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Full text of "...Roll of membership with ancestral records... : [1893-1894, 1897, 1899, 1901, 1904, 1907, 1910, 1913, 1916, 1920, 1923]"

Gc 

973.3406 

S6m2r 

1913 

1415302 

gene:al.o3y collection 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBUC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01076 4469 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/rollofmembership1913sons 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY ^^^ 



OF THE 



^ong of t|)e ^ntertcan l&etiolutton. 



Committee of ^uMication. 

VERNON ASHLEY FIELD, 
CHARLES FRENCH READ, 
LAWRENCE WATERS JENKINS. 

Compiler* 

HERBERT WOOD KIMBALL. 











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Massachusetts Society 



OF THE 



^ons of tfet American Bebolutton 



REGISTER OF MEMBERS 

October io, 1913 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOCIETY AND BOARD OF MANAGERS 
CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 







PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 
1913 



THE F. A. BA8SCTTC OO., 8PRINQFICLD, MASS. 



1415302 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

National Society Officers, 1913-14 6 

Board of Managers of the State Society 7 

List of Officers from the Formation of the State Society . . 9 

Proceedings of the Society and Managers 25 

List of Members 45 

Records of Revolutionary Ancestors Ill 

Chapters 175 

General Information 179 

Addresses 187 

Constitution and By-Laws of the State Society 205 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

"The Battle of Bunker Hill" Frontispiece 

Opposite 

Luther Atwood 7 

Edwin Sanford Crandon 9 

Arnold Expedition — Tablet at Danvers Centre 37 

National Society's Certificate of Membership 179 



NATIONAL SOCIETY 

OP THE 

^otifij of t|)e amertcan 2^e\Jolution 

Organized April jo, i88q 
Incorporated by Act of Congress June 9, igo6 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

1912-1913 

ROGERS CLARK BALLARD THRUSTON, Louisville, Kt. 

]^ice;^ce^itirnt^;<5ennal 
LA VERNE NOYES, Chicago, III. 
WILLSON WHIPPLE KIRBY, Denver, Colo. 
JAMES PHINNEY BAXTER, Portland, Maine 
WALLACE McCAMANT, Portland, Oregon 
Rear Adm. GEORGE W. BAIRD, U. S. N., Washington, D. C. 

;^ecretacp'0enrral anD Stegi^tcatf^enecal 
A. HOWARD CLARK, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

(Scea^ucrr^^enecal 
JOHN H. BURROUGHS, 15 William St., New York City 

lliftorian^^ennal 
DAVID L. PIERSON, East Orange, N. J. 

Cbaplain^^eneral 
Rev. WILLIAM FORCE WHITAKER, Elizabeth, N. J. 




LUTHER ATWOOD 
President Massachusetts Society S. A. R. 1913 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY 

OF THE 

^ons of ti)e American 2^e\)olution 

Organized April /p, i88g 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 

BLECTED AT BOSTON APBIIi 19, 1913 

LUTHER ATWOOD, Lynn 

FRANK ERNEST WOODWARD, Wellesley HiUs 
Rev. NEWTON MARSHALL HALL, D.D. Springfield 
VERNON ASHLEY FIELD, Chelsea 

HERBERT WOOD KIMBALL, Waban 
(17 Milk St., Boston) 

^xttiivxtx 
CHARLES MONTRAVILLE GREEN, M.D., Boston 

i^Mtorian 
Bmg.-Gen. PHILIP READE, U.S.A. (Ret.), LoweU 

Ctiaplain 
Rev. LEWIS WILDER HICKS, Wellesley 



8 Jjonjef of tl)e American ^Ilebolution 

%tiati of jn^anagerj^ 

Term 
expires 

ALLEN HENRY BAGG, Pittsfield 1914 

SAMUEL CROWELL, M.D., Dorchester 1914 

GEORGE MAURY RICE, Worcester 1914 

ALBERT FRANCIS AMEE, Cambridge 1914 

JAMES EDWARD SEAVER, Taunton 1914 

WEBSTER BRUCE, Lynn 1915 

ELMER HUMPHREY COPELAND, M.D., Northampton . . . 1915 

PHILIP TILLINGHAST NICKERSON, Boston 1915 

CHARLES FRENCH READ, Brookline . . . . . . . 1915 

LAWRENCE WATERS JENKINS, Danvers 1915 

CHARLES GREENOUGH CHICK, Hyde Park 1916 

ARTHUR FRENCH CLARKE, Brookline 1916 

WALTER SILVANUS FOX, Dorchester 1916 

FRANK RUMRILL, Roxbury 1916 

WALTER KENDALL WATKINS, Maiden 1916 




EDWIN SANFORD CRANDON 
President Massachusetts Society S, A. R. 1910-1913 



LIST OF OFFICERS 

FROM THE FORMATION OF THE STATE SOCIETY 



*CHARLES HICKS SAUNDERS 1889-1891 

♦EDWIN SHEPARD BARRETT 1891-1898 

FRANCIS HENRY APPLETON 1898-1901 

FRANCIS HENRY BROWN, M.D 1901-1903 

♦CHARLES ELISHA ADAMS 1903-1905 

MOSES GREELEY PARKER, M.D 1905-1907 

CHARLES KIMBALL DARLING 1907-1908 

EDWARD CLARENCE BATTIS 1908-1910 

NATHAN WARREN 1910-1911 

EDWIN SANFORD CRANDON 1911-1913 

LUTHER ATWOOD . 1913- 

j©ice-]^re!Jil»ent!* 

♦WILLIAM N. DAVENPORT 1889-1890 

♦EDWIN SHEPARD BARRETT 1890-1891 

CHARLES MONTRAVILLE GREEN, M.D 1891-1892 

♦CHARLES HENRY JOY 1891-1892 

♦EDWARD JACOB FORSTER 1891-1897 

HENRY CABOT LODGE . 1892-1899 

♦NATHAN APPLETON 1892-1902 

FRANCIS HENRY BROWN, M.D 1897-1901 

♦CHARLES ELISHA ADAMS 1899-1903 

♦GEORGE EUGENE BELKNAP 1902-1903 

MOSES GREELEY PARKER, M.D 1903-1905 

EDWIN SANFORD CRANDON 1903-1907; 1910-1911 

CHARLES KIMBALL DARLING 1903-1907 

EDWARD CLARENCE BATTIS 1905-1908 

♦JOHN HENRY MANNING 1907-1909 

ARTHUR HOLBROOK WELLMAN 1907-1908 

LUKE STEARNS STOWE 1908-1913 

ALFONSO SCOTT HARRIS 1908-1910 

LUTHER ATWOOD 1910-1913 

^Deceased 



10 M>nn^ of t^t ^mertcan Iflebolutton 

CLARENCE STUART WARD 1889 

♦JOHN LINDSAY STEVENSON 1889-1892 

CHARLES MONTRAVILLE GREEN, M.D 1892- 

CLARENCE STUART WARD 1889 

ALFRED BROOKS FRYE 1889-1891 

ALFONSO SCOTT HARRIS 1891-1892 

♦WILLIAM BARRETT 1892-1894 

HERBERT WOOD KIMBALL 1894-1896; 1907- 

GEORGE EDWARD BROWN 1896-1897 

CHARLES EPHRAIM STEARNS 1897-1902 

WILLIAM LITHGOW WILLEY 1902-1903 

WALTER SILVANUS FOX 1903-1907 

Steoijjtiacjf 

♦LUTHER L. TARBELL 1889-1892 

NATHAN WARREN 1892-1894 

FRANCIS HENRY BROWN, M.D 1894-1896 

HERBERT WOOD KIMBALL 1896- 

l^ijjtorianj^ 

♦ALFRED AUGUSTUS STOCKER, M.D 1889-1893 

♦SAMUEL ARTHUR BENT 1893-1895 

CHARLES KIMBALL DARLING 1895-1901 

♦FRANCIS HENRY LINCOLN 1901-1906 

EDWARD JONES COX 1906-1907 

CHARLES FRENCH READ 1907-1909 

PHILIP READE 1909- 

Cfiaplainjf 

♦HENRY S. HUNTINGTON 1889 

♦CARLTON ALBERT STAPLES 1889-1904 

LEWIS WILDER HICKS 1905- 

*Deceaied 



pvottthinq^ of t^e ^octett anD tl^e iBoatD of 

i«anagetj5 

5une, 1910— S^une, 1313 



^bistractjs of ^^roctcDtngjsi 

JUNE 1910— JUNE 1913 

At the meeting of the Board of Managers, September 9, 1910, the 
late Henry A. May was employed to search the records and locate the 
burial places of soldiers of the Revolution who were buried in Boston 
and its vicinity, and which had not been designated by "markers." 
The result of his search showed burials in the following grounds: 
Copp's Hill, 22; the Granary, 15; Boston Common, 15; Eustis 
Street, Roxbury, 16; Phipps Street, Charlestown, 11; Dorchester 
South, 6; Eliot Street, Jamaica Plain, 6; Westerly, West Roxbury, 5; 
Walter Street, Roslindale, 1. On motion of our late compatriot, 
William W. Bartlet, it was voted to authorize the Memorial Com- 
mittee to place markers at such graves, and to affix name-plates to 
markers placed at tombs. 

October 14, 1910, it was voted to contribute fifty dollars toward 
a memorial Flag Staff to be erected in Cambridge by Daughters of 
the American Revolution in memory of Revolutionary Soldiers and 
Patriots. 

President Nathan Warren stated that a silver cup for the Lexing- 
ton Minute-men's winter carnival would be given by individual 
members of the Society. 

FIELD DAY AT MALDEN, OCTOBER 12, 1910 

The Society held its annual Field Day at Maiden and assisted in 
the exercises attending the unveiling of the momorial tablets at Bell 
Rock Park. The Revolutionary tablet which was originally placed 
on the boulder at Bell Rock was removed to give place to the new 
soldiers' moniunent and was replaced on the left fagade of the base 
of the new monimient, while the new Founders' tablet was placed on 
the opposite side of the fagade. The exercises took place at 10:30 
A. M. with the following program: Invocation by Rev. L. J. Bimey; 
hymn, "Angel of Peace" by the high school chorus; introductory 
remarks by Frank E. Woodward, President of Maiden Chapter, Sons 
of the American Revolution; address by Edwin S. Crandon, vice 
president of the State Society; address by Mrs. Adeline F. Fitz, 
president-general of the Daughters of the Revolution; address by 
Mayor George H. Fall; unveiling of the tablets by Miss Elizabeth 



14 ^ona of tt)e American ^ebolutton 

D. Walker and Miss Katherine Hall; hymn, "To Thee O Country," 
by the chorus ; address by Sylvester Baxter, chairman of the Maiden 
Park Commission; and an address by Charles E. Mann, president 
of the Maiden Historical Society. Following the exercises at the 
park, the company of ladies and gentlemen visited the Public Library 
on their way to the Auditorium where the banquet was served. Vice- 
president Candon presided, and among the speakers were Hon. Levi 
S. Gould, formerly the first Mayor of Melrose, Hon. George H. Fall, 
of Maiden, and Joseph Santosuosso, Esq., of Boston. The remainder 
of the afternoon was spent in a carriage ride through Middlesex Fells , 
which was one of the pleasantest features of the Field Day. 

At the meeting held December 9, 1910, the following resolution on 
the death of William Williams Bartlet was tmanimously adopted: 

"Resolved, That in the death of Compatriot Bartlet this Society has lost one 
of its most loyal and efficient members, and the Board of Managers a wise and 
alert counselor whose interest in the aims of the Society was especially conspicu- 
ous during the few months he was connected with the Board. 

"His Compatriots tender to the family of their lamented comrade their pro- 
found sympathy, and commend them to the comfort of God's infinite grace." 

WASHINGTON'S 179TH BIRTHDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1911 

The members of the Society met in the morning on the Essex Street 
side of Hotel Essex to dedicate a memorial tablet to Major-General 
Henry ICnox. Master Joseph Atwood, a son of Luther Atwood, of 
Lyim, removed the American flag from the face of the bronze tablet 
afiixed to the side of the hotel building. 

The inscription on the tablet is : 

Near this site was the birthplace of 

Henry Knox 

Volunteer at the Battle of Bunker Hill 

Colonel of Artillery, 1775 

Brigadier-General, 1776 

Major General, 1781 

Commander-in-chief of the Army, 1783 

Secretary of War, 1785 

He brought across the country on sleds for 

use at the Siege of Boston, 1776, the 

artillery captiu*ed at Ticonderoga 

Placed by the Massachusetts Society 

Sons of the American Revolution, 1911. 



^h^ttattii of proccetitn0$( 15 

The company then adjourned to the hotel where they were ad- 
dressed by President Nathan Warren, who formally commended the 
tablet to the care of the owners of Hotel Essex. Compatriot Leslie 
C. Wead, president of the company controlling the hotel property, 
promised that he and his successors in the company would hold the 
tablet in sacred reverence. Mr. Wead then delivered an appreciation 
of General Knox and his military and administrative services. 

Brigadier-General Philip Reade, U. S. A. (ret.) delivered a short 
address on the life of General Knox. 

The regular meeting of the Society was held at Hotel Vendome, 
President Warren presiding. Brig. -Gen. Philip Reade read a very 
interesting account of "Some Massachusetts Soldiers with Whom 
Washington Passed His Forty-sixth Birthday at Valley Forge." 
The paper covered the period between December 19, 1777, and Jtuie 
19, 1778, and named by Massachusetts counties the principal officers 
from the Commonwealth who were with Washington at Valley Forge. 
About half the eight thousand soldiers who encamped there in Decem- 
ber, 1777, were from Massachusetts. 

On motion of Dr. F. A. Gardner, it was unanimously resolved that 
it was the sense of the Society that the records prepared by General 
Reade should be published by the State. Compatriot Edwin Day 
Sibley gave several very interesting readings entitled "Character 
Studies." Compatriot Dr. George B. Stevens read an excellent paper 
on the unfortunate Penobscot Expedition, or "Bagaduce Expedi- 
tion." Compatriot Walter Kendall Watkins offered the following 
resolution which was unanimously adopted: 

"Resolved, That the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American Rev- 
olution protest against the attempt to change the name of Court Street in Bos- 
ton, as tending to a confusion and contradiction in the historical associations of 
the most important epochs in American history, the American Revolution, and 
the Anti-Slavery agitation of the Civil War. 

At the conclusion of the exercises Itmcheon was served and a social 
hour enjoyed. 

ANNUAL MEETING, APRIL 19, 1911 

The Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revolution 
held its twenty-second annual business meeting on Patriots' Day in 
the Old South Meeting House, the usual place of gathering, with 
excellent attendance. The retiring president, Nathan Warren, pre- 
sided. Historian-General, David L. Pierson of New Jersey, was 
the guest of the Society. An interesting ceremony early in the pro- 



16 ^onj6( of tl^e American Heboiution 

ceedings was the trooping of the colors by a detail from Troop A of the 
first squadron of cavalry, the National Lancers, in command of 
Captain John S. Barrows, president of Boston Chapter, S. A. R. 

The meeting opened with prayer by the Society's chaplain, Rev. 
Lewis Wilder Hicks of Wellesley. President Warren gave a r^sum6 
of the work of the Society and spoke also of future purposes and aims, 
especially in welcoming "yoimg American blood of Revolutionary 
standard" to join our ranks. 

The annual reports of the secretary -registrar, the treasurer, the 
historian and the auditors were read by those officials. Secretary 
Kimball reported the membership to be 1,635, of whom 86 had been 
admitted during the year. Treasurer Green reported that the total 
receipts had been $4,923.73, the expenditures $4,824.39, and that the 
cash balance on hand April 15 was $99.34. The auditors foimd the 
accounts to be correct and that the permanent fund, amoimting to 
$6,567, is on deposit in approved savings banks; and that the reserve 
fund, on deposit, amotmted to $971.78. In the absence of Historian 
Reade, the secretary read the Necrology for the past year, giving 
biographical notices of thirty-nine members who had died. 

Of the delegates appointed to the Louisville, Kentucky, Congress 
of the National Society held May 1-3, 1911, Massachusetts was repre- 
sented by Dr. Moses Greeley Parker, Edwin S. Crandon, Dr. Waldo 
E. Boardman, Webster Bruce, John G. Moseley and T. Julien Silsby. 

The committee appointed to nominate officers for the ensuing year 
reported the following who were unanimously elected: President, 
Edwin Sanford Crandon, of Cambridge; vice-presidents, Hon. Luke 
S. Stowe of Springfield, Luther Atwood of Lynn, and Frank E. Wood- 
ward of Wellesley Hills ; secretary and registrar, Herbert W. Kimball 
of Waban; treasurer, Charles M. Green, M. D., of Boston; historian, 
Brig.-Gen. Philip Reade, U. S. A. (retired) of Lowell; chaplain. Rev. 
Lewis W. Hicks of Wellesley; managers for three years, Allen H. 
Bagg of Pittsfield, Samuel Crowell, M. D., of Dorchester, George M. 
Rice of Worcester, Albert F. Amee of Cambridge, and James E. Seaver 
of Taunton. Charles E. Wiggin of Roxbury was elected for two years 
to fill the unexpired term of the late W. W. Bartlet. 

At the conclusion of the business meeting the members marched to 
the American House preceded by a fife and drum corps, where in the 
large banquet room the retiring president, Nathan Warren, presided, 
and the newly-elected president, Edwin Sanford Crandon, was in- 
ducted into office. During the ceremony the members, standing at 
their places, sang "The Star Spangled Banner." The color sergeant 



^h^ttatt^ of ^toctthinq^ 17 

of the Lancers gave the Society flag into the keeping of President 
Crandon, who made a short speech. 

The after dinner speaking was begun by Hon. Charles D. Kimball, 
president of the Rhode Island Society, who extended its felicitations, 
and reminded his hearers of the fact that our ancestors, who had 
foimded a nation, had nevertheless left something for the men of the 
present generation to do. Immigrants from the countries of the old 
world could not perhaps appreciate the blessings of a free govern- 
ment such as we enjoy, but Americans fully realize the blessings 
brought by oiu* iorm of government, and it was for them to teach this 
fact to others. 

David L. Pierson, historian general of the National Society, recalled 
some of the interesting Revolutionary incidents of New Jersey, and 
rejoiced that he was permitted to speak on Patriots' Day in Boston, 
which he described as "the hotbed of patriotism." 

Charles Dana Burrage, president of the Sons of the Revolution 
in Massachusetts, and also a member of this Society, said there were 
ever reciuring problems to be solved, problems that involved the 
welfare of countless thousands. Selfish dominations, the attempt to 
acquire for personal ends even the breathing spaces of the people, 
showed that there was a constant duty to perform, and a need to 
teach the true meaning of patriotism and obedience to the laws of God. 

William E. L. Dillaway said the people were coming to a stage 
where great changes were to be met, questions of the initiative, the 
referendum and the recall as showing a need of more patriotic days 
instead of lessening the ntmiber of holidays, in order that patriotism 
might prevent the rule of the people from becoming the rule of the 
mob. . 

Nathan Warren, the retiring president, said that Americans might 
well take pride in the great strides that had been taken since April 
19, 1775. The day was increasing in importance, and it would in 
time become one of the momentous days of the year. There was 
never a time when the day and its inspirations were needed more 
than now. 

Mr. Warren announced that a committee appointed for the purpose 
had drawn up a testimonial for Dr. Charles M. Green, whose imselfish 
and devoted services as treasurer since 1892, the Society desired to 
acknowledge and this testimonial, which was beautifully engrossed, 
was read by President Crandon, chairman of the committee on the 
testimonial, and who was selected by Mr. Warren to present it to 
Dr. Green. 



18 ^onjgt of tf)e American Hebolution 

The after dinner speaking was brought to a close with a brief 
address by President Frederick W. Hamilton of Tufts College. 

May 12, 1911. At a meeting of the board of managers it was voted 
to contribute fifty dollars towards a tablet the Berkshire Coimty 
Chapter proposes to place near the site of Easton's Tavern, Pittsfield, 
in which the capture of Fort Ticonderoga was planned. At this meet- 
ing, it was voted to invite the National Society to hold their congress 
of 1912 in Boston. 

THE EASTON MEMORIAL TABLET 

Berkshire Coimty Chapter, of Pittsfield, July 3, 1911, unveiled a 
bronze tablet on, or near, the site of the historic Easton's Tavern, 
which stood where now is situated the Berkshire Athenaeimi and 
Museum of Art, in which met the men who planned the capture of 
Ticonderoga. Joseph E. Peirson, president of the chapter, presided 
and addresses were made by Judge Edward T. Slocimi; Dr. J. F. A. 
Adams, Hon. Luke S. Stowe and Hon. Walter F. Hawkins. The 
singing was by the pupils from the public schools, and the tablet was 
imveiled by daughters of Dr. and Mrs. F. K. Chaffee. The tablet 
bears the following inscription: 

Near this spot stood 

Easton's Tavern 

Here on May 1, 1775, Colonel 

James Easton and John Brown 

of Pittsfield and Captain Edward 

Mott of Preston, Conn., planned 

the capture of Fort Ticonderoga 

which on May 10 surrendered 

to the Continental Volunteers 

under Ethan Allen with Colonel Easton 

second in command 

Jime 11, 1911. The Committee on Memorials reported it had 
placed 220 markers during the past year at graves of Revolutionary 
soldiers biiried in Dorchester, Boston, Roxbury, West Roxbury and 
Charlestown and had sent to Compatriot D. A. Healey of Holyoke 
two markers to be placed in that city. 

In recognition of the faithful work of Charles E. Alexander, editor 
of the patriotic department of the Boston Transcript, the Society of 



^h^ttact^ of ^roceetiingjsi 19 

shared with the Daughters of the American Revolution in presenting 
to Mr. Alexander a fine mahogany colonial desk. The Daughters of 
the Revolution, also, gave a mahogany chair for the desk. 

October 6, 1911. The Board of Managers unanimously adopted a 
resolution in appreciation of the devoted services of the Society's 
historian, Brig.-Gen. Philip Reade, in connection with the work of 
providing for a monument, the Commonwealth has erected at Valley 
Forge to commemorate Massachusetts soldiers who were with Wash- 
ington during the winter of 1777-8. 

FIELD DAY AT WORCESTER, OCTOBER 19, 1911 

The 130th anniversary of Comwallis' Surrender at Yorktown was 
celebrated by the Society holding its annual Field Day at Worcester 
by invitation of Worcester Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution. 
The threatening weather somewhat lessened the attendance, but the 
program prepared by Compatriots George M. Rice and Hon. Alfred 
S. Roe, who personally conducted the party and described the many 
places of historic interest, was carried out; among which is the 
Common, where stands the monument to Col. Timothy Bigelow 
(15th Continental regiment), the City Hall, which occupies the site 
of the Old South Church from which was read the Declaration of 
Independence for the first time in Massachusetts. Mayor James 
Logan received the company at City Hall and invited all to inspect 
the building. 

From City Hall, trolley cars carried the party to the building of the 
American Antiquarian Society, where the librarian, Clarence S. 
Brigham, gave a short history of the Society, saying it was established 
one hundred years ago in an inland town to escape excessive taxation 
levied by the British on sea coast towns. After a most interesting 
inspection of the building, the party stopped at the tablet marking 
the birthplace of the eminent historian Bancroft, and on their return 
visited old Exchange Hotel where Washington ate his breakfast in 
1789, and General Lafayette stopped in 1825. Hotel Warren was 
reached in time to partake of an excellent dinner served to eighty-five 
ladies and gentlemen, among whom was our "own son," John Adams, 
aged ninety-nine years. 

Vice-president Frank E. Woodward presided at the dinner, and 
afterwards in a brief introductory speech presented his Honor, James 
Logan, mayor of the city, who made an address. (See Addresses). 

Following the dinner, a visit was made to the General Artemas 
Ward colonial mansion at Shrewsbury, still owned by his descendants, 



20 M>on0 of t^t American ^ebolutton 

two of whom were present, and every courtesy was extended to the 
guests who were shown through the many rooms of this historic old 
mansion with its priceless relics of Revolutionary days. 

The return to Worcester was made in time to take the 4:55 train 
for Boston. A vote of thanks was given to Worcester Chapter for the 
very successftd way in which it entertained the Society. 

November 10, 1911. It was voted to place markers at the graves 
of Captain John Cushing who was buried in Freeport, Maine, and 
Elisha Adams, in Hopkinton. It was voted to contribute one hundred 
dollars to the building fimd of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society. 

It was voted to constitute the president of the Massachusetts 
Society an active member of the "Society for the Preservation of 
New England Antiquities." 

December 8, 1911. It was voted to have printed and circulated 
among the members of the Society a catalogue of books in the 
Society's library. 

It was voted to thank General Reade for the architect's designs 
for the Massachusetts Valley Forge Monument, and also to have the 
same suitably framed and hung in the Society's room. 

February 9, 1912. It was voted to appropriate fifty dollars to 
place a bronze tablet at Danvers Centre in commemoration of 
Arnold's Expedition to Quebec. Later it was voted to pay the expense 
of obtaining a boulder for the tablet. 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY. FEBRUARY 22, 1912 

The Society celebrated the 180th Birthday of George Washington 
at Hotel Vendome, Boston, at 10:30 a. m. President Edwin S. 
Crandon presided and there were about two hundred members 
present. After introductory remarks by President Crandon, "The 
Sword of Bimker Hill" was sung by Richard B. Hall, who also sang 
the "Star Spangled Banner," and the members joined in the chorus. 
Hon. Solon W. Stevens was the first speaker. He reviewed with 
optimism the affairs of the country and declared that conditions are 
gradually becoming better. Brigadier General Reade, U. S. A. 
(retired), gave interesting details concerning some of the men that 
Massachusetts had put into Washington's army from January 1, 
1777. "The first mission of Washington at Valley Forge was unifica- 
tion. He was assisted by Steuben, Alexander Hamilton and Henry 
Knox, and it was then Washington prevented what threatened to be a 



^h^ttatt0 of ^rocecUingjef 21 

loose confederacy of states. Valley Forge was the reveille of the 
army of the United States, the first call for which was sounded by 
Washington, who demonstrated that public safety required that 
enlistments be made for the war ; that confederation under one com- 
mander did not mean a crown; that Continental Congresses and 
Coimcils were inefficient to win campaigns ; that imskilled volunteers 
were no match, in the long run, for well-trained veterans; that a 
standing army was not a thing to be dreaded. Had Washington's 
army at Valley Forge been destroyed or scattered, the conquest of the 
Hudson River and the separation of New England from the Middle 
States might have been an easy task. The Massachusetts troops at 
Valley Forge were of the foremost actors in the various movements 
which culminated in that more perfect imion of states secured by the 
Federal Constitution . ' ' 

Hon. Horace H. Atherton, Jr., president of Old Essex Chapter, 
of Lynn, presented to the State Society in behalf of the Chapter, a 
white silk flag of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. President 
Crandon appropriately responded, and the unanimous thanks of the 
Society were given the Chapter for its generous gift. Following the 
presentation, a luncheon and social hoiu- closed a most successful 
meeting. 

April 12, 1912. It was voted to apply for a resident membership 
for the secretary, or registrar, in the New England Historic Genea- 
logical Society. 

TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL MEETING, APRIL 19, 1912 

The twenty-third annual meeting was held in the Old South Meet- 
ing House at 10:30 a. m. President Edwin S. Crandon presided, and 
the meeting opened with prayer by the chaplain. Rev. Lewis Wilder 
Hicks of Wellesley. Trooping of the colors was performed by a detail 
from Captain C. B. Appleton's Troop A, imder command of Sergeant 
George W. Austin. 

President Crandon prefaced his opening address by a brief tribute 
to Major Archibald Butt, who was among those lost in the Titanic 
disaster. In his address. President Crandon recalled the stirring 
incidents of one hundred and thirty seven years ago today, and he 
referred to its bearing upon the new conception of the relation of the 
people to the government. "Today, we who benefit so greatly in 
sharing this goodly heritage meet to rejoice in the benefits given by 
the God of owe Fathers to their children, to consider gravely our duty 



22 ^on^ of tl^e 9lmfrtcan Hebolution 

and privilege in the work of perpetuating their names and principles ; 
to review the year, to plan for the building of yet statelier mansions 
as the swift seasons roll." 

The annual reports of the secretary-registrar, treasurer and his- 
torian were then read by those officials. 

The secretary reported the total membership March 31, 1912, as 
1,638. The number of "actual sons" of soldiers of the Revolution 
was reduced to six : three having died since the last meeting. 

Treasurer Dr. Charles M. Green's report showed: Receipts, 
$3,785.70; expenditures, $3,436.96; cash balance in general fund, 
$198.08. The auditing committee, Charles F. Read, chairman, 
reported the treasurer's accounts correct, and the permanent fund, 
amotmting to $6,991 is on deposit in approved savings banks; and 
that the reserve fund, amoimting to $1,239.72 is on deposit in the 
State Street Trust Company. Total net assets, $8,428.80. 

The historian, Brig.-Gen. Philip Reade, read the names of forty 
members who had died since the last annual report. General Reade 
took this occasion to remind the Society that probably not more than 
one-third of the members had sent to the secretary their autobiog- 
raphies, and urged the delinquents to promptly file them. 

Dr. Moses Greeley Parker of Lowell, President General of the 
National Society, brought words of greeting from that organization. 
Major Talbot Aldrich, president of the Sons of the Revolution in 
Massachusetts, also a member of this Society, extended the greetings 
of the Sons of the Revolution. 

Resolutions offered by Nathan Warren were passed, expressing 
sympathy for the families of those lost in the Titanic disaster and for 
those saved, who have passed through such a trying experience. A 
unanimous vote of thanks was given to President Edwin S. Crandon 
for his valuable services during the past year. 

The meeting then proceeded to ballot for officers for the ensuing 
year, restdting in the unanimous reelection of the officers of the 
previous year. Five new managers were elected for three years, as 
follows: Webster Bruce of Lynn; Elmer H. Copeland, M. D., of 
Northampton; Charles C. Doten of Plymouth; Philip T. Nickerson 
of Boston ; and Lawrence W. Jenkins of Danvers. The Society then 
adjourned to the American House for the annual dinner. President 
Crandon presided. 

The after dinner speakers were Hon. Robert Luce, Lieutenant 
Governor of this Commonwealth ; Dr. Moses Greeley Parker, Presi- 
dent General of the National Society; Rev. Newton M. Hall, D. D. 



^B^tractjBf of ^rocerbittgifif 2S 

of Springfield, former president of George Washington Chapter of 
that city; Robert Lincoln O'Brien and Lee M. Friedman. Vernon 
A. Field gave recitations to intersperse the various addresses. 

THE BOSTON CONGRESS OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY, 
MAY 20 AND 21, 1912 

The twenty-third Annual Congress of the National Society, held 
its first day session in the Old South Meeting House, Boston, May 
20, 1912, and its second day session. May 21, in Faneuil Hall, with 
an attendance of 215 accredited members, including 12 general 
officers and past presidents general. 

At this congress. Dr. Moses Greeley Parker, of Lowell, who was 
elected president-general at the Louisville Congress the previous 
year, presided. The social functions comprised: Religious services at 
the First Church, comer of Berkeley and Marlborough Street, Sunday 
afternoon. May 19, 1912, at which Rev. William M. Gilbert of 
Cliftondale oJEfered the invocation; appropriate music by a selected 
choir, and a sermon by Chaplain Rev. Lewis W. Hicks. Preceding 
the services a detail from the First Corps of Cadets, commanded by 
Captain Joshua Atwood of Company B, placed the national and 
state colors at the altar. On Monday, during the recess of the con- 
gress, President-General Parker entertained the officers at a luncheon 
at the Parker House. On Monday afternoon, the ladies were given a 
sight-seeing automobile trip through Old Boston. Monday evening, 
there was a general reception to delegates and ladies at Hotel Somer- 
set. On Tuesday morning, special services were held in the Granary 
burial ground under direction of Boston Chapter. The ceremonies 
were preceded by a parade of detachments from the Worcester Con- 
tinental and other military organizations, marshalled by Brig. -Gen. 
Charles K. Darling and Lieut.-Col. John S. Barrows, who acted as 
escort to the delegates to the congress, marshalled by Brig.-Gen. 
Philip Reade. The march was from Boston Common to the Granary 
ground, and from there to Faneuil Hall. 

On Tuesday, after the adjournment of the congress, the delegates 
were entertained at luncheon in the Armory at Faneuil Hall by 
Colonel Everett S. Benton, captain of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company. On Tuesday afternoon, delegates and ladies 
were given a sight-seeing automobile trip through parts of Boston 
and to Cambridge and vicinity. On Tuesday evening, the delegates 
to the congress were tendered a banquet at Hotel Somerset by the 



^4 ^onie( of tt)e 9lmericdn Hebolution 

Massachusetts Society. About two hundred and fifty were present. 
The ladies at the same time were given a banquet in the smaller 
ball-room, afterwards joining the members in the larger hall for the 
speeches. President Edwin S. Crandon presided as toastmaster. 
Addresses were delivered by retiring President-General Parker, 
President General-elect James M. Richardson, Rev. William H. Van 
Allen, Hon. Solon W. Stevens, Rev. Frederick W. Hamilton, and 
Edwin Day Sibley. 

The Massachusetts Society was represented by the following- 
named delegates: President Edwin S. Crandon, Hon. Luke S. Stowe 
(delegate-at-large), Luther Atwood, Frank E. Woodward, Charles 
M. Green, M. D., Brigadier-General PhiHp Reade, Rev. Lewis W. 
Hicks, Herbert W. Kimball, Hon. Solon W. Stevens, Edward J. Cox, 
Vernon A. Field, Nathan Warren, Hon. Edward C. Battis, General 
Charles K. Darling, Francis H. Brown, M. D., Colonel Everett C. 
Benton, Charles F. Read, Lieut. Col. John S. Barrows, Charles Dana 
Burrage, Alfonso S. Harris, Prescott Chamberlain, Albert F. Amee, 
Webster Bruce, Dr. Waldo E. Boardman, W. J. Litchfield, Walter K. 
Watkins, John G. Moseley, T. Julien Silsby, P. Hildreth Parker, 
George M. Rice, Capt. W. L. Willey, Dr. Frank A. Gardner, Alvin R. 
Bailey, Grenville H. Norcross and Colonel Ephraim Steams. 

May 10, 1912. It was voted to purchase twelve dozen small 
American flags, the "Betsey Ross," to be placed Memorial Day at 
the graves of soldiers of the Revolution buried in North Dorchester 
and the Granary cemeteries. Compatriot Edward Webster McGlenen 
supplied the flags for other cemeteries in Boston. 

It was voted to appoint President Crandon to represent the Society 
on the Patriotic Advisory Board of the "North American Civic 
League for Immigrants." 

Jime 14, 1912. A vote of thanks was given Compatriot Edward 
J. Cox and his associates, of Boston Chapter, for their earnest and 
effective work in providing the military escort to the National Society 
at its Boston Congress, May 21, 1912. It was voted to appoint 
Captain Joshua Atwood to form a Color Guard for trooping the colors 
at meetings of the Society. 

FIELD DAY AT SALEM AND DANVERS, SEPTEMBER 14, 

1912 

The dedication of a memorial tablet at Danvers commemorating 
the Quebec Expedition of 1775 was made the occasion for holding the 



^bfittatt^ of ^tottthing^ 25 

annual Field Day at Salem and Danvers. About seventy-five ladies 
and gentlemen met at Salem and were received by a committee from 
Old Salem Chapter, who acted as guides to places of historic interest. 
After dining in Ames Memorial Hall, special electric cars took the 
party to Danvers Square, where the tablet, on a large boulder, is set 
on the lawn in front of "Ye old Berry Tavern." The exercises of 
unveiling the tablet were begun with prayer by Chaplain Lewis W. 
Hicks. President Crandon was then introduced by Compatriot 
Alvin R. Bailey, chairman of the committee on arrangements. 
Mr. Crandon spoke briefly of the purposes of the society and its work 
in erecting similar memorials in the state. Upon removal of the flag 
from the tablet, President Crandon said: "We dedicate and give 
this memorial as an inspiration of better citizenship and in recognition 
of the high and noble deeds of the past, and may God bless us one 
and all." 

The weather had been threatening and a shower of rain fell at the 
conclusion of Mr. Crandon's address. Arrangements had been made 
for such a contingency and the company proceeded at once to the 
rooms of the Danvers Historical Society, where Charles H. Preston, 
a member of the committee, welcomed all in behalf of the Society 
and President Crandon introduced Hon. Alden P. White as the orator 
of the occasion. Judge Alden told in detail the history of Benedict 
Arnold's expedition to Canada, and the manner in which he handled 
the misdeeds of Arnold, mentioning him simply as "that other man" 
was unique and truly masterly. Dr. Frank A. Gardner, of Salem, 
a recognized student of Revolutionary history, followed Judge White 
with an interesting account of the personnel of the expedition, which 
was made up of two battalions with Colonel Benedict Arnold in 
command; Lieut. -Col. Christopher Greene of Warwick, R. I., 
Lieut. -Col. Roger Enos of Windsor, Conn., Major Return Jonathan 
Meigs of Middletown, Conn., Major Timothy Bigelow of Worcester. 
Among the other officers was Capt. Samuel McCobb of Georgetown; 
and two volunteers who held no commissions but later attained dis- 
tinction and rank — Lieut. -Col. Aaron Burr and Eleazer Aswold. 

Hon. George B. Sears was the last speaker. He spoke briefly of 
Danvers history and expressed the opinion that in all schools the local 
history of the cities and towns in which the schools are located should 
be taught. 

October 11, 1912. Markers were contributed for the graves of 
Enos Reynolds, West Boxford, and Philip Bagley, Newburyport — 
Btinker Hill survivors who were present when the comer stone for the 



26 ^onfi of tt)e American iflebolution 

monument was laid in 1825, and at its dedication when completed in 
1843. Markers were contributed for the graves of Lieutenant Thomas 
Whitman, buried in Stowe; Captain Peter Dolliver, in the Granary 
ground; Captain Joshua Wheeler, in Boston Common ground, and 
James Allen in the South ground. Voted to contribute five dollars 
for the "American Flag Association." 

December 13, 1912. Voted to contribute fifty dollars towards the 
purchase of the historic Bellingham Cary Mansion in Chelsea. 

January 10, 1913. Voted an appropriation of twenty-five dollars 
to purchase from Historian General Reade a copy of the fac-simile 
of autographs of the original members of the Society of the Cincin- 
nati, together with an alphabetical list of the same showing rank, 
organization and residence of each. 

WASHINGTON BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION 
FEBRUARY 22, 1913 

The Society celebrated Washington's 181st birthday at the Hotel 
Vendome with an attendance of about two hundred members and 
guests. The routine business of the meeting began at 10:30 a. m., 
and luncheon was served at its close. 

President Edwin S. Crandon presided and the speakers included 
Rev. Dr. Daniel D. Addison, who spoke on Washington, "The Great 
American." (See address in full). Edward J. Cox, who spoke on 
"Revolution in the Schools," and Brig.-Gen. Philip Reade, who as 
historian gave incidents connected with the Revolutionary cam- 
paigns ; Walter Kendall Watkins offered a resolution that the Society 
consider the advisability of a closer examination of correspondence 
and documents in connection with the history of the Revolutionary 
period. 

Remarks were made by C. J. H. Woodbtuy of Lynn, and Rev. F. E. 
Emrich, who advocated the translation into the various languages 
of the Europeans now flocking to these shores of information regarding 
this coiuitry and its history. 

March 14, 1913. The secretary stated that Dr. Samuel Crowell 
had ptu-chased a marker, with name-plate affixed, which he intended 
to place at the tomb of Ebenezer Withington in the North Dorchester 
Cemetery. Lieut.-Col. John S. Barrows offered the following resolu- 
tion which was adopted by a tmanimous vote: 

"That the managers heartily approve of the changes now being 
made on the exterior of the Old South Meeting House, restoring it 



^hattatt^ of proceebtngi( 27 

to the appearance of the time for which it is most famous, putting it 
in harmony with the Old State House and Christ Church, making 
more emphatic the reminders of those times not too well known by 
the present generation. The work of the Old South Society is heartily 
approved, and those changes which will make the noted building 
nearer to the condition existing in Revolutionary days, are endorsed 
by the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution." 

April 11, 1913. The board of managers having learned with great 
sorrow of the death of David Floyd, of Winthrop, on motion of 
President Crandon a resolution of condolence was extended to Mrs. 
Floyd, and a record made of his worthy character and faithful ser- 
vices. 

Captain Charles C. Doten, of Plymouth, having resigned from the 
board of managers, it was voted to fill his unexpired term by the 
appointment of Charles French Read, of Brookline. 

TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING, APRIL 19, 1913 

Following its custom of many years, the Society assembled within 
the historic Old South Meeting House at 10:30 a. m., with a very 
large attendance of its members. President Edwin S. Crandon 
presided. A preliminary feature of the exercises was the "trooping 
of the colors" by a detachment from the Worcester Continentals, 
with drummers and fifer. Rev. Lewis W. Hicks, chaplain of the 
Society, made the opening prayer. Mr. Crandon's address was 
followed by the annual reports of the secretary-registrar, the treas- 
urer, and the historian. 

The secretary's report showed a membership on March 31, of 
1,604, of whom 56 are life members. Also two Honorary members: 
Comte de Sahune Lafayette and Gaston de Sahune Lafayette of 
France, great-great grandsons of General Lafayette. Year by year 
the number of "actual sons " of the soldiers of the Revolutionary War 
dwindles: only four are left (John Adams died since the meeting.) 

The treastirer's report is herewith given in full by vote of the 
Society. The historian read the names of 38 members who had died 
since the last annual meeting. Of the delegates chosen to represent 
the Society at the congress of the National Society at Chicago, May 
19-20, 1913, the following-named attended: Dr. Moses Greeley 
Parker, John Graham Moseley, George H. Nutting, Franklin R. 
Gifford, Henry F. Pimderson, Edward B. Coolidge and J. F. Whitney. 



28 ^on^ef of tfje American lUeboiutton 

It was voted to refer to the board of managers Mr. D. S. Water- 
man's recommendation that the Society place memorial tablets in 
Roxbury to commemorate the distinguished services of Major-General 
William Heath and Brigadier-General John Greaton. 

An incident of the meeting was the presence of Stephen B. Smith, 
of East Weymouth, aged 82 years, whose father, Enos Smith, served 
when a boy in 1781, on the state ship Protector, commanded by 
Captain John Foster Williams. A purse of about fifty-eight dollars 
was contributed by those present, and given to Mr. Smith. 

The treasurer of the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution has the honor to submit his twenty-first annual 
report, for the year ending April 15, 1913 : 

RECEIPTS 

Annual dues from 1,575 members @ $2.00 $3,150.00 

Admission fees from 87 members @ $3.00 261.00 

Life-membership fees from 4 members @$25.00 100.00 

Income from Permanent Fund 263.76 

Interest on bank balances 8.66 

For 27 certificates of membership @ $1.00 27.00 

Sale of yearbook 2.00 

Ordinary receipts of the year $3,812.42 

EXPENDITURES 

Dues to Nat'l Society, S.A.R., 1,550 members, @ $0.50. .. 775.00 

Rent, care and lighting of office, and telephone 362.45 

Salary of Registrar 500.00 

Clerical assistance for Secretary-Registrar and Historian . . 144.57 
Printing, postage, stationery, rosettes, and miscellaneous 

expenses 543.27 

Books, magazines, photographs, binding, and framing . . . 88.25 

Certificates of membership 27.00 

Net expense of annual meeting, April 19, 1912 199.64 

Net expense of Field Day at Danvers, Sept. 14, 1912 . . . 20.65 

Net expense of meeting in Boston, Feb. 22, 1913 26.00 

Funeral flowers for three compatriots 12.65 

Placing S. A. R. markers and name-plates 28.55 

Committee on Cooperation in Patriotic Work 5.00 

American Flag Association 5.00 

Representative membership and assessment in New Eng- 
land Historical Genealogical Society 10.00 

Subscription to Society for Protection of New England 

Antiquities 5.00 

Boulder and tablet commemorating Arnold's Expedition 

to Quebec 88.80 

Subscription to the Cary House Association 50.00 



^h^ttatt^ of proceeHing^ 29 

Admission and life-membership fees added to Permanent 

Fund $361.00 

Ordinary expenditures of the year $3,252.83 



Surplus of the year 559.59 

Balance from last year 198.08 

Drawn from the Reserve Fund 1,000.00 

Subscriptions towards expenses of Congress, May 1912 865.15 

Receipts from sale of tickets, medals, etc 416.50 

3,039.32 

Total expenses of Congress 2,318.64 

Net surplus of the year 720.68 

Year's overlay placed in Reserve Fund 500.00 

Cash balance in General Fund, April 15, 1913 220.68 



Charles M. Green, Treasurer. 

We have examined the accounts of the treasurer and have com- 
pared the vouchers therewith. We find them to be correct, with a 
balance of cash on hand $220.68 on the closure of the accounts 
April 15, 1913. 

We also find that the Permanent Fund, amounting to $7,352.00, 
is on deposit in approved savings banks, and that the Reserve Fund, 
amounting, with accrued interest, to $762.27, is on deposit with the 
State Street Trust Company. 

Talbot Aldrich 1 

Charles F. Read \ Auditing Committee. 

Prescott Chamberlain j 

Boston, April 16, 1913. 



Following the business session, the members and guests assembled 
outside the Meeting House where they were photographed, and then 
marched to the American House preceded by the Worcester Conti- 
nentals' color bearers and musicians. At the hotel, President Crandon 
presided. "Trooping the colors" was well done by the Worcester 
color guard. The invocation was offered by Chaplain Hicks. The 
Society had as special speakers, David L. Pierson, historian-general 
of the National Society, Marshall P. Thompson, Brigadier-General 
Philip Reade, Gardner W. Pearson, Adjutant General of the Com- 
monwealth, and Major Henry V. A. Joslin of Rhode Island, followed 
by an address by President Crandon, who at this time retires from 
office, after an active, successful administration. 



30 4>oniE( of tt)e Slmettcan ^ebolutton 

May 9, 1913. The standing committees for the ensuing 5''ear were 
appointed as follows: On membership, the president, the secretary 
and the historian ; on finance, vice-president Woodward, Dr. Samuel 
Crowell and Webster Bruce; on publication and printing, vice- 
President Woodward, Dr. Samuel Crowell and Webster Bruce; on 
publication and printing, Vice-President Field, Lawrence W. Jenkins 
and Charles F. Read. Special committee on memorials, the vice- 
president. Rev. Newton M. Hall, D. D., Rev. L. W. Hicks, Charles 
G. Chick, Frank Rumrill, Walter K. Watkins, Albert F. Amee, H. W. 
Kimball, Edwin S. Crandon and George P. Tilton. 

At a subsequent meeting, Mr. Chick was appointed vice-chairman 
of the memorial committee. Special committee on inspection and 
safety: General Philip Reade, Walter K. Watkins, Arthur F. Clarke, 
Walter S. Fox, and H. W. Kimball. It was voted to contribute 
markers for the graves of Charles Libby and David Legro, buried in 
Lebanon, Maine. 

Jime 13, 1913. A committee, to act with other committees, was 
appointed on the proposed duplication of Washington's journey 
when he started from Philadelphia, June 23, 1775, to command the 
Continental Army at Cambridge, consisting of Henry F. Pimderson 
of Springfield, Edwin S. Crandon of Cambridge, and Brig.-Gen. 
Philip Reade of Lowell. 

It was voted to authorize the committee on publication and print- 
ing to publish a triennial register, or "Year Book" in the fall of 
1913. 



ILtfit of iWemberB 



Ifist of jHemberjEi 



This list contains the names of those who were members of the Society in June, 
1910, and those who have been admitted up to October 10, 1913, including those 
who have died, but excluding those whose membership has otherwise ceased in 
that period. The name of the city or town given as residence is in Massachusetts, 
unless otherwise indicated. 

The records of members included in former volumes are not repeated in this unless 
repetition is rendered necessary for the purpose of change or addition. The 
records of new members are given in full. 

Admitted National Number 

1912 ABBOTT, FREDERIC BASSETT, Lynn 23673 

Great*-grandson of Ebenezer Abbott 
Great*-grandson of John Swain 
Great*-grandson of Jacob Walton 

1911 ABBOTT, SAMUEL, Newton Centre 22481 

Great-grandson of Bixby Abbott 
Great*-grandson of Joseph Winn 
Great*-grandson of Benjamin Ames 

1906 ABBOTT, S. WENDELL, Lawrence 18068 

1893 ADAMS, ALEXANDER CLINTON, Boston .... 4988 

Died Nov. 24, 1910 

1910 ADAMS, CHARLES SUMNER, West SomerviUe . . . 22186 
1891 ADAMS, FRANK SYDNEY, Brookline 4873 

1894 ADAMS, JAMES DEXTER, Rear Admiral, U. S. N., Wash- 

ington, D. C 5186 

1891 ADAMS, JAMES FORSTER ALLEYNE, Pittsfield . . 4835 

1891 ADAMS, JOHN, Holden (actual son) 968 

Died July 7, 1913, aged 99 years. 

1908 ADAMS, JOHN WESLEY, Methuen 19989 

1911 ADAMS, WILLIAM RICHARDSON, Stoneham . . . 22870 

Great-grandson of Stephen Adams 
Great'-grandson of Samuel Adams 
Great*-grandson of Stephen Hoar 
Great*-grandson of Daniel Hoar 

1894 AHL, GEORGE WASHINGTON, BrookUne .... 5180 

1901 ALBREE, EDWARD CURLING, Swampscott .... 13990 



34 J>oniet of t^e Slmettcan Iflebolutton 

1894 ALDEN JOHN EATON, Newton 5162 

Died Sept. 15, 1910 

1900 ALDEN, RALPH PARKHURST, Springfield .... 13004 

1912 ALDRICH, TALBOT BAILEY, Canton 24037 

Great'-grandson of Benjamin Adams 

1906 ALEXANDER, WINTHROP, Roxbury 18069 

1911 ALLAN, BERT JOHN, Middleboro 23166 

Great'-grandson of John Allan 

1890 ALLEN, CRAWFORD CARTER, Newport, R. L (life member) 611 
1889 ALLEN, FRANK AUGUSTUS, Cambridge .... 603 

1902 ALLEN, GEORGE HARRISON, Lynn 14969 

1911 ALLEN, JOHN KERMOTT, Brookline 16127 

(Transferred from Illinois Society) 
Great-grandson of Gilbert Allen 

1901 ALLEN, WILLIAM HERMON, Newtonville .... 14309 

1911 ALLEN, WILLIS LLOYD, Shirley 22889 

Great'-grandson of James McMichaels 
Great*-grandson of Zachariah Dodge 
Great'-grandson of Jabez Upham 

1913 ALLEY, GUSTAVUS EVERETT, East Everett . . . 25091 

Great-grandson of Joseph Alley, Jr. 
Great-grandson of Joseph Johnson 
Great'-grandson of Jacob Ingalls, Sr. 

1901 AMEE, ALBERT FRANCIS, Cambridge 18710 

1901 AMEE, JOHN, Cambridge 13711 

1896 AMES, GEORGE EDGAR, LoweU 8690 

1903 AMES, GEORGE FREDERICK, Lynn 16020 

1896 AMSDEN, FRANKLIN DANA, Brookline .... 9481 

1894 ANDREW, HENRY HERSEY, New York City . . . 5123 

1900 ANDREWS, HENRY LEVI, Wobum 13005 

1912 ANDREWS, JOHN COLE, Wobum 24038 

Great*-grandson of Amos Andrews 
Great*-grandson of Timothy Ross 
Great*-grandson of Samuel Robie. 

1911 APPLETON, CHARLES BROOKS, Brookhne .... 22402 
Great-grandson of John Hooton 
Great*-grandson of Rev. Edward Brooks 

1896 APPLETON, FRANCIS HENRY, Peabody (Ufe member) 8636 

1911 APPLETON, FRANCIS HAWKS, Brookline .... 28654 
Great-grandson of Jacob Woolley 

1904 APPLETON, WILLIAM SUMNER, Boston .... 16846 



1415302 

%i0t of ^tmhtt^ 



35 



1911 APPLETON, FRANCIS HAWKS, Jr., Franklin . . . 23655 
Great*-grandson of Jacob WooUey 

1908 ARMINGTON, SAMUEL WALLACE, Holden . . . 19773 
Died March 11, 1913 

1911 APPLETON, LLOYD ELLIOTT, Rye, N. Y 23666 

Great*-grandson of Jacob Woolley 

1896 ARMSBY, WALTER HOLBROOK, Wrentham . . . 9364 

1908 ARNOLD, SETH FENELON, Boston 19772 

1909 ASHLEY, JOHN HILL, Springfield 21026 

1902 ATHERTON, HORACE HALE, Jr., Saugus .... 14960 

1911 ATHERTON, LAURENCE GEORGE, Lynn .... 23657 

Greats-grandson of James Mullin 
Great*-grandson of Amos George 
Great*-grandson of John Huse 
Great*-grandson of Samuel Tenney 

1911 ATKINS, FRANK WILBUR, Lynn 22890 

Great-grandson of Nathaniel Dudley 
Great*-grandson of John Dudley 

1903 ATTWILL, LOUIS HULEN, East Lynn 16021 

1908 ATWATER, CHARLES BREWSTER, Springfield . . . 19746 

1902 ATWOOD, BENJAMIN S., Whitman 14572 

1910 ATWOOD, JOSHUA, Brighton 22003 

1902 ATWOOD, LUTHER, Lynn 14961 

1902 AUSTIN, GEORGE WILLIAM, Roxbury 14982 

1902 AUSTIN, HENRY HERBERT, Wellesley 14795 

1910 AYER, SILAS HIBBARD, Boston 22004 

1910 BABBITT, CHARLES JACOB, Boston 22195 

Died April 4, 1913 

Great*-grandson of Ebenezer Babbitt 

1908 BABB, RALPH WARREN, Lynn 20203 

1908 BABB, WALTER PRESTON, Lynn 19750 

1912 BACHELLER, CHARLES MANSFIELD, Lynn . . . 24539 

Great-grandson of James Bacheller (Bachelor) 

1902 BACHELLER, EDWARD FRANKLIN, Lynn .... 14962 
1892 BACHELOR, CHARLES OSCAR, Worcester .... 4950 
1908 BACON, ANSELM LOTHROP, Newton Centre . . . 19395 

1903 BACON, AUGUSTUS, Roxbury 15826 

1895 BACON, HORACE SARGENT, Lowell . . . . . 7239 

1899 BAGG, ALLEN HENRY, Pittsfield 12452 



36 



^oniS^ of tt)e American Hebolution 



1908 
1894 
1889 
1899 
1893 
1903 
1908 
1891 
1895 
1896 
1892 
1907 
1892 
1905 
1902 
1910 
1910 
1891 

1903 
1903 
1891 
1897 
1909 
1890 
1907 
1904 
1912 



1908 
1900 
1898 
1897 

1913 



BAGG, AARON, West Springfield . 
BAILEY, ALVIN RICHARDS, Newton 
BAILEY, DUDLEY PERKINS, Everett . 
BAILEY, FREDERICK, LoweU . 
BAILEY, FREDERIC WILLIAM, Worcester 
BAILEY, JAMES ROGERS, Lawrence 
BAILEY, WILLIAM AMBROSE, Northampton 
BAKER, CHARLES FRANCIS, Fitchburg 
BAKER, DAVID ERASTUS, NewtonviUe . 
BAKER, FRANK, United States Army 
BAKER, GEORGE MINOT, Concord 
BAKER, HARRY MUDGE, Lynn 
BAKER, JAMES EDWARD, South Lincohi 
BALDWIN, LOAMMI FRANKLIN, Wobum 
BALDWIN, PERCY VERMILYE, BrookHne 
BALDWIN, THOMAS WILLIAMS, Cambridge 
BALKAM, CLIFFORD MANN, Colorado Springs, Colo 

BALL, ISRAEL MANNING, Holden . 
Died January 1913 

BALL, JAMES TURNER, Dorchester 

BALL, JOHN RODNEY, Lawrence 

BALLARD, WILLIS DANA, Holyoke (life member) 

BANCROFT, FRANCIS JAMES, Reading 

BANGS, CHARLES HOWARD, Lynn 

BANGS, CHARLES McCLARY, Fitchburg 

BANKS, GEORGE HERBERT, Springfield 

BARBER, GEORGE DANIELSON, Worcester 

BARBER, JOHN WILLIAM, Norwood 
Great-grandson of Theodore Bellows 
Greats-grandson of Phineas Hutchins 
Greats-grandson of James Reed 

BARKER, ARTHUR WESLEY, LYNN .... 

BARKER, BENJAMIN PRESCOTT, Maiden . 

BARLOW, EDWIN THAYER, North Adams . 

BARNES, ALBERT, Kearsarge, Conway, N. H. (Actual son) 
Died July 29, 1910 

BARNES, J. EDGAR, Lynn 

Great*-grandson of George Waterhouse 
Great'-grandson of Lemuel Barnes 



19623 

5069 

619 

12230 

4989 

15841 

19396 

947 

8571 

8942 

4949 

19169 

4953 

17431 

14999 

17359 

22007 

970 

15305 
15678 
4922 
10217 
20732 
637 
19003 
16552 
24540 



19980 

12757 

11050 

9492 

24546 




o 
m 



> 






%x^t of f^tmhet^ 



37 



1904 
1908 
1906 
1897 
1890 
1899 

1889 

1906 
1906 

1896 
1904 
1906 

1910 
1907 
1906 

1910 
1910 
1897 
1909 
1903 
1898 
1903 
1895 
1902 
1899 
1894 

1912 



BARNES, LEWIS EDGAR, Methuen 

BARNES, WILFRED MOLSON, Westmount, Canada 

BARR, WALTER SUMNER, West Springfield . 

BARRETT, FRANK JAMES, Lenox 

BARRETT, HARRY HUDSON, Maiden .... 

BARRETT, NELSON MACEY, Concord .... 
(Transferred to Philippine Society) 

BARRETT, RICHARD FAY, Concord .... 
Died July 31, 1912 

BARRON, CARLOS EDWIN, Westminster 

BARRON, WILLIAM BETHUEL, Westminster (Actual son) 
Died Sept. 6, 1912 

BARROWS, JOHN STUART, Boston . 

BARRY, CHARLES STODDARD, BrookUne 

BARTELS, J. MURRAY, Boston . 

Transferred to Empire State Society 

BARTER, ULYSSES GRANT, Maiden 
BARTLET, ASHTON HALL, Roxbury 



BARTLET, WILLIAM WILLIAMS, Roxbury 
Died Dec. 1, 1910 



BARTLETT, STEPHEN DREW, Allston . 

BASSETT, CHARLES HOWARD, Barre . 

BATCHELDER, EDWARD SAWYER, Brookline 

BATCHELDER, ELMER GREENLEAF, Lynn 

BATCHELDER, GEORGE HILL, Lynn . 

BACHELDER, WILLIAM JOHN, Loudon, N. H. 

BATEMAN, JOHN F., LoweU .... 

BATES, CHARLES, Cambridge .... 

BATES, EVERETT ALANSON, Springfield . 

BATES, FREDERIC RUSSELL, Melrose . 

BATES, THEODORE CORNELIUS, Worcester (life member) 
Died March 11, 1912 

BATES, J. ROSS, Cranford, N. J 

Great-grandson of Zealous Bates 
Great*-grandson of Daniel Nichols 



16565 
20212 
18057 
10168 
636 
12059 

629 

18071 
18214 

8943 
16332 
18445 

22005 
18500 

17892 

22187 
22008 

9835 
20733 
15842 
11509 
15579 

7248 
14553 
11872 

5163 

24196 



bonier of tl^e Slmerican Ifiebolutton 



BATES, WALTER CLARK, Jamaica Plain 

BATES, WILLIAM HERBERT, Swampscott . 
Greats-grandson of Rufus Brown 

BATTIS, EDWARD CLARENCE, Salem . 

BAUER, CHARLES THEODORE, Jamaica Plain . 

BAUER, FREDERIC GILBERT, East Weymouth 
member) 



Supplemental 



1896 
1913 

1896 
1902 
1902 

1904 BAUER, RUDOLPH SHERMAN, Lynn . 

1910 BEAL, FRANCIS LEAVITT, East Cambridge 

Greats-grandson of Thomas Lothrop "j 
Great-grandson of Levi Tower 
Greats-grandson of Henry Lambert 
Great'-grandson of Joseph Souther J 

1906 BEAL, WILLIAM WILLS, Roxbury .... 

Greats-grandson of Joseph Boynton (Supplemental) 

1908 BEARDSELL, GEORGE RICHARDSON, Lynn 

1895 BECKFORD, FRANCIS SUTTON, Beverly 

1911 BEDLOW, JOSEPH JAMES, Cambridge . 

Great-grandson of Elijah Kellogg 

1911 BELCHER, CHARLES EDWIN, Brookline 

Great*-grandson of John Nixon 

1905 BELDEN, ALBERT MATSON, Northampton 

Died Aug. 5, 1912 

1893 BELL, CHARLES UPHAM, Andover . 

1912 BELL, ROBERT, West Springfield 

Great'-grandson of Stephen Knight 

1910 BELL, J. CARROLL, West Lynn . 

Greats-grandson of John Crane 

1904 BENNETT, FRANK P., Saugus . 

1902 BENNETT, WILLIAM ROBINSON, Chelsea 

1894 BENT, ALLEN HERBERT, Roslindale . 

1903 BENT, JAMES READ, Maynard 

1911 BENTON, CHARLES EVERETT, Belmont (life member) 

Great'-grandson of Joseph Chamberlain 

1911 BENTON, EVERETT CHAMBERLAIN, Behnont . 
Greats-grandson of Joseph Chamberlain 

1911 BENTON, JAY ROGERS, Belmont (life member) . 
Great'-grandson of Joseph Chamberlain 

1913 BERRY, ARTHUR STACKPOLE, Somerville . 

Greats-grandson of Samuel Berry 



aife 



8652 
24743 

8937 
15000 

15151 
16333 
22188 



18450 

19990 

7278 

22878 

23163 

17777 

4990 
24541 

22476 

17026 
14800 
5142 
16191 
23166 

22891 

23167 

25096 



Eiisrt of 0itmhtt^ 39 

1913 BERRY, FRANK EDWARD, Lynn 25093 

Great-grandson of Enoch Poor 
Great-grandson of Joseph Cilley 

1908 BERRY, HENRY NEWHALL, Lynn 19383 

1901 BERRY, JOHN CUTTING, Worcester 13989 

1908 BICKNELL, GEORGE EDWARD, LoweU .... 20222 

1908 BICKNELL, HARRY EMERSON, Northampton . . . 20223 

1893 BIGELOW, MELVILLE MADISON, Cambridge (life 

member) 5016 

1913 BILL, RAYMOND RUSSELL, Springfield 25085 

Great*-grandson of Benajah (or Elijah) Bill 

1912 BILLINGS, DWIGHT MORRIS, Amherst . . . . 24542 

Greats-grandson of William Thompson 

1896 BILLINGS, WILLIAM CHESTER, Washington, D. C. . 9351 

1899 BIRNIE, WALTER, Springfield 12233 

1906 BISBEE, FRED MILTON, La Junta, Colo 18437 

1911 BLACK, A. SHIRLEY, Lynn 23408 

Great-grandson of Daniel Gallusha 
Great*-grandson of Thomas Kilby Hudson 
Great'-grandson of Aaron Cheever 
Great*-grandson of Isaac Organ 
Great*-grandson of Nathaniel Putnam 
Great*-grandson of Edmund Black 
Great'-grandson of Nehemiah Ramsdell 
Great*-grandson of Jonathan Lufken 

1908 BLACK, EVERETT HUDSON, Lynn 19624 

(Supplemental, same as A. Shirley Black) 

1906 BLACKLER, FRANCIS, Smyrna, Turkey in Asia . . . 18058 

1907 BLACKLER, WILLIAM FRANCIS GRIFFITT (life mem- 

ber) Smyrna, Turkey in Asia 18925 

1908 BLAGUE, GILES, Springfield 19397 

1907 BLAISDELL, CHARLES ELIJAH, LoweU . . . . 19004 

1913 BLAIR, ORRIN CURTIS, Lynn 24547 

Greats-grandson of Adam Blair 

1900 BLAKE, CLARENCE JOHN, Boston 13021 

1907 BLANCHARD, FRANK INGALLS, Swampscott . . 18901 

1896 BLINN, ALFRED MILLARD, Roxbury 8663 

1907 BLISS, CHESTER WILLIAM, Springfield .... 19005 

1906 BLISS, GEORGE, Warren 18059 

Died July 5, 1913 



40 M>on0 of ttie Slmettcan Uleboiutton 

1902 BLISS, GEORGE SPENCER, West Lynn 14994 

1903 BLISS. WILLIAM HAYWARD, Newton 16022 

1910 BLOOD, ARTHUR JOSIAH, Lynn 21856 

1910 BLOOD, CHARLES OTIS, Lynn 21858 

1898 BLOOD, JOHN BALCH, Newburyport 11031 

1910 BLOOD, LILLEBRIDGE KING, Lynn 21859 

1896 BOAL, THEODORE DAVIS, Boalsburg, Pa 8678 

1902 BOARDMAN SAMUEL MAY, Boston (life member) . . 14963 

Died June 1, 1913 

1900 BOARDMAN, WALDO ELIAS, Boston (life member) . . 12773 

1894 BODGE, GEORGE MADISON 5086 

1904 BODURTHA, EARLE S. P., Agawam 17027 

1903 BOGARDUS, FREDERIC RUTHVEN, Brookline . . . 16192 

1895 BOLSTER, PERCY GARDNER, Dorchester Centre . 8536 
1906 BOND, CHARLES WOOD, Newton Centre .... 18446 

1899 BOOTH, HENRY ADELBERT, Springfield .... 12060 
1909 BOOTH, OLIN ROYAL, Brimfield 21039 

1906 BOSSON, ALBERT DAVIS, Boston 17893 

1908 BOSWORTH, CHARLES WILDER, Springfield . . . 19398 

1904 BOSWORTH, HENRY HALL, Springfield 16566 

1890 BOUVE, WALTER LINCOLN, Hingham 877 

1891 BOWDITCH, GALEN MELVIN, Chelsea 4860 

1895 BOWMAN, AUSTIN LORD, New York City .... 8550 
1894 BOWMAN, GEORGE ERNEST, Boston (life member) . . 5145 

1901 BOWMAN, HENRY HUBBARD, Springfield .... 13701 

1903 BOYDEN, MERRILL NORTON, Newtonville .... 15580' 
Died Oct. 24, 1911 

1896 BRACKETT, SIDNEY LAWRENCE, Watertown . . . 8946 

Died Nov. 11, 1910 

1901 BRADBURN, H. DWIGHT, Hartford, Conn 13617 

1907 BRADFORD, EDWARD STANDISH, Springfield . . . 19006 
1889 BRADISH, JOHN QUINCY, Providence, R. I. ... 628 

1905 BRADSTREET, GEORGE FLINT, Maiden .... 17627 

1911 BRAMHALL, FREDERICK ELDRIDGE, Lynn . . . 22495 

Greats-grandson of Zebdiel Weston 

1900 BREED, CHARLES NORCROSS, Lynn 12763 

1902 BREED, CHARLES ORRIN, Lynn 14965 

Died Nov. 15, 1910 



%i^t of 0itmttt0 



41 



1913 

1910 
1908 
1912 

1908 
1912 

1911 

1894 
1895 

1895 
1911 

1900 
1896 
1894 
1907 
1908 
1904 

1898 
1907 
1891 
1893 
1910 
1899 
1897 
1908 
1906 
1906 



BREED, EDWARD EVERETT, Lynn 25097 

Greats-grandson of James Day 

BREED, FRANCIS STEWART, Lynn 22009 

BREED, G. HERBERT, Lynn . . 20224 

BREED, GEORGE HERSCHEL, Lynn 23839 

Greats-grandson of Pharaoh Johnson 
Greats-grandson of Thomas Williams 



BREED, NATHANIEL POPE, Lynn 



BREED, MELVILLE, Swampscott .... 
Greats-grandson of Pharaoh Johnson 
Greats-grandson of Thomas Williams 

BREED, SAMUEL OLIVER, Lynn .... 
Grandson of Benjamin Massay, Jr. 

BRETT, HARRIE IRA, West Roxbury 

BREWER, EDWARD HENRY, Dalton . . . 
Died Oct. 22, 1911 

BRIGGS, EDWARD CORNELIUS. Chestnut Hill 

BRIGGS, HERBERT JAMES, Providence, R. I. . 
GreatS-grandson of James Briggs 

BRIGGS, JAMES ELLIS, Riverdale, New York City 

BRIGGS, WILLIAM CHURCHILL, Dorchester 

BRIGHAM, EDWIN HOWARD, Brookline 

BRIGHAM, FRANK LORING, Springfield 

BRIGHAM, JAMES JOSLYN, Springfield . 

BRIGHAM, WILLIAM HARTWELL, Hudson 
Died May 22, 1911 

BROCK, GREENLEAF COBURN, Lowell 

BROOKS, BENJAMIN, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

BROOKS, ETHAN, West Springfield . 

BROOKS, GEORGE FRANCIS TARR, Belmont 

BROOKS, IRVING STRONG, Springfield . 

BROOKS, LAWTON STICKNEY, Springfield . 

BROOKS, L. LORING, Boston .... 

BROOKS, JOSHUA LORING, Springfield . 

BROOKS, WILLIAM WOOLLEY, Brookline . 

BROWN, BENJAMIN WILLIAM, Northbridge 



19626 
23840 

23658 

5146 
8577 

5298 
23161 

13234 
8680 
5065 
19007 
19400 
16564 

11168 

19008 

985 

4990 

5623 

12471 

10593 

19601 

18215 

18224 



42 



^tm^ of tf^t American llet>olutiott 



1902 
1903 
1893 
1895 
1893 
1911 

1912 

1905 
1913 



1899 
1897 
1905 
1898 
1891 
1890 
1910 
1895 
1895 
1912 

1913 

1903 
1906 
1909 
1895 
1909 
1897 



BROWN, CHARLES ALBERT, Lynn 

BROWN, CHARLES AUGUSTUS, Honolulu, T. H. 

BROWN, FRANCIS HENRY, Boston 

BROWN, GEORGE EDWARD, Cambridge 

BROWN, GILBERT PATTEN, Boston (life member) 

BROWN, HARRY LAMPREY, Brookline . 
Great-grandson of John Dearborn 

BROWN, HENRY WILLIS, Roxbury 
Great*-grandson of Hopestill Willis 
Great*-grandson of John Merriam 

BROWN, HOWARD PAYSON, Pittsfield . 

BROWN, LAWRENCE EVERETT, Lynn 
Great-grandson of Ezra Brown 
Great-grandson of D. Gallusha 
Great*-grandson of Isaac Organ 
Great*-grandson of Thomas Kilby Hudson 
Great'-grandson of Theophilus Burrill 
Great'-grandson of Nehemiah Ramsdell 

BROWN, LEROY SUNDERLAND, Lexington 

BROWN, PLUMB, Springfield 

BROWN, W. T. KENDALL, Binghamton, N. Y. . 

BRUCE, WEBSTER, Lynn 

BRYANT. ANDREW SYMMES, Springfield . 

BRYANT, DAVID MASON, South Deerfield . 

BRYANT, HENRY GARDNER, New York City . 

BRYANT, NELSON ELLIOT, Amoy, China . 

BRYANT, WILLIAM HERBERT, Cambridge . 

BUCK, CHARLES WARREN, Mendon . 
Great-grandson of Jonathan Sprague 

BUCKMAN, FRANCIS ALVAH, Wobum . 

Great-grandson of Jacob Buckman, Jr. (Bucknam) 

BULFINCH, FRANCIS VAUGHN, Brookline . 

BURCHMORE, CHARLES F. P., Winthrop . 

BURCHMORE, GEORGE DUNHAM, Maiden 

BURDITT, GEORGE LOVELL, Cambridge . 

BURGESS, WILLIAM HENRY, Lexington 

BURKE, ARTHUR WALLACE, Brookline 



14966 

16193 

5012 

8584 

5024 

23169 

23850 

17628 
24729 



12068 

10218 

17629 

1006 

945 

639 

21860 

7295 

6282 

24528 

25079 

15827 
18225 
20735 
8581 
21041 
10761 



aitjert of 0itmhn0 



43 



1898 BURKE, CHARLES SUMNER, Hanson . 

1907 BURNETT, WILLIAM ALBERT, Amherst 

1897 BURNHAM, ALBERT WINSLOW, LoweU 

1906 BURNHAM, ARTHUR WENDELL, Waban 

1904 BURNHAM, KINGSLEY ALLAN, Boston 

1911 BURRAGE, CHARLES DANA, Needham . 

Greats-grandson of Joseph Chamberlain 

1897 BURRAGE, ARCHIE HAMILTON, Jamaica Plain 
1897 BURRAGE, GEORGE DANA, Newtonville 

1907 BURROWS, CHARLES IRVING, Lynn . 

Great-grandson of Joseph Johnson 
Greats-grandson of Jacob Ingalls 

1907 BURRILL, HARRISON PARROTT, Lynn 

1912 BUSS, CHARLES HOLMES, 2d, Wobum . 

Great*-grandson of Nathan Ballard 

1896 BUSH, EDWARD H., Dalton .... 
1910 BUXTON, FRANK WILLIS, Worcester 

1913 BYERS, ALBERT HUNTER PARKE, Lynn . 

Great*-grandson of John Du Parr (Dipper) 

1909 CABLE, GEORGE WASHINGTON, Northampton 

1896 CAHILL, CHARLES TRACY, Roxbury 
1892 CALKINS, CHENEY HOSMER, Springfield . 
1907 CALKINS, IRVING ROMARO, Springfield 
1907 CAMERON, DONALD McLENNAN, Lowell . 

1905 CAMPBELL, LOUIS LEONARD, Northampton 

1894 CANDAGE, RUFUS GEORGE FREDERICK, Gleasondale 
Died June 19, 1912 

1894 CAPEN, SAMUEL BILLINGS, Jamaica Plain 

1903 CARLSMITH, CARL SCHURZ, Hilo, Hiwaii Islands 

1905 CARLE Y, ALFRED G., Northampton .... 

1901 CARPENTER, EDWARD WILTON, Amherst 

1897 CARPENTER, HORATIO, Seekonk 

1902 CARPENTER, LYMAN, Attleboro (Hfe member) . 

Died May 12, 1910 

1902 CARPENTER, WHEATON ALTON, Attleboro 

1907 CARR, GEORGE BYRON, Lynn 



11310 
19163 
10772 
18216 
16551 
23163 

9965 

9964 

18903 

18902 
24039 

8653 
22010 
25086 

20458 
9037 

4928 
18904 
19023 
17800 

6097 

5067 
16186 
17793 
13702 
10967 
15152 

14984 
19155 



44 



ponies of tf^t ^mrttcan Klebotutton 



1895 
1895 
1897 
1904 
1901 
1900 
1898 
1894 
1889 

1896 

1905 
1903 

1901 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1911 

1895 
1908 
1900 
1898 
1896 
1904 
1904 
1894 
1898 

1897 
1905 



CARTER, CHARLES HOWARD, Needham (life member) 
CARTER, CHARLES NEWMAN, Needham (life member) 
CARTER, EDWIN ALBERT, Springfield . 
CHADBOURN, WILLIAM L., Roxbury . 
CHADWICK, GEORGE WHITEFIELD, Boston . 
CHAMBERLAIN, GEORGE DUDLEY, Springfield 
CHAMBERLAIN, HENRY GALE, Chelsea 
CHAMBERLAIN, PRESCOTT, Boston 



CHAMBERS, DEXTER BALDWIN, Cleveland, Ohio 
Died June 1912 

CHANDLER, CLEAVELAND ANGIER, East Bridgewater 
(life member) 

CHAN NELL, HENRY EDGAR, Stanstead, P. Q. . 



CHAPIN, CLIFFORD SAMUEL, Great Barrington 
Great*-grandson of Moses Ranger 
Great*-grandson of Consider Cushman 



Supplemental 



CHAPIN, GEORGE HOYT, Wrentham 

CHARLES, ORLANDO W., Bryantville 

CHASE, ALLAN JASPER, Maiden 

CHASE, CHARLES HENRY, Behnont 

CHASE, CHARLES HENRY, Lynn . 

CHASE, CHARLES HENRY, Northampton 
Great-grandson of Daniel Stewart 
Great-grandson of Thomas Emerson 

CHASE, GEORGE SAMUEL, Cambridge . 

CHASE, MIAL WOODBURY, Lynn . 

CHENERY, WILLIAM ELISHA, Boston (life member) 

CHENEY, FRED AUGUSTINE, Chelsea . 

CHESTER, CHARLES EDWARD, Boston 

CHESTER, DWIGHT, Newton Centre 

CHESTER, HORACE, Maiden . 

CHESTER, WALSTEIN ROATH, Brookline 

CHICK, ALBERT BRACKETT, Roxbury 
Died August 15, 1913 

CHICK, CHARLES GREENOUGH, Hyde Park 
CHILDS, CHARLES EZRA, Northampton 



8588 

8589 

9966 

16347 

13980 

13601 

11169 

5063 

657 

8660 
17292 
16023 

13988 
14983 
15845 
16009 
16010 
22496 

5264 
19981 
13007 
11152 

9357 
16553 
16346 

5093 
11518 

9846 
17876 



%i0t of 0itmhu^ 



45 



1889 CHOATE, ISAAC BASSETT, Boston . 
1908 CHOATE, WILLIAM HENRY, FaU River 

1895 CHURCHILL, ASAPH, Milton . 

1913 CHURCHILL, JOHN WEST, Plymouth . 
Great-grandson of Richard Bagnell 

1908 CLAPP, ALVIN WINTHROP, Northampton 

1908 CLAPP, FRANK LUCIUS, Northampton . 

1896 CLAPP, HENRY BINGLEY, Boston . 

1902 CLAPP, JAMES HUMPHREYS, Dorchester 
Died February 11, 1913 

1898 CLARK, AUGUSTUS TAYLOR, Newton Centre (life 
member) 

1906 CLARK, CHARLES HOBART, United States Army 

1909 CLARK, EDWARD WARREN, LoweU . 

1905 CLARK. ELIOT ALBERT, Pittsfield .... 
Greats-grandson of Titus Munson (Supplemental) 

1905 CLARK, GEORGE WRIGHT, Northampton . 

1895 CLARK, HORACE LYMAN, Easthampton 

1911 CLARK, J. MAXWELL, North Hadley 
Greats-grandson of Samuel Endicott 

1904 CLARK, LYMAN NOBLE, Westfield .... 

1911 CLARK, SIDNEY AVERY, Northampton 

Great'-grandson of Jonathan Clapp 
Great'-grandson of Amos AUen 
Great'-grandson of Elias Lyman 

1913 CLARK, SYLVANUS BOYD, Maiden .... 
Great'-grandson of Eleazer Clark 
Great'-grandson of Moses Hodsdon, Jr. 

1894 CLARK, THOMAS HENRY, Cambridge . 

1900 CLARK, WILLIAM ABBOTT, Northampton 

1897 CLARKE, ARTHUR FRENCH, BrookUne 

1890 CLARKE, AUGUSTUS PECK, Cambridge 
Died April 22, 1912 

1906 CLARKE, CHRISTOPHER, Northampton 
1889 CLARKE, GEORGE KUHN, Needham . 
1889 CLARKE, WILLIAM BUTLER, Weston . 

1905 CLARY, JOHN WILLIAM, Cambridge . 

1912 CLENDENIN, JOHN CALVIN, Lynn 

Greats-grandson of John Clendenin 

1896 COBB, CAROLUS MELVIN, Lynn . 



649 

20221 

7292 

24749 

20215 

20216 

9031 

14797 

11156 

18476 
20736 
17638 

17877 

5262 

22892 

16847 
23170 



25098 

5179 

13022 

9842 

858 

18073 

644 

645 

17779 

23675 

8991 



46 j&on^ of tfyt American ^ebolutton 

1913 COBB, CHARLES MAXFIELD, Lynn 25099 

Great*-grandson of Peter Cobb 
Greats-grandson of Richard Dole 

1912 COBB, FREDERICK WALTER, Newton Upper FaUs . . 23841 
Great-grandson of Ebenezer Cobb, Jr. 
Greats-grandson of Ebenezer Cobb, Sr. 

1911 COBB, SIMEON HERBERT, Chelsea 23659 

Great-grandson of Simeon Cobb 

1912 COBB, STANWOOD, Newton Upper FaUs .... 23842 

Great-grandson of Ebenezer Cobb, Jr. 
Great'-grandson of Ebenezer Cobb, Sr. 

1900 COBURN, GEORGE BANCROFT, LoweU .... 13009 

1898 COBURN, JOSEPH BRADLEY VARNUM, Lowell 11164 

1900 COCHRANE, CHARLES AUGUSTUS, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. . 13245 
1909 COCHRANE, HAROLD BRINKERHOFF, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 21034 
1894 COFFIN, RUFUS, Boston 5188 

1901 COGGESHALL, JOHN INGERSOLL, Lowell .... 14310 
1898 COGGESHALL, JOHN WELLS, Providence, R. I. . . . 11523 
1908 COLBURN, ALBERT FERNANDO, Chelsea .... 19747 

1913 COLBURN, CLIFTON, Lynn 25428 

Great-grandson of John Colbum 
Great*-grandson of Joseph Policy 

1896 COLBY, ARTHUR DANE, LoweU 8651 

1897 COLE, DANIEL POMEROY, Springfield 9845 

1912 COLE, JOHN FOSTER, South Boston 24040 

Greats-grandson of John Trull 

1903 COLE, LUCIEN D., Newburyport 16847 

1908 COLLINS. CHARLES ALEXANDER, Lynn .... 19748 

1908 COLLINS, GEORGE JACQUES, Lynn 20204 

1903 COMEY, HENRY NEWTON, Danvers 15848 

1897 CONANT, CHARLES HENRY, Lowell 9483 

Died December 26, 1910 

1892 CONANT, SAMUEL MORRIS, Pawtucket, R. I. . . 4939 

1894 CONE, FRANK WHITHED, Cambridge 5042 

1911 COOK, AUSTIN ELIOT, Hadley 23159 

Great'-grandson of Elisha Cook 

1913 COOK, FRANK LEO, Boston 24730 

Great-grandson of George Beaver 



%i^t of 0ltmhtt0 47 

1896 COOK, RANDALL WEBSTER, Whitman 8932 

1911 COOK, HOMER FRANCIS, Hadley 23160 

Greats-grandson of Jonathan Cook 

1911 COOK, RUFUS LYMAN, Hadley 23158 

Great*-grandson of Elisha Cook 

1902 COOLEY, GEORGE PEIRCE, Cambridgeport (life member) 14776 

1898 COOLIDGE, EDWARD BURROUGHS, Cleveland, Ohio 11311 

1889 COOLIDGE, HORACE HOPKINS, Boston .... 647 
Died February 3, 1912 

1901 COOPER, J. FRANCIS, Brockton 13704 

1905 COPELAND, ELMER HUMPHREY, Northampton . . 17639 

1895 COPELAND, HORATIO FRANKLIN, Whitman . . . 7247 
1909 COREY, EDWIN HENRY, Jr., Newton Highlands . . 21046 
1894 CORLISS, WILLIAM FRIEND, New York City . . . 5125 

1896 COUSENS, ELMER ELLSWORTH, Somerville (life member) 9051 

1909 COWELL, EDWIN TUCKER, Dorchester .... 20743 

1902 COX, ALFRED ELMER, Maiden 15164 

1897 COX, EDWARD JONES, NewtonviUe 9968 

1911 COX, JOHN WALTER, Boston 23660 

Great-grandson of Samuel Cox, Jr. 

1905 CRAFTS, HARRY CLINTON, Pittsfield 17780 

1897 CRANDON, EDWIN SANFORD, Cambridge (life member) . 9831 

1910 CRANDON, LOWELL DREW, Cambridge .... 21862 
1908 CRANE, WINTHROP MURRAY, Dalton .... 20213 

1908 CRANE, WINTHROP MURRAY, Jr., Dalton . . . 20214 

1909 CRANE, ZENAS, Dalton 20459 

1903 CRAWFORD, GEORGE ARTEMAS, Brookline . . . 15581 

1911 CREAMER, WALTER HOWARD 2965 

(Transferred from Vermont Society) 
Greats-grandson of Benjamin Walker 

1908 CREIGHTON, ALBERT MORTON, Lynn .... 19749 



1908 CROCKER, LEWIS CASS, Lynn . 

1908 CROSBY, WILLIAM SUMNER, Brookline 

1901 CROSS, ALLEN EASTMAN, BrookUne . 

1913 CROSS, CHARLES ALFRED, Lynn . 
Great-grandson of Joshua Cross 

1896 CROWELL, SAMUEL, Dorchester 



19751 

19992 

7527 

24548 

9048 



48 



M>on0 of tfyt ^mertcan lUebolutton 



1902 

1893 
1908 

1906 
1906 
1911 

1898 

1904 
1912 

1912 



1894 
1908 
1902 
1913 

1907 
1912 

1901 
1901 

1896 
1896 

1901 
1901 
1894 
1909 
1904 



CUMMINGS, HORACE STUART, Washington, D. C. 
Died December 7, 1911 

CUMMINGS, SAMUEL WELLS, Boston . 

CURRIER, CHARLES OTIS, Chelsea (life member) 
Greats-grandson of Caleb Hodgdon (correction) 

CURRIER, EDWIN MARTIN, Dracut . 

CURRIER, ELLIS BLISS, Northampton . 

CURRIER, FREDERICK AUGUSTUS, Fitchburg . 
Great-grandson of Edward Currier 

GUSHING, GEORGE WALTER, Cambridge . 
Died January 19, 1913 

GUSHING, HENRY WINTHROP, South Hingham 

GUSHING, J. STEARNS, Norwood .... 
Great-grandson of Charles Gushing 
Greaf'-grandson of Jacob Gushing 

GUSHING, MATTHEW MARBLE, Saratoga, Wyoming 
Greats-grandson of Silas Whitney 
Greats-grandson of David Gushing, Jr. 
Great*-grandson of David Gushing 
Great'-grandson of Samuel Whitney 

CUSHMAN, JAMES MARTYN, Taunton 

CUSHMAN, JOHN SOUTHER, Lynn 

CUTLER, ELBRIDGE GERRY, Boston 

CUTLER, SAMUEL RYAN, Revere . 
GreatS-grandson of Solomon Cutler 

CUTLER, U. WALDO, Worcester 

CUTTER, CHARLES GORDON, Dorchester 
Greats-grandson of Samuel Cutter 

CUTTER, FRANK BARTLETT, Cambridge 

CUTTER, HENRY ORVILLE, Cambridge 

CUTTER, LEONARD TAYLOR, U. S. R. C. Service 

DALY, M. ORDWAY, Dorchester .... 
Died April 6, 1913 

DANFORTH, CHARLES FREDERICK, Boston . 

DANFORTH, FRANK PIERCE, Rosario, Argentine Republic 

DARLING, CHARLES KIMBALL, Boston (life member) 

DARLING, HAROLD DUNCAN, Hyde Park . 

DARROW, FRANKLIN METCALF, Maiden . 



14798 

5020 
19752 

18426 

18447 
22893 

11170 

16567 
24543 

24026 



5167 
19726 
14996 
24731 

19024 
24177 

13714 

13815 

9271 

8626 

13816 
13817 
5049 
20468 
16554 



%m of f^tmhet^ 49 

1905 DAVIS, CLAYTON ERWIN, Florence 17640 

1913 DAVIS, GEORGE HENRY, Maplewood 24732 

Great-grandson of Joshua Davis 
Great-grandson of Sylvanus Burrill 

1904 DAVIS, HARRY WEBSTER, Dorchester 16348 

1903 DAVIS, J. MORTON, Swampscott 15829 

1896 DAVIS, NATT ALPHEUS, Lowell 8687 

1900 DAVIS, NESTOR WILBUR, Winchester 12765 

1903 DAVIS, WALTER ALONZO, Fitchburg 15828 

1913 DAVIS, WILLARD SAWTELLE, Hyde Park .... 24733 
Great-grandson of Simon Davis 

1906 DAVIS, WILLIAM VAIL WILSON, Pittsfield .... 18074 

Died August 25, 1910 

1908 DAY, JAMES MANNING, Newark, N. J 20225 

Died April 23, 1912 

1907 DAY, ROBERT WOLCOTT, Springfield 19009 

1904 DAY, WILLIAM OTIS, Springfield 16568 

1895 DAYTON, W. HARDY, Salem 7209 

1896 DEAN, SAMUEL BRIDGE, Roxbury 9034 

1901 DEANE, JOHN MILTON, Assonet 13813 

1907 DEARBORN, GEORGE VAN NESS, Cambridge . . . 10654 

1897 De LONG, EDWIN RICHARD, Boston 10615 

Died November 26, 1911 

1889 DENHAM, EDWARD, New Bedford 663 

1904 DESHON, GEORGE DURFEE, United States Army . . 16349 

1898 DEVENS, CLIFFORD, West Roxbury 11868 

1899 DEVENS, WILLIAM, Roslindale (life member) . . . 11875 
1904 DEWICK, FRANCIS AUGUSTINE, Dorchester Centre . 17029 
1896 DEWING, EBEN FRANKLIN, Arlington . . • . . . 9061 

1901 DeWOLF, JOHN OVIATT, Winchester 13715 

1898 DEXTER, CHARLES WARNER, Boston 11314 

1910 DICKERMAN, FRANK ELLIOT, Somerville (life member) 22023 

1895 DILL, JOSHUA MARTIN, Newton Centre .... 7300 

1908 DINSMORE, MARTIN LUTHER, Springfield .... 20205 

1908 DOAK, ALBERT CLARENCE, Lynn . . . . . 19753 

1891 DOBLE, FRANCIS MARION, Charlestown .... 4906 
Died January 27, 1912 



50 J>on^ of tl^e American Heboiution 

1896 DODD, GEORGE LINCOLN, Wrentham 8517 

1895 DODD, HORACE, Brookline 7273 

1902 DODGE, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, Chelsea .... 15157 

Died January 9, 1913 

1908 DODGE, ELMER ADDISON, Danvers 19764 

1905 DODGE, WILLIAM PEABODY, Davenport, Iowa . . . 14408 

1897 DONNELL, ALBERT, Burlington 10585 

1907 DORR, ARTHUR LOVERING, South Boston .... 18362 

1906 DORR, DUDLEY APTHORP, Lancaster 18427 

Died January 6, 1912 

1906 DORR, DUDLEY HUNTINGTON, Lancaster .... 18428 

1896 DORR, HENRY GUSTAVUS, Boston 8603 

1890 DORR, JOSEPH, Boston 878 

1903 DORT, WILSON CASE, NewtonviUe 16327 

1890 DOTEN, CHARLES CARROLL, Plymouth .... 901 

1911 DOWS, AZRO MILTON, Lowell 23420 

Grandson of Joseph Dows 
Great-grandson of Benjamin Dows 

1901 DOW, ROGERS, Boston 13986 

1907 DOW, WALTER WARE, West Somerville 19025 

1911 DORMAN, WILLIAM EDWIN, Lynn 23171 

Great*-grandson of John Dorman 

1912 DOWSE, WILLIAM BRADFORD HOMER, West Newton . 24178 

Great-grandson of Joseph Dowse 

1911 DOYLE, HENRY LEAMAN, Lynn (Actual son) . . . 23168 
Died Oct. 2, 1911 
Son of Thomas Doyle 

1913 DRAKE, JAMES FRANK, Springfield 24549 

Great-grandson of James Drake 

1894 DRAPER, WARREN MARTIN, Franklin, N. H. . . . 5081 

1911 DREW, FRANK LORRAINE, West Roxbury .... 23666 
Great*-grandson of Ebenezer Tyler 

1906 DREW, HERBERT STEPHEN, North Cambridge . . . 17883 

1907 DROWN, FRANK STEEL, Boston 19010 

1897 DROWNE, ALBERT HENRY, Revere 10220 

Died February 14, 1911 



%i^t of i^ember^ 



51 



1897 DROWNE, EDWARD ALBERT, Newtonville . 

1906 DROWNE, LUMAN S., Northampton 

1909 DRURY, SAMUEL DWIGHT, Northampton . 
1902 DUGAN, WALTER HOVEY, Brookline . 
1897 DUNCAN, JAMES LEWIS, New York City . 

1906 DUNNING, CHARLES HENRY, Winchester . 

1907 DUNNING, JAMES GARDNER, Springfield . 

1910 DURANT, WILLIAM, WeUesley 

1897 DURGIN, HENRY IRWIN, South Eliot, Maine . 

1906 DURRELL, HAROLD CLARKE, Cambridge . 

Great'-grandson of Seth Peabody (Supplemental) 

1895 DUSTIN, WILLIAM OTIS, Ehnore, Minn 

1909 DWIGHT, THEODORE FISKE, Springfield . 

1899 DYAR, PERLIE APPLETON, Boston 

1890 EASTE, CHARLES HENRY, Arlington 

1900 EDDY, ISAAC HERSEY, Dorchester Centre . 

1895 EDGECOMB, HORACE ALBERT, Newton Highlands 

1902 EDSON, CHARLES HENRY, Whitman . 

1908 EDSON, JOHN FRANCIS, Lynn .... 

1911 EDWARDS, ROBERT ELLERY, Northampton 

Great-grandson of Oliver Edwards 
Great-grandson of Thomas Knowlton 

1904 ELDRED, JOHN ROBINSON, North Cohasset 

1891 ELDREDGE, EDWARD HENRY, Boston 
1897 ELDRIDGE, DAVID GORHAM, Dorchester 
1897 ELDRIDGE, EDRIC, Yarmouthport . 

1905 ELLIOT, HENRY LIBBY, Salem 

1892 ELLIS, EMMONS RAYMOND, Cambridge 
1908 ELLIS, LEON CLIFTON, Lynn . 
1900 ELLIS, RALPH WATERBURY, Springfield 

1910 ELLSWORTH, GEORGE ALBERT, Boston 

Died Sept. 10, 1913 

1910 ELTON, WILLIAM E., Dorchester Centre 

1900 EMERSON, HERBERT CLARK, Springfield 



10221 
17896 
20471 
14980 

9847 
18061 
19151 

7127 
10614 
18448 

7281 

20737 

12304 

675 

12758 

8532 
14777 
19603 
23172 

16830 
4923 
10952 
10617 
17878 
4982 
20206 
13602 
22024 

22189 
13603 



52 

1913 

1902 
1901 
1911 

1904 
1912 

1906 
1895 
1908 
1902 
1910 
1894 

1893 
1895 
1900 
1899 
1908 
1899 
1906 
1908 
1897 
1897 

1907 
1899 
1910 
1903 
1908 
1911 



^on^s^ of tf^t American Iflebolution 



EMERSON, JOHN EDWIN, Roxbury 
Great-grandson of Solomon Wood 



EMERSON, JOHN WELCH, Chelsea . 

EMERSON, NATHANIEL WALDO, Boston . 

EMERSON, THOMAS ALBERT, Northampton 
Great-grandson of Thomas Emerson 
Greats-grandson of James Bancroft 

EMERSON, WILLIAM FRANCIS, Longmeadow 

EMERY, JAMES WEYMOUTH, Cambridge . 
Great-grandson of Samuel Emery 

EMERY, WILLIAM MORRELL, FaU River . 

ENDICOTT, EUGENE FRANCIS, Chelsea 

ENGLISH, CHAUNCEY FRENCH, Brookline 

ENSIGN, DWIGHT WATTS, Cambridge . 

ESTABROOK, FRED WILSON, Worcester 

EVANS, ARTHUR WINFRED, Boston . 
Died Jan. 6, 1913 

EVANS, CHARLES HAROLD, Gaylordsville, Conn. 

EVANS, EDGAR IRVING, Brookline 

EVANS, WILMOT ROBY, Jr., Everett . 

FALL, GEORGE HOWARD, Maiden . 

FARR, HOLLON AUGUSTINE, New Haven, Conn. 

FARRINGTON, SOUTHWELL, Lowell 

FARWELL, JOHN WHITTEMORE, Boston (life member) 

FARWELL, LORENZO CHASE, Dorchester . 

FAUNCE, CHARLES HENRY, Chelsea . 

FAUNCE, ELMON CROCKER, Everett . 
Died June 24, 1913 

FAUNCE, WILLIAM HERBERT, Roxbury . 

FAXON. ELISHA JOHN, Salem (actual son) . 

FAY, ALBERT EUGENE, Worcester . 

FAY, FRANK SLATER, Worcester . 

FAY, JAMES MONROE, Northampton . 

FELT, CHARLES FREEMAN, Lynn . 
Great-grandson of Joshua Felt 



24734 

14568 
13716 
23667 



nicest of f^tmhtx^ 53 

1911 FELT, WILLIAM HENRY, Lynn 23174 

Great-grandson of Joshua Felt 

1908 FERRIN, ALLAN CONANT, LoweU 19385 

1894 FESSENDEN, EDWARD STANLEY, Arlington . . . 5051 

1895 FIELD, HENRY ALONZO, Springfield 7272 

1891 FIELD, JAMES BRAINERD, Lowell 991 

1900 FIELD, VERNON ASHLEY, Chelsea 13604 

1904 FISHER, JOHN WALLACE, Newton 16556 

1904 FISHER, OLIVER MASON, Newton 16557 

1904 FISHER, WILLIAM BIXBY, Boston 17039 

Died June 21, 1911 

1912 FISHER, WILLIAM PHINEAS, Andover 24041 

Greats-grandson of John Tenney 

1905 FISK, EVERETT OLIN, Natick 17050 

1899 FLAGG, EDWARD HERMAN, Wellesley 12052 

1906 FLAGG, J. WALTER, Worcester 18484 

1905 FLAGG, LEWIS GARDNER, Boston 17795 

1903 FLANDERS, DANA JUDSON, Maiden 15585 

1903 FLANDERS, WALLACE FARNSWORTH, Winchester . . 15584 

1908 FLETCHER, AUSTIN BRADSTREET, Sacramento, Cal. . 19731 

1912 FLETCHER, HARRY GAY, West Somerville .... 24535 
Greats-grandson of James Fletcher 
Greats-grandson of Elijah HHdreth 
GreatS-grandson of Jonathan Woodward 
Greats-grandson of James Chadwick 
Greats-grandson of Timothy Fletcher 
Great*-grandson of Peter Reed 

1895 WALTER VARNUM FLETCHER, Dorchester . 5273 

1905 FLOYD, C. HAROLD, New York City (life member) . . 17631 

1897 FLOYD, DAVID, Winthrop 10172 

Died March 17, 1913 

1912 FLOYD, RICHARD DANIEL, Jersey City, N. J. . . . 24042 
Great-grandson of Robert Spalding, Jr. 
Greats-grandson of Robert Spalding, Sr. 
GreatS-grandson of Joseph Dampney 
Greats-grandson of Eleazer Richardson 
GreatS-grandson of Peter Poor 

1897 FOBES, EDWIN FRANCIS, Lexington 10621 



54 



J>on^ of ti)e ^tmerican Iflebolution 



1911 FOBES, WILLARD HENRY, Maiden 

Great-grandson of Benjamin Fobes, Jr. 
Great-grandson of John Mellish 

1898 FOLLANSBEE, THOMAS UPHAM, Chelsea . 

1897 FOLSOM, GEORGE COMBE, Wellesley HiUs . 

1900 FOOT, AUGUSTUS RICHARDS, New York City 

1901 FORBES, FRED BETTINSON, Cambridge 

1911 FOSS, FREDERICK BOYDEN, Quincy . 

Great'-grandson of Jonathan Damon 

1910 FOSTER, ALBERT GOODWIN, Lynn 
Great*-grandson of Joseph Richards 
Great*-grandson of Stephen Whitney 
Great'-grandson of Josiah Whitney 

1895 FOSTER, ARTHUR LANG, Roxbury 

1907 FOSTER, HOWARD WYMAN, Tewksbury 

1909 FOSTER, JOHN EDWARD, LoweU 

1897 FOSTER, JOSEPH, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Pay Director (Rear Admiral), U. S. Navy, (Retired) 

1904 FOX, CHARLES HENRY, Roxbury .... 

1906 FOX, DANIEL DANA, Dracut 

1900 FOX, RUSSELL, Lowell 

1912 FOX, RUSSELL METCALF, Lowell .... 

Great'-grandson of David Fox 
Great*-grandson of Stephen Russell 

1895 FOX, WALTER SILVANUS, Dorchester . 

1908 FOX, WARREN WYMAN, Dracut 

1910 FOX, WILLIAM LONG, Winthrop 

Great'-grandson of Edward Fox 

1908 FRANCIS, HENRY ALMIRON, Pittsfield 
1891 FRISBEE, FRANKLIN SENTER, Cambridge 

1905 FRISBEE, FRANK DUNLAP, Newton . 

Died May 16, 1911 

1903 FRISBEE, JESSE FRANKLIN, Newton . 

1895 FROTHINGHAM, THOMAS GODDARD, Boston 

1896 FULLER, AUGUSTUS HEMENWAY, Ballard Vale 
1896 FULLER, FREDERIC WILLIAM, Springfield . 



22483 

11316 
9970 
13235 
13717 
23175 

22199 



8634 
19158 
21027 
10597 

16558 
18429 
13246 
24529 

7265 
20451 
22477 

19755 

4842 

17295 

16001 
7202 
8613 
9477 



Ei^t of 0itmhtr0 



1894 FULLER, GEORGE FRANCIS, Springfield 

Died April 3, 1910 

1911 FULLER, PARKER THURSTON, Rockland, Maine . 

Greats-grandson of Barnabas Fuller 

1904 FURLONG, CHARLES WELLINGTON, Watertown . 

1909 FURLONG, LEONARD, Manila, P. I 

Died July 9, 1911 

1895 FURNESS, DAWES ELLIOT, Boston .... 

1900 GALBRAITH, FREDERICK WILLIAM, Jr., Cincinnati, O 

1900 GALBRAITH, SAYWARD, Palmer 

1899 GALE, BENNETT TYLER, Lee 

1913 GALE, CARL CUSTER, Watertown . . . ' . 
Greats-grandson of Thaddeus Gage 

1906 GALLAGHER, EDWIN BLAKELEY, Dorchester . 

1905 GALLOUPE, FRANCIS ELLIS, Boston .... 

1907 GARDNER, CLARENCE RHODOLPHUS, Northampton 

1898 GARDNER, FRANK AUGUSTINE, Salem . 

1899 GARDNER, HENRY LUNT, Springfield .... 

1909 GARFIELD, JAMES FREEMAN DANA, Fitchburg . 

Died Dec. 14, 1911 

1910 GARDNER, GERALD A., Somerville 

Died Jan. 6, 1913 
Great-grandson of Jacob Dunbar 

1910 GARNEY, HENRY, Lynn .... 
1895 GATES, SAMUEL PEARLY, Bridgewater 

1908 GAY, ARTHUR PARK, West Newton 
1908 GAY, RICHARD LEWIS, Brookline . 

1908 GENUNG, JOHN FRANKLIN, Amherst . 
1897 GEORGE, EDWIN STANTON, Yonkers, N. Y 

1906 GERE, GEORGE SHERWOOD, Northampton 
1906 GERRISH, ORVILLE KNIGHT, Lakeville 

1909 GIFFORD, ELISHA, New Haven, Ct. (actual son) 

1912 GIFFORD, FRANKLIN ROBINSON, Dorchester Centre 

Greats-grandson of William Robinson 
Greats-grandson of Joshua Davis 

1894 GILBERT, SHEPARD DEVEREUX, Salem . 

1911 GILBERT, WILLIAM MARSHALL, Cliftondale . 

Great-grandson of Asahel Gilbert 
Great-grandson of David Hubbard 



55 

5152 

23401 

16569 
21042 

8600 
12774 
12766 
12457 
24750 

18075 
17436 
18908 
11172 
12241 
20744 

22196 

22012 

5281 
19756 
19757 
19758 
10596 
18201 
17899 
21028 
23826 

5080 
23668 



56 



4>onje; of t^t ^mettcan Ulebolutton 



1893 GILMORE, JOSEPH HENRY, Jr., Rochester, N. Y. 

1905 GLIDDEN, DANIEL AUGUSTUS, Quincy 

1905 GLIDDEN, GEORGE BLANCHARD, Dighton 

1891 GLINES, EDWARD, SomerviUe .... 

1911 GLOVER, FRANCIS WILLIAM, Clinton . 
Greats-grandson of Simeon Loomis 

1895 GLYNN, WILLIAM FRANCIS, Crescent City, Fla. 

1901 GOLDSMITH, SANFORD KING, Jamaica Plain 

1908 GOLDTHWAIT, EDWARD ONVILLE, Lynn . 
1891 GOODRICH, HENRY A., Fitchburg . 
1900 GOOGINS, FRANCIS JAMES, Hyde Park 
1895 GOSS, FRANCIS WEBSTER, Roxbury 

1897 GOTT, JOHN, Gloucester 
1891 GOULD, EDWIN CARTER, Melrose . 
1895 GOULD, GEORGE LAMBERT, Maiden 
1900 GOULD, JAMES, Chelsea 
1891 GOULD, LEVI SWANTON, Melrose . 

1898 GOULD, WARREN FURBER, Newport, R. I. 

1902 GOWEN, HOWARD EARL, Lynn 

1895 GOWING, ROBERT HOSMER, Wilmington 

Died Sept. 28, 1910 

1905 GRAFFAM, PETER, Maiden 

1910 GRAHAM, FREDERICK WEBSTER, Lynn 

1909 GRAHAM, GEORGE HERBERT, Lynn . 

1903 GRANGER, FRANK EDWARD, Boston . 
1903 GRANT, GEORGE WARREN, Salem 

1896 GRAVES, ABBOTT FULLER, Kennebunkport, Maine 

1907 GRAVES, ELWOOD LEON, Springfield . 

1907 GRAVES, GEORGE ALEXANDER, Springfield 
Died AprH 3, 1913 

1907 GRAVES, HERBERT HAMILTON, Springfield 

1909 GRAY, FRANCIS ALONZO, Akron, Ohio . 

1902 GREELEY, WILLIAM HENRY, Abington 

1913 



GREEN, ARTHUR WARDWELL, Lynn . 
Great-grandson of Ebenezer Brown 
Greats-grandson of Samuel Harris Green 
Greats-grandson of Samuel Boden 



%x0t of f^tmhtt^ 51 

1889 GREEN, CHARLES MONTRAVILLE, Boston (life member) 689 

1903 GREEN, ROBERT MONTRAVILLE, Boston (Ufe member) 16195 

1906 GREENE, RANSOM ALPHONSO, East Somerville . . 18477 

1909 GREENE, FOSTER REGNIER, FaU River .... 14661 

1910 GREENLAW, WILLIAM PRESCOTT, Winthrop . . . 22025 

1896 GREENWOOD, CHARLES, Maiden 8657 

Died July 2, 1913 

1902 GRIFFIN, FREDERICK, Lawrence 14556 

1897 GRIFFITH, FRANK CARLOS, Boston 10166 

1903 GRIMMONS, CHARLES ARNOLD, Somerville . . . 16024 
1908 GROVER, LYNDON VASSAR, Lynn 19733 

1901 GROVER, THEODORE, Revere 13718 

1902 GROVER, WALTER COREY, Cambridge .... 14799 

1896 GUILD, CURTIS, Boston 8650 

Died March 12, 1911 

1897 GUILD, CURTIS, Jr., Boston 9482 

1898 GUILD, GEORGE BARNETT, Chelsea 11037 

1902 GURNEY, ALLSTON DYER, Whitman 14780 

1895 GURNEY, DAVID ALLSTON, Whitman 7243 

1899 HACK, HAROLD WRIGHT, Short Hills, N.J. . . . 12459 

1912 HAILE, HENRY CHAPIN, Springfield 24044 

Great-grandson of Stephen Pease 

1891 HAINES, JOHN, Waltham 953 

1891 HALE, FRANCIS WILBUR, Gleasondale 4863 

1901 HALE, HARRY PATTERSON, Brookline 14305 

1911 HALE, WILLIAM, Gloucester (life member) .... 22894 

Great-grandson of Nathan Lord 

1899 HALL, CHARLES HILAND, Springfield 12242 

1899 HALL, CHARLES OTIS, Lowell 12305 

1899 HALL, EDWIN ADAMS, Cambridgeport (life member) . . 12322 

1897 HALL, F. GARDNER, Boston 10967 

1908 HALL, FRANK WEBSTER, Lowell 20218 

1897 HALL, GEORGE ROBINSON, Boston 10970 

1899 HALL, HARRISON COBURN, Boston (life member) . . 12053 

1895 HALL, HENRY LYON, Dorchester 7291 



58 



Ǥ>oniE? of tt^t ^tmerican ^eboiutton 



1891 HALL, IRVING G., Somerville 

1900 HALL, NEWTON MARSHALL, Springfield . 

1910 HALL, WALTER ATWOOD, Swampscott 

Greats-grandson of Hiel Hall (Supplemental) 

1905 HALLWORTH, WILLIAM LEIGH, Maiden . 

1912 HAM, GUY ANDREWS, Dorchester .... 
Great*-grandson of Samuel Ham 

1904 HAMLEN, EDWARD MONROE, Taunton 
Died Nov. 25, 1911 

1897 HAMLIN, EDWARD BEMIS, Falmouth . 

1897 HAMLIN, SIMEON, Falmouth 

1908 HAMILTON, FREDERICK WILLIAM, Cambridge 

1912 HAMMOND, ALBERT BALLARD, Brookline 
Greats-grandson of Lemuel Robinson 

1907 HAMMOND, WINTHROP, Portland, Oregon . 

1909 HANNAH, FREDERICK AUGUSTUS, New York City 
1907 HANSCOM, CHARLES WATTS, Quincy . 

1906 HANSCOM, GEORGE ELMER, Maiden . 
1895 HARDY, WILLIS CHENERY, Hollis. N. H. . 
1897 HARMON. ISRAEL, Springfield 

1910 HARRINGTON, ARTHUR CLARK, Berwick. Me. 

Great*-grandson of Benjamin Jones ] 
Great'-grandson of Samuel Willard, Jr. 

Great'-grandson of William Allen i 

Greats-grandson of Naphtloli Harmon J 

1904 HARRINGTON, EDWIN EUGENE, Maiden 

1889 HARRIS, ALFONSO SCOTT, Brookline 

1899 HARRIS, FREDERICK, Springfield . 

1895 HARVEY, CHARLES AUGUSTUS, Boston 

1909 HARVEY, FRED POMEROY, Reading 

1906 HARVEY, WILLIAM DANIEL, Newton Centre 

1911 HASKINS. CARYL DAVIS, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Died Nov. 18, 1911 
Great*-grandson of William Haskins 

1897 HASTINGS, ARTHUR HENRY, Braintree 

1909 HASTINGS, CHARLES HOUGHTON, Lynn . 

Great*-grandson of Richard Clark (Supplemental) 

1901 HASTINGS, FRANK WATSON, Cambridge 
1897 HASTINGS, WALTER OLIVER, Braintree 



> Supplemental 



10954 

21478 

13720 
10955 



%i^t of f^tmbex^ 



59 



1911 HASTINGS, WILMOT REED, Lynn ...... 22879 

Great-grandson of Benjamin Hastings 
Greats-grandson of Simon Hastings 
Great'-grandson of Richard Clark 

1895 HATCH, EDWARD AUGUSTUS, Roxbury .... 8527 

1898 HATCH, LEONARD BRADFORD, Whitman .... 11168 

Died Oct. 9, 1910 

1899 HATCH, LINCOLN DANFORTH, Roxbury .... 12054 

1900 HATHAWAY, FRANCIS ROBERTSON, Salem . . 13230 

1913 HATHAWAY, JOSIAH, Boston 24735 

Greats-grandson of Thomas Hooper 

1894 HATHAWAY, LE BARON, Plymouth 5177 

Died Dec. 22, 1912 

1910 HATHORNE, HENRY GATES, Danvers 22197 

Great-grandson of John Fay, Jr. 

1901 HAWES, EDWARD EVERETT, Hyannis 13820 

1896 HAWKES, ADAM AUGUSTUS, Wakefield .... 9272 

1912 HAWKES, CLARENCE, Hadley 24028 

Greats-grandson of Phineas Smith 

1909 HAWKES, EDGAR BROOKS, Wakefield 20746 

1903 HAWKES, NATHAN MORTIMER, North Saugus . . . 16003 

1910 HAWKINS, WILLIAM HENRY, Blackstone .... 22479 

Grandson of Benjamin Hawkins 

1903 HAWLEY, WILLIAM DICKINSON, Maiden . . . ' . 16177 

1904 HAYNES, J. EVERETT, Springfield 16833 

1907 HAYNES, LINCOLN CALVIN, Springfield .... 18492 

1908 HAYNES, STANFORD LYMAN, Springfield .... 19759 
1903 HAYWARD, CHARLES APOLLOS, Braintree .... 16198 

1894 HAYWARD, FRANK CONANT, Concord Junction . . 5194 
1906 HAYWARD, FRED PRESTON, Milton 17900 

1902 HAYWARD, G. WARREN, Neponset 14997 

1902 HAYWARD, JONATHAN ELIPHAR, East Braintree . . 14986 

1890 HAYWARD, JONATHAN PARKER, East Braintree . . 873 

1896 HEALEY, D. ALDEN, Holyoke 9476 

1905 HEATHFIELD, HERBERT D., Brookline .... 17879 
1898 HERSEY, ALBERT WATSON, Auburndale .... 11317 

1895 HERSEY, CHARLES HENRY, Roxbury 5248 



60 



^oitief of tfjc American Ifleboiution 



1910 HERSEY, GEORGE MILBANK, Cambridge 
1896 HEWES, VIRGIL HENRY, New York City 
1896 HEWINS, EBEN NEWELL, Brookline 
1898 HEWINS, WILLIAM HARRISON, Falmouth 
1902 HICKS, EDWARD PHILLIPS, Boston . 

1902 HICKS, LEWIS WILDER, WeUesley . 

1912 HIGGINS, JOHN WOODMAN, Worcester 

Greats-grandson of Isaac Whitney 
Greats-grandson of Elisha Barber 
Great'-grandson of Samuel BuUard 
Great'-grandson of Ebenezer Fisher 
Great'-grandson of Thomas Sawin 

1907 HIGGINS, LEWIS ELEON, Taunton . . 

1898 HILER, ERNEST OSGOOD, Jamaica Plain 

1903 HILL, EDWARD MARCY, Brookline 
1903 HILL, HENRY HORACE, Brookline . 
1907 HILL, JAMES FREDERICK, Maiden 

1895 HILL, LEW CASS, Boston . 

1902 HILL, WILLIAM MILLETT, Salem . 

Died Dec. 27, 1911 

1906 HILLARD, JAMES PEARSE, Springfield 

1907 HILLIARD, FRANK, Lynn . 

1908 HILLIARD, L. EVERETT, WatervUle, Me 

1903 HILTON, WINTHROP ATKINSON, West Lynn 

1909 HINCKLEY, H. DALE, U. S. R. Cutter Service 

1904 HITCHCOCK, CHARLES BIDWELL, Springfield 
1904 HITCHCOCK, LORANUS E., Cambridge . 

1911 HITCHCOCK, N. SEELYE, Easthampton 

Great'-grandson of Luke Hitchcock 

1896 HODGDON, CHARLES EDWARD, Portsmouth, N. H. 

1909 HODGDON, CHARLES ELLSWORTH, Swampscott 

1911 HODGDON, H. TURNER, Cambridge 
Greats-grandson of John Porter 

1909 HODGES, WILLIAM HORTON, Lynn . 

1910 HOITT, CHARLES LEWIS, Lynn 

Great'-grandson of Moses PUlsbury 

1913 HOLBROOK, CLINTON ELLIS, Dorchester 

Greats-grandson of Benjamin Morey 



Ei^t of ^tmbtt^ 



61 



1900 HOLDEN, ARTHUR PRESCOTT, Maiden . 

1908 HOLDEN, FRED GURNSEY, Brookline . 
1900 HOLDEN, MILES CARTER, Springfield . 

1894 HOLDEN, WILLIAM, Leominster 
1907 HOLLAND, BERT ELLSWORTH, Jamaica Plain 
1896 HOLLINGSWORTH, ZACHARY T., Cohasset 

1895 HOLMAN, CHARLES BRADLEY, Hopkinton 

Died Dec. 30, 1910 

1912 HOLMES, GIDEON SCULL, Roxbury 

Greats-grandson of David Worthington 

1907 HOLMES, J. ALBERT, Somerville . . 

1909 HOLMES, PERCIVAL JERAULD, Somerville 
1903 HOLMES, WILLIAM BOYD, Somerville . 

1899 HOLT, LEWIS GARRISON, Lawrence 
1905 HOOD, WALLACE PARKER, Danvers . 

1890 HOOD, WILLIAM ORVIN, Danvers . 

Died June 18, 1911 

1891 HOOPER, ARTHUR, Boston 

1891 HOOPER, THOMAS, Boston .... 
Died Nov. 24, 1912 

1895 HOOTON, HORACE JAMES, Dorchester . 

1896 HOOTON, WILLIAM ALDEN GALE, Brooklyn, N 

1902 HOPKINS, FRED ISAAC, East Lynn 

1913 HOPKINS, FRED WILLIAM, North Attleboro 

Great'-grandson of Henry Fletcher 

1900 HOPKINS, ROBERT MILNE, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1890 HORTON, EVERETT SOUTHWORTH, Attleboro 

Died June 3, 1911 
1895 HORTON, WALTER GREGG, Brookline . 

1903 HOSMER, CHARLES FREDERICK, AUston . 

1895 HOSMER, JEROME CARTER, Dorchester 

1908 HOUGHTON, GEORGE EUCLID, Lynnfield . 
1902 HOUGHTON, WILLIAM EVERETT, Swampscott 

1896 HOWARD, ALFRED HENRY, Boston 
1902 HOWARD, CHANNING, Winthrop . 
1894 HOWARD, WILLIAM JAMES, Whitman . 
1894 HOWARD, WILLIAM JUSTIN, Springfield . 

1897 HOWARD, WILLIS PATTERSON, Arlington . 



13242 

19607 

12768 

5192 

19011 

8934 

7241 

24544 

18913 
20474 
16328 
12307 
17438 
706 

4894 
4892 

7235 

9056 

15167 

25100 

13231 
895 

8538 
15586 

5231 
19734 
14970 

9363 
14969 

5154 

5100 
10576 



62 



J)on^ of tf^t American Iflebolution 



1889 
1911 

1895 
1895 
1900 
1902 
1896 
1902 
1902 
1895 
1901 
1902 
1896 
1889 

1903 
1895 

1894 

1910 
1905 
1890 
1897 
1904 
1910 

1904 
1907 
1909 
1911 



1912 



1905 



HOWE, ARCHIBALD MURRAY, Cambridge 

HOWE, ARTHUR CLARK, North Hadley 
Great-grandson of John Clark 

HOWE, DAVID, Taunton .... 

HOWE, EDWARD WILLARD, Roxbury . 

HOWES, WILLIAM JAMES, Holyoke 

HOWLAND, ALLEN SHEPARD, Cambridge 

HOWLAND, CHARLES WARREN, Templeton 

HOWLAND, GERALD SHEPARD, Cambridge 

HOWLAND, SHEPARD, Cambridge . 

HUBBARD, FRANK ALLEN, Taunton 

HUCKINS, FRANK WOLCOTT, Roxbury 

HUIE, HERBERT ELIPHALET, Springfield 

HULING, RAY GREENE, Cambridge 

HULL, JAMES WELLS, Pittsfield 
Died Feb. 2, 1911 

HUMPHREY, E. KIRK, Lowell .... 

HUMPHREYS, RICHARD CLAPP, Dorchester 
Died May 6, 1912 

HUNNEWELL, JAMES FROTHINGHAM, Boston 
Died Nov. 11, 1910 

HUNT, CLARENCE NATHANIEL POOR, Lynn . 

HUNT, EDWARD PAYSON, Newton Centre . 

HUNT, NATHANIEL FRANCIS, East Braintree . 

HUNTOON, GEORGE LADD, Lowell 

HUTCHINSON. EDWARD BRYANT, Cambridge . 

HUTCHINSON, FRED JOTHAM, Hyde Park 

Great-grandson of Moses Hadley (Supplemental) 

HYDE, CHARLES HENRY, Maiden .... 

HYDE, HENRY STANLEY, Springfield . 

INGALLS, JAMES FREDERICK, Lynn . 

INGALLS, JEROME, Lynn 

Great-grandson of John Collier 
Great-grandson of Nathaniel Fuller 

JAMES, GEORGE FRANK, Newtonville 24045 

Great-grandson of John Batchelder 

JAMES, HARRY WILLIAMS, Chelsea 17439 



%i^t of iWember^ 



63 



1894 JAMES, WILLIAM EDGAR, New Bedford .... 6166 

1908 JAMES, WOODWORTH, Brookline 19386 

1910 JAQUES, RUPERT WARD, West Lynn 21486 

Greats-grandson of Samuel Jaques (Supplemental) 

1903 JENKINS, GEORGE OTIS, Whitman 15833 

1903 JENKINS, LAWRENCE WATERS, Danvers .... 15588 

1899 JENKINS, W. IRVING, Clinton 12062 

1898 JENKS, FRED ARNOLD, Chelsea 11040 

1895 JENNEY, BERNARD, South Boston 8542 

1901 JENNEY, WALTER, South Boston 13821 

1913 JEWETT, GEORGE WILLIS, Reading 24744 

Great-grandson of Gideon Walker 
Greats-grandson of Asa Walker 

1912 JOHNSON, ASA JUSTUS, Swampscott 24179 

Greats-grandson of Henry Smith 
Greats-grandson of Eliphalet Rollins 

1903 JOHNSON, BENJAMIN NEWHALL, Lynn .... 16184 

1908 JOHNSON, C. HUDSON, Lynn 19735 

Great'-grandson of Henry Smith (Supplemental) 

1905 JOHNSON, ERVIN ARTHUR, West Somerville . . . 17642 
1894 JOHNSON, E. WALTER, Salem (life member) .... 5168 
1894 JOHNSON, FRANCIS HENRY, Cambridge .... 5170 

1894 JOHNSON, LUTHER SCOTT, Lynn 6169 

1906 JOHNSON, MELVILLE EDWARD, Lynn .... 17884 

1912 JOHNSON, MOSES E., Peabody 24190 

Grandson of James Johnson 
Great-grandson of Daniel Stevens 

1912 JOHNSON, SAMUEL ALLEN, Salem 23828 

Great-grandson of Timothy Rice 
Great-grandson of Edmund Allen 
Greats-grandson of Eliphalet Allen 
GreatS-grandson of Samuel Howe 

1896 JONES, JOHN FRANKLIN, Blacksburg, S.'C. . . . 9075 

1904 JONES, MATT BUSHNELL, Newton 16570 

1895 JORDAN, HENRY GREGORY, Hingham .... 8583 

1896 JORDAN, JEDIAH PORTER, Roxbury 8626 

1889 JOSLIN, JAMES THOMAS, Hudson 708 

Died Feb. 22, 1913 



64 



cS>onjBf of tlje Slmcrican iHciJoIution 



1912 JOY, CHARLES REDINGTON, Boston . 

Greats-grandson of Elisha Story, M.D. 

1896 JOY, FRED, Winchester 

1904 JOYNER, FRANK HALL, Alhambra, Cal. 

1895 JUNKINS, WILLIAM OLIVER, Portsmouth, N. H. 

1905 KEEN, ALPHEUS AUGUSTUS, Albuquerque, N. M. 
1907 KEENE, PAUL MUNROE, Lynn .... 

1913 KEENE, WILLIAM GERRY. Lynn .... 

Greats-grandson of William Blackler 
Greats-grandson of Samuel Russell Gerry 

1898 KEITH, ELIJAH AUSTIN, Brockton .... 

1896 KEITH, HORACE ALDEN, Campello 

1891 KEITH, S. LORIN, Bridgewater 

1894 KELLOGG, FRANK OILMAN, Cambridge 

1911 KELLEY, H. MORRIS, Lynn 

Great-grandson of John Witham 
Great-grandson of Abraham Swett 
Greats-grandson of Stephen Doten 

1907 KELLY, EDWARD LOWELL, Melrose 

1897 KENDALL, HENRY HUBBARD, Newton Centre . 
1896 KENDRICK, EDMUND PEASLEE, Springfield . 

1896 KENNEY, MELVIN WILLARD, Dorchester . 

1907 KEYES, JOHN BROOKS, Quincy .... 

1895 KEYES, JOHN MAYNARD, Concord 

1902 KIDDER, CHARLES FREDERICK, Dorchester . 

1908 KIDDER, HARRY WELTON, Amherst . 

1897 KIMBALL, CLARENCE LIVINGSTON, Lowell 

1904 KIMBALL, FRANCIS ELLIOTT, Worcester . 

1897 KIMBALL, FRANK REED, Lexington (life member) 

1911 KIMBALL, FRED NELSON, Swampscott 
Greaf'-grandson of Abel ICimball 

1896 KIMBALL, HARRY SMITH, Elizabeth, N. J. . 
1895 KIMBALL, HERBERT SAWYER, Waban (Newton) 
1891 KIMBALL, HERBERT WOOD, Waban (Newton) . 

1909 KIMBALL, NELSON WINSLOW, Lynn . 

Died Nov. 18, 1912 

1913 KIMBALL, RICHARD DAVENPORT, Waban 
Great*-grandson of Aaron Kimball 



24029 

9074 
17030 

5295 
17880 
19159 
25083 

11161 
8976 
4921 
5027 

23410 



9226 
10577 

8989 

9270 
18496 

7242 
14988 
19387 

9495 
16571 
10591 
23662 

8659 

7226 

956 

21479 

25088 



%i0t of Mtmbtt0 



65 



1911 KIMBALL, WALLACE LOWE, HaverhiU 22888 

Great-grandson of Zachariah Stevens 

1908 KINGSBURY, ARTHUR LILLIE, Northampton . . . 19996 

1905 KIRKHAM, GUY, Springfield 17297 

1897 KIRKHAM, JOHN STUART, Springfield 9485 

1913 KIRKPATRICK, GEORGE HOLLAND, Lynn . . . 24550 
Greats-grandson of Richard Kating (Keating) 

1905 KIRTLAND, RALPH McINTOSH, Maiden .... 17633 

1909 KITTREDGE, HENRY PRESTON, Quincy .... 20750 

1906 KNEELAND, FREDERICK N., Northampton . . . 17885 
1897 KNIGHT, AUSTIN MELVIN, Rear Admiral U. S. Navy 10224 
1897 KNIGHT, CHARLES SANFORD, Jr., Chicago, 111. . 10223 
1905 KNIGHT, JOSEPH DANIEL, SomerviUe 17796 

1903 KNOWLTON, JESSE FREMONT, Chelsea .... 15308 

1911 KNOWLTON, LESLIE DOANE, Maiden 23663 

Great-grandson of Thomas Knowlton 

1895 LADD, WALTER ALEXANDER, SomerviUe .... 5286 

1894 LAFAYETTE, GASTON DE SAHUNE, Toul, France . . 5184 

1894 LAFAYETTE, COMTE DE SAHUNE, Paris, France . 5185 

1910 LEIGHTON, CHARLES, Lynn 21866 

1910 LAMB, CHARLES EDGAR, Winthrop 22177 

1905 LAMSON, WILLIAM GEORGE, Elkins, N. H. ... 17440 

1911 LANE, EMORY WARREN, Waltham 22897 

Great-grandson of Nathan Warren 

1908 LANE, G. EVERETT, Lynn 20453 

1901 LANE, GEORGE WILLIAM, Newton 13725 

1895 LANE, RUFUS ALLEN, San Francisco, Cal 5289 

1906 LANGDON, JAMES DAVEE, Smyrna, Asia Minor . . . 18065 
1901 LANNING, CHARLES DEWICK, Dorchester .... 14313 
1898 LATHROP, FRED HASKINS, Toledo, Washingtoii . . 11526 

1904 LAWRENCE, WALDRON GUSTINE, AUston . . . 17033 

1910 LEACH, OSBORNE, Danvers 21492 

1895 LEEDS, CHARLES, Chelsea 7212 

1907 LEETE, THEODORE WOOLSEY, Longmeadow . . . 19012 

1897 LEGG, CHARLES EDMUND, Chelsea 10446 

1910 LEIPER, HARPER, Boston 13962 



Y. (life 



66 M>tm^ of tt)e American ^ebolution 

1908 LELAND, GEORGE IRVING (BAILEY), Lynn 
Died May 6, 1912 

1912 LELAND, HERBERT MESSINGER, Brookline 
Greats-grandson of Asaph Leland (Lealand) 

1899 LEONARD, CLARENCE ETTIENNE, Yonkers, N 

member) 

1891 LEONARD, FREDERICK MAURY, Winthrop 

1910 LEWIS, GEORGE ANDREW, Scituate . 

1905 LIBBEY, ELLERY CHANNING, East Saugus 
1907 LIBBY, CHARLES FRANK, LoweU . 
1902 LINCOLN, CHARLES ELIOT, Dorchester 
1907 LINCOLN, CHARLES HODGES, Hudson 

1894 LINCOLN, FRANCIS HENRY, Hingham 

Died July 7, 1911 

1897 LINCOLN, GEORGE MARTIN, Taunton 

Died Sept. 22, 1910 

1898 LINCOLN, HENRY LENDALL, Cambridge . 
1910 LITCHFIELD, GEORGE ALEXANDER, Southbridge . 

1910 LITCHFIELD, JOHN FREDERICK BATES, Worcester 

1904 LITCHFIELD, SCOTT IRVING, Melrose 

1911 LITCHFIELD, WILLIAM ELIAS, Newton 

Great'-grandson of Josiah Litchfield 

1911 LITTLE, ALEXANDER ELBRIDGE .... 

Great'-grandson of Samuel Little 

1912 LITTLE, HARLAND GOODWIN, Lynn .... 

Greats-grandson of John Smith 
Greats-grandson of Samuel Little 

1897 LITTLE, JAMES LOVELL, Brookline .... 

1906 LITTLEFIELD, CHARLES CLEMENT, South Boston 

1895 LITTLEFIELD, MARCELLUS, Woburn .... 

1895 LITTLEFIELD, SETH JUDSON, Chelsea 

1911 LIVINGSTON, CLARENCE BERTRAM, LoweU . 

Greats-grandson of Benjamin Livingston (Levinston) 

1913 LIVINGSTON, ERNEST GEORGE, LoweU . 

Greats-grandson of Benjamin Livingston (Levinston) 

1905 LLOYD, HENRY WYCKOFF, Springfield 

1900 LOCKE, CHARLES BROWN, Cambridge .... 
1900 LOCKE, ISAAC HENRY, Beknont 



19983 
23829 

12461 
937 
21865 
17643 
19162 
14558 
18914 
5098 

10958 

11174 

22178 
22179 
16572 
22899 

23403 

23830 

10449 

18203 

5246 

8594 

22485 

25080 

17441 
13011 
13013 



EtiBft of f^tmhtt^ 67 

1891 LODGE, HENRY CABOT, Nahant 4901 

1909 LOMBARD, RICHARD THOMAS, Medford .... 21040 

1902 LONG, JOHN DAVIS, Hingham 14979 

1905 LOOK, FRANK NEWHALL, Florence 17644 

Died Sept. 9, 1911 

1911 LOOMIS, FRANK SELDEN, Springfield . . . . . 23421 

Greats-grandson of Nehemiah Loomis 

1906 LOOMIS, WILLIAM STILES, Holyoke 18479 

1895 LORD, CHARLES EDWARD, Newton 8549 

1903 LORD, SAMUEL CRANE, Milton 15319 

1905 LORD, SAMUEL DAVIS, Peabody 17298 

1897 LORD, WARREN ALDEN, Sioux Falls, S. D 10974 

1908 LOTHROP, CUMMINGS LINCOLN, Springfield . . . 19736 

1901 LOVELL, CHARLES EDWARD, Whitman .... 13801 

1895 LOVETT, GEORGE EVANS, Boston 5270 

Died Sept. 30, 1913 

1892 LOW, DAVID W., Gloucester 4970 

1908 LOW, DAVID L., Attleboro . 19774 

1903 LOWE, ALONZO WOODBURY, Lynn 15590 

1895 LOWE, ARTHUR HOUGHTON, Fitchburg .... 7231 

1898 LOWE, ORIN MESSINGER, Fitchburg ..... 11512 

1896 LOWELL, JOHN ADAMS, Newton Highlands .... 9364 

1905 LUTHER, MARK LEE, New York City 17299 

1898 LYMAN, GEORGE HINCKLEY, Boston 11508 

1912 LYMAN, MOSES, Jr., Springfield 24197 

Great^'-grandson of Moses Lyon 

1905 LYMAN, ROBERT WORTHINGTON, Northampton . . 17785 

1889 LYNCH, ROBERT A., Maiden 725 

1891 LYNDE, HENRY FRANCIS, Somerville 4826 

1913 LYON, ALBERT W., Boston 25429 

Greats-grandson of Jacob Lyon 
Great'-grandson of Benjamin Lyon 

1891 LYON, HENRY WARE, Paris, Me., Rear Admiral U. S. N. (retired) 4875 

1911 LYON, WILLIAM SCOTT, Wellesley 22880 

Great-grandson of Benjamin Lyon 
Great-grandson of John Hand 
Great-grandson of Daniel Hand 

1910 LYONS, ELIAS BEN, Haverhill 21313 

Transferred from Illinois Society 
Greats-grandson of Elias Lyons 



68 



M>tm^ of t^t American Hetjolution 



1895 MACALLISTER, RICHARD, Aylmer, Canada 

1913 MACOMBER, WALTER HERBERT, Lynn 
Great-grandson of Joseph Macomber 

1904 MacCABE, ARTHUR, Gloucester 

Died Nov. 12, 1912 

1899 MacDUFFIE, JOHN, Springfield . 

1905 MACFARLANE, G. SIDNEY, Lynn . 

1912 MACKAY, GEORGE HENRY, Jr., Boston 
Greats-grandson of William Mackay 

1912 MACKAY, R. LANGDON, Boston 

Greats-grandson of WiUiam Mackay 

1900 MAKEPEACE, ERNEST WARREN, Aachen, Germany 

1904 MALLALIEU, WILLARD EMERSON, Auburndale 
1908 MANCHESTER, THEODORE ALONZO, Lynn 
1897 MANDELL, SAMUEL PIERCE, Boston . 

1905 MANN, ALFRED EUGENE, Somerville . 

1900 MANN, CHARLES FORRESTER, Worcester . 
Died June 8, 1912 

1907 MANN, EDWARD FORRESTER, Worcester . 
1903 MANSFIELD, CHARLES HENRY, Lynn 

1896 MANSFIELD, DANIEL GARDNER, West Medford 

Died Dec. 28, 1912 

1913 MANSFIELD, GIDEON MARION, Boston 

Great-grandson of Elisha Story, M. D. 

1908 MANSON, JOHN LINCOLN, Dorchester . 
1910 MARBLE, FREDERICK PARKER, Lowell 
1907 MARDEN, WILMOT LEIGHTON, Lynn . 

1894 MARION, HORACE EUGENE, Brighton . 
1902 MARRETT, AUGUSTUS POPE, Cambridge 
1910 MARSH, EDWARD, Dedham 

1895 MARSH, FRANCIS, Dedham 

1897 MARSH, HENRY DANIEL, Springfield . 

1896 MARSH, JAMES MORRILL, Lynn . 

Died July 8, 1913 

1912 MARSH, KIRK WHITE, West Medford . 
Greaf-grandson of Samuel Marsh 
Greats-grandson of Benjamin French 
Greats-grandson of Parker BodweU 
GreatS-grandson of Asa Grosvenor 

1894 MARSHALL, DANIEL OAKES, Gloucester 



5119 



%i^t of i^lemfter^ 



69 



1899 
1904 
1907 
1908 
1912 



MARSHALL, ISAAC NEWTON, Wareham 
MARTIN, GEORGE HENRY, Lynn . 



1908 
1905 
1909 
1901 
1910 
1911 

1913 



1897 
1911 

1906 
1898 

1910 
1913 

1897 



MARTIN, JOHN BLISS, Maiden 

MARTIN, J. BRAYTON, Lynn .... 

MASON, ALBERT CLARK, Franklin 
Great-grandson of Noble Mason 
Great-grandson of Samuel Luther 
Greats-grandson of Ambrose Peck 
Greats-grandson of Jonathan Peck 
Great'-grandson of Stephen Bulloch 
Greats-grandson of Caleb Hill 
Greats-grandson of Aaron Millard 
GreatS-grandson of James Thurber 
Great'-grandson of Samuel Bulloch 
Great'-grandson of Moses Miller 
Great'-grandson of Isaiah Lindsey 
Great'-grandson of Samuel Ingalls 

MASON, HERVEY, Melrose 

MATHER, JOHN LYMAN, Northampton 

MATHES, ROY WENTWORTH, Lynn 

MATTHEWS, FREDERICK HERBERT, Chelsea 

MATTOON, JAMES SMITH, Pittsfield . 

MAWHINNEY, JOHN FOSTER, Pittsfield 
Transferred from Nebraska Society 
GreatS-grandson of James Ashton 

MAXIM, MAYNARD, Newtonville . 

GreatS-grandson of Nathan Maxham (Maxim) 
GreatS-grandson of Eleazer Partridge 
GreatS-grandson of Gideon Powers 
GreatS-grandson of Isaac Thayer 

MAY, HENRY ASHLEY, Roxbury . 
Died March 31, 1911 

MAY, HENRY LYON, Roxbury .... 

GreatS-grandson of Nehemiah May 
GreatS-grandson of Mark Stacy 

MAYNARD, CHARLES ALBERT, Northampton 

MAYNARD, HERBERT FULLER, Boston . 
Died Nov. 11, 1910 

MAYO, HENRY ROGERS, Lynn 

McAFEE, DONALD ROSCOE, Medford . 
Great'-grandson of Isaac Atwood 

McCLELLAN, JOHN EDWARD, Ludlow, Vt. . 



12309 
16835 
19001 
19762 
23843 



19988 
17786 
20748 
13822 
21867 
16487 

24726 



10152 
23411 

18431 
11320 

22190 
25089 

10623 



70 c^on^ei of tf^t American ifleiJoJution 

1898 McCLINTOCK, WILLIAM EDWARD, Chelsea . . . 11682 

1913 McCLINTOCK, WILLIAM JAMES, Chelsea .... 25076 
Greats-grandson of John Bailey 

1912 McCOY, BARTON SHERMAN, Boston 23832 

Great-grandson of Daniel McCoy 
Greats-grandson of William McCoy 

1905 McCOY, IRA DAYTON, Los Angeles, Cal 17645 

1912 McCOY, IRA DAYTON, Jr., Los Angeles, Cal. . . . 24198 
Greats-grandson of John McCoy 
Great'-grandson of Elisha Keeler 
Great'-grandson of George Trenchard 

1912 McCOY, LYCURGUS, Battle Creek, Mich 23831 

Grandson of Daniel McCoy 
Great-grandson of William McCoy 

1897 McCULLOCH, ALMIRON JUDSON, Savoy .... 10427 

1899 McDUFFIE, JOHN, Cambridge 12246 

1899 McELWAIN, CHARLES CHURCH, Springfield . . . 12076 

1894 McGLENEN, EDWARD WEBSTER, Dorchester . . . 5141 
1902 McGOWN, JOSEPH E., Clinton 15160 

1902 McINTOSH, CHARLES WESTON, Somerville . . . 14783 

1908 McKENZIE, ALBERT HOWARD, Gloucester .... 20208 

1911 McKERNON, CHARLES, Pittsfield 23669 

Greats-grandson of Phineas Whiteside 

1898 McLACHLAN, HENRY ALEXANDER, Chelsea . . . 11851 

1912 McLANE, WILLIAM NELSON, Fall River .... 23844 

GreatS-grandson of Philip Knapp 

1900 MEACOM, COPLEY OSGOOD, Dorchester .... 13607 

1905 MEAD, ADELBERT FRANCIS, West Somerville (life 

member) 17277 

1895 MEAD, JULIAN AUGUSTUS, Watertown .... 7211 

Died March 30, 1913 

1899 MEAD, TILSON ANDERSON, Roxbury . . . . . 12310 

1909 MEANS, JOHN HAMILTON, South Boston, (Hfe member) 20463 

1895 MERRIAM, FRANK, Boston 5217 

1895 MERRIAM, JOHN McKINSTRY, Sherborn .... 5229 

1897 MERRIAM, OTIS, Chelsea 10602 

1895 MERRILL, FRANK MARSH, Lowell 5285 

Died Sept. 3, 1913 

1903 MERRILL, CHESTER STANLEY, Dorchester . . . 16196 
1909 MERRITT, JOHN REUBEN, Swampscott .... 21480 



%i^t of ^tmhtt^ 



71 



1906 MERRITT, RALPH DAVIS, Swampscott . 

1896 MILLER, CHARLES HENRY, Everett (life member) 

1893 MILLER, EDWIN CHILD, Wakefield 
1906 MILLER, GEORGE WASHINGTON, Lowell 
1901 MILLETT, CHARLES HOWARD, Maiden 
1889 MILLETT, JOSHUA HOWARD, Maiden . 

1901 MILLS, FREDERICK HENRY, Dorchester 

1902 MILLS, HENRY JAMES, East Saugus 

1904 MINOTT, GEORGE L., Gardner . 

1894 MITCHELL, EDWIN VINAL, Medfield . 

1906 MITCHELL, FREDERIC MASON, Newtonville 

1912 MITCHELL, WALTER CUMMINGS, Chelsea 
Greats-grandson of Ebenezer Butterfield, Jr. 

1898 MITCHELL, GEORGE EDWIN, Chelsea . 

Died Sept. 11, 1911 

1912 MOFFITT, JERRY, Southbridge .... 
Great-grandson of WiUiam Brown 
Greats-grandson of Ebenezer Humphrey 

1911 MONTAGUE, DAVID THOMPSON, Boston 
GreatS-grandson of Moses Montague 

1905 MONROE, CHARLES DANA, Springfield . 

1895 MOODY, BENJAMIN, Concord . 

1904 MOOREHEAD, WARREN KING, Andover 

1911 MORGAN, CHARLES FRANCIS, Worcester 
Greats-grandson of Aaron Montague 

1902 MORGAN, PAUL BEAGARY, Worcester . 

1911 MORGAN, RALPH LANDERS, Worcester 
GreafS-grandson of Aaron Montague 
Greats-grandson of Joseph Morgan 

1904 MORIARTY, GEORGE ANDREWS, Jr., Boston 

1909 MORRELL, GEORGE CORYDON, Boston 

1899 MORRILL, SAMUEL, Boston 

1893 MORROW, CHARLES HARVEY, Gloucester 

1897 MORSE, GLENN TILLEY, West Newbury 

1900 MOSELEY, FRANK, Winchester 

1896 MOSELEY, HAROLD PHELPS, Westfield 

1894 MOSELEY, JOHN GRAHAM, Boston 

1895 MUDGE, ARTHUR BARTLETT, Lynn . 

Died Dec. 26, 1910 



18204 

8992 

5017 

18205 

14314 

729 

13619 

14971 

17040 

5034 

18432 

24180 

11514 

24030 

23422 

17442 
8576 
9528 

23423 

14955 
23424 

16836 

20464 

12226 

4994 

10426 

12760 

9261 

6064 

8570 



72 



J)oniei of tt)e American Ulebolution 



Y. 



1897 MULLIKEN, HARRY SANDERSON, Mapinai, Mexico 

1908 MYRICK, EVERETT MARSHALL, Lynn 

1913 MYRICK, JAMES WILLIAM HORACE, Boston . 
Great-grandson of Heman Myrick 

1897 NAGLE, FRANK LINCOLN, Newtonville 

1906 NAGLE, FRANK LINCOLN, Jr., Boston 

1912 NAYLOR, EMMETT HAY 

Transferred from Illinois Society 
Greats-grandson of William Hay (Hays) 

1902 NASH, GRIDLEY THAXTER, Abington . 
1897 NASH, HERBERT, Boston .... 

1897 NASH, NATHANIEL GUSHING, Cambridge 

1904 NASON, GEORGE WARREN, Boston 
Died May 18, 1911 

1896 NEALE, ELISHA JOHN, Lowell . 
Died July 5, 1911 

1896 NEWCOMB, ARTHUR EUGENE, Wakefield 

1889 NEWCOMB, ARTHUR WILBUR, Quincy 

1898 NEWCOMB, FRANK HAMILTON, Belle Terre, N 
1889 NEWCOMB, HERBERT HARRIS, Quincy 
1893 NEWELL, NELSON CYRUS, Springfield . 
1893 NEWELL, WILLIAM CHANDLER, Springfield 

1907 NEWHALL, ARTHUR EDWARD, Lynn . 

1889 NEWHALL, CHARLES LYMAN, Southbridge 
Died Sept. 21, 1913 

1909 NEWHALL, EDWIN LEONIDAS, Lynn . 

1911 NEWHALL, FREDERICK HOWARD, Lynn 

Greats-grandson of Jonathan Dearborn 
Greats-grandson of William Farrington 
GreatS-grandson of John Quitier 
Greats-grandson of John Burrill 
Great'-grandson of Ebenezer Burrill 
Great'-grandson of John Underbill 

1912 NEWHALL, GUY, Lynn .... 

Greats-grandson of Jacob NewhaU 

1903 NEWHALL. ISRAEL AUGUSTUS, Lynn . 

1903 NEWHALL, JAMES SILVER, Lynn . 

1907 NEWHALL, TERRY ARDEN, Lynn . 

1891 NEWTON, EDWARD BARTLETT, Winthrop 
Died Jan. 16, 1911 



9830 
19763 
25081 

9489 

17886 
18849 

14787 
9498 
9497 

17041 

8699 

8610 

745 
8636 

747 

4998 

4997 

19165 

746 

21044 

22881 



24048 

16185 

16013 

19166 

4870 



EiiSft of ^ttnbtt0 



73 



1889 NEWTON. JOHN CALVIN, East Bridgewater .... 743 

1912 NEWTON, JOSEPH LYMAN, Winthrop 24047 

Great-grandson of Edward Newton 

1895 NICHOLS, ANDREW, Danvers 8514 

1911 NICHOLS, GEORGE BYRON, Lynn 22498 

Greats-grandson of Edward Doan 

1898 NICHOLS, GEORGE KING, Grafton 11858 

Died Jan. 7, 1913 

1905 NICHOLS, PHINEAS PENDELTON, Northampton . . 17787 

Died March 10, 1911 

1890 NICHOLS, RICHARD JOHNSON, Lynn 893 

1910 NICKERSON, GEORGE ELWIN, Lynn 22181 

1896 NICKERSON, PHILIP TILLINGHAST, Boston . . . 8929 

1896 NICKERSON, STEPHEN WESTCOTT, Ayer .... 9033 

1908 NICKERSON, WALTER IRVING, Melrose .... 19766 
Died Oct. 18, 1910 

1894 NORCROSS, GRENVILLE HOWLAND, Boston . . . 5176 

1900 NORTHROP, EDWIN NATHANIEL, Lynn .... 13608 

1912 NORTHROP, HARRY CLIFFORD, Lynn .... 23845 

Great'-grandson of Goodman Noble 

1911 NOYES, FRANK ALBERT, Stoughten 23412 

Great-grandson of Humphrey Noyes, Jr. 

1898 NOYES, RUFUS KING, Boston 11041 

1890 NUTTER, ISAAC NEWTON, East Bridgewater ... 910 
Died Jan. 9, 1911 

1892 NUTTING, GEORGE HALE, West Roxbury (life member) . 4977 

1906 NYE, DANIEL BUTLER, Tientsin, China .... 18066 
1889 OAKMAN, HENRY PHILLIPS, Neponset .... 750 

1895 OBER, JOSEPH EDWIN, West Medford 5284 

1897 ODELL, WILLIAM HERRICK LOVETT, Dorchester . . 10445 

1901 OLMSTEAD, JAMES MONROE, Boston 14000 

1908 OSBORN, JOHN HANSON, Lynn 20219 

1910 OSGOOD, JOSEPH BARLOW FELT, Salem .... 21493 
Died Jan. 8, 1913 

1907 OSTRANDER, JOHN EDWIN, Amherst 18916 

1895 OTIS, EDWARD OSGOOD, Boston 7224 

1912 PACKER, FRANK MARCUS, Roxbuiy 23846 

Greats-grandson of Thomas Packer 

1901 PAGE, ALBERT NORTON, Maiden 14306 



74 



J>on${ of tlje American ^etiolution 



1896 
1894 

1889 
1902 

1909 
1911 



1913 



1891 
1895 
1894 
1900 
1894 
1897 
1894 
1897 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1894 
1906 
1894 
1894 
1906 
1895 
1894 
1890 
1909 



PAGE, FRANK DWIGHT, Fitchburg 

PAINE, ROBERT TREAT, Boston . 
Died Aug. 11, 1910 

PALMER, MOSES POORE, Groton . 

PALMER, WILLIAM LINCOLN, Winthrop 
Greats-grandson of Ebenezer Bacon 

PARCHER, GEORGE CLARENCE, Saugus 

PARISH, ROSWELL, Jr., Newton Highlands 
Transferred from Connecticut Society 
Great-grandson of Roswell Parish 
Greats-grandson of Ichabod Marvin 
Greats-grandson of Reuben Harris 
Greats-grandson of Ephraim Bell 

PARKER, BOWDOIN STRONG, Dorchester . 
Great-grandson of Levi Gunn 
Great-grandson of Jonathan Kimball 
Great-grandson of Jehu Dickinson 
GreatS-grandson of Caleb Cheney 

PARKER, CHARLES HENRY, West Medford 

PARKER, CHARLES LINCOLN, Maiden 

PARKER, CHARLES SCHOFF, Boston . 

PARKER, CHARLES SHERMAN, Pepperell . 

PARKER, CHARLES WALLINGFORD, Boston . 

PARKER, GEORGE STEARNS, Sioux City, Iowa . 

PARKER, HERMAN, Marblehead .... 

PARKER, HORACE BARRY, Brookfield . 

PARKER, JOHN LORD, Lynn 

PARKER, MOSES GREELEY, Lowell (life member) 

PARKER, PERCY, LoweU 

PARKER, PETER, Framingham 

PARKER, P. HILDRETH, Lowell .... 

PARKER, ROSS, Aubumdale 

PARKER, SIMON BAILEY, Springfield Centre 

PARKER, THEODORE, Worcester .... 

PARKER, THEODORE EDSON, Lowell (life member) 

PARKER, WALTER EDWARD, Lawrence 

PARKER, WILLIAM THORNTON, Northampton 

PARKHURST, CHARLES ERWIN, Somerville 



8698 
5212 

756 
14570 

21031 
10305 



24740 



4908 
5218 
5200 

12761 
5053 

10153 
5199 

10604 

940 

4978 

4959 

5127 

18220 
5201 
5092 

18206 

5233 

5114 

857 

20475 



ttijeft of 0itmbtx0 



75 



1906 PARLIN, FRANK EDSON, Cambridge . 

1895 PARSONS, CHARLES SUMNER, Boston . 

1913 PARSONS, NORMAN BLOOMFIELD, Worcester 
Great-grandson of Solomon Parsons 

1891 PARSONS, SAMUEL BLOOMFIELD, Worcester 
Died Jan. 22, 1912 

1908 PARSONS, WILLIAM EDWARD, Springfield . 

1902 PARSONS, WILLIAM EDWIN, Brookline 
1894 PARSONS, WILLIAM EMERSON, Gloucester 

1896 PARTRIDGE, FRANCIS CHANDLER, Brookline 
1891 PARTRIDGE, WILLIAM HENRY, Newton . 

1903 PATCH, ANDREW WARREN, Maiden . 

1896 PAULINT, LUCIUS FRANCIS, Lowell . 

1910 PEABODY, JAMES CHARLES, Roxbury . 
Great-grandson of John Peabody 
Greats-grandson of Richard Peabody 
Greats-grandson of Samuel Howard 
Greats-grandson of Zebulon Spalding 
GreafS-grandson of Abraham Tyler 

1908 PEACH, FREDERICK COFFIN, Swampscott 

1906 PEAKES, CHARLES EDMUND, Weston . 

1899 PEAR, CHARLES MERIAM, Cambridge . 

1899 PEARSON, ARTHUR EMMONS, West Newton 

1899 PEARSON, WILLIAM EDWARD, Worcester . 

1889 PEARSON, WILLIAM HENRY, West Newton 

1906 PEASE, ALBION PARSONS, Winthrop . 

1903 PEASE, ALVIN FOWLER, Maiden . 

1912 PEDRICK, THOMAS FRANKLIN, Lynn 
GreafS-grandson of John Pedrick 
GreatS-grandson of John Selman 
GreafS-grandson of Samuel Chinn 
GreafS-grandson of Richard Beson 
GreafS-grandson of Francis EUis 

1900 PEIRSON, JOSEPH EDWARD, Pittsfield . . . . 
1898 PENDERGAST, GEORGE HENRY, Somerville . 
1906 PENDLETON, FREDERICK NICKELS, Portland, Ore 

1901 PERKINS, CLARENCE ALBERT, Maiden . 

1912 PERKINS, FRANK SUTHERLAND, Middleton . 
Greats-grandson of Aaron Perkins 



18440 

5297 

25077 

960 

19737 

14998 
5120 
9375 
4803 

15320 
9040 

22480 



19610 
18433 
12463 
12313 
12314 
752 
10869 
16330 
24031 



13232 
11322 
18442 
14307 
23833 



76 



^on^ of t{)e American ]^e))o!utton 



1899 PERKINS, FREDERICK, United States Army 

1913 PERKINS, FREDERIC WILLIAM, Lynn .... 
Greats-grandson of Jonathan Williams 

1912 PERKINS, HARRY STAMFORD, Salem 

Greaf-grandson of Aaron Perkins 

1897 PERKINS, NATHANIEL PORTER, Wenham 

Died April 29, 1913 

1904 PERLIE, HORACE EDGAR, Washington, D. C. (life member) 
1894 PETERSON, JACOB JOSEPH SUMNER, Waltham 

1896 PETERSON, WILLIAM ESROM, Waltham . 

1898 PETTINGELL, FRANK HERVEY, Los Angeles, Cal 

Great-grandson of John Smith 

1897 PEW, JOHN JAMES, Gloucester 

1912 PHELPS, SAMUEL FOWLER, Boston 

Transferred from Empire State Society 
Great'-grandson of Gurdon Saltonstall 

1897 PHILBRICK, CALEB, LoweU 

Died June, 1913 

1896 PHILLIPS, LOUIS AGASSIZ, Waltham 

1912 PHILLIPS, STEPHEN WILLARD, Salem 
Greats-grandson of Stephen Phillips 

1911 PIERCE, ALFRED, Lexington 

Great-grandson of Thaddeus Harrington 

1896 PIERCE, CHARLES QUINCY, Watertown 

1905 PIERCE, CHAUNCEY HERBERT, Northampton . 

1912 PIERCE, EDWIN WILLIS, Newton .... 

Great*-grandson of David Osgood 
Greats-grandson of Isaac Williams 
GreatS-grandson of Samuel Steele 
Great'-grandson of Eleazer Steele 
Great'-grandson of Aaron Davis 
Great'-grandson of Josiah Pierce 

1891 PIERCE, GEORGE FRANCIS, Dorchester 

1897 PIERCE, ROSCOE, Chelsea 

1908 PILLSBURY, GEORGE EDWARD, Lynn 

1908 PILLSBURY, WILLIAM H. CLARK, Brookline 

1896 PINGREE, DAVID, Wenham .... 

1907 PINKHAM, ARTHUR WELLINGTON, Lynn 

1896 PINKERTON, GEORGE FRANCIS, Roxbury 

1901 PITCHER, FRED ABNER, Chelsea . 

1912 PLUMMER, OSGOOD, Worcester 

Great-grandson of Solomon Allen 



12316 
25430 

23834 

10155 

16837 
5202 
8948 

11521 

10428 
12825 

10753 

8647 
23835 

22882 

8995 
17647 
24049 



938 

9850 

19884 

19776 

8681 

19167 

8939 

13620 

24199 



%i0t of ^tmttt0 



77 



1897 POLLARD, ARTHUR GAYTON, LoweU . 

1913 POLLARD, GEORGE FISHER, Harvard . 
Great-grandson of Thaddeus Pollard 

1897 POLLARD, HARRY GILMORE, LoweU . 
1906 POMEROY, GEORGE ELTWEED, Toledo, Ohio 

1906 POMEROY, HENRY BURT, Cortland, N. Y. . 

1908 POMEROY, WILLIAM HENRY, Springfield . 
1902 POOLE, CHARLES HENRY, Whitman 

1902 POOLE, DAVID VINING, Abington . 

1912 POORE, HERBERT CARLETON, East Braintree 

Greats-grandson of Benjamin Hinckley 

1898 PORTER, LINN BOYD, Brookline . 
1898 POTTER, BRIGGS EDMUND, Watertown 
1910 POTTER, CLIFFORD BRADLEY, Springfield 

1903 POTTER, JOHN THOMAS, Chicago, 111. . 

1913 POWERS, ALFRED FOSTER, Worcester . 

Great-grandson of John Tilton, Jr. 

1907 POWERS, SAMUEL LELAND, Newton . 
1905 POWERS. T. WOLCOTT, Boston 
1897 PRATT, ABNER KINGMAN, Newton Centre 

1909 PRATT, ARTHUR PEABODY, BeUows Falls, Vt. 

1912 PRATT, CHESTER BROWN, West Newton . 

Great-grandson of Benjamin Saunders 
Great^'-grandson of Amos Pratt 

1897 PRATT, GEORGE, Danvers .... 

1897 PRATT, HERMAN WASHINGTON, Chelsea 
1901 PRATT, ORESTES M., Holdemess, N. H. 
1891 PRATT, ROBERT MARION, Boston 
1903 PRAY, SAMUEL, West Newton . 

1913 PRESCOTT, CHARLES ABRAM, Roxbury 

Greats-grandson of Ebenezer Prescott 

1895 PRESTON, CHARLES HENRY, Danvers 

1898 PRICHARD, EDWARD AUGUSTUS, Reading 

1908 PRIEST, JOHN FOX, Aubumdale 

1910 PRINCE, CHARLES JOHN, Boston . 

Died March 23, 1912 

1912 PRINCE, CHARLES BARNARD, Sherborn 
Greaf-grandson of Jonas Parker 



10754 
24745 

10961 
2294 
18051 
19998 
14981 
14788 
24545 

11860 
11302 
21869 
16015 
25426 

18918 
5490 
10165 
21048 
24194 

10588 
10603 
13983 
4801 
15592 
24739 

8530 
11163 
19611 

21488 

24181 



78 Jtiin0 of tfje American Uleboiution 

1899 PRINCE, ARTHUR DOW, Lowell 12473 

1912 PRIOR, WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, Dorchester . . 24536 

Great'-grandson of Micah Weston 

1908 PUNDERSON, HENRY FULLER, Springfield . . . 19389 

1899 PUNDERSON, JAMES HYATT, Stockbridge .... 12064 

1908 PUTNAM, GEORGE WASHINGTON, Lowell .... 19390 

1912 PUTNAM, CHARLES RICHARD, Lexington .... 24537 
Great-grandson of Stephen Temple, Jr. 
Greats-grandson of Stephen Temple, Sr. 

1891 PUTNAM, SAMUEL HENRY, Worcester 4831 

Died March 19, 1911 

1908 QUACKENBUSH, GERRIT VAN SCHAICK, U. S. Army . 19612 

1898 QUINCY, EDWARD AUGUSTUS, Allston .... 11325 

1896 QUINCY, JOSIAH, Dedham 8646 

1911 QUINN, JOHN BUCKBEE, Lexington 23165 

Greats-grandson of Benjamin Betts 

1908 RADDIN, J. ARTHUR, Cliftondale 19999 

1911 RAMSDELL, LEDOIT B., Gardner 23164 

Great-grandson of John Ramsdell 
Great-grandson of Nathan Darby 

1912 RAND, JOHN PRENTICE, Worcester 24200 

Great-grandson of Nehemiah Rand 
Great-grandson of Nathaniel Shattuck 
Great-grandson of Richard Batten 
Great-grandson of Nathan Wheeler 
Greats-grandson of John Batten 
GreatS-grandson of Jeremiah Andrews 
Greats-grandson of Ephraim Adams 

1912 RAND, WALDRON HOLMES, Jr., Newton Centre . . 24193 
Greats-grandson of Bartlett Holmes 
Great'-grandson of Benjamin Pryor 

1911 RAND, WILLIAM BRISBANE, Dorchester .... 23665 
Greats-grandson of Bartlett Holmes 
GreatS-grandson of Benjamin Pryor 

1903 RANDALL, FRANK MORTIMER, New York City . . 16326 

1905 RANDALL, WILLIAM MOREHOUSE, Vineyard Haven 

(life member) 17443 

1909 RANDLETT, FRANK HUNT, Roxbury 20749 

1889 RAYMOND, FRANKLIN FREEBORN, Boston ... 785 

1900 READ, CHARLES FRENCH, Brookline 13237 



%x^t of ^€mhtt0 



79 



1905 READ, ROBERT LELAND, Maiden 17797 

Died June 9, 1912 

1896 READ, WILLIAM ARTHUR, Lowell 9035 

Died June 7, 1911 

1892 READE, PHILIP, Lowell 4966 

1902 REED, CLARENCE DERWOOD, Whitman .... 14789 

1899 REED, EBEN WILDER FARLEY, Guapiles, Costa Rica 12065 

1890 REED, HAMMON, Lexington 787 

Died May 2, 1911 

1894 REED, WILLIAM HOWELL, Belmont 5158 

1910 REES, THOMAS BOWEN, Smyrna, Asia Minor . . 21489 

1897 REYNOLDS, HENRY RUSSELL, Dorchester (Actual son) . 10606 

Died April 5, 1912 

1913 REVALEON, CHARLES WILLIAM, Brookline . . . 25078 
Greats-grandson of Prince Ames 

1909 REYNOLDS, HERBERT WALPOLE, Oakland. Cal. . . 21484 

1894 RICE, FRANCIS HENRY, Millbury 5128 

1897 RICE, GEORGE MAURY, Worcester 10579 

1900 RICH, WARREN LEONARD, Cambridge .... 12771 

1894 RICHARDS, JOHxN BION. New York City (life member) 5068 

1912 RICHARDS, SAMUEL TANNER, Somerville .... 24050 
Great-grandson of Josiah Richards 

1891 RICHARDS, WILLIAM DOUGLAS, Winchester ... 931 
1900 RICHARDSON, ARTHUR GANO, Salem 13001 

1908 RICHARDSON, EDWARD, Springfield 19985 

1889 RICHARDSON, EDWARD FARWELL, South Acton . . 773 

1894 RICHARDSON, GEGNEY KING, Boston .... 5116 

1910 RICHARDSON, HENRY HERBERT, Lynn .... 21494 

1911 RICHARDSON, JOHN SAMUEL, Roxbury .... 22883 

Great-grandson of Joseph Richardson 
Great-grandson of Daniel Thompson 

1896 RICHARDSON, J. WINSLOW, Winchester .... 8994 

1889 RICHARDSON, LOUIS GRAY, Chicago, lU. (life member) . 774 

1904 RICHARDSON, SAMUEL WILLIAM, U. S. Marine Hospital 17042 
Died May 10, 1911 

1900 RICHARDSON, WALTER PEARCE, Salem .... 13002 

1909 RICHARDSON, WILLIAM STREETER, Canton . . . 21032 

1911 RICHMOND, RAY, Brockton 22900 

Great'-grandson of Thomas Shaw 



80 



^oniBf of tf)t American Ifletjolution 



1911 

1897 
1896 
1904 
1897 
1900 
1892 
1897 
1905 
1910 
1900 
1906 
1905 
1911 



1896 
1906 
1902 
1908 
1900 

1890 
1908 
1907 
1895 
1906 
1897 
1911 

1901 
1911 

1897 



RICKER, HOMER DEAN, West Lynn 23671 

Greats-grandson of Thomas Tash 

RICKER, CLINTON ATWOOD, Cambridge . 

RIDEOUT, AMOS WOODBURY, Boston . 

RIPLEY, EBED LINCOLN, Hingham 

RIPLEY, HENRY LEWIS, U. S. Army (retired) . 

RIPLEY, HENRY TABOR, North Chelmsford 

RIPLEY, JAMES HUNTINGTON, Springfield 

ROAK, MILLBURY FRANKLIN, Dorchester Centre 

ROBBINS, CHARLES MAY, West Harwich . 

ROBBINS, EUGENE H., Pittsfield .... 

ROBBINS, GEORGE BRYANT, Melrose . 

ROBERTS, BRIAN CHADWICK, Augusta, Me. . 

ROBINSON, ALBERT, Peabody 

ROBINSON, CHARLES EDGAR, Brookline . 
Greats-grandson of Peter Parker 
Greats-grandson of William Standish 
Greats-grandson of David Wallingford 

ROBINSON, JOHN, Salem 

ROBINSON, JOHN COOLEY, Longmeadow 

ROBINSON, ROSWELL RAYMOND, Maiden 

ROBINSON. WILLIAM ARTHUR HAWES, Springfield 

ROCKWELL, CYRUS SYLVESTER, Independence, Ore. 
(Actual son) 

ROE, ALFRED SEELYE, Worcester 

ROGERS, GEORGE LYMAN, Roxbury 20220 

ROGERS, HENRY WARREN, Lynn 19379 

ROGERS, JACOB CROWNINSHIELD, New York City . 8531 

ROGERS, SYDNEY SEYMOUR, Holyoke .... 18067 

ROGERS, WILLIAM HENRY, Newtonville .... 10581 

ROLLINS, CHARLES FISKE, Brookline 23413 

Great-grandson of Samuel Rollins 
Greats-grandson of William Stacy 

ROLLINS, EDGAR JASPER, Somerville 14301 

ROLLINS, WILLIAM STACY, Belmont 23414 

Great-grandson of Samuel Rollins 
Greats-grandson of William Stacy 

ROOT, HENRY ALLEN, Pittsfield 10756 



10962 

9352 

16337 

925 

13610 

4930 

10158 

17881 

22019 

13014 

1694 

17289 

23404 



8667 
17888 
14324 
19614 
13238 

882 



ati^t of ^tmbtt^ 



81 



1908 
1896 
1912 

1897 
1894 
1902 
1904 
1897 
1890 
1906 
1910 
1889 
1910 
1890 
1895 
1911 

1910 
1911 

1911 

1913 

1912 



1891 
1904 
1908 
1909 



ROOT, WILLIAM LACY, Pittsfield . 
ROPES, CHARLES F., Salem 

ROPES, REUBEN WILKINS, Salem . 

Great-grandson of Benjamin Ropes, Jr, 

ROSSITER, JOSEPH, East Boston 

ROWE, GEORGE HOWARD MALCOLM, Boston 

ROWSE, WALTER WHEELER, Lexington 

RUCKER, WILLIAM COLBY, Washington, D. C. 

RUDE, EDWIN GILBERT, Springfield . 

RUGGLES, HENRY STODDARD, Wakefield . 

RUMRILL, FRANK, Roxbury .... 

RUSSELL, HEZEKIAH STONE, Pittsfield 

SABIN, N. HENRY, WilUamstown 

SAFFORD, RALPH KIRKHAM, Springfield . 

SALMON, STEPHEN DECATUR, Boxborough 

SAMPSON, WILLARD LINCOLN, Newton . 

SANBORN, CHARLES SIDNEY, Lynn . 
Great-grandson of Peter Sanborn 

SANBORN, ELMER ELLSWORTH, Lynn 

SANBORN, PHILIP ASA, Lynn .... 
Great'-grandson of Jonathan Sanborn 

SANBORN, RALPH ROSCOE, Lynn . 
Great-grandson of Peter Sanborn 

SANDERSON, ALBERT BOWMAN, Springfield 
Greats-grandson of Caleb Hubbard 

SANDERSON, KENDALL AINSWORTH, Lynn 

Greats-grandson of Nathaniel Martin 
Greats-grandson of Jacob Sanderson 
Great'-grandson of Jonathan Kendall 
Greats-grandson of Jonathan Goodwin 
Great'-grandson of Moses Ainsworth 
Great'-grandson of Enoch Hammond 
Greats-grandson of Isaac Turner 
GreatS-grandson of Barzillian Hammond 
Greats-grandson of Joseph Ramsdell 

SAVAGE, JAMES FRANCIS, Lowell 4865 

SAVORY, GEORGE EDWIN, Boston ..... 16839 

SAWTELL, JOSEPH OTIS, Springfield 19615 

SAWYER, ALFRED PATTEN, Lowell 21050 



19613 

8634 

23836 

9952 

5070 

14791 

17043 

10429 

889 

18208 

21870 

807 

21495 

812 

8565 

22884 

21496 
23406 

22877 

25082 

23837 



82 



^tm0 of tl^e Slmerican Ifiebolution 



1903 SAWYER, FRANK EZRA, NewtonviUe 15594 

Died April 17, 1912 

1906 SAWYER, FREDERICK WILLIAM, Boston .... 18052 

1911 SAWYER, HOLLIS HUNNEWELL, Aubumdale . . . 22885 

Greats-grandson of Elisha Nye 

1901 SAWYER, JOHN HOWARD, Arlington 13806 

1909 SEAGER, CHARLES WILLIE, Pittsfield 20739 

1890 SEAMANS, FRANK MANNING, Brookline .... 923 

1908 SEARS, GEORGE BOWMAN, Danvers 19738 

1895 SEAVER, FRANCIS ELIOT, Cambridge 5269 

1894 SEAVER, JAMES EDWARD, Taunton 5147 

1912 SEELEY, AUGUSTUS BARRY, Marshfield .... 24195 

Greaf-grandson of Aaron Hawley 

1911 SENTON, ALFRED LONG, Allston 22886 

Greats-grandson of Levi Long 
Great'-grandson of John Nixon 

1905 SERGEANT, GEORGE H., Northampton 17648 

1912 SHATTUCK, AMERICA, Somerville (Actual son) . . . 23847 

Son of Abraham Shattuck 
Grandson of Jeremiah Shattuck, Jr. 

1896 SHATTUCK, EDWARD HORACE, Lowell (life member) 8665 
1908 SHAW, CHARLES SUMNER, Pittsfield 20455 

1910 SHAW, HENRY LYMAN, Boston 22182 

Died April 2, 1911 

1896 SHAW, HENRY SOUTHWORTH, Milton .... 9058 

1906 SHAW, RALPH HENRY, Lowell 18481 

1907 SHELDON, WALTER ALEXANDER, Northampton . . 18919 

1911 SHELDON, WALTER PIERCE, Maiden 22486 

Great'-grandson of Peter Woodbury 

1908 SHEPARD, FREDERICK ABBOTT, Pelham .... 19617 

1905 SHEPHERD, THOMAS MONROE, Northampton . . . 17649 

1903 SHERIDAN, CHARLES FRANK. LoweU 15595 

1904 SHERRIFF, GUY MAURICE, Somerville 17044 

1906 SHORES, HARVEY TOWLE, Northampton .... 18449 

1896 SHORT, FRANK MANNING, Lowell 8676 

1900 SHURTLEFF, HOWARD LIVINGSTON, Boston . . . 13244 

1902 SHURTLEFF, JOSIAH BRYANT, Jr., Revere . . . 14562 



%i^t of iWcmberjef 85 

1897 SHUTE, FRANK HENRY, Gloucester 9827 

1904 SHUTE, WALTER CHAUNCEY, South Hingham . . . 16574 

1903 SIBLEY, CHARLES WILLARD, Athol 16005 

1894 SIBLEY, EDWIN DAY, SomerviUe 5149 

1910 SIBLEY, EDWIN ERNEST, Chelsea 22183 

1906 SILSBY, T. JULIEN, Brookline 18443 

1901 SIMMONS, ARTHUR ABORN, Grafton 13997 

Died May 6, 1911 

1913 SIMPSON, HARRY RUSSELL, West SomervUle . . . 25427 
Greats-grandson of John Simpson 
Greats-grandson of William Simpson 
Greats-grandson of Elisha Bartlett 
Great'-grandson of Ebenezer Bartlett 
Great'-grandson of Ephraim Frost 
Great*-grandson of Thomas Beale 

1901 SINNETT, GEORGE JAMES, Jr., Roxbury .... 13976 

1912 SKAGGS, WILLIAM CONLEY, Winthrop .... 24182 
Great-grandson of William Skaggs 



1913 SKINNER, ARTHUR JESSE, Springfield 
Greats-grandson of Jesse Wilson 

1897 SLOCUM, EDWARD TINKER, Pittsfield 

1912 SMALL, DENNIE PHILIP, Brookline 



24738 

10209 
24526 



Great-grandson of Thomas Small 
Greats-grandson of Richard Lunt 
Greats-grandson of Ebenezer Roberts 

1904 SMITH, ADDISON HENRY, Chicopee 16561 

1911 SMITH, C. FREDERIC, Swampscott 23425 

Great-grandson of Elijah Smith 
GreatS-grandson of Jonas Smith 
GreatS-grandson of William Flagg 

1895 SMITH, CHANNING, Cherry Valley ...... 8661 

1896 SMITH, EDWARD FRANKLIN, Brookline .... 9374 

Died May 30, 1912 

1895 SMITH, EDWIN GROSVENOR, Maiden . . . . . 7233 

1891 SMITH, E. EARNEST, Newton Centre 4805 

Great-grandson of Timothy Bryant 1 o i 
Greats-grandson of Eldad Smith / Supplemental 

1906 SMITH, FRANK HERBERT, Hadley 18487 

Great-grandson of Caleb Smith \ 

GreatS-grandson of Elihu Cook >■ Supplemental 

GreatS-grandson of Samuel Gaylord ) 



84 



^onief of tl)e American lEIeboIution 



1911 SMITH, FRED GARDNER, Winthrop 
Great-grandson of Perez Gardner 

1906 SMITH, HENRY PICKERING, Boston . 

1896 SMITH, HINSDALE, Springfield . 

1906 SMITH, JAMES HENRY, Methuen . 
1902 SMITH, JOSEPH MATHER, West Springfield 

1908 SMITH, JOSEPH NEWHALL, Lynn . 

Died Dec. 18, 1912 

1909 SMITH, RALPH MANSON, Wenham 

1911 SMITH, RUFUS MAY, Hadley . 

Great-grandson of David Stockbridge . 

1912 SMITH, RUTHERFORD ENDICOTT, Lynnfield Centre 

Great-grandson of Ebenezer Hart 

1907 SMITH, WILLIAM HOWARD, Springfield 

Died March 12, 1911 

1898 SNOW, ELMER HEMAN, Chelsea . 

1901 SNOW, FREDERIC WARREN, Chelsea . 

1897 SNOW, WALTER BRADLEE, Watertown 

1908 SNOW, WILLIAM BROWN, Maiden . 

1907 SNOWMAN, EDWARD ANDERSON, Springfield 
1905 SOLIS, ANDREW JACKSON, Winchester 

1898 SOULE, HENRY BISHOP, United States Navy 
1905 SOUTHWICK, ELBRIDGE GRUMMOND, Northampton 

1911 SOUTHWORTH, ERNEST BOWKER, Stoughton . 

Greats-grandson of Jedediah Southworth 

1909 SPALDING, GEORGE HOMER, Lowell . 

1909 SPALDING, ROLLIN AARON, Lynn 
Died July 18, 1912 

1908 SPALDING, WILLARD FLOYD, Lynn . 

1912 SPAULDING, HENRY PLYMPTON, BrookUne . 

Great-grandson of Thomas Warland 

1894 SPAULDING, JAMES HALVOR, North Cambridge 

1911 SPAULDING, WALTER LEVI, Indian Orchard 
Great-grandson of Jonas Hadley 

1905 SPEARE, LEWIS ROBINSON, Newton Centre 

1902 SPILLER, HARRY CHARLES, Chelsea . 
1908 SPINNEY, FRANK CASWELL, Lynn 
1908 SPRAGUE, CHARLES FRANCIS, Swampscott 
1908 SPRAGUE, GEORGE EVERETT, Lynn . 



Si^t of i^cmBeriBf 



85 



1903 SPRAGUE, HENRY BREED, Lynn .... 

1911 SPRAGUE, RUFUS WILLIAM, Charlestown . 
Great-grandson of Rufus Sprague 

1911 SPURR, WAKE BRYARLY, Lynn .... 

Greats-grandson of Jacob Eichorn (Achom) 

1896 STEARNS, ALBERT HENRY, Dorchester 

1910 STEARNS, A. MAYNARD, Dorchester . 

1897 STEARNS, EPHRAIM, Waltham .... 

1895 STEARNS, F. MAYNARD, Brookline 

1896 STEARNS, GEORGE MYRON, North Cambridge 

1894 STEARNS, HENRY AUGUSTUS, Central FaUs, R. I. 

Died Oct. 10, 1910 

1895 STEARNS, WILLIAM BRAMHALL, Brookline 

1912 STEINMETZ, SPENCER JANNEY, Brookline 

Great'-grandson of Samuel Morris, Sr. 

1896 STETSON, JAMES H., Quincy 

1903 STEVENS, ANDREW JACKSON, Maiden 

1904 STEVENS, CHARLES FREDERICK, WeUesley (life 

member) 

1894 STEVENS, EDMUND HORACE, Cambridge 
1909 STEVENS, FRANCIS HERBERT, WeUesley 
1891 STEVENS, GEORGE BECKWITH, Dorchester 

1895 STEVENS, GEORGE DANA, Maiden 

1909 STEVENS, GEORGE HARRY, Pittsfield . 
Died July 3, 1912 

1913 STEVENS, PAUL, Dorchester 

Great-grandson of Zachariah Stevens 

1896 STEVENS, SOLON WHITHED, Winchester 

1897 STEVENSON, J. HENRY, East Boston . 
1889 STEVENSON, JOHN MCALLISTER, Pittsfield 

1908 STEVENSON, JOHN McALLISTER, Jr., Sweetwater, 
1897 STEVENSON, WILLIAM CHIPMAN, Pittsfield . 

1911 STICKNEY, JAMES REUBEN, Dorchester . 

Greats-grandson of James Tuttle 
Greats-grandson of Adam Dunlap 
Great'-grandson of WiUiam Bodwell 
Greats-grandson of David FuUington 
Greats-grandson of Francis Fletcher 
Greats-grandson of David Peabody 



Texas 



16016 

22488 

23651 

8628 

21872 

10442 

8502 

9372 

5181 

7230 

23848 

8675 
15310 

16339 
5101 

21483 
4830 
7219 

20740 

24727 

8983 
10161 
808 
20000 
10208 
23154 



86 



J)on^ of tlje 2lmctican lletoolution 



1910 STOCKBRIDGE, CHARLES HAMBLETON DAVIDSON, 

Boston 

Died Dec. 1, 1910 

1889 STODDARD, PAUL WORRICK, Hopkinton (life member) 

1889 STODDARD, WILLIAM A., Neponset (life member) 

1894 STODDER, CHARLES FREDERICK, Boston 

1895 STONE, ARTHUR KINGSBURY, Boston 
1897 STONE, CHARLES ALLEN, Springfield . 

1894 STONE, CHARLES BRADLEY, West Acton 

Died Sept. 29, 1912 

1909 STONE, DANIEL CLIFFORD, Medford 

1910 STONE, GREGORY EUGENE, Winthrop 

1895 STONE, HARLAN PAGE, Springfield 

1911 STONE, IRVING, Lexington . 

Grandson of Samuel Pease 

1903 STONE, WILLIAM CARLOS, Springfield 

1900 STORER, OSCAR, Melrose 

1903 STORY, ARTHUR DANA, Essex 

1913 STORY, WALTER SCOTT, Springfield 
Great-grandson of Charles Scott 

1892 STOWE, LUKE STEARNS, Springfield 

1901 STRONG, THOMAS MORRIS, Boston 

1912 STRONG, WARREN BOSTWICK, Cambridge 

Great*-grandson of Elizur Bostwick 

1903 STUDLEY, JOHN HENRY, Maiden . 

1909 STURTEVANT, WILLIAM BECK, East Boston 

1895 SWAN, FRANCIS HENRY, Boston . 
1897 SWAN, WILLIAM LOCKE, South Weymouth 

1896 SWEAT, AUGUSTUS TOWER, Belmont . 

1901 SWEET, CHARLES OSCAR, Attleborough 

1911 SWEET, ERVIN VIALL, Attleborough 
Great-grandson of Amos Sweet 
Greats-grandson of Thomas Sweet 

1906 SWETT, CHARLES WEBSTER, Brookline 

Died March 29, 1913 
1905 SWIFT, WALTER BABCOCK, Boston 

1897 SYLVESTER, AUSTIN TURNER, Winthrop 

Died Feb. 28, 1913 

1898 TAFT, EDGAR SIDNEY, Gloucester . 



21498 

800 
809 
5136 
7221 
9828 
5046 

21038 

21873 

8507 

22489 

15596 
13239 
16187 
25090 

4963 
13706 
24032 

15311 
21485 

5252 
10755 

9365 
14319 
23664 

18209 

17635 
10437 

11046 



Ut^t of iWemberitf 



87 



1906 TAFT, HERBERT CHARLES, LoweU 

1897 TAFT, ROSCOE CHAUNCEY, South Egremont 
Died April 17, 1913 

1894 TAGGARD, HENRY, Brighton (life member) 

1901 TAINTER, GEORGE ARTHUR, Roxbury 

1900 TAPLEY, G. ARTHUR, Revere . 
1903 TAPLEY, HENRY FULLER, Lynn . 

1907 TAPLEY, WILLIAM WELLS, Springfield . 

1912 TARR, ARTHUR MYRON, Gloucester 

Great'-grandson of Nehemiah Grover 

1912 TARR, HENRY A., Gloucester . 

Greats-grandson of Nehemiah Grover 

1895 TATMAN, CHARLES TAYLOR, Worcester 

1909 TEBBETTS, THEODORE CHARLES, Lynn 
1894 TEMPLE, JACKSON LEE, North Adams . 
1897 TEMPLE, JUNIUS BRUTUS, North Adams 

1902 THAYER, JAMES FRANKLIN, Lexington 
1907 THOMAS, J. BARLOW, Lowell . 

1901 THOMPSON, FRANK VICTOR, Brighton 

1911 THOMPSON, HARRY AUGUSTIN, Lowell 
Great*-grandson of Nathaniel Maxfield 

1896 THOMPSON, JAMES ALBERT, Whitman 

1910 THOMPSON, LEON ERNEST, Lynn 

1902 THOMPSON, LEON HERBERT, Wales . 

1913 THOMPSON, MARSHALL PUTNAM, BrookUne 

Great-grandson of Thomas Thompson 
Greats-grandson of Benjamin Scott 
Greats-grandson of Zachariah Whitney 
GreatS-grandson of Nathaniel Fisk 
Greats-grandson of Ephraim Kimball 
Greats-grandson of Daniel Putnam 
GreatS-grandson of Samuel Marshall 

1894 THORNTON, JAMES BROWN, Boston . 

1906 THORPE, GARDINER ELLSWORTH, AUston 

1907 THURSTON, JOHN HENRY, Cambridge . 

1896 TIBBETS, GEORGE PARSONS, Easthampton 

1897 TILTON, GEORGE PRESCOTT, Newburyport 
1896 TINKHAM, S. EVERETT, Roxbury . 



18222 
10608 

5037 
14316 
13026 
15597 
19017 
24185 

24186 

7289 
20728 

5209 
10432 
14564 
19019 
13977 
22490 

8935 
21874 
14793 

24747 



5208 
18483 
19018 

9274 
11028 

8648 



88 



^onie? of t()e American ^ebolutton 



1913 TITUS, ISAAC WALTON, Lynn 24746 

Greats-grandson of Richard Ward 

1898 TOBEY, FRANK GEORGE, Springfield 11165 

1896 TOBEY, RUFUS BABCOCK, WoUaston 9038 

1895 TODD, EDWARD NELSON, Lynn 8593 

1895 TODD, HERBERT E., Lynn 8591 

1907 TODD, NELSON BARNARD, Lynn 19160 

1904 TODD, THOMAS, Concord 

1904 TODD, THOMAS, Jr., Concord 

1897 TOWLE, CHARLES FRANK, New York City . 

1913 TOWN, PHINEAS, St. Louis, Mo 

Great-grandson of Ezra Town 

1912 TOWNSEND, EVERETT, Brookline .... 

Died Aug. 18, 1913 
Great-grandson of John Fowle 
Greats-grandson of Josiah Fowle 
Greats-grandson of Daniel Townsend 

1897 TREADWAY, ALLEN TOWNER, Stockbridge 

1891 TREADWELL, SANFORD LUDINGTON, Brookline 

1899 TREFRY, WILLIAM DAVIS THAYER, Marblehead 

1913 TRIPP, BURTON ASHBURTON, Lynn . 

Greats-grandson of Burtis Soper 

1907 TRIPP, THAXTER NORTON, Lynn .... 
1895 TROWBRIDGE, EDWARD ALLYN, Boston . 

1912 TRULL, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, Lowell 

Great-grandson of John Trull 

1911 TRULL, JOHN Tewksbury 

Great-grandson of John Trull 

1913 TUCK, PARKER, Lowell 

GreatS-grandson of Jesse Tuck 
GreatS-grandson of Joseph Bradley Vamum 

1908 TUCKER, CHARLES HANSON, Lynn . 
1895 TUCKER, FRANK, Roxbury 

1900 TUCKER, HARRY BARTLETT, Springfield 

1899 TUFTS, JOSEPH AUGUSTINE, Fitchburg 

1910 TUPPER, FRANK, Worcester 

1904 TURNER, HENRY EDWARD, Maiden . 
Died June 28, 1911 



16340 
16341 
10212 
25094 

24538 



9956 

4882 
12249 
25084 

19168 

7268 

23849 

22491 

24741 

19740 

7299 
13015 
12465 
22184 
16562 



HijBft of f^tmhn^ 89 



1898 TUTTLE, CHARLES DEXTER, Roxbury .... 11516 

Died June 8, 1912 

1913 TUTTLE, HENRY CARLISLE, Boston 23486 

Transferred from Connecticut Society 
Greats-grandson of Hezekiah Beecher 

1901 TWITCHELL, FRANCIS ADAMS, SomerviUe (life member) 13979 

1903 TWITCHELL, JULIAN PHELPS, Gill 15598 

1899 TYLER, EDWARD ROYALL, Boston (life member) . . 12763 
1897 UNDERWOOD, EDWARD LIVINGSTON, Canton . . 9957 
1894 UPHAM, ROGER FREEMAN, Worcester .... 5050 

1902 UPTON, CHARLES THOMAS, Lowell 15172 

1909 UPTON, EUGENE CHARLES, Maiden 20742 

1911 VAN DEUSEN, CHARLES HILBORNE, Springfield . 22499 

Great-grandson of Cornelius Van Deusen 

1905 VAN DEURSEN, GEORGE LIVESAY, Lowell . . . 17429 

1904 VAN GUYSLING, GEORGE EDMUND, Los Angeles, Cal. 

(life member) 16575 

1908 VAN VLACK, WILLIAM CHARLES, Springfield . . . 19742 
Died May 1, 1913 

1894 VARNEY, CHARLES H., Maiden 5089 

1912 VERY, GEORGE FRANCIS, Salem 24187 

Great-grandson of James Very 

1911 VERY, NATHANIEL AUGUSTUS, Salem .... 23415 
Grandson of James Very 

1896 VERY, NATHANIEL THOMAS, Salem 8927 

1908 VIETS, JAMES ROLLIN, Lynn 19770 

1890 WADE, HENRY FRANCIS, Cambridge 900 

Died May 8, 1912 

1908 WADE, JESSE HARRIS, Ipswich 19743 

1904 WADHAM, JOHN PRAY, Kansas City, Mo 16826 

1907 WADLEIGH, ARTHUR GOULD, Lynn ..... 18497 

1903 WALBRIDGE, PERCY EDGAR, Boston 15838 

1909 WALES, THOMAS BEALE, Brookline 20466 

1893 WALES, THOMAS BEALE, Jr., Newtonville .... 5001 

1903 WALKER, CLARENCE ORVILLE, Maiden .... 16006 
Died Feb. 20, 1911 

1903 WALKER, F. ARTHUR, Taunton 15839 



90 J^on^ of tt^t American Heboiutton 

1904 WALKER. HARRY BRADLEY, Newton Highlands . . 16827 

Died Sept. 25, 1912. 

1906 WALKER, LOUIS BRYANT, Taunton 18210 

1895 WALLACE, CRANMORE NESMITH, Boston . . . 5213 

1902 WALTON, CHARLES REUBEN, Brighton .... 14958 

1903 WARD, ALBERT LONGLEY, Taunton 15323 

1889 WARD, CLARENCE STUART, Brookline .... 830 

1889 WARDWELL, EDWARD JOSEPH, Camden, Maine . . 840 

1889 WARDWELL, FRANK WELLINGTON, Cleveland, Ohio . 841 

1895 WARE, HORACE EVERETT, Milton 7260 

1906 WARNER, CHARLES FORBES, Northampton . . 18488 
1892 WARNER, FRANK EDWARDS, Boston 4938 

1907 WARNER, JOHN GERRY, Lynn 19002 

1907 WARNER, LOUIS HENRY, Northampton .... 18924 

1908 WARNER, STEWART GERRY, Swampscott .... 19987 

1911 WARREN, ARTHUR M., Chelmsford 23652 

Great'-grandson of Moses Parker 

1909 WARREN, JOHN BROADFIELD, Bolton .... 20729 

1905 WARREN, JOHN KELSO, Worcester 17291 

1896 WARREN HORACE WINSLOW, Dorchester Centre . 9368 
1891 WARREN, NATHAN, Waltham 4898 

1897 WARREN, ORIN, West Newbury 9961 

1910 WARREN, RICHARD, Waltham 22021 

1902 WARREN, WINSLOW, Dedham 14977 

1909 WATERMAN, DEPENDENCE STURTEVANT, Roxbury . 21477 

1901 WATERMAN, FRANK STURTEVANT, Roxbury . . 14320 

1901 WATERMAN, GEORGE HUSE, Boston 14321 

Died Feb. 2, 1911 

1890 WATERS, WILSON, Chelmsford 854 

1891 WATKINS WALTER KENDALL, Maiden .... 4810 

1912 WAY, WILLIAM THOMAS, Plymouth 24530 

Greaf-grandson of Nathaniel Maynard 

1896 WEAD, LESLIE CLARK, Brookline 8933 

1907 WEAVER, FRANK LEWIS, Lowell 19020 

1901 WEAVER, FRANK WILLIS, Attleboro 13809 

1910 WEBB, FRANK ELBRIDGE, Roxbury 21500 



%i^t of i^erxibtt^ 91 

1902 WEBBER, SAMUEL GILBERT, Brookline .... 15173 

1894 WELCH, CHARLES OSCAR, Salem 5095 

1889 WELLINGTON, FREDERICK AUGUSTUS, East Boston . 835 

1895 WELLINGTON, J. FRANK, SomerviUe 8561 

1901 WELLMAN, ARTHUR HOLBROOK, Topsfield . . 14308 

1906 WELLS, DANIEL WHITE, Hatfield 18054 

1895 WELSH, WILLARD, Maiden 5260 

1897 WESSON, JAMES LEONARD, Boston 9491 

1895 WESTON, ROBERT SPURR, Brookline 5223 

1892 WHARFIELD, WILFRED MARO, Springfield . . . 4933 

1892 WHARFIELD, WILLISTON CLIFFORD, Holyoke . . 4934 

1900 WHEAT, WILLIAM GEORGE, Springfield .... 13017 

1912 WHEELER, ARTHUR LORING, Boston 24176 

Great'-grandson of John Wheeler 

1904 WHEELER, ARTHUR MAXWELL, Arlington Heights . . 10673 
1899 WHEELER, BERTRAND THORP, Portland, Me. . . . 12228 
1908 WHEELER, FRANK ELISHA, Springfield .... 19744 

1911 WHEELER, HARRY EDWARD, Boston 23416 

Greats-grandson of Abner Stanford 

1912 WHEELER, H. WARREN, Boston 24033 

Greats-grandson of John Wheeler 

1911 WHEELER, STANLEY CUSHMAN, Brooklyn, N. Y. . . 23417 

Greats-grandson of Abner Stanford 

1894 WHITCOMB, HENRY CLAY, Dorchester Centre . . 5054 

1902 WHITCOMB, HENRY ESTABROOK, Worcester . . . 15175 
1894 WHITCOMB, JOHN DAVIS, Medford 5055 

1905 WHITCOMB, JOHN MURRAY, South Weymouth . . 17446 
1908 WHITE, CHARLES ELMER, Lynn 19771 

1912 WHITE, FRANK MERRILL, Winchester 24034 

Great-grandson of Nathan Merrill 
GreatS-grandson of James Steele 
Greats-grandson of Jeduthan Richardson 

1890 WHITE, Mcdonald ELLIS, Salem 853 

1903 WHITE, ROBERT DAY, West Springfield .... 15324 
1894 WHITE, WILLIAM EDWIN, Charlestown .... 5047 

1901 WHITE, WILLIAM ROLAND, Springfield .... 13708 
1899 WHITNEY, CYRUS HENRY, Somerville (life member) . 12229 



M>nn^ of tt)e ^(.niencan lUebolution 



1896 
1910 

1898 
1913 

1902 
1906 
1895 
1911 

1891 
1906 
1912 

1904 
1896 

1908 

1905 
1898 
1912 

1902 
1892 
1894 

1895 
1890 
1910 



WHITNEY, FRANK ORMAND, Roxbury 

WHITNEY, HARRIE HOLLAND, Arlington . 
Greats-grandson of Silas Whitney 

WHITNEY, JAMES FRANCIS, Somerville 

WHITTEMORE, ARBY CLIFFORD, Boston . 
Great-grandson of Levi Babbitt 

WHITTEMORE, HARRIS STEWART, Cambridge 

WIGGIN, ARTHUR MESERVE, Roxbury 

WIGGIN, BURTON HOWE, LoweU . 

WIGGIN, CHARLES BEAL, Brookline . 



Greats-grandson of Robert Pike 

WIGGIN, CHARLES EDWARD, Roxbury 

WIGGIN, GEORGE WINSLOW, Franklin 

WIGGIN, HARRY CARLETON, Newton . 
Great'-grandson of Josiah Wiggin 

WIGGIN, JOSEPH, Maiden 

WIGHT, HENRY KIRKE, Indian Orchard 
Died June 3, 1913 

WILCOX, DORVIL MILLER, Lee . . . 
Grandson of Nathaniel Wilcox 
Great-grandson of Hiel Wilcox 

WIDDIPIELD, SAMUEL EDWARD, Lansing, Mich 

WILDER, CHARLES PRATT, Worcester . 

WILKINS, CLARENCE HERBERT, Newton Centre 
Great-grandson of Bray Wilkins 
Great-grandson of Thomas Aiken 

WILKINS, S. HERBERT, Salem .... 

WILLARD, WILLIAM MASON, Longmeadow 

WILLCUTT, LEVI LINCOLN, Brookline . 
Died Jan. 3, 1912 

WILLCUTT, LEVI LINCOLN, Jr., Brookline 

WILLEY, WILLIAM LITHGOW, Boston . 



WILLEY, WILLIAM AUGUSTINE, Lynn 
Great grandson of Dominicus Scammon 



1908 WILLIAMS, ABRAHAM CASE, Springfield 



8936 
22492 

11308 

24742 

15174 

18213 

8597 

23406 

4857 
18056 
24036 

16843 
8674 

19745 

17284 
11506 
24035 

15304 
4929 
5079 

8515 

870 

22198 

19621 



1906 



Supplemental 



1896 
1899 
1892 
1909 
1900 
1902 
1912 

1890 
1912 

1905 
1898 
1896 
1902 
1904 
1889 

1911 



1911 

1895 
1910 
1901 
1912 

1908 
1902 



UtiEft of f^tmhtt^ 

WILLIAMS, CHARLES EDWIN, Northampton 
Greats-grandson of Jesse York 
Greats-grandson of Warham Williams 
Greats-grandson of Charles Miner 
GreatS-grandson of John Randall 
Greats-grandson of Oliver Grant 
Greats-grandson of Jeremiah Wheeler 

WILLIAMS, CHAUNCEY CLEVELAND, Washington, D. C. 

WILLIAMS, ENOS DEAN, Taunton . 

WILLIAMS, HORACE PERRY, Roxbury . 

WILLIAMS, J. FRANK, Wakefield . 

WILLIAMS, SPENCER THOMAS, Maiden 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM GOOCH, Boston . 

WILLIS, ARTHUR, Brookline 

Great-grandson of Charles Willis 

WILLIS, HENRY AUGUSTUS, Fitchburg 

WILLIS, JAMES FRANKLIN, Brookline . 
Grandson of Charles WiUis 

WILSON, ARTHUR HERVEY, Cambridge (life member) 

WILSON, CHARLES HIRAM, Brookline .... 

WILSON, HERBERT ALVA, Brighton .... 

WILSON, LEON EUGENE, Lynn 

WINGATE, EDWARD LAWRENCE, Maiden 

WINKLEY, SAMUEL HOBART, Boston .... 
Died Aug. 1, 1911 

WINN, JOHN, Brookline 



93 

17890 



Greats-grandson of Joseph Winn 
Great'-grandson of Elijah Howe 
GreatS-grandson of Isaac Prouty 

WINN, WILLARD ALLEN, Worcester 
Greats-grandson of Jeremiah Winn 
WINSHIP, WILLIAM HENRY, Maiden . 
WINSLOW, LOUIS MARTIN, Lynn . 
WINSOR, EZRA OTIS, Allston . 

WINSOR, GEORGE RYDER, Brookline . 
Great-grandson of Peter Winsor 

WIRES, WILLIAM MARSHALL, Jr., Lynn 

WISE, HOWARD PARKER, Maiden . 



8611 
12468 

4975 
20730 
13613 
15301 
24531 

852 
24532 

17789 
11869 
9260 
14794 
17046 
847 

23418 



23419 

5254 
22191 
13625 
24533 

19393 
14565 



94 



^on^ of ti)e ^(.mertcan Hebolutton 



1904 WITHINGTON, AUGUSTUS HENRY, Newton Centre 

1899 WOOD, ALBERT, Worcester 

Died Sept. 26, 1912 

1891 WOOD, ALVA SYLVANUS, Woburn .... 

1905 WOOD, EDWARD EVERETT, Jr., Northampton . 

1913 WOOD, HENRY LEANDER, Lynn .... 
Greats-grandson of Joseph Wood, Jr. 

1910 WOOD, FREDERICK MARSHALL, Ashmont 

1894 WOOD, WILLIAM, Milton 

1913 WOODARD, FRED MARTON, Lynn 
Greats-grandson of Ezekiel Brown 

1909 WOODBURY, CHARLES JEPTHA HILL, Lynn . 

1909 WOODBURY, WILBUR LARKIN, Swampscott . 

1910 WOODRUFF, FREDERICK ORR, Lexington . 
1903 WOODS, EDWARD FRANKLIN, West Newton . 
1897 WOODWARD, FRANK ERNEST, WeUesley Hills . 

1895 WOODWARD, FRED HUDSON, Dorchester Centre 
1894 WOODWORTH, ARTEMAS BROOKS, Lowell 

1905 WOODWORTH, CHARLES A., Springfield 

1900 WOODWORTH, ELIJAH BURGHARDT, Cambridge 
1894 WORCESTER, ALFRED, Waltham .... 

1906 WORCESTER, HORACE LEMUEL, Rochester, N. H. 

1909 WORCESTER, WILLIAM HENRY, Lowell . 

1893 WRIGHT, FRANK VERNON, Salem 
Died Aug. 3, 1912 

1911 WRIGHT, FRANK VERNON, Jr., Salem 

Greats-grandson of Peter DoUiver 

1910 WRIGHT, JOHN BERTRAM, Amsterdam, N. Y. . 
1900 WYER, EDWIN FRANCIS, Woburn .... 
1899 WYETH,- EDWARD CAZNEAU, Chelsea . 

1908 WYMAN, LOUIS AUGUSTUS, Swampscott . 

1897 YORK, GEORGE AMOS, New Bedford . 

1893 YOUNG, CHARLES FREDERICK, Lowell (life member) 

1908 YOUNG, JAMES GRANVILLE, Boston . 
Died June 22, 1911 

1912 YOUNG, WALTER ALLEN, Providence, R. I. 

Greats-grandson of Paul Wheelock 



%i^t of 0itmhet0 95 

1900 YOUNG, WILLIAM WILKES, Edgewood Park, Pa. . . 13614 
Died Jan. 21, 1912. 

1912 ZIMMERMAN, CHARLES BALLARD, Cambridge . . 24534 
Greats-grandson of John Zimmerman 
Greats-grandson of Jesse Emerson 
Greats-grandson of John Hubbard 
Greats-grandson of Joseph Bennett 
Great'-grandson of Josiah Ballard 



3Recorl»sj of 3^e\)olutionarp Ancestors 



Eecottijsj of ISeboluttonat^ ancejstorji 

The records of Revolutionary Ancestors, given in previous volumes, are not 
repeated unless for new members or amendments 

EBENEZER ABBOTT: Bom, Jan. 15, 1757, at Andover; died after 1801 at 
Reading. Private, Capt. Jonathan Foster's Company, Col. Wade's Regi- 
ment; enlisted July 1, 1778; also, Capt. Evans' Company same Regiment; 
served in Rhode Island to Jan. 1, 1779; also, Capt. William Green's Com- 
pany, Col. How's Regiment, 3 months' service in Rhode Island, Aug.-Nov., 
1780. 
Frederic Bassett Abbott 

BIXBY ABBOT: Bom, Nov. 24, 1750, at Andover; died 1813. Corporal, Capt. 
Benjamin Ames' Company, Col. James Frye's Regiment, which marched on 
the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. In camp at Cambridge May 17, 1776; 
served at the battle of Bunker Hill, and during the Siege of Boston. 
Samuel Abbott 

JOHN ABBOTT: Bora, April 12, 1741, at Marblehead; died at Marblehead. 
Enlisted in the Continental Army, Nov. 7, 1777, for 3 years, from Col. 
Jonathan Glover's Regiment. 
Thomas Franklin Pedrick 

BENJAMIN ADAMS: Bom, Jan. 18, 1728, at Newington, N. H.; died March 
29, 1803, at Newington, N. H. Private, Capt. Abijah Smith's Company; 
enlisted from Col, Enoch Hale's Regiment of militia, mustered Sept. 21, 1776; 
also, Surgeon's mate. Col. Moses Nichols' Regiment of New Hampshire 
militia raised to join the Continental Army for the defence of West Point, 
July-Oct., 1780. 
Talbot Bailey Aldrich 

EPHRAIM ADAMS: Bom, Feb. 15, 1722-3, at Ipswich; died March 26, 1799, 
at New Ipswich, N. H. " He took a leading part in the stormy measures that 
preceded the Revolution." Member of the Committee of Correspondence 
at New Ipswich, N. H., in 1775. Marched on the Lexington alarm to Cam- 
bridge and served 13 days. Private, Capt. Josiah Parker's Company, Col. 
Hale's Regiment; served with the Northern army at Ticonderoga, July 18, 
1776; also, Capt. Abijah Smith's Company; New York service, and at the 
battle of White Plains; also, Capt. Bryant's Company, Col. Moore's Regi- 
ment; reinforced the army at Saratoga, Sept.-Oct., 1777; also, Capt. 
Twitchell's Company; served at Rhode Island in Aug., 1778. Represented 
New Ipswich in the Provincial Congress. Selectman of the town to obtain 
soldiers in 1777, 1779, 1781. 
John Prentice Rand 



100 ^tm^ of tf^t American Iflrtiolutton 

SAMUEL ADAMS: Bom, June 6, 1717, at Newbury; died May 8, 1791, at 
Newbury. Private, Capt. John Noyes' Company, Col. Samuel Johnson's 
Regiment. Service with the Northern army, Aug.-Dec, 1777. 
William Richardson Adams 

STEPHEN ADAMS: Bom, May 5, 1760, at Newbury; died Feb. 8, 1838, at 
Newburyport. Private, Capt. Silas Adams* Company, Col. Jonathan 
Titcomb's Regiment; Rhode Island service; roll dated June 29, 1777. Said 
to have been in the battle at Trenton. 
William Richardson Adams 

THOMAS AIKEN: Born, Feb. 27, 1747, at Windham, N. H.; died Jan. 10, 
1831, at Deering, N. H. Signed the "Association Test" in 1776. Private, 
Capt. N. Aiken's Company, Col. Moore's Regiment, and served at Ticon- 
deroga in 1777. 
Clarence Herbert Wilkins 

MOSES AINSWORTH: Born, 1743, at Brookfield; died May 2, 1833, at 
Cavendish, Vt. Private, Capt. Walker's Company, Col. Danielson's Regi- 
ment; enlisted May 8, 1775, for the 8 months' service during the Siege of 
Boston; also, served to the credit of 3d precinct of Brookfield, 5 months, 
June 30, 1778. 
Kendall Ainsworth Sanderson 

JOHN ALLAN: Bom, Jan. 3, 1746, at Edinburgh Castle, Scotland; died Feb. 7, 
1805, in Maine. Colonel; appointed Sept. 17, 1777, to command troops at 
Machias, Me. ; also. Continental Agent and Commander-in-chief of Indians 
in Eastern department; served to the close of the war. 
Bert John Allan 

AMOS ALLEN: Bom, Sept. 15, 1734; died, 1818. Private, Capt. Solomon 
Strong's Company, Col. Bradley's (Fifth) Regiment, "Connecticut Line;" 
enlisted Dec. 6, 1776, for 3 years; discharged Dec. 6, 1779. Engaged in 
battle of German town; wintered at Valley Forge; present at battle of 
Monmouth, and engaged in storming of Stony Point. 
Sidney Avery Clark 

EDMUND ALLEN: Bom, Dec. 1, 1775; died Dec. 23, 1833. Private, Capt. 
Crafts' Company, Col. Learned's Regiment, which marched from Sturbridge, 
April 20, 1775, in response to the Lexington alarm; also, Private, Capt. 
Putnam's Company, Col. Holman's Regiment; served at Rhode Island, 
June 22, 1778, 21 days; also, Capt. Putnam's Company, Col. Wade's Regi- 
ment; served at Rhode Island, June 21-July 17, 1778; marched to join 
Gen. Sullivan at Providence, R. I. 
Samuel Allen Johnson 

ELIPHALET ALLEN: Bom about 1728 (probably) at Sherbom. Private, 
Capt. Mason's Company, Col. Cushing's Regiment; drafted for service in 
the Northem army; enlisted Aug. 16, 1777; discharged Nov. 29, 1777. 
Samuel Allen Johnson 

GILBERT ALLEN: Bom in 1736; died Jan. 6, 1816, at Morristown, N. J. 
Private in a company of Minute-men of the Morris County New Jersey 
militia during the Revolution. 
John Kermott Allen 



Kiecor0^ of 0eboluttonarp ^ntt^tot^ 101 

SOLOMON ALLEN: Born, June 6, 1754, at Gloucester; died June 6, 1836, at 
Gloucester. Private, Capt. Abraham Dodge's Company, Col. Little's Regi- 
ment; enlisted Feb. 9, 1776; also, Capt. Andrew Woodberry's Company, 
Col. Hallet's Regiment; served Aug.-Nov., 1780; reinforced the Continental 
Army. 
Osgood Plummer 

WILLIAM ALLEN: Of Rochester, N. H. Member of the "Committee of 
Correspondence" for Rochester, N. H., chosen June 19, 1775. April 12, 
1776, signed a Resolution "at the risk of our lives and fortunes to oppose 
the hostile proceedings of the British forces in America." 
Arthur Clark Harrington 

JOSEPH ALLEY, Jr.: Born in 1757 at Lynn; died Feb. 10, 1832, at Lynn. 
Private, Capt. Ezra NewhaU's Company, which marched on the Lexington 
alarm April 19, 1775, and served 17 days; also, same company, Col. John 
Mansfield's Regiment; 8 months' service during the Siege of Boston; also, 
Matross, Capt. Edes' Company, Col. Thomas Crafts' (artillery) Regiment; 
enlisted May 20; roll made up to Nov. 1, 1776; also, Sailor, brigantine 
Rover, Capt. Welman, June 30, 1780. 
GusTAVus Everett Alley 

NATHAN ALLEY: Bom, Feb. 29, 1752, at Lynn; died Feb. 7, 1832, at Lynn. 
On a list of men "who served at Concord battle and elsewhere." Matross, 
Capt. Edes' Company, Col. Thomas Crafts' (artillery) Regiment, July 23, 
1776; also. Gunner, same company and regiment, May 20-Nov. 1, 1776. 
George Abner Ingalls 

BENJAMIN AMES: Bom, Feb. 24, 1724, at Andover; died Jan. 10, 1809, at 

Andover. Captain, Col. James Frye's Regiment, which marched on the 
Lexington alarm; commissioned May 20, 1775; at the battle of Bunker 
Hill, and Siege of Boston. 
Samuel Abbott 

PRINCE AMES: Of Andover; died April 21, 1817. Private, Capt. Abbott's 
Company, Col. Tupper's (5th Continental) Regiment; enlisted for 3 years 
or the war Feb. 19, 1777; also, Capt. Farnum's Company, Col. Francis' 
Regiment; served at Bennington and West Point; also, Capt. Emerson's 
Company, Col. Tupper's Regiment, Jan., 1781-Jan., 1783. His widow re- 
ceived a pension. 
Charles William Revaleon 

AMOS ANDREWS: Born, May 31, 1743, at Ipswich; died Oct. 21, 1827, at 
Gloucester. Private, Capt. James Lane's Company, July, 1775, 6 months' 
service; also, Capt. William Pearson's Company; stationed at Gloucester 
for defence of seacoast; 6 months' service July, 1776; also, Capt. John 
Dodge's Company, Col. Smith's Regiment of Guard, Nov., 1777-April, 1778, 
at Charlestown, and at Cambridge guarding Burgoyne's captured troops. 
Pensioned. 
John Cole Andrews 

JEREMIAH ANDREWS: Of Temple, N. H. He marched on the alarm of 
April 19, 1775, to Cambridge and served 14 days; also, Private, Capt. 



102 «f>oni6? of ti)e American Ulebolutton 

Town's Company, Col. Reed's Regiment; service from April 23, 1775, during 
the 8 months' Siege of Boston; also, Capt. Drury's Company, Col. Heald's 
Regiment; reinforced the Northern army at Ticonderoga, June- July, 1777; 
also, served in same company. Col. Moore's Regiment at Saratoga, Sept.- 
Oct., 1777. 
John Prentice Rand 

JAMES ASHTON: Of Albany County, N. Y.; died Oct. 9, 1802, at Cambridge, 
N. Y. First Major, Col. Van Woest's Regiment of Albany County militia, 
April 1, 1778; also, March 6, 1779; offered his resignation on account of 
indisposition, March 12, 1783; reappointed June 27, 1783; allowed £79 3s 
4d for services performed between Aug. 13, 1779 and Nov. 5, 1780. 
John Foster Mawhinney 

ISAAC ATWOOD: Born, July 17, 1747, at Plymouth; died March 15, 1836, at 
Bedford, N. H. Private, Capt. Abraham Hammett's Company of Minute- 
men, which marched from Plymouth to Marshfield on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 17 days. 
Donald Roscoe McAfee 

LEVI BABBET: Bom, Aug. 31, 1757, at Norton; died May 8, 1795, at Norton. 
Private, Capt. Gilbert's Company, Col. Dagget's Regiment, which marched 
on the Lexington alarm and served during the Siege of Boston. 
Arby Clifford Whittemore 

EBENEZER BACON: Bom, Sept. 15, 1736, at Billerica; died, 1799 at Sidney, 
Me. A member of a County Convention held at Wiscasset, Me., June 23, 
1779, "to consult what measures would be taken respecting the British 
Landing at Penobscot." 
William Lincoln Palmer 

JAMES BACHELLER (BACHELOR): Born, Feb. 26, 1756, at Lynn; died 
Aug. 31, 1837, at Lynn. Private, Capt. William Farrington's (Second Lynn) 
Company, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. Pen- 
sioned under first act of Congress giving him $1.25 per month. 
Charles Mansfield Bacheller 

RICHARD BAGNELL: Born, May 9, 1752, at Plymouth; died March 22, 
1809, at Plymouth. Corporal, Capt. Hammatt's Company, which marched 
to Marshfield on the alarm of April 19, 1775; also, Capt. Mayhew's Com- 
pany, Col. Cotton's Regiment; enlisted May 1, 1775, 8 months' service at 
the Siege of Boston; also. Ensign, Capt. Warren's Company, Col. John 
Brooks' (7th Continental) Regiment, Jan. 1, 1777; also, Lieutenant, Capt. 
Holden's and Capt. Maynard's Companies, same regiment; served to the 
close of war. 
John West Churchill 

JOHN BAILEY: Bom, 1733, at Woolwich, Me.; died July 29, 1813, at Wool- 
wich, Me. Captain, Col. Michael Jackson's (8th Continental) Regiment, 
Jan. 1, 1777; served 5 months, 6 days. 
William James McClintock 

NATHAN BALLARD: Bom, 1745, at Andover; died Jan. 14, 1835, at Concord, 
N. H. First Lieutenant, Capt. Benjamin Taylor's Company, Col. Bumham's 



fittnvtx0 of l^eboluttonatp ^nte^tot^ 103 

Regiment in camp at Winter Hill, Dec, 1775. Captain of a company which 
marched from Amherst and Wilton, N. H., for Ticonderoga on an alarm 
June 29, 1777; Lieutenant, Capt. Goss' Company, Col. Moses Nichols' 
Regiment, 1777; reinforced the Northern Army, July 20, 1777. Commanded 
the company at the battle of Bennington. 
Charles Holmes Buss, 2d. 

JAMES BANCROFT: Born at Reading, May 9, 1739; died May 17, 1831, at 
Reading. Sergeant, Capt. Thomas Eaton's Company of the train band; 
Second Lieutenant, Capt. Batcheller's Company, Col. Bridge's Regiment, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; Ensign, same regi- 
ment. May 27, 1775; served during the Siege of Boston; on guard at the 
battle of Bunker Hill; Captain, 4th Company, 2d Middlesex County Regi- 
ment, May 6, 1776; also, Col. Jonathan Reed's Regiment at Ticonderoga, 
Sept. -Nov., 1776; also. Col. Michael Jackson's (Continental) Regiment, 
Jan., 1777-May, 1780. General Washington spoke of him as his "faithful 
Bancroft" and Lt. Col. Brooks expressed freely his confidence and friendship 
for Capt. Bancroft. 
Thomas Albert Emerson 

ELISHA BARBER: Bom, May 31, at (probably) Dedham; died in Feb., 1814, 
at Sherbom. Private, Capt. King's Company, Col. Josiah Whitney's Regi- 
ment at Hull, June-Dec, 1776; also, enlisted in the Continental Army for 
6 months in 1780. 
John Woodman Higgins 

LEMUEL BARNES (BARNS): Bom, June 16, 1729, at Plymouth. Private, 
Capt. Jesse Harlow's Company, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775, to Marshfield; also, Capt. Peleg Wadsworth's Company, Col. Cotton's 
Regiment; enlisted May 15, 1775; 8 months' service during Siege of Boston; 
also, Capt. Partridge's Company, Col. Steams' (Plymouth County) Regi- 
ment; served at Dorchester Heights, April- July, 1778. 
James Edgar Barnes 

EBENEZER BARTLETT: Of Newton. Contributed £370. 10s to buy beef 
for the army in 1780 to 1782; also advanced £100. 
Harry Russell Simpson 

ELISHA BARTLETT: Bom, Feb. 15, 1753, at Newton Centre; died, March 4, 
1834, at Newton. Private, Capt. Amariah Fuller's Company, which marched 
on the Lexington alarm to Cambridge; service, four days. 
Harry Russell Simpson 

JOHN BATCHELDER: Born, Oct. 6, 1757, at North Hampton, N. H.; died, 
Aug. 6, 1835, at North Hampton, N. H. Private, Capt. Joseph Clifford's 
Company at Pierce's Island, Nov. 5, 1775; also, Capt. Henry Elkins' Com- 
pany at Piscataqua Harbor, Nov. 23, 1775; also, Capt. Leavett's Company, 
Col. Nichols' Regiment of Volunteers, on the Rhode Island expedition, 
Aug., 1778. 
George Frank James 

ZEALOUS BATES: Bom, March 1, 1754, at Hingham; died, July 5, 1831, at 
Westboro. Private, Capt. Job Cushing's Company, Col. Greaton's Regi- 



104 ^on^ of tt)e American Ulebolutton 

ment; enlisted, May 16, 1775; 8 months' service at Cambridge during the 

Siege of Boston; Sergeant, Capt. Obadiah Beals' Company, Col. Lowell's 

Regiment; service at Dorchester Heights, and at Hull, March and June, 

1776. 

John Ross Bates 

JOHN BATTEN, Sr.: Of Salem; born, 1708. Corporal and Sergeant in Capt. 
Benjamin Ward, Jr.'s Company; service at Salem, Jan. 22-Nov. 18, 1776; 
also. Prize Master, brigantine Massachusetts, Capt. Fisk; service March 8- 
July 21, 1777; also, on the ship Jason, Capt. Forrester, June 15, 1780. 
John Prentice Rand 

RICHARD BATTEN: Bom, July 13, 1737, at Salem; died, Aug. 25, 1822, at 
Francestown, N. H. Mustered by Col. Daniel Moore out of his regiment to 
march to New York, Dec, 1776. Wages and travel, £5 5s. 
John Prentice Rand 

THOMAS BEALE: Bom at Newton in 1727; died at Newton in 1806. Private, 
Capt. Amariah Fuller's Company, which marched on the Lexington alarm 
to Cambridge. Belonged to the "alarm list." 
Harry Russell Simpson 

GEORGE BEAVER: Bom, May 1, 1755, in Chester Co., Pa.; died, Jan. 16, 
1836, in Franklin Co., Pa. Private, Capt. Caleb North's and Thomas 
Church's Companies of Riflemen, Col. Anthony Wayne's (4th) Battalion, 
Pa.; enlisted in Berks County, Pa., for year 1776; engaged in battle of 
Three Rivers, Canada, June 8, 1776; Captain, 5th Company, First Battalion, 
Berks County militia. Col. Daniel Hunter, 1778. Pensioned. 
Frank Leo Cook 

HEZEKIAH BEECHER: Born, Oct. 8, 1752, at Woodbridge, Conn.; died, 
Dec. 11, 1797, at Cheshire, Conn. Private in the New Haven Company 
which marched on the Lexington alarm; Private, Capt. Johnson's Company, 
Col. Douglass' Regiment; Wadsworth's Connecticut Brigade; reinforced 
Washington's army at New York, June, 1776; served in the city and at the 
battle on Long Island, Aug. 27, 1776. Present at the battle of White Plains, 
Oct. 28, 1776. 
Henry Carlisle Tuttle 

THEODORE BELLOWS: Bom, Aug. 13, 1760, at Walpole, N. H.; died. May 6, 
1835, at Charlestown, N. H. Sergeant, Capt. Peter Page's Company, Col. 
Nichols' Regiment of New Hampshire militia, raised for defence of West 
Point, 1780; served, July 6-Oct. 19, 1780. 
John William Barber 

SAMUEL BERRY: Gardnerstown, Me. Born at Georgetown, Me., Aug. 10, 
1737. First Lieutenant, Fourth Company, Second Lincoln County Regiment, 
July 23, 1776; also, Capt. Brown's Company, Col. Wade's Regiment; 
enlisted, July 1, 1778; service, 6 months in Rhode Island. 
Arthur Stackpole Berry 

RICHARD BESOM: Bom, 1728, at Marblehead; died, Feb. 4, 1812, at 
Marblehead. Matross, Capt. Fettyplace's (Seacoast) Company of Marble- 
head, Feb. 20, 1776- Jan. 1, 1777. 
Thomas Franklin Pedrick 



iflfcorDier of ifleboluttoitarp ^ntt^tut^ 105 

BENJAMIN BETTS: Bom. Oct. 20, 1747, at Norwalk, Conn. Private 
Capt. Bell's Company, Lieut.-Col. John Mead's Regiment of "House- 
holders," who "kept watch and ward by order of Maj.-Gen. Wooster," 
Dec. 24, 1776. 
John Buckbee Quinn 

BENAJAH BILL: Bom, June 29, 1760, at Groton, Conn.; died. May 22, 1842, 
Private, Major Wyllss' (Third) Company, Col. Webb's (Continental) Regi- 
ment; enlisted, Jan. 1, 1780, for 3 years, or during the war. Census of Pen- 
sions in 1840 shows Benajah Bill, of Lyme, Conn., aged 79. 
Raymond Russell Bill 

EPHRAIMBILL: Born, Aug. 15, 1719, at New London, Conn.; died, Nov. 24, 
1802, at Norwich, Conn. Military and Marine Agent for Connecticut; 
also. Director at the building of a battery on Waterman's Point in 1775. 
RoswELL Parish, Jr. 

EDMUND BLACK: Born, Oct. 9, 1737, at Haverhill; died at Derry, N. H. 
Private, Capt. William Boyes' Company, Col. Reynold's Regiment New 
Hampshire militia; enlisted, Sept. 17, 1781, for the town of Goffstown; 
discharged, Nov. 25, 1781. 
Everett Hudson Black 
Albert Shirley Black 

WILLIAM BLACKLER: Baptized, May 18, 1740, at Marblehead; died. 
June 15, 1818, at Marblehead. Member of Council to carry into effect the 
Resolve for non-importation of British goods. Captain, Col. Glover's 
(21st Continental) Regiment, which served during the Siege of Boston, 
and through the campaign of 1776. 
William Gerry Keene 

ADAM BLAIR: Bom, 1757, at Blandford; died, April 22, 1840, at Blandford. 
Private, Capt. Lemuel Stewart's Company; served May 3- June 25, 1775, 
on an expedition against Ticonderoga and Crown Point; also, at Albany, 
July 19-Sept. 17, 1775, under Gen. Schuyler. 
Orrin Curtis Blair 

DAVID BLOOD: Bom, Sept. 28, 1718, at Groton; died (probably) at Pepperell. 
Private, Capt. John Nutting's Company, Col. Prescott's Regiment, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; service 15 days; also, 
Capt. Russell's Company, Col. Eleazer Brooks' Regiment; at Dorchester 
Heights, March 4, 1776; also, on a list of men who served at Ticonderoga 
in 1776. 
Walter Levi Spaulding 

SAMUEL BODEN: Baptized at Marblehead, Aug. 6, 1738; died, Dec. 7, 1807, 
at Marblehead. Private, Capt. Broughton's (5th) Company, Col. Glover's 
(21st) Regiment; enlisted. May 24, 1775, and served during the Siege of 
Boston. 
Arthur Wardwell Green 

PARKER BODWELL: Bom, Oct. 29, 1750, at Methuen; died, Aug. 7, 1795, 
at Methuen. Private, Capt. John Davis' Company, Col. Frye's Regiment, 



106 M>on^ of tfyt American ^ebolution 

which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. In camp at Cam- 
bridge, May 17, 1775; served at the battle of Bunker Hill, and during the 
Siege of Boston. 
Kirk White Marsh 

WILLIAM BODWELL: Born, June 21, 1763, at Methuen; died, 1835, in Ohio. 
Private, Capt. Peabody's Company, Col. Francis' Regiment, Nov. 29, 1776; 
also, Capt. John Wiley's Company, Col. Michael Jackson's (Continental) 
Regiment, April, 1777-Dec. 31, 1779; also, Capt. Wade's Company of same 
regiment, Jan. -Dec, 1780. 
James Reuben Stickney 

ELIZUR BOSTWICK: Bom, Jan. 13, 1757, at New Milford, Conn.; died, 
Aug. 13, 1851, at [Edinburgh, Ohio. Private, Capt. Isaac Bostwick's (7th) 
Company, 7th Connecticut Regiment, July 10-Dec. 21, 1775. 
Warren Bostwick Strong 

JOSEPH BOYNTON: Bom, July 5, 1738, at Rowley; died, Sept. 18, 1820, at 
Winchendon. Lieutenant, Capt. John Boynton's Company, Col. Spar- 
hawk's (Worcester County) Regiment of Mass. militia; commissioned, 
April 5, 1776; also, Capt. William Mareau's Company of same regiment; 
service, Jan., 1777, at New York; also, same company and regiment; 
marched on the Bennington alarm, Aug. 21, 1777. 
William Wills Beal 

JAMES BRIGGS: Bora, Dec. 20, 1748, at Dighton; died, Aug. 16, 1813, at 
Dighton. Captain, Col. John Bailey's Regiment; commissioned, Feb. 13, 
1776; also, Captain of a company raised from Col. Carpenter's Regiment to 
reinforce the Continental Army, July 31, 1776, to Dec. 12, 1776; also. Col. 
Freeman's Regiment on a "secret expedition" to Rhode Island, Oct. 2, 1777; 
also. Col. Jacobs' Regiment, Sept. 1-Oct. 12, 1778. 
Herbert James Briggs 

JOEL BRIGGS: Bora at Taunton, April 15, 1757; died at Braintree, Jan. 18, 
1828. Private, Capt. Seth Gilbert's Company, Col. Dagget's Regiment, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also. Drummer, 
Capt. Isaac Hodges' Company, Col. Carpenter's Regiment; served on an 
expedition to Rhode Island, July-Aug., 1778. 
Charles Arthur Harding 

EDWARD BROOKS: Born, Nov. 4, 1733, at Medford; died. May 6, 1781, at 
Medford. Volunteer at Concord Bridge, April 19, 1775; also. Chaplain of 
frigate Hancock; a prisoner at Halifax, N. S., 1777-78; exchanged, Jan. 29, 
1778, for Parson Lewis. 
Charles Brooks Appleton 

EBENEZER BROWN: Bora, Feb. 12, 1757, at Reading; died, Sept. 18, 1834, 
at Marblehead. Private, Capt. Ezra Newhall's Company, Col. Mansfield's 
Regiment; enlisted. May 6, 1775, and served during the Siege of Boston; 
also, reenlisted, July 1, 1777, as Drummer, Capt. Townsend's Company of 
Lynn, and Nov. 3, 1777, as Drummer, Capt. Greenwood's Company, Col. 
Gerrish's Regiment and served to April 3, 1778. Pensioned. 
Arthur Wardwell Green 



I^ecorti^ of jtleboluttonarp ^nct^tat^ 107 

EZRA BROWN: Born, Nov. 2, 1750, at Saugus; died, Feb. 19, 1829, at Saugus. 
Private, Capt. David Parker's Company of Minute-men, which marched on 
the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also, Drummer, Capt. Ezra Newhall's 
Company, Col. Hutchinson's Regiment, May- Aug., 1775, during the Siege 
of Boston. 
Lawrence Everett Brown 

EZEKIEL BROWN: Of Brunswick, Me. Drummer, Capt. Curtis' Company, 
Col. Mitchell's Regiment; served on the Penobscot Expedition, July 7- 
Sept. 25, 1779; roll dated Harpswell. 
Fred M. Woodard 

RUFUS BROWN: Born, Sept. 17, 1744, at Lynn. Private, Capt. Ezra New- 
hall's Company of Minute-men, which marched on the Lexington alarm, 
April 19, 1775; also. Corporal and Sergeant, Capt. Newhall's Company, 
Col. Marshall's Regiment; enlisted, May 3, 1775; served during the Siege 
of Boston; also, Private, Capt. Buffington's Company, Col. Samuel Johnson's 
Regiment; served, Aug. 14-Nov. 30, 1777, "at the Northward;" also, 
Capt. Brown's Company, Col. Gerrish's Regiment of Guards, April- July, 
1778; also, Capt. Huse's Company, same regiment, July-Dec, 1778; also, 
Capt. Putnam's Company, Col. Tyler's Regiment, July- Dec, 1779, at 
Rhode Island. 
William Herbert Bates 

TIMOTHY BRYANT: Bom, Aug. 15, 1750, at Hartford, Conn. ; died, Feb. 17, 
1794, at Manchester, Conn. Private, Capt. Timothy Cheney's Company, 
which marched from the town of Hartford, Conn., on the Lexington alarm, 
April 19, 1775. 
Ezra Ernest Smith 

JACOB BUCKMAN, Jr. (BUCKNAM): Born, Aug. 16, 1759, at Medford; 
died, Feb. 19, 1839, at Wobum. Private, Capt. Jonathan Maynard's Com- 
pany, Lieut. Col. John Brooks' (7th Continental) Regiment; enlisted, Feb. 8, 
1781, for 3 years. 
Francis Alvah Buckman 

SAMUEL BULLARD: Colonel, 5th Middlesex County Regiment of Massa- 
chusetts militia, 1776; also, Gen. Warner's brigade; served, Aug. 14-Nov. 30, 
1777, at the taking of Gen. Burgoyne; resigned, April 14, 1779. 
John Woodman Higgins 

SAMUEL BULLOCK: Born, Nov. 15, 1703, at Rehoboth; died. May 5, 1779, 
at Rehoboth. Private, Capt. Martin's Company, Col. Carpenter's Regi- 
ment, which served at Bristol, R. I., on the alarm of Dec 8, 1776; also, 
drafted from Capt. Simeon Cole's Company to march to Horse Neck, Conn., 
under command of Col. Thomas Carpenter. 
Albert Clark Mason 

STEPHEN BULLOCK: Bom, Oct. 21, 1735, at Rehoboth; died, Feb. 2, 1816, 
at Rehoboth. Captain, 6th Company, Col. Carpenter's (1st Bristol County) 
Regiment of militia; served on the Rhode Island alarm of Dec. 8, 1776; 
also, on same service, July 27-Sept. 10, 1778. Reported chosen by his com- 
pany prior to the Lexington alarm. 
Albert Clark Mason 



108 J>onie( of tf)t American ifletjolutton 

EBENEZER BURRILL: Born, Feb. 6, 1702-3, at Lynn; died. May 20, 1778, 
at Lynn. "A recognized patriot in promoting the cause of Independence." 
He was called one of "Sam Adams' Rebels." Delegate from Lynn to the 
Provincial Congress, Oct. 7, 1774. 
Frederick Howard Newhall 

JOHN BURRILL: Born, Aug. 29, 1726, at Lynn; died, Dec. 14, 1793, at Lynn. 
Private, Capt. Rufus Mansfield's (4th Lynn) Company, which marched on 
the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Frederick Howard Newhall 

SYLVANUS BURRILL: Born in 1757; died, Oct. 2, 1824, at Boston. Private, 
Capt. Hopestill Hall's Company, Col. Robinson's Regiment; enlisted, 
Jan. 31, 1776; service, 21 days to time of marching; also. Corporal, Lieut. 
William Foster's Company, Col. Pierce's Regiment, March 3-April 8, 1778; 
service at Long Island. 
George Henry Davis 

THEOPHILUS BURRILL: Born, Oct. 30, 1740, at Lynn; died at Swampscott. 
Private, Capt. William Farrington's Company of Minute-men, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm; also, Capt. Greenwood's Company, Col. 
Gerrish's Regiment of Guards at Winter Hill, Nov., 1777-Feb., 1778. 
Lawrence Everett Brown 

EBENEZER BUTTERFIELD: Born, Jan. 26, 1732, at Dunstable; died, 
April 2, 1821, at Farrington, Me. Private, Capt. Oliver Cummings' Com- 
pany, Col. Spalding's Regiment, May 31, 1776; also, of the Training Band 
of Dunstable, June 25, 1776, and on the Alarm List. Jan. 5, 1778, the second 
parish of Dunstable paid him £9 10s for "sarvice hire" in Capt. Cummings' 
Company. 
Walter Cummings Mitchell 

JAMES CHADWICK: Baptized, Feb. 25, 1753, at Falmouth; died, Oct. 25, 
1826, at China, Me. Seaman, brigantine Rising Empire, Capt. Whellen, 
May 24-Sept. 4, 1776; Private, Capt. Joseph Palmer's Company, Col. 
Freeman's Regiment; served on alarm at Falmouth, Feb. 4, April 2, and 
May 16, 1779. 
Harry Gray Fletcher 

JOSEPH CHAMBERLIN: Born, March 18, 1738, at Northfield; died, Sept. 5, 
1815, at Newbury, Vt. Ensign, Capt. Thomas Johnson's Company of 
Minute-men; served at Ticonderoga in 1776; and from April, 1777-May, 
1779, he was Lieutenant in Capt. J. G. Bayley's Company, Col. 01cott'« 
Regiment, scouting and guarding; he was at Pawlet, Aug. 16-Oct. 5, 1777; 
also. Lieutenant in Capt. Simeon Stevens' Company, same regiment, 1779- 
1781; answered several "alarms" in Capt. Cox and Capt. Frye Bayley's 
Companies to the end of the war. 
Everett Chamberlin Benton 
Jay Rogers Benton 
Charles Everett Benton 
Charles Dana Burrage 



HecorDjSi of 0e))o{utionarp ^ntt0tot^ 109 

AARON CHEEVER: Born, 1740, at Danvers; died. May 26, 1803, at Danvers. 
Sergeant, Capt. Israel Hutchinson's Company of Minute-men, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Albert Shirley Black 

CALEB CHENEY: Born, Jan. 12, 1738-9, at Mendon; died, July 5, 1800, at 
MUford. Lieutenant, Capt. Jennison's Company of Minute-men, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days; also, 
Capt. Gershom Nelson's Company, July 19, 1776; also. Sergeant, Lieut. 
Thaj'^er's Company, Col. Nathan Tyler's Regiment, which marched to 
Providence, R. I., on the alarm of Dec. 8, 1776. 
BowDoiN Strong Parker 

SAMUEL CHINN: Bom, Sept. 14, 1735, at Marblehead; died, Dec. 11, 1806, 
at Marblehead. Quarter Gunner, Capt. Fettyplace's (Seacoast) Company 
of Marblehead; Feb. 14, 1776- Jan. 1, 1777. 
Thomas Franklin Pedrick 

ELEAZER CLARK: Bom at Berwick, Me., 1756; died at Berwick, Me., 1831. 
Private, Capt. Samuel Grant's Company, Col. Titcomb's Regiment; served 
in Rhode Island, 2 months 14 days; warrant allowed July 21, 1777; also, 
Capt. Waterhouse's Company, Col. Gerrish's Regiment of guards; served 
at Winter Hill, April 2- July 3, 1778; also. Private, Capt. Place's Company, 
Col. Reed's Second (New Hampshire) Regiment. Pension allowed for one 
year's service from Jan., 1776; also, Capt. Ashley's Company, Col. Bellow's 
Regiment, which reinforced the garrison at Ticonderoga in June, 1777. 
Sylvanus Boyd Clark 

RICHARD CLARK: Bom, July 16, 1732, at Watertown; died, Feb. 24, 1809, 
at Watertown. Private, Capt. Samuel Barnard's Company, Col. Thomas 
Gardner's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Charles Houghton Hastings 

AARON CHEEVER: Bom at Danvers in 1740; died. May 26, 1803, at Danvers. 
Sergeant, Capt. Israel Hutchinson's Company of Minute-men, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Everett Hudson Black 

JOSEPH CILLEY: Bom in 1734 at Nottingham, N. H.; died, Aug. 25, 1799, 
at Nottingham, N. H. Major, 2d New Hampshire Regiment, May-Dec, 
1775; also, 8th Continental Infantry, Jan., 1776; also, Lieut. Col. 1st New 
Hampshire, Nov., 1776; also. Colonel, Feb. 22, 1777, to succeed Col. John 
Stark, who had been promoted to Brigadier-General. Served at Bemis' 
Heights, Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Stony Point, and at Monmouth. Presented 
with a sword by the N. H. Assembly; Major-General N. H. militia, 1786; 
quelled the insurrection that year. He was successively Treasurer, Vice- 
President and President of the New Hampshire Society of the Cincinnati. 
Frank Edward Berry 

JOHN CLARK: Bom about 1760 at Stoughton; died, Jan. 12, 1837, at Spencer. 
Private, Capt. Patrick's Company, Col. Alden's (7th Continental) Regi- 
ment; enlisted, June 27, 1777, for 3 years; also. Private, Major's Com- 
pany, Col. John Brooks' Regiment, March-July, 1777; also, on a return of 



110 ^on^ of tt^t American ]fletioIutton 

men in camp before Aug. 15, 1777, certified to at Cherry Valley, Feb. 24, 
1779. Pensioned. 
Arthur Clark Howe 

JONATHAN CLAPP: Born, 1713, at Northampton; died. May 10, 1782, at 
Easthampton. Second Major, Col. Seth Pomeroy's (2d Hampshire County) 
Regiment of militia, Feb. 8, 1776; resigned, April 14, 1778, on account of 
age, and inability to perform the duties of his office. 
Sidney Avery Clark 

JOSIAH CLARK: Bom at Wells, Me.; died, 1834, at Lebanon, Me. Enlisted 
in the Continental Army for 6 months, in 1780, for the town of Wells, Me. 
Homer Dean Ricker 

RICHARD CLARK: Born, July 16, 1732, at Watertown; died, Feb. 24, 1809, 
at Watertown. Private, Capt. Samuel Barnard's Company, Col. Thomas 
Gardner's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
WiLMOT Reed Hastings 

JOHN CLENDENEN: Of Silver Spring, Cumberland Co., Pa.; died, June, 
1802. First Lieutenant, Sixth Company, Third Battalion, Cumberland 
County Associators, July 31, 1777- Jan., 1778. Had command of the com- 
pany, Jan. 5, 1778. 
John Calvin Clendenen 

EBENEZER COBB: Bom at Middleboro, Aug. 13, 1731; died, Aug. 20, 1811, 
at Middleboro. Sergeant, Capt. William Shaw's Company of Minute-men, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775, to Marshfield; also. 
Private, Capt. Wood's Company, Col. Sprout's Regiment; service on an 
alarm at Dartmouth, Sept. 6, 1778; also, Capt. Sparrow's Company, Col. 
Jacobs' Regiment; company detached to reinforce Continental Army for 
3 months, July-Oct., 1780. 
Stanwood Cobb 
Frederick Walter Cobb 

EBENEZER COBB, Jr.: Born, March 17, 1759, at Middleboro; died. May 9, 
1826, at Norway, Me. Private, Capt. Nathaniel Wood's Company, Col. 
Ebenezer Sprout's Regiment; service on an alarm at Dartmouth, Sept. 6- 
12, 1778. 
Stanwood Cobb 
Frederick Walter Cobb 

SIMEON COBB: Bom in 1736 at Taunton; died, Oct. 20, 1815. Lieutenant, 
Capt. Oliver Soper's Company, Col. Walker's Regiment, May 24, 1775; 
also, Capt. Leonard's Company (3d Bristol County) Regiment of militia^ 
April 5, 1776; Company detached, Aug. 14, 1779, for service at Rhode 
Island. 
Simeon Herbert Cobb 

PETER COBB: Of Presumscot. Bom at Falmouth, Me., Feb. 4, 1719-20. 
Private, Capt. Samuel Knight's Company; enlisted, July 9, 1775; served 
six months at Falmouth; also, Capt. Benjamin Hooper's Company, Aug. 31- 
Nov. 24, 1776, at Fahnouth; also. Corporal, Capt. WiUiam Cobb's Company, 



mecortiiB^ of Heboluttonarp ^ntt^tot^ ill 

Col. Mitchel's Regiment of militia raised in Cumberland County for the 
Penobscot expedition; served July 8-Sept. 25, 1779. 
Charles Maxfield Cobb 

JOHN COLBURN: Bom, Aug. 3, 1738, at Concord; died, Feb. 6, 1829, at 
Leominster. Sergeant, Capt. Carter's Company, Col. Abijah Steams' 
Regiment; marched on the Bennington alarm, Aug. 22, 1777; service, 11 
days; also, Lieutenant Stickney's Company, same Regiment; reinforced 
the army under Gen. Gates at Saratoga, Oct. 9, 1777; service, 17 days. 
Clifton Colburn 

JOHN COLLIER (COLLYAR): Bom, March 9, 1740, at Marblehead; died, 
Dec. 22, 1806, at Marblehead. Enlisted in the Continental Army from 
Col. Jonathan Glover's Regiment, for 3 years, by order of Council, Nov. 7, 
1777. 
Jerome Ingalls 

COLEMAN COOK: Of Hadley; bom, Aug. 3, 1747; died, Dec. 20, 1835. 
Private, Capt. Hezekiah Hubbard's Company of Minute-men, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Austin Eliot Cook 
RuFus Lyman Cook 

ELISHA COOK: Bom, Feb. 22, 1715, at Hadley; died, March 7, 1794, at 
Hadley. Ensign, Capt. Oliver Lyman's (Northampton) Company; marched 
to East Hoosuck on the alarm of Aug. 17, 1777; service, 7 days. 
RuFus Lyman Cook 
Austin E. Cook 

ELIHU COOK, Jr.: Of Hadley; bom. 1753; died, 1801. Corporal, Capt. 
Reuben Dickinson's Company, Col. Woodbridge's Regiment; served at 
Ticonderoga in 1776. 
Frank Herbert Smith 

JONATHAN COOK: Born, Jan. 17, 1722, at Hadley; died at Hadley. Member 
of a committee to report Resolutions "concerning the existing state of 
affairs," passed, Jan. 3, 1774. Lieutenant, Capt. Elisha Porter's Company 
of militia, 1775; Private, Capt. Oliver Lyman's Company, Col. Dike's 
Regiment, Nov., 1776; also, Capt. Oliver Smith's Company, Col. Porter's 
Regiment, which marched on the Bennington alarm, Aug. 17, 1777; also, 
Capt. Moses Kellogg's Company, same regiment, marched on alarm to 
reinforce the Northern Army under Gen. Gates, Sept.-Oct., 1777. 
Homer Francis Cook 

EBENEZER COUSINS: Of WeUs, Me. Private, Capt. John Lane's (Seacoast) 
Company, Aug.-Nov., 1775; stationed at Cape Ann; also, stationed at 
Gloucester, Nov.-Dec, 1775. 
Homer Dean Ricker 

SAMUEL Cdx, Jr.: Born, Oct. 6, 1760, at Dorchester; died. May 9, 1813, at 
Dorchester. Private, Capt. Robinson's Company, Col. Gill's Regiment, 
March, 1776; guard duty at the lines near Dorchester Heights; Corporal, 
Lieut. William Foster's detachment of Col. Pierce's Regiment, March 1, 
1778, at Long Island; enlisted in the Continental Army for 9 months from 



112 M>txn0 of tJ)e American lUeboiutton 

July 17, 1779; Colonel's Company, Col. Wesson's Regiment; Seaman, ship 
Essex, which was captured, June 16, 1781, and her crew confined in the 
"Old Mill Prison," Plymouth, England. 
John Walter Cox 

JOHN CRANE: Born, Dec. 7, 1744, at Braintree; died, Aug. 21, 1805, at 
Whiting, Me. Captain, Col. Gridley's Artillery Regiment, May 3, 1775; 
Major, Col. Knox's Continental Regiment of Artillery, Dec. 10, 1775; 
wounded at Corlaer's Hook, Sept. 14, 1776; Colonel, 3d Continental Artil- 
lery, Jan. 1, 1777; transferred to Corps of Artillery, June 17, 1783; brevet 
Brigadier-General, 1783, served to Nov. 3, 1783. 
J. Carroll Bell 

JOSHUA CROSS: Bom in 1752 at Salem; died. May 24, 1829, at Salem. 
Seaman, brigantine Griffin, Capt. Gideon Henfield; roll sworn to May 23, 
1780. 
Charles Alfred Cross 

EDWARD CURRIER: Born at Wilmot, N. H. Private, Capt. Daniel 
Reynold's Company, Col. Peabody's Regiment, 1777-1778; Captain 
Dustin's Company, Col. George Reid's Regiment; Captain Cheney's Com- 
pany in the spring of 1782 and June, 1784. Pensioned. 
Frederick A. Currier 

SAMUEL CUTTER: Bom, Jan. 21, 1736, at Charlestown; died, April 7, 1791, 
at Somerville. Ensign, Capt. Isaac Hall's Company, Col. Gardner's Regi- 
ment, June 2, 1775; present at the battle of Bunker Hill; stationed on the 
lines at Prospect Hill, July 6, 1775; succeeded Caleb Brooks as the Lieuten- 
ant of the company. 
Charles Gordon Cutter 

WILLIAM CUTTER: Bom, July 15, 1759, at Ariington; died, Nov. 28, 1846, 
at Arlington. Sergeant, Capt. William Adams' Company, Col. Thatcher's 
Regiment; served at taking possession of Dorchester Heights, March 4, 
1776; also, Capt. Benjamin Blaney's Company, Col. Eleazer Brooks' Regi- 
ment of Guards; served at Cambridge, Jan.-April, 1778; also, Lieutenant, 
Capt. John Walton's Company, Sept. 4, 1778. 
Charles Gordon Cutter 

CHARLES GUSHING: Bom, July 13, 1744, at Hingham; died, Nov. 25, 1809, 
at Lunenburg. Lieutenant, Capt. Isaiah Cushing's Company, Col. B. 
Lincoln's Regiment, which assembled on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 
1775; also, Capt. Jotham Loring's Company, Gen. Heath's Regiment; 
stationed at Hingham, May 20, 1775; also, same company. Col. Greaton's 
Regiment, April 27, 1775; also. Captain, June 22, 1775; stationed at Port 
No. 2, Cambridge; Captain, 24th Continental Infantry, Jan. 1, 1776; 
Member of the Committee of Correspondence for Hingham, 1779-81; Repre- 
sentative, 1780-81-84-90-91-92-93. Senator, 1794. 
Josiah Stearns Gushing 

DAVID GUSHING: Born, Sept. 7, 1727, at Hingham; died, Feb. 15, 1800, at 
Hingham. Lieutenant- Colonel of Col. Solomon LoveU's (2d Suffolk Coun- 



Iflecorti^ of ^ebolutionarp ^ntt^tut^ US 

ty) Regiment, Massachusetts militia, Feb. 7, 1776; Colonel, Oct. 6, 1778. 
Matthew Marble Gushing 

DAVID GUSHING, Jr.: Born July 2, 1754, at Hingham; died, May 3, 1827, 
at Ashburnham. Lieutenant, Gapt. Jotham Loring's Gompany of the train 
band, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also. Sergeant, 
Gapt. Gushing's Gompany, Gol. Lovell's Regiment at Dorchester Heights, 
March 4, 1776; at Hingham, March 15; at Hull, June 14, 23 and 27, 1776, 
guarding the shores. 
Matthew Marble Gushing 

CONSIDER GUSHMAN: Bom, July 6, 1740, at Plymouth; died, April 4, 
1819, at Greenfield. Private, Gapt. Moses Harvey's Gompany, Gol. Wood- 
bridge's Regiment; served at Saratoga to reinforce the Northern Army, 
Aug.-Nov., 1777. 
Clifford Samuel Chapin 

SOLOMON CUTLER: Born, May 10, 1740, at Lexington; died at Rindge, 
N. H. Captain in Lieut.-Gol. Heald's detachment of Gol. Hale's Regiment, 
which marched from New Hampshire to reinforce the garrison at Ticon- 
deroga, June 29, 1777. "Captain Cutler, in 1775, went to Cambridge to 
provide provisions for the men that went to muster. He was a Lieutenant in 
1775, and Captain in 1777." 
Samuel Ryan Cutler 

JOSEPH DAMPNEY: Baptized at Salem, May 27, 1739. Private, Gapt. 
Richardson's Gompany, Col. Mansfield's Regiment, commanded by Lieut.- 
Gol. Israel Hutchinson; served the 8 months' service during the Siege of 
Boston; camp at Winter Hill, Oct. 27, 1775. 
Richard Daniel Floyd 

JONATHAN DAMON: Bom, April 11, 1751 ; died in 1823 at Dedham. Private, 
Gapt. Aaron Fuller's Company of Minute-men, which marched on the 
Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775, from 1st Parish in Dedham. In 1780, 
loaned the town of Dedham £100, and in 1781, £19 4s, "hard money," to 
pay the soldiers. 
Frederick Boyden Foss 

NATHAN DARBY: Bom, Aug. 17, 1737, at Westminster; died at Stratton, 
Vt. Private, Gapt. Elisha Jackson's Gompany, which marched from West- 
minster, under command of Major Bridge, to reinforce the Northern Army, 
Sept., 1777; service, 27 days. 
Ledoit B. Ramsdell 

AARON DAVIS: Born, April 26, 1709, at Roxbury; died, July 29, 1777, at 
Roxbury. Colonel. On the committee for Suffolk County to raise men for 
New York and Canada, 1776. Member of the Provincial Congress, sitting 
at Watertown, June 17, 1775; volunteer at the battle of Bunker Hill; 
allowed by Council, June 13, 1776, for losses sustained at the battles of Lex- 
ington and Bunker Hill. 
Edwin Willis Pierce 

JOSHUA DAVIS: Born, March 5, 1729-30, at Mansfield, Conn.; died, Sept. 22, 
1789 (probably), at Mansfield, Conn. Private, Gapt. Nathaniel Hall's 



114 ^tm0 of tl)e ^Imettcan ^eboiutton 

Company, Fifth Regiment, Fifth Brigade, Connecticut Militia, in Conti- 
nental Army service, 1777-1781. 
Franklin Robinson Gifford 

JOSHUA DAVIS: Bom, Oct. 25, 1743, at Chehnsford. Private, Capt. Oliver 
Barron's Company, Col. David Green's Regiment, which marched on the 
Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
George Henry Davis 

SIMON DAVIS: Bom in 1756 at Acton; died in 1816 at Bmnsvrick, Me. 
Private, Capt. Nathan Hale's Regiment, which marched from Rindge, N. H., 
on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; enlisted April 23, 1775, for 8 months' 
service during the Siege of Boston; appointed Sergeant of Capt. Thomas' 
Company, Col. James Reed's Regiment; also. Private, Capt. Stone's Com- 
pany, Lieut.-Col. Heald's detachment to reinforce the garrison at Ticon- 
deroga, June 29, 1777. Pension granted to his widow. 

WiLLARD SaWTELLE DaVIS 

JAMES DAY: Born at Gloucester, Dec. 16, 1738; died at Gloucester. Lieu- 
tenant, Capt. Andrew Woodbury's Company, Lieut.-Col. Hallet's Regiment, 
commissioned, Aug. 4, 1780; Acting Adjutant, Aug. 24, 1780; service in 
Rhode Island, Aug.-Nov. 2, 1780. 
Edward Everett Breed 

JOHN DEARBORN: Born, July 21, 1740, at Hampton, N. H.; died, Oct. 19, 
1794. Captain, Col. Moulton's Regiment of Militia, which marched from 
Hampton, N. H., and joined the army under Gen. Gates at Saratoga, Sept.- 
Oct., 1777. 
Harry Lamprey Brown 

JONATHAN DEARBORN: Bom, Dec. 26, 1746, at Chester, N. H.; died, 
Nov. 22, 1826, at Chester, N. H. Among the men raised from Colonels 
Thornton's and Webster's Regiments of New Hampshire to serve in 
New York in Capt. Runnel's Company, Col. Tash's Regiment, Sept. 26, 
1776. 
Frederick Howard Newhall 

JOHN DICKINSON: Born, May 8, 1758, at Whately; died, Oct. 6, 1814, at 
Whately. Private, Capt. White's Company, Col. David Wells* Regiment, 
May- July, 1777, which served at Ticonderoga. 
BowDoiN Strong Parker 

EDWARD DOANE: Born in 1741 at Cape Elizabeth, Me.; died in 1817 at 
Cape Elizabeth, Me. Private, Capt. David Strout's (Seacoast) Company, 
which served at Cape Elizabeth and Scarborough, July- Dec, 1775; also, 
Capt. Benjamin Hooper's (Seacoast) Company; served at Falmouth, Me., 
Jan.-Nov., 1776. 
George Byron Nichols 

ZACHARIAH DODGE: Bom, Feb. 14, 1732, at Wenham; died at North 
Edgecomb, Me. Private, Capt. John Low's Company, Col. Mansfield's 
Regiment; enlisted. May 12, 1775; served during the Siege of Boston; 
camp at Winter Hill. 
W. Lloyd Allen 



HecorD^ of !fleboiuttonarp ^nce^torjtf 115 

RICHARD DOLE: Bom at Newbury, Feb. 3, 1736; died at Windham, Me., 
in 1825. Enlisted in the Continental Army from Capt. Trott's Company, 
Col. Pike's (4th Cumberland County) Regiment; served 3 years from Jan., 
1777, as Private in the Lieut.-Colonel's Company, Col. Thomas Marshall's 
Regiment; promoted to Corporal, Nov. 1, 1777; also, in Capt. Benjamin 
Walcut's Company, same regiment; marched from Boston to Bennington; 
served at West Point, Jan. and March, 1779. 
Charles Maxfield Cobb 

PETER DOLLIVER: Bom, Oct. 8, 1753, at Gloucester; died, June 23, 1816, 
at Boston. Adjutant, 16th Continental Infantry, Jan.-Dec, 1776; Captain 
of Jackson's additional Continental Regiment, Feb., 1777-March, 1779; 
Member of the Society of the Cincinnati. Pensioned. 
Frank Vernon Wright, Jr. 

JOHN DORMAN: Bom, Oct. 2, 1738, at Boxford; died in 1792 at Boxford. 
Lieutenant, Capt. Gould's Company, Col. Johnson's Regiment, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also. First Lieutenant, 
same company and regiment, commissioned April 3, 1776. 
William Edwin Dorman 

STEPHEN DOTEN: Bom, June 24, 1726, at Plymouth; died, April 1, 1778, 
at Plymouth. Corporal, Capt. Finney's Company, Col. Lothrop's Regi- 
ment; served 10 days on a Rhode Island alarm, Dec. 11, 1776. 
H. Morris Kelley 

BENJAMIN DOWS: Born, Feb. 6, 1716, at Billerica; died about 1793 at 
Billerica. Private, Capt. Stickney's Company, Col. Bridge's Regiment, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; served "more or 
less" for 8 months at the Siege of Boston; also. Corporal, Capt. Kidder's 
Company, Col. Brooks' Regiment; service at White Plains, N. Y., for which 
he received a coat and bayonet; also, Capt. E. Farmer's Company, Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Regiment; reinforced the Northern Army, Sept. 29-Nov. 
8, 1777. 
AzRO Milton Dows 

JOSEPH DOWS: Bom, Feb. 5, 1760, at Billerica; died, Nov. 4, 1847, at 
BiUerica. Private, Capt. Minot's Company, Col. Howe's Regiment, Sept. 1, 

1776, 6 months' service near Boston; also, Capt. Varnum's Company, same 
regiment, Rhode Island service in the spring of 1777; also, Capt. Minot's 
Company, Col. Whitney's Regiment; Rhode Island service. May- July, 
1777; also, Capt. Stephen Russell's Company, Aug. 15, 1777; marched to 
Bennington on the alarm and then to Pawlet, Vt., where the company was 
attached to Col. BuUard's Regiment, and marched to Stillwater, N. Y., where 
he took part in the battle at that place, Sept. 19, 1777; served to Nov. 30,. 

1777, in New York; reenlisted in Aug., 1778, for 8 months. Lieutenant 
Flint's Company, which marched to White Plains and was attached to Col. 
Thomas Poor's Regiment and served until March, 1779; reenlisted in Sept., 
1779, and served 3 months at Claverack, N. Y., under Col. Samuel Denny 
for defence of the U. S. A. Pensioned. 

AzRO Milton Dows 



116 J>on^ of tf)t ^Lmerican Iflebolutton 

JOSEPH DOWSE: Born, Jan. 1, 1760, at Charlestown; died, March 29, 1839, 
at Sherbom. Private, Capt. Harrington's Company, Dec, 1776; service 
at Sherbom and also at Mystic guarding stores; also. Private, Capt. Hovey's 
Company, Col. Tyler's Regiment; enlisted, July 13, 1779; served in Rhode 
Island until Dec, 1779; reenlisted, July 4, 1780, for 6 months' service in the 
Continental Army; reenlisted, Aug. 19, 1781, in Capt. Maynard's Company, 
Col. Webb's Regiment; served to Dec 1, 1781. Pensioned. 
William Bradford Homer Dowse 

JAMES DRAKE: Bom, Nov. 14, 1755, at Epping, N. H.; died, Feb. 26, 1834, 
at Pittsfield, N. H. Private, Capt. Daniel Gordon's Company, Col. Tash's 
Regiment, raised to reinforce the Continental Army at New York; mustered 
Sept. 20, 1776. After the war he was a major in the New Hampshire militia. 
James Frank Drake 

JOHN DUDLEY: Bom, April 9, 1725, at Exeter, N. H.; died. May 21, 1805, 
at Raymond, N. H. Active in the councils of the Nation during the Revolu- 
tion; Speaker pro tern., House of Representatives, New Hampshire, 1778, 
1779 and Speaker, 1784. Chairman, Committee of Safety. 
Frank Wilbur Atkins 

NATHANIEL DUDLEY: Bom, Nov. 25, 1763; died. May 7, 1844, at Free- 
man, Me. Private, Capt. Whittier's Company, Col. Gales' Regiment of 
Volunteers, which marched from New Hampshire and served on Rhode 
Island, Aug. 5-28, 1778. Receipted to the town of Raymond, N. H., for a 
bounty of £10. 
Frank Wilbur Atkins 

ADAM DUNLAP: Of Londonderry, N. H.; bom, 1750; died, 1823. Private, 
Capt. Joseph Finley's Company; also, Capt. James Oilman's Company, 
Col. Gales' Regiment of Volunteers. 
James Reuben Stickney 

JOHN DU PARR (or DIPPER): Born in France; died before 1791 at Portland, 
Me. John Dipper of Marblehead appears as Private, Capt. Symond's Com- 
pany, Col. John Glover's Regiment; enlisted, June 4, 1775; served during 
the Siege of Boston, and, probably, during the Campaign of 1776. 
Albert Hunter Parker Byers 

OLIVER EDWARDS: Born, Aug. 29, 1755, at Northampton; died, April 4, 
1829, at Chesterfield. Private, Capt. Jonathan Allen's Company, Col. 
Pomeroy's Regiment, which marched from home, April 20, 1775, on the 
Lexington alarm; also, same company. Col. John Fellows' Regiment; 
enlisted April 27, 1775, for the 8 months' service at the Siege of Boston; 
also, same company and regiment went on the expedition to Quebec, Sept. 9, 
1775. 
Robert Ellery Edwards 

JACOB EICHORN (ACORN): Bom in Germany; died after 1790 at Waldo- 
boro. Me. Member of the Waldoboro, Me., Committee of Correspondence, 
1776. Private, Capt. Ulmer's Company, Col. McCobb's Regiment, July- 
Sept., 1779; served in the Penobscot Expedition. 
Wake Bryarly Spurr 



Itlecortijei of iHeboiutionarp ^nce^torjf 117 

FRANCIS ELLIS: Bom at Marblehead, 1740; died, Sept. 14, 1817, at Marble- 
head. Corporal, Capt. Selman's Company, Col. John Glover's Regiment, 
which marched to Cambridge, June 22, 1775; served during the Siege of 
Boston. "Time out, Dec. 31, 1775." 
Thomas Franklin Pedrick 

SAMUEL EMERY: Born in 1732 at Kittery, Me. Private, Capt. Shapleigh's 
Company, Col. Storer's Regiment, Aug. 14-Oct. 23, 1777; served in the 
Northern Army in the campaign on the upper Hudson River, ending in 
Burgoyne's surrender. 
James Weymouth Emery 

JESSE EMERSON: Died (probably) in Brookfield after March 6, 1802. Private, 
Capt. Goodale's Company of Minute-men, which marched on the Lexington 
alarm; also, Sergeant, Capt. King's Company, Col. Woodbridge's Regi- 
ment; served during the 8 months' enlistment at the Siege of Boston. In 
camp at Prospect Hill, Oct. 23, 1775. 
Charles Ballard Zimmerman 

THOMAS EMERSON: Born, Dec. 11, 1757, at Reading; died, Feb. 17, 1837, 
at Lynnfield. Private, Capt. Walton's Company, Col. Green's Regiment, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also, belonged to 
the training band. May 13, 1775; Private, Capt. BacheUer's Company, Col. 
Bridge's Regiment; enlisted at Cambridge, April 28, 1775, and was present 
at the battle of Bunker Hill; also, Mariner, brigantine Cutter (privateer), 
Capt. Crowell, Aug. 15, 1780; captured and confined in Dartmoor Prison; 
on his exchange he was appointed a Captain in the militia by Gov. John 
Hancock. 
Thomas Albert Emerson 

THOMAS EMERSON: Born at Dunstable; died at Hollis, N. H. Private, 
Capt. Daniel Emerson, Jr.'s Company, Col. Wingate's Regiment in the 
Continental Army service, July, 1776. Receipt dated Litchfield, N. H., 
July 9, 1776, for bounty received for advance pay for service in Canada; 
also. Private, Third Company, same regiment; served 6 months at Ticon- 
deroga, 1776. 
Charles Henry Chase 

SAMUEL ENDICOTT: Bom at North Danvers, Dec. 14, 1754; died, April 8, 
1840, at Newport, N. H. Surgeon's Mate, Col. Nathaniel Wade's (Essex 
County) Regiment; service, July-Oct., 1780; reinforced Continental Army. 
John Maxwell Clark 

WILLIAM FARRINGTON: Born, July 15, 1734, at Lynn; died, Nov. 1, 1808, 
at Lynn. Captain, Second Lynn Company, which marched on the Lexington 
alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Frederick Howard Newhall 

JOHN FAY, Jr.: Born, May 23, 1756, at Southboro; died, June 14, 1839, at 
FitzwiUiam, N. H. Private, Capt. Josiah Fay's Company of Minute-men^ 
which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; enlisted in same company, 



118 ^on^ai of tlje 9lmcrican Heijolution 

Col. Jonathan Ward's Regiment, April 24, 1775; served during the Siege of 
Boston; camp at Dorchester, Oct. 7, 1775. 
Henry Gates Hathorne 

JOSHUA FELT: Bom, June 21, 1751, at Saugus; died in 1822 at Westmore- 
land, N. H. Private, Capt. David Parker's Company of Minute-men, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; wounded at Menotomy 
(Arlington). The only man in his company injured. 
Charles Freeman Felt 
William Henry Felt 

EBENEZER FISHER: Bom, July 28, 1730, at (probably) Dedham; died, 
Oct. 7, 1804, at Wrentham. Private, Capt. KoUock's Company, Col. John 
Smith's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; 
also, Capt. Cowell's Company, Col. Benjamin Hawe's Regiment; served 
on "a secret expedition," Sept. -Oct., 1777. 
John Woodman Higginson 

NATHANIEL FISK: Bom, March, 1741, at Wenham; died, 1813, at Tops- 
field. Private, Capt. Joseph Gould's Company of Minute-men, Col. John 
Baker's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm. 
Marshall Putnam Thompson 

FRANCIS FLETCHER: Bora, 1733, at Concord; died in 1797. On a list of 
men who marched from New Ipswich, N. H., in response to the Lexington 
alarm of April 19, 1775; also, on a pay roll of Col. Enoch Hale's Regiment, 
which marched to Ticonderoga, Oct. 28, 1776. 
James Reuben Stickney 

HENRY FLETCHER: Born in England in 1720; died in Accomack Co., Va., 
1799. High Sheriff of Accomack County, Va., under appointment of Patrick 
Henry, 1779; Magistrate and Justice of Oyer and Terminer in 1777; Vestry- 
man and Warden of Accomack Parish in 1772. 
Fred William Hopkins 

JAMES FLETCHER: Born, Sept. 3, 1743, at Westford; died, Sept. 19, 1806, 
at Boxford. Sergeant, Capt. Underwood's Company, Col. William Prescott's 
Regiment of Minute-men, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 
1775; service, 19 days. 
Harry Gay Fletcher 

TIMOTHY FLETCHER: Bom, Sept. 30, 1707, at Westford; died. May 8, 
1780. Lieutenant. Member of the Committee of Correspondence for 
Westford; also, of a Committee to hire soldiers. 
Harry Gay Fletcher. 

BENJAMIN FOBES, Jr.: Born, Jan. 12, 1735, at Easton; died, Jan. 30, 1797, 
at Easton. Private, Capt. Randall's Company, Col. George Williams' 
Regiment; served on a Rhode Island alarm, Dec. 7, 1776-Jan. 1, 1777. 
WiLLARD Henry Fobes 

WILLIAM FLAGG: Bom, July 12, 1739, at Watertown; died after 1784 at 
Ashby. Corporal, Capt. Stone's Company of Minute-men, Col. William 



|[iecottiis^ of Heboiutionarp ^nce^tot^ 119 

Prescott's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm; service, 14 
days; also, on a list of men drafted Aug. 19, 1777, to serve for 3 months. 
Charles Frederic Smith 

JOHN FOWLE: Born, Nov. 10, 1755, at Woburn; died, Dec. 9, 1834 at 
Woburn. Seaman on the privateer Warren; enlisted, Jan., 1776, served 2 
months; also. Artisan, Captains Emerson's and Thayer's Companies, Col. 
Baldwin's (Continental) Regiment; served 6 months in 1777; also, Private, 
Capt. Wyman's Company, Col. Gerrish's Regiment of Guards; served, 
Feb.-April, 1778. Pensioned. 
Everett Townsend 

JOSIAH FOWLE: Born, July 14, 1731, at Woburn; died, Feb. 8, 1805, at 
Woburn. Private, Capt. Jonathan Fox's (East) Company of Woburn, which 
took an active part in the battle of Lexington, April 19, 1775, and served 
30 days thereafter; also. Private, Capt. Brown's Company, Col. Josiah 
Whitney's Regiment; June- Aug., 1776; camp at Hull. 
Everett Townsend 

DAVID FOX: Born in 1741 at Dracut; died in 1832 at Dracut. Private, Capt. 
Russell's Company, Col. Green's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington 
alarm, April 19, 1775; also, Capt. Vamum's Company of Volunteers, Col. 
Reed's Regiment, which reinforced the Northern Army, Oct.-Nov., 1777; 
also, same company of the train band. Col. Simeon Spaulding's Regiment, 
1777; also, hired a substitute to serve in the Continental Army for 8 months 
in 1778. 
Russell Metcalf Fox 

EDWARD FOX: Bom, Aug. 8, 1756, at Nottingham, N. H.; died. May 17, 
1839, at Meredith, N. H. Private, Capt. Oilman's Company, Col. Enoch 
Poor's Regiment, May- Aug., 1775; also, Capt. Benjamin Butler's Company 
on Great Island, Nov. 5, 1775; also. Sergeant, Capt. Sanborn's Company, 
Col. Evans' Regiment, which marched from New Hampshire, Sept., 1777, 
and reinforced the Continental Army at Saratoga; also, Capt. Parsons' 
Company, Col. Nichols' Regiment of Volunteers, which served at Rhode 
Island, Aug. 5, 1778. 
William Long Fox 

BENJAMIN FRENCH: Born, Feb. 18, 1744, at Billerica; died, Feb. 20, 1806, 
at MUford, N. H. Sergeant, Capt. Stephen Russell's Company, Col. Green's 
Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Kirk White Marsh 

EPHRAIM FROST: Born, July 10, 1715, at Cambridge; died, March 5, 1799, 
at Cambridge. Captain of the train-band from 1771-1776; also, Private, 
Capt. WilUam Adams' Company, Col. Thatcher's Regiment, which served 
at taking possession of Dorchester Heights, March 4, 1776; also, Capt. 
John Walton's Company, at Noddle's Island, Dec. 9, 1776. Member of 
the Committee of Safety and Correspondence. 
Harry Russell Simpson 

BARNABAS FULLER: Born, Sept. 25, 1723, at Plympton; died, March 24, 
1814, at Hebron, Me. Private, Capt. Turner's Company, Col. Marshall's 



120 ^on^ of tt)e American ^ebolutton 

Regiment, June-Dec, 1776, at Hull; also, enlisted in the Continental Army, 
Jan., 1777, for 3 years; joined Capt. C. Marshall's Company, Col. Thomas 
Marshall's Regiment; served at Bennington and West Point; transferred 
to Capt. Wales' Company of same regiment; also, reenlisted for 6 months, 
July 19, 1780- Jan. 31, 1781. 
Parker Thurston Fuller 

NATHANIEL FULLER: Born, March 12, 1726-7, at Lynn; died, May 22 
1799, at Lynn. Private, Capt. Nathaniel Lindsay's Company, raised in 
Marblehead to reinforce the Continental Army; service, Dec. 10, 1776- 
March 18, 1777. i 

Jerome Ingalls 

DANIEL FULLINGTON: Born, 1743, at Epping, N. H. Private, Capt. 
Norris' Company, Col. Poor's Regiment, at the Siege of Boston, June 15, 
1775; also, Oct. 10, 1775. 
James Reuben Stickney 

THADDEUS GAGE: Born, April 17, 1754, at Bradford; died, May 11, 1845, 
at Sanbornton, N. H. Private, Capt. Nathaniel Gage's Compan}'- of Minute- 
men, Col. Frye's Regiment, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
in camp at Cambridge, May 17, 1775, and served during the Siege of Boston. 
Carl Custer Gale 

DANIEL GALLUSHA: Born, Aug. 1, 1740, at Norton; died, Dec. 9, 1825, at 
Lynn. Lieutenant, Capt. Lindsey's Company, Col. Samuel Gerrish's Regi- 
ment, July 21, 1775; also. Captain, Col. Woodbridge's (25th) Regiment; 
engaged. May 12, 1775; served during the Siege of Boston. 
Albert Shirley Black 
Lawrence Everett Brown 

PEREZ GARDNER: Bom, March 26, 1762, at Hingham; died, Jan. 31, 1841, 
at Hingham. Private, Capt. Wilder's Company, Col. Thayer's Regiment; 
service in Rhode Island, July-Oct., 1780; also, enlisted in the Continental 
Army for 3 years from March, 1781; also, Capt. Hitchcock's Company, 
Col. Vose's Regiment at West Point, York Huts, and on the General's barge. 
Fred Gardner Smith 

SAMUEL GAYLORD (GAILORD): Of Hadley; bom, 1743; died, 1816. 
Sergeant, Capt. Eliakim Smith's Company, which marched on the Lexington 
alarm, and served 15 days. 
Frank Herbert Smith 

AMOS GEORGE (GORGE): Bora, May 31, 1754, at Haverhill; died, Dec. 23, 
1827, at Haverhill. Corporal, Capt. Nathaniel Gage's Company, Col. 
Gerrish's Regiment of Guards; service, Dec, 1777-Feb., 1778, at Winter 
Hill, and guarding Burgoyne's captured troops. 
Laurence George Atherton 

SAMUEL RUSSELL GERRY: Bom, July 27, 1750, at Marblehead; died, 
Feb. 1, 1807, at Marblehead. Commissary of the forces stationed at Marble- 
head, Feb. 3, 1776; Second Lieutenant, Capt. Fettyplace's Company of 



^ettith^ of ilebolutionarp ^ncei^tora 121 

matrosses at Marblehead for defence of seacoast, Feb., 1776- Jan., 1777, and 
was continuously in service as Commissary until Aug., 1780. 
William Gerry Keene 

ASAHEL GILBERT: Bom, Dec. 15, 1760, at Hebron, Conn.; died, Nov. 23, 
1852, at Galesburg, 111. Trumpeter, Capt. Seymour's Company, Col. 
Sheldon's 2d Troop Light Dragoons; enlisted, May 1, 1778; served two 
years and was honorably discharged; service on east side of Hudson river, 
Westchester front, and formed a part of Gen. Charles Scott's Light Horse 
Regiment. Pensioned. 
William Marshall Gilbert 

RICHARD GOODMAN: Bom, April 10, 1748, at West Hartford, Conn.; 
died, April 8, 1834, at West Hartford, Conn. Private, First Lieut. Charles 
Seymour's Company, Col. Belden's Regiment, General Wolcott's Brigade, 
Connecticut Militia; served, March- June, 1777, at Peekskill. 
Frank Selden Loomis 

JONATHAN GOODWIN: Bom, 1740; died, Oct 28, 1811, at Newbury, Vt. 
Private, Capt. Bayley's Company, Col. Marsh's Regiment, April, 1777- 
May, 1779; also, Capt. Stevens' Company, May, 1779-May, 1781; also, 
Capt. F. Bayley's Company, May, 1781, to close of the war; served guarding 
and scouting. 
Kendall Ainsworth Sanderson 

OLIVER GRANT: Bom, July 18, 1729, at Stonington, Conn.: died. May 22, 
1798. Private, Tenth Company, Col. Samuel Parson's (Eighth) Regi- 
ment, 1775; also. Captain, Fourth Battalion under Generals Spencer and 
Wooster in Rhode Island and Connecticut, 1776-1777. Pensioned. 
Charles Edward Williams 

SAMUEL (HARRIS) GREEN: Baptized, March 24, 1745, at Marblehead, 
Master, Privateer Polly, commanded by Capt. Leech, Sept. 10, 1776; also, 
Master, schooner Franklin, Jan.-June, 1777; also. Master, ship Plearne, 
June-Sept., 1777; taken prisoner, Sept. 17, 1777, and exchanged for Capt. 
Workman, Feb. 23, 1778. 
Arthur Wardwell Green 

ASA GROSVENOR: Born, April 16, 1745, at Pomfret, Conn.; died, Sept. 28, 
1834, at Reading. Private, Capt. Zebulon Ingalls' Company, which marched 
from Pomfret, Conn., in response to the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; 
also. Sergeant, Capt. Clark's Company, Eleventh Regiment, Connecticut 
Militia, which served in New York in 1776. 
Kirk White Marsh 

NEHEMIAH GROVER: Born about 1731, at Gloucester; died about 1804 at 
Gloucester. Private, Capt. Joseph Whipple's Company; raised for seacoas, 
defence in Essex County; stationed at Marblehead and Gloucester; service, 
July-Dec, 1775. 
Henry A. Tarr 
Arthur Myron Tarr 



122 J>on^ of tl)c ^mencan Iflebolutton 

LEVI GUNN: Bom, April 29, 1757, at Montague; died, June 2, 1795, at 
Montague. Private, Capt. Slarrow's Company, Col. David Leonard's Regi- 
ment; service at Ticonderoga, Feb. -April, 1777; also. Captain Chapin's 
Company, Col. Jacob Gerrish's Regiment of Guards, July-Dec, 1778. 
BowDOiN Strong Parker 

JOHN HADLEY: Born, Sept. 28, 1719, at Groton; died, at (probably) West- 
ord. Private, Capt. Wright's Company, Col. Brooks' Regiment; served 
in the Campaign of 1776. In the White Plains battle, Oct. 28, 1776. 
Walter Levi Spaulding 

JONAS HADLEY: Born, May 26, 1756, at Westford; died, Jan. 9, 1807, at 
Groton. Private, Capt. Minot's Company, Col. Dike's Regiment, which 
served at Dorchester Heights; warrant allowed, Nov. 30, 1776; also, Capt. 
Lawrence's Company, Col. Reed's Regiment of Volunteers, which marched 
to assist the army under Gen. Gates, Sept. 26-Nov. 9, 1777. 
Walter Levi Spaulding 

MOSES HADLEY: Born, Nov. 14, 1750, atAmesbury; died, Sept. 9, 1829, at Hud- 
son, N. H. Private, Capt. James Ford's Company of New Hampshire militia, 
which marched from Nottingham West on Ticonderoga alarms in June and 
July, 1777; signer of the "Association Test," Nottingham West in 1776. 
Fred Jotham Hutchinson 

HIEL (or JEHIEL) HALL: Bom, May 6, 1735, at Wallingford, Conn.; died, 
Sept. 7, 1807, at WaUingford, Conn. Lieutenant, Major WilHam Hart's 
First Regiment of Light Horse, May, 1776; Quartermaster, Third Troop, 
First Regiment, Light Horse, of Connecticut. 
Walter Atwood Hall 

SAMUEL HAM: Bom, Oct. 3, 1738, at Portsmouth, N. H.; died at Shapleigh, 
Me., in 1830. Private, Capt. John Drew's Company, raised for Canada; 
mustered, July 27, 1776; also. Private, Capt. Daniel Jewell's Company, 
Col. Bartlet's Regiment of Militia, which served at West Point, N. Y., in 
1780. 
Guy Andrews Ham 

NAPTHBOLI HARMON: Bom, Nov. 18, 1722, at York, Me.; died at Sanford, 
Me. Member of the Committee of Safety for Sanford, Me., 1777-1778. 
Arthur Clark Harrington 

ENOCH HAMMOND: Bom, Oct. 29, 1734, at Newton; died, July 29, 1823, 
at Petersham. Private, Capt. Amariah Fuller's Company, which marched 
on the Lexington alarm ; also, belonged on the Alarm List. 
Kendall Ainsworth Sanderson 

DANIEL HAND: Born, Aug. 12, 1744, at East Hampton, Long Island, N. Y.; 
died in 1841 at Richmond. Private, Capt. Rowley's Company, Col. Simond's 
(Berkshire County) Regiment of militia; served at Saratoga, April-May, 
1777; also, same company, Col. John Brown's Regiment of militia, Sept., 
1777; also, Capt. Crocker's Company, same regiment, Aug., 1777; served 
at Bennington; also, Capt. Bacon's Company, Col. Rossiter's Regiment 



Hecorti^ of ^flcbolutionarp 3lncejBftor0 123 

in Nov., 1780, and also, in Oct., 1781; served at Stillwater, Albany, and 

Ticonderoga. 

William Scott Lyon 

THADDEUS HARRINGTON: Born, Sept. 9, 1736, at Lexington. Private, 
Capt. John Parker's Company of Lexington Minute-men; present at the 
battle, April 19, 1775; also. Private, Capt. John Bridge's Company, Col. 
Eleazer Brooks' Regiment; also, Adjutant, Third Middlesex County Regi- 
ment of militia, April 27, 1776. 
Alfred Pierce 

REUBEN HARRIS: Born, 1740; died, Dec. 27, 1829, at Lisbon, Conn. "He 
served at Valley Forge during the winter of 1777-8, and his sufferings while 
there caused the loss of sight of both his eyes." 
RoswELL Parish, Jr. 

EBENEZER HART: Bom, Nov. 15, 1762, at Lynn; died, March 26, 1840, at 
Lynnfield. Private, Capt. Winship's Company, Col. Rufus Putnam's 
(Continental) Regiment; also. Corporal; enlisted, Feb. 15, 1777, and served 
for three years, or during the war. 
Rutherford Endicott Smith 

WILLIAM HASKINS: Bom, April 16, 1740, at New Salem; died, July 11, 
1781. Private, Capt. Gray's Company, Col. Brewer's Regiment, May 1, 
1775; also, Matross, Capt. Badlam's Company, Col. Gridley's (artUlery) 
Regiment, June 6, 1775; also. Private, Capt. D. Cowden's Company, Col. 
Woodbridge's Regiment, July 12, 1775; served during the Siege of Boston; 
enlisted in the Continental Army, Jan. 17, 1777, for 3 years; joined Capt. 
Daniel Shays' Company, Col. Rufus Putnam's (5th) Regiment. 
Caryl Davis Haskins 

BENJAMIN HASTINGS: Of Watertown (1760-1801). Private, Capt. Walton's 
Company; served in a detachment at Noddle's Island in Dec, 1776; also, 
in a detachment from Capt. Steams' Company, Col. Thatcher's Regiment; 
served, guarding stores at Watertown, Jan.-Feb., 1779. 
Wilmot Reed Hastings 

SIMON HASTINGS: Born, March 28, 1735, at Watertown; died, Aug. 15, 
1785, at Boston. Private, Capt. Samuel Barnard's Company, Col. Thomas 
Gardner's Regiment, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; also, 
receipted for a bounty to serve in the army dated Watertown, July 17, 1776. 
Wilmot Reed Hastings 

BENJAMIN HAWKINS: Born, May 8, 1759, at Gloucester, R. I.; died, 
Jan. 10, 1836, at Gloucester, R. I. Private, Dec. 4, 1776, on the alarm at 
Newport, R. I.; also, Captains Whipple's and Winsor's Companies, Col. 
Chad. Brown's Regiment, Jan.- June, 1777; also. Captains Whipple's and 
Tourtelott's Companies, Col. Crary's Regiment, July, 1777- June, 1778; 
Capt. Collins' Company, Col. Brown's Regiment, April, 1780; Capt. Wil- 
marth's (independent) Company, July, 1780. Pensioned. 
William Henry Hawkins 



124 ^on^ of tfje American lUeboiution 

AARON HAWLEY: Bom, 1739, at Bridgeport, Conn.; died, July 21, 1803, at 
Bridgeport, Conn. Brigade Major to Gen. SiUiman, Connecticut Militia, 
1781. 
Augustus Barry Seeley 

WILLIAM HAY (or HAYS): Bom, 1743, at Prince Edward City, Va.; died, 

1797, in Butler Co., Ky. Private, Capt. Cunningham's Company, Col. 
Parker's (1st Virginia) Regiment.; enlisted, Feb. 17, 1778, for 1 year; 
transferred to Lieut.-Col. Ball's Company, same regiment, about Oct., 1778. 
Pensioned. 

Emmett Hay Naylor 

CHARLES H. HAYWOOD: Bom, Dec. 24, 1723, at Concord; died, April 16, 
1806, at Brattleboro, Vt. Private, Major Paul Raymond's Company (First 
Worcester County) Regiment, which marched to Cambridge on the Lex- 
ington alarm, April 19, 1775; service, 3H days. 
Walter Levi Spaulding 

DAVID HAYWOOD: Bom, May 4, 1755, at Holden; died, Nov. 2, 1824, at 
Weathersfield, Vt. Private, Capt. C. Marshall's Company, Col. Thomas 
Marshall's (Continental) Regiment; enlisted, June 7, 1778, for 9 months. 
Walter Levi Spaulding 

JOHN HIBBARD: Bom, Sept. 17, 1744, at Dudley; died in March, 1831, at 
Rowe. Private, Capt. Hamilton's Co., Col. Brewer's Regiment; served 
during the campaign at Fort Edward. Pay abstract dated Brookfiield, 
Feb. 17, 1777. 
Charles Ballard Zimmerman 

ELIJAH HILDRETH: Bom, Feb. 21, 1751, at Westford; died, March 17, 

1798, at Westford. Private, Capt. Jonathan Minot's Company, Col. James 
Prescott's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; 
service, 6 days; also, Drummer, same company, Col. Baldwin's Regiment, 
Jan. 12, 1776. 

Harry Gay Fletcher 

CALEB HILL: Born, Nov. 27, 1760, at Swansea; died, March 20, 1826, at 
Swansea. Captain, Second Company, First Bristol County Regiment of 
militia, March 27, 1776. 
Albert Clark Mason 

BENJAMIN HINCKLEY: Bom, 1743, at Plymouth; died. May 24, 1824. 
First Lieutenant, Capt. Higgins' Company, Second Bamstable County 
Regiment of militia, April 20, 1776; also. Private, Capt. Hamlen's Company, 
Lieut-Col. Hallet's Regiment, Aug. 12, 1780; company detached to reinforce 
Continental Army at Rhode Island for 3 months. 
Herbert Carleton Poore 

LUKE HITCHCOCK: Born, Feb. 22, 1723, at Springfield; died, Aug. 9, 1777, 
at New Lebanon, N. Y. Private, Capt. Cooley's Company, Col. Mosley's 
Regiment; enlisted, July 9, 1777, and marched to reinforce the Northem 
Army opposing Burgoyne; died on his way home. Member of the General 



Hccorti^ of flebolutionarp 'M.ntt^tot^ 125 

Court from the town of Granville, 1775, where he was a leading and useful 
man and Deacon in the church. 
N. Seelye Hitchcock 

DANIEL HOAR: Bom in 1713 at Concord. Private, Capt. Nicholas Dike's 
Company, which marched from Westminster to Cambridge on the Lexington 
alarm and served 43^ days. 
William Richardson Adams 

STEPHEN HOAR: Bom, Jan. 15, 1758, at Westminster; died, Oct. 28, 1810, 
at Westminster. Corporal, Capt. Elisha Jackson's Company, which served 
under command of Major Ebenezer Bridge on the Bennington alarm in 
Aug., 1777. 
William Richardson Adams 

MOSES HODSDON, Jr. : Bom at Berwick, Me., July 26, 1740; died at Berwick, 
Me., Dec. 20, 1810. Private in the Berwick Company of Minute-men in 
1775. 
Sylvanus Boyd Clark 

BARTLETT HOLMES: Bom, 1744, at Plymouth. Private, Capt. Jesse 
Harlow's Company of Minute-men, which marched to Marshfield on the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 7 days; also. Second Lieutenant, Capt. 
Bartlett's Company, Col. Bradford's (10th Plymouth County) Regiment of 
militia, June 6, 1776; also, Ensign, Capt. Stetson's Company, Col. Dike's 
Regiment, Sept., 1776-March, 1777, at Dorchester Heights; also, Capt. 
Goodwin's Company, Col. Cotton's Regiment; Sept.-Oct., 1777, on a 
secret e.xpedition to Newport, R. I.; also. Master of schooner Hannah, 
Dec. 26, 1777-May 18, 1778. 
William Henry Harrison Prior 
William Brisbane Rand 
Waldron Holmes Rand, Jr. 

THOMAS HOOPER: Born, July 31, 1737, at Bridgewater; died at Saratoga 
in 1777. Enlisted in the Continental Army from Capt. David Kingman's 
Company for 3 years; joined Capt. Thomas Turner's Company, Col. Brad- 
ford's Regiment; also. Corporal, same company and regiment. On pay 
rolls, Sept. 4-Nov. 30, 1777. Died of wounds received in battle at Sara- 
toga. 
Josiah Hathaway 

JOHN HOOTON: Bom, Sept. 4, 1754, at Boston; died, Sept. 14, 1844, at 
Boston. Sergeant, Capt. Elias Parkman's Company, Col. Joseph Webb's 
Regiment; served, April, 1777, until August, 1778, on garrison duty at 
Boston. An active patriot early in the war; he took part in the destruction 
of the tea in Boston harbor. 
Charles Brooks Appleton 

SAMUEL HOWARD: Bom, 1731, at Chehnsford; died, 1816, at Chelmsford. 
Private, Capt. Pollard's (Billerica) Company of militia, Col. Green's Regi- 
ment, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; in camp at 
Cambridge, May 1, 1775; also, Capt. Randall's Company, Col. Marshall's 



126 ^on^ of t^t American ^etooiutton 

Regiment; reinforced the Continental Army for 3 months, Aug. 1, 1776. 
James Charles Peabody 

ELIJAH HOWE: Bom, Dec. 17, 1731, at Southbridge; died, Feb. 2, 1808, at 
Spencer. Private, Capt. Thomas Newhall's Company of militia, which 
marched to Cambridge on the Lexington alarm; also, Capt. White's Com- 
pany, Col. Samuel Denny's Regiment, which marched on the alarm "at the 
Northward," Aug. 21, 1777. 
John Winn 

SAMUEL HOWE, of Belchertown. Lieutenant- Colonel, Col. Porter's (Hamp- 
shire County) Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm; also, Col- 
onel, 4th Hampshire County Regiment of militia, Feb. 8, 1776. 
Samuel Allen Johnson 

CALEB HUBBARD: Born, April 23, 1754, at Sunderland; died, April 7, 1850, 
at Sunderland. Private, Capt. Leonard's Company, Col. Woodbridge's 
Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm from Sunderland; also, 
same company and regiment; service during the Siege of Boston, 8 months; 
receipt dated Cambridge, Dec. 25, 1775; also, Capt. Wells' Company, Col. 
Brewer's Regiment; served at Ticonderoga 3 months from Sept. 1, 1776; 
also. Sergeant, Capt. Slarrow's Company, Col. Wells' Regiment, Sept.- 
Oct., 1777; served at the Northward. 
Albert Bowman Sanderson 

DAVID HUBBARD: Born, Sept. 2, 1758, at Glastonbury, Conn. Private, 
Capt. Welles' Company, Second Battalion, Col. Gay, in 1776; Corporal, 
Capt. Hale's Company, Col. Walcott's Regiment; served Jan.-March, 1776, 
at Jamaica Plain until the British evacuated Boston; also, served with a 
detachment from Gen. Walcott's Regiment at Saratoga previous to Bur- 
goyne's surrender in 1777; also. Private, Second Company, Third Conn. 
Regiment of foot in "Short Levies" of 1782. Pensioned. 
William Marshall Gilbert 

THOMAS KILBY HUDSON: Born, April 9, 1756, at Lynn; died, Aug. 18, 
1814, at Lynn. Private, Capt. Joseph Hiller's Company, Col. Titcomb's 
Regiment; service at Rhode Island, June- Aug., 1777. 
Everett Hudson Black 
Albert Shirley Black 
Lawrence Everett Brown 

EBENEZER HUMPHREY: Born, June 22, 1741, at Oxford; died, June 20, 
1836, at Oxford. First Lieutenant, Capt. Kingsbury's Company, Fifth 
Worcester County Regiment of militia, April 4, 1776; also. Lieutenant, 
Capt. Lamb's Company, Col. James Converse's Regiment, Aug. 1, 1776; 
also, same company. Col. Cushing's Regiment in 1777; also. Captain, Col. 
Jacob Davis' Regiment, which served at Rhode Island, July 30, 1780. 
Pensioned. 
Jerry Moffitt 

JONATHAN HUMPHREY: Born, July 29, 1764, at North Cohasset; died, 
Aug. 2, 1836, at North Cohasset. Private, Capt. John Lincoln's Company, 



iFlecocb^ of Jflebolutionarp Slnce^tor^ 127 

Col. Joseph Webb's Regiment; reinforced Continental Army, Aug. 21- 

Nov. 29, 1781. 

Charles Gordon Cutter 

JOHN HUSE: Born, Oct. 7, 1746, at Newbury. Private, Capt. Robert Dodge's 
Company, Col. Ebenezer Francis' Regiment, Nov. 29, 1776; also, Capt. 
Titcomb's Company, Col. Gerrish's Regiment of guards; served, Nov., 
1777-April, 1778, at Charlestown, and at Cambridge, guarding Burgoyne's 
captured troops; also, Capt. Richard Titcomb's Company, Col. Wade's 
Regiment, which reinforced the Continental Army for 3 months from July, 
1780. 
Laurence George Atherton 

PHINEAS HUTCHINS: Born, 1739; died, Feb. 18, 1785, at Walpole, N. H. 
Served as Ensign of the Second Lunenburg Company organized, Oct. 25, 
1774, and as Lieutenant in 1776. Removing to Fitzwilliam, N. H., he was a 
Private in Capt. John Mellin's Company, which marched from that town 
to reinforce the garrison at Ticonderoga on the alarms in June and July, 
1777. 
John William Barber 

JACOB INGALLS, Sr.: Born about 1715 at Lynn; died about 1791 at Lynn. 
Private, Capt. William Farrington's Company of militia, which marched 
on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Charles Irving Burrows 
GusTAVus Everett Alley 

SAMUEL INGALLS: Born, April 20, 1723, at Rehoboth; died after 1784 at 
Rehoboth. Private, Capt. Martin's Company, Col. Williams' Regiment, 
which served at Tiverton, R. I., Sept. 29-Oct. 16, 1777. 
Albert Clark Mason 

SAMUEL JAQUES: Born, Nov. 20, 1728, at Newbury; died, June 4, 1824, at 
West Newbury. Private, Capt. Adams' Company, Col. Titcomb's Regi- 
ment; served at Rhode Island, June 29, 1777, 2 months; also, Capt. Noyes' 
Company, Col. Johnson's Regiment; served with the Northern Army, 
Aug. 14-Nov. 30, 1777; also, Capt. Huse's Company, Col. Gerrish's Regi- 
ment; service, April- July, 1778, at Cambridge and Winter Hill; also, Capt. 
Evans' Company, Col. Wade's Regiment; served at Rhode Island, 1778. 
Rupert Ward Jaques. 

JAMES JOHNSON: Born at Sandown, N. H.; died, May 5, 1833, at Salisbury, 
N. H. Among men from Salisbury who were paid £6 bounty to serve in the 
Continental Army for 3 years, June, 1778; also. Private, Capt. Webster's 
Company, Col. Stickney's Regiment; served on a Ticonderoga alarm, 
July, 1777; also, joined the Northern Army at Bennington and Stillwater; 
also, same company. Col. Nichols' Regiment at Rhode Island in Aug., 1778; 
also, Corporal, Capt. Runnel's Company, Col. Mooney's Regiment; service, 
6 months at Rhode Island, July 5, 1779. 
Moses E. Johnson 



128 J^oniBf of t^c 2lmencan jflebolution 

JOSEPH JOHNSON: Born, Feb. 2, 1756, at Lynn; died, Jan. 17, 1826, at 
Lynn. Seaman, brigantine Ann, Capt. Amos Mansfield; engaged, Dec. 19, 
1776; discharged, April 14, 1777. 
Charles Irving Burrows 
GusTAVus Everett Alley 

PHARAOH JOHNSON: Born, Sept. 16, 1756, at Lynn. Seaman, brigantine 
Ann; receipt for wages dated Dec. 20, 1776. 
George Herschel Breed 
Melville Breed 

BENJAMIN JONES: Of Somersworth, N. H. Sergeant, Capt. James Libbey's 
Company, Col. Stephen Evans' Regiment, which joined the Northern Army 
at Saratoga, Sept. 8-Dec. 15, 1777. 
Arthur Clark Harrington 

RICHARD KEATING (or KATING): Born in 1751 at Kittery, Me.; died, 
April 22, 1839, at South Thomaston, Me. Private, Capt. Ulmer's Company, 
Col. McCobb's Regiment; served in the Penobscot expedition, July 8- 
Sept. 24, 1779. 
George Holland Kirkpatrick 

ELISHA KEELER: Born about 1736 in Connecticut; died about 1814 at 
Wyalusing, Pa. Private, Capt. Elijah Chapman's (5th) Company, Second 
Connecticut Regiment, Col. Heman Swift; served, March 13, 1782-March 4, 
1783. 
Ira Dayton McCoy, Jr. 

ELIJAH KELLOGG: Born, Aug. 14, 1761, at South Hadley; died at 
Harpswell, Me., 1843. Drummer, Capt. Leonard's Co., Col. Woodbridge's 
Regiment; enlisted, April 28, 1775; also, Capt. Lyman's Company, Col. 
Dike's Regiment, Nov. 27, 1776; stationed at Dorchester; also, promoted 
to Drum Major; enlisted in the Continental Army, Jan. 1, 1777, for 3 years, 
Capt. Smith's Company, Col. Marshall's Regiment; also, Capt. King's 
Company, same regiment; transferred to the Colonel's Company, April 1, 
1779. At the expiration of his time he entered Dartmouth College and 
became a minister. Pensioned. 
Joseph James Bedlow 

JONATHAN KENDALL: Born, Jan. 29, 1743, at Hopkinton; died, July 8, 
1817, at Athol. Private, Capt. Allen's Company, Col. Doolittle's Regiment 
of Minute-men, which marched on the Lexington alarm; also, Capt. Wilde's 
Company, same regiment; served during the Siege of Boston; also, Capt. 
Mellin's Company, which marched from Fitzwilliam, N. H., on a Ticonderoga 
alarm, July 3, 1777. A powder horn and ball he brought from Ticonderoga 
now owned by his great'-grandson. 
Kendall Ainsworth Sanderson 

ABEL KIMBALL: Born, Feb. 10, 1731, at Bradford; died, June 4, 1790, at 
Bradford. Sergeant in command of a company which marched from Brad- 
ford on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also. Lieutenant of a detach- 
ment which marched Nov. 30, 1775, to Gloucester to prevent the enemy 
from retaking a brig laden with warlike stores; also, Lieutenant, Capt. 



HecorDjef of Jfletjolutionarp ^nce^^torjef 129 

Foster's Company, Col. Huntington's Regiment, which reinforced the Con- 
tinental Army, Feb. 3, 1776. 
Fred Nelson Kimball 

AARON KIMBALL: Bom, Feb. 18, 1729-30, at Norwich, Conn. ; died, Nov. 20, 
1807, at Grafton. Captain, Col. Artemas Ward's Regiment of militia, which 
marched from Grafton on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; served until 
May 15, 1775; also. Captain, First (Grafton) Company, Sixth Worcester 
County Regiment of militia, April, 1776: also. Captain of a company en- 
listed from Worcester County brigade, commanded by Col. Nathan Spar- 
hawk, which served in New York, under Gen. George Clinton, and in New 
Jersey, Jan., 1777, 3 months. 
Richard Davenport Kimball 

EPHRAIM KIMBALL: Born, Feb. 15, 1732, at Fitchburg; died. May, 1823, 
at Fitchburg. Private, Capt. William Thurlo's Company, which marched 
under command of Major Ebenezer Bridge, on the Bennington alarm, 
Aug. 22, 1777. 
Marshall Putnam Thompson 

JONATHAN KIMBALL: Born, July 23, 1761, at Milford; died, July 31, 1823, 
at Mendon. Private, Capt. Nelson's Company, Col. Ezra Wood's Regiment; 
enlisted in the Continental Army for 9 months, June 2, 1778. 
BowDOiN Strong Parker 

PHILIP KNAPP: Bom, May 12, 1755, at Raynham; died, March 16, 1842, 
at Raynham. Private, Feb. 1, 1776, 2 months' service in Capt. Hall's Com- 
pany, Col. French's Regiment; Aug. 1, 1776, in Capt. Wilbur's Company, 
Col. Francis' Regiment, 4 months; April, 1777, in Capt. Wilbur's Company, 
Col. Hathaway 's Regiment, 2J^ months; Aug., 1777, in Capt. E. Dean's 
Company, Col. Carpenter's Regiment, 1 month; Jan., 1778, in Capt. Fales' 
Company, Col. Dagget's Regiment, 3 months; May, 1779, in Capt. Haskins' 
Company, IJ^ months; Sept., 1781, in Capt. Drake's Company, Col. 
Drury's Regiment, 3 months; also, in Capt. Shaw's Company, Col. Leon- 
ard's Regiment, 2 weeks on guard duty at New Bedford, Aug., 1780. Pen- 
sioned. 
William Nelson McLane 

STEPHEN KNIGHT: Bom, 1762, at Fryeburg, Me.; died, April 12, 1832; 
buried at East Salisbury. Private, Capt. George Smith's Company, Col. 
Vose's (Continental) Regiment; enlisted, Aug. 1, 1777, service 3 years; 
muster roll for Dec, 1777, sworn to in camp near Valley Forge. 
Robert Bell 

THOMAS KNOWLTON: Born, Nov. 22, 1740, at Boxford; died, Sept. 16, 
1776, at Harlem Plains, N. Y. Captain of a company which marched from 
Ashford, Conn., on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; Captain, Fifth 
Company, Gen. Israel Putnam's Regiment; commissioned. May 1, 1775; 
at the battle of Bunker Hill he served with distinction, and inflicted heavy 
loss upon the enemy; Major and Lieutenant-Colonel, Twentieth Connecti- 
cut Infantry, Jan. 1, 1776; killed at Harlem Plains, N. Y, 
Robert Ellery Edwards 



130 ^oniei of t{)e 9lmertcan ^ebolutton 

THOMAS KNOWLTON: Born, Jan. 28, 1760, at Wenham; died, Oct. 10, 
1827, at Northport, Me. Private, Capt. Richard Dodge's Company, Col. 
Baldwin's (26th) Regiment; served in the Campaign of 1776; also, same com- 
pany. Col. Gerrish's Regiment; served, guarding Burgoyne's army, Nov., 
1777- July, 1778, at Charlestown and Cambridge; also, served in the Con- 
tinental Army during 1780, 6 months. 
Leslie Doane Knowlton 

HENRY LAMBERT: Born in 1740 at Cohasset; died, March 14, 1826, at 
Cohasset. Private, Captains Cushing and Beal's Companies, Col. Lovell's 
Regiment; Dec, 1776-March, 1777; service at Danbury, Conn., and at 
Hull; also, Capt. Wild's Company, Col. Brooks' Regiment at Cambridge, 
Nov., 1777-April, 1778, guarding Burgoyne's captured troops; also, Capt. 
Lincoln's Company, Col. Joseph Webb's Regiment; served, Aug.-Nov., 1781. 
Francis Leavitt Beal 

SAMUEL LAWRENCE: Born, May 2, 1714, at Groton; died, July 26, 1799, 
at Ashby. Private, Lieut. Aquilla Jewett's Company of militia. Col. James 
Prescott's Regiment, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 
6 days. 
Walter Levi Spaulding 

ASAPH LELAND: Born in 1730 at HoUiston; died in 1812 at Holliston. 
Private, Capt. Ezra Eames' Company, Col. Abner Perry's Regiment, 
July 28-Aug. 7, 1780; company marched to Rhode Island on an alarm. 
Herbert Messinger Leland 

ISAIAH LINDLEY: Bom about 1723 at Rehoboth. Private, Capt. Martin's 
Company, Col. Williams' Regiment, which served at Rhode Island, Sept. 29- 
Oct. 30, 1777. 
Albert Clark Mason 

JAMES LITCHFIELD: Born, Feb. 10, 1738, at Scituate; died, Oct. 10, 1786, 
at Scituate. Private, Capt. Turner's Company, Col. Thomas' Regiment of 
militia, which marched on the Lexington alarm; also, Capt. Shepard's 
Company, Col. Jeduthan Baldwin's (Continental) Regiment, Artillery 
Artificers; Oct. 1, 1777-Dec. 31, 1779; also, Capt. Parker's Company, same 
regiment; engaged for the war. 
Charles Edward Litchfield 

JOSIAH LITCHFIELD: Born, Dec. 20, 1706, at Scituate; died, Aug. 1, 1787, 
at Scituate. Private, Capt. Stetson's Company, Col. Thomas' Regiment; 
served on an alarm at Dorchester Heights, March 24, 1776; also, Capt. 
Winslow's Company, Col. Josiah Whitney's Regiment, Aug. 1, 1776, 3 
months' service at Hull. 
William Elias Litchfield 

SAMUEL LITTLE: Born, Feb. 18, 1713, at Newbury; died, Sept. 29, 1792, at 
Atkins, N. H. Private, Capt. John Calfe's Company, raised out of Col. T. 
Bartlett's Regiment for recruiting the Continental Army in New York, 1776; 
also. Private, Capt. Hezekiah Hutchins' Company of New Hampshire 



fittoth^ of ]!!eboluttonarp ^ntt^tot^ 131 

volunteers, which joined the Northern Continental Army at Saratoga, 
Sept.-Nov., 1777. 
Alexander Elbridge Little 
Harwood Goodwin Little 

BENJAMIN LIVINGSTON (or LIVERSTONE): Born, April 3, 1743, at 
Billerica; died, April 22, 1837, at Peachham, Vt. Minute-man in Capt. 
Thomas Newhall's Company; marched from Leicester on the Lexington* 
alarm, April 19, 1775; joined the Continental Army, and was present at 
the battle of Bunker Hill; Corporal, Capt. Todd's Company, Col. Crafts' 
Regiment of artillery, which served during the Siege of Boston; ordered 
twice to Rhode Island and engaged the enemy at Tiverton; Lieutenant, 
Capt. Lincoln's Company, Col. Denny's 1st Worcester County Regiment 
of militia, April 15, 1777. Promoted Captain; served in the Northern 
Army at Bennington, Stillwater, Saratoga, Fort Stanwix and the surrender 
of Burgoyne. 

Clarence Bertram Livingston 
Ernest George Livingston 

NEHEMIAH LOOMIS: Bom, Nov. 8, 1739, at Westfield; died, Oct. 12, 1808, 
at Southwick. Private, Capt. Silas Fowler's Company, Col. John Moseley's 
Regiment; enlisted, Oct. 21, 1776; reinforced Northern Army for 28 days; 
also, same company, Col. David Mosely's Regiment; company probably 
mounted and stationed at Springfield and Northampton for defence of the 
Government, June 12, 1782. 
Frank Selden Loomis 

SIMON LOOMIS: Born, Aug. 24, 1760, at Lebanon, Conn.; died, Dec. 28, 
1840, at Lebanon, Conn. Private, Capt. Storr's (2d) Company, Gen. 
Putnam's (3d) Connecticut Regiment, May 17-Dec. 16, 1775; enlisted, 
Feb. 12, 1777 in Second Troop, Col. Sheldon's Dragoons; also, Capt. Dewey's 
Company, Col. Johnson's Regiment in 1778; also, Capt. Robinson's Com- 
pany, Col. Enos' Regiment, on the Hudson, 1778; also, in a detachment from 
Second Regiment, "Horse militia," 1779. Pensioned. 
Francis William Glover 

LEVI LONG: Bom, July 23, 1758, at Coventry, Conn.; died, Sept. 11, 1849, 

at Rutland, Vt. Private, Capt. Brigham's Company, Eighth Regiment 
Connecticut Line; May, 1777- Jan., 1778; also, Capt. William's Company of 
militia. Col. Ebenezer Allen's Regiment; served on alarms in Oct. and 
Nov., 1780. 
Alfred Long Seaton 

NATHAN LORD: Born, April 14, 1758, at Berwick, Me.; died, April 3, 1807, 
at Berwick, Me. Ensign and Second Lieutenant, Capt. Sullivan's Company, 
Col. Scamman's (30th) Regiment; enlisted. May 5, 1775; served at the 
Siege of Boston until Dec. 31, 1775; present at the battle of Bunker Hill; 
also. Second Lieutenant, same company, Col. John Patterson's Regiment; 
served at New York and in Canada, March-May, 1776. Taken prison at 
"the Cedars," May 19, 1776; wounded in the skirmish; after his exchange 



132 ^on^ of tJ)c 3lmertcan Hebolutton 

served on a privateer, which was captured by the British after he had had a 
fist-fight with an English midshipman, the Duke of Clarence, whose admira- 
tion for the Yankee's pluck influenced his release from prison. 
William Hale 

THOMAS LOTHROP: Bom in 1738 at Braintree; died, Sept. 4, 1813, at 
Cohasset. Major, First Plymouth County Regiment of Massachusetts 
militia; Lieutenant-Colonel, Feb. 7, 1776; resigned, Aug. 26, 1777; also, 
Major, Col. Lovell's (Second Suffolk County) Regiment, Feb. 7, 1776; 
Lieutenant-Colonel, same regiment, commanded by Col. David Cushing, 
Oct. 6, 1778. 
Francis Leavitt Beal 

JONATHAN LUFKEN: Of Haverhill. Private, Capt. Richard Ayers' (2d 
Haverhill) Company, Col. Johnson's Regiment, which marched on the 
Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Everett Hudson Black 
Albert Shirley Black 

RICHARD LUNT: Born, April 17, 1743, at Newbury; died, Oct. 27, 1796, at 
Newburyport. Seaman on brig Dalton, Nov. 15, 1776; captured by British 
ship Reasonable, Dec. 24, 1776, and taken to Plymouth, England, where the 
crew were imprisoned in the "Old Mill" prison; after his release he served 
in the Alliance of Capt. John Paul Jones' squadron, and received prize 
money from vessels captured. 
Dennie Philip Small 

SAMUEL LUTHER: Bom, Nov. 27, 1760, at Swansea; died, March 20, 1826, 
at Swansea. Private, Capt. Peck's Company, Col. Carpenter's Regiment; 
served on a Rhode Island alarm, Aug. 3, 1780; also, Capt. Barney's Com- 
pany, Col. Mitchell's Regiment; reinforced Continental Army for 3 m.onths, 
Aug. 26, 1780. 
Albert Clark Mason 

ELIAS LYMAN: Of Northampton; bom. May 16, 1710. A member of the 
Committee of Correspondence and Safety for the town of Northampton; 
appointed at a meeting held, Nov. 27, 1775. 
Sidney Avery Clark 

MOSES LYMAN: Born, March 20, 1743, at Goshen, Conn.; died, Sept. 29, 
1829, at Goshen. Sergeant, Capt. Wheeler's Company, Col. Simond's de- 
tachment at Ticonderoga, Dec, 1776-March, 1777; also. Second Lieutenant, 
Capt. Newell's Company, same regiment, served on an alarm at Man- 
chester, July 9, 1777; also. Lieutenant, Capt. Daniel Brown's Company, 
served on an alarm at Pawlet, Sept.-Oct., 1777; also, same Company, Col. 
Simonds' Regiment; commissioned, May 3, 1778; conveyed to Gen. Wash- 
ton the news of Burgoyne's surrender. 
Moses Lyman, Jr. 

BENJAMIN LYON: Born, June 30, 1732, at Walpole; died in 1797. Private, 
Capt. Wheeler's Company of Minute-men, Col. Robinson's Regiment, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm; service, 12 days; also, Capt. Penniman's 



Iflecordjer of iUcbolutionarp '^ntt^tot^ 133 

Company, Col. Biker's Regiment; enlisted, Dec. 13, 1776, to serve until 
March 1, 1777. Pensioned. He was a classmate with Paul Revere at Milton 
Academy. 
Albert W. Lyon 

BENJAMIN LYON: Bom in 1754 in Essex County, N. J. Private, Capt. 
Jacob Crane's Company, Col. Oliver Spencer's Regiment; served 3 months 
in the Fall of 1777, and also, in Col. Frelinghysen's Regiment, altogether a 
service of 11 months. In the battle at Connecticut Farms. Pensioned. 
William Scott Lyon 

JACOB LYON: Bom, Oct. 12, 1754, at Dorchester; died, Jan. 3, 1829, at 
Wellesley. Fifer, Capt. Gould's Company, Col. Sargent's Regiment; en- 
listed, May 30, 1775; served at the siege of Boston; also, reinforced the 
Continental Army; engaged for the town of Milton for six months' service, 
July-Dec, 1780; also, Capt. Robbins' Company, July-Dec, 1781. 
Albert W. Lyon 

ELIAS LYONS: Of Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Private, Capt. John 
Aderson's Company, Fourth Battalion, Second EstabHshment, New Jersey 
Continental Line, Dec. 17, 1776; wounded at the battle of the Brandywine, 
Sept. 11, 1777; transferred to Capt. Lloyd's Company, Third BattaUon, 
Feb. 1, 1779; on rolls to Dec. 31, 1779. 
Elias Ben Lyons 

WILLIAM MACKA.Y: Born, 1724, at Boston; died, Jan. 19, 1801, at Boston 
Member of the Committee of Correspondence; also, a Member of the Com- 
mittee of Donations, at Boston, Nov., 1772. 
George Henry Mackay, Jr. 
Robert Langdon Mackay 

JOSEPH MACOMBER: Bom, March 28, 1732, at Taunton; died, Jan. 25, 
1800, at Middleboro. Lieutenant, Capt. Pearce's (2d Middleborough) Com- 
pany of militia, which marched to Marshfield on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
also. Sergeant, Capt. Levi Rounsevel's Company, Col. Brewer's Regiment; 
enlisted, May 5, 1775; served during the Siege of Boston; also, Lieutenant, 
Capt. Seagrave's Company, Col. Joseph Read's (13th) Regiment, Jan. 8, 
1776. Commission signed by John Hancock, President of Continental 
Congress. 
Walter Herbert Macomber 

SAMUEL MARSH: Born, Jan. 18, 1733, at Nottingham West, N. H.; died, 
March 17, 1820, at Nottingham West, N. H. Private, Capt. Jeremiah 
Fames' Company, New Hampshire Volunteers, Oct. 1776; also, Capt. 
James Ford's Company, which marched on Ticonderoga alarms in June and 
July, 1777; also, Corporal, Capt. Elliott's Company, Col. David Hobart's 
Regiment, July 21, 1777, served 2 months; also, Lieut. Brown's Company, 
Col. Moore's Regiment at Saratoga, Sept., 1777; also, Capt. Cross' Company, 
Col. Mitchell's Regiment; served at Rhode Island in Aug., 1778. 
Kirk White Marsh 



134 Jjonjei of tlje 3lmertcan Iflebolution 

NATHAN MAXHAM: Born at Wareham or Rochester; died at Buckfield, 
Me. Private, Capt. Elisha Haskell's Company, Col. Benjamin Howe's 
Regiment; service at Rhode Island, July-Sept., 1778; company raised in 
Plymouth County. 
Maynard Maxim 

DANIEL McCOY: Bom, 1755; died, 1818. Private, Capt. George Reihm's 
Company of Berks County, Pennsylvania, militia, 1781. Regimental Com- 
mander: Lieut. -Col. Samuel Ely. 
Lycurgus McCoy 
Barton Sherman McCoy 

JOHN McCOY: Bom, June 1, 1752, in England; died, Sept. 28, 1847, at 
Bath, N. Y. As a British soldier he deserted to join the American forces 
under Washington on Long Island, N. Y., in 1776. Enlisted, Jan. 7, 1779, 
at New Milford, Conn., in Capt. Billings' Company, Col. Heman Swifts' 
Regiment to serve 3 years; also, on the rolls, Aug. 6, 1782, and Oct. 14, 
1783. 
Ira Dayton McCoy, Jr. 

WILLIAM McCOY: Born in Scotland about 1730; died in Bourbon Co., Ky., 
about 1800. Private, Third Pennsylvania Regiment. Nov. 3, 1783, he 
receipted for $40.-^^ "as balance of pay due to him in settlement for his 
services in that organization." 
Lycurgus McCoy 
Barton Sherman McCoy 

JAMES McMICHAEL: Bom, 1761, at Bristol, Me.; died, 1845, at Waldoboro, 
Me. Private, Capt. Benjamin Plumer's Company, Col. William Jones' 
Regiment; company detached to serve on the Penobscot Expedition under 
Col. McCobb, July, 1779; served 2 months, 18 days; also. Private, Capt. 
Benjamin La Monts' Company, Col. Wade's Regiment; enlisted. May 9, 
1778; engaged in Sullivan's defeat in Rhode Island; also. Private, Capt. 
Hunter's Company, Col. Jones' Regiment on an alarm at Sheepscot River, 
Me. Roll dated New Castle, Me., Sept. 15, 1777. Pensioned. 
W. Lloyd Allen 

JOHN MELLISH: Bom, Nov. 12, 1758, at Dorchester; died, June 20, 1824, 
at Dorchester. Private, Capt. Hopestill Hall's Company, Col. Robinson's 
Regiment; enlisted, Jan. 29, 1776; also, Capt. Seth Sumner's Company, 
Col. Gill's Regiment at Moon Island, June 12, 1776; also, served at Rhode 
Island, April 17, 1777, 25 days. 
WiLLARD Henry Fobes 

JOHN MERRIAM: Bom, Dec. 9, 1761, at East Sudbury; died, 1843, at East 
Sudbury. Private, Capt. George Rollins' Company, Col. Putnam's (5th 
Continental) Regiment; served 6 months from June, 1780, at West Point. 
Henry Willis Brown 

NATHAN MERRILL: Born, Jan. 21, 1763, at Concord; died, March 13, 1846, 
at Milford, N. H. EnHsted in the summer of 1780 from Bedford for 6 months' 
service in the Continental Army; discharged, Jan. 8, 1781. Participated 
in the North river campaign and was on guard at the execution of Andr^. 



Idecortiif of ^flebolutionarp "JSintt^tot^ 135 

Reenlisted, Aug. 29, 1782, for 6 months and served at Cambridge. His 
musket, etc., now in possession of his great-grandson. 
Frank Merrill White 

AARON MILLARD: Of Rehoboth. Private, Capt. Danforth's Company, 
Col. Brewer's (9th) Regiment of militia; 8 months' service during the Siege 
of Boston. Receipt dated Roxbury Camp, Nov. 14, 1775. 
Albert Clark Mason 

MOSES MILLER (or MILLARD): Bom, June 10, 1727, at Rehoboth; died, 
1787, at Rehoboth. Private, Capt. Willmarth's Company, Col. Carpenter's 
Regiment; company detached and served on a Rhode Island alarm, Jtdy 28, 
1780, under Gen. Heath. 
Albert Clark Mason 

CHARLES MINER: Born, Oct. 3, 1741, at Stonington, Conn. Private, First 
Regiment, "Connecticut Line." Enlisted, July 1, and discharged, Dec. 4, 
1780. 
Charles Edwin Williams 

MOSES MONTAGUE: Bom, Nov. 17, 1724, at South Hadley; died, Dec. 18, 
1792, at South Hadley. Captain, Col. Woodbridge's Regiment, which 
marched in response to the alarm of April 19, 1775, and served 15 days; 
also, same company, Col. Israel Chapin's Regiment; company raised to 
reinforce Continental Army for 3 months, Oct.-Dec, 1779; Captain, May 28, 
1778, in regiment commanded by Col. Porter Hadley. 
Daniel Thompson Montague 

BENJAMIN MOREY: Bom at Norton, May 18, 1732. Captain, Col. John 
Daggett's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; 
service, 10 days. 
Clinton Ellis Holbrook 

AARON MORGAN: Bom, March 16, 1749, at Brimfield; died, Aug. 30, 1825, 
at Brimfield. Private, Capt. Joseph Thompson's Company of Minute-men, 
Col. Danielson's Regiment, which marched in response to the Lexington 
alarm and served until April 29, 1775; also, Sergeant, Capt. Ephraim 
Chapin's Company, Col. Woodbridge's Regiment; served under Gen. Gates 
in the Northern department, Aug.-Nov., 1777. 
Charles Francis Morgan 
Ralph Landers Morgan 

JOSEPH MORGAN: Born, Aug. 19, 1705, at Brimfield; died, Jan. 28, 1798, 
at Brimfield. Sergeant, Capt. Joseph Thompson's Company of Minute-men, 
Col. Timothy Danielson's Regiment, which marched in response to the 
Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775, and served 10 days. 
Charles Francis Morgan 
Ralph Landers Morgan 

SAMUEL MORRIS, Sr.: Bom, July 3, 1711, at Philadelphia, Pa.; died in 
1782. Member of the Pennsylvania Committee of Safety, July 24, 1776, to 
March 13, 1777; also, Member of the Board of War, March 13, 1777. 
Spencer Janney Steinmitz 



136 M>tmsi of tt)e ^tmerican Kiebolutton 

JAMES MULLIN: Bom, 1760, at New Castle, N. H.; died, June 21, 1841, at 
Lynn. Private, Capt. Nathan Brown's Company, Col. Long's Regiment at 
New Castle, N. H., Sept.-Dec, 1776, and at Ticonderoga and Saratoga, 
Jan.-Aug., 1777. Pensioned. 
Laurence George Atherton 

TITUS MUNSON: Bom, July 5, 1734; died, April 12, 1776, at Long Island, 
N. Y. Ensign, Fourteenth Company (or Train Band), Second Regiment, 
Connecticut militia; church record, Northfield, Conn., April 12, 1776, 
records his death of smallpox, while in the Revolutionary Army. 
Eliot Albert Clark 

HEMAN MYRICK: Bom, April 28, 1760, at Eastham; died, March 30, 
1815, at Eastham. Seaman, brigantine Independence, Capt. Samson, May- 
Sept., 1776; also. Marine, brigantine Hawk, Capt. Oakes, May 3, 1777; 
with the fleet under Commander John Manley. 
James William Horace Mvrick 

JACOB NEWHALL: Bom, May 3, 1740, at Lynn; died, June 18, 1816, at 
Saugus. Private, Capt. David Parker's (1st Lynn) Company, which marched 
on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. Kept a tavern at Saugus and gave 
aid to soldiers; it was a rallying place for the Minute-men; entertained 
Washington when he visited that place in 1789. 
Guy Newhall 

EDWARD NEWTON: Of Lancaster; bom, Jan. 23, 1738; died, Feb. 28, 1819. 
Ensign, Capt. Robbins' Company, Col. Whitcomb's Regiment, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775, and served 14 days; also. 
First Lieutenant, Capt. Eager's Company, Col. Whitney's (2d Worcester 
County) Regiment of militia, March 20, 1776; also, Capt. Stuart's Company, 
same regiment, which marched on the Bennington alarm, Aug. 21, 1777; 
also, Capt. Greenleaf's Company, Col. Cushing's Regiment, which reinforced 
the Northern Army, Sept. 1, 1777, for 3 months; also. Captain, Seventh 
Company, Col. Whitney's Regiment, April 12, 1780. 
Joseph Lyman Newton 

DANIEL NICHOLS: Of Cohasset (1711-1780). Private, Capt. Job Cushing's 
Company, Col. Greaton's Regiment; enlisted, June 1, 1775; 8 months' 
service at Cambridge during Siege of Boston. 
John Ross Bates 

JOHN NIXON: Bom, March 1, 1727, at Framingham; died, March 24, 1815, 
at Middlebury, Vt. Captain of a company of Minute-men at Lexington, 
April 19, 1775; Colonel, April 24, 1775; wounded at the battle of Bunker 
Hill; Colonel, Fourth Continental Infantry, Jan. 1, 1776; Brigadier-General, 
Continental Army, Aug. 9, 1776, on recommendation of General Washington; 
resigned, Sept. 12, 1780. 
Charles Edwin Belcher 
Alfred Long Seaton 

GOODMAN NOBLE: Bora, July 3, 1756, at New Milford, Conn. ; died, Aug. 7, 
1834, at Cairo, N. J. Private, Capt. Hall's Company, Seventh Connecticut 
Regiment; enlisted, Feb. 15, 1777; served, 3 years. 
Harry Clifford Northrop 



Mnottm of Uleboluttonarp '^ntt^totH 137 

HUMPHREY NOYES, Jr.: Bom, Jan. 23, 1746, at Atkinson, N. H.; died. 
May 16, 1814. Private, Capt. Ezra Giles' Company of New Hampshire Vol- 
unteers, which reinforced the Northern Army at Saratoga, Sept.-Oct., 1777. 
Frank Albert Noyes 

ELISHA NYE: Bom, April 27, 1745, at Sandwich; died. May 12, 1833, at 
Hallowell, Me. Lieutenant, Capt. John Grannis' (seacoast) Company; 
stationed at Elizabeth Islands, July-Dec, 1776; also, Captain of a company 
Dec. 16, 1776, stationed at Naushon, Jan.-Aug., 1777, for defence of seacoast. 

HOLLIS HUNNEWELL SAWYER 

ISAAC ORGAN: Born at Boston in 1761; died. May 29, 1831, at Lynn. Pri- 
vate, Capt. Watson's Company, Col. Greaton's (3d Continental) Regiment; 
service, March-Dec, 1779; also. Drum Major, Capt. Sumner's Company of 
same regiment, 1780, and Capt. Watson's Company of same regiment, 1781. 
Beat "taps" at the execution of Major Andr6. 
Everett Hudson Black 
Albert Shirley Black 
Lawrence Everett Brown 

DAVID OSGOOD: Bom, July 20, 1756, at Billerica; died, 1827, at Amherst, 
N. H. Private, Capt. Walker's Company, Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regiment; 
8 months' service during the Siege of Boston; also, enlisted in the Conti- 
nental Army for 3 years, April, 1777- June, 1780; Private, Seventh Company, 
Col. Thomas Nixon's Regiment; also, Capt. Danforth's Company, same 
regiment; also, Lieut.-Col. Smith's Company, same regiment; also, Lieut.- 
Col. Whiting's Company, same regiment. Pensioned. 
Edwin Willis Pierce 

THOMAS PACKER: Of New Hampshire. Private, Capt. John Folsom's Com- 
pany, Col. Moses Kelley's Regiment of Volunteers, which marched from 
New Hampshire in Aug., 1780, and reinforced the Continental Army on 
Rhode Island, 26 days' service. 
Frank Marcus Packer 

ROSWELL PARISH: Born, Oct. 18, 1759, at Canterbury, Conn. ; died, Sept. 6, 
1807, at Canterbury, Conn. Private, Capt. John Kingsley's (Windham) 
Company, which marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; also, 
Capt. Bacon's Company, Col. Douglass' Regiment of Connecticut militia, 
which served during the Campaign of 1776; wounded at the battle of White 
Plains, Oct. 28, 1776; placed on the pension list. Later, appointed by 
Jonathan Trumbull, Major, Twenty-First Regiment militia, Oct. 12, 1799. 
Original commission in possession of his great-grandson. 
RoswELL Parish, Jr. 

JONAS PARKER: Bom, Feb. 6, 1722, at Lexington; died, April 19, 1775, at 
Lexington. Private, Capt. John Parker's Company of Lexington Minute- 
men. One of the martyrs who were shot by the British on Lexington Com- 
mon, April 19, 1775. 
Charles Barnard Prince 

MOSES PARKER: Bom, May 13, 1731, at Chelmsford; died, July 4, 1775, at 
Boston. Lieutenant-Colonel of Col. E. Bridge's (27th) Regiment of foot, 



138 M>tm^ of tljr American ^cbolution 

May 27, 1775; marched on the Lexington alarm, and participated in the 
battle of Bunker HiU in which he was wounded, and was taken to a hospital 
in Boston where he died. 
Arthur M. Warren 

PETER PARKER: Born, Oct. 3, 1738, at Framingham; died, Nov. 5, 1803, at 
Framingham. Member of the Committee of Correspondence and Safety 
for Framingham, 1776-1778; also of a committee of ten members selected 
to provide for the families of soldiers who enlisted in the Continental Army. 
George Edgar Robinson 

SOLOMON PARSONS: Bom, Aug. 29, 1757, at Leicester; died, May 11, 1831, 
at Worcester. Private, Capt. Martin's Company, Col. Bigelow's Regi- 
ment and Capt. Houdin's Company, Col. Rufus Putnam's Regiment, Conti- 
nental Army; enlisted. May, 1777, for the war; wounded at the battle of 
Monmouth, June 26, 1778, which crippled him for life. 
Norman Bloomfield Parsons 

ELEAZER PARTRIDGE: Bom, April 19, 1740, at Medway; died in 1828. 
Private, Capt. Elijah Pond's Company, which marched on the Lexington 
alarm, April 19, 1775; also, same company. Major Metcalf's Regiment, 
which marched on the Rhode Island alarm of Dec. 8, 1776. 
Maynard Maxim 

DAVID PEABODY: Bom, June 27, 1736, at Boxford. Private, Capt. John 
Miles' Company of Nottingham, N. H., which marched, Sept. 22, 1781, to 
reinforce the army for 3 months; also, Capt. Cross' Company, Col. Nichols' 
Regiment; reinforced the army at Rhode Island, Aug., 1778. 
James Reuben Stickney 

JOHN PEABODY: Bom, July 24, 1762, at Boxford; died, Jan. 3, 1851, at 
Lunenburg. Private, Capt. John Dodge's Company, Col. Gerrish's Regi- 
ment, April- Dec, 1778, at Winter Hill; also, Capt. Richardson's Company, 
same regiment; reinforced Continental Army, Oct.-Nov., 1779; also, Capt. 
Mallon's Company, Col. Enoch Putnam's Regiment; reinforced Continental 
Army, Aug.-Dec, 1781. Pensioned. 
James Charles Peabody 

RICHARD PEABODY: Bom, April 13, 1731, at Boxford; died, June 7, 1820, 
at Boxford. Private, Capt. Gould's Company, Col. Samuel Johnson's Regi- 
ment, which marched from Boxford on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; 
also. Captain of a company raised to reinforce the Continental Army in Can- 
ada, Colonel Wigglesworth's Regiment; served at Ticonderoga in 1776. A 
zealous patriot during the struggle for independence. He sent his sons into 
the army as soon as they became old enough to serve. 
James Charles Peabody 

SETH PEABODY: Bom, Nov. 27, 1744, at Topsfield; died, Jan. 4, 1828, at 
Canaan, Me. Private, Capt. Jesse Dorman's Company, Col. Scammon's 
(30th) Regiment of Foot, York County, Me.; enHsted, May 8, 1775; served 
at the battle of Bunker Hill and during the Siege of Boston. 
Harold Clark Durrell 



iUccortije? of iflebolutionarp ^nct^tot^ 139 

SAMUEL PEASE: Of Newmarket, N. H. Drummer, Capt. Kinsman's Com- 
pany, Col. John Stark's Regiment; at the Siege of Boston May-Aug. 1775; 
also, Capt. Joshua Abbott's Company, Fifth (Continental) Regiment, 
April to Nov., 1776, at Mount Independence. 
Irving Stone 

STEPHEN PEASE: Born, July 4, 1755, at Somers, Conn.; died, June 23, 1838, 
at Somers, Conn. Private, Capt. Abbe's Company; Seventh Regiment Con- 
necticut Line; enlisted, April 24, 1777, for 3 years; discharged in Dec, 
1777. 
Henry Chafin Haile 

AMBROSE PECK: Bom, Nov. 17, 1747, at Swansea; died before April 9, 
1819, at Swansea. Clerk, Capt. Perley Peck's Company, Col. Carpenter's 
Regiment; served on an alarm at Bristol, R. I., Dec. 13, 1776; also. Lieu- 
tenant, same company and regiment, same service, Aug. 1, 1780. 
Albert Clark Mason 

JONATHAN PECK: Born, Jan. 17, 1734, at Rehoboth; died in 1817 at Reho- 
both. Private, Capt. Stephen Bullock's Company, Col. Carpenter's Regi- 
ment; July 27-Sept. 10, 1778, on an expedition to Rhode Island. 
Albert Clark Mason 

JOHN PEDRICK: Born at Marblehead; died there, Jan. 12, 1807. Matross, 
Capt. Edward Fettyplace's (Marblehead) Company; Sept. 1, 1776- Jan. 1, 
1777, for defence of seacoast. 
Thomas Franklin Pedrick 

MATTHEW PEIRCE: Born, Sept. 6, 1755, at Harvard; died, June 16, 1835, 
at Springfield, Vt. Private, Capt. Wade's Company, Col. Little's Regiment, 
which served in the Campaign of 1776; also, enlisted in the Continental 
Army for 6 months during 1780. 
Walter Levi Spaulding 

AARON PERKINS: Bom, 1744, at Ipswich; died. May 10, 1801, at Ipswich. 
Sergeant, Capt. Nathaniel Wade's Company, which marched from Ipswich 
on the alarm of April 19, 1775; served till May 10, 1775; Ensign, same com- 
pany. Col. Little's Regiment; also. Adjutant at the battle of Bunker Hill; 
also. Sergeant, Capt. Low's Company of Volunteers, Major Charles Smith's 
Regiment; served in Northern department, Oct. -Nov., 1777, and in guarding 
Burgoyne's captured troops; also. Lieutenant, Capt. Gould's Company, 
Col. Wade's Regiment, July-Oct., 1780; reinforced Continental Army; also. 
Adjutant same regiment. 
Frank Sutherland Perkins 
Harry Stamford Perkins 

JOSEPH PETERSON: Born, Feb. 1, 1749-50, at Duxbury; died, 1776, at 
Duxbury. Private, Capt. Bradford's Company, Col. Cotton's Regiment, 
May 1, 1775; served at Roxbury during the Siege of Boston. 
William Henry Harrison Prior 

STEPHEN PHILLIPS: Born, July 18, 1718, at Watertown; died, March 1, 
1801, at Marblehead. Moderator of a meeting of citizens of Marblehead, 
Dec. 7, 1773, which adopted resolutions: "That Americans have a right to 



140 ^on^ei of t^t American !lieboiutton 

be as free as any inhabitants of the earth, and to enjoy at all times an unin- 
terrupted possession of their property." The brave citizens of Boston were 
commended for "their noble firmness in support of American Liberty." 
Also, chosen Moderator, May 23, 1774, of a town meeting at which he was 
chosen a member of the Committee of Correspondence. 
Stephen Willard Phillips 

JOSIAH PIERCE: Born, Feb. 13, 1723, at Waltham; died, 1806, at Worcester. 
Member of a committee at Worcester appointed, March 7, 1774, "to take 
into consideration the acts of the British Parliament for raising revenue 
from the colonies." Member of a committee appointed, Aug. 22, 1774, "to 
oppose buying any article except drugs and medicines imported from Great 
Britian or Ireland." Selectman, Worcester, 1765, 1774 and 1775. 
Edwin Willis Pierce 

ROBERT PIKE: Of Newmarket, N. H. (1745-1821). Sergeant, Capt. Oilman's 
Company, Col. Enoch Poore's Regiment; service, during the 8 months' 
Siege of Boston; also. Captain, Lieut.-Col. Senter's Regiment of New Hamp- 
shire militia. Rhode Island service, June- Dec, 1778. 
Charles Beal Wiggin 

MOSES PILLSBURY: Bom at Newbury, Jan. 16, 1699; died in April, 1787, at 
Boxford. Private, Capt. Pilsberry's Detachment of militia, which marched 
from Amesbury on the Lexington alarm, April 19 and 20, 1775; aged, 76 
years. 
Charles Lewis Hoitt 

THADDEUS POLLARD: Born, Aug. 7, 1746, at Harvard; died, Sept. 3, 1803, 
at Harvard. Private, Capt. Davis' Company, Col. Whitcomb's Regiment of 
Minute-men, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also, 
enlisted, April 26, 1775, same company and regiment, and served 8 months 
at the Siege of Boston; also, Private, Capt. Whitney's Company, Col. 
Josiah Whitney's Regiment, July 22, 1777, which marched on an alarm at 
Rhode Island; also, Lieut. Fairbanks' Company, Col. Cushing's Regiment, 
Sept. 6, 1777; reinforced the Northern army for 3 months. 
George Fisher Pollard 

JOSEPH POLLEY: Bom, Sept. 3, 1728, at Lancaster; died, Feb. 28, 1806, at 
Fitchburg. Private, Capt. Ebenezer Bridge's Company of Minute-men, 
Col. John Whitcomb's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm to 
Cambridge; reenlisted, April 25, 1775, in Capt. John Fuller's Company, 
Col. Asa Whitcomb's Regiment; served during the siege of Boston; camp 
at Prospect Hill. He was one of the Committee of Inspection and Safety 
for the town of Fitchburg in 1775. 
Clifton Colburn 

SETH POMEROY: Born, May 20, 1706, at Northampton; died, Feb. 19, 1777, 
at Peekskill, N. Y. Brigadier-General, Continental Army, June 22, 1775; 
did not serve or accept the appointment. He took an active part at the 
battle of Bunker Hill as a volunteer. Colonel, Second Hampshire County 
Regiment of militia, March 22, 1776; at the request of Gen. Washington 
he took command of the troops at Peekskill, N. Y., where he died. 
Charles Arthur Harding 



Uttoth^ of ^etjolutionarp ^ntt0tot0 141 

ENOCH POOR: Bom, June 21, 1736, at Andover; died, Sept. 8, 1780, at 
Hackensack, N. J. Colonel, Second New Hampshire Regiment, May- Dec, 
1775; Colonel, Eighth Continental Infantry, Jan. 1, 1776; Colonel, Second 
New Hampshire Infantry, Nov., 1776; Brigadier-General, Continental 
Army, Feb., 1777. He was a friend of Lafayette and known as "Light In- 
fantry Poor." 
Frank Edward Berry 

PETER POOR: Born, June 11, 1730, at Andover; died in Dec, 1802. First 
Lieutenant in command of a company of Minute-men, which marched on 
the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775, to Cambridge. 
Richard Daniel Floyd 

JOHN PORTER: Bom, April 18, 1742, at Wenham; died, April 23, 1834, at 
Littleton. Paymaster, Twenty-first Continental Infantry, Sept. 12-Dec. 31, 
1776; Captain, Thirteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Jan. 1, 1777; Major, 
May 30, 1777; transferred to Sixth Massachusetts Regiment, Jan. 1, 1781; 
Brigade Inspector and Major, Sixth Middlesex Coimty Regiment, 1781- 
1788. 
H. Turner Hodgdon 

GIDEON POWERS: Bom, Sept. 10, 1758. Private, Capt. Fletcher's Company, 
Col. Enoch Hale's Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers, which served 
in Rhode Island, Aug., 1778, 21 days. 
Maynard Maxim 

AMOS PRATT: Bom, April 11, 1734, at Maiden; died, March 14, 1821, at 
Lynn. Private, Capt. David Parker's (1st Lynn) Company, which marched 
on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, to Concord; service, 2 days. 
Chester Brown Pratt 

EBENEZER PRESCOTT: Bom, June 6, 1756, at Hampton FaUs, N. Y.; died, 
June 26, 1834, at Pittsfield, N. H. Private, Capt. Henry Elkins' Company; 
at Pierce's Island, Nov. 5, 1775; also, Capt. William Prescott's Company, 
Col. Tash's Regiment at New York, 1776; also, Capt. Leavitt's Company, 
Col. Drake's Regiment, which reinforced the Northern Army at Stillwater, 
Sept., 1777. 
Charles Abram Prescott 

BENJAMIN PRIOR: Bom, Oct. 23, 1740, at Duxbury; died, Jan. 1, 1821, at 
Duxbury. Private, Capt. Bradford's Company, Col. Warren's Regiment, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; also, Capt. 
Arnold's Company, Col. Lothrop's Regiment; served on the Rhode Island 
alarm of Dec. 10, 1776. 
William Henry Harrison Prior 
William Brisbane Rand 
Waldron Holmes Rand 

ISAAC PROUTY: Bom, Dec. 22, 1750, at Spencer; died, June 15, 1828. 
Private, Capt. John Wolcott's Company of rangers, which marched from 
Brookfield and Spencer on the Lexington alarm; also, Capt. Richardson's 
. Company, Col. Dike's Regiment, which served on guard duty at Dorchester 
Heights, Sept.-Nov., 1776. 
John Winn 



142 M>on0 of tf^t American Ifletioiution 

DANIEL PUTNAM: Bom, April 19, 1748, at Fitchburg; died, April 26, 1813, 
at Fitchburg. Ensign, Capt. Bridge's Company, Col. John Whitcomb's 
Regiment of Minute-men, which marched on the Lexington alarm to Cam- 
bridge; served to May 2, 1775; also, Capt. Thurlo's Company, which 
marched on the Bennington alarm, Aug. 22, 1777. 
Marshall Putnam Thompson 

NATHANIEL PUTNAM: Born in 1747 at Danvers; died, Nov. 15, 1800, at 
Danvers. Private, Capt. Jeremiah Page's Company, which marched on the 
Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Everett Hudson Black 
Albert Shirley Black 

JOHN QUINER: Born, March 11, 1734-5, at Marblehead; died, Feb. 17, 1803 
at Lynn. Private, Capt. William Blackler's Company, Col. Glover's Regi- 
ment; enlisted. May 27, 1775; service, 8 months during the Siege of Boston; 
also, reenlisted, Nov. 7, 1777, for 3 years in the Continental Army. 
Samuel Oliver Breed 
Frederick Howard Newhall 

JOHN RANDALL: Born, Aug. 14, 1730; died, May 18, 1882. Private, Second 
Company, Eighth Regiment, Connecticut militia; service, July-Dec, 1775; 
stationed on Long Island Sound, and at Roxbury, Mass., in General Spencer's 
Brigade. 
Charles Edwin Williams 

JOHN RAMSDELL: Bom, Sept., 1738 (probably), at Abington; died, Oct. 29, 
1816, at Wardsboro, Vt. Private, Capt. Trufant's (seacoast) Company, 
Dec. 1, 1776- Jan. 1, 1777, at Hull; also, Capt. Allen's Company, Major 
Casey's Regiment at Bristol, R. I., April 19, 1777. 
Ledoit B. Ramsdell 

JOSEPH RAMSDELL: Born, 1708; died, Aug. 22, 1788, at Hanover or Dux- 
bury. Member of the Committee of Safety in Hanover, 1775, 1776, 1777. 
Private, Capt. Turner's Company, Col. John Cushing's Regiment, which 
marched on the Rhode Island alarm of Dec. 8, 1776; service, 15 days. 
Kendall Ainsworth Sanderson 

NEHEMIAH RAMSDELL: Born about 1717 at Lynn; died at Lynn in 1782. 
Private, Capt. William Farrington's (2d Lynn) Company of militia, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Everett Hudson Black 
Albert Shirley Black 
Lawrence Everett Brown 

NEHEMIAH RAND: Bom, Dec. 9, 1734, at Charlestown; died, July 10, 1794, 
at Lyndeborough, N. H. Removed from Charlestown after his house had 
been burnt, June 17, 1775. Represented Lyndeborough at Conventions in 
Concord and Exeter, N. H., for the purpose of "forming a plan of govern- 
ment and supporting the credit of the currency for the years 1778 and 1779." 
Town meetings, May 4, 1778, and Feb. 3, 1780. 
John Prentice Rand 

MOSES RANGER (RAINGER): Bora, March 6, 1744-5, at Brookfield; died, 
Jan., 1829, at Colrain. Private, Capt. Lawrence Kemp's Company, Col. 



]$ecot:ii$f of Ifleboluttonarp ^ntt^tot^ 143 

Leonard's Regiment; service at Ticonderoga, Feb. -April, 1777; also, Capt. 
John Wells' Company, Col. David Wells' Regiment in Northern department, 
Sept.-Oct., 1777; also, Capt. McClellan's Company, Col. David Field's 
Regiment; marched on the Bennington alarm of Aug. 17, 1777. 
Clifford Samuel Chapin 

JAMES REED: Bom, 1723, at Wobum; died, Feb. 13, 1807, at Fitchburg. 
Captain of a company of Minute-men from Fitzwilliam, N. H., which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; Colonel, Third Regiment, 
New Hampshire militia. At the battle of Bunker Hill the New Hampshire 
regiment, at the rail fence, covered the retreat of the Americans. After the 
Siege of Boston he served under General Heath at New York in 1776; 
commissioned by Congress Brigadier-General, Aug. 9, 1776; ordered to 
relief of the Americans in their Canadian retreat; commanded the Second 
New Hampshire Regiment, and successfully accomplished his mission. In 
consequence of illness from smallpox he became totallj'- blind and incapaci- 
tated from further service. 
John William Barber 

PETER REED: Bom, May 19, 1701, at Concord; died, Sept. 19, 1791, at 
Littleton. Private, Capt. Aquila Jewett's Company of militia, Col. James 
Prescott's Regiment, which marched in response to the Lexington alarm. 
April 19, 1775; age, nearly 74 years. 
Harry Gay Fletcher 

TIMOTHY RICE: Of Belchertown. Corporal, Capt. Dinsmore's Company, 
Col. David Field's Regiment; "marched to the Northward at request of 
General Gates," Aug. 17-19, 1777, and were dismissed by order of General 
Lincoln. 
Samuel Allen Johnson 

JOSEPH RICHARDS: Born, Sept. 25, 1753, at Lynn; died, Sept. 28, 1824, at 
Lynn. Private, Capt. William Farrington's (2d Lynn) Company of militia, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Albert Goodwin Foster 

JOSIAH RICHARDS: Born, Nov. 15, 1749, at Dedham; died, June 8, 1835, at 
Dedham. Private, Capt. Joseph Guild's Company, April 19, 1775; 2 weeks; 
also, Capt. Daniel Whiting's Company, Col. Brewer's Regiment, May, 1775, 
8 months; also, Capt. Abel Richard's Company, May 31, 1776, 2 months; 
served at the Lexington alarm; Siege of Boston; Dorchester Heights; 
Guard duty at and around Boston. Pensioned. 
Samuel Tanner Richards 

ELEAZER RICHARDSON: Born, June 29, 1746, at Woburn; died, Feb. 1, 
1808, at Woburn. Private, Capt. Ezra Newhall's Company of Minute-men, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; service, 21 days. 
Richard Daniel Floyd 

JEDUTHAN RICHARDSON: Born, April 16, 1738, at Woburn; died, Oct. 11, 
1815, at Woburn. Lieutenant, also Clerk, Capt. Jonathan Fox's Company, 
which served at the battle of Lexington and Concord, April 19, 1775; also, 
Jesse Wyman's Company, Second Middlesex County Regiment of militia, 
March 26, 1776; also, Capt. Ford's Company, Col. E. Brooks' Regiment at 



144 ^<m0 of t^e ^(.mertcan iflebolutton 

Cambridge, Feb. -March, 1778, guarding the "Convention Troops." 
Frank Merrill White 

JOSEPH RICHARDSON: Bom, July 3, 1763, at Newton; died, Feb. 21, 1836, 
at Baldwin, Me. Private, Capt. Andrews' Company, Col. Joseph Prime's 
Regiment, May 8-Dec. 31, 1780; service under Brig.-Gen. Wadsworth at 
the Eastward. His widow pensioned. 
John Samuel Richardson 

JAMES RIDLON: Of Buxton, Me.; born, Dec. 10, 1753, at Saco, Me. Private, 
Capt. John Elden's Company, which marched in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; also, Capt. Hill's Company, Col. Scamman's Regiment, 
served. May 3-Sept. 27, 1775, and at Biddeford, in consequence of armed 
vessels coming to Winter Harbor, Dec. 14, 1775. 
Homer Dean Richer 

EBENEZER ROBERTS: Born, Sept. 13, 1717, at Gloucester. Private, Capt. 
Harvey's Company, Col. David Wells' Regiment, May- July, 1777; served 
in the Northern department. 
Dennie Philip Small 

SAMUEL ROBIE (or ROBY): Bom, Dec. 24, 1761, at Chester, N. H.; died, 
Nov. 26, 1822, at Springfield, N. H. Dmmmer, Capt. Daniel Reynold's 
Company, Col. Peabody's Regiment, raised by the state of New Hampshire; 
served in Rhode Island, Jan.-July, 1778; also, Sept., 1778- Jan., 1779; also, 
Capt. Philip Putnam's Company, Col. Nahum Baldwin's Regiment at the 
battle of White Plains, Oct. 28, 1776. 
John Cole Andrews 

LEMUEL ROBINSON: Bom, March 4, 1736, at Dorchester; died, July 29. 
1776, at Boston. Lieutenant- Colonel of Col. Heath's (Suffolk County) 
Regiment of militia, 1775; Colonel of a regiment "raised to serve before 
Boston until April 1, 1776;" appointment by Council, Jan. 23, 1776. 
Albert Ballard Hammond 

WILLIAM ROBINSON: Bom, Oct. 25, 1732, at Attleboro; died, Feb. 16, 
1805, at Plainfield, Conn. Member of the Connecticut Legislation, 1775 
and 1778, from the town of Plainfield; Town Clerk, 1771-1804. 
Franklin Robinson Gifford 

ELIPHALET ROLLINS (RAWLINS): Born, July 23, 1734, at Stratham, 
N. H.; died in 1819 at Loudon, N. H. Private, Capt. Harper's Company, 
Col. Wyman's Regiment; enlisted, July 16, 1776, for service in Canada; also, 
Capt. Weare's Company, Col. Scammel's Regiment; enlisted, Feb. 14, 1777. 
A. Justin Johnson 

SAMUEL ROLLINS (ROLLINGS): Bom, 1745, at Rochester, N. H.; died, 
1831, at Richmond, Me. Private, Capt. Arnold's Company, Col. Joshua 
Wingate's Regiment; enlisted, July 20, 1776; served at Ticonderoga; also, 
Sergeant, Capt. Worthen's Company, Col. Mooney's New Hampshire Regi- 
ment, raised for the defence of Rhode Island, July 13, 1779- Jan. 8, 1780. 
Charles Fiske Rollins 

BENJAMIN ROPES, Jr.: Born, 1747, at Salem; died, 1778, at Salem. Ser- 
geant, Capt. B. Ward, Jr.'s Company, Jan. 22, 1776; Second Lieutenant, 



JUccorHjBf of Hebolutionarp ^ntt^tot^ 145 

June 27, 1776; company stationed at Salem for seacoast defence; service 
to Nov. 18, 1776; also, same company Col. Pickering's Regiment; marched 
to Danbury, Conn., Dec. 24, 1776; also, Capt. John Simond's Company of 
matrosses at Salem, June 21, 1777; also. Lieutenant in a seacoast company 
at Salem, Dec, 1777. 
Reuben Wilkins Ropes 

TIMOTHY ROSS: Bom, July 30, 1751, at Ipswich. Private, Capt. Abraham 
Dodge's Company, Col. Little's Regiment; served from May 12, 1775, at the 
Siege of Boston; also, Sergeant, Capt. Gideon Parker's Company of same 
regiment, Jan. 1, 1776; also, Capt. Cumming's Company, Col. Gerrish's 
Regiment at Claverack, N. Y.; reinforced the army under Gen. Washington, 
Oct.- Nov., 1779; also, enlisted in the Continental Army, served, June- 
Dec, 1780. Pensioned. 
John Cole Andrews. 

RICHARD RUSSELL: Bom, June 15, 1729, at Marblehead, and died at 
Marblehead. Seaman, brigantine Massachusetts, Capt. Souther, Aug.-Dec, 
1776; "entitled to prize money." 
Thomas Franklin Pedrick 

STEPHEN RUSSELL: Born in 1722 at Dracut; died in 1800 at Dracut. 
Captain, Col. Green's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm; 
also. Captain, Col. Spaulding's Regiment, May 31, 1776, and of Col. Bullard's 
Regiment, which served at Stillwater, Skenesboro, and Ticonderoga, Aug.- 
Nov., 1777; Member of the Committee of Correspondence, etc., for Dracut, 
1775-1777. 
Russell Metcalf Fox 

GURDON SALTONSTALL: Bora, Dec. 22, 1708; died, Sept. 19, 1785, at 
Norwich, Conn. Colonel, Connecticut militia, 1775 and 1776; Brigadier- 
General, Connecticut militia, Sept. 10, 1776-May, 1777; served in New York, 
New London, and in the eastern end of the state. 
Samuel Fowler Phelps 

JONATHAN SANBORN: Bom, April 13, 1733, at Newmarket, N. H.; died, 
Oct. 11, 1789, at Newmarket. Private, Capt. Samuel Runnel's Company, 
Col. Mooney's Regiment; marched from New Hampshire and served for 
the defence of Rhode Island, June-Dec, 1779. 
Philip Asa Sanborn 

PETER SANBORN : Bom, July 9, 1751, at Hampton Falls, N. H. ; died, Aug. 6, 
1827, at Baldwin, Me. Private, Capt. Shaw's Company, Col. Fogg's Regi- 
ment; enlisted in the Continental Army for 9 months, 1779; also, Col. 
Benjamin Tupper's (Continental) Regiment at West Point, March, 1779. 
Pensioned. 

Charles Sidney Sanborn 
Ralph Roscoe Sanborn 

JACOB SANDERSON: Bom, Aug. 3, 1741, at Lunenburg; died, Feb. 9, 1829, 
at Lunenburg. Private, Capt. George Kimball's Company of Minute-men, 
which marched in response to the Lexington alarm; also, Capt. Fuller's 
Company, Col. Bullard's Regiment; enlisted, Aug. 20, 1777, and was present 
at the battle of Stillwater and Saratoga. 
Kendall Ainsworth Sanderson 



146 ^oiiiS of tt)e American l$el)olutton 

BENJAMIN SAUNDERS: Bom, Sept. 18, 1755, at BiUerica; died, June 15, 
1837, at Tewksbury. Private, Capt. Farmer's Company, Col. Green's 
Regiment, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; also. Private, 
Capt. Fox's Company, Col. Henry Jackson's (Continental) Regiment; 
served, Sept. 12, 1777, to Sept. 12, 1780; engaged for the town of Fitchburg. 
Chester Brown Pratt 

THOMAS SAWIN: Bom in 1718 at Natick; died, Feb. 3, 1790, at Natick. 
Private, Capt. Joseph Morse's Company, Col. Samuel Bullard's Regiment, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
John Woodman Higgins 

DOMINICUS SCAMMON: Born, Feb. 7, 1742-3, at Saco, Me.; died, Jan. 6, 
1824, at Saco, Me. Committeeman "to see that the several Resolves of the 
Continental Provincial and County Congresses be complied with in Pep- 
perrellboro." 
William Augustine Willey 

BENJAMIN SCOTT: Born, 1725, at Abbotsford, Scotland; died after 1776, 
at Fitzwilliam, N. H. Sergeant, Capt. Timothy Parker's Company of 
Minute-men, which marched from Sturbridge on the Lexington alarm; 
service, 14 days; also, Lieutenant in Col. Ford's (New Hampshire) Regiment 
in camp, Oct. 14, 1777. 
Marshall Putnam Thompson 

CHARLES SCOTT: Born, Aug. 11, 1758, at Vemon, Conn.; died, Nov. 3, 
1827, at Grantham, N. H. Private, Capt. James Osgood's Company, Col. 
Bedel's New Hampshire Regiment of militia; served, Jan.-Dec, 1776, 
Taken prisoner at the battle of the Cedars, in Canada, May 19, 1776; ex- 
changed and rejoined his regiment at Mt. Independence; also. Private, Col. 
Chase's Regiment commanded by Major Smith at Ticonderoga, June- July, 
1777. 
Walter Scott Story 

JOHN SELMAN: Bom, May 6, 1744, at Marblehead; died, May 30, 1817, at 
Marblehead. Captain, Eighth Company, Col. John Glover's Regiment, 
April 24, 1775; 8 months' service at Cambridge during the Siege of Boston; 
also. First Major, Col. William Bacon's (5th Essex County) Regiment of 
militia, Sept. 20, 1779. 
Thomas Frederick Pedrick 

ABR.\HAM SHATTUCK: Bom, Oct. 12, 1759, at Pepperell; died, March 10, 
1841, at Washington, N. H. Private, Capt. Job Shattuck's Company, Col. 
Robinson's Regiment; served at Cambridge, March, 1776; also, enlisted 
in the Continental Army, Capt. Brown's Company, Col. Michael Jackson's 
Regiment, for 3 years. Term to expire, Feb., 1780. Pensioned. 
America Shattuck 

ELEAZER SHATTUCK: Bom, Oct. 26, 1751, at Pepperell; died, Aug. 19, 
1844, at Ashby. Private, Capt. Henrj'- Haskell's Company, Col. Prescott's 
Regiment; in Camp at Cambridge, Jan. 13, 1776, and served in the Campaign 
of 1776. 
Walter Levi Spaulding 



UecorD^ of Iflc^olutionarp ^nce^torjef 147 

JEREMIAH SHATTUCK, Jr. : Born, April 11, 1726, at Groton; died at Pep- 
perell. Private, Capt. Nutting's Company of Minute-men, Col. William 
Prescott's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm; served during 
the Siege of Boston; also, Corporal, Capt. Wood's Company, Col. Jonathan 
Read's Regiment at Cambridge, March- July, 1778. 
America Shattuck 

NATHANIEL SHATTUCK: Born, April 3, 1749, at Pepperell; died, Jan. 30, 
1828, at Temple, N. H. Marched from Temple, N. H., on the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; served at Cambridge, 14 days; also, Private, Capt. Parker's 
Company, Col. Nichols' Regiment, which marched from Ipswich, N. H., 
July 19, 1777, and reinforced the Northern Army at Stillwater for 2 months. 
John Prentice Rand 

THOMAS SHAW: Bom, 1738, at Carver; died at Valley Forge, Pa., July 6 
(also, given June), 1778. Thomas Shaw, of Middleboro, Private, Seventh 
Company, Col. Gamaliel Bradford's (14th Continental) Regiment, May 15, 
1777- July 6, 1778. 
Ray Richmond 

JOHN SIMPSON: Bom at Windham, N. H., Nov. 8, 1754; died at Windham, 
N. H., Nov. 18, 1824. Private, Capt. Woodbury's Company, Col. John 
Stark's Regiment, May-Aug., 1775; wounded at the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Capt. Woodbury certified that "the aforesaid John Simson behaved like a 
good soldier during the action." 
Harry Russell Simpson 

WILLIAM SIMPSON: Bom at Windham, N. H., Feb. 5, 1748; died at Wind- 
ham, N. H., Oct. 15, 1830. Private, First Company of militia in Windham, 
July 8, 1775; also, Capt. Nathan Sanborn's Company, Col. Tash's Regi- 
ment; mustered, Sept. 20, 1776, to reinforce the Continental Army at New 
York. 
Harry Russell Simpson 

WILLIAM SKAGG: Bom, 1757, in North Carolina; died, 1848, in Green Co. 
Ky. Private, Capt. Thomas Maston's Company, Col. Shelby's Regiment 
of Virginia militia, March 1, 1778; also, Captains Maston's and Bean's 
Companies, 1779; engaged in skirmishes with Indians. Pensioned. 
William Conley Skaggs 

THOMAS SMALL: Born, 1741, at Cape Elizabeth; died, March, 1827, at 
Deer Isle, Me. Second Lieutenant, Capt. Thomas Robbins' Company, Col. 
Buck's (5th Lincoln County) Regiment of militia, July 23, 1776. 
Dennie Philip Small 

CALEB SMITH: Of Hadley; bom in 1760; died in 1818. Private, Capt. 
Joshua Parker's Company, Col. Nathaniel Wade's Regiment; served in 
Rhode Island, June-Dec, 1778; also, in Capt. Samuel Lamb's Company at 
Warwick and East Greenwich, R. I. ; also, Private, Capt. Eli Parker's Com- 
pany, Col. Learned's Regiment; Continental Army service, 6 months in 
1780. Pensioned. 
Frank Herbert Smith 



148 «f>onj0f of tf^t American Iflebolution 

ELDAD SMITH: Born, 1743; died, June 16, 1808, at East Hartford, Conn. 
Private, Capt. Jonathan Wells' Company, which marched from Hartford, 
Conn., "for the relief of Boston in the Lexington alarm, April, 1775." 
Ezra Ernest Smith 

ELIJAH SMITH: Born, Jan. 30, 1760, at Waltham; died in Jan., 1846, at 
Waltham. Private, Capt. Caleb Brooks' Company, Col. Dike's Regiment; 
enlisted, Dec. 16, 1776, for the war; served at Boston on guard duty. 
Charles Frederic Smith 

JOHN SMITH: Bom in England; died, July 11, 1811, at Newburyport. Sea- 
man on privateer Dalton, which was captured, Dec. 24, 1776, and he was 
imprisoned in England. After his release, March 15, 1779, he served in 
John Paul Jones' squadron, and returned to America on the Alliance, Capt. 
Landais. His name appears among the men entitled to prize money from 
prizes captured by the squadron of Capt. John Paul Jones in 1779. 
Frank Hervey Pettingell 
Harland Goodwin Little 

JONAS SMITH: Bom, June 7, 1719, at Waltham; died, Nov. 4, 1802, at 
Waltham. Private, Capt. Abraham Peirce's Company of militia, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm; also. Sergeant, Capt. Child's, Company, 
Col. Thomas Gardner's Regiment; served for 8 months during the Siege of 
Boston; camp at Prospect Hill, Oct. 6, 1775. 
Charles Frederic Smith 

HENRY SMITH: Bom in Germany, Sept. 29, 1738; died, Dec. 12, 1827, at 
Pittston, Me. Captain, Fourth Company, Second Lincoln County Regiment 
of Massachusetts militia; commissioned, Aug. 23, 1776. He had been a 
Captain in the French and Indian war. 
C. Hudson Johnson 
A. Justin Johnson 

PHINEAS SMITH: Born, June 5, 1717, at Hadley; died in Feb., 1787, at 
Granby. Captain of a company. Col. Porter's Regiment, which marched in 
response to the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; also. Captain, Fourth 
Company, Col. Woodbridge's Regiment of militia, April 1, 1776; marched 
on the Bennington alarm of Aug. 17, 1777; resigned, Oct. 6, 1777, on account 
of old age. 
Clarence Hawkes 

BURTIS SOPER: Born, Dec. 29, 1753, at Milan, N. Y.; died, Oct. 19, 1827, at 
Cady Hill, N. J. Served in Col. Graham's Regiment of New York State 
militia; also, in Lieut. Robert Wood's Company, March 3-April 3, 1779; 
also, served at Poughkeepsie, April, 1779, on guard in the Armenia 
Precinct. 
Butler Ashburton Tripp 

JOSEPH SOUTHER: Bom, Dec. 31, 1745, at Cohasset; died, April 3, 1827, at 
Cohasset. Private, Capt. Job Cushing's Company, Col. Greaton's Regiment; 
enlisted, May 24, 1775; served at Cambridge during the Siege of Boston, 
1775; also, Capt. Thomas Hunt's Company, Col. Henry Jackson's (Con- 
tinental) Regiment; served. May, 1777-May, 1780. 
Francis Leavitt Beal 



^ecottije; of lUeboIuttonatp ^ntt^tot^ 149 

GEORGE SOUTHWICK: Of Danvers; bom, 1750; killed in battle April 19, 
1775, at Menotomy (now Arlington). Private, Capt. Samuel Epes' Com- 
pany, Col. Pickering's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm, 
April 19, 1775. 
William O. Brooking 

JEDEDIAH SOUTHWORTH: Bom, Jan. 6, 1745, at Bridgewater; died, 
March 11, 1809, at Stoughton. Private, Capt. William Briggs' Company, 
which marched from Stoughton on the Lexington alarm; also, Ensign, same 
company. Col. Joseph Reade's Regiment; Lieutenant, May, 1775, and 
Captain, Aug. 1, 1775; served through the Siege of Boston; Member of the 
Constitutional Convention and objected to the Constitution because of its 
provisions regarding slavery. 
Ernest Bowker Southworth 

ROBERT SPALDING (SPAULDING) : Bom, Jan. 28, 1728-9; died at Milford, 
Conn., in 1776. Second Lieutenant, Capt. Ford's (4th) Company, Seventh 
(Middlesex County) Regiment, May 31, 1776; also, Capt. Wright's (8th) 
Company, Col. Eleazer Brooks' Regiment; served at White Plains, N. Y., 
Oct. 31, 1776. 
Richard Daniel Ford 

ROBERT SPALDING, Jr. (SPAULDING): Bom, July 28, 1757, at Chelms- 
ford; died, Oct. 7, 1810, at Sharon, N. H. Private, Capt. William Hudson 
Ballard's Company, Col. Whitcomb's Regiment; served at Ticonderoga, 
May-Nov., 1776; also, Capt. Joseph Boynton's Company, Col. Wade's 
Regiment; July-Dec, 1778, at Rhode Island. 
Richard Daniel Floyd 

ZEBULON SPALDING (SPAULDING): Bom, March 2, 1744, at Cheknsford; 
died, Feb. 26, 1816, at Westford. Private, Capt. Wright's Company, Col. 
Brooks' Regiment, which served during the Campaign of 1776. Reported 
in "camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 1776, and fit for duty." 
James Charles Peabody 

ZEBULON SPAULDING: Bom, March 2, 1744, at Chelmsford; died (proba- 
bly), at Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Wright's Company, Col. Brooks' Regi- 
ment; served in the Campaign of 1776; present at the battle of White 
Plains, Oct. 28, 1776. 
Walter Levi Spaltlding 

JACOB SPRAGUE: Bom, June 25, 1709, at Hingham; died in Jan., 1785. 
Corporal, Capt. Enoch Whiton's Company, Col. B. Lincoln's Regiment, 
which assembled on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Charles Gordon Cutter 

JONATHAN SPRAGUE: Born at Smithfield, R. I., Dec. 9, 1765; died, Oct. 29, 
1815, at Thompson, Conn. Fifer, Capt. Sergeant's Company, Col. Jacob Ger- 
rish's Regiment of guards. On detached service at Winter HiU, July, 1778. 
Charles Warren Buck 

RUFUS SPRAGUE: Born, June 7, 1745, at Johnston, R. I.; died in Sept., 
1794, at Johnston, R. I. Committeeman to supply the recruits for the army 
from Johnston, R. I., with blankets. 
RuFus William Sprague 



150 M>on^ of tljc 3lmcrican ^ebolution 

MARK STACY: Of Sturbridge. Private, Capt. Campbell's Company, Col. 
Learned's Regiment; enlisted. May 1, 1775; served the 8 months' term at 
Roxbury camp during the Siege of Boston. 
Henry Lyon May 

WILLIAM STACY: Born at New Salem; died in 1804 in Ohio (?) Marietta. 
Major, Col. Woodbridge's Regiment; engaged, April 27, 1775; served dur- 
ing the eight months' service at the Siege of Boston; appointed officer of 
fatigue by Maj.-Gen. Putnam, July 15, 1775; also, Lieut.-Col. Seventh 
Continental Regiment, Jan. 1, 1777; transferred to Fourth Regiment, Sept. 
29, 1778; taken prisoner at Cherry Valley, Nov. 11, 1778; prisoner of war 
four years ; did not return to the army. 
Charles Fiske Rollins 
William Stacy Rollins 

WILLIAM STAN DISH: Of Pembroke; born, July 31, 1736. Private, Capt. 
John Turner's Company, Col. Cotton's Regiment, which marched to Rhode 
Island, Sept. 28, 1777; service, 1 month, 3 days. 
Charles Edgar Robinson 

ABNER STANFORD: Bom, May 12, 1747, at Sherbom; died in April, 1819, 
at Chesterfield, N. H. Private, Capt. David Batchelor's Company, Col. 
Joseph Read's Regiment; service during the Siege of Boston; also, Capt. 
Daniel's Company, Col. Thomas Nixon's (Continental) Regiment; en- 
listed, April 21, 1777, for 3 years and then for "during the war;" served 
to July, 1783. Present at the capture of Burgoyne at Saratoga, Oct. 17, 1777. 
Harry Edward Wheeler 
Stanley Cushman Wheeler 

ELEAZER STEELE: Bom, Aug. 21, 1726, at Tolland, Conn.; died, 1799, at 
Tolland, Conn. Member of the Committee on Soldiers' Supplies in Tolland 
Conn.; Town Clerk, 1776-1784; Representative to the General Assembly. 
Edwin Willis Pierce 

JAMES STEELE: Of Stoneham. Private, Capt. Samuel Sprague's Company 
of Minute-men, who marched from Stoneham on the Lexington alarm; 
service, 5 days. 
Frank Merrill White 

SAMUEL STEELE: Bom, May 6, 1757, at Tolland, Conn.; died, Nov. 25, 
1835, at Springfield, Vt. Drammer, Capt. WyUy's Company, Second Con- 
necticut Regiment at the Siege of Boston, May-Dec, 1775; also, Capt. 
Steiner's Company, Major Sheldon's troop of Light Horse, Col. Lee's Regi- 
ment, Jan., 1776; served in the Campaign of 1776; also, in the Second 
Connecticut Regiment, July 1, 1780, for 6 months; served 6 months as 
Sergeant, 16 months as Drummer and 2 months as Drum-Major. Pensioned. 
Edwin Willis Pierce 

DANIEL STEVENS: Bom in 1747 at Plaistow, N. H.; died, Oct. 10, 1824, at 
Salisbury, N. H. Private, Capt. Oilman's Company, Col. Enoch Poor's 
Regiment; at the Siege of Boston, Aug. 1, 1775; also. Lieutenant, Capt. 
Wilson's Company, Col. Badger's Regiment of militia in 1776, and Ensign 



HecorD^ of Hebolutioitarp ^mt^totfi 15 1 

of Capt. Giles' Company of volunteers, which joined the Northern Army at 
Saratoga, Oct., 1777. 
Moses E. Johnson 

ZACHARIAH STEVENS: Bom, Nov. 12, 1763, at Andover; died, Aug. 30, 
1846, at Gloucester. Private, Capt. John Dodge's Company, Col. Gerrish's 
Regiment of guards; service, Aug. 6-Dec. 6, 1778, at Winter Hill; also, 
Capt. Kettell's Company, Major Nathaniel Heath's detachment of guards, 
Aug. 14-Sept. 10, 1779, at Boston; also, Capt. Abbott's Company, Col. 
Wade's Regiment; reinforced the Continental Army at West Point, July- 
Oct., 1780; also. Sailor on ship Marquis de La Fayette of 16 guns, John 
Buflfington, master, Oct., 1782-May, 1783; took one prize, a ship bound from 
New York to Glasgow. Pensioned. 
Wallace Low Kimball 

ZACHARIAH STEVENS: Born, Nov. 12, 1763, at Andover; died, Aug. 30, 
1846, at Gloucester. Private, Capt. John Dodge's Company, Col. Gerrish's 
Regiment of guards; Aug.-Dec, 1778, at Winter Hill; also, Capt. Kettell's 
Company, Major Nathaniel Heath's detachment of guards, Aug.-Sept., 
1779, service in and about Boston; also, Capt. Abbot's Company, Col. 
Nathaniel Wade's (Continental) Regiment, July-Oct., 1780; at West Point. 
Present when Arnold's treason culminated. Pensioned. 
Paul Stevens 

DANIEL STEWART (STUARD): Bom, 1756, at Paxton; died, June 13, 1834, 
at Brattleboro, Vt. Private, Capt. Phineas Moor's Company of Minute-men, 
Col. Doolittle's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 
1775, to Cambridge; Corporal, Capt. Simon Hunt's Company, Col. Brooks' 
(Continental) Regiment. In 1776 was "reported as fit for duty, and as hav- 
ing been sent with the wounded" at the battle of White Plains, and later 
served in the New Jersey campaign. Later he had the title of Colonel. 
Charles Henry Chase 

DAVID STOCKBRIDGE: Bom, Feb., 1749, at Scituate; died, Feb. 11, 1832, 
at North Hadley. Corporal, Capt. Thompson's Company, Col. Leonard's 
Regiment, which reinforced the Northern Army, May- July, 1777. 
RuFus May Smith 

ELISHA STORY: Bora, 1743, at Boston; died, Aug. 27, 1805, at Marblehead. 
Member of the "Boston Tea Party," and the "Sons of Liberty;" studied 
medicine with Gen. Joseph Warren; of the party who disarmed the sentinels 
on Boston Common, and seized two brass cannons, and carried them to the 
Neck; the cannon were used during the war. He served as a Volunteer in 
Capt. Coggswell's Company of Ipswich, which marched on the Lexington 
alarm; commissioned by Congress, Surgeon of Little's Massachusetts Regi- 
ment; served, May-Dec, 1775; was present as a Volunteer at the battle of 
Bunker Hill; also. Surgeon, Twelfth Continental Regiment, Jan.-Dec, 1776, 
served during that campaign. Resigned in 1777, being dissatisfied with the 
management of the medical department. 
Gideon Marion Mansfield 
Charles Redington Joy 

JOHN SWAIN (SWANE): Bom, May 2, 1751, at Reading; died, Aug. 24, 
1815, at Lynn. Private, Capt. Nathaniel Bancroft's Company, which 



152 4>on30i of tl)e ^Imerican iflebolutton 

marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also, Capt. Ezra Newhall's 
Company, Col. Israel Hutchinson's Regiment; served on guard duty during 
the Siege of Boston, and in the Campaign of 1776 in New York, and at the 
battle of Trenton. 
Frederic Bassett Abbott 

AMOS SWEET: Born, March 9, 1734-5, at Attleboro; died in Attleboro. 
Private, Capt. Foster's Company, Col. Dagget's Regiment; service at Rhode 
Island on the alarm of Dec. 8, 1776; also, Capt. May's Company, same Regi- 
ment on same service, Aug., 1778; also, same company. Col. Dean's Regi- 
ment, same service in Aug., 1780. 
Ervin Viall Sweet 

THOMAS SWEET: Born, Aug. 18, 1741, at Attleboro; died, Aug. 14, 1830, at 
Attleboro. Sergeant, Capt. Wilmarth's Company, Col. Dagget's Regiment, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm; also, served on an alarm caused by 
the battle of Bunker Hill; also. Sergeant, Capt. Foster's Company, Col. 
Carpenter's Regiment, July- Aug., 1778; served at Rhode Island; also, 
same service in July, 1780. 
Ervin Viall Sweet 

ABRAHAM SWETT: Bom in 1740 at Haverhill; died, April 18, 1816, at 
Haverhill. Private, Lieut. Israel Bartlet's detachment, which marched on 
the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 5 days; Lieutenant, Col. 
Calvin Smith's (13th Continental) Regiment, Jan., 1777- June, 1779. 
H. Morris Kelley 

THOMAS TASH: Bom, July 5, 1722, at Durham, N. H.; died, Oct., 1809, at 
New Durham, N. H. Colonel, Second New Hampshire Regiment; muster 
roll dated Hampton, Sept. 21, 1776; also, Colonel, First New Hampshire 
Regiment, at Peekskill, N. Y., Nov. 20, 1776. 
Homer Dean Ricker 

STEPHEN TEMPLE: Bom, 1734, at Worcester; died, 1809. Private, Capt. 
Josiah Wood's Company, which marched from Northbridge in response to 
the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; served at Roxbury 8 days; reenlisted, 
April 27, 1775; Sergeant, Capt. Batchelder's Company, Col. Joseph Read's 
Regiment, which served during the Siege of Boston. 
Charles Richard Putnam 

STEPHEN TEMPLE, Jr.: Of Upton (1764-1852). Private, Capt. Bowman's 
Company, Col. Rufus Putnam's (5th Continental) Regiment; engaged, 
Jan. 15, 1781, for 3 years; Muster Roll for April, 1781, dated at West Point. 
Charles Richard Putnam 

JOHN TENNEY: Bom, Feb. 17, 1723, at Bradford; died, July 1, 1808, at 
Bradford. Private, Capt. Savory's Company, Col. Johnson's Regiment, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm; First Lieutenant, Capt. Spofford's 
5th (Rowley) Company, Col. Daniel Spofiford's (7th Essex County) Regi- 
ment, June 20, 1776; also, Capt. Dodge's Company, Col. Pickering's Regi- 
ment; service, Dec. 16, 1776-March 15, 1777; reinforced the Continental 
Army. 
William Phineas Fisher 



iflccortijS of lIlebolutiDnarp ^Incejaftor^ 153 

SAMUEL TENNEY: Born, Nov. 18, 1747, at Bradford. Private, Capt. John 
Savory's (2d Bradford) Company, Col. Johnson's Regiment, which marched 
on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
Laurence George Atherton 

ISAAC THAYER: Born, Nov. 23, 1741, at Braintree; died, Feb. 22, 1805, at 
Buckfield, Me. Second Lieutenant, Capt. Sawins' Company, Col. E. 
Thayer's (5th Suffolk County) Regiment of militia; also, Capt. Job Cush- 
ing's Company, Lieut. -Col. Pierce's Regiment, which served at Rhode Island, 
May 15-July 1, 1779. 
Maynard Maxim 

DANIEL THOMPSON: Of Wobum. Killed on retreat of the British from 
Concord, April 19, 1775. References: Journals of the Provincial Congress of 
Massachusetts, 1774, 1775, page 678. 
John Samuel Richardson 

THOMAS THOMPSON: Bom, 1742, at Holden; died, Feb. 21 , 1813, at Keene, 
N. H. Private, Capt. Joseph Hooker's Company of Minute-men, Col. 
Woolbridge's Regiment, which marched in response to the Lexington alarm; 
also, Capt. Gray's Company, Col. Brewer's Regiment; enlisted. May 1, 
1775, for the 8 months' service at the Siege of Boston; camp at Prospect 
Hill, Nov. 29, 1775; also, Capt. Thompson's Company, Col. Porter's Regi- 
ment; reinforced the Northern Army under Gen. Gates, Sept. 3-29, 1777. 
Marshall Putnam Thompson 

WILLIAM THOMPSON: Bom, Oct. 29, 1742, at Stratford, Conn.; died, 
April 27, 1777, in battle at Ridgefield, Conn. Lieutenant in Col. Samuel 
Whiting's Regiment of guards "being the Fourth Regiment of Connecticut 
militia, raised for defence of said state in March, 1777;" Lieutenant Thomp- 
son was killed in the Danbury Raid, April 27, 1777. 
Dwight Morris Billings 

JAMES THURBER: Born, June 28, 1721, at Rehoboth; died, Sept. 19, 1805, 
at Rehoboth. Private, Capt. Lyons, or Capt. Perrin's Companies, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; also, Capt. Martin's 
Company, Col. Carpenter's Regiment, which served on the Rhode Island 
alarm of Dec. 8, 1776. 
Albert Clark Mason 

JOHN TILTON, Jr.: Born at Ipswich, Dec. 18, 1746. Private, Capt. Joseph 
Smith's (Sudbury) Company, Col. James Barrett's Regiment, which marched 
on the Lexington alarm. 
Alfred Foster Powers 

LEVI TOWER: Bom, July 25, 1756, at Cohasset; died, June 7, 1850, at Cohas- 
set. Drummer, Capt. Job Cushing's Company, Col. Greaton's Regiment, 
engaged, May 18, 1775; served at Fort No. 2, Cambridge, during the Siege 
of Boston; also, Capt. Obadiah Beal's Company at Dorchester Heights, 
March 4, 1776; also, Capt. Peter Cushing's Company, Col. Lovell's Regi- 
ment; service at Danbury, Conn., and at Hull in 1776; also, enlisted in 
Capt. Job Cushing's Company of same regiment, Dec. 18, 1776; discharged, 
March 17, 1777. 
Francis Leavitt Beal 



154 .^on$r of ti)e American ^eboiution 

EZRA TOWN: Born, April 30, 1736, at Topsfield; died, Dec. 25, 1795, at 
New Ipswich, N. H. Lieutenant, Capt. Archelaus Town's Company; 
marched from New Ipswich on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; Cap- 
tain, Col. James Reed's Regiment, June 14, 1775, which was at the battle 
of Bunker Hill and prevented the enemy from flanking the Americans at the 
redoubt; served through the Siege of Boston; encamped on Winter Hill. 
Phineas Town 

DANIEL TOWNSEND: Bom, Dec. 26, 1738, at Lynn; died, April 19, 1775, 
at Menotomy. Private, Capt. Bancroft's Company of Minute-men, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; met the retreating 
British soldiers at Menotomy, now Arlington, when he and three other Lynn 
men were killed. 
Everett Townsend 

GEORGE TRENCHARD: Born about 1708 at Salem, N. J.; died about 1780. 
Captain, First Battalion, Salem, New Jersey, militia. 
Ira Dayton McCoy, Jr. 

JOHN TRULL: Bom in 1729 at Billerica; died, Oct 5, 1791, at Tewksbury. 
Captain of a company of Minute-men, Col. Bridge's Regiment, which 
marched from Tewksbury on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also, 
Captain, Eleventh Company, Col. Spaulding's (7th Middlesex County) 
Regiment, May 31, 1776; took an active part pursuing the British on their 
retreat from Concord, April 19, 1775. 
John Foster Cole 
John Trull 
Benjamin Franklin Trull 

JESSE TUCK: Bom, Jan. 16, 1743, at Kensington, N. H.; died, Dec. 20, 1826, 
at Kensington, N. H. Sergeant and Lieutenant, Capt. Clifford's Company, 
Col. Wingate's Regiment, at Pierce's Island, Nov. 5, 1775, for defence of 
seacoast. 
Parker Tuck 

ISAAC TURNER: Bom, 1751; died at Ludlow, Vt. Private, Capt. Soper's 
Company, which marched from Hanover to Marshfield on the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; also, Capt. Winslow's Company, Col. Gary's Regiment; 
also, Col. Whitney's Regiment; served at Roxbury and Boston, May-Nov., 
1776; also. Corporal, Capt. Bonney's Company at Castle Island, Oct-Dec, 
1778. 
Kendall Ainsworth Sanderson 

JAMES TUTTLE: Of Dover, N. H. Corporal, Capt. Brewster's Company, 
Col. Pearce Long's Battalion, Sept. 3, 1776; served at New Castle, N. H., 
Aug.-Dec, 1776. 
James Reuben Stickney 

ABRAHAM TYLER: Born, June 9, 1735, at Boxford; died, April 4, 1815, at 
Boxford. Sergeant, Capt. John Cushing's Company of militia. Col. John- 
son's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 5 days. 
James Charles Peabody 



^ttoth^ of iHebolutionarp ^ntt^tot^ 155 

EBENEZER TYLER: Bom, April 5, 1740, at Attleboro; died, Jan. 29, 1810, 
at Attleboro. Private, Capt. Jabez Ellis' Company of Minute-men, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; also. Sergeant, Capt. 
Ide's Company, Col. Dagget's Regiment on the Rhode Island alarm, Dec. 8, 
1776; also. Lieutenant, Capt. Robinson's Company (4th Bristol County) 
Regiment, Dec. 22, 1777; also, Capt. Wilmarth's Company, same regiment 
at Rhode Island, 3 months from Jan. 1, 1778; also, Capt. Foster's Company, 
Col. Thomas Carpenter's Regiment, Rhode Island service, July 27, 1780; 
also, Capt. Robinson's Company, Col. Dean's Regiment, Rhode Island 
alarm, July 31, 1780. 
Frank Lorraine Drew 

JOHN UNDERHILL: Bom, March 16, 1720, at Chester, N. H.; died in 1793, 
at Chester, N. H. Sergeant, Capt. Stephen Dearborn's Company, Col. 
Stickney's Regiment in Gen. John Stark's Brigade, which reinforced the 
Northern Army, Aug.-Sept., 1777. 
Frederick Howard Newhall 

JABEZ UPHAM: Bom, May 6, 1735, at Athol; died at Waldoboro, Me. 
Sergeant, Lieut. Weeks' Company, Col. Porter's Regiment, which marched 
on the Lexington alarm; also. Private, Capt. Angel's Company, Col. Brewer's 
Regiment; served during the Siege of Boston. 
W. Lloyd Allen 

JOSEPH BRADLEY VARNUM: Born, 1750, at Dracut; died, 1821. Served 
in Capt. Russell's Company, Col. Green's Regiment at the Lexington alarm; 
Captain, Tenth Company, Col. Spaulding's (7th Middlesex County) Regi- 
ment of militia. May 31, 1776; also. Captain of a Dracut Company of 
volunteers. Col. Reed's Regiment, Sept.-Nov., 1777; reinforced the Northern 
Army at Saratoga; also, Captain, Col. Mcintosh's Regiment, July 29- 
Sept. 11, 1778, at Rhode Island; Purchasing Agent for Gen. Hancock, 1781; 
Colonel, Seventh Regiment militia, 1787; Brigadier-General, 1787; Major- 
General, 1805-1821; Representative, Senator and Counsellor, 1780-1792; 
Judge, 1795-1811; United States Representative, 1793-1811; Speaker of 
the House; Senator, 1811-1817. 
Parker Tuck 

JAMES VERY (VERRY): Bom in 1763 at Salem; died in 1814 at Salem. 
SaUor, brigantine Dolphine, Capt. IngersoU, May 25, 1780. "Reported 
rated ^ share." 
Nathaniel Augustus Very 
George Francis Very 

CORNELIUS VAN DEUSEN: Bom, Jan. 8, 1758, at Claverack, N. Y.; died, 
Oct. 8, 1787, at Green City, N. Y. Served as Sergeant 1 year, and as Ensign 
1 year from Feb. 28, 1778, in the Eighth Regiment, First Claverack, N. Y., 
Battalion. His widow received a pension. 
Charles H. Van Deusen 

ASA WALKER: Born, Oct. 8, 1726, at Sutton; died, Oct. 5, 1809, at Sutton. 
Private, Capt. Arthur Dagget's Company of Minute-men, Col. Learned's 
Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; also. 



156 J^on^ef of tfje American iFleboIutton 

same company and regiment; enlisted, May 1, 1775; service at Roxbury 
Camp during the Siege of Boston. 
George Willis Johnson 

BENJAMIN WALKER: Born, 1742 (probably), at Andover; died, Aug. 15. 
1775, at Boston. Lieutenant, Col. Moses Parker's Company, commanded 
by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, marched from Chelmsford on the Lexington 
alarm; also. Captain, Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regiment; enlisted, April 19, 
1775, eight months' service. In command of his company at the battle of 
Bunker Hill where he was wounded in the thigh and died of his wound in 
Boston jail, Aug. 15, 1775. 
Walter Howard Creamer 

GIDEON WALKER: Bom, Feb. 25, 1756 (probably), at Sutton; died, Sept. 9,' 
1825, at Croydon, N. H. Private, Capt. Sibley's (Sutton) Company, Col. 
Holman's Regiment; enlisted in the Continental Army, June, 1778, for 9 
months, and joined Col. Rufus Putnam's Regiment at Fishkill, N. Y. 
George Willis Jewett 

DAVID WALLINGFORD: Born, Sept. 25, 1744; died, March 12, 1791, at 
HoUis, N. H. Private, Capt. Dow's Company of Minute-men, which marched 
from Hollis, N. H., in response to the alarm of April 19, 1775; also. Lieuten- 
ant, Capt. Town's Company, Col. Hutchinson's Regiment, June, 1775; also, 
Capt. Emerson's Company, June, 1777; also, Capt. Goss's Company, July, 
1777, which went to Bennington. 
Charles Edgar Robinson 

JACOB WALTON: Bom, 1720; residence, Reading. Private, Capt. John 
Walton's Company, Col. David Green's Regiment, which marched on the 
Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. Belonged to the train band. 
Frederick Bassett Abbott 

RICHARD WARD: Bom, April 5, 1741, at Salem; died, Nov. 4, 1824, at 
Salem. Captain, Third Company, First Essex County Regiment of militia, 
June 6, 1776; also. Commissary of seacoast companies at Salem; also, 
Muster Master for Essex County, Feb. 28, 1781; Member of the Committee 
of Safety during the active period of the Revolution ; constructed Fort Lee at 
Salem Neck; accompanied Col. Pickering's Regiment to Medford, and 
marched for Charlestown on June 17, 1775; also, with the regiment in the 
New Jersey campaign of 1776. 
Isaac Walton Titus 

THOMAS WARLAND: Bom, July 20, 1757, at Cambridge; died, Aug. 27, 
1839. Private, Capt. Thatcher's Company, Col. Gardner's Regiment, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm; served on guard to prevent the rescue of 
prisoners, May 11, 1776; also. Corporal, Capt. Walton's Company, Col. 
Thatcher's Regiment, Sept. 2, 1778; also. Sergeant, same company, which 
was detailed to guard the "Convention Troops" at Cambridge. 
Henry Plvmpton Spaulding 

NATHAN WARREN: Born, Feb. 5, 1761, at Weston; died, July 26, 1843, at 
Weston. Private, Capt. Baldwin's Company, Col. Dike's Regiment, Dec, 
1776-March, 1777; also, Capt. Hunt's Company, Col. Eleazer Brooks' 
(Middlesex County) Regiment, Nov., 1777- April, 1778; also, Capt. Andrews 



^ccortiiBf of Klebolutionarp ^ntmot^ 157 

Company, Col. Cyprian Howe's Regiment, July, 1780-Nov., 1780; service 
at Rhode Island. 
Emory Warren Lane 

GEORGE WATERHOUSE: Bom, 1746, at Barrington, N. H.; died, April 1, 
1840, at Poland, Me. Sergeant, Capt. Samuel Hayes' Company at 
Pierce's Island, Nov. 5, 1775; stationed in defence of Piscataqua Harbor; 
also. Second Lieutenant in Col. Bumham's Regiment at Winter Hill, Dec, 
1775. 
James Edgar Barnes 

JEDEDIAH WENTWORTH: Born, Nov. 2, 1748, at Somersworth, N. H.; 
died, Oct. 9, 1821, at Lebanon, Me. Private, Capt. Jonathan Wentworth's 
Company, Col. Poor's Regiment; mustered, June 20, 1775. 
Homer Dean Ricker 

MICAH WESTON: Bom, 1737; died, Aug. 4, 1816, at Duxbury. Drammer, 
Capt. Bradford's (1st Duxbury) Company, Col. Warren's Regiment, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775; also, same company, 
Col. Cotton's Regiment, May 8, 1775; served at Roxbury camp during the 
Siege of Boston; also, Capt. Jesse Harlow's Company, stationed at Plymouth 
Jan.-Nov., 1776; also Capt. Arnold's Company; Col. Lothrop's Regiment; 
served at Rhode Island on the alarm of Dec. 10, 1776; also, Capt. Samson's 
Company, at the Gurnet, May 20, 1777; also, Capt. Lapham's Company, 
Col. Reed's Regiment; service with the guards at Cambridge, April- July, 
1778; also, Capt. Cooper's Company, Fourteenth Continental Regiment; 
reinforced the army for 9 months, July 23, 1779. 
William Henry Harrison Prior 

ZEBDIEL WESTON: Of Duxbury (1740-1804). Private, Capt. Andrew Sam- 
son's Company; mustered, May 20, 1777, for service at the fort on the 
Gurnet at the entrance to Plymouth Harbor. 
Frederick Eldridge Bramhall 

JEREMIAH WHEELER: Bora, July 21, 1725. Private, Capt. Thomas 
Wheeler's Company, Eighth Regiment, Connecticut militia, which marched 
from Stonington, Conn., Sept. 8, 1776, and served in New York until Nov. 9, 
1776. 
Charles Edwin Williams 

NATHAN WHEELER: Of Temple, N. H. He, with two other men, hired 

Isaac Mitchell to serve in Capt. William Scott's Company for 3 years in the 

army, March 19, 1777. 

John Prentice Rand 
PAUL WHEELOCK: Bom, Feb. 9, 1739, at Uxbridge. Corporal, Capt. 

Seagrave's Company, Col. Joseph Read's Regiment; enlisted. May 8, 1775; 

served during the Siege of Boston; also, Capt. Hammet's Company, Col. 

Drury's Regiment; reinforced the Continental Army at Claverack, N. Y., 

Oct.-Nov., 1779. 

Walter Allen Young 
PHINEAS WHITESIDE: Born, 1716, in Ireland; died, 1793, at Cambridge, 

N. Y. Member of the Assembly of New York State, 1779-1780. Oct. 28, 

1779; receipted for attendance, Aug. 23-Oct. 25, 1779, $828; also, Jan. 8- 



158 ^on^ of t()e American Urboluttan 

March 14, 1780, $1,680; also, May 11-July 2, 1780, £24, 16s; also, Nov. 23, 
1782, receipted for 59 bushels of wheat. 
Charles McKernon 

BARZILLA WHITING: Bom, 1757. Private, Capt. Cobb's Company, Col. 
Mitchell's Regiment, marched on the Rhode Island alarm from Abington 
to Bristol, R. I., Dec. 9, 1776; also, same company. Major Cary's Regiment; 
service at Rhode Island, July 30, 1780. 
Kendall Ainsworth Sanderson 

ISAAC WHITNEY: Born, Dec. 28, 1748, at York, Me.; died, Oct. 21, 1837, 
at Gorham, Me. Private, Capt. McLellan's Company, Col. Fogg's (Conti- 
nental) Regiment; served, 9 months; arrived at Fishkill, N. Y., June 14, 
1778. Pensioned. 
John Woodman Higgins 

JOSIAH WHITNEY: Born, Oct. 12, 1731, at Stow; died, Jan. 24, 1806, at 
Stow. Lieutenant-Colonel, Col. Asa Whitcomb's Regiment, April 19, 1775; 
services during the Siege of Boston; Colonel, Second Worcester County 
Regiment, April 10, 1776; regiment raised to fortify town and harbor 
of Boston; also. Colonel of a regiment which served in Rhode Island, May- 
July, 1777, and on an alarm at Bennington, Aug. 19, 1777; also. Colonel 
Brig.-Gen. Titcomb's brigade at Rhode Island, July-Sept., 1778. 
Albert Goodwin Foster 

SAMUEL WHITNEY: Bom, May 23, 1719, at Weston; died, Jan. 1, 1782, at 
Westminster. A recognized patriot and a leading citizen of Weston; removed 
to Westminster before the Revolution and served as Lieutenant of a militia 
company in that town. 
Matthew Marble Gushing 

SILAS WHITNEY: Bom, Oct. 20, 1752, at Westminster; died, Nov. 14, 1798, 
at Ashbumham. Private, Capt. John Estabrook's Company, Col. Asa 
Whitcomb's Regiment, which marched to Cambridge on the Lexington 
alarm, April 19, 1775. After the war he was a Captain in the militia, and 
was prominent in town affairs at Ashbumham. 
Matthew Marble Gushing 

SILAS WHITNEY: Bom, Feb. 26, 1758, at Stow; died in 1838, at Charles- 
town. Private, Capt. Amasa Cranston's Company, Col. E. Brooks' Regi- 
ment; served in the Campaign of 1776, and present at the battle of White 
Plains. 
Harrie Holland Whitney 

STEPHEN WHITNEY: Bom, May 1, 1757, at Stow; died, June 25, 1806, at 
South Deerfield. Private, Capt. Whitney's Company, Col. Josiah Whitney's 
Regiment; served on a Rhode Island alarm, July 22, 1777; also, Capt. 
Hill's Company, same regiment and service in Oct., 1777; also, Capt. 
Myrick's Company, Col. Sparhawk's Regiment, Sept.-Dec, 1778, at Boston. 
Albert Goodwin Foster 

ZACHARIAH WHITNEY: Bom, Jan. 11, 1747, at Woburn; died, 1827 or 28, 
at Fitchburg. Private, Capt. Shattuck's Company, Lieut.-Col. Barnabas 



lllecotbje? of l^eboluttonatp ^ntt^ttit^ 159 

Sears' Regiment, Hampshire County miKtia; served, Aug.-Nov., 1781 
roll dated Deerfield. 
Marshall Putnam Thompson 

JOHN WHEELER: Born, Feb. 5, 1731, at Southboro; died, June 12, 1815, at 
Westmoreland, N. H. Captain of the Petersham Company of Minute-men, 
Col. Doolittle's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm; enlisted, 
May 1, 1775, in Capt. Fletcher's Company, same regiment; Commissioned 
Lieutenant, June 12, 1775; also. Lieutenant of Capt. Knowlton's Company, 
Col. Dike's Regiment; served at Dorchester Heights until March 1, 1777; 
also, served at Ticonderoga in Capt. Josiah Brown's Company, Col. Hale's 
Regiment, New Hampshire militia, which marched on a Ticonderoga alarm. 
May 8, 1777. 
H. Warren Wheeler 
Arthur Loring Wheeler 

JOSIAH WIGGIN: Born in 1726 at Newmarket, N. H. Private, Capt. John 
Drew's Company; mustered, Aug. 29, 1776, from Col. Evan's New Hamp- 
shire Regiment for service in Canada. 
Harry Carleton Wiggin 

SAMUEL WILLARD, Jr. : Born, Sept. 15, 1743, at York, Me. ; died at Sanford, 
Me. Lieutenant, Capt. Edward Harmon's Company, Col. Ebenezer Sayer's 
Regiment of Massachusetts militia; commissioned, June 26, 1776. 
Arthur Clark Harrington 

HIEL WILCOX: Bom, May 3, 1734, at Killingworth, Conn.; died, Dec. 5, 
1822, at New Concord, N. Y. Private in the Seventeenth Albany County 
Regiment of New York militia. His name appears on an assignment of a 
land bounty right, dated in Albany, May 27, 1782. 
DoRviL Miller Wilcox 

NATHANIEL WILCOX: Born, Jan. 6, 1759, at Nine Partners, N. Y.; died, 
Feb. 14, 1837, at Lexington, N. Y. Private, Capt. George Darrow's Com- 
pany, Col. Van Dyke's (N. Y.) Regiment; enlisted in May, 1776, served, 
7 months; reenlisted in May, 1777, Capt. Salisbury's Company, Col. 
Whiting's (N. Y.) Regiment; served, 4 months; reenlisted in April, 1778, 
in Capt. Mudge's Company at Cherry Valley, N. Y.; served 1 month; 
reenlisted in May or June, 1778, in Capt. Gray's Company, Col. McKinstry's 
Regiment and served 9 months; reenlisted, June 1, 1779, in Capt. Noble's 
Company in "the Levies," Col. Robert Van Rensselaer; served, 4 months 
at Fishkill, N. Y.; reenlisted in Aug., 1781, in "the Levies," under command 
of Col. M. Willett and served, 4 months. 
DoRviL Miller Wilcox 

BRAY WILKINS: Bom, April 29, 1729, at Salem or Middleton; died in 1775 
or 6, at HoUis, N. H. Private, Capt. Reuben Dow's Company of Minute- 
men from HoUis, N. H., who marched in response to the Lexington alarm; 
reenlisted for 8 months in Capt. Town's Company, Col. Bridge's Regiment; 
company afterwards transferred to Col. Hutchinson's Regiment in which 
he served at Bunker Hill as Sergeant. 
Clarence Herbert Wilkins 



160 ^tm^ of tf)t American Hebolutton 

ISAAC WILLIAMS: Born, June 10, 1744, at Roxbury; died, Dec. 5, 1815, at 
Roxbury. Lieutenant, Capt. Child's Company, Col. William Heath's Regi- 
ment; served on the Lexington alarm to May 3, 1775; also, First Lieutenant, 
Capt. Lemuel May's Company (1st Suffolk County) Regiment of militia, 
May 10, 1776. 
Edwin Willis Pierce 

JONATHAN WILLIAMS: Bom, Nov. 18, 1745, at Roxbury; died, Feb. 18, 
1794, at Roxbury. Sergeant, Capt. Samuel Sprague's Company, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm; service, 15 days; also, Lieutenant, Capt. 
Clarke's Company, Col. Bromfield's (Boston) Regiment of Militia, Feb. 5, 
1777; also. Lieutenant, Capt. Belcher's and Capt. Cutler's Companies, Col. 
Wade's Regiment; July 1, 1778- Jan. 1, 1779; service at Rhode Island. 
Frederic Williams Perkins 

THOMAS WILLIAMS: Bom, Sept. 5, 1759, at Lynn; died, Feb. 22, 1799, at 
Lynn. Seaman, brig Haskett and John; captured by the British, May 3, 
1781, and confined in old Mill Prison, July 7, 1781. 
George Herschel Breed 
Melville Breed 

WARHAM WILLIAMS: Bom, April 9, 1731, at Stonington, Conn.; died at 
Stonington, Conn., in 1812. Chosen by town of Stonington, Dec. 16, 1779, 
to supply soldiers' families. Among the list of pensioners residing in New 
London County in 1832. His name is found among the list of subordinate 
officers in Stonington, Conn. 
Charles Edwin Williams 

CHARLES WILLIS: Bom, June 27, 1753, at Boston; died, Jan. 14, 1831, at 
Boston. Sail Maker, U. S. brig General Gates, Capt. Skimmer; Private, 
Capt. Phineas Steams' Company, which marched from Watertown to rein- 
force army at Dorchester Heights in March, 1776; also, Corporal, Capt. 
Bumstead's Company, Lieut.-Col. Hatch's (Boston) Regiment; served on 
guard at and about Boston, May 7, 1777; also, Capt. Hinkley's Company, 
Lieut.-Col. Symmes' guards at Boston, Feb.-May, 1778. 
James Franklin Willis 
Arthur Willis 

HOPESTILL WILLIS: Bom, June 9, 1746, at Sudbury; died, March 13, 1823, 
at Sudbury. Private, Capt. John Nixon's Company of Minute-men, Col. 
Abijah Pierce's Regiment, which marched to Concord on the alarm of 
April 19, 1775, and pursued the British on their retreat; also. Sergeant of 
the Picket Guard under Major Baldwin, May, 1775; also, Lieutenant, Capt. 
Wheeler's Company, Col. Reed's Regiment, Sept. 28, 1777; service in the 
Northern department under Gen. Gates. 
Henry Willis Brown 

JESSE WILSON: Bom, Jan. 20, 1729, at Pelham, N. H. Captain, Col. Moses 
Nichols' Regiment of New Hampshire miUtia, Brigadier-Gen. Stark's 
Brigade, July-Sept., 1777. 
Arthur Jesse Skinner 



Hecorti^ of ifleboluttonarp ^ncejftor^ 161 

JEREMIAH WINN: Born, April 29, 1749, at Wobum; lived, also, in Wilming- 
ton. Private, Capt. Walker's Company, Col. Green's Regiment, which 
marched on the Lexington alarm; also, John Baker's Company, Col. Samuel 
Gerrish's Regiment; enlisted, April 24, 1775; served 3 months, 9 days; 
also, Capt. Pettingell's Company, Col. Baldwin's Regiment, Sept. 27, 1775. 
WiLLARD Allen Winn 

JOSEPH WINN: Bom, July 3, 1734, at Wobum; died, April 30, 1817, at 
Burlington. Lieutenant, Capt. Samuel Belknap's Company, which marched 
from Wobum and served on the Lexington alarm at Concord and Cambridge ; 
also, commissioned. May 6, 1776, Lieutenant of same company of the Second 
Middlesex County Regiment of militia; also, Lieutenant of Capt. Ford's 
Company, Col. E. Brooks' Regiment, which served at Cambridge guarding 
the "Convention Troops," Nov. 13, 1777; also, served at Rhode Island, 
Sept. 6, 1778, and at Boston to Jan., 1779. 
John Winn 
Samuel Abbott 

PETER WINSOR: Bom, Aug. 21, 1761, at Duxbury; died, April 19, 1845. 
Enlisted in the Continental Army, Sept. 10, 1777, for the war. He 
served part of the time in Lieut.-Col. Brooks' (7th) Regiment; Corporal, 
Aug. 1, 1781; discharged at expiration of term, June 8, 1783. "Among 
the men entitled to honorary badges for faithful service since July 21, 1777." 
George Ryder Winsor 

JOHN WITHAM: Bom at Marblehead, and died there after 1789. Private, 
Capt. Bradbury Saunders' Company, stationed at Gloucester for seacoast 
defence; served 4 months from Jan., 1776. One of the men on the Franklin, 
Capt. Mugford, which captured and carried into Boston the British transport 
Hope, a valuable prize for the Americans. 
H. Morris Kelley 

JOSEPH WOOD, Jr.: Bom, April 18, 1748, at Hopkinton; died, Oct. 13, 
1820, at Grafton. Private, Capt. Joseph Warren's Company, Lieut.-Col. 
Wheelock's Regiment, which marched on the Bennington alarm, Aug. 21, 
1777. 
Henry Leander Wood 

SOLOMON WOOD: Bom at Dracut in 1756; died, June 5, 1820, at Dracut. 
Private, Capt. Cobum's Company of Minute-men, Col. Bridge's Regiment, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; served during the 
8 months' service at the Siege of Boston; he was present at the battle of 
Bunker HiU, and made claim on the General Court for allowance for the loss 
of his gun; also. Private, Capt. Varnum's Company, Col. Jonathan Reed's 
Regiment, which reinforced the Northern Army at Saratoga, Oct. 1, 1777; 
served, 42 days. 
John Edwin Emerson 

PETER WOODBURY: Born, June 20, 1705, at Beverly; died. May 14, 1775, 
at Beverly. Sergeant, Capt. Caleb Dodge's Company of the Alarm List, 
which marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775; died from effects of 
this exertion, aged 70 years. 
Walter Pierce Sheldon 



162 M>tm^ of tt)e American He^iolutton 

JONATHAN WOODWARD: Bom, May 1, 1740, at Dunstable; died, Dec. 24, 
1840, at Dunstable. Private, Capt. Leonard Butterfield's Company, Col. 
Bridge's Regiment of Minute-men, which marched to Cambridge on the 
Lexington alarm and served 10 days; also, Capt. Ford's Company of vol- 
unteers, Col. Reed's Regiment at Ticonderoga, July 25, 1776; discharged 
at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777; also, same company and regiment, Sept.-Nov., 
1777, reinforced Northern Army; also, Capt. Vamum's Company, Col. 
Mcintosh's Regiment; service at Rhode Island, July-Sept., 1778. 
Harry Gay Fletcher 

JACOB WOOLLEY: Bom, Jan. 27, 1762, in New Jersey; died, Nov. 21, 1829, 
at Chatham, N. J. Drummer, Capt. Silas Howell's Company, First Bat- 
talion, Second Establishment, New Jersey Continental Line; enlisted, 
March 1, 1777; served at the engagements at Short Hills, N. J.; Brandy- 
wine and Germantown, Pa. ; transferred to Capt. John Flahaven's Company, 
Nov. 30, 1777; Fifer, March 1, 1778, and was in the battle at Monmouth, 
N. J., June 28, 1778; also. Drummer, Capt. Aaron Ogden's Company, 
Feb. 1, 1779, Gen. Maxwell's Brigade, Gen. Sullivan's Division in the cam- 
paign against the Six Nations, May-Nov., 1779; he was in the battle of 
Newtown and Chemung; Connecticut Farms and Springfield. In same 
company transferred to First Regiment, New Jersey Continental Line, 
Jan. 1, 1781, and in Capt. Forman's Company of same regiment, Aug. 1, 
1781, Col. Elias Dayton commanding, at the siege of Yorktown; present at 
the surrender of Comwallis, Oct. 19, 1781; also. Private, Capt. Alexander 
Mitchell's Company, New Jersey Regiment, March 1, 1783, and served to 
the close of the war. Pensioned. 
Francis Hawks Appleton 
Francis Hawks Appleton, Jr. 
Lloyd Elliott Appleton 

DAVID WORTHINGTON: Born, July 19, 1755, at Belchertown; died, 
April 19, 1818, at Peru. Private, Capt. Cowls' Company, Col. Woodbridge's 
Regiment, which marched in response to the Lexington alarm of April 19, 
1775; served, 25 days; also, Capt. Elijah Dwight's Company; also, Capt. 
Parker's Company, Col. Leonard's Regiment, reinforced Continental Army 
at Ticonderoga for 2 months. May 8, 1777; also, Capt. Bordwell's Company, 
Col. Porter's Regiment; served with Northern Army, Sept.-Oct., 1777. 
Gideon Scull Holmes 

EBENEZER WYETH: Born, Dec. 17, 1752, at Cambridge. Private, Capt. 
Thatcher's Company, Col. Gardner's Regiment, which marched on the 
Lexington alarm; also, Capt. Walton's Company, same regiment at Fort 
No. 2, Cambridge, Sept., 1778; also, at Boston serving under Gen. Heath, 
Oct. 3-Nov. 9, 1778. 
William Henry Wyeth 

JESSE YORK: Bom, Aug. 1, 1740; died, Dec. 13, 1808. Sergeant, Capt. 
Thomas Holmes' Company, Eighth Regiment, Connecticut militia; enlisted, 
Sept. 8, 1776, and served at New York to Nov. 9, 1776. 
Charles Edwin Williams 



Hecorb^ of Jflebolutionarp ^ntt^tot^ 163 

JOHN ZIMMERMAN: Born, Nov. 11, 1747, in Lancaster Co., Pa.; died, 
Aug. 22, 1829, near Washington ville, Ohio. Private, Capt. Fester's Com- 
pany, First Vacant Regiment; also, Capt. Lorah's Company, Second 
Vacant Regiment; also. Captains Hubley and Bayer's Companies, German 
battalion, commanded successively by Lieut.-Col. George Strecker, Col. 
Baron Avendt, and Lieut.-Col. Ludwig Weltner; served, July 25, 1776- 
Oct. 12, 1779; also, served in Capt. Orth's Company, Second battalion, 
Lancaster County militia; Lieut.-Col. Thomas Edwards commanding, 1781 . 
Charles Ballard Zimmerman 



CHAPTERS 



ORGANIZED BY AUTHORITY OF ARTICLE V OF THE 
CONSTITUTION OF THE MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY 



©IB ^alcm CI)apter, Salem 
CHARTERED, OCTOBER 31, 1895 

President Albert Robinson 

First Vice-President .... Francis S. Beckford 
Second Vice-President .... Osborn Leach 

Secretary Frank S. Perkins 

Treasurer Francis B. Hathaway 

Registrar Andrew Nichols 

^00tan C()aptcr, Boston 

CHARTERED, OCTOBER 31, 1895 

President Alvin R. Bailey 

Vice-President Waldo E. Boardman, D.M.D. 

Secretary Charles C. Littlefield 

Treasurer Edwin B. Gallagher 

Historian Marshall P. Thompson 

(Seorffc WsiS\iin%toii Chapter, Springfield 
CHARTERED, OCTOBER 31, 1895 

President John MacDuffie 

Vice-President . . . . Clifford B. Potter 

Secretary Henry A. Booth 

Treasurer Henry F. Punderson 

Registrar Frank G. Tobey 

Historian William F. Emerson 

Chaplain Rev. Newton M. Hall, D.D. 

Auditor Edwin G. Rude 



166 ^onje? of t^t ^mttitan lletjolutton 

©11 fSmmitiitj: chapter, Lowell 

CHARTERED, JANUARY 17, 1896 

President Rev. Allan C. Ferrin 

Vice-President Herbert C. Taft 

Secretary P. Hildreth Parker 

Treasurer Dr. Clarence B. Livingston 

Registrar Warren W. Fox 

Historian Frank W. Hall 

Chaplain Rev. Wilson Waters 

Auditor George W. Miller 



(BVa ^66tTC €l)apter, Lynn 

CHARTERED, FEBRUARY 7, 1896 

President Horace H. Atherton, Jr. 

First Vice-President .... Charles J. H. Woodbury 

Second Vice-President .... Henry F. Tapley 

Secretary Luther Atwood 

Treasurer Webster Bruce 

Historian Charles H. Bangs, M.D. 



©Ill Colonp Cl)apter, Whitman 

CHARTERED, APRIL 17, 1896 

President David V. Poole 

Vice-President Horatio F. Copeland 

Secretary Charles E. Lovell, M.D. 

Treasurer Randall W. Cook 

Historian Judge Charles H. Edson 



©15 S>ttfioIli (!Dl)apter, Chelsea 

CHARTERED, FEBRUARY 3, 1897 

President Fred A. Jenks 

Vice-President Fred H. Matthews 

Secretary Thomas U. Follansbee 

Treasurer Elmer H. Snow 

Historian William E. McClintock 



Wavtteuv C|)apter, Worcester 

CHARTERED, APRIL 2, 1897 
President John C. Beery, M.D. 

^ George M. Rice 
Vice-Presidents .... "\ U. Waldo Cutler 

C Paul B. Morgan 

Secretary U. Waldo Cutler 

Treasurer George D. Barber 

Historian John K. Warren, M.D. 

iQctototDne C!)apter, Newton 

CHARTERED, MAY 7, 1897 

President Frederic M. Mitchell 

Vice-President Vacant 

Secretary and Treasurer . . . Edward J. Cox 

Registrar . . Samuel G. Webber, M.D. 

Historian Edward J. Cox 

^crti£(j)ire Countp CJiapter, Pittsfield 

CHARTERED, JUNE 4, 1897 

President Joseph E. Peirson 

t Hon. E. T. Slocum 
Vice-Presidents .... < Allen H. Bagg 

( Wm. C. Stevenson 
Secretary and Registrar . . . . H. Payson Brown 

Treasurer Charles S. Shaw 

Historian Wm. L. Root 



167 



Eoiiert Crcat JJaine Chapter, Taunton 

CHARTERED, SEPTEMBER 3, 1897 
President . 
First Vice-President 



Second Vice-President 
Secretary . 
Treasurer . 
Registrar . 
Historian . 
Chaplain . 



Enos D. Williams 
Lewis E. Higgins 

Frank C. Walker, M.D. 
James E. Seaver 
William M. Emery 
Rev. J. Francis Cooper 



168 M>tm^ of tfyt ^mttitaa lle\)oIutton 

ilallien Chapter, Malden 
CHARTERED, APRIL 6, 1900 
President William H. Winship 

First Vice-President .... Spencer T. Williams 
Second Vice-President .... A. Warren Patch 

Secretary Walter K. Watkins 

Treasurer Willard Welsh 

Historian William B. Snow 



CambriUffe CI)apter, Cambridge 

CHARTERED, MARCH 7, 1902 

President John Amee 

Vice-President 

Secretary Shepard Howland 

Treasurer Albert F. Amee 

Historian Edward B. Hutchinson 

Set!) pomcrop Cjjaptcr, Northampton 
CHARTERED, OCTOBER 13, 1905 

President Elmer H. Cofeland, M.D. 

Vice-President Louis L. Campbell 

Secretary Charles H. Chase 

Treasurer Harry E. Bicknell 

Historian George W. Cable 

Chaplain Rev. Henry G. Smith 

Auditor Alfred G. Carley 

Bopbttrp Cl)apter, (Roxbury District) Boston 
CHARTERED, APRIL 13, 1906 

President Frank E. Granger 

Vice-President William C. Briggs 

Secretary Arthur M. Wiggin 

Treasurer Arthur L. Foster 

Historian Henry C. Whitcomb 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

AND 

MATTERS OF HISTORICAL INTEREST 



SEAL 

The Seal of the National Society is one and seven-eighths of an 
inch in diameter, and consists of the figure of a minute-man stand- 
ing by the side of a plough, surrounded by thirteen stars; the whole 
encircled by a band three-eighths of an inch wide, upon which in 
raised letters is the name of the Society, with the date of organiza- 
tion. That of the State Society is identical with that of the National 
Society, except that within the name of the parent society is the 
motto "Massachusetts Society, organized April 19, 1889." 



INSIGNIA 

The Badge — Obverse: A gold cross of four arms and eight points, 
of the same size as the Chevalier's Cross of the French Legion of 
Honor, with white enamelled arms. In the centre is a gold medal- 
lion bust of George Washington in profile, surrounded by a ribbon 
in blue enamel, on which is the motto of the Society in gold letters, 
" Libertas et Patria." Between the medallion and the points of the 
cross is a laiu-el wreath. Reverse: Like the obverse; the medal- 
lion, however, has the figure of a minute-man, surrounded by a 
ribbon in blue enamel, containing in gold letters the words, "Sons 
of the American Revolution." The cross is surrounded by an eagle 
in gold, suspended by a silk ribbon of blue, white, and buff. 

The cross is a reproduction of the emblem of the French Order 
of St. Louis, with certain changes, and was adopted to commem- 
orate the assistance given to the Colonies by Louis XVI, Grand 
Master of that Order. The medallion, containing the head of 
Washington and the figure of the minute-man, is fitly placed upon 
a cross of such an origin and associations. 



170 ^onjef of tlje American Hebolution 

The Rosette — The rosette is a button in the shape of a raised 
cup, of blue, white, and buff ribbon. It is to be worn in the upper 
left-hand button-hole of the coat. 

The only badge now authorized by the National Congress is that 
described above, superseding all forms previously used. The price 
of the badge, or cross of St. Louis, adapted to this Society, is nine 
dollars. It may be obtained of Messrs. J. E. Caldwell & Co., Phila- 
delphia, by permit issued by the Registrar-General, which will be 
furnished by the Registrar. The rosette may be procured of the 
Registrar for twenty-five cents. 



THE OFFICIAL MARKER 

The subject of identifying and marking the graves of Revolu- 
tionary soldiers and sailors has for some time engaged the attention 
of the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution. 

The General Court of Massachusetts, by an act passed in 1884, 
authorized towns to appropriate money for the purpose of erecting 
headstones or other monuments to the memory of the patriot dead. 

The design adopted by the Massachusetts Society follows the 
insignia badge of the Society, having the letters S. A. R. (Soldier 
American Revolution) on three of the arms, and the figures 1775 
on the fourth arm of the cross. More than nine thousand five him- 
dred markers have been made and used throughout this and other 
States, and even in our distant possessions and in foreign lands. 
A list of soldiers and sailors whose graves have been designated 
was printed in connection with the Society's Year Books of 1901 
and 1904. 

The Massachusetts Society, while retaining the design of the 
marker as originally made of iron, has now entirely changed its 
material and mode of manufacture. The cross has been slightly 
reduced in size, and is made of good bronze. It is securely fastened 
to a brass rod, and this rod, with the cross, makes its entire length 
about thirty-seven inches. If desired, the end of the rod having an 
anchor may be set in cement, which is to be biuied eighteen inches 
below the surface of the ground. This anchor will render the marker, 
when once adjusted, almost immovable; and, with the bronze and 
brass of which it is composed, the whole will last for many years. 
The National Congress, at its session in 1894, adopted the design for 



<Deneral ^information 171 

its official marker, and recommended its use by all the State Societies. 
At the session of 1903 the changes suggested by the Massachusetts 
Society were approved. 

Full information for procuring the markers may be obtained 
from the Registrar. 

Marble headstones, suitably inscribed for marking the graves of 
soldiers or sailors of the Revolution, are furnished free of charge upon 
application to the Quartermaster General, U. S. Army, Washington, 
D. C. 



INFORMATION 

Membership in this Society is strictly limited by the National 
and State Constitutions to such persons as can prove their descent 
from well-authenticated patriot Revolutionary ancestry. Collateral 
descent has at no time been allowed in this body by prescribed 
law or otherwise. Appropriate papers and all needed information 
for making application for admission will be furnished by the 
Registrar. 

Applications for Membership must be made out in duplicate; 
must be signed by the applicant on the second and fourth pages; 
must be sworn to before a justice or a notary; and returned to the 
Registrar with check for five dollars — which includes the admission 
fee and the first year's assessment. Biographical data should be 
given as fully as possible, and reference to authorities quoted. Care 
should be taken that all these requirements be carried out, as no 
imperfectly prepared papers can be received. 

The Secretary of most of the States will make a search of the 
rolls and archives, and furnish an official certificate for a small sum. 
The Commissioner of Pensions at Washington will furnish a cer- 
tificate, gratis, if the ancestor was a pensioner. 

The Certificate of Membership issued by the National Society, 
handsomely engraved, and of size suitable for framing, will be 
f\imished for the sum of one dollar in advance. Application to be 
made to the Registrar. 



THE FRONTISPIECE 

THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL 
From a painting by Col. John Trumbull 

"On the morning of June 16, 1775, positive and reliable informa- 
tion was brought to Cambridge from Boston during the previous 
night of the plans and decision of the British commanders for the 
occupation of Dorchester Heights on June 18. Immediate consulta- 
tion took place at General Ward's headquarters in Cambridge, when 
it was decided to occupy Charlestown Peninsula that night and force 
the British to attack us on June 17; the real objective, therefore, of 
the Battle of Bimker Hill was to prevent the execution of the British 
plan of occupying Dorchester Heights on June 18. After much 
argument this bold plan for precipitating a battle and making it as 
crippling as possible to the British was adopted, and Prescott was 
sent with about a thousand men to intrench himself on Charlestown 
Heights. 

"The steepness of Btmker Hill on the western side made it im- 
possible for our troops on the stmimit to depress their gims enough 
to prevent the British from seizing Charlestown Neck and thus 
capturing o\xr forces on the stimmit of Bunker Hill. Hence the occu- 
pation of Breed's Hill was a necessity, probably not unanticipated 
by our generals at Cambridge, as from that point the North End of 
Boston and the shipping could be commanded. The result of this 
bold move exactly corresponded to the purpose of fortifying Charles- 
town Heights. The British did accept the challenge and did suffer 
such a loss in carrying our position as proves the regulars' marvellous 
courage and high discipline. Their total force engaged was about 
2,640 men and ofi&cers, of which niunber 1,054 were killed or woimded, 
a proportion of average losses rarely recorded in any battle, while 
the whole right wing of Howe's line, in front of the rail fence held by 
Stark and Putnam, was utterly and hopelessly routed. 

"According to General Howe's letter of Jime 22, 1775, still pre- 
served, we now know that the entire British army in Boston on that 
day was not quite 5,500, of whom 1,450 were needed to garrison the 
town; this would leave 4,050 for off ensive operations ; of this 4,050, 



oBcnctal ^information 173 

2,640 were engaged in the battle; they lost 1,054, or 40 per cent, 
which was 26 per cent of the entire available field force on Jiine 17. 
This loss so crippled the British army that they were thenceforth 
on the defensive and dared not risk another such battle for the pos- 
session of Dorchester Heights. This crippling of the British army 
was hoped for in challenging them to fight at Charlestown; our 
objective, which was to prevent them from occupying Dorchester 
Heights, was won and thus gained time for us to obtain the ordnance 
necessary to make our occupation of those heights effective in closing 
British sea commimication and thus assuring their surrender or the 
evacuation of Boston, without damaging the town if we would not 
fire on them. Thus Bunker Hill is an historic battle and will continue 
to be so as years pass. Indeed, a critical study of the movements of 
that battle on both sides will well repay the military student, even 
though he may have taken part in the greatest battles of the 
Rebellion." — Horace N. Fisher. 



^IDDresses 



THE PRESIDENT'S NEW YEAR'S GREETING 

Boston, 1 January, 1913. 

The President, to all Compatriots, gives most hearty New Year's Greeting, 
and seeks personally to say to each and all: 

Compatriots : 

We are at the parting of the ways. Your ideas and mine, those of 
our Fathers, as to what the word "Americanism" means, are not the 
ideas of many of our fellow citizens. A new conception of the body 
politic, of the popular participation in government of, for, and by 
the people, is in process of evolution. Economic beliefs and former 
standards are shattered; the very fabric of our American system is 
under review. 

We confront problems, intensified by significant developments of 
the past year. The privilege of membership in our Society becomes 
more and more the opportunity to serve for American ideals. Can 
we not give our influence for maintenance of those conceptions of the 
Fathers which are foundation principles of the Republic, while con- 
ceding freely to the restless age and changing views on many phases 
of life and action of these strenuous times. 

Less politics, more thoughtful study and appreciation of the value 
of our heritage, are needed. It is the part of wisdom that we imder- 
stand what we believe. Each one of us should know more about 
the history of oiu* country and should strive to apply such knowledge 
towards the good of our fellow men. There is solemn need of better 
understanding between older and younger Americans — descendants 
of the founders and those who, having accepted heartily our invita- 
tion, in these later days are bringing new blood, new ideas, new 
theories into America. 

We can learn much from the new comers — frugality, love of the 
home — to get back to God's plan in family, and social and civic life; 
to practical and literal obedience to the Ten Commandments and the 
Golden Rule. We should be able to show what liberty under law 
means and that Americanism rests upon firm foundations, glorying 
in its past, living and working today, with perfect confidence in the 
future. We Americans, of all origins and descents, must get together 
and help each other, for the good of all. God has joined us together, 



178 <^on$r of ti)e Slmettcan Heboiution 

the American people, and we have work to do in opposing efforts 
that would tear us apart. 

Now, this means just this: "Get next" to the twentieth century- 
American: we are dangerously near to forgetting that we've rolled 
by a dozen years of the new century — almost an eighth of it. Aren't 
we rather laying back on our oars and thinking nineteenth century 
thoughts in the most vital of all centuries, in our pride in eighteenth 
century achievements? Well, if that is so, we've got to "forget it" 
and "get next" to 1913, or it will get by us. 

Now for a practical suggestion : Suppose the members and chapters 
engage in a systematic method of keeping the present generation 
better informed on the great events of American Revolutionary 
history, and as a step in that direction, so far as possible, observe in 
some general way, for the benefit of their respective communities, 
when convenient and consistent, certain especial dates. These 
observations may take the form of public meetings attended by all 
of the members of the Society in the immediate vicinity, with ad- 
dresses and other forms of entertainment, respecting the American 
Revolution and its relation to the present. Certain anniversary days 
should be observed by the display of the National Flag. 

The events and dates suggested as appropriate for observation 
are: January 1 — Flag of the Colonies raised at Cambridge, 1776; 
February 22 — Washington bom, 1732; March 17 — British evacuated 
Boston, 1776; April 19 — Revolutionary War began, 1775, and Revo- 
lutionary army disbanded, 1783; May 6 — Celebration at Valley 
Forge Camp of the announcement of French aid, 1778; June 14 — 
United States flag created, 1777; June 17 — Battle at Bunker Hill, 
1775; July 4 — Independence declared, 1776; August 16 — Battle at 
Bennington, 1777; September 22 — Nathan Hale executed, 1776; 
October 19 — Yorktown surrendered, 1781; November 2 — ^Wash- 
ington's farewell to the army, 1783; December 16 — France recog- 
nized the United States as an independent nation, 1782. 

Membership in the Sons of the American Revolution is the accept- 
ance of a solemn duty — to build into the structure of the American 
Republic the maintenance of true and endtiring principles. Are we 
doing it, each and all of us? Let us try to build statelier mansions 
as this new year's swift seasons roll. 

Fraternally, 

Edwin S. Crandon, President. 



antirejefifife^ 179 

HON. JAMES LOGAN'S ADDRESS AT WORCESTER, 
OCTOBER 19, 1911 

Sons of the American Revolution : 

I have prepared no lengthy address, as I was simply asked to give 
to our visitors a word of kindly greeting, which as Mayor of the City 
I am glad to do. 

You come to no mean city for your outing today. Worcester is a 
city with a long and honorable record behind it, and any man might 
have a reasonable pride in being permitted to render service to such a 
city as Mayor. So today, while as Mayor I stand as the representa- 
tive of the sons of many nations in this city, we are all at heart true 
Americans, remembering always that true Americanism has nothing 
to do with a man's ancestors or his place of birth. 

The foundations of true Americanism are laid in lofty aspirations 
which have their source in the heart and conscience of the people, and 
we can heartily subscribe to the large thought to which our great 
Senator Hoar once gave expression when he said: "If every man of 
native birth were to die tonight, the men of foreign birth, who have 
come here to seek home and liberty under the shadow of the Republic, 
would carry on the government in God's own appointed way." 

From all quarters of the globe we have gathered here in Massa- 
chusetts to make our homes. The blood of all the families of mankind 
mingle here in a national life-giving stream, which flows into the 
civic life of America, and while the great Father of us all ordained 
that among the nations of the earth the language of the lips should 
be different, he also ordained that the language of the heart should 
be the same. 

Today, we hark back to that day in 1775 when your forefathers 
revolted against the tyranny of George the Third. How little that 
means to the millions who enjoy the blessings which your forefathers 
fought for, but how much it meant to them. 

When they struck the blow for freedom, we were a feeble people 
scattered along the Atlantic Coast in widely separated settlem.ents, a 
people with diverse interests and in no way homogenous, with dif- 
ferent characteristics, customs and manners; but they all loved 
liberty, and loving it they were determined to possess it, even though 
to secure it they followed the path of glory to the grave. 

For hundreds of years men had struggled blindly, sometimes con- 
fusedly, but always steadily upward toward that national freedom 
which makes liberty the biilwark of prosperity and the foxmtain of 



180 Jhwf^ of tt)e 9lmetican Iflebolutton 

happiness, until that day in July, one hundred and thirty-five years 
ago, when upon this continent was founded a government based upon 
the rights of man. 

The spirit of Bunker Hill was a part of the cargo that came over in 
the Mayflower. Since that day when the Mayflower landed her 
precious cargo at Plymouth, many vessels have entered our ports but 
none have brought anything more valuable than the ideals of liberty 
which came with those first sturdy pioneers. They laid the founda- 
tions upon which the United States have been built. 

Bimker Hill made another George the Third impossible, and it also 
made possible the reign of Victoria the Good, and also the reign of 
that splendid disciple of peace, Edward VH. The free England of 
today would have been impossible without the separation of the 
colonies from the mother country. The hour had struck on the great 
clock which marks time and eternity and the world was ready for the 
cultivation of the ideals of liberty. But that was not a growth that 
sprang into existence in 1776. Oh, no, it was then that the flower 
bloomed, but the seed had been planted long years before, and the 
roots had taken firm hold in fertile soil. 

George the Third, as other monarchs had done for thousands of 
years, tried to rule by the sword, and relied upon the sword to make 
his will effective, but a better day was dawning when the ruler of a 
great nation would rule through the heart and conscience of his people, 
and as a result the institutions of our mother country have been grow- 
ing more and more democratic and the position of her monarch has 
been made more and more secure. 

The tree of liberty has been nurtured by the blood of the British 
people, and when I use those words I use them in no contracted sense. 
Were there to be cut from the tree of liberty those branches which 
have been grafted into it by the British people and their descendants, 
grafts that have been bought with the blood of her noblest sons — 
were those branches to be cut off, the tree of liberty would shrink to 
an insignificant shrub. 

Democratic Great Britain is the rich fruitage of the planting on 
Btmker Hill, one hundred and thirty-six years ago, and the memories 
and traditions of that struggle on the heights of Bunker Hill which 
ended in a defeat, but which defeat wore the mantle of glory is now 
the priceless heritage of honor for both the mother country and our 
own, and all the sons and daughters of both countries have a right to 
their share in the glory which is ours. 

But what a splendid foe your forefathers had to fight! General 



atitire^^e^ 181 

Howe, who on the Heights of Quebec sixteen years before had stood 
with twenty-four others in a forlorn hope, was more alone at Bunker 
Hill, where every one of the twelve officers on his staff was either 
killed or wounded. He promised his men not to send them where he 
could not go himself and nobly did he keep his promise. Three times 
inside of an hour and a half he led the British storming column at a 
cost of 224 killed and 830 wounded, and of the killed and woimded 
157 were officers. It was from just such stock as this that your fore- 
fathers sprung. In one of General Howe's companies every man was 
killed or wounded. The price our fathers paid for us on that day was 
150 killed and 270 woimded, and this price was willingly paid that 
you and I might have the priceless heritage of freedom. The men who 
defended and the men who stormed the heights of Bunker HiU were 
of the same material out of which could be built the two leading 
nations of the world. 

As the years went on and the nation expanded. New England gave 
her sons to settle the fertile fields of the West. They went there to 
take up the rich farming land, but in a larger way they went for 
another piupose, not known or appreciated then. In the providence 
of God they went with the spirit of Bunker Hill to hold that great 
empire of the West against the assaults of slavery, so that when in the 
fullness of time the cause of freedom needed defenders in the West, 
the seed from old New England had taken deep root and kept the 
great Southwest forever free. 

The United States has rendered an incalculable service to humanity 
by merely living and thriving for the last one hundred and thirty-five 
years. We have kept steadily on our cotuse and have held to that 
form of government which in every age has been the ideal and hope 
of every generous soul. We have foimd our form of government 
sufficient for all purposes, for peace, order, education, for the acquisi- 
tion of wealth and the seciu-ity of property, for strength to withstand 
the shock of battle and for clemency after the tritmiph of Civil War. 
True we have a written constitution, but this government of otirs 
does not depend on the thoughts of man committed to paper, but 
upon those eternal principles implanted in the heart of man by 
Almighty God. 



WASHINGTON, THE GREAT 
AMERICAN 

By Rev. Dr. Daniel Dulany Addison 
Address delivered at the Hotel Vendome, February 22, 1913 

Gentlemen, Descendants of Heroes of the American Revo- 
lution: 

I like to feel that I have a personal justification in appearing here 
today to speak to you on this subject. As your President has indi- 
cated, I am a Virginian by birth, a resident of the city of Washington 
until I came to Massachusetts, and a member of the church that 
George Washington served so long as a member of the vestry, but 
further than that it interests me, without going into personal matters, 
to recall, as every patriot must be thrilled by such memories, that my 
great, great-grandfather was one of the signers of the Declaration of 
Independence (applause), and that another ancestor of mine, the 
Rev. Walter Dulany Addison, lived at Oxon Hill, on the Potomac 
River, almost across from Moimt Vernon. The intercotu-se between 
the Washington family and the Addison family at Oxon Hill was very 
close and intimate, so much so that when General Washington died 
this clergyman of our church that I am speaking of, the Rev. Walter 
Dulany Addison, was one of the clergymen who officiated at his 
funeral. These are personal thoughts, but they make one, as I say, 
thrill to recall that your representative and my representative in that 
period responded as men of action to the need of the time. In other 
words, you and I are as near those great events represented by our 
ancestors as we possibly could be, and we like to feel that if we our- 
selves had been there in those days we should have responded as they 
responded. Let us lay that to our souls and feel that we should have 
so given our interest and our life for the great cause. 

Henry Cabot Lodge, in his very remarkable life of Washington, says 
that on the 9th of February in the year 1800 there was a great military 
display in the city of Paris. They were celebrating the successes of 
the Egyptian expedition, and the flower of the French soldiers were 
there on the Champs de Mars in their glitter and their pomp, and 
every flag was draped in black. He said that on the same day on the 



9ldtire^30fejef 183 

victorious squadrons of the English navy in the English Channel 
every flag was at half mast. Why? Because the news had come to 
them that George Washington had died. France honored him in the 
midst of her own rejoicing and victories, and the English fleet, repre- 
senting the nation from which he had wrested an empire, also honored 
him. This means that they recognized that one of the great creative 
souls of human history had passed away. 

In studying his life, we must put aside the mythical Washington 
or the one that has grown up through tradition, and think of him as a 
man who developed, not rapidly, but through the circumstances of 
his career, always responding to those calls that came to him. A boy 
in the old Dominion of Virginia, reared in a family of refinement, 
with traditions of manhood, living in the country, enjoying all those 
sports and avocations of the country life which give good health, 
strong constitution, and a manly outlook on the world, his education 
was very humble. He was taught to read by the parish sexton, and 
what little learning he gained in his youth, or childhood rather, was 
through the minister and his mother and the few relatives who took 
interest enough in him to assist in his training. But the greatest 
factor in his growing manhood was Lord Fairfax, a man of refinement 
and education, who had seen a great deal of the courts of Europe and 
who soon learned to love young Washington, talking to him about 
important aft'airs and helping him to decide what he should do. He 
found an apt pupil; for this we know from the diaries written by 
Washington as a boy, containing the wonderful list of directions and 
rules for the government of his life, which in many respects are equal 
to those Lord Chesterfield gave to his son. One, for instance, I recall, 
where he said: " Let me ever keep burning in my heart that spark of 
celestial fire called conscience." This was the boy who had a fine 
purpose from the very start. He did not know exactly what was to 
be his business, but finally, through Lord Fairfax, who desired to 
have him survey properties that he owned, he took up the work of a 
surveyor. This led him far afield in the wilderness. And the remark- 
able fact is that the surveying by George Washington is permanent 
and authoritative today, showing with what accuracy and care he 
entered into every work that he undertook. 

This surveying led him out into the West, where he learned to know 
Indian and pioneer life. He sat beside the camp fire and prepared 
himself to be the pioneer scout and soldier that he afterwards became. 
With difficulties in the way, he performed this work admirably. His 
military interest naturally arose from the fact that the French and 



184 Jhon^ of tl^e American Hebolutton 

Indians were making encroachments on the West. He was soon sent 
out with a small expedition in that direction ; and it was at that time 
that he first really sprang into national fame. It was rather remark- 
able that a man in his early twenties should suddenly find himself 
famous throughout the world. The reason was that at the Great 
Meadows he met a French force greater than his own. He engaged 
in battle ; and a leading French officer was killed in that action. The 
only member who escaped to Canada afterwards told, and it was 
known in Paris and England and elsewhere, that a man by the name of 
Washington had met a French force and had overcome them. He 
was called an assassin in those days, but they little knew that he so 
organized his slight force that he was able to overcome the enemy. 
This prepared him, of course, for his next great interest. 

When Braddock came to our country to push back the French and 
the Indians, there was no one in Virginia who had had the same 
pioneer experience in scouting as Washington, so naturally he was 
attached to Braddock. We remember the story of how he advised 
Braddock about methods of fighting in the wilderness ; but he could 
not impress upon him the fact that he must not go with his flags 
flying and his drums beating as he would on the field of battle in 
Europe or on some parade ground. Of course, the Indians ambushed 
them and they were overcome. But the one figure that stood out in 
Braddock's defeat was yoimg Washington, who organized the dis- 
ordered companies and saved many of them by the heroism of his own 
personality ; and it is the irony of history that the man whose advice 
was rejected by General Braddock was the man who read the burial 
service over the grave of the English general. 

In understanding Washington's life we can divide it into three 
periods : the first period up to the time of the breaking out of the 
American Revolution; then the period of the war; and then the 
period after the war, the great constructive epoch in our history. I 
have traced rapidly the life of Washington up to Braddock's defeat. 
From that time to the outbreak of the war he was alive to all problems 
of the young colonists. He had made up his mind, as is shown by 
his letters, that the time was coming when we should have to struggle 
against the English government, and also perhaps in the dim future 
to have our independence. He was a member of the vestry. He was 
the lieutenant-colonel of the forces in Virginia. In fact, just before 
the outbreak of the American Revolution he was by all odds the first 
soldier in the land, for he had had experience among the Indians and 
French pioneers; he had had experience with the trained troops of 



^hhtt^0e^ 185 

Europe. He had watched them carefully — their methods of drill and 
their system. When the call came, the country turned to the one man 
who could help them. He was equipped so well that instantly they 
thought of him, and Congress elected him to be the commander-in- 
chief of the American forces. 

There was one incident in the House of Burgesses that is of great 
interest. We speak of him as a silent man. He was. He kept his 
own counsel. No one could tell what was working in his mind. He 
never spoke of himself, only he spoke through his acts. As an old 
motto on a family coat-of-arms that I recently saw reads, "Let the 
deed show." But he did make one speech in the House of Burgesses, 
and it was the most eloquent speech made on the occasion. He rose 
and said, " I at my own charges will take a thousand men to the help 
of the men in Boston," and he sat down. That was all, but it was 
enough. It showed his spirit. (Applause.) 

When he came to Boston to take command of the American forces 
he was dealing with numbers of men that he had never met before, 
under conditions that were strange, and yet by his adaptation, and 
dignity, and knowledge of character, he was able to weld these forces 
into an effective group of men and soldiers. As he said himself after- 
wards, he considered that it was one of the most remarkable pieces 
of work that any general had ever been called upon to perform. Here 
in Boston were fifty-five hundred English troops, and with his raw 
recruits without any powder he kept them at bay. By placing 
his guns on Dorchester Heights, without practically striking a blow 
in battle, he won the first great victory of the American Revolution. 
The English troops evacuated Boston; and Boston attained her 
liberty. Never again were the English soldiers there with power 
during the whole Revolution. This initial stroke was a stroke of 
genius. Without great bloodshed he was able to free the city of 
Boston from the enemy. (Applause.) 

Then on to New York, with the great defeat. And let us say here 
that Washington was in some respects greater in defeat than in 
victory, because he knew how to handle the defeat. He never was 
overwhelmed with any sense of melancholy; he never for an instant 
lost faith in himself or his cause. He used his defeat for further 
victories. After the campaigns about New York he was constantly 
driven back. The English soldiers were rejoicing in their victories, 
and they thought the American Revolution was over, but Washing- 
ton, driven into New Jersey, crossed the Delaware, and struck that 
marvellous blow at Trenton, then at Princeton and at Germantown 



186 ^oniei of tl)c American Ulebolutton 

though a defeat there, but he showed that he was still alive. As some 
who have analyzed his military purposes have said, Washington did not 
attempt to meet the British forces on the field in great battles, but he 
desired, whatever his defeats might be, to keep an army in the field, and 
as long as he kept an army in the field, wherever that army might be, 
the Revolution would go on, and if he could continue it long enough 
there would be success to the American cause. When he struck de- 
tachm_ents here and there, as he did at Trenton and at Princeton, it was 
to show that he was still in the field. He could let the English have one 
or two cities, or a dozen cities, on the seaboard, if they stayed there. 
As you remember, Benjamin Franklin said in Paris when he heard 
that the English troops had taken Philadelphia, "Why, yes, that is ex- 
cellent, because Philadelphia has taken them." Let them have Phila- 
delphia and New York, but as long as the American soldiers were in 
the field and could maintain themselves the Revolution would go on. 

And this was the reason that during the time of Valley Forge, the 
lowest ebb of the American cause, when Congress through stupidity 
and through lack of power was not able to give the money and the 
men that were needed, and enlistments were such that a new army 
had to be created almost every six months, Washington out of his own 
purse, and by writing constant letters to his friends and representa- 
tives in Congress, desired to have his soldiers there so they might 
simply be in the field standing guard. If it had taken ten or fifteen 
years. General Washington and the men who felt like him would have 
still been in the army working for the success of their cause, because 
they were determined; they had great convictions; they were not 
only defending their homes, but a few of them, like Washington, were 
trying to lay the foundations of a great nation, a great empire. There 
were not many of those men of large vision. It was the foresight of 
Washington which made him realize what the future of this country 
might be. Alexander Hamilton was one who had the larger thought, 
but he was not bom in this land. Among all the colonists, who had 
lived rather a local, circumscribed life, Washington was the one who 
had the sense to feel the greatness of the empire which was to be 
fotmded here. He was determined that he would give his property, 
his fortune, his life, everything, for that cause. 

As a military genius, he showed his great power in thus using his 
defeats for further victories and always maintaining an army in the 
field at every cost. Oh, what was the joy in his heart when he heard 
that the English troops were going down to Philadelphia ! Was he 
to interfere with their taking that city? No. Why? And here 



aiiDrejsfjBfeia? 187 

comes in the largest strategy of the war. He had learned that an 
army was coming by way of Canada down to attack us from the 
north, and his (Washington's) fear was that the British army in 
New York woiild march up the Hudson and join the British army 
coming from the north and so divide the northern colonies from the 
southern colonies. This, indeed, might have been the destruction 
of the American cause. But Washington had written to Congress and 
to officers to have a force go quietly up to the north to meet the 
British army. If he had seen that the English troops around New 
York were going up towards Albany, then he would have had to fight 
in the rear, but he would have fought what he considered a losing 
cause, so he rejoiced in his soul when he heard that they were going 
down to Philadelphia. He knew that the fanners would rise up 
around Albany and Saratoga and take care of that army by them- 
selves, as they did when the elite of the English troops, headed by 
Burgoyne, surrendered to the American farmers at Saratoga. 

Then other battles came when the allies helped and when the cause 
was practically won. After the victory and when peace was estab- 
lished, we find again that Washington was the one man who saw the 
weakness of our federation, and worked harder than any of the others 
for the establishment of the American union. He believed in a strong 
centralized government, that the national government should have a 
power greater than that of the states, that it should be able to weld 
these several colonies into a strong nation. And how great his 
prescience was! when we know today that it took a great war to 
emphasize the thought of the federal authority, and that we have not 
as yet the federal government as strong as it ought to be. The only 
way in which you and I practically through our daily lives ever- come 
in touch with the centralized American government is through the 
postoffice and the postman who comes to our door. We have yet to 
fight out on a larger scale those problems of the centralized govern- 
ment in our land, and when we do we shall be carrjang out the desire 
and the will of Washington and Hamilton and those other great 
spirits among our forefathers — the American union, the government 
of the people. 

Washington saw, when he refused a crown, that this must be a 
republic. He believed that no men were great enough to govern others 
without their consent, as Lincoln said, and he laid firmly those founda- 
tions which have made us the land of the free and the land where the 
people rule. If in the midst of our modem political conditions and 
strange theories of government, we may have to change some of our 



188 ^on^ei of tf)e American Hebolutiott 

constitutional methods, it will always be in the direction of greater 
authority lodged in the hands of the people ; and when the people are 
educated and learn their power, when they combine for high pur- 
poses, there is no authority or power in this land that can withstand 
them. When the evils have grown so great that the people rise in 
their might and say they must be controlled and destroyed they will 
be controlled and destroyed. (Applause.) 

Whether it is by a form of representative government, by checks 
and balances, as we inherited it from the past, or whether it is to be 
by the more direct expression of the will of the people, we are in an 
evolutionary stage which is bringing to us nearer the great open doors 
of the new civilization, the civilization which will be based upon 
patriotism and justice and righteousness, and that evolution has 
come directly from that which Washington and our patriots in those 
days started, the foundations they laid. The structure is to be built 
upon that. We are not in a static condition, of course; government 
never is. We have to reinterpret old constitutions ; we have to estab- 
lish new methods. But let us always remember that if you can trust 
the people, as Washington trusted them, as Lincoln trusted them, then 
our problems will be solved in a judicial, in a patriotic and a righteous 
way. That is simply our confidence in the htmian soul when it is 
given its freedom and when there are no outside obstacles to control 
it and no pressure brought to bear upon it from artificial laws or 
influences that have been operative in past times. Democracy in its 
essence simply means a confidence in the human soul; if we cannot 
have confidence in the human soul, why, then in a certain sense we 
cannot have confidence in the God who created the hiunan sotil. The 
philosophy imderlying our American institutions is the conviction 
that the human sotd has in it a divine element, and when it is given 
the opportunity and the training it will be able to express itself 
according to the will of God. 

These were the underlying ideas in the mind of General Washington 
as we find them in his letters, his vast correspondence, and in some 
of his speeches as President of the United States. And furthermore, 
he established a land here, and he knew that he was so establishing 
it, in which opportunity is given for every talent and ability that man 
possesses. There are no artificial chains that bind genius here. The 
boy from the slums or the boy from the Back Bay equally has his 
chance. America is the place for the manufacture of many noble 
things, but the greatest manufacture of all is the manufacture of 
character. We are here producing opportunities for men of character 



']3itihte00t0 189 

who can make their way to the highest positions in the land. While 
we, members of this organization, members of other patriotic organi- 
zations, love to refer to our ancestors and to remember what they 
have done, yet we also recall that, as Napoleon once said, "I am an 
ancestor." So men rise up today and become an ancestor, and we 
honor them, and we say that it is an example of what this land of 
ours can do and what it is ready to give to every individual who has 
ability, a chance to express that ability and to make a permanent 
place for himself in our land. 

So we have rapidly sketched the life of one of our great heroes, we 
have tried to put our finger here and there on his genius and what he 
stood for. If we are true American patriots we shall not only honor 
Washington by our veneration and applause, but we shall do our 
best to stand guard and to see that those principles which he estab- 
lished shall become more generally extended, that his wisdom shall 
be incorporated in any new instruments or methods of government 
that we may adopt, and that his graciousness and kindliness and 
brotherliness shall come to our aid as we try to assimilate the great 
numbers of strangers who come to our shores from foreign lands, 
lands that are far removed from Anglo Saxon tradition. We shall 
never go far wrong if we have a confidence in the htiman soul; if we 
believe that men are the children of God, and as children of God we 
shall be worthy members of the new civilization which is to come and 
develop out of that which has been laid by the forefathers whom we 
honor today. (Great applause.) 



LEXINGTON-CONCORD-BUNKER HILL 

The British Soldiers' Side 

Address by Brig. Gen. Philip Reade, U. S. Army (retired) 

before the massachusetts society; sons 

OF THE American Revolution. 

King George III set himself, his ministers, Parliament and all 
Great Britain to subdue to his will one stubborn town on the sterile 
coast of Massachusetts Bay. 

Gen. Thomas Gage had been appointed commander-in-chief of 
the British forces in the colonies, was made governor, and four 
additional regiments of soldiers with proper artillery were sent to 
Boston to support him in his arbitrary measures, reinforcing those 
sent in 1767, to overawe sixteen thousand people of European origin, 
all of whom learned to read and write. Among these people were 
Samuel Adams, John Hancock, James Warren, James Bowdoin, John 
Adams, James Otis, Joseph Hawley, Josiah Quincy, Henry Knox and 
Paul Revere. 

The Royalist soldiers landed at Long Wharf Boston, October 1st, 
1768, and remained until March 17th, 1776. 

Thirty-six days after the Lexington-Concord affair, Sir William 
Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, and Sir John Burgoyne with reinforce- 
ments increased the strength of the Boston garrison to nearly ten 
thousand men. On Lexington Day he had four thousand men, 
but Gage did not disparage the character of the Colonists. 
In November, 1774, he made this appeal to the British Govern- 
ment: He "was confident that to begin with an army of 20,000 men 
would, in the end, save Great Britain both blood and treasure" and 
declared "Neither twenty, forty nor sixty thousand can end the 
dawning struggle." This prophecy was echoed by Col. George 
Washington: Said the latter to Capt. Robert Mackenzie, of his old 
regiment, who intimated that Massachusetts was rebellious, and 
sought independence: — "Unequivocally, if the ministry are deter- 
mined to push matters to extremity, I add, as my opinion, that 
more blood will be spilled than history has ever furnished instances 



atbUre^^ejr 191 

of, in the annals of North America; and such vital wound will 
be given to the peace of this great country, as time itself cannot 
cure, or eradicate the remembrance of." Washington and Gage 
had served together, twenty years before, and until the Lexington 
affair, had been friendly correspondents. It will be seen, there- 
fore, that the full significance and intensity of the patriotic 
ferment, and its results to the British crown, after the stem 
arbitrament of war, was appreciated by General Gage, and Wash- 
ington, and we may also add the names of Lord Chatham, 
Lord Dartmouth, Lord Effingham, Admiral Keppel, and Granville 
Sharpe. 

Gage and Washington were also in accord in another respect. 
Each regarded the military occupation of Boston, where the revolu- 
tionary sentiment was as pronounced as in Alamance, N. C., and 
the popiilation more dense as well as more enlightened, to be a grave 
military, as well as political, error. 

Perhaps during the midsiunmer of 1775, the beleagured city of 
Boston astonished by the stolid and bloody resistance to its guardian 
garrison, contained no person less astonished than Thomas Gage, 
its soldier commander, who, however, was loyal to his king, — 
loyalty, perhaps, not entirely shared by Mrs. Gage, who was a New 
Yorker. 

Frederick the Great and Washington were reticent soldiers. The 
Prussian declared that "if he suspected that his nightcap would 
betray his thoughts, while he slept, he would bum it," Gage's 
secrets, however, were not like Washington's; some of them were 
"furnished with wings" and the patriots were kept advised of the 
plans of the Royalist commander. The British in Boston fared 
badly. Food was scarce and poor. It was "pork and beans one day, 
beans and pork another." Even in Gage's household fresh meat 
was seldom to be seen. Putnam, knowing their strait, sent Gage's 
wife "a fine quarter of veal," for which he received "a very polite 
card of thanks." 

When Washington assumed command of the Continental Army 
at Cambridge (July 3rd, 1775) the yeomanry of New England had, 
since Lexington Day, firmly grasped all approaches to the city of 
Boston. This pressure was now and then resisted by efforts of the 
garrison to seciure supplies from the surrounding coimtry farms, but 
gradually the country exciu"sions of the troops were restricted within 
the range of their town guns. Bullocks, flour and other provisions 
were needed. Boston was surrounded by nearly twenty thousand 



19S ^on^ of ti)e 9lmertcan Hebolutton 

minute-men. These minute-men made persistent pressure upon every 
artery through which food could flow to relieve the hungry garrison 
within the British lines. Ordinary provisions had become abundant 
in the Continental Army. The adjacent country fed them. 

General Gage set the example in seizing military stores. His 
orders required him to do so. Respecting the attempted seizure of 
arms in the hands of the people, that precipitated the "skirmish," 
as the British defined it, which occurred at Lexington on April 
19, 1775. Lord Dartmouth said "The effect of Gen. Gage's 
attempt at Concord will be fatal." King George III called him 
"The Mild General." Gage went back to England in October, 1776, 
and Howe was left in command of the forces in Boston. 

General Gage, April 29, 1775, sent to Governor Trumbull a narra- 
tive, entitled "A circumstantial Account of an Attack that happened 
on the 19th of April, 1775, on His Majesty's Troops, by a Number 
of the People of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay." This 
was also circulated in a handbill and is printed in the Massachusetts 
Historical Collections, Vol. II, with the exception of the last para- 
graph, which is as follows: "Thus this unfortunate affair has hap- 
pened through the rashness and imprudence of a few people who 
began firing on the troops at Lexington." 

Gage's predecessor in Boston, the scholarly Lt. Gov. Thomas 
Hutchinson, was a Boston man, the trend of whose mind resembled 
William Bradford's and John Winthrop's, — he had, too, the courage 
of his convictions, — bvit after May 13, 1774, Boston had, in Gage, 
as governor, not a historian, but a soldier who had exhibited gallantry 
in Braddock's time and who had been commissioned "to observe 
and follow such orders and directions from time to time as he shall 
receive from His Majesty, the King, or the superior officers set over 
him, according to the rtdes and discipline of war." The view that 
he took of men and things about him was necessarily that of a 
soldier. 

The king had ordered that the town of Boston be placed im- 
mediately under military rule, so red coats were everywhere to be 
seen, on the Common, on King Street, in the Town House, in Faneuil 
Hall and the Old South Meeting House. 

In 1769, Parliament requested the king to "instruct the Gov. of 
Mass. to forward to England for trial, upon charges of high treason" 
several prominent citizens of that colony, "who had been guilty of 
denouncing Parliamentary action." 

The orders of his sovereign compelled Gage to use military force 



^Utixt^^e^ 193 

to vindicate and execute authority, — that is what his troops were 
there for. 

The English sovereign ordered him to "seize all arms and powder." 
An act of Parliament forbade the exportation of arms to the Colonies. 
Thus by royal decree and Parliamentary Act, Gage's duty was to 
send Colonel Leslie February 26, 1775 with three hundred of the king's 
troops from Castle Island to Salem to capture a number of cannon se- 
creted there. This affair was bloodless and the Colonists saved their 
cannon, but the episode at Salem North Bridge marked the first 
armed resistance to the measures of the king's troops. Gage learned 
that the Committee of the Provincial Congress had caused military 
stores to be deposited at Concord and Worcester. He turned his 
attention to Concord. His soldiers captured powder stored in the 
old mill not far from the hill on which Tufts College now stands, and, 
on the same day, they carried off two field-pieces from Cambridge. 

Vol. IV, 2nd series of the Massachusetts Historical Collections 
gives the instructions of Lieutenant-General Gage to his scouts, 
Capt. Brown, 52nd Regiment and Ensign D'Bemi^re, 10th Regi- 
ment, on Feb. 22, 1775, regarding contraband munitions of war that 
were being gathered for Provincial uses against the king's troops.* 

The execution of the Boston Port Bill devolved on Gen. Thos. 
Gage. His manners were pleasing. He entered upon his duties 
with a large measure of popularity. His letters, his orders, his trials, 
his experiences, display the diversities between civilians and military 
men. Gage has been measured and recorded by non-military men. 

His instructions required him to compel "a full and absolute sub- 
mission" to the rigorous laws of Parliament; and to this end he was, 
if it should be considered necessary, authorized to employ with effect 
the king's troops. This was a harsh duty to perform, but the ministry 
resolved to subdue Massachusetts by arms. 

The letters of Lord Dartmouth and General Gage, or extracts 
from them, were published in the Parliamentary Register, of 1775. 

The Earl of Dartmouth, in a letter to Governor Gage, dated 
April 9, 1774, after urging the duty of "mild and gentle per- 
suasion," says: "at the same time, the sovereignty of the king, 
in this Parliament, over the Colonies, requires a full and abso- 
lute submission; and his majesty's dignity demands, that until 
that submission be made, the town of Boston, where so much 
anarchy and confusion have prevailed, should cease to be the 
place of residence of his governor, or of any other officer of 
Government who is not obliged by law to perform his functions 



• See also Boatonian Society Publications, vol. ix. 



194 J>on^ of tt)e ^merttan Heboiution 

there." After dwelling on the "criminality" of those who aided 
in the proceedings in Boston during the months of November 
and December, 1773, the letter says: "The king considers the 
punishment of these offenders as a very necessary and essential 
example to others of the ill consequences that must follow from 
such open and arbitrary usurpations as tend to the subversion 
of all government, etc." The instructions of the Treasury 
Board, dated March 31, were equally rigorous, and looked to a 
complete prostration of the commerce of Boston. 



Copies of these Regulating Acts were received early in June, and 
were immediately circulated through the colonies. General Gage did 
not receive them officially until the 6th of August, and with them a 
letter of instructions from the government. Lord Dartmouth hoped 
these new laws would have "the good effect " to give vigor to the civil 
authority, and instructed the governor at all hazards to put them in force. 

A meeting of delegates from committees of the coimties of 
Worcester, Essex, and Middlesex was held on 26th of August, 
1774, at Faneuil Hall. The governor, meantime, kept a watchful 
eye on these movements. He resolved to use his troops to 
disperse public meetings and to protect the courts; and made his 
first attempt at Salem. A meeting was called in this town, August 
20, by printed handbills from the committee of correspondence. 
On the 23rd of August, General Gage issued a proclamation, 
forbidding all persons to attend this meeting, "or any other 
not warranted by law" as they would be chargeable with all 
the ill consequences that might follow and must "answer 
for them at their utmost peril. ' ' The inhabitants, however, assembled 
on the 24th, according to the notice. By request, the committee 
waited on General Gage, who ordered them to dissolve the meeting. 
The committee began to argue the legality of the assembly. "I 
came to execute the laws not to dispute them," replied Gage. A 
detachment of troops was ordered to disperse the meeting ; but while 
the committee were in consultation, the people transacted their 
business and adjourned, and the discomfited governor gratified his 
resentment by arresting those who called the unlawful assembly. 
On June 24th, General Gage issued a proclamation against the 
Solemn League and Covenant. 

The next attempt of General Gage indicated his intention to 
secure the cannon and powder of the province, and thus disarm the 
people. Under the sanction and direction of members of the com- 



^LUtirr^^ejf 195 

mittees of correspondence of Boston, Charlestown and Cambridge, the 
people repaired in a body to the residence of Lieutenant-Governor 
Oliver, and obliged him to resign his office. The resignation of other 
important officers, who had accepted appointments or executed 
processes, was "procured." General Gage was advised by his ad- 
herents not to use force to disperse this meeting, and thus, unmo- 
lested, it acted in a revolutionary manner almost within gun-shot of 
his batteries. "The flames of sedition," he writes, September 2, "had 
spread universally throughout the country beyond conception," and he 
assured Lord Dartmouth that "civil government was near its end" 
that the time for "conciliation, moderation, reasoning, was over;" 
and that nothing could be done but by forcible means; that Con- 
necticut and Rhode Island were as furious as Massachusetts; that 
the only thing to be done was to secure the friends of the government 
in Boston; to reinforce the troops and act as circumstances might 
require. "I mean, my lord," he adds, "to secure all I can by degrees, 
to avoid any bloody crisis as long as possible, unless forced into it 
by themselves, which may happen." But as it was resolved "to 
stem the torrent, not to yield to it" he frankly told the minister 
"that a very respectable force should take the field." 

This was the period of transition from moral suasion to physical 
force. General Gage saw no hope of procuring obedience but by 
the power of arms ; and the patriot party saw no safety in anything 
short of military preparation. Resistance to the acts continued to 
be manifested in every form. On the 9th of September the memora- 
ble Suffolk resolves were adopted, going to the same length with 
those of Middlesex; and these were succeeded by others in other 
coimties equally bold and spirited. These resolves were approved 
by the Continental Congress, then in session. Everywhere the people 
either compelled the unconstitutional officers to resign, or opposed 
every attempt to exercise authority, whether by the Governor or 
by a constable. They also made every effort to transport ammuni- 
tion and stores to places of security. Cannon and muskets were 
carried secretly out of Boston. The guns were taken from an old 
battery at Charlestown, where the Navy Yard is. This was difficult 
to accomplish, for any unusual noise in the battery might be heard 
on board a ship of war which lay opposite to it. But a party of pa- 
triots, mostly of Charlestown, removed the gtms silently at night, 
secreted them in the town for a few days, and eluding a strict 
search made for them by British officers, carried them into the 
country. 



196 M>tm0 of t^t aimerican Hebolution 

General Gage immediately began to fortify Boston Neck. This 
added intensity to the excitement. The inhabitants became alarmed 
at so ominous a movement; and, on the 5th of September, the 
selectmen waited on General Gage, represented the public feeling, 
and requested him to explain his object. The governor stated in 
reply, that his object was to protect his majesty's troops and his 
majesty's subjects; and that he had no intention to stop up any 
avenue, or to obstruct the free passage over it, or to do anything 
hostile against the inhabitants. He went on with the works and 
soon mounted on them two twenty-four pounders and eight nine 
pounders. Again, on the 9th, the selectmen called on him, and 
represented the growing apprehension of the inhabitants. The 
fortress, at the entrance of the town, they said, indicated a design 
to reduce the metropolis to the state of a garrison. In a written 
reply, General Gage repeated his former assurances, and character- 
istically remarked, that it was his duty, so it should be his endeavor, 
to preserve the peace and promote the happiness of every individual, 
and recommend the inhabitants to cultivate the same spirit. On the 
next day a committee from the Suffolk convention waited on him. 
They represented that the prevailing ferment was caused by his 
seizing the powder at Charlestown, by his withholding the stock in 
the Boston magazine from its legal proprietors, by his new fortifica- 
tion, and b}^ the insults of his troops to the people. General Gage's 
reply is dated September 12. He admits instances of disorder in the 
troops, but appeals to their general good behavior, and concludes, 
"I would ask what occasion there is for such numbers going armed 
in and out of towTi and through the country in a hostile manner? 
Or why were the guns removed privately in the night from the 
battery in Charlestown? The refusing submission to the late acts 
of Parliament I find general throughout the province, and I shall lay 
the same before his majesty." The patriots were never at a loss for 
words, and on receiving this, they promptly presented an address 
to the governor, recapitulating his hostile acts, and requesting him, 
in his purposed representation, to assure his majesty, "That no wish 
of independency, no adverse sentiments or designs toward his majesty 
or his troops now here, actuate his good subjects in this colony ; but 
that their sole intention is to preserve pure and inviolate those rights 
to which, as men, and English Americans, they are justly entitled, 
and which have been guaranteed to them by his majesty's royal 
predecessors." Dr. Joseph Warren, in presenting this address to 
General Gage, remarked, "That no person had, so far as he had been 



^htivt^^e^ 197 

informed, taken any steps that indicated any hostile intention, until 
the seizing and carrying off the powder from the magazine in the 
County of Middlesex." 

The General Congress remonstrated on these fortifications. Gen- 
eral Gage, October 20, in his reply, grimly says: "Two works of 
earth have been raised at some distance from the town, wide of the 
road, and gims put in them. The remains of old works, going out 
of the town, have been strengthened and guns placed there likewise." 

General Gage, August 27, 1774, wrote to Lord Dartmouth — "It is 
agreed that popular fury was never greater in this province than at 
present, and it has taken its rise from the old source at Boston, though 
it has appeared first at a distance. Those demagogues trust their 
safety in the long forbearance of government, and an assurance that 
they cannot be punished. They chicane, elude, openly violate, or 
passively resist the laws, as opportunity serves; and opposition to 
authority is of so long standing, that it has become habitual." 

"The people," Tudor well remarks, "were the subjects of a dis- 
tant monarch, but royalty was merely in theory with them." 

Governor Gage stunmoned the selectmen to meet at the Province 
House, August 13, when he abruptly handed them the clause about 
town-meetings, and read it to them. The selectmen replied that 
the provincial law would be the rule of their conduct, when the 
governor stated that he was determined to enforce the act of Parlia- 
ment and that they must be answerable for any bad consequences. 

Governor Gage summoned the selectmen to the Province House 
to tell them that he should enforce the act. The selectmen remarked 
that they should be governed by the law of the province (i. e., not the 
king). Meetings called before the first of August were kept alive 
for weeks and months ; and they might be kept alive, remarked Gage, 
for years. The governor and his advisors were puzzled; dared not 
order the troops to stop them, or forebore to do so, — and, to their 
infinite annoyance, the patriots continued to thunder in the fonun. 
The people flocked in crowds to Faneuil Hall, a place redolent with 
the blossoming of young America. When this overflowed, the resort 
was to the Old South Church, which hence has not inaptly been called 
the "Sanctuary of Freedom." But in case an obnoxious office was 
to be resigned, or a patriotic agreement was to be entered into, or a 
public measure was to be lampooned, the concourse flocked to 
Liberty Tree, where, agreeably to previous notice, the invisible 
genius of the place had displayed the satirical emblems, or procured 
table, paper and pens. It was a fine large old elm, near the comer 



198 M>tm0 of t^t American Kebolution 

of Washington and Essex Street. A staff ran through it, reaching 
above it, on which a flag was displayed, and an inscription was put 
on it, stating that it was pruned by order of the Sons of Liberty in 
1766. All processions saluted it as an emblem of the popular cause. 
No wonder it put the royal governors in mind of Jack Cade's Oak 
of Reformation. 

General Gage, September 2, writes of this clause in the act "No 
persons I have advised with can tell what to do with it." 

Boston was literally full of clubs and caucuses, which were used 
with great effect to secure unity of action. 

The six newspapers printed in Boston in 1774 were as follows: 
The Boston Evening Post, The Boston News-Letter, Massachusetts 
Gazette, Boston Post-Boy and Advertiser, Boston Gazette and Country 
Journal, and The Massachusetts Spy. 

"A number of the better sort of people," General Gage writes, 
July 5, "attended town-meeting in Boston with a design to make a 
push to pay for the tea, and annihilate the committee of correspond- 
ence, but they were outvoted by a great number of the lower class." 

The destruction of the tea belonging to Mr. Francis Rotch was 
defended as a measure of "political necessity." The phrase "mili- 
tary necessity" is an equally elastic term. All soldiers know the 
forceful significance of the words "military necessity." 

From the letters of the period Josiah Quincy, Jr., writes to us, 
"To prepare for the worst, for it is a serious truth, in which our 
friends there are all agreed, that our cotmtrymen must seal their 
cause with their blood. Oiir old Louisburg soldiers laugh at the newly 
erected fortifications of Gage, and say they are mud walls in com- 
parison with what they have subdued; and that, if necessary, they 
would regard them no more than a beaver dam." 

John Adams says that the great Virginia orator, Patrick Henry, 
on being told that it was Major Hawley's opinion that "We must 
fight, and make preparation for it," solemnly averred, " I am of that 
man's mind." Such phrases are no mere words. Then they were 
things. They heralded the coming of that terrible calamity, civil 
war. 

All eyes then were fixed on Boston; and, until its evacuation, it 
was regarded with intense interest and, at times, with apprehension. 
A hostile fleet surrounded it without, a formidable military were 
assembling within, tents covered its fields, cannon were planted on 
its eminences, and troops daily paraded in its streets. It wore the 
aspect, and became subject to the vexations, of a garrisoned town. 



^DlireiBf|fej0{ 199 

General Gage, his crown-appointed councillors, and the official func- 
tionaries, were obliged to live in a town in which the dignity of his 
majesty prescribed that not one of them should reside. This was 
Dartmouth's order of April 9th, 1774. On September 20th, 1774, 
Governor Gage wrote: "The factionists have some warm friends in 
N. Y. and Philadelphia; the people of Charleston, S. C., are as mad 
as they are here." On September 25th, General Gage writes: "The 
disease is not confined to Boston : it is universal, — there is no 
knowing where to apply a remedy. " In " The American Revolution, 
Part 1, page 285, Sir George Otto Trevelyan says: "Gage had been 
confidentially instructed by the King to ' insinuate to New York and 
such other colonies as were not guided by the madness of the times,' 
proposals which might entice them back to due obedience without 
putting 'the dagger to their throats.' The quoted words are foimd in 
letter from George the third to Dartmouth: Jan. 31, 1775." 

On October 26th, 1774, a Massachusetts Provincial Congress 
adopted a plan for organizing the militia, maintaining it, and calling 
it out when circumstances should render it necessary. An executive 
authority, — the Committee of Safety, — ^was created, clothed with 
large discretionary powers; and another called the Committee of 
Supplies. On the 27th, Artemus Ward and Seth Pomeroy were 
chosen general officers. Among the energetic acts of this memorable 
Congress was one authorizing the collection of military stores. In 
November, the Committee authorized the purchase of materials for 
an army, and ordered them to be deposited at Concord and Worcester. 
These proceedings were denounced by General Gage, in a proclama- 
tion dated November 10th, as treasonable, and a compliance with 
them was forbidden. In a short time the king's speech and the action 
of Parliament were received, which manifested a firm determination 
to produce submission to the late Acts, and to maintain "the supreme 
authority" of Great Britain over the colonies. However, a second 
Provincial Congress (Feb. 1 to 16, 1775) renewed the measiu-es of 
its predecessor, and gave definiteness to the duties of the Committee 
of Safety by "empowering and directing" them (February 9th) to 
assemble the militia whenever it was required to resist the execution 
of the two acts. Two additional generals, John Thomas and William 
Heath, were appointed. It was made the duty of the five general 
officers to take charge of the militia when called out by the Com- 
mittee of Safety, and to "effectually oppose and resist such attempt 
or attempts as shall be made for carrying into execution by force" 
the two acts. This Congress appealed to the towns for support. It 



200 ^on^ef of tl)e 2lmerican lliebolution 

urged that, when invaded by oppression, resistance became "the 
Christian and social duty of each individual." The conviction was 
fast becoming general that force only cotdd decide the contest. 
Stimulated and sustained by such a public opinion, the committees 
of safety and supplies were diligent, through the gloomy months 
of winter, in collecting and storing at Concord and Worcester, ma- 
terials for the maintenance of an army. Towns voted freely 
money to arm, equip and discipline "Alarm List Companies." These 
minute-men were trained often — the towns paying the expense. 
The company, after its field exercises, would sometimes repair to the 
meeting-house to hear a patriotic sermon, or partake of an entertain- 
ment at the town-house where zealous "Sons of Liberty" would 
exhort them to prepare to fight bravely for God and their country. 
Thus an army was in existence around Gage, should he make a foray. 

On the 17th of November, Gage's force consisted of eleven foot 
regiments and the artillery. In December, five hundred marines 
landed. There were daily moimted in December, 370 men and a 
field-officers' guard on the neck. The force was brigaded under 
Brigadier-General Hugh, Earl Percy; Major of Brigade Moncreiff. 
Brig. Gen. Robt. Pigott; Major of Brigade Small; Third Brigadier 
Jones; Major of Brigade Hutchinson. 

In "The American Revolution" Trevelyan says that King George, 
March 7th, 1774, — saw in General Gage, — fresh from America, — 
one of those mischievous public servants who know a colony so much 
better than the colonists know it themselves: "His language," — 
said the king, — "was very consonant to his character of an honest 
determined man. He says they will be lions, whilst we are lambs: 
but if we take the resolute part, they will undoubtedly prove very 
weak." 

In January, 1775, King George III reconsidered the favorable 
opinion which he had formed of General Gage and now declared him 
"wanting in activity and decision;" — so, in vain he appealed to 
Amherst to take Gage's place, — offering him a peerage, — but Amherst 
"could not bring himself to serve against the Americans to whom he 
had been so much obliged." 

American historians like Bancroft and Parkman say that Gage was 
an "amiable man having reputable military talents." Leslie Stephen 
refers to his "mild rule when Governor of Montreal" and says that 
Gage was "brave, not brilliant." After the Provisional Congress 
refused longer to obey him as Governor, he was blamed at home and 



mhxt^^e^ 201 

abroad for his thankless, futile efforts. When the Colonists began 
to drop the phrase "Mother England" and to substitute "British" 
for "English," they began to lampoon Gage as a soldier-governor. 
Like precedents are elsewhere found in history. Gage was the victim 
of Lord North's "The king will have it so!" His two principal de- 
tractors were his sovereign and his subordinate, Burgoyne. The latter 
critic, like envious Casca, may be discounted in his aspersions of 
Gage's "unfitness and incapacity" owing to his own aspirations and 
vauntings. No expressions of rancour or bitterness exist in Gage's 
reports. He writes of "Demagogues, seditionists, controversionists, 
factionists, disunionists, armed antagonists, misguided men," and says 
"the law is studied by everybody in Boston, — Insult and provocation 
are rife in the air. They are past masters in the art of invective." 
After the fierce fight of King's Mountain, a headstone was placed for 
rifleman Major Patrick Ferguson, Royalist. North Carolina has 
within its limits, besides Mecklenbiu-g and Alamance, the carefully 
marked battle-field of Guilford Court House and here stands the 
plain marble shaft of Lieutenant-Colonel Stuart of the Queen's 
Guards, erected by the Guilford Battle Ground Company in honor of 
a brave foeman one hundred and fourteen years after his death. 
American sympathies and recognition went out at the dedication 
of the monument to Sir Isaac Brock, after Queenstown Heights. 
The running fights of Lexington and Concord are shown by 
tablets, but there are at least three unmarked graves tenanted by 
British soldiers. One is in the Lexington graveyard; two are by the 
roadside near the statue of the embattled farmer in Concord. These 
men died doing what they conceived to be their duty. James Russell 
Lowell pays them fitting tribute as follows: 

"These men were brave enough and true 
To the hired soldier's bull-dog creed; 
What brought them here they never knew. 
They fought as suits the English breed; 
They came three thousand miles and died 
To keep the past upon its throne — 
Unheard, beyond the ocean tide, 
Their English mother made her moan." 



€omtitution anD CB^^Hato^ of tl^e Sl^a^mtfimtttfi 

^octeti? 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF THE 
AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

As Amended April 19, 1910 



ARTICLE I 



NAME 



The name of the Society shall be The Massachusetts Society 
OF THE Sons of the American Revolution. 



ARTICLE II 

OBJECTS 

The objects of the Society are: to perpetuate the memory and 
spirit of the men who achieved American Independence, by the 
encouragement of historical research in relation to the Revolution 
and the publication of its results, the preservation of documents 
and relics, and of the records of the individual services of Revo- 
lutionary soldiers and patriots, and the promotion of celebrations 
of all patriotic anniversaries; to carry out the injunction of Wash- 
ington in his Farewell Address to the American people, "to pro- 
mote, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the 
general diffusion of knowledge," thus developing an enlightened 
public opinion, and affording to young and old such advantages 
as shall develop in them the largest capacity for performing the 



206 M>on0 of ti)e American lUebolutton 

duties of American citizens; to cherish, maintain, and extend the 
institutions of American freedom ; to foster true patriotism and love 
of country; and to aid in securing for mankind all the blessings of 
liberty. 

ARTICLE III 

MEMBERSHIP 

Any man is eligible for membership who is of the age of twenty- 
one years, and who is descended from an ancestor who, with unfailing 
loyalty, rendered material aid to the cause of American Independence, 
as a soldier or as a seaman, or a *civil officer in one of the several 
Colonies or States, or of the United Colonies or States, as a recognized 
patriot ; provided that he shall be found worthy. 



ARTICLE IV 
orncERS 

The officers of the Society shall be a President, three Vice-Presi- 
dents, a Secretary, a Treasurer, a Registrar, a Historian, a Chaplain, 
and a Board of Managers, consisting of fifteen members and the 
officers of the Society ex officiis. The offices of Secretary and Registrar 
may be held by one person. The Society or Managers shall also 
elect a Delegate-at-large, and such other Delegates as it may be 
entitled to by the Constitution of the National Society. 



ARTICLE V 

LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Ten or more members of the Society, resident in any locality 
as may be approved by the Board of Managers, may form them- 
selves into a Chapter, to be called by such name as said members 
may assume. A Charter may be granted to such Chapter by the 
Board of Managers, upon application in writing of ten or more 
members of the Society, stating name to be assumed, the location, 
and names of its proposed members. Such Chapter may enact a 
Constitution and By-laws not inconsistent with those of the National 
Society, or of this Society. 

* The Constitution of the National Society omits the words "civil oflScer" as a basis for 
eligibility. 



0iA^0atfyu0nt0 M>ocittp €onj0ititutton 207 

No person shall be admitted to such Chapter unless he is a mem- 
ber in good standing of The Massachusetts Society of the Sons 
OF THE American Revolution; and all members of this Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution, resident within the territory 
of such Chapter, shall be eligible to membership therein. If any 
member of such Chapter should cease to be a member of the State 
Society, his membership in the Chapter shall also cease. 

Membership in Chapters shall not in any way change the rela- 
tions of members to the State Society, nor impair obligations of 
payment of dues and other requisitions of the Constitution and 
By-laws of said Society. Provided, however, that the Board of 
Managers may from time to time, by vote, authorize the return to 
designated Chapters, or classes of Chapters, of a portion of the 
annual dues paid the Society by members of said Chapters. 

Every Chapter shall annually report a list of officers and members 
to the Secretary of the State Society on the first of April. 



ARTICLE VI 

QUORUM 

A quorum of the Society for the transaction of business shall 
consist of forty members ; of the Managers, five members ; but a less 
number may adjourn. 



ARTICLE VII 

amendments 

This Constitution or the By-laws may be altered or amended at 
any meeting of the Society, by a vote of three-fourths of the members 
present; provided that notice of such intended alteration or amend- 
ment be borne on the notification of said meeting. 



BY-LAWS 



ARTICLE I 

MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. Applications for membership must be made in 
duplicate on blanks furnished by the Society, and with the initiation 
fee and dues for the current year be forwarded the Registrar, the 
money to be returned in case of rejection. 

Section 2. The applicant shall become a member after a favor- 
able report and election by the Managers. 

Section 3. The initiation fee shall be three dollars, the annual 
dues two dollars, payable in advance. The payment of twenty-five 
dollars at one time shall constitute a Life Member, and shall exempt 
from further dues. The annual dues of a member elected between 
the fifteenth day of January and the fifteenth day of April in each 
year shall continue his membership imtil the end of the next succeed- 
ing fiscal year. 

The Board of Managers shall have authority to use their dis- 
cretion in remitting individual dues. 

Section 4. The Board of Managers shall have power to drop 
from the rolls, after thirty days' notice has been given him, any 
member who shall be in arrears for dues for one year, and he may 
be reinstated in his membership by said Board upon the payment 
of his indebtedness to the Society. 

Section 5. Members in arrears shall be debarred from the 
privileges of membership. 

Section 6. The Board of Managers shall judge of the qualifica- 
tion of candidates for admission to the Society and vote upon the 
same, and they shall have full power and authority, after due notice 
and impartial trial, to expel any member who, by conduct vnhe- 
coming a gentleman, shall render himself tmworthy to remain a 
member of the Society. 



Section 7. A member may resign, if his dues are all paid, by 
simply notifying the Registrar in writing. 

Section 8. Members, in good standing, may be transferred to 
another Society, on application from the same; and members in 
good standing in other Societies may, on application, be admitted 
to membership in this Society, by vote of the Managers. 

Section 9. Members admitted by transfer from another State 
Society shall be exempt from the payment to this Society of another 
admission fee. 

ARTICLE II 

ELECTION OF OPFICERS AND MEETINGS 

Section 1. The officers shall be elected by ballot at the annual 
meeting, and a majority shall be required for choice. Proxies shall 
not be allowed. The term of office shall be for one year, and until a 
successor shall be elected. Vacancies occturing during the year shall 
be filled by the Managers. 

Section 2. The Managers, consisting of fifteen in number, shall 
be elected at the organization meeting, November 8, 1907, and the 
members thereof divided into three classes of five each. The term of 
office of the first class shall expire April 19, 1908; the term of office 
of the second class shall expire April 19, 1909; the term of office of 
the third class shall expire April 19, 1910. At each annual meeting 
of the Society there shall be elected by baUot five Managers to suc- 
ceed those whose terms of office expire at that time, and to hold 
office for three years. No member of the Board of Managers elected, 
as such, shall be eligible for reelection imtil one year after the expira- 
tion of his term of office. 

Section 3. The Society shall hold its annual meeting on the 
nineteenth of April in each year, the anniversary of the battles of 
Lexington and Concord, except when such date shall fall on Sunday, 
in which event the meeting shall be held on the following day. 

Section 4. Special meetings shall be held on the written request 
of twenty-five members, by vote of the Managers, or on the call of 
the President. 

Section 5. Notices of all meetings of the Society shall be mailed 
to each member at least seven days before the meeting. 



210 ^on^ of t^t ISimmtan ]f(eboiution 

Section 6. The following shall be the order for business for the 
meetings of the Society or Managers : — 

1. Reading of the Records. 

2. Commiinications, and action thereon. 

3. Reports of Standing Committees. 

4. Reports of Special Committees. 

5. Reports of Officers. 

6. Unfinished business. 

7. New business. 

This order may be changed by unanimous consent. 



ARTICLE III 

DUTIES or OFFICERS, ETC. 
PRESIDENT 

Section 1. The President, or in his absence the senior Vice- 
President present, or in their absence a chairman pro tempore, shall 
preside at all meetings of the Society or Managers. He shall preserve 
order, and shall decide all questions of order, subject to an appeal 
to the Society or Managers. 

SECRETARY 

Section 2. The Secretary shall notify all members of their 
election and of such other matters as may be directed by the Society 
or Managers. He shall have charge of the seal, certificate of incor- 
poration, and records. He, together with the presiding officer, shall 
certify all acts of the Society. He shall give due notice of the time 
and place of all meetings of the Society or Managers, and attend the 
same. He shall keep fair and accurate records of all the proceedings 
and orders of the Society or Managers, and shall give notice to the 
several officers of all votes, orders, resolves, and proceedings of the 
Society or Managers affecting them or appertaining to their respective 
duties, and generally perform the duties inciunbent upon such an 
officer. 



TREASURER 

Section 3. The Treasurer shall have custody of all funds and 
securities of the Society. He shall collect all moneys due the Society, 
excepting initiation fees and annual dues. The life membership 
and initiation fees he shall invest, in a manner approved by the Board 
of Managers, as the Permanent Fund of the Society. The income of 
this permanent fimd, together with the annual dues, he shall apply 
to the current expenses of the Society; but he shall expend no part 
of the Permanent Fund except by recommendation of the Board of 
Managers confirmed by vote of the Society. He shall deposit in a 
reliable bank or savings institution to the credit of The Massachu- 
setts Society of the Sons of the American Revolution all 
uninvested funds, and make such investments in the name of the 
Society as may be ordered by the Society or Managers. He shall pay 
to the Treasurer-General, between the first day of March and the 
annual meeting, the per capita tax required by the National Society. 
He shall keep a true accoimt of his receipts and expenditures. He 
shall not pay out any money from the treasury, except upon the 
written order or approval of the President or upon vote of the Society 
or Managers. The fiscal year of the Society shall end on the fifteenth 
day of April. 

REGISTRAR 

Section 4. The Registrar shall keep a Register of the names 
and dates of election, transfer, resignation, and death of all mem- 
bers, collect all initiation fees and annual dues, and pay the same 
to the Treasurer forthwith. He shall keep an assessment account, 
crediting each member with the amount paid over to the Treasurer. 
He shall forward to the Registrar-General of the National Society 
a duplicate of all applications for membership which have been 
accepted, within one week after the applicants shall have been 
elected. He shall issue certificates of membership and insignia to 
members entitled thereto. 



HISTORIAN 

Section 5. The Historian shall have the care and custody of 
all historical, geographical and genealogical papers, manuscripts 
and documents belonging to the Society, and keep a correct list 



212 ^onjEf of tlje American Iflebolutton 

of the same. At the annual meeting he shall report the names of 
deceased members, adding a biographical notice, if possible. He 
shall endeavor to be present at all excursions of the Society, and call 
attention to, and give information regarding, points of historic 
interest. 

REPORTS 

Section 6. The Secretary, Treasurer, and Registrar shall each 
render an annual report to be read at the annual meeting. Such 
reports must be first presented to the Managers at their meeting in 
April. 

BONDS 

Section 7. The Treasurer and Registrar shall each give such 
bond for the faithful discharge of their respective duties as may 
be required by the Managers. 

AUDITORS 

Section 8. The Managers shall, at least one month before the 
annual meeting, appoint three Auditors, who shall examine and 
audit the books and accounts of the Treasiu-er and Registrar, and 
report at the annual meeting. 



ARTICLE IV 

BOARD OF managers 

Section 1. The Managers shall judge of the qualifications of 
candidates for admission to the Society, and vote upon the same. 

Section 2. They shall appoint from their own number the fol- 
lowing Standing Committees, of three members each : — 

Membership — to whom all applications shall be referred. 

Finance, 

Publication and Printing, 
and such other committees as they may deem advisable. 

Their duties shall be such as usually pertain to committees of like 
character and such as may be defined by the Managers. 

Section 3. They shall recommend plans for promoting the 
objects of the Society, and shall authorize the disbursement and 



expenditure of unappropriated money in the treasury for the pay- 
ment of current expenses of the Society. In general, they shall 
watch over the interests of the Society, and suggest, from time to 
time, such measures as they deem conducive to its prosperity. 

Section 4. They shall in the month of February appoint a 
Nominating Committee of five members, four of whom shall be out- 
side the Board of Managers, whose duty it shall be to select the name 
of a candidate for each office to be filled at the ensuing annual meet- 
ing, and report to the Board of Managers in the month of March. It 
shall be the duty of the Secretary to mail to each member of the 
Society a copy of the Nominating Committee's report at least one 
week before the annual meeting. 

Section 5. The Managers shall meet once in each month, except 
during the months of July and August, and whenever called by the 
President, or at the request of five of its members. 



SOCIETY PUBLICATIONS 

The publications of the Society have been: 
Year-book for 1893, 168 pages. 
Year-book for 1894, 152 pages. (Supplemental.) 
Register for 1897, 512 pages. "Historical Memoranda." 
Register for 1899, 295 pages. "Historical Memoranda." 
Register for 1901, 189 pages. 

Soldiers' Graves Designated by Markers, 68 pages. 
Register for 1904, 291 pages. (With supplementary list of markers.) 
Register for 1907, 229 pages. 
Register for 1910, 259 pages. 



I give, bequeath and devise to the Massachusetts Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution for general ptirposes the sum of 
Dollars. 



1897