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Full text of "The Rocky Mountain Cook Book: For High Altitude Cooking"

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THE ROCivV MOUNTAIN 

COCK BOOK 



^iirh Altitude Cooking. 



H 



By CAROLINE TRASK NORTON 

Graduate of the* Boston School of Domeitic Science. 

Fomerljr Tetcher of Cookine tt the School 

of Domeitic Science, DenTer* Colo. 



This Book is adapted to cooking in both high and low 

altitudes. All the receipts given have been 

thoroughly tried by the author. 



Edited and Publlihed bjr 

CAROLINE TRASK NORTON 

"'* Hnmboldt St., DenTOf, Colo. 



copyright, 1903, 
By Carounk Trask Norton. 



THIRD EDITION 

COPYKICHT, 1918. 



>1 



This book is dedicated to my Denver friends, whose words 
of encouragement and appreciation have so greatly aided me 
during my two years of work with them. 



IK 



I s 



PREFACE 

In publishing the third edition the author has added many 
more pages, and wholly reconstructed it, profiting by the 
experience gained from the previous editions. 

Knowing the difficulty of cooking in a high altitude the au- 
thor, in this book, has endeavored to give the public the benefit 
obtained from teaching and housekeeping in Denver, making 
high altitude cooking a special study. Water boils at sea level 
at 212°. In Denver, where the air is much lighter,it boils at 202° . 
Therefore, it does not reach as great a heat and boiling requires 
a longer time. It has been the wish to make the recipes 
practical and easily followed by the most inexperienced cooks. 
She has not attempted giving much information on chemistry 
and food values, leaving that for the cooking schools. No 
girl's education is complete without such a course. An intel- 
ligent knowledge of cooking will enable them to feed their 
family with less expense and giving them the variety the 
family requires. 

Food for invalids should be selected and cooked with the 
greatest care. A chapter is devoted to that kind of oooking. 
Scientific cooking should fill an important part in the training 
of a nurse. 

The desire of the author will be obtained if the book 
proves helpful to all who use it and inspires them with the 
wish for more knowledge in the art of cooking. 



GENERAL RULES. 

Be conect in meamiTeiDeiits for perfect resulta. 
All mesaunments level exceptinz baking powdei, whicb la 
measnied rounding with the side of the can. 
lonr before meaauiing. 
standard measniiiiK cnp. 
milk orer hot water. 
vegetaUea in fresbl; boiled salted water, 
utter crumbs — one tablespoonfnl of melted butter 
:h two tablespoonfuls of crumbs, 
iztract the jnice from oniony cut acrooa the grain, 
halves and grate. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Breads 

Breads with Baking Powdei . 
Griddle CakM 

Sonpa , 

Cream Soups 



Sidl FUh 

Lobsters 

Meats 

Poik 

Hutton and Lamb 

Veal . . , 

Poultry , . 

Game 

Botiees 

FtitterB 

Vegetables 

Sauces 

PnddlDEs and Ice Cream Sauces. . 

Cbeese Dishes 

Salads 

Eggs 

Sandwiches 

Pastry - 

Hot Puddings 

CoU Desseits 

Froien Dessert* 

Sherbets 



B TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Paga 

PnncliM zsa 

Ice CieunB 289 

Sancea for Ice Cream 206 

HonuM 298 

Parfaits 299 

CakM 304 

PilliiiKi for Layer Cake 329 

Idngs for Cakes 332 

Qingerbiead, Donshnnts, Cookies and Cieam PnSs 335 

Compotes, Preseiring, JelUea and Pickles 339 

Preseiving 341 



Jama or Mannal«d«s . 

JelUea 

Picklea 



BREADS. 



All measurements level, with the exception of baking 
powder, which is measured rounding with the side of the can. 
Sift flour before measuring. 



One-half the amount of yeast can be used in the 
following receipts if preferred, allowing more time. 
In all of the receipts given for bread or rolls with the 
amount of yeast used the bread or rolls can be started 
in the momiBg and finished by noon. 

ROMAN WAR BREAD. 

Put in a mixing bowl two cups of Roman meal, 
one cup of graham meal, and one-half cup of white 
flour, two teaspoonfuls of salt. Pour over it two cups 
of scalded milk, or half potato, or rice water, hot. 
Add one yeast cake that has been dissolved in a half 
cup of lukewarm water. Beat thoroughly for a few 
minutes, put in a warm place to rise over night; in 
the morning add enough white flour to knead. After 
a thorough kneading, set to rise well covered, until 
double the bulk. Make out in loaves, let rise again 
twice the size, bake one hour. This amount will make 
two loaves of bread and a pan of biscuits. 

WAR CORN HEAL BREAD. 

Into a sauce pan put one cup of milk and one c^p 
of water that potatoes or rice have been boiled in. 
Add one cup of water. Let this come to a boil, adding 
two teaspoonfuls of salt, one tablespoonful of sugar. 
Then stir in one cup of yellow corn meal, cook for 
five minutes, stirring, dissolve one yeast cake in half 



i-*f 



10 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

a cup of lukewarm water. When the com meal mix- 
ture is cool add the dissolved yeast, cover, set in a 
warm place to rise over night. 

In the morning stir in one cup of com meal, one 
of whole wheat flour, and one-half cup of white flour, 
if needed. Take out on the board, knead until 
bubbly, let rise double the bulk, make into loaves, let 
rise double the bulk again. Bake one hour in mod- 
erate oven. 

MILK BREAD. 



2 cups of milk (scalded). 

1 cake of compressed 
yeast, dissolved in half 
a cup of lukewarm 
water. 



2 teaspoonfuls salt. 
1 tablespoonful of sugar. 
Flour enough to make a stiff 
dough — 6 or 7 cups. 



Pour the hot milk over the sugar and salt. When 
cool add the dissolved yeast cake, then with a knife 
cut in the flour and knead for twenty minutes. Put 
in a warm place to rise. When risen twice the bulk, 
cut down and let rise again. Make out in two loaves 
and a pan of biscuits, rise double the bulk in the pan. 
Bake the bread forty-five minutes. 



MILK BREAD (With Sponge). 

Pour two cups of scalded milk onto one table- 
spoonful of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of salt. When 
cool add one yeast cake dissolved in one-half cup of 
lukewarm water. Stir in three cups of flour, beat 
well. Let rise until light and bubbly, about an hour, 
then add enough flour to knead, and knead twenty 
minutes. Let rise and bake the same as milk bread. 



BRSADS. 11 

WATSR BREAD. 



2 tablespoonfuls butter. 
2 teaspoonfuls salt. 
1 tablespoonful sugar. 



2 cups boiling water. 
1 yeast cake. 



Put butter, sugar and salt in mixing bowl, add the 
boiling water; when cool add dissolved yeast cake, 
then put in enough flour to knead. Knead and let rise 
the same as directed for milk bread. 

CHEESE BREAD. 

Stir one cup of grated cheese in a sponge for two 
loaves of bread, mix and make the same as any of the 
above rules for bread. 

DATE BREAD. 



1 cup of milk. 

% cake compressed yeast 

^ cup of milk. 

1 teaspoonful salt. 



y^ cup of molasses. 

1 cup of dates. 

2 cups of whole wheat flour 

and white flour to knead. 



The milk is scalded and cooled. Mix the yeast 
with the one-fourth cup of milk. Add the rest of the 
milk with the salt, molasses and dates, chopped rather 
coarse. Then stir in the flour. At first put in two 
cups of whole wheat flour then add as much more as 
is required. When double in bulk shape into a loaf 
and when again light raise and bake one hour. 

WALNUT BREAD. 

Stir one cup of chopped walnuts in a sponge for 
two loaves of bread, and proceed as above. Either 
of these two breads are good to serve with salads or 
Dutch luncheon. 



12 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

WHOLE WHEAT BREAD. 



1 cup white flour. 
5 or 6 cups of whole wheat 
flour, or enough to knead. 



2 cups of milk scalded. 

1 tablespoonful sugar. 

2 teaapoonfuls salt. 
1 yeast cake. 

Make the same as milk bread with sponge. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Make the same as whole wheat bread, using one 
cup of flour and the rest graham. 

Graham is not as nutritious as whole wheat 

BRAN BREAD. 

Soften half cake of compressed yeast in one cup 
and a half of water. Add one cup and a half of 
scalded and cooled milk. Add also one tablespoonful 
of shortening and teaspoonful of salt. Two table- 
spoonfuls of molasses. Two cups of bran and three 
cups of white flour. (One of Graham and two of 
white flour may be used.) Mix all together thor- 
oughly and turn into two bread pans. When light 
bake about sixty minutes. 

RTE BREAD. 

Rye bread may be made the same as whole wheat, 
using two tablespoonfuls of molasses in place of the 
sugar, if preferred. 

ROLLED OATS BREAD. 

Pour two cups of scalded milk over two cups of 
rolled oats, two tablespoonfuls of molasses, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, and one teaspoonful of butter. Dis- 
solve one yeast cake in half a cup of lukewarm water. 



BREADS. 13 



When cool add the yeast, and flour enough so the 
dough will drop from the spoon. Let rise double the 
size, cut down and let rise again the same ; then put in 
small pans, let rise slowly twice the size, and bake for 
forty-five minutes. 



NUT BREAD. 



1 scant cup of nuts. 
1 teaspoonful of salt. 
^Vz ^^P^ ^^ flour. 



1 beaten egg. 
% cup of sugar. 

1 cup of milk. 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking 

powder. 

Mix well and pour in pan. Let remain one-half 
hour. Then bake three-quarters of an hour. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 



2 cups scalded milk. 
4 tablespoonfuls butter. 
2 teaspoonfuls salt. 



2 tablespoonfuls sugar. 
1 yeast cake. 



Pour the hot milk over the sugar, salt. When 
cool, add yeast cake that has been dissolved in 
one-half cup of lukewarm water, then beat in thor- 
oughly three cups of flour. Let rise until light and 
bubbly, then add butter and flour enough to knead. 
Knead about ten minutes. Let rise twice the bulk. 
Shape the rolls. Let rise in the pan until twice the 
size. Bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes. 

POTATO ROLLS. 

One cup sweet milk scalded, with three-fourths 
cup shortening. One-half cup of sugar. One tea- 
spoonful of salt. Add one cup of mashed potato. 
When cooled add one dissolved yeast cake, one beaten 
egg and one cup of flour. Mix well and let rise two 



14 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

hours. Then add six cups of flour, knead well. Let 
rise one and a half hours. Roll out thin, cut with 
biscuit cutter. Dip each piece in melted butter. 
Place two together. Rise again an hour and a half 
and bake twenty minutes. 

BREAD STICKS. 

Make the same as Parker House rolls. Mould in 
small balls, then roll under the hand, on the board, 
in thin sticks about six inches long. Let rise slowly, 
placing them in the pan one inch apart. Bake in a 
slow oven that they may dry before browning. Serve 
with soups or salads. 

CINNAMON ROLLS. 

Make the same as Parker House rolls. Roll the 
dough one-half inch thick, spread with a thin layer 
of melted butter and cinnamon. Roll up like jelly 
roll. Cut in slices an inch thick, place them on a 
well-greased pan one inch apart, sprinkle the top with 
a little powdered sugar. Let rise in the pans twice 
the size. Bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes. 

Parker House dough can be made in braids, cres- 
cents or rolled and cut the same as for cinnamon rolls, 
without the spice, sugar and currants. 

To Make Crescents. — ^RoU the dough until only 
an eighth of an inch thick. Cut in pieces about four 
inches square, and then into triangles. Hold the 
apex of the triangle in the right hand, roll the edge 
next to the left hand over and over towards the right, 
stretch the point and bring it over and under the roll. 
Bend the ends of the roll around like a horseshoe. 
Let rise twice the size. Bake in a quick oven. 



BREADS. 15 

CORN M£AL ROLLS. 



1 cup scalded milk. 
1 cup com meal. 
1 cup wheat flour. 



1 yeast cake. 

1 teaspoonful of salt. 

1 tablespoonful each of su- 
gar and butter or short- 
ening. 

Pour the hot milk onto the com meal, salt and 
sugar, when cool add the yeast that has been dis- 
solved in one-third cup of lukewarm water, then beat 
in the cup of flour, cover, and let rise overnight; in 
the morning mix with it enough white flour to knead, 
and the shortening. Knead thoroughly, let rise slowly 
twice the size, make out the same as Parker House 
rolls, let rise in the pans, slowly, until light ; bake in 
a hot oven twenty minutes. 

BUNNS. 

1 cup scalded milk. I 1 egg. 

5 tablespoonfuls sugar. I 1 yeast cake. 



2 tablespoonfuls butter. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 



2 cups of flour. 



Pour the hot milk over the salt, sugar and butter. 
When cool add the yeast that has been dissolved in 
one-half cup of lukewarm water, and the egg well 
beaten. Beat in the flour, let rise about two hours, 
then cut in flour enough to make a stiff dough with 
one-half cup of well washed currants and one tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon. Let rise again twice the size. 
Shape in small balls, place on buttered pan. When 
well risen bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes. 
Brush over with milk just before taking from the 
oven. 

HOT CROSS BUNNS. 

Dissolve one cake of yeast in one-half cup of luke- 
warm wat«r ; scald two cups of milk, when cool add 



16 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

the yeast, two teaspoonfuls of salt and three table- 
spoonfuls of sugar. Make a sponge by adding about 
three cups of flour. Beat briskly a few minutes, set 
aside to rise, when light and bubbly add two beaten 
eggs, one-half cup of well cleaned currants, and one- 
fourth cup of softened butter, flour enough to knead, 
let rise twice the bulk, then roll in sheet, cut in 
rounds, place in the pan. When double the size, cut 
with scissors a cross on top of each bunn. Bake 
about twenty minutes, then brush the tops with a paste 
made by boiling two teaspoonfuls of cornstarch with 
one cup of boiling water, first softening the starch 
with a little cold water, sprinkle with sugar, dry in 
the oven. 

SQUASH BRBAD. 



1 cup squash, stewed and 

sifted. 
1 tablespoonful sugar. 
ll^ cups scalded milk. 



1 teaspoonful salt. 
1 teaspoonful butter. 
1 yeast cake. 
Flour enough to knead. 



Mix the sugar and salt and squash, add butter and 
hot milk. When cool add yeast cake that has been 
dissolved in one-half cup of warm water. Add flour. 
Knead twenty minutes. Let rise until light, shape 
in loaves, let rise and bake. 

RAISED CORN BRBAD. 

Heat two cups of milk or the same amount of 
water that potatoes or rice have been boiled in. Let 
this come to the boiling point. Add two teaspoonfuls 
of salt, one tablespoonful of sugar. Then stir 
in one cup of sifted com meal. Stir and cook for 
five minutes. Remove from the fire. When cool add 
one yeast cake that has been dissolved in one-half 



BR£ADS. 17 

cup of lukewarm water, cover, set in a cool place to 
rise over night In the morning stir in one cup of 
corn meal, the rest white flour or whole wheat. 
Knead thoroughly. Grease the bread pan, put back 
the dough, let rise slowly until double the bulk, then 
shape in loaves, rise twice the size, and bake slowly 
for one hour. This amount makes two loaves. 



BARLEY AND WHEAT BREAD. 

Prepare as above, using two (2) cups of barley 
flour and the rest wheat flour. Molasses can be used 
in place of sugar. 



FRENCH ROLLS. 

Soften one yeast cake in half a cup of lukewarm 
water. Stir in flour enough to make a stiff dough. 
Knead and shape into a ball, score on the top in two 
parallel cuts. Put the dough in a bowl of lukewarm 
water, the cuts upward, and set aside in a warm place. 
In a few minutes the ball will swell and float, then 
remove to a pint of lukewarm water in which one- 
fourth cup of butter has been melted. Add two tea- 
spoonfuls of salt and flour to make a stiff dough, 
Imead fifteen minutes. Set aside until it has risen 
twice the bulk, then shape in rolls. Take a small 
ball of the dough, roll under the hand to give an ob- 
long shape with pointed ends. Set some distance 
apart on the baking pan and let rise to double the 
bulk. Score the tops diagonally with a sharp knife. 
When nearly baked brush over the tops with milk. 
Return to the oven to finish baking. 



SOGET HOUNTAIH COOK BOOK. 

BBA,TEir BISCOIT. 



Kub lard and salt in the flour and mix with the 
■water to a stiff dough. Knead ten minutes, then beat 
hard with a rolling pin or beater, turning it over and 
over until it begins to blister and is light and puffy. 
Then cut with a small biscuit cutter, place some dis- 
tance apart on the pan, prick with a fork. Bake in a 
hot oven twenty minutes. 

QERHAIT COFFEE CAKE. 

Dissolve one yeast cake in one-half cnp warm 
water, add it to one cup of scalded and cooled milk, 
with flour enough to make a stiff batter. Let rise. 
When light and bubbly add one-third cup melted but- 
ter, one-fourth cup sugar, one-half teaspoonful salt, 
one ^g, well beaten, grating of lemon rind and flour 
to make a stiff batter. Beat well. Let rise twice the 
bulk, then spread in a dripping pan, cover and let 
rise again. When risen, brush over with beaten egg 
and dust with sugar and cinnamon mixed. Bake in 
a hot oven twenty minutes. 



1 cup scalded milk. I 1 yeast cake. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter. >4 teoBpoonfuI salt. 
2 tablespoonfuls sugar. Flour. 

2 («g». I 

ke a sponge of the milk, salt and yeast that 
m dissolved in half a cup of warm water. Add 
lOugh to make a pour batter. When it is light 
11 of bubbles, add the butter, sugar and well 
eggs. Stir in enough flour to make a stiff 



BREADS. 19 

dough. Knead it twenty minutes. Let it rise to 
double the bulk. Then mould with the hands into ob- 
long biscuits the shape of an egg. Place them in the 
baking pan near together, let rise double the bulk. 
When ready for the oven brush over the top with 
milk and sprinkle sugar over them, if liked sweet. 
Bake in a hot oven about twenty minutes. 

BRIOCHE CAKES. 



2 eggs. 

y^ cup melted butter. 

y^ teaspoonful salt. 



1 cup of scalded milk. 
y^ cup sugar. 
y^ yeast cake. 
\y^ cups flour. 

Grate rind of half lemon, and juice of half lemon. 
IMssolve yeast in lukewarm milk, then add to it one 
and one-half cups of flour and the sugar and salt; 
cover well, rise until light and bubbly, then add well 
beaten eggs and remaining ingrediente, adding a cup 
and one-half more of flour, beating it in well. Let 
rise twice the bulk, then roll on slightly floured board. 
Roll half an inch thick, spread with softened butter, 
fold both sides to the center, to make three layers: 
cut off strips three-fourths of an inch wide. Cover 
and let rise. Take each piece and fold the ends to- 
gether, forming a circle. Let rise again twice the 
size and bake twenty minutes. 

ZWIEBACK. 

Make the receipt for rusks in one large loaf the 
same shape as the rusks, or two loaves can be made 
from it, if liked small. Rise and bake well. When 
cold, cut in half -inch slices and dry them in a very 
slow oven, until dried through and of a deep yellow. 



20 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



BREADS WITH BAKING POWDER. 

All measurements level, with the exception of baking 
powder, which is measured rounding: with the side of the can. 
Sift flour before measuringr. 



BAKING POWDER BISCUITS. 



2 cups white flour. 
% teaspoonful salt. 
2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. 



2 tablespoonfuls butter. 

(Lard can be used if 

wished) . 
Milk to make a soft dough. 



Sift flour, salt, baking powder together, rub in the 
butter, add the milk gradually, cutting it in with a 
knife. Turn onto a well-floured board, knead it 
quickly to get in shape. Roll out half an inch thick. 
Cut in biscuits and bake in a hot oven at once. 

ENTIRE WHEAT BISCUITS. 

Make the same as baking powder biscuits, using 
the entire wheat flour with one-third white flour. 

CREAM SCONES. 



2 tablespoonfuls butter. 

2 eggs. 

Va cup cream. 



2 cups flour. 

2 teaspoonfub baking 

powder. 
l^ teaspoonful salt. 

Sift dry materials together, work in the butter 
with the fingers, beat eggs well and add to the cream. 
Stir this into the dry materials and butter. Roll out 
three-fourths inch thick. Cut in diamond shape; 
brush over with white of egg, slightly beaten, sprin- 
kle with powdered sugar. Bake ten minutes in hot 
oven. 



BREADS WITH BAKING POWDER. 21 

SHORT CAKE. 



4 cups flour. 
3 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. 



% tablespoonful salt. 
8 tablespoonfuls butter. 
Milk enough to roll out. 



Sift dry materials together, mix in the butter 
with the fingers, then add milk gradually. Do not 
use more flour than necessary to roll. Divide the 
dough in halves. Roll out one-half inch thick, place 
one-half in buttered pan, spread over with melted 
butter, place the other half on top of it and bake 
twenty minutes in hot oven. Remove from pan. 
Take top layer off. Butter the inside well of both 
layers. Cover the bottom layer thickly with crushed 
sweetened fruit and a layer of whipped cream. Place 
the other layer on top. Cover the top with whipped 
cream, colored with the fruit juice if liked, or fruit 
sprinkled over the top. Serve while warm. 



CREAM MUFFINS. 



1 cup cream. 

2 eggs, beaten separately. 



2 cups flour. 
Yg teaspoonful salt. 
2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. 

Mix in order given, sifting dry materials to- 
gether. Add cream and yolks well beaten, then -fold 
in the whites stiffly beaten. Bake in gem pans to 
serve at once. 

ENGLISH MUFFINS. 

Beat two eggs very light, add one teaspoonful of 
salt and two tablespoonfuls of softened butter, one 
tablespoonful of sugar, one cup of warm milk, and 
one-half yeast cake dissolved in one-half cup of warm 



22 ROCKY HOUNTAIK COOK BOOK. 

water; stir in enough flour to make a stiff batter, beat 
thoroughly and let stand over night in a cool place. 
In the morning beat thoroughly again, turn into 
well-buttered muffin pans and let rise slowly for one 
hour, then bake about twenty minutes. 

RICS MUFFINS. 



y^ cup well-cooked rice. 
1*4 cups white flour. 
2 teaspoonfuls baking 

powder. 
y^ teaspoonful salt. 



1 tablespoonful sugar. 
1 tablespoonful melted 
butter. 

1 cup milk. 

2 eggs. 



Sift flour, salt, sugar and baking powder to- 
gether, then add rice, well beaten eggs, milk and but- 
ter. Bake in muffin pans for twenty minutes. 



MUFFINS. 



2 cups flour. 

2 teaspoonfuls baking 

powder. 
14 teaspoonful salt. 
1 teaspoonful sugar. 



1 tablespoonful melted 
butter. 

1 egg- 

1 cup milk. 



Sift flour, salt, sugar and baking powder together. 
Stir in the beaten egg, milk and melted butter. Bake 
in hot gem pans ten or fifteen minutes. 

Hye Muffins. — Can be made the same, using one 
cup and a half of rye and one-half cup of white flour. 

Entire Wheat Muffins. — ^Made the same as muf- 
fins, using one cup and a half of entire wheat and 
one-half cup of white flour. 

Oraham Muffins. — ^Make the same as muffins, 
using one and one-half cups graham to one-half cup 
of whit« flour. 



BREADS WITH BAKINO POWDSR. 23 

BARLSY MUFFINS. 



1 
/ 



1 cup barley meal. 

1 cup white flour. 

1 tablespoonful sugar. 

1 tablespoonful shortening. 



1 «gg- 

y^ teaspoonful salt. 

1 cup milk. 

2 teaspoonfuls baking 

powder. 



Sift dry materials together. Add melted shorten- 
ing, beaten egg, milk. Beat briskly. Bake in mut 
fin pans for fifteen minutes. 

BRAN MUFFINS. 



Beat 2 eggs light. 
Add 1 teaspoonful salt. 
^ cup of brown sugar 

or molasses. 
2 cups of sweet milk. 



3 cups of bran. 

1 cup of white flour with 
2 slightly rounding 
teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. 



POP-OV£RS (For Colorado Altitude.) 



1 cup milk. 
1 cup flour. 



2 eggs. 

14 teaspoonful salt. 



These can be made with one egg at low altitude. 

Mix the salt with the flour. Beat the yolks well 
and add to the milk ; then add slowly to the flour to 
make the batter smooth ; then fold in the whites that 
have been beaten stiff. Fill the hot greased gem pans 
half full. Bake at once in a hot oven for thirty min- 
utes. 

DATE GEMS. 

Beat two eggs very light, add one cup of milk, 
one-half cup of finely diopped dates, one cup of whole 
wheat flour and one-half cup of white flour sifted, 
with one teaspoonful of baking powder, a little salt, 
a tablespoonful melted butter ; beat thoroughly ; bake 
in hot g^m pans in hot oven for about fifteen minutes. 



ROCKY HOUHTAIM COOK BOOK. 



SAtLT LUHHS. 



2 cupB fiour. 

2 teaspoonfuls baldDg 

14 teaspoonful Bslt. 



2 eggs, beaten separately. 

% cap milk. 

^ eup melted butter. 



Mix flour, baking powder and salt. Add the 
beaten yolks and melted butter; then add tbe stiffly 
beaten whites. Fill ^e mufSn rings half full and 
bake ten minutes in hot oven. If liked sweet, add 
two tablespoonfuls of sugar to the flour. 

CORK CAKE. 

IVi cupi flour. 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
Vi teaspoonful salt. powder. 

1 cup j'ellow com meal. 2 eggs, beaten separately. 

2 tablespoon fuls augar. I14 cupa milk. 
2 tablespoonfuls butter. 

Cream, butter and sugar together. Sift meal, 
flour, salt and baking powder together; add to them 
the creamed sugar and butter, beaten yolks. Mix 
welL Add milk slowly, and lastly whites beaten stiff. 
Sake in muffin rings or in a pan in hot oven. 

CORN CAKE (MtB. Lincoln). 



% teaspoonful salt. 
2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. 



1 tablespoonful melted 

1 tablespoonful sugar. 
Yolks of two eggs, white 



1^ cups milk. 

Bake in a brick-loaf bread pan half an hour. 
CORH CAKE (Hiia Pailoa). 



1 cup aweet milk. 
% cup BOUT milk. 
1 tablespoonful butter. 



BREADS WITH BAKING POWDER. 25 

Mix together the meal, flour, salt and soda. Add 
the beaten egg. Add half the sweet milk and all the 
sour milk. Melt the butter in a hot spider or shallow, 
round pan and pour the mixture into it. Pour the 
other half of the mixture over the top, but do not 
stir it. Bake twenty minutes in hot oven. 

CORN MEAL MUSH. 

Put one quart of water on to boil with one tea- 
spoonful salt. Sift together one cup of corn meal 
and two tablespoonfuls flour. Stir this gradually in 
the boiling water. Let it cook hard for five min- 
utes, stirring all the time. If lumpy, beat with 
Dover beater. Then place in the double boiler and 
oook for two hours. Eat hot or pour in a pan. When 
cold out in half -inch slices, dip in flour and brown 
each side in hot fat. 

CORN MEAL IfUFFINS. 

One pint corn meal scalded with one pint boiling 
water. Allow to cool. Add a teaspoonful of salt. 
Teaspoonful of sugar. Two well beaten eggs. Two 
tablespoonfuls of flour. Drop from a spoon into hot 
lard and fry until brown. 



PARKER HOUSE CORN MEAL GEMS. 

Sift together one cup of flour, one cup of yellow 
com meal, two teaspoonf uls baking powder, one-half 
teaspoonful of salt. Cream, one-fourth cup of butter. 
Add gradually half a cup of sugar, then three well 
beaten eggs and one cup of milk. Bake in buttered 
gem pans in a quick oven. 



26 ROCKY MOUirrAIN COOK BOOK. 

SPOON BRSAD. 

Sift together one cup of yellow or white com 
meal, half a teaspoonful of salt and two teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder. Beat two eggs very lightly and stir 
into the dry ingredients with one quart of sweet milk. 
Turn the mixture into a well buttered baking-dish 
holding three pints, add two tableepoonfuls of butter 
cut in small pieces. Bake in a hot oven about one- 
half hour. Stir often until the bread begins to thick- 
en. Serve with a spoon from the dish in which it is 
baked. Eat with butter. A good breakfast or lunch- 
eon dish. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 
Very Pine. 



1 cup com meal. 
1 cup rye meal. 
1 cup entire wheat or 
white flour. 



V2 cup molasses. 

% teaspoonful soda. 

2 cups milk. 

1 teaspoonful baking powder. 

Mix in order given, dissolve soda in molasses. 
Steam three hours. 



SOUR MILK BROWN BREAD (Mrs. Lincoln). 



1 cup com meal. 
1 cup rye meal. 
1 cup graham flour. 



1 teaspoonful salt. 

1 teaspoonful soda. 

2 cups sour milk. 



Mix in order given, dissolve the soda in the milk, 
add more milk or water if not thin enough to pour. 
Steam three hours. One-half cup raisins can be 
added to any receipt for brown bread. Then it is 
called a plum loaf. 

GRIDDLE CAKES. 



1 tablespoonful sugar. 
1 well-beaten egg. 
1 cup milk. 



1% cups flour. 

ll^ teaspoonfuls baking 

powder. 
% teaspoonful salt. 

Sift all the dry materials together. Add milk 
and egg. 



BREADS WITH BAKINO POWDER. 27 

CORN MEAL GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Made the same as griddle cakes, using one-half 
cup of com meal and the rest white flour. Pour the 
milk hot over the corn meal. When cool add the 
other ingredients. 

ENTIRE WHEAT GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Make the same as griddle cakes, using one cup of 

the entire wheat flour to one-quarter cup of white 

flour. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 



1 tablespoonful butter. 

1 tablespoonful sugar. 
^ teaspoonful salt. 

2 eggs^ beaten separately. 



1% cups milk. 

1 teaspoonful baking 

powder. 
1% cups flour. 



Sift dry materials. Cream, butter and sugar. Add 
milk and yolks well beaten, lastly the stiffly beaten 
whites. 

BREAD CRUMB GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Soak one cup of bread crumbs in two cups of 
milk. Let stand over night. Then add one egg beat- 
en very light. One-half teaspoonful salt. One-half 
teaspoonful soda dissolved in a little cold water. Two 
tablespoonfuls of flour sifted with a teaspoonful of 
baking powder. A little more flour may be needed. 

RICE GRIDDLE CAKES. 



1 cup milk. 

y^ cup well-cooked rice. 

% teaspoonful salt. 



1 teaspoonful baking 

powder. 
1 egg, 
1 teaspoonful sugar. 



Flour enough to make a thin batter, or thick 
enough to fry well. 



28 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

PANCAKES. 

Fry several large griddle cakes as large as a good 
sized plate. Pile one on top of the other, well but- 
tered. Cut down like a pie. 

WAFFLES (Mrs. Lincoln). 



1V4 cups milk. 
1 tablespoonful sugar. 
1 tablespoonful melted 
butter. 



2 cups flour. 
1 teaspoonful baking 

powder. 
Ys teaspoonful salt. 

3 eggs. 

Sift dry materials together, add the beaten yolks 
with the milk, then melted butter and the stiffly 
beaten whites. 

LEMON SYRUP (Serve with Waffles). 



1 cup sugar. 
y^ cup water. 



1 tablespoonful butter. 

1 tablespoonful lemon juice. 



Boil the sugar and water until it is a thin syrup, 
then add butter and lemon juice. 



CEKEALS. 29 



CEREALS. 



Cereals contain a large per cent of starch, so 
should have a rapid cooking in boiling water for a few 
minutes when first started. Then they may be put 
inside the double boiler to continue to cook more 
slowly. Care should be taken that the cereal does 
not stick to the dish when it is having its first hard 
boiling. 

TO BOIL RICE. 

Wash thoroughly one-half cup of* rice. Have two 
quarts of water boiling hard in the kettle, with one 
teaspoonful of salt. Throw in the rice and allow to 
boil rapidly without a cover until tender, then drain 
through a colander. Put on the stove to dry, lifting 
the rice apart to allow the steam to escape. Rice that 
is cooked in this way will have every kernel sepa- 
rate. 

STEAMED RICE. 

Put in double boiler two and one-half cups of 
milk or water or a part of each. Add to it one-quar- 
ter teaspoonful salt, set the inside of the boiler on top 
of the stove. When it comes to a boil add one-half 
cup well washed rice. Let it boil hard for five 
minutes. Then replace it in the double boiler, and let 
cook until soft. The time of cooking depends on the 
age of the rice. 



30 ROCKY MOUNTAIM COOK BOOK. 



SOUPS. 



GENERAL RULES FOR SOUP STOCK. 

Meat and bones for soup stock should be allowed 
to soak in cold water fully one hour before putting 
on the stove, to extract the juices. Soup stock should 
simmer on the back of the stove and not boil hard. 
The meat should be cut in small pieces and washed 
clean. Soup meat, when cooked, has no nutrition 
left in it. If properly made, the goodness of the meat 
is in the stock. 

Use one quart of cold water to every pound of 
meat and bones. Add seasoning in the following pro- 
portions : 

For every quart of water, one even teaspoonful of 
salt, three peppercorns, or a little ground pepper, two 
cloves, a celery root or the outside stalk, a sprig of 
parsley, a tablespoonful each of onion, carrot and 
turnip, a part of a bay leaf, a pinch of sage, summer 
savory, thyme and marjoram. It is not necessary to 
have all the herbs. A very nice flavored soup can be 
made with the vegetables alone. 

If you wish to have a dark-brown stock, reserve 
part of the lean meat and part of the v^etables, and 
brown them in a little fat taken from the meat. A 
tablespoonful of browned sugar or caramel will also 
give a brown color to the stock. Do not remove the 
scum from the soup while it is cooking, as that is the 
albumen of the meat. As soon as the soup is done 
strain at once and set aside until cold and the fat has 
formed a cake on top. Eemove the fat and reheat. 

Soup stock should cook from six to eight hours. 



SOUPS. 81 

Whole rice is sometimes served in a white soup. 
Boil the rice until tender then add to the soup. 

CASAMBL FOR COLORING SOUPS AND GRAVIES. 

Melt one cup of sugar with two tablespoonfuls of 
water in a sauce pan. Stir until it is a dark brown 
color. Add one cup of boiling water, let simmer 
for fifteen minutes. Bottle for use, when cool. 

TO CLEAR SOUP STOCK. 

Remove the fat. Allow the white of an egg to 
every quart of stock. Mix the beaten white with the 
cold stock. Set on the fire, stirring all the time until 
it reaches the boiling point, then let it boil without 
stirring for ten minutes, draw it on the back of 
the stove and add one-half cup cold water. Let it 
stand for ten minutes, strain through a cheese cloth 
and colander. 

GARNISHES FOR SOUPS. 

Croutons, — Cut stale bread into cubes and brown 
in butter in an omelet pan, or butter first, cut in cubes 
and brown in the oven. Serve with thick soups. 

Egg Balls, — ^Rub to a paste with a wooden spoon 
the yolks of bard-boiled eggs. Season with salt, pep- 
per or paprica and melted butter, add enough raw 
yolk or white to mould them. Roll them in white of 
egg, slightly beaten, and dip in flour. Have them 
about one-half the size of a yolk. Fry them in butter. 
Serve one to each person. 

Mcurrow Balls. — ^Melt a tablespoonful of the mar- 
row, beat it until creamy, then add to it a well-beaten 
egg and a little salt and pepper and as much soft 

2 



32 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

bread crumbs as it will take. Mould in little balls 
and cook them in boiling water for ten minutes. 
Place them in the tureen first before serving. 

Noodles. — Two eggs slightly beaten, mix with 
them two tablespoonfuls of water, one-quarter tea- 
spoonful of salt and enough flour to make a stiff 
dough. Knead it well for fifteen minutes, then cut 
off small pieces at a time and roll them as thin as 
wafers. When very thin sprinkle with flour and roll 
into a tight roll, cut from the end into thin slices or 
threads for the soup. Let them dry in a slightly 
warm oven for an hour. These can be cut before roll- 
ing into fancy shapes with the vegetable cutter. Be- 
fore serving put them in boiling salted water and let 
them boil for fifteen minutes. Serve in thin soups. 

Lemon cut in thin slices is served, a slice to each 
person. 

Macaroni^ Spaghetti and Vermicelli is broken in 
three or four-inch lengths and put on to cook in boil- 
ing salted water until tender, then remove from the 
water in a colander ; let the cold water run through. 
Place on a board and cut in one-inch pieces. If the 
large-size macaroni is used, cut into one-fourth inch 
pieces, thus forming rings. Put in the tureen just 
before serving. 

ROYALE CUSTARD TO SERVE WITH CONSOMME. 



Little pepper. 

Vj8 cup beef stock. 



2 yolks. 

1 egg. 

% teaspoonful salt. 

Beat the eggs slightly or until well mixed, add 
the seasonings and the clear stock. Pour into a dish 
so it will be about one inch thick. Set it in a pan of 
hot water and place in a moderate oven until it is 



SOUPS. 33 

firm. Do not let it brown on top. When cold cut 
it into cubes or into fancy shapes with the cutter. 
Place carefully in the tureen after the soup is in it. 
Allow four or five pieces to each person. 

FORCE MEAT BALLS. 

Chop any cooked meat very fine, season highly 
with onion, lemon juice, salt and pepper, add enough 
yolk to hold them together. Mould in little balls, 
roll them in egg and flour, fry them in butter. Serve 
in the soup. 

Grated cheese may be passed with the soup. 

Butter crackers and brown them in the oven. Pass 
with soup. 

Serve popcorn with any kind of soup. 

BROWN SOUP STOCK. 



3 lbs. shin of beef. 
3 quarts cold water. 
9 peppercorns. 
5 cloves. 

3 teaspoonfuls salt. 
1 good-sized onion. 



1 good- sized carroty or 2 

small ones. 
1 turnip. 

3 sprigs of parsley. 
Celery root or stalks and 
herbs, if you like. 



Put half the meat and the bones in the water, 

brown the rest of the meat and vegetables and add 

them. 

WHITE STOCK. 



3 lbs. knuckle of veal, or 

one fowl. 
Herbs. 

3 teaspoonfuls salt. 
Peppercorns. 



1 onion. 

2 celery roots or 4 stalks. 
1 turnip. 

1 good- sized carrot. 

3 quarts water. 



WHITE SOUP. 



Three tablespoonfuls of butter and flour. Melt 
the butter and stir into it the flour. Add slowly one 



84 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

quart of the white stock and one pint of cream. Sea- 
son to taste. 

CONSOIIME. 



2 lbs. skin of beef. 

2 lbs. knuckle of veal or a 

small fowl or hen. 

3 quarts of water. 
6 peppercorns. 

4 cloves. 



1 tablespoonful salt. 

2 onions. 
2 carrots. 

1 turnip. 

2 roots of celery. 

3 sprigs parsley. 



Brown half the meat and the vegetables, simmer 
for eight hours. Strain. When cold remove the fat 
and clear. Add thin slice of lemon to each serving. 

JULIENNE SOUP. 

Julienne soup is made by adding to the plain con- 
sommg stock, vegetables cut in thin strings or fancy 
shapes. Add salt and hot water to the vegetables. 
Cook until tender, then add to the stock and serve. 

MACARONI OR VERMICELLI SOUP. 

Cook the macaroni or vermicelli in boiling salted 
water until tender, drain, pour cold water over it, 
then lay the sticks close together. Cut in inch pieces 
and add to a plain soup stock. 

BOUILLON. 



4 lbs. beef from the round. 

2 lbs. bone. 

3 quarts water. 

1 tablespoonful salt. 
6 peppercorns. 



3 cloves. 

1 bay leaf. 

1 celery root. 

1 teaspoonful mixed herbs. 



Boil down to two quarts, then remove the fat and 
clear. Add more seasoning if desired. 



SOUPS. 35 

TOMATO SOUP. 



1 quart of stock. 
1 can tomatoes. 
1 teaspoonful sugar. 



Salt and pepper to taste. 
1 tablespoonful flour. 



Add the tomato, sugar, salt and pepper to the 
stock, let it cook one hour. With cold water make a 
thickening of the flour and add that, cook ten min- 
utes. Strain through a fine sieve. Just before serv- 
ing add one-fourth cup of cream, if liked. This is a 
great improvement 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 



1 quart of stock. 

1 pint of boiling water. 

Vz cup each of chopped 

onion, carrot, turnip 

and cabbage. 



Vs cup cooked and strained 

tomato. 
1 teaspoonful chopped 

parsley. 
1 teaspoonful salt and a 

little pepper. 

Cook the vegetables in the stock until tender, or 
the vegetables can first be cooked in boiling salted 
water and then added. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Clean a calf's head thoroughly, cut in several 
pieces, then soak an hour in cold water. Drain off 
the water, add four quarts of cold water and a table- 
spoonful salt and cook slowly until the meat slips 
from the bones. Remove the meat, but let the bones 
remain, then add 



5 doves. 

8 peppercorns. 

5 allspice. 

2 onions, sliced. 

2 carrots, sliced. 



1 turnip, sliced. 

3 celery roots. 

1 tablespoonful herbs. 

Inch of stick cinnamon. 



Let simmer for two hours, strain and set away 
until cold. Before serving, remove the fat and for 



36 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

every quart of stock, brown one tablespoonful of but- 
ter; when brown add one tablespoonful of flour, and 
gradually the stock. Season with salt and pepper if 
required. Cut in small dice one-half cup of the 
cooked meat to every quart and add to the stock with 
slices of hard-boiled egg or the yolk of egg made in 
little balls, the juice of half a lemon and thin slices 
of the rind, two tablespoonfuls of sherry. This can 
be omitted, if desired. 



OX-TAIL SOUP. 



2 ox tails. 
1 onion. 

1 tablespoonful beef or 
salt pork drippings. 
4 quarts water. 
1 tablespoonful salt. 



6 peppercorns. 

4 cloves. 

2 roots celery. 

2 teaspoonfuls chopped 

parsley. 
1 tablespoonful mixed herbs. 



Wash and cut the ox tail at the joints. Heat the 
fat and saute the onion and half of the tail in the fat. 
Put all in the soup kettle with the water. When it 
comes to a boil add the seasoning and vegetables. 
Cook for six hours slowly. Strain, saving out some 
of the pieces of meat. When ready to serve remove 
the fat, reheat and season more if necessary. Add 
small pieces of meat and serve one or two to each 
serving. 

MULLA6ATAWNY SOUP. 



3 lbs. chicken or fowl. 
Knuckle of veal. 


1 tablespoonful curry pow 
der. 


3 cloves. 

8 peppercorns. 

3 sour apples, medium size. 

Juice of a lemon. 


1 tablespoonful sugar. 
4 quarts water. 
1 tablespoonful of well- 
cooked rice. 


1 tablespoonful salt. 





SOUPS. 37 



Make the same as for soup stock. When tender 
strain, leaving small pieces of the meat in the soup. 
Beheat, add more seasoning, if desired, the rice and 
pieces of meat. 



BLACK BEAN SOUP. 



2 cupfuls black beans. 

1 quart soup stock. 

1 tablespoonful butter and 

flour. 
1 sprig parsley. 



1 celery root. 
y% ^ay loaf. 
3 peppercorns. 
1 clove. 
y^ onion. 



Soak the beans over night, drain off the water, 
add the seasonings tied together in a cheese cloth, 
cover with cold water and boil slowly until tender, 
adding water when needed. When the beans are soft, 
remove the seasonings and pass the beans through a 
sieve, mashing them through with a spoon. Then add 
the stock to them. Melt the butter, stir into it the 
flour and gradually stir into the stock. Season with 
salt and pepper. Put in the tureen iust before the 
soup is addJd two tablespoonfuls sherry wine, thin 
slice of lemon, egg balls and the white of egg cut in 
dice. 

CLAM BOUILLON. 

Wash clean two quarts of clams (in the shell), 
cover with boiling water, let boil for twenty minutes, 
strain, let the bouillon settle, strain again, reheat, sea- 
son with pepper and salt. Serve in bouillon cups 
with whipped cream on top. A few of the clams can 
be chopped fine and added to the bouillon. 

SCOTCH BROTH. 



2 lbs. mutton (neck). 
2 quarts water. 
% cup each of carrot, tur- 
nip and a small onion. 



2 celery stalks, cut fine. 
2 teaspoonfuls salt. 
y^ teaspoonful white pepper. 
2 tablespoonfuls barley. 



38 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Soak the barley over night. Remove the fat and 
skin from the mutton. Cut the meat from the bones 
and into small pieces. Put the bones on to boil in 
one pint of cold water and the meat on in three pints 
of cold water. When it boils up add the barley and 
water. Cut the vegetables in dice and fry for five 
minutes in two tablespoonfuls of butter and add to 
the meat. Cook slowly for four hours. Strain the 
bones from the water and add it to the meat with 
the salt and pepper. 

MUTTON BROTH. 

Get a piece from the neck or shoulder. For every 
pound of meat and bones add a quart of water. Sim- 
mer for five hours very slowly. (A small onion may 
be added.) Strain when cold, remove the fat, season 
with salt and pepper and add some well cooked rice 
and serve. 

CHICKEN BROTH. 

Eemove the skin and fat from the chicken. Cut 
at the joints and make the same as mutton broth. 

CHICKEN GUMBO. 



1 quart chicken stock. 
14 can okra. 



Small green pepper finely 

chopped. 
y^ ^^V cooked rice. 



Boil altogether for twenty minutes and serve. 



CREAM SOUPS. 39 



CREAM SOUPS. 



Part oream may be used instead of all milk, mak- 
ing a much richer soup, or a little whipped cream 
may be added when served. 

OYSTER SOUP. 



4 tablespoonfuls butter. 
Salt and pepper to taste. 



1 pint of milk. 
1 pint of oysters. 
4 teaspoonfuls flour. 

Put on the milk in the double boiler to scald. 
Melt the butter and stir the flour into it. When the 
milk has scalded, stir the butter and flour into it, 
stirring until it is smooth. Cook for ten minutes. 
Wash and pick over the oysters, put them on to cook 
in their own liquor. Cook until they begin to grow 
plump and the edges curl. Put them at once in the 
thickened milk and season. Serve. It should not 
be seasoned until the oysters are added, as some 
oysters are more salty than others. 

POTATO SOUP. 



Pepper to taste 

2 tablespoonfuls butter. 

1 onion. 



1 pint milk. 
1 cup mashed potato. 
l^ teaspoonful salt. 
1 teaspoonful flour. 

Put the milk on to scald in the double boiler. 
When scalded, add the potato, cook it ten minutes. 
Melt the butter ; stir in flour. Add to the milk. Cook 
onion with potato. Add seasoning and strain through 
a strainer. Reheat and serve. Serve with croutons 
or hot crackers. 



40 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP. 



1 teaspoonful salt. 

Pepper. 

y^ teaspoonful soda. 



1 quart milk. 

1 can tomatoes. 

% cup butter. 

3 tablespoonfuls of flour. 

Scald the milk in the double boiler. Melt the 
butter in a sauce pan. Stir into it the flour, salt and 
pepper. When smooth stir it into the hot milk. Al- 
low it ta cook ten minutes, stirring until smooth ; cook 
the tomatoes until soft. Mash through a strainer and 
add the soda. When ready to serve put the tomato 
and milk together. Serve at once to prevent curdling. 

ARTICHOKE SOUP. 

Cook Jerusalem antichokes until very tender. 
Press through a sieve while hot. Allow two cups of 
rich milk (or half chicken or veal) to every cup of 
the pulp. To this amount melt two tablespoonfuls 
of butter. Cook in it one slice of onion cut fine. 
Cook slowly. Do not brown the butter. In a few 
minutes remove the onion. Stir into the butter one 
tablespoonful of flour, stir this into the hot milk, add 
the pulp. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 
When well heated add one or two tablespoonfuls of 
cream. Serve with cheese toast, croutons or hot 
crackers. 

SPLIT PEA SOUP. 



1 cup dried split peas. 
3 pints cold water. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter. 



1 tablespoonful flour. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 
Pepper. 



Wash the peas well and soak in cold water a 
day and night (in high altitude, in lower altitude one 
night will be sufficient.) Put on to boil in fresh 



CREAM SOUPS. 41 

water, let cook until soft, supplying water as it cooks 
out When soft mash through a strainer. Melt the 
butter, stir into it the flour and seasonings and gradu- 
ally one cup of milk or enough when added to peas to 
make a thick, creamy consistency. Cook the strained 
peas and creamed milk together for ten minutes. 
Serve with fried dice of bread. This soup cannot be 
satisfactory made in a high altitude, as the long 
cooking necessary for the peas spoils the flavor. 



GREEN PEA SOUP. 



1 quart of milk. 
1 can of peas. 
% cap butter. 



1 tablespoonful flour. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 
Little pepper. 



Scald the milk in double boiler. Melt the butter, 
stir into it the flour and seasoning. When smooth 
stir into the milk, cooking for ten minutes, stirring 
until smooth. Heat up the peas in their own liquor. 
Mash through a strainer and add the pulp to the milk. 
This is a delicious and nutritious soup. 

GREEN CORN SOUP. 



2 tablespoonfuls butter. 
1 pint of milk. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 



4 good-sized ears of com. 
1 teaspoonful flour. 
Little pepper. 



Cut the kernels from the ear with a sharp knife. 
Put the cobs on to boil in enough cold water to cover. 
Boil half an hour and strain, then cook the pulp in 
the com water for twenty minutes, then add the sea- 
sonings. Melt the butter, stir into it the flour and 
when smooth stir into the hot milk. After cooking 
ten minutes add the com with the liquid and season- 
ings. Half a can of corn can be used instead of the 
green corn. 



42 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

CREAM OF CORN SOUP (Made from Can Com). 

Make the same as the pea soup made from the 
can peas. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 



y^ peck clams in the shell. 
1 quart potatoes, sliced. 

thin. 
y^ pound salt pork. 
1 onion. 



Salt and pepper to taste. 

y^ cup butter. 

1 tablespoonful flour. 

1 quart hot milk. 

Crackers. 



Wash the clams until clean. Put them in a kettle 
with one quart of cold water. Set them on the stove 
to cook until the top ones are broken open, then re- 
move from the stove. Skim out the clams. Pour 
the liquid in a dish to settle. When the clams are 
cool, cut ofF the heads with scissors. Fry the onion 
in the pork in lie kettle that you are going to make it 
in. When brown remove the pieces of onion and 
pork, then add the potatoes and the clam liquor, 
which should be carefully poured in, not to disturb 
the settlings. When the potatoes are soft, add the 
clams, seasonings and hot milk, more water if desired. 
Melt the butter, stir into it the flour and add to the 
chowder, or, better still, to the hot milk before it is 
added. Put the crackers in the tureen and turn the 
chowder on them. 

CREAM OF CLAM SOUP. 

Melt in a double boiler two tablespoonfuls of but- 
ter, stir into it two tablespoonfuls of flour, one tea- 
spoonful of salt and a little pepper or paprica, then 
add gradually two cups of milk. When hot and 
smooth, stir in one snuxll can of minced clams. Cook 
for twenty minutes, then strain and reheat; add one- 
half cup of cream and ser\^e at once. 



CREAM SOUPS. 4S 

ASPARAGUS SOUP. 



1 pint of milk. 

1 good-sized bunch of 

asparagus. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter. 



1 tablespoonful flour. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 
Pepper. 



Put the asparagus on to cook in cold water 
enough to cover. Cook until very tender. Cut off a 
few of the tips to serve in the soup. Mash the rest, 
with the water they are cooked in, through a strainer. 
Scald the milk. Melt butter, stir into it flour and sea- 
sonings, then stir it into the milk. Add the asparagus 
pulp and tips. Serve. 

PEANUT SOUP. 

Cook two cups of shelled and blanched peanuts 
with a slice of onion and a stalk of celery until ten- 
der. Mash through a sieve. Stir into it a pint of 
white stock and one pint of hot milk or thin cream, 
which has been added to it. Two tablespoonfuls of 
butter melted with one tablespoonful of flour and one- 
half teaspoonful of salt and a little pepper stirred 
into it. 



ALMOND SOUP. 



1 quart of white stock. 
1 pint of cream. 

1 tablespoonful flour. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter 



Salt and pepper to taste. 

^ cup of blanched almonds 
that have been chopped 
and pounded fine. 



Melt the butter, stir into it the flour. When 
smooth, stir it into hot cream. Cook for ten min- 
utes. Add the hot stock and season, then add the 
nuts and serve. 



44 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

CREAM OF CHKSTNUT. 



1 cup chestnut meats. 
1 quart chicken or veal 

stock. 
1 cup cream. 



1 tablespoonful flour. 
1 tablespoonful butter, 
salt and pepper. 



Gash a cross on each nut and place in a pan in 
the oven until the shells break open. Remove the 
meat and cook in boiling water until tender. Press at 
once through a sieve. Add to the boiled stock. Melt 
the butter. Stir into it the flour and add to the stock. 
Boil for five minutes. Then add cream and sea- 
sonings. 

MUSHROOM SOUP. 



1 pint of milk. 
y^ cup of cream. 

y^ pound fresh mushrooms. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter. 



1 tablespoonful flour. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 
Speck of pepper. 
Yolks of 2 eggs. 



Scald the milk in a double boiler. Melt the but- 
ter, stir into it the flour, salt and pepper. Stir this 
into the hot milk, let cook for ten minutes, then add 
to it the beaten yolks and cream, stirring and cooking 
five minutes. Peel the mushrooms, cut off the stems 
and break them in small pieces. Put them in a sauce 
pan with just enough hot water to keep them from 
sticking. Let them cook five minutes. Chop fine. 
Add them to the cream soup and serve. The eggs may 
be omitted or slightly beaten and added a few minut^ 
before serving. 

MUSHROOM STOCK SOUP. 

Two cups of chicken or turkey stock, one-half 
pound of fresh mushrooms that have been cooked and 
chopped fine, and added to the stock. Melt two 
tablespoonfuls of butter, add to it two of flour and the 



CREAM SOUPS. 45 

hot stock. Cook ten minutes, strain out the mush- 
rooms, add one cup of cream and season. This is a 
most delicious, rich soup. The mushrooms may be 
left in the soup. 

BERMUDA SOUP. 

Peel and slice three Bermuda onions, brown a 
delicate brown in pork fat or a little butter, then cook 
in boiling salted water till tender. Melt in a double 
boiler two tablespoonfuls of butter, stir into it two 
tablespoonfuls of flour, then gradually two cups of 
milk. When smooth put in the onions and cook for a 
half hour. Mash all through a sieve, reheat, season 
with a teaspoonful of salt and a little pepper. Add 
half, cup of cream and serve at once. 

SPINACH SOUP. 

Wash one pound of spinach, put it on to cook 
without adding water — there is enough that clings to 
the leaves to cook it — one teaspoonful salt, a small 
onion sliced. When tender, mash through a strainer 
or puree sieve. Scald two cups of milk in double 
boiler, melt in sauce pan two tablespoonfuls of but- 
ter, stir into it one of flour. When blended, stir it 
into the hot milk. Cook ten minutes, then add one 
cup of the spinach pulp and the yolk of one egg di- 
luted with a half cup of cream. Cook ten more min- 
utes. Season with salt and pepper. 

CREAM OF CAULIFLOWER SOUP. 

Let a cauliflower stand in cold water, head down, 
for one hour — in cold salted water — ^this is to draw 
out any insects that may be in it. Put on to boil in 



48 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

ORANGE SOUP. 

The juice of six oranges and one lemon, sweeten 
slightly, add a little sherry wine if desired. Chill. 
Serve with chipped ice. 



FISH. 40 



FISH. 

» Fish, to be palatable and nutritious, should be 
fresh, well cleaned and thoroughly cooked. When 
fresh, the eyes are bright, the flesh firm and elastic 
to the touch. Fish should be cleaned, washed in cold 
water and dried (not soaked) as soon as it reaches 
us and put directly on the ice or in a cold place. It 
should not be put in the compartment with milk or 
butter, as they absorb the odors very quickly. Frozen 
fish should be laid in cold water until they become 
limber. ^ 

TO SKIN AND BONE A FISH. 

Cut through the skin, down the back bone, taking 
of the fins. Beginning at the head, loosen the skin 
and strip it down. Use a knife to help loosen the 
skin, and a little salt on the fingers enables one to get 
a firmer hold. Then slip the knife under the flesh, 
keeping it close to the bone, to remove the flesh or fil- 
lets. They can be served whole or divided in uniform 
piecs if the fish is large. 

TO BOIL A FISH. 

Put the fish into a kettle of boiling water, enough 
to cover, with a teaspoonful of salt and a tablespoon- 
ful of vinegar or half the juice of a lemon. This 
hardens it Do not let the water boil rapidly after the 
fish is put in, as that breaks it ; let it simmer on top 
of the stove. A little celery, onion, bay leaf and pep- 
percorns put in the water improves the flavor of white 
fish. Allow fifteen minutes to a pound. If a fish ket- 



50 ROCKY MOUKTAIN COOK BOOK. 

tie is not used, place the fish in a plate and tie the 
plate in a cloth before putting in the kettle. Pre- 
pared in this way it is much easier to remove from 
the kettle. 

TO BROIL FISH. 

Clean the fish, wash and wipe dry. Cover with 
a little softened butter, season with salt and pep- 
per. Rub the broiler with salt pork or butter. 
Broil first the flesh side until brown before turning. 
A thick fish should cook about twenty minutes, a thin 
one less time. Try with a fork. When done, place 
on a hot platter, season with butter, salt and pepper 
and a little chopped parsley. Garnish with lemon or 
water cress or serve with a sauce. 

TO BAKE FISH. 

Place in the bottom of the pan two or three thin 
slices of salt pork to prevent the fish from sticking, 
or on the rack, if rack is used. If part of a fish is to 
be baked, wash it and wipe dry, cover the fish with 
buttered cracker crumbs that have been well seasoned 
with salt, pepper, lemon juice, chopped parsley and a 
little onion juice, or sprinkle with flour; or, salt and 
pepper, little pieces of butter, and five minutes before 
removing from the oven cover the top with grated 
cheese, seasoned with a little salt and paprica. 

STUFFING FOR FISH. 



1 cup of powdered cracker 

crumbs. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 
A little pepper. 
1 teaspoonful chopped 

parBlay. 



1 teaspoonful onion juice. 
% cup melted butter. 

2 teaspoonfuls of pickles, 

chopped, or, one of ca- 
pers and one of pickles. 



FISH. 51 

If not moist enough, use a little hot water. An 
egg may be used, but it is not necessary. This should 
be a dry stuffing. 

TO BAKE A WHOLE FISH. 

Stuff and sew up the fish. Place the fish upright 
in the pan. If broad and short they may be kept in 
place by propping up. If not the right shape to 
prop, skewer in the shape of the letter S. If pre- 
pared in this way will keep their shape after cooking. 
Place when done on a hot platter. Pour a sauce 
around it, place a slice of lemon in the mouth. Be- 
fore baking, cut gashes (three or four) across the back 
and place in each a slice of salt pork. The head and 
tail should be left on. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

When it is available, cod or haddock is used, but 
halibut makes a very good chowder. Have the fish 
cut in serving pieces. Out salt pork in tiny squares. 
Fry until brown, with one finely chopped onion ; put 
in a kettle with the fish. Cover with boiling water, 
add a little salt. Cook until the fish is tender. Cook 
sliced potatoes until tender. Add those to the chow- 
der, and one cup of rich milk. Melt two tablespoon- 
f uls of butter, stir into it one of flour ; use one cup of 
the hot liquid to make a sauce, stirring gradually into 
the butter and flour, then add this to the chowder, 
season with pepper and salt to taste ; put a few crack- 
ers on top when ready to serve. 

TO COOK SMELTS. 

Clean,, wash and dry them, season with salt and 
pepper, dip in fine granulated com meal or flour. 



52 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Fasten together with a toothpick forming a ring (or 
fry without). Place in as many as will cover the 
bottom of a frying basket, dip in smoking hot fat and 
cook for one minute. Or, fry out in frying pan half 
a dozen slices of salt pork. Cook the smelts in this, 
first on one side and then the other, until they are 
brown. Serve with tartare sauce. 



FILLETS BAKED WITH TOMATOES. 

Any kind of fillets or sliced fish can be cooked in 
this way. Place on the bottom of the pan four slices 
of salt pork, one onion cut in slices, wash and wipe 
the fish dry, cover the top with butter-seasoned 
crumbs. Place in the pan on top of the pork and 
onions. Wipe clean half a dozen tomatoes (or enough 
to serve one to each person), place them around the 
fish. Cook in a hot oven until the fish is done, bast* 
ing several times, both the tomatoes and fish with the 
fat in the pan. When done place the fish carefully 
on a hot platter and arrange the tomatoes around it. 
Serve with HoUandaise, white or Beamaise sauce. 



STITFFED FILLETS OR SLICED FISH. 

Wash and wipe the fish dry, season with salt and 
pepper, spread a layer of "stuffing for fish" over the 
pieces, about an inch thick. EoU up and tie securely 
with a string. Place in a buttered pan or on slices of 
salt pork. Cover the top and sides with buttered 
crumbs. Cook in a hot oven three-quarters of an 
hour. Serve with maitre d'hotel butter or a white 
sauce made from the fat in the pan. 



FISH. 53 

BOILED SALMON. 

Prepare and cook as for boiled fish. Serve on a 
hot platter with HoUandaise sauce and the little ball 
potatoes, placing some of the potatoes on top of the 
fish to form a bunch of grapes. 

SALMON CUTLETS. 

One cup of cold fish minced fine, season with one 
teapsoonful of salt, a little pepper, one teaspoonful 
chopped parsley, two teaspoonfuls lemon juice. Mix 
with one-half cup of thick white sauce. (See sauces.) 
When cold shape in cutlet form. KoU in crumbs and 
egg and crumble again. Fry in deep hot fat until 
brown. Serve with the pap^r ruffles stuck in the 
small end of each, placing the large end to the center 
of the platter. Pour around them a HoUandaise or 
white sauce. Any left-over whitefish is delicious pre- 
pared in this way. 

FISH TIMBALE. 

Cut one pound of raw fresh whitefish in small 
pieces, chop or pound to a pulp, press through a 
coarse sieve. To every cup of the fish pulp add one 
tablespoonful of fine bread crumbs that have soaked 
in a third of a cup of milk or cream until soft. One 
teaspoonful of salt, one-eighth teaspoonful of pepper, 
one-half teaspoonful of onion juice, the yolk of one 
egg well beaten. Beat all well together for five min- 
utes, then fold in lightly the stiffly beaten white. But- 
ter a mould or bowl ; fill it not over two-thirds full ; 
set it in a pan of hot water. Cover the mould with a 
greased paper and set in a moderate oven. Cook until 
the center is firm, from twenty minutes to one hour, 



54 ROCKT MOUKTAIN COOK BOOK. 

according to size of the timbale. Turn from the 
mould and surround with a lobster, shrimp or tomato 
sauce. 

PLANKED SHAD AND POTATO ROSES. 

Place the shad that has been prepared as for broil- 
ing on a thick hardwood board ; hold it down with a 
few tacks. Season it with salt and pepper and cover 
with buttered crumbs. Shape hot mashed potato 
through a pastry bag and tube, in the form of roses 
aroimd the fish, brush over with the yolk of egg that 
has been slightly beaten. Cook in a hot oven for 
twenty-five minutes. 

CASSEROLE OF FISH. 

Line a mould or baking dish with seasoned 
mashed potato, first buttering it well. Fill up the 
mould with any kind of highly seasoned creamed fish, 
or fish that has been mixed with tomato sauce. Cover 
the top over with an inch layer of mashed potato, 
brush over with a beaten yolk of egg. Bake in a hot 
oven for fifteen minutes. 

CREAMED FISH SERVED IN MASHED POTATO CASE. 

Line a baking dish with xnashed potato. Cover 
with the beaten yolk of e^. Set in a hot oven to 
brown, then serve in it any kind of creamed fish. A 
good luncheon dish. Creamed meats are also good 
served in this way. 

CREAMED SALT FISH. 

Cook the salt fish in boiling water until tender, 
changing the water once. Pick in small pieces and 



FISH. '55 



mix with a white sauce. Serve on toast or on a plat- 
ter garnished with broiled sweet or white potatoes. 



SALT FISH BALLS. 



1 cup raw salt fish. 

2 cups potatoes. 



1 egg. 
Little pepper. 



Pick the fish in small pieces, free from bones. 
Pare the potatoes, cut in quarters. Cook the potatoes 
and fish together inboiling water until tender* Drain 
off the water and mash until very light ; add the pep- 
per and when a little cool, the egg, well beaten. Drop 
from a tablespoon into smoohing hot fat. Fry until 
brown. Cook only three or four at a time, as too 
many cool the fat. Drain on soft paper. Serve with 
a white sauce. It is better not to form the mixture 
into shapes, as it makes them heavy. 

SALMON FISH BALLS. 

Mix one-half cup of salmon with one cup of 
mashed potato. Season and add one egg. Shape in 
little flat cakes. Cover with melted butter and broil, 
or fry in salt pork fat. Brown on one side and then 
the other. The salt pork gives a very nice flavor. 

PETITS FISH BALLS. 

Shape any kind of fish ball mixture in balls the 
size of a good-sized marble. Fry in a basket in deep 
fat. Drain on soft paper. Serve with tartare, to- 
mato or white sauce. 

TIMBLE OF COOKED FISH. 

One cup of chopped cooked fish. One tablespoon- 
ful of fine bread crumbs soaked for one-half hour in 



Se ROCKY HOniTTAIH COOK BOOK. 

half cup of milk. One teaapoonful of grated onion. 
One whole egg and one yolk. Salt and pepper. Two 
tablespoonfuls of cream. 

Mix all ingredients. Add eggs last well beaten. 
Turn in one large mold or in small ones. Cook in a 
pan of hot water until firm. Do not let water boiL 
Cook on top of stove or in the oven. Remove from 
mold and surround with white sauce. Pieces of as- 
paragus tips ma; be added to the sauce. 



SHELL FISH. 57 



SHELL FISH. 



OYSTERS RAW. 

Oysters to be served raw should be very fresh, 
and should not be served at all from the first of May 
to September, as their flavor is not as good and they 
are not so healthful. For serving raw, the small 
oysters should be used. Look them over carefully to 
see that there are no pieces of shells. Leave them on 
the deep half of the shell and arrange regularly 
around the plate, giving six to each person. Have a 
little ice in the center of the plate, chipped fine. 
Place on the ice a little parsley or vsratercress and a 
quarter of a lemon on that. Serve with them paprica 
or tobasco sauce, horseradish, thin slices of brown 
bread buttered or crackers. 

OYSTERS COOKED IN THE SHELL. 

These are very delicious and should be served as 
soon as ready. They make a very palatable dish for 
Sunday night supper. 

Wash the shells clean, put them in a pan with 
the round side down to hold the juice, and cook in a 
hot oven until the shells break open. Eemove the up- 
per shell. Season to taste when served. 

Clams are delicious cooked in this way, in their 
own juices. 

OYSTERS SERVED IN ICE. 

Have fresh, small oysters that have been well 
picked over. Make a cavity in a smooth block of ice 



58 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

with a hot brick, or pail or can of hot water. Place 
the ice on a platter with colored tissue paper under 
it if you want the color effect. Surround it with 
parsley or watercress and quarters of lemon, then 
place in the oysters. 

Oyster Cocktail is very nice served in this way. 

Individual cakes of ice can be made in the same 
way. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Select large oysters for frying. Pick them over 
carefully to see that none of the shell adheres. Put 
them in a strainer and let the cold water run through 
them just to rinse them. Drain well, season finely 
rolled cracker crumbs with salt and pepper, dip the 
oysters in the crumbs, then into egg, which has just 
been beaten slightly, to mix it, and has two table- 
spoonfuls of water added to it, then into the crumbs 
again. Put five or six at a time in the frying basket 
and plimge in the smoking hot fat. Cook until a 
golden brown. These should not be fried until time 
to serve. Pickles, horseradish, chow-chow, tartare 
sauce or celery salad can be served with them, either 
as a garnish or separately. Fried oysters may be pre- 
pared some time before cooking. 

BROILED OYSTERS. 

Prepare the oysters as for fried. Dry th)m well. 
Dip them in melted butter, rub a fine wr- broiler 
with butter or salt pork, place them on the broiler 
over hot coals and cook until the juice flows. Place 
them on rounds or squares of toast, three or four on 
each piece. Pour a little melted butter over them, 
season with pepper. Serve any kind of pickles with 
them. 



SHELL FISH. 50 

OYSTER COCKTAIL. 



1 pint of small oysters. 

cleaned and thoroughly 

chilled. 
1 tablespoonful horseradish. 
5 tablespoonfuls lemon Juice. 
1 tablespoonful vinegar. 



3 tablespoonfuls Worcester- 
shire sauce. 

3 tablespoonfuls catsup. 

1 teaspoonful tobasco sauce. 

1 teaspoonful salt, or more 
if needed. 



Serve in cocktail glasses or in lemon cups, or to- 
mato cups, on a bed of green, or cups shaped from 
tomato or celery jelly. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

Put a tablespoonful of butter into a hot sauce 
pan, then add the oysters that have been well picked 
over and cleaned. Let them cook until the edges 
curl, then place them on pieces of toast or hot crack- 
ers that have been moistened with the liquor. Sea- 
son with butter, salt and pepper. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Cook one pint of oysters in their own liquor until 
plump and their edges curl. Drain off the liquor. 
Make a sauce by melting two tablespoonfuls of butter 
and stirring into it two tablespoonfuls of flour, one- 
fourth teaspoonful of salt (or more if needed), a lit- 
tle pepper or paprica. Stir slowly into this one-half 
cup of oyster liquor to one-half cup of cream or milk. 
Cook ten minutes and add the oysters. Let them re- 
heat in the sauce for five minutes. Serve on toast or 
in patty shells, timbale cases or bread boxes. 

OYSTERS IN SHELLS OR RAMQXHN DISHES. 

Cook the oysters and make the sauce the same as 
for Creamed Oysters. Remove the sauce from the 



60 ROCKY MOUlfTAnr COOK BOOK. 

fire, add the oysters and the beaten yolks of two ^gs, 
butter the shells or dishes and fill about two-thirds 
full. Cover the top with buttered bread crumbs and 
bake in a hot oven for five minutes, or until the 
crumbs are brown. 

To Bviter Crumbs. — ^Melt one tablespoonful of 
butter, add to it two tablespoonfuls of crumbs, stir 
them into the butter. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Wash and pick over the oysters. Butter a baking 
dish and place in a layer of oysters. Sprinkle them 
with salt, pepper and bits of butter and a layer of 
cracker crumbs. Before putting on the top layer of 
crumbs add three tablespoonfuls of sherry, if liked. 
Cover the top with buttered crumbs. (Buttered 
crumbs given in the preceding receipt.) Bake for 
twenty minutes in a hot oven or try the oysters in the 
center and see if the edges are curled. 

PIGS IN BLANKET. 

Season large oysters with salt and pepper an hour 
before using, then wrap each oyster in a thin slice of 
bacon and fasten with a wooden toothpick. Cook on 
a hot spider or frying pan or in the chafing dish until 
the bacon is brown. Serve on small pieces of but- 
tered toast. 

Oysters in Baiter. — (See fritter batter.) Select 
large oysters, clean and dry dip in fritter batter. Fry 
till brown in hot fat. Drain on soft paper. 

CLAMS. 

Little Neck Clams are the best for serving raw. 
Serve the same as raw oysters. 



SHELL FISH. 61 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Boil four quarts of clams. Remove from the 
shells. Remove skin from the head and cut off the 
end. Strain the liquor. Fry until brown and crisp 
diamond squares of salt pork and one onion chopped 
fine. Peal and slice potatoes. Cook until tender. 
Add' to the clam liquor with the pork scraps and 
onion. Add the clams. Melt two tablespoonfuls of 
butter. Stir into it two of flour and mix with some 
of the hot liquor. Then stir all into the chowder. 
Add one cup of rich milk. Serve with crackers. 
Canned clams may be used in place of fresh ones. 

ROASTED CLAMS. 

Roast the same as oysters. 

STEAMED CLAMS. 

Wash the shells until clean and free from grit. 
Put them in a kettle without water, cover closely and 
cook until the shells open. Serve hot in the shells, 
with melted butter. Serve a small glass of the clam 
water to each person. 

CLAMS IN BATTER. 

Cook the same as for steamed clams. Cut off 
the head (the black tip) and dip in batter; fry in 
smoking hot fat until brown. (See fritter batter.) 
The clams may be chopped before adding to the bat- 
ter if desired. 

CLAMS A LA TOURINE. 

Twelve clams chopped fine or one small can of 
minced clams. Loaf of bread. Remove the bread 



1 



62 ROCKY MOUlITAnr COOK BOOK. 

from the crust and soak in milk until soft. Add one 
tablespoonf ul of onion chopped fine. One tablespoon- 
f ul of melted butter. Pepper and salt to taste. 

Mix all together. Add clam juice if not moist 
enough. Bake in shells with buttered crumbs on top. 

SCALLOPS. 

Wash quickly, dry between cloths, dip in cracker 
crumbs that have been seasoned with salt and pepper, 
then in slightly beaten egg that has two tablespoon- 
fuls of water added to it, and in the crumbs again. 
Place them in a frying basket, immerse it in smoking 
hot fat for one minute. Drain on brown paper. 
Serve with tartare sauce. 

CRABS. 

Crabs are at their best during the months of 
May, June, July and August. Crabs, like lobsters, 
shed their shell once a year. When the shell is form- 
ing they are soft shell crabs. 

SOFT SHELL CRABS. 

Soft Shell Crabs should be used only when fresh. 
Eemove the sand bag, gills and intestines. Wash and 
wipe dry. Roll in cracker crumbs, egg, and crumbs 
again, immerse in smoking hot lard for two minutes 
or roll in flour and saute in hot butter on both sides. 
Serve with tartare sauca 

BOILED CRABS. 

Plunge them head first in hot water (not boiling), 
then add one tablespoonf ul of salt; boil for twenty 
minutes. When cold remove the outside shell and 
take out the meat carefully. 



L 



SHELL FISH. 63 

DEVILED CRABS. 

Mince the meat fine and mix with half the 
amount of white sauce; season with salt, paprica or 
a little cayenne, teaspoonful chopped parsley, tea- 
spoonful lemon juice, yolk of hard-boiled egg. Re- 
place in the shell, cover with buttered crumbs and 
brown in a hot oven. 

CRAB FLAKES IN TARTAR SAUCE. 

Mix the crab flakes with tartar sauce. Serve ice 
cold in small glasses or in double glasses surrounded 
by ice as a first course at luncheon or dinner. Serve 
with it hot toasted crackers. 

DEVILED CRABS OR LOBSTER, NEW ORLEANS. 

Pick the fish apart in fine pieces. Make a soft 
paste of fine fresh bread crumbs and thin cream. Add 
the fish, salt and pepper, bake until brown in shells 
with finely powdered buttered crumbs on top. 

FRIED FROG LEGS. 

After being skinned, dip in cracker crumbs sea- 
soned with salt and pepper; then in egg and the 
crumbs again. Put in a frying basket, immerse in 
smoking-hot fat for one minute. Drain. Serve with 
a cream or mushroom sauce or a drawn butter sauce. 

DEVILED SHRIMP. 



1 pint of shrimp. 

1 cup white stock or milk. 
4 tablespoonfuls butter. 

2 tablespoonfuls flour. 

3 



1 teaspoonful mustard. 
14 teaspoonful cayenne. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 
1 tablespoonful lemon juice. 



64 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Make a sauce by melting the butter, stirring in 
the flour and seasonings and the milk or stock. When 
smooth add the minced shrimps. Sprinkle shells or 
ramquin dishes with buttered crumbs, cut in the 
shrimp mixture. Cover over with buttered crumbs. 
Cook from ten to twelve minutes in a hot oven. 



LOBSTERS, 

Lobsters are difficult to digest and should only be 
eaten when fresh. Select a heavy lobster for the size. 
These will be found to be the most meaty. 

TO BOIL A LOBSTER. 

Have enough water in a kettle to cover, and be- 
fore the water gets very hot put in the lobsters. 
This seems the most merciful way, as it smothers 
them at once. Add two tablespoonfuls of salt, cover 
and boil for thirty minutes. 

TO OPEN A LOBSTER. 

When the lobster is cold, break off the large claws, 
separate the tail from the body. Remove the small 
claws. Save the coral and the green liver. Break 
the tail by pressing the sides together ; then open and 
take out the meat and remove the intestinal canal, 
which runs the full length. Break off the gills. The 
gills, stomach and intestines are the only parts not 
used. Break the body in the middle and pick the 
meat from the joints. Hammer the claws near the 
edges, so as not to break the meat. Eemove the meat 
If the body of the shell is to be used for serving, cut 
down the underside with a sharp knife. 



SHELL FISH. 65 

TO BROIL A LIV£ LOBSTER. 

With a sharp knife cut quickly down the back, 
remove the intestines and stomach. Broil over a mod- 
erate fire for thirty minutes, shell side down. Spread 
a little butter over it when broiling to keep it moist. 
When done, break the claws, season with salt, pepper 
and melted butter. 

PLAIN LOBSTER. 

Remove the meat from the shell, place on a plat- 
ter, garnish with the little claws and parsley. Season 
individually with salt, pepper, vinegar and oil or 
melted butter. , 

SAUTE LOBSTER. 

Break the lobster meat in small pieces, heat in 
hot butter in saucepan or chafing dish, season with 
salt, pepper and a little vinegar. Cook for about five 
minutes. 

CREAMED LOBSTER. 

Cut the meat quite fine, reheat in a white sauce, 
seasoned with salt, pepper or paprica, lemon juice. 
Serve on toast or in patty cases, timble cases, bread 
boxes, or in shells or ramquin dishes, baked for five 
minutes in the oven with the buttered crumbs on top. 

DEVILED LOBSTER. 

Chop the lobster very fine season highly with 
lemon juice, paprica, a little chopped celery, two 
small pickles chopped fine, salt. Mix with a white 
sauce, using half as much sauce as meat Fill the tail 
of the lobster shells with the mixture, setting them in 
the pan with the meat side up. Cover the top with 



66 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

buttered crumbs. Bake for fifteen or twenty minutes 
in a hot oven. Place two tails together lengthwise, 
the crumbs side up and garnish with the claws and 
parsley or watercress. 

LOBSTER A LA NEWBUR6. 

Cut the meat from a two-pound lobster in inch 
pieces. Melt in the chafing dish or sauce pan two 
tablespoonfuls of butter, add the lobster and one- 
fourth teaspoonful of salt, a speck of cayenne or pap- 
rica. (A truffle chopped fine may be added.) Cover 
and let cook for five minutes, then add one-fourth cup 
of sherry or madeira, or half sherry and half brandy, 
and cook for five minutes. Beat the yolks of two eggs 
and mix them well with a cup of cream, add this 
and stir until it thickens. Serve at once or the eggs 
may cause it to curdle. 

LOBSTER SOUFFLE. 



2 tablespoonfuls butter. 

2 tablespoonfuls flour. 
1 cup milk. 

3 eggs. 



1 cup of very finely chopped 

lobster meat. 
Salt, paprica and little 
onion juice. 



Melt the butter. Stir into it the flour and 
gradually the milk. Then the lobster and seasonings 
and the beaten yolks of the eggs. Cook for five min- 
utes after the yolks are put in. Remove from the 
fire when cool. Add the stiffly beaten whites. Bake 
in a buttered pan in hot water until firm. 



OYSTER SOUFFLE. 



Make the same as lobster souffle. Use one cup 
of oysters that have been cooked and chopped fine. 
One-half cup of the oyster juice and one-half cup of 
milk. 



MEATS. 67 



MEATS. 



The cheaper cuts of meat should have a long, slow 
cooking to break up the fiber. A cheap cut of meat 
often contains more nourishment than an expensive 
cut. For example, there is more nourishment in a 
well-cooked piece of round than in a well-cooked fillet. 
Tough meats are better boiled, as a lower degree of 
heat can be used and slower cooking. 



TO ROAST BEEF. 

Beef should be well streaked with fat, of a bright 
red color, elastic to the touch, and have a thick out- 
side layer of fat. Put the meat in the pan which has 
been heated hot on top of the stove, then sear the 
meat in the hot pan on all sides, turning it with a 
fork. Then place it in the pan on a rack, sprinkle 
first with flour, then with salt and pepper. Put two 
tablespoonfuls of drippings in the pan if you have 
them, but no water, as water steams the meat. Cook 
in a very hot oven for ten minutes, then reduce the 
heat, basting often with the fat in the pan. Boast 
ten minutes to a pound, if liked rare, and fifteen min- 
utes if liked well done. 

Rolled Roast — Should be cooked a little longer. 

Searing — ^First cooking the meat in a hot oven 
hardens the outside and keeps the juices in. Place 
on the platter with the fat side up. Carve in thin 
slices across the grain. 



08 ROCET HOUITTAIN COOK BOOK. 

OKATY FOS R0A5I BEEF. 

Pour the fat from the pan in a bowl, then pour 
about a pint of hot water or stock in the pan, to get all 
of the settlings. Put four tablespoonfuls of hot fat 
in a sauce pan, stir into it two tablespoonfuls of flour, 
well mixed, stir in the hot water or stock from the 
pan. Season to taste with salt, pepper, Worcester- 
shire sauce, ketchup or mushroomB. Cook for ten 
minutes. 

T0RK8HIRE PUDDIHO. 

Beat two eggs very lightly, add one-half teaspoon- 
ful of salt and one cup of milk. Stir this gradually on 
three-fourths cup of flour, beat until smooth. Pour 
in hot gem pans that have in them drippings from the 
roast beef. Bake in a hot oven thirty minutes, bast- 
ing twice with beef drippings, but not until they have 
been baking for fifteen minutes. Serve around the 
roast beef. This is a much better way than baking it 
in a pan. 

FILLET OF BEEF. 

Have your butcher remove the fat veins and trim 

into shape. The beat way of cooking it is to lard it. 

If you do not care to do that, first place it in the pan 

on several slices of pork and cover the top with thin, 

narrow strips, dredge with flour, salt and pepper, or 

cover the top of the fillet with buttered, seasoned 

crumbs. Place around the fillet one carrot, turnip 

BTid rniinn ciit. in thin slices, and a couple of stalks of 

hot oven for thirty minutes. After 

ing pour into the pan one cup of 

aently. The fillet should be served 

uce pan a couple of tablespoonfuls 



MEATS. 69 

of butter and two of flour. When melted, stir slowly 
in the gravy from the pan, which has been strained 
from the vegetables, and the fat skimmed off. Pour 
into it a half can of mushrooms that have been 
drained from the liquor. Cook ten minutes. Pour 
around the fillet. If this does not make gravy enough 
add a little hot water to it. 

BRAISED BEEF OR POT ROAST. 

Four to six pounds of beef from the lower part of 
the round or rump. Place on the bottom of the pan 
six thin slices of salt pork and on the pork lay one- 
half cup each of carrot, turnip, onion and celery, cut 
in small slices. On the vegetables place the meat. 
Dredge well with flour, pepper and salt. Place in a 
hot oven for fifteen minutes. Then add two cupfuls 
of stock or hot water. Place slices of vegetables on 
top of the meat, cover closely with a pah. Cook 
slowly for four hours. When done, garnish the plat- 
ter with vegetables, after being strained from the 
gravy. Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter, stir into 
it one of flour and slowly add the gravy. Cook ten 
minutes. Serve as a gra^y with the meat. This way 
of cooking beef may be done in a pot, then it is called 
a pot roast. 

BEEF A LA MODE. 

Use five or six pounds of beef from the lower part 
of the round, cut thick. Lard it well with a larding 
needle, or make incisions into the meat with a sharp- 
pointed knife. Press into them thin strips of salt 
pork. This is called daubing. It can be done by the 
butcher. Put several thin slices of pork or two table- 
spoonfuls of drippings in the pot. When hot, put in 



70 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

the meat and brown it on all sides by turning it, then 
dredge with flour, salt and pepper, half cover the meat 
with boiling water. Add to it one-half cup each of 
carrot, turnip, onion, cut in slices, and a sprig of pars- 
ley. Cover the pot tight and simmer slowly for four 
or five hours ; add more water when necessary, having 
about a cup of the liquor when the meat is done. 
Place the meat on a hot platter, thicken the gravy a 
little with the vegetables, pour around it This is 
very good cold. 



B£EF STEW WITH DUMPLINGS. 

The cheaper cuts of meat can be used for a stew. 
The aitch-bone, or two or three pounds from the shin, 
or flank, or upper part of chuck rib. Stew can be 
made from cooked meat, the flank from a roast or left- 
ocer pieces of fresh meat. Eemove the meat from 
the bones, cut in two-inch pieces, season with flour, 
salt and pepper, brown all over with fat from the 
meat or drippings. Put in the stew pan, add one 
onion cut in thin slices, one good-sized turnip, two 
carrots. Add boiling water enough to cover. Cook 
slowly for two hours, then add six potatoes that have 
been pared, sliced thin and soaked in cold water for 
half an hour. Cook for five minutes, then add the 
dumplings, having the Uquor come up even with the 
potatoes and the dumplings resting on top. Cover 
closely and cook for ten minutes. Put the meat in 
the center of the platter, the vegetables and dumplings 
around the outside. Thicken the gravy a little and 
pour around the vegetables. Season the gravy more 
if desired. 



1 cup flour. 

y^ teaspoonful salt. 



M£ATS. 71 

DUMPLINGS. 



1 teaspoonful baking 
powder. 



Mix with one-half cup of milk into a dough soft 
enough to handle. Pat out in small cakes or roll and 
cut with a small biscuit cutter. Cook for ten minutes 
in the boiling stew, being careful that the water does 
not boil on them, as that would make them soggy. 

MBAT PIB. 

Lay in a baking dish a few thin slices of cold 
meat, grating of onion, salt and pepper, a layer of 
thin-sliced potatoes. (Cold cooked potatoes can be 
used, cut in thicker slices.) Fill up the dish with 
these layers. Pour over it any cold gravy, tomato 
sauce, or soup stock. Cover the top with pastry, rolled 
a half inch thick. Pake in a hot oven for about one- 
half hour. Any kind of meat can be used in this way, 
and other vegetables used if desired. 

WARMED-OVER BEEF. 

Cut the beef in small, thin slices. Make a gravy 
of two tablespoonf uls of butter and one of flour ; when 
browned a little, add a cup of stock or gravy and one 
teaspoonful of Worchestershire sauce and one table- 
spoonful of catsup. Season with salt and pepper. 
Add the meat. Simmer for fifteen minutes. Place 
on a hot platter, garnish with three-cornered pieces of 
toast or little ball potatoes. 

ROLLED STUFFED FLANK. 

Take the inside flank, wipe it clean and dry, re- 
move the fat, spread it evenly with a bread stuffing, 



72 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

highly seasoned, about an inch thick. Boll it up and 
tie securely with a white twine. Cut into slices an 
onion, carrot and turnip. Place them in the pan, lay 
the meat on them and dredge with flour, salt and pep- 
per. Add a bay leaf, sprig of parsley and the root 
or stalk of celery, one cup of water or stock. Cook 
for fifteen minutes in a very hot oven; then cover 
with another pan and cook slowly for four hours, 
basting frequently. It must have a long, slow cook- 
ing to be tender. When done, strain out the vege- 
tables, make a gravy of the liquor and serve with the 
meat. 

BOILED DINNER. 

Select a piece of com beef that is well streaked 
with fat. Wash it in cold water, put on to boil in 
cold water enough to cover. When it begins to boil, 
skim. Allow it to simmer slowly, until tender, about 
forty minutes to a pound. Scrape, wash and quarter 
the carrots, peel and quarter parsnips, peel and slice 
in inch slices the turnips, quarter the cabbage, peel 
the potatoes and cook whole. About one hour before 
the meat is done add the turnips, carrots and parsnips 
and a half hour before done add the potatoes. Tie 
the cabbage in a piece of cheese cloth and cook it in a 
separate kettle in some of the liquor from the corn 
beef. Cook one hour or until tender. 

Cook the beets separately in boiling water. When 
done plunge them into cold water and rub off the skin. 
Serve hot or cold. Place the com beef in the center 
of the platter and the carrots, turnips, parsnips and 
potatoes around. Serve cabbage and beets in separate 
dish. 



MEATS. 73 

PRESSED CORN BEEF. 

Remove the be^f from the bones, pick in rather 
small pieces, put layers of lean and fat in a round 
baking dish. Cover the top with a plate and press 
down with a brick or flat iron for several hours. Then 
slice thin. Serve with baked potatoes and pickles. 

CORN BEEF HASH. 

Half corn beef and half mixed v^etables. Chop 
all together until fine. Season with a very little salt 
and pepper ; moisten with a little stock or gravy. Put 
one tablespoonful of drippings in the frying pan. 
When hoi add the hash. When brown, cover the top 
with a plate ; quickly turn the hash into it by turning 
the frying pan upside down. Put another tablespoon- 
ful of drippings in the pan and brown the hash on the 
other side. Remove to a hot platter, garnish with 
pickles cut lengthwise in half, or parsley. 

VEGETABLE HASH. 

Equal parts of all the left-over vegetables. Put 
into the frying pan a tablespoonful of drippings, add 
the vegetables and cook until heated through, stirring 
often. This is very nice served with the cold corn 
beef. 

SPICED BEEF. 

Select a piece from the middle cut of shin or the 
round. Wash the meat quickly and cut in four pieces. 
Cover with boiling water. After it has boiled for 
one-half hour, add the following seasonings, tied in 
cheese cloth : Six cloves, twelve peppercorns, one bay 
leaf, half teaspoonful sage, half teaspoonful thyme, 
three or four celery roots or stalks. Simmer slowly 



74 ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

now until the meat falls apart, pack and press. (See 
com beef.) When cold, serve in thin slices. 

BROILED BBBFSTEAK. 

Cut off the flank end to use in other ways, as that 
is toughened by broiling. Grease the broiler with a 
little fat from the meat. Broil over red-hot coals, 
turning at first every ten seconds (to sear the outside 
and keep the juices in). If liked rare, broil eight 
minutes; well done, twelve minutes. Select a steak 
one inch and a half or two inches thick. Serve on a 
hot platter, season with butter and salt, maitre d'hotel 
sauce or mushroom sauce. 

SPANISH STEAK. 

For this use round steak cut one and one-half or 
two inches thick; sear it on both sides by turning it 
in a hot pan, then season with salt, pepper, a bit of 
butter and about one-half cup of water or stock. Cook 
in a hot oven for one-half hour, then cover with slices 
of raw onions. Add a few more pieces of butter ; cook 
another one-half hour, then add a layer of sliced to- 
mato, cook for another one-half hour, then cover with 
grated cheese. When brown, serve with a gravy made 
from the liquor in the pan. 

SWISS STEAK. 

Select a slice of round steak cut about two inches 
thick. Pound into the steak on both sides as much 
flour as it will take up (one cup). Brown the meat 
on both sides in bacon or salt pork fat. Cover with 
boiling water and let simmer about two hours. Peel 
an onion for each person to be served. Let cook five 



MEATS. 76 

minutes in boiling water. Drain and rinse in cold 
water and set cooking around the meat. Mushrooms 
may be added. Season with salt and pepper. 

BROILED FILLET OF BEEF. 

Cut the fillet in slices three-fourths an inch thick. 
Grease the broiler well. Broil over clear coals for 
six minutes, turning every ten seconds, at first. Place 
on rounds of toast the size of the slices. Season with 
salt, pepper and butter and garnish with peas or with 
mushroom sauce. 

HAMBURG STEAK. 

Use one pound from the round or the ends of 
steak. Put through a meat grinder or chop very fine. 
To it add : 



1 tablespoonful of onion 

juice. 
1 teaspoonful of salt 



y^ teaspoonful of pepper. 
1 beaten egg. 



Form into flat cakes, dredge with flour and saute 
in a little hot butter or drippings. Brown well on 
both sides. Eemove to a hot platter, stir into the hot 
fat left in the frying pan one tablespoonful of flour. 
When brown, stir slowly into it one cup of stock or 
hot water. Season to taste with pepper and salt and 
add a few mushrooms or peas, or cubes of carrot that 
have first been cooked. Heat through and pour 
around the steaks. 

PLANE STEAK. 

The steak should be cut about an inch and a half 
thick. Have ready a hot broiler well oiled. Cook the 
steak over the coals about eight minutes, turning sev- 



76 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

eral times. Then place on a hot plank. Pile hot 
mashed potatoes around the edge of the plank. Brush 
over the edges of the potato with the yolk of an ^g 
beaten and diluted with a little milk, and set t£e 
plank into a hot oven to brown and reheat the potato. 
Remove from the oven. Fill the space between the 
plate and the potato with cooked peas, stringed beans 
and thin strips of carrot. Season with salt, pepper 
and butter. 

BEEF TONGUE. 

Smoked Tongue. — Soak for one hour in cold 
water, pour off the water and put on to cook in cold 
water. Let it come to a boil, pour off the water again. 
Put on in fresh cold water and boil until tender. Re- 
move the skin, roots and fat Serve hot or cold. If 
hot, serve with tomato saiice. 

Fresh Tongue. — ^Wash and cook in boiling salted 
water until tender. Remove the skin and fat 

TONGUE IN JELLY. 

Cut the tongue in slices and hold in shape. Place 
in a mould or dish the right size to hold it in place. 
Pour around it half inch thick of aspic jelly. When 
that is nearly firm, cover with the jelly. Serve when 
cold and firm. (See aspic jelly.) 



PORK. 77 



PORIC 



ROAST PIG. 

Select a pig from three to five weeks old. Wash 
well and stuff with a potato stuffing. 

Stuffing. — Two cups mashed potato, season with 
one-fourth cup of butter, two tablespoonfuls of 
chopped onion, one-fourth teaspoonful of pepper, one 
teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful sage, stuff and 
sew. 

Skewer the fore legs forward and the hind ones 
backward. Bub over with softened butter, sprinkle 
with flour, salt and pepper. Put in a hot over with a 
little water in the pan. Baste often with melted but- 
ter at first to soften the skin. Bake about three hours 
or until tender when tried with a fork. Arrange on 
the platter in a bed of parslev, with a slice of lemon 
in the mouth. Serve with apple sauce or fried 
apples. 

ROAST PORE. 

The loin, spare-rib and shoulder are best for roast- 
ing. Sprinkle well with flour,, salt, pepper and sage. 
Cook in a hot oven, allowing twenty-five minutes to a 
pound. Pork should be well cooked. It requires five 
hours for digestion, and is more easily digested when 

cold. 

PORK CHOPS. 

To fry or saute them, have them cut one-half inch 
thick, dredge with a little flour, sage, salt and pepper, 
and cook until brown on both sides. It will take 



78 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

about twenty minutes. Serve on a hot platter, gar- 
nished with fried apples. 

BACON. 

Slice very thin, remove the rind, place in a hot 
frying pan. Cook until crisp. Drain on soft paper. 

FRIED APPLES. 

Cut slices of sour apples, one-half inch thick. Do 
not remove the skin. Saute in beef drippings, pork 
fat or butter until tender. 

BROILED HAM AND EGGS. 

Have the ham cut in very thin slices. Place it in 
hot water for three or four minutes to take out a little 
of the salt. Wipe dry ; broil over hot coals for about 
five minutes. Fry out several slices of salt pork, add 
the eggs and cook until the white is firm, basting them 
with the fat from the pan. 

FRIED HAM. 

Put the slices on a hot frying pan, brown on both 
sides. Remove, and cook the eggs in the fat left in 
the pan. Place the eggs around or on top of the 
ham. 

BOILED HAM. 

If salt, soak for several hours. Wash thoroughly, 
trim off any of the black part. Cover with cold water 
and let it cook slowly, allowing one-half hour to a 
pound. Remove from the fire, let it remain in the 
water over night, then cut off the skin. Press into 
the fat a number of whole cloves, sprinkle the top 



PORK. 79 

with cracker crumbs and brown sugar. Bake in quite 
a hot oven for fifteen minutes. A half glass of sherry 
wine may be added to the boiling ham just before it 
is done. 

BAKED VIRGINIA HAM. 

Soak the ham two days in cold water, changing 
the water four times. Then put in fresh cold water, 
bring to the boiling point, and let simmer for four 
to six hours until tender, when pierced with a fork. 
When cool remove the skin, stick with cloves, cover 
with brown sugar and sprinkle with fine cracker 
crumbs. Brown in the oven. 

BAKED HAM. 

Prepare the ham the same as for boiling. Let it 
simmer slowly for four hours, then remove it and cut 
off the skin. Press cloves into the fat. Bake in a 
moderate oven for two hours, basting at first with one- 
half cup of sherry wine, and then with the fat in the 
pan. Fifteen minutes before it is done cover with 
cracker crumbs and one-fourth cup of brown sugar. 
Serve hot or cold. If serving hot, make a gravy of 
two tablespoonfuls of the fat in the pan. Stir into it 
one tablespoonful of flour and one cup of brown 
stock. 

HAM COOKED IN CIDER. 

Boil and prepare the ham for baking. Baste it 
every few minutes with a quart of hot cider. 

SAUSAGES (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Use sweet fresh pork. Take one-third fat and two- 
thirds lean. Chop or grind very fine; season for 



80 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

every pound of meat and fat two teaspoonfuls of salt, 
two teaspoonfuls of sage, one-half teaspoonful of pep- 
per. Make cotton bags, one-half yard long and four 
inches wide. Dip them in strong salt and water and 
dry. Crowd the meat into them, tie the bag tightly 
and keep in a cool place. When wanted for use turn 
the end of the bag back, cut off the meat in half-inch 
slices, fry in hot frying pan until brown on both 
sides. 

PHILADELPHIA SCRAPPLE. 

Cook a pigs head in boiling water until the flesh 
slips easily from the bones. Take out the bones, and 
when cold chop the meat fine. When the liquid is 
cold remove the fat and reheat the liquid to the boil- 
ing point Add a teaspoonful of salt to each quart of 
liquid. Then sift in through the fingers of one hand, 
while stirring with the other, enough com meal to 
give the consistency of mush. Let boil hard several 
minutes. Then set back to cook more slowly for an 
hour. Stir occasionally. At last stir in the chopped 
meat and turn into bread pans and set aside in a 
cool place. When ready to use cut in slices half an 
inch thick and brown in fat. 

TO TRY OUT LARD. 

Cut the leaves in small pieces, remove all flesh. 
Put a few pieces in the kettle first. When they are 
tried out put in the remainder. Cook slowly until the 
scraps are crisp, strain through cheese cloth into pails. 

Many like to add one pound of suet to every five 
of the leaves. This makes a firmer lard. 



PORK. 81 

BOSTON BAKED PORK AND BEANS. 

Soak two cups of pea beans in cold water over 
night. In the morning drain off the water, put on 
fresh cold water and parboil them on the stove until 
the skin breaks, or you can pierce them with a pin. 
Then drain them through a colander, and pour cold 
water over them. Place in the pot Clean one-fourth 
pound of salt pork, cut the top in gashes, place on top 
of the beans, pressing it down in them until the rind 
just shows. Mix one-half teaspoonful of salt, one- 
fourth teaspoonful of mustard, one tablespoonful of 
molasses in one cup of hot water and pour over the 
beans. Keep water enough in them to come to the top 
of the beans. Bake in a slow oven for eight hours. 
One small onion can be baked in the beans if the flavor 
is liked. The bean pot should be earthen, with bulg- 
ing sides and have a close cover. 



8a ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



MUTTON AND LAMR 



Good mutton should have thick, white, hard, fat, 
fine-grained red meat. 

ROAST LEG OF MUTTON. 

Have the bone cut short, wipe it all over with cold 
water, dredge with flour, salt and pepper. Place in 
a hot oven for fifteen minutes, then add to the pan 
one cup of hot water, baste frequently, allowing ten 
minutes to a pound if liked rare, and fifteen minutes 
if liked well done. Garnish the end of the bone with 
a paper frill or a bunch of water cress or parsley. 

ROAST LOIN OF MUTTON. 

Remove the fat and kidney. Have the joints 
cracked, so as to be easily carved. Boast the same as 
the leg. Serve with mint sauce. 

CROWN ROAST. 

This can be prepared by your butcher and makes 
a very handsome and delicious roast Cut a full loin, 
trim the rib bones as for French chops and chop them 
to a uniform length ; then roll the loin backwards into 
a circle and tie securely. Tie around each bone a 
slice of salt pork so they will not bum. Baste fre- 
quently with the fat in the pan. Allow fifteen min- 
utes to a pound. Cover each bone with a paper ruffle, 
fill up the center with potato chips and garnish 
around the roast with them, or, garnish with timbale 
cases filled with creamed peas, or pea timbales. 



MUTTON AND LAMB. 83 

ROAST SADDLE OF MUTTON. 

The saddle is the back; if split it is the loin. Ee- 
move the pink skin^ as that contains the strong flavor, 
and the fat and kidneys from underneath. KoU the 
flank under and tie it into a good, round shape. 
Dredge with flour, salt and pepper. Cook in a hot 
oven, baste frequently, allowing ten minutes to a 
pound if liked rare, and fifteen minutes if liked well 
done. Carve slices parallel to the back bone, then slip 
the knife under and separate them from the ribs. 
After the top is carved, turn the saddle and carve the 
tenderloin, which lies underneath. 

ROAST LEG OF MUTTON STUFFED. 

Eemove the bone, sprinkle the inside with salt 
and pepper, stuff and sew. Cook the same as roast 
leg of mutton. 

Stuffing. — One cup of stale bread crumbs, one- 
fourth cup melted butter, one-fourth teaspoonful each 
salt, pepper, marjoram and sage, a teaspoonful of 
onion juice if desired and hot water if not moist 
enough. 

BOILED LEG OF MUTTON. 

Put the mutton into boiling water to cover, boil 
for fifteen minutes, then set aside and simmer, allow- 
ing twenty minutes to a pound. One-half hour before 
removing the meat add turnip cut in half -inch slices. 
Eemove the meat to a hot platter, garnish with the 
turnip, cover the top with chopped parsley or capers. 
Serve with caper sauce. Save the water to use with 
tbo bone and left-over pieces for soups. 



84 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

RAGOUT OF MUTTON. 



2 lbs. from the neck or flank. 
2 tablespoonfuls butter. 
1 tablespoonful flour. 
1 onion. 
1 carrot. 



^ can peas. 

2 cups of water or stock. 

1 clove. 

Sprig of parsley. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 



Put the butter into the frying pan. When melted 
add the flour and brown. Then add the carrot and 
onion cut in small dice and the seasonings and mut- 
ton. Cook, stirring frequently until all are brown; 
then add the stock or water and meat. Cover closely, 
let simmer for two hours, add the peas just before 
serving. 

NECK OF LAMB IN CASSEROLE. 

Cut small pieces for serving. Wipe with a damp 
cloth and roll in flour. Brown in salt pork fat. Then 
place in a casserole. Add hot water to cover and let 
cook about three hours or until tender. Add one-half 
dozen peeled onions that have been parboiled. Half 
dozen small carrots cut up in fine pieces. One-half 
dozen small potatoes cut in slices. Cover and let 
cook until the vegetables are dona Add a can of 
peas drained from the water. Salt and pepper. 
Serve very hot. 

CURRT OF MUTTON. 

Fry one large onion cut in thin slices in two 
tablespoonfuls of butter. Mix with two tablespoon- 
fuls of flour, one teaspoonful of curry powder, one 
teaspoonful salt, one-fourth teaspoonful of pepper. 
Stir into the butter and onion. Add gradually two 
cups of stocL Cut two pounds of lean mutton in 
two-inch pieces, add them to the sauce and sinamer 
until tender. Place the meat on a hot platter, with 
a border of rice around it. 



MUTTON AND LAMB. 85 

MUTTON AND LAMB CHOPS. 

Broil the chops over hot coals, turning every ten 
seconds, the same as steak, thus searing over the chops 
and keeping the juice inside. When the meat looks 
puffy it is done. It requires ten minutes to broil 
chops one inch thick; if liked rare, eight minutes. 
Place on a hot platter, season with salt, pepper and 
butter, garnish with points of toast and a little pars- 
ley or watercress, or with peas, French-fried potatoes, 
potato balls or straws. 

French Chops, — Have the meat and fat scraped 
from the bone. When served, the bone is usually cov- 
ered with a ruffle. 

CHOPS IN PAPER CASES. 

Place the chop on well-greased heavy writing 
paper, season with salt and pepper, fold the paper 
over the chop and turn the edges over twice to hold 
them securely. Broil over a moderate fire, turning 
frequently. These may be served in the paper. These 
are very delicate to serve to invalids. 

ROAST SPRING LAMB. 

Spring lamb is divided into fore and hind quar- 
ters, the whole of either not being too much to roast 
at one time. The fore quarter is less expensive than 
the hind. It should be fresh and thoroughly cooked. 
Roast in a hot oven, season with flour, salt and pep- 
per. After fifteen minutes^ cooking add one cup of 
hot water, baste frequently, allowing about twenty 
minutes to a pound. Serve with mint sauce and 
green peas or asparagus and new potatoes. 



86 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

BOILED LAMB T0N6UBS (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Boil six tongues in salted water with the juice of 
half a lemon until tender. Serve cold with tartare 
sauce, or pickle them by covering with hot-spiced 
vinegar. 



VEAL. 87 



VEAL. 

The flesh of veal should be pink and firm; if it 
has a white or blue tinge it is unwholesome. It con- 
tains less nourishment than any other meat and less 
flavor, so should be highly seasoned, and, like lamb, 
should be thoroughly cooked. 

ROAST VEAL. 

The loin, breast and fillet (a thick piece from the 
upper part of the leg) are best for roasting. Remove 
the bone from the fillet and stuff with a highly 
seasoned bread stuffing; skewer into shape. To pre- 
pare the veal for roasting, cover the top with thin 
strips of salt pork, or lard with a larding needle ; sea- 
son with flour, salt and pepper. Allow twenty-five 
minutes to a pound. Make a gravy from the drip- 
pings in the pan. Horseradish is very acceptable to 
serve with veal. 

STUFFED SHOULDER OF VEAL. 

Have the blade removed and fill the space with a 

highly seasoned stuffing ; sew up the opening and truss 

with strips of salt pork. Allow thirty minutes to a 

pound. 

STUFFING. 

To one cup of stale bread crumbs add one-half 
tablespoonful of salt, sage, thyme, one teaspoonful 
lemon juice, of chopped salt pork, one-quarter tea- 
spoonful pepper, one-quarter cup melted butter, one 
egg beaten until light, and if too dry add a little hot 
water. 



88 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

VEAL CUTLETS. 

Dredge the cutlets with salt and pepper, dip in 
fine cracker crumbs, then in egg, then again in the 
crumbs. Saute in hot fat, either salt pork or beef 
drippings. Brown well on both sides, place on a hot 
platter and surround with a tomato or Bemaise sauce 
or make a gravy by adding one tablespoonful of flour 
to the fat, adding one cup of stock, and season with 
salt, pepper and a teaspoonful of lemon juice, or sea- 
son with butter, salt and pepper and pass with them 
tartare sauce. 

VEAL CUTLETS WITH CREAM. 

Divide the cutlets into sections. Dip them in 

cream, then sprinkle with flour, salt and pepper. 

Saute in hot butter imtil well browned on both sides. 

Remove to a hot platter and surround with a sauce 

made by adding one tablespoonful of flour to the fat 

and cream left in the frying pan and one cup of 

cream. Cook for five minutes, season to taste and 

add to the sauce a handful of fresh mushrooms, if you 

have them, and allow them to cook five minutes in the 

sauce. 

VEAL STEW. 

The ends of the ribs, the neck and knuckle may be 
used for the stew. Cut about two pounds of the meat 
in two-inch pieces. Cover the meat with boiling 
water. Let simmer until tender. Add one onion 
sliced thin, two teaspoonfuls of salt, one-fourth tea- 
spoonful of pepper, two carrots sliced, one turnip 
sliced one-half inch thick, when the meat is put on to 
cook; twenty minutes before the meat is done add 
four good-sized potatoes that have been sliced and 



VEAL. 89 

soaked in cold water for an hour. Remove the meat 
and vegetables on a platter, thicken the gravy with 
one tablespoonful of flour and season with two table- 
spoonfnls of butter and one-half cup of milk or cream. 

For Yeal Pot Pie add dumplings with the pota- 
toes, the same as for beef stew. 



VEAL LOAF. 



5 pounds of veal. 

1 cup finely powdered 

cracker crumbs. 
% cup of stock. 
3 eggs. 
1 tablespoonful finely 

chopped onion. 
1 teaspoonful thyme. 



1 teaspoonful summer 

savory. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 

1 teaspoonful pepper. 

^ cup of salt pork chopped 
fine, or 

2 tablespoonfuls of melted 

butter. 



Chop the veal fine, add cracker crumbs and sea- 
sonings, stock and eggs slightly beaten. Form with 
the hands into a loaf, cover the top with slightly 
beaten egg, and a layer of cracker crumbs. Place in 
a baking pan on four thin strips of salt pork. Bake 
for three hours, basting frequently with butter and 
hot water. This is better served cold. 

SCALLOPED VEAL. 

Cut cooked veal in thin slices or cubes. Put in a 
baking dish alternate layers of veal and buttered 
crumbs, seasoning each layer of meat with salt and 
pepper. Over the top pour a tomato sauce and sprin- 
kle over with a layer of buttered crumbs. Bake 
for half an hour. 



90 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

BRAISED CALFS LIVBR. 

Lard it in three rows, or place several strips of 
salt pork over the top. Out into slices one carrot, one 
turnip, one onion and two slices of salt pork; put 
them in the baking pan. Place the liver on them. 
Add one cup of stock or hot water, one teaspoonful 
of salt and four peppercorns, a sprig of parsley. 
Cover with another pan and cook in a moderate oven 
two hours and a half, basting often. Add more stock 
or water, if necessary. Make a gravy by melting in a 
sauce pan two tablespoonfuls of butter, stirring into 
it one of flour. When brown gradually stir in one 
cup of the stock left in the pan that has been strained 
from the vegetables. Season with more salt and pep- 
per, if necessary. Pour around the liver. 

BROILED LIVER. 

Slice in three-fourth inch slices. Soak in cold 
water for five minutes to draw out the blood. Wipe 
dry. Dip in melted butter. Broil from five to eight 
minutes, turning at first every ten seconds. Season 
with butter, pepper and salt Broiled bacon is often 
served with it. 

CALF'S HEART ROASTED. 

Wash the heart clean and wipe. Pill with a 
cracker or bread stufiing seasoned with melted butter, 
salt, pepper, onion and sage. Bake for two hours. 
Season the outside with salt and pepper, and sprinkle 
with flour. Baste with hot water and butter. Make a 
grsLYj from the liquid in the pan. Garnish around 
with boiled onions or stuffed tomatoes. 



VEAL. 91 

CALF'S HEAD WITH BRAIN SAUCE. 

Soak the head in cold water for two hours. Take 
out the brains. Scrape the head very clean, then pin 
in a floured cloth. Put on to boil in salted, boiling 
water enough to cover. After boiling two hours, add 
the brains, which have first been pinned in a floured 
cloth, liver and lights, and boil two hours longer. Re- 
move the cloth from the head and the large bones will 
slip out. Lay on the platter with the skin side up. 

To Make the Brain SoAice. — Take one quart of 
liquor that the head has been boiled in, one-third of 
the liver chopped fine; also the brains chopped fine. 
Melt one-half cup of butter, stir into it five table- 
spoonfuls of flour. When smooth add the hot liquor, 
a little at a time. Stir in the chopped brains and 
liver, then add two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, a half 
cup of white and red wine. Salt and pepper to taste. 
A little grated nutmeg, if cared for. Cook ten min- 
utes. Skin the tongue and slice the remainder of the 
liver, and surround the head with them. Pour over a 
part of the gravy. Garnish with slices of lemon and 
radishes cut to represent roses. Send the remainder 
of the gravy to the table in a dish. 

SWEETBREADS. 

Sweetbreads are two large glands lying along the 
back of the throat and in the breast. Those found 
in veal are considered the best. They spoil very 
quickly and should be put in cold water for one-half 
hour and parboiled before using in any form. 

To Prepare Sweetbreads. — Put them in cold 
water. Remove the pipes and membranes. Cook in 



92 ROCKY MOUNXAIH COOK BOOK. 

boiling salted water with one tableepoonful of lemon 
juice or one-half tablespoonful of vinegar, for twenty 
minutes, then plunge in cold water for ten minutes 
to harden. 

FRIEI) SWEETBREADS. 

Cut the parboiled sweetbreads in slices. Dip in 
egg, crumb and egg again. Fry in deep fat for one 
minute, or season the slices with salt and pepper. 
Saute in hot butter. Garnish with parsley and olives 
or pickles and slices of lemon. 

LARDED SWEETBREADS. 

Lard the parboiled sweetbreads in even rows, and 
bake in the oven until brown, first sprinkling with 
flour, salt and pepper. 

Creamed. — Cut in cubes and serve in white sauce, 
on toast, patty cases, bread boxes or timbale cases. 
They may be served in the same way with poulette 
sauce. 

SWEETBREADS SERVED IN RAMQUIN DISHES OR 

SHELLS. 

Cut the sweetbreads in small pieces, mix with 

.a cream or poulette sauce. Butter well the dishes, 

fill two-thirds full, cover with buttered crumbs 

and bake in a hot oven for eight minutes. Serve at 

once. Mushrooms or oysters can be added to them. 

TRIPE. 

Soak tripe for one-half hour in cold water, chang- 
ing the water twice, then cook in boiling water for 
twenty minutes before cooking in any form. 



VEAL. 93 

BROILED TRIPE. 

Dry it after boiling. Dip into melted butter, then 
season with salt and pepper, and broil for ten min- 
utes. Season again and serve. 

TRIPE IN BATTER. 

Cut the boiled tripe in two-inch pieces, dip in 
batter and fry one minute in deep fat. Or fry out 
several pieces of salt pork and brown in the fat. 

Baiter. — One egg, one-fourth cup of cold water, 
one teaspoonful of lemon juice, one-fourth teaspoon- 
ful salt, and flour to make a drop batter (a batter that 
will drop from the spoon, not pour). 



04 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



POULTRY. 



POULTRY AND GAUE. 

Poultry should be drawn as soon as killed, to be 
perfectly wholesome. That custom is not used in our 
markets, but it should be made compulsory for the 
good of the meat. To tell the age of poultry, press 
the end of the breat bone. If it is soft and bends 
easily the bird is young. If the end is hardened it 
is over a year old. Pin feathers indicate a young 
bird, and long hair an old ona The skin should be 
firm, smooth and white. Geese and ducks should 
not be over a year old, have soft yellow feet, tender 
wings and thick, hard breast. Wild ducks have red- 
dish feet 

TO CLEAN AND TRUSS POULTRY. 

Singe the hair and down by holding the fowl over 
the gas, or over a roll of lighted paper held over the 
fire. Cut off the necks close to the body, leaving skin 
enough to fold over on the back (if to be roasted). 
Remove the windpipe and crop, then remove every- 
thing from the inside that can come out. Be sure that 
the lungs are taken out They lie close to the back- 
bone, and are a bright-red, spongy mass. l^Text take 
the leg; bend it back slightly, and carefully cut the 
skin on the joint just enough to expose the sinews 
without cutting them. Run a fork or skewer under 
them, pulling them out. The drumstick is much im- 
proved by removing the sinews or tendons. Cut out 
the oil bag in the tail. Wash out the inside very 
quickly with cold water, and with a bowl of water 



POULTRY. 95 

and cloth wash the outside. Do not allow them to 
soak in water, as that will extract the flavor and 
nourishment 

Cut the gall carefully from the liver. Cut the 
outer coat of the gizzard and draw it carefully away 
from the inner sack. Open the heart and wash away 
the clot of blood. The heart, gizzard and liver are 
the giblets. All poultry and game are cleaned in this 
way. Wild ducks, coot and geese should be washed 
thoroughly with soap and water, as the skin is very 
oily and can not be cleaned without. 

TO STUFF AJiD TRUSS A FOWL FOR ROASTING. 

After the fowl has been prepared as given above, 
place it in a bowl or platter, put a little of the stuffing 
in the opening at the neck, the rest in the body, filling 
out the breast until plump ; then draw the neck skin 
over on the back and sew it, and if the opening of 
the body is full, sew that up with a coarse thread ; if 
it is not, it is not necessary. Press the l^gs close to 
the body and cross over the tail, and tie firmly with 
twine. Put a long skewer through the thigh into the 
body and out through the opposite thigh, and another 
through the wings, drawing them close to the body. 
Wind a string from the tail to the skewer in the thigh, 
then up to the one in the wing, across the back to 
the other wing, then down to the other thigh, and tie 
around the tail. If you have no skewers, the legs and 
wings can be kept in place by tying firmly to the body 
with string. Put the fowl on a rack in a pan, rub 
well with softened butter, dredge with flour, salt and 
pepper. Put in a hot oven for fifteen minutes, then 
reduce the heat, add a little hot water to the pan to 
prevent burning. Baste with butter and hot water 

4 



96 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

until brown, then baste frequently with the fat in the 
pan. Cook until the legs will separate from the body. 
Draw out the skewers and cut the strings. Allow 
about three hours for an eight pound turkey. Serve 
cranberry sauce or jelly with roast turkey, currant 
jelly with roast chicken and game, apple sauce with 
roast goose. 

STUFFING FOR ROAST TURKEY OR CHICKEN. 

For two cups of fine bread crumbs add one-fourth 
cup of melted butter, one small onion chopped fine, 
one teaspoonful salt and two teaspoonfuls of mixed 
herbs, a little pepper. This makes a dry stuffing; if 
liked moist, add a little hot water or milk. 

GIBLET SAUCE. 

Boil the giblets in salted water until tender, chop 
them quite fine, put a tablespoonf ul of flour in the pan 
in which the fowl was roasted. Let it brown; then 
add, stirring constantly, one cupful of the water the 
giblets were cooked in. Season with salt and pepper, 
strain and add the chopped giblets, and serve in a 
grsivy boat. 

TO DRESS FOWLS OR BIRDS FOR BROILING. 

Singe, wipe off with a cloth and cold water, split 
down the middle of the back, lay open, and remove the 
contents from the inside. 

TO BONE A BIRD, FOWL OR TX^KEY. 

The skin should be firm and unbroken, and the 
bird should not be drawn. Remove the head, wash 
and singe. Remove the tendons from the legs as 



POULTRY. 97 

directed, loosen the skin around the end of the drum 
sticks. The work of boning is not difficult, but re- 
quires time and patience. Use a small pointed knife. 
A regular boning knife is the best. Cut the skin 
down the full length of the back, scrape the meat 
away from the bone, beginning at the neck, until you 
feel the shoulder blade, loosen the flesh from this, and 
then follow the bone to the wing joint, and to the 
middle joint in the wing. Care must be taken to 
avoid cutting through the skin at these places, as the 
skin is very near the bone. Leave the first bone in 
the wing, then remove the flesh from the breast. Be 
careful and do not cut through the skin at the ridge, 
or to cut through the membrane into the inside. Re- 
move the flesh around the second joint, then the drum- 
stick, turning the flesh wrong side out. Turn the bird 
and do the same on the other sida When the meat is 
free from the carcass lay the bird on a board, skin 
side down. Place the flesh in place, sprinkle it with 
salt and pepper, stuff out the legs and wings with the 
force meat and fill the bird with it. Draw the skin up 
and sew it together; turn it over and skewer and tie 
the legs and wings in position of a trussed fowl ; press 
and tie the body into natural shape, dredge with flour, 
salt and pepper ; cover with several slices of salt pork. 
Eoast, allowing twenty-five minutes to a pound. 
Baste frequently. Make a gravy by using six table- 
spoonfuls of the drippings in the pan, one of flour and 
a cup of cream or white stock. Season. 

FORCEHEAT FOR STUFFING BONED FOWLS. 

Use the cooked or uncooked meat of another fowl 
or veal, or a part of both ; chop fine. To every cup of 
meat add one-fourth cup of bread or cracker crumbs, 



98 ROCKY MOUNTAIH COOK BOOK. 

one-fourth cup of melted butter, one teaspoonful 
chopped parsley, one teaspoonful of onions, chopped 
fine, one-fourth teaspoonful each of sage, thyme, pep- 
per, one-half teaspoonful salt, one stalk of celery, 
chopped fine. Moisten with stock the meat was 
cooked in, or leftover gravy. 

TO BOIL FOWL. 

Boiled fowl are sometimes cooked with oysters, 
bread or chestnut stuffing, but as the stuffing is apt 
to get wet and soggy, they are better cooked without 
it. Clean, sprinkle the inside with salt and pepper, 
put on to cook in boiling water enough to cover, with 
one teaspoonful of salt and one whole small onion. 
Simmer until tender. (The time depends upon the 
age and size of the fowl.) Serve with oyster, celery 
or caper sauce, using some of the liquor the fowl was 
boiled in for the sauce. Pour the sauce around the 
fowl, or garnish with a border of rice. 

BRAISED CHICKBN. 

Take an old chicken, prepare it for roasting. 
Dredge with flour, salt and pepper. Brown all over 
in hot butter or chicken fat, then place in the roast- 
ing pan on a bed of sliced onion, carrot, turnip and 
celery. Cover the top with four slices of salt pork, 
add two cups of water, cover closely with another pan, 
roast for three hours, basting often and replenishing 
the water so as to keep about two cups in the pan. 
Remove the fowl on a platter, garnish with vegetables 
and make a gravy of the liquid in the pan. Season 
to taste. Cook in a pot on top of the stove, if liked. 



I 

J 



POULTRY. 99 

BROaED SPRING CHICKEN. 

Split down the back, remove the entrails and 
breast bone and the oil bag from the tail. Wipe 
clean with a cloth and cold water. Rub with soft but- 
ter, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place on a broiler 
the inside down ; broil over a slow fire for twenty-five 
minutes. When nearly done turn and let the skin 
side brown. Place on a hot dish, spread with butter, 
or with maitre d'hotel sauce. Garnish with water- 
cress or parsley and slices of lemon. 

TO BROIL A TURKEY. 

Select a very small, fat, young one, weighing not 
over five pounds. Have it split as you would a chick- 
en for broiling. Place it in the roasting pan seasoned 
with salt, pepper and butter, with a half cup of water 
in the pan. Cook until the meat is tender, then broil 
over a rather slow fire. When brown put on a hot 
platter, spread with butter and season with salt. Save 
any liquid left in the pan for chestnut sauce to pour 
around it. If the turkey is unusually young and ten- 
der it can be broiled without cooking in the oven. 

PANNED CHICKEN. 

Prepare the chickens as for broiling. Place them 
in a pan, skin side up; rub with softened butter; 
dredge with fiour, salt and pepper ; put in a hot oven. 
After ten minutes baste with butter and a little hot 
water. Cook for thirty minutes, baste three times, 
using not over a half cup of water, the rest butter. 
Remove to a hot dish and make a gravy from the fat 
in the pan. Add to it one tablespoonful of flour. 
When brown, add a cup of thin cream or white stocks. 



100 ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK 

Cook until smooth, stirring all the time ; pour around 
the chicken. 

FRICASSEE CmCXXN. 

Cut the chicken in small pieces for serving, put 
in the pot with warm water enough to cover, one tea- 
spoonful of salt and two stalks or roots of celery. 
Cook slowly until tender; remove the chicken and 
strain the celery from the liquor. Fry out half a 
dozen slices of salt pork, and one onion sliced thin in 
the frying pan. Butter or chicken fat can be used 
in place of the pork. When the fat is hot put in the 
chicken and brown on all sides. Arrange on the plat- 
ter. Remove the onion from the fat, add two table- 
spoonfuls of flour to it, and two cups of the liquor 
gradually. When smooth, add one-half can of peas 
or the same amount of mushrooms drained from the 
liquor, cook for five minutes, pour around the chicken 
and garnish with points of toasted bread or toasted 
crackers. 

CHICKEN STEW WITH DUMPLINGS. 

An old chicken is the best. Have it cut in four 
pieces, and make the same as beef stew. 

(See Dumplings, under Beef Stew.) 

CHICKEN CURRY (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Cut the chicken at the joints, and remove the 
breast bone, wipe, season with salt and pepper, dredge 
with flour, and brown in hot hxdter. Put in a stew 
pan. Fry one large onion, cut in thin slices, in the 
butter left in the pan till colored, not browned. Mix 
one large tablespoonful of flour, one teaspoonful of 



POULTRY. 101 

sugar and one teaspoonful of curry powder, and 
brown them in the butter. Add slowly one cup of 
water or stock and one cup of strained tomatoes, or 
one sour apple chopped, and salt and pepper to taste. 
Pour this sauce over the chicken and simmer one 
hour or until tender. Add one cup of hot milk or 
cream. Boil one minute longer and serve with a 
border of boiled rice. Rabbit, veal and lamb may be 
curried in the same way. 

SPANISH CHICK£N. 

Split tender broilers in halves, rub with salt, 
sprinkle over with finely chopped cloves and Spanish 
peppers. Over all put thin strips of bacon or salt 
pork. Bake in a hot oven till the chicken is tender. 
Watch carefully that it does not burn. If necessary, 
add a little water. When tender remove from the 
pan, add two tablespoonfuls of flour to the fat left in 
the pan and one cup of thin cream, one-fourth cup of 
water ; cook on top of the stove for five minutes, stir- 
ring all the time. Season to taste if salt or pepper is 
required. Pour around the chickens. 

CHICKEN JULIENNE. 

Split the chickens down the back as for broiling,' 
lay them breast down in a baking pan, filling the de- 
pression inside the ribs with equal quantities of finely 
minced onion, carrot, celery and peas; season with 
salt, a little pepper, and several small pieces of butter, 
add one-half cup of hot water ; cook in a hot oven for 
one-half hour, or till the vegetables are tender; re- 
move the vegetables and turn the chickens over to 
brown, then make a sauce by adding flour to the 



102 ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

liquid in the pan, and the v^etables and one-half cup 
of cream ; pour around the chicken and garnish with 
8weet potato croquettes. 

CHICKEN FRITTERS. 

Cut cold chicken or turkey off the bones in as 
large pieces as possible. Sprinkle with salt and pep- 
per, dip in fritter batter and fry in deep fat until a 
good brown, drain on brown paper. Serve with pou- 
lette, Bemaise or tartare sauce. 

STUFFED CHICKEN OR TURKEY LEGS. 

Remove the tendons from the drum sticks, remove 
the bone, stuff the leg with a force meat (See force- 
meat for boned chicken or turkey.) Draw the skin 
over the ends and sew securely, keeping the shape. 
Lay them in a baking pan, cover with boiling water 
and simmer in the oven until tender — about an hour 
and a quarter. Eemove from the water, let cool, take 
out the stitches, roll in beaten egg and seasoned fine 
bread crumbs, then in egg again, and fry in deep fat 
for one minute. Serve with olive, tartare, celery or 
currant jelly sauce. 

CHICKEN A LA MARYLAND. 

Clean the chicken, remove the head and legs. Put 
on to cook in a pot of warm water, enough to 
cover. Cook with it one sliced onion, carrot, turnip, 
one bay leaf, two cloves, six peppercorns, two celery 
roots or two or three stalks of celery. Cook slowly 
until the chicken is tender, then remove the meat 
from the bones. Cut in two-inch pieces. Cook the 
stock down to one cup, heat and strain one cup of 



POULTRY. 103 

tomatoes, melt in a sauce pan two tablespoonfuls of 
butter, add one tablespoonful of flour. When smooth 
stir in slowly the cup of stock, then the tomato, and 
the chicken. Cook for ten minutes. Surround with 
points of toast or serve in fried bread baskets or tim- 
bale cases. This can be made in the chafing dish by 
having the chicken prepared before. 

CHICKEN SOUFFLE. 

Chicken, veal or lamb may be cooked in this way : 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 
1 tablespoonful of flour. 
y^ teaspoonful salt. 
A little pepper. 
1 teaspoonful of chopped 
parsley. 



1 cup of milk^ or chicken 
stock. 

1 cup of finely chopped 

chicken. 
10 drops onion juice. 

2 eggs. 



Make a sauce by melting the butter, then adding 
flour, salt and pepper. Cook for ten minutes, stirring 
until smooth. Add the rest of the seasonings to the 
chicken, mix the sauce and chicken togethei*, then stir 
in the well-beaten yolks. Stir over the fire for five 
minutes. Set aside to cool. When cool beat very 
stiff the whites of the ^gs, stir them lightly into 
the chicken. Put in a buttered pudding dish, bake in 
a hot oven for twenty minutes. Serve at once in the 
same dishes. This can be baked in individual ram- 
quin dishes or shells. 

PLANQUEI^TE OF CHICKEN. 

An old chicken will do as well as a young one. 
Cook until tender in boiling water, with a teaspoonful 
of salt, a small onion, and two stalks of celery. Strain 
the stock and cook down to one cup. Melt two table- 
spoonfuls of butter, stir into it one of flour. When 



104 R0CK7 MOUMTAIN COOK BOOK. 

smooth, stir gradually into the stock and one-half cup 
of cream. Cook ten minutes, then add two well-beaten 
yolks of eggs, cook five minutes, but do not boil, as it 
might curdle. Remove from the fire, add two tea- 
spoonfuls of lemon juice; cut the chicken in small 
pieces, add to the sauce. Serve on toast, surrounded 
by a border of rice. 

CHICKEN A LA BECHAMEL. 

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter. Stir into it 
one of flour, one-fourth teaspoonful of salt, a little 
pepper, then add one-half cup each of chicken stock 
and cream. Stir until smooth, cook for five minutes, 
then remove from the fire, and beat into it three well- 
beaten eggs and two cups of chopped chicken. Turn 
into buttered ramquin dishes or in a baking dish, and 
bake standing in a pan of hot water about twenty 
minutes. The water should not boil. Salmon or any 
kind of white fish can be used in this way. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

One good-sized, old chicken. Put it in the pot 
and cover with warm water (use warm water so that 
part of the nourishment may be in the gravy), add to 
it two teaspoonfuls of salt, six peppercorns, one onion, 
sliced, three stalks of celery or the celery root, one car- 
rot and one turnip, sliced. Cook slowly for two hours, 
or until the meat will leave the bones. Boil the liquor 
down to two cups. Melt in a sauce pan one-fourth 
cup of butter, stir into it one tablespoonful of flour, 
and gradually the two cups of liquor. When that is 
smooth, stir in one-half cup of thick cream, season 
with salt and pepper. Pick the chicken mostly from 



POULTRY. 105 

the bones, leaving a few of the small bones to hold up 
the pie. Put a layer of the chicken in the bottom of 
the baking dish, then cover with a layer of the gravy. 
In the center of the dish place the breast bone to hold 
up the crust, fill up with the layers, and put a crust 
on top three-fourths of an inch thick, cutting a slit in 
the center to let out the steam. Layers of thin-sliced 
potatoes may be added to the pie, a few truffles or 
mushrooms, or alternate layers of chicken, oysters and 
the gravy. The baking dish is often lined with a thin 
layer of pastry, but it is very apt to be soggy. Bake 
three-quarters of an hour. To cover the pie use plain 
pastry, chopped puff pastry, or a rich baking powder 
biscuit dough. 

VecU Pie can be made in the same way. 

CHICKEN SMOTHERED IN OYSTERS. 

Cut a roasting chicken in serving pieces. Wash 
and wipe dry. Brown in a little bacon or salt pork 
fat. Then place in a casserole. Season with salt 
and pepper. Add a cup of water. Let cook one hour 
or until tender. Then add with cup of oysters one 
cup of cream. Cover and cook for twenty minutes. 
Reserve a little of the cream to soften one tablespoon- 
ful of flour. Stir that into the sauce. Cook for ten 
minutes and serve. 

CHICKEN ROASTED IN CASSEROLE. 

Prepare the chicken for roasting. Place in the 
casserole and cover the breasts with thin slices of salt 
pork. Place around it onions that have first been 
boiled for ten minutes. Cover closely. After a while 
add a little water if necessary. Cook slowly from 



106 ROCKT MOUNTAIll COOK BOOK. 

two to three hours according to the size of the fowl. 
Make a gravy from the fat in the casserole. 

CHOPPED PUFF PASTE FOR CHICKEN PIE. 



2 cups of flour. 
y^ teaspoonful salt. 
1 teaspoonful sugar. 
1 cup butter. 



1 egg. 

y^ cup ice water. 

^ tablespoonful lemon juice. 



Beat the egg until light, add to it lemon juice and 
water. Sift all the dry materials together and chop 
the butter with them. Add the liquid, roll and fold 
four times. Bake in a hot oven. 

ROAST GOOSE. 

A young goose four or five months old is the best. 
Singe, remove the pin feathers, then wash in warm 
soap suds to cleanse it, and open the pores, then draw 
it as you would a turkey or chicken. Wash in cold 
water and wipe dry inside and ont. Stuff with a 
potato stuflSng, sew and truss. Put on a rack in the 
pan, cover the breast with slices of fat salt pork. 
(The pork fat aids in drawing out the oil.) Place in 
the oven for an hour, then take the pan from the 
oven and pour off all the fat, dredge with flour. When 
the flour is brown, add a little hot water; baste often. 
Cook until brown and tender. Make a gravy from 
some of the fat in the pan, flour and hot water, season 
to taste. Serve with apple sauce. 

POTATO STUFFING. 



1 cup mashed potatoes. 
1 tablespoonful of onion 

chopped fine. 
1 tablespoonful of sour 
apples chopped fine. 



y^ teaspoonful sage. 
^ teaspoonful saft. 
% teaspoonful pepper. 



POULTRY. 107 

ROAST TAMB DUCK. 

Singe, clean, remove the crop, oil bag, legs, en- 
trails. Stuff, truss and dredge with flour, salt and 
pepper. After they have been in a hot oven for ten 
minutes, add a little hot water to the pan, and baste 
often. Boast thirty minutes, if liked rare, and forty- 
five minutes, well done. Stuff with a potato or bread 
stuffing, or with celery and apples. Serve with an 
olive or bread sauce. 

OTST£R STUFFING. 

2 cups of oysters. % teaspoonful pepper. 

1 cup bread crumbs. 1 tablespoonful lemon juice. 



2 cups oi oysiers. 
1 cup bread crumbs. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 



Pick over and wash the oysters. Mix with the 
crumbs and seasonings, and stuff any kind of poultry. 
Turkeys are the best stuffed with oysters. 

CHESTNUT STUFFING. 

Cut a cross in the shells of one quart of the large 
chestnuts. Place them in a pan with a teaspoonful 
of butter and bake in a hot oven until the shells break 
open. The skin will come off with the shell. Remove 
from the shell and cook in boiling water with one- 
half teaspoonful salt until tender. While hot, mash 
a few at a time through a colander or potato press. 
Season with two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, salt 
and pepper, and moisten with one-half cup of stock. 



KOCET UOUNTAIH COOK BOOK. 



GAME. 

CAKVASBACK AMD REDHEAD DUCKS. 

Pick, singe, draw them, leaving on the head. Cut 
an opening to remove the crop, and through it draw 
the head and neck, letting the head come out at the 
back between the drumsticke. Tie firmJy in place. 
With a bowl of cold water wipe out the inside and out- 
aide. Cut off the wing at the second joint. Sprinkle 
the inside with salt and pepper, dredge the outside 
with flour, salt and pepper, and cover with thin strips 
of salt pork. Put inside of the duck a teaspoonful of 
currant jelly, a sour apple, quartered and cored, or 
a couple of sticks of celery, cut in pieces. Place in 
the baking pan with a little hot water, and bake in a 
very hot oven for fifteen to twenty minutes. "Wild 
ducks should be served rare and very hot. Serve 
fried hominy and currant jelly with the ducks. 

The canvasbadis have a purple head and silver 
breast and are in season from September to May. 
The redhead ia often taken for it. 

SALHI OF DUCK OR GAHB. 

Cut the game in small pieces, put them in a liot 

oven for five minutes to start the juices. Put in a 

sauce pan two tablespoon fuls of butter, one-fourth 

pound of salt pork cut in dice one tablespoonful of 

onion and carrot chopped fine, one-fourth teaspoonful 

d one bay leaf, ten peppercorns. 

38, stirring often, then add one 

ir; let it brown, then add two 

Jc. Cook very slowly for tiiirty 



6AMB. 109 

minutes, strain, add one-fourth cup of madeira and 
the pieces of game, cover and cook slowly for forty 
minutes, garnish with croutons and truffles. The 
truffles should be added five minutes before the salmi 
is done. Cooked game can be used. Simmer only for 
ten minutes after it is added to the sauce. 

LARDED GROUSE. 

Draw, wipe clean, inside and out, lard the breast, 
and truss. Kub with softened butter, dredge with 
flour, salt and pepper. Roast for twenty-five minutes. 
Serve with bread or olive sauce. 

POTTED PIGEONS. 

Clean and truss them, dredge with flour, salt and 
pepper. Place them in a stew pan on slices of bacon, 
the breasts up. Add a carrot and onion cut in dice. 
Cover with stock or hot water. Let them simmer un- 
til they are tender. Serve each pigeon on a thin slice 
of buttered toast. Make a gravy and pour around 
them. Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter, stir into it 
one of flour, gradually stir in the liquor and vegeta- 
bles left in the boiler, season to taste with salt and 
pepper. 

ROAST PIGEONS OR SQUABS. 

To roast they should be young. Draw, clean and 
truss them, tie thin slices of bacon or salt pork over 
the breasts, dredge with flour, put a small piece of 
butter inside. Eoast from fifteen to twenty minutes, 
baste with butter, and a very little hot water. Or 
they can be split down the back, and covered with 
slices of pork or pieces of butter, dredged with flour 



110 ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

and roasted in the oven. Serve on slices of toast, 
garnish with parsley, shoe string, French-fried or 
Saratoga potatoes. 

SQUABS IN CASSEROLE. 

Truss for clean squabs in the same manner as a 
chicken is dressed for roasting. Roll in flour and 
brown in hot fat Place in a casserole. Add a cup 
of chicken or veal broth. Salt and pepper as needed. 
Let cook thirty minutes. 

Parboil one cup of potato balls and let brown in 
the fat where the squabs were browned. Peel eight 
mushrooms. Break in small pieces and brown in the 
fat. Then add to the squabs and cook about twenty 
minutes. Add one-half cup of cream and thicken 
with a little flour. Sherry or madeira may be added. 
Serve in the casserole. 

QUAILS BROILED. 

Split down the back. Rub with melted butter, 
broil over hot coals for eight minutes. Serve on 
slices of buttered toast, season with butter, salt and 
pepper. 

QUAILS ROASTED. 

Draw them and wipe inside and out with a cloth 
and cold water. Truss, letting the legs sta,nd up. Tie 
around each one a thin slice of salt pork or bacon. 
Bake in a hot oven for twenty minutes; baste fre- 
quently with butter and a little hot water. Serve 
on slices of toast. Season with a little salt, pepper 
and the melted butter in the pan. A very nice way is 
to lo/rd thenu 



QAMB. Ill 

WOODCOCK ROASTED. 

Dress, wipe clean inside and out, cut off the feet, 
tie the legs close to the body. Skin the head and neck 
and tie the peak under the winds. Tie thin slices of 
pork or bacon around them. Bake in a hot oven for 
ten or fifteen minutes. Baste with butter. Clean 
and cook in boiling salted water the hearts and livers, 
then pound to a paste, season with salt and pepper. 
Butter thin slices of toast, large enough for one bird, 
cover with the paste, place the birds on the toast, 
moistening them with the butter in the pan. Garnish 
with watercress or pieces of parsley. 

VENISON ROASTED. 

It should be wiped clean with a cloth and cold 
water, cover with strips of salt pork and roasted the 
same as beef or mutton, allowing twelve to fifteen 
minutes to a pound. Serve with; currant jelly sauce 
and a simple salad. 

VENISON STEAK. 

Venison steak is cooked the same as beefsteak, 
serving currant jelly with it or around it on the plat- 
ter, forming a sauce. The roasting pieces are the sad- 
dle and haunch or leg. Steak is cut from both. 

ROASTED PARTRIDGE. 

Patridges have a white meat and should be well 
done. Dress and truss, cover with thin slices of salt 
pork, dredge with flour. Bake about forty-five min- 
utes, basting often with hot water and butter. Place 
on a hot platter, and surround with coarse crumbs of 
bread fried in butter, and serve with it a bread sauce. 



112 ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

STKWED PIGEONS. 

Clean and wipe the pigeons dry. Make a stuffing 
of half a cup of pitted olives with the livers chopped 
fine, a tablespoonful each of finely chopped onion and 
parsley. Moisten two cups of stale bread crumbs with 
two tablespoonfuls of melted butter and a little hot 
water. Season with a tablespoonful of salt, one^- 
fourth teaspoonful of paprica and a tablespoonful of 
currant jelly. Stuff the pigeons, and truss well with 
twine. Place in a saucepan two tablespoonfuls of but- 
ter. When hot, brown the pigeons in it, then stir into 
it two tablespoonfuls of flour, and gradually three 
cups of boiling water. When smootii, add a small 
onion, two carrots and two stalks of celery, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, six peppercorns. Cook very slowly, 
tightly covered, for one hour and a quarter, or till 
they seem tender. Serve the pigeons on slices of toast. 
Strain and thicken the gravy and serve separately. 

PIGEONS IN CASSEROLE. 

Clean and truss the pigeons. Brown in hot but- 
ter. Place them in a casserole, pour what butter is 
left from the sauce pan around them with a table- 
spoonful each of chopped onion, celery and carrot, 
and a teaspoonful of salt. Pour in a half cup of dry 
white wine. Cover and cook in the oven for one 
hour. Serve on slice of toast that has been moistened 
with the sauce from the casserole. Gkimish with 
parsley. Served with orange and lettuce salad. 

HOT PIGEON PIE. 

Bone the pigeons. Brown in butter. Put on to 
stew with sliced onions, carrots and two stalks of 



GAME. 113 

celery cut in hdf-inch pieces, salt and pepper. Stir 
into the butter, after the pigeons are removed, two 
tablespoonfnls of flour ; mix till smooth, add two cups 
of hot water gradually, replace the pigeons and cook 
slowly till tender; then pour into a baking dish, cover 
with puff paste, with slits cut in the center for the 
steam to escape. Bake in a hot oven twenty-five min- 
utes. 



114 KOCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



ENTREES. 



Eiitr6es are served between courses, and for regu- 
lar course. 

CROQUETTES. 

Croquettes are made of nearly all kinds of meat, 
fish, vegetables, cheese, eggs and nuts. When shaped 
flat like a chop they are called cutlets. To prepare 
them the materials should be cooked tender, well 
seasoned and finely chopped (a meat chopper is best 
to use for meat croquettes), mixed together with a 
creamy sauce, moulded, rolled in bread or cracker 
crumbs, dipped in slightly beaten egg, rolled in 
crumbs again (this prevents the fat from getting in- 
side), and fried a rich brown in clear smoking hot fat. 
They are usually surrounded with a sauce or peas. 
If not, should be garnished with celery tips, parsley, 
watercress or small leaves of lettuce. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

An old chicken can be used. They are cheaper 
than young ones, and the flavor is better. Clean the 
chicken well, and plunge in a kettle of boiling salted 
water. Place the kettle on the stove where it will 
have a slow cooking. Add to it one good-sized onion 
cut in slices, eight peppercorns, two or three roots of 
celery, or a few of the outside stalks (celery seed 
may be used in place of celery). A small amount of 
thyme and bay leaf can be used if desired. Let cook 
until tender. Remove from the liquid and when old 
chop fine and mix with a cream sauce. The liquid 



BNTRSSS. 115 

should be strained and when cold remove tiie fat and 
use for the sauces. YeciL or lamb can be cooked in 
this way for croquettes. 

SAUCE FOR CROQUETTE MATURE. 
All Croquettes Are Mixed With a Sauce. 



V^ teaspoonful salt. 
% teaspoonful pepper. 



1 cup milk, cream or stock. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter. 

3 tablespoonfuls flour. 

A dash of nutmeg can be used. When stock is 
used, take one-half cup of milk or cream. Scald the 
cream, milk or stock in a double boiler, melt the but- 
ter in a sauce pan, stir into it the flour and seasonings. 
When smooth, add it to the scalded milk. Cook ten 
minutes, stirring frequently. Add it to the chopped 
mixture, and when cool mould in shape, and dip first 
in crumbs, then in ^g, then in crumbs again. When 
meat is used, allow about one-half as much sauce as 
meat It is well to add the sauce to the meat gradu- 
ally, so as not to get the mixture too thin. It should 
be as thin as possible to mould. The beauty of a 
croquette is to have it creamy inside. 

TO PREPARE THE EGG AND CRUMBS FOR CROQUETTES. 

Beat the egg slightly until it is thoroughly mixed. 
Add to it two tablespoonfuls of cold water or milk. 
Put the bread or crackers through a meat grinder, or 
roll them. Always sift them. Bread should be thor- 
oughly dry before rolling. 

TO MOULD CROQUETTES. 

Take a tablespoonful of the mixture, roll lightly 
between the hands in a ball, roll the ball lightly in 



116 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

bread crumbs and mould with the hands in any shape 
you like. Dip in the egg, and see that all parts are 
covered (this prevents the fat from getting inside), 
lift out on the blade of a knife and again roll in the 
crumbs. Set aside if possible fuly one hour, before 
frying. Croquettes can be made up the day before 
frying if kept in a cool place and covered. 

TO FRY CROQUETTES. 

Have a good, clean fat. Let it become smoking 
hot. It can be tested by a piece of bread. If it colors 
while counting twenty it is right. Place four or five 
at a time in the frying basket, plunge in the hot fat 
and cook until brown. Remove them to a soft paper 
to drain. Have the fat smoking hot each time before 
immersing the basket. Croquettes can be fried with- 
out the basket, it being much more convenient to 
use it. 

SWEETBREAD CROQUETTES. 

Clean the sweetbreads. Cook in boiling salted 
water with two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice (or one 
tablespoonful to each pair) until tender. When cold 
cut in small cubes and mix with sauce. Add one 
beaten egg to the sauce five minutes before removing 
from the stove. A couple of tablespoonfuls of finely 
chopped chicken can be used with the sweetbreads. 
Chicken or veal stock can be used with the milk to 
make the sauce, or the milk used alone. 

MUSHROOM CROQUETTES. 

Peel the mushrooms, break in small pieces. Cook 
in sauce pan with two tablespoonfuls of water tod a 



ENTREES. 117 

litte salt. Let boil for five minutes, drain from the 
liquid and use it with cream to make the sauce. Add 
one ^g to the sauce. Mushrooms and sweetbreads 
are often used together. Chicken may be added to 
either the sweetbreads and mushrooms. 

NTJT CROQUETTES. 

Brazil, English walnuts or pecans can be used. 
One cup of chopped chicken or veal, one-half cup of 
nuts chopped fine. Mix with sauce. 

EGG CROQUETTES. 

Cook eggs in water, just off the boil, for thirty 
minutes. When cold remove from the shell. Chop 
the whites fine, sift the yolks, mix together with one 
egg slightly beaten. Season with salt and pepper 
and finely chopped parsley or chives. A few cooked 
mushrooms can be added. Mix with heavy white 
sauce. Set aside until cold, then mould, dip in the 
crumbs and egg. Fry. Serve with a white sauce 
alone or add a few peas, small beans, mushrooms or 
asparagus tips. 

CHEESE CROQUETTES. 

One-half cup grated Parmesan cheese, one cup 
American cheese, grated or cut in small pieces, mix 
together with a slightly beaten egg. Season with one- 
fourth teaspoonful of paprica, one-half teaspoonful of 
salt, mix with heavy white sauce. When cold, shape, 
dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs again. Fry. These 
are very nice to accompany a Balad. They can be 
made with only American clieese. 



118 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

RICE AND CHBBSB CROQUETTSS. 

Melt one tablespoonful of butter. Stir into it one 
of flour and one-third cup of milk, one-fourth tea- 
spoonful of salt, paprica. Stir until smooth then add 
one-fourth cup of grated cheese and one cup of cold 
boiled rice (boiled so as to leave the grains whole, but 
well done). When cold form in croquettes. Beat 
one egg, add a tablespoonful of water, brush over the 
croquettes thoroughly with the egg, roll in sifted 
bread crumbs and fry in deep fat 

HOmNY OR RICE CROQUETTES. 

Add to one cup cooked hominy or rice while warm 
one teaspoonful of sugar, the beaten yolk of an egg, a 
little hot milk or cream to moisten, one-fourth tea- 
spoonful of salt, or moisten with a little tomato sauce. 
After shaping, press a cavity in the center of each and 
put in half a teaspoonful of jelly or marmalade. 
Close the rice over it, mould, dip in crumbs and egg, 
the same as other croquettes. These croquettes are 
nice to serve with game. 

Com Meal Mush. — Sliced in plain or fancy 
shapes, dipped in crumbs, egg and crumbs again and 
fried in deep fat, is served witii game. Before the 
mush is quite cool it can be molded in croquette 
shapes, crumbed and egged. 

MACARONI AND SPAGHETTI CROQUETTES. 

Break in small pieces, plunge in boiling salted 
water, cook until tender, drain, cool, then cut in small 
rings. Add to each cupful one tablespoonful of 
grated cheese, one-fourth teaspoonful of paprica and 



ENTREES. 119 

mix together with a very little heavy white sauce, just 
enough to hold the mixture together. When cool 
mould and dip in crumbs, egg and crumbs. Serve 
with tomato, poulette or mushroom sauce. 

OYSTER CROQUETTES. 

Pick over carefully, so as to remove all pieces of 
shell. Kinse through a strainer. Allow them to cook 
five minutes in their own liquor. Drain. When 
cool cut in small pieces. Mix with a sauce made of 
one-half cream and the rest of liquid the oysters were 
strained from. Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter in 
a sauce pan, add to it three tablespoonfuls of flour, 
one-fourth teaspoonful salt, a speck of pepper. When 
smooth stir into it gradually the oyster liquor, then 
the cream. Cook for ten minutes, stirring often, then 
add a slightly beaten egg. Cook five minutes, mix 
with the oysters ; when cold, egg and crumb. Serve 
with cream or shrimp sauce. 

SHAD ROE CROQITETTES. 

Cook the roe in boiling salted water, with one 
tablespoonful of lemon juice, for twenty minutes. 
Drain, cut in fine pieces, mix with the heavy white 
sauce that has had one egg added to and cooked in it 
for five minutes. Season with salt and pepper. When 
cold, mould, egg and crumb. Serve with HoUandaise 
or cucumber sauce. 

LOBSTER CUTLETS. 

These can be formed in the shape of a croquette 
or cutlet. Buy a cooked lobster, remove the meat, cut 
in fine pieces, mix with the heavy white sauce that 



120 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

has an egg cooked in it for five minutes, mould and 
crumb. Fry. Stick into the small end of the cutlet 
a claw. Serve surrounded with peas, a white or Hol- 
landaise sauce. 

Salmon Cutlets. — ^Are made in the same way, with 
the addition of lemon juice and a little chopped pars- 
ley. White fish can be used the same. 

CLAM CROQUETTES. 

One cup of minced clams drained from the liquid. 
Mix with heavy white sauce made of half cream and 
half the liquor from the clams. Season with salt and 
pepper. When cool, mould, egg and crumb. Serve 
with Beamaise or tartare sauce. 

SWEET AND WHITE POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Two cups hot, well-mashed potato, one tablespoon- 
ful of butter, a little pepper, one teaspoonful salt, a 
little celery salt, a few drops of onion juice, one tea- 
spoonful of chopped parsley, the beaten yolk of an 
egg, add a little cream or milk if not moist enough to 
mould. Roll in crumbs and egg and crumbs. Fry 
in smoking-hot fat 

POTATOES IN SURPRISE. 

Use for these sweet or white potato croquette mix- 
ture. Take one tablespoonful and mould it flat in the 
hand, about half an inch thick. Drop into the center 
of it one teaspoonful of creamed chicken, mushrooms 
or sweetbreads that have been highly seasoned, fold 
the potato over it and mould, egg and crumb, like 
other croquettes. Serve with poulette sauce. 



ENTREES. 121 

CELERY CROQUETTES. 

Cut well-cleaned celery in very small pieces, cook 
until soft in boiling salted water. Drain, mix with 
a heavy sauce made by melting two tablespoonfuls of 
butter and stirring into it four tablespoonfuls of flour, 
one-half cup of the water drained from the celery 
and one-half cup of cream, one-fourth teaspoonful 
salt Cook for ten minutes, stirring, then add a 
slightly beaten egg. Cook five minutes, mix with the 
celery, mould, e^ and crumb. These are delicious 
served with the roast or game course. 

TO PREPARE MUSHROOMS. 

Mushrooms contain almost as much nutrition as 
meat. The simplest way of cooking mushrooms is the 
best. Sherry and madeira are sometimes used with 
them for flavoring, but to many their flavor, alone, is 
far preferable. They decay quickly and should not 
be used unless fresh. Use silver knife for peeling. 
Wash them, remove the stem and peel the caps. The 
stems can be boiled separately and the water used to 
flavor sauces or soups. 

Saute Mushrooms. — Cut or break the caps in 
pieces, put them in a sauce pan or chafing dish with 
some butter. Let cook in the butter for ten minutes. 
Season with salt and pepper and a little sherry if you 
like. Serve on toast. 

CREAMED MUSHROOMS. 

Break the caps in small pieces. Cook with a very 
little water for five minutes, then add one-half cup of 
cream that has had a tablespoonful of flour mixed 



122 R0CK7 MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

with it, one-fourth teaspoonf ul of salt and a little pep- 
per, add a tablespoonful of butter. Cook ten minutes. 
This amount of cream and seasoning for one pound of 
fresh mushrooms. Serve on toast, or as filling for 
patty cases, timbale cases or bake ten minutes in ram- 
quin dishes, covered with buttered crumbs. 

MUSHROOMS A LA POULSTTE. 

Stew the mushrooms in a little water with a table- 
spoonful of butter. Season with salt and pepper. 
When tender add a little chicken stock and cream and 
the beat^ yolks of two e^. Stir until it thickens. 
Serve at once. 

BROILED MUS^OOMS. 

The largest size should be used for broiling. Peel 
them and remove the stem, brush over with melted 
butter, broil as you would steak, for about five min- 
utes. Place on buttered toast, season with salt, pep- 
per and butter and a little chopped parsley. 

MUSHROOM SOUFFl£ 



2 tablespoonfuls butter. 
2 tablespoonfuls flour. 
H cup mushroom liquor. 



^ cup cream. 

% cup chopped mushrooms 

3 eggs. 

Salt and pepper. 



Melt butter. Stir in it the flour and slowly the 
mushroom liquor and cream and seasonings. Beat the 
yolks slightly. Stir into the sauce. Cook for two or 
mreemmutes. Add the mushrooms. Remove from 
\vL.r' T.^^^ '^^^*^y ^1 a^d the stiffly beaten 
rn of\.. . '""Z buttered baking dish. Set in a 
pan of hot water for one-half hour. Serve at once. 



ENTREES. 123 

CORNHEAL SOUFFLE. 



1 cup milk. 

114 cup oommeal. 



2 eggs. 

% teaspoonful salt. 



Scald the milk. Stir in it the meal. Stir until 
smooth. Then cook a little. Add the salt and well 
beaten yolks. Fold in the stiffly beaten whites. Bake 
for thirty minutes setting in a pan of hot water. 

TO PREPARE CALF'S BRAINS. 

Soak for an hour in cold water, then cook slowly 
in boiling water for twenty minutes with a tablespoon- 
ful of vinegar or lemon juice. Slice of onion, a 
little thyme, bay leaf, salt and peppercorns. Place 
again in cold water to blanch, remove the skin and 
fibers and cook by any of the receipts given for sweet- 
breads. 

CHICKEN SOUFFLE. 



2 tablespeenfuls butter 

2 tablespoonfuls flour. 

2 cups milk or part chicken 

stock, 2 cups finely 

chopped chicken. 



% cup fine bread 

crumbs, salt, pepper 
and onion juice. 

3 ^KS. 



Melt the butter. Stir into it the flour and season- 
ings. Add gradually the milk or stock, then the bread 
crumbs. Add the egg yolks slightly beaten and the 
chopped chicken. Fold in the stiffly beaten whites. 
One-half cup of chopped mushrooms may be added. 
Bake setting in a pan of hot water until firm. 

CHICKEN A LA DUXELLE. 

For a chicken weighing three pounds use two cups 
of stock or water, two tablespoonfuls butter, two 
tablespoonfuls fiour, one teaspoonful chopped parsley, 



124 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

a few drops of onion juice, one teaspoonful lemon 
juic5e, one teaspoonful salt, pepper, crumbs. Cut the 
chicken as for fricassee, sprinkle with the salt and 
pepper. Melt the butter, add the flour and season- 
ings, gradually the stock, stirring all the time, dip the 
chicken in the sauce, then roll in fine crumbs, sprin- 
kle over lightly with salt and pepper, place in baking 
pan. Cook thirty minutes in hot oven. Serve with 
Bechamel, mushroom or poulette sauce. Garnish 
with thin pieces of toast cut in fancy shapes. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Boil an old chicken in as little water as possible 
until the meat slips from the bones. Remove the 
skin, pick the meat apart, remove all the fat. Season 
the liquor highly with salt, pepper and celery salt, or 
cook a few stalks of celery with the chicken. Cook 
down to one cup. Butter a mould ; decorate it with 
slices of hard-boiled egg, trufiles, sliced pickles and 
olives, if liked. Pack the meat in, mixing the light 
and dark. Over each layer of meat pour some of the 
liquor, until all is used. Set away until cold, with 
a weight on top. When ready to serve remove from 
the mould. Garnish with lettuce, parsley, watercress, 
hard-boiled eggs cut in halves, radishes or olives. 

CHICKEN A LA KING. 

Melt four tablespoonfuls of butter. Add one-half 
green pepper chopped fine and cook about five ^min- 
utes, after letting the butter brown. Add two level 
tablespoonfuls of flour, and one-half teaspoonful of 
salt and cook until frothy. Then add two cups of 
cream and stir until the sauce thickens. Set over hot 



BNTREES. 126 

water and add a half cup of cooked mushrooms cut in 
small pieces. Add two and a half cups of cooked 
chicken in cubes. Serve on toast 

SCALLOPED CHICKEN OR TURKEY. 

Take equal parts of cold chicken or turkey and 
boiled rice or macaroni. Put in layers in a baking 
dish, cover with poulette or tomato sauce, well sea- 
soned. Cover with buttered crumbs. Bake until the 
crumbs are a rich brown. 

CHICKEN TIMBALE. 

Chop the meat from the breast and second joints 
of an imcooked chicken by passing it through the meat 
chopper several times. To one cup of the meat add 
five eggs, one at a time, beating them in thoroughly. 
Then add one teaspoonful salt, one-eighth teaspoonful 
pepper, a little celery salt and one-half cup of fresh 
mushrooms, if convenient. They can be omitted. 
Two cups of heavy cream. Decorate a well-buttered 
mould with slices of hard-boiled egg or truffles. Turn 
in the mixture and cover with a buttered paper. Cook 
standing in a pan of hot water until the center feels 
firm to the touch, from thirty to forty-five minutes. 
It can be cooked either on top of the stove or in the 
oven. Do not let the water boil. Put the bones of 
the chicken on to cook in cold water enough to cover, 
season highly with soup seasonings and cook slowly 
on the back of the stove for three hours. Reduce the 
stock to one cup, strain and use with one-half cup of 
cream thickened with two tablespoonf uls of flour that 
has been added to two tablespoonfuls of melted but- 
ter. Season to taste and pour around the timbale 
when ready to serve. 



lae BOCET MOVNTAIN COOE BOOK. 

Individual Moulds. — Can be decorated with hard- 
boiled egga, cut in fancy shapes, truffles, pickles or 
peas, and fiUed with the same mixture. Cook from 
fifteen to twenty minutes. 

Macaroni Timbale. — Cook until tender in boiling 
salted water long sticks of very fine macaroni or spa- 
ghetti. When soft lay carefully on a napkin to cool 
Butter well a mould, wind the macaroni around it, 
pressing it gently into the butter to hold it, then fill 
up carefully with the timbale mixture. 

HONBYCOHB TIHBALB. 

Cook in boiling salted water the largest-size maca- 
roni. When tender remove to a doth to cool, then 
cut in pieces one-half an inch long. Butter a dome- 
shaped mould or bowl thickly, cover it with the maca- 
roni by sticking each piece into the butter, one at a 
time, as closely together as possible. Fill with the 
chicken timbale mixture. 

HACAROHI Ain> CHEESE TIMBALE. 

Line the mould with cooked macaroni and fill 
with the following mixture : One cup of cooked mac- 
aroni, cut in small pieces, one-half cup of grated 
cheese. Stir these into a sauce made by melting two 
tablespoonfuls of butter, stirring into it two table- 
spoonfuls of flour, one cup of milk. When smooth 
lalf teaapoonful salt and paprica. Stir in 
slightly beaten, mix with the macaroni and 
11 up the monld and poach in hot water until 
irve surrounded by a white sauce. 



ENTREES. 127 

TURBAN OF MACARONI AND HAM. 

Let three-fourths of a cup of macaroni boil rap- 
idly in salted water till tender, drain, rinse in cold 
water and cut in small pieces, mix with the macaroni 
one-half cup of chopped ham, one-half teaspoonful of 
salt, a little paprica, three beaten eggs, one cup of 
milk or thin cream. Turn in buttered moulds and 
bake, setting in a pan with a little hot water until the 
mixture feels firm to the touch. Let cool a few min- 
utes. Turn from the moulds and surround with a 
tomato or white sauce. 

HAM TIMBALES. 

Soak one tablespoonful of fine bread crumbs in 
one cup of thin cream for half an hour, then add two 
well-beaten eggs, one cup of finely chopped cooked 
ham, one-half cup of milk, one-half teaspoonful of 
mustard and one-fourth teaspoonful of salt. Turn 
into well-buttered timbale moulds, or use one large 
mould. The moulds can be decorated with slices 
of hard-boiled eggs cut in fanciful shapes. Cook, 
setting the moulds in a pan of hot water till the cen- 
ters are firm. Serve with a white sauce. 



HAM MOUSSE. 



1 tablespoonful granu- 
lated gelatine. 
Va cup cold water. 
% cup hot cream. 
l^ cup cream. 



2 cups finely chopped 
boiled ham. 

1 teaspoonful mixed mus- 
tard. 

l^ teaspoonful salt. 



Soften gelatine in cold water. Add hot cream, 
mustard and salt. Stir this into the ham. When 
slightly thick add the half cup cream whipped. Then 
turn into mold. Serve cold. Surround with mayon- 

5 



128 ROCKY MOVNTAnr COOK BOOK. 

naise dressing that is partly whipped cream. Add 
chopped olives and pickles to the sauce or horseradish. 

BOUBANS. 

1 lb. of cooked chicken I ^ cup of butter, 

breasts (2 cups). | ^ cup of salt pork. 

Put the meat and pork through the grinder, add 
to it three eggs, beating in one at a time until smooth 
and light, add a teaspoonful of onion juice and one 
of salt, pepper to taste, add one-half cup of the liquor 
the chicken was boiled in, cook in well-buttered 
moulds, either one large one or small ones, as you 
would a timbale. Serve with a sauce made of one- 
half-cup of chicken stock, one-half cup of cream and 
one-half cup of canned mushrooms, seasoned and 
thickened with two tablespoonfuls of flour that has 
been added to two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. 

ASPIC JELLY. 



1 fowl. 

1 shin of beef. 
1 knuckle of veal. 
5 cloves. 

1 bay leaf. 

2 tablespoonfuls salt. 
lYji packages of gelatine. 



2 large onions. 

3 carrots. 

4 stocks of celery. 
2 turnips. 

1 cup of sherry or madeira. 
6 peppercorns. 



The wine can be omitted. Put the meats in a ket- 
tle just covered with cold water and simmer for five 
hours. An hour before removing from the fire, add 
seasonings and vegetables that have been browned in 
marrow from the soup bone or butter, strain the 
stock ; it should be cooked down to two quarts. When 
cold remove ail the fat, and stir into it the beaten 
whites of two eggs, clear as you would clear soup 



ENTREES. 129 

stock, then add the gelatine, which has been softened 
in cold water. Aspic jelly can be made from any 
soup stock by clearing it and adding gelatine. 

* 

TO MOULD IN ASPIC JELLY. 

Pack the mould in a pan of broken ice ; have it set 
in the pan firm and straight; pour in a little of the 
jelly; when firm, garnish with hard-boiled eggs, vege- 
tables, macaroni, nuts, olives, pickles, truffles, all cut 
in fancy shapes. Fasten each piece in place with 
a few drops of jelly, and when hard, add a little more 
jelly to cover. Then place whatever you wish to 
mould in the center carefully, pour in a little more 
jelly to hold it ; when hard fill up the mould with the 
jelly. To decorate on the sides, dip the ornaments in 
the jelly and place on the sides after the mould is very 
cold. AH kinds of meat, game or fish can be moulded 
in this way, either in one large mould or in individual 
moulds. A whole tongue is very nice moulded in 
Aspic. 

TO UNMOULD JELLT. 

Dip the mould quickly in warm water, put the 
dish over it and invert dish and mould together ; gar- 
nish with some of the jelly cut in small pieces, parsley 
or any green. Nasturtiums, with the leaves, make a 
very effective garnish. 

CHICKEN CHARTREUSE. 

Mix finely chopped cooked chicken (or any meat) 
that has been highly seasoned, with a cream, or pou- 
lette sauce, or left-over sauce from the meats ; line a 
well-buttered mould with hot cooked rice an inch 



130 ROCKY MOUMTAIH COOK BOOK. 

thick, fill the center with the meat and cover the top 
with rice, cover the mould and cook standing in hot 
water for forty-five minutes. Serve surrounded by a 
tomato sauce. A very nice way of using up leftovers. 

CHICKEN TBKRAPIlf. 

•To be cooked on the chafing dish or over hot water. 
Cut one cold chicken and one parboiled sweetbread 
quite fine ; make one cup of cream sauce by using two 
tablespoonfuls of butter melted, adding to it two of 
fiour, one cup of thin cream; season with salt and 
pepper, then put in the meat; when heated, add the 
yolks of two beaten eggs ; cook five minutes, then add 
a wine glass of sherry or madeira. Serve. 



MOCK TBRRAPIN. 



2 ducks. 

1 pound calf's liver. 
1 onion. 

3 stalks celery. 



2 doves. 

1 tablespoonful salt. 
6 peppercorns. 
Sprig of parsley. 



Clean the ducks and put them on to cook in boil- 
ing water with the liver and seasonings ; cook slowly 
until tender ; remove from the kettle when cold. Cut 
ducks and liver in dice, mash the hard-boiled yolks of 
six eggs to a smooth paste, add gradually a cup of 
thick cream, melt three tablespoonfuls of butter in a 
sauce pan, add two tablespoonfuls of flour, one-half 
cup of milk, stir until smooth, gradually stir in the 
egg yolks and cream, stir constantly until it reaches 
the boiling point, season with salt and pepper, then 
add the meat, heat and serve. 



ENTREES. 131 

CHICKENS, PIGEONS OR GAME OF ANY KIND IN 

CASSEROLE. 

Singe and draw them ; wipe dry ; saute to a rich 
brown in frying pan, using butter, bacon or pork fat; 
then place in a casserole; add to the fat in the pan 
two tablespoonfuls of flour and two cups of stock, 
chicken, veal or beef stock ; season with salt, pepper, a 
teaspoonful of parsley or cloves, chopped fine, a half 
teaspoonful of onion juice. Cook the sauce for a few 
minutes. Turn it into the casserole, put on the cover 
and cook slowly in the oven about two hours, accord- 
ing to the tenderness of the fowl or game. Skin off 
the fat, and if game, add half cup of stoned olives 
that have been heated, or two tablespoonfuls of capers. 
Serve in the casserole, 

CHICKEN LIVERS. 

Put in the chafing dish or sauce pan (over the 
fire) two tablespoonfuls of butter. When hot add 
the livers cut in pieces. Turn them to brown on all 
sides, dredge with flour, add a cup of stock after they 
have been cooking five minutes ; season with salt and 
pepper, add one-fourth cup of madeira or sherry, a 
few stoned olives. Serve on toast 

Chicken Livers may be cooked in butter until 
brown, sprinkled with flour, add cream and season- 
ings. 

SALMI OF DUCK OR GAME (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Cut the meat from cold roasted game or duck into 
small pieces. Break up the bones and remnants, 
cover with stock or cold water, add a pinch of herbs, 
two cloves and two peppercorns. Boil down to a cup- 
ful for a pint of meat. Fry two small onions cut fine 



132 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

in two tablespoonfuls of butter till brown, add two 
tablespoonfuls of flour, stir till dark brown. Strain 
the liquor in which the bones were boiled and add it 
gradually to the butter and flour; add more salt if 
needed, one tablespoonful of lemon juice, two table- 
spoonfuls of Worchestershire sauce and the pieces of 
meat. Simmer fifteen minutes; add a dozen mush- 
rooms and a glass of claret, if you like, or the juice of 
a sour orange. Serve hot on slices of fried bread. 
Garnish with parsley and slices of orange, or serve 
canned peas in the center with the meat on toast 
around tiiem. 

MEAT PIB. 

Cut cold-cooked meat into thin slices, remove all 
the gristle, put in baking dish, cover with gravy or 
tomato sauce. Season welL Spread a crust of 
mashed potato over the meat, brush over with beaten 
egg and cook in a hot oven for twenty minutes. 

MEAT PIB (No. a). 

Put layers of cooked sliced meat and potato in a 
baking dish (other vegetables can be used if liked) ; 
cover with a gravy; season and spread over with a 
plain pastry rolled one-half inch thick ; bake in a hot 
oven for thirty minutes, or covered with a baking 
powder biscuit dough. 

BEEF LOAF. 

Put through the meat grinder two pounds of beef 
from the top of the round. Add one half cup of 
cream, the yolks of two eggs and the white of one, 
one-fourth cup of melted butter, two teaspoonfuls of 
salt, one-half teaspoonful of sage, one-fourth tea- 



t 



ENTREES. 133 



spoonful of pepper. Pack solidly in a bread pan and 
bake from thirty to forty minutes. When cold, slice 
thin, garnish with sliced pickles or olives. 



NUT LOAF. 



1 egg* 

1 cup tomato pulp. 
1 cup peanut meats. 
14 cup walnut meats. 



14 cup butter or fat. 
1 cup soft bread crumbs. 
^ cup milk. 
Salt, pepper. 



Soak the crumbs in the milk for half an hour, 
add the beaten egg, softened butter, tomato, nuts, sea- 
sonings. Make in loaf. Bake, basting with melted 
butter, bacon or salt pork fat. 

SPANISH RICE. 

Cut cooked mutton or lamb in thin slices or cubes. 
Place in a baking dish a layer of meat, sprinkle light- 
ly with salt and pepper and cover a quarter of an 
inch thick with cooked rice, then with tomato sauce, 
and so on until the dish is full. Spread buttered 
crumbs over the top ; bake in a quick over for twenty 
minutes. 

RAGOUT OF MUTTON OR LAMB. 

Two pounds from the neck of mutton or lamb, cut 
in inch pieces. Put two tablespoonfuls of butter into 
a frying pan, add one onion cut in thin slices, one 
good-sized carrot sliced, and the meat well browned, 
being careful that it does not bum ; then stir in two 
tablespoonfuls of flour and gradually add a cup and a 
half of water, teaspoonful of salt, one-fourth tea- 
spoonful of pepper, tie in a piece of muslin a sprig 
of parsley, half a bay leaf and a clove (remove be- 
fore serving). Cover closely and simmer for two 



134 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

hours. Add one-half can of peas ten minutes before 
serving. This can be cooked in a casserole dish. 

Cooked WAiiton or lamb may be prepared in the 
same way, cooking slowly one hour. 

LIVER LOAF. 

Put a calf s liver through the meat grinder, sea- 
son lightly with salt, pepper, a dash of cayenne and 
nutmeg and three eggs, one-fourth cup of melted but- 
ter ; mix well together, put into a well-buttered mould 
or bread pan, bake standing in a pan of hot water 
for one hour. Serve cold, garnishing with slices of 
hard-boiled ^g and pickles or olives. Or serve hot 
with a brown sauce. 

TO BROIL VENISON STEAK. 

Cover with melted bviter, and then broil as you 
would other steaks. Season with salt, pepper and 
butter, or cover with maitre d'hotel sauce. Serve at 
once. 

SWEETBREADS A LA TOURAINE. 

Parboil two sweetbreads; melt three tablespoon- 
fuls of butter, saute the sweetbreads in it with two 
good-sized slices of onion and one carrot sliced. When 
browned remove the sweetbreads to a baking pan, add 
two tablespoonfuls of sherry, one-half cup rich stock, 
cook in the oven for half an hour, basting often. Mash 
a pint of cooked peas through a sieve, reheat, allowing 
the water to cook out of them, season with butter, 
pepper and salt, shape into nests (on the platter, one 
for each sweetbread). Arrange the sweetbreads in 
the nests and pour around them the following sauce : 



ENTREES. 135 

Saute six fresh mushrooms, cut in strips, in butter; 
stir in two tablespoonf uls of flour ; when bbnded with 
the butter add a cup of thick cream and the gravy left 
in the pan after cooking the sweetbreads. A nest of 
the whole peas may be used. 

STUFFED SWEETBREADS. 

After the sweetbreads have been parboiled trim 
and peel. Then stuflF with the following force meat. 
One teaspoonful of bread crumbs. One teaspoonful 
of chopped nuts. Four mushrooms chopped fine. 
Two teaspoonf uls of cream and two of melted butter. 

Put in a shallow baking pan. Season with pepper 

and salt and a few pieces of butter. Bake quickly 

basting with white wine which has in it a little melted 

currant jelly. Serve on toast rounds. Garnish with 

cress. 

HAM PUFFS. 

2 cups Water. 



4 QggS' 

2 cups flour. 



IS cups nour. 
14 cup finely chopped 
cooked ham. 



Yg teaspoonful curry powder. 

% teaspoonful salt. 

A little cayenne of paprica. 



As soon as the water boils stir into it the flour; 
beat well; stir until the batter leaves the sides; re- 
move from the fire; beat in the eggs one at a time; 
add the ham and seasonings. Drop the batter from 
the tip of the spoon into smoking-hot fat; cook until 
brown; drain on soft paper. Serve with white sauce 
or cabbage salad. 

TERRAPIN. 

The best terrapin are the "Diamond Back," from 
Chesapeake Bay. Very good ones are taken from Long 
Island waters and along the seacoast. The season for 
eating them is from Dec^nber to April. 



136 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

TO PREPARE TERRAPIN. 

Drop the live terrapin into boiling hot water ; let 
them remain for twenty minutes; remove the skin 
from the head and feet by rubbing with a cloth ; wash 
in several waters ; then put into fresh boiling water ; 
cook until tender. This is shown by pressing the feet 
between the fingers. If they are not tender in an 
hour's cooking they probably are not good ; the meat 
will be stringy and tough. Remove as soon as tender. 
When cold cut off the nails, remove the shells, very 
carefully take the gall sacks from the liver (if the 
sacks be broken, so the liquid touches the liver or 
meat, it will give a very disagreeable, bitter taste). 
Eemove the entrails, lights, heart, head, tail and 
white muscles; separate the pieces from the joints, 
divide the meat in pieces an inch and a half long. Do 
not break the bones. Place the meat, terrapin eggs 
and liver in a stew pan, cover with boiling water and 
boil until the meat is ready to drop from the bones. 

STEWED TERRAPIN. 

Mash the yolks of six hard-boiled eggs to a paste; 
mix them with one-fourth cup of butter ; stir this into 
two cups of hot cream; cook in double boiler; stir 
until smooth; season with salt, paprica and a dash 
of nutmeg ; add one quart of the cooked terrapin and 
cook for fifteen minutes. Just before serving add 
two tablespoonfuls of sherry. Serve in very hot soup 
plates. 

TERRAPIN A LA NEWBURG. 

Put in a double boiler or chafing dish one quart 
of terrapin, one cup of cream. "When it is well heat- 
ed through add to it the well-beaten yolks of four 



ENTREES. 137 

eggs, mixed with one cup of cream ; stir until it thick- 
ens; season with salt, pepper, paprica and two table- 
spoonfuls madeira or sherry just before serving. 

COCKTAIL OF LITTLE NECK CLAMS AND OYSTERS. 

Chill thoroughly one-half dozen of little neck 
clams or oysters for each person ; mix one tablespoon- 
ful of lemon juice, one tablespoonful of mushroom 
catsup, six drops of tobasco sauce, a little paprica, one- 
fourth teaspoonful of salt, two teaspoonfuls of horse- 
radish; allow a tablespoonful and a half for each 
person. Serve in sherry glasses, grape fruit, lemon 
and orange shells, fresh tomatoes or peppers. 

BAKED BANANAS. 

Select small bananas, pull down a section of the 
skin and remove the coarse threads, cover with the 
skin and lay them in an agate pan, bake imtil the 
skins turn black Remove the pulp from the skin 
and cover with a Sultana Sauce. 

SULTANA SAUCE. 

Pick over and wash one-half cup of Sultana rai- 
sins, cook until plump and tender in boiling water, 
mix two tablespoonfuls of flour with a cup of sugar 
and one-fourth teaspoonful of salt, pour on this one 
and one-half cups of boiling water, stir until smooth 
and boil for ten minutes, then add the raisins, that 
have been drained from the water they were cooked 
in, a few gratings of lemon peel and two tablespoon- 
fuls of sherry or brandy. 



ROCET MOmfTAni COOK BOOK. 



FRITTERS. 



FKITTEK BATTEB (Hra. Lincoln). 

YolkB of two eggB well beaten, add one-half cap of 
milk or water and one tablespoonful of olive oil, one- 
fourth teaspoonful of salt, one cup of flour, or enou^ 
to make it a drop batter. When readj to use add the 
whites of the ef^ beaten stiff. If intended for fruit, 
add a teaspoonful of sugar to the batter ; if for clams, 
tripe or meat, add one teaspoonful of lemon juice. 
This batter will keep several days. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 

Cook the oysters until they are plump; drain 
from the liquor (use the liquor instead of milk to 
make the batter). Dip each oyster into the batter; 
fry until brown in deep fat. 

PEACH FRITTERS. 

Select lai^, fine peaches ; skin and halve them ; 
dip in batter and fry. 

CLAU FSIXTBRS. 

Chop the clams ; mix with the batter ; drop from 
a spoon into the fat. Use some of the clam water to 
r in place of the milk. 

BAITAHA FRIT3XRS. 

nana in two-inch pieces, dip in the bat- 
ich brown ; drain on paper. Serve with 
luee. 



FRIXXSRS. 139 

ORANGE FRITTERS. 

Slice in half -inch slices, dip in batter and fry the 
same as banana fritters. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Pare and core the apple, slice in half-inch slices, 
dip in batter and fry. Any of these fritters can be 
sprinkled with powdered sugar and served with a 
sauce. It is better to steam the apples a few minutes. 

VEGETABLE FRITTERS. 

Cook the vegetables until tender, cut in small 
pieces, dip in the batter and fry. 

QUEEN FRITTERS. 

Make the same mixture as for cream puffs, drop 
from a spoon into hot fat, cook until brown, drain. 
Serve with a sauce. 

SAUCE FOR FRITTERS. 

Mix two tablespoonfuls of flour, one-fourth tea- 
spoonful of salt with a cup of sugar ; pour over it one 
cup of boiling water, stir and boil for ten minutes; 
then add one tablespoonful of creamed butter, two 
tablespoonfuls of sherry or madeira, or flavor with a 
tablespoonful of lemon juice, nutmeg or the juice of 
half an orange and a few drops of lemon juice. Frit- 
ters are served as an entree or dessert. 

BATTER FOR TIMBALE CASES OR FONTAGE CUPS. 

Yolks of two eggs well beaten, half a cup of 
water, one-fourth teaspoonful of salt, one tablespoon- 



140 ROCKY MOUNTAnf COOK BOOK. 

f ul of olive oil, one cup of flour, or enough to make a 
thin batter. Let it stand for two or three hours be- 
fore using. Have a kettle of hot fat, place the iron 
in the fat until it is very hot, or until the fat smokes, 
letting the iron heat up with the fat; remove the iron 
from the fat and quickly wipe a little of the fat from 
the mould ; dip it in the batter until it is coated, place 
again in the hot fat, cook a delicate brown, drain on 
soft paper. Be careful in cooking them that the iron 
does not touch the bottom of the kettle, as that will 
break them at the bottom. Use them to hold creamed 
meats, mushrooms, vegetables, fish or anything that 
you care to serve individually. 

BREAD BOXES. 

For these use stale bread ; cut from a loaf slices 
an inch and a half thick, trim oflf the crusts, making 
a trim, thick slice; cut a square from this inside, 
making a box to hold creamed meats or vegetables. 
Cover the boxes with melted butter and brown in the 
oven. These can be cut in rounds, squares, hearts, 
diamonds or any fancy shapes. 



VEGETABLES. 141 



VEGETABLES. 



When convenient, vegetables should be freshly 
picked and thoroughly washed. The most simple 
ways of cooking them are the best; they then retain 
their own flavor. Most all vegetables should be 
cooked in boiling salted water, and removed from the 
stove as soon as done, as over-cooking will make them 
soggy. Green vegetables keep their color better by 
cooking without a cover. The time for cooking de- 
pends upon their freshness and the altitude. A high 
altitude requires a longer cooking. They should be 
seasoned with salt, pepper, butter, cream and sauces. 
Fresh green vegetables that contain sugar should have 
a smail quantity of sugar added to the seasoning to 
replace that which is boiled away in the water. One 
vegetable, besides the potato, is served with the meat 
course; other vegetables, like egg plant, stuffed to- 
matoes and peppers, artichokes, mushrooms, maca- 
roni and many others, can be served as a separate 
course. 

POTATOES. 

To Boil Potatoes, — ^Wash them well with a brush, 
pare them and drop at once in cold water, having 
them uniform size so they will be done together. Put 
them on to cook in boiling salted water, about half a 
teaspoonful of salt to a quart of water, boil slowly 
till they are done (as violent boiling breaks them). 
Then drain off all the water, return to the back of 
the stove, shake gently to allow the steam to escape, 
sprinkle with a little salt and serve on a hot dish. 



142 ROCKY MOUHTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Potatoes cooked in this way will always be light and 
palatable. 

OLD POTATOES. 

In the spring of the year the potatoes become 
withered (the water evaporates from them) ; they 
should then be pared and allowed to soak in cold 
water two or three hours before cooking, so that they 
may take in some of the water they have lost. 

NEW POTATOES. 

New potatoes are boiled with the skin on. As 
soon as they are done peel them and dry on the stove ; 
season with salt alone, or cover them with a little 
melted butter and a sprinkling of finely chopped 
chives or parsley ; just a little cream, pepper and salt 
make a nice dressing, or cover with cream sauce. 

MASHED POTATOES. 

Boil and dry the potatoes as directed, mash them 
in the same dish in which they are boiled. For two 
cups of potato use one-half cup of milk or cream, 
heated with two tablespoonfuls of butter and a tea- 
spoonful of salt ; add slowly to the potato, beating all 
the time ; when very light and foamy, pile into a hot 
serving dish, but do not smooth them over, as that will 
make them heavy. 

RICED POTATO. 

Press well-seasoned, lightly mashed potato 
through a potato ricer onto the serving dish. Serve 
broiled meats around a mound of riced potato. 



VEGETABLES. 143 

POTATO CAEXS. 

Mix a well-beaten egg with seasoned mashed po- 
tatoes, mould in cakes, dip in melted butter and brown 
in the oven, on a buttered pan, or saute in butter or 
bacon fat; garnish with parsley. 

POTATO ROSES. 

Use well-seasoned, hot mashed potatoes, add to two 
cups of the potato the yolks of two eggs and the white 
of one well-beaten, place in a pastry bag with a tube 
having a star-shaped opening; force out the potato 
from the tube with a gentle pressure, guide it around 
in a circle until it comes to a point, have them small, 
brush them over lightly with beaten egg, brown them 
in the oven by placing them onto a well-buttered pan, 
or garnish a planked fish with them. If browned on 
a pan remove them carefully with a broad-bladed 
knife. 

POTATO SOUFFLE. 

Two cups of hot seasoned mashed potato, fold 
lightly into it the stifey beaten whites of two eggs, 
turn at once into well-buttered dishes, individual 
dishes, paper boxes or one large flat dish can be used ; 
brown in a hot oven for fifteen minutes. Serve at 
once with fish, meat or entrees. The potato can also 
be baked in a well-buttered border mould, then turned 
into a hot dish and the center filled with creamed 
meats, mushrooms or fish. 

CREAMED POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes into cubes or thin slices, 
make a cream sauce in double boiler, season well with 



144 ROCKT MOUNTAni COOK BOOK. 

salt and pepper, heat the potatoes in the sauce for 
fifteen minutes. Serve on a hot dish wth a sprink- 
ling of chopped parsley or chives over them. 

SCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Butter a baking dish, cover the bottom with a 
layer of cooked sliced cold potato, then with a layer 
of cream sauce, and so on until the dish is full; 
sprinkle buttered crumbs over the top, brown in a hot 
oven. 

DELMONICO POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes into small cubes, butter 
a baking dish, or individual dishes or cases, cover the 
bottom with a layer of potato, then with a layer of 
cream sauce; sprinkle over with grated or thinly 
sliced cheese and a little paprica ; fill up the dish with 
the layers, having the cheese on top, bake in a hot 
oven from ten to fifteen minutes, according to the 
amount baked. These potatoes are delicious served 
with broiled meats. 

POTATOES A LA BECHAMEL. 

Cut cold potatoes into cubes as for Delmonico 
potatoes, bake in buttered dishes, cover the layer of 
potato with Bechamel sauce and sprinkle buttered 
crumbs over the top, brown in a hot oven for fifteen 
minutes. 

VIENNESE POTATOES. 

, ^^f *^ ^o cups of hot, seasoned mashed potato 
tHe yolks of two eggs and the white of one well beaten, 
and one-half cup of grated cheese; mould into small 
balls and roll the balls into long shape, thick in the 



VSGETABLBS. 145 

center, with pointed ends, roll on a slightly floured 
board, brush over with slightly beaten ^g, lay on 
well-buttered pan one inch apart, make two slanting 
cuts on the top of each, again brush over with egg, 
brown in a hot oven; remove carefully on a broad- 
bladed knife. Garnish broiled meats or fish. 

MASHED POTATOES MILANESE. 

Peel the potatoes, boil in boiling salted water till 
tender, drain and shake over the stove until the steam 
has escaped, mash till smooth and creamy, moisten- 
ing all the time with chicken stock ; season with salt 
and pepper and add cream enough to enable to beat 
with an egg beater; pile in a dish without smooth- 
ing, sprinkle grated cheese over the top, brown in a 
hot oven. 

POTATO BALLS. 

To make the balls, use a potato scoop, pare and 
wash the potato, press the scoop well into the potato 
and then turn it to form the ball (cook at once the 
scraps left from the potato and use for mashed or 
creamed potatoes). Cook till tender in boiling salted 
water. Serve with butter, pepper and salt or in cream 
sauce, or maitre d'hotel sauce. These make a pretty 
garnish to serve as a mound, cannon-ball style, on top 
of boiled, broiled or baked fish. 

FRIED POTATO BALLS AND STRAWS. 

Cut the potatoes with the scoop for the balls, and 
in slices, then in thin strips for the straws; soak in 
cold water for one hour, dry between towels, fry a 
few at a time in smoking hot, deep fat, drain on soft 
paper, season with salt 



146 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

FRENCH-FRIED POTATOES. 

Cut raw potatoes in half-inch slices, then half- 
inch strips, soak in cold water for an hour, dry, and 
fry in smoking hot fat. Season with salt. 

POTATO NESTS. 

Prepare the potato as for straws, arrange them in 
nest shape in a wire utensil that comes for the pur- 
pose (it is a wire formed in the shape of a nest) ; fry 
in deep fat, remove from the form, drain and fill with 
creamed fish, meats, or mushrooms; garnish with 
parsley. 

WALDORF POTATOES. 

Cut raw potatoes round and round, the same as 
you would pare an apple ; fry in a basket in deep fat ; 
drain on a paper, season with salt, garnish a roast or 
fish with them. 

POTATO CHIPS. 

Shave raw potatoes in thin slices. A potato slicer 
is much the better to use. Soak in cold water for one 
hour, dry between towels, fry in deep fat, drain on 
soft paper, sprinkle with salt 

Cut raw potatoes in hearts, crescents and other 
fancy shades by using cookie cutters and the French 
vegetable knife, first cutting the potatoes in slices; 
fry in deep fat or cook in boiling salted water. Serve 
with cream sauce. 

HASHED BROWN POTATOES. 

Cut cold cooked potatoes into small cubes. Put 
into a frying pan slices of salt pork cut thin ; when 



V£6£TABLES. 147 

they are well browned remove them, and put in the 
potato ; with a knife press it into a mound ; when it 
has browned on one side, with a wide-bladed knife 
turn and brown on the other side. Serve on a hot 
dish. The pork gives a very delicious flavor to the 
potatoes. 

FRIED POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes into slices half an inch 
thick, fry till brown on both sides in a frying pan 
that is well greased with salt pork or bacon fat, sea- 
son with salt and a little pepper. 

FRANCONIA POTATOES. 

Wash and pare the potatoes, put them in the pan 
with the meat and baste when the meat is basted. 
Serve on the platter with the meat. 

LYONNAISE POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes into cubes, season with 
salt and pepper. Saut6 one tablespoonful of finely 
chopped onion in two tablespoonfuls of butter until a 
light brown, then add the potatoes and stir with a 
fork until they have absorbed all the butter ; add one- 
half tablespoonful of finely chopped parsley. Serve 
on a hot dish. 

BROILED POTATOES. 

Pare and cut in slices one-quarter of an inch 
thick. Broil on both sides till tender, season with 
butter, pepper and salt, or use cold boiled sweet or 
white potatoes, cut them in slices, dip in melted but- 
ter and broil till a delicate brown ; season with salt 
and pepper. 



148 ROCKY MOUNTAni COOK BOOK. 

BAKKD SWEET AND WHITE POTATOES. 

Select potatoes of uniform size, wash and scrub 
them with a brush, place in a pan and bake till soft. 
Break the skin to allow the steam to escape. Serve 
at once uncovered. 

STUFFED POTATOES. 

Bake four potatoes; when tender cut in halves 
lengthwise and scoop out the inside; mash and beat 
till very light; season with a tablespoonful of butter 
and cream, one-fourth teaspoonful of salt and fold 
into the mixture the white of two e^s which have 
been beaten stiff; fill the skins, heaping it lightly on 
top ; replace in a hot oven and brown. 

POTATOES UNION LEAGUE. 



1 quart of boiled potatoes. 
lYi cups cream. 



2 green peppers. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter. 



Put pieces of butter in the bottom of the baking 
dish. Then some of the potatoes and peppers chopped 
fine; a sprinkling of salt and flour and cream and 
more potatoes until all are used. Sprinkle buttered 
bread crumbs over the top and bake until brown. 

POTATO FRITTERS. 

Into a cupful of mashed potatoes stir two well- 
beaten eggs and two tablespoonfuls of flour. Season 
to taste. Beat thoroughly and let stand for one-half 
S V ^""^ ^ tablespoonful into hot fat Cook 
until brown. Drain on soft paper. 



VEGETABLES. 149 

STUFFED POTATOES (No. a). 

Bake the potatoes, cut a piece off the top of each, 
remove the inside, season, mash and mix with any 
chopped meat or grated cheese (the cheese is very de- 
licious) ; replace in the potato, letting it come a little 
over the top of the potato, brush the top over with 
melted butter and brown in the oven. 

SWEET POTATOES, SOUTHERN STYLE. 

Cut cold, baked or boiled sweet potatoes in quar- 
ter-inch slices, cover the bottom of a baking dish with 
a layer of the potato spread quite thickly with pieces 
of butter, and scatter over a little sugar and salt ; sea- 
son each layer in this way, having the sugar on top. 
Bake in the oven imtil heated through and browned 
slightly. 

SWEET POTATOES— CREOLE. 

Boil sweet potatoes until tender. Mash, season 
with butter, cream, salt and pepper. Put in a baking 
dish, sprinkle lightly with brown sugar and bits of 
butter. Bake until brown. 

GRIDDLED SWEET POTATOES. 

Boil large sweet potatoes, peel, and when cold cut 
in thick slices. Dip in melted butter and brown over 
the coals or under the gas flame. Pour a little melted 
butter over them and serve. 

GREENS. 

Greens should be well picked over, wash in several 
cold waters, put on to cook without water, the water 
that clings to the leaves is sufficient to cook them; 



150 ROCKT MOUHTAni COOK BOOK. 

sprinkle over tliem a teaspoonful of salt and cook 
slowly, uncovered, until tender ; drain, chop fine, gar- 
nish with hard-boiled eggs cut in slices or eighths, or 
run the yolks through a potato ricer, and sprinkle over 
the top ; cut the whites in rings and place around the 
outside. Season with butter and a little pepper and 
salt 

SPINACH. 

Cook and prepare the same as greens, or after 
chopping mix with butter, a little cream, garnish 
with egg and points of toast, or form in a mound, 
cover with buttered cracker crumbs, brown in the 
oven and surround with broiled chops. Spinach is 
very nice served in bread boxes. 

SPINACH SOUFFLE. 

One cup of spinach that has been cooked, well 
drained and washed through a strainer; two cups of 
milk, two tablespoonfuls each of butter and flour, 
two eggs, one teaspoonful of salt, pepper. Make 
a cream sauce of the butter, flour, scalded milk and 
seasonings, add beaten egg yolks, remove from the 
fire, add spinach and fold in the stifBy beaten whites. 
Bake in a buttered serving dish (setting in a pan of 
hot water) one-half hour; serve at onoe. 

SPINACH TIMBALE. 

Mix one cup of cooked spinach that has been 
finely chopped and pressed through a coarse sieve with 
one-half cup of thin cream, one-fourth teaspoonful of 
salt, and two beaten eggs, a little pepper. Bake in 
one large mould or in individual moulds, setting in a 
pan of hot water on top of the stove, or in the oven. 



VEGETABLES. 151 

until the center is firm. Let stand a few minutes 
before removing from the mould; serve with or with- 
out a sauce. 

CABBAGE. 

Take off the outside leaves, cut in quarters, wash 
and soak in cold water for one hour, drain and put 
on to cook in boiling salted water with a fourth tea- 
spoonful of soda. The soda helps to make it more di- 
gestible. When tender drain, cut or chop fine, season 
with butter, hot milk or cream, salt and pepper, or 
mix with a white sauce and cover with buttered 
crumbs, brown in the oven. 

CABBAGE BAKED WITH CjEIEESE. 

Cold cabbage can be used; chop cooked cabbage 
fine, put in a baking dish layers of cabbage, white 
sauce and cheese, well seasoned, having the cheese on 
top; brown in a hot oven. 

ROUTH EROUTH. 

Cut red cabbage in halves, soak in cold water, 
then shave in thin slices, put on to cook in the follow- 
ing mixture : For every two cups of cabbage use two 
tablespoonfuls of butter, the same amount of vinegar, 
one-half teaspoonful of salt, little pepper, two cups 
of boiling water; cook slowly till tender. Serve hot 
or cold. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

Trim off the outside leaves, cut the stalk even 
with the flower, let it soak upside down in cold salted 
water for half an hour to draw out any insects, cook 
the same way as cabbage. Serve with white, Hoi- 



162 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

landaise, B6cliainel sauce or drawn butter ; or serve in 
any of the ways as directed for cabbage. 

CAX7LIFL0WSR ITALIAN. 

Trim off the outside leaves, soak the cauliflower 
in cold water for an hour, then place on a plate and 
steam until tender, cover with grated cheese and 
brown in the oven for about five minutes. 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

Remove any wilted leaves, soak in cold salted 
water, to draw out any insects that may be in them, 
cook in boiling salted water (uncovered) till tender, 
but not till they lose their shape; season with butter, 
pepper and salt, or cover with a cream or HoUandaise 
sauce. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Cut off the white, hard end of the stalks, untie the 
bundles, soak for half an hour in cold water, tie them 
up again and cook in boiling salted water until ten- 
der; remove onto slices of buttered toast, cut the 
string and season with butter, pepper and salt, or 
cover with a white or poulette sauce; or cut the as- 
paragus in inch pieces, boil and season as directed 
above, or serve plain witiiout toast. 

ASPARAGUS LOAF. 

Butter quite thick a three-pint mould or bowl (a 
pail could be used), decorate the bottom and sides 
with stalks of cooked asparagus ; melt two tablespoon- 
f uls of butter in a double boiler, stir into it two of 
flour, half a teaspoonful of salt and one-fourth of 



VEGETABLES. 153 

paprica ; stir into it gradually one cup of cream, one 
cup and a half of cooked asparagus tips and four well- 
beaten eggs ; turn into the mould, cook standing in a 
dish of hot water until the center is firm, either in the 
oven or on top of the stove ; do not let the water boil. 
(It is easier to cook in the oven on that account.) 
Invert on a serving dish. Serve surrounded by a 
cream sauce with asparagus tips added, or serve with- 
out a sauce. 

ARTICHOKES. 

Cut off the outside leaves, soak in cold water for 
a half hour, trim away the lower leaves and the ends 
of the others, cook in boiling salted water until the 
leaves can be drawn out, drain, remove the choke and 
serve with cream sauce, or drawn butter. 

ARTICHOEX SOUFFLE. 

Slice and boil sufficient Jerusalem artichokes to 
make two cups of pulp, that has been mashed fine, 
soak one half cup of fine fresh bread crumbs in one 
half cup of hot milk for ten minutes. One table- 
spoonful melted butter, the yolks of two e^s beaten, 
with a half teaspoonful salt, lastly fold in the stiffly 
beaten whites. Bake, setting the pan in one of hot 
water, about one-half hour or until firm. Turnips 
may be used in this way as well as squash. 

BREADED ARTICHOKES. 

Cooked Jerusalem artichokes cut in uniform size, 
or the canned artichokes which contain from six to 
eight bottoms. Beat one egg slightly, add to it two 
tablespoonfuls of milk or water, dip the pieces in the 
egg, then in fine sifted dry crumbs. Fry in deep 



154 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

fat to a nice brown. Drain on soft paper. They may 
be served with sauce tartare, as a separate course, or 
as a vegetable. 

EGG PLANT. 

Cut the egg plant in slices one-half an inch thick 
without removing the skin. Steam till tender, dip 
each slice in powdered crumbs, then in egg, and in 
crumbs again ; saute on both sides, in lard, butter or 
drippings till tender. 

STUFFED EGG PLANT. 

Boil the egg plant till tender, cut in halves, re- 
move the insides and mash ; season with butter, pep- 
per and salt; if you like, add two tablespoonfuls of 
grated cheese or one-half cup of almonds cut very 
fine, put back in the shells, cover with buttered 
cruml^, brown in the oven. 

SALSIFY OR OYSTER PLANT. 

Scrape and at once throw into cold water, with a 
little vinegar or lemon juice to keep from discoloring; 
cook in boiling salted water till tender (about one 
hour), drain, season with butter, salt and pepper, or 
cut in half -inch pieces and serve in cream sauce, or 
dip in fritter batter and fry in hot fat, or when cold 
brown in butter. 

RAW TOMATOES. 

Scald by pouring boiling water over them a few 
hours before using, peel and put on the ice ; slice or 
serve whole with mayonnaise or French dressing; 
garnish with lettuce. 



VEGETABLES. 155 

STEWED TOMATOES. 

Pour over them boiling wafer, remove the skins 
and cut in small pieces, removing all the bad places ; 
stew until tender, with a very little water. To one 
quart of tomato add one teaspoonful of salt and sugar, 
one tablespoonful each of butter and powdered crack- 
er crumbs and a little pepper; cook the cracker 
crumbs in the tomato five minutes before adding the 
seasonings. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Scald and peel the tomatoes ; butter a baking dish 
and cover the bottom with a layer of tomatoes cut in 
half -inch slices ; season with salt, pepper and a sprink- 
ling of sugar; cover with a thin layer of buttered 
crumbs (a little onion juice is an improvement) ; fill 
the dish with the layers, having the crumbs on top ; 
bake in a hot oven for one hour, less time if a small 
quantity is used. A layer of grated cheese can be 
added to each layer of tomato. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Select large, firm tomatoes ; cut a thin slice from 
the stem end and scoop out the inside; sprinkle the 
inside with salt and pepper; fill with the following 
mixtures : Mix with the pulp an equal amount of but- 
tered cracker crumbs; season with salt, pepper and 
onion juice, or use in place of the crumbs the same 
amount of cooked rice or macaroni ; fill the tomatoes 
full, replace the slice of tomato, cover with a thin two- 
inch slice of salt, fat pork, hold the slices of tomato 
and pork in place by putting a wooden toothpicl^ 
through them. The pork bastes them and adds very 
much to the flavor. Remove the toothpick before serv- 



156 ROCKY MOUNTAnf COOK BOOK. 

ing. The top of the tomato can be covered with but- 
tered crumbs instead of using the slices of tomato and 
pork. 

Bake in a granite pan, with a little stock or hot 
water. Serve on slices of toast or surrounded by a 
brown sauce. Any kind of finely chopped meat may 
be used for stuflBng by mixing it with a few buttered 
crumbs, a little stock or a little left-over sauce, well 
seasoned, and a grating of onion or cooked peppers 
finely chopped. Cooked mushrooms and sweetbreads 
can be used by chopping them and mixing with either 
of the following sauces: Cream, celery, allemande, 
poulette, or Bechamel, or stuff seasoned rice. 

TOMATOES STUFFED WITH CHEESE AND MUSHROOMS. 

One-half pound fresh mushrooms, one-half cup of 
grated cheese. Peel and cut the mushrooms in small 
pieces, stew for five minutes in two tablespoonfuls of 
boiling water, drain well, put in sauce pan, two 
tablespoonfuls of butter ; stir into it two of flour, one- 
half teaspoonful salt and one-eighth of paprica, and 
the water that was drained from the mushrooms, with 
enough cream to make one cup in all. Cook ten min- 
utes, stirring. Then add the mushrooms and grated 
cheese, fill the tomatoes with the mixture and cover 
the top with buttered crumbs. Bake with a few table- 
spoonfuls of stock or hot water in the pan. Serve on 
buttered toast. 

CURRIED TOMATOES. 

Cut tomatoes in halves. Put them in a granite 
pan. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and place a tea- 
spoonful of butter on each one. Let them cook till 
soft, but not to lose their shape. Remove on a hot 
dish surrounded with curry sauce. 



VSOBTABLES. 167 

TOMATO SOUFFLE. 



1 cup tomato pulp. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter. 
2 tablespoonfuls flour. 



1 tablespoonf ul grated cheese. 

2 eggs, 1 cup milk, salt and 

and pepper. 



Melt the butter. Stir into it the flour and grad- 
ually the milk. The seasonings, grated cheese and to- 
mato pulp. The egg yolks. Then fold in the stiffly 
beaten whites. Turn into a buttered baking dish and 
surround it in hot water. Bake about thirty minutes. 
Serve at once. 

TOMATOES WITH CELERY SAUCE. 

Prepare and cook the same as for curried to- 
matoes, surrounded with celery sauce. 

TOMATOES WITH WALNUTS. 

Take six ripe tomatoes (or one quart of canned 
ones), plunge in boiling water, peel, and place in 
a buttered sauce pan to bake. When tender rub 
through a sieve. Cut one small onion and cook in 
two tablespoonfuls of butter imtil a light brown. Add 
to the tomato, with one-half cup of finely chopped 
walnut meats, one-half cup of fine, fresh bread crumbs 
and one-fourth cup of grated cheese. Stir over the 
fire until all are well blended. Add two slightly 
beaten eggs, salt and pepper, let cook for five minutes. 
Serve hot on rounds of toast. 

TO PREPARE PEPPERS FOR STUFFING. 

Cut a slice from the top, scoop out the inside and 
parboil in boiling salted water five minutes. Stufl 
with any of the mixtures you would use for tomatoes. 



158 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

PEPPERS STUFFED WITH OYSTERS. 

Chop one pepper and a slice of onion very fine. 
Parboil one pint of oysters, drain, cut in small pieces. 
Soak one-half cup of fine bread crumbs in the oyster 
liquor, press out the liquor. Saute the pepper and 
onion in two tablespoonfuls of butter till a light 
brown, add them to the oysters and crumbs. Season 
with salt and pepper, fill up the peppers and cover 
the top with buttered cracker crumbs. Bake until 
tender. Serve with tomato sauce. 

PEPPERS STUFFED WITH SWEETBREADS. 

Simmer sweetbreads in boiling salted water, with 
a tablespoonf ul of lemon juice five minutes ; then cut 
in small cubes. Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter, 
add to it two of flour and one-half cup of chicken 
stock, the same amount of cream. Season with salt 
and pepper. Cook ten minutes, add the sweetbreads, 
and a half cup of mushrooms if you wish ; fill the pep- 
pers, cover with buttered crumbs. Bake and serve on 
rounds of toast. 

BROILED TOMATOES. 

Cut the tomatoes in thick slices (without peeling), 
brush over with melted butter and broil, turning fre- 
quently. Lay them on a hot dish, season each slice 
with salt, pepper and a piece of butter. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Cut firm ripe tomatoes in halves, cut off the green 
stem, place them in an agate baking pan, the cut side 
up ; season each piece with a little salt, a few small 
pieces of butter, some chives cut very fine, or in place 



VEGETABLES. 159 

of the chives, very finely chopped onion; bake in a 
hot oven about fifteen minutes. Do not cook long 
enough to break and lose their shape ; place each one 
on round pieces of buttered toast. 

CHESTNUT PUREE. 

Remove the shells by cutting a cross on the flat 
side of each and putting them in a pan in a hot oven 
till the shell bursts open. The shell and skin will both 
come off together. Put them in boiling salted water 
and cook until very tender, then drain and mash 
through a potato ricer, or colander. Season with but- 
ter, pepper, salt and a little cream. 

BOILED ONIONS. 

Remove the skins, put them on to cook in boiling 
salted water. After they have been cooking five 
minutes change the water, and change again after ten 
minutes' cooking; then boil till tender, drain, remove 
carefully to a hot dish, put a piece of butter in the 
center of each and a little pepper and salt. A little 
thick cream may be poured over them, or a cream 
sauce. 

ROASTED ONIONS. 

Boil the onions for ten minutes, drain them care- 
fully and remove to a granite pan. Place a good- 
sized piece of butter on each one, put in a hot oven 
and cook till tender, baste with melted butter if nec- 
essary to prevent burning. Place on a hot dish and 
season with salt and pepper. Or use as a garnish. 

6 



160 R0CK7 MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

FRIED ONIONS. 

Cut in thin slices (it is best to use the young 
onions), and fry till brown and tender in butter, or 
fry until crisp six thin slices of salt, fat pork ; put in 
the onions and cook. The pork gives them a delicious 
flavor. Season with salt and pepper. 

SCALLOPED ONIONS. 

If the onions are large cut in quarters, boil, then 
put in a baking dish; cover with cream sauce and 
buttered crumbs. Bake till brown. 

STUFFED SPANISH ONIONS. 

Peel and cut out a part of the inside, parboil them 
for five minutes, drain, fill with any kind of force 
meat, mixed with one-third part of moistened bread 
crumbs. Season with salt, pepper and melted butter, 
cover the top with buttered crumbs ; cook in the oven 
till tender. 

CARROTS. 

Carrots when young and tender make a very de- 
licious vegetable. Wash and scrape them, cook in 
boiling salted water. Serve with butter, pepper and 
salt, or a cream sauce. Cut in slices, cubes, strips or 
rounds, with a potato cutter if you like, before boil- 
ing. Or cut in half lengthwise and brown in hot 
butter. 

TURNIPS. 

Wash, pare, cut in slices or fancy shapes. Cook 
and season the same as carrots, or mash and season 
with melted butter, pepper and salt. 



VSGEXABLES. 161 

STUFFED TURNIPS. 

Select turnips of uniform size, cut out the center 
and cook in boiling salted water till tender and fill 
with any of the following mixtures: Creamed peas, 
or a pea purfie, carrots and string beans that have 
been cooked, chopped fine and seasoned with a little 
cream, salt and pepper, or either of the vegetables 
alone, or stuff with a puree of chestnuts or creamed 
mushrooms; garnish the top with a slice of truffle. 
Serve hot as a vegetable, garnish a fillet of beef with 
them or surround a crown roast. 

PARSNIPS. 

Wash, scrape, cook in boiling salted water. Sea- 
son the same as carrots. 

FRIED PARSNIPS. 

* 

Cut cold cooked parsnips in halves lengthwise, or 
if very large in half-inch slices. Saut4 in hot butter, 
brown on both sides. Season with salt. 

BEETS. 

Wash and cook in boiling salted water. When 
tender, drain and plunge in cold water; the skin will 
then slip oflF easily. Season with butter, pepper and 
salt and vinegar. 

CORN ON THE EAR. 

Strip off the outside husks, leaving enough of the 
husks to completely cover the ear ; tie a string around 
the end of each ear to hold the husk. Cook in boiling 
unsalted water for ten or fifteen minutes, according 



1jB2 ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

to the age of the corn. Salt would harden the hull. 
Before boiling remove all the silk from the ear, then 
replace the husk. 

SUCCOTASH. 

Use equal parts of shelled beans and com, cut 
from the ear, first cooking each separately; mix to- 
gether. Season with cream, butter, salt and pepper. 
In the winter time the dried lima beans and canned 
corn may be used. Soak the beans over night in cold 
water, cook in boiling water till tender, drain off the 
water, add the com, reheat and season. 

GREEN PEAS. 

The time for cooking depends upon the freshness 
and age of the peas. Cook them uncovered in boiling 
water, salt them when nearly done. They are done 
when they mash easily with a fork. Let the water 
boil nearly away, and season with butter, cream and 
a little sugar if you wish, or serve in a cream sauce. 
Peas contain a great deal of nutrition. 

FRENCH PEAS. 

Put one can of French peas in a saucepan with 
a little browned onion. A tablespoonful of but- 
ter and two level teaspoonfuls of flour. Then slowly 
add one cup of stock. Then add one-half cup of rich 
milk or cream. A teaspoonful of powdered sugar 
and one egg yolk. Cook for five minutes and serve 
hot, or make a sauce of butter, flour, seasonings, milk, 
then add peas. 



VEGETABLES. 163 

ARTICHOKES A LA MILANESE. 

Put boiled artichokes in a casserole. Place a 
piece of butter in the center of each and sprinkle them 
with finely grated cheese. Cover and cook slowly for 
twenty minutes. Serve hot. 

STRING BEANS. 

Remove the strings. Lay a number of the beans 
together, with a sharp knife cut them in quarter-inch 
pieces, or cut them lengthwise in thin strips. Cook 
in boiling salted water for one hour or longer. When 
tender season with salt, pepper, butter, cream or a 
cream sauce. 

SHELLED BEANS. 

Wash and cook in boiling salted water for half 
an hour to an hour. Season the same as string beans. 

DRIED LIMA BEANS 

Are cooked the same as shelled beans, first soaking 
them over night. Beans, like peas, contain a great 
deal of nutrition. 

MEXICAN BEANS. 

Wash well. Soak over night in plenty of cold 
water. In the morning turn off the water. Add 
fresh cold and put on the stove to cook six or eight 
hours. Adding to them one whole onion, a slice of 
salt pork or bacon, one green or red pepper. Add salt 
before serving as desired. 



164 R0CK7 MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

CKLERT. 

Scrape clean, saving the coarse outside pieces for 
soups, sauce or creamed celery. Put in cold water 
for half an hour before using. Serve with the soup. 

CREAMED CELERY. 

Clean, cut in inch pieces, cook in boiling salted 
water. Serve in cream sauce. 

BOILED CELERY. 

Boil the large outside stalks, without cutting them, 
till tender ; season with butter, salt and pepper and a 
thin grating of cheese. 

WINTER SQUASH. 

If the shell be hard split the squash, remove the 
seeds and steam. If the shell is soft pare it before 
steaming. To one pint of squash season with two 
tablespoonfuls of butter, one-half teaspoonful of salt, 
a little pepper, and a little heavy cream is a great 
improvement; mash very lightly. 

BAKED SQUASH. 

Cut in pieces, remove the seeds, place in a pan 
and bake till soft Mash and season. 

SUMMER SQUASH. 

Wash and cut in small pieces, cook with or with- 
out the skin and seeds. Cook in boiling salted water 
or steam. When tender, remove to a piece of cheese 
cloth, squeeze till ihe squash is dry. Mash and 
season. 



VS6EXABLBS. 165 

CORN MOCK OYSTERS AND CORN FRITTERS. 

Cut down through the center of each row of ker- 
nels with a sharp knife ; with the back of the knife 
press out the pulp, leaving the hull on the cob. To 
one cup of the pulp add two well-beaten eggs, one tea- 
spoonful of butter and half of salt, little pepper and 
two tablespoonfuls of flour, or enough to hold it 
together. Fry as you would griddle cakes on a but- 
tered griddle, or add a little more flour and drop 
from a spoon into deep fat^ making a com fritter. 
Use caimed corn the same way, first heating and 
mashing through a strainer. 

SWEET CORN IN CREAM WITH CHEESE. 

Cut the com from the ears, moisten with thick 

cream, season with salt and pepper; fill a baking dish, 

cover the top with grated Parmesan or cream cheese. 

Sprinkle with a little paprica, bake quite slowly for 

half an hour. 

CORN PUDDING. 

One cup canned com put through the meat 
grinder. Two cups milk in which one-half cup of 
fine fresh bread crambs have been soaking a half 
hour. Two beaten eggs. One teaspoonful of salt. 
Bake in a buttered dish imtil firm as a custard. 

CANNED CORN TIMBLE. 

Put one cup of canned com through the meat 
chopper. Beat three eggs until the whites and yolks 
are well mixed. Add a tablespoonful of green or 
red pepper chopped fine, salt and pepper and a tea- 
spoonful of grated onion. One cup and a half of 
milk. Bake in buttered molds surrounded with hot 
water. 



166 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

MACARONI, SPAGHETTI AND VERMICELLI. 

Macaroni and spaghetti are used as a vegetable, 
vermicelli for sonps and puddings. They are made 
from flour and water and should be combined with 
sauces or cheese. Cheese is most palatable cooked or 
served with it, as it supplies the fat which the maca- 
roni does not contain. Combined with cheese and 
sauce it makes a most nutritious dish, and should 
enter into our diet more extensively. 

TO COOK MACARONL 

If the macaroni or spaghetti is to be used for a 
garnish or timbales, do not break it, but place the 
long pieces carefully in boiling salted water. When 
to be used in other ways, break in inch pieces. Cook 
in boiling salted water till tender, drain in a colander 
and pour cold water over it. This prevents it from 
being sticky. Reheat in a white sauce and serve. Or 
put in a baking dish, cover with white sauce and a 
sprinkling of buttered crumbs on top. Brown in a 
hot oven. 

BAKED MACARONI WITH CHEESE. 

Put into a baking dish a layer of cooked macaroni 
then a layer of white sauce, and grated or thinly 
sliced cheese with a sprinkling of salt and paprica. 
Fill up the dish in this way, having the cheese on top. 
Brown in a hot oven. 

MACARONI WITH TOMATO OR OTHER SAUCES. 

Cook the macaroni as directed. Mix with the 
sauces and serve, or mix with the sauces with the ad- 
dition of cheese and buttered crumbs and bake in the 



VEOETABLBS. 167 

oven. Individual baking dishes may be used, as well 
as a large dish. 

MACARONI AND EGGS. 

Cover the bottom of a baking dish with a layer 
of cooked macaroni, then a layer of hard-cooked eggs, 
cut in thin slices. Cover with a white sauce and but- 
tered crumbs, or grated cheese. Brown in a hot 
oven. This makes a very good luncheon dish, it being 
also most nutritious. 

BAKED MACARONI AND CELERY. 

Put in a baking dish a layer of cooked macaroni, 
a layer of cooked celery cut in small pieces, cover 
with a cream sauce, a grating of cheese, little paprica 
and so on until the dish is full, having the grated 
cheese on top. Bake in a hot oven for about twenty 
minutes. 

FLORENTINE MACARONL 

Break macaroni in three- or four-inch pieces ; cook 
till tender in boiling salted water, drain through a 
colander and place on a hot platter, sprinkle lightly 
with grated cheese and pass with it a tomato sauce. 

SPAGHETTL 

Can be cooked the same as macaroni. It is most 
often served without being broken. It then becomes 
an art to wind it around a fork and eat it succes- 
fully. 



BEAN LOAF. 



1 cup shelled peanuts. 
1 cup cooked beans. 
y^ cup buttered cracker 
crumbs. 



1 teaspoonful salt. 

Pepper. 

1 cup milk. 



168 HOCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Press the beans through a sieve. Add the nuts 
finely ground and the other ingredients. Mix thor- 
oughly. Shape in a loaf. Bake in a pan about one 
and a half hours, basting with melted butter. 

GOLDEN BUCK. 



y^ teaspoonful Boda. 

&Llt, paprica. 

1 tablespoonful cream. 



1 tablespoonful butter. 
% pound cheese. 
1 egg. 
1 cup tomato pulp. 

Melt the butter in a double boiler or chafing dish. 
Add the cheese grated or cut fine. Stir constantly 
until the cheese is melted. Stir in the beaten e^, 
dilute with the tomato, add the salt, paprica, and 
soda in the tomato. A little Worcestershire sauce 
may be added and last the cream. 

Serve at once on hot squares or rounds of toast 
or crackers. 



*" 



SAVCBS. 189 



SAUCES. 



It is very easy to make good sauces if the proper 
care is taken at the beginning by first melting the but- 
ter and stirring the flour into it, thus forming the 
roux — or thickening. For white sauces the flour is 
not changed. For brown sauces the flour is cooked 
in the oven until brown. Sauces are a great improve- 
ment to the dishes they accompany, especially so to 
made-over dishes. Save every scrap of meat and 
bone. It takes a very little to make the stock for a 
sauce. The flavor of vegetables can be obtained by 
sauteing them in butter before the flour is added. 
White sauces should be cooked in a double boiler to 
prevent the milk from burning. A sauce that is made 
by melting the butter, then stirring into it the flour, 
and gradually the liquid, cannot help being a smooth 
sauce, if quickly stirred. It is safer to strain all 
sauces before serving. If you do not have stock on 
hand beef extract can be used in place. In that case 
saute the vegetables first in the butter. 

DRAWN BUTTER SAUCS (For Fish). 



2 cups boiling water or 

white stock. 
^ cup butter. 



3 tablespoonfuls flour. 
y^ teaspoonf ul salt. 
Speck of pepper. 



Melt the butter, and when bubbling stir in the 
flour, salt and pepper, gradually stir in the water, or 
stock. Cook ten minutes. 

CAP£R SAUCE (To Serve with Boiled Mutton). 

Make the same as drawn butter sauce, using the 
liquid the mutton was boiled in instead of water. Add 
two tablespoonfuls of capers. 



170 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

WHITS OS CSBAM SAUCB. 



2 cups of milk, cream or 

white stock. 
4 tablespoonfuls of butter. 



4 tablespoonfuls of flour. 
% teaspoonful salt. 
Speck of pepper. 



Scald the milk in a double boiler. Melt the but- 
ter in a sauce pan, stir the flour into it, also season- 
ings ; when smooth, stir it gradually into the hot milk. 
Cook ten minutes, stirring frequently. This sauce, 
when made partly of cream, can be used for creamed 

toast 

SHRIMP SAUCB (For Fiah). 

Add one cup of shrimps that have been cut in 
small pieces, to a white sauce, two teaspoonfuls of 
lemon juice and a little paprica or red pepper. Cook 
ten minutes after the shrimps have been added. 

BGG SAUCB (For Boiled Fiah). 

Cut two hard-boiled ^gs in slices or cubes, add 
to a white sauce; add a teaspoonful of chopped pars- 
ley, if cared for. 

LOBSTBR SAUCB (For Fiah). 

One cup of lobster cut in dice, added to a white 
sauce, one tableq)oonful lemon juice, the dried and 
powdered coral. 

OYSTBR SAUCB (Boiled Fiah or Fowl). 

Cook the oysters in their own liquors till the 
edges curl. Make a white sauce, using half the liquor 
the oysters were cooked in, and half cream. Add the 
oysters and a little paprica. Serve as soon as the 
oysters are added. 



SAUCES. 171 

CELERY SAUCE. 

Cut the celery in one-half inch pieces. Cook till 
tender in boiling salted water, let the water cook 
down to one-half cup, make a white sauce with the 
celery water and cream, add the celery, reheat. 

MUSHROOM SAUCE. 

Peel and break in small pieces one-half pound 
fresh mushrooms. Cook in one-fourth cup of hot 
water for five minutes. Drain from the liquid. Make 
a white sauce by using the mushroom liquor and 
cream, half and half, add the mushrooms, reheat. 

MUSHROOM SAUCE (Using Canned Mushrooms). 

Make a brown roux, using two tablespoonf uls of 
butter and two tablespoonf uls of browned flour. Stir 
into it one cup of brown stock, one-half cupful of the 
liquor from the mushrooms, one teaspoonful salt, a 
little pepper. Cook ten minutes, add the beaten yolk 
of an egg that has been diluted with one tablespoonf ul 
of cream, then the mushrooms. Cook ten minutes 
longer. Serve with beefsteak or fowls. Canned 
mushrooms can be used with the white sauce made of 
milk, cream or white stock. 

SAUCE PIQUANTE. 

Add two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice, the same 
amount of capers, chopped pickles and olives, and 
one teaspoonful of finely chopped chives, or in place 
of the chives one-half teaspoonful onion juice to two 
cups of drawn butter sauce. 



172 SOCKY M0UNTAI9 COOK BOOK. 

ALLXMANDS SAUCE. 

Make a white sauce, using one-half chicken or 
veal stock and one-half milk. When the sauce has 
cooked ten minutes, add to it the yolks of two beaten 
eggs mixed with one-half cup of cream. Stir till it 
thickens, but do not let boil. A dash of nutmeg can 
be used. 

BicUAMEL SAUCX. 

Cook two slices each of onion and carrot in two 
tablespoonfuls of butter till a light brown. Drain off 
the butter, reheat and stir into it two tablespoonfuls 
of flour, one-half teaspoonful salt and a little pepper, 
then gradually add one cup of chicken or veal stock 
and one-half cup of cream. 

POULETTS SAUCE. 

Make a white sauce, using well-seasoned chicken 
stock that has been seasoned with onions, carrot, cel- 
ery, salt and pepper. Just before serving add to it 
one teaspoonful lemon juice, yolk of one egg, diluted 
with two tablespoonfuls of cream and one teaspoonful 
chopped parsley. Do not add the lemon juice until 
just before sending to the table. The cream and egg 
can be cooked in the sauce about five minutes, cook- 
ing over hot water. 

CURRY SAUCE. 

Brown two slices of onion in two tablespoonfuls 
of butter When brown remove the onion and stir 
m two tablespoonfuls of flour mixed with a teaspoon- 
thLjA^^ P^'^^®'' ^^^ ^^^ *^ teaspoonful of salt, 

the si^e T IT ^* "^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^d make 
^ same as white sauce. 



SAUCES. 173 

BR£AD SAUCE (For Game). (Mra. Lincoln). 



2 cups of milk. 

^ cup fine bread crumbs. 

3 slices of onion. 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 



y% teaspoonful of salt. 

Speck of pepper. 

y^ cup coarse bread crumbs. 



Cook the fine crumbs and onion in the milk for 
one-half hour (over hot water). Remove the onion, 
add the salt, pepper and butter creamed. Brown the 
coarse crumbs in butter, sprinkle the crumbs over the 
bird and serve the sauce with it, or around it. 

HOLLANDAISB SAUCE (For Baked, Broiled or Boiled Fish). 

14 teaspoonful salt. 
Speck of paprica or pepper. 
y^ cup boiling water. 



% cup of butter. 
Yolks of three eggs. 
Juice of half a lemon. 



Rub the butter to a cream in a double boiler, beat 
in the yolks one at a time, then add the lemon juice, 
salt and pepper. About ten minutes before using, 
add the boiling water, cook over hot water, stirring 
continuously imtil it thickens. Potato balls are first 
cooked and served in the sauce and poured around 
the fish. 

HORSERADISH SAUCE (For Fiali and Veal). 

Cook in double boiler for twenty minutes one-half 
cup of freshly grated horseradish, and one-half cup 
of fine bread crumbs, then add one cup of cream and 
season with salt and pepper. If milk is used instead 
of cream, mix with it the beaten yolk of an egg and 
just before serving add a tablespoonful of butter. 

CUCUMBER SAUCE (For Fish.) 

Pare one good-sized cucumber, grate. Season 
with salt, pepper and tarragon vinegar. Common 
vinegar can be used in place of the other. 



174 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

MINT SAUCE (For Lamb). 

1 cup finely chopped mint. 1 ^ cup vinegar. 
^ cup sugar. j 

Mix all together. Serve cold or hot If cold, let 
it stand an hour before serving. If hot heat only to 
the boiling point. 

MUSTARD SAUCE (Com Beef or Fisb). 

Make one cup of drawn butter sauce, add to it one 
tablespoonful of mustard mixed with a tablespoonful 
of vinegar and a little paprica or red pepper. 

HORSERADISH SAUCE. 

Whip one-half cup of thick cream and stir into it 
two tablespoonf uls of grated horseradish that has been 
drained from the liquid ; add one-fourth teaspoonful 
salt. Serve with cold meats, broiled fish or baked 
beans. 

CHAMPAGNE SAUCE (For Ham). 

Put in a sauce pan one cup of champagne, or 
white wine, one teaspoonful of sugar, one clove, four 
peppercorns. Let them heat very slowly for ten min- 
utes. Strain, add a cup of brown sauce, and if con- 
venient one-half cup of mushrooms. 

MUSTARD SAUCE FOR HAM. 
I ^^l^^^\^^^^'' I 1 beaten e^^. 

slow wl?rvf *^^*^^^ «Jid cook over hot water adding 

Cook untif. i-"'!'^ ""^ ^^*^^ »^^ .vinegar mixed, 
a thick custard. Remove and add one 



SAUCES. 175 

tablespoonful of olive oil. This sauce can be served 

hot or cold. 

MAITRE D'HOTEL SAUCE. 

(Broiled Fish and Steak). (Mrs. Lincoln). 



% cup butter. 

l^ teaspoonful of salt. 

Speck of pepper. 



1 tablespoonful each of 
chopped parsley and 
lemon juice. 



Rub the butter to a cream, add the salt, pepper 
and parsley and very slowly the lemon juice. 

ESPAGNOLE SAUCE. 

Make a white sauce, add to it two yolks of eggs, 
beaten slightly, diluted with two tablespoonfuls of 
cream. Dissolve one tablespoonful of granulated gel- 
atine in one cup of highly seasoned hot chicken stock. 
Mix with the white sauce and when cool dip pieces of 
cooked chicken, veal or lamb in it. When cold, dip 
again to give it another coating. Serve very cold on 
lettuce leaves. Garnish with olives stuffed with 

peppers. 

BROWN SAUCE. 



2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 

3 tablespoonfuls of flour. 
2 slices of onion. 



2 teaspoonfuls lemon juice. 

2 cups of stock. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 



Melt the butter in a sauce pan. When hot, add 
the onion and brown slightly, then add the flour and 
gradually the stock. Cook ten minutes, add the 
lemon juice, salt and pepper. Strain, reheat and 
serve. Stock for brown sauces can be made from 
any kind of meat and bones with the soup stock sea- 
sonings, first soaking the bones and meat in cold 
water for one hour. The different flavors and sea- 
sonings added to the brown sauce make a great variety 
of sauces. 



176 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

BROWN MUSHROOM SAUCB. 

To one cup of brown sauce add one-half cup of 
mnshrooms. 

SAUCB POINADB. 

To one cup of brown stock add one teaspoonful 
mixed herbs, parsley, bay leaf, thyme, one clove. 
Cook fifteen minutes, strain, reheat with one-half cup 
of claret. Make the sauce a little thicker than brown 
sauce to start with, as the claret will dilute it. 

BROWN SAUCB PIQUANTB. 

To one cup of brown sauce add one teaspoonful 
each of chopped pickles, capers and olives, having the 
spoons rounding full. 

ROBBRT SAUCB. 

To one cup of stock, add one teaspoonful made 
mustard and two of tarragon vinegar. 



ri^-rt 



I I 



rr^l 



CURRANT JELLT SAUCB (For Mutton and Game). 

One cup of brown sauce, one-half cup of currant 
jelly. Heat both together and serve. 

OLIVB SAUCB (For Roast Dnck). 

Soak one-half cup of olives in cold water for 
thirty minutes to extract the salt. Half of them chop 
fine and the remainder pare round and round as you 
would an apple. Add to one cup of brown sauce. 
Simmer for ten minutes. 



SAUCES. 177 

FLEMISH SAUCE. 

One cup brown sauce, one-half cup of carrots that 
have been cut in dice and boiled, one tablespoonful 
each of green peas, chopped pickles and grated horse- 
radish, a teaspoonf ul of finely chopped chives or a few 
drops of onion juice. 

SPANISH SAUCE. 

Cook in two tablespoonfuls of butter, two table- 
spoonfuls of finely chopped peppers and a teaspoon- 
ful of finely chopped onion. Cook in one cup of 
brown sauce, one-half cup of stewed tomatoes for ten 
minutes. Strain and add slowly to the butter and 
peppers, with a tablespoonful each of capers and 
mushrooms. 

TOMATO SAUCE (Ho. i). 

Cook one cup of tomato and slice of onion ten 
minutes, mash through a strainer and add to one cup 
of brown sauce with a half teaspoonf ul of sugar. Salt 
and pepper to taste, making the brown sauce a little 
thicker. 

TOMATO SAUCE (Ho. s— Good for Macaroni). 

I 

One cup and a half of tomato, two slices of onion, 
five peppercorns, one-half teaspoonful salt, one clove 
and a teaspoonful of sugar. Cook all together with 
one-fourth cup of water for tw«ity minutes. Mash 
through a strainer and add it to two tablespoonfuls of 
flour that has been stirred into two of melted butter. 
Cook ten minuteeu 



178 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

CHESTNUT SAUCE (For Soast Turkey). 

Cut a cross in the shell of one pint of large chest- 
nuts. Cook in a hot oven until the shells hreak open, 
then remove the shell and skin at once. Cook them 
in boiling salted water till very tender. Mash fine, 
either with a masher or potato ricer. Add to the 
turkey gravy made from the drippings of the pan. 
The chestnuts may be added to a cream or poulette 
sauce and served with boiled f owL 

PORT WINE SAUCE (For Veniaon). 

One cup of brown sauce, one-half cup port wine, 
one-half cup of currant or grape jelly, one teaspoon- 
ful lemon juice, salt and paprica. Cook all together 
for ten minutes. 

6IBLET SAUCE (Roaat Poultry). 

Put the giblets on to cook in warm salted water. 
When tender, chop very fine. Put in a saucepan 
three tablespoonfuls of the drippings from the poul- 
try, stir into it two tablespoonfuls of flour. When 
foamy add one cup of the liquid the giblets were 
cooked in. Simmer for ten minutes, then add the 
giblets, heat and serve. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Put three pints of washed cranberries in a granite 
sauce pan ; on top of them put three cups of granu- 
lated sugar and one cup and a half of water. After 

Z ^^^ ^ ^^^ ^^^^ fifteen minutes, closely cov- 
ered, and do not stir. Remove the scum. Serve as 
a sauce, or mash through a strainer and they will jell. 



SAUCES. 179 

APPLE SAUCE (Roast Pork). 

Pare, quarter and core six large, tart apples. Put 
on to cook in a granite sauce pan with one cup of 
sugar and one of water. Cook till soft, remove be- 
fore they lose their shape. Flavor with a little lemon 
juice or nutmeg, if liked. 

CHEESE SAUCE. 

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter, stir into it two 
of flour, one-fourth teaspoonful of salt, and a little 
paprica, then gradually add one cup of hot milk, stir- 
ring. Cook over hot water for ten minutes, then stir 
in one-fourth cup of grated cheese and serve as soon 
as melted. 



180 



ROCKY MOUHXAni COOK 9O0K. 



PUDDINGS AND ICE CREAM SAUCES. 

PLAIH HOT PUDPniG SAUCE. 

a t«,bl«8POonfal« butUr. 
2 cups boiling w»t«r. V^p^ntiA »». 

i S&JlSSrful. flour. ^voring. 

Mix the flour, sugar and «altjeU to^^^^'°ZZ 
pour on the boiling water let boil ten J^^^'J 
Sd the creamed butter imd A'^J^'^-^A S^nu^ 
different flavorings may be used with "^^^f^^^J^^on 
meg, a teaspoonful of vanilla, tabkspoo^^ of lem^^ 
and a little of the grated rind, this »"«*^^ , j ^r 
sauce, or two tablespoonfuls of shenry orm^dev^' 
one of brandy. A little nutmeg added with any 
these flavorings is an improvement. 

BKOWir SUGAR SAUCE. 
Make the same as plain sauce, using brown sugar 
in place of white. 
MOLASSES SAUCE (Good with Apsit and Rice Pudding* . 

Melt in a sauce pan two tablespoonfuls of ^"**®5; 
Stir into it the same amount of flour and one c«P " 
molasses that is diluted with one-haH cup ^^K.^T 
water. Cook slowly ten minutes, flavor with a iiwie 
lemon juice, vinegar and nutmeg. Half brown sugar 
and half molasses makes a very nice saue©. 

CASAMBI, SAUCE. 

Put one-half cup of sugar in a sauce pan. Stir 
*^jl melted and a light brown, then add one-half cup 
of boiling water. Simmer for fifteen minutee. 



PUDDINGS AND ICE CRBAM SAUCBS. 181 

HOT FRUIT SAUCE. 
Peach, Apricot, Strawberries, Raspberries, Etc. 



1 cup of the fruit or 

berries. 
% cup of sugar. 



1 teaspoonful com starch 
or flour. 



Mix the corn starch smooth in a little cold water. 
Stir it into the fruit. Boil from five to ten minutes. 
Mash and strain. 

CREAMY SAUCE. 



Ys cup butter. 

1 cup powdered sugar. 



2 tablespoonfuls of cream 
and the same amount 
of wine. 



Cream the butter, add the sugar slowly, then beat 
in the wine ; just before serving add the cream. Or, 
add the cream and wine together and cook over hot 
water till smooth and creamy, but not enough to melt 
the butter. A hot or cold sauce can be made from 
this receipt 

EGG SAUCE. 

Beat one egg very light, five minutes ; then beat in 
one-fourth cup of powdered sugar and fold in one- 
half cup of heavy cream, whipped. 

FOAMY SAUCE. 



Yg cup butter. 

1 cup powdered sugar. 

^ cup boiling water. 



3 tablespoonfuls of wine or 

fruit juice. 
White of one egg. 



Cream the butter, add the sugar and cream, then 
the wine; just before serving add the boiling water. 
Mix it in well, add the white of egg, well beaten. 
Beat all together with a Dover beater till light and 
foamy. 



182 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

HARD SAUCE. 

y^ cup butter. I White of one egg. 

1 cup powdered sugar. | Flavoring. 

Cream the butter and sugar, then fold in the 
white of egg beaten stiff. Flavor with a little nut- 
m^, lemon, vanilla or wine; pile lightly on a serv- 
ing dish. 

SABATON SAUCE. 

Put in a sauce pan one-half cup of sherry, one- 
half cup sugar and one beaten egg. Beat over the fire 
with a Dover beater till it begins to thicken. 



WINE SAUCEL 



1 cup powdered sugar. 

1 cup boiling water. 

1 tablespoo^ul flour. 

1 egg. 



Vk <^P butter. 

^ cup wine. 

A little grated nutmeg. 



Mix the flour and sugar with a few grains of salt 
all together. Pour over them the boiling water, let 
boil ten minutes. Cream the butter and beat the egg 
lightly. Add the wine to the hot sauce and pour over 
the egg, butter and nutmeg. Beat vigorously till well 
mixed. 

WINE SAUCE (No. a). 



1 cup powdered sugar. 

1 cup butter. 

2 eggs. 



2 tablespoonfuls of wine. 
1 tablespoonful brandy. 



Cream the butter and sugar, add the eggs well 

Deaten, the wine and brandy. Heat through over hot 
water. 



PUDDINGS AND ICE CREAM SAUCES. 183 

BRANDY SAUCE. 

Mix one cup of sugar, one-fourth teaspoonful salt, 
and three tablespoonfuls of flour together, pour on 
them two cups boiling water, let boil for ten minutes, 
stirring until smooth, then pour this onto two table- 
spoonfuls of butter creamed, and two tablespoonfuls 

of brandy. 

LEMON SAUCE. 



The juice of 2 lemons and 
the grated rind of one. 



2 cups sugar. 
V^ cup butter. 
Whites of 2 eggs. 

Cream the butter and sugar, add the lemon juice 
and rind. Just before sending to the table add the 
whites of the eggs beaten lightly. 

PINEAPPLE SAUCE. 

Grate one cup of pineapple fine, mix with it two 
tablespoonfuls of thick sugar syrup. Serve with 
puddings or fritters. 

RICHELIEU SAUCE (For Hot Paddings). 

Mix one tablespoonful of flour with three-fourths 
cup sugar and a few grains of salt. Pour slowly over 
it (stirring all the time) one cup boiling water. Cook 
ten minutes. Remove from the fire and flavor with 
one teaspoonful of vanilla or one tablespoonful of 
wine and two of lemon juice. Add one-fourth cup 
each shredded almonds and candied cherries, or pine- 
apple cut in small pieces. 

GOLDEN SAUCE (Rich and DeUcions). 

Cream one-third cup of butter and one cup of 
powdered sugar together. Add the beaten yolks of 



184 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

three eggs^ juice and grated rind of a lemon^ then add 
the whites beaten stiflF. Cook over hot water, stirring 
constantly until it thickens like a custard. 

0SAN6B SAUC^. 

Mix together one cup of sugar, two tablespoonfuls 
of flour, one teaspoonful grated orange peel. Pour 
over it all one cup of boiling water. Boil ten min- 
utes. Semove from the fire, add the juice of one 
orange and one-fourth cup of butter creamed. 

SYRUP SAUCES. 

Fruit juices make nice sauces for blanc mange, 
com stardi, rice or cottage puddings. Heat and 
sweeten the juices, thicken with a little flour and 
flavor with wine or nutmeg. 

MAPLE PUDDING SAUCE. 

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter and stir into it 
one of flour, pour slowly over it one cup of hot maple 
syrup, stirring all the time. Cook for ten minutes, 
add a little salt; one-fourth cup of thick cream can be 
added just before taking from the stove. 

CHOCOLATE SAUCE (For Ice Cream or Pttddinss). 

Grate two ounces (two small squares) of Baker's 
chocolate and mix with it two cups of sugar and add 
two tablespoonfuls of butter, one and one-half cups of 
hot water. Cook to the soft ball stage, flavor with one 
teaspoonful of vanilla. Pour hot over ice cream. 



PUDDINGS AND ICE CREAM SAUCES. 185 

MAPLE SUGAR SAUCE (For Ice Cream). 

One cup of maple sugar, one-half cup hot water. 
Cook till it forms a soft ball in cold water. One-half 
cup of chopped walnuts may be added to it. 

COFFEE SAUCE. 



1 cup of strong coffee. 
1 tablespoonfid flour. 



^ cup sugar. 

% cup thick cream. 



Mix the sugar and flour together. Stir them into 
the boiling coffee. Cook five minutes, add the cream 
and serve cold on vanilla ice cream. 

FAVORITE SAUCE. 

Beat until quite thick the yolks of two eggs. 
Then add the beaten white of one, and two table- 
spoonfuls of confectioners' sugar. Place in a double 
boiler and cook stirring (the while) until thick. Pour 
into a cool bowl and beat with a wooden spoon until 
cold. Then mix in this one cup of whipped cream. 
Flavor as desired. 



186 ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



CHEESE DISHES. 



C0TTA6B CHEESE. 

Let fresh milk stand in a warm place for two or 
three days or until the curd separates from the whey. 
Turn the curd in a double piece of cheese cloth, hang 
it up in a cool place until the curd is free from the 
whey, add salt and a little cream. . Shape in balls. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

Melt in a sauce pan two tablespoonfuls of butter. 
Stir into it two of flour. When smooth add a 
cup of milk, half teaspoonful of salt, a few grains of 
cayenne, or paprica. Cook two or three minutes. 
Add the yolks of three eggs, well beaten, and one cup 
of grated cheese. Set away to cool. When cold, add 
the whites, beaten to a stiff froth. Turn into a but- 
tered baking dish, set in a pan of hot water, bake 
thirty-five minutes. Or, turn in buttered individual 
dishes and bake fifteen or twenty minutes. Serve at 

once. 

CHEESE CRACKERS. 

Butter crackers lightly, spread over with grated 
cheese, a little salt and paprica. Brown in the oven. 

CHEESE WATER CRACKERS. 

Split Bent's water crackers in halves, moisten by 
dipping quickly in very hot water, spread over with 
melted butter and French mustard, and a thick layer 
of grated cheese. Season with salt and paprica. 
Place in a hot oven until the cheese is creamy. 



CHEESE DISHES. 187 

WELSH RAREBIT (No. x). 

One pound of American cream cheese. Herki- 
mer County is the best. One-half c»p of ale or beer, 
one-half teaspoonful each of dry bustard and salt, 
one-fourth teaspoonful of paprica. Other seasonings 
can be used. Slices of hot toast or crackers. Cut the 
cheese into small pieces and put it in the chafing dish 
with one tablespoonful of the ale or beer. Stir and 
as it begins to melt add the rest of the ale gradually. 
As soon as it is all melted stir in the seasonings, then 
serve at once on toasted bread or crackers. Heat the 
plates. Everything must be very hot, as the cheese 
hardens quickly. 

WELSH RAREBIT (No. 2). 

Make the same as No. 1, using milk in place of 
the ale or beer, and one well-beaten egg, mixed with 
the milk. Cream can be used in place of milk. 

CHEESE TIMBALES. 

Melt two tablespoonf uls of butter in double boiler 
and two of flour, one-half teaspoonful salt, one-fourth 
of paprica. Gradually add one-half cup of cream 
and one-half cup chicken stock. When thick and 
smooth, stir into it one-half cup grated cheese and two 
eggs, beaten well. Pour in buttered timbale moulds, 
bake standing in a pan of hot water until the centers 
are firm. Serve surrounded by a white sauce. 

FROZEN CHEESE (To Serve with Salad). 

Cook the beaten yolks of three eggs with one- 
fourth teaspoonful of salt and a little paprica in a 



188 ROCKY MOUNXAnf COOK BOOK. 

cup of scalded milk. Cook until it coats the spoon 
like custard, then add one-half cup of grated cheese 
and one teaspoonful of granulated gelatine that has 
been softened in cold water. Beat until it begins to 
set a little, then fold in one-half cup of cream that 
has been whipped stiff. Pack in a baking powder or 
cocoa can for two hours, in equal quantities of salt 
and ice. 

CHEESE BALLS (To Serre with Salad). 

Mix with one cup and a half of grated cheese, 
one tablespoonful of flour, one-fourth teaspoonful salt 
and a little paprica, then add the whites of two egg&y 
beaten stiff. Shape in small balls, roll in finely sifted 
cracker crumbs. Fry in deep fat and drain on soft 
paper. 

CHEESE PUDDING (A Good Luncheon Dish). 

Soak one cup of fine bread crumbs in two cups 
of milk. Add the yolks of three eggs, two tablespoon- 
fuls of melted butter, one-half pound of American 
cream cheese, grated, one-half teaspoonful salt, one 
teaspoonful each of chopped parsley and Worcester- 
shire sauce, one-fourth teaspoonful paprica. Then 
add the stiffly beaten whites. Bake in a pudding dish 
or in individual dishes, until it is puffed up and 
brown, in a hot oven. It will take about thirty min- 
utes for the large dish. 

CHEESE RAHEKniS. 

Grate one-fourth pound of soft cheese. Put in a 
sauce pan with one cup of soft bread crumbs. Two 
cups of milk. One-half teaspoonful of salt, a little 
paprica. 



CHEESB DISHES. 189 

Stir and cook until ingredients are well mixed. 
Take from the fire and drop in the yolks of two eggs, 
mix. Then fold in the stiffly beaten whites. Turn 
in baking dish or Kamekin dishes and bake in a quick 
oven. Small dishes ten minutes, large ones twenty. 

CHEESE FINGERS. 

* 

Rub one-fourth pound of soft American Cheese 
with a teaspoonful of catsup, a little salt, paprica and 
a tablespoonf ul of butter. Spread over thin strips of 
bread and toast quickly in a hot oven. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

Put one-half cup of flour in a soup plate, make a 
well in the center and put into it two tablespoonfuls 
of grated cheese, yolk of an egg, salt, paprica and 
two tablespoonfuls of ice water. 

Mix, working the flour gradually in. Knead the 
dough until smooth and hard. Roll in a thin sheet 
and cut in five-inch strips. Bake brown. 

POLENTA CHEESE CAKES. 



% cup of grated cheese. 
Salt. 



3 cups of milk. 

y^ cup com meal. 

2 tablespoonfuls of flour. 

Scald the milk. Mix meal, flour and salt. Stir 
all at once in the milk. Cook half an hour or longer. 
Then stir in the cheese. Remove from the fire. 
Spread in a buttered dish to make a layer an inch 
thick. When cold cut in squares or rounds and set in 
a buttered baking dish. Sprinkle with grated cheese. 
Then set over layers sprinkled with cheese having a 
layer of cheese on top. Place in a hot oven to brown. 
Serve in baking dish. 



190 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



CHEESE MUFFINS. 



% cup of milk. 
2 eggs. 
Salt. 



1 tablespoonful of melted 

butter. 

2 tablespoonfuls of flour. 
V2 <2up o^ grated cheese. 

Beat the eggs well. Mix all the ingredients. Bake 
in sma]! mii£Sn pans for twenty minutes. 



SALADS. 191 



SALADS. 



Salads should form an important part in our 
menu. The oil which we use with them aids diges- 
tion and is one of the best forms of fat we can use. 
The green salads are the most easily prepared, and 
with a French dressing most appropriate for a dinner 
salad, often with the addition of some other fresh 
vegetable. Almost all kinds of meat, fish, vegetables 
and eggs with the addition of some kind of greens 
make good salads. It only requires a little thought 
in making the combination to always have a palatable 
salad. 

TO PREPARE THE GREENS. 

All greens should be carefully washed in cold 
water and all poor leaves thrown aside, for the beauty 
of a salad is to have it perfectly fresh. Let the leaves 
remain in ice-cold water for twenty minutes or so, 
then swing them in a wire basket to free them from 
the water, or dry each leaf with a napkin. 

TO PREPARE MEAT FOR SALAD. 

Meat for salads should be cut in dice, not smaller 
than a half inch, and should be marinated for one 
hour before serving. Meat salads are the only kind 
that are improved by marinating. 

TO MARINATE. 

Mix the meat with a French dressing one hour 
before serving. Before mixing the salad together, 
drain off any of marinate which has not been absorbed 
in the meat. 



198 ROCKY MOUNTAm COOK BOOK. 

SOUS THIHGS THAT CAN BE SBSVSD WITH A SALAD. 

watercress, cucumber, ginger, mint and plain sand- 
wiches, made from all kinds of bread, rolls and crack- 
ers. Different kinds of cheese, either toasted or 
plain, served with crackers or bread and butter sand- 
wiches, cheese souffle, frozen cheese, cheese croquettes, 
cheese balls and cheese in any palatable form, is per- 
missible with salads. Wine or orange jelly moulded 
with nuts or fruits, or plain, is very delicious served 
with a salad. 

Radish Roses. — ^For these use the small, round 
ones. Cut the radish in scallops in two layers. Soak 
in ice water two hours before serving. 

Radish Tulips. — Select small ones of oblong 
shape, cut them in quarters nearly down to the stem. 
Soak. 

FRENCH DRESSnCG. 



Vz teaspoonful salt. 
% teaspoonful paprica. 
3 tablespoonf uls of oil. 



1 tablespoonful of vin^^ 
or lemon juice. 



Mix in the order given, adding the oil slowly, 
stirring all the time. A little tarragon vinegar with 
the other is considered a great improvement by many. 
One-fourth teaspoonful of dry or made mustard can 
be added, and a little onion juice. The onion juice 
IS a great improvement when the dressing is to be 
used for potaio salad. 



I^YONNAISE DRESSING. 

1 teaspoonful mustard. 
Va teaspoonful salt. 
% teaspoonful paprica or a 
uttle cayenne. 



Yolks of four raw eggs. 
2 cups olive oil. 
2 tablespoonfuls of vinegar. 
2 tablespoonfuls lemon juice. 



SALADS. 198 



When used for fruit salad take fo^p^Kblespoon- 
fuls of lemon juice, without the vine^f^P Mix the 
dry seasonings and the egg yolks well together, add 
the oil a drop at a time until it begins to thicken, then 
it can be added a little more quickly. When it gets 
very thick, thin it with a little lemon juice or vinegar, 
then alternate the oil, vinegar and lemon juice until 
it is all used up. Just before serving add one-half 
cup of whipped cream. A wooden spoon, fork or 
Dover egg-beater are used to mix the dressing with, 
but the best of all to use is the mayonnaise mixer. 
With this mixer the dressing can be made much 
quicker, easier and lighter. Mayonnaise dressing can 
be colored any color you wish by using the vegetable 
colorings. 

COOKED SALAD DRESSING (Miss Howard). 

Mix half a tablespoonful of mustard, one-half a 
tablespoonful of sugar and one teaspoonful of salt, 
with the yolks of two raw eggs. Add three table- 
spoonfuls of melted butter and three-fourths of a cup 
of cream. Pour slowly on the mixture (stirring) 
one-fourth of a cup of vinegar. Cook the dressing in 
a double boiler until it thickens (stirring constantly). 
Strain and cool. 

COOKED SALAD DR1KSSIN6. 



% teaspoonful salt. 
14 teaspoonful mustard. 
cStyenne or paprica. 



1 egg. 

l^ cup of milk. 

3 tablespoonfuls of vinegar. 

1 tablespoonful of butter. 

Beat the egg until light, put all the ingredients in' 
a double boiler except the vinegar. Cook until it 
thickens. Eemove from the stove and add the 
vinegar. 



194 ROCKY MOXniTAIN COOK BOOK. 

COOKBD DRSSSIN6 (Mn. Lincoln). 



Va <^up of butter, creamed. 
1 teaspoonful sugar. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 
% teaspoonful mustard. 
% teaspoonful paprica. 



Yolks of two eggs beaten 

slightly. 
2 tablespoonfuls hot water. 
2 tablespoonfuls vinegar. 



Mix the eggs and seasonings together. Add the 
hot water and vinegar. Beat (stirring constantly) in 
a double boiler. When thick and creamy, add the 
creamed butter, stirring. Whipped cream or egg 
whites can be added. If to be used on fruit salad, 
omit the mustard and use lemon juice in place of the 
vinegar. 



WINE SALAD DRESSING. 



^ cup sugar. 
Vz ci^P sherry. 



2 tablespoonfuls Madeira or 
2 teaspoonfuls of brandy. 



Heat them all together until the sugar is melted. 
Cool and serve. 

SOUR CREAM DRESSING. 



1 cup sour cream. 
^ teaspoonful salt. 
^ teaspoonful paprica. 



1 tablespoonful horseradish. 
A few drops onion juice if 
desired. 



Add the salt and paprica to the cream, whip until 
thick, then stir in the horseradish and onion juice. 



TARTARE SAUCE. 



To one cupful of mayonnaise add four olives, two 
gherkins and two teaspoonfuls of capers, all chopped 
fine. The olives stuffed with peppers can be used in 
place of the plain olive. 



SALADS. 195 

DENVER SALAD DRESSING. 



2 tablespoonfuls of lemon 

juice. 
1 tablespoonful of mustard 



1 teaspoonful salt. 

Paprica. 

1 cup of cream. 



Mix seasonings with lemon juice. Then add two 
tablespoonfuls of cream. Beat the remaining cream 
and stir in the seasonings gradually. 

VINAIGRETTE SAUCE. 

Mix one teaspoonful of salt and little paprica. 
One tablespoonful of Tarragon vinegar. Two table- 
spoonfuls of cidar vinegar. Six tablespoonfuls of oil. 
One tablespoonful each of chopped green paper, cu- 
cumber, pickles and a teaspoonful of chives. 

THOUSAND ISLAND SALAD DRESSING. 



1 teaspoonful of Tarragon 

vinegar. 
^ teaspoonful of paprica. 
% teaspoonful of salt. 
Yz cup of chili sauce. 



1 cup of mayonnaise 

dressing. 
1 teaspoonful of pimentos 

chopped fine. 
1 teaspoonful of chopped 

green peppers. 

Beat into the mayonnaise the chili sauce, season- 
ings, vin^ar and chopped vegetables. 

CHIFFONADE DRESSING. 

Chop fine the white of a hard-cooked egg. Add 
the yolk pressed through a sieve. A tablespoonful 
each of chopped chives, parsley, capers and cooked 
beet. Half teaspoonful of scraped onion pulp. One- 
half teaspoonful each of salt and paprica. One-half 
cup of oil and three tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Mix 
all thoroughly to be used on asparagus salad. 



196 ROCKY MOUNTAni COOK BOOK. 

ROQUBFORT CHEESE DRESSING. 

Mash until smooth one tablespoonful of Roque- 
fort cheese. Mix with one tablespoonful of oil. Then 
proceed as with French dressing. First add salt and 
paprica. Then three tablespoonfuls of oil and lastly 
one tablespoonful of vin^ar. 

BEARNAISE SAUCE. 
(To be used Hot or Cold with Meat or Fish.) 



1 tablespoonful of hot water. 
1 tablespoonful of tarragon 
vinegar. 



4 tablespoonfuls of salad oil. 
Yolks of four eggs. 
% teaspoonful of salt. 
Paprica or cayenne. 

Beat the yolks, add the oil and water, cook in 
double boiler until it thickens, remove, add salt, pep- 
per and vinegar. It should be thick like mayonnaise. 
Butter can be used in place of the oil. Cream three 
tablespoonfuls of butter and cook with the eggs. Omit 
the hot water. When thick, remove from the fire, add 
two tablespoonfuls more of butter creamed and the 
seasonings. 

LETTirCE AND WATERCRESS SALAD. 

Use only the tender leaves. Wash each leaf and 
let them stand in ice water a few minutes before 
using. Dry them, arrange in a bowl with the largest 
leaves on the outside, sprinkle over with chives 
chopped fine, or new onions sliced very thin. Sliced 
pickles or olives are sometimes used with the lettuce. 
Rub the bowl with garlic before putting in the lettuce, 
if liked. Mix with a French dressing. Garnish with 
radishes cut to represent roses or tulips. 



SALADS. 197 

CELERY SALAD. 

Use only the tender stalks (the outside can be 
saved for soups and sauces). Scrape and wash each 
stalk, let stand in ice-cold water a half hour before 
using. Dry in a towel and cut in one-fourth inch 
pieces or into straws one inch long. If cut into 
straws put in ice water for twenty minutes before 
serving to curl them. Mix with either French or 
mayonnaise dressing and garnish with lettuce leaves. 
Celery salad is often served with game. 

STUFFED CELERY SALAD. 

Clean the tender stalks of celery, put in cold 
water a few minutes, dry and fill the crevice with the 
following mixtures : Fill the stalks with tartare sauce, 
place three or four on lettuce leaves and serve. Or 
they may be stuffed with Roquefort cheese that has 
been mashed fine with a spoon and a little sherry wine 
added to it. Or filled with Neufchatel cheese that 
has been creamed and chopped nuts mixed with it. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Cook a chicken or fowl until tender in boiling 
water enough to cover, with a tablespoonful of salt, 
six peppercorns, one clove, a small bay leaf, one onion, 
several stalks of celery, or two or three of the roots. 
Remove from liquid and when cold* cut the meat in 
half -inch pieces. (Save the liquid and bones and 
add to your soup stock. Cut the celery in half-inch 
pieces using half as much celery as meat. One-half 
cup of walnuts or olives cut in small pieces and added 
to two cups of the chicken and one of celery is an 
improvement. 



108 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Marinate the chicken and celery one hour before 
serving, drain off any marinate that is left in the 
dish, mix the nuts or olives or both, with the celery 
and chicken. Arrange in a salad dish, first mixing 
a part of the mayonnaise dressing with the salad. 
Cover the top with mayonnaise, garnish with celery 
leaves, olives, lettuce or hard-boiled eggs sliced. In 
the summer, when celery is out of season, cucumber 
cut in cubes can be used in place of it Garnish with 
lettuce or watercress. 

MOULDED CHICKEN SALAD. 

Put the chicken on to cook in warm water with 
all the seasonings and vegetables as for chicken salad. 
Cook until tender, then cook the stock down to two 
cups. Strain and when cold remove the fat. Clear 
the stock (see clearing soup stock), and add to it two 
tablespoonfuls of granulated gelatine that has been 
softened in one-half cup of cold water. Reheat for a 
few minutes to dissplve the gelatine; prepare the 
chicken and celery as for chicken salad. Season with 
salt and pepper. When the stock begins to get cold 
and thicken, beat into it one cup of whipped cream 
and the chicken and celery. Pour into a mould that 
has been decorated with hard-boiled eggs, cut to repre- 
sent daisies, or slices of egg, truffles or olives. The 
decorations can be held in place by a little of the 
stock. After the gelatine has been added mould in 
individuals or one large mould. Remove on salad 
dish. Garnish with lettuce or celery leaves and serve 
with mayonnaise dressing. 



SALADS. 199 

MOULDED CHICKEN SALAD (No. s). 

Garnish individual moulds or one large one. 
After the garnish is set with a little of the jelly, then 
add a layer of jelly one inch thick. When that has 
hardened, place the salad in carefully and cover it 
with a thin layer of the jelly to hold it firm. "When 
that has hardened fill up the mould with the jelly, 
making three layers, with the salad between. Gar- 
nish with greens, lettuce, watercress or celery leaves. 
Serve with mayonnaise. 

MOULDED CHICKEN SALAD (No. 3). 

Mould in a double mould. If one is not at hand, 
use any two moulds or tins of the same shape, one of 
which is an inch or so smaller than the other. Place 
the larger one on ice, decorate it and hold in place 
with a little of the jelly, then pour enough of the jelly 
to make a layer the same thickness as the width of 
space between the two moulds. When it is set fill the 
smaller mould with ice and set inside of it and fill 
the space between the two with jelly. When that is 
set remove with a spoon the ice from the mould and 
pour into it a little warm water (not hot). The 
mould can then be easily removed. Fill up the space 
with the chicken salad. Hold it in place with more 
jelly. Remove from the mould when cold. Garnish 
and serve with mayonnaise. 

MOULDED CHICKEN SALAD (No. 4)- 

Mould in tomato jelly instead of the chicken jelly. 






200 ROCKY MOXINTAIK COOK BOOK. 

MOXaDBD CHICKEN SALAD (No. 5)* 

Moulcl in wine jelly^ placing the chicken salad in 
the center. Garnish and serve with mayonnaise. 

MOULDED CELERY AND WALNUT SALAD. 

Use half the quantity of walnuts as of celery. 
Clean and cut the celery in half-inch pieces. Cook 
the walnuts for ten minutes in boiling salted water 
with a slice of onion, a clove and three peppercorns. 
Cut in small pieces. Mix the celery and walnuts 
with just enough mayonnaise to hold them together. 
Mould the same as chicken salad, either chicken, 
tomato or wine jelly. 

MOULDED SWEETBREADS AND CUCUMBER SALAD. 

(Boston Cookiiig School). 

Simmer one pair of sweetbreads twenty minutes 
in boiling, salted, acidulated water, with a bit of bay 
leaf, a slice of onion and a blade of mace. Cool and 
cut in dice. There should be three-fourths of a cup. 
Soak one-fourth tablespoonful of gelatine in a table- 
spoonful of cold water and dissolve in two tablespoon- 
fuls of boiling water. Add one tablespoonful and a 
half of lemon juice and a half cup of cream beaten 
thick. Add the cubes of sweetbreads, one-fourth of a 
cup of cucumber cubes and season with salt and pap- 
rica. Turn into moulds, chill and serve on lettuce 
leaves with French or mayonnaise dressing. 

PINEAPPLE AND CUCUMBER SALAD. 

Juice of six lemons and the juice of one can of 
pineapple. Three tablespoonfuls of gelatine softened 



SALADS. 201 

and dissolved in as little water as possible. One 
cucumber cut in fine cubes. One-half cup of shredded 
pineapple. 

Add the gelatine to the lemon juice. Add the 
pineapple juice when it begins to thicken, the cucum- 
ber and the shredded pineapple. Sweeten to taste. 
A little green coloring may be added. Pour in mold. 
Serve the next day. 

MOULDING SALADS. 

Any kind of salad can be moulded in the jellies 
the same as chicken salad. Garnish with the greens 
and serve with mayonnaise, cooked, or sour cream 
dressings. 

TO GARNISH WITH CURLED CELERY. 

Cut the stalks of celery in one or two-inch lengths, 
then cut each piece in strips nearly to the center, be- 
ginning at each end, leaving enough whole to hold 
together. Set in ice water one hour before using. 

TO UNMOULD JELLY. 

Place the mould quickly in warm water, remove, 
put the serving dish over the top of the mould and 
invert them together. A very little heat will melt 
gelatine. 

TOMATO JELLY. 



1 cup of any kind of strong 

soup stock. 

2 cups tomatoes. 
I slice of onion. 
1 clove. 

4 pepperoomB. 



1 teaspoonful salt. 
1 teaspoonful sugar. 

1 teaspoonful catsup. 

2 tablespoonfuls granulated 

gelatine. 



202 ROCKY MOUNTAni COOK BOOK. 

Boil all together for one-half hour or until the 
tomatoes are soft Soften the gelatine in one-half cup 
of cold water, then stir it into the tomato when dis- 
solved, and mould. A very pretty eflfect is obtained 
by moulding it in a ring mould. Have celery salad 
in the center mixed with mayonnaise or a cooked 
dressing, and surround it with lettuce. Or, mould 
with a salad moulded inside, or in small moulds, and 
garnish a salad around with them. 

Another nice way to serve it is to mould in the 
shape of a cup and fill with a salad, resting on lettuce. 
This is done the same as Moulded Chicken Salad 
No. 3 by placing one mould or cup inside of another. 

GRAPE FRXnX JELLY. 

Put one-third cup of sugar and one-third cup of 
water in a sauce pan. Boil three minutes. Remove 
and add one and a half tablespoonfuls of granulated 
gelatine that has been soaked in two tablespoonfuls 
of cold water. One-half cup of grapefruit juice. 

One tablespoonful of lemon juice, a little salt 
Pour in molds. 

SOME SALADS TO SERVE IN WHOLE TOMATOES OR 

PEPPERS. 

Equal parts of celery, nuts and apples; or celery 
and nuts, celery alone. Chicken salad, celery and 
sweetbreads, equal parts ; celery, mushrooms and Eng- 
lish walnuts, equal parts. Grape fruit and nuts, 
equal parts. Celery, cucumbers and sweetbreads, in 
fact, almost any salad with the exception of fish and 
fruit salad, are served in tomatoes or peppers. To 
prepare the peppers and tomatoes, scoop out the cen- 
ters and season. 



SALADS. 208 

CELERY JELLY. 



1 cup cold water. 

2 cups celery cut in %-inch 

pieces and the roots 
cut fine. 



1 teaspoonful salt. 
3 peppercorns. 



Cook slowly until the celery is very tender, keep- 
ing about a cup of water in it all the time. When 
tender, mash through a strainer. To two cups of 
celery, after it is strained, add one tablespoonful of 
granulated gelatine that has been softened in two 
tablespoonfuls of cold water. Eeheat until the gela- 
tine is dissolved, then pour in moulds. Mould as 
you would chicken or tomato jelly. 

TO PREPARE WHOLE TOMATOES FOR SALAD. 

Scald and skin them, select all as near the same 
size as possible. Place on ice until half an hour before 
serving, then scoop out the center (saving the pieces 
for soup stock, or a sauce). Sprinkle with salt and 
a little pepper, turn over and drain, fill with mayon- 
naise, or any combination you care for. 

TOMATOES AND PEPPERS STUFFED WITH CHEESE. 

Remove the skin from the tomatoes. Scoop out 
the center and fill with Roquefort cheese which has 
been beaten to a smooth cream with a little cream. 
Chill. Slice. Place on rounds of toast that have 
been covered with Anchovy paste. 

NEUFCHATEL SALAD. 

Fill the whole tomatoes with balls made from 
Neufchatel cheese and slices of stuffed olives, dress 
with French dressing and serve on lettuce leaves, or 
surround the tomatoes with watercress. 



M4 KOCKY MOUNXAIH COOK BOOK. 

ITALIAN SALAD. 

Cook the large macaroni until tender in boiling 
Baited water, drain through a colander and when cold 
cut in half-inch pieces, place in a salad bowl (without 
lettuce) and cover over with slices of hard-boiled egg ; 
pour over all a French, mayonnaise or boiled dressing. 
A very good luncheon salad. 

CUCUlfBER SALAD (To Serve with Fish). 

Peel the cucumbers, place them in ice-cold water 
to become crisp. (Do not add salt, as that wilts 
them). Wipe them dry, place on a flat dish and slice 
very thin without destroying the shape of the cucum- 
ber. Garnish with cress or lettuce. Pour over it all 
a French dressing. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

Peel and place in ice water, then cut the cucum- 
bers across in lengths of three inches, scoop out the 
inside to form a cup to hold the following salad: 
Equal parts of sweetbreads, cucumbers and English 
walnuts mixed with mayonnaise. Fill up the cup 
with the salad,, set on lettuce leaves, put a teaspoonf ul 
more mayonnaise on top of each salad and place on it 
a radish cut to represent a rose. 

CUCUMBER SALAD (No. 2). 

Pare and chill a cucumber, cut in half lengthwise, 
remove the seeds and dry. Fill with the following: 
Chop fine the solid part of a peeled tomato, a thin 
slice of new onion, or a few sprigs of chives and a 
couple of stalks of tender celery. Mix with Bear- 
naise sauce, French or mayonnaise dressing. 



SALADS. 805 

CUCUMBER AND TOMATO SALAD. 

Place a bed of crisp lettuce in a salad dish, then 
a layer of sliced cucumber and one of tomatoes sliced. 
Use a French or mayonnaise dressing. A good din- 
ner salad. 

CUCUMBER AND TOMATO SALAD (No. 2). 

Peel the tomatoes by dipping in boiling water, 
take out the centers, turn them upside down to drain. 
Sprinkle with salt and fill with cucumber that has 
been cut in cubes and mixed with mayonnaise. Serve 
on lettuce leaves. 

ORANGE SALAD. 
(Very Nice to Serve with Game or a Winter Dinner Salad). 

Place a bed of crisp lettuce in a salad bowl, peel 
and cut seedless oranges in one-half inch slices, spread 
them over the lettuce, mix with French dressing. 

GRAPE FRUIT SALAD (To Serve with Game). 

Arrange on lettuce the same as orange salad. Peel 
and remove the pulp from the sections, cut up in inch 
pieces. Serve with French or wine dressing. 

RUSSIAN SALAD (No. i). 

One cup each of cooked carrots, beets, peas and 
string beans, all cut in cubes. Arrange on a salad 
dish in four mounds on four nests of lettuce. Mix 
and cover the top of each with mayonnaise or cooked 
dressing. Garnish the top of the carrot and beet salad 
with capers and pickels cut in fancy shapes, the peas 
and beans, with the yolk of a hard-boiled egg or the 



206 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

coral from the lobster. Have a tuft of lettuce in the 
center and arrange around each mound shrimps or 
lobster. 

RUSSIAN SALAD (No. 2). 

Fill the outside of a mould with clear aspic jelly 
and the center with a number of different vegetables 
mixed with mayonnaise. Cover the top with jelly. 
Serve on a flat dish. Garnish with plain or shredded 
lettuce. (See Moulding Salads.) 

STRING BEAN SALAD. 

Use the very small beans. After being cooked, 
cut in half-inch pieces. Serve on lettuce with French 
or mayonnaise dressing. Garnish with the yolk of 
hard-boiled egg that has passed through a potato ricer. 
String beans mixed with peas makes a delicious salad. 

ASPARAGUS SALAD. 

Use only the tips. Cook in salted water until 
tender. Chill, serve with French or mayonnaise 
dressing on lettuce, or in little cups made from the 
new turnips that have been cooked and scooped out. 

ASPARAGUS SALAD, GARNISHED WITH EGGS. 

Place a bunch of cooked asparagus on a bed of 
lettuce, cover with French dressing; over the center 
sprinkle the yolks of two tard-boiled eggs that have 
been pressed through a potato ricer; cut the white of 
the eggs in rings and surround the outside. 

PEPPER SALAD. 

Plunge three green sweet peppers and one red 
one in boiling water, remove and rub off the skin. 



SALADS. 207 

When cold cut the stem and remove the seeds ; slice in 
rings; also slice tender small onions in rings; cover 
all with French dressing and serve on lettuce. Slices 
of tomato can be added in place of the red pepper. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Two cups of cooked potato balls, or sliced potato. 
Sprinkle over each layer a grating of onion, a little 
celery cut fine, pepper and salt and the yolk of a hard- 
boiled e^y passed through a strainer. On the top 
sprinkle chopped parsley, mix with French or a 
cooked dressing. Serve on lettuce leaves and garnish 
around the mound with beets cut in slices or fancy 
shapes. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Cut the meat from a fresh boiled lobster in one- 
inch pieces. Marinate (or mix with a French dress- 
ing) one hour before serving. Keep in a cold place, 
then drain it and mix with it a little mayonnaise. 
Place it on a flat dish surrounded by lettuce leaves. 
Smooth^it oflF, leaving it high in the center. Cover 
quite thick with mayonnaise. Stick in the top the 
heart of the lettuce and sprinkle over it the powdered 
coral of the lobster. 

FISH SALADS. 

Salmon, shad roe or any firm white fish mixed 
with mayonnaise and garnished with lettuce can be 
served as a salad. Olives, pickles and capers are a 
pleasant addition to these salads, or tartare sauce 
may be used with them in place of mayonnaise. 



208 ROCKY UOJJJXTAa COOK BOOK. 

OTSTBR SALAD. 

Cook the oysters in their own liquor until they 
are plump (about five minutes). Drain and chill. 
Mix with mayonnaise or tartare sauce. Serve on let- 
tuce, garnish with olives, capers or pickles. Celery 
or tender young cabbage cut fine can be served with 
the oysters. 

WALDORF SALAD. 

Peel two raw, tart apples, cut in dice, measure 
and take the same amount of celery cut in small 
pieces, mix with the apples. Mix with mayonnaise 
and serve on nests of lettuce or in red apples with the 
center removed to form cups. Set them on lettuce 
leaves. Have a layer of the dressing on top with a 
heart or small leaf of the lettuce stuck up in the 
center. 

PINEAPPLE SALAD. 

Use equal amount of pineapple cut in dice, cher- 
ries stoned and cut in halves, one-half the amount of 
strawberries cut in halves. Serve with a wine or 
mayonnaise dressing. If mayonnaise is used, mix it 
with one-half whipped cream. Serve the salad in the 
whole pineapple surrounded by lettuce leaves and a 
few sweet peas. Cut off the top of the pineapple 
about one inch deep. Scoop out the inside and use 
for the salad. Drain, chill and fill with the salad 
just before serving. 

A FRUIT SALAD SERVED IN CANTALOUPE. 

Equal parts of the cantaloupe (cut in dice), 
oranges and apples cut in small pieces, one-half the 
amount of English walnuts cut in small pieces. Mix 



SALADS. 209 

with mayonnaise which is one-half whipped cream. 
Select small cantaloupes of uniform size, cut off the 
top and save to use for a cover. A bow of narrow 
ribbon may be drawn through the top to form a 
handle.) Carefully remove the pulp from the salad, 
drain and fill just before serving. Surround each one 
by lettuce leaves. 

OTHER FRXnX SALADS (No. z). 

Equal parts of apple, celery and nuts, mixed with 
mayonnaise or cooked dressing, served on lettuce or 
in cups made from red apples, oranges or lemons. 

FRUIT SALAD (No. a). 

Mix equal parts of bananas, oranges, white grapes 
and pecan nuts, cut in small pieces. Add a little 
lemon juice and mix with mayonnaise which has a 
part of whipped cream with it. Serve on lettuce with 
some of the dressing on top. Garnish with slices of 
orange and nuts. 

FRXnX SALAD (No. 3). 

Eemove the stone from dates, halve them and 
press into the hole pieces of walnuts. Pour over a 
French or wine dressing. Serve on shredded lettuca 

GRAPE SALAD. 

Skin and remove the seeds from malaga grapes, 
stuff each one with a filbert nut which has been 
blanched (let them stand in boiling hot water five 
minutes, then remove the skin). Serve on a bed of 
lettuce, cover with mayonnaise which is a part of 
whipped cream. Garnish around it with sections of 
orange. 



210 SOCKT MOUVTAOr COOK BOOK. 

MANDAfinr SALAD (Good Dinner Salad). 

Equal parts of mandarins sliced very thin with 
the skin on, white grapes seeded and halved, bran- 
died peaches, one-half of maraschino cherries and figs 
that are fresh and moist, cut in inch pieces. Serve 
with wine dressing in punch glasses or in orange cups. 

FRUIT COMPOTB SALAD. 

For each service set a slice of pineapple on let- 
tuce. Place a section of orange and grapefruit on 
top and cover with Denver salad dressing. Chopped 
nuts also may be scattered over the top. 

ALLIGATOR PEAR SALAD. 

Peel and cut the pears ill halves. Discard the 
seeds. Serve one-half to each person, or remove the 
pulp from the skin with a teaspoon. Serve on lettuce 
with vmie salad dressing or oil dressing that has 
orange juice and a little lemon juice. Two of oil, 
one each of orange and lemon. Alligator pears con- 
tain a large proportion of fat and do not require the 
oil dressing. 

NXTT AND CUCUMBER SALAD. 

Two cups of cucumber, pared and cubed, one cup 
of Brazil nuts blanched and cut in small pieces. Serve 
with French or mayonnaise dressing on lettuce. Gar- 
nish with radishes cut to form roses. 

CUCUMBER AND RADISH SALAD. 

Use equal parts of cucumber and radishes sliced 
very thin. Serve in layers on lettuce leaves, with 
French dressing. 



SALADS. 211 

CHICKEN AND MUSHROOM SALAD. 

Cut the chicken in dice shape, break fresh mush- 
rooms in small pieces, add a very little hot water, 
cook five minutes. When cold mix with the chicken, 
having equal quantities. Season with salt, mix with 
mayonnaise. Serve on lettuce leaves. Garnish by 
placing a few olives stuffed with peppers over the top. 

SALMON AND CUCUMBER SALAD. 

While the boiled salmon is hot, flake in small 
pieces, sprinkle over it a little lemon juice, onion 
juice, pepper and salt. Set on the ice; several hours 
before using mix lightly together with thin slices of 
cucumbers cut in halves. Cover with tartare sauce. 
Serve on lettuce. 

TRUFFLE SALAD (A Good Dinner SaUd). 

Cut tender stalks of celery in half-inch pieces, 
put sliced truffles to soak in sherry wine for a half 
hour. Have equal quantities of truffles and celery, 
drain the truffles and mix with the celery. Sprinkle 
with a little salt. Mix with mayonnaise dressing. 
Serve on lettuce hearts and scatter a few capers over 

EGG SALAD. 

Cook six eggs in water just off the boil for twenty 
minutes, chill and shell them. Cut the whites in 
strings and put the yolks through a potato ricer. Ar- 
range on shredded lettuce, making little nests of the 
whites and filling them with the yolks. Pour lightly 
over them a French dressing. Serve with cheese 
balls and toasted sandwiches or toasted crackers. This 
salad can be made by using little nests of the whites 



212 SOCXT MOXnrrAIH COOK BOOK. 

and filling them with balls of the yolks that have 
been mashed and mixed with French dressing. 

EGG SALAD (No. a). 

Cut hard-cooked eggs in halves, remove the yolks, 
mix them with olives, chopped fine and mayonnaise 
dressing. Fill the whites with the mixture and 
round them on the top to give the appearance of a 
whole yolL Serve in nests of lettuce or watercress. 

EGG SALAD (No. 3). 

Cut hard-boiled eggs in slices. Serve on water- 
cress. Sprinkle over with finely chopped chives and 
French dressing. 

WATKR LILY SALAD. 

Cut cold hard-boiled eggs in quarters lengthwise ; 
if the eggs are very large cut in eighths. Place six of 
these pieces in a circle, one pointed end of each piece 
meeting in the center, to represent the lily. Arrange 
them on lettuce leaves and cover with French dressing. 

CHSSSB SALAD. 

3 eggs cooked hard, 1 cup chicken cut in dice. 

A% cups of cream cheese 
cut in small dice. 

Rub the yolks through a ricer, mix with the chick- 
en and cheese. Serve with French or cooked dress- 
shLa^""™'?^ T.'*^ ^^**^^®> *^^ ^Wtes of eggs cut in 
Sch L^?^^ ^'^^^^ ^^'^ ^^^^d ^^^ mound of salad, 
peppeT "^ ^^ ^^ *^^ ^li^«« i^ it, stuflPed with 



SALADS. 213 

BIRDS' NEST SALAD. 

Use the soft cream cheeses. EoU into balls the 
size of a bird's egg, arrange in nests of lettuce, four 
or five balls to a nest. Cover with French dressing 
and sprinkle a few specks of paprica over each egg. 
Or a little green coloring paste can be rubbed in the 
cheese to make the little green eggs. 

CREAM CHEESE SALAD. 

Mix with a soft cream cheese, one gherkin and 
three good-sized olives chopped fine and enough may- 
onnaise dressing to shape in its original shape. Chill 
thoroughly. Serve on a bed of lettuce surrounded by 
nasturtium blossoms. Cut in slices for serving. 

CREAM CHEESE AND BAR-LE-DUC. 

Toast small crackers. Pipe or arrange with a 
spoon around the edge a border of cheese that has been 
softened with a little cream. Place a teaspoonful of 
the bar-le-duc in the same. Serve with salad or as a 
course with coffee. 

AMERICAN CREAM CHEESE SALAD. 

One cup of the American cream cheese grated. 
Add to it one tablespoonful of chicken chopped fine, 
three olives, season with salt and pepper and mix to- 
gether with enough mayonnaise to shape it in the 
form of a cream cheese. Chill thoroughly, serve on 
lettuce, surrounded by olives or nasturtium blossoms. 
Cut in slices for serving. 



214 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

COLD SLAW. 

Shred a red or white cabbage very fine, mix it 
with a French dressing, using twice the amount of 
vinegar used for French dressing, or cover with 
the following dressing: Heat half a cup of vinegar 
with one teaspoonful each of salt and sugar, one- 
half teaspoonful of mustard, a little pepper and pap- 
rica. White hot stir into it a tablespoonful of but- 
ter creamed, then pour over the beaten yolks of two 
eggs. Cook over hot water until it thickens a little. 
Mix the dressing with the cabbage while hot. Serve 
cold alone as a salad or with broiled fish or fried 
oysters. 



SOGS. 21S 



EGGS. 



Eggs are very valuable food, being highly nutri- 
tious and easily digested. Almost any of the fol- 
lowing receipts can be prepared in the chafing dish 
on the table. 

EGGS COOKED IN THE SHELL (No. i). 

To cook the eggs soft, place in boiling water. Set 
on the back of the stove where it will not boil, for 
eight minutes, at a high altitude, one minute less for 
sea leveL 

EGGS COOKED IN THE SHELL (No. a). 

Another way of cooking the egg soft is to place it 
in cold water on the stove, remove as soon as they 
reach the boiling point. Cooking eggs either by No. 
1 or No. 2, you will find the albumen is creamy and 
easily digested. Boiling eggs makes the albumen 
hard and homy, not easily digested. 

EGGS COOKED IN THE SHELL (No. 3). 

To cook an egg hard, place in boiling water, set 
on the back of the stove from twenty minutes to a 
half hour. 

POACHED EGGS. 

Place in a frying pan as many muffin rings as 
you have eggs to poach, drop an egg in each ring, then 
turn in enough boiling water to cover them. Add a 
little salt, cook slowly on the side of the range. It 
should take from ten to fifteen minutes to cook them. 



216 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Bemove carefully, using a pancake turner, or a wide- 
bladed knife, onto a round piece of toast ; remove the 
rings. Season with a little salt, pepper and a piece 
of butter. Serve on a platter. Garnish with water- 
cress or parsley. Before toasting the bread cut the 
slices into rounds with a large sized biscuit cutter. 
To poach the eggs without rings break carefully in 
the boiling salted water. 

POACHED EGGS (No. a). 

Add a little salt to the white of the egg, and beat 
to a stiff froth, place in a cup, and carefully drop 
the yolk (so as not to break it) into the center. Set 
the cup in a dish of boiling water, cover and boil four 
minutes. At sea level three minutes would be long 
enough. Season with a little butter, salt and pepper. 
Serve in the cup. A good way to serve an egg to an 
invalid. 

POACHED EGGS (No. 3). 

Spread the toast with creamed chicken, minced 
ham, anchovy or sardine paste, and place a poached 
egg on top. Or, serve poached eggs with boiled ham 
or bacon. 

FRIED ECK^. 

Put a little butter in a frying pan, when it is hot . 
break in the eggs; cook slowly. If they are to be 
served hard, turn them and cook on the other side. 

SCRABfBLED EGGS. 

Beat the eggs lightly, just enough to mix them. 
To each egg add two tablespoonfuls of milk, or half 
milk and half cream, a little salt and pepper. Put in 



EGOS. 217 

a sauce pan a tablespoonful of butter; when' it bub- 
bles add the eggs and stir constantly until they set. 
They should be just a little firm, but not hard. They 
can be mixed with chopped meats, chives, tomato that 
has been cooked, parsley, or anything that one has, to 
give a good flavor. 

SHIRRED EGGS. 

Individual baking dishes are generally used, al- 
though several can be cooked in one large disL But- 
ter the dish, break into it an egg, sprinkle a little 
salt on the whites, cover with a tablespoonful of thick 
cream, or baste several times while baking with 
melted butter. Set the dish in a pan of hot water, 
cook until quite firm to the touch. 

EGGS COCOTTE. 

Butter individual baking dishes, and line with a 
paste of fine bread crumbs mixed with cream, or 
sprinkle the dish over with finely chopped ham, 
chicken or mushrooms mixed to a paste, with a little 
cream, or sauce, and seasoned. Lining with a thin 
layer, break in the egg and cook the same as shirred 
eggs. When done cover the top with a little cream, 
tomato, or bechamel sauce, and sprinkle with chopped 
parsley. 

OMELETS. 

It is better to make several small omelets than one 
large one. An omelet should be served at once, and 
let the family wait for the omelet rather than the 
omelet for the family. With a little care one can 
soon become an expert at making them. They should 
cook slowly, be a delicate brown when done. Avoid 
burning. 



218 ROCKY MOUHTAIN COOK BOOK. 

OMELET No. z. 

Beat the yolks of two eggs until light and foamy, 
add one-fourth teaspoonful of salt, a little pepper and 
a tablespoonful of milk for every egg used. Beat the 
whites stiff, fold lightly into the yolks, melt a tea- 
spoonful of butter in an omelet pan (it is best to keep 
this pan for omelets alone). Let the butter cover the 
pan; when bubbling turn in the omelet, cook slowly 
and carefully until brown on the bottom, then set the 
pan on the upper grate in the oven for a minute to 
dry. When the center is dry as you cut into it, run 
a knife around the edge, then under the half nearest 
the handle, and fold over to the right ; then invert the 
omelet on a hot platter ; garnish with parsley. 

FRENCH OMELET No. a. 

Beat two eggs slightly, add one tablespoonful of 
milk, one-fourth teaspoonful salt and a little pepper. 
Melt a teaspoonful of butter in the omelet pan ; when 
bubbling pour in the egg. With a fork break the ^g 
in several places, letting the uncooked egg run under 
and brown. When the egg is set, fold and serve on a 
hot platter the same as for omelet No. 1. 

CHEESE OMELET. 

Make the same as No. 1 or 2. Add one-fourth 
cup of grated cheese to the yolks of two eggs, and a 
little paprica. 

RUM OMELET. 

Make the same as omelet No. 1. Have the omelet 
slightly underdone; just before sending to the table 
pour two tablespoonfuls of brandy around it, dip a 



£66S. 219 

block of sugar in the brandy, set it on top of the ome- 
let and touch a lighted match to it, or light on the 
table. 

HERB OMELBT. 

Mix chopped parsley, chives, chervil and tarragon 
with the eggs before cooking. 

HAM OMELET. 

Stir into omelet No. 1 two tablespoonfuls of finely 
chopped ham. The same amount of diicken can be 
used, or mushrooms. 

PEAS OMELET. 

Cover the omelet just before folding with a layer 
of creamed peas. 

TOMATO OMELET. 

Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter. Into it cook 
one tablespoonful of finely chopped onion and a slice 
of red or green pepper chopped fine. Add one cup of 
tomatoes, and cook altogether until the mixture has 
evaporated. Add a tablespoonful of sliced cooked 
mushrooms. One-fourth teaspoonful of salt, a little 
pepper. This is used as a filling and garnish for the 
omelet. 

Beat four e^s and add four tablespoonfuls of 
milk, a little salt and pepper. Put one tablespoonful 
of butter in an omelet pan and cook. Surround witii 
the sauce. 

JELLY OMELET. 

Make the same as No. 1 ; omit the pepper ; allow 
a teaspoonful of powdered sugar to each egg; when 



220 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

ready to fold, cover over with a layer of jelly or mar- 
malade. 

ORANGB OHELET (Mrm Lincoln). 

The thinly grated rind of one orange and three 
tablespoonfuls of the juice, three eggs and three table- 
spoonfuls of powdered sugar. Beat the yolks and 
the sugar, rind and juice. Fold in the whites and 
cook as omelet No. 1. Turn out, sprinkle thickly 
with powdered sugar and score in diagonal lines with 
a clean, red-hot poker. The burnt sugar gives the 
omelet a delicious flavor. 

PINEAPPLE OMELET. 

Make the same as omelet No. 1 ; omit the pepper 
and part of the salt ; add to the yolks two tablespoon- 
fuls of powdered sugar, and one-half cup of grated 
pineapple. When done sprinkle with powdered sugar 
and score the same as for orange omelet. Garnish if 
you like with slices of pineapple. Orange and pine- 
apple omelets make delicious and quickly prepared 
desserts. 



Pour a cream tomato or mushroom sauce around 
omelets. 



A good change is to mix chopped chives or parsley 
with the omelet before putting in the pan, 

EGGS COOKED IN WHOLE TOMATOES. 

With a pointed knife take out the center of the 
tomato, season with salt and pepper, drop into it a 
whole ^g, cover the top of the ^g with a little cream 



BOOS. 221 

sauce^ set in a buttered pan and bake in the oven 
until the egg is firm; remove to a platter, garnish 
around them with a cream sauce. The sauce can be 
omitted entirely, covering the top of the egg with a 
piece of butter. 

EGGS IN GREEN PEPPERS. 

Parboil the peppers in boiling water for five min- 
utes; when cool cut about an inch from the pointed 
end, take out the seeds, and cut off the stem ; sprinkle 
the inside with salt and pepper, and break an egg 
into each ; put a little piece of butter on top and place 
in an agate plate; bake in the oven twenty minutes, 
or until the egg is firm. Serve on a slice of toast, sur- 
rounded with white or tomato sauce. 

EGGS EN COQUILLE (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Cut slices of stale bread in large rounds; with a 
smaller cutter, cut half way through and scoop out 
the center, leaving a cavity large enough to hold an 
6gS' ^^P ^^ bread shells in egg beaten with a little 
milk, and sautg or fry in deep fat a delicate brown. 
Place them on a platter, cover with hot cream sauce, 
or poultry gravy. Serve a poached egg in each shell. 
The shells may be covered with melted butter and 
browned in the oven. 

POACHED EGGS A LA HOLLANDAISE. 

Split and toast some round muffins; put on each 
a round, thin slice of broiled ham, and on the ham a 
poached egg. Pour over the top of each some Hol- 
landaise sauce. 



222 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

POACHED SGG8 WITH CBLERT SAUCE. 

Place a poached egg on a round slice of toast and 
surround it with celery sauce. Take one cup of cel- 
ery cut in half -inch pieces and cook in boiling salted 
water till tender. Make a white sauce by using two 
tablespoonfuls of flour and butter, one-half cup of 
cream and the same amount of the water the celery 
was cooked in (letting the water cook down to that 
amount), one-fourth teaspoonful salt, a little pepper. 
After the sauce has cooked over hot water ten min- 
utes, add the cooked celery, reheat and serve. 

EGG BALLS TO SERVE IN SOUP. 

Mash the cooked yolks of four hard-boiled eggs 
through a sieve, season with a little salt and pepper, 
one-half teaspoonful of melted butter and enough raw 
yolk of an egg to make the mixture the right consis- 
tency to mould in little balls. Then poach them in 
hot water, or dip in white of egg and flour and saute 
in butter. It takes about three minutes to cook them. 

EGG TIMBALES (Miss Barrows). 

Beat four eggs slightly^ add one cup of milk, 
chicken or veal stock, season with salt and peppet, 
and if desired onion juice and chopped parsley. Turn 
mto buttered small moulds, and steam or bake in a 
pan of hot water till firm in the center. Turn out 
and serve hot with a cream or tomato sauce, or garnish 
with sliced cucumbers or olives. 

CURRIED EGGS. 

Cook six eggs in hot water twenty minutes. Re- 
move the shells and with a sharp, thin knife cut in 



B6GS. 223 

slices. Saute one tablespoonful of finely chopped 
onion to two tablespoonf uls of butter, till a delicate 
brown, add two tablespoonfuls of flour mixed with 
one-half tablespoonful of curry powder, stir until 
smooth, then add slowly one cup of white stock, cream 
or milk. Season with salt and pepper, cook till the 
onion is soft, then add the ^gs when they are heated 
through. Serve on toast, or cover hot toast with slices 
of hard-boiled egg, and cover with the sauce. 

CURRIED EGGS (No. a). 

Boil rice so every kernel is separate (see boiling 
rice), make little nests of it and place in each nest 
one hard-boiled egg that has first been dipped in the 
sauce, then pour a tablespoonful more of the sauce 
over the egg. 

STUFFED EGGS (No. x). 

Cut hard cooked eggs in two lengthwise^ Re- 
move the yolks and mash fine. Mix with them any 
finely chopped meat; ham or chicken are the best. 
If convenient a few mushrooms or truffles chopped 
fine, a little cream or any kind of sauce, a gherkin or 
a few capers if cared for. Season with salt and pep- 
per, fill the whites with the mixture, smooth them 
over the top and rub a little raw egg over them, press 
the two halves together. Make a mound of the re- 
maining yolks, place it in the center of the platter 
and the eggs around it, and pour around the eggs a 
cream sauce. 

STUFFED EGGS (No. a). 

Prepare and stuff the e^s (as stuffed eggs No. 
1). Roll them in fine crumbs, then in ^gg, and in 
8 



224 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

crumbs again. Fry in deep fat a rich brown. Serve 
surrounded by a white or tomato sauce. 

EGGS WITH CHS£SB. 

Cut cold, hard-boiled eggs into slices. Butter a 
baking dish, cover the bottom with a layer of the e^, 
then a layer of grated cheese sprinkled over with 
paprica and a covering of cream sauce, and so on 
until the dish is full, haying the cheese on top. Cook 
in a hot oven till the cheese is brown. This can be 
baked in individual dishes and makes a very good 
luncheon dish. 

JAPANESE EGGS. 

Boil as many ^gs as you wish to use until hard, 
drop in cold water, remove the shell ; boil one cup of 
rice, when full and flaky drain and heap on a platter, 
cut the eggs in halves and press down in the rice; 
pour over all a cream or tomato sauce. 

EGGS AND ASPARAGUS. 

Bounds of hot toast covered with tips of aspara- 
gus. On these place a poached egg. Pour over the 
whole a cheese sauce. 



SAHDWICHBS. 220 



SANDWICHES. 



Sandwiches, like salads, can be made in great 
varieties, only care and thought must be taken in 
selecting the combinations. 

Sandwiches can he made from white, brown, gra- 
ham bread, fresh rolls, crackers, etc., and may be cut 
in any shape, with or without the crust. To many 
the most appetizing part of the bread is sacrificed 
when the crust is removed. 

Some of the shapes may be cut in squares, rounds 
(with a biscuit cutter), triangles, hearts or rolled. 
To keep sa/ndwiches moist cover with a damp napkin. 
The butter for sandwiches can be either salted or un- 
salted, and should be creamed before spreading, as it 
then will spread evenly without breaking the bread. 
Seasoning of chopped mint leaves or parsley, spinach 
juice that has been crushed and pressed through a 
cloth, a little tarragon vinegar, onion juice if cared 
for, capers, pickles, nasturtiums, or olives finely 
chopped can be added to the butter. 

Cvi the bread in very thin slices, trimming off 
the crust before slicing, the crust and the trimmings 
can be dried for crumbs. Have the slices fit evenly 
one upon the other. BreaS for sandwiches should be 
fine grained and a day old. Bolls used for sand- 
wiches should be fresh and small. 



226 ROCKT MOUHTAIN COOK BOOK. 

LETTUCE SAHDWICHES. 

Lay a crisp, dry leaf of lettuce between thin slices 
of buttered bread, sprinkle with salt. Mayonnaise 
can be used in place of the butter. 

WATERCRESS SANDWICHES. 

Wash and dry the watercress, crush the leaves a 
little and prepare the same as lettuce sandwiches. 

SPANISH SANDWICHES. 

Spread buttered graham bread with mixed mus- 
tard, a layer of cottage cheese, then with a layer of 
chopped olives or pickles mixed with mayonnaise. 

HEAT SANDWICHES. 

Spread the bread with butter or mayonnaise, or 
mix die meat with mayonnaise. A crisp lettuce leaf 
or watercress can always be used with the meat ; chop 
chicken and celery together, mix with mayonnaise or 
fresh dressing. Thinly sliced meat of any kind, sea- 
soned with salt and pepper, and mustard if ham is 
used ; spread over with mayonnaise or French dress- 
ing, if liked. Meats chopped or pounded to a paste, 
mixed with hard-boiled eggs, mashed, a little cream, 
season with salt and pepper, and if you like, a little 
onion juice. 

Chopped ham mixed with mustard, a little cream 
or mayonnaise, and a little chopped pickles or olives. 

Chicken livers cooked till tender, with a thin 
slice of onion, a few peppercorns and salt, chopped 
very fine, mixed with cream or mayonnaise. 



SANDWICHES. 227 

Owme can be prepared the same as meat. A few 
chopped olives or pickles mixed with it is an 
improvement. 

AUTOMOBILE SANDWICHES. 

Cut the bread in thin slices, leaving on the crust, 
spread with butter and cover with thin slices of com 
beef; cover the meat with a thin layer of chopped 
green sweet peppers and a little finely chopped onion 
and mayonnaise dressing ; cover with a slice of bread. 

GREEN PEPPER SANDWICHES. 

Can be made by chopping sweet peppers and 
onion very fine, mixing with a little mayonnaise and 
placing between thin slices of bread. 

EGG SANDWICHES. 

Spread buttered bread with a little chopped pars- 
ley, watercress or olives, and cover with thin slices 
of hard-boiled egg. Chop the eggs fine, mix with 
mayonnaise, lay the egg between crisp lettuce leaves. 
Sliced boiled eggs can be covered with mayonnaise 
and laid between lettuce leaves. 

FISH SANDWICHES. 

Anchovies or sardines can be freed from the bone, 
pounded to a paste and moistened with a little lemon 
juice, or mixed with finely chopped pickles, olives or 
capers, served between thin slices of toasted bread 
or crackers, or the plain buttered bread or crackers. 
These sandwiches are sometimes served for the first 
course at a dinner, surrounded by lettuce or water- 
cress, as an accompaniment to oysters or alone. 



22B ROCKY MOUNXAIH COOK BOOK. 

Shad Roe, made very fine, seasoned with salt, 
pepper and a little lemon juice and spread between 
lettuce leaves if you like. With bread or crackers 
any fresh boiled fish can be used in the same way. 

NUT SANDWICHES. 

Peanuts, walnuts, pecans, almonds and almost any 
kind of nut can be used for sandwiches. Chop them 
fine, mix with cream, mayonnaise or French dressing, 
or with cream or Neufchatel cheese. Nut sandwiches 
are very nice made of graham or brown bread, as 
well as white bread. 

CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

CiU American or Swiss cheese in thin slices, cover 
with a thin coating of French mustard and put be- 
tween buttered graham or rye bread. Any kind of 
grated cheese can be mixed with salt, paprica, a little 
cream or butter and spread between slices of brown, 
graham or white bread or crackers. Neufchatel 
cheese rubbed to a paste w^*^ cream and put be- 
tween thin slices of brown bread. 

Orated cheese and anchovies mixed with salt, pap- 
rica and a little vinegar. 

HOT CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Cut slices of bread two inches square. Cut from 
the square a small square of bread, leaving the box a 
half inch thick all aroimd, fill the space with a piece 
of American cheese, sprinkle it over with a little salt 
and paprica, cover the top with a thin slice of the 



SANDWICHES. 229 

bread, thus forming a box, brush over with melted 
butter or beaten white of an egg, brown in a hot oven. 
These are delicious. Serve very hot on hot plates. 

CLUB HOUSB SANDWICHES. 

Use four pieces of toasted bread spread with may- 
onnaise dressing. Cover two of these with lettuce 
leaves, lay thin slices of cold chicken upon the lettuce, 
over this thin slices of cold bacon or minced ham, 
then more lettuce, cover with the other slices of toast 
that have been spread with mayonnaise. Qarnish 
with lettuce leaves and mayonnaise. 

HOT HAM OR CHICKEN SANDWICHES. 

Spread buttered bread with chopped ham or 
chicken. If ham is used, mix it with a little mustard 
and moisten with a little cream if necessary. Mix 
chopped chicken with pepper, salt and a little cream 
or chicken gravy. Dip each sandwich into a slightly 
beaten egg that has been diluted with two tablespoon- 
fuls of milk. Saute in butter, browning both sides. 
This can be browned in the chafing dish or on the 
stove. Serve with pickles or olives. 

SWEET SANDWICHES. 

Spread thin slices of buttered bread with any 
kind of jam, jelly, preserves, candied fruits; the 
bread can be cut in fancy shapes or the sandwiches 
rolled. For rolling very fresh bread should be used, 
and the sandwiches should be fastened together with 
wooden toothpicks for an hour before serving, keep- 
ing them moist by covering with a napkin wrung out 
in cold water. Spread thin slices of bread with 



230 SOCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

orange marmalade or preserved ginger cut in thin 

slices. 

GINGESBHSAD SANDWICHES. 

Bake gingerbread in thin sheets, when cold cut it 
open and into shapes for sandwiches. Spread with 
cream cheese and thin slices of preserved ginger, or 
the ginger can be chopped fine. These are nice for a 
picnic. 



CANAPES. 281 



CANAPES. 



Canapes are served hot and are thin slices of 
bread, sauted in butter or browned in the oven. They 
are cut in circles or strips. Sometimes they are used 
as the first course at a luncheon and sometimes as a 
dessert. 

ANCHOVY OR SARDINE CANAPES. 

Spread strips or rounds of sauted bread with an- 
chovy or sardine paste that has been mixed with a 
little lemon juice. Arrange on top rosettes of hard- 
boiled eggs chopped fine, the white and yolks ar- 
ranged separately or in alternate lines. 

HAM CANAP^. 

Cut thin slices of bread in rounds with a large 
biscuit cutter. Saute in butter or brown in the oven. 
Chop boiled ham very fine, mix with mustard and fl 
little cream spread on the bread, cover the top with 
grated cheese with a sprinkling of paprica, put in a 
hot oven for a few minutes for the cheese to melt 

CHEESE CANAPIE^. 

Cover pieces of sauted bread with grated parme- 
san cheese, sprinkle with salt and paprica, brown in 
the oven. Serve at once. 

CHICKEN CANAPES. 

Chop chicken and celery very fine, half and half, 
season highly, mix with gravy, stock or cream spread 



2S2 ROCKT HOUNTAra COOK BOOK. 

on sauted bread and serve with thin slices of hard- 
boiled egg in rows down the c^iter. 

PRUNE OS FIG CANAP^. 

Soak the fruit in cold water for ten minutes, cook 
in a little hot water till tender, cut the figs in quar- 
ters, remove the stones from the prunes. Stew the 
fruit with sugar and a little water, using one table- 
spoonful of sugar and a half cup of water to a cup 
of the fruit. When the sugar and water is mostly 
cooked in the fruit, add two tablespoonfuls of sherry 
wine, cook for two or three minutes and place on 
sauted squares or rounds of bread, cover the top with 
whipped cream. These make a very nice dessert and 
can be cooked on the chafing dish. 

FRUIT CANAPES. 

All kinds of preserved fruit can be used, the fruit 
being heated and a little wine added if cared for, 
placed on the sauted bread, covered with whipped 
cream. Peaches and pineapple are particularly good 
served in this way. A little brandy can be added to 
the peaches. 

ALEXANDRA CANAPl^. 

Butter small rounds of toasted bread, cover each 
piece with anchovies. Scatter over them hard-boiled 
eggs, olives and capers chopped together very finely. 

APRICOT CANAPES. 

Cut thin slices of bread into rounds. Saute a 
delicate brown in hot butter, cover with apricot mar- 
malade and dot with whipped cream. 



CANAPES. 233 

ANCH0VT-AND-E66 CANAPES. 

Cut bread in slices one-fourth inch thick and ciut 
into diamond or round shapes. Spread with butter 
and brown in oven. When cold have ready some fresh 
butter beaten to a cream. Into this beat Anchovy 
paste to tint and flavor as desired. Spread the bread 
lightly with the butter. Set a slice of hard cooked 
egg in the center. Pipe a narrow thread of butter 
around the edge and fill the space between the egg 
and the edge with very finely chopped pickled beets. 
Serve cold as an appetizer at luncheon or dinner. 



2S4 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



PASTRY. 



The pie, although greatly abused, has more 
friends than any other dessert. In New England, 
not many years ago, it was the custom to make up 
enough mince pies a week before Thanksgiving to 
last a good part of the winter. In many homes the 
custom is still carried out. It was no unusual sight 
to see forty or fifty pies all ready for the brick oven. 
The beauty of a pie is to have the pastry light and 
flaky and well browned. 

A well made plain pastry is good enough for most 
any pie. But the puff paste greatly improves a mince 
pie, especially for special occasions, like Thanksgiv- 
ing or Christmas. The puff paste is used mostly for 
pate shells, tarts, cheese straws^ etc 

PLAIN PASTRY (Enough for One good-sized Pie). 



% teaspoonful of salt. 
Ice water. 



1^ cups of flour. 

y^ cup of lard. 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 

Sift the flour and salt together, cut in the lard 
with a knife or rub in with the tip of the fingers, then 
cut in just enough ice water to hold it together. In 
putting in the water add only a few drops at a time, 
so as not to get too much. The pastry should be dry. 
Flour the board well, and roll out the pastry lightly, 
patting it with the rolling pin to get in shape to roll. 
Cover it over with one tablespoonf ul of butter cut in 
little bits ; sprinkle a little flour over the butter. (The 
pastry should be rolled in an even square). Fold over 
the two sides to nearly meet in the center, then fold 



PASTRY. 236 

the ends over to the center, and the ends over again 
on over the other, making a square piece of pastry; 
pat and roll out again, place the other tablespoonful 
of butter and roll and fold in the same way ; roll and 
fold once more, making three times in all. The pas- 
try is then ready for use. All pastry is better to 
remain on the ice some time before using. It can be 
kept a week or more in this way. 

PUFF PASTE (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Four cups of flour (or one pound), two cups of 
butter (or one pound), one-fourth teaspoonful of salt, 
ice water. This amount makes about twelve pat6 
shells. 

Put the butter in a bowl of ice water, work it with 
the hands or wooden spoon until it becomes smooth 
and waxy. This is to wash out the salt and make it 
lighter. Then knead it in a napkin to get out all the 
water, pat it in half a dozen flat thin strips, lay it flat 
on a napkin in a pan; place this pan between two 
pans that are filled with cracked ice. This is done to 
thoroughly chill the butter. Sift the flour and salt 
together, mix it to a stiff dough with ice water, using 
a knife and only a few drops of water at a time. 
Then knead it on the board until it is smooth, place 
on the ice for thirty minutes. Then flour the board 
well and tods the ball of dough on it, using a knife ; 
then roll out in a long sheet. Take one piece of the 
butter from the ice, roll it in a little flour, cut in thin 
strips and place on the pastry ; fold over the sides of 
the pastry, letting the edges just meat in the center. 
Then fold the ends over to tiie center and double it 
over again ; pound gently in a flat cake and roll out 
again. Boll each piece of butter in the same way. 



&M SOCKT MOUlTTAni COOK BOOK. 

After the butter is all in, roll and fold once more, or 
as many more times as you care to do it. Should 
the paste become soft and sticky, put it on the ice for 
a while, then flour the board well and roll out. The 
paste should be folded and rolled till no streaks of 
butter remain. Then place it on the ice to chill, or 
cut out in the shapes to be used, place in the pans and 
chill on the ice for thirty minutes before baking. 

TO BAKE PUFF PASTE. 

The dough should be ice cold before putting in 
the oven. The oven should be hot, the greater heat 
at the bottom so the paste may rise before browning. 
It is well to place an asbestos mat or paper on the 
grate above them so they will not brown too soon. A 
brown crust over the top will hold them down and 
prevent them being as light Pate cases should bake 
about twenty-five minutes, and tarts fifteen minutes. 

TO MAKE pIt^ shells FROM PUFF PASTE. 

Boll the paste to a quarter of an inch thickness. 
Cut into rounds with a fluted or plain cutter. Use 
the circles or rounds for one pat6 shell ; cut a hole in 
the center of two with a small cutter. Moisten the 
edge of each circle with a very little water, as too 
much water will hold the edges down and make them 
heavy. Place the two rings with the holes cut in 
them on top of the whole round, pressing the edges 
lightly together. Olaze them on the top with an egg 
if you like; the egg must not go over on the edges. 
Use the small pieces that are cut from the rounds for 
covers after the cases are filled. Bake them in a sep- 
arate pan, as they do not require as long a baking. 



PASTRY. 237 

Tarts are made with the two layers, cutting 
one in a circle and placing it on the round the same 
as for a pate. Fill with jelly, jam, preserves or 
lemon cream, the same as for lemon pie, first cooking 
the lemon cream in a douhle boiler. When cool fill 
the tart shells. Serve cold. 

VOL-AU-VENT. 

Can he cut in any shape required, a large round 
being most often used. EoU out the puflF paste one- 
half inch thick ; turn a pie plate upside down on the 
paste, press it down to make a marking, and cut out 
with a sharp knife. Put two or three rims around 
the edge as you would a pie, only thicker ; place in a 
large pan on a paper; bake in a hot oven forty-five 
minutes. Fill with any kind of cream, meats, mush- 
rooms or oysters, or serve as a dessert, filled with 
stewed fruits covered with whipped cream. 

PTTFF PASTE STRIPS. 

Roll out the paste one-fourth an inch thick,' cut 
in strips with a pastry wheel one inch wide and four 
inches long; bake in a hot oven for fifteen minutes. 
On a papered pan spread a strip with apricot or 
raspberry jam, cover with a strip, place a meringue 
over the top, brown in the oven and serve as a dessert. 
Cut puff paste in a three-inch square, bring the four 
comers to the center, moisten diem a little to keep 
in place. Bake for twenty minutes and put a little 
jam or jelly in each comer, with a little whipped 
cream on the jelly. 



238 ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

TO GLAZE PASTRY. 

Beat an egg slightly, then mix with it a table- 
spoonful of water. Brush over the pastry with a 
brush very lightly, and dust with a very little pow- 
dered sugar. This gives a brown and glossy look. 

CHEESB STRAWS. 

Roll puff paste thin, sprinkle with grated cheese 
and a little paprica. Fold and roll out, sprinkle and 
fold twice more; roll the last time one-half inch 
thick, cut into straws, place in the pans, put on the 
ice for half an hour ; bake in a hot oven for ten or 
fifteen minutes. 

APPLE PIE. 

Cut sour apples in quarters, peel and core, and 
slice. Place them evenly in the plate, piling a little 
in the center. Cover with half a cup of sugar; sea- 
son with one-half teaspoonful cinnamon or grated 
nutmeg, and a teaspoonful of butter. In the spring 
of the year when the apples have lost their flavor, 
season with lemon juice and a little of the grated 
rind. Cut slits in the upper crust for the steam to 
escape, dampen the edges of both upper and under 
crust, press them together. Place around edge a 
half inch strip of the pastry; moisten it before put- 
ting on so it will cling to the crust. Bake about 
thirty minutes in a hot oven, try the apples to see if 
done, with a straw or fork. 

SQUASH PIE. 



1 cup dry sifted squash. 
lYi cups scalded milk. 
14 cup sugar. 



y^ teaspoonful salt. 

% teaspoonful cinnamon. 

2 eggs. 



PASTRY. 239 



Mix in the order given. Line a plate with pastry, 
put on a rim. Bake until the center is firm. 



PUMPKIN pm. 

Make the same as squash, only season with one- 
fourth teaspoonful each of ginger and cinnamon. 

CUSTARD PIE. 

Beat three eggs slightly, then beat in six table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, one-fourth teaspoonful of salt, 
nutmeg or cinnamon. Pour into this mixture two 
cups of scalded milk. Line a deep plate with pastry, 
put a rim around and bake slowly. Watch carefully, 
when it puffs up take out at once. 

RHUBARB PIE. 

If the rhubarb is very young and tender do not 
peel it. If the skin has become tough, peel and cut in 
half -inch pieces. Line a plate with the crust, fill with 
the rhubarb, sprinkle with one cup of sugar, and a 
teaspoonful of butter ; if liked, flavor with cinnamon 
or nutmeg, cover with a crust and put a rim around 
it. Bake in a quick oven for about thirty minutes. 

BERRY PIES. 

Pick over and wash the berries, line a plate with 
pastry, fill with the berries, sprinkle with half cup of 
sugar, or more if the berries are very acid ; cover with 
a crust; bake. 

CRANBERRY PIE. 

Stew the cranberries. Line a plate with pastry, 
and a rim of pastry around it. Fill with the cooked 



240 ROCKY MOUHTAIN COOK BOOK. 

cranberries, having them cold, and cover the top with 
strips of pastry about half an inch wide, having them 
cross 'each other to form little squares. Bake. A 
Thanksgiving pie. 

APPLE TART PIE. 

Make the same as cranberry pie. Stew the ap- 
ples, sweeten and season with lemon juice and 
nutmeg. 

PRUNE, APRICOT OR PEACH PIE. 

Line a deep plate with pastry and bake, or invert 
the pie plate, and bake the pastry on the outside of 
it. When cold fill with the stewed fruit, cover the 
top with whipped cream. 

Peach Pie can be made the same as a sliced apple 
pie. 

DELICIOUS LEMON PIE. 

Beat four eggs. Place them in a double boiler, 
stirring in one cup of sugar, one tablespoonful butter, 
juice and a rind of lemon. One-fourth teaspoonful 
salt and add very gradually one-half cup of cold 
water. Stir until it becomes very thick like a drop 
batter. Bake the pie crust well pricked. When cool 
pour in the mixture that is also cool. Cover with 
meringue. Brown in oven. 

MERINGUE. 

Beat the whites of two eggs until stiff. Then beat 
in two tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar and fold in 
one tablespoonful. 



PASTRY. 241 

L£MON PIS (With- Com Starch). 

Mix two tablespoonfuls of corn starch with one 
cup of sugar ; add one cup of boiling water, boil ten 
minutes, take from the stove; add a teaspoonful of 
butter, one whole egg and one yolk, the grated rind 
and juice of a lemon. Bake between crusts or with 
a meringue. 

CREAM PIE. 

Boil one cup and half of milk; stir into it one- 
fourth cup of sugar, one teaspoonful of com starch 
or flour mixed with the sugar, one-fourth teaspoonful 
of salt; stir until smooth. Remove from the stove 
and add three egg yolks slightly beaten. Bake in a 
crust-lined plate. 

MINCE MEAT. 



4 cups chopped meat. 

1 cup chopped suet. 
8 cups chopped apple (sour). 

2 cups meat liquor. 
2 cups brown sugar. 
2 cups molasses. 

2 cups cider. 

Juice and grated rind of two 

lemons.  
Juice and grated rind of 

three oranges. 
1 lb. of stoned and chopped 

raisins. 



1 lb. washed currants. 
y^ lb. chopped citron. 
^ lb. chopped figs. 

^ lb. chopped English Wal- 
nuts, if liked. 

2 tablespoonfuls of salt. 

2 tablespoonfuls cinnamon. 
2 teaspoonfuls mace. 
2 teaspoonfuls powdered 

cloves. 
2 teaspoonfuls allspice. 

1 cup of brandy. 

2 tablespoonfuls rose water. 



Mix in the order given. Use cold tea in place of 
cider and brandy if you wish. Cook slowly in a pre- 
serving kettle for one hour, stirring often. Add the 
brandy and rose water after removing from the stove. 
Meat from the lower part of the round is the best to 
use. A little more brandy or wine can be poured 
over the pie just before the upper crust in put on. 



242 ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Mince meat is better to pack in an earthen jar, and 
to keep several days before using, Sauteme may be 
used in place of cider. 

PETITE PIES. 

Line small round patty or gem pans with plain 
or pufif paste. Fill with lemon or cream filling, 
stewed fruits or berries. Cover with a crust, cut a 
dash in the center for the steam to escape. Bake in 
a quick oven. 

ENGLISH APPLE PIE. 

Fill a buttered pudding dish with tart apples cut 
in eighths, pared and cored; sprinkle with sugar, a 
little salt and grated rind of a lemon. Pile the apples 
high in the center ; add one-fourth cup of cold water, 
a few pieces of butter. Invert the dish upon the pas- 
try ; cut large enough to give place for the high center 
and shrinkage. Cover the pie with the paste, putting 
a rim of paste around the edge. Bake about forty- 
five minutes, 

BUTTER SCOTCH PIE. 

Bake on a tin sheet three circles of thin pastry, 
that have been well pricked, the size of a pie plate. 
When cool put between layers of butter scotch filling. 
Cover with meringue. 

BUTTER SCOTCH FILLING. 

Cream one-fourth cup of butter. Mix with three- 
fourths cup brown sugar. One-fourth cup flour. Pour 
over this mixture two cups of scalded milk and turn 
into the double boiler. Add beaten yolks of two eggs. 



PASTRY. 243 

Cook, stirring all the time until the mixture thickens. 
Add one-fourth teaspoonful salt. 

MERINGUE. 

Beat the whites of two eggs until stiff. Then beat 
in two tablespoonf uls of brown sugar, a speck of salt. 
Set in the oven five minutes to brown. 

BAMBURY TARTS. 

Chop fine one cup of stoned raisins. One-fourth 
pound of grated citron. Add the rind and juice of a 
lemon. One cup of sugar. One-fourth teaspoonful 
salt and a egg beaten lightly. 

Roll pastry into a sheet one-eighth inch thick and 
cut into rounds the size of a cup. Put a little of the 
mixture on each piece. Moisten half the edge with 
cold water and fold over the pastry pressing the edges 
together. Bake fifteen or twenty minutes. This fill- 
ing may first be cooked in a double boiler and used 
cold for filling tarts. 



244 K0CK7 MOmtTAIR COOK BOOK. 



HOT PUDDINGS. 



All measurements level, with the exception of baking 
powder, which is measured rounding with the side of the can. 
Sift flour before measuring. 



CREAM RICE PUDDING. 



1 quart of milk. 

Vi cup well washed rice. 

% cup sugar. 



1 teaspoonful salt. 
A little stick cinnamon or 
nutmeg. 



Soak half an hour in the milk. Bake slowly about 
an hour, or until the rice has thickened the milk, or 
a thick creamy substance. This is a delicious, inex- 
pensive and nutritious dessert. One-half cup of the 
whole raisins or a few pieces of preserved ginger can 
be cooked with it to give variety. Serve with butter 
alone, or butter and maple sugar, or cream. 

BAKED RICE PUDDING. 

Make the same as cream rice pudding, with the 
exception of using one-half cup of molasses in place 
of the sugar. Season with cinnamon; add one-half 
cup of raisins and one cup of sour apples, if liked, 
that have been pared, cored and quartered. Serve 
with cream. 

CREAM TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

1 quart of milk. 1 ^ cup sugar. 

Yi cup tapioca. | Yolks of 3 eggs. 

Scald the milk in double boiler. Soak the tapi- 
oca in it for one hour, or until it is transparent. Re- 
move from the stove ; add the beaten yolks and sugar, 
bake in buttered pudding dish for half an hour. Serve 



HOT PUDDINGS. 245 

with lemon sauce, or remove from the oven, cover the 
top with a layer of jam or jelly, and spread over it a 
meringue made from the whites of the eggs and four 
tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. Brown in the 
oven. 

APPLB AND PEACH TAPIOCA. 

Wash one-half cup of tapioca (the pearl is the 
best), pour over it one quart of boiling water, cook in 
double boiler till transparent (about an hour), stir 
often, that it may not become lumpy ; add half a tea- 
spoonful of salt, core and pare eight tart apples, place 
them in a buttered pudding dish, and fill the cores 
with sugar, a little lemon juice and. cinnamon; pour 
the tapioca over them, and bake till the apples are 
soft. Serve hot or cold with foamy sauce or sugar 
and cream. Peel the peaches, cut in halves, cook in 
the same way. 

SAGO PUDDING. 

Scald one quart of milk in a double boiler ; wash 
and add to it one-half cup of sago, and one-half tea- 
spoonful of salt ; let it cook till transparent, stirring 
often to prevent lumping. Beat two eggs with one- 
half cup of sugar. Remove the sago from the stove ; 
add the eggs and sugar. Bake in buttered pudding 
dish for one-half hour, or until it puffs up. Serve 
hot or cold, with cream. 

Make sago with apple or peaches the same as 
peach and apple tapioca. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

Mix one cup of yellow corn meal, one cup of mo- 
lasses, one teaspoonful of salt; pour onto them one 



246 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

quart of scalded milk, one-fourth cup of butter, and 
two beaten eggs; let bake in a deep pudding dish 
slowly for one-half hour, then pour in three pints of 
cold milk. Bake very slowly for five or six hours. 

WHOLE WHEAT PUDDING. 

Mix one cup and a half of whole wheat flour, one- 
half cup of white flour, one-half teaspoonful each of 
soda and salt; sift, add one cup of milk, half a cup 
of molasses, one-half cup each of shelled and chopped 
walnuts and raisins. Steam for two hours and a 
half. Serve with cream, foamy or lemon sauce, or a 
hard sauce flavored with lemon juice, or sherry. This 
will serve eight people. 

FIG PUDDING. 



1 cup of milk. 

y^ teaspoonful soda dissolved 

in the milk. 
4 teaspoonfuls of brandy. 
y^ nutm^. 



12 soda crackers, rolled 

fine. 
y^ lb. figs, chopped fine. 
% cup of suet, chopped fine. 
2 eggs, well beaten. 
I cup sugar. 

Mix in the order given. Steam four hours. Serve 
with a wine or hard sauce. Will serve eight people 
generously, as it is a rich pudding. 

STEAMED PRUNE PUDDING. 



Vz cup <^^y bread crumbs. 

Va cup flour. 

1 teaspoonful baking pow- 
der. 

V2 cup finely chopped suet 
or y^ cup melted butter. 

Mix altogether thoroughly. Steam in a mould 
two and a half hours. Serve with a hard or creamy 
sauce. 



% cup sugar. 

2 eggs beaten light. 

y^ cup of prune pulp. 

^ cup milk. 

y^ teaspoonful salt. 



HOT PUDDINGS. 



247 



THANKSGIVING PUDDING. 



1 teaspoonful baking 

powder. 
% cup flour. 
ll^ cups of soft bread 

crumbs. 
1 cup scalded milk. 
y^ cup sugar. 
5 eggs. 

1 cup raisins. 
y^ cup of currants. 
y^ cup of finely chopped 

dates. 



y^ cup finely chopped citron, 
y^ cup finely chopped suet. 
The grated rind of a small 

lemon. 
y^ cup chopped walnuts. 
y^ nutmeg. 

1 teaspoonful cinnamon. 
1% teaspoonfuls of salt. 

2 tablespoonfuls each of 

brandy and sherry. 



Pour the hot milk over the crumbs. Mix in the 
order given. Steam in a buttered mould six hours. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 



IVJe lbs. raisins, stoned. 
Xy^ lbs. currants. 
1 lb. suet, chopped fine 
IVi lbs. bread crumbs. 
1 lb. flour, or 4 cups. 
1 lb. sugar. 

1 lb. preserved lemon and 
orange peel mixed. 



Grated rind of one lemon. 

2 teaspoonfuls salt. 

% nutmeg. 

y^ ounce mixed spices. 

1 cup brandy. 

1 dozen eggs. 

1 cup scalded milk. 



Pour the milk over the crumbs. Mix in the order 
given. This quantity makes four puddings. Steam 
six hours. 



OLD ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

Pour one cup of milk on one cup of soft sifted 
bread crumbs. Mix with one cup of brown sugar, one 
teaspoonful of salt and one cup of finely chopped 
suet. One pound of raisins, one-half pound of dates, 
one-half cup of nut meats. One-half cup of finely 
chopped citron and one half cup orange peel. Beat 
the yolks of four eggs, add to the softened crumbs. 



fl4S ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Then add the sugar and fruit. One cup of flour, one 
teaspoonful each of cinnamon and nutmeg and lastly 
the beaten whites. Steam in a buttered mould four 
hours. 

SUET PUDDING. 



^ cup chopped suet. 
% cup molasses. 
1 cup milk. 
1 cup stoned raisins. 
% cup chopped citron. 
% teaspoonful soda. 



Grated rind of half a lemon. 
^ teaspoonful cinnamon. 
V^ teaspoonful salt. 
About two cups and a half of 
flour. 

1 egg- 



Sift all the dry materials together, then stir in 
the others. One-half cup of butter can be used in- 
stead of the suet. Steam in a buttered pudding mould 
three hours. Serve with hard, foamy or wine sauce. 

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING. 

Remove the crusts and butter thin slices of stale 
bread. Lay them in layers in a pudding dish, alteiv 
nating with layers of stoned raisins. When the 
dish is full pour over it two well-beaten eggs mixed 
with half a cup of brown sugar, one-fourth teaspoon- 
ful salt, one pint of milk. Bake slowly for one hour. 
Sprinkle cinnamon and nutmeg over each layer of 
bread. 

STEAMED BREAD PUDDING. 



1 cup soft bread crumbs. 

2 cups scalded milk. 
14 cup sugar. 
Yolks of three eggs. 



Vi cup currants or raisins. 
% cup candied orange peel. 
y^ teaspoonful salt. 
l^ teaspoonful nutmeg. 



Mix in the order given. Steam three hours. 
Serve with wine or creamy sauce. 



HOTPVDDnfGS. 249 

BROWN BKTTY. 

In a buttered pudding dish arrange alternate lay- 
ers of soft bread crumbs and sliced sour apples. Sea- 
son each layer with bits of butter, a little salt, and 
ground cinnamon. When the dish is full pour over 
it one-half cup of molasses, and a half cup of hot 
water. Bake for one-half or three-quarters of an hour 
or until the apples are soft. Raisins, chopped al- 
monds or walnuts can be used with the apple. Serve 
with cream. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 



1/4 cup melted butter. 

1/4 cup sugar 

2 eggs. 

14 teaspoonful salt. 



1 cup milk. 

2 cups flour. 

1 rounding teaspoonful 
baking powder. 



Sift the dry materials together; beat the eggs and 
sugar, and add them with the milk and melted butter. 
Bake in a round pan with a hole in the center for 
one-half hour. Serve with lemon sauce. 

STEAMED BERRY PUDDING (Mrs. Lincoln). 



2 cups flour. 

1 teaspoonful baking pow- 
der. 
^ teaspoonful salt. 

1 cup milk. 

2 tablespoonfuls melted 

butter. 



2 eggs. 

% cup sugar. 

2 cups of berries, or fruit, 

raisins or currants 

may be used. 



Sift the dry materials together ; add the fruit, stir 
it well around in the flour, then add the rest of the 
materials. Steam two hours. 

CABINET PUDDING. 

Butter a mould well. Ornament it with candied 
fruits. Arrange in it slices of sponge cake or lady 



250 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

fingers ; dip them lightly in sherry if you like. Ar- 
range alternate layers of cake and fruit, then pour 
over it all a custard made of a pint of milk, yolks of 
three eggs and three tablespoonfuls of sugar; pour 
it into the mould, bake setting in a pan of water, for 
one hour. Serve with a wine sauce. 

BAKED PINEAPPLB PUDDING. 

Pare and grate one pineapple ; to every cup of the 
pineapple add one-half cup of sugar and one-fourth 
cup of butter creamed together, one cup of thin 
cream and four eggs slightly beaten, a little salt. 
Bake in rather a slow oven until it puffs up and the 
center seems firm. Cover with a meringue made 
with the whites of three eggs beaten foamy, beat in 
four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar till stiff, then 
fold in two tablespoonfuls. Bake in a slow oven for 
ten minutes. 

STEAMBD 0RAN6B OR PINBAPPLB PUDDING. 

Let one cup of soft bread crumbs soak in one cup 
of hot milk ten minutes ; add one cup of sugar, one 
cup of orange juice or one cup of grated pineapple 
and one tablespoonful lemon juice. If orange is 
used one tablespoonful of grated orange peel with the 
orange and lemon juice, two eggs, one tablespoonful 
melted butter, one-fourth teaspoonful salt, one tea- 
spoonful baking powder sifted with one-fourth cup 
of flour. Steam in a buttered mould two hours and 
a half. Serve with a creamy sauce. 

QUINCB PUDDING (Mrs. HIU). 

Pare and grate six ripe quinces; mix the pulp 
as grated with the juice of a lemon to keep it from 



HOT PUDDINGS. 251 

discoloring; add the grated yellow rind of a lemon, 
a cup of sugar, the heaten yolks of six and the whites 
of three eggs, and one cup of cream. Mix thoroughly 
and bake until firm in a buttered pudding dish, 
standing in a pan of hot water. Serve cold ; sprinkle 
with powdered sugar, or serve with sugar and 
whipped cream. 

BOSTON APPLE PUDDING. 

Pare and core sour apples enough to make three 
good cups before they are cooked. Stew with them 
one cup and a half of sugar, one-half cup of water, 
two inches cinnamon bark; cook until they are soft, 
then mash through a sieve ; add one tablespoonful of 
lemon juice, one cup hot cream, and the yolks of 
four eggs and one white, and a tablespoonful melted 
butter. Line a pudding dish with rich pastry and 
pour in the mixture ; bake till firm, or butter a pud- 
ding dish and bake without the pastry until firm. 
Serve with cream, hot or cold. 

CORN PUDDING. 

Six ears of sweet com, one quart of milk, or half 
milk and half cream, one-fourth cup of flour, four 
eggs, one-half cup of sugar, one-fourth teaspoonful 
salt, one tablespoonful melted butter. Cut the com 
down through the kernels and press out the pulp. 
Bake in a buttered mould till firm. Serve hot with 
lemon sauce. 

SNOWBALL PUDDING. 

Beat the yolks of four eggs till light, then grad- 
ually beat in one cup of granulated sugar. When 



262 KOCKT MOUNXAIH COOK BOOK. 

light add three tablespoonfuls of milk, one cup full 
of flour, with one teaspoonf ul of baking powder sifted 
with it. Beat the whites stiff, fold lightly into the 
mixture. Fill well-buttered cups or moulds two- 
thirds full; steam for one-half hour. Serve with 
lemon, foamy or wine sauce, or any fruit sauce. 

NUT PUDDING. 

Three-fourths cup of molasses, one-half cup of 
chopped suet, one cup of sweet milk, two and one- 
half cups of flour, one cup seeded raisins, one cup 
chopped English walnuts, one-half cup chopped figs, 
one-half grated nutmeg, one-half teaspoonful each of 
cinnamon and salt, three-fourths teaspoonful of soda, 
mix well together, steam three hours. Serve with 
a hard or orange sauce. 

WEYMOUTH PUDDING. 

Two cups stale bread crumbs soaked in one cup 
hot milk, one cup finely chopped suet, one cup each 
chopped figs and raisins, one cup sugar, one-half tea- 
spoonful salt, three eggs, juice and grated yellow of 
the rind of a lemon. Beat all the ingredients well 
together; steam in a well-buttered mould for three 

hours. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

Place in the bottom of a buttered pudding dish 
six fresh cocoanut cakes. Pour over them a custard 
made of one pint of milk, three eggs, two tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar, a little salt ; bake till the custard is firm. 
Remove from the oven, cover the top with a layer of 
raspberry jam, or currant jelly; apricot jam is also 
very delicious with it. Spread over it a meringue 



HOT PITDDINOS. 



263 



made of the whites of two eggs and three tablespoon- 
fuls of powdered sugar, beaten stiif. 

Macaroon Pitdding can be made in the same way, 
using macaroons in place of cocoanut cakes. 

CRACKER PUDDING. 

Butter eight butter crackers ; place them in a but- 
tered pudding dish, pour over them a custard made 
of three cups of milk and the yolks of four eggs and 
white of onC; half cup of sugar, one-fourth teaspoon- 
ful of salt; bake till firm. Serve with lemon or 
orange sauce. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 



y^ cup sugar. 



Yolks of three eggs, white of 



one. 



2 cups milk. 

2 tablespoonfuls com starch. 

y^ teaspoonful salt. 

Scald the milk in double boiler; sift the corn 
starch, salt and sugar together, stir into the milk. 
Cook fifteen minutes, stirring until smooth, then add 
the eggs slightly beaten; cook ten minutes. Serve 
hot or cold with cream and sugar. 

DUTCH APPLS CAKE. 

2 cups flour. 

^ teaspoonful salt. 

2 teaspoonfuls baking 

powder. 
^ cup butter. 

Sift the dry materials together ; rub in the butter, 
then the milk and beaten egg; spread on a buttered 
shallow pan; pare, core and*quarter the apples, lay 
them in rows on top of the dough and press the sharp 



1 egg. 

1 cup milk. 

4 sour apples. 

Sugar and cinnamon. 



264 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

edge a little in the dough; sprinkle them over with 
sugar and a little cinnamon. Bake in a hot oven 
thirty minutes. Serve hot with lemon or a hard 
sauce. Peaches can be used in place of the apples. 

APPLE SNOWBALL. 

Cook one cup of well-washed rice in a double 
boiler with one-half teaspoonful of salt^ one cup of 
milk and one and one-half cups of water. When the 
rice has taken in all the liquid, butter small moulds 
or cups well, line them with one-half inch of the hot 
rice, fill the center with a quarter of a sour apple; 
sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon, or lemon juice. 
Cover it all over with rice, and steam in a steamer, 
or setting in a pan of hot water on top of the stove 
for one-half hour. It is better to have the apples 
slightly cooked first. Peaches or pineapple are de- 
licious used in the same way. Serve with creamy 
sauce. Be careful in taking^ them from the mould 
that they do not lose their shape • 

STEAMED CARROT PUDDING. 



1 cup bread crumbs. 
1 cup carrot. 



cup carrot. y^ cup suet. 



1 cup currants. 



1 teaspoonful soda. 
l^ teaspoonful salt. 
1 teaspoonful cinnamon. 
Yg teaspoonful nutmeg. 



1 cup potato. 

1 cup flour. 

1 cup molasses. 

1 cup raisins. 

Grate the carrot and potato, add the bread crumbs, 
sift the spices and soda with the flour, also salt. Add 
the suet, molasses and fruit, dredge with a little 
extra flour. Steam in a well-buttered mould for four 
hours. 



i 



HOT PUDDINGS. 255 

BIRD'S NEST PUDDING. 

Pare and core six sour apples, and place them in 
a buttered pudding dish. Mix one-fourth cup of 
flour and one-fourth teaspoonful salt with a little milk 
to form a paste; then add the yolks of four eggs, 
well beaten, a little more milk, then fold in the whites 
the rest of the milk, making two cups in alL Pour 
over the apples ; bake in a moderately hot oven for 
three-quarters of an hour. Serve with any kind of a 
sauce. 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Make a rich baking powder biscuit dough ; roll it 
out and cut in squares; pare and core sour apples; 
fill the center with sugar and a little cinnamon mixed 
with it, a little piece of butter ; wrap each apple in a 
square of dough, having the points meet on top; 
dampen them a little with milk and press together; 
bake for twenty-five minutes, or imtil the apples are 
tender, or steam for one hour. Serve with a molasses 
sauce. A hard or creamy sauce is also good. 

ROLLED APPLE DUMPLING. 

Make a rich biscuit dough. Eoll out about half 
an inch thick. Peel, core and quarter sour apples; 
place them in the dough, cover with a little sugar, 
cinnamon, nutmeg and bits of butter ; roll the dough 
over the apples, pressing the ends tight together. 
Steam for an hour and a quarter. Serve with mo- 
lasses, hard or creamy sauce. Peaches can be used 
in the same way. 
9 



2M ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

STEAMED APPLE PUDDING. 

Fill a mould or dish half full of sour apples that 
have been pared, quartered and cored, cover with half 
a cup of sugar, half a teaspoonful of cinnamon and 
little pieces of butter; cover the top with a rich bis- 
cuit dough, cut a slit in the center for the steam to 
escape. Steam for one hour and a half, or bake in 
the oven until the apples are tender. Serve with 
lemon sauce. 

APPLE CHARLOTTE. 

Cut bread into slices a quarter of an inch thick, 
then in inch wide strips ; dip each piece in melted 
butter and line a baking dish with them, having the 
pieces meet closely together. Fill the center of the 
mould with apple sauce, that has been cooked in quar- 
ter pieces, sweetened and flavored with lemon juice. 
Cover the top with strips of bread dipped in the 
melted butter. Bake in a hot oven forty minutes. 
Turn carefully out on a flat dish. Serve with cream 
or a sauce. 

APPLES AND RICE. 

Steam one cup of well-washed rice in a double 
boiler with one-half teaspoonful of salt, one cup of 
milk and one cup of water till soft ; add a little more 
milk or water if necessary, also cook with it a little 
nutmeg, cinnamon or rose water, and a half cup of 
chopped almonds, if cared for. When the rice is 
soft and has absorbed the liquid, press it in the shape 
of a bowl. Cook sour apples that have been- cored 
and pared, in a syrup made of half as much water as 
sugar, till they are tender; remove carefully with a 
big spoon, place around the rice and fill the inside 



HOT PUDDINGS. 257 

with them, boil the syrup down and pour around 
them. Fill each apple up with whipped cream and 
put a piece of currant or raspberry jelly on top of 
each. Serve hot or cold. 

APPLE MERINGUE. 

Core and pare six or eight sour apples, cover the 
tops with sugar, a little grated orange or lemon peel 
add one-half cup of water, cover and bake in a pud- 
ding dish till tender. Then cover with a meringue 
made of the whites of three eggs, beaten until foamy, 
then beat in gradually four tablespoonfuls of pow- 
dered sugar ; bake in a slow oven ten minutes. Serve 
cold. 

CUSTARD SOUPFL^. 



^ cup sugar. 
% cup flour. 
2 cups hot milk. 
% cup butter. 



Yolks of five eggs. 
White of five eggs. 
1 teaspoonful vanilla. 



Mix the sugar and flour together with a little 
cold milk, stir into the boiling milk, cook for ten 
minutes, stirring until smooth, then add the butter; 
mix and stir in the well-beaten yolks. Remove from 
the stove, add the whites beaten stiff. Bake in a 
pudding dish or little moulds. Place the dish in a 
pan of hot wat^r, bake in a hot oven thirty minutes. 
If little moulds are used, bake twenty minutes. Serve 
cd once. If the souffle is done before time to serve, let 
it remain in the oven with the door open. Serve with 
whipped cream or any light sauce. 

CHOCOLATE SOUFFL^. 

Make the same as custard souffle; melt two 
squares of chocolate, mix it with two tablespoonfuls 



258 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

of hot milk and stir into the double boiler before the 
jolks are added. 

PINEAPPLE SOUFFLE. 

Add one-half cup of grated pineapple to a custard 
souffle. After it is removed from the stove, just 
before the whites are added, use one more egg, and 
if the pineapple is not sweetened, one-half cup of 
sugar, instead of a fourth. Serve with whipped 
cream, flavored with pineapple. 

PRUNE SOUFFLE. 

Beat the whites of five eggs till foamy, add one- 
fourth teaspoonf ul cream of tartar, and beat till dry, 
then beat in gradually half a cup of powdered sugar 
and one-half cup of prunes that have been cooked, 
stoned and chopped; turn into a buttered pudding 
dish, set in a pan of hot water and bake one-half 
hour. Serve aJt once, in the same dish, with whipped 
cream or a cold boiled custard. 

CHERRY SOUFFLE. 

Two cups of canned cherries. Butter a mould 
well and decorate it with the cherries. Mix three 
tablespoonfuls of flour with a little cold cherry syrup 
and stir into one-half cup of the hot syrup. Stir 
until it thickens, beat the yolks of three eggs and stir 
into the mixture with one tablespoonful of lemon 
juice. Remove at once from the stove and when cool 
fold^n the whites beaten stiffly. Turn into the mould, 
steam for one hour and a quarter, then take the 
souffle from the stove. Let it stand in the mould a 
few minutes before turning out. Serve with swee^ 



HOT PUDDINGS. 259 

ened and flavored whipped cream, or with hot cherry 
juice. 

PEACH SOUFFL^ 

Make the same as cherry souffle, decorating the 
mould with half peaches and using two tablespoon- 
fuls of lemon juice. 

LEMON SOUFFL]^ (Boston Cooking School). 

Beat the yolks of three eggs till light and foamy, 
beat the whites till dry, then beat the yolks into the 
whites; beat in gradually a scant half cup of 
sugar and the juice and grated rind of a lemon, turn 
into a buttered pudding dish, dust with sugar and 
bake about twenty minutes. Serve at once with or 
without a sauce. 

RICE SOUFFL]^. 

Cook one-half cup of well-washed rice in one cup 
of boiling water and one-fourth teaspoonful of salt. 
When tender drain from the water and put the rice 
in a double boiler with one cup of milk and one of 
cream. Cook twenty miutes. Add the yolks of 
five ^gs that have been beaten lightly with five table- 
spoonfuls of powdered sugar. Remove at once from 
the stove, set aside to cool, then add one tablespoonful 
of grated orange peel and a tablespoonful of the juice, 
fold in the stiffly-beaten whites. Bake in a well but- 
tered pudding dish forty minutes. Serve at once 
with a light, delicate sauce. 

MOCHA SOWThi. 

Melt three tablespoonfuls of butter and add to it 
three tablespoonfuls of flour. Gradually pour on this 



260 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

three quarters of a cup of hot strong coffee and one 
quarter of a cup of cream. One-fourth teaspoonful 
salt and one-half cup sugar. The well-beaten yolks 
of three eggs. Cook over hot water until smooth. 
Then remove from the fire and fold in the whites 
stiffly beaten. Flavor with one-half teaspoonful 
vanilla. Turn into a buttered baking dish and bake 
surrounded by hot water for twenty-five minutes. 
Serve with Mocha sauce. 

MOCHA SAUCE. 

Mix the yolks of two eggs, one-fourth cup of 
sugar and a few grains of salt Add gradually one- 
half cup of strong hot coffee and cook in double boiler 
until it thickens, stirring constantly. Cool and fold 
in one cup of whipped cream. 

ZEBAIONE. 

Beat one whole egg and two yolks very lightly. 
Then beat in gradually one-fourth cup of sugar and 
speck of salt. Cook over hot water, stirring con- 
stantly and gradually adding three tablespoonfuls of 
sherry wine. Orange juice can be used in place of 
wine. Continue stirring until the mixture is thick. 
Serve hot in wine glasses. This amount will serve 
four or five people. 

GINGER PUDDING. 



2 cups flour. 

1 teaspoonful baking 

powder. 
% teaspoonful salt. 

1 cup milk. 

2 tablespoonfuls melted 

butter. 



2 eggs. 

14 cup sugar. 

1 tablespoonful lemon juice. 

3 tablespoonfuls of finely 

chopped preserved ginger. 



HOT PUDDINGS. 261 

Sift the baking powder, salt and flour together, 
then mix the ginger thoroughly into the flour, then 
add the sugar, melted butter, lemon juice, beaten eggs 
and milk. Steam two hours in a large mould or one 
hour in individual moulds. Serve with lemon sauce. 

DELMONICO PUDDING. 

Scald one quart of milk in a double boiler, then 
stir into it one-half cup of com starch that has been 
mixed to a paste with cold milk and half a teaspoon- 
ful of salt. Cook for fifteen minutes, stirring con- 
stantly until perfectly smooth, then add the yolks of 
four eggs beaten with one-half cup of sugar. Cook 
for five minutes, then turn into a buttered pudding 
dish. Bake twenty minutes. Remove from the oven, 
cover the top with a layer of jelly or jam and over 
that a meringue. Return to the oven and brown 
slowly. Serve hot or cold, with or without whipped 
cream. 

STRAWBERRY PUDDING. 

Fill a three-pine mould or pail two-thirds full 
with alternate layers of sliced sponge cake and maca- 
roons. Add to a pint of the strawberry juice one cup 
of cream, one-half cup of sugar and one-fourth tea- 
spoonful of salt. Pour it over the cake, cover the 
mould tightly, steam for two hours. Serve hot with 
whipped cream, flavored with a little sherry. 

VICTORIA PUDDING. 

Bake sponge cake in a round pan with a hole in it, 
fill up the hole with whipped cream and sprinkle the 
top with red cherries cut in fine pieces. Surround 
the cake with a chocolate sauce. 



292 ROCKY MOUHTAIM COOK BOOK. 

MILTOH PUDDING. 



2 cups fresh bread crumbs. 

4 cups milk. 

2 eggs. 

V^ teaspoonful salt. 



3 tablespoonfuls sugar. 
2 oz. or 2 squares of Baker's 
Chocolate. 



Scald the milk in a double boiler, add the choco- 
late, which has been scraped fine, the sugar and the 
salt. When the chocolate has dissolved pour the mix- 
ture over the bread crumbs, add the e^s, pour in a 
buttered baking dish and bake until the center is firm, 
about one-half hour. Serve with a liquid sauce. 

DKLICATE PUDDING. 



% cup butter. 
y^ cup flour. 
1 cup scalded milk. 
1 teaspoonful baking 
powder. 



2 eggs. 
y^ cup sugar. 
V4 cup fine dried bread 
crumbs. 



Cream the butter. Stir in the flour and let cook 
in the hot milk stirring constantly until the mixture 
thickens. Beat the eggs. Add the sugar and stir into 
the hot mixture. Stir in the crumbs and turn into 
individual molds carefully buttered, dredged with 
sugar. Bake until firm. Serve with orange or lemon 
sauce. 

PRUN£ PUDDING. 

Stew one cup of raisins and one cup of prunes 
until tender. Place in a baking dish. Sprinkle with 
a little lemon juice and one-fourth cup of sugar. 
Cover with a rich biscuit dough. Bake and serve hot 
with cream sauce. 






HOT PUDDINGS. 263 

STEAMED DATE PUDDING. 

Sift together one cup of whole wheat flour, one- 
half cup of white flour, one-half teaspoonful salt, one 
teaspoonful soda. Beat one egg. Add half cup of 
molasses, half cup of milk, one-quarter cup of melted 
shortening and one cup of dates stoned and cut in 
small pieces. A little cinnamon and nutmeg. Mix 
all thoroughly and turn into a buttered mold. Steam 
two and a half hours. Serve hot with a sauce. 



264 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



COLD DESSERTS- 



GARNISHING. 

For garnishing cold desserts use fancy cakes, 
icings, fresh or candied fruits, compotes, jellies, nuts, 
currants, raisins, angelica, spun sugar, which can 
be made in nests, balls or to encircle a dish. Fresh 
flowers and leaves also make a most attractive decora- 
tion. Angelica can be cut in strips, then in little dia- 
mond shapes, making very effective decoration, and 
especially so when combined with candied cherries, 
sugared rose leaves or sugared violets or lilac blos- 
soms. Angelica is not expensive — a ten-cent piece 
will last quite a while. 

FLAVORING. 

Essences of fruit, flowers and nuts make some of 
the best flavoring. They cost about twenty cents a 
bottle. Vanilla is most commonly used, but many 
other flavors should help to take its place. It is not 
considered wholesome. Oranges and lemons are al- 
ways a pleasant flavor, using the juice or grated yel- 
low of the peel (not the white). The preserved peel 
makes a delicious flavor as well as a pretty garnish. 

LIQUEURS AND WINES. 

Liqueurs and cordials are rich syrups of different 
flavors, with only enough alcohol to keep them. They 
give a very delicate and pleasant flavor and are inex- 
pensive, as a bottle will last a long time. Maras- 
chino has the flavor of bitter cherry, noyan of peach, 



COLD DESSERTS. 266 

curacao of orange peel. Rum, brandy and wine, 
either madeira, sherry or port, are used a great deal 
and impart a very agreeable flavor, if not too gener- 
ously used. 

COLORING. 

Use the vegetable coloring paste ; it comes twenty- 
five cents a bottle. A bottle will last a long time, as 
it requires a very little to give the delicate coloring 
that you wish to use. Dilute a little in milk or water 
before using. 

BOILED CUSTARD. 



2 cups milk. 
Yolks of four eggs. 

3 tablespoonfuls of sugar. 



Speck of salt. 

Flavor with nutmeg, vanilla, 
or a little sherry wine. 



Scald the milk in a double boiler, beat the yolks, 
sugar and salt together. Pour the hot milk slowly 
into the egg (stirring all the time), pour back in the 
double boiler and cook until it is thick like cream, or 
till it coats the spoon. As soon as it thickens, re- 
move from the stove ai once, as too long cooking 
will cause it to curdle. Watch and stir it all the 
time it is cooking, then strain through a fine strainer 
and flavor. Using only the yolks gives a much 
smoother custard. Three yolks can be used, but four 
makes a much richer custard. 

Chocolate Custard. — ^Melt one-half ounce of Bak- 
er's chocolate with a tablespoonful of milk, stir into 
boiled custard just before straining, flavor with 
vanilla. 

Caramel Custard. — ^Melt four tablespoonfuls of 
sugar to a caramel with one tablespoonful of water. 



26a ROCKY MOUllTAnff COOK BOOK. 

Stir into the hot milk before pouring on the egg yolks. 
Make the same as boiled custard. 

Nut Custa/rd. — One-half cup finely chopped wal- 
nuts added to boiled custard after straining. 

Cocoanut "Custard. — One cup finely grated cocoa- 
nut added to boiled custard after straining. 

Maple Custard. — Sweeten boiled custard with 
one-half cup of thick maple syrup, add it to the hot 
milk with the eggs. Candied fruits may be cut fine 
and added, making a fruit custard. 

BAKED OR STEAMED CUSTARD. 

1 quaxt of milk. I 6 tablespoonfiilB of sugar. 

6 eggs. I ^ teaspoonful of salt. 

Scald the milk, beat the eggs, salt and sugar to- 
gether. Pour the milk over them, stirring all the 
time. Strain into a baking dish, flavor with grated 
nutmeg, bake standing in a pan of hot water until 
the custard puffs up, or try with a knife, if it comes 
out clean, free from the milk, it is done. Watch care- 
fully. Bake or steam in cups or moulds if desired. 

BAKED OR STEAMED CARAMEL CUSTARD. 

Make the same as plain baked or steamed, with 
the exception of melting the sugar to a caramel with 
two tablespoonfuls of water, then adding it to the hot 
milk. Steam in a buttered mould and serve; if you 
like, serve cold, with caramel sauce. 



COLD DESSERTS. 287 

BAKED OR STEAMED CHOCOLATE OR COCOANUT 

CUSTARD. 

Melt one ounce of chocolate in the hot milk for 
chocolate custard. Bake in a buttered mould, set in 
a pan of hot water. Serve very cold with custard 
sauce or surrounded with whipped cream that has a 
few maraschino or candied cherries strewn over it. 
Make the same as baked or steamed custard. 

Baked Cocoan/ut Custard. — Add one cup of grated 
cocoanut to the hot milk. Bake or steam. 

i 
FLOATING ISLAND. 

Beat the whites of three eggs stiff with one table- 
spoonful of powdered sugar. Scald two cups of milk 
for boiled custard, poach the whites in the milk until 
firm, two tablespoonfuls at a time. Remove care- 
fully on a sieve. Make the boiled custard. Serve the 
whites on the custard with a piece of bright colored 
jelly on top, or blanched almonds, stuck endwise into 

the white. 

APPLE SNOW. 

Quarter and core two cups of sour apples (do not 
pare), steam or stew the apples till tender, mash 
through a sieve. Beat the whites of two eggs stiff 
with half a cup of powdered sugar, add the apple and 
one tablespoonful of lemon juice or a grating of nut- 
meg. Beat till like snow. Pile in a dish with bits 
of bright jelly on top. Serve with or without cream. 

IRISH MOSS BLANC MANGE (Mrs. Lincoln). 



y^ cup Irish moss. 

1 quart of milk. 

% tsaspoonf ul of salt. 



1 teaspoonful vanilla, or two 
tablespoonfuls of wins. 



2e8 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Soak the moss in cold water for fifteen minutes, 
pick it over, wash and tie in cheese cloth, boil it in the 
milk till it thickens when dropped on a cold plate, 
add the salt, strain, flavor. Mould in small cups or 
egg shells. Serve with sugar and cream. 

Blcmc Mange may be made by using one table- 
spoonful of sea moss farina. Stir it into the boiling 
milk. Cook twenty minutes. 

PLAIN BAVARIAN CREAM (ChocoUte and Coffee). 



2 tablespoonfuls granulated 

gelatine. 
2 tablespoonfuls cold water. 



^ cup sugar. 
2 cups cream. 
Flavor. 



Soak the gelatine in cold water, whip the cream 
until you have about three pints (if it is the thin 
cream; if heavy cream, use one cup). Scald the re- 
mainder of the thin cream, if thick cream is used, 
scald one cup of milk, add the gelatine to the hot 
milk. Strain, flavor with vanilla, wine, melted choc- 
olate or one-half cup of strong coffee. Place the dish 
in one of cracked ice, stir until it begins to thicken, 
then fold in the whipped cream. Pour into a mould. 
When stiff enough to drop from a spoon, mould in in- 
dividual or a large mould. The mould can first be 
decorated with half preserved peaches, slices of 
orange or pineapple, candied fruits or angelica. 

BAVARIAN CREAM WITH EGGS. 



2 cups heavy cream, 

whipped. 
2 cups milk. 
2 tablespoonfuls granulated 

gelatine. 



y2 cup cold water. 

V2 <^up sugar. 
4 eggs. 

Speck of salt. 
Flavoring. 



Soak the gelatine in cold water, whip the cream, 
heat the milk in a double boiler, beat the egg yolks, 



COLD DESSERTS. 269 

sugar and salt together, stir into the hot milk, cook 
for two minutes, stirring constantly. Add the soaked 
gelatine. Strain into a big bowl or granite dish, set 
in a pan of cracked ice. When cold add flavoring, 
vanilla or almond, a teaspoonful each, a half cup of 
candied orange peel and two tablespoonfuls of the 
juice. Stir until it begins to harden, then fold in the 
cream and the beaten whites. 

FRUIT BAVARIAN CREAM. 



2 cups of any kind of fruit 
juice or pulp sweet- 
ened to taste. 

1 tablespoonful lemon juice. 



3 tablespoonfuls gelatine. 
^ cup cold water. 
Yz cup boiling water. 
2 cups heavy cream. 



Soak the gelatine in cold water, dissolve in the 
boiling water. Add it to the fruit juice or pulp. Set 
the dish in one of ice water or cracked ice. Stir until 
it begins to thicken, fold in the whipped cream. The 
mould may be garnished with the whole fruit, or sur- 
rounded by it when served. To garnish the mould 
place the fruit around the mould, hold it in place with 
a little of the Bavarian cream. When it is firm pour 
carefully in the remainder. It is better to mould 
fruits in an earthen or agate mould. 

FRUIT BAVARIAN CREAM (No. 2). 

If you wish to mould in layers, put half of the 
dissolved gelatine in the cream and the other half in 
the fruit. Pour one-half of the cream first in the 
mould. When that is firm pour in the fruit. Allow 
that to become firm, then add the rest of the cream, 
making three layers, with the fruit in the center. 
Garnish with whipped cream, flavored with the fruit 
juice. 



270 ROCKY MOUHTAIM COOK BOOK. 

PSUHE BAVASIAH CBBAJL 



1 cup finely chopped cooked 

pnines. 
1 cup prune juice. 
1 tablespoonful lemon juice. 
3 tablespoonfuls granulated 

gelatine. 



y^ cup cold water. 
% cup boiling water. 
2 cups cream. 



Soften gelatine in cold water. Then dissolve m 
hot water ; add this to the prune juice with the sugar 
and lemon. When the mixture begins to thicken stir 
in the prunes and the whipped cream. Pour in mould. 
Serve surrounded by whipped cream. 



BAVARIAlf IN THE SHELL. 

Line a mould with lady fingers or macaroons, 
dipped lightly in wine, if liked. Fill up with Ba- 
varian cream, garnish with whipped cream sprinkled 
over with candied fruits or nuts. 

BAVARIAN EN SURPRISE. 

Use a double mould for this, or one small mould 
set in a larger one. Line the mould with chocolate 
or coffee Bavarian. Fill the center with the plain 
Bavarian or flavor the plain with chopped nuts that 
have been soaked a half hour in wine or orange juice. 
Or line a mould with the fruit Bavarian, fill the cen- 
ter with the plain, garnish with fruit or whipped 
cream. Or line the mould with Bavarian cream and 
ftli the center with the fruit Bavarian. 

PINEAPPLE BAVARIAN CRBAM. 

pack^il^^^'?* ""^ ^^^^^ pineapple, add one-half 

waSrTnd tf ^ • *'.^^^ T^*"^^^ ^^ on/half cup of cold 
and the juice of one-half lemon. Set this mix- 



COLD DESSBHTS. 271 

ture in a dish of ice water and stir till it begins to 
thicken, then fold in two cups of heavy cream beaten 
stiff, mould. One-half of this quantity will serve six 
people. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 



1 level tablespoonful of 

granulated gelatine. 
% cup of cold water. 

2 cups cream. 

Yq cup of cold water. 



2 tablespoonfuls sherry, or 1 
teaspoonful of vanilla 
may be used in place of 
the wine. 

1 dozen lady fingers. 



Soak the gelatine a few minutes, add to it one- 
fourth cup of boiling water to dissolve it. Whip the 
cream, add the sugar and flavoring, then gradually 
whip in the gelatine, setting the dish in a pan of ice 
water ; line the mould with the lady fingers ; when the 
cream becomes stiff, pour into the mould. 

PETITE SPONGE BAVARIAN. 

Bake sponge cake in very thin sheets ; with a bis- 
cuit cutter cut from it small cakes. Make a plain 
Bavarian cream and spread one-half inch thick on the 
small cakes, place one on top, making a sandwich; 
when the Bavarian cream seems firm cover the sand- 
wiches all over with a chocolate frosting; sprinkle 
small candies over the top. 

DIPLOMATIC PUDDING. 

Mould in a double mould. Line a mould one 
inch thick with wine, orange or lemon jelly, fill up 
the center with Bavarian cream. First decorate the 
mould with candied fruits, making some design, hold 
the decoration in place with a little of the jelly the 
mould is to be lined with. When firm, line with the 
jelly, decorate with whipped cream, sprinkle over 
with the fruits. 



i 



272 ROCKY MOUNTAIK COOK BOOK. 

FRUIT CRSAM. 

Soften one and one-fourth tablespoonfuls of gran- 
ulated gelatine in one-fourth cup of cold water, dis- 
solve with one-fourth cup of hot milk, add one-half 
cup of sugar, one-half cup each of cooked figs and 
prunes, cut in small pieces, and one-half cup of white 
grapes skinned, seeded and cut in pieces. Mix all 
together with one cup of heavy cream, whipped, stir 
occasionally until it begins to set, then mould. 

CHOCOLATE MACAROON CREAM« 



1 tablespoonful granulated 

gelatine. 
y^ cup cold water. 

2 cups milk. 

3 eggs. 



1 square chocolate. 

V2 cup sugar. 

y^ cup macaroons which 

have been dried and 

rolled fine. 



Soak the gelatine in cold water. Scald the milk. 
Add chocolate to the milk. When melted add the egg 
yolks beaten with the sugar with a speck of salt. Stir 
until the mixture thickens. Remove from the fire 
and add macaroons. When slightly cooled, the stiffly 
beaten whites. Teaspoonful of vanilla. Turn into 
mold. Serve cold, surrounded by whipped cream. 

MACAROON GINGER CUSTARD. 



2 cups scalded milk. 
6 macaroons dried and rolled 
fine; speck of salt. 



3 eggs. 

3 tablespoonfuls sugar. 



Add the macaroons to the hot milk. Then add 
the eggs slightly beaten, sugar and salt. Bake, setting 
the dish in a pan of hot water. When firm remove 
from the fire and cover with thin slices of preserved 
ginger. 



COLD DESSERTS. 273 

Then a meringue made of the whites of two eggs 
and two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Brown in the oven 
a few minutes. Serve cold. 

GINGER RICE SOUFFLE. 

To one cup of warm cooked rice add one table- 
spoonful sugar ; one-half cup of cream that has been 
whipped and two tablespoonfuls of finely cut pre- 
served ginger. Serve cold in glasses. 

PINEAPPLE SPONGE. 

Two cups grated pineapple sweetened to taste, 
add one tablespoonful granulated gelatine that has 
first been softened in one-fourth cup cold water and 
dissolved in a little hot water. Set in a dish of cold 
water or cracked ice, stir imtil it begins to thicken, 
add a tablespoonful of lemon juice and fold in the 
whites of four eggs. Mould, serve with whipped 
cream flavored with the pineapple or custard sauce. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Make a lemon or orange jelly. When it begins to 
thicken beat in the whites of three egp that have 
been whipped stiff. Beat all together vigorously un- 
til it is stiff enough to drop from a spoon, mould, 
serve with custard sauce. 

LEMON JELLY. 



1 cup sugar. 

% cup lemon juice. 



^ box gelatine. 
% cup cold water. 
2 cups boiling water. 

Soak the gelatine in cold water, dissolve with the 
boiling water, then add the sugar and lemon juice. 
When all is dissolved, strain and mould. 



S74 BOCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

ORANGE JELLT. 



y^ box gelatine. 
Vi cup cold water. 
Vi cup boiling water. 



2 tablespoonfuls lemon juioe. 

1 cup sugar. 

2 cups orange juice. 



Soften the gelatine in cold water, dissolve it with 
the hot water, add the sugar, lemon juice, orange. 
When all is dissolved, strain through a cheese cloth. 
Mould, garnish the mould, if you like, with slices of 
orange held in place with a little of the jellv, un- 
mould and surround with whipped cream, sprinkled 
over with candied orange peel. Or serve the orange 
jelly in orange basket made from the skin, with a 
little whipped cream on top. Set the orange basket 
on a few green leaves. 



COFFEE JELLT. 



1^ tablespoonfuls 

gelatine. 
^ cup cold water. 



% cup sugar. 

1 cup boiling water. 

^Vz ^^V^ strong coffee. 



Soften the gelatine in the cold water, add the boil- 
ing water, sugar, coffee. When well dissolved, strain 
through a cheese cloth, mould, serve with whipped 
cream flavored with a little orange. 

WINE JELLY. 



1% tablespoonfuls 

gelatine. 
y^ cup cold water. 

1 cup boiling water. 

2 tablespoonfuls lemon juice. 



1 cup sugar. 

1 cup sherry wine or one 

cup of madeira. 

2 tablespoonfuls of brandy. 



Soften the gelatine in the ,cold water, add the hot 
water and sugar and the rest of the materials, strain 
through a cheese cloth. The mould can first be deco- 
rated with maraschino cherries. 



COLD DESSERTS. 276 

CHAMPAGNE JELLY. 

Make the same as wine jelly, using one cup of 
champagne. Omit the brandy. 

SAUTERNE JELLY. 

Make the same as wine jelly, omit the brandy, use 
one cup and a half of sauteme. 

ROMAN JELLY. 

Into one quart of lemon jelly put two wine glasses 
of kirsch and one of rum, divide this into three equal 
parts, color one green, the other red and leave the rest 
uncolored. Whip each part till they begin to thicken, 
then put in a mould in alternate layers. 

PEACH CHARLOTTE. 



1 tablespoonful granulated 

gelatine. 
% cup cold water. 
14 cup boiling water. 
% cup sugar. 



2 tablespoonfuls lemon juice. 

1 cup peach juice. 

Whites of three eggs, or on© 

cup of heavy cream, 

whipped. 



Soften the gelatine in cold water, dissolve in hot 
water, add the sugar, lemon and peach juice, strain. 
When it begins to thicken, fold in the stiffly beaten 
whites or the whipped cream. Line a mould with 
half peaches, hold them in place with a little of the 
jelly. When they are firm, gently pour in the char- 
lotte, garnish with whipped cream and peaches. 

ORANGE AND STRAWBERRY CHARLOTTE. 

Make the same as peach charlotte. For orange 
ase one cup of the orange juice and one cup of sugar. 
Line the mould with slices of orange. Garnish the 
dish with whipped cream, flavored with orange. 



276 ROCKY MOUNTAIK COOK BOOK. 

For Strawberry Charlotte, line the mould with 
large strawberries, hold in place with the jelly. Make 
the same as peach charlotte, using one cup of straw- 
berry juice and one cup of sugar. Garnish the dish 
with whipped cream and strawberries. 

SPANISH CUSTARD. 



1 tablespoonful granulated 

gelatine. 

2 tablespoonfuU cold water. 
^ cup boiling water. 
Yolks of three eggs. 



l^ teaspoonful salt. 
2 cups thin cream. 
Whites of three eggs. 
Flavoring. 
Yi cup sugar. 



Soak the gelatine in cold water, then dissolve in 
boiling water. Beat the yolks, sugar and salt to- 
gether. Scald the cream and pour over the egg and 
sugar. Return to the double boiler and cook till it 
thickens, then add the gelatine and whites of eggs, 
take from the fire and flavor with an essence. Mould. 

ITALIAN JELLY. 

Make a lemon, orange or wine jelly. Decorate 
the mould with preserved fruits or nuts, hold in place 
with a little of the jelly, just a few drops on each 
piece. When it is set, pour in a layer of the gelatine 
an inch thick. When that is firm, cover with a layer 
of fruits or nuts, hold these in place with a little of 
the gelatine, and so on until the mould is full. Gar- 
nish with whipped cream and the f ritits and nuts. 

RICE CSEAM. 

Put one-half cup of well washed rice on to boil 
in one quart of boiling salted water, and the yellow of 
the rind of one-half orange, or lemon. When the 
rice is tender, drain, remove the peel, mii lightly 



COLD DESSERTS. 277 

with the rice one tablespoonful of gelatine that has 
been softened in a little cold water and dissolved with 
one-half cup of hot milk and one-half cup of sugar. 
When the mixture begins to be a little firm, flavor 
with three tablespoonfuls of sherry or madeira (that 
can be omitted), and fold in one cup of heavy cream 
whipped stiff. Mould. This can be garnished with 
whipped cream and candied orange or lemon peel, or 
serve with plain cream or preserved fruits. 

RICE AND ALMOND CREAM (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Blanch and cut fine one-half cup of almonds. Put 
them in double boiler with three cups of milk, one- 
fourth cup of sugar and one-half teaspoonful of salt. 
When hot, add one cup of well-washed rice. Cook 
until the rice is tender. When ready to serve dip out 
in f rappe glasses, having them about half full, put on 
a teaspoonful of jelly, then fill with thick whipped 
cream, with more jelly on top. 

APPLE CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Pare and core three or four cooking apples. Cook 
with them the yellow rind of half a lemon or orange 
and half an inch of stick cinnamon. Cook until the 
apple is very tender. Press through a sieve. There 
should be one cu.p of the pulp. Cook half a cup of 
sugar with one-fourth cup of water to the thread 
stage, pour slowly onto the white of one egg beaten 
stiffly, stirring all the time. Beat frequently until 
cold, then add to the apple with three tablespoonfuls 
of sherry wine and one tablespoonful of granulated 
gelatine that has been softened in one-fourth cup of 
cold water, then dissolve over hot water. Set the 
mixture in a pan of ice or snow, stirring until it be- 



278 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

gins to thicken, then fold in one cup of heavy cream 
that has been whipped stiff with one-fourth cup of 
powdered sugar. Fill the mould decorated with lady 
fingers or macaroons. Garnish, when unmoulded, 
with whipped cream and charries. Apricots can be 
used in place of the apples. 

CHARLOTTE SNOWBALLS. 

Bake sponge cake mixture in deep round gem 
pans. When cold ice the outside with a boiled icing. 
Fill up the center with whipped cream sweetened and 
flavored. Place a candied cherry on top or fill with 
wine or orange jelly and whipped cream. The cakes 
may be surrounded with the jelly when served. 

CHOCOLATE BAVAROISE (Boston Cooking School). 

Melt two ounces of chocolate (in a double boiler) 
with one-fourth cup each of sugar and water. Cook 
until glossy, add to it one cup of milk. When hot 
add the yolks of three eggs that have been well beaten, 
with one-fourth cup of sugar. Cook in the hot milk 
and chocolate till the mixture coats the spoon, then 
add one tablespoonf ul of granulated gelatine that has 
been softened in one-fourth cup of cold water, strain. 
Set the dish in cold water of surround with cracked 
ice. Flavor with one teaspoonful of vanilla. Stir 
until the mixture becomes thick, then fold in one cup 
of heavy cream that has been whipped stiff. Mould. 
When ready to serve, surround with whipped cream 
and garnish with a few candied cherries or other 
fruits. 



COLD DESSERTS. 279 

NEWPORT WHIPS. 

Mix two cups of sweet or sour cream with half a 
cup of fruit juice and one tablespoonful of lemon 
juice, and half a cup of powdered sugar. Beat till 
stiff. Serve in glasses with sponge cake or first line 
the glasses with lady fingers and fill up with the whip. 

STUFFED FIGS. 

Select fine, large figs, wash them, make an opening 
on the side of each fig and press in a teaspoonful of 
English walnut meats finely chopped, fasten together 
with a toothpick. Cover with boiling water, cook 
until tender. The time depends upon the toughness 
of the figs. Ten minutes before removing from the 
fire add one-third cup of sugar and the juice of half 
a lemon (this amount is for a pound of figs). Flavor 
with sherry wine. Serve with whipped cream. 

ORANGE SECTIONS MOULDED IN JELLY. 

Make an orange jelly, have ready individual 
moulds. Set in ice water, pour in a very little of the 
jelly. When hard arrange in each a section of orange 
that has been freed from the skin. Add a few drops 
of the jelly to hold it in place. When firm, fill up 
the mould with the jelly. To serve, remove from the 
mould, surroimd with whipped cream that has been 
sweetened. 

PINEAPPLE IN THE SHELL. 

Select a pineapple that has a nice green top. Cut 
a slice from the top, remove the pineapple, cut in 
small pieces and use the same amount of orange and 
bananas, mix with the pineapple, sprinkle with sugar. 



280 SOCKT MOUNTAIH COOK BOOK. 

chill. When ready to serve, replace in the shell with 
the top on, surround the base with green leaves and 
serve from the shell. 

CHBSTNUT PUS^E. WITH CREAM. 

Use the large French chestnuts. With a sharp- 
pointed knife, cut a cross on the shell of the chestnut, 
put in a pan in the oven with a teaspoonful of butter, 
bake until the shell is well broken open, then the 
skin will come from the nut shell, boil in hot water 
with a little salt till tender, then mash through a 
puree sieve. Put in a double boiler, sweeten, flavor, 
add a little cream, stir over the hot water till almost 
dry, press through a colander or potato ricer, onto 
the serving dish, making a mound, surround with 
whipped cream that has been sweetened a little and 

flavored. 

CHESTNUTS WITH CREAM. 

Remove the shell and skin (as given in chestnut 
puree), boil till tender, then add sugar (a half cup 
of sugar to a pound of chestnuts), and boil until clear. 
Let them remain in the syrup until cold, then drain. 
Pile on a dish, boil the syrup down to a thick con- 
sistency, pour over the nuts. Serve cold with whipped 

cream. 

PARIS DE MARRONS (Chestnuts). 

Make a pur6e of boiled chestnuts (see chestnut 
puree with cream), sweeten and flavor with lemon, 
vanilla or sherry to one pint of puree, add one table- 
spoonful of granulated gelatine that has been soft- 
ened in a little cold water and dissolved over hot 
water, and one-half cup of heavy cream whipped. 
Mould, garnish with whipped cream and glace chest- 
nuts. 



COLD DESSERTS. 281 

CHERRY CREAM. 

One and one-half tablespoonfuls of granulated gel- 
atine softened in one-fourth cup of cold water, then 
add one-half cup of boiling water, one-half cup of 
sugar (the amount of sugar depends upon the acidity 
of the fruit), one cup of cherry juice, juice of half a 
lemon. When this is cold enough to hold together, 
add one cup of whipped cream. This is very pretty 
moulded in individual moulds and served on sponge 
drops. 

CRUMBLE TART. 



1 cup chopped dates. 
1 cup chopped pecans. 
I cup sugar. 



2 eggs. 

1 teaspoonful baking 
powder. 



Mix all well together. Eake in a buttered pud- 
ding dish one-half hour. Serve cold in glasses with 
whipped cream on top. 



282 KOCKT MOTJHTAIH COOK BOOK. 



FROZEN DESSERTS. 



Frozen desserts are much more acceptable in 
warm weather than hot desserts. They can be pre- 
pared several hours before using, which is often 
greatly in their favor. Every household should be 
supplied with an ice cream freezer, and the art of 
making frozen desserts (which is very simple), should 
be acquired. 

Proportions of Salt and Ice. — The ice should be 
cracked very fine. Use coarse rock salt In freezing 
ice cream or sherbets, three measures of ice to one of 
salt is used. Place the can inside the freezer with 
the mixture in it, put on the cover and adjust the 
crank firmly, turn the crank to see that it is in proper 
working order, pack the three measures of ice and 
one of salt around the can and so on till the freezer 
is full. Turn slowly at first (this makes it fine 
grained) ; turn constantly until the mixture stiffens — 
this you can tell by the way the crank moves. Before 
removing the cover wipe off all the ice and salt, re- 
move the paddle, pack down the mixture solid with 
a spoon, replace the cover, put a cork in the hole, 
drain off the water and if not to be used at once, pack 
the freezer full with ice and salt. Cover the top with 
an old piece of carpeting or thick cloth. 

Mousses, Parfaitsj are whipped cream flavored 
with or without eggs, packed in ice and salt. To pack 
them use two measures of ice to one of salt. 

To TJnmovld Frozen Desserts — ^Dip the mould in 
cold water, wring out a cloth in warm water, wrap 
around it and invert on the serving dish. 



FROZEN DESSERTS. 283 

PUNCHES AND SHERBETS* 

These are water ices and are usually served in 
glasses. Punches are simply ices or sherbets, mth 
liquors added. 

LEMON SHERBET. 



1 quart of water. 
2V^ cups of sugar. 

2 cups of lemon juice. 



Juice of one orange. 
White of one egg. 



Boil the sugar and water together for ten min- 
utes; when cold add it to the lemon and orange 
juice; freeze. When nearly frozen, add the white 
of egg beaten to a foam. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 

Make the same way as lemon sherbet, using one 

pint of orange juice, juice of one lemon, two cups of 

sugar. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 



1 quart of water. 

2 cups of sugar. 

1 can grated pineapple. 



Juice of two lemons and one 

orange. 
White of one egg. 



Make the same as lemon ice. The sherbet is 
made more delicate by pressing the pineapple through 
a sieve or squeezing through cheese cloth. 

STRAWBERRY, RASPBERRY AND CURRANT SHERBETS. 

Heat the berries in a little hot water for about 
five minutes, then squeeze through cheese cloth; to 
every pint of juice add the juice of one lemon. Boil 
two cups of water, one and one-half cups of sugar to- 
gether for ten minutes, add to the juices, freeze, add- 
ing the white of egg just before it is frozen. 



2S4 BOCET MOVNTAIH COOK BOOK. 

CHBBKY, PEACH, APBICOT AHD VLVU SHEBBBTS. 

These fniita should be cooked in a very little 
water. When tender, squeeze through dieese cloth. 
Make the same as strawberry sherbet One cup of 
whipped cream may be added to sherbets after they 
are frozen, stirring the crank a few times to mix the 
cream with the sherbet 

APPLE SHERBET. 

Select nice, bright-flavored apples ; cook with them 
a piece of cinnamon bark and a pinch of salt, and 
water enough to cover. When very soft and fine, 
mash through a puree sieve ; add a grating of nutm^ 
and the juice of a lemon; sweeten to taste. Freeze, 
adding the beaten white of egg, as in other sherbets. 
A little preserved ginger cut in small pieces may be 
added with the white of egg. 

BOSTON SHERBET. 

Four cups raspberry juice, from fresh or pre- 
served berries ; juice of one lemon ; sweeten to taste, 
then add one-half cup of maraschino ; freeze. When 
fr<Ken, stir in one-half cup of maraschino cherries, 
cut in small pieces. Add the white of e^ as in other 
sherbets. 



6KAPE SHERBET. 



8 cups Water. 



id water for fifteen minutes ; add 
ize, and add the white of egg be- 



FROZEN D£SS£RTS. 285 

MILK SHERBET (Mrs. Durand). 



4 cups of milk. 
Juice of three lemons and 
grated rind of one. 



3 cups sugar. 
White of one egg. 



Do not add the milk until ready to freeze. Serve 
ten people. 

GRAPE BOMBE. 

Line a mould with the grape sherbet an inch 
thick. A melon mould makes a pretty bombe. Fill 
the center with sweetened whipped cream ; cover the 
top over with the sherbet; pack, buried in ice and 
salt, for three hours, using two measures of ice to 
one of salt. 

Bombes. — Any of the sherbets used the same as 
the grape, makes delicious bombes, strawberry or 
raspberry being particularly delicious. 

FRAPP^. 

Frappes are made the same as sherbets, only not 
frozen as hard. 

COFFEE FRAPPE. 



1 quart of clear black 

coffee. 
1 cup sugar dissolved in 

the coffee. 



Speck of salt. 

White of one egg, added be- 
fore it is quite frozen. 



Serve in glasses with a little whipped cream on 
top. 



286 ROCKY MOUNTAIH COOK BOOK. 



PUNCHES- 

Punches are used to serve between courses, or 
with a meat course. They should be frozen only to 
a mush. 

TOMATO PUNCH. 

Cook together one-half can of tomatoes, one cup 
of water, three apples cut in eights (without peel- 
ing), one cup of sugar, one-fourth teaspoonful of gin- 
ger. When the apples are tender, rub through a fine 
sieve and add the juice of one lemon, two tablespoon- 
f uls of preserved ginger cut in fine pieces, four table- 
spoonfuls of maraschino; freeze; serve in glasses. 

TEA PUNCH. 

Make one quart of strong tea, made from Ceylon 
of Oolong ; add the juice of one orange and of half a 
lemon, one cup of sugar, and before it is quite frozen 
add the beaten white of an egg. After freezing, stir 
in one cup of whipped cream ; or, omit the cream in 
the freezing and put a spoonful on the top of the 
glasses when serving. 

6RAP£ FRXnT PUNCH. 

Boil one cup of sugar and two cups of water for 
fifteen minutes ; add one cup of grape fruit juice, and 
the juice of one large lemon, the beaten white of one 

egg. 

MINT PUNCH. 



4 cups water. 
2 cups sugar. 
1 cup lemon juice. 
Juice of one orange. 



White of one egg. 
1 cup creme de menthe 
cordial. 



\. 



FROZEN D£SS£RTS. 287 

Just before the punch is frozen, add the beaten 
white of egg, finish freezing and stir in the cup of 
creme de menthe ; pack for one hour ; serve in glasses. 

ROMAN PUNCH. 

Make the same as the mint punch, using the 
lemon ice for the foundation, and add, after freezing, 
a cup of rum. Orange ice may be used in place of 
the lemon ice for any of the punches. 

CHAMPAGNE PUNCH. 

Make an orange sherbet. When frozen, add a cup 
of champagne. 

SAUTERNE PUNCH. 

Make the same as champagne punch, using one 
cup of sauterne in place of the champagne. 

CURACAO, MARASCHINO, NOYON PUNCH. 

Make a quart of pineapple, orange or lemon sher- 
bet; when frozen, stir in one cup either of cham- 
pagne, sauterne or rum, and a half cup of any of the 
above cordials. 

GINGER ALE IN PUNCHES. 

In making the sherbets for the punches, one quart 
of ginger ale can be used in place of the water. This 
gives a very bright, sparkling punch, and when sau- 
terne is added to it, can hardly be recognized from 
champagne punch. 

Serving, — These punches will serve twelve people. 
10 



288 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

CRBMS-DB-MENTHS ICE. 



1 quart water. 
1 cup sugar. 



2 tablespoonfuls lemon puice. 

White one egg. 

y^ cup creme-de-menthe. 



Freeze water, sugar and lemon juice. When 
frozen stir in the creme-de-menthe and fold in the 
white of egg that has been only slightly beaten. 



FROZEN DESSERTS. 289 

ICECREAMS* 

VANILLA ICE CREAM. 



4 cups of cream. 
1 cup of sugar. 



1 tablespoonful of vanilla. 
1 egg- 



Beat the egg until foamy, then beat in the sugar, 
add flavoring aud cream ; freeze. 



LEMON ICE CREAM. 



Make the same as vanilla, omitting the vanilla, 
and adding the juice of one lemon. Decorate the ice 
oream with preserved lemon peel. 



ORANGE ICE CREAM. 



4 cups heavy cream. 
1 cup orange juice. 
Juice of one lemon. 



1% cups of sugar. 
1 egg. 



Beat the sugar and ^g together, add the orange 
and lemon juice, and just before freezing mix it with 
the cream. 

PINEAPPLE ICE CREAM. 



4 cups heavy cream. 

1^ cups sugar. 

1 cup grated pineapple. 



Juice of one lemon. 

1 egg. 

More sugar if necessary. 



Mix all together, beating the egg and sugar till 
light; add the Dineapple and lemon, and cream just 
before freezing. 

PEACH AND APRICOT ICE CREAM. 

4 cups cream. I 1 cup of the fruit pulp. 

1 egg. I Sweeten to taste. 

Beat the egg, mix all together, freeze. 



290 KOCKT MOUSTAIH COOK BOOK. 

COFfSS ICB CRBAM. 

4 caps heavy creun. I 1 cap black eoffee. 

1 cap migmr. { 1 



Beat the ^g, add sugar, cream and coffee, freeze. 



WALHUT ICE CXRAM. 



4 caps cream. 
1 cap ragar. 
1 emr. 



1 cop walnut meats chopped 
fine. 

The walnut meats can be soaked in a little sherry 
wine one hour before freezing if liked. Beat ^g, add 
sugar and cream, and freeze. Wh«i frozen, stir in 
the nuts. 

GINGKR ICE CREAM. 

4 cups cream. i i cup preserved guiger cut 

,,^W' I in smiJl pieces. 

H cup sugar. f 

Beat the egg, add sugar and cream, freeze. When 
nearlj frozen add the ginger. 

ALMOITD ICE CREAM. 

^^r.^""- ' ? te«poonf ul8 vanil^ 

1 egg, ^ I 1 teaspoonful almond. 

Color green with coloring paste, mix and freeze. 

RICE ICE CRBAM. 

lemon ice ZL ^ * ^®"^^°- ^a^e a vanilla or 
^«ie tW8%rrrV „^«\f-o^en, stir in the rice, 
cream fnlly an hour before serving. 



FROZEN DESSERTS. 291 

MASSHMALLOW ICE CREAM. 

Cook one cup of sugar, one-half cup of water un- 
til it threads ; then pour over the stiffly beaten white 
of one egg, adding a little at a time and beating all 
the time; then stir into the mixture one-half pound 
fresh marshmallows that have been broken in fine 
pieces ; one teaspoonful of vanilla, speck of salt, stir 
into one quart of cream and freeze. 

NEAPOLITAN ICE CREAM. 

Make a vanilla ice cream ; pack one-third of it in 
a mould. Mix one square of Baker's chocolate with 
another third;. pack that in the mould; add a tea- 
spoonful of almond to the last third and color green 
with coloring paste; pack smoothly over the chocolate, 
cover the mould securely ; pack in ice and salt for two 
hours. 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM. 

Cook three-fourths of a cup of sugar to a caramel 
and dissolve with one-half cup of hot water ; add the 
water gradually and let remain on the back of the 
stove until the caramel dissolves. When cool, add it 
to one quart of cream, one-half cup of sugar and one 
beaten ^g; freeze. 

MACAROON ICE CREAM. 

Make a vanilla ice cream, using four cups of 
cream. Roll half a dozen macaroons to a powder, 
soak in sherry for ten minutes, add to the cream after 
it is frozen. The sherry may be omitted if desired. 



^:^ 



292 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

FSSSH FRUIT ICE CREAM. 

Make a plain ice cream, the same as for vanilla 
ice cream, omitting the vanilla. Use two cups of the 
fresh fruits and pulp; sweeten to taste. In using 
raspberries for raspberry ice cream, it is better to 
cook them for about five minutes, then they will mash 
through a sieve more easily. 



PISTACHIO ICE CREAM. 



4 cups cream. 
1 cup tugar. 
1 egg. 



2 teaspoonfuls vanilla. 
1 teaspoonful almond. 

Green vegetable coloring. 



Beat the egg, add sugar, cream and flavoring; 
these two flavorings give the flavor of pistachio, and 
color with a little of the coloring that has been dis- 
solved in a little of the cream. 

FROZEN PUDDING OR TUTTI-FRUTTI. 

Make a vanilla ice cream, using heavy cream. To 
one quart of the ice cream add, after it is frozen, one 
cup of candied plums, apricots and cherries (one cup 
all together) that have been cut in fine pieces and 
soaked in sherry or maraschino, with a tablespoonful 
of brandy, if cared for, for one hour. Turn in a 
mould, pack in ice and salt two hours before serving, 
or serve from the freezer. 

PLUM PUDDING GLACl^ 

Make one quart of chocolate ice cream, and add 
one cup of the fruits, as given in f roze^. pudding. 

FROZEN ELLIOTT PUDDING. 

Make a vanilla ice cream. Line a melon mould 
with macaroons that have first been dipped lightly 



FROZEN DESSERTS. 293 

in sherry; spread them over with apricot jam, fill up 
the mould with the vanilla ice cream, pack in ice and 
salt for two or three hours before serving. This pud- 
ding can be served with a brandy sauce. 



FROZEN BANANAS. 



1 dozen bananas. 

2 cups of sugar. 
2 cups of water. 



Juice of three oranges. 
2 cups heavy cream. 



Boil the water and sugar five minutes, cool, then 
add the bananas, which should be mashed to a pulp, 
and juice of oranges ; freeze. Just before it is frozen 
add the cream, which has been whipped stiff. Any 
fruit can be, used in this way. This will serve fif- 
teen people. 

ORANGE DELICIEUSE. 

Boil together for ten minutes three cups of sugar 
and one and one-half cups of water; cool, add three 
cups of orange juice. Scald in double boiler one and 
one-half cups of cream ; when scalded, add the beaten 
yolks of three eggs ; cook till it coats the spoon (about 
five minutes). When cold, mix with the syrup; beat 
one cup and a half of thick cream and add to the 
other ingredients, then freeze at once. When nearly 
frozen, stir into it one-half cup of finely shredded 
orange peel. This will serve eighteen people. This 
receipt can easily be divided, using one or two thirds, 
as one likes. 

FROZEN PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 

Place on each side of a melon mould a nice slice 
of canned pineapple. Put one cup of the juice in a 
sauce pan with the yolks of four eggs (beaten slight- 



294 SOCKT M OUHTAIH COOK BOOK. 

ly), stir until it begins to thidcen; remove from the 
fire and beat with a Dover beater nntil cool, then add 
half a cnp of grated pineapple and one cup of heavy 
cream beaten stiff. Fill up the mould with the mix- 
ture^ pack in ice and salt for three hours. Oranges 
may be used in this way^ filling the mould with orange 
ice cream and lining it with slices of orange. 

PEACHES, APRICOTS AND GRATED PIHEAPPLE 
FROZEN IN THE CAN. 

Place a tin can of any of these fruits in a deep 
pail or tub, pack with ice and salt (two measures of 
ice to one of salt) for three hours. Open the can 
with the can opener, remove, without breaking, onto 
the serving dish, surround with whipped cream and 
serve. 

Serve Ice Creams or Sherbets in champagne 
glasses with whipped cream on top, coloring the cream 
an opposite color from the frozen cream, using the 
juices of fruits or berries or jellies. 

LALLA ROOKH OR FROZEN EGG-NOG. 



Yg nutmeg grated. 

^ cup of rum. 

2 tablespoonfuls of brandy. 



4 cups of cream. 

4 eggs- 

1 cup sugar. 

Beat the eggs to a stiff foam, add the sugar and 
beat again. Mix with the cream nutm^ and a speck 
of salt and freeze ; when frozen, stir in the rum and 
brandy. 

NESSELRODE PUDDING. 

Make a vanilla ice cream with a rich, thick cream. 
Boil one cup of blanched French chestnuts until ten- 
der; mash through a puree sieve, one cup of mixed 



FROZEN DESSERTS. 296 

candied fruits cut in small pieces ; moisten with two 
tablespoonfuls of maraschino, sherry or orange juice. 
Stir the fruit into the cream after it is frozen ; let 
stand fully an hour before serving. 

SULTANA ROLL AND CLARET SAUCE. 

Line one-pound baking powder cans with pista- 
chio ice cream, sprinkle with sultana raisins that have 
first been boiled for five minutes, then soaked several 
hours in brandy (drain from the brandy before using). 
Fill the center with whipped cream that has been 
sweetened and flavored; cover the top with pistachio 
ice cream ; pack in ice and salt for two hours before 
serving. Serve with claret sauce. 

Boil one cup of sugar and one-half cup of water 
to a thick syrup; when cool (not cold), add one-third 
cup of claret. Serve very cold over the sultana roll. 
Sherry may be used in place of claret. 

CREME-DE-MENTHE ICE CREAM. 

1 quart thin cream. | 1 egg. 

1 cup sugar. j *4 cup creme-de-menthe. 

Add sugar and beaten egg to the cream, a speck 
of salt and freeze. When frozen stir into it the 
creme-de-menthe. Pack for a while before serving. 

ALASKA ICE CREAM. 

Dispose on a platter lady fingers or slices of 
sponge cake. Place on the cake a layer or mold of any 
kind of ice cream. Fully cover with meringue. 
Dredge with granulated sugar and set under the 
flame to brown quickly. Serve at once. 



296 ROCKY MOUHTAIK COOK BOOK. 

PEPPERMIKT CANDT ICE CSEAM. 

Dissolve in one quart of hot cream one cup of 
peppermint stick candy crushed fine. Cool and add 
one beaten egg and more sugar if necessary. Freeze. 
Pack in mold or serve in glasses. Garnish with a 
little whipped cream with some of the crushed pep- 
permint over the top. 

MAKASCHUI 0, SHERRY, PORT AKD BRANDY SAUCES. 

Make the same as claret sauce^ using whatever 
liquor you like. 



SAUCES FOR ICE CREAKL 

Can be made from sweetened whipped cream, 
chilled and flavored. 

QINGBR SAUCE (Boston Cooking School). 

Dilute two teaspoonfuls of com starch with water 
and stir in one-fourth of a cup each of brandy and 
ginger syrup, and two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice ; 
cook five minutes, then add one-fourth cup of finely- 
chopped ginger, a few gratings from the rind of a 
lemon and one teaspoonful of butter. Serve hot or 
cold. 

MAPLE SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM. 

Boil two cups of maple syrup until quite thick, 
then add one-half cup of cream and a speck of salt ; 
cook until it will form a soft ball when tried in cold 
water, then pour over the ice cream. Keep it hot by 
standing the dish in hot water until ready to use. 



FROZEN DESSERTS. 297 

HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM. 

Mix one ounce of grated chocolate with one cup 
of sugar, add one-fourth cup of water, one-fourth 
cup of cream, speck of salt, cook till it will form a 
soft ball when tried in cold water. Serve at once, 
or keep hot by setting in hot water. This sauce may 
be used cold if preferred. 

HOT COFFEE SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM. 

Boil one cup of sugar and half a cup of cream for 
five minutes, with a speck of salt, then add one cup 
of strong black coffee; boil for ten minutes, or until 
it becomes a thick syrup. 

HOT RASPBERRY AND STRAWBERRY SAUCE. 

Boil one cup of sugar, two cups of fruit juice and 
one tablespoonful of lemon juice to a thick syrup. 
Serve hot or cold. 

HOT ORANGE SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM. 

Mix with one cup of orange juice and the juice of 
one lemon one teaspoonful of com starch that has been 
dissolved in a little cold water, one cup of sugar ; cook 
to a thick syrup, strain, and serve hot or cold. 



298 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

MOUSSES. 

Mousses are whipped cream^ fruit pulps and fla- 
vorings mixed together and packed in ice and salt to 
freeze. 

FRUIT MOUSSES. 

Whip two cups of cream stiff. If the thin cream 
is used, drain it through a sieve before adding to the 
pulp. Mix enough sugar to the pulp to sweeten — ^the 
amount depends upon the acidity of the fruit — ^then 
mix with the cream, pour in a mould, pack in ice and 
salt for three hours, using two measures of ice to one 
of salt. Raspberries and peaches make very delicious 
mousse, the flavor of the preserved being almost as 
good as the fresh fruit. 

COFFEE MOUSSE. 

Whip two cups of cream stiff, add to it three- 
fourths cup of black coffee that has been cooked to a 
thick syrup with three-fourths cup of sugar, then 
cooled. Pack in ice and salt. 

Chocolate Mousse. — ^Melt two ounces of chocolate, 
add to it one-half cup of cream ; add three-fourths cup 
of sugar ; melt all together, cool, and add to two cups 
of whipped cream. Pack in ice and salt for three 
hours. 

Curacao and Noyon Mousse, — ^Add one-half cup 
of curacao or noyon or two cups of whipped cream, 
sweeten with a little powdered sugar if necessary. 
Pack for three hours in ice and salt. 



I 

J 



FROZEN D£S8£STS. 299 



PARFATTS- 

Parfaits are flavorings, whipped cream and eggs. 
They are frozen by being packed in ice and salt. 

ANGEL PARFAIT. 

Boil one cup of sugar and one-half cup of water 
till it threads, then pour in a fine stream on the 
whites of two eggs beaten till foamy. Set in a dish 
of ice water and beat until cold. Add two teaspoon- 
fuls of vanilla, fold into it two cups of heavy cream 
beaten stiflF. Turn into a mould and pack in ice and 
salt for three hours, two measures of ice to one of salt. 

PINEAPPLE PARFAIT. 

Make the same as angel parf ait, omitting the va- 
nilla and stirring into the syrup and eggs when cold 
one cup of grated pineapple. 

MAPLE PARFAIT. 

To one cup of rich maple syrup add the beaten 
yolks of two eggs, cook in a sauce pan, stirring con- 
tinually till it boils. Boil for five minutes, strain, set 
aside to cool. Beat two cups of heavy cream until 
stiff, then fold in the beaten whites of the eggs. Whip 
the syrup with a Dover beater until very light, and 
stir all the ingredients together; mould and pack in 
ice and salt for three hours. This amount will serve 
twelve people. 

GINGER PARFAIT. 

Heat one cup of ginger syrup, pour slowly over 
the whites of two eggs ; beat two cups of heavy cream 



302 ROCKY MOUNTAIH COOK BOOK. 

juice, one-half cup of strong tea, one grated pine- 
apple, one pint of apoUinaris; add more sugar if 
needed. Freeze to a granular consistency, using as 
much salt as ice. 

COLLEGE ICES. 

Put into a frappe glass two tablespoonfuls of any 
kind of fruit or berries that have been sugared and 
flavored with a little brandy or wine; fill the glass 
with vanilla ice cream ; pour over the top a little fruit 
syrup or chocolate sauce. 

GOOSEBERRY SORBET. 

Cook together one quart of gooseberries, two cups 
of water and one cup of sugar till soft, then add a 
tablespoonful of lemon juice and a little green vege- 
table coloring. When cold freeze. When quite stiff, 
add a wine glass of maraschino and two tablespoonfuls 
of rum. Before adding the lemon juice and coloring, 
mash through a fine sieve. 

CHOLOCATE SURPRISE. 

Line a melon mould with a rich chocolate ice 
cream about one inch thick, fill up with orange sher- 
bet, cover the top with the ice cream. Pack the mould 
in ice and salt for two hours. When ready to serve, 
surround with crystallized orange peel. 

COUPE DE JAQUE. 

Fill frappe glasses one-third full of the following 
mixture: Cut in small pieces equal quantities of 
orange, pineapple, white grapes and English walnuts; 



i 



FROZEN DESSERTS. 303 

soak in brandy for two hours. Fill up the glasses 
with orange sherbet. 

COUPES VENUS. 

Put two generous spoonfuls of vanilla or peach 
ice cream into champagne glasses. Make a shallow 
depression in the cream and into it set a whole pre- 
served peach. Set a maraschino cherry on the peach. 



; 



304 KOCKT MOUHTAm COOK BOOK. 



CAKES. 

All measurements level, with the exception of baking 
powder, which is measured rounding with the side of the can. 
Sift flour before measuring. 



DIRECTIONS FOR MAKIK6 CAKB. 

The baking of cakes is more affected by the high 
altitude than anything else we cook. Oar sea level 
receipts can be used in high altitudes by adding one 
more egg, not changing the receipt in any other way, 
in this way making a rich, moist cake. 

Baking Cake. — The oven should be slow, and 
enough fire to last \mtil the cake is done. Grease the 
pans with lard, as butter bums very quickly, making 
the cake black.« 

Preparing the Maierials for the Cake. — The but- 
ter and sugar should be creamed together very lightly, 
making a creamy, soft mixture. A great deal depends 
upon creaming the butter and sugar properly. The 
eggs should be beaten light and foamy. When the 
whites are to be beaten alone, put them in a flat dish 
— ^a plate or platter — and beat with the Daisy beater ; 
they beat up much quicker beaten in this way, al- 
though if one cares to, they can beat the whites in a 
bowl with the Dover beater before beating the yolks, 
thus having the beater to wash but once. Sift salt and 
baking powder with the flour. When fruit is used, 
roll it in flour and add it last. When a cake cracks 
open in baking, too much flour has been used. It is 
hard to give the exact amount of flour a cake will take, 
5;S some flour will take more moisture than others, 
^ayer cakes require a hotter oven than thick cakes. 



CAKES. 305 

When a cake browns before it has raised, the oven is 
too hot. Any loaf cake can be baked as a layer cake. 
All cakes should be baked as soon as they are made. 
Mix cake in an earthen bowl and beat with a wooden 
spoon. Do not use a cheap quality of butter or stale 
eggs. For cake making use a very fine granulated 
sugar ; the coarse sugar makes cake heavy and coarse- 
grained. Have everything ready before beginning to 
make the cake. Cakes are divided into two classes — 
cakes with butter, and cakes without butter. 



SPONGE CAKE. 



4 eggs. 

% cup of sugar. 

1 cup of flour. 



^ teaspoonful of salt. 

1 tablespoonful lemon juice. 



(In making this cake at a low altitude, use one 
whole cup of sugar.) Separate the whites from the 
yolks, putting the yolks in the mixing bowl; beat 
them until creamy and gradually beat in the sugar; 
add lemon juice. Beat the whites till stiff; sift the 
salt with lie flour, add one-fourth of the whites to 
yolks ; sift over it one-half of the flour, then add an- 
other fourth of the whites ; fold in, sift in the rest of 
the flour, then fold in the remainder of the whites. 
Bake in a slow oven about thirty minutes, or until the 
cake leaves the side of the pan. If you care for a 
sugary top, sprinkle a little sugar over it before put- 
ting in the oven. This cake can be baked in loaf, 
layer or drop cakes. 



5 eggs. 

1 oup tugar. 



BOILED SPONGE CAKE. 



1 cup flour. 
Salt 



aoe ^ ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Boil the sugar with one-third cup of hot water 
until a thick syrup or until it will thread and fly. 
Then beat it gradually onto the yolks that have been 
beaten lightly. Beat until thick. Add the grated 
rind of half a lemon, the sifted flour and the stiffly 
beaten whites. Bake in a tube pan one hour. This is 
moist and delicious. 

ROLL JELLY CAKE. 

Make the same as above ; spread very thin on shal- 
low pans ; bake in a moderate oven ; spread with jelly 
while warm ; roll up. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE (No. a). 

Beat the yolks of five eggs till light ; beat in grad- 
ually one cup of sugar and alternately half a cup of 
heavy cream and two cups of flour ; sift with the flour 
one teaspoonful of bakii^ powder and one-half tea- 
spoonful of salt ; add the grated rind of half a lemon, 
and lastly fold in the stiffly beaten whites of the e^s, 
Bake about forty-five minutes. 

BERWICK SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat seven eggs two minutes (at a low altitude use 
six eggs) ; add three cups of sugar, beat five minutes, 
two cups of flour sifted with one teaspoonful of baking 
powder ; beat two minutes ; one cup of cold water, beat 
one minute; one-fourth teaspoonful of salt sifted in 
two cups of flour, beat three minutes ; grated rind and 
juice of one lemon, beat one minute. Observe the 
time exactly. This quantity makes three loaves. 



X 



J 



CAKES. 307 

SWEDISH SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat the whites of five eggs dry and the yolks of 
five eggs very lightly. Gradually beat one cup of 
sugar into the yolks. Add the grated rind of a lemon 
and two tablespoonfuls of lemon juice. Then fold in 
half a cup of potato flour and the whites of the eggs. 
Bake in a tube pan about one hour. 

GOLD SPONGE CAKE. 

Six eggs well beaten. One cup of sugar beaten 

into the eggs. Then add three tablespoonfuls of 

water, two of lemon puice and one and a fourth cups 

flour that has one half teaspoonf ul baking powder and 

a little salt sifted with it. Bake in a ring pan slowly 

one hour. 

LADY FINGERS. 



1 teaspoonful of lemon or 
vanilla flavoring. 



4 eggs. 

y^ cup of powdered sugar. 

y^ teaspoonful of salt. 

Make the same as sponge cake. Drop in buttered 
lady finger pans, sprinkle the top with powdered 
sugar. Bake from ten to fifteen minutes. Drop by 
the spoonful on a buttered pan for sponge drops. 

GOLDEN ROD CAKE. 

Beat the yolks of six eggs till light ; gradually beat 
into these one-half cup of sugar, then two tablespoon- 
fuls of orange juice and one-half cup of sifted flour, 
sifted again with a level teaspoonful of baking pow- 
der and one-fourth teaspoonful of salt ; bake in small 
cakes and cover with orange icing. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

One cup of flour, sifted ; mix with one teaspoonful 
of cream of tartar and sift four times. Beat the 



L 



30e ROCKY MOUNTAIH COOK BOOK. 

whites of twelve r^gs until stifF. (Eleven eggs can be 
used in a low altituda) Add one cup and a half of 
fine granulated sugar and beat again. Add one tea- 
spoonful of vanilla or almond, then mix in the flour 
quickly and lightly. Bake in a funnel cake pan ; line 
the bottom with paper, not greased ; pour in the mix- 
ture and bake fifty minutes. 

MARSHMALLOW ANGEL CAKE. 

Bake a thin angel cake. When cold, cut through 
the center. Spread over it a layer of flavored and 
sweetened whipped cream that has one-half cup of 
marshmallows cut in small pieces and whipped with 
the cream. Cover with the cake and spread a little 
of the cream on top, with the whole marshmallows for 
garnish. 

CAKES WITH BTJTTSS. 

By changing the receipts a little, various cakes 
can be made from one receipt, simply by adding 
spices, fruits, chocolate and different flavorings. 
When the fruits are used, roll in flour first. Where 
chocolate is used, vanilla combines with it to give the 
best fiavoring. 

SPICE CAKE. 
(Made from the Tolks of Angel Cake. Mrs. Durand). 
10 yolks. 1 scant cup granulated 



ly^ cups of flour. 



sugar. 



Put the yolks in a granite sauce pan, beat the 
sugar gradually into the eggs with a flat beater ; beat 
till light and thick; set the sauce pan in a pan of 
boiling water on the stove. Cook till thick. When 
cool, add two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one-half tea- 



J 



:Jf 



CAKES. 309 

spoonful of cloves and one cup of nut meats cut fine, 
and the ^ flour that has been sifted four times. 

WHITE CAKE (Mrs. Gaylord). 



Yg cup of butter. 

2 cups of sugar. 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking 

powder. 
1 cup of milk. 



Whites of five eggs. 
3 cups of flour. 
1 teaspoonful of vanilla or 
rose water. 



Cream butter and sugar, sift the baking powder 
and flour together, add half of the flour and half of 
the milk imtil used up, then fold in the stiffly beaten 
whites and flavoring. 



GOLD CAKE. 



Yz cup of butter. 
lYt <^ps powdered sugar. 
Y2 cup of milk. 
Yolks of five eggs. 
Yz teaspoonful of baking 
powder. 



Y4 teaspoonful of salt. 
2 cups of flour. 
Flavor with mace, nutmeg 
or vanilla. 



Cream the butter and sugar, add the flavoring, 
beaten yolks, part of the flour that has the salt and 
baking powder sifted in it, the milk, then the rest of 
the flour. Bake from thirty to forty minutes. 



SILVER CAKE. 



Make the same as the gold cake, using the whites ; 
add the milk to the creamed butter and sugar, then 
add part of the flour, part of the whites, the rest of 
the flour, and fold in the remaining whites; flavor 
with almond or lemon juice. 



310 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

BRIDE'S CAKE. 



1 cup butter. 

114 cups powdered sugar. 
Whites of eight eggs. 

2 cups flour. 

% teaspoonful baking 
powder. 



y^ teaspoonful salt. 

1 teaspoonful of lemon or 
rose extract or y^ tea- 
spoonful of almond. 



Cream the butter and sugar, add the flavoring, the 
flour that has the salt and baking powder sifted in it, 
half of the beaten egg ; beat thoroughly. Fold in the 
rest of the whites. Bake in a round pan with a tube. 
Cover with boiled icing. 



POUND CAKE. 



% lb. of butter. 

1 lb. of sugar (or 2 cups). 

8 or eggs (if small, nine). 



1 lb. of flour (4 cups). 

2 tablespoonfuls of wine and 

2 of brandy. 



In a low altitude one pound of butter could be 
used. Cream the butter, add the sugar gradually and 
cream, then the brandy and wine. Beat the yolks of 
the eggs very lightly, add those alternately with flour ; 
fold in the whites last. One cup of currants, raisins 
or citron may be added, or spices. 



WHITE POUND CAKE. 



1 pound sugar. 
% pound butter. 
1 pound flour. 



Whites 16 eggs. 

1 pound blanched almonds. 

14 pound citron. 



- Cream the butter and sugar. Add part of the 
flour, the fruit and the rest of the flour. Fold in 
whites of the eggs. This will make two large loaves. 
Bake for one hour. 

DENVER POUND CAKE. 



l^ pound butter. 

l^ pound powdered sugar. 

6 eggs. 



Grater rind of half lemon. 
V2 pound flour. 



CAKES. 311 

Break the eggs one at a time in a large plate and 
beat with the hand. Then beat in the butter and 
sugar that have been creamed together. The flour 
and the lemon juice. Bake for one hour. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE No. i. 



% cup of butter (scant). 

1% cups sugar. 

1 cup cold water. 

3 level cups swan's-down 
flour, sifted three times 
before measuring. 



Two teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. 

Whites of 4 eggs. 

Flavor with ^ teaspoonful 
almond and % teaspoon- 
ful vanilla; salt. 



Cream, butter and sugar, add one-third water with 
one cup flour; beat thoroughly. Add second cup 
flour with one-third water. Sift baking powder with 
last cup. Add it with the remainder of water. Beat 
thoroughly, then fold in the whites of the eggs beaten 
stiff. Bake in two layers and ice. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE NO. a. 

Cream one cup of butter with two cups of sugar. 
Sift together three and a half cups of flour and two 
level teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Add this to 
the butter and sugar alternately. With one cup of 
milk and one teaspoonful of rose water, beat the mix- 
ture very thoroughly and fold in the whites of six 
eggs beaten lightly. Bake in three-layer cake pans. 

FILLING AND FROSTING FOR LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. 

Dissolve three cups of granulated sugar in one 
cup of boiling water and cook until the syrup will 
spin a thread and then pour it in a fine stream on 
to the whites of three eggs beaten until stiff, beating 
constantly meanwhile. To this frosting add one cup 
of chopped raisins, one cup of chopped nut meats and 



312 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



five figs cut in very thin strips. This mixture is used 
as the filling between the layers and for the frosting. 



ALMOST POUND CAKE. 



^ teaspoonful baking 

powder. 
y^ teaspoonful salt, 
little nutmeg. 



1 cup sugar. 
% cup butter. 
4 eggs. 

2 tablespoonfuls of milk. 
1% cups flour. 

Cream the butter and sugar, add the eggs well 
beaten, nutmeg, milk; sift the flour before measur- 
ing, then sift again with the baking powder and salt; 
beat all together for ten minutes, bake in a loaf or 
small cakes. 

W£DDIN6 CAKE. 



1 lb. currants. 

1 lb. dates, chopped fine. 

2 lbs. raisins. 
1 lb. citron. 

1 teaspoonful each cinna- 
mon, mace, allspice, 
cloves and 2 grated 
nutmegs. 



% cup brandy. 

1 lb. butter. 

1 lb. brown sugar. 

9 ^gs. 

4 cups flour. 

^ teaspoonful of soda dis- 
solved in a tablespoon- 
ful of water. 



Cream butter and sugar, add yolks well beaten, 
part of flour, spices, part of brandy, rest of flour, then 
the whites of eggs ; lastly the fruit that has been rolled 
lightly in flour. Bake in a wooden starch box, lined 
with three layers of paper. This cake requires from 
five to six hours' baking in a moderate oven. 

FRXnX CAKE. 



% cup of butter. 

% cup of sugar 

% cup dark molasses 

y^ teaspoonful soda sifted 

in the flour. 
4 eggs. 

1 tablespoonful mixed 

spices. 

2 cups flour. 



2 tablespoonfuls brandy. 
Juice of half a lemon. 
^ cup of candied orange 

peel. 
^ cup walnut meats chopped 

flne. 
^ cup each of raisins, dates 
and citron. 



CAEBS. 318 

Slice the citron and orange peel. Cream the but- 
ter and 8ugar, add spices and molasses, the beaten 
yolks of eggs, part of the flour, whites of eggs beaten 
stiff, lastly the fruit floured, and nuts. Bake in a 
slow oven for about an hour and a quarter. 

LIGHT FRXnX CAE£. 

Make a pound cake ; add one cup of currants and 
raisins (one cup in all), and one-half cup of sliced 
citron, one tablespoonful of mixed spices, the juice 
and grated rind of half a lemon. Flour the fruit and 
add it last. 

IMPERIAL CAKE. 



1 pound sugar. 

1 pound butter. 

1 pound flour. 

10 eggs. 

Wine glass of brandy. 



1 pound blanched almonds 

cut in strips. 

2 pounds raisins. 

1 pound citron, also cut in 

strips. 

2 teaspoonfuls baking 

powder sifted with flour. 



Cream the butter and sugar. Add the well beaten 
eggs, the flour, brandy and fruit. This will make two 
good size cakes. Bake one hour. 

LEMON CAKE. 

Cream one cup of butter and two cups of pow- 
dered sugar (at a low altitude granulated sugar can 
be used), beat the yolks of six eggs till thick and 
light, add alternately one cup of milk and four cups 
of flour sifted with one-half teaspoonf ul of soda ; beat 
thoroughly, then add the beaten whites of the eggs, 
lastly the grated yellow rind of a good-sized lemon 
with the juice. Cover with an icing flavored with 
lemon juice. 



314 SOCKT MOUKTAIN COOK BOOK. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

Make the same as spice cake, omitting the spices, 
adding one-half cup of chopped almonds, one-half tea- 
spoonful of almond extract ; cover with a boiled icing 
and sprinkle over with almonds cut in strips. 

PISTACHIO CAKE. 

Bake a silver or bride's cake in a large, shallow 
pan. When cold, cover with a boiled icing, colored 
green with vegetable coloring and flavored with al- 
mond.. Sprinkle with blanched and finely chopped 
pistachio nuts. 

NUT CAKE. 

Add one-haf cup of chopped nuts (floured) to 
"Eocky Mountain" cake. Sprinkle a layer of chopped 
nuts and a little powdered sugar over the top just 
before putting in the oven, or frost with a white or 
chocolate frosting, and decorate with the whole nut 
meats. A maple icing is delicious on this cake. 

APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 



1% cups sifted flour. 
1 level teaspoonful soda. 
1 teaspoonful dnnamon. 
1 cup warm thick apple 
sauce. 



^ cup butter. 
1 cup sugar. 
1 egg beaten light. 
1 cup raisins. 
1 cup dates. 

Mix in usual manner. Bake in a tube pan lined 
with buttered paper, one hour and a half. 

FIG CAKE. 

Add one-half cup of finely chopped figs (floured) 
to spice cake after it is mixed. 



1 cup butter. 

2 cups sugar. 
6 eggs. 

1 cup milk. 

2 cups raisins. 

2 cups chopped figs. 



CAKES. 315 

FIG CAKE (No. a). 



1 cup blanched almonds. 
1 tablespoonful of honey. 
314 cups of flour. 
1 teaspoonful baking 

powder. 
y^ teaspoonful salt. 



Cream the butter and sugar, add the eggs well 
beaten, and the honey. Soak the fruit in brandy for 
a half hour, sift in the flour, baking powder and salt, 
add fruit, mix with the flour, then the milk. Mix 
well and bake in two loaves. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CAKE (Loaf or Layer Cake). 



1 scant cup of sugar. 

y^ cup of butter. 

y^ teaspoonful of baking 

powder. 
14 teaspoonful of salt. 



Vz <^P o^ milk. 

3 eggs. 

1% cups of flour. 

Flavoring. 



Cream the butter and sugar, add flavoring of any 
kind, the well-beaten eggs, part of the flour (with the 
salt and baking powder sifted in it), the milk and the 
rest of the flour; beat thoroughly for ten minutes. 
Bake in gem pans if you like. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

Make the same as "Rocky Mountain" cake, add- 
ing the grated yellow of the rind of one orange. Bake 
in layers and spread with orange filling. Cover with 
orange icing. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Make a "Rocky Mountain" cake; mix melted 
chocolate with one-third of it ; put in the pan a layer 
of the plain cake, then the chocolate mixture, after 



316 KOCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

that the remainder of the mixture. A very nice way 
to make marble cake is to take one-third of the mix- 
ture of "Rocky Mountain" cake and mix with it 
spices, currants and citron, or a little preserved orange 
or lemon peel. 

SPICK CAKE. 



^ cup of butter. 

1 cup of sugar. 

Vz cup of milk. 

IV^ cups of flour. 

^ teaspoonful of baking 

powder. 
^ teaepooaf ul of salt. 



Juice and grated rind of 

half a lemon. 
1 teaspoonful of cinnamon. 
Several gratings of nutmeg. 
y^ teaspoonful allspice. 
3 whole eggs and the yolk of 

one. 



Cream the butter and sugar, add spices, the beaten 
yolks of eggs, lemon juice and rind, part of the flour 
which has sifted in it the baking powder and salt, 
then the milk, the rest of the flour and the stiffly 
beaten whites. Bake until the cake leaves the side of 
the pan. 

CURRANT CAKE. 

Make the spice cake, omitting the spices and add- 
ing one-half cup of currants that have been floured. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

Add one-half cup of grated cocoanut that has been 
floured to "Rocky Mountain" cake just before put- 
ting in the oven. Cover with boiled icing that has two 
tablespoonfuls of grated cocoanut mixed with it, or 
ice with the icing and sprinkle the cocoanut over the 

top. 

NEVER-FAIL CHOCOLATE CAEE. 

Melt together one and one-half squares of Baker's 
chocolate and three tablespoonfuls of butter. Place 
in a bowl and add one cup sugar, one-half cup milk, 






CAKES. 317 

one cup pastry flour with two teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, little salt. 

Bread two eggs into the mixture, one teaspoonful 
vanilla. Do not stir until all the ingredients are 
added. Beat with Dover egsr beater five minutes. 
Bake in a loaf for thirty or thirty-five minutes. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Add one square of Baker's chocolate (melted) to 
^TRocky Mountain" cake; after the cake is mixed, 
flavor with a teaspoonful of vanilla ; ice with a boiled 
or chocolate icing. I 

LOAF CHOCOLATE CAEIE. 

Boil to a thick cream one-half cup each of sugar 
and milk and one square of chocolate ; let cool ; then 
cream together one-half cup of butter and one cup 
of sugar, then add three well-beaten eggs, one-half 
cup of milk, one teaspoonful of baking powder sifted 
with two cups of flour, a little salt, one teaspoonful 
of vanilla and the chocolate mixture added last. 

FUDGE CAKE. 

Cream together one rounding tablespoonful of 
butter and three-fourths cup of sugar. Then add 
two squares of melted chocolate and one beaten egg. 
Three-fourths cup of milk. One-fourth teaspoonful 
salt. One-half teaspoonful vanilla. Add one cup of 
flour sifted with one rounding teaspoonful of baking 
powder. Bake in a shallow pan. 

ICING. 

One cup confectioners' sugar. One rounding 
tablespoonful butter. Cream together. Then add 



318 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

two teaepoonf uls of dry cocoa, one-half teaspoonful of 
vanilla and two tablespoonfuls of strong hot coffee. 
More sugar may be needed for spreading. 

DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE. 



1 cup brown sugar. 
y^ pound of chocolate. 



1 egg. 

Yg cup milk. 



Melt the chocolate. Add it to the hot milk with 
the sugar and cook to a smooth paste. Then add the 
egg, beaten without separating the white and yolk 
and set aside to cool. 

Beat one-half cup of butter and one cup of 
sugar together. Add the yolks of two eggs. Alter- 
nately one-half cup of milk and two and one-fourth 
cups of flour that has two rounding teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder and a little salt sifted with it. Then 
add the well beaten whites, the cold chocolate mix- 
ture, and one tablespoonf ul of warm water. A little 
more flour may be needed. Bake in two layers. 
Fill the layers and cover the top with boiled frosting. 

POTATO TORTE. 

Beat one cup of butter to a cream. Gradually 
heat in one cup and three-quarters of sugar. Add the 
beaten yolks of three eggs and one cup of mashed 
potatoes. One cup of sweet chocolate grated. One 
cup of finely chopped nuts, grated rind of one lemon. 
Two cups of flour sifted with two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder and three egg whites beaten light. 
Bake in three-layer cake pans or in a loaf. Bake the 
layers about fifteen minutes and the loaf about forty- 
five minutes. Put the layers together with fruit jelly. 
Cover the outside with mocha frosting. 



CAKSS. 319 

MOCHA FROSTING. 

Cream one cup of butter. Gradually beat in two 
cups and a half of confectioners' sugar, and drop by 
drop strong black coffee to flavor as desired. 

TWELFTH NIGHT CAKE. 

Beat to a cream one cupful of butter and two of 
granulated sugar. Beat the whites and yolks of six 
eggs separately ; beat the yolks into the creamed but- 
ter and sugar, a little at a time, then add one-half cup 
of milk alternately with three cups of flour that has 
one teaspoonful of baking powder sifted with it, then 
fold in the beaten whites of the eggs, lastly add the 
crated rind and juice of half a lemon, a cup of seeded 
faisins soaked in brandy and rolled in flonrfand a tea- 
spoonful of caraway seeds. Bake in a round pan with 
a tube in the center, line it with buttered paper. Roll 
the silver pieces in thin white paper, then in flour; 
place in opposite sides of the cake. Bake slowly. 
When cold, ice with a thick white frosting, decorate 
with candied cherries and angelica, surround with 
holly and stick a piece in the center. 



CHOCOLATE NUT BAR. 



2 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. 

2 squares Baker's 

Chocolate. 



% cup melted butter. 
% cup flour. 
% cup walnut meats 
broken in pieces. 



Mix all well together. Bake slowly in a shallow 
pan. Cut in squares while warm. 

ANGEL OR SPONGE CAKE WITH CHESTNUTS. ' 

Make an angel or sponge cake; bake in a sheet. 
When cold, cut in halves and cover with a layer of 

11 



320 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

chestnuts and whipped cream; or, bake in a round 
pan ; when cold, cut out the center, fill with the chest- 
nuts and cover the top with whipped cream flavored 
with maraschino. Shell and blanch the chestnuts, 
boil in sweetened water. When soft mash through 
a sieve, then use in the cake. 

ROOSEVELT CAKES. 

Cut rich white cake in squares; cut the squares 
in halves and spread with apricot jam ; cover with the 
other half. Press whipped cream through a pastry 
bag in fanciful shapes on top, or if the bag is not 
used, dot with the cream and sprinkle with finely-cut 
angelica. 

BROWNIES. 



2 eggs slightly beaten. 
1 cup brown sugar. 
1 cup chopped pecans or 
walnuts. 



l^ cup flour. 

y^ teaspoonful baking 

powder. 
Pinch of salt. 



Beat all together. Bake in small cakes. Mod- 
erate oven. 

POUND CAKE WAFERS. 



^ lb. butter (1 cup). 
% lb. sugar (U^ cups). 
4 eggs. 

% teaspoonful of baking 
powder. 



1 tablespoonful caraway 

seeds. 
Nutmeg. 



Flour enough to roll thin, cut out in rounds, 
sprinkle with sugar and bake in a quick oven. Cream 
the butter and sugar, add the eggs well beaten, nut- 
naeg, flour and baking powder sifted together, then 
caraway seeds. 



CAKES. 321 

VENETIAN CAKES. 



^ cup of butter. 

^ cup of powdered sugar. 

1 cup of flour. 



1 cupful of chopped almonds 

or walnuts. 
1 teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Yolks of 3 eggs. 



Cream the butter and sugar till very light, add 
the well beaten yolks, the almonds, flour and vanilla. 
Take a small piece, roll it in powdered sugar, then 
made a ball of it in the hands ; put a piece of the nut 
on the top of each. Place them an inch apart, bake 
in a moderate oven about fifteen minutes. 

ORANGE QUARTERS. 

Make an orange or sponge cake; drop in tins 
make for these cakes. Bake in a moderate oven; 
cover with orange icing. 

ALMOND WAFERS. 

Cream half a cup of butter and one cup of pow- 
dered sugar together, then beat in, very slowly, half 
a cup of milk, and lastly two cups of flour and half 
a teaspoonful of vanilla. Spread very thin on the 
inverted bottom of a dripping pan, buttered. Mark 
in squares, sprinkle with blanched almonds chopped 
fine. Bake in a moderate oven five to eight min- 
utes. Lift from the pan with a knife, roll on the hot 
pan, putting one comer over the other, or one side 
over the opposite side. 

ALMOND AND DATE MACAROONS (Mrs. Aldrich). 

Whites of four eggs beaten stiff. Then beat in 
gradually two cups of powdered sugar, one cup 
almonds that have been blanched and put through a 



1 



^ 



822 SOCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

grinder. One cup of dates cut in fourths. Drop a 
teaspoonful for each cake on a greased tin two inches 
apart. Bake very slowly about fifteen minutes. Let 
cool before removing carefully with a spatula. 

PEANUT COOKIES. 



4 tablespoonfuls of butter. 

1 egg- 

% cup of sugar. 

1 cup of flour. 



1 teaspoonful of baking 

powder. 
Speck of salt. 
1 cup of shelled and diopped 

peanuts. 

Cream the butter and sugar, add the beaten egg, 
then the flour, salt and baking powder sifted together, 
the nuts last. Boll into little balls. Place an inch 
apart. Bake ten to fifteen minutes, 

HONET CAKES. 

Four pounds of strained honey, one and one-half 
pounds brown sugar, one teaspoonful of soda, cloves 
and cinnamon to taste, one-half pound citron, cut in 
strips, one quart hickory nut meats, one pound shelled 
almonds, flour enough to roll out and cut in little 
squares. Warm the honey, then add sugar, add soda 
dissolved in warm water, add the citron, nuts, 
chopped fine. Warm the flour before adding. Bake 
slowly in pans, not to touch. 



ONE-TWO-THREE-FOUR COOKIES. 

1 
cups 



cup of butter. 4 eggs. 

Mm« nf fliiorftr. 2 tablcspooufuls of carawajT 



A \i\A.y MM. iLfUVWA* 

2 cups of sugar. 
4 cups of flour. 



seeds or spices to taste. 



Cream butter and sugar, add well beaten eggs, 
then flour and spices. If you like, cover the tops 



CAKES. 323 

over with finely chopped preserved ginger, or pro- 
served orange peel and a sprinkling of sugar. Add 
ginger to the mixture and bake as a sugar ginger- 
bread in on© sheet. 

JUHBLBS. 

EoU one-two-three-four cookies a little thicker, 
cut with a doughnut cutter and sprinkle over with 
sugar. 

WALNUT WAFERS. 



^ lb. brown sugar. 
y2 lb. walnut meats. 



6 tablespoonfuls of flour. 
2 eggs. 



Beat the yolks till light, beat in the sugar, add the 
flour and nuts and beaten whites of eggs. Drop by 
spoonfuls on larded tins that have been sprinkled with 
flour. Bake quickly. 



SUGAR COOKIES. 



Yn cup of butter. 

1 cup of powdered sugar. 

2 eggs. 



1 teaspoonf ul of baking 
powder. 



Flavor with lemon juice,, vanilla or nutmeg. Use 
flour enough to roll out; speck of salt. 

HERMITS. 

Add half a cup of stoned and chopped raisins to 
sugar cookies; a little cinnamon and nutmeg. 

COCOANUT COOKIES. 

Add a half cup of grated cocoanut to sugar cook- 
ies. 



% 



S24 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

SPICBD COOKIES. 



94 cnp sugar. 
y^ cup fthorteniiig, 
half butter. 

4 tablespoonfuls milk. 
Salt, cinnamon, nutmeg. 



y^ teaspoonful soda, dis- 
solved in one table- 
spoonful water. 

1 teaspoonful baking 
powder. 

y^ cup chopped raisons. 



Flour to make 8ti£F enough to roll. 

MAS6ASST DBLAND CAKES. 

Beat two ^gs and the yolk of another until 
foamy; add one-half cup of brown sugar, three- 
fourths cup of sifted flour, one teaspoonful of 
baking powder, one-half teaspoonful of salt sifted to- 
gether, then stir in one cup of pecan nuts cut in small 
pieces. Put the mixture in small gem or muffin pans 
with a pecan nut meat in the center of each. Sift a 
little powdered sugar over the top. Bake about fif- 
teen minutes. 

PEPPER NUTS. 



2 cups of powdered sugar. 

4 eggs. 

y^ teaspoonful of soda. 

1 teaspoonful doves. 

2 teaspoonfuls cinnamon. 
% lb. citron. 



1 cup of hickory nuts cut 

fine. 
1 teaspoonful salt. 
As much flour as you can 

knead in. 



Beat the eggs well, then add sugar and beat again. 
Cut the citron in bits, add it with the nuts and spices, 
sift flour, soda and salt together. After the flour is 
added, roll in little balls, place an inch apart and 
bake in a moderate oven. 

PECAN WAFERS. 

Cream one-fourth cup of butter and one-half cup 
of sugar together, add almost drop by drop four table- 



t CAK£S. 32S 

spoonfuls of milk and one cup of flour ; spread on the 
ii bottom of a buttered pan as thin as possible. Sprin- 

'■ kle with chopped nuts, mark in squares and bake in a 

I moderate oven. 

^ SNOW BALL CAKES. 

Bake angel or bride^s cake in small round gem 

pans. Cover with a boiled icing flavored with lemon 

and put a piece of candied ginger in the center of 

each. 

BOWKNOT COOKIES. 



V^ cup butter. 
% cup sugar. 
ly^ cups Hour. 



1 egg. 

Grated rind of half lemon, 
little salt. 



Cream the butter and sugar. Add the beaten egg. 
Flour and flavoring. 

Take one teaspoonful of the dough and roll under 
the hand making a strip about four inches long. 
Twist into a bowknot shape. Place carefully on the 
pan two inches apart. Bake in a slow oven. 

SUOAH CREAM COOKIES. 

One-half cup butter. One-half cup sugar. Cream 
together. Then beat in the yolks of two eggs. Two 
tablespoonfuls of cream. Spices as desired. Add 
flour enough to roll thin. 



DATE BARS. 



1 cup sugar. 
3 eggs. 

1 cup chopped walnut 
meats. 



1 pound dates chopped fine. 
1 cup flour. 
1 teaspoonful baking 
powder, little salt. 



Beat the egg yolks and mix with the sugar. Add 
the flour, baking powder and salt sifted together. 



• I 



3M KOCKT MOmiTAIII COOK BOOK. 

Add DDte and dates and the beaten whites of the eggs. 
Bake in s Bhallow pan diirty minutes in a moderate 
oren. Cut in bare when warm. Roll in powdered 
sug«r. 

OAT MBAI WAFEBS. 

1% taUwpoMifnla bnttv. | \^, cups graaulattd angmr. 

t% cup* Qiuk«r Okta. l 2 teaspoonfnlB baldng 

9 Ciggl. powder. 

I 1 teaapoonful Tonilla. 

Cream the butter with part of the augar. Beat 
the rest of the bo^h with tiie yolks. Add other in- 
gredients and whites of ^^gs last. Let stand for ten 
minutes. Then drop from a teaspoon on shallow pans 
two inches apart. 

SCOTCH GDTGEItBREAD. 



Bift together. V, teupoonful 

2 cupa flour. % teaspoonful grated 

% cup gruiul&t«d Bug&r. nubneg. 

Vi te«spoonfu aoda. ^ teaspoonful salt, 

1 teaapoonful baking 

Then add one-half cup small seeded raisins. One- 
half cup sliced preserved ginger. One-fourth cup of 
almoni^ chopped fine. Heat one-fourth cup of mo- 
lasses and one-half cup of shortenii^ to the boiling 
point, and stir into the dry ingredients. Then add 
two well beaten ^gs. Bake in a loaf one hour or in 
a sheet half an hour. 

ROLLED OATS, FSUIT AND HUT COOZmS. 

■D-.^ - - — of butter to a cream. Gradually beat 
gar. The beaten yolks of two eggs. 
» milk. One cup raisins. One-half 
ped fine. The whites of two ^gs 



CAK£S. 327 

beaten dry. Two cups rolled oats and two cups flour 
sifted, with a level teaspoonful soda. 

Mix thoroughly adding more flour if needed to 
make a dough. Omit milk for richer dough. Roll 
out and place an inch apart. 



BABA OR RUM CAKES. 



2 cups flour. 

4 eggs. 

^ cup butter. 



^ teaspoonful salt. 

1 cake compressed yeast. 

y^ cup water. 



Mix the yeast through the water thoroughly. Stir 
in flour to make a dough. Ejiead into a ball. Cut at 
right angles across the top half way through the ball 
and set in a sauce pan of luke warm water. Beat 
the rest of the flour, salt and butter and two of the 
eggs until smooth. Add the other two ^gs, one at a 
time^ and beat Then add the light ball of sponge 
and again beat until smooth. Turn into well but- 
tered timble molds. When nearly double in bulk 
bake twenty minutes. 

Boil one cup of sugar and a half cup of water 
until a thick syrup. A(|d half cup rum. Turn the 
hot syrup over the hot cakes. These are best when 
warm but may be served cold. 

MAR6UERITSS. 

Make a boiled icing. Stir into it six marshmal- 
lows broken in pieces. A tablespoonful of ground 
cocoanut. One cup walnut meats chopped flne. Tea- 
spoonful vanilla. Spread on crackers. Brown in the 
oven. Serve hot or cold. 



328 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

BNGLISH WAR CAKE. 



1 cup brown sugar. 
Spices. 



1 cup hot water. 
1^ cups raisins. 
% cup lard. 

Boil altogether three minutes. Cool. Then add 
one teaspoonful soda and two cups of flour, sifted 
with one teaspoonful baking powder. Bake in round 
pan. 

CANADIAN WAR CAK£. 

Two cups of brown sugar and two tablespoonfuls 
of lard are put in a sauce pan with two cups of hot 
water. One teaspoonful salt. One teaspoonful cin- 
namon. Package of seeded raisins. 

Boil altogether five minutes. Then cool. Add 
three cups of sifted flour with one teaspoonful baking 
powder and one tablespoonful hot water. 



FILLINGS FOR LAYER CAKE. 329 



FILLINGS FOR LAYER CAKE^ 



CHOCOLATE FILLING. 



ly^ cups granulated sugar. 

l^ cup cream. 

1 tablespoonful of butter. 



Speck of salt. 

Square of Baker's chocolate. 



Cut the chocolate in small pieces; put all on to- 
gether to cook. Try it in cold water ; when it reaches 
the soft ball stage remove from the fire. When cool, 
beat until a thick cream ; spread on the cake. Do not 
stir the filling after it begins to boil. 



FIG FILLING. 



Vs lb. of figs. 
l^ cup sugar. 



Juice of half a lemon. 
2 tablespoonfuls of sherry. 



Chop the figs fine, boil till tender, then add the 
sugar and lemon juice. Cook till smooth. Remove 
from the fire and add the sherry. 

CREAM FILLING. 

For Cream Cakes and Layer Cakes, — Scald one 
cup of milk, or part milk and cream. When scalded, 
add one ^g beaten with one-fourth cup of sugar, two 
tablespoonfuls of flour and a speck of salt. Beat all 
together with a Dover beater; stir into the milk. 
Cook ten minutes and flavor. 

FIG CARAMEL ICING. 



1 cup of brown sugar. 
^ cup of cream. 



1 tablespoonful butter. 
Speck of salt. 



380 ROCKY MOUNXAIH COOK BOOK. 

Boil all together until it will form a soft ball when 
tried in cold water. Eemove from the stove. When 
cool, add one-half cup of figs chopped fine; beat till 
cool enough to spread. Dates or cooked prunes can 
be used in the same way. 

PRUNE WHIP FILLING. 

Bake sponge cake in layers. Whip a cup of cream, 
sweeten with powdered sugar. Cut up cooked prunes 
to make one-half cup ; add to the cream. 

MARSHMALLOW ICING AND FILLING. 

Make a boiled icing, using the white of two eggs 
instead of one; cut one-half pound of marshmallows 
in small pieces and melt in a double boiler with two 
tablespoonfuls of boiling water. When melted, stir 
into the boiled icing ; flavor with vanilla and spread. 
Use for a filling or icing. 

LEMON OR ORANGE FILLING. 

Mix the juice and grated rind of one lemon with 
one cup of sugar and the beaten yolks of two eggs 
and two tablespoonfuls of milk, a speck of salt. Cook 
in a double boiler, stirring constantly until it thick- 
ens. Spread when cold. To make orange filling, use 
the grated rind and juice of one orange and two tea- 
spoonfuls of lemon juice. Make the same as lemon 

filling. 

BANANA FILLING. 

Make a boiled icing. When it is thick enough to 
spread, stir into it one-half cup of bananas cut in 
thin^ small pieces. 



FILLINOS FOR LAYBR CAK£. 831 

PINEAPPLE FILLING. 

Add one-half cup of grated pineapple to boiled 
icing when it is ready to spread. 

NUT FILLING. 

Add one-half cup of any kind of nuts (chopped 
fine) to boiled icing when thick enough to spread, or 
nuts may be added to a lemon or orange filling. 

ORANGE COCOANUT FILLING. 

Put in a cup the grated rind, one-half orange, and 
the juice of a whole one. Tablespoonful lemon juice. 
Fill the cup up with water. Add one tablespoonful 
com starch mixed with a little water. Cook until it 
thickens over hot wat^r. Stir into the mixture the 
yolk of one egg beaten with two heaping tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar and one of butter. Cup of grated 
cocoanut. 



332 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



ICINGS FOR CAKES. 



PLAIN ICING. 



White of one egg, 
I teaspoonful of lemon 
juice. 



About one cup of powdered 
sugar. 



Stir the sugar in the white of egg without first 
beating the white; flavor with the lemon or any fla- 
voring you prefer. 

ORANGE ICING. 

Juice of half an orange, one-half teaspoonful of 
lemon juice, powdered sugar; stir enough powdered 
sugar into the juice to spread a thin icing. 

CONFECTIONERS' FROSTING. 

To two tablespoonfuls of boiling water or boiling 
fruit juice and one teaspoonful of lemon juice, add 
enough confectioners' sugar to spread. 

BOILED ICING. 



1 cup granulated sugar. 
y^ cup of boiling water. 
White of one egg. 



^ teaspoonful of cream of 
tartar. 



Boil the sugar and water without stirring until 
the syrup threads; beat the egg stiff, add the cream 
of tartar and pour the boiling syrup over the egg in 
a fine stream, beating all the while. When it is thick 
enough to spread, put it on the cake. 



ICINGS FOS CAKES. 333 

ROYAL ICING. 

This icing is thickened largely by the beating. 
Beat the white of one egg and a tablespoonful of con- 
fectioners' sugar vigorously for two minutes ; add the 
sugar by the tablespoonful, beating after each one for 
some time. Keep on adding the sugar and beating 
till the mixture begins to sugar on the spoon, and a 
knife will make a clean cut through it. Add a few 
drops of lemon juice at a time until a tablespoonful 
has been used. 

YELLOW FROSTING. 

Beat the yolks of two eggs till light colored, then 
stir in powdered sugar till stiff enough to spread. 
Flavor with lemon, vanilla or wine. 

MOCHA FROSTING. 

Wash one cup of butter in cold water to free from 
the salt, pat to remove the water and beat to a cream. 
Beat in the yolk of an egg, then gradually one and 
one-half cups powdered sugar, add strong coifee to 
give the desired flavor. It should be like strong cof- 
fee and cream. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 

Stir into boiled icing a square of melted choco- 
late; add it to the icing before it is thick enough to 
spread. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING (NO. a). 



1 cup granulated sugar. 
% cup of cream. 
1 square of scraped choco- 
late. 



% teaspoonful of salt. 
Speck of cinnamon bark — 
Cook with it if cared for. 



% 



834 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

One-half cup of milk and one tablespoonful of 
butter may be used in place of the cream. Cook all 
together without stirring till it will fly a fine thread 
when tried. Eemove from the fire. When cold, beat 
to a thick cream; flavor with vanilla (if the cinna- 
mon is not used). Eemove the cinnamon before start- 
ing to beat it 

NUT ICING. 

Stir into a boiled or plain icing one-half cup of 
any kind of nuts you prefer. Chop the nuts fine. 

BANANA ICING OR FILLING. 

Add to a boiled icing one-half cup of bananas cut 
in fine pieces; flavor with one teaspoonful of lemon 
juice. 

PINK ICING. 

Color the plain or boiled icing with a little of the 
pink vegetable coloring. 

CARAMEL ICING. 



1 cup of brown sugar. 
14 cup of cream or milk. 



If milk is used, add one 
tableapoonf ul of butter 
with it. 

^ teaspoonful of salt. 



Boil without stirring till the mixture threads. 
Remove from the fire and when cool beat to a cream 
and spread over the cake. 

MAPLE ICING. 

Boil the maple until a thick syrup, then add one- 
fourth cup of cream and a little salt; boil till it 
threads. Make the same as caramel icing. 



QIHGBKBSSAl), DO06HNDI8, ETC. 335 

GINGERBREAD, DOUGHNUTS, COOK- 
ES AND CREAM PUFFS. 

All measurementa level, with the exception of baking 
powder, which la measured rounding- with the side of tho can. 
Sift flour before meBHurlng. 



SOFT GIHGBSBSEAD. 



^ cup molSBses. 
^ cup milk. 

^ cup melted butter. 



^ tettapoonful eacli of < 

najQon and ginger. 
y^ teaspoonful salt. 
Vi teaspoonful of soda. 
i'/g cups flow:. 



Sift the dry materials all tc^ther; mix with the 
others. Bate about one-half hour. If sour milk is 
used, take one teaspoonful of soda ; if heavy sour 
cream, omit the butter, 

SUGAK QIHGBRBBEAD. 

^ cup of butter, I 2 teagpoonfulB ginger. 
1 cup of Bugar. ^ teaspoonful salt. 

1 egg. 1 teaBpoonful of baking 

Vt cup of milk. I powder. 

Mix stiff enough with flour to roll out. Bake in a 
sheet ; mark off the top in diamond shapes. 

SOFT GIHGBK COOKIES. 

Put one teaspoonful of ginger and soda in a mix- 
ing bowl. Heat one cup of molasses and put in tlie 
bowl. Scald half a cup of buttermilk, add to the 
molasses; stir in sifted flour enough to form i " 
dough, then half a cup of softened butter, 
thoroughly; roll out, cut into cakes. Bake in a 
erate oven. Do not change lke order of mixin 



33e ROCKY MOUNTAUr COOK BOOK. 

HAfiD MOLASSES COOKIES. 



1 cup molasses. 
1 cup of butter. 
1 teaspoonful of soda. 



1 tablespoonful of ^nger. 
% teaspoonful of salt 



Heat the molasses and butter together until the 
butter is melted. When cool, add one teaspoonful of 
soda and the flour and salt. Use enough flour to roll 
out, but not more than is necessary. 



GINGER SNAPS. 



1 cup molasses. 
l^ cup sugar. 

2 teaspoonfuls of ginger. 



1 teaspoonful of soda. 
% cup softened butter. 
Flour enough to roll very 
thin. 



Heat the molasses, pour it over the sugar, then 
add to it the rest of the materials. Bake quickly. 



FILLED COOKIES. 



1 cup sugar. 

Vs cup of butter and 

lard together. 
1 egg. 



% cup sweet milk, in which 

dissolve one teaspoonful 

of soda. 
3^ cups of flour sifted with 

two teaspoonfuls cream 

tartar. « 

1 teaspoonful vanilla, salt. 



Cream, butter and sugar. Add beaten ^g, milk, 
flour and flavoring. Roll very thin, cut, and place on 
each cookie one teaspoonlul of the following filling. 
Place another cookie on top of the fiUijfg and bake. 



FILLING. 



Put in a sauce pan one cup of chopped raisins 
and nuts, one-half cup sugar, one-half cup water, one 
tablespoonful of flour blended with a little lemon 
juice and water. Cook imtil thick. 



GIN6BRBRBAD, DOUGHNUTS, ETC. 



337 



DOUGHNUTS. 



1 cup sugar. 

1 cup milk. 

2 eggs. 

1 tablespoonful melted 
butter. 



1 teaspoonful salt. 

2 teaspoonfuls baking 

powder. 



Flavor with cinnamon, nutmeg or vanilla. Use 
only as much flour as is necessary to roll out. Cook 
in hot, deep fat four to six at a time. Roll out only 
a part of the dough at a time. 



SOUR MILE DOUGHNUTS. 



1 cup sour milk. 

1 cup sour cream. 

2 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. 



1 level teaspoonful soda. 
1 level teaspoonful baking 
powder. 



Flour enough to roll. About six or s^ven cups. 
Flavor with nutmeg, cinnamon or vanilla. 



RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 



2 cups raised bread dough. 
% cup sugar. 
2 eggs. 



1 tablespoonful melted 
butter. 



Spice to taste. Flour enough to roll. Mix the 
ingredients well into the dough. Cut out and fry at 
once. 



CREAM PUFFS AND ECLAIRS. 



3 eggs. 
Speck salt. 



% cup of butter. 
1 cup boiling water. 
1 cup flour. 

Put the butter and water in a 8auc5epan. "When 
the butter is melted and the water boiling, stir in the 
flour and salt all at once. Stir quickly until the mix- 



338 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

ture is quite firm (a minute or two), remove from 
the fire. When cool, beat in the e^s one at a time, 
until the mixture is light and smooth. Drop in table- 
spoonfuls a little distance apart on buttered tins. 
Bake in quite a hot oven, for thirty minutes. Split; 
when cool, fill with a whipped or made cream. 

Eclmrs. — ^Make the same as for cream puffs. 
Bake in strips four inches long and one wide. When 
cool, fill with cream. Cover with chocolate or any 
frosting you care to use. 

CREAM FOR CREAM PUFFS AND ECLAIRS. 



Yg cup sugar. 

1 teaspoonful butter. 

Speck of salt. 



2 cups milk scalded in 

double boiler. 
4 tablespoonfuls flour. 
2 eggs. 

Mix the salt, sugar and flour together, wet with 
a little cold milk; stir into the hot milk; cook ten 
minutes, then add the beaten egg; cook five minutes. 
Remove from the fire ; flavor to taste. When cool, use 
for the filling. 

MERINGUES OR KISSES. 

Beat the whites of four eggs till stiff and flaky. 
Beat into them gradually one cup of powdered sugar. 
When it has become thick drop in tablespoonfuls on 
buttered paper placed on a board. Bake slowly in 
a warm oven for half an hour, or until they feel hard 
and hollow to the touch. When cool, remove the soft 
part, fill with ice cream, sherbet or whipped and fia- 
vored cream ; put two together. Place on the paper 
in oblong shape, for meringues ; for kisses, drop from 
a teaspoon in any shape. 



COMPOTES, PRESERVING, ETC. 339 

COMPOTES, PRESERVING, JELLIES 

AND PICKLES. 



COMPOTES OF APPLES, PEARS, PEACHES AND 

APRICOTS. 

Pare, core or stone the fruit, cut in quarters or 
halves, according to the size of the fruit. Make a 
syrup of one-half as much water as sugar. When the 
syrup is quite thick, put in the fruit and cook until 
tender. Do not use over-ripe fruits — ^rather a little 
under-ripe. Then remove from the syrup with a 
skimmer, lay carefully on a serving dish in a circle, 
or letting each piece overlap the other. Boil the 
syrup down tiU thick; pour over the fruit. Serve 
cold. Compotes are very delicious when used to sur- 
round moulds of rice or cornstarch, decorated with 
whipped cream. 

BAKED APPLES. 

Core and pare sour apples ; put in a shallow agate 
or earthen dish, fill the cavities with sugar, chopped 
nuts, chopped dates, or figs. In place of the sugar 
maple syrup can be used. When nuts or fruit are 
used to fill them, use sugar or syrup, too. Add water 
to cover the bottom of the dish. Cook in a quick 
oven till tender. Remove carefully on the serving 
dish. Let the syrup cook down until quite thick. 
Pour over the fruit. A little mound of whipped 
cream can be served on each apple. Pears and 
quinces can be baked in the same way. A little 
lemon juice or some of the grated rind can be used for 
flavoring. 



340 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

BAKED PEACHES. 

Semove stones and fill the space with a paste of 
sugar, butter and (»nnamon. Bake slowly, basting 
with a syrup of lemon juice and sugar. When tender 
cover with meringue. Brown and serve hot or cold. 

STEWED RHUBARB. 

Wash, and if the rhubarb is a little tough, peel, 
cut in inch pieces. Cook till tender in a granite 
saucepan. Use one cup sugar to two of the fruit, 
and enough water to well cover the bottom of the dish. 

STEWED PRUNES. 

Wash very carefully, soak in cold water for two 
hours. If they seem soft and fresh, do not soak them. 
Put in porcelain kettle with boiling water to cover. 
Boil until tender, then add a tablespoonful of sugar to 
every cup of prunes. Boil ten minutes longer. 
Lemon juice may be added. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE AND JELLY (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Put three pints of washed cranberries in a granite 
sauce pan. On top of them put three cups of sugar 
and three gills of water. After they begin to boil, 
cook them ten minutes, closely covered and do not 
stir them. To make the jelly, add equal quantities 
of sugar and cranberries. 

FIRM CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Pick over, wash and measure the cranberries* 
Add to them half their amount of hot water. Cover 
and cook until soft. Do not add more water. Mash 
through a strainer. Add to the pulp the same amount 



COMPOTES, PRESBRVIN6, ETC. 341 

of sugar as water. Stir well together and put at 
once into the mold. This does not require more 
cooking. 

WHITE GRAPE FRUIT COCKTAIL. 

Eemove the skins from white grapes and cut in 
halves and remove the seeds. Chill and place in cock- 
tail glasses. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and sher- 
ry wine or orange juice. Place a brandied cherry on 
top. Serve as a first course at luncheon. Pieces of 
pineapple, orange or grapefruit may be mixed with 
the grapes if desired. 

BLUSHING APPLE. 

Select bright red apples. Peel all but a band 
around the center. Core. Boil the apples and skins 
together with a little sugar. When the fruit is tender 
remove carefully from the water and place on a serv- 
ing dish. Drain out the skins. Add more sugar to 
the syrup and cook until thick. If not as red as de- 
sired add a little red vegetable coloring. Pour over 
the apples. 



PRESERVING* 

Select the best of fruits. Have them ripe and 
fresh. The cans should be carefully washed and 
filled up with hot water. Wash the covers and put in 
hot water. Use new rubbers every year to prevent 
any air reaching the fruit. 

PEACHES AND APRICOTS. 

Peel the peaches by placing in a wire basket and 
plunging into boiling water, then the skins will slip 



342 ROCKY MOUNTAIK COOK BOOK. 

easily. Halve them or leave them whole. Use a few 
of the pits — ^they improve the flavor. Weigh the 
fruit and use three-fourths or one-half (just as you 
prefer) as much sugar as you have fruit. Make 
syrup by adding half as much water as you have 
sugar. Cook down imtil quite thick (about as thick 
as molasses), then add the fruit. Cook until trans- 
parent; remove the scum as it forms. Skim the 
fruit from the syrup and fill the jars. If the syrup 
seems a little thin, cook down; pour into the jars, 
filling full to overflowing. Tightly screw on the cov- 
ers ; turn bottom side up, and as they cool, the covers 
can be tightened. 

BRANDIED PEACHES OR APRICOTS. 

Prepare and cook the peaches as above, leaving 
them whole. Fill jars with the fruit; to every pint 
jar of the peaches, add to it one-fourth cup of brandy. 
Cook the syrup down very thick, fill up the jars with 
it and seal. 

PRESERVED PLUMS. 

Prick the fruit with a fork in several places ; this 
prevents the skin from breaking somewhat, or they 
may be skinned the same as the peaches. Cook in 
the same way. 

BRANDIED PLUMS. 

Make the same as brandied peaches. 

PRESERVED QUINCES AND PEARS. 

Pare and quarter, removing the core; preserve 
the same as peaches. Pears are improved by cooking 
in the syrup a little of the yellow rind of oranges or 
lemons. 



COMPOTES, PRESERVING, ETC. 343 

PRESERVED PINEAPPLE. 

Pare and remove the eyes; use a silver fork to 
shred it, or cut in slices or inch pieces, not using the 
core. Preserve the same as peaches. 

GRAPES. 

Wash and press the pulp from each grape; boil 
the pulp till tender; press through a sieve to remove 
the seeds, add the pulp to the skins, measure, add 
two cups of sugar to every three cups of the fruit. 
Boil all together until quite thick and seal while hot 
like the other preserves. 

CITRON. 

Pare and core the citron, cut in cubes or in fancy 
shapes, or scallop the edges. Cook the same as 
peaches, tie a little ginger root in a piece of cheese 
cloth and cook in the syrup to flavor, or a little of the 
yellow rind of lemon. 

CHERRIES. 

Wash, remove the stones and preserve the same as 
peaches. 

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES, RASPBERRIES, BLACK- 
BERRIES, GOOSEBERRIES AND CURRANTS. 

Wash, remove from the stems and preserve the 
same as peaches. 

SXmSHINE STRAWBERRIES, RASPBERRIES, BLACK- 
BERRIES, GOOSEBERRIES AND CURRANTS. 

Select and hull three pounds of perfect fruit. 
Cook three pounds of fine granulated sugar and two 



344 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

cups of boiling water until a light thread is formed. 
Do not stir the sugar after it b^ns to boil. Cook 
the fruit in the syrup ten minutes. After it begins 
to boil, then pour out in platters and let stand in the 
sun for two days. Cover with cheese cloth. Put in 
the jars cold, have them fresh scalded. Berries are 
delicious done in this way ; they absorb the syrup, 
making them plump and full. 



CANNING. 



Prepare the fruit the same as for preserving. 
Canning differs from preserving only in the amount 
of sugar used, and often no sugar at all is used. The 
proportion of sugar used is one-fourth as much as 
fruit, and a pint of water to a pound of sugar in 
making the syrup. Another way of canning is to pack 
the fruit tightly in the jars, fill the jars with the 
syrup, place the jars in a kettle of hot water, resting 
the bottles on slats of wood or folded paper. Do not 
let them touch. Cover the boiler, let them cook till 
the fruit is tender. The fruit will shrink a little, so 
the jars will have to be filled up. It is well to re- 
serve a little syrup for this purpose. Place on the 
tops and seal at once. Another way is to cook them 
in their own juices. Fill the jars with the fruit, put 
on in the kettle with cold water to reach half way up 
the jars. Raise to the boiling point and cook until 
the fruit is tender. Let stand in the water till cold 
again. If the fruit has shrunken, fill up the jars, 
using the contents of one to do it. 

The fruit may be cooked without sugar and will 
keep as well by thoroughly cooking in a little water 
and sealing immediately. 



COMPOTES, PRESERVING, ETC. 346 

CANNING TOMATOES. 

Remove the skins by first dipping the tomatoes 
in boiling water. Cut in small pieces, reject the pith 
or any bad specks. Cook them until soft, without 
adding water, then put in the jars at once; have the 
jars hot and freshly scalded. 

STRINGED BEANS. 

Bemove the strings from the beans. Leave them 
whole or cut them in inch lengths if preferred. Wash 
in cold water. Then fill into sterilized jars. Set 
the filled jars into the steam cooker. Put lukewarm 
water into the cooker. Cover and let the jars heat 
gradually. Then fill each jar to overflowing with 
boiling water. Cover and let cook until the beans 
are tender enough to serve. Adjust the rubbers. Add 
salt, one teaspoonful to a quart. Set the lids in place 
and cook again for twenty minutes. Store in a dark 
place. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Use only the tender portions of freshly cut as- 
paragus. Wash carefully. Set the stalks head up in 
sterilized jars. Put lukewarm water in the cooker. 
Cover and when boiling adjust rubbers. Fill the jars 
with salt boiling water. Set the covers in place and 
cook about half an hour. Then tighten the covers. 
Cook about ten minutes longer. 

PEAS OR SHELLED BEANS. 

Shell the peas or beans when fresh. Wash and 
pack into jars shaking down meanwhile. Set the 
cans over lukewarm water on a rack. Put on the 



846 SOCKT MOUHTAIH COOK BOOK. 

covers and let stand until the water boils. Then fill 
each jar to overflowing with boiling salt water and 
cook until the vegetables are tender. Adjust the rub- 
bers and set the lids in place. Then cook ten min- 
utes. Semove and tighten the lids. 



J AXIS OR XXARMALADES. 

Use equal quantities of fruit and sugar. Pare, 
core and cut in small pieces the large fruits; the 
small ones wash and hull, place in the preserving ket- 
tle the fruit and sugar in layers. Let stand half an 
hour to extract the juice. Cook it slowly. When it 
becomes clear, put a little on a cold plate, if it hardens 
it is done; put in glasses or jars and cover. 

ORANGE MASMALADS. 

1 dozen oranges. t 3 lemons. 

4 grape fruit. | 

Slice the fruit very thin. Remove the seeds, 
weigh it, to every pound, or two cups, allow three 
cups of water; put in a crock and let stand twenty- 
four hours, then put on the fire and boil one-half 
hour. Return it to the crock and let remain another 
twenty-four hours, then measure. To every pint add 
two and one-fourth cups of sugar, then boil until it 
jellies slightly. This amount will make about twelve 
quarts. 

CANDIED ORANGE PEEL. 

Cut rind of orange in thin strips. Soak two days 
in cold water. Cover well with water and change 
fully ten times a day. Drain, put on the stove cov- 



COMPOTES, PRESBRYING, BTC. 347 

ered with cold water. Let come to a boil, then drain. 
Make a thick syrup, cook the straws in the syrup till 
it hairs, then remove from the syrup and roll in gran- 
ulated sugar. 

RHUBARB MARMALADB. 

One quart of red rhubarb cut in pieces. Four 
oranges, pulp and grated rind. One lemon, juice and 
rind. Three cups sugar. Cook all together until 
thick. 



To make clear jelly, select perfect fruit, wash it and 
put in a porcelain lined kettle with water enough to 
cover. Cook slowly till the fruit is tender, strain 
through a flannel bag, measure the juice, allow 
one cup less of sugar than you have of juice. 
Warm the sugar in the oven, but do not allow 
it to bum. Boil the juice twenty minutes, 
then add the hot sugar, stir until the sugar is dis- 
solved, skim thoroughly and cook about ten minutes, 
or until it jellies when a little is dropped on a cold 
plate. Turn at once in glasses, let remain to settle 
twenty-four hours, then cover the tops with melted 
paraffine. Over^ripe fruit will not jelly. 

CURRANT JBLLY. 

Wash the currants, pick off any that are not per- 
fect, but do not stem them. A few boxes of raspber- 
ries cooked with the currant gives a delicious flavor. 
Four boxes of raspberries to twenty-four boxes of cur- 
rants give a delicate flavor of the raspberries. Pro- 
ceed with making the jelly as directed above. 



34S SOCKY MOUITTAIH COOK BOOK. 

CRABAPPLE Ain> APPLE JSLLT. 

Wash) cut in quite small pieces, but do not pare. 
Barely cover with cold water, cook till soft, then 
strain. A little of the yellow of lemon or orange peel 
improves the flavor, cooked with the apples, or a little 
of the root ginger. 

QUIUCE JELLT. 

Make the same as apple jelly. 

GRAPE JELLY. 

Select under-ripe grapes ; the wild grapes give the 
best flavor. Wash them, add a quart of cold water 
to twelve boxes of grapes, cook until they are tender 
and well broken apart and proceed the same as di- 
rected. 

PLUM JELLT. 

Make the same as grape jelly, using the wild 
plums if convenient. 



PICKLES. 

TO SWEET-PICKLE FRUIT AND BERRIES (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Eight pounds of fruit, four pounds of best brown 
sugar, one quart of best vinegar, one cup of mixed 
whole spices, stick cinnamon, cassia buds, allspice and 
cloves, less of the latter than of the former. Tie the 
spices in a bag and boil with the vinegar and sugar. 
Skim well, then add the fruit. Cook till the fruit is 
clear. Remove carefully from the syrup and put in a 
jar or a crock, Boil the syrup down nice and thick 
«iid pour over the fruit. Seal. 



COMPOTBS, PRBSERVINO, £TC. 349 

PEACHES. 

Scald to remove the skins, leave them whole, cook 
without breaking. Do not stick with cloves. 

PEARS. 
Pare them, leave them whole with the stem on. 

CUCUMBERS, WATERMELON AND CANTALOUPE. 

Pare them, remove the soft part from inside, cut 
in pieces to serve. Cook in boiling water for ten 
minutes, drain and cook in the hot syrup till clear 
and tender. 

PINEAPPLE. 

Pare, remove the eyes, cut in serving pieces or 
slices and cook in the syrup till clear. 

CURRANTS, GRAPES AND ALL BERRIES. 

Remove from the stems, wash and cook in the 
syrup until they form the consistency of jam. . Pre- 
pare the grapes for the syrup, as given for preserving. 

PICKLED WALNUTS (Boston Cooking School). 

Take the walnuts when they are well filled put 
and tender, pierce each one with a strong needle three 
or four times and lay them in a brine which com- 
pletely dissolves its salts, changing for fresh every 
day for nine days, then spread the nuts in the air 
until they become black. Put them in crocks and 
pour over them this mixture, boiling hot: A gallon 
of vinegar, an ounce each of ginger root, allspice, 
mace and whole cloves, and two ounces of pepper- 
corns, boil all together for ten minutes. Cover, press- 



350 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

ing the nuts under the vinegar with a plate. Let 
them stand six weeks before using. 

APPLE CHUTNST (Boston Cooking School). 

Pare and core a dozen sour apples, peel a mild 
onion and seed one cup of raisins, chop the apples, 
onions, raisins and three green peppers very fine, add 
one pint of cider vinegar, half a cup of currant jelly 
and let simmer an hour. Then add two cups of su- 
gar, the juice of four lemons, one tablespoonful of 
ground ginger and a tablespoonful of salt, and cook 
another hour, stirring almost constantly. Store as 
canned fruit. 

GINGER APPLE. 

Five pounds of sour apples chopped fine, three 
pounds hrovm. sugar, one ounce ground white ginger 
root, one cup of water. Cook slowly three or four 
hours or till transparent 

UNCOOKED PICKLES. 

Use medium-sized pickles, out in slices one-fourth 
inch thick; pack them in quart jars, with three me- 
dium-sized onions sliced very thin, and one hot red 
pepper to each jar ; add one tablespoonful of salt and. 
fill up with water. Add one-half teaspoonful of pul- 
verized alum. Let stand over night, then drain oflj 
the water and rinse. Fill the jars full of the pickles, 
and add two tablespoonfuls of olive oil and fill with a 
good, sharp vinegar. Seal. 

PICKLED CUCUlfBERS. 

Make a brine of one pint of coarse salt and six 
quarts of boiling water, boil and skim clear, wash 



 ^' 



-•*' 



COMPOTES, PRESERVING, ETC. 851 

one hundred and fifty small cucumbers, put in the 
brine and let remain forty-eight hours, covered, then 
drain. Soak in cold water for two hours, drain and 
put them in a crock. Stick one large onion full of 
cloves, an ounce of horseradish root and several lit- 
tle red peppers, and put with the cucumbers and a 
piece of alum the size of a pea. Fill a muslin bag 
with one cup of mixed spices, celery seed, white mus- 
tard seed, whole cloves, allspice, peppercorns, stick 
cinnamon, boil this in vinegar enough to cover the 
cucumbers for ten minutes. Put the bag in the crock 
with the vinegar, pour off the vinegar the third day, 
reheat it and return to the pickles. Do not use for 
three weeks. 

MIXED PICKLES. 

Anything that you wish to use can be added to the 
cucumbers in the brine — ^pieces of cauliflower, small 
onions, nasturtium seeds, watermelon, beans. All 
make good pickles. 

CUCUMBER AND ONION PICKLES. 

Four hundred small cucumbers. Two poimds of 
pickling onions. Spices. Soak cucumbers in salt 
brine over night. Drain. Einse well with cold water 
and dry in a towel. Place in an earthen crock lay- 
e« of cucumbers and onions and spices. Then cover 
with boiling hot vinegar. These will be crisp and 
ready for use after three weeks. 

MUSTARD PICKLES. 

Equal quantities of small cucumbers, button 
onions, cauliflower picked apart, sliced green toma- 
toes and two or three sliced green peppers. Soak in 

IS 



S52 SOCXT MOUHTAnr COOK BOOK. 

the brine and drain^ as given in Pickle Cucumbers, 
Prepare enough of the following mixture to cover: 
To one quart of vinegar, use one cup of brown sugar, 
one-half cup of flour and one-half cup of ground mus- 
tard. Boil the sugar and vin^ar for five minutes, 
skim, mix the mustard and flour together, pour the 
hot vinegar slowly onto it, stirring until smooth. Pour 
hot over the pickles. They will be ready to use in 
three weeks. 

DILL PICKLBS. 

Fill a quart jar with pickles about &e size of a 
finger. Between the pickles put in a piece of dill or 
more if desired. When the jar is full add a level 
tablespoonful of salt. Pour in cold water. Put dill 
on top and seal air tight. Place the jars in the sun 
each day until the water is cloudy. When the water 
looks clear again the pickles are ready for use. A 
few whole peppers may be added. 

PICCALILLI OR CHOW-CHOW. 



8 lbs. of green tomatoes. 

1 cup of salt. 

2 cups brown sugar. 
8 small onions. 

2 heads of celery. 
1 teaspoonful of white 
pepper. 



1 tablespoonful whole eiiuiA- 

mon, broken up. 
1 tablespoonful of whole aU- 

spice. 

1 tablespoonful mustard 

seed. 

2 quarts best vinegar. 



Chop or slice the tomatoes, sprinkle the salt over 
them and let stand over night, in the morning drain 
off the water and chop the onion and celery, place all 
in a porcelain lined kettle, sprinkle with sugar, tie the 
spices in a bag, add those and the vinegar, cook slowly 
all day. Put in jars or earthen crock. 



■-€ 



COMPOTBS, PSBSERVUrG, ETC. 85S 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Make the same as the chow-chow, only using ripe 
tomatoes and chop them quite fine. To eight pounds 
of the tomatoes use one pound of onions chopped fine. 
Salt over night and proceed the same as the above 
receipt. 

TOlfATO CATSUP (Mrs. CampbeU.) 

Boil one bushel of ripe tomatoes, skins and all. 
When soft, mash through a colander to remove the 
skins and seeds. Mix one cup of salt, two pounds of 
brown sugar, half an ounce of cayenne pepper, three 
ounces each of ground allspice, mace and celery seed, 
two ounces of ground cinnamon, tie in a muslin bag, 
add to the tomato two quarts of best vinegar. Cook 
slowly till reduced to one-half. It is an improvement 
to add a cup of brandy a few minutes before it is 
done. Put in small bottles, seal, keep in a cool place. 

WATERMELON PICKLE. 

Cut rind in inch pieces, and soak in a weak brine 
over night. In the morning rinse well and drop in 
strong boiling alum water. (One tablespoonful of 
powdered alum to two quarts of water). Let stand 
fifteen minutes. Then drop in ice water. Let re- 
main until cold. Make a syrup of cup of sugar and 
one quart of water. When boiling drop melon in and 
simmer six to eight hours. Pour off this syrup and 
drop the melon into a syrup made of two cups of 
vinegar and six cups of sugar. Add spices tied in a 
cheese doth. Let boil thoroughly and remain over 
night in the syrup. Next morning fill the jars full 
of the melon boiling down the syrup and pour into 
the jars. Seal. 



$64 ROCKY MOUHTAIN COOK BOOK. 

CONFITUSE. 

6 boxes of cherries. I 5 oranges. 

5 lbs. sugar. | 2 lbs. raisins. 

Grate rind of half the oranges ; peel the rest and 
slice in thin pieces ; cdiop raisins ; stone cherries ; first 
add the sugar and let remain until the other things 
are prepared, then mix together and boil hard thirty 
minutes. 



CANDIES. 855 



CANDffiS- 



FONDANT. 

Fondant is the basis of all French cream candies 
and can be kept any length of time, if air tight and in 
a oool place. A great variety of bonbons and choco- 
lates can be made from it by using different flavor- 
ings, nuts and fruits, and also makes a delicious icing 
for small and larsje cakes. White grapes and straw- 
berries with the hulls on dipped in the fondant makes 
a delicious bonbon. 

To Make Mints. — ^When the fondant is rather a 
thin cream, flavor with mint, drop on buttered slab 
or rice paper from a teaspoon. 

VEGETABLE COLORING. 

The vegetable colorings are perfectly harmless; 
use only a small quantity, as a little will color a large 
amount of fondant. 



TO MAKE FONDANT. 



2 cups of sugar. 
^ cup of water. 



Vs teaspoonful of cream of 
tartar. 



Do not stir after it begins to boil ; let it cook until 
it reaches the soft ball stage; the thermometer regis- 
ters at that stage 236'' — 238°, or try a little in cold 
water, and if it forms a soft ball in the fingers, it is 
done, and must be removed at once. Let it cool until 
it forms a crust; if stirred while too warm it will 
grain. Stir until it becomes thick and creamy. If it 



356 KOCKT MOimXAIN COOK BOOK. 

becomes grainyy cook again \dth a little cool water. 
Various candies can now be made by using the differ- 
ent flavorings, nuts and fruits. Fondant is used for 
creaming nuts, figs and dates. 

COATING FOK CHOCOLATE. 

Place equal quantities of fondant and cbocolate 
with a few drops of vanilla, over hot water, stirring 
constantly until melted. Dip, place on rice paper, 
allow to harden. If the chocolate gets thick, add a 
few drops of hot water, also place the dish that holds 
the chocolate in warm water while dipping to keep 
from hardening. 

GLAC:^ ORANGES, GRAPES, NUTS, ETC. 
2 cups sugar. | V& cup water. 

Boil together without stirring, until the thermom- 
eter roisters 340°, or until the syrup crackles and 
breaks when a little is put in cold water. Remove 
from the fire, drop the pieces into the syrup one at a 
time with a candy wire, or two forks, place on an 
oiled slab or rice paper to dry. 

To glace oranges, divide the sections carefully, 
allow them to dry several hours before dipping. To 
glacS grapes, wipe the grapes dry and leave the little 
stem on to prevent them from getting moist. 

CHOCOLATE FUDGE. 



2 cups fine granulated 

sugar. 
y^ cup cream. 



2 squares of Baker's choco- 
late or 2 tablespoonf uls 
of cocoa. 

2 tablespoonf uls of butter. 

Speck of salt 



CANDIES. 857 

Stir until the ingredients are melted, but not after 
it begins to boil. Cook until it forms the soft-ball 
stage when tried in cold water. Remove from the 
fire. When cool, stir until thick and creamy, pour 
into a pan and when cold cut in squares. One-half 
cup of chopped nuts can be added just before taking 
from the fire. 

MAPLR FUDGE. 



2 cups thick maple syrup. 
y^ cup of cream. 



2 tablespoonfuls butter. 
Speck of salt. 



Make the same as chocolate fudge. If the syrup 
is not very thick, cook down before putting in the 
other ingredients. 



PANOCHA. 



Speck salt. 

y^ cup chopped walnuts. 



2 cups brown sugar. 

^ cup cream. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter. 

Make the same as fudge, add the nuts just before 
removing from the fire. 

OPERA CARAMELS. 



3 cups fine white R?>^ar. 
1 cup of cream. 



^ teaspoonful of cream of 
tartar (scant). 



Boil together until it reaches the soft-ball stage. 
When cool, flavor, add one-half cup of any chopped 
nuts, or fruits, or a mixture of both. Stir to a thick 
cream, then turn into a buttered dish to the depth of 
half an inch. When cold cut in little squares. 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 



y^ cup white sugar. 2 squares Baker's chocolate. 

Vi cup brown sugar. 
y^ oup molasses. 



% cup of cream or milk. 



358 KOCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

If milk is used, add two tablespoonfuls of butter. 
Stir the mixture constantly while cooking. When it 
snaps and cracks tried in cold water, remove from 
the fire, pour in buttered pans, add chopped nuts be- 
fore removing from the fire, if desired. 

BUTTKR SCOTCH 

2 cups sugar. I ^ cup butter. 

^ oup cream. | 

Cook all together until it snaps when tried in cold 
water. Pour in buttered pans, cut in little squares 
before quite cold. 

PEANUT CANDY. 

Fill a tin one-half inch deep with the nuts. Cook 
sugar with a little water until it crackles when tried 
in cold water, pour over the nuts. 



VINEGAR CANDT 



2 cups sugar. 
% cup water. 



3 tablespoonfuls vinegar. 

4 tablespoonfuls buttw. 



Cook all together until it hardens when tried in 
cold water. Pour in a buttered pan. When cool 
enough to handle pull until it is white and creamy 
looking, cut in squares or sticks. 

MOLASSES CANDT. 

2 cups molasses. ^ cup of butter. 

1 cup of white or brown 
sugar. 

Cook until it hardens when tried in cold water. 
Pour in buttered pans. When cool enough to handle 
pull till light colored. Cut in sticks. One cup of 
chopped nuts may be added just as you take it from 
the stove. 



BBVESA6BS. 359 



BEVERAGES. 



To make good, bright-tasting tea and coffee, the 
water should be freshly boiled. Water that has been 
boiled for some time loses its life and gives a dull 
taste to drinks. Before making tea or coffee, scald 
the pot. 

TEA. 

Put the tea in a strainer and wash with cold 
water, then put in the scalded pot and pour on the 
freshly boiled water, let remain on the back of the 
stove for five minutes, then pour the tea from the 
leaves into a hot pot and serve, often the tea is left 
to remain on the leaves, it then soon becomes bitter. 
The proportion used depends upon the strength re- 
quired, and the kind of tea used. Tea is considered 
by some to be better if made very strong and diluted 
vdth boiling water. When a quantity of tea is to be 
made, as for a reception, tie the tea in muslin bags, 
put the bag in the boiling water, let remain for five 
minutes, then remove. 

Tea Ball. — The boiling water is poured from the 
samovar into the cup, the ball is placed in the cup, 
removed when the right color is attained. 

BuLSsian Tea. — ^Is made by adding sugar and a 
thin slice of lemon to each cup. 

Tea Punch. — ^Is made by first soaking the sugar 
in rum or brandy and adding the lemon. 



300 ROCKT MOUHTAIN COOK BOOK. 

Iced Tea. — ^Make the tea several hours before 

using. When cool, put on ice. If not cold enough 

when wishing to serve, put cracked ice in each glass, 

one tablespoonful lemon juice, sugar to taste, added 

when hot 

COFFEB. 

To Make Coffee. 

Oftentimes the coffee leaves its flavor in the 
kitchen by too long a cooking. There are now 
many reliable coffee cookers that can be used on the 
table. Coffee made in this way is preferable, as it is 
served as soon as mada The coffee pot should be 
kept scrupulously clean and aired. Great care should 
be taken to have the spout free from grains. Coffee 
will go much farther if finely ground, and should 
always be freshly made. 

BOILED COFFEE. 

The white of one egg is sufficient to clear one cup 
of ground coffee. Use one level tablespoonful of cof- 
fee for every cup. Mix the coffee in a bowl with the 
white of egg and a very little cold water (one-fourth 
cup to a cup of ground coffee), put into the scalded 
\ pot and pour on the boiling water ; let boil three min- 
utes. Remove to the back of the stove, add two table- 
spoonfuls of cold water, let settle for ten minutes, 
pour the coffee from the groimds and send to the 
table. If stronger coffee is required, increase the 
proportion of coffee. 

DRIP COFFEE. 

Use one rounding tablespoonful of coffee to a cup, 
put the coffee in a flannel bag, lay on the strainer and 



BBVBRA6SS. 861 

pour the boiling water over it. Have the pot hot to 
b^n with and stand in a pan of hot water while 
dripping. 

BREAKFAST COFFEE (Mrs. T. L. Watson). 

This is to be mixed the night before. Mix six 
tablespoonfuls of coffee with the white of an egg (or 
smaller quantity if you like). Put into a small cov- 
ered earthen dish, pour over it two cups of cold water, 
cover tightly, a preserve jar would do, and the next 
morning put into the coffee pot, pour the boiling water 
over it, using a cup to every tablespoonf ul, let it boil 
tip just once, pour into it half a cup of cold water, let 
settle a few minutes before serving. This can be 
made for after-dinner coffee by preparing in the morn- 
ing. 

TURKISH COFFEE. 

Have the coffee very finely ground, using a table- 
spoonful to a cup, put in a pot, add cold water. 
When it touches the boiling point it is ready to serve. 
The Turk does not use cream or sugar. 

BLACK COFFEE. 

Is made by any of the above receipts, using about 
double the proportion of coffee. 

ICED COFFEE. 

Iced coffee is served in glasses. Add cream and 
sugar to the coffee and chill on the ice several hours 
before serving. 



362 ROCKT MOXni TAIN COOK BOOK. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Scald two cups of milk in double boiler, then add 
to it one square of Baker's chocolate that has been 
broken up in pieces, two tablespoonfuls of sugar and 
a pinch of salt. When the chocolate has dissolved, 
add a few drops of vanilla if you like. Beat with a 
Dover egg beater for a few minutes and serve at once> 
Put a teaspoonf ul of whipped cream in the cup before 
pouring in the chocolate. 

MAILLARD'S CHOCOLATE. 

For each cup of chocolate use one cupful of milk 
and one bar of chocolate. Put the milk in a sauce 
pan, porcelain-lined, break the chocolate in small 
pieces, add to the milk, stir constantly with a wooden 
spoon until the chocolate is dissolved, and the milk 
has boiled up once. Add more hot milk if too rich. 
Beat vigorously. Serve at once. 

COCOA. 

Dissolve one tablespoonful of cocoa in two of 
water. Add to two cups of boiling milk, let boil up 
once. Sweeten to taste, beat well and serve. 

SHELLS. 

Steep one cup of shells in one quart of boiling 
water three hours, adding more water as it boils 
away. Strain, serve with cream and sugar. 

LEMONADE. 

Allow the juice of two lemons to three glasses of 
lemonade. Sweeten with sugar, or better still, sugar 



BBVBRA6BS. 863 

syrup. Add the water and cracked ice, put a thin 
slice of lemon in each glass. 

ORANGEADE. 

To the juice of two oranges add the juice of a 
half of a lemon. Sweeten, add water and ice, half 
a thin slice of orange for each glass. 

EGG LEMONADE. 

Beat an e^ thoroughly, beat in four tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar and the juice of two lemons, three cups 
of water, two tablespoonfuls of maraschino, if liked, 
ice and serve. 

SUMMER DRINK. 



4 quarts of lemonade. 
1 pint of pineapple juice. 
1 pint of strawberry or 
raspberry juice. 



A few thin slices of lemon 
and a few of the ber- 
ries. 



FRXnX PUNCH. 

Boil a grated pineapple, four cups of sugar and 
four cups of water twenty minutes, add one cup of 
strong tea, then strain. When cold, add the juice of 
five lemons, six oranges, one pint of strawberry, rasp- 
berry or grape juice, hdf a pint of maraschino che?^ 
ries, six quarts of water and a big piece of ice. When 
ready to serve, a bottle of apoUinaris water, or gin- 
ger ale, mint leaves, pieces of pineapple or berries can 
also be used, with or without the cherries. 

COBBLERS. 

Cobblers are made by filling a glass with cracked 
ice, adding any kind of wine, and a little water if de- 



SM ROCKY MOiniTAm COOK BOOK. 

sired. Sweeten witli sugar symp, add a strawberry, 
raspberry, bit of pineapple^ slice of orange, maras- 
diino cherry, or any fruit yon happen to hay& 



CLABETCUP. 



1 pint of daret. 

1 pint of Boda water. 

Juice of one lemon and 

orange. 
1 glass of curacao. 



Slice of caenmber. 
Sweeten with sugar syrup. 
Bunch of mint. 
Haye it weU iced. 



CHAHPA6NB CUP. 



1 quart of champagne 
1 glass of sherry. 
1 glass white curacao. 
Juice of one orange and 
lemon. 



1 pint of apoUinaris. 
Slice of cucumber. 
Bunch of mint. 
Large piece of ice. 



GIKGEK ALE PUNCH. 



Juice of six lemons and six oranges, two quart 
bottles of ginger ale, one pint of champagne, sweeten 
with sugar syrup, a large piece of ice and thin slices 
of lemon and orange. 

SAUTERNS PUNCH. 

The juice of six oranges and lemons, two quarts 

of sauteme, one pint of sherry, one cup of curacao, 

one pint of soda water, sweeten with sugar syrup, 

add a few pieces of any kind of fruits and a large 

piece of ice. 

£66-N0G6. 

Beat the yolk of one egg and one teaspoonful of 
sugar until very light and thick, beat the white to a 
stiff foam, mix together, turn into a glass, add a tea- 
spoonful of rum or brandy, or both may be used, stir 
or shake all together, add a little grated nutmeg. 



BBVXRAG£S. 865 

Whipped cream may be used instead of the milk. 
AddTore sugar and^rum if desired. 

BALTIMORE EGG-NOG. 

Yolks of five eggs well beaten. One cup of pow- 
dered sugar beaten into the yolks. Then slowly one 
pint of rum and one cup of brandy. Then one quart 
of milk and one quart of cream. One grated nut- 
meg. Beat the whites of the eggs stiff and fold into 
the mixture. Prepare the day before using. 

MILK PUNCH. 

Add to a glass of milk a tablespoonful of sherry, 
rum or brandy, sweeten to taste, shake, or mix well, 
put a little nutmeg on top. 

GRAPE JUICE. 

Add one quart of water to four quarts of grapes 
that have been washed and removed from the stems. 
Let them come slowly to the boiling point and remain 
on the stove for fifteen minutes, then strain through 
a thick cloth, return the liquid to the fire, let it come 
to the boiling point, turn into glass jars and seal. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

Turn over four quarts of ripe raspberries one 
quart of vinegar. Let remain for twenly-four hours, 
tiien strain through a cheese cloth, turn the liquor 
over four quarts more of fresh raspberries ; let stand 
for twenty-four hours ; again strain out the juice, and 
to each two cups of juice add two cups of sugar^ Boil 
for twenty minutes, turn into bottles, cork when cold. 
When used, dilute, using three parts of water. 



8M ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



INVALm COOKERY. 



Nothing but the best of cooking should be served 
to the sick. 

First. — The greatest care should be taken in se- 
lecting the best materials. 

Second. — The greatest care should be taken in 
cooking them. 

Third. — The food should be served on the dainti- 
est of china and glass, and the freshest of linen. 

Fourth. — Those whose profession it is to care for 
the sick are not competent to cook for them until they 
have had thorough instruction in the art by a profes- 
sional teacher. Cooking should be an important ad- 
junct of nurse training. A very great deal depends 
upon the patient being properly nourished during con- 
valescence, and if the food is not well cooked it can 
not easily be digested, the materials are spoiled, and 
the result of nourishing the patient is not obtained. 
Cooking eggs in various ways, broiling (see broiled 
steak), bread making, soups, fancy dishes and ices 
are found in the book. 

TO MAKE TOAST. 

Select bread that is fully twelve hours old (if 
newer bread has to be used, cut in thin slices and set 
in the oven to dry out the moisture before toasting; 
if moist bread is used to toast, the inside will be soft 
and indigestible), cut in thin slices, cut off the crust 



INVALID COOKERY. 367 

unless preferred on, toast slowly a delicate brown on 
both sides, butter while warm, and serve only while 
it is fresh. 

CREAM FOR CREAM TOAST. 

Scald one cup of milk in the double boiler; melt 
in a sauce pan two tablespoonfuls of butter; when 
melted stir into it two tablespoonfuls of sifted flour 
(level), pour onto it a little of the hot milk, stirring 
until smooth, then the rest of the milk ; turn all back 
in the double boiler and cook ten minutes. This way 
the flour is thoroughly cooked, and if well stirred can 
not be lumpy. 

TO MAKE TEA. 

Use only freshly boiled water. Scald the teapot 

Put the dry tea into a strainer and let the cold water 

run through to wash out the dust Put the tea in the 

teapot, pour the boiling water over it ; set on the back 

of the stove to steep flve minutes. Pour the tea from 

the grounds into a hot pot and serve at once. The 

amount of tea to be used depends upon the strength 

required. 

COCOA. 

Heat two cups of milk in the double boiler ; when 
scalded add two tablespoonfuls of cocoa, one of sugar 
and a few grains of salt. Dissolve the cocoa, sugar 
and salt in a little boiling water, stir into the hot 
milk, cook for flfteen minutes, beat with the Dover 
beater for a minute and serve at once. 

TO COOK AN EGG IN THE SHELL. 

If the egg is to be served soft in the shell (the 
white cooked and the yolk soft), place the egg in a 

13 



M8 ROCKT MOmrTAnf COOK BOOK. 

sauoe pan, cover with water that has come to the 
boil, set on the back of the stove for ten minutes 
(where it won't boil), or cover the ^g with oold 
water, place on the front of the stove and allow it to 
just reach the boiling point; remove from the water 
at once. Eggs cooked in this waj are easily digested ; 
the white is of a jelly-like consistency, not hard and 
homy as when boiled. To cook the egg hard, let re- 
main in the water longer. 

TO COOK CEREALS. 

Cereals should be thoroughly cooked. It is best 
to use a double boiler, as cereds being starchy will 
easily stick on. Put the cereal in the double boiler, 
with a little salt, a half teaspoonful to a cup of the 
dry cereal, cover with boiling water and cook fast on 
the top of the stove for five minutes, stirring a little 
to prevent sticking ; then place in the boiler and cook 
for a half hour, anyway. Some cereals require longer 
cooking. Now many of them go through a steaming 
process before being put on the market, so that the 
five minutes of hard boiling and the half hour cook- 
ing in the double boiler is all that is required. The 
cooking of rice and all kinds of cereals are given in 
the book. 

TO COOK CORN STARCH OR TAPIOCA. 

Heat the milk in double boiler; when scalded add 
the corn starch that has been mixed smooth the thick- 
ness of cream with a little cold milk and a little salt 
Stir into the hot milk and cook for twenty minutes 
before sugar or eggs are added. Various ways for 
cooking com starch and tapioca are given in the book. 



INVALID COOKERY. 369 

Wash the tapioca and add to the hot milk, stirring 
frequently. 

CORN STARCH GRUEL. 

Scald two cups of milk in a double boiler; mix a 
tablespoonful of com starch with a little cold milk 
and an eighth of a teaspoonful of salt; stir into the 
hot milk and cook for twenty minutes; stirring fre- 
quently. If too thick, add a little hot milk. Flavor 
with a little sugar and nutmeg, or lemon or orange 
juice. 

Make Arrowroot Gruel the same as com starch. 

MILK PORRIDGE. 



1 cup of milk. 

1 tablespoonful of flour. 



1 dozen raisins, quartered. 
y^ teaspoonful of salt. 



Scald the milk in double boiler, rub the flour to 
thin paste with a little cold milk, add to the hot milk 
with the salt, stir till smooth; cook twenty minutes. 
The raisins should be washed in cold water, quartered 
and boiled for ten minutes, letting the water boil out, 
then add to the milk after the flour has been put in. 
Flavor with a little sugar and nutmeg. 

CRACKER GRUEL. 

Brown fresh crackers in the oven until a light 
brown is reached. Roll very fine ; use two tablespoon- 
fuls of the powdered cracker, one-half cup boiling 
water and one-half cup hot milk, speck of salt; stir 
the cracker crumbs in the milk and water, add salt, 
let boil for one minute. A little sugar and flavoring 
may be added. 



370 ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 

CORN MEAL GRUEL. 



2 tablespoonf uls of com 

meal. 
1 tablespoonful of flour. 



y^ teaspoonful of salt. 

2 cups of hot milk or water. 



If milk is used, heat in double boiler to prevent 
burning. Mix the meal, flour and salt to a smooth 
paste with a little cold water, pour onto it the milk 
or boiling water, a little at a time, stirring rapidly. 
When smooth the liquid can be added more rapidly. 
Let cook for thirty minutes. It can be thinned with 
hot milk and flavored with a little sugar, nutmeg or 
lemon. 

OATMEAL GRUEL. 



2 cupg boiling water. 
2 tablespoonfuls oatmeal. 



y^ teaspoonful salt. 



Boil all together for one hour ; add more boiling 
water if necessary, strain. Serve with hot milk or 
cream. 

RICE WATER. 



1 tablespoonful of rice. 
1 quart of cold water. 



l^ teaspoonful of salt. 



Put the well-washed rice and salt in the cold 
water; let cook for one hour, or until it is soft. A 
little cream, sugar and flavoring may be added. 

BARLEY WATER (Mrs. Lincoln). 



14 lemon. 

1 quart boiling water. 



1 tablespoonful pearl 

barley. 
3 blocks of sugar. 

Wash the barley in cold wat^r ; put barley, sugar 
and lemon into the boiling water; let it stand cov- 
ered on the back of the stove for three hours, then 
strain it and serve. Currant jelly or orange juice 



INVALID COOKERY. 87f 

may be used instead of the lemon. This is a valu- 
able for colds and affections of the chest. 

TOAST OR CRACKER WATER. 

Toast in the oven bread crumbs or crackers very 
brown, but do not bum. To a cup of crumbs or 
crackers add one cup of cold water ; let stand for one 
hour, then strain ; add cream and sugar to taste. 

SLIPPERY ELM TEA. 

Pour one cup of boiling water over one teaspoon- 
ful of the powdered slippery elm, or a little of the 
bark. When cool, strain, flavor with lemon juice and 
sugar. Serve cold. 

BEEF TEA. 

Remove the fat from one pound of round steak, 
cut in small pieces, put in a glass jar, add one cup of 
cold water; set the jar in cold water, after being 
closely covered; heat very slowly, taking fully an 
hour or more, or till the meat is white ; strain, press- 
ing the meat to obtain all the juice ; season with salt. 

BEEF JUICE. 

Remove the fat from a slice of the round of beef, 
wipe with a cloth that has been dipped in warm 
water. Broil for a few seconds to start the juice. 
Cut the meat in small pieces, press through a meat 
press. Pour boiling water through the press just be- 
fore using it. Season with salt. 



872 B0CK7 MOUHTAIH COOK BOOK. 

LAMB BROTH. 

Cut lean, juicy meat in indi pieces, cover with 
cold water; let stand for half an hour, then put on 
the stove and heat gradually. Cook slowly after it 
begins for a half hour. Salt, peppercorns and a small 
onion may be added when it is put on the stove. 
Strain, season if more is needed, add a little well- 
cooked rice. The fat should be all skimmed off be- 
fore serving. Do not skim until the broth is strained. 

CHICKEN BBOTH. 

The best flavor and most nourishment is obtained 
from an old chicken. Cut apart the joints, remove 
all the fat that is possible. Cover the chicken with 
cold water, let stand for a half hour, then put on the 
stove where it will heat slowly. Simmer till the meat 
is cooked from the bones ; add salt, peppercorns and a 
small onion when put on the stove. Strain before 
serving. Bemove the fat and add a little well-cooked 
rice. 

ACID DRINKS. 

Pour boiling water onto any kind of acid berries ; 
when cold, serve, or dissolve acid jelly in cold water. 
Barberry and currant are especially good. 

TAMARINDS WATER. 

Boil one-half cup of tamarinds in three pints of 
boiling water for one hour; cool; sweeten a little if 
cared for. 

LEMONADE. 

Juice of a small lemon, cutting off a thin slice to 
put in the glass; one glass of ice water, one table- 



nrVALID COOKEBT. 878 

spoonful of sugar, or^ mudi better, a little sugar 
syrup. 

0BAN6EADE. 

Make the same as lemonade, usinsc the juice of 
half a lemon and half an orange! 

FLAXSEED LEMONADE (Mrs. Lincoln). 

Pour one quart of boiling water over four table- 
spoonfuls of whole flaxseed and steep three hours; 
strain, add the juioe of two lemons, sweeten to taste; 
add a little more water if the liquid seems thick. 
This is soothing to colds. 

ALBUMENIZED WATER. 

Beat the white of one egg slightly; mix with a 
glass of cold water ; flavor with brandy, wine, lemon 
or orange juice, as directed. 

ALBUMENIZED MILK. 

^ Shake the white of an egg and a glass of milk in 
a jar or shaker until they are mixed thoroughly; 
sweeten, and flavor to taste. 

MUSTARD POULTICE. 

Use one-fourth as much com meal as mustard; 
mix to a consistency to spread with warm water. 

FLAXSEED POULTICE. 

Mix the ground flaxseed with hot water. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Betsragbs^ 359. 

Baltimore Eg:ir-Nogr> 366. 
Cobblers, 363. 
Cocoa, 362. 
Coffee, 360. 

Black, 861. 

Boiled, 360. 

Breakfast, 361. 

Drip, 360. 

Iced, 361. 

Turkish, 361. 
Champagne Cup, 364. 
Chocolate, 362. 

Maillard's, 362. 
Claret Cap, 364. 
"Ejgg Lemonade, 363. 
EgST-Nogr. 364. 
Fruit Punch, 363. 
Ginger Ale Punch, 364. 
Grape Juice, 365. 
Lemonade, 362. 
Milk Punch, 365. 
Orangeade, 363. 
Raspberry Vinegar, 366. 
Russian Tea, 359. 
Sauteme Punch, 364. 
Shells, 862. 
Summer Drink, 363. 
Tea, 359. 
Tea Ball, 359. 
Tea Punch, 359. 



Brbad^ Roman War, 9. 

Barley and Wheat, 17. 
Beaten Biscuit, 18. 
Brioche Cakes, 19. 
Bran, 12. 
Bunns, 16. 
Cinnamon Rolls, 14. 
Cheese, 11. 
Com Meal Rolls, 15. 
Date, 11. 
French Rolls, 17. 
German Coffee Cake, 18. 
Graham, 12. 
Hot-Cross Bunns, 16. 
Milk, 10. 

Milk (with Sponge), 10. 
Nut, 13. 



Parker House Rolls, 13. 

Potato Rolls, 13. 

Raised Com, 16. 

Rolled Oats, 12. 

Rusks, 18. 

Rye, 12. 

Sticks. 14. 

Squash, 16. 

Walnut, 11. 

Water, 11. 

War Com Meal, 9. 

Whole Wheat, 12. 

Zwieback, 19. 



Breads with Baking Pow- 

DER« 20. 

Barley Muffins, 23. 
Biscuits, 20. 
Boston Brown, 26. 
Bran Muffins, 23. 
Com Cake, 24. 

Mrs. Lincoln, 24. 

Spider, 24. 
Com Meal Mush, 26. 

Muffins, 25. 

Parker House Gems, 26. 
Cream Muffins, 21. 
Cream Scones, 20« 
Date Gems, 23. 
English Muffins, 21. 
Entire Wheat Biscuits, 20. 
Flannel Cakes, 27. 
Griddle Cakes, 26. 

Bread Crumb, 27. 

Com Meal, 27. 

Entire Wheat, 27. 

Rice, 27. 
Pancakes, 28. 
Pop-Overs, 23. 
Rice Muffins222. 
Rye, Entire Wheat and 

Graham Muffins, 22. 
Sally Lunns, 24. 
Short Cake, 21. 
Sour Milk Brown, 26. 
Spoon, 26. 
Waffles (Mrs. Lincoln), 28. 



879 



B0CK7 MOUITTAIH COOK BOOK. 



Cakwb and CkMKIMj 804. 

Almond. 814. 

Almond Wafers, 821. 

Almond and Date Maca- 
roons, 821. 

Almost Pound, 812. 

Angel Cake, 807. 

Angel or Sponge, ete., 819. 

Apple Sauce, 814. 

Baba or Rum, 827. 

Berwick Sponge, 806. 

Boiled Sponge, 805. 

Bowknot Cookies, 825. 

Bride's, 810. 

Brownies, 820. 

Canadian War, 828. 

Chocolate, 817. 

Chocolate Nut Bar, 819. 

Cocoanut, 816. 

Cocoanut Cookies, 828. 

Cream Sponge, 306. 

Currant, 316. 

Date Bars, 825. 

Denver Pound, 810. 

Devil's Food. 318. 

Directions for Making, 804. 

English War, 828. 

Fig, 314, 815. 

Filling and Frosting for 
Lady Baltimore, 811. 

Fruit. 312. 

Fudge, 817. 

Gold, 809. 

Golden Rod, 307. 

Gold Sponge, 807. 

Hermits, 328. 

Honey, 322. 

Icing, 317. 

Imperial, 313. 

Jumbles, 323. 

Lady Baltimore, 311. 

Lady Fingers, 807. 

Lemon, 313. 

Light Fruit, 818. 

Loaf Chocolate, 317. 

Margaret Deland, 824. 

Marguerites, 827. 

Marshmallow Angel, 808. 

Marble, 816. 

Mocha Frosting, 819. 

Never-Fall Chocolate, 816. 

Nut, 814. 

Oatmeal Wafers, 326. 

One-Two-Three-Four 
Cookies, 3^2. 

Orange, 315. 

Orange Quarters, 321. 



Peanut Cookies, 822. 
Pecan Wafers, 824. 
Pepper Nuts, 824. 
Pistachio. 814. 
Potato Torte, 818. 
Pound. 810. 
Pound Wafers, 820. 
Rocky Mountain. 816. 
Rolled Oats, Fruit and Nut 

Cookies, 826. 
Roll Jelly, 806. 
Roosevelt, 820. 
Scotch Gingerbread. 826. 
Silver. 809. 
Snowball. 825. 
Spice, 808. 
Spice, 816. 
Spiced Cookies. 824. 
l^>onge, 305. 
Sugar Cookies. 828. 
Sugar Cream Cookies. 825. 
Swedish Sponge, 807. 
Twelfth Night. 819. 
Venetian, 821. 
Walnut Wafers, 828. 
Wedding. 812. 
White, 809. 
White Pound, 810. 
With Butter, 808. 

FiLIJNOS FOR Latsr Cakb, 829. 

Banana, 880. 

Chocolate, 829. 

Cream. 829. 

Fig. 829. 

Fig Caramel Idng, 829. 

Lemon or Orange. 830. 

Marshmallow Idng, 380. 

Nut. 831. 

Orange Cocoanut, 881. 

Pineapple, 831. 

Prune Whip, 880. 

Icings for Caksb^ 882. 
Banana or Filling. 884. 
Boiled, 882. 
Caramel, 834. 
Chocolate Frosting, 888. 
Confectioner's Frosting, 882 
Maple, 884. 
Mocha Frosting, 888. 
Nut, 834. 
Orange, 882. 
Pink, 884. 
Plain. 832. 
Royal, 883. 
. Yellow Frosting, 888. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



ZI7 



Candies, 356. 

Butterscotch, 358. 
Chocolate Caramels, 357. 
Chocolate Ftidge, 356. 
Coatingr for Chocolate, 356. 
Fondant, 356. 
Glace Oranges, Grapes, 

etc., 356. 
Maple Fudge, 357. 
Molasses, 358. 
Opera Caramels, 357. 
Panocha, 357. 
Peanut, 358. 
To Make Fondant, 355. 
Vegetable Coloring, 355. 
Vinegar, 358. 

Canning, 344. 

Asparagus, 345. 
Peas or Shelled Beans, 345. 
Stringed Beans, 345. 
Tomatoes, 346. 

Canapes, 281. 

Alexandra, 232. 

Anchovy-and-Bgg, 233. 

Anchovy or Sardine, 231. 

Apricot, 232. 

Cheese, 231. 

Chicken, 231. 

Fruit, 232. 

Ham, 231. 

Prune or Fig, 282. 

Cerba;<8, 29. 

Boiled Rice, 29. 
Steamed Rice, 29. 

Chsbsb Dishbs, 186. 
Balls, 188. 
Cottage, 186. 
Fingers, 189. 
Frozen, 187. 
Muffins, 190. 
Polenta, Cakes, 189.. 
Pudding, 188. 
Ramekins. 188. 
Straws, 189. 
Souffle, 186. 
Timbales, 187. 
Water Crackers, 186. 
Welsh Rarebit, 187. 

Cold Dbssbrts, 264. 

Apple Charlotte Russe, 277. 
Apple Snow, 267. 



Bavarian Cream with Eggs, 

268. 

Fruit Cream, 269. 

Prune Cream, 270. 

In the Shell, 270. 

En Surprise, 270. 

Pineapple Cream, 270. 

Petite Sponge, 271. 
Champagne Jelly, 275. 
Charlotte Bavaroise, 278. 
Charlotte Russe, 271. 
Charlotte Snowballs, 278. 
Cherry Cream, 281. 
Chestnuts with Cream, 280. 
Chestnut Purfie with 

Cream, 280. 
Chocolate Macaroon 

Cream, 272, 
Coffee Jelly, 274. 
Coloring, 265. 
Crumble Tart, 281. 
Custard, Boiled, 265. 

Chocolate, 265. 

Caramel, 265. 

Nut, 266. 

Cocoanut, 266. 

Maple, 266. 

Baked or Steamed, 266. 
Caramel, 266. 
Chocolate, etc., 267. 
Diplomatic Pudding, 271. 
Flavoring, 264. 
Floating Island, 267. 
Fruit Cream, 272. 
Garnishing, 264. 
Ginger Rice Souffle, 273. 
Irish Moss Blanc Mange, 

267 
Italian* Jelly, 276. 
Lemon Jelly, 273. 
Macaroon Ginger Custard, 

272. 
Newport Whips, 279. 
Orange Jelly, 274. 
Orange Moulded in Jelly, 

279. (ft 

Orange Strawberry Char- 
lotte, 275. 
Paris de Marrons, 280. 
Peach Charlotte, 275. 
Pineapple in the Shell, 279. 
Pineapple Sponge, 273. 
Plain Bavarian Cream, 268. 
Rice and Almond Cream, 

277. 
Rice Cream, 276. . 
Roman Jelly, 275. 
Sauteme Jelly, 275. 
Snow Puddings, 273. 
Spanish Custard, 276. 
Stuffed Figs, 279. 
WUie Jelly, 274. 



378 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



COMPOTBfl, JSLLiaS AND 
PlCKLBS^ 839. 

Apples, Pears. Peaches and 

Apricots, 839. 
Baked Apples, 389. 
Baked Peaches, 840. 
Blushing Apple, 841. 
Cranberry Sauce and Jelly, 

840. 
Firm Cranberry Jelly, 840. 
Stewed Prunes, 340. 
Stewed Rhubarb, 340. 
White Grapefruit Cocktail, 

841. 

EOGS, 215. 

And Asparagus, 224. 
Balls to Serve in Soup, 222. 
Cocotte, 217. 
Cooked in Shell, 215. 
Cooked in Whole Tomatoes, 

220. 
Curried, 222, 228. 
En CoquiUe, 221. 
Fried, 216. 

In Green Peppers, 221. 
Japanese, 224. 
Omelets, 217, 218. 

Cheese, 218. 

French. 218. 

Ham, 219. 

Herb, 219. 

Jelly, 219. 

Orange, 220. 

Peas, 219. 

Pineapple, 220. 

Rum, 218. 

Tomato, 219. 
Poached, 216, 216. 
Poached a la HoUandalse, 

221. 

With Celery Sauce, 222. 
Scrambled, 216. 
Shirred, 217. 
Stuffed, 223. 
Timbales, 222. 
With Cheese, 224. 

Entrees, 114. 

Aspic Jelly, 128. 
Baked Bananas, 187. 

Sultana Sauce, 137. 
Beef Loaf, 132. 
Boudans, 128. 
Broiled Mushrooms, 122. 
Chicken Chartreuse, 129. 

Terrapin, 130. 
Chickens. Pigreons, etc., 181. 

Livers, 131. 
Chicken Soufll6, 123. 

A la Duxelle, 123. 

A la King, 124. 

Pressed, 124. 



Scalloped, or 
Turkey, 125. 

Timbale, 125. 

Chicken Timbale, 125. 
Honeycomb, 126. 
Macaroni and 
Cheese, 126. 
Cocktail of Clams and 

Oysters, 137. 
Commeal Souffle, 123. 
Creamed Mushrooms, 121. 
Croquettes, 114. 

Celery, 121. 

Cheese, 117. 

Chicken, 114. 

Clam. 120. 

Egg. 117. 

Hominy or Rice, 118. 

Macaroni and Spa- 
ghetti. 118. 

Mushroom, 116. 

Nut 117. 

Oysters, 119. 

Prepare Egrg and 
Crumbs for, 115. 

Rice and Cheese, 118. 

Sauce for Mixture, 116. 

Shad Roe, 119. 

Sweet and White 
Potato, 120. 

Sweetbread, 116. 

To Fry, 116. 

To Mould, 115. 
Ham Mousse, 127. 

To Mould 'in Aspic 
Jelly, 129. 
Ham Puffs, 136. 
Liver Loaf, 134. 
Lobster Cutlets, 119. 
Meat Pie, 132. 
Mock Terrapin, 130. 
Mushrooms a la Pou- 

lette, 122. 
Mushroom Souffld, 122. 
Nut Loaf, 133. 
Potatoes in Surprise, 120. 
Prepare Calf's Brains, 128. 
Ragout of Mutton or 

Lamb, 133. 
Salmi of Duck or Game, 131 
Spanish Rice, 133. 
Sweatbreads a la Tou- 

raine, 134. 

Stuffed, 135. 
Terrapin. 135. 

To Prepare. 136. 

A la Newburg, 186. 

Stewed, 136. 
To Broil Venison Steak, 184. 
To Prepare Mushrooms, 121 
To Unmould Jelly, 129. 
Turban of Macaroni and 

Ham, 127. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



379 



FiBH^ 49. 

To Skin and Bone, 49. 
Bake a Whole, 51. 
Bake, 50. 
Boil. 49. 
Broil, 50. 
Cook Smelts, 51. 

Balls, Salt, 55. 
Petite, 55. 
Salmon, 55. 

Boiled Salmon, 53. 

Casserole, 54. 

Chowder, 51. 

Creamed, in Mashed Pota- 
to, 54. 

Creamed Salt, 54. 

Fillets Baked with Toma- 
toes, 52. 
Stuffed or Sliced, 52. 

Planked Shad, 54. 

Salmon Cutlets, 53. 

Stuffing for, 50. 

Timbale, 53. 

Timble of Cooked, 55. 

Frittbrs, 138. 
Apple, 139. 
Banana, 138. 

Batter (Mrs. Lincoln). 138. 
Batter for Timbale Cases, 

139. 
Bread Boxes, 140. 
Clam, 138. 
Orange, 139. 
Oyster, 138. 
Peach, 138. 
Queen, 139. 
Sauce for, 139. 
Vegetable, 139. 

FR03EEN Dbsberts^ 282. 
Proportions of Salt and 

Ice, 282. 
To Unmould, 282. 

Oamb^ 108. 

Canvasback and Redhead 

Ducks, 108. 
Hot Pigeon Pie, 112. 
I<arded Qrouse, 109. 
Pigeons in Casserole, 112. 
Potted Pigeons, 109. 
Quails Broiled, 110. 

Roasted, 110. 
Roasted Partridge, 111. 
Roast Pigeons or Squabs, 

109. 
Salmi of Duck or Game, 108 
Squabs in Casserole, 110. 
Stewed Pigeons, 112. 
Venison Roasted, 111. 

Steak, 111. 
Woodcock Roasted, 111. 



OiNGBRBREAO. DOUOHNUTB, 

MoLASSBs Cookies and 
Cream Puffb^ 335. 
Cream for Cream Puffs, 338 
Cream Puffs and Eclairs, 

337. 
Doughnuts, 337. 

Raised, 337. 

Sour Milk, 337. 
Filled Cookies, 336. 
Filling, 336. 
Ginger Snaps, 836. 
Hard Molasses Cookies, 836 
Meringues or Kisses, 338. 
Soft, 335. 

Soft Ginger Cookies, 885. 
Sugar Gingerbread, 335. 

Hot Puddings, 244. 
Apple Charlotte, 256. 
Apple Snowball, 254. 
Apple M6ringue, 257. 
Apple and Peach Tapioca, 

245. 
Apples and Rice, 256. 
Baked Apple Dumplings, 255 
Baked Indian, 245. 
Baked Pineapple, 250. 
Baked Rice, 244. 
Bird's Nest, 255. 
Boston Apple, 251. 
Bread and Butter, 248. 
Brown Betty, 249. 
Cabinet, 249. 
Cocoanut, 252. 
Com, 251. 
Com Starch. 253. 
Cottage, 249. 
Cracker, 253. 
Cream Rice, 244. 
Cream Tapioca, 244. 
Dutch Apple Cake, 253. 
English Plum, 247. 
Fig, 246. 

Mocha Sauce, 260. 
Nut, 252. 

Old English Plum, 247. 
Ginger, 260. 
Delicate, 262. 
Delmonico, 261. 
Milton, 262. 
Prune, 262. 
Steamed Date, 263. 
Strawberry, 261. 
Victoria, 261. 
Quince, 250. 

Rolled Apple Dumplings,266 
Sago, 245. 



ROCKY MoxrrrxAiii coos book. 



Souffl6, Custard, 267. 

Cherry, 258. 

Chocolate, 257. 

Lexnon, 259. 

Mocha, 259. 

Peach, 269. 

Pineapple, 268. 

Prune, 258. 

Rice, 259. 
Steamed Apple, 256. 
Steamed Berry, 249. 
Steamed Bread, 248. 
Steamed Carrot, 264. 
Steamed Orangre or Pine- 
apple, 250. 
Steamed Prune, 246. 
Snowball, 251. 
Suet, 248. 
Thanksgiving, 247. 
Weymouth, 252. 
Whole Wheat, 246. 
Zebaione, 260. 



ICB Crbamb, 289. 

Alaska, 295. 
Almond, 290. 
Caramel, 291. 
Coffee, 290. 
Creme-de-Menthe, 295. 
Fresh Fruit, 292. 
Frozen Bananas, 293. 
Frozen Elliott, 292. 
Frozen Pineapple, 293. 
Frozen Pudding or Tutti- 

Fruttl, 292. 
Ginger, 290. 
Lalla Rookh or Egg-Nog, 

294. 
liemon, 289. 
Macaroon, 291. 
Maraschino, Sherry, Port 

. and Brandy Sauces, 296. 
Marshmallow, 291. 
Neapolitan, 291. 
Nesselrode Pudding, 294. 
Orange, 289. 
Orange Delideuse, 293. 
Peaches, Apricots, etc., 294. 
Peach and Apricot, 289. 
Pineapple, 289. 
Pistachio, 292. 
Peppermint Candy, 296. 
Plum Pudding, 292. 
Rice, 290. 
Sultana Roll and Claret 

Sauce, 296. 
Vanilla, 289. 
Walnut, 290. 



ISYAUD CooExaT, 866. 
Acid Drinks, 372. 
Albumenized Water, 378. 

Milk, 373. 
Barley Water, 370. 
Beef Juice, 371. 
Beef Tea, 371. 
Chicken Broth, 872. 
Cocoa, 367. 
Commeal Gruel, 370. 
Com Starch Gruel, 869. 
Cracker Gruel, 369. 
Cream for Cream Toast, 

367. 
Flaxseed Lemonade, 378. 
Flaxseed Poultice, 373. 
Lamb Broth, 372. 
Lemonade, 372. 
Milk Porridge. 369. 
Mustard Poultice, 373, 
Oatmeal Gruel. 870. 
Orangeade, 373. 
Rice Water, 370. 
Slippery Elm Tea. 871. 
Tamarinds Water, 872. 
Toast or Cracker Water. 

371. 
To Cook Egg in the Shell. 

367. 

Cereals, 368. 

Com Starch or Tapioca, 
368. 
To Make Tea* 367. 
To Make Toast, 366. 

Jamb or Marmauldbs^ 346. 
Candied Orange Peel, 846. 
Orange, 346. 
Rhubarb. 347. 

'■ ' \ " 

jBLLiaSj 347. 

Crabapple and Ajppte, 848. 
Currant, 847. 
Grape, 348. 
Plum, 348. 
Quince, 348. 

LOBSTBRS^ 64. 

A la Newburg. 66. 
Creamed. 66. 
Deviled, 65. 
Plain, 65. 
Saut6, 66. 
Souffl6. 66. 
To Boil, 64. 

Broil Alive, 6S. 

Open, 64. 



GBNBRAL INDBX. 



381 



WUkTB, 67. 

Beef a la Mode, 69. 

Stew with Dumplings, 70 
Beef Tonffue, 76. 
Boiled Dinner, 72. 
Braised Beef or Pot 

Roast 69. 
Broiled Beefsteak, 74. 
Broiled Fillet of Beef, 76. 
Combeef Hash, 73. 
Dumplinss, 71. 
Fillet of Beef, 68. 
Hamburg Steak, 75. 
Pie, 71. 

Plank Steak, 75. 
Pressed Combeef, 73. 
Rolled Stuffed Flank, 71. 
Spiced Beef, 73. 
Spanish Steak, 74. 
Swiss Steak, 74. 
Tongue in Jelly, 76. 
To Roast Beef, 67. 

Gravy for, 68. 
Vegetable Hash, 73. 
Warmed-Over Beef, 71. 
Yorkshire Pudding, 68. 

MoussBS, 298. 

Coffee. 298. 
Chocolate, 298. 
Curacao and Noyon, 298. 
Fruit, 298. 

Mutton and IiAMB^ 82. 

And Lamb Chops, 85. 

Boiled Lamb Tongues, 86. 

Boiled Leg of, 83. 

Chops in Paper Cases, 85. 

Crown Roast, 82. 

Curry of, 84. 

Neck of Lamb in Cas- 
serole, 84. 

Ragout of, 84. 

Roast Leg of, 82. 

Roast Loin of, 82. 

Roast Saddle of, 83. 
Leg of. Stuffed, 83. 

Roast Spring Lamb, 85. 

Parfaits, 298. 

Angel, 299. 

Banana, 801. 

Biscuit aiac6 or Tortoni, 

801. 
Caf6, 300. 
Chestnuts or Candied 

Fruits. 300. 
Chocolate Surprise, 802. 
College Ices, 302. 
Coupe de Jaque, 302. 
Coupe Venus, 303. 



Ginger, 299. 

Gooseberry Sorbet, 302. 

Maple, 299. 

Macedoine Frapp6, 301. 

Pineapple, 299. 

Tea and Orange Peel, 300. 

Pastry, 234. 

Bambury Tarts, 243. 
Cheese Straws, 238. 
Pie, Apple, 238. 

Apple Tart, 240. 

Apricot or Peach, 240. 

Berry, 239. 

Butter Scotch, 242. 
Filling. 242. 

Cream, 241. 

Cranberry, 239. 

Custard, 239. 

Delicious Lemon, 240. 

English Apple, 242. 

Lemon, 241. 

Meringue, 240, 243. 

Mince Meat, 241. 

Petite, 242. 

Prune, 240. 

Pumpkin, 239. 

Rhubarb, 239. 

Squash, 238. 
Plain, 234. 
Puff Paste, 236. 

To Bake, 236. 

To Make Pat6 Shells 
from, 236. 
Puff Paste Strips, 237. 
To Glaze, 238. 
Vol-Au-Vent, 237. 

Pickles, 348. 

Apple Chutney, 350. 
Chili Sauce, 363. 
Confiture, 354. 
Cucumber, 360. 
Cucumber and Onion. 351. 
Cucumbers, Watermelon 

and Cantaloupe, 349. 
Currants, Grapes and All 

Berries, 349. 
Dill, 352. 
Ginger Apple, 350. 
Mixed, 351. 
Mustard, 351. 
Peaches, 349. 
Pears, 349. 
PicaliUi or Chow-CbV>w, 

352. 
Pickled Walnuts, 349. 
Pineapple, 349. 
To Sweet-Pickle Fruit and 

Berries, 348. 
Tomato Catsup, 353. 
Uncooked, 350. 
Watermelon, 363. 



ROCKT MOUNTAIN COOK BOOK. 



POBKj 77. 

Bacon, 78. 

Baked Virginia Ham, 79. 

Boiled Ham, 78. 

Boston Baked, and Beans, 

81. 
Broiled Ham and Bgya, 78. 
Chops, 77. 
Fried Apples, 78. 
Fried Ham, 78. 
Ham Cooked in Cider, 79. 
Philadelphia Scrapple, 80. 
Roast Pig, 77. 

Pork, 77. 
Sausages (Mrs. Lincoln), 79 
To Try-Out Lard, 80. 

PouLntT, 94. 

And Game, 94. 
Braised Chicken, 98. 
Broiled Spring Chicken, 99. 
Chestnut Stuffing, 107. 
Chicken, Panned, 99. 

A la Maryland, 102. 

A la B6chamel, 104. 

Chopped Puff Paste 
for Pie, 106. 

Curry (Mrs. Lincoln), 
100. 

Fricassee, 100. 

Fritters, 102. 

Julienne, 101. 

Pie, 104. 

Planquette of, 108. 

Roasted in Casse- 
role, 105. 

SouflI6, 103. 

Spanish, 101. 

Smothered in Oys- 
ters. 106. 

Stew with Dump- 
lings, 100. 

Stuffed, or Turkey 
Legs, 102. 
Forcemeat for Stuffing 

Boned Fowls, 97. 
Giblet Sauce, 96. 
Oyster Stuffing, 107. 
Potato Stuffing, 106. 
Roast Goose, 106. 
Roast Tame Duck, 107. 
To CUean and Truss, 94. 

Stuff and Truss for 
Roasting, 95. 
Stuffing for Roast 

Turkey, 96. 
To Dress Fowls for 

Broiling, 96. 

Bone Bird, or Turkey, 96 
To Boll Fowl, 98. 
To Broil a Turkey, 99. 



Prisbryino^ 341. 

Brandied Peaches or Apri- 
cots, 342. 

Brandied Plums, 342. 

Citron, 843. 

Cherry, 343. 

Gk>oseberries and Cur- 
rants, 343. 

Grapes, 343. 

Peaches and Apricots, 341. 

Pineapple, 343. 

Preserved Plums, 342. 

Quinces and Pears. 342. 

Raspberries, Blackberries, 
etc., 343. 

Puddings and Icb Cbxam 
Saucbs, 180. 

Brandy, 183. 
Brown Sugar, 180. 
Caramel, 180. 
Chocolate, 184. 
Coffee, 185. 
Creamy. 181. 
Egg, 181. 
Favorite, 185. 
Foamy, 181. 
Gtolden, 183. 

Maple, 184, 185. 

Orange, 184. 

Syrup. 184. 
Hard. 182. 
Hot Fruit, 181. 
Lemon, 183. 
Molasses. 180. 
Pineapple, 183. 
Plain or Hot, 180. 
Richelieu, 183. 
Sabayon, 182. 
Wine. 182. 

Punches and Sherbets^ 283. 

Sherbet, Lemon, 283. 

Apple. 284. 

Boston, 284. 

Cherry, Peach, etc., 284. 

Grape. 284. 

Milk (Mrs. Durand),286 

Orange. 288. 

Pineapple. 283. 

Strawberry, Raspberry 
and Chirrant, 283. 
Grape Bombe, 285. 
Frappe, 285. 

Coffee, 285. 

Punches, 286. 

Champagne, 287. 
Creme-de-Menthe Ice, 288. 
Curacao, Noyon, etc, 287. 
Ginger Ale in, 287. 
Grape Fruit, 286. 



GBNERAL INBEZ. 



8S3 



Mint, 286. 
Roman, 287. 
Sauteme, 287. 
Tea, 286. 
Tomato, 286. 

Saladb, 191. 

AlUsrator Pear, 210. 
American Cream Cheese, 

213. 
Asparaerus, 206. 

Garnished with Bggs, 
206. 
Bird's Nest, 218. 
Celery, 197. 

Stuffed, 197. 
Celery and Walnut, 200. 
Celery Jelly, 203. 
Cheese, 212. 
Chicken, 197. 

Moulded, 198, 199. 200. 
Chicken and Mushroom, 211 
Cold Slaw, 214. 
Cream Cheese, 218. 

And Bar-le-Duc, 218. 
Cucumber and Radish, 210. 
Cucumber, 204. 

And Tomato, 205. 
Dressing, French, 192. 

Beamaise Sauce, 196. 

Chiffonade, 195. 

Cooked (Miss Howard), 
193. 

Denver, 195. 

Mayonnaise, 192. 

Roquefort Cheese, 196. 

Sour Cream, 194. 

Tartare Sauce, 194. 

Vinaiffrette Sauce, 196. 

Wine, 194. 
Egg, 211, 212. 
Fish, 207. 

Fruit Compote, 210. 
Fruit, served in Canta- 
loupe. 208. 
Garnish with Curled Cel- 
ery, 201. 
Grape, 209. 
Grape Fruit, 205. 
Grape Fruit Jelly, 202. 
Italian, 204. 

Iiettuce and Watercress, 196 
Lobster, 207. 
Mandarin, 210. 
Moulding, 201. 
Neufchatel, 203 
Nut and Cucumber, 210. 
Orange, 205. 
Other Fruit, 209. 
Oyster, 208. 
Pepper, 206. 
Pineapple, 208. 



Pineapple and Cucum- 
ber, 200. 

Potato, 207. 

Russian, 205, 206. 

Salmon and Cucumber, 211. 

Some Things to Serve With, 
192. 

String Bean, 206. 

Sweetbreads and Cucum- 
ber, 200. 

To Marinate, 191. 

To Prepare the Greens, 191. 
Meat for Salads. 191. 

To Prepare Whole Toma- 
toes, 203. 

To Serve in Whole Toma- 
toes, etc., 202. 

To Unmould Jelly, 201. 

Tomato Jelly, 201. 

Tomatoes and Peppers 
Stuffed with Cheese, 208 

Truffle, 211. 

Waldorf. 208. 

Water Lily, 212. 

Sandwichbs^ 225. 
Automobile, 227. 
Cheese, 228. 
Club House, 229. 
Bgg, 227. 
Fish. 227. 
Gingerbread, 280. 
Green Pepper, 227. 
Hot Cheese, 228. 
Hot Ham or Chicken, 229. 
Lettuce, 226. 
Meat, 226. 
Nut. 228. 
Spanish, 226. 
Sweet 229. 

Sauces^ 169. 

Allemand6, 172. 
Apple, 179. 
Bechamel, 172. 
Bread (for Game), 178. 
Brown, 175. 

Mushroom, 176. 

Piquante, 176. 
Caper, with Boiled Mutton, 

169. 
Celery, 171. 
Champagne, 174. 
Cheese, 179. 
Chestnut, 178. 
Cranberry. 178. 
Cucumber, 173. 
Currant Jelly, 176. 
Curry, 172. 
Drawn Butter, 169. 
Bgg. 170. 
Bspagnole, 176. 
Flemish, 177. 
Giblet, 178. 



BOCKT MOUNTAra COOK BOOK. 



HoUandaise (for Fish), 17 S. 

Horseradish, 173, 174. 

Lobster, 170. 

MaJtre D'Hotel, 176. 

Mint (for Lamb), 174. 

Mushroom, 171. 

Mustard (for Beef), 174. 

Mustard (for Ham), 174. 

Olive (for Roast Ducik), 176 

Oyster. 170. 

Piquante, 171. 

Polnade, 176. 

Port Wine, 178. 

Poulette, 172. 

Robert, 176. 

Shrimp, 170. 

Spanish, 177. 

Tomato, 177. 

White or Cream, 170. 

Sauces for Icb C^rbam^ 296. 

Ginger, 296. 

Hot Chocolate, 297. 

Coffee, 297. 

Orange, 297. 

Raspberry, 297. 
Maple, 296. 

Shbllbd FisHj 57. 

Clams, 60. 

In Batter, 61. 

A la Touraine, 61. 

Roasted, 61. 

Steamed, 61. 
Clam Chowder, 61. 
Scallops, 62. 
Crabs. 62. 

Boiled, 62. 

Deviled, 63. 

Soft Shell, 62. 
Crab Flakes in Tartar 

Sauce, 63. 

Deviled or Lobster, 68. 
Deviled Shrimp, 63. 
Fried Frog Legs, 63. 
Oysters Raw, 67. 

Broiled, 68. 

Cocktail, 69. 

Cooked in Shell, 67. 

Creamed, 59. 

Fried, 58. 

In Shells or Ramquin, 69 

Panned, 69. 

Pigs in Blanket, 60. 

Scalloped, 60. 
Served in Ice, 67. 
Souffl6, 66. 



SouPfl^ SO. 

Black Bean. 37. 
Brown Stock, 38. 
Bouillon, 34. 
Caramel, 31. 
Chicken Broth, 38. 
Chicken Gumbo, 38. 
Clear Stock, 31. 
Clam Bouillon, 37. 
Consomm6, 34. 
Force Meat Balls, 33. 
Garnishes, 31. 
Gteneral Rules, 30. 
Julienne, 34. 

Macaroni or Vermicelli. 34. 
Mock Turtle, 36. 
Mullagatawny, 36. 
Mutton Brotih, 38. 
Ox-Tail. 36. 
Royale Chistard. 32. 
Scotch Broth, 37. 
Tomato. 36. 
Vegetable. 36. 
White, 33. 
White Stock, 33. 

Crbak Soups, 89. 

Almond, 43. 
Artichoke, 40. 
Asparagus, 43. 
Bermuda. 46. 
Can C!om, 42. 
Cauliflower, 46. 
(Chestnut, 44. 
(Ham, 42. 

Clam C!howder. 42. 
Green Com, 41. 
Green Pea, 41. 
Mushroom, 44. 

Stock, 44. 
Oyster, 39. 
Peanut, 43. 
Potato, 39. 
Spinach, 46. 
Split Pea, 40. 
Stock, 46. 
Tomato, 40. 

Fruit Sottps^ 47. 
Cherry, 47. 
Currant, 47. 
Gooseberry, 47. 
Orange, 48. 
Peach, 47. 
Pineapple, 47. 
Plum, 47. 
Raspberry, 47. 
Strawberry, 47. 

SUMMBR Soups^ 47. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



386 



VSAL^ 87. 

Braised Calf's Liver, 90. 

Broiled Ldver, 90. 

Calf's Heart Roasted, 90. 

Head with Brain 
Sauce, 91. 
Cutlets, 88. 

With Cream, 88. 
Loaf, 89. 
Roast, 87. 
Scalloped, 89. 
Stew, 88. 

StufTed Shoulder of, 87. 
Stuffing, 87. 
Sweetbreads, 91. 

Fried, 92. 

Larded, 92. 

Served in Ramquin 
Dishes, 92. 
Tripe, 92. 

Broiled, 98. 

In Batter, 93. 

VmOBIABl^B, 141. 

Artichokes, 163. 
Artichokes, a la Milanese, 

163. 

Breaded, 153. 

Souffl6, 153. 
Asparagus, 152. 

Loaf, 152. 
Bean Loaf, 167. 
Beans, String, 163. 

Dried Lima, 163. 

Mexican, 163. 

Shelled, 163. 
Beets, 161. 
Brussels Sprouts, 152. 
Cabbage, 151. 

Baked with Cheese, 151. 
Canned Com Timbale, 165. 
Carrots, 160. 
Cauliflower, 151. 

Italian. 152. 
Celery, 164. 

Boiled. 164. 

Creamed, 164. 
Chestnut Pur6e, 159. 
Com Mock Oysters and 

Fritters, 165. 
Com on the Elar, 161. 
Com Pudding, 165. 
Egg Plant, 154. 

StufCed, 154. 
I*rench Peas, 162. 
Oreen Peas, 162. 
Greens, 149. 
Qolden Buck, 168. 



Macaroni, Spaghetti, etc., 
166. 

And Eggs, 167. 
Baked, and Celery, 167. 
Baked with Cheese, 166. 
Florentine, 167. 
To Cook, 166. 
With Tomato Sauce, 166. 

Onions, Boiled, 169. 
Fried, 160. 
Roasted, 159. 
Scalloped, 160. 
Stuffed Spanish. 160. 

Parsnips, 161. 
Fried, 161. 

Peppers Stuffed with Oys- 
ters. 158. 

Stuffed with Sweet- 
breads, 158. 

Potatoes, 141. 

A la B6chamel, 144. 
Baked Sweet or White, 

148. 
Balls, 145. 

Fried and Straws, 
145. 
Broiled, 147. 
Cakes. 143. 
Chips, 146. 
Creamed, 143. 
Delmonioo, 144. 
Franconia, 147. 
French Fried, 146. 
Fried, 147. 
Fritters, 148. 
Hashed Brown, 146. 
Lyonnaise, 147. 
Mashed, 142. 
Mashed, Milanese, 146. 
Nests, 146. 
New, 142. 
Old, 142. 
Riced, 142. 
Roses, 143. 
Scalloped, 144. 
Souffle, 143. 
Stuffed, 148, 149. 
Sweet, Southern Style, 

149. 

Creole, 149. 

Qriddled, 149. 
Uhion League, 148. 
Viennese, 144. 
Waldorf, 146. 
Routh Krouth, 151. 
Salsify or Oyster Plant, 164 
Spaghetti. 167. 



ROCKY MOnKTAIN COOK BOOK. 



Spinach, 160. 
Souffle, 160. 
Tlmbaie, 160. 

Squash, Winter, 164. 
Baked, 164. 
Summer, 164. 

Suoootash, 162. 

Sweet Com with Cheese, 165 

Tomatoes, Raw, 164. 
Baked. 158. 
Broiled. 168. 
Curried, 156. 



Scalloped. 155. 

Souffle, 167. 

Stewed. 155. 

Stuffed. 155. 

Stuffed with Cheese and 

Mushrooms. 156. 
With Celery Sauce. 157. 
Walnuts, 157. 

To Prepare Peppers, etc.. 
157. 

Turnips, 160. 
Stuffed, 161. 




*^ae** 



OVER SN"^' ' ' 



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