsin and enjoyed water skiing and scuba diving with 
her sisters on Long Lake. She has enjoyed traveling and went on 
several trips with her family and friendr- ■■ -^^-r^i^.r-- +-,,,-,, ^■■, -^jj^g 
country and visiting Madrid, Spain. 

Terry is the fourth daughter of Arthur and Lola Stevens. 
The oldest daughter, Linda Lou (Stevens) Anderson; bom in 1947, 
married Peter Anderson in 1965, and has four children. Second 
bolTij Cynthia (Stevens) Linder; bom. in 1948, married Cameron 
Linder in 1971, and has two children. Third born, Janet Lee Stevens; 
bom in 1950, and her twin sister; Cherie llae Stevens, born in 
1956. 



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•LEASE USt INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

iaar Cont r i ljnt or to the t<OCk Valley College Family History Collection: 

So thai your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
Unerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
cw mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
iccess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ******** A A***)'.A-.V A A****:VA:V:V:'.- 

* OFFICE USE CODE 

I . Your r\amc Pamela Kay Stewart a 

Date of form '^. T^ TT TTTT * ( ' t' ^ ^ 

November 26, 197^- ^ ,,. — • 

■/. Your college: Kock Va I ley (.0 liege (10 H ) 

IToctTonr, Illinois * 

****** y.- A A A A A A ft ,\ A A A A A ;'. A A V ■. A A .'i 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to soy things about your family in 
your paper, 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 I8OO-I85O 

X 1850-1900 1900 or later 

k. Please check al I regions of the United States In which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

^New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) ,x M iddle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna., N.J., Va.) 

X South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La, ,MJ5S. , Ala. ,Tenn, Ky 

~~~yost South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., oVTj T jPcE ast North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

Pacific (Cal., Wash; ^(Hawaii, Alaska) HI- WIb.) 

X Plalne (ND,SD,Neb. ,K«n. tlowa, MB) 
5. Please check al I occupational categories In which members of your family whom you have 

discussed In this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming Mining X Shopkeeping or small business 



Transportation ^Blg Business M anufacturing 

Professions ~^ Industrial laboT ^ Other 



L4%j^^tek 



6. Please check al I religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
In this paper have belonged. 

^ R oman Catholic ^Jewish ^ P resbyterian V' M ethodist 

^Baptist EpI scopal Ian C ongregational ^L utheran 

Quaker ^Mormon Other Protestant ^Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians M exicans ^Puerto Ricans 

Jews C entral Europeans I tal lans ^Slavs 

\/ I rish ^British \g( N ative Americans over several generations 

^East Asian Other 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

w^ Interviews with other <^ FamI ly Bibles Family Genealogies 

fami ly members 

Vital Records ^Land Records ^The U.S. Census 

v^ Photographs Maps Other 



ILY DATA 



andfather(your father's side ) 

j,:a^e JOSEPH ErvGS STEWART current residence 

if Lad, dale or deaUi febftt&j^y g^^f^ i^S residence 

Place of birth Terre Haute Ind. Date of Birth January 9i 1681 



Education( number of years) 
grade school 8th 

Occupations 

1st labor 

2nd linesman 



3rd labor 

4th 



Place of Residence 

Dates l920-24 Ist Pavenport Iowa Dates l920-2U- 
"Dates 1924-40 2n dLa Harpe IL Dates l924-2 5 

Dates T940-47 3rd Burchard Nebraska Dates l925-& 
_Dates 4th Pawnee Nebraska Dates l94Q-45 



Reliscion Methodist 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternintes , ect, 
Dem.ocgatic 



Place of r.'.arriage to your Grandmothe r Davenport Iowa 

Grandmother { YQurfathers side) 

Crrent residence 60 5N. Main 



Date 1920 



Name Paisie Marie Stewart 
if dead date of death 



Place of birth Burchard Nebraska Date 1897 

Education( number of years) 

grade school ■-- hgh school 10th vocational 



_- college_ 



Occupations 
1st labor 



place of residence 
DAtes 1918- 1st Davenport lu 6Late^ 920-2 4 



2nd printing co. 
3rd advertisign 



4th labor 



Dates l920 2n d La Happe IL dates l924-2 5 

Dates 1948 3r d Burchard Neb dates l925-40 

Dates l960 4th gawnee Neb. datesl^fte48_ 



Religion METHODIST 



Political party, civil or social ilubs, sororites, etc, 
REPUBLICAN _^ 



J : - J , 






1 '■'o fo -■. i^fiauc 

-I -clx'l S£;'-/iu ind£l J-sJ 



\/ O v X c* ^' w ^\u 



j. 



Grnndfather (your mother's side) 

Name Sidney Furman 

I f dead, date of death 



Current Residence 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years): 



grade school 
Occupat ion(s) 

»st 

2nd 

3rd 

itth 



high school 



_ Date of bi rth 
vocational 



col lege 



_Oates_ 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 



Dates 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



3rd 



ijth 



_Oates_ 
Dates 



Re I I g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



date" 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 

Note: If your mother was raised by a ii e p f ai lier U l ll l UL li e r l e i aHVH f tp a or^l'r 
I give that data on the back of this page (C-I) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 
I f dead, date of death 



Current Residence 



Place of birth^ Tr^l^^nd 

education (number of years; 
grade school high school 



vocational 



Data of birth march 22, I9II 
^^^ col lege 



Occupation(s) 

'*t fant.nnv 

2nd 



3rd 



_Dates_ 

_^Data8_ 

Dates 



1st Chicago IL 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



2nd rtockford 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



3rd 



Dates 



"e " 9 1 on Catholic 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



date I'^^k 



t'tace of marriage to your grandfatha r rhiV^^n -gjt? — ' 

■(ote: If your mother was raised by a stia'prnc^the r or another r> l .f » w« f^^ "nrr 

»;.c Liioi 6mi.a on me DacK o? this page (0-2) ' "'' " 



C-l Stepgrandf ather (your mother's side) 



N .J I ne 

I f (lorid. (la IP of death 



l'l.|(<- Ml l.illh 

I iliK .il i on (iiiiiiiln'r fif yr.ii •, ) 
• |t'i<lc '.(liixil h i (jh school 



Ottup.it Ion (s) 

1st 

?n(l 

3rd 

^th 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



Current Residence 



I). lie ol l)ii Ih 



vocal ioniil 



CO I lr<n" 



1st_ 

2nd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 



3rd 



'»th 



Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 



date 



Dates_ 

Dates 

Dates 



D-? S tc[)C)r.indmothifr (your mother's side) 



N .ime 

I f dead, d.jtc of death 



f'l.icc of b I r I h 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 

Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 



_Dates_ 
Dates 



Current Residence 



Date of birth 



vocational 



1st 



2nd 



3rd 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



CH!i£M°^ A & B ^or A-i or B- 1 ; - your father's name should appear below 

Name Joseph Elmer Stewart 



!'■!!!. °!..'"'"^^- ^f^^i."^:Y ^'^- -"^^^ date La Harpe 111. 

Number of years of schoo tlq v Qee unaf l iSA c 

'^ • L ■ . - "CC»P*tl6rt Servicema n 
MarltalStitui ' 



Res I dence 

Number of chl Idren 



DECEASED 



Name Billie Tvlau rice Stewart 
Place of birth Burchard Nebraska'.' 



Number of years of school Ing 

»-/ 

i.a£LiL-l_££an dc h i 1 d 



gate October 21, I925 



ss^erohw^p^ 



?CT7n5t7turTa'rr xeS""'^^'^'^'^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^ 



Place Of birth La Harne IL 
Number of years of school I h fl 
Res I dence Rockfod IL 
Number of chl Idren ^ " 



_________ date xxjcg^ax I928 

■U I, I 1 Occupation jr pnsinesRTnWfT 
warltal St> tm ^larriga^'^ "' 



"date 1931 



Name MaX Elroy Stewart 

Place of birth Burchard {Nebraska/ ' 
Number of years of schooling ~~" — — OccuDatlort^T^ 
Residence Michigan Harltal Statu/ marrtM 

Number of children 3 ■■ 



iccupatl6rt .Cons true tioTi 



Name Larry Dee Stewart 

Place of birth Burchard hebradka 
Number of years of schooUn g' 12 

Res I denc e Rpckf ord " 

Number of chl Idren 2 



^ Occupat<eft - rir ei-'ighter 

narital Status 



marTTTTT 



Name 

Place Gf birt h 

Number of years oi* schooling 

Residence 

Number of children 



date 



„ OccupatJbn^ 
HirTtiT Status 



Name ^ 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Number of chl Idrin 



Marital Status 



date 
Occupatlbh 



Name 

Place' of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Number of chl Idren 



dat e 
'ccupatlon 



"WFTTal Status 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years oV schooling 

Residence 

Number of chl Idren 



Narital Status 



- <**t e 
Occupation 



Name^ 

Place' of birth 

te^d^nti ^•-"o'^choollngl 

Number of till JUHIl 



.JUrltal Status 



. <**t e 
'ccupatlon 



iHll.URtN <>i (. and (or (.-I, D-l)-yoiir mother's name should appoor below 



"■""'■ M ary Jean Stewart 
M.i, ,' ,;r Im , II, Rockford 



Niiriilxi III ycir ■, of school i tU) 1 2 

I''-' i 'I'-""- Hockford 

HMi.i)..-t ol .liHttrcn 2/ 



N. ■ _ Sally Aj Ejnes Geary 

I' I.I. - ol l.i iih "Rockford 

Huiiilx'r ol y<%n ', of Schooling l*^ 

Rp'. i 



Number of children t. 



P lace (jf hi rth 

Number o( years of school ing 

Res i dencc 



Number r)f ch i 1 dren 



~~~~~ .l,>tr 1935 

"Occupation -boan oJilcer" 
Marital Status mafrTTTI 



date 



1937 



TTccupatlon none' 



Marital Status married 



date 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



N.irm' 

P I .ii.<- of l.irtii 

Niiiiibei t)( yeors of schooling 

Ke-. i derir.e 



Number of ch i 1 dren 

Nanie 

Pi;ice of birth 



Numbet <jf yeors of schooling 
Kes i ficnce 



6. 



7. 



Number of chl Idren 

Nrum' 

PI. ICC of bi rth 



Number of years of schooling 
Res i dence 



Number of chi Tdren 

Name 

P I ace of b i rth 



Number of years of schooling 
Res i dcnce 



Number of chi Idren 

Name 

Place of bi rth 



Number of years of school ing 
Residence 



Number of ch i 1 dren 



9. 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 



Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Res i dence 



Number of chi Idr 



"3atl 



^^^^^^ OccupatiOri 
Marital Status 



date 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



Marital Status 



^__ date__ 
bccupatloh 



date 



"Occupation 
Marital Status 



date 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



date 
Occupation 



Marital Status 



^_ date_ 

Occupation 
Marital Status 



Your Father 



Name Larry Dee Stewart 
If dead, date of death 



Current Residence 



Rockford 



Place of birth Burchard Nebraska 
Education (number of years; 



Date of birth 193^ 



grade school 

Occupatlon(s) 

1st Construction 



high school ^ 



vocational 



col lege 



Dates 1952-60 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st fischer Rockford Datesl955 



2n d FireFighter 
3rd 



_Oates_ 
Dates 



2nd S.Johnston Rockford Datesl958 



3r d Independence Rockford Date» l964 
kth 



Dates 



^th _Dates 

Religion protestant 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Hprnnr^-rci + i n ,.■.... 

Place of marriage to your motherRn f Wf r.rri ■■•■■■■.••.■ j ate jnnP? '; . 1 Q^^" 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on thebacV 



of this page. (E-2) 
Your Mother 



Name Mary JeanStewart 

I f dead, date of death 



Current Ratldence fiQc^fprd 



Place of birth Rockford IL 

Education (number of years) 



grade school 8 
Occupat ion(s) 



1st sectetary 

2nd 

3rd 



high school 



Dates_ 
Dates_ 
Dates 



Date of birth July 16. 193'^ 
vocational ^coi lege 



1st rockford 

2nd 

3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



^e I i g I on Protestant 

"olltical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

^ democratic ■:■■■•' 

^lace of marriage to your fathfei Rockf ord/Il d ate June a^ijQ-^c 

^OTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the b'acVSf 
this page (F-2). 



E-l Stepfather 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth D ate of birth 

Education (number or years) 
grade s choo I h i gh school vocational college 



Occupatlonis) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd D ates 

3rd D ates 3 r d D ates 

't t h_^ Da tes ^ > t h D a t e s_ 

Re I tglon " 

Polltlcat pSi'llei, dl^M fif 564181 clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother D at< 

F-2 Stepmother 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of hirth Date of birth 
Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving honne) 
1st D ates 1st D ates 

2nd D ates 2 nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3 r d Dates 

Re I i g I on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father date 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your nam should appear below 



Name^ 

Place o 



r bl rth Rnr-Vrnrri 11 



Place of birth fingKfprl.T]. 
• Number of years of scnool mg 



Res idence 



Residence R.qrKfnrfl 
Number of children 



JLL 



Name; 



lirhplp Marip St.Pwap-t, 



Place of birth Rnckford 

Number of years of schooling 7" 



Res I dence Rgckford 
Number of c^illdren 



Name 
' Place of bi rth 

Number of years of School ing 
' Res i dence 



Number of chi Idren 



' Name 

' ^ ' ace of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res idence 



Number of chl Idren 



Nanie^ 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Residence 

Number of chi Idrert 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Residence 



Number of chl Idren 



N ame 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school Ing 

Res i dence 



Number of chi Idren 



Kame^ 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of schooling 

Res i dence 



Mumber of chl Idrert 



TaTe of birth June 11 ,1956 
Occupation salescierk 



Marital Status single 



Date of birth Feb. 20 I962 
Occupation 



Marital Stat u s single 



Date of birth 

Occupation 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



Date of birth 

Occupation 



bate of birth 

Occupation 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



TJa'te of blrth__ 
Occupation 



bate of birth 

Occupation 



"Rarltal Status 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 
Occupation' 



ill. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willincj) 

1 hL'r(?l)y donate this family history, along with all literary and adiinrii'. tr.it ivf 
tiijlits, to the Rock Valley College" Family History Collection, deposited m the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed jr tt-^^jp/ij \6f^^.:>au /: . 

Date ::7g^>ej^HMn..ja.^-^J12^L- 



GENEALOGY CHART 



T^pla Kpiv Stewart 
I June 11, 1956 

ied 



Larry D. Stewart 



Father 

B april 12, 193^ 
MJune 25, 1955 
D 



Mary Jean Stewart 



Mother 

Bluly 15, 1935 
MJune 25, 1955 
D 



€iA Mlt .6J?.u3<\«r 

Great grandfather 



Joseph Enos Stewart 



Grandfather 



1881 
1920 
19^8 



I __afiu)^Qift{^xussiii.t^ 



Daisie rna-.rJ-g St ewarj: m 
Grandmo'tner 



1897 



Great grandmother 

B 
D 



'^ D 



nnO{?.hft^fTfaG^f:^^O r>C 



^nV^p) 



Sidney FURRIAN 



Grandfather 

B 

M 193^ 

D 



r — 

B 
M 
D 



Carrije Furman 

Vanderl i nde 
B 1894 
D 1974 



Brid-~et Rita Furman 



Grandmother 



1911 



Lists of Information 



Interviews, - Daisie Karie Stewart 
Larry Dee Stewart 
Mary Jean Stewart 
Bridget Rita (Kc Ging) Furman 

Family Fhoto Albums- Donated by Daisie Karie Stewart 
Family Records Book "" • 



Family Date Book "" 



Baisie iv^arie (Cox) STEWART'S parents; 



ly Great-Grandfather; 



Elmer Sutton Cox 



•born - I869 in Alpha 

Illinois 
died- 



Ky Great-Grandifiother ;■ 



r.'argaret Eugene (Simpson) CoX 
born - 18^ 



in Stubenville 



died - 1916 



picture of both 
great-grandparents 
on their peanut farm 
in Iowa . ' a. 







Josheph Enos Stewart's parents; 
KY GREAT -GRANDFATHER: 

ELAHUE STEV.'AHT 

As I noted once before in the report, I received the 
majority of inf onr.ation from my Grandmother Stev^art. as she, 
did not remember to much about the lives of her husbands parents, 
I did not get an exceedingly large am.ount of informaion about 
fchem. . 

Ky Great-Grandmother; 

ELANOR ( FRArvCIS ) STEWART 

I have no information of when either of them were 
born or m.arried, nor the dates of their death. They were 
wed in La Harpe Illinois. They had six children , The first 
a girl, named Gertrude, then Charlie, then^Frank, then Joseph 
(my grandfather), then Bob, and.^lastly Eugene. 

Eugene is the brother of m.y Grandfather who married 
my Grandma's sister Stella. 



Ky Grandmother could retrace some of the important 
facts of her history to her parents, bithdates and deaths, 
but could not give in detail information of their 
life before they Vv'Bre married and she v/as born. 

She could recall her fathers' fathers name, or 
her grandfathers name. All she could remeber v/as his 
nam.e , Joseph Franklin Cox, not any da-^es however. 

She could also recall the names of her mother's 
parents, her m.others fathers' name was Alexander Simpson, 
Ke lived in Stubenville as long aS she can remem.ber, but 
she does not know if he was born there. He was a minister, 
and also owned a small grocery store. Kis relations date 
back to Scotland in 12^3. 

Her mother's mother's name v/as Julia (Kurphy) Simps on. 
She v/as born in Stubenville » 



Pictures of my GrandTTiother's 
mother, f.'y great-grandmother 
Stewart, in background of peanut 
farm and hom.e in Iowa. 



^ 








PATERNAL GRANDMOTHER: 

DAISIE MARIE (COX) STEWART: Born July 18, 1897 
BURCHARD, NEBRASKA 

Notati on : 

At the spry age of 77 years old, my grandmother is the 
most admired woman by me. Most of the information in this 
report was souly the recollections of this fabulous woman. 
All of the documents, pictures and possessions were donated 
to this report by her. I realized by making this report 
how careless one can be with one's possessions. When I saw 
the things my grandmother has saved for over 60 years I was 
thoroughly amazed. Many items in this report were things 
she held '^ery close to her heart, and it has made me feel 
^ery honored to be able to share these experiences with her. • 
With all my love, I give all my thanks to her. 

Daisie Marie Cox was born on July 18, 1897 to Elmer 
Sutton Cox and Margaret Eugene (Simpson) Cox. She was the 
fifth child, and had two older sisters, two older brothers, 
and one younger sister. Her oldest sister, Minnie Estella 
(Cox) Mapes, born September 2, 1891, called by Stella (Deceased' 
second older sister, Jessie Mae (Cox) Cook, born November 16, 
1892, living in California with son and family, third, older 
brother, Lyle Elroy Simpson Cox, born February 27, 1894, called 
Roy for short, (Deceased), fourth oldest, Wilford Franklin (Cox 




THIS CERTIFIES THE ABOVE TO BE A TRUE COPY OF AN ORIGINAL 
CERTIFICATE ON FILE WITH THE DIVISION OF VITAL STATISTICS 
STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, WHICH IS THE LEGAL DEPOSI- 
TORY FOR SAME. , <n ^, // ^^ —■^V) 






^'"'STATE REGISTRAR 
LINCOLN, NEBRASKA : >^ 1 5 10 :.l 



born March 28, 1896, called Bill for short, and younger sister. 
Alberta Bernice (Cox) Goodale, born October 27, 1906, (Deceased) 



Daisie lived on a farm in Burchard, Nebraska for the first 
few years of her life, and at age four they moved closer into 
town. On the farm they grew peanuts and raised chickens. 

Picture of farm and her parents on Page . At age five, she 

started school, her worst subject was mathematics, and her 
favorite was reading. She was a typical little girl, she 
disliked any type or form of dresses, she liked climbing trees 
and playing with the boys, she was an A-1 tomboy, and an excellent 
accident prone victim, constantly breaking and spraining arms and 
fingers. 

Amongst her favorite hobbies were roller skating, and 
needlepoint or sewing. She was crowned Champion Roller Skater 
of Burchard, Nebraska. Some samples of her needlepoint and 
crafts are shown on Page . 

Her family was Methodist, and every Sunday morning, all 
of the children went to church. Both of her parents attended 
church also, but not as often because they worked all week and 
for them it was a day of rest. At the age of twelve, she was 
baptized Methodist. 

Family life was very hard with six children and shortage 
of work caused them to skimp and save. Every member of the 
family was a hard working person, and all of them supported 
themselves when they were old enough to get a job and graduate 
from high school . 



School in the 1900's was \jery different from what it is 
today. My grandmother graduated in May, 1915, from the 10th 
grade of Burchard High School, Burchard, Nebraska. Tenth 
grade was the very highest one could go to get a high school 
diploma. The town population was 200, and the school adhered 
with this. The school was a square wooden building, heated by 
pot belly stoves, with two rooms up and two rooms down. The 
1st through 3rd grades were in one room downstairs, and 4th 
through 6th grades in the other room downstairs, the 7th through 
8th, in one room upstairs, and 9th through 10th, in the other 
room upstairs. In 1915 on Easter Sunday, there was a cyclone 
and the school building was destroyed. 

In 1914, their family home burnt to the ground, and they 
in turn became renters. After Daisie graduated from High School, 
she worked for her cousin in a weekly newspaper office. In 
1917, the war began, and every eligible young man enlisted into 
the service. When everyone went to war, she and a girlfriend rah 
the whole production of the Burchard Times. Together they 
collected news, reported it, printed it, and distributed it. 
The hardest was the printing, which they had to do by hand 
setting foot press type printing. 

In 1918, she left Burchard, Nebraska and went to live with 
her older sister, Stella and her husband, in Davenport, Iowa, 
for a change of work. She worked for the Government at Rock 
Island Arsenal. She was making $31 per wee, full time, working 
oil machinery. She paid rent of $9 per month to her sister and 
brother-in-law. When the end of the war was announced, all of 
the employees at the arsenal celebrated, and those hired for 



v/ar-time duty, were laid off. The following job was a printing 
job at Lecair-King Printing Establ i shment , ' maki ng $17-18 weekly. 
There she did advertisements and ran a printing press (electric) 
She worked at Lecair-King for approximately one year, and then 
transferred to another printing company of which she could not 
recall the name, here she made $30 a week. 

She met her future husband while boarding at her sister's. 
He was the brother of her brother-in-law, who was also boarding 
at the same house. Jessie Cox, Daisie's other sister, boarded 
there also. In the early 1920's, both Dai si e and Jessie moved 
because of poor cooking, to live with Mrs. Byrd Briggs. On 
Saturday, December 11,1920, at 3:30 P. M., Daisie married 
Joseph Enos Stewart. The ceremony was performed by Dr. Frank 
Cole, Minister of the Methodist Church in Davenport, Iowa. The 
attendants of the ceremony were Mr. & Mrs. Roy Cox, Jessie Cox, 
and Mrs. Briggs. The ceremony and reception took place in the 
Briggs home. 

PATERNAL GRANDFATHER: 

JOSEPH ENOS STEWART: Born January 9, 1881 

Deceased February 26, 1948 



Joseph Enos Stewart, born in Terre Haute, Indiana, on the 
9th day of January, 1881, was the son of Elihue Stewart and 
Eleanor (Francis) Stewart. He was the 4th child, having three 
older than he, Gertrude, Charlie, Frank (closest brother), and 
two younger, Robert and Gene. He finished the eighth grade. 



highest one could go in a small country school. He lived on 
a farm a short while and moved to a town , , "LaHarpe, Illinois." 
his favorite hobby was ice skating, he also liked dancing, squirrel 
and rabbit hunting, and music. His favorite song was' Listen to the 
Mocki ngbi rd . ' 

MARRIED LIFE OF 
JOSEPH ENOS STEWART & DAISIE MARIE STEWART 

They were wed on December 11th, 1920. There is a xeroxed copy of the 
marriage certificate on the following page. They were married in Davenport, 
Iowa, and stayed as residents there for two or three years. My Grandfather 
was employed by French and Hicks Iron Mill at the time. Work was scarce, 
so they moved to Rockford, Illinois. They took a new residence in an 
upstairs apartment at 2611 West State Street. Neither of them had 
any experience in a special field, just took the type of work 
they could find, times were hard, and they were classified as 
the lower class hard working citizen. 

In 1924 they moved to LaHarpe, Illinois, because of a 
chance at more work. My Grandmother was expecting her first 
child, my Grandfather got a job for a telephone company as a 
lineman. Their first chila was born on February 17, 1924, 
they named him Joseph Elmer Stewart. My Grandfather's new job 
often took him away from home a lot. They laid lines all along 
the Rockies in the West and Central States. Shortly after my 
Grandmother had 'little Joe', she was expecting her second child. 
My Grandfather was out of State working, so my Grandmother decided 



:\ 



j^ 



MARRMGE CERTIFICATE 

This Certifies, that U'^^^^-J^^ C ^iiC^^^i^zn^of 

^dSa^u^^^Ci>^. : of. 




^ 



r f^L-'"^--'-''''!^^ 




by vie, according to the Ordinance of God and the Laz:s of the State of Io'j:a, at 



_ /;; the County of Scott, and State of loira, 

on the ~J*^ day oj X^^'^-'^J^^^^^'S^t^'^ 





mmmmmmmMmMMmmmwmmm 



^^sffs?^ 




STATE OF IOWA, 
County of Scott 



COUNTY REGISTRAR 
Vital Statistics 



Olertifkatmit oi jEcirrkg^ 



JO SEPH E. STEVJART 



and 



DA IS IE M. COX 



^ge next birthday—. __3m. Yrs. 

^ge next birthday_ 22 Yrs. 



were married by £llank___Cilla., Ministe r 

on nac£j!ib.e.r__ll.^_lS2.Q at Davenport, lovja 



I, ELMER JENS, do hereby certify that I am the Clerk of the District Court in and for said County, 
and as such official I have the possession and control of all such records, in and for said County, and am 

charged with the duty of keeping such records; that in Book 22 Page____ii8_Z 

of said Marriage records is found and appears the entry from which the above is taken. 

IN TESTIMONY \VHEREOF, I have hereunto affixed my hand and the seal of said 

(SEAL)' *> 



Court, at Davenport, Iowa, this ^k^'^^^ J August fX ^ jg 59 



By. 



Clerk ofihe District Court 

u 

Deputy 









to visit her Mother and Father. She was there when she had her 
second son, Billie Maurice Stewart, born October 21, 1925, in 
Burchard, Nebraska. 

My Grandma just loved girls and she had two boys, so I 
guess they decided to try again. On February 26, 1928, she 
was blessed with her third son, Delmont Couver Stewart. He 
was born in LaHarpe, Illinois, while my Grandfather was still 
working for the line company. When Delmont was eight or nine 
months old, they moved back to Burchard, Nebraska because of big 
line work opportunity. 

On December 14, 1931, again my Grandmother gave birth to a 
boy. Max Elroy Stewart. Shortly after she had him out of 
diapers and walking, she gave birth to another boy, Larry Dee 
Stewart, on April 12, 1934. When she had her last boy and 
the doctor told her he was only about 5 or 6 lbs. she claimed 
she didn't want to see him because she thought he would be 
all wrinkly and skinny. She gave birth to most of her children 
in their home, with a midwife assisting the doctor. 

Even with five small boys, she remained very active in 
social clubs. She taught the adult class of Sunday School, and 
belonged to the Lady's Aid Society. The pass times of the church 
circles were having bazaars and quilting parties. 

Their home had no electricity, neither did any home in 
Burchard till the lines went up. My Grandmother made 90% of all 
the boys clothes and hers by an old tredal machine (pedal power) 
washed all clothes on the washboard, and ironed with a flat iron 
that one had to heat by setting over hot coals. The town also 
had no city water, all water was fetched from the well. In order 



to vote, they had to go to a different County. My Grandfather 
was a Democrate and my Grandmother a Republican. 

In about 1940, my Grandfather got another job in Hastings, 
Nebraska, at a Government plant. My Grandmother was living in 
Burchard alone with all the boys. They rented a home at $5.00 
a month. She got lonesome in Burchard and decided to move them 
all to Pawnee, Nebraska in 1941. By this time, 'Little Joe' 
had graduated from Burchard High School. 

'Little Joe' tried to enter the service after he graduated 
from High School, but he was too young and they wouldn't accept 
him. He worked for Civil Service for about 3 years. In 1941 
Joe decided to join the Marines. Bill joined Merchant Marines 
in 1943 and reinlisted in the Army in 1945. Delmont, the third 
oldest son, quit school in Nebraska and came to Rockford in 
1945 to work at Woodward Governor. On March 26, 1945, he enlisted 
in the Navy. In 1946, the whole family moved back to Rockford and 
stayed. Bill married Charlotte Quackenbush (also from Nebraska) 
in Kansas on March 7, 1946, while he was in the service. 

Shortly after the family moved back to Rockford, my Grand- 
father became sick, in early 1948. My Grandmother went to work 
to help support the family while he was so sick. She was employed 
by an Advertising Printing concern making $69 a month for about 
6 months, until he was so sick they couldn't keep him in the Nursing 
Home. My Grandmother stayed with him constantly for the last 2 or 3 
months to take care of him. He died at the age of 67 on February 26, 
1948 (also Delmonts birthday) from hardening of the arteries. The 
doctor claimed he just worked himself to death. 



In 1950 Joe died in active duty in the service. His 
papers are shown on the following page. Max quit school and 
joined the Navy in 1952. Larry graduated from West High School 
in i952 anc! went to work with his oldest brother (then) Bill 
doing construction work. 

My Grandmother got a job working at a small grocery store 
after her husband died. An old man owned the store on the corner 
of West State and Day Avenue, Rockford, Illinois. He was going 
in debt so she helped him out of it. In 1950 she worked for 
Illinois Cabinet (now General Electric) on 11th Street. She 
was fired because she went to see her son, Delmont and Daughter- 
in-law Geraldine's wedding in Plattsmith, Nebraska. She had 
asked her foreman for the day off, but he did not okay it with 
the manager of the plant. 

In 1955 her youngest son, Larry (my father) married Mary 
Jean Furman (my mother) and a few years following her second 
youngest boy Max, married Mary Lou Gaspari. 

On December 31, 1947, she became a Grandmother, her first 
grandchild was a boy, named Dannie Lee, born to the Bill Stewarts. 
Her first grand-daughter was born on June 11, 1956, Pamela Kay 
Stewart, born to the Larry Stewarts. 

She continued working various jobs until she was past 
retirement age. She has had a very hard life, but one wouldn't 
know it by looking at her. She is now living in the Senior Citizens 
High Rise on North Main Street. She has a clan of grandchildren, two 
of her boys and their families , Max and Bill, live in Farmington. 
Michigan. She became a Great-Grandmother for the first time in 
March, 1974. Her other two sons, Delmont and Larry, and their 



s& 




families live here in Rockford. Her favorite pass time is 
playing cards, sone of the women and her get together every 
day and every single Saturday to play cards. She loves the 
apartment, because its so much like their own little community 
She loves flowers and birds, and when she was younger, and had 
her own home, I can remember the back yard being a patch of 
flowers. 



OFFSPRING OF DAISIE MARIE (Cox) STEWART - and 
Joseph Enos Stewart (Deceased) 



JOSEPH ELMER STEWART - born February 
17, 1924, in LaHarpe, Illinois, Died 
in the service (Korean War) in 1950, 



Billie Maurice Stewart - born October 
21, 1925, in Burchard, Nebraska, 
married Charlotte Quackenbush , December 
31, 1947. They have three boys, two 
married and one grandchild, all residing 
in Michigan. 



Delmont Couver Stewart - born February 
26, 1928, in LaHarpe, Illinois, married 

Geraldine , in 1950. They 

have a high school freshman boy, and a 
grade school girl. They reside on Gorham 
Place, Rockford, Illinois. 



Max Elroy Stewart: Born December 14, 1931 
in Burchard, Nebraska, married Mary Lou 
Gaspari in 1957. They have two girls and 
a young boy, all residing in Michigan. 



Larry Dee Stewart: Born April 12, 1934, in 
Burchard, Nebraska , married Mary Jean Furman 
in 1955. They have two girls. All reside 
on Springcreek Road, Rockford, Illinois. 



THE IMMEDIATE LIST OF GRANDCHILDREN 

OF 

JOSEPH ENOS STEWART & DAISIE MARIE (Cox) STEWART 

(in age grouping) 



DANNIE LEE STEWART (Karen Stewart - wife) 

MICHAEL STEWART (Terry Scott Stewart - wife) 

STEVEN STEWART 

PAMELA KAY STEWART (1st ever to attend college) 

LAURA ANN STEWART 

GUY LESLIE STEWART 

MICHELE MARIE STEWART 

CHERYL KAY STEWART 

NANCY STEWART 

WILLIAM JOSEPH STEWART 



GREAT - GRANDCHILD 

ERIC SCOTT STEWART (Son of Michael Stewart) 



Father; Larry Dee ^tewart 

Born - April 12, 193^ 

He vvas born in his home in Burchard Nebraska to 
Joseph Enos and Daisie iv.arie Stev;art. Ke was the 5'th 
child of the Stewarts, he had four older brothers, Joe, 
Bill, Delmont, and Iv^ax. Kis nickname was "pee-wee" because 
iT-ie was the smallest of the bunch. They lived in a four 
room house, in Nebraska, it had tv;o bedrooms, a kitchen, 
and a living room. Three of the five boys slept in one 
bedroom and the other two in a bed in the living room. There 
v^as no running vvater in the house, and no inside toilet. 
They heated the house by a wood burning pot belly stove 
in the center of the living room. 

Ke left Burchard in 4th grade and moved to Pawnee. 
There they lived in a two-story house, this house contained 
the essential item.s such as running water, toilets, and 
electricity. Ke attended Pawnee Elementary School for 
4th through 8th grades. Then they moved to Rockford Illinois, 
T-.here he finished 8th and 9'th 'grades, at .Roosevelt . Then he 
went to V/est High School, where he met his future wife, and 
graduated from West in 1952. He got a job in construction 
with his brother Bill in 1952, and worked construction until 
i960. Ke then went on to work for the Rockford Fire Department, 
He iTiarried Kary Jean Furman, in 1955. 



MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER: 

BRIDGET RITA (McGING) FURMAN: BORN March'22, 1911 
COUNTY MAYO, IRELAND 

I could noL gather wery much information on my mothers 
parents because of broken ties, but I could gather a few 
essential items. Bridget was born in County Mayo, Ireland 
on March 22, 1911. She has one living sister by the name 
of Mary Margaret (McGing) Frowan, now a widow, with no 
children. She came to the United States at the age of 18 
years old, she was sponsored by her Aunt Dehlia McGing, 
wh3 lived in Chicago. 

Living was bad in Ireland and when one had a relative 
who lived in the States, one usually applied for a sponsorship. 
Within a few minutes of interviewing her, I found that it is 
very difficult to try to immigrate to another country. First 
she had to apply to the States for permission to come, then she 
had to go through health exams over and over. When one applied 
to go to the States, one couldn't say that one was trying to 
get to the United States for a job and a better place to live, 
but just claimed for a visit, or under full responsibility of 
sponsor. Her sister, Mary Margaret, came over under sponsorship 
of Dehlia McGing, first, and later they sent for Bridget. She 
came over on a ship, and landed in New York with no one to meet 
her. She took a train from New York to Chicago and there met 
her sister and Aunt. She was employed as Domestic Help several 
years, and was married in 1934 to Sidney Furman. 



"other: I'ary Jean (Furman) STEVi'ART 

born - July 15, 1935 

She was the first and oldest child of Sidney 
and Bridget Rita(r.c Ging) Furrran. She was born in 
Rockford Hospital. She was two years old when her sister 
Sally Agnes Furir.an was born. They lived Furman Street 
till she was four years old, and then moved to arline 
Avenue . 

She attended Whig Kill School for 1st through 8th 
grades. Then she went to Roosevelt Jr. HighSchool. They 
move to the 2500 block of Auburn and then she attended 
V/est High and graduated from there in 1953. 

At the age of 14 she v/orked in a drive-in, she lied 
about her age and told them she was 16. Then when she was 

15 she v/ent to work at a restaurant, The Paul Bunyan, 
and worked hours after school and weekends. The Restaurant 
went out of business, and she then went to v/ork at the 
Green Shutters. She worked at Green Shutters until her 
Junior year of High School, then she went to v;ork for 
Johnsons Pharmacy, and remjained there her whole junior 
and senior years of High School. 

When she graduated from West High in 1953 she left 
home and took an apartment v.'ith a girlfriend , in the 
500 block of Fischer Avenue. The she went to work at 
Rockford Realestate Board. 

She ^rarried Larry Dee Stewart on June 25th, 1955 » 
as a result of going steady with him for 4years (off and 
on) . 



LARRY DEE STEWART and MARY JEAN (Furman) STEWART 



They lived in a tiny three room apartment on Fischer Avenue, 
Rockford, Illinois, for three months, when my mother spor'.ed a 
mouse and demanded to leave. They went to see a duplex for rent, 
by Mary & Vito Carnelli. When they went to rent, the Carnelli's 
told them they wanted no children, because it was bran new. My 
parents agreed because they had no plans for children for five 
years. The following month, my mother became pregnant. Vito 
and Mary accepted it, however, and doted on the fact that they 
had a baby to play with. 

When I was two years old, they moved out of the duplex. 
My mother returned to work after my birth as Legal Secretary 
for Attorney Stuart Nordquist and worked there for three 
years. My father was then employed by Venice Tile Co. 
My mother then quit this job and went to work for the City 
Legal Department, and in the same year, my father joined the 
City Fire Department as an Alarm Operator. In 1961 my mother 
became pregnant with Michele Marie Stewart. She quit work on a 
Friday and had her on the following Tuesday. 

By then they were living at 208 N. Independence, Rockford, 
Illinois. Then she went to work for Attorney Tuite, part-time, 
which later developed into full-time. She worked for Tuite for 
three years. Then she changed jobs and went to work for Rockford 
Title Company. My father then became a firefighter for Rockford 
Fire Department, Eng. Co. 8. 

In 1972 my mother quit work at Rockford Title Company and 
went to work at Home Federal Savings & Loan as a Loan Officer. 




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MYSELF 



PAMELA KAY STEWART Born June 11, 1956 



Pamela Kay Stewart, born in Swedish American Hospital in 
Rockford, Illinois, on the 11th day of June, 1956. Daughter 
of Larry Dee Stewart and Mary Jean (Furman) Stewart. The first 
child of Larry Stewarts, having one younger sister, Michele Marie 
Stewart, born February 20, 1962. The first granddaughter of 
Daisie Marie Stewart and Mr. & Mrs. Furman. Born and lived in 
Rockford, Illinois, all her life. 

The first home I ever lived in was a duplex at 215 S. 
Johnston, Rockford, Illinois. Parents were renters of Mary and 
Vito Carnelli. I was very spoiled and fussed over by both my 
Grandmother Stewart and Mary Carnelli, because I was the first 
girl they ever had to cater to. I was the best dressed fattest 
little girl that ever breathed fresh air on, this earth. My 
Grandma worked at a baby shop and seldom came home without 
a gift for her "little girl", and Mary was an a-1 "best Italian 
cook I ever knew." When I was old enough to walk, talk, and eat 
at the table, I would eat one dinner at home and walk next door 
and pound on the back door of Mary's when I knew she and Vito 
would be eating, then I would conive for myself a second dinner. 

My mother returned to work when I was four months old, and 
my Grandmother and Mary Carnelli shared the rearing of me. My 
Grandmother also worked during the day, but I would always spend 
nights with ner if Mom and Dad went out. I stayed under Mary's 
keeping all day long five days a week till I was two years old. 



Whenever Vito came home from work he would always read to me. 
I absolutely loved to be read to and my ^ery favorite story 
was "Tom Thumb". Another pastime I awed at was to watch Mary 
let her hair down. She had long black waist length hair and 
would always wear it in a bun. I would always know when Vito 
was coming home because Mary would let me help her take all the 
pins out of the bun and brush all the long hair, and then she 
would put it all in a bun again to look extra nice for Vito. 

ther than my Grandma Stewart, Mary and Vito were like 
my other set of Grandparents. They all watched me grow and 
struggled with me to become what I am today. Vito was always 
so intelligent and he used every bit of intelligence and 
commonsense he had right up to the day he died. He was the 
most patient, gentle, man I have ever known, and he took the place of 
tha Grandfather I never had. 

My life in nursery school was an estatic joke. The 
couple, Mr, & Mrs. Johnson, who owned the nursery school "Happy 
Day Hour" on 631 North Court Street, would come aroung and pick 
the children up. The first time he ever came to get me I screamed 
all the way there, because I wanted to stay home with Mary. Once 
I got used to all the children, you couldn't drag me away from it. 
very best friend was Diane Quinn, her Grandma and Grampa owned the 
nursery, and we were both spoiled rotten. We got away with murder, 
and in turn, everyone wanted to be our friends for security sake. 



My 



If there were ever two little devils in this world, we 
certainly came under that heading. We were. tomboys all the 
way around. 

I especially recall one incident, perhaps because its 
the one of many I can remember being scolded for, that in most 
nurseries would take the cake. The girls bathroom had a lock on 
the door, and Diane and I would ruin all the boys art work during 
art, or steal all the crayons and run into the girls bathroom 
with them, because the boys couldn't get in. One day, however, 
we couldn't find the crayons and figured that the boys had hid 
them in their bathroom, so we raided the boys bathroom, with the 
boys in them and all. Chances are, we wouldn't have gotten in 
trouble had we not asked why the toilets were different, but 
girls will be girls, won't they? 

For two of the best friends in the world, Diane and I fought 
like cats and dogs. VJhenever we were mad at each other, we would 
slide up and down the hallway with our backs to the wall just 
eyeing each other without a word said. Once we even fought because 
we did not agree on a game to play, so we got mad at each other and said 
naughty things about each others mother. Which her mother overheard 
and made us each apologize to each other. Our fights always ended 
with embraces and tears. 

When I was four years old, I graduated from Kindergarten at 
Happy Hour Nursery School. Diane and I graduated together. We had 
red crepe paper gowns and caps and I remember when we stooped over 
the water fountain, we smeared water all the way down us. After we 
were presented our diplomas, lunch was served in the cafeteria. The 
children had peanut butter sandwiches, and the adults something more 



elegant. But Diane and I decided it would be fun to get everyone 
together and toss our peanut butter sandwiches up in the air 
as a celebration. The only downfall was that some stuck to the 
ceiling, and once again, we were in hot water. The best part 
of nursery school was the ego trip one got when it was ones birthday. 
The birthday child got to stand on the table before lunch and have 
everybody in the whole school sing Happy Birthday. Needless to 
say, I enjoyed nursery school tremendously, Diane and I were 
the envy of everyone in that school because we had the blood and 
guts to do things even the normal devious boys didn't think of. 

When I was about 4 or 5 years old, we moved to 208 N. 
Independence. Then I lived just three houses away from my 
Grandma and I could go see her any time I wanted. I was one 
of the very few girls on the block, and so my best friend 
was Mark Washburn who lived acrossthe street. Well he was my 
best friend until one day I bet him he couldn't punch me in 
the nose and I went home with a bloody nose. We made friends 
again, however, and continued climbing trees and playing together. 
We lived directly behind Sunset Park and every winter we went 
ice skating in the back, and in the summer we made mud pies. I 
even remember the day my Dad got mad at the paper boy because 
he ran over my toes with his bike. (chances are I deserved it, 
from what I've heard, I was a devil). 

At age Five, I started Kindergarten at St. Paul Lutheran 
School on Kilburn. I guess my parents figured a perochial school 
would reform my wild streak. I absolutely loved it. You didn't 
fight or argue with friends or you would sit in the Chapel with 
whomever you disagreed with and pray for forgiveness, instead of 



having phonics with the rest of the class. Every Wednesday, every 
grade from Kindergarten to 8th grade would go to the Chapel for 
services instead of religion within the class. I honestly admired 
Pastor Fritsch for his sermons, if anyone ever preached so con- 
vincingly to a child, I'm sure he was the best. His voice was so 
strong and demanding he could scare the devil out of sinning but 
personally, he was the sweetest and gentlest old man. 

When I was six years old, my sister was born. When my mother 
went to the hospital she asked what I preferred, and I stated that 
I either wanted a puppy dog or a sister. My mom says she thought 
she did quite well, considering. 

I attended school at St. Paul Lutheran for five years, till I 
was in 4th grade. We then moved to 3309 Spring Creek Road into a 
house my father built and I attended 5th grade at Bloom School. 
In 1966, one day before my 11th birthday, I fell off a trampoline 
and broke my arm. I remember this because it was supposed to be 
my magic birthday - I was 11 years on the 11th day, somehow it 
strikes me as ironic. 

During the summertime when both of my parents worked, my 
sister and I stayed at my grandma's. We either helped her plant 
things in her garden, or played with friends. 

In 1967, we moved from 3305 Springcreek Road to 7346 Spring 
Creek Road. I then attended Bell School, and my sister began 
kindergarten at St. Paul Lutheran. 

When I was ten years old my parents gave me music lessons 
and let me choose whatever musical instrument I wanted to play. 
I chose accordi an . When I was twelve I performed in solo's and 
b and competition at the McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. 



The highest I ever did in solo was "Superior" 3rd place 
White Ribbon, and our band from Guzzardo School of Mucis 
placed second. Blue Ribbon and trophy. 

In 1970 I graduated from Eighty Grade at Bell School 
under the Principal Marcella Maiers. I then attended 
Guilford Sr. High School from 1970 - 1974. I graduated 
from Guilford with an average of B's, in June of 1974. 

My best friend all through high school was Sylvia 
Haug. ]/ie met at Hope Reformed Church in 1969 when my family joined, 
Together we did several projects for the church. We both attend 
Rock Valley College and are still best friends. After I graduate 
from Rock Valley, I will transfer to Hope College, in Holland 
Michigan, (where Sylvia is going too). After Hope, I haven't 
decided on a school to go to. I'm in college now on a pre-law 
schedule, and I will choose the law school to which I'm going 
according to the state I decide to practice in. 



I 



STITES. JOHN KEVIN, 195^- 



•LEASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

)ear Contributor to the Kock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
American families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
'ew mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
|cces5 to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

I. SURVEY ***A;V>':ftAAAA**;'.-:^-.VAA****;'::'r;'r;V;V 

* OFFICE USE CODE 

I . Your name Jo A w J t i T t^ 5 



Date of form * {\D H ) 



'/. Your college: Rock Val ley Col lege •'■ (ID // ) 

Rockford, Illinois >'- 

*****:•: ;•, ;V ,': A- ;V ;V >V A ;V A ;V ;•; A A y; * :t :V :'; A A .'.- 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 1 800-1 850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 

k. Please check al 1 regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

X N ew England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) X M iddle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K% 

West South Central (Ark., N.M., Tex., Ok.) X East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 

^Pacific (Cal., Washj (Hawaii, Alaska) 

5. Please check al I occupat ional categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

Farming Mining _V' Shopkeep i ng or small business 

^Transportation ^Big Business y M anufacturing 



Professions Industrial labor Other 



6. Please check al 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

Roman Catholic ^Jewish Presbyterian \ M ethodist 

Baptist Epi scopal ian Congregational ^ Lutheran 



^[^uaker M o rmon O ther Protestant ^Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians ^Mexicans Puerto Ricans 

^Jews ^Central Europeans _ltalians Slavs 

Irish British Native Americans over several generations 

East Asian Other 



8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X^ Interviews with other Family Bibles Jif Fami ly Genealogies 
f ami 1 y membe rs 

_Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 

Photographs >/ Maps Other 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name ^^ A/^/ ./T^^^CiT Current Residence hce^f ^^^/ 

I f dead, date of death ' 

Place of birth V^^vV^x-V Date of Birth .<< ^- /? /9tPO 

Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high school ^ vocational C? college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
^ / / / f/. -y (after leaving home) 
1st S<:4^r /t./,U (<^-'(^^6^t »stes m. /n^z-a.r 1 st r4fe»r^ Dates /f,3^ 

'^^'^%-LjJ^jStL^^r.i^ r^,,///^ Dates /»« ,^^»»» 2nd Y^^e^.^ Dates /^^5> 

3rd ;^/;.^/v^ .^^^f^^l/^r Dates /y^.y~ /y^y 3rd ^^A//V Dates/£££_ 

hth F.F.t,.,,,^ C4../Jrr ^Bte s/929-f?U htU Dates 

Re 1 i g i on /7?«'r/,oe/,rr'~ 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc y/>,'(^^^^ Zou^^ 

m. A.m. Fpy m,,.. ^y.r'/o^'l'^:^ ^, ^ ^.yr.„^._ i"'-;^ 

v.ac. Of Marriage to your grandmother ^^^.^^ 3r}P>..... .. -J^e^^^^^- 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 



'lame (/,'r^ ^^^cpif* ^ f7(^(ffe^^ ( ^n*-e< ) Current Residence A<S>f,^ro^£ ' 
If dead, date of death ^' ^ ^ ' ^ ' 



Place of birth C f<^€.L^J ^jC,' « Date of bi rth ^^^//^ /r^ / 

Education (number of years): 
grade school c> high school (^ vocational ^" col lege_ 

Occupation(s) 

2nd <^^^r <r/c0'lf 

3rd 

kx.h 



DateVf^- Y£ 1st 


PLACE 
(aft« 


OF 
;r 


RESIDENCE 
eaving home) 

Dates 


Dates'/<$' *^(J 2nd 










Dates 


DatestJK i<' 3rd 
Dates i»th 


Dates 
Dates 



Rel igion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather "^ ' DATT" 

Note; 



'' ^h^HaM^SFl'fhl^^Saig'Sf'^tl'lf? ^aii^^A-^)^ stepmother or anoth 



er relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 



N li nie 

I f dead, dale of death 



Place of bi rth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

ktU 



Re 1 i g i on 



Current Residence 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


ijth 



Date of Bi rth 



vocational 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Dates 

_Dates_ 

Dates 



Place of marriage to your grandmother 



"Tin 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



_Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Re 1 i gion 



Current Residence 



Date of bi rth 



vocat ional 



col lege 



Ist_ 

2hd_ 
3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Date 



Dates 



Dates 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 

Grandfather (your mother's side) 

m'^/x^? ^\ /5^^>,^^>^ r„r.»n^ Residence 

•f deatf'; date of death Q.^ 7 , ., y .. — 

Place of h\rx\, G-,rL S ../.... Date of birth ^^/. Z 6 /^ f C^ 

Education (number of ye^rs)* " ^f - — =-i ^' ' ^ 

grade school 6 high school ^^ vocationaI_ college 



Occupat ion(s) 

1st ^rc^^c /..^..- Dates .yi^-//^^ 1st /?>. ^^^''' leaving ho,;^ ) 

^ _Dates 2nd 



2nd 
3rd 
'ith 



_Dates 3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

Dates /7/3-//^ 

Dates 

Dates 



_Dates_ /,th 



Dates 



Re 1 i g i on /7-,/^ r: 

Political parties, c.v.l o^r social clubs, fraternities, etc. /y> ,^ .< .r ^ . .. ,-, 

^ ' ace of marrriage to your grandmother — "7^ 77"^ ; — 3 — . 

Note: If your mother was raised by a .mp9ib l ^ OZ-jJiuuiL I ItildL l .ti UO ag e 18 ) <i ^/ ^^ ^ 
give that data on the back of this page (C-l) ^ 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Tr Jj,±^-f/jVj^''''- '■ ^""'"^ residence /,//..,/ JT// 



grade school .^ high school vocational college 

Occupat ion(s) 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
Ist „ (after leaving home) 

^^ ^Dates 1st 

2nd 



Dates 



— — __Dates 2nd 

^'"'^ Dates 3rd 



_Oates 
Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

Mace of marriage to your grandfather T~T7 7~ ~ 7^ 

''ote: If your mother was raised by a stegmotgeror another relative (to a ge TgT 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) ^ 



C- I Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death 



I'l.id- ol liiilh I). lie of liiilli 

fdiK.ilion (imriil)c r of yr.i i ■. ) 
') t .nic '.( hoo I h i 

Occupat ion(s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

^ith 



citoo 1 


vocat 


iono 


1 




CO 


1 1< 

ENi 
h, 


-ijf 


Dates 


1st 


PLACE 
(after 


OF 
1( 


RESIDI 
saving 


CE 

ome) 
Dates 


Dates 


2nd 












Dates 
Dates 


Dates 


3rd 












Dates 


Ath 












Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother d ate 

D-2 5 tepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 



I f dead , date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational col lege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd ^Dates ^2nd Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 

Re I i g i on 



Political party , civil or soci al c 1 ubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



CHILDREN of A 6 B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 

1. Name 8fr^^,./ T ^Tr.rrf 

Place of bi rth ^jaj-g 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 



A. 



-. , . v...,,y ^ occupation 

Resldence r/r^^A^y CPJlr. Harit;>l «;f;.f,.c ,-7)^r. .TTT 

Number of chi Idren ^ 

^- Name/ .^ ^ ^r-^^ "^ 

Place of bi rth 37j.g 

Number of years of school ing '' " Oc cupatirtn c li o — ~i — J 

Number of chi Idren / </ ■ — 

3. Name 

Place of bl rth ^^^^ -c^-. — . 

Number of years of schooling Occupation ~ 

Residence . Harlr;,! ^f.^,■c 

Number of chi Idren T " 



\. Name 

Place of bi rth 



- ...... date 

Number of years of schooling JTccupatlort 

Residence M ar I taPTtatus 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~ ' jg^g 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marl talTFatus 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of birth j a ^e 

Number of years o^ schooling ^ccupIFrnTT 

Residence MarltaT Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth ^^^^ 

Number of years of schooling Occupatloh 

"e"'d«"^e HaritaTTFatus 

Number of chi Idren — 



Name 

P I a ce of bi rth ^^^^ 

Number of years of schooling ^ccupiTT^ 

Residence nrrrr^i c^Z^ 

u . , — r-m • Marital Status 

Number of children 



date 



Name 

Place of bi rth ^^^g 

Number of years or schooling "OccupitT^ 

S";^^"^^ ,,., Marital TFatus ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 



Resid^ncI ye^-^°^ schooling Q-ccupaTi^ 

Number of i lil i i i m ii ^Marital Ttatus 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C-l, D-l)-your mother's name should appear below 



fl.,..Y,.r 1,1, I h ^^yxA-../-^/ dau>_^ 

Re. i<lcncc /■Tc-c •^A-,.-/ 77//' Marital Status ////,-,,.«^ ~- 



R<-'. i <lcncc /•To-c -r-Z-j-,.^/ Z^//[ Marital Status ///z^tt^ct^ 

Nuinhnr n( children ^: // l ■/. 

Name 

P lace of b! rth date 



Number of children 



10. Name 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Mar I tal Status 



3. Name 

Place of birth date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res idence Mari tal Status 

Number of ch i I dren 



Name 

P lace of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marj tal ^Status 

Number of ch i 1 dren 

Name 

P lace of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling "Occupat ion 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res idence Mari tal ^Status 

Number of ch i Tdren 



Name 

Place of b i rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi 1 dren 



Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occ'upatiort 

Residence Mari tal Status ~ 

Number of ch i 1 dren 



Name 

Place of b i rth date 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ]^ 

Number of chi Idren 



Place of birth "~~ ~ date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation" 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



Your Father 



I f dead, date of death 



o^' birth /Pocyf-Z-arJ 

tion (number of yearX) 



Current Residence ■^,C/fi^r./ IT// 



Place 
Educa 
grade school 



jL 



Date of birth j,.^^ J/fj.^ 

high school ^•' ^vocational college 



Occupat ion(s) 



Ist^ 



•^/•c/.' Ve 



A/.. 



X 



Dates //-T-y- ^/ Sr 1st 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
^ w^ L. Dates/^?^f>"^3' 



2" d^r,^f^;^^1^^, /r Dates/^/viy./v.,- 2nd IJcJ;-..-./ Ddtes 99- 

3rd ^^y,,^ Dates ^--^v^ 3rd ^.. . Dates ^^'^f 

^y^ ^O.,,'n^i-f^^-^^,- Dates /YfC ' 



Re 1 1 g I on 



kx.\\ 



Dates 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your mother //qcA^qkc/ '-^^^ ~ 

^OTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relat 
of this page. (E-2) 



date ,/'^^,. ^.-/^^/^' 
ive give that data on the back 



i^our Mother 



H e^fce d def K '" ^'^^" ^'^^ " - ' ' «esl.ence ^^^^^^ T// 



Mace of birth f(,.,/-U^rl 

Education (number of' years} 
grade school /: high school /f? 

)ccupation(s) 

1st //^^.■.,^.v. /^ 



Date of birth /V^ /i~' // 
vocational college 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
y. ^ yy (after leaving home) 
Dates ^r— 1st /f^.^Z-fZ/ Dates Vf 



Dates 
Dates 



2nd 
3rd 



Dates 



Dates 



le 1 i g 1 on 

'olitical party, civi I or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



lace of marriage to your father /; .^^.J j^// j^te ^^ ' , - ■ ■ ^ 

lOTE: If you were raised by a steproth^r or another relative give that dat a on 'the' ' 'b^acrof 



this page (F-2). 



I 



E-l Stepfather 

Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth D ate of birth 

Education (number of years) ~" 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupationfs) •* PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd ^Dates ^3rd Dates 

^th Dates ^tU Dates 

Re] igion 

Pol i t i cai* part les , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother Date" 



F-2 Stepmother 



Name 



If dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates ^2nd Dates_ 

3rd Dates ^3rd ^P^^^^. 

Re I i g i on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father — — — date 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

Name /7Z>y A Jac^rr^e g <. r r 'r -r f 

Place ofb\rthf^^,/,J ^ ^,„,.. //„^ /K, /f^,:.,///.Z. Dat'e of birth. 

Number of years of schooling 2fDb^tf Occupation Q, ^,- 

Residence A^grforr/ ' Marital Status Olar^. er/ 

Niimhi^r r\i rh i 1 A ran ""^ ^''— " ' ■ / ■■■-■ 



ce of birth ^^^</ J^ S/»,^ fL.^-f».^JrN Date of birth 0?^r,A // / f ^^ ^ 

iber of year^ of schooling /^ Occupatior T 0^, /^^> 

idence (^^ T>>r t / Marital Status ff„s/, 

ber of chlldreri ^ 

of birth ^Xj>^/^>>/^ M ^jt, A./('/s,/r/t D ate of birth 

Number of years of school i ng .^ — Occupat 

Residence ^c.^,//.../ Marital Status ff. j 

Number of ch i 1 draft ~ — U-fZ» 



Name 

Place 

Numbe 



upa 1 1 6n fy^./em,- 



Place of birth ^/^,^/,^l 4^^ ^^ A^/^YiJ D^Fe of birth 

Number of V^ys of^schopllng ' ^ OccupaTToT T ^^^Jr^ t-' 

Res i den ce (gcrfo^t/ ~ Marital Status <.., /f. 

Number of children — — ^^ 

Name 

Place of birth " PlTe of birth 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ~~~~ 

Number of chi 1 dren ~ ~ """" — " 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth_ 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren "~~~ 



Name 

Place of birth Date of birth 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Residence Marital Status" 

Number of chi Idren — __ 

'<ame 

Mace of birth Date of birth 

dumber of years of school ing Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ~~~~~_ 

Number of ch i Idren 



lil. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willincj) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights,' to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in ttie 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



Signed 
Date 



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"i.2B.\N0W-, a city of South-eastern ^ Pennsylvania.. a,S,A, 
,1' L.ebfc.'ia'n Vsiley, g5 miles ncr thwest of Phil.? '■* ^ 
Co'inty saat dC l«baron County^ It is served ^ 
wall,, the Pennsylvan'i anf"- the Reading Railro. ■ ^ 
ti©n (1950) 2dj,156= 'I960) 27,206, 

About, five miles south of the city are the < 
xr*n mines, one of the snost '•■-•■■-!>■. five aiagnet; -^ 
n the world c Limestone;, br <», and br\ 
obound. The city has iron •„.. ^.,^^1 works anc .... ../u. .. 

industries making use ©f these products^ 

The first settlement wag aade about 1730 and twenty 
years later a town was laid out by one ef the land owners 
George Steit* ar d named Steiiztown. About 1760^ it bo 
came known as Lebanon, It wa^ incorporated ag a borough 
:.n 1821 and chartered as a city in 13^5.. 

The iron deposl:* as Cornwall have been worKed since 
L740.. During the Re'/ciution , Baron Stelcel used ore from 
ohis area to make cannon for the Continental Anay." 



(Fro.a Encyclopedia Brittanica . 1959 Edition. Vol«ame :i3 , 
Paf,e 354) 






STITES 

I. JOHI'I STITES (1595 - 1717) 

Came from England in the time of Cromwell. He came as a phy- 
sician and surgeon to the colonists and settled in Hempstead, Long 
Island. He was a man of powerful physique being over six feet tall, 
and wonde7;ful endxirance, he walked over a hundred miles to visit a 
friend when he was very old. He lived to be 122. (From Littell's 
"Histo.vy of the Passaic Valley"). 

II. RICHRRD STITES (1640 - 1702) 

He was also born in England, He was an artist. 

III. WILLIAM STITES (1676 - 1727) 

Was a rich farmer and slave holder. He is buried in a private 
burying ground in Somersfe'- County, New Jersey. 

Henry Stites 
Benjamin Stites 

IV. •■iCLIAM STITES JR. (1710 - 1810) 

Is buried at Mt. Bethel, Somerset Co., New Jersey, 

John Stites 
Richard Stites' 
Hezekiah Stites 
Rebecca Stites 
Elijah Stites 
Benjamin Stites 



'"' 3 baa i'»>j ;> Ji 

■stf .btiBlts: 

. iMU-il-i 

ha9 Mli )o 



<xi oei-ji 



bnaoni 



T»h 






V, WILLIAM STITSS (1750 - 1778) 

In 1774, George, Isaac, and William Stites^ with their families 
iinmigratea to this country from England. William lived at Newton, 
Sussex CoTinty, N.J,, until the breaking out of the Revolutionary War 
up to the Battle Princeton, January 3, 1778, when he was mortally 
wou'ided, and being reiaoved to Paulus Hook, died. His family consis- 
'v-^d of a wife and five children, three sons and two daughters. 

George Stites: 

George reared a log cabin to shelter his family and with no 
other surroundings than the red ittan of the forest, lived a number 
of years as civilization worked its way into that section of the 
country. Log homes were built to relieve the Stites' ccibin from its 
loneliness and the village thus brought into existence was called 
"Stites Settle", and which as time wore on and the population in- 
creased was named Lebanon, Pa. 

Isaac Stites: 

It is supposed that Isaac settled in southern New Jersey. About 
the time of the outbreak to the Revolutionary War all trace was lost 
of Isaac. 

VI. WILLIAM STITES (1777 - 1865) 

Made and sold all kinds of fish nets and fishing tackle. He 
lived in Phillipsburg, W.J. and is buried in Easton, Pa. Married to 
Sarah Rush, descendent of Benjamin Rush, M. D., signer of the Dec- 
laration of Independence. William married her at the age of 24, she 
being 15. The frxiits of this marriage were thirteen (13) children, 
five sons and eight daughters. In the year 1831 they moved to Phil- 
lipsburg, and lived happily together giving their children a lixsaral 

■i. ■ : ... 

education, considerincr the circumstandes of t>>^ ti:r.3S. Williair. v/as 



Oft asv ell .bflAlpoS n 



•L w*N 



(0.1 



1 ^:tn»H 



or 



•«^i^t tUmAttif»6 



V. WILLIAM STITES (1750 - 1778) 

In 1774, George f Isaac, and William Stites, with their families 
iisffliigratea to this country from England. William lived at Newton, 
Sussex County, N,J., until the breaking out of the Revolutionary War 
up to the Battle Princeton, January 3, 1778, when he was mortally 
wouvded, and being removed to Paulus Hook, died. His family consis- 
Vad of a wife and five children, three sons and two daughters. 

George Stites: 

George reared a log cabin to shelter his fami3.y and with no 
other surroxandings than the red man of the forest, lived a number 
of years as civilization worked its way into that section of the 
country. Log homes were built to relieve the Stites' cabin from its 
loneliness and the village thus brought into existence was called 
"Stites Settle", and which as time wore on and the population in- 
creased was named Lebanon, Pa. 

Isaac Stites: 

It is supposed that Isaac settled in southern New Jersey. About 
the time of the outbreak to the Revolutionazr/ War all trace was lost 
of Isaac. 

VI. WILLIAM STITES (1777 - 1865) 

Made and sold all kinds of fish nets and fishing tackle. He 
lived in Phillipsburg, N.J. and is buried in Easton, Pa. Married to 
Sarah Rush, descendent of Benjamin Rush, M. D., signer of the Dec- 
laration of Independence. William married her at the age of 24, she 
being IS. The fruits of this masrriage were thirteen (13) children, 
five sons and eight daughters. In the year 1831 they moved to Phil- 
lipsburg, and lived happily together giving their children a liberal 

■J. • : . ., 

education, considerincr the circumstandes of th** tir.es. William was 



tiMi mX ham .T^V «r 



'A ^mU 



■ ■■ M- 



X ato 






%tlm$fn 



called to his final account in 1865 at the old age of 88 years, 2 
months, and 5 days old. He left his widow in comfortable circum- 
stances. The old lady then made her home with her daughter, Mrs. 
Edvmrd Lamb. 

VII. GEORGE STITES (September 16, 1820 - April 22, 1887) 

Architect and Building Contractor. In 1860 he immigrated with 
his family by ox team from Phillopsbtarg, N.J. to Rockford, Illinois. 
Designed and built several buildings and churches in the Rockford 
area. Of the few of his buildings still standing is the Argule Church 
constructed in 1877. The fruits of his marriage were twelve (12) 
children. He lived comfortably for his time and deid on April 22, 
1887 at the Age of 67. George is buried in Cederbluff Cenetary in 
Rockford, Illinois. 

Samuel Stites (1816 - 1882) 

Physician. Dr. Samuel Stites was married twice. His first wife 
was Ann Doufert of Womelsdorf, a.? to them were bom 2 sons and 2 
daughters. William Stites of Richfield, Pa., and Mrs. Sallie Gil- 

\,A To them were born 
Lydia and Clara, 

Dr. Harry, Dr. George, and Albert. Samuel Stites was born in North- 
hampton County, Pa., June 23, 1816. He chose as his life work the 
medical profession, and graduated from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1850 suid located in Fisherville, Douphin County, Pa., where 
he practised until the year 1857, when he moved to Miller sto«m. Perry 
County, Pa. While in Dauphin County he took an active interest in 
the State Militia, being elected lieutenant Colonel of his Regiment. 




aqA - 0S8X »»! 
OdBl al .lOlo . bos it>«^lria:xA 

.L.M ,pwvd»qeXXJtitS[ ma) MBAi aav xH yX-UkI slif 
bos •Volftliiyd larxmrmm Sllai bos AMnpla^G 

o^l'xsMi mill lo Ktlirxr "ttl ol teiea^i^aaoc 

xo£> bmi •■i;^ aid :KOt x'^I*^^bo^«k>» tevll rtl .aa^i^XJUfo 

' nuldMbmO ul bmlratd ml •v«o^ .t» to a^A mL> ^« V88i 

.aittslIXX «»xoS4do» 
(£UX - titX) MJlit XmmM 
^ Mdf aaJlJt Xaaoat .vQ .aaJLolaY^ 
i OS «.M .t^oftaXagaO to ivaSoaa aaA aav 
,M*litf»M to a*ilit amniMH .avftMimt 



bra fl ^oJtrU a«i aoAv to » ^antUh (OX) oa:^ 



flw ••llJl XaoHM .tJmilA tea ««i«w9 .va «Tn» '"xc 

li al4 aa aeMto M .U01 «Ct M«lb %am «f»«BoO oo^^Mtf 

':»Xa^avii0 MM am!) toiaataif toa >tl— atrag Xaoifcaoi 

^•liJ%»a<ajW d tatfaoAl Im MtX al aioav 

•tf flMlir «rMX mt «C ll^av toai^oaiq Ad 

(pni •! alldV .aff ,t^iwoo 

A fstotf «ai5lXill a^B;fa mH 



When the Civil War broke out, bsing beyond the age of military ^.uty, 
he nevertheless entered the army of the north as a contract or act- 
ing surgeon, and after the war was elected coroner of Perry Count^/, 
and at the time of his death in 1882, was serving in that office, av 
the age of almost 66 years. 

Martha (Margaret) Stites (Dec. 13, 1823 - Nov. 3, 1893) 
Lewis Stites 
Isaac Stites 
Rosetta (Lamb) Stites 
Catherine Stites 

Anna Maria (Lewis - Phillipsburg, N*J.) Stites 
a Sarah Ellen Stites (July 20, 1858 - Oct. 1914) 
Harriet Stites (Sept. 16, 1856 ~ April 4, 1858) 
William Stites 
Ellen Stites 
Valeria Stites 

VIII. SAMUEL TILDEN STITES (Sept. 10, 1866 - Dec. 1943) 

Inventor- Plant superentindent for Bur sens Knitting. Married 

to Henrietta (Nettie) Blakesiy, Nov. 17, 1892. Took out (29) patents 

on knitting machines, in his company's name. Prom his patents he 

maintaind a comfortable income up until the time of his death. He 

had six children. 

Rebecca Stites? (June 23, 1849 - 1913) Died at Sunberry, Pa. 

Married to Peter J. Hower, September 29, 1870. 

Anna Maria: (Feb. 10, 1846 - Nov. 22, 1907). Died an Sat. Nov. 

22, 1907 at Sparta, Wisconsin. Married to Edward E. Sage, Jan. 2, 1871, 



39. 



William Farrel (Darxsel) Stitess (Sept. 12, 1844 - July 1916), 
Died at Siou2£ Palls, South Dakota, Married to Helen Howard , Sept, 
10, 1868. Was in Ford's Theater the night of the assassination of 
President LincoJji. 

Mary Martha (Mollie) Stitesi (Feb. 5r 1848 - May 10^ 1915). 
Died Monday May 10, 1915 at Rockford, 111, Married to Luther Wool- 
sey, 1870, 

Rosetta (Rose) Stitas: (Mar. 3, 1861). Married to Malcom Love 
September 13, 1883, 

Sadie Stites: (1858 - 1914) 

Joshua Stites: (Feb. 2, 1851 - Nov. 23, 1883) 

Carrie Stites: (1862 - 1940) 

Alice Stites: (Aug. 29, 1864). Married to Dr. Hohn S. Yar- 
ling, July 5, 1900. 

Lillian Stites: (Nov, 5, 1868). Married to Charles C. Day, 
December (about 1904) , date lost« 

George Stites: (Oct. 4, 1854 •- Dec. 23, 1857) 
IX, SAt^DEL TILDBN STITSS (1900 - ?; 

Chief clerk at Railroad Express. Married to Vera Muidoon. 
Lived in Chicago during the roaring tv/enties. Returned to Rockford 
to work for the R. R. Express in 1929, eventually attaining the po- 
sition of Chief Clerk before his retirement. 

Clair Stites (1893 - 1962) . Worked as a machinist in Rockford. 

George Stites: Moved to California in 1943. 

Raymond Stites; Moved to California, worked for the Aircraft 
industry. 



.OOtX ,?. t'ni-T 
IJ 

.a mdS lot ;l-xovt- 
OS bmvtM tmmSkS^ •pxo»a 



Arthur Stites: (1893 - 1962). Worked as machinist at Rockford. 
Martha Stites: Married a number of times, no chifldren. Lives 
in California. 

X. lAWREHCE STITES (June 3, 1927 - % 

Business owner. Meurried March 25, 1949 to Joan Bolander. Had 
four sons. Owns emd operates his own Jamitor Contracting Service. 

Beamard Stites: (1921 - ) 

Realestate Salesmen. Was a temk comander iinder Gereral Patton 
diiring World War II. Placed in combat two days after D-Day. Did 
not leave the front until V-E Day. Married Mary Lou Bacon, had two 
children. Lives in Cleveland. 

Deloris Stites: Married Eugene Dickenson. 

XI. K^RR STITES ; (June 3, 1951 - ) 
John Stites: (March 11, 1954 - ) 
Tim Stites: (June 29, 1959 -• ) 
Chip Stites: (May 4, 1964 - ) 






1311 ■ -iC 




9- ^ rtniSomxiaoO "xoSUulL mto mid ••Jsasf 

t • Ittl> tMtfUt 

bia .Ysa-<i tiailft tf* ov^ ^s^b* ■! iaaaif .Zt 

'\fi bail ,noo<tf ooJ YUM iaJtSMH •!■■ S^ lUfli 

• ini «c MMU tMBSJMI •" 

C • Mil .11 mmm tM#AM AM 
( • Mix tit MMU tM^tM 



STOECKLINV FRANCES MARYEV 1955- 



.EASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
RAMI LX HISTORY 

•ar Contributor to the Hock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
lerican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
;w mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
;ce5S to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ■ ***A;':5V5',-A>VAA*AV.-,';-.Vyr:V5Vyr*A-.V;V;V;V;': 

* OFFICE USE CODE 

I. Your name ■jptvn-'c ?■ -mn-^nvT tt.t * 

Date of form j-^Y 5 IQ?^ ^^ '' ' 

7. Your college: Rock Valle y f-ol lege ■•• (ID H ) 

Rockford, 11 1 "inms - 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 I 800- 1 850 

!r~l 850- 1900 X 1900 or later 



Please check all regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) Middle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N.J., Va.) 

South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , K^4 

West South Central (Ark., N.M., Tex., Ok.) X East North Central (Mich., Ohio, srd.) 



Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 

5. Please check all occupational categories in which members of your family v/hom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

v Farming X Mining Shopkeeping or small business 



Transportation Big Business X Manufacturing 



X Professions Xy Industrial labor _X ^Other 

6. Please check all religious groups to which m.embers of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

,; Roman Catholic Jewish ^Presbyterian _r Methodist 

Baptist Episcopalian Congregational X Lutheran 
^0_uaker Mormon Other Protestant ^Other 

7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians Mexicans ^Puerto Ricans 

Jews Central Europeans Italians ^Slavs 



Irish British X Native Americans over several generations 



> 



East Asian x Other 

What sources did you use in coiTipiling your family history? 

X lnterviev;s with other Family Bibles Family Genealogies 

f ami ly members 
X Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 



X Photographs X Maps X ^Other 



<i 



i} 



I, FAMILY DATA 

~ A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name LZLAaKj VICTOR 3T0ECKLIN Current Residence 

' r If dead, date of death 7/26/1960 ^~ 

Place^of birth ALHAI.3R A , I LLI MO I S Date of Birth [JAY 6.lO0l\- 



Education (number of years): 
grade school X high school 3 YR3. vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 192^^-' 

1st RAILROAD Dates 1920-1924 I stRQCKFORD. ILLUIOIS D ates iQ?^^ 

2nd IiiDU3?r.IAL(lIAT*L LOCK) Dates 192^-1926 2nd ST. LOUIS. MISSOURI D ates iq?^ 

3r d INDUSTRIAL (FORD r:OTOR) Dates 1926 3rd ROCKFORD. ILLINOIS D atesi Qg? 

Z,thFOREr.iAN(BURD PISTOrO Dates 192? AIID ON Ijth Dates 



Re I i g i on 


BAPTIST 


N0N2 




Pol itical 


parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 




NON'E 






Place of 
ktriTc . 1 ( 


Marriage to your grandmothc." T-i'^Tirvr -■-!--• TTT-rtr^-rr. 


^>- r.nnt't^o 


— "'" 5/2Q/1.926., 



\ that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

B, Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name HELEN(r-ALLICOAT) ST05CKLIN Current Residence ROCKFORD. ILLINOIS 
I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth YIRuINIA, ILLINOI S Date of bi rth .SEPTEI-IBER27. 1907 

Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high school NITJTH GRA Dfocat ional college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 1923- 

Ist CLEANS HOrSS DateJ .91B TO N Oj'fet ROCkFORD, ILLINOIS D ates N'Q., 

2nd Dates 2nd ^Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Dates 



Hth Dates '♦th ^Dates_ 

Rel i gion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. NONE 

NONE 

Place of marriage to your grandfather BELVIDEKii, il,Ll:iUio DATE^ 5/20/19 26" 
w^*„. 1,- . ■ ■■.■■ 9 — -^ 



Note: If 



ih^ni:.aHP.n'h^^Ba£i'S?^t(f§ pai^^^A-^)! stepmother or ano 



ther relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

N.inK? > - - Current Residence 

I f dead, date of* death 

Place of birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
ist Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


i»th 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates 

^ith Dates ^th Dates 



Re I i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother date 

A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name - f. ■ - Current Res idence g| 



I f dead, date of deatll 



Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): | 

grade school high school vocational col lege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Ist ^Dates 1st ^Date 

2nd ^Dates 2nd ^Dates 

3rd ^Dates 3rd ^Dates 

Re 1 i g i on \ 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



i 



3. 
Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name REUBEN V/ALLACE GUSTAVI30N Current Residence .-,„p,,-nn"n tttt-ot- 
I f dead, date of death 

\ice of birth cARENGO.ILLIrlQI'-^ ^^^^ °^ birth JUr:E'l.l8Q7 

toucation (number of years): 
grade school x high school 8th GRAES/^cat ional college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st CREAi.IERY D ates l9l3-I9l6 lst ROCKFORD, ILLIiJQIS D ates ipi^nK 

, same 
2nd TMnU3TRIAL(J.L. GL-AJ^KE) D ates l92l- yr.2 nd Dates 

3rd INDU3TRIAL(GREEIiLEE) D ates 1921-l95Q3 rd D ates 

^th TrTnUSTRTAL(FAHL2R) Dates 1950-1972^ th ^Dates 

Religion LUTHER AM 

Political parties, evil or social clubs, fraternities, etc, mpitj 7- 



^, . .IQKE ^ 

Place of marriage to your grandmother ,-,pp pr^r TTTTROI" aate 

Note: If your mother was raised by a tttljp f a n igf' O r Jnoi f ie^ r r K i ar l VH ( t O ag e l8)^"0Vt 16,191 
give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name FRANCES (BURllAj}} GU3TAVIS0N C urrent Residence 

\^ dead, date of death SEFTEISERg 21 1 q<i 

.'lace of bi rth v^^.|,| j -j +v,nar^i a ^Oate of birth Aup:ust 1^. 1901 

Education ( n umber of years) 
grade school ^-^ high school '^'^^ '"""A/cfeat ional college 



jOccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

i (after leaving home) 

hst ,.^,.,.-., :..p^^o ^Dates 1st RQGKFORD. ILLINOIS D ates 1917 

:2nd IinPUGTRIAL (NAt'l LOCIO ^tes ^Znd " D ates ^9lS 

brd FREE SSVOiNG nACKINE CO Dates 3rd " " Dates ^9^2 



Religion ROT :AN GATHtDLIC 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. NONE 



Mace of marriage to your grandfather ^;nr, •pn'?n T T TTTJOT ; ' ^^^^ „\^^* ^^ ' ^^22 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmotner or another relative (to age 18) 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



i» 



C-l Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 

Name .'Oli ■ Current Residence 



If dead, date of death 



I'l.itc <)( hiilh I). lie of liiill 

FdllC.llioti (iniiiil)i' t (i\ /r.ii.j 

H r.iile '.( hoo I h i I 

Occupat ion (s) 

Is I 

2nd 

3rd 



choo 1 


vocat 


it)nii 


PLACE 
(after 


OF 

1 


CO 

RESID 
caving 


llrqe 


Dates 


1st 


ENCE 
home) 
Dates 


Dates 


2nd 
3rd 
'4th 












Dates 


Dates 


Dates 
Dates 


Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political part ies , c^i vi 1 or soci al ^clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother datt 



D-2 S tepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name •:Q;y3 Current Residence 

I f dead , date tjf death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



¥ 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd 
3rd 
Re 1 i g i on 


Dates 2nd 
Dates 3rd 




Dates 
Dates_ 




Pol i tica1 


party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 












Place of 


marriage to your grandfather 


Date 















i 



CmtDREN of A 6 B (or A- 1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below '*' 

Nam e I^^LAMD STOECKLIN , JR . _ 

Place of birth - -0^-^^' "::" , ILLI^'Ci J ^^^^ 3;rp.l^. 12, 1926 

Number of years ol' schooling ^^ Y-A:': — Occ upat i on -^---^ AID TU IDE2 

Residence Mari talTTatus 

7 Number of ch i Idren — • ■ — 

Name^ 

Place of bi rth gj^g 

Number of years of schooling Occupation " 

Residence . M ari taTTtltus 

Number of children ' 



Name 

Place of bi rth — ^^^^ 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

S^'u^^"". ■■L-r-r. Marital s'tatus ' 

Number of c h i Idren 



Name 

Place of' bi rth ~~~"date 

Number of years ot schooling dccupTTT^ 

^^^'<i^^ce H arlt;.rTf.f,.c 

Number of chi Idren — 



Name 

Place of bi rth ^^^^ 

Number of years ot schooHng OccuFiTiOn" 

Residence — — — 



Number of chi Idren 



itatus 



' Name 

P'^^g Of birth — -T ate 

Numoer of years or schooling flccupTtTST 

g^^'^^"^^ ,.., Maritaf Status " 

Number of chi Idren " 



Name 

Place of bi rth "~ ■ ^^^g 

Number of years of schooling Occu^^tT^ 

S^^'^^^^i MaritalTTatus 

Number of chi Idren — ^ 



Name 

Place of bi rth '- "date 

Number of years of schooling g'ccupItT^ 

Residence MariTal Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth ^^^^ 

Number of years of schooling Occup:^tT^ 

Residence Mar i ta iTTatus 

Number of chi Idren ' 



kName 

'Place of birth ^^^^ 

Residence ^^^^^"^ '^cnool , ng ' -- QccupaTi^ 
Number of L l ll I drt^n ■ ^"arital Sta^Ui 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C- 1 , D-l)-your mother's name should appear below 
I. N.iin.' > C-TO^aA EIAII.'P. CnjSI'AVI^^Of^ 'iPOV.IJCC CRCS ^LAIID 

f\'«''- or \,\,\\, ::oci.?g:vD. illiiiqij u.ui- ^ept. ?. .. iq?? 

NiiiiiIxT 1)1 yr.ir •. fjf school i tu) 1^ Y'JA";/} Occupal ion jEC^-i _ 'A ! 1' 

Residence lAVilAZ CITY,~;.G. Marital Status I'ARRII:.D 

Number of ch I Idren D 



2. Name R2UP;^"!TA ^^2:153 GU3TAVIS0N STOUCIILIN 

Place of hi rth i.CC.IOAD, I.LLIfiOI3 date ;;0V. gB, 1928 

Number of years of schooling 13 YloAir-J Occupation FOriZI.'A?! 

Residence ;:CC.'rC D, IlliiiClJ MariTaT Status Jb'vUKCED 
Number of ch i Idren 3 

3. Natne JZAIJIIIE;: ADl^LL^ 3U3TAVI30N "■■:013VM\ 

Place of birth :C(J.^vUKij,lJ.i.li;Ci3 ~ date JULY 15, 1932 

Number of years of schooling Ic Yi^Ai'.J 5'ccupation . CD\3I. 

Residence l:VA::3TC;:, Ili.ii.Ui ■; Marital Status . .AiliU-^L. 



Number of children 



Number of ch i Tdren 



Number of ch i Idren 



A. Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schoo 1 I ng Occupation 

Res i dence Mar i ta 1 ^Status 

Number of ch i 1 dren 

5. Name 

P lace of birth """" date 



Number of years of schooling Occupat ion 

Residence Mar i tal Status 

Number of ch i 1 dren '~~~"'~~ 



6. Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 



7. Name 

P lace of birth date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of ch i 1 dren '~~~~ 

8. Name 

P 1 ace of b i rtfi ^date 



Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Mari tal Status ' 

Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

Place of birth ~ ' ' ~" ~ date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of ch i Idren 



(0. Name 

Place of birth "" date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation" 

Residence Marital Status ' 



bur Father 



' 'yead, date or death r -j^; \ p, _ 1 q? ^ 

■J ace of birth RQCrFORi:. ILLIHOT.'^ 
ducat ion (number of years) 



Current Residence 



_Date of birth Ji^r-T- 1?- ]'^r>r. 



grade school 8 
iccupation(s) 
St U. s. NAVY 



high school 



vocational 



col lege 



„j 30DY AND FENDEl". 



Dates ic)4?_/j.q 
Dates 19^5-6? 



lst_ 
2nd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

AVAL ^^TA'^'T--:-^ Dates iQZ.?_Zj.c; 



vOCKTORE, ILLINOIS odtes 19^5-6? 



rd 



CAR 3ALS3I;Ai* 



Dates 1967-7^ 



th 



Dates 



e 1 1 g I on 



3rd ORLArODO, FLORIDA D ates l969-73 

'♦th Dates 



RO^'A^' P-VTIlOLIG 



olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. VF\; - L'AVY GT.im 
lace of marriage to your mother ROGLFORD. TLLT"OT" 



- - ■ ^. ^^^ d ate AFiTT 11. 1 Q'^"^ ' 

OTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

our Mother 

f^ RZITRRTA AGNR S GU3TAVIS0N STORGRT.TT! Current Residence JIOCIO^ORD ITTTNnTl 
) dead, date of death ' ' t\V^^^-VIW . I Mi Ii MM . t 



lace of birth R0C;:F0RD. ILLINOIS 

ducation (number of years) 

grade school 3 high school 

ccupation(s) 

St PSAT.T.^ GTTT-^T- 



Date of birth ::qv. 28. iQp3 

J4_____^ vocational col lege \ 



Dates iQZj,p 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

1st p.AT.TinA T-T.AMn, r.h-^.Tl^ Dates 



1 947»1 9L9 



nd B00KI:EEP5R 



Date5 l943 



r d V/irXiE^ 

'fthTEi:;:--: 



el igion 



Dates l9lj-2;-Z|'S 
" Datesl9^6 - 



2n d OGEANSIDE. CALIF. 
3r d RCCKFORD. TT.TTROT 



_Dates 19Zf9-51. 
Dates IQS?- 



-IC 



olitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

lace of marriage to your father 
I f you were rais( 
this page (F-2). 



mc ,f -.CG/.F G'R. ILLIRCI^ date APRIL 11, IQ^I 

uit: ir you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the oack of 



E-1 Stepfather 



Name '.'C".: 

If dead,- date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (5) 
)st 

2nd 

3rd 



iith 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd 
_3rd_ 
Ath 



Date of bi rth 



vocat iona 1 



col lege 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Re 1 ig ion 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



Date 



F-2 Stepmother 



Name 



1:01::: 



If dead, date of death 



Place of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Date of bi rth 



vocat ional 



col lege 



Occupat ion (s) 

Ist Dates 


1st 




PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 


Dates 


2nd Dates 
3rd Dates 


2nd 
3rd 
soror i t ies , 


etc. 




Dates 
Dates 


Re 1 i g i on 


Kolitical party, civil or social clubs. 








Place of marriage to your father 






date 















CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



'iame 



^lace^r^irth ::oG::FO;:.. IILIIjOIo Date of birth JULY 16, I954 

dumber of years of school ing CUriREIIT - l^th Y~Ar! Occupation J'lUD^M'x' 

' ydence ^QniFQi^D. TTLIKQI3 Marital Status Slil'JIJ: 

her of cni Idren p — 



Jame FnANCEG IJARYS STO'CCKII?; 

'lace ot birth r-,ncyYDY:U. "L LIi: CT - Date of birth ■ --. 1 ;, .qck 

lumber of years 't^V^^ Tn ^ ct j Mfep - llth YEAR 0ccupati5?r^Trte^7^-^^ 

^^ ^ ' ^^" ^^ r^nni.FnRfi. TTTJimiS Marital STTt u s .1 N GT!! 

lumber of children ■ ■ - 

e 

lame 

'■_ . ' "^■l^^''^.i TTT.Ti nr; ^Date of b __^_ 

Occupation oTUDEfi'I 



,, i :!jI i L1.1 ,"~ L01jIojJi ..lUlJ.iu . i \:ll l . 

lace of birth ^nni:TY^T;r) , TTT,Ti:nT - ^Date of birth pEC. ?.?. IQ'^? 

lumber of years of schooling GU;\?.E:!C - 3th YETTI" Occupation iTUDENT 



les i dence ~ Marital Status 

lumber of chi Idren 



''ace of birth — p^g of birth 

lumber of years of school ing Occupation' 

■es i den ce Marital Status " 

lumber of chi Idren ' '~' " ~~ 



lame 

'lace of birth ^ T lte of birth 

lumber of years of schooling Occupation 

^es] dence _~~~~ Marital Status ' 



lumber of chi Idren 

lane 

'lace of birth g^te of birth 

lumber of years of schooling Occupation" 

lesidence__^__^ ^Marital Status " 

lumber of ch 1 Idren ' "~~ 



ame 

laceTf birth " Date of birth 

umber of years of school ing Occupation 

"''^e"ce_^ ^ Marital StatliT 

umber of chi I dren 

ame 

lace of birth Date of birth 

umber of years ot' schooling Occupation 

^s i dence Marital Status ~~~~ 

umber of children 



Jil. ASSIGMMtNT 0^ LITERARY PIGflTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights/ to the Rock Valley Col lege" Family History Collection, deposited in the 
. Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

^ sicned ^oMou rAJUM JdxA. ■ 

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PAGE 1 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 
HELEN LOUISE MALLICOAT 

Interview Witht 



LELAND VICTOR STOECKLIN 

Letters Sent Toj 



A) Helen Stoecklin (herself) 
5^3^ Dale Avenue 
Loves Park, Illinois 

A) Delores Harris (sister) 
Box 153 

Alhambra, Illinois 

B) Roland Stoecklin (brother) 
Alhambra, Illinois 

C) Vernon Stoecklin (brother) 
707 Washington Street 
Highland, Illinois 

D) Marion Stoecklin (brother) 
1625 Zurich Drive 
Florissant, Missouri 

E) Darlene Zude (niece) 
1033 St. Louis Street 
Edwardsville, Illinois 

F) Otis Stoecklin (brother) 
Alhambra, Illinois 

G) Ealalia Hotz 

County Clerk — Madison County 
Edwardsville, Illinois 



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PAGE 2 



HELEN anci LELAND STOECKLIN 

Interview withi 



Letter Sent Tot 



LELAND STOECKLIN, JR. 

Interview Withi 



FRANCES JULIA EURMAN 

Letter Sent Tot 



Interview Withs 






A) Helen Stoecklin (wife) 
5434 Dale Avenue 
Loves Park, Illinois 

B) Reuberta Stoecklin (daughter-in 

law) 
2009 Brownfield Road 

Rockford, Illinois 

A) Otis Stoecklin (brother-in-law) 

Alhambra, Illinois 



A) Helen Stoecklin (mother) 
5^3^ Dale Avenue 

Loves Park, Illinois 

B) Reuberta Stoecklin (wife) 
2009 Brownfield Road 
RockTord, Illinois 

A) Dory Cattaneo (cousin) 
2806-6th street 
Peru, Illinois 

B) Jeannien Grossman (daughter) 
9^20 Springfield 
Evanston, Illinois 

A) Reuben Gustavison (husband) 
lll'^-l'+th street 
Rockford, Illinois 



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REUBEN WALLACE GUSTAF30N 

Interview vVith; 



FRANCES and REUBEN GUST AVI SON 

Interview With: 



Letter Sent Toi 



PAGE 3 

A) Reuben Gustavison (himself) 
1114-l^th street 
Rockford, Illinois 

A) Reuben Gustavison (husband) 
lllil-litth street 
Rockford, Illinois 

B) Reuberta Stoecklin (daughter) 
2009 Brownfield Road 
Rockford, Illinois 

C) Gloria Grossland (daughter) 
Kansas City, Missouri 

A) Jeannien Grossman 
9^20 Springfield 
Evanston, Illinois 



REUBERTA AGNES GUSTAVISON 

Interview With: 



Letter Sent Toi 



A) Reuberta Stoecklin (herself) 
2009 brownfield Road 
Rockford, Illinois 

B) Reuben Gustavison (father) 
Ill4-I4th street 
Rockford, Illinois 

C) Gloria Grossland (sister) 
Kansas City, Missouri 

A) Jeannien Grossman (sister) 

9^20 Springfield 
Bvanston, Illinois 



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PAGE ^ 



REUBERTA and LELAND STOECKLIN 

Interview With: 



FRANCES MARYE STOECKLIN 

Interview With* 



A) Reuberta Stoecklin (wife) 
2009 Brownfield Road 
Rockford, Illinois 

B) Reuben Gustavison (father) 
llli»-l^th street 
Rockford, Illinois 

C) Helen Stoecklin (mother-in-law) 
5^3^ Dale Avenue 

Loves Park, Illinois 

A) Frances Stoecklin (herself) 
2009 Brownfield Road 
Rockford, Illinois 



ALSO, DOCUMENTS SUCH AS IIRTH CERTIFICATES, MARRIAGE 
CERTIFICATES, DISCHARGE PAPERS, DIVORCE PAPERS, DEATH 
CERTIFICATES, AND CITIZENSHIP PAPERS WERE USED. 



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BIRTH 
MAY 6,190^1 
JULY 5,1905 
SEPT. 21,1906 
AUG. 1,1908 
SEPT. 27,191^ 
DEC. 5, 1916 

I9I8 
JULY 23,1920 
JULY 18,1923 
MAY 12, 1928 



STOECKLIN 
FAMILY OF 
EDWARD R. STOECKLIN 
MARY LANGE 
CHILDREN 

1 , Leland 

2. Otis 

3. Newton 

4, Richard 

5. Vernon 

6, Edward "Shooter" 
7 1 Leonard 

8, Marion 

9. Roland 
1(D, Delores 



PAGE 5 



DEATH 
JULY 26,1960 

MAY 8,1970 



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'j^ PAGS^ 6 

1. LELAND born May 6,190^^-; riarried May 20,1925 to HELEN 

LOUISE MALLICOAT one child Leland, Jr. 
A. LELAND STOECKLIN, JR. born September 12,192$; married 

REUBERTA AGNES GUSTAVISON April 11,1953. Leland deceased 
May 18,1973. Three children. Tim, Frances, and Ellyn. 

a, Timothy Robert Stoecklin;born July 16,1954 

b, Frances Marye Stoecklinjborn December 1^,1955 

c, Ellyn Louise Stoecklin; born December 23,1957 

2. OTIS born July 5,1905, unmarried? residing in Alhambra, Illinois 

3. NEV/TON ^3orn September2l,l906; married June 21,1930 to ELSIE 
KATHERINE WILLE-born July 30, 1903; deceased December 8,1955; 
two children, Donald andDDarleen. Married August 20,1963 

to to DOROTHY EICHMAN-born July 15,1924. No children. 

A. DONALD NEWTON STOECKLIN- born September 3,1931. Married 
April 27,1957 to RUTH ANN HAYES, born July 10,1939. 
Five children- Donna Jeff, Scott, Pamela, Amy. 

a. Donna Katherine Stoecklin-born S^tember 14,1957 
(a twin to Donna was stillborn) 

b. Jeff Allen Stoecklin- born June 12,1962 

c. Scott Dee- born December 28,1963 

d. Pamela Sue- born January 27,1968 

e. Amy Lynn- born January 17,1970 

B. DARLENE JUNE (STOECKLIN) SUDE-bom June 22, 1 938; married 
June 18,1966 to HAROLD WILLIAM XUDE-born May 25, 1937; two 
children- Craig and Todd 

a. Craig William Zude- born January 27,1971 

b. Todd Andrew Zude- born February 27,1973 

n. EICHARD born August 1,1908, married to CHRISTINE WATSON ? 
V DIVORCED? one son Richard, Jr. Remarried? two sons 



9 



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PAGE 7 

5. VERNON born Septeinber27» 191'+{ married June 13,1939 to 

DOROTHY KNABELiborn 191^; five children-Duane, Darrel 
;^ Patricia, Maryilyn, smd Dennis, 

A. DUANE STOECKLIN born 19^1 J married? ; SHIRLEY MEYER born 

19^0; four children- Maria, Michelle, Dean, and Denise 

a, Maria StoecKlin; born I966 

b, Michelle Stoeeklinj born I969 

c, Dean Stoecklinjborn 1971 

d, Denise Stoecklinjborn 1973 

B. PATRICIA (STOECKLIN)BAER born 1920; married ?;to 

ROBERT BAER, born 1920 j one child-Erick 
a, Erick Baer,born 1971 

C. MARILYN STOECKLIN- born dead 19^5 

D. DENNIS STOECKLIN- born 1955 

E. DARRELL STOECKLIN- born 19$8 

I*' 6. EDWARD "SHOOTER" STOECKLIN - born December 6,191 6, married one child 

7. LEONARD - born inl 918 {deceased one month after birth 

8. MARION - born July 23,1920; married three children 

9. ROLAND- born July 18, 1923 5 married two childrenjone child died in infanc; 
\Q. DEIORES - born May 12, 1928, married to WILLIAM HARRIS-one child 



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PAGE 8 

HELEN LOUISE MALLICOAT 

J HELEN LOUISE IlALLICOAT WAS BORN IN VIRGINIA, ILLINOIS ON 

SEPTE?.I3SR 27, 1907. HER PARENTS, EFFIE AI(D VVALi'LER, HAD FOUR 
CHILDREN - HELEN, MILE'RED, EARL AND CHRISTINE. CHTUSTINE DIED 
AT THE AGE OF SIX PRO?/f SCARLET FEVER. 

THE MALLICOAT FAMILY LIVED IN A LARGE HOUSE, A LIVING ROOM 
WITH A STOVE IN IT HEATED THE HOUSE DURING THE VOiNTER AND AND ALSO 

PROVIDED STEEPING QUARTERS IN THE WINTER BEftAUSE OF THE COLD. THERE 

WAS ALSO A KITCliEH WITH A COOK STOVE AW ONE BEDROOM D0V/N3TAIR3.,_ 

UPSTAIRS THERE v^S A BEDROCK IN 'MraCH ALL OF THE CHILDREN SLEPT. 

IN THE BACK YARD WAS A ;VELL FOR DRINKING AND AN OUTHOUSE. HELEN'S 

FATPER OV/NED TW HORSES AND HER MOTHER OWNED A COW. FROM THE COW 

THE FAI^ILY RECEIVED THEIR MILK, CREAK AND CHEESE. 

VIRGINIA, ILLINOIS IS LOCATED BETWEEN SPRINGFIELD AT© BEARDSTOWT^, 

ILLINOIS. THE POPULATION OF VIRGINIA WAS LESS THAT^ 1,000 PEOPLE. 

y EVERYONE KNEW THEIR NEIGHBORS km TOWNSFOLK. THERE WERE FOUR 

r 

CHURCHES AND JUST ONE SCHOOL FOR BOTH ELEffiENTARY AND SECONDARV 
GRADES. THE TOWN WAS LAID OUT IN A SQUARE. THE COURTHOUSE WAS IN 
THE CENTER. STORES SUCH AS HARDWARE, DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES WERE 
AROUND THE COURTHOUSE AT© AROUND THE STORES WERE HOUSES. 

»THE FAraLY WAS METHODIST. SUNDAY SCHOOL ^ND CHURCH WERE 
ATTErroED REGULARLY. 
I „, HELEN'S PARENTS BELIEVED STRONGLY IN PHYSICAL DISCIPLINE | SUCH 
AS SPAI-IKING AT® USING THE BUGGY iVHIP. PARENTS DISCIPLINED REGULARLY - 
THE CHILDREN COULD STATE THEIR VIEWPOINTS A3 TO mo WAS ON THE 
• IGHT SIDE. HELEN REIvIEI-iBERS ONE TIME HER FATHER CAUGHT HER 
-ALKING TO A BOY AND v.liEN SHE RETURNED HO^!E Sh'E WAS HORSE ^VHIPPED. 

J 



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2»iI£jaH ._. ...0 WA OKA OKUWIflO HOT JJSVi A SAW OHAY XOAfl HHT KI 

WOO sr^r^ 'thftt .woo a cewo aEiiTr/," f~- u/TA -::rj^QH o\tt chjtwo jhhta^ 
.aaasmo •ni'A -^ _ j.___/i yjima^ sir: 

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PAGE 9 

HOLIDAYS ^^ERli: ALV/AYo SFEIIT AT HOME i/ITH THE FAKILY. THii; 
FAraLY ALSO ATTEI^ED THE STATS FAIRS IN SPraNGFIELD, ILLINOIS, 
> CARNIVALS Ar© '.VENT ON PICNICS. FRIENDS AliD NEIGHBORS GOT TOGETH-ER 
TO PLAY BASEBALL. ON SATURDAY NIGHT, ONCE A MONTH, HELEN'S FATHER 
WOULD GO DOVWTOV/Is TO BUY CHEESE AND CRACKERS AND BRING TliEI-I HOME 
FOR A FAIIILY TREAT. THERE WAS NO TELEVISION OR RADIO IN THE 
MALLICOAT HOUSEHOLD, BUT THEY OWNED A VICTROLA WiilCH PROVIDED 
FAirjLY EfiTERT AI rff.ffiNT . 

HELEN ATTENDED SCHOOL AND FINISHED THE NINTH GRADE. VARIOUS 
GAT'TES WERE PLAYED AT SCHOOL SUCH A3 HOP-SCOTCH, SKIP ROPE AW TAG. 
HELEN STUDIED ARITHr4ETIC, GEOGRAPHY, HISTORY AND SPELLING IN SCHOOL. 
THE ELSr^rNTARY GRADES »VSRE ALL IN THE SAT.IE ROOM VftilLS SECONDARY 
GRADES WERE UPSTAIRS. 

HELEN BEGAN WORKING IN I9I8 AT THE AGE OF ELEVEN. SHE GOOJCED 
AI© CLEArfSD HOUSE FOR MRS. SKYLES, A NEl-'-IOR. SHE EARNED FOUR 
. DOLLARS A WEEK. SHE USED HALF OF THE MONEY FOR HERSELF Af© GAVE 
THE REST TO HER MOTHER TO HELP VCETH THE FAIIILY INCOME. 

IN 1923 HELEN MALLICOAT LEFT HOKE AND CAME TO ROCICFORD, ILLINOIS. 
SHE WAOTED TO GST AWAY FROK HOI-IE. IN ROCKFORD SHE CLEANED A 
WOMAN'S HOME ANT) TOOK CARE OF HER CHILDREN WHICH EARNED HER FOUR 
DOLLARS A WEEK PLUS ROOM AM) BOARD. IN 192^ HELEN SUFFERED AN 
ATTACK OF KPPENDICITIS AND V/ENT TO THE HOSPITAL. SHE HAD AN 
APPEI-JDECTOI.'IY km THEREFORE DID NOT WORK FOR A v/HILS. 

THERE WAS MUCH CONFLICT IN THE MALLICOAT FATIILY IN THE YEARS 
1922 TO 1924. HER FATHER STARTED TO DRINK HEAVILY. HER MOTHER THEN 
DIVORCED HIM AND CAI»TE TO LIVE IN ROCKFORD. MILDRED, HELEN'S YOUNGER 
SISTER MOVED V/ITH HER MOTHf:R, BUT EARL STAYED IN VIRGINIA iflTH THEIR 
ATHSR. THOUGH HSR FATHER RET^ARRIED IN LATER YEARS, HSR MOTHER 



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■^ ^aiHSAMaH JHHTA^ HSH HOUOHT .H3HTA^^ 



PAGE 10 

RSKAiriED SINGLE. AFTER HELEN'S TTOTHER ArxT' 3ISTEH QWiE TO ROCKrCHD, 

iiELEN MOVED WITH THEI'l. 

HELEN MET LELAND STCSCKIIN ON A DANCE FLOOR IN BELVIDERE, 
ILLINOIS IN 1925. THEY WERE MARRIED MAY 20, I926. 



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PAGE 12 

LELAriD VICTOR 3T0EGKLIN 

LELAMD VICTOR STOECKLIN WAS BORN ON r.LA.Y 6, 1904 IN ALHAMBRA, 
ILLINOIS. LELAND WAS THE OLDEST OF TEN CHILDREN BORN TO f.-ARY AND 
EDWARD STOECKLIN. OF THE TEN CHILDREN, ONE CHILD, LEONARD, DIED 
SHORTLY AFTER BIRTH. 

THE HOFv'E IN WHICH THE FAMILY GREW UP WAS A FOUR ROOM SINGLE 
STORY FRAIvlE STRUCTURE. IT INCLUDED A KITCHEN, DINING ROOM, LIVING 
ROOr/i AND BEDROOM. OUTSIDE THERE WAS ANOTHER BUILDING THAT WAS 
GALLED A SUMPffiR KITCHEN AND WAS LATER CONVERTED INTO A BEDROOi'': 
FOR THE BOYS. IN THIS ROOM WERE TWO DOUBLE BEDS WHERE FOUR OF 
THE BOYS SLEPT IN EACH BED. THERE WAS NO INDOOR PLUr.IBING BUT 
WATER V/AS PUMPED FROM A WELL OUTSIDE THE DOOR AT© AN OUTHOUSE 

y WAS IN THE BACKYARD MIDST THE GRAPEVINES. 

r 

LELAND DIDMAfJY ODD JOBS IN HIS EARLY YEARS TO HELP SUSTAIN 
THE FAMILY. HE AND HIS BROTHERS HAD A PAPER ROUTE IN T}£E FAMILY 
FOR OVER TWENTY YEARS. THE BOYS PICKED FRUIT IK A LOCAL ORCHARD, 
DELIVERED MILK, CUT GRASS AND ALSO VJDRKED FOR THE LOCAL FARLERS 
IN THE AREA. AT THE AGE OF SIXTEEN, LELATiD WORKED ON THE RAILROAD 
LAYirrc- RAILS. HIS CHIEF HOBBIES WERE HUNTING AND FISHING. 

THERE WAS ONLY ONE GRADE SCHOOL AND THE HIGH SCHOOL IN 
I ALHAIVBRA or.TY OFFERED THREE YEARS. TO FINISH THE FOURTH YEAR 
\ND GRADUATE, YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO TO A LARGER TOWN. LELAND 
DROPPED OUT OF SCHOOL BEFORE COMPLETING THE EIGHTH GRADE, BUT 
THIS WAS NOT UNUSUAL DU'RING THOSE DAYS FOR A YOUNG MAN TO GO 
TO WORK AT AN EARLY AGE. 

THE SMALL TOWN OF AI.HAI^fflRA HAD A POPULATION OF ABOUT THRiiS 
HUNDRED FIFTY PEOPLE. IT WAS MAINLY A FARMING CO ^^V;UNITY. THERE 



SI 3?:Aq 



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MooHoaa A OTMI oaTflavwoo hstaj saw oma naHOTi^i hsnimue a naj.TAO 
■=10 Ri'cfH. aaaHw eoaa ajauoa owt anaw mooh eiht m ,2Yoa aHT hoi 

. HiaMUJ^I HOOOMI OM cAV' 3FSHT .023 HOAa MI T<iai2 EYOa aHT 
■laUOHTUO MA Ol'iA flOOQ ■ USUI A MOfR OS'IMUI 2AW H3TAV, 

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iiUTcUf. qjaH or cHAaY yjhas eih aao ykam gig gwajsj 

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IIAH ?HT HO CiailHOW GMAuiaJ .WaSTXIE ^0 aOA aHT TA.A3HA WT Vil 

..n QUA oniTHUH anaw aaiaaoH ^aiHO cIH .ejiah omiyaj 

MI J0QH02 HOIH HHT OMA J.OOH02 SGAHO aHO YJHO SAW 3HaHT 
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A 30 M(. .0 IWOT JJAM2 aHT ^ 

.AW Ti .ajqoaq yt3I3 oaHOH'jH 



PAGE 13 

WAS AM EVANGELICAL CHURCH A^iD A BAPTIST CHURCH WHICH WAS ACROSS 
THE STREET FROM THEIR KGIrlE. THE BUSINESS SECTION CONSISTED OF A 
BUTCHER SHOP, TWO GARAGES, TWO BANKS, A EI„\CKS^n:TH SHOP. ONE GRAIN 
ELEVATOR. A DAIRY OWMiD BY PEVELY DAIRY OF ST. LOUIS, MO., T«0 
BARBER SHOPS Am THREE SALOONS. IN THOSE DAYS YOU BOUGHT YOUR 
ICE CREAM, SODA, SANDWICHES, BEER AND OTHER BEVERAGES IN SALOONS. 
THERE V/ERB TWO RAILROADS THAT RAN THROUGH THE TOWf. THEY WERE 
THE TOLEDO -ST. LOUIS AND THE WESTERN RAILROADS. 

SPORTS V/BRE CENTERED AliOUI© BASEBALL IN THE SUMMERTIME AND 
BASKETBALL IN THE V/INTER, V/ITK ICE SKATING ON TKE PONDS IN THE 
WINTER AND fiVaf^UNG Ii: THEM DURING THE SWLf'ffiR. IN THE SUMKlxiR 
THE TOV/N HAD A HOMECOMING WITH A PARADE, BOOTHS, RIDES AND OTHER 
GAIrtES. THIS WAS A BIG TOWN AFFAIR WHICH LASTED FOR TV«) DAYS, 
HOLIDAYS IN A SMALL TOWN WERE USUALLY CELEBRATED ^/ITH RELAXATION. 
j) ) THE 3T0ECKLIN FAI.1ILY CELEBRATED THE FOURTH OF JULY TOGETHER AMD 
BOU(iKT THEIR OWN PIREaDRKS. ON SPECIAL HOLIDAYS, SUCH AS 
CmiSTWAS AND THANKSGIVING, ALL THE FATIILY RELATIVES TRIED TO 
GET TOGETHER, THIS WAS A FAI^IILY REUNION AT THAT Tllffi, BUT 
TRANSPORTATION WAS THE MAIN PROBLEM IN GETTING THE FAI4ILIES TOGETHER. 

THE FA?.TILY ATTEND THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH. RELIGIOUS LIFE 
WAS TAUGHT TO THE ENTIRE FAIRLY. THEY WERE GIVEN THE GOLDEN RULE 
AND BELIEVED IN THE TEN COMj^ANDMENTS . 

F^MILY BUSINESS MATTERS VflSRE TALKED OVER BETV/EEN PARENTS A?© 
30rf3. THE FAI.1ILY INCOME WAS AVEIiAGE. IT WAS JUST ENOUGH TO PAY 
ALL BILLS AND KEEP POOD ON THE TABLE. THE FAMILY WAS CLOSE-KNIT, 
^ICH WITH LOVE, VERY PROUD Am HARD IVORKING. 

THE F^V,ILY i/AS DISCIPLINED BY THEIR MOTHER, BUT THE FINAL 
UTHORITY ON OTHER THAN ROUTINE t'-ATTERS WAS THEIR FATHER. HE .VAS 



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OT a2l;!T cSVITAJan YJIIAAI aWT JJA .OHIVIOcXMAHT O^IA aA'.rofi^o 
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PAGE 1^ 

A TOUGH TOP SSARdENT AT© SULEL' WITH Mi IRON HAND, TH3Y WEK;i 
■;AISING EIGHT BOtS AND ONE GIRL AND 'frtTH A LARGE FAMILY DISCIPLIie; 
liAD $0 BE MAINTAINED . MOST OF THE FMULx CONFLICTS THAT OCCUREl! 
vv-SRE ABOUT T^iE 3AI/IE A3 AHY NORMAL FAi.tlLY GROWING UP WOULD 
EXPERIENCE. ONE OF THE BOYS BlAY THINK HE WAS DOING MORE 'rfORK 
THAN SOMEONE ELSE, WHILE ANOTHER WAS RECEIVING MORE PRIVILEGES 
THAN THE OTHERS. A FIGHT COULD BE STARTED IF ONE 0? THE BOYS 
BECAME ANGRY ENOIKJH WHICH WAS NOT UHCOMIfON AMONGST- A LARGE FAf4ILY. 
j_J)F BOYS. IT V/A3 bEST THAT AN OUTSIDER STAYED OUT OF THESE FIGHTS 
I^ RET'ISMBERED BY bfiE OF LEE'S BROTHERS, MARION. ANOTHER EXPERIENCE 
■REJ«E^BERED BY HilARION IS WHEN THEIR FATHER SET A TIME LIMIT TO BE 
HOME AND LEE OR ONE OF HIS BROTHERS CHOSE TO IGNORE IT. WHEN THEY 
ARRIVED H0T1E LATE, THEIR FATHER HAD CUT A SMALL TREE LIf-ffi AND 
PROCEEDED TO USE IT ON THE SEAT OF THEIR PANTS. THE NEXT TIME 
) THEY WENT OUT, THEY WERE DEFINITELY HOIvlE AT THE TIME THEY V'/ERE 
TOLD BY THEIR FATHER. 

THE STOECKLIN FAMILY NEVER OWffiD AN^ AUTOMOBILE OR TELEVISION. 
THEY HAD A RADIO, BUT IT REMAINS UNCLEAR AS TO WHET^ IT WAS BOUGHT. 

IN 1924, AT THE AGE OF TWENTY, LEE LEFT HOME AND CAIvIE TO 
ROCKPORD. HE WAS EI^IPLOYSD AT NATIONAL LOCK COIviPANY WITH A SALARY 
JUST LESS THAN SEVET^rTY-FIVE DOLLARS A KOIITK FOR A SIX-DAY V/ORK 
V/EEK. HE WORKED THERE FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS. IN WJM OF 1926 HE 
MARRIED HELEN MALLICOAT. LATER TliAT YEAR HE LEFT ROCKFORD AND 
WENT TO ST. LOUIS FOR E^JPLOYP^lENT . JOBS WERE VERY HARD TO GET .\S 
THESE WERE THE DEPRESSION YEARS. HE WORKED FOR THE PORD f.'X)TOR CO. 
FOR ABOUT ONE YEAR^. IN,. ^927 HE RETUJiNSD TO ROCKFORD WITH HIS WIFE 
SND SON, LELArro, JR. \iiiO WAS BORN SEPTEMBER 1926. ^^TER TWENTY -FIVE 
)YEARS working as a POREIiTAN FOR BURD PISTON RING HE RETIRED. A 
LENGTHY ILLNESS SOON FOLLOVffiD ASK) HE DIED IN JULY I96O. 



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PAGE 16 

LELAND AND HELEN STOECKLIN 

HELEN MET LELAND ON A DANCE FLOOR AND MARRIED ON MAY 20,192^ 
IN BELVIDERE, ILLINOIS. THEY RAN AWAY AND MAERIED WITHOUT 
THEIR PARENTS PERMISSION. WHEN THEIR PARENTS FOUND OUT, THEY 
DID NOT OBJECT TO THE MARRIAGE, 

THE FIRST YEAR OF THETP MARRIAGE THEY LIVED IN ST. LOUIS, 
MISSOURI. LELAND WAS EMPLOYED AT FORD MOTOR COMPANY'AS A FOREMAN. 
HELEN WORKED AS A FLOOR LADY TN A LAUNDRY. IN 1926, WHILE IN ST. 
LOUIS, THEIR ONLY CHILD, LELAND, JR. WAS BORN. THEY LIVED IN A ONE 
ROOM ROOMING HOUSE. CONDITIONS WERE DEFINITELY CROWDED. IN 192?, 
THEY MOVED TO ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS, AND LELAND WORKED FOR THE ViTA.:-.. 
HE THEN FOUND A JOB AT BURD PISTON RING AS A FOREMAN. HE WORKED THERE 
FOR TWENTY -FIVE YEARS BEFORE HE DIED. THE FAMILY LIVED WITH 
HELEN'S SISTER MILDRED ON PEARL AVENUE IN LOVES PARK, ILLINOIS WHEN 
THEY MOVED UP TO ROCKFORD. THERE WERE THREE ROOMS IN THE HOUSE 
AND CONDITIONS SUCH AS SLEEPING, EATING, AND LIVING SPACE WERE 
CROWDED. LELAND JR. ATTENDED GRAJ)E SCHOOL IN lOVES PARK. THE 
FAMILY FOUND A SMALL HOUSE ON PEARL AVENUE FOR A SHOT WHILE 
AND THEN MOVED TO THEIH PERMAPIENT RESIDENCE ON DALE AVENUE IN I^VES 
PARK, ILLINOIS. ^ 

THE HOUSE WAS A WOODEN STRUCTURE WITH A FRONT PORCH, LIVING 
ROOM, DINING ROOM, KTTtHEN, BATHROOM, AND TWO BEDROOMS, UPSTAIRS 
WAS AN attic' IN THE BACKYARD, GRAPEVINES WERE GROWN. LELAND 'S 
BROTHER, RICHARD, BOARDED WITH THE FAMILY FOR ABOUT FIVE YEARS, 
PAYING FOR THE ROOM AND BOARD AND THE WASHING AND IRONING OF HIS 
CLOTHES FOR FIVE DOLLARS A WEEK. 

THE FAMILY INCOME WAS USED FOR ThT PAYING THE BILLS SUCH AS 
THE HOUSE, 3 CAR , FOOD AND CLOTHES. 



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PAGE 17 

THE FA14ILY V/A3 ALWAYS TOGETHER ON HOLIDAYS. THE FAT-'ILY 
ATTENDED BAPTISMS, WEDDIl^&S, AT© FUNERAI.S TOGETHER. TV/0 
WEEK VACATIONS WERE. SPgNT DO'.VK IN ALHAIvBRA, ILLINOIS, THE HOME 
OF LELAFTD'S SIDE (DF THE FAI.ilLY. DURING THE SUM/iERTIivE THE 
FAIIILY WOULD GO ON PICNICS, AND ON THE FOURTH OF JULY, THE FAiVJLY 
WOULD DRIVE TO CHICAGO TO BASEBALL GABIES. LELAI® LOVED BASEBALL 
AND HIS FAVORITE TEAI^l WAS THE ST. LOUIS CARDINALS. THERE WERE 
NO FAIvIILY REUNIONS BECAUSE THE STOECKLIN FAInlLY GOT TOGETHER OFTEN. 
MANY SUNDAY DRIVES WER:^ ^SEW VISiTING FRIENDS AI€) RELA'ITVES. 

THE FIRST CAR THE FAMILY OWNED 'WAS A 1925 MODEL A FORD. THEY 
ALWAYS HAS A RADIO AND. RECORD-PLAYER, AI^ID THE FIRST TV WAS PURCHASED 
IN THE EARLY FIFTIES, 

THE FAT.HLY DID NOT ATTEfJD CHURCH. 

BOTH LELAND ANT) HELEN SALKHD OVER FARIILY BUSIN^ESS AND PERSONAL 
PROBLEMS TOGETHER. THEIR DECISIONS HAD TO BE AGREED ON BY EACH OTHER. 

THERE WAS NO CONFLICT WITH THE FAMILY WITH LELAND AND HELEN, 
BUT AFTER HELEN'S MOTHER'S DEATH, HER BROTHER AND SISTER GOT INTO A 
BIG ARGUMENT AS TO WHO V/AS GOING TO RECIEVE HER PROPERTY. lOLDRED, 
HER SISTER, WANTED THE PROPERTY ON HER MOTHER'S FARI.l ALL TO HERSELF, 
SHE TOOK HELEN TO COURT AND HER BROTHER EARL ALSO. SHE WON THE CASE. 
TO THIS DAY, HELEN AND EARL ARE NOT SPEAKING TO HER SISTER. 

IN 19^^^, THEIR SON LELAIMD JR. WENT INTO THE NAVY FOR T'WD YEARS. 
HE RETURflED HOI.rE ATfD LIVED WITH THE FAIvIILY UNTIL HE MARRIED IN 1953. 

IN i960, LELArO STOECKLIN DIED IN A NU^RSING HOME IN CHERRY VALLEY, 
ILLINOIS IN MAYv HS DIED' OF" SEPTICEMIA. H^g SON LELAND JR., DIED IN 
1973 OP LUNG CANCER. HELEN STILL RESIDES AT THE HOME ON DALE AVENUE 
IN I^VES PARK ^v ILLINOIS. SHE IS EMPLOYED BY VARIOUS PEOPLE TO CLEAN 
THEIR HofvI^S. 



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.caiT^n YJHAa 31 : 
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_ ^. ,.., .,.. n^^^c-., .rft ^T TAH riC0I2I03a HIJH'i 



,a> 



EIHT 



.qq nan ^'^ '"•'- 

.OEJA J5^-~ '"HTOfia HaH C^' 

:3H or ■ - "^ow aHA :. 

.,1 HHT OTVtl -"VI-W .^.. '^^^^ ^^ 

TfT ITH 

••' " -'- ,.HL OVIAJaJ «02 8IH . ■' ""^ • 

_,^ ^» .naonAO owuJ 10 e's" 

. ; . .,. 3JAa i<o aMOH aFT ta ■ 

I HH2 .2I0HIJJI ,MflAq savoi 



JVb 



-lUl 



PAGE 18 



^n™%tii°J°.:^„^,^,„"/,Y^l'f/;>c^ outon. return.. w,.„ tn, Ma.i.ee 



J_ _ -■■^.i-^iJ^i;. put 13 in AD DIlIO.V THKitK] O ■•— -"w.uta 

MARRIAGE LICENSE ^linois sta te board of health 



ADULT 



Jitr.Ali£diA_Si!:UJtlMt 



Return of a Maf riage to County Clerk 
1. Full name of G-ROO^J\ll^LA^Ayl^jJ<:£ui,^ 

JlaLhJrrr± J JUL 




IJOONE (OUNTY ^„ 






» 






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X 



Pm O 
O 

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^v-( o S '/) x: 



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;^.^^< ...T.-T ^^._ vwoa T. U 

-^.^ ^ , , ., , 3HT Cl-.IHUa .YJIMA^ 3HT 19 2018 fc' 

THOVA^ 



, j;-Lui 



:;jov; 



. JSaOM ^S^t A £AW OaiWO YJIMA^ SHT 

^r^.u^.-H" • - -'^ ^-'^^'f '"^ ^■^"' ,i^YAjq cEooa^ WA Old. 

CEcAHO'r" 

. ^.^ oiSMiEua YJii«A^ --'"^ oa^u. 

. .^.-'^ -.i)A.3 'iS KO OaZiJIClA Sfi O'i - .^lEIOS 

. .ITfifa iZ^: ,HTA. 

■qq jcm ^.— - 

A^ E'RaHTor.^ "-: no n 

: ■:raH or L,.. TO^I 2: , EIHT C 

... ^Y OTWI ;^ «I^T '^^^ • - 

.-yrpTT-i T: C3.Wld OMA ;?TflOH a£ 

.: 'lo ev 
..lOMIJJI ,MflAq EavoJ Mil 














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r: 



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13 ^ ^ 

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PAGE 18 



Jfo. 



MIL 



MARRIAGE LICENSE 



ADULT 



with 



Issued. 



Married 



Filed 



TDiu 1 b 




//-" r)/nda. 



Clerk 



J 



Recorded 




17 wZL 



tST" This RetnrD ia to be carefully filled out and returnrd with the Marrlaje 
License. This return docs not take the pUice of the Certificate which comes 
attached U, the Licence, but is in ADDI ilO.N' THKHLTO. 

Illinois state board of health 



Pn.£p. (s> 7 of Marriage Record 



State Board of Health Register, 
Pa^e 



4 



FVFPkit.bomc&Co Chicaco 



Return of a Mafriage to County Clerk 
1. Full name of GBOOyiJ\tll^AA^_jDLrCJLJ^ 

8. Place of residence i/Ii?Xij'-i-f^. , '^ -^-^ ' 

8. Occupation ^Q^AJI-CII . 

4. Age next blrthdayuAA years. Color _ZL Race_j2^^ 

5. Place of birth (LLkAAl.kn'L 5./ /- 

6. Father's name hAlUlLAJ^ ^OXcLi 

7. Mother's maiden name / / \- d. AA^ 0<^ r 



8. Number of groom's marriage 

9. Full name of BRIDE ^ 7 fj^-'U. l'//] A'U ^^A 
Maiden name If a widow _j'ilJX4l'/jT2Li:LL^ldJ^ 




10. Place of rfi.ddnnce ((jrCMi i^d. J^LL 

years. 'Color_^^__ Race_ZL44t: 

...p jr. Ihi J /i/niM. 

15. Number of bride's marriage l) ^ '^X^-t-KA -. 

16. Married at ' c p-/ iX"U ^7.? C In the Oonnty of 

la^tTIif.^ _ and State of Illinois the A ^ ' 



11. AgG next birthday _ev^ years. 'Color jN- 

12. Place of birth ]) LJl.. Al4^ f- A , ^^ 

13. Father's name 

14. Mother's maiden name 



day of _ 



. and State of Illinois the . 



17. Witnesses to marriage . 

- Ul 






N. B.— At Nos. 8 and 15 ttate wtcthcr 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc.', marriage of 
each. At 17 give names of subscribing witnesses to the marriage CcrtlDcatc./ 
lino subscribing TJltnesses, give nainos ot two persons who witnessed Vhs 
eeremony. - . / ^ 



~JI\lLJU-'AJL 



We hereby certify that the information above given Is correct, 
to the best of jin^knowledge and belief. 






ii_i_. (Groom.) 



-'(Bride.) 



I hereby certify that the above is a correct return of a Marriage 

at .Qdadijj. this A J}" 



Dated 



.uXl^ 



BI8TM NO 






Wlnnebap'o 



STATE OF ILLINOIS »'*!,'Jl'« / 

^^^£DICAL_CE£in^^ 



b. Of.ott took ploce 



jo. SlAIf 

COUNTy, iLunois li Illinois 



b. COUNTY 

Winnebago 



c. ^*td>tnct woi ' 

■r.W,o„..„^„^ ^^^ -----TOWNSHtP. nOUTS.0£..,<,™«o^. 

CITY, VILLAGE. OR TOWN " I d i.N.r.,u ^. . li . •^. .'y-^^^-^'-^i^'^-J^'^L-'ifa,' °L^J -o,:,, « j^ 



Cherry Valloy , in . 



NLAME Of 

H06PITAI 0!L^ '"*'^'"i> 

iNisT iTuroNCher: 

3. NA.«^ Of 
DECEASED 

Le land 

i. SEX 



d. [E^NGTH Of su, .N 11 d. cirY," vinAcr oTtwTn •^"■ 

i Y ra. i Loves Park 



I. STREET ADDRESS 



££I_Valley Nur^ .Hm.-j j^ yt.,Jj5454 Palo Ave, 






5 RACE 



7, MARRIED. NEVER WAtSl'EO 

male , Whits I TaTr iea^"^^" ""•^'''^ 
r° ;:i^l^.^i°.S^,^^^':?^4';V;t:1'°^-^'^°°'a^^^"soRfND^]I7^ 



Stoecklin 



13. FATHER'S fUU 
NAfv^E 

Edward Stoeoklin 

li. Woi deceosec/ ever ,.i (J S /.^.-d fc^cesJ 
J.»i. e..» .. ■ - ((or.i £j le. 



8. DATE Of BI5TH 

May 6,1904 



vcs n NO vs. 

*. DATE OF ivONim ,o,i ^t^o," 

"^'" July 23,1960 



(•? AGE t|" voo- 



11. a,.?THPlACE (Cifyondi,offorfore,9Rcoi,nfo.7 

d Pj.9ton RiTigLJAIJia mbJba. 111^ 



M. MOTHER'S FUU 
MAiDEN NAME 



12 C'l.zea of. 




_No 

18 CAUSe OF DEAIM 



Past i. DCATh y/AS CAU^fn RY Tc . I ti=== 

r^Ai CAL/StO By [fnl«r on/,, on. coui. pef /./.« for lAI. iBl. and ICI.] 



b. AODCESS 

5434 Dale Ave . 



RElA'iONSmiP to 

"life 



iMMfOIATE CAUSE. lAI 



SeprtlcsitlR 



I ,r.;^T:.^o°M,r ':' '° '" Decubitus nic«r» 



P CAUSE lAI. iror,,,9 

< 'fie UNDfRlYiNG L 

ycoji»;o5f ►du. lolCl 



■N"i\Ai BETvvftN £ 
ON..- AND DfATH "r. 

>'pnths 5; 

i. 

:'!o!Tths ri 



2 "^ "SCRIBE CCUMSIANCES OF INJURY. If ANY.' WHOSE NATURE IS f^EN 



TIONEO IN PART I OR PART II ABOVE. 



19 AUTOPSY? 

TEs D NO g 



3—Z&«*»0 



I ( ''•"^>^_^^^_'^' Offended ff,e deceosed hem ,,_ 

■ " 0"d deoih occvrrtd ol ^ '. ilj /^ 



, 'o. 



7-23-^ 



. 19- 



UAJt Signed ^ — — *-*- iv.. Tom mo eouset < 

^^^AS;j^^^^_^^Z^u^^^^M M.D.3 03"North K«in. 

DISPOSITION EURlAl.REMOVAl-CREfMTlON ,omJ^/2S/19QC)\^ „„ n- ' 

u CEMETERY... Suns Qt.f^ampri a 1 Oardona 



ffioi / fosr «ow i-ie dtceoied o(i/» 
M.. from the eouset onj on Ifie djf ilottd obo*. 

PHONE 



LOCATION. Koc^kf;prd,_"i 11 ,' 



24. deceived fof 
fi/ing on 



Rnekford, 111. VO 3-6677 



7 ' ^ ^ '^9(cc) 



fS.en»d; 



_„ FIRM NA.M^.59.lP.4^an.t'y...?.unera3,..H.Qmft. 
^-°ADDREsi...4PJ,.. River., i^re 

. toos ; . Pa r jj., ; , 1 J.; v Vpioi s 



VS & R 200..BUREAU OF STATISTICS- -lUINOIS DEPARTMENT OF FUBlFhE 




-(^^cy^^i^-^ 



P'^-'^ 



HEALTH- -SPP.INGFIELD 



/ HEREBY CERTIFr THAT the foregoing is a true and 



.W ,k. record .as es.aMUHed ..i //W T^Ty V/T/^ ^^^17:,;;' t T' "'"" ^"V"' ''''''"' "■'"-' "' """ ' .^ 
regisfrouon of hulks, siiltbirlhs and deaths. ■"'''" ''^'''"^'^'' "">' 'he prnv,s.ons oi the itUnou Uat.,us relanng to the 



DATE__ ___A-.'-i:l. ^2 6 

^^y Rock ford 



/^Co 



^' ^d. (2 



AT 



i«i~l ir-.i«J o< a,n a<.iib ■ |«r 



SIGNE 



IliHioiv OFrlClAl \\U\. 



Registrar' /H/, 



rh<wLrrd tc 






.{Deputy S tAlJ^ .r«r 

h. 'ft. I>cr-r.r,..l .4 f*U Hf.MII 



■^ ueuAUO 3xa^c)CO^^:^ pepvTH ^^f^^^ 



•N 



Nx 



i 



I 



PAGE 20 

LELAI-JD 3T0ECKLIN, JR. 
) 

ON SEPTEr©ER 12, 1926 LELAtO STOECKLIN, JR. WAS BORW AN 
ONLY CHILD TO HELEN AND LELATJD 3T0ECKLIN, 3R. A3 A CHILD HE 
WAS ACTIVE IN BASEBALL AND BASKETBALL AND CADDIED AT FOREST 
HILLS COUNTRY CLUB. liE HAD NO FORMAL RELIGIOUS UPBRINGING 
A3 A CHILD, HE V/AS USUALLY DISCIPLINED BY HIS MOTHER BY 
DEPRIVING km OF SOME PLEASURE SUCH A3 ATTENDING THE MOVIES. 
FOR SEVERE INFRACTIONS HJS FATHER USED TO USE A BELT FOR 
PUNISHlilENT^ ~ ^. ' 

HE ATTBNDED GRADE SCHOOL IN LOVES PARK, ILLINOIS AND 
GRADUATED FROM HARLEM HIGH SCHO§L IN 19ifi(;, HE LEFT THE NEXT 'DAY 
TO JOIN UP'«© SERVE WITH THE W.^* NAVY IN THE PACIFIC THEATER 

\ OF WAR DURING WORLD WAR II. 

HE V/AS??ELEASED WITH AN HONORABLE DISCHARGE FROM THE NAVY 
IN HAY 19^6. UNDER THE GI BILL HE OBTAl?ffiD VOCATIONAL TRAINING 
A3 A METAL lAAN AND PAINTER DOING BODY AND FENDER WORK AT 
RECHT-FROSbltJH CHE^OLET IN ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS. LEAVING THERE 

. HE. WORKED IN THE ^, LOUIS, MO. AREA BEFORE TO ROCKFORD IN 1951. 

i 'HE THEN DID BODY ©ID FENDER WORK FOR \C[LLIAI>1S0N MOTOR CO. FOR 
ABOUT A YEAR I||LA3^ , DID THE SOD Y AND FEr^IDER WORK ON TRUCKS FOR 
i.ULLER-PINEHURST DAfRY. HE' WORKED FOR THE DAIRY FOR ABOUT 
FIFTEEN YEARS BEFORE GOING INTO BUSINESS FOR HIPISELF IVITH A 
..y^TNER. 'WHEN THE BUSINESS FAILED HE TRIED 3EILIMG USED CARS. 

IN 1952 HE ^1ET REUBERTA AGNES GUSTAVISON. THEY WERE f.URRIED 

. -U.-IL 11, 1953 AND '4ERE DIVORCED FEBRUARY 7, 1969. AFi'ER THE 
DIVORCE HE MOVED TO ORLANDO, FLORIDA V/HERE HE RETURNED TO BODY 
AND FENDER WORK UNTIL SHORTLY BEFORE HIS DEATH FROM LUNG CAr.'CER 
MAY 18, 1973. 



.HL ,WIuDi0a0T8 dWAJHJ 

I 

•HOa 2AW .HI, ,WIJy{0a0T8 OMAjaJ b^^t ,S1 fla©laT<ia2 MO 
•IH OIIHO A aA .He ,KIJX0aOT2 GWAjaj OMA HaJSH OT OIIHO YJWO 
T2aH(H TA aaiaOAO OJIA dJJ^ST^ZAS QUA JJAaaEAS MI aVITOA 8AW 

owioMiHaqu EiroiouaH jamao^ om oah aH .aujo yhtmuoo ejjih 

YS HilHTOf^ cIH Ya OaMIJ^IDEia YJJAUEU ZM SH .OIIHO A 8A 

.aaivoH aHT omiomstta ea houe anueAaj^ sMoe ^o um omivih^sc 
HOT Tjaa A aeu or qszu shiita^ zm . i-tmi anavaz hc'. 

.TM3MH2IMUq 
OMA 2I0MIJJI ..^HAq 83Vai MI J00K02 aOAHD aHOMaTTA SH 
YAQ'TXaW 3HT T^aJ aH .^^^1 MI JtdOHOe HOIH r^JflAH MOOT OaTAUOAF 
R3TA2IHT OmOAq SHT MI YVAM i^.V^aCHT HTIW aVHSE OMA qu WIOL OT 

.II HAW ClIHOW OMIHUa HAW "lO ( 

YVAM aHT MOfl^ aoftAHOEiQ ajaAHOMQH WA HTiw oaaAajaH EAw an 

OMIMUflT oAMOITAOOY aaMIATSO aH JJIfl 10 aHT JHCIMa .^^-T YAM Wl 

TA ^iflow aaoMa^ oma Yaoa OMioa aaTMiAq oma mat.! JATaM a ea 

5HaHT OMIVAaj .alOMIJJI .QHO^OOH MI TaJOHVaHO HOIjaOOT-THOafl 
,tl^t MI aH(W!00fl OT 3H0^a AHJIA .OM .EIUOI .TC aHT MI QEXfiCfH 3H I 
flO^ .00 HOTOM MOEMAIJJIW HO^ JIflOW flaOMS^ OMA YOOQ QIQ MaHT 2H I 
HO? c^iOUHT WO XHOW HaOMa'i OMA YOOS aHT QIQ OVtAjl^ HAZY A TU06. I 
T'dOaA HO^ YJ^IAQ aHT HO? CEIXHOW aH .YfllAQ T8HUH3VIiq-HaJJU 

A HTIW ^jaeniH nw EaaMieua otmi omioo ano^a sHAaY MaaT^i 
.ciJiAO oaEu DMiJjaE oaiHT aH aajiAi 2EaMiEua sht wanw .flaMTH/. 

.H3W YSKT .M0EIVAT8U0 SaMOA ATflaSUafl Tai4 aH S^9X HI 

..^cj^x .'T YflAunaa^ caoHovia anaif oha ci^i ,IjC dim- 
iiH anaHw aqihoji .oomajao or osvom an aoRovi 
/iaoMAO a aiH aflo'iaa yjthohe jitmu xhow Haai'^53 cu'. 

,Z^l .81 Y/. 



. -I- 



PAGE 






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■PAGE 22 




s 



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PAGE 23 









C2857401 












/'" 



fh?in fijr 






// 2.Ar.;AI. fir's? CL^iS V_N!» 

TiAY/.L r;-.-^cs?.>a. i.-.FA?<A::c« cv:. 






vi>Fij-. ^eo "f 






jScning Nation in Time of JVar 



'.■^Sp fBHa!W3T!i-':--~'j;swms^, 



PAGE 24 



rl Kirliy 
llh SI. 
ordnance 



K-a-l.in hs 
'' ir forcrs 



OXPPTMG l^'^^j 

TBe top (^ 



A 10 



REGISTER-STAR, ROCKFORD Sat., .May 19, 1973 



I Death notices 




LeJand Stoecklin Jr. 

Leiand Stoecklin Jr. ' 

Leland Stoecklin, Jr., 46, for- 
merly of Rockford, died at 10:30 
a.m. Friday in the Gainesville, 
Fla., Veterans' Administration 
Hospital after a long illness. 

He lived most of his life in the 
Loves Park area, moving to 
Florida four years ago. He was 
employed as a body and fenda- ' 
repairman by the Muller-Pine-' 
hurst Dairy for 15 years. | 

Survivors include his mother 
Helen, Loves Park; a son, Tim- 
othy Robert; and two daughters, ; 
JTPranges Marye and EHyn": 



iLouise, all of Rockford; and an ' 
' aunt and several uncles. I 
! Services will be at 9 a.m.! 
fMcnday in Delehanty Funeral! 
Home, 401 River Lane, Loves ' 
Park, and at 9:30 a.m. in St. 
James Catholic Church. Burial 
will be in Sunset Memorial Gar- 
dens. ' 



Gain«villff, F,a., died ot 10.30 a.m. FhV 
I day, Moy 18, 1973 Irvthe Veterans' Admin- 

Navy In the South PacZ V.'l '"' ^^■ 
elude his mclher He?.; L~»- o"'! '"" 
son, Timomy Robert R~-<fcr7 "L": " 
-ooghters. <=r^.^^' ^Tve'cM^^' 
I s'-e'^TeVliu^cres"' '"-'"orZ\n°"Lr'Z 

wver Lone, Loves Pork, and ot 930 a m 

i!iff«VKnr,S'-> 



l£U\t\D3^oecKUiJJ 



fl 



PAGE 25 




' y 



PARTMENT OF HEALTH AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES ••• STATE OF FLORIDA 

■i~\ Emtrelt S. Roberts. Secretary . . Reubin O'D Askew. Governor 

' '• I 
, i Li DIVISION OF HEALTH Wllson T. SoWder, M.D, M.P.H., Director 

nil Alachua County Healtn Deparfmenf 



Telephone (904) 378-5321 



Drpirlmrnl of HcRllf. nnd Rrl,.l,llll.ll«e Scrvir 
■ DlVl'^ION OK llf.MTII 



P. 0. Box 1327. Gainesville, Florida 32601 

CERTIFICATE OF DEATH 
FLORIDA 



BTATE FILK NO.. 



REGISTRARS NO. 



loot fOI ' 

(TioKS , Leland 



NMN 



Stoccklin, Jr. 



-Male 



Oa7£ Of DtAIH 1 -ONiK, o, 

)Mav 18, 1973 



04 



White 



I ACE — 1< 

l.''"'46 



OAIE Cf 8IRIH 



CITY, TOV.N, OR LOCATION OF DEATH 

-. Gainesville 



.Sept. ,12,1926 |,. Alachu 



COUNTY OF DEATH 



,, Yes 



-lOSflTAl OR OTHER INSTITUTION — NA.'.'E nP ~0I 

,jV. A. Hospital Gainesville, Florida 326C1 



STATC Of B STH i.» « 

, Illinois 



SOCIAL SECUf-.T-f NUMBER 

„ 353 18 13 46 



CITIZEN Of WHAT COUNTRY 

, U. S. A. 



MARCIED, NEVER W.ACRiED. 
WIOOWEO, OIVORCEO I JPKii 

10 Divorced 



SURVIVING SPOUSE I 



U5UA'. OCCUPATION rO.X •.MD C 

,3, 1;?;K laborer 



MCJI Of KIND OF BUSINESS OR INDUSTRY 

„i KJn< labor 






RESIDENCE— STATE 

i<5 Florida 



COUNTY 

Hi, Oranqe 



CITY. TOWN. O; lOCAll! 

11, Orlando 



Yes 



iSTBEET AND NUMBER 

L. 8517 Forrest Citv R: 



.^O^HEii— MAIDEN NAME 



inOC Leland Stoecklln, Sr. 



KJ3C Helen 



Malicott 



INK3R.'AArJI — NA.ME 

V, A, Records 



AILING ADDRESS iSTitit 

V. A. Hospital 



Gainesville, Florida 



• part I. 



DEATH WAS CaJSED 9V: 



(ENTER ONIT QUI CAUii PER IINE fC fo). (b). AND (c)) 



COHOITIONS, 



(b) 



Bronchogenic Carcinoma 



3 month? 



XKJC Bronchoe^enic Carcinoma 



3 Months 



PART II. OTHER SIGNIFICANT CONDITIONS.- COM0irio~J COwTt 



MOT llurcD TO CAUK OrvfN 



ALTIOPSY 
ITII Ot M01 

IS No 



IfrobotM ACCirE^T. SUICIDE OR 
HOV1C16E1 OR UN'DETERMINtC) 



DATE Of INJURY 



fc»OHTH, DAT, T(* 



HOW INJURY OCCURRED > "■ 



II, lAOOY, j LOCATION 
1 10, 



MO., CITY 0« TOWN, HA 



CERTIFICATlON- 



MOMTM OAT 



f^t^GT""-' V A TO 

r. ' ;,",a;';°jMol April 8,1973 !;iJ-Iay 18,1973 



Ih, !ltf Did 



Df ATM OCCU««t3 AT rv( pl*C(. C"- ~? 

rio:i5a„.^?i\v:!:^ri;.^; 



CfRTiriCATiCN — V'ED'CAL Eyav.inER or COROnERi 



MOuNCtD OIaO 



CERTifiER- n;wE in»£ o< '■■•<ti 

»3. Michael C. Maeder. M. D. 






■ ^<DI0«lf,O> UIU 



IDATE SIGNED i-c--^. O". 

':„ Mav 21, 19: 



MAILING ADDRESS — CfST/P'fR 



'M Michael C. Maeder. M. P. V. A. ''ospltal Gainesville Flor-da 32-:0: 

BURIAL. CSEMAIlON. REMOVAL CtMEIER T OR CRcM.a;ORY — NA.vf .LOCATION cr. oi io«~ i^"' 

^•'"""Removal | ,.» Sunset Memorial Gardens L, Rockford Illinois 



Date i.omth o.t .1.«i I funeral MC-JE — nave / iCj'ESi I SIttTI 0« I • o ..0 , CUT 01 lOwM, ll.n, I.. 1 

„< May 18, 1973 I,;. Johnson Hay ,s Funeral Hor-.e Ga i-'.esville Florida 32cO. 



12 fUNERAL^'REaOR— S.GMATUCf 



If,£Gi-S-.j-£ /.;v:i.*f yj .^ f, I Oa"! .ici- to .t icCai .iO.s-... 



I HEREBY CERTIFY THE ABOVE TO BE A TRUE ANT EXACT COPY OF THE DEATH 
CERTIFICATE FIIJID IN THIS OFFICE. 



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(DATE) 



MYRTLE/ X KG'. .^LL, L,:.?UTY REGISTRAR 



rv-'ATH CSetrtXCATE 



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PAGE 26 

GUSTAF30N 

Birth Family of Death 

1853-1/8 CHARLES AUGUST GUSTAFSON 1915-12/3 

I86I-5/23 AGNES CHRISTINE LANTZ 19i^4 

CHILDREN 

1881-1/8 1. Minnie 19^+6-12/12 

1885-1/7 2. Jessie May 1968-5/12 

1886 -1/31 3. Arthur Edward 

I889-I/29 ^1-. Annie I893- 

I89I-8/2I 5. Gustaf Victor I96O-9/30 

1893-3/7 6. Carl Artell 1970-9/20 

I894-9/7 7. Chester Etnil 

1897-6/^ 8. Reuben Wallace 

1897-6/^ 9. Ralphie (twin) 1900- 

1 899-9/17 10. Feme 

1. MINNIE- Deceased? married Ray Bucklinj no child 

@. JESSIE- Deceased; married Arthur Carlson; no child 

^. AKNIE- Deceased in childhood 

9. RALPHIE- Deceased in childhood 

For Families of: 
3. ARTHUR - 5. GUSTAF - 6. CARL - 7. CHESTER- 8. REUBEN - 

10, FERNE See following pages. 



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3. ARTHUR born I/3I/I886; married 9/3/191^ to EDNA Viola 
Bishop, born h/2G/lQ9h; three children- 
Violet, Tv/yla, Shirley 

A. VIOLET (Munger) EASTON- born 6/23/191^; married 

12/27/37 to L. .Vesley tiUNGSR, Deceased, 
three children- Pamela, Lance, Nicholas, 
married 2/22/53 to CHARLES 0. EASTON, born 
7/31/1916; three children- Vickie, Charla, Millie 

a, PAlvJSLA (r.iunger) BLUI.i- born 3/18/^4} married 

5/2/64 to LEROY BLUM- born 2/3/^3; two 
children-twin girls born 11/1 9/66 
Julie Christine, Jeanette Elaine 

b, LANCE V/esley Munger- born 9/1/45; married 

11/19/66 to KATHRYN RODGERS. born 4/26/46; 
one child- Jennifer, born 7/29/6? 

c. NICHOLAS Edward Kunger- bom 9/17/49; married 

5/30/70 to GAIL FARKAS.born I/6/5O; 
no children 

d. VICKIE Sue (Easton) LOOoEl^- born 1 2/7/53 » married 

9/11/70 to iHOI^AS LOOSER, born 9/6/49; one 
child- Stacey Lj-nn, born 3/19/7^ 

e, CHJIRLA iviari EASTON- bom' 1/18/55 

f . MILDRED Edna L. S-^STON- born Q/r6/S7 

B. TWYLA (G) Wrede- born 4/24/18; married 9/^/36 to 

CLIFTON J. VVREDE, born 8/13/15; tv/o children- 
Ardith and Gayle, 
a. ARDITH ?vAY (Wrede) Davis- born 10/l8/39l married 
3/29/58 to RICHARD DAVIS born ?; tv/o children 
Cynthia Denice, born 2/1 5/61 | Kichael Richard 
born 3/31/64 



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PAGE' 28 

PAivIILY OF ART & EDNA (con't.) 

b. GAYLE LESLEY (Wrede) JACOBS- born 10/22A3 

married 2/20/60 to FR/uN/-: JACOBS, JR., born?; 
four children; Robyn Rae- born 12/31/60; 
Lori Christine- bom k/\0/6'}; r^oelle Tiffany- 
born 10/m-/66t Frank Pvlatthew- born I2/I6/7I 
C. SHIRLEY (GUSTAF30N) BJERGS- born 8/23/20; married 
8/26/38 to LLOYTD ARTHUR BJERGE- born 5/2/1?; 
three children- KAren, Lynn, Leslie 

a. KAREN ELAINE (Bjerge) Johnson- born 3/I6/43; 

married 1st to R, V^iener- one child, Laurie 
born 1/26/60 ; 2nd marriage 11/6/6^4- to DGNAIj3 
JOHNoOiJ, born ?; one child, Andrew born 8/27/66 

b. LYNN ijerge)- born 3/6/48 

■ i 

c. LESLIE GAYLE Bjerge- born 9/lV58 

FAMILY OF GUST"& ALTA 

5. GUSTAF VICTOR- born 3/21/1891$ died 9/30/I96O; married ALTA 

born 11/3/1399'; ten children- Arlene, Adrienne, 

Derwent, Bernita, Berneta, Beverly, Derry, Charmaine, Dale, 
and Lynn, 

A, ARLEI-S - born 3/29/1919- at home with Alta. 

B. ADRIENNE (Gustafson) SIFFRING- born ?; married ? to 

ROY SIFFRING I four children- Cherene,r..elody, 
LeRoy, and Tina Marie, 

a, CHERENE(Siffring) 'HOLMES married Roy HOLfviES 

Tour children; Bobby, born 7/3/59} Debra 
born 8/3/63; Cynthia, born V19/66; and 
Donald, born 6/3/72 

b. MELODY (Siffring) HALSTED: married John HAL3TED; 

two children, John I. Halsted II, born k/26/65 



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FAI.IILY OF GUST & ALTA (con't) 

b. and Tammy Ann, born 1/22/68 

c. LEROY E. 3IFFRING, bom ? at home 

d. TINA MARIE, borh 3/3/62, at home 
C. DSRV/ENT - born ?; married ? to DOROTHY 



five children- Darryl, Gary, Randy Lee, 
Bruce, and Craig. 

a. DARRYL- born ? ; married to ? 

b. GARY- born 7/1 8/^^85 at home 

c. RANDY LEE- bom 1/21/50 j dec. 6/8/52 

d. BRUCE- born 5/23/51 

e. CRAIG- born l/h/5^ 

D. BSRNSTA (Gu£ i^c^r^on) BOYER- bom ? ; married ?fto Roger 

BOYER, one child, Ronald 
a, RONALD- born 8/5/55 

E. BERNITA (Gustafson) RICHERSON- born? i Married ? to 

Robert RICHERSON- born ? one child, Carol 
a, CAROL- bom ?; married?to Tommy ELLIOT, tv/o 
children, Melinda, born 9/11/6?; and 
Tommy, Jr.- born 9/I5/68. 

F. BEVERLY (Gngtafson) 3CHUELKE- bom ?; married ? to 

FRED SCHUELKEj nine children 

a. TERRY LEE- born ? 

b. AUDREY (r.lR.& TvlRS. DENNIS BREWER) 
C, GLORIA (MR.& r/IRS. ROBERT TURNER) 

d. PAT (MRS. PATRICIA FISHER) 

e. DONALD 

f. BONNIE 
S. ROCHELLE 
h. REBECCA 

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FAI.HLY OF GUST fc ALT A (con't) 

G. PERRY E. - born? ; married to FAYB: five children 

V/illiam Kichael, Noel, Donna Faye, Robin, and Paul 

a. WILLIAP^ MICHAEL- born 5/27/58; dec. 5/12/68 

b. KOEL - born 5/28/59 

c. DONNA FAYE (dec.) 

d. ROBIN - born 3/13/62 

e. PAUL- born 9/19/63 

H. GK;u-ii.iAINE (Gustafson) Stroup -born ?, married to 

ClARENGE STxROUP ? five children, Gail, Wanda, 
Jerry, Gordon, ^d Kristy, 

a. GAIL (ivIR & IVIRS. EDWARD PETERS) 

b. WANDA - born 11/15/55 

c. JERRY- born 5/12/57 

d. GORDON - born 8/3I/59 

e. KRISTY- born 10/3/6^1-, dec. I2/3I/65 

I. PALS 0. - born ?j married to JANICE, tv/o children 
Victor Gustav and Timothy Owen 

a. VICTOR GU3TAV- born IO/3I/6I 

b. Tir.iOTHY O'^ffiN- born 2/9/66 

J. LYNN - born ?; married to DONNA ? ; two children, 
Roberta and Kimberly 

a. ROBERTA- born 9/16/64 

b. KIMBERLY- born I/I6/66 

FAP.rELY OF CARL £c NONA 

6. CARL - born 3/7/1893; dec. 9/20/I97O; married NONA PHELPS, 

born 3/7/l890,dec. II/II/6O; tv/o children; Isabelle and Chadwick 
A. laABELLE (G ustafson) HANSON- born V2/17; married 
to CLIFFORD HANSON ; no children 



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PAGE 31 

Fmin OF CARL & NONA (con't) 

B. CHADV/ICK - born 12/9/20 married 1st to Frances 
(dec) one child^Garyj married to SSTELLE} 
no children, 
a. GARY- born 5/14/^0 J married to 3USI3 ?, dec. 
two children, NttWA Marie, born 9/I3/6O 
and Victor Qhadwick, born 5/8/69 

FAI.:iLY OF CHESTER & HELEN 

?. CHESTER- born 9/7/189^? married 8/31/191^ to HELEN YOWIG, 
Three children; Eleanor, Cha'^es, and Donna. 

A. BLSANOR (Gustafson) JOHNSON- born 11/3/15; married to 

LEROY J0H.:30N, 6/2/?'^ two children, Dick and Larry 
a. RICHARD- bom ?; married JULIE , born? ; 

tv;o children? Steve, born 5/1/^3 and Scott, 
born 11/29/65 
■ • !^ b. LARRY - born ? 5 married 6/II/66 to KAREN ? : born?; 
two children, Cindy- bom 1/12/68 and Kim 
born 8/17/70 

B. CHARLES - born ?; married 8/3l/4o/to EVELYN ROCK- 

bom?;-o... children, Nancy and Peggy, 

a. NANCY (Gustafson) SV/ANSON - born 6/6/41, four 

children; Gary- born 5/1 5/5^; Tla- born 
•*^' 6/22/57 ;Mark- bom 9/17/59; and Diane- 

''^'^''' bom 10/21/6/'-. 

b, PEGGY - born 9/23/^2 

C. DONNA (Gustafson) 3KEIK - bom ?; married 9/20/52 to 

PHILLIP SHEIK- born ? three children, Lori, Jeff, 
and Sandy, 
a. LORI- born 7/1/57 



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>AGE 32 

FATIILY OF CHESTER & HELEN (con't) 

b. JiFF - torn 2/12/59 
C. SANDY - born 7/26/6^ 

FAI.'IILY OF REUBEN & MARY 

8. REUBEN - born 6/4/1897; 1st married to Frances (dec) ; three 

children, Gloria, Reuberta, and Jeannien, 2nd marriage 

7/18/59 to loVRY bom 2/31/15; no children. 

■ i 

A. GLORIA (Gustafson)(I/a,rvik)Crossland - born 9/2/23; 

Tst'marriage to George Marvik (dec); 2nd 
marriage to iVILLIA<!\ C'^OSSLAND- born ?; no children 

B. REUBERTA 3T0SCKLIN - bom 11/28/28; married to L3K 

STOECIvLIN married 4/11/535 three children 

a. TIMOTHY - born 7/16/5^ 

b. FRANCES - bom 12/14/55 

c. ELLYN - born 12/23/57 

C. JEANNIEN (Gustafson) GR033I.UN -bofn 7/15/33? married 

to HAI-IK GROSSMAN - born ? three children 

a, ERIC - born ll/lO/5« 

b, ELLICE - bom 1/23/6 3 

c, LANCE - born 9/21/64 

FAT/IILY OF FERNE & ALLEN 

IP.FERNE- bom 9/17/1899 married to ALLEN \'<'EDELL - born 6/4 1894; 

two children; Athalie and Allen, Jr. 

A. ATHALIE (Wedell) (Scriber) NICHOLS - born 5/19/18 

1st marriage to William Scriebpr dec. 1941; 

one child; Diane; 2nd marriage 1/25/^ to 

LA'.7RENCE NICHOLS - born?; two children Judy and fl,, 
a. DIANNE (Nichols) HUM-IEL -born 10/24/40; married 

to RICHARD HUIv'il'lEL - born ? three children 



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PAGE 33 

FM1ILY OF FERNE & ALLEN (conHj) 

a. Shannon - born 5/20/6?, 3tephann5 - berto 

11/27/63, and Sanantha Jo- born 5/1 9/68 

b. JUDY ANNE (PJichols) DAY- born 8/25/46 married 

6/I8/67 to MILTON DAY - born ? ; two children 
Brett Allen- born II/I9/68 and Blake Andrew- 
born 8/31/70. 

c. DAVID born 11/7/^7 j married 2/2/69 to J0YG2; 

no children, 
B. ALLEN. JR. ,born 5/25/2^^; married IO/20/5I to JEANNE 
Bom ?; four children, Bonnie , Robert, Holly Jo, 
and Heidi Rae, 

a. BONNIE - bom 5/5/^9 (step daughter) 

b. ROBERT - born 12/28/55 

c. HOLLY JO - born 12/12/62 

d. HEIDI RAE - bom 2/1 6/66 



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PAGE 3 if 

FRANCES JULIA BURMAN 

IN THE YEA;^ 1901, ON AUGUST 14, FRANCES JULIA WAS BORN INTO 
THE PAr/flLY OF VINCENT AND MARY BURMAN. AT THAT TIME HER BROTHER 
FRANK WAS ^ YEARS OLD. SHE WAS BORN IN THE TOWN OF KUTKA, LITHUANIA 
\VHICH IN THE YEAR I9OI WAS A PART OF RUSSIA. 

THE BURMAN FAMILY WAS CONSIDERED AN AVERAGE INCOME FmiLY. 
THii: INCOME WAS USED MAI^aY FOR FOOD, CLOTHING AND SHELTER. DAILY 
FAIRLY BUSINESS DECISIONS WERE MADE BY HER FATHER AND KOVHER,: 
VINCENT AND MARY BURMAN, BUT KEY DECISIONS WERE MADE ONLY BY THE 
FATHER . 

THERE WERE NO PHYSICAL MEANS OF PUNISHMENT USED FOR DISGIPLINAf-^Y 
ACTION. FRANCES'S FATHER SAT DOWN WITH THE CHILDREN AND TALi;ED OUT 
PROBLEMS AND DISOBEDIANCES. 

THE FAMILY WAS CLOSE-KNIT. HOLIDAYS WERE ALWAYS AT HOME 
WITH THE FAMILY AND FRIENDS. THE FMULY CELEBRATED BAPTISIMS, 
HOLY C0r»1MUNI0N AND MARRIAGES. 

THE RELIGION WAS ROMAN CATHOLIC. THEY ATTENDED MASS EVERY 
SUfHDAY AND RECEIVED THEIR SACRAMENTS. V/HEN IN SPRING VALLEY, 
ILLINOIS THEY ATTENDED ST. ANNE'S LITHUANIAN CHURCH AND IN ROCKFORD, 
ILLINOIS ATTENDED ST. JAMES CATHOLIC CHURCH. 

IN THE YEAR I9OI, VINCENT BURMAN (FRANCES'S FATHER) CATHIE TO 
THE UNITED STATES OP AMERICA TO MAKE A BETTER HOME FOR THE FAT.IILY. 
AFTER RECEIVING WORD TO JOIN HIM, THE FAMILY COMPOSED OF MOTHER 
MARY, FRANCES AI© FRANK CAJVTE BY BOAT TO SPRING VALLEY, ILLINOIS. 
THE REASONS THEY CAME TO THE UNITED STATES WERE FOR BETTER 
WORKING AND LIVING CONDITIONS AND ALSO BECAUSE RELATIVES LIVED IN 
THE UNITED STATES. THE FAT/IILY SETTLED IN SPRING VALLEY, ILLINOIS. 



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PAGE 35 

SPRING VALLEY. ILLINOIS IN THE EARLY 1900'S WAS CHIEFLY KNOWN A3 A 
GOAL MINING TO\VN. THE T0V7N HAD A POPULATION OF 10,000, STORES 
INCLUDED GROCERY, HARDWARE AND SALOONS. EACH NATIONvlLITY HAD THEIR 
OV/N CHURCH. SCHOOLS IVERE BOTH PUBLIC AiTO PAROCHIAL. 

THEY LIVED IN AN 8 ROOM APARTMENT ABOVE CHARLES BU'RMAN'S 
(FRANCES'S FATHER'S. COUSIN) GROCERY ArJD HARDWARE STORE . IN 1912, 
HER BROTHER CHARLES .WAS BORN AND IN 191^. THE LAST OF THE FAT-IILY, 
JOSEPH, WAS BORN, IN 1916 THE BURIvlANS MOVED OUT OF THEIR APARTMENT 
AND INTO A "HOrvIE. WHILE LIVING IN SPRING VALLEY, FRANCES BEGAN 
WORKING* HER FIRST JOB WAS CLEANING HOMES FOR PEOPLE, IK 1917, 
FRANCES LEFT HOME AND MOVED TO ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS, SHE DECIDED 
TO M0VE1BECAUSE ROCKPORD HAD MORE OF A VARIETY OF JOBS km THERE 
V/ERE NO JOBS LEFT IN SPRING VALLEY. SHE BOARDED IN A DUPLEX 
HOUSE. HER FIRST JOB IN ROCKFORD WAS CLEANING AND IRONING FOR A 
FAMILY, THEN IN 1919 SHE WORKED AT NATIO :.'.i. iOCK' COMPANT WHICH 
MADS DEFENSE MATERIALS FOR WORLD WAR I. 

AS FOR SCHOOLING^ FRANCES FINISHED THE EIGHTH GRADE. HER 
FAMILY REJ^TAINED IN SPRING VALI-EY, BUT IN 1919 PROBLEMS AROSE IN 
THE TOWN AND THE COAL MINES CLOSED DOWN. SINCE THAT WAS FRANCES'S 
FATHER'S ONLY OCCUPATION, THE FAIRLY MOVED TO ROCKFORD. FRANCES 
llOYm) BACK^V/ITH HER FAT'IILY UNTILSHE MARRIED. 

in' 1919, V/HILE BOARDING IN THE DUPLEX, SHE MET HER HUSBAND- 
TO-BE, REUBEN GUSTAVISON V/HO LIVED ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE DUPLEX. 
THEIR COURTSHIP LASTED FOR THREE YEARS. 

IN 1925 HER FATHER DIED OF CANCER AND IN 1928 |ER MOTHER 'WAS 
KILLED BY A TRUCK. AT THAT TIF/IE HER BROTHERS WERE STILL YOUNG 
AND FRANCES AND HER HUSBAN'; RAISED THEI-I AS THEIR OV/N. 



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.•.".■;I" -A v3Ha<JITmi YJIf.lA^ HaH HTIW }{'OA<x O^v 

-j:ial:^jh iiSi . aHT MI aniafiAoa aJiHW ,^191 Hi 

,xai7ua 2HT '?o SQi:. .diiTc ci.ix wo aavLi OHw W02IYAT2U0 wasuas ,30-: 

aaHHT r "caj qiH2THUoo aiani 

;:'^UG ■ . ■ "' :\'At TA .aOUHT A Ya v,^aa. 

.i._ni uo<,i^,. iiiAaeuH Haw oma 83iowah^ " 



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■.TAM HO/ 3 .EIlOOJAc t ' lOWI (^ 

..!ArHOOHA=£ C . jL .ii;>SUKO M\'. 

.H 8 >IA HI UciVIJ r^iHT 
U1I2U00 g'flaHTAI *• 
, . .: , • • AHO HffiiTO^iil >-:. 

,vtQi wi .^iou. SAW aoL - :h .oh 7 

'E .EIOKIill .u/vOa^ioOh OT (HVOM OWA aiAOii T'^HJ E£. 

' -^o YT? : OAH ancFiHoofl ■ avoi^ 

A WI d .tiuLIAV CKIfi^JE HI T': OH S^v 

..3 CAW <• ' -. ToJ^Iv 

^Ji;iU .iL;>iJVv ^iw QlQi ill MiihT .Yvii;U^ 

ojHOW Ro<i aiAinaTAM aawa^aa ao/ f 

• 2AW lAKT aOMIc^ .liWOQ 032010 83WIM JAOO SHT OWA WV/0 . 

.o/io^xooH ys oavoM yjiju^ awT .moitaiuooo y^iwo • 

.Gnl-V'A ' 3Ha*IITmi YcIIMA^ HaH HTIW >lOAa (XiV 

He .xaj^ju ajiT HI oMiaaAoa aimw ,9x91 wi 

,7.zLL^ja -;ii'i -:o LaiL >.aHTo anT no cbvij ohw woeivateud waauaH ,aii-: 

" ' " "TAJ qiHCTRUOO " 
-Av/ '. ;U (_i. aO UaiU /ioil.'i'A'i sail ^SQI HI 

: ■• " ■ .ilOUHT A Ya Uiaa. 

. viu. L>.. ^inAtiv^ji HaH OMA 8aOWAfl^ OViA 



MS&/: 




rOMIJJI .YaJJAV OKIHH- 
10 .IJil.-.JiJi A ^.. V. . -^.VOT OWIMIM lAOO 

HI. .eilOOJAfi CMA OHO OHaaJOMI i^ 

UaU^ H'l'Od aiu..v i^wiOfiOw .H03UH0 HWO 
nA<U M00J3 8 WA M| QSVIJ YiHT 

(MI2U00 g'HEHTA^ c' ) 

. .^1 AiiO HailTO/.^ K2H 

Till J a jiH'- dX^'I i;: EAW ,H^E20I. 

.J-^Cii. :^ IIIVIJ HJIHte .L^OH A OTMI GM 

,7191 WI .-J.iC^i iiC D SAW aOL T8ftl'5 HHH .OMI^IHOW 

' 'a 3HE .cIOMIJJI ,a;/Ja:ioO;% OT OaVOM CMA SMOH tt:3j EaOHA^ 

: !i.: ^ -^o YTaiflAv a -^o aaoM oah a^o^oop ; avoM or 

A Ki g: IE MI (T'lz^ c-dQi, OH a«aw 

;. .■■li ...iv.yAi avk j/:i.v-_j.u lav: e::i. ■!. TSfll^ HEH" 

HOIHW YMA^WOO JiOCXLIAyiD»BL'TAK TA CQ-i^.Jv. ^x^ ^L^l WI WSHT .x^I.l?/'i 

QJflOW Rm BJAlJiaTAM ScWa^aG aoAM ( 

Jklii .v-CiA::u :i_:iJla _i'i a>L.:UiWl^ Z.". .~:iJ0OH02 HOI SA 

^Ti asoHA tTiajao:i<i <?jC^i wi .Tua ,mj^wv ^liiaL -^i aawiAMaH yji:: 

c'CSanAfT? BAW TAHT aOWI2 .HWOQ 032010 E3WIM JAOO SHT CRU WWOT 3111 
CSOKAH^ .OHO^OOH VS OHVOM YJIi4A^ BHT .MOITASLUOOO y»IMO S' HSHTA^ 

.OaiHi^A": 3»eJ[ITWU X^IMAU HEH HTIVi X0A5 OaVQM 

-jm/.vv, ii }L3Ji " .xaiiju iiHT HI oMiaHAoa aJiHw ,^t9i wi 

.xajqnjQ sht "^o aai;, .^^i'o am wo oavu ohw ko8iyatsuo waauaH ,aa-c 

." ^ "^ RO*? CaTSAJ qiHcTRUOO Hiaiii 

-An iu ualG HaHTA^ Saii ^SQX MI 

■::ij'ji u, '^^T TAHT '■' . "'"^"^ ' ra C;^jai^ 

i-ini uuwiAA ®lAfii.»>n nail uw^v caJilAH*^ """ 



PAGE 36 







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PAGE 37 
REUBEN WALLACE GU3TAF30N 

ON JUNE k, 1897, TWIN BOYS WERE BORN TO AGNES AND CHARLES 
GUSTAF30N. REUBEN WALLACE AND RALPH WALTER WERE NAIviED BY THEIR 
PARENTS. THEIR FIRST HOME WAS A FARM IN MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS, 
IT //AS A VERY LAJRGE FARMHOUSE IN WHICH FOUR ROOMS WERE UNUSED. 
FARM ANIKALS CONSISTED OF EIGHTEEN HORSES, TWO HUNDRED CHICKENS, 
FIFTY TURKEYS, FIFTY DUCKS, THREE HUNDRED HOGS, AND SIXTY MILK 
COWS. THE MAIN OCCUPATION WAS FARMING, IN WHICH ALL OF THE FAMILY 
TOOK PART. OF THE 280 ACRES, THE FARM CONSISTED OF 100 ACRES OF 
CORN, GRAIN FIELDS, AW PASTURE LAND WITH THE BALANCE IN WOODLAND. 
A SMALL RIVER RAN THROUGH THE WOODS AND IN THE SUMMERTIIvlS THE 
CHILDREN WOULD GO FISHING. THE FARM WAS LOCATED MIDWAY BETWEEN 
WOODSTOCK AND MARENGO, ILLINOIS. 

WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS HAD A POPULATION OF ABOUT 1,000 PEOPLE. 
THERE WAS A BIG SQUARE IN THE CENTER OF THE CITY IN WHICH THE 
COURTHOUSE WAS LOCATED. THERE WAS A PARK AROUND THE COURTHOUSE 
AND VARIOUS STORES AND HOMES NEARBY.. MARENGO WAS ABOUT THE SAr»rE 
SIZE AS WOODSTOCK IN POPULATION AND FORMAT. THERE WAS A TOWN 
PUMP, DRY GOODS STORE, HARDWARE STORE, MEAT MARKET, GROCERY STORE, 
CHURCHES, AND SALOONS. 

HIRED HANDS '^VHO WORKED ON THE FARM LIVED WITH THE FAI.'^ILY. 
AT TIMc:S THERE WAS ALSO A HIRED GIRL WHO HELPED V/ITH THE CHILDREN 
AND IN THE HOUSE. ONE SCHOOL YEAR Tlffi TEACHER LIVED WITH THEM 
BECAUSE IN THOSE TIMES IT WAS COMT-IOK FOR THE TEACHER TO TRAVEL 
AND LIVE '^TH VARIOUS FAI-IILIES. RELATIVES V/HO CAI.IE TO VISIT 
V/OULD STAY WITH THE FAIvlILY FOR A V/EEK AT A TIME. 

REUBEN ATTENDED A COUNTRY SCHOOL TO THE EIGHTH GRADE. IT WAS 
A ONE ROOM SCHOOLHOUSE WITH Th"E TEACHER TEACHING ALL GRADES. 
HIS SCHOOL SUBJECTS WERE READING, ARITHf/lETIC, GRAMTvIAR , GEOGRAPHY, 



^ilJHAiiO G7IA cd\10A OT MKOS 3HaW EYOfl MIV.'T ,T98i ,4^ aWUI, MO 
■T'-HT Y3 OaMAH SHSW flSTJAW HqjAH OWA 30AJJAW M3ffUafl .W08^AT2UD 
: lO JI .YTWUOO YJi[Vl3H OM HI M91A.Z A 2AW SMOH TEHI*? flI3HT .ETHSHAq 
.d: Ofl JTUO^ HOIHW HI aCUOHMHA^ aOHAJ YHSV A 2AW TI 

,cMa-:uihJ j^;iu.i-n owT .ciaesoH waaTHDia "^o aaiEiEwoo ejamima mha^ 
~ .:ooH aaflcmim sshht ,2Aoua Yr?n /an^mi Yr?n 

:ii -^i . jlJIHW HI .SHIMHA^ 2AW MOITA<TUOOO HIAM 3HT .8W00 

•ic -' :> oaTEicHoo mra"^ aHT.EaaoA 08s aHT -^o .tha^ xoot 

.01, lAQ 3HT HTIW OWAJ HilUTEAq OHA .EOian MIAHC ,V!flOO 

-.hi : Jc aHT MI OViA EQOOW 3HT HOUOHHT VIAH HaVIH JJAM8 A 

HadWTati i'AV;jiivi aaTAooj eaw mjia^ sht .omH2n oo aiuow vtsHoiiHO 

.8I0HIJJI .OGWaflAM OVIA xooTzaow 
.'^liOiii , JOai- iC HQITAJJ^QI A OAH EIOMIJ.II .J>I00T8a00W 

JiilW /li YTIO aHT ^0 flaTMaO aHT HI SHAUPE Oia A EAW aJHHT 
ii^cJhrhUOO 3HT aWUOflA XHAq A EAW SHaHT .OaTAOOJ EAW 3SU0HTHU0C 

3MAc aHT TuoaA EAW ooMaflAM . .YaflAavi EaMOH OVIA 83H0TS ^ooIRAV cm/ 

WHOT A EAW aaaHT .TAMflCW OMA MOITAJUqO^ MI JiOOTSaOOV. EA 3511 
.•iHOTE YHaOOHC ,Ta>iflAM TABM .aflOTt aflAWQflAH ,aHOTE SOOOO YflQ ,qMU4 

.EMOOJAE OMA ,E3H0HXJHr 
. i !Ai ^iiiT iiTiV c^VIJ MHA*? aHT WO OHXflCW OHW EOMAH OSHIH 
■/i^/,UJ.IHO 2HT HTIV OaqjaH OHW J«IO CdfllH A OcJA EAW aHSHT SflMIT TA 
MaHT HTIW oaVIJ HaHOAaT aHT HASY JOOHOE aVIO .EEIIOH aHT MI OMA 

lavAflT OT Ha}iOA3T aHT Ho^ Mor^ioo EAW TI EaMiT SEOHT MI asuAoas 
Tisiv OT ar-TAO ohw EaviTAjaa .sauiaAq euoihav htiw avu oma 
.awiT A TA )iaaw a ao^r yjima^ sht htiw yate ojuow 
. ...0 H"""^' "'" -"' ")ohoe yhtwuoo a oaawsTTA MaauaH 

OABT aHT HTrrf aSUOHJOOHOE MOOH aMO / 

, ^ , . .:. ..r. iHA ,DMiaAa« anaw sToaLauE joohoe Eih 



PAGE 38 

HISTORY, AND VVRITING. LIKE ANY OTHER BOY, REUBEN SOIiCTIAAES 
PLAYED- HOOKEY FROr" SCHOOL. DURING RECESS, GAIyIES WERE PLAYED 
SUCH AS CHASE REINDEER, FOX AND GEESE, AND DROP THE HANKERCHIEF. 

THE FAMILY PRACTICED THE LUTHERAN FAITH, BUT DURING CHILDHOOD 
YEARS THEY DID NOT ATTEND CHURCH REGULARLY. 

KEY DECISIONS vVERE MADE BY THE PARENTS. CHILDREN WERE ABLE TO 
STATE THEIR VIEV/POINTS. DAILY FAIWILY BUSirJESS DECISIONS WERE MADE 
BY THEIR FATHER. THE CHILDREN WERE DISCIPLINED BY THEIR MOTHER 
BY SPANKING OR TALKING WITH THEM. 

IN 1905 THE FAMILY MOVED TO A SMALLER FARM WHICH WAS DOWI^l 
THE ROAD PROM THE BIG FARM. THEY MOVED BECAUSE THE FATaLY WANTED 
A SMALLER FARM TO RAISE. 

WHEN REUBEN WAS TEN YEARS OLD, THE FIRST PHONOGRAPH WAS 
PURCHASED. THERE WAS ALSO A PIANO THAT HAD BEEN IN THE FAMILY 
FOR MANY YE^RS. THIS WAS THE ONLY HOUSEHOLD ENTERTAINMENT. 
THERE WAS NO AUTOMOBILE. HORSES WERE USED FOR TRANSPORTATION. 

ON THE FOURTH OF JULY, NEIGHBORS GATHERED FOR PICNICS. MARENGO 
HAD A FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION V^HICH THE GU3TAF30N FAf/IILY 
ATTENDED REGULARLY. WOODSTOCK ALSO OFFERED VARIOUS KINDS OF 
ENTERTAINMENT. IN THE SUTvlMERTIME ThlERE WAS A COUNTY FAIR, AND 
DURING THE YEAR, THERE WAS AN OPERA HOUSE WHICH OFFERED STAGE 
SHOWS THAT THE FA]^!ILY ATTEITOED. THE CHILDREN V/ENT TO THE MOVIES 
AND THE ICE CREAM PARLOR ON THE V/EEKENDS. IF THEY BEHAVED DURING 
THE \YEEK, THERE WERE ALSO NEIGHBORHOOD BASEBALL GAJvlES IN 'iVHICH MANY 
OF THE BOYS PARTICIPATED. AT CHRISTMASTIME, THERE "WERE PROGRAI.iS 
HELD AT SCHOOL AND FAMILY GET-TOGETHERS AFTER. AT EASTER THE 
CHILDREN ALL MADE EASTER BASKETS, BOILED EGGS AND PAINTED THEM. 

AT AGE SIXTEEN REUBEN GOT HIS FIRST JOE WORKING IN THE 
CREAJ^iERY AT KINGSTON, ILLINOIS. SIX MONTHS LATER THE CREAIilERY 
WAS CLOSED AND REUBEN WENT ON TO ANOTHER CREAMERY TO WORK. IN LATE 



8c aoAs 



,OMITIJ?y^ OMA ,YflOT8IH 
. I00H08 MOH^ rS>iOOH OSYAJq 

IISR H2AH0 2A HOU< | 
ITOAH^I YJi:/lA^ SHT 

HOmmo owaTTA tovi aia rJ. 



:)a 



aSTPIAW YJII.IA^ 3HT ScUAOafi 



513HTOM .flaJIKO SHT .HSHTA^ HIOTT Yfl 

ivIAT HO CVirMA^c Yfl 
Ilr4A^ SHT ^O^t WI 
. HA'5 013 3HT MOOT OAO 

.■ralAH OT MflA^ flaiJAMc A 
:.Aw' HqAHCC EHAStY UST 8AW WadUaH MSHW 

YJDU^ 3HT MI Waaa OAH TAHT 0. 2.IA 8AW anaHT .Cia2AH0flU4 

VIO aHT 8AW' alH*^ \8flA3Y YMAM flc 
.SJiaOMOTOA on 2AW : 
;0^ 3HT ■ 

y:; ; aHT hodw mot 

•sjo :oiHAV 08JA >iooTcaoc .\juo3H oaciwaTTA 

, 'lA'? YTmJOO A EAW 3HaHT . 

■jDATo aana^'^o hoihw seuoh Anaqo 

WSHOIIHb aHT . 
J Yam* •?! .: 
YWAM HOrHK ,r- 

:T .aWITcAMToI .OaTAi: 

L-iA eaaHTaooT- ioono; 

. ..IT .:.-': .!1.V. :SAa aOA.M JJA HaHUJIHO 



,HAaY aHT OWIHUi, 

YJirua aHT taht cWoh: 



UVIA (EcOJO th 



PAGE 39 
1915. V/HEN REUBEN WAS EIGHTEEN , HIS FATHER DIED ON Th^ . _.. . 
HIS MOTHER, SISTERS FERIi AND JESSIE, AND BROTHER GUS, THEN i.!OVED 
yrTO ROCKFORD, AfJD LIVED ON PARK AVENUE WITH HER PARENTS. IN 1 ■' ' . 
REUBEN STAYED BEHIND BECAUSE HE WAS EI.^LOYED AT THE GRSAIffiRY, 
TV/ENTY, HE MOVED TO ROCKFORD AND JOINED HIS FAT.iILY. HE WAS EKPLCY'..:- 
AT W.F. &. JOffll BARNES FOR TWENTY-FIVE CENTS AN HOUR. DURING WORLD 
vVAR O^rS, AT THE AGE OF TWENTY -ONE, REUBEN SERVED IN THE NAVY HERE 
AIO IN FRANCE. DURING THIS TIKE, HIS MOTHER MOVED BACK TO THE FAr<M 
WITH HER BROTHER BECAUSE SHE WAS UNABLE TO FIITO A JOB IN ROCKFORD. 
AFTER AN HONORABLE DISCHARGE, REUBEN RETURNED TO ROCKFORD AItt) LIVED 
WITH HIS AUNT. HE \'fEm BACK TO W.F. & JOHN BARNES FOR A SHORT 
vVHILE. HE WORlvED ON A DRILL PRESS. HIS NEXT JOB FOR FORTY -EIGHT 
CENTS AN HOUR WAS AT BARBER -CO LT.l AT-: COMPANY AS A PLANER. AFTER 
HE WAS LAID OFF, HE OBTAINED ANOTHER JOB IN 1921 AT J.L. CLARK 
FOR FIFTY CEIfTS AN HOUR. HE WAS AT J.L. CLARK FOR TKREE MONTHS 
WHEN THEY .<ENT ON STRIKE. HE THEN 'aENT TO GREENLEE BROTHERS AND STAYED 
THERE FOR TWENTY -NINE YEARS WITH A STARTING WAGE OF FORTY CENTo AN 
HOUR TO ONE DOLLAR AND SIXTY -FIVE CENTS AND LEFT WITH THAT WAGE IN 
1951. WHEN HE WAS OFFERED MORE MONEY, HE V^NT TO WORK FOR i AHLER 
WAIWFACTURING COMPANY EARNING UP TO FOUR DOLLARS AND FIFTY CSNvS 
PER HOUR. HE RETIRED THERE AFTER TWENTY -ONE YEARS AT THE AGE OF 
SEVENTY -SIX. 

IN 1920, REUBEN CHANGED HIS LAST NAI^IE TO GUSTAVI30N WHICH 
WAS ORIGINALLY GUSTAFSON. TO CHANGE A LAST NAIvIE IN THOSE TIMES, ALL 
THAT HAD TO BE DONli WAS TO SIP.IPLY V/RITE OUT THE NEW NAIvIE. NO 
LEGAL ACTION WAS REQUIRED. THEN, AFTER ^EN YEARS, THE NAIVIE WAS 
DECLA:iED LEGAL. THE REASON REUBEN CHANGED HIS NAIvIE WAS BECAUSE 
THE NAME GUSTAFSON WAS 30 COMMON ATJD HE WANTED A DIFFERENT LAST 
NAiA'IE, BUT SIMILIAR TO GUSTAFSON. HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN THE FAIVIILY 
WHO DID THIS. 






OT^^ 



. ..; TA 

.aOMAH^ HI (MA 
Ha HSH HTIV.' 

. AHoeia ajaAflQMOH m nar^A 

. . -.OAQ E . .TWA tlH 

THjia-YT ;i 2IH uiaa A no as:i«ow aai 

: TA 2AW HUGH HA < 

.10 .J.T. T/ IS^t MI HCTm : .•■fO GIU Zi~ 

e.i . rosi wA 2TMao Y!Wis no 

- nainp aH ,2D:: tush yhht 

VIA VIITHAT. ASY aMIT1->rTWaWT HOT . 

m -naj OKA ETV130 :2vn-YTxia oiia HAjjoa sho ot too: 

F.. 3H0M (mKS!^%Q 2AW . ' 

Ajjoa auOT OT w 

r aKo-YwswT Jiaa?^ anaiiT a35iiT3; 

.xis-rr,. 

HOIHlft .AJ 2IK .; ,0S9i -i 

.!iO OT .no. 

Lc QT aAw siiaKi as or 

.JAi)SLI 
OT «AI 

aia oKf 



PAGE 40 

A3 A YOUNG MAN, REUBEN HAD VERY FEV/ R0KMCE3 BEFORE HE 
MET AND LATER KARRIED FRANCES BURMAN. 



REuc 



^r- -■• 






iftHAM Hs?Aj ovfA nam 







Cancel th? three terms not appiicable — / 
Diot cr.ler 'R. R.," "E. F. D.,"^ or otlierl 
f. address.) I 



PAGE ^1 



^'^ 



Jarenso.. 



JtJicvWwt. 



Ij^^r: ^. zu2^ .. CERTIFICATE OF BIRTH 



I 



ReKistered No.. 



St t and 
N'lber, No.. 



(Coiisecuiivc No.) 



L'LL NAME AT BIRTH B.'5\U.>^.&.n.. .(J.Ua.t,a7/J. ^QH 



no.'spital 



+4. Twin, Triplet, 



n, Tnplet, .5. Nntober in orderi fi. Legit in ale? 

ua^ P I °?t^'k''- ■ - --.^ I, of bjrth unknown „« „ 

Maxe (lo be answered onh- in the event of I Y^ 3 

_ J plural liirth'!.) | 



(If birlh occurred in hospiiai "oriiis'tii'ution. clve 
us name Instead of street and nuiubcr.j 

7. Date of 

i,i„„ June _4th. 1897 



FATHER 

Chp.rles V. Gustavl son 



(Day) 



aidence at time 

_ thi s birth ' !a renKo Tttq . 111. 



white 



11. Age pt tirne 

of this birth ~'..-^.. vr 



45 



irtUpl.vce (City or Place) Unkn.O.ViIl 

anie Slate, If in U. S.) 

ame Coiinlr y. iJ Foreign)-. SJt'.G'^.g n 

lleurMtion 
. a-.nre of Ind!;.str.7) YB-V^ITx^ 



14. Full iMaiden h„„^„ , t ^ j. 

Na me Agns s A. Ls.ntz 



1.1. Residence at tim';. 

of this birth \\B.V i-iy\^o f Trrp. Ill» 



white 



17. Ak3 at time _ - 



18. Birlhpl.icc (City or Pi:Lce) UnlCnOWn 



of thi s hirth... -.-f..^ yr 



(Name State, if in U. S.) 

(Name Conntr.v. it Forei-ni .3^9^?.^... 



Xumlier of cliildren born to this moth'^r at the 

; of and inciijding this birth rT^ 



19. Occupation 

(Nature of Induslr.r).. 



Farmlns-Houge wi f e 



ereby certify that the person named at Item 2 Wii born on the dale stated above! 

'ed .C.arI....A......G:Us.t.aY.lE.Qn Erct-lier 

(Tille or relationship of signer must be stated.) 

^-^ fi^-5 Mth*...3t.,....E0!:;fcfQM^.Ill.. ; 



e ....lldi.Y-. ....... 

(Month) 



(b) Number of children 
living at time of 

this birth 



.1 Tth.. 1 94 1 



id.AV.SU,3t .L.t.t'h 19 4 1 A T ^1 

. -«™ ,^^^„ Marengo., Illinois , 






k 



u 

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PAGE 42 




\ 



PAGE 43 
REUBEN AND FRANCES GUSTAVI30N 

NOVEIaBER I6, 1922 REUBEN GU3TAVI30N Af4D FRANCES BURMAN 
HERE MARRIED IN ST. JAI.IES PRO-CATIiSDRAL ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS. 
IN 1923 REUBEN MADE THEIR FIRST RADIO WHICH WAS K.NOWN AS A 
CRYSTAL SET. FOR TRANSPORTATION THEY PURCHASED A I9I8 
ROADSTER FOR SEVENTY -FIVE DOLLARS IN 1923. THEIR FIRST 
RESIDENCE WAS AN APARTfrlSNT ABOVE FRAI^JCES'S PARENTS ON 17TH 
AVENUE. REUBEN WAS V^RKING AT GREENLEE BROS. AND FRANCES 
RAN A THREADING MACHINE AT NATIONAL LOCK CO. FOR THIRTY -FIVE 
DOLLARo PER \TOEK. IN 1927 THEY FOUfID A.NOTHEH HOKE IN ROCKFORD, 
ILLINOIS ON FOURTEENTH STREET AND SETTLED THERE PERKAN'SNTLY . 
THE HOUSE PAYMENTS WERE T'WENTY-FIVE DOLLARS PER KONTH. IN 1932 
REUBEN REMODELED THE HOUSE BY DIGGING Tft£. BASEMENT, ENCLOSING 
THE FRONT PORCH AND RELOCATING T}i£ STAIRWAY TO THE UPSTAIRS. 
THE HOUSE WAS A FAIRLY LARGE SIZE BUT BOARDERS ALWAYS LIVED 
WITH THE FAMILY AS PART OF THE FAI^ilLY FOR MATflf YEARS. 

IN SEPTE^ffiER OF 1923 THEIR FIRST CHIIA A GIRl, WHO WAS 
NAI»1ED GLORIA ELAINE WAS BORN. ON NOVERlBEl^ 28, 1928 ANOTHER 
DAUGHTER, REUBERTA AGNES, WAS BORN ON THANKSGIVING DAY MUCH 
TO FRAT^CES DISAPPOINTfffiNT AS SHE ViiAS WISHING VERY STRONGLY 
FOR A SON. JEANNIEN ADELLE, THE YOUNGEST OF THL TH1?EE GIRLS, 
KADE HER APPEARANCE DURING THE HOT SUfclMER KCNTH OF JULY li-'33. 

IF THE CHILDREN WARRANTED SEVERE PUNISK^ffiNT, THEY KNEW 
ABOUT "THE RAZOR STRAP" IN THE BASEItlENT. 

THE CHILDREN REGULARLY ATTEND CATECHISM A3 THEY DID i.Cl 
ATTEND PAROCHIAL SCHOOL EVEN THOUGH THE FAftllLY WEHi:. DEVOUT 
KOMAN CATHOLICS AND ATTENDED MASS AS REQUIRED AI1D RECEIVED 
ALL THE HOLY SACRAT-IENTS . THEIR MOTHER INFLUENCED THE 
CHILDREN STRONGLY IN THIS DIRECTION. 



KOEIVATci'JO ESOWAOT CMA WaSUaJI 

VlAMHUe aaOKAHT CMA H08IVAT2U0 WSfiUaH SSQl ,^1 flaa?iHVOH 

.2I0MIJJI ,C AO-OJH aSMAT, .TE WI OSIHHAM aflSVi' 

A EA WOii;i cAW HOIHW OIOAfl TEHI"? fllSHT SOAM WaffUafl CS9I MI 

8tQl I YaHT WOITATRCHcMAHT HO^ .T32 JAT2YH0 

TSHi^ HiaHT ,eSf 1 WI 2HAJJ00 avn-yTM3Va8 HOT flaTEQAOfi 

HT^t ViO <;TM3«Aq c • c ZVOfiA TI1SMTHA<IA WA EAW 30Waai2aH 

saoJUfl^ OMA ,Eo«a aa. cw eaw waauaj? .auwavA 

avn-YTHIHT HOT .00 XOOJ JAWOITAW TA aKIHOAM OWIOAaHHT A ?UH 
,aSO^>iOOH MI 3MQH HSHTOHA OMUO^ Y3HT ^^X WI .^aw Ha^ c vUJJOa 

.y>- 32 awA TaaflTE HTviaaTHUo^ wo 2Iomijji 

st9J Ki .HTWOM jHi avn-YTVfawT anaw ETMaMYAq beuoh 3Ht 

la Yfl aEuoH aHT aajaaoMan waauaw 

.cHIATtil'J iHT or lAWfilATC o^iT OriTAOOiaK OMA HOHOq TVIOJrJ S; 

oavij 2XAWJA EHsa^Jioa Tua 3sie aoflAj yjau^ a 2Aw azuoH anr 

.2HAay YMAM «0*I YJIMA^ aHT ao THAI 2A YJIMAa 3HT HTIW 

EAW OHW JfllCi A AIIHO TEHPI HIHHT tS^X ^0 HaaM3Tqa2 MI 

HSHTOMA 8S9X ,8S 5EaM3YOI1 MO .WHOa EAW 3WIAJ3 AlflOJO (SSHM 

HOUM YAQ OMIVIDE^WAHT MO MHO€ EAW .EaMOA ATHSSUaH .HaTHOUAQ 

YJ0W0HT2 Yfi r* EAW aHE 8A TMaMTMIOq<IAEia SaOMAfW C 

,2jflio aajWT aHT ^o raaoMuoY aHT .ajjaoA mbimmabl .mo2 a urn 

• CrVX YJin, ao HTMOM HaMMUE TOH aHT OMIHUa aOMAHAaqqA asH aOAM 
^ VRHAW WSHOJIHO 3HT a I 

-d aHT MI •'lAHTE fiOSAH aHT" TUOfiA 
A YJHAJUOaa MaflOIIHO 3HT 

; Mava joohos jAiHOOHAq omstta 
aaoMaTTA oma eoijohtao mamc 

i HI2H1 Ke YJOH 3HT J.' 



PAGE kk 

THEY WERE AN AVERAGE FAMILY WITH A TYPICAL AVERAGE INCOME 
FOR THE TIMES. NOTHING WAS EVER LUXURIOUS AI^JD THE WEEKLY INCOME 
WAS USED FOR FOOD, CLOTHING, INSURANCE , UPKEEP OF THE HOME AND 
OTHER NECESSITIES. DECISIONS WERE MADE FOR FAIv!ILY WELFARE BY 
BOTH PARENTS. 

IN LATER YEARS THE FAMILY VTOULD GO ON A FISHING VACATION 

DURING THE 3UM1HER MONTHS IN WISCONSIN OR MINNESOTA. HOLIDAYS 

WERE SPENT IN FAMILY GET-TOGETHERS AND FOURTH OF JULY WAS SPENT 
1 

AT HOr/IE AND WATCHING CITY FIREWORKS AT THE BELL BOWL OF THE 
CAMP GRANT ARMY BASE LOCATED JUST OUTSIDE OF ROCKFORD. THERE 
WERE NO FAMILY REUNIONS BECAUSE FAMILIES V/ERE TOGETHER OFTEN. 
SOME SUNDAYS WERE SPENT DRIVING TO LAKE DELAVAN, WISCONSIN TO 
SPEND THE DAY WITH REUBEN'S SIDE OF THE FAT-IILY WHILE OTHER 
SUNDAYS THE FAMILY PILED INTO THE CAR AFTER A BIG SUNDAY DINNER 
AND WENT FOR A COUNTRY RIDE VISITING RELATIVES ON THEIR FARMS. 

COMIUNITY LIFE WAS CENTERED MOSTLY AROUND SCHOOL ACTIVITIES. 
THERE WERE CHRISTMAS PLAYS AT SCHOOL IN WHICH ALL OF THE GIRLS 
WOULD PARTICIPATE. MOVIES WERE A BIG THING ON WEEK-ENDS AND THE 
GIRLS LOOKED FORWARD TO ATTENDING THE STATE THEATER FOR TlIE 
SATURDAY SERIAL WITH THEIR MOTHER. FOR OTHER AMUSEMENTS THEY 
WENT TO LOCAL PARKS FOR PICNICS V/ITH OTHER RELATIVES, THE SEVENTH 
STREET FALi, FESTIVAL, CARNIVALS AND FREQUENT ACTIVITIES AT THE 
PERRYVILLE GRANGE HALL WITH OTHER FARM FAT/IILIES AND RELATIVES. 
THERE WERE FEW CHURCH SOCIALS AI^fD MOST GATHERINGS V/ERE Wlln 
FATOLIES. 

FRANCES ATTENDED ADULT EDUCATION CLASSES AT® IN 19^1 RECEIVED 
HER NATURALIZATION PAPERS FOR CITIZENSHIP OF THE UNITED STATES. 
SHE V/AS VERY PROUD TO BECOME AN AJ1ERICAN CITI7EN. 



<ti"^t^' 



au ar^oH hht -^o 



YJIMAT aOAHSVA MA flHaW YSHT 
H3V3 8AW OWIHTOK aHT flCTi 

! .CHIHTOJO ,aOC« HOT OaeU 2AW ^ 
(W 8V!0I8I03<3 



HTOa 
AH aHT BffASr «STAJ «I 

•2 3HT OWIflUa 

a'? wi Tvraqa a jew 

i.fll"'! YTIO OVriHOTAW GHA mm TA 
IIBTVO TEUL (BfTAOOJ ■.. A TVUffO «?MAO 

je aMoiwuafl YJiMA^i ow 3ffaw 

..- afiSW SMOE 

I\l YAQ 3HT mS^E 

l^'mA f?AO aKT OWI V sht stacmue 

wo 83- OWITIEIV 3015? YH- THSW OKA 

.23ITIVrT0A JOOHOe OMUOHA YJTEOM 03518^30 BAM 3^IJ T 

) HHT "lO JJA HOIH\^ SHSW HHSHT 

dHT aviA 8avia-)»avrf mo ohiht oiff a afiav* eaivow ;oiTJiA*f cuuow 

a.-rt* Hd H31»AaHT STATE PA OT aHAWHO^T Cia?I00J 8JHI0 



i.rTAOAV 0HIH2I^ 
BY/. 

YJUL ^ 
3HT -^O JXOfl 

?:raHT , 

OT y 



. HSHTOM ni3HT HTtV JAIfiaE YAQlWfAE 

' iq Ho^ AnoT OT Twaw 

:/ITOA I e3WA eJAV; 

ro HTIV* n aJJITYftHSq 

:0M OVIA EvIAIDOE HOfHJKO WS-^r ^ 

.EaiJIMA*!! 

.jiviaoaH ni9i m oha saEEAjo worTAOuas tjuoa cnimaTTA EaowAH-^i 

IT ^0 'i TIO HO^ ^<!3^Aq .lOITASIJAmJTAM H3H 
A MA a: ' EAW 2 



.'32 3HT ,1 



,T. 



I PAGE k5 

ir; 1950 fratm-ces developed heart PROBLav.s. she was in the 

HOSPITAL IN RGCKFORD, BUT LATER vv'SNT TO THE r.!ETHODIST HOSPITAL 
IM MADISON* '.fISCONSIN BECAUSE OP THE SPECIALISTS AT THE JACKSON 
CLINIC THL.c^. .yhxLi. A jtaTIET^T IN THE HOSPITAL SHE DIED OF 
BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS IN SEPTEMBER 1951. 

REUBEN LIVED WITH HIS TWO YOUNGER DAUGHTERS IN THE HOME 
ON' FOURTEENTH STREET UKT'IL AFTER REUBERTA'S MARRIAGE IN 1953. 
1:1 THE FALL OF I953 HE iVBNT TO CALIFORNIA Al^ AFTER A "WTLD 
FLING" RETURNED TO LIVE WITH RSUBERTA AT© HER HUSBAND IN THE 
FOURTEENTH STREET HOKE AGAIN. 

IN JULY 1959 HE t4ARRIED MARY KAY AKCH2R IN KAN3A3 CITY, 
no. Am THEY LIVED IN AN APARTMENT ON NORTH ROCKTON AVENUE IM 
ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS. 



.r^9i Haaji3T<iaE wi eitighaoo 

-s ndriA aWA AIMHOTIIAO C" ..a cc^^ ^0 JJA^ 3HT Kl 

— ■— 'n JBBH ou ATflaausn n.xw aVij OT oaMHUT:- --"'"ura 

.WIAOA ^" ^3HT8 Hl.ia^i/^JO^ 

., .,^,,., ,,,, ^. .^,^., ,,^ o-,.- ,n.r,..r, ,,:, , , t CEVIJ Y3HT OV'lA ..y.i 






PAGE ^■6 




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PAGE 48 



JACKSDN CLINIC 

16 SOUTH HENRY STREET 
MAOISDN 3, WISCONSIN 



OBSTETRICS ; 



I GYNECOLOOr 1 



GENERAL ALLERCSY 
PEDIATRICS 



NEUROLOGY 

UROLOSr AND PROCTOLOGY 



Octoter 24, 1351 



PATHOLOGY 

CTHELCRCO L. 6CH 
X-RAY AND RADIUS 

ADMINISTRATION 



THE JACKSON FOUNDATION 
HARRY F. COLFER, M. D. 
DIRECTOR 



Mr. Heuten Gustavison 
1114 14th Street 
Hcclifcrd, Illinois 

DeaJ- ly. Gustc-Tison: 

I a.Ti Borr^' there has 'been a delav in inforning you. 
of the findincjs of the postnorten examination. !fe found the 
evidence of rheuznatic heart disease vhich \:e had expected. 
?his condition had caused a great deal of nar roving" of two 
of the heart valves, the tricuspid and nitral valves. On 
the 3iitral valve was the infection v/hich v/as the most serious 
part of her troutle and for which v;e v/ere treating her v.'ith 
penicillin and streptomycin. This condition is knov/n as sat- 
acute 'bacterial endocarditis and is not unccvjnon in patients 
with rheur.atic heart disease. There vere also several areas 
in the lungs in which the circulation had oeen inpaired ty 
tlood clots, and it was thess v;hich contricuted to the sudden 
fatal termination. 

I feel that ever;,^thing that could have teen done 
was done for her, "but that her heart disease was too severe 
to have allowed her to live inuch longer even if the infection 
had teen completely cleared \xp. 

Thank you again for yo'ur cooperation in allov/ing 
this ezaaiuat ion. 



\ 



Sincerely yours, 

H. c. Ashr&n. ;:.r. 



HGA/rp 



\XTr€^ 5rMT to Reo6^ (a^Mtsoio 



I PAGE -4-9 

I 

1 

REUBERTA AGNES GUST AVI SON 

ON NOVEr/IBER 28, 1928 REUBERTA AGNES WAS BORN THE SECOND OF 
THREE GIR^S. THE FAMILY HOME WAS A SIX ROOM TWO -STORY FRAME 
HOUSE. THERE WERE THREE BEDROOMS ON THE SECOND FLOOR ANTD A 
ROOM mTK RUNNING WATER AND TOILET FACILITIES. THE FRONT ROOM 
CONTAINED A PIANO AND RADIO WHERE MOST OF THE FAT-IILY RELAXATION 
TOOK PLACE. THE LARGE DINING ROOM NEXT TO IT WAS USED FOR MORE 
THAN JUST DINING. SEWING, HOMEWORK, PROJECTS AND AT ONE TIME 
IT WAS USED FOR SLEEPING QUARTERS WHEN SERIOUS ILLNESS WAS IN 
THE HOUSE AT® IT WAS QUARArW'INED IN THOSE DAYS. 

THERE WERE NO SERVANTS BUT THERE V/ERE BOARDERS vmo PAID 
FIVE DOLLARS RENT WEEKLY. CONDITIONS WERE CROWDED AND THE 
FAMILY WHILE THE GIRLS WERE SMALL SLEPT IN ONE BEDROOM WHEN 
THE OTHER TWO WERE USED BY THE BOARDERS. 

EHE FAMILY INCOME WAS AVERAGE EVEN THOUGH THERE WAS A 
DEPRESSION km TIMES WERE ROUGH. 

AT AGE FOURTEEN REUBERTA STARTED V/ORKING AS A SALESCLERK 

IN A DIME STORE IN DOWNTOV/N ROCKFRD. FOLLOWING THAT SHE V/ORKED 

AS A BOOKKEEPER Or>IE SUIvMER AND AT AGE SIXTEEN WORKED AS A WINDER 

ON A NAVY CONTRACT FOR SOCKS AT ROCKFORD MITTEN AND HOSIERY. 

AT AGE SEVENTEEN SHE STA.RTED WITH ILLINOIS BELL TELEPHONE CO. 

AS A TELEPHONE OPERATOR FOR FORTY DOLLARS A ,mW.. 

REUBERTA GRADUATED FROM EAST ROCKFORD HIGH SCHOOL IN 19^6, 
SHE CONTINUED WORKING FOR ILLINOIS BELL WHILE ATTENDING COURSES 

AT EAST ROCKFORD HIGH SCHOOL A3 A:. EXTEh6»oN PROGRAI.I OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF iLLiftQis. THERE V/ERE MANY VETERAi\S RETURNING TO 

COLLEGE AT THAT TIME AND THE UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES WERE 



Mo^ivATcu; ATJiaausfl 

^0 oMooaa sht WHoa eaw eswda ATJiaausH 8s9i ,8s risawavow vio 

JMAH^ YflOTE-OWT MOOH XI8 A 2AW aT^OH YJIMA.'^ SHT .BulHIO aSHHT 

Hooi'? OHooac aHT v'lO eMooHoaa aasHT anaw anaHT .a2uoH 

MOOfl TMOJT? SHT ,8aiTIJI0A^ TaJIOT OWA HaTAW OMIMWUJT HTIW MOOfl 
HOITAXAJSH YJIIAA-? SHT ^0 TEOM SHSHW OIOAfl OMA OWAiq A aaMIATVTOO 

anoM HO*? aa8u eaw ti ot Txaw moof. omnia aoHAj sht .aoAjq xoot 

HMIT 3VI0 TA QUA ETOaLOflSE ..'IHOWaMOH .OMIWaE .CWIHIQ T2UL MAHT 

'.ii 8AV; eiiawjji Euoiaaa waHw eaaTHAup omqaajE hot aaeu 2aw ti 

.EYAa aaOHT WI aaWITMAHAUP EAW ti (MA 32U0H aHT 

aiAq cHw 2H3(i5iAoa afiav/ anaiiT Tua oTWAVfl32 oh anaw anaHT 
5:ht G/tA aacwoHO anaw 2;ioiti(dioo .yijesv/ Twan 2HAjjoa avi-^ 
waHW Moofloaa awo wi t<cij2 jjAraE aflaw ejrib an? aJiHw yjima-? 
.csaoflAoa aHT ys cheu aisw owt naHTO aHT 

A 2AW aflSHT HOUOHT Wava aOAflaVA 2AW 3M00VII YJIMA^ aHI 

.HOUOH anaw 2aMiT owa vioi28a«'iaa 

>{HaJ02HJA2 A 2A OHi:?IHOW OaTHAT? ATHaaUBH MaaTHUO'5 aOA TA 
aaXflCfW SHE TAHT OMIWOJJCH .Oil^XOOfl MWOTHWOQ WI aH0T2 31410 A VII 

ndOMiw A 2A aa}iHO«' nasTxiE aoA TA QUA HmmuB awo Haqaavi/.ooa a ea 

.YHaiEOH aWA WaTTIM QHOTXOOfl TA aHOOE HO^ TOAHTWOO YVAW A WO 

.00 awoHqajsT jjaa eiowijji htiw ost^iate bhe waaTwavas aoA ta 
A E.HAjJoa YTHo^ flo^ flOTAHas[o awoH^ajaT A 2A 

.cUi^I HOIH a> TEAa MOffi daTAUQAHO ATHaauafl 

Jtiaa cIOWIJJI HO^ OWIXflCW daUWITWOO SHE 

i MOi^sna '1A EA jooHOs HoiH aaonyioon teah fk 

.dV YVIAM 3flaW aflSHT .EIOWIJJI ^° YTIEflaVI 
OKA £aiTI25iaVIWU aHT OMA SMIT TAHT TA S: /O 



PAGE 50 
OVERCROWDED, HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOMS WERE USED FOR COLLEGE COURSES. 

AT AGE EIGHTEEN AGAINST HER MOTHER'S WISHES, REUBERTA MADE 
HER OWN DECISION TO MOVE TO CALIFORNIA AND LIVE WITH HER GIRLFRIEND. 
THERE SHE WAS SOON EMPLOYED AS AN OPERATOR FOR PACIFIC TELEPHONE 
AND TELEGRAPH FOR ABOUT FORTY DOLLARS A WEEK. THERE SHE SHARED 
AN APARTMENT WITH HER GIRLFRIEND ON BALBOA ISLAND. WHEN HSR 
GIRLFRIEND MARRIED, SHE MOVED ACROSS THE BAY TO THE TOWN OF BALBOA. 
THIS WAS A SMALL BEACH TOWN ON THE PACIFIC COAST WHICH WAS DENSLY 
POPULATED DURING THE. SUMMER, BUT DURING THE WINTER MOST PEOPLE 
RETURNED TO THEIR HOMES AROUND LOS ANGELES AND INLAND FROM THE 
COAST. TWO YEARS L/.TER SHE MOVED TO OCEANSIDE, CALIFORNIA AS 
HER COUSINS HAD MOVED THERE PROM WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS. SHE LIVED 
WITH THEM FOR ABOUT A YEAR BEFORE RENTING HER OWN APARTMENT WHILE 
WORKING FOR PACIFIC TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH IN OCEANSIDE. 

IN 1951 SHE RETURNED TO ROCKFORD BECAUSE HER MOTHER WAS 
SERIOUSLY ILL WHEN HER MOTHER'S CONDITION DID NOT IMPROVE, 
SHE TRANSFERRED BACFf ' AND AGAIN WORKED AS AN OPERATOR AND EMPLOYMENT 
SUPERVISOR FOR ILLINOIS BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY. 

AFTER THE DEATH OF HER MOTHER IN SEPTEMBER 1951. REUBERTA 
STAYED IN THE FAMILY. HOME TO KEEP HOUSE FOR HER FATHER AS HER 
OLDER SISTER WAS MARRIED AND HER YOUNGER SISTER WAS CONTINUING 
HER EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS. 

IN 1952 REUBERTA WAS INTRODUCED TO LELAND STOECKLII^Y HER 
SISTER AND BROTHER-IN-LAW. AFTER A YEAR'S COURTSHIP THEY 
WERE MARRIED ON APRIL 11, 195.'3. 



HOAW! A:r.::juiia ,::aHar.; ^'HaKxc: ^'miaoa ji33TH0I3 aoA ta 
.onaifl'^jflio fl3H HTiw avij cviA kimo'iiJ.AQ oT avoM OT woiaioaa wwo aan 
:'i'?i?A*i flo^ aoTAflaqo ka ea (13yoj<ims wor "'" i^raHT 

Cia;-L'.Kii 2H2 S<. . ^HAJJOa YTHO'! TUOSA flC'*l MH-^MiJdJaT OVLA 

HSH MaHW .OKAJc ^ WO OKr flaH HTIW TWaMTJlAqA MA 

.AOaiAfl 'i' " ;.HT 280flOA CllVOK SHS .OaiHJiA.M cwaiH^Jflio 

YJ8W30 SAW HCIHW TEAO: ::i''iIDA'i 2HT WO MWOT HOASa JJAMZ A 8AW 8IHT 

aj<Toaq t8om fiaTwiw aHT owrmia Tua .HaMMua 3ht owihuq oaTAjuqoq 
aHT Mo<T'={ oMAJWi cm/ " "" ■• '.aWOH HiaHT OT aaWHUT3H 

2A AIWH01IJA0 .aOlUilAiOO CT a:iVOr/l allL- HSTAJ EflAaY OWT ,T8A00 

G3VTJ 3H2 .2ICW^- - , ^ TOOW MOH"? aHBHT OaVOM OAH 2WIEU00 HSH 

3JIHW TWSMTi^AqA WWC Hiii-l ur^.TkiaH 3H0^Sa HA3Y A TUOaA flO^ MaHT HTIW 

.3G].r'':Aa00 HI H<lAH03JaT CH!A awr- "-'T HO'I OWIXHOW 

2AW fl3HTCM fl3H 32UA0aa QHO^JfOOfl OT Ui/lhU'r^M ' "' " 

,3voflq5iJi TOW aid woitiowoo e'flaHTOM f^:--- jiMae 

rr.aivilOj^lMa OMA ?.<" " "* 135(H0W MIAOA oka .^jAK C2i>-l):d'ic>;A>!T SfHE 

.y i'/!0Hq3jaT jjaa siowijji flo3 floaivHaque 

ATflaaiJ3H ,iev-t yiaaiv!iiT<i38 wi flaHTOM nan 3o HTAaa 3ht flaT3A 
aaH EA flaHTA'=i ash H03 aeuoH qaa>j ot awoH yjima^ bht wi aaYATZ 

OWIUWITWOO saw SaTEIB HaOWUOY fl3H CWA aaiFflAM 2AW flaT2I2 Haoio 

II ^0 YTi2flaviwu aHT ta woiTAouaa naH 

::.^[ .-v '[Yu-i:^.. jT oaouaoflTwi 2AW ATflaauafl 2^9 J wi 

Yah.! inci:"- '1 --" • .'^-rr^ .WAJ-WI-flSHTOHa aWA 5!aT8I2 

.'-^9' ."' """' "" OaiHflAM 3fl3W 



PAGE 51 







PAGE 52 






■ jr««| 



■jiir iiiii'i " *'^-^ "^ 

Reuc:, ;.- u.,,ijv ,-.:,t^. ., -. :.,.. ..... ■,...' 

become the bride of Lealand Victor Stocci<- 
lin, Jr., April 11 in St. James pro-cathedral. J 
She is the daughter of Reuben Gustavi?on. 
(Van DyicG phoio) 






PAGE 53 
LELAND AND REUBERTA STOECKLIN 

IN 1952 REUBERTA GUSTAVISON WAS INTRODUCED TO LELAND STOECKLIN 
BY HER SISTER AND BT?OTHER-IN-LAW, GLORIA AND GEORGE MARVIK. WHO 
WERE FRIENDS OF LELAND. ABOUT ONE YEAR- LATER THEY 'WERE MARRIED ON 
APRIL 11, 1953 IN 3T. JAIvlES PRO -CATHEDRAL. 

ECONOMICALLY THEY lU^D SIMILAR BACKGROUNDS AND AFTER THEIR 
MARRIAGE THEY MOVED INTO THE GUSTAVISON FAI^ILY HOI/IE ON FOURTEENTH 
STREET IN ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS TO LIVE WITH HER FATHER. SHE HAD 
BEEN WITH HIM SINCE HER MOTHER'S DEATH IN SEPTEMBER 1951 BECAUSE 
HER YOUNGER SISTER, JEANNIEN, WAS AWAY AT SCHOOL AND HER OLDER 
SISTER. GLORIA WAS MARRIED Ar^lD HAD A HOME OF HER OWN. THE TWO 
STORY FRAME HOUSE HAD AN ENCLOSED FRONT PORCH, LIVING ROOM, DINING 
ROOM AND KITCHEN ON THE FIRST FLOOR WITH THREE BEDROOMS ANT) A 
BATHROOM ON THE SECOND FLOOR. WHEN SHE WAS NOT AWAY AT SCHOOL, 
REUBERTA 'S SISTER, JEANNIEN, LIVED WITH THEM /Jl.SO UNTIL SHE 
MOVED TO CHICAGO AFTER GETTING HER COLLEGE DEGREE. THERE VffiRE 
NO OTHER BOARDERS. TPIERE WAS NO RENT OR ROOM Al-ID BOARD CHARGED 
BY EITHER PARTY. 

AT THAT TIME REUBERTA WAS AInI EMPLOYMENT SUPERVISOR FOR 
ILLINOIS BELL TELEPHONE COMPAI^ EARNING ABOUT FIFTY -FIVE DOLLARS 
PER WEEK AND LSE WORKED FOR MULLER-PINEHURST DAIRY AS A BODY AND 
FENDER MAN ON THE TRUCK FLEET AND EARNED ABOUT SEVENTY -EIGHT 
DOLLARS PER WEEK. THIS WAS AN AVERAGE INCOME FOR THE TIME AND 
WAS USED FOR DAILY LIVING EXPENSES. REUBERTA 'S FATHER, REUBEN, 
WAS EMPLOYED AS A PLANER FOR FAHLER MFG. AND ENGINEERING CO. /-ND 
MAINTAINED THE HOUSE AND PROPERTY EXPENSES WHILE REUBERTA AND LEE 
PAID FOR ALL DAILY HOUSEHOLD LIVING EXPENSES. 



j^e ^t^^ 



MIJ^iOaOTE / QUA CJHj". 

MiJDioaoT8 awAjaj aoHTvii 2aw H08IV; naffuafl s^^J hi 

OHW ,>iIVftAM SiJhJaO OWA AlflOIO .WAJ-Mi-rianTOHa OMA HHTeia «aH YH 

>io oaiHHAM anav. ysht jhtai ^3y awo tuosa .awAjaj ^o cOMaiirf aaaw 

.JAHaaHTAO-OHl c3T4AL .Tc HI ^^9^ Jt JIH^A 
HiaHT HaT-iA CMA &a>IU0HO){0Aa HAJIMI2 OA-H YHHT YJHAOIMOHOOa 
HTViaaTHUO'l wo a.MOH YIir^A^ W02IVAT8U0 aHT OTMI OaVOM raHT aOAIHHAM 

;ah aH8 .fiaHTA^ nan htiw avij ot eiomijji .cho'imooh hi TaaHTE 

aeuAoaa ii<^t HasMTqas vii HTAaa a'naHTOM hbh aoma mih htiv.' waaa 

«aajo HaH avu jooHoa ta yawa 2Aw ,KiaiMiuaL .aaTEiE naoMUOY aaH 

OWT aHT ,VIWO HaH "50 aivlOH A OAH aVIA OaiflHAM EAW AnOJO .HaTcIC 

omwia ,MooH omvij ,HOHoq tvioh^ oaEOJOwa wa oah aauoH 3MAH*i yhotb 

A CWA cMOOHCEff 32flHT HTB^' HOOJ"? TEHn SHT HO H3H0TIX OHA MCOH 

,J00H02 TA YAWA TOH 2AW aH2 MSHW .HOOJ^ OHOOaE aHT HO MOOHHTAS 

aHE JITMU Oa.IA rCIHT HTIW OaVIJ ,HaiHHAaL ,HaT2I2 2'AT5I3aUaH 

aaaw anaHT .aanoaa aoajjoo F.aH OHiTTao naTiA ooaoiho ot aavoM 
aaoHAHO aaAoa ojia mooh ho Tnan oh eaw aHan? .EHaaHAoa hshto oh 

.YTJiAq flaHTia Ya 

HOI H08iv«a<iu2 Twaiiiyoj-iida ha eaw ATHaauaii smit taht ta 

EHAjjoa avi-^-YT*?!^ TUoaA OHiHJTAa YHA<r.ioo anoHqaJaT jjaa 2iowijji 

QUA Yaoa A aA yauq TcHUHawi^i-rajJUM ncn aa/inow aaj oha xaaw aaq 

TH0ia-YTHav32 TuoaA aavTHAs dviA Tasj^ }iouflT aHT HO HAM Haawa^ 

awA aifliT aHT ho^ awiooMi aOAnavA ha eaw eiht .^laaw naq aaAjJoa 

,waau3H .flaHTA^ E'ATaaauaH .aapwa^xa dhivij yjiaq ho^ aa2U 2Aw 

GHA .00 OMiHaavnowa oha .dim naJHA^ ao^ aaviAjq a ea oaYOJiwa eaw 

aaj OHA ATHaauafi ajiHw 2a2Ha<ixa YTHaqoHi oha beuoh aHT aaHUTHIA^^ 

.saswaqxa ohivij oioHaEUOH yjiaq jja ho^ aiA<i 



PAGE 5^ 

THE FAT.IILY ALWAYS HAD A RADIO AND THE FIRST TELEVISION SET 
WAS PURCHASED IN DECEIffiER 1953. THOUGH LEE HAD OvVNED A CAR FOR 
MANY YEARS, SiEIR FIRST CAR WAS A YELLOW AND H.ACK I951 CHEVROLET 
CLUB COUPE. 

IN JULY 1954 TIMOTHY ROBERT WAS BORN. SliCRTLY AFTER LEE 
HAD RETURNED FROM SURGERY AT THE METHODIST HOSPITAL IN MADISON, 
WISCONSIN, FRANCES MARYE WAS BORN IN DECEMBER 1955. SOON AFTER 
HER BIRTH I^ DECEMBER 1957, IT BEGAT/IE APPARENT THAT . ELLYN LOUISE 
WAS NOT HEALTHY - SUBSEQUENT HOPITALIZATION DISCOVERED THAT SHE 
HAD A RARE liEREDIT/JlY CONDITION KNOWN AS GALACTOSEMIA. FORTUNATELY 
IN HER CASE IT WAS NOT FATAL BUT THOUGH DIETARY CONTROLLED, IT WOULD 
ALWAYS BE V/ITH HER. 

VARIOUS KETHODS OF DISCIPLINE VffiRE USED WITH THE CHILDREN AND 
USUALLY ADMINISTERED BY THEIR MOTHER. THEY RECEIVED THE USUAL 
SPANKINGS, BUT ALSO HAD THEIR MOUTHS WASHED OUT WITH SOAP, STOOD 
IN THE CORNER OR WERE GROUNDED FROM AMUSEMENTS. THEIR GRANDFATHER 
SCOLDED THEM AND WHEN THEY WERE WITH THEIR AUNT GLORIA SHE EXPECTED 
GOOD BEHAVIOR AND EXACTED THE NECESSARY PUNISHIvTENT IF NEEDED. 

DURING MOST OF THEIR MARRIAGE REUBERTA, LEE AND THE CHILDREN 
ATTENDED MASS REGULARLY AT ST. JMiES PRO -CATHEDRAL. THE CHILDREN 
ATTENDED CATECHISM AND RECEIVED THEIR SACRAMENTS. LATER THE FAMILY 
WAS NOT AS REGULAR IN CHURCH ATTENDANCE OR ACTIVITIES. 

HOLIDAYS VffiRE SPENT WITH BOTH SIDES OF THE PAi.4ILY TOGETHER 
IN THE EARLY YEARS. LATER THEY VARIED ATTENDAIsCE WITH EITHER 
REUBERTA'S FAN!ILY OR LEE'S PARENTS FOR ONE OR T/iORE OF THE HOLIDAY 
FESTIVITIES. CHRISTMAS EVE WAS USUALLY SPENT WITH REU'EERTA'S 
FATHER AND SISTERS AND CHRISTMAS DAY WAS SPENT WITH LEE'S MOTHER. 
\ R?:CENT YEARS HAVE SEEN SEVERAL YEARLY FAIvIILY REUiilONS WITH 
.EUBERTA'S RELATIVES ON HER FATHER'S SIDE, THE GUSTAFSONS. 



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1 PAGE 55 

1 

IN 1959 REUBEN GUSTAVI30N MARRIED MARY ARCHER AND MOVED 
LEAVING THE HOIVIE ON FOURTEENTH STREET FOR LEE ATD REUBSRTA AND 
THE CHILDREN. THEY CONTINUED LIVING THERE AND PURCHASED THE 
HOUSE ON A CONTRACT BASIS FROM HER FATHER. ' REUBERTA HAD TO MAKE 
ALL THE FAJ'IILY DECISIONS BUT LEE lAKDE ALL THE DECISIONS CONCERNING 
HIMSELF. 

IN JULY i960, AFTER THE DEATH OF LELAND, SR. , FAMILY CONFLICTS 
V/HICH HAD BECOTVIE NOTICEABLE BEGAN TO INCREASE. LEE, JR. CONTINUED 
TO HAVE FREQUENT "PROBLEMS" VffllCH CAUSED SEVERAL DIFFERENT PERIODS 
OF HOSPITALIZATION FOR VARIOUS ILLNESSES. HE REFUSED TO ACCEPT 
THE FACT THAT HE V/AS AN ALCHOLIC AT© THIS V/AS THE UNDERLYING 
CAUSE FOR HOST OF HIS ILLNESSES AND SUBSEQUENT FREQUENT JOB CHANGES. 

FOLLOVaNG HER HUSBAND'S DEATH, HELEN STOECKLIN HELPED TO 
CREATE MORE PROBLET/iS FOR HER ONLY CHILD AI© HIS FAT-IILY. SHE 
FAILED TO SEE THAT BY TAKING OVER FOR LEE AND HIS FAT.IILY AND NOT 
ALLOWING THEM TO ACCEPT AND FACE THEIR OWN RESPONSIBILITIES COULD 
NOT HELP THEM, BUT ONLY BRING MORE PROELETAS AND FAT^IILY DISSENSION. 
FOR INSTANCE-SHE PURCHA(^ED AN .EXPENSIVE RADIO FOR KER FOUR YEAR 
OLD GRANDSON AND THEN CONSTANTLY BERATED HIM BECAUSE HE DID NOT 
REALIZE ITS VALUE AND DIDN'T TAKE CARE OF IT. MANY OF HER GIFTS 
TO THE CHILDREN WERE TOO EXPENSIVE AT© IMPRACTICAL FOR THEIR AGE. 
SHE WAS ALWAYS GIVING MONEY TO L2E ON THE PRETEXT THAT IT WAS 
FOR THE FAIRLY , BUT IN REALITY ONLY ENABLED HIM TO INCREASE HIS 
DRINKING. SHE CONSISTENTLY COULD NOT OR WOULD NOT ACCEPT IT 
A-3 A FACTOR OF THEIR PROBLEFiS. AFTER MANY YEARS OF COUNSELING, 
..m3PITALIZATI0N3, TRYING AND FAILING TO OVERCOi^'iE THESE CONFLICTS. 
REUBERTA DIVORCED LEE IN FEBRUARY 19^9. 



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PAGE 56 
REUBERT. DID NOT RET-IARRY BUT HAD RETURNED TO A CAREER WITH 
ILLINOIS BELL TELEPHONE C0MP.\jr3f. LEE SUBSEQUENTLY LEFT ROCKFORD 
AND HIS .CHILDREN DID NOT HEAR FROM HIM AGAIN. IN I973 THEY 
RECEIVED WORD THAT HE WAS IN FLORIDA AND T^IIINALLY ILL WITH 



CANCER OF THE LUNGS - HIS DEATB CAI.1E IN HAY 1973. 



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PAGE 57 



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PAGE 58 



The POST 



Thurs., Apr. 16, 195^ 



da 



Leland Stoecklin Jr. And His Bricie 
Fly To Miami, Fia,, For Honeymoon 



Mr. and Mrs. Leland Stoecklin. 
Jr., whose marriage was an event 
of Saturday, Aprii 11, are now in 
Miami. Fla.. on a two week wed- 
ding trip. They plan to visit Ha- 
vana, Cuba, before returning to 
make their homo with Mrs. 
Stoecklin's father, Reuben Gusta- ! 
vison, 1114 14th street. When they I 
departed from Rockford last week- 
end Mrs. Stoecklin, the former 
Reuberta A. Gustavison, was < 
wearing a grey tailored suit, black 
' and white accessories and the or- j 
chid from her bridal bouquet. 

For the wedding ceremony, j 
which took place at 10 a. m. in 
St. James Pro-Cathedral, Reu- 
iberta wore a ballerina-length gown i 
and a flowing fingertip veil at- ; 
■tached to a white lace crown. The! 
delicate white lace bodice was ' 
designed with a v-neclcline and 
pointed fingertip length sleeves. ] 
Varying points cf lace e.xtended ! 
Irom the waistline of her bouffant : 
net skirt. She carried a white or- 
chid surrounded by carnations. 
SISTER ATfEXDS BRIDE 

As her sister's honor attenda"'., 
Miss Jeannien Gustavison wore 
an aqua ballerina-length frock 
fashioned of lace and net with 
scalloped lace panels extending 
^OT,-n me sMrt. A matching lace 
ar.d net picture hat and a bouquet 
of yellow f arnations and Talisman 
roses completed her cos.ume. 

East .Mitchell attended the 
bridegroom, son of the senior Le- 
land Stoecklins, 5-i34 Dale avenue 
Clifford Hanson and Chadv.ick 
Gustafson ushered. 

A pink camellia corsage com- 
pleted Mrs. Stoeclclin's attire 
vh;c.i consisted of a two-piece 
navy b.ue crepe dress and pink 
accessories. 

Organ music was plaved by 
Bertha McGuire for the " double- 
nng .service which was performed 
ty ihe Rt. Rev. Xeo M. Keenan 
_Ye..ow stock and white Easter lil- 
ies decorated the church a"ar 

Following the ceremony there 
v;as a breakfast at the Sweden 
House for the bridal party and 
Jmmedia-.e ffmilies. In the aft^r- > 
noon a reception was held in Ly- ' 
ran hall, which was decorated 

for the occasion with white and 
green floral arrangements. Guests-' 

registered with Mrs. Gloria Mar-! 

vik, the bride's sister ' 

NAVY VETERA.V 
The new Mrs. Stoecklin is th- 

employment assistant at the lili- 

Eo.s Bell Telephone co.mpanv of. 

fice. She wa.s graduated in" me 

from East Rockford high school 
tand attended University of IHinois 



extension classes for a yesr at' 
East high. Lee, a Harlem high 
school graduate of 1943, spent 2^.^' 
years with the navy during World; 
War II, serving in both the Pacific 
and Atlantic theaters. He is an 
employee of MuUer's Dairy. [ 

Mrs. Betiie Poszkus, Mrs. Ethel 
Ward and Mrs. Jane Yastrab were 
hostesses at a miiscelJaneous show- 
er on Reuberta March 9 at the 
Poszkus home, 518 East Jeffer- 
son street, and a similar party 
was held March 18 at the home 
of Mrs. Helen Gustafson. 1631 4th 
avenue.. Her co-hostesses were 
Mrs. Elenore Johnson and Tvlrs. 
Evc-lyn Gustafson. On March 27, 
Mrs. Helen Stoecklin and Mrs. 
Gloria Marvik entertained at the 
Stoecklin residence, 5434 Dale av- 
enue. 






% 



PAGE 59 



» 




^ 



FOCK GENERATIONS — Four genera- 
tions cf the Stoecklin iamily are shown at 
the first birthday celebration of the 
youngest meincer, Timothy R. Stoecklin. 
I.e'1 to right are Timmy's father, Ldand 



Stoecklin, Jr., 1114 14th st.; his grcat- 
g^rndmother, Mrs. Mary Stoecklin, Al- 
hambra, III.; Timmy; and his gnindi'atliBlv 
L«land Stoecklin, 5431 Dale avc. Loves 
Park. 






PAGE 60 



STATE OP ILLINOIS 
IN THE CIRCUIT COUBT OF TH2 ITth JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
COUNTY OF WINNEBAGO 






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rt 


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a 


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■fro V£) td M 

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Ul H, ^ H- H* 

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P- 








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!=: 


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rt- 




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^^ 




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M 


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3 




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CO 


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C 


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3 




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Cu 




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4 




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s' 






CD 








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> 




3 


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> 




4 


ct 


> 




m 


M 


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4 








4 


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B 




3* 


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ct 


CD 


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4 


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w 






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"^ -^ 



PAGE 61 
FRANCES MARYE STOECKLIN 

FRANCES MARYE WAS BORN 01. DECEIviBER 14, 1955 TO LELAND 
AND REUBERTA STOECKLIN. SHE WAS BORN A MIDDLE CHILD. 

THE FATHLY LIVED ON FOURTEENTH STREET IN A LARGE TWO STORY 
mm. IN ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS. 

FRANCES AND HER BROTHER TIM AND HER SISTER ELLYN WERE 
DISCIPLINED BY THEIR. MOTHER REUBERTA. THE USUAL METHODS WERE 
USED SUCH AS GROUNDING, SPANKING, AND WASHING OUT THEIR MOUTHS 
'^TH SOAP. 

THE FAJfllLY GOT TOGETHER ON HOLIDAYS WITH BOTH SIDES OF THE 
FAMILY, THE GUSTAVISOFS AND THE 3T0ECKLINS. DURING THE SUr.»IERTir.iE , 
THE FAMILY WENT OK VACATIONS AND PICNICS. THERE ARE RECENT 
FAIvlILY REUNIONS ON REUBERTA '3 SIDE OF THE FAIvIILY WHICH THE FAMILY 
ATTEI^S. 

FRANCES HAD MANY WAYS OF ENJOYING HERSELF. SHE WENT TO HIGH 
SCHOOL ACTIVITIES SUCH A3 BASKETBALL AND FOOTBALL GAMES AND WAS 
ACTIVE IN THE FRENCH CLUD BEING TREASURER. DURING THE SURIJxERTIME, 
SHE \mm SWIMMING AND PLAYED TENNIS. v^NTERTIME FUN WAS SPENT ICE 
SKATING AND SLEDDING AT VARIOUS SLOPES. 

THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRANCES LIVED IN WAS VERY FRIENDLY. SHE BABYSAT 
FREQUENTLY BEFORE SHE BEGAN V/ORKING. hlAm CHILDREN LIVED IN HER 
NEIGHBORHOOD AND AT NIGHTS THEY WOULD ALL GET TOGETHER AND DO 
SOMETHING. SHE HAD MANY NEIGHBORHOOD ROMANCES. CHURCHILL PARK WAS 
NEARBY, AND SHE REGULARLY WENT THERE IN BOTH THE SUMMER AND WINTER. 

IN FEBRUARY CFI969, HER PARENTS DIVORCED. FRANCES' FATHER 
LEFT TOWN AND MOVED TO FLORIDA. HE LATER DIED IN MAY OF 1973 
OF LUNG CANCER. 

IN MARCH OF 1973, THE FAMILY MOVED TO A NEWLY BUILT HOUSE ON 
BROWi.FIELD ROAD. THEY REIUIN THERE AT THIS TIME. 

FRANCES ATTENDED HALLSTROM GRADE SCHOOL, LINCOLN JUNIOR HIGH 









'•IL 


■.-•A'V. 




^ ;-' 


.1 , • ■■ r ... 




.•.Mil': 




' A \:r^ 


0T2 OW 




.1 


/.I Ih^HTZ H 



y? wo aSVIJ YJIMA^ aHT 

.zimiddi .aHOT."^oofl wi smoh 
. '/lYJJii H^TEifc n^i a;iA MIT >iaHTOHa HaH dWA eaoMAOT 
..V. saoHTaM tT .ATHaauaH hshtom hisht ya oaviLiqioaia 

}M HI3HT TUO C.iiiclAW QUA ,DWIiiWAC[8 .OHIOPIUOHO 8A HOUE CHZU 

.qA02 HTIW 

iiH'l '10 S:iCiu .-LTOa liTIVV cX/.aiJj:-: HO juJiTd^j OL xOD YJr^*i SHT 

■ - •- •-• 3HT DVlima .^ ---'TC SHT OMA 2'I08IVATEU0 SHT.YJIMA^ 

^•JiH aflA 25iaHT .c.vi/i^X'i GM^v 2W0ITA0AV HO TMHW YJIMA^ SHT 

i^i._ •. aiiT HoiiTw YJiMA'i aHT ^0 ddie ci^ATflaauKfl WO awoiMUsr: yjima? 

.cOMaTTA 

n-^irt u i-ridv. oiic . i^vr.c..-;^-. -JWlYOLWa "iO EYAv/ lij-.i u.aji fiaOIIAJTi 

8AW aWA cV" lAffTOO^ QUA JJAaTa:>{2Aa EA H0U2 eaiTIVITOA JOOHOS 

. "TUc. .inT vniHua .fHHUcAafiT oMiaa aujo HOwaOT sht mi aviTOA 

.. iviciie aAw wu^ awiTHaTMiw .EiwwaT oaYAjq qua owimmiy/o Tviaw sue 

.23«iOa2 EUOIflAY TA OMiaOaJE QUA 0MITAJI8 

:.^.<i ^nc. .iJOMaiHa Yfiav 2aw hi oavij aaowAfra aooHHoaHoiaw aHT 
flaH WI oaviJ W3HCUIH0 YWAM .DWDiHow wAoaa SHE a«o^aa YiTwaupaH-? 

" ' OWA HaHTaCOT TaO JJA OIUOW YaHT 2TH0IM TA OMA QOOHHOaHOiaW 

■— flUHO .830WAM0H aO0HH0»tOiaH YWAM OAH SHZ .OlIIHTar402 

-2 aHT HTOa WI aHSHT TWaW YJHAJUOafl aHE OWA .YBHAaW 

'■" . — '^"^^ "^-"^TaRAq HSH ,9d^jr^o YHAUflaa^ wi 

;. .;^ i.u 7:::iA^ dA .AaiHOJ'? OT OSVOM OWA WWOT TiSd 

.jiaowAO owuj ^'^ 

. ^.u .i.f.i .aiMA^ aHT ^tS9i ^0 HOflAM WI 

... ix ciHT TA anaHT wiamsh ysht .oAOfi ojari.iwo 

' .I00H02 aOAJ^O MOHTEJJAH daOWaTTA EaOWAfT^ 



PAGE 62 

SCHOOL, AlUJ IN JUriE OF 1973 GRADUATED FROK ROCKFORD EAST HIGH 
3GH00L. SHE IS NOW CURRENTLY ATTENDING ROCK VALLEY COLLEGE IN 
ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS '.^HSRE SHE IS IN THE NURSING PROGRA^u 

V/mLE IN HIGH SCHOOL, FRANCES APPLIED «fro THE COOPERATIVE 
EDUCATION PROGRAI.'. THIS PROGRAIv] ALLOV/ED THE STUDENT TO WORK IN 
HIS OR HER FIELD IN WHICH THEY ifILL BE GOING INTO, AND RECIEVE 
THE SCHOOL GRSDITS FOR WORKING miUL GOING TO SCHOOL. SHE WAS 
INTSRVIE'/SD OUT OF SEVENTY GIRLS AllD CHOSEN ONE OF TIIE TEN GIRLS 
IN THE PROGRAIfi AT ?:A3T HIGH SCHOOL. SHE WAS INTERVIEWED AT 
ROCKFORD MEf/IORlAL HOSPITAL IN THE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION NURSING 
.ASSISTANT PROGRAM AND SHE WAS CHOSEN ONE OF THE SE'/EN OUT OF 
THE TEN GIRLS TO WORK THERE. SHE REMAINS AT ROCKFORD ME&K)RIAL 
HOSPITAL WORKING A3 A irjRSING ASSISTANT EVEN THOUGH SHE IS FINISHED 
.ITH THE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAfi. 



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nl yvnO* Ox Trwi(iU'i'c aril OinCxiaA MA/iOOH*i EDW .fiAHOOW*! WOIT.' 

avaiDSH OKA .oTur wtoo aa jjiw ysht hoihw wi nan hsh ro cih 

ID war :^ ■ .-hu oha cJhio ': -fo ii/c 

TA Offt I cAW aH8 ,JOOH08 HOIri icAi TA t'dAflOOfl^ aHT HI 

OHKWK MOliAOliCS SrviTAHZqOOO SHT KI JATiqEOII vl/. " 

? "iio awo raaoHD 2Aw hhb oha mahooh^ TnAitifceA 

dAI.-;0 ■ :3H SK8 .S-- ^V/ OT aiHIO MST SHT 

V.t THATEiaEA '7W JATI^EOK 

^1 MOIiA- 



PAGE 63 



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SUNESON, THEODORE JOHN, 1952- 



.EASE USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY" HI STORY 

;ar Contributor to the Kock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
ncan families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
:w mmtues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
xess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY 



***;'c-,V;VAAAAA*A-,V^;V*Ay:A*A:V;VA:'r: 



y , ^ _ * OFFICE USE CODE 

1. Your name / AeccfcTe ^oA a.> ..'L a.^.^'qa.^ Jr * 

Date of form ^ ^ _ ^^^ a (,0 ^ 



2. Your college: Rock Valley College -:■. (\d // 

Rockford, Illinois :•; 



*#***;•; ■!: ^ ^V ;V ;V :V; )V i: -.'c A A iV A ;V .', * ■!: ;V ;V :V : 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

X B efore 1750 1750-1800 I8OO-I850 

1850-1900 1900 or lateT 

4. Please check an_ regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived, 

X N ew England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) j£ Middle Atlantic (N.Y., Penna., N.J. , Va.) 

S°"th Atlantic (Ga., Fla., N.C., S.C.) ^East South Central (La. , Miss. , Ala. *Tenn l< 

.^-5t South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., k7 F x E ast North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind, 

^Pacific (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 



5. Please check an_ occupat ion a 1 categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming Mining 2< ^Shopkeeping or small business 

^Transportation ^B i g Business _>< Manufacturing 



Professions Industrial labor _x Other 



6. Please check aJM_ religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discusse 
in this paper have belonged. 

^Roman Catholic ^Jewish x, P resbyterian Methodist 



Baptist Episcopal ian Congregational w Lutheran 

n,.-,b^^ Li ;m „ . . . ^ . . 



Quaker ^Mormon Other Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians ^f-lexicans ^Puerto Ricans 

^Jews ^Central Europeans Italians Slavs 

.'•''sh ^British ^ N ative Americans over several generations 



East Asian ^ Other 



o. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X, Interviews with other Family Bibles X Family Genealogies 

f ami 1 y membe rs 

Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 

^Photographs Maps Other 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name A e / -^ c- /\J Js h iv- ">/ ,c >-Xr/t'' Current Residence 

I f dead, date of oeatn /<y-^t7 - ^ ^-' 

Place of bi rth ^f^co Ja^KC-h.^ ///,-//< l<,ta,^iL'\ Date of Birth ^ -^ h 1^30 



Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high school ^/ vocational college 



I 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^y o;^/^,r. Dates ^»^.;t-/9,^T 1 st /i'icU^/ Dates /9K'^ 

2nd p^-t- o PCcc Dates // 2nd ,i<_ je,^A,''U yJ Aa.'^J Dates \l/ 

3rd PoS-Vq c^ C/c-e Dates /' 3rd A' / Cf <fv Dates p^/st 

^th p <> ^-->. ,j -p cil Dates y^rc -/^^<^ ^th /J7^rij 6,.^/^ /l- Sf Dates /yj-y^, 

Re 1 i g i on J.u i- kp/i^/C 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. (wpcl"* Ik/»/iJ P^^f^-ly 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother /'^ , ^qj^ f C -^^z aate 



NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
I that data on the back of this page, (A-1) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name /^/[,/i'/^ J)ophe ^/cJ ^Cr^eA.' Current Residence /7)o/CU/i/e A' J'' 

I f dead, date of death 



Place 



of bi rth ^^iJ^S:S' ^'^'^:J'. Date of bi rth J-.J/ - /^^; 



Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high school V vocational ^ col lege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) . 
1st ^ec^^Ac^^ftgyf Dates 1 s t /^ / ^/ ^^ , / Dates ^y^?:^ 

2nd /^ouf^e coi-^e Dates 1w6^^^^^^aAc_^ ^Dates 



3rd Dates 3rd /j \y c,-6/ 



Dates 



^th Dates ^th /jj^y^i /^,^/^ Dates J'i/^^ 

Re 1 i g i on /c7A^/e^A. 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. CA,^ji^<;K 

Place of marriage to your grandfathe r ^j^^, y^,^^^ . ^^^ ,^ DATE 6- ,g<,> ^ , ^/// 
^°^^- th%Hatl^S^*fh^^BaHl'S?^ti(f? pg|i^|A-^)f stepmother or another relative give 



3. 

■■andfather (your mother's side) 

3me /^A ^ /; e ;/ 0_ / ,jfAy 6> a / Current Res i den ce d^^ ft^/T; >^^ y ^i'j^ rr,yo.<,^^ 

F dead, date of death 

lace of bi rth 0^£^c/v (.i-',<,c oa. <- ,m) Date of birth ></ - ,3c - /-f^j'^ 

Jucation (number of years): 

jrade school ^ high school >>/ vocational college ^ 



:cupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
it \)\^Qn\hf,i.^\\(f^l ~^^lo.<, ^Dates 1st ^^P6c.-^ ^Dates 

^<^ dioc\ J-6cj$e cu-A-^y^ ^Dates 2nd />x^//a. ^Dates 

rd PA/k^m^ :,t'c/)/ ^<,^ /t\<, ^Dates 3rd J3^^/,/l ^Dates 

th PkA/?r\^Vi<+^. /AJ A r-ii^A?^ ^ ate s k t h ,^-><v>> ^^y ^Da te s 

2' i g i on p p /, .5 c-..^ -,; ej^,A /^> 

alitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc . /Y) /^ca-< t^' u^ T l r^<. 

lace of marriage to your grandmother f>^.,^esV^ ^\- ,1^ U^.^.cc^c.Q^ . . . "^^^t .^-.c- ^ /9~ 

3te: If your mother was raised by a !» Ldp f dl fi e r ''u r anPi n e r r&\iil \ \Jti (CO ag e l8r 

give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

randmother (your mother's side) 

ame /7)v^^(-- .T^ ^rv .-^^r ^ex-ir,j ^Current Residence ^^. ./ . ,, ^ ..^^ 

f dead, date of death /-^cj' /<^.?;^' 



Date of bi rth g - ^/- / .-pyc 



lace of b i rth niA)^^^^ Ir-jJ U'lscc r^<j rV 

ducat ion (number of years) 

grade school ^ high school ^-/ vocational college y 



ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
St gooL V:<-,= P>^ye Dates 1st /riAJ&^-^'fj /rC ^Dates_ 

" d ScKj<yce.-(c ^Dates 2n d ^^^/,^l ^Dates_ 

rd ^Dates 3rd ^Date5_ 

eligion p ^r..<; 6\/ /fyP-y^ ff 

olitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



lace of marriage to yoOr grandfathe r /Yl'^PKh^ ^ / i^cf <:^^aSc c'/l--<;//l d ate <"/-/; -/^/p 

Dte: If your mother was raised by a stepmother cr another relative (to age 18) 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



Stepgrandf ather (your mother's side) 

^^'^ Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death """" ' ~ 

'''•"-'• "' '''''"■ D.Ue of hinli 

T'liicil ion (nijiiil)c r of yf.ii',) ~" ~ ~ 

()r.iilc -.iluH,] hi(jh school vocotionoi colloqc 



Occupation(s) PL^CE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
'5t Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3''d Dates 3rd_ ^Dates 

'♦th Dates ijth 



Dates 



Re I i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 

Place of marriage to your grandmother ' ' ~' date ' ' 

Stepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name/w^y,^ /'/^^l,^ ,,.^ /-Mr/ /ry Current Res i dence 6£efl/i>^^, OJj^<rc>^Xy^.' 

If deacl, date of death ^ ^^^ 

Place of birth f))p£> ,^, // /jj,^ ro/ix</ a) Date of bi rth /^ - p^j- ycyc<r 

Education (number of years) ~ ' 



grade school ^ high school y vocational Ji college ,^L^ 



Occupation(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
'st /^o^.^^.l^^a^^^ Dates 1st £i>^/,^ rfL^ , Dates_ 

2"d/^^^,^/ ii?rJn,>;-^,n^i ^Dates 2nd /yj^A.-Jioc ^. . < , Dates_ 

3'-d /^,.,,^^ ,... J? Dates 3rd S^je /,^ "._,,,, ^, Dates_ 

Religion (-4/;,,, I,, ^ ^_ 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



FT 



ace of marriage to your grandfathe r ^.^y,^ ./<<.. ^-,x/t Da te ^-^. ^ -y^^/ 



CHILDREN of A & B (or A-1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below '*' 

NafDe -/7/^y^/c^^-- .-TAA yt' ..5c/y,/rZ<r/c> 

Place of birth ^.V,v/,^^y,^ date ^- / . ycyj,,, 

Number of years or scnool.ng ' AJ >/^ ^ ~ Occu^ti6n .< :;;;,.,,^,^V /^,,^ .. ^^.^.^-^ 

Residence c.^,c,,v //h>uo,^ Marital Status /^.-^.y/.y-^^'^^' ^^^^ 

Number of children^ 

Narne 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of school in g Occupation 

Residence ___Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren ~~~ "~^ — 



Name 

Place of bl rth date 

Number of years of school ing Occupatibn 

Res I dence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi ldr6n "~~^~~' 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling OccupatiOrt 

Res i dence M arital Status ~ 

Number of chi Idren 

Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupatibn 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren "" 



Name 

P 1 ace of bi rth Ja te 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of ch i Idren ~ 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~ date 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~ ^date 
Number of years of schooling Occupation 
Residence HaTTTal Status ' 
Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren ' 



Name 

Place of bi rth ~ date 

Number of years of schooling OccupatT^ 

residence u » ^ i p 

N,„.ho. ^? 'Marital Status 



Number of Clll Idryn 



Name 

Number of years ot schooling ^ q_ 
Residence ^,,,^^< ,-^,, ,,„,, ^^ 
dumber of children j^ 

"lame 

*lace of b i rth 



CHILDREN of C and D (or C- , . D-,)-your .other's nan,e should appear below 



Nu.Mb.-r of y>.-.jr-. oi schooling ~^ 
Res i dcncc c>j^i 



j: /l./oo'^ 



Occupat ion X J ~/ y?7 7T 



ce OI birth ^ ,,, ,,;^,:^„ 



date 



,^- ^/-/^.7c/ 



-lumber of years ol' school ing 
Residence 



lumber of ch i Idren 



lame 

lace of birth ' ' 

lumber of years of" school ing 
esidence 



umber of ch i Idren 



anie 

lace of bi rth "^ 

umber of years of' school ing 

as i dence 



jmber of ch i Idren 



3me 

lace of bi rth ~ 

limber of years of school ing 

lisidence 



'imber of ch i Idren 



^lme 

face of bi rth ~ " 

^mber of years of school ing" 

fsidence 

Nmber of chi Idren ' 



Nme 

Pace of bi rth ' 

^nber of years of schooling 

Esidence 

1 Tiber of chi Idren 



< ne 

'jce of bi rth ~ 

Inber of years ot schooling 

It idence 

'^'f>er of chi Idren 



yj^^;'Pf' °"A^^r ^r^c^r. ^r^^-fO^s 



Marital Status .,„^..^..V 




date 

Occupat ion 



date 

Occupat ion 



Mari tal Status 



date 



Marital Status 



Occupation 



date_ 

Occupation 
Marital Status 



date 



Occupat i6n 
Marital Status 



date 



Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



date 



Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



'ce of birth ' — 

i^ber of years of schooling 

cidence 



''^ber of children 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



Your Father 



NameTj^^ 7^^,. 7"//,^^ .'yu ^^. .><. r... Current Residence <:^^^^^,^ r //r.:^;< 

I f dead, date of death ' ■ '^ ^ ^'f /^<\f\ 

Place of birth /^.'^, z..^/; c i^, D ate of birth V ^ - /^oa 

Education (number of years) 
grade school 6 high school J Ji vocational college y 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
^^^ Ct^tNi^l'o^ (cmofi^-/ Dates 7- /.c//. 1st Dates /^^/ 

2nd Dates / 2nd Odtes 



3rd Dates / 3rd^ ^Dates 

\^\4^3^lM^L,^x^^.:il2^1:L4. Dates Z'^;/ ^th r^;^^,,^ r//....,< Dates ,9p./ 

Re 1 igion > , , ^ '^ 

Political parties civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. y;;^,.,.,,. n^u.^.....n\ 
l\rl^ ?r "'^^^'^g^ to your mother -/f^ p^/^ /7)>^< ^ ^ ' ^ d ate Tu^'^' ~. /^y^c. 



. .auc u. ludrr.dye Lo your motner yy ^^/, //;,,<^ ■ d ate y-^^z'^ ' <■ \^^.^c/ 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

Your Mother 

Nam e/%4^,/ f/j:2^/p-,^A <<^4-/ .-^g /t/Ko/O Cu r ren t Res i den ce OP/^c 'o/jJ r/Z^nJ' > < 

If dead, '"date of death ^ 

Place of h\rt\\ fy>^/,A, /j >Acof^<./rf Date of bi rth q - p-p - /<^o ^ 

Education (number of years) ~ 

grade school C^ high school V vocational j college / 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st A,,.P<^ r k'/C') Dates 1st D ates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd.< /)^/ /JL^^,-, Dates 3rd Of?(^(^a nJ 7///^c- <; Dates /gy^7- ^^ 

Religion ^,.^/^.^,^^^/ 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. ,-,^/^ ^rr^ <^y^c ^^, /r / /^^/fe^ 

^^fP^/;^y.-^^<- , ^P/chf, .<rArrJ .h-/..,~^,.< ■ ■ - - - - ■ ■ ; 

I'lace of marriage tajj^our fath6 r"7~.^^/^ T??/^: ■ ■ ^ d ate 6 -2i- /^y^f 

NOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 



this page (F-2). 



CHILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

Place of birth /, a, p, „ i, ■ . ■ ^ — ' — ' — '■ rr~r c ■_ • 

^ , f ^v ^'-r , ^"- ''- /s<t ... < /i.' Date of birth J-Qr^ /o<rn_ 

»Jumber of years of schooling /// il, n.-^..^^^; ^^^^ /y? ^ 

»Jumber of ch dren — '^J^'^i/ f-^. 



»Jumber of ch i id ran 
^ame 



lace of birth ,,.^^^,, w -T777^ 



. " ■ ' ^" /6;^V^'^^ ^i,.<,r^rs^^j^ Date of birth y/~,o - /9<^ 

umber of year. oV School fng " ^^,,, " Occupati oh^^^ /, l- 

!!:^!"!! ^f5;--' 7-.^-^--- Harital ^t^us .... .7 " 



lumber of ch i Idren ' O/ '^,y' i 



ame fi;y^ /VVhA,^ .<r,..,.,>^... 

I T °^^'^"-^^^^--^-^v-;.^^>^-^->- ^^>-4 D are of birth 3- ^^- /^5 5/ 

""^r °^ y^ars of school, ng .j Occu pation 5^!!/,^ 

esidence cw^.^cic .1. TJJ...., ^ Marl tal Status" , ^,;1 ,. . - "^^-"^-^ 

lumber of children "" — — • ^f'-'ir f/ -r^ — _ 



lame 

lace of birth j^jp-, ^^ ^.^^^ 

umber of years or schooling OccupatT^ 

^^l^^^ce_^ Marital Sr..r — 

umber of en 1 Idren ~~" 



ame 

lace of bi rth 



,: , _^^_____ f^ate of birth 

umber of years or schoolin g OccupiH^ 

^''^^"<^^__,, Marital sT^.s 

umber of childreri " 



ame 



^^f^^^'^t^ . , bare of birth 

umber of years or schooling OccupatioTT 



"'^^"^^ ,. ZZZ^H" Marital Status 

umber of ch 1 Idren 



ame 



'^^^ °^ '^''•'^^^ DitTof birth_ 

_ Occuf 
Marital Status" 



umber of years or schooling — Occu^TtTo?; 

5Sidence ' ~ 



jmber of ch i Idren 
ame 



'^^^ °^ ^"-^'^ . . .. Date of birth 

jmber of years or schooling Occupation' 

'''^^"" , Marital STatus 

Jmber of children — — 



Hi. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along v/ith all literary and administrative 
rights, to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed /J jr{c-^-^\\\SLAnr-t^ ^ ' 

Sl.,3v-2^ 



Date 



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In researchins; this family history, I found that my 
heritage stretches back to the time when the Uniteg States 
was formed and even before. I felt that it would be only right 
to include some of the facts I found about my antecedents. 
Clearly recorded dates begin with the birth of Edward Gray 3d, 
1730, probably in Yarmouth, Mass, He married Mary Paddock of 
Cape Cod, Mass. in 17^8. She was bom in 1727. They had 13 
children, 8 daughters and 5 sons. Mary Paddock Gray died In 
Lenox, M:ass. in I789 at age 62. Edward Gray died in I803 in 
Sandgate, Vermont, an extremely prosperous and patriotic man. 

Edward Gray was born in 1772 in Lennox, Mass. He was the 
fifth son of Edward Gray and Mary Paddock Gray. He married 
Rhoda Stoddard of Sandgate, Vermont in 1793 » who was born in 
1770 in Sandgate, Vermont. They had I5 children, Edward owned 
and operated a grist mill until he died in I8I3, with spotted 
fever. Rhoda Stoddard Gray died in I850, in Potsdam, N.Y. at 
age 80. 

Cliver Gray, son of Edward Gray Jr. and Rhoda Stoddard, 
was born at Sandgate, Vermont 1797, He married Mary Goodrich 
of Benson, Vermont, on October 18, I83O. She died on July 18, 
I8U5, Five children were born of this marriage. Oliver Gray 
remarried in 18^6 to Adelia Farnsworth, of Dorset, Vt. In I857, 
Oliver and one son, Hermon G. came to Oregon, Dane County, Wis. 
A year later Edward, and step-mother Adelia came west to their 
new home, Cliver died Dec. 1^, I863, and Adelia died Sept", 29, 
I883, It is interesting to note that Edward Gray hired a substi- 
tute to serve for him in the Civil V'ar. This caused him consider- 



able unpopularity In the area, and he later moved to Charles City, 
Iowa, and then to St. Paul, Minn, 

Hermon Othiniah Gray was born January 25t I838. He married 
Mary All Buchanan, born January 8, 1953 t who was a widow. They 
had a son, Harvey Oliver Gray born on April 30, 1888, Hermon 
died in 191^ and Kary All Gray died in 1925. Hermon was said to 
have been a very prosperous farmer. He came from a hard-working 
farm family of strict religious practices. They were Presbyterians, 
who never missed church on Sunday, and spent the remainder of the 
day quietly listening as their father read aloud from the Bible. 
My Grandfather says that his father (Hermon) came to dread Sundays, 

Mary Elizabeth All Buchanan Gray, I853-I925, was the daughter 
of George All, I826-I909. and Helen Greene, I826-I917, of Little 
Falls, New York. Helen Greene was the daughter of Madeline Herki- 
mer, I796-I873, who was the niece of the Revolutionary War General, 
Nicholas Herkimer, General Herkimer was known for his action 
and bravery at the battle of Oriskany, New York, where he lost 
his life. It was said to have been one of the most bloody battles 
of the war. General Burgoyne never recovered from the blow 
administered at Oriskany. 

Mary All Gray was the daughter of George and Helen Greene All, 
Also of interest is the fact that she was the great granddaughter of 
Alyda Sp.huyler, who was the wife of George Herkimer, brother of 
Nicholas, Although it is not perfectly clear, Alyda Schuyler is 
either the sister or cousin to Hester Schuyler, the grandmother 
of Schuyler Colfax, Vice President of the United States during 
the first administration of U. S, Grant, While holding this office. 



2. 



Mr, Colfax was accused of posta.l frauds and his name was connected 
with the Credit Kobilier scandal, although this was never proven. 

Through the years the Herkimer and Schuyler families inter- 
married many times creating a very prominent union of families in 
the Mohawk Valley of N,y, There were many Army officers and ac- 
quaintances of General George V/ashington among my maternal ancestors. 

Harvey Oliver Gray, born in Oregon, Wisconsin, April 30, 1888, 
was the son of Hermon and Mary All Gray. He was brought up on a 
farm about six miles outside o^' town and had to ride his pony to 
and from school every day, regardless of the weather. 

A favorite story of his Is that of his first pair of glasses. 
It seems he was not doing well ("damn near failing"), and his 
teacher suggested that his eyes could be the problem. His father 
said it was nonsense, and he needed to study harder. So his 
brother-in-law bought the needed glasses, warning him to wear 
them only at school. Very soon the school teacher happened to 
see Hermon and told him how much the glasses were helping his son. 
It all turned out well though, as Hermon accepted the fact and 
paid for the glasses. 

After completing high school, Oliver worked two years in a 
local pharmacy. It was here the. t he developed a strong interest 
in that profession. He then went to the University of Vfisconsln 
at Madison for two years and became a druggist, graduating in 
1910. He presently is the oldest living graduate of the School 
of Pharmacy. 

Following his graduation from the University, he became a 
pharmaceutical salesman. He then onllsted .In the Ar:2iy, and 



3. 



Served as a medic In World War 1. He married Karie Jeanette 

Sexton in 1918, at Marshfield, Wisconsin. Shortly thereafter 

he took over a drug store in Berlin, Wisconsin. During this time . 

he had two children. Around the beginning of the depression he 

sold the drug store and went back on the road selling pharmaceutical 

supplies. Karie Sexton Gray died in January of 1938, and H. 0. 

Gray worked in several drug stores in various locations in the 

state. He married Lydia Hadley in 19^1. in Berlin, Wisconsin. They 

presently reside in Green Bay, Wisconsin. He has been a great 

help to me in writing this paper. 

Karie Jeanette Sexton, Born August k, I89O, died January 
29f 19381 was the daughter of a prominent Marshfield, Wisconsin 
family. She was raised in an affluent lifestyle, the family 
employing a maid, and it is said, the first family in the town 
to have a telephone. She was the daughter of William Arthur 
Sexton, and Ida Richardson Gates. Marie was educated at the 
University of Wisconsin and following her graduation, kept 
the books for the family drug store business until she met and 
married H. Cliver Gray in 101 8. T>{o children were born of this 
marriage. 

Only a few facts are available at this time regarding 
William and Ida Gates Sexton. The Sextons are Irish, an ancestor 
of theirs having served as Kayor of Limerick, Ireland, a number 
of generations ago. William A. Sexton was born near Berlin, 
Wisconsin, and educated in pharmacy at the University of Michigan. 
He then came to Karshfield, Wisconsin, where he established a 
prosperous drug store business, owning three stores before he 
died. 



^. 



The lineage of Ida Sexton can be traced to Revolutionary 
War times to a Private Lawscn, who served with General George 
Washington, She was a member of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, Ida was educated at Lawrence College, Appelton, 
Wisconsin, as a teacher. Her father was a doctor. She taught 
school near Marshfield, having to travel over rough country 
to reach her school. It was here that she met and married William 
A. Sexton. 

Lydia Ha.dley Gray was born in Kerrill, Wisconsin, on October 
23, 1905. She was trained as a medical technician, but has not 
followed her profession except for a short period. She lived 
with, as housekeeper, and made a home for Oliver's two children, 
following the death of their mother. In 19'J-l. she and Oliver were 
married, and are today living in Green Eey, Wisconsin. 



LudwiK Andresen vms born In 1859, in Pedersdorf auf Fehmarn, 
a small island off the coasts of Germany and Denmark, He came to 
the United States alone in 1873» at the age of l4, to avoid the 
German draft. It seems that when he arrived in the United States, a 
letter from his mother, telling friends of his arrival, had failed 
to reach them. A gua.rd at Ellis Island helped him reach his des- 
tination, but at the same time took the non-english speaking boy 
for about twenty-three dollars, all the money he had In the world. 
The guaxd told him that his German money was no good, and traded 
him a hand full of change for It, -Ludwig lived and worked with' 
friends in their grocery store in Yorkville, now E. 85th St, in 
New York City, He learned the grocery business well, and after his 
marriage to Louise Stubbemann in 1884, he acquired his own business. 
He later owned a confectionary store, and also sold 'real estate. 
They had four children. Ludwig died a prosperous man while traveling 
In Germany in 1925. 

Louise Stubbemann Andresen was born In 1861 , in Ansdorf 
Hanover, Germa,ny, She came to America in I878, at the age of 17, 
and worked as a seamstress. She, like her husband, came from a 
family of farmers. She and Ludwig lived in Yorkville, until they 
moved to the Bronx, where he bought an apartment building, York- 
ville was a heavily German populated area, and the area of the Bronx 
where they later lived, was heavily Jewish. Louise died In 1951 1 at 
the t=ifre of 90 

Henry Suneson was the first Suneson to come to America'. 
He was born in Skiz(na , Sweden, The dates of his birth, death and 
marriage were not obtainable. He immigrated with a group of 
people who were enroute to Redwing, Minn. He was the carpenter 

6, 



among the group. It was rumored that he got drunk and missed 
the train when it left the city. Since he was a carpenter by- 
trade, he went to work as a cabinet and piano maker. He met 
Augusta, his wife, sometime before I88O. It is not known how or 
where, except th-at it was in New York City. They were married, 
they had four children, and lived first at ^^th St., the Hell's 
Kitchen section of New York City. Later they lived at W. l^l^th 
St., the area th^at is now Harlem, 

Augusta Suneson came to America from Malmo, Sv;eden. All 
that we know of her, is t?i3 1 she worked there as a cook, and did 
the same after she immigrated. One time, however, before she 
immigrated it is said that she cooked lunch for the King of 
Sweden. She returned to Sweden for one visit, in order to spend 
an inheritance that could not be taken from that country. She 
and two of her children stayed for an entire year. She died in 
1909 in New York City, 

Nelson John Suneson was born on November 21, I88O, in the 
area of New York City known as Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan, ^^th St. 
He was one of the four children born to Henry and August-a Suneson. 
He was christened Nils, but later legally changed his name to 
Nelson. His educRtion consisted of grade school and four years of 
high school which he attended in the evenings. He worked ^8 years 
in the Post Cffice and retired in 195C as a supervisor. He married 
Anna Sophie Andresen on the 28th of June, 1911. He hgd met her 
about 7 years earlier at a dance. They would dance all night 
and then go to work the next day. They were very active members 
of the Lutheran Church, he serving on the vestry, 3nd she as 
the superintendant of the Sunday School. He was also very active 

7. 



in Republican politics, serving as precinct captain and slso 
a member of the local Republican Club. Ke was a Century Wheelman, 
which meant that he qualified riding one hundred miles by bicycle 
on a Sunday. He was a member of the Bradhurst Field and Social Club, 
They lived in Manhatta.n most of their lives except for a short 
stay in Scranton, Pa. and later in their retirement years in 
Montvale, New Jersey, vjhere Nelson died in i960. 

Anna Sophie Andresen was born on March Jl , 188?, in Yorkville 
(E. 85th St.) New York City. She was the daughter of Ludwig and 
Louise Andresen. She is the eldest. of four children born to them. 
She yjBS educated following high school at business school, and 
worked as a secretary before her marriage to Nelson Suneson, 
Together they had one child, a son, Theodore John Suneson. As 
mentioned, Anna was very active in church activities, and was 
also a member of the Republican Club. She is presently living 
in Montvale, New Jersey, where she is still able to be active 
in the Golden Age Social Club, and is a member of the Park 
Ridge Auxilliary of the Pascack Valley Hospital, 



Theodore John Suneson was born in New York City on April 
6, 1920. He is the son of Nelson and Anna Suneson. He completed 
grade school in six years and high school In three. He attended 
Purdue University from 1938 to 19'J-l. gradiiating with a 3. S. in 
agriculture. After graduation he was employed by Tjarnation Company, 
entering their management training program. He worked in two plants 
before enlisting in the Army in 19^1-2. He served as a master sergeant 
in the 77th Division, in the Pacific Theater of V/orld Wf3 r 2. After 
the war he returned to Carnation Company and has vjorked in many 
plants since then--South Dayton, N.Y., Sparta, Mich.. Berlin, 
Wis., Statesville, M.C, Gustine, Calif., Tupelo, Miss., Waupun, 
V/is., Gustine, Calif., again and here at Oregon, 111,, where he 
is plant superintendant for Carnation Campany. 

He met Mary Gray in Berlin, Wis. in 19^7 and married her 
in 19^9. They ha,ve three children. He is active with the Boy Scouts, 
a Mason, and a member of Rotary Club, He serves on the church 
council as finance chairm-an for St, Paul's Lutheran Church. It is 
interesting to note that those friends with whom he has kept in 
touch through the years, are those alliances formed through the 
Lutheran Church in New York City, ra. ther than any formed In school. 
He also owns a small farm outside of Oregon, which is his chief 
interest outside his family and job. 

Mary Elizabeth Gray was born in Berlin, Wis. in 1926. She 
is the daughter of Harvery Oliver and Marie Graj'-. She was 12 years 
old at the time of her mother's death and due to her father's 
occupation and determination to keep his family, she attended 
three different high schools in four years. From 19^^4—^+5 she 



9. 



attended Ripon College, Hipon, Wisconsin, before entering nurses 
training at St. Agnes Hospital School of Nursing, Fond du Lac, 
Wisconsin, 19'+5-^'-8. She was married June 23, 19^9, to Theodore 
J, Suneson, In Tupelo, Miss,, and has three children. She present- 
ly resides with her family in Oregon, Illinois. 

Mary Gray Suneson is employed as the Cgle County School 
Nurse, and is a m^ember of the Ogle County Board of Health. Her 
other activities Include the church and school activities of her 
children, and her own as well. She Is currently working toward 
her Baccalaureate degree, for OSPI certification in school nursing, 
Other Interests include bridge, sewing and reading. She has also 
been very interested as this family history has been traced. 

Theodore John Suneson, Jr. was born January 20, 1952, at 
Waupun, V/isconsin, first child of Theodore and Mary Suneson, 
Thus far he has received 8 years elementary school education at 
Gustine, Calif,, ^ years high school at Oregon, 111., and 2| years 
college, the last one having been spent at Rock Valley Jr. College, 
His Interests now include golf, reading, and part time raising 
livestock. Due to the mobility of his father's position, Ted 
has lived in several areas of the United States, and has visited 
many. He plans to enter Northern Illinois Unlversitjf this fall. 

William Gray Suneson vfas born in Waupun, Wisconsin on April 
10, 1956. His education will continue as he graduates from high 
school this year, and enters Western Illinois University in the 
fall. He is interested in all types of sports, but especially 
gymnastics , 

Ann Marie Suneson was born in Gustine, California on March 

10. 



28, 1959. She is now completing her first year of high school. 
Her interests are varied and numerous, an active teen-ager. 

In researching this history, I have come across many facts 
that have made this endeavor interesting. While I have traced 
only the Gray geneology back to pre-Revolutionary War times, 
the Sexton family can be traced to that period in history also, 
through the lineage of Ida Gates Sexton. A cousin has been contacted 
for more information about this family, but this has not been 
received to this date. 

These families appear to have' been so Americanized for so 
many genera tion6 that there are no specific customs or traditions 
that are followed. Families get together at Thanksgiving and 
Christmastime when possible, birthdays of close relatives are 
always remembered, and vacations are sometimes spent together. 

The Suneson family, in the past two generations have conducted 
their lives in a similar fashion. However, my great-grandparents 
and grandparents (Andresens) always attended the annual Fehmarns 
che Verein Dance, a gathering of friends and natives from the 
Island of Fehmarn, This must have been similar to a family reunion, 
since the Island is so small and isolated, that most inhabitants 
were probably somehow related. 

Both familes are affiliated with churches of their choice. 
The Suneson and Andresen families cling to the Lutheran Church, 
while the Grays and Sextons are Presbyterians, which follow old 
family lines. 

In conclusion, it seems clear to me that while some of my 
ancestors were prominent people in their times, and some not 

11. 



so prominent, they must all have been good people of strong 
moral principles, and I am proud of my heritage. 



12. 



TANNAHILL KATHY GAIL .1955- 



:ASE use INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY 

ir Contributor to the Hock Valley College Family History Collection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
;rican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
i mintues, and will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
;es5 to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SURVEY ***.;t-,VA;':A;':AAAA-.'.-;V-.VyrA>':*AA:':;'r;VA;V 

* OFFICE USE CODE 

1. Your name <rrtV\y Trx»KxcxW. li * 

Date of form ' * {\r, u \ 

^Ac^v ^ nns .,. ^'^ " ' 

2. Your college: Rock Val 1 ey C.ol lege --■-• ( i d // ) 

Rock ford, 11 1 inois •>■. 

***** Vc ;'.- ;V ^.hiz-kiiii -.V A ;V ;V * A ;V * i; :V V; ;■; A ,': 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 1800- 1850 

\ 1850-1900 1900 or later 

U. Please check al I regions of the United States in which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

\ N ew England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) X" M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna., N.J., Va.) 

/ South Atlantic (Ga. , Fla., N.C., S.C.) E ast South Central(La. .Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn , Ky^ 

West South Central (Ark., N.M. , Tex., Ok.) X East North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind.) 

^ P aci fie (Cal., WashJ (Hawaii, Alaska) 

5. Please check al 1 occupational categories in which members of your family whom you have 
discussed in this paper have found themselves. 

X Farming ^Mining _V_Shopkeepi ng or small business 

^Transportation ^B i g Business Manufacturing 



y- P rofessions x Industrial labor ^Other 

6. Please check al 1 religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
in this paper have belonged. 

X R oman Catholic ^Jewish ^Presbyterian V M ethodist 

X B apt i St Epi scopal ian x C ongregational Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon OtVier Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed in your paper? 

^Blacks Indians ^Mexicans ^Puerto Ricans 

^Jews ^Central Europeans Italians Slavs 

Irish X B ritish x N ative Americans over several generations 

East Asian )^ Other 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

)^ Interviews with other )( Fami ly Bibles Family Genealogies 
f ami ly members 
Vital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 



Photographs Maps Other 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Name pipyd SI f rRd TannahiH Current Residence deceased 

I f dead, date of death 1945 



Place of birth Franklin, Illinois Date of Birth -[^9^ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school 5 high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st electrician Dates ^ stc^^r^^rjn^ rninonc Dates i'?)^ 

2nd Manager, Rural Elec. Co . Dates 2nd Lancaster, Wise. ^Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Fairfield Dates i73 7-|C,<^^- 

'tth Dates i»th ^Dates 

Re 1 i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Republican, Lions, Eastern 

Star, White Shrine, 32"d Degree mason 

Place of Marriage to your grandmother ogK^icnip j date 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name ihelma Isabella Pepnock Current Residence Rr,r^v-Fr^yH_ rn 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Lancaster. Wiscnnsin Date of birth j^ggo 

Education (number of years): 
grade school g high school -^ vocational col lege 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1 s t housewife Dates 1st ^.^jj^^^^t^^ jn ^^^^^ i^j-^y-crS^ 

2nd Dates 2nd Purand. Illinois Dates 

3rd Dates 3rd Rockford, Illinois Dates 

4th Dates '♦th Dates 



Re I i gion 



I 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Republican, Eastern Star. 

White Shrine, Royal Neighbors 

Place of marriage to your grandfather pebuque , Iowa DATE 

Note 



i^aHatPSfl»fh^^Ba£l'&?<^tl(^? $^9!%%^, stepmother or another 



relative give 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 



N .1 nic 

I f dead, dale of death 



Current Residence 



Place of bi rth 



Date of Bi rth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion(s) 

Ist 

2nd 

3rd 

Ath 



Dates 
Dates 
Dates 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



3rd_ 



Dates_ 

Dates 

Dates 



Re 1 i gi on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 
Place of marriage to your grandmother 



^S^t 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of bi rth 



Current Residence 



Date of bi rth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school^ 



vocational 



col lege 



Occupat ion (s) 
1st 

2nd 

3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



_Dates 
Dates_ 
Dates 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 



Date 



Dates 
Dates 



Re 1 i gion 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Jame Thomas M. Scott Current Residence deceased 

f dead, date of death Jan. <i<L, T940 



col lege 



Mace of birth Wayne County Date of birth unknown 

ducat ion (number of years): ""^ ' ■ 

grade school 5 high school vocational 

'"^''^''""^^^ PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

St farmer Dates life ,3^ ^'^'"" ^^'"'"^ ^"'"' pates 

"'^ ^^^^^ ^2nd^ Oates. 

"^ ~ ^^^^^ ^3rd ^D3tes_ 

^'^ Dates /4 th 

e 1 i g i on Baptist 

oliticai parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Republican; 



Dates 



lace of marriage to your grandmother Fairfield. 111. -^^tT 

ote: If your mother was raised by a bKJp r dl li e r U l d ll ULlm r m l dl l vti (tO aO e 1 8f 
give that data on the back of this page (C-1) 

randmother (your mother's side) 

^"'e L>el»/v^o l^o'./^ tS;KA»w5: ^Current Residence deceased 

r dead, date of death iqTT ' ■ — 



JOkh. 



lace of birth^ Wayne County Date of birth May 24, 1940 

Jucation (number of years) "~ '^ =- 

jrade school 5 high school vocational college 



:cupat ion(s) 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 



,. f. ^ (after leaving home) 
't Wrm L^.^e. Dates lst_ Dates 

'^. __^ Dates 2nd 



Dates 



Dates 



'^ ^ Dates ^3rd 

Mitical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Progressive, Bemoctat 



ace of marriage to your grandfathe r — ~ ~3ate 

te: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age TST 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C- I Stepgrandf ather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead . date of death 



l'l.i(<- ..I hit III I). lie of hiilli 

( diK ,1 1 i 'iti (tiiiiiil)c r oT yT'i t •, ) 
i)t.i(lc '.(hool hi<|h school vocal ion. il colloiH" 

Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 

'4th 



Dates 


1st 


PLACE 
(after 


OF 

1 


RESIDENCE 
eaving home) 

Dates 


Dates 


2nd 








Dates 


Dates 


3rd 








Dates 


Dates 


iith 








Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political parties , civil or social ^clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother d ate 

D-2 S tepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 



I f dead, date (jf death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 



Occupat ion (s) 

l',t 

2nd 

3rd 





vocational 


col lege 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 




Dates 


1st 


Dates 


Dates 


2nd 




Dates 


Dates 


3rd 




Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political party , civil or soci a 1 c 1 ubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



CHikDREN of A & B (or A-1 or B-1) - your father's name should appear below 

Name f?o\ftc^t A\9recj». To^v^ acxK\\\ 

Place ot birth i^^^ tp^ .,^......<i„ date pgob^^ ^ i?lo 

Number of years ot schooling /g Occupatlbh &.'„ ■ , t. , ^ 
Residence , ,,..^. ^...-. Mar i ta l Sta tus ^_^ ^Trn,-' P^^ .^r^ ^.,^...^ 
Number of chi Idren o " ^^'^' 



Name 



jOI 



f birth ^^^......r.^ ,,-,t... 



Number of years of schooling Occupati6n . ^^. +„ 
Residence Co^irfu^ tii;^o. Marifal <:f=.«-Mc .. . """^^ ^^— 



Residence R.o.,kf-^.^, tm^.o., Marital Status.. j. ,. '^ 

Number of ch l Mr4n o' , ^ ^^tus ^ , 4^^^^ , ^^rv^^^.r^ a 



Name 



Hrrtt 



^ct^ CJJooJl 



Place or birth ^.-....y-,. . ^^C.cqk,^ — date c^a^.^ . 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

IJ"i^^""-4l^f^=*-LiLLvc:s Marital Ttatus riLi.,o...A 

Number of chi Idrien 9! '"^iw, -,nj 

Name Pt^,.m. mno r>?Pv^ A^v,KcvU tl\gr 

Place of birth ....^sT.. ,n.. .,...; ^ >^«-^ 

Number of years ot schooling (^ccupat 1 6rt „ . . ■■.., w...-n; .... 

Residence , , ,j- ,.,.,^,..,.. Marita l S tatus.,,,,,,, J^^;^^^r^ 

Number of chi Idren 3 ** ' ^ '^' 

Name Jfi.^\vv_ (Lu,,r-t:«r To.v\>^o^Vv',\\ 

Place ot birth ko,^c-cv^(>.vv uj.scoAy:^ date 

Number of years of schooling I' t^ Occupatibn Pl fs c — T — 7k - j- 

Number of chi Idren 2 



Name 

P 1 ace of bi rth "" 3^a te 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence MarlTaT Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Name^ ^ 

Place o^ bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupatioh 

Res i dence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren — — __ 



Name 

Place of bi rth ^date 
Number of years of schooling Occupatioh 
Residence MiTTTal Status " 
Number of chi Idren ' 



Name 

Place ot bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place ot birth date 

Number of years of school ing Occupation 

S^mberTf Ul i m ren "^^'^al Status ; 



CHILDREN 



of C and D (or T.- 1 , D-l)-your mother's nome should oppeor below 



N.iriM' Ruel La mont Scott 
r'l.if i- fif i)i t III 



NiiiiibcT ol yf.irs n\ sc Ikjo I i tifj 



'■'t'' Nov. 14. 1907 



f<ti', i dcticc 

Niimhpr of ch i 1 dren 



Mar i tal ^Status 



Occupal ion 



I? T<r 



2 . N jrtK 



"'^- ATta Aline Scott Fearn 

ac; of b! rth Wavnp nniintv 



Plac; of bi rth Wavne Count V 
Number of years of scnool ing 
Res i dence 



date Jan. 10, 1909 



Occupat I on 



Mari tal Status 



Number of ch i 1 dren 

Name Clarence Thomas Scott 
Place of bi rtl 
Number of 
Res i dence 



^ Wayne County 

Number of years or schooling 



Number of ch i 1 dren 



Marital S t a t us 



"" date Sept. 18, 1910 
Occupation , 



'*• Name Martha Lorajne Scott Brown- deceased 
Place of birth Wayne County 

Number of years of schooling 
Res i dence 



"Jiti" Oct, 16, 1912 



Number of ch i 1 dren 



Mari tal ^Status 



Occupation 



5. Nanie Minnie Henrietta Scott Holstein 



Nanie Minnie H 
Place of bi rth W 



Number of yea 
Res i dence 



h Wayne County 
rs of school i ng 



date March '^. 1914 



Occupat I on 



Number of ch i Idren 



Marital Status 



6. 



Name Hazel Fae Scott Grubb 
Place of birth Wayne County 



Number of years of schooling 
Res i dence 



date Feb. 6, I9I6 



Occupation 



Number of ch i Tdren 



Mar i tal ^Status 



7. Name 



Sarah Leota Scott Tannahill 
Place of birth Wayne County 



Number of years of schooling 9 
Res i dence ~ " " ' - - - • 

N 



Res i dence Rnckford. Illinois 

■dumber of ch i 1 dren ^ 



- date Jan. 13. 1918 
"Occupation Jnuus Iry _ 
Marital Status miniiea 



8. Name 



Name Caljli Glen Scott- died in infancy 
P I ace of PI rth //; 



^avne County 
Number of years of schooling 
Res i dence 



Number of ch i 1 dren 



Occupat ion 
Mari tal Status 



date not, known 



9. 



Name Rnv Fred Scott 



b I rth W; 



P'ace of birth Wayne County 
Number of years of school i ng 
Res i dence 



date Nov. 21, 1932 
Occupat I on . 



Number of ch i I dren 

Name 

Place of bi rth 



Marital Status 



Number of years of school i ng 

Residence 

Number of ch i Idren 



date_ 

Occupat ion 



Marital Status 



^our Father 



lame Robert Alfred Tannahi 11 
f dead, date of death 



Current Residence Rockford, 111. 



'lace of birth Lancaster. Wisconsin 
ducat ion (number of^ years) 
grade school g 



high school 



^Date of birth Oct. 30, 191? 

Ji vocational col lege 



lccupation(s) 



s t Wise. State Emp. Set rsyg& ejG-jS 
warren & van i^rague '"^B^:^ — 

n d Harlend & Bartholem ea/tes ^l-k^■ 
U.i:5. Navy 44-^|S 

rd Air Tex Products Dates ^7-55 
KocKiord Clutch bb-^l 

th Metro. Life ^D a t e s 61-65 

eli^iTigersoll 6i»-now 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

'"' mmim 111 ''''' 

2nd Badette, Minn. 



3H¥- 



Norfolk 7a. 
3r d Portsm ouilih, Va 

l-'airfieid, 111. 
'♦th Durand, 111. 
" Ruukfurd, ill. 



Odtes 41 



Dates 
Dates 55 

55-mvi 



litlcal parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Republican; Elks, Moose, 
Eagles. Eastern Star. Thirtv-second degree Mason ■ 
lace of marriage to your mother Fairfield. 111. d ate i 

OTE: If you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that dat 



of this page. (E-2) 
our Mother 



a on the back 



^"^ — Sarah Lenta Tannahi n ^Current Residence Rockford. 111. 

f dead, date of death ^ —————— ' ■ - 



lace of birth g^ff, TlliTIOJH 
ducation (number or years) 



grade school 

pcupation(s) 

pt Airtex Corp. 

lid 



high school 



Date of birth Jan. 13. 1918 
___ vocational ^college 



\r d National Lock 
|i 1 i g i on 



Dates l937-39 Ist Geff. 111. 

Dates 1949-1955 2nd Same asE-1 

Dates l9'^';-now 3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



alltical party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 

lace of marriage to your father ' "" ~~~' ■~~~"^~~"^~~ ■ 

)TE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



"3atJ 



E-1 Stepfather 

Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth ^Date of birth 

Education (number of years) "" — ^_— — 

grade school high school vocational college 



OccupationCs) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


^ith 



3rd ^Dates 3rd Dates 

^th Dates ^th Dates 

Re 1 i g i on 

Pol i t i cai* part I es , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother ~~~~~~ Date 



F-2 Stepmothe r 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth_ 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates_ 

2nd ^Dates ^2nd Dates_ 

3rd Dates ^3rd Dates_ 

Re 1 i g i on 

Political party , civil or social c lubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father date 



HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 

^"^ Carolyn Ann Tann^hin T^^c^iy ^^^^ 
lace of birth NnyfolV. VnV^nr.^^ 
jmber of years of school i ng -\2 



Date of bi rth 



M;:^y ?4, 1 Q4 



ssidence Wypd^tnr-k . Til i none 
jmber of children a 



^"^ Rober|: Alfred Tann^hi 11 . .t^, 

of t"rth Portsnput-h Viraini;. 
of school I nq TO 



lace 

jmber of years of schooling 2_2 

^sidence Rpykford. THinois 



Jmber of chi Idren 







i">e Kathy Gai 1 T^^nn^hi 1 1 



lace of birth F^r^^LgM, . T1 1 1noi P, 
jmber or years of schooling -]->, 

'S ' dence Rpckf ord . THinnic; 



li 



imber of chi Idren 







tme 

ace of bi rth ' 

iraber of years of school ing 

:si dence 

imber of chi Idren 



ime 

ace of bi rth 

imber of years of school ing 

:si dence 

imber of chi Idren 



ime 

ace of bi rth 

imber of years of school ing 

;si dence 

imber of chi Idren 



me 

ace of bi rth 

mber of years of school ing 

si dence 

mber of chi Idren ' 



me 

ace of bi rth 

mber of years of school ing 

si dence 



mber of chi Idren 



Occupat i on ,-^nnfar^nHng pi .n^ ,..p.-v^v. 



Marital Status r^u^^r^^ ^^.^.p^ 



Date of birth 



Jnly 1<^^ 1Q4 



Marital Status 



Occupation An^n man..f.^..^^^ 



Sing1 p. 



Date of bi rth 



Apyjl ^n, 19'^^, 



Occupat I On_2tudeci 



Marital Status singlp 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 

Occupat Ion 



Date of bi rth 



Marital Status 



Occupation 



bate of bi rth 
Occupation 



Marital Status 



Date of birth 

Occupat I on 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 
Occupat ion 



Hi. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family are willing) 

I hereby donate this family history, along with all literary and administrative 
rights,' to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 
Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois ^ 

Signed kn^J^^ ,/j> !/Gy<^&^LJL 

Date 



A History of t'y Family 
Preface 

The facts and figures on the Tannahill family before 19^0 are not 
really well known. Each of my parents remembers thinqs that thei^ parents 
had told them about their childhood, but whether it is factual or not 
no one is sure. So I have included some of these thinqs, hut som^ of 
the more "fantasised" items I have disregarded. 

There are other problems involved, as well. Both of my grandfathers 
are dead, and my maternal grandmother is deceased. None of these has 

1 

any livii q relatives, as far as I was able to find out, except for my 
grandmother who has a younger sister. I tried to qet some information 
from her. but either she didn't feel like answering questions, or the 
letters 1 wrote to her were never recieved. 

Because of these hindrances, the history which concentrates on the 
childhoou of my grandparents is rather sketchy. There is another reason 
for the information of my paternal grandfather being so un-detailod. 
Although his wife is still living, and in Pockford, she knows very 
little abDut his early life, for reasoss which arc mentioned in the 
body of tiie paper. But even his Non-persinal data has been lost, because 
the records of taxes, purchases, etc., were kept in the Frnnklin County 
Courthousp, which burned down early in the 1920's. 



A History of My Family 

When the Mayflower sailed from England to the New Colonies, it 
carried abourd it two men whose children were to marry and found the 
roots ;0f the family tree Simms. They were Reverend Zecheriah Symmes 
and Christian f1. Sonne. Their children married, and had one son 
(at least), named Linus Christian Simms. His children went on to 
form the many branches of the tree, and years later, the two families 
again were united by the marriage of Henry P. Simms and Martha Jane 
Sons. Their marriage produced as well as one boy and two other girls, 
my maternal grandmother, Velma Rosie Simms. 

Velma Simms was a typical farm girl. Her parents owned and worked 
a good-sized farm in Wayne county, and she and her siblings worked on it 
daring the spring and summer months, and after harvest in the fall they 
attended the neighborhood school. The school they attended only had 
five grades, but that was all one needed to carry on the business of 
farming back then. 

It is not known exactly how her childhood was spent, but the 
house the family lived in is still standing in the backwoodsy part 
of Wayne county, about five miles out from Fairfield, Illinois. It 
is a largish, two-story house with eight rooms and a storm cellar. 
Back then, it had no electricity or running water. Kerosene lamps 
were used for lighting, and the water was brought in from a well and 
heated on the woodburning stove in the kitchen. They also caught 
rainwater in large barrels under the eaves of the house and barn, and 
this they used for washing elothes and for a final rinse on the 



•sf- 



girls' nn' in Mother's hair on Sciturday niqhts. 

The rnnily v/as a very reliqious onp , and God v/as a special ni'^i'iher 
of the fa"'ily. Each Sunday was obsorvod as a day of rest, except 
during pi siting and harvesting seasons. 

Holidiys were special occasions in the farm family. Christm-r- v/as 
especially happy, even though it was also celigious. The'Simms were 
a wealthy family, but as Christmas wasn't yet commercialized, thf nifts 
were simple things like home-made toys or clothing, a penny, and snme 
store-bounht candy. 

When Velma was about Seventeen years old, she met Thomas Scntt, a 
young man who also lived in Wayne county. They courted for about a year, 
and then Miey became engaged and were married. In early I'^n?, the first 
child, a son, was born to the couple. From then on, a child was t)orn 
to Thomas and Velma about every eleven months for four years, thv-^n it 
tapered off to every other year until nine children were born. Tho first, 
third and last children were boys, and seven girls were born. Hne o" 
these, Cdlli Glen, died in infancy. The other nine grew up, got married, 
and except for one, they are still livincj. Most of them still live in 
or very n^^r Wayne County. 

The house that Thomas, Velma, and •:,.> children lived in was very 
like thai that Velma had grown up in. It was a large farmhouse with 
big rooms, no electricity, and no indoor plumbing. The outhouse was 
about fifty feet away from the kitchen door, and made for uncomfortable 
conditions in the middle of winter. It. also, was situated on a farm 
in Wayne County. 

Botii parents were Baptists by faith and raised their children as 
such. Si;nday was a holy day, and the girls had to wear dresses and 
behave t'l-mselves all day, while the boys had to wear their Sund.iy 
clothes r.nd keep their shoes on. It was impossible to ask them to 



behave on top of all that punishment. 

Christmas was a happy time in thq Scott family household. As they 
lived on a farm, there was always a turkey, ham, roast pig or beef for 
dinner. All the trimmings were served up, and Velma made many types 
of pies. And, as far as the kids were concerned, Christmas just wouldn't 
be Christmas without Plum pudding. As well as the feast, each child 
would recieve a "store-bouqht" gift, and some new clothes, hankies and 
fruit or candy. Most of the gifts were necessary items. Thomas didn't 
believe in "throwing away money on no wasteful things". 

Thore were stockings hung on Christmas Eve, and the 
tree was already decorated and awaiting the visit of Santa, 
festoon crl with garlands of popcorn and cranberries, paper 
chains dud glazed cookies. 

On normal days, the seating arrangements at the dinner 
table were rather unique. Ten people is a lot to serve, 
especially if some of them are quite small. So Thomas sat on 
the side of the table near the end, and his wife sat diagonally 
across from him; the younger children were strategically 
placed so that Mom and Dad could easily keep order amonq the 
savages . 

Farm life was good for the Scott family, especially during 
the depression of the 30's. Mot that they were rich or anything, 
but they had a considerably large farm, and so wore able to 
raise most of the food they needed. And, unlike many of the 
city folk, there was no lack of work there on the farm. My 
mother recounted to me a tale of one of the rainy-day escapades 
she and her sisters used to indulge in when it rained. Since 
the chickens scratched around out^side the house where it was 
a little dryer during the rain, they would tie a piece of 
corn to a long string and hang it out of there second-story 



bcdro '11 window. The chickens would peck at it, and f ho 
fjirls would yank it up out of theri? rorich. AntI sinri the 
birds were excitable^ creatures, they would scatter ai ; a y 
and t up an awful commotion. Rut that was funny. The 
funni'-r part happened when they found out if the chicken 
got the corn half swallowed before they hauled the corn 
up and away, the chicken would cone halfway up and then 
fall back to the ground and squawk away desperatly when 
the s'^ain was dislodged, only to come after it again 
when it was again lowered to the ground. (Chickens are 
sort of stupid,) Unfortunately (for the girls, not the 
chickens) their mother caught them at it one day when she 
saw a chicken go crawling up the wall outside her win- 
dow, and soon put a stop to it. 

Sunny days were spent in a more constructive manner. 
The boys usually worked out in the fields, and the girls 
occasionaly would help plant or harvest, but their job 
was usually a combination of watching the baby and 
weeding the garden or doing some of the housework. In 
the winter, the kids would attend school. This was about 
five miles away, and they had to walk. All of them recall 
donning the red flannels when it was really cold, and the 
girls said notheing could be more uncomfortable then 
long woolen undies when it got wet, then had to dry on 
one while sitting in an uncomfortable desk in a poorly 
heated room. But each of them managed to make it through 
the eleven years of schooling required for a diploma. 

All of these "children" have long siRce become adults. 
Ruel , who is the oldest, is married and has three married 



daughters who all have children of their own. He and his 
wife live in a trailor community in Hammond, Indiana where 
he is employed as a Trade Union boi 1 ermaker . The oldest 
daughter, Alta, lives with her husband in Fairfield 
during the summer. In the winter, they spend a month in 
Flori'1.1. Clarence also lives in Fairfield. He and his 
wife have no children, but they have gathered quite ^ bit 
of moMPy over the years. He is director of Fairficl'I's 
leading bank, he dabbles in real estate, and he owns and 
opera 'es a farm in Wayne County about five miles out of 
town. Martha Loraine, hhe next younger, was marrird, but 
she WIS killed when th6 car in which she and her husband 
where riding crashed. 

The next daughter, Henrietta Holstein, also lives in Fairfield. 
Here -".he and her husband Charles own and operate a grocery store, 
where their son, Jim is employed as a butcher. They also have a 
daughter who is married and lives on a farm about four miles north- 
west of town. Hazel Grubb is the next younger. She lives in St. 
Charles Mo. with her husband. In nearby St. Louis, her daughter and 
one of her sons have their homes. Another son lives in Wisconsin. 

The next child in the list is my mother, Sarah Tannahill. She 
has two other children besides me, and we live in Rockford (except 
for my married sister who lives in Hebron, 111.). The very last 
child born to Thomas and Velma Scott, Roy Fred, lives in the small 
village of Geff with his wife. They run a farm there which raises 
some of the best dairy cattle in Illinois. 

Although the family of Scott children live, for the most part, 
very near to each other, they are not really too close. Recently, 



■on,>l "fanily "on-^ior," ni^ 



nic 



a tra'i i t ioiial 'Family Rotinion' picnic vii\s bpnun , but this was 
done I / a Scott Granchild, not a Scott child. 

/^i the same time that the Simms and the Sons were makino thnir 
journov into a new type of life, the paternal half of my famil/ tree 
was continuing the same traditions in Scotland that they had been 
follo\/inq for years. The name Tann^hill is a very common one in 
Scotland, but my particular "brand" is a little more on the 
distinguished side than most of the others. One of the men of the 
family had done a favor to the king, and so was granted an ar^a of 
land vn'th which he could do anythinc] m wanted. He turned it into 
a farm, and he became quite wealthy from it. Later he v/as mad*^ thane 
of a small area in the north of the country, and acquired a small 
castle. 

In the late 1800' s, '-arryinq on the tradition started by that 
remote ancestor, four brothers who were great-grandsons of the 
thane decided they'd had enough of Scotland and wanted to go to 
Arnerira, where there was still room to breathe. They were all 
trained in ai skill of some kind, and v/ere fairly well off, evpn in 
American standards, so they had no trouble establishing a foothold 
in their new homeland. As the years went on, the brothers, who had 
settled in Virginia, had children to help them on their farms, who 
then qrew up and lived on other farms in Virginia. Until Alfred 
Burton, my great-grandfather. He moved from the east into rilinois'! 
sor3where in the 1880's. Here he married a girl from the town in '• ■ 
which he had settled, FPanklini, and settled down to have children. 
They had a son, a daughter and another son, each about two years 
apart. Then, Alfred died, and since his widow couldn't afford to 
keep all three children, She put the two oldest into foster homes, 



and k( ''f the ycbiinqest with her. She later remarried. Here, the 
fcinnly ^iccounts become vague. The girl adopted the name of her 
foster' iiarents, and the youngest boy took the name of his step- 
father. Only Floyd Burton kept the surname of Tannahill. He was 
born in Franklin, Illinois, and later moved to Chiqago with his 
foster parents, but he moved back to Franklin county in time to 
see all his records, including his birth certificate, be burned 
UP in a fire which demolished the County courthouse. In 1913, he 
moved to Lancaster Wisconsin, where he became an electrical 
engineer, and where he also met his future wife, Thelma Isabella 
Pennock. She was the daughter of fairly strict Methodist parents, 
but they agreed to let her marry Floyd because "at least he 
wasn't Catholic". .They were married in Debuque, Iowa on April 
18, of 1917. On October 30 of that same year, their first child, 
Robert Alfred, was born. As the years went on, four more children 
were born to them, Mildred Nesbeth in 1919, Ruth Jean in 1921, 
Phyllis flaa.iin 1924, and in 1936, another son, John Curtis, 
was born. 

Meanwhile, Floyd was still working as an electrician in 
Lancaster and the surrounding areas. He worked his way up to 
General Manager of the area electric installation company, and 
still found time to be with his family. 

Meals were one time when all of the family gathered together. 
Floyd sat at the head of the table, but Thelma was usually seated 
between two children in order to keep peace at the table. He 
wasn't real strict, but he disciplined any child when he thought it 
was getting out of hand. Some of the neighborhood mothers didn't 
like it, but all of his own kids and quite a few of the neighbor's 
knew they'd better do what was right when he was around. 



Holidays, such as Christmas, were alv/ays gay celebrations. Even 
during the depression, there would be a tree and presents, and decor- 
ations would be hung all over the house. A Christmas Eve snack would 
be served before bedtime, and then the kids would hang up their 
stockings and troop upstairs to bed. Mom and Dad would sit up late, 
then when they were sure the children were asleep, they would dig 
out the presents from their hiding places and put them undor the tree. 
Early in ^^he morning, Thelma would get up to check the turkey and 
start the rest of the food for the big Christmas dinner. 

Birlhdays were also celebrated. Usually the children would have 
a small party and recieve gifts from the family and friends. They 
would also get to pick out something special for dinner that evening. 

The house which the Tannahills owned was a rather small two- 
story on the edge of town. It had five rooms, including a bathroom 
with a stationary tub - a real novelty for that area. Robert hnd a 
room of his own, and the his three sisters shared a room. Thi^ro was 
a floor vent that let the heat up into the upstairs, and this was opened 
by the kids while their parents were having card parties so they 
could watch the action and listen to the grownups. 

By the time Curtis was born, Robert was 18, and had a job 
working at the Wisconsin State Employment Service. In 1937, when 
the baby was about nine months old, the family decided to move 
to Fairfield, Illinois. Robert was almost finished with high school, 
so he stayed with his grandmother while the rest of the family moved. 
After he graduated, he moved down to southern Illinois with the rf^st of 
the family. 

When he m,oved to Fairfield, Robert got a job with the Warren 
and van Prague owned Rural Electrification Company. In T^33, he 
met Sara Scott, who was then working at Air-Tex Products. They 



beqr\n dati'i, and in the snn'nq of IT^^. ' hny hprrime onaflfK'!. ~\hr 
couplo W.I married in the Huitist rhurcii .it Fairfield. It vas a vM-y 
small wed inn, as neither family was at the time very v/ealtliy. Sara 
v;ore a blu'^ wool traveling suit (the wcddinn was in Septemhor) , and 
Robert vjv) " a black dress suit. After the wet^dinq, they moved f(^ '■> fvuse 
in GreenvMle, Illinois. Sar:: continued to i-'ork at Air-Tex, and 
Rohr-rt c<i'tiniied workinq in the Electric company, which his father by 
that tim'^ had become manaq'^r of. In 1940, the elder Mr. Trinnahill 
died of iieart attack. His wife and the ycunaer children moved to a 
smaller, modern home in the city with a "re<"l" bathroom. Meanwhile, 
Robert's 'Idest sister, Mildred had become enqaqed, and was marri' ' in 
1940. 

In l')41, Robert and his wife moved to Bodette, Minne':sota, a very 
small to' n on the border of Canada. The best part of this was th.it 
one coul'! ice skate across the river into Canada during the winter, ; 
But is Wis terribly cold and remote, and as Sara discovered she was 
prennant. they decided to move back into warmer climes. In the sprinq 
of the following year, they relocated to Norfolk, Virginia. Robert took 
a job with the firm of Harlend and Bartholemew. In May, their first 
child, a daughter, was born in Norfolk. They had her christened 
Carolyn Ann. She didn't really change their way of living any. She 
slept in the same bedroom of the small apartment with them, and most 
likely kept the neighbors awake all night. In 1943, their second 
child was born, this time a son. He was born in Portsmouth, but that 
isn't too unusual even though, since the two cities are rather like 
Rockford and Loves Park. At this time, Carolyn's crib was moved to 
the living room of the apartment, and Bobby Jr. took over the 
bassinette in the parent's room. 

In 1944, Robert enlisted in the U.S..Air Force, and Sara and the 



children moved back to Fairfield where her mother and his could help hor 
with them. Robert remained in the Air Force until 1946, at which 
tine he was discharged and went home to rejoin his family. They remained 
here until 1955. Robert began to work at Air-Tex in 1947, and two years 
later Sara went back to work their, leaving Robert's mother to watch 
the children. 

By this time, Mildred had been married and had two girls, each 
a year younger than Robert's children. She was living in Fairfield 
with her husband, William Caulkins. The next sister, Jean, was ■ ■ 
Mt'-ried in 1938, the year before she graduated from high school, and 
a year before her brother's wedding as Hell. She finished high school, 
then she and her husband moved to Flora with their baby daughter. 
Phyllis Mae was 16 years old in 194u,and her baby brother Curt was just 
four. Both of them lived at home with their mother. While she 
stayed with Robert's kids, Phyllis was in school, and Curtis stayed 
with her, so there was no problem as far as "who-takes-care-of- who". 

In 1943, Phyllis graduated from high school, and later that year 
married Robert Mendenhall. They lived in Fairfield for a while, then 
they movixi to North Carolina while Robert was in the War. He came 
back and they moved to Flora, Illinois for a few years, and in 1961, 
they movi'd to California. 

In 1955, Robert and Sara decided to move north to RockforrI, Ill- 
inois. They had by this time had another baby, another girl, who 
was born in April of 1955. She was named Kathy Gail, and was the 
main reason they decided to move. For one thing, the house was just 
too small for five people to live comfortably, and for another, ttie 
companies in Rockford were just getting started again after a'^ight 
si :mp in business^ so they were paying more than either of the 
parents could make at Air-Tex. So they packed up and moved to 



Durdnd, \ hn-c they occupind d small nparLnient in the city. This wi", 
quite tei : ^rary, just until they could find a home and jobs in Rnrlford, 
and from •. iiat the house was described as to me by my mother, (me 
being the reason for all this, of course) it v^as a very small, dir^y, 
and cramp'd dwelling-place. Fortunatly they found a house right av/ay. 
This was o two-story Cape Cod Bungalow located in the far northwest 
area of P"ckford. Back then there was a farm across the street frrMi ., 
the house, and another about three blocks av^ay. The back yard stt'tched 
for about an acre, which is quite a lot, considerang that it was in 
the city. 

Robert took a job with Rockford Clutch, Inc., and Sara began 
working dt National Lock & Company. Carolyn and Bobby, the two 
oldest children both attended Roosevelt Junior high school, and 
Robert's mother, who was living with them, took care of baby Katf:y 
while everyone else was gone. 

In 1 052, Mildred's husband died. She moved up to Rockford, where 
she met and married Tony Furno, the man she is married to at.the 
present lime. They moved to a house in southwest Rockford, where 
they and there 14-year-old daughter still live. But at the time, 
this closnness caused some problems, s'-u was v/orking eigiit to ton 
hours daily, and when she came home at night, she would have to 
fix supper for not only her family, but for Mildred and her tv;o 
oldest daughters, and on weekends, for Robert's other sister, Jean. 
Phyllis, '..'ho was now married and had two boys, v/ould also come up when 
Jean did, so there would be a ton of people in the house who 
expected her to "do" for them when she got home. After about two 
years, though, Sara laid down the law to her husband, and said it 
was eith. r them or her, so he put a stop to the weekend visits and 
limited "'ildred and her brood to one supper a v/eek. 



In T'i'O, Kathy start':>d attendinq tlm neiqhbnrhood qrado school, 
at the Kiriorqarten level. The fnllnwinn year, Robert quit his job 
at Rockfii' I Clutch and v/ent to work sellinq Insurance for Metro- 
politan I '*e. This little job didn't work out too well, thnuqfi, 
and in 1 '^ '^' , he Started wnrkinq at Inqersoll Association. About 
that sanip vear. National Lock finished buildinq their new fastener 
division '1ant out by the Greater Rockford Airport, and Scira'tran:.- 
f erred t*i re for a better job.' 

Carolyn, the oldest, got married in 1159 to Corneilius Beasl'V, 
a man she met while in high school. They fiad two children. Carolyn 
Evyette in 1962, and Kathleen Denise in 1963. In 1964 they were 
divorced, and in 1966, she remarried to Robert Mau. They have two 
children. Robert William Scott, who was born in 1967, and Cassandra 
Elise, wlin was born in 1969. They currently live in Hebron, Illinois. 

Robert Tannahill, Jr. joined the army after he graduated from 
West High School the year after his sister. He was really in the 
Marines, and was stationed in Tokyo Japan for four years. In 196^ 
he was given an honorable discharge because of wounds recieved in 
the course of duty, and returned home, where he continued to live 
with his parents. The yeor previously, Robert's mother Thelma had 
moved into an Apartment on John St., about one mile from Robert and 
Sara's home. She still was brought over to take care of Kathy 
during the times before and after school, lunchtime, and summer 
vacation. But since the room she i»ad occupied was now vacant, that's 
where Bob Jr. camped out. In 1968, he moved out because of friction 
with the parents. He now lives, after numerous changes of address, 
about a block away from the Cape Cod bungalow where' his parents 
and little sister, Kathy (me) still live. 

Robert and Sara both still work at Ingersoll and National Lock, 



respectively. Kathy graduated from West Hiqh in January of 1973, a 
semester early, and now attends Rock Valley College. 

As was stated before, the family members born after 1915 are 
for the most part still alive. They have all "succeeded" in life, 
as far as their careers go. Except for Christmas and the Scott 
family reunion, there is very little close-knit unity between my 
parents and there siblings. Each of them had definitly improved 
their standard of living as compared proprtionally to that of their 
parents. 

The life-styles of the Scott-Tannahill descendants are quite 
different from that of their parents, but the times are changed quite 
a bit, at least as far as technology goes, and in many other aspects, 
as well. We have suffered no depression in my generation, and so 
religion has not been as important to their children as it was to 
my grandparents. The society in general is much more mobile, whiih 
may be part of the reason for the lach of closeness in the families 
of my parents and their brothers and sisters. 

Women have the right to vote, and lately, the double stantiard ha 
been attacked by "Women's Lib", and general increased knswledge. 
Because rf all these things, though my parents benefitted from 
the bhinr^, they learned from their parents, I shall probably not 
benefit as greatly from mine. That remains to be seen. 

But in any case, it can be seen how the type of life a person 
leads can cause him to determine one path of iife over another, and 
one part of the country over anotheriby investigating the backgrounds 
and influences of society, government and home, i have, in this 
paper, attempted to present some of these topics to the reader. 



TAYLOR, TOri LYMAN, 1955- 



H USt IMR; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETjS M^THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
FAMILY HISTORY ^^^'^'^-^hm^ 

iocvit rib.it or to the «OCk Valley Conege P««"y History Collection: 

i So that your f««Hy hl.tory can b. made mor. useful to hi storiSlf.^n^ others studyiny 
^V.nflmi ies we are ask i no you to flM out the forms below. This will take you only « 
li'ulr l^d :in :; eal.ly'nide over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
us to just those kinds of family histories needed. 

SWVgy ^ * OFFICE USE CODE 

•>our nan* jl^ ^-LX1£J2 }L^ ^ I (,D | ^'^^: ' ) 



D.itc of form 



. 1-^^-17 



2. Your coM.qe: Mock Valley CoH eg* 
Rqckford, Illinois 



(ID I .) 



3. Cl.ea the earlle»« date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your Ddper, ' ' 

Before 1750 ^ 1750-1800 1800-1850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 

I,. Please check all regions of the United States In which members of your family whoo, you 
have discusseTTn your paper have 1 Ivied. 

New England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) V. Middle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna. , N. J. , Va.) 

^Jl.rh ! Unt c (ci Fla. N.C.. TTT) East South Central (La. .Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, Kf 

— V^rsoil; clntr;r(Ari!;'N';:;'te;.. 0rFjL.^..t North Central (Hich Ohio. Ind. 
^Pacific (Cal., Washj (Hawaii, Alaska) '^^- **""' 

5. MTase check all occupational categories In which members of your family whom you have 
discussed In TTiTs paper have found themselves. 

^ Farming Mining < Shopkeep I ng or small business ^' 
"^Transportation Big Business "^^Manufacturing 
P rofessions Industrial labor Other 

6. Please check all religious groupi' to which members of your family whom you have discuss 
In this paper have belonged. 

Roman Catholic Jewish ^Presbyterian j( Methodist 

"T^Baptist ^EpIscopaTTJS^ CongrejItTonal _>v_Lutheran 

"^luaker Mormon _JI]^«'' Protestant ^Other 

7. What ethnic and social .groups are discussed In your paper? 

Blacki Indians Mexicans ^Puerto R leans 

^Jews X^Central Europeans Italians V S lavs 

Irish X — ^B ritish M atlveAnarlcans over several generations 

^E ast Asian ^Other 

8. What sources did you use In compiling your family history? 

'^ lntervle»*»%lth other )( Femi ly Bibles _^Faml ly Gerteatogies 
fami ly members 

^ V ital Records Land Records The U.S. Census 

•^'P hotographs X M aps Other ^ 



< 




Occwp«t/on(s) 

2nd 
3rd 

'oil tied Oartlaa .1 II 



••» ttc. 




■•ndmoth.r (yoor f«th«r', ,|d.) 



ill 
^ve give 




•ce of btrth D 



"'ah school 



Current M.,d.nc, J^£££r5Ia£,^jaU^(y 
D«t« of birt h ore /'^^ ,5f.^^ 



up«tloo($) 



Oaus ^■'*^'^ 




CIC«| 



_ col lege 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
l.f iCfcti?^!*/ '«avlng home) 

Dates /955-^^^ ^ i 

_Dates 

Dates 







mrr 



^u^, 



. ^'•' """•' •ororltl.,. .tc._5tPu6./CA^ 



yow BrandfTJ 



St«p«r«ndr*ilMf (your f«tli«f*fl «|^) 
9r*i. »chool 9 h,^ tellOOl Jj( 



wMitr«iil 






Occupatlon(s) 



^eollofn^ 






>***jsL.aa8!f 



l^atM 



Wcti,ion 7^FT»^<^£>/ST 



D*f» 



•*•• 



Politic, part..., civil or .ocl.I eluH, fr.Ur«ltl„. m. S>^f?l>t/fc^f? 
H«e o^ «arrj««c b your fraflAioOicr 



Roa<F<9/en 

St«p9r«n*ioth«r (your fachtr't iltfo) 



ims- 



n4«ecw 3 / 



»f diad. datt of ^atV 



Pl«c« of birth 



,^_^ Currant Roiidwiec^ 
_.^ftiU of birth 



Iducatloo (nuMbor of y««rt)i 

9r«d« school kl^ m.mkt^\ 

high tehoo)^ ^>oftlonal c oiu,. 



Occup«tion(s) 

ht 

Ind 

)rd 



Datot 



ftc 



PLACC or MtlOCNCC 
(aftor l«ovln9 hoM) 



Ootot 



Jiatof^ 
Oatoi 



^2M 



tellglon 



Jrd 



J)at«*^ 
0«t«s 



•ollt.cl p.rty, civil or social clubs, sororltlas, ate. 



laea of Mrriaga to your grandfathar 



Data 



• , ^ . i. 

Mbn4f»thtr (your moth«r'« »iM) 
f dead, date of d<«th ' '^ 



Place of birth Ia Cct^ . ^ \^y iSCQAJ S h^ Data of birth b£PrgA^r°>^^ 9. /S?9 
Education (numbar of y*«irs)i 
grada school ^ high achool *•/ vocational collage 



Ikcupatlon(») PLACE OF RESIDENCE ,_ ., 

(after leaving home) l'^^^" f^**** 1 
lat C^o^r. Pc^^STT/^ D aft j9JV-)'^^V 1 1 1 ROCkFO/Q/:) . I i-L • ^Da tts t^- 

tn d ?f)KM€R Dataa H^W-VS 2 n d SU6^^ 6/?gt;(^ j^^. p afs I^HH-(%2 

|rd /A/^CHi A a" Qf^R/^rV R D ata t /^«^ - / ^6^3 r d /^^~(6c U/'S , D ates '"^^^'^fS- 

>th D ata i A t h D ates 

Icl Iglon f^PtpjIlT 

•olltlcal parties. cIvM or social clubs, fratarnltfas, ate. fj^^riiCAA/ A^i^/^ ^FC<^TI(/ir 

Mace of warrlige to your grandmother fi^ ^c^-'^ l'^'<=TC'^' date ^^/oT^^ya^^/t; 

tote: If your mother was raised by a ll ipf ll ll l l U l WlUi nir ri Ul l V g ( t P I ge l 8> ^ / 9 o "^ — 
give that data on the back of this page (C-l) '^/ '^ 

Irandmother (your mother's side) 

l»»e JOr ^DTH tf^ i-u Kjf) GH^EA/ C urrant Rat I danc e AA'Tj &0 , [/^ I S CCMS. L^ 

f dead, date of death —<-«—— t-^————— —— 

'lace of birth n>,.CC-M IV 6TC>/^, /LL. Data of birth J/^M-i^fly :k^,/'lOC 

ducat Ion (number of years} 

grade school % high school V vocational colleg e 

•ccupatlon(t) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

, ^ . ^ -» « ti (after leaving hoeie) 

• t H<»^-»J- TE,'-'^''^ "^ ^Ij D atas n^Q-/^- ' I • t Y^^i^'^-i^^^^l 9.CK^r-oRO D a tas )t x^-/9V'^ 

w d t^O<fSPl< '-f D ataa /^^'c^- 2 ii d ^u^^^ fe'^Ol'U^ /g Dates /^v^-z-TO 

r d D ates 3 r d iiltVTIfeC; v^i$. D ates /^^3-»ygf5 

ellglon 

olltlcei party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



ace of merriaga to your grandfatho r i^UbMj/i-'GTt'iy: ' /a d ate 'htfV '^i/TTT 

ote: If your mother was raised by a stapiaothar or another r»i»n«« (tc r;c !;; 
y.'«* liivi Mie on crw oacK or this paga (fhZ) 



fti#f\s.n ui n » • \ur 



I or B- I ; 



your racnar'i nwne snouia appear dviom 



•> Place of birth /^C'Cic'F':^)^^ , ii.L|/^/C)iS 
Nuii6«r of years of »<T>oolTflg \^ 
Residenc e R{XKF6KC , jLL. 
Nuniber of children Ci. 



data 






Oceupat 

Warital Sftut M/^RRi^n 



dcK JiR. I i/T/e 






Name ^ 

Place o 

Number of years o 

Res I denc e f^r'-- ■ J' ,tL u 

Nun*>er of chTTdran ^ 



f school Ing \ J~ 



Oceupat 1 6rt fp^f^^^t^' 
Marital Statui ,^ ^/? ^^ 'e ''-' 



Pi*ce of birth ~ " 



rs of school Ihfl 



Number of yea 

Res I dance ROCkTC/^P 

NuH*er of cnll^rtn 



rr 



data I'iri- n-^1 

Occupation 



c 



warltal Statu* M^^WTrgggP </yfc;- L- 



Name AjL/^O LCU'Sr r/^'^LpR 

P lace of birth ^^ ^'-^£^ Rco^^a^V 'd at a ,jui\ lS,/'^3^ ' ^ ^ '^^ :»- 5 / / *?5^^ 

Number of years o^ schootin g <? Tccupatlbrt 

Res I dence _ _ /'^'■'^'^^^''-^ """^ M arital Status .;,\/6><-e 

Number of chl Idran Q 



Name 

Place of birth "" 

Number of years of schooMng 
Residence 



Number of chl Idran 

Name ______^_ 

Place Of' birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Res I denc e 

Number of chl I (iran 



Name 

Place of birth ""^ 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I dence ' 

Number of chl Idran 



Name 

Place of birth ""~ 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 



Number of children 



Name 

Place of birth "^ 

Number of years of schooling 
Residence 



Number of chl Idran 



Name 

Place of birth """ 

Number of years or aclteollfta 

Residence 

Mumbar o f U III U IWI 



Harltal Status 



date 
Occupation 



date 
7ccupatlon 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



data 
Occupation 



dat e 
Occupation 



Marital Status 



Piarital Status 



'Occupation 



data 



Occupation 
naritai Status 



CHILDREN 



of t and (or (-1, D-l)-your mother's name should .p^^r b«l,iN 



N.iml,.» .,( /«-,if. of stho«»IInn 






NiNDiirr o( r.hlldren a. 



d.Ur , M>»ttCH /) /^-a/;- - v' ^ 



'<ij.nl,.- r of y.-.irs of fchoollrtg 



N.iii 

I 

Nijtnl 

f<«!i i (Icf.ce Y^pScOF i^U 

Number of chl Idreh Vt** 



:'.!' a . 



Harlttl 



Tyccup.nfe;3S2iZS 



Plac e oi b.rth Ro<!j^>?gfe^ ^ "^ ^ ' 
Number of years of schooling >». ' 



Res I dencc C^'A/fcl/A. ]\_l . 
Number of chi Jdr«n ' -a] " 



date DfTc P/v, ^g^^^ | ^^/ 9 9l 5' 






N 

p 

N 

Hesi deuce ^ 

Number of chi Idrcn 



I ■»■«• r,f birth PgcKPgXgtJ 
uin»*«f of years of schooling 



feg,VP\/A^tLL , 



i2^ 






Name V.fir'^ A I ^ 

P»«ce of birth 



Nu->.r Of yeo^=?f^^5 



Kes i dence \m\m 'y^t)J - SAueA\ v c 
Number of chi l dren "^ ^ ^ ' ^ '' ' 



; dete PiRf()L 3.5- ic^:)^ 






fe«?r/^ 



Nc 

PI 

Number of years of schoolin g |^ 

"''^'•^•^"^^ ,S^^»i<g» ^-f r;cAG>&, /LL. 

" — ^ I 



<>»m.- Op not ^j^^ L.J,vtO 

' ' occ of birth KOLFAJ^ 77 
lumber of years of school fn 



t-t^l^OZ-S 



Numl)cr of chi Tdren 



TCrTuT 



.^___ dat e //oi/f/^^^^ z') /c^a'^ 

^p.tioa -7CTp ^- 

status >iA)^i«^ie'^ ^^ 



Nane 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Number of chl Jdren "" 



"Occupatlbn 
Narltal Status 



Name 

Plac e of b i rth 

Number of years of schooling 
Residence ' 

Number of chi Idran 



date 

bccupation 



•rltal Status 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of schooling 

Residence 

Number of chl Idran 



dat a 
Occupation 



TBrTtaT Status 



Name 

Place of birth 



date 
BccupatiotT 



''•rltal Status 



r 

jCr rati 






If Father .....•^'♦f? 



of felrt h R<X.i<FtjRO, ;iL. ^tou of bfrt h Lj^vol /fl . /^^l^ ^ 

Eton (numUr ^yaa^ J .-; . . ^ 



laca 

lucatton (nuMMr «r ye«( 

iradc school g high tchool V voc«tlona1_ collag* 



:cupatlon(t) PLACE OF RCSIOCNCC 

it pAtg^l/V6 D ata* n^fe- 1990 Ut FMh\ U/|jgt?r ^4J^ u>^ ^cxtifl ate* /'1li^6'' /^7 

> d "^ ^^Si^OW/^Re SrQ<gfD atas )^'l^'l^li 2n d /I^T/)}? I A A^D ^g/90 O aut /"^^g- 

^ ng^viCK 0R\^^(\ D atas ISOM- 3rd ^ Datat 

h Datas lith Datai 

nfioo Mrruo£)/ST ' 

lltlcal partlas, civil or social clubs, fratarnltlas, ate. TTgUSTpr OV AJORT\^ P9R) L 

aca of marrlaga to your motbir )^ ' r^ftPT>'i>T CV-^HCfj: ■ 7^&CKR>>^ ta <;pPrgAiQjRe aO^ /ly i : 
TE: If you wera raised by a stapfathar or anothar raTatlva giva that dataontKaTacV""^"^ , 
of this page. (E-2) A 

ur Mother 



»e A\/|R1LVV lORRP^W^ rf)-^0^ Currant tosldanc a RoC^I^RO, )LL. 

dead, date of <aath " ^ * 

jica of birth T/yZ/g.^UlLLr , \//lS. Data of birth MPrRC^ . 1^2G 

ucatlon (number of years) vuRSfS • 

|rade school g high school H vocational Tie/9tA«i/V6- c ol lege 



Bupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) ^^_^ 

t Hg6r)ST£/^gO VMf?sr Datas i95<?'/?6S 1st ff)R^^ Dates /^^^- /1^ 



< SCMCOL ^uy?Sg Petes y?6^- 2n d/^"'r^/^^/V^0 8^ D ates 1^">^- 



1 ^Dates 3rd ^Dates 



I i g I on , 

lltica! party. cTvll or social clubs, sororities, etc. JJ^^S>£ ^ C^H/3, jy^tC^A/kiRS , 

iUo/^e^f^^^RS ""T' ■ ;• • " __ _ ■ '" ' 

lice of marrlaaa to your fatha r l<f ' B^rri^T ChMf^ci^' JKCcKFOi^o) d ate s«iPTC/<^^g a<g,>?Vl 
It: If you Mara raised by a stapmothar or anothar relet rva give that deta on the back of 
this page (F-2). 




'"• '^^^"'NMtNT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If vou .n, 

° f'^bllc library, Rockford. Illinois Collection, deposited m lUv 
Signed 




°*^e JJj>^i::f^cidj£^^_Xl^ f?Sl^ 



GENEALOGY CHART 



L^Ba^a^ t m^ix /\ 



^=r:^iLt 



'-:Hrr^ 



T'^ 



ed 



Father 
D 



l/a/A^ ^AVutR. 



jP)/A^S T/>yLO^..„ 



Great grandfather 



j B i"?5"b 



M 



Grandfather 

D 'ifKi^- ;<i^ rW^/ Great grandmother 

B 

D 






Grandmotlier 



Bpi^i-fw^'^'t '-> /i^ /3'!^ 



D ) 'I D i 



AT^Rii^yy "Taylci^ 



Mother 
D 



B '^ ^ ^ 



6S..^R LU4;^f./^t^ 



Grandfather 
D 



D . ^'b "j 



PC'C^T^p/^ i-(>(A/rt'/^i* 



B /5.-^/ 
D »'4t 



70 Ki/ "^T^S'^^LQY 



B iS'kC 
M '^^ 

D ;VG J- 



IJ 



Grandmother _- 



D ? 



SOURCES OF INFORMATION 

I. Letters From Grandpa and Grandma Liindgren 

II. Two Interviews From Grandma Edith and Uncle Ace 

III. Many Talks With My Parents 

IV. Rockford Public Library 

V. Winnebago Coxinty Courthouse 



aen'^biisjJ. ssaboBiD bna sq&nsiO iiiO'i''l eieJ-tel .1 
eoA eloffU boB ritibi ambxiBiO mOT'? eweivTietnl owT ,11 

etneiB^ YM rid-iW bXIbT ^nsM .III 

XXBidLJ. oxJIcfiH biol3iooH .VI 

eet/offinjjoO Y^"Wo3 o^cfenniW .V 



'0 6 aroq •RqT-Cy j.sr?>.jOA. 



L^?' x.i, J &■ ; ' '^ ^ o'Gi; 



ira 



life .1 9 r € X>8!IH& IJBSJLe 



th« te» 



ycTi is^joL 



aox/'Bi qq.aqBZTxa P^b xibuuCi 'v 

esuaoTi a^BxajCBBj 'x 

0L5I 'a 

spaea puBi 'xi 

aaai ueaSpimi 'IIIA 

aaaj aoiT^Bj, -jia 

st[dBaSoq.oi{d; 'ia 

aoijCBj, auTBaao'i ujCxiaB^ 'g; 
aoxiCBi auaSna ubu:uCt[ 'v 

BI^UdJ-Bi 'A 

uaaSpunx Baq:).oaoc[ 'CI 

uaaSpimx ubxjbh '0 

aox/^Bi q^-TPa 'a 

aox^Bji aov puB trenL^i 'V 

si^-uaaedpuBao 'ai 

!j.pXOX{SBq.s ax-JTSM 'j: 

Q.pXoqsBQ.s uqof 'a 

uaaSpuni axxiTI 'CI 

uaaSpuni jbosq '0 

9IQ.Ta ■^XT'nBj: >ia8X0 9^!l■ ^oaj sq.aaxa 'X 

itaBXO iiaBiAi -g 

aox^Bjj uuv puB sauiBf "v 

s^uaaBdpuBJo q.8aao 'III 

iCaBTCE e ,aox-'^Bi jCoy 'II 

aox^Bj, tCov 'I 



I 



AOy Taylor 

Acy Taylor was bom In England in 1797. In mj raaaaroh 
it says he cama brar to America with the Engliah Army in 
1813. That would make him only sixteen years old, la euL. 
armyi and in a -foreign country besides. Well, if it is 
family legend, or if ha had eaay-to-get-along-with parent* 
makes no difference. The fact is he made it. 

He married a Lavisa Gardner here and decided to make 
America his hojie. Ha first lived somewhere in Upstate New 
York, but was soon diiaatisfied with this. He then decided 
to pack up and move his family out to the "Western !?ro■ti•l^", 
But before he moved the whole family, ha did what so many 
other new family didi Ha dacided he would check out the taw. 
land himself. 

He went to Albany on a boat and rode the Great Lakes until 
he reached Chicago. He then went on foot to the Rock River 
and made out his stake claim. The only reason he stopped here 
must have been because of the talk he heard on tha way. He 
stopped alkottt thraa milas aaat of the Book Rj.ver for no appajrant 
reason. From. that time on, until 1970, when I moved off of the 
farm, there had been a Taylor living on it for some I30 years. 

He did write a diary about his eight day adventure. He 
writes when he gets aboard his boat on July., 22, I84O, until 
he sees the Rock River on. Aiigust 5, 

I also have a mortgage or some sort of land deed to the 
land^ written in February 5, 1846, at 2:30 p.m. This was given 
to his son Lyman , 



1840 

July 22 - Albany at noon then went on board the boat Neptune of the 
Clinton line-Captain Sam Bennet. Started out of Albany at 
7-O'olock at night and reached Schenecttady. 

July 23 - About half past four in the afternoon and one mile ast 
of Port Jackson and Amsterdam a couple of the passengera 
left the boat on a shooting frolick and soon returned 
with a woodchuck- I think the largest I ever saw- so I 
can see the stock is better which makes me feel encour- 
aged about the land. They then dressed the carcas on 
deck for cooking. It clouded up for rain which took 
place about half past five P.M. 

July 24 - Friday - This morning rainy and xmpleasant. At 9 A.K 

we reached Little Falls where we saw quite a village with 
three churches. I there inquired of a man how these 
people got their living; the reply wae they drill little 
holes in the rock and put in corns of wheat. The shooters 
left the boat about 10 o'clock and returned with a gray 
squirrel and put it in the pan with the woodchuck. Twelve 
o'clock and we are now crossing the German flats. Now I 
found out. the crew, and the bowman is an Indian.* One 
of the steamsmen is Yankey, the other is a Dutchman. The 
Indian is the smartest of the ^jhree, the Dutchman next 
ond the Yankey mean. Twelve o'clock and we are now ' 
10 miles from Utica. I have become acquainted with the men 
on board. There are 3 men on board that call themselves 
shoe makers that are going to look for a place to locate 
themselves and two of them left home in the same way that 
I did and are ffoing to send for their families. Caine to 
Utica at 5 P.M. ,.. stayed til 7, then passed on. It has 
become clear and cool for this season. 

July 25 - This morning is very foggy and cool but I had a good nights 
rest. At five this morning we were at Canastota. The fog 
becomes to disappear. At 9, it begins to be very warm. 
The woodchuck and the squirrel we gave away to some loafers 
by the canal. Twlve O'clock dinner ate and under good 
headway, we are within 6 miles of Syracuse. Differ 'Ot 
passengers come on and go off. Three P.^:. r..<.w int the 
pleasant place of Syracuse with my face tow.'-.rds the West 
but my mind is on my family behind me. We now start out' 
at sunset. 

July 26-1 find myself at Montquma in good health, but before this 
however, I have changed my mind as to the crew. The 
Dutchman is the best by far. One P.M. now at Lyons and the 
people are going to a meeting and I am 11 miles from Van 
Clecks - still going on, oh that I could hear from home' 



7 o'clock P.M. I arrived at J.H. Van Clacka and find th«a ii^ 
wall. Saw John Raskins there and stayed until Monday nooat 
than took the packet boat Palmira, Captain unknown. 

- A man called on me while I am now writing to give him his 
bill for the fare, and he will pay it. I was now obliged 
to disown the title and be called a passenger. Then on sat 
by me and told me he was going to Rochester to get work 
for he got on a spree at Newark with his friends emd was 
oblige^ to quit for he was ashamed to stay any longer. 
My fare from Macedon to Rochester was 7 5 cents without 
board. I arrived at 6 in the afternoon and started out 
6b the packet Hutson - old line for Buffalo at 7 in the 
afternoon - fare $1.00 without board. All is well. 

July 28-5 o'clock in the afternoon and we are 18 miles from Buffalo. 
The Captain and one of the crew now sit at the table playing 
cards. About this time I think and inquire, think and 
inquire again and know not what to do. But this is the 
word "Go on" so I shall. At 6 in the afternoon came to 
Tonawanda and the hour changed. The wind has blown hard 
from the southwest all day and now it begins to rain. I 
have now passed the boat that I started from Albany on 
which my boxes are on board. Came into BuffeuLo at 6:30 
in the afternoon, put my boxes in the tavern, then went to 
M.W. Bottoma and stayed over night with them. That night 
we went to the theater. The next morning I went down to 
the wharf, istorad my goods with Hunter Palmers, emd took 
a receipt for them. Then I got mu trunk and went on board 
with the General Scott. We went up to the lake, the wind 
blowing hard from the northwest, and I had not gotten fifty 
rods from shore when I wished my self on shore again. But 
it was too late for that wish to have effect. TVi-s boat 
went on, up and down, like a horse in full canter. The 
Scott had on fvll freight and a good number of passengers, 
but she had not gone far before we all began to be sick, 
for the boat was first one end up and then the other, 
varying from A to 12 feet higher than the other end of the 
boat, which changed the countenance of most all the passen- 
gers on board the boat. One would suppose that Jonsdi was 
called for in earnest. But towards night we all began to 
recover from our sickness and we passed the night tolerable 
well and found ourselves all alive the next morning. 

July 30 - We reached Claavelemd at 10 o'clock in the forenoon. I then 
went to the Cleveland House, took dinner, -and stayed 
over night. I was expecting the Cleveland boat at 4 in the 
morning, but for some reason or o±her it was detained longer. 

July 31 - Took breakfast, Dinner, and Supper here - walked about 
and viewed the city also the Lake Shore, then the St. 
Clair house, the steam boats that came in, and also the 



conal boats. Then I went back to the house again and talked 
with all I met that appeared to he respectable. There were 
soire gii^ls there that talked about other girls that boarded 
with them at Buffalo. Some said they were married at 
fifteen - one said she was married about one year ago. I 
will omit the rest, for :* is sunsei, Friday night and 
at "_pve';and, '^I'io. 

~ stfi^t-i over '} '■ r. night, also f-.r-'^ ^n ^h"^ rrior^-p'rig I got up 
e&'^^.y ^* "^ went to 'he "'•-ike •:-.Y:ori- viher-p ' had been for two 
days pas:"ed ever-y two hou'-s. Tri'^re T shw the boat that I 
was waiting for, I retu-r^e-ii i o vhe G', Clair house with 
s[eed, paid my bi'i, i^tept into LI--? carriage and soon iound 
mysel-f" on the dock bei'ore * '' e 'lleveland. The coachman took 
riy tr-\;rk and I went on bos r-a th^* Cleveland. We started out 
vit 7 - '■ tne morning for the rar- West with myself and a 
gocdiy number of passengere or coard. The time that I 
srenl in the city of "^lev*-,' i brd cee.'ned very long and it was 
i^-rdious for me to oe so deta":ned from my journey. I have 
nor, .^een cne face tha"^ I have ever known since 1 J eft the 
J , H . ""leeks, save the Marshall v, . Bottoms farr;ily and they 
a; le^red to be glad to r>ee :r.e. 

Now it is l*^' o'cloc-: ' r: the tor'enc;on ur.^ier good 
heJidway. They stovtei tw ce to wood be -ore we reached 
Detrci*, which was in 'l^e twijight oi the evening, and we 
stayed ''":'=' re "jntil 9 'f"© next morn'^r.g - The :3abt)ath. 

A<- r.!=ve got uiider good heodA^j' uga i n for tne 1 1'ea i West, 
letr-oit is a very f ' ne place to "ook fit with lir.e Ihur'ches, 
nr'd many fine bull dingy. Cn tne w'nole it looky very splendid, 
''•e have sailed very near th" 'anada shore for por.f^ time and 
ir some ■laces, it xooks vei-y f.r.e. 1 cou^d p->e the 
p'-itish troops assembled togp ' h-^ ■", They said ;.;;ey wei-e going 
*o have a boxing party at .; r o'c cck Sunday in 'he forenoon. 
Now we are on the Lake St. Clair with a ia ! r view of the 
.Michigan shore. Here there are many fire hcu.e- c the 
ishore and some with fire looking f'ru^ t t^ees a^^d f "■ ne 
'; Of':"'i ons for I'ar-mers. 

''1 the twilight oi a:j t even:-.-, the--' came on board 
::r:-- ioa"*., a mari th^-it WHlKed al"Oi.t ! ^.e a pa-:s-=?f.ger. He 
took uj. a valise and started ot 1 *or a .'ustice of the Peace. 
"'he vustice tr-ied and jut him in Jail and left for another 
trial, Sleven in the j'oi-enoon, ajid we are now losing sight 
of al .. shor-es. large wh'te houses look like vef^a on the 
floor. Cnce in a whi^e we pass a lonely vesH«i tha ' is 
making up or down the l.-iwe, Twej.ve o'clock gt noon now 
and we are now going up the St. Clair channel where they 
go by stakes set in the mud. Here we see the- .^ea gu' .s 
1 lying briskly. The houses on the shore looK very sm.all, 
for they are a great way off. The marshes are with'n a 
stones throw each side of the boat. 1, at th ' s moment, 
sp:'ed the wr-eck ot a s':oo]- that a]; ears to have a ' n fiere 
for some years. The marshes look splenild indf^t-i her«=^, we 
are now sailing a point nearer southeast than ♦r-ast, very 



clear and pleasant. 

One o'clock afternoon now and we are in fair eight of 
fine fields - some covered with com, some with horses and 
some with other astulf - grain crops, but none have cattle. 
Canada shore the same. I now cast my eye anotjier way and 
see buildings that look as if they atoed on the face of the 
water. We are taking another point of compass, Northeast. 
Here is a little village on the Michigan shore - a fine 
house has a pole by it with a line sign on it. It looks 
well bTe with fine crops of corn. On the Michigan shore, 
the houses all stand near the shore and the fruit trees look 
well - in iact it looks inviting to the farmer. 

The Canada shore looks baren here. At 2 o'clock 
Svmday afternoon, we stopped at a place called Newport 
on the Michigan shore. There they put on 70 cords of wood 
and started out at 4 o'clock which made 2 hours there. We 
went off the boat a considerable distance to view the land 
crops. There I saw a lot of cows that were of good size and 
in good condition. Their land looked very well though it 
had the appear-ance of neing sol t in wet weather. Fruit 
trees looked thriftly, corn stout and all things looked well, 
though the road was full of sheep and hogs which gave it 
a bad appearance. One hour later- and under good headway. 
Here the appearance is much the best on the Canada side. The 
make of the land and the crops look all together the best her 
It has clouded up and it looks likely for a atorm. Sunset 
'^ind we are now passing by Fort Gravit. Here we can qee thfe 
'^anon and several soldiers out of the fort. The boat made 
??uch fl noise that we did not hear any thunder, but the 
lightning flashed in every direction arid the wind blew hard 
which made the boat shake well - this was when we first came 
into Lake Huron. The wind was in our stem, the tiails were 
twisted and we went at the i*ate of 16 miles an hour. The 
waves were as much a 8 feet high. 

This morning it cleared off and then the wind changed and 
took our bow. They then let down the sails. The head wind 
brok down the waves and they raised anew in our Jront which 
made it all the worse for us than betore. The vvind still 
blows, but not quite so hard a^ it did this morning. We 
jave come to the place called Thunder Bay Island, passed by 
and cane to the place called Pre'^jue Isle. Here we wooded 
again and started out about 12 o'clock at noon under good 
headway. On this lake my head swims very bad. i^n this last 
island, there are but 3 or 4 families to board the choppers 
that chop wood for the boats, but they have a store and a 
tavern. I did not see but two women on the island, when we 
went ashore and walked about an hour or more to view the 
place, while they were wooding the boat. The Ta. orders said 
that a man could not live in that place in the winder any 
more than a worm could live in a fire - it is i.o cold. 
Since we came on this lake, we have been out ol sight of 



of land a considerable part of the time. 

At six o'clock in the afternoon, we arrived at Makinaw 
Island, where we wooded again. Here ia splendid fort, 
where the Americans have a company of soldiers there -to 
keep the fort. It is the grandest place to look at that 
I have ever seen since T left hoaie. The evening g\in was 
fired there as we left the place and under good headway 
for the west. 

Tuesday morning at 5 o'clock, we came to the Island of 
Manitoo. Here we were out of the wind, but last night the 
wind blew hard and it thundered and lightning, which made 
the waves run high, and it appeared to me to be dangerous. 
But when we left this Island, we found it worse for a spell 
for as we came into Lake Michigan, the waves ran still 
higher for the wind had a better chance to trouble the 
water. Here the Captain took his station on the upper deck, 
while we were passing by the place called Sleeping Bain. 
He appeared to be in trouble to see the boat tip and travel 
Pbaut 30. He would look first one way then the other, then 
go to the wheel and to the bow and look there, but to our 
joy, the wind shifte* a little, and broke down the sea to 
some measure. But for myself, I have been seasick ever 
since the wind rose last night, which makes it very bad 
for me. 

Here is one thing w6rthy of notice. It was found out 
that there came on board off the Manitee Island, for the 
purpose of getting married, a couple, and it was found out 
that there was an Episcopal Minister on board the boat. 
And there whp pom** Jolly set of passengers on board and 
they were put up by the Captain to persuade these passengers 
to get married on the boat. They consented to it and the 
hour was set at 9 o'clock in the evening in the cabin. The 
hour came and we all assembled in the gentleman's cabin and 
the performance was all went through with. The ring was 
given and put on the bride's linger and all things passed 
with great solemnity. Then came on the cake and cheese 
that was passed to all. Then came on the wine that was 
passed to all. Also by this time, it began to re Jolly 
times. The Captain brough on the champagne as i^-ng as we 
all would drink. Then there was a song axing by Ksq. 
Walker or Col. Waker of Illinois. It was a seaman's song 
and when he closed the song, a cheer was given by the stompir 
and the spating of the hands, so it closed the merriment. 

Wednesday morning, we came to a , lace Milwauco. Here some 
passengers landed and also some freight. Here i lost my 
boots, tho\igh I had another pair with me, so I did not care 
30 much lor that. There has been a calm sea ever since 
the wedding took place 



While I write this, I am in sight of Chicago, my 
landing place just 14 days since I went on board of the canal 
boat in Albany, and 14 long days, I can assure you. When 
I came to look over luggage on board, I found my boots 
which were moved there by mistake. A calm sea, all is 
well. Twelve o'clock at noon, we landed at Chicago, with 
fair' and pleasant weather for the season. Three o'clock 
in the afternoon, we had the luck to hire an Englishman 
to carry us to the Hock River. I fell in company with a 
Mohawk Dutchman and his wife and son that was going to 
Rock River in Winnebago County - town of Arlin, so I 
thought I would go with them to see that place first, so 
we started out for that place. We had not got more than 
three miles, before we got slewed in a mud hole. This was 
bad for us, for we had to unlead part of the lead, backed 
out past the lead, and got help to help the rest of it. 
Then we went to a place called Whiskey Point and stayed 
all night. In the morning, we went on our journey and 
had very good luck through the day. We came to a place 
Elgin about 5 in the afternoon, then watered our team, 
then went 5 miles farther to the tavern where a man call 
Esq. Kimball is. There we put up for the night 40 miles 
from Chicago, and since I came on the prairie, T have seen 
one Rattle snake, that we killed. In killing him, we 
whipped the rattles off so I could not save them. I saw 
some prairie hen, but the Prairie I had Dut a fair.t idea 
of. It was sometimes flat and muddy, and soreetimes high 
and rolling. Cows, horses, and oxen, all together it 
looks sometimes well and sometimes bad enough. 

We stayed at Esq. Kimballs tavern over night, where we 
slept on the floor. We go up in the morning, took some 
bitters, and started on i rom there to the Rock River. We 
went through many fine Prairies, some of them I should have 
glad to own myself, but the peo] le that then lived on them 
were as well suited with them as 1, was. We came through 
one Dlace called Elgeon, that looked very well. Went that 
day to th"^ Dutchman's home. There I stayed over night - 
took supper and breakfast. 

Now I am three miles from the Rock River, where I shall start 
for this morning. Here the appearance of the land is good. 
Went one mile to H.L. Roads and went to Barrets and to the 
Post Office. Mr. Thurtson's, back to i..r. Roads, then to 
Mr. Havens, then to Mr. Vernestons - The first mentioned 
place where I and the folks stopped that I came in with - 
The Mohawk Dutchman, that I have mentioned, was one of a 
band of robbers that had been driven out of this neighborhood, 



PATERNAL GHKA^^-GRANLl ATHER 



JAMES TAYTXR 



James Taylor born in l8':»6 was the son ot I yman and 
Elizabeth Taylor. He married a girl named Anna Winterer, 
who was burn in 1861. They met at a farm in Hillsboro, 
Wisconsin. At the time he was in the pi-ocess of changing jobs 
due tc the change ol seasons. 

They lived and wurked a forty-acre farm. James planted 
pine trees in 1872 and walnut trees in I9OO lor the purpose 
ot winribreaking. He bought this larm that he had worked so 
hard on ; roir a man named Charles ^ude in 19C9. Charles ?.une 
had built the farm house in 187^" lor S1';0! . James enlarged the 
tacilities by adding moi'e buili.iings in 1909. 

.- railroad ran thivugh the jarm. It stactfi^d ir ;~{ockford 
an.-'' i-Hri t. Caledonia. There were two engines, #1296 and #786. 
The?"e were six and eight wheeler trains. The railroad was in 
operation ] rom I856 through 1936. 

James Taylor had be^n a town clerk 1 or the Harlem township, 
as well as a larmer. He was tbwr clerk lor forty years. 

Jairies Taylor died in 1934 at the age 01 78 years old. Anna 
Winterer Taylor died in 1940 at tne age ol 79 years old. 



PATE iNAT C ;EAT-GRANrrATH^R 



Mark f^lerk 

Mark Clark, born February 2, l8bH, met his bride-to-be, 
Alma Louis Sajsbury, at the church soc al3 in lavis, Illinois. 
He ha>i sang in the Sunday ochoul ch>^ir ano Alma ^';.d played 
the organ. After a long courtship, Mh^-K mar'rled Alma en 
June 28, 1893. Tht'r- iirst born was r-'i'""y. He was born on 
April 15, 1894. Their next child, rldith, was boi^n on 
Pecember 19, I896. Alma Clark died on July 28, I893. The 
cause of her death was a heart attack. 

Mark Clark remarried a tew years later. He married 
Stella Mc^ay in 1902. Three years iF-ter, in 1905, they had 
a daut-hter' w'n. ch they named Viula. 

During these years, Mark cigr'k had two Jobs. First, he 
was a got^dener. Alter he g-^ew tired o! t;.is occupation 
he becp.rae a hu t L.e mHker. 

His pasttimes included mai^y hobuies. His mOot lavorite 
bein^: wood Cr:rving. lie oesiened and produced beautili-1 pieces 
rr)>--iy o ; which ar'e still tre;.sur'ed by felatives. Ma^^k Clark 
had a urlque tar,te all his ow^' which was shown in hLs workings, 

}'e died o' natural causes 1 r' 1 '51 at the age ot 83 years 
o.d. r/ark Clark was laid to rejt in Roc.<.ord, Illinois. 



EZEF^TS rROM CLARK'S 1 AMILY BIBLE 

CHARTKS CLARK. Departed this lile October 16, 1870. 

HARRY CLARK. Departed this liie April ?7 , 1874. 

Mother- passed away at her h^me in raysville, O^^le Coxinty, 
Illinois at 5o' clock Sunday morning, October 7th, 1906, aged 
71 years 1] months and 14- days, and was laid to rest beside her 
boy, Harry, in the Daysville cemetary. Mother bom October 22,1835. 
Father died about 10 o'clock a.m. on Monday, April 3rd, 1916, 
and was laid to rest beside his wile and son, Harry, in the 
Daysville Cemetary. (Aged 7 5 years and 5 days). 

Wy lather, Mai'k Clark, born Tebruary 2nd. 1868, died August of 
1951 yt 83 years old. laid to rest Rockford, Illinois. 



MATERNAL GREAT - GRANrFATHER 
Oscar ".n''idt:;ren 

Oscer ^ undgren cam«^ from '^^ii.o' -•' ^ Sweden and was bom 
ther-e in ]fi73. '"^^ *as the sor o' e'P'- ] w^-i^^re^ who wn^ 
R 90 born in SiLoTiPin, Sweden. When :h<-v care over ^o Araerjoa 
in 1885, they continued to ramfi, p.-^ t oe^ nad done in Sweden. 
His father f 8 rrried in 3t. Charjet^, : irwis -for ?7 ye°rs unt.il 
he moved to a farm in the snn.e vie:'- *y. He iived there 
1? years until his retireraen: -^nd we- i on to Jive with his 
daug/.ter in '^pneva, Illir:ois, where >r died. 

(so^r : ypaosed farminfj for y ;i;:-p wh'ie. At a^e ?i, 
he worked w;tn a railroad con,rany :,;:;:• t had wor-KPd buildln/^ o 
railroad in Panamp. C^iisl. nf- lY.^.rj c-.-.:ie hoaie -ifter fjv^ y^ars 
from the '^anal /odo. He r-e ''.: "^ned here at bin luri*-^ new f h r-n 
and 'ne-ied nim out. After his fatbe'-'? dea'h, ne VoVfjht t'-p 
f'arn from the other heirs. He le^t'^i •''.'^.re U-)r th-^ee years 
sol *hp iarzv, and Ga,';.e to r^ck*^or'd q-i hou^h l a handsorr.e 
rei^ii-'ce and started a grocery stor-^' in the 7th street ar'ey. 

He remained there until he sold he store and retl r-ed in 
1947. Oscar and his bride, Tiliie, ooi-ght 9 ho-jpe on SeminoDe 
Dr. and lived tnere until his death - -. 19h5, 



MATERNAL G^fiAT-GRANLMOTHER 
Tillle Carlson (Londgren) 

Ida, or Tillle as she was called in America, came from 
Vosmond, Sweden. I f O' nd out very iittle about her. How 
ah« met Oscar is unknown. She did come o/er to the United 
States when she was 17 years old. She had a brother, Axel 
Carlson. He was married and had two daughters living in 
Dekalb, Illinois. 

She married Oscar in 1003 in Idxon, Illinois. Little 
else is known about her except she was a wonderful wife and 
housewile to Oscar for 62 years, until Oscar's death. 



MATERNAL r, H ?:aT ~ G i^ A NPPA WENT 3 
John ". tasl'oldt 

HaiiH Stasholdt, later r.e c}iarif;ed his nair^e to John when 
he move i to America, came from och 1 esewig-Holstein, Germany, 
wriio?! wH.-^ part of Terimark at t.rie t'Tie. This explains his 
Tanisr; j^r.ce?''' r.y , h^ ■.'' '^ pfirerts we'^e Danes. I ' ttle was 
fojnd out >".!oijt h' .- "Ire over- there, or h i f^ other j-e^atives. 
He did hnve a r:ei.he«, thou^ih, w^.o 'A'33 a postmaster i r. Viel, 
Gej^myiy, Hie nam<^ w-is ^l^r.s '^roderson. He rrarri ed a c^iri 
PHmed '""rr-t'^a, and they ha'i two ch-']dren, Hans and Greta]. 
Gretaj later married a man namea Schultz who owned ari o' eo 
factory ^n Germany. Hans -'r. .lived the rest of his life in 
the ^U33ian section of Kas c Germany, never being heard ot since. 
Hans ir. died before 'Aorjd Aer TI, Greta lived in Tenniark 
for part of the war- apd tht^r n.o/p.d to Berlin later. 

Great-grandpa Stasholrit carue over to America when he .van 
a young man. How young is u-'iknowr. He came over here for a 
visit, but never wert i.ack. He escaped mllitar-y sei'vice 
because of h ; s eyesighi. He always had poor eyes, but, saw 
ir.ore than some peopLe wi*h good eyes. John went to Floomington, 
Illinois to farm arii lived thore until he retired from farming 
in 19-^0 He was 70 at the time and then went to live with hla 
daughter Dorothea Lundgren (ivly Grandma). He stayed with them 
untl"! he died at the age of 102. I guess I would corsider him 
a pretty successful farmer. He had al^ his hospital Dills and 
such^paia for until two weeks before he passed away. Not bad 
for living 102 years and still having a good credit rating. 

Some of Jo>'n Sta.sholdt's other relatives were nephews 
living in Iv'inneso'a. Their nanies we'-e ^lause, Lajveny, Hanz, 
and Feter. 



* u 



M 



MATERNAL GREAT -GRANDMOTHER 
Maria Steinke (StaeholdtJ 

Great -Grandma Staeholdt came from Lauenbach, Germany, 
which was in th« central part of it. Her father waa probably 
a farmer, because they farmed when they arrived in America. 
They didn't all come over here at the same time, thovi^h. 
One or two of her brothers came over first. Then at a^e 
seventeen, she arrived. The next year her parent* came over. 

She had ti-rm brothers. Theodore, the youngest started 
out farming, then quit. He later became a feed seilesman. 
Otto was a jack of all trades and died rather young. Ferd was 
a cabinet maker for the Chicago and Altose Railroad, doing the 
woodwork on the passenger cars. And the other two brothers, 
Carl and Albert farmed, according to what I could find out. 

There were two social classes in Germany back then. The 
high class and the low class. It didn't mean that the higher 
class had anymore money or anything, I guess, it Just meant 
they thought they were on a higher plane than the lower class. 
There was a difference in language, too, which probably had 
a lot to do with the clase differences. 

How Marie and John Meant isn't very clear to me, except 
they met throiigh neighbors somehow. Other than that I'm unsura 
about their marriage and life together. 

They did have four children in their marriage. They were 
Dorothea, Cecilia, John, and Clara. 



PATERNAL GRANDFATHER AND STEP GRANDFATHER 
LyTnan.and Ace Taylor 

Ace and Lyman were two close brothers who were broiight 
up In the same home environment and had similar interests. 
So for this reason, I will put them on the same page. 

Grandpa Lyman was bom on June 4, I896 and Ace was 
born on December 14, I889. There parents were James 
and Anna Taylor (Winterer). He bought the farm from his 
dad in I900. He put the buildings up in I9OO for a cost of 
$1500. There were four buildings that James and Charles 
Rude constructed. 

Ace and T yman had two sisters, Erma bom in I887 and 
Still living,'' Barbara, born in I899 '^^id died in J935, by 
a heart attack. Barbara had a twin brother, Leonard, who 
also died of a heart attack in 105'^. 

There was very little social life on the farm. Mostly 
hard work and little reward. They had few luxuries. They 
did get an automobile in 1919.. It was a 1916 Ford that cost 
James $380.00. 

What little social life they did have was in atheljcs. 
Ace played on the Harlem Village baseball and football team?. 
These guys would go to Belvidere, Freeport, Rochelle, arid 
other towns to play these rivals. They used to be pretjty i?cCi."' 
in football, usually playing a rough brand, of it. Other than 
this outlet, there was little to do except work and such. 

Both boys were brought ^in a strong Methodist home. That is 
how Lyman met Edith and Ace met Marion; Through church socials 
and meetings. 

Lyman lived and worked on the farm hie whole life. Ace, 
tho\igh, was different. He lived on the farm until 1913. From 
there, he moved to the Elmer Day farm and worked there for 
three years. From there, he worked on the John liuilford farm, 
the Peter McParland fann for three years, and then at Patterson 









for four j«[«rs* Ttamllfjf h« boti^t th« lumber caapaiKj at 
?orr««toa» Illinois in 1926 and kapt it \mtil he aold it 
in 1964. 



y 

' n. 



\ 



MATERNAX GRANDMOTHER 
Edith Clark (Taylor) 

Edith Clark was bom on December 19, 1896, at eight- 
thirty p.m. to Mark and Alma Clark (oalabury). She was 
the last child bom to the couple. She had a brother named 
Harry who was bom. on April 15, 1894. 

She was bom in the town of Davis, Illinois, which is 
in Ogle Coxinty. Her father built the home they lived in. 
It was a small and modest home, but had all the coziness needed. 
Her mother died a short time after she was three years old. 
That was June 28, 1899 of some sort of sudden heart ailment. 
Her father soon married in ig02 to a Miss Stella Clark. 
They, in turn, had a daughter in 19C5, named Viola. 

Her father was a stem gentleman who wasn' t afraid of 
using the paddle it it called for it. Religion played an 
important part in the family, as they were devout Methodist. 
Ir fHct, it was throiagh church socials, that grcuidma met her 
husband Tyman. 

He sang in the choir, as he was suppose to have a 
beautiful voice. She played the organ and they were soon on 
the way to marriage. They first met in 191?, then married in 
!]917. During their marriage t?iey had four children. Everett 
was bom in ini9, and died on October 19, 1927 of Polio. 
Maurice was born on September 19, 1^?0 and died of a heart 
attack on May 26, 1969. Gene was born on June 16, 19^6. And 
Alma was bom on Jime 14, 1936, and died drowning on June 25, 
1950. 

Her husband died on April 19, 1944 of cancer. She remained 
as a widow until Lyman's brother married her on March 5, 1954. 
They are still married and are living In Forreston, Illinois. 
His name is. Aee Taylor 



PATERyAL GRANDFATHER 
Harlem Lundgren 

Harlan Lixndgren was bom Jon September 9» 1899 to 
Oscar and Ida lundgren. I found out little about his ear;Ly 
life. However, he did leave home at a young age. How old, 
I don't know. Wh«n he did leave, he went to laCrosse, Wisconsin 
and served as a machinist on the C.B.+O. Railroad. He was on 
the air brake department. 

After that job, he attended night school for drafting and 
engineering. From this education, he transferred to West 
Burlington, Iowa for eight months. Hannibal, Missouri was 
the next step, where he was a. shop engineer and draftsman. 
He moved on to Bloomington, Illinois for a Job on the Chicago- 
Alton Railroad. This is where he met his wife, Dorothea. It 
was at a church meeting for young people. 

After their wedding, Grandpa settled down somewhat. He 
was the County Forester for sixteen years until 1945. He 
farrred on Forest Hills Road for four years, too. And finally, 
hia last Job was a machine operator tor some factory until his 
retirement in 1963. This was in Su^ar Grove, Illinois. 

In 1965, Grandpa and his wife decided to buy a farm In 
Antigo, Wisconsin and have lived up there until this day. 



v». MATERRAL GRAUDMOTHEB 

Dorothea! Lundgren (Staaholdt) 

Dorothea Lundgren was bom on January 25, 1900 to 
John and Marie Stasholt. She was the youngest of four 
children in the family. I found out very little about her 
hoae life and later school life. 

She did,. though, get enough education to teach in echool. 
That was just for one year, then she met Harlan. Married 
women weren't allowed to teach school, so she quit. But, 
she wasn't content to be ^ust a housewife. She was rery 
active in organizations. T^e "Musical Lundgren' s" , .4-H, 
Homemakers, the Qrange Hall, and the Church were just a few 
things that kept her busy. 

She was also kept busy by six children. Dorothy, Harlan 
Jr. , Marilyn, John, Hazel and Loren were plenty of trouble 
for her. Grandma had very little time for herself. 

She met her husband at a church social for young people. 
That relationship turned out to last for over a half century. 
They were married on September 15, 1922, and it is still going 
strong. 



^t^s 



i 



PtERWAL FATHER 
Ljaan Eu£«n« Taylor 

On J\m« 16, 1926, at approxiaately 3:30 p.«. , a naw 
nlna pound, six ounoa boy was bom to Lynan and Edith Taylor. 
Ha was the third ohlld of the couple. 

Dad* a future was planned out for hla even In this early 
ata^e of life. He waa going to becoae a famer. During the 
1920's and 1930*8, fame were usually handed down from father 
to son, or the son went out and bought his own place. Money 
was not too plentiful during this era, so that left little 
chance of him going off to college and learning another 
career or trade. Also, sons were plenty helpful to Uair fathfrs, 
considering he had to rely heavy on horses, steaa tractors, 
and manual labor. 

Dad was growing up with farming when the rural population 
was not 80 outnumbered by the urban popfilatlon. Chorea 
were as much as his life as were food and sleep. He and his 
brother, Maurice, did their chores befoiTe they went to school 
and when they cane hone iti the afternoon. 

That left little time for their social lives. Except for 
the local 4-H clubs or the Argyle Gun Club (Shooting clay 
pigeons) , there was very little in the way of socializing. 
There was just no time for school activities. Except for my 
Mother. And that was Just during his Jxinlor and senior years 
in Harlem High School. He would takfli her out to the "cool 
places" like Marion's Sweet Shop and .Top Hat. 

OnJepiuary 2, 1944, his life changed drastically. His 
Dad went into the hospital complaining of stomach cramps. The 
doctors found out it cancer of the liver. He died on April 19, 
1944. The year Dad graduated from Harlem High. He knew now 
that farming was his future. 

Grandpa Ljcaan was a stem, but gentle man. I guess all 
grandohildran are told that about their grandparents, if 



anybody stepped out of line, he made sure they etepped right 
back In it. He did most of the punishjng business, and was 
good with the belt. 

Alter his Pad's leath, time moved r-apidly lor my Dad. 
Maurice married in T^.1^, leaving the whole t>.rm to his brother. 
H«» then got married in 1947 to Marilyn i.undgre*.- Farming, 3 ike 
the rest of the economy, picked up briskly in the next few 
years. Com, cattle, and land were all maKing more money than 
ever before. Farming was becoming a bigger business. 

More tragic struck the Taylor Faaily in 1950. Dad's 
sister. Alma Louise, went to an eight grade graduation party 
in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, and dr-ownei. That slowed things 
down for a while, as they all were & close-knit fan.ily. 

I iff. in the rest of the Fit ties was easier. They had a 
baby girl on May 3, ^951 and nam^d i C Kathleen Louise Taylor. 
T^"arT.;ng j^icked up a little more :n the Mid-fifties, so they 
decided to havf^ me on February 28, 19^?. So much for prosperity. 

The 1h60's brought more change?' too, for Gene Taylor. He 
a\d } '■ R tirother, Maurice, now owned a-:d worked four farius 
bet-APRn them. This went on un^il May ?.C , 1969f when Maurice 
ii:^-i o' fi heart attack in the field where my Dad and hirr. were 
plowing. 

Not wanting to keep on farming. Lad sold the iarm.i'Whicn 
Aci:5 half his .'i/iother' s) . From there, re becaine part owne^ cf 
North 'ark Hardware in Loves Par-k. He stayed there unrii 
oepternhnr of this year, when they sold it to Rnotn^r ]ar'"y. 
He nows drives a t^uck for Porter ?ros. Sand Hid Caravel. 



.s^-^; 



MATERNAL MOTHER 
Marilyn Lorraine Taylor 

Marilyn Liindgren was bom on March 11, 1926 in 
Janesville, Wisconsin. She was the third child, and second 
girl bom to Harlan and Dorothea Lundgren. 

She was raided in a strict, Baptist home. Tt was 
nothing for them to go to church three times on Sunday. Not 
that they enjoyed it or anything, it was just that they had 
no choice, 

The family was a musical one. The six brothers and sisters 
called themselves the "Musical Lundgrens". They did shows in 
school, Grange Hall, church socials, and other area benefits. 
Mom had the singing and dancing part with one other sister, 
while the rest of them played instruments, sang songs, and 
gave readings. Later in high school (She attended Harlem 
High School from first to twelfth grade) , she was also 
active in the school musicals. 

life in those days was anything but hard times. They 
had enough money for food and clothing, but were far from 
wealthy. They had each other and were very close to one 
another. Grandma did most of the disciplining in the family, 
but Grandpa still wore the pants and made the final decision. 

Mom was a cheerleader lor three years In Harlem High Sohool. 
This is where she met my father. They first met as freshmftn, 
but she had little to do with him until he was a Junior. 
She was also into all intra-mural sports at school. Back 
then, girls could participate in basketball, volleyba]!, and 
the sort. Bowling and G.A.A. were also popular with her at 
the time. 

After graduation, she entered Nurse's Training at St. 
Anthony's Hospital in 1944. After graduating ih. May of 1947, 
she finally ittarri«d my fatj^er on Spptember 20, 1947. 



She then went on to private dury nursing for some 
time afterwards. After her two children (Kathleen and Tom) 
were in school, she returned to surt^ical nursing. This lasted 
until 1965, when she went to work at A].jna Nelson Nursin^j Home. 
Finally, in 1967 i she became school nurse at Rock Cut School 
where she remains umtil this day. 



GREAT GRANDPARENTS: IDA AND OSCAR 

^rNDG-^"N 



GRANDMOTHER RDITH "^AYT.OR 



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( P a t iMMI H*. IM lor Ktcard m iLtmrtttt oUtcf a( Wiu«kar> CoM(>. JUMii i 

WAntANTY DEED JCHKT TENANCY *^ "^ ^'^ftftp- IUtor4if o< Om4« ^ 

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THAT THE GRAKTOKS 

niTC TATUm m4 M* TAXLOt, bar taoibMi, 

oftlw tmm of PetrMMa tathcCnBityo^ <%!• aa^Suwot Xllia*l« 

ior ui4 la c«n«idcntioa ol tkc *•■■ of Obc DoHar aad nthrr (w>4 and rahuM* i inriiinllMi 
» liaad pw4. CONVEY wU WAMIANT «o 

ftOtOD OLSOa a«a CUOTS OLSOl. » 

■aabud aad Wlf • ;;, 

o< the Town of H*t1«b ■ iIm Commj ol VlmMibago ^ij sim« •< Ulinoi* ] 

—t M HaMU ia r iBii n .>WM<>ittiM« W .tWMI— ii^ i m r t tii wl ar-X*. I»<rfl: S 

Part mt tiM SMtlWMt Qwirtw (i) •< ■>•<!— t—Mf »lg>t (M) 

ToviMlilp rerty-fiv* <4S) Itortii, «Mf« 1N» (a) iMt •< «IM VUrtf 

(3rd) Priaeipftl ■•rldlM, >— <•< M follow, to-«lt: lofflMiM 

at tho polot of latonoetloa of tho BMtorljr liao of tfeo Huff Boo4 

(so Callod) wltk tho Bertkorlr liao of p r— !■— — »< y < ky I^rMa 

Taylor aod wifo to Ibllr H. toll by WaiTMty Doo« «oto4 May 1«, 

1883 and rfcordod la book lit of Oootfa oa 9090 MM la tbo Boeordor'a 

Office of tinaobaco Ooaaty, Illlaola, tboaoo Uatorly aloof tbo 

Northerly liao of aal« froalaoo ao eoavoyod to tolly M. Ball aad 

along tlM Nertborly liao of wt9m^M•• oeavoyod.by l4rBaa Ibylor aad 

wife to Lmrlfl A. iTabrlofe by Ibrrbaty Vaod datod May Id, IMS aad 

recorded In Book lid of Bpada oa pago S30 la aald Booordor'a Off loo 

and alone tJM Nortborly liao of yroaiooa ooaroyod by J aaa o Ibylor 

and wife to LovU A. ybbrleb by torraaty Oaod datod Marob SS, IMM 

and reeordod la Book IM of Dooda oa pago 19T la oald booo r dor'a 

Office, to tbe bortboaatorly ooraar of aald ff laia ao ooaroyod 

to Lewie A. yabrlefc by aald dood r aoordad la Book IM of Dooda 00 

Page 237, tboaeo Sootbarly aloat tbo laatorly Uao o< aald promiaoa . 

so coRveyod to Lavla A. Pabrlok, Oaa (1) obala aad rifty-alsbt aad 

ono-half (Mi) llaka to tho fcrtborly liao of f raa t asa ooayaysd by 

Lyaaa Taylor aad olfo to Uvla A. PabrlA by bbrraaty Dood datod 

Kovoaber S, ItTl aad raoo f da d la Book •• of Baoda oa pa«o 439 

in said Baeordor'a Mflao, tboaao Baat aioac tbo Borth liao of 

said prsalaeo c oB<rsysd ta Lavia A. rabrlak by dood rooordod la 

Book •• of Baoda oa paco 4M aa afo r oaaid ta tbs «Mtorly line of 

the right of aay of tbo Cblaaca aad ■ar t baaatora Balloay Coopaay, 

theace V>athorly aloaff tba Bba ta rly liao of aald rlfht of way, to 

tho Sooth liao of aald Baa tl aa Ib aa ty a lgb t (SB), tboaoo last oa tho 

South liao of oaM Baatloa ta tba »lMif (t> tMtlo* poat oa tho ^ 

South liao of aald Baatlaa, tbiaii Bm^ oa tbo lalf (i) Baotioo liao 

to tbo eoator of aald Baatlaa, tboaaa Mat oa tbo Bortb llaa of tbo 5. 

Southooat Qoartor (t> of Bald aaa tl aa naaty-ol«bt (BB) to tho Baot- 

erly liao of prsalaw n a Mj id b^r C. C. f b l aasa aad alfo to tolly m 

A. touadoro by tonraaty Baad totad Jbaairy B, IBBB aad rooordod la ^ 

Book ld« of tooda. oa pi«a BIB, la aald to u o r dar'a ffl aa, tboa ao ■} 



ftilXy k. iMMtora, m Afor««*i4, f tb« test llM of tih« •lufnbad, 
th«Bc« aMttorly aleiw tlM MmmtmrXy 11m of Mid Kluff BMd to th«^ 
place of boclaalBc; oxeortlac tlMrofroa, tlM proalooo oo«w«y«d 
by JMMS Iktylor aad vif* to Looaftrd 1. Ikylor by Warraaty Daod datod . 
rsbruary 17, 1»S7 aod rooordod la Book 330 of DMda oa pac« 330 In 
aaid Rocordor's Off loo, also oxooptlag tho proslaoa eoavoyod by Aaoa 
Taylor ot al to fcrd rabrlck, by QOlt Clala DMd da tod Fabruary 
3 , 1»3» aad rooordod la Book 433 of Dooda oa pag* M4 In Mid Rocord- 
•r'a Offlco of, aad also tho proaiaoo ooavoyod by Charlos P. Mogaa, 
Trust** ot at to J. H. Pattorsoa Ooapaay by Quit Clala Dood datod July 
13, 1937 aad rooordod la Book 413 of Osods oa paco fl la tb* R*- 
eordor's Offleo. sltuatod la Wiaaabago Oooaty, Btat* of Illlaol*. 
EXCIPTIM:, also, Part of Cho Soatlaisst ()aartar (V) of taccion 28 Totra- 
«hip 45 Moreh, Baas* < >Mt of ciia Tkix* Prlacipal Naridlaa. doscrlb«d 
a« follows: Boti«aUs «C th* paiat af iacaraaetioa of ths Bascarly 
llM of iluff Baad with ths Hertkarly llaa of praalMS eoovoyod by Aoa 
L. J€ha»r^, ot al to Naurlaa Taylor sad lufsa* Taylor by dood recorded 
as aieroflla nuakar M«l«-1221 la ths laeordar's Offleo of Wlan*b«si> 
County, Illlaels; thaoea Northarly aloag tha Bastsrly lioa of Bluff 
Road 16 fMt; thaoea Bastarly parallal with tho Itertherly 11m of th* 
proaisos so. eeavayad to tiis said Naarica Tavlar aad Bugaaa Taylor 106 
fact to a polat la tha Barthaaatarly lias af ths praaiaas coavoysd to 
Maurice Taylor aad itusas Tajrlart thsBBi I s u d w ascsrly aad Uasterly 
aloas tha Horthwssfearly aai Barthsrly liaM af tha praadaas eooveyod to 
th* said Naorioa Taylor mad lai|MM Taflar, a distsaoa af 112 fMt, aor* 
or loss, to tiM plaea af haglaiilag* 

70 07 1609 






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'itiuied in ih- A null bpgu. Ill ihc M»te of IIIiiml- hrrrbx rrlrisnii: ami v\»uiii(; all rifli!' iirdrr 

4n<< by viriur sr M'.mrslraH EirmnikHi Laws of ilir Stair nf Illinois 

^ .-! ihi-i slxtMnCh da) u( April A D 1<J 70 



(Seal) 
(Seal) 
(Seal) 
(Seal) 






(Seal) 
(Seal) 

>Seal) 
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-T^TK OF II I.IN'OIS, 1 

wiv\hBA(Xi rorvTY | * 

EDITH TATLOft and ASA TATUA. tar iMMbud. 



1. Ihe aiHlenifiicd. a Notary Public, in and for <*i4 C'ouniv ai«l 
Siai, alorrsaid. DO HEREBY CERTIFY THAT 



perionallv known to nie to lif ihr <>anir perxm ■ whoac aaaie B STC nubacribeil 

tu the forrKoinc ■tslrumrnt. apprarrd before me thia day ia paraon and acknuwledced that QteT signed 
"caled and dcliirrrri ^„ui in>irufnrnt asClMlr free aad vul— lap act. fur the a>«s and purpu«ef therein 
•at forth, im uHinc thr rrlra«r anil waiver of lite rifkt of koaintcad 



pl^AtMerin) hand and Nnlarul Seal thia. .tiChdajr o4 April 



Tflb'~ inttnmcnt prrparrd by 



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lArrick, JackAon 4 tvltMr 

Same 

228 S. Mala St.. &oekf«rtf, lU. 



70 i7 1610 



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Fatart taxca to: 

Roland Olson and C lady a Ola on 



•ox SS, Route 1, 

AiMreaa Caledonia, Illinois 61011 



WAKBAMTT DBSD iO!MT TKHAHC Y 



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70 C,7 16U 



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*>•«" P* 1I-' ir rw!^ #nS t^'i^icicnt tyavvc«t : «u) iift^ etc t«'.-itin<;<i to vetuM km» "/^ o t iixi to »n« mnJm* 

it i. M 'it > 

tfi'.-'n da<'« fwi' r.!« r-.-'.cSvabov cf HK-fk U^'v(uam/|-s, H'Urt' n U'cxbjkccU c( tH« Mm* endci*«d tMeM«» 



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• WM4V 9k '^/^/^rJj^^ 



•«uitr Clerk. 















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r : C!^m IFf that the attached is a true and correct copy of the 
^rrUn '^«cor<l of Lvman Tavl nr and FTi7ahPth RnwmonH 



and thflt this record was established and filed In my Office In 
accordance with the provisions of the Illinois Statutes. 

•'"'*^^. >5Q Inuige 2343 PAUL. P. GILL ^ ,Coim tY clerk 

Dat^d, Hovember 7, 1974 ^Z^^^EI^^S^ 







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th° cttocbcd *« fi trii- end correct copj <jf tSe 

_ MdrrU«e '"' ^^ o f Lvman T avlnr and Elizabeth Bowmend 

a-' f -t ChU reccTd ^ns established .ind filed In ny Office la 

wii^ r.h.:> provisions of th'i Illinois Stntutes. 
.U -.i 450 Tr.g e 2343 PAUL P. GILL County Clerk 



Dntc^d i^nvpmhPr 7. 1974, 



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I HEREBY CERTIFY THAT the attached is a true and correct copy of the 

Ma rriage record of Lyman V. Taylor and Edith L. Clark 

and Ltiat this record was established and filed in my Office in 

accordance with the provisions of the Illinois Statutes. 

Reel _ il2 Inia^e 1109 PAUL P. GILL 22""ty Clerk 



Dated November 7, 1974 



bv 



DEPUTY ^>y^ 



THILLEN. PAUL JOSEPH. 1955- 



.;A".t USE INK; PLEASE PLACE THESE SHEETS AT THE FRONT OF THE SECOND COPY OF YOUR 
rAMILY HISTORY 

jjjr Contributor to the Kock Valley College Family History Coi lection: 

So that your family history can be made more useful to historians and others studying 
i-rican families, we are asking you to fill out the forms below. This will take you only a 
V miniues, .md will be easily made over into an Index which will permit archive users ready 
i;ess to just those kinds of family histories needed. 



SURVEY ***>VA*A*AA***)VA-.VA*A***;V*; 

* OFFICE USE CODE 



I . Your nome l/^UL OOS^Ta/ //^/U-C^ * 

^-''"^ "^ ^"^"^ /Vpu. /7. /^7^ :; ^'° " ^ 

A Your coll(;ge: Rock Va Hey (.0 liege (10 M ) 

IToiElcTord, Illinois '"= 

3. Check the earliest date for which you have been able to say things about your family in 
your paper. 

^Before 1750 1750-1800 X 1800- 1850 

1850-1900 1900 or later 



A. Please check al I regions of the United States In which members of your family whom you 
have discussed in your paper have lived. 

y N ew England (Mass., Conn., R.I.) X M iddle Atlantic (N.Y. , Penna., N.J., Va.) 
X South Atlantic (Ga., Fla., N.C., S.C.) X E ast South Central (La, , Miss. , Ala. ,Tenn, Ky 
West South Central (Ark., N.M, , Tex,, Ok.) y E ast North Central (Mich., Ohio, Ind. 

5. Please check al I occupational categories In which members of your family whom you have 
discussed In this paper have found themselves. 

r^ Farming Mining X S hopkeeping or small business 

X , T ransportation B ig Business X M anufacturing 
^Professions Industrial labor y^ O ther ^/^SO^/9/vce 

6. Please check al I religious groups to which members of your family whom you have discussed 
In this paper have belonged. 

X Roman Catholic J ewish P resbyterian ^Methodist 

^Baptist E piscopal Ian C ongregational X Lutheran 

Quaker Mormon CtTier Protestant Other 



7. What ethnic and social groups are discussed In your paper? 

^Blacks Indians M exicans P uerto Ricans 

^Jews X C entral Europeans I tal lans S lavs 

Irish y B ritish )( N ative Americans over several generations 

^East Asian ^Other 

8. What sources did you use in compiling your family history? 

X Interviews with other F amI ly Bibles Family Genealogies 

fami ly members 

y Vi tal Records L and Records ^The U.S. Census 

y P hotographs y M aps O ther 

I 



(v\KT>k3>«v 



A 



FAMILY DATA 



A. Grandfather (your father's side) 

Nam e l)lJ>HO(0SB f^Di^lCK iHlt-i-S/O Current Residence 2^y^ Bit;/ u^g, JZo^^^ 
If dead, date of death "^ 



Place of birth /l/'^w \)l^AJflJA .J-OcOA D«t« of Birth fi PiSil. JU . / S'J"? 

Education (number of years): 
grade school V high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PUCE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
Ist C^P-PBrt/TBjQ. Dates l9-2.X-:i-U' ^ st/jJeaj Vl£/U/i/a TLoc^/? Dates /f:SL2._ 

2nd ^t;C/€: D/P\U^/e_ Dates /f2^ - ^X 2nd V>^/^tPSUlH^oXouJ/9 D ates / f2^ 

3rd S^/9-fX Sc/S. •^7^>/P^3 Date8 /f<AS"'/ %^ 3rd Z>\/^ /?!(// di-fcZZLjO^^ Dates 

^th Cu^ToD/fiA) Dates /9^0-/y7X ^th ^Dates 

Rellglon ^/M/^/i; C^TH^^C 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, frattrnltles, etc. n/Ts/ Co a /l/Cft 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother r^jp^p^uia^^_ -Tr^txJ i^ " ^^^ ^r-^ ^^ ■ f ^ ^ 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age l8) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

). Grandmother (your father's side) 

Harni B^eTH4 H/lSTofV i ~B nh}STo£ TTSR. Cu rren t Residence D^^/^s O/d^^ ILo cv^ 
If dead, date of death ---- ^ ' 

Place of birth D\J JEPSlZ/LLS . TjOUJi^ Date of birth ^u L\J )S, ) ?0Z^ 

Education (number of years): 
grade school 5 high school vocational col lege 



t 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

-^ (after leaving home) 
1st Dates \it V\l hPSU /LLc _l^Wi9 Dates /^;Z3 

2n d Dates 2n d D ates 

3r d Dates 3r d D ates 

^th Dates kth D ates 

Reliqlon/^/>7/?/^ Cj^tH-OUC 

t Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your fl randf at he r^V^/)^////^^ ^/j t/^ /^ ATg ^'^p/ J. j^: />'. 
'^°**= i^an;tJ^Sf!»Ch»*6a«'W<*dil8 Wii Vi)f stepmother or another relative give 



^ 



A- I Siepcjrandfather (your father's side) 



N.iriK' 



Current Residence 



If .IrnrI, <l. 

PI. ICC of b 

Ediif.ition 
grade schc 


i(r of dea 

rlh 
number of 

)Ol 

s) 


tTT 

ye 


ars 


) 

_ high school 

Dates 


Ist 


Date of Birth 
vocational college 


Occupat Ion 


PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 
Dates 


2nd 
3rd 








Dates 
Dates 
Dates 


__ 3rd__ 


Dates 
Dates 


lith 


Dates 


Re 1 i q i on 





Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc.^ 
^lace of marriage to your grandmothar 



liTt 



A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of bi rth 



Current Resldence_ 
Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school v'"C\t V vocational 



coTlege 



J 



Occupat ion(s) 

Ist 

2nd 

3rd 



Dates 



Dates 



Dates 



lst_ 
2nd_ 
3rd 



PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 



Date' 



_DateS! 
Dates 



Re I i g i on 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather 



Date 



3. 

Srandfather (your mother's side) 

^ame Oo^^rP/^ ^egA^/f/e^J) iflo^/Z Current Res I dence L^j/^yQS O^cL (z . iLo u^ yg 
If dead, date of death ^ 

'lace of h\rxy\ LATTAJ/^AVIi-LE I^LU/^ Date of birth AufU^C^ I 90 'Z- 

[ducat ion (number or years): 
grade school ■^ high school vocational college 



)ccupatlon(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

T\ '^ (after leaving home) 

1st ly^(L/^.OQD Dates /^/7-.^<^ 1st Uu ^>S> £ P, .-L^ UJ S Dates /^,-^<y? 2. 

!"d f-fitiZm iUT /^. Datts /fSO'SS' 2 nd fe^/^ 7S/PeS> Tl// cL. cZLi D ates //jU -JJ* 

trd Kfhl i~I^O /h D Dates /^^s'69 3 rd T^/QZ-^y/ . ^lo <x^ 79 D ate ^/^g-Vl^ 

>th ^Dates ^ th l^J EPS U C ULE ILcu^ /^ D a \.^% I94<1 -?</. 

>ol i tical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc« 

'lace of marriage to your grandmother j^^^£p^^ S~;::^j C^ -^ ^ "^^^t ^C^T: // /9J6 

lote: If your mother was raised by a rC ip fgl l fi r *U r InOlTie r He l JLl VK ( tP a ge \8Yf^ ■ ",• ' 
give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Irandmother (your mother's side) 

^»'^ (Y]p\-fl j OR. I £ /fe ^O a' fdoHA u r ren t Residence H^ J ^ /^^ O / U^ S .ZLc U' -^ 

tf dead, dJU of death / 

Mace of \>\ r x.\x Q U fV 'D B f^ . Zun CU f^ D ate of \)\n\\ H(/GUST SO./9/A- 

iducation (number ftf years) r- - - vJ 

grade school fl high school vocational college 

)ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
K ^ (after leaving home) 
1st 4-Aorg/W UlU^f4/A/a) D ates /f>^7^S^/ 1st ^/^-fh £ AS Q^ bou £: D ates 

!nd Klh-^eQ '^A-RT- 0\P/vea^ \ ik\.t% 19:^1 -^ 2 nd ^Dates 

tr d CIB^^ Dates /'?^^^^3 rd ^Dates 

tel lglon 7?^,>/u- ^UT^f^e/i^-'R o/^/^^ C^77^i>^ C C P>G^^ - ^ 9 ^ 
•ol i tical party, cIvM or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



-TK. 



I'lace of marriage to your grandfathe r Y^jCffijQ/h^^ f'ZL/9^ . ^ ^^^ .^'"^^^^ 

(lote: If your mother was raised by a stepmotner or another r^aMw. r*« -g- 1?; 
f ,!vc :^^; Jala wn the oacK or this ptiq^ (D-2) 



C- I 'jtepgrandf ather (your mother's side) 

N.jine Current Residence 

I f (U-rid, (laio of death 

l'l.i.< ..I l.iiili D.itc .)! Itiilh 

I iliK .il iuii (iiiiiiilx' r of yr.i I ■, ) 
■ ir.nlf (ImikI hiyli school vocolionol lol lrt|«' 

()ctii|).)t ion(s) 

Is I 

Pnd 

3rd 



Dates 


1st 


PLACE 
(after 


OF 


RESIDENCE 
eaving home) 

Dates 


Dates 


2nd 










Dates 


Dates 


3rd 










Dates 


Dates 


kth 










Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother d ati 

0-? S tcpcir.indmothcr (your mother's side) 

Nome Current Residence 



1 f (Ic.id, d.jlc of death 
I'lriccr of birth 


Date of 
vocational 


birth 


^\^A 


-\ ^ 




Education (number of years) 
grade school high school 




col lege 

OF RESIDENCE 
leaving home) 




Occupot ion(s) 

1st Dates 


1st 


PLACE 
(after 


Dates 


2nd Dates 


2nd 








Dates 


3rd Dates 

Re 1 i (J i on 


3rd 
sororities, etc. 








Dates_ 


Political party, civil or social clubs. 
















Place of marriage to your grandfather 






1 


Date 





CHjJtDREN of A 6 B ^or A- I or B- I j ' your father's name should appear below 



Marital Status 



Name JL/'^ J/f/l/<£ I ^^ I C L-B 
Place of birth L>y f=nc U/ cL.S ^ ~L 
Number of years of school Irtg >•? 
Res Idence C^/C/^&{), ZJ^ / / Ma 

Number of cnl Idren 

Name //z?j^y_^^z> / ^^^^^j) ^TM/U^ <5 ^^ 
I ' ace of* birth :^^pv^<rY^/Z-^ / » ^,^ date A^/S-ZySTT // / f-J-y 
Number of vears oTf schoolin g /J2, Occuoa 1 1 6rt /2?/Z^ 7y/^/i/^/P 

ResJldenc e/c^^/?/?2> -T 77"^ Marital Status ^^/^/'^ /^'^j^yZ S^j,^? 
Number of chl Idren ? ————»--»——*- 

^!ame (j ^ /LJ}1 /^_ l.£ £. TTZ/l^ E: /2/ ^ 

Pl^e of"blrtK^77j^r^/^.Vz;^ ■Jf^af)6^^^J±^ 
Number of years pf /s^hoo Uj) fl /<5^|/yP Js Occup»t I On i 

Resldence>/^|/ /jfer A6^^v9Ma7T7a! §tatuc^/^/>t 



Number of chK!dr«n 



^^t^JT* ^ ^-^-^- l" 



Name 
Place 



A, 



7; A ^i^Azi^^MarTtal Ttatue^ 



:l_occu^^^^ 




v^z? ^^.^^-.^g 



/3>. /9^L^ 



Number of yfrj of schooling /^ Occupaflbri X/i?C <^y>g^^ 

^^^]^^-^- ^^F<f ^P^ ii H arlta i St atu. C/ ^^^ ^ ^ ^ 

Number of cnMarer; — .^— — —— — ^.i— . 



r of years 6r schooHng 



Name 

Place 

Number of years 

Res 1 denc e 

Number of children 



Name ____^__^___^_______ 

Place or birth 

Number of years of school Irtg 

Res I dence ' 

Number of children 



mf^:^mUi 14^ <^^ dat a 9-/y'^/9^:i 

s ef schooHng Occupation 

srital Status 

'S'ate 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



Name 

Place of birth 



Number of years of schoolirtg 

Res I dence ' 

Number of chl Idran 



Marital Status 



date 
Occupation 



Name 

Place of birth ""^ 

Number of years of schooling 

Res I den ce ' 

Number of chl Idren 



dat e 
Occupation 



Marital Status 



Name 

Place of birth "" 

Number of years of schooling 
Res idence 



Number of chl Idren 



Karitfil status 



"Occupation 



Name 

Place or birth " 

Number of years of schooling 

Residenc e 

Number oT Ull lUruil 



daice 



Occupation 
.nantai Status 



(HII.UKtN i(( (. and (or (.-I, 0-l)-your mother's name should apptvir behtw 

\\ l/'i •)! /.-.ir . (Tl ■TTTiool irif| /"2_ Occupdt I On /^e-C./>'<^/t//C 

"' ' ■''"• ' ^l^U/UG —/J Marital Status 7:)/<)OQ^.gO 

NiiMil.ri Ml <lifl(lrPn jf^ 



^cT.S /9J2 



Nuiiiixr m( vr.it', of scnooilnq X!5_ Occupatl 



)yi.it', OT scnooiinq /^ " Occupat 1 On f/f^f^;^^ ^;/ j:-g 

H^'.^un^i: AOCy/rr.^/> -r // Marital Status /;2<<h^^/ ^r> //' ^^T/ 

Number of ch I I dren ^ 

P I oce of bTr th lS^ki:,^^'iy/p^<rij/a^E .^O u/r^ date ^/^ . j> / ^g-/ 

Number o( jiears of schooling / -y Occupat 1 On y-y^^(;£/^ / pg 

"«s i <\f^n^c U\lBf?SUl lX-B y:2^<:>^JU-fi> Marital Status /Z^)9-/>/p>/g/:> //^ -^/-^r? 

Number of r.Ki 1 dren ^ 

P I •■'■'• nM-irth-p^^O^^ ^(?{^^^ date /"^ ^ (f ^ „. ,.^^ ^ 

NumhfM .jf ye>»cs of schooling / "2^ Occupat iOn ^^^Fyf/>(<:/^^ /L' (/J^\^ 

«<•'• i di-nfc UpBU^UC ,Zr:C(A^'^ Marital status /7i>^/?/?/g/> /<:?^/j--6- p^ 



Number nf ch I 1 dren ^ 



Number (jf yciirs oT schooling _/ 






c? 



/2I Occupatlon /Ao/y^^ ^/-f^- 

Kes i <\f:<^cc SflPfX}5^7h/?T/ JLO^^/ /9^-^ Marital Status />7/>PP /g/> ^-/OT- >S--y 

Nuiiilx'r of ch i Idren l^ 

N.wrH- 

PI. ICC of hi rth date 

Number f)f years of Schooling OccupatlOrt 

Res i dence Marital Status 

Number of chi Tdren 



7. Name 



Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marl tal Status 

Number of chi 1 dren 

Name 

P I ace of birth date 

Number of years of schooling OccupatlOrt 

Residence Marl tal Status 

Number of ch i Idren — — — — 



9. Name 

P lace of bi rth date 



Number of years of schooling """ OccupatlOrt 

Res i dence HarltaT Status \ 

Number of chi Idren 



10. Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation" 

''«^' dence ZITZIZ!""!"'" RarTTal Status " 



Niimh*!' r,r .u I I J 



our Father 






col lege 



aucation inumber' of years; ———————. m , i , i 

grade school ^ high school V vocational 

ccupation(s) PL^CE OF RESIDENCE 

^^%ft)f)-I^B'ilS/A^e^^ O^tes jm-/^U>/ ]»c DpP^lS'/^\!^!^"l^°^ Dates/^^/-6.7 

^^^^^. Dates /f^/> 7/ 2n d ^7t)C/1^P» yj/Tt // 

rd/11 1/ a£^ -V^^^ /^^^Tr^atesi^.7^,^r d^P^^1^^.a^/?4"/ / D ate, ^-/ 

th _ Dates < >th Dates 

jlitJcal parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. £kf>. -SooC/TS l^oST ^''7 ^ 

lace of marriage to your fr^thtr Xn/ /TpAQ j jX^ ^'TACO/^ date /U^ /J JCi. /VL t/ 

)TE: If you were raised by a stepfather or anotheV relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 

)ur Mother 

^^Sfll^LS\/ fr\f^Pl^Qf)6Hk)iniLiPALrr.nt Re.ldence B>C^/=tf <PZ> ZL / / 

f dead, date of death ^ * i t . f . .... 

'^« °f birthW/n. L>Ct/vriS& Tm ^ >t Date of birth <^7-, 3 /P^2^ 

Jucation (number of years) / ' ^ ■ ' 

jrade school ^ high school J^ vocational ^college 

:cupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after/ leaving home) 



-. (after/leaving home) 
'' — Dates lst^i»/yg n ^ A-S^O^ D ates 

'<^___ Dates 2n d ^Dates 

"^ Dates 3r d D ates 

! 11 g I on r> 

ace of marriage to youV fa the' T) J tP.S^' / ^-^^ ^H^^ay-A d ate t\ j/)i)^X I 9^/ 

>TE: If you wer« raised by a stepifother or another'TelatI ve give that data on the b'ack of 
this page (F-2). 



E-l Stepfather 



Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth ^Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



0ccupatlon(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving ho<ne) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2n d D ates 

3rd D ates 3 rd Dates 

^th Dates ^^th ^Dates_ 

Re 1 Iglon ————— 

Poll 1 1 cat par'llei, dUI I fif SOCISI clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother D at< 

F-2 Stepmother 



Name 






Date of birth 


If dead, date of death 
Place of hi rth 


— 




Education (number oT years) 
grade school high school 


__ vocational^ 
1st 




col lege 


Occupat ion(s) 

1st Dates 




PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 

Dates 


2nd Dates 


2nd 
3rd 
sorori ties, 


etc. 


Dates 
Dates 


3rd Dates 


Re 1 i g I on 

Political party, civil or social clubs, 






Place of marriage to your father 






date 



HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 




y/Uy_JL\o^^7>^ /U/U.£/lJ 



ace of birth pA /^ /^^n r -7-0 ca^ t^ Date of b I rth C>ct. ^^ ^fSS 

mber of y^y rs of school Ing /-r^ " Occupat loh <^'/>V;/i^^ ^77^ 

^ ' dence /\^vK^^^^-r// Marital Status .^/>t^.L^ 

mbe r of en 1 1 aren 



/ of bi rthp/V^/. A/yVr ^^;.-^, ^ ' -p^ of birth v^)|^Ly :2.^ /^X? 

5r of^ears of^SCh6ollng / 2- _ _ _ OccupatlOrt /^/7^ ip<g-/t?7^ 

enc eJrOCy^^/^l>~r// Marital Status S//l/^l^^ 

r of chl Idren 



ame 

lace^ r -t — 

umber of ^e a rs^c^f^ school fng "^ ~*^ / 2- Occupation / S'/^' £^ <£ nTy 

es i der ' - - - ' -^ - - ^ ' ' ~ 

umbe 

ame 

lace of bi rth Date of birth 



umber of years of schooling Occupation 

BS i dence Marital Status 

umber of chl Idren 



ante 

lace of bi rth Date of birth 

umber of years of schoolin g Occupation 

es i dence Marital Status 

umber of chi 1dr*rt 



ame 

lace of birth ' Date of blrth__^ 

umber of years of school Ing Occupat lort" 

es i dence Marital Status 

umber of ch I Idren 



ame 

lace of birth ' ^^^- ^^ birth 

umber of years of schooling Occupat tort 

esi dence " T?a r 1 1 a I Status 

umber of chl Idren 

ame 

lace of bi rth Date of birth 

umber of years of schooling Occupation 

est dence Marital Status 

umber of chi Idreh 



111. ASSIC.NMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family dr^i willincj) 

1 hor(4)y donate this family historv, along with all literary and admini'.trdtivc 
i)ijhLs,'to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited m the 
Kocl<ford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 



Signed _/^*«/y ^^TaC^C^L 

Date _4^S?rv.j2._-3 __/5^?/_ 



GENEALOGY CHART 



A/apla/1/^ IHlLL£n> 






ied 



Father 
D 



Great grandfather 

l\ipth/}i£B TU/US/^l ^fr\^sl^^< '^^^ 



Grandfather 



B _ 

M l^'i^ 



m 



oth 



1 JHS£&£.^ J^'^.^-s <^A 

Great grandmother 
y4 \~Q9EPTyh /S^O 



ju'^y 1^'' /9'<5 2_ 



D 19'-^ 






B 



sijL- nioM/^ 



Grandfather ^ ,/ 

wscpT n, I 9 ^O 

D 






Mother -^Tf^fLL € 
D 



\ce QlcH-^ 






y 



^VtF^£//'. 



//'^ 






' B^ct' 2-, I s ^^ 



f^f^nofJicDk/^so/i/ 



D/yiA'i ^?, ^^i^ 



Grandmother >^ ^ 

fiL/<^. So^^f^-r^ W}AD£€ S/?//^/^ 



r^. , .!»- 



rr, 1 



c 



< I 

Ai I, 

^ (-- 

'5 < 


















^ 









f- ^ 



^ 



H 



to 1- 



H 












c 






> 



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< 

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rv Ll- 



-o <. 










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OL 






r 

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It 



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C 


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-^ -, 


5- 


<3_- c 


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"^ X 


_X 




vO 





The making of this pr per was hardly all my vrork, f-nd, 
accordingly, I would like to thank as many people as 
possllDle for helping mei 

Harland & Shirley Thillen 

A. F. & Bertha Thillen 

J, L, ^ MP'rjorle Mohr 

Floyd & Tilly Smith 

Zena Legg 

Mary Murphy 

Lalande Mary Thillen 

Sister Rose Mary Thillen (Lllf Jane) 

Gail Elsbary 

Magdalene Goetzinger 

Alice Schmitt 

Reglna Schmitt 

Mary Becker 

3thel Gihbs 

Lenoir j4ohr 



a 



V 



cr 







Q^, 



s:> 



n 






«5 



n 



dT 



crf 



CHILDREN OF JOHN & GfiRTHUDE ANSTOETTER 

Benjamin Anstoetter 

Borni SeT3t. 2?, I893t in Dyersvllle, Iowa 

Occupatloni Pnrnier (presently retired) 

Rellgioni Roman Catholic 

Marriagei Nov. 18, 1919 .Dyersvllle, Iowa to Lydla Kramer, 

by Fpther Warning 
Children! Ten 
Current Residencei Farley, Iowa 

Clara Anstoetter Jasper 

Borni Dec. 25, 1897 

Occupntloni Housewife 

Rellgioni Rompn CRtholic 

Marriagei Jan. 13. 1920, to Tony Jasper, at Xavler Church 

by Father Warning. 
Chlldreni Seven 
Current Residencei Farley, Iowa 

Bertha Anstoetter Thlllen 

Borni July 18. 1902 

Occuprtloni Housewife 

Rellgioni Roman Catholic 

Lei sure I Working vrith the church 

Marriagei Alphonse Thlllen. Sept. 28, 1925, at Xavler Church 

Dyersvllle, Iowa. 
Chlldreni Five 
Current Residencei Dyersvllle, Iowa 



CHILDREN OF SIMON AND THERESA THILLEN 



Grace Thlllen Slngsang 

Borni Nov. 15f 1895f New Vienna, Iowa 

Occupptloni Housewife 

Religioni Romrn C>tholic 

Marriage! Sept. 26, 1916, to Clem Slngsang 

Children! Sight 

Current Residence! Dyersville, Iowa 

Fredrick Alphonse Thillen (A. F.) 

Bornt April 16, 1897, New Viennp, Iowa 

Occupstiont Retired 

Religioni Roman Catholic 

Merripgei Sept. 28, 1925, to Bertha Anstoetter, of 

Dyersville, Iowa, 
Children! Five 
Current Residence! Dyersville, Iowa 

Leocaudia Thillen Lpngel 

Borni April 2?, 1899. New Vienna, Iowa 

Occupation! Housewife 

Religion! Roman Catholic 

Marriage! Jan 21, 1921, to Clem Langel 

Children! Six 

Current Residence! Dyersville, Iowa 

George Thillen 

Born! Jan. 6, 1902, New Vienna, Iowa 
Religion! Rome.n Catholic 

Death! March 13, 1920, of an infection In his leg, which 
had been amputated in 1918. 

Lucinda Thillen 
Born! July 18, 1906 
Died! July 25, 190? 

Slyvsria Thillen Hermson 

Born! Jan. 1, 1910, New Vienna, Iowa 

Occupation! Housewife 

Religion! Roman Cptholic 

Marriage! Sept. 25, 1930, to John Hermson 

Children! Four 

Current Residence! New Vienna, Iowa 



Cletus Thlllen 

Borni Nov. 18, 1913* New Vienna, Iowa 

Occupratloni Various jobs, including shipyards during 

Helisioni RoMa^^Cathollc 

MarriPgei Twice, first ended in divorce, second in 

separation. 
Children! None 
Current Residencei Sen Rafel, California 

Viola Thillen Lake 

Born I July I5, 1915 

Occupetloni Housewife 

Religioni Roman Catholic 

Harrlagej to Tony Lfke, Oct. 16, 19^7 

Childreni Two 

Current Residence! Dyersvllle, Iowa 



CHILDREN OF ALPHONSE & BERTHA THILLEN 

Llla Jan9 Thlllen 

Born I May 19, 1929 

Educatlont St. Francis Xavier High School, gr^-d. 19^7l 

Loras College, Dubuque, Iowa 19^8, 
Occupatloni Roman Catholic Nun, Order of St. Francis. 
Residence I Chlca,?o, 111. 
Religion: Roman Catholic 

Harland Bernard Thlllen 

Born I Aug. 11, 1931 

Educntloni St. Frpncls Xavler High School, grtd. 19^9 

Occupfitloni Mll>: Driver for lUiller Phlnehurst Dairy. 

Organizations! Member Teamsters Local #482i Committee 

Member, i^xplorer Post #37 # 
Religion: Romf-n Cfth6llc 
Lei sure I Bowling 
Marriagei Nov. 22, 1951f Dyersvllle, Iowa, to Shirley Marie 

Mohr. 
Chlldrent Three, Steven Bernard, Paul Joseph, rnd Ann Marie. 
Residence! Rockford, Illinois 

Duane Cletus Thlllen 
Borni Sept. 13, 1933 
Died! Oct. 9, 193^+ 
Buried! Dyersvllle, Iowa 

Velma Lee Thlllen 

Borni Aug. 5, 1935 

Education! St. Francis Xavler High School, grad. 1953i 

Nurses training in Carrol, lowej grad, in 1957 as 

a Registered Nurse. 
Occupstion! Housewife 
Religion! Roman Catholic 
Marriage! April 2?, I96O, in Norfolk, Vir., to Raymond Christian, 

born Mnrch 11, 1936, in Walden, N, Y. 
Children! Pour, Brinn, Bruce, BradT'^y, fmd Brett 
Residence! Key West, Pla, 

Lalande Mary Thlllen 

Born! April I3, I9/+3 

Education! St. Francis Xavler High School, grad. I96O 

Occupation! Insurance Clerk 

Religion! Roman Catholic 

Leisure! Reading, Knitting 

Residence! Rockford, 111 



PATERN/\L HISTORY 
Page 1 

Simon Thillen wos born on May JO, I876, in Luxemborg, Iowa, 
the son of Fred and Mary Thillen. Not to much is knovm pbout 
him until the birth of his children. One thing thpt is known 
is his msrri' ge to Theresa Wessels of Mevr Vienna, lows. Dpte 
is not known, but is thoujcht to be somewhere nround 1895* He 
was a fprmer all of his life ps we know it, working seven 
different farms in W. Dubuque County between 1R97 and 19^0. In 
19^0, he moved to Dyersville, where he lived until his death on 
Feb. k, 19^3. 

All thft is known about Theresa VVessels is th^t she was born 
on a farm west of New Vienna, Iowa on April 15, I873. Her par- 
ents f rei Barrey and Thsresia Wessels, both born in Westfpllenji 
Germany. (This is a st'^te located just west of Harover, in present 
day West Germany.) Ei^ht children came of this marri-^f^e. She 
lived with hsr husband until his death in 19^3. She stayed 
alone until 19^8, x^rhen she moved to her daughter Violn's house 
(Mrs. Tony Lake), in Dyersville. She dies on Nov. 4, 1952, 
and w'lS buried at Nev; Virnna, Iowa. 

Sometime in 1897, the Simon Thillen family moved to the 
Barney Wessels farm, outside '^ievr Vienna, (fir. Wessels was the 
Pather-in-la'AT to this marriage). The Wessels family then moved 
into New Vierne , It is on this fr^rm, th- t, on April 16, 1897 
Fredrick Alphonse Thillen was born. He vas preceded in birth 
by a sister, and Irter w^s to ^dd two brothers and four more 
sisters to his relations. He lived in the New Vienna area (on 
three farms) until 1922, 



Page 2 

He went to school In New Vienna until the '<j;e of 13, when he 
started working on the farm with his fatlier. The school house 
hfid four rooms in it, which I guess could be called gredes. 
A person would st^rt in one room, and when the teacher felt he 
WPS smrrt enonjrh to go to the next room, he w^is moved along. 
Another interesting Iden of the school w."S the language. 
Since the erea r^round the school v:-s almot entirley German, the 
language vbs spoken quite often, pnd pIso in the school. In 
the morning, a. person (including Tepchsrs) was to spenk only In 
German, no matter what the reason. The ■afternoon was reserved 
for English. 

In 1922, A. F. Thillen(he reversed his initials) moTed to 
New Vienna. lis first job was as a carpenter for his uncle, 
John Lies. He worked there until Jan. 1, 1926, In eit'ier late 
1921 or early 22 he met Bertha Anstoetter, who Irter nns to be- 
coue his wife. As for dptlng was concerned. It usuf^llj' consisted 
of a dance and not much else. These were quite often held et 
farms. Music ttjps plnyed ori the mouth or^an, the violin, hrmonlca, 
or the piano. 

On Sept. 28, 1925i they were m^Trled In the church pt 
Dyersvllle, Iowa. For there honeymoon, they went ot the Cattle 
Congress In Waterloo, Iowa. They were there for a week, staying 
at Pete Thlllen's house, rfter returning from Wf-terloo, they moved 
to Dyersvllle, where they had a house on Victoria St. (nor 2'nd Ave). 
Living with them was Getrude Anstoetter, (his mother-in-law) . 
She lived with them until her depth in 1931. 



Page 3 

On Jan. 1, 1926, A. F. Thillen bought a local trucking 
firm. Up to this noint, he had worked es a c?rpenter. He 
named it the "Thillen Trucking Line". (former name was Esch) . 
The Job consisted of hauling Just obout anything thpt needed 
haullnd, including frrm pnlm^ls. He had ore full-time «nd 
between 2 r^nd 3 p.-rt-tine men vjorking for him, deperding upon 
business. He had two trucks. 

He ran the truck line until 1,?45, v/hen he bought the gps 
stfition by the p^rk in Dyersville from Phil Winters. There he 
sold gas, some groceries, ^ nd a lot of ice cream, whlhc was 
hand-packed, often by my father, Harland. He worked this store 
urtil 1950, when he bought a ptcre from Joe Tobin in the down- 
town ^rea of Dyersville. This was called "Thillen* s Cash Store". 

He worked this store until I96O, when the owners refused 
torenew lis l^-se. They 1- ter sold the building. 

/.Iphonse Thillen was on the Dyerpville Town Council from 
April 1, 1950 until June 1, 196p. He wrs elected to five terras. 
At the time it was not required to declare r- politic-'-l p«^rty. 
He first ran hecauKe of the encourpgement from two friends. He 
wss not to thrilled with the idea, and said he would let them 
put his name on the bpllot, but he would not actively seek the 
office. He ;vas elected by approximately & two to one margin^ 
defeating Leo Zimmer, v:ho lived across the street. He represent* 
ed the third rrecinct. He w?s forced to resi--^n his position 
when he Joined the police force, fs it wes illegal to be a city 
enployee and p member of the council at the spme time. 



Page 4 
Prom here, he becf^nie a member of the Dyersville Police 
force. He worked here for only 8 weeics, from June 15 until 
August 15» 't this time, he was offered a position with the 
Western Dubuque School District as head custodian for the 
schools. Three years I'^ter, at the age of 66, he became 
custodian of the new Jcinciergarden building in DyersvlLle, which 
wrs built on the same block In vrhich he lived. He worked here 
until July 1, l'?72, on which day he officially retired. But he 
did not remain retired for long. Fourteen months l^ter, he 
got e p-rt-tiiQe Job with the lonal branch of the U. 3, i ost Office, 
where he works today. 



Page 5 
LIPS AND FAMILY OP BERTHA ANSTOETTER 

John Hermnn Anstoetter was born In Hanover, Germany on 
Sept, 11, I85O. He came to the United States Ih 1868, et the 
age of 18, and settled In Kenosho, Wisconsin. He lived there 
for 2 or 3 years, and then moved to the John Hermson farm out- 
side of New Vienna, He lived hejre for five yc^rs. In I876, 
he msrried Elizabeth Erdman. Of this marriage came 9 children. 
She died on ^pril 15, 1888, nine days after giving birth to 
her ninth child, Henry. On June 23, 1891, he married his 
former wife's sister, Gertrude. They were married in Sacred 
Heart Church in Dubuque by Father Baumann, (Catholic) She was 
born on Feb. 2, I876 in New Vienna, Iowa. There were three 
children, including Bertha Anstoetter, my grandmother. From 
his first marriage until the time of his death, he lived on a 
farm four miles east of Dyersville, Iowa, He died in I9I5. 

The family stayed on the f^rm until 1920. It was run by 
his wife and his sons from the first marriage. The change of 
years at this time wes s very trying time for the Anstoetter 
family. In Nov. of 1919, Ben (a son from the second marriage) 
got married, and left the fj^rm. In early December, the stock 
was sold from the f^rm. About two weeks later John, (from the 
first marriage) died pt the age of 41. In Jan. Clare (from the 
second marriage) married and also left the fprm. Then in Feb, 
the farm was sold, and Bertha moved into Dyersville with her 
mot-ier. 

The home life of the Anstoetter family was little different 
from most of the farmers in the area. Most of the time was spent 



Page 6 

working on the farm, which was a seven day b week occupation. 
As a result, the family did very little traveling, the only time 
they would go anywhere is to a funerrl for a friend. (It is at 
one of these funerals, or rather at the wake, thpt Bertha met 
her future husband, Alphonse Thillen.) Dubuque was the local 
bi; town, pnd it is here that the family would go once In a while 
to go shopping. Since a c^r wps slower, they would t^ke p. tr^in. 
But this was fj^r from c everyday experience. 

Bertha Anstoetter's schooling was sbout average for p girl 
In those days. While most of the boys would only go until the 
fourth grade, girls would often go until the eigth grade. This 
is how far she went. Six of these ye^rs she went to country 
schools, but for two years (the sixth and seventh grades) she 
went to the school In town. (Dyersvllle, Iowa) 

Like most of the famil^s in the arer, the fe.Tilly was 
Catholic, and it was quite religious. Although the bible w^^s not 
read very often, religion did quite often tie in the family 
pctivltles. Church was a regular occurance on Sundays . 

Bertha rarely worked at a paying Job, but would often go 
to her blder sister Clara's house (Pr>rn) to help out with the 
kid's and Just do general help aound the house. 

On Sept. 28, 1925, she married Alphonse Thillen. They had 
five children. They werei 

Llla Jane, born on May 19, 1929* She graduated from St. 
Francis Xavier High School in Dyersvllle in 19^7. On Aug. 12, 
she entered. the Brown Order of Mt. St. Francis of Dubuque (Roman 
Cstholic sister). She lives today in Chicego, where she teaches 
grrde school. 



page 7 

Harlrnd Bernard wes born on Aug. 11, 1931 • He went to 
Xavler High in Dyersvllle, nnd grrdupted in 19^9. He married 
Shirley Mohr on Nov. 22, 1951 » «nd lives tod«iy in Rockford. 

Velmo Lee was born on Aug. 5, 1935 also graduated nt 
Xavler High. Went to nurses school in Carrol, lowsf where she 
graduated in 1956. Was in Virginia when she met her husband, 
Raymond Christian, who was and still is in the U.S. Navy. They 
currently live in Key West, Pia, 

Duane Cletus. He was born on Sept. 13f 1933t and died at 
the age vf one year pnd 26 days, on Oct. 13, 193^» He died at 
the hospital in Dubuque of pneunomia, 

Lalande Mary was forn on April 13, 19^3« She graduated in 
i960 from Savier High. She then worked at Mercy Hospital in 
Dubuque for one year, then she entered Mt. St. Francis Convent 
in Dubuque, where she stayed for six years. She currently lives 
in Rockford, 

All through her life, Bertha Anstoetter Thlllen has been an 
active member of the Roman Catholic Church. Much of her spare 
time is spent helping clean the church, making the host for the 
services, and being s general help around the church. 

Today she still lives in Dyersvllle, and in one year will 
celebrate her 50 'th wedding anniversary. 



CHILDREN OF JOE AND HANNAH MOHR 

Joseph Leonard Mohr 

Borni June 6, 1904, Lsttnervllle, lovra 

Occupstioni ChicPiTo and Gre^t Western Railro-;d for 45 yeprs, 

^Iso did some farming pnd worked with the W.P.A. 

for one year. 
Rellgloni Roman Catholic 

Marrlaget to Marjorie Nelson, Sept. 11, 1930 
Chlldreni Five 
Current Residence i Dyersvllle, Iowa 

Alice Margaret Mohr Schmidt 

Borni 1905f Lattnervllle, Iowa 

Occupation! Housewife 

Rellgloni Roman Catholic 

Marrlp.gej to Jopexjh A. Schmidt, Nov. IB, 1925 

Chlldreni Eleven 

Current Resldencei Dubuque, Iowa 

Reglna Mohr Schmidt 

Bornt Oct. 19, 1*506, Lattnervllle, Iowa 

Occupation HouseT-rlfe 

Rellgloni Roman C/^thollc 

Marrlpgei to Lelnnd W, Schmidt, Oct. 2?, I925 

Chlldreni Two 

Current Resldencei Dubuque, Iowa 

Magdelene Ceclla Mohr Goetzlnger 

Borni 1907 

Occupation! Housewife 

Rellgloni Roman Catholic 

Marrlagei Nov. 18, 1925» to Leo Goetzlnger 

Chlldreni nine 

Current Residence! Durango, Iowa 

Lewis John Mohr 

Borni March 30, I908, Graf, Iowa 

Occupatloni Telegraph Operator for Chicago Great Western RR. 

Rockford Products for 14 ye-^rs, TV and radio repairman. 
Marrlagei to Lenore Schrelber, July ?Q, 1931 
Chlldreni Four 
Deathi April 5, 1973, while living In Holcomb, 111. 

Mary Mohr Becker 

Borni De«. 17» 1913, Graf, loxva 

Occupatloni Ee<^6. Cook, Flnley Hospital In Dubuque, for 20 yr. 

Marrlagei to Fred Becker, on Dec. 5t 1928 

Chlldreni Three 

Current Resldencei Dubuque, low" 

Ethel Mohr Glbbs 

Borni May 29, 1920, Gr.- f , lowp 

Occupatloni Housewife 

Marrlagei to Gilbert Glbbs, July 4, 193^ ( her husbmd died on 

May 22, 1973) 
Chlldreni Seven 
Rellgloni Roman Catholic 
Current Resldencei Dundee, Iowa. 



CHILDREN OF JOHN AND M/DGE NELSON 



Marjorle Mae Nelson Mohr 

Born* i^ug. JO, 191'4-, Porestvllle, lotja 

Occup'^tiont Housewife, Retr-ll Sidles Clerk 

Religlont Born Lutheran, became Roman Cptholic In 19^5 

Karrlfgei Sept. 11, 1930 to J, L. Mohr of Dundee 

Children! Five 

Current Residence! Dyersvllle, Iowa 

Donald Nelson 
Bornj 1916 
Dledi 1916 

Dorothy Ann Nelson 

Borni Aug. 25» 19-3i Rlchlr^nd Toyjnship, nee.r Dundee, Iowa 

Dlrdi Dec. 3. 1923 

Gall Nelson Elsbury 

Borni Dec. 17, 19?0, In Dundee, Iowa 

Occupatloni Housewife, Machine Operator 

Msrrlsgei to Earl Elsbury, of Strpvrberry Points, lowr on Dec. 17» 

1936. 
Children! Pour 
Religion! Lutheran 
Lurrent Residence! Milan, 111 



CHILDREN OF J. L. ''ND M.ARJORIE MOHR 



Merrill Leonard Mohr 

Bornt May 1, 1931» ^pdee, lown 

Bducationt St. Frpncls Xavler High School 

Occupatloni Mechanic 

Resldencei Sterling, 111 

Religion I Romrn C thollc 

Marrl^get July 31, 195^. to Rlth V/essells, of New Vlenne., In 

New Vlennn, Iowa. Divorced, March 1973 • 
Chlldreni Five, Scott, Joseph, I'hlllip, Jone, and Larld. 

Shirley Mf>rle Mohr Thlllen 

Born I Oct. 3, 1932, Dundee, Iowa 

Eduoaticni St. Frf.ncis Xfsvier lilgh School 1950 

Occupstloni Housewife, seamstress 

Organlzatlont Rockford Memorial i.uxiallry. Beta Sigma Phi 

Sorority. 
Rellgloni Roman Catholic 
Lei sure I Sewing, painting, stitchery 

Marrif*gei Nov. 2?, 1951, to Hprl^nd Thillen of Dyersville 
Children* Three j Steven Bernard, Paul Joseph, ^nd -^nn Msrie 

Beverly Ann Mohr White 

Borni Feb. 3, 193^ • Dundee, Iowa 

Educationi St, Francis Xavier High School 1952, Dubxique Beauty 

Academy, 1953* 
Rellgloni Roman Cn thollc 
Occupationi House'wlfe 
Resldencei Dyersville, Iowa 

Marrlr'.gei Oct. 21, 1953. to Allan White, from Dyersville. 
Chlldreni S:^- Sandra, Victoria, Shell©, Benjamin, Michael, 
and Srrah. 

Kay Francis Mohr Gansemer 

Borni Jnn. 10, 1936, Dundee, Iowa 

Eduostioni St. Francis Xavier High School 

Occupationi Housewife, Nurses' Aid 

Resldencei Dubuque, Iowa 

Rellgloni Roman Catholic 

Marriage! Oct. 15» 1956, to Joseph Gnnsemer, of Dyersville 

Chlldreni Three j Barbt^ra, Crrmen, and Sherry 

Mary Alice Mohr Murphy 

Borni Feb. ?, 1939 

Educfitloni St. Fronds Xavier High School, 1957 

Occupationi Housewife 

R'^sldencei Shreveport, LouisariS 

RellGioni Roman Cr thollc 

Mn.rrlagei Feb. 15, 1958f to Ernest Murphy, of Worthlngton, Iowa 

Chlldreni Timothy, Colleen, Margaret, Broc, Shannon, end Amamda 



MATERi'ii.L aisaORY 
P/.GE 8 

On Febrii.rry 2, 18?.6, L\iclous Shervrlr wrs ^o^n In Vermont (the 
town Is not knovm) . He int-rrled Angilena Strong Cborn July 2,1833) 
on June 6, 1848. I think this may have taken plpce around Cuba, 
Mew York, as thi? Is where the bride Is from, and the first child, 
(VJlllleai, "born May 22, 18'^ 9) w&s born. Fron risre they aoved to 
Chicago, then to Bnrrington Station, 111., (v^'ere another son, 
Warren, vjas ■horn). They then moved to Dubuoue, -^nd liter to 
Manchester, Iowa. He vms rn pi\^ioner f.ll of his life, • nd he died 
on December 2, 1888 ?nd ie bviried in aichland, Iowa (ne??r Ottum'.-ia) , 
His wife diei in 191? on Dec, 21. She is burled in Porectvllle, 
Iowa. 

While t*^Gy lived in Ioi-tti (in vrhich town is not knovm) they 
had 6 daughter, named Flora, She v.-as born on June 3C» 1859» 
In 1880, on Nov, 17. she carried Richard Smith. 

Jpne Cook Smith \ips born on March Ik, 1829 In Welesby, 
England. It is not known v^hen she came to this country. Sometime 
n round the snrlng of 1852 she was married ifo Henry Smith (born 
April 18, 18>2) . It is thought that he c-me from either ''ova Sootla 
or Englrnrt, but sgain, we h^ve no record?. They located in Forestvllle, 
Iowa, where he i»jss p farmer. From this marrir-c-e C'^me Richard Smith, 
v?ho merried Florfi Shervjin. He vras born on M-^y 9» 185^. He also 
was a farmer '11 of his life, which excludes pf^rt of his youth 
spent in Oskfloosi attending school. I was not able to find any- 
thing about the children from this marriage, except for th&t of 
Madge Smith, Vno ^-ms born on Oct. 5, 1890. Richard Smith was 
a fermer all of his life, and died in 1931 • He was buried in 
Porestville. His wife died in 1933. on Nov. 1. 



PAGE 9 

John Kelson «nd Annft Thompson hi d s son n^med. John Ben Nelson, 
Jr. He was horn on Nov. 2, 1869. In 18?^ John Kelson left home, 
and was never Goen Rgaln. Seven years later he wps declared legally 
dead, rnd his widow remairled to ^- air-m -nrmed Benson. There were 
eight children from this jiRrriPge. Vhen Ann-- Tboapson I'elson re- 
married, the man she married would not let John Nelson, Jr. into 
the house, sr.ving he was old enou5?h to take c-re of himself. He 
TIPS twelve at the time. He went to stay with H^^rold Crsh, f^ fp-rmer 
\&.o lived just outside of Forestvillf*. L."t3r, this man helped set 
hira up with a fr?rm of his o^m. Just down the rond from their farm. 
They c^^ve hira a tesm of horses pnd :-■ plow. Here he built a 
farm, as sll that was there when he got the Isnd w^^s just that, 
Ipnd, vrith r.z- buildinars or a house. He bailt the house himself 
(see picture). He frrmed for awhile, and then in 192i^ loved into 
Dundee to work for the Dzl^'/mrs County Hi^hw-'^y Commission. He left 
the farm with p son (F«y) from his first raarriawe (I could find 
nothing about the first "carriage) . Fpy rm the f??rm uncil the 
Decjresslon hit, when, deeply in debt, his father, Ben i-slson, ceme 
to take it over. Ben :ielscn was a strong man, but the weight of 
workino!; the f ^rm during the Depression, raising a family, pnd paying 
off his son's dett», pror?d too iiuch for him, ^nd his mind went. 

On i4arch 29, 1932, he was found in the barn on his f. rm, having hung 
himself. He was sixty-three. Children of his second uarriage were 
a son, Donald, born in 19I6 (he lived only four days) .-'nd dsu;hters 
Marjore, born in 191^, ^nd Dorothy, bora in 1923 (lived only eight 
montns) . Gail was born in 1920. 



PAGE 10 

Madge lielson, after her husb?ind's derth, remarried to 
Richard Alderson. The first child of Ben rnd Kadge Nelson wps 
harjore, born on -Aughst 13, 191^. She lived on the ferm for ei ht 
yep.rs and then moved to Dundee with the fjiaily. It is here that 
she v;ent to school. At the age of 1^ she finished school '-nd went 
to work In M^^nchester for y. Mrs. Mf-y, doing V' rlous jobs for her* 

The Nelson frmily xiras a tightly knot f^'/nlly. There had been 
four children, but two had died before reai-hlng the Rt;e ol one year. 
As a result, the f'^mily was somewhat scif;il for the tiiues, ■^speci-lly 
since they had been a fc-rm f^^-ially, which usn»-'lly produced nuch larger 
families. V.'hile the family lived in Dundee, they kept a touch of 
the ff.rm with them, raising a large garden. Religion pi- yed a 
major part of the family's life. The frther whs a der.con at the 
church across the street, r'nd the mother taught Sunday school. 

Xhe family did little traveling, but did go on picnics and 
camping trips quite often, which I'lv.'ays took them to a j^ood 
fishing spot, as Pen nelson vjag lond of that sport. 

Marjore would go down to Masonville every ye* r for ^a week or 
ten days to visit a girl friend. Masonville was about twelve miles 
to the south of Porestville (see ffif<p) . 

The only people who tr- veled in the family were Richr-rd wnd Flore 
Smith, her gr^nd parents. Every j'-ear they would drive to Florida, 
where tlney ^^fould spend the summer. They had f cottage in Orl; ndo. 
This happened every ye^r for thirty years. Tht- reason they could 
do this vres ho r-old his farm for ' very good price whei: he vres youngt 
end never worked another day in nis life. On the d* y they would 
be ready to leave, the family, including grandchildren, would gather 
for o large nicnic in Dubuque. >.fter the picnic, they vjould start 



PAGE 11 

on their trip. It would t^jjce them ten to twelve days to drive to 
Florida in tlieir old Essex. 

On Sept. 11, 1930. Inrjore I-Ielson married J. L. Mohr. He 
was a worker on the rfcilrofd. A short time later they moved back 
to the farm ne>^r Forestville (which by this time no longer exists). 
For the next 25 yeirs she v?ill spend her time rrising her family. 

Three ci-iildren were born en this farm. Tliey were Merrill (Bud), 
born on Mnyl, 1931» Shirley, born Oct. 3, 193^-, f^nd Beverly, born 
Feb. 193^» in 1935 they moved to Gr^f, ne^-^r l^attnerville, where 
their third daughter was born, (Kay, bojsn Jun. 10, I936) . In 1937 
they moved to Ftrley, where their last child was born, ^-ntother girl 
named Mary. She w&s born on Feb. 7, 1939. All cire married today, 
with the exception of Merrill (Bud) who v/as oivorced two years pgo. 

During the ye^rs 1?^7 until 1951 ilprjore worked at Gj.over*s 
Shirt Factory in Dyersville, lovja. She ms.de ^1.35 per hour while 
running a sewing msichine, making shirts. 

After working in the factory, she moved into the restaurant 
business with iilv 0»Conner of Dyersville. It wps Cf^lled the Home 
Crfe. She rsn this for three veprs, from I95I to 195^. it was 
not -^ success ond she sold out her half to her partner in 1954. She 
then went to vork as r clerk in La\erne's Dress Shop, ^Iso locf.ted 
in Dyersvlll', str.rtlng there in 195^ ^nd still i^orkd there. 

J. L, ^.ohr wns born on June 6, 1904 in L&ttnerville, Iowa. 
Ee v^as the olc'est of sever, children. Iheie was another child born, 
but it wss born dead, end no name was recorded, not even if it 
v?as -' boy or s-irl. 

His life was like that of most other boys pt that time. He 
went to school until the fourth grade, at vjhlch time he went to work 
for the railroad. His schooling took ulace at a smell school near Graf. 



PAGE 12 

He went here with the Keper brothers. Hoy, Clarence, end Emmet. 
They were his frood friends, fnd often tv^ey would hunt together, 
trap, go Dick berries rnd just ror.m In the hills surrounding the 
Fre<^. I guess you would c 11 it a carefree lifs, but i'; didn't 
last forever . 

The fpmily did do some traveling together. Everj- five yef.rs 
or so the f-^'.'ni.ly would peck up -nd go out tc South Dakota. His 
father had a brother and a sister living out there. Fete Mohr 
lived in pprkston, where ^^e was h fermer. Ills sister, Julie Mohr 
Welland lived in Scotland (i'bout 45 miles southwest of tJioux Palls; 
Paricstcn is cbout 15 mile? tc the north of Scotland). Gr^ndina Mohr 
lived with the Weilands. She v.'as usually working on ? loom, v;hlch 
she made rugs and bedspreads and the like quite often. It usually 
took two days to make the trip, if they traveled by car. The train 
usually took p full 24 hours. They would usu- lly st&y for ten days 
to two weeks, rils father could get orHy time off to do this, not 
a paid V- cation like people get tod.B.y, This had a tendency to cut 
trips short and make the;Ti infrequent. 

Although the f'^mily soent most of their time livia^ In Graf, 
or the nrea, they did spend some time In Diindee, vjhere they h-'d lived 
for about two years previously. The fp-nlly moved here > gsin in 1929i 
so the father could be closer tc his vicrk, *^!S he had been moved to 
the Dundee stptlcn from Gr>-f . >t this time there were three gen- 
erations cf the family working with the railroad. They were John 
Steffens, his son^in-lew Joe Mohr, rnd his grandson, J. L. hohr. 



PaQE 13 

While living in Dundee, J. L. Jlohr met his wife, Mprjorie 
Nelson, who liTed in the hoiiJ^e rcro??s the street # The-^ were married 
on Sect. 11, 1030. ""his r"R .Inst ?t t'r»e strrt of the Denression, 
and he lost his .1ob with the rnllrofd coiBp- ny, so he went to work 
with his f'^ther-in-lavr, chopping viood. for tae '..'inter of 1930-31 • 
Then, in 1931, After his fnther-ln-l-^w took his life, he moved to 
the far/n, near Porestville. He worked the ff^.rm for about two 
and a half yenrs. IvTiile he lived here, his first three children 
(Merrill, Shirley, -nd Beverly) were born. Jvist rfter her birth 
(Beverly) they moved b'^ck into Dundee, p.fter movins bt-ck to Dundee, 
he went to work for the W.P.A., where he clashed rocks for the gr^^vel 
used on ro'-ids. In 1935 he we.it b^^ck to "?ork for the Chicn.^o jreft 
Western R^^ilrcrd. Re worked here ?s a se.'tion foreman until his 
retirement Ci j'ov. 28, 1969» 

Th3 fanily life of J. L. Mohr was similar to the other ffimilles 
in the are^ . Since the f?»!nlly vses f<^r fron rich, cc.?t of th- 
children usu lly mpde up g'-\mes without the use of specif?! toys. 
When he vras young, pbcat fse 10 tr l^v, t'lC-y Kould go running and 
hiding prA jUFt pl^y pround the house. In his tee.r,ege yerrs, since 
he worked rll d-^y during the week, he would usijally go to f barn 
dance when one i^ms be'ns hrld. 

Cne sole neans of fpfr.lly entertainment ;^s the r^dio. Since 
the rren h^d no electricity at the time thv"^ redio v;rs bought, it 
rrn off f^ b? ttery, '-rd h'r' to be chr-rged -^-Tery so often. So, the.v 
would hpul the battery wp to Epworth to p.et It chf^rt^ed rt ^ garage. 
The rndlo would be used only at night. The one special show of 
the family was "Fibber md iloily McGee", which was " favorite of 
Joe Mohr. 



PAGE Ik 

The Catholic church at Lettnervllle was the center of 
activities on Sundays. The femily would pttend mass every Sundpy, 
and afterwards would stf^nd around and tnlk with the other 
perishoners, ps this v-nR one of the fev? times they could get 
together end talk with some of the other people ir the area. 
Since the school the children attended v/ns a public school, no 
religion was taught in it. Therefore, cuch cf the religious in- 
struction was taught in the home, although the children did go 
to Centrpli" on Spturday for religion classes. 

He was married in L- mont, Iowa pt the Catholic church by 
Father Klure, The service was not in the church itself, ps his 
bride was not a Catholic, but p Lutheran, and it was forb<=de for 
a Catholic to marry out of the church rnd h^ve the service take place 
in the church itself. So they were married in the rectory (where 
the priest lives) with only two people in attendance. 

Since his retirement in 1969f J. L» Mohr has spent much of 
his time working around the house pnd refinishinn- furniture for 
my mother and himself. He is very handy in working with furniture 
and in making then look like they did when they vrere first put 
together. He still lives in Dyersville, in a house that he bought 
thirty yef-rs ago, in 19^^. 



CHILDREN OF EABLAIVD AND SHIRLEY rriELLEN 



SteTen Bernard TMllen 

Borni Mny 6, 1953 

EducRtiom Rockford West High School, grad 1971, Western 111. U., 1971 

Occupatlont U.S. j-rmy, p«r--<trooper, 82nd Airborne 

Resldencei Fort Bracg, N.C. 

Paul JoseDh Thillen 

Borni Oct. 29. 1955 

Education! Rockford West High School, grpd. 1973. Rock Valley 

Residence. g8iif§^,i££3-1^7^ (Currently enrolled) 

Arm Marie Thillen 

Borni July ."9, 1957 

Education! Rockford Hest High School, 1971-7^( currently enrolled) 

Resldencei Rockford, Illinois 



PAGE 15 

Shirley Marie Mohr was born on Oct. J, 1932 t on a farm 
north of Dundee, lox^a. She was the first daughter nd second-born 
of J. L. and Marjorle Mohr. She lived on the fnriii until she was two 
yeers old, vyhen the farally moved into Pundee. The family lived 
here for three ye^rs, --nd then nioved to Graf for one year. Fron Graf, 
they moved to Fr>rley, '.fhere she st-' rted in school. By this time she 
hrd her one "brother ^nd three sisters. 

Mom went to the mblic school in Farley, where she studied 
mostly reading, Trriting, pnd the usual. When she first started, 
she hf'd to wplk because the family had no car. This practice 
continued for the rest of her schooling. 

As a child 1-^ Parley, her most frequent pl-^yn;^ tes were 
the Stoughton children. Since they had feT^' toys, they would play 
hide and seek, jacks, rnd would jump rope. 

Mom^s Grandma and Grandpa Mohr used to live down the road, ? nd 
every Saturday ni^ht they would t^ke one or two of the gr-md children 
Into Dyersville to go shopping. But the children never bought any- 
thing - they got everything they needed from the Sears catalog. 

The family never traveled, except to go to tielr Grandr^^ i^elson's 
on Christmas. This was always a big event, besides Just being 
Christmas. First, after they ate their Christ.nas dinner (wliich 
was around noon), they could eat all the candy they could manage 
to take from the big table In the living room. This was special 
because they did not get candy too mnny other times. The other treat 
was the gifts, wnlch usually consisted of a doll, v:hich ivas given 
to them by Santa Glaus personally (pljtyed by Richard Alderson, their 
grandmother's second husband). 



PAGE 16 

The family moved to Dyersville during her sixth grade, In 
194^, Mother stayed at a lady»s house In Farley in order to finish 
the school year. They h°d moved because her father had been 
transferred by the railroad. 

She finished her last two years of grade school in Dyersville, 
and then attended St. Francis Xaiver for high school, which ^aso 
WRS in Dyersville. She was a cheerleader In high school, for two 
yesrs, and v;as a school reporter for the school newspaper, reporting 
the big sporting events. 

When Moni graduated from high school, she moved Into Dubuque to 
ivork for the Dubuque Telegraph-Kerald, where she wrote classified 
£ds. While there, she dated a young fellow from Dyersville whom 
she hnd met In high school, Harland Thillen. He would hitch-hike 
into Dubuque, and they would go to a movie or something like that, 
and then he -would hitch-hike home to Dyersville. Later they 
decided to get married. 

Mom moved tack to Dyersville the next yesr (1951) ^nd 
decided to get mrrried In November. They decided on November 
because the Korean conflict was going on at the time rnd they were 
quite certrln thet hs would be drafted. On November 22 they were 
married in St. Frnncis Xaiver Church in Dyersville. Their first 
house was next dcor to his parents, vriiere they lived until he 
was drafted into the service in the spring of 1953* ^he then moved 
back home to her parents* home while her husbf'nd served in the ^rmy. 
It is here th^t she had her first child, named Stev^en jJernard, on 
May 6, 1953. 



P/.GE 17 

When Dart returned in Seotember of 195^» the frmlly took a 
trio out to Colorado, where they stayed for one week. 

While staying at her parents* hoae. Mom mnnaged to keep 
"busy by helping sround the hou?e, r^'lslng her son, pnd doing the 
house work for her mother, v.iio \7PS spending a lot of time working. 
After her husbpnd returned, she held vprious part-time jobs 
In Dyersvllle. It wt s In Dyersville thrt tVie other two children 
were >^orn{ Paul Joseph on Oct. ?9i 1955t f^nd Ann Marie on July 29, 
1957. (All the children were born at Mercy Hosplti^l in Dubuque, 
but lived in Dyersville). Dyersville had no hospital at the time. 
When the family moved to Stockton, Illinois, it was 3 totally new 
idea for Mom, as she hpd never lived aviay from the Dyersville area. 
The family lived in U\o different houses wMle in Sto kton. 'i/hile 
at the second home. Mom helped to tpke cere of an elderly lady who 
lived ? cross the street. We didn't stay in Stockton for too long. 
Dad ch?5nged jobs, end was now selling insurance in Freeport, Illinois, 
commuting daily from Stockton. Cn M-rch 10, I963. v/e packed up r nd 
again moved, after livinc in Stockton for just one md r hrlf years. 
We first lived at 439 S, West Ave. in Freeport. It wrs a nice 
apartment, but was quite dirty at first, and jnany hours were spent 
cleaning It up before tney moved into it. We lived in the f-p^rtment 
for awhile, and then moved to a house at 844 W. Galena. While we 
lived here. Mom was a den mother for the Cub Scouts, of vrhich iteve 
and I were members. She and Mrs. Brooks were* co-leaders cf the den. 
It is in Freeport that she first started to tf-ke in sewinrj to do, in 
order to make extra money for the family. This was in 1964. She 
still sews for people toiay. In I966 Day was transferred to Hockford 



I 



PAGE 18 

with th? Insurance company, so, once ngaln, we packed up r<nd 
.-noved, choosing a house In Roukford In the Oxford Perk /rea. 
This was In August, on the 15th, th^t we entered our new home. 

Since moving to Rockford, Mom has seen Steve end I gr^^duate 
from high school ^nd start college, -^nd now Ann is pbout to 
graduate from hin;h school. She is a member of the Bet*' Sigria Pi 
Sorority, Tvhich is a social and service organization here in 
Rockford. She also has been ^t volunteer "Pink Lady" at Rockford 
Memorial Hospital, She spends her spare time doing some painting 
and sewing. She still lives in Rockford. 



PAGE 19 

Harland Thlllen was born on Aug. 11, 1931 t the first son and 
second child of A. F. and Berthn Thlllen. He does xiot remeniber 
too auch nbout his early childhood, except that it was happy 
and he played trucks with Elaer Hentges. He started his grade 
school education ft Xaiver Grade School In Dyersville in 193*^. 
Dnd was always n;ood in math, ivhich he always enjoyed, but was not 
so hot in English and History, which he hfted with a passioni 

Durin^j; the summer. Dad would go to the old school, which had 
served ps the hi h school at the time, and pl'^y Sofitball, Later, 
around the sixth grade, mnr'les got real bis, "nd he was the co- 
champ of Dyersville, rlong xuith Bob Nenlrer. He estimrtes he had 
about eifc'-ht or nine-hundred marbles at his peak. lie ended up 
burying 300 of them in the ground, where t;70 yenrs l^ter they 
built a garage. The marbles are still under the garage. 

I guess the life history of my father would be work. Ever 
since the seventh grode he has vjorked somewhere, it tnat time he 
x/orked vxith his dad in the grocery store he (his father) vias 
operating at the time. His job was to run pop rncl cupcrkes dovm 
to the factory workers and the J.L. Glark plnnt in Dyersville, (the 
same J.L.Clark as in Rockford). Lnter, ;flhen he a'ss 17, he worked as 
a set up man for a welder pt the Silver Streak fir nufacturlng Go. 
in Dyersville. Re vras prid v^l.25 per hour, ^rtiile he xrorked here, 
he pIso worked for his father on x^reek-ends. While in high school. 
Dad spent most of his time xirorklng, but he found tine to plry 
baseball rlso. He was a four yerr letter winner at Xriver high 
School in Dyrirsville. He pl.'>yed centerfield, ^nd was excellent on 
defense. His hitting was fair. 



PAGE 20 

Dad graduated from high school In 19^9 with a cl .ss of 33 
people. After ,T:ro.duation he began to vjork with his father in 
the store on p- full time basis. While still in high school, Dad 
met his future -iifife, Shirley Mohr. Re begr-n df=>tins her then 
and later, -^jhen she moved to Dubuque, he would hitch hike into 
Dubuque every woeX-end to see her. 

In !'oveaber of 1951, on the 22nd, Mom r,nd Dad were married 
in St, Fr-ncis Xriver Basclllicr in Dyersvllle. They went to St. Louis 
for one week for their honeymoon. 

The next i.pril, D^d entered the Tmy. It vms 1953 f nd he 
was sent to Koren . He arrived in Korea on June 1, 1953* "rid stayed 
there for 1^+ nonths, or until July 31. 195^. One month before he 
left, his son was born, '/liile in Korea, he was connected with the 
^39th Sn.5?ineers, although he mn a battalion P. U His life in the 
Priay was not p very rough cne, .-1 though it vms boring -t times. The 
P. A. was op-in fro.T 12i00 until 2i^5 In the afternoon, 'nd from ^^^0 
until 6iO0 in the evening. The rest of the time he had for stocking 
shelves and doing other things. 

He vrB.3 discharged on Aug. k, 195^ from Port Carson, Colorado. 
Ha flew home as far ns Cedrr Rapids, vrhere he was Tiet by Shirley and 
his one year olr^ -^on, who didn't w^nt to talk with him. The three 
of them went to Denver for a two week vacation. 

When they got bask to Dyersvllle, Mom and Dad moved b-^c^: into 
the home they were living in before he entered the / rmy (while in 
the Army, his wife lived with her parents). It was a smrll two 

bedroom house next door to his father's house. He continued to 
live and work in Dyersvllle until 1961, first for his father and 



PAGE 21 

In i960 he went to ^-roTk for Bud Roonev In the grocerj' business. 
It is becn\ise of this that he -noved to Stookton, Illinois In I96I. 
He worked here "S a m^nf-gsr for one of '."fhat was supposed to be 
.<^ ohr^ln of stores ^un by Rooney f'nd ° couple of Tseopls from Rock 
Isl-^nd, but the Ide"' went bnnkmpt. In Ar»rll of I962 he quit working 
for Rooney --nd ojot n job selllnc?; lnsur<^nce for Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Gomp^^ny. He started here In April of 1962 on the 7th. 

When he started working; for Metropolitan, he vi4s still living 
In Stockton, so every morning he would get up p'nd drive the .'^5 miles 
to Freeport to work. He did this for seven months until November of 
1962 ^ -x^en we aoved to Preer-ort. Ths first plr-ce we lived was 
an apert-nent on S. West Street. We lived there for just about two 
years, when we moved to a house on Galena Street, ^-hlle living in 
the apartment, we took one Ion? trir). This vres in 1963» when we 
went to the Snst coast for two weeks. The family cmped both ways 
out ''nd back, which was very exciting becpuse none of us h-'d ever 
re-'lly c-^rmed before. It was especially exciting on the first night 
because it rained whet seemed like forever ---^nd the entire inside 
of the tent was quite wet. But, for some reason, ye rever wenl? to 
a hotel, r.lthough the Idea riid cross our minds. We took another 
trie that ye?r, this one to Shreveport, Loulslpna to see my mother's 
sister, Mary, nnd her f'-mily. We did this ?t Thpnksgivlrig -^nd 
had quite a few problems with the err. In faot, it bnrely made it 
backl 

Just before we m.ade this trip, vre moved to tbe house on 
Gf^lena, which rt the time seemed huge to me. It h-^d nine rooms 
pnd a really big brsement which we could plypr in. The family 
took another trin while we lived in this house, this one toothe Black 
Hills in South Dakota, This was a strange trip because Ann got 



P/GE 22 

sick while v:e were out there, r-ind most 0*" the time we just sat 
around snd did nothing. But, /^gpln, it '/?8S fun. 

In July of 1966 Dad was promoted with i-letropolltsn, pnd In 
August we iioved to Rockford. He no;; was a mf^nager pnd h«d a 
staff working for him. We aioved to Oxford Street here In to;«i 
and still live liere. Dad continued working for i'^etropolltpn as a 
mf nager until 197^$ v.'hen he decided to go hack to being -m agenti 
Vvhere he thought he could do better by himself. He worked at this 
until 19?1 vrhen he quit the insurance business altogether. He 
vas quite frustrated Tilth the comppny in particular, since they 
kept nr kins him Dromlses but f^'lled to come through. So, in f:ov. of 
1971 be '.cent to v/ork for Charles V. Welse here in Rockford as a 
salesman. Ke worked here full time for just 4i months, when he 
went to vjcrk for Muller-Pinehurst Company, vjhere he vjorks today 
f s a routeoian. 

Throughout his life, my dad*s leisure has been built around 
physlc<=l recreation rnd work. As frr as sports go, he has plsyed 
semi-pro baseball for two yerrs for the Dyersvllle i^.itehawks 
and slow-pitch Softball here in Hockford for two seasons. He else 
bowls, having a I70 overage and he plnyed handball end rrn for 
about 3i years, until his arthlritis started bothering nim. 

Dad works around the house quite often, proving himself a 
h'^ndyman quite often. If anything breaks, he is the first to 
attempt to fly it, usurlly s^^ccess^^ully . 

He still lives in Rockford v:ith his wife and two of his 
children, in the house they moved into alght years pgo. 



PAGE 23 

I was born on October 29, I955 &t Xftlver Kospltel in Dubuque. 
At the time I h&.d one brother, Steve, vj-hc was 2^, The family 
lived in a sm?-ll house in pysrsville, next door to my father's 
parents. 

I BM told that v;hen I was just rbout three years old , I 
WPS dovm at my insternal gre.nd par ants' home (vrho also lived in 
Dyersville) -md. 1 drank one-hrlf pint of fuel oil. Well, the 
parents got pretty shook up, I ^suess, frid rushed me to the 
hospital in Dubuque, where I had my stomach pumped. I ifas in the 
hospital for a couole of days, but then went home, heslthy again. 

I ^n not certf In rbout the first t^'ing I remember, but I think 
it was around the a^e of four. There are not too mnny things I can 
remember about living there. Steve, my older brother, 'nd Ann, 
my younger sister, ;re pbout the only plpym- tes I c-n rGneraber. I 
do remember going over to a friend of my brothers, who at the time 
were putting aii addition on to their house, and driving a few nails 
in, or at least trying to. I also renember pl?.ying Simon Says over 
at ti'ls house. 

One of my mogt profound memories of Iowa is ol-yin;; n form of 
"house"' with my brother and sister. There was a room in our house 
in Dyersville which l»ad what was then a very l-^rge roo-n, which 
served as a type of attic, since there was nobhln,g else f^nd it had 
no heat. We would fto in the room, '.i^hlch got cold at times, <--nd 
build a "house" which would often t^ke us nil morning and tien In 
the afternnon we would take It down. Str^n^e, but funl 



PAGE 2k 

I don't remember my first 4ny at school, but just about 
everything I do remember V7hen I was younr, had to do with school. 
I first attended klndersarten in Dyersville &nd Cfn re'nember 
walking home nnd peeking in my Grandma Mohr's window at woik. She 
was working at the dress shoD at the time and I would look until 
she v/aved «nd then continue on my way home. 

On March 11, I96I the f-mily moved to St;ookton, Illinois. 
My father was trnnsf erred there with the supermarket ch^in. I 
remember that he would be gone overnight to look for r-> house, pnd 
he v;ould tell us kids chnt he was seeing & ^^^'^ about £^ horse. Like 
kids, we fell for it. 

Ue first lived in an upstairs apartment in Stockton. I 
actonded the public school to finish kindergarten, Steve weiit 
to the Catholic school, tie was in second grade. About the only 
thing I can remember about the school is that the teacher was 
the vjife o:" my barber. 

We lived in the apartment for just a couple of months. Then 
we moved about five or six blocks to a repl big house, with a huge 
yard, p-t least I thought it was huge. As it turns out, it really 
wasn't, but efter hf^ving no y-ird at all in tne apartment, it must 
h?ve seeiaed like a park. i. s it turned out, the yard turned into 
one, because I Oi-.n hardly remember playing ?.nywhere else for the 
next -jes-T, ihe yard i-reis the scene of b'seb«ll wnd footb^^tll, 
although for seme reason my brother set up a golf course around 
the house, which 5s I remember had only thrse holes. This is strange 
because self had never been a family snort, and we had no golf balls 



PAGE 25 

or clubs. While I lived in this house, I went through first grade 
pnd stfTted second. Rut, on Nov, 3, 1962 the family moved to 
Freeport, where my dad had started a job selling insurance. We 
moved to another apartment, but this one was somex^het bigger then 
the one before. My brother and I were sent to the Catholic school 
while my sister went ta the oublic kindergarten just down the street. 
We lived at ^39 S. West Avenue. I had a few problems in school, 
as I did not like ruy ^fiacher, and I have ^n idea she didn't like met 
I think her ntme was ^iiss Forstan (not sure), but I do know that I 
spent more time in the hall th-^n in the classroom (or at least it 
seemed thet way) . 

The next years vrent better in school, even though I was far 
from a great student. Back ft home, f^bout «11 I did was play 
baseball, which vrould normally lest on a good summer day from ten 
o'clock in the morning until 8 in the evening. In the fall it 
was footbf'll, pnd di^ring the winter my brother and the neighbor 
and myself would i^lay army. I was always the German, f^nd they 
were the Americans. I always lost because Germany did lose the 
war. 

After fourth grade (I965) we moved to a big house on Galena 
Street in Freeport. We lived here for two yerrs until v;e .-noved 
to Rockford. That house was strmge, because at the end cf the 
back was e big hole, vjhich was said to be an ebai\doned quary, or 
something like that. Steve and I used to go and run around down 
there, even though Mom and Dad would chew us out if they ever c^-ught 
us, which hanpened on occasion. At this time I was playing baseball, 
which I enjoyed very much. I was very lucky r^nd pitched a no- 



PAGE 26 

hitter once, v.'inninf? 15-2. The reason they scored wfts I hit a 
couple of br.tters md. ywlkod a Tew more. I think th.e reason 
they didn't get any hits \-mE because I vip.s so wild they vTere 
efroirl to go to "biit. 

In l'^67 on /ugunt 15 v;e noved ac^-in, this time to Hockford 
where my dad had been trrncf erred with Metroi^olitr.n Life Insurance 
Compeny. I really did not want to go, but I guess I had no choice 
in the ma.tter. 

When vie rioved to Hockford, It was strange for me, bee-use I 
had to go to 9. new school in,w|-iich I knew only one person, my 
brother. I h^d ,'^one to new schools before, but that w«s in second 
srede PTi^y for sorae reacon this seamed auch nore foreign than the 
other schools, maybe "because this i«5s the first -DUbllc school I 
had attended. Also, the school was so much Irrger than those I 
had attended. 

Mevertheless, Roosevelt v;as fun, -nd liks my normal self, 
I fli-'^de friends fast. I can still remember the first d-:y in that 
scViool. I had >- music class and there was this one bl©ck kid 
who '^-s about 8 or Q inches taller than me, '^nd I kept asking him 
if he :»/£t? supposed to be in the seventh grade, to which he kept 
answerini; "yes." 3y the end of class ha was thinking I was mighty 
strange. 

At Roosevelt I ran on niy first track tea.-ii, or at least tried 
to. I o;ot cut on the ti^ird w^eek of the season. This came as a 
real shock to -ne, since I had quit basebrll to run tr-^ck. I tried 
to make up for it by golns^ to see ^ly brother run for vVast High. 

When I was a f reshm-^r I w^nt to West High, - nd first 



PAGE 27 

freshmnn class In the history of the pchool. I re? lly sn joyed 

the school, espccirlly belrxg x;lth r-ll those big people fg'in. 
When I was r fre'^h'npn, I wps only 5 feet 2 Inches, so I was quite 
R Vit smrller than most erery'horiy else. It Kas during my freshm-m 
yePT thp.t I started running ppipin, which carrlod on through ell of 
my high school yer.r^. 

When I Kns s sophomore, my brother got rae my first ,1ob, as 
a brisboy at a rest»~nrpnt dovmtown. I vjorked tliere off and on for 
three years. Slncr; then, I hrve vforked et four other .1obs, the 
most recent belnr; for the Rockford Park District last summer. 

In 1973 I sradupted from Rockford Wect High School. I was 
ranked right around the halfway mark in my cIpss, whether ebove 
or below I honestly do net know. 

After graduation, I had rsl^nned on going to Western Illinois 
University, bnt after reconriiclering, I decided to enroll ?it 
Rock Valley, a decision I am glnd I made. Next ye^^r, I hope to 
attend Sangamon St^^te University in Springfield, Illinois, where 
I would major in Political .Studies. 



BROTHERS ;.ND SISTERS OP PAUL THILLEN 
FAGE 28 
STEVEN BERNARD THILLEN 

Steve was born on Mey 6, 1953 1" Xavier Hosnital In Dubuque. 

He was the first child of the fnmily. 

Steve strrted school in Dyersville, snd was in second grade 
vhen we naoved tc Stockton, so I Imorlne he remenbers lovja pretty 
veil. In Stockton, he joined his first basebPll team, ^nd I 
was the batboy. Wg user" to plry b»^seb)-ill r^nd footn.-^H in the front 
yard quite cf ten. He would usuelly win, because he wr-r so rriuch 
bigger th^n I vras. 

Wl?en v.'e moved tc Freenort, Steve fnd I pi;ot on different 
baseball teaas, so we f:ot to go wf-tch each othftr on ocnrsion* but 
I really didn't see him nl^iy that much after that. I don't know if 
he rffis any p:ood or not, bnt I imaf^lne he was. 

It v:as in Preeport th^^t he first began swimming. '.Ve all 
thought he was a c;reat swlrimer and sometime around 1Q6^ he sv.'am 
a mile In t'le Boy ^^contr?' annual "Hile S'lim'* at sumner camp. 

He '-Iso pl--red footb<^ll in Preepo:^t, where thf;y ^^ut him in 
the middle of the line, which was a ^-jcste, beo^ace he vias one of 
the fastest T)eor)].9 on the team. 

Steve also nlpved trumpet in the ■^ra'le school b^-nd. He 
played for ^^ oouole of years, but quit w^ien he had too a-ny thlnp;s 
going O'l at once, since he was a Boy Scout, athletic studont, 
musfcfclan, and whatnot. 

When the f-^mily moved to Rockford, Tteve and I went to 
Roosevelt Jr. High together for one year. Then he went to v;est 
Hl^. This is where he first "^eg^n to run. In his sor)homore year 
he ran cross-country nd tr-ok and did very well, -nd he kept it up 



PAGE 29 

ell during his hlfTh school dfyfi, eventually setting the school 
record -^or the tiro ralle run during hlR senior year rt 9i^6«2, This 
stood for three ye^r^, "^Iso, while in hlH;h school, he i«?as In 
ROTC. l^Tien he gr^div^ teri he vies a Cnptnln, r.nd iiss in charge of 
tYt School Drill Teaai, »fter he graduated, he enrolled pt Western 
Illinois UrAversitv, v?i^ere he majored In P.E. He attended -^or 
just one qu-^rter, -^^hen he quit «nd joined the Arny. 

Stave entered the .*rm-" on Dec. 20, 1971, rnd vias sent to 
Fort Polk, Louisiana for basic training. He l^ter ;^s sent to 
Port Benning, Geor<?;i?i, where he stayed for about one year, and 
then was sent to Port Bragg, N, C. He has been at Fort Brpgg off 
and on for the ^nst tvio years. He has also gone to Alns?ca, 
Wew Mexi"30, and Turkey for the Army. He will be getting out of 
the Ar-ny (the 82nd itirborne) in December of 197^. 

ANN MARIE llilLLSN 

Ann i\ras born on July 29, 1957 at Xavier Hospital in Dubuque. 
She wa? the last chile) of the family. Ann lived only t\-io and 
a hplf year?! in Dyersvllle, so she does not re^^ember it nt .^11. 
She strrted lcinderg'=rten in Stockton but was in school only a 
couple of montS^p before ne moved to Preeport. Ann vjps in the 
public grade school, but then went to the Othclic grade school. 
She alvrays was pretty prood in school, usually ,7:etting A*s and B*s. 
I usually got chewed out for not doing as good in school a? my 
sister. 

Ann waiSlstill in grade school when we came to Rockford, 



PAGE 30 

pnd she aocordlrvrly went to Walker grt-'de school for two yeers, 
before rjolng to Roo!?eTelt, She f'l«;o went to liocsevelt for tuo 
years, ^rettln,'^ her ixp^nnl good a;rades. 

Her freshmpn yerr she ^'ent to West, where she strrted her 
atheletic CRreer. Thnt ye^r she played tennis, softball, volleyball, 
basketball -^nd f^- few other stjorts. For the rest of her time in 
high school -^he ripoiried to ff;o for one sport pt p time, nnd it 
has wor'ked cut for the best. For the last two years she has 
received ?=;ixth nlr'ce in the rirls state track meet, Ipst sriring 
setting a school record of 5t27,0 for the mile in the process. 

She is still at West High where she is a senior. She will 
graduate in June of 1975 f-'-'^d. plans on attending Rock Vf.lley next 
year. 



turner; BRADLEY THO^iASV 1954- 



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Rockford, Illinois -■•- 

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Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1 s t Farmer Dates I£M./ l5-3€t La' e Lei ton, '^isc. Dates 

2nd Larcn Dates ? 2nd IcloJt, Mice. Dates 



Dates 


•? 


Dates 


7 


Dates 


? 



3rd Car Seles- icr Dates ? 3rd Dates_ 

'ith Factory Lor': or Dates ? 'ith Dates 

Religion ^DiX^H^Hr^H^thcUi^T 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. L'B .ocrat 



Place of Marriage to your grandmother ^-v'pivlltca' - f^- ^ date ^ /^/t c; 

NOTE: If your father was raised (to age 18) by a stepfather or another relative give 
that data on the back of this page. (A-1) 

B. Grandmother (your father's side) 

Name Hylda Ihde V/lckus Current Residence L'lEC'-r.glR Dells, '.^isCj 

I f dead, date of death 

Place of birth Dellona, Wise. Date of birth '\/2'\/^f 



Education (number of years): 
grade school C high school h vocat ional college |j_ 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Teacher Dates 17^-^.^ 1st I.r-'-e Delton, Wi .qp. D ates l'^-2<^ 



2nd SociaT ^■^or'^or Dates ^,^-^r' 2nd Larcr e. \/isc. 

3rd Dates 3rd Fortai^e. Wise. Dates 33-U5 

'4th Dates ^th Baraboo. V/isc. D ates ^5-^0 

Religion Episcopalian ''isc. Dells, L'isc. ^0-7'+ 

i Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Deniocrat 



Place of marriage to your grandfather - -^-^ ]3r>i +,- >- -i '-r- . DATE <_ ^r '] ■- 

Note: If ' 



'' iLl%tl%^nht^l^Wh¥tin ag|i^^A-^)f stepmother or another relative gi 



A- 1 Stepgrandfather (your father's side) 

N.jnie Current Residence 

I f dead, date of death ~~ 

Place of birth Date of Birth 



Education (number of years) 
grade school high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


kth 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates 

'ith Dates kth Dates 



Re I i g i on 



Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother dati 

A-2 Stepgrandmother (your father's side) 

Name Current Residence 



I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 



Education (number of years): 
grade school high school vocational col lege 

Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st ^Dates 1st ^Date; 

2nd ^Dates 2nd ^Dates^ 

3rd ^Dates 3rd ^Dates 



Ret igion 


sorori ties, 


etc. 




Political party, civil or social clubs, 








Place of marriage to your grandfather 






Date 







Grandfather (your mother's side) 

Name rpn-py n pap Current Residence Deed. 

I f dead, date of death I'l /'"^ '~~~ 



Place of birth .cc'fcTQ. 111. Date of birth 6/2*^/85 

Education (number of years): 
grade school ^ high school vocational college 



0ccupation(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Leather Worher Dates 05-*^ 5 1st Hocl'f ord , 111. Dates 

2nd D ates 2nd ^Dates 

3rd D ates ^3rd ^Dates 

'♦th Dates ^'♦th ^Dates 

Rel igion L'-itherc-n 

Political parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Denoc"^at 



Place of marriage to your grandmother ^ i.^^^ ,- -r-,-, date U /per ■r; 

Note: If your mother was raised by a ij tHp^ f atHeK O F Wuihe' r r e l at l Vt! ( r o a ge 18) — '^ ''^ 
give that data on the back of this page (C-l) 

Grandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Sedie Cle-rv CI sen C urrent Residence pgnd 

I f dead, date of death '^/2p/6C 

Place of birth Vc';ford. 111. ^Date of birth t^/l^/gf 

Education (number of years) 
grade school ^T high school vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

'st Eousevlfe Dates Life 1st ?L''C^icrd. 111. D ates LJ f e 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



3rd ^Dates 3rd ^Dates 

Re 1 i g i on "\o --j ;-. Z' thol? c 



Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. De'iocE't 



l^lace of marriage to your grandfathe r ncc'-':^ClV' , 7i:: . d ate '■/2'^/0»^ 

Note: If your mother was raised by a stepmother or another relative (to age 18) 
give that data on the back of this page (D-2) 



C-l Stepgrandfather (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 

I f dead . date of death 



l'l.i(,<- ..( hirlh D.ilc of hiilh 

I iliK .1 1 i on (niiMil)c r ol •/<-. , t 7) 
t|t.iil<> -.(hool h i <jh '.chool vcjcot i on,) I colliM)f 



Occupat ion(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates 2nd Dates 



Dates 


1st 


Dates 


2nd 


Dates 


3rd 


Dates 


'4th 



3rd Dates 3rd ^Dates 

'♦th Dates '4th Dates 

Re 1 i g ion 

Political parties, civil or social ^clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandmother d ate 

D-2 S tepgrandmother (your mother's side) 

Name Current Residence 



I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school iiigh school 

Occupat ion (s) 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 





vocational 


col lege 

PLACE OF RESIDENCE 
(after leaving home) 




Dates 


1st 


Dates 


Dates 


2nd 




Dates 


Dates 


3rd 




Dates 



Re 1 i g i on 

Political party , civil or soci al c 1 ubs , sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your grandfather Date 



CHIhDREN of A 6 B (or A- 1 or B- 1 ) - your father's name should appear below 

Name ' elth Warner Turner 

Place of birth r^y^ Dpitrr. ^'i.cc. date 7/lo/l<^ 

Number of years of schooling j- Occupation :a: iitenaxiCe I-Isn 

Residence ioc^icrd, .11. Mari taFTTatus ; -.rrT^'^ ' 

Number of children u """ ''^^'^^^ 

Name ^']llnor Lorraine Turner 'w'ickus 

P ' a ce of birth Ls.\:e Pol ton, V/lsc. 3 ate 11/23/ 1 ^ 

Number of years of schooling ip 



12 Occupatibn i^ccr intant 

Residence__^ ^Marital Status l.arr-ed 

Number of chi Idren ^ 

Name Chg.rlos Al':-^:rl Turner 

Place of birth Jgjsr';. '"sc. date V30/28 

Residence' ^''7 °' .'r'""' ' M / ! ^ 1 ..Q^'^^'^" ^If^t-^^ITT^ T^n^ineer 

Residence Cconto, ..-sc. Marital Status Divorced V^: V/id oi/er 

Number of children "^ Tt^'-C' :' Icre r 

Na"« '>iT ^dwprd Turner 

Place Of birth L.o^pr ~^ . V/- m . d ate 1/2U/32 

Number of years of scTiooling c OccupatiOh T'nnp ' 

Residence one M arital Status I'ono 

Number of chi Idren —————— 



Name^ ^____^____ 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooHng Occupatlbn 

Residence Marital Status " 

Number of chi Idren 



Name _^__ 

Place of bi rth Jate 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of school Ing Occupatioh 

Residence Marital Status ' 

Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

P 1 ace of birth ^ date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residence Marital Status 

Number of chi Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Res i dence Marital Status ' 

Number of chi Idren 



, Name 

Place of birth date 

Number of years of schooling Occupation 

Residenc e M arital Status 

Number of Llll lUmil 



CHILDREN of C and D (or f.-l, D-l)-your mother's name should appeor below 



N.inic 



Hard Clse^n 



^''■" '• "^ hi" rill riOC\:.fnrc , JH. 

Niinih'T f>( ye. If, of school ituj' * 



Hf", i dencc 

Numher of ch i Idren 



.11. 



.rn^-rr- 



N.ime 



irth -^ ^ jr ^ 



Piacn of birth Ir r'-f nrn '!'' 

Number of years of schooling JO 

Residence Tmr-e Psrl- -']_i 



Lev 



Number of ch i Idren 



JL 



3. Name 



rrrr-r-n P] c,pp 



Place of birth ?,oc\-fOT6. 111. 
Number of years of schooling 
Residence r^iCC^'fcrd 1 1"! , 
Number of ch i Idren i? 



Place of birtli 'Acc'-J'cvd ^ 111 , 



Number of years of school ing 

Res i dence :^.OC^-fcrd. 111. 

Number of ch I 1 dren 



IT 



Name ^'^^/ - CI sen 

Place of birth 



Number of years of school ing ' ' 
Res i dence 



' -i--!- ■ 



_ " ":cc^:fcr(;^. Ill . 

Number of ch i Idren r\ 



6. 



7. 



Place of birth nocl:ford. -"ll . 



Number of years of school ing 



J^QIl^ 



Res i dence 

Number of ch i Idren 

Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 



. one 



■■t^- 1/2/1? 



Occupation I^artgnce"" 
Marital Status llarrJed 



date f/1'^/18 

ITccupation i^trjl Saleslady 



Mari tal Status ilarriec 



date 



3/V20 



Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

Place of birth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 

Number of ch i Idren ~~ 



9. 



Name 

Place of b i rth 

Number of years of' school ing 

Residence 

Number of ch i Idren 



Name 

Place of bi rth 

Number of years of school ing 

Residence 



(Jccupation I i 3 ntenance 
Marital Status 2 Divorne?^ ^r Tar-rip r^ 



date ^/?/2? 



, Occupation Retajl Salerladv 
Mari tal ^Status I 'srried """ 



date lC/?l/?f^ 



, Occupation Factory UorVer 

Marital Status Divorced 



date 10/^0 



Marital Status 



ccupat ion i'one 



Loiig. 



_ date 

Occupat i6n 
Marital Status 



"date 



Occupation 
Marital Status 



date 



Occupation 



Marital Status 



date 



ccupat ion 



Marital Sf^tiK; 



our Father 



ame - pt j-;, . ~:irri°-r Current Residence Plocl-ford. 311 » 

f dead, date of death 

lace of birth j.g^-P Dpitnn, Wi^o. ^Date of birth 7/1^716 

ducat ion (number of years) 

grade school ^ high school !_ vocational ^college 



ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

St Factory '..'orker Dates 25 years 1st Porte. ee, V.'isc. Dates ^ years 

nd r.arr.pntpr- Dates Ii-vpar.q 2nd SRloit. ^o so. DAtes -t^ yoars 

'Td VflintpnsnoP Kan Dates i y^ar 3rd Rcckfordf Til. Dates 2? yg^rg 

fth ^Dates ^^ith ^Dates 

leligion Hovnn Catr-olic 



olitical parties, civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. Der-Ocr; 



'lace of marriage to your mother rLCcVrcrd. jTll. _ d ate 1/1 '^A'' 

lOTE: if you were raised by a stepfather or another relative give that data on the back 
of this page. (E-2) 



'our Mother 



lame ;;, renc 's 01 sen Turner Current Res I dence Rcclrf 02^d . 

f dead, date of death 



Mace of birth Hnol-f nrr^^ TIT . Date of birth ii-/^/?2 

Education (number of years) 
grade school 2 high school ■■ vocational ^college_ 



)ccupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 

1st Retail Saleslady Dates ^^-7^ 1st Roc^ford, 111. ^Dates_ 

Ind Dates 2nd _Dates_ 

}rd Dates 3rd _Dates_ 

Re 1 i g i on Itornan Catholic 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. Donccrat 



Place of marriage to your fathfer ; ^,i r^; - -y -r-;^ ^ ^ ' d ate l/'l*^/'." " 

MOTE: If you were raised by a stepmother or another relative give that data on the back of 
this page (F-2). 



E-1 Stepfather 

Name 

If dead, date of death 



Place of birth D ate of birth 

Education (number of years) "" ^~~~~~~~~ 

grade school high school vocational college 



0ccupation(5) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 



2nd Dates 2nd Dates 

3rd ^Dates ^3rd Dates 

'♦th Dates ^ith Dates 

Re 1 i g i on 

Pol i t i ca+ part les , civil or social clubs, fraternities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your mother ' """" Date 



F-2 Stepmother 

Name 

I f dead, date of death 



Place of birth Date of birth 

Education (number of years) 
grade school high school^ vocational college 



Occupation(s) PLACE OF RESIDENCE 

(after leaving home) 
1st Dates 1st Dates 

2nd Dates ^2nd Dates 

3rd^ ^Dates ^3rd Dates 

Re 1 i gion ~~~* 

Political party, civil or social clubs, sororities, etc. 



Place of marriage to your father date 



HILDREN of E and F (or E-2, F-2) - your name should appear below 



ame ^Roger Heed Turner 

lace of birth Itocl-fcrd. Til. 



umber of years of school ing 
gs i dence e^ 1 ., T 1 

umber of chi Idren f 



Date of birth c/c/L'' 



c ' t-; 



Occupation 



Marital Status 



rerry I lie ha el Tur 



i-ioc lucre! 



1 a ce of bi rth 

jmber of years of schooling 
2si dence : cc^^rorc. Ill7 



■1 1 



Date of birth 



r/'-p /r^f, 



umber of chi Idren 



Marital Status 



Occupation If etc" 







Eradlev Thoraas Turner 



lace of birth Roclford, 111. 

umber of years of schooling TTT 



Date of bi rth 



Bs i dence ^.cc^ i 

umber of ch i Idren 



"11. 

— F" 



Occupation 

Marital Status cr.o 



Ccntjiiulnr 



r/^ h/^h 



ame rvoss '.•.■illiam Turner 

lace of birth Roc'-f crd , 111. 

umber of years of schooling T^, 

TT. 



es i den ce 

umber of chi 1 dren 



-tool "ford 







Date of birth }.?/lQ/n^, 



Marital Status 



Occupation y.C'T.p. 



a me 

lace of bi rth 

umber of years of schooling 

es i dence 



umber of chi 1 dren 



ame 

lace of bi rth 



umber of years of schooling 
es i dence 



umber of ch i Idren 



ame 

lace of bi rth 



umber of years of schooling 
es i dence 



umber of chi 1 dren 



ame 

lace of bi rth 

umber of years of schooling 

es i dence 



umber of ch i Idrert 



Date of bi rth 



Occupat lon 
Mari tal Status 



Date of birth_ 
Occupation 
Marital Status 



Date of birth 

Occupat I On 



Marital Status 



Marital Status 



Date of bi rth 
Occupat ion 



111. ASSIGNMENT OF LITERARY RIGHTS (If you and your family dre willing) 

I hereby donate this family historv, along with all literary and administrative 
rights/ to the Rock Valley College Family History Collection, deposited in the 



Rockford Public Library, Rockford, Illinois 

Signed 
Date 










§^^ 









rJ 



1 








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A\ 1 


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'■■ rrl -r 7 r^'^rr r-'rri'^d to lloze J in^rloy 

*=» "; i"*^ T rr -r born V diod 3/*^' 5 

r ■ ' ionx) Gcninn nTrj od t*-" Ch'Tlott'^ J-^'noc 
(. : --^ ( r 11 oir cl ilorcn- 

**L;i.llie Elnl-n torn 7/1 ^/V"' '^■'r-r 'i/;\>3 

'jVcu j] Cr mam'od to I'ary Focg 
(no of their childron- 

*i-.Ml)ort Dnvid born 10/:iy/i'd dlod 1/1/56 

Albert Ihde morrjod to Lnllie Gonnn on 1/3/8? 
Cha I.:;- on- 
born 2/20/88 
12/.:'V8o 



Fred Albert 

l.'cry Arena 

Luln Mae 
♦*Kylda Gertrude 

Beatrice Sophia 

John Henry 

Albert Julius 

Ethel Bernice 
Lena Married 

Fred J'arried 

Mary Married 

Lulu Married 



7/6/02 
11/11/03 
3/23/^6 
12/5/98 
I4/IO/OI 
2/2O/OI+ 
V8/07 
h cli51dren 
1 child 
h children 
3 chjldren 



died 12/2r/73 
oiod yYl/C" 



oiod 11/22/53 
died 9/^/''>5 
died 10/28/63 



Mylda 



1 Divorce, Twice V.'idov;ed 



^ children from 1st 



] r;,- tr:- '"o r.-rrii "^fl 3 ol:'lorca 

Jrj n ;..■ rrjnd P cl-ndron 

Alb'^rt !!orr?'od ]. cl-'ld 

^ill ol inrrT'-'d r cljldron 

!t ♦ * * J j» )< It sf ■< V >; * y + + J: -■ ^- r; ^ 

ola'ido T rnor narrlod to I'ylda Tide on <^/'^Vl5- Divorc?,c ?/3'^ 
Uh;; !(. : • u- 

*'^. oitL •'.rucr born 7/1^/1^ 

;;iJnor Lorra'no " ll/"3/l*" 

C],r:rl0G Albert " , ' /"y /?-?. 

^■oil Edward " l/2'r/32 died l/2'!/'^2 

Ileit: llarrri'd U cliildren 

Kljnor Karrjod 5 cbilurcii C t^randcl/' Idren 

Chorlos 1 iJlvurcvO, 'adovfod 3 store] ■'luron by 2nd 
— Lc 's J. Sbults mr rricd to Lylc^n Turner on 12/2'' /''*''■ 
— Lq- ■ r died on 3/3/53 
— St':"yc] lldrcn- 

J.r.o.iecn born 11/11/16 V/idov.-->d 
— iU ""b^rt F. '/iclnc nicirrfcd to llylda Ch'jlto o\\ 2/1'' /''Z 
— Del dnod on ^/ih/c^h 
--Gto_ cbildren- 

liicLard Korrr'.ed and Died 

?iOg9r Karried 

I.atblnon Married 

E13 zaboth I'arri cd 

.ionald I-.'arried 

Uussell Ksrried 



P 3 



Peter (Johnson; Cison married to JnJ.aa John sen 
Children- 



01 e 

Sisan 
Carrie 

Anna 
Bess 
li'attie 
Oscar 

i:idvrard 

»*]ienry 

lliUltl; 

Alfred 

Dolly 
Ole 
Susan 
Carrie 
Anna 
Bess 
I'lattie 
Oscar 
Edward 
Henry 
Edltb 
Alfred 
Dolly 



born 
n 



Married 



died 
n 



died 1/10/65 



1869 
1871 
1873 
1875 
1877 
1879 
1881 

1883 

1885, June 26 

1887 " 

1892 " 

1897 

2 children 
no children 
7 children 

3 children 

1 child 
no children 

5 children 
3 children 

6 children 

2 children 
2 children 

1 Divorce, Widowed 2 children by 2nd 






Thomps Cleary marrlrd to Brir'gei. Coffey 
Cneof tlejr cMldren- 

Ladle jrene born 3 ''+/t'^ 

Henry CI son married to Sadie Cleary on V25/06 
Ciiildrftn- 



died 3 .dt '(-0 



V.illard 
Irene 
Gordon 
♦♦Eugenous 
Dean 
Charlene 

Willard 

Irene 

Gordon 

Eugeno'js 

Dean 



born 1/2/13 died 3/25/5*+ 

" 6/10/18 

" 3/V20 

" l>/3/22 

" 10/21/26 

" 10/30 
Married 2 children 
Married no children 

2 Divorces, Married 6 children by 2nd 2, 1 grchild 
Married k children 
1 Divorce no children 



died 10/30 
3 grandchildren 



Keith Turner married to Eugenous Olson on 1/19/^6 

Children- 
Roger Reed born 9/9/^6 
Perry Michael " 5/22/50 
Bradley Turner " 9/2k/^k 

Ross William •» 12/10/55 



[f-^^ie -5 



LITKKAL FAMILY HISTORY 



"y rat'Tnnl »^rand father ' b grandfather, «'arron Turner, fought in 
t'fO Civil V„-ir . He was paid to take a"0ther'6 place. His snn, 
Ciiarlcs Turnrr, Pennsylvania ^utch, moved to Wisconsin in IP/'', //ith his 
wife, Ixose Kln;:sley, who was of Enelieh backcround. They movfi into 
the Lake D^i'on area where they had seven children, Claude w-n-- the 
first-lorn ''nd only boy. The rest were girls. They were Method j rjt s 
in a farmin •: community. Claude not only learned farmin/:, but rr.-TKoning, 
too. Claud.; made it through the sixth /^rade in school and then quit. 
On September 6, 1915, he married my grandmother. 



»•»»♦•»»•••♦•»»»*«••♦ 



My pat' rnal grandmother's remembered history goes back to her 
grandparents. John Gomieux, a French Canadian renamed Goman, :narried 
Charlotte Jones in Wisconsin. One of their children was LilU- Elpha, 
born in l870 and on January 3, l887 at age sixteen married Aleert David 
Ihde, who was 25 and the son of Fred Ihde and Mary Foss, both of erman 
descent. In fact, they were part of a whole German settlement which 
came over to America from Hanover, Germany. Lillie and Albert raised 
nl:;e chil^n-en on a farm just outside Dellona, Wisconsin. Albert's 
mother, Mary, who was a practical murse, helped raise the children and 
take care of them. Through the family's life, there were three different 
and separate buildings built right next to each other. They were all 
lived in and evacuated when their time came. 

There w-ire plenty of chores for the children to do on the farm; 
planting, hoeing, picking, etc. The oldest daughter living at home, 
Mary, helped her mother with the housework and the younger .children. 
The oldest daughter and first-born, Dena, lived with some relatives in 



r 

Kilburn, now Wisconsin Dells, and was not a familiar face to the children. 

For entertainment, Hylda, my grandmother, born in 1896, learned 
to play the organ by ear. Albert, their father, played the violin and 
often played at barnyard dances. There were lots of house dances on the 
Ihde farm during the summer. After all, there were workers from town 
who stayed at the house for harvesting and what all. There was also the 
school located on a corner of the Ihde farm. Eight grades. All the 
girls, except the youngest, Ethel, were brought up to be teachers and 
were, too. Two of the boys, Fred and John, worked on the same railroad. 
On the farm, they raised corn, potatoes, hay, apples, berries, grain 
(rye and oats), buckwheat for flour, and some hogs and milking cows. 
What they did not raise, they traded for. 

Some interesting footnotes: When Lillie and Albert were first 
raising their children, there was only one church nearby. Episcopalian, 
They were Lutl.eran, but they changed their faith and took their children 
to Sunday school.,,, At suppertime, Albert sat at the head of the talle, 
while Lillie sat at the foot. The children were in between. The oldest 
ones got the chairs, while the rest stood and ate. Seems they had short- 
ages back then, too,,,, As far as my grandmother could remember, she 
knew few harassed minorities, except for the drunken Indian, who was 
kept off the street by making the bars off limits to him when he was 
sober. 



•»»»»••««««»••••••••• 



Claude Turner married Hylda Ihde and about ten months later Keith was 
born, July n, 1916, Keith was the first of four. They livd noar Lake 
Delton, Wisconsin, after Claude bought his grandfather's farm of eighty 
acres, Tho.v stayed for about fourteen years, until they movid to 
LaFarge, V.'i nconsin , when the Depr'ssion struck. They were forced to sell 
their farm because of the high mortsa/:;e, Claude traded for a Chevrolet 






ii-alershiD i •• LaFarro. Aft(!r thin, Cl.-'i:'.' sf.artod to drink v<-ry lieavy, 
and h'ylda !■ '"t him. She went, to Porta'^e, wl.'^re Claude would nhow up 

very once i •■ ri while. Hylda finally ;:ot a divorce in .ieptomhor of 
1 ■%, after twenty years of narrjn;te in ord ?r to stop Claude's inter- 
ference, Clnude never did pay child support. 

After ''ic separation and eventual divorce, Keith had to work to 
support the family, and so ho worked at a shoe factory for Ihri-e years 
and then at a Beloit factory. When V/orld V/ar II came, Keith tried to 
enlist in thu Navy, They didn't take him because of hi(';h blood pres- 
sure. One -ionth later, he was drafted into the Army, 

Birthd'.vs were celebrated, especially Hylda's, However, J.'ril's, 
the youn,e;cst child's, birthday was tragedy. That morning, at age ten, 
Neil went ice skating, broke ice, and drowned. This happened in 19'+2, 
just before Keith was drafted. 

On the farm, again, what food they didn't grow, they bartered for. 
Eggs were traded for flour and spices. They had many workers stay at 
the farmhouse during the summer. It was big enough with 21 rooms. Then 
the Depression came. The dealership came, and then it went. So Claude 
went on a V/PA pro ject .building roads and bridges at LaFarge, 

Some interesting footnotes: The nearest hospital was ten miles 
away, so when it came time for the baby, they could not go to the hos- 
pital. Both Keith and Elinor were kept in a sort of maternity house 
for the first few days of their lives. They were cared for by nurse, 
until they could be taken home, , , ,Keith was given a calf at a/;e thir- 
teen. He traded it for a Model T, In eighth grade, he took his car 
to school with him,,,, Keith could remember, during Prohibition, his 
father kept a still in the basement. With all the features; a vat, 



A'je- ^ 



tubin-T, ami 'he incessant drinpin,: into the ju;;s. . , , When V/orl 'i "ir II 
was just ab'^ut over, Keith was anxious to r:et home, So anxionr;, tnat he 
fave ur a cii-uice to fret the Le/^ion of M<>rit, the hir;heGt noncom: a tnn t 
medal, for "is inventions in China that the Army used, ...I war; very sur- 
prised at the mobility of this family, Ilylda haM had coveral r- cidonces 
since her childhood, as well as three marriages, Charles, her second 
son, hn.-z livod in Milwaukee, Rock ford, all the y.ay out to Balti^nore 
and back to '.Visconsin, Oconto as of this writing, Elinor and her hus- 
band had three different homes in Wisconsin, before moving to Arizona, 
Keith has been the most stable, livinr; in Rockford for the Itst 27 years. 



»•»••••»•••»••»*•*••« 



My maternal grandfather, Henry Olson, born in l885i was the ninth 
child in a ntring of twelve. His parents, J'eter Johnson and Julia John- 
son\,maiuen name;, were born and lived in i^orway until lfj('4» xheir firct 
three children were born in Norv;ay. In 1 87^ , they came to the "land of 
opportunity" and settled in Clinton, 'V -con sin , where another child was 
born, A fifth child was born in Franklin Grove, Illinois, before the 
family settled down in Rockford, Illinois, where the next seven were born, 
Julia's sifters came over from Norway much later. That was the extent of 
the exodus of that particular Johnson family. 

Their last name was changed for them to Olson, by way of their oldest 
son's name which was Ole, They belonged to the Lutheran religion, and they 
their chil( ren go to Sunday school. Their family consisted of seven 
girls and live boys. Only the youngest is alive today, Dolly, who is 
now the w1 'Mwcd Mrs. Stenholm. They lived in a house on Greenmont 
Street nex^^ to the Cedar Bluff Cemetery. Their father, Peter, worked 
for the city, while their mother took care of the household cnores. 






This is no nvoraf^e feat, conciderinf: that thoro were twelve children to 
take care cf. The mother also took care of the family budget and dis- 
riiplinrd the children. After most of the children were fone, ; hoy 
would have , = n occasional boarder in the big house. As far as mtcr- 
tainment went, the bit; day was New Year's Day which was also their 
mother's birthday, A hall would bo rented, and a family reunion .vould 
be held. 

Some interesting footnotes: The boys never went to high school, 
because thev did not want to be called choppies, who wore na"iorl such 
because of a funny cap they were required to wear. As far sr. the girls, 
schooling wns not considered important, ,. ,Dolly ' s first marria -e was 
family arranged, but they were divorced a few years later, Hhc- also 
took care of her parents in later life and inherited the property,.,. 
Pneumonia w; s a very recurrent illness at that time. Just al^out every- 
one in the family contracted the disease. Tuberculosis was prominent at 
this time, too, Anna was a middle-aged victim of TB,»,,To sho'.v the 
conflict between the Swedes and Norwegians, Henry and Edward would, 
almost every Saturday, get into a brawl with Swedes in the Swedish sec- 
tion of town. This meant a lot ;of sewing and bandaging back at the 
home front. 



»♦»•#»»»#*»»••«♦*»•»# 



I could find very little about ray maternal grandmother's childhood, 
because there is no one living on her side of the family. At least, 
no one who could give me information about her growth into womanhood, I 
do know thot she was born and lived om a farm near Rock ford, Uor father, 
Thomas Cle;iry, was fairly rich and owned a section of Alpine Rord in 
Rockford known as Cleary Hill which is Highcrest today. He riirried 






Fridi^et Coff' ', and Sadie , nnn of five childron, was born in 1 '(, 
Sadie's othnic background was Irish and Sco;ch. Her reli,;ious inck- 
/:round was H(r-,an Catholic, as expected. 



«»««»•«•»«•»««««•««•• 



V/hen S;iii.o and Henry were marrici, there were some ill fO'Oinf^s be- 
cause of tiiC religion aspect, Sadie being Catholic and Henry, Lutheran, 
Sadie's fathi-r would not even come to the couple's home until their first 
child, Wlllard, was born. Eventually, of course, both families ac- 
cepted the marriage, Henry's brother, Edward, also married a Catholic, 

Their home, a five room bungalow, was located on Lawndale Avenue in 
Rockford, The house was "cozy" for the six children and parents, and 
that is where family life centered. My mother, Eugenous Olson, was 
born here in 1922, They could not afford to dress their children the 
way they wanted to, so they stayed home, Henry worked as a leather 
worker at Hess and Hopkins Company in Rockford, He sewed horse col- 
lars. He worked there for sixty years. When his boys grew up, he helped 
them get their first Jobs down at Hess and Hopkins, To supplement the 
income and provide food, Henry rented 72 acres on Kilburn and, along 
with his sons, worked the land through the Depression until 1956. They 
raised pigs, vegetables, and had a milk cow. What they didn't eat, 
they sold or traded away, Sadie took care of the budget. 

For entertainment, Irene, who was very athletic, could tap dance. 
The radio was quite often turned on in the evening, Gordon and Willard 
learned to play the drums, Gordon was also the mechanic in the family. 
He got seriously burned once when checking a gas tank with a match. 
Other near disasters were Eugenous' (Jean's) car accident at sixteen, 
Irene's bout with dyptheria, and Henry's double pneumonia. One disaster 



fa q e / / 



was the death of their sixth child, Charlene, shortly after birth. 

The Derre^SKion was an oxcitinc time for the Olson family. '//hen 
the banks closed, they lost their savin.^^s, never to be seen arnin. Henry 
'•-1 liis sons would chop wood for some nei/^hbors and get wood in nay- 

nt in ordnr to heat their house. When the children's shoes wore out, 
cardboard w.-i;-> used for solos. They never did accept government hand- 
outs, and tliiG v/as a source of pride for them. 

Some interesting footnotes: Henry and Sadie first mot at a dance, 
following wli ' ch Henry I.ouk ^--ncing lessons, ,, .Sadie brourht up i.he 
children as "atholics and took them to church most Sundays, Th'.ir religion 
was a source of derision by some of their classmates, who callcvi them 
"cal lickerc ', , , ,Only one member of the family finished high school, 
Ji^an, Her -raduation was followed by a big celebration, ,, ,Henry and 
Sadie took only one vacation through their years of marriage, o busi- 
ness trip to Cincinnati, Ohio. Henry had an invention concerning his 
job of sewin " horse collars. They took his idea, but not Henry. 



♦ *••«»»•»«♦■» »»••«»»»» 



Keith I'urner and Eugenous Olson m(7t on a blind date before tne war. 
V/hen Keith cnmc back from China, they were married January 19, 19'(C. 
Roger, their first-born, was born premature, and they were lucky he 
lived. They lived in a Beloit, Wisconsin, apartment for almost nine 
months before moving to just outside of Rockford, Illinois. 

Keith worked for Taylor Freezers in Beloit for about twenty years 
until he had a heart attack in 1965. He continued his education for a 
year and a half at Rock Valley Junior College, before returnin-: to 
work as a carpenter and is at present a maintenance man. 

Jean, v.ho was Catholic, took the children to Mace on Sunday 



p. 



CyO (- 



and catccliir-i. She finnll.y convincod KcJ i.h to convert to Ca l.hol i ciCTi, 
v,e quit that, n few years Inter. Ac the children grew up, Jean found uhe 
needed nomeU im: else. She became a saleslady for Amway, aprodiicts dis- 
tribution c(~' vTny, She had been doin>^ this since about 1'jb5. 

SoTie inieresting footnote; An ov<^rw<;i ^ht , bouncing baby i oy was 
born on SemTi' e"iber24, 19r''(» He v;as named liradloy Thomas Turner. H'?y, 
t'.-t's me.,..Ro":er joined the Navy in 19fi6» '.Vhile in the Navy, ho con- 
tracted tubefculosis. He is now under treatment and payments nx. the 
expense of t.no USNavy. , , .Koi th also had a r:jrden to supplement his 
income. He r.ad vegetables, strawberries, f^rapes, and cherry trees. 

»»«»»»»»•«»*»♦»•♦»»»» 

I learn-'d many things about my family. The most interesLing to 
me were: Counting all the wars and all the relatives who fou";ht, none 
died bocauGc; of their part in the wars. Of course, this is not count- 
ing those wc never knew because of their deaths....! believe I have had 
the unique experience of having three grandfathers die within seven 
months of each other. Del Wickus, my grandmother's third husband, died 
in Sont-cBi'oer of 196^. Henry Olson, my mother's father, died in January 
of 1965. And Claude Turner, my true pat'^rnal grandfather, died in 
March of 1965.... I was very surprised at all the different occupations in 
my family. True, there were a lot of factory workers and farmers, but 
Willard, one of my mother's brothers, was a bartender. Gordon, another, 
brother, was at one time a truckdriver. Charles, my father's brother, is 
an electronics engineer, and Elinor, his sister, became an accountant 
through a correspondence course. My paternal grandmother and four of her 
sisters were teachers. My grandmother was also a social worker....! have 
tried to be as partial as possible without letting anyone know it. 



F 

547 

W7 
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V.15 



Rock Valley family history 
col lect ion. 



■^■^ N. MANCHESTER. 
/ INDIANA 45962 



3 9696 0006 7886 2 
ROCK VALLEY COLLEGE