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Full text of "Roll of honour, Arbroath and district. 1914-1919"



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ROLL OF HONOUR 

HRBROnTH HMD DISTRICT 
1914 : 1919 



SECOND EDIT J ON. 




PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY T. BUNCLE & CO. 
MARKET PLACE, ARBROATH. 



THANKFULLY, proudly, lovingly, we, People of Arbroath, 
have made this Roll wherein are inscribed the names of 
those our brothers who have died in a great cause. 
They who are in this Book enrolled are set apart from 
those who have received all other battle honours by that 
frontier which runs through the Valley of the Shadow ; by 
that No-Man's Land which divides the Battlefields from the 
Threshold of Valhalla and the Fields of Elysium : for herein are to be 
found those only who, having paid the highest price, have earned the 
highest reward. 

Far be it from anyone by lightest word or thought to dim the 
lustre of those shining honours worthily conferred by men ; of which 
the foremost is that Cross bestowed " For Valour " only, which whoso 
wins and wears is ever after regarded by his fellows as ennobled : still 
less would one detract from the fair renown of those who have yielded 
up agility of limb or clearness of sight or health or vigour that their 
country might gain in like measure as they sacrificed. 

But, high above all, enthroned like Cherubim in the superior 
galleries, are they who gave all that was theirs to give ; and so giving, 
have gained that which whosoever will gain must give and suffer as 
they gave and suffered — that peace which passeth all understanding : 
who, having " outsoared the shadow of our night " and passed beyond 
all earthly dignities, have assuredly received the freedom of that city 
whose builder and maker is God. 

Ye lie, ye lads of ours, in Flanders, in Artois and in Picardy, 
where from your dust, mingled with that of the heroes of Crecy and 



Agincourt, shall grow lilies upon whose petals will be written 
" Faithful unto Death " in characters of gold ; in Palestine, where your 
bones share with the dauntless Crusaders, with Abraham and with 
David and the prophets and righteous men of old, that place of 
holiest sepulture ; your graves are on the rocky hillsides in rugged 
Macedonia, whither ye had gone, like Saint Paul before you, " assuredly 
gathering that the Lord had called him," to help the afflicted and to 
rescue the oppressed ; ye rest in the land in the Middle of the Rivers, 
where the sun rose on the morning of Time and God saw everything 
that He had made, and, behold, it was very good ; deep in the dim 
silences of the mighty ocean ye sleep until the sea shall give up its dead. 

But the memory of your unfaltering courage and your unswerving 
faithfulness shall live for evermore. 



THEY GO FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH." 



Words by 
Agnes Lindsay Carnegie. 



Music by 
Tom Adamson. L.R.A.M. 




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Lord God of Heaven, who watched Thy soldiers falling, 
Weary, and worn, and wounded in the strife; 

Thou who saw all — the sacrifice, the Borrow — 
Now hast Thou called Thy sons to perfect life! 

Lord God of Battles, earthly life dies fighting ; 

Peace follows pain, as night is killed Dy day ; 
And Thy true soldiers, who, like Christ, are victors, 

Deem all attained who conquer in the fray. 

Lord God Almighty. Thy Son's mother quailing. 
Sank neath the cross — her dear Son crucified I 

But at His tomb an angel voice triumphant 
Broke the deep gloom — " Arisen, glorified I " 

Lord God our Father, gather in Thy mercy 

All these Thy sons and those who love them here ; 

Then when the Last Post sounds on life's grim battle 
Show us Thy Heart, Lord, banishing all fear 

A.L.C. 



ROLL OF HONOUR 



L-CPL. R. L. BANNERMAN, B.W. 



PTE. J. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 





Lance-Corporal Robert L. Ban- 
neeman, Black Watch, twenty-seven 
years of age. son of John Bannerman, 
21 Fergus Square, Arbroath, was em- 
ployed, before joining the army, as a 
blacksmith with Mi- Wilson at Pits- 
candly, near Forfar. In March 190n 
he joined the colours as a private in 
the Blaok Watch. He w T as stationed 
at Perth, Fort George, and Curragii 
Camp in Ireland. In February 1907 
he went with his regiment to India, 
and was there stationed at various 
places, including Peshawar, Sial- 
kote, and Calcutta. He took part in 
the Coronation Durbar at Delhi, and 
returned home, time-expired, in De- 
cember 1912. Being on the reserve he 
was called up on the outbreak of hos- 
tilities and crossed to France almost 
immediately. He was probably the 
first Arbroath soldier to fall, as he 
was killed in action at the battle of 
the Aisne on the 14th of September 
1914. His commanding officer 

wrote : — ' ' He was killed while con- 
trolling the fire of his men with the 
greatest coolness and disregard of 
danger. I had always the greatest 
admiration for him as a fine leader. 



Private John G. Smith, 1st Blaok 
Watch, 41 St Mary Street, Arbroath, 
thirty-four years or age, was a son of 
Charles Smith, seaman, 16 Millgate 
Loan. He married Charlotte Emma 
Wood, and left two sons. He had 
been eight years in the army and 
was a reservist in the Black 
Watch, which he had joined shortly 
before the South African War. He 
served all through that campaign, 
and concluded an honourable record 
of service by having awarded to him 
the South Africa 1901-02 medal, and 
the medal with four bars for 
engagements in the Transvaal, 
Orange Free State, and Cape 
Colony. At the time he was 
mobilised for active service, Private 
Smith was employed with Messrs W. 
Briggs & Sons, Ltd., at their chemir- 
cal works, Elliot. He was recalled 
to the colours on the day that war 
was declared with Germany, and was 
among the first to go to France. He 
took part in the first encounters 
which British troops had with the 
enemy, and was killed on the 15th 
of September 1914 during the memor- 
able retreat from Mons. 



PTE. F. ROBERTS, A. & S. H. 



PTE. J. S. SMITH, CAMERONS. 





Private Frank Roberts, 2nd 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 
was the son of James Roberts, Ar- 
broath. He was thirty-three years of 
age, and his home was at 45 Mill- 
gate Loan. He married Johan Burn, 
and left two sons and three daugh- 
ters. Private Roberts joined the 
army in 1902, and after serving foT 
three years was put on the reserve. 
He was employed at Millgate Tan- 
work when he was called up for active 
service in August 1914. Amongst 
the first to< go to France, he took 
part in the retreat from Mons, and 
was killed in action near Lille on the 
21st of October 1914. His fate for 
some time was uncertain. Some 
months later, however, information 
was received of his death in a letter 
from Corporal Dunbar belonging to 
the same battalion, and who, having 
been made a prisoner and was then 
at a camp in Gottingen, Germany, 
wrote : — "As I do not belong 
to the same company, I made in- 
quiries, and the statements of men 
who belong to Private Roberts' sec- 
tion leave no doubt that he met a 
hero's death near Lille." 



Private Joseph Swankie Smith, 
1st Cameron Highlanders, was the 
son of Charles Smith 8 Marketgate, 
Arbroath. He was thirty-six years 
of age and unmarried. He was on 
the reserve, as he had joined thei 
army during the Boer War, and had 
served in South Africa, Gibraltar, 
and Malta. When he was mobilised on 
the outbreak of war, Private Smith 
was a factory worker with Messrs 
David Corsar & Sons, Ltd. He went 
to France with his battalion in 
August 1914, and was killed in action 
at the battle of the Aisne. 

PTE. DAVID CHRISTISON, B.W. 

Private David Christison, 1st 
Black Watch, was the nephew of 
James Christison, Detham Mill, and 
grandson of Mrs H. Christison, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty -eight years 
of age, and was employed at Dens 
Iron Works. He was a reservist, 
and had served five years in India. 
He was posted as missing on the 11th 
of November 1914, and it was after- 
wards presumed that he had been 
killed in action on that date. 



STOKER ROBERT SMITH, R.N. 



CPL. RITCHIE, BLACK WATCH. 





Ist-Class Stoker Robert Smith, 
H.M.S. Hawke, who was twenty- 
seven years of age, was the son of 
William Smith, farmer, East Ward, 
Carmyllie. He joined the navy in 
1906, and was a reservist. In 1910 
he was one of the crew of H.M.S. 
Bedford when that vessel went 
ashore in Korea Strait, and he very 
narrowly escaped with his life on that 
occasion. Stoker Robert Smith was 
of a very- cheery disposition, and was 
very popular in the service. After 
leaving the navy and being put on 
the reserve, he was employed as an 
attendant in Hawk head Asylum, 
near Glasgow. When mobilised on 
the outbreak of war he joined H.M.S. 
Hawke, and was lost when that ill- 
fated vessel was torpedoed on the 
15th of October 1914. A brother 
of Stoker Smith was also in the 
navy. 

FrE. JOHN MITCHELL, B.W. 

Private John Mitchell, 1st 
Black Watch, son of Mrs Mitchell, 
Frioekheim, was killed in action 
during the Mons retreat. 



Corporal William Ritchie, 1st 
Black Watch, Anderson's Buildings, 
Inverkeilor, was the son of James 
Ritchie, farm grieve, Rosehill, and 
brother of Mrs Ramsay, Bandoch, 
Inverkeilor. Corporal Ritchie was 
twenty-four years of age, and un- 
married. He was employed as a 
porter at Arbroath Railway Station, 
and was a member of the Railway 
Section of the Arbroath Miniature 
Rifle Club. In 1911 he joined the 
army as a private in the 1st Black 
Watch, and on the outbreak: of war 
he went to France with the first 
Expeditionary Force from Aldersbot. 
He died of wounds in France on the 
15th of October 1914. Corporal 
Ritchie had six brothers serving. 

PTE. CHAS. MACDONALD, B.W. 

Private Charles Macdonald, 
Black Watch, 3 South Grimsby, Ar- 
broath, twenty-nine years of age, 
had served in the Royal Highlanders 
and was called up as a reservist on 
the outbreak of war. He died in 
Boulogne on the 7th of November 
1914 from wounds received in action. 



2nd-LIEUT. WEBSTER, GORDONS. 



PTE. JOHN SMART, GORDONS. 





Second-Lieutenant Joseph F. 
Webster, Gordon Highlanders, was 
the second son of Sir Francis Webster 
of Ashbrook, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-two years of age, and was at 
Cambridge when he accepted a com- 
mission in the 60th Rifles. He was 
transferred to the 3rd Black Watch, 
in which he got his commission and 
was subsequently attached to the 2nd 
Gordon Highlanders. After a few 
weeks' training he was ordered to 
France, and was killed in an attack 
on Zaandvoorde Ridge on the 30th 
October 1914. He was mentioned 

in despatches for his initiative and 
gallantry on 26th October. A 
platoon was driven from its trench. 
Captain Gordon reported that during 
the retirement " the men got very 
much scattered, and many were hit. 
Taking seven men with him, Lieu- 
tenant Webster jumped out from the 
trench he was in, dashed forward 
under very heavy fire, rallied the 
men he could find, and re-occupied 
the trench. But for his coolness and 
bravery the enemy might easily have 
taken the trench and thus made the 
situation very critical." 



Private John Hay Smart, 1st 
Gordon Highlanders, 39 Oulloden 
Road, Arbroath, thirty -two years of 
age, was the son of Alexander Smart, 
and of his wife Barbara Finlayson, 
Muirside, Kinnell, Friockheim. He 
maixied Jean Bennet Duncan, and 
left one daughter. He was employed 
as a sawyer at the Arbroath Saw- 
mills. In September 1899 he joined 
the army as a private in the 1st Gor- 
don Highlanders and was called up 
as a reservist on the 5th of August 
1914. He was then drafted to 
France, where after only two months' 
service he died of wounds at Bethune 
on the 26th of October 1914. 

SEAMAN FRANKLIN GRAY, R.N. 

Seaman Franklin Gray, Royal 
Navy, son of Charles Gray, 44 High 
Street, Arbroath, was on board 
H.M.S. Monmouth, one of the two 
cruisers which were lost during the 
naval engagement off Coronel, Chile, 
on the 1st of November 1914. He 
was seventeen years of age, and had 
been eighteen months in the navy and 
was registered as a "first-class boy." 



PTE. FARQUHAR, CAMERONS. 



L-CPL. DAVID STEPHEN, B.W. 





Private Samuel Farquhar, 
Queerrs Own Cameron Highlanders, 
9 Millgate Loan, Arbroath, was the 
son of Andrew Farquhar, 20 Cock- 
burn Street, Falkirk. He was thirty- 
four years of age, and had married 
Agnes Coull. He enlisted in the 

Cameron s before the South African 
War. When called up as a re- 
servist on the 5th of August 1914 lie 
was employed at the Dens Iron 
Works. Private Farquhar left for 
France, went through the Mons re- 
treat, and was killed in action on the 
2nd of November 1914. 

PTE. MITCHELL, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Robert Mitchell, 1st 
Black Watch, was the son of James 
Mitchell and of his wife Margaret 
Stephen, Castl© Street, Friockheim. 
He was twenty-five years of age and 
unmarried. In 1907 he joined the 
army as a private in the 1st Black 
Watch. He was on the reserve, and 
was employed as a bleacher at the 
outbreak of hostilities. He was 
killed in action at Zonnebeke on 
the 11th of November 1914. 



Lance-Corpl. David M. Stephen, 
A Company of the 1st Black Watch, 
was the son of George Stephen and 
of his wife Jessie Moir, 55 Dishland 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
two years of age and unmarried, and 
was at one time employed as a 
ploughman at Leysmill. He joined 
the army as a private in 1910, and 
had served for four years and been 
promoted Lanoe^Corporal when war 
broke out. He died oif wounds on the 
2nd of November 1914 at Colchester. 

SGT. BROWN, LONDON SCOTTISH 

Sergeant Norman M'Leod Brown, 
London Scottish (T.F.), twenty-seven 
years of age, was a nephew of Mrs 
Aitken, Sandhutton, Arbroath, witli 
whom he lived for some years. He 
was in the India Office, and went 
to France in 1914 as a Corporal, 
was promoted Sergeant at the front, 
and at the time of his death had been 
recommended for a commission. 
Sergeant Brown was shot by a 
sniper at Givenchy on the 24th of 
December 1914, and was buried in 
the cemetery there. 



L-CPL. GLEN, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE DAVIDSON, SCOTS GUARDS. 





Lance-Corporai, James GlTen, 1st 
Black Watch, was a son of Joseph 
Glen, 33 Sidney Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty -one years of age, and 
was unmarried. He was an appren- 
tice turner in the employment of 
Messrs Douglas Fraser & Sons. Ho 
was a well-known footballer, and 
played in the Arbroath Fail-field 
Club, and was -a member of the team 
which won the Arbroath and District 
Cup, the Newgate Cup, and were 
Melvin League champions in 1911-12. 
Lance-Corporal Glen was a member 
of the Territorial Force, having 
joined in July 1909 as a private in 
the Third Battalion of the Black 
Watch (Special Reserve). He was 
mobilised as a reservist four days 
after the outbreak of hostilities. 
He was transferred to the 1st 
Black Watch, and went to France 
with that Battalion at the beginning 
of September 1914. He took part in 
the battles of the Marne and the 
Aisne, and oame through scathless 
the historic stand made by the Black 
Watch in the latter engagement, but 
fell in action on 31st October 1914 at 
the first battle of Ypres. 



Private Thomas B. Davidson, 1st 
Battalion Scots Guards, was the son 
of Mrs R. W. Milne, 10 Wallace 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
one years of age, and had just come 
home from Ontario when war broke 
out, and he enlisted in the Scots 
Guards. He was posted "missing" 
on the 11th of November 1914, and 
had since been reported killed on 
that date. 

SERGT. doig, black watch. 

Sergeant Doig, 1st Battalion 
Black Watch, whose widow and four 
children live in Carnoustie, was a 
son of Sergeant Doig, of the Forfar 
Town Constabulary. He was a re- 
servist and a police constable. On 
the 2nd of November 1914 Sergeant 
Doig was wounded in the shoulder, 
and advised to go to the base hospital 
for treatment. When a little dis- 
tance from the firing line he returned 
to the trenches for his haversack in 
which were some souvenirs which he 
did not wish to lose. As he set foot 
in the trenches a shell killed him in- 
stantaneously. 



PTE. LINDSAY, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. GRAHAM, BLACK WATCH. 





Pbivate Alexander Lindsay, 1st 
Black Watch, 36 Fergus Square, Ar- 
broath, was the son of James Gunn 
Lindsay and of his wife Elizabeth 
Robertson. He was twenty-nine 
years of age and had married Maggie 
Collins, and left one son. In 1904 he 
joined the 1st Black Watch, and was 
a postman at the Arbroath Post 
Office when he was called up as a 
reservist. He took part in the fight- 
ing at the Marne, waa reported miss- 
ing on the 11th of November 1914, 
and was presumed to have been 
killed in the first battle of Ypres. 

SGT. FALCONER, ROYAL SCOTS. 

Lance - Sergeant William Fal- 
coner, Royal Scots, Kinnaird Street, 
Arbroath, was twenty-nine years of 
age. He bad been in the army for 
twelve years, during five of which he 
had served in India. He was wounded 
at Mons, taken prisoner, and died 
from his wounds on the 28th of 
August 1914. News of his death was 
learned only on the entry of our 
troops into St Quentin, where he had 
been detained as a prisoner. 



Private James Graham, 2nd Black 
Watch, thirty-four years of age, was 
the son of John and Ann Graham, 
14 East Mill Wynd, Arbroath. He 
married Maria Izatt, who was living 
at Bareilly, India, at the time of her 
husband's death. Private Graham 
joined the 1st Black Watch in 1901, 
but two years later was transferred 
to the 2nd Battalion, and went with 
that battalion to India, where he 
served for eleven years. He left 
India in 1914 with the first contin- 
gents, and was killed in action on 
the 15th of November 1914. Private 
Graham had two brothers serving at 
the front with the Black Watch, one 
in the 5th Battalion, and another, 
who had been wounded, in the 3rd. 

PTE. WALTON, ROYAL SCOTS. 

Private Arthur Walton, Royal 
Scots, twenty-nine years of age, son 
of Mrs Walton, 75 East High Street. 
Forfar, was a native of Arbroath. 
He was married, and was stationed 
at Devonport when he was called up 
on the outbreak of war. Private 
Walton was killed in action in 1914. 



COL.-SGT. GLASS, BLACK WATCH 



PTE. G. BELL. BLACK WATCH. 





Colour-Sergeant Victor Glass. 
5th Blaok Watch, 30 Union Street, 
Friockheim, was the son of John 
Glass and of his wife Isabella Dun- 
can, Westgate, Friookheim. He was 
thirty-nine years of age, and had 
married Betsy Reid, and left three 
sons and three daughters. He joined 
the army in 1893 and in the Egyptian 
a.nd South African wars won four 
medals and bars. When he retired 
from the army he settled down in his 
native village working as a railway 
surfaceman. He was still imbued 
with the martial spirit, however, and 
had joined the Volunteers in 1905, 
and the Territorials on their incep- 
tion. When war was declared he 
was one of the first to volunteer for 
service abroad. While guarding an 
outpost three of his company had 
been wounded. The Captain and 
Sergeant Glass set out with stretchers 
to bring them in, and on the way the 
sergeant was shot. He died on the 
8th of December 1914 in the hospital 
at Boulogne. His Captain wrote: — 
' ' I can only say that a good, brave 
man has died fighting bravely and 
cheerfully for his country." 



Private George Bell, 5th Black 
Watch, was a son of Enoch Bell, 12 
Rosebank, custodian of the Abbey — 
a well-known townsman who had five 
sons on active service, four in the 
army and one in the navy. Private 
Bell was well known in aquatic 
circles, and was a member of St 
Thomas Swimming Club. He was 
twenty-seven years of age, un- 
married, and was the first Arbroath 
member of the local Territorial 
Battalion to make the supreme 
sacrifice. A bleacher at Wardmill 
Bleaehfield with Messrs Wm. Webstei 
& Co., he joined the 5th Black Watch 
on the 14th of August 1914, and left 
Broughty Ferry with the Battalion 
for France in the beginning ol 
November 1914. He was in Captain 
Duncan's company, and met his death 
on the 9th of December of the same 
year, falling a victim to a sniper's 
bullet as he left a dug-out to carry 
out an order which he had received 
from his company officer. The an- 
nouncement of Private Bell's death 
was received with deep regret by his 
soldier companions in France as well 
as by his many friends in Arbroath. 



PTE. MURRAY. BLACK WATCH. 



SGT. J. FOX, BLACK WATCH. 





Private James Knox Murray, 
5th Black Watch, was the youngest 
son of Edward Murray, Glasgow, 
and of Mrs Murray, stationer, 
Gardvne Street Friockheiru. He was 
an apprentice engineer with Messrs 
Douglas Fraser & Sons, Ltd., Ar- 
broath. He had joined the Territorial 
Force in 1912 as a private in the 5th 
Black Watch and after war was de- 
clared went with his battalion to 
France. He had been working in 
the trenches under the direction ot 
an engineer when a bullet from one 
of the enemy's snipers struck him 
in the chest. Lieutenant Bruce- 

Gardyne, who was near, attended to 
the wounded lad and had him at once 
taken back to the aid-post. He was 
afterwards conveyed to the hospital, 
where he died on the 5th of January 
1915. He was buried at Estaires. 
Private Murray, who was only nine- 
teen years of age, was a bright, in- 
telligent, cheery-hearted lad. He 
was a great favourite among his 
fellows, and the whole village felt 
keenly the death of the young 
soldier. His Captain wrote of him 
in terms of high appreciation. 



Sergeant James Fox, 1st Black 
Watch, 3 Ladyloan, Arbroath, 
twenty-two years of age, was the 
son of David Fox, shoemaker, 
and of his wife Mary Reid. At one 
time a ploughman at Downfield, 
Dundee, he joined the Territorials 
in 1911 as a private in the 1st Black 
Watch. He was mobilised when 

war broke out, and from Aldershot 
he went to France with his battalion 
in August 1914. Sergeant Fox 
died of wounds at Choques on the 
26th of January 1915. ' 

PTE. WILLIAM CLARK, R.S.F. 

Private William Clark, 2nd 
Royal Scots Fusiliers, was the son 
of George Clark, 31 Ann Street, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-four years 
of age, and was a very well-known 
and popular member in local foot- 
ball circles. Private Clark was 
supposed to he a prisoner of war, 
but Sergeant Cairns, who was in the 
same company and was a prisoner in 
Mecklenburg, wrote to say that Pri- 
vate William Clark was killed in 
action on the 30th of October 1914. 



PTE. W.CLARK, BLACK WATCH 



PTE. J. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 





Private William Clark, 5th 
Black Watch, Kinnaird Street, 
Friockheim, twenty-one years of age, 
was the son of Mrs Clark, Egypt, 
Farnell. Previous to enlisting he 
was an apprentice blacksmith em- 
ployed by Alexander M'Kay, Friock- 
heim. He was a much-liked man in 
the village, and had interested him- 
self in many of its organisations. 
He was a member of the Territorial 
Force, having joined the Friockheim 
Company of the 5th Black Watch in 
1911, and he went with them to 
France. On the 5th of February 
1915, the day of his death, he was 
one of a working party behind the 
lines not more than two hundred 
yards from the enemy. One of his 
comrades had been wounded just 
previously, and Private Clark was 
attending to him and calling up the 
stretcher-bearers when lije was shot 
through the head and killed instan- 
taneously. He was buried not far 
from the place where he fell. Pte. 
Clark, who was unmarried, was the 
third of the Friockheim men of his 
battalion to lay down his life fight- 
ing for his King and country. 



Private John Smith, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of John Walker 
Smith and of his wife Martha Dun- 
can, 9 Barngreen, Arbroath. He 
was a moulder at the Dens Iron 
Works and was only eighteen years 
of age. He joined the Territorial 
Division of the 5th Black Watch in 
1913. On the night of the 6th of Feb- 
ruary 1915, while the section was, 
going out of the trenches to take 
up a position as an outpost, Private 
Smith was wounded, and died on his 
way to hospital. He was buried by 
the Chaplain of the Forces be- 
side a comrade from Montrose in a 
little cemetery about four miles 
from the place where he fell. 

ACTING SGT. MARSHALL. O.G. 

Acting Sergeant Frederick 
Livingstone Marshall, 1st Cold- 
stream Guards, was the son of H. 
Marshall, Hull, an old Arbroathian. 
He had been through the South 
African War, and held two medals 
and five bars. He rejoined the colours 
in August 1914, and was killed in 
action on the 25th of January 1915. 



10 



PTE. H.SAVEGE, BLACK WATCH. PTE. R. JACK, BLACK WATCH. 





Private Horatio Savege, 5th 
Black Watch, twenty-one years of 
age, was a son of Thomson Savege, 
painter and decorator, High Street, 
Arbroath. He joined the Arbroath 
High School Section of the 5th Black 
Watch at the outbreak of war, and 
went to France in November 1914. 
When King George visited his 
army in France in December, Pri- 
vate Savege was one of the two 
soldiers of the Battalion who were 
presenued to him when he expressed 
a wish to inspect the winter clothing 
of the 5th Black Watch. On the 5th 
of February 1915 he was killed 
suddenly, and was buried in a 
beautiful orchard near the place 
where he fell, amid the roar of 
artillery from both sides. Captain 
J. A. Wilson wrote: — "It is 
a great blow to me to lose such a 
keen soldier as your son proved 
himself to be. So pleased was I 
with his behaviour that I had sent 
in his name for promotion." Pri- 
vate Savege had three brothers in 
the army, one of whom, Lieutenant 
O. F. Savege, was awarded the 
Military Cross. 



Private Robert L. R. Jack, 5th 
Black Watch, was the son of John 
C. Jack and of his wife Helen Blair, 
56 Helen Street, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-one years of age, and was 
employed at Kelly Bleachfield. He 
enlisted in August 1914, and went 
overseas in November. He served in 
France until the 9th of February 
1915, when he was wounded and 
taken to No. 6 General Hospital. He 
died there on the 14th of February, 
and was buried in the cemetery at 
Merville, near Bethune. 

PTE. R. WHITE, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Robert White, 5th Black 
Watch, nineteen years of age, was 
the son of Robert White, 21 Ernest 
Street, Arbroath. He was employed 
as an iron dresser at Dens Iron 
Works. He joined the army on the 
5th of August 1914 as a private in 
the 5th Black Watch, and went to 
France in November. Private White 
was killed in action in France on 
the 9th of May 1915— that never-to- 
be-forgotten day in the annals of 
the gallant 5th Black Watch. 



11 



PTE. DUNDAS, BLACK WATCH. 



CPL. EDWIN THOMSON, B.W. 





Private John Milne Dundas, 5th 
Black Watch, was the third son of 
David Dundas, Roys ton, Arbroath. 
He was only nineteen years of age 
and was an all-round athlete. He 
played in the 2nd XI. of the Ar- 
broath United Cricket Club, and was 
also a prominent player in the High 
School football team. Private 

Dundas was employed as a clerk in 
a merchant's office in Dundee when 
war was declared, and he at once 
gave up his civil work and volun- 
teered for service in the army. 
Along with many other former pupils 
of the Arbroath High School he 
joined the High School Section of the 
5th Black Watch in September 1914, 
and after about a couple of months' 
training proceeded from Broughty 
Ferry with the battalion to France. 
He came uninjured through all the 
fighting in which the battalion took 
part during the first months of the 
war, and was killed in action at the 
battle of Neuve Chapelle on the 10th 
of March 1915, while he was engaged 
with others of his company in 
digging trenches to secure the 
advantage gained in the battle. 



Corporal Edwin Thomson, 5th 
Black Watch, was a son of David 
Thomson and of his wife Mary Ann 
Jack, 100 High Street, Arbroath. He 
was thirty years of age and un- 
married, and was an assistant in a 
large drapery firm in London. When 
home on holiday in September 1914 
he joined the 5th Black Watch as a 
private. He was twice promoted and 
went to France on the 1st of No- 
vember 1914. Corporal Thomson 
died in a field ambulance of wounas 
received in action at Neuve Chapelle 
on the 12th of March 1915. His 
platoon commander said he was a 
great favourite with them all, and 
that he was a fine soldier, always 
ready and willing to do his very best. 

PTE. STRAOHAN, BLACK WATCH 

Private Thomas Strachan, 1st 
Black Watch, 39 Culloden Eoad, Ar- 
broath, was thirty-two years of age. 
He was married and left one child. 
Private Strachan had served for 
several years in India and was a re- 
servist. He was killed in action 
early in the war. 



12 



PTE. MELVILLE, BLACK WATCH 



A.B. WILLIAM FLEMING, R.N. 





Private William G. Melville, 
5th Black Watch, was the son of Mrs 
Mary Melville, 20 Jamieson Street, 
Arbroath. He was nineteen years 
of age and had nearly finished his 
apprenticeship as a tailor with Mr 
C. Y. Myles. He joined the Terri- 
torial Force in 1912 as a private in 
the 5th Black Watch. He left with 
his battalion for France in October 

1914, and was killed in action at 
Neuve Chapelle on the 10th of March 

1915. In writing to his mother, his 
Captain said: — "I was close beside 
your son when he was killed. He 
was out with the working party along 
with me, was struck through the 
back of the neck and killed instan- 
taneously. He was my servant for 
some time, and we always found him 
a very willing lad. In the trenches he 
was always very keen on his work, 
and always cheerful and full of pluck. 
He was a great favourite amongst 
the men of his own platoon, and his 
death will be much regretted by 
everyone, and especially by myself, 
as he was at one time in the 
battalion signallers, and I knew him 
to be a keen soldier." 



Able- Seaman William Wilson 
Fleming, H.M.S. "Goliath," who 
was thirty-two years of age, was the 
son of John Webber Fleming and of 
his wife Annie Boyle, 69 Guthrie 
Port, Arbroath. He married Beatrice 
Annie Gaynor, and left two sons 
and one daughter. He joined the 
navy in 1901, when quite young. 
Having passed for able-seaman and 
having served for nearly thirteen 
years, he joined the Royal Fleet 
Reserve. For a short time he was 
an auxiliary postman at Arbroath, 
but had been transferred to the 
regular staff at Forfar when war 
broke ouii and he was called up. 
He was lost when H.M.S. "Goliath" 
was torpedoed in the Dardanelles on 
the 12th of March 1915. 

PTE. ARTHUR, BLACK WATCH. 

Private W. Arthur, 1st Blaok 
Watch, Rossie Street, Arbroath, was 
thirty-two years of age. He was a 
reservist, and before the war was^ 
employed as a dyeworker in Dundee. 
Private Arthur was killed in action 
at Ypres on the 9th of May 1915. 



13 



PTE. ALEX. SMITH, CAMERONS. 



PTE. D. LAMB, BLACK WATCH. 





Private Alexander Smith, 4tli 
Cameron Highlanders, nineteen years 
of age, was the eldest son of James 
Smith and of his wife Hannah 
Robertson, Leytonstone, and grand- 
son of Alexander Smith, at one time 
English Master in the Arbroath Higli 
School. He was a clerk in the Penin- 
sular and Oriental Steam Navigation 
Company. He joined the 4th Cameron 
Highlanders, and after training at 
Bedford, went with his battalion to 
France in February 1915. On the eve 
of the battle of Neuve Chapelle 
volunteers for the Machine Gun Sec- 
tion were called for, and Private 
Smith was one of the men to respond 
for vhis dangerous duty. In its dis- 
charge he was severely wounded in 
the right shoulder and lung, and 
was brought into hospital on Thurs- 
day, 11th March. On Monday he 
was sufficiently strong to dictate a 
letter home, but the chaplain's warn- 
ing note at the end helped to prepare 
his parents for what was to fallow. 
He died the same night, the 15th 
of March 1915, and was buried 
in the Communal Cemetery at 
Merville. 



Private David Lamb, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of Robert Lamb 
and of his wife Betsy Orrock, 3 
Lillies Wynd, Arbroath. He was 
twenty years of age, and was for- 
merly an irondresser in the employ- 
ment of the Keith &. Blackman Com- 
pany, Ltd. After the declaration of 
war he joined the 5th Black Watch 
as a private. He was in training for 
a few months at Forfar and 
Broughty Ferry, and left for France 
in December 1914. He was wounded 
at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, and 
died two days later, on the 13th of 
March 1915, in No. 10 Stationary 
Hospital. He was buried in the 
French "Souvenir" Cemetery, 
about a mile and a half from the 
town of St Omer. 

PTE. D. HUTTON, BLACK WATCH 

Private David Hutton, Black 
Watch, was the son of Mrs Hutto i, 
46 Marketgate, Arbroath. At the 
outbreak of war he came from India 
to France with his battalion, and 
died in No. 11 General Hospital in 
November 1914. 



14 



PTE. W. SKEA, BLACK WATCH. PTE. J. LAW, BLACK WATCH. 





Private W. Skea, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of James Skea, 
21 Hannah Street, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-three years of age and 
unmarried, and had been employed 
as a moulder by Messrs Keith 
& Blackman. In October 1914 he 
joined up as a private in £he 5th 
Black Wadch. After being in France 
for five months Private Skea died of 
wounds on the 21st of March 1915 in 
No. 13 General Hospital, Boulogne. 

CAPT. HENDERSON-HAMILTON. 

Captain Charles Henderson- 
Hamilton, 12th Scottish Rifles, 
attached to 1st King's Own Scottish 
Borderers, was the eldest son of the 
Rev. C. C. Henderson-Hamilton, of 
Dalserf, and grandson of the Rev. 
William Henderson, formerly of S. 
Mary's Church, Arbroath. While 
at Oxford he was a noted one-mile 
runner, winning a British Univer- 
sities' record. He got his captaincy 
in February 1915, and was killed in 
action at the Dardanelles in the fol- 
lowing August. His younger brother 
was killed in France a month later. 



Private James Law, 5th Black 
Watch, 18 Smithy Croft, Arbroath, 
thirty-six years of age, was the son 
of John Law, potato dealer. He 

married Christina Clark and left two 
sons. Previous to the outbreak of 
war he was employed as a labourer 
at the Arbroath Sawmills. He joined 
the army in August 1914, and after 
training at Broughty Ferry went to 
France. He was wounded in Novem- 
ber 1914, and was discharged from 
hospital in December, and after a 
short leave was sent to Hawick, 
where the second line was stationed. 
Whilst there he> heroically rescued 
from drowning, at great danger to 
his own life, a comrade of the 4th 
Black Watch who had fallen into a 
rushing mill lade. A few weeks 

later, on the 28th of March 1915, 
Private Law died at the Depot in 
Hawick from accidental choking. 

PRIVATE G. MASTERTON, B.W. 

Private Gilbert^ Masterton, 4th 
Black Watch, was the son of Mrs 
Masterton, Lochty Street, Carnous- 
tie. He was killed in action in 1915. 



15 



PTE. N. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. J. ALLAN, LONDON REGT. 




Private Norman J. A. Smith, 5th 
Black Watch, who was twenty years 
of age, was the son of Alexander 
Sorley Smith, ironmonger, and of his 
wife Katherine Farquhar, 1 Dal- 
housie Place, Arbroath. He was one 
of the Arbroath High School Section 
of the 5th Black Watch (Territorials) 
who joined the colours on the out- 
break of the war. Private Smith was 
a well-known member of the Arbroath 
United Cricket Club, and was a 
capable bowler and a very promising 
batsman. He was the second mem- 
ber of the Arbroath United Cricket 
Club to fall in the war. He was on 
the staff of Messrs Frank Stewart 
Sandeman & Sons, manufacturers, 
Dundee, when he volunteered for 
service, and enlisted in F Company 
of the 5th Black Watch in September 
1914. Private- Smith went to France 
with the Battalion in November. 
Early in the following year he was 
severely wounded in the head by a 
bullet passing through a loophole 
into the trench in which he was. He 
became unconscious and was taken 
to the hospital, and died there on the 
following day, the 11th of April 1915. 




Private James Kenneth Allan. 
7th Battalion, London Regiment, 
eighteen years of age, was the son of 
Robert M. Allan and of his wife 
Hannah Kate Lang, Bowes Park, 
London, and a grand-nephew of 
Patrick Allan Fraserof Hospitalfield, 
Arbroath. He and his brother, 
Private Fraser Allan, belonged to the 
7th Battalion City of London Rifles. 
They wished to join the London Scot- 
tish, but that famous corps was full. 
Private Allan left for France in March 
1915. A few weeks afterwards, on the 
3rd of April 1915, he died of wounds 
received in action at Festubert. He 
was buried at Bethune Cemetery. 

PTE. ALEX. VALENTINE, B.W. 

Private Alexander Valentine, 
1st Black Watch, was the son of 
David Valentine, 25 Park Street, Ar- 
broath. He was thirty-eight years 
of age, had married, and left three 
children. As a member of the re- 
serve, Private Valentine was called 
up as soon as war was declared. He 
was killed in action on the 25th of 
January 1915. 



16 



PTE. D. KYDD, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. W. DONALD. CANADIANS. 





Private David Kydd, 1st Black 
Watch, twenty years of age, was the 
son of David Burness Kydd and of 
his wife Annie Cowie, 16 Chalmers 
Street, Arbroath. He was a gar- 
dener at Rossie Castle previous to 
joining the army in November 1914. 
After five months' training at Nigg, 
lie went to France. He had been 
there scarcely a month when he was 
killed by a sniper whilst on outpost 
duty on the 23rd of April 1915. The 
Chaplain wrote: — "David Kydd 
was much respected by his comrades, 
and gave promise of being a good 
soldier." 

PTE. M'GREGOR, BLACK WATCH 

Private Thomas M'Gregor, 5th 
Black Watch, was a son of David 
M'Gregor, bla.cksmith, 35 Leonard 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
one years of age, and was an iron- 
dresser with Messrs Keith & Black- 
man Co., Ltd. Private M'Gregor 
had three brothers with the colours, 
one of whom was fighting alongside 
of him when he was killed on the 
31st of January 1915. 



Private William Donald, Cana- 
dian Scottish, Winnipeg, Canada, 
was the son of Mrs D. Buchan, 
Smithy ton, Guthrie. He was forty- 
six years of age, and was unmarried. 
He was a motorman in Winnipeg 
when he joined the Canadian Scottish 
at the outbreak of war, and went 
over to France. He was posted as 
missing on the 23rd of April 1915, 
and later reported killed on that date. 



CPL. WILLIAM ROSE, K.O.S.B. 

Corporal William Rose, King's 
Own Scottish Borderers, thirty-five 
years of age, was the son of William 
Rose, 18 Bridge Street, Arbroath. 
He joined the regular army when a 
young man, and had seen twelve 
years' service in the K.O.S.B., being 
for a number of years stationed in 
India. He was working in Stirling 
when war broke out, and was im- 
mediately recalled to the colours and 
sent to France. He was killed in 
action at Ypres on the 13th of 
November 1914. His younger 

brother, Harry, was a prisoner of 
war for nine months. 



17 



PTE. FINCHER, AUSTRALIANS. 



PTE. ARTHUR BINNIE, A.&S.H. 





Private Charles Fincher, 5th 
Battalion of the Australian Imperial 
Force, was the son of Mr and Mrs 
George Fincher, Lauriston, Victoria, 
Australia. His mother was the 
daughter of Mr Nicoll, 2 Gayfield, 
Arbroath. Before leaving Australia 
he was in the South Melbourne Gas 
Works, Victoria. On the 14th of 
August 1914 he joined the 5th Bat- 
talion of the Australian Imperial 
Force. At a dinner given by the 
Essendon Football Club to seven of 
their players going to the front a 
place was left vacant with Private 
Charles Fincher' s name attached as 
a. mark of respect to Ms memory. He 
was twenty-three years of age, saw 
service in Egypt with the First Aus- 
tralian Contingent, and afterwards 
went with them to Gallipoli. He was 
killed in action on the 25th of April 
1915, the day of the landing at 
Gallipoli. Two of Private Fincher' s 
brothers, Lieutenant J. F. Fincher, 
who was twice mentioned in des- 
patches, and Lieutenant George F. 
Fincher, also mentioned in des- 
patches, served in Egypt and France 
from 1915. 



Private Arthur Kinnear Binnie, 

7th Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, 62 Port Street, Stirling, was 
the son of George Binnie, who was 
store-keeper for Messrs Dodds & 
Bathie, and of his wife Margaret 
Adamson, West Grimsby, Arbroath. 
He was nineteen years of age, and 
when war was declared was working 
as a steel moulder with the firm of 
Messrs Beardmore, Glasgow. He 
joined the 5th Black Watch in 1910. 
but was transferred to the 7th 
A. & S.H. He went over to France 
in December 1914, and was killed near 
St Julien on the 25th of April 1915. 

SERGEANT F. PHIN, GORDONS. 

Sergeant Francis David Phin, 
8th Battalion of the Gordon High- 
landers, who was twenty-seven years 
of age, was the eldest son of David 
Phin, Huntly, and grandson of 
Daniel Bra-celin, Arbroath. He was 
employed at the Arbroath Railway 
Station for several years. He en- 
listed at the outbreak of war, and 
had been only two months in France 
when he was killed in action in 1915. 



18 



PTE. W. JARRETT, SEAFORTHS. 



PTE. G. ROSS, BLACK WATCH. 




p 


fc. 


v 

i. 

1 


i 

«4^ 


. ■ • x 


■aBrjHKLV;.! 



Private William Webster Jar- 
rett, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, who 
was thirty-two years of age, lived at 
31 Elliot Street, Arbroath, and was 
the son of Alexander Jarrett and of 
his wife Margaret Kinnear Pearson, 
47J Ladyloan. He married Jane 
Garden, and left two sons and one 
daughter. He enlisted in 1901 in 
the 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, and 
served for seven years. He was em- 
ployed by Messrs M'Farlane & Co., 
coal merchants. On the outbreak of 
war he was called up and sent to 
France. Private Jarrett was killed 
in action near St Julien on the 25th 
of April 1915. Two of his brothers 
served with the Seaforths, and an- 
other was in the Black Watch. 

PTE. YEAMAN, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Edward Yeaman, 1st 
Black Watch, was a nephew of Pri- 
vate George Muir, 18 Millgate Loan, 
Arbroath, who was in the same regi- 
ment. Private Yeaman, who was 
nineteen years of age, was a miner at 
Lochgelly. He was killed in action 
near Ypres on the 9th of May 1915. 



Private George Ross, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of George Ross 
and of his wife Mary Wood, 26 
Cairnie Street, Arbroath. He was 
eighteen years of age, and before 
joining the army in September 1914 
he was employed as a moulder at 
Westburn Foundry. While cutting 
barbed wire in front of the trenches 
in France Private Ross was wounded, 
and died on the 8th of May 1915. He 
was buried in Merville cemetery. 
One of his Arbroath comrades writ- 
ing of him, said : — ' ' He was one of 
the gamest fellows I ever came 
across." This was his message to 
his mother: — "Bid her goodbye, 
and tell her I am not afraid." 

PTE. A. NESS, BLACK WATCH. 

Private A. Ness, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of Mr and Mrs 
Ness, Kinloch Street, Carnoustie. 
He was employed by the Taymouth 
Engineering Company, and was one 
of Carnoustie's best amateur foot- 
ballers. Private Ness was killed in 
action on the 9th of March 1915. An 
elder brother was in the R.A.M.C. 



19 



PTE. J. WILKIE, CAMERONS. 



PTE. A. BEATTS, BLACK WATCH. 





Private James Wilkie, 3rd 
Cameron Highlanders, aged eighteen 
years, elder son of John Wilkie and 
Isabella Black Ferguson, Woodville, 
Dumbarton, both formerly of Ar- 
broath, was an apprentice engineer 
and draughtsman with Messrs 
Denny, of Dumbarton. He joined 
the army on the 8th of January 1915 
as a private in the 3rd Cameron 
Highlanders, and was subsequently 
transferred to the 1st Battalion. He 
got three months' training at Inver- 
gordon, and was then sent to 
Northern France After a fortnight 
at the front his battalion, along with 
a battalion of the 3rd Black Watch, 
was put into the front line and com- 
manded to make a bayonet charge on 
an enemy trench. A similar attack 
by two brigades had been made in 
the morning with disastrous results, 
and in the later charge the two bat- 
talions were practically wiped out. 
Private Wilkie was killed in action 
on Sunday afternoon, the 9th of May 
1915, near Bichebourg St Vaast. 
He was shot through the forehead 
when within forty yards of the enemy 
trench. 



Private Alexander Beatts, 1st 
Black Watch, son of William Beatts, 
35 West Grimsby, Arbroath, was 
nineteen years of age, and was em- 
ployed at the Dens Iron Works. 
He had joined the army four 
months before war broke out, and 
went to France in 1914. After nine 
months' fighting there he was 
killed on the 9th of May 1915 at 
the battle of Ypres. Private Beatts 
had three brothers with the colours. 
William and Joseph were also in the 
1st Black Watch, and the former was 
killed in October 1918. James was 
taken prisoner at Mons. 

PTE. D. GEEKLE, CANADIANS. 

Private David Geekie, Princess 
Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, 
was the only son of Andrew Geekie, 
London, and a grandson of David 
Geekie, Beechlea, Carnoustie. Be 
was in Canada when war broke out, 
and at once enlisted in Princess 
Pat's Own, one of the first battalions 
of the Dominion's troops to reach 
the front. Private Geekie was killed 
in the battle of Neuve Chapelle. 



20 



PTE. DUNCAN. BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. J. MILNE, BLACK WATCH. 





Private Hay Duncan, 5th Black 
Watch, 34 Ann Street, Arbroath, 
was the son of Joseph Duncan, 120 
East High Street, Forfar. He was a 
butcher with Mr C. Steven, Guthrie 
Port, Arbroath. He joined the 
Territorials in 1912 as a private in 
the oth Black Watch, and was 
mobilised on the outbreak of war. 
After training in Broughty Ferry he 
went over with the first of the Terri- 
torial Forces to France in November 
1914. While advancing across an 
open field Private Duncan was struck 
in the foot by a piece of shell, and 
when on his way to the dressing 
station was hit again and killed on 
the 9th of May 1915. He was buried 
by men of the Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders at Auber Ridge. Pri- 
vate Duncan belonged to the Inch- 
cape Good Templar Lodge in Ar- 
broath. At a meeting the members 
recorded that he had been a life-long 
abstainer; that he did not forget his 
principles in warfare, but diligently 
sought to pass them on to others ; 
that he was greatly beloved by all 
who knew him, and had died as he 
lived, a hero for principle. 



Private James Milne, Black 
Watch, 15 Fergus Street, Arbroath, 
twenty-seven years of age, was the 
son of William Milne, Glover Street. 
H§ married Margaret Anderson and 
left three young children. He was 
employed at the St Rollox Works, 
Lindsay Street, as a canvas beamer. 
He joined the army on the 4th of 
August 1914 and went over to France 
on the 1st of November. Private 
Milne was killed in action on the 
memorable 9th of May 1915, when 
the Black Watch made their his- 
toric charge. Their bravery cost 
them dearly, but it covered their 
gallant regiment with glory. 

PTE. BALFOUR, BLACK WATCH. 

Private David Balfour, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of Mrs Balfour, 
" South America," Carnoustie. He 
was nineten years of age, and was 
employed in the Taymouth Engineer- 
ing Works. At the battle of Neuve 
Chapelle on the 10th of March 1915 
he was hit by a bullet and killed in- 
stantaneously He had a high repu- 
tation for pluck among his comrades. 



21 



ENG.-LIEUT. BEATON, R.N.R. 



L/CPL. W. STUART, D.C.M., B.W. 





Engineer-Lieutenant H. A. F. 
Lindsay Carnegie Beaton, Royal 
Naval Reserve, was the elder son 
of D. D. Beaton and of his wife 
Catherine Robertson Ross, Heather- 
cairn, Friockheim. He married Eva 
Ferrier, and lived at Union Street, 
Friockheim. He served his appren- 
ticeship at Dens Iron Works, and 
after further experience in Belfast 
and Glasgow he received an appoint- 
ment as marine engineer on one of 
the largest boats of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company. In March 
1915 he joined the Royal Naval Re- 
serve as Engineer-Lieutenant on 
H.M.S. "Trent," which at that time 
was on active service in the Eastern 
Mediterranean. Engineer-Lieutenant 
Beaton, who had but a short time 
before recovered from an attack of 
malarial fever and had probably re- 
turned to duty too soon, died of heat- 
stroke at Aden on the 15th of May 
1915, and was buried in the Maala 
Cemetery there. Mr Beaton's ready 
resourcefulness in cases of emer- 
gency, and his fearless daring, were 
evidenced on more than one occasion 
when he risked his life to save others. 



Lance-Corporal William Stuart, 
D.C.M., 1st Black Watch, Brisbane, 
Queensland, Australia, was the son 
of William Stuart, 30 St Vigeans 
Road, Arbroath. He was thirty 

years of age and was unmarried. He 
was a reservist, as he had joined the 
army in 1913 as a private in the 1st 
Black Watch. At the time of his 
being called up he was employed on 
the Blackall and Wyndorah Railway 
in Queensland. Lance-Corporal 

Stuart won the Distinguished Con- 
duct Medal for devotion to duty on 
the 9th of May 1915 at Rue de Bois. 
He started playing the pipes the 
moment he left the parapet with the 
second line, and continued playing 
the whole distance to the German 
parapet, being fatally wounded dur- 
ing the advance. It was presumed 
that he died the same day. 

PTE. P. MOSTYN, BLACK WATCH 

Private Peter Mostyn, 5th Black 
Watch, 62 Helen Street, was another 
of the Arbroath members of the 
5th Black Watch who lost his life 
in the battle on the 9th of May 1915. 



22 



PTE. SPIERS, BLACK WATCH. 



L-CPL. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 





Private Alexander Spiers, 1st 
Battalion of the 5th Black Watch, 
was a son of Alexander Spiers and of 
his wife Annie Welsh, 29 John Street, 
Arbroath. Before being called up he 
had been for five years a mercantile 
clerk with Messrs David Corsar & 
Sons, Ltd. He was a member of the 
Territorial Force, which he joined 
in 1912 as a private in the Black 
Watch. When war broke out he was 
immediately mobilised, and after 
having undergone four months' 
training at Broughty Ferry he went 
over to France. Private Spiers had 
many exciting experiences and hair- 
breadth escapes during his seven 
months' service there. One of these 
was at Neuve Chapelle, where during 
the heavy fighting, when he was 
carrying a wounded soldier, a shell 
went through his kilt. He was 
killed in action at the age of 
twenty on the 9th of May 1915 at 
Festubert, and was buried in the 
Rue Petillion Cemetery. His officer, 
writing of his death, said that his 
comrades had erected a memorial 
cross over the grave of one who had 
died so gallantly for his country. 



Lance-Corporal Alexander Smith, 
1st Black Watch, was the son of Mrs 
Smith, 17 Kinnaird Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty years of age and un- 
married. At one time he was em- 
ployed as a grocer with Messrs Low 
& Company, Dunfermline, and after- 
wards with the West Port Associa- 
tion, Ltd., Arbroath. At the out- 
break of war he joined the 1st Black 
Watch as a private, and went over 
to France, where he was wounded at 
La Bassee. He was invalided home, 
but on his recovery he returned to 
the front, and was killed at Festu- 
bert on the 9th of May 1915. 

PTE. J. M'INTOSH, CANADIANS. 

Private James M'Intosh, 1st 
Canadian Battalion, twenty-three 
years of age, was the son of George 
M'Intosh and of his wife Elizabeth 
Shepherd, Arbirlot, near Arbroath. 
He was farming in Canada when he 
joined the Expeditionary Force. He 
served in France, and although no 
details regarding his death were re- 
ceived it was presumed that he was 
killed about the 23rd of April 1915. 



23 



PTE. PATTULLO, BLACK WATCH 



PTE. H. SPINK, BLACK WATCH. 





Private Harry Pattullo, 2nd 
Black Watch, was the son of David 
Pattullo, 25 Lillies' Wynd, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-seven years of age 
and was unmarried. At one time lie 
was employed at Waulkmills Bleach- 
field. Having afterwards gone to 
America he came home and joined 
the colours in January 1915 as a pri- 
vate in the 2nd Black Watch. On 
the 9th of May 1915 his company 
carried out an attack on the German 
trenches, and suffered very heavily. 
On the roll being called Private 
Pattullo' s name was amongst those 
reported missing. Those who re- 
turned had little hope of any missing 
being left alive under such a fire as 
they had met with. On search 
parties being sent out Private Pat- 
tullo's body was eventually re- 
covered. Amongst his effects 
brought in and afterwards sent home 
was a small Testament, and written 
on the back of his pay-book there 
was found the following pathetic 
message: — "Will you please forward 
these papers to my father, and let 
him know I died for a good cause, 
fighting the dirty Huns." 



Private Henry Spink, 5th Black 
Watch, 16 Auchmithie, was the son 
of James Spink, salmon fisher, 18 
Hill Place, Arbroath. He was nine- 
teen years of age, and was a farm- 
servant at Rosehill when he enlisted 
in November 1914. He was wounded 
at Fromelles on 9th May 1915. 
Notwithstanding his injuries he con- 
tinued fighting until he was killed 
by a bullet passing through his 
chest. Private Spink's brother also 
served in the Black Watch. 

L.-CPL. S. ESPLIN, CANADIANS. 
Lance-Corporal Stewart Esplin, 
16th Canadian Scottish, twenty- 
seven years of age, was the son of 
Mrs Esplin, 39 St Mary Street, Ar- 
broath. He was killed in action on 
the 22nd of April 1915. 

PTE. RENNLE, SCOTS GUARDS. 
Private Andrew Rennie, 2nd 
Scots Guards, twenty years of age, 
belonged to Arbroath, and was a 
farm servant at Templeton. He was 
killed in action in Franoe in May 
1915. 



24 



L-CORPL. J. MAXWELL, B.W. 



PTE. DAVID DONALDSON, B.W. 






Lance-Corporal J. Maxwell, 5th 
Black Watch, 41 John Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of Mrs C. Kell, 
59 Hill Street, Dundee. He was 

twenty-eight years of age, and was 
unmarried. He was a shoemaker by 
trade, and was employed by Mr Colin 
Grant at Hill Road Boot Factory. 
Lanee-Corporal Maxwell was over six 
feet in height, and was an en- 
thusiastic player in the Ardenlea 
Football Club and trainer of the 
Violet Club. He joined the 5th 
Black Watch Territorials about 1903 
as a private, and for five years had 
been a member of the signalling sec- 
tion. In November 1914 he went over 
to France, and for six months was a 
despatch rider, but was afterwards 
attached to the telephone service in 
the trenches. On the morning of the 
9th May 1915 he was wounded in the 
hand by a bullet, but stayed in the 
trenches till the evening, and it was 
while on his way to the dressing 
station that he was killed instan- 
taneously by a shrapnel shell. A 
cross was erected over his grave 
which was carefully tended by his 
comrades. 



Privatb David Donaldson, 5th 
Black Watch, was the son of William 
Donaldson, March of Lunan, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty years of age 
and unmarried, and had been em- 
ployed as a farm servant at Irons- 
hill, Inverkeilor. On the 9th of 
November 1914 he joined up as a 
private in the 5th Black Watch, and 
was sent to France early in 1915. 
Private Donaldson was wounded on 
the 9th of May, and was taken to 
the hospital at Boulogne, where he 
had his legs amputated. He sank 
rapidly, however, and died on the 
11th of May 1915. 

PTE. GEORGE M'GREGOR, B.W 

Private George M'Gregor, 5th 
Black Watch, was the son of David 
M'Gregor, 35 Leonard Street, Ar- 
broath. He was 22 years of age, and 
was formerly employed as a cycle 
mechanic. Private M'Gregor was 
killed in action in the battle of 
Neuve Chapelle. His brother, also 
one of the 5th Black Watch, was 
killed at the front, and two other 
brothers served with the colours. 



25 



CAPT. GUTHRIE, IRISH GUARDS 



PTE. J. GRAY, LONDON REGT. 





Captain John Neil Guthkie, 
younger of Guthrie, Irish Guards, 
Guthrie Castle, near Arbroath, was 
the eldest son of Captain Guthrie of 
Guthrie and of his wife Myra David- 
son of Tulloeh. He married Vera, 
daughter of John Gordon, and left 
no family. Captain Neil Guthrie, who 
was twenty-nine years of age, was 
heir to the estates of Guthrie and 
Gagie. In 1905 he joined the army 
as a lieutenant in the 9th (Queen's 
Royal) Lancers, was transferred into 
the Irish Guards in 1908, and became 
Captain in 1913. His coming of age 
whilst he was a lieutenant in the 
Lancers was marked by great rejoic- 
ings, and he was the recipient of 
many tokens of goodwill. Shortly 
after the outbreak of war he was 
seriously wounded in France. He 
met his death at Festubert on the 
18th of May 1915 while gallantly 
leading his men to the attack. Faced 
by an inferno of rifle, shell, and 
machine gun fire, the heroic officer 
went forward unflinchingly until he 
was struck and instantly killed by 
a shell splinter. His death was 
mourned throughout the countryside, 



Private James Todd Gray, 7th 
City of London Battalion (London 
Begiment), Thornton Heath, Lon- 
don, was the son of Andrew Gray and 
of his wife Sarah Todd, 9 Dishland 
Street Arbroath. He was a promis- 
ing lad, twenty-one years of age. He 
served his apprenticeship with Mr 
Guild, hatter. Arbroath, and after- 
wards got a post as a shop assistant 
in London. He joined the Territorial 
Force as a private in the 7th City of 
London Battalion, and on the out- 
break of war went with his battalion 
to France and served as a divisional 
scout. He died of wounds on the 
25th of September 1915, after the 
capture of Loos. 



more especially in the villages of 
Friockheim and Guthrie, and a 
touching memorial service was held 
in the Parish Church. His General, 
writing of Captain Guthrie, said : — 
"He is a great loss to the regiment, 
and did splendidly out at the front." 
His CO. wrote: — His loss to us is 
immense as a soldier and a friend. 
He died a gallant soldier." 



26 



PTE. J. WATSON, ROYAL SCOTS. 



SEAMAN D. STRATHERN, R.N.D. 





Private John Watson, 1st Royal 
Scots, was the son of John Watson, 
engineer, 43 Dishlandtown Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty years of 
age, and had been employed by 
Messrs Keith & Blackman, Ltd. He 
joined the army in November 1914 
as a private in the 1st Royal Scots. 
He served in France with his bat- 
talion, and was killed in action at 
Ypres on the 12th of May 1915. 

PTE. D. FEARN. BLACK WATCH. 

Private David Fearn, 8th Black 
Watch, was the son of John Fearn, 
gamekeeper on the Panmure estate, 
who lived at Salmond's Muir. He 
was twenty years of age and was one 
of a large number of former pupils of 
Arbroath High School who at the out- 
break of war joined the colours either 
in Regular or Territorial battalions. 
Private Fearn was an ardent golfer, 
and a popular member of the Ar- 
broath Artisan Club, and at the 
time of his enlistment he was a golf 
club-maker with Mr Robert Simpson, 
Carnoustie. He was killed in 

action in August 1915. 



Leading Seaman David Bell 
Strathern, Royal Naval Division, 
was the son of David Strathern, 
grocer, Dundee, and grandson of 
David Bell, woollen manufacturer, 
Helen Street, Arbroath. He was 
serving his apprenticeship as an en- 
gineer, and was not quite nineteen 
years of age when he enlisted in the 
Royal Naval Division in November 
1914. He was promoted leading- 
seaman and was afterwards ap- 
pointed head scout for the Colling- 
wood Battalion on their leaving for 
the Dardanelles campaign. During 
service there he was killed in action 
on the 4th of June 1915. 

CPL. KNIGHT, SCOTS GUARDS. 

Corporal John Knight, 2nd Scots 
Guards, was the son of Robert 
Knight, baker, 7 Sharp's Lane, 
Lochee, formerly of Arbroath. He 
was twenty-three years of age, and 
before joining the army was em- 
ployed as a moulder at Dens Iron 
Works. He was married and left one 
child. Corporal Knight was killed 
in action on the 16th of May 1915. 



27 



PTE. JOS. DUNCAN, GORDONS. PTE. KEILLOR, ROYAL SCOTS. 




. 




"■. ' ":";■ 


, 


; 






■ 


afl 








' 


^B 


: 


Jjtl 


■:¥: ; :**dW# 




m. 






i*~ 















Private Joseph Duncan, 2nd 
Gordon Highlanders, son of Edwin 
Duncan, retired salmon-fisher, Rose- 
berry Cottage, Carnoustie, was 
twenty-eight years of age and un- 
married. He was well-known in Car- 
noustie, where he was for many 
years a pastry baker. He emigrated 
to Canada, where he lived for three 
years, but he returned and joined the 
2nd Gordons in March 1915. He was 
trained in Aberdeen and was sent to 
France on the 1st of June 1915. 
When there he volunteered for any 
work that required special daring. 
He was selected among other volun- 
teers for a dangerous expedition to 
the enemy's lines to gain informa- 
tion that was urgently needed. 
While returning in the late afternoon 
of the 17th of June 1915, he was 
killed instantaneously by a sniper. 
His platoon officer wrote: — " Your 
son was a man of exceptional ability, 
and his courage and good example 
was of a kind we rarely find in a man 
who had not served before in this 
war. I had noticed him immediately 
as being one of my best men and a 
future N.C.O." 



Private Charles W. Keillor, 2nd 
Royal Scots, 39 Leonard Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of Mrs Robert- 
son, Penicuik, Midlothian, formerly 
of Arbroath. He was twenty-one 
years of age, and was employed 
at the Dens Iron Works. He 
joined the army on the 30th of 
November 1914 as a private in the 
2nd Battalion of the Royal Scots. 
He left for France on the 8th of 
April 1915, and was killed in action 
on the 18th of June in that year. 
Private Keillor was shot by a sniper, 
and died without suffering. 

PTE. M'AULEY, BLACK WATCH. 

Private David Christie M'Auley, 
Black Watch, was the son of Mur- 
doch M'Aulay, Inverkeilor. He was 
thirty-one years of age, and had had 
eight years' service — seven years 
with the colours and one year in the 
reserve. Before he was called up he 
had been employed in the Hastings 
Jute Mills, Calcutta. Private 

M'Aulay died from wounds in 
Choque Military Hospital, France, 
on the 19th of May 1915. 



28 



PTE. WM. REID, BLACK WATCH. 



SEAMAN 



BREMNER, R.N. 





Private William Reid, 1st Black 
Watch, was the son of William Reid 
and of his wife Margaret Lownie, 16 
Brechin Road, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-three years of age and un- 
married. Private Reid was working 
at Dens Iron Works. He joined the 
army in February 1913 as a private 
in the 1st Battalion of the Black 
Watch, and was mobilised on the 
outbreak of war. He was wounded in 
France, and four months later was 
killed by shell-fire in the trenches 
on the 16th of June 1915. A whole 
trench had been blown in, and all 
the men in that part had been 
buried and killed. They were dug 
out, and respiration was tried 
on Private Reid for two hours, 
but proved of no avail. He 

was buried in a small military ceme- 
tery near by. In writing to his 
mother the Chaplain said she might 
well be proud of her brave boy, who 
had served his King and country so 
well. Private Reid had two brothers 
with the colours, one in the 5th 
Black Watch, and one in the Royal 
Navy. His father was an ex-soldier 
of the 42nd Highlanders. 



Seaman Fr\ncis Bremneh, Royal 
Navy, 23 Ladybridge Street, Ar- 
broath, was the grandson of Thomas 
Cargill and of his wife Margaret 
Taylor, 27 High Street. He was 
twenty-six years of age, and was a 
railway porter at the Arbroath 
Station before joining the Howe 
Battalion in October 1914. He 
served in the Dardanelles campaign, 
and died of an abscess on the brain 
on board the Hospital Ship Delta on 
the 12th of July 1915. 

L-CPL. G. GRAY, AUSTRALIANS. 

Lance-Corporal G. Gray, 6th 
Battalion of the Australian Imperial 
Force, was the eldest son of George 
Gray, 22 Fergus Square, Arbroath. 
He was thirty-two years of age, and 
unmarried. He served his appren- 
ticeship with Mr A. S. Matthewson, 
painter. Before leaving Arbroath he 
was a member of the Forfarshire Bat- 
tery of the Royal Field Artillery. In 
January 1915 he joined the Austra- 
lian contingent, with which he sailed 
to Egypt, and he afterwards left for 
the Dardanelles, where he was killed. 



29 



CPL. A. GIBB, ROYAL SCOTS. 



PTE. G. CROOK. ROYAL SCOTS. 







BSpWl 




iks&fffi* 


Pi 

V 


tt^ 


JBsRnsk 




L. 




Corporal Arthur John Gibb, 4th 
Royal Scots, Mediterranean Expedi- 
tionary Force, was the eldest son of 
John Gibh, stationmaster, Inver- 
keilor, and of his wife Ann Grant, 
He was twenty-three years of age, 
and was a brilliant student of Edin- 
burgh University, where he gained 
his M.A. degree in 1914 with first- 
class honours in English. For three 
years he was a member of the College 
Company of the 6th Royal Scots, 
and, although he had received an im- 
portant appointment in George Wat- 
son's College, he immediately volun- 
teered for service as soon as war 
broke out. Had he lived he would 
have taken a high place in the profes- 
sion of teaching, which he had chosen 
as his life's work. He went to the 
Dardanelles early in June 1915, and 
took part in the famous charge of 
the Royal Scots on the 28th of that 
month, after which he was posted as 
missing. After four months of pain- 
ful uncertainty as to his fate, his 
parents heard from the Red Cross 
Enquiry Office that a companion in 
the same platoon had actually seen 
him fall. 



Private George R. Crook, 5th 
Royal Scots, twenty-one years of age, 
was the son of Mrs Crook, 39 Barn- 
green, Arbroath. He was with a 
Leith engineering firm when he joined 
the Royal Scots. He took part in 
the fighting at the Dardanelles when 
that battalion distinguished itself, 
and his death resulted on the 12th 
of July from wounds received in 
action the previous day. 

PTE. ROBT. LEE, CANADIANS. 
Private Robert Lee, Canadian 
Forces, was the son of John Lee, 
Schoolhouse, Kirkden. He was 
killed in a bayonet charge at Ypres 
on the 8th of May 1915. 

PTE. BERT SNOWBALL, B.W. 
Private Bert Snowball, 5th 
Black Watch, was one of Car- 
noustie's leading golfers, and was 
employed with Mr R. Simpson, club- 
maker. At one time he had the dis- 
tinction of having beaten Vardon in 
Ireland. He was killed in May 1915 
by the same shell that wounded a 
Carnoustie and an Arbroath man. 



30 



PTE. G. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. JAMES ADAMSON, R.S.F. 





Private Geohge Smith, C Com- 
pany, 8th Black Watch, was the son 
of David Smith, March of Lunan, 
He was twenty-three years of age, 
and was unmarried. Before the war 
lie had been employed as a plough- 
man at East Idvies. He joined the 
army in November 1914, and after 
training went over to France in 
May 1915. Three months after- 
wards, on the 14th of August, 
he was killed in action. A comrade 
wrote that shelling had been going 
on for about two hours, when one of 
the big "Jack Johnsons" fell right 
into the trench and killed Private 
Smith and three other men. He was 
buried in the cemetery at Goire 
Wood, about two miles behind 
Givenchy, where he was killed. His 
platoon officer wrote: — '"I Knew 
your son very well, and I can assure 
you that his death is a great loss to 
the platoon. Always bright and 
cheery, even under the most depres- 
sing circumstances, he was ever keen 
on his work, quick to learn, and 
eager to do all he could. He was 
absolutely without fear, and was a 
great favourite with the platoon." 



Private James Adamson, Gth 
Royal Scots Fusiliers, 5 Bonnybank, 
Gorebridge, Midlothian, was the son 
of James Adamson and of his wife 
Agnes M'Kenzie, 8 Leonard Street, 
Arbroath. He married Dinah 

Hendry, of Leith. He was a tailor 
by trade, but he had enlisted in the 
regular army in 1894 as a trooper 
in the 11th Hussars. His service 
extended over eight years in 
India and Egypt. He was called up 
as a reservist on the outbreak of war 
in August 1914, and went over with 
the first army to France. He came 
through the bitter experience of the 
retreat from Mons, where he was 
wounded. He was invalided home, 
but on his recovery he returned to 
France in July 1915. A month later 
he was again wounded, this time 
with fatal results. He was taken 
to the 2 /lst West Riding Casualty 
Clearing Station, where he died 
on the 28th of August 1915 at the 
age of forty-three. He was buried in 
Lillers Cemetery, in that portion set 
apart for British soldiers, and a cross 
with his name and the date of his 
death was erected over his grave. 



31 



BUGLER B. A. PARKER, B.W. 



PTE. D. KYDD. BLACK WATCH. 




Bugler Bertie Allan Robertson 
Parker, who was twenty-three years 
of age and unmarried, was the son of 
Sergeant David Parker and of his 
wife Agnes F. Robertson, 9 Convent 
Street, Arbroath. Previous to the 
war he was employed at Westburn 
Foundry. He had been for more 
than seven years a member of the 5th 
Black Watch, Territorial Force, hav- 
ing joined the 1st Battalion in 1908 
as a bugler. He left for the front 
in November 1914, and came through 
unscathed until the 8th of Septem- 
ger 1915, when he was killed in 
action. He was engaged on listen- 
ing-post duty when a bullet from a 
German sniper laid him low. Before 
going to the war Bugler Parker was 
a very promising young boxer and all- 
round athlete. An open contest for 
soldiers was held in the Kinnaird 
Hall, Dundee, as a means not only of 
adding to the national fund, but also 
as a stimulus for recruiting. Bugler 
Parker entered for a 9 st. event, al- 
though only weighing 7 st. 8 lb., and 
met and knocked out a lad much 
bigger and heavier than himself. 
Captain Manson, of the Boys' Bri- 




Private Douglas Kydd, 5th 
Black Watch, twenty-three years of 
age, was the son of William Kydd, 
31 West Mill Wynd, Arbroath. He 
was an iron moulder at the Dens 
Iron Works, and was well-known as 
a football player, having been con- 
nected with several of the junior 
clubs. He joined the army in August 
1914 and went over . to France in 
November. He was killed by a 
sniper on the 25th of August 1915. 
The Chaplain records that his death 
was instantaneous, and that he lies 
with many other brave men in the 
corner of a quiet green orchard near 
where he fell. 



gade, wrote: — "Bert was a great 
favourite with the boys, and was 
well-liked by everyone who came into 
contact with him. I can hardly be- 
lieve we will have him no more teach- 
ing us the bugle." Bugler Parker 
was a holder of the " Mons Star." 
His father was also at the front with 
the 5th Black Watch, but he was 
invalided home and afterwards 
stationed at Forfar. 



32 



CPL. D. MURRAY, CANADIANS. PTE. RITCHIE, BLACK WATCH. 





Corporal David Murray, Cana- 
dian Expeditionary Force, was the 
son of John Murray, Kirkstile, St 
Vigeans. He was thirty years of 
age, and had married only a week 
before his death. Before going to 
Canada he was employed with Mr 
Dorward, West Port, Arbroath, and 
at the time of joining up he was in 
the Calgary Government Telephone 
Store. In April 1915 he became a 
private in B Company, 56th Cana- 
dians, and later was promoted cor- 
poral. He died on the 15th of Sep- 
tember 1915 in the General Hospital, 
Calgary, while still under training. 



Private George Ritchie, 1st 
Black Watch, 91 Leonard Street, 
Belfast, was the son of Mrs George 
Ritchie, 64 Cairnie Street, Arbroath. 
He married Mary Anna Bell, and 
left one daughter. He was a 
cabinetmaker by trade, in the em- 
ployment of Messrs Harland & 
Wolff, shipbuilders, Belfast. He 
joined the army on the 2nd of March 
1915 as a private in the 1st Black 
Watch, and after three months' 
training at Nigg, went to France 
with his battalion. He was killed 
at Loos on the 25th of September 
1915 at the age of thirty-four. 



PTE. CHARLES REID, GORDONS. 

Private Charles Reid, 1st Gor- 
don Highlanders, was the son of 
James Reid, bleacher, Arbroath. He 
was thirty-nine years of age, and 
left a widow and five children. Pre- 
vious to joining up in September 
1914, he had been employed in a 
Leven coal mine. During his service 
in France he went through many hot 
engagements, including that of Hill 
60, and was killed early in 1915. 



A.B. ROBT. MARSHALL, R.N.D. 

Able Seaman Robert Marshall, 
Royal Naval Division, was the son 
of Mrs Marshall, Carlogie Road, 
Carnoustie. He was a leading and 
popular member of the Carnoustie 
Cricket Club and also of the Musical 
Society. Before the war he was in 
the engineer's department of the 
Dundee Harbour Office. Seaman 
Marshall was killed in action at the 
Dardanelles in 1915. 



33 



SGT. ALBERT E. CROWE, B.W. PTE. W. SHAW, BLACK WATCH. 





Sergeant Albert Edward "Crowe, 
2nd Black Watch, was a brother of 
Miss Crowe, East Hills, Carmyllie. 
His lather belonged to Montrose and 
Sergeant Crowe himself was a tele- 
graph messenger at Montrose Post 
Office previous to joining the regular 
army in August 1909. He went to 
France at the outbreak of war, and 
was killed at the age of twenty-two 
in the battle of Loos on the 25th of 
September 1915. Captain Cochrane, 
who was commanding Sergeant 
Crowe's section of the Black Watch, 
wrote : — ' ' He served under me as 
machine gun sergeant since March, 
and I had the greatest regard for his 
character and abilities. He was 
killed close beside me on the 25th at 
about one p.m., a long way behind 
the German lines. He had shown 
great courage and enterprise in the 
fighting on the 25th, and had he been 
spared I would have recommended 
him for the D.C.M. I must express 
the great loss I and the machine gun 
company in general have suffered in 
his death." Sergeant Albert Crowe's 
name was mentioned in Sir Douglas 
Haig's Despatches. 



Private William Shaw, Black 
Watch, whose home was at 31 
Broughton Place, Edinburgh, was 
the second son of William Shaw, 
plumber, and of his wife Jessie Dor- 
ward, 48 Fergus Square, Arbroath. 
Private Shaw was thirty-five years of 
age and unmarried. He was for 
some time employed as a tailor with 
Mr Clancy, Dunfermline. When war 
broke out he enlisted in Edinburgh 
as a private in the Black Watch. In 
August 1915 he went out to France, 
and after one month's service there 
he was killed in action on the 25th 
of September 1915. 

CPL. J. HAG AN, BLACK WATCH. 

Corporal John Hagan, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of Mrs Hagan, 
15 Cross Mill Wynd, Arbroath, who 
had two other sons and two grand- 
sons in the service, all of whom had 
been wounded. Corporal Hagan was 
thirty-five years of age, and before 
the war had been employed at the 
Alma Works, Arbroath. He was 
wounded on the 9th of May 1915, and 
died in hospital the following day. 



34 



PTE. DAVID GRAY, GORDONS. L-CPL. D. SCRIMGEOUR, B.W. 





Private David Gray, Gordon 
Highlanders, was the son of William 
Gray, 3 St Vigeans Road, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-four years of age and 
before enlisting had been a plough- 
man. He was killed at Loos on the 
25th of September 1915. 

PTE. A. STEWART, CAMERONS. 

Private Archibald Stewart, 3rd 
Cameron Highlanders, belonged to 
Milton of Fintry, Kintore. He was 
employed as a porter at Guthrie 
Station, and was amongst the first in 
the district to enlist, which he did in 
September 1914. He was wounded 
at Loos on the 25th of September 
1915, and died four days later. 

C.S.M. BROWN, BLACK WATCH. 

Company Sergeant-Major Brown, 
2nd Black Watch, was the only son 
of Mrs Brown, Carnoustie. He had 
seen several years' service in India, 
and went to Frajice with his 
battalion. Sergeant-Major Brown 
was in the battle of Neuve Chapelle, 
coming through unharmed. He was 
killed in action in October 1915. 



Lance - Corporal David Scrim- 
geottr 9th Battalion Black Watch, 
was the son of John Scrimgeour, 31 
Leonard Street, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-six years of age, and was a 
signalman at Muthil Station. He 
belonged to the Territorial Division 
of the Black Watch, was mobilised 
in August 1914, and went over to 
France in September. Lance-Cor- 
poral Scrimgeour was posted as 
missing and afterwards was officially 
reported as having been killed in 
action at the battle of Loos on the 
25th of September 1915. 

Q.M.S. W. M. OGG, CAMERONS. 
Quartermaster-Sergeant William 
Moss Ogg, 5th Cameron Highlanders 
(Lochiel's Battalion), was the son of 
William Ogg, Houston Lea, Car- 
noustie. He was married and left two 
children. He was at one time in the 
1st Camerons, and on the outbreak of 
war he at once rejoined the forces. He 
was killed in action in October 1915. 
One of the sergeants wrote: — "He 
was loved by all his men because of 
his personal character and his untir- 
ing efforts on our behalf." 



35 



PTE. CARRIE, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. JAMES BARRIE, S.R. 




■■:■;■:-■■:■,,■ , : .,-. .■.■■;.::■■-;;■;■:. :\\Y- 




Private Peter Carrie. 8th Black 
Watch, 56 Melville Street, Loch- 
gelly, was the son of David Carrie, 
42 J East Abbey Street, Arbroath. 
He was forty-four years of age. He 
married Jane Stewart and left three 
sons and one daughter. Private 
Carrie had been seven years in the 
army, and served both in India and 
South Africa. He was at one time 
employed at the Millgate Tanworks, 
but at the time of his rejoining the 
colours in 1914 he was working as a 
miner at Lochgelly. He was killed 
on the 29th of September 1915. The 
medical officer said that Private 
Carrie had been with him all the time 
during the great battle of Loos, and 
by his vigilance had saved him over 
and over again. On the night of Sep- 
tember the 25th his assistance was 
invaluable in looking after many 
seriously wounded men, and he did 
not hesitate to go out, under fire and 
bring them in. Had he lived he 
would have been recommended for 
the D.O.M. The Black Watch made 
a magnificent charge on the 25th of 
September, and Peter helped to keep 
up the great name it had always had 



Private James Barrie, 10th 
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), 
thirty-four years of age, was the 
adopted son of Mrs Jane Welsh, 14 
Robert Street, Arbroath. He served 
his apprenticeship at Hill Road Boot 
and Shoe Factory, and was working 
in Glasgow when he joined the 
colours on the outbreak of war. He 
fell in action during the heavy fight- 
ing at the battle of Loos on the 25th 
of September 1915. 

PTE. W. REDD, BLACK WATCH. 

Private William C. Reid, Black 
Watch, Arbroath, was a brakesman 
on the Caledonian Railwav. He had 
served for two years in the army, 
had been wounded, and later was 
presumed to have been killed. 

CPL. A. LEADINGHAM, H.L.I. 

Corporal Arthur Leadingham, 
12th Highland Light Infantry, 
twenty-eight years of age, was the 
son of George Leadingham and of 
his wife Betsy Malcolm, 29 Millgate, 
Friockheim. He served in France and 
was killed on the 13th of August 1915. 



36 



L-CPL. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. JOHN WHITTON, K.O.S.B. 





Lance-Corporal James D. Smith, 
9th Black Watch, was the son of 
Alexander Smith, solicitor, Loch- 
shade Cottage, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-eight years of age, and had 
served his apprenticeship with 
Messrs Clark & Oliver, S.S.C. 
Later he was law clerk with Messrs 
Fraser, Stoddart & Ballingall, Edin- 
burgh. He was a good all-round 
athlete, and prominent in the 
cricket, football, and hockey fields. 
Lance-Corporal Smith joined the 
army in October 1914 as a private, 
and was attached to the hand gren- 
ade section of his battalion. He was 
killed in action at the battle of Loos 
on the 25th of September 1915. 



Private John Whitton, 7th 
King's Own Scottish Borderers, was 
the son of John Whitton, 15 Fergus 
Square, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
one years of age. He had served his 
apprenticeship with the High Street 
Co-operative Society, Arbroath, but 
was with the Co-operative Stores in 
Cambuslang when he enlisted in 
September 1914. When he joined the 
army he was detailed as an officer's 
servant both at home and at 
the front. After having been three 
months in France Private Whitton 
was posted as missing after the 
battle of Loos. Afterwards he was 
officially reported as having been 
killed on the 25th of September 1915. 



PTE. W. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 

Private William Smith, 2nd 
Black Watch, was the son of William 
Smith, 26 Arbroath Road, Car- 
noustie. He had been for ten years 
in India with his regiment. Private 
Smith, who was thirty-three years 
of age, died in hospital as the result 
of wounds received in action on the 
9th of May 1915. 



PTE. S. TODD, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Samuel Todd, 2nd Black 
Watch, was the son of William Todd, 
factory worker, South Grimsby, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-four years 
of age, aoid had been a member of 
the 1st Black Watch for nearly four 
years, but had later been trans- 
ferred to the 2nd. He was killed 
in action on the 9th of May 1915. 



37 



CPL. WM. JACK, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. TAYLOR, BLACK WATCH. 





Corporal William Jack, 9th Black 
Watch, thirty-five years of age, 
was the youngest son of William 
Jack, Milldens, Guthrie. He was 
employed with his brother, John 
Jack, licensed grocer, Arbroath, til) 
August 1914, when he enlisted in 
the 9th Black Watch. Corpora] 
Jack went to France in July, and 
was killed at the battle of Loos on 
the 25th of September 1915. He had 
just got over the parapet when a 
bullet struck him in the forehead, 
and he died instantaneously. 

PTE. M'ANDREW, CAMERONS. 

Private William M' Andrew, 5th 
Camerons, was the son of Alexander 
M' Andrew, plasterer, 33 Lindsay 
Street, Arbroath. Before he joined 
the army he was employed as a plas- 
terer in Forfar. He left a wife and 
two daughters. Private M'Andrew 
was killed in action on the 20th of 
November 1915, having been shot 
through the head while on listening- 
post duty. He was buried in a 
small cemetery about a mile and a 
half behind the firing line. 



Private George Laird Taylor, 
8th Black Watch, was the son of 
George Laird Taylor and of his wife 
Elizabeth Turnbull, Courthill, Inver- 
keilor. He was seventeen years of 
age, and was employed as a plough- 
man at East Newton. He joined the 
Black Watch in October 1914, went 
to France with his battalion, and 
was killed in action at the battle of 
Loos on the 25th of September 1915. 

PTE. J. HUTCHISON, B.W. 

Private J. Hutchison, 2nd Black 
Watch, son of John Hutchison, 8 
Cross Mill "Wynd, Arbroath, was 
nineteen years of age, and was em- 
ployed at Stanley Works previous to 
joining the Black Watch in 1913. 
He was killed in action on the 9th 
of May 1915. On the afternoon of 
that day the battalion heroically 
climbed over the parapet of the 
trench and charged bravely forward 
in spite of heavy losses, but before 
they had gone twenty yards they 
were cut down under a heavy fire, 
Private Hutchison being one of 
those who died in the attack. 



38 



PTE. G. HOGG, SCOTS GUARDS. 



L-CPL. JOHN MANN, K.O.S.B. 





Private George Edward Hogg, 
1st Scots Guards, Denfield, Arbroath, 
was the son of David S. Hogg and of 
his wife Jessie Murray, Denfield. He 
was twenty years of age and un- 
married, and was employed as a 
ploughman on the farm of Drum- 
bertnot, Lunan. He enlisted on the 
19th of September 1914 as a private 
in the 1st Scots Guards, and went 
over to France in February 1915. He 
was killed in action at the battle of 
Loos on the 27th of September 1915. 
Private Hogg had two brothers at 
the front — Private James, 1st Black 
Watch, and Sergeant David, R.F.A., 
who was killed the following year. 

SGT. MILLER, BLACK WATCH. 

Sergeant G. E. Miller, 5th Black 
Watch, was twenty-six years of age 
and lived at 8 Carnegie Street, Ar- 
broath. He was an assistant in 
Inverbrothock School, and was one 
of several teachers under the Ar- 
broath School Board who joined the 
5th Black Watch on the outbreak of 
war. Sergeant Miller was killed in 
action on the 9th of May 1915. 



Lance-Corporal John Mann, 6th 
Battalion of the King's Own Scot- 
tish Borderers, Parkhill Mains, Ar- 
broath, was the son of Alexander 
Mann and of his wife Jane Lawson, 
Kinnell. He was twenty-two years 
of age, and was a gardener at 
Hoddam Castle, Ecclefechan. He 
joined the army in September 1914 
as a private, went to France with his 
battalion, and died on the 27th of 
September 1915 in the Casualty 
Clearing Station at Chocques from 
wounds received at Loos. 

PTE. D. JAMIESON. SEAFORTHS. 

Private David Jamieson, 8th Sea- 
forth Highlanders, 24 West Newgate, 
Arbroath, was the son of William 
Jamieson and of his wife Joan Pert, 
26 Leonard Street. He was thirty- 
five years of age, had married Jean 
Smith, and left six of a family. He 
was an iron turner when he joined 
up in August 1914. He went to 
France in June 1915, and was killed 
on the 25th of September. He had 
two brothers in the army, one of 
whom died of wounds in 1917. 



39 



ARM.-SGT. PETRIE, F. & F. YEO. 



PTE. J. NAIRN, BLACK WATCH. 





Armourer-Sergeant Robert M. 
Petrie, Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, 
was the fourth son of James Petrie, 
blacksmith, Gravesend, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-nine years of age and un- 
married, and carried on business as 
a blacksmith with his brother in 
Gravesend. He was an enthusiastic 
footballer, and was included in the 
Yeomanry team which had the dis- 
tinction of winning the Regimental 
Cup. He joined the Arbroath troop 
of the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry as 
a trooper, and had just completed 
eight years' service when war was 
declared. He was mobilised at 
Cupar, and, after undergoing training 
in different camps in England, went 
to Gallipoli with the regiment. He 
had been only > a few weeks there 
when, while in charge of a party im- 
proving a trench at Suvla Bay, he 
was struck by a bullet from a sniper, 
and died almost immediately, on the 
3rd of October 1915. His comrades 
buried him in a little cemetery just 
behind the trenches. Sergeant 

Petrie was the first Fife and Forfar 
Yeoman belonging to the Arbroath 
district to fall in action. 



Private James Nairn, Black 
Watch, was the son of David Nairn, 
Jenny's "Wells, Boysackmuir, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty years of age 
and before he enlisted he was em- 
ployed as a shepherd. He joined tlie 
Black Watch in July 1915, and after 
several months' training was drafted 
to France in January 1916. Private 
Nairn was posted as missing on the 
14th of October 1916, and later was 
officially reported as having been 
killed in action on that date. 

PTE. T. ADAMS, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Thomas Adams, 2nd 
Black Watch, Yukon Cottage, Car- 
noustie, was thirty-eight years of 
age. He had married and left one 
child. Private Adams had seen much 
active strvice, having served with 
the Scots Guards through the whole 
of the South African War. He re- 
enlisted in April 1915. Three months 
later he was killed by a stray bullet. 
His officer, who was standing by him 
when he was shot, said : — "The regi- 
ment has lost a good soldier, and I 
have lost one of my best men." 



40 



PTE. DONALDSON, STAFFORDS. 2nd-MEUT. SIMPSON, GORDONS. 





Private James Donaldson, 5th 
South Staffordshire Regiment, was 
the son of George Donaldson, joiner, 
44 St Vigeans Road, Arbroath. He 
served his apprenticeship as a baker 
with the West Port Association, Ltd. 
in Arbroath, but for eight years pre- 
vious to joining the colours he was 
employed as a driller at the Mother- 
well Bridge Works. He was thirty- 
three years of age and unmarried. 
He was at one time a member of the 
Territorial Force, and he enlisted at 
Hamilton in September 1914 in the 
2nd Royal Scots. He was afterwards 
transferred to the 5th South Stafford- 
shire Regiment, in which he served 
as orderly to the adjutant. Private 
Donaldson had been in France for 
nearly a year when he was reported 
killed in action on the 13th' of Octo- 
ber 1915 near Hullouch at Fosse 8, 
Hohenzollern Redoubt. Adjutant 
Lamond, with whom he served, had 
a very high opinion of his character 
and ability. He wrote of him: — 
"He has been my orderly nearly the 
whole of this year (1915), and I have 
always found him worthy of respect, 
not only as a soldier, but as a man." 



Second-Lieutenant Douglas A. 
Simpson, 7th Gordon Highlanders, 
(T.F.)., was the only son of A. Nicol 
Simpson, the well-known writer, 
"Nihil Naething," Whinhurst, For- 
doun. and grandson of John Simp- 
son, manufacturer, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-five years of age, and 
before enlisting was a flax-spinner, 
being employed as assistant to his 
father at the East Mill. Brechin. He 
joined the army in February 1915 as 
second-lieutenant, and after some 
months' training went to France 
with his battalion. Three months 
afterwards he was wounded in action 
and died the following day at Warloy 
Hospital on the 15th of October 1915. 
Writing of 2nd-Lieutenant Simpson, 
the "Brechin Advertiser" said: — 
"He was a young man of high pro- 
mise. Possessed of many fine quali- 
ties, he was very popular and held in 
high esteem by all who knew him. 
He seemed to frame his own life's 
work as if he intended to so walk 
that others might profit by his ex- 
ample. When war broke out he 
looked upon it as a sacred duty to 
offer his services to his country." 



41 



PTE. C. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 



2nd-LIEUT. R. M. BUNCLE, R.F.A. 





Private Chables Smith, B Coy., 
1st Black Watch, twenty-five years 
of age and unmarried, was the son of 
David Smith, March of Lunan, In- 
verkeilor. Previous to joining the 
colours he had been a ploughman at 
Mains of Logie, near Montrose. In 
February 1915 he became a private in 
the Black Watch, and went over to 
France in July. After serving for 
three months he died of wounds on 
the 14th of October, and was buried 
in the cemetery at Guillemont. 

L-CPL. GEO. APPLEBY, K.O.S.B. 

Lance-Corporal George Appleby, 
1st King's Own Scottish Borderers, 
Lochty Cottages, Carnoustie, was 
in India when war broke out. On 
landing at the Dardanelles he was 
w ounded and was sent back to 
Alexandria, but later returned to 
the firing line. He was killed 

in action on the 28th of June 
1915 while serving with the Mediter- 
ranean Expeditionary Force. For 
his bravery he was awarded a certi- 
ficate by the General Officer Com- 
manding the 29th Division. 



Second-Lieutenant Ronald M. 
Bi'ncle, 1st Lowland Brigade, 
Royal Field Artillery (T.), was the 
only son of Dr Alexander Buncle, 
Purston, Pontefract, and grandson 
of Thomas Buncle, " Arbroath 
Guide." He was nineteen years cf 
age, and a medical student at Edin- 
burgh University. He was attached 
to the Officers' Training Corps, and 
was mess president of his battery. 
He got his commission in September 
1915. While in the training ground 
at Edinburgh his horse, startled by 
a passing engine, bolted and fell, 
kicking him and fracturing his skull. 
He was taken to Craigleith Military 
Hospital, where he died on the 16th 
of October. 

L-CPL. CHAS. GOWANS, B.W. 

Lance-Corporal Charles Gowans, 
1st Black Watch, was the son of 
Charles Gowans, Ladybridge Street. 
Before coming over to join the army 
he was employed in the Montreal 
Electric Works, Canada. Lance- 
Corporal Gowans was killed in action 
on the 9th of May 1915. 



42 



CPL. MUCKART. WELSH HORSE. 



CPL. W. HOWIE, F. & F. YEO. 



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W- '%■ 






j|^gf 






|W:g:::;^:::S::|jS;|^ 


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ftfllfll 


III 
ilia 



Corporal David Mtjckart, 1st 
Welsh Horse, was the son of David 
Muckart, J.P., and of his wife Mar- 
garet Pattullo, Tarryburn House, St 
Vigeans. He was twenty-eight years 
of age and unmarried. Before enter- 
ing the army he was an electrical en- 
gineer in connection with the electric- 
station at Llanelly, South Wales. He 
joined up on the 4th of August 1914 
as a trooper in the 1st Welsh 
Horse. He was afterwards promoted 
to the rank of corporal, and attached 
to the machine gun section of the 
same battalion. He took part in the 
Dardanelles expedition, and was for 
five weeks in the thick of the strenu- 
ous fighting on the Gallipoli Penin- 
sula. He died of dysentery on the 
14th of November 1915 in the 21st 
General Hospital, Alexandria. In a 
letter his Commanding Officer said : 
" He was a good soldier, and one of 
my most reliable men, and was al- 
ways a popular lad ; and every one 
of his comrades, as a lasting token 
of respect, contributed towards 
erecting a white marble cross and 
border on his grave with a very neat 
inscription." 




Corporal William Howie, of the 
Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, was a son 
of Thomas Howie, farmer, Beech- 
wood, Arbroath . He was twenty- 
eight years of age and unmarried, 
and was employed as a traveller for 
Mr James A. Thomson, ironmonger. 
He joined the army in September 
1914 as a trooper. He served in 
Gallipoli, and was killed instan- 
taneously at Suvla Bay on the 28th 
of November 1915 through a shell 
from the Turkish lines e/xploding 
amongst a party of the Yeomanry who 
had just come in from the firing line. 

LIEUT. HENDERSON-HAMILTON 

Lieutenant James Campbell 
Henderson-Hamilton, 9th Black 
Watch, thirty-one years of age, was 
the younger son of the Rev. C. C. 
Henderson-Hamilton, and grandson 
of the Rev. William Henderson, 
formerly incumbent of S. Mary's 
Church, Arbroath. He was killed in 
action in France on 25th-27th Sep- 
tember 1915, just a month after his 
elder brother was killed at the Dar- 
danelles. 



43 



PTE. D. PYPER, SEAFORTHS. PTE. S. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 





Private David Pyper, 48th Sea- 
t'orth Highlanders, Lena, Manitoba, 
Canada, was the son of Robert 
Pyper, Lenaville, Huntingdon Road. 
Dumfries, who for many years was 
Inspector of Police in Arbroath. Pri- 
vate Pyper was thirty-eight years of 
age. In 1904 he had married Mary 
Baxter, a Canadian, and he left two 
sons. He was a master builder of 
wooden houses in Saskatchewan and 
all over the country. Early in 1915 
he joined the army in Victoria, Brit- 
ish Columbia, as a pioneer sergeant. 
On his arrival in England he was a 
provost sergeant, but as he was 
anxious to get to the front at once 
he transferred to the 31st Seaforth 
Higlanders as a private as that 
battalion was just getting ready 
to go overseas. He was engaged 
as a sniper, and on the 9th 
of November 1915 was shot on the 
left hand by an explosive bullet. He 
was admitted to Boulogne Hospital, 
and a week later was put on board 
the hospital ship Anglia to be taken 
to Dover, but was drowned when the 
vessel was sunk on the 17th of 
November. 



Private Sydney Smith, 8th Black 
Watch, who was thirty-two years of 
age and unmarried, was the youngest 
son of William Smith, joiner, and of 
his wife Beattie Ann Harris, 7 Lady- 
loan, Arbroath, and grandson of 
David Harris, butcher, Millgate, Ar- 
broath. He was employed at Kelly 
Bleachfield. Private Smith joined 
the Royal Highlanders in Perth in 
May 1915, and died of wounds in the 
4th General Hospital, Versailles, on 
the 30th of December 1915. 

PETTY OFFICER JAGGER. B.N. 

Petty Officer John Jagger, 
Royal Navy, son of Mrs Jagger, 93 
Keptie Street, Arbroath, was twenty- 
seven years of age. On leaving the 
High School he joined the navy. He 
had been for three years on H.M.S. 
Natal, when on the 30th of December 
1915 it was sunk by an internal ex- 
plosion in Invergordon Harbour. 
Petty Officer Jagger had a day off 
duty on the day of the disaster, but 
instead of going ashore he spent the 
day resting, and was in his bunk 
when the explosion occurred. 



44 



LIEUT. S. S. ANDERSON, R.S.F. L-CPL. S. GLASS, BLACK WATCH. 




Lieutenant Samuel Stephen 
Anderson, 5th Royal Scots Fusi- 
liers, thirty-three years of age, was 
the son of Mrs Anderson, 19 Leam- 
ington Terrace, Edinburgh. He 
taught modem languages for four 
years in Arbroath High School, and 
latterly in Ayr Academy. " S. S.," 
as he was familiarly called in Ar- 
broath, was a member of the local 
opera company, and his fine bass 
voice was frequently heard on the 
concert platform — that same voice 
which in Gallipoli on the evening of 
his last Christmas Day (four days be- 
fore his death) cheered his brothel- 
officers in what was voted a "great 
evening' ' by singing in French the 
Marseillaise. Lieutenant Anderson 
enlisted as a private in September 
1914, and, as his Brigadier General 
said, from the first he showed the 
greatest determination and energy, 
and was marked out for early pro- 
motion. He rose through all the 
ranks, and won his commission on the 
field. While a sergeant he acted as 
interpreter in Gallipoli. Later he 
went through the fiery ordeal of the 
29th-30th December 1915, and was 




Lance-Corporal Stephen Glass, 
2nd Black Watch, thirty-six years of 
age, was the son of John Glass and of 
his wife Isabella Duncan, Westgate. 
Friockheim. He joined the Terri- 
torials in 1911, and was working at 
Friockheim Bleachfield when he was 
mobilised. He was killed at Festu- 
bert o<n the 9th of May 1915, during 
a heroic advance under heavv fire. 



killed instantaneously by a shell on 
the 30tb He lies with many of his 
brother officers and men in a grave 
at the head of the Krithia Nullah. 
The following was written in his 
memory by Private Robertson, lec- 
turer in history in Birmingham Uni- 
versity : — 



You were called early to those hills afar 
Where once reigned desolation, and once more 
She reigns with Death, her consort, to the shore, 
Where the sea waves lament the dead that are 
Imprisoned in that kingdom. And you went 
By joy attended— and by fears, but 'these 
You conquered in repeated victories — 
To the' sad battles of the Orient. 
But Death was angered at your high disdain, 
And at the latest hour his vengeance wrought, 
Yet gaine 1 no triumph; for, serene in thought, 
You met his coming; so for you, though slain, 
Scarcely we grieve, but say, " Do they not live 
Who counted life a little thing to give ? " 



45 



PTE. MACLURE, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. D. SIM, BLACK WATCH. 





Private Edward Maolube, 2nd 
Black Watch, who was twenty-one 
years of age, was the son of John 
M. Maclure, Arbroath Dye Works, 
and of his wife Isabella Scott. 3 Fer- 
gus Square, Arbroath. He served 
his apprenticeship as an engineer 
with Messrs Douglas Fraser & Sons, 
and before going to the front was an 
engineer in the employment of the 
British United Shoe Machine Co., 
Leicester. He joined the army in 
November 1914, and after some 
months' training at Nigg. Ross- 
shire, he left for France with the 2nd 
Black Watch in March 1915, but 
was afterwards transferred to the 
Machine Gun Corps. He left France 
in December for Mesopotamia, and 
was killed in action there on the 21st 
of January 1916. His sergeant, writ- 
ing of him, said : — "He feared noth- 
ing and was a great loss to the gun." 

PIPER J. DAVIS, BLACK WATCH 

Piper John Davis, 2nd Black 
Watch, who was at one time a 
gardener at Abbethune. was killed in 
action on the 27th of September 1915. 



Private David Sim, Black Watch, 
27 Panmure Street. Arbroath, was 
the son of William Sim. He married 
Susan Balfour, and left two sons and 
one daughter. He was at one time 
employed in the Goods Department, 
Leith Walk Station, Edinburgh. 
Private Sim joined the army in Sep- 
tember 1914, and went to France with 
his regiment two months later. In 
January 1915 he was invalided home 
for six months. After returning to 
France and serving there for a short 
time he was sent to> the eastern 
front, and it was presumed that he 
was killed at the Persian Gulf on 
the 21st of January 1916. 

ACTG.-SGT. WILLIAM LAMB, R.E. 

Acting-Sergeant William Lamb, 
Royal Engineers, thirty-one years of 
age, was the only son of Mrs Lamb, 
Barry Road, Carnoustie. He served 
his apprenticeship with Mr C. Black, 
builder, Carnoustie. He afterwards 
joined the Royal Engineers and 
served for twelve years, mostly in 
India and China. Sergeant Lamb was 
killed in action in November 1915. 



46 



GUNR. W. G. WISHART, R.F.A. PTE. MALCOLM, BLACK WATCH. 





Gunner W. G. Wishart, Royal 
Field Artillery, 16 Cedar Street, 
Lower Broughton, Manchester, was 
the son of John Wishart, 41 
Lordburn, Arbroath. He was 

thirty-five years of age, had married 
Mary Norrie, and left one son. He 
had sei'ved seven years in India, but 
was in a hose-pipe factory in Man- 
chester when he was mobilised in 
1914, and was drafted to Mesopo- 
tamia. On the first of March 1916 he 
was going up the Tigris with a convoy 
when he was accidentally drowned. 

PTE. R, GILL, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Robert Gill, Black 
Watch, twenty-eight years of age, 
was a son of William Gill and of his 
wife Sarah Ann Toward, 35 Jamieson 
Street, Arbroath. He had served in 
India before the war, but had pro- 
cured his discharge, and was working 
with his father when he joined up. 
After he had been two years in 
France he was reported missing in 
October 1916, and was presumed to 
have' been killed. His brother, Frank, 
was killed in action in May 1918. 



Private Joseph Malcolm, 9th 
Black Watch, was the youngest son 
of James Malcolm and of his wife 
Mary Ann Mann, Guthrie Quarries. 
He was twenty-four years of age and 
unmarried, and had been employed 
as a ploughman at Mains of Letham. 
He joined the army in August 1915, 
and died of wounds received in action 
in France on the 13th of March 1916. 

C.P.O. DUNDAS, D.S.M., R.N.R. 

Chief Petty Officer Alexander 
H. Dundas, D.S.M., Royal Naval 
Reserve, was a nephew of Bailie 
Dundas, Princes Street, Arbroath. 
He was thirty-three years of age, and 
was at one time employed with Mr 
Dargie, painter, and at the Abbey 
Leather Works. He entered the navy, 
and was on board a training ship in 
the Forth. After serving for twelve 
years he was placed on the Naval 
Reserve. For his conduct in connec- 
tion with the sinking of a submarine 
Chief Petty Officer Dundas gained 
the Distinguished Service Medal. 
He was drowned while serving in the 
North Sea. 



47 



PTE. W. D. JACK, BLACK WATCH 



PTE. RODGER, ROYAL SCOTS. 





Private William D. Jack, 5th 
Black Watch, was the son of John 
C. Jack and of his wife Helen Blair, 
56 Helen Street, Arbroath. He was 
seventeen years of age and had been 
working at Kelly Bleachfield. He 
was a member of the Territorial 
Fare© and was mobilised in Septem- 
ber 1914. He was training at 
Auehterarder, and when practising 
gymnastics there he met with a 
serious accident. He was taken to 
the Dundee Military Hospital, where 
he died on the 8th of March 1916. He 
was buried in the Eastern Cemetery, 
Arbroath, with full military honours, 
many beautiful wreaths manifesting 
the grief of his comrades in arms 
and personal friends. His Command- 
ing Officer wrote of him : — "He was 
in my company for several months, 
and was very promising ; he was an 
excellent shot, and always bright 
and cheery and ready to do his work. 
He was very popular with his com- 
panions, and there is not an officer 
or man in the company but feels his 
loss very much. He led his life 

cheerily and well, and died in the 
service of his country." 



Private Arthur Rodger, 13th 
Battalion Royal Scots, was the 
second son of Mrs J. Rodger, 12 Kyd 
Street, Arbroath. He was nineteen 
years of age, and previous to his 
joining the army in July 1915 w'as 
employed as a labourer at the West- 
burn Foundry. He first joined the 
3rd Royal Scots, but was afterwards 
drafted to the 13th Battalion. Pri- 
vate Rodger was on sentry duty on 
the 20th of March 1916 at Hill 70, 
near the village of Loos, when the 
enemy started a very heavy bom- 
bardment. He was hit by shrapnel 
and instantaneously killed. 

SGT. E. MARQUIS, GORDONS. 

Sergeant Ernest Marquis, 8th 
Gordon Highlanders, was the son of 
Mrs Marquis, Westhaven, Carnous- 
tie. He served his apprenticeship 
as a gamekeeper on the Panmure 
estate. Sergeant Marquis was men- 
tioned in despatches for meritorious 
conduct in the field in January 1916. 
Later he was officially reported killed 
in action. A brother of Sergeant 
Marquis was also serving at the front. 



48 



PTE. DAVID JACK, GORDONS. 



PTE. HOWIE, R.A.M.C. (T.). 




mm 



mam 




Private David S. ^M. Jack, 8th 
Gordon Highlanders, was the son of 
James Jack and of his wife Margaret 
Sinclair. 2 Burcot Koad, Meersbrook, 
Sheffield. Private Jack was a native 
of Arbroath, his father having been 
for many years a leading engineer in 
the Dens Iron Works. He was eigh- 
teen years of age, and when he joined 
Kitchener's Army in November 1915 
he was working as a shell turner at 
Messrs Hadfield's, Newhall Road, 
Sheffield. After going through three 
and a half months' training at Aber- 
deen lie went to France. On the 1st 
of April 1916 he was shot through 
the head and killed instantaneously 
while on duty in a listening post. 
He was buried in a military ceme- 
tery behind the trenches. His Com- 
manding Officer wrote that he was a 
great loss to all who knew him, and 
he would be much missied. 

ARTIFICER, R, STEWART. R.N. 

Artificer Robert Stewart, R.N., 
son of Mrs Stewart, Rose Street, 
Carnoustie, lost his life while on 
duty in His Majesty's navy in 1915. 



Private William Howie, 1st 
Lowland Field Ambulance, R.A.M.C. 
(T.), was the elder son of Thomas J. 
Howie and of his wife Mary 
Morrison, Auchinblae, 23 Kirkburn 
Avenue, Cambuslang, and grandson 
of William Howie, draper, Arbroath. 
He was thirty-one years of age and 
unmarried. He had an appointment 
in the Dominion Bank, first at Win- 
nipeg, and latterly as assistant 
accountant in the branch at Vancou- 
ver, B.C. During his stay at Winni- 
peg he was an enthusiastic athlete 
and footballer, and captained the 
team in connection with Ralph 
Connor's Church. At the outbreak 
of war he resigned his appointment, 
and came home and joined the 1st 
Lowland Field Ambulance, then 
stationed at Yorkhill, Glasgow. Pte. 
Howie was a brother of Captain 
and Adjutant Adrian M. Howie, 
M.R.C.V.S., who was in charge of 
the South African Veterinary Corps 
engaged in East Africa, under 
General Smuts. Private Howie died 
of meningitis at Hawiok on the 25th 
of April 1916. and was buried at 
Arbroath. 



49 



PTE. J. SKENE, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. BREMNER, BLACK WATCH 





Private John Gilbert Skene, 2nd 
Black Watch, was the sod of Gilbert 
Skene and of his wife Margaret 
Young. 3 Ogilvy Place, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-five years of age and 
unmarried, and was at one time 
employed as a farm servant at the 
Mains of Glamis, near Forfar. He 
joined the army in July 1910, and 
went with his regiment to France 
on the outbreak of war. He was 

wounded in action in October 1914, 
his spine having been seriously in- 
jured. Private Skene got his dis- 
charge as no longer physically fit for 
war service in October 1915. He died 
in King George's Military Hospital 
in London on the 11th of April 1916. 
His patience and fortitude during his 
long illness won the admiration of 
the military and hospital authorities. 
and they arranged that he should be 
buried in his native town. Beautiful 
wreaths were sent from the Tommies 
in the hospital, the nursing staff, 
the Marchioness of Ripon, and from 
Colonel Dennison. Private Skene 
was one of four brothers who were 
on active service from the beginning 
of the war. 



Private George R. Bremner. 
5th Black Watch, 33 Barngreen, 
Arbroath, was the son of Joseph 
Bremner, 1 West End Place. Edin- 
burgh. He was twenty-eight years 
of age, and had married Eliza Chal- 
mers, leaving no children. He had 
served his apprenticeship with Messrs 
David Corsar &■ Sons, Ltd., but pre- 
vious to the outbreak of war he was 
employed as a labourer in the elec- 
tricians' department of Messrs Jas 
Keith & Blackman, Ltd. In 1912 he 
joined the Territorials, and was a 
keen member of the Force. He was 
mobilised, and became a kettle- 
drummer in the Pipe Band of the 5th 
Black Watch. After being trained 
at Broughty Ferry he went with his 
battalion to France in November 
1914. When serving in the trenches 
there as an officer's orderly he met 
his death on the 22nd of April 1916. 
The trench being shelled, Private 
Bremner was killed and his officer 
seriously wounded. His major writ- 
ing, said: — "All the officers were 
very fond of him, and all ranks will 
miss him." He was buried in the 
British cemetery at Festubert. 



50 



PTE. FULLERTON, CANADIANS. 



PTE. CUMMING, BLACK WATCH. 





Private William Fullerton, 43rd 
Canadian Cameron Highlanders. 
Cabri, Saskatchewan, Canada, was 
the son of David Fullerton, Redford, 
Carmyllie. He was twenty-seven 

years of age, and was farming in 
Canada when war broke out. He 
volunteered for service, joined the 
Canadian Cameron Highlanders, and 
came over with the second contin- 
gent from the Dominion. After a 
few months in Britain, he went to 
France, and was killed in action on 
tbe 19th day of May 1916. He was 
buried in Maple Cemetery, Belgium. 

ENGINEER GEO. HUNTER, R.N. 

Engineer George Hunter, Royal 
Navy, thirty-two years of age, was 
the son of John Hunter, quarrier, 
Carmyllie He was in the Royal 
Naval Reserve, and was called up on 
the outbreak of war. He w-as serv- 
ing as engine-room artificer on 
H.M.S. Hampshire when that vessel, 
with Ljprd Kitchener on board, was 
lost on the 5th of June 1916. En- 
gineer Hunter was presumed to have 
been drowned on that date. 



Private James Stuart Cumming, 
9th Black Watch, was the son of 
Francis Cumming and of his wife 
Mary Stuart, 33 Dishlandtown Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-three 
years of age and unmarried. He was 
a moulder with Messrs Alexander 
Shanks & Son, Ltd., and joined 
Lord Kitchener's Army in October 
1914 as a private in the 9th Black 
Watch. He served at the front in 
Fiance from June 1915 until the 24th 
of May 1916, when he died of wounds. 
Private Cumming had two> brothers 
serving with the colours — Gunner 
A. Cumming, Forfarshire Battery, 
R.F.A., who was killed in action, and 
Walter Cumming, in the R.N.R. 

GNR. JAMES MURRAY, R.F.A. 

Gunner James Murray, Royal 
Field Artillery, twenty-three years of 
age, was the son of John Murray, 
Kinnell Mill. He had married Agnes 
Clark, and was a farm servant at 
Hilton of Fearn. In September 1914 
he joined the colours, but had been 
only three weeks in France when he 
died on the 22nd of September 1916. 



51 



LT. HUNTER, SURREY RIFLES. 



PTE. GERRARD, ROYAL SCOTS. 





Lieutenant Alexander Forben 
Hunter, 21st (County of London.) 
Battalion, London Regiment (First 
Surrey Rifles), twenty-one years ot 
age, was the son of James M. Hunter 
and of his wife Phoebe Forbes, Clair- 
mont, Keptie Road, Arbroath. Pre- 
vious to joining up he was a clerk in 
the Chartered Bank of India, Aus- 
tralia, and China, London, E.C. In 
July 1915 he joined the Artists' Rifles 
as a private, and in December of the 
same year receibed his commission 
in the 21st (County of London) Bat- 
talion of the London Regiment) First 
Surrey Rifles). He went to France 
in March 1916, and a couple of 
months afterwards it was officially 
reported that he was killed in action 
on the 23rd of May. His officer, in a 
letter to his father, stated that the 
battalion took part in an attack on 
the night of the 23rd May. Lieu- 
tenant Hunter led his platoon over 
the parapet with the utmost gallan- 
try. Practically all his platoon was 
wiped out. He further added: — 
" Lieutenant Hunter was an excel- 
lent boy, most popular, a charming 
companion, and an excellent soldier." 



Private Allan Gerrard, 12th 
Royal Scots, son of George Gerrard 
and of his wife Mary Fraser. 3 
Leonard Street, Arbroath, was 
twenty-two years of age. He was 
enployed as an assistant tenter at 
the Baltic Works, and was well- 
known in junior football circles. He 
joined the army in March 1915, and 
went to France in October. He was 
fatally wounded in the trenches by 
the bursting of a rifle grenade close 
beside him. He was taken to No. 8 
Casualty Clearing Station, where he 
died three days later, on the 24th 
of May 1917, and he was buried in 
the cemetery at Bailleul. 

SGT. T. M'lVOR, BLACK WATCH. 

Sergeant Thomas M'Ivor, 9th 
Black Watch. 5 Cross Mill Wynd, 
Arbroath, was previous to the war 
employed as a miner at Bowhill, 
Fifeshire. He . married Catherine 
Yeaman, and left three children. 
He joined the colours in May 1915, 
and three of his brothers were also 
in the army. Sergeant M'Ivor was 
killed in action in 1916. 



52 



A.B. D. MACPHERSON, R.N.V.R. PTE. J. STEPHEN, CANADIANS. 




Able-Seaman David Macpheeson, 
Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 
Clyde Division, was the son of David 
Wilson Macpherson. engine driver, 
57 Kinnaird Street, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-eight years of age. He 
served his apprenticeship in the West 
Port Association, and was afterwards 
in Motherwell for a few years. He 
subsequently went to America, and 
returning to Scotland, was employed 
for some months in the grocery trade 
at Coatbridge. He joined the navy 
in August 1915, and was killed in 
action on board Admiral Arbuthnot's 
flag ship, Defence, at the battle of 
Jutland on the 31st of May 1916. His 
brother, George, was also engaged 
in the encounter on a destroyer. 

S.-S. ALEX. M'QUATTIE, F. & F. Y. 

Shoeing-Smith Alex. M'Quattie, 
Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, nineteen 
years of age, was an apprentice 
blacksmith at Hayhillock, Carmyllie. 
He had joined the army, and was 
mobilised in August 1914, drafted 
to Gallipoli, where he took ill, and 
died at Malta in 1915. 




Phivate James Stephen, 7th 
Platoon, B Company, 49th Battalion, 
Canadian Expeditionary Force, 
Strome, Alberta, Canada, was the son 
of Alexander Stephen, East Scryne, 
Carnoustie, formerly at Lawton, 
near Arbroath. Private Stephen was 
twenty-eight years of age, and lie 
was farming in Canada when war 
broke out. He joined the Expedi- 
tionary Force in January 1915, and 
was reported missing on the 3rd of 
June 1916. Later he was officially 
reported killed. His corporal, writ- 
ing of him, said: — "He was one of 
the finest fellows I ever met, and was 
well liked by all who knew him." 

CPL. BLACK, BLACK WATCH. 

Cobpoeal Alexander Black, 9th 
Black Watch, was the son of John 
Black, Arbroath. He was thirty- 
two years of age, and left a widow 
and five children. Corporal Black's 
brother, Private John Black, was 
severely wounded in the fighting on 
the Tigris. Corporal Alexander 
Black was killed in action in France 
in May 1916. 



53 



PTE. T. SCOTT, SEAFORTHS. PTE. WILFRED MEEKISON, R.S. 





Private Thomson Scott. 5th 
Seaforth Highlanders, was the eldest 
son of the Rev. A. Murray Scott and 
of his wife Jessie Thomson, United 
Free Church Manse, Colliston, Ar- 
broath. He was thirty-three years 
of age and was unmarried. Previous 
to the outbreak of war he was in 
business as a chartered accountant 
in London. He joined the Seaforth 
Highlanders in September 1914, and 
went into training at Bedford, where 
he remained for several mouths, and 
afterwards left for France in the 
summer of 1915. While on sentry 
duty a few miles from Arras Private 
Thomson Scott was instantaneously 
killed on the 4th of June 1916 by 
the bursting of a shell in the trench 
he was in. The Officer Commanding 
A Company, 5th Seaforth High- 
landers, wrote: — "I share the re- 
spect in which he was held by all 
who oame in contact with him. No. 1 
platoon, in which he was, are to-day 
mourning as they have never 
mourned before. He was a fine 
soldier, aaid as fine a comrade. As 
a business man he was invaluable as 
company accountant." 



Private Wilfred Meekison, 15th 
Royal Scots, was the son of James 
Meekison and oif his wife Mary Milne, 
33 St Vigeans Road, Arbroath. He 
was thirty-three years of age, and 
was a steel worker in Motherwell. 
In June 1915 he joined the 18th Re- 
serve Battalion Royal Scots, and 
went to France early in 1916. He 
there joined the 15th Royal Scots, 
and was for some time attached to 
the Royal Engineers. Private 

Meekison had just returned to his 
unit when he was killed in the 
trenches, instantaneously, by a shell 
on the 23rd of June 1916. His officer 
described him as an "excellent sol- 
dier whom we can ill afford to lose." 

PTE. GEO. BLACK, CANADIANS. 

Private George Black, Canadian 
Highlanders, was the son of J. Black, 
Graham Place, Carnoustie. He was 
a moulder, and had been in the Tay- 
mouth Engineering Works. Private 
Black had been in Canada, and re- 
turned with his regiment in Decem- 
ber 1915. He was wounded, and 
died on the 29th of April 1916. 



54 



SGT. D. SMITH, BLACK WATCH. 



CPL. MIDDLETON, ROYAL SCOTS 





Sergeant David Smith, 5th Black 
Watch, son of Mrs Smith, Grant 
Place, Carnoustie, was twenty-four 
years of age. He served his appren- 
ticeship as an iron turner in the Tay- 
mouth Engineering Works. He was 
a member of the Territorial Force, 
and was well-known and popular in 
Carnoustie. In August 1914 he was 
mobilised as a private in the 5th 
Black Watch, and later, when in 
France, he did great service by 
initiating the throwing of grenades 
with the rifle. It was while explain- 
ing the method to his officer that a 
grenade accidentally burst and killed 
him on the 23rd of June 1916. His 
major wrote : — "He died a grand 
soldier, loved and respected by all 
ranks in his special branch. Just a 
few days before he was one of a 
selected few who carried out a great 
enterprise. To be selected in our 
battalion is a great honour, and I 
know that his work on that occasion 
added greatly to the success of the 
enterprise, which brought to the 
battalion great praise and con- 
gratulations from corps commanders 
downwards." 



Corporal George Mijddleton, 3rd 
Royal Scots, son of James Middle- 
ton, 26 Helen Street, Arbroath, was 
twenty years of age. He was a 
plumber with Mr John Rayne, 
and joined the army in Novem- 
ber 1914. After being trained at 
Weymouth and Hawick, he left for 
France in August 1915. Two days 
before his death, on the 29th of June 
1916 he was promoted to corporal. 
He was one of a covering party, and 
was about to cross the parapet when 
he fell a victim to a German sniper. 
He was buried in the British 
cemetery at Vermilles. 

PTE. ADAM SUTHERLAND, R.S. 

Private Adam Sutherland, Royal 
Scots, lived at 70 Lochland Street 
Arbroath. He was thirty-six years 
of age, and left a widow and one 
child. Before he joined the army 
he was employed as a farm servant 
at Hospitalfield. He enlisted in 

January 1915, and had been at the 
Western front for a year. Private 
Sutherland was killed in action on 
ttoa 12th of May 1916. 



55 



PTE. JAMES BEATTIE, R.N.D. 



LT. BROWN, LONDON SCOTTISH. 





Private James Beattie. 1st Hawke 
Battalion, Royal Naval Division, was 
the elder son of James Beattie, 
Sea ton Lodge, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-four years of age and served 
his apprenticeship as an engineer at 
Dens Iron Works. Previous to the 
war he was employed for a time with 
an engineering firm in Newcastle. 
He was a well-known player in the 
Ardenlea Football Club. About two 
months after war broke out he en- 
listed as a seaman in the 1st Hawke 
Battalion, Royal Naval Division. 
After being trained at the Crystal 
Palace and Blandford he went with 
his battalion to the Dardanelles, 
where he remained for several 
months. On the evacuation of 
Gallipoli he was sent to a rest camp 
at Mudros, and in May 1916 was 
transferred to France. Private 
Beattie had been in the trenches only 
a couple or hours wheii he was in- 
stantaneously killed by the explod- 
ing of a German grenade on the 22nd 
of June 1916. He was buried at Aix 
la Noulette. A brother, Driver Nor- 
man Beattie, was in the Forfarshire 
Battery of the Royal Field Artillery. 



Second-Lieutenant Ralph Adair 
Brown, London Scottish (T.F.), was 
the son of George T. Brown, formerly 
of Arbroath, and of his wife Mary A. 
Peebles, Bowes Park, London. He 
was twenty-one years of age and was 
on the staff of Messrs Gutbrie & Co., 
East India Merchants, London. He 
joined the army in September 1914 as 
a private in the London Scottish 
(T.F.), and passed through all grades 
of non-commissioned rank, in accord- 
ance with the traditions of that dis- 
tinguished corps. In 1915 he was 
promoted second-lieutenant in his 
own battalion. He distinguished 
himself in all his examinations, and 
he and his twin brother. Captain 
Lindsay G. Brown, M.C., were two 
out of four officers specially recom- 
mended to the War Office for merit in 
examination out of a school of 500 
officers. Second-Lieutenant Brown 
went to France in 1916, and was 
killed at Gommecourt on the 1st of 
July 1916. A second brother was 
also in the London Scottish, and a 
third, Dr Peebles Brown, was one 
of the first doctors to volunteer for 
service. 



56 



PTE. EVERARD WATSON, S.R. 



PTE. SIMPSON, BLACK WATCH. 




Private Everard Hector Gerald 
Watson, Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles), New Orleans, was the only 
son of Lieutenant Commander Alex- 
ander Watson, U.S.A. Navy. Oak- 
land, California, late of Arbroath, 
and grandson of James Watson, 
Stanley Street. He was a clerk in 
the American Mercantile Service, and 
was o<n his way to this country when 
the vessel was torpedoed in the Eng- 
lish Channel and he was taken to the 
hospital at Le Havre. He enlisted 
there in the Scottish Rifles, and was 
sent over to Greenock for training, 
returning to France on the 1st of 
June 1916. Private Watson had been 
in France only a month when he was 
killed in action on the 5th of July 
1916. He was buried at Vermilles. 

PTE. N. ROBERTSON, B.W. 

Private Norman Robertson, 
Black Watch, was the son of John 
and Catherine Robertson, and grand- 
son of John Brockie, town's bellman 
and billposter. Arbroath. He was 
reported missing on the 21st of 
January 1916, and died on that date. 




Private John Simpson, 6th Black 
Watch, was the son of Mrs Simpson, 
13 Green Street, Arbroath. He was 
thirty-five years of age and un- 
married, and at one time was a carter 
in Arbroath, but was in the service 
of Messrs Dewar, Perth, when he en- 
listed in October 1915. He had been 
at the front only two months when 
he was killed in action in July 1916. 
Private Simpson had three brothers 
with the colours — William, who was 
also in the Black Watch, James with 
the Canadian, and George in the 
Horse Artillery. 

PTE. BAIRD. SOUTH AFRICANS. 

Private James Baird, 3rd South 
African Infantry, thirty-six years of 
age, was the son of William Baird, 
Johannesburg, and of his wife Anne 
M' Arthur, formerly of Arbroath. 
During the South African War he 
served in Lord Roberts' Horse. When 
war was declared he again volun- 
teered, and served for some months 
in the German West African cam- 
paign. He was presumed to have been 
killed in July 1916, at Delville Wood. 



57 



CAPT. ALEX. P. LOW, R.A.M.C. 



PTE. DONALDSON, SCOT. RIFLES 





Captain Alexander Pethie Low, 
R.A.M.C, Bank House. Stirling 
Street, Dundee, was the son of Cap- 
tain William Low and of his wife 
Helen Petrie, and grandson of Alex- 
ander Petrie, who had a large bakery 
business in the High Street- Ar- 
broath. Captain Low was forty-one 
years of age. He had married Ella 
Boyd, and left two sons. After 

leaving Arbroath High School he took 
his medical degree at Edinburgh, and 
subsequently built up a large practice 
in Dundee. He was gazetted Cap- 
tain of the R.A.M.C. (T.F.) in 1912 
and was mobilised in September 1914. 
For a year he acted as surgeon to the 
First Scottish General Hospital, 
Aberdeen. In France he worked in 
the Highland Casualty Clearing 
Station. No. 30 Clearing Station, 
and finally became medical officer to 
the 7th Seaforth Highlanders. A 

private in the Seaforths described his 
last day's work, when on the 14th of 
July 1916 they started the advance 
to Longueval and Delville Wood : — 
"He walked about from one wounded 
man to another with the utmost cool- 
ness. He was with us in the front 



Private William Donaldson, 1st 
Scottish Rifles (Cameronians), seven- 
teen years of age. was the son of 
John Donaldson, 163 Pollokshaws 
Road, Glasgow, formerly of Arbroath. 
He was employed in Cranston's Tea 
Rooms in Glasgow when he was called 
up in July 1915, and he was killed 
at High Wood (Somme) on the 20th 
of July 1916. 



line when one shell wounded several 
of us, and if anybody showed bravery 
and coolness it was Captain Low. 
There was a quiet nobility in the way 
he did what he would have said was 
only his duty, that one was forced to 
wonder at it even in the heat of 
action." Captain Low was killed by 
a direct hit on the head with a shell 
and was buried just south of the 
village of Longueval. His Lieut. - 
Colonel, mentioning that Captain 
Low had joined the men who fought 
through to Longueval about an hour 
after it was taken, said: — "We 
were each struck with his sense of 
duty in following so soon. The shell- 
ing at the time was very heavy." 



58 



PTE. R. CRIGHTON, A. & S. H. 



SGT. CHRISTIE, BLACK WATCH. 






1 

1 

1 




■ ' ... 


^glg 


k ■ 

,--■■'* M:;.2M ':: 

■■■■y: ■: ■. :■■ '■■:■.: 

iHfliHlH 




■ftipSSIlSjiillfj 



Private Robert Crighton, lOtli 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 
was twenty-two years of age, and 
was the son of William Crighton, 
and of his wife Jessie Ann Middleton, 
Home Farm, Guynd, Carmyllie. He 
was employed as a ploughman at 
Hillkirk. Letham. He joined the lOtli 
Battalion of the Argyll and Suther- 
land Highlanders in August 1915. 
After some months' training Private 
Crighton went across to France. He 
was killed on the 14th of July 1916 
at Longueval village, Delville Wood. 

PTE. WM. M'ARTHUR, R.S.F. 

Private William M'Arthur, 
Royal Scots Fusiliers, twenty years 
of age, was the son of William H. 
M'Arthur, boot and shoe maker, 
Acton Cottage, Maule Street, Car- 
noustie. Prior to his enlistment, 
Private M'Arthur was employed by 
his father. He attested under the 
Derby scheme, and was called up in 
January 1916. He went to France in 
May, and died on the 13th of July 
in Bartholomew's Hospital, London, 
the result of a bullet wound. 



Sergeant John Christie. Black 
Watch, was the son of Mrs Christie, 
15 Kyd Street, Arbroath. He was 
thirty-one years of age, and had 
married Agnes Ferguson, leaving a 
son and a daughter. When war broke 
out he was employed in a linoleum 
work at Kirkcaldy. He had already 
served with the colours, having been 
for seven years in the Cameronians. 
but in August 1914, immediately after 
the declaration of war, he re-enlisted, 
and became a private in the Black 
Watch. He was promoted sergeant, 
and served in France as a signaller 
until the battle of the Somme, when 
hie was killed by poison gas on the 
14th of July 1916. 

LIEUT. CLOUDSLEY, SURREYS. 

Lieutenant Hugh Cloud sley, 
Royal West Surrey Regiment, was 
the youngest son of John Leslie 
Clo'udsley, Brightlands, Reigate, and 
grandson of James Cloudsley, White 
Hart Hotel, Arbroath. Before join- 
ing the army he was a barrister-at- 
law. He was killed in action on the 
1st of July 1916. 



59 



PTE. A. R. ANDERSON, Q.R.W.S. 



PTE. JAMES RITCHIE, T.S., N.F. 





Private Archibald Ronald An- 
derson. 10th Battalion Queen's 
Royal West Surreys, who was twenty 
three years of age, was the son of 
Mrs Christina Anderson, 26 Lady- 
loan, Arbroath. He was formerly a 
clerk with Messrs Alexander Shanks 
& Son, Ltd., Dens Iron Works, Ar- 
broath, but had been transferred to 
their London office. For three years 
before leaving Arbroath he had been 
secretary of the "Men's Own." In 
London he joined the 6th Battalion 
Royal Fusiliers, being later trans- 
ferred to the 8th Battalion, and was 
attached to the 10th Battalion West 
Surrey Regt. After some months' 
training at Dover, Private Anderson 
was sent to France in June 1916. He 
received a gun-shot wound in the 
chest on the 27th of July 1916, and 
died in hospital the following day. 
He was buried in the military 
cemetery at Bailleul. His Captain 
wrote: — "He was a good soldier, 
liked by everyone in his company. 
There was a call for volunteers for a 
job, and he was one of the first to 
tome forward. He went through a 
lot, and the job was a success." 



Private James Ritchie, Tyneside 

Scottish, Northumberland Fusiliers, 
51 Sidney Street, Arbroath, was the 
son of John Ritchie and of his wife 
Betsy Jolly, 47 Kinnaird Street. He 
was thirty-four years of age. and 
married Jane Connie. He was em- 
ployed in Glasgow as a shunter. He 
joined the army in 1915, and was 
killed in action during the advance 
on the Somme in 1916. 

GUNR. ALEX. CARGILL, R.F.A. 

Gunner Alexander Cargill, 
Royal Field Artillery, twenty-five 
years of age, was the son of Alex. 
Cargill, 17 Union Street East. Ar- 
broath. He was wounded in July 
1916, and was taken at once by motor 
ambulance to the hospital, but died 
on entering it. He was buried in a 
British cemetery in France. 

PTE. BEATTTE, CAMERONIANS. 

Private David Beattie. Scottish 
Rifles, was the son of David Beattie. 
Upper Victoria, Carnoustie. He was 
killed in action on the 10th of March 
1915 at the battle of Neuve Chapelle. 



60 



PTE. DAVIDSON, ROYAL SCOTS. 



PTE. GEO. PHILIP, GORDONS. 





Private Thomas Barnett David- 
son, 11th Royal Scots, was the only 
son of Thomas B. Davidson and of 
his wife Ann Jardine, 9 Cairnie 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty 
years of age and was employed as a 
baker in Montrose when he joined 
the army in May 1915. He went to 
France in December of that year, 
and was killed in action at the 
battle of the Somme on the 14th of 
July 1916 

L-CPL. MILLER, BLACK WATCH. 

Lance-Corporal William Miller, 
Black Watch, twenty-one years of 
age, was the son of Alexander Miller, 
8 Carnegie Street, Arbroath. Lance- 
Corporal Miller, previous to joining 
the colours, had been employed at the 
Abbey Leather Works. He had been 
serving at the front from early in the 
war, and was wounded in the arm at 
the battle of Neuve ChapelLe. On 
the 6th of August 1916 he was again 
wounded, and died the same day. 
Lance-Corporal Miller's brother, Ser- 
geant George Miller, was killed in 
May of the previous year. 



Private George Philip, 1st Gor- 
don Highlanders, who was twenty- 
six years of age, was the son of Mrs 
Soutar, 143 Panmure Terrace, Car- 
noustie. He was employed at Ar- 
broath railway station as a porter. 
He enlisted in the Gordon High- 
landers in 1908, and went out to 
Egypt in a draft for the 2nd Gordon 
Highlanders. He went to France in 
1914, and was seriously wounded in 
the first battle of Ypres. After 

nearly' a year's leave he returned to 
France, and was transferred to the 
1st Gordon Highlanders. Private 
Philip was killed in action in Delville 
Wood on the 18th of July 1916. He 
was at first reported missing, but 
his body was afterwards found by a 
machine gun party when they were 
clearing a position for their guns. 

PTE. J. RAMSAY, S. AFRICANS. 

Private James Ramsay, South 
African Rifles, who was fifty years of 
age, was the son of George Ramsay, 
Whitewell Cottage, Arbroath. He 
was killed when on service in East 
Africa on the 4th of July 1916. 



61 



CAPT. W. HARRIS, M.C., R.S F. 



PTE. MURRAY, ROYAL SCOTS. 





Captain W. T. Harris, M.C., 
Royal Scots Fusiliers, twenty-four 
years of age, was the son of William 
Harris and of his wife Marjory 
Whyte, 8 Hillington Park Circus, 
Glasgow. He was trained as an en- 
gineer with the Fairfield Shipbuild- 
ing and Engineering Company. He 
was one of the original members of 
the Glasgow University Officers' 
Training Corps, and in February 
1915 joined the army as 2nd lieut. 
in the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and went 
to France a few months later. In 
July 1916 he was promoted to the 
rank of captain and was awarded the 
Military Cross. Very shortly after- 
wards, at the battle of the Somme, 
on the 30th of July 1916, Captain 
Harris was reported wounded and 
missing. His Colonel said that the 
fighting on that day was very severe, 
and the casualties heavy. He also 
wrote: — "I had formed a very high 
opinion of him indeed as a soldier. 
He was extremely practical, sound, 
and a thoroughly reliable officer, and 
had at times been of the very 
greatest assistance to me. I had just 
given him command of a company." 



Private George Murray, 17th 
Royal Scots, 32 Rossie Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of Robert 
Murray and of his wife Ann King, 
60 Fergus Square, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-three years of age, and 
married Mary Bouiek Brown. He 
was employed as under foreman at 
the Nursery Mills, Arbroath. In 
November 1915 he joined the 17th 
Royal Scots, and went later with his 
regiment to France, where he died 
of wounds on the 21st of July 1916. 

PTE. FALCONER, ROYAL SCOTS. 

Private Tom Falconer, Royal 
Scots, was the son of J. Falconer, 
market gardener, 63 Queen Street, 
Carnoustie. He was twenty years of 
age, and before the outbreak of war 
was in the employment of Mr Grieve, 
farmer, Rotten Row, Carnoustie. He 
was one of the first of the Carnoustie 
recruits to enlist. Private Falconer 
was killed in action in July 1916. 
His eldest brother, Lance-Sergeant 
Falconer, was wounded at Mons and 
died two days later, on the 28th of 
August 1914. 



62 



PTE. DAVID M'GREGOR, R.S.F. 



PTE. ROBERT CARGILL, R.S.F. 




Private David M'Gregor, Sig- 
naller, B Company, 2nd Battalion 
Royal Scots Fusiliers, was the son of 
David M'Gregor, Watson Crescent, 
Edinburgh, formerly of 44 Ernest 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
one years of age, and was serving 
his apprenticeship as an engineer at 
Dens Iron Works, Arbroath, when he 
enlisted in February 1915. After 
six months' training at Fort Matilda, 
near Greenock, he went to France in 
September. Private M'Gregor was 
posted missing on the 30th of July 
1916 at Guillemont, and was after- 
wards reported killed on that date. 

L-CPL. D. CARRIE, SEAFORTHS. 

Lance-Corporal David Carrie, 
Seaforth Highlanders, was the son of 
David Carrie, 42J East Abbey Street, 
Arbroath. He was thirty-two years 
of age, and left a widow and family. 
Lance-Corporal Carrie was killed in 
action in July 1916. He was the 
second of 'his family to lose his life 
at the front, his brother, Private 
Peter Carrie, having fallen in the 
battle of Loos. 




Private Robert Cargill, 2nd Royal 
Scots Fusiliers, was the son of David 
Cargill, and of his wife Elizabeth 
Swankie, 21 South Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty years of age, and was 
employed as a labourer at Dens Iron 
Works when he enlisted in the 2nd 
Royal Scots Fusiliers in September 
1914. He went to France at the be- 
ginning of 1916, and took part in the 
fighting on the Somme front. On 
the 30th of July 1916 Private Cargill 
was reported missing at Guillemont, 
during the Somme offensive, and 
was afterwards presumed to have 
been killed on that date. His brother, 
Lance-Corporal David Cargill, was 
killed four months later. 

SIGNALLER R. MYLES, B.W. 

Signaller Russel Myles, 4th 
Black Watch, 6 Panmure Street, Car- 
noustie, was before the war a post- 
man in Dundee. He went to France 
early in 1915, and in September died 
of wounds received in action. A 

comrade wrote : — ' ' I only hope to 
die as bravely as he did — he died a 
hero's death, doing his duty." 



63 



LIEUT. R. MACOONALD, A.I.F. 



DRIVER DAVID PATTULLO, R.E. 





Lieutenant Ronald Alexander 
Leslie Macdonald, 1st Light Horse, 
Australian Imperial Force, twenty- 
seven years of age, was the son of 
Alexander Macdonald and of his wife 
Elizabeth Price, Erudgere, New South 
Wales. He was the nephew cf 
W. K. Macdonald, Town Clerk of 
Arbroath, and of F. F. Macdonald 
of Lochlands. Previous to joining 
the army, which he did at an early 
stage in the war, Lieutenant Mac- 
donald was a sheep farmer at Erud- 
gere. He enlisted as a private in 
the 1st Australian Light Horse, and 
afterwards obtained a commission in 
the same regiment. He was wounded 
in the Gallipoli campaign. Later he 
served with the Egyptian Expedi- 
tionary Force, and was killed in 
action at the head of his men on the 
morning of the 9th of August 1916. 
He was buried at the top of the First 
Ridge, half a mile west of Hod el 
Hisba, Egypt, near which he fell. A 
tablet to his memory was erected in 
the Parish Church of Arbroath, and 
was unveiled by Rev. Professor 
Cooper, D.D., Moderator of the 
Church of Scotland, in June 1917. 



Drivrr David Patttjllo, Royal 
Engineers, twenty-four years of age, 
was the eldest son of David Pattullo 
and of hi.s wife Ann Edwards, 69 
Helen Street, Arbroath. Refore the 
war he had been a ploughman in the 
Dundee district. He joined the army 
in May 1915, and had been for six 
months at the front in France. On 
the 30th of July 1916 he was severely 
wounded by a bomb dropped from a 
German aeroplane, and was taken to 
No. 5 Casualty Clearing Station, 
where he died the next day. 

PTE. J. AFFLECK, S. AFRICANS. 

Private James Affleck, South 
African Contingent, son of William 
Affleck, Charles Street, Carnoustie, 
was twenty-nine years of age. Re- 
fore going to France he had been 
through the West African fighting, 
along with his two brothers, Tom 
and Forbes. Tom also served for 
some time on the ,Western front and 
when lying wounded in a French hos- 
pital sent home the news that his 
brother had been killed in action 
there. 



64 



SIGNALLER J. KERR, R.F.A. 



PTE. A. PAUL, BLACK WATCH. 



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t 




























mfi 1 1 






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. 






Er *^" \ 














Ti ^ 




BnfteUSKE 


A 




Signaller John Kerr, Royal Field 
Artillery, was the son of David Kerr, 
9 Fergus Square, Arbroath. He was 
nineteen years of age and, previous 
to enlistment, had been serving his 
apprenticeship as an engineer with 
Messrs Alexander Shanks & Son, 
Ltd. In October 1914 he joined the 
army as a gunner in the Forfarshire 
Battery of the R.F.A. He was serv- 
ing at the front for over a year, and 
was acting as a signaller at the 
time of his death. During the ad- 
vance on the Somme, on the 10th of 
August 1916, he was struck by a 
piece of shrapnel while in the 
trenches, and died at Dernancourt 
the following day. 

SGT-MAJOR CARTER, K.O.S.B. 

Company Sergeant-Major G. E. 
Carter, K.O.S.B., Berwick-on-Tweed, 
was, before being called up, engaged 
by the Carnoustie Corporation, and 
was also for a time in the Taymouth 
Engineering Works. He had pre- 
viously served seven years in the 
K.O.S.B. He was killed in action 
at the battle of the Somme in 1916. 



Private Alexander Paxil, 6th 
Black Watch, was the son of Alex- 
ander Paul, Hodgeton, Inverkeilor. 
He was twenty-two years of age and 
before enlisting he was employed as 
a ploughman at West Hall, Dundee. 
He joined the army as a private in 
the 6th Black Watch in August 1915, 
and had served in France for nearly 
a year when he was wounded in the 
thigh and chest and taken prisoner. 
He died a month later, on the 15th 
of August 1916, a prisoner of war in 
Germany. 

PTE. MASSON, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Peter Masson, Black 
Watch, twenty-two years of age, was 
the son of Douglas Masson, cabinet- 
maker, Tayview Buildings, Broughty 
Ferry, and grandson of ex-Poilce 
Sergeant William Masson, Helen 
Street, Arbroath. Prior to his en- 
listment Private Masson was a clerk 
at the Dundee East Station. He 
had been in the army for about a 
year when he was killed at the battle 
of the Somme, on the 3rd of Sep- 
tember 1916. 



65 



SGT. DAVID S. HOGG, R.F.A. PTE. JOHN CORMIE, SEAFORTHS 





Sergeant David Scott Hogg, 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son ot 
David Hogg and of his wife Jessie 
Murray, Denfield, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-three years of age, and 
was unmarried. He was a gardener, 
but for about a year before joining 
the army he had been a member of 
the Forfarshire Constabulary, and 
was stationed at Carnoustie. He was 
the first to fall of ten members of 
the County Constabulary who had 
joined the colours. He joined the 
Boyal Field Artillery in September 
1914 as a gunner, and had served 
only three months when he was pro- 
moted. Sergeant Hogg went to 
France in June 1915, and was killed 
in action at the battle of the Somme 
on the 25th of August 1916. His 
captain said that Sergeant D. S. 
Hogg was an exceptionally keen and 
efficient sergeant, and shortly before 
his death had been recommended for 
the Military Medal for consistent 
good work with his battery in France. 
One of his brothers, Private George 
Hogg, Scots Guards, was killed in 
September 1915, and another served 
with the Black Watch. 



Pbivate John Cormie, Seaforth 
Highlanders, was the brother of Mrs 
A. Petrie, 19 Park Street, Arbroath. 
He belonged to Burghead, was 
twenty-five years of age, and had 
married Helen Fraser, Buckie, who, 
with their daughter, resided with Mrs 
Petrie. Private Comrie was a sea- 
man, and acted as fireman before en- 
listing in November 1914. He had 
been a year at the front when he was 
killed by a shell while returning to 
the trenches during the Somme ad- 
vance, on the 18th of August 1916. 

PTE. SIMPSON, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Albert Simpson, Black 
Watch, twenty-one years of age, 
was the elder son of William Simp- 
son, Invertay, Carnoustie, who him- 
self holds a medal and three clasps 
for service in the Egyptian war. Pri- 
vate Albert Simpson was by trade a 
moulder, and, prior to enlistment, 
had been employed in Taymouth En- 
gineering Works, Carnoustie. He 
had served at the front from Novem- 
ber 1914, and was killed in action on 
the 3rd of August 1916. 



66 



L-CPL. FRED. FALCONER, R.S.F. PTE. THOMSON, BLACK WATCH. 





Lance-Corporal Fred. M. Fal- 
coner, Royal Scots Fusiliers, was 
the youngest son of Alexander Fal- 
coner, 84 Ireland Street, Carnoustie. 
He was twenty years of age and was 
employed as a vanman by Mr Nicol, 
Carnoustie. He joined the army in 
February 1916 as a private in the 
Royal Scots Fusiliers. After a few 
months' training at Fort Matilda, 
Greenock, Lance-Corporal Falconer 
left for France in July, and died 
from wounds received on the 26th of 
August 1916 at Delville Wood. 



Private Roy Thomson, 5th Black 
Watch, was the only son of Alex- 
ander Thomson, grieve, and of his 
wife Barbara Mitchell, Redcastle, 
Inverkeilor. He was only sixteen 
years of age, and had been a farm 
servant at West Drums, Brechin. He 
joined the 5th Black Watch in August 
1915, and after about a year's train- 
ing, went to France. He had been 
only a few months at the front when 
he was killed in action on the 
Somme, on the 3rd of September 
1916. 



PTE. MURRAY, BLACK WATCH. 

Private David Murray, Black 
Watch, Olive Cottage, Carnoustie, 
was previous to the war engaged as 
a ploughman. He had been nineteen 
months at the front, and was killed 
in action during the Somme advance 
in 1916. An officer, writing of him, 
said he was "the cheeriest man in 
the company. No march was too 
long, and nothing too fatiguing but 
that he finished the job whistling and 
singiifg, and by his cheeriness he 
cheered those around him." 



2nd.-LD3UT. KYD, R, WARWICKS. 

Second-Lieutenant F. P. Kyd, 
East Surrey Regiment (attached to 
the Royal Warwick s), was the elder 
son of John Kyd, manager of the 
National Bank of India, Madras. Be- 
fore going to India Mr John Kyd was 
teller, in the Arbroath branch of the 
British Linen Bank, and had many 
friends in the town and district. 
Second-Lieutenant Kyd was killed 
in action on the 18th of August 
1916 during the advance on the 
Somme. 



67 



PTE. WM, SIM, DORSET REGT. PTE. WILSON, BLACK WATCH. 




Private William Sim, 5th Dorset 
Regiment, twenty-nine years of age, 
was the son of Richard Sim, 83 
Prinlaws, Leslie, Fifeshire, formerly 
of Arbroath, and of his wife Jessie 
Ferrier. He was twenty-nine years 
of age and was unmarried. Before 
the outbreak of war lie was employed 
as a miner with the Fife Coal Com- 
pany, Kinglassie. He had served 
for nearly five years as a stoker in 
the Royal Navy, but took his dis- 
charge, and on the 7th of August 

1914 he enlisted in the 5th Dorset 
Regiment. He went to the Dar- 
danelles in May 1915, and was killed 
in action on the 22nd of August 

1915 at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli, during 
a charge by the Dorsets. Private 
Sim came of a very patriotic family. 
His father, an old Arbroathian, was 
a soldier, and although sixty years 
of age, joined the Black Watch in 
1915 and served a year, but was dis- 
charged when conscription came into 
force. A younger brother came from 
Australia and enlisted in the King's 
Own Scottish Borderers, but having 
been wounded at Ypres he was after- 
wards discharged from the army. 




Private Robert Shepherd Wil- 
son, 5th Black Watch, was the son 
of John Wilson and of his wife Jessie 
Hardy Shepherd, Mainsbank Farm, 
Inverkeilor. He was twenty-two 
years of age, unmarried, and until 
the time of his enlisting he was em- 
ployed as a farm servant at Park- 
conon, near Arbroath. He joined the 
army in June 1915 as a private in 
the 5th Black Watch. Private 
Wilson was killed by a sniper on the 
3rd of September 1916. 

PTE. JAS. P. CADOGAN, H.L.I. 

Private James Paterson Cadogan, 
16th Battalion Highland Light In- 
fantry, twenty years of age, was the 
oldest son of Edward Cadogan, 30 
Auehmithie, near Arbroath. He was 
employed as a ploughman at Mains 
of Letham when he enlisted in the 
5th Black Watch in April 1916. Later 
he was transferred to the Highland 
Light Infantry, and after a short 
period of training went to France. 
He was reported missing on the 18th 
of November 1916, and was presumed 
to have died on that date. 



68 






PTE. J. LUNDIE, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. ALEX. MANN, CAMERONS. 





Private James Lundie, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of John Lundie 
and of his wife Agnes Johnstone, 4 
Reform Street, Arbroath. He was 
nineteen years of age, and had been 
working at the Westburn Foundry 
before the war. He had joined the 
Territorials in 1913, and he went to 
France with his battalion in Novem- 
ber 1914. He fought at Neuve 
Chapelle, Festubert. Givenehy, and 
Loos, and escaped unwounded until 
the battle of the Somme when he was 
shot through the head and instan- 
taneously killed on the 3rd of Septem- 
ber 1916. Private Lundie had three 
brothers serving in the Royal Navy 
and one in the 4th Gordon High- 
landers, 51st Division, who was 
wounded in July 1918. 

PTE. THOMSON, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Peter Thomson, Black 
Watch, was the son of Robert Thom- 
son, 4 Peddie Street, Dundee, for- 
merly of Arbroath. He was twenty 
years of age, and was killed in action 
at the battle of the Somme on the 
14th of July 1916. 



Private Alexander Mann, 
Cameron Highlanders, was the son 
of Alexander Mann and of his 
wife Jane Lawson, Kinnell, Friock- 
heim. He was twenty-five years of 
age, and had married Jean Smart. 
He was a grocer with Messrs Cooper 
& Company, Perth, when he joined 
the army in April 1916. Private 
Mann was posted as missing on the 
3rd of September 1916. and was 
officially reported killed on that date. 

L-CPL. LAMB, BLACK WATCH. 

Lance-Corporal Sidney Lamb, 
Black Watch, was the youngest son 
of Mrs Lamb, Glenogil Terrace, Car- 
noustie. He was twenty-four years 
of age, and was on the clerical staff 
of Messrs William Briggs & Sons' 
chemical works, Dundee. Lanoe- 
Corporal Lamb was well-known in 
local sporting circles as a golfer and 
a cricketer, hut more especially as a 
footballer. He was killed in action 
on the 21st of September 1916. His 
eldest brother, a mercantile captain, 
was a prisoner in Germany, and an- 
other brother served with the colours. 



69 



SGT. E. FORD, D.C.M., B.W. 



PTE. MELDRUM, BLACK WATCH 





'm 



Sergeant Edward Ford, D.C.M., 
1st Black Watch, was the son of Geo. 
Ford and of his wife Annie Robertson, 
59 Kinnaird Street, Arbroath. Be- 
fore the war he was employed as a 
joiner with Messrs J. & R. W. Siev- 
wright. He had, however, joined the 
army in August 1905 as a private in 
the 1st Black Watch., and had served 
seven and a half years with the 
colours, five and a half of which were 
spent in India. He held the medal 
of the 1911 Durbar at Delhi, and had 
been one and a half years on the Army 
Reserve before mobilisation. He was 
promoted corporal after the first 
battle of Ypres, and sergeant after 
La Bassee. In October 1915 he won 
the D.O.M., which was awarded for 
consistent attention to duty through- 
out the campaign. On one occasion 
he rallied and led forward his platoon 
under very heavy fire. Sergeant 
Ford was on active service in France 
for over two years, and had been in 
every engagement from Mons on- 
wards. He came through scathless 
until the Somme advance, when he 
was killed by a sniper at High Wood 
on the 3rd of September 1916. 



Private George Meldrum, 5th 
Black Watch, was the son of George 
Meldrum. 11 River Street, Brechin, 
and grandson of Mrs Grant, 7 St 
Vigeans Road, Arbroath. He was 
employed as a lapperat the Caldhame 
Works, Brechin, when he joined the 
army in 1915. He was killed in 

France on the 3rd of September 1916. 

GUNNER WM. LOWNIE, R.F.A. 

Gunner William Lownie, Royal 
Field Artillery, thirty-one years of 
age. was the son of John Lownie and 
of his wife Caroline Teviotdale, 9,J 
Dishland Street, Arbroath. He was 
a miner in Dunfermline when he 
joined the army in September 1914. 
He served in France for over a year, 
and was killed on the 3rd of July 
1916. His major said that he was 
one of two who volunteered to make 
an observation post in one of the cap- 
tured German trenches, and was thus 
engaged when he was killed by a stray 
bullet; also that he was one of his 
best workers, for whom he had the 
greatest respect and a sincere feeling 
of affection, as had all the men. 



70 



PTE. HARRY ALEXANDER, B.W. 



PTE. G. CRAIG, BLACK WATCH. 





Pkivate Harry Alexander, 5th 
Black Watch, eighteen years of age, 
was the son of W. D. Alexander, post- 
man, and of Mrs Alexander, 6 Gowan 
Street, Arbroath. Before joining 

the army in May 1915 Private Alex- 
ander was serving his apprenticeship 
as an engineer at the Dens Iron 
Works. After three months' mili- 
tary training he went to France, and 
served at the front for a year. He 
was reported missing on the 3rd of 
September 1916 at the battle of Guil- 
lemont, on the Somme, and he was 
presumed to have been killed on or 
about that date. Private Alexander 
had an older brother serving in the 
Scots Guards. 

PTE. A. M'GREGOR, H.L.I. 

Private Arthur M'Gregor, High- 
land Light Infantry, nineteen years 
of age, was the son of Geo. M'Gregor, 
East Balmirmer. He died of wounds 
received in action in October 1916. 
Private M'Gregor had four brothers 
at the front, two with the New Zea- 
land forces, one with the Canadians, 
and one in the Black Watch. 



Private George CRaig, Black 
Watch, nineteen years of age, was a 
son of John Craig, formerly of Ordie, 
Oathlaw, and of Mrs Craig, 15 Cul- 
loden Road, Arbroath. Before join- 
ing the army in December 1915, he 
was employed as a grocer with the 
West Port Association, Ltd. He had 
been for three months at the front 
in France when he was reported mis- 
sing on the 3rd of September 1916, 
and it was presumed he was killed on 
that date at Thiepval during the ad- 
vance on the Somme. 

PTE. THOS. ROBERTSON, K.R.R, 

Private Thomas Robertson, 
King's Royal Rifles, son of J. Robert- 
son, Brown Street, Carnoustie, was 
a member of the Metropolitan Police, 
and was one of twenty chosen for ser- 
vice as policemen in Rhodesia, where 
he was for five years. He saw two 
years' active service there, and at 
the outbreak of war he returned to 
join the home forces. He was fatally 
wounded at the front in 1916. Pri- 
vate Robertson had three brothers 
serving with the colours. 



71 



PTE. RAMSAY, BLACK WATCH. 




PTE. ROBERT S. SCOTT, B.W. 



Stretcher-Bearer David Ramsay, 
1st Black Watch, 10 North Bank 
Street, Clydebank, was the son of 
David Ramsay, flaxdiiesser, and of 
his wife Hannah Donaldson, 21 
Sidney Street, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-eight years of age, and had 
married Margaret Muir, and left one 
son. He was an ironturner by trade, 
and had served his apprenticeship at 
the Westburn Foundry. Later he 
went to Messrs Singer, at Ivilbowie. 
Private Ramsay was well-known in 
Arbroath as a member of the Burgh 
Instrumental Band, in which he 
played the trombone and on going to 
the West Country he became asso- 
ciated with the famous Clydebank 
Band, being a member of that band 
on three occasions when it carried oft 
the Scottish championship. He en- 
listed in Glasgow in February 1915, 
and had been fourteen months at the 
front. In France he played the 

trombone in the Black Watch Band, 
and acted as stretcher-bearer in 
strenuous times. He was killed in 
action on the 3rd of September 1916. 
His brother, Peter, also served in the 
Black Watch in France. 




Private Robert Spexce Scott, 1st 
Black Watch, was the fourth son of 
George Scott. 23 Jamieson Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-eight 
years of age, and was one of three 
brothers serving with the colours, one 
being in the Black Watch, and one in 
the R.F.A. Private Scott had been 
en enginedriver with the East India 
Railway Company at Tundla, but he 
came home and joined the 1st Black 
Watch in July 1915. He went with 
his battalion to the front in Novem- 
ber of that year, and was killed dur- 
ing the capture of Highwood on the 
4th of September 1916. His platoon 
officer wrote : — "By his death we 
have lost a valued and cheerful com- 
rade of our regiment — a good and 
brave soldier." 

CORPL. COULL, ROYAL SCOTS. 

Corporal Stewart M'Leod Coull, 
Royal Scots, was the youngest son 
of Mr Coull, Smith's Place House. 
Leith, and nephew of William Coull. 
Ethiehaven, near Arbroath. He was 
killed in action in France on the 16th 
of September 1916. 



72 



PTE. G. DINNIE, BLACK WATCH. 



GNR. THOMAS MAGUIRE, R.G.A. 





Private George Dinnie, Black 
Watch, twentj'-one years of age, was 
a son of David Dinnie and of his 
wife Margaret Bowman, 37 Leonard 
Street, Arbroath. When he joined 
tlie 5th Black Watch on the 18th 
of May 1915 he was in the em- 
ployment of Corsar Brothers, Apple- 
gate Works, as a flaxdnesser. He 
underwent military training at 
Ripon, and crossed to France in 
January 1916. Soon afterwards he 
took part in the fighting, and was 
wounded, but not so severely as to 
lead to his being sent to this country 
for treatment. On the 3rd of Sep- 
tember 1916 Private Dinnie was en- 
gaged in a battle on the Somme when 
he sustained serious wounds in the 
chest and facie, and died at the 35th 
Casualty Clearing Station on the 13th 
of the same month. Private Dinnie 
had three brothers in the army. Pri- 
vate James Dinnie, M.M., enlisted 
in the Black Watch, but was trans- 
ferred to the Seaforths, and after- 
wards to a machine gun corps. Pri- 
vate Charles Dinnie served in the 
Black Watch in Egypt; and Private 
James Dinnie in the 1st Black Watch. 



Gunner Thomas Maguire, Royal 
Garrison Artillery, was the son of 
Thomas Maguire, Ballinshoe. Kirrie- 
muir, formerly of Kinniell, and of his 
wife Janet M'lntosh. He was 
twenty-seven years of age, and was 
unmarried. Before joining the army 
he was a police constable stationed at 
Perth. He enlisted in November 
1915 as a gunner in the Royal Garri- 
son Artillery, and after three months' 
training went to France. Gunner 
Maguire was killed instantaneously 
by a shell in the fierce fighting at 
the Sommie on the 15th of September 
1916. His officers looked upon him 
as one of the most conscientious and 
hard-working men of the battery. 

L-CPL. WILLIAM WALKER, B.W. 

Lance-Corporal William Walker, 
Black Watch, was the son of Andrew 
Walker, Westgate, formerly of Pit- 
muies Mill, Friockheim. He was 

twenty-two years of age, and had 
been at the front sine© November 
1914. He was severely wounded in 
the head and died in France on 21st 
September 1916. 



73 



LIEUT. KITSON, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. W. HERD, SCOTS GUARDS. 





Lieutenant Frederick Neil Ed- 
monstone Kitson, 5th Black Watch, 
thirty-one years of age, was the son 
of the Rev. John Francis Kitson, 
Vicar of Antony, Cornwall, and of his 
wife Charlotte Edmonstone, daughter 
of Admiral Sir William Edmonstone, 
Bart, of Duntreath. He was a nephew 
of Mrs Duncan, Parkhill, near Ar- 
broath, and helped in the manage- 
ment of the estate. Before the war 
Lieutenant Kitson was a very popu- 
lar officer in the county battalion of 
the Black Watch (T.F.). He went 
to the front with the battalion in 
November 1914. In 1915 he was 
wounded by a sniper at Neuve 
Chapelle, and in January 1916 he was 
mentioned in despatches by Field- 
Marshal French. Lieutenant Kitson 
was later in charge of the transport 
department of the brigade, under 
Brigadier-General Stewart. On the 
14th of September 1916 both were 
going up to the trenches when 
General Stewart was killed outright 
and Lieutenant Kitson was mortally 
wounded by the same shell. Lieuten- 
ant Kitson was buried in the Cite 
Bon Jean Cemetery at Armentieres. 



Private William Herd, 2nd Scots 
Guards, twenty-four years of age, 
was the son of David Herd and of 
his wife Margaret Ramsay, East- 
haven. Private Herd had been a 
porter at Easthaven Station, and 
later was a farm servant at Inver- 
peffer. He joined Kitchener's Army 
in January 1915, and at one time his 
battalion had the honour of forming 
the King's bodyguard at Buckingham 
Palace. He had been at the front 
about six months when he was re- 
ported as wounded and missing on 
the 16th of September 1916 at 
Givenchy. Later it was notified that 
he had been buried near Combles. 

PTE. H. MANN, CANADIANS. 

Private Henry L. Mann, Cana- 
dian Contingent, was the son of Wm. 
Mann and of his wife Emma Peters, 
42 Dishlandtown Street, Arbroath. 
He was killed at the front during 
the Somme advance on the 26th of 
September 1916, his death being 
caused by a piece of shrapnel, which 
struck him while he was asleep in 
his dugout. 



74 



PTE. G. R. SHERIFF, CAMERONS. 



PTE. C. WEIR, BLACK WATCH. 





Private George Ross Sheriff, 2nd 
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, 
was the eldest son of Fred Sheriff, 
mason, and of his wife Jemima 
Barrie, 24 Ladybridge Street. Ar- 
broath. He was a patternmaker at 
the Dens Iron Works, in the last 
year of his apprenticeship, when he 
enlisted in January 1915. After serv- 
ing for seven months in France he 
was sent to Salonica, where he saw 
eleven months' service. He was 
wounded in action in the Struma 
Valley, and died on 2nd October 1916 
at an ambulance station at Salonica. 
His platoon officer wrote of Private 
Sheriff: — "I looked upon him as one 
of my best men, and one in whom I 
had full confidence." 

PTE. A. D. ELLIS, CANADIANS. 

Private Arthur David Ellis, 
28th Canadians, was the son of David 
Ellis, signalman, Leysmill. He was 
twenty-six years of age, and was in 
Canada when war was declared. He 
at once joined up and came over to 
France, where he was killed in 
action on the 6th of June 1916. 



Private Charles Weir, 5th Black 
Watch, was a grandson of Charles 
Weir, 43 Panmure Street, Arbroath. 
He was eighteen years of age, and 
prior to enlisting was an apprentice 
ironmoulder in the employment of 
Alex. Shanks & Son, Ltd., Dens 
Iron Works. He joined the 5th 

Black Watch in September 1914 and 
went to France three months later. 
He was killed in action on the 14th 
of October 1916. 

PTE. J. MANBY, SCOTS GUARDS. 

Private J. Manby, Scots Guards, 
133 Kinloch Street, Carnoustie, was 
employed by the Carnoustie Town 
Council as a stoker at the Gasworks. 
In golfing circles he was well- 
known. He joined the colours in 
January 1915, and was killed in 
action on the 15th of September 1916. 
Private Manby' s younger brother, 
Alexander, was a member of the 
Black Watch (regulars!). He came 
with his regiment from India at the 
outbreak of war, and was killed in 
action a few months before his 
brother. 



CAPT. DAVID FREW, R.A.M.C. PTE. DAVID S. MUNDIN, B.W. 





Captain David T. C. Frew. 
Royal Army Medical Corps, twenty- 
nine years of age, was the son cf 
David Alison Frew, formerly of Ar- 
broath, and of his wife Ann Eliza- 
beth Berrey, 9 Burnbank Terrace, 
Glasgow. He married Marie Louise 
Henrietta, daughter of Fernand 
Lusien Perregaux, M.D., Paris. Dr 
Frew's work at the Royal Infirmary 
and the Western Medical School, 
Glasgow, where he was lecturing in 
anatomy, kept him from joining the 
army at once when war broke out. 
He became a lieutenant in the Royal 
Army Medical Corps in 1915, and in 
June of that year was sent to France, 
where he served as one of the staff of 
the Twenty-fourth General Field 
Hospital at Etaples. He afterwards 
joined the Seventh Field Ambulance 
at the front in the Ypres salient and 
was wounded there. Captain Frew 
later took over the duties of medical 
officer to the London Rifle Brigade, 
and after several months with that 
corps he had a short leave and re- 
joined at Aldershot. He died on the 
29th of September 1916 in the Cam- 
bridge Hospital there. 



Private David Spence Mundin. 
5th Black Watch, Mansion House, 
Arrott Street, Arbroath, was the son 
of Henry Mundin and of his wife 
Elizabeth Spence, Lochland Street. 
He married Williamina Nicol Barnet 
and left two sons and a daughter. 
He was twenty-seven years of 
age. Before the war he was a 
postman. He joined the 5th Black 
Watch in July 1915, and went to 
France in February 1916. After one 
year and three months' service he 
was killed at the battle of the Somme 
when his platoon made a charge over 
the open on the 14th of October 1916. 

L-CPL. ARTHUR WHYTOCK, B.W. 

Lance-Cobporal Arthur Why- 
tock. Black Watch, 5 Wallace Street, 
Arbroath, was a farm servant at 
Nether Kelly before he joined the 
army. He had been at, the front 
about fourteen months when he was 
killed in action on the 3rd of Sep- 
tember 1916. His Commanding 
Officer wrote that the company had 
sustained a great loss in Private 
Why took' s death. 



76 



PTE. W. CRUICKSHANKS, B.W. 



PTE. HARRY BISSET, B.W. 





Private William W. Cruick- 
shanks, 5th Black Watch, was a son 
of George Cruickshanks, 22 Helen 
Street, Arbroatli. He was twenty- 
one years of age, and before the war 
was an apprentice moulder at the 
Dens Iron Works. He had joined 
the Territorials in March 1911, and 
he left for France with his battalion 
on 28th of October 1914. For a year 
and ten months he was on active 
service. On the 12th of October 1916. 
at the battle of the Somme, he 
was severely wounded in the head 
and chest by a rifle bullet. He was 
taken to a Base Hospital, and died 
froim wounds the following day. 



Private Harry Bisset, 5th Black 
Watch, 31 Elliot Street, Arbroath, 
was the son of Alexander Bisset and 
of his wife Mary Kennedy, 45 West 
Grimsby, Arbroath. He married 
Agnes R. Gaxden, and left two sons 
and two daughters. He was twenty- 
nine years of age and had been under- 
foreman with Messrs Douglas Fraser 
& Sons. He joined the 5th Black 
Watch Territorials in 1905, and was 
mobilised in August 1914. He went 
to France in November, and was re- 
ported wounded and missing on the 
14th of October 1916. and it was sup- 
posed that he had fallen in a charge 
made by his battalion on that date. 



PTE. J. STEWART. CANADIANS. 

Private James Stewart, Cana- 
dians, was the grandson of John 
Anderson, West Newton and Sea- 
field, Arbroath. He was in the Prince 
Albert Branch of the Union Bank of 
Canada, and volunteered for service 
on the declaration of war. He went 
to the front in September 1915, and 
was killed in action on the 25th of 
September 1916. 



PTE. JOHN COOK, CANADIANS. 

Private John Cook, Canadian 
Contingent, Toronto, was the son of 
John Cook, farmer, Bank of Arbir- 
lot, near Arbroath. He was thirty- 
eight years of age, was married, and 
left five children. He was killed in 
action on the 16th of September 1916. 
Private Cook had a brother in the 
army who acted as a shoeing smith 
at the front. 



77 



L-CPL, DAVIDSON, D.C.M., B.W. 



PTE. R. DOYLE, BLACK WATCH. 





Lance-Corporal James Davidson, 
D.O.M., 5th Black Watch, was a son 
of Charles Davidson and of his wife 
Ann Middleton, 43 Hannah Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty -three 
years of age, and was a miner at 
Methil. He enlisted in August 1914, 
and was one of the first draft to 
leave for the front. Lance-Corporal 
Davidson was a stretcher-hearer, and 
was twice mentioned in despatches, 
and was also awarded the Distin- 
guished Conduct Medal for con- 
spicuous deeds of gallantry in 
carrying the wounded off the field. 
On one occasion he had a very 
narrow escape. While dressing 

a wounded companion something 
struck his hack. On opening his 

haversack he found two bullets, and 
his tin of bully beef had been badly 
dented. He was wounded in May 

1915, and invalided home. On his 
recovery he returned to France, and 
fell in action on the 14th of October 

1916. His mother was personally pre- 
sented with his D.C.M. at Holyrood 
Palace by his Grace the Duke of 
Montrose in May 1916. She had 
three other sons in the* service. 



Private Richard Doyt.e, 5th 
Black Watch, 35 Fisheracre, Ar- 
broath, was the son of Arthur 
Doyle, and of his wife Ann Smith, 
40 Maule Street. He married Mary 
Bogie, and left one son. Private 
Doyle was twenty-three years of age, 
and was employed with Messrs 
Keitli it Blackman Co.. Ltd. As a 
Territorial he was mobilised in 
August 1914, and after fourteen 
months' service he returned from 
France as a time-expired man. In 
July 1916 he re-enlisted voluntarily, 
but had been two months back on 
active service when he was wounded, 
and died in a casualty clearing station 
on the 16th of October 1916. 

PTE. ARTHUR DAVIDSON, N.Z. 

Private Arthur Davidson, New 
Zealand Contingent, was a native of 
Friockheim, and was, before going to 
New Zealand, employed at the Friock- 
heim Bleachfield. When the call to 
arms came he and his younger 
brother, Mark, gave a ready response. 
He was killed in action in France in 
October 1916. 



78 



PTE. D. J. C. IRELAND, A. & S.H. 



PTE. ARTHUR C. PETRIE, B.W. 





Private David John Campbell 
Ireland, 2nd Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders, who was thirty-six 
years of age and unmarried, was the 
only son of James Ireland, Bannety 
and Lappie, and of Mrs Ireland, 
East Balmirmer, Arbroath. After his 
father's death he managed the farm 
in conjunction with his mother, and 
though he might have stayed at 
home he considered that it was his 
duty to go to the front rather than 
his grieve, who was a man with a 
family. He joined the 14th Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders on the 
22nd of July 1915, and afterwards 
was transferred to the 2nd Battalion 
of tlie same regiment. On the 31st 
of October 1916 Private Ireland was 
killed instantaneously by shell fire 
while on duty in the trenches on the 
Somrae. He was buried at the foot 
of what was known as '"The Lone 
Tree," about five hundred yards in 
front of Les Boeufs. His platoon 
commander wrote: — " We one and 
all were extremely sorry to lose so 
good a comrade, and still miss him ; 
he was always cheery and gave of his 
best. He died an honourable death." 



Private Arthur C. Petrie, 5th 
Black Watch, nineteen years of age, 
was the son of John Petrie, and of 
his wife Mary Jane Davidson, 40 
Cairnie Street, Arbroath. He was a 
maehineman in the Westburn Foun- 
dry and joined the 5th Black Watch 
in October 1914. He had been about 
two years in France and had under- 
gone the terrible experience of being 
buried by a shell which necessitated 
some time in hospital. He was re- 
ported missing on the 14th of October 
1916. On that date the 5th Black 
Watch were in action between 
Beaumont Hamel and Thiepval. The 
ground was so full of shell holes that 
many men disappeared, leaving no 
trace, and it is presumed that Private 
Petrie must have fallen at that time. 
The battalion took at least two Ger- 
man lines and held them till relieved. 

PTE. M'COMBIE, SEAFORTHS. 

Private Joseph Robertson 
M'Combie, Seaforth Highlanders, 
Arbroath, thirty-six years of age, 
was killed in action in France on 
the 13th of November 1916. 



79 



CAPT. ALEX. R. GIBB, R.F.A. PTE. WILLIAM M. FOULIS, R.E. 





Captain Alexander Reid Gibb, 
Royal Field Artillery, Arbroath, 
forty-one years of age, was the son 
of John Smith Gibb, Treasurer of 
the Edinburgh and Leith Gas Com- 
mission. After leaving Edinburgh 
University, he was for some time 
with Mr J. Gordon Mason, S.S.C.. 
Edinburgh, and in 1906 he entered 
into partnership with Mr H. Victor 
Neill, solicitor, Arbroath. Captain 
Gibb was well-known when in Edin- 
burgh as an athlete and an all-round 
sportsman and he was at one time a 
prominent cross-country runner. In 
Arbroath he took a keen interest in 
tennis, and when called away on 
active service he was treasurer of the 
Club. He was also an enthusiastic 
golfer, and as a member of the Ar- 
broath Club was a winner of the 
Storrer Cup. As a Freemason he 
was a member of Lodge Panmure 
(No. 299) and held the office of 
Deputy-Master. To the Arbroath 

Literary Club he had contributed in- 
teresting papers. Soon after com- 
ing to Arbroath he became on officer 
in the Forfarshire Battery, R.F.A., 
with which he left for the front in 



Private William M. Foulis, 
Royal Engineers, eighteen years of 
age, was the second son of Alex- 
ander Foulis and of his wife Annie 
M'Kimmie, 13$ Lochland Street, Ar- 
broath. He was an apprentice joiner 
with James Simpson, St Mary Street, 
when he joined the 3rd Royal Scots 
in January 1916, and had been only 
a month in training when he was 
transferred to the Royal Engineers. 
He proceeded to France in March 
193 6, and died of gun-shot wounds 
at Warlencourt, on the Sonime, on 
the 30th of October 1916. 



1915. He, however, was subse- 
quently transferred to a regular 
battery and was attached to the 
Highland Brigade. On the 12th of 
October 1916 he was hit by a shell 
while observing from a front trench, 
and died almost instantaneously. 
The Colonel in command of the Bri- 
gade said that during the short time 
Captain Gibb had been with him he 
had done some exceptionally good 
work, and that he was very popular 
with everybody. 



80 



DRIVER A. B. CUMMING, R.F.A. 



PTE. MALCOLM, MIDDLESEX. 





Driver Andrew Blair Cumming, 
Royal Field Artillery, twenty-one 
years of age, was the son of Francis 
Cumming, tailor's cutter, and of his 
wife Mary Stewart, 33 Dishland 
Street, Arbroath. He was a watch- 
maker with Mr John Anderson. He 
enlisted in June 191-5, and had been 
in France only two months when he 
was wounded, and died on 4th Nov. 
1916. His brother, James, was killed 
six months earlier, and another 
brother served with the R.N.D. 

PTE. CHRISTIE, S.A. SCOTTISH. 

Private James Christie, South 
African Scottish, was a son of George 
Christie, builder, and of his wife Ann 
Millar, 67 Lochland Street, Arbroath. 
Private Christie was thirty years of 
age and unmarried. He was a joiner 
by trade, and had been about five 
years in South Africa before enlist- 
ing. He joined the South African 
Scottish in November 1915. He was 
killed by machine gun fire on the 
Somme on the 12th of October 1916. 
Private Christie had a brother serv- 
ing in France with the A.S.C. 



Private William Malcolm, 
Middlesex Regiment, 28 Campbell 
Road, Finsbury Park, London, was 
the son of John Malcolm and of his 
wife Margaret Bowman, 23 Hay's 
Lane, Arbroath. He was thirty-nine 
years of age, and had married, and 
left five sons and a daughter. He 
served his apprenticeship as a 
plasterer with Mr G. A. Campbell, 
St Mary Street, and was working at 
his trade in London when he joined 
the army in July 1915. Private 
Malcolm was killed in action on the 
10th of November 1916. 

PTE. W. MORRIS, CANADIANS. 

Private William Morris, Cana- 
dian Pioneers, twenty-seven years of 
age, was a native of Arbroath. He 
served his apprenticeship as, an en- 
gineer at Westburn Foundry, and was 
a well-known member of Parkhead 
Football Club. When war broke out 
he was sailing as a marine engineer 
between San Francisco and Hong 
Kong, and enlisted at Vancouver, 
B.C. Private Morris was killed in 
action on the 18th of September 1916. 



81 



BDR. J. A. MORRISON, R.G.A. 



PTE.*HUGH ROBERTSON, B.W. 





Bombardier James A. Morrison. 
Royal Garrison Artillery, was a son 
of Andrew Morrison, boot finisher, 
and of his wife Murray Officer Camp- 
bell, 31 Taymouth Street, Carnoustie. 
He was twenty-seven years of age, 
married Mary Ann Ogilvie, and left 
two sons and a daughter. Bom- 

bardier Morrison was a tenter em- 
ployed' at Smieton's weaving factory. 
He was a member of the Territorials 
and was called up at the commence- 
ment of the war. He went to France 
in May 1916 and died at the Somme 
from shell concussion on the 7th of 
November 1916. His section officer 
wrote: — "I had in your husband an 
extraordinary good and trustworthy 
n.c.o. and most splendid companion 
at all times. His major also wrote: 
— " His loss is very deeply felt by 
all of us ; he invariably did his duty 
cheerfully and well." Bombardier 
Morrison belonged to one of Car- 
noustie's most patriotic families. 
Three of his brothers served with the 
colours and his father was a member 
of the local Volunteer Corps. His 
brother, Robert, R.F.A., was 
awarded the D.C.M. 



Private Hugh Robertson, 5th 
Black Watch, was the son of William 
Robertson, Tealing, and of his wife 
Mrs Ruxton, Berryhillock. Car- 
myllie. He was thirty-seven years of 
age and was unmarried. He left 
some years ago for New Zealand, 
where he worked for several farmers 
in the Stirling district. When war 
broke out he immediately volunteered 
for active service but was rejected on 
account of having lost the sight of 
one eye. The call to aid his country 
was however insistent with him, and 
he returned to Scotland and enlisted 
in the Black Watch. He went to 
France in August 1916, and was 
killed in action on the 13th .of No- 
vember of the same year. 

PTE. THOMAS M'FARLANE, B.W. 

Private Thomas M'Farlane, 2nd 
Black Watch, twenty-seven years of 
age, was the grandson of Thomas P. 
M'Farlane, 11 St Vigeans Road, Ar- 
broath. He was employed at Cox's 
Mill, Lochee, before he joined the 
army in 1908. He was killed in 

action on the 1st of January 1916. 



82 



PTE. R. A. MANGAN, B.W. 



L-CPL. DAVID CARGILL, B.W. 






Private Richard A. Mangan, 
7th Black Watch, was the son of 
Richard Mangan and of his wife 
Susan Sheridan, 12 Anderson Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-nine years 
of age, and was a grocer with the 
High Street Co-operative Society. 
He captained the Y.M.C.A. team 
that won for the fourth time the Dun- 
dee and District Gymnastic Junior 
Shield in 1911-12. He joined the 
5th Black Watch in March 1916 and 
was afterwards transferred to the 
7th battalion. He took part in the 
British offensive in France in 1916, 
and was killed at Beaumont Hamel 
on the 13th of November 1916. His 
company officer wrote :— " His com- 
rades speak very highly of him. and I 
am sure he nobly upheld the tradi- 
tions of the Black Watch." 

PTE. MATHEWSON, M.M. C.I. 

Private John Mathewson, Cana- 
dian Infantry, son of Mrs Mathew- 
son, 19 East Abbey Street, Arbroath, 
was awarded the Military Medal, for 
conspicuous gallantry on the Somme, 
and was killed in October 1917. 



Lance-Corporal David Cargill, 
5th Black Watch, was the son of 
David Cargill and of his wife Eliza- 
beth Swankie, 21 South Street, Ar- 
broath. He was eighteen years of 
age and before joining the army was 
employed at Stanley Works. He 
enlisted in November 1914, and went 
to Prance in July 1916. He was 

twice wounded, and was killed on the 
14th of November 1916 by a sniper 
when on his way to a dressing 
station. His brother was killed in 
July 1916. 

LIEUT. JAMES KERR, H.L.I. 

Lieutenant James Kerr, High- 
land Light Infantry, twenty-five 
years of age, was the son of James 
S. Kerr, 3 Wellgate, Dundee, and 
grandson of James Kerr, shoemaker, 
Keptie Street, Arbroath. He was in 
the service of the International 
Banking Incorporation, Yokohama, 
when he came to London and got a 
commission in August 1918. He was 
killed in action on the 1st of July 
1916. Lieutenant Kerr had two 
brothers in the army. 



83 



CPL. J. PATTULLO, CANADIANS. 



PTE. GEO. BATCHELOR, B.W. 





Corporal James Alexander Pat- 
txtllo, 50th Battalion Canadians, 739 
18th Avenue N.W., Calgary, Alberta, 
was the son of James Pattullo, for- 
merly grieve at South Mains of Ethie, 
Arbroath, and of his wife Agnes 
Jamie, Ethie Ranch, Airdrie, Alberta. 
He married Mary A. Cathro, an Ar- 
broathian , and left two children. Cor- 
poral Pattullo was twenty-eight years 
of age, and was a teamster with the 
Johnston Cartage Company in Cal- 
gary when he joined the 50th Cana- 
dians in June 1915. After four 
months' training in Sareee Camp. Cal- 
gary, he left with his battalion for 
England and was stationed at Bram- 
shott Camp till he went to France in 
August 1916. At the battle of the 
Somme, on the 16th of November 
1916, during a terrible bombardment 
which played havoc with the bat- 
talion, a "whizz bang" shell ex- 
ploded in the trench and killed him 
instantaneously. Corporal Pattullo 
was a great favourite with the men 
of his platoon. Their remark when he 
fell was : — "We^have lost a good cor- 
poral." His officers also spoke well of 
the good work he had done in France. 



Private George Batchelor, 6th 
Black Watch, twenty-six years of 
age, was the adopted son of William 
Smith, Eastgate, Friockheim. He 
was a gardener at Kincaldrum 
House, Forfar, before he joined the 
army in March 1916. He went to 
France in July, was severely wounded 
in action, and died of his wounds at 
Etaples in November. Rev. John 
Smith, Friockheim, said of him: — 
" His military career has been com- 
paratively short, but he took to him- 
self the soldier spirit, and was bent 
on duty. Cheerful, generous-hearted, 
and industrious he had the esteem of 
his employers and the regard of his 
associates in civil life, and we doubt 
not he was a good comrade-in-arms." 

PTE. A. MITCHELL, CANADIANS. 

Private Alexander Mitchell, 
Canadian Expeditionary Force, was 
the youngest son of Charles D. Mit- 
chell, Detroit, who was formerly a 
master slater in Arbroath. Private 
Mitchell was thirty-four years of age. 
He was killed in action in France on 
the 16th of September 1916. 



84 



PTE. JAMES TOSH, H.L.I. 



PTE. A. M'KNIGHT, K.O.S.B. 





Peivate James Tosh, 17th High- 
land Light Infantry, was the son of 
James W. Tosh, Millfield Feus, near 
Arbroath. He was nineteen years of 
age and before joining the army was 
a farm worker in the service of Mr 
James Fairlie, West Balmirmer. He 
enlisted in the Highland Cyclist Bat- 
talion in December 1914, and was 
later transferred to the 17th H.L.I. 
He proceeded to France in June 1916 
and was killed in action on the 18tb 
of November 1916. His commanding 
officer wrote: — "I knew him very 
well as he worked in our mess. He 
was one of the most popular men in 
the company and I know that he will 
be missed very much. When he was 
killed he was right in front of the 
attack, as cool as anything." 

CPL. W. CEABB, AUSTRALIANS. 

Coepoeal William Ceabb, Austra- 
lian Imperial Force, twenty-seven 
years of age, was the son of William 
Crabb, Nether Dysart, Montrose, and 
grandson of William Crabb, Auch- 
mithie. He died from wounds on the 
13th of October 1916. 



Peivate Alexandee M'Knight, 
1st Battalion King's Own Scottish 
Borderers, was the son of John 
M'Knight, and of his wife Agnes 
Spalding, 26 Ladyloan, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-eight years of age, 
and before the war was employed as 
a tailor in Glasgow. Private 

M'Knight joined the 1st King's Own 
Scottish Borderers in February 1916 
and was killed in action in France on 
the 19th of November 1916. Second- 
Lieutenant J. C. Cameron, in a letter 
intimating Private M'Knight' s death 
wrote: — "He fell on November 16 
while bravely doing his duty. He 
was a splendid fellow, a type of sol- 
dier we can ill afford to lose." 

CPL. J. BROWN, CAMERONS. 

Coepoeal James Beown, Cameron 
Highlanders, twenty-eight years of 
age, was the son of James Brown, 43 
Helen Street, Arbroath. He had 

served for ten years in the army, 
and was killed in action on the 4 th 
of October 1916. His brother, 
George, had also been in the army 
and had lost his sight in France. 



85 



DRIVER J. COSGROVE, R.F.A. 



GUNNER E. M. SMITH, R.F.A, 





Driver John Cosgrove. Royal 
Field Artillery, was the son of Mrs 
Cosgrove, 12 Park Lane, Dundee, and 
formerly residing at 47 Culloden 
Road, Arbroath. He was eighteen 
and a half years of age, and before 
he joined the army was an apprentice 
pavior in the service of the Town 
Council. He enlisted in the Forfar- 
shire Battery of the Royal Field Ar- 
tillery in September 1914 and served 
with the 51st Divisional Ammunition 
Column all through the battle of the 
Somme. He was killed in action on 
the 17th of December 1916, near 
Albert. While sleeping in his dug- 
out a shell made a direct hit and his 
death was instantaneous. His officer 
wrote : — ' ' He came to France with 
me and I found him ever a good and 
reliable soldier. Naturally quiet, he 
went about his work without fuss or 
trouble, and, withal, he was a keen 
soldier who had long desired to see 
battery work. He died as he lived, 
doing his duty, without parade or 
ostentation, and I am by much the 
poorer by his untimely end. He 

lies at rest" in a little village behind 
the line." 



Gunner Edward M'Intyre Smith. 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son of 
Captain Edward Smith, and of his 
wife Louisa Pinckney, and nephew of 
the Misses Smith, 126 High Street, 
Arbroath, where he resided. He was 
twenty-seven years of age, and was 
in the office of Messrs Andrew Low- 
son. Ltd. He joined the Forfarshire 
Battery of the R.F.A. in October 
1915, and was killed in action on the 
17th of December 1916. He was 
buried in Aveling Cemetery, near 
Albert. His commanding officer 
wrote: — "His presence in the bat- 
tery will be greatly missed. He was 
very popular, and, being always 
anxious and keen to do his duty, he 
made a splendid type of a soldier." 

SGT.-MAJOR J. CRAWFORD, B.W. 

Sergeant-Major John Crawford, 
Black Watch, Arbroath, was the son 
of John Crawford, gardener, Dal- 
gairn, Cupar. He was an assistant 
with Mr Alex. Hird, draper, Keptie 
Street, and had been a member of 
the local Territorial Force. He died 
of wounds in November 1916. 



GUNNER J. A. EMSLIE, R.F.A. 



L-CPL. J. HANTON, A. & S.H. 





Gunner John Adamson Emslie, 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son of 
Robert Emslie and of his wife Susan 
Adamson, 3 West Mary Street, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty years of age, 
and before the war was an apprentice 
plumber with Mr T. R. Grant, 
Brothock Bridge. He enlisted in the 
Forfarshire Battery of the Royal Field 
Artillery in August 1915, and after 
four months' training went to France. 
On 17th December 1916 he was seri- 
ously wounded, and in the hope of 
saving his life his leg was amputated 
but it was of no avail and he died on 
the 20th of December 1916 at No. 9 
Casualty Clearing Station. Gunner 
Emslie was buried in Contay Military 
Cemetery, France. 

PTE. JAMES TODD, GORDONS. 

Private James Todd, Gordon High- 
landers, twenty-five years of age, was 
the son of James Todd. Kinnell, 
near Arbroath. Before enlisting in 
1915 he was a member of the Leith 
Police Force. He served in France, 
was severely wounded, and died on 
the 16th of October 1916. 



Lance-Corporal Joseph Hanton, 
14th Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, Hayshead House, Arbroath, 
was the son of William Hanton, and 
of his wife Margaret- Kydd, St 
Vigeans. He was twenty-five years 
of age and unmarried. He was a 
clerk in the head office of the Bank 
of Scotland in Edinburgh, having ser- 
ved his apprenticeship in the office of 
the Arbroath branch. He joined the 
army in June 1915 as a private in the 
14th Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, and went to France in 1916. 
After serving there for six months, 
Lance-Corporal Hanton was killed 
on the 29th of December 1916 at 
Bouchavesnes, near Combles. 

PRIVATE. ALEX. MEEK, H.L.I. 

Private Alexander Meek, 15th 
Highland Light Infantry, Ernest 
Street, Arbroath, was twenty-eight 
years of age. He was married and 
left two children. Private Meek was 
a painter by trade and had been only 
a few weeks at the front when he 
was killed in action on the 18th of 
November 1916. 



87 



L-CPL. W. RENNIE, A. & S.H. 



GUNNER DAVID WEIR, R.F.A. 




Lance-Corporal William Rennie, 
14th Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, was the son of William 
J . Rennie and of his wife Jane Fen- 
ton, 15 Hay swell Road, Arbroath. He 
was nineteen years of age, and was 
an apprentice with Messrs Boots, 
chemists, when he joined the army 
in October 1915 as a private. He 
went to France the following year, 
and only a few days after his promo- 
tion to lance-corporal he was killed in 
action near Bouehavesnes on the 29th 
of December 1916. His colonel wrote : 
— "Your son was ever a brave soldier 
and a good comrade," and his platoon 
officer wrote : — " Lance-Corporal 
William Rennie was a fine soldier. 
He did his duty, being faithful unto 
death." 

PTE. HUGHES, BLACK WATCH. 

Private William Hughes, Black 
Watch, son of Mrs Hughes, Dishland 
Street, Arbroath, was thirty years of 
age, and had joined the Territorials 
a few months before the war. He 
was wounded at La Bassee, and killed 
at the battle of the Somme in 1916. 




Gunner David Ferrier Weir, 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son of 
Charles Weir, 43 Panmure Street, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty years of age. 
and when war broke out he was serv- 
ing his apprenticeship as an iron- 
moulder with the Messrs James Keith 
& Blackmail Co., Ltd. He was a 
member of the Forfarshire Battery, 
but on account of his age he was not 
sent to the front till August 1916. 
Three months afterwards Gunner 
Weir was transferred to a Welsh 
battery. He was killed in action on 
the 2nd of January 1917 — the second 
of his family to fall at the front. 

BDR. J. FARQUHARSON, R.F.A. 

Bombardier John Farquharson, 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son of 
Colin Farquharson, 40 Green Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-three 
years of age, and was married. Be- 
fore the war he was employed as a 
moulder at Westburn Foundry. In 
May 1915 Bombardier Farquharson 
went with his battery to the front, 
and was killed in action in December 
1916. 



88 



PTE. A. CRAIG, BLACK WATCH. 



SEAMAN WM. J. IRVINE, R.N. 





Private Alexander Craig, 7th 
Black Watch, 29 Fisheracre, Ar- 
broath, was the eldest son of John 
Craig, formerly of Ordie, Oathlaw, 
and of Mrs Craig, 15 Culloden Road. 
He married Margaret Marshall 
Wood, and left three sons and two 
daughters. He was thirty-three 
years of age, and before joining the 
army was employed as a ploughman 
at Little Cairnie Farm, Arbroath. He 
joined the army in August 1916, and 
after a few months' training at Nigg 
he was sent over to France. Private 
Craig was killed in action on the 
Somme on the 5th of January 1917, 
the first day he was in the trenches, 
and he was buried in the British 
Military Cemetery at St Ollivers. 
His brother was killed in 1916. 

PTE. C. FRASER, S. AFRICANS. 

Private Charles T. Fraser, nine- 
teen years of age, only son of James 
W. Fraser, M.D.. Stutterheim, Cape 
Colony, and grandson of Gilbert 
Fraser, " commercial teacher, Ar- 
broath High School, was killed in 
action in East Africa in 1916. 



Seaman William James Irvine, 
R.N., eighteen years of age, was the 
son of William Irvine, the School 
House, Guthrie. He was a pupil of 
the Arbroath High School, and had 
gained a bursary of £50 for four years 
at St Andrews University. He joined 
the navy in September 1916 and was 
sent to Devonport for a course of 
training in submarine hunting. He 
took pneumonia and died in the Royal 
Naval Hospital, Plymouth, on the 
6th of January 1917. He was buried 
in the churchyard at Guthrie. 

PTE. M'KINNON, BLACK WATCH 

Private James M'Kinnon, 5th 
Black Watch, 279 High Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of Peter 
M'Kinnon, Aberdeen. He was 

twenty-seven years of age, and had 
married Agnes Ross, and left a son 
and a daughter. Private' M'Kinnon 
was a carter with the Caledonian 
Railway Company when he joined the 
army in September 1914. On the 1st 
of September 1916 he was killed in 
action and was buried at Knights- 
bridge Cemetery, Mesnil, near Albert. 



89 



PTE. J. SOUTAR, BLACK WATCH, 



PTE. A. TODD, BLACK WATCH. 





Private James Soutar, 9th Black 
"Watch, twenty-one years of age, was 
the son of George Soutar, Westhills, 
Carnvyllie. Before joining the army, 
in June 1915. he had been a plough- 
man at Labothie, Inverarity. "When 
in France he was in charge of a Lewis 
gun team, and was on the point of 
being made a lance-corporal when he 
was killed on the 24th of January 
1917. He was leading his gun team 
at the head of the platoon when he 
was wounded, and had to be carried 
to No. 45 Casualty Clearing Station, 
where he died four days later. His 
officer said he was one of the best 
men he had, and the chaplain wrote : 
— "He was a true and brave soldier, 
one of the best and bravest in the 
battalion, and we are all glad and 
proud to have known him." 

PTE. CAR GILL, BLACK WATCH. 

Private James Cargild, 5th Black 
Watch, twenty-two years of age, son 
of David Cargill, 44 Auchmithie, was 
a farm servant at Kinaldie. He 

was killed in action in France on the 
23rd of April 1917. 



Private Andrew Todd, 1st Black 
Watch, son of Mrs Andrew Todd, 14 
Millgate Loan, Arbroath, was twenty- 
three years of age and was a plough- 
man at Arrot. Brechin. He joined the 
colours in February 1915, and was 
killed at Albert on the 23rd of Janu- 
ary 1917. A sergeant, writing, said : 
— " We have lost a good comrade, 
one who was always willing, obliging 
and cheerful, and our country 
mourns another good soldier." 

SGT. J. WHITTON, M.M., B.W. 

Sergeant John Whitton, 5th 
Black Watch, was the son of David 
Whitton, Friockheim. Being one of 
the local corps of the Black Watch 
(Territorials) he left for France in 
November 1914. He was wounded 
early in the war, and again wounded 
in October 1916, and for his meri- 
torious conduct then he was awarded 
the Military Medal. Shortly after- 
wards he was killed in action. "Ser- 
geant Whitton was a quiet, unassum- 
ing lad, ever earnest in duty, upright 
in word and deed," were the terms 
in which his Captain spoke of him. 



90 



DR. RAMSAY, CANADIAN A.S.C. 



SAPPER F. ROBERTSON, R.E. 





Driver James Ramsay, Canadian 
Army Service Corps, thirty-one years 
of age, was the second son of James 
Ramsay, 24 St Vigeans Road, Ar- 
broath. He was unmarried and had 
been a baggage porter in Montreal 
previous to the outbreak of war. In 
December 1914 he joined the Cana- 
dian Army Service Corps as a driver 
of the 2nd Divisional Train. He ser- 
ved in France until the 28th of Janu- 
ary 1917, when he died suddenly and 
was buried in a little cemetery at 
Huillecourt. France. He was a 
great favourite in his unit. 

PTE. D. BROWN. CANADIANS. 

Private David Brown, Canadian 
Cameron Highlanders, thirty-eight 
years of age, was the son of George 
Brown, 20 Brechin Road, Arbroath. 
He was a tailor's cutter and after be- 
ing several years in Soutli Africa he 
went to Canada where he was in busi- 
ness for himself. Private Brown 
joined the Cameron Highlanders in 
Canada and had been only five 
weeks at the front when he was 
killed in action in 1917. 



Sappeh Frank Robertson, 3rd 
Field Company, Royal Engineers 
(T.F.), twenty-eight years of age, was 
the son of Alexander and Margaret 
Robertson, Kinloch Cottage, Golf 
Street, Carnoustie. He was em- 
ployed as a mason with Messrs A. 
Robertson & Sons when he joined the 
army in November 1915. After en- 
listing he was for some time engaged 
in bridge-building at Balmuir ; and 
then finished his training at Norfolk. 
He was only four weeks in France 
when he contracted a chill, which 
proved fatal. He died of pneumonia 
on the 12th of February 1917 and was 
buried in the cemetery at Etaples. 

SGT. ANDW. SIMPSON. K.O.S.B. 

Sergeant Andrew Simpson, 
King's Own Scottish Borderers, 
Kinloch Street, Carnoustie, joined 
the army in 1914. He was one of 
Carnoustie's strongest golfers. He 
had been in the South African Police 
and fought in Mashonaland and dur- 
ing the South African war. Sergeant 
Simpson was killed at the battle of 
Loos on the 25th of September 1916. 



9] 



A.B. ALEX. JAMIESON, R.N.D. ENG. SUB-LT. SMITH, R.N.R. 





Able Seaman Alexander Pert 
Jamieson, Royal Naval Division, was 
the son of W. Jamieson, 26 Leonard 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
five years of age and was unmarried. 
He was employed at Messrs David 
Oorsar & Sons' Nursery Mills, and 
was at one time secretary of the 
Woodside Club, and secretary and 
treasurer of the Arbroath and Dis- 
trict Juvenile Association. He 
joined the Royal Naval Division in 
November 1915. Seaman Jamieson 
was wounded in action, and died in 
France on the 18th of February 1917. 
His elder brother. Private David 
Jamieson, was killed in action at the 
battle of Loos on the 25th of Sep- 
tember 1915. 

GUNR, BRAND, AUSTRALIANS. 

Gunner Robert Brand, Austra- 
lian Imperial Forces, was the son of 
Private James Brand. Brisbane, 
Queensland, Australia, and grandson 
of Robert 0. Brand, Fergus Square, 
Arbroath. He had been on active ser- 
vice, and died in the hospital at Ted- 
worth on the 24th of February 1917. 



Engineer Sub-Lieutenant Smith, 
Royal Naval Reserve, was the son of 
Edward Smith and of his wife Isobel 
Crockatt, 48j Cairnie Street, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-eight years 
of age, and he served his apprentice- 
ship at the Dens Iron Works. He 
was afterwards with Messrs Cuth- 
bertson & Company, Glasgow, and 
he joined the R.N.R. as engine- 
room artificer on H.M.S. Marl- 
borough. He took part in the Jut- 
land battle and was afterwards pro- 
moted to the rank of Chief Engine- 
Room Artificer. Engineer Sub-Lieu- 
tenant Smith received bis com- 
mission on the 1st of January 
1917, and was transferred to 
H.M.S. Bacchante off which he was 
accidentally drowned on the 21st of 
February 1917. 

PTE. GALWAY, AUSTRALIANS. 

Private William Ernest Galway, 
Australian Imperial Forces, was the 
grandson of William Ruxton, 50 
Howard Street, Arbroath. Private 
Galway was killed in action at 
Bapaume, France, in March 1917. 



92 



PTE. JAS. ADAM, CANADIANS. PTE. HEBENTON, CANADIANS. 





Private James Adam, Canadian 
Boyal Highlanders, was the youngest 
son of Mrs Adam, 38 Helen Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-nine years 
of age and was unmarried. He had 
served his apprenticeship as a baker 
in Arbroath, but afterwards went to 
Canada, and was in the Ottawa Gas 
Company when he joined the army 
in 1915. He was a keen footballer, 
both at home and abroad, and won a 
silver cup in one of the championship 
matches at Ottawa. He came over 
with a Canadian Contingent in April 
1916, and was stationed in England 
for three months, after which he went 
to France, and was killed in action 
there on the 1st of March 1917. 

PTE. MUNBO, SCOTTISH RIFLES. 

Private James Munro, Scottish 
Rifles, 35 East Abbey Street, Ar- 
broath, was a son of James Munro, 
45 Leonard Street. He had married 
Annie Macfarlane and left one child. 
Before enlistment he was employed at 
the Dens Iron Works, and had been 
six months at the front when he was 
killed on the 24th of March 1917. 



Private William Gibb Hebenton, 
72nd Canadian Seaforths, 109 Ninth 
Street, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 
Canada, was the fourth son of David 
Hebenton and of his wife Annie Low, 
27 East Abbey Street, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-six years of age, and 
was formerly employed as a freight 
clerk on the Canadian Northern Pail- 
way. He joined the 72nd Canadian 
Seaforths in September 1915, and 
came over to France. Private 

Hebenton was one of the victims of a 
severe gas attack at Vimy Ridge. 
He died in the 22nd Casualty Clear- 
ing Station on the 2nd of March 1917 
as the result of poison fumes. 

PTE. BOWMAN, BLACK WATCH. 

Private James Bowman, Black 
Watch, thirty-one years of age, was 
the son of Robert Bowman, Fifth- 
muir, Arbroath. He was married 
and left two of a family. Before en- 
listing in 1916 he was employed in 
Arbroath as a lorryman with Mr 
James Jack, aerated water manufac- 
turer. Private Bowman died in hos- 
pital at Cromarty in April 1917. 



93 



GUNNER DAVID MILL, R.G.A. 



CPL. CHARLES H. HARPER, R.E. 




Gunner David Mill. 100th Siege 
Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, 
was the son of James Grieve Mill, 
and of his wife Mary Laburn, 131 
Paumure Terrace, Carnoustie. He 
was twenty years of age, and before 
the war he was employed as a 
machineman at the Taymouth En- 
gineering Works. Carnoustie. Gunner 
Mill joined the Royal Garrison Ar- 
tillery (Territorials) in 1912, and was 
mobilised on the 4th of August 1914. 
and attached to the North Scottish 
R.G.A. He was stationed for a time 
at Brought? Ferry, and served for a 
year in France, where he was killed 
during a heavy bombardment at 
Berles an Bois on the 6th of March 
1917 by a shell entering the cellar 
where he was sheltering. His major 
wrote: — "He was one of the most 
hard-working and quiet men in the 
battery. He was first under me at 
Broughty Ferry, where he helped 
well both on the guns and in the 
mess, and in France he helped in 
many ways, latterly looking after the 
men's messing. His work at the 
front was excellent, and he always 
did his best." 



4J4fc 



Corporal Charles Henry Har- 
per. Royal Engineers, was the son of 
J. Wallace Harper, 4 Guthrie Port, 
Arbroath. He was forty years of 
age and was unmarried. He served 
his apprenticeship with the Tele- 
phone Company in Dundee, going 
later to Manchester and afterwards 
to Madras, where for seven years he 
held an appointment with the 
Oriental Electric Company. He was 
in the Government telephone service 
in Glasgow when he joined the army 
in December 1915. He died of 
wounds at Rouen on the 3rd of 
March 1917. Two of his brothers came 
from Vancouver with the Canadians 
and served in France. 

PTE. MDLNE, HOME DEFENCE. 

Private Charles Milne, Home 
Defence Corps, fifty years of age, 
was the youngest son of James Milne, 
29 St Mary Street, Arbroath. He 
married Ann Carrie, and lived at 56 
Paumure Street, Carnoustie. Private 
Milne died of apoplexy in No. 4 
Military Hospital, Glasgow, on the 
16th of February 1917. 



94 



LT. ROBERT C. MILNE, R.N.R. 



PTE. PATTULLO, BLACK WATCH. 





Lieutenant Robert Conway 
Milne, Royal Naval Reserve, was 
the son of Robert Conway Milne, 
Port Missionary, Sailors' Home Mis- 
sion and Institute. Barrow-in-Fur- 
ness, and nephew of Miss Airth, 
Bible- reader, Arbroath. He served 
his apprenticeship in the Hindustan 
Shipping Company, of Sunderland, 
and when war was declared was a 
chief officer in the Clan Line Shipping 
Company. He joined the navy as 
lieutenant in the Royal Naval Re- 
serve. While on H.M.S. Magnificent 
he did much secret service work, and 
went through a special course of 
gunnery instruction. He was appoin- 
ted as Gunnery-Lieutenant on H.M.S. 
Q27, a mystery ship operating in the 
route of Atlantic shipping. Q27's 
first trip was productive of much 
harm to the enemy, but her second 
was disastrous to herself and thirteen 
men. Lieutenant Milne was the only 
officer lost. He was fatally wounded 
on getting out the port lifeboat, the 
ship suddenly listing on being struck 
by a torpedo. She went down in four 
minutes on the 13th of March 1917. 
Lieut. Milne was buried at sea. 



Private Allan Pattullo, 3rd 
Black Watch, was the youngest son 
of Allan Pattullo and of his wife Ann 
Edwards, 69 Helen Street, Arbroath. 
He was nineteen years of age and was 
a batcher at Alma Works when he 
was called up in October 1916. Pri- 
vate Pattullo joined the 3rd Black 
Watch, and had been in training at 
Nigg when he became ill and died in 
the hospital at Nigg on the 12th of 
March 1917. His brother. Private 
David Pattullo, Royal Engineers, 
was killed in action in 1916. 

PTE. ROBERTSON, CANADIANS 

Private Arthur Robertson, 148th 
Canadians, twenty-three years of age, 
was the son of Duncan Robertson, 
2413 Cartier Street, Montreal, for- 
merly of Arbroath. Private Robert- 
son was killed in action at the battle 
of Vimy Ridge. He had three 

brothers, all natives of Arbroath, 
with the colours. William was in tbe 
Naval Division at the Dardanelles, 
Alexander in the Vancouver Regi- 
ment, and James in the Canadian 
Army Medical Corps. 



95 



SGT. ALEX. KIDD, CANADIANS. 



PTE. E. SPINK, LIVERPOOLS. 





Sergeant Alexander Kidd, 87th 
Canadian Grenadier Guards, 815 
Alma Street, Montreal, was a son of 
William Kidd, Station Cottages, 
Leysmill. He was thirty-seven years 
of age and had married Lizzie Crow, 
and left five children. He served in 
the Boer War with distinction, win- 
ning hoth the King's and Queen's 
medals. He returned to Scotland and 
joined the Police Force. Five years 
afterwards he went to Canada and 
was in the C.P.R. Police. In Novem- 
ber 1915 he enlisted as a private, and 
was wounded by shrapnel at the 
battle of the Somme. On his recovery 
he was sent to the Canadian Base 
Depot at Le Havre, until, after an 
accident, serious illness developed. 
He was sent to No. 7 Stationary Hos- 
pital, Harfleur, where he died on the 
28th of March 1917. He was buried 
in the cemetery at St Marie, Havre. 
Sergeant Kidd had five brothers in 
the army. Lieutenant William Kidd 
fought in South Africa ; Edward and 
Stewart were both with the Scottish 
Horse ; Francis was on the head- 
quarter staff in England, and Charles 
was with a Scottish regiment. 



Private Edward Spink, King's 
Liverpools, 13 Bank Street, Arbroath, 
was the son of Edward Spink, man- 
ager and secretary of the Arbroath 
Friendly Coal Society, Ltd. Private 
Spink, who was twenty years of age, 
was clerk in the office of the Society 
previous to his enlistment in August 
1915, when he joined the Highland 
Cyclist Battalion. He was after- 
wards transferred to the King's 
Liverpools and he served at the front 
in France for four months before he 
was killed in action on the 13th of 
March 1917. Private Spink's 

younger brother, Herbert, was also 
in the army, having been in the 
Mechanical Transport Section. 

PTE. J. FYFE, BLACK WATCH. 

Private John Fyfe, Black Watch, 
was the son of John Fyfe, at one 
time of Kinnell's Mill, Friockheim. 
Although under age he went over to 
France with the rest of the Friock- 
heim boys of the Black Watch in 
November 1914. He was only twenty- 
years of age when he was killed in 
action on the 31st of July 1917. 



96 



PTE. ALEXANDER, CAMERONS. 



PTE. C. WARDEN, ROYAL SCOTS. 





Private David Alexander, 7th 
Cameron Highlanders, was the son 
of Mrs Alexander, 45 Lochlands 
Drive. Arbroath. He was twenty- 
tight years of age and was a grocer 
in Cambuslang. He enlisted m 
November 1914, and was promoted 
corporal. He went to France as a 
private, and was killed on the 9th 
of April 1917. 

PTE. JOHN H. PETERS, R.S.F. 
Private John Hunter Peters, 
Royal Scots Fusiliers, twenty-one 
years of age, was the son of David 
Peters, Denhead of Arbirlot. He 
was a ploughman at Letham Grange 
when he joined the 5th Black Watch 
in 1916. He was transferred to the 
R.S.F. , and was killed on the 3rd of 
May 1917. 

PTE. W. W. MATTHEW, N.F. 
Private Walter W. Matthew, 
24th Northumberland Fusiliers, was 
the son of Joseph Matthew, Dalhousie 
Place, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
three years of age, and was presumed 
killed on the 29th of April 1917. 



Private Chari.es Andrew War- 
den, 12th Royal Scots, was the son 
of Charles M. Warden, Easthaven. He 
was eighteen years of age and was a 
railway porter at Carnoustie station. 
He joined the 12th Royal Scots in 
August 1915, and went to* France in 
December. While in action at Fam- 
poux, near Arras, on the 12th of 
April 1917, Private Warden remained 
in the worst of shell-torn areas under 
heavy fire bandaging a wounded 
officer until he himself was killed by 
a shell. His commanding officer said 
he was a most energetic soldier, al- 
ways obliging, and always on tlio 
spot when he was wanted. 

PTE. D. REDD, ROYAL SCOTS. 

Private David Reid, Royal Scots, 
son of James Reid, bleacher, and 
brother of Mrs Galbraith, Elliot 
Place, Arbroath, was thirty-three 
years of age, and was employed at 
Kelly Blea.chfield. He joined the 
army in February 1915, and was 
killed at the Somme in 1916. A 
brother. Charles Reid, was killed in 
the previous year. 



97 



2nd-LT. D. A. CARNEGIE, R.F.A. L-CPL. D. BUIK, CAMERONS. 





Second-Lieutenant David Alex- 
ander Carnegie, 122nd Brigade, 
Royal Field Artillery, 38th Division, 
was the son of Lieutenant-Colonel 
the Honourable Douglas Carnegie 
and of his wife Margaret Jean John- 
stone Douglas, Fair Oak, Rogate, 
Sussex, and grandson of the ninth 
Earl of Northesk. He was twenty 
years of age and instead of going to 
Cambridge, as was intended, he went 
to Woolwich, received a commission 
in May 1916, and was immediately 
sent out to France, where he took 
part in the engagements at Mametz 
and Contalmaison. He was killed in 
action by the explosion of an enemy 
shell in his battery at Brielen, near 
Ypres, on the 2nd of April 1917, and 
was buried in the military cemetery 
at Elverdinghe, in Flanders. The 
Colonel commanding his brigade 
wrote : — ' ' He was a splendidly gal- 
lant fellow who has done magnificent 
work always. He could always be 
absolutely depended upon, and his 
powers of observation and intuition 
were exceptional. His reports were 
always valuable. Both officers and 
men were most awfully fond of him." 



Lance-Corporal David Buik, 
Cameron Highlanders, thirty-one 
years of age, was the son of Mrs 
Buik-Duncan, Ferndene, Kinlocb 
Street, Carnoustie. He had been 
employed as a soft leather cutter at 
the Dalhousie Leather Works, and 
prior to enlistment was engaged with 
a firm of Glasgow contractors. He 
joined the Cameron Highlanders as 
a private in November 1915, went to 
France in May 1916, and was pro- 
moted lance-corporal. He was 
wounded in the head and died on the 
14th of April 1917 at No. 11 General 
Hospital, Dannes Camiers. He was 
buried in Etaples Military Cemetery. 
A brother served with the Gordons. 

PTE. VALENTINE, CANADIANS. 

Private Henry Guild Valentine, 

15 th Canadians, youngest son of 
Richard Valentine, Tarry Mill, Ar- 
broath, was thirty-four years of age 
and unmarried. He had been in 
Canada for ten years, and joined the 
Canadian Expeditionary Force in 
1915. He was serving in France and 
died there on the 9th of April 1917. 



98 



SGT. FAIRWEATHER, M.M., R.S. 



PTE. NICOLL, BLACK WATCH. 





Sergeant John Brown Fair- 
weather, 1st Royal Scots, twenty- 
eight years of age, was the son of 
John Fairweather, 37 Lordburn, Ar- 
broath. He joined the army in 1906, 
and served for seven years in India. 
From there he was drafted to France 
and landed on Christmas day 1914. 
He was promoted sergeant in the 
field, and was decorated with the 
Military Medal for bravery in a 
bombing raid near Arras the day be- 
fore he was wounded for the third 
and last time. He died in a base hos- 
pital as the result of gun-shot 
wounds in the head on the 14th of 
April 1917, and was buried in the 
soldiers' cemetery at Aubigny, 
Artois. Sergeant Fairweather had 
three brothers in the army — James 
was killed the same month ; Edward 
gained the Military Medal. 

PTE. T. MARTIN, SCOTS GUARDS. 

Private Tom Martin, 2nd Scots 
Guards, twenty-four years of age, 
was a clerk with the N.B. Railway 
Co. at Arbroath. He was killed in 
action on the 27th of September 1915. 



Private Andrew Nicoll, 5th Black 
Watch, was the youngest son of Mrs 
William Nicoll, 248 High Street, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty years of age. 
Before enlisting he was employed at 
Waulkmills Bleachfield. He joined 
the army in March 1915 as a private 
in the 5th Black Watch, and after 
several months' training at Forfar 
and Ripon he was sent over to 
France in 1916. He was ill, and re- 
turned to England for a time, and 
after rejoining his unit he was trans- 
ferred to the Machine Gun Corps at 
Grantham. In October Private Nicoll 
left for Mesopotamia, where he died 
of wounds on the 16th of April 1917. 

PTE. R. BELL, SEAFORTHS. 

Private Richard Bell, Seaforth 
Highlanders, Rose Street, Car- 
noustie, was, at the time of enlist- 
ing, employed in the vitriol works of 
Messrs Tennant, Carnoustie. He 
was married and left three children. 
As a golfer he was one of the Car- 
noustie Club's leading men, being a 
scratch player. Private Bell died of 
wounds in April 1917. 



99 



SGT. A. CATHRO, CANADIANS. 



GUNR. ALEX. MITCHELL, R.F.A. 





Sergeant Alexander . Cathro, 
50th Battalion Canadians, Calgary, 
Alberta, Canada, twenty-five years 
of age, was the son of Private James 
Cathro, C.A.S.C, and of his wife Isa- 
bella Mathewson, Calgary. Sergeant 
Cathro and his wife, Jeannie Lind- 
say Gibson, were both natives of 
Arbroath. Sergeant Cathro was a 
ploughman in the Arbroath district 
before going to Calgary in 1911, and 
lie was employed there as a teamster 
with the Ashdown Hardware Co. He 
joined the army as a private in the 
50th Canadian Battalion in February 
1915, and was in training at Garcee 
Camp until October, when he was 
sent overseas and stationed at Bram- 
shott. He went to France in August 
1916 and was wounded in the face at 
the battle of the Somme. After three 
weeks in hospital he returned to the 
trenches on the very day his brother- 
in-law, Corporal James Pattullo, was 
killed. He himself lost his life at 
the capture of Vimy Ridge on the 
10th of April 1917. Officers' letters 
spoke highly of his character, of his 
devotion to duty, and of the good 
work he did in France. 



Gunner Alexander Murray 
Officer Mitchell. R.F.A., son of 
Alexander M. O. Mitchell, Drummy- 
gar, Carmyllie, was thirty-one years 
of age and unmarried. He had been 
a ploughman in the Carmyllie dis- 
trict and prior to enlisting in Novem- 
ber 1915 was a driver on the Dundee 
and Monifieth Tramway Cars. While 
performing his duty at the guns in 
France he was hit on the head by a 
piece of shell and instantaneously 
killed on the 18th of April 1917. His 
section officer, writing of him, says : 
"I at all times found him one of my 
most willing and capable gunners." 

GUNR. PERCY NICOLL, R.F.A. 

Gunner Percy Nicoll, Royal Field 
Artillery, was the son of J. M. Nicoll, 
Invertay, and brother of Mrs Reid, 
Catherine Cottage, Carnoustie. He 
had served his apprenticeship as a 
fitter with Messrs G. Anderson & Co., 
Ltd., was employed for a time as 
mechanic with Messrs J. Smieton & 
Sons, and later received an appoint- 
ment in London. Private Nicoll was 
killed on the 13th of April 1917. 



100 



PTE. J. FETTES, SEAFORTHS. 



PTE. ALEX. ROBERTSON, R.S.F. 




Private John Fettes, Seaforth 
Highlanders, 28 Ponderlaw Street, 
Arbroath, who was thirty years of 
age. was the son of James Fettes, 
plumber, 9 Union Street, Brechin. 
He married Margaret Cant, and left 
one son. He was an ironmoulder 
with the Messrs James Keith & 
Blackmail Company, Ltd., when he 
enlisted in August 1914 in the Sea- 
forth Highlanders. Private Fettes 
served for a. year in England, and 
then went to France, where he had 
been for ten months at the front 
when he was wounded. After his 
recovery he was sent to Mesopo- 
tamia, and was killed in the fighting 
on the Persian Gulf on the 21st of 
April 1917. 

TPE. ANDERSON, LIFE GUARDS 

Trooper Alexander Anderson, 
Life Guards, was the son of George 
G. Anderson, 25 West Abbey Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty years of 
age, and before enlisting in 1916 he 
was a clerk in the Dundee office of 
Messrs Wordie & Co. He was killed 
in action on the 12th of April 1917. 




Private Alexander Robertson, 
Royal Scots Fusiliers, was the son of 
James Robertson and of his wife 
Jean Reid, 71 Loch land Street, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-three years 
of age and had married Janet Web- 
ster and left one son. Before join- 
ing the army in April 1916 Private 
Robertson was in business in North 
Port as a hairdresser. After a 
year's service he died of wounds in 
a Casualty Clearing Station in 
France on the 21st of April 1917. 
Private Robertson had two brothers 
serving in the R.F.A. 

PTE. ARTHUR TAYLOR, N.F. 

Private Arthur Taylor, Nor- 
thumberland Fusiliers, second son of 
Alexander Taylor, painter, 50 How- 
ard Street, Arbroath, was twenty- 
eight years of age and unmarried. 
He had served his apprenticeship as 
a moulder at the Dens Iron Works, 
and was working at his trade in 
Yoker when he enlisted in the Royal 
Engineers. He was afterwards 

transferred and was killed in action 
on the 9th of April 1917. 



101 



(2 



PTE. M. BROWN, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. JOSEPH KEITH, H.L.I. 




Private Melville Brown, 7th 
Black Watch, was the son of Stephen 
Brown and of his wife Mary Ann 
Milne. 5 Kinnaird Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty- three years of age and 
unmarried and had been employed as 
a batcher at the Wellgate Works. He 
joined the Black Watch in November 
1915, and was killed in action in 
France on the 23rd of April 1917. 

LT. CRAWFORD, LONDON RGT. 

Second-Lieutenant William Scott 
Crawford, younger son of Mrs 
Crawford, Heme Hill, London, was 
twenty-nine years of age. He had 
been in the Arbroath Office of the 
"Dundee Advertiser." Having been 
in Messrs Shanks' engineering shop 
at the Dens Iron Works, Lieutenant 
Crawford worked for a time on a Lon- 
don engineering paper and later was 
in the London office of the Thomson 
publications. In January 1914 he 
joined the financial staff of " The 
Times," from which the following is 
quoted: — "He developed fast, show- 
ing gifts of leadership and quick de- 
cision. When the time came to join 




Private Joseph Keith, 15th High- 
land Light Infantry, Marywell, was 
the son of William Keith, Stone- 
haven. He was thirty-eight years ot 
age, and had married Jane Ann 
Stewart and left two sons and four 
daughters. Before joining the army 
in June 1916 he was a ploughman at 
Castleton, Marywell. He served in 
France, where he was wounded in 
action, and died in No. 10 General 
Hospital, Rouen, on the 9th of April 
1917. 



the army he threw himself heart and 
soul into his new profession and the 
gifts he had shown in Printing-House 
Square soon brought him the honour 
of nomination to a commission. His 
letters from France showed that no- 
thing impressed him more than the 
courage and cheerfulness of his men, 
of whose welfare he was for ever 
thinking." Lieut. Crawford wrote 
occasional verses for the ' Guide," 
and two of his pieces were brought 
under the notice of a well-known 
composer. He was killed in action 
in April 1917. 



102 



L-CPL. CHAS. STEWART, B.W. 



PTE M DONALD, BLACK WATCH. 




Lance-Corporal Charles Stewart, 
7th Black Watch, thirty years cf 
age, was the eldest son of David F. 
Stewart and of his wife Jessie Her- 
ron, 42 Sidney Street, Arbroath. He 
had been in America for several years 
but was employed as a machineman at 
Dens Iron Works, Arbroath, when he 
joined the army in February 1916 as 
a private in the oth Black Watch. 
After some months' training he went 
to France in July, and was trans- 
ferred to the 7th Battalion. Lance- 
Corpora.l Stewart was killed in action 
at the battle of Arras on the 23rd of 
April 1917. He was buried in a 
British cemetery near where he fell, 
north of Roeux and east of Fampoux. 

PTE. J. WHYTE, BLACK WATCH. 

Private James Whyte, Black 
Watch, was the son of Alexander 
Whyte, 64 Cairnie Street, Arbroath. 
Before joining the army he was 
employed at the High Street 
Foundry. Private Whyte, who had 
three brothers serving with the 
colours, .was killed in action on the 
23rd of April 1917. 




Private John M'Donald, 7th 
Black Watch, was the son of Donald 
M'Donald and of his wife Mary Ann 
Croall, East Kirkton, St Vigeans, 
Arbroath. He was twenty years of 
age and was employed as a tenter at 
the Alma Works. In August 1916 
he joined the 5th Black Watch, but 
when he went to France in Decem- 
ber he was transferred to the 7th. 
Private M'Donald was killed in 
action on the 23rd of April 1917, 
and was buried in a British Ceme- 
tery at Brown's Copse, four and a 
half miles east of Ai'ras. 

PTE. DONALDSON, CANADIANS. 

Private Robert E. Donaldson, 
52nd Canadians, was a native of 
Friockheim. He went to Canada 
some years ago. When war broke 
out he enlisted and came over to 
France. He was killed in 1917 while 
on guard in a captured German 
trench. The Canadian chaplain 
spoke of him as " a brave, worthy, 
man, a faithful soldier and a bright, 
gentle companion who willingly gave 
of his best for a righteous cause." 



103 



PTE. J. FAIRWEATHER, B.W. 



PTE. J. SHEPHERD, GORDONS. 





Private James Fairweather, 7th 
Black Watch. 98 Keptie Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of John Fair- 
weather and of his wife Mary 
M'Millan Dalrymple, 37 Lordburn. 
He was twenty-five years of age. had 
married Jane B. Cargill and left one 
daughter. He was a cabinetmaker 
with Messrs D. T. Wilson & Sons 
when he joined the army in March 
1916. After three months' training 
at Nigg, Private Fairweather went 
to France, where he served for ten 
months as a Lewis gunner. He was 
killed on the 23rd of April 1917 in 
the fighting round Arras, and was 
buried at Brown's Copse British 
Cemetery, near Arras. Three of Pri- 
vate Fairweather' s brothers served 
with the colours, and his brother 
John was killed the same month. 



Private James Shepherd, Gordon 
Highlanders, 36 Fergus Square, Ar- 
broath, was the son of John Shep- 
herd and of his wife Mary Lyell. He 
was thirty-five years of age and had 
married Mary Donald, and left two 
sons and two daughters. He had 
been an iron-moulder in Carnoustie, 
and enlisted in October 1914 in the 
Black Watch, but later was trans- 
ferred to the Gordon Highlanders. 
For two years he served on Home 
Defence, and had been at the front 
four months when he was wounded 
at the battle of Arras on the 23rd 
of April 1917. He died the following 
day. and was buried in the com- 
munal cemetery at Aubigny, near 
Arras. His commanding officer 
wrote deeply regretting the death of 
such an excellent soldier." 



L-CPL. J. JOLLY, CANADIANS. 

Lance-Corporal John Jolly, 
Canadian Contingent, thirty-two 
years of age, was the son of Mrs 
Moug, Salmond's Muir, near Ar- 
broath. He was killed in action on 
the 9th of April 1917. 



PTE. MINTOSH, LIVERPOOLS. 

Private William M'Intosh, 
King's Liverpool Regiment, Blind- 
loch, Arbroath, was the son of A. 
M'Intosh, Malleny Lodge, Balerno. 
He was killed in action on the 9th 
of April 1917. 



104 



PTE. JAMIESON, LI VERPOOLS. 



PTE. W. FRASER, ROYAL SCOTS. 





Private David Fairweatiier 
Jamieson, 18th Liverpool Regiment, 
was the son of James Jamieson and 
of his wife Jane Anderson, 16 West 
Keptie Street, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-one years of age and before 
he enlisted he was a waiter at the 
Star Hotel, Montrose. In November 
1915 he joined the Dundee Highland 
Cycle Bridage, but was afterwards 
transferred to the 18th Liverpools. 
Private Jamieson was killed in action 
on the 24th of April 1917, and was 
buried at Cherisy Rode East Ceme- 
tery, Heninel, five miles south-east 
of Arras. 

PTE. W. GRAY, BLACK WATCH. 

Private William Gray, 7th Black 
Watch, twenty years of age, was the 
third son of David Gray, Mains of 
Kelly, Arbroath. He was a farm 
servant when, shortly after the out- 
break of war, he joined the Black 
Watch, and went over to France in 
January 1915. Private Gray was 
wounded at Neuve Chapelle and at 
the Somme. He was killed in action 
on the 23rd of April 1917. 



Private William Fraser. 16th 
Royal Scots, 48 Broughton Road, 
Edinburgh, was the son of John 
Fraser, 21 Guthrie Port, Arbroath. 
• He was thirty-four years of age and 
had married Catherine M'lver, and 
left two sons and two daughters. Be- 
fore joining up in January 1917 he 
had been head gardener at Middle- 
ton Hall, near Edinburgh. After 
four months' service he was killed 
in France on the 28th of April 1917. 

2nd-LT. W. SHAND KYDD. R.F.A. 

Seconu-Lieittenant Wm. Shand 
Kydd, Royal Field Artillery, twenty- 
four years of age, was the son of 
Wdliam Shand Kydd, Highgate, Lon- 
don, formerly of Arbroath. He was 
in his father's business as a wall- 
paper manufacturer, and, a great 
student and a lover of art, he had the 
prospect of a brilliant career. He 
joined the O.T.C. and within a week 
of receiving his commission left for 
France with his brother officer, 
Lieut. Scott of Bloomfield, Arbroath. 
He was killed in action near Arras 
on the 16th of May 1917. 



105 



SGT. F. MITCHELL, CAMERONS. GNR. CHAS. CARNEGIE, R.F.A. 





Sergeant Frederick Mitchell, 
5th Cameron Highlanders, was the 
fourth son of Frederick Mitchell and 
of his wife Elspeth Martin, 4 Reform 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
six years of age and was unmarried, 
and at one time was employed as a 
machineman with Messrs Douglas 
Fraser & -Sons at AYestburn Foundry. 
He joined the army in 1908 as a pri- 
vate in the 5th Cameron Highlanders, 
and had completed four years' service 
in India with his regiment when war 
broke out. Sergeant Mitchell went 
across to France in December 1914, 
and took part in a great many en- 
gagements, in one of which in 1915 
he was wounded. On the 7th of May 
1917 Sergeant Mitchell was again 
wounded in action and died the same 
day in a Canadian Field Hospital in 
France. The chaplain, in writing to 
his mother, said that her son had been 
laid side by side with other gallant 
comrades in the cemetery of the little 
French town of Aubigny, not far 
from Arras. Sergeant Mitchell's 
younger brother, Private James 
Mitchell, served also at the front 
with the Cameron Highlanders. 



Gunner Charles Carnegie, Royal 
Field Artillery, was the son of David 
Carnegie and of his wife Barbara 
Anderson, Brokpan, South Africa, 
and grandson of Hugh Anderson, 16 
West Keptie Street, Arbroath. Be- 
fore he enlisted he was employed as 
a postman in Arbroath. Gunner Car- 
negie joined the Royal Field Artillery 
in September 1915, and was killed in 
France on the 29th of April 1917. 

2nd-LT. R, MILLER, A. &. S. H. 

Second-Lieutenant Robert Gor- 
don Miller, Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders, thirty-two years of age, 
was the son of Mrs Miller, Ancrum 
Road, Dundee. He was a native cf 
Arbroath, and a brilliant pupil of the 
High School. From there he went on 
to St Andrews University, where he 
graduated. For three years he was 
assistant minister at Paisley Abbey, 
and afterwards became minister of 
St Mary's Parish Church, Dumfries. 
Mr Miller joined the army as a com- 
batant and went to the front in 
1916. He was wounded in April, 
and died on the 11th of May 1917. 



106 



PTE. G. SPENCE, ROYAL SCOTS. 



PTE. WILLIAMSON, CANADIANS. 





Private Georgk Spence, 12th 
Royal Scots, twenty-one years of age, 
was the youngest son of James 
Spence, Beechwood Place, South- 
muir, Kirriemuir. Before enlisting, 
in October 1915, he was an uphol- 
sterer with Mr D. T. Wilson, Ar- 
broath. He went to France in Janu- 
ary 1916, and in April was wounded 
and invalided home. He returned to 
France, and was again wounded on 
the 3rd of May 1917, and died the 
following day. Two months latei 
his brother was also killed in action. 

SGT. C. MOIR, BLACK WATCH. 

Sergeant Charles Moir, Black 
Watch, twenty-nine years of age, 
was the son of Alexander Moir, 
joiner, Friockheim. Soon after the 
outbreak of war he enlisted as a 
private in the Black Watch. He was 
a leading member of the Friockheim 
Dramatic Club, a keen supporter of 
the Good Templar Lodge, and a good 
musician. He was promoted to the 
rank of sergeant shortly before his 
death, which took pace on service 
on the 23rd of October 1916. 



Private Arthur S. Williamson, 
28th Canadian Infantry, was a native 
of Arbroath, and lived at 22 Dish- 
land Street. He was thirty-one 
years of age and had served his ap- 
prenticeship as a tailor with Messrs 
F. & J. Selby. He had also been em- 
ployed for a short time at the Ar- 
broath Post Office before he left for 
Canada, where he joined the colours. 
He was wounded at the battle of the 
Somme, and killed in action at 
Fresnoy on the 7th of May 1917. 

PTE. DAVID LAIRD, GORDONS. 

Private David Laird, 2nd Gordon 
Highlanders, was the son of Alex- 
ander Laird and of his wife Agnes 
Kidd, Muirlieads, Carmyllie. He 
was nineteen years of age and was a 
ploughman at Guildy Den, Monikie. 
He joined the Black Watch in May 
1915, but was transferred to the Gor- 
don Highlanders. While in France 
he was struck by a falling tree and 
was sent to Dartmouth Military 
Hospital. After returning to France 
he was again wounded, and died in 
Rouen Hospital in October 1916. 



107 



2nd-LT. J. N. BENNETT, R.G.A. PTE. JAMES R. WOOD, A. & S.H. 





Second-Lieutenant John Nicoli. 
Bennett, Royal Garrison Artillery. 
Arbroath, was the son of Mrs Ben- 
nett. 7 Pilmour Links, St Andrews. 
He was thirty-seven years of age and 
had married Janey L. Wilson only a 
month before he was killed. Lieut. 
Bennett had been a solicitor with 
Mr Norman M'Bain, Hill Street. Ar- 
broath for about seven years. He was 
prominent in golfing circles in For- 
farshire and Fifeshire, and was the 
winner of the championship trophies 
of both the Arbroath and the Ar- 
broath Artisan Clubs. In December 
191o he joined the Artists' Rifles, 
Officers' Training Corps, was 
gazetted second lieutenant, R.G.A. , 
early in 1917, and went to France in 
April of that year. He had only 
been at the front for three . weeks 
when he was hit on the head by a 
piece of shell and killed instan- 
taneously on the 19th of May 1917. 
He was buried in the St Laurent- 
Blangy Cemetery, near Arras. An 
officer writing said: — "Although he 
has been with the battery but a few 
days, we all, both officers and men, 
thought a good deal of him." 



Private James R. E. Wood. Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders, was the 
youngest son of Colin Wood, coach- 
builder, and of his wife Mary Brand, 
6 Academy Street, Arbroath. He 
was twenty -five years of age and un- 
married. Before joining the army he 
was employed at the works of Messrs 
Douglas Fraser&Sons. In November 
1915 he enlisted as a private in the 
Scottish Horse, but was afterwards 
transferred to the Black Watch, and 
later to the Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders. He served in Salonika, 
and was reported missing between 
the 8th and 9th of May 1917. Ten 
months later he was officially reported 
as presumed killed on that date. 

PTE. W. BELL, BLACK WATCH. 

Private William D. Bell, 9th 
Black Watch, son of William Bell, 
Kirkton of Guthrie, had just finished 
his apprenticeship as an engineer with 
Messrs G. & J. Fitchet, Gighty Burn, 
when he joined the army in May 1916. 
He served in France, and was killed 
on the 14th of April 1917. His 
brother, James,, was killed in the war. 



108 



PTE. W. FLEMING, CAMERONS. 



GNR. ALEX. MURRAY, R.F.A. 





% |£K 




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■ 




.aHH 




W " 3 


yl^i- >~ 




Private William Bennf.t Flem- 
ing, 5th Cameron Highlanders, nine- 
teen years of age, was the son of 
George Herschell Fleming, Fraser- 
field, near Arbroath. He assisted his 
father with his produce business in 
Carnoustie district before joining the 
army in 1916. Private Fleming was 
wounded at Loos, and for some time 
was in an Australian Hospital in 
France and afterwards in Arbroath. 
After rejoining his unit he was very 
severely wounded in the eye and leg 
during the Somme offensive, and died 
in the Canadian Hospital at Etaples. 
France, on the 12th of May 1917. 

PTE. CRAIG, YORK & LANCS. 

Private Wilfrid A. Craig. York 
and Lancaster Regiment, was the 
son of William Craig, cabinetmaker, 
James Street, Arbroath. He was 
married, and left one child. He 
served his apprenticeship with his 
father, and after studying at Aber- 
deen he became manual instructor 
and art teacher under the Rothesay 
School Board. He was killed in 
action on the 25th of May 1917. 



Gunner Alexander Murray. 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son of 
John Murray and of his wife Helen 
Caird, Kirkstile, St Vigeans, Ar- 
broath. He was nineteen years of 
age, and was an apprentice engineer 
at the Dens Iron Works. He joined 
the army in September 1914 as a 
private in the Royal Field Artillery, 
went to France in 1916, and was 
attached to the 47th Division. Heavy 
Trench Mortar Battery. Gunner 
Alexander Murray was wounded and 
died shortly afterwards in No. 3 
Canadian Casualty Clearing Station 
in France on the 28th of May 1917. 
He had three brothers in the army, 
one of whom died whiLe in training, 
another was in the Camerons, and 
the third in the Army Pay Corps. 

PTE. KENNY, SCOTTISH RIFLES. 

Private James Kenny, Scottish 
Rifles, 131 Kinloch Street. Car- 
noustie, was at the outbreak of war 
employed as a vanman with Messrs 
Nicol & Smibert, Dundee. He was 
married, and left two children. He 
died on the 23rd of April 1917. 



109 



WIRELESS OFFICER BURNETT. DRIVER JOHN ROBB, R.F.A. 





Wireless Officer James Bttrnett, 
s.s. "Hollington," eighteen years of 
age, was the eldest son of the Rev. 
George Burnett, Rockliffe U.F. 
Church. Glasgow, formerly of Friock- 
heim, and of his wife Margaret 
Howie. He was in the service of the 
Marconi Company for a year, during 
which time he made voyages to S. 
America, Australia, and the West 
Indies. He sailed as sole wireless 
officer on the s.s. Hollington, a ship 
of 11,000 tons, which was carrying 
munitions of war to Archangel. North 
of the Shetland Islands the Holling- 
ton was attacked on the 2nd of June 
1917 by a German submarine, and 
after a fight of on© and a half hours 
was torpedoed, and sank so suddenly 
that only two of her crew managed 
to escape. One of the two survi- 
vors said: — "Wireless Officer Bur- 
nett had sent out the S.O.S., and 
came out of his cabin to give some 
message to the captain. Then he 
went back to wait for an answer to 
his call, and must have gone down 
with his ship standing by the instru- 
ment just like the brave boy he was 
— true to the last." 



Driver John Robb, 39th D.A.C., 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son of 
John Robb, shoemaker, and of his 
wife Martha Will. 50 Leonard Street, 
Arbroath. He was 19 years of age, 
and before he enlisted he worked a 
moulding machine at the Westburn 
Foundry. He joined the army in 
September 1914 as a driver in the 
Forfarshire Battery of the Royal 
Field Artillery, and went to France 
with the 39th* D.A.C. in 1916. Dvr. 
Robb was killed by a shell on the 
6th of June 1917, and was buried at 
Vlammertinghe, near Ypres. 

SEAMAN F. RUSSELL. R.N.D. 

Able-Seaman Francis Duthie 
Milne Russell, Royal Naval Divi- 
sion, was the son of Charles Russell. 
40 Fergus Square, Arbroath. He 
was nineteen years of age, and had 
served his apprenticeship at Dens 
Iron Works. He joined the R.N.D. 
in 1915, and died of wounds in 
November 1916. His brother, 

Gunner Charles Russell, served in 
the Royal Field Artillery, and had 
been gassed. 



no 



PTE. JAMES SCRIMGEOUR, B.W. 



DVR. T. S. CARNEGIE, A.S.C. 





Private James Scrimgeour, 5th 
Black Watch, twenty-one years of 
age, was the son of James Scrim- 
geour a,nd of his wife, Elizabeth S. 
Nelson, 25 Elliot Street. Arbroath. 
He was an apprentice! moulder with 
Mr Nicol, Guthrie Port, and had 
joined the Black Watch (T.) in 1913. 
When war was declared Private 
Scrimgeour was mobilised and went 
into training at Broughty Ferry. He 
went to France in November 1914, 
and was wounded in May 1915. He 
was transferred to the 74th Machine 
Gun Corps, and he returned to 
France in the following year. On the 
8th of June 1917 he died of wounds 
received in action the day before, 
and was buried near Armentieres. 

PTE. BROWN, BLACK WATCH. 

Private W. M. Brown, Black 
Watch, Bolshan, Friockheim, who. 
before he enlisted, was an attendant 
in the Royal Asylum, Montrose, was 
married and left one child. Private 
Brown was reported missing on the 
23rd of April 1917 and was presumed 
to have been killed on that date. 



Driver Thomas Smith Carnegie, 
Army Service Corps, 8 Don Street, 
Forfar, was the son of William Car- 
negie and of his wife Sarah Smith, 
21 Hayswell Road, Arbroath. He 
was thirty-eight years of age, and 
had married Elizabeth Middleton, 
and left a son and a daughter. He 
was employed with the Strathmore 
Auction Company when he joined the 
army in August 1916. After about 
a, year's service he died at Salonika 
of pneumonia following injuries on 
the 13th of June 1917. 

PTE. FINLAY, SCOTS GUARDS. 

Private Horace Finlay. 2nd Scots 
Guards, twenty-two years of age, was 
the son of W. F. Finlay, Officer of 
Customs and Excise, 1 Walker Place, 
Arbroath. He was a gardener on 
Diummond Castle estate when he 
joined Kitchener's Army in November 
1914. After training in England he 
went to France in November 1915. 
and was killed by a bursting shell at 
the Somme, near Le Coronfes, on the 
24th of September 1916. His brother, 
George, had also been at the front. 



Ill 



MAJOR OUCHTERLONY, R.E. 



SEAMAN G. R. DAWSON, R.N.D. 





Major John Pai.grave Heathcotf. 
Otjchterlony, D.S.O.j Royal En- 
gineers, thirty two years of age, was 
tlie eldest son of Lieutenant-General 
Ouehterlony of the Guynd, Arbroath. 
He married Kathleen Spachman and 
left one daughter. He entered the 
Royal Military Academy at Woolwich 
at the age of sixteen, received his 
commission in the Royal Engineers in 
1901, and was stationed at Chatham, 
Gibraltar, and Aldershot. He was 
appointed head of the Roads Depart- 
ment in Ashanti, West Africa, and 
received the thanks of the Colonial 
Office for his efficient services there. 
He returned in 1915 and trained at 
Buxton, and took to the front the 
138th A.T.C. He served as staff 
officer to the chief engineer, 4th Army 
Corps, and was given the command 
of the 102nd Field Company. He 
was gazetted captain in 1912, and 
major in 1916. Major Ouehterlony 
was twice mentioned in despatches, 
and was awarded the Distinguished 
Service Order in June 1917: — "For 
gallantry and devotion to duty on 
several occasions during the period 
from the 20th of September 1916 to 



Able-Seaman George Rodger 
Dawson, Royal Naval Division, was 
the son of William Dawson, 10 
Union Street West, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-six years of age and un- 
married, and was employed at Well- 
gate Works. In November 1915 lie 
joined the Royal Naval Division. 
Seaman Dawson was reported mis- 
sing on the 24th of April 1917, and 
later officially reported to have been 
killed in action on that date. 



the 2nd of October 1916, on which he 
reconnoiter.ed sites for new trenches 
and posts in front of our first line, 
going personally over the ground in 
daylight under considerable shell and 
rifle fire, and afterwards marking out 
the lines by daylight under very try- 
ing conditions. His example was 
freely followed by his men and enabled 
the work to be considerably acceler- 
ated." Major Ouehterlony refused 
a good appointment in Egypt as he 
considered his duty lay in France. 
He was killed in action near Ypres 
on the 7th of June 1917 during trie 
capture of the Messines Ridge. 



112 



DRIVER N. DEBOYS, R.F.A. 



PTE. G. MANN, BLACK WATCH. 





Drivee Norman Deboys, Koyal 
Field Artillery, twenty-five years of 
age, was the son of Robert Deboys, 
40 St Vigeans Road, Arbroath. He 
had been, in Port Glasgow and was 
a grocer with the High Street Co- 
operative Society, Ltd., when he 
joined the R.F.A. in November 1915. 
He was killed in action in France on 
the 23rd of June 1917. His officer 
wrote: — "A more cheerful worker I 
could not wish for. His sergeant was 
equally full of praise for his industry 
and cheerfulness. Steady, pleasant 
to deal with, and diligent, he was 
always ready for a job, however un- 
pleasant, and his coolness under fire 
was a great help to those in charge, 
and a fine example to the rest. He 
had endeared himself to his whole 
battery, and I feel his loss as a per- 
sonal one." 

PTE. W. DUNCAN, GORDONS. 

Private W. Dttncan, Gordon High- 
landers, was the son of Gordon Dun- 
can, 100 Keptie Street, Arbroath. 
Private Duncan was killed in action 
in France on the 23rd of April 1917. 



Private George Mann, 6th Black 
"Watch, was the youngest son of 
William Mann, Muirmills, Farnell. 
He was twenty-two years of age ana 
before he enlisted was a ploughman 
at Fonah, Forfar. He joined the 
Black Watch in August 1915, and 
went to France in the following Feb- 
ruary. On the 3rd of July 1917 Pri- 
vate Mann was killed instantaneously 
near Ypres along with fourteen com- 
rades of his platoon by a shell which 
destroyed the dug-out in which they 
were sleeping. He was one of five 
brothers who joined the colours. 

DR. GEORGE MOTR, M.T., A.S.C. 

Driver George Moir, Motor 
Transport, Army Service Corps, lived 
at 11 St Vigeans Road, Arbroath. He 
was forty years of age, and had 
married Charlotte Baird. Before 
joining the army he was a chauffeur 
with Mr Don, Tealing. He had been 
over a year in the army and had 
chiefly served in Mesopotamia. He 
died in the Stationary Hospital at 
Baghdad on the 24th of July 1917, 
from the effects of the heat. 



113 



LT. RANDAL PLAYFORD, R.F.A. 



SEAMAN W. REID, ROYAL NAVY. 





LlEtTTENANT PATRICK R AN DAL PLAY- 

ford, 1st West Lancashire Royal 
Field Artillery, was the grandson of 
Major Evan Bruoe-Gardyne, and 
nephew of Miss Bruce Gardyne, of 
Middleton. He was twenty-five years 
of age. He had been at the School of 
Mines, Camborne, Cornwall, and went 
to take up a mining appointment in 
South Africa in 1913, returning to 
England just before the outbreak of 
war. Having been in the Glenal- 
mond Officers' Training Corps, he 
got a commission and went to France 
in September 1915. He took part in 
many big engagements, including the 
battle of the Somme. His name 
was mentioned by his major as 
having done splendid work, especially 
just before his death. He was then 
in command of his battery with only 
two younger officers sent to replace 
those killed at Ypres. For three 
weeks Lieutenant Randal Pla.yford 
was in full command, and was killed 
by shrapnel just when the brigade 
was relieved. According to his CO. 
' ' his behaviour was an example of 
the highest courage and never- 
failing sense of duty." 



Able-Seaman William Reid, Royal 
Navy, was the fifth son of James 
Reid. retired engine-driver, 20 Ogilvy 
Place, Arbroath. He was thirty years 
of age, unmarried, and had had nearly 
fifteen years' service in the navy, 
having joined as a "boy" in 1903. In 
1913 he won the Victoria Medal for 
big gun firing open to all the British 
navy. Seaman Reid took part in the 
battle of Jutland and was mentioned 
in despatches and highly commended 
for services rendered. He lost his 
life through the explosion on board 
H.M.S. Vanguard while anchored in 
harbour on the 9th of July 1917. The 
posthumous honour of the Russian 
Medal of St George in recognition 
of his services in the battle of Jut- 
land was received by his parents 
through the Admiralty in 1918. 

PTE. CAMERON, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Alexander Cameron. 6th 
Black Watch, son of Andrew 
Cameron, West Milldens, Guthrie, 
was a gardener before enlisting. He 
was wounded on the 27th of April 
1917, and died on the 2nd of May. 



114 



PTE. JAMES CAMERON, H.L. 



PTE. GEORGE ANDERSON, B.W. 





Pkivate James Cameron, loth 
Highland Light Infantry, was the 
son of John Cameron, 35 Howard 
Street, Arbroa.th. He was twenty 
years of age and was a ploughman in 
the employment of Mr Norris, at 
Tulloes, near Letham. He joined the 
11th Black Watch in June 1916, but 
was afterwards transferred to the 
15th Highland Light Infantry, in 
which he qualified as marksman. He 
had been about ten months in France 
when in the early morning of the 15th 
of July 1917, at Nieuport, on the Bel- 
gian front, his battalion made a night 
attack on a German position, and 
Private Cameron was killed by a 
shell. His commanding officer wrote 
of him: — "He was one of the smart- 
est men in my platoon, and I feel his 
loss keenly for such men are hard to 
replace. His comrades in the ranks 
have lost a good friend, and I my- 
self, have lost one of the most like- 
able and reliable men I have ever 
had the good fortune to command." 
Private James Cameron had three 
brothers with the colours, one of 
whom served in Mesopotamia, and 
one in Salonika. 



Private George Anderson, 5th 
Black Watch, Anderson Place, Inver- 
keilor, was a carter on Ethie estate. 
He was thirty-five years of age, had 
married Nellie Kynoch Menmuir and 
left one son and one daughter. Pri- 
vate Anderson was much respected 
and loved by all who knew him, and 
although he hated the very idea of 
war, when the time came to leave 
his young wife and children he 
never wavered. He joined up in 
June 1916 and served in France until 
the 11th of July 1917. On that day 
he was killed in Belgium through 
concussion caused by a shell which 
passed through the roof of his dug- 
out. His commanding officer wrote 
that he was " a brave man who had 
nobly done his bit." 

PTE. G. BLACK, BLACK WATCH. 

Private George Black, Black 
Watch, 7 Panmure Street, Car- 
noustie, was a labourer at Carnoustie 
Engineering Works. He joined up 
when he was just over sixteen years 
of age. Private Black was killed in 
action on the 23rd of April 1917. 



115 



SERGT. A. RENNIE, R.F.A. 



SEAMAN HENRY TOCHER, R.N. 





Sergeant Andrew Rennie, Royal 
Field Artillery, Watery T3utts. Errol, 
was th,e eldest son of Andrew Rennie 
and of his wife Catherine Mann, 58 
Helen Street, Arbroath. He was 
thirty-one years of age, and had 
married Kate Henderson and left 
three sons and one daughter. Before 
he joined the army in 1905 he was 
employed as a passenger porter at 
Arbroath station. Sergeant Rennie 
was stationed in Ireland for three 
years and afterwards passed into the 
reserve. He was employed as a post- 
man at Inohture when war broke out, 
and he was recalled to the colours. 
He was in the retreat from Mons, 
took part in the first battle of Ypres. 
was wounded at the battle of the 
Marne, and was wounded a second 
time in September 1916. For a time 
he served as an instructor on Salis- 
bury Plain, and in March 1917 was 
promoted to the rank of sergeant in- 
structor. On the 23rd of July 1917 
Sergeant Rennie was killed in action 
in France, and was buried near the 
dug-out on the Zelebeke railway, 
south-east of Ypres. He had a 
brother in the Army Service Corps. 



Seaman Henry Tocher, deckhand, 
minesweeper, Royal Navy, 51 Lady- 
loan, Arbroath, was the son of James 
Tocher and of his wife Margaret 
Crombie, Artrochie Schoolhouse,Logie 
Buchan. He was forty-two years of 
age and had married Elizabeth Will. 
He was employed as a fireman by the 
Arbroath Harbour Board before he 
joined the navy in November 1915. 
Seaman Tocher served as a deckhand 
on the paddle minesweeper Queen of 
the North for nearly two years 
until, on the 20th of July 1917, his 
ship was sunk in the English Cham 
nel. No trace was ever found of him. 

CPL. MORRISON, SCOTS GUARDS. 

Corporal John Morrison, Scots 
Guards, was the eldest son of Mrs 
Morrison, Millgate Loan, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-five years of age and 
unmarried. Previous to» the out- 
break of war Corporal Morrison was 
a member of the Glasgow Police 
Force. He was killed in 1916 by a 
shrapnel shell which burst in the 
trenches, killing and wounding 
several others as well. 



116 



ARTIFICER MORTON, R.F.A. 



GNR. WILLIAM MILLS, R.F.A. 





Artificer Edward Douglas Mor- 
ton, Royal Field Artillery, twenty- 
two years of age, was the son of Mrs 
Morton, 21 Duke Street, Arbroath. 
He was finishing his apprentice- 
ship as a fitter at the Dens Iron 
Works when he was mobilised on the 
outbreak of hostilities. He had 
joined the 1st Forfarshire Battery 
of the R.F.A. as a gunner in 1910, 
and on the dec-laration of war was 
sent to Bedford and thence to France 
in May 1915. He was promoted 
fitter on the field, and in October 
went to Woolwich to pass the fitter's 
test for his diploma. He returned to 
France and died from gas poisoning 
on the 25th of July 1917. On that 
day a gas shell burst close to him in 
the trench. He and several others 
affected were immediately taken to 
a gas-proof dug-out, but Fitter Mor- 
ton soon became unconscious and ditd 
in a few hours. He was buried just 
south of the town of Poperinghe and 
a cross was erected over his grave. 
His officer wrote of him : — "He was 
a splendid artificer and greatly liked 
by everyone. His place in the bat- 
tery will be very difficult to fill." 



Gunner William Mills, Royal 
Field Artillery, twenty-two years of 
age, was the son of Alexander A. 
Mills, 16 Kyd Street, Arbroath. He 
was an apprentice engineer at the 
Westburn Foundry. Having joined 
the Territorial Force he was mobilised 
in September 1914 as a gunner in the 
Forfarshire Battery of the R.F.A., 
and left for France in May 1915. 
When in action near Ypres several 
gas shells burst close to him, and 
although he was immediately taken 
to a gas-proof dug-out and thence to 
the dressing station he gradually be- 
came unconscious and died in a few 
hours, on the 25th of July 1917. He 
was buried in the British Military 
Cemetery near Poperinghe. His 
captain wrote that he was a 
" splendid fellow and greatly liked 
by everyone." 

PTE. JAMES LEONARD, S.H. 

Private James Leonard, Scottish 
Horse, had been a gardener at the 
Elms, Arbroath. He died of wounds 
in 1917, leaving a widow and three 
children. 



117 



CAPT. JAMES BRUCE, R.F.A. 



PTE. SPENCE, BLACK WATCH. 





Captain James Bruce, Royal Field 
Artillery, was the third son of the 
Bon. Frederick John Bruce of Seaton. 
near Arbroath, and cousin of the 
Earl of Elgin. H© was twenty-nine 
years of age and unmarried. Like 
the other members of his family, 
Captain Bruce was a brilliant 
musician. He had studied music on 
the Continent, and was a 'cellist of 
outstanding ability. He was an In- 
trant to the Faculty of Advocates 
when he joined the army in August 
1914. After training with his bat- 
tery at Bedford he went abroad with 
it in May 1915, and served continu- 
ously in all the different positions 
which it occupied in the British line 
up to the time when, as acting cap- 
tain, he was killed in action near the 
Ypres Canal on the 25th of July 
1917. His epitaph on the family 
tombstone at St Vigeans is : — 

He nevere yet no vileinye ne sayde 
In al his ljf unto no maner wight. 

Two of Captain Brace's brothers 
were with the colours. Charles having 
been an officer in the Machine Gun 
Corps, and Richard an officer in the 
Black Watch. 



Private Edward Y. Spence, 5th 
Black Watch, was the son of James 
E. Spence, Beechwood Place. South- 
niuir, Kirriemuir, formerly of Ar- 
broath. He was at one time em- 
ployed as a clerk in the office of 
Messrs W. and J. Mackintosh, soli- 
citors. He enlisted shortly after the 
outbreak of war and served in France 
for two and a half years. On the 
31st of July 1917, in the attack east 
of Ypres. Private Spence was attached 
to C Company as a signaller and ad- 
vanced with them to St Julien, where 
heavy fighting took place. He was 
killed by a sniper soon after his 
company had captured the German 
position. His brother, George, was 
killed on the 4th of May 1917. 

PTE. R, MUCKHART, GORDONS. 

Private Richard Muckhart, Gor- 
dons, son of Mrs Muckhart, Pan- 
bride, was a ploughman at Boysack, 
near Arbroath. He was killed while 
"gallantly advancing" to the attack 
on the 16th of May 1917. Private 
Muckhart had two brothers with the 
colours. 



118 



CPL. F. JOHNSTON, M.M., R.F.A. 



SEAMAN JAMES SPINK, R.N. 





Corpokal Frederick: Johnston, 
M.M., Royal Field Artillery, nine- 
teen years of age, was the son of 
William Johnston and of his wife 
Elizabeth Ramsay Dorward, Colli- 
ston Oastle Stables, near Arbroath. 
He was an apprentice grocer with his 
uncle Mr Peter Johnston, Hilltown, 
Dundee, when he joined the army in 
November 1914 as a gunner in the 
R.F.A. After several months' train- 
ing in England he went to France 
in September 1915. He took part in 
the battles of Loos, the Somme, and 
the Ridges, and was promoted to the 
rank of corporal on the field. Cor- 
poral Johnston was awarded the Mili- 
tary Medal for the following conspicu- 
ous services in circumstances of ex- 
treme danger, when he was buried 
five times under exploding shells : — 
" On the 30th of July near Mametz 
Wood during important operations 
all the O.P. wires of the batteries in 
the Brigade were out, and there was 
no communication to the front tren- 
ches. The enemy were maintaining 
a heavy barrage. This n.c.o. suc- 
ceeded in mending his line in several 
places, restoring communication and 



Seaman James Findlay Spink, 
Royal Navy, 22 John Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of James Spink 
and of his wife Catherine Coull, 17 
Ladybridge Street. He was forty -one 
years of age and had married Betsy 
Cargill and left four sons and three 
daughters. He was a labourer at the 
Arbroath Sawmills, when, in July 
1916, he joined the navy as a deck- 
hand on a minesweeper. Seaman 
Spink was on H.M. Trawler George 
Millburn when it was mined, and he 
was drowned off Queenstown, Ireland, 
on the 12th of July 1917. 



keeping it restored till the conclu- 
sion of the operations, whereby 
valuable information was transmitted 
to all brigades, and was the only 
means of transmission in the Brigade 
that proved successful on that day." 
On the 31st of July 1917 Corporal 
Johnston's gun was hit by a shell, 
and he was killed by the explosion 
of the ammunition. He was buried 
at Voormezele. Two of his brothers 
served with the forces, one in France 
and the other in Mesopotamia. 



110 



GNR. THOS. GORDON, R.F.A. 



PTE. J. LEE, BLACK WATCH. 





Gunner Thomas Gordon. Royal 
Field Artillery, 22 Guthrie Port, Ar- 
broath, was the son of John Gordon 
and of his wife Elizabeth Stewart, 19 
Panmure Street. He married Janet 
Munro, and left one daughter and 
three sons, one of whom was also in 
the R.F.A. He was forty years of 
age aoid when war broke out was a 
machineman at West burn Foundry. 
Gunner Gordon joined the Forfar- 
shire Battery of the R.F.A. in Sep- 
tember 1914, and was afterwards 
attached to the 51st Divisional Am- 
munition Column.* He went to 
France in May 1915. Gunner Gor- 
don was engaged in driving a road 
through the German lines captured 
at Ypres in the advance of the pre- 
ceding day when he was instan- 
taneously killed on the 31st of July 
1917 by a shell which seriously woun- 
ded several of his comrades. His 
officer wrote: — "He died in harness, 
doing his duty and helping the ad- 
vance of his division which now, as 
in the past, has maintained its name 
as a gallant fighting force.' He was 
laid to rest where he fell, close to 
the road he had helped to make." 



Private John Lee, 6th Black 
Watch. Millgate, Friockheim, was 
the son of Mrs Alexander, 2 Murray 
Place, Arbroath. He married Agnes 
Courts, and left two sons and one 
daughter. He was thirty-five years 
of age and was working at Dens Iron 
Works when he joined the army in 
January 1917. After six months' 
training he went to France, and was 
killed on the 31st of July 1917. 

PTE. N. SMITH, GORDONS. 

Private Norman Smith, 7th Gor- 
don Highlanders, twenty-three years 
of age. was the son of Alexander 
Smith, Barrelwell, Brechin, and was 
brought up at Grange of Conon. He 
was killed in action on the 13th of 
November 1916. 

PTE. J. PETERS. BLACK WATCH. 
Private John Peters, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of Alexander 
Peters, Dilty Moss, Carmyllie. He 
returned from Canada to join the 
Black Watch, was wounded on the 
Somme, and died in Orpington Hos- 
pital, Kent, in October 1916. 



1-20 



PTE. W. H. TODD, GORDONS. PTE. JAMES ROBERTSON, B.W. 





Private William Hercules Todd. 
10th Gordon Highlanders, was the 
son of William Todd and of his wife 
Mary Ann Norrie, 51 Millgate, 
Friookheim. He was twenty-six 
years of age and unmarried. Be- 
fore he joined the army he was em- 
ployed as a yarn bleacher with Mr 
Robert Wood at Friookheim. In 
October 1916 Private Todd joined the 
3rd Black Watch but was afterwards 
transferred to the 10th Gordon High- 
landers early in 1917. He was woun- 
ded at Arras in April and on the 31st 
of July 1917 was killed in action at 
Ypres. Private Todd had a brother 
serving in France with the R.F.A. 

GNR. ALEX. ADAMS, R.G.A. 

Gunner Alexander Adams, Royal 
Garrison Artillery, 5 Russell Street, 
Arbroath, married Emily Black and 
left two children. He was thirty- 
three years of age and was employed 
at Dens Iron Works when he joined 
the army in May 1916. Gunner 
Adams had been in France for 
eleven months when he was killed 
in action on the 1st of July 1917. 



Private James C. Robertson, 6th 
Black Watch, was the son of Ben- 
jamin Robertson and of his wife Bar- 
bara Ogilvie, Old Downie, Carnoustie. 
He was twenty-four years of age, un- 
married, and was a member of the 
Glasgow police force when he joined 
the Scottish Horse in December 1915. 
Private Robertson was selected for a 
course of signalling and passed first- 
class. In January 1917 he went across 
to France, and was then transferred 
to the 6th Black Watch, with which 
battalion he saw some heavy fighting 
on the Somme and in various parts 
of France. Private Robertson was 
killed in action at Ypres on the 31st 
of July 1917, and was buried in a 
military cemetery near Turco Farm. 

PTE. MORRISON, SOOTS GUARDS 

Private James Morrison, 2nd 
Scots Guards, was the son of James 
Morrison. 43 Lady loan, Arbroath. 
Before joining the army he was em- 
ployed at the Abbey Leather Works. 
Private Morrison, after being ten 
months in France, was killed in 
action on the 26th of July 1917. 



121 



L-CPL. J. WATT, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. SWANKIE, BLACK WATCH. 





Lance-Corporal James William 
Watt, 5th Black Watch, was the 
third son of James B. Watt and of 
his wife Agnes Mann, 50 Lochland 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
four years of age, and was unmarried. 
At the outbreak of war he was an 
apprentice engineer with Messrs 
Alex. Shanks & Son, Ltd., at Dens 
Iron Works. Being a Territorial 
he was at once mobilised, and after 
a few months' training he left for 
France with the Arbroath detach- 
ment of the 5th Black Watch (T.) 
in the early part of November 1914. 
Lance-Corporal Watt served at one 
time in France as a despatch-rider, 
and afterwards was attached to the 
signalling corps of his battalion. He 
was killed in action at Ypres on the 
31st of July 1917. An officer of his 
battalion wrote : — ' ' Lance-Corporal 
Watt was one of the most reliable 
men I had, and one of the bravest 
soldiers in the battalion. He was 
one of five of the best men of the 
section who were all killed at the 
same time in the front line of our 
attack, and at the moment of a great 
victory." 



Private Daniel SwANKiE,5th Black 
Watch, thirty-six years of age, was 
the son of David Swankie and of his 
wife Isabella Cargill, 18 John Street, 
Arbroath. He was employed as a 
collier near Edinburgh when he joined 
the army in 1916. After being re- 
ported missing he was presumed to 
have died on the 31st of July 1917. 

PTE. ROBERTSON, LIVERPOOLS. 
Private David Robertson, Liver- 
pool Regiment, was the son of Mrs 
Robertson, Collier Street. Carnoustie. 
He was an apprentice with Mr Mur- 
doch, grocer, Ireland Street, and 
afterwards was in Liverpool. Private 
Robertson was wounded and gassed, 
and died on the 16th of July 1917. 

SERGT. MATTHEWS, CAMERON'S. 
Sergeant Kred Matthews, 
Camerons, 26 Fergus Square, Ar- 
broath, was thirty-one years of age. 
He had married Betsy Farquhar, 
and had a hairdresser's business in 
Guthrie Port. When war broke out 
lie was working in the Fife coal 
mines. He was killed in 1917. 



122 



L-SGT. ROBERT FINDLAY, B.W. 



PTE. ROBERTSON, SEAFORTHS. 



i 




■ 






HJSH 


■L.. « — ^ 


he 




Lance-Sergeant Ro*bert Gordon 
Findlay, 5th Black Watch, nineteen 
years of age, was the son of David 
Findlay and of his wife Agnes Adam, 
39 Dishland Street. Arbroath. Be- 
fore going on active service Lance- 
Sergeant Findlay was employed as a 
labourer with Messrs James Keith 
& Blackman Co., Ltd., High Street 
Foundry. He joined the 5th Bat- 
talion of the Black Watch (T.F.) in 
January 1914, was mobilised for 
active service in August, and pro- 
ceeded to France with the battalion 
in October. He served for three 
years, was posted missing on the 
31st of July 1917. and was presumed 
to have been killed on that date. 

L-CPL. CUSHNLE. CANADIANS. 

Lance-Corporal George Ctjshnie, 
44th Battalion Canadian Infantry, 
twenty-nine years of age, was the son 
of Alexander Cushnie and of his wife 
Jane Harkness, Cross Roads, Friock- 
heim. He was a joiner by trade, 
had gone to America, and enlisted 
at Winnipeg in June 1915. He was 
killed on the 19th of November 1916. 



Private Edward William Robert- 
son, 8th Seaforth Highlanders, 
eighteen years of age, was the son of 
John Robertson and of his wife Kate 
Hencock, 7 Arrott Street, Arbroath. 
He was an apprentice mill mechanic 
in the employment of Messrs Lowson, 
Ltd., when he joined the 8th Seaforth 
Highlanders in January 1917. Pri- 
vate Robertson was reported missing 
at Ypres on the 31st July 1917, and 
was presumed killed on that date. 

SGT. BARTON, SCOTTISH HORSE. 
Sergeant Joseph Richard Bar- 
ton, 3rd Scottish Horse, Thomas 
Street, Carnoustie, was for twelve 
years in the Royal Field Artillery, 
seven of which were spent in India. 
He was thirty-two years of age, and 
on leaving the army he was employed 
at Tennant's Chemical Works. On 
the outbreak of war he at once en- 
listed in the Scottish Horse. Ser- 
geant Barton was killed in action. 
He had one brother in the submarine 
service of the navy, one in the 
A. & S.H., and a third was employed 
as a shipwright at a floating dock. 



123 



A.B. L. WILLIAMSON, R.N.D. 



GNR. GEORGE G. KIDD, R.F.A. 





Able Seaman Lawrence William- 
son, Royal Naval Division, twenty 
years of age, was the youngest son of 
William Williamson and of his wife 
Janet Petrie Gray, 3 Walker Place, 
Arbroath. On leaving Arbroath 
High School he entered the office of 
Messrs Francis Webster & Sons, 
Alma AVorks, and enlisted under the 
Derby scheme a fortnight before the 
completion of his apprenticeship as a 
mercantile clerk. Able Seaman L. 
Williamson enlisted in the Royal 
Naval Division on the 16th of 
November 1915. He was attached to 
the Hawke Battalion. After under- 
going training at the Crystal Palace 
and at Blandford he went to France 
towards the end of June 1916, being 
transferred to the Nelson Battalion. 
He was for a time in the trenches, 
and on the 13th of November 1916 
took part in the battle of the Ancre, 
in which the battalion suffered heavy 
losses. Reported missing, in July 
1917 intimation was received that it 
had been officially assumed that he 
had been killed in action on the date 
mentioned, and a week later this 
was confirmed. 



Gunner George Gibson Kidd. 
Royal Field Artillery, 129 Kinloch 
Street, Carnoustie, was the only son 
of William Kidd. joiner, and of Mrs 
Kidd, Thomas Street. He was 
twenty-five years of age. and was 
unmarried. At the time lie enlisted 
he was employed as an iron turner 
with Messrs George Anderson & Co., 
Ltd.. Carnoustie. On the 4th of 
August 1917 Gunner Kidd died in a 
dressing station in France of wounds 
received in action. His captain said 
all his old comrades and officers re- 
garded him as the most willing and 
cheerful worker in the battery. 

PTE. BENNETT, BLACK WATCH. 

Private William Bennett, 5th 
Black Watch, 40 Green Street, Ar- 
broath, was the youngest son of Mrs 
David Bennett, 35 East Abbey 
Street. He was twenty-eight years 
of age and left a widow. He was at 
one time a hairdresser in Arbroath, 
but when he enlisted at the begin- 
ning of the war he was employed in 
Dundee. Private Bennett was killed 
in action on the 3rd of August 1917. 



124 



PTE. W. DUNCAN, SEAFORTHS. 



GNR. FRANK ROBINSON, R.F.A. 





Private William Duncan, 7th 
Seaforth Highlanders, twenty-three 
years of age, was the son of David 
Reid Duncan, Drummygar, Carmyllie, 
near Arbroath. He was employed at 
Balglassia Farm, Brechin, when he 
joined the army in December 1916. 
He went overseas to France, and on 
the 7th of August 1917, when he was 
holding the front line, he was hit by 
a shell, and killed instantaneously. 
On the afternoon of the following day 
he was buried beside a comrade who 
was killed by the same shell in the 
military cemetery at Ruyaulcourt, 
near Gouzeaucourt. His platoon 
officer, writing of his death, said: — 
"I am indeed grieved to lose him as 
he was a good soldier, and carried 
out his duties quietly and efficiently." 

PTE. JAS. BELL, BLACK WATCH. 

Private James Bell, 5th Black 
Watch, Bridgend, Pitmuis, was the 
son of William Bell, blacksmith, 
Kirkton of Guthrie. He enlisted in 
August 1914, and was killed in action. 
His brother. William, was killed in 
April 1917. 



Gunner Frank Robinson, Forfar- 
shire Battery, Royal Field Artillery, 
was the fourth son of John Robinson, 
cutler, 29 Guthrie Port, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-nine years of age and 
unmarried, and before he enlisted 
was employed as a plater at the en- 
gineering works of the James Keith 
& Blackman' Company, Ltd. In 

October 1914 he joined the second 
line of the Forfarshire Battery of 
the R.F.A., and went to France in 
May 1915. Gunner Robertson was 
struck by a shell and killed instan- 
taneously on the loth August 1917. 

PTE. R . DEWAR, BLACK WATCH. 

Private R. D. Dewar, Black 
Watch, was the son of R. D. Dewar, 
Berryfauld, Arbroath. He was at 
one time with Messrs Clark & Oliver, 
S.S.G. He was originally in the 
Scottish Horse, and served with 
them in Gallipoli. where he was 
wounded, but was later transferred 
to the Black Watch. He was killed 
in action on the 31st of July 1917. 
Private Dewar had a brother also in 
the Black Watch who was wounded. 



125 



CAPT. T. B. MYLES, M.C., H.L.I. RIFLEMAN M'LEOD, LON. REGT. 




1 ■ m \j0* 




Captain Thomas Booth Myles, 
Highland Light Infantry, twenty- 
four yeaa's of age, was the fourth son 
of Charles Y. Myles. Wellbank, Ar- 
broath. He married Bella Shand Hill, 
Aberdeen, and left one son. Cap- 
tain Myles was an enthusiastic 
cricketer and footballer, and a power- 
ful swimmer, being one of the few 
who could claim to have swum across 
the Tay. As an out-door life had 
great attractions for him he became 
a student at the Agricultural College. 
Aberdeen. When war broke out he 
joined the University detachment of 
the Gordon Highlanders, and after- 
wards received a commission, being 
posted to the H.L.I. He went to 
France with his battalion, and took 
part in many engagements, being 
afterwards promoted to a captaincy. 
On the 1st of August 1917 Captain 
Myles was trying to get in touch with 
another regiment to ascertain what 
tbe enemy dispositions were when he 
was shot by a sniper. His command- 
ing officer wrote: — "He was one of 
my most valued company comman- 
ders, and his place will be hard to 
refill. Only recently he was in com- 



Rifleman John M'Leod, 6th Lon- 
don Regiment, was the son of John 
M'Leod. 13 Glebe Street, Dundee. 
He was thirty-two years of age, and 
had married Esther Marion Styles, 
and left one daughter. He was with 
the Arbroath Equitable Co-operative 
Society, Ltd., and was a baker in 
London when he joined the army in 
October 1916. He served overseas, 
and was killed in action on the 17th 
of November 1917. 



mand of two raiding parties which 
did particularly good service, for 
which lie had been recommended for 
the Military Cross." After his death 
this honour was awarded to Captain 
Myles, and the following notice ap- 
peared in the "London Gazette" :'— 
"T /Lieut. (T/Capt.) Thomas Booth 
Myles. H.L.I., whose conduct when 
commanding two companies in a raid 
was a fine example to the men, and 
was largely responsible for the suc- 
cess of the raid, during which 79 
prisoners were taken, and valuable 
information was obtained." Captain 
Mylts had three brothers in the army. 



126 



PTE. A. ALLAN, CANADIANS. 



PTE. ANDERSON, ROYAL SCOTS, 





Private Alexander Allan. C 
Company, 195th Overseas Battalion, 
Regina, Govan, Sask., Canada, was 
the son of James and Barbara Allan. 
Bolshan, Friockheim He was em- 
ployed as a ploughman in Govan, 
when he enlisted in 1916. He served 
overseas, and was killed in action 
on the 15th of August 1917. 

SGT. A. MARSHALL, M.M., S.R. 

Sergeant Alexander Marshall, 
M.M.. 9th Scottish Rifles, twenty- 
three years of age, was the step-son 
of William Rae, West Mains of Auch- 
mithie, near Arbroath. He was a 
valet to Sir Wm. Dunn, in London, 
when he joined the 1st Scottish Rifles. 
He went to France in December 1914, 
distinguished himself by his fine 
soldierly qualities, and was rapidly 
promoted sergeant. He' was wounded 
in September 1916, and later was 
transferred to the 9th Battalion. 
Sergeant Marshall was awarded the 
Military Medal for bravery in the 
field. He was reported missing on 
the 3rd of May 1917, and was pre- 
sumed killed on that date. 



Private William Anderson, Royal 
Scots, 21 Fergus Street. Arbroath, 
was the son of William Anderson, 31 
Green Street. He was twenty-five 
years of age, had married Charlotte 
Cameron, and left one daughter. He 
was employed as a fitter at Dens Iron 
Works before joining the Black 
Watch in March 1917. Afterwards 
lie was tranferred to the Royal 
Scots, went overseas to France, and 
was wounded in April 1917. After 
eighteen months' service he was re- 
ported missing on the 22nd of August 
1917. and later was reported killed 
near Ypres on that date. News of 
his death was also received from the 
chaplain, Rev. Duncan M'Lean, a 
native of Arbroath. 

CPL. W. RENNIE, M.M., B.W. 

Corporal W. Rennie, M.M., 8th 
Black Watch. Arbroath, twenty-seven 
years of age, was a brother of Mrs 
Kydd,23W T estMill Wynd. He joined 
the army in 1915, and in 1916 was 
awarded the Military Medal. He was 
reported missing on the 3rd of May 
1917, and afterwards reported killed. 



127 



PTE. FALCONER, 0. & B. L. 



PTE. WISHART, BLACK WATCH. 





Private James Gordon Falconer, 
Oxford and Bucks. Light Infantry, 
twenty-one years of age, was the son 
of James Falconer and of his wife 
Isabella M. Henderson, Brinkburn, 
Carnoustie. He was on the staff cf 
the Carnoustie branch of the Bank 
of Scotland when lie joined the army 
in April 1915 as a sapper in the City 
of Dundee Royal Engineers. At the 
end of 1916 he was transferred to the 
1st Bucks. Battalion of the Oxford 
and Bucks. Light Infantry and went 
with them to France early in 1917. 
Six months later he was attached to 
the Trench Mortar Battery, and had 
been with it only a week when he was 
killed in action just outside Ypres on 
the 9th of August 1917. His captain 
wrote: — "I was struck by his con- 
fident and fearless manner, and gave 
him important work to do because I 
knew lie would carry out all his 
orders to the minutest detail. His 
company commander in the battalion 
had nothing but praise of him. He 
is now buried outside Ypres and I am 
sure will rank among the best of the 
brave men who have fallen in the 
third battle of Ypres." A comrade 



Private Albert Wishart, 5th 
Black Watch, twenty years of age, 
was the son of Alexander Wishart, 
and of his wife Jessie Kidd. 16 
Panmure Street, Arbroath. He was 
an apprentice fitter with Messrs 
Alex. Shanks & Son, Ltd., at Dens 
Iron Works, and having joined the 
Territorial Force, was mobilised in 
August 1914.- He served for three 
years, during which time he was 
twice wounded. On the 31st of July 
1917 he was posted missing, and 
later was reported as presumed to 
have died on that date. 



in arms, who had been through the 
battle with him. wrote: — " He 
brought up the party for which he 
was acting as guide with splendid 
courage and skill, through some very 
heavy shelling. Just as he got to 
the place a single shell came over, 
and the shook of the explosion must 
have killed him. His work was done, 
and he fell as he would have wished, 
facing the enemy, calm, brave, and 
unmoved, and unshaken by the 
enemy fire." 



128 



L-CPL. PEARSON, CANADIANS. 



PTE. D. BAXTER, SEAFORTHS. 



...... :.-'CS}«iSS.:» 

■■■:■■: ■• 





Lance-Corporal John Pearson, 
M.G.S.. 6th Brigade, 2nd Canadians, 
thirty-three' years of age, was the son 
of John Pearson, 27 New Road, For- 
far, and brother of Mrs J. A. Hast- 
ings, 8 Ponderlaw Lane, Arbroath. 
Before going to Canada he had been 
in the office of Mr J. P. Anderson, 
solicitor, Forfar. He joined the 
army as a private in January 1915. 
He served in Franc© from the be- 
ginning of 1916, was wounded the 
following year, and was killed at 
Arras on the 22nd of August 1917. 

ENGINEER A. WISHART, R.N. 

Engineer Alexander Wishart, 
Royal Navy, 1 Dalhousie Terrace, 
Dundee, was the son of Stephen 
Wishart, ship carpenter, Arbroath, 
and husband of Elizabeth Nairn. He 
served his apprenticeship with Messrs 
Corsar Brothers and left England in 
May 1917 as chief engineer of the 
R.N. Transport s.s. Taplow to load 
copper bar for Port Talbot. Nothing 
more was heard until the Taplow was 
posted missing from the 5th of June. 
His death was officially intimated. 



Private David H. Baxter, 8th 
Seaforth Highlanders, 49 Jedburgh 
Road, Plaistow, London, was the son 
of David Baxter, 16 Taymouth Ter- 
race, Carnoustie. He was thirty- 
nine years of age, and had married 
Mary Leau. He was at one time em- 
ployed as a clerk in the Arbroath and 
St Vigeans Parish Council Office, but 
when he enlisted, under the Derby 
scheme, in May 1916, he was head 
clerk with Messrs Samuel Price & 
Sons, solicitors, London. He joined 
the Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, and went to France in 1917, 
when he was transferred to the Sea- 
forths. Private Baxter was killed in 
Belgium on the 22nd of August 1917. 

GNR. GEORGE OWLER, R.G.A. 

Gunner George Owler, Royal 
Garrison Artillery, thirty-four years 
of age, was the son-in-law of T. 
Martin, Baragneen, Arbroath. He 
was in the employment of the 
Broughty Ferry Corporation. Gunner 
Owler had been at the front for six 
months when he was wounded, and 
died in hospital in August 1917. 



129 



FITTER GEO. D. DICK, R.G.A. 



L-CPL. FARQUHAR, GORDONS. 





Fitter George D. Dick, 25th Siege 
Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, 72 
Brechin Road, Arbroath, was the 
youngest son of James Brown Dick, 
38 Hamilton Green. He was thirty 
years of age, married Annabella 
Mathiew, and left two daughters and 
one son. He was a fitter at Dens 
Iron Works. He joined the army in 
November 1914 as a gunner in the 
R.F.A. He served for about two 
years in Arbroath, Forfar, and Stir- 
ling, and latterly in a munition fac- 
tory in Govan. He was then drafted 
to Woolwich Arsenal to go through a 
test proving him capable of acting as 
fitter of an 8-inch howitzer. In 1916 
he was transferred to the 25th Siege 
Battery, R.G.A., and drafted to 
France, where he was engaged in 
most of the heavy fighting in the 
Arras and Somme districts. Later 
he was on the Belgian coast, working 
at a forge attached to the battery 
commanded by Mr Lloyd George's 
son, when, on the 5th of August 
1917, he was instantaneously killed 
by big gun shell fire. He was 
buried in Bains British Cemetery, 
Dunkirk. 



Lance-Corporal Hugh Farqtjhar, 
9th Gordon Highlanders (Pioneers), 
was the son of Henry Farquhar, 
slater, 11 Convent Street, Arbroath 
He was twenty-eight years of age, 
and was at one time employed as a 
plasterer with Mr Frank Middleton, 
Lindsay Street. He took a keen in- 
terest in Freemasonry, and was a 
member of Lodge St Thomas. Lance- 
Corporal Farquhar had gone to Van- 
couver, but he returned and joine.l 
the 9th Gordons. He was on active 
sen-ice for two years and on the 23rd 
of August 1917, at Ypres, he was 
struck by a bullet and killed instan- 
taneously. The Chaplain said: — "He 
was a fine soldier and a good man, 
and did his duty nobly to the last." 

PTE. GEO. THOMSON, H.L.I. 

Private George Thomson, High- 
land Light Infantry, was the son of 
Mrs Frederick Thomson, Gardyne 
Street, Friockheim. When he volun- 
teered for the army he was in the 
employment of Messrs Arthur & 
Company, Glasgow. Private Thomson 
was killed in action in France in 1916. 



130 



SGT. WM. PORTER, M.M., B.W. 



STOKER ALEX. A. FORBES, R.N. 




Sergeant William Porter. 5th 
Black Watch, 19 Hays Lane, Ar- 
broath, was the son of James Porter 
and of his wife Helen Hutchison, 16 
Jamieson Street. He was twenty- 
four years of age and unmarried, and 
was employed as a mechanic at the 
Dens Iron Works. Sergeant Porter 
joined the Territorials in 1909 as a 
private in the Royal Highlanders, and 
at the outbreak of war was mobilised, 
and left for France with the 5th 
Black Watch in November 1914. He 
attained the rank of sergeant and in 
1917 he was awarded the Military 
Medal for gallant conduct in face of 
the enemy. Afterwards he distin- 
guished himself in organising and 
consolidating work. Sergeant Porter 
died of heart failure on the 29th of 
August 1917 at Poperinghe. He had 
gone to bed apparently in his usual 
health, and was found dead next 
morning. A comrade wrote: — "All 
the boys liked and admired Bill, as 
they called him. His death was the 
last thing we looked for — it was the 
hardest of misfortunes after coming 
through all that he did that he should 
pass away so suddenly." 




Stoker Alexander Anderson 
Forbes, Royal Navy, forty-five years 
of age, was the son of George Forbes 
and of his wife Ann Anderson, Leys- 
mill. He had joined the navy as 
stoker petty officer in 1894, and had 
received the Long Service and Good 
Conduct Medal. He was employed as 
a cranesman at Leysmill Quarries 
when he was called upas a reservist. 
He was on board H.M.S. Faulkner, 
one of the ships commandeered from 
the Chilian Government, and while 
serving in the North Sea contracted 
a chill by which he was disabled. He 
was discharged by the Admiralty 
"with honour" in March 1916, and 
after a lingering illness died of con- 
sumption on the 30th of August 1917. 

PTE. J. M'LAUCHLAN, A. & S. H. 

Private John M'Lauchlan, Argyll 
and Sutherland Highlanders, lived at 
147 Kinloch Street, Carnoustie. He 
was three times wounded, and suf- 
fered from shell shock and trench 
fever. He was reported missing on 
the 22nd of August 1917, and was 
presumed to have died on that date. 



131 



SGT. D. B. YOUNG, R.A.M.C 



SGT.-MAJ. DUNCAN, CAMERONS. 





Sgt. David Buchan Young, Royal 
Army Medical Corps, 102 Lea Road, 
Northampton, was the son of David 
B. Young, 8 Woodlands Crescent, 
Muswell Hill Road, London, formerly 
of Arbroath. He was twenty-nine 
years of age, had married Isobel Mar- 
garet Sutcliffe, and left two sons. He 
had had a brilliant training in art, 
having gained the national scholarship 
and the local one for Burnley, as well 
as the Townley Gold Medal. He also 
took the A.R.C.A., South Kensing- 
ton, and a full diploma. He was 
second art master at the Northamp- 
ton School of Art when, in October 
1915. he joined the Army Medical 
Corps as a private in preference to 
accepting a commission, which had 
been offered him. Before going to 
France in February 1916 he was pro- 
moted sergeant and six months later 
he was invalided home from the 
Somme front suffering from trench 
fever. After rejoining, Sergeant 
Young was detailed to Mesopotamia, 
and went up the Tigris to Baghdad. 
On his way home to England on board 
a hospital ship he died from heat 
stroke in August 1917. 



Sergeant-Major J. C. Duncan, 
10th Cameron Highlanders, thirty- 
three years of age, was the son of 
D. Duncan, Inverquiech, Alyth, for- 
merly at the Guynd, near Carmyllie. 
He was a member of tlie Arbroatli 
Amateur Football Club, and was an 
enthusiastic athlete, having won 
many heavyweight events in local 
games. He belonged to the County 
Constabulary when he joined up in 
August 1914 as a private in the Scot- 
tish Horse. He served with them as 
quartermaster-sergeant at Gallipoli, 
and on the evacuation of the Dar- 
danelles was sent to Egypt. He 
was then transferred to the 10th 
Camerons, and fought with them at 
Salonika, where he was fatally woun- 
ded on the 2nd of September 1917. 
He died on the 7th and was buried in 
the British Cemetery at Nicoslav. 

PTE. GEO. MACFARLANE, B.W. 

Private George Macfarlane, 
Black Watch, was the son of Charles 
Macfarlane, Scroggiefield, Glamis, 
formerly of Carmyllie. He was 
killed in France in 1917. 



132 



L-CPL. STEPHEN CARRIE, R.S.F. 



GNR. JOHN HENDERSON, R.F.A. 





Lance-Corporal Stephen Carrie, 
9th Royal Scats Fusiliers, 37 Ann 
Street, Arbroath, was the sixth son 
of James Carrie and of his wife Mary 
Ann Robertson, 9 West Grimsby. He 
was twenty-five years of age and had 
married Clara Low, and left two 
daughters. At the time he enlisted 
he was a barman in the employment 
of Mr D. D. Barnett, Millgate Loan. 
In April 1916 he joined the army as a 
private in the Royal Scots Fusiliers, 
and after six months' training was 
sent to the front, where he was pro- 
moted, and served for a year. Lance- 
Corporal Carrie was severely wounded 
on the 8th of September 1917, and 
died on his way to the Base Hospital. 
His commanding officer said that he 
was a most gallant and trustworthy 
man and a great favourite with every 
man in the platoon. Lanee^Corporal 
Carrie had three brothers in the army 
— one who served in France with the 
Black Watch for three years, an- 
other who came across with the Aus- 
tralians and was severely wounded, 
and a third who served for some time 
in Mesopotamia with the Royal 
Field Artillery. 



Gunner John Henderson, Royal 
Field Artillery, 18 St Mary Street, 
Arbroath, was the son of John Hen- 
derson, Kirkton of Rattray, Blair- 
gowrie, and of Mrs Henderson, later 
of 94 Helen Street, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-seven years of age, and 
had married Maggie Jane M'Gregor, 
and left two daughters. He had been 
a fireman at the Public Baths, but 
at the time of joining the army, in 
April 1916, he was storekeeper with 
the Equitable Co-operative Society, 
He was killed in action on the 19th of 
September 1917 and was buried at La 
Clyte, a peaceful little cemetery three 
miles north of Dran outne. His officer 
wrote of him : — ' ' He was always 
willing and cheerful, and conducted 
himself with great bravery under 
many trying experiences." 

PTE. J. HENDERSON. GORDONS. 

Private James Henderson, Gor- 
don Highlanders, was the son-in-law 
of James Fotheringham, Manora 
Bank. Carnoustie, and was a linotype 
operator in the "Dundee Advertiser" 
Office. He was killed in May 1917. 



133 



SEAMAN W. PATTULLO, R.N.R. 



PTE. J. M'BAY, BLACK WATCH. 





Seaman William Pattullo, Royal 
Naval Reserve, was the eldest son of 
D. Pattullo and of his wife Margaret 
Chaplin. 35 Howard Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-seven years of age, 
and unmarried. He had served his 
apprenticeship at Westburn Foundry, 
but when he joined up he was an iron- 
turner in the employment of Messrs 
Corsar Brothers, manufacturers. In 
February 1916 he joined the Mechani- 
cal Transport, and being discharged, 
he again answered the call for men 
for the Royal Naval Reserve in 
December. On the 12th of Septem- 
ber 1917 Seaman Pattullo lost his 
life at sea off Lerwick by the blowing 
up of his ship by enemy action. He 
was of a bright and cheery disposi- 
tion, faithful to duty to the last. A 
comrade said that even when his ship 
was in danger he was quietly talk- 
ing of his journey home and of his 
leave which was due when the ship 
should have entered Lei-wick har- 
bour. Loved by all his mates, the 
men of the group of ships to which 
he was attached collected a sum of 
money to be spent on erecting a 
memorial. 



Private James M'Bay. 6th Black 
Watch, twenty-five years of age, was 
the son of Mrs M'Bay, 68 Brechin 
Road. Arbroath. He was employed 
as a ploughman with Mr Binnie, 
Fauldie Hill. Arbirlot, when he joined 
the army in March 1916 as a private 
in the 6th Black Watch (Territorials). 
He served in France from July until 
September 1916, when he was in- 
valided home. He returned to 
France in May 1917, and, after pre- 
viously having been missing, was 
posted as killed in action on the 16th 
of September. Private M'Bay had 
two brothers serving in France — 
Driver William M'Bay, R.F.A., and 
Private Alex. M'Bay, Canadians. 

CAPT. A. MORISON. ESSEX RGT. 

Captain Alfred James Morison, 
Essex Regiment, was the youngest 
son of J. R. Morison, Carnoustie, and 
nephew of John P. Morison, North 
of Scotland Bank. Captain Morison, 
who was thirty-five years of age, 
joined the Royal Fusiliers and in 1915 
received a commission in the Essex 
Regiment. He was killed in 1917. 



134 



ENG. A. SMITH, MERC. MARINE. 



PTE. GEORGE MARSHALL, B.W. 





Second Engineer Alexander D. 
Smith, s.s. Gibraltar, was the second 
son of Alexander Smith, solicitor, 
and Mrs Smith, Lochshade Cottage, 
Viewfield Road, Arbroath. He was 
twenty -nine years of age. and had 
been an engineer at Dens Iron 
Works. On the 12th of September 
1917, when second engineer on s.s. 
Gibraltar, Transport 647, he was 
killed in the Mediterranean by the 
action of an enemy submarine. His 
only brother, Lance-Corporal James 
D. Smith was killed in action at the 
battle of Loos. 

PTE. NORRIE, BLACK WATCH. 

Private E. Norrie, Black Watch, 
was the son of George Norrie, West- 
haven. He was an apprentice iron- 
moulder with Messrs George Ander- 
son & Co., Ltd., Carnoustie, and was 
only sixteen years of age when he 
enlisted in November 1914. He was 
invalided home, but returned to 
France, where he had been for a year 
when he died of gunshot wounds on 
the 6th of September 1917. Private 
Norrie had four brothers serving. 



Private George Marshall, 6th 
Black Watch, was the son of Robert 
Marshall and of his wife Mary Smith, 
21 Lordburn, Arbroath. He was forty 
years of age, had married Jane Ed- 
wards, and left a son and a daughter. 
He had served his apprenticeship as 
a lath-splitter in Arbroath, but at 
the time of joining the army, in May 
1915, he was employed with Mr 
Lamond, Cowdenbeath. He was sta- 
tioned at Perth and Nigg with the 
9th Black Watch, and after three 
months' training went to France 
with his unit. He was later trans- 
ferred to the 6th Black Watch, and, 
after serving in France for about two 
years, was wounded in the fighting 
near Arras, and died on the 16th of 
September 1917. He was buried in 
the cemetery adjoining the Hospital 
at Dozingham, six miles from Ypres. 

PTE. JAMES THOMSON, B.W. 

Private James Thomson, Black 
Watch, twenty-two years of age, was 
a farmer at Fauldiehill, by Arbroath. 
He joined the army in 1916 and was 
killed in action in France in 1917. 



135 



SGT. A. E. SHAW, ROYAL SCOTS. SAPPER L. SIM, CANADIANS. 





Sergeant Alfred Ernest Shaw, 
9th Royal Scots. 31 Broughton Place, 
Edinburgh, was the fifth son of 
William Shaw, plumber, and of his 
wife Jessie Dorward, 48 Fergus 
Square. Arbroath. He was twenty- 
four years of age and was a Highland 
ornament-maker and jeweller in the 
employment of Messrs Mackay & 
Chisholm, Princes Street, Edinburgh. 
Being a Territorial, he was mobilised 
on the outbreak of war, and went to 
France in February 1915 with the 9th 
Royal Scots, "the Dandy Ninth." He 
saw a great deal of hard fighting, his 
battalion, owing to the extraordin- 
ary pressure of the enemy, having 
at one time occupied the same 
trenches for thirty-one days,. A 
year later he was invalided home 
suffering from myalgia, and on his 
return to France, after being em- 
ployed for some time as a hut-builder 
he was promoted to the rank of ser- 
geant. He again took part in many 
engagements, and was made platoon 
sergeant, and it was while leading 
his platoon in an attack on the 
enemy trenches that he was killed 
on the 20th of September 1917. 



Sapper Lewis H. Sim. 3rd Cana- 
dian Tunnelling Company, twenty- 
four years of age, was the son of Mrs 
Sim, 56 Helen Street, Arbroath. He 
was working with Mr James Grant, 
Firthfield, but left for Canada, and 
in October 1915, when he joined the 
army there, he was a farm servant 
at Nanticoke. Ont. He had only been 
a few months at the front when he 
died of shrapnel wounds- in the leg 
and back, on the 24th of Septem- 
ber 1917, in the 14th Field Ambu- 
lance, Belgium. 

CPL. D. WYLLIE, GLOUCESTERS. 

Corporal David J. Wyllie, 
Gloucester Regiment, was the only 
son of Mrs Wyllie, 11 Fergus Square, 
Arbroath. He was (twenty-seven 
years of age, and had married Cora 
Smith, leaving two children. Corpl. 
Wyllie served his apprenticeship as 
a moulder in Arbroath, but went to 
America a number of years ago. 
When war broke out he returned to 
Britain and enlisted in the Glouces- 
ters. He was killed in action on 
the 9th of October 1917. 



136 



CPL. G. BOYD, AUSTRALIANS. 



GNR. DAVID D. CLYNE, R.G.A. 





Cohporal George F. Boyd. Aus- 
tralian Field Artillery. 39 Brougham 
Street, Melbourne, was the son cf 
George Boyd, shoemaker, Lochland 
Street, Arbroath, and of his wife 
Helen Finlayson, who now resides at 
4S Hayburn Street. Partick, Glasgow. 
He was thirty years of age, and had 
married Helen Carrie, 36 John 
Street, Arbroath. Corporal Boyd was 
an engineer with Messrs W. D. Grant 
& Son. Melbourne, when, in July 
1915, he joined the Australian Field 
Artillery as a gunner. He was after- 
wards promoted corporal. For six 
months he was on active service in 
Egypt, and thence went to France, 
where he was in much heavy fighting. 
He was wounded and gassed in June 
1917. and on the 23rd of September 
he was killed at Dickiebusch, in Bel- 
gium, by the bursting of an enemy 
shell while he was asleep in his dug- 
out. His sergeant wrote: — "I oan 
hardly yet realise that dear old George 
is gone. He was the life and soul 
of the Battery, and all the boys 
join with me in sending deepest 
sympathy to you in the loss of your 
noble son and my heroic friend." 



Gunner David D. Ci.yne, Royal 
Garrison Artillery, 42 Calder Street, 
Crossbill, Glasgow, was the son of 
Robert Clyne, The Lighthouse, Crom- 
arty (formerly of the Bell Rock Light- 
house), and of his wife Isabella David- 
son. He was twenty-seven years of 
age. and served his apprenticeship 
with Messrs J. P. Grewar & Son, 
Arbroath, afterwards going to the 
Porterfield Works, Renfrew. For 
about two years he was in the Ar- 
broath Artillery Corps, and became a 
gunner in the R.G.A. in April 1916. 
He had ten months' service in France. 
On the 25th of September 1917 he 
was struck by an enemy shell when 
manning his gun and in a few hours 
succumbed to his wounds, unable 
even to send a message home before 
he died. He is buried in Menin Road 
South Military Cemetery, near Ypres. 

PTE. D. STEWART, SEAFORTHS. 

Private David Stewart, Seaforth 
Highlanders, Milton of Conon, Car- 
myllie. who was formerly employed at 
West Newbigging Farm, was killed in 
action on the 12th of October 1917. 



137 



LIEUT. G. D. G. STUART, R.F.A. 



PTE. 



J. SCOTT, A. & S. H. 





Lieutenant George Douglas Gor- 
don Stuart, twenty-one years of age. 
2nd Highland Brigade, Royal Field 
Artillery (T.F.), was the son of 
Robert Stuart. Inspector of Poor, and 
of his wife Janet Steven Reid. 19 
Dalhousie Place, Arbroath. Before 
the war Lieutenant Stuart took a 
keen interest in the Boy Scouts, and 
was a scoutmaster in the local body. 
He was at the High School when war 
was declared and at once joined the 
Forfarshire Battery of the R.F.A. as 
a bombardier. In November 1914 he 
was commissioned 2nd-lieutenant in 
the 2nd Highland Brigade, and was 
afterwards promoted lieutenant. He 
was drafted to France in 1916, was 
posted to the Lahore Division of Ar- 
tillery, attached to the Canadian 
Corps, and was with that Division 
during the battles of the Somme. 
Vimy Ridge, and Ypres. Lieutenant 
Stuart was killed on the 23rd of Sep- 
tember 1917 in the village of Pilkem. 
on the Pasehendaele Ridge, whilst 
bringing under cover one of his men 
who had been badly gassed. He w 7 as 
buried in Blenet Farm British Ceme- 
tery, Elverdinghe, Belgium. His 



Private Alfred James Scott. 8th 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 
was the son of Alfred Scott and of 
his wife Annie Campbell, 45 West 
Abbey Street, Arbroath. He was 
nineteen years of age and was serv- 
ing his apprenticeship as a chemist 
with Mr Howat Duncan when he 
joined the 8th Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders in December 1916. Pri- 
vate Scott was killed in action at 
Ypres on the 20th of September 1917. 



colonel wrote : — ' ' Like the gallant 
lad he was, it was in saving a man 
who had been gassed, and in getting 
the man under cover that he lost his 
own life. If we must go during the 
war, we would all ask to go as he did 
— saving somebody's life under shell 
fire among one's guns with one's own 
men all round one." Lieutenant 
Stuart had two brothers who gained 
the Military Cross. Captain J. 0. G. 
Stuart, Black Watch, who was killed 
in 1918. and Lieutenant A. R. Stuart, 
R.F.A., who was severely wounded. 
A third brother was in a volunteer 
regiment in Shanghai. 



138 



PTE. D. R. SIEVWRIGHT, M.G.C. 



PTE. HERRON, AUSTRALIANS. 




Private David R. Sievwricht, 
Machine Gun Corps, was the son of 
David R. Sievwright, Bonnington of 
Arbirlot. near Arbroath. He was 
twenty years of age and, before join- 
ing the army, was employed as a shep- 
herd by Mr T. Mitchell, Shiel green, 
Memus. Kirriemuir. In December 
1915 he attested under Lord Derby's 
scheme, and six months later he 
joined the 5th Black Watch. After 
training for some time in camp at 
Ripon, Private Sievwright was trans- 
ferred to the Machine Gun Corps at 
Clipstone Camp, and went to France 
in January 1917. He was killed in 
action while on duty at Hansbeck 
Wood, near Ypres, on the 26th of 
September 1917, and was buried by 
his comrades near the place where he 
fell. His commanding officer wrote: 
— "Private Sievwright was fixing his 
gun during an intense bombardment 
when a piece of shell struck him on 
the head, and he died shortly after- 
wards without regaining conscious- 
ness. He was a most excellent sol- 
dier, always attending to his duties 
with utter disregard for his personal 
safety. He was a universal favourite." 




Private Fred N. Herron, 2nd 
Pioneer Battalion, Australian Im- 
perial Force, was the son of James 
N. Herron. blacksmith, 49 East 
Abbey Street, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-nine years of age, and was a 
moulder at Dens Iron Works. He 
afterwards went to Australia and 
had been working in Melbourne for 
five years when he joined the Aus- 
tralian contingent and came to Eng- 
land. Two months later he crossed 
to France. After preparing the roads 
for the guns going up for an at- 
tack, Private Herron was wounded 
by an aerial bomb, and died in No. 
10 Casualty Clearing Station on the 
29th of September 1917. 

PTE. ADAM CAR GILL, B.W. 

Private Adam Cargill, Black 
Watch, was the son of Adam Cargill. 
9 Old Shorehead, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-two years of age, and was 
employed at Netherward Works 
when he enlisted in 1914. Private 
Cargill had been two years in France 
when he was killed in action on the 
14th of October 1916. 



139 



LT. ALISTAIR HENDRY, R.F.A. 



GNR. JAMES BOWDEN, R.G.A. 





Lieut. Alistair Hendry, Royal 
Field Artillery, the Bruce Hotel, Car- 
noustie, was the son of William 
Hendry, Glasgow, and of his wife 
Janet Morrison Anderson. He was 
twenty years of age, and was a clerk 
with Messrs James Smieton & Sons. 
Ltd. Having joined the Territorial 
Force he was mobilised in September 
1914 as a private in the 4th Black 
Watch, and went to France with his 
regiment in February 1915. He saw 
much active service in the spring and 
summer of that year, got his com- 
mission in the Royal Field Artillery 
in September and later was attached 
to the 189th Brigade. On the 27th of 
September 1917 he volunteered to go 
out and find a company of Argyll and 
Sutherlands with whom his battery 
had lost touch for forty-eight hours. 
He succeeded in his mission, coming 
upon them when they had fired their 
last round and given up all hope. 
Afterwards he and six other infantry 
officers took cover in a German dug- 
out, where they were all killed by 
the bursting of a shell. For this 
service Lieutenant Hendry was men- 
tioned in despatches. 



Gunner James Bowden, Royal 
Garrison Artillery, nineteen years of 
age, was the son of James Bowden 
and of his wife Annie Beattie, 11 
Ogilvy Place, Arbroath. He was a 
farm servant at Pitcundrum, Arbir- 
lot, when he joined the Royal Garri- 
son Artillery in September 1916. 
After several months' training Gnr. 
Bowden went to France in June 1917. 
and three months later, on the 29th 
of September 1917, he was killed, to- 
gether with an officer and eight other 
men, by a shell striking the dug-out 
in which they had taken shelter. 

PTE. BEATTIE, BLACK WATCH. 

Private William Beattie, Black 
Watch, a native of Arbroath, was 
the son of Joseph Beattie, 21 Kin- 
cardine Street. Dundee, and the 
nephew of Andrew Beattie, 49 West 
Abbey Street, Arbroath. He was 
nineteen years of age, and joined the 
Black Watch in 1916. Private Beattie 
had been at the front only two 
months, and two weeks in the 
trenches, when he was gassed and 
died on the 30th of September 1917. 



140 



PTE. J. COWIE, BLACK WATCH. 



L-CPL. NORMAN M'lNTOSH, B.W. 



, ■ :■■..:■■■■ 


•' 


% M' 1 










^ 


' 






Private James Cowie, Black 
Watch, Dundee Eoad, Forfar, was 
the eldest son of David Cowie and of 
his wife Janet Myles, Muiredge, Car- 
myllie. He married Sarah Smith, 
and left one son and two daughters. 
He was twenty-eight years of age, 
and was an insurance agent in the 
Forfar branch of the Prudential 
Assurance Company. He joined the 
Black Watch in September 1915 and 
when in France served as stretcher- 
bearer in his company. Private 
Cowie was killed in action at Ypres 
on the 28th of September 1917. His 
captain wrote: "The eight stretcher- 
bearers of the company were all shel- 
tering from an enemy bombardment 
in a concrete shelter known as a 
" pill-box " when it was smashed by 
a direct hit by a heavy shell. Five 
men, of whom Private Cowie was one, 
were killed instantaneously. All five 
were buried together and the stones 
of the "pill-box" built into a cairn 
by their comrades. A cross was 

erected on the spot within view of the 
historic city of Ypres. Private Cowie 
was a cheery companion in days of 
rest and a loyal comrade in action." 



Lance-Corporal Norman M'In- 
tosh, 9th Black Watch, was ths son 
of Alexander M'Intosh, and of his 
wife Elizabeth Grindlay, 32 St Mary 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
three years of age, and was a farm 
servant at Finniston, Letham, when 
he joined the 5th Black Watch as a 
private in May 1915. Lance-Corporal 
Al'lntosh went to France early in 
1916, was wounded at the battle of 
the Somme in September, and was 
invalided home. On his return to 
France he was transferred to the 
9th Black Watch as a machine 
gunner. He died of the effects of gas 
poisoning on the Arras front on the 
30th of September 1917, and was 
buried in the British Level Crossing 
Cemetery, four miles east of Arras. 

PTE. TASKER, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Robert Tasker, Black 
Watch, twenty- three years of age, 
was the son of David Tasker, Fir- 
hills, near Arbroath. He was a farm 
servant, and joined the army in 1916. 
Private Tasker died of wounds on 
the 26th of September 1917. 



141 



BOMB. J. E. CHRISTIE, R.F.A. PTE. JOH N CROWE, SEAFORTHS. 





Bombardier John Esplix Chris- 
tie, Royal Field Artillery, twenty- 
three years of age, was the son of 
James Christie and of his wife Mary 
Esplin, 24 St Mary Street, Arbroath. 
He was an engine-fitter at Dens Iron 
Works before joining the army in Sep- 
tember 1914 as a driver in the R.F.A. 
He went to France as bombardier 
instructor of signalling, and served 
there for two and a half years. At 
Cambrai, on the night of the 10th of 
October 1917, he was sleeping in a 
small dug-out near the battery posi- 
tion when a shell burst at the door, 
killing him and several others instan- 
taneously. He was buried in a mili- 
tary cemetery behind the lines. Major 
Fraser wrote of him: — "I had come 
much into contact with your son in 
the course of his duties as signaller, 
and had a very high opinion of him. 
He was a most promising young sol- 
dier and would soon have gained fur- 
ther promotion. Many a time I have 
relied on him to do a difficult bit of 
work, and he always succeeded." 
The chaplain wrote: — " A good and 
brave soldier, efficient at his work, 
and always ready to do his duty." 



Private John Christie Crowe, 
Seaforth Highlanders, thirty-eight 
years of age, was the son of David 
Crowe, Marketgate, Arbroath. He 
married Agnes Adam Findlay, and 
left a son and a daughter. He was a 
lorryman with Messrs Wordie & Co., 
railway contractors, when he joined 
the Seaforths in October 1916, 
and was sent to Nigg Camp for three 
months' training. He then went to 
Fiance, and had been only a fort- 
night in the firing line when he was 
wounded with shrapnel at the battle 
of Arras on the 24th of March 1917. 
After being in Stobhill Hospital, 
Glasgow, for seven months, he died 
on the 7th of October 1917. He was 
buried in the Eastern Cemetery, Ar- 
broath, with full military honours." 

PTE. CARGILL, BLACK WATCH. 

Private John Cargill, Black 
Watch, twenty years of age, was the 
son of John Cargill, 5 South Street, 
Arbroath. He was reported missing 
on the 14th of October 1916, and 
afterwards presumed to have been 
killed in action on that date. 



142 



GUNNER WM. SPINK, R.F.A. 



CPL.-FAR. M'GLASHAN, R.F.A. 





Gunner William Spink, Rojal 
Field Artillery (T.F.), fifty-one years 
of age, was the son of William Spink, 
fisherman, Ladybridge House, Ar- 
broath. He was a shore porter when 
he enlisted in September 1914. He 
served in France for two and a half 
years. On the 4th of October 1917 he 
and other soldiers were resting and 
smoking when a shell suddenly fell in 
their midst, and Gunner Spink was 
killed. His officer, writing of him, 
said: — " Gunner Spink was a great 
favourite in the battery and has been 
greatly missed. He was one of the 
original men in the battery, and was 
an example to all the newer men, as 
he was a most willing worker, and 
never had a complaint to make. 1 
knew him well, and always admired 
him for his courage in sticking to a 
job which must have been a hard 
one for a man of his age." 

PTE. J. PHMPS. CANADIANS. 

Private James D. Philips, Cana- 
dians, aged twenty-two, grandson of 
J Japp, Kinloch Street, Carnoustie, 
was killed on the 9th of August 1918. 



Cpl. -Farrier Donald M'Glashan, 
Royal Field Artillery, 23 Lndyloan, 
Arbroath, was a master blacksmith 
in Dickfield Street before joining the 
colours. He was a Freemason, being 
a member of St Thomas Lodge, and 
was also a member of the Men's Own 
Brotherhood. He was forty years 
of age, and in January 1915 he 
joined the army as a farrier in the 
Forfarshire Battery, R.F.A., 2nd 
Highland Brigade. Four months 
later Corporal-Farrier M'Glashan 
went across to France, and was at 
the front until the 12th of October 
1917, when he was killed by a shell. 

L/SGT. W. RAE. BLACK WATCH. 

Lance-Sergeant William Rae, 
Black Watch , thirty years of age, was 
the son of William Rae, 12 Church 
Street, Arbroath. He was at one 
time a bleacher at Waulkmills, but 
had gone to the United States. When 
war broke out, however, he at once 
returned to Scotland, and enlisted. 
When on active service he was re- 
ported missing, and in August 1917 
was officially posted as killed. 



143 



SGT. A. ECCLES, AUSTRALIANS. 



PTE. ALEX. DONALDSON, R.S. 





Sergeant Albert Edward Eccles, 
Machine Gun Corps, Australian Im- 
perial Force, twenty-six years of age. 
was a son of Mr and Mrs Eccles, 
Broughty Ferry. Before going to 
Australia he lived with his aunt, Mrs 
Will, 13 Victoria Street, Arbroath, 
and was a brother of Agnes Eccles, 
Dunellan, Strachan Street. He was 
in the Australian Merchant Service 
before enlisting in November 1914. 
He landed with the first Aus- 
tralian contingent at Gallipoli, where 
he was severely wounded. After 
undergoing treatment in Cairo he 
was invalided to Australia, and was 
offered bis discharge, which he re- 
fused. On recovery he returned over- 
seas, was promoted sergeant, and 
acted as machine gun instructor at 
Grantham. He went to France in 
March 1917, and was killed in action 
at Zonnebeke on the 5th of October. 
His captain wrote: — "In losing Ser- 
geant Eccles the company lost at 
that time its best n.c.o., a fine soldier 
and a man. Had he lived I should 
have recommended him for a decora- 
tion, and for promotion to company 
sergeant-major. ' ' 



Private Alexander Donaldson, 
11th Boyal Scots, was the son of 
George Donaldson, joiner, 44 St 
Vigeans Boad, Arbroath. He was 
thirty-three years of age, and had 
been a gardener at Ashbrook, but 
when he enlisted he was foreman 
gardener with Mr C. A. Hamilton, 
Duntocher. Private Donaldson joined 
the 3rd Boyal Scots at Hamilton in 
March 1916, but was afterwards 
transferred to the 11th Battalion. 
He was wounded by shrapnel and had 
just been a month out of hospital 
when he was killed in action in 
France on the 12th of October 1917. 
Private Donaldson had two brothers 
with the army, one of whom was 
killed in October 1915. 

PTE. THOS. SKEA, SEAFOBTHS. 

Private Thomas Skea, Seaforth 
Highlanders, 71 Ladyloan, Arbroath, 
was thirty-three years of age. When 
war broke out he was employed as a 
carter, but as he had been in the 
army he at once rejoined the colours. 
He was killed in action on the 12th 
of October 1917. 



144 



PTE. DAVID OGILVIE, A. & S. H. 



BOMB. JAMES SKEA, R.F.A. 





Private David Ogilvie, 14th 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 
twenty-four years of age, was the son 
of Alexander Ogilvie, 14 Taymouth 
Terrace, Carnoustie. He was a 
police constable in Perth when he 
joined the army in July 1915. He 
was wounded in June 1916, and was 
killed during the advance at Paschen- 
daele on the 12th of October 1917. 
The quartermaster-sergeant wrote : — 
" He was very popular with both 
officers and men, who held him in 
high esteem, as he was such a cheer- 
ful and willing lad, never grudging to 
do his duty, no matter how danger- 
ous." Pte. Ogilvie had two brothers 
serving, John in the Australians, and 
Ormiston in the Reserve Cavalry. 

SGT. J. GRAY, BLACK WATCH. 

Sergeant John D. Gray, Black 
Watch, son of A. Gray, Dundee 
Street, Carnoustie, was in the Tay- 
mouth Engineering Works. He was 
mobilised as a Territorial, and in 
November 1914 went to France, 
where he saw much service before 
he was killed in action. 



Bombardier James Skea, Royal 
Field Artillery, twenty-four years of 
age, was the son of James Skea, 21 
Hannah Street, Arbroath. He was 
a plasterer with Mr A. Donald, 
Lindsay Street, and enlisted in 
October 1914 as a driver in the 
R.F.A. He served in France for 
two and a half years, and died of 
wounds on the 20th of October 1917 
at Doringhem, near Poperinghe. 

GNR. ROBERT PRYDE, R.G.A. 

Gunner Robert Pryde, Royal 
Garrison Artillery, Monifieth, thirty- 
seven years of age, was the son of 
Robert Pryde, Woodhills, Carmyllie. 
He had married Annie Black, and 
was a waiter in Dundee when he 
enlisted. He was killed in action in 
France on the 24th of July 1917. 

PTE. A. M'KENDRICK, B.W. 

Private Andrew M'Kendrick, 
Black Watch, was a gardener with 
Miss Lowson, Balgavies, near 
Guthrie. He had only been six 

days in France when he was killed 
in action. 



145 



A.B. ROBERT KEILLOR, R.N. 



PTE. REDFORD, LONDON SCOT. 





Able Seaman Robert Kydd Milne 
Keillor, Royal Navy, 12 Brechin 
Road, Arbroath, was the son of 
Thomas Keillor and of his wife M. 
Ainsworth, Stuart Street, Arbroath. 
He was forty years of age, and had 
married Grace Muir Janes. When 
war broke out he was employed as 
under-overseer at Stanley Works, and 
was a bugler in the Angus Rifles. In 
1896 he joined the navy as a " boy," 
and had served for twenty-one years. 
On the 16th of October 1917, while on 
H. M.S. Attentive III. he was drowned 
at Dunkirk Docks when returning to 
his ship during an air raid. In the 
darkness he slipped over the edge of 
the dock, and although a powerful 
swimmer, it is supposed he had been 
stunned by the fall and unable to 
recover himself. Seaman Keillor's 
body was recovered some days later, 
and was interred in the British ceme- 
tery near Dunkirk. The commodore 
at Dunkirk wrote: — -"He gave his 
life for his country just the same as 
if he had lost his life in action. He 
had been a good bit under fire, and 
like all his countrymen, proved that 
he was a man in every respect." 



Private Alexander Redford, 1st 
London Scottish, twenty-nine years of 
age, was the son of John Redford, 32 
Fergus Square, Arbroath. He was a 
hairdresser in Glasgow when hejoined 
the H.L.I, in November 1915. He 
was afterwards transferred, and was 
wounded in France in September 
1916. He was again wounded on the 
19th of October 1917, and died the 
following day at No.3 Casualty Clear- 
ing Station. He was buried in Gre- 
villers British Cemetery, Bapaume. 
The chaplain wrote: — "All ranks 
mourn a good comrade and a capable 
experienced soldier. We shall miss 
his strong and attractive presence ; 
he was of such a cheery disposition 
and a bright light in his platoon." 

PTE. W. BLACK, ROYAL SCOTS. 

Private William Corsar Black, 
Royal Scots, nineteen years of age, 
Kinnell, near Arbroath, was a 
ploughman at Oathlaw when he en- 
listed in 1914. He was wounded in 
the summer of 1917, and died on 
the 8th of November in the 18th 
General Hospital, Calais. 



146 



PTE. J. LESLIE, ROYAL SCOTS. 



L-CPL. HUNTER, AUSTRALIANS. 





Private James Leslie, Royal 
Scots, twenty-four years of age, was 
the son of Thomas Russell Leslie and 
of his wife Jane Hunter, Kirkstile, 
St Vigeans. He was a ploughman at 
Mains of Letham when he enlisted 
in January 1916. He was wounded 
at Arras in April 1917, and had re- 
joined his regiment but a few weeks 
when he was killed at Paschendaele 
on the 22nd of October 1917. 

PTE. J. TODD, SOUTH AFRICANS. 

Private John Todd, Royal Garri- 
son Artillery, Natal contingent, forty 
years of age, was the son of Mrs Todd, 
45 Hill Street, Arbroath. He enlisted 
in 1914, and saw a year' s fighting in 
West Africa, afterwards going to 
France, where he was killed in 1917. 

PTE. J. WILKIE, BLACK WATCH. 

Private John Wilkie, 5th Black 
Watch, twenty-eight years of age, 
was a grandson of James Wilkie, Mill- 
field Feus, near Arbroath. When he 
joined the army in 1916 he was a 
ploughman at Mains of Kelly. He was 
killed on the 3rd of September 1917. 



Lance-Corporal James Hunter, 
2nd Battalion, Australian Imperial 
Force, Sydney, was the eldest son of 
Joseph Hunter and of his wife Helen 
Walker, 47 Young Street, Annandale, 
Australia (formerly of Arbroath), and 
grandson of James Hunter, 6 Hume 
Street, Arbroath. He was thirty-five 
years of age, and left a son and a 
daughter. He was a telegraph lines- 
man in Sydney when he joined the 
Imperial Force in 1915. He served 
in France, and was killed in action 
on the 27th of October 1917. 

2nd-LT. WALTER STEELE, H.L.I. 

Second-Lieutenant Walter F. B. 
Steele, Highland Light Infantry, was 
the son of Capt. J. W. Steele, Glas- 
gow, and grandson of Robert Steele, 
at one time chief officer of the Coast- 
guards in Carnoustie. Lieutenant 
Steele was well-known in the Car- 
noustie district. He joined the H.L.I, 
in November 1914, and received his 
commission the same year. He had 
only been in France eleven months 
when he was killed by a shell, on 
the 20th of October 1917. 



147 



SERGT. JOHN BOWIE. R.F.A. PTE. FRED ANDERSON, B.W. 





Sergeant John Bowie, Royal Field 
Artillery, twenty-two years of age, 
wa.s the eldest son of William Bowie 
and of his wife Helen Spence, 15 
Carnegie Street, Arbroath, formerly 
of Letham Mill. He was for a time 
an engineer with Messrs James Law 
&. Sons, Arbroath, and was with 
Messrs M'Kie& Baxter, Govan, when 
he joined the army in August 1914 
as a gunner in the R.F.A. He was 
sent to Norwich for training, and 
was made a bombardier. In July 
1915 he went to Port Said, then to 
Suvla Bay, where he remained till 
the evacuation of Gallipoli. Sergeant 
Bowie was six months in Egpyt be- 
fore going to France, where he was 
promoted to the rank of sergeant, 
and served until the 28th of October 
1917, when he was killed at his guns 
on the Ypres front. He was buried 
in Dickebusch Military Cemetery. 
His major wrote that he was a splen- 
did n.c.O 1 . and man generally. In 
spite of awful weather and heavy 
shelling, from the time he arrived 
the telephones were always through, 
which resulted in important news 
getting back. 



Private Frederick Anderson, 5th 
Black Watch, twenty-one years of 
age, was the son of David Anderson, 
and of his wife Elizabeth Baxter, 70 
Howard Street, Arbroath. He was a 
farm servant at Auchterforfar when 
he enlisted in January 1915 in the 
5th Black Watch. Private Anderson 
went to France at the end of the 
year, and saw a good deal of fight- 
ing, having been wounded in Septem- 
ber 1913, and again in an engage- 
ment in August 1917. He was 
killed in action in France on the 
29th of October 1917. 

PTE. ALEXANDER GLEN, B.W. 

Private Alexander Glen, Black 
Watch, St Vigeans, near Arbroath, 
was the son of Alex. Glen, Tayock 
Cottage, Montrose. He was thirty- 
eight years of age, had married Mar- 
garet Turner, and left five sons and 
a daughter. He was beadle in St 
Vigeans Parish Church, and was in 
the employment of the parish 
minister when he joined the army in 
August 1916. Private Glen was killed 
in France on the 13th of May 1917. 



148 



PTE. F. LESLIE, CANADIANS. 



S.M. M'NAUGHTON, CANADIANS. 





Private Frank Leslie, 85th Nova 
Scotia Highlanders, was the son of 
James C. Leslie and of his wife Isa- 
bella Buiek, 24 Newton Avenue, 
Lynn, Mass., formerly of Colvill Cot- 
tages, Dishland Street, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-four years of age and was 
unmarried. Private Leslie, who was 
a former pupil of the Arbroath High 
School, was employed as a machinist 
at the General Electric Co., Lynn, 
Mass. A younger brother, Lieuten- 
ant G. B. Leslie, crossed from U.S.A. 
to Canada and enlisted in September 
1915, both brothers being at first in 
the same battalion, the 73rd Royal 
Highlanders of Canada. Private 
Leslie was in several engagements, 
at Ypres, at the Somme, and at Vimy 
Ridge, where the 73rd suffered so 
heavily that it was linked up with 
other units. He was transferred 
to the 85th Nova Scotia Highlanders 
and was attached to the 12th Cana- 
dian Infantry Brigade Headquarters 
as a runner. He was killed in 

action on the 31st of October 1917 
at Paschendaele Ridge. He " per- 
formed his duties fearlessly and 
well, as became a soldier." 



Sergeant-Major Harold Victor 
M'Natjghton, 13th Canadian Scot- 
tish, St Thomas, Ontario, was the 
son of William M'Naughton, for- 
merly of Arbroath, and of his wife 
Jane L. Cruden, Highgate, London. 
He was thirty years of age and had 
married Gladys Graves, Ontario. 
He was on the clerical staff of the 
Pere Marquette Railway when he en- 
listed on the first day of recruiting. 
He came to England in June 1916 as 
a company sergeant-major, and later 
went to Prance. He was in the Ypres 
area, when, in trying to get his men 
under cover, he was struck by a shell 
and killed. His company major 
wrote: — "Everybody liked 'Mac,' as 
we all called him, and I always felt 
proud to be in command of such a 
good soldier." Sgt.-Major M'Naugh- 
ton had two brothers in the army. 

PTE. WILLIAM LOW, A. & S. H. 

Private William Low, Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders, eighteen 
years of age, belonged to East 
Skiechen, Carmyllie. He was killed 
in France in 1917. 



149 



PTE. SYMON, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. FINDLAY, BLACK WATCH. 





Private Alexander Symon, 14th 
Black Watch, Fife and Forfar Yeo- 
manry, nineteen years of age, was 
the son of James Symon, 7 Abbot 
Street, Arbroath. He was serving 
his apprenticeship as a printer in the 
' ' Arbroath Guide ' ' Office when he 
joined the 14th Black Watch in 
October 1916. He was sent to Nigg 
Camp, and after five months' train- 
ing he went to Egypt and Palestine. 
Private Symon took part in the first 
battle of Gaza in March 1917 and was 
in other engagements. An Arbroath 
comrade was with him when he went 
over the top at the second battle of 
Gaza. He was killed during the 
course of the battle at Tel el Sheria, 
near Beersheba, on the 6th of Novem- 
ber 1917. His captain, Sir W. A. A. 
Campbell, Bart., wrote: — "Your boy 
was in my company since he joined 
the battalion. During the operations 
he stuck the hard work and long 
marches like a hero; he found, I 
know, his pack and equipments a sore 
trial, but he never made a complaint, 
and set a fine example to those 
stronger and bigger than himself. He 
died doing his duty like a brave boy." 



Private Alfred Ftndlay, 5th 
Black Watch, 14 Maule Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of Mrs Findlay. 
14 Walker Road, Newcastle. Before 
the war he was employed as a fitter 
and turner with Messrs Douglas 
Fraser& Sons. Having been for two 
years a member of the Territorial 
Force he was mobilised in August 
1914. After training he went to 
France, where he was twice wounded 
at La Bassee and at the battle of the 
Somme. In March 1917 he w T as dis- 
charged through illness as the result 
of wounds and he died in Newcastle 
on the 2nd of November in that year. 

SGT. A. SMART, BLACK WATCH. 

Sergeant Alexander Smart, 8th 
Black Watch, son of Alexander 
Smart, cattleman, Balgavies, was a 
gardener at Glamis Castle. He 
joined the Angus and Mearns Rifles 
in 1905, volunteered for foreign ser- 
vice, and was called up in September 
1914. He was transferred, and when 
serving in France, was reported 
missing on the 3rd of May 1917, and 
later certified as killed on that date. 



150 



CPL. OVENSTONE. F. & F. YEO. 



PTE. GEO. SCOTT, CANADIANS. 





Corporal Peter M. Ovenstone, 
Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, was the 
youngest son of Philip Ovenstone and 
of his wife Julia Meldrum, 13 Cairnie 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
two years of age and unmarried. He 
was a plasterer and cement worker 
before he joined the army in August 
1914 as a trooper in the Fife and 
Forfar Yeomanry. He served in the 
coast defences in Norfolk and Lincoln- 
shire till August 1915 when he sailed 
for Gallipoli and landed at Suvla Bay 
Three months later he was invalided 
home suffering from enteric fever. In 
August 1916 he rejoined his regiment 
in Egypt and there got his first pro- 
motion. Shortly before his death he 
had passed with distinction his ex- 
aminations for senior rank. At the 
battle of Sheria, in an attack on a 
very strong Turkish position north cf 
Beersheba Corporal Ovenstone' s com- 
pany went up against four enemy 
machine guns, which they captured, 
and it was in that attack that he 
was killed on the 6th of November 
1917. Ths regiment took two lines 
of trenches that day, and broke the 
centre of the Turkish line. 



Private George Scott, 1st Cana- 
dians, Brantford, Canada, thirty-two 
years of age, was the son of James 
Scott, Bonhard, Arbirlot, near Ar- 
broath. He had been in Canada for 
six years and was in the employment 
of a contractor when he joined up in 
1915 and came to England. He was 
drafted to France, and was killed in 
aotion on the 6th of November 1917. 

L-CPL. ALEX. BOBERTSON, B.W. 

Lance-Ctl. Alexander Robert- 
son, 2nd Black Watch, son of 
Alex. Robertson, Garnet Terrace, 
Carnoustie, was in the service of the 
National Telephone Company. He 
was at first in the R.G.A., but was 
transferred. He was killed in action 
in the Persian Gulf. 

PTE. A. KENNEDY, CANADIANS. 

Private Andrew Kennedy, Cana- 
dians, was the son of Mrs Kennedy, 
Ethiehaven, near Arbroath. He was 
twenty-three years of age, and was 
a ploughman in the Forfar district 
before going to Canada. He was 
killed in action in 1917. 



151 



PTE. GEDDES, BLACK WATCH. CPL. A. BENNET, CANADIANS. 





Private Charles Raitt Geddes, 
5th Black Watch, twenty-one years 
of age, was the eldest son of David 
Geddes and of his wife Margaret 
Raitt, Woodside, Colliston. He was 
employed as a ploughman at Park- 
conon when he joined the 5th Black 
Watch in July 1915. After serving 
for nine months in France, Private 
Geddes was invalided home, and was 
in hospital for three months. In 
February 1917 he was drafted to 
Egypt, and afterwards to Palestine, 
where he was killed in action on the 
6th of November 1917. Private 
Geddes was buried in the Military 
Cemetery at Wadi Samarra. He was 
a steady lad of blithe and kindly dis- 
position and was a general favourite, 
and, his commanding officer said, he 
was a fine and reliable soldier. His 
sergeant wrote : — ' ' We have many 
happy recollections of Charlie. We 
often talk of him, he was such a 
good lad, and to all the boys in the 
platoon he was always 'Happy Char- 
lie,' and a comrade and friend to 
them all. For myself I always found 
him the same, ever ready to do 
whatever duty he was asked." 



Corporal Andrew W. Bennet, 
81st Canadians, was the son of A. D. 
Bennet, Little Cairnie, Arbroath, 
formerly of St Vigeans. He married 
Charlotte Lamond and left a son and 
a daughter. He was at one time em- 
ployed as a ploughman near Arbroath 
but had been in Canada for some 
years when he joined the 81st Cana- 
dian Infantry in 1915. Corporal 
Bennet went to France the follow- 
ing year, and was killed in action 
at Paschendaele Ridge on the 12th 
of November 1917. 

SUB-LIEUT. A. M'LEOD, R.N.R, 

Sub-Lieutenant Arthur M'Leod, 
Royal Naval Reserve, twenty-five 
years of age, was the son of John 
M'Leod, 13 Glebe Street, Dundee, 
formerly of Arbroath. He served his 
apprenticeship as an engineer at Dens 
Iron Works, and after being in 
Greenock and Leith he was four years 
at sea as an engineer in the mercan- 
. tile marine. Li 1916 he joined the 
R.N.R. as a sub-lieutenant, and was 
lost by the torpedoing of H.M.S. 
Champagne on the 9th October 1917. 



152 



L-CPL. J. GRAY. BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. D. MILNE, BLACK WATCH. 





Lance-Corporal John B. Gray, 
5th Black Watch, was the son of 
Alexander B. Gray and of his wife 
Bella Thomson, 74 Cairnie Street, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-five years of 
age, and was a moulder with John 
Brown, Ltd., Clydebank, when he en- 
listed in September 1914 as a trooper 
in the 1st Scottish Horse. He sailed 
for the Dardanelles in August and 
went through the Gallipoli campaign, 
but was invalided home suffering 
from enteric fever. After his re- 
covery he went to France, and was 
attached to the 5th Black Watch 
with the rank of lance-corporal. At 
Paschendaele Ridge on the 15th of 
November 1917 Lance-Corporal Gray 
was killed by a German sniper, and 
died instantaneouslv. He had been 
doing excellent work in the line, and 
the night before he was killed he led 
a ration party under exceedingly diffi- 
cult conditions. One of his officers 
said: — "Lance-Corporal Gray was 
very efficient in his work, and we all 
liked him for himself, quite apart 
from his good qualities as an n.c.o. 
He had latterly returned from a course 
at which he got a very good report." 



Private Duncan Milne, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of Alexander 
Milne, 12 Bakers Wynd, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-three years of age, 
and was a machineman at Stanley 
Works when he enlisted in August 
1914. He went to France shortly 
afterwards and passed through three 
years of fighting without a wound. 
On the 15th of November 1917 he was 
posted missing, and was presumed 
to have been killed on that date. 

PTE. WM. ROBERTSON, R.S. 

Private William Robertson, 13th 
Royal Scots, twenty-one years of 
age, was the youngest son of James 
Robertson, 47 West Abbey Street, 
Arbroath. On the 28th of March 
1918 he was reported missing, and 
was presumed killed on that date. 

CPL. JAMES MACLENNAN, B.W. 

Corporal James MacLennan, 
Black Watch, twenty-seven years of 
age, was the son of J. MacLennan, 
Montrose Street, Brechin, formerly of 
Arbroath. He enlisted in 1915, and 
was killed on the 14th of July 1916. 



153 



LIEUT. N. GIBSON, GORDONS. 



PTE. A. VALENTINE. CAMERONS. 





Lieutenant Norman James Gib- 
son, 4th Gordon Highlanders, 348 
Great Western Road, Aberdeen, was 
the son of William Gibson, at one 
time Caledonian Railway Goods 
Agent, Strachan Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-four years of age and 
before the war was in the office of 
his brother, Mr D. O. Gibson, stock- 
broker. Aberdeen. In August 1914 
he joined the Arbroath High School 
section of the 5th Black Watch as a 
private, and went to France with the 
first Territorial battalion to leave 
Scotland. After about a year in 
France he obtained a commission in 
the 4th Gordon Highlanders. On the 
21st of November 1917 the battalion 
was detailed to storm the village of 
Cantaing, strongly held by the Ger- 
mans, which it did with magnificent 
dash, driving the enemy completely 
out of the place, and taking nearly 
300 prisoners. In the hour of victory 
Lieutenant Gibson fell at the head of 
his men. The capture of this village 
will for ever be a glorious one in the 
annals of the battalion. Lieut. Gibson 
was a very gallant officer and a great 
inspiration to the men under him. 



Private Alexander D. Valentine, 
6th Cameron Highlanders, nineteen 
years of age, was the son of Eliza- 
beth Valentine, Meg Taylor's Land, 
Inverkeilor, near Arbroath. He was 
at the Arbroath High School when 
he was called up in March 1917. He 
served overseas, and died of wounds 
in France at No. 19 Casualty Clear- 
ing Station on the 19th of November 
of the same year. The Sister who 
nursed him wrote: — ''What a splen- 
did son you have lost — he lived so 
bravely and died so splendidly." 

L-CPL. JOHN DUNCAN, H.L.I. 

Lance-Corporal John Duncan, 1st 
Highland Light Infantry, twenty-two 
years of age, was a grandson of John 
Duncan, Muirmill Crossing, Farnell. 
He was a fireman when he joined the 
5th Dragoon Guards in September 
1914. After a year in France he was 
drafted to Mesopotamia. He was 
wounded and taken prisoner on the 
Persian Gulf in April 1917, and after 
having been for five months in the 
bands of the Turks he died in Angora 
on the 10th of September 1917. 



154 



PTE. J. GRAY, BLACK WATCH. 



GNR. ALEX. LAIRD, R.G.A. 





Private John Young Gray, 3rd 
Black Watch, 8 Stanley Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of William Gray 
and of his wife Joan Stephen, 44 
Leonard Street. He was thirty-one 
years of age and had married Mary 
Anderson, and left one son. Private 
Gray was a clicker with Samuel Fair- 
weather & Sons at Abbey Leather 
Works when he joined the 3rd Black 
Watch in November 1916. He went 
to France early in 1917, and served 
until the 22nd of November, when 
he was wounded, and died two days 
later. Private Gray was buried in 
Roequigny Road British Cemetery, 
not far from Peronne. 

SGT. J. ELDER, BLACK WATCH. 

Sergeant John Elder, Black 
Watch, was the son of James Elder, 
Millar Street, Carnoustie. He was 
twenty years of age, and was at one 
time employed in Messrs Winter's 
boot and shoe factory. Sergeant 

Elder was one of the original Car- 
noustie Territorials. He was woun- 
ded on the 26th of September 1917, 
and presumed killed on that date. 



Gunner Alexander Laird, Royal 
Garrison Artillery, 10 Union Street, 
Broughty Ferry, was the son of Alex- 
ander Laird, Muirhills, Carmyllie. 
He was twenty-six years of age, and 
had married Catherine Ireland. He 
was employed as a ploughman at 
Shank, Kingennie, when he joined the 
R.G.A. in June 1916. He went to 
France in December of that year and 
died of pneumonia, the result of gas 
poisoning, on the 25th of November 
1917, at Levenholme Hospital, Man- 
chester. He was buried in Barnhill 
Cemetery, Broughty Ferry. Private 
Laird had two brothers killed. 

PTE. GEORGE HASTINGS, S.R. 

Private George Hastings, Sco1>- 
tish Rifles (attached Royal En- 
gineers), was the son of George Hast- 
ings, 23 St Mary Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-two years of age, had 
married Jane Green, and left one 
daughter. He was employed at the 
Eadie Tube Works, Rutherglen, when 
he joined the army in March 1917. 
He was killed in action in Palestine 
on the 2nd of November 1917. 



155 



SGT. DAVID KITTO, R.A.M.C. CPL. A. NICOL, BLACK WATCH. 





Sergeant David Alexander Kitto, 
Royal Army Medical Corps, 3 Fergus 
Square Arbroath, was the son of 
Thomas Kitto and of his wife Mar- 
garet Hosie, Coral Cottage, Car- 
noustie. He was thirty-two years of 
age, and had married Isabella Scott 
Mac-lure. Before joining the army he 
was a teacher of science at HarthiM 
School, Lanarkshire. In June 191") 
he became a private in the Royal 
Army Medical Corps, and after train- 
ing for some months at the Alexandra 
Military Hospital, Cosham, and Cam- 
bridge Hospital Aldershot, he was 
promoted sergeant and sailed on the 
hospital ship Britannic from Decem- 
ber of that year until March 1916. He 
went to France in May, attached to 
the 37th Field Ambulance, and was 
killed in action by a shell on the 30th 
of November 1917. His lieutenant- 
colonel wrote : — "His good work and 
gallantry during the action were 
brought to my notice by the officer 
commanding the stretcher-bearers." 
Sergeant Kitto' s brother, Sergeant 
George Kitto, science master in the 
Harris Academy, Dundee, served in 
the Royal Flying Corps. 



Corporal Alfred J. Nicol, 5th 

Black Watch, was the son of Alex- 
ander Nicol and of his wife Annie 
Wilson, 43 Gardyne Street, Friock- 
heim. Be was twenty-four years of 
age, and was employed by Mr C. Y. 
Myles, Arbroath. Having joined the 
Territorials in 1912 he was mobilised 
on the 4th of August 1914, and 
was drafted to France in November. 
He was twice wounded, first at 
the battle of Neuve Chapelle, on the 
10th of March 1915, and again on 
the 9th of May. He then went 
scathless through two and a half 
years' service, until the 24th of 
November 1917, when he was so 
severely wounded at Paschendaele. 
Belgium, that he died the folowing 
day. He was buried at Menin Road, 
South Military Cemetery, Ypres. 

GUNNER W. SIMPSON, B.F.A. 

Gunner W. Simpson, Royal Field 
Artillery, twenty-eight years of age, 
was a native of Arbroath. Before he 
enlisted he was a farm servant at 
Old Downie, near Carnoustie. Gnr. 
Simpson was killed in action in 1916. 



156 



PTE. JAMES K. LAIRD, H.L. 



CH. OFF. HOOD, MERC. MARINE. 





Private James K. Laird, High- 
land Light Infantry, twenty-two 
years of age, was the second son of 
Alexander Laird, Muirheads, Car- 
myllie. Before joining the colours 
in June 1916, he was a ploughman 
at Tearing Home Farm. He went 
to France in October 1916, and was 
killed in action on the 29th of No- 
vember 1917. Private Laird's two 
brothers died in the war. 

L-CPL. W. ADDISON, R.S.F. 

Lance-Corporal William Addi- 
son, Eoyal Scots Fusiliers, twenty- 
nine years of age, was the son of 
William Addison, baker, 54 Keptie 
Street, Arbroath. He was a grocer, 
and enlisted shortly after the out- 
break of war. He was killed in action 
on the oth of August 1917. One of 
his officers said of him that "he died 
doing his duty, setting a fine ex- 
ample of courage to the men he com- 
manded." Lance-Corpora 1 Addison 
had three brothers with the forces, 
one, Sergeant Alexander Addison, of 
the Gordons, having been awarded 
the Military Medal. 



Chief Officer George W. Hood, 
Mercantile Marine, 14 Merryland 
Street Govan, was the son of James 
Hood, Haxdresser, and of his wife 
Helen Christie, Bank Street, Ar- 
broath. He was forty-three years 
of age, and married Jemima S. Shaw. 
He went to sea in 1890, and after 
having served his apprenticeship in 
a sailing vessel and passed all his ex- 
aminations he sailed as chief officer 
in a steamship line. Chief Officer 
Hood was on Admiralty service dur- 
ing the war, and for three years 
he had many encounters with sub- 
marines, having been chased twice in 
one day in the Mediterranean, and 
he gained a reward for being the first 
to sight the U-boat. The following 
voyage, on the s.s. Livonia, of Lon- 
don, on the way out to Spain, the 
vessel was torpedoed, but was able 
to put into Brest for repairs, and the 
voyage was continued. But the gal- 
lant ship and most of her crew were 
fated never to reach home. While on 
her way to the T^ne she was tor- 
pedoed off Falmouth on the 3rd of 
Deceimber 1917, and Chief Officer 
Hond went down with his ship. 



157 



CAPT. HUNTER, LONDON SCOT. 



PTE. ALEX. PATERSON, A.O.C. 



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Captain Hope Hunter, 14th Lon- 
don Regiment (London Scottish), 
Rosebrae, Arbroath, was the fourth 
son of George Neisli Hunter and of 
his wife Isabella Cloudesley, Bon- 
nington, Arhirlot. He was forty-two 
years of age, unmarried, and when 
war was declared was inspecting en- 
gineer for the London Hydraulic- 
Power Co. Captain Hunter had 
served in the London Scottish from 
1898, and was awarded the Territorial 
Long Service Medal in 1910. He was 
for many years one of the best shots 
in his regiment, and gained many 
shooting distinctions at Bisley and 
elsewhere. He had been through the 
South African campaign as a mem- 
ber of the Volunteer Coy., 2nd Gor- 
don Highlanders, and received the 
Queen's South African Medal with 
four clasps. In August 1914, al- 
though he had resigned as a Terri- 
torial, he at once gave up his civil 
post and enlisted. He refused a 
commission, and for a time was 
armourer-sergeant and musketry-in- 
structor. Later he got a commission 
and served in France, Macedonia, 
Egypt, and Palestine. He broke 



Private Alexander F. Paterson, 
Army Ordnance Corps, formerly of 
.37 Lordburn, Arbroath, was the son 
of David Paterson, Luthermuir. He 
was thirty-three years of age, and 
had married Emily Scott Milne. He 
had gone to India, and was a tailor's 
cutter in Mandalay. He enlisted in 
February 1917, and died of dysen- 
tery in Mesopotamia. 



down through overwork at Enab, 
near Jerusalem, and was taken to 
No. 24 Stationary Hospital, El Kan- 
tara, where he died on arrival, on the 
3rd of December 1917. His command- 
ing officer, writing of him, said: — 
"He died in soldier's harness, lie was 
supervising and controlling the Bri- 
gade water supply — a very arduous 
task while marching through water- 
less tracts. He never failed us, but 
the strain was great and he stuck to 
his post too long." The adjutant 
wrote: — "He died as the result of 
extraordinary devotion to duty ; he 
never spared himself, but worked 
himself to death." Captain Hunter's 
brother, William, also served. 



158 



PTE. MACGREGOR. SEAFORTHS. 



A.B. THOMAS STRACHAN, R.N. 





Private Ben Macgeegob, 7th Sea- 
forth Highlanders, 13 Hamilton 
Green, Arbroath, was the son of Tom 
Maegregor, superintendent of the Ar- 
broath Eastern Cemetery, and of his 
wife Mary Nicol, Brechin Road. He 
was twenty-three years of age, and 
had married a daughter of John Mit- 
chell Greenock, and left one daugh- 
ter. He was a hairdresser at Hamil- 
ton Green when he enlisted in Decem- 
ber 1916 in the Gordons. He was 
afterwards transferred, and went to 
France in April 1917. On the 30th of 
December of that year he was killed 
in action near Ypr.es and buried near 
the place where he fell. His officer 
wrote: "His death is deeply regret- 
ted, as he was remarkably well liked 
throughout the company; his cheery 
presence was of great help to us." 

PTE. ALEX. KINLOCH, H.L.I. 

Private Alexander Kinloch, 
Highland Light Infantry, nineteen 
years of age, was the son of George 
Kinloch, Monifieth, formerly of Ar- 
broath. He was killed in France on 
the 2nd of December 1917. 



Able-Seaman Thomas Dall Stra- 
chan, Royal Naval Division, nineteen 
years of age, was the son of Thomas 
Dall Strachan, 56a High Street, Ar- 
broath. He was serving his appren- 
ticeship as a moulder at Dens Iron 
Works when he was called up on 
attaining his eighteenth birthday, in 
October 1916. He became a private 
in the Highland Cyclist Battalion at 
Cupar-Fife, and, after serving three 
months, was transferred to the 
R.N.D. He went to France in June 
1917, and was with the Drake Bat- 
talion, 189th Brigade, until the 30th 
of December 1917. On that day he 
was in the trenches at Cambria when 
a shell exploded and killed him. He 
was buried at Villers-Plouch. 

PTE. ALEX. MTDDLETON, N.Z. 

Private Alexander Middleton, 
Nelson Company, New Zealand Ex- 
peditionary Force, was the son of 
John Middleton, Gardyne Street, 
Friockheim. He left a lucrative 
position to fight for his country, and 
he was killed in action in France on 
the 3rd of December 1917. 



159 



PTE. PATERSON, BLACK WATCH. 



L-CPL. JAMES BOYLE, H.L.I. 





Private James Cbaig Paterson, 
14th Black Watch, was the son of 
Daniel Paterson and of his wife Agnes 
Warnock, Letham Mains, Arbroath. 
He was thirty-four years of age and 
had married Annie Kydd Mitchell, 
and left four daughters, who after his 
death removed to 50 Fergus Square. 
He conducted the dairy part of the 
business at his father's farm before 
joining the army in June 1916. He 
served overseas, and after the taking 
of Zeitun Ridge, when the 14th Black 
Watch (F. &F.'&) led the advance to 
the village of Zeitunia. and were 
under severe artillery and machine 
gun fire, he was amongst those struck 
down. He was in the act of carrying 
a wounded comrade to shelter when 
he was hit by a bullet in the spine, 
and although taken by the stretcher- 
bearers to the medical aid post, where 
he received prompt attention, he died 
in a few hours, on the 27th of Decem- 
ber 1917. He was buried with some 
of his comrades on the slope of a hill 
within sight of the distant spires of 
Jerusalem and the Mount of Olives. 
After he was hit Private Paterson 
asked a friend in the same Lewis 



Lance-Corporal James Boyle, 
Highland Light Infantry, was the 
eldest son of David Boyle, mill over- 
seer, 27 Elliot Street, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-four years of age, and 
was employed with Messrs Francis 
Webster & Sons, Netherward Works. 
He joined the 18th Royal Scots in 
November 1915, and was drafted into 
the Highland Light Infantry on 
going overseas. After serving for 
eighteen months in France he was 
killed in action at Cambrai, on the 
26th of November 1917. 



Gun Section to write home for him, 
and to send a parcel of souvenirs 
from Jerusalem which he had ready 
for posting, and which he had been 
so pleased to secure for his wife and 
children. This comrade, writing, 
said: — "Hour husband is very much 
mourned and missed by the whole of 
the company, and especially by No. 
1 Platoon. He was much esteemed 
by all ranks. His cheery disposition 
made everyone who came in contact 
with him take a more than ordinary 
liking to him." 



160 



A.B. JAMES HARDIE, R.N.D. 



A.B. THOMAS RAMSAY, R.N.D. 





Able-Seaman James Hardie, Royal 
Naval Division, Howe Battalion, 
twenty years of age, was the son of 
William Bardie, 23 Abbot Street, Ar- 
broath. Before joining the R.N.D., 
in November 1915, he was employed 
in the reeling department of Stanley 
Works. He was in the Howe Bat- 
talion and while under very heavy fire 
at Cambrai he got shell shock. He 
was taken down the line to the 
doctor, but while in sick bay he was 
struck by a shell and killed on the 
30th of Deoember 1917. 

DRIVER FRED. PRINGLE, R.F.A. 

Driver Fred. Pringle, Royal 
Field Artillery, twenty-five years of 
age, was the son of John Pringle, 
Tarry Mill near Arbroath. He was 
employed at Alma Works when he 
joined the army in 1914. He was 
killed by shrapnel on the 3rd of 
December 1917 and was buried in the 
British Military Cemetery at Rubes- 
court. Captain Meikle said of him : 
" Fred was the life of the Battery 
and a great favourite with both 
officers and men." 



Able-Seaman Thomas R. Ramsay, 
Royal Naval Division, twenty-two 
years of age, was the son of James 
Ramsay, Mayview Cottage, West- 
haven, Carnoustie. Before joining 
the navy in January 1915 he was a 
butcher with Mr Thomas Duncan, 
High Street, Carnoustie. He served 
at the Dardanelles, Egypt, and 
France, and was posted missing at 
Cambrai on the 31st of December 
1917. He was presumed to have died 
on that date. His commanding officer 
wrote: — " He fought most bravely, 
and added fresh laurels to the name 
of the Hood Battalion." 



PTE. JAS. BROWN, SEAFORTHS. 

Private James Brown, 5th Sea- 
forth Highlanders, twenty-four years 
of age, was the son of David Brown, 
a ploughman at Boghead, Inverkeilor, 
near Arbroath. He married Mary 
Edwards, Braehead, Lunan, and was 
a farm servant at Arbikie when he 
joined the army in July 1916. He 
went to France in March 1917, and 
was killed in action at Vimy Ridge 
on the 16th of May. 



161 



PTE. W. S. COUTTS, BEDFORDS. 



STAFF-SURGEON MILL. R.N.V.R. 





Private William S. Coutts, 6th 
Bedfords, twenty years of age, was 
the only son of Alex, and Marion 
Coutts, 4 Lochland Street, Arbroath. 
Before joining the army, in October 
1916, he was an apprentice mechanic 
at the Baltic Works. He was a pro- 
minent junior footballer, having 
played for St Thomas H.H., Park- 
head, and Violet. He also played for 
his battalion, and won the welter- 
weight championship for boxing. In 
May 1917 he went to France, and 
served there as a runner. He was 
killed on his twentieth birthday, the 
31st of December 1917. In letters 
from his captain and chaplain , he. re- 
ceived the highest praise as a brave 
man and one of the most efficient and 
obliging soldiers of his battalion. 

PTE. G. REID, BLACK WATCH. 

Private George Reid, 5th Black 
Watch, twenty years of age, was the 
son of James Reid, Montrose. He 
was a farm servant at Windyhills, 
near Arbroath. While under train- 
ing he took ill and died of pneumonia 
in Ayrshire in 1917. 



Staff-Surgeon George Robertson 
Mill, M.D., Royal Naval Volunteer 
Reserve, Ballahale Park Road, 
Birkenhead, was the son of James 
Oilers Mill and of his wife Helena 
Valentine Finlayson, London, and 
nephew of Miss Finlayson, 32 Sidney 
Street, Arbroath, with whom he lived 
from childhood. He was thirty- 

seven years of age, and had married 
Ada M. Ashton, Birkenhead. He had 
a distinguished career both at the 
Arbroath High School and Edinburgh 
University, and, after a voyage to 
Japan and some time in a Liverpool 
hospital, he settled in Birkenhead. 
When war broke out he joined the 
Naval Division, to which he was 
attached. He was six months at 
the Dardanelles, where he did most 
strenuous work. He had been 

appointed Staff-Surgeon, and on 
his return to Britain in 1917 he was 
given a shore appointment as a naval 
surgeon for the Birkenhead district. 
The following week, however, he be- 
came seriously ill and died on the 
11th of February 1918. He was 

buried at Flaybrick-hill Cemetery, 
Birkenhead, with full naval honours. 



162 



PTE. HENDRY. BLACK WATCH. 2nd-ENG. GILL. MERC. MARINE. 





Private Charles Hendry, 5th 
Black Watch, son of Charles Hendry, 
16 North Grimsby, Arbroath, was 
employed at the Public Shambles 
when he enlisted in August 1914. 
Although only fifteen, he was accep- 
ted on account of his physique. Dur- 
ing the battle of the Somme he was 
buried by a shell explosion and sus- 
tained so severe a shock that he was 
eventually discharged in July 1917. 
He never recovered from his injuries 
and died in the Arbroath Infirmary 
on the 16th of February 1918. He 
was buried in the Eastern Cemetery, 
with full military honours. 

PTE. WILLIAM SIMPSON, A.A.C. 

Private William Simpson, Ameri- 
can Aviation Corps, twenty-four 
years of age, was a son of John W. 
Simpson, Ashgrove Farm, Montana, 
and grandson of John Simpson, 21 
Bank Street, Arbroath. He joined 
the army when America entered the 
war, but took ill when in training 
and died at Waco, Texas, in Feb- 
ruary 1918, from pneumonia follow- 
ing influenza. 



Second - Engineer Alexander 
Gill, s.s. Marconi, 15 Culloden Road, 
Arbroath, was the son of Henry Gill 
and of his wife Gilbertina Mason, 
Strathlogie, Ponderlaw. He was 
twenty-eight years of age and un- 
married. He served his apprentice- 
ship as an engineer at Dens Iron 
Works, and afterwards became a 
marine engineer. A year before the 
war he joined the service of Messrs 
Lamport & Holt, Liverpool, and it 
was on one of their boats, the s.s. 
Marconi, that he lost his life when it 
was torpedoed off Gibraltar on the 
27th of February 1917. He and the 
seventh engineer were on duty at the 
time, and both were killed. Engineer 
Gill was buried at Gibraltar. 

SIGN. J. SCOTT, SEAFORTHS. 

Signaller J. Scott, Seaforths, 
Mary well, Arbroath, twenty-seven 
years of age, was a grocer with 
Mr Doig, Guthrie Port, and for 
a time was employed with Messrs 
Keith & Blackman. He had been 
about a year in France when he was 
killed in action. 



163 



PTE. JAMES DRURY, A. & S. H. TROOPER CHRISTIE. F. & F. Y. 





Private James Brown Drury, 

8th Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, 51st Division, 303 Holmlea 
Road, Cathcart, Glasgow, was the 
son of William Smith Drury (for- 
merly of Arbroath) and of his wife 
Georgina Brown, 98 Gumming Drive, 
Mount Florida, Glasgow. He was 
thirty-five years of age and had 
married Annie Keir Wilson, and left 
a son and a daughter. Before enlist- 
ing, in June 1916, he had been a 
traveller with Messrs John Lees & 
Co., bootmakers, Maybole. After 
training, he went to France in 
October 1916, and was a despatch- 
carrier, afterwards taking part in en- 
gagements in Belgium and France. 
He was severely wounded by a shell 
and, after five days at a casualty 
clearing station, he was taken to No. 
10 General Hospital, Rouen, where 
he died the next day, on the 19th of 
February 1918. His lieutenant 
wrote saying that Drury had been in 
his platoon sine* he himself joined, 
that he was one of the best men he 
had, always cheerful, a general 
favourite with his comrades, and did 
his duty well at all times. 



Trooper Andrew Douglas 
Christik, Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, 
twenty-one years of age, was the son 
of Andrew Christie and of his wife 
Mary A. Taylor, 1 Hayswell Road, 
Arbroath. He was a draughtsman 
at Dens Iron Works. He had joined 
the Territorials in November 1913, 
and on the outbreak of war volun- 
teered for service abroad. He was 
on the eve of going to Gallipoli when 
his health broke down, and he died 
on the 28th of February 1918 from 
illness contracted while on service. 

PTE. KELLY, QUEEN'S LON. RGT. 

Private Peter Kelly, Queen's 
London Regiment, twenty-five years 
of age, was the son of John Kelly, 
37 Lordburn, Arbroath. He was a 
grocer with the High Street Co- 
operative Society when he joined the 
R.A.M.C. In 1916 he applied for 
service abroad, and was transferred. 
He served in France, Egypt, and 
Salonica, and was killed in action in 
Palestine on the 9th of March 1918. 
Private Kelly had three brothers who 
had also volunteered for service. 



164 



CPL. ALLAN. M.M., CANADIANS. 



A.B. JOHN SWORD HARRIS. R.N. 





Corporal James Allan, M.M., 
C. Company, 195th Overseas Bat- 
talion, Regina, Lampman, Sas- 
katchewan, Canada, was the son of 
James and Barbara Allan, Bolshan, 
Friockheim. He was twenty-six 
years of age and was a ploughman at 
Lampman when he joined the colours 
as a private in 1916. He came over- 
seas with his battalion, and was pro- 
moted to the rank of corporal, and 
was awarded the Military Medal. 
After serving for two years he took 
part in the heavy fighting during the 
first part of the German advance, 
and was killed in action on the 12th 
of March 1918. Corporal Allan's 

brother, Private Alexander Allan, 
also served with the Forces, and had 
fallen in the previous August. 

PTE. A. THOMS, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Alexander Thoms, 7th 
Black Watch, twenty-three years of 
age, was the son of Alexander Thoms, 
12 Abbey Path, Arbroath. He was 
reported missing on the 9th of April 
1918, and was presumed to have 
been killed at that time. 



Able-Seaman John Sword Harris, 
Royal Navy, eighteen years of 
age, was the youngest son of Mrs 
J. Harris, 48£ Cairnie Street, Ar- 
broath. He was a clerk in the Ar- 
broath branch of the Bank of Scot- 
land. He joined the navy in June 
1917, and was serving as a gunner 
on H.M.S. Tithonus when that 
vessel was torpedoed on the 28th cf 
March 1918 off the Firth of Forth. 
No trace was ever found of Gunner 
Harris, and he was presumed to 
have been drowned. 

LIEUT. W. FARQUHAR, R.F.A. 

Lieutenant W. R. Farquhar, 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son of 
John Farquhar, Kimberley, formerly 
of Arbroath, and cousin of Rowland 
C. Farquhar, Hill Place, Arbroath. 
He served as captain through the 
South-West African campaign, and 
then came to Europe and joined the 
R.F.A. , in which he saw much service 
in France and Flanders. He died 
from wounds and shell shook at Queen 
Alexandra's Military Hospital, Lon- 
don, on the 23rd of March 1918. 



165 



C.S.M. J.S. FRASER, GORDONS. 



PTE. A. WATT. BLACK WATCH. 





Company Sergeant-Major John 
S. Fraser, 4th Gordon Highlanders, 
Andson Street, Friockheim, was the 
son of William Fraser and of his wife 
Elizabeth Duguid, Brechin. He was 
thirty-seven years of age, and had 
married Ida Edwards, Brechin, and 
left three sons. Sergeant-Major 
Fraser was a slater in Friockheim, 
and was a most useful member of the 
Parish Council. He was also a scout- 
master, and was secretary to the 
Masonic Lodge. He had long been 
connected with the Volunteers and 
Territorials, and held the long service 
medal. He was mobilised in August 
1914 as a sergeant in the 5th Black 
Watch, and appointed to instructor 
duty. He went to France with the 
Gordons, and was acting C.S.M. 
when he was killed at Hermies, near 
Bourbon Wood, on the 22nd of March 
1918. His CO. said:— "He was a 
good and faithful soldier, and a 
splendid leader of men." The chap- 
lain wrote : — ' ' He was one of the 
best men we had, and a man who 
could ill be spared. His work out 
here was excellent, and officers and 
men were greatly attached to him." 



Private Alexander Watt, 6th 
Black Watch, was the son of Charles 
and Jemima Watt, West Balmirmer, 
near Arbroath. He was a farm ser- 
vant in the Letham district when he 
joined the colours in September 1914 
at the age of seventeen. He was 
posted missing on the 21st of March 
1918, and was reported to have died 
of wounds on the field on that date. 

L-CPL. W. CROFTS. CANADIANS. 

Lance-Corporal William Boag 

Crofts, Canadian Seaforth High- 
landers, was the only son of William 
Crofts, 6 Gowan Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-nine years of age, and 
unmarried. At one time he was a 
baker with Messrs Grant & Laing, 
but went to America and was em- 
ployed in a shipyard in San Francisco. 
He joined the Canadian Seaforth 
Highlanders as a private in June 
1916, and came over to France, where 
he served for eight months. LancE- 
Corporal Crofts was killed in action 
on the 29th of September whilst 
going into Cambrai on the last day 
of the attack. 



166 



PTE. G. FITZCHARLES, R.S. 



L-CPL. D. RITCHIE, E. YORKS. 





Private George Fitzcharles, 3rd 
Royal Scots, 33 Park Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of Michael Fitz- 
charles, Guthrie Port. He was 
thirty-two years of age, had married 
Isabella Hutton and left a son and a 
daughter. He was a furniture dealer 
with his father when he joined the 
army in July 1915. He went to 
France in October, and was invalided 
home the following year suffering 
from shell shock and wounds. In 
1917 he returned to France, was 
slightly wounded several times, and 
was killed in action on the 27th of 
March 1918. His platoon officer 
wrote of him : — ' ' He was a good sol- 
dier. We feel his loss very much." 



Lance-Corporal David Ritchie, 
East Yorkshire Regiment, Wyn- 
grove, Carnoustie, was the son rf- 
George Ritchie, 64 Cairnie Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-eight 
years of age, and had married Isa- 
bella Mathers. He was a baker m 
Fargo, U.S.A., and came over from 
America and enlisted as a private n 
the Army Service Corps in November 
1915. He was sent across to France, 
and served there for eighteen months, 
after which he was transferred to the 
East Yorkshire Regiment. Lance- 
Corporal Ritchie was killed in action 
on the 21st of March 1918. His 
elder brother, Private George Ritchie, 
fell at the battle of Loos. 



SAPR. ROBERTSON, CANADIANS. 

Sapper Ralph Robertson, Cana- 
dians, was the son of Mrs Robertson, 
Thistlebank, Carnoustie. He was 
married, and left two children. He 
was with Messrs Anderson & Co., 
Ltd., and afterwards went to Canada. 
He had been in France seven weeks 
when he was killed by the bursting of 
a shell in his dug-out. 



PTE. J. S. ANDERSON, B.W. 

Private James S. Anderson, 7th 
Black Watch, was the son of J. 
Anderson, 25 West Abbey Street, Ar- 
broath. He married Jemima Pattullo, 
32 Ernest Street, and was a clerk in 
the employment of Messrs Wordie & 
Co. when he joined the army. He died 
of wounds in the Field Hospital at 
Gaucourt on the 28th of March 1918. 



167 



2nd-MEUT. J. LAIRD. K.R.R. 



L.CPL. MOORE, BLACK WATCH. 





Second-Lieutenant James Dun- 
can Laird, King's Royal Rifle Corps, 
was the elder son of James Duncan 
Laird and of his wife Agnes Young 
Hutcheon, Rosebrae Farm, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-three years of age, 
and had married Ruth Maclaren. 
He was an engineer at the Electric- 
Works at Broughty Ferry and Dun- 
dee. In February 1916 he joined the 
Royal Engineers as a sapper, and 
served at Clipstone, London, Llan- 
dudno, and Conway. Afterwards he 
was drafted to Kimmel Park, Rhyl, 
in September 1917 was commissioned 
to the King's Royal Rifle Corps, and 
went across to France with them in 
October. He served there until the 
great German advance in the spring 
of 1918. His platoon at that time 
was near Nesle, holding a position in 
front of a village when he was com- 
pelled to withdraw owing to the heavy 
shelling and the great number of the 
enemy attacking. Lieutenant Laird 
was struck in the body by a piece of 
shrapnel. His companions could 
do little for him, and he died at 
Roye-le-petit on the 24th of 
March 1918. 



Lance-Corporal Robert Valen- 
tine Moore, 5th Black Watch, 
twenty-two years of age, was the son 
of George Moore, 9 Lochland Street, 
Arbroath. He was a plumber with 
Messrs John C. Lindsay & Son, when 
he enlisted in February 1916. He 
took part in five battles, and was 
made a lance-corporal on the field. 
He was gassed in October 1917, and 
was reported wounded and missing on 
the 21st of March 1918. The chaplain 
wrote : — ' As the Germans were 
advancing, and he could not walk, he 
had to be left behind. We hope that 
he is a prisoner." This hope, how- 
ever, was not realised, as no further 
information as to L-Cpl. Moore's 
fate was received. 

CHIEF-ENGINEER JAS. MILL. 

Chief-Engineer James Mill, Mer- 
cantile Marine Service, 73 Ladyloan, 
Arbroath, was the son of William 
Mill, lighthouse-keeper. He was 
thirty-nine years of age when the 
vessel on which he was serving was 
torpedoed, and he was drowned on 
the 20th of April 1918. 



168 



GNR. W. SPARK, M.M.. R.F.A. 



PTE. D. A. DOYLE, CAMERONS. 





Gunner William M'Gregor 
Spark, M.M., Royal Field Artillery, 
was the third son of James Spark and 
of his wife Ann M'Gregor, 20 Helen 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
five years of age^ and had served his 
apprenticeship with the firm of 
Messrs Douglas Fraser & Sons, Ltd., 
and for a number of years had been a 
moulder with Messrs Weir, in Glas- 
gow. He joined the Royal Field 
Artillery in Glasgow in September 
1914. He distinguished himself by 
his gallantry in restoring communica- 
tion under heavy shell fire, and was 
awarded the Military Medal. Two 
years later Gunner Spark was killed 
in action, on the 22nd of March 1918, 
near Veranges. 

SERGT. WM. HARDIE, D.G. 

Sergeant William Hardie, 2nd 
Dragoon Guards, forty-seven years 
of age ; was the son of Alexander 
Hardie and of his wife Jemima 
Davidson, West End, Friockheim. He 
was working in Cheshire when he 
enlisted in 1914, and he was killed 
on the 25th of March 1918. 



Private David A. Doyle, 5th 

Cameron Highlanders, was the 
youngest son of Mrs Arthur Doyle, 
40 Maule Street. Arbroath. He was 
nineteen years of age, and was a 
textile worker with Messrs Webster 
Brothers, Stanley Works. He joined 
the army in March 1917 as a private 
in the Lovat Scouts, but was after- 
wards transferred to the 5th Cameron 
Highlanders, and was drafted to 
France in October. Private Doyle 
was killecf in action on the 23rd of 
March 1918 in the heavy fighting on 
the western front during the last 
great German offensive. His brother, 
Private Richard Doyle, Black Watch, 
died of wounds in October 1916. 

PTE. WATSON, BLACK WATCH. 

Private John Watson, 7th Black 
Watch, twenty years of age, was the 
son of Mrs James Watson, 3 Rose- 
bank, Arbroath. He was an oiler at 
Nursery Mills, and joined the army 
in 1917. He was reported missing 
from the 21st-26th of March 1918, 
and was presumed to have died r. 
that time. 



169 



2nd-LIEUT. J. CUMMING, R.F.C. 



PTE. D. C. ORR. BLACK WATCH. 





Second-Lieutenant James Leslie 
Cumming, Royal Flying Corps, nine- 
teen years of age, was the elder son 
of Edwin C. Cumming and of his wife 
Mary Fairweather, Cardean, Ar- 
broath. He was acquiring a business 
training in the office of Messrs 
Stewart Bros., manufacturers, Dun- 
dee, when he joined the Highland 
Light Infantry as a private in Feb- 
ruary 1917. He got a commission in 
the Royal Flying Corps in October 
of that year, and passed as pilot in 
February 1918. He had a promising 
career before him, both in the Flying 
Corps and as a business man, but it 
was suddenly cut short by a flying 
accident at Winchester, when he was 
killed on the 24th of March 1918. 
Lieutenant Cumming was buried in 
the Arbroath Eastern Cemetery with 
full military honours. 

PTE. D. MORTIMER GORDONS. 

Private David H. Mortimer, 
Gordon Highlanders, son of Mrs 
Mortimer, Barry Road, Carnoustie, 
was a shoemaker with Messrs 
Scroggie Bros. He was killed in 1918. 



Private David C. Orr, 8th Black 
Watch, was the only son of Hugh 
Orr and brother of Mrs Davidson, 32 
St Vigeans Road, Arbroath, with 
whom he lived. He was nineteen 
years of age, and was employed as a 
labourer with Messrs Keith & Black- 
man Co., Ltd. He enlisted in 
October 1916, and was sent across to 
Fiance in the following September. 
He served there for six months, and 
was killed in action during the heavy 
fighting on the western front on the 
23rd of March 1918. 

PTE. THOMSON, S. WALES BDS. 

Private Roy Bartlett Thomson, 

South Wales Borderers, twenty-one 
years of age, was the son of John 
Thomson and of his wife, Mina 
Willocks, 10 Gardyne Street, Frioek- 
heim, and grandson of William Wil- 
locks. Blindloch, Arbroath. He was 
a draughtsman with Messrs Douglas 
Eraser & Sons, Arbroath, when he 
enlisted in 1916 in the A.S.C., being 
afterwards transferred. He served 
for fifteen months in France, and was 
killed on the 30th of August 1918. 



170 



TR. BROWN. DRAGOON GUARDS 



PTE. THOMAS PORTER. H.L.I. 





Trooper William Gardiner 
Brown, 6th Dragoon Guards, was 
the youngest son of Frank Brown 
and of his wife Annie Gardiner, 
Elliot, near Arbroath. He was 
twenty-eight years of age, and before 
enlisting in April 1917 was at Kelly 
Bleachfield. He enlisted in the 4th 
Dragoon Guards, and trained at 
Tydworth Camp, London. He 

crossed the Channel to France in 
December 1917, and on his arrival 
at the base was transferred to the 
6th Dragoon Guards. He saw a good 
deal of stiff fighting in the opening 
weeks of 1918, and on the 24th of 
March he was severely wounded, and 
died at 46 Casualty Clearing Station 
without regaining consciousness. He 
was buried by the chaplain in a 
" peaceful British Cemetery" at 
Noyon. 



STOKER HAMILTON OGG, 
Stoker Hamilton Ogg, 



R.N. 



Royal 

Navy, was the son of J. L. Ogg, 19 
Millgate Loan, Arbroath. He was 
drowned at sea, the vessel on which he 
served having been torpedoed. 



Private Thomas Porter, 12th 
Highland Light Infantry, was the 
nephew and adopted son of David 
Donaldson, 18 Fergus Square, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-four years 
of age, and was a faxm servant at 
West Grange of Cbnon when he en- 
listed in July 1915. After three 
months' training he was sent to 
France, where he served for two and 
a half years. Private Porter was 
twice mentioned in despatches, in 
May, amd again in October 1917. He 
was killed in action on the 25th of 
March 1918 during a fierce conflict 
against tremendous odds. His com- 
manding officer wrote: — "At all 
times I have found him a fearless, 
courageous, and dutiful soldier, and 
an example to many." 

MAJOR ROBERTSON, M.C.,R.F.A. 

Major Herbert Robertson, M.C., 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son of 
the Rev. John Robertson, at one 
time minister of the East Free 
Church, Arbroath. Major Robertson 
was awarded the Military Cross. He 
died of wounds in May 1918. 



m 



CAPT. BLACK, M.C., SUFFOLKS. 



PTE. J. BRAND, ROYAL SCOTS. 





Captain David Smith Black, 
M.O., 7th Suffolk Regiment, twenty- 
nine years of age, was the son of 
David Black and of his wife Alexina 
Smith, 127 Greenheads Street, Glas- 
gow, and grandson of George Smith, 
Brechin Road, Arbroath. He was 
in the Civil Service when he enlisted 
in October 1914 in the 17th H.L.J. 
Later he was transferred, being 
gazetted second-lieutenant in March 
1917. In August he gained the Mili- 
tary Cross and his captaincy. The 
' ' Gazette ' ' notice was : — ' ' For con- 
spicuous gallantry and devotion to 
duty during a raid on the enemy's 
position. Finding that the first 
objective required but little mop- 
ping up, he led the second wave to 
the second objective, where many 
of the enemy were killed and 
wounded. He then withdrew his 
company in good order, after taking 
a number of prisoners, and, having 
re-organised them under heavy shell 
fire, took over a portion of the front 
line. Throughout he displayed great 
pluck and initiative." Captain 

Black was killed in action at Albert 
on the 27th of March 1918. 



Private Joseph Brand, Royal 
Scots, 77 Lochland Street, Arbroath, 
was the son of Joseph Brand and of 
his wife, Jane Johnstone, 68 Howard 
Street. He married Margaret Ann 
Steven, and left one daughter. He 
was thirty-three years of age, and 
was a baker with the Equitable Co- 
operative Society. He was a well- 
known figure on the bowling greens, 
being champion of the Abbey green 
in 1911, and winner of the Captain 
Smith Cup in 1915. He attested 
under the Derby scheme, and joined 
the army in November 1916. He 
served in the Army Service Corps for 
a year as a baker, being afterwards 
transferred. After training in Edin- 
burgh, he left for the western front 
in January 1918, and fell fighting 
during the retreat on the 26th of 
March. He was buried in the mili- 
tary cemetery at Wailly. 

PTE. JOHN RAMSAY. GORDONS. 

Private John Ramsay, Gordon 
Highlanders, Lindsay Street, who 
was a reedmaker in Arbroath, was 
killed in action in 1918. 



172 



CAPT. ALAN D. BLACK. R.E. L-CPL. NORMAN LAWTON, N.Z. 





Captain Alan D. Black, 1st City 
of Dundee Royal Engineers (T.F.), 
Bellefield Avenue, Dundee, was the 
son of David Black, Petrograd, and 
of Mrs Black, Dundee, formerly of 
Arbroath. He was twenty-four years 
of age, had married Marjorie Hale, 
and left one daughter. Captain Black 
was a textile engineer, and had been 
employed for some time in the West- 
burn Foundry, Arbroath, but was 
afterwards in Blackness Foundry. 
Dundee. In 1906 he joined the Terri- 
torial Force as a sapper, and got his 
commission before the war. He was 
mobilised on the outbreak of hos- 
tilities, and went to France in the 
spring of 1915. He went through 
much stiff fighting during his service 
there until, on the 27th of May 1918,. 
he was killed instantaneously by 
machine gun fire at Germicourt, near 
Berry-au-Bac, while pluckilv leading 
his men over a trench. His Com- 
manding Officer, writing of him. 
said: — "His loss will be keenly 
felt by the whole company, especially 
by myself, as I have always found 
him so ready to give me any help and 
assistance possible." 



Lance-Corporal Norman Lawton, 
15th Reinforcements, New Zealand 
Force, Auckland, was the son of 
Joseph Lawton, Union Cottage, 
Friockheim. He was thirty-six years 
of age, and was a gardener at Letham 
Grange before going to New Zealand. 
He had been for three years a land- 
scape gardener there when he joined 
up in May 1916. He came to England 
in October with the 4th New Zealand 
Rifle Brigade. The following month 
he went to France. He was wounded 
in the spring, was again wounded on 
the 28th of March 1918, and he 
died the following day in a dressing 
station at Beaussart, where he was 
buried. 

SGT. URQUHART. ROYAL SCOTS. 

Sergeant Harry Urqtjhart, Royal 
Scots, twenty-three years of age, 
was the son of George Urquhart, 
ploughman at Hatton Mill, Kinnell. 
He was a farm servant in the 
district when he enlisted as a 
private. In March 1918 he was re- 
ported missing and was presumed 
killed in action. 



173 



CAPT. J. 0. G. STUART, M.C.B.W. 



PTE. OGILVIE, BLACK WATCH. 



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Captain James Ogilvie Graxt 
Stuart, M.C., 5th Black Watch, was 
the son of Robert Stuart, Inspector 
of Poor, and of liis wife Janet 
Steve Reid, 19 Dalhousie Place, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-five 
years of age and was on the foreign 
training staff of the Chartered Bank 
of India, Australia and China, Lon- 
don. He served two years with the 
Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, but 
joined the London Scottish in 1912 
and went to France in 1914 as a cor- 
poral in the 1st Battalion. He was 
promoted sergeant early in 1915 and 
later was commissioned to the 5th 
Black Watch. He was soon pro- 
moted lieutenant and got his cap- 
taincy in July 1917. On the same 
day he was awarded the Military 
Cross at St Julien for conspicuous 
gallantry and devotion to duty while 
commanding his company in an 
attack. Captain Stuart was killed 
by a sniper while making a per- 
sonal reconnaisance at Hangar Wood, 
Villers Bretonneaux during a retreat 
from St Quentin on the 30th of 
March 1918 whilst in command of his 
battalion. The chaplain wrote: — 




Private George Ogilvie, 11th 
Black Watch, was the son of George 
Ogilvie and of his wife, Jane Begg, 
2'A Church Street, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-seven years of age, and was a 
labourer at Dens Iron Works when he 
enlisted in August 1915. He went to 
France early in 1916, hut two months 
later was invalided home suffering 
from trench feet. He returned to 
France and was posted as missing on 
the 24th of March 1918, and was pre- 
sumed to have been killed on that 
date. 



" His death is an irreparable loss to 
the battalion. He was a splendid 
company commander, and when he 
was called on under very difficult cir- 
cumstances to take command of the 
battalion, he rose to the occasion and 
led the men magnificently. We all 
loved " Jogs," as he was familiarly 
called, he was a favourite with every- 
body, and his men would have done 
anything for him." His colonel 
wrote: — "He was one of the finest 
officers I have ever had under me, 
and I trusted him absolutely." 



174 



PTE. CARRIE. LON. SCOTTISH. 



PTE, MILNE, BLACK WATCH. 





Private Frederick "William 
Carrie, 1st London Scottish, twenty 
years of age, was the son of George 
Carrie, Master of the House of In- 
dustry Douglas, Isle of Man, for- 
merly of Arbroath. He joined the 
Civil Service, and was attached to 
the Admiralty. Private Carrie 
joined the London Scottish in Feb- 
ruary 1917, and was sent to France 
four months later. He was killed in 
action on the 28th of March 1918. 
His CO. wrote: — " He was a keen 
and capable young soldier. He was 
in the bombing section and was in 
a dug-out in a communication trench 
connecting the front with the sup- 
port trenches. The Germans drove 
right past this point, thereby im- 
prisoning his section. By a counter- 
attack the Germans were driven out 
again , the bombing section being re- 
leased, and they carried on till a 
block was established. At this point 
the section was withdrawn for a short 
rest. It was necessary for the section 
to take over the block again, and 
while holding this a shell killed six 
of them. All were buried in the block, 
which lies in the Oppy sector." 



Private George Milne, 5th Black 
Watch, was the son of George Milne, 
39 Dishland Street, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-two years of age, and was a 
farm servant at Leuchlands when he 
enlisted in July 1915. He went to 
Fiance in October, and the following 
year was wounded on the Somme. On 
the 21st of March 1918 it was offici- 
ally reported that Private Milne had 
been killed in action but afterwards 
information was sent that he had 
been taken prisoner and had died of 
wounds in German territory on the 
4th of April 1918. 

CAPT. ANDEESON, M.C., L.F.. 

Captain D. W. Anderson, M.C., 
London Regiment, twenty-nine years 
of age, was the son of Mrs Anderson, 
Maule Street, Carnoustie. In civil 
life he was a dentist in Coventry. He 
was promoted captain on the field, 
won the Military Cross in November 
1917 and was killed in action in 1918. 
Captain Anderson had two brothers 
ia the army; one was killed in action, 
and another brother was severely 
wounded in Gallipoli. 



175 



SGT. CRAMMOND. M.M.. R.F.A. 



PTE. GUILD, BLACK WATCH. 





Sergeant Griffith Ireland Cram- 
mond, M.M., Royal Field Artillery, 
twenty-five years of age, was the son 
of Peter Crammond and of his wife 
Elizabeth Ireland, 33 St Mary Street, 
Arbroath. He served his apprentice- 
ship as a plumber with Mr John 
Rayne. Afterwards he was in 
Greenock, but returned and joined 
the Forfarshire Battery of the R.F.A. 
as a gunner at the end of 1914. 
After having been wounded in France 
he was artillery instructor at Scotton 
Camp until November 1917, when he 
returned overseas. On the 5th of 
April 1918 a shell from the enemy 
landed on the gun and killed him in- 
stantaneously. His major wrote: — 
"He had done invaluable work 
and displayed the very greatest cour- 
age, and I cannot tell you how much 
we shall all miss him. He was a 
splendid example of a soldier, and at 
all times and under all conditions 
was most cheerful. He was most 
popular with both officers and men 
of my battery, and his name had only 
recently been sent in for a decora- 
tion." The Military Medal was 
awarded after his death. 



Private Alfred Guild, 7th Black 
Watch, was the son of Peter Guild, 
carpenter, and of his wife Joan 
Russell, 48 John Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-eight years of age. 
Before he joined the army in March 
1916 he was an ironmonger at Mr 
James Cuthbert's. Private Guild 
went to France in 1916, and was 
twice wounded. He was reported 
missing on the 9th of April 1918, and 
afterwards was officially presumed to 
have died on that date. 

L-CPL. ROBT. CRAIG, GORDONS. 

Laxce-Corporal Robert Craig, 
7th Gordon Highlanders, was the 
step-son of William Rae, attendance 
officer, Guthrie. He joined the army 
when he was eighteen years of age, 
and went from India to France with 
the 2nd Gordons. He was wounded, 
and on recovery was transferred to 
the 7th Gordons. After his return to 
France he was again wounded, and 
was sent to Shrewsbury V.A.D. Hos- 
pital, where he died on the 25th of 
April 1918. He was buried in 
Guthrie Churchyard. 



176 



SEN. W.O. THOS. DILLY, R.N. 



FDR. WILLIAM OGG, R.F.A. 





Senior Wireless Operator 
Thomas M'Kinnon Dilly, sixteen 
years of age, was the son of Stuart 
Dilly, 16 High Street, Arbroath. He 
was a grocer with the High Street Co- 
operative Society Ltd., when in June 
1917 he started training in wireless 
telegraphy at the North British Wire- 
less School, Dundee. In December 
he gained the Postmaster-General's 
Certificate of Proficiency. He passed 
all the Marconi tests in London, and 
he made his first voyage to Bergen 
and Christiania on H.M.T. Carperby. 
In April 1918 he was appointed to 
H.M.T. Cyrene. The vessel sailed from 
Glasgow on the 5th of April, and was 
torpedoed the same night off Holy- 
head. As the electric installation 
had been destroyed, the S.O.S. signal 
could not be given. It was presumed 
that Operator Dilly had been amongst 
those who were drowned. The 
Marconi Wireless Company, in a 
letter to his parents, wrote : — " You 
will be proud to know that your son 
gave his life for his country as truly 
and as bravely as those young men 
who have laid down their lives in 
actual combatant service." 



Bombardier William Ogg, Royal 
Field Artillery, was the son of 
William Ogg, 13 Ann Street, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-five years of 
age, and was a cabinetmaker with 
Messrs J. P. Grew ar& Son. He was 
a member of the Arbroath Battery of 
the R.F.A. when war broke out, and 
he mobilised as a gunner with his bat- 
tery. For some time he was an in- 
structor in England, and in January 
1917 he went to France. He served 
there for over a year until, on the 9th 
of April 1918, he was killed in action 
near Sailly-sur-la-Lys. Writing of 
his death, his major said: — "You 
will be proud to know that your son 
died in a truly soldierlike manner, 
serving his gun to the last." 

PTE. THOMSON, ROYAL SCOTS. 

Private William Thomson, Royal 
Scots, nineteen years of age, son of 
Alexander Thomson, Maule Street, 
Carnoustie, died in Horton War Hos- 
pital, Epsom, on the 27th of April 
1918., He was buried in Barry 
Churchyard, with full military 
honours. 



177 



SGT. R. E. KYDD, CANADIANS. 



PTE. J. STEWART. CANADIANS 




Sergeant Robert Ewart Gauldie 
Kydd, 24th Battalion Victoria Rifles, 
Canadian Contingent, was the 
youngest son of James Kydd and of 
his wife Jean Laken Guild, Lethani 
Mill, near Arbroath. He was thirty- 
seven years of age, and was at one 
time a clerk with the N.B. Railway 
Co. at Arbroath. In 1901 he enlisted 
in the Scots Guards, and served for 
eight years. He afterwards went to 
Canada, where he was when war 
broke out. In December 1914 he 
joined the 24th Victoria Rifles as a 
private, and acted for a time as a 
drill instructor. He was promoted 
sergeant, and went to France, where 
he was wounded in 1916. He was in- 
valided to England, and was for a 
time clerk in the Canadian Records 
Office, London, and later instructor 
at the Canadian Depot in the south 
of England. Sergeant Kydd was 
killed in action on the 11th of April 
1918 at Neuville Vitasse, near Arras, 
France. He was buried near where 
he fell. His platoon commander 
wrote : — ' ' He was simply wonderful 
in the line, and the greatest help to 
me." 




Private John Stewart, 43rd 
Canadian Cameron Highlanders, 
Grandview, Manitoba, Canada, was 
the son of John Stewart and of his 
wife Mary Stott, Anniston Lodge, 
Inverkeilor. He was twenty-seven 
years of age and unmarried. At one 
time he was employed in farm work 
in the district, but he went to 
Canada, and was a contractor in 
Manitoba when he enlisted in June 
1916. He was wounded on the 11th 
of April 1918, and was taken to No. 
57 Casualty Clearing Station, and 
died there a few minutes afterwards. 
His platoon officer said that in Pri- 
vate Stewart he found one of his best 
and most reliable soldiers,, always 
cheerful, and doing his duty. 

PTE. DUNDAS, LIVERPOOL SCOT. 

Private Charles Dtjndas, Liver- 
pool Scottish, was a son of John Dun- 
das, Birmingham, formerly of Ar- 
broath, and nephew of David Dundas, 
Royston, Arbroath. He was nineteen 
years of age, joined tthe army in 1917, 
and was killed in the German 
advance in 1918. 



178 



PTE. ALEX. B. SHERIFF, M.G.C. PTE. LOWSON, BLACK WATCH. 





Private Alexander Barrie 
Sheriff, 39th Machine Gun Corps, 
twenty years of age, was the son of 
Frederick Sheriff, 24 Lady bridge 
Street, Arbroath. He was a rail- 
way clerk at Carnoustie when he 
joined the 3rd Cameron Highlanders 
in January 1917. Three months later 
he was transferred to the M.G.C. On 
the 13th of April 1918 he was reported 
wounded and missing at Merville, 
and is presumed to have died at that 
time. His brother was killed in 1916. 

PTE. D. OUR, BLACK WATCH 

Private David Orr, 1st Black 
Watch, 25 Lady bridge Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of Joseph Orr. 
He was forty years of age, had 
married Annie Swan Swankie, and 
left four daughters and two sons. He 
joined the army in 1903, and served 
in India. When war broke out he 
was a ploughman at Balcathie. He 
rejoined the colours and was wounded 
at the battle of the Aisne, and dis- 
charged, but he never really re- 
covered and died in the Arbroath In- 
firmary on the 17th of January 1918. 



Private George Low son, 7th 
Black Watch, was the son of George 
Lowson, 16 Hannah Street, Arbroath. 
He was eighteen years of age, and 
was well-known as a clever footballer 
of the Grange team. He was an ap- 
prentice engineer at Dens Iron Works 
when he joined the 3rd Gordon High- 
landers in June 1917. On being 
drafted to the front, he was trans- 
ferred. He had been in France only 
ten days when he was wounded, and 
died on the 17th of April 1918, in 
No. 6 General Hospital, Rouen, 
France. He was buried in an Eng- 
lish cemetery at St Sever, Rouen. 
Private Lowson' s officer wrote: "It 
was the willing sacrifice of a gallant 
Gordon Highlander for his own home 
folk. He used to be my servant and 
I shall always look back on the 
memory of his faithfulness to duties." 

PTE. JOHN BRADFORD, B.W. 

Private John Bradford, Black 
Watch, twenty-one years of age, 
son of James Bradford, ploughman, 
Woodhill, Carnoustie, died of 
wounds in April 1918. 



179 



L-SGT. HARRY DUFFUS. H.L.I. 



PTE. WILSON. BLACK WATCH. 





Lance-Sergeant Harry W. 
Duffus, Highland Light Infantry, 4 
George Drive, Govan, was the son of 
John Duffus, 40 Sidney Street, Ar- 
broath. He belonged to a well-known 
Arbroath family which has produced 
some noted athletes and cross-country 
runners, his brothers James and 
Stewart being champion runners of 
Scotland. He was thirty-six years 
of age, and had served his appren- 
ticeship as a tailor with Messrs 
Anderson & Hewit, afterwards had 
been for some time in Barrow-in- 
Furness, and later for about twelve 
years with Messrs Border & Co., 
Glasgow. In November 1915 he joined 
the 9th H.L.I. (Glasgow Highlan- 
ders), and after having trained at 
Ripon went to France. He came 
through two years' service there 
without a scratch, until the grim 
battle of the 16th of April 1918, when 
he was killed by shrapnel, and was 
buried on the battlefield. The chap- 
lain wrote: — "We shall miss our 
comrade, but he has laid down his 
life in a great cause, and he has 
heard his Master's greeting, ' Well 
done good and faithful servant.' " 



Private Ronald Wilson, Black 
Watch, nineteen years of age, was 
the son of Mrs Wilson, Berryfauld, 
Arbroath. He was a clerk with 
Messrs Douglas Fraser & Sons before 
he joined the Highland Cyclist Bat- 
talion in September 1916. He was 
transferred to the Royal Highlanders 
before going to France in October 
1917. On the 21st of March 1918 he 
was posted missing, and is presumed 
to have died on or since that date. 

PTE. W. M'GOWAN, CAMERONS. 

Private William M' Go wan, 2nd 
Cameron Highlanders, twenty-five 
years of age, was the son of James 
M'Gowan, 7 Lillies Wynd, Arbroath. 
He was a vanman with Mr George 
Stewart, butcher, High Street. Pri- 
vate M'Gowan joined the army as a 
regular six months before war broke 
out and left Inverness, where he was 
stationed, for France on the day war 
was declared. He was twice 

wounded and gassed, and in the 
summer of 1917 he was invalided 
home. He died in Arbroath Infir- 
mary on the 1st of March 1918. 



180 



PTE. BOUICK. RIFLE BRIGADE. 



GNR. THOS. STUART, R.F.A. 





Rifleman David Bouick, 16th 
Rifle Brigade, twenty-one years of 
age, was the son of David Bouick, 
newsagent, Keptie Street, Arbroath. 
He was a likeable and popular lad, 
and was a fine singer. He had been 
a baker with Mr Carnegie Soutar, 
and when he joined the army in April 
1915 he was posted as a baker to the 
Army Service Corps, in which he 
served for two years at Havre. He 
was transferred to the 16th Rifle 
Brigade in September 1917, and was 
in the great engagements of March 
and April 1918. He was killed at 
Givenchy on the 18th of April. 

GNR. TAYLOR, S. AFRICANS. 

Gunner D. Taylor, South African 
Horse Artillery, was the third son of 
William Taylor, farmer, Raesmill , 
Inverkeilor, and of Mrs Taylor, Car- 
noustie. He was married, and left 
three of a family. He was educated 
at Arbroath High School and served 
his apprenticeship with Messrs 
Webster & Littlejohn, solicitors. 
After filling an important legal posi- 
tion in Edinburgh he went to South 



Gunner Thomas Stuart, Royal 
Field Artillery, twenty-three years of 
age, was the son of William Stuart, 
30 St Vigeans Road. Arbroath. He 
was an apprentice moulder at Dens 
Iron Works, and joined the R.F.A. 
in June 1915. After nearly three 
years' service he was killed instan- 
taneously while feeding his gun at 
Vannecourt on the 21st of March 
1918. Gunner Stuart's brother, 
William, was killed in May 1915. 



Africa His eldest son, who was 

studying medicine, was amongst the 
first to volunteer for service, and he 
himself decided that the call of the 
Empire must be obeyed, and joined 
the S.A.H.A. as a gunner. When in 
this country with his unit he received 
news of the death of his son at the 
front, but this only strengthened his 
resolution to do his utmost, and when 
offered his discharge on account of 
age, or a post on garrison duty, he 
replied that he had not come all the 
way from South Africa for any other 
work but fighting the Hun. He was 
killed in the last German advance. 



181 



L-CPL. SWINTON, ESSEX REGT. 



PTE. CHAS. BUTCHART, B.W. 






Lance-Corporal David Swinton, 
2nd Essex Regiment, was the grand- 
son of James Taylor, 20 Park Street, 
Arbroath. He was nineteen years of 
age, and had been employed at the 
railway as an engine-cleaner. He 
joined the army in August 1915 as a 
gunner in the Royal Field Artillery, 
and after having been six months in 
France he was invalided home. He 
was transferred to the South Staf- 
fords as a musketrv instructor, and 
later to the 2nd Essex. Sixteen days 
after his return to France Lance- 
Corporal Swinton, when running to 
take a post, was killed by a sniper 
at Rue de Vinaigre. Roselles, on the 
19th of April 1918. 

2nd-LT. ARNOLD J. PETRLE. N.Z. 

Second-Lieutenant Arnold J. 
Petrie, New Zea.landers, Invercar- 
gill, New Zealand, was the grandson 
of Captain Alexander Petrie, Ar- 
broath, and the nephew of Miss 
Petrie, 28 West Path, Carnoustie. 
He was wounded at Mons. He was 
again wounded, and died in hospital 
in France on the 18th of April 1918. 



Private Charles Butchart, 5th 
Black Watch, 4 Guthrie Hill. Ar- 
broath, was the son of John Butchart, 
East Abbey Street. He was thirty- 
eight years of age, and had married 
Elizabeth Gauldie. He was an en- 
thusiastic footballer, and played in 
the Parkhead team. He was a 
bleacher at Elliot when lie enlisted 
in April 1915. After three years' 
service Private Butchart was killed 
in France on the 24th of April 1918. 

PTE. J. MARSHALL, E. YORK" 

Private James Weighton Mar- 
shall, East Yorkshire Regiment, 
was the son of H. Marshall, Hull, 
formerly of Arbroath. He was thirty- 
four years of age. and left a widow 
and two daughters. He was killed in 
action on the 24th of March 1918. 

CAPT. HALL, LONDON REGT. 

Captain George Hall, London 
Regiment, was the son of Mrs Hall, 
Carlogie Terrace, Carnoustie. He 
went to France in 1916 and was men- 
tioned in despatches early in 1917. 
He was killed in action in 1918. 



182 



PTE. MILNE, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. CROALL, BLACK WATCH. 





Stretcher-Bearer James Milne, 
5th Black Watch, twenty-two years 
of age, was the son of ex-Sergeant 
Charles Milne, R.F.A.. and of his 
wife Mary Willocks, 69 Sidney 
Street, Arbroath. He was an ap- 
prentice baker with Mr W. B. 
Williamson. He joined the local 

battalion of the Black Watch Terri- 
torials in 1912 and was mobilised at 
the outbreak of war. Private Milne 
went to France with his battalion in 
1914. He was specially mentioned 
in despatches in November 1915 and 
again in November 1916. He was 
killed in action at Mount Kemmel on 
the 24th of April 1918. Private 

Milne had three brothers with the 
colours, one, Gunner Charles Milne, 
R.F.A., died of pneumonia in Ar- 
broath Infirmary. 

2nd-LIEUT. A. M'GREGOR, B.W. 

Second-Lieutenant Alexander 
M'Gregor, Black Watch, Ireland 
Street, Carnoustie, who before the 
war was in the employment of Messrs 
Thomson, Fearns & Company, Dun- 
dee was killed in action in 1918. 



Private David C. S. Croall, 5th 

Black Watch, 9 Sidney Street, Ar- 
broath, was the second son of David 
Croall, woodturner, and of his wife 
Jeanie Anderson, 23 Lady loan. He 
was thirty-two years of age and had 
married Jessie Kirkaldy, and left 
one son. Private Croall served his 
appr entice ship with Messrs S. Fair- 
weather & Sons, and afterwards 
went to America and settled in An- 
dover, Mass. He returned in Octo- 
ber 1915, and joined the 5th Black 
Watch (Lewis Gun Section). After 
a year's training and service he was 
sent to France, where he was 
wounded and invalided home. Six 
weeks after his return to France he 
was killed by a sniper at Voorme- 
geele on the 27th of April 1918. 

PTE. JAS. MORTIMER, K.O.S.B. 

Private James Mortimer, King's 
Own Scottish Borderers, eighteen 
years of age, was the eldest son of 
Thomas Mortimer. 21 Polmadie Road, 
Glasgow, formerly of 64 Fergus 
Square. Arbroath. He was killed 
on the 25th of April 1918. 



183 



PTE. SHEPHERD, ROYAL SCOTS, 



CAPT. COWAN. MERC. MARINE. 





Pkivate John Shepherd, 2nd 
Royal Scots, was the son of James 
Shepherd, 19 Cairnie Street. Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-four years 
of age, and was unmarried. He was 
a baker with his father when he joined 
the 2nd Royal Scots in December 
1915. After completing his training 
he was drafted to France, where he 
served for two years. Private Shep- 
herd was twice mentioned in de- 
spatches." He was severely wounded 
on the 4th of May 1918, and was 
taken to No. 23 Casualty ' Clearing 
Station, where he died very shortly 
afterwards. His CO. wrote: — "I 
knew him very well, as he was my 
orderly, and had been continually 
with me for four months. He had 
done splendid work out here, and, no 
matter what he had to do, I never 
heard him ' grouse ' once. I only 
wish he had been awarded a medal, 
which he highly deserved, and which 
I had twice recommended him for." 
One of Private Shepherd's brothers, 
Private Robert Shepherd, Camerons, 
was a prisoner of war. and another, 
Private David Shepherd, Black 
Watch, was invalided home. 



Captain John J. K. Cowan, 
H.M.T. s.s. Kut Sang, thirty-three 
years of age, 10 Bank Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of John Cowan, 
master plumber, and of his wife 
Betsy Ann Hood. He married 

Martha Phillips, and left three 
daughters. He went to sea at the 
age of sixteen as an apprentice in the 
employment of Messrs W. O. Taylor 
& Co., shipowners, Dundee, and 
after being in the Monarch Line he 
entered the service of Messrs Gow, 
Harrison & Co., Glasgow, as an 
officer in 1909. On the outbreak of 
war he went to China to the Indo- 
China Steam Navigation Company. 
Captain Cowan, while serving as 
chief officer on s.s. Kut Sang, lost 
his life through the vessel being sunk 
by two torpedoes in the Mediter- 
ranean on the 29th of April 1918. 

SAPPER JAS. ALEXANDER, R.E. 

Sapper James Alexander, Royal 
Engineers. Dundee Street, Car- 
noustie, at one time employed by Mr 
James Gourlay, blacksmith, was 
killed in action in 1918. 



184 



BOR. EDWD. W. JONES, R.F.A. 2nd-LT. KYDD, LABOUR CORPS. 



- ; - ■" ><8&* 


Mmm 


*«n 


V 



Bombardier Edward Watt Jones, 
1st Forfarshire Battery, R.F.A. (T.). 
twenty-five years of age, was the son 
of Thomas H. Jones and of his wife 
Margaret Edward, 17 Ogilvie Place, 
Arbroath. When war broke out he 
was in the office of Messrs James 
Keith it Blackmail Company, Ltd. 
Having been a Territorial since 1911 
lie was mobilised in August 1914 and 
went to France in May 1915. He 
was killed near Bethune on the 1st 
of May 1918. His CO. wrote :— "He 
was the battery clerk and an awfully 
good one at that. He had been at the 
guns since the 21st of March, and his 
is the beggest loss the battery has 
sustained. If one wanted to know 
anything one had only to ask Bom- 
bardier Jones. He was never down 
in the dumps, and kept all the ser- 
geants cheery." 

PTE. GOODMAN, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Edward Goodman, Black 
Watch, was a gamekeeper at Gar- 
dyne Castle, Guthrie. He joined 
the army in September 1917, and 
was killed early in 1918. 




Second-Lieutenant Henry John 
Naysmith Kydd, 497th Home Ser- 
vice Employment Coy., Labour 
Corps, was the second son of Alex- 
ander Kydd, headmaster, Ladyloan 
Public School, and of his wife Mar- 
garet Violet Naysmith, 11 Hillend 
Road, Arbroath. He was thirty- 

two years of age, and had married 
Helen Davidson. He was a chemist 
with his uncle, Mr A. Naysmith, 
and afterwards was in business in 
Fulham Road, London. He volun- 
teered in 1915, and joined the 3rd 
Duke of Wellington's Regiment, ob- 
taining a commission. He sustained 
an injury when at bayonet practice, 
and although he offered to serve 
abroad he was rejected. While on 
service be contracted pneumonia 
and died on the 13th of May 1918 
in the V.A.D. Hospital at Tyne- 
mouth, where he was buried with 
full military honours. 

PTE. FARQUHARSON, SEAF'THS. 

Private George G. Farqttharson, 
Seaforth Highlanders, son of G. Far- 
quharson, Carnoustie, died in 1918. 



185 



LT. GARRARD, M.C., GORDONS. 



SAPPER JOHN MUCKART, R.E. 




Second - Lieutenant Frederic 
George Garrard, M.C., Gordon 
Highlanders, who was twenty years 
of age, was the elder son of Fred- 
eric William Gerrard, Brambledene, 
Coul sdon, Surrey, and of his wife 
Elizabeth Rodger, formerly of 
Inchock, Inverkeilor. He was a ser- 
geant in the Officers' Training Corps, 
Croydon. From there he joined the 
Inns of Court O.T.C. in 1915 and in 
August 1916 went to the Royal Mili- 
tary College, Sandhurst. He obtained 
his commission on the 2nd of July 
1917, went to Italy in December, 
and on the 22nd of May 1918 he 
died in a casualty clearing station 
of wounds received two days pre- 
viously. Lieut. Garrard was awarded 
the Military Cross. The following is 
the extract from the "Gazette": — 
"For conspicuous gallantry and de- 
votion to duty in leading a raiding 
party. He was dangerously woun- 
ded, but seeing another officer who 
had been wounded and could not get 
away, he went out and dragged him 
back for fifty or sixty yards till he 
got assistance from some other 
men." 




Sapper John Pattullo Muckart, 
Royal Engineers, thirty-two years of 
age, was the son of David Muckart, 
J. P., and of his wife Margaret Pat- 
tullo, Tarryburn House, St Vigeans. 
He was an engineer with Messrs 
George Anderson & Co., and was 
afterwards with his father. In May 
1916 he joined the army, went to 
France in November, and served on 
the Soissons and Thiers front. He 
was reported missing on the 27th- 
30th May 1918, and is presumed to 
have died at that time. His younger 
brother, David, died in Alexandria. 

PTE. STEWART, M.M., R.S. 

Private William Stewart, M.M., 
Royal Scots, twenty-one years of 
age, son of James Stewart, 5 St 
Vigeans Road, Arbroath, was a 
plumber with Mr John Rayne he- 
fore he enlisted in 1915. He was a 
captain's runner, and was awarded 
the Military Medal for gallantry in 
standing by his captain in a very 
difficult position. He was reported 
missing on the 28th of March 1918, 
and presumed to have been killed. 



186 



L-CPL. F. GILL, BLACK WATCH. 



PTE. MAXWELL, CANADIANS. 





Lance-Corporal Frank T. Gill, 
5th Black Watch, was the son of 
William Gill and of his wife Sarah 
Ann Toward, Kenton Cottage, 
Jamieson Street, Arbroath. He was 
employed as a boot-finisher at the 
Abbey Leather Works. Having 

joined the 5th Black Watch (Terri- 
torials) as private, he was mobil- 
ised, and crossed the Channel with 
his battalion soon after war broke 
out, the 5th Black Watch being the 
first Scottish Territorial Force in 
France. He was wounded at Given- 
chy. Later he passed as Corporal 
Signal Instructor and for six months 
instructed the troops at Ripon. He 
re-crossed to France in April 1918, 
and after three and a half years' ser- 
vice he was injured while resting be- 
hind the lines by the bursting of a 
stray shell, and died of wounds on 
the 29th of May. His officer, writ- 
ing to his father, said: — "During 
the time Lance-Corporal Gill was 
with me I grew to know him well 
and to admire his work both as a 
signaller and a n.c.o. His company 
commanders and all in C Coy. had 
the greatest praise for your son." 



Private William Maxwell, 26th 
Canadian Infantry, 537 Eastern 
Avenue, Toronto, Canada, was the 
son of David Maxwell, grocer, High 
Street, Arbroath, and of his wife 
Annie M'Bay. He was twenty-nine 
-years of age, had married, and left 
one son and one daughter. Before 
Koing to Canada he served his ap- 
prenticeship as an engineer at West- 
burn Foundry. He joined the army 
in 1915 and came over to France, 
where he was twice wounded. He 
died in hospital in France on the 
14th of June 1918 of wounds re- 
ceived in action two days before. 

2nd-LT. RICHARDSON, R.W.K. 

Second-Lieutenant Arthur Bal- 
four Richardson, 8th Royal West 
Kents, twenty-nine years of age, was 
the son of William Richardson and 
of his wife Agnes Neil, 30 Jamieson 
Street, Arbroath. He was manager 
of the Mandeville branch of the Bank 
of Nova Scotia when he joined the 
Artists Rifles in November 1915. He 
went to France in March 1916, and 
was killed on the 21st of March 1918. 



187 



GNR. COLIN PATERSON, R.G.A. DVR. F. PROCTOR, CANADIANS. 





Gunner Colin Grant Paterson, 
351st Siege Battery, Royal Garrison 
Artillery (T.F.), 31 Barnwell Ter- 
race, Govan, was the son of Alex- 
ander Paterson and of his wife Isa- 
bella. Caird, 33 West Newgate, Ar- 
broath. He was thirty-eight years 
of age, and had married Elizabeth 
Chapman, and left one son and two 
daughters. He had been employed 
with Mr Colin Grant, and was 
subsequently a boot-finisher at 
Shieldhall, Govan. He enlisted in 
December 1915, and served in this 
country and in France. When in 

action on the 6th of June 1918 a 
shell fell close to the gun and the gun- 
ners shifted their quarters ; Gunner 
Paterson, however, was the last to 
cross the intervening ground for 
shelter, and another shell dropping 
killed him instantaneously He was 
buried in a cemetery near the place 
where he fell. His section officer, 
writing of him, said: — " He was 
well liked by both officers and men, 
and was a most energetic and faith- 
ful man in the execution of his 
duties. He lias right well upheld the 
name of our glorious country.' 



Driver Frederick George Proc- 
tor, 53rd Canadian Field Artillery, 
twenty years of age, was the son of 
William Proctor and of his wife Mary 
Ann Davis, 36 Marketgate, Arbroath 
(later 18 Gill son Avenue, West 
Toronto). Before leaving for Canada 
he was a. clerk with Messrs Dewar 
it Webster, solicitors. He enlisted 
in February 1915, and after three 
years' service, on the 5th of July 
1918, he was seriously wounded and 
died the same day. His brother 
wrote: — "George died trying io 
save his two horses, but the three 
got killed. He was one of the 
finest boys that ever lived." 

PTE. A. MDLLAR, SEAFORTHS. 

Private Arthur Mit.lar, 4th Sea- 
forth Highlanders, nineteen years of 
age, was the son of John and Helen 
Millar, 44 Addison Place, Arbroath. 
He was a clerk with Messrs James 
Keith & Blackman Co., Ltd., when 
he enlisted in December 1914. On 
the 20th of July 1918 he was reported 
missing, and was presumed to have 
been killed in action on that date. 



188 



PTE. CAMERON, BLACK WATCH. PTE. N. GIBB, SCOTS GUARDS. 





Private Alexander Cameron, 5th 
Black Watch, was the fifth son of 
John Cameron, 5 Fergus Street, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-seven years 
of age and unmarried, and before go- 
ing to the front was employed as a 
fitter at the Arbroath Gas Works. 
Private Cameron had been a Terri- 
torial, and was one of the first Ar- 
broath men to rejoin when war was 
declared. After three months' train- 
ing he was drafted with the 5th 
Black Watch to France in November 
1914, and served there continuously 
till March 1918, when he was taken 
prisoner. He died of pneumonia on 
the 10th of July 1918 in Denain 
Prisoner of War Camp Hospital. 



Private Norman Alexander Gibb, 
2nd Scots Guards, twenty-three years 
of age was the son of John G. Gibb 
and of his wife Ann Grant, Station 
House, Inverkeilor, near Arbroath. 
He was a railway clerk in the Super- 
intendent's Office, Tay Bridge Sta- 
tion, Dundee, when he joined the 
army in June 1917. After training 
for six months at Caterham and 
London, Private Gibb went to France 
in December, and served in the 
trenches until the 12th of July 1918, 
when he was killed by a. shell near 
Arras. He was buried in a British 
cemetery at Berles-au-Bois, in 
France'. Private Gibb's brother fell 
in action at the Dardanelles. 



PTE. D. CRAIG, BLACK WATCH. 

Private David Fox Craig, 2nd 

Black Watch, twenty-seven years of 
age, son of William W. Craig, 64 
Howard Street, Arbroath, was em- 
ployed at the Asphalt Works. He 
enlisted in 1915, and was killed in 
Palestine on the 11th of June 1918. 
His brother, Corporal James Craig, 
was a signaller in the Black Watch. 



LT. J. L. BERRY, TANK CORPS. 

LlEITTENANT J. LESLIE BERRY, 

Tank Corps, 5 Briarwood Terrace, 
Dundee, was the second son of the 
Rev. J. B. Berry, at one time mini- 
ster of the U.F. Church, Colliston. 
Before joining the army he was em- 
ployed with Messrs George Rollo & 
Co., Panmure Street, Dundee. Lieut. 
Berry was killed in action in 1918. 



189 



GNR. S. W. PATERSON, R.M.A. 



DVR. DAVID DEUCHARS, B.W. 





Gunner Stewart Wiuoe Pater- 
son, Royal Marine Artillery, 2 Duke 
Street, Arbroath, was the son of 
George Paterson, Barns of Claver- 
house, Dundee. He was thirty-one 
years of age and had married Mary 
A. Thomson and left three daugh- 
ters. He joined the Arbroath Con- 
stabulary in 1907, and along with 
several other members of the 
Force he enlisted in the Royal 
Marine Artillery in November 1915. 
After training in Portsmouth he left 
for France in September 1916. He 
was wounded at Ypres in July 1917, 
and was for two months in a hospital 
in France. On the 10th of July 1918 
Gunner Paterson was in a barn hav- 
ing dinner when a large shell burst 
through the roof and killed him 
instantly. He was buried in Lijes- 
senthock Military Cemetery, Poper- 
inghe. His captain, writing of him, 
said he was one of the best men in 
the whole battery, a brave hard- 
working, cheerful comrade. The 
death of Constable Paterson was the 
first break in the ranks of the seven 
members of the Arbroath Force who 
joined the army. 



Driver David Deuchars, Black 
Watch, twenty-five years of age, 
was the son of David Deuchars and 
of his wife Isabella Falconer, 14 
Spink Street, Arbroath. He was a 
lorryman at the Arbroath Railway 
Station when he joined the Black 
Watch at Perth in March 1917. 
Private Deuchars was sent to Nigg 
for three months' training and after- 
wards to Grantham, where he was 
transferred to the 51st Heavy 
Machine Gun Corps in November. He 
was sent to France where he was em- 
ployed as a transport driver. He 
was killed by a shell when going up 
the line on the morning of the 20th 
of July 1918. Driver Deuchars had 
a brother who served in Ireland. 

PTE. ROBERTS, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Frank Roberts, Black 
Watch, nineteen years of age, was 
the son of J. C. Roberts, Newbigging 
Farm, near Arbroath. Before en- 
listing in December 1914 he was a 
farm servant at the Mains of Kelly. 
On the 21st of March 1918 he was re- 
ported missing and presumed killed. 



190 



SGT. J. DOUGLAS. CAMERONS, 



2nd-LIEUT. D. BRACELIN, B.W. 





Sergeaxt James Douglas, M.M., 
5th Cameron Highlanders, twenty- 
six years of age, was the son of 
James Douglas, 26 Sidney Street, 
Arbroath. He served his appren- 
ticeship as a plumber with Mr Cook. 
High Street, but joined the regulars 
in 1909 when quite a lad. He had 
been for three years in India, when 
war broke out, and arrived with his 
regiment in France on Christmas 
Day 1914. He was wounded in July 
of the following year and was subse- 
quently wounded a second time. In 
March 1918 he was awarded the Mi'i- 
tary Medal for gallantry in the field. 
When leading his men forward to 
attack a German position, Sergeant 
Douglas was shot on the 18th of July 
1918. Writing of his death his officer 
said — :" He was one of the finest 
n.c.o.'s and one who had served with 
me in many actions. He had all the 
qualities of a true soldier, and his 
death is a great loss to all. As a 
comrade he proved himself one of the 
very best — cheery and good-natured 
at all times." Sergeant Douglas's 
younger brother, David, served with 
the Gordons. 



Second-Lieutenant Daniel Brace- 
lin, 3rd S.R. Royal Highlanders, 
twenty-one years of age, was the 
eldest son of Captain Patrick J. 
Bracelin and of his wife Maria 
O'Farrell, 23 Ann Street, Arbroath. 
When he joined the army he was an 
undergraduate of University Col- 
lege, Dundee. He was a fine athlete, 
and when at the Arbroath High 
School had for two years in succes- 
sion won the championship trophy at 
the school sports. In March 1916 he 
joined the Pioneer Royal Engineers, 
and served with them until Febru- 
ary 1917. Having been in France for 
ten months, he then came home for 
a commission, and in June 1917 was 
gazetted to the 3rd S.R. Royal 
Highlanders. He returned to 

France in April 1918, and was men- 
tioned in Sir Douglas Haig's Des- 
patch of December for bravery in the 
field. He was killed in action in the 
Bois de Courton, near Rheims, on the 
20th of July 1918. A Requiem Mass 
was offered for Lieutenant Bracelin 
in St Thomas Roman Catholic 
Church, Arbroath, of which he was 
a prominent member. 



191 



PTE. E. DALGARNO, GORDONS. SIG. ANDERSON, WORCESTERS 





Private Eric George Dalgarno, 
4th Gordon Highlanders, was the 
eldest son of George G. Dalgarno and 
of his wife Alice Maud Miln, View- 
hank, Arbroath. "When at Dollar 
Academy he helonged to the Cadet 
Corps, but on returning to Arbroath 
he joined the Volunteer Force. In 
August 1917, after having worked 
for four months as an engineer at 
Messrs Keith & Blackmail's, he be- 
came, at the age of eighteen, a pri- 
vate in the 4th Gordon Highlanders. 
He was trained at Tillicoultry, Can- 
terbury and Colchester, went over to 
France in March 1918, and served 
there for four months. He was in 
the Rheims district on the 21st of 
July, and a comrade-in-arms tells 
how, after a long thirst, they had got 
a supply of water ; Private Dalgarno 
started off with water bottles to sup- 
ply the thirsty men, and was killed 
by gun-fire in the forest near 
Epernay. He is buried in St Imoges 
Cemetery. His platoon commander, 
writing of him, said: — "Eric has 
always held such a high place in my 
estimation, and he will be a dis- 
tinct loss to the platoon. He was so 



Signaller Alec. Anderson, 3rd 
Worcestershire Regiment, 17 St 
Vigeans Road, Arbroath, was the son 
of David Lundie Anderson, coffee 
planter, and of his wife Louisa 
Krasse, Kandy, Ceylon. He was 
twenty-five years of age, and joined 
the army in August 1911. He was a 
signaller, and took part in the retreat 
from Mons. On the 3rd of June 
1918 he died of wounds in the Mon- 
tigny-sur-Vesle Field Hospital, and 
was buried at Rheims. 



unassuming and yet did his work so 
diligently and without a grumble. 
1 Grousing ' is a privilege in the 
army, but I don't think I ever heard 
him ' grouse,' no matter how dis- 
agreeable the task or how tired he 
was." In Private Dalgarno's diary, 
which was returned after his death, 
he had written against his birthday — 
his nineteenth birthday, which was 
just three days before he was killed — 
" And how can man die better 
Than facing fearful odds 
For the ashes of his fathers 
And the temples of his gods? " 



192 



GNR. JAMES G. TRAILL, R.F.A. 



PTE. CHRISTISON, GORDONS. 





Gunner James Gibb Traill, Royal 
Field Artillery, was tlie son of David 
B. Traill and of his wife Jessie Gibb, 
12 John Street, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-nine years of age, and un- 
married, and before he enlisted was 
a machine operator at the Abbey 
Leather Works. He joined the local 
detachment of the R.F.A. in Novem- 
ber 1915, and was drafted to Fra-nce 
in February 1916. Gunner Traill died 
of wounds at No. 48 Casualty Clear- 
ing Station on the 25th of July 1918. 

LIEUT. ARNOLD SCOTT, R.S.F. 

Lieutenant Arnold Scott, Royal 
Scots Fusiliers, was the youngest son 
of George Scott, marine engineer, 
formerly of Arbroath, and of Mrs 
Scott, 1 Wimmarleigh Gardens, 
Seven Kings, Essex, and a nephew 
of Mrs John Sanderson, Victoria 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
five years of age, and had joined the 
London Scottish in August 1914. He 
went to France in April 1915, and 
served there almost without a break 
until he was killed in action on the 
9th of June 1918. 



Private M'Inrot Christison, 
4th Gordon Highlanders, eighteen 
years of age, was the son of John 
D. Christison and of his wife Annie 
Bowen, 26 Fergus Square, Arbroath. 
He was a grocer with the High 
Street Co-operative Society when he 
joined up in January 1918. Private 
Christison had been only a few weeks 
in France when he was killed in action 
on the 23rd of July 1918. His com- 
pany officer said that a cousin of Pte. 
Christison' s belonging to the Edzell 
district had expressed a desire to be 
in the same company, and that he 
had acceded to the request. On the 
23rd of July they were beside each 
other, and were both killed by the 
bursting of the same shell. Private 
Christison had four brothers serving. 

LT. J AS. WILSON, CAMERONS. 

Lieutenant James Wilson, 
Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, 
twenty-five years of age, was the son 
of Thomas Wilson, Dalhousie Place, 
Arbroath. He died in Colchester 
Military Hospital on the 12th of 
July 1918. 



193 



PTE. T. W. SIMPSON, R.A.M.C. PTE. JOHN NAPIER. GORDONS. 





Private Thomas William Simp- 
son, Royal Army Medical Corps, 
twenty-six years of age, was the fifth 
son of James Simpson and of his wife 
Emma M'Donald, Broughty Ferry. 
Before enlisting in May 1916 he was 
assisting his father, a well-known 
Arbroathian, in his printing office in 
Broughty Ferry. He served in France 
for fourteen months, and while en- 
gaged in field ambulance work he was 
killed by a shell near Soissons on the 
24th of July 1918. Private Simpson 
had four brothers on service. A poem 
to his memory, by William Birrell, 
author of " War and Patriotic 
Poems," was published in the 
Broughty Ferry " Guide." 

CPL. TOM NEILSON, A.S.C. 

Corporal Tom Neilson, Motor 
Transport, Army Service Corps, 
attached to the Royal Field Artillery, 
Maulesbank Cottage, Carnoustie, 
had been employed as gardener and 
chauffeur by Mr Alexander Duncan, 
Maulesbank. Corporal Neilson had 
been in France for two years when 
he was killed in action. 



Private John Christie Napier, 
7th Gordon Highlanders, eighteen 
years of age, was the son of John 
Stewart Napier and of his wife 
Dorothy Christie, 52 St Vigeans 
Road, Arbroath. He was a joiner 
with Mr Simpson, St Mary Street, 
when he volunteered for service in 
1916, but lie was not called up till 
August 1917. Private Napier went 
to France to join his battalion, a unit 
of the 51st Division, and he was killed 
in action on the 20th of July 1918 near 
Marfaux, in the forest of Rheims. 

PTE. FRANK NAIRN, GORDONS. 

Private Frank F. Nairn, 
Gordons, was the youngest son of A. 
T. Nairn, Albert Lodge, Barry Road. 
Carnoustie. Before enlistment he 
was apprenticed to Messrs Hender- 
son & Logie, C.A., Dundee. He was 
very popular in local junior sporting 
circles, and was a well-known mem- 
ber of the Carnoustie Links Tennis 
Courts. He joined the army in 1917 
and was posted missing and pre- 
sumed killed on the 9th of April 
1918. 



194 



PTE. JOHN MILNE, GORDONS. 



SGT. FORSYTH. BLACK WATCH. 





Private John Findlay Stuart 
Milne, 7th Gordon Highlanders, 
eighteen years of age, was the son of 
George Milne, 39 Dishland Street, 
Arbroath. He was a farm servant at 
Kirkton of Inverkeilor when he 
joined the 7th Gordon Highlanders 
in December 1917. After six months' 
training Private Milne was drafted 
to France, and had been there only 
seven weeks when he died of wounds 
in July 1918. His brother, Private 
George Milne, was taken prisoner 
and died of wounds just three months 
before, and yet another brother 
served with the colours. 

PTE. WM. STORMONTH, B.W. 

Private William Stormonth, 
Black Watch, nineteen years of age, 
was the son of David Stormonth, 6 
Reform Street, Montrose. He was 
a native of Arbroath, his father hav- 
ing been a traveller with Messrs D. 
Thornton & Son. Private Stor- 
month was a draper in Montrose. He 
was wounded and taken prisoner in 
March 1918, and died in a German 
hospital four days afterwards. 



Sergeant John Forsyth, 5th 
Black Watch, twenty-two years of 
age was the eldest son of Alexander 
Forsyth, 10 Hannah Street, Ar- 
broath. Before enlisting he was a 
clerk in the office of Messrs James 
Keith & Blackman Co. Ltd., and was 
a well-known junior footballer and 
cricketer. He joined the 5th Black 
Watch in September 1914, and was 
drafted to France three months 
later. During his long service at the 
front Sergeant Forsyth saw much 
stiff fighting, and had many narrow 
escapes, and he was gassed in Novem- 
ber 1917. He was with his company 
in an attack against a strong enemy 
position when he was wounded, and 
died two days afterwards, on the 
30th of July 1918. Sergeant For- 
syth's younger brother was serving 
in the navy. 

PTE. J. BAIN, BLACK WATCH. 

Private John Bain, Black Watch, 
21 Park Street, Arbroath, was a 
miner by trade. He served in 
France, and was killed in action on 
the 19th of July 1918. 



195 



DVR. NORMAN A. ROBB, R.F.A. 



PTE. WM. STEWART, GORDONS. 





Driver Norman A. W. Robb, 
Royal Field Artillery, was the young- 
est son of Mrs Robb, 17 Panmure 
Street, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
two years of age, unmarried, and was 
a lorryman in the employment of 
Messrs Wordie & Company, railway 
contractors. Driver Robb was a 

Territorial in the local battery of the 
R.F.A., and when war broke out he 
went to France in March 1915, being 
one of the first contingent of Forfar- 
shire R.F.A. Territorials to go from 
Arbroath. He served in France 
until the 27th of April 1918, when he 
was dangerously wounded in the 
back. He was treated for some 
months in Calais, and afterwards 
taken to the Ontario Military Hospi- 
tal at Orpington in Kent, where he 
died on the 7th of August 1918. He 
was buried in the Eastern Cemetery, 
Arbroath, with full military honours. 
Driver Robb had three brothers who 
served at the front — Private F. B. 
Robb, Machine Gun Corps, attached 
to the Royal Scots Greys ; Private 
William Robb, Machine Gun Corps, 
and Private Joseph R-obb, Army 
Service Corps. 



Private William Stewart, 4th 
Gordon Highlanders, twenty-four 
years of age, was the son of Robert 
Stewart, North Tarry, Arbroath. He 
was a ploughman at Invergowrie 
when he enlisted in December 1917. 
After several months training he 
was drafted to France. He was woun- 
ded in action on the 23rd of July, and 
died at No. 10 General Hospital, 
Rouen, on the 5th of August 1918. 

SGT. C. WHITLAW, M.M., R.E 

Sergeant Charles Y. M. Whit- 
law, M.M., Special Company, Royal 
Engineers, twenty-four years of age, 
was the youngest son of James Whit- 
law, Glasgow, formerly of Arbroath. 
Before joining the army in August 
1914 he was an apprentice engineer 
at Possilpark, Glasgow. He went to 
France in May 1915 with the Scot- 
tish Rifles, but was afterwards trans- 
ferred, and was attached to the 
Royal Engineers when in 1917 he was 
awarded the Military Medal for gal- 
lantry in the field. Sergeant Whit- 
law was killed in action in France on 
the 23rd of July 1918. 



196 



PTE. 



MARR. CANADIANS. 



PTE. GEO. STOTT, CANADIANS, 





Private Gobdon Mark, Canadian 
Scottish, was the son of John Marr, 
Westhaven Farm, Carnoustie. He 
was twenty-seven years of age, and 
unmarried. He had left Carnoustie 
for Canada in 1910, and was settled 
at Calgary, Alberta, when he joined 
the Canadian Scottish in June 1915. 
He came overseas, and served in 
France, where he was mortally 
wounded at Amiens on the 8th of 
August 1918. In this gallant charge, 
in which the 16th Canadian Battalion 
covered itself with glory, Private 
Marr was in the front line, and, as 
his officer said, was fearlessly aggres- 
sive, and an example to his comrades. 
He also added that there was no 
doubt Private Marr would have won 
promotion had he lived. Other 
letters spoke in high appreciation of 
his courage and soldierly qualities : — 
" He was a good soldier, and showed 
splendid devotion to duty. His loss 
is keenly felt by all ranks of his com- 
pany, and especially by his platoon 
commander, with whom he was de- 
servedly most popular. His bat- 
talion mourns in him one of its best 
and most fearless men." 



Private George Murray Stott, 
43rd Battalion Canadian Camerons, 
twenty-nine years of age, was the 
son of James Stott, 5 St Vigeans 
Road, Arbroath. He had gone to 
Canada, and was employed as a 
labourer in Winnipeg when he joined 
the army in July 1915. He served 
for three years, and was reported 
wounded and missing on the 16th of 
August 1918. Later it was pre- 
sumed that he died on that date at 
Fresnoy-les-Roye. 

PTE. JOHN M. GRAY, A.I.F. 

Private John M. Gray, 46th Bat- 
talion, Australian Imperial Force, 
thirty-two years of age, was the son 
of George Gray, 107 Strathmartine 
Road, Dundee, and grandson of John 
Gray, painter, Fergus Street, Ar- 
broath. He was a plasterer with Mr 
Donald, Arbroath , and afterwards 
went to Australia. He had served for 
two and a half years when he was 
wounded, and died in No. 2 Eastern 
Hospital, Brighton, on the 13th of 
April 1918. His brother was killed 
in the fighting at Gallipoli. 



197 



L-CPL. CHRISTIE, LANCS. FUS. PTE. WM. A. BRUCE, K.O.S.B. 





Lance - Corporal Alexander 
Christie, 15th Battalion, Lanca- 
shire Fusiliers, was the son of Alex- 
ander Christie, gas collector, and of 
his wife Margaret Potter, 8 Carnegie 
Street, Arbroath. He was thirty 

years of age and had served his ap- 
prenticeship as a chemist with Mr 
D. H. Burn. Before enlisting he was 
chief dispenser in one of Messrs 
Boots' shops in Eastbourne. He 
joined up in November 1916 as a 
private in the Queen's Regiment, the 
2nd Regiment of Foot. Previous to 
crossing to France in January 1917 
he was transferred to the 15th Lanca- 
shire Fusiliers, and later was pro- 
moted to Lance-Corporal rank, and 
was given charge of the Lewis Gun 
Section of his company. His battalion 
took part in most of the heavy fight- 
ing between Nieuport, on the coast, 
and St Quentin. He had been twice 
wounded with shrapnel in previous 
engagements, and he was again 
wounded at Bouchoir just after going 
over the top. This time, unfortun- 
ately, the shrapnel wounds were 
fatal, and he died almost at once 
on the 10th of August 1918. 



Private William Alexander 
Bruce, 2nd King's Own Scottish 
Borderers, 805 Garscube Road, 
Glasgow, was the son of John Bruce 
and of his wife Margaret Reid, 21 
Seamore Street, Glasgow, both for- 
merly of Arbroath. He was twenty- 
eight years of age, had married Isa- 
bella Gunn, and left one son. He 
was a motorman on the Glasgow 
Tramways when he joined the 3rd 
Royal Scots in July 1917. Later he 
was transferred, drafted to France 
in October, thence to Italy, and 
returned to France in the spring of 
1918. He had not fully recovered 
from the effects of gas poisoning 
when on the 26th of August 1918 he 
was wounded by machine gun fire 
and died the following day in the 
56th Casualty Clearing Station. He 
was buried in the military cemetery 
at Bagueux, near Arras. 

PTE. J. KEIR, CANADIANS. 

Private John Keir, Canadians, 
son of Mr and Mrs Keir, Thistle 
Cottage, Friockheim, was killed in 
action in 1918. 



198 



PTE. 



GREEN, CAMERONS 



2nd-LT. W. L. STORMONT, R.F.A. 





Peivate Albert Green, Service 
Battalion, 11th Cameron High- 
landers, lived at 6 Taymouth Terrace, 
Carnoustie. He married Annie 

Esplin and left two sons and a 
daughter. He was employed in the 
works department of the Carnoustie 
Town Council when he enlisted in the 
9th Black Watch in July 1915. Pri- 
vate Green was gassed in April 1916, 
and after recovering was transferred 
to a Labour Battalion, and later to 
the Camerons. He was killed in 
France on the 29th of August 1918. 

LT. VAL. SCROGGIE. A. & S. H. 

Lieutenant Valentine Scroggie, 
14th Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, son of E. Scroggie, Dundee 
Street, Carnoustie, was a well-known 
golfer. He enlisted in June 1915, 
served in France, and received his 
commission in July 1918. He was 
killed in action on the 4th of No- 
vember. He had two brothers with 
the colours, Dr Scroggie, in the 
R.A.M.C., who was mentioned in 
despatches, and Harold H. Scroggie, 
who was wounded at Gaza. 



Second-Lietttenant W. L. Stor- 
mont, 2nd Forfarshire Battery, 
Royal Field Artillery, twenty-one 
years of age, was the fourth son cf 
David Stormont, 1 Shore, Arbroath. 
He was an apprentice engineer with 
Messrs James Keith & Blackmail 
Co., Ltd., when he joined the army, 
immediately after the outbreak of 
war. He quickly gained. the rank of 
sergeant, and in January 1918 he 
received his commission, and went 
to France three months later, being 
attached to the 81st Battery. On 
the 31st of August 1918 he was 
killed instantaneously by a shell 
splinter near Fontaine les Croisilles. 
He was buried in St Martin Calvaire 
Cemetery, south-east of Arras. His 
brother officers, writing of his death, 
spoke very highly of his qualities as 
a soldier and a man, saying he was 
a most efficient officer, and held in 
high respect by all. 

SEAMAN BOWDLER. R.N.D. 



Able-Seaman 
Naval Division, 
Carnoustie, was 



Bowdler, Royal 
41 Yeaman Street, 
killed in 1918. 



199 



CPL.-FAR. W. HUTTON, R.G.A. L-CPL. D. K. LINDSAY, K.O.S.B. 




Corporal - Farrier William 

Hutton, Royal Garrison Artillery, 
11 Fergus Square Arbroath, was the 
son of Mrs Hutton, 22 Rossie Street. 
He was twenty-nine years of age, 
had married Eliza Wyllie ; and left 
one son and one daughter. Before 
the war he was a blacksmith with Mr 
Donald M'Glashan, Dickfield Street, 
who also fell while serving in the 
army. Corporal Hutton joined the 
1st Forfarshire Battery of the Royal 
Field Artillery in 1907 as a gunner. 
When war broke out he went to 
France with the local battery but was 
transferred to the R.G.A. On the 
2nd of September 1918 he was hit by 
a splinter from a bomb dropped on 
the road as he was going up to the 
guns with ammunition, and he died 
on the way to the dressing station. 
In writing to his wife, the chaplain 
said : — "Many times I have met your 
husband at my services ; he was a 
hero, and has given his life for the 
cause of righteousness and freedom. 
Though his name may never appear 
in official lists of honours, he has won 
the honour and respect of his com- 
rades by his undaunted courage." 




Lance Corporal Douglas Kidd 
Lindsay, 5th King's Own Scottish 
Borderers, was the youngest son of 
Thomas and Isabella Lindsay, 175 
High Street, Arbroath. He was 
nineteen years of age, and previous 
to entering the army was a clerk in 
the office of the Millgate Tannery. 
He joined the Highland Light In- 
fantry in February 1917, and served 
with them in France. In June 1918 
he was transferred, and was attached 
to the K.O.S.B. until the time of 
his death on the 1st of September. 
He was killed by a shell near Mount 
Kemmel whilst acting as " No. 1 " 
of a Lewis Gun team. 

SGT. JOSEPH GIBSON, R.F.A. 

Sergeant Joseph Gibson, Royal 
Field Artillery, twenty years of age, 
son of James Gibson, mason, 42 
Leonard Street, Arbroath, was at 
Messrs Douglas Fraser & Sons' when 
he joined the local battery of the 
R.F.A. After having served in 
France for seventeen months he died 
of wounds at No. 1 Casualty Clearing 
Station on the 4th September 1918. 



200 



PTE. JAS. MATTHEW, H.L. 



PTE. BENSON, BLACK WATCH. 





Private James Matthew, 9th 
Highland Light Infantry (Glasgow 
Highlanders) was the second son of 
George Matthew and of his wife Mar- 
garet Paterson, 12 Abbot Street, 
Arbroath. He was thirty-one years 
of age, unmarried, and was a waiter 
in Glasgow when he joined the 9th 
H.L.I. Private Matthew was 

stationed in England for more than 
a year, and after having been only 
two months in France he was killed 
in action at Arras on the 20th of 
May 1917. He was of a cheery dis- 
position and was very popular with 
all who knew him. 

SEAMAN ALEX. PETRIE, R.N.R. 

Seaman Alexander Petrie, Royal 
Naval Reserve, 43 St Mary Street, 
Arbroath, was fifty-seven years of 
age. He left a widow and five of a 
family. He had been at sea in his 
youth, but was working at Dens 
Iron Works when the volunteered in 
August 1915. On the 3rd of April 
1917, when serving on H.M.S. 
Drifter, he was accidentally drowned 
in Buckie Harbour. 



Private Harry Benson, 5th Black 
Watch, twenty-four years of age, 
was the son of William Benson, 53 
West Grimsby, Arbroath. He was 
assisting his father as a general 
dealer when he joined the army in 
February 1915. After enlisting at 
Forfar he was sent to Hawick, 
Glasgow, Dundee, Wormit, Bridge of 
Earn, and then across to France. He 
was wounded there, and on recovery 
served in Egypt and Palestine, and 
again returned to France. Five 
months later he was killed in action 
on the 2nd of September 1918, and 
was buried at Copse Trench British 
Cemetery, near Peronne. His CO. 
paid high tribute to his gallantry. 

L-CPL. GEO. ROBERTS, B.W. 

Lance-Corporal George Roberts, 
Black Watch, Carnoustie, brother of 
Mrs Gibson, 53 Millar Street, was 
employed as a baker with Mr T. B. 
Cunningham before enlisting in 
October 1916. He served in France, 
had been gassed and wounded at 
Arras, and was killed in action in 
August 1918. 



201 



PTE. ALLAN MANN. GORDONS. 



DVR. EDWARD DRURY, A.S.C. 




* 



. .... - 




Private Allan B. Mann, 1st 
Gordon Highlanders, nineteen years 
of age, was the son of Mrs John 
Mann, 8 Shore, Arbroath. He was 
a bleacher at Elliot when he enlisted 
in the Black Watch in May 1917, 
being afterwards transferred. After 
training at Bridge of Allan and 
Cromer, he was drafted to France, 
where he served for seven months. At 
the end of August 1918 he was badly 
wounded in an action which paved 
the way for a big advance. Private 
Mann was taken to No. 45 Casualty 
Clearing Station, where everything 
humanly possible was done to save 
him, but he succumbed on the 3rd of 
September, and was buried in the 
Military Cemetery at Bac du Sud. 
He was the youngest of five 
brothers serving with the colours. 

CPL. MITCHELL, ROYAL SOOTS. 

Corporal James Mitchell, Royal 
Scots, twenty-one years of age, was 
the son of James Mitchell, Middle- 
gate, Friockheim. He was reported 
missing on the 25th of April 1918, 
and presumed killed on that date. 



Driver Edward Gordon Drury, 
Army Service Corps, twenty-two 
years of age, was the son of William 
Smith Drury and of his wife Georgina 
Brown, 98 Cumming Drive, Mount 
Florida, Glasgow. Before the war 
he was an engineer with Messrs J. 
H. Carruther.s, Glasgow. He joined 
the l/2nd Lowland Field Ambulance, 
B.A.M.C. (T.F.), in February 1913, 
and was called up on the 5th of 
August 1914. For five months he 
was training recruits at Yorkhill, 
Glasgow, and later was at Dunferm- 
line. In May 1915 he went to 
Egypt and Palestine, where he took 
part in many engagements and had 
many trying experiences. He was 
afterwards drafted to France and 
transferred in 1916. On the 4th of 
September 1918 the camp was being 
heavily shelled, and Driver Drury, 
just having left his horses, was going 
to the cookhouse for tea when he was 
struck in the back by a large piece of 
shell, which killed him instan- 
taneously. The chaplain said: — "He 
was a gallant and most lovable boy." 
Driver Drury' s brother was killed 
the same year. 



■202 



PTE. T. CUTHILL, HAMPS. RGT. 



SAPPER ALEX. MILLER. R.E. 




■llil 



^$mM. 



iliil^M 





Private Thomas Ctjthill, 12th 
Hampshire Regiment, 12 Abbot 
Street, was the son of James Cuthill, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-six years 
of age, had married Elizabeth 
Matthew, and left one daughter. He 
was a tailor with Mr James Peter, 
and was well-known as a junior foot- 
baller. He joined the Scottish Horse 
in November 1915, and was after- 
wards transferred. After serving for 
a year in England he was drafted to 
Salonica, where he remained nearly 
two years before being sent to 
France. He had been in France only 
three weeks when, on the 4th of 
September 1918, he was posted as 
missing, and later was officially re- 
ported killed in action on that date. 

SGT. GEORGE BUICK, R.G.A. 

Sergeant George Buick, Royal 
Garrison Artillery, was the son of 
George Buick, shoemaker, Glasgow. 
He was married and left one child. 
He served his apprenticeship as a 
dentist with Mr Davie, Arbroath, and 
afterwards practised in Bristol. He 
was killed on the 24th of April 1918. 



Sapper Alexander M'Lean Miller, 
Royal Engineers, 2 Fallside Road, 
Bothwell, was the son-in-law of 
Andrew Rennie, 58 Helen Street, Ar- 
broath. He was thirty-two years of 
age and left one daughter. In March 
1915 he joined the Royal Scots, was 
wounded in September, and went to 
Salonica in 1916, where he was at- 
tached to the Royal Engineers. On 
the 21st of September 1918 he died of 
pneumonia in a hospital in Salonica. 

SGT. D. MACPHERSON, S.H. 

Sergeant Donald Macpherson, 
Scottish Horse, attached to the 
Black Watch, was a native of Dun- 
doe. He was on the staff of the 
" Dundee Courier," and had pre- 
viously represented that paper in Ar- 
broath, where he had made many 
friends, and was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Miniature Rifle Club. 
When war was declared he volun- 
teered for service, took part in the 
Dardanelles campaign, and was in- 
valided home. On his recovery he 
went to France, and was killed by a 
shell on the 6th of October 1918. 



203 



GNR. DAVID MUNRO, R.F.A. 



PTE. D. MACKAY. ROYAL SCOTS. 





Gu nner David MacDougall 
Munbo, Royal Field Artillery, was the 
son of Alexander Munro and of his 
wife Margaret MacDougall, Mains cf 
Balcathie, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
one years of age, and at the time of 
joining the army, in April 1915, he 
was a clerk at Stanley Mill. He went 
through three and a half years' ser- 
vice in this country and in France. 
When in action on the 14th of Sep- 
tember 1918 a shell dropped close to 
him, and he was killed instan- 
taneously by the explosion. His 
lieutenant, waiting of his death, 
said : — "We are all very sorry to lose 
him, as he was such a bright lad, and 
always did his task well and cheer- 
fully. He was one of my best gunners, 
and we shall all feel the loss of such 
an excellent man." The Rev. W. W. 
Scotland, Arbirlot, referring to 
Gunner Munro, said: — "He was a 
young man of attractive disposition 
and high character. In the early days 
of the war he joined the colours volun- 
tarily, and the sense of duty that 
influenced him in the beginning was 
with him till the ,end." His brother 
was killed the following month. 



Private Donald Mackay, Boyal 
Scots, was the son of Norman Mac- 
kay, blacksmith, 4 Lochland Street, 
Arbroath. He was thirty-one years 
of age, and had married Jane Nicoll, 
and left one son. Before joining the 
3rd Royal Scots in 1916 Private 
Mackay was in the service of the 
Pearl Assurance Co. at Arbroath. He 
went to France with the 2nd Royal 
Scots in December, and was invalided 
home in June 1917. In October he 
was drafted to Palestine with the 4th 
Battalion of the same Regiment, and 
returned to France in April 1918. He 
served there until the 22nd of Sep- 
tember, when he was killed in action 
at Moeuvres, in the Cambrai sector. 
His sergeant, writing of him, said : — 
" He was a most popular chap, well 
liked, and a noble soldier." 

PTE. WM. PATON, GORDONS. 

Pbivate William Paton, Gordon 
Highlanders, thirty-one years of age, 
was the eldest son of William Paton , 
Inverpeffer, Carnoustie. He died at 
St Luke's Hospital, Halifax, on the 
loth of October 1918. 



204 



PTE. ANDREW ROSS, R.S.F. 



PTE. J. BINNIE. SCOTS GUARDS. 





Private Andrew Ross, Royal 
Scots Fusiliers, 65 River Street, 
Brechin, was the son of Andrew Ross, 
23 Church Street, Arbroath. He was 
forty-three years of age, had married 
Helen Taylor Laurence Paton, and 
left three sons. He was employed at 
the East Mill, Brechin. In Arbroath 
hs was a well-known bowler, having 
won the Macdonald Cup three times 
and the Ross Cup twice. He joined 
the Black Watch in 1914, but was 
transferred in 1917. In February 
1918 he went to France, and was 
killed in action on th? 23rd of Septeni- 
ber. The chaplain gave him high 
praise as a good soldier and comrade. 

L-CPL. MITCHELL, W. RIDING. 

Lance-Corporal David A. Mit- 
chell, Duke of Wellington's Regi- 
ment, was the only son of Charles 
Mitchell, 21 Carnegie Street, Ar- 
hroath. He was greatly respected 
in his profession as teacher at Keptie 
School, and was match secretary of 
the Arbroath Amateur Football Club. 
He was presumed killed in France on 
the 10th of April 1918. 



Private James Binnie, Scots 
Guards, twenty-four years of age, 
was the second son of William Binnie, 
J. P., farm manager, and of his wife 
Margaret Thomson, Crofts, Car- 
myllie. He was employed as a farm 
servant at Redcastle, Inverkeilor, 
when he joined Kitchener's Army in 
September 1914 as a private in the 
Scots Guards. After six months' 
training in this country, he was 
drafted to France early in 1915. He 
went through the battle of Loos, and 
was wounded in October. He was in- 
valided home, and on his recovery a 
year afterwards he returned to 
France and was again wounded and 
sent home. Private Binnie went to 
France for the third time in October 
1917, and for some time was attached 
to the Machine Gun Section. While 
serving in a trench mortar battery of 
the 2nd Guards' Brigade he was killed 
by a violent explosion of their 
ammunition at the Canal du Nord on 
the 27th of September 1918. His cap- 
tain said he was extremely popular 
with everyone in the company, and 
was always cheerful and hard work- 
ing. 



205 



BDR. WILLIAM DICKSON. R.F.A. 



L-CPL. J. MICHIE. SEAFORTHS. 





Bombardier William Dickson, 
Royal Field Artillery, twenty-seven 
years of age, was the grandson of 
William Shillito, 22 Jamieson Street, 
Arbroath. Before joining the colours 
he was employed as a compositor in 
the "Arbroath Guide" Office, where 
his forceful character, his capable 
workmanship, and his energy were 
greatly appreciated. He entered the 
army in February 1915 as a gunner in 
A Battery, 170th Brigade, R.F.A. , 
and the sterling qualities which lead 
to success in civil life made him an 
enthusiastic and most efficient sol- 
dier. For two years he went through 
much heavy fighting in France. On 
the day before he was to have come 
home on leave he was fatally wounded 
and died after being a few hours in 
hospital, on the 28th* of September 
1918. He was buried in La Kreule 
Cemetery. His major wrote: — "The 
death of Bombardier Dickson has 
caused a big gap in the ranks of the 
battery. He was a man in whom all 
the officers had the greatest faith, 
and he was very popular amongst the 
men. The battery has lost a man it 
could ill afford to lose." 



Lance-Corporal John L. A. 
Michie, 7th Seaforth Highlanders, 
nineteen years of age, was the eldest 
son of James M. B. Michie and of his 
wife Janet Baxter Anderson, 18 
Church Street, Arbroath. He was 
an apprentice joiner with Messrs J. 
& R. W. Siev wright and a student at 
Dundee Technical College, and had a 
promising career in front of him. 
He joined the Seaforth Highlanders 
as a private, and was later promoted 
to lance-corporal rank. When serving 
in France he was severely wounded 
by shrapnel in both legs on the 21st 
of September 1918. In the hope of 
saving his life one leg was amputated, 
but Lance-Corporal Michie succumbed 
to his wounds, and died three days 
later at a casualty clearing station. 

PTE. W. PHLLIP, BLACK WATCH 

Private William Philip, Black 
Watch, twenty-one years of age, was 
the son of David Philip, Tooty, Car- 
myllie. He was a farm servant in 
the district, enlisted in 1917, and had 
been only a few weeks in France when 
he was killed in the spring of 1918. 



206 



CPL. CHARLES KYDD, M.G.C. 



PTE. GEO. OAKLEY, 79th T.M.B. 





Corporal Charles W. Kydd, 
Machine Gun Corps, twenty-eight 
years of age, was the son of 
George and Mary Ann Kydd, Elliot, 
near Arbroath. He had gone to 
America, but returned to enlist in a 
home regiment in March 1915. He 
joined the H. L. 1., but was trans- 
ferred to the Machine Gun Corps of 
the 29th Battalion. For three years 
ht did his part in France as a 
machine gunner, and " well and hard 
h>; fought." A shell bursting within 
a few yards killed him on the 30th of 
September 1918, and he was buried 
close to the village of Ghelve, near 
Menin. His lieutenant wrote of him 
as a very good n.c.o., whom he was 
extremely sorry to lose. 

PTE. KENNETH MORRIS, H.L.I. 

Private Kenneth David Morris, 
Highland Light Infantry, was the 
third son of Mr and Mrs Morris, 
Mainhouse Lodge, Kelso, and grand- 
son of George Dorward, Friockheim. 
He died of acute pneumonia at 
Auxiliary Hospital, Kinghorn Fife, 
on the 25th of October 1918. 



Private George Oae:ley, 79th 
Trench Mortar Battery, 21 Park 
Street, Arbroath, was the fourth son 
of David Oakley, 97 Bouverie Street, 
Port Glasgow, formerly of Arbroath. 
He was thirty-one years of age, and 
had married Jessie Watt, and left one 
son and two daughters. He had 
wrought at Westburn Foundry, but 
was at Gourock Ropework when he 
joined the A. & S. H. in October 1914. 
After being drafted from Greenock to 
Hawick and Broughty Ferry, he was 
in Dundee guarding the Tay Bridge. 
Thence he was sent to Portobello, and 
to Deal, and from there to guard the 
prisoners at Stobs Camp. He was 
then transferred to the Royal Defence 
Corps, and served at Rosyth and 
Ripon. In October 1917 he volun- 
teered for foreign service, and was 
wounded in France in January 1918. 
He fell in action on the 1st of October, 
and was buried in Belleglise Ceme- 
tery on the St Quentin Canal. His 
captain wrote that he was an "excel- 
lent soldier and most popular both 
with the officers and men." Four 
brothers and two brothers-in-law also 
served with the colours. 



•207 



PTE. A. MITCHELL, GORDONS. 



PTE. DUTHIE, BLACK WATCH. 
















|P| 


~^- i. 






* 1 


i 




4 



Private Alexander Mitchell, 1st 
Gordon Highlanders, eighteen years 
of age, was the son of Private Alex- 
ander Mitchell, Black Watch, and of 
his wife Margaret Tosh, 25 John 
Street, Arbroath. He was a machine- 
man at Dens Iron Works when he 
enlisted in March 1918. During an 
attack on a village, the men were going 
over a ridge when very heavy machine 
gun fire was opened on them, and 
Private Mitchell was hit on the head. 
He was sent to 34 Casualty Clearing 
Station, and died on the 3rd of 
October 1918, and was buried in the 
British Cemetery, Grevillers, about 
a mile from Bapaume. His 
chaplain, in writing of him, said: — 
" In spite of his youth he lived his 
life with us in a manner which did 
him credit. He did his duty as a 
soldier with a smartness and keen 
sense of responsibility and honour 
which earned for him the esteem and 
respect of his officers and fellow- 
comrades, while he had qualities of 
heart which .endeared him to us all. 
He showed a distinctive courage in 
the face of danger." Private Mit- 
chell's father was a prisoner of war. 



Private William Duthie, 7th 
Black Watch, was the son of Robert 
Duthie, and of his wife Mary 
Carnegie, Parkhill Mains, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-four years of age and 
unmarried, and before he went to the 
front was a farm servant at Tarry, 
St Vigeans. Private Duthie joined 
the army in March 1916, was 
wounded at Beaumont Hamel in 
November, and was invalided home, 
returning to France early in 1918. 
Private Duthie was killed in action 
on the 1st October 1918, and was 
buried in Flanders, near the River 
Lys, not far from Courtrai. 

W.O. RONALD W. FALCONER, 

Senior Wireless Operator 
Ronald Walter Falconer, twenty 
years of age, was the son of Daniel 
Falconer,, currier, and of his wife 
Henrietta Smart, 18 Brechin Road, 
Arbroath. He was an apprentice 
printer and entered the Marconi 
Service in 1915. He was drowned on 
the 16th of April 1918 when serving 
on s.s. Ladogo, which was lost 
through enemy action. 



208 



L-CPL. A. TAYLOR. CAMERONS. 



LIEUT. C. W. THOMSON, R.N.R. 





Lance-Corporal Arthur David- 
son Taylor, 5th Cameron High- 
landers, twenty years of age, was the 
grandson of David Taylor, Lnnan 
Mill, Inverkeilor. He was a plough- 
man at Leysmill when he enlisted in 
June 1917. After three months' 
training at Invergordon he was 
drafted to France, where he was three 
times wounded and gassed. On the 
1st of October 1918, Lance-Corporal 
Taylor died of wounds at Potyes 
Chateau Dressing Station, and was 
buried in the cemetery at Potyes. 
His Commanding Officer wrote : — 
" He was in charge of a Lewis gun 
section, and was wounded by a sniper 
on the 28th of September, and lived 
three days. He was a very brave 
and able soldier, and very popular 
amongst his comrades." 

L-CPL. P. CARMICHAEL, R.S.F. 

Lance - Corporal Peter Car- 
michael, Royal Scots Fusiliers, was 
the only son of John Carmichael, at 
one time gardener at Rosely, Ar- 
broath. He was killed in action on 
the 25th of October 1918. 



Lieutenant Charles Wallace 
Thomson, Royal Naval Reserve, 4 
Wykeham Terrace, Brighton, was the 
youngest son of Captain John Thom- 
son, Merfield, Victoria Street, Ar- 
broath. He was thirty-two years of 
age, and married Nora Moody. After 
serving his apprenticeship on one of 
the Loch Line Shipping Co. vessels, 
he entered the service of the Royal 
Mail Steam Packet Co., and rose to 
the rank of chief officer. He was on 
the R.M.S. Petoria when it was cap- 
tured by a German raider, and was 
kept a prisoner on board the raider 
for six weeks, and saw many stirring 
scenes connected with the sinking of 
British merchantmen. He was landed 
in the U.S.A., and before release, was 
compelled to promise that he would 
not take up arms against Germany. 
He had no hestiation, however, in 
cancelling his enforced pledge, and he 
received a commission in the R.N.E ., 
and served for two years on H.M.S. 
Edgar, taking part in eighty actions 
at the Dardanelles. He was appointed 
Chief Shipping Controller at Syra- 
cuse, and he died of enteric fever at 
Malta on the 4th of October 1918. 



209 



LIEUT. T. KEILLOR, M.C., A.I.F. 



PTE. J. SMART, BLACK WATCH. 





Lieutenant Thomas Keillor, 
M.C., Australian Imperial Force, 6 
Payneham Road, St Peters, Adelaide, 
was the son of Alexander Keillor, 35 
Millgate Loan, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-nine years of age, and had 
married Kathleen Wise. He was a 
grocer, and had gone to Australia, 
where he joined the A.I.F. in 1916. 
In 1917 he. was promoted Lieutenant 
on the field in France. His record 
as a soldier was splendid throughout. 
He was awarded the Military Cross 
in September 1917, and in June 1918 
he won the addition of a bar. The 
quotations from General Birdwood's 
letters to him on these two occasions 
showed how greatly he deserved the 
honours, and how much his daring 
service was appreciated by the 
General. " Dear Keillor, — I write to 
congratulate you very heartily upon 
the Military Cross which has been 
awarded to you. . . . You led your 
platoon with great dash and gallan- 
try, and when your senior officers 
were wounded you took charge of the 
company and showed admirable skill 
and judgment in the consolidation of 
the position, and the organisation of 



Private John Smart, 3rd Black 
Watch, twenty years of age, was the 
only son of George Smart and of his 
wife Williamina Grant, 1 Elliot 
Street, Arbroath. He was a plough- 
man at East Newton when he enlisted 
in April 1918, and had been only 
fourteen days in France when he was 
killed on the 23rd of September. 



your defence, and I know r what a fine 
example you set your men by your 
soldierly conduct, for which I thank 
you." When the bar was awarded: 
"As battalion intelligence officer you 
went forward with the assaulting 
troops right to the objective. On 
your way you encountered two Ger- 
mans who were in the act of firing 
on our men from the rear, and killed 
them both single-handed. . . . You 
hrought back to headquarters much 
valuable information. . . . This neces- 
sitated your passing through a very 
heavy enemy barrage, which you did 
with total disregard for your own 
safety. Thanking you so much. . . . 
W. N. Birdwood." Lieut. Keillor was 
killed on the 3rd of October 1918. 



210 



SERGT. DAVID FELL, R.F.A. 



PTE. HENRY GRANT. A. & S. H. 





Sergeant - Fitter David Fell, 
Royal Field Artillery, 28 Bank Street, 
Arbroath, was the youngest son of 
James Fell, grocer and spirit mer- 
chant, and of his wife Mary M'Bay, 
and brother of Mrs Ross, Millgate 
Loan. He was twenty-three years of 
age, and was a patternmaker at 
Dens Iron Works, and a well-known 
player in the Parkhead Football 
Club. In March 1915 he joined up 
as a gunner, was promoted ser- 
geant, and went to France, where he 
served for eleven months. Sergeant 
Fell was gassed early in 1918, and on 
the 4th of October he died in No. 56 
Casualty Clearing Station of wounds 
received in action the day before. He 
was buried at Grevillers British 
Cemetery, west of Bapaume. 

CPL. P. SWANKIE, CANADIANS. 

Corporal Peter Swankie, Cana- 
dian Expeditionary Force, was the 
son of William Swankie, 11 Union 
Street East, Arbroath. He died from 
wounds in an English hospital, and 
was buried on the 17th of November 
1918 in Arbroath Western Cemetery. 



Private Henry Grant, Argyll and 
Sutherland Highlanders, 7 Murray 
Place, Arbroath, was twenty-seven 
years of age. He married Mary 
Clark, and left a son and a daughter. 
He was manager of Shepherd's Dairy 
Co., Ltd., in West Port, when he 
joined the A. & S. H. in January 
1916. When serving in France he 
was wounded at Arras in 1917, and on 
the 10th of October 1918 he was 
posted missing. Later it was offici- 
ally reported that he had been killed 
in action or died of wounds on or 
about that date. 

PTE. J AS. HARRIS, CANADIANS. 

Private James Alexander Harris, 
Canadian Infantry, was the third son 
of Captain James Harris, of the 
Anchor Line, Langside, Glasgow, and 
a grandson of David Harris, Millgate, 
Arbroath. He had been in a stock- 
broker's office in Glasgow, but was in 
America when war broke out. He 
joined the colours in 1916, and went 
overseas in January 1918. On the 
27th of September he was killed in 
action in France. 



211 



CAPT. MACGREGOR, M.C., B.W. 



CPL. C. E. WITHINGTON, R.D.C. 





Captain A. J. Macgregor, M.C., 
13th Black Watch, was the son of 
Colonel A. D. Macgregor, Gordon 
Highlanders, and of his wife Effie 
Lindsay, Melrose, Guernsey. He 
was a nephew of D. C. Rutherford 
Lindsay Carnegie of Kinblethmont, 
near Arbroath. Captain Macgregor 
was forty-four years of age, and was 
unmarried. He held an important 
position in the Imperial Chinese Cus- 
toms, China, and took part in the de- 
fence of Tientsin. In August 1914 
he joined the army as second-lieuten- 
ant in the Scottish Horse, and served 
on most of the battle fronts. He 
went through the Gallipoli campaign, 
took part in the fighting in Egypt 
and Salonica, and finally was in the 
last great advance in France. He 
was awarded the Military Cross for 
service on the Struma front, when 
the Scottish Horse had become the 
13th Battalion of the Black Watch. 
He was fatally wounded by a shell on 
the 6th of October 1918, and died 
near Le Catelet two days later. His 
Brigadier tersely summed up Captain 
Macgregor' s character and work: 
" He said little and did much." 



Coeporal Charles E. Within gton, 
Royal Defence Corps, 6 Dishland 
Street, Arbroath, was the son of 
Edward Withington, carpenter, and 
of his wife Margaret Holgarth, Rose 
Cottage, Moorfield Lane, Scarisbrick, 
Lancashire. He was forty-seven 
years of age, and had married Mary 
Smith, and left two sons and one 
daughter. He was a compositor at 
Mr Hutton's Steam Printing Works, 
Ormskirk, when he joined up in June 
1915, and was stationed at Tralee. 
Corporal Withington was on his way 
home on leave on board s.s. Leinster 
when that vessel was torpedoed on 
the 10th of October 1918. His body 
was washed ashore at Kirkcudbright 
and buried with full military honours. 

GUNNER GEORGE WATT, R.F.A. 

Gunnek George Watt, Royal Field 
Artillery, was the son of Jonathan 
Watt, East Mary Street, Arbroath. 
He was a bleacher at Kellyfield when 
he joined the Black Watch Terri- 
torials. Later he was transferred 
to the Machine Gun Section of the 
R.F.A. He was killed in July 1918. 



212 



PTE. J. SUTTIE. DORSET REGT. 



CPL. ALEXANDER SMITH, R.F.A. 





Private J. Suttie, 6th Dorset 
Regiment, 14 Ann Street, Arbroath, 
was the son of Andrew Suttie and of 
his wife Jane Wilkie, 17 Ernest 
Street. He was thirty-seven years of 
age, had married Helen Leslie, and 
left one son and two daughters. Pri- 
vate Suttie was a storekeeper with 
Messrs Grant & Son, grain mer- 
chants, when he joined the Army 
Service Corps in July 1916. He was 
afterwards transferred and had been 
in France only three weeks when on 
the 11th of October 1918, he was killed 
in action near Neuilly and was buried 
in the River British Cemetery. 



Corporal Alexander Smith, Royal 
Field Artillery, 53 Green Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of James Smith, 
23 Elliot Street. He was twenty- 
six years of age, and had married 
Janie L. Fettes. Previous to joining 
the colours in September 1914 he was 
a mechanic at Inch Mill. Except 
during a few months when he was in- 
valided home for blood poisoning Cor- 
poral Smith served continuously at 
the front from shortly after the out- 
break of war until October 1918. He 
was wounded in action at that time 
and died on the 12th of the month 
at No. 12 General Hospital, Rouen.. 



SGT. WILLIAM GROVE, A.I.F. 

Sergeant William G. Grove, 
American Expeditionary Force, 
twenty-nine years of age, was the son 
of William Grove and of his wife 
Browina Stewart, 27 Ward Street, 
Orange, New Jersey, both of whom 
were natives of Arbroath. He joined 
the American army in December 1917, 
went to France in June 1918, and died 
there of bronchial pneumonia. He 
had two brothers with the colours. 



PTE. ANDREW REEKIE, B.W. 

Private Andrew Reekie, Black 
Watch, 9 Kyd Street, Arbroath, was 
twenty-five years of age, and was a 
native of Perth. He was employed 
as a plasterer with Mr Archibald, and 
he was well known in Arbroath as a 
prominent player in Parkhead Foot- 
ball Club. He served with the colours 
for about two and a half years, and 
died of wounds in France on the 9th 
of October 1918. 



213 



PTE. WM. BEATTS, A. & S. H. 



L-CPL. J. ROSS, BLACK WATCH. 





Private AVilliam Beatts, 7th 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 
was the son of "William Beatts, 35 
West Grimsby, Arbroath. He was 
twenty years of age, and was a 
moulder with Messrs Keith & 
Blaekman Co., Ltd. He joined the 
A & S. H. in November 1915, and 
was drafted to France in February 
1916. Private Beatts was singularly 
unfortunate. He was wounded four 
times, gassed once, and had also suf- 
fered from trench fever. He was 
killed on the 13th of October 1918 by 
an enemy sniper during an advance 
on the village of Lieu-Stamand, about 
ten miles north-east of Cambrai. His 
death was instantaneous and he was 
buried close to the field of battle. 
His platoon sergeant wrote of him in 
most appreciative terms saying that 
he was a very good soldier, very 
obedient, and gave no trouble. Pri- 
vate Beatts had four brothers on ser- 
vice — Private Alexander Beatts was 
killed in 1915 ; Private James Beatts. 
K.O.S.B., was taken prisoner at 
Mons ; another brother was in the 
Black Watch ; and a fourth in the 
navy. 



Lance - Corporal James Pirie 
Boss, 8th Black Watch, 9 Culloden 
Boad, Arbroath, was the eldest son 
of Mrs G. Kerr, 12 Barngreen. He 
was thirty-four years of age and had 
married Agnes W. Butchart. He was 
a clicker at the Abbey Leather Works 
when he enlisted as a private in No- 
vember 1916. After three months' 
training he went to France in Feb- 
ruary 1917, and was soon afterwards 
promoted lance-corporal. On the 
14th of October 1918 Lance-Corporal 
Boss was killed by machine gun fire 
while leading his section to the 
attack of an enemy pill-box. His 
death was instantaneous, and he was 
buried near the place where he fell. 

A.B. NORMAN STTTRROCK, R.N. 

Able-Seaman Norman Sturrock, 
Royal Navy, was a nephew of James 
Sturrock, 22 Green Street, Arbroath. 
Brought up at Laurencekirk, he 
came to Arbroath, and joined the 
navy when he was sixteen years of 
age. He was drowned at sea in 
August 1918, the vessel on which 
he was serving being torpedoed. 



214 



PTE. SMITH, SHER. FORESTERS. 



PTE. GEO. K. CLARK, A.E.F. 





Private Edwin Henderson Smith, 
Sherwood Foresters, 10 Jamieson 
Street, Arbroath, was the son of 
Peter Smith, farmer, and of his wife 
Jane M'Crow, Fallaw, Inverkeilor. 
He was twenty-eight years of age, 
and had married Elizabeth Robertson. 
He was with Mr D. Y. Walker, 
butcher, when he enlisted in 1915. He 
went to France and served with the 
A.S.C. until April 1917, when he was 
transferred to the 10th Welsh In- 
fantry Regiment, and later to the 
Sherwood Foresters. He was woun- 
ded in July 1918, and again in 
October. On the 17th of October he 
died of wounds at No. 12 (St Louis, 
U.S.A.) General Hospital, Rouen, and 
was buried at St Sever Cemetery. 

GNR. DAVID WYLLIE, R.F.A. 

Gunner David Wyllie, Royal 
Field Artillery, twenty-one years of 
age, son of William Wyllie, 50 Helen 
Street, Arbroath, was employed at 
Netherward Works when he joined 
the army in June 1915. He was re- 
ported missing and presumed killed 
on the 28th of June 1918. 



Private George Kinloch Clark, 
G Coy., 29th Engineers, American 
Expeditionary Force, eighteen years 
of age, was the son of Joseph M. 
Clark and of his wife Jane Grant, 
449 Union Avenue, Paterson, New 
Jersey, and grandson of James 
Grant, Boysaok Muir. He died of 
puenmonia on s.s. Adriatic when on 
his way to France on the 17th of 
October 1918, and was buried in 
Everton Cemetery, Liverpool, with 
full military honours. 

PTE. C. ROBERTSON, H.L.I. 

Private Charles Robertson, High- 
land Light Infantry, was the son of 
William Robertson, 19 West Mary 
Street, Arbroath. He married Sarah 
Mitt, and left three children. He 
was house steward at Stoneyetts 
Hosptial, near Glasgow, and enlisted 
in June 1917. He died of wounds in 
Germany on the 25th of April 1918. 

SGT. A. STEWART, AMERICANS. 

Sergeant Adam Shand Stewart, 
American Infantry, adopted son of 
Alexander Stewart, Marywell, was 
killed on the 28th of September 1918. 



215 



PTE. ALEX. M. KYDD, R.S.F. 



GNR. E. B. WILLIAMSON. R.F.A. 





Private Alexander Murray 
Kydd, Royal Scots Fusiliers, was the 
son of Mrs Mitchell, 32 St Vigeans 
Road, Arbroath. He was twenty- 
three years of age, and before he 
enlisted was a farm servant at Pan- 
lathy. Private Kydd joined the 
Royal Scots Fusiliers in January 
1915, and after several months' 
training he was sent to France. Two 
months later he was drafted to 
Salonica, where he served for two 
years and a half. In June 1918 he 
was invalided home for two months, 
after which he returned to France. 
Private Kydd was killed in action at 
Vichte on the 20th of October 1918. 
His CO. said he was a splendid and 
brave soldier and his work during the 
battle was exceptional owing to his 
inherent fearlessness and confidence. 

PTE. LINDSAY, SCOTS GUARDS. 

Private James Lindsay, Scots 
Guards, twenty-two years of age, 
was a son of James Lindsay, Dun- 
nichen, formerly of Salmond's Muir, 
Arbroath. He was killed in action 
in October 1918. 



Gunner Edward B. Williamson, 
1st Forfarshire Battery, Royal Field 
Artillery, was the son of Alexander 
D. Williamson, 59 Kinnaird Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-two years 
of age, and was an apprentice 
mechanic with Messrs Francis Web- 
ster & Sons. He joined the Terri- 
torials in February 1912, was mobil- 
ised at the outbreak of war, and went 
to France in 1915. With the excep- 
tion of a short time in Italy, Gunner 
Williamson was engaged in the fight- 
ing in Northern France and Flan- 
ders. He was in No. 4 General Hos- 
pital, France, suffering from a 
poisoned hand when he took pneu- 
monia, and died on the 22nd of Octo- 
ber 1918. He was buried in the 
Military Cemetery at Etaples. 

PTE. SHANKS, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Arthur Shanks, Black 
Watch twenty-one years of age, was 
the son of Thomas Shanks, 1 Rose- 
bank, Arbroath. He was a plough- 
man at Windyhills when he enlisted 
in November 1916. He was killed in 
action on the 2nd of September 1918. 



216 



L-CPL. THOS. MITCHELL, H.L.I. PTE. GRAHAME, BLACK WATCH. 





Lance-Corporal Thomas F. Mit- 
chell, 9th Highland Light Infantry, 
twenty years of age, was the son of 
David Mitchell, 18 West Ahbey 
Street, Arbroath. He was an ap- 
prentice fitter at the Dens Iron 
Works when he joined the H.L.I, in 
February 1917. He went to France 
in November, but in three months 
was invalided home with trench feet. 
He returned to France in September 
1918, and was killed at Engle Fon- 
taine on the 24th of October. His 
brother, David, was in the A.S.C. 

LT. PATRICK J. LAMB, R.G.A. 

Lieutenant Patrick James Lamb, 
Royal Garrison Artillery, twenty- 
three years of age, was the son of 
Commissioner Lamb, Salvation 
Army, Westgate-on-Sea, formerly of 
Friockheim. He had seen much ser- 
vice in the western front, and had 
been recommended for the Military 
Cross for pluck and daring in putting 
out a fire on a waggon load of am- 
munition. Lieut. Lamb was killed 
in action in August 1918. His brother 
Alexander was wounded on service. 



Private David Grahame, 8th 
Black Watch, was the fourth son of 
John Grahame, Keptie Gardens, Ar- 
broath. He was twenty years of age 
and was employed as a farm servant 
at Milton of Oraigie, near Dundee. 
He enlisted in June 1918, and was 
killed in action on the 24th October. 

CORPORAL J. A. FORD, R.F.A. 

Corporal J. A. Ford, Royal Field 
Artillery, was the son of Robert 
Ford, 2 Hannah Street, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-five years of age and 
was a miner at Wellesle|y Pit, Den- 
bea.th, Methil. He enlisted in Sep- 
tember 1914, went to France in 1915, 
and was wounded. Later he w'as 
drafted to Salonica, where he was 
gassed. He died of pneumonia in 
No. 80 Field Ambulance Hospital, 
Salonica, on the 17th of November 
1918. His section officer wrote that 
he was one of his best n.c.o.'s, a 
very willing and cheerful worker, and 
that though he had died after hos- 
tilities had ceased, he had died in 
the cause of his country. Two of 
his brothers also served in France. 



217 



L-CPL. M'CONNELL, SEAFORTHS. CPL. J. L. RUTHERFORD, A.S.C. 





Lance-Corporal John M'Connell, 
M.M., 6th Seaforth Highlanders, 
was the son of John M'Connell and 
of his wife Mary A. Grant, St 
Ruth's, Hamilton Green, Arbroath. 
He was twenty-six years of age, un- 
married, and was a printer at the 
"Herald" Office. He joined the 

Territorials in 1909 as a signaller in 
the 5th Black Watch, and was 
mobilised while in camp on the 4th 
of August 1914. After a few months' 
training he was drafted to France 
in November 1914, and was on 
active service for four years, dur- 
ing which time he was twice gassed. 
In 1917 he was awarded the Military 
Medal for his conspicuous gallantry 
in repairing telephones under heavy 
barrage fire. In March 1918 Lance- 
Corporal M'Connell was transferred 
to the Seaforths. He was killed on 
the 25th of October 1918 at the battle 
of Valenciennes, and was buried in 
the British Cemetery at Maing. His 
Commanding Officer said he was 
loved by officers and comrades alike, 
and was in every way a gallant sol- 
dier, and that his career in the army 
was an exceptionally fine one. 



Corporal James Lyall Ruther- 
ford, Army Service Corps, 6 Stirling 
Street, Dundee, was the son of Hector 
Rutherford, butcher, and of his wife 
Jessie Coutts. He was twenty-five 
years of age and unmarried. When 
he enlisted he was working with his 
brother, D. C. Rutherford, butcher, 
Hilltown, Dundee. Corporal Ruther- 
ford joined the Army Service Corps 
in January 1915. He died on the field 
in France on the 24th October 1918. 

PTE. ESPLLN, BLACK WATCH. 

Private Charles Esplin, Black 
Watch, was the son of Charles 
Esplin, builder, Gardyne Street, 
Friockheim. He was taken prisoner 
in March 1918, and since June there 
was no news of him until a letter 
came from a returned prisoner of 
war stating that Private Esplin had 
been admitted to hospital, and had 
died ten days afterwards. It was 
the German War Hospital at Valen- 
ciennes where Private Esplin died 
on the 20th of July 1918. He was 
the only Friockheim prisoner of war 
who died in enemy hands. 



218 



SEAMAN BRUCE, ROYAL NAVY. 



PTE. WM. MANN, GORDONS. 





Seaman William Bruce, mine- 
sweeper deckhand, eighteen years ol 
age, was the son of Nicholson Bruce, 
fisherman, 11 Marketgate, Arbroath. 
He was a labourer in the Millgate Tan- 
work when he joined the 5th Black 
Watch in November 1915. He served 
for nine months, but was discharged 
on account of his age — not being 
then seventeen. He afterwards offered 
his services to the navy, and for six 
months was engaged as deckhand on 
a minesweeper. He died as the result 
of influenza in the Hazel Hospital, 
Gosport, on the 25th of October 1918. 

GNR. CHAS. SHELSTON, R.F.A. 

Gunner Charles Shelston, Royal 
Field Artillery, was the son of 
Charles Shelston, 43 Wallace Street, 
Arbroath. He was twenty-four 

years of age, and had been with 
Messrs Clark, Oliver, Dewar & 
Webster, S.S.C. When he enlisted in 
1915 he was a journalist in Dundee. 
For a year he was on the staff of the 
Army Pay Corps, Perth, but was 
afterwards transferred. He died of 
wounds on the 18th of October 1918. 



Private William Mann, 1st Gor- 
don Highlanders, Parkhill Mains, 
Arbroath, was the third son of Alex- 
ander Mann and of his wife Jane 
Lawson, Kinnell. He was nineteen 
years of age, and was a ploughman 
at Leysmill Farm. Private Mann 
joined the Gordons in June 1918. He 
died of wounds in No. 3 Casualty 
Clearing Station, France, on the 25th 
of October 1918. He was the young- 
est of three brothers who all fell in 
the war. Lance-Corporal John Mann, 
K.O.S.B., died from wounds received 
at Loos, and Private Alexander 
Mann was killed in 1916. 

PTE. THOMAS C. SMITH, R.S. 

Private Thomas 0. Smith, 16th 
Royal Scots, was the son of James 
Smith, 12 Marketgate, Arbroath. He 
was twenty-four years of age, and 
was employed as a bleacher. After 
six weeks' service in France he was 
wounded, returned to France on his 
recovery, and was taken prisoner 
shortly afterwards. He died in hos- 
pital at Stettin on the 11th of De- 
cember 1918. 



219 



SIG. D. BLACK, M.M., R.F.A. PTE. D. MORRISON, SEAFORTHS. 





Signaller David Black, M.M., 
Royal Field Artillery, was the son of 
William Black, butcher, and of his 
wife Margaret Stewart, Woodview, 
Carnoustie, and grandson of John 
Stewart, Beechmont, Carnoustie. He 
was twenty years of age and was in 
his father's business. He joined the 
army in June 1917, and went to 
France in April 1918. He was awarded 
the Military Medal for conspicuous 
bravery in keeping communications 
intact for two and a half hours dur- 
ing heavy enemy gun-fire, and at the 
time of a violent thunderstorm. He 
was killed in action soon afterwards. 
His CO. said: — "He died as he had 
lived, nobly and gallantly. At a 
time when it was absolutely neces- 
sary for the telephone communica- 
tion to be complete, he went out and 
did his utmost, under shell-fine, to 
mend the broken lines. Long before 
he had won his decoration (which he 
received for very similar work) he 
had gradually established himself in 
the respect and affection of all his 
comrades, while his officers knew 
him for a lad who could be relied on 
in the hour of danger. 



Private Douglas Morrison, Sea- 
forth Highlanders, twenty years of 
age, was the son of James Morrison 
and of his wife Margaret Leckie, 
Leader Cottage, Lauder, formerly of 
Seaton, Arbroath. He was an iron- 
turner at Dens Iron Works when he 
joined the 5th Black Watch (T.F.) 
the day after war was declared. For 
a year and a half he worked in 
Motherwell, but being anxious to 
go on active service, he was drafted 
to France in 1917. He w r as wounded 
in January 1918. On the 26th of 
October, when attacking south of 
Valenciennes, he was hit on the head 
and died in an ambulance train the 
following day. He was buried at 

Etaples. Private Morrison had two 
brothers serving, Sergeant John and 
Sergeant George Morrison. 

PTE. JAS. GIBSON, GORDONS. 

Private James Gibson, Gordon 
Highlanders, eighteen years of age, 
was the son of Mrs Gibson, Pan- 
mure Terrace, Carnoustie. He en- 
listed in November 1917, and was 
killed in action in 1918. 



220 



PTE. J. C. STARK, ROYAL SCOTS. 



PTE. JAMES SMITH, GORDONS. 





Private James Chalmers Stark, 
10th Royal Scots, was the son of 
David L. Stark and of his wife Mary 
M. Carver, 43 Cairnie Street, Ar- 
broath. He was nineteen years of 
age, and was a clerk with Messrs 
Francis Webster & Sons. He en- 
listed in April 1917 in the Fife and 
Forfar Yeomanry, arid served with 
them for fifteen months. He was 
then transferred and sent to Northern 
Russia, where he was killed in action 
on the 27th of October 1918. 



Private James Smith, 9th Gordon 
Highlanders, eighteen years of age, 
was the eldest son of James Smith 
and of his wife Sarah Wood, 34 Kin- 
naird Street, Arbroath. He was at 
one time a butcher with Mr F. Boath, 
but when he enlisted in January 
1918 li9 was employed by Mr John 
Taylor, Laurencekirk. Private Smith 
had been two and a half months in 
France when he died of pneumonia, 
after influenza, in a hospital in 
France on the 30th of October 1918. 



PTE. J. SMART, BLACK WATCH. 

Private James Smart, 3rd Black 
Watch, thirty-nine years of age, was 
the son of William Smart, joiner and 
cartwTight, Seaton, near Arbroath. 
Before he entered the army he was a 
joiner at Seaton in partnership with 
his brother David. In May 1916 he 
joined the 3rd Black Watch and was 
trained at Nigg for nine months. 
He then sailed for Palestine in Feb- 
ruary 1917 and while there took part 
in strenuous fighting. In April of 
the following year he was transferred 
from Egpyt to France, and was woun- 



ded at the Canal du Nord on the 2nd 
of September. He was taken to a 
General Hospital at Eti-etat where he 
lay dangerously ill for a month. Per- 
mission was given by the War Office 
to visit him, and his brother im- 
mediately set out for France. He 
was too late, however. Private Smart 
died on the 5th of October, and his 
brother had only the mournful satis- 
faction of seeing him laid to rest in 
the Cemetery at Etretat, and being 
present at his funeral, which was 
carried out with military honours, 
and attended by American soldiers. 



221 



GNR. ALEX. MUNRO, R.F.A. 



L-CPL. A. STURROCK, M.F.P. 





Gunner Alexander Mtjnro, Royal 
Field Artillery, twenty-four years of 
age, was the second son of Alexander 
Munro and of his wife Margaret 
MacDougall, Mains of Balcathie, Ar- 
broath. He was a fireman in the 
Newaa-k Sailcloth Co., Port Glasgow, 
when he enlisted in April 1917. After 
serving for a year and a half, and 
having been drafted to Italy, he took 
part in the advance on the Piave, and 
was killed by gun-fire on the 29th of 
October 1918. His major wrote: — 
"He is at rest on the banks of the 
Piave. He is much missed by his 
fellow soldiers. I found him one of 
my best gunners, always cheerful and 
a splendid worker." Gunner 

Munro' s brother, David, was killed 
in France a few weeks earlier. 



Lance-Corporal Alexander Sttjr- 
rock, Military Foot Police, 9 Duke 
Street, Arbroath, was the son of 
Alexander Sturrock and of his wife 
Margaret Tough, Carmyllie. He was 
thirty-five years of age, had married 
Nellie Smith, and left three sons. He 
was at one time a farm servant at 
East Seaton, but joined the Arbroath 
Burgh Police Force in 1908. He en- 
listed in the Military Foot Polioe in 
May 1916 and went to France shortly 
afterwards. He was due home on leave 
when lie had a very severe attack ot 
influenza, followed by pneumonia, and 
died in a hospital in France on the 
27th of October 1918. L.-Cpl. Stur- 
i-ock was one of seven Arbroath 
policemen who joined the colours, 
and was the second to die on service. 



PTE. JOHN QUINN, K.O.S.B. 

Private John Quinn, King's Own 
Scottish Borderers, was the son ot 
John Quinn, 108 Harvey Street, 
Newcastle, formerly of 41 Ponderlaw, 
Arbroath. He was reported missing 
on the 25th of April 1918, and was 
presumed to have died at that time. 



PTE. RAMSAY, CYCLIST CORPS. 

Private David Ramsay, Cyclist 
Corps, twenty-one years of age, was 
the brother of Miss M. Ramsay, Pan- 
mure Terrace, Carnoustie. Before he 
enlisted in 1915 he was employed in 
the Carnoustie Foundry. Private 
Ramsay died of w r ounds in 1918. 



222 



GNR. WM. MIDDLETON, R.G.A. 



PTE. 



L. WATSON, K.O.S.B. 





Gunner William Middleton, 
Eoyal Garrison Artillery, twenty- 
five years of age, was the only son cf 
William Middleton, 22 Ann Street, 
Arbroath. He was a clerk with 
Messrs Wordie & Co., at Arbroath, 
and afterwards at Aberdeen. In 
May 1915 he vounteered for service 
in the Royal Field Artillery, and went 
to France in the spring of 1916. He 
was wounded in the arm by shrapnel 
and invalided home. On returning 
to France he was transferred to the 
25th Siege Battery of the R.G.A. , in 
which he served until he had a severe 
attack of influenza, and died in No. 
50 Casualty Clearing Station on the 
31st of October 1918. 




Private David L. Watson, 1st 
King's Own Scottish Borderers, was 
the brother of Mrs James Anderson, 
21 Hill Place, Arbroath. He was 
forty-three years of age, and was un- 
married. Private Watson was a 
shoemaker before he enlisted in Sep- 
tember 1914. He was at the landing 
of the Forces at Y Beach on Gallipoli 
Peninsula, was severely wounded, 
and was taken on H.M.S. Goliath to 
the hospital at Malta. After recover- 
ing he went to France, and was 
again wounded, and was wounded for 
the third time and gassed in July 
1917. Pte. Watson died of pneumonia 
in the hospital at Boulogne on the 1st 
of November 1918. 



PTE. MARK DAVIDSON, N.Z. 

Private Mark Davidson, New 
Zealand Division, who belonged to 
Frioekheim, was killed in action in 
France on the 6th of November 1918. 
He and his brother, Arthur, had both 
left Frioekheim for New Zealand, 
and they were amongst the first to 
join up when war was declared. They 
both made the supreme sacrifice. 



PTE. W. MORTIMER, GORDONS. 

Private William Mortimer , 
Gordon Highlanders, eighteen years 
of age, was the son of George Morti- 
mer, 25 Kinloch Street, Carnoustie. 
Before enlisting in January 1917 he 
was a clerk in the Panmure Works. 
He was in France for five weeks, and 
had only been a few hours in the 
firing line when he was killed in 1918. 



223 



PTE. WILSON, BLACK WATCH. 



GUNNER WM. J. REID, R.G.A. 





Private George Wilson, 1st 
Black Watch, 52 Marketgate, Ar- 
broath, was the son of George Wilson 
and of his wife Catherine Young, 
Arbroath. He was thirty-four years 
of age, and had married Helen 
Rennie. When war was declared he 
was employed at the Dens Iron 
Works, but he was a reservist, and 
had not long returned from India, 
where he had served for nine years 
in the Black Watch. He was mobil- 
ised on the 4th of August 1914, and 
was taken prisoner on the 29th of 
October. After four years of cap- 
tivity in Germany he died when free- 
dom and victory were within sight. 
He was in the prisoner's camp at 
Sehneidemuhl, when he had an attack 
of influenza, and was admitted to the 
hospital on the 29th of October 1918. 
His illness developed rapidly, and he 
died on the 2nd of November. The 
President of the British Help Com- 
mittee wrote saying that he was 
buried with full military honours, and 
he sent the ribbons taken from his 
grave as a token of sympathy from all 
ranks of the lager, who deeply 
mourned the loss of an old comrade. 



Gunner William James Reid, 
Royal Garrison Artillery, was the 
only son of James Reid, 52 Helen 
Street, Arbroath. He was thirty- 
seven years of age, had married Lily 
Ber shell, and left two sons and one 
daughter. Before he enlisted in June 
1916 he was at the farm of Nether 
Careston. He died of pneumonia in 
a military hospital in France on the 
1st of November 1918. 

PTE. H. MARSHALL, D.L.I. 

Private Horatio Marshall, 
Machine Gun Corps, Durham Light 
Infantry, twenty-two years of age, 
was the son of Horatio Marshall, 12 
Portland Street, Hull, who belonged 
to Arbroath. He enlisted in May 
1917, and was pre sunned killed ion the' 
27th of May 1918. Two elder brothers 
were both killed in the war. 

PTE. THOS. J. VEY, C.A.M.C. 

Private Thomas J. Vey,, Canadian 
Army Medical Corps, 26 Helen 
Street, Arbroath, died of influenza 
in the Military Hospital at Shorn- 
cliffe on the 16th of November 1918. 



224 



PTE. J. CARGILL, SEAFORTHS. 



PTE. STURROCK, SCOT. HORSE. 





£'" 




Private James Moffat Cargill, 
4th Seaforth Highlanders, thirty 
years of age, was the son of Andrew 
Cargill, 26 Seagate, Arbroath. He 
enlisted in June 1916, and went. to 
France in December. After going 
through much heavy fighting he was 
taken prisoner at Cambrai in Novem- 
ber 1917. On the 1st of November 
1918 he died of influenza in a 
Brussels hospital, and was buried in 
Etterbeck Cemetery. 

2nd-LT. MURRAY DICKSON, B.W. 

Second-Lieutenant Murray Dick- 
son, Black Watch, was the son of 
G. Cecil Dickson, M.D., Medical 
Officer of Heath for Carnoustie. He 
was twenty-seven years of age, was 
a. brilliant tennis player, and one of 
the most popular young men in Car- 
noustie. He went to Calcutta in 1911. 
On the outbreak of war he joined the 
Calcutta Scottish, but early in 1917 
he came home to enlist. In August 
1918 he went to France, and fell in 
action on the 26th of October. His 
brother, Captain Dickson, served in 
France and in India. 



Private James Sturrock, Scottish 
Horse, twenty-five years of age, was 
the son of Alexander Sturrock, The 
Smithy, St Vigeans, near Arbroath. 
He was employed with Mr James A. 
Thomson, ironmonger, High Street, 
when, in April 1915, he joined the 
Scottish Horse, attached to the Black 
Watch. He served two years and 
nine months abroad in Egypt, 
Salonica, and France, and was killed 
in action in France on the 4th of 
November 1918. 

PTE. G. LOW, LONDON REGT. 

Private George Low, London 
Regiment, was the son of Andrew 
Low, Castle Street, Friockheim, who 
also served in France. Before joining 
the colours Private George Low was 
an apprentice architect with Mr 
H Gavin, Arbroath. He was a bright 
intelligent lad, and he enlisted in 
the Gordons when he was seventeen, 
but after serving in France for some 
time he was discharged because of his 
youth. As soon as age permitted he 
re-enlisted, and was killed in action 
in September 1918. 



225 



PTE. R. MILNE, BLACK WATCH. L-CPL. WM. LINDSAY, M.F.P. 





Private Robert Milne, 10th 
Black Watch, was the son of Henry 
Milne and of his wife Isabella Esplin, 
North Mains, Carmyllie, near Ar- 
broath. He was twenty-nine years 
of age and was unmarried. He was 
employed as a ploughman at Old 
Downie when he joined the 10th Black 
Watch on the 7th of June 1916. Pri- 
vate Milne was for a short time 
training in Dunfermline, and was 
then drafted with his regiment to 
Salonica, where he served for a year 
and a half. After a short home leave 
he was sent to Ireland, and later 
to France. He had been in France 
just two months when he was killed 
in action on the 4th of November 
1918. The chaplain, writing of him 
to his father, said : "We have buried 
him in a little military cemetery 
near the battlefield. We deplore his 
loss very much indeed. It will be 
all the harder for you, because he 
fell when victory and peace were 
within sight. His was a great 
sacrifice. You have the sure 

knowledge that he died doing 
his duty — a brave man to the 
very end." 



Lance-Corporal William Lind- 
say, Military Foot Police, 21 John 
Street, Arbroath, was the son of 
Peter and Ann Lindsay, Westerton, 
Stracathro. He was thirty-eight 
years of age, had married Catherine 
Cargill, and left two sons. Lance- 
Corporal Lindsay had sixteen years' 
service as a member of the local con- 
stabulary, and was a most popular 
officer. He joined the M.F.P. in May 
1916, and he died of influenza in a 
Casualty Clearing Station at Cani- 
brai on the 6th of November 1918. 
His death was the third gap made by 
the war in the Arbroath Police Force. 

PTE. COCHRANE, SCOT. RIFLES. 

Private William S. Cochrane, 
Scottish Rifles, Ashgrove, Carnoustie, 
was in a jute factory in Dundee, and 
was well-known in Carnoustie as a 
tenor vocalist. On the outbreak <i 
war he became connected with the 
Army Pay Corps at Perth, rising to 
the rank of sergeant. In July 1917 
he was transferred, and went to 
France, where he died of wounds on 
the 26th of October 1918. 



226 



ind-LT. ANDERSON, GREN. GDS. 



GNR. C. C M'DONALD, R.F.A. 





Second-Lieutenant A. D. Ander- 
son, Grenadier Guards, 13 King's 
Bench Walk, London, was the son of 
T. C. Anderson, formerly of Ar- 
broath, and of his wife Catherine 
Fraser, Maskeliye, Ceylon. He joined 
the Inns of Court O.T.C., but later 
went to Mexico, and there his out- 
standing ability gained for him the 
post of Comptroller of the Eagle Oil 
Coy. When war was declared he 
volunteered, but it was represented 
to him that he was doing more 
necessary work by guarding the 
supply of oil for the services. In 
1917, however, he joined the House- 
hold Brigade O.T.C., and on reaching 
France was posted to the King's 
Coy., 1st Battalion — the first com- 
pany of the first regiment in the 
British Infantry — a highly coveted 
honour. On the 7th of November 1918, 
on the way to Maubeuge, he was 
killed by a German machine gun at 
very close range. His Colonel wrote : 
"He was intensely brave during the 
fighting, and we had the greatest 
admiration for his courage. I am 
proud to have known him and to 
have had him in my battalion." 



Gunner Chas. Croall M'Donald, 
Royal Field Artillery, twenty-three 
years of age, was the son of 
Donald M'Donald and of his wife 
Mary Ann Croall, East Kirkton, St 
Vigeans. He was a barman in the 
Lome Bar when he joined the R.F.A. 
as a driver in April 1915. He went 
to France in May 1918, and served 
there and in Belgium until the 8th 
of November, when he was killed 
while driving an ammunition waggon. 
He was buried in Belgium, eight miles 
north-east of Courtrai. Gunner 
M'Donald' s brother, John, was killed 
in action in April 1917. The Rev. 
C. E. Duff, in referring to the two 
brothers, said: — "It would be diffi- 
cult to find two finer young men in 
the parish." 

PTE. J. RENNIE, ROYAL SCOTS. 

Private James Rennie, Royal 
Scots, thirty-five years of age, 53 
Caldrum Street, Dundee, was a 
brother of Mrs Hennan, 14 Smithy 
Croft, Arbroath. He enlisted in 
February 1915, and was presumed to 
have died in April 1918. 



227 



MAJOR SYDNEY WILSON, R.F.A. 



SEAMAN DAVID BROWN, R.N. 





Major Sydney Cunningham Wil- 
son, Royal Field Artillery, was the 
son of John Wilson, Rotomahana, 
Arbroath. He was thirty-two years 
of age and had married Florence 
Lindsay Fairweather, Craigard. He 
was in his father's manufacturing 
business, and was an enthusiastic 
officer in the Forfarshire Battery of 
the R.F.A., and had been promoted 
Captain. He was mobilised with the 
Highland Brigade, and went to 
France in the spring of 1915. In 
June 1916 he was gazetted Major, 
and in 1917 was given command of a 
Gloucester Battery, and was ordered 
to Italy with it in November. While 
on service in the mountains he met 
with a serious accident, from which 
he never fully recovered. After be- 
ing in hospital for eight months, he 
was posted to Brighton as Senior 
Major in an Officer Cadet Battery, 
but had been there only a few weeks 
when he took ill and pneumonia set 
in. He died on the 9th of November 
1918, and was buried in the Western 
Cemetery, Arbroa-th, with full mili- 
tary honours. The following is an 
extract from a letter signed by the 



Seaman David Beattie Brown, 
Royal Navy, 34 Helen Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of William 
Brown, pilot, Arbroath Harbour. He 
was thirty-nine years of age, and 
was a merchant seaman before join- 
ing the navy as a minesweeper in 
July 1916. He died of pneumonia in 
the 3rd Scottish General Hospital, 
Stobhill, Glasgow, on the 8th of 
November 1918. 



warrant officers, n.c.o.'s, and men 
of Major Wilson's Battery: — "We 
served with him during the latter part 
of the Somme and through the third 
battle of Ypres, the worst time we 
ever had. We all respected and ad- 
mired him for his undoubted efficiency 
and his cheerfulness. Whatever hap- 
pened the Major always smiled and 
helped us along. . . . We not 
only respected him as a battery com- 
mander, but felt we could turn to 
him as a friend. Two of Major 
Wilson's brothers, who had both been 
wounded, served in the Black Watch, 
and his brother-in-law, Major Fraser, 
D.S.O., was in the R.F.A. 



228 



GNR. CHARLES MILNE, R.F.A. 



PTE. ORROCK, BLACK WATCH. 





Gunner Charles Milne, Royal 
Field Artillery, twenty-five years 
of age, was the son of Charles Milne 
and of his wife Mary Willooks, 69 
Sidney Street, Arbroath. He was 
an ironmoulder with Messrs Keith &■ 
Blaokman, Ltd., and had joined the 
Forfarshire Battery of the R.F.A. 
(T.F.) as a driver in 1909. He was 
mobilised at the outbreak of war and 
went to France with his Battery in 
May 1915- In November 1918 he 
came home on leave, and shortly after 
his arrival he became seriously ill 
with influenza, followed by puen- 
monia. He died in Arbroath In- 
firmary on the 20th of November. 
Gunner Milne's brother, James, was 
killed the same year. His father and 
two brothers also served. 

SIG. CHAS. ADAMSON, R.F.A. 

Signaller Charles Adamson, 
Royal Field Artillery, Peddie Street, 
Dundee, nephew of Charles Ander- 
son, newsagent, Guthrie Port, Ar- 
broath, was killed in action in Meso- 
potamia in 1918. His father and 
brother were also serving. 



Private George Ttjrnbltll 
Orrock, 8th Black Watch, twenty- 
four years of age, was the son of 
James Orrock, R-edcastle, near Ar- 
broath. He was a farm servant at 
East Newton when he joined Kit- 
chener's Army in October 1914. He 
was severely wounded at Loos in 
October 1915, and for eighteen 
months was in an English hospital. 
He never, however, fully recovered, 
and after a long illness he died in 
Arbroath Infirmary on the 29th of 
November 1918. He was buried with 
full military honours in Inverkeilor 
Churchyard. Pte. Orrock' s brother, 
John, also served in the Black Watch, 
and his brother, James, was with the 
Gordons in India. 

CAPT. W. L. MILLAR, R.A.M.C. 

Captain William Linton Millar, 
Royal Army Medical Corps, Forres, 
was formerly in Arbroath as an 
assistant to Dr J. A. Dewar. He 
was thirty-eight years of age, was 
married, and left one child. While on 
service he became seriously ill with 
pneumonia and died in October 1918. 



229 



SGT. W. FOX BLACK WATCH. 



L-CPL. W. PATERSON, R.A.F. 





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•4- 




\ 







Sekgeant William Fox, 5th Black 
Watch, 79 Blaokscroft, Dundee, was 
the son of David Fox, shoemaker, and 
of his wife Mary Reid, 3 Lady loan. 
Arbroath. He was twenty-eight 
years of age, had married Kathleen 
Scanlan, and left one son. Before 
going to the front he was employed 
as a machineman by Messrs Douglas 
Fraser & Sons. He joined the Terri- 
torials in 1907 as a private, and when 
war broke out he was mobilised and 
went to France in November 1914. 
His health gave way and he was dis- 
charged in 1916, after having served 
for two years. He died at his home in 
Dundee on the 7th of December 1918. 
His brother died of wounds in 1915. 




Lance-Corporal William Pater- 
son, Royal Air Force, seventeen 
years of age, was the sixth son of 
George Paterson, Dishland Gardens, 
Arbroath. He was an engine attend- 
ant, employed by the Town Council, 
when he joined the army in 1917, and 
went to Henlow for training. On 
the 18th of December 1918, when 
pulling down the propeller of an aero- 
plane to start the engine he slipped, 
and the propeller fractured his skull. 
He was taken to the Military Hos- 
pital at Kempton, where he died next 
morning. He was buried in the 
Eastern Cemetery, Arbroath, with 
military honours. He was one of six 
brothers who served with the Forces. 



A.M. ALEX. PETRTE, R.A.F. 

Air Mechanic Alexander Petrie, 
Royal Air Force, 66 Howard Street, 
Arbroath, was forty years of age and 
had married Wilhelmina Greig. He 
died suddenly of pneumonia at 3rd 
Southern General Hospital, Oxford, 
on the 26th of December 1918, and 
was buried in the Western Cemetery, 
Arbroath, with full military honours. 



PTE. R, KINNEAR, SEAFORTHS. 

Private Ronald Kinnear, Sea- 
forths, son of Mrs Kinnear, 11 Green 
Street, Arbroath, enlisted in 1915, 
but was discharged because of his 
age. When eighteen he again joined 
the Black Watch. He was trans- 
ferred, but had been in France only 
a fortnight when he was presumed 
to have died on the 9th of April 1918. 



230 



PTE. S. ORAM, BLACK WATCH. 



3rd A.M. FRED DORWARD, R.A.F. 





Private Scott Oram, 1st Black 
Watch, nineteen years of age, was 
the son of Henry Oram, and of his 
wife Mrs Wallace, 10 Garden Street, 
Arbroath. He was employed at 
Netherward Mill when he volunteered 
for service in November 1914. He 
was taken prisoner at Mons before 
lie was fifteen years of age, and 
during his four years of captivity 
went through many trying experi- 
ences in Germany and the occupied 
Russian territory. Just on the eve 
of home coming he took influenza 
and died in Schneidemuhl Hospital 
Camp on the 23rd of December 1918. 

A.B. JAMES CHRISTIE, R.N.D. 

Able-Seaman James Christie, 
Royal Naval Division, twenty-two 
years of age, 50 Guthrie Port_, Ar- 
broath, joined up in November 1915. 
He was gassed, and had been twice 
wounded at the Ancrie and at Cam- 
brai. He took pneumonia just before 
demobilisation, and died on the 3rd 
of March 1919. He was buried in 
the Eastern Cemetery, Arbroath, 
with full military honours. 



Third Air Mechanic Fred 
Dorward, Royal Air Force, twenty- 
three years of age, was the son of 
William Dorward, blacksmith, and of 
his wife Martha Low, 12 Taymouth 
Terrace, Carnoustie. He was an iron- 
turner in the Taymouth Engineering 
Works when he joined the 5th Black 
Watch in August 1914. In 1917 he 
was transferred. After serving for 
four and a half years in France and 
being twice wounded, he was de- 
mobilised, only to die five days later, 
on the 15th of February 1918, of 
pneumonia, following influenza. 

SEAMAN ROBT. SWANKIE, R.N. 

Seaman Robert Swankie, Royal 
Navy, 35 John Street, Arbroath, 
was the son of David Swankie, 16 
High Street. He was forty years of 
age and had married Joan Turnbull. 
Before joining the navy as a mine- 
sweeper in March 1916 he was at 
Netherward Works. On the 5th of 
April 1919, while serving as a deck 
hand on the Fifiiiella., which was 
lying in Pembroke Docks, he fell 
into the water and was drowned. 



231 



CPL. JOHN BOATH, GORDONS. 



PTE. D. M. WADDELL, 





Corporal John S. Boath, 4th Gor- 
don Highlanders, 24 Millgate Loan, 
Arbroath, was the son of William 
Boath and of his wife Helen Mill, 19 
Wallace Street. He was forty-two 
years of age, had married Elizabeth 
Whytock and left a son and a daugh- 
ter. He had been a butcher with Mi- 
David Harris, and was for many 
years the principal salesman to Mi- 
George Harris. Well-known and 
greatly respected in Arbroath, he 
was a prominent Freemason, a mem- 
ber of Lodge St Thomas, and was 
R.W.M. for two years. He was also 
an office-bearer of Hope Chapter 
Royal Arch and for five years in suc- 
cession was R.W.M. of the Free Gar- 
deners' Friendly Society. In August 
1916 he joined the 5th Black Watch 
as a private and was connected with 
the commisariat department at Ripon 
Camp. Later he was transferred, 
and was promoted corporal in June 
1918. Early in 1919 he had influenza 
followed by pneumonia, and he died 
in Edinburgh Castle Military Hos- 
pital on the 4th of February. He 
was buried in Arbroath Western 
Cemetery with Masonic honours. 



Private Duncan M. Waddell, 

4th Battalion Australian Imperial 
Force, thirty-two years of age, was 
the son of Mrs James Waddell, 40 
Ernest Street, Arbroath. He was 
manager at Himmel's Hotel, Sydney. 
He enlisted in August 1915, and on 
two occasions was recommended for 
decoration. He died of pneumonia at 
No. 2 General Hospital, Le Havre, 
on the 20th of February 1919 while 
on his way for demobilisation. 

LT. JOHN BORRIE M'NAB, R.E. 

Lieutenant John Borrie M'Cul- 
loch M'Nab, Royal Engineers (T.F.), 
was the son of Mrs M'Nab, Agra 
Bank, Carnoustie, and had married 
Mabel Wilson, Dundee. He had been 
at the Arbroath High School, and 
when he joined the O.T.C. in Novem- 
ber 1914 was constructing bridges at 
Carstairs. He became an instructor 
and in August 1918 went to France. 
On the 14th of February 1919 Lieut. 
M'Nab discovered a German mine. In 
withdrawing the charge the mine ex- 
ploded and killed him. He was buried 
in Mons Military Cemetery. 



232 



SGT. J. GRANT, ROYAL SCOTS. 



FITTER A. WALLACE. R.F.A. 





Seegeant James H. S. Grant, 
10th Royal Scots, Parkhill Mains, 
near Arbroath, was the son of James 
Grant and of his wife Isabella Hart, 
60 Bell Street, Dundee. He married 
Isabella Fullarton, and was an elec- 
trical engineer in Dunfermline when 
he joined the Highland Cyclist Bat- 
talion as a private in November 1914. 
He served three years on the East 
Coast, and was then sent to Ireland, 
transferred to the Royal Scots, and 
acted as physical instructor. He 
died of pneumonia at Ballinrobe on 
the 22nd of February 1919. 

SHOEING-SMITH MITDIE, R.F.A. 

Shoeing-Smith George Mudie, 
Royal Field Artillery, twenty-two 
years of age, was the son of Mary 
Mudie, Bleachfield Cottage, Car- 
noustie. He died at Derey-Mortier 
on the 11th of September 1918. 

PTE. CHAS. STURROCK, B.W. 

Private Charles Sturrock, Black 
Watch, was the son of David Stur- 
rock, Alyth, formerly of Carmyllie. 
He died in Mesopotamia in 1918. 



Fitter Alexander Murray Wal- 
lace, Royal Field Artillery, twenty- 
seven years of age_, was the son of 
James Wallace, Glenisla, Elliot 
Street, Arbroath. He was a joiner in 
Glasgow. Drafted to Egypt in March 

1916, he served there until he took 
typhus fever in the summer of 1919 
and died on the 5th of June in the 
27th General Hospital. Fitter Wal- 
lace was one of thirteen members of 
different branches of the Wallace 
family who served in the war. 

A.M. DAVID ADAM, R.A.F. 

Air Mechanic David Adam, Royal 
Air Force, 20 Hannah Street, Ar- 
broath, was the son of David Smith 
Adam, Gardyne Street, Frioekheim. 
He was twenty years of age and was 
an engineer with Messrs Anderson & 
Chalmers before he joined up in July 

1917. He was drowned near Mau- 
beuge on the 18th of March 1919 
through the collapse of a footbridge 
over the River Sambre. When he fell 
into the river officers hurried to the 
spot, but notwithstanding careful 
search no trace of him could be found. 



233 



REPORTED MISSING. 



DIED AFTER DEMOBILISATION. 



No OFFICIAL CONFIRMATION OF DEATH 
HAD BEEN RECEIVED AT THE TIME OF 
PUBLICATION. 



Died shortly after demobilisa- 
tion FROM ILLNESS PROBABLY CON- 
TRACTED DURING SERVICE. 



PTE. STRACHAN, SCOTS. GDS. 

Private David Strachan, 2nd 
Scots Guards, twenty-nine years of 
age, was the son of William Strachan, 
for many years grieve at Hillhead, 
Carmyllie. The family had removed 
to Brechin and Private Strachan was 
a farm servant in the district. He 
enlisted on the outbreak of war, and 
was posted missing in the spring of 
1915. 



PTE. D. C. BOTHWELL. B.W. 

Private D. C. Bothwell, Black 
Watch, brother of Miss Bothwell, 5 
Cross Mill Wynd, Arbroath, had 
gone to America. He joined up for 
the British Army there in October 
1917, and re-crossed to this country 
in a vessel which was torpedoed off 
the Irish Coast. He went to France 
in July 1918, and was reported 
missing on the 2nd of September. 



PTE. JAS. DAVIE, CANADIANS. 

Private James Davie, Canadian 
Cameron Highlanders, was the son of 
James Davie, farmer, Bonnington of 
Tulloes, Carmyllie. He had been a 
farm servant in the district, but was 
in Canada when war was declared. He 
enlisted in the Canadian Camerons, 
and was subsequently reported 
missing. 



CPL, J. PETERS, ROYAL SCOTS. 

Corporal James Peters. 13th 
Battalion Royal Scots, Machine Gun 
Section, was the eldest son of George 
Peters and of his wife Jane Dickie, 
Abbey House, Arbroath. He was 
twenty-two years of age, and was 
an apprentice engineer with Messrs 
Alexander Shanks & Son at Dens 
Iron Works. He enlisted in the 
13th Royal Scots in October 1915. 
He was drafted to France in Feb- 
ruary 1916, and was demobilised on 
the 5th of February 1919. On his 
return to Arbroath he took influenza 
and died on the 16th of February. 



2nd A.M. WM. WADDELL, R.A.F. 

Second Air Mechanic William 
Waddell, Royal Air Force, nineteen 
years of age, was the eldest son of 
William Waddell, ironmoulder, and 
of his wife Christina Proctor, 23 
Bank Street, Arbroath. He was 
a motor mechanic in the employment 
of Mr David Robbie, motor and cycle 
agent, Brothock Bridge, when he 
joined the army in March 1918. Air 
Mechanic Waddell was stationed at 
Roehampton, near London, for a 
year, and had just been demobilised 
when he took influenza, and died on 
the 4th of April 1919. 



234 



' ' They feared only dishonour, but with their bodies they 
stood out the battle ; and so, in a moment big with fate, it 
was from their glory, rather than from their fear, that they 
passed away. . . . And having each one given his 
body to the commonwealth they receive instead thereof a 
most remarkable sepulchre, not that wherein they are 
buried so much as that other wherein their glory is laid up, 
on all occasions both of word and deed, to be remembered 
evermore ; for to famous men all the earth is a 
sepulchre ; and their virtues shall be testified not only by 
the inscription on stone at home, but in all lands whereso- 
ever in the unwritten record of the mind, which far 
beyond any monument will remain with all men ever- 
lastingly." Pericles — Thucydides Hist. II. 



235 



Non ille pro caris amicis 
Aut patria timidus perire. 



236 



INDEX. 



Page 

Adam, Gunner Alexander, - - 121 

Adam, Air Mechanic David, - - 233 

Adam, Private James, 93 

Adams, Private Thomas, - - 40 

Adamson, Signaller Charles, - - 229 

Adamson, Private James, - - 31 

Addison, Lance-Corporal Wm. , - 157 

Affleck, Private James, 64 

Alexander, Private David, - - 97 

Alexander, Private Harry, - - 71 

Alexander, Sapper James, - - 184 

Allan, Private Alexander, - - 127 

Allan, Corporal James. M. M., - 165 

Allan, Private James K., - - 16 

Anderson, 2nd Lieutenant A. D. , - 227 

Anderson, Signaller Alexander, - 192 

Anderson, Trooper Alexander, - 101 

Anderson, Private Archibald R., - 60 

Anderson, Captain D. W., M.C., - 175 

Anderson, Private Frederick, - 148 

Anderson, Private George, - - 115 

Anderson, Private James, - - 167 

Anderson, Lieut. S. S., - - - 45 

Anderson, Private Wm., - - 127 

Appleby, Lance-Corporal George, - 42 

Arthur, Private W., - - - 13 

Bain, Private John, - - - 195 

Baird. Private James, 57 

Balfour, Private David, - - 21 

Bannerman, Lance Cpl. Robert L., 1 

Barrie, Private James, 36 

Barton, Sergeant Joseph, - - 123 

Batchelor, Private George, - - 84 

Baxter, Private David H., - - 129 
Beaton, Eng. Lt. H. A. F. Lindsay 

Carnegie, 22 

Beattie, Private David, - - 60 

Beattie, Private James. - - 56 

Beattie, Private Wm., - - 140 

Beatts, Private Alexander, - - 20 

Beatts, Private William, - - 214 

Bell, Private George, - - - 8 

Bell, Private James, - - - 125 

Bell, Private Richard, 99 

Bell, Private Wm. D., - - 108 

Bennet, Corporal Andrew W. , 152 

Bennett, 2nd Lieut. John Nicoll, - 108 

Bennett, Private Wm, - - - 124 

Benson, Private Harry, - - - 201 

Berry, Lieut. J. Leslie, - - 189 

Binnie, Private Arthur, - - 18 

Binnic, Private James, - - - 205 

Bisset, Private Harry, - - - 77 



Page 

Black, Captain Alan, - - - 173 

Black, Corporal Alex. , - - - 53 

Black. Captain David S., M.C., - 172 

Black, Signaller David, M.M., - 220 

Black, Private Geo., - - - 115 

Black, Private Geo., Canadians, - 54 

Black, Private Wm., - - - 146 

Boath, Corporal John, - - - 232 

Bothwell, Private D. C, - - 234 

Bouick, Private David, - - - 181 

Bowden, Gunner James, - - 140 

Bowdler, Able Seaman, - - - 199 

Bowie, Sergeant John, - - - 148 

Bowman, Private James, - - 93 

Boyd, Corporal George F., - - 137 

Boyle, Lance-Corporal James, - 160 

Bracelin, 2nd Lieutenant Daniel, - 191 

Bradford, Private John, - - 179 

Brand, Private Joseph, - - - 172 

Brand, Gunner Robert, 92 

Bremner, Able Seaman F. , - - 29 

Bremner, Private George R. , - - 50 

Brown, Company Sergeant- Major,- 35 

Brown, Private David, 91 

Brown, Seaman David B. , - - 228 

Brown, Corporal James, - - 85 

Brown, Private James, - - - 161 

Brown, Private Melville, - - 102 

Brown, Sergeant Norman M'L., - 5 

Brown, 2nd Lieutenant Ralph A., - 56 

Brown, Trooper William G., - - 171 

Brown, Private W. M., - - 111 

Bruce, Captain James, - - - 118 

Bruce, Private Wm. A., - - 198 

Bruce, Seaman Wm., - - - 219 

Buick, Sergeant Geo., - - - 203 

Buik, Lance-Corporal David, - 98 

Buncle, 2nd Lieutenant Ronald M. , 42 

Burnett, Wireless Officer James. - 110 

Butchart, Private Chas., - - 182 

Cadogan. Private James P., - - 68 

Cameron, Private Alexander, - 189 

Cameron, Private Alex., Guthrie, - 114 

Cameron, Private James, - - 115 

Cargill, Private Adam, - - - 139 

Cargill, Gunner Alexander, - - 60 

Cargill, Lance-Corporal David, - 83 

Cargill, Private James, 90 

Cargill, Private James M., - - 225 

Cargill, Private John, - - - 142 

Cargill, Private Robert, - - 63 

Carmichael, Lance-Corporal Peter,- 209 

Carnegie, Gunner Charles, - - 106 



237 



Page 

Carnegie, Lieutenant David A., - 98 

Carnegie, Driver Thomas S., - 111 

Carrie, Lance-Corporal David, - 63 

Carrie, Private Frederick W., - 175 

Carrie, Private Peter, - - - 36 

Carrie, Lance-Corporal Stephen, - 133 

Carter, Com. -Sergt. -Major G. R., - 65 

Cathro, Sergeant Alexander. - - 100 

Christie, Lance-Corporal Alex. , - 198 

Christie, Trooper Andrew D., - 164 

Christie, A.B. James, - - - 231 

Christie, Private James, - - 81 

Christie, Sergeant John, - - 59 

Christie, Bombardier John E., - 142 

Christison, Private David, - - 2 

Christison, Private M'Inroy, - - 193 

Clark, Private George, - - - 215 

Clark, Private William, - - 9 

Clark, Private William, Farnell, - 10 

Cloudsley, Lieutenant Hugh, - 59 

Clyne, Gunner David, - - - 137 

Cochrane, Private Wm. S. , - - 226 

Cook, Private John, - - 77 

Cormie, Private John, 66 

Cosgrove, Driver John, 86 

Coull, Corporal Stewart M'L., - 72 

Coutts, Private Wm. S., - - 162 

Cowan, Captain John, - - - 184 

Cowie, Private James, - - - 141 

Crabb, Corporal William, - - 85 

Craig, Private Alexander, - - 89 

Craig, Private David F., - - 189 

Craig, Private George, - - 71 

Craig, Lance-Corporal Robert, - 176 

Craig, Private Wilfred A. , - - 109 

Crammond, Sgt. Griffith I., M.M., 176 

Crawford, Sergeant-Major John, - 86 

Crawford, 2nd Lieutenant W. , - 102 

Crighton, Private Robert, - - 59 

Croall, Private David, - - - 183 

Crofts, Lance-Corporal William B. , 166 

Crook, Private George R. , - - 30 

Crowe, Sergeant Albert, - - 34 

Crowe, Private John C. , - - 142 

Cruickshanks, Private William, - 77 

Cumming, Driver Andrew, - - 81 

Cumming, 2nd Lieut. James L. , - 1 70 

Cumming, Private James S., - - 51 

Cushnie, Lance-Corporal George, - 123 

Cuthill, Private Thomas, - - 203 

Dalgarno, Private Eric, - - - 192 

Davidson, Private Arthur, - - 78 

Davidson, L.-Cpl. James, D.C.M., 78 

Davidson, Private Mark, - - 223 

Davidson, Private Thomas B., - 6 

Davidson, Private T. B.,CairnieSt., 61 

Davie, Private James, - - - 234 

Davis, Piper John, 46 

Dawson, Seaman George R. , - - 112 



P»ge 

Deboys, Driver Norman, - - 113 

Deuchars, Driver David, - - 190 

Dewar, Private R. D., - - - 125 

Dick, Fitter George D., - - 130 

Dickson, 2nd Lieutenant Murray, - 225 

Dickson, Bombardier William, - 206 

Dilly, Sen. Wireless Op. Thomas, - 177 

Dinnie, Private George, 73 

Uoig, Sergeant, - - - - 6 

Donald, Private William, - - 17 

Donaldson, Private Alexander. 144 

Donaldson, Private David, - - 25 

Donaldson, Private James, - - 41 

Donaldson, Private Robert E. , - 103 

Donaldson, Private William, - - 58 

Dorward, Air Mechanic Fred.. - 231 

Douglas, Sergeant James, - - 191 

Doyle, Private David, - - - 169 

Doyle, Private Richard, - - 78 

Drury, Driver Edward G. , - - 202 

Drury, Private James B., - - 164 

Duffus, Lance-Sergeant Harry, - 180 

Duncan, Private Hay, - - - 21 

Duncan, Lance-Corporal John, - 154 

Duncan, Private Joseph, - - 28 

Duncan, Sergeant-Major J. C, - 132 

Duncan, Private W., - - - 113 

Duncan, Private Wm. , Carmyllie, 125 
Dundas, Chief Petty Officer Alex., 

D.S.M., 47 

Dundas, Private Charles, - - 178 

Dundas, Private John Milne, - 12 

Duthie, Private William, - - 208 

Eccles, Sergeant Albert E., - - 144 

Elder, Sergeant John, - - - 155 

Ellis, Private Arthur D., - - 75 

Emslie, Gunner John A., - - 87 

Esplin, Private Charles, - - - 218 

Esplin, Lance-Corporal Stewart, - 24 

Fairweather, Private James, - - 104 

Fairweather, Sergeant John, M.M., 99 

Falconer, Lance-Corporal Fred M., 67 

Falconer, Private James G., - - 128 

Falconer, Wireless Oper. Ronald, - 208 

Falconer, Private Tom, 62 

Falconer, Lance-Sergeant William, 7 

Farquhar, Lance-Corporal Hugh, - 130 

Farquhar Private Samuel, - - 5 

Farquhar, Lieutenant W. R., - 165 

Farquharson, Private George, - 185 

Farquharson, Bombardier John, - 88 

Fearn, Private David, 27 

Fell, Sergeant David, - - 211 

Fettes, Private John, - - - 101 

Fincher, Private Charles, - - 18 

Findlay, Private Alfred, - - 150 

Findlay, Lance-Sergeant Robert G. , 123 

Finlay, Private Horace, - - 111 



238 



Page 

Fitzcharles, Private George, - - 167 

Fleming, Private William, - - 109 

Fleming, Able Seaman Wm. W, , - 13 

Forbes, Stoker Alexander A., - 131 

Ford, Sergeant Edward, D.C.M., - 70 

Ford, Corporal J. A., - - - 217 

Forsyth, Sergeant John, - - 195 

Foulis, Private William, - - 80 

Fox, Sergeant James, - - - 9 

Fox, Sergeant William, - - 230 

Fraser, Private Charles T., - - 89 

Fraser, Company-Sergt. -Major J. S., 166 

Fraser, Private William, - - 105 

Frew, Captain David T. C. , - - 76 

Fullerton, Private William, - - 51 

Fyfe, Private John, 96 

Galway, Private William E , - 92 

Garrard, 2nd Lieut. F. G., M.M., - 186 

Geddes, Private Charles, - - 152 

Geekie, Private David, - - 20 

Gerrard, Private Allan, 52 

Gibb, Captain Alexander R., - - 80 

Gibb, Corporal Arthur, - - - 30 

Gibb, Private Norman A., - - 189 

Gibson, Private James, - - - 220 

Gibson, Sergeant Joseph, - - 200 

Gibson, Lieutenant Norman, - - 154 

Gill, 2nd Engineer Alexander, - 163 

Gill, Lance-Corporal Frank, - - 187 

Gill, Private Robert, 47 

Glass, Lance-Corporal Stephen, - 45 

Glass, Colour-Sergeant Victor, - 8 

Glen, Private Alexander, - - 148 

<>len, Lance-Corporal James, - - 6 

Goodman, Pri\ ate Edward, - - 1S5 

Gordon, Gunner Thomas, - - 120 

Gowans, Lance-Corporal Charles, - 42 

Graham, Private James, - - 7 

Grahame, Private David, - - 217 

Grant, Private Henry, - - - 211 

Grant, Sergeant James H. S. , - 233 

Gray, Private David, 35 

Gray, Seaman Franklin, - - 4 

Gray, Lance-Corporal G., - - 29 

Gray, Private James T., - - 26 

Gray, Sergeant John, . - - 145 

Gray, Lance-Corporal John B., - 153 

Gray, Private John M., - - - 197 

Gray. Private John Y., - - - 155 

Gray, Private William, - - - 105 

Green, Private Albert, - - - 199 

Grove, Sergeant William, - - 213 

Guild, Private Alfred, - - - 176 

Guthrie, Captain John Neil, - - 26 

Hagan, Corporal John, 34 

Hall, Captain George, - - - 182 

Hanton, Lance-Corporal Joseph, - 87 

Hardie, Seaman James, - - - 161 



Page 

Hardie, Sergeant William, - - 169 

Harper, Corporal Charles H. , - - 94 

Harris, Private James A., - - 211 

Harris, A.B. John S, - - - 165 

Harris, Captain W. T., M.C., - 62 

Hastings, Private George, - 155 

Hebenton, Private William, - - 93 

Henderson-Hamilton, Capt. Chas. , 15 

Henderson-Hamilton, Lieut. James, 43 

Henderson, Private James, - - 133 

Henderson, Gunner John, - - 133 

Hendry, Lieutenant Alistair, - - 140 

Hendry, Private Charles, - - 163 

Herd, Private William, 74 

Herron, Private Frederick N., - 139 

Hogg, Sergeant David S., - - 66 

Hogg, Private George E., - - 39 

Hood, Chief Officer George W., - 157 

Howie, Corporal William, - - 43 

Howie, Private William, - - 49 

Hughes, Private William, - - 88 

Hunter, Lieutenant Alexander F. , - 52 

Hunter, Engineer George, - - 51 

Hunter, Captain Hope, - - - 158 

Hunter, Lance-Corporal James, - 147 

Hutchison, Private J., 38 

Hutton, Private David, 14 

Hutton, Corporal Far. William, - 200 

Ireland, Private David J. C.,- - 79 

Irvine, Seaman William J., - - 89 

Jack, Private D.S.M., 49 

Jack, Private Robert L. R. , - - 11 

Jack, Corporal William, - - 38 

Jack, Private William D., - - 48 

Jagger , Petty Officer John, - - 44 

Jamieson, Seaman Alexander P., - 92 

Jamieson, Private David, - - 39 

Jamieson, Private David F., - - 105 

Jarrett, Private William W., - 19 

Johnston, Corpl. Frederick, M.M., 119 

Jolly, Lance-Corpoial John, - - 104 

Jones, Bombardier Edward W., - 185 

Keillor, Private Charles, - - 28 

Keillor, Seaman Robert, - - 146 

Keillor, Lieutenant Thomas, M.C. , 210 

Keir, Private John, - - - 198 

Keith, Private Joseph, - - - 102 

Kelly, Private Peter, - - - 164 

Kennedy, Private A., - - - 151 

Kenny, Private James, - - - 109 

Kerr, Lieutenant James, - - 83 

Kerr, Signaller John, 65 

Kidd, Sergeant Alexander, - - 96 

Kidd, Gunner George, - - - 124 

Kinloch, Private Alexander, - - 159 

Kinnear, Private Roland, - - 230 

Kitson, Lieut. Frederick N. E., - 74 



239 



Page 

Kitto, Sergeant David A., - - 156 

Knight, Corporal John, 27 

Kyd, 2nd Lieutenant F. P., - - 67 

Kydd, Private Alexander M. , - 216 

Kydd, Corporal Charles W., - - 207 

Kydd, Private David, 17 

Kydd, Private Douglas, 32 

Kydd, 2nd Lieutenant Henry J. N., 1S5 

Kydd, Sergeant Robert E. G. , - 178 

Kydd, 2nd Lieutenant William S., 105 

Laird, Gunner Alexander, - - 155 

Laird, Private David, - - - 107 

Laird, 2nd Lieutenant James D., - 168 

Laird, Private James K, - - 157 

Lamb, Private David, 14 

Lamb, Lieutenant Patrick J., - 217 

Lamb, Lance-Corporal Sidney, - 69 

Lamb, Acting-Sergeant William, - 46 

Law, Private James, - - - 15 

Lawton, Lance-Corporal Norman, - 173 

Leadiugham, Corporal Arthur, - 36 

Lee, Private John, - - 120 

Lee, Private Robert, 30 

Leonard, Private James, - - 117 

Leslie, Private Frank, - - - 149 

Leslie, Private James, - - - 147 

Lindsay, fri> ate Alexander, - - 7 

Lindsay, Lance-Cpl. Douglas K, - 200 

Lindsay, Private James, - - 216 

Lindsay, Lance-Corporal William, - 226 

Low, Captain Alexander P., - • 58 

Low, Private George, - - - 225 

Low, Private William, - - 149 

Lownie, Gunner William, - - 70 

Lowson, Private George, - - 179 

Lundie, Private James, 69 

Maguire, Gunner Thomas, - - 73 

Malcolm, Pri' ate Joseph, - - 47 

Malcolm, Private William, - - 81 

Manby, Private J., 75 

Mangan, Private Richard A., - 83 

Mann, Private Alexander, - - 69 

Mann, Private Allan B., - - 202 

Mann, Private George, - - - 1 1 3 

Mann, Private Henry L., - - 74 

Mann, Lance-Corporal John, - - 39 

Mann, Private William, - - - 219 

Marquis, Sergeant Ernest, - - 48 

Marr, Private Gordon, - - - 197 

Marshall, Sergt. Alexander, M.M., 127 

Marshall, Actmg-Sergt. Fred L., - 10 

Marshall, Private George, - - 135 

Marshall, Private H., - - - 224 

Marshall, Private James W., - - 182 

Marshall, A.B. Robert, - 33 

Martin, Private Thomas, - - 99 

Masson, Private Peter, 65 

Masterton, Private Gilbert, • - 15 



Page 

Mathewson, Private John, M.M., - 83 

Matthew, Private James, - - 201 

Matthew, Private Walter W. , 97 

Matthews, Sergeant Frederick, - 122 

Maxwell, Lance-Corporal J., - - 25 

Maxwell, Private William, - - 187 

Meek, Private Alexander, - - 87 

Meekison, Private Wilfred, - - 54 

Meldrum, Private George, - - 70 

Melville, Private William, - - 13 

Michie, Lance-Corporal John, - 206 

Middleton, Private Alexander, - 159 

Middleton, Corporal George, - - 55 

Middleton, Gunner William, - - 223 

Mill, Gunner David, - 94 

Mill, Staff-Surgeon George R. , - 162 

Mill, Chief Engineer James, - - 168 

Millar, Private Arthur, - - - 188 

Millar, Captain William L., • - 229 

Miller, Sapper Alexander, - - 203 

Miller, Sergeant G. E., - 39 

Miller, 2nd Lieutenant Robert G. , - 106 

Miller, Lance-Corporal William, - 61 

Mills, Gunner William, - - - 117 

Milne, Gunner Charles, - - - 229 

Milne, Private Charles, 94 

Milne, Private Duncan, - - - 153 

Milne, Private George, - - - 175 

Milne, Private James, 21 

Milne, Stretcher-Bearer James, - 183 

Milne, Private John F. S., - - 195 

Milne, Lieutenant R. Conway, - 95 

Milne, Private Robert, - - - 226 

Mitchell, Gunner Alexander, - - 100 

Mitchell, Private Alexander, - - 208 

Mitchell, Pte. Alexander, Detroit, - 84 

Mitchell, Lance-Corporal David A., 205 

Mitchell, Sergeant Frederick, - 106 

Mitchell, Corporal James, - - 202 

Mitchell, Private John, - - - 3 

Mitchell, Private Robert, - - 5 

Mitchell, Lance-Corporal Thos. F., 217 

Moir, Sergeant Charles, - - - 107 

Moir, Driver George, - - - 113 

Moore, Lance-Corporal Robert, - 168 

Morison, Captain Alfred J., - - 134 

Morris, Private Kenneth, - - 207 

Morris, Private William, - - 81 

Morrison, Private Douglas, - - 220 

Morrison, Bombardier James, - 82 

Morrison, Private James, - - 121 

Morrison, Corporal John, - - 116 

Mortimer, Private David, - - 170 

Mortimer, Private James, - - 183 

Mortimer, Private William, - - 223 

Morton, Fitter Edward D. , - - 117 

Mostyn, Private Peter, 22 

Muckart, Corporal David, - - 43 

Muckart, Sapper John, - - - 186 

Muckhart, Private Richard, - - 118 



240 



Mudie, Shoeing-Smith George, 
Mundin, Private David S., - 
Munro, Gunner Alexander, 
Munro, Gunner David, - 
Munro, Private Jaines, - 
Murray, Gunner Alexander, - 
Murray, Corporal David, 
Murray, Private David, 
Murray, Private George, 
Murray, Gunner James, 
Murray, Private James K., - 
Myles, Signaller Russel, 
Myles, Captain Thomas B. , M.C., - 

Macdonald, Private Charles, - 
Macdonald, Lieut. Ronald A. L. , - 
Macfarlane, Private George, - 
Macgregor, Private Ben, 
Mackay, Private Donald, 
Maclennan, Corporal James, - 
Maclure, Private Edward, 
Macpherson, Seaman David, - 
Macpherson, Sergeant Donald, 
M 'Andrew, Private William, 
M'Arthur, Private William, - 
M'Auley, Private David C, - 
M'Bey, Private James, - - - 
M'Combie, Private Joseph R., 
M'Connell, Lanee-Cpl. John, M.M., 
M'Donald, (iunner Charles C. , 
M'Donald, Private John, 
M'Farlane, Private Thomas, - 
M'Glashan, Cpl. Farrier Donald, - 
M'Gowan, Private William, - 
M'Gregor, Captain A. J., M.C., - 
M'Gregor, 2nd Lieut. Alexander. - 
M'Gregor, Private Arthur, 
M'Gregor, Private David, 
M'Gregor, Private George, 
M'Gregor, Private Thomas, - 
M'lntosh, Private Jaines, 
M'Intosh, Lance-Corporal Norman, 
MTntosh, Private William, - 
M'lvor, Sergeant Thomas, 
M'Kendrick, Private Andrew, 
M'Kinnon, Private James, 
M' Knight, Private Alexander, 
M'Lauehlan, Private John, - 
M'Leod, Sub-Lieutenant Arthur, - 
M'Leod, Rifleman John, 
M'Nab, Lieutenant J. Borrie, 
M ' Naughton , Sergt. - Ma j . Harold V . 
M'Quattie, Slioeing-Smith Alex., - 

Nairn, Private Frank F. , 
Nairn, Private James, - 
Napier, Private John C, 
Neilson, Corporal Torn, 
Ness, Private A., - 
Nicol, Corporal Alfred, - 



Page 




Page 


•233 


Nicoll, Private Andrew, 


99 


76 


Nicoll, Gunner Percy, - 


100 


222 


Norrie, Private E. , -<■■-. 


135 


204 






93 


Oakley, Private George, 


207 


109 


Ogg, Stoker Hamilton, - 


171 


33 


Ogg, Bombardier William, 


177 


67 


Ogg, Qr.-Master-Sergt. William, 


35 


62 


Ogilvie, Private David, - 


145 


51 


Ogilvie, Private George, 


174 


9 


Oram, Private Scott, 


231 


63 


Orr, Private David, 


179 


126 


Orr, Private David C, - 


170 




Orrock, Private George, 


229 


3 


Ouchterlony, Major J. P. H. , D. S. O. , 


112 


64 


Ovenstone, Corporal Peter, - 


151 


132 


Owler, (iunner (ieorge, - 


129 


159 






204 


Parker, Bugler Bertie A. R. , 


32 


153 


Paterson, Private Alexander F. , - 


158 


46 


Paterson, Gunner Colin G. , - 


188 


53 


Paterson, Private James C, - 


160 


203 


Paterson, Gunner Stewart, 


190 


3S 


Paterson, Lance-Corporal William, 


230 


59 


Paton, Private William, 


204 


28 


Pattullo, Private Allan, 


95 


134 


Pattullo, Driver David, 


64 


79 


Pattullo, Private Harry, 


24 


218 


Pattullo, Corporal James A., - 


84 


227 


Pattullo, Seaman William, 


134 


103 


Paul, Private Alexander, 


65 


82 


Pearson, Lance-Corporal John, 


129 


143 


Peters, Corporal James, 


234 


180 


Peters, Private John, 


120 


212 


Peters, Private John H, 


97 


183 


Petrie, Air Mechanic Alexander, - 


230 


71 


Petrie, Seaman Alexander, 


201 


63 


Petrie, 2nd Lieutenant Arnold, 


182 


25 


Petrie, Private Arthur C, 


79 


17 


Petrie, Arm. -Sergt. Robert M., 


40 


23 


Philip, Private Geoi-ge, 


61 


141 


Philip, Private William, 


206 


104 


Phillips, Private James, 


143 


52 


Phin, Sergeant Francis D. , 


18 


145 


Playford, Lieut. Patrick Handal, • 


114 


89 


Porter, Private Thomas, 


171 


85 


Porter, Sergeant William, 


131 


131 


Pringle, Driver Frederick, 


161 


152 


Proctor, Driver Frederick G., 


188 


126 


Pryde, Gunner Robert, 


145 


232 


Pyper, Private David, - 


44 


149 






53 


Quinn, Private J., - - 


222 


194 


Rae, Lance-Sergeant William, 


143 


40 


Ramsay, Private David, 


222 


194 


Ramsay, Stretcher-bearer David, - 


72 


194 


Ramsay, Driver James, - 


91 


19 


Ramsay, Private Jaines, 


61 


156 


Ramsay, Private John, - 


172 



241 



Page 

Ramsay, Seaman Thomas R.,- - 161 

Redford, Private Alexander, - - 146 

Reekie, Private Andrew, - - 213 

Reid, Private Charles, - - - 33 

Reid, Private David, 97 

Reid, Private George, - - - 162 

Reid, Gunner William, - - - 224 

Reid, Private William, 29 

Reid, Seaman William, - - - 114 

Reid, Private William C, - - 36 

Rennie, Private Andrew, - - 24 

Rennie, Sergeant Andrew, - - 116 

Rennie, Private James, - - - 227 

Rennie, Corporal W., M.M., - 127 

Rennie, Lance-Corporal William, - 88 

Richardson, 2nd Lieut. Arthur B., 187 

Ritchie, Lance- Corporal David, - 167 

Ritchie, Private George, - - 33 

Ritchie, Private James, - - 60 

Ritchie, Corporal William, - - 3 

Robb, Driver John, - - - 110 

Robb, Driver Norman A. W. , - 196 

Roberts, Private Frank, - - 2 

Roberts. Private F. , Newbigging, 190 

Roberts, Lance-Corporal George, - 201 

Robertson, Lance-Cpl. Alexander, 151 

Robertson, Private Alexander, - 101 

Robertson, Private Arthur, - - 95 

Robertson, Private Charles, - - '215 

Robertson, Private David, - - 122 

Robertson, Private Edward W., - 123 

Robertson, Sapper Frank, - - 91 

Robertson, Major Herbert, M.C., - 171 

Robertson, Private Hugh, - - 82 

Robertson, Private James, - - 121 

Robertson, Private Norman, - - 57 

Robertson, Sapper Ralph, - - 167 

Robertson, Private Thomas, - - 71 

Robertson, Private William, - - 153 

Robinson, Gunner Frank, - - 125 

Rodger, Private Arthur, - - 48 

Rose, Lance-Corporal William, - 17 

Ross, Private Andrew, - - - 205 

Ross, Private George, - - - 19 

Ross, Lance-Corporal James P., - 214 

Russell, Seaman Francis, - - 110 

Rutherford, Corporal James, - - 218 

Savege, Private Horatio, - - 11 

Scott, Private Alfred, - - - 138 

Scott, Lieutenant Arnold, - - 193 

Scott, Private (ieorge, - - - 151 

Scott, Signaller J., - - - 163 

Scott, Private Robert S., - - 72 

Scott, Private Thomson, - - 54 

Scrimgeour, Lance-Corpl. David, - 35 

Scrimgeour, Private James, - - 1 1 1 

Scroggie, Lieutenant Valentine, - 199 

Shanks, Private Arthur, - - 216 

Shaw, Sergeant Alfred, - - - 136 



Shaw, Private William, 
>helston, Gunner Charles, 
Shepherd, Private James, 
Shepherd, Private John, 
Sheriff, Private Alexander, 
Sheriff, Private (ieorge, 
Sievwright, Private David R. , 
Sim, Private David, 
Sim, Sapper Lewis H., - 
Sim, Private William, - 
Simpson, Private Albert, 
Simpson, Sergeant Andrew, - 
Simpson, 2nd Lieut. Douglas A., - 
Simpson, Private John, - 
Simpson, Private Thomas W., 
Simpson, Gunner W., 
Simpson, Private W , - 
Skea, Bombardier James, 
Skea, Private Thomas, - 
Skea, Private W., - - - - 
Skene, Private John (i.,- 
Smart, Sergeant Alexander, - 
Smart, Private James, - 
Smart, Private John, 
Smart, Private John H., 
Smith, Corporal Alexander, - 
Smith, Lance-Corporal Alexander, - 
Smith. Private Alexander, 
Smith, Engineer Alexander D., 
Smith, Private Charles, - 
Smith, Sergeant David, - 
Smith, Gunner Ed ward M. , - 
Smith, Private Edwin H., 
Smith, Private George, - 
Smith, Private James, - 
Smith, Lance-Corporal James D., - 
Smith, Private John. - 

Smith, Private John G., 
Smith, Private Joseph S., 
Smith, Private Norman, 
Smith, Private Norman J. A., 
Smith, Stoker Robert, - 
Smith, Private Sydney, - 
Smith, Private Thomas C. , - 
Smith, Private William, 
Smith, Eng. Sub-Lieutenant, 
Snowball, Private Bert, 
Soutar, Private James, - 
Spark, Gunner William M., M.M., 
Spence, Private Edward Y., - 
Spence, Private George, 
Spiers, Private Alexander, 
Spink, Private Edward, 
Spink. Private Henry, - 
Spink j 'Seaman James F. , 
Spink, Gunner William, 
Stark, Private James C. , 
Steele, 2nd Lieut. Walter F. B., - 
Stephen, Lance-Corporal David M., 
Stephen, Private James, 



Page 

34 

219 

104 

184 

179 

75 

139 

46 

136 

68 

66 

91 

41 

57 

194 

156 

163 

145 

144 

15 

50 

150 

221 

210 

4 

213 

23 

14 

135 

42 

55 

86 

215 

31 

221 

37 

10 

1 

2 

120 

16 

3 

14 

219 

37 

92 

30 

90 

169 

118 

107 

23 

96 

24 

119 

143 

221 

147 

5 

53 



242 



Page 

Stewart, Sergeant Adam, - - 215 

Stewart, Private Archibald, - - 35 

Stewart, Lance-Corporal Charles, - 103 

Stewart, Private David, - - 137 

Stewart, Private James, - - 77 

Stewart, Private John, - - - 178 

Stewart, Artificer Robert, - - 49 

Stewart, Private William, M.M., - 186 

Stewart, Pte. William, N. Tarry, - 196 

Stormont, 2nd Lieutenant W. L., - 199 

Storinonth, Private William, - - ] 95 

Stott, Private George M., - - 197 

Strachan, Private David, - - 234 

Strachan, Private Thomas, - - 12 

Strachan, Seaman Thomas D., - 159 

Strathern, Seaman David B., - 27 

Stuart, Lieut. George D. G., - - 138 

Stuart, Captain James 0. G., M.C., 174 

Stuart, Gunner Thomas, - - 181 

Stuart, Lance-Cpl. Wm., D.C.M., - 22 

Sturrock, Lance-Cpl. Alexander, - 222 

Sturrock, Private Charles, - - 233 

Sturrock, Private James, - - 225 

Sturrock, A B. Norman, - - 214 

Sutherland, Private Adam, - - 55 

Suttie, Private J., - - - - 213 

Swankie, Private Daniel, - - 122 

Swankie, Corporal Peter, - - 211 

Swankie, Mine Sweeper Robert, - 231 

Swinton, Lance-Corporal David, - 182 

Symon. Private Alexander, - - 150 

Tasker, Private Robert, - - 141 

Taylor, Private Arthur, - - 101 

Tavlor, Lance-Corporal Arthur D., 209 

Taylor, Gunner D., - - - 181 

Tavlor. Private George L. , - - 38 

Thoir-s, Private A., ~ - - - 165 

Thomson, Lieut. Charles W.,- - 209 

Thomson, Corporal Edwin, - - 12 

Thomson, Private George, - - 130 

Thomson, Private James, - - 135 

Thomson, Private Peter, - - 69 

Thomson, Private Roy, 67 

Thomson, Pte. Roy, Friockheim, - 170 

Thomson, Private William, - - 177 

Tocher, Seaman Henry, - - - 116 

Todd, Private Andrew, 90 

Todd. Private James, - - 87 

Todd, Private John, - - - 147 

Todd, Private Samuel, - - - 37 

Todd, Private W. H., - - - 121 



Page 

Tosh, Private James, 85 

Traill, Gunner James ('., - - 193 

Urquhart, Sergeant Harry, - - 173 

Valentine, Private Alexander, - 16 

Valentine, Private Alexander D., - 154 

Valentine, Private Henry G. , - 98 

Vey, Private Thomas, - - - 224 

Waddell, Private Duncan, - - 232 

Waddell, Air Mechanic William, - 234 

Wallace, Fitter Alexander, - - 233 

Walton, Private Arthur, - - 7 

Walker, Lance-Corporal William, - 73 

Warden, Private Charles A., - - 97 

Watson, Private David L., - - 223 

Watson, Private Everard H. G., - 57 

Watson, Private John, 27 

Watson, Private John, Rosebank, - 169 

Watt, Private Alexander, - - 166 

Watt, Gunner George, - - - 212 

Watt, Lance-Corporal James W., - 122 

Webster, Lieutenant Joseph F. , 4 

Weir, Private Charles, 75 

Weir, Gunner David, 88 

White, Private Robert, - - 11 

Whitlaw, Sergeant Charles, M.M., 196 

Whitton, Private John, 37 

Whitton, Sergeant John, M.M., - 90 

Whyte, Private James, - - - 103 

Whytock, Lance-Corporal Arthur,- 76 

Wilkie, Private James, 20 

Wilkie, Private John, - - - 147 

Williamson, Private Arthur S., - 107 

Williamson, Gunner Edward B., - 216 

Williamson, A.B. Lawrence, - - 124 

Wilson, Private George,- - - 224 

Wilson, Lieutenant James, - - 193 

Wilson, Private Robert S., - - 68 

Wilson, Private Ronald, - - 180 

Wilson, Major Sydney, - - - 228 

Wishart, Private Albert, - - 128 

Wishart, Engineer Alexander, - 129 

Wishart, Gunner W. G., - - 47 

Withington, Corporal Charles, - 212 

Wood, Private J. R. E., - - 108 

Wyllie, Corporal David, - - 1 36 

Wyllie, Gunner David, - - - 215 

Yeaman, Private Edward, - - 19 

Young, Sergeant David B. , - - 132 



For permission to reproduce a number of the photographs we are indebted to the 
following Arbroath photographers : — Mr and Mrs W. J. Anckorn, Messrs W. H. 
Geddes & Son, Mr A. Gibson, and Mr A. C. Milnk. 



243 



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