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Full text of "Romeo and Juliet"

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ni^si 



H 70. ^5L [^01^1 



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K.S«. Cu 



^omm m& Jttli^i 



Reprint of (Q° i) 1597. 



EDITED DY 

P. A. DANIEL. 



PUBLISHED FOR 

BY N, TRUBNER & CO., 57, 59, LUDGATE HILL» 
.LONDON, KC, 1874. 



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SitJUB n. |[0. 2. 



JOHN CHILOS AND SON, PRINTERS. 



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NOTICE. 

E0mt0 anb 3ulitt 

(Gil) 1597- 



Th IS reproduction of the earliest, and imperfect, edition 
of Romeo and Juliet has been printed directly from the 
facsimile prepared by Mr E. W. Ashbee, under the direction 
of Mr J. O. Halliwell (Phillipps), and has been carefully com- 
pared with the Quarto in the British Museum (Press mark, C. 
34. k. 58). It is printed line for line, and page for page, with 
the original. 

The collation of Steevens*s, Mommsen's, and the Cambridge 
Editors* reprints of this play, given with Mr H. H. Furness*g 
reprint in the first volume of his ' New Variorum Shakespeare,' 
has been of great assistance to me in my endeavour to 
secure accuracy for this reprint. 

One peculiarity of the original should be mentioned, as 
it is not here reproduced. From Signature E, inclusive, 
to the end of the play, a smaller type is used than that with 
which the preceding pages are printed j and the running title 
is changed from ' The moft excellent Tragedie, of Komeo and 
luliet * 10 ' The excellent Tragedie of Romeo and luliet.* 

In some few places I have not deemed it necessary to 
reproduce the typographical phenomena of the original, such 
as turned letters, &a 

For the loan of his valuable copy of the facsimile the 
Society is greatly indebted to the liberality of Mr F. W. 
Cosens. 

P. A. Daniel. 



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AN 

EXCELLENT 

conceited Tragedie 

OF 

Romeo and luliet. 

A8 it hath been often (with great applaufe) 
plaid publiquely, by the right Ho- 
nourable the L. of Hunfdon 
his Seruants. 



LONDON, 

Printed by lohn Danter. 

15 9 7- 



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The Prologue. 



'"T^VVo houjltold Frends alike in dignitie, 

"^ {In /aire Verona, where we lay our Scene) 
From ciuill hroyles broke into enmitie, 
VFhofe ciuill warre makes ciuill liands vncleane. 
From forth thefatall loynes of thefe two foes, 
A paire offlarre-croft Ijouers tooke their life : 
VFhofe mifaduentures, piteous ouerthrowes, 
{Through the continuing of their Fathers Jlr if e, 
And death-markt pqffhge of their Parents rage) 
Is now the two howres traffique of our Stage. 
The which if you with patient eares attend, 
What here we want weeHJludie to amend. 



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The most excellent Tragedie of 

Romeo and luliet. 
Enter 2. Seruing-men of the Capolets. 

GRegorie, of my word He carrie no coales. 
2 No, for if you doo, you fhould be a Collier. 
I If I be in choler, lie draw. 
2 Euer while you Hue, drawe your necke out of the 
the collar. 

1 I ftrike quickly being moou*d. 

2 I, but you are not quickly moou*d to ftrike. 

1 A Dog of the hoiife of the Mountagues moues me. 

2 To mooue is to ftirre, and to bee valiant is to ftand 
to it: therefore (of ray word) if thou be mooud thou't 
runne away. 

1 There's not a man of them I meete, but He take 
the wall of. 

2 That fhewes thee a weakling, for the weakeft goes 
to the wall. 

1 Thats true, therefore He thruft the men from the 
wall, and thruft the maids to the walls: nay, thou flialt 
fee I am a tall peece of flefti. 

2 Tis well thou art not fifli, for if thou wert thou 
wouldft be but poore lohn. 

1 He play the tyrant. He firft begin with the maids, & 
off with their heads. 

2 The heads of the maids ? 

I I 
a — Qi. I 



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The mojl excellent Tragedie^ 


I I the heades of their Maides, or the Maidenheades, 


take it in what fence thou wilt. 


2 Nay let them take it in fence that feele it, but heere 


comes two of the Mountagues. 


Enter two Seruingmen of the Mountagues. 


I Nay feare not me I warrant thee. 


2 I feare them no more than thee, but draw. 


I Nay let vs haue the law on our fide, let them begin 


firft. He tell thee what He doo, as I goe by ile bite my 


thumbe, which is difgrace enough if they fufFer it. 


2 Content, goe thou by and bite thy thumbe, and ile 


come after and frowne. 


I Moun: Doo you bite your thumbe at vs? 


1 I bite my thumbe. 


2 Moun : I but i'ft at vs ? 


I I bite my thumbe, is the law on our fide ? 


2 No. 


I 1 bite my thumbe. 


I Moun: I but i'fl at vs? Enter Beneuolio. 


2 Say I, here comes my Maflers kinfman. 



They draw, to them enters Tybalt, they Jight, to them the 
Prince, old Mountague, and his wife, old Capulet and 
his wife, and other Citizens and part them. 

Prince: Rebellious fubie6b5 enemies to peace. 
On paine of torture, from thofe bloody handes 
Throw your miflempered weapons to the ground. 
Three Ciuell brawles bred of an airie word. 
By the old Capulet and Mountague, 
Haue thrice difturbd the quiet of our flreets. 
If euer you diflurbe our ftreets againe. 

Your 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Your liues (hall pay the ranfome of your fault : 

For this time euery man depart in peace. 

Come Capulet come you along with me. 

And Mouuiague, come you this after noone. 

To know our farther pleafure in this cafe. 

To old free Towne our common iudgement place. 

Once more on paine of death each man depart. 

Exeunt, 

M: wife. Who fet this auncient quarrel firft abroach ? 
Speake Nephew, were you by when it began ? 

Benuo: Here were the feruants of your aduerfaries. 
And yours clofe fighting ere I did approch. 

Vy]fe: Ah where is Romeo, faw you him to day ? 
Right glad I am he was not at this fray. 

Ben: Madame, an houre before the worfliipt funne 
Peept through the golden window of the Eaft, 
A troubled thought drew me from companie : 
Where vnderneath the groue Sicamnure, 
That Weft ward rooteth from the Citties fide. 
So early walking might I fee your fonne. 
I drew towards him, but he was ware of me. 
And drew into the thicket of the wood : 
I noting his affe6tions by mine owne, 
That moft are bufied when th'are moft alone, 
Purfued my honor, not purfuing his. 

Moun: Black and portentious muft this honor proue, 
Vnlefle good counfaile doo the caufe rem:)oue. 

Ben: Why tell me Vncle do you know the caufe r 
Enter Romeo, 

Moun: I neyther know it nor can learne of him. 

Ben: See where he is, but ftand you both afide. 
He know his grieuance, or be much denied. 

B Mount 



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The mqft excellent Tragedie, 

Mount: I would thou wert fo happie by thy (lay 
To heare true flirifr. Come Madame lets away. 

Benuo: Good morrow Cofen. 

Romeo: Is the day fo young? 

Ben: But new flroke nine. 

Romeo: Ay me, fad hopes feeme long. 
Was that my Father that went hence fo faft ? 

Ben: It was, what forrow lengthens Romeos houres? 

Rom: Not hauhig that, which hauing makes them 

Ben: In loue. (Ihort. 

Ro: Out. 

Ben: Of loue. 

Ro: Out of her fauor where I am in loue. 

Ben: Alas that loue fo gentle in her view, 
Should be fo tyrranous and rough in proofe. 

Ro: Alas that loue whofe view is muffled ftill. 
Should without lawes giue path-waies to our will : 
Where fliall we dine ? Gods me, what fray was here ? 
Yet tell me not for I haue heard it all, 
Heres much to doe with hate, but more with loue. 
Why then, O brawling loue, O louing hate, 
O anie thing, of nothing firfl create ! 
O heauie lightnes ferious vanilie ! 
Mifliapen Caos of bed feeming thinges. 
Feather of lead, bright fmoke, cold fire, ficke health. 
Still waking fleepe, that is not what it is : 
This loue feele I, which feele no loue in this. 
Doeft thou not laugh ? 

Ben: No Cofe I rather weepe. 

Rom: Good hart at what? 

Ben: At thy good hearts opprefsion. 
Ro: Why fuch is loues tranfgrefsion, 

Griefes 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

Griefes of mine owne lie heauie at my hart. 

Which thou wouldft propagate to haue theni preft 

With more of thine, this griefe that thou haft iliowne. 

Doth ad more griefe to too much of mine owne : 

Loue is a fmoke raifde with the fume of iighes 

Being purgde, a fire fparkling in louers eyes : 

Being vext, a fea raging with a louers teares. 

What is it elfe ? A madnes moft difcreet, 

A choking gall, and a preferuing fweet. Farewell Cofe. 

Ben : Nay He goe along. 
And if you hinder me you doo me wrong. 

Ro: Tut I haue loft my felfe I am not here. 
This is not Romeo, hee's fome other where. 

Ben : Tell me in fadnes whome llie is you loue ? 

Ro: What fliall I grone and tell thee ? 

Ben: Why no, but fadly tell me w ho. 

Ro: Bid a iickman in fadnes make his will. 
Ah word ill vrgde to one that is fo ill 
In fadnes Cofen I doo loue a woman. 

Ben: I aimde fo right, when as you faid you lou*d. 

Ro: A right good mark-man, and fliee's faire I loue. 

Ben: A right faire marke faire Cofe is fooneft hit. 

Ro: But in that hit you miife, ihee*le not be hit 
With Cupids arrow, flie hath Dianaes wit. 
And in ftrong proofe of chaftitie well arm'd : 
Gainft Cupids childiih bow ihe lines vnharm'd, 
Shee*le not abide the fiedge of louing tearmes. 
Nor ope her lap to Saint feducing gold. 
Ah Ihe is rich in beautie, only poore. 
That when fhe dies with beautie dies her ftore. E^eu, 

Enter Countie Paris, old Capulet. 
Of honorable reckoning are they both, 

B 2 And 



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The mojl excellent Tragedie, 

And pittie tis they liue at ods fo long : 
But leauing that, what fay you to my fute ? 

Capu: What Ihould I fay more than I faid before. 
My daughter is a ftranger in the world, 
Shee hath not yet attainde to fourteene yeares : 
Let two more fommers wither in their pride. 
Before fhe can be thought lit for a Bride. 

Paris: Younger than Ihe are happie mothers made. 

Cap: But too foone marde are thefe fo early maried^ 
But wooe her gentle Paris, get her heart. 
My word to her confent is but a part. 
This night I hold an old accurtom'd Fcaft, 
Whereto I haue inuited many a gueft. 
Such as I loue : yet you among the llore. 
One more moft welcome makes the number more. 
At my poore houfe you ihall behold this night. 
Earth treadding ftai^, that make darke heauen light : 
Such comfort as doo lufty youngmen feelc. 
When well apparaild Aprill on the heele 
Of lumping winter treads, euen fuch delights 
Amongft frelh female buds ihall you this night 
Inherit at my houfe, heare all, all fee. 
And like her moll, whofe merite moll fhalbe. 
Such amongll view of many myne beeing one. 
May Hand in number though in reckoning none. 

Enter Scruingman. 
Where are you lirra, goe trudge about 
Through faire Verona ftreets, and feeke them out : 
Whofe names are written here and to them fay. 
My houfe and welcome at their pleafure Hay. 

Exeunt, 

Ser: Seeke them out whofe names are written here 

and 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

and yet I knowe not who are written here: I mud to 
the learned to learne of them, that's as much to fay, as 
the Taylor muft meddle with his Lade, the Shoomaker 
with his needle, the Painter with his nets, and the Filher 
with his Penfill, I muft to the learned. 

Enter BenuoUo and Romeo. 

Ben: Tut man one lire burnes out anothers burning. 
One paine is leflhed with anothers anguifti : 
Turne backward, and be holp with backward turning. 
One defperate griefe cures with anothers languifti. 
Take thou fome new infe6tion to thy eye. 
And the ranke poyfon of the old will die. 

Romeo: Your Planton leafe is excellent for that. 

Ben: For what? 

Romeo: For your broken fhin. 

Ben: Why Romeo art thou mad ? 

Rom: Not mad, but bound more than a madman is. 
Shut vp in prifon, kept without my foode, 
Whipt and tormented, and Godden good fellow. 

Ser: Godgigoden, I pray (ir can you read, 

Rom: I mine owne fortune in my miferie. 

Ser: Perhaps you haue learned it without booke : 
but I pray can you read any thing you fee ? 

Rom: I if I know the letters and the language. 

Seru: Yee fay honeftly, reft you merrie. 

Rom : Stay fellow I can read. 

He reads the Letter. 

SEigneur Marti no and his wife and daughters, Countie 
Anfelme and his beauteous Jl/ters, the Ladie widdow of 
Vtruuio, Seigneur Placentio, and his louelie Neeges, 
Mercutio and his brother Valentine, mine vncle Capu- 
let his wife and daughters, my faire Neece Rofaline and 

B 3 Liuia 



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The moft excellent Tragedic, 

Liuia, Seigneur Valentio and his Cofen Tibalt, Lucio 

and the liuelie Hellena. 

A faire aflerably, whether fhould they come ? 

Ser: Vp. 

Ro; Whether to liipper ? 

Ser: To our houfe. 

Ro; Whofe houfe? 

Ser: My Mailers. 

Ko: Indeed I Ihould haue askt thee that before. 

Ser: Now il'e tel you without asking. My Matter is 
the great rich Capulet, and if you be not of the houfe of 
Alountagues, I pray corae and crulh a cup of wine. Reft 
you merrie. 

Ben: At this fame auncient feaft of Capulets, 
Sups the faire Rofaline whom thou fo loues 
With all the admired beauties of Ferona, 
Goe thither and with vnattainted eye. 
Compare her face with fome that I fhall fhew. 
And I will make thee thinke thy fwan a crow. 

Ro; When the deuout religion of mine eye 
Maintaines fuch falihood, then turne teares to fire. 
And thefe who often drownde could neuer die, 
Tranfparent Hereliques be burnt for Hers 
One fairer than my loue, the all feeing fonne 
Nere faw her match, fince ftrft the world begun. 

Ben: Tut you faw her faire none els being by. 
Her felfe poyfd with her felfe in either eye : 
But in that Criftall fcales let there be waide. 
Your Ladyes loue, againft fome other maide 
That I will fhew you Ihining at this feafl. 
And fhe fhall fcant fhew well that now feemes bcfl. 

Rom: He goe along no fuch fight to be fhowne, 

Biit 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

But to reioyce in fplendor of mine owne. 

Enter Capulets wife and Nurce. 

Wife: Nurce wher's my daughter call her forth to 
mee. 

Nurce : Now hy my maiden head at twelue yeare old I 
had her come, what Lamb, what Ladie bird, God forbid* 
yi^hers this girle ? what luliet. Enter luliet. 

Juliet : How now who cals ? 

Nurce : Your Mother, 

Jul: Madame I am here, what is your will ? 

W: This is the matter. Nurfe giue leaue a while, we 
mud talke in fecret. Nurce come back again I haue re- 
membred me, thou'fe heare our couufaile. Thou know 
eft my daughters of a prettie age. 

Nurce : Faith I can tell her age vnto a houre. 

VFife : Shee*s not fourteene. 

Nnrce: lie lay fourteene of my teefh, and yet to my 
teene be it fpoken, I haue hut foure, fhees not fourteene. 
How long is it now to Lammas-tide ? 

FVfe : A fortnight and odde dayes. 

Nurce: Euen or odde, of all dayes in the yeare come 
Lammas Eue at night Jhcdl Jhe he fourteene, Sufan and ^fhe 
God reft all Chriftian foules were of an age, VFell Sufan is 
with God, Jhe was too good for me : But as I fa'ul on Lam- 
mas Eue at night Jhall Jhj be fourteene, that Jhall Jhee ma- 
rie I remember it well, Tis Jince the Earth-quake nowe e- 
leauen yeares, and Jhe was weand I neuer Jhall forget it, of 
all the daies of the yeare vpon that day : for I had then laid 
wormewood to my dug, ftting in the Jun vnder the Doue- 
houfe wall. My Lord and you were then at Mantua, nay I 
do heare a hraine ; But as I faid, when it did tqft the worm- 
wood on the nipple of my dug, ^ felt it hitter, pretty foole 

to 



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The moft excellent Tragedie, 

to fee it teachie and fall out with Dugge, Shake qUoth the 
Doue-houfe twos no need I trow to bid me trudge^ and Jince 
that time it is aleauen yeare : for then could luliet flande 
high lone^ nay by the Roode^Jhee could haue wad led vp and 
downe, for euen the day before fhee brake her brow, and then 
my husband God be with his fpule, hee was a merrie man : 
Dojl thou fall forward, luliet? thou wilt fall backward when 
thou hajl more wit : wilt thou not luliet ? and by my holli- 
dam, the pretty foole left crying and faid L To fee how a 
ieafi fhall come about, 1 warrant you if I fhould Hue a hun- 
dred yeare, I neuer fliould forget it, wilt thou not luliet? 
'\nd by my troth fhe Jlinted and cried L 

luliet : And flint thou too, 1 prethee Nurce fay I. 

Nurce: FFell goe thy waies, God marke thee for his 
grace, thou wert the prettieji Babe that euer I nurjl, might 
I but Hue to fee thee married once, I haue my w\fti. 

Wife: And that fame marriage Nurce, is the Theame 
I meant to talke of: Tell me luliet, howe (land you af- 
feded to be married ? 

lul: It is an honor that I dreame not off. 

Nurce : An honor ! were not I thy onely Nurce, I 
would fay thou hadjifuckt wifedome from thy Teat, 

Wife: Well girle, the Noble Couutie Par'u feekes 
thee for his Wife. 

Nurce: A man young Ladie, Ladie fuch a man as all 
the world, why he is a man of wcLxe. 

Wife : Veronaes Summer hath not fuch a flower. 

Nurce : Nay he is a flower, in faith a very flower. 

Wife : Well luliet, how like you of Paris loue. 

luliet: lie looke to like, if looking liking moue. 
But no more deepe will I engage mine eye. 
Then your confent giues ilrength to make it flie. 

Enter Clowne, 



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of Romeo and hdiet, 

Clowne : Mnddam you are cald for, f upper is readie, 
the Nurce curjl in the Pantrie, all thinges in extreamitie, 
make hqflfor I mujl be gone to waite. 

Enter Mashers with Romeo and a Page, 

R(i : What fhall this ipeech bee fpokc for our excufe ? 
Or fhall we on without Apologie. 

Benuoleo: The date is out of fuch prolixitie, 
Weele haue no Cupid hudwinckt with a Scarfe, 
Bearing a Tartars painted bow of lath. 
Scaring the Ladies Hke a crow-keeper : 
Nor no without booke Prologue faintly fpoke 
After the Prompter, for our entrance. 
But let them meafure vs by what they will, 
Weele meafure them a meafure and be gone. 

Rom: A torch for me I am not for this aumbling, 
Beeing but heauie I will beare the light. 

Mer: Beleeue me Romeo I mufl haue you daunce. 

Rom: Not I beleeue me you haue dancing fbooes 
With nimble foles, I haue a foule of lead 
So flakes me to the ground I cannot flirre. 

Mer: Giue me a cafe to put my vifage in, 
A vifor for a vifor, what care I 
What curious eye doth coate deformitie. 

Rom: Giue me a Torch, let wantons light of hart 
Tickle the fenceles rufhes with their heeles : 
For I am prouerbd with a Grandfire phrafe. 
He be a candleholder and looke on. 
The game was nere fo faire and I am done. 

Mer: Tut dun*s the moufe, the Cunftables old word. 
If thou beefl Dun, weele draw thee from the mire 
Of this furreuerence loue wherein thou flickft. 
Leaue this talke, we burne day light here. 

C Rom: Nay 



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The moft excellent Tragedie, 

Rom; Nay thats not fo. Mer: I meane fir in delay. 
We bume our lights by night, like Lampes by day. 
Take our good meaning for our iudgement fits 
Three times a day, ere once in her right wits. 

Ro/n; So we meane well by going to this maske : 
But tis no wit to goe. 

Mer: Why Rom^o may one aske ? 

Rom; I dreamt a dreame to night. 

Mer: And fo did I. Rom; Why what was yours? 

Mer: That dreamers often lie. (true. 

Rom; In bed a fleepe while they doe dreame things 

Mer: Ah then I fee Queene Mab hath bin with you. 

Ben: Queene Mab whats fhe? 
She is the Fairies Midwife and doth come 
In fhape no bigger than an Aggat (lone 
On the forefinger of a Burgomafler, 
Drawne with a teeme of httle Alomi, 
Athwart mens nofes when they lie a fleepe. 
Her waggon fpokes are made of fpinners webs, 
The couer, of the winges of Gralhoppers, 
The traces are the Moone-fhine wairie beames, 
TLc collers crickets bones, the lafh of filmes. 
Her waggoner is a fmall gray coated file. 
Not halfe fo big as is a little worme, 
Pickt from the lafie linger of a maide, 
And in this fort llie gallops vp and downe 
Through Loners braines, and then they dream of loue : 
0*re Courtiers knees : who flrait on curfies dreame 
O're Ladies lips, who dreame on kilfes flrait : 
Which oft the angrie Mab with bliflers plagues, 
Becaufe their breathes with fweetmeats tainted are : 
Sometimes Ihe gallops ore a Lawers lap. 

And 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

And then dreames he of fraelling out a fute. 

And foraetime comes fhe with a tithe pigs taile. 

Tickling a Parfons nofe that lies a fleepe. 

And then dreames he of another benefice : 

Sometime fhe gallops ore a fouldiers nofe. 

And then dreames he of cutting forraine throats. 

Of breaches ambufcados, countermines. 

Of healthes fine fadome deepe, and then anon 

Drums in his eare : at which he ftartes and wakes. 

And fweares a Praier or two and (leepes againe. 

This is that Mab that makes maids lie on their backes, 

And proues them women of good cariage. (the night. 

This is the verie Mab that plats the manes of Horfes in 

And plats the Elfelocks in foule fluttiih haire, 

Which once vn tangled much miffortune breedes. 

Rom: Peace, peace, thou talkft of nothing. 

Mer: True I talke of dreames. 
Which are the Children of an idle braine. 
Begot of nothing but vaine fantafie. 
Which is as thinne a fubftance as the aire. 
And more inconftant than the winde. 
Which wooes euen now the firofe bowels of the north. 
And being angred puffes away in hade. 
Turning his face to the dew-dropping fouth. (felues. 

Ben: Come, come, this winde doth blow vs from our 
Supper is done and we fhall come too late. 

Ro: I feare too earlie, for m/ minde mifgiues 
Some confequence is hanging in the liars. 
Which bitterly begins his fearefuU date 
With this nights reuels, and expiers the terme 
Of a difpifed life, clofde in this bread, 
By fome vntimelie forfet of vile death : 

C 2 But 



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The moft excellent Tragedies 

But he that hath the fleerage of my courfe 
Dire^ my faile, on luflie Gentlemen. 

Enter old Capulet with the Ladies. 

Capu: Welcome Gentlemen, welcome Gentlemen, 
Ladies that haue their toes vnplagud with Corns 
Will haue about with you, ah ha my Miftrefles, 
Which of you all will now refule to dance? 
Shee that makes daintie, ihee He fweare hath Corns. 
Am I come neere you now, welcome Gentlemen, wel- 
More lights you knaues, & turn thefe tables vp, (come. 

And quench the fire the roome is growne too bote. 
Ah iirra, this vnlookt for fport comes well. 
Nay fit, nay fit, good Co fen Capulet: 
For you and I are pad our Handing dayes. 
How long is it fince you and I were in a Maske ? 

Cof: By Ladie fir tis thirtie yeares at leaft. 

Cap: lis not fo much, tis not fo much, 
Tis fince the manage of Lucentio, 
Come Pentecojl as quicklie as it will, 
Some fine and twentie yeares, and then we maskt. 

Cof: Tis more, tis more, his fonne is elder far. 

Cap: Will you tell me that it cannot be fo. 
His fonne was but a Ward three yeares agoe. 
Good youths I faith. Oh youth's a ioUy thing 

Rom: What Ladie is that that doth iurich the hand 
Of yonder Knight? O fhee doth teach the torches to 

bume bright ! 
It feemes fhe hangs vpon the cheeke of night. 
Like a rich iewell in an Aethiops eare, 
Beautie too rich for vfe, for earth too deare : 
So fiiines a fnow-white Swan trouping with Crowes, 
As this faire Ladie ouer her fellowes fhowes. 

The 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

The meafure done, iie watch her place of (land. 
And touching hers, make happie my rude hand. 
Did my heart loue till now ? Forfweare it fight, 
I neuer faw true beautie till this night. 

Tib: This by his voice ihould be a Mountague, 
Fetch me my rapier boy. What dares the llaue 
Come hither couer'd with an Anticke face. 
To fcorne and ieere at our folemnitie ? 
Now by the ftocke and honor of my kin. 
To ftrike him dead I hold it for no fin. 

Ca: Why how now Cofen, wherfore ftorme you fo. 

7* ; Vncle this is a Mountague our foe, 
A villaine that is hether come in fpight. 
To mocke at our folemnitie this night. 

Ca: Young Romeo, is it noO 

Ti: It is that villaine Romeo. (man, 

Ca: Let him alone, he beares him like a portly gentle- 
And to fpeake truth, Verona brags of him. 
As of a vertuous and well gouem*d youth : 
I would not for the wealth of all this towne. 
Here in my houfe doo him difparagement : 
Therefore be quiet take no note of him, 
Beare a faire prefence, and put oflf thefe frownes. 
An ill befeeming femblance for a feaft. 

Ti: It fits when fuch a villaine is a guefl, 
lie not indure him. 

Ca: He fhalbe indured, goe to I fay, he fhall. 
Am I the Mafter of the houfe or you ? 
You'le not indure him ? God Ihall mend my foule 
You*le make a mutenie amongfl my guefts, 
You*le fet Cocke a hoope, you'le be the man. 

711; Vncle tis a ihame. 

C 3 Ca: Goe 



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The moft excellent Tragedie, 

Ca: Goe too, you are a faucie knaue, 
This tricke will fcath you one day I know what. 
Well faid my hartes. Be quiet : 
More light Ye knaue, or I will make you quiet. (ting> 

Tibali : Patience perforce with wilfull choUer mee- 
Makes my flefli tremble in their different greetings: 
I will withdraw, but this intrufion fhall 
Now feeming fweet, conuert to bitter gall. 

Rom: If I prophane with ray vnworthie hand. 
This holie ihrine, the gentle linne is this : 
My lips two blulhiug Pilgrims ready ftand. 
To fmooth the rough touch with a gentle kille. 

luli: Good Pilgrime you doe wrong your hand too 
Which mannerly deuotion fhewes in this : (much^ 

For Saints haue hands which holy Palmers touch. 
And Palme to Palme is holy Palmers kilfe. 

Rom: Haue not Saints lips, and holy Palmers too ? 

luii: Yes Pilgrime lips that they mufl vfe in praier. 

Ro : Why then faire faint, let lips do what hands doo. 
They pray, yeeld thou, leafl faith turne to difpaire. 

lu: Saints doe not mooue though: grant nor praier 
forfake. 

Ro: Then mooue not till my praiers efFed I take. 
Thus from my lips, by yours my (in is purgde. 

lu: Then haue my lips the fin that they haue tooke. 

Ro: Siune from my lips, O trefpalfe fweetly vrgde! 
Giue me my finne againe. 

lu: You kifle by the booke. 

Niuie: Madame your mother caJies, 

Rom: What is her mother ? 

Nurle: Marrie Batcheler her mother is the Ladie of tht 
houfe, and a good Lady, and a wife, and a vertuous. I nurjl 

her 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

her daughter tliat you talkt withall, I tell you, he that can 
lay hold of herjhall haue the chinkes. 

Kom: Is fhe a Alountague ? Oh deare account. 
My life is my foes thrall. 

Ca: Nay gentlemen prepare not to be gone. 
We haue a trifling fooliih banquet towards. 

They whifper in his eare. 
I pray you let me intreat you. Is it fo ? 
Well then I thanke you honeft Grentlemen, 
I promife you but for your company, 
I would haue bin a bed an houre agoe : 
Light to my chamber hoe. 

Exeunt, 
Jul: Nurfe, what is yonder Gentleman ? 
Nur : Thefonne and heire of old Tiberio. 
lul: Whats he that now is going out of dore ? 
Nur: That as I thinhe is yong Petruchio. (dance ? 

Jul: Whats he that followes there that would not 
Nur: I know not. 

Jul: Goe barne his name, if he be maried. 
My graue is like to be my wedding bed. 

Nur: His name is Romeo and a Mountague, the onely 

fonne of your great enemie, 
lul: My onely Loue fprung from my onely hate. 
Too early feene vnknowne and knowne too late : , 
Prodigious birth of loue is this to me. 
That I fbould loue a loathed enemie. 
Nurfe: FFhats this 1 what's that f 
Jul: Nothing Nurfe but a rime I learnt euen now of 

one I dancd with. 
Nurfe : Come your mother Jlaies for you. He goe a long 
with you. Exeunt. 

Enter 
a — Q I. 2 



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The mnjl excellent Tragedie, 
Enter Romeo alone, 

Ro: Shall I goe forward and my heart is here? 
Turne backe dull earth and iinde thy Center out. 
Enter Benuolio Mercutio, 

Ben: Romeo, my cofen Romeo, 

Mer: Doeft thou heare he is wife, 
Vpon my life he hath ftolne him home to bed. 

Ben: He came this way, and leapt this Orchard wall. 
Call good Mercutio, 

Mer: Call, nay He coniure too. 
Romeo, madman, humors, pafsion, liuer, appeare thou in 
likenes of a figh : fpeak but one rime & I am fatiflied, cry 
but ay me. Pronounce but Loue and Done, fpeake to 
my goflip Venus one faire word, one nickname for her 
purblinde fonne and heire young Abraham : Cup'id bee 
that fhot fo trim when young King Cophetua loued the 
begger wench. Hee heares me not. I coniure thee by 
Rnfalindes bright eye, high forehead, and fcarlet lip, her 
prettie foote, (Iraight leg, and quiuering thigh, and the 
demaines that there adiacent lie, that in thy likeuefle 
thou appeare to vs. 

Ben: If he doe heare thee thou wilt anger him. 

Mer: Tut this cannot anger him, marrie if one (huld 
raife a fpirit in his Miftris circle of fome ftrange fafhion, 
making it there to ftand till flie had laid it, and coniurde 
it downe, that w^ere fome fpite. My inuocation is faire 
and honeft, and in his Miftris name I coniure onely but 
to raife vp him. 

Ben\ Well he hath hid himfelfe amongd thofe trees. 
To be conforted with the humerous night, 
Blinde in his loue, and beH befits the darke. 

Meri 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

Mer: If loue be blind, loue will not hit the marke. 
Now will he lit vnder a Medler tree. 
And wifh his Miftris were that kinde of fruite. 
As maides call Medlers when they laugh alone. 
Ah Romeo that fhe were, ah that fhe were 
An open Ei coetera, thou a poprin Peare. 
Romeo God night. We to my trundle bed : 
This field bed is too cold for mee. 
Come lets away, for tis but vaine. 
To feeke him here that meanes not to be found. 

Ro : He iefts at fears that neuer felt a wound : 
But foft, what light forth yonder window breakes ? 
It is the Eafl, and luliet is the Sunne, 
Arife faire Sunne. and kill the enuious Moone 
That is alreadie iicke, and pale with griefe : 
That thou her maid, art far more faire than fhe. 
Be not her maide fince fhe is enuious. 
Her veftall liuerie is but pale and greene. 
And none but fooles doe weare it, cafl it off. 
She fpeakes, but fhe fayes nothing. What of tliat ? 
Her eye difcourfeth, I will anfwere it. 
I am too bold, tis not to me fhe fpeakes. 
Two of the fairefl fVarres in all the skies, 
Hauing fome bufines, doe entreat her eyes 
To twinckle in their fpheares till they retnrne. 
What if her eyes were there, they in her head. 
The brightnes of her cheekes would fhame thofe flars : 
As day-light doth a Lampe, her eyes in heauen. 
Would through the airie region flreame fo bright. 
That birdes would fing, and thinke it were not night. 
Oh now fhe leanes her cheekes vpon her hand, 
I would I were the gloue to that fame hand, 

D That 



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The moft excellent Tragedie, 

That I might kifle that cheeke. 

Jul: Ay me. 

Rom: She fpeakes. Oh fpeake againe bright Angell: 
For thou art as glorious to this night beeing ouer my 
As is a winged meffenger of heauen (head^ 

Vnto the white vpturned woondring eyes. 
Of mortals that fall backe to gaze on him. 
When he beftrides the lafie pacing cloudes. 
And falles vpon the bofome of the aire. 

lul: Ah Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? 
Denie thy Father, and refiife thy name. 
Or if thou wilt not be but fwome my loue. 
And ire no longer be a CapuleL 

Rom: Shall I heare more, or fhall I fpeake to this? 

lul: Tis but thy name that is mine enemie. 
Whats Mountague ? It is nor hand nor foote. 
Nor arme, nor face, nor any other part. 
Whats in a name ? That which we call a Rofe, 
By any other name would fmell as fweet : 
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo cald, 
Retaine the diuine perfe6tion he owes : 
Without that title Romeo part thy name. 
And for that name which is no part of thee. 
Take all I haue. 

Rom : I take thee at thy word. 
Call me but loue, and iFe be new Baptifde, 
Henceforth I neuer will be Rom^o, 

lu: What man art thou, that thus beskrind in night, 
Doeft fhimble on my counfaile ? 

Ro\ By a name I know not how to tell thee. 
My name deare Saint is hatefuU to my felfe, 
Becaufe it is an enemie to thee. 

Had 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Had I it written I would teare the word. 

lul: My eares haue not yet drunk a hundred words 
Of that tongues vtterance, yet I know the found : 
Art thou not Romeo and a Mountague ? 

Ro: Neyther faire Saint, if eyther thee difpleafe. 

lu: How camft thou hether, tell me and wherfore ? 
The Orchard walles are high and hard to clime. 
And the place death confidering who thou art. 
If any of my kinfmen finde thee here. 

Ro: By loues light winges did I oreperch thefe wals. 
For ftonie limits cannot hold loue out. 
And what loue can doo, that dares loue attempt. 
Therefore thy kinfmen are no let to me. 

lul: If they doe finde thee they will murder thee. 

Ro: Alas there lies more perrill in thine eyes. 
Then twentie of their fwords, looke thou but fweete. 
And I am proofe againft their enmitie. (here. 

lul: I would not for the world they fhuld find thee 

Ro: I haue nights cloak to hide thee from their fight. 
And but thou loue me let them finde me here : 
For life were better ended by their hate. 
Than death proroged wanting of thy loue. 

lu: By whofe diredtions foundft thou out this place. 

Ro: By loue, who firft did prompt me to enquire, 
I he gaue me counfaile and I lent him eyes. 
I am no Pilot : yet wert thou as farre 
As that vaft fhore, wafht with the furtheft fea, 
I would aduenture for fuch Marchandife. 

lul: Thou knowft the maflce of night is on my face. 
Els would a Maiden blufh bepaint my cheeks : 
For that which thou hafte heard me fpeake to night, 
Faine would I dwell on forme, &ine faine denie, 

D 2 Wha 



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The moft excellent Tragedie, 

What I haue fpoke : but farewell complements. 

Doeft thou loue me ? Nay I know thou wilt fay I, 

And I will take thy word : but if thou fwearft. 

Thou maieft proue falfe : 

At Louers penuries they fay loue fmiles. 

Ah gentle Romeo, if thou loue pronounce it faithfully : 

Or if thou thinke I am too eafely wonne, 

ire frowne and fay thee nay and be peruerfe. 

So thou wilt wooe : but els not for the world. 

In truth faire Mountague, I am too fond. 

And therefore thou maiefl thinke my hauiour light : 

But truft me gentleman He proue more true. 

Than they that haue more cunning to be ftrange. 

I fhould haue bin ftrange I muft confefle. 

But that thou ouer-heardft ere I was ware 

My true loues Pafsion : therefore pardon me. 

And not impute this yeelding to light loue. 

Which the darke night hath fo difcouered. 

Ro: By yonder blefled Moone I fweare. 
That tips with iiluer all thefe fruit trees tops. 

Jul: O fweare not by the Moone the vnconftant 
That monthlie changeth in her circled orbe, (Moone, 

Lea ft that thy loue proue like wife variable. 

Ro: Now by 

Jul: Nay doo not fweare at all. 
Or if thou fweare, fweare by thy glorious felfe. 
Which art the Grod of my Idolatrie, 
And IFe beleeue thee. 

Ro: If my true harts loue 

Jul: Sweare not at al, though I doo ioy in 
I haue fmall ioy in this contrad to night, (thee. 

It is too ralh too fodaine, too vnaduifde. 

Too 



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of Romeo and lullet. 

Too like the lightning that doth ceafe to bee 

Ere one can fay it lightens. I heare fome comming, 

Deare loue adew, fweet Mountague be true. 

Stay but a little and il'e come againe. 

Ro: O blefled blefled night, I feare being niglit. 
All this is but a dreame I heare and fee. 
Too flattering true to be fubftantiall. 

lul: Three wordes good Romeo and good night in- 
If that thy bent of loue be honourable ? (deed. 

Thy purpofe marriage, fend me word to morrow 
By one that iFe procure to come to thee : 
Where and what time thou wilt performe that right. 
And al my fortunes at thy foote iPe lay. 
And follow thee my Lord through out the world. 

Ro: Loue goes toward loue like fchoole boyes from 
their bookes. 
But loue from loue, to fchoole with heauie lookes. 

lul: Romeo, Romeo, O for a falkners voice. 
To lure this Tallell gentle backe againe : 
Bondage is hoarfe and may not crie aloud. 
Els would I teare the Caue where Eccho lies 
And make her airie voice as hoarfe as mine. 
With repetition of my Romeos name. 
Romeo ? 

Ro: It is my foule that calles vpon my name. 
How filuer fweet found louers tongues in night. 

lul: Romeo? 

Ro: Madame. 

lul: At what a clocke to morrow fliall I fend ? 

Ro: At the houre of nine. 

Jul: I will not faile, tis twentie yeares till then, 
Romeo I haue forgot why I did call thee backe. 

D 3 Row; 



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The mq/l excellent Tragedie, 

Rom : Let me flay here till you remember it. 

Jul: I fhall forget to haue thee ftill ftaie here, 
Remembring how I loue thy companie. 

Rom: And il'e ftay Hill to haue thee Hill forget. 
Forgetting any other home but this. 

lu: Tis alraofl morning I would haue thee gone. 
But yet no further then a wantons bird. 
Who lets it hop a little from her hand. 
Like a pore prifoner in his twilled giues. 
And with a filke thred puis it backe againe. 
Too louing iealous of his libertie. 

Ro: Would I were thy bird. 

Jul: Sweet fo would I, 
Yet I fhould kill thee with much cherrifliing thee. 
Good night, good night, parting is fuch fweet forrow. 
That I Ihall fay good night till it be morrow. (bread, 

Rom; SL'cpe dvvell vpon thine eyes, peace on thy 
I would that I were fleep and peace of fweet to reft. 
Now will I to my Ghoftly fathers Cell, 
Hii help to craue, and my good hap to tell. 

Enter Frier Francis. (night. 

Frier: The gray ey*d morne fmiles on the frowning 
Checkring the Eaflerne clouds with flreakes of Hght, 
And flecked darkenes like a drunkard reeles. 
From forth daies path, and Titans fierie wheeles : 
Now ere the Sunne aduance his burning eye. 
The world to cheare, and nights darke dew to drie. 
We mud vp fill this oafier Cage of ours. 
With balefuU weeds, and precious iuyced flowers. 
Oh mickle is the powerfuU grace that lies 
In hearbes, plants, flones, and their true qualities : 
For nought fo vile, that vile on earth doth line. 

But 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

But to the enrth forae fpeciall good doth giue : 

Nor nought fo good, but ftraind from that fake vfe, 

Reuolts to vice and Humbles on abufe : 

Vertue it felfe tumes vice being mifapplied. 

And vice fometimes by a^on dignified. 

Within the infant rinde of this fmall flower, 

Poyfon hath refidence, and medecine power : 

For this being fmelt too, with that part cheares ech hart. 

Being tafled flaies all fences with the hart. 

Two fuch oppofed foes incampe them ftill. 

In man as well as herbes, grace and rude will. 

And where the worfer is predominant. 

Full foone the canker death eats vp that plant. 

Kom: Good morrow to my Ghoftly Confeflbr. 

Fri: BenedicUe, what earlie tongue fo foone faluteth 
Yong fonne it argues a diftempered head, (me ? 

So foone to bid good morrow to my bed. 
Care keepes his watch in euerie old mans eye. 
And where care lodgeth, fleep can neuer lie : 
But where vnbrufed youth with vnftuft braines 
Doth couch h'ls limmes, there golden fleepe remaines : 
Therefore thy earlines doth me affure, 
Thou art vprowfd by fome diftemperature. 
Or if not fo, then here I hit it righ 
Our Romeo hath not bin a bed to night. 

Ro: The laft was true, the fweeter reft was mine. 

Fr: God pardon fin, wert thou with Kofal'me ? 

Ro; With Rofaline my Ghoftly father no, 
I haue forgot that name, and that names woe. (then ? 

Fri: Thats my good fonne: but where haft thou bin 

Ro.- I tell thee ere thou aske it me againe, 
I liaue bin feafting with mine enemie : 

Where 



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The mojl excellent Tragedie, 

Where on the fodaine one hath wounded raee 
Thats by me wounded, both our remedies 
With in thy Jielp and holy phificke lies, 
I beare no hatred blefled man : for loe 
My intercefsioii likewife fteades my foe. 

Frier : Be plaine my fonne and homely in thy drift, 
Ridling confefsion findes but ridling fhrift. 

Roto.- Then plainely know my harts deare loue is fet 
On the faire daughter of rich Capulet : 
As mine on hers, fo hers likewife on mine. 
And all combind, faue what thou mud combine 
By holy marriage : where, and when, and how. 
We met, we woo*d, and made exchange of vowes, 
ire tell thee as I pafle : But this I pray. 
That thou confent to marrie vs to day. 

Fri: Holy 5. Francis, what a change Is here ? 
Is Rofaline whome thou didft loue fo deare 
So foone forfooke, lo yong mens loue then lies 
Not truelie in their harts, but in their eyes. 
Jefu Maria, what a deale of brine 
Hath waiht thy fallow cheekes for Rofaline ? 
How much fait water caft away in wafte. 
To feafon loue, that of loue doth not tafte. 
The funne not yet thy fighes from heauen cleares. 
Thy old grones ring yet in my ancient cares. 
And loe vpon thy cheeke the ftaine doth fit. 
Of an old teare that is not wafht off yet. 
If euer thou wert thus, and thefe woes thine. 
Thou and thefe woes were all for Rofaline, 
And art thou changde, pronounce this fentence then 
Women may fal, when ther*s no ftrength in men. 

Rom: Thou chidft me oft for louing Kof aline. 



Frier 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Fr: For doating, not for louing, pupill mine. 

Rom: And badfl me burie loue. 

Fr: Not in a graue. 
To lay one in another out to haue. 

Rom: I pree thee chide not, fhe whom I loue now 
Doth grace for grace, and loue for loue allow : 
The other did not fo. 

Fr: Oh fhe knew well 
Thy loue did read by rote, and could not fpell. 
But come yong Wauerer, come goe with mee. 
In one refped lie thy afsiftant bee : 
For this alliaunce may fo happie proue. 
To turne your Houfholds rancour to pure loue. Exeunt. 

Enter Mercutio, Benuolio, 

Mer: Why whats become of Romeo 9 came he not 
home to night ? 

Ben: Not to his Fathers, I fpake with his man. 

Mer: Ah that fame pale hard hearted wench, that Ro- 
Torments him fo, that he will fure run mad. {/aline, 

Mer: Tybalt the Kinfman of olde Capolet 
Hath fent a Letter to his Fathers Houfe : 
Some Challenge on my life. 

Ben: Romeo will anfwere it. 

Mer: I, anie man that can write may anfwere a letter. 

Ben: Nay, he will anfwere the letters mailer if hee bee 
challenged. 

Mer: Who, Romeo f why he is alreadie dead : ftabd 
with a white wenches blacke eye, fhot thorough the eare 
with a loue fong, the verie pinne of his heart cleft with the 
blinde bow-boyes but-lhaft. And is he a man to encounter 
Tylalt? 

Ben: Why what is Tybalt 9 

Mer: More than the prince of cattes I can tell you. Oh 
he is the couragious captaine of complements. Catfo, he 

E fights 



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The excellent Tragedie 

fightes as you fing pricke-fong, keepes time dyftance and 
proportion, refts me his minum reft one two and the thirde 
in your bofome, the very butcher of a filken button, a Duel- 
Uft a Duellift, a gentleman of the very firft houfe of the firfl 
and fecond caufe, ah the immortaJl Paflado, the Punto re- 
uerfo, the Hay. 

Ben: The what? 

Me: The Poxe of fuch limping antique affedting fan- 
tafticoes thefe new tuners of accents. By lefu a very good 
blade, a very tall man, a very good whoore. Why graund- 
fir is not this a miferable cafe that we ihould be flil afflided 
with thefe ftrange flies : thefe fafhionmongers, thefe par- 
donmees, that ftand fo much on the new forme, that they 
cannot fitte at eafe on the old bench. Oh their bones, theyr 
bones. 

Ben. Heere comes Romeo. 

Mer: Without his Roe, like a dryed Hering. O flefh flefh 
how art thou fifhified. Sirra now is he for the numbers that 
Petrarch flowdin : Laura to his Lady was but a kitchin 
drudg, yet fhe had a better loue to berime her : Dido a dow- 
dy Cleopatra a GypHe, Hero and Hellen hildings and harle- 
tries : Th{fhie a gray eye or fo, but not to the purpofe. Signior 
Romeo bon iour, there is a French curtefie to your French 
flop : yee gaue vs the counterfeit fairely yefternight. 

Rom : What counterfeit I pray you ? 

Me: The flip the flip, can you not conceiue? 

Rom ; I cry you mercy my bufines was great, and in fuch 
a cafe as mine, a man may ftraine curtefle. 

Mer: Oh thats as much to fay as fuch a cafe as yours wil 
conftraine a man to bow in the hams. 

Rom: A moft curteous expofition. 

Me : Why I am the very pinke of curtefie. 

Ro/w : Pinke for flower ? 

Mer: Right. 

Rom: Then is my Pumpe well flour'd : 

Mer: Well faid, follow me nowe that left till thou haft 

worne 



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of Romeo and lul'ut. 

wome out thy Purape, that when the fingle fole of it is worn 
the ieft may remaine after the wearing folie finguler. 

Rom: O fingle foald ieft folic finguler for the finglenes. 

Me, Come between vs good Benuolio, for my wits ^e. 

Row : S wits and fpurres, fwits & fpurres, or He cry a match. 

Mer: Nay if thy wits runne the wildgoofe chafe, I haoe 
done : for I am fure thou haft more of the goofe in one of 
thy wits, than I haue in al my fiue : Was I with you there for 
the goofe ? 

Rom: Thou wert neuer with me for any thing, when 
thou wert not with me for the goofe. 

Me: He bite thee by the eare for that ieft, 

Rom .• Nay good goofe bite not. 

Mer: Why thy wit b a bitter fweeting, a moft ftiarp (auce 

Rom : And was it not well feru*d in to a fweet goofe ? 

Mer: Oh heere is a witte of Cheuerell that ftretcheth 
ftom an ynch narrow to an ell broad. 

Rom : I ftretcht it out for the word broad, which added to 
the goofe, proues thee faire and wide a broad goofe. 

Mer: Why is not this better now than groning for loue ? 
why now art thou fociable, now art thou thy felfe, nowe art 
thou what thou art, as wel by arte as nature. This driueling 
loue is like a great naturall, (hat runs vp and downe to hide 
his bable in a hole. 

Ben: Stop there. 

Me: Why thou wouldft haue me ftopp my tale againft 
the haire. 

Ben : Thou wouldft haue made thy tale too long ? 

Mer: Tut man thou art deceiued, I meant to make it 
fliort, for I was come to the whole depth of my tale ? and 
meant indeed to occupie the argument no longer. 

Rom: Heers goodly geare. 

Enter Nurfe and her man. 

Mer: A faile, a faile, a faile. 

E a Ben: Two 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Ben : Two, two, a fhirt and a fraocke. 

Nur: Peter, pree thee giue me my fan. 

Mer: Pree thee doo good Peter, to hide her face: for 
her fanne is the fairer of the two. 

Nur: God ye goodmorrow Gentlemen. 

Mer: God ye good den faire Gentlewoman. 

Nur: Is it godyegooden I pray you. 

Mer: Tis no lefle I aflfure you, for the baudie hand of 
the diall is euen now vpon the pricke of noone. 

Nur: Fie, what a man is this? 

Rom: A Gentleman Nurfe, tliat God hath made for 
himfelfe to marre. 

Nur: By my troth well faid: for himfelfe to marre 
quoth he } I pray you can anie of you tell where one maie 
finde yong Romeo ? 

Rom: I can: but yong Romeo will bee elder when you 
haue found him, tlian he was when you fought him. I am 
the yongeft of that name for fault of a worfe. 

Nur: Well faid. 

Mer: Yea, is the worft well? mas well noted, wife- 
ly, wifely. 

Nu: If you be he fir, I defire fome conference with ye. 

Ben: O, belike Ihe meanes to inuite him to fupper. 

Mer: So ho. A baud, a baud, a baud. 

Rom: Why what hafl found man ? 

Mer: No hare fir, vnlefle it be a hare in a lenten pye, 
that is fome what flale and hoare ere it be eaten. 
He walkes by them, and Jin gs. 
And an olde hare hore, and an olde hare hore 

is verie good meate in Lent : 
But a hare thats hoare is too much for a fcore, 
if it hore ere it be fpent. 
Youl come to your fathers to fupper ? 

Rom-. I will. 
Mer: Farewell ancient Ladie, farewell fweete Ladie. 
Exeunt Benuolio, Mercutio: 

Nurf: 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

Nur: Many farewell. Pray what faucie merchant was 
this that was fo full of his roperipe ? 

Rom: A gentleman Nurfe that loues to heare hirafelfe 
talke, and will fpeake more in an houre than hee will (land 
to in a month. 

Nur: If hee fland to anie thing againft mee. He take 
him downe if he were luilier than he is : if I cannot take him 
downe. He finde them that Ihall : I am none of his flurt- 
gills, I am none of his skaines mates. 

She turnes to Peter her man. 
And thou like a knaue muft (land by, and fee euerie lacke 
vfe me at his pleafure. 

Pet: I fee no bodie vfe you at his pleafure, if I had, I 
would foone haue drawen : you know my toole is as foone 
out as anothcrs if I fee time and place. 

Nur: Now afore God he hath fo vext me, that euerie 
member about me quiuers : fcuniie lacke. But as I faid, my 
Ladie bad me feeke ye out, and what fhee bad me tell yee, 
that He keepe to my felfe : but if you (hould lead her into a 
fooles paradice as they faye, it were a verie grofle kinde of 
behauiour as they fay, for the Gentlewoman is yong. Now 
if you fhould deale doubly with her, it were verie weake 
dealing, and not to be offered to anie Gentlewoman. 

Rom,: Nurfe, commend me to thy Ladie, tell her I pro- 
teft. 

Nur: Good heart : yfaith He tell her fo : oh fhe will be 
a ioyfull woman. 

Rom : Why, what wilt thou tell her ? 

Nur: That you doo proteft : which (as I take it) is a 
Gentlemanlike proiier. 

Rom: Bid her get leaue to morrow morning 
To come to fhriit to Frier iMurence cell : 
And (lay thou Nurfe behinde the Abbey wall. 
My man fhall come to thee, and bring along 
The cordes, made like a tackled ftaire. 
Which to the high top-gallant of my ioy 

E 3 Mufl 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Mufl be my condud in the fecret night. 
Hold, take that for thy paines. 

Nur: No, not a penie truly. 

Rom .• I fay you fhall not chufe. 

Nur : Well, to morrow morning fhe fhall not faile. 

Rom ; Farewell, be truftie, and He quite thy paiue. Erit 

Nar.* Peier, take my fanne, and goe before. Ex, o nines. 

Enter Juliet, 

Jul : The clocke ftroke nine when I did fend my Nurfle 
In halfe an houre fhe promifl to returne. 
Perhaps fhe cannot finde him. Thats not fo. 
Oh fhe is lazie, Loues heralds fhould be thought^ 
And runne more fwift, than haflie powder iierd. 
Doth hurrie from the fearfull Cannons mouth. 

Enter Nurfe, 
Oh now fhe comes. Tell me gentle Nurfe, 
What fayes my Loue ? 

Nur: Oh I am wearie, let mee reft a while. Lord how 
my bones ake. Oh wheres my man? Giue me fome aqua 
vitae. 

Jul : I would thou hadft my bones, and I thy newes. 

Nur : Fie, what a iaunt haue I had : and my backe a to- 
ther fide. Lord, Lord, what a cafe am I in. 

Jul: But tell me fweet Nurfe, what fayes Komeo? 

Nttr: Romeo, nay, alas you cannot chufe a man. Hees 
no bodie, he is not the Flower of curtefie, he is not a proper 
man : and for a hand, and a foote, and a baudie, wel go thy 
way wench, thou haft it ifaith. Lord, Lord, how my head 
beates ? 

Jul : What of all this ? tell me what fayes he to our ma- 
nage? 

Nur : Marry he fayes like an honeft Gentleman, and a 
kinde, and I warrant a vertuous : wheres your Mother I 

Jul : Lord, Lord, how odly thou replieft ? He faies like a 

kinde 



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of Romeo and luJiet, 

kinde Gentleman, and an honed, and a vertuousj wheres 
your mother ? 

N//r : Marry come vp, cannot you ftay a while ? is this 
the poultelle for mine aking boanes? next arrant youl haue 
done, euen doot your felfe. 

lul : Nay (lay fweet Nurfe, I doo intreate thee now. 
What fayes my Loue, my Lord, my Romeo ? 

Kur : Goe, hye you ftraight to Friar Laurence Cell, 
And frame a fcufe that you muil goe to (hrift : 
There Hayes a Bridegroome to make you a Bride. 
Now comes the wanton blood vp in your cheekes, 
I mud prouide a ladder made of cordes. 
With which your Lord muft clime a birdes neft foone. 
I mud take paines to further your delight. 
But you muft beare the burden foone at night. 
Doth this newes pleafe you now ? 

lul : How doth her latter words reuiue my hart. 
Thankes gentle Nurle, difpatch thy bufines. 
And He not faile to raeete my Romeo, Ereunt. 

Enter Romeo, Frier. 

Rom : Now Father Laurence^ in thy holy grant 
Coufifts the good of me and luliet. 

Fr : Without more words I will doo all I may. 
To make you happie if in me it lye. 

Rom : This morning here ihe pointed we fhould meet. 
And confumate thofe neuer parting bands, 
Witnes of our harts louc by ioyning hands. 
And come fhe will. 

Fr : I gefle (lie will indeed. 
Youths loue is quicke, fwifler than fwifteft fpeed. 

Enter luliet fomewhat f aft, and embraceth Romeo. 
See where (he comes. 

So light of foote nere hurts the troden flower : 
Of loue and ioy, fee fee the foueraigne power, 

lul: Ro7neo, 
a-'(^i. 3 Rom: 



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The cxccllcjit Trugcd'ie 

Rom : My luliet welcome. As doo waking eyes 
(Cloafd in Nights myfts) attend the frolicke Day, 
So Romeo halh expedted lul'iet, 
And thou art come. 

Jul: I am (if I be Day) 
Come to my Sunne : ihine foorth, and make me faire. 

Rom : All beauteous fairnes dwelleth in thine eyes. 

Jul: Romeo from thine all brightnes doth arife. 

Fr : Come wantons, come, the ftealing houres do palfe 
Defer imbracements till fome fitrer time. 
Part for a while, you fhall not be alone. 
Till holy Church haue ioyud ye both in one. 

Rom : Lead holy Father, all delay feemes long. 

Jul : Make haft, make haft, this lingring doth vs wrong. 

Fr : O, foft and faire makes fweeteft worke they fay. 
Haft is a common hindrer in crofle way. Exeunt omnes. 

Enter Benuolio, Mercutio, 

Ben : I pree thee good Mercutio lets retire. 
The day is hot, the Capels are abroad. 

Mer : Thou art like one of thofe, that when hee comes 
into the confines of a tauerne, claps me his rapier on the 
boord, and fayes, God fend me no need of thee : and by 
the operation of the next cup of wine, he drawes it on the 
drawer, when indeed there is no need. 

Ben : Am I like fuch a one ? 

Mer: Go too, thou art as hot a lacke being mooude, 
and as foone mooude to be moodie, and as foone moodie to 
be mooud. 

Ben : And what too ? 

Mer: Nay, and there were two fuch, wee ftiould haue 
none ftiortly. Didft not thou fall out with a man for crack- 
ing of nuts, hauing no other reafon, but becaufe thou had ft 
haftll eyes ? what eye but fuch an eye would haue pickt out 
fuch a quarrell ? With another for coughing, becaufe hee 

wakd 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

wakd thy dogge that lay a ileepe in the Sunne? With a 
Taylor for wearing his new dublet before Eafter: and 
with another for tying his new Ihoes with olde ribands. 
And yet thou wilt forbid me of quarrelling. 
Ben : By my head heere comes a Capolet, 

Enter Tylalt. 

Mer: By my heele I care not. 

Tt/b : Gentlemen a word with one of you. 

Mer . But one word with one of vs ? You had bed couple 
it with fomewhat, and make it a word and a blow. 

Tyb : I am apt enough to that if I haue occafion. 

Mer : Could you not take occafion ? 

Tyb : MerciUio thou conforts with Romeo r 

Mer : Confort. Zwounes confort ? the llaue wil make fid- 
lers of vs. If you doe firra, look for nothing but difcord: For 
heeres my fiddle-fticke. 

Enter Romeo. 

Tyb : Well peace be with you, heere comes my man. 

Mer : But He be hanged if he weare your lyuery : Mary 
go before into the field, and he may be your follower, fo in 
that fence your worihip may call him man. 

Tyb: Romeo the hate I beare to thee can afFoord no bet- 
ter words then thefe, thou art a villaine. 

Rom : Tybalt the loue I beare to thee, doth excufe the 
appertaining rage to fuch a word : villaine am I none, ther- 
fore I well perceiue thou knowft me not. 

Tyb : Bace boy this cannot ferue thy turne, and therefore 
drawe. 

Ro : I doe protefl I neuer iniured thee, but loue thee bet- 
ter than thou canft deuife, till thou (halt know the reafon of 
my loue. 

Men O diflionorable vile fubmiflion. AUnflochado caries 
it away. You Ratcatcher, come backe, come backe. 

Tyb : What wouldell with me ? 

F Mer: 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Mer : Nothing King of Gates, but borrow one of your 
nine liues, therefore come drawe your rapier out of your 
fcabard, leafl mine be about your eares ere you be aware. 

Rom : Stay Tibalt, hould Mercutio : Benuolio beate 
downe their weapons. 

Tibalt vnder Romeos arme thru/Is Mer^ 
cutio, in andjlyes. 

Mer: Is he gone, hath hee nothing? A poxe on your 
houfes. 

Rom : What art thou hurt man, the wound is not deepe. 

Mer: Noe not fo deepe as a Well, nor fo wide as a 
bame doore, but it will ferue I warrant. What meant you to 
come betweene vs ? I was hurt vnder your arme. 

Rom : I did all for the bed. 

Mer: A poxe of your houfes, I am fairely drefl. Sirra 
goe fetch me a Surgeon. 

Boy : I goe my Lord. 

Mer: I am pepperd for this world, I am fped yfaith, he 
hath made wormes raeate of me, & ye aske for me to mor- 
row you (hall finde me a graue-man. A poxe of your houfes, 
I fhall be fairely mounted vpon foure mens fhoulders: For 
your houfe of the Mountegues and the Capolets: and then 
fome peafantly rogue, fome Sexton, fome bafe flaue fhall 
write my Epitapth, that Tybalt came and broke the Princes 
Lawes, and Mercutio was flaine for the firll and fecond 
caufe. Wher's the Surgeon ? 

Boy : Hee's come fir. 

Mer: Now heele keepe a mumbling in my guts on the 
other fide, come Benuolio, lend me thy hand : a poxe of your 
houfes. Exeunt 

Rom : This Gentleman the Princes neere Alie. 
My very firend hath tane this mortall wound 
In ray behalfe, my reputation flaind 
With Tibalts flaunder, Tybalt that an houre 
Hath beene my kin (man. Ah luliet 

Thy 



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of Romeo and luUet, 

Thy beautie makes me thus effeminate, 
And in my temper foftens valors ileele. 

Enter Benuolio, 

Ben : Ah Romeo Romeo braue Mercutio is dead. 
That gallant fpirit hath a Ipir'd the cloudes. 
Which too vntimely fcorad the lowly earth. 

Rom : This daies black fate, on more daies doth depend 
This but begins what other dayes mud end. 

Enter Tibalt, 

Ben : Heere comes the furious Tihalt backe againe. 

Rom : A Hue in trjrumph and Mercutio flaine ? 
Away to heauen refpe6tiue lenity : 
And fier eyed fiiry be my conduct now. 
Now Tihalt take the villaine backe againe, 
Which late thou gau'ft me : for Mercutios foule. 
Is but a little way aboue the cloudes. 
And ftaies for thine to beare him company. 
Or thou, or I, or both (hall follow him. 

Fight, Tihalt falles, 

Ben : Romeo away, thou feed that Tihalt' s flaine. 
The Citizens approach, away, begone 
Thou wilt be taken. 

Rom : Ah I am fortunes flaue. 

Eveunt 

Enter Citizens, 

IFutch. Wher*s he that flue Mercutio, Ti/haft that vil- 
laine ? 

Ben : There is that Tyha/t. 

F 2 iratch: Vp 



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The excellent Tragedie 
Vp firra goe with vs. 

Enter Prince, Capolets wife. 

Pry: Where be the vile beginners of this fray? 

Ben : Ah Noble Prince I can difcouer all 
The moll vnlucky mannage of this brawle. 
Heere lyes the man flaine by yong Komeo, 
That flew thy kinfman braue Mercutio, 

Ml Tihalt, Tybalt, O my brothers child, 
Vnhappie fight? Ah the blood is fpilt 
Of my deare kinfman. Prince as thou art true : 
For blood of ours, flied bloud of Mountagew, 

Pry: Speake Benuolio who began ihis fray? 

Ben : Til alt heere flaine whom Korneos hand did Hay. 
Romeo who fpake him fayre bid him bethinke 
How nice the quarrell was. 
But Tibalt dill perfifling in his wrong. 
The flout Mercutio drewe to calme the ftorme. 
Which Komeo feeing cal'd flay Gentlemen, 
And on me cry'd, who drew to part their flrife. 
And with his agill arme yong Romeo, 
As faft as tung cryde peace, fought peace to make. 
While they were enterchanging thrufls and blows, 
Vnder yong Komeos laboring arme to part. 
The furious Tybalt caft an enuious thruft. 
That rid the life of flout Mercutio. 
With that he fled, but prefently returned. 
And with his rapier braued Ro;weo : 
That had but newly entertain'd reuenge. 
And ere I could draw forth my rapyer 
To part their furie, downe did Tybalt fall. 
And this way Romeo fled. 

Mo : He is a Mountagew and fpeakes partiall, 
Some twentie of them fought in this blacke flrife ; 
And all thofe twenty could but kill one life. 

I doe 



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of Romeo and Itdiet. 

1 doo intreate fweete Prince thoult iuftice giue, 
Romeo flew Tybalt, Romeo may not Hue. 

Prin : And for that offence 
Immediately we doo exile him hence. 
I haue an intereft in your hates proceeding. 
My blood for your rude braules doth lye a bleeding. 
But He amerce you with fo large a fine, 
That you fhall all repent the loffe of mine. 
I will be deafe to pleading and excufes. 
Nor teares nor prayers fhall purchafe for abufes. 
Pittie fhall dwell and gouerne with vs flill : 
Mercie to all but murdrers, pardoning none that kill. 

Exeunt omnes. 

Enter Juliet. 

Jul : Gallop apace you fierie footed fleedes 
To PJueIus manfion, fuch a Waggoner 
As Phaeton, would quickly bring you thether. 
And fend in cloudie night immediately. 

Enter Nurfe wringing her hands, with the ladder 
of cordes in her lap. 
But how now Nurfe : O Lord, why lookft thou fad ? 
What hafl thou there, the cordes ? 

A^//r : I, I, the cordes : alacke we are vndone. 
We are vndone, Ladle we are vndone. 

lul: What diuell art thou that torments me thas? 

Nurf: Alack the day, hees dead, hees dead, hees dead. 

Jul : This torture fhoald bj roard in difmall hell. 
Can heauens be fo enuious ? 

Nur: Romeo can if heauens cannot. 
I faw the wound, I faw it with mine eyes. 
God faue the fample, on his manly breall : 
A bloodie coarfe, a piteous bloodie coarfe. 
All pale as afhes, I fwounded at the fight. 

F 3 lull 



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The cxcelloH Tra<re(lie 



d 



//// ; Ah Romeo, Romeo, what di Taller hap 
Hath leuerd thee from thy true Juliet ? 
Ah why fhould Heauen fo much conlpire with Woe, 
Or Fate enuie our happie Marriage, 
So foone to funder vs by timelelfe Death ? 

Nui • O Tifbalt, Tylalt, the bell frend I had, 
O honeft Ty laity curteous Gentleman. 

lul : What ftorme is this that biowes fo contrarie. 
Is Tybalt dead, and Romeo murdered : 
My deare loude coufen, and my dearell Lord. 
Then let the trumpet found a generall doome 
Thefe two being dead, then liuing is there none. 

Nur : Tybalt is dead, and Romeo banilhed, 
Romeo that murdred him is banilhed. 

Jul : Ah heauens, did Romeos hand Ihed Tybalts blood ? 

Nur : It did, it did, alacke the day if did. 

lul : O ferpents hate, hid with a flowring face : 
O painted fepulcher, including lilth. 
Was neuer booke containing fo foule matter. 
So feirly bound. Ah, what meant Romeo ? 

Nur : There is no truth, no faith, no honeftie in men : 
All falfe, all fait hies, periurde, all forfworne. 
Shame come to Romeo, 

lul : A blifter on that tung, he was not borne to fliame : 
Vpon his face Shame is aihamde to fit. 
But wherefore villaine didll thou kill my Coufen? 
That villaine Coufen would haue kild my husband. 
All this is comfort. But there yet remaines 
VVorfe than his death, which faine I would forget : 
But ah, it prelTeth to my memorie, 
Romeo is banilhed. Ah that wc.rd Banilhed 
Is worfe than death. Komo is baniihtd. 
Is Father, Mother, Tybalt, lulut. 
All killd, all llaine, all d-ad, all banifh d. 
Where are my Father and my Mother Nurfe ? 

Nur : VVc' ping and wayling ouer Tybalts coarfe. 

Will 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Will you goe to them ? 

lul : I, I, when theirs are fpent. 
Mine fhall he fhed for Komeos banifhment. 

Ni/r ; Ladie, your Romeo will be here to night. 
He to him, he is hid at Laurence Cell. 

lul: Doo fo, and beare this Ring to my true Knight, 
And bid him come to take his laft farewell. Exeunt. 

Enter Frier, 

Fr : Komeo come forth, come forth thou fearfuU man, 
Affli^on is enamourd on thy parts. 
And thou art wedded to Calamitie. 

Enter Romeo. 

Rom .• Father what newes, what is the Princes doome. 
What Sorrow cranes acquaintance at our hands. 
Which yet we know not. 

Fr : Too ^miliar 
Is my yong fonne with fuch fowre companie : 
I bring thee tidings of the Princes doome. 

Rom .• What leffe than doomes day is the Princes doome? 

Fr : A gentler iudgemeut vanifht from his lips. 
Not bodies death, but bodies banifhment. 

Rom .• Ha, Baniihed ? be mercifiill, fay death : 
For Exile hath more terror in his lookes. 
Than death it felfe, doo not fay Banifhment. 

Fr : Hence from Verona art thou baniihed : 
Be patient, for the world is broad and wide. 

Rom .* There is no world without Verona walls. 
But purgatorie, tortm^, hell it felfe. 
Hence banifhed, is banifht from the world : 
And world exilde is death. Calling death banifhment. 
Thou cutft my head off with a golden axe. 
And fmileft vpon the flroke that murders me. 

Fr : Oh monflrous finne, O rude vnthankfulnes : 
Thy fault our law calls death, but the milde Prince 
(Taking thy part) hath rufhd afide the law. 

And 



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The excellent Tragedie 

And turad that blacke word death to baniftiment : 
This is meere mercie, and thou feeft it not. 

Rom : Tis torture and not mercie, heauen is heere 
Where luliet Hues : and euerie cat and dog. 
And little moufe, euerie vnworthie thing 
Line here in heauen, and may looke on her. 
But Komeo may not. More validitie. 
More honourable (late, more court fhip lines 
In carrion flyes, than Komeo : they may feaze 
On the white wonder of faire Juliets skinne. 
And fleale immortall kifles from her lips j 
But Romeo may not, he is banifhed. 
Flies may doo this, but I from this muft flye. 
Oh Father hadfl ihou no ftrong poyfon mixt, 
No fharpe ground knife, no prefent meane of death. 
Though nere fo meane, but banifhment 
To torture me withall : ah, banifhed. 
O Frier, the damned vfe that word in hell : 
Howling attends it. How hadft thou the heart. 
Being a Diuine, a ghoftly Confelfor, 
A finne abfoluer, and my frend profeft. 
To mangle me with that word, Banifhment? 

Fr : Thou fond mad man, heare me but fpeake a word. 

Rom : O, thou wilt talke againe of Banifhment. 

Fr : He giue thee armour to beare off this word, 
Aduerfities fweete mi Ike, philofophie. 
To comfort thee though thou be baniflied. 

Rom ; Yet Banifhed ? hang vp philofophie, 
Vnleffe philofophie can make a Juliet, 
Difplant a Towne, reuerfe a Princes doome, 
It helpes not, it preuailes not, talke no more. 

Fr : O, now I fee that madmen haue no eares. 

Rom: How fhould they, when that wife men haue no 
eyes. 

Fr : Let me difpute with thee of thy eftate. 

Rom : Thou canft not fpeak of what thou doft not feele. 

Wert 



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of Rameo and luUei, 

Wert thou as young as I, luliet thy Loue, 

An houre but married, Tybalt murdred. 

Doting like me, and like me banifhcd. 

Then might ft thou fpeake, then might ft thou teare thy 

hajrre. 
And fall vpon the ground as I doe now. 
Taking the meafure of an vnmade graue. 

Nurfe knockes. 

Fr : Komeo arife, ftand vp thou wilt be taken, 
I heare one knocke, arife and get thee gone. 
Nu : Hoe Fryer. 
Fr : Gods will what wilfiiJnes is this ? 

Shee knockes againe, 

Nur : Hoe Fryer open the doore, 

Fr : By and by I come. Who is there ? 

Nur : One from Lady luliet, 

Fr : Then come neare. 

Nur : Oh holy Fryer, tell mee oh holy Fryer, 
Where is my Ladies Lord ? Wher's Romeo ? 

Fr: There on the ground, with his owne teares made 
drunke. 

Nur : Oh he is euen in my Miftrefle cafe, 
luft in her cafe. Oh wofuU fimpathy, 
Pitteous predicament, euen fo lyes fhee. 
Weeping and blubbring, blubbring and weeping : 
Stand vp, ftand vp, ftand and you be a man. 
For Juliets fake, for her fake rife and ftand. 
Why ftiould you fall into fo deep an O. 

He rifes, 
Komeo : Nurfe. 
Nur : Ah fir, ah fir. Wei death's the end of all. ^ 

G Kom: 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Kom : Spakeft thou of Juliet, how is it with her ? 
Doth fhe not thinke me an olde murderer. 
Now I haue ftainde the childhood of her ioy. 
With bloud remou'd but little from her owne ? 
Where is ihe ? and how doth fhe P And what fayes 
My conceal'd Lady to our canceld loue ? 

Nur : Oh fhe faith nothing, but weepes and pules. 
And now fals on her bed, now on the ground. 
And Tybalt crj'es, and then on Romeo calles. 

Kom : As if that name fhot from the deadly leuel of a gun 
Did murder her, as that names curfed hand 
Murderd her kinfman. Ah tell me holy Fryer 
In what vile part of this Anatomy 
Doth my name lye ? Tell me that I may facke 
The hateful! manfion ? 

He offers tojlah himfelfe, and Nurfefnatches 
the dagger away, 

Nur: Ah? 

Fr : Hold, flay thy hand : art thou a man ? thy forme 
Cryes out thou art, but thy wilde ades denote 
The vnrefonable furyes of a beafl. 
Vnfeemely woman in a feeming man. 
Or ill befeeming beafl in feeming both. 
Thou hafl amaz*d me. By my holy order, 
I thought thy difpofition better temperd, 
Hafl thou flaine Tybalt} wilt thou flay thy felfe? 
And flay thy Lady too, that Hues in thee? 
Roufe vp thy fpirits, thy Lady Juliet liues. 
For whofe fweet fake thou wert but lately dead : 
There art thou happy. Tybalt would kill thee. 
But thou fluefl Tybalt, there art thou happy too. 
A packe of bleffings lights vpon thy backe, 
Happines Courts thee in his beft array : 
But hke a misbehaude and fuUen wench 
Thou frownfl vpon thy Fate that frailles on thee. 

Take 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Take heede, take lieede, for fuch dye miferable. 

Goe get thee to thy loue as was decreed : 

Afcend her Chamber Window, hence and comfort her. 

But looke thou (lay not till the watch be fet : 

For then thou canfl not palfe to Mantua. 

Nurfe prouide all things in a readines, 

Comfort ihy Miftrefle, hafle the houfe to bed. 

Which heauy forrow makes them apt vnto. 

Nur : Good Lord what a thing learning is. 
I could haue ftayde heere all this night 
To heare good couufeU. Well Sir, 
He tell my Lady that you will come. 

Rom : Doe fo and bidde my fweet prepare to childe, 
Farwell good Nurfe. 

Nurfe offers to goe in and tumes agcune, 

Nur : Heere is a Ring Sir, that fhe bad me giue you, 
Rom : How well my comfort is reuiud by this. 

Elxit Nurfe, 

Fr : Soiome in Mantua, He finde out your man. 
And he (hall fignifie from time to time : 
Euery good hap that doth befall thee heere. 
Farwell. 

Rom : But that a ioy, pad ioy cryes out on me. 
It were a griefe fo breefe to part with thee. 



Enter olde Capolet and his wife, with 
County Paris, 



Cap : Thiuges haue fallen out Sir fo vnluckily, 
That we haue had no time to moue my daughter. 

G 2 



Looke 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Looke yee Sir, fhe lou*d her kinfman dearely. 
And fo did I. Well, we were borne to dye. 
Wife wher's your daughter, is fhe in her chamber 9 
I thinke fhe roeanes not to come downe to night. 

Par : Thefe times of woe affoord no time to wooe, 
Maddam farwell, commend me to your daughter. 

Paris offers to goe in, and Capolet 
calles him againe. 
Cap : Sir Paris ? He make a defperate tender of my child. 
I thinke fhe will be rulde in all refpedtes by mee : 
But foft what day is this? 
Par: Munday my Lord. 
Cap : Oh then Wenfday is too foone. 
On Thurfday let it be : you (hall be maried. 
Wee'le make no great a doe, a frend or two, or fo : 
For looke ye Sir, Tybalt being flaine fo lately. 
It will be thought we held him careleflye : 
If we fhould reuell much, therefore we will haue 
Some halfe a dozen frends and make no more adoe. 
But what fay you to Thurfday. 

Par: My Lorde I wiflie that Thurfday were to mor- 
row. 
Cap: Wife goe you to your daughter, ere you goe to 
bed. 
Acquaint her with the County Paris loue. 
Fare well my Lord till Thurfday next. 
Wife gette you to your daughter. Light to my Chamber. 
Afore me it is fo very very late. 
That we may call it earely by and by. 

Exeunt, 



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of Romeo and Iiiliet, 



Enter Romeo and luliet at the window, 

lul : Wilt thou be gone ? It is not yet nere day. 
It was the Nightingale and not the Larke 
That pierft the fearfull hollow of thine eare : 
Nightly (he lings on yon Pomegranate tree, 
Beleeue me loue, it was the Nightingale. 

Rom : It was the Larke, the Herald of the Morne, 
And not the Nightingale. See Loue what enuious drakes 
Doo lace the feuering clowdes in yonder Eaft. 
Nights candles are burnt out, and iocond Day 
Stands tiptoes on the myltie niountaine tops. 
I muft be gone and liue, or ftay and dye. 

lul : Yon light is not day light, I know it I : 
It is fome Meteor that the Sunne exhales. 
To be this night to thee a Torch-bearer, 
And light thee on thy way to Mantua, 
Then ftay awhile, thou (halt not goe foone. 

Rom : Let me ftay here, let me be tane, and dye : 
If thou wilt haue it fo, I am content. 
He fay yon gray is not tlie Mornings Eye, 
It is the pale reflex of Cynthias brow. 
He fay it is the Nightingale that beates 
The vaultie heauen fo high aboue our heads. 
And not the Larke the Meifenger of Morne. 
Come death and welcome, lulict wils it fo. 
Wliat fayes my Loue ? lets talke, tis not yet day. 

Jul .-It is, it is, be gone, flye hence away. 
It is the Larke that fings fo out of tune. 
Straining harfti Difcords and vnpleafing Sharpes. 
Some fay, the Larke makes fweete Diuiiion : 

G 3. Thia 



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The excellent Tragedie 

This doth not fo : for this diuideth vs. ^ 
Some fay the Larke and loathed Toad change eyes, 
I would that now they had chaugd voyces too : 
Since arme from arme her voyce doth vs affray, 
Hunting thee hence with Huntfvp to the day. 
So now be gone, more light and light it growes. 

Rom: More light and light, more darke and darke our 
woes. 
Farewell my Loue, one kilTe and He defcend. 

He goeih downe, 

Jul : Art thou gone fo, my Lord, my Loue, my Freud ? 
I mud heare from thee euerie day in the hower : 
For in an hower there are manie minutes, 
Minutes are dayes, fo will I number them : 
Oh, by this count I Ihall be much in yeares. 
Ere I fee thee againe. 

Rom : Farewell, I will omit no opportunitie 
That may conueigh my greetings loue to thee. 

lul : Oh, thinkft thou we Ihall euer meete againe. 

Rom : No doubt, no doubt, and all this woe Ihall feme 
For fweete difcourfes in the time to come. 

Jul : Oh God, I haue an ill diuining foule. 
Me thinkes I fee thee now thou art below 
Like one dead in the bottome of a Tom be : 
Either mine ey-iight failes, or thou lookfl pale. 

Rom : And truft me Loue, in my eye fo doo you, 
Drie forrow drinkes our blood : adieu, adieu. Elxit. 

Enter Nurfe hqftely. 

Nur : Madame beware, take heed the day is broke. 
Your Mother s comming to your Chamber, make all fure. 
She goeth downe from the window. 

Enter 



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of Romeo and luliet. 



Enter Juliets Mother, Nurfe, 

Moth : Where are you Daughter ? 

Nur : What Ladie, Lanibe, what luliet? 

Jul : How now, who calls ? 

Nur : It is your Mother. 

Moth: Why how now Juliet? 

lul : Madam, I am not well. 

Moth : What euermore weeping for your Cofens death : 
I thinke thoult wafli him from his graue with teares. 

lul: I cannot chufe, hauing lb great a lolfe. 

Aloth : I cannot blame thee. 
But it greeues thee more that Villaiue Hues. 

lul : What Villaine Madame ? 

Moth : That Villaine Romeo. 

lul : Villaine and he are manie miles a funder. 

Aloth : Content thee Girle, if I could finde a man 
I foone would fend to Mantua where he is. 
That fhould beftow on him fo fure a draught. 
As he' fhould foone beare Tybalt conipanie. 

lul : Finde you the meanes, and He finde fuch a man : 
For whileft he lines, my heart ihall nere be light 
Till I behold him, dead is my poore heart. 
Thus for a Kinfman vext ? (newes ? 

Moth : Well let that palfe. I come to bring thee ioyfull 

lul : And ioy comes well in fuch a needful! time. 

Aloth : Well then, thou haft a carefull Father Girle, 
And one who pittying thy needftill ftate. 
Hath found thee out a happie day of ioy, 

lul : What day is I hat I pray you ? 

Aloth : Many my C.iilde, 

The 



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The excellent Tragedie 

The gallant, yong and youthfull Gentleman, 
The Countie Paris at Saint Peters Church, 
Early next Thurfday morning mufl prouide, 
To make you there a glad and ioyfull Bride. 

Jul : Now by Saint Peters Church and Peter too. 
He ihall not there make mee a ioyfull Bride. 
Are thefe the newes you had to tell me of? 
Marrie here are newes indeed. Madame I will not marrie 

yet. 
And when I doo, it llialbe rather Romeo whom I hale, 
Thau Countie Paris that I cannot loue. 

Enter olde Capolet. 

Moth : Here comes your Father, you may tell him fo. 

Capo : Why how now, euermore Hiowring ? 
In one little bodie thou refembleft a fea, a barke, a ftorme : 
For this thy bodie which I tearme a barke. 
Still floating in thy euerfalling teares. 
And toft with fighes arifing from thy hart: 
Will without fuccour ihipwracke prefenily. 
But heare you Wife, what haue you founded her, what faies 
file to it ? 

Moth : I haue, but (he will none the thankes ye : 
Would God that (he were married to her graue. 

Capo: What wMIl fhe not, doth fhe not thanke vs, doth 
fhe not wexe proud P 

lul : Not proud ye haue, but thankfull that ye haue : 
Proud can I neuer be of that I hate. 
But thankfull euen for hate that is ment loue. 

Capo : Proud and I thanke you, and I thanke you not. 
And yet not proud. VVhats here, chop logicke. 
Proud me no prouds, nor thanke me no thankes. 
But fettle your fine ioynts on Thurfday next 
To goe with Paris to Saint Peters Church, 
Or I will drag you on a hurdle thether. 

Out 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Out you greene (icknes baggage, out you tallow face. 
\u : Good father heare me fpeake ? 

She kneeles doume. 

Cap : I tell thee what, eyther refolue on thurfday next 
To goe with Paris to Saint Peters Church : 
Or henceforth neuer looke me in the face. 
Speake not, reply not, for my fingers ytch. 
Why wife, we thought that we were fcarcely bled 
That God had fent vs but this onely chyld : 
But now I fee this one is one too much. 
And that we haue a crolfe in hauing her. 

Nur : Mary God in heauen blefle her my Lord, 
You are too blame to rate her fo. 

Cap, And why my Lady wifedome ? hold your tung. 
Good prudence fmatter with your goflips, goe. 

Nur : Why my Lord I fpeake no treafon. 

Cap : Oh goddegodden. 
Vtter your grauity ouer a goflips boule. 
For heere we need it not. 

Mo : My Lord ye are too hotte. 

Cap : Gods blefled mother wife it mads me. 
Day, night, early, late, at home, abroad. 
Alone, in company, waking or fleeping. 
Still my care hath beene to fee her matcht. 
And hauing now found out a Gentleman, 
Of Princely parentage, youthful I, and nobly trainde. 
Stuft as they fay with honorable parts. 
Proportioned as ones heart coulde wifh a man : 
And then to haue a wretched whyning foole, 
A puling mammet in her fortunes tender. 
To fay I cannot loue, I am too young, I pray you pardon 

mee? 
But if you cannot wedde He pardon you. 
Graze where you will, you Hiall not houfe with me. 
Looke to it, thinke ont, I doe not vfe to iefL 

H I 



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The excellent Tragedie 

I tell yee what, Thurfday is neere. 

Lay hand on heart, aduife, bethinke your felfe. 

If you be mine. He giue you to my frend: 

If not, hang, drowne, flame, beg. 

Dye in the ftreetes .• for by my Soule 

He neuer more acknowledge thee. 

Nor what I haue fliall euer doe thee good, 

Thinke ont, looke toot, I doe not vfe to ieft. Exit. 

Inl: Is there no pitty hanging in the cloudes. 
That lookes into the bottom of my woes ? 
I doe befeech you Madame, cad me not away. 
Defer this mariage for a day or two. 
Or if you cannot, make my mariage bed 
In that dimme monument where Tybalt lyes. 

Moth : Nay be aflfured I will not fpeake a word. 
Do what thou wilt for I haue done with thee. Exit, 

Jul : Ah Nurfe what comfort ? what counfell canft thou 
giue me. 

Nur : Now truft me Madame, I know not what to fay : 
Your Romeo he is banilht, and all the world to nothing 
He neuer dares returne to challendge you. 
Now I thinke good you marry with this County, 
Oh he is a gallant Grentleman, Ro7neo is but a dilhclout 
In refpeft of him. I promife you 
I thinke you happy in this fecond match. 
As for your husband he is dead : 
Or twere as good he were, for you haue no vfe of him. 

lul : Speakfl thou this from thy heart ? 

Nur : I and from my foule, or els belhrew them both. 

lul: Amen. 

Nur : What fay you Madame ? 

lul : Well, thou haft comforted me wondrous much, 
I pray thee goe thy waies vnto my mother 
Tell her I am gone hauing difpleafde my Father. 
To Fryer Laurence Cell to confefle me. 
And to be abfolu*d. 



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of Romeo and luliet, 
Nur : I will, and this is wifely done. 



She lookes after Nurfe, 



lul: Auncient damnation, O moft curfed fiend. 
Is it more finne to wi(h me thus forlworne, 
Or to difpraife him with the felfe fame tongue 
That thou haft praifde him with aboue compare 
So many thoufand times ? Goe Counfellor, 
Thou and my bofom henceforth fhal be twaine. 
He to the Fryer to know his remedy. 
If all faile els, I haue the power to dye. 



Exit, 



Enter Fryer and Paris, 

Fr : On Thurfday fay ye : the time is very fliort. 

Par : My Father Capolet will haue it fo. 
And I am nothing flacke to flow his haft. 

Fr : You fay you doe not know the Ladies minde ? 
Vneuen Is the courfe, I like it not. 

Par: Immoderately flie weepes for Tylalts death. 
And therefore haue I little talkt of loue. 
For Venus fmiles not in a houfe of teares. 
Now Sir, her father thinkes it daungerous: 
That flie doth giue her forrow fo much fway. 
And in his wifedome hafts our manage, 
To ftop the inundation of her teares. 
Which too much minded by her felfe alone 
May be put from her by focietie. 
Now doe ye know the reafon of this haft. 

Fr : I would I knew not why it fliould be flowd. 

H 2 Enter 



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The excellent Tragedie 



Enter Paris, 

Heere comes the Lady to my cell. 

Par : Welcome my loue, my Lady and my wife : 

lu : That may be fir, when I may be a wife, 

Par : That may be, mnft be loue, on thurfday next. 

lu : What muft be Ihalbe. 

Fr : Thats a certaine text. 

Par : What come ye to confeflion to this Fryer. 

lu : To tell you that were to confefle to you. 

Par : Do not deny to him that you loue me. 

Jul : I will confefle to you that I loue him. 

Par : So I am fure you will that you loue me. 

lu : And if I doe, it wilbe of more price. 
Being fpoke behinde your backe, than to your face. 

Par : Poore foule thy face is much abufd with teares. 

lu : The teares haue got fmall vidory by that. 
For it was bad enough before their fpite. 

Par : Thou wrongfl it more than teares by that report. 

lu : That is no wrong lir, that is a truth : 
And what I fpake I fpake it to my face. 

Par : Thy face is mine and thou haft flaundred it. 

Ill : It may be fo, for it is not mine owne. 
Are you at leafure holy Father now : 
Or fhall I come to you at euening Mafle ? 

Fr : My leafure femes me penfiue daughter now. 
My Lord we muft entreate the time alone. 

Par : God ftieild I ftiould difturbe deuotion, 
Juliet far well, and keep this holy kifle. 

Exit Paris, 

Ju : Goe fhut the doore and when thou haft done fo. 
Come weepe with me that am paft cure, paft help, 

Fr : Ah Juliet I already know thy griefe, 
I heare thou muft and nothing may proroge it. 

On 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

On Thurfday next be married to the Countie. 

lul : Tell rae not Frier that thou heard of it, 
Vulefle thou tell rae how we may preuent it. 
Giue me fome fudden counfell : els behold 
Twixt my extreames and me, this bloodie Knife 
Shall play the Vmpeere, arbitrating that 
Which the Commifsion of thy yeares and arte 
Could to no ilTue of true honour bring. 
Speake not, be briefe : for I deiire to die. 
If what thou fpeakft, fpeake not of remedie. 

Fr : Stay Juliet, I doo fpie a kinde of hope. 
Which cranes as defperate an execution. 
As that is defperate we would preuent. 
If rather than to marrie Countie Paris 
Thou hafl the (Irength or will to flay thy felfe, 
Tis not vnlike that thou wilt vndertake 
A thing like death to chyde away this fliame. 
That coapft with death it felfe to flye from blame. 
And if thou dooft. He giue thee remedie. 

Jul : Oh bid me leape (rather than marrie Paris) 
From off the battlements of yonder tower : 
Or chaine me to fome fteepie mountaines top. 
Where roaring Beares and fauage Lions are : 
Or fliut me nightly in a Charnell-houfe, 
With reekie fliankes, and yeolow chaples fculls : 
Or lay rae in torabe with one new dead : 
Things that to heare them narade haue made me tremble j 
And I will doo it without feare or doubt. 
To keep my felfe a faithful! vnftain J Wife 
To my deere Lord, ray deerefl Romeo, 

Fr : Hold Juliet, hie thee home, get thee to bed, 
Let not thy Nurfe lye with thee in thy Chamber : 
And when thou art alone, take thou this Violl, 
And this diftilled Liquor drinke thou off: 
When prefently through all thy veynes fliall run 
A dull and heauie flumber, which iball feaze 

H. 3. Eacl: 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Each vitall fpirit : for no Pulfe fliall keepe 
His naturall progrefle, but furceale to beate : 
No figne of breath ihall teflifie thou liuft. 
And in this borrowed likenes of ihrunke death. 
Thou Ihalt remaine full two and fortie houres. 
And when thou art laid in thy Kindreds Vault, 
He fend in haft to Mantua to thy Lord, 
And he fliall come and take thee from thy graue. 

Jul : Frier I goe, be fure thou fend for my deare Romeo, 

Rieunt, 



Enter olde Capolet, his Wife, Nurfe, and 
Seruingman. 

Capo : Where are you firra ? 

Ser : Heere forfooth. 

Capo : Goe, prouide me twentie cunning Cookes. 

Ser: I warrant you Sir, let me alone for that. He knowe 
them by licking their fingers. 

Capo : How canft thou know them fo ? 

Ser: Ah Sir, tis an ill Cooke cannot licke his owne fin- 
gers. 

Capo : Well get you gone. 

Exit Seruingman, 

But wheres this Head-ftrong ? 

Moth : Shees gone (my Lord) to Frier Laurence Cell 
To be confeft. 

Capo : Ah, he may hap to doo fome good of her, 
A headftrong felfewild harlotrie it is. 

Enter 



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of Romeo and luliet. 



Enter luliet. 

Moth : See here fhe corameth from Confefsion, 

Capo: How now my Head-flrong, where haue you bin 

gadding ? 
lul : Where I haue learned to repent the lin 

Of froward wilfull oppofition 

Gainft you and your behefts, and am enioynd 

By holy Laurence to fall prollrate here. 

And craue remifsion of fo foule a fa<5l. 

She kneeles downe. 

Moth : Why thats well faid. 

Capo : Now before God this holy reuerent Frier 
All our whole Citie is much bound vnto. 
Goe tell the Coinitie prefently of this. 
For I will haue this knot knit vp to morrow. 

Jul : Nurfe, will you go with me to my Clofet, 
To fort fuch things as fhall be requifite 
Againfl to morrow. 

Moth: I pree thee doo, good Nurfe goe in with her, 
Helpe her to fort Tyres, Rebatoes, Chaines, 
And I will come vnto you prefently, 

Nur : Come fweet hart, fhall we goe : 

lul : I pree thee let vs. 

Exeunt Nurfe and Juliet. 

Moth : Me thinks on Thurfday would be time enough. 
Capo: I fay I will haue this difpatcht to morrow, 
Goe one and certefie the Count thereof 
Moth : I pray my Lord, let it be Thurfday. 
Capo : I fay to morrow while (hees in the mood. 
Aloth : We fhall be fhort in our prouifion. 

Capo: 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Capo : Let me alone for that, goe get you in. 
Now before God my heart is pafsing light. 
To fee her thus conformed to our will. Exeunt. 



Enter Nurfe, luliet. 

Nur : Come, come, what need you anie thing elfe 9 
Jul : Nothing good Nurfe, but leaue me to my felfe : 

For I doo meane to lye alone to night. 

Nur : Well theres a cleane fmocke vnder your pillow, 

and fo good night. Ejc'iI. 

Enter Mother. 

Mith : What are you bufie, doo you need my helpe ? 

III! : No Madame, I dcfire to lye alone. 
For I haue manie things to thinke vpon. 

Moth: Well then good night, be ftirring luliet. 
The Countie will be earlie here to morrow. Exit, 

Jul: Farewell, God knowes when wee fhall meete a- 
gaine. 
Ah, I doo take a fearfuU thing in hand. 
What if this Potion fhould not worke at all, 
Muft I of force be married to the Countie ? 
This fhall forbid it. Knife, lye thou there. 
What if the Frier fliould giue me this drinke 
To poyfon mee, for feare I Ihould difclofe 
Our former marriage? Ah, I wrong him much. 
He is a holy and religious Man : 
I will not entertaine fo bad a thought. 
What if I (hould be ftifled in the Toomb ? 

O 



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of Romeo and Iiiliet. 

Awake an houre before the appointed time : 

Ah then I feare I (hall be lunaticke. 

And playing with my dead forefathers bones, 

Dafh out my franticke braines. Me thinkes I fee 

My Cofin Tybalt weltring in his bloud. 

Seeking for Romeo : flay Tybalt flay. 

Romeo 1 come, this doe I drinke to thee. 

She fats vpon her bed within the Curtaines. 



Enter Nurfe with hearbs. Mother, 
Moth : Thats well faid Nurfe, fet all in rediues. 
The Countie will be heere immediatly. 

Enter Oldeman. 

Cap : Make haft, make haft, for it is almoft day. 
The Curfewe bell hath rung, t'is foure a clocke, 
Looke to your bakt meates good Angelica. 

Nur: Goe get you to bed you cotqueane. I faith you 
will be licke anone. 

Cap: I warrant thee Nurfe I haue ere now watcht all 
night, and haue taken no harme at all. 

Moth : I you haue beene a moufe hunt in your time. 

Enter Seruingman with Logs ksf Coales. 

Cap : A lelous hood, a lelous hood : How now firra ? 
What haue you there ? 

Ser : Forfooth Logs. 

Cap: Goe, goe choofe dryer. Will will tell thee where 
thou ftialt fetch them. 

Ser : Nay I warrant let me alone, I haue a heade 1 troe to 

I choofe 



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The excellent Tragedie 

choofe a Log. 

Exit. 

Cap : Well goe thy way, thou fhalt be logger head. 
Come, come, make haft call vp your daughter. 
The Couutie will be heere with muficke ftraight. 
Gods me hees come, Nurfe call vp my daughter. 

Nur: Goe, get you gone. What lambe, what Lady 
birde ? faft I warrant. What luliet ? well, let the County take 
you in your bed : yee fleepe for a weeke now, but the next 
night, the Countie Paris hath fet vp his reft that you flial reft 
but little. What lambe I fay, faft ftill : what Lady, Loue, 
A^hat bride, what luliet} Gods me how found ftie fleeps? Nay 
then I fee I muft wake you indeed. Whats heere, laide on 
your bed, dreft in your cloathes and down, ah me, alack the 
day, fome Aqua vitae hoe. 

Enter Mother, 

Moth : How now whats the matter ? 

Nur : Alack the day, ftiees dead, ftiees dead, ftiees dead. 

Moth : Accurft, vnhappy, miferable time. 

Enter Idem an. 

Cap : Come, come, make haft, wheres my daughter ? 
Moth : Ah ftiees dead, ftiees dead. 
Cap : Stay, let me fee, all pale and wan. 
Accurfed time, vnfortunate olde man. 

Enter Fryer and Paris, 

Par : What is the bride ready to goe to Church ? 

Cap : Ready to goe, but neuer to returne. 
O Sonne the night before thy wedding day, 
Hath Death laine with thy bride, flower as ftie is, 
Deflowerd by him, fee, where flie lyes. 

Death 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Death is my Sonne in Law, to him I giue all that I haue. 

Par : Haue I thought long to fee this mornings face. 
And doth it now prefent fuch prodegies ? 
Accurft, vnhappy, miferable man, 
Forlorne, forfaken, deftitute I am : 
Borne to the world to be a flaue in it. 
Diftrefl, remediles, and vnfortunate. 
O heauens, O nature, wherefore did you make me. 
To liue fo vile, fo wretched as I Ihall. 

Cap : O heere (he lies that was our hope, our ioy. 
And being dead, dead forrow nips vs all. 



A/I at once cry out and wring their hands. 



All cry : And all our ioy, and all our hope is dead. 
Dead, loft, vndone, abfented, wholy fled. 

Cap : Cruel, vniuft, impartiall deftinies. 
Why to this day haue you preferu'd my life ^ 
To fee my hope, my ftay, my ioy, my Jife, 
Depriude of fence, of life, of all by death, 
Cruell, vniuft, impartiall deftinies. 

Cap : O fad fac'd forrow map of mifery. 
Why this fad time haue I deftrd to fee. 
This day, this vniuft, this impartiall day 
Wherein I hopM to fee my comfort fiill. 
To be depriude by fuddaine deftinie. 

Moth : O woe, alacke, diftreft, why ftiould I liue ? 
To fee this day, this miferable day. 
Alacke the time that euer I was borne. 
To be partaker of this deftinie. 
Alacke the day, alacke and welladay. 

Fr : O peace for ftiame, if not for charity. 
Your daughter Hues in peace and happines. 
And it is vaine to wifti it otherwife. 

I 2 Come 



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The excellent Tragcdie 

Come fticke your Rofemary in this dead coarfe. 
And as the cuftome of our Country is. 
In all her heft and fumptuoas ornaments, 
Conuay her where her Anceftors He tomb'd. 

Cap : Let it be fo, come wofiill forrow mates, 
Let vs together talle this bitter fate. 

They all hut the Nurfe goefoorth, cajling Rofemary on 
her andjhutting the Curtens. 



Enter Mujitions, 

Nur : Put vp, put vp, this is a wofiill cafe. Exit, 

I. I by my troth Millrelfe is it, it had need be mended. 

Enter Seruingman. 

Ser : Alack alack what ihal I doe, come Fidlers play me 
fome mery dumpe. 

I. A fir, this is no time to play*. 

Ser : You will not then ? 

I. No marry will wee. 

Ser : Then will I giue it you, and foundly to. 

1. What will you giue us ? 

Ser : The fidler. He re you. He fa you. He fol you. 

I. If you re vs and fa vs, we will note you. 

Ser: I will put vp my Iron dagger, and beate you with 
my wodden wit. Come on Simon found Pot, He pofe you, 

I Lets heare. 

Ser : When griping griefe the heart doth wound. 
And dolefull dumps the minde opprefle: 
Then mufique with her liluer found. 
Why (iluer found ? Why liluer found ? 

I. I thinke becaufe muficke hath a fweet found. 

Ser : Pretie, what fay you Mathew minikine ? 



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of Romeo and lulkt, 

2. I thinke becaufe Mufitions found for filuer. 
Ser : Prettie too : come, what fay you ? 

3. I fay nothing. 

Ser: I thinke fo. He fpeake for you becaufe you are the 
Singer. I faye Siluer found, becaufe fuch Fellovves as you 
haue fildome Golde for founding. Farewell Fidlers, fare- 
well. Exit, 

I. Farewell and be hangd : come lets goe. Exeunt. 



Enter Romeo. 

Rom : If I may truft the flattering Eye of Sleepe, 
My Dreame prefagde fome good euent to come. 
My bofome Lord fits chearfull in his throne. 
And I am comforted with pleafing dreames. 
Me thought I was this night alreadie dead : 
(Strange dreames that giue a dead man leaue to thinke) 
And that my Ladie Juliet came to me. 
And breathd fuch life with kilTes in my lips. 
That I reuiude and was an Emperour. 

Enter Balthafar his man looted. 

Newes from Verona. How now Balthafar, 
How doth my Ladie ? Is my Father well 9 
How fares my Juliet ? that I aske againe : 
If (he be well, then nothing can be ill. 

Bah : Then nothing can be ill, for Ihe is well. 
Her bodie fleepes in Capels Monument, 
And her immortall parts with Angels dwell. 
Pardon me Sir, that am the Meflenger of fuch bad tidings. 

Rom : Is it euen fo ? then I defie my Starres. 

I 3 Goe 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Goe get me incke and paper, hyre poll horfe, 
I will not (lay in Mantua to night. 

Bait : Pardon me Sir, I will not leaue you thus. 
Your lookes are dangerous and full of feare : 
I dare not, nor I will not leaue you yet. 

Rom : Doo as I bid thee, get me incke and paper. 
And hyre thofe horfe : (lay not I fay. 

Exit Balthafar. 

Well luliet, I will lye with thee to night. 

Lets fee for meanes. As I doo remember 

Here dwells a Pothecarie whom oft I noted 

As I pad by, whofe needie (hop is (lufft 

With beggerly accounts of emptie boxes : 

And in the fame an Aligarta hangs, 

Olde endes of packthred, and cakes of Rofes, 

Are thinly (Irewed to make vp a (how. 

Him as I noted, thus with my felfe I thought : 

And if a man fhould need a poyfon now, 

(Whofe prefent fale is death in Mantua) 

Here he might buy it. This thought of mine 

Did but forerunne my need : and here about he dwels. 

Being Holiday the Beggers (hop is (hut. 

What ho Apothecarie, come forth I fay. 

Enter Apothecarie. 

Apo : Who calls, what would you (ir ? 

Rom : Heeres twentie duckates, 
Giue me a dram of fome fuch fpeeding geere. 
As will difpatch the wearie takers life. 
As fuddenly as powder being (ierd 
From forth a Cannons mouth. 

Apo : Such drugs I haue I muft of force confeflfe. 
But yet the law is death to thofe that fell them. 

Rom ; 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

Rom : Art thou fo bare and full of pouertie. 
And dooft thou feare to violate the Law ? 
The Law is not thy frend, nor the Lawes frend. 
And therefore make no confcience of the law ; 
Vpon thy backe hangs ragged Miferie, 
And ftarued Famine dwelleth in thy cheekes. 

Apo : My pouertie but not my will con fen ts. 

Rom: I pay thy pouertie, but not thy will. 

j4po : Hold take you this, and put it In anie liquid thing 
you will, and it will feme had you the Hues of twenty men. 

Rom : Hold, take this gold, worfe poyfon to mens foules 
Than this which thou hafl giuen me. Goe hye thee hence, 
Goe buy the cloathes, and get thee into fleih. 
Come cordiall and not poyfon, goe with mee 
To Juliets Graue : for there muft I vfe thee. Elxeunt, 



Enter Frier John, 

John : What Frier Laurence, Brother, ho ? 

Lour : This fame ihould be the voyce of Frier lohn. 
What newes from Mantua, what will Romeo come ? 

lohn : Going to feeke a barefoote Brother out. 
One of our order to aflbciate mee. 
Here in this Cittie vifiting the (ick. 
Whereas the infe6tious peftilence remaind : 
And being by the Searchers of the Towne 
Found and examinde, we were both Ihut vp. 

Lour : Who bare my letters then to Romeo ? 

lohn : I haue them ftill, and here they are. 

Lour : Now, by my holy Order, 
The letters were not nice, but of great weight. 
Goe get thee hence, and get me prefently 



As 



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The excellent Tragedie 

A fpade and mattocke. 

John : Well I will prefently go fetch thee them. Exit. 

Laur : Now muft I to the Monument alone. 
Lead that the Ladie ihould before I come 
Be wakde from flecpe. I will hye 
To free her from that Tombe of miferie. Exit. 



Enter Countie Paris and his Page with flowers 
andfweete water. 

Par : Put out the torch, and lye thee all along 
Vnder this Ew-tree, keeping thine eare clofe to the hollow 

ground. 
And if thou heare one tread within this Churchyard, 
Staight giue me notice. 

Boi/ : I will my Lord. 

Paris Jlrewes the Tomb with flowers. 

Par: Sweete Flower, with flowers I flrew thy Bridale 
bed: 
Sweete Tombe that in thy circuite dofl containe. 
The perfe6t modell of eternitie : 
Faire luliet that with AngelLs doft remaine. 
Accept this latell fauour at my hands. 
That liuing honourd thee, and being dead 
With funerall praifes doo adorne thy Tombe. 

Boy whiftles and calls. My Lord. 

Enter Romeo and Balthafar, with a torch, a 
a mattocke, and a crow ofyron. 

Par. 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Par : ITie boy giues warning, fomething doth approach. 
What cnrfed foote wanders this was to night. 
To (lay my obfequies and trae loues rites ? 
What with a torch, muffle me night a while. 

Rom; Giue mee this mattocke, and this wrentching I- 
ron. 
And take thefe letters, early in the morning. 
See thou deliuer them to my Lord and Father. 
So get thee gone and trouble me no more. 
Why I defcend into this bed of death. 
Is partly to behold my Ladies face. 
But chiefly to take from her dead finger, 
A precious ring which I muft vfe 
In deare imployment. but if thou wilt flay. 
Further to prie in what I vndertake. 
By heauen lie teare thee ioynt by ioynt. 
And llrewe thys hungry churchyard with thy lims. 
The time and my intents are fauage, wilde. 

Bali : Well, He be gone and not trouble you. 

Rom : So Ihalt thou win my fauour, take thou this. 
Commend me to my Father, farwell good fellow. 

Bolt : Yet for all this will I not part from hence. 

Komeo opens the tomhe, 

Rom : Thou deteflable maw, thou womb of death, 
Gorde with the deareft morfell of the earth, 
llius I enforce thy rotten iawes to ope. 

Par : This is that banifht haughtie Mountague, 
That murderd my loues cofen, I will apprehend him. 
Stop thy vnhallowed toyle vile Mountague. 
Can vengeance be purfued frirther then death ? 
I doe attach thee as a fellon heere. 
The Law condemnes thee, therefore thou muft dye, 

Rom ; I muft indeed, and therefore came I hither. 
Good youth be gone, tempt not a defperate man. 

K Heape 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Heape not another finne vpon my head 
By iheding of thy bloud, I doe protefl 
I loue thee better then I loue my felfe : 
For I come hyther armde againft my felfe. 

Par : I doe defie thy coniurations : 
And doe attach thee as a fellon heere. 

Kom : What doll thou tempt me, then haue at thee boy. 

TheyJighL 



y 



Boy : O Lord they fight, I will goe call the watch. 

Par : Ah I am llaine, if thou be mercifull 
Open the tombe, lay me with luliet. 

Rom : Yfaith I will, let me perufe this face, 
Mercutios kinfinan, noble County Paris ? 
What faid my man, when my betofled foule 
Did not regard him as we pafl along. 
Did he not fay Paris ihould haue maried 
Juliet ? eyther he faid fo, or I dreamd it fo. 
But I will fatisfie thy laft requefl. 
For thou haft prizd thy loue aboue thy life. 
Death lye thou there, by a dead man interd. 
How oft haue many at the houre of death 
Beene blith and pleafant ? which their keepers call 
A lightning before death But how may I 
Call this a lightning. Ah deare luHet, 
How well thy beauty doth become this graue ? 
O I beleeue that vnfubftanciall death. 
Is amorous, and doth court my loue. 
Therefore will I, O heere, O euer heere. 
Set vp my euerlafting reft 
With wormes, that are thy chamber mayds. 
Come defperate Pilot now at once runne or 
The daftiing rockes thy fea-ficke weary barge. 
Heers to my loue. O true Apothecary : 
Thy drugs are fwift : thus with a kifle I dye. 



FalU. 
Enter 



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of Romeo and luliet. 



Enter Fryer with a Lanthome, 

How oft to night haue thefe my aged feete 
Stumbled at graues as I did paife along. 
Whofe there ? 

Man. A frend and one that knowes you well. 

Fr : Who is it that conforts fo late the dead. 
What light is yon ? if I be not deceiued. 
Me thinkes it burnes in Capels monument ? 

Man It doth fo holy Sir, and there is one 
That loues you dearely. 

Fr. Who is it ? 

Man : Romeo, 

Fr : How long hath he beene there ? 

Man : Full halfe an houre and more. 

Fr : Goe with me thether. 

Man : I dare not fir, he knowes not I am heere : 
On paine of death he chargde me to be gone. 
And not for to difturbe him in his enterprize. 

Fr ; Then mufl I goe : my minde prefageth ill. 

Fryer Jloops and lookes on the blood and weapons. 

What bloud is this that ftaines the entrance 

Of this marble ftony monument ? 

What meanes thefe maifterles and goory weapons ? 

Ah me I doubt, whofe heere ? what Romeo dead ? 

Who and Paris too ? what vnluckie houre 

Is acceilaiy to fo foule a finne ? 

luliet rifes. 
The Lady fturres. 

K 2 lul. 



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The excellent Tragedie 

Ah comfortable Fryer. 
I doe remember well where I fhould be. 
And what we talkt of: but yet I cannot fee 
Him for whofe lake I vndertooke this hazard. 

Fr : Lady come foorth, I heare fome noife at hand. 
We (hall be taken, Paris he is flaine, 
And Romeo dead : and if we heere be tane 
We fhall be thought to be as accelfarie. 
I will prouide for you in fome clofe Nunery. 

lul : Ah leaue me, leaue me, I will not from hence. 

Fr : I heare fome noife, I dare not (lay, come, come. 

lul : Goe get thee gone. 
Whats heere a cup clofde in my loners hands ? 
Ah churle drinke all, and leaue no drop for me. 

Enter watch. 
Watch : This way, this way. 
Jul : I, noife ? then mufl I be refolute. 
O happy dagger thou fhalt end my feare. 
Reft in my bofome, thus I come to thee. 

Shejlahs herfelfe andfalles. 



Enter watch. 

Cap : Come looke about, what weapons haue we heere ? 
See frends where \uUet two daies buried. 
New bleeding wounded, fearch and fee who's neare. 
Attach and bring them to vs prefently. 

Enter one with the Fryer, 
I. Captaine heers a Fryer with tooles about him, 
Fitte to ope a tombe. 

Cap : A great fufpition, keep him fafe. 

Enter 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Enter one with Romets Man. 
I. Heeres Romeos Man. 
Capt : Keepe him to be examinde. 

Enter Prince with others, 
Prin : What early mifchiefe calls vs vp fo foone. 
Capt : O noble Prince, fee here 
Where Juliet that hath lyen intoombd two dayes, 
Warme and frefh bleeding, Romeo and Countie Paris 
Likewife newly llaine. 

Prin : Search feeke about to finde the murderers. 

En tor olde Capolet and his Wife. 

Capo : What rumor's this that is fo early vp ? 

Moth : The people in the flreetes crie Romeo, 
And fome on luliet : as if they alone 
Had been the caufe of fuch a rautinie. 

Capo : See Wife, this dagger hath miftooke : 
For (loe) the backe is emptie of yong Mountague, 
And it is fheathed in our Daughters breaft. 

Enter olde Montague, 

Prin : Come Mountague, for thou art early vp. 
To fee thy Sonne and Heire more early downe. 

Mount : Dread Souereigne, my Wife is dead to night. 
And y9ng Benuolio is deceafed too : 
What further mifchiefe can there yet be found ? 

Prin : Firft come and fee, then fpeake. 

Mount : O thou vntaught, what manners is in this 
To prefTe before thy Father to a graue. 

Prin : Come feale your mouthes of outrage for a while. 
And let vs feeke to finde the Authors out 
Of fuch a hainous and feld feene mifchaunce. 
Bring forth the parties in fufpition. 

Fr : I am the greateft able to doo leaft. 
Mofl worthie Prince, heare me but fpeake the truth. 

K 3 And 



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The excellent Tragedie 

And He informe you how thefe things fell out. 

Juliet here llaine was married to that Romeo, 

Without her Fathers or her Mothers grant : 

The Nude was priuie to the marriage. 

The baleful! day of this vnhappie marriage. 

Was Tybalts doomefday : for which Romeo 

Was baniihed from hence to Mantua. 

He gone, her Father fought by foule conftraint 

To marrie her to Paris : But her Soule 

(Loathing a fecond Contra6t) did refufe 

To giue confent -, and therefore did ihe vrge me 

Either to finde a meanes fhe might auoyd 

What fo her Father fought to force her too : 

Or els all defperately ihe threatned 

Euen in my prefence to difpatch her felfe. 

Then did I giue her, (tutord by mine arte) 

A potion that ihould make her feeme as dead : 

And told her that I would with all pod fpeed 

Send hence to Mantua for her Romeo, 

That he might come and take her from the Toombe. 

But he that had my Letters (Frier John) 

Seeking a Brother to aflbciate him. 

Whereas the licke infe^on remaind. 

Was ftayed by the Searchers of the Towne, 

But Romeo vnderflanding by his man. 

That luliet was deceafde, retumde in poft 

Vnto Verona for to fee his loue. 

What after happened touching Paris death. 

Or Romeoj is to me vnknowne at all. 

But when I came to take the Lady hence, 

I found them dead, and ihe awakt from fleep : 

Whom faine I would haue taken from the tombe. 

Which fhe refufed feeing Romeo dead. 

Anone I heard the watch and then I fled. 

What afterhappened I am ignorant of. 

And if in this ought haue mifcaried. 



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of Romeo and Itdiet, 

By me, or by my meanes let my old life 
Be iacrificd fome houre before his time. 
To the moft ftrickeft rigor of the Law. 

Pry : We ftiU haue knowne thee for a holy man, 
Wheres Romeos man, what can he lay in this P 

BcUth : I brought my maifter word that fhee was dead. 
And then he poafled (baight from Mantua, 
Vnto this Toombe. Thefe Letters he deliuered me. 
Charging me early giue them to his Father. 

Prm : Lets fee the Letters, I will read them ouer. 
Where is the Counties Boy that calld the Watch? 

Boy : I brought my Matter vnto Juliets graue. 
But one approaching, ffaraight I calld my Mailer. 
At lad they fought, I ran to call the Watch. 
And this is all that I can fay or know. 

Prin : Thefe letters doe make good the Fryers wordes. 
Come Capolet, and come olde Mountagewe. 
Where are thefe enemies ? fee what hate hath done. 

Cap : Come brother Mountague giue me thy hani 
There is my daughters dowry : for now no more 
Can I beilowe on her, thats all I haue. 

Moun : But I will giue them more, I will er £t 
Her flatue of pure golde : 
That while Verona by that name is knowne. 
There fhall no ftatue of fuch price be fet. 
As that of Komeos loued luliet. 

Cap : As rich fhall Romeo by his Lady lie, 
Poore Sacrifices to our Enmitie. 

Prin : A gloomie peace this day doth with it bring. 
Come, let vs hence. 

To haue more talke of thefe fad things. 
Some fhall be pardoned and fome punifhed : 
For nere was heard a Storie of more woe. 
Than thb of luliet and her Romeo 



FINIS. 



•— Qi. 



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PRESIiNTEI> 



TO THE MEMBERS 



nv 

H. R. H. PRINCE LEOPOLD, 

OHK t>F TKK VICK-l*RESIUKNTS OF TKF S(H-ir.1 V. 



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ROMEO AND JULIET. 

parallel Eexts of tfje jFirst Etoo ©uartos, 
(QO 1597— Qi, 1599. 



EDITED BY 

P. A. DANIEL. 



PUBLISHED FOR 

Eije i^eto Sfjaftspere Socictg 

BY N. TRUBNER & CO., 57, 59, LUDGATE HILL, 
LONDON, E.C., 1874. 



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Suits II. ITo. 1. 



JOHN CHILDS AND SON, PRINTERS. 



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INTRODUCTION.] Romeo and luliel. iii 



INTRODUCTION. 



In laying this work before the New Shakspere Society I wish it to be distinctly 
understood that I claim no credit for originality either of plan or execution. 

The plan was suggested by Mr j^^mes Sp edding. the Editor of Bacon's Works ; and 
at Mr Fumivall's instance I undertook the work, which had indeed been already carried 
our, for German students, by Professor Tycho Mommsen in his parallel-text edition of 
the first two quartos of this play, published at Oldenburgh, in 1859. ^^^ ^^^^ execution 
of it I am mainly indebted to the thorough and independent collatioas of the early texts 
contained in Professor Mommsen*s book, and in the * Cambridge Shakespeare ' edited by 
Messrs W. G. Clark and W. Aldis Wright. Without the assistance afforded me by these 
important works I could not, or certainly would not, have engaged in this task ; with it I 
have been enabled to compile a work which 1 believe will be found to be useflil to the 
Shaksperian student. 

The one object I have endeavoured to keep steadily in view has been the collection 
in a convenient form of every scrap of material afforded by tlie old editions which 
could possibly aid or be deserving of consideration in the great work of the restoration 
of Shakspere's text. And these materials I have endeavoured to free from the utterly 
useless rubbish which is found in all the old editions. In the text of the quartos 
here reprinted, no departure from the originals, however obviously corrupt, has knowingly 
been permitted ; in the collations given in the margin, only the corrections and varied 
readings of the subsequent editions are recorded ; the obvious blunders of those editions 
are excluded except in cases where they have given rise to a plausible variation in a 
later edition. For instance, in Act I. Sc. i. 1. 127, 1 have not recorded the obvious 
blunder of Q3 and Ft. in printing honour for humour; but the obvious blunder of Fi, 
Act II. Sc. v. 1. ji, in printing so well for not well is noted, as it accounts for the 
plausible conjectural emendation of the later Folios, so ill. So again, in Act III. Sc. 
ii. 1. 57, hedawde (for bedawbde) of Q4 accounts for hedeawd of Q5, and has accordingly 
found a place in my margins. It will be seen however that I have not been severe 
in the application of this rule, and many varying errors have been admitted, which 
doubtless might have been rejected. Those who are curious to ascertain the amount 
of error in the old copies may consult the collations of Mommsen and the Cambridge 
editors, where they will find many instances of printers' blunders recorded, such as by 
no possibility could be deserving of a moment's consideration in the settlement of 



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Romeo and luliet. [introduction. 



the text. In saying this I must not be understood as casting a slur on the German and 
Cambridge editions ; on the contrary, their editors in their minute collation of errors 
have done most excellent and invaluable work. They have accumulated decisive evidence 
as to the chronolog}' of the old copies. That end however being attained, and the 
order and origin of each Quarto and Folio being finally determined, it would have been 
a waste of space and, worse, a hindrance, to encumber these pages with material which, 
having served its purpose, may now once for all be cast aside. 

The dates and pedigree of the several Quartos and Folios are as here set out. 

(Qi) 1597. 





Q2. 1599 






Q^. 1609 




Q|. N. D. 
Qs- 1637. 




Fi. 1623 




Fa. 163a 






F3. 1664 
f!. 1685. 







The title-pages of Qj, 4, and 5 are as follows : — 

Q3. THE I MOST EX-;CELLENT AND | Lamentable Tragedie, of | Romeo and 
Juliet. I As it hath beene fundrie times publiquely Acted, | by the Kings Maiellies 
Seruants | at the Globe. | Newly corrected, augmented, and amended: | [Printer's 
(?) Device. Rose and Crown.] London | Printed for Iohn Smethwick, and 
are to be fold | at his Shop in Saint Dunftanes Church-yard, | in Fleeteftreete 
vnder the Dyall. | 1609. 

Q4. THE MOST I EXCELLENT | And Lamentable Tragedie, ] of Romeo and | 
IvLiET. I As it hath beene fundrie times publikely Acted, | by the Kings Maiesties 
Seruants | at the Globe. | Newly Corrected, augmented, and amended. \ [Smethwick's 
Device. A smeath holding in its bill a scroll inscribed Wick. The motto, Non 
altum peto. I. 5.] London, | Printed for Iohn Smethwickcj and are to bee fold at 
his Sliop in | Saint Dunftanes Churchyard, in Fleeteftrcete | vnder the Dyall. 

[Note. ' It is a curious fact that after some copies of the undated edition had 
been published, having Shakespeare's name on the title-page, that name 
was omitted in the copies which were subsequently issued.* — Halliwell. 

* Its title-page bears for the first time the name of the author. After the word 
"Globe" and in a separate line we find the words: "Written by W. Shake- 
speare.'* ' — Cam. Edd. 

The copy in the British Museum (Press Mark, C. 34. k. 56) is without the 
author's name. It is conjecturally dated, in the catalogue, ' [1607] ' and 
is probably the 'quarto in 1607 ' mentioned by Knight. — Ed.] 



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INTRODUCTION.] Romco and Iidiet, 



Q5. THE MOST I EXCELLENT | And Lamentable Tragedie | of Romeo and | 
Juliet. I As it hath been fundry times publikely Acted | by the Kings Majesties 
Servants | at the Globe. \ Written by H^, Shakespeare. \ Newly corrected, augmented^ 
and amended. \ [Smethwick's Device.] London, | Printed by R. Young tor John 
Smethwicke, and are to be sold at | his Shop in St. Dunstans Church-yard in 
Fleet street, | under the Dyall. 1637. 

A hasty and separate perusal of (Qi) may leave the reader with the impression that 
it represents an earlier play than that given in the subsequent editions; read line for line 
with Q2 its true character soon becomes apparent. It is an edition made up partly from 
copies of portions of the original play, partly from recollection and from notes taken 
during the performance. Qi gives us for the tirst time a substantially true representation 
of the original play. Still (Gli) is of great value as it affords the means of correcting 
many errors which had crept into the ' copy ' from which Q2 was printed, and also, in 
its more perfect portions, affords conclusive evidence that that 'copy' underwent revision, 
received some slight augmentation, and, in some few places, must have been entirely 
re-written. This opinTori is~tEe result of my own independent investigations; but I 
do not put it forward as an original theory: I am happy to say that it places me in 
more or less close agreement with Mommsen, Collier, Grant White, the Cambridge 
editors, etc., to whose notes I refer the reader. As however the study of this question, 
on which great diversity of opinion has been entertained, may perhaps be facilitated by 
pointing out the evidences contained in the parallel texts which led me to the opinion 
expressed above, I have here set them forth as briefly as possible under their several 
headings. 

TRUE REPRESENTATION IN (ttl) OF PORTIONS OF THE ORIGINAL PLAY. 

Act L Sc. i. lines 153 — 214. The Dialogue between Romeo and B;?nvolio is line for 
line and almost word for word the same in both quartos. So again nearly the whole of 
Act L Sc. ii. between Capulet and Paris in the first instance, and then between Capulct's 
servant and Romeo and Benvolio. Act L Sc. iii. Juliet, her mother, and the Nurse; the 
first 28 lines of this scene are absolutely identical in both quartos. Act I. Sc. iv. Romeo 
and his friends prepare for their visit in masquerade to Capulet's house; with the exception 
of some omissions, and the imperfect version of the Queen Mab speech, the two quartos 
are here again substantially identical. So again in Act L Sc. v. from tlie entry of the 
guests to the end, allowing for omissions in (Qi) and evident revisions in Q2, both 
quartos are substantially identical. The same may be said for Act IL Sc. i. ii. the 
famous balcony scene; for Sc. iii. between Romeo and Friar Lawrence; and for the 
larger portion of Sc. iv. between Benvolio, Mercutio, Romeo, the Nurse and her man 
Peter. 

Act in. Sc. ii. The Nurse announces to Juliet the banishment of Romeo. The 
Nurse's sj>eeches in this scene are substantially identical in both quartos. Act III. Sc. iii. 
Romeo in concealment at the Friar's cell. By far the greater portion of this scene as 
given in (Qi) is substantially identical with Q2. Act IIL Sc. v. The parting of the 



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vi Romeo and luliet, [introduction. 

Lovers in the first part of this scene is much alike in both quartos. So is the latter part 
of the scene, allowing for omissions in (Qi). 

Act IV. Sc. i. At the Friar's cell. In both quartos the first part of this scene, till the 
exit of Paris, is almost identical. From this point to the end only scattered fragments of 
what 1 believe to have been the original play, as given in Q2, are to be found in (Qi). 



SHORTENED PASSAGES. [ V ?^'''*^ J 



Act I. Sc. i. The Prince's speech when he arrives to part the fray. — The dialogue 
between Mountague, his wife, and Benvolio. (Benvolio's account of the fray breaks 
down after the first two lines j but that his description, as given in Q2, was in existence 
when (Qi) was printed seems manifest when we examine his confused account in (Qi) 
of the fight in which Mercutio and Tibalt are slain (Act III. Sc. i.). There will be 
found one of the lines — ' While we [they] were enterchaunging thrusts and blows ' — 
which (Qi) here omits. Mountague omits the description of Romeo's melancholy 
humour, yet his remark — 'Black and portentous must this humour prove,' etc., is 
retained.) Other evidence of shortened representation will be found in the abruptness 
of the conclusion of t[m scene in (Qi), together with the absolute agreement of the 
additional lines, given in Q2, with what had gone before. In Act I. Sc. iii. in the latter 
part of the scene. Lady Capulet's description of Paris, lines 66 — 81, was certainly not 
added in Q2, therefore its non-appearance in (Qi) may fairly be set down as the result 
of omission. 

For the rest the gaps made in the text of (Qi) in arranging it opposite that of Q2 so 
clearly show the places where omissions are to be looked for, that it is needless to point 
them out here. I know of no passage of any importance throughout tlie play which was 
not probably in existence at the time (Qi) was printed. Here of course reser\'e must be 
made for substituted, revised, and slightly augmented passages. '" -. 

r 

IMPERFECT REPRESENTATION. 

Compare in both Quartos, the Prologue, and, in the opening Scene, the dialogue between 
the Servants up to the actual commencement of the fray, and the summing up in (Qi) 
of the whole conduct of the fray in a descriptive stage direction. The impression this 
leaves on me is, that (Qi) is a text carelessly made up from imperfect notes. Other 
principal passages where this imperfect representation is apparent are Act I. Sc. iv., 
Mercutio's description of Queen Mab. Act II. Sc. v. Where the Nurse gives an account 
to Juliet of her embassage. Act III. Sc. i. In which occurs the fatal affray in which 
Mercutio and Tybalt are slain. Act III. Sc. ii. In which the Nurse brings the account 
of Tybalt's death and Romeo's banishment to Juhet. (It should be however noted, that 
in this scene the corruptions and omissions are almost exchihively confined to Juliet's 
speeches; those of the Nurse are nearly perfect. Of the twenty -eight lines given to her 
in Q2, more than twenty are found in (Qi) > ^"^ ^"^ ^^ ^^^ additional lines of Q2 — 
'Ah Where's my man? giue me some Aqua-vitae' — had been already given in (Qi) in 
Act II. Sc. v.) 



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INTRODUCTION.] Romeo and luliet, vii 

Act III. Sc. V. After the departure of Romeo till the entry of Capulet. 

Act IV. Sc. ii. to the end of the play. The greater portion of all this is evidently 
the result of rough notes carelessly made up. Here and there fragments more or less 
perfect of the original play are noticeable, and some passages (which I shall point out 
under their proper heading) seem to indicate a radical diiference between the original 
play and that given in Q2. Note, as a particular instance of imperfect rendering, in Act 
V. Sc. i. Romeo's soliloquy on the Apothecary and his Shop. 

PASSAGES POSSIBLY RE-WRITTEN FOR a2. 

Act II. Sc. vi. Romeo and Juliet meet at the Friar's cell to be married. 

Act IV. Sc. V. The lamentations over the supposed dead body of Juliet. 

Act V. Sc. iii. 1. 12 — 17. Paris' address before the tomb of Juliet. 

The essential differences between the two quartos in these passages cannot be 
accounted for as the result of imperfect note-taking during the performance. If they 
really existed in the original play in anything like the form they present in (Qi) they 
must have been re-written for Q2. 

EVIDENCE OP REVISION OF THE ' COPY * FROM WHICH €12 WAS PRINTED. 

Proofs of this revision will be found throughout the Play ; but here I shall content 
myself with giving two instances, the whole evidence for which will be found in the 
parallel texts, and which, as they admit of no doubt, will best sene the purpose of 
directing attention to this peculiarity of Q2. Act II. Sc. iii. lines i — 4. *The grey eyde 
mome,' etc. Both quartos begin this scene with these four lines j but on comparison it 
will be seen that (Qi) has the better version: if, now, the reader will cast his eye 
higher up the page of Q2 he will find a third version of these four lines inserted in the 
midst of Romeo's last speech in the preceding scene. How did it come there ? 
Evidently this third version was intended by the author as a substitute for the 
inferior version that (by the carelessness of the transcriber) had got into the ' copy ' 
prepared for the printer of Q2 } it was wTitten on the margin, or on a paper attached to 
it. By an oversight, however, theoriginal hues in the ^copy' were nor Strnrkthrough j 
'^and by a blunder the printer misplaced the revision where we now see it. 

Act III. Sc. iii. lines 38 — 45. The admirable confusion these lines present in Q2 is 
here clearly the result of the revision of the * copy ' from which it was printed. Tlie 
text of that copy must in the first instance have been identical with that presented by 
(Qi), which I here print in roman type, placing in the margin, in italics, the additions 
and revisions made on the ' copy ' for Q2. I have also numbered the lines in the order 
it was intended they should appear. 

I. And steale iramortall kisses from her lips ; blessing 

1. Who euen in pure and vestall modest ie 
4. But Romeo may not, he is banished. 3. Still blush, as thinking their own kisses sin. 

(5) Flies may doo this, but I from this must flye. 5. This mayjlyes do, when I from this must /lie, 
6. They are freemen but 

I am banished. 7. Andsayest thou yet, that exile is not death f 



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viii Romeo and luUet. [introduction. 

In the first line blessing was properly substituted for kisses ; lines 2 and 3, which are 
purely parenthetical, should then alone have been introduced j but the printer took all 
the four lines (2, 3, 5, 7) which he found on the right-hand margin of his * copy ' and 
inserted them together, allowing the cancelled line (5), for which the marginal line 5 is 
a substitute, to remain in the text. Line 6, I must suppose, got into its proper place 
from having been written on the opposite margin. 

For some other special instances of this revision I must refer the reader to the notes to 
my revised text of the Play. Act I. Sc. i. 1. 122, 123, Sc. iv. 1. 62 — 645 Act III. Sc^i. 
1. 85^ 87, Sc. v. 1. 177— 181 J Act IV. Sc. i. 1. 95— 98, no; Act V. Sc. iii. 1. 102,^ 
fo3, 167. 

I have now only to add a few words in explanation of the plan of this work. Q2 is 
printed page for page and line for line with the original. The Acts and Scenes are 
numbered in the margin in accordance with the division of the * Cambridge ' and most 
modern editions. The lines of the text are numbered separately tor each scene, but as 
printers* lines, it not being possible in this reprint to number them metrically. 

(Qi), which is nearly one quarter less than GI2, ((Qi) has 2232 lines, including 
Prologue; Q2, 3007), has necessarily been printed with gaps in the text in order to bring j 
the parallel passages of the two quartos as nearly opposite each other as possible. It is, 
however, printed line tor line with the original, and the commencement of each page 1 
is marked with an asterisk. 

The system I have adopted for the marginal notes is founded on that of the I 
' Cambridge Shakespeare/ and will present no difficulty to those accustomed to that : 
edition. Q, stands for Quarto ; Qq. for the agreement of Q3, 4, j ; F for Folio ; Ff. ! 
for the agreement of all the Folios. Only those quartos and folios are mentioned which j 
differ from the text of Q2. To save space where the difference between the text of 
Q2 and other editions is merely a matter of punctuation, I have given the notes of 
punctuation within brackets, thus. Act I. Sc. i. 1. 2^,* maids,] [?] Ff. [!] Q5.* signifies 
that the Folios instead of a period have a note of interrogation after maids and Q 5 a note 
of exclamation. It is of course only in passages where the sense is affected that I have 
taken notice of the punctuation. 



The Society is much indebted to the liberality of Mr F. W. Cosens for the loan of his 
valuable facsimiles (Ashbee's) of the Quarto editions, the temporary possession of 
which has greatly facilitated my task. 

P. A. Daniel. 



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ROMEO AND JULIET, 
a parallel Eext (Sbition of tfie jFirst Etoo ©uartos, 

(Qi) i597-^Q2, 1599, 

ARRANGED SO AS TO SHEW THEIR DIFFERENCES, 

AND WITH 

COLLATIONS OF THE OTHER QUARTOS AND THE FOLIOS. 



EDITED BY 

P. A. DANIEL. 



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2 


(Q^ I) 1597- 




AN 




EXCELLENT 




conceited Iragedie 


' 


OF 




Romeo and luliet. 




As it hath been often (with great applaufe) 
plaid pubhquely, by the right Ho- 
nourable the L. oi\Hunfdon 
his Seruants. 




LONDON, 




Printed by lohn Danter. 




15 9 7- 



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Q? 2. 1599. 



THE 

MOST E X=^ 

cellent and lamentable 

Tragedie, of Romeo 

and luliet. 

Newly corrected, augmented^ and 
amended : 

As it hath bene fundry times publiquely acted, by the 

right Honourable the Lord Chamberlaine 

his Seruants. 



LONDON 

Printed by Thomas Creede, for Cuthbert Burby, and are to 

be fold at his (hop neare the Exchange. 

1599- 



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Romeo and luliet {Q: i) 1597. 



[PROLOGUK. 



The Prologue. 



^ I ^f^To hoiijhold Frends alike in dignilie, 

-^ {In f aire Verona, where we lay out Seene) 
From ciuill Iroyles broke into enmitie, 
Vyhofe ciuill warre makes ciuill hands vncleane. 
From forth thefatall loynes of thefe iuofoeSj 
A paire of flarre-crofl Loners tooke their life : 
FFhofe mifaduentures, piteous ouerthrowes, 

{Through the continuing of their Fathers fir fe, 
And death-markt pqffage of their Parents rage) 



Is now the two howres traffique of our Stage. 
The which if you with patient eares attend, 
What here we want weeHfludie to amend. 



12 



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PROLOGUE.] 



Romeo and Iiiliet Q'. 2. 1599. 



The Prologue. 



Corus. 

^ I ^wo houjiiolds loth alike in dignilie, 

(Infaire Verona where we lay our ^cenej 
From auncient grudge, Ireake to new mutinie, 
where ciuill hloud makes ciuill hands vncleane : 
From forth thefatall loynes of thefe two foes, 
A paire offlarre-crojl loners, take their life : 
whofe mifaduentur'd pittious ouerthrowes, 
Doth with their death burie their Parents Jlr if e. 
The fearf till poffoge of their death-mar kt loue, 
And t/ie continuance of their Parents rage : 
ivhich hut their childrens end nought could remoue : 
Is now the two houres trafficque of our Stage. 
The which if you with patient eares attend, 
what hearefhall miffe^ our toyle fhall flriue to mend, 

A% 



This Prologue is omitted 
in the Folio editions. 



Chorus. Qq. 



14. hiare] here Qq. 



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Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. I. 



[In this column the be- 
ginning of each page of the 
original edition of (Qi) is 
marked with an asterisk.] 



The most excellent Tragedie of 

Romeo and luliet. 



Enter 2. Seruing-men of the Capolets. I. i. 

GRegorie, of my word He carrie no coales. 
2 No, for if you doo, you fhould be a Collier. 
I If I be in choler. He draw. 
2 Euer while you liue, drawe your necke out of the 
the collar. 

1 I ftrike quickly being moou'd. 

2 I, but you are not quickly moou'd to ftrike. 

1 A Dog of the houfe of the Mountagues moues me. 

2 To mooue is to ftirre, and to bee valiant is to ftand 
to it: therefore (of my word) if thou be mooud thou't 
runne away. 

1 There's not a man of them I meete, but He take 
the wall of. ^* 

2 That fhewes thee a weakling, for the weakeft goes 
to the wall. 

1 Thats true, therefore He thruft the men from the 
wall, and thruft the maids to the walls: nay, thou ihalt 16 
fee I am a tall peece of flefli. 

2 Tis well thou art not fifli, for if thou wert thou 
wouldft be but poore lohn. 

I He play the tyrant. He firft begin with the maids, & 20 
off with their heads. 

2 The 



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ACT I. SC. l] 



Romeo a?id Juliet Of. 2. 1599. 



I. I. 



12 



16 



THE MOST Ex- 
cellent and lamentable 

Tragedie, of Romeo and Juliet. 

Enter Sampfon and Gregorie, with Swords and Buckltrs, of the 
houfe of Capulet. 

SAmp. Gregorie, on my word weele not carrie Coles. 
Greg. No, for then we (hould be Collyers. 

Samp. I meane, and we be in choller, weele draw. 

Greg. I while you line, draw your necke out of choller. 

Samp. I ftrike quickly being moued. 

Greg. But thou art not quickly moued to (Irike. 

Samp. A dog of the houfe of Mount ague moues me. 

Grego. To moue is to ftirre, and to be valiant, is to fland : 
Therefore if thou art moued thou runft away. 

Samp. A dog of that houfe ihall moue me to ftand : 
I will take the wall of any man or maide of Moiinta- 
gues. 

Grego. That fhewes thee a weake flaue, for the weakeft goes 
to the wall. 

Samp. Tis true, & therfore women being the weaker vefTels 
are euer thruft to the wall: therfore I wil pulh Mountagues men 
from the wall, and thruft his maides to the wall. 

Greg. The quarell is betweene our maifters , and vs their 
men. 

Samp. Tis aH one, I will fhew my felfe a tyrant, when I haue 
fought with the men, I will be ciuil with the maides, I will cut 
off their heads. 

A 3 Grego. The 



[THE TRAGEDIE OF 
ROMEO and IVLIET. 

Actus Primus. Scoeaa 
Prima] Ff. 



Act I. ScF.NE i. 



I. oti] /f Fi, 2, 3. a F4. 



3. and] //Ff. 

4. 0/ choller] of the colter 
Q4. 5. [coUiir Q5.) o th 
Collar Ff. {p th F3, 4.) 



13. a weahe flaue,] weak 
slave, Fa, 3. toeah, Slave, 
F4. 

15. Tis true] True Ff. 
weaker] tueakest F3, 4. 



21. ciuil} ciuill Q3. Fi. 
civill Fa. cruell Q4. 5. 
civil F3. 4.. 
/ will cut] and cut Ff. 



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Romeo and Iidiet [Of*, i) 1597. 



[act I. 



sc. I. 



2 The heads of the raaids ? 

1 I the heades of their Maides, or the Maideuheades, 
take it in what fence thou wilt. 

2 Nay let them take it in fence tliat fcele it, but heere 
comes two of the Mountagues. 



24 



Enter two Seruingmen of the Mountagues. 

1 Nay feare not me I warrant thee. 

2 I feare iheni no more than thee, but draw. 

1 Nay let vs haue the law on our fide, let them begin 
firft. He tell thee what He doo, as I goe by ile bite my 
thumbe, which is difgrace enough if they fuffer it. 

2 Content, goe thou by and bite thy thumbe, and ile 
come after and frowne. 

I Moun: Doo you bite your thumbe at vs? 

1 I bite my thumbe. 

2 Moun : I but i'ft at vs ? 

1 I bite my thumbe, is the law on oiir fide ? 

2 No. 

I I bite my thumbe. 

1 Moun : I but i'd at vs ? Enter Beneuolio. 

2 Say I, here comes my Mafters kiufman. 



36 



40 



44 



5^ 



They draw, to them enters Tybalt, they Jight, to them the 
Prince, old Mountague, and his wife, old Capulet and 
his wife, and other Citizens and part them. 



Prince: 



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ACT I. sc. I.] Romeo and luliet Q? 2. 1599. 


9 




Gre^o. The heads of the maids. 


23. maids.] [?] Ff. [!] Q5. 


24 


Samp, I the heads of the maides, or their maiden heads, take it 
in what fenfe thou wilt. 






Greg, They mull tak^t/fenfe that feele it. 

Samp. Me they {half^^e while I am able to stand , and tis 


26. sens;;} in sense Q4, 5, 




y^. 3. 4. 


28 


knowne I am a pretie peece of flefh. 

Greg, Tis well thou art not fifh, if thou hadft, thou hadfl bin 






poore lohn: draw thy toole, here comes of the houfe of Moun- 


30. Af.^urtfaCT^es] the Moun- 




tagues. 


tagues Ff. 




Enter two other feruing men. 




32 


Samp. My naked weapon is out, quarell, I will back thee. 






Greg, How, tume thy backe and runne ? 
Samp, Feare me not. 


33. Haio,} r?l Ff. 
backe^, U f"!. [:] F2. 
runner] [.] Fi, 2. 




Greg. No marrie, I feare thee. 


35. thee^, | !] QS- 


36 


Sam- Let vs take the law of our fides, let them begin. 
Gre, I will frown as I pafle by, and let them take it as they lifl. 
Samp. Nay as they dare, I wil bile my thumb at them, which 






is difgrace to them if they beare it. 


39. is] is a Qq. Ff. 


40 


Ahram, Do you bite your thumbe at vs fir ? 

Samp. I do bite my thumbe fir. 

Abra, Do you bite your thumb at vs fir ? 






Samp. Is the law of our fide if I fay I ? 


43 e/] ^« QS- 


44 


Greg, No. 

Samp. No fir, I do not bite my thumbe at you fir , but I bite 
my thumbe fir. 

Greg, Do you quarell fir ? 




48 


Abra, Quarell fir, no fir. 


48. sir,] [?] Ff. 




Sd, But if you do (ir , I am for you, I feme as good a ma as you. 


49. Bu/i/] //Ff. 




Abra, No better. 


50. l>efter.] [?] Ff. 




Samp, Well fir. Enter Benuolio, 




5^ 


Greg, Say better, here comes one of my maiflers kinfmen. 






Sam. Yes better fir. 


53. sir] om. Ff. 




Abra, You lie. 






Samp, Draw if you be men, Gregorie, remember thy wafhing 


55. washing] stvashinj 


56 


blowc. Theyjight, 

Benuo. Part fooles , put vp your fwords, you know not what 
you do. Enter 


Q4.5- 



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lO 



Romeo and Inliet (Q! i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. I. 



Prince : Rebellious fubieds enemies to peace. 



On paine of torture, from thofe bloody handes 
Throw your miftempered weapons to the ground. 



80 



Three Ciuell brawles bred of an aine word. 

By the old Capulet and Mountague, 

Haue ihrice difturbd the quiet of our ftreets. 



84 



If euer you diflurbe our ftreets againe. 



Your 



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ACT I. SC. 1.] 



Romeo and luliet Q*. 2. 1599. 



II 



Enter Tihalt, 

Tilalt, What art thou drawne among thefe hartlefle hindes ? 
turae thee Benuolio, looke vpon thy death. 

Benuo, I do but keepe the peace, pUt vp thy fword, 
or manage it to part thefe men with me. 

Tih, What drawne and talke of peace ? I hate the word, 
as I hate hell, all Alountagues and thee : 
Haue at thee coward. 

Enter three orfoure Citizens with Clubs or partiffons. 

Offi. Clubs, Bils and Partifons, ftrike, beate them downe, 
Downe with the Capulets, downe with the Mountagues. 
Enter old Capulet in his gowne, and his wife. 

Capti. What noyfe is this ? giue me my long fword hoe. 

JVife. A crowch, a crowch, why call you for a fword ? 

Cap. My fword I fay, old Mountague is come. 
And florilhes his blade in fpight of me. 

Enter old Mountague and his wife. 

Mount. Thou villaine Capulet, hold me not, let me go. 

M. tVife. 2. Thou flialt not iVir one foote to feeke a foe. 
Enter Prince Eskales, with his traine. 

Prince. Rebellious fubiedb enemies to peace, 
Prophaners of this neighbour-ftayned fteele. 
Will they not heare ? what ho, you men, you beafls : 
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage. 
With purple fountaines ilfuing from your veines : 
On paine of torture from thofe bloudie hands, 
Throw your miftempered weapons to the ground. 
And heare the fentence of your moued Prince. 
Three ciuill brawles bred of an ayrie word. 
By thee old Capulet and Mountague, 
Haue thrice didurbd the quiet of our ftreets. 
And made Neronas auncient Citizens, 
Caft by their graue befeeming ornaments. 
To wield old partizans, in hands as old, 
Cancred with peace, to part your cancred hate. 
If euer you diflurbe our ftreets againe. 

Your 



63. drawne] draw Ff. 



[Fight] Ff. 
[or partysons] < 



Ff . 



69. crowch'] crutch Ff. Q5. 

70. My] A F4. 



72. Capulet, hold] Capulet. 
HoldFi. Capulet: hold 

Qs- 

73. Af. Wi/e. 2.1 2. Wife. 
Ff. 

one] a Ff. 



79. torture . . . hands^] 
Torture, . . . hands Fi, 
a. 3' QS- torture, . . . 
hands, Q4. 

those] these Fa, 3, 4. 

80. mistempered] mistem' 
per'd Ff. Qs. 

8a. brawles] Broyles Ff. 



85. Neronas] Verona' sQq. 
Ff. 



Digitized by 



Goo^^ 



Romeo and Iidiet (Q'f i) 1597. 



[act 



I. SC. 1. 



Your Hues fhall pay the raufome of your fault : 
For this time euery man depart in peace. 

Come Capulet come you along with me, 91 

And Mouutague, come you this after noone. 
To know our farther pleafure in this cafe. 
To old free Towne our common iudgement place. 
Once more on paine of death each man depart. 9^ 

Exeunt. 

M: wife. Who fet this auncient quarrel firft abroach ? 
Speake Nephew, were you by when it began ? 

Benuo: Here were the feruants of your aduerfaries. 
And yours clofe lighting ere I did approch. 1 00 



Vl^ife: Ah where is Romeo, faw you him to day ? 
Right glad I am he was not at this fray. 

Ben : Madame, an houre before the worfhipt funne 
Peept through the golden window of the Eall, 
A troubled thought drew me from companie : 
Where vnderneath the groue Sicamoure, 
That Weft ward rooteth from the Citties fide. 
So early walking might I fee your fonne. 
I drew towards him, but he was ware of me. 
And drew into the thicket of the wood : 
I noting his affedtions by mine owne. 
That moft are bufied when th*are moft alone. 



iia 



u6 



ISO 



Purfued my honor, not purfuing his. 



Monn : 



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Google 



ACT I. SC. I.] 



Romeo and luUet Q'. 2. 1599. 



^3 



91 



96 



100 



]04 



108 



112 



116 



120 



124 



Your Hues fhall pay the forfeit of the peace. 

For this time all the reft depart away : 

You Capulet {hall go along with me, 

And Mouniague come you this aftemoone. 

To know our farther pleafure in this cafe : 

To old Free-towne, our common iudgement place : 

Once more on paine of death, all men depart. 



Exaunl. 



Mounta. Who fet this auncient quarell new abroach ? 
Speake Nephew, were you by when it began ? 

Ben, Here were the feruants of your aduerfarie 
And yours, clofe fighting ere I did approach, 
I drew to part them, in the inftant came 
The fierie Tybalt, with his fword preparde. 
Which as he breathed defiance to my eares, 
He fwoong about his head and cut the windes. 
Who nothing hurt withall, hift him in fcome : 
While we were enterchaunging thrufts and blowes. 
Came more and more, and fought on part and part, 
Tdl the Prince came, who parted either part. 

Wife, O where is Romeo, faw you him to day ? 
Right glad I am, he was not at this fray. 

Benuo. Madam, an houre before the worlhipt Sun, 
Peerde forth the golden window of the Eaft, 
A troubled minde driue me to walke abroad. 
Where vnderneath the groue of Syramour, 
That Weftward rooteth from this Citie fide : 
So early walking did I fee your fonne. 
Towards him I made, but he was ware of me. 
And ftole into ihe couert of the wood, 
I meafuring his afFedions by my owne. 
Which then moft fought, where moft might not be 
Being one too many by my wearie felfe, (found : 
Purfued my humor, not purfuing his. 
And gladly ftiunned, who gladly fled from me. 

Mounta. Many a morning hath he there bin feene. 



With 



94 farther] Fathers Q3, 
Fi,a.3. Fatfur's F4. 
further Q5. 



104. swoong] TwongQq. Ff. 



1 10. / am] am I Qq. Ff. 



113. driue] drave Qq. Ff. 

114. Syramour'] sycamore 
Q5. sycauiour Ff. 



120. soiif^ht ."^ '." om. Q5. 



I -a. shunned] shunnd Ff. 



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H 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. i. 



Moun: Black and portentious muft this honor proue, 
Vnlefle good counfaile doo the caufe remooue. 
Ben : Why tell me Vncle do you know the caufe ? 

Enter Romeo, 
Moun : I neyther know it nor can learne of him. 



i3<5 



Ben : See where he is, but (laud you both afide. 
He know his grieuance, or be much denied. 

Mount : I would thou wert fo happie by thy ftay 
To heare true (hrift. Come Madame lets away. 

Benuo: Good morrow Cofen. 

Romeo: Is the day fo young? 

Ben: But new ftroke nine. 

Romeo: Ay me, fad hopes feeme long. 
Was that my Father that went hence fo fall ? 

Ben: It was, what forrow lengthens Romeos houres? 



15* 



156 



Rom : 



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ACT I. SC. I.] 



Romeo and luliet Q. 2. 1599. 



15 



With teares augmenting the freih mornings deawe. 
Adding to cloudes, more clowdes with his deepe fighes. 
But all fo foone, as the alcheeriug Sunne, 
128 Should in the ^rthefl £a(l begin to draw^ 
The fhadie curtaines from Auroras bed. 
Away from light fleales home my heauie fonne. 
And priuate in bis Chamber pennes himfelfe, 
132 Shuts vp his windowes, locks faire day-light out. 
And makes himfelfe an artiiiciall night : 
Blacke and portendoits mud this humor proue, 
VnlelTe good counfell may the caufe remoue. 
136 Ben. My Noble Vncle do you know the caufe ? 

Moun, I neither know it, nor can leame of him. 
Ben. Haue you importunde him by any meanes ? 
Moun. Both by my felfe and many other fHends, 
140 But he b owne affe6tions counfeller. 

Is to himfelfe (I will not fay how true) 
But to himfelfe fo fecret and fo clofe. 
So farre from founding and difcouerie, 
144 As is the bud bit with an enuious worme. 

Ere he can fpread his fweete leaues to the ayre. 
Or dedicate his bewtie to the fame. 
Could we but leame from whence his forrows grow, 
148 We would as willingly giue cure as know. 

Enter Romeo. 
Benu. See where he comes, fo pleafe you flep afide, 
lie know his greeuance or be much denide. 

Aloun. I would thou wert fo happie by thy flay, 
152 To heare true fhrift, come Madam lets away. 

Exeunt. 
Benuol. Good morrow Coufin. 
Romeo. Is the day fo young ? 
Ben. But new flrooke nine. 
1^6 Romeo, Ay me, fad houres feeme long : 

Was that my father that went hence fo fafl ? 

Ben. It was : what fadnefle lengthens Romeos houres ? 

B Rom. Not 



Z35. mornings] morning 



35. m^ 
F3.4. 



127. alckeering\ all cheer' 
'"^Q^' all-cluering Yi. 



134. portendous] portentous 



1*2.3,4. 



139. other] others Ft. 

140. is] his Qq. Ff. 



Digitized by 



Google 



i6 



Rameo and luliet {Qt i) 1597. 



[act 



I. SC I. 



Rom: Not hauing that, which hailing makes them 

Ben: In loue. (ihort. iGo 

Ro: Out. 

Ben: Of loue. 

Ro: Out of her fauor where I am in loue. 

Ben: Alas that loue fo gentle in her view, 164 

Should be fo tyrranous and rough in proofe. 

Ro: Alas that loue whofe view is muffled (till, 
Should without lawes giue path-waies to our will : 
Where ihall we dine? Gods me, what fray was here? 168 

Yet tell me not for I haue heard it all, 
Heres much to doe with hate, but more with loue. 
Why then, O brawling loue, O louing hate, 

O anie thing, of nothing firft create ! 1/3 

O heauie lightnes ferious vanitie ! 
Mifliapen Caos of bed fceming thinges. 
Feather of lead, bright fmoke, cold fire, ficke health. 
Still waking fleepe, that is not what it is : 176 

This loue fecle I, which feele no loue in this. 
Doeft thou not laugh ? 

Ben: No Cofe I rather weepe. 

Rom: Good hart at what? 180 

Ren: At thy good hearts oppref»ion. 

Ro: Why fuch is loues tranfgrefsion, 
Griefes of mine owne lie heauie at my hart. 

Which thou wouldft propagate to haue them prefl 184 

With more of thine, this griefe that thou haft fliowne. 
Doth ad more griefe to too much of mine owne : 
I^ue is a fmoke raifde with the fume of fighes 

Being purgde, a fire fparkling in loners eyes : ' 88 

Being vext, a fea raging with a loners teares. 
What is it elfe? A madnes moft difcrect, 
A choking gall, and a preferuing fweet. Farewell Cofe. i 192 



Ben : Nay He goe along. 
And if you hinder me you doo me wrong. 



Ro: 



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ACT I. sc. 1.] Romeo and luliet Q? 2. 1599. 


■ — « 

^7 




Ro. Not hauing that, which hauing, makes the Ihort. 




i6o 


Ben, In loue. 
Rom, Out. 


i6o. In hue.] [?] Qs. 




Ben. Of loue. 


162. O/hue.-] [?] Q5. 




Rom, Out of her fauour where I am in loue. 




164 


Ben. Alas that loue fo gentle in his view. 
Should be fo tirannous and rough in proofe. 

Romeo, Alas that loue, whofe view is muffled flill. 
Should without eyes, fee pathwaies to his will : 




168 


Where fhall we dine > 6 me ! what fray was here ? 
Yet tell me not, for I haue heard it all : 
Heres much to do with hate, but more with loue : 
Why then 6 brawling loue, 6 louing hate, 




172 


any thmg of nothing firfl created : 
heauie lightneiTe, ferious vanitie. 


172. created] create F2, 3, 4. 




Milhapen Chaos of welfeeing formes. 


174. welseeing] welseem- 


i;6 


Feather of lead, bright fmoke, cold fier, licke health. 
Still waking fleepe that is not what it is. 
This loue feele I, tliat feele no loue in this, 
Doeft thou not laugh ? 

Benu, No Coze, I rather weepe. 


inir Q4 F2. well seeming 
Q5. well-seeming F3, 
4. 


180 


Rom. Good hart at what ? 

Benu. At thy good harts oppreffion. 

Romeo, Why fuch is loues tranfgreffion : 






Griefes of mine owne lie heauie in my breaft. 


183. mine] my Q4, 5. 


184 


Which thou wilt propogate to haue it preaft. 


184. propogate] propagate 




With more of thine, this loue that thou haft fliowne. 


Qq. Ff. 




Doth ad more griefe, too too much of mine owne. 


186. too too] to too Qq. Ff. 




Loue is a fmoke made with the fume of fighes, 


187. with] o/V^. 


188 


Being purgd, a fire fparkling in loners eies. 
Being vext, a fea nourifht with louing teares. 
What is it elfe ? a madneiTe, mofl difcreete, 
A choking gall, and a preferuing fweete : 




192 


Farewell my Coze. 

Ben, Soft I will go along : 
And if you leaue me fo, you do me wrong. 






But 





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i8 



Romeo and luliet [Qz i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. I. 



Ro: Tut I haue loft my felte I am n.>t here^ 
This is not Romeo, hee's feme ether where. 

Ben : Tell me in fadnes whome Ihe is you loue ? 

Ro: What fhall I grone and tell thee ? 

Ben: Why no, but fadly tell me who. 

Ro: Bid a iickman in fadnes make his will. 
Ah word ill vrgde to one that is fo ill. 
In fadnes Cofen I doo lone a woman. 

Ben: I aimde fo right, when as you faid you lou'd. 

Ro: A right good mark-man, and fliee's faire I loue. 

Ben: A right faire marke faire Cofe is fooneft hit. 

Ro: But in that hit you milfe, lliee'Ie not be hit 
With Cupids arrow, ihe hath Dianaes wit. 
And in ftrong proofe of chaftitie well arm'd : 
Gainft Cupids childifli bow Ihe lines vnharm'd, 
Shee'le not abide the fiedge of louing tearmes. 



195 



230 



20 J 



208 



Nor ope her lap to Saint feducing gold. 

Ah file is rich in beaut ie, only poore, 

That when fhe dies with beautie dies her ftore. 



212 



Exeu. 



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ACT I. SC. I.] 



Romeo and luUet Q! a. 1599. 



19 



Rom. Tut I baue loll my felfe, I am not here, 
196 This is not Romeo, hees fome other where. 

Ben. Tell me in fadneffe, who is that you loue > 

Ro. What ihall I grone and tell thee ? 

Ben. Grone, why no : but fadly tell me who ? 

Ro. A iicke man in fadnefle makes his will : 
^•/ A word ill vrgd to one that is fo ill : 

In fadnelfe Cozin, I do loue a woman. 

Ben. I aymde lb neare, when I fuppofde you lou'd. 
ao4 Ro. A right good mark man, and fhees faire I loue. 

Ben. A right faire marke faire Coze is foonell hit. 

Romeo. Well in that hit you mifTe, fheel not be hit 
With Cupids arrow, (he hath Dians wit : 
ao8 And in llrong proofe of chaftitie well armd. 

From loues weak childiih bow fhe lines vncharmd. 
Shee will not (lay the fiege of louing tearmes. 
Nor bide th'incounter of alfailing eies. 
21 a Nor ope her lap to fain6t feducing gold, 
O ihe is rich, in bewtie onely poore. 
That when ihe dies, with bewtie dies her ftore. 

Ben. The fhe hath fworn, that (he wil ftil Hue chafte ? 
ai6 Ro. She hath, and in that fparing, make huge wafle : 

For bewtie fteru'd with her feuerilie. 
Cuts bewtie off from all pofteritie. 
She is too faire, too wife, wifely too faire. 
To merit blilTe by making me difpaire : 
Shee hath forfworne to loue, and in that vow, 
Do I line dead, that line to tell it now. 

Ben. Be rulde by me, forget to thinke of her. 

Ro. O teach me how I fhould forget to thinke. 

Ben. By giuing libertie vnto thine eyes. 
Examine other bewties. 

Ro. Tis the way to call hers (exquifit) in quellion more, 
Thefe happie maskes that kis faire Ladies browes. 
Being black, puts vs in mind they hide the faire : 
He that is ftrooken blind, cannot forget 

B 2 The 



224 



228 



195. Tuf] But F3. 4. 



199. pt€ who f] me who : 
Q4. me who. Fi, a, 3, 
Q5. me, who. F4. 

200. A , . . makes] Bid a 
. . . make Q4, 5. A . . . 
in good sadness makes 
F2, 3, 4. 

201. A word] O, word F2, 

3.4- 
204. mark man]m arks-man 

F3.4. 



213. richy in be^otie] rich 
in beauty, Qq. Ff. 



216. make] Ptakei F2, 3, 4, 

217. sterud] starvdY^. 



219. is too] is to Q4. 
wise^ wisely] wisewi: sely 
Fi. wise wisely F2. 



228. These] TlioseT^,^. 

229. puts] put Q5. F3, 4. 

230. strooken] strucken Q5, 
F3.4. 



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20 



Romeo and luliet [Q". i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 2. 



Enter Countie Paris, old Capulet. 



1.2. 



Of honorable reckoning are they both, 
And pittie lis they liue at ods fo long : 
But leaning that, what fay you to my fute ? 

Capu: What lliould I fay more than I faid before. 
My daughter is a ftranger in the world, 
Shee hath not yet attainde to fourtcene yeares : 
Let two more fommers wither in their pride. 
Before fhe can be thought lit for a Bride. 

Paris: Younger than flie are happie mothers made. • 
Cap: But too foouc marde are thefe fo early maried : 



But wooe her gentle Paris, get her heart. 
My word to her confent is but a part. 



16 



This night I hold an old accuftom'd Feaft, 
Whereto I haue inuited many a guefl. 
Such as I loue : yet you among the flore. 
One more mofl welcome makes the number more. 
At my poore houfe you iliall behold this night. 
Earth treadding liars, that make darke heauen light : 
Such comfort as doo lully youngmen feele. 
When well apparaild Aprill on the heele 
Of lumping winter treads, euen fuch delights 
Amongll frelh female buds lliall you this night 
Inherit at my houfe, heare all, all fee, 



20 



24 



2S 



And 



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ACT I. sc. 2.] Romeo and luliet Qr. 2. 1599. 


21 




The precious treafure of his eye-fight loft. 




232 


Shew me a miftrefle that is paffing faire. 
What doih her bewtie feme but as a note, 
Where I may reade who paft that pafling faire : 
Farewel, thou canft not teach me to forget. 




236 


Ben. He pay that dodrine, or elfe die in debt. Exeunt. 




[.2. 


Enter Capulet, Countie Paris, and the Clowne. 


Act I. Scene a. 




Capu. But Mounlague is bound as well as I, 


I. But] om. Q3 Ff. Amd 




In penaltie alike, and tis not hard I thinke. 


Q4,5. 




For men fo old as we to keepe the peace. 




4 


Par, Of honourable reckoning are you both. 
And pittie tis, you liu'd at ods fo long : 
But now my Lord, what fay you to my fute ? 

Capu, But faying ore what I haue faid before. 


• 


8 


My child is yet a ftraunger in the world, 
Shee hath not feene the chaunge of fourteen yeares. 
Let two more Sommers wither in their pride. 
Ere we may thinke her ripe to be a bride. 




12 


Pari, Younger then fhe, are happie mothers made. 
Capu. And too foone mard are thofe fo early made : 






Earth hath fwal lowed all my hopes but Ihe, 


14. Earth'] The earth 




Shees the hopeful 1 Lady of my earth : 


Q4.5. i5.TrMi//F2,3.4. 
swallowed] swttllowdQ$. 


i6 


But wooe her gentle Paris, get her hart. 
My will to her confent, is but a part. 


15. Shecs]Sh^esYi. S/i€ 
is Q4. 5. i-'a. 3. 4- 




And fhee agreed, within her fcope of choife 


18. a^eed] agree Qq. Ff. 




Lyes my confent, and faire according voyce : 




20 


This night I hold, an old accuftomd feaft. 

Whereto I haue inuited many a gueft : 

Such as I loue, and you among the ftore. 

One more, moft welcome makes my number more : 




24 


At my poore houfe, looke to behold this night, 
Earthtreading ftarres, that make darke heauen light : 
Such comfort as do luftie young men feele. 
When well appareld Aprill on the heele. 




38 


Of limping winter treads, euen fuch delight 






Among frefh fennell buds fhall you this night 


29. fennell] Female Fa, 




Inherit at my houfe, heare all, all fee : And 


3.4. 



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22 



Romeo and Iti/iet ((> i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 2. 



And like her moll, vvhofe nierite mod llialbe. 
Such amongft view of many my lie beeing one. 
May Hand in number though in reckoning none. 

Enter Seruingtnari. 
Where are you firra, goe trudge about 
Through faire rerona llreets, and feeke them out : 
Whofe names are written here and to them fay. 
My houfe and welcome at their pleafure Hay. 

Exeunt, 

Ser: Seeke them out whofe names are written here, 
and yet I knowe not who are written here: I muft to 
the learned to learne of them, that's as much to fay, as 
the Taylor muft meddle with his Lafte, tlie Shoomaker 
with his needle, the Painter with his nets, and the Fiiher 
with his Penfill, I muft to the learned. 

Enier BenuoUo and Romeo. 

Ben: Tut man one tire burnes out anolhers burning. 
One paine is lelTned with anotlicrs anguifli : 
Turne backward, and be holp with backward turning, 
One defperateTgriefe cures with anothers languilh. 
Take thou fome new infedion to thy eye. 
And the ranke poyfon of the old will die. 

Romeo: Your Planton leafe is excellent for that, 

Ben: For what ? 

Romeo: For your broken fliin. 

Ben: Why Romeo art thou mad? 

Rom: Not mad, but bound more than a madman is. 
Shut vp in prifon, kept without my foode, 
Whipt and tormented, and Godden good fellow. 

Ser: Godgigoden, I pray fiv can you read, 

Rom: I mine owaie fortune in my miferie. 

Ser: Perhaps you haue learned it without booke : 
but I pray can you read any thing you foe ? 

Rom: I if I know the letters and the language. 

Seru: Yee fay honeftly, reft you merrie. 

Rom: Stay fellow I can read. 

He 



3^ 



36 



40 



44 



48 



5^ 



56 



60 



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Google 



ACT I. SC. 2.] 



Romeo and luUet Q? 2. T599. 



23 



32 



36 



40 



44 



48 



52 



S^ 



60 



And like her moil, whofe merit mofl {hall bee : 
Which one more view, of many, mine being one. 
May fland in number, though in reckning none. 
Come go with me, go iirrah trudge about. 
Through faire Verona, find thofe perfons out, 
Whofe names are written there, and to them fay. 
My houfe and welcome, on their pleafure flay. 

Exit, 

Seru. Find them out whofe names are written. Here it is writ- 
ten, that the fhoo-maker fhould meddle with his yard, and the 
tayler with his laft, the fifher with his penfill, & the painter with 
his nets. But I am fent to find thofe perfons whofe names are 
here writ , and can neuer find what names the writing perfon 
hath here writ (I mull to the learned) in good time. 
Enter Benuolio, and Romeo. 

Ben, Tut man, one tire burnes out, an others burning. 
On pajne is lefned by an others anguilh, 
Tume giddie, and be hoipe by backward turning : 
One defperate greefe, cures with an others languilh : 
Take thou fome new infcdion to thy eye. 
And the rancke poyfon of the old will dye. 

Romeo. Your Plantan leafe is excelleni for that 

Ben. For what I pray thee ? 

Romeo. For your broken fhin. 

Ben, Why Romeo, art thou mad ? 

Rom, Not mad, but bound more then a mad man is : 
Shut vp in prifon, kept without my foode, 
Whipt and tormented, and Godden good fellow. 

Ser. Godgigoden, I pray fir can you read ? 

Rom, I mine owne fortune in my miferie. 

Ser, Perhaps you haue learned it without booke : 
But I pray can you read any thing you fee ? 

Rom. I if I know the letters and the language. 

Ser. Yee fay honeftly, refl you merrie. 

Rom, Stay fellow, I can read. 



32. one more viewP^ {veiw 
O3, Fi.) OH more view 
Q4.5. 



B3 



He 



42. here'] om. Ff. 



44. oui;\ [.] om. Qq. Ff. 

45. On\ One Qq. If. 



48. thy eye] the eye Qq. Ff. 



56. Godden] Good-een F4. 

57. God^goden] God gi 
Good-een F4. 

59. learned] learn d F(. 



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24 



Romeo and luliet [Q*. i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 2. 



He reads the Letter, 

SEigneur Martino and his wife and daughters, Countie 
Anfelme and his beauteous JiJIers, the Ladie widdow of 
Vtruuio, Seigneur Placentio, and his louelie Neeces, 
Mercutio and his brother Valentine, mine vncle Capu- 
let his wife and daughters, my faire Neece Rofaline and 
Liuia, Seigneur Valentio and his Cofen Tibalt, Lucio 
and the Huelie Hellena. 
A faire affembly, whether fliould they come ? 

Ser: Vp. 

Ro; Whether to fupper ? 

Ser: To our houfe. 

Ro; Wbofe houfe? 

Ser: My Mailers. 

Ro; Indeed I Ihould haue askt thee that before. 

Ser: Now il'e tel you without asking. My Mafler is 
the great rich Capulet, and if you be not of the houfe of 
Mountagues, I pray corae and crufh a cup of wine. Reft 

Ben: At this fame auncient feaft of Capulets, [you merrie. 
Sups the faire Rofaline whom thou fo loues : 
With all the admired beauties of Ferona, 
Goe thither and with vnattainled eye. 
Compare her face with fome that I fliall fliew. 
And I will make thee thinke thy fwan a crow. 

Ro; When the deuout religion of mine eye 
Maintaines fuch falihood, then turne teares to fire. 
And thefe who often drownde could neuer die, 
Tranfparent Heretiques be burnt for Hers 
One fairer than my loue, the all feeing fonne 
Nere faw her match, fince firfl the world begun. 

Ben: Tut you faw her faire none els being by. 
Her felfe poyfd with her felfe in either eye : 
But in that Criftall fcales let there be waide. 
Your Ladyes loue, againft fome other maide 
That I will fliew you fhining at this feaft. 
And Ihe fliall fcant fliew well that now feemes beft. 

Rom: He goe along no fuch fight to be fhowne, But 



64 



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9a 



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ACT I. SC. 2.] 



Romeo and luliet Q'. 2. 1599. 



25 



64 



68 



76 



80 



84 



88 



9* 



96 



He reades the Letter. 

SEigneurM^nlno,^ his wife and daughters : Countie Anfelme 
and his hewtiousjijlers : the Lady widdow q/* Vtruuio, Seigneur 
Placentio, and his louely Neeces : Mercutio and his brother Va- 
lentine: mine FncleCapu\et his wife anddaughters : myfaireNeece 
Rofaline, Liuia, Seigneur Valentio, and his Cofen Tybalt : Lucio 
and the Uuely Hellena. 
A faire afferablie, whither (hould they come ? 

Ser. Vp. 

Ro, Whither to fupper? 

Ser. To our houfe. 

Ro, Whofe houfe ? 

Ser. My Maifters. 

Ro. Indeed I fhould haue askt you that before. 

Ser. Now ile tell you witliout asking. My maifler is the great 
rich Capulet , and if you be not of the houfe of Mounlagues, I 
pray come and crulh a cup of wine. Reft you merrie. 

Ben. At this fame auncient feaft of Capulets, 
Sups the faire Rofaline whom thou fo loues : 
With all the admired beauties of Verona, 
Go thither, and with vnattainted eye. 
Compare her face with fome that I Ihall fhow, 
And I will make thee thinke thy fwan a crow. 

Ro. When the deuout religion of mine eye, 
Maintaines fuch falftiood, then turne teares to tier : 
And thefe who often drownde, could neuer die, 
Tranfparent Hereticques be burnt for liers. 
One fairer then my loue, the all feeing Sun, 
Nere faw her match, fince firft the world begun. 

Ben. Tut you faw her faire none elfe being by. 
Her felfe poyfd with her felfe in either eye : 
But in that Chriftall fcales let there be waide. 
Your Ladies loue againft fome other maide : 
That I will fhew you fliining at this feaft. 
And flie fhall fcant ftiew well that now feemes beft. 

Ro, Ile go along no fuch fight to be ftiowne. 

But 



64. daughters] daughter Ff. 
Ansel me] Ansel me Qq. 
Fi, a. Anselm F3, 4. 

65. Vtruuio] Vitruvio 
^"3.4. 



72,73. Whither to supper f 
Ser. To] Whither to 
supper. Ser? To Q3. 
Whither to supper. Ser. 
To Q4. Whither? to 
supper f Ser. To Ff. Qs. 



[Exit.] Ff. 



81. loves] lovest Fa, 3, 4, 
Q5- 



9o/^..]L?]Q3.4.[0Fi. 
[!]Fa,3.4. Qs. 

9a. Tut] Tut Tut Fa. 
Tut, tut F3, 4. 



97. seemes] shelves Qq. 
Fi, a. shews F3, 4. 



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26 



Romeo and luliet (Q^ i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 3. 



But to reioyce in fpleudor of mine owne. 

Enter Capulets wife and Nurce, 

Wife: Nurce wher*s my daughter call her forth to 
mee. 

Nurce : Now by my maiden head at twclue yeare old I 
bad her come, what Lamb, what Ladie bird, God forbid, 
Whers this girle ? what luliet. Enter Juliet, 

luliet : How now who cals ? 

Nurce : Your Mother. 

Jul: Madame I am here, what is your will ? 

FF: This is the matter. Nurfe giue leaue a while, we 
muil talke in fecret. Nurce come back again I haue re- 
membred me, thou'fe heare our counfaile. Thou know 
eft my daughters of a prettie age. 

Nurce : Faith I can tell her age vnto a houre, 

Fl^fe : Shee's not fourteene. 

Nnrce: He lay fourteene of my teeth, and yet to my 
teene be it fpoken, I haue but foure, Jhees not fourteene. 
How long is it now to Lammas-tide ? 

FFife : A fortnight and odde dayes. 

Nurce: Euen or odde, of all dayes in the yeare come 
Lammas Eue at night fhall fhe be fourteene. Sufan and Jhe 
God reft all Chriftian foules were of an age. VFell Sufan is 
with God, Jhe was too good for me : But as I faid on Lam- 
mas Eue at night Jhall Jhe be fourteene, that Jhall Jhee ma- 
rie I remember it well. Tis Jince the Earth-quake nowe e- 
leauen yeares, and Jhe was weand I neuer Jhall forget it, of 
all the daies of the yeare vpon that day : for I had then laid 
wormewood to my dug, fitting in the fun vnder the Doue- 
houfe wall. My Lord and you were then at Mantua, nay I 
do beare a braine ; But as I faid, when it did tqft the worm- 
wood on the nipple of my dug, ^ felt it bitter, pretty foole 
to fee it teachie and fall out with Dugge. Shake quoth the 
Doue-houfe twos no need I trow to bid ine trudge, and Jxnce 
that time it is aleauen yeare : for then could luliet Jlandc 
high lone, nay by the Roode^Jhee could haue wadled vp and 
downe, for euen the day before Jhee brake her brow, and then 
my husband God be with his 



1.3. 



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ACT I. SC. 3.] 



Romeo and luUet Q: 2, 1599. 



V 



But to reiojce in fplendor of mine owne. 
I- 3' Enter Capulets IFife and Nurfe. 

Ifye, Nurfe wher's my daughter ? call her forth to me. 
Nurfe. Now hif my maidenhead, at twelue yeare old I bad her 
come, what Land', what Ladie-lird, God forbid, 
JFheres this Girle ? what luhet. 

Enter luliet. 
Juliet, How now who calls ? 
Nut. Your rnother. 

lull. Madam I am here, what is your will ? 
IVife. This is the matter. Nurfe giue leaue a while,we mud talk 
in fecret . Nurfe come backe againe, I haue remembred mee, 
thou'fe heare our counfel. Thou knoweft my daughters of a pre- 
tie age. 
12 Nurfe. Faith I can tell her age vnto an houre, 

JVife, Shee's not fourteene. 

Nurfe. He lay fourteene of my teeth , and yet to my teene be it 
fpoken, I haue butfoure,Jhees not fourteene, 
16 How long is it now to Lammas tide ? 
If^ife. A fortnight and odde dayes. 

Nurfe. Euen or odde, of all daies in the yeare come Lammas Eueat 

night Jlaljlie befourteen. Sufan andfJie,God rejl all Chr{/Uanfoules, 

20 wereqfan age. Jf^ell SuCaniswith Goil,fhewas too good for me : But 

as Ifaid,on Lammas £«e at night fhallffie be fourteene , thatfhall 

fhee marrie, I remember it well . Tisjince the Earth-quake now 

eleuenyeares,andfhe was weaned Ineuerfhallforget it, of all the daies 

24 of the yeare vpon that day : for I had then laide worme-wood to my 

dug fitting in the fun vnder the Doue-houfe wall. My Lord and 

you were then at Mantua, nay Idoo beare a braine . But as If aid, 

when it did tajle the worme-wood on the nipple of my dug , and 

28 filt it bitter, pretiefoole, tofee it teachie and fall out with theDugge, 

Shake quoth the Dou^-houfe, twos no need I trow to I id me trudge: 

andfince that time it is a leuen yea res, for thenfhe could flandhy lone, 

nay byth roodefhe could haue run and wadled all about : for euen 

32 the day before fhe broke h er brow, and then my husl and, God be with 

his 



Acr I. Scene 3. 

2. yeare] yeens Q5. years 
F4. 



10. oml, my F4. 
knowest]' knaw'st Q5. 



14. teene] teeth Fa, 3, 4. 

19. stal] shall Qq. Ff. 
21. that] thtn Q4, 5. 

24. o/the] in theQs, F3, 4. 



30. a leuen] a eltfun Fi. 
eleven Fa, 3, 4. Q5. 
hylone] a lone Q3. alone 
The rest. 

31. byth\ btthQ-x,^. btth' 
Fi, a, 3. ^>'M Qs, F4. 



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28 



Romeo and luliet (Qf i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 3. 



his foule, hee was a merrie wan : 
Dojl thou fall forward , luliet? thou wilt fall backward when 
thou haji more wit : wilt thou not luliet ? and hif my holU- 
dam, the pretty foole left crying and fa'id L To fee how a 
leajl fliall come about, I warrant you if I fJiould Hue a hun- 
dred yeare, I neuer Jliould forget it, wilt thou not luliet ? 
and by my troth fhe flinted and cried L 



35 



luliet : And flint thou too, I prethee Nurce fay 1. 

Nurce: Well goe thy waies, God marke thee for his 
grace, thou wert the prettieft Babe that euer I nurfi, might 48 
/ hut Hue to fee thee married once, I haue my w'l/h, 

VFife: And that fiime marriage Nurce, is the Thearae 
I meant to talke of: Tell me luliet, howe (land you af- 52 
fe6ied to be married ? 

lul: It is an honor that I dreame not off. 

Nurce : An honor I were not I thy onely Nurce, I 
would fay thou had/if uckt wifedomefrom thy Teat. 

Wife: Well girle, the Noble Countie Paris feekes ^6 
thee for his Wife. 



Nurce: A man young Ladie, Ladie fuch a man as all 
the world, why he is a man of waxe. 

Wife: Veronaes Summer hath not fuch a flower. 
Nurce : Nay he is a flower, in faith a very flower. 



64 



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ACT I. SC. 3.] 



Romeo and luUet Q! 2. 1599. 



29 



his Joule, a was a merrie man, tooke r>p the child,yea quoth he,doeJl 
thou fall vpon thy face f thou wilt fall backward when thou hajl more 
wit, wilt thou not lule ? And hy my holy dam , thepretie wretch left 
cry in g, and f aid I : tofee now how a ieq/IJhall come about: [warrant, 
andljhouldliueathoufand yeares. In euerjkould forget it: wilt thou 
not lule quoth he 9 and pretiefoole itjlinted, andfaid L 

Old La. Inongh of this, I pray thee hold thy peace. 

Nurfe. Yes Madam, yet I cannot chufe but laugh , to thinhe it 
Jhould lean eery in g, and fay I: andyel Iwarrantithadvponitbrow,a 
bump as big as a young Cochrelsftone: a peril lous knock , and it cryed 
bitterly. Yea quoth my husband, fal (ft vpon thy face, thou wilt fall 
backward when thou commejl to age: wilt thou not lule ? Itjlinted, 
andfaid I. 

luli. And (lint thou too, I pray thee Nurfe, fay I. 

Nurfe, Peace I hauc done : God marke thee too his grace , thou 
waft the prettiejl babe that ere Inurjl , and I might Hue to fee thee 
married once, I haue my w[fh. 

Old La. Marrie, that marrie is the very theame 
I came to talke of, tell me daughter Juliet, 
How flands your difpofitions to be married ? 

Juliet. It is an houre that I dreame not of. 

Nurfe. An houre, were not J thine onely Nurfe, J would fay thou 
hadflfuckt wifedomefrom thy teate. 

Old La. Well thinke of marriage now, yonger then you 
Here in Verona, Ladies of efleeme. 
Are made alreadie mothers by my count. 
I was your mother, much vpon thefe yeares 
That you are now a maide, thus then in briefe : 
The valiant Paris feekes you for his loue. 

Nurfe. A man young Lady, J,ady,fuch a man as all the world, 
JVhy hees a man of ware. 

Old La. Feronas Sommer hath not fuch a flower. 

Nurfe. Nay hees a flower, in faith a very flower. 

Old Jm. What fay you, can you loue the Gentleman ? 
This night you fliall behold him at our feaft, 
Reade ore the volume of young Paru face. 

And 



'''Julflj"''' ^^'' 



37. and I should] and I 
shall Qq. Fi, a. 

38. Jule] JuUt Fx, a, 3. 
JuUtt F4. 



41. upon] on Q5. 

it brow\ its brow F3, 4. 



44- Jvlt] JuletY^, 3. Ju- 
liet F4. 

46. stint thou] stent thou 
F3. stint thee Yi^. 

47. too] to F2,3. 4, Q5. 



51. Juliet] JuletY^y 

52. dispositions] disposition 
Ff. 

53. It is] 'TisF3.4, 
houre] hour F3, 4. 

54. houre] hour F 3, 4, 
thine] om. Q4, 5. 
say] say that F3, 4. 

55. wisdome] thy wisdome 
Q4.5. 

58. mothers hy my count.] 
{l]^A,V^Q^S mothers. 
By my count Ff. Uount, 
l''2.4.) 



62 t^^r/J-.lHQa.s [-] 
F4. 



68. Paris] Paris s F4. 



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30 



Romeo and Itiliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 4. 



FFife : Well luliet, how like you of Paris loue. 

Juliet: He looke to like, if looking liking moue, g. 

But no more deepe will I engage mine eye, 
Then your confent giues ftrength to make it flie. 

lEnter Clown e J] 

Clowne : Aladdam you are cald for, flipper w readie, 
the Nurce curjl in the Pantrie, all thinges in extreamitie, 88 
make hqfijor I mujl he gone to waite. 



Enter Mashers with Romeo and a Page. 

Ro : What ihall this fpeech bee fpoke for our excufe ' 
Or (hall we on without Apologie. 

Benuoleo: The date is out of fuch prolixitie, 
Weele haue no Cupid hudwinckt with a Scarfe, 
Bearing a Tartars painted bow of lath. 
Scaring the Ladies like a crow-keeper : 
Nor no without booke Prologue faintly fpoke 
After the Prompter, for our entrance. 
But let them meafure vs by what they will, 
Weele meafure them a meafure and be gone. 

Rom: A torch for me I am not for this aumbling, Beeing 



1.4. 



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ACT I. SC. 4.] 



Romeo and luliet Of 2. 1599. 



3^ 



And find delight, writ there with bewties pen, 
Examine euery married liuiament. 
And fee how one an other lends content • 
And what obfcurde in this faire volume Hes, 
Finde written in the margeant of his eyes. 
This precious booke of loue, this vnbound louer. 
To bewtifie him, onely lacks a Couer. 
The iifh lines in the fea, and tis much pride 
For faire without the faire, within to hide : 
That booke in manies eyes doth fhare the glorie 
That in gold clafpes locks in the golden ftorie : 
So fliall you fhare all that he doth poffefTe, 
By hauing him, making your felfe no lefTe. 

Nurfe, No lefTe, nay bigger women grow by men. 

Old La. Speakc briefly, can you like of Paris loue ? 

lull. He looke to like, if looking liking moue. 
But no more deepe will J endart mine eye. 
Then your confent giues ftrength to make flie. Enter Seruing. 

Ser. Madam the guefts are come, fupper feru'd vp, you cald,' 
my young Lady askt for, the Nurfe curll in the Pantrie, and e- 
uerie thing in extremitie : I mufl hence to wait , I befeech you 
follow flraight. 

Mo. We follow tJiee, Juliet the Countie flaies. 

Nur. Go gyrle, feeke happie nights to happie dayes. 

Exeunt. 
Enter Romeo, Mercutio, Benuolio, withjiue orjixe other 
Maskers, torchlearers. 

Romeo. What fliall this fpeech be fpoke for our excufe ? 
Or fhall we on without appologie ? 

Ben, The date is out of fuch prolixitie, 
Weele haue no Cupidy hudwinckt with a skarfe. 
Bearing a Tartars painted bow of lath, 
Skaring the Ladies like a Crowkeeper. 
But let them meafure vs by what they will, 
Weele meafure them a meafure and be gone. 

Rom. Giue me a torch, I am not for this ambling, 

C Being 



70. married] severall Qq. 
Ff. 



77. /aire, within] [,] om. 
Qq. Ff. 

78. manies] many Q5. 



82. bigger] [:] Ff. 



86. make] make it Q4, 5, 

F2, 3,4. 
[Enter a Seruing man.] Ff. 



[Exit.] Ff. 



Act I. Scene 4. 



4. hudwinckt] hood-winckt 
Q4. 5, F4. hood tuinkt 
Fi, 2, 3. 



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Romeo and Li Uet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 4. 



Beeing but heauie I will beare the Jight. 

Mer: Beleeue me Romeo I muft haue you daunce. 

Rom: Not I beleeue me you haue dancing lliooes 
With nimble foles, I haue a foule of lead 
So flakes me to the ground I cannot Hirre. 



Mer: Glue me a cafe to put my vifage in, 
A vifor for a vifor, what care I 
What curious ey^ doth coate deformitie. 



28 



Rom: Glue me a Torch, let wantons light of hart 
Tickle the fenceles rufhes with their heeles : 
For I am prouerbd with a Grandfire phrafe. 
He be a candleholder and looke on. 
The game was nere fo faire and I am done. 

Aler: Tut dun's the moufe, the Cunftables old word, 
If thou beeft Dun, weele draw thee from the mire 
Of this furreuerence loue wherein thou ftickft. 
Leaue this talke, we burne day light here. 

Kom: Nay thats not fo. Mer: I meane fir in delay. 
We burne our lights by night, like Lampes by day. 
Take our good meaning for our iudgement fits 



36 



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ACT I. 



sc. 4.] 



Romeo and luUet Q' 2. 1599. 



33 



12 



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24 



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44 



Being but heauie I will beare the light. 

Mercu, Nay getle Romeo, we muft haue you dance. 

Ro. Not I beleeue me, you haue dancing lliooes 
With nimble foles, I haue a foule of Leade 
So (lakes me to the ground I cannot moue. 

Mer. You are a I^uer, borrow Cupids wings. 
And fore with them aboue a common bound. 

Rom. I am too fore enpearced with his fhaft. 
To fore with his light feathers, and (o bound, 
I cannot bound a pitch aboue dull w^oe, 
Ynder loues heauie birthen do I fincke. 

Horatio. And to fink in it Ihould you burthen loue. 
Too great oppreflion for a tender thing. 

Rom. Is loue a tender thing ? it is too rough. 
Too rude, too boyllrous, and it pricks like thorne. 

Mer. If loue be rough with you, be rough with loue 
Prick loue for pricking, and you beate loue downe, 
Giue me a cafe to put my vifage in, 

A vifor for a vifo^ what care I 
What curious eye doth cote deformities : 
Here are the beetle browes iliall blulh for me. 

Benu. Come knock and enter, and no fooner in, 
But euery man betake him to his legs. 

Ro. A torch for me, let wantons light of heart 
Tickle the fencelefle rulhes with their heeles : 
For I am prouerbd with a graunfire phrafe. 
He be a candle-holder and looke on. 
The game was nere fo faire, and I am dum. 
Mer. Tut, duns the moufe, the Conftables own word 
If thou art dun, weele.draw thee from the mire 
Or faue you reuerence loue, wherein thou ftickeft 
Vp to the eares, come we burne daylight ho. 
Ro. Nay thats not fo. 
Mer. I meane fir in delay 
We wafte our lights in vaine, lights lights by day : 
Take our good meaning, for our indgement fits. 



13. soule] soale Yi. sole 
F2, 3. 4. 



17. enpearced^ impearced 
F2, 3. impterced F4. 

18. io bound,'] to bound: 
Fi, 4. to bond: Fa, 3. 



21. Horatio.] Hora. Ff. 
Mercu. Q4. Mer. Q5. 



24. boystrou£\ boysterous 
Q3.5. Ff. 
and\ om. F3, 4. 



29. cott] quote Qq. Ff. 



Fiue 



35. graunsire] Grandsier 
Ff. {-sire F4.) 

37. dum] dun Qq. done 
Fi, 2, 3. Dun F4. 

39. mire\ [.] Ff. [.] Q5. 

40. Or saue you reuerence] 
( your Ff. ) Or, saue your 
rei'erence, F4. 

42. Nay] om. Q4, 5. 

43. sir in delay] sir in 
delay, Q4, 5. sir I de- 
lay, Fi. sir/, delay, F2. 
sir I delay. F3. sir, I 
delay. F4. 

44. li'^his lights'] lights, 
lights, Ff. 

45. indgement] judgement 
Qq. Ff. 



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34 



Romeo and Iidiet (Q^ i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 4. 



(tnie. 
things 



Three times a day, ere once in her right wits. 

Rom ; So we meane well by going to this raaske : 
But tis no wit to goe. 

Mer: Why Roweo may one aske ? 

Rom; I dreamt a dreame to night. 

Mer: And fo did I. Row; Why what was yours? 

Mer: That dreamers often lie. 

Row; In bed a llee|>e while they doe dreame 
^Afer: Ah then I fee Queene Mab hath bin with you. 

Ben: Queene Mab whats Ihe ? 
She is the Fairies Midwife and doth come 
In fhape no bigger than an Aggat ftone 
On the forefinger of a Burgomaller, 
Drawne with a teeme of little Atomi, 
Athwart mens nofes when they lie a lleepe. 
Her waggon fpokes are made of fpinners webs, 
The couer, of the winges of Grafhoppers, 
The traces are the Moone-fliine watrie beames. 
The collers crickets bones, the laih of filmes. 
Her waggoner is a fmall gray coated flie. 
Not halfe fo big as is a little worme, 
Pickt trom the lafie finger of a maide, 
And in this fort llie gallops vp and downe 
Through Loners braines, and then they dream of loue : 
O're Courtiers knees : who ftrait on curfies dreame 
O're Ladies lips, who dreame on kilfes ftrait : 
Which oft the angrie Mab with blifters plagues, 
Becaufe their breathes with fweetmeats tainted are : 
Sometimes ihe gallops ore a Lawers lap. 
And then dreames he of fmelling out a fute, 
And fometime comes Ihe with a tithe pigs taile. 
Tickling a Parfons nofe that lies a fleepe. 
And then dreames he of another benefice : 
Sometime Ihe gallops ore a fouldiers nofe. 
And then dreames he of cutting forraine throats. 
Of breaches ambufcados, countermines. 
Of healthes fiue fadome deepe, and then anon 
Drums in his eare : at which he ftartes and wakes. 
And fweares a Praier or two and lleepes againe. 
This is that Mab that makes maids lie on tlieir backes, 
And proues them women of good cariage. (the night. 

This is the verie Mab that plats the manes of Horfes in 
And plats the Elfelocks in foule fluttilh haire, 
Which once vntangled much miffortune breedes. Rojn : 



48 



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ACT I. SC. 4.] 



Romeo and luliet Qi 2. 1599. 



35 



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Piue times in that, ere once in our fine wits. 

Ro. And we meane well in going to this Mask, 
But tis no wit to go. 

Mer. Why, may one aske ? 

Rom, I dreampt a dreame to night. 

Mer. And fo did I. 

Ro. Well what was yours ? 

Mer. That dreamers often lie. 

Ro. In bed afleep while they do dream things true. 

Afer. O then I fee Queene Mab hath .bin with you : 
She is the Fairies midwife, and fhe comes In Ihape no bigger the 
an Agot flone, on the forefinger of an Alderman, |firawne with 
a teeme of little ottamie/ouer mens nofes as they lie afleep : her 
waggo fpokes made of log fpinners legs :/the couer, of the wings 
of Gra{hoppers,ther traces of the fmalleifl fpider webJher collors 
of the moonfliines watry beams, per whip of Crickett bone, the 

J a fmall grey coated Gnat J not 



la(h of Philome,iher waggoner 
half fo big as a rdund litle worme^prickt from the lazie fingtr of 
a man.j Her Charriot is an emptie JIafel nut. Made by the loyner 
fquirrel or old Grub, time out amind, the Faities Coatchmakers : ] 
and in this (late fhe gallops night by night, throgh loners brains, . 
and then they dreame of loue.j On Courtiers knees, that dreame 
on Curfies ftrait,jore Lawyers fingers who ftrait dreame on fees, 1 
ore Ladies lips wno ftrait one kifles dream,|which oft the angriei 
Mab with blifters plagues L becaufe their breath with fweete 
meates tainted areJ Sometime ftie gallops ore a Courtiers nofe,\ 
and then dreames ne of fmelling out a fute :■ and fometime comes 
flie with a tithpigs tale,|tickling a Perfons nofe as a lies afleepey 
then he dreams of an other Benefice.^* Sometime ftie driueth ord 
a fouldiers neck,^nd then dreames he of cutting forrain throates,r 
of breaches, amoufcados, fpanifti blades :/Of healths fine fadome 
deepe , and then anon drums in his eare , at which he ftarts and 
wakes, knd being thus frighted, fweares a praier or twp;& fleeps 
againe : this is that very Mah/that plats the manes of horfes in the 
night -.land bakes the Elklicks in foule fluttifli hairesf, which 
once vntangled, much misfortune bodes. ' 

C 2 This 



57. an Agot stone] an Agat 
stone Qq. an Agat- 
stone Ff. (an om. Fi, 2.) 

58. ottamie] atomics Qq. 
Ff. 

59. spokes'] spoke's F3, 4. 

60. traces] Trace F3, 4. 
spider\ Spiders Ff. Q5. 
collars] collcrs Qq. co id- 
lers Fi. collars F2, 3, 4. 

62. Philome^filme F2, 3, 4. 

f^ey coated] gray-coated 

63. lazie finger] Lazie- 
finger Fi, 3. 

64. man] woman F2, 3, 4. 

65. amind] a mind Q3, 4, 
Fi, 2. o/mindQ^, F3, 4. 

67. Courtiers] Countries 

Fa. 3. 4. 
69. one] on Qq. Ff 

71. Sometime] sometimes 

Qs- 

73. wit A a] with Fr. 
Persons] Parso/tsQq. Ff. 
(Parson's F4.) 
a lies] he lies F2, 3, 4. 



7T. eare] eares Ff. 



80. Elklocks] El/locks Q4, 
5. ^2,3,4 

81. untangled] entangled 
F3. intanglcd F4. 



J 



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3« 



Romeo and luUet [Of. i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 5. 



Rom : Peace, peace, thou talkft of nothing. 

Mer: True I talke of dreames, 88 

Which are the Children of an idle braine. 
Begot of nothing but vaine fantafie. 
Which is as thinne a fubftance as the aire. 

And more inconftant than the winde, 92 

Which wooes euen now tlie frofe bowels of the north. 
And being angred pufFes away in hafte, 
Turning his face to the dew-dropping fouth. (felues. 

Ben: Come, come, this winde doth blow vs from our 96 
Supper is done and we fliall come too late. 

Ro: I feare too earlie, for my minde mifgiues 
Some confequence is hanging in the (lars. 

Which bitterly begins his fearefull dale 100 

With this nights reuels, and expiers the terme 
Of a difpifed life, clofde in this bread, 
By fome vntimelie forfet of vile death : 

But he that hath the fteerage of my courfe 104 

Dire6i8 my faile, on luftie Gentlemen, 



1.5. 



Enter 



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ACT I. sc. 5.] Romeo and luliet Q? 2. 1599. 


37 




This is the hag, when maides lie on their backs. 






That prelTes them and learnes them firfl to beare. 




84 


Making them women of good carriage : 






This is fhe. 


35. .A.-.][.]Fa.3.4. 




Romeo, Peace, peace, Mercutio peace. 






Thou talkft of nothing. 




88 


Mer, True, I talke of dreames : 
Which are the children of an idle braine. 
Begot of nothing but vaine phantafie : 
Which is as thin of fubftance as the ayre. 




pa 


And more inconftant then the wind who wooes. 


92. inconstant] unconstant 




Euen now the frozen bofome of the North : 


gs. F3,4. 




And being angerd puffes away from thence. 






Turning his fide to the dewe dropping South. 




96 


Ren, This wind you talk of, blows vs from our felues. 
Supper is doUe, and we (hall come too late. 

Ro, I feare too earlie, for my mind mifgiues. 
Some confequence yet hanging in the ftarres. 




100 


Shall bitterly begin his fearfull date. 

With this nights reuels, and expire the terme 

Of a defpifed life clofde in my breft : 






By fome vile fofreit of vntimely death. 


103. fofreit] forfeit Qq. Ff. 


104 


But he that hath the ftirrage of my courfe. 


104. stirrage] steerage Q5, 
F4. 




Dire6t my fute, on luflie Gentlemen. 




Ren, Strike drum. 






They march about the Stage, and Seruingmen come forth with 


. . with their napkins.] Ff. 


1.5. 


Napkins, 


Act I. Scene 5. 




Enter Romeo. 


[Enter Seruant.] ff. 




Ser, Wheres Potpan that he helpes not to take away ? 






He fliift a trencher, he fcrape a trencher ? 






I. When good manners fhall lie all in one or two mens hands 


3. alP, om. Ff. 


4 


And they vnwalht too, tis a foule thing. 






Ser, Away with the ioynftooles, remoue the Courtcubbert, 


5. ioynstooles] Hyphened 




looke to the plate, good thou, faue me a peece of March-pane, 


Courtcubbert] court-cub- 




and as thou loues me, let the porter let in Sufan Grindjhne, and 


bord Fi , 2, 3. court-cup- 
board ^<y, F4. 
7. loves] lovest Ff. 


8 


Nell, Anthonie and Potpan, 




2. I Boy 





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38 



Romeo and luliet (Q'? i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 5. 



Enter old Capulet with the Lailics, 

Capu: Welcome Gentlemen, welcome Gentlemen, 
Ladies that haue their toes vnplagud with Corns 
Will haue about with you, ah ha my Miftrefles, 
Which of you all will now refufe to dance? 
Shee that makes daintie, fhee He fweare hath Corns. 
Am I come neere you now, welcome Gentlemen, wel- 

(come. 



16 



More lights you knaues, & turn thefe tables vp. 
And quench the fire the roome is growne too hote. 
Ah firra, this vnlookt for fport comes well. 
Nay fit, nay fit, good Cofen Capulet: 
For you and I are pafl our flanding dayes, 
How long is it fince you and I were in a Maske ? 

Cof: By Ladie fir tis thirtie yeares at lead. 

Cap: Tis not lb much, tis not lb much, 
Tis fince the mariage of Lucentio, 
Come Pentecoft as quicklie as it will. 
Some fine and twentie yeares, and then we maskt. 

Cof: Tis more, tis more, his fonne is elder far. 

Cap: Will you tell me that it cannot be fo. 
His fonne was but a Ward three yeares agoe. 
Good youths I faith. Oh youth's a iolly thing. 



28 



3^ 



3<5 



40 



Rom: 



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ACT I. 



sc. 5.] 



Romeo mid luUrt Q? 2. 1599. 



39 



16 



20 



2. I boy readie. 

Ser. You are lookt for, and cald for, ankt for, and fought for in 
the great chamber. 
12 3. We cannot be here and there too, chearely boyes. 

Be brisk a while, and the longer liuer take all. 

Exeunt, 
Enter ail the guejis and gentlewomen to the 
Alaskei'S. 
I. Capu. Welcome gentlemen. Ladies that haue their toes 
Vnplagued with Comes, will walke about with you : 
Ah my milleffes, which of you all 
Will now denie to daunce, (he that makes daintie. 
She He fwear hath Corns : am I come neare ye now ? 
Welcome gentlemen, I haue feene the day 
That I haue worne a vifor and could tell 
A whifpering tale in a faire Ladies eare : 
Such as would pleafe : tis gone, tis gone, tis gone, 
You are welcome, gentlemen come, Mulitions play. 
Mitjick plaijes and theif dance. 
24 A hall, a hall, giue roome, and foote it gyrles. 
More light you knaues, and turne the tables vp : 
And quench the lire, the roome is growne too hot. 
Ah (irrah, this vnlookt for fport comes well : 
28 Nay fit, nay fit, good Cozin Capulct, 

For you and I are pafl our dauncing dayes : 
How long ifl now fince lafl your felfc and I 
Were in a maske ? 
32 2. Capu, Berlady thirtie yeares. 

1. Capu, What man tis not fo much, tis not fo much, 
Tis fince the nuptiall of Lucientio : 
Come Pentycofl as quickly as it will, 

^6 Some fiue and twentie yeares, and then we maskt. 

2. Capu, Tis more, tis more, his fonne is elder lir : 
His fonne is thirtie. 

I. Capu, Will you tell me that ? 
40 His fonne was but a ward 2 . yeares ago. 

C 3 Romeo, What 



10. and ra/if] cald F3, 4. 
12. 3.] I. Ff. 



16. Ah Mj'] Ak me, F2, 
3.4- 



23. gentlemen comc^ gcn^ 
tlemen^ come Qq. Ff. 

24. A hall, a hall,] A 
Hall, Hall, Ff. 

25- /^''j y^ f'2, 3. 4. 



32. Berlady] Byr lady F4. 

34. Luchntio :\ I.ucientio, 
Q3, 4. Lucentio, Fi, 
3, 4. Lucentio. F2. 



39. I. Capu.] 3 Cap. Ff. 

40. 2.] two Qq. Ff. 



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40 



Romeo and luUet [Q". i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 5. 



Rom: What Ladie is that that doth inrich the hand 
Of yonder Knight ? O Ihee doth teach the torches to 44 

burne bright ! 
It feemes Ihe hangs vpon the cheeke of night. 
Like a rich iewell in an Aethiops eare, 
Beautie too rich for vfe, for earth too deare : 
So fliines a fnow-while Swan trouping with Crowes, 48 

As this faire Ladie ouer her fellowes fliowes. 
The meafure done, ile watch her place of Hand, 
And touching hers, make happie my rude hand. 
Did my heart louc till now ? Forfweare it fight, ^2 

I neuer faw true beautie till this night. 

Tib: This by his voice ihould be a Mountague, 
Fetch me my rapier boy. What dares the ilaue 
Come hitlier couer'd with an Aniicke face, 

To fcorne and ieere at our folemni ju ? 
Now by the (locke and honor of my kin. 
To (Irike him dead I hold it for no fin. 

Ca: Why how now Cofen, wherfore florme you fo. 60 

Ti : Vncle this is a Mountague our foe, 
A villaine that is hether come in fpight. 
To mocke at our folemnitie this night. 

Ca: Young Romeo, is it not? 64 

Ti: It is that villaine Romeo. (man, 

Ca; Let him alone, he bcares him Hke a portly gentle- 



And to fpeake truth, Ferona brags of him, 
As of a vertuous and w ell gouern'd youth : 
I would not for the wealth of all this towne. 
Here in my houfe doo him difparagemcnt : 
Therefore be quiet take no note of him. 



68 



Beare a faire prefence, and put off thefe frownes. 
An ill befeeming femblance for a feall. 
Ti: It fits when fuch a villaine is a guefl. 



Ile 



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ACT I. SC. 5.] 



Romeo and lullet Q\ %. 1599. 



41 



44 



48 



52 



5^ 



60 



64 



68 



76 



Ro, What Ladies that which doth enrich the hand 
Of yonder Knight? 
Ser. I know not fir. 

Ro, O (he doth teach the torches to burn bright : 
It leemes (he hangs vpon the cheeke of night : 
As a rich lewel in an Ethiops eare, 
Bewtie too rich for vfe, for earth too deare : 
So Ihowes a fnowie Done trooping with Crowes, 
As yonder Lady ore her fellowes Ihowes : 
The meafure done. He watch her place of fland. 
And touching hers, make bleifed my rude hand. 
Did my hart loue till now, forfweare it fight. 
For I nere faw true bewtie till this night. 

TUal^ This by his voyce, iliould be a Mountague. 
Fetch me my Rapier boy, what dares the llaue 
Come hither couerd with an anticque face. 
To fleere and fcorne at our folemnitie ? 
Now by the ftocke and honor of my kin. 
To ftrike him dead, I hold it not a fin. 

Capu. Why how now kinsman , wherefore florme 
Tib. Vncle, this is a Mountague our foe : (you fo ? 
A villaine that is hither come in fpight. 
To fcorne at our folemnitie this night. 
Cap, Young Romeo is it. 
Tib. Tis he, that villaine Romeo, 
Capu, Content thee gentle Coze, let him alone, 
A beares him like a portly (rentleman : 
And to fay truth, Verona brags of him. 
To be a vertuous and welgouenid youth, 
I would not for the wealth of all this Towne, 
Here in my houfe do him difparagement : 
Therefore be patient, take no note of him. 
It is my will, the which if thou refped. 
Shew a faire prefence, and put off thefe frownes. 
An illbefeeming femblance for a feafl. 

Tib, It fits when fuch a villaine is a gueft. 



41. Ladi€s] Ladie is Qq, 
Ff. 



45. // sfemes she] Her 
beauty ¥2,^, 4. 

46. Asl'LikeYoy^^^ 



S3, nere} nere Q5. never 
¥i. 

55. what] [f\ Q5. 



He 



64. it.] [f\ Ff. QS. 



70. this] the Ff. 



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Google 



^ 



41 



Romeo and luliet (Qf i) 1597. 



[act I. sc. 5. 



lie not indure him. 

Ca: He fhalbe indured, goe to I fay, he fhall. 

Am I the Mailer of the houfe or you ? 
You'le not indure him ? God Ihall mend my foule 
You'le make a mutenie amongft my guefts, 
You'le fet Cocke a hoope, you'le be the man. 

Ti: Vncle tis a fhame. 

Ca: Goe too, you are a faucie knaue, 



80 



84 



This tricke will fcath you one day I know what. 



Well faid my hartes. Be quiet : 

More light Ye knaue, or I will make you quiet. Oi"g, 

Tihalt : Patience perforce with wilfull choUer mee- 
Makes my fleili tremble in their different greetings : 
I will withdraw, but this intrulion iliall 
Now feeming fweet, conuert to bitter gall. 

Rom: If I prophane with my vnworthie hand. 
This holie ihrine, the gentle finne is this : 
My lips two blufhing Pilgrims ready (land. 
To fmooth the rough touch with a gentle kilfe. 

luU: Good Pilgrime you doe wrong your hand too 
Which mannerly deuotion iliewes in this : (much. 

For Saints haue hands which holy Palmers touch. 
And Palme to Palme is holy Palmers kifle. 

Rom: Haue not Saints lips, and holy Palmers too ? 

lull: Yes Pilgrime lips that they mufl vfe in praier. 

Ro : Why then faire faint, let lips do what hands doo. 
They pray, yeeld thou, lead faith turne to difpaire. 

lu : Saints doe not mooue though : grant nor praier 
forfake. 

Ro: Then mooue not till my praiers effed I take. 
Thus from my lips, by yours my fin is purgde. 

lu: Then haue my lips the fin that they haue tooke. 

Ro: Sinne from my lips, O trefpafle fweetly vrgde ! 112 

Giue 



92 



96 



100 



104 



108 



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ACT I. SC. 5.] 



Romeo and luUet Q? 2. 1599. 



43 



80 



84 



88 



92 



96 



104 



108 



He not endure him. 

Capu. He fliall be endured. 
What goodman boy, I fay he lliall, go too. 
Am I the matter here or you ? go too, 
Youle not endure him, god (hall mend my foule, 
Youle make a mutinie among my guefls : 
You wil fet cock a hoope, youle be the man. 

TL Why Vncle, tis a fhame. 

Capu. Go too, go too. 
You are a fawcie boy, ift Co indeed? 
This trick may chance to fcath you I know what. 
You muft contrarie me, marrie tis time. 
Well faid my hearts, you are a princox, go. 
Be quiet, or more light, more light for fhame. 
He make you quiet (what) chearely my hearts. 

TL Patience perforce, with wilfull choller meeting 
Makes my flefh tremble in their different greeting : 
I will withdraw, but this intrufion fhall 
Now feeming fweet, conuert to bittreft gall. Exit, 

Ro, If I prophane with my vnworthieft hand. 
This holy fhrine, the gentle lin is this. 
My lips two blufhing Pylgrims did readie (land. 
To fmoothe that rough touch with^ tender kis. 

lu. Good Pilgrim you do wrog your had too much 
Which mannerly deuocion ihowes in this. 
For faints haue hands, that Pilgrims hands do tuch. 
And palme to palme is holy Palmers kis. 

Ro, Haue not Saints lips and holy Palmers too ? 

luli I Pilgrim, lips that they muft vfe in praire. 

Rom, O then deare Saint, let lips do what hands do. 
They pray (grant thou) leaft faith tume to difpaire. 

lu. Saints do not moue, thogh grant for praiers fake. 

Ro. Then moue not while my praiers effed I take. 
Thus from my lips, by thine my (in is purgd. 

lu. The haue my lips the (in that they haue tooke. 

Ro. Sin from my lips, 6 trefpas fweetly vrgd : 



Giue 



79. lVAat][f]Qs. [.]F4. 



8a. my] the Ff. 
83. set\ set a Q4. 5. 



86. ist"] 'tis Y2, 3. 4. 



90. or more Ught^ more 
light for shame^ or {more 
lights more tight for 
shame) Q$. or more 
light, for shame^ F2,3,4. 



95. hittrat] hitter Qq. Ff. 



97. sin] sinne Q4, 5. 

98. two"] to Fi. 

did] om. Fa,3,4. QS- 



102. that\ the F3, 4. 
hands do] hand, do F2, 
3>4- 



109. /] doe Fa, 3, 4. 



Digitized by 



Google 



44 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act I. 



sc. 



124 



128 



Giue me my finne againe. 
lu: You kilTe by tlie booke. 
Nurfe: Madame your mother calles, 
Rom: What is her motJier ? 116 

Nurfe: Marrie Batcheler her mother is the Ladie of the 
houfe, and a good Lady, and a wife, and a vertuous, I nurjl 
her daughter that you talkt withall, I toll you, lie that can 
lay hold of herjhall haue the chinkes, 

Kom: Is fhe a Mountague ? Oh deare account. 
My life is my foes thralL 

Ca: Nay gentlemen prepare not to be gone. 
We haue a trifling fooliih banquet towards. 

They whifper in his eare, 
I pray you let me intreat you. Is it fo ? 
Well then I thanke you honefl (Gentlemen, 
I promife you but for your company, 
I would haue bin a bed an houre agoe : 
Light to my chamber hoe. 

Exeunt. 

lul: Nurfe, what is yonder Gentleman ? 

Nur : Thefonne and heir^e of old Tiberio. 

Jul: Whats he that now is going out of dore ? 13S 

Nur: That as I thinke is yong Petruchio. (dance ? 

Jul: Whats he that foUowes there that would not 

Nur: I know not, 

Jul: Goe learne his name, if he be maried, '4^ 

My graue is like to be my wedding bed. 

Nur: His name is Romeo and a Mountague, th^ onely 
fonne of your great enemie, 

Jul: My onely Loue fprung from my onely hate, ^44 

Too early feene vnknowne and knowne too late : , 
Prodigious birth of loue b this to me. 
That I fhould loue a loathed enemie. 

Nurfe : FFhats this ? what's that ? 148 

Jul: 



See Q2. Act III. Sc. 4. 
lines 6, 7, and 34. 



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ACT I. SC. 5.] 



Romeo and luliet O? 2. 1599. 



45 



Giue me my fin againe. 

luU. Youe kifle bith booke. 

li'ur. Madam your mother craues a word with you. 
1 16 J^o. What is her mother ? 

Nurf, Marrie Batcheler, 
Her mother is the Lady of tlie houfe. 
And a good Ladie, and a wife and vertuous, 
1 30 I Nurft her daughter that you talkt withall : 
I tell you, he that can lay hold of her 
Shall haue the chincks. 
Ro. Is {he a Capulet ? 
1 24 O deare account ! my life is my foes debt. 

Ren, Away begon, the fport is at the bell. 
Ro, I fo I feare, the more is my vnreft. 
Capu. Nay gentlemen prepare not to be gone, 
128 We haue a trifling foolifh banquet towards : 
Is it ene fo ? why then I thanke you all. 
I thanke you honefl gentlemen, good night : 
More torches here, come on, then lets to bed. 
132 Ah firrah, by my faie it waxes late. 
He to my reft. 

lulL Come hither Nurfe, what is yond gentleman ? 
Nurf. The fonne and heire of old Tylerio, 
I ^6 lull, Whats he that now is going out of doore ? 

Nur, Marrie that I thinke be young Petruchio. 
In, Whats he that follows here that wold not dace ? 
Nur, I know not. 
140 lull. Go aske his name, if he be married. 

My graue is like to be my wedding bed. 

Nurf, His name is Romeo, and a Mountctgue, 
The onely fonne of your great enemie. 
144 lull. My onely loue fprung from my onely hate. 

Too earlie feene, vnknowne, and knowne too late. 
Prodigious birth of loue it is to mee. 
That I muft loue a loathed enemie. 
148 Nurf Whats tis ? whats tis. 



114. bitk] hy'tK Fi. a. 
m F3, 4. 



lu, A 



[Exeunt] F2, 3, 4, 



136. o/}o/fAtQ4,S' 
137- ^^] ^ ** ^3' 4- 



141. weddingl wedded Yi. 



143. ^<wr] our F2, 3, 4. 



148. tisf . . . tis."] its? . . . 
//■jfQq. thisf ,. .thist 
Ff. 



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Goo^^ 



4<5 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. I. 



lul: Nothing Nurfe but a rime I learnt euen now of 

one I dancft with. 
Nurfe : Come your mother ftaies for you, He goe a long 
with you. Exeunt. 



Enter Romeo alone, 

Ro: Shall I goe forward and my heart is here? 
Turne backe dull earth and finde thy Center out. 
Enter Benuolio Alercutio. 

Ben: Romeo, my cofen Romeo, 

Mer: Doeft thou heare he is wife, 
Vpon my life he hath flolne him home to bed. 

Ben : He came this way, and leapt this Orchard wall. 
Call good Mercutio, 

Mer: Call, nay He coniure too. 
Romeo, madman, humors, pafsion, liuer, appeare thou in 
likenes of a figh : fpeak but one rime & I am fatiffied, cry 
but ay. me. Pronounce but Loue and Doue, fpeake to 
my goflip Venus one faire word, one nickname for her 
purbhnde fonne and heire 

young 



II. I. 



12 



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II. 





ACT II. sc. I.] Romeo and lullet Q^ 2. 1599. 


47 




///. A rime I learnt euen now 






Of one I dand withall. 






One cals within Juliet. 






Nurf. Anon, anon : 




15^ 


Come lets away, the Grangers all are gone. 

Eteunt. 
Chorus, 
Now old defire doth in his deathbed lie, 
And young afte6tion gapes to be his heire, 


15a. a// an] are all Q4. 




That faire for which loue gronde for and would die. 


3. gronde for] groH ed Q$. 


4 


With tender Iiiliet match, is now not faire. 
Now Romeo is beloued, and loues againe. 
Alike bewitched by the charme of lookes : 
But to his foe fuppofd he muft complaine. 


4. ma/ch] matcht Qq. Ff. 


8 


And ilie fteale loues fweete bait from fearful hookes : 
Being held a foe, he may not haue accefle 
To breathe fuch vowes as louers vfe to fweare, 
And ihe as much in loue, her meanes much lelT?, 




12 


To meete her new beloued any where : 

But pallion lends them power, time meanes to meete, 

Tempring extremities with extreeme fweete. 




[. I. 


Enter Romeo alone, 
Ro, Can I go forward when my heart is here. 


Acr II. Scene r. 




Tume backe dull earth and find thy Center out. 


2. thy] my F2, 3. 4. 




Enter Benuolio with Mercutio. 






Ben, Romeo, my Cofen Romeo, Romeo. 




4 


Aler. He is wife, and on my life hath ftolne him home to bed. 
Ben, He ran this way and leapt this Orchard wall. 




8 


Call good Mercutio : 
Nay He coniure too. 

Aler, Romeo, humours, madman, paffion louer. 


7. Nay . . . . foo] Restored 
to Mercutio by Q4, 5. 

8. Mer.] om. Q4. 5. 
10. on] one Qq. Vi. 




Appeare thou in the likenefle of a figh, 
Speake but on rime and I am fatisfied : 


II. Crie but ay me] Cry 
me but ay me Fi. Cry 
me but ay me Fa, ^. Cry 


12 


Crie but ay me, prouaunt, but loue and day, 
Speake to my golhip Fen us one faire word. 


me but aim F4. 
prouaunt] Prouant Fi. 
pronounce Q4, 5. Couply 
F2. 3. 4. 

day] die Q4. dye Q$, 
13. /or] to Q5. 
her] heire Q4, 5. 




One nickname for her purbhnd fonne and her, 

D Young 



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48 



Romeo and Iidiet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act ri. sc. 2. 



young Abraham : Cupid liee 
that fhot fo trim when young King Cophetua loued the 
begger wench. Hee lieares me not. - I coniure thee hy\ 
Rofalindes bright eye, high forehead, and^ fcarlet lip, her ' 
prettie foote, flraight leg, and quiuering thigh, and the 
demaines that there adiacent lie, that in thy likenefle 
thou appeare to vs. 



16 



20 



J 



Ben: If he doe heare thee thou wilt anger him. 

Mer: Tut this cannot anger him, marrie if one ilmld 
raife a fpirit in his Miftris circle of fonie ftrange falhion, 
making it there, to (land till flie had laid it, and coniurde 
it downe, that were fome fpite. My inuocation is faire 
and honed, and in his Millris name I coniure onely but 
to raife vp him. 



24 



23 



Ben\ Well he hath hid himfelfe amongft thofe trees. 
To be conforted with the humerous night, 32, 

Blinde in his loue, and beft befits the darke. 

Mer: If loue be blind, loue will not hit the marke. 
Now will he fit vnder a Medler tree. 
And wifh his Millris were that kinde of fmite, 36 

As maides call Medlers when they laugh alone. 
Ah Romeo that ilie were, ah that (he were 
An open Et ccetera, thou a poprin Peare. 

Romeo God night, il'e to my trundle bed : ^^o 

This field bed is too cold for mee. 
Come lets away, for tis but vaine. 
To feeke him here that meanes not to be found. 

Ro: He iefts at fears that neuer felt a wound : |I. 

But foft, what light forth yonder window breakes ? 
It is the Ea(l, and lulUt is the Sunne, 
Arife faire Sunne, and kill the enuious Moone 
That is alreadie ficke, and pale with griefe : 

That 



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ACT II. sc. 2.] Romeo and Iidiet Q: 2. 1599. 


49 




Young Abraham : Cupid he that (hot fo true. 


14. Abraham: Cupid] [:] 
om. Q4. 5, Ff. 




When King Cophetua lou'd the begger mayd. 




i6 


He heareth not, he ftirreth not, he nroueth not. 
The Ape is dead, and I muft coniure him. 


16. stlrrtth] siriueth Q3. 


" - — ■ 


- I coniure thee by Rofaimes bright eyes. 
By her high forehead, and her Scarlet lip. 




20 


By her fine foot, ftraight leg, and quiuering thigh. 
And the demeanes, that there adiacent lie. 
That in thy likenefle thou appeare to vs. 

Ben, And if he heare thee thou wilt anger him. 


1 


^4 


A/er. This cannot anger J^im, twouid anger him 






To raife a fpirit in his miftrelfe circle. 


25 mistresse\ mistress's F'4. 




Of fome ftrange nature, letting it there ftand- 


; 




Till (he had laid it, and coniured it downe. 




28 


That were fome fpight. 


' 




My inuocation is faire & honeft, in his mi fires name. 


29. ifi] and in Qq. Ff. 




I coniure onely but to raife vp him. 


misires] mistress's F4. 




Ben, Come, he hath hid himfelfe among thefe trees 




3i 


To be conforted with the humerous night : 


3a. humerous] humorous 




Blind is his loue, and beft befits the darke. 


F4. 




Mar, If loue be blind, loue cannot hit the marke, 


34. Mar.] Mcr. Qq. Ff. 




Now will he fit vnder a Medler tree. 




36 


And wilh his miftrefle were tliat kind of fruite. 
As maides call Medlers, when they laugh alone. 
Romeo that fhe were, 6 that fhe were 






An open, or thou a Poprin Peare. 


39. open, or] open b*catera. 


40 


Romeo goodnight, ile to my truckle bed. 


and Q4, 5. (and cat era 

Qs) 




This field-bed is too cold for me to lleepe. 


Poprin] Poperin Q4, 5. 




Come fhall we go ? 






Ben, Go then, for tis in vaine to feeke him here 




44 


That meanes not to be found. Erit, 


[Exeunt.] Q4. 5, Ff. 


11.2. 


Ro. He jeafts at fcarres that neuer felt a wound. 
But foft, what light through yonder window breaks ? 
It is the Eaft, and Miet is the Sun. 


Act II. Scene 2. 


4 


Arife faire Sun and kill the enuious Moone, 
Who is alreadie ficke and pale with greefe. 

That 





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50 



Royneo and luUet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act i:. sc. 2. 



That thou her maid, art far more faire than flie. 
Be not her maide lince ilie is enuious, 
Her veflall liuerie is but pale and greene. 
And none but fooles doe weare it, call it off. 



She f|)eakes, but (he fayes nothing. What of that ? 

Her eye difcourfeth, I will anfwere it. 

I am too bold, tis not to me fhe fpeakes, 

Two of the fairefl (larres in all the skies, 

Hauing fome buiines, doe entreat her eyes 

To twinckle in their fpheares till they retnrne. 

What if her eyes were there, they in her head, 

The brightnes of her cheekes would (hame thofe liars : 

As day-light doth a Lampe, her eyes in heauen. 

Would through the airie region ftreame fo bright, 

That birdes would (ing, and thinke it were not night. 

Oh now (he leanes her cheekes vpon her hand, 

I would I were the gloue to that fame hand. 

That I might ki(re that cheeke. 

lul: Ay me. 

Rom: She fpeakes. Oh fpeake againe bright Angcll : 
For thou art as glorious to this night beeing ouer my 

(head. 
As Ls a winged meflfenger of heauen 
Vnto the white vpturned woondring eyes. 
Of mortals that fall backe to gaze on him. 
When he beftrides the la(ie pacing cloudes. 
And failes vpon the bofome of the aire. 

lul: Ah Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? 
Denie thy Father, and refufe thy name. 
Or if thou wilt not be but fworne my loue. 
And il'e no longer be a CapuleL 

Rom : Shall I heare more, or (hall I fpeake to this ? 

lul: Us but thy name that is mine enemie. 



11 



16 



20 



28 



3a 



.36 



Whats Mountague P It is nor hand nor foote. 



Nor 



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ACT II. sc. 2.] Romeo and luliet Q". 2, 1599. 


5' 




That thou her maide art far more faire then (he : 






Be not her maide (ince fhe is enuious. 




8 


Her veftall liuery is but (icke and greene. 

And none but fooles do weare it, cafl it off: 

It is my Lady, 6 it is my loue, 6 that ilie knew fhe wer. 

She fpeakes, yet fhe faies nothing, what of that ? 




12 


Her eye difcourfes, I will arifwere it : 
I am too bold, tis not to me fhe fpeakes : 
Two of the fairefl flarres in all the heauen. 






Hauing fome bufines to entreate her eyes. 


15. tJ] do Qq. Ff. 


i6 


To twinckle in their fpheres till they retume. 
What if her eyes were there, they in her head. 
The brightnefle of her cheek wold fhame thofe (lars. 
As day-light doth a lampe, her eye in heauen. 


> 

i 


20 


Would through the ayrie region (Ireame fo bright. 
That birds would fmg, and thinke it were not night : 
See how fhe leanes her cheeke vpon her hand. 
that I were a gloue vpon that hand. 




24 


That I might touch that cheeke. 

lu. Ay me. 

Ro. She fpeakes. 
Oh fpeake againe bright Angel, for thou art 




28 


As glorious to this night being ore my head. 
As is a winged mefTenger of h^uen 
Vnto the white vpturned wondring eyes. 
Of raortalls that fall backe to gaze on him. 




32 


When he befbides the lazie puffing Cloudes, 
And fayles vpon the bofome of the ayre. 

luli. Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? 
Denie thy father and refufe thy name : 




3^> 


Or if thou wilt not, be but fworne my loue. 
And ile no longer be a Capulei, 

Ro, Shall I heare more, or fhall I fpeake at this ? 

lu. Tis but thy name that is my enemie : 




40 


Thou art thy felfe, though not a Mountague, 






Whats Mountague ? it is nor hand nor foote. 


41. n»r hand] not hand F^. 




D 2 Nor 





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5^ 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 2. 



Nor arme, nor face, nor any other part. 

Whats in a name ? That which we call a Rofe, 44 

By any other name would fmell as iVeet : 

So Romeo would, were he not Romeo cald, 

Retaine the diuine perfection he owes : 

Without that title Romeo part thy name, 48 

And for that name which is no part of thee. 

Take all I haue. 

Rom : I take thee at thy word, 
Call me but loue, and il'e be new Baptifde, 5^ 

Henceforth I neuer will be Romeo. 

Ill: What man art thou, that thus bcskrind in night, 
Doeft ftumble on my counfaile ? 

Ro: By a name 1 know not how to tell thee. 5^ 

My name deare Saint is hatefull to my felfe, 
Becaufe it is an enemie to thee. 
Had I it written I would teare the word. 

lul: My eares haue not yet drunk a hundred words ^o 

Of that tongues vtterance, yet I know the found : 
Art thou not Romeo and a Mountague 9 

Ro: Neyther faire Saint, if eyther thee difpleafe. 

lu: How camft thou hether, tell me and wherfore? 64 

The Orchard walles are high and hard to clime. 
And the place death coniidering who thou art. 
If any of my kinfmen finde thee here. 

Ro: By loues light winges did I oreperch thefe wals, 68 

For flonie limits cannot hold loue out. 
And what loue can doo, that dares loue attempt. 
Therefore thy kinfmen are no let to me. 

lul: If they doe finde thee they will murder thee. 

Ro: Alas there lies more perrill in thine eyes. 
Then twentie of their fwords, looke thou but fweete. 
And I am proofe againft their enmitie. (here. 

lul: I would not for the world they fliuld find thee 7^ 

Ro: 



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ACT 11. sc. 2.] Ro7/?^o and Iidiet Q*. 2. if.gg. 


53 




Nor arme nor face, 6 be fome other name 






Belonging to a man. 




44 


Whats in a name that which we call a rofe. 
By any other word would fmell as fweete. 


44. IVAats] What's Qq. 
F3. 4. ivAatf Fi. 
nami\ names Fi. name f 




So Romeo would wene be not Romeo cald, 
Retaine that deare perfe6tion which he owes. 


Q4. 5. F2. 3. 4, 
46. wene] were Qq. Ff. 


48 


Without that tytle, Romeo doffe thy name. 


48. title, Romeo] title Ro- 




And for thy name which is no part of thee. 


meo, Fi, 2, 3. title ; Ro- 
meo, F4. title Romeo 




Take all my felfe. 


Qs. 




Ro. I take thee at thy word : 




5^ 


Call me but loue, and He be new baptizde. 
Henceforth I neuer will be Romeo, 






Mi, What man art thou, that thus befchreend in 


54. beschreend] he^creend 




So ftumblell on my counfell ) (liight 


Q3.4. bescreendFLC^s- 


56 


Ro, By a name, I know not how to tell thee who I 
My name deare faint, is hatefuU to my felfe, (axi\ : 
Becaufe it is an enemie to thee. 
Had I it written, I would teare the word. 




6o 


Mi, My eares haue yet not drunk a hundred words 






Of thy tongus vttering, yet I know the found. 


61. tongus] tongues Qq. Ff. 




Art thou not Romeo, and a Mountague ? 






Ro. Neither faire maide, if either thee diflike. 




64 


Mi, How camefl thou hither, tel me, and wherfore ? 
The Orchard walls are high and hard to climbe. 
And the place death, coniidering who thou art. 


64. cames{\ cam'st Ff. Q5. 




If any of my kifmen find thee iiere. 


67. kismen] kinsmen Qq. 


68 


Ro, With loues light wings did I orepearch thefe 


Ff. 




For ftonie hmits cannot hold loue out, (walls. 


. 




And what loue can do, that dares loue attempt : 






Therefore thy kinfmen are no ftop to me. 




7^ 


lu. If they do fee thee, they will murther thee. 

Ro, Alack there lies more perill in thine eye. 
Then twentie of their fwords, looke thou but fweete. 
And I am proofe againft tlieir enmiiie. 




76 


Mi, I would not for the world they faw thee here. 




1 


Ro. I 





y 



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54 



Romeo and luliet [Qf. i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 2. 



Ro: I haue nights cloak to hide thee from their fight. 
And but thou loue me let them finde me here : 
For life were better ended by their hate. 
Than death proroged wanting of thy loue. 

lu: By whofe diredions foundft thou out this place. 

Ro: By loue, who tirft did prompt me to enquire, 
I he gaue me counfaile and I lent him eyes. 
I am no Pilot : yet wert thou as farre 
As that vaft fliore, walht with the furtheft fea, 
I would aduenture for fuch Marchandife. 

lul: Thou knowft the mafke of night is on my face. 
Els would a Maiden blufh bepaint my cheeks : 
For that which thou hafte heard me fpeake to night, 
Faine would I dwell on forme, faine faine denie. 
What I haue fpoke : but farewell complements. 
Doeft thou loue me ? Nay I know thou wilt fay I, 
And I will take thy word : but if thou fwearfl. 
Thou maieft proue falfe : 
At Loners periuries they fay loue fmiles. 
Ah gentle Romeo, if thou loue pronounce it faithfully : 
Or if thou thinke I am too eafely wonne. 
He frowne and fay thee nay and be peruerfe. 
So thou wilt wooe : but els not for the world. 
In truth faire Mountague, I am too fond. 
And therefore thou maieft thinke my hauiour light : 
But truft me gentleman He proue more true. 
Than they that haue more cunning to be llrange. 
I Ihould haue bin ftrange I mud confefle. 
But that thou ouer-heardfl ere I was ware 
My true loues Pafsion : therefore pardon me. 
And not impute this yeelding to light loue. 
Which the darke night hath fo difcouered. 

Ro: By yonder bleffed Moone I fweare, 
That tips with (iluer all thefe fruit trees tops. 

lul: O fweare not by the Moone the 
That monthlie changeth in her circled orbe. 



vncouftant 
(Moone, 
Lead 



80 



84 



88 



9^ 



96 



100 



104 



108 



112 



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ACT II. 



SC. 2.] 



Romeo and luliet Q". 2. 1599. 



55 



80 



84 



88 



92 



96 



100 



104 



108 



Ro. I haue nights cloake to hide me fro their eies. 
And but thou loue me, let them iinde me here. 
My life were better ended by their hate. 
Then death proroged wanting of thy loue. 

lu. By whofe dire6tion foundft thou out this place ? 

Ro. By loue that firll did promp me to enquire. 
He lent me counfell, and I lent him eyes : 
I am no Pylat, yet wert thou as farre 
As that vail lliore wafheth with the fartheft fea, 
I Ihould aduenture for fuch marchandife. 

lu. Thou knoweft the mask of night is on my face, 
Elfe would a maiden blufh bepaint my cheeke. 
For that which thou haft heard me fpeake to night, 
Faine would I dwell on forme, faine, faine, denie 
What I haue fpoke, but farwell complement. 
Doeft thou loue me r I know thou wilt fay I : 
And I will take thy word, yet if thou fwearft. 
Thou maieft proue falfe at loners periuries. 
They fay loue laughes, oh gentle Romeo, 
If thou doft loue, pronounce it faithfully : 
Or if thou thinkeft I am too quickly wonne. 
He firowne and be peruerfe, and fay thee nay. 
So thou wilt wooe, but elfe not for the world. 
In truth faire Montague I am too fond : 
And therefore thou maieft think my behauior light. 
But truft me gentleman, ile proue more true. 
Then thofe that haue coying to be ftrange, 
I ftiould haue bene more ftrange, I muft confelfe. 
But that thou ouerheardft ere I was ware. 
My truloue paflion, therefore pardon me. 
And not impute this yeelding to light loue. 
Which the darke night hath fo difcouered. 

Ro. Lady, by yonder blefled Moone I vow. 
That tips with liluer all thefe frute tree tops. 

lu. O fwear not by the moone th'inconftant moone. 
That monethly changes in her circle orbe, 

D 3 



Uall 



8a. promp\promptYi, 3, 4. 



84. Pylit\ Pylot or Pilot 
Qq. Ff. 

85. vasi shore waiheth] 
(washet Q3. washt Q4, 
5.) vast-shore-^washet Fi. 
vast-shore : washd F2. 
{wash'd F3.) vast-shortt 
wash'd F4. 

87. knowcst\kH0w'st Q$. 



91. compUment'] Comple- 
ments F2, 3, J,. 

92. love me t /] Love t I 
Fi. Lovet O J F2, 3. 
Love f 0,1 F4. 

94. ma/'est] mayest F3. 
may st F4. maist Os- 

>/i^]MQ3. F3. [:j"Fi. 
05. M Q4. F4. 
periuries. j [ .] am. Qq.Ff. 

95. laughs'] lau^ht Fi. 
97. thinhest] think si Qs- 



loi. maiest'] mayest F2, 4. 
maist F3, Q5. 
behauior] hauiour Vi, 

3.4. 
103. coying] more coying 
Q4, 5. more coyning F2, 
3. 4- 

106. truloue] trueloue 03- 
true loue Q4. true Loues 
Ff. Q5. 



109. blessed] om. Ff. 



111. inconstant] uncon- 
stant F3. 4. 

112. circU] circled Qq. Ff. 



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56 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 2. 



Leaft that thy loue proue likewile variable. 

Ro: Now by 

lul: Nay doo not fweare at all. 
Or if thou fweare, fweare by thy glorious felfe. 
Which art the God of my Idolatrie, 
And Il'e beleeue thee. 

Ro : If my true harts loue 

Jul: Sweare not at al, though I doo ioy in 
I haue fmall ioy in this contract to night. 
It is too raih, too fodaine, too vnaduifde. 
Too like the lightning that doth ceafe to bee 
Ere one can fay it lightens. 



(thee. 



n6 



120 



124 



I heare fome comming, 
Deare loue adew, fweet Mountague be true. 
Stay but a little and il'e come againe. 

Ro: O blefled blefled night, I feare being night, 
•Vll this is but a dreame I heare and fee. 
Too flattering true to be fubftantiall. 

lul: Three wordes good Romeo and good 
If that thy bent of loue be honourable? 
Thy purpofe marriage, fend me word to morrow 



night in- 
(deed. 

B7 



140 



144 



148 



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ACT II. sc. a.] Romeo and luliet Of 2. 1599. 


57 




Leaft that thy loue proue likewife variable. 






Ro. What ihall I I'weare by ? 






lu. Do not fweare at all : 




ii6 


Or if thou wilt, Iweare by thy gracious felfe. 
Which is the god of my Idolatrie, 
And He beleeue thee. 






Ro. If my hearts deare loue. 


119. hue.'] [-] F2, 3. 4. 


1 20 


lu. Well do not fweare, although I ioy in thee : 


120. STveare,'] [,] om. Fa, 




I haue no ioy of this contra6t to night. 


fhu: [.] Qs, Fa. 3. 4- 




It is too rafh, too vnaduifd, too fudden. 


• 




Too like the lightning which doth ceafe to bee. 




124 


Ere one can fay, it lightens, fweete goodnijght : 


. 124. say, [J om. Q5. 

iighUns,][^QS' 
sweele] Sweete Ff. ([.] 




This bud of loue by Soramers ripening breath. 




May proue a bewtious floure when next we meete. 


F4.) 




Goodnight, goodnight, as fweete repofe and reft. 




128 


Come to thy heart, as that within my breft. 

Ro, wilt thou leaue me fo vnfatisfied ? 
t lull. What fatisfadion canft thou haue to night ? 

Ro. Th'exchange of thy loues faithful vow for mine. 




13a 


lu. I gaue thee mine before thou didft requeft it : 
And yet I would it were to giue againe. 






Ro. Woldft thou withdraw it, for what purpofe loue ? 


134. it.] [?] F3. 4. 




lu. But to be franke and giue it thee againe. 




136 


And yet I wiih but for the thing I haue. 
My bountie is as boundlelle as the fea. 
My loue as deepe, the more I giue to thee 
The more I haue, for both are infinite : 




140 


I heare fome noyfe within, deare loue adue : 


[Cals within.] Ff. (Calls F4.) 




Anon good nurfe, fweete Mountague be true : 




Stay but a little, I will come againe. 






Ro. blelTed blefled night, I am afeard 




144 


Being in night, all this is but a dreame. 






Too flattering fweete to be fubftantiall. 

lu. Three words deare Romeo, & goodnight indeed. 


[Enter.] F2, 3. 4. 




If that thy bent of loue be honourable. 




148 


Thy purpofe marriage, fend me word to morrow. 






By 





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58 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 2. 



By one that il'e procure to come to thee : 

Where and what time thou wilt performe that right. 

And al my fortunes at thy tbote il'e lay. 

And follow thee my Lord through out the world. 



'5^ 



Ro: Loue goes toward loue like fchoole boyes from ^^o 
their bookes. 
But loue from loue, to fchoole with heauie lookes. 

lul: Romeo, Romeo, O for a falkncrs voice. 
To lure this Talfell gentle backe againe : 

Bondage is hoarfe and may not crie aloud, ^^4 

Els would I teare the Caue where Eccho lies 
And make her airie voice as hoarfe as mine, 
With repetition of my Romeos name. 
Romeo ? 

Ro: It is my foule that calles vpon my name, ^^8 

How filuer fweet found louers tonguc»s in night. 

Jul: Romeo? 

Ro: Madame. i?^ 

////.• At what a clocke to morrow ihall I fend ? 



Ro: At the houre of nine. 

lul: I will not faile, tis twentie yeares till then. 
Roffieo I haue forgot why I did call thee backe. 

Rom: Let me Hay here till you remember it. 

Jul: I Ihall forget to haue thee Hill ftaie here, 
Remembring how I loue thy com panic. 

Rom: And il'e ftay ftill to haue thee llill forget. 
Forgetting any other home but this. 

lu : Tis almoft morning I would haue thee gone. 
But yet no further then a wantons bird, 



Who 



176 



18c 



184 



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ACT II. sc. 2.] Rojjieo and luliet Q". 2. T599. 


59 




By one that ile procure to come to thee. 

Where aud what time thou wilt performe the right. 


150. ri]^Af] rite F3. 4. 
rights Q4. rites (^5. 




And all my fortunes at thy foote ile lay. 


152. L.\ Loue Q4, 5. Lord 


152 


And follow thee my L. throughout the world. Madam. 


[Within : Madam^^ Ff. 




I come, anon : but if thou meanell not well. 


153- meanest] meanst Q5. 




I do beleech thee (by and by I come) Madam. 


[Within : Madam,] Ff. 




To ceafe thy ftrife, and leaue me to my griefe. 


155. strife] sute Q4. suit 


'56 


To morrow will I fend. 
Ro, So thriue my foule. 


Q5- 




lu. A thoufand times goodnight. 


[Exit.] Ff. 




Ro. A thoufand times the worfe to want thy light. 


159. light] sight Q4. 5. 


i6o 


Loue goes toward loue as fchooleboyes from their bookes, 






But loue from loue, toward fchoole with heauie lookes. 


161. toward] towards VI. 




Enter luliet again e. 






lull, Hift Romeo hift, 6 for a falkners voyce. 






To lure this Taflel gentle back againe. 




164 


Bondage is hoarfe, and may not fpeakc aloude, 
Elfe would I teare the Caue where Eccho lies. 






And make her ayrie tongue more hoarfe, then 


166.7. then With] then 




With repetition of my Romeo. 


with The F2, 3, 4. {than 
F4.) then mvne With 


168 


Ro. It is my foule that calls vpon my name. 


Q4. than mine With Qs. 
167. Romeo.] f,! Fa. 




How liluer fweete, found loners tongues by night. 


168. souie] loue Q4, 5. 




Like fofteft mulicke to attending eares. 






lu. Romeo. 




172 


Ro. My Neece. 


172. Neece] Deere Q4, 5. 




///. What a clocke to morrow 


sxoeete \i. sw^et F3. 
Sweet F4. 




Shall I fend to thee ? 






Ro. By the houre of nine. 




,76 


lu I will not faile, tis t wen tie yeare till then, 
I haue forget why I did call thee backe. 

Ro. Let me ftand here till thou remember it. 


176. yeare] y eares Qq. Ff. 




lu. I fliall forget to haue thee ftill Hand there. 


179. /c;/-^^/U Q3. 4, Ff. 


180 


Remembring how I loue thy companie. 

Ro. And Ile ftill (lay, to haue thee ftill forget, 
Forgetting any other home but this. 

Ju. Tis almoft morning, I would haue thee gone. 




184 


And yet no farther then a wantons bird. That 


184. farther] further Ff. 



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6o 



Romeo and Iidiet {Cf. i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 3. I 



Who lets it hop a little from her hand. 

Like a pore prilbner in his twilled giues. 

And with a lilke thred puis it backe againe. 

Too louing iealous of his libertie. 188 

Ro: Would I were thy bird. 

lul: Sweet lb would I, 
Yet I Ihould kill thee with much cherriihing thee. 
Good night, good night, parting is fuch Iweet forrow, 192 

That I ihall fay good night till it be morrow. (breaft, 

Rom; Sleepe dwell vpon thine eyes, peace on thy 
I would that I were deep and peace of fweet to reft. 196 



Now will I to my Ghoftly fathers Cell, 
His help to craue, and my good hap to tell. 



Enter Frier Francis. 
Frier : The gray ey'd raorne fmiles on the 
Checkring the Eafterne clouds with ftreakes of Ught, 
And flecked darkenes like a drunkard reeles. 
From forth daies path, and Titans tierie wheeles : 
Now ere the Sunne aduance his burning eye. 
The world to cheare, and nights darke dew to drie. 
We muft vp fill this oaiier Cage of ours, 
With balefull weeds, and precious iuyced flowers. 



(night, 
frowning 



II. 3. 



Oh mickle is the powerfull grace that lies 

In hearbes, plants. Hones, and their true qualities : 



16 



For 



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ACT II. SC. 



3-] 



Romeo mid Iiiliet Ct. 2. 1599. 



61 



188 



192 



ig6 



11.3. 



16 



That lets it hop a litle from his hand. 
Like a poore prifoner in his twilled giues, 
And with a lilken threed, plucks it backe againe. 
So louing lealous of his liberlie. 

Ro, I would I were thy bird. 

lu, Sweete fo would I, 
Yet I fhould kill thee with much cheriiliing : 
Good night, good night. 
Parting is fuch fweete forrow. 
That I ihall fay good night, till it be morrow. 

lu. Sleep dwel vpon thine eyes, peace in thy breaft. 

Ro. Would I were fleepe and peace fo fweet to reft 
The grey eyde mome fmiles on the frowning night, 
Checkring the Eafterne Clouds with ftreaks of light 
And darknefle fleckted like a drunkard reeles. 
From forth daies pathway, made by Tytans wheeles. 
Hence will I to my ghoftly Friers clofe cell, 
His helpe to craue, and my deare hap to tell. 



Enter Frier alone with a lasket. 
Fri. The grey-eyed mome fmiles on the 
Checking the Eafterne clowdes with ftreaks of light 
And fleckeld darknefle like a drunkard reeles. 
From forth daies path, and Titans burning wheeles : 
Now ere the fun aduance his burning eie. 
The day to cheere, and nights dancke dewe to drie, 
I rauft vpfill this ofier cage of ours. 
With balefull weedes, and precious iuyced flowers. 
The earth that's natures mother is her tombe. 
What is her burying graue^ that is her wombe : 
And from her wombe children of diuers kinde. 
We fucking on her naturall bofome finde : 
Many for many, verlues excellent : 
None but for fome, and yet all different. 
O mickle is the powerfull grace that lies 
In Plants, hearbes, ftones, and their true qualliiies : 



Exit, 

(night, 
frowning 



For 



187. f Arced] ihred Qq. Ff. 
backe] om. F2, 3, 4. 



193.4. Parting . . . mor- 
rtno] Given to Rom. Q-j, 
Ff. ^^ 

195. Sleep . . . breast] 
Given to Rom. Q4, 5. 

[E.xit.] F2. 3, 4. 

196. Ro.] om. Q4, 5. 

197-200. The . . .wheeles] 
om. Q4, 5. 

199. fleckted] flec\eld Q3. 
flecker d Ff. 

201. Friers] Fries Ff , 2. 



Act II. Scene 3. 

1-4. The . . . wheeles] om. 

F2, 3. 4. 
2. Checking]CheckringQ^. 

Fi. 
Z fleckeld] flecUedYi. 



13. many,] [,] om. Qq. Ff. 



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6z 



Romeo and luUet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 3. 



For nought fo vile, that vile on earth doth liue. 
But to the earth fome fpeciall good doth giue : 
Nor nought fo good, but ftraind from that faire vfe, 
Reuolts to vice and ftumbles on abufe : 
Vertue it felfe tumes vice being mifapplied. 
And vice fometimes by adtion dignified. 



20 



Within the infant rinde of this fmall flower, 

Poyfon hath relidence, and medecine power : 

For this being fraelt too, with that part cheares ech hart. 

Being tafted (laies all fences with the hart. 

Two fuch oppofed foes incampe them dill. 

In man as well as herbes, grace and rude will. 

And where the worfer is predominant. 

Full foone the canker death eats vp that plant. 

Row; Good morrow to my Ghoftly Confeflbr. 

Fri: Benedicite, what earlie tongue fo foone falutetli 

(me? 
Yong fonne it argues a diftempered head. 
So foone to bid good morrow to my bed. 
Care keepes his watch in euerie old mans eye. 
And where care lodgeth, fleep can neuer lie : 
But where vnbrufed youtli with vnftuft braines 
Doth couch his limmes, there golden fleepe remaines : 
Therefore thy earlines doth me aflure, 
Thou art vprowfd by fome diftemperature. 
Or if not {o, then here I hit it righ 
Our Romeo hath not bin a bed to night. 

Ro: The laft was true, the fweeter reft was mine. 

Fr: God pardon (in, wert thou with KofalineP 

Ro; With RofaJine my Ghoftly father no, 
I haue forgot that name, and that names woe. 

Fri: Thats my good fonne: but where haft 

Ro; I tell thee ere thou aske it me againe, 
I haue bin feafting with mine enemie : 
Where on the fodaine one hath wounded mee 

Thats 



(then ? 
thou bin 



24 



28 



3a 



36 



40 



44 



48 



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Google 





ACT II. sc. 3.] Romeo and luUet Q: 2. 1,599. 


63 




For nought fo vile, that on the earth doth line. 






But to the earth fome fpeciall good doth giue : 






Nor ought fo good but ftraind from that faire vie. 




20 


Reuolts from true birlh, ftumbling on abufe. 
Vertue it felfe turaes vice being mifapplied. 
And vice fometime by adion dignified. 

Enter Romeo. 
Within the infant rinde of this weake flower 




^4 


Poyfon hath refidence, and medicine power : 






For this being fmelt with that part, cheares each part. 


25. SfmU with that part,'] 




Being tafted, llaies all fences with the hart. 


smelt, with that part 
Ff. 


28 


Two fuch oppofed Kings encamp them Hi II, 
In man as well as hearbes, grace and rude will : 
And where the worfer is predominant. 
Full foone the Canker death eates vp that Plant. 
Ro, Goodmorrow father. 


26. staies] slaves Qq. Fi, 
2, 3, slays' V^. 


32 


Fri. Benedicitie. 
What early tongue fo fweete faluteth me ? 






Young fonne, it argues a di tempered hed. 


34. distempered^ distem- 




So foone to bid goodmorrow to thy bed : 


per d Q5, F4. 


36 


Care keepes his watch in euery old mans eye, 






And where care lodges, fleepe will neuer lye : 


37. lodges'] lod^eth F2, 3, 4. 




But where vnbrufed youth with vnftuft braine 






Doth couch his lims, there golden fleepe doth raigne. 




4o 


Therefore thy earlinefle doth me aflure. 






Thou art vproufd with fome diftemprature : 


41. distempratnre'\ distem- 




Or if not fo, then here I hit it right. 


perature F3, 4. 




Our Romeo hath not bene in bed to night. 




44 


Ro, That laft is true, the fweeter reft was mine. 






Fri God pardon fin, waft thou with Rof aline ? 






Ro. With Rofaline, my ghoftly father no. 


46. father no,'] Father? 




I haue forgot that name, and that names wo. 


i\o, Ff. 


48 


Fri. Thats my good fon, but wher haft thou bin thC ? 

Ro, He tell thee ere thou aske it me agen : 
I haue bene feafting with mine enemie. 
Where on a fudden one hath wounded me : 

E Thats 





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64 



Romeo and luliet {Of*, i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 3. 



From this point to the' 
end of the play a 
smaller type is used 
in the original edi- 
tion, and the running 
title is changed from 
' The most excellent 
Tra^edie, of Romeo 
and Juliet to * The 
excellent Tr,7,^edie of 
Romeo and Juliet.' , 



Thats by me wounded, both our remedies 52 

With in thy help and holy phificke lies, 
I beare no hatred blefled man : for loe 
My intercefsion likewife fteades my foe. 

Frier : Be plaine my fonne and homely in thy drift, 56 

Ridling confefsion iindes but ridling ihrift. 

Row.- Then plainely know my harts deare loue is fet 
On the faire daughter of rich Captilet : 

As mine on hers, fo hers likewife on mine, 60 

And all combind, faue what thou muft combine 
By holy marriage : where, and when, and how. 
We met, we woo'd, and made exchange of vowes, 
Il'e tell thee as I paife : But this I pray, 64 

That thou confent to marrie vs to day. 

Fri : Holy 5. Francis, what a change is here ? 
Is Rofaline whome thou didft loue fo deare 

So foone forfooke, lo yong mens loue then lies 68 

Not truelie in their harts, but in their eyes. 
lefu .Maria, what a deale of brine 
Hath waflit thy fallow cheekes for Rofaline ? 

How much fait water cafl away in wafte, 72 

To feafon loue, that of loue doth not tafte. 
The funne not yet thy iighes from heauen cleares. 
Thy old grones ring yet in my ancient eares. 
And loe vpon thy cheeke the ftaine doth lit, 76 

Of an old teare that is not wafht off yet. 
If euer thou wert thus, and thefe woes thine. 
Thou and thefe woes were all for Rofaline, 

And art thou changde, pronounce this fentence then 80 

Women may fal, when ther's no ftrength in men. 

Rom: Thou chidft me oft for louing Rofaline. 

Fr: For doating, not for louing, pupill mine. 

Rom : And badft me burie loue. 84 

Fr: Not in a graue. 
To lay one in another out to haue. 

Rom: I pree thee chide not, fhe whom I loue now 

Doth 



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ACT II. SC. 3.] 



Romeo and luliet Qt 2. 1599. 



65 



Thats by me wounded both, our remedies 

Within thy helpe and holy phificke lies : 

I beare no hatred blefled man : for loe 

My interceflion like wife fleads my foe. 
Fri Be plaine good fonne and homely in thy drift, 

Ridling confeflion, findes but ridling ihrift. 

Ro. Then plainly know, my harts deare loue is fet 

On the faire daughter of rich Caput et : 
60 As mine on hers, fo hers is fet on mine. 

And all combind, faue what thou mull combine 

By holy marriage, when and where, and how. 

We met, we wooed, and made exchange of vow : 
64 He tell thee as we palTe, but this I pray. 

That thou confent to marrie vs to day. 

Fri, Holy S. Frauncis what a change is here 

Is RofaJine that thou didft loue fo deare, 
68 So foone forfaken r young mens loue then lies 

Not truly in their hearts, but in their eies. 

lefu Maria, what a deale of brine 

Hath wafht thy fallow cheekes for Rofaline ? 
72 How much fait water throwne away in wafte. 

To feafon loue, that of it doth not tafte. 

The Sun not yet thy lighes, from heauen cleares 

Thy old grones yet ringing in mine auncient eiares : 
76 Lo here vpon thy cheeke the ftaine doth fit. 

Of an old teare that is not walht off yet. 

If ere thou waft thy felfe, and thefe woes thine. 

Thou and thefe woes were all for Rofaline, 
80 And art thou chang'd, pronounce this fentence then. 

Women may fall, when theres no ftrength in men. 
Ro, Thou chidft me oft for louing Rofaline, 
Fri. For doting, not for louing pupill mine. 
84 Ro. And badft me burie loue. 

Fri. Not in a graue. 

To lay one in an other out to haue. 

Ro, I pray thee chide me not, her I loue now. 



52. wounded both,'] wound- 
ed, both Q3, 4. wounded: 
both Ff. wounded ; both 
Q5. 



56. and] rest Ff. 



66. 5.] Saint F4. 



Doth 



73. iast€.'\ p] F4. 



75. ringtng\ rtng Q4, 5. 
Fa. 3. 4. 
mine] my Q3, 4, Ff. 



80. chan^fd,] [?] Qq. Ff. 



86. lit] i: Qq. Fi. 3. 4. 



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66 



Romeo mid luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 4. 



Doth grace for grace, and loue for loue allow : 88 

The other did not fo. 

Fr: Oh (he knew well 
Thy loue did read by rote, and could not fpell. 

But come yong Wauerer, come goe with mee, 9^ 

In one refpedt lie thy af:>illant bee : 
For this alliaunce may fo happie proue, 
To turne your Houlholds rancour to pure loue. Exeunt, 



ir. 



Enter Mercutio, BenuoUo. 

Mer: Why whats become of Romeo? came he not 
home to night ? 

Ben: Not to his Fathers, I fpake with his man. 

Mer: Ah that fame pale hard hearted wench, that Ro- 
Torments him fo, that he will fure run mad. {Jaline, 

Mer: Tylalt the Ktnfman of olde Capolet 
Hath fent a Letter to his Fathers Houfe : 
Some Challenge on my Htb. 

Ben: Romeo will anfwere it. 

Aler: I, anie man that can write may anlVere a letter. 

Ben: Nay, he will anlwere the letters mailer if hee bee 
challenged. 

Mer: Who, Romeo / why he is alreadie dead : ftabd 
with a white wenches blacke eye, Ihot thorough the eare 
with a loue fong, the verie pinne of his heart clclt with the 
blinde bow-boyes but-lhaft. And is he a man to encounter 
Tylaltf 

Ben: Why what is Tijlalt? 

Mer: More than the prince of cattes I can tell you. Oh 
he is the couragious captaine of complements. Catfo, he 
fightes as you iing pricke-fong, keei>es time dyftance and 
proportion, reils me his minum reft one two and the thirde 
in your bofome, the very butcher of a lilken button, a Duel- 
lift a Duelliil, a gentleman of the very lirft houle of the firft 

and 



12 



16 



20 



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ACT II. SC. 4.] 



Rcmeo and Itdiei Qi 2. 1599. 



67 



II. 



88 Doth grace for grace, and loue for loue allow : 
I'he other did not fo. 

Fri, O fhe knew well. 
Thy loue did reade by rote, that could not fpell : 
9a But come young wauerer, come go with me. 
In one refped ile thy affiflant be : 
For this alliance may fo happie proue. 
To tume your hou (holds rancor to pure loue. 
9^ Ro. O let vs hence, I (land on fudden haft. 

Frl Wifely and (low, they ftumble that run faft. 

Exeunt, 
Enter Benuolio and Mercutio. 
Mer, Where the deule (hould this Romeo be ? came hee not 
home to night ? 

Ben. Not to his fathers, I fpoke with his man. 
Mer, Why that fame pale hard hearted wench, that Rofaiine, 
Torments him i'o, that he will fure run mad. 

Ben. Tibalt, the kifman to old Capulet, hath fent a leter to his 
fathers houfe. 

Mer. A challenge on my life. 
Ben. Romeo will anfwere it. 

Mer. Any man that can write may anfwere a letter. 
Ben. Nay, he wil anfwere the letters maifter how he dares, be- 
irig dared. 

Mercu. Alas poore Romeo, he is alreadie dead, ftabd with a 

>*'liite wenches blacke eye, runne through the eare with a loue 

-^^^iig, the very pinne of his heart, cleft with the blind/ 

«=><:> xve- boy es but-(hafr, and is hee a man to encounter Ty- 

Ro. Why what is Ti/balt ? 

Mer. More then Prince of Cats. Oh hees the couragious 
^^^^5)lain of Complements : he fights as youfing prickfong, keeps 
* ^ *^rie, diftance & proportion, he refts, his minum re(b, one two, 
^*^<i the third in your bofome : the very butcher of a (like but- 
^^^^3, a dualift a dualift, a gentleman of the very (irft houfe of the 

E a firft 



8 



9a. ^0] and got Q4, 5. 



95. kousholdi\ houshould 



Act II. Scene 4. 



6. kisnian\ kinsman Qq. 
Ff. 



13. dead, ttabd^ [ ]om Fi. 



18. Ro.] Ben. Ff. 



ao. fi'ickson/\ Pricke-son^ 
Q5- /^'^^-lJ^''^/3. 4- 

21. he rests^^ [.] om. Qq. Ff. 
minum rests] minum Ff. 

23. duelisf] Duellist F4 
(bis). 



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68 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 4. 



and fecond caufe, ah the immortall PafTado, the Punto re- 24 
uerfo, the Hay. 

Ben: The what? 

Me: The Poxe of fuch limping antique affeding fan- 
tafticoes thefe new tuners of accents. By lefu a very good 
blade, a very tall man, a very good whoore. Why graund- 
fir is not this a miferable cafe that we ihould be ftil afflided 
with thefe ftrange flies : thefe falhionmongers, thefe par- 
donmees, that (land fo much on the new forme, that they 32 
cannot (itte at eafe on the old bench. Oh their bones, theyr 
bones. 

Ben. Heere comes Romeo. 

Mer: Without his Roe, like a dryed Hering. O fleih fleih 
how art tliou filhified. Sirra now is he for the numbers that 36 
Petrarch flowdin : Laura to his Lady was but a kitchin 
drudg, yet fhe had a better loue to berime her : 2)ido a dow- 
dy Cleopatra a Gypfie, Hero and Hellen hildings and harle- 
tries : Th'{/hie a gray eye or fo, but not to the purpofe. Signior 40 
Romeo bon iour, there is a French curtefie to your French 
flop : yee gaue vs the counterfeit fairely yefternight. 

Kom : What counterfeit I pray you ? 44 



Me: The flip the flip, can you not conceiue ? 

Rom ; I cr}' you mercy my bufines was great, and m fuch 
a cafe as mine, a man may ftraine curtefle. 

Aler: Oh thats as much to fay as fuch a cafe as yours wil 
conftraine a man to bow in the hams. 



48 



Kom : A mod curteous expofition. 5 2 

Me: Why I am the very pinke of curtefie. 

Rom : Pinke for flower ? 

Mer: Right. 

Rom : Then is my Pumpe well flour'd : ^(5 

Mer: Well faid, follow me nowe that ieft till thou haft 
wome out thy Pumpe, that when the fingle fole of it is worn 
the left may remaine after the wearing folie finguler. Rom: O 



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^4 



aS 



32 



36 



ACT II. SC. 4.] 



Romeo and luliet Q' 2. 1599. 



69 




firft and fecond caufe, ah the imraortall Paflfado, the Punto re- 
uerfo, the Hay. 

Ben, The what ? 

Mer. The Pox of fuch antique lifping affeaing phantacies, 
thefe new tuners of accent : by lefu a very good blade, a very 
tall man, a very good whore. Why is not this a lametable thing 
graundfir, that we lliould be thus aflliaed with thefe ftraunge 
flies : thefe fafhion-mongers, thefe pardons mees, who ftand fo 
much on the new forme, that they cannot fit at eafe on the old 
bench. O their bones, their bones. 

Enter Romeo, 

Ben, Here Comes Romeo, here comes Romeo. 

Mer, Without his Roe, like a dried Hering, O flefh, fleih, 

how art thou fifhlfied ? now is he for the numbers that Petrach 

flowed in : Laura to his Lady, was a kitchin wench, marrie 

fhe had a better loue to berime her : Dido a dowdie, Cleopatra 

a Gipfie, Hellen and Hero, hildings and harlots : Thlsbie a grey 

eje or fo, but not to the purpofe, Signior Romeo, Bonieur, theres 

St French falutation to your French flop : you gaue vs the coun- 

trerfeit fairly laft night. 

Ro. Goodmorrow to you both, what counterfeit did I giue 

Mer, The flip flr, the flip, can you not conceiue ? 

Ro, Pardon good Mercutio, my buflnefle was great, and in 
^'%^:ach a cafe as mine, a man may ftraine ciirtefie. 

Mer. Thats as much as to fay, fuch a cafe as yours, conflrains 
^^ man to bow in the hams. 

Ro. Meaning to curfie. 

Mer, Thou haft moft kindly hit it. 

Ro, A moft curtuous expofilion. 

Mer. Nay I am the very pinck of curtefie. 

Ro. Pinck for flower. 

Mer. Right. 

Ro. Why then is my pump well flowerd. 

Mer, Sure wit follow me this ieaft, now till thou haft worne 
vit thy pump, that when the (ingle fole of it is worne, the ieaft 



»ri 



ay remaine after the wearing, foly lingular. 



Ro. O 



27, phantacies] phantasies 

QS. F3 4. 

28. accent] accents Q5. 
fy Jesii\ Jesu Ff. 



31. pardons mees] pardon 
mees Q3. pardon-mee's 
Ff. {me's F3, 4.) par- 
dona-meesQ^, 5. 



36. Petrach] Petrarch Qq. 
Ff. 



40. Bonieur] Bon ieur Q3. 
Bon iour Fi. Boniour 
Fa, 3. Bon jour Q$. 
Bonjour F4. 



46. goo^ om. Ff. 



50. cursie] courtesie F2, 3, 

5a. curtuous] curteous Qq. 
Fi. courteous F2, 3, 4. 



57. w/VlMQq.Ff. 

ieasty] [, J om. F4. 

59. soly sin^iar] sole-sin- 
gular Ff. 



4 

\ 



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Romeo and luliei (Q? x) 1597. 



[act u. 



sc. 4. 



Rom: O (ingle foald iefl folie (inguler for the (inglenes. ^o 

Me, Come between vs good Benuolio, for my wits faile. 

Row. Swits and fpurres, fwlts & fpurres, or He cry a match. 

Mer: Nay if thy wits runne the wildgoofe chafe, I haue 
done : tor I am fure thou haft more of the goofe in one of 64 
thy wits, than I haue in al my fine : Was I with you there for 
the goofe ? 

Kom: Thou wert neuer with me for any thing, when 
thou wert not with me for the goofe. 68 

Me: He bite thee by the eare for that ieft. 

Rom .• Nay good goofe bite not. 

Mer: Why thy wit is a bitter fweeting, a moft fharp I'auce 

Kom: And was it not well fem'd in to a fweet goofe ? 

Mer: Oh heere is a witte of Cheuerell that ftretcheth 
from an ynch narrow to an ell broad. 

Kom: I ftretcht it out for the word broad, which added to 
the goole, proues thee faire and wide a broad gooie. j6 

Mer: Why is not this better now than groning for loue? 
why now art thou fociable, now art thou thy felfe, no we art 
thou what thou art, as wel by arte as nature. This driueling 
loue is Hke a great natural!, that runs vp and downe to hide 80 
his bable in a hole. 

Ben : Stop there. 

Me: Why thou wouldft haue me ftopp my tale againft 
the haire. 

Ben : Thou wbuldft haue made thy tale too long ? 84 

Mer: Tut man thou art deceiued, I meant to make it 
ihort, for I was come to the whole depth of my tale ? and 
meant indeed to occupie the argument no longer. 

Kom: Heers goodly geare. Enter Nurfe and her man. 88 

Mer: A faile, a faile, a laile. 

Ben: Two, two, a fhirt and a fmocke. 

Nur: Peter, pree thee giue me my fan. ^2 

Mer: Pree thee doo good Peter, tp hide her face: for 
her fanne is the fairer of the two. 

Nur: God ye goodmorrow Gentlemen. 

Mer: 



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ACT II. SC. 



4] 



Romeo and luliet Q". 2, 1599. 



7' 



60 



64 



68 



72 



76 



80 



Ro O fingle folde ieaft, falie lingular for the finglenetre. 

Mer, Come betweene vs good Benuolio, my wits faints. 

Ro. Swits and fpurs, fwits and fpuires, or ile crie a match. 

Mer. Nay, if our wits run the wildgoofe chafe, I am done : 
For thou haft more of the wildgoofe in one of thy wits, then 1 
am fufe I haue in my wholj liuc. Was I with you there for the 
goofe? 

Ro, Thou waft neuer with me for any thing, when thou waft 
not there for the goofe. 

Mer. I will bite thee by the eare for that ieaft. 

Rom. Nay good goofe bite not. 

Mer. Thy wit is a very bitter fweeting, it is a moft ftiarp fawce. 

Rom. And is it not then well feru'd in to a fweete goofe ? 

Mer. Oh heres a wit of Cheuerell, that ftreiches from an 
ynch narrow, to an ell broad. 

Ro. I ftretch it out for that word broad, which added to tlie 
goofe, proues thee farre and wide a broad goofe. 

Mer. Why is not this better now then groning for loue, now 
art thou fociable, now art thou Romeo : now art thou what thou 
art, by art as well as by nature, for this driueling loue is like a 
great naturall that runs lolling vp and downe to hide his bable 
in a hole. 

Ben. Stop there, ftop there. 

Mer. Thou delireft me to ftop in my tale againft the haire. 

Ben. Thou wouldft elfe haue made thy tale large. 

Mer. O thou art deceiu'd, I would haue made it ftiort, for 1 
^5 come to the whole depth of my tale, and meant indeed to 
-c:upie the argument no longer. 

Ro. Heeres goodly geare. Enter Nurfe and her man. 

fayle, a fayle. 

Mer. Two two, a ftiert and a fmocke. 

JVtfr. Peler : 

J^eter. Anon. 

JVttr. My fan Peter. 

Mer. Good Peter io hide her face, for her fans thefliirer face. 

JV'ttr. God ye goodmorrow Gentlemen. 

E .3 Mer. God 



60. soii€] Solely F4. 

61. wits faints] wit faints 
Fa, 3, 4. wits faint Q$. 



67. Thou wast] Thou 7cas 
F2. 3. 4. 



71. bitter sweeting"] Bitter- 
swectiuf( Ff. 

72. then] om. Qq. Ff. 
in /<?] into Ff, 

sweet e goose] Sweet-goose 
Fi, 2. 



76. w/./<'l|,]Qq. Ff. 
a hr.ui i abroad Ff. 
71' Why\\}]i^A,. 



80. bable] bauble F4. 



83. desirest] desirst Fi, 2, 
3- 

35. for] or Fi, 2, 3. 



ri'ntcr etcl between lines 
87 & 83 Ff. 

90. shert] shirt Qq. Ff. 



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72 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 4. 



Mer: God ye good den faire Gentlewoman. 

Nur: Is it godyegooden I pray you. 

Mer: Tis no lefle I aflfure you, for the baudie hand of 
the diall is euen now vpon the pricke of noone. 

Nur: Fie, what a man is this? 

Rom: A Gentleman Nurfe, that God hath made for 
himfelfe to marre. 

Nur: By my troth well faid : for himfelfe to marre 
quoth he ? I pray you can anie of you tell where one maie 
finde yong Romeo ? 

Rom: I can: but yong Romeo will bee elder when you 
haue found him, than he was when you fought him. I am 
the yongefl of that name for fault of a worfe. 

Nur: Well faid. 

Mer: Yea, is the word well ? mas well noted, wife- 
ly, wifely. 

Nu: If you be he fir, I defire fome conference with ye. 

Ben: O, belike (he meanes to inuite him to fupper. 

Mer: So ho. A baud, a baud, a baud. 

Rom: Why what hafl found man? 

Mer: No hare fir, vnlefle it be a hare in a lenten pye, 
that is fomewhat flale and hoare ere it be eaten. 
He walkes hy them, andjings. 
And an olde hare hore, and an olde hare hore 

is verie good meate in Lent : 
But a hare thats hoare is tcx) muoh for a fcore, 
if it hore ere it be fpent. 
Youl come to your fathers to fupper ? 

Rom\ I will. 
Mer, Farewell ancient Ladie, farewell fweete Ladie. 
Exeunt Benuolio, Mercutlo: 

Nur: Marry farewell. Pray what faucie merchant was 
this that was fo full of his roperipe ? 

Rom: A gentleman Nurfe that loues to heare himfelfe 
taWce, and will fpeake more in an houre than hee will Hand 
to in a month. 

Nur: If hee fland to anie thing again ft mee. He take 
him downe if he were luftier than he is : if I cannot take him 
downe. He finde them that fliall : I am none of his flurt- 
gills, I am none of his skaines mates. She 



96 



104 



108 



116 



X20 



124 



128 



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ACT II. SC. 



4.] 



Romeo and Inliet Q'. 2. 1599., 



73 



g6 Mir. God ye goodden faire gentlewoman. 

Nur. Is it good den ? 

Mer. Tis no lefle I tell yee, for the bawdie hand of the dyal, 
is now vpon the prick of noone. 

Nur, Out vpon you, what a man are you ? 

Ro. One gentlewoman, that God hath made, himfelf to mar. 

Nur. By my troth it is well faid, for himfelfe to mar quoth a ? 
Getleme ca any of you tel me wher I may find the yong Romeo f 

Ro. I can tell you, but young Romeo will be older when you 
haue found him, then he was when you fought him : I am the 
youngeft of that name, for fault of a worfe. 

Nur. You fay well. 

Mer. Yea is the word wel, very wel took, ifaith, wifely, wifely. 

Nur. If you be he fir, I defire fome confidence with you. 

Ben. She will endite him to fome fupper. 

Aler. A baud, a baud, a baud. So ho. 

Ro. What haft thou found ? 

Mer. No hare fir, vnleflTe a hare fir in a lenten pie, that is fome- 
thing ftale and hoare ere it be fpent. 

An old hare hoare, and an old hare hoare is very good meate in 
lent. 

But a hare that is hore, is too much for a fcore, when it hores ere 
it be fpent. 
Romeo, will you come to your fathers ? weele to dinner thither. 

Ro. I will follow you. 

Mer. Farewell auncient Lady, farewell Lady, Lady, Lady. 

Exeunt. 

Nur. I pray you fir, what fawcie merchant was this that was 
► full of his roper ie ? 

Ro. A gentleman Nurfe, that loues to heare himfelfe talke, 

d will fpeake more in a minute, then hee will ftand too in a 
oneth. 

Nur. And a fpeake any thing againft me. He take him downe, 

^"•^^d a were luftier then he is, and tweniie fuch lacks : and if I 

^^«.iinot, ile finde thofe that fhall : fcuruie knaue, I am none 

^^^ his flurt gills, I am none of his skaines mates, and thou muft 

ftand 



100 



104 



108 



112 



116 




98. yee] you Qq. Ff. 



loa. well said] said Fi, 2, 
3. sad F4. 



109. If you] Ifikou Q4, 5. 

1 10. endite] enviie F2. r»- 
vite F3, 4. 



[Exit. Mercutio, Benuolio.] 
Ff. 

123. roper ie] roguery F4. 
125. too] to Qq. Ff. 



130. flurt gills] flurt-^ils 

Ff. gil'flurts Q^, s. 1 

skaines mates] skains- I 

mates F4. I 



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74 



Romeo and luHet (O? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 4. 



She tumes to Peter her man. 
And thou like a knaue mufl ftand by, and fee euerie lacke 
vfe me at his pleafure. 132 

Pet: I fee no bodie vfe you at his pleafure, if I had, I 
would foone haue drawen : you know my toole is as foone 
out as anothers if I fee time and place. 136 

Nur: Now afore God he hath fo ve\t me, that euerie 
member about me quiuers : fcuruie lacke. But as I faid, my 
Ladie bad me feeke ye out, and what ihee bad me tell yee, 
that lie keepe to my felfe : but if you fhould lead her into a j jq 
fooles paradice as they faye, it were a verie grolfe kinde of 
behauiour as they fay, for the Gentlewoman is yong. Now 
if you {hould deale doubly with her, it were verie weake 
dealing, and not to be offered to anie Gentlewoman. 144 

Rom: Nurfe, commend me to thy Ladie, tell her I pro- 
teft. 

Nur: Good heart: yfaith He tell her fo : oh Ihe will be 148 
a ioyfull woman. 

Rom : Why, what wilt thou tell her ? 

Nur: That you doo proleft : which (as I take it) is a 153 
Gentlemanlike proffer. 



Rom,: Bid her get leaue to morrow morning 
To come to flirift to Frier Laurence cell : 
And ftay thou Nurfe behinde the Abbey wall. 
My man Ihall come to thee, and bring along 
The cordes, made like a tackled ftaire. 
Which to the high top-gallant of my ioy 
Muft be my condu6t in the fecret night. 
Hold, take that for thy paines. 

Nur : No, not a penie truly. 

Rom .- I fay you ihall not chufe. 

Nwr ; Well, to morrow morning fhe iliall not faile. 

Row ; Farewell, be truftie, and He quite thy paine. Exit 



160 



164 



Nur: 



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\cr 11. sc. 4.] * Rmeo and luliet Or. 2, 1599. 


75 




fland by too and fufFer eueiy knaue to vfe me at his plea- 




132 


fure. 

P<f^ I faw no man vfe you at his pleafure : if I had, my weapon 






fhuld quickly haue bin out : I warrant you, I dare draw aflbone 


134. #«//I[,lQ3. 4. Ff. 
assoone] as soon V^, 4. 




as an other man, if I fee occaiion in a goodquarel, & the law on 


136 


my fide. 

Nur, Now afore God, I am fo vext, that euery part about me 
quiuers, skuruie knaue : pray you fir a word : and as I told you, 
my young Lady bid me enquire you out, what (he bid me fay, I 




140 


will keepe to my felfe : but firfl let me tell ye, if ye fhould leade 
her in a fooles paradife, as they say, it were a very grolfe kind of 
behauior as they fay : for the Gentlewoman is yong : and there- 
fore, if you (hould deale double with her, truly it were an ill 




'44 


thing to be olFred to any Gentlewoman, and very weake dea- 
ling. 

Rom, Nurfe, commend me to thy Lady and Miftreffe, I pro- 


144. of red] offered Qq. Ff. 




teft vnto thee. 


147. thee,] [— ] F2, 3, 4, 


148 


Nur. Good heart, and yfaith I wil tel her as much : Lord, Lord, 
(he will be a ioyfull woman. 

Ro, What wilt thou tell her Nurfe? thou dooeft not marke 






me? 


151. »f^/][.]QS- 


'5» 


Nur, I will tell her fir, that you do proteft, which as I take it. 






is a gentlemanlike offer. 


153. a] om. Q4, 




Ro, Bid her deuife fome means to come to fhrift this afternoon. 






And there fhe fhall at Frier Laurence Cell 




»56 


Be ihrieued and married : here is for thy paines. 
Nur, No truly fir not a penny. 






Ro, Go too, I fay you fhall. 


X58. too] to F2, 3, 4. 




Nur, This afternoone fir, well fhe (hall be there. 




i6o 


Ro, And (lay good Nurfe behinde the Abbey wall. 
Within this houre my man Ihall be with thee. 


160. stav] stay thou Fl 
Nurse\ [.] F4. 




And bring thee cordes made like a tackled ftayre. 


i6a. thee\ the F2, 3. 




Which to the high topgallant of my ioy. 


tackled] tackling Q5. 


164 


Mufl be my conuoy in the fecret night. 






Farewell be truftie, and ile quit thy paines : 


165. quit] quite Qq. Ff. 




Farewel, commend me to thy Miftrelfe. 






Nur, Now 





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76 



Romeo and lid let (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 5. 



Compare lines 67. 68, Act 
V. Sc. I of Q2. and cor- 
responding lines of (Qi). 



Nur : Peter, take my fanne, and goe before. Ex, omnes. 

Enter Juliet. 
Jul : The clocke ftroke nine when I did fend my Nurffe 
In halfe an houre ihe promift to returne. 
Perhaps (he cannot finde him. Thats not fo. 
Oh {he is lazie, Loues heralds fhould be thoughts. 
And runne more fwift, than haftie powder fierd. 
Doth hurrie from the fearfull Cannons mouth. 



11.5. 



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ACT II. sc. 5.] Romeo and luliet Q? 2. 1599. 


77 




Nur, Now God in heauen blefle thee, harke you fir. 




i68 


Ro. What faift thou my deare Nurfe ? 






Nur, Is your man fecret, did you nere here fay, two may keep 


169. here] heare Ff. 




counfell putting one away. 


170. away.'] [?] Qs> F4. 




Ro, Warrant thee my mans as true as fteele. 


1 71. Warrant] I warrant 


172 


Nur, Well fir, my Miftrelfe is the fweeteft Lady, Lord, Lord, 
when twas a litle prating thing. O there is a Noble man in town 
one Paris, that would faine lay knife aboord : but ihe good foule 


F2. 3, 4. 
mans] man Ff. 




had as leeue fee a tode, a very tode as fee him : I anger her fome- 


175. see a] a see Fi. 


176 


times, and tell her that Paris is the properer man, but ile warrant 
you, when I fay fo, fhe lookes as pale as any clout in the verfall 
world, doth not Rofemarie and Romeo begin both with a let- 




180 


ter z 

Ro, I Nurfe, what of that ? Both with an R. 






Nur. A mocker thats the dog, name R. is for the no, I know 


181. dog, name R.] dogs- 




it begins with fome other letter, and ihe hath the pretiefl fen- 


name. R. Q3, Fi. dog^es 
or dogs name. R. The 


184 


tentious of it, of you and Rofemarie, that it would do you good 
to heare it. 

Ro. Commend me to thy Lady. 

Nur. I a thoufand times Peter. 

Pet. Anon. 


rest. 

«^.][.]Qs. 


188 


Nur. Before and apace. 






Exit. 


[Exit Nurse and Peter] Ff. 


II. 5. 


Enter luliet. 
lu. The clocke ftrooke nine when I did fend the Nurfe, 


Act II. Scene 5. 




In halfe an houre fhe promifed to retume. 


3. promised] promts' d Q5. 




Perchance (he cannot meete him, thats not fo : 




4 


Oh fhe is lame, loues heraulds fhould be thoughts. 


4. heraulds] HerauldYiy 




Which ten times fader glides then the Suns bearaes. 


3. Herauid Fa. 
5. glides] glide Y A,, 




Driuing backe {hadowes ouer lo wring hills. 






Therefore do nimble'piniond doues draw loue, 




8 


And therefore hath the wind fwift Cupid wings : 


8. wind swift] Hyphened 




Now is the Sun vpon the highmoll hill. 


Q3. S. Ff. 




Of this dayes iourney, and from nine till twelue. 






Is there long houres, yet (he is not come. 


II. /j there] Is three Qq. 


12 


Had fhe afFedions and warme youthfiiU bloud, 


/ three Yl. 




She 





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OA spheres . . . (rqua xntt:^^ 
See Qa, Act 111. Sc. 2, 
1.90. 



Romeo and Iidiet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act II. sc 5. 



Enter Kurfe. 
Oh now (he comes. Tell me gentle Nurfe, 
What fayes my Loue ? 



Kur: Oh I am wearie, let mee reft a while. Lord how 
my bones ake. Oh wheres my man? Giue nae fome aqua 
vitae. 

Jul : I wouJd thou hadft my bones, and I thy newes. 

Nur : Fie, what a iaunt haue I had : and my backe a to* 
ther fide. Lord, Lord, what a cafe am I in. 

Jul : But tell me fweet Nurfe, what fayes Komeo ? 



24 



N«r: Borneo, nay, alas you cannot chufe a tnaft. He^ 
no bodie, he is not the Flower of airtefie, he is not a proper 
man : and for a hand, and a foote, and a baudie, wel go thy 
way wench, thou haft it ifaith. Lord, Lord, how my head 
beates ? 



lul : What of all this ? t6ll me what fayes he to our ma- 
riage ? 



40 



44 



Ni/r: 



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ACT II. SC. 5.] 



Romeo and Iidiet Q'. 2. 1599. 



79 



She would be as fwift in motion as a ball. 

My words would bandie her to my fweete loue. 

M. And his to me, but old folks, many fain as they werdead, 
16 Vnwieldie, flowe, heauie, and pale as lead. 

Enter Nurfe. 
O God fhe comes, 6 hony Nurfe what newes ' 
Haft thou met wich him ? fend thy man away. 
Nur. Peter ftay at the gate. 
20 lu. Now good fweete Nurfe, O Lord, why lookeft thou fad ? 

i Though newes be fad, yet tell them merily. 
I If good, thou ihameft the muiicke of fweete newes. 
By playing it to me, with fo fower a (ace. 
24 ! Nur. I am a wearie, glue me leaue a while, 
} Fie how my bones ake, what a iaunce haue I ? 
I lu. I would thou hadft my bones, and I thy newes : 
' Nay come I pray thee fpeake, good good Nurfe fpeake. 
28 I Nur, lefu what hafte, can you not ftay a while ? 
Do you not fee that I am out of breath ? 

lu. How art thou out of breath, when thou haft breath 
To fay to me, that thou art out of breath ? 
32 The excufe that thou doeft make in this delay. 
Is longer then the tale thou doeft excufe. 
Is lliy newes good or bad ? anfwere to that. 
Say either, and ile ftay the circumftance : 
3^ Let me be fatisfied, ift good or bad ? 

Nur, Well, you haue made a ftmple choyfe, you know not 
how to chufe a man : Romeo, no not he though his face be bet- 
ter then any mans, yet his leg excels all mens, and for a hand 
40 and a foote and a body, though they be not to be talkt on, yet 
they are paft compare : he is not the flower of curtefie, but ile 
warrant him, as gentle as a lamme : go thy wayes wench, feme 
God. What haue you dinde at home ? 
44 lu. No, no. But all this did I know before. 

What fayes he of our marriage, what of that ? 

Nur. Lord how my head akes, what a head haue I ? 
It beates as it would fall in twentie peeces. 

F My 



13. Sh€ toould] Sh€'ld F2, 
3.4- 

15. M.] om. Q4. S. Ff. 
fain\fain€ Qq Fi. 2. 
Two lines, first ending 
folks Ff. 



ao. lookesf] looKst Q4. S. 
F4. lookes F2. looks F3. 

22. shamtst'l sham it Q4vS, 
Ff. 



25. iaunce] jaunt Q4, 5, 
Ff. 
If]I hadfQq. Ff. 

27. good good] good Y2, 3, 4. 

28. kaste,] hast f Tt 

29. that"] om. Fa. how F3, 

4- 



39. leg excels"] legs excels 
Fi, 2, 3 legs excel I F4. 

40. a bodjA body Q4, 5. a 
baxody F2, 3, 4. 

41. ile] I F2. 3, 4. 

42. CLS a\a Ff. 



44. this] this this Fx. 



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8o 



Romeo and luliet (Q^ i) 1.597. 



[act II. sc. 6. 



Nur : Marry he fayes like an honeft Gentleman, and a 
kinde, and I warrant a vertuous : wheres your Mother? 

Jul : Lord, Lord, how odly thou replied ? He faies like a 
kinde Gentleman, and an honed, and a vertuous j wheres 
your mother ? 

Nur: Marry come vp, cannot you flay a while? is this 
the poultefle for mine aking boanes? next arrant youl haue 
done, euen doot your {Me. 

Jul : Nay flay fweet Nurfe, I doo intreate thee now. 
What fayes my Loue, my Lord, my Komeo ? 



60 



64 



^ur : Goe, hye you flraight to Friar Laurence Cell, 
And frame a fcufe that you mufl goe to fhrift : 
There flayes a Bridegroome to make you a Bride. 
Now comes the wanton blood vp in your cheekes, 
I mufl prouide a ladder made of cordes. 
With which your Lord mull clime a birdes nell fooue. 
I mufl take paines to further your delight. 
But you mufl beare the burden foone at night. 
Doth this newes pleafe you now ? 

lul : How doth her latter words reuiue my hart. 
Thankes gentle Nurfe, difpatch thy bufines. 
And He not faile to meete my Jkomeo, Exeunt, 



168 



Enter Romeo, Frier. 

Rom : Now Father Laurence, in tliy holy grant 
Confifls the good of me and luliet, 

Fr: Without more words I will doo all I may, 
To make you happie if in me it lye. 



II. 6. 



Rom : 



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ACT II. sc. 6.] Romeo and luliet Q'. 2. 


1599- 


81 


48 


My back a tother fide, a my backe, ray backe : 
Beihrewe your heart for feuding me about 




48. a mv^ mv Fi. my 
Fa, 3,' 4. ah my Q5. 




To catch my death with iaunfing vp and downe. 




50. iauHsing] iaunting Ff. 

Q4. 5. 

51. not welt] so well Fi. 




lu, Ifaith I am forrie that thou art not well. 




5* 


Sweete, fweete, fweete Nurfe, tell me what fayes my 

Nur. Your loue fayes like an honefl gentleman, 
And a Courteoas, and a kinde, and a handfome, 
And I warrant a vertuous, where is your mother ? 


loue ^ 


50 ill Fa, 3. 4. 


56 


lu. Where is my mother, why Ihe is within, wher (luild flie be ? 
How odly thou repliefl : 


56. Two lines, first ending 
motfur f Ff. 

57. replUst] repltst Ff. 




Your loue fayes like an honefl gentleman. 








Where is your mother ? 




59. yoyr\ my Fa. 3. 4. 


6o 


Nur. Gods lady deare. 








Are you fo hot, marrie come vp I trow. 




61. hot,'] [?] Ff. 




Is this the poultis for my aking bones : 




62. bones :-]\lt\Y{. 




Henceforward do your meffages your felfe. 






64 


lu, Heres fuch a coyle, come what faies Romeo ? 
Nur. Haue you got leaue to go to fhrift to day ? 
lu. I haue. 








Nur. Then high you hence to Frier Lawrence Cell^ 




67. high\ hit Q5. F4. 


68 


There Hayes a husband to make you a wife : 
Now comes the wanton bloud vp in your checkes, 
Theile be in fcarlet flraight at any newes : 
Hie you to Church, I muft an other way. 






72 


To fetch a Ladder by the which your loue 
Mufl climbe a birds neall foone when it is darke, 
I am the drudge, and toyle in your delight : 
But you fhall beare the burthen foone at night. 






76 


Go ile to dinner, hie you to the Cell. 

lull. Hie to high fortune, honeft Nurfe farewell. 


Exeunt. 




II. 6. 


Enter Frier and Romeo. 
Fri. So fmile the heauens vpon this holy a6t, 
That after houres, with forrow chide vs not. 
Ro. Amen, amen, but come»what forrow can, 




Act II. Scene 6. 


4 


It cannot counteruaile the exchange of ioy 


That 





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8^ 



Romeo and luUet (Q! i) 1597. 



[act II. sc. 6. 



Rom : This morning here llie pointed we (hould meet. 
And confumate ihofe uener parting bands, 
Witnes of our harts loue by ioyning hands. 
And come fhe will. 

Fr : I gefle fhe will indeed. 
Youths loue is quicke, fwifter than fwifteft fpeed. 



Enter luliet fomewhat faji, and emhraceth Romeo. 
See where (he comes. 16 

So light of foote nere hurts the troden flower : 
Of loue and ioy, fee fee the foueraigne power, 

lul: IXomeo. 

Rom : My luHei welcome. As doo waking eyes 
(Cloafd in Nights myfts) attend the frolicke Day, 
So Romeo hath expe6led lullet. 
And thou art come. 

Jul: I am (if I be Day) 
Come to my Sunne : fhine foorth, and make me faire. 

Rom : All beauteous fairnes dwelleth in thine eyes. 

lul : Romeo from thine all brightnes doth arife. 

Fr : Come wantons, come, the dealing houres do pafle 
Defer imbracements till fome fitrer time. 
Part for a while, you iliall not be alone, 36 

Till holy Church haue ioynd ye both in one. 

Rom : Lead holy Father, all delay feemes long. 

lul : Make haft, make haft, this lingring doth vs wrong. 

Fr : O, foft and faire makes fweeteft worke they fay. 
Haft is a common hindrer in crofle way. Exeunt omnes. 



Enter 



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ACT II. sc. 6.] Romeo and luliet Q*. 2. 1599. 


83 




That one fhort minute giues me in her fight : 






Do thou but clofe our hands with holy words. 






Then loue-deuouring death do what he dare. 




8 


It is inough I may but call her mine. 

Fri. Thefe violent delights haue violent endes. 






And in their triumph die like fier and powder : 


10. triumph] [:] Fr. 




Which as they kifle confume. The fweeteft honey 




12 


Is loathfome in his owrie delicioufnefle. 
And in the tafte confoundes the appetite. 
Therefore loue moderately, long loue doth fo. 
Too fwift arriues, as tardie as too Howe. 

Enter luliet. 




i6 


Here comes the Lady, Oh fo light a foote 
Will nere weare out the euerlafting flint. 






A louer may beftride the goflamours. 


18. gossamaurs] gossamour 
F4. 

19. ydeles] ydles Q3, Fr, a. 




That ydeles in the wanton fommer ayre. 


20 


And yet not fall, fo light is vanitie. 

lu. Good euen to my ghoftly confeflbr. 

Fri. Romeo fhall thanke thee daughter for vs both. 


idles Q4. 5. F3. 4. 

1 




lu. As much to }^\m, elfe is his thankes too much. 


23. is-\ in Q4. s. Fi, 2. 3. 


24 


Ro, Ah luliet, if the meafure of thy ioy 
Be heapt like mine, and that thy skill be more 
To blafon it, then fweeten with thy breath 


■ 




This neighbour ayre and let rich muficke tongue. 


27. musick€\ musitkes Qq. 


28 


Vnfold the imagind happines that both 




Receiue in either, by this deare encounter. 






lu. Conceit more rich in matter then in words. 






Brags of his fubftance, not of ornament. 




32 


They are but beggers that can count their worth. 
But my true loue is growne to fuch excelTe, 






I cannot fum vp fum of halfe my wealth. 


34. sum of] some 0/Q4, 5. 




Fri. Come, come with me, and we will make fhort 


Ff. 


36 


For by your leaues, you Ihall not flay alone, (worke, 
Till holy Church incorporate two in one. 

F 2 Enter 


[Exeunt.] Fa, 3, 4. 



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«4 



Romeo and hdiet [Q*. i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. I. 



Enter Benuolio, Mercutio, 
Ben : I pree thee good Mercutio lets retire. 
The day is hot, the Cape Is are abroad. 



III. 1. 



Mer : Thou art like one of thofe, that when bee comes 
into the confines of a tauerne, claps me his rapier on the 
boord, and fayes, God fend me no need of thee: and by 
the operation of the next cup of wine, he drawes it on the 
drawer, when indeed there is no need. 

Ben : Am I like fuch a one ? 

Mer: Go too, thou art as hot a lacke being mooude, 
and as foone mooude to be moodie, and as foone moodie to 
be mooud. 

Ben : And what too ? 

Mer: Nay, and there were two fuch, wee fhould haue 



none fhortly. Didft not thou fall out with a man for crack- 
ing of nuLs, hauing no other reafon, but becaufe thou hadfl 
halill eyes? wliat eye but fuch an eye would haue pickt out 



20 



fuch a quarrell ? With another for coughing, becaufe hee 
wakd thy dogge that lay a fleepe in the Sunue? With a 
Taylor for wearing his new dublet before Eafter : and 
with another for tying his new (hoes with olde ribands. 
And yet thou wilt forbid me of quarrelling. 



^4 



Bm : By my head heere comes a Capolet, 

Enter Tyhalt, 
Mer: By my heele I care not. 
Tyh : Gentlemen a word with one of you. 



Mer: 



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ACT III. 



SC. 1.] 



Borneo and luliet Ql 2. 1599. 



III. I. Enter Mercutio, Benuolio, and men, 

Ben. I pray thee good Mercutio lets retire, 
The day is hot, the Capels abroad : 

And if we meete we ihall not fcape a brawle, for now thefe hot 
daies, is the mad blood flirring. 

Aler. Thou art like one of tliefe fellowes, that when he enters 
the confines of a Tauerne, claps me his fword vpon the table, 
and fayes, Crod fend me no need of thee : and by the operation 
of the fecond cup, draws him on the drawer, when indeed there 
is no need. 

Bm. Am I like fuch a fellow ? 

Mer, Come, come, thou art as hot a lacke in thy moode as 
any in Italie : and alToone moued to be moodie, and alToone 
moodie to be moued. 

Ben, And what too ? 

Mer, Nay and there were two fuch, we fhould haue none 
j6 fhortly, for one would kill the other: thou, why thou wilt 
quarell with a man that hath a haire more, or a haire lefle in hi?, 
beard, then thou haft : thou wilt quarell with a man for cracking 
Nuts, hauing no other reafon, but becaufe thou haft hafel eyes : 
what eye, but fuch an eye wold fpie out fuch a quarrel ? thy head 
is as full of quarelles, as an egge is full of meate, and yet thy 
head hath bene beaten as addle ^ an egge for quarelling : thou 
haft quarelJ with a man for coffing in the ftreete, becaufe hee 
24 hath wakened thy dogge that hath laine afleep in the fun. Didft 
thou not fall out with a taylor for wearing his new doublet be- 
fore Eafter, with an other for tying his new ftiooes with olde ri- 
band, and yet thou wilt tuter me from quarelling ? 
28 Ben, And I were fo apt to quarell as thou art, any man ftioulcl 

buy the fee-(imple of my life for an houre and a quarter. 

Mer, The fee-fimple, 6 iimple. 

Enter Tybalt, Petruchio, and others. 
22 Ben. By my head here comes the Capulets, 

Mer. ^Y my heele I care not. 

Tybalt, Follow me clofe, for I will fpeake to them, 
(xentlemen. Good den, a word with one of you. 

Mrr 



Act III. Scene i. 



2. Capels] Capulets Q4, 5, 
Ff. 



5. these\ those F4. 



27. fro ni^^ for Q5. 



30. fee-simple,] [?1 Ff. 



^i. comes] come Q$, F2, 3, 
' 4- 



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86 



Romeo and Iidiet (g? i) 1597. 



[act hi. sc. 1. 



Mer : But one word with one of vs ? You had beft couple 
it with fomewhat, and make it a word and a blow. 
Tyh : I am apt enough to that if I haue occafion. 

Aler : Could you not take occafion ? 

Tyl : Mercittio thou conforts with Romeo ? 

Men Confort. Zwounes confort? the llaue wil make fid- 
lers of vs. If you doe (irra, look for nothing but difcord : Fof 
heeres ray fiddle-fticke. 



Enter Romeo, 

Tyh : Well peace be with you, heere comes my man. 

Mfr : But He be hanged if he weare your lyuerj' : Mary 
go betbre into the field, and he may be your follower, fo in 
that fence your worth ip may call him man. 

Tyb: Romeo the hate I beare to thee can afFoord no bet- 
ter words then thefe, thou art a villaine. 

Rom : Tybalt the loue I beare to thee, doth excufe the 
appertaining rage to fuch a word : villaine am I none, ther- 
fore I well perceiue thou knowft me not. 



Mer: O diilionorable vile fubmifCon. 



Mlajlochado 



36 



44 



5a 



5^ 



60 



T)fb : Bace boy this cannot feme thy turne, and therefore 
drawe. ' 

Ro : I doe proteft I neuer iniured thee, but loue thee bet- 64 
ter than thou canfl deuife^ till thou (halt know the reafon of 
my loue. 



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ACT HI. sc. I.] Romeo and luUei (> 2. 1599. 


87 




Mer. And but one word with one of -v's, couple it with fome- 


35. us,] [?] Qq. Ff. 


36 


thing, make it a word and a blowe. 






Tib, You (hall find me apt inough to that fir, and you wil giue 


37. wi7] sha// Qs. 




me occalion. 






Mercu. Could you not take fome occaiion without gl- 




40 


uing? 






Tyb. Mercutio, thou conforteft with Romeo, 


41. c0HS0rtest']coruot^stTf, 




Mer, Confort, what doeft thou make vs Minftrels ? and thou 


Romeo,\ [,] Fa. 




make Minftrels of vs, looke to hear nothing but difcords : heeres 




44 


my fiddlefticke, heeres that (hall make you daunce : zounds con- 


44. xounds] Com* Ft 




fort. 






Ben, We talke here in the publike haunt of men : 






Either withdraw vnto fome priuate place. 




48 


Or reafon coldly of your greeuances : 
Or elfe depart, here all eyes gaze on vs. 

Mer, Mens eyes were made to looke, and let them gaze. 
I will not budge for no mans pleafure I. 
Enter Romeo. 




S^ 


Tyb, Well peace be with you fir, here comes my man. 

Mer, But lie be hangd fir if he weare your liuerie : 
Marrie go before to field, heele be your follower. 
Your worihip in that fenfe may call him man. 




56 


Tyb, Romeo, the loue I beare thee, can alfoord 
No better terrae then this : thou art a villaine. 

Ro, Tybalt, the reafon that I haue to loue thee. 
Doth much excufe the appertaining rage 




6o 


To fuch a greeting : villaine am I none. 
Therefore ferewell, I fee thou knoweft me not. 


60. villaine am I none] (/ 
am Qs) om. Fa, 3, 4. 

61. kftow€st] kncw'stQ^, s, 




Tyb, Boy, this fhall not excufe the iniuries 


Ff. 




That thou haft done me, therefore turne and draw. 




64 


Ro, I do proteft I neuer iniuried thee. 
But loue thee better then thou canft deuife : 


64. iniuried'] iniuredQ%,A. 
injur d Qs, Ff. 

65. loue^ loud Ff. 




Till thou ftialt know the reafon of my loue. 


deuise-:]l]QS' [;] F4. 




And fo good Capulet, which name I tender 




68 


As dearely as mine owne, be fatisfied. 


68. mine"] my Qq. Ff. 




Mer, calme, diftionourable, vile fubmiflion : 


69. calme,] [,] ora. Q4. 5. 




F 3 yjf/a 





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88 



Romeo and lu/iet (Q". i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 1. 



AUaJlochado caries- 
it away. You Ratcatcher, come backe, come backe. 

Tyh : What wouldeft with me ? 

Mer : Nothing King of Gates, but borrow one of your 
nine lines, therefore come dravve your rapier out of your 
fcabard, leafl mine be about your eares ere you be aware. 



Rom : Stay Tihalt, hould Mercutio : BenuoHo beate 
downe their weapons. 

Tilcdt vnder Romeos arme thriiJIs Mir- 
cutio, in andjlyes. 



Mer: Is he gone, hath hee nothing? A poxe on your 
houfes. 

Rom : What art thou hurt man, the wound is not deepe. 

Aler : Noe not fo deepe as a Well, nor fo wide as a 
bame doore, but it will ferue I warrant. What meant you to 
come betweene vs ? I was hurt vnder your arme. 

Rom : I did all for the bed. 

Aler : A poxe of your houfes, I am fairely dreft. Sirra 
goe fetch me ^ Surgeon. 

Boy : I goe my Lord. 

Aler : I am pepperd for this world, I am fped yfaiih, he 
hath made wormes meate of me, & ye aske for me to mor- 
row you fliall finde me a graue-man. A poxe of your houfes, 
I fhall be fairely mounted vpon foure mens Ihoulders: For 
your houfe of the Mountegues and the Capolets : and then 
fome peafantly rogue, fome Sexton, fome bale llaue Ihall 
write my Epitapth, that Tybalt came and broke the Princes 
Lawes, and Mercutio was llaine for the firft and fecond 
caufe. Wher*s the Surgeon ? 

Boy : Hee's come fir. 

Men Now heele keepe a mumbling in my guts on the 
other fide, come Benuolio, lend me thy hand : a poxe of your 
houfes. Exeunt 

Rom : 



88 
92 

100 



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ACT III. SC. 



'•] 



Romeo and luliet Ql 2. T599. 



89 



76 



80 



84 



88 



92 



96 



Allajiucatho carries it away, 

Tihalt, you ratcatcher, will you walke ? 

Til\ What wouldft thou haue with me ? 

M. Good King of Cats, nothing but one of your nine lines, 
that I meane to make bold withall, and as you fliall vfe mee 
hereafter drie beate the reft of the eight. Will you plucke your 
fword out of his pilcher by the eares ? make hafte, leaft mine be 
about your eares ere it be out. 

Tlh. I am for you. 

Rom, Gentle Mercutlo, put thy Rapier vp. 

Mer, Come ftr, your Palfado. 

Rom, Draw Benuolio, beate downe their weapons. 
Gentlemen, for fliame forbeare this outrage, 
Tibalt, Mercutio, the Prince exprelly hath 
Forbid this bandying in Verona ftreetes. 
Hold Tybalt, good Mercutio, 

Away Tybalt. 

Mer, I am hurt. 
A plague a both houfes, I am fped. 
Is he gone and hath nothing. 

Ben. What art thou hurt ? 

Mer. I, I, a fcratch, a fcratch, marrie tis inough. 
Where is my Page ? go villaine, fetch a Surgion. 

Ro, Courage man, the hurt cannot be much. 

Mer, No tis not fo deepe as a well, nor fo wide as a Church 
doore,but tis inough, twill ferue : aske for me to morrow, and you 
fhall finde me a graue man. I am peppered I warrant, for this 
world, a plague a both your houfes, founds a dog, a rat, a moufe, 
a cat, to fcratch a man to death : a braggart, a rogue, a villaine, 
that fights by the book of arithmatick, why the deule came you 
betweene vs ? I was hurt vnder your arme. 

Ro, I thought all for the beft. 

Mer, Helpe me into fome houfe Benuolio, 



Or 



72. wouldst] woulds Q3, 4, 
Fi. 2. 3. 



84. Forbid this] Forbid 
Q3. 4, 5. Forbiddtn Ff. 
Vtrona\ Verona's Q5. 

[Exit Tybalt] Ff. 



87. a botfi] a both the Fi. 
of both the F2. 3, 4. 

88. nothing.^ [f] Qq. Ff. 



95. pepperecT^ pepper d Ff. 

96. a both] of both F2, 3. 4. 
sounds^ 'sounds 1^5. 

What Ff. 
98. deule] deule Q3. 4, 
Fi, 2. devil Q5. dev I 
F3. Div'l F4. 



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90 



Romeo and Iiiliet (Qf i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 



Rom : This Gentleman the Princes neere Alie. 
My very frend hath tane this mortall wound 
In my behalfe, my reputation ilaind 

With Tibalis flaunder, Ti^bali that an houre 108 

Hath beene my kinfman. Ah luliei 
Thy beaut ie makes me thus effeminate. 
And in my temper foftens valors fteele. 

Enter Renuolio, 

Ben : Ah Romeo Romeo braue MerciUio b dead. 
That gallant fpirit hath a fpir'd the cloudes. 
Which too vntimely fcorad the lowly earth. 

Rom : This dales black fate, on more dales doth depend 
This but begins what other dayes muft end. 
Enter Tihalt, 

Ben : Heere comes the furious Tibalt backe againe. 

Rom : A Hue in tryumph and Mercutio (laine ? 
Away to heauen refpeAlue lenity : 

And fier eyed fury be my condu6t now. 120 

Now Tibalt take the villaine backe againe, 
Which late thou gau'ft me : for Mercutios foule. 
Is but a little way aboue the cloudes. 

And ftaies for thitae to beare him company. 1 24 

Or thou, or I, or both fhall follow him. 



112 



116 



F}ght, Tihalt falles, 
Ben : Romeo away, thou feed that Tibalt* s fUune, 
The Citizens approach, away, begone 

Thou wilt be taken. 



Rom : 



13a 



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ACT III. sc. I.] Romeo and Iidiet Cf. 2. T599. 


91 




Or I Ihall faint, a plague a both your houfes. 


loa. a both] d both F4. 




They haue made wormes meate of me. 




104 


I haue it, and foundly, to your houfes. 


104. soundly,] [,] oin. Qq. 
to] too F2. too, F3, 4. 




Exit. 




Ro. This (Gentleman the Princes neare alie. 


houses.] [— ] Q4, 5. 




My very friend hath got this mortall hurt 
In my behalfe, my reputation (laind 


106. got this] gott his Q3. 


io8 


With Ti/balts llaunder, Tybali that an houre 
Hath bene my Cozen, O fweete Juliet, 
Thy bewtie hath made me effeminate. 
And in my temper foftned valours fteele. 

Enter Benuolio. 




112 


Ben, Romeo, Romeo, braue Mercutio is dead. 


112. Mercutio is] Mercu- 






tios is Fi. Mercutios 




That gallant fpirit hath afpir'd the Clowdes, 


QS, F2, 3, 4. 




Which too vn timely here did fcorne the earth. 


115. mo] moe Q4. more 
doth] doe Fa. do F3. 




Ro. This dayes blacke fate, on mo daies doth deped. 


u6 


This but begins, the wo others muft end. 


does F4. 
[Enter Tybalt] Ff. 
116. begins,] [.] ora. Q5. 




Ben. Here comes the furious Tybalt backe againe. 




Ro. He gan in triumph and Mercutio flaine^ 


F4. 
118. ^<2«1^^^Q3, 4, Fi. a. 




Away to heauen, refpediue lenitie. 


gone Q5. F3, 4. 
slaine,]mYi. 
lao. fier end] fier and Q3. 
fire and Q4. 5. Fi. a. 
fire, and F3. 4. 


no 


And fier end furie, be my conduft now. 




Now Tybalt take the villaine backe againe. 




That late thou gaueft me, for Mercutios foule 


12a. gauest] gaustYt Q5. 




Is but a little way aboue our heads. 




124 


Staying for thine to keepe him companie : 
Either thou or I, or both, muft go with him. 

Ty. Thou wretched boy that didft cofort him here, 
Shalt with him hence. 




128 


Ro. This fhall determine that. 

They Fight. Tibalt /aZ/ej. 
Ben. Romeo, away be gone : ^ 
The Citizens are vp, and Tybalt flaine, 






Stand not amazed, the Prince wil doome thee death. 


131. amazed] ama%d Ff. 
Q5. 


132 


If thou art taken, hence be gone away. 




Ro. 





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92 



Romeo and Iiiliet (Q*. i) T597. 



[act III. sc. 1. 



[ Waich : Vp] catchword 
in tlie original. 



Rom : Ah I am fortunes flaue. 

Enter Citizens, 



Exeunt 



IVdtch. Wher's he that flue Mercutlo, Tybalt that vil- 156 
laine ? 

Ben : There is that Tj/lalt, 

[IVatchx Vp] 
Vp firra goe with vs. 

Enter Prince ^ Capolets wife. 

Pry: Where be the vile beginners of this fmy ? 140 

Ben : Ah Noble Prince I can difcouer all 
The mod vnlucky mannage of this brawle. 
Heere lyes the man Ilaine by yong Romeo, 
That flew thy kinfman braue Mcrcutio, 144 

M: Tllalt, Tybalt, O my brothers child, 
Vnhappie fight? Ah the blood is fpilt 
Of my deare kinfman. Prince as thou art true : 
For blood of ours, ftied bloud of Alountagew. 148 

Pry: Speake Benuolio who began this fray? 

Ben : Tibalt heere ftaine whom Romeo^ hand did llay. 
Romeo who fpake him fayre bid him bethinke 
How nice the quarrell was. 



But Tibalt ftill perilling in his wrong, 



The llout Mercutio drewe to calme the ftormc, 



Which Romeo feeing cal'd ftay Gentlemen, 164 

And on me cry'd, who drew to part their llrife, 



And 



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ACT III. SC. I.] 



Romeo and luUet Ct! 2. 1599. 



93 



Ro. O 1 am fortunes foole. 
Ben, Why doft thou (lay ? 

Evit Romeo. 
Enter Citizens, 
Cltti. Which way ran he that kild Mercutio ? 
136 Tybalt that mutherer, which way ran he ? 
Ben. There lies that Tyhalt, 
Citi, Vp (ir, go with me : 
I charge thee in the Princes name obey. 

Enter Prince, olde Mountague, Capulet, 
their wiues and all, 
140 Prin, Where are the vile beginners of this fray ? 

Ben. O Noble Prince, I can difcouer all : 
The vnluckie mannage of this fatall brail. 
There lies the man flaine by young Romeo, 
144 That flew thy kifman, braue Mercutio. 

j Capu. in. Tybalt, my Cozin, O my brothers child, 
j O Prince, O Cozen, husband, O the bloud is fpild 
; Of my deare kifman, Prince as thou art true, 
148 For bloud of ours, fliead bloud of Mountague. 
O Cozin, Cozin. 

Prin. Benuolio, who began this bloudie fray ? 
Ben. Tybalt here flain, whom Romeos hand did flay, 
152 ' Romeo that fpoke him faire, bid him bethinke 
How nice the quarell was, and vrgd withall 
Your high difpleafure all this vtrered. 
With gentle breath, calm look, knees humbly bowed 
ij(5 Could not take truce with the vnruly fpleene 
Of Tybalt deafe to peace, but that he tilts 
With piercing fteele at bold Mercutios breaft, 
Who all as hot, turnes deadly poynt to poynt, 
160 And with a Martiall fcorne, with one hand beates 
Cold death afide, and with the other fends 
It backe to Tybalt, whofe dexteritie 
Retorts it, Romeo he cries aloud, 
164 Hold friends, friends part, and fwifter then his tongue. 

His 



140. vt/f] vild F2, 3. 

141. ali:] [:] om. Ff. Q5. 



144. kisman] kinsman Qq. 
Ff. 



147. kisman] kinsman Qq. 
Ff. 



150. blouiie] om. Ff. 
15a. bid] bad Q^. 



154. vtrered] vttered Qq. 
Ff. 

155. baioed] bow'd Ff. 

157. Tybalt] Tybalts Yi. 



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94 



Romeo and luliet {Cf. i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 2. 



And with his agill arme yong Romeo, 

As faft as tung ciyde peace, fought peace to make. 

While they were enterchanging thnifts and blows, 

Vnder yong Komeos laboring arme to part. 

The furious Tyhalt caft an enuious thruft. 

That rid the life of ftout Mercutio, 

With that he fled, but prefently returned. 

And with his rapier braued Ro/weo : 

That had but newly entertained reuenge. 

And ere I could draw forth my rapyer 

To part their furie, downe did Tyhalt fall. 

And this way Ro/weo fled. 

Mo : He is a Mountagew and fpeakes partiall. 
Some twentie of them fought in this blacke ftrife : 
And all thofe twenty could but kill one life. 
I doo intreate fweete Prince thoult iuftice giue, 
Romeo flew Tyhalt, Romeo may not Hue. 



168 



176 



180 



Prin : And for that offence 
Immediately we doo exile him hence. 
I haue an interefl in your hates proceeding. 
My blood for your rude braules doth lye a bleeding. 
But He amerce you with fo large a fine. 
That you fhall all repent the lolfe of mine. 
I will be deafe to pleading and excufes. 
Nor teares nor prayers fhall purchafe for abufes. 



188 



192 



Pittie fhall dwell and gouerne with vs flill : 



Mercie to all but murdrers, pardoning none that kill. 

Exeunt omnes. 
Enter luliet. 
lul : Gallop apace you fierie footed fleedes 

To 



HI. 2 



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ACT III. SC. 2.] 



Romeo and luUet Q*. 2. 1599. 



95 



168 



176 

180 

184 

188 

192 

196 
III. 2. 



His aged arme beates downe their fatall poynts. 
And twixt them rulhes, vnderneath whofe arme^ 
An enuious thrull from Tybalt, hit the life 
Of ftout Mercutio, and then Ti/bali fled. 
But By and by comes back e to Romeo, 
Who had but newly entertaind reuenge. 
And toote they go like lightning, for ere I 
Could draw to part them, was ftout Tybalt ilaine : 
And as he fell, did Romeo turne and flie. 
This is the truth, or let Benuolio die. 

Ca. Wi. He is a kifman to the Mountague, 
AfFe^on makes him falfe, he fpeakes not true : 
Some twentie of them fought in this blacke ftrife. 
And all thofe twentie could but kill one life. 
I beg for luftice which thou Prince muft giue : 
Romeo flew Tybalt, Romeo muft not liue. 

Prin. Romeo flew him, he flew Mercutio, 
Who now the price of his deare bloud doth owe. 

Capu. Not Romeo Prince, he was Mercutios friend. 
His fault concludes, but what the law fhould end. 
The life of Tybalt. 

Prin. And for that offence. 
Immediately we do exile him hence : 
I haue an intereft in your hearts proceeding : 
My bloud for your rude brawles doth lie a bleeding. 
But ile amerce you with fo fh-ong a fine. 
That you fhall all repent the lofle of mine. 
It will be deafe to pleading and excufes. 
Nor teares, nor prayers fhall purchafe out abufes. 
Therefore vfe none, let Romeo hence in haft, 
Elfe when he is found, that houre is his laft. 
Beare hence this body, and attend our will, 
Mercie but murders, pardoning thofe that kill. 



Exit. 



Enter luliet alone. 
Gallop apace, you fierie footed fteedes, 

G 



Towards 



165. 



_ a^ed] agill Q4, 5. 
able Fa, 3, 4. 



/ 



171. tOOt€\ toot Q4, 5, 

Fi, 2. io't F3, 4. 



175. kismati] kinsman Qq. 



ni 



Mountague] Mountaguti 

Qs. 



182. owe,'] [?] Q3. 

185. Capu.] Cap. Q3. Ff. 
Moun. Q4. Mou. Q5. 



192. It wilt] I will Q^, s, 
F2. 34. 

193. out] our Ff. 



195. his] the Qs. 



[Exeunt.l Ff. 
Act hi. Scene 2. 



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95 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 2. I 



To Phoebus man fi on, fuch a Waggoner 

As Phaeton, would quickly bring you thether. 

And fend in cloudie night immediately. 



Enter Nurfe wringing her hands, with the ladder 
of cordes in her lap. 

But how now Nurfe : O Lord, why lookft thou fad? 
What haft thou there, the cordes r 



Nun 



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ACT III. SC. 2.] 



Romeo and luUet Ql 2. 1599. 



97 



Towards Phoelus lodging, luch a wagoner 
As Phaelan would whip you to the weft. 
And bring in clowdie night immediately. 
Spread thy clofe curtaine loue-performing night, 
That runnavvayes eyes may wincke, and Romeo 
Leape to thefe armes, vntalkt of and vnfeene, 
Louers can fee to do their amorous rights. 
And by their ovvne bewties, or if lone be blind. 
It beft agrees with night, come ciuill night. 
Thou fober futed matron all in blacke. 
And learne me how to loofe a winning match, 
Plaide for a paire of ftainlelle maydonhoods. 
Hood my vnmand bloud bayting in my cheokes, 
With thy blacke mantle, till ftrange loue grow bohl, 

16 j Thinke true loue a6led limple modeftie : 

Come night, come Romeo, come thou day in niglii, 
For thou wilt lie vpon the winges of night. 
Whiter then new fnow vpon a Rauens backe : 
Come gentle night, come louing black browd night, 
Giue me my Romeo , and when I ihall die. 
Take him and cut him out in little ftarres. 
And he will make the face of heauen lb fine, 

24 That all the world will be in loue with night. 
And pay no worlhip to the garilli Sun. 
O I haue bought the manfion of a loue. 
But not pofleft it, and though I am fold, 

28 Not yet enioyd, fo tedious is this day, 
As is the night before fome feftiuall. 
To an impatient child that hath new robes 
And may not weare them. O here comes my Nurfe. 

Enter Nurfe with cords. 
32 And flie brings newes, and euery tongue that fpeaks 
But Romeos name, fpeakes heauenly eloquence : 
Now Nurfe, what newes? what haft thou there. 
The cords that Romeo bid thee fetch ? 



Nur, I, 



. Phaetan] Phaeton Qq. 
Ff. 



6. rnnnawaves] run-oiiuiyts 
Q4, 5. V\. ritn-uw.tUs 
F2, 3. run-aways F4. 



9. An.i hy^ 
F2. 3, 4.' 



r^y O4. 5. 



\/ 



19. nnv snow upoji] new 
sno-.v on F'a, 3, 4. snow 
upon Q4, 5. 

21. /] A^Q4. 5- 



24. U'Un shall Q5. 



34. there] [?] Ff. 



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Google 



98 



Romeo and luUet (Q! i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 2. 



Nur : I, I, the cordes : alacke we are vndone. 
We are vndone, Ladie we are vndone. 

lul : What diuell art thou that torments me thus ? 

Nurf: Alack the day, hees dead, hees dead, hees dead. 

Jul: This torture fhould be roard in difmall hell. 
Can heauens be fo enuious ? 

Nur: Romeo can if heauens cannot. 



36 

45 
40 
46 



I faw the wound, I faw it with mine eyes. 
God faue the faraple, on his manly bread : 
A bloodie coarfe, a piteous bloodie coarfe. 
All pale as aihes, I fwounded at the fight. 

Jul : Ah Romeo, Romeo, what difafler hap 
Hath feuerd thee from thy true Juliet ? 
Ah why fhould Heauen fo much coufpire with Woe, 
Or Fate enuie our happie Marriage, 
So foone to funder vs by timelelfe Death ? 

Nur : O Tj/lali, Tybalt, the bed frend I had, 
O honed Tybalt, curteous Gentleman. 



56 



64 



lul : What ftorme is this that blowes fo contrarie. 
Is Tybalt dead, and Romeo murdered : 
My deare loude coufen, and my dearefl Lord. 
Then let the trumpet found a generall doome 
Thefe two being dead, then liuing is there none. 



68 



Nur . 



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^^^^I^-T III. SC. 2.] 



Romeo and luliet ft 2. 1599. 



99 



36 



40 



44 






60 



64 



68 



Nur. I, I, the cords. 

lu. Ay me what news ? why doft thou wring thy hads ? 

Nur. A weraday, hees dead, hees dead, hees dead, 

e are vndone Lady, we are vndone. 

lack the day, hees gone, hees kild, hees dead. 

!u. Can heauen be lb enuious ? 

Nur. Romeo can, 
'hough heauen cannot. O Romeo, Romeo, 

ho euer would haue thought it Romeo ? 

lu. What diuell art thou that doft torment me thus ? 

his torture fhould be rored in dilmall hell, 

aih Romeo llaine hirafelfe ? fay thou but I, 

nd that bare vowell I fliall poyfon more 

hen the death arting eye of Cockatrice, 

am not I, if there be fuch an I. 

T thofe eyes ihot, that makes thee anfwere I : 
:i" he be llaine fay I, or if not, no. 
riefe, founds, determine my weale or wo. 
_ Nur, I faw the wound, I law it with mine eyes, 
"^^od faue the marke, here on his manly breft, 
^^^ piteous coarfe, a bloudie piteous coarfe. 
Pale, pale as aihes, all bedawbde in bloud. 
All in goare bloud, I founded at the fight. 

lu. O break my hart, poore banckrout break at once. 
To prifon eyes, nere looke on libertie. 
Vile earth too earth refigne, end motion here. 
And thou and Romeo prefle on heauie beare. 

Nur. O Ti/lalt, Tybalt, the beft friend I had, 
O curteous Tybalt, honeft Gentleman, 
That euer I Ihould hue to fee thee dead. 

lu. What ftorme is this that blowes fo contrarie ? 
Is Romeo flaughtred ? and is Tybalt dead ? 
My deareft Cozen, and my dearer Lord, 
Then dreadfuU Trumpet found the generall doome, 
For who is lining, if thofe two are gone ? 

G 2 Nur. Tybalt 



38. weraday] weladayQq, 
F3, 4. weiady Fi, 2. 
hees dead] Twice only Ff. 



46. rored] roar'd Ff. 



49. death arting\ death' 
darting Qq. Ff. 

50. an /.] [,] (^s^ 

51. th€e\ the Fa, 3, 4. 



53. Brieft, sounds,] [, ,] 
cm. Qs, F4. 
my] o/myFLQs. 



57. MawMe] bedawde 
Q4. bedeaw d Q5. 

58. sounded] swouned Q5. 
swooned F4. 

59. banchrout] bankrupt 
Qs. F4. 

61. too] to Qq. Ff. 

6a. on] one Q4, 5, Fa. 3, 4. 
beare] beereQ^, 5, Fi, a. 
beer F 3, 4. 



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Google 



lOO 



Romeo and luUet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 2. 



Nur : Tylalt is dead, and Romeo banifhed, 
Romeo that murdred him is baniflied. 

lul : Ah heauens, did Romeos hand ilied Tylalts blood ? 

Nur : It did, it did, alacke the day it did. 

lul : O ferpents hate, hid wiih a flowring face : 



O painted fepulchcr, including fihh. 



Was neuer booke containing fo foule matter. 
So feirly bound. Ah, what meant Romeo ? 

Nur : There is no truth, no faith, no honeftie in men : 
All falfe, all faithles, periurde, all forfworne. 



88 



Shame come to Romeo, 

lul : A blifter on that tung, he was not borne to fliame : 



92 



Vpon his face Shame is alliamde to fit. 



But wherefore villaine didft thou kill my Coufen ? 
That villaine Coufen would haue kild my husband. 



104 



All 



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( 


ACT III. sc. 3.] ftom^o and luUet Q'. 2. 1599. 


lOI 




Nur. Tybalt is gone and Romeo baniihed. 




7^ 


Romeo that kild him he is baniihed. 






lull God, did Romeos hand Ihead Tibalts bloud ? 


73. luli. God] Separate 
line Ff. 
did] Nur. Did F2, 3. 




It did, it did, alas the day, it did. 




Nur. lerpent heart, hid with a flowring face. 


74. // did] Nur. // did 


76 


///. Did euer draggon keepe fo faire a Caue? 


75. Nur.]Jul.F2.3.4.05- 




Bewtifull tirant, fiend angelicall : 


76 lu.] om. F2, 3 4. Qs. 




Rauenous douefeatherd raue, woluilh rauening lamb. 


78. Two lines Ff., the first 




Defpifed fubftance of diuineft Ihowe : 


ending rauen. 
douefeatherd] Doite-fva- 


8o 


lull oppofite to what thou iuftly leem'fl. 


ther'dVi. doue,/eaihred 
Q4. 5. Doutj feathtrd 




A dimme faint, an honourable villaine : 


Fa, 3. 4. 




nature what hadfl thou to do in hell 


81. dimme] dimne Fi. 
damfted Q4, 5, F2, 3, 4. 




When thou didll bower the fpirit of a fiend. 


83. bower] power Q4. 
Poure Qs. 


84 


In mortall paradife of fuch fweete flelh ? 




Was euer booke containing fuch vile matter 






So fairely bound ? 6 that deceit Ihould dwell 






In fuch a gorgious Pallace. 




88 


Nur. Theres no truil, no faith, no honeftie in men. 
All periurde, all forfworne, all naught, all dilTemblers, 
Ah wheres my man ? giue me fome Aqua-vitae : 
Thefe griefs, thefe woes, thefe forrows make me old. 




92 


Shame come to Romeo. 






lu. Blillerd be thy tongue 


93. Bllsierd] B/is/eredQq. 




For fuch a wilh, he was not borne to Ihame : 






Vpon his brow fhame is alliam'd to fit : 




96 


For tis a throane where honour may be crownd 
Sole Monarch of the vniuerfal earth. 






what a beaft was I to chide at him ? 


98. ai Aim] Aim Fz. Aim 




Nur, Wil you fpeak wel of him that kild your coziu ? 


so Fa, 3, 4. 


100 


lu. Shall I fpeake ill of him that is my husband ? 
Ah poor my lord, what tongue flial fmooth thy name. 
When I thy three houres wife haue mangled it ? 
But wherefore villaine didfl thou kill my Cozin ? 




104 


That villaine Cozin would haue kild my husband : 
Backe foolilh teares, backe to your natiue fpring. 
Your tributarie drops belong to woe. 

Which 





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I02 


Romeo and luUet {Q: i) 1597. [act hi. 


sc. 2 




All this is comfort. But there yet remaines 






Worfe than his death, which faine I would forget : 
But ah, it prelTeth to my memorie, 






Romeo is banilhed. Ah that word Bauifhed 




• 


Is worfe than death. Komco is banilhed. 

Is Father, Mother, Tybalt, luliet. 

All killd, all flaine, aU dead, all banillied. 




# 


Where are my Father and my Mother Nurfe ? 

Nur : Weeping and wayling ouer Tybalts coarfe. 
Will you goe to them ? 

lul: I, I, when theirs are fpent. 
Mine (hall he fhed for Komeos baniihment. 


Nur: 



112 



116 



13a 



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io8 



ii6 



120 



124 



128 



13a 



136 



140 



ACT HI. SC. 



2.] 



Romeo and luliet O: 2. 1599. 



103 



Wliich you miflaking offer vp to ioy. 

My husband Hues that Tybalt would haue flaine, 

And Tybalts dead that would haue llain my husband : 

All this is comfort, wherefore weepe I then ? 

Some word there was, worfer then Tybalts death 

That raurdred me, I would forget it faine. 

But oh it prefles to ray memorie. 

Like damned guiltie deeds to (inners mindes, 

Tybalt is dead and Romeo baniihed : 

That baniihed, that one word banifhed. 

Hath flaine ten thoufand Tybalts : Tybalts death 

Was woe inough if it had ended there : 

Or if fower woe dehghts in fellowfliip. 

And needly will be ranckt with other griefes. 

Why followed not when flie faid Tybalts dead, 

Thy father or thy mother, nay or both. 

Which moderne lamentation might haue moued. 

But with a reareward following Tybalts death, 

Romeo is baniflied : to fpeake that word. 

Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, luliet. 

All flaine, all dead : Romeo is baniflied. 

There is no end, no limit, meafure bound. 

In that words death, no words can that woe found. 

Where is my father and my mother Nurfe ? 

Nur, Weeping and wayling ouer Tybalts courfe. 
Will you go to them ? I will bring you thither. 

lu, Wafli they his wounds with teares ? mine 
When theirs are drie, for Romeos banifliment. 
Take vp thofe cordes, poore ropes you are beguilde, 
Both you and I for Romeo is exilde : 
He made you for a highway to ray bed. 
But I a maide, die maiden widowed. 
Come cordes, come Nurfe, ile to my wedding bed. 
And death not Romeo, take my maiden head. 

Nur, Hie to your chamber, lie finde Romeo 
To comfort you, I wot well where he is : 

G 3 



fliall be 
(fpent. 



109. Tyfialts] Tida/tFt. 

stain] kil'd Fa. kiUd 

F3. 4. 
III. vford ik^re was] words 

there was Q3, 4. Fi. 

words there were Q5. 
1 1 a. murdred] murdered 

Q4. Fi. 3. 4. 



Harke 



121. /o/Iowed]/filow'd Q5. 



123. moued] mou'd Fd Q5. 

za4. rearevfard] rere-ward 
Ff. rereward Q3. 



ia8. measure] [,] Qq. Ff. 



131. course] coarse Ff. Q5. 
corse Q4. 

133. teares t] [:] Q3, 4, Ff. 

136. /] [»] QS. F3, 4. 
T37. a] an F4. 

139. cordes] cordQq. Ff. 



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104 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act 111. sc. 3. 



Nwr; Ladie, your Rowt'o will be here to night. 
He to him, he is hid at Laurence Cell. 

lul : Doo lb, and beare this Ring.to my true Knight, 
And bid him come to take his lall farewell. Exeunt. 



144 



Enter Frier. 1 11. 3 

Fr : Ro/wpo come forth, come forth thou fearfull man, 
Affli6tion is enamourd on thy parts. 
And thou art wedded to Calamiiie. 

Enter Womeo. 

Rom : Father what newes, what is the Princes doome. 
What Sorrow cranes acquaintance at our hands. 
Which yet we know not. 

Fr : Too flimihar 
Is my yong Ibnne with fuch fowre companie : 
I bring thee tidings of the Princes doome. 

Rom : What leile than doomes day is the Princes doome ? 

Fr : A gentler iudgement vaniiht from his lips. 
Not bodies death, but bodies banilhment. 

Rom : Ha, Banirtied ? be merciful!, fay death : 
For Exile hath more terror in his lookes. 
Than death it felfe, doo not fay Banilhment. 

Fr : Hence from Ferona art thou banilhed : 16 

Be patient, for the world is broad and wide. 

Row; There is no world without Verona walls. 
But purgatorie, torture, hell it felfe. 
Hence banillied, is baniiht from the world : 
And world exilde is death. Calling death banifhment. 



Thou cutfl my head off wnth a golden axe. 
And fmilefl vpon the llroke that murders me. 

Fr : Oh monftrous (inne, O rude vnthankfulnes : 
Thy fault our law calls death, but the milde Prince 
(Taking thy part) hath ruilid afide the law. 
And turnd that blacke word death to banilhment : 



24 



28 



This 



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sc. 3.] 



Romeo and luliet Q"- 2. 1599. 



1^5 



>^ ^^arke ye, your Romeo will be here at night, 
^ -e to him, he is hid at Lawrence Cell. 

h. O find him, giue this ring to my true Knight, 
^^^^nd bid him come, to take his lail farewell. 

Enter Frier and Romeo. 

Fri, Romeo come forth, come forth thou fearefuU man, 
Afflidion is enamourd of thy parts : 
And thou art wedded to calamiiie. 

Ro. Father what newes ? what is the Princes doome ? 
What forrow cranes acquaintance at my hand. 
That I yet know not ? 

Fri, Too familiar 
Is my deare fonne with fuch fowre companie ? 
I bring thee tidings of the Princes doome. 
Ro, What lefle then doomesday is the Princes doome? 
Fri, A gentler iudgement vanilht from his lips, 
12 Not bodies death, but bodies banifhment. 

Rom. Ha, banifhment? be mercifuU, fay death : 
For exile hath more terror in his looke. 
Much more then death, do not fay banifliment. 
lO Fri. Here from Verona art thou banifhed : 

Be patient, for the world is broad and wide. 

Ro. There is no world without Verona walls. 
But purgatorie, torture, hell it felfe : 
20 Hence baniflied, is blanifht from the world. 
And worlds exile is death. Then baniflied. 
Is death, miflermd, calling death banifhed, 
Thou cutfl my head off with a golden axe, 
24 And fmilefl vpon the flroke that murders me. 
Fri. O deadly fin, 6 rude vnthankfulnes. 
Thy fault our law calls death, but the kind Prince 
Taking thy part, hath ruflit afide the law, 
28 And turnd that blacke word death to banifliment. 



Eilt. 



I'l.is 



Act hi. Scenk 3. 



5. acquaintance] admit- 
tance F4. 



II. gentler] gentle F4. 



20. blanishi] banisht Qq, 
Ff. 



24. smilcsi] smiVst Q5, 
1*3. 4. 



Digitized by 



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io6 



Romeo and Iidiet {Of. i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 3. 



This is meere mercie, and thou feed it not. 

Rom : Tis torture and not mercie, heauen is heere 
Where luliet Hues : and euerie cat and dog. 
And little moufe, euerie vnworthie thing 
Liue here in heauen, and may looke on her. 
But Romeo may not. More validitie. 
More honourable (late, more courtfhip liues 
In carrion flyes, than Romeo ; they may feaze 
On the white wonder of faire Juliets skinne. 
And fteale immortall kifles from her lips 5 



32 



36 



But Romeo may not, he is banillied. 

Flies may doo this, but I from this muft fiye. 44 

Oh Father hadft thou no ftrong poyfon mixt, 

No Iharpe ground knife, no prefent meane of death. 

Though nere fo meane, but banifhment 

To torture me withall : ah, banifhed. 48 

O Frier, the damned vfe that word in hell : 

Howling attends it. How hadft thou the heart. 

Being a Diuine, a ghoftly Confeftbr, 

A finne abfoluer, and my frend profeft, 52 

To mangle me with that word, Banifhment? 

Fr : Thou fond mad man, heare me but fpeake a word. 

Rom : O, thou wilt talke againe of Banifhment. 

Fr : He giue thee armour to beare off this word, c(S 

Aduerfities fweete milke, philofophie. 
To comfort thee though thou be banifhed. 

Rom .• Yet Banifhed ? hang vp philofophie, 
VnlefTe philofophie can make a Juliet, 60 

Difplant a Towne, reuerfe a Princes doome, 
It helpes not, it preuailes not, talke no more. 

Fr : O, now I fee that madmen haue no eares. 

Rom: How fliould they, when that wife men haue no 6a. 
eyes. ^r : 



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ACT III. 



sc. 3.] 



Romeo and luliet Q^ 2. 1599. 



107 



This is deare mercie, and thou feeft it not. 

Ro, Tis torture and not mercie, heauen is here 

Where luliet Hues, and euery cat and dog, 
32 And litle moufe, euery vn worthy thing 

Line here in heauen, and may looke on her. 

But Romeo may not. More validitie. 

More honourable ftate, more courtfhip liues 
3^ In carrion flies, then Romeo : they may feaze 

On the white wonder of deare lulieis hand. 

And fteale iramortall blefling from her lips. 

Who euen in pure and veftall modeflie 
40 Still blufh, as thinking their owne kifles (in. 

This may flyes do, when I from this muft flie. 

And fayeft thou yet, that exile is not death ? 

But Romeo may not, he is banilhed. 
44 Flies may do this, but I from this mud flie : 

They are freemen, but I am banilhed. 

Hadfl thou no poyfon mixt, no fharpe ground knife. 

No fudden meane of death, though nere fo meane, 
48 But baniihed to kill me : Baniflied ? 

O Frier, the damned vfe that word in hell : 

Howling attends it, how haft thou the heart 

Being a Diuine, a ghoftly Confeflbr, 
52 A fin obfoluer, and my friend profeft. 

To mangle me with that word baniflied ? 

Fri. Then fond mad man, heare me a little fpeake. 
Ro, O thou wilt fpeake againe of banifliment. 
S^ Fri. He giue thee armour to keepe oflf that word, 

Aduerfities fweete milke, Philofophie, 

To comfort thee though thou art baniflied. 
Ro. Yet baniflied ? hang vp philofophie, 
60 Vnlefle Philofophie can make a luliet, 

Difplant a towne, reuerfe a Princes doome. 

It helpes not, it preuailes not, talke no more. 
Fri. O then I fee, that mad man haue no eares. 
64 Ro, How fliould they when that wife men haue no eyes. 

Fri, Let 



36. secxt] seise F3, 4. 
38. tlessing] klessings F4. 

42. sayai] saisl Qq. Ff. 
44. 45. om. Ff. 



50. Hawlingattends] Hmvl- 
ings attends Fi. H<rwl- 
ifigs attend F2, 3, 4. 

52. sin obsoluer\ Sin-Ah- 
soluer Yi. 

54. Then'] Thou Q4. 5. 
om. F2, 3, 4. 
a little] om. Ff. 



63. man'\ men Qq. Ff. 

64. thdt] om. Qq. Ff. 



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io8 



Romeo and Itiliet {Qf. i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 3. 



Fr: Let me difpute with thee of thy eliate. j 

Rom : Thou canft not Ipeak of what ihou doft not f^ie\e, \ 

Wert thou as young as I, luliet thy Loue, 

An houre but married, Tybalt murdred. 

Doting like me, and like me banilhcd. 

Then might (1 thou fpeake, tlien might ft thou teare thy 
hay re. 

And fall vpon the ground as I doe now. 

Taking tlie meafure of an vnmade graue. 
Nurfe knockes, 
Fr : Komeo arife, ftand vp thou wilt be taken, 

I heare one knocke, arife and get thee gone. 

Nu : Hoe Fryer. 



Fr : Gods will what wilfulnes is this? 



Shee knockes arable. 



80 



Nur : Hoe Fr}'er open the doore, 

Fr : By and by I come. Who is tlicre ? 

Nur : One from Lady luliet, 

Fr : Then come neare. | 84 

i\7/r ; Oh holy Fryer, tell mee oh holy Fryer, 
Where is my Ladies Lord ? Wher's Romeo ? 

Fr : There on the ground, with his owne tearcs made 83 
drunke. 

N^ur : Oh he is euen in my Miftreife cale. 
iuft in her cafe. Oh wofull (impathy, 
Pitteous predicament, euen fo lyes Ihee, 

Weeping and blubbring, blubbring and weeping . 92 

Stand vp, ftand vp, ftand and you be a man. 
For Juliets fake, for her fake rife and ftand. 
Why fliould you fall into fo deep an O. 
He rifes, 

\Komeo: Nurfe. Nur: 



95 



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ACT III. sc. 3.] Romeo and Iidiet Ql 2. 1599. 


109 




Fr'f. Let me difpiUe with thee of thy ellate. 






Ro. Thou canfl not fpeak of that thou doll not feele. 






Wert thou as young as I, lu/iel thy loue, 


67. as /, fulUt thy] as 


68 


An houre but married, Tybalt murdered, 
Doting like me, and like me baniflied. 


luliet my Ff. 




Then mighteft thou fpeake, 


70. nii^htest] mights t Qs, 




Then might ft thou tea re thy hayre. 


F3. 4. 


72 


And fall vpon the ground as I do now. 
Taking the meafure of an vnmade graue. 






Enter Nurfe, and knocke. 


1^ Enter . . . knockes] 
Q3. Ff. [Nurse knocks. 




FrL Arife one knocks, good Romeo hide thy folfe. 


Q4. 5. 


76 


Ro. Not I, vnlefle the breath of hartficke grones, 
Myft-like infold me from the fearch of eyes. 


75. Aarts/rJtt] heart-sicke 
Q4. 5. ^4- 




They knocke. 


[Knocke ] Q4. 5. Ff. 




Frl. Hark how they knock (whofe there) Romeo arife, 


-JT. whose] who'sQ\,$. Ff. 




Thou wilt be taken, ftay a while, ftand vp. 


78. {itay a while) Q4. 5. 




Slud knock. 


[Knocke ag^aine.l Q4. 5. 
[Knocke. IFf. 




Run to my ftudie by and by, Gods will 


79. {by and by) (^^, 5. 


8o 


What (implenes is this ? I come, I come. 

Knocke. 
Who knocks fo hard ? whece come you ? whats your will ? 
Enter Nurfe. 






Nur. Let me come in, and you Ihal know my errant : 


82. erranf] errand Q4, 5, 




I come from Lady luliet. 


84 


Fri. Welcome then. 

Nur. holy Frier, O tell me holy Frier, 
Wheres my Ladyes Lord ? wheres Romeo ? 
Fri. There on the ground. 




88 


With his owne teares made drunke. 

Nur. he is euen in my miftrelfe cafe, 
luft in her cafe. O wofull fimpathy : 
Pit ions prediccament, euen fo lies (lie. 




92 
96 


Blubbring and weeping, weeping and blubbring. 
Stand vp, ftand vp, ftand and you be a man. 
For luUets fake, for her fake rife and ftand : 
Why ftiould you fall into fo deepe an O ? 

Rom. Nurfe. A//r. Ah 


1 



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Romeo and Itiliet {Qf. i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 3. 



Nur: Ah fir, ah fir. Wei death's the end of nil. 

Rom : Spakeft thou of luUet, how is it with her ? 
Doth fhe not thinke me an olde murderer. 
Now I haue ftainde the childhood of her ioy. 
With bloud remou'd but little from her owne ? 
Where is fhe ? and how doth fhe ? And what fayes 
My cpnceal'd Lady to our canceld loue ? 

Nur : Oh fhe faith nothing, but weepes and pules. 
And now faLs on her bed, now on the ground. 
And Tybalt cr3'es, and then on Romeo calles. 

Row : As if that name fhot from the deadly leuel of a gun 
Did murder her, as that names curfed hand 
Murderd her kinfman. Ah tell me holy Fryer 
In what vile part of this Anatomy 
Doth my name lye ? Tell me that I may facke 
The hateful! manfion ? 

He offers tojlah himfe/fe, and Nurfe fnatches 
the dagger away, 

Nur: Ah? 

Fr : Hold, flay thy hand : art thou a man ? thy forme 
Cryes out thou art, but thy wilde adkes denote 
The vnrefonable furyes of a beafl. 
Vnfeemely woman in a feeming man. 
Or ill befeeming beafl in feeming both. 
Thou hafl amaz'd me. By my holy order, 
I tliought thy difpofition better temperd, 
Hafl thou flaine Tybalt} wilt thou flay thy felfe? 
And flay thy Lady too, that lines in thee ? 



100 



104 



108 



ii5 



120 



Roufe 



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ACT III. SC. 3.] 



Romeo and luliet Qf 2. 1599. 



1 II 



Nur. Ah (ir, ah (ir, deaths the end of all. 

Ro, Spakeft thou oi luliet ? how is it with her? 

Doth not Ihe thinke me an old murtherer. 

Now I haue ftaind the childhood of our ioy. 

With bloud remoued, but little from her owne ? 

Where is fhe ? and how doth Ihe ? and what fayes 

My conceald Lady to our canceld loue ? 
^04 Nur, Oh file fayes nothing fir, but weeps and weeps. 

And now faUs on her bed, and then fiarts vp. 

And Tybalt calls, and then on Romeo cries. 

And then downe falls againe. 
108 Ro, As if that name fhot from the deadly leuell of a gun. 

Did murther her, as that names curfed hand 

Murderd her kinfman. Oh tell me Frier, tell me. 

In what vile part of this Anatomie 
1 1 2 Doth my name lodge ? TeU me that I may facke 

The hatefuU manfion. 

Fri Hold thy defperate hand : 

Art thou a man ? thy forme cries out thou art : 
116 Thy teares are womaniih, thy wild a6b denote 

The vnreafonable furie of a bead. 

Vnfeemely woman in a feeming man. 

And ilbefeeming beafl in feeming both, 
120 Thou haft amaz'd me. By my holy order, 

I thought thy difpofition better temperd. 

Haft thou flaine Ti/lalt ? wilt thou fley thy felfe ? 

And fley thy Lady, that in thy life lies, 
124 By doing damned hate vpon thy felfe ? 

Why rayleft thou on thy birth ? the heauen and earth ? 

Since birth, and heauen, and earth all three do meet. 

In thee at once, which thou at once wouldft loofe. 
128 Fie, fie, thou fliameft thy ftiape, thy loue, thy wit. 

Which like a Vfurer aboundft in all : 

And vfeft none in that true vfe indeed. 

Which fhould bedecke thy fliape, thy loue, thy wit : 
132 Thy Noble fliape is but a forme of waxe, 

H Diorreflin": 



97. deaths] death is Q5. 

98. S/^akest] Speak'st Ff. 
Spak'st Q5. 

is it] is/ Q5. is'/ F4. 

99. no/ she] she not Q5. 

100. childhood] chi id-head 

Q5. 
loi. remoued] remov'dQ$. 

103. canceld] conceald Ff. 



116. deuote] denote Q4, 5, 
Fi. doe note Fa. do 
note F3, 4. 



123. lies] lives F4. 



125. ray lest] ravfs/ Ff. 

127. loose] lose Q5, F3, 4. 

128. shamest] shamst Q5, 
Ff. 

129. a] an Q5. F4. 



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112 



Romeo and lul'iet [Q". i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 3. 



Roufe vp thy fpirits, thy Lady luliet liues, 
For whofe fweet fake thou wert but lately dead : 
There art thou happy. Tybalt would kill thee. 
But thou (lueft Tybalt, there art thou happy too. 



'44 



A packe of bleflings lights \^on thy backe, 

Happines Courts thee in his befl array : 148 

But like a misbehaude and fullen wench I 

Thou frownft vpou thy Fate that fuiillc»s on thee. 

Take heede, take heede, for fuch dye miferable. 

Goe get thee to thy loue as was decreed : 152 

Afcend her Chamber Window, hence and comfort her. 

But looke thou (lay not till the watch be fct : 

For then thou can ft not palfe to Mantua, 



Nurfe prouide all things in a readines, 
Comfort thy Miftrefle, hafte the houfe to bed. 
Which heauy forrow makes them apt vnto. 

Niir : Good Lord what a thing learning is. 
I could haue ftayde heere all this night 
To heare good counfell. Well Sir, 
He tell my Lady that you will come. 

Rom : Doe fo and bidde my fweet prepare to childe, 
Fnrwell good Xurfc. 



1 68 



Kurfe 



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ACT III. SC. 



3-] 



Romeo and luliet Q? 2. 1599. 



"3 



DigrefliDg from the valour of a man, 

Thy deare loue fvvorne but hollow periurie. 

Killing that loue which thou haft vowd to cherifli, 

136 Thy wit, that ornament, to Ihape and loue, 
Milhapen in the condud of them both : 
Like powder in a skillelle fouldiers flaske. 
Is fet a tier by thine owne ignorance, 

140 And thou difmembred with thine owne defence. 
What rowfe thee man, thy luliet is aliue. 
For whofe deare fake thou waft but lately dead. 
There art thou happie, Tybalt would kill thee, 

144 But thou fteweft Tiialt, there art thou happie. 

The law that threatned death becomes thy friend. 
And turnes it to exile, there art thou happie. 
A packe of blelfings light vpon thy backe, 

148 Happines courts thee in her be ft array. 
But like a miftiaued and fullen wench. 
Thou puts vp thy fortune and thy loue : 
Take heede, take heede, for fuch die miferable. 

ij2 Go get thee to thy loue as was decreed, 

Afceud her chamber, hence and comfort her : 
But looke thou ftay not till the watch be fet. 
For then thou canft not palTe to Mantua, 

156 Where thou ihalt line till we can find a time 
To blaze your marriage, reconcile your friends. 
Beg pardon of the Prince and call thee backe. 
With twentie hundred thoufand times more ioy 

160 Then thou wentft forth in lamentation. 

Go before Nurfe, commend me to thy Lady, 
And bid her haften all the houfe to bed. 
Which heauie forrow makes them apt vnto, 

164 Romeo is comming. 

Nur. O Lord, I could haue ftaid here all the night. 
To heare good counfell, oh what learning is : 
My Lord, ile tell my Lady you will come. 

168 Ro. Do fo, and bid my fweete prepare to chide. 

Nur. 



Here 



139. ajer] on fire Q5. 



144. slewest'\ slew si Ff. 
hapfie] happy too Fa. 3, 4. 

145. oecomes] became Ff. 

146. turnes^ turnt Q3. 
tum'd Ff. 

147. light\ lights Q4. 



149. mishaued] misbe- 
hau'd Q4, 5. 

150. puts vp] powts vpon 
Q4. poutst upon Q5. 
puttest vp Ff. 



158. the\ thy Q3. Ff. 



165. tk€\ om. Ff. 



8 



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114 



Romeo and luUet (Q^ i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 4. 



Nurfe offers to goe in and turnes againe, 
Nur : Heere is a Ring Sir, that fhe bad me giue you, 
Rom : How well my comfort is reuiud by this. 

Ejcit Xtirfe. 

Fr : Soiorne in Mantua, He finde out your man. 
And he ihall fignifie from time to time : i?^ 

Euery good hap that doth befall thee heere. 
Farwell. 

Rom : But that a ioy, pad ioy cryes out on me. 
It were a griefe fo breefe to part with thee. 180 

Enter olde Capolet and his wife, with III. 4 

County Paris, 
Cap : Thinges haue fallen out Sir fo vnluckily. 
That we haue had no time to moue my daughter. 
Looke yee Sir, (he lou'd her kinfman dearely, 
And fo did I. Well, we were borne to dye. 
Wife wher's your daughter, is flie in her chamber ? 
I thinke fhe meanes not to come downe to night. 

Par : Thefe times of woe affoord no time to wooe, 
Maddam farwell, commend me to your daughter. 
Paris qffers to goe in, and Capolet 
calles him againe. 
Cap : Sir Paris} He make a defperate tender of my child. la 

I thinke Ihe will be rulde in all refpedtes by mee : 



But foft what day is this ? 

Par: Munday my Lord. 

Cap : Oh then Wenfday is too foone, 
On Thurfday let it be : you ihall be maried. 



20 



Wce1e 



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ACT III. SC. 4.] 



Romeo and lul'iet Q*. 2. 1599. 



1^5 



Nur, Here fir, a Ring ihe bid roe giue you (ir : 
Hie you, make hafl, for it growes very late. 

Ro. How well my comfort is reuiu*d by this. 

Fri, Go hece, goodnight, & here (lands al your (late : 
Either be gone before the watch be fet, 
Or by the breake of day difguife from hence, 
Soioume in Mantua, ile find out your man, 
17^ And he (hall fignifie from time to time, 

Euery good hap to you, that chaunces here : 
Giue me thy hand, tis late, farewell, goodnight. 

Ro, fiut that a ioy pad ioy calls out on me, 
180 It were a griefe, fo briefe to part with thee : 
Farewell. 

Elxiunt, 
HI. 4. Enter old Capulet, his wife and Paris. 

Ca. Things haue falne out fir fo vnluckily. 
That we haue had no time to moue our daughter, 
Looke you, (he lou'd her kinfman Tybalt dearely 
And fo did I. Well we were borne to die. 
Tis very late, (heele not come downe to night : 
I promife you, but for your companie, 
I would haue bene a bed an houre ago. 

Paris. Thefe times of wo affoord no times to wooe : 
Madam goodnight, commend me to your daughter. 

La, I will, and know her mind early to morrow, 
To night (bees mewed vp to her heauines. 

Ca. Sir Paris, I will make a defperate tender 
Of my childes loue : I thinke (he will me rulde 
In all refpe6ls by me : nay more, I doubt it not. 
Wife go you to her ere you go to bed, 
16 Acquaint her here, of my fonne Paris loue. 

And bid her, marke you me ? on wendfday next. 
But foft, what day is this ? 

Pa. Monday my Lord. 
20 Ca. Monday, ha ha, well wendfday is too foone, 

A thurfday let it be^ a thurfday tell her 

H 2 Sne 



169 bid] bids Q4. 5. 



T74. dis^tst] 
Qq.Fl 



disguisd 



Act hi. Scene 4. 



IX. shies] sfu is Qq. Ff. 



13. me] be Qq. Ff. 



16. here, of\ hereof^ Q3. 
here of Q4, F3, 4. htre 
with Q5. 

17. next.] [,] Qq. Ff. 



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Google 



ii6 



Romeo and luliet [Q*. i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 5. 



Wee'le make no great a doe, a frend or two, or fo : 24 

For looke ye Sir, Tylalt being flaine lb lately. 

It will be thought we held him carelellye : 

If we fliould reuell much, therefore we will haue 

Some halfe a dozen frends and make no more adoe. ^^ 

But what fay you to Thurfday. 

Par: My Lorde I wifhe that Thurfday were to mor- 
row. 

Cap : Wife goe you to your daughter, ere you goe to P 
bed. 
Acquaint her with the County Paris loue. 
Fare well my Lord till Thurfday next. 
Wife gette you to your daughter. Light to my Chamber. 
Afore me it is fo very very late. 
That we may call it earely by and by. 



Rreunt, 



Enter Romeo and Iidiet at the ivindow. 

lul : Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet nere day. 
It was the Nightingale and not the Larke 
That pierft the fearfull hollow of thine eare : 
Nightly Ihe fings on yon Pomegranate tree, 
Beleeue me loue, it was the Nightingale. 

Rom : It was the Larke, the Herald of the Morne, 
And not the Nightingale. See Loue what enuious ftrakes 
Doo lace the feuering clowdes in yonder Eaft. 
Nights candles are burnt out, and iocond Day 
Stands tiptoes on the mydie mountaine tops. 
I mud be gone and line, or ftay and dyQ. 

lul: Yon light is not day light, I know it I : 
It is fome Meteor that the Sunne exhales. 
To be this night to thee a Torch-bearer, 
And light thee on thy way to Mantua, 
Then day awhile, thou Ihalt not goe foone. 

Rom : Let me ftay here, let me be tane, and dye : 
If thou wilt haue it fo, I am content. 
He fay yon gray is not the Mornings Eye, 



III.5- 



i5 



It 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] 7?omfo flr;?rf lullet Q*. 2. 1599. 


1^7 




She ihall be married to this noble Earle : 






Will you be ready ? do you like this hafte ? 




24 


Well, keepe no great ado, a tViend or two. 


24. Well, keepe] Weele 




For harke you, Tybalt being llaine fo late, 


keepe Q3. 4. Fr. 2. 
{Wee 11 QS' ^V^el F3. 




It may be thought we held him cartlefly 


4.) 




Being our kinfman, if we reuell much : 




28 


Therefore weele haue fomc halt'e a doozcn friends. 
And there an end, but what lay you to Thurfday ? 

Paris. My Lord, I would that thurfday were to morrow. 

Ca, Well get you gone, a Thurfday be it then : 


28. doozen] dozen Qq. Ff. 


3^ 


Go you to luliet ere you go to bed. 
Prepare her wife, againft this wedding day. 
Farewell my Lord, light to my chamber ho. 






Afore mee, it is fo very late that wee may call it early by and by, 


35. very] om. Ff. 


36 


Goodnight. 

Exeunt, 




HI.S. 


Enter Romeo and luliet aloft. 


Act III. Scene 5. 




lu. Wilt thou be gone ? It is not yet neare day : 


I. // . . . day] ora. F2, 3, 




It was the Nightingale, and not the Larke, 


4. 

1 




That pierft the fearefuU hollow of thine eare. 


1 


4 


Nightly ihe fings on yond Pomgranet tree, 
Beleeue me loue, it was the Nightingale. 

Rom, It was the Larke the herauld of the morne. 
No Nightingale, looke loue what enuious ftreakes 




8 


Do lace the feuering cloud.^s in yonder Eaft : 






Nights candles are burnt out, and iocand day 


9. iocand] iocoud Q3, 4, 




' / 
Stands tipto on the myftie Mountaine tops. 


Fi, 2. Jocond Q5. F3. 
jocund F4 




I muft be gone and liue, or ft ay and die. 


10. tipto] tip-toe Q4, 5. 
tiptoe F4. 


12 


lu, Yond light is not daylight, I know it I : 


Mountaine] Mouniaines 




It is fome Meteor that the Sun exhale. 


Qq Fi. 1 
13. exkaU] exhales Q3, 4, | 




To be to thee this night a Torch-bearer, 


Ff. 




And light thee on thy way to Mantua, 




i6 


Therefore (lay yet, thou needfl not to be gone. 


16. yet,] [,lom. F4. 




Ro, Let me be tane. let me be put to death. 


needst not to be] needest 
not be Qs. 




I am content, fo thou wilt haue it fo. 






lie fay yon gray is not the the mornings eye. 


19. the the] the Qq. Ff. 




Tis 





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11« 



Romeo and luliet {Q". i) T597. 



[act III. sc. 5. 



It is the pale reflex of Cynthias brow. 

He fay it is the Nightingale that beates 

The vaultie heauen fo high aboue our heads. 

And not the Larke the MeflTenger of Morne. 

Come death and welcome, luUet wils it fo. ^4 

What fayes my Loue ? lets talke, tis not yet day. 

Jul : It is, it is, be gone, flye hence away. 
It is the Larke that fings fo out of tune. 

Straining harlh Difcords and vnplealing Sharpes. 28 

Some fay, the Larke makes fweete Diuilion : 
This doth not fo : for this diuideth vs. 
Some fay the Larke and loathed Toad change eyes, 
I would that now they had changd voyces too : j 3a 

Since arme from arme her voyce doth vs affray, 
Hunting thee hence with Huntfvp to the day. 
So now be gone, more light and light it growes. 

Rom : More light and light, more darke and darke our 36 
woes. 



Farewell my Loue, one kifle and He defcend. 
He goeth downe, 

Jul : Art thou gone fo, my Lord, my Loue, my Frend ? 44 

I muft heare from thee euerie day in the hower : 
For in an hower there are manie minutes, 
Minutes are dayes, fo will I number them : 
Oh, by this count I ihall be much in yeares. 
Ere I fee thee againe. 48 

Rom : Farewell, I will omit no opportunitie 
That may conueigh my greetings loue to thee. 

lul : Oh, thinkft thou we Ihall euer meete againe. 5a 

Rom : No doubt, no doubt, and all this woe Ihall ferae 
For fweete difcourfes in the time to come. 

Jul: 



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ACT III. SC. 



5-] 



Romeo and luliet Q! 2. 1599. 



119 



20 Tis but the pale reflex of Cinthias brow. 

Nor that is not the Larke whofe uoates do beate 

The vaultie heauen fo high aboue our heads, 

I haue more care to flay then will to go : 
24 Come death and welcome, luliet wills it fo. 

How ift my foule ? lets talke it is not day. 
lu. It is, it is, hie hence be gone away : 

It is the Larke that fings fo out of tune, 
28 Straining harfti Difcords, and vnpleaflng Sharpes. 

Some fay, the Larke makes fweete Diuifion : 

This doth not fo : for fhe diuideth vs. 

Some fay the Larke and loathed Toad change eyes, 
32 O now I would they had changd voyces too : 

Since arme from arme that voyce dotli vs affray. 

Hunting thee hence, with Huntfup to the day. 

now be gone, more light and light it growes. 

36 1 Romeo. More light and light, more darke and darke our 
woes. 

Enter Madame and Nurfe. 
Nur. Madam. 
I lu, Nurfe. 
40 i Nur. Your Lady Mother is cuming to your chftber, 
I The day is broke, be wary, looke about. 

luli. Then window let day in, and let life out. 
Ro. Farewell, farewell, one kilfe and IJe defcend. 
44 lu. Art thou gone fo loue. Lord, ay husband, friend, 

1 muft heare from thee euery day in the houre. 
For in a minute there are many dayes, 

by this count I ihall be much in yeareis, 
48 Ere I againe behold my Romeo. 

"Rom. Farewell : 

1 will omit no opportunitie. 
That may conuey ray greetings loue to thee. 

f 2 /^- O thinkft thou we ihall euer meete againe ? 

Rom. I doubt it not, and all thefe woes ihall feme 
For fweete difcourfes in our times to come. 

H 3 ru. O 



22. heauen] heavens F3, 4. 



25. talhe] [,] Q4. s. Ff. 



44. so] M Q3. [?] Ff. 
ay\ ah F2, 3, 4. 



52. thinkst"] thinkest Q3, 4, 
Ff. 

54. times] time Qq. Ff. 



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I20 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 5. 



Jul : Oh God, I haue an ill diuining Ibule. 
Me thinkes I fee thee now thou art below 56 

Like one dead in the bottome of a Tombe : 
Either mine ey-fight failes, or thou lookfl pale. 

Rom : And trufl me Loue, in my eye fo doo you, 
Drie forrow drinkes our blood : adieu, adieu. E^iL 60 

Enter Nurfe hajlely, 

Nur : Madame beware, take heed the day is broke. 
Your Mother's comming to your Chamber, make all fure. 
She goeth downefrom the window. 
Enter Juliets Mother, Nurfe, 

Moth : Where are you Daughter P 

Nur : What Ladie, Lambe, what Juliet 9 

Jul : How now, who calls ? 

Nur : It is your Mother. 

Moth : Why how now Juliet ? 

Jul : Madam, I am not well. 

Moth : What euermore weeping for your Cofens death : 
I thinke thoult walh him from his graue with teares. 



lul: I cannot chufe, hauing fo great a lofle. 
Moth : I cannot blame thee. 
But it greeues thee more that Villaine Hues. 
lul : What Villaine Madame ? 
Moth : That Villaine Romeo, 
lul : Villaine and he are manie miles a funder. 



84 



Moth : 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] Romeo and luUet Q'. 2. 1599. 


121 




Ro. God I haue an ill d'uining foule. 


55. Ro.] Jul. Q4. 5. Ff. 


5^> 


Me thinkes I fee thee now, thou art lb lowe. 
As one dead in the bottome of a tombe. 


56. tAc£ now,] [,] om. Q5. 




Either ray eye-fight failes, or thou lookefl pale. 


58. tooifst] look' si Ff. Q5. 




Rom, And truft me loue, in ray eye fo do you : 




60 


Drie forrow drinkes our bloud. Adue, adue. 

Exit, 
lu. Fortune, Fortune, all raen call thee fickle. 
If thou art tickle, what doft thou with him 






That is renowrad for faith ? be fickle Fortune : 


63. renmvmd] renowm'd 
Q4. renown d Q5, Ff. 


64 


For then I hope thou wilt not keepe him long. 




But fend him backe. 






Enter Mother. 






La. Ho daughter, are you vp ? 




68 


lu. Who ift that calls ? It is my Lady mother. 
Is Ihe not downe fo late or vp fo early ? 
What vnaccuftorad caufe procures her hither ? 

La. Why how now Juliet P 

lu. Madam I am not well. , 


67. // is] Is it Ff. 
mother?, [?] Fa. 3. 4. 


P 


La. Euermore weeping for your Cozens death ? 






What wilt thou wafh hira from his graue with teares ? 


73. Whai'\^]Qs- 




And if thou couldft, thou couldft not make him Hue : 






Therfore haue done, fome griefe (hews ranch of loue. 




76 


But much of greefe, fhewes flill fome want of wit. 

IiL Yet let me weepe, for fuch a feeling loflTe. 

La, So ihall you feele the lofle, but not the firiend 
Which you weepe for. 




80 


lu. Feeling fo the loflTe, 
I cannot chufe but euer w^eepe the friend. 
La. Wei gyrle, thou weepft not fo much for his death, 






As that the villaine lines which flaughterd him. 


83. slaughterd] slaughtered 


84 


lu. What villaine Madam ? 


^ Qq. 




La. That fame villaine Romeo. 


86. a sunder"] assunder 




lu. Villaine and he be many miles a funder : 


Fi, a, 3. asunder Q5, 
F4. 




God padon, I do with all my heart : 


87. padon] pardon Q3, Fi. 
pardon him Q4, 5, ¥2, 


88 


And yet no man like he, doth greeue my heart. 

La. That 


3. 4- 



n/ 



u^ 



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122 



Romeo and luliet (Q^ i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 5. 



Moth : Content thee Girle, if I could finde a man 
I foone would fend to Mantua where he is. 

That fliould beftow on him fo fure a draught. 
As he fhould foone beare Tybalt companie. 

lul : Finde you the meanes, and He finde fuch a man : 
For whileft he lines, ray heart fhall nere be light 
Till I behold him, dead is my poore heart. 
Thus for a Kinfman vext ? 



96 



108 



(newes ? 
Moth: Well let that paflTe. I come to bring thee ioyfuU 
lul : And ioy comes well in fuch a needfuU time. 

Moth : Well then, thou haft a carefull Father Girle, 
And one who pittying thy needfuU ftate. 
Hath found thee out a happie day of ioy. 

lul : What day is that I pray you ? 

Moth : Marry my Childe, 
The gallant, yong and youthfull Gentleman, 
The Countie Paris at Saint Peters Church, 
Early next Thurfday morning muft prouide. 
To make you there a glad and ioyfull Bride. 

lul : Now by Saint Peters Church and Peter too. 
He fhall not there make mee a ioyfull Bride. 



116 



120 



Are 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] Romeo and luliet Q: 2. 1599. 


123 




La. That is becaufe the Traytor murderer Hues. 


89. murdenr] om. Qq. Ff. 




lu. I Madam from the reach of thefe my hands : 






Would none but I might venge my Cozens death. 




92 


La, We will haue vengeance for it, feare thou not. 
Then weepe no more, He fend to one in Mantua, 
Where that fame bannilht runnagate doth Hue, 
Shall giue him fuch an vnaccuftomd dram. 




96 


That he fhall foone keepe Tybalt companie : 
And then I hope thou wilt be fatisfied. 
lu. Indeed I neuer fhall be falisfied 
With Romeo, till I behold him. Dead 




100 


Is my poore heart fo for a kinfman vext : 
Madam if you could find out but a man 
To beare a poyfon, I would temper it : 
That Romeo (hould vpon receit thereof. 




104 


Soone fleepe in quiet. O how my heart abhors 
To heare him namde and cannot come to him, 






To wreake the loue I bore my Cozen, 


106. Coun,] Cozin, Tybalt 




Vpon his body that hath flaughterd him. 


Fa, 3. 4. 
107. slanghterd\ slaugh- 


io8 


Mo. Find thou the means, and He find fuch a man. 
But now ile tell thee ioyfuU tidings Gyrle. 

lu. And ioy comes well in fuch a needie time. 


tered Q3. 4. 




What are they, befeech your Ladyfhip ? 


in. beseech'' I beseech Q4, 5, 
F2, 3.4. 


112 


M. Well, well, thou hafl a carefuU father child. 




One who to put thee from thy hea nines. 






Hath forted out a fudden day of ioy, 






That thou expe6b not, nor I lookt not for. 




ii6 


lu. Madam in happie time, what day is that ? 

M. Marrie my child, early next Thurfday morne. 
The gallant, young, and Noble Gentleman, 
The Countie Paris at Saint Peters Church, 


116. that'\ this Ff. 


120 


Shall happily make thee there a ioyfuU Bride. 


120. happily] happly Q3, 4. 




lu. Now by S. Peters Church, and Peter too. 


mere 1 m • r I . 
121. 5.J Saint Qq. Ff. 




He fliall not make me there a ioyfull Bride. 






I wonder at this hafle, that I muft wed 




124 


Ere he that fhould be husband comes to wooe : 


124. should] muit Q5. 


1 


I pray 





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124 



Romeo and luliet [Q*. i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 5. 



Are thefe the newes you had to tell me of? 

Marrie here are uewes iadeed. Madame I will not marrie 

yet. 
And when I doo, it flialbe rather Romeo whom I hate. 
Than Countie Paris that I cannot loue. 



128 



Enter olde Capolet. 
Moth : Here comes your Father, you may tell him fo. 

Capo : Why how now, euermore fliowring ? 
In one little bodie thou refembleft a fea, a barke, a ftorme : 

For this thy bodie which I tearme a barke. 
Still floating in thy euerfalling teares. 
And toft with (ighes arifing from thy hart : 
Will without fuccour lliipvv racke prelenlly. 
But heare you Wife, what haue you founded her, what faies 
flie to it ? 
Moth : I haue, but flie will none flie tliankes ye : 
Would God that Ihe were married to her graue. 

Capo : What will fhe not, doth flie not thanke vs, doth 
flie not wexe proud ? 



T40 



144 



Jul : Not proud ye haue, but thankfull that ye haue : 
Proud can I neuer be of that I hate. 
But thankfull euen for hate that is ment loue. 

Capo : Proud and I thanke you, and I thanke you not. 
And yet not proud. VVhats here, chop logicke. 
Proud me no prouds, nor thanke me no thankes. 
But fettle your fine ioynts on Thurfday next 
To goe with Paris to Saint Peters Church, 
Or I will drag you on a hurdle thether. 

Out 



i5» 



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ACT III. SC. 5.] 



Romeo and Iidiet Q'. 2. 1599. 



125 



128 



132 



136 



140 



^44 



^56 



I pray you tell my Lord and father Madam, 
I will not marrie yet, and when I do, I fweare 
It ihall be Romeo, whom you know I hate 
Rather then Paris, thele are newes indeed. 

M. Here comes your father, tell him io your felfe : 
And fee how he will take it at your hands. 
Enter Capulet and Nurfe. 
Ca. When the Sun fets, the earth doth driile deaw, 
But for the Sunfet of my brothers fonne. 

It rains downright. How now a Conduit girle, what flill in tears 
Euermore ihowring in one litle body? 
Thou countefaits. A Barke, a Sea, a Wind : 
For flill thy eyes, which I may call the fea. 
Do ebbe and flowe with tcares, the Barke thy body is : 
Sayling in this fait floud, the windes thy fighes, 
Who raging with thy teares and they with them. 
Without a fudden calme will ouerfet 
Thy tempefl tofled body. How now wife, 
Haue you deliuered to her our decree? 

La. I fir, but fhe will none, Ihe giue you thankes, 
I would the foole were married to her graue. 

Ca. Soft take me with you, take me with you wile, 
How wnll fhe none ? doth fhe not giue vs thanks ? 
Is fhe not proud ? doth fhe not count her blefl, 
Vn worthy as fhe is, that we haue wrought 
So worthy a Gentleman to be her Bride? 

lu. Not proud you haue, but thankful that you haue : 
^'"Oud can I neuer be of what I hate, 
^ut thankfull euen for hate, that is meant loue. 

Oa. How, how, howhow, chopt lodgick, what is this ? 
^■"oud and I thanke you, and I thanke you not, 
^J^d yet not proud miflreffe minion you? 
-*^l>anke me no thankings, nor proud me no prouds, 
"^^t fettle your fine loynts gainft Thurfday next, 

^ go with Paris to Saint Peters Church : 
^r I will drag thee on a hurdle thither. 

You 



131. earth"] ayre Q4. aire 

Q5. 

133. It . . . downright'] se- 
parate line Ff. 

rmo^ [?1 Ff. 

t^ars] [.] Q4. [?1 Ff. 

134. showring] [:J Q4. [?] 

bodyf] pjom. Q5. 

135. Thou countefaits. A] 
(—tcr/iiits. A Q3. —ter- 

feits, a Q4. — terfeit'st 
a Q$. — terfaits a Fi. 
— terffits a F2.) 77/ v 
counterfi-its a F3. ( — ter- 

feit's a F4.) 
137. is-] is Fr. om. F2, 

3. 4- ^ 
139. thy] the Ff. 
141. wife,] wise, Q4. 

wife f Qs, Ff. 
143. giue'^ ^iues Qq. Ff. 

thankes, \l\(^S' L?l ^"4. 



146. Hou^ [,] Ff. [?J Qs. 



149. Bride] 
Qq. Ff. 



Bridegroom 



152. that is meant] that's 
meant in Q5. 

153. How, how, howhow,] 
How notv, how now, 
Q3, 4. How now f How 
notv f Q5, Ff. 

155. And . . . you] om. Ff. 

proud] [:]Q4. 5. 

you f] , you, Q5. 
157. /attle] settle F2, 3, 4. 



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126 



Romeo and luliet (Cf. i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 5. 



* I Out you greene ficknes baggage, out you tallow face. 



Ttt ; Good father heare me fpeake ? 

She kneel es downe. 

Cap : I tell thee what, eyther refolue on thurfday next 
To goe with Paris to Saint Peters Church : 
Or henceforth neuer looke me in the face. 
Speake not, reply not, for my fingers ytch. 
Why wife, we thought that we were fcarcely bleft 
That God had fent vs but this onely chyld : 
But now I fee this one is one too much. 
And that we haue a croflTe in hauing her. 

Nur : Mary God in heauen blelTe her my Lord, 
You are too blame to rate her fo. 

Cap. And why my Lady wifedome ? hold your tung. 
Good prudence fmatter with your goflips, goe. 

Nur : Why my Lord I fpeake no treafon. 

Cap : Oh goddegodden. 



Vtter your grauity ouer a goflips boule. 
For heere we need it not. 

Mo : My Lord ye are too hotte. 

Cap : Gods blefled mother wife it mads me, 
Day, night, early, late, at home, abroad. 
Alone, in company, waking or fleeping, 
Still my care hath beene to fee her matcht. 
And hauing now found out a Gentleman, 
Of Princely parentage, youthfiill, and nobly trainde. 
Stuft as they fay with honorable parts. 
Proportioned as ones heart coulde wilh a man : 
And then to haue a wretched whyning foole, 
A puling mammet in her fortunes tender. 
To fay I cannot loue, I am too young, I pray you pardon 
mee ? But 



160 



164 



168 



17a 



175 



184 



188 



192 



196 



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ACT III. sc. 5] Borneo and luUet Q"! 2. 1599. 


127 


i6o 


Out you greene ficknefle carrion, out you baggage. 






You tallow face. 


161. Youl Out you F4. 




La. Fie, fie, what are you mad ? 






lu. Good Father, I befeech you on my knees. 




164 


Heare me with patience, but to fpeake a word. 

Fa. Hang thee young baggage, difobedient wretch, 
I tell thee what, get thee to Church a Thurfday, 
Or neuer after looke me in the face. 




168 


Speake not/ replie not, do not anfwere me. 






My fingers itch, wife, we fcarce thought vs bled. 
That God had lent vs but this onely childe, 


169. itch, wife,'] itch, wife: 
Ff. itch: Wife, Q5. 




But now I fee this one is one too much. 




172 


And that we haue a curfe in hauing her : 
Out on her hilding. 

Nur, God in heauen blefle her : 
You are to blame my Lord to rate her fo. 




176 


Fa. And why my Lady wifdome, hold your tongue. 






Good Prudence fmatter, with your goffips go. 
Nur. I fpeake no treafon. 


177. Prudence smatter,"] 
Prudence, smatterQ^, 4, 
Ff. Prudence smutter 


J 80 


Father, 6 Godigeden, 
May not one fpeake ? 

Fa. Peace you mumbling foole, 
Vtter your grauitie ore a Gofhips bowie, 
For here we need it not. 


gossips] gossips, Qq. gos- 
sip, Ff. 

179. Father, 6 Godigeden,"] 
Fa. Godigeden. Q4. 5. 
Godigoden, F2. 3. O 
God gi' goode en F4. 

180. May"] Nur. May 


184 


Wi. You are too hot. 

Fa. Gods bread, it makes me mad. 
Day, night, houre, tide, time, worke, play. 
Alone in companie, flill my care hath bene 


Q4.S. 


188 


To haue her matcht, and hauing now prouided 
A Gentleman of noble parentage. 






Of faire demeanes, youthfull and nobly hand. 


190. Hand] allied Qq. Ff. 




Stuft as they fay, with honourable parts. 




19a 


Proportiond as ones thought would wifh a man. 
And then to haue a wretched puling foole, 
A whining mammet, in her fortunes tender. 
To anfwere, ile not wed, I cannot loue : 




196 


I am too young, I pray you pardon me. But 





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128 



Romeo and Iidiet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act III. sc. 5. 



But if you cannot wedde He pardon you. 

Graze where you will, you Ihail not houfe with me. 

Looke to it, thinke ont, I doe not vie to ieft. 

I tell yee what, Thurfday is neere, 200 

Lay hand on heart, aduile, bethinke your felfe. 

If you be mine. He giue you to my frend : 

If not, hang, drowne, ftarue, beg, 

Dye in the ftreetes .- for by my Soule 

He neuer more acknowledge thee. 

Nor what I haue (liall euer doe thee good, 204 

Thinke ont, looke toot, I doe not vfe to ieft. £ri/. 

Inl: Is there no pitty hanging in the cloudes. 
That lookes into the bottom of my woes ? 

I doe befeech you Madame, caft me not away, 208 

Defer this mariage for a day or two. 
Or if you cannot, make my mariage bed 
In that dim me monument where Tybalt lyes. 

Moth: Nay be afTured I will not fpeake a word. 212 

Do what thou wilt for I haue done with thee. Exit. 



ltd: Ah Nurfe what comfort? what couufell canft thou 
giue me. 

Nwr : Now truft me Madame, I know not what to fay : 
Your Romeo he is banifht, and all the world to nothing 
He neuer dares returne to challendge you. 



-^24 



Now I thinke good you marry with this County, 

Oh he is a gallant Gentleman, Romeo is but a difliclout 

In refpe6t; of him. I promife you 



228 



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ACT III. SC. 



5-] 



Romeo and lulitt Q: 2. 1599. 



129 



But and you will not wed, ile pardon you. 

Graze where you will, you Ihall not houfe with me, 

Looke too't, thinke on't, I do not vfe to ieft. 
200 Thurfday is neare, lay hand on hart, aduife. 

And you be mine, ile giue you to ray friend. 

And you be not, hang, beg, flarue, dye in the ftreets. 

For by my Ibule ile nere acknowledge thee, 
ao4 Nor what is mine fhall neuer do thee good : 

Truft too't, bethinke you, ile not be forfworne. 

Exit, 
lu. Is tliere no pittie fitting in the cloudes 

That fees into the bottome of my greefe ? 
ao8 O fweet my Mother caft me not away. 

Delay this marriage for a month, a weeke. 

Or if you do not, make the Bridall bed 

In that dim Monument where Tiball lies. 
212 -^/o. Talke not to me, for ile not fpeake a word. 

Do as thou wilt, for I haue done with thee. 

Exit, 
III, O God, 6 Nurfe, how fliall this be preuented ? 

My husband is on earth, my faith in heauen, 
216 How fhall that faith returne againe to earth, 

Vnlefle that husband fend it me from heauen. 

By leauing earth ? comfort me, counfaile me : 

Alack, alack, that heauen fliould pra6tife ftratagems 
220 Vpon fo foft a fubiedt as my felfe. 

What fay ft thou, haft thou not a word of ioy ? 

Some comfort Nurfe. 

Nur, Faith here it is, Romeo is baniflied and all the world to 
224 That he dares nere come back to challenge you : (nothinar, 

Or if he do, it needs rauft be by ftealth. 

Then fince the cafe fo ftands as now it doth, 

I thinke it beft you married with the Countie, 
• 28 O hees a louely Gentleman : 

Rnmios a dilhclout to him, an Eagle Madam 

Hath not fo greene, fo quick, fo faire an eye 

As Paris hath, beflirow my very hart, I 



204. ttrvfr] ever Q4. 5. 



223. Faifh . . 
ate line Ff. 



is,] separ- 



227. Coun//e]eoun/Fa,2,4. 



229. Romios] Romeos Q3, 
4, Fi, 2. Romeos Q5, 
F3. 4- 

231. beshraw] beshrewQ$, 



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130 



Romeo and Iiil it t {Q^. i) 1597. 



[act IV. sc. 1. 



I thinke you happy in this fecond match. 232 

As for your husband he is dead : 

Or twere as good he were, for you haue no vfe of him. 

lul : Speakft thou this from thy heart ? 2 36 

Nur : I and from my foule, or els beihrew them both. 

lul: Amen. 

Nur : What fay you Madame ? 

Jul : Well, thou haft comforted me wondrous much, 240 

I pray thee goe thy waies vnto my mother 
Tell her I am gone hauing difpleafde my Father. 
To Fryer Laurence Cell to confefle me. 
And to be abfolu'd. 

Nur: I will, and this is wifely done. 244 

She loohes after Nurjc, 

lul: Auncient damnation, O moft curfed fiend. 
Is it more finne to wifh me thus forfworne. 
Or to difpraife him with the felfe fame tongue 
That thou haft praifde him with aboue compare 248 

So many thoufand times ? Goe Counfellor, 
Thou and my bofom henceforth ftial be twaine. 
He to the Fryer to know his remedy. 

If all faile els, 1 haue the power to dye. Er/7. 252 

Enicr Fryer and Paris, IV. i. 

Fr : On Thurfday fay ye : the time is very fliort. 

Par : My Father Capolet will haue it fo. 
And I am nothing llacke to flow his haft. 

Fr : You fay you doe not know the Ladies minde ? 
Vneuen is the courfe, I like it not. 

Par : Immoderately flie weepes for Tybalts death. 
And therefore haue I little talkt of loue. 
For Venus fmiles not in a houfe of teares. 
Now Sir, her father thinkes it daungerous: 
That ftie doth giue her forrow fo much fway. 
And in his wifedome hafts our manage. 

To ftop the inundation of her teares. 12 

Which too much minded by her felfe alone 
May be put from her by focietie. Now 



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ACT IV. sc. I.] Romeo and Iidiet Q? 2. 1599. 


^?l 


232 


I thinke you are happie in this fecond match, 
For it excels your fir (I, or if it did not. 
Your firft is dead, or twere as good he were, 
As liuing here, and you no vfe of him. 




236 


lu. Speakfl thou from thy heart ? 


236. Speakst] Speakfst Qq. 
Ff. 

237. else] or else Qq. Ff. 




Nur, And from my foule too, ehe befhrew them both. 




lu. Amen. 


Two lines, And . . .ioo\ 
Or else . . . bofh, Ff. 




Nur, What? 




240 


lu. Well thou haft comforted me maruellous much. 


240. maruellous'] maruel- 
ous Fi. man'lous F2, 




Go in, and tell my Lady I am gone, 


3. 4- 




Hauing difpleafd my father, to Laurence Cell, 






To make confefsion, and to be obfolu'd. 


24^ obsolud]ahsoludQc\. 

Vi, 2, 3. Absolved F4. 

244. [Exit.] Q4. 5. F2. 3. 4. 


244 


Nur, Marrie I will, and this is wifely done. 




lu, Auucient damnation, 6 moft wicked fiend. 






Is it more fin to wifh me thus forfwome. 






Or to difpraife my Lord with that fame tongue. 




^48 


Which Ihe hath praifde him with aboue compare. 
So many thoufand times ? Go Counfellor, 






Thou and my bofome henceforth Ihall be twaine : 
He to the Frier to know his remedie. 




2^2 


If all elfe faile, my felfe haue power to die. 






Exit, 


[Exeunt] Ff. 


IV. I. 


Enter Frier and Countie Paris. 


Act IV. Scene i. 




Fri. On Thurfday fir : the time is very ftiort. 


[Count F2. 3, 4.] 




Par, My Father Capulet will haue it fo. 






And I am nothing flow to flacke his hafte. 




4 


Fri. You fay you do not know the Ladies minde ? 
Vneuen is the courfe, I Hke it not. 

Par. Immoderately fhe weepes for Tyhalts dcalh. 






And therefore haue I little talke of loue. 


7. talke'^^ talkt Qs- 


8 


For Venus fmiles not in a houfe of teares. 
Now fir, her father coimts it daungerous 






That file do giue her forrow fo much fway : 


10. do] doth Qq. Fi, 2. 




And in his wifedome haftes our marriage. 


should F3, 4. 


12 


To ftop the inundation of her teares. 

Which too much minded by her felfe alone 

May be put from her by focietie. Now 





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Kr- 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act IV. sc. I. 



Now doe ye know the reafon of this haft. 

Fr: I would I knew not why it fhould be flowd. 16 

Enter Paris, 
Heere comes the Lady to my cell, 

Par : Welcome my loue, my Lady and my wife : 

L^: That may be fir, when 1 may be a wife, 20 

Par : That may be, mull be loue, on thiirfday next. 

Ill : What mull be fhalbe. 

Fr : Thats a certaine text. 

Par : What come ye to confellion to this Fryer. 

lu : To tell you that were to confelle to you. 24 

Par : Do not deny to him that you loue me. 

lull I will confelfe to you that I loue him. 

Par : So I am fure you will that you loue me. 

lu : And if I doe, it wilbe of more price, 28 

Being fpoke behinde your backe, than to your face. 

Par : Poore foule thy face is much abufd with teares. 

lu : The teares hauc got fmall victory by that. 
For it was bad enough before their fpite. 32 

Par: Thou wrongft it more than teares by that report. 

lu : That is no wrong lir, that is a truth : 
And what I fpake I fpake it to my face. 

Par : Thy face is mine and thou haft ilaundred it. 36 

lu : It may be fo, for it is not mine owue. 
Are you at leafure holy Father now : 
Or fliall I come to you at euening Mafl^e ? 

Fr : My leafure femes me i^enftue daughter now; 40 

My Lord we muft entreate the time alone. 

Par : God ftieild I Ihould difturbe deuotion, 
luliei farwell, and keep this holy kilTe. 44 

Exit Paris, 

lu : Goe ftiut the doore and when thou haft done fo. 
Come weepe with me that am paft cure, paft help, 
Fr : Ah lu/iet I already know thy griefe, 

I beare thou muft and nothing may proroge it. On 



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ACT IV. sc. 1.] Romeo and luUet Q? 2. 1599. 


133 




Now do you know the reafon of this hade. 


15. kastc] [?]Qq. Ff. 


i6 


Fri, I would I knew not why it iliould be (lowed. 


16. slowed \ slawd Ff. 




Locke fir, here comes the Lady toward my Cell. 


17. toward] towards Qq. 




Enter luliet. 




Pa, Happily met my Lady and my wife. 






lu. That may be fir, when I may be a wife. 




20 


Pa, That may be, muft be loue, on Thurfday next. 

///. What muft be lliall be. 

Fri, Thats a certaine text. 

Par, Come you to make confeflion to this Father? 


20. may be,] [,] om. Q4. 


24 


///. To aunfwere that, I Ihould confefle to you. 
Pa, Do not denie to him, that you loue me. 
///. I will confefle to you that I loue him. 
Par. So will ye, I am fure that you loue me. 




28 


lu. If I do fo, it will be of more price. 
Being fpoke behind your backe, then to your face. 
Par, Poor foule thy face is much abufde with tears. 
lu. The teares haue got fmall vidorie by that. 




3^ 


For it was bad inough before their fpight. 

Pa, Thou wrongft it more then tears with that report. 

lu. That is no (launder fir, which is a truth. 
And what I fpake, I fpake it to my face. 




36 


Pa. Thy face is mine, and thou haft flandred it. 

lu. It may be fo, for it is not mine owne. 
Are you at lei fure, holy Father now. 
Or fliall I come to you at euening Mafle? 




40 


Fri, Myleifure femes me penfiue daughter now. 






My Lord we muft entreate the time alone. 


j^i. we] youYi. /F2, 3.4. 




Par, Godftiield, I fliould difturbe deuotion. 






luliet, on Thurfday early will I rowfe yee. 




44 


Till then adue, and keepe this holy kifle. 






Exit. 


[Exit Paris] Ff. 




lu, ftiut the doore, and when thou haft done fo, 






Come weepe with me, paft hope, paft care, paft help. 


46. care] cure Q5. 




Fri. luliet I already know thy greefe. 




48 


It ftraines me paft the compafle of ray wits, 

I heare thou muft, and nothing may prorogue it. On 


1 



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^34 



Romeo and Iiil'iet [Q] i) 1597. 



[act IV. sc. I. 



On Thurfday next be married to the Count ie. 

lul: Tell me not Frier tliat thou heard of it, 
Vnleile thou tell me how we may preuent it. 



Giue me fome fudden counfell : els behold 
Twixt my extreames and me, this bloodie Knife 
Shall play the Vmpeere, arbitrating that 
Which the Commifsion of thy yeares and arte 
Could to no iflue of true honour bring. 
Speake not, be briefe : for I delire to die. 
If what thou fpeakft, fpeake not of remedie. 

Fr : Stay Juliet, I doo fpie a kinde of hope, 
Which cranes as defperate an execution. 
As that is defperate we would preuent. 
If rather than to marrie Countie Paris 
Thou haft the ftrength or will to flay thy felfe, 
Tis not vnlike that thou wilt vndertake 
A thing like death to chyde away this Ihame, 
That coapft with death it fclte to flye from blame. 
And if thou dooft. He giue thee remedie. 

Jul : Oh bid me leape (rather than marrie PariA) 
From off the battlements of yonder tower : 
Or chaine me to fome fteepie mountaines top, 
Where roaring Beares and fauage Lions are : 
Or fhut me nightly in a Chamell-houfe, 



'\2 



64 



68 



76 



With reekie fhankes, and yeolow chaples fculls : 
Or lay me in tombe with one new dead : 



84 



Things 



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'r jv. sc. 



1-] 



Romeo and Iiiliet Q? a. 1599. 



^i5 



5« 



60 1 



64 



68 



80 



84 



On Thurfday next be married to this Count ie. 

///. Tell me not Frier, that thou heareft of tliis, 
^V^ElelFe thou tell me, how I may preuent it: 
If" in thy wifedome thou canft giue no helpe, 
H>o thou but call my refolulion wife, 
-A.nd with this knife ile helpe it prefently. 
C^od ioynd my heart, and Romeos thou our hands 
-A^nd ere this hand by thee to Romeos feald : 
Shall be the Labell to an other deed. 
Or my true heart with trecherous reuolt, 
Tume to an other, this (hall fley them both : 
Therefore out of thy long experienft time, 
G-iue me fome prefent counfell, or behold 
Twxt my extreames and me, this bloudie knife 
S liall play the vmpeere, arbitrating that, 
^^V^hich the commiffion of thy yeares and art, 
Could to no iffue of true honour bring : 
Be not fo long to fpeake, I long to die, 
If" what thou fpeakft, fpeake not of remedie. 

Fri, Hold daughter, I do fpie a kind of hope, 
^^hich craues as defpcrate an execution, 
-A^ that IS defperate which we would preuent. 
^f" rather then to marrie Countie Paris 
T*hiou haft the ftrength of will to ftay thy felfe, 
T*ben is it likely thou wilt vndertake 
-A thing hke death to chide away this ftiame, 
T*liat coapft with death, himfelfe to fcape from it : 
-Axid if thou dareft, lie giue thee remedie. 

lu. Oh bid me leape, rather then marrie Paris, 
***«*om of the battlements of any Tower, 
^-^r walke in theeuilh wayes, or bid me lurke 
^^^here Serpents are : chaine me with roaring Beares, 
^-^r hide me nightly in a Charnel houfe, 
^-^recouerd quite with dead mens ratling bones, 
^^ith reekie ihanks and yealow chapels fculls : 
^r bid me go into a new made graue, 
And hide me with a dead man in his. 



Thincjs 



50. Countie] count Fa, 3, 4. 

51. hearest] hearstQ^. 



56. Romeos] [,] Qq. Ff. 

57. Romeos] Romeo Ff. 
Romeos Q5. 



60. sley] slay Qq. Ff. 



73. jAjv] j/drxQ4, 5, F3, 4. 
lay Fa. 

74. is it] it is F3, 4. 



76. deaths himselfe] death 

kimselfe, Qq. Ff. 
j^. dares t] dar'st Ff. 

79. 0/ the] of the Qs> ^3> 
4- 



84. chapels'] chappels Q3, 
Fi. chaplesse The rest. 

86. his] his shroud Q4, 5. 
his graue Ff. 



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136 



Romeo and Iidiet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act IV. sc. I. 



Things that to heare them namde haue made me tremble j 

And I will doo it without feare or doubt, 88 

To keep my felfe a faithfull vnftaind Wife 

To my deere Lord, my deereft Romeo. 

Fr : Hold luliet, hie thee home, get thee to bed. 
Let not thy Nurfe lye with thee in thy Chamber : 
And when thou art alone, take thou this Violl, 
And this diftilled Liquor drinke thou off: 
When prefently through all thy veynes (hall run 96 

A dull and heauie flumber, which ihall feaze 
Each vitall fpirit : for no Pulfe fhall keepe 
His naturall progrefle, but furceafe to beate : 
No figne of breath fhall teftifie thou Hufl. 



And in this borrowed likenes of ihrunke death. 
Thou Ihalt remaine full two and fortie houres. 



And when thou art laid in thy Kindreds Vault, 



112 



He fend in haft to Mantua to thy Lord, 

And he Ihall come and take thee from thy graue. 



116 



lul: 



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ACT IV. sc. I.] Romeo and luUet Q: 2. 1599. 


137 




Things that to heare them told, haue made me tremble. 




88 


And I will do it without feare or doubt, 
To liue an vnflaind wife to my fweete loue. 

FrL Hold then, go home, be merrie, giue confent. 
To marrie Paris : wendfday is to morrow. 




9* 


To morrow night looke that thou lie alone. 






Let not the Nurle lie with thee in thy Chamber : 


93. /A/ Nursi] thy Nurst 




Take thou this Violl being then in bed, 


Qq. Ff. 




And this dillilling liquor drinke thou otf. 




96 


When prefenlly through all thy veines ihall run, 
A cold and drowzie humour : for no pulfe 
Shall keepe his natiue progrefle but furceafe. 






No warmth, no breaft lliall tellilie thou liueft. 


99. brejst] breath Qq. Ff. 


100 


The rofes in thy lips and cheekes lliall fade : 


liuest] liv'st O5. 
100. /tfi/^.][:]oin.Qq. Ff. 




Too many afhes, thy eyes windowes fall : 
Like death when he Ihuts vp the day of life. 


101. Too ffiany] To many 
Fi. To mealy Fa. 3. 4. 
Too paly Q4. To paly 




Each part depriu'd of fupple gouemment. 


thy] the Q3. 4. Ff. 


I04 


Shall ftifFe and ftarke, and cold appeare like death. 




And in this borrowed likeneife of fhrunke death 


105. borrowed] borrow' d 




Thou ftialt continue two and fortie houres. 


. QS- 




And then awake as from a pleafant lleepe. 


• 


io8 


Now when the Bridegroome in the morning comes. 
To rowfe thee from thy bed, there art thou dead : 




Jr- 


Then as the manner of our countrie is. 




>- 


Is thy bed robes vncouered on the Beere, 


III. Is] In Qq. Ff. 


ilI2 


Be borne to buriall in thy kindreds graue : 


vncouered] vncouerdQq. 
Ff. 


^ 


Thou fliall be borne to that fame auncient vault. 
Where all the kindred of the Capuleis lie, 
In the meane time againft thou fhalt awake. 


113. shall] Shalt Qq. Ff. 


ii6 


Shall Romeo by my Letters know our drift. 






And hither (hall he come, an he and I 


117, 118. an . . .walking] 




Will watch thy walking, and that very night 


and . . . waking Qq. 
om. Ff. 




Shall Romeo beare thee hence to Mantua. 




I20 


And this fhall free thee from this prefent iliame. 






If no inconftant toy nor womanilh feare. 
Abate thy valour in the a6ting it. 


121. inconstant] it neon- 




slant F3. 4. 

toy] toy Q4. Joy Qs- 




lu. Giue 


i 



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138 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 159 



jy/- 



[act IV. sc. 2. 



lul : Frier I goe, be fure thou fend for my deare Romeo, 

Exeunt. 



Enter olde Capolet, his Wife, Nurfe, and IV. 

Seruingman, 

Capo : Where are you firra ? 

Ser: Heere forfoolh. 

Capo : Goe, prouide me twentie cunning Cookes. 

Ser: I warrant you Sir, let me alone for that, lie knowe 
them by licking their lingers. 

Capo : How canfl thou know them fo ? 

Ser: Ah Sir, tis an ill Cooke cannot licke his owne lin- 
gers. 

Capo : Well get you gone. 

Exit Serulngman, 
But wheres this Head-ftrong ? 

Moth : Shees gone (my Lord) to Frier Laurence Cell 
To be confeft. 

Capo : Ah, he may hap to doo fome good of her, 1 2 

A headftrong felfewild harlotrie it is. 
Enter luliet. 

Moth : See here fhe commetli from Confelsion, 

Capo: How now my Head-llrong, where haue you bin 
gadding ? 

lul: Where I haue learned to repent the (in j 16 

Of froward wilfuU oppofition 
Gainft you and your behefts, and am enioynd 
By holy Laurence to fall proftrate here. 
And craue remifsion of fo foule a fa6t. 
She kneeles downe. 

Moth : Why thats well faid. 

Capo : Now before God this holy reuereut Frier 
All our whole Citie is much bound vnto. 
GoQ tell the Countie prefently of this. 
For I will haue this knot knit vp to morrow. ,Jul : 



30 



zz 



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ACT IV. SC. 2.] 



Romeo and lit/ let Cf. 2. 1599. 



139 



lu. Giue me, giue me, O tell not me of feare 
12,^ fri. Hold get you gone, be (Irong and profperous 

In this refolue, ile fend a Frier with fpeed 
To Mantua, with my Letters to thy Lord. 

lu, Loue giue me ftrength, and ftrength Ihall helpe afford : 
128 Farewell deare father. (Exit, 

J v". a. Enter Father Capulet, Mother, Nurfe, and 

Seruing men, two or three, 
Ca. So many gueils inuite as here are writ. 
Sirrah, go hire me twentie cunning Cookes. 

Ser, You fliall haue none ill fir, for ile trie if they can lick their 
lingers. 

Capu. How canft thou trie them fo ? 

Ser, Marrie fir, tis an ill Cooke that cannot lick his owne fin- 
gers : therefore hee that cannot lick his fingers goes not with 
me. 

Ca, Go be gone, we ihall be much vnfurnifht for this time : 
What is my daughter gone to Frier Lawrence ? 
Nur, I forfooth. 

Cap, Well, he may chance to do fome good on her, 
A peeuiih felfewield harlottry it is. 

Enter luliet. 
Nur, See where flie comes from flirift with merie looke. 
Ca, How now my headftrong, where haue you bin gadding ? 
1 6 lu. Where I haue learnt me to repent the fin 

Of difobedient oppofition. 
To you and your behefls, and am enioynd 
By holy Laurence, to fall proflrate here, 
20 To beg your pardon, pardon I befeech you. 
Henceforward I am euer rulde by you. 

Ca, Send for the Couutie, go tell him of this, 
Ile haue this knot knit vp to morrow morning. 
24 lu, 1 met the youthful! Lord at Laivrence Cell, 

And gaue him what becomd loue I might. 
Not fiepping ore the bounds of modeftie. 

Cap, Why I am glad ont, this is wel, (land vp, 
2 s This is aft fhould be, let me fee the Countie : 

I marrie go I fay and fetch him hither. Now 



123. of feare] ofcare Fi. 



[Exeunt] Q4. 5. 

Act IV. Scene 2. 



9, 10. Prose in Ff. 



13. selfewicld\ selfewillde 
Q3. selfe-uHUd Q4, 5. 
selft-wild Fi, 2, 3. self- 
wild F4. 



16. me\ om. Q4, 5. 



22. Countie] Count ¥2,2.4. 



25. becomtf] becomed Ff. 
becommed Q4, 5. 



28. ast] asi Q4, 5, Ff. 



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140 


Romeo and luliet (Q? 1) 1597. [act iv. sc. 3 




Jul : Nurfe, will you go with me to my Clofet, 




To fort fucb things as fhall be requilite 




Againft to morrow. 




Moth : 1 pree thee doo. good Nurle goe in with her. 




Helpe her to fort Tyres, Rebatoes, Chaiues, 




And I will come vnto you prefently. 


J 


Nur : Come fweet hart, fhall we goe : 


*■ 


Jul : I pree thee let vs. 




Exeunt Nurfe and luliet. 




Moth : Me thinks on Thurfday would be lime enough. 




Capo : I fay I will haue this difpatcht to morrow. 




Goe one and certefie the Count thereof. 


/ 


Moth : I pray my Lord, let it be Thurfday. 


Capo : 1 fay to morrow while fliees in the mood. 




Moth : We iliall be iLort in our prouifion. 


* 


Capo : Let me alone for that, goe get you in. 




Now before God my heart is pafsing light. 




To fee her thus conformed to our will. Exeunt. 




Enter Nurfe, luliet. 


r' 


Nur: Come, come, what need you anie thing elfe ? 




Jul : Nothing good Nurfe, but leaue me to my felfe : 




For I doo meane to lye alone to night. 




Nur : Well theres a cleane fmocke vnder your pillow, 




and fo good night. Exit. 




Enter Mother. 




Moth : What are you bufie, doo you need my helpe ? 




Jul : No Madame, I defire to lye alone. 




For I haue manie tilings to tliinke vpon. 




Aloth : Well then good night, be ftirring luliet. 


V 


The Countie will be earlie here to morrow. Exit. 




Jul: 



3» 



IV. 5. 



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IV. 





ACT IV. sc. 3.] Rameo and luliet Cf. 2. 1599. 


141 




Now afore God, this reuerend holy Frier, 
AH our whole Citie is much bound to him. 


30. reuerend holy] holy 
reverend (^5. 


3^ 


lu. Nurfe, will you go with me into my Clofet, 
To helpe me fort fuch needfull ornaments. 
As you thinke fit to furnilh me to morrow ? 

AIo, No not till Thurfday, there is time inough. 




3^ 


fa. Go Nurfe, go with her, weele to Church to morrow. 






Exeunt. 


[Exeunt luliet and Nurse.] 




AIo, We (hall be Ihort in our prouiiion. 


Ff. 




Tis now neare night. 






Fa, Tulh, I will llirre about. 




40 


And all things ftiall be well, I warrant thee wife : 

Go thou to luliei, helpe to decke vp her, 

lie not to bed to night, let me alone : 

lie play the huswife for this once, what ho ? 




44 


They are all forth, well I will walke my felfe 






To Comitie Paris, to prepare vp him 


45. vp him] him vp Ff. 




Againft to- morrow, my heart is wondrous light. 






Since this fame wayward Gyrle is lb reclaymd. 




3- 


Exii. 
Enter luliet and Nurfe, 
lu, I thofe attires are bed, but gentle Nurfe 
I pray thee leaue me to my felfe to night : 
For I haue need of many oryfons. 


[Exeunt.] O4. %. [Ex unt 
Father and Mother.] Ff. 
Act IV. ScKNK 3. 


4 


To moue the heauens to fmile vpon my (late. 






Which well thou knoweft, is crolTe and full of fin. 


5. Anowesl] i/rozv st Ff. Q5. 




Enter Mother. 






AIo. What are you buiie ho ? need you my helpe ? 






lu. No Madam, we haue culd fuch necelTaries 




8 


As are behoofefull for our ftate to morrow : 
So pleafe you, let me now be left alone. 
And let the Nurfe this night fit vp with you. 
For I am fure you haue your hands full all. 




12 


In this lb fudden bufinelle. 

AIo, Good night. 
Get thee to bed and reft, for thou haft need. Exeunt. 

lu. Farewell, 


1 



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142 



Romeo mid lul'iet [Q'l) T597. 



[act IV. sc. 3. 



////: Farewell, God kiiowes when wee fliall meete a- 
gaine. 

Ah, I doo take a fearfull thing in hand. 



What if this Poiion fliould not worke at all, 
Muft I of force be married to the Countie ? 
This fhall forbid it. Knile, lye thou there. 
What if the Frier flioulcl g'ue iiie this drinke 
To poyfon niee, for fi are I lliould difclofe 
Our former marriage? Ah, I wrong him much. 
He is a holy and religious Man : 
I will not eniertaine fo bad a thought. 



24 



What if I fhould be ftifled in the Toomb ? 
Awake^an houre before the appointed time : 



[<>] 



Ah then I feare I fliall be lunaticke. 

And playing with my dead forefathers bones. 



Dalh 



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ACT IV. sc. 3.] Romeo and luliet Q? 2. 1599. 


143 




/m. Farewell, God knowes when we Ihall meete againe. 




i6 


I haue a faint cold feare thrills through my veines. 






That almofl freezes vp the heate of life : 


17. lifi\fireVi, 




He call them backe againe to comfort me. 






Nurfe, what ihould ihe do here ? 




ao 


M7 difmall fceane I needs muft a6t alone. 






Come Violl, what if this mixture do not worke at all ? 


21. Violl]^ Viall Qq. Fi 
2, 3. Vial F4. 

22. then\ om. F4. 




Shall I be married then to morrow morning ? 




No, no, this Ihall forbid it, lie thou there. 




24 


What if it be a poyfon which the Frier 
Subtilly hath miniftred to haue me dead. 
Lead in this marriage he Ihould be dilhonourd, 
Becaufe he married me before to Romeo ? 




28 


I feare it is, and yet me thinks it Ihould not. 






For he hath dill bene tried a holy man. 


29 a] an Qs. 




How if when I am laid into the Tombe, 






I wake before the time that Romeo 




3a 


Come to redeeme me, theres a fearfull poynt : 






Shall I not then be lliffled in the Vault ? 


33. s/(^e(/] stljied Ff. Q5. 




To whofe foule mouth no healthfome ayre breaths in. 


1 




And there die llrangled ere my Romeo comes. 




3^ 


Or if I liue, is it not very like. 

The horrible conceit of death and night. 






Togither with the terror of the place. 


38. Togither] Together (^<\. 




As in a Vaulte, an auncient receptacle. 


Ff. 


40 


Where for this many hundred yeares the bones 
Of all my buried aunceftors are packt. 
Where bloudie TyhaJt yet but greene in earth. 
Lies feftring in his ihroude, where as they fay. 


40. this\ these Qq. Ff. 


44 


At fome houres in the night, fpirits refort : 

Alack, alack, is it not like that I 

So early waking, what with loathfome fmels. 






And ihrikes like mandrakes torne out of the earth. 


47. shrikes] shrieks F4. 


48 


That lining mortalls hearing them run mad : 






if I walke, fhall I not be diftraught, 
Inuironed with all thefe hidious feares. 


49. if 1 walke] Or if I 
wake Q4, 5. Or if I 
walke F2, 3, 4. {7valk 




And madly play with my forefathers ioynts ? And 


F4.) 



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144 



Romeo and luUet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act IV. sc. 4. 



Dalh out my franticke braines. Me thinkes I fee 
My Cofin Tybalt weltring in his bloud. 
Seeking for Romeo : flay Tybalt flay. 
Romeo I come, this doe I drinke to thee. 

Shefals vpon her bed within the Cur tables. 
Enter Nurfe with hearts, Mother. 
Moth : Thats well laid Nurfe, fet all in redines. 
The Countie will be heere immediatly. 
Enter Okie man. 
Cap : Make haft, make haft, for it is almoft day. 
The Curfewe bell hath rung, t'is foure a clocke, 
Looke to your bakt meates good Angelica. 



56 



IV. 4 



Nur : Goe get you to bed you cotqueane. I faith you 
will be ficke anone. 



Cap : I warrant thee Nurfe I haue ere now watcht all 
night, and haue taken no harme at all. 

Aloth : I you haue beene a moufe hunt in your time. 



12 



Enter Seruingman with Logs tsf Coales. 
Cap : A lelous hood, a lelous hood : How now firra ? 
What haue you there ? 

Ser : Forfooth Logs. 

Cap : Goe, goe choofe dryer. Will will tell thee where 1 6 
thou ftialt fetch them. 

Ser : Nay I warrant let me alone, I haue a heade I troe to 
choofe a Log. 

Exit, 

Cap : Well goe thy way, thou ftialt be logger head. 20 

Come, come, make haft call vp your daughter, 
The Countie will be heere with muftcke ftraight. 



Gods 



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ACT IV. sc. 4.] Romeo and luliet Q'. 2. 1599. 


145 


52 


And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his fhrowde, 
And in this rage with fome great kinfmans bone. 






As with a club dafli out my defprate braines. 


54. defprate] desperate Qq. 




looke, me thinks I fee my Cozins Ghoft, 


Ff. 


56 


Seeking out Romeo that did fpit his body 






Vpon a Rapiers poynt : flay Tybalt, (lay ? 


57. a] my Fi. Ais F2, 3, 4. 




Romeo, Romeo, Romeo, heeres drinke, I drinke to thee. 




IV. 4. 


Enter Lady of the houfe and Nurfe. 
La. Hold take thefe keies & fetch more fpices Niirfe. 
AV/r. They call for dates and quinces in the Paftrie. 
Enter old Capulet. 


Act IV. Scene 4. 




Ca. Come, flir, ftir, llir, the fccond Cock hath crowed. 


3. crowed^ crowd Ff. , 


4 


The Curphew bell hath roong, lis three a clock : 


4. ri>ong\ roung Q3. 4. | 




Looke to the bakte meates, good Angelica, 


ruftgQs, Fi. 




Spare not for cod. 






Ntir. Go you cot-queane go, 




8 


Get you to bed, faith youle be (icke to morrow 
For this nights watching. 

Ca. No not a whit, what I haue watcht ere now, 






All night for lefler caufe, and nere bene ficke. 


II. iesser] lesse Qq. Fi. 
a lesse F2, 3. a less F4. 


12 


La. I you haue bene a moufe-hunt in your time. 




But I will watch you from fuch watching now. 






Exit Lady and Niirft. 






Ca. A iealous hood, a iealous hood, now fellow, what is there r 


14. what is] what Fi. 




Enter three orfoure with /pits and logs. 


whats F2. what's F3, 4. 
Two lines, the second be- 




and Raskets. 


ginning Nouu in Ff. 




Pel. Things for the Cooke fir, but I know not what. 




i6 


Ca. Make hafle, make ha fie firra, fetch drier logs. 


16. haste sirra] haste^ sir- 




Call Peter, he will fhew thee where they are. 


rah Ff. haste; sirrah 

Qs. 




Pel. I haue a head fir, that will find out logs. 






And neuer trouble Peter for the matter. 




ao 


Ca. Maffe and well faid, a merrie horfon, ha. 






Twou (halt be loggerhead, good father tis day. 
Play Muficke. 


21. Twou] Thou Qq. Ff. 
father] faith Q4. 5. F2. 
3.4. 




The Countie will be here with muficke flraight. 






For fo he faid he would, I heare him neare. 




24 


Nurfe, wife, what ho, what Nurfe I fay ? Enter 





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Romeo and luliet {Of. i) 1597. 



[act IV. sc. 5. 



Gods me hees come, Nurfe call vp my daughter. 



Nun Goe, get jou gone. What lambe, what Lady IV. 5. 
birde ? faft I warrant. What luliet ? well, let the County take 
you in your bed : yee fleepe for a weeke now, but the next 
night, the Countie Paris hath fet vp his reft that you flial reft 
but little. What lambe I fay, faft ftill : what Lady, Loue, 
what bride, what luliet} Gods me how found ftie deeps? Nay 
then I fee I muft wake you indeed. Whats heere, laide on 
your bed, dreft in your cloathes and down, ah me, alack the 12 
day, fome Aqua vitae hoe. | 16 



Enter Mother, 
Moth : How now whats the matter ? 
Nur : Alack the day, (hees dead, {hees dead, ftiees dead. 
Moth : Accurft, vnhappy, miferable time. 



Enter Old em an. 
Cap : Come, come, make haft, wheres my daughter ? 



^4 



Moth : Ah ftiees dead, fliees dead. 
Cap : Stay, let me fee, all pale and wan. 
Accurfed time, vnfortunate olde man. 



Enter 



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ACT IV. sc. 5.] /?o777('o flr//r/ Iiil'iet Ql 2, 1599. 


H7 




£«/er Nurfe. 






Go waken ////if/, go and trim her vp. 






He go and chat with Paris, hie, make hafte. 

Make hall, the bridgroome, he is come already, make haft I fay. 


27. Two lines, the first 
ending already, Ff. 


IV. 5. 


Nur, Miftris, what miftris, luUet, faft I warrant her fhe. 


Act IV. Scene 5. 




Why Lambe, why Lady, fie you fluggabed. 

Why Loue I fay. Madam, fweete heart, why Bride : 


I. mi St r is. Juliet,'] Mis- 
iris, Juliet: Q5. Mis- 
tris f Juliet f Ff. 


4 


What not a word, you take your pen ni worths now, 
Sleepe for a weeke, for the next night I warrant 
The Counlie Paris hath fet vp his reft. 
That you ftiall reft but little, God forgiue me. 


she] om. F2, 3, 4. 
4, penniworths\ penni- 
worth Q5. 


8 


Marrie and Amen : how found is Ihe a fleepe : 






I needs muft wake her : Madam, Madam, Madam, 
I, let the Countie take you in your bed. 


9. needs must] must needs 
Qq. Ff. 




Heele fright you vp yfaith, will it not be ? 




12 


What dreft, and in your clothes, and downe againe? 
I muft needs wake you. Lady, Lady, Lady. 
Alas, alas, helpe, heipe, my Ladyes dead. 




i6 


Oh wereaday that euer I was borne. 
Some Aqua-vitae ho, my Lord my Lady. 


15. wereaday] weleaday 
Q3. weladay Q4. 5. Fr, 
2, 3. wel-a-day F4. 




Mo. What noife is here ? 


[Enter Mother.] Ff. 




Nur, lamentable day. 






Mo. What is the matter ? 




20 


Nur. Looke, looke, oh heauie day ! 

Mo. me, me, my child, my onely life. 
Reuiue, looke vp, or I will die with thee : 
Helpe, helpe, call helpe. 

Enter Father. 




24 


Fa. For ftiame bring luliet forth, her Lord is come. 
Nur. Shees dead : deceaft, ftiees dead, alack the day. 
M. Alack the day, ftiees dead, ftiees dead, ftiees dead. 
Fa. Hah let me fee her, out alas ftiees cold. 




28 


Her blond is fetled, and her ioynts are ftiffe : 
Life and thefe lips haue long bene feparated. 
Death lies on her like an vntimely froft, 
Vpon the fweeteft flower of all the field. 






K 2 Nur. 





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148 



Rojneo and lul'iet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act IV. sc. 5. 



Enter Fryer and Paris. 

Par : What is the bride ready to goe to Church ? 

Cap : Ready to goe, but neuer to returne. 
O Sonne the night before thy wedding day. 
Hath Death laine with thy bride, flower as ihe is, 
Deflowerd by him, fee, where ilie lyes. 
Death is my Sonne in Law, to him I giue all that I haue. 

Par : Haue I thought long to fee this mornings flice. 
And doth it now prefent fuch prodegies ? 
Accurft, vnhappy, miferable man, 
Forlome, forfaken, deftitute I am : 
Borne to the world to be a flaue in it. 
Diftrell, remediles, and vufortunate. 
O heauens, O nature, wherefore did you make me. 
To Hue fo vile, fo wretched as I lliall. 

Cap : O heere fhe lies that was our hope, our ioy. 
And being dead, dead forrow nips vs all. 

All at once cry out cmd uTtng their hands. 

All cry : And all our ioy, and all our hope is dead. 
Dead, loft, vndone, abfented, wholy fled. 

Cap : Cruel, vniuft, impartiall deftinies. 
Why to this day haue you preferu'd my life ? 
To fee my hope, my ftay, my ioy, my life, 
Depriude of fence, of life, of all by death, 
Cruell, vniuft, impartiall deftinies. 

Cap : O fad fac'd forrow map of mifery. 
Why this fad time haue I deftrd to fee. 
This day, this vniuft, this impartiall day 
Wherein I hop'd to fee my comfort fiill. 
To be depriude by fuddaine deftinie. 

Moth : O woe, alacke, diftreft, why ftiould I line? 
To fee this day, this miferable day. 
Alacke the time that euer I was borne. 
To be partaker of this deftinie. 
Alacke the day, alacke and welladay. Fr : 



3^ 

40 
44 



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ACT IV. SC. 



5-] 



Romeo and la /let Q'. 2. 1599. 



149 



32 Nur. O lamentable day / 

Mo, O wofuU time / 
Fa. Death that hath tane her hece to make me waile 

Ties vp my tongue and will not let me fpeake. 
Enter Frier and the Countie, 
36 Fri Come, is the Bride ready to go to Church ? 

Fa. Ready to go but neuer to returne. 

O fonne, the night before thy wedding day 

Hath death laine with thy wife, there (he lies, 
40 Flower as flie was, deflowred by him. 

Death is my fonne in law, death is my heire. 

My daughter he hath wedded. I will die. 

And leaue him all life liuing, all is deaths. 
44 Par, Haue I thought loue to fee this mornings face. 

And doth it giue me fuch a fight as this ? 

Mo. Accuril, vnhappie, wretched hateful! day. 

Mod miferable houre that ere time faw, 
48 In lading labour of his Pilgrimage, 

But one poore one, one poore and louing child. 

But one thing to reioyce and folace in. 

And cruell death hath catcht it from my fight. 
5a Nur. O wo, O wofull, wofull, wofuU day, 

Moft lamentable day, moft woftill day 

That euer, euer, I did yet bedold. 

O day, O day, O day, O hatefull day, 
56 Neuer was feene fo blacke a day as this, 

O wofull day, O wofull day. 

Par. Beguild, diuorced, wronged, fpighted, flaine, 

Moft deteftable death, by thee beguild, 
60 By cruell, cruell, thee quite ouerthrowne, 

O loue, O life, not life, but loue in death. 

Fat. Defpifde, diftreill*d, hated, martird, kild, 

Vncomfor table time, why cam ft thou now, 
(5^. To murther, murther, our folemniiie ? 

O childe, O childe, my foule and not my childe. 

Dead art thou, alacke my child is dead. 

And with my child my ioyes are buried. Frl. Peace 



[Enter . . . with the Mu- 
sitians] Q^. [. . . with 
Musicians] Q5. 



39. there] see there F2, 3. 
See^ there F4. 

40. dejlowred] deJUrwred 
now Fa. dejlourd now 
F3.4« 



43. ell life liuing.'\ all, 
life, liuing, Q4. 5. 

44. loue^ longQq. Ff. 



54. iedold] behold Qq. Ff. 



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Goo^^ 



150 


Romeo and luliet (Qf i) 1597. [act iv. sc. 5. 




Fr : peace for fhame, if not for charity. 




Your daughter Hues iu peace and happines. 
And it is vaine to wilh it otherwife. 


* 

1 


Come fticke your Rofemary in this dead coarfe. 
And as the cuftome of our Country is. 
In all her befl and fumptuous ornaments, 
Conuay her where her Ancellors lie tomb*d. 




Cap : Let it be fo, come wofull forrow mates. 
Let vs together tafte this bitter fate. 




They all hut the Nurfe goefoorth, cafting Rofemary on 
her andjhutting the Curtens, 




Enter Alujitions, 
Nur : Put vp, put vp, this is a wofull cafe. Exit. 




I. I by my troth Miftrefle is it, it had need be mended. 

Enter 



58 



84 



100 



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ACT IV. SC. 



5-] 



Romeo and Iiiliet Q^ 2. 1599. 



68 FrL Peace ho for fhame, confufioiis care Hues not. 

In thefe confufions heauen and your felfe 
Had part in this faire maide, now heauen hath all. 
And all the better is it for the maid : 
Your part in her, you could not keepe from death. 
But heauen keepes his part in etemall life. 
The moil you fought was her promotion. 
For twas your heauen (he (hould be aduanfl, 
7^ And weepe ye now, feeing fhe is aduanfl 

Aboue the Cloudes, as high as heauen it felfe. 
O in this loue, you loue your child fo ill. 
That you run mad, feeing that fhe is well : 
80 Shees not well married, that lines married long. 
But fhees befl married, that dies married young. 
, Drie \y your teares, and flick your Rofemarie 
On this faire Coarfe, and as the cuflome is, 
84 And in her befl array beare her to Church : 
For though fome nature bids vs all lament. 
Yet natures teares are reafons merriment. 
Fa. All things that we ordained fefliuall, 
88 Turne from their office to black Funerall ; 
Our inflruments to melancholy bells. 
Our wedding cheare to a fad buriall feafl : 
Our folemne himnes to fullen dyrges change : 
9^ Our Bridall flowers feme for a buried Coarfe : 
And all things change them to the contrarie. 

Fri, Sir go you in, and Madam go with him. 
And go fir Paris, euery one prepare 
9^ To follow this faire Coarfe vnto her graue : 
The heauens do lowre vpon you for fome ill : 
Moue them no more, by croffing their high wil. 

Exeunt manet, 
Mitfi. Faith we may put vp our pipes and be gone. 
1 00 Nur, Honefl goodfellowes, ah put vp, put vp. 

For well you know, this is a pitilull cafe. 

Fid. I my my troath, the cafe may be amended. [Exit omnes. 

K 3 Enter 



68. confusions care] con- 
fusions, care Qq. con- 
fusions : Care Ft. 

69. confusions] [,] Q3, 4, 
Ff. [:]Q5. 



75. she] that sh F2, 3, 4. 
77. it selfe] himulfe Qs. 



85. sonU] fond F2, 3, 4. 
us all] all us Yi. 



90. burialf] funerall Q$. 



[Exeunt manent Musid] 

Q4. 5. [Exeunt] Ff. 
99. Musi.] Mu. Ff. 



102. Fid.] Mu. Ff. 

my my] by my Qq. Ff. 
[Exeunt onnnes] Qq. om. 

Ff. 



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152 



Romeo and lu/iet {Ql i) 1597. 



[act IV. sc. 5. 



Enter Seruim^man, 



Ser : Alack alack what flial 

fome mery dumpe. 
I. A fir, this is no time to play. 
Ser : You will not then ? 
I. No many will wee. 

Set : Then will I giue it you, and Ibundly to. 
f . What will you giue us ? 



I doe, come Fidlers play me 



108 



Ser : The fidler. He re you. He fa you. He Ibl you. 



I. If you re vs and fa vs, we will note you. 

Ser : I will put vp my Iron dagger, and beate you with 
my wodden wit. Come on Simon found Pot, He pofe you, 

I Lets heare. 

Ser : When griping griefe the heart doth wound, 124 

And dolefiill dumps the minde opprelle: 
Then muiique with her filuer found. 
Why filuer found ? Why filuer found ? 

1. I thinke becaufe muficke hath a fweet found. 128 
Ser : Pretie, what fay you Mathew minikine ? 

2. I thinke becaufe Mufitions found for filuer. 
Ser : Prettie too : come, what fay you ? 

3. I fay nothing. 132 
Ser: I thinke fo. He fpeake for you becaufe you are the 

Singer. I faye Siluer found, becaufe fuch Fellowes as you 
haue fildome Golde for founding. Farewell Fidlers, fare- 
well. Exit. 

I. Farewe'l 



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ACT IV. SC. 5.] 



Romeo and luUet Q: 2. 1599. 



153 



104 



108 



116 



120 



124 



128 



13a 



136 



Enter IFill Kemp, 
Peter, Mufitions, oh Mufitions, harts eafe, harts eale, 
O, and you will haue me liue, play harts eale. 
Fidler, Why harts eafe ? 
Peter, O Mufitions, becaufe my hart it felfe plaies my hart is 

play me fome merie dump to comfort me. (full : 
Minjirels, Not a dump we, tis no time to play now. 
Peter, You will not then ? 

Minjl, No. 

Peter, I will then giue it you foundly. 

Mif{ft, What will you giue vs ? 

Peter, No money on my faith, but tlie gleeke. 

1 will giue you the Minftrell. 

MinJlreL Then will I giue you the Seruing-creature. 

Peter. Then will I lay the feruing-creatures dagger on your 
I will cary no Crochets, ile re you. He fa (pate. 

You, do you note me ? 

MinJl, And you re vs, and fa vs, you note vs. 

2. M, Pray you put vp your dagger, and put out your wit. 
Then haue at you with my wit. 

Peter, I will dry-beate you with an yron wit, and put vp my 
Anfwere me like men. (yron dagg«*r. 

When griping griefes the hart doth wound, then mufique wilh 

her liluer found. 
Why filuer found, why mufique, with her filuer found, what fay 

you Simon Catling? 

MinJl, Mary fir, becaufe filuer hath a fweet found. 

Peter, Prates, what fay you Hugh Rebick ? 

a. M, I fay filuer found, becaufe Mufitions found for filuer. 

Peter, Prates to, what fay you lames found pofl ? 

3. M, Faith I know not what to fay. 

Peter, O I cry you mercy, you are the finger. 
I will fay for you, it is mufique with her filuer found, 
Becaufe Mufitions haue no gold for founding : 
Then Mufique with her filuer found with fpeedy help doth 

lend redreffe. Eiit, 

Minjh 



Killer Tcter ] <^4. 5. Ff. 



105. Fidler.^ Nfu. Ff. 

106. is full] is full o/woe 
Q4. 5. 

107. O . . . comfort wr] 
om. Ff. 

108. Minstrels.] Mu. Ff. 

no. MinM.] Mu. Ff. 
iia. Minst.] Mu. Ff. 

114. Minitreir\ mintstrell 
F2. 3. 4. 

115. Minstrel.] Mu. Ff. 

116. lay] sayK^^ 



119. Minst.] Mu. Ff. 



121. Then . . . wit.] Given 
to Peter Q4, 5. 



128. Minst.] Mu. Ff. 

129. Prates] Prat est Q3, 
Ff. Pratee Q4. 5. 

131. Prates to,] Pratcst 
tOy Q3. Vi, 2. Praiec 
to, Q4*. Pratee too : Q5. 
Pratest too^ F3, 4. 
sound post] Sound-Post 
Ff. 

13a. 3. M] 3 Mu. Ff. 



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J 54 



Romeo and luliet {Q^ i) 1597. 



[act v. SC. I. 



I. Farewell and be liangd : come lets goe. 



Exeunt, 



Enter Romeo. V. i. 

Rom : If I may trufl the flattering Eye of Sleepe, 
My Dreame prefagde fome good euent to come. 
My bofome Lord fits chearfull in his throne, 
And I am comforted with pleafing dreames. 
Me thought I was this night alreadie dead : 
(Strange dreames that giue a dead man leaue to Ihiuke) 
And that my Ladie luliet came to me. 
And breathd fuch life with kilTes in my lips. 
That I reuiude and was an Emperour. 



Enter Balthafar his man looted, 
Newes from Verona, How now Balthafar, 

How doth my Ladie ? Is my Father well ? 

How fares my Juliet ? that I aske againe : 

If fhe be well, then nothing can be ill. i6 

Bait : Then nothing can be ill, for fhe is well. 
Her bodie fleepes in Capels Monument, 
And her immortall parts with Angels dwell. 



Pardon me Sir, that am the MelVenger of fuch bad tidings. 

Rom : Is it euen fo ? then I defie my Starres. 24 

Goe get me incke and paper, hyre pofl horfe, 
I will not flay in Mantua to night. 

Bait: Pardon me Sir, I will not leaue you thus. 
Your lookes are dangerous and full of feare : 28 

I dare not, nor I will not leaue you yet. 

Rom : Doo as I bid thee, get me incke and paper. 
And hyre thofe horfe : ftay not I fay. 



Exit 



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ACT V. SC. I.] 



Romeo and luliet Q! 2, 1599. 



^55 



140 



V. 



T2 



16 



24 



28 



Min, What a peftilent knaue is this fame ? 
M, 2. Hang him lack, come weele in here, tarrie for the mour- 
ners, and (lay dinner. 



Exit, 



Enter Romeo. 
Ro, If 1 may truft the flattering truth of fleepe, 
My dreames prefage fome ioyfull newes at hand. 
My bofomes L. fits lightly in his throne : 
And all this day an vnaccuftomd fpirit. 
Lifts me aboue the ground with chearfull thoughts, 
I dreamt my Lady came and found me dead. 
Strange dreame that giues a deadman leaue to thinke. 
And Breathd fuch life with kifles in my lips. 
That I reuiude and was an Emperor. 
Ah me, how fweete is loue it felfe pofTell 
When but loues Ihadowes are fo rich in ioy. 

Enter Romeos man. 
Newes from Verona, how now Balthazer, 
Doll thou not bring me Letters from the Frier ? 
How doth my Lady, is my Father well : 
How doth my Lady Juliet ? that I aske againe. 
For nothing can be ill if fhe be well. 

Alan, Then (he is well and nothing can be ill. 
Her body fleepes in Capels monument, 
And her immortall part with Angels lines. 
I faw her laid lowe in her kindreds vault. 
And prefently tooke pofte to tell it you : 
O pardon me for bringing thefe ill newes. 
Since you did leaue it for my office (ir. 

Rom, Is it in fo ? then I denie you (larres. 
ITiou knoweft my lodging, get me inke and paper, 
And hire poll horfes, I will hence to night. 

Man, I do befeech you (ir, haue patience : 
Your lookes are pale and wilde, and do import 
Some mifaduenture. 

Ro, Tuih thou art deceiu'd, 
Leaue me, and do the thing I bid thee do. 



Haft 



138. Min.] Mu. Ff. 



[Exeunt.] Q4, 5. 
Act V. Scene i. 



3. L.U'0^<fQ4.5'^^,3'4 
i/t] on Q5. 

4. M/j day an] thisan day 
an Fi. this winged Yi, 
3.4. 

vnao ustomd]vccustom' d 
Fi. 
7. dreame that giues] 
dreames that giues Q4. 
dreatnes that give Q5. 



[Enter Romeos man Bal- 
thazer] Q4. 5. 



18. Capels] CapuletsY^. 



24. in] even Qq. Ff. 
denie] deny F2, 3. 4, Q5. 

25. knowest] know' St Q5. 



v^ 



y 



Digitized by 



Goo^^ 



156 



Romeo and luiiet (Qf i) 1597. 



[act v. SC. I. 



Exit Balthajar, 



Well lulitt, 1 will lye with thee to night. 
Lets fee for meanes. As I doo remember 



36 



Here dwells a Pothecarie whom oft I noted 



40 



As I pafl by, whofe needie fhop is ftufft 
With beggerly accounts of emptie boxes : 
And in the fame an ALigarta hangs. 



44 



Olde endes of packthred, and cakes of Rofes, 

Are thinly ftrewed to make vp a ihow. 

Him as I noted, thus with my felfe I thought : 

And if a man ihould need a poyfon now, 

(Whofe prefent fale is death in Mantua) 

Here he might buy it. This thought of mine 

Did but forerunne my need : and here about he dwcls. 

Being Holiday the Beggers fliop is fhut. 
What ho Apothecarie, come forth I fay. 
Enter Apothecarie. 
Apo : Who calls, what would you iir ? 

Rom : Heeres twentie duckates, 
Giue me a dram of fome fuch fpeeding geere. 

As will difpatch the wearie takers life. 

As fuddenly as powder being fierd 



5* 



60 



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ACT V. sc. 1.] Romeo and luliet Q*. 2. 1599. 


157 


32 


Haft thou no Letters to me from the Frier ? 
Man. No my good Lord. 






Exit. 


[Exit Man.l Ff. 




Ro. No matter get thee gone, 






And hyre thofe horles. He be with thee ftraight. 




36 


Well Juliet, I will lie with thee to night : 
Lets fee for meanes, O mifchiefe thou art fwift. 
To enter in the thoughts of defperate men. 
I do remember an Appothacarie, 




40 


And here abouts a dwells which late I noted. 


40. a] om. Fi. he F2, 3, 4, 




In tattred weeds with ouerw helming browes. 


Qs- 




Culling of limples, meager were his lookes. 






Sharpe miferie had worne him to the bones ;* 




44 


And in his needie (hop a tortoyes hung, 
An allegater ftuft, and other skins 
Of ill ihapte fifties, and about his ftielues, 
A beggerly account of emptie boxes, 




48 


Greene earthen pots, bladders and muftie feedes. 
Remnants of packthred, and old cakes of Rofes 
Were thinly fcattered, to make vp a ftiew. 
Noting this penury, to my felfe I feid. 




52 


An if a man did need a poyfon now, 
Whofe fale is prefent death in Mantua, 
Here Hues a Catifte wretch would fell it him. 
this fame thought did but forerun my need. 


52. An] AndQs, F3, 4. 


56 


And this fame needie man muft fell it me. 
As I remember this ftiould be the houfe, 
Being holy day, the beggers ftiop is ftiut. 






What ho Appothecarie. 


[Enter Appothecarie] Ff. 


6o 


Appo, Who calls fo lowd ? 






Kom, Come hither man, I fee that thou art poore. 


61. Kom.] Rom. Qq. Ff. 




Hold, there is fortie duckets, let me haue 






A dram of poyfon, fuch foone fpeeding geare. 


63. speeding] spreading 


64 


As will difpearfe it felfe through all the veines. 


Qs- 




That the life-wearie-taker may fall dead. 


65 Irfe-wfaHe-iakrr] life' 




And that the Trunke may be difchargd of breath. 


wcaric i.ikcr (^5. 




As violently, as haftie powder fierd Doth 





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158 


Romeo and luUet (Q: i) 1597. [act v. sc. 2. 




From forth a Cannons mouth. 




Apo : Such drugs I haue I muft of force confefle. 




But yet the law is death to thofe that fell them. 


* 


Rom : Art thou fo bare and full of pouertie. 




And dooft thou feare to violate the Law ? 




The Law is not thy frend, nor the Lawes frend. 




And therefore make no confcience of the law : 




Vpon thy backe hangs ragged Miferie, 


^ s ^ 1 


And (larued Famine dwelleth in thy cheekes. 


\^ 


^po : My pouertie but not my will confents. 




Rom : I pay thy pouertie, but not thy will. 




j4po : Hold tal^ you this, and put it in anie liquid thing 




you will, and it will ferue had you the lines of twenty men. 




Rom : Hold, take this gold, worfe poyfon to mens foules 




Than this which thou haft giuen me. Goe hye thee hence. 




Goe buy the cloathes, and get thee into flefli. 




Come cordiall and not poyfon, goe with mee 




To Iiiliets Graue : for there muft I vfe thee. Exeunt. 




Enter Frier John. 




John : What Frier Laurence, Brother, ho ? 




iMJtr : This fame ftiould be the voyce of Frier lohn. 




What newes from Mantua, what will Romeo come ? 




lohn : Going to feeke a barefoote Brother out. 




One of our order to aflTociate mee. 


• . 1> 1 


Here in this Cittie vifiling the lick. 


V. 


Whereas the infeftious peftilence remaind : 


■ ' , 


And being by the Searchers of the Towne 




Found and examinde, we were both ftiut vp. 




Lauv. 



68 



80 



V.2. 



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ACT V. sc. 2.] Romeo and Juliet Q? 2, 1599. 


159 


68 


Doth hurry from the fatall Canons wombe. 






PoiL Such mortall drugs I haue, but Mantuas lawe 
Is death to any he that vtters them. 


69. Poti.] App. & Ap. Ff. 
(also at Unes 78, 80.) 




Ro, Art thou fo bare and full of wretchednefle. 




7^ 


And feareft to die, famine is in thy cheekes. 


72. /earest]fsarsi Ff. Q5. 




Need and oppreflion ftarueth in thy eyes. 


73. thy] thine Qs, F3. 4. 




Contempt and beggerie hangs vpon thy backe : 


74. hangs upon'\ hang on 




The world is not thy friend, nor the worlds law. 


F2,3,4. hang upon Qs- 


76 


The world affoords no law to make thee rich : 
Then be not poore, but breake it and take this. 
Poti,^ My pouertie, but not my will confents. 






Ro, I pray thy pouertie and not thy will. 


79. pray] pay Q4, 5. 


8o 


Pot'u Put this in any.Hquid thing you will 
And drinke it off, and if you had the (Irength 
Of twentie men, it would difpatch you ftraight. 






Ro, There is thy Gold, worfe poyfon to mens foules. 


83. There is] There sYi, 


84 


Doing more murther in this loathfome world. 
Then thefe poore copounds that thou maieft not fell. 


84. murther] murthers Q4. 
murder F3, 4. murders 

Qs- 




I fell thee poyfon, thou haft fold me none, 
Farewell, buy foode, and get thy felfe in flefti. 


85. ma i est] maxst Q4. 
maist Qs, F3, 4, 


88 


Come Cordiall and not poyfon, go with me 
To luUets graue, for there muft I vfe thee. 

Exeunt, 




V. 2. 


Enter Frier lohn to Frier Lawrence. 
loh. Holy Francifcan Frier, brother, ho. 


Act V. Scene 2. 




Enter Lawrence. 


[Enter Frier Lawrence] Ff. 




Law, This fame Ihould be the voyce of Frier lohn, 






Welcome from Mantua, what fayes Romeo ? 




4 


Or if his minde be writ, giue me his Letter. 

loh. Going to find a barefoote brother out. 
One of our order to aflbtiate me. 
Here in this Citie vifiting the (icke. 


4. if his] ifY'z, 3. 4. 


8 


And finding him, the Searchers of the Towne 
SufpeAing that we both were in a houfe. 
Where the infedtious peftilence did raigne, 
Seald vp the doores, and would not let vs forth. 




12 


So that my fpeed to Mantua there was ftaid. Law. Who 





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Romeo and luliet (Qf i) 1597. 



[act v. sc. 3. 



Lour : Who bare my letters then to Romeo ? 
lohn : I haue them ftill, and here they are. 



Laur : Now, by my holy Order, 
The letters were not nice, but of great weight. 

Goe get thee hence, and get me prefently 
A fpade and mattocke. 

John : Well I will prefently go fetch thee thorn. 

Laur : Now mufl I to the Monument alone, 
Leaft that the Ladie ihould before I come 
Be wakde from lleepe. I will hye 
To free her from that Tombe of miferie. 



Etit. 



Er'it, 



20 



24 



Enter Counlie Paris and his Page with flowers 
andfweete water. 
Par : Put out the torch, and lye thee all along 
Vnder this Ew-tree, keeping thine eare clofe to the hollow 

ground. 
And if thou heare one tread within this Churchyard, 
Staight giue me notice. 
Boy : I will my Lord. 

Paris flrewes the Tomb with flowers. 
Par: Sweete Flower, with flowers I llrew thy Bridaie /ii 
bed: 
Sweete Tombe that in thy circuite doft containe. 
The perfedt modell of eternitie : 
Faire Miet that with Angells doft remaine. 
Accept this lateft fauour at my hands. 
That liuing honourd thee, and being dead 
With funerall praifes doo adorne thy Tombe. 



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ACT V. sc. 3.] Romeo and luliet Q". 2. 1599. 


161 




Lmw. Who bare my Letter then to Romeo 9 






lohn. I could not fend it, here it is againe. 






Nor get a meflenger to bring it thee. 




i6 


So fearefuU were they of infection. 

Law, Vnhappie fortune, by my Brotherhood, 
The Letter was not nice but full of charge. 
Of deare import, and the negledting it. 




30 


May do much danger : Frier John go hence. 
Get me an Iron Crow and bring it flraight 
Vnto my Cell. 

John, Brother ile go and bring it thee. {Exit, 




>4 


Law. Now muft I to the Monument alone. 






Within this three houres will faire luliet wake. 


25. M/j] these Qs. 




Shee will befhrewe me much that Romeo 






Hath had no notice of thefe accidents : 




28 


But I will write againe to Mantua, 
And keepe her at my Cell till Romeo come, 
Poore lining Coarfe, clofde in a dead mans Tombe. 

Exit. 




V.3. 


Enter Paris and his Page. 


Act V. Scene 3. 




Par. Giue me thy Torch boy, hence and (land aloofe. 


I. aloofe"] aloft Fi, 2, 3. • 




Yet put it out, for I would not be feene : 






Vnder yond young Trees lay thee all along. 


3. yonn^\ yong Q4. 
along] alone F2, 3. 

4. Holding] Laying J'3, 4. 


4 


Holding thy eare clofe to the hoUow ground. 




So Ihall no foote vpon the Church-yard tread. 






Being loofe, vnfirme with digging vp of Graues, 






But thou fhalt heare it, whiftle then to me 




8 


As iignall that thou beared fome thing approach, 
Giue me thofe flowers, do as I bid thee, go. 






Pa. I am almoft afraid to (land alone. 


10. alone] along F2. 


12 


Here in the Church-yard, yet I will aducnture. 

Par. Sweet flower, with flowers thy Bridall bed I drew 


[Exit.] F2. 3. 4. 

12. strew] \,] Qa. 4. (:) 




woe, thy Canapie is dud and dones. 


The rest. 
13 Canapie] Canopie Fi. 




Which with fweete water nightly I will dewe. 
Or wanting that, with teares didild by mones. 


Canopy Ql, F2. 3, 4. 
14. dewe] newQs. 


16 


The obfequies that I for thee will keepe : 

Nightly 





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l62 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act v. sc. 3. 



Boy whijlles and calls. My Lord. 

Enter Romeo and Balthafar, with a torch, a 
a mattocke, and a crow of yron. 
Par : The boy giues warning, fomething doth approach. 
What curfed foote wanders this was to night. 
To (lay my obfequies and true loues rites ? 
What with a torch, muffle me night a while. 

Rom : Giue mee this mattocke, and this wrentching I- 
ron. 
And take thefe letters, early in the morning. 
See thou deliuer them to my Lord and Father. 

So get thee gone and trouble me no more. 

Why I defcend into this bed of death. 

Is partly to behold my Ladies face. 

But chiefly to take from her dead finger, 

A precious ring which I mud vfe 

In deare imployment. but if thou wilt flay. 

Further to prie in what I vndertake. 

By heauen He teare thee ioynt by ioynt. 

And ftrewe thys hungry churchyard with thy lims. 

The time and my intents are fauage, wilde. 



24 



28 



3» 



36 



Bait : Well, He be gone and not trouble you. 

Rom : So (halt thou win my fauour, take thou this. 
Commend me to my Father, farwell good fellow. 

Bolt : Yet for all this will I not part from hence. 
Komeo opens the torn be, 

Rom : Thou deteftable maw, thou womb of death, 
Gorde with the deareft morfell of the earth. 
Thus I enforce thy rotten iawes to ope. 



40 



Par : This is that baniflit haughtie Alountague, 
That murderd my loues cofen, I will apprehend him. Stop 



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ACT V. SC. 3.] 



Romeo and Iidiet Q^ 2. 1599. 



J 63 



Nightly {hall be, to drew thy graue and weepe. 

IfTii/Ue Boy. 
The Boy giues warning, fomething doth approach. 
What curfed foote wanders this way to night, 
20 To crofle my obfequies and true loues right ? 
What with a Torch ? muffle me night a while. 

Enter Romeo and Peter. 
Ro, Giue me that mattocke and the wrenching Iron, 

Hold take this Letter, early in the morning 
24 See thou deliuer it to my Lord and Father, 

Giue me the light vpon thy life I charge thee. 

What ere thou heareft or feeft, ftand all aloofe. 

And do not interrupt me in my courfe. 
28 Why I defcend into this bed of death. 

Is partly to behold my Ladies face : 

But chiefly to take thence from her dead finger, 

A precious Ring : a Ring that I mull vfe, 
32 In deare imployment, therefore hence be gone : 

But if thou iealous doft returne to prie 

In what I farther fhall intend to doo. 

By heauen I will teare thee loynt by loynt, 
^6 And ftrew this hungry Church-yard with thy lims : 

The time and my intents are fauage wilde. 

More fierce and more inexorable farre. 

Then emptie Tygers, or the roaring fea. 
40 Pet, I will be gone fir, and not trouble ye. 

Ro, So flialt thou fhew me fricndlhid, take thou that. 

Line and be profperous, and farewell good fellow. 
Pet, For all this fame, ile hide me here about, 
44 His lookes I feare, and his intents I doubt. 

Ro, Thou detellable mawe, thou wombe of death, 

Gorg'd with the deareft morfell of the earth : 

Thus I enforce thy rotten lawes to open, 
48 And in defpight ile cram thee with more foode. 
Pa, This is that banillit haughtie Mountague, 

That murdred my loues Cozin, with which greefe 



19. way] wayes Fi. 



21. muffle me night] night 
muffle me Q5. 

[Enter Romeo and Bal- 
thazar his man] Q4, 5. 

22. that] the Qq. 



26. hearest] hearst Ff. Q5. 



It 



34. farther] further Ff. 



40. Pet.] Bait. Q4, 5. (also 
at line 43.) 

ye] you Qq. Ff. 

41. friendshid] friendship 
Qq. Ff. 

[Exit.] F2. 3. 4. 



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164 



Romeo and luliet (Q? 1) 1597. 



[act v. sc. 3 



Stop thy vnhallowed toyle vile Mountague. 

Can vengeance be purfued further then death ? 

I doe attach thee as a fellon heere. 

The Law condemnes thee, therefore thou mufl dye, 

Rom .• I muft indeed, and therefore came I hither. 
Good youth be gone, tempt not a defperate man. 



56 



Heape not another finne vpon my head 
By Iheding of thy bloud, I doe protell 
i loue thee better then I loue my felfe : 
For I come hyther armde againft my felfe. 



64 



Par: I doe defie thy coniurations : 
And doe attach thee as a fellon heere. 

Rom : What doft thou tempt me, then haue at thee boy. 
Theyfght, 

Boy : O Lord they fight, I will goe call the watch. 

Par : Ah I am flaine, if thou be mercifuU 
Open the tombe, lay me with luliet, 

Rom : Yfaith I will, let me perufe this face, 
Mercutios kinfman, noble County Paris ? 
What faid my man, when my betoffed foule 
Did not regard him as we paft along. 
Did he not fay Paris fhould haue maried 
luliet ? eyther he faid fo, or I dreamd it (o. 



68 



7^ 



7^ 



But I will fatisfie thy lail requeft. 

For thou hafl prizd thy loue aboue thy life. 



Death 



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ACT V. SC. 3.] 



Romeo and luliet Q? 2. 1599. 



165 



It is fuppofed the faire creature died. 
And here is come to do fome villainous ihame 
To the dead bodies : I will apprehend him. 
Stop thy vnhallowed toyle vile Mountague : 
Can vengeance be purfued further then death ? 

56 Condemned villaine, I do apprehend thee. 
Obey and go with me, for thou mud die. 

Rom, I mud indeed, and therefore came I hither. 
Good gentle youth tempt not a defprate man, 

60 Flie hence and leaue me, thinke vpon thefe gone. 
Let them affright thee. I befeech thee youth. 
Put not an other fin vpon my head. 
By vrging me to fiirie, 6 be gone, 

64 By heauen I loue thee better then my felfe. 
For I come hither armde againft my felfe : 
Stay not, begone. Hue, and hereafter fay, 
A mad mans mercie bid thee run away. 

68 Par, I do defie thy commiration. 

And apprehend thee for a Fellon here. 

Ro, Wilt thou prouoke me ? then haue at thee boy. 
O Lord theyjight, I will go call the JVaich, 

72 Par. O I am flaine, if thou be mercifull. 

Open the Tombe, lay me with luliet, 

Rom, I faith I will, let me perufe this face, 
Mercutios kinfman. Noble Count ie Paris, 

76 What faid my man, when my betofled foule 
Did not attend him as we rode ? I thinke 
He told me Paris fhould haue married luliet. 
Said he not fo ? or did I dreame it fo ? 

80 Or am I mad, hearing him talke of luliet. 
To thinke it was fo ? O giue me thy hand. 
One writ with me in fowre misfortunes booke. 
He burie thee in a triumphant graue. 

84 A Graue, O no. A Lanthorne flaughtred youth : 

For here lies luliet, and her bewtie makes 

This Vault a feafting prefence full of light. 



59. desprate] desperate Qq. 
Ff. 

60. these] those Ff. 



Death 



67. bid] badQs- 

68. commiration'] commis- 
seration Q3, Ki. com' 
thiseration Q4, 5, Fa, 
3.4. 

71. Given to Pet. Ff., to 
Page. Q4, 5, and printed 
in rom. 



75. Mercutios] Mercutius 
Q3. t'x. a. 3- 



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i66 



Romeo and luliet (Q? i) 1597. 



[act v. sc. 3. 



Death lye thou there, by a dead man interd. 
How oft haue many at the houre of death 
Beene blith and pleafant ? which their keepers call 
A lightning before death But how may I 
Call this a lightning. Ah dcare lu/iet. 



88 



How well thy beauty doth become this graue ? 
O I beleeue that vnfubllanciall death, 
Is amorous, and doth court my loue. 



104 



Therefore will I, O heere, O euer hccre. 

Set vp my euerlafting reft 

With wormes, that are thy chamber mnyds. 



1 12 



Come defperate Pilot now at once runne on 
The dalhing rockes thy fea-ficke weary barge. 
Heers to my loue. O true Apothecary : 
Thy drugs are fwift : thus with a kifle I dye. 



Falls. 
Enter 



124 



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ACT V. SC. 3.] 



Romeo and luliet Of 2, 1 599. 



167 



I Death lie thou there by a dead man interd, 
88 How oft when men are at the point of death, 
Haue they bene merie ? which their keepers call 
A lightning before death ? Oh how may I 
Call this a lightning ? O my Loue, my wife, 
9^ Death that hath fuckt the honey of thy breath. 
Hath had no power yet vpon thy bewtie : 
Thou art not conquerd, bewties enfigne yet 
Is crymfon in thy lips and in thy cheeks, 
9^ And deaths pale flag is not aduanced there. 
Tyhalt lyeft thou there in thy bloudie fheet ? 
O what more fauour can I do to thee, 
Then with that hand that cut thy youth in twaine, 
To funder his that was thine enemie ? 
Forgiue me Couzen. Ah deare luliet 
Why art thou yet fo faire ? I will beleeue, 
Shall I beleeue that vnfubftantiall death is amorous. 
And that the leane abhorred monfter keepes 
Thee here in darke to be his parramour ? 
For feare of that I ftill will ftaie with thee. 
And neuer from this pallat of dym night. 
[ Depart againe, come lye thou in my arme, 
Heer's to thy health, where ere thou tumbleft in. 
O true Appothecarie / 

Thy drugs are quicke. Thus with a kifle I die. ^ 
Depart againe, here, here, will I remaine, 
With wormes that are thy Chamber-maides : O here 
Will I fet vp my euerlafting reft : 
And ftiake the yoke of inaufpicious ftarres. 
From this world wearied flelh, eyes looke your laft : 
Armes take your laft embrace : And lips, O you 
The doores of breath, feale with a righteous kille 
A dateleflTe bargaine to ingrofling death : 
Come bitter condud, come vnfauoury guide. 
Thou defperate Pilot, now at once run on 
The daftiing Rocks, thy leafick weary barke : 
Heeres to my Loue. O true Appothecary : 
^ -^4 Thy drugs are quicke. Thus with a kifle I die. 

L3 



104 



108 



116 



Enter 



100. thine] thy Ff. 



vyj. pallat] fallaceQq.Tt. j 

dii\ 



night.] [.T om. Qq. Ff. 
108—111. Depart 



om. Q4. 5. 
108. arme] armes Ff. 



116. roorld wearied] Hy- 
phened Qq. Fi. wjrlJs 
wearied Fa, 3, 4. 



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i68 



Romeo and luliet (Q^ i) 1597. 



[act v. sc. 3. 



[/m/.] catchword in the 
original. 



Enter Fryer with a Lanthome. 

How oft to night haue thefe my aged feete 
Stumbled at graues as I did pafle along. 
Whofe there ? 

Man, A frend and one that knowes you well. 

Fr : Who is it that conlbrts fo late the dead, 
What light is yon ? if I be not deceiued, 
Me thinkes it burnes in Capels monument ? 

Man It doth fo holy Sir, and there is one 
That loues you dearely. 

Fr. Who is it ? 

Man : Romeo, 

Fr : How long hath he beene there ? 

Man : Full halfe an houre and more. 

Fr : Goe with me thether. 

Man : I dare not fir, he knowes not I am heere : 
On paine of death he chargde me to be gone. 
And not for to difturbe him in his enterprize. 

Fr ; Then muft I goe : my minde prefageth ill. 

Fryer Jioops and lookes on the blood and weapons. 

What bloud is this that flaines the entrance 

Of this marble (lony monument ? 

What meanes thefe maifterles and goory weapons ? 

Ah me I doubt, whofe heere ? what Romeo dead ? 

Who and Paris too ? what vnluckie houre 

Is acceflary to fo foule a finne ? 



132 



136 



r40 



148 



15^ 



The Lady fhirres. 



luliet rifes. 



Ah comfortable Fryer. 
I doe remember well where I fhould be. 
And what we talkt of: but yet I cannot fee 
Him for whofe fake I vndertooke this hazard. 

Fr : Lady come foorth, I heare fome noife at hand. 



i5<5 



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ACT V. sc. 3] Romeo and luliet Q? 2. 1599. 


169 




Entrer Frier with Lanthorne, Crowe, 


Entrer . . . ] Enter . . . Qq. 




and Spade, 


Ff. 




Frier, S. Frances be my fpeede, how oft to night 


125. S ] Si. Q3. Ff. Samt 

94. s. 

/'"ranees] Francis Qq, Ff. 




Haue my old feet fhimbled at graues ? Whoes there ? 




Man, Heeres one, a friend, and one that knowes you well. 


127. Man.] Bnlt. Q4, 5 


128 


Frier, Blifle be vpon you. Tell me good my friend 


(also at lines 132, 134, 
136, 138, 144). 


I What torch is yond that vainly lends his light 




1 To grabs and eyelefle fculles : as I difcerne. 




1 It burneth in the CapeU monument. 


131. Cupels] CapuleCs F4. 


*i^ 1 Man, It doth fo holy fir, and theres my maifler, one that you 


132. It . . . sir] separate 
line Ff. 




Frier, Who is it ? • (loue. 




Man, Romeo. 






Frier, How long hath he bin there ? 




ia6 


Man, Full halfc an houre. 
Frier, Go with me to the Vault. 
Man. I dare not fir. 




My Mafter knowes not but I am gone hence. 




^^ 1 And feareftilly did menace me with death 




I If I did flay to looke on his entents. 




1 Frier, Stay then ile fco alone, feare comes vpon me. 


142. feare comes] feares 




much I feare fome ill vnthriftie thing. 


comes Fi. feares come 
Fa. 3. 4. 


144 


Man. As I did fleepe vnder this yong tree heere. 


143. vnthrifiie] unlucky 
Qq. Ff. 

144. yong] young Qq. Ff. 




I dreampt my maifler and another fought. 




And that my maifler flew him. 






Frier. Romeo. 




148 


Alack alack, what blond is this which flaines 
The flony entrance of this Sepulchre ? 
What meane thefe maiflerlefTe and goarie fwords 
To lie difcolour'd by this place of peace ? 




15^ 


Romeo, oh pale / who elfe, what Paris too ? 
And fleept in bloud ? ah what an vnkind hower 
Is guihie of this lamentable chance ? 
The Lady flirres. 




156 


luli, comfortable Frier, where is my Lord ? 
I do remember well where I ihould be : 
And there I am, where is my Ro?neo ? 


156. where is] where sT(. 




Frier, I heare fome noyfe Lady, come from that nefl Of 





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170 



Romeo and luUet (Qt 1) 1597. 



[act v. sc. 3. 



We fliall be taken, Paris he is flaine. 
And Romeo dead : and if we heere be tane 
We fliall be thought to be as acceflarie. 
I will prouide for you in fome clofe Nunery. 

lul : Ah leaue me, leaue me, I will not from hence. 

Fr • I heare fome noife, I dare not (lay, come, come, 

lul : Goe get thee gone. 
Whats heere a cup clofde in my louers hands ? 
Ah churle drinke all, and leaue no dH)p for me. 



i54 



168 



Enter watch. 
IVatch : This way, this way. 
lul : I, noife ? then mud I be refolute. 
O happy dagger thou flialt end my feare. 
Reft in my bofome, thus I come to thee. 

She^flahs herfelfe andfalles. 



.76 



Enter watch. 
Cap : Come looke about, what weapons haue we heere ? 
See frends where luliet t\\o daies buried. 
New bleeding wounded, fearch and fee who's neare. 
Attach and bring them to vs prefently. 



184 



Enter one with the Fn/er. 
I. Captaine heers a Fryer with tooles about him. 



192 



Fitte 



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ACT V. SC. 



3-] 



Romeo and luUet Q? 2. 1599. 



171 



160 



164 



168 



173 



176 



180 



184 



188 



Of death, contagion, and vnnaturall lleepe, 
A greater power then we can contradict 
Hath thwarted our intents, come, come away. 
Thy hulband in thy bofome there lies dead : 
And Paris too, come ile difpofe of thee. 
Among a Sifterhood of holy Nunnes : 
Stay not to queftion, for the watch is comming. 
Come go good luUtt, I dare no longer (lay. 



Exit, 



192 



lull. Go get thee hence, for I will not away. 
Whats heere ? a cup clofd in my true loues hand ? 
Poifon I fee hath bin his timelefle end : 
O churle, drunke all, and left no friendly drop 
To help me after, I will kilFe thy lips, 
Happlie fome poyfon yet doth hang on them. 
To make me dye wath a reftoratiue. 
Thy lips are warme. 

Enter Boy and IFatch. 

IVdtch. Leade boy, which w^ay. 

lull. Yea noife ? then ile be briefe. O happy dagger 
This is thy llieath, there ruft and let me dye. 

IVdtch boy. This is the place there where the torch doth burne. 

IFatch. The ground is bloudie, fearch about the Churchyard. 
Go fome of you, who ere you lind attach. 
PittifuU fight, heere hes the Countie ilaine. 
And luliet bleeding, warme, and newlie dead : 
Who heere hath laine this two daies buried. 
Go tell the Prince, runne to the Capu/ets, 
Raife vp the Mountagues, fome others fearch. 
We fee the ground whereon thefe woes do lye. 
But the true ground of all thefe piteous woes 
We cannot without circumftance defcry. 
Enter Romeos man. 

IFatch. Hcres Romeos man, we found him in the Churchyard. 

Chief. u'ait.^t. Hold him in fafetie till the Prince come hither. 
J.f.ter Frier, and another IFatchman. 

3. IFatch. Here is a Frier that trembles, fighes, and weepes. 

We 



171. druftke ali,"] drift ke 
all, Qq. F4. drift ke a lit 
Fi, 2. 3. 
le/i] leave <:^S' 



176. way:\ [?] Qq. Ff. 

177. Yea noise] separate 
line Ff. 

178. This is] Ti s is Q3. 
Tis iti Ff. 

[Kils herselfe] Ff. 

179. Watch boy.] Boy Q4, 
5. Ff. 



184. this] these Qq. Ff. 



191. Chief, watch] Con. Ff. 
cotne^ comes F2, 3, 4. 



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Google 



172 



Romeo and Iidiet (Q? i) 1597. 



U 



[act v. sc. 3. 



Fitte to ope a tombe. 

Cap : A great fufpition, keep him fafe. 

Enter one with Romets Man. 

I. Heeres Romeos Man. 

Capt : Keepe him to be examinde. 

Enter Prince with others. 

Prin : What early mifchiefe calls vs vp fo foone. 

Capt : O noble Prince, fee here 
Where Juliet that hath lyen intoombd two dayes, 
Warme and frefti bleeding, Romeo and Countie Paris 
Likewife newly flaine. 

Prin : Search leeke about to finde the murderers. 
En tor olde Capolet and his fnje. 

Capo : What rumor's this that is fo early vp ? 

Moth : The people in the ftreetes crie Romeo, 
And fome on Juliet : as if they alone 
Had been the caufe of fuch a mutinie. 



196 

204 



Capo : See Wife, this dagger hath miftooke : 
For (loe) the backe is emptie of yong Mountaguc, 
And it is flieathed in our Daughters bread. 



212 



Enter olde Montague. 

Prin : Come Mountague, for thou art early vp. 
To fee thy Sonne and Heire more early downe. 

Mount : Dread Souereigne, my Wife is dead to night. 
And yong Benuolio is deceafed too : 
What further mifchiefe can there yet be found ? 

Prin : Firft come and fee, then fpeake. 

Mount : O thou vntaught, what manners is in chis 
To prefle before thy Father to a graue. 

Prin : Come feale your mouthes of outrage for a while. 
And let vs feeke to finde the Autliors out Of 



216 



220 



224 



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ACT V. 



sc. 3.] 



Romeo and luUet Q? 2. 1599. 



^1i 



We tooke this Mattocke and this Spade from him. 
As he was comming from this Church-yards (ide. 
Chief watch, A great fufpition, flay the Frier too too. 
Enter the Prince, 
196 Prin, What mifaduenture is fo early vp. 

That calls our perfon from our morning reft 9 
Enter Capels. 
Ca, What fhould it be that is fo flirike abroad ? 
JVife, O the people in the ftreet crie Romeo, 
200 Some luliet, and fome Paris, and all runne 
With open outcry toward our Monument. 

Pr, What feare is this which ftartles in your eares ? 
Watch, Soueraine, here lies the County Paris flain, 
304 And Romeo dead, and luUet dead before, 

Warme and new kild. (comes. 

Prin, Search, feeke & know how this foule murder 
Wat. Here is a Frier, and Slaughter Romeos man, 
208 With Inftruments vpon them, fit to open 
Thefe dead mens Tombes. 

Enter Capulet and his wife, 
Ca. O heauens / O wife looke how our daughter 
This dagger hath miftane, for loe his houfe (bleeds ! 
212 Is emptie on the back of Mounlague, 

And it misfheathd in my daughters bofome. 

JVife, O me, this fight of death, is as a Bell 
That wames my old age to a fepulcher. 
Enter Mountagiie, 
Prin, Come Mountague, for thou art early vp 
To fee thy fonne and heire, now earling downe. 

Moun, Alas my liege, my wife is dead to night, 
Griefe of my fonnes exile hath ftopt her breath. 
What further woe confpires againft mine age ? 
Prin, Looke and thou flialt fee. 
Moun, O thou vntaught, what miners is in this. 
To prefle before thy father to a graue ? 

Prin, Scale vp the mouth of outrage for a while. 
Till we can cleare thefe ambiguities. 



216 



220 



224 



194. Church-yards] 
Church-yard Q3. Ff. 
Churchyard Q4, 5. 

195. Chief watch ^ Con. Ff. 
too too.] too, too. Q3, 4. 
too. Q5. Ff. 

197. morning] mornings 
, 04. 5> Ff. 

[Enter Capulet and his 
Wife] Q4. 5, Ff. 

198. is so shrike] they so 
shrike Qq. Ff. (shriek 



And 



207. Slaughter] Slaugh- 
terd Qq.^ Fl. 



[Enter . . . ] oin. Q4, 5, 

Ff. (see above). 
210. heauens] heaveit Qq. 

Ff. 



213. it] is Qq. Ff. 

ntissheathd] misheathed 
Fi , 2, 3, Q5. mis-sheathed 
F4. 



217. earling] eariyQq. Ff. 



220. mine] my Qq. Ff. 



224. outrage] out-rage Q4, 
F3. 4. 



Digitized by 



Google 



^74 



Romeo and lulici {Ql i) 1597. 



[act 



sc. 



U-^ 



Of fach a hninous and fold leene inifchaimce. 



Bring forth the j)arties in fufpition. 

Fr : I am the greatefl: able to doo lead. 
Moll worthie Prince, heare me but fpeake the truth. 
And He informe you how thefe things fell out. 
Juliet here flaine was married to that Romeo, 
Without her Fathers or her Mothers grant : 
The Nurfe was priuie to the marriage. 
The balefull day of this vnhappie marriage, 
Was Ti/ialls doomefday ; for which Rofneo 
Was banilhed from hence to Mantua. 
He gone, her Father fought by foule conllraint 
To marrie her to Paris : But her Soule 
(Loathing a fecond Contra6t) did refufe 
To giue confent^ and therefore did Ihe vrge me 
Either to hnde a meanes Ihe might auoyd 
What fo her Father fought to tbrce her too : 
Or els all defperately Ihe threatncd 
Euen in my prefcnce to difpatch her felfe. 
Then did I giue her, (tutord by mine arte) 
A potion that fhould make her feeme as dead : 
And told her that I would with all pod fpeed 
Send hence to Mantua for her Komeo, 
That he might come and take her from the Toombe. 
But he that had my Letters (Frier John) 
Seeking a Brother to aflbciate him. 
Whereas the ficke infection remaind. 
Was flayed by the Searchers of the Towne, 
But Komeo vnderftanding by his man. 
That luUet was deceafde, returnde in poil 
Vnto Ferona for to fee his loue. 
What after happened touching Paris dealh. 
Or Ykomeos is to me vnknowne at all. 






® 






'\ 






--J6 . 

i<i: 



But 



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ACT V. SC. 3.] 



Romeo and luliet Cf. 2. 1599. 



175 



And know their fpring, their head, their tnie difcent. 
And then will I be generall of your woes, 
228 And leade you euen to death, meane time Ibrbeart, 
And let milchance be flaue to patience. 
Bring foorth the parties of fufpition. 
Frier. I am the greateft able to do leall, 
232 '-'Yet moft fufpe<^ed as the time and place 

Doth make againfl me of this direfull murther : 
And heere I fland both to impeach and purge 
' My felfe condemned, and my felfe excul'de. 
236 ^ Prin. Then fay at once what thou doft know in this ? 
v^ Frier. I will be briefe, for my ihort date of breath 
^^Is not fo long as is a tedious tale. 

- Romeo there dead, was husband to that luliet, 
240 s^And fhe there dead, thats Romeos faithfull wife : 

I married them, and their ftolne marriage day 

- Was Tilalts doomefday, whofe vntimely death 
Banilht the new-made Bridegroome from this Citie. 

244 ^^or whome, and not for Til alt y Juliet pinde. 
You to remoue that fiege of griefe from her 
— Betrothd and would haue married her perforce 
To Countie Paris. Then comes fhe to me, 
248 '^ And with wild lookes bid me deuife tome meane 
^ To rid her from this fecond mariage : 

Or in my Cell there would flie kill her felfe. 
—Then gaue I her (fo tuterd by my art) 
2^2 A fleeping potion, which fo tooke effect 
As I intended, for it wrought on her 
i The forme of death, meane time I writ to Romeo 
■ That he ihould hither come as this dire night 
20 - To help to take her from her borrowed graue, 
v^Bjing the time the potions force (hould ceafe. 
^•But he which bore my letter. Frier John, 
jrAVas flayed by accident, and yeflernight 
260 ^''^etumd my letter back, then all alone 
^ At the prefixed hower of her waking, 

M 



Came 



233. Do//-] DoeQs. 



240. thats] that's Ff. that 
Q4,5 



V 



248. miane]ifuanesQc\.Ti, 



259. stayed] stayd Ff. 



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Qoo^z 



il6 



Romeo avd luliet {Q! i) 1597. 



[act v. sc. 3. 



But when I came to take the Lady hence, 

I found them dead, and flie awakt from fleep : 
Whom faine I would haue taken from the tombe. 



268 



Which ihe refufed feeing Romeo dead. 
Anone I heard the watch and then I lied. 
What afterhappened I am ignorant of. 
And if in this ought haue mifcaried. 
By me, or by my meanes let my old life 
Be facrificd fome houre before his time. 
To the mod ftrickefl rigor of the Law. 

Pry : VVe Hill haue knowne thee for a holy man, 
Wheres Romeos man, what can he fay in this 9 

Balth : I brought my maifter word that fhee was dead. 
And then he poafled (Iraight from Mantua, 
Vnto this Toorabe. Thefe Letters he dehuered me. 
Charging me early giue them to his Father. 



276 



i8o 



Prin : Lets fee the Letters, I will read them ouer. 
Where is the Counties Boy that calld the Watch ? 

Boy : I brought my Mafter vnto Juliets graue. 
But one approaching, ftraight I calld my Mafler. 
At laft they fought, I ran to call the Watch. 
And this is all that I can fay or know. 

Prin : Thefe letters doe make good the Fryers wordes. 



288 



Come Capolet, and come olde Mountagewe, 



Where 



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ACT V. SC. 



3] 



Romeo and Ittllet Of, 2. 1599. 



^77 



264 



268 



276 



280 



284 



288 



292 



296 



^^ Came I to take her trom her kindreds Vault, 
' * Meaning to keepe her clolely at my Cell, 
^ Till I conueniently could lend to Romt'o. 
^— But when I came. Tome minute ere the time 
v^ Of her awakening, here vntimely lay, 
" The Noble Paris, and true Romeo dead. 
»/ She wakes, and I entreated her come I'orth 
/ And bearc this worke of" heauen \\ ith patience : 
v'But then a noyle did icare me from the Tombc, 
v^And ihe too defperate would not go with me : 
"^ut as it feemes, did violence on her felfe. 
^ Al this I know, Sc to the marriagelher Nurfe is piiuie : 
^ And if ought in this mi fear ied by hiy fault. 

Let my old lifo be iacriticd fome houre before his Hme, 
Vnto the rigour of feuerell law. 

Prin. We ill 11 haue knowne thee for a holy man, 
Wlieres Romeos man ? what can he fay to this ? 

Balth, I brought my mailler newes of Juliets death, 
And then in pofle he came from Mantua, 
To this fame place. To this fame monument 
This Letter he early bid me giue his Father, 
And threatned me with death, going in the Vault, 
If I departed not, and left him there. 

Prin. Giue me the IvCtter, I will looke on it. 
Where is the Counties Page that raifd the Watch ? 
Sirrah, what made your maifter in this place ? 

Bni/. He came with flowers to llrew his Ladies gr.uio, 
And bid me Hand aloofe, and fo I did. 
Anon comes one with light to ope the Tombe, 
And by and by my maiiler drew on him. 
And then I ran away to call the Watch. 

Prin. This Letter doth make good the Friers wonls, 
Their courfe of Loue, tlie tidings of her death. 
And here he writes, that he did buy a poyfon 
Of a poore Pothecarie, and therewithal!. 
Came to this Vault, to die and lye with lu/iet. 
Where be thefe enemies ? Cap u let, Mountague ? 



266. awiikening] awaking 
Qq. Ff. 

a68. fntreated her] intreat 
her to F4. 



273. her\ the Q5. 

275. his] the Q(i. Ff. 

277. tx] an F4. 

279. Balth] lioy Ff. 



281. place. To . . . monu- 
ment \ place, to . . . monu- 
ment. Ff. Qs. 



2S3. Boy.] Pa-e Ff. 



Sec I 



Digitized by 



Google 



1/8 



Romeo and IiiUet {Q: i) 1597. 



[act v. sc. 3. 



Where are thefe enemies ? fee what hate hath done. 



Cap : Come brother Mountagite giue me thy hand, 
There is my daughters dowry : for now no more 
Can I beftowe on her, thats all I haiie. 

Moun : But I will giue them more, I will ered 
Her ftatue of pure golde : 
That while Ferona by that name is knowne. 
There Ihall no llatue of fiich price be fet, 
As that of Komeos loued lu/iet. 

Cap : As rich iliall Rornco by his Lady lie, 
Poore Sacrifices to our Enmitie. 

Prin : A gloomie peace this day doth with it brin:^. 
Come, let vs hence, 

To haue more talke of thefe fad things. 
Some Ihall be pardoned and fome puniflied : 
For nere was heard a Storie of more woe, 
Than this of luliet and her Romeo. 



304 



308 



312 



316 



FfMS. 



Digitized by 



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ACT V. SC. 3.] 



Borneo and luliet Qf. 2. 1599. 



179 



See what a fcourge is laide vpon your hate ? 
300 That heauen finds means to kil your ioyes with loue. 

And I for winking at your difcords too, 

Haue loft a brace of kinfmen, all are punifht. 
Cap. O brother Mountague, giue me thy hand, 
304 This is my daughters ioynture, for no more 

Can I demaund. 

Moun. But I can giue thee more. 

For I will raie her ftatue in pure gold, 
308 That whiles Verona by that name is knowne. 

There (hall no figure at fuch rate be fet. 

As that of true and feithfull luliet, 

CapeL As rich fhall Romeos by his Ladies lie, 
3 1 2 Poore facrilices of our enmitie. 

Prin. A glooming peace this morning with it brings. 

The Sun for forrow will not fhew his head : 

Go hence to haue more talke of thefe fad things, 
3 16 Some fhall be pardoned, and fome punifhei 

For neuer was a Storie of more wo. 

Then this of luliet and her Romeo, 

FINIS. 



299. Aa/ef]i]Qs.F(, 

300. /oue,] [;] Q5, Ff. 

302. drare] brase Qq. 



307. rati] raise Q4, 5, Ff. 
309. suck] that Qq. Ff. 



311. Romeoi . . . Ladies] 
Romeo . . . Lady Ff. 
Romeo's . . . Indies Q5. 

313. glooming] gloomy F4. 



316. pardoned] pardon d 
Ff. 

f Exeunt Omnesl Ff. 



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" Societie (saith the text) is the happinegse of life." — Loves Labour's losty iy. 2. 



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Treat. : Mr W. Staffobd. Hon, Sea.: Mrs. J. H. Simpson and Mr Mabk H. Judge, 256, High Holbom, W.C. 

DUBLIN, Hon, Sec, Prof. E. Dowden, LL.D., 60, Wellington Road. 

EDINBURGH, Presidents, Prof. Blackib, M.A., Prof. Masson, M.A., LL.D.,and Samuel Neil, Esq. 

Hon, Sec, John Wilson, Esq., 1, Randolph Place. 

MONTREAL, CANADA, Hon. Sec, Thomas D. Kino, Esq., 26, Beaver Hall (to whom SubscriptioM 

may be paid). 



General Hon. Sec for the United States : Prof. F. J. Child, Harvard Collie, Cambridge, Massachofletta 

(to whom Subscriptions may be paid). 



LIST OF PAPERS 

TO BE READ AT THE NEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY'S MEETINGS, AT UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, 
GOWER ST, W.C, FROM OCTOBER, 1874, TO JUNE, 1875, AT 8 P.M. 

Friday, October 9. The Politics of Shakspere's Historical Plays ; by Eichard Simpson, Esq., B.A. 

Friday, November 13. The * "Weak Endings * of Shakspere, in relation to the Chronology of his 
Plays ; by Professor J. K. Ingram, LL.D., Trin. Coll., Dublin. 

Friday, December 11. I. On Hamlet's inserted Speech of " a dozen or sixteen Lines," by Wm. T. 
Malleson, Esq., and Professor J. E. Seeley, M.A., Cambridge. II. A Discussion on the 
Play of OymheUne; to be opend by J. W. Hales, Esq., M.A., or F. J. Fumivall, Esq., M.A. 

Friday, January 8. On the first Two Quartos of Hamlet^ 1603, 1604 ; by the Eev. E. A. Abbott, 
D.D. {This paper is not intended for printing.) 

Friday, February 12. On Ben Jonson's Phrases, "Words, and Allusions, by H. C. Hart, Esq., of 
Trinity College, Dublin. 

Friday, March 12. On the Date of King John; by Brinsley Nicholson, Esq., M.D. 

Friday, April 9. A Paper by Professor Leo, Ph.D., of Berlin. 

Friday, May 14. A Scratch Night : short Papers or Eemarks on any Shakspere Topics, by any 
Members of the Society who will send or speak what they have to say. 

Friday, June 11. On the Originals of Shakspere's Plots ; by Henry B. Wheatley, Esq. 



Offers of other Papers and of Scraps are desired, and should be made to Mr Fumirall, 
8, St George's Square, Primrose Hill, London, N. W. The Committee can appoint the 4th Friday 
pf any month for the reading of any extra Paper that they approve. 



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KEW 8HAKSPERE SOCIETY S PUBLICATIONS. 3 

The following Publications of the Kew ShaJcspere Society have been issued for 1874: 
Series I. l^'ansactions : The New Shakspere Society's Transactions, Part I, containing four 
Papers by the Eev. P. G. Pleay, M.A., with Eeports of the Discussions on them, a Table of 
the Quarto Editions of Shakspere's Works, 1593-1630, and a print of the genuine Parts of 
Timon and Pericles; with an Appendix containing, 1. Mr James Spedding's Paper on the 
several shares of Shakspere and Pletcheb in Henry VIII, with the late Mr S. Hickson's, 
Mr Fleay*s, and Mr Furnivairs independent confirmations of Mr Spedding's results. 2. The 
late Mr S. Hickson's Paper on the several shares of Shakspeee and Fletcheb (when young) 
in the Two Noble Kinsmen, with Mr Pleay's and Mr Pumivall's Notes, and Tables of Metrical 
Tests, confirming Mr Hickson's results. 

Series 11. 1. A Parallel-Text Edition of the first two Quartos of Borneo and Juliet, 1597 and 1599, 
arranged so as to show their Differences, and with Collations of all the Quartos and Folios, 
edited by P. A. Daniel, Esq. 

This Edition is presented to the Society hy H. B, H. Prince Leopold, one of its Vice- 
Presidents. 

I>r Inglehy also presented to every Member of the Society who had paid his Svhscription by 
Nov, 7, 1874, a copy of his Still Lion, an attempt to establish a Science of Criticism of 
Shakspere*8 Text, 

Series IV. Shakspere Allusion-Books, Part I. a. Greenes Groatesworth of Wit [written in 
1592], 1596 ; b. Henry Chettle's * Kind-Harts Dreame ' [written in 1593] ; c, ' Englandes 
Mourning Garment * [1603] ; d. A Mourneful Dittie, entituled Elizabeths Losse, together 
with A Welcome for King James [1603] ; e. extracts from * Willobie his Avisa ; Or the 
true Picture of a Modest Maid, and of a Chast and constant wife,' 1594 ; /. extracts from 
Marston, Carew, Ac. ; y. Gabriel Harvey's Third Letter, from his * Foure Letters and certaine 
Sonnets,' 1592 ; h. five sections, — Poetrie ; Poets ; Comparative Discourse of our English 
Poets, with the Greeke, Latine, and Italian Poets; Painters; Musique; — from Francis 
Meres's Palladis Tamia, 1598, &c. &c. ; edited by C. Mansfield Ingleby, Esq., LL.D. 

The following Publications of the New Shakspere Society are in the Press : 
Series L Transactions, Part II. Containing Papers by Mr Hales, Mr Fleay, Mr Simpson, 
and Professor Ingram, with Eeports of the Discussions on them. 

Series U. Plays, The First two Quartos of Borneo and Juliet, 1597 and 1599, in a, simple 
Eeprints ; (for b. Parallel-Texts, see above ;) c, a revised Edition of the Quarto Text of 1599, 
collated with the other Quartos and the Folios ; the whole edited by P. A. Daniel, Esq. 

[_All in type. 

Series III. Originals and Analogues, Part T. a. The Tragicall Historye of Romeus and Juliet, 
written first in Italian by Bandell,^ and nowe in ilSiglishe by Ar[thur] BrFooke], 1562 ; 
edited by P. A. Daniel, Esq. b. The goodly hystory of the true and constant loue between 
Ehomeo and Julietta ; from Painter's Palace of Pleasure^ 1567 ; edited by P. A. Daniel, Esq. 



Series IT. Plays, Preparing : 2. Henry V: a. Facsimile Beprints of the Quarto and first Folio ; 
I, Parallel-Texts of the Quarto and First Folio, arranged so as to show their differences ; 
c, a revised edition of the Play ; the whole edited by Brinsley Nicholson, M.D. 

3. The Two Noble Kinsmen, by Shakspere and Fletcher ; a. A Eeprint of the Quarto of 1636 ; 

b, a revised Edition, with Introduction, Notes, and Glossarial Index of all the words, 
distinguishing Shakspere's from Fletcher's, by Harold Littledale, Esq., Trinity College, 
Dublin. 

4. Cymbeline : a. A Eeprint of the Folio of 1623 ; b. a revised Edition with Introduction 

and Notes, by W. J. Craig, Esq., M.A., Trinity College, Dublin. 

The following works have been suggested for publicAtion : — 
1. Parallel Texts of the imperfect sketches of b, Hamlet, and its Quarto 2 (with the 
Folio and a revised Text) ; c. Merry Wives of Windsor, and Folio i ; d. The Contention, 
and Henry VI, Part 2, in Fi ; The True Tragedy, and Henry VI, Part 3, in Fi. 



1 



The original Italian story by Luigi da Porto, 1630, 
with a Translation, &c., by Prof. G. Pace-Sanfelice, 
can be had at Glaisher'g, 265, Higli-Holbom, for U, ; 



the facsimile Quarto of Much A doe, ICOO, for !«., and 
Booth's reprint of the Folio for 12#. Qd, 



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4 SUGGESTED PUBLICATIONS OP THE NEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY. 

2. Parallel Texts of the following Quarto Plajrs and their versions in the First Folio, with 

collations: Eichard III, Qi ; 2 Henry IV, Qi ; Troilus and Cressida, Qi ; Lear, Qi : 
to show the relations of the Folio text to that of the previous editions. Of Othello, four 
Texts, Qi, Q2, Fi, and a revised Text. 

3. Parallel Texts of the two earliest Quartos of Midsummer Night's Dream, and Merchant 

of Venice ; to show which edition is the better basis for a revised text. 

4. The First Quartos of Much Ado about Nothing; Loues Labour's Lost; Eichard II; 

1 Henry IV ; from which the copies in the Folio were printed. 

Eeprints in Quarto of the remaining Folio Plays, with collations. When possible, the 
passages whicli Shakspere used from North's Plutarch, Holinshed's and Halle's Chron- 
icles, Ac, will be printed opposite the texts of his Eoman and Historical Plays. Also 
the plots of the old plays of * The Taming of a Shrew,' * Promos and Cassandra,' * The 
troublesome raigne of King John,' &c., will be printed parallel with the plots of 
Shakspere's Plays that were founded on them. In all Eeprints of Quarto and Folio 
editions of Shakspere's Plays, the numbers of act, scene, and line, will be given in the 
margin, so as to make the books handy to work with. 

Series V. The Contemporary Drama. Works suggested by Mr Eichard Simpson (see The 
Academy, Jan. 31, 1874, p. 120-1 :)— 

a. The Works of Eobert Greene, Thomas Nash (with a selection from Gabriel Harvey's), 
Thomas Lodge, and Henry Chettle. 

h. The Arraignment of Paris (Peele's) ; Arden of Feversham ; George-a- Greene ; Locrine ; 
King Edward III (of which Act ii. is by a diflferent hand, and that, almost certainly 
Shakspere's) ; Mucedorus ; Sir John Oldcaatle ; Thomas Lord Cromwell ; The Merry 
Devil of Edmonton ; The London Prodigal ; The Puritan ; A Yorkshire Tragedy ; Faire 
Em ; The Birth of Merlin ; The Siege of Antwerp ; The Life and Death of Thomas 
Stucley; A Warning to Fair Women. (Perhaps *The Prodigal Son,' and 'Hester and 
Ahasuerus,' extant in German Translations.) 

c. The Martinist and Auti-Martinist Plays of 1589-91 ; and the Plays relating to the quarrel 

between Dekker and Jonson in 1600. 

d. Lists of all the Companies of Actors in Shakspere's time, their Directors, Players, Plays, 

and Poets. 

e. Dr Wm. Gager's Meleager, a tragedy, printed Oct. 1592 (with the correspondence relating 

to it between Dr Gager of Christ Church, and Dr John Reynolds of Corpus (Univ. Coll. 
Oxf MS. J. 18; and at Corpus). Also, Eeynolds's rejoinder in 1593, 'The Overthrow 
of Stage Plays,' &c., with the letters between him and Gentilis. Also, Gentilis'a 
* Disputatio de Actoribus et Spectatoribus Fabularum non notandis.' Hannov. 1659. 
And *Fucus sive Histriomastix * (a play against Reynolds), Lambeth MS. 838). 

/. Robert Chester's Love's Martyr — from which Shakspere's lines to the * Phoenix and 
Turtle 'were taken — with an Introduction showing who Salisbury was, to whom the 
Chorus Vatum dedicates the book ; and showing the relation between Chester's poem 
and Shakspere's Cymbeline, 

Eichard II, and the other Plays in Egerton MS. 1994 (suggested by Mr J. 0. Halliwell). 

The Returne from Pemassus, 1606; to be edited by the Rev. A. B. Grosart. 

Series VI. Shakspere's England, William Harrison's Description of England, 1577, 1587, edited 
from its two versions by Fredk. J. Furnivall, Esq., M.A. 

Series VII. Mysteries, Sfc. Ancient Mysteries, icith a Morality, from the Digby MS. 133, 
re-edited from the unique MS. by the Rev. W. W. Skeat, M.A., The Towneley Mysteries, 
re-edited from the unique MS. by the Rev. Richard Morris, LL.D. 

Series VIII. Miscellaneous. Autotypes of the parts of the Play of Sir Thomas More that may 
possibly be in young Shakspehe's handwriting, from the Harleian MS. 7368. Thomas 
Rymer's * Tra2:edies of the last Age considered and examined ', 1673, 1692 j and his * A short 
View of Tragedy of the last Age ', 1693. 



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THE NEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY. 



{THE FOUXDEIVS PROSPECTUS REVISED.) 



To do honour to Shakspebe*, to make out the succession of hia plays, and thereby the growth 
of his mind and ^rt ; to promote the intelligent study of him, and to print Texts illustrating his 
works and his times, this New Shakspere Society is founded. 

It is a disgrace to England that while Germany can boast of a Shakspere Society which has 
gatherd into itself all its country's choicest scholars, England is now without such a Society. 
It is a disgrace, again, to England that even now, 258 years after Shakspebe's death, the study 
of him has been so narrow, and the criticism, however good, so devoted to the mere text and its 
illustration, and to studies of single plays, that no book by an Englishman exists which deals in 
any worthy manner with Shakspebe as a whole, which tracks the rise and growth of his genius 
from the boyish romanticism or the sharp youngmanishness of his early plays, to the magnificence, 
the splendour, the divine intuition, which mark his ablest works. The profound and generous 
" Commentaries " of Gervinus ^ — an honour to a German to have written, a pleasure to an 
Englishman to read — is still the only book known to me that comes near the true treatment and 
the dignity of its subject, or can be put into the hands of the student who wants to know the 
mind of Shakspebe. I am convinced that the unsatisfactory result of the long and painful study 
of Shakspebe by so many English scholars — several, men of great power and acuteness — arises 
mainly from a neglect of the only sound method of beginning that study, the chronological one.^ 
Unless a man's works are studied in the order in which he wrote them, you cannot get at a right 
understanding of his mind, you cannot follow the growth of it. This has been specially brought 
home to me by my work at Chaucer. Until I saw that his Fity was his first original work, the 
key of his life was undiscoverd; but that found, it at once opend his treasure-chest, the rest 
of the jewels he has left us were at once disclosd in their right array, the early pathetic time 
of his life made clear, its contrast with the later humorous one shown, and, for the first time these 
470 years, the dear old man stood out as he was known in Wycliffe's time. Something of this 
kind must take place in the mind of every one who will carefully and reverently follow Shakspebe' s 
steps on his way up to the throne of Literature, where he, our English poet, sits, the glory not 
of our land alone, but of the world. 

Dramatic poet though Shakspebe is, bound to lose himself in his wondrous and manifold 
creations ; taciturn " as the secrets of Nature " though he be ; yet in this Victorian time, when 
our geniuses of Science are so wresting her secrets from Nature as to make our days memorable 
for ever, the faithful student of Shakspebe need not fear that he will be unable to pierce through 
the crowds of forms that exhibit Shakspebe's mind, to the mind itself, the man himself, and see 



* This spelling of our great Poet's name is taken 
from the only unquestionably genuine signatures of his 
that we possess, the three on his will, and the two on 
his Stratford conveyance and mortgage. N.one of these 
signatures have an e after the h ; four have no a after 
the first c; the fifth 1 read -eerc. The e and a had 
their French sounds, which explain the foims * Shaxper ', 
&c. Though it has hitherto been too much to ask people 
to suppase that Shakspere knew how to spell his own 
name, I hope the demand may not prove too great for 
the imagination of the Members of the New Society. 

* Miss Bunnett's translation, with an Introduction 
by myself, is publisht by Smith and Elder, 12*. 
Mr H. N. Hudson's * Shakespeare : his Life, Art, and 
Character ' (Sampson Low and Co.), with comments on 
twenty-five of his best Plays, is the best original com- 
mentary of its kind in English that I know. It is 
of course much indebted to German criticism. Mrs 
Jamieson's CJtaracteHstics of Women (os.j Eoutledge) 
has some most subtle and beautiful studies of Shak- 



spere's chief woman-creations. See too Prof. Dowden's 
forthcoming Mind and Art of Shakgj/ere. (H. S. King.) 
^ The ordinary editions put the Plays higgledy- 
piggledy ; often, like the Folio, beginning with Shak- 
spere's almost-last play, the Tempest^ and then putting 
hia (probably) third, the Tiro Gentlemen of Verona, 
next it. No wonder readers are all in a maze. Fur- 
ther, though I can put my finger on Chaucer's "nyght- 
yngale thai clepeih forth the fresshe lev'c's neice,'''' and 
say ' Here is first the real Chaucer,' yet 1 (though past 
40) cannot yet do the like for Shakspere. (Is it " the 
nimble spirits in the aHerieSy'^ note 1, page 6 (perhaps 
an insertion in the amended edition of 1597), or in Tlie 
Comedie of Errors^ iii. 2 

Sing, Siren, for thy selfe, and I will dote; 
Spread ore the ttiluer wanes thy golden haireSt 
And as a b[t']d Ho take thtCm], and there lie:) 

How many of the readers of this can ? Yet oughtn't we 
all to have been able to do it from the time we were 18, 
or twenty-one ? 



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6 



THE FOUNDERS PROSPECTUS OF THE NEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY. 



him as he was ; while ia the effort, in the enjoyment of his new gain, the worker will find his own 
great reward. 

Fortunately for us, Shakspebe has himself left us the most satisfactory — ^because undesigned 
— evidence of the growth in the mechanism of his art, in the gradual changes in his versification 
during his life, changes that must strike every intelligent reader, and which I cannot at all under- 
stand the past neglect of. To cite only one such change, that from the sparing use of the unstopt 
line to the frequent use of it^: — a test which, when applied to three of Shakspere's unripest, 
and three of his ripest (though not best) plays, gives the following result, — 



Earliest Plays. 

Loues Labour's Lost 
The Comedy of Errours 
The two Gent, of Verona 



Proportion of unstopt 
lines to Btopt ones. 

1 in 18-U 
1 in 10 7 
1 in 10- 



Latest Plays. 

The Tempest 

Cymbeline King of Britaine 

The Winter's Tale 



Proportion of unstopt 
lines to stopt ones. 

1 in 3 02 
1 in 2 52 
1 in 212 2 



surely shows its exceeding value at a glance, though of course it alone is not conclusive. 
Working with this and other mechanical tests — such as Mr Spedding's, of the pause, of double 
endings (or redundant final syllables), of the weak ending in rw, in, &c. (including light endings), 
the use of rymes. Alexandrines, &c. — we can, without much trouble, get our great Poet's Plays into 
an order to which we can then apply the higher tests ^ of conception, characterization, knowledge 
of life, music of line, dramatic development, and imagination, and see in how far the results of 
these tests coincide with, or differ from, those of the former ones ; whether the conscious growth 
of power agrees or not with the unconscious change of verse.** 

Having settled this, we can then mark out the great Periods of Shakspere's work — whether with 
Gervinus and Delius we make Three, or, guided by the verse-test, with Bathurst, we make Four, or 



* Here are two extreme instances. The early one has a stop at the end of every one of its first 16 lines. Tlie 
late one has only 4 end-stopt lines. (See the late C. Bathurst's ' Differences of Shakspere's Versification at different 
Periods of his Life,' 1857.) • 



(Early) Loiies Labour's lost^ iv. 3 (p. 135, col. 1, 
Booth's reprint) 
Ber, 'tis more then neede. 

Haue at you then, affections men at armes ; 
Consider what you first did sweare vnto : 
To fast, to study, and to see no woman : 
Flat treason against the kingly state of youth. 
Say, Can you fast ? your stomacks are too young : 
And abstinence ingenders maladies. 
And where that you haue vow'd to studie (Lords), 
In that each of you haue forsworne his Booke. 
Can you still di*eame and pore, and thereon looke ? 
For when would you, my Lord, or you, or you, 
Haue found the ground of studies excellence, 
Without the beauty of a womans face ? 
From womens eyes this doctrine I deriue : 
They are the Ground, the Bookes, the Achadems, 
From whence dolh spring the true Promethean fire. 
Why, miuersall plodding poysons vp \ 
The nimble spirits in the arteries, 
As motion and long during action tyres i .'^"r.r- 
The sinnowy vigour of the traualler. ) 



I probably 
> added 



' The proportion in TJie Life of King Henry the 
Eight is 1 in 276 ; but in this play there are clear 
traces of another hand — Fletcher's, Mr Tennyson tells 
me. (See Mr Spedding's able paper in Gents. Mag., 
August, 1850, and the most striking confirmations of 
his results by Mr Hickson, in I Notes and Queries, 
ii. 198, and others ; all printed in the Appendix to 
Part 1 of the New Shaksj?ere, Society's Transactions, 
1874.) The last long speech of Cranmer looks as if it 
was written first in EUizabeth's time, — Mr Hales sug- 
gests, at the time of her dying sickness in March 1603 
— then pulled in two, and a complimentary bit on King 



(Late) The Tragedie of Cymbeline^ iv. 2 (p. 388. col. 2, 
Booth's reprint) 
Bel. No single soule 

C'an we set eye on : but in all safe reason 
Ho must haue some Attendants. Though his H[um]or 
Was nothing but mutation, I, and that 
From one bad thing to worse : Not Frenzie, Not 
absolute madnesse could so far haue rau'd 
To bring him heere alone : although perhaps 
It may be heard at Court, that such as wee 
Caue heere, hunt heere, are Owt-lawes, and in time 
May make some stronger head, the which he hearing, 
(As it is like him) might breake out, and sweare 
Heel'd fetch vs in ; yet is't not probable 
To come alone, either he so vndertaking, 
Or they so suffering : then on good groimd we feare, 
If we do feare this Body hath a taile 
More perillous then the head. 



James I. inserted in the middle. Mr Spedding, how- 
ever, always held, and the metrical tests show, that it 
was not ; but that the whole Play was late. 

^ Mr J. W. Hales's 7 Tests are, 1. External Evi- 
dence (dates of printing) ; 2. Internal (from allusions 
in the Plays, &c.) ; 3. Metre ; 4. Language and Style 
(3 and 4 comprised under Form) ; 5. Power of Charac- 
terization ; 6. Dramatic Unity ; 7. Knowledge of Life. 
(See The Academy, Jan. 17, 1874, p. 68 ; Jan. 31, 
p. 117.) 

* The Sonnets and Minor Poems will be discusst in 
their chronological order with the Plays. 



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THE founder's prospectus OF THE NEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY. 7 

with other critics Five, and define the Characteristics of each Period.* We can then put forth a 
Student's Handbook to Shakspebe, and help learners to know him. But before this, we can 
lay hand on Shakspebb's text, though here, probably, there will not be much to do, thanks to the 
labours of the many distinguisht scholars who have so long and so faithfully workt at it. Still, as 
students, we should follow their method. First, discuss the documents : print in parallel columns 
the Quarto and Folio copies of such plays as have both,* and determine whether any Quarto of 
each Play, or the Folio, should be the basis of its text,^ with special reference to Richard IIL 
Secondly, discuss all the best conjectural readings, seeking for contemporary confirmations of 
tliem ; and perhaps drawing up a Black List of the thousands of stupid or ingeniously fallacious 
absurdities that so-called emenders have devised. Thirdly, led by Mr Alexander J. Ellis, discuss 
the pronunciation of Shaxspebe and his period, and the spelling that ought to be adopted in a 
scholars'-edition of his Plavs, whether that of the Quartos or Folio,' or any of Shakspebe's 
contemporaries. It is surely time that the patent absurdity should cease, of printing 16th- and 
17th-century plays, for English scholars, in 19th-century spelling. Assuredly the Folio spelling 
must be nearer Shakspebe's than that ; and nothing perpetuates the absuraity (I imagine) but 
publishers' thinking the old spelling would make the book sell less. Lastly, we could (unless we 
then found it needless) nominate a Committee of three, two, or one, to edit Shakspebe's WbrJcSy 
with or without a second to write his Life, 

The above, the main w^ork of the Societjr, will be done as in ordinary Literary and Scientific 
Societies, by Meetings, Papers, and Discussions ; the Papers being shorter, and the Discussions 
much fuller, than in other bodies. The Society's first Meeting was held on Friday, March 13, 
at 8 P.M., at University College, Gower Street, London, W.C., as the Committee of the Council 
of the College have been good enough to grant the use of the College rooms to the New Shakspere 
Society at a nominal charge, to cover the cost of gas and firing. Offers of Papers to be read at 
the Society's Meetings are wisht for, and should be made to the Director. The Papers read will 
be issued as the Society's Transactions, and will form Series 1 of the Society's Publications. 

The second part of the New ShaJcspere Society^ s work will be the publication of — 2. A Series of 
Shakspebe's Plays, beginning with the best or most instructive Quartos, both singly, and in parallel 
Texts with other sketch- Quartos or the Folio, when the Play exists in both forms ; and when not, 
from the Folio only. This Series will include a. Eeprints of the Quartos and first Folio ; h. trial- 
editions of the whole of Shakspere's Flays in the spelling of the Quarto or Folio that is taken as 
the basis of the Text. 3. A Series of the Originals and Analogues of Shakspere' s Flays^ including 
extracts from North's Plutarch, Holinshed, and other works used by him ; 4. A short Series of 
Shakspere- Allusion Books, contemporary tracts, ballads, and documents alluding-to or mentioning 
Shakspebe or his works ; 6. A Selection from the Contemporary Drama, from Garrick's Collection, 
&Q. ; 6. Works on Shakspere's England, such as Harrison's celebrated Description of England, 
W. Stafford's Complaint, &c. ; 7. A chronological Series of English Mysteries, Miracle-Flays, 
Interludes, Masks, Comedies, &c., up to. Shakspere's time ; 8. Miscellanies, including (at Mr 
Tennyson's suggestion) some facsimiles of Elizabethan and Jacobite handwritings, to show what 
letters would be most easily mistaken by printers ; and (at Mrs G. H. Lewes's suggestion) reprints 
of last-century criticisms on Shakspere, to show the curious variations in the history of opinion 
concerning him ; besides other occasional works. 

The Society's Transactions will be in 8vo ; its Texts will be issued in a handsome quarto, the 
quarto for Members only ; but as the Society's work is essentially one of popularisation, of 
stirring-up the intelligent study of Shakspebe among all classes in England and abroad, all such 
publications of the Society as the Committee think fit, will be printed in a cheap form, for 
general circulation. 

The Presidency of the Society will be left vacant till one of our greatest living poets sees that 
his duty is to take it. A long list of Vice-Presidents is desired, men eminent in Literature, Art, 
Science, Statesmanship or rank, as well to do honour to Shakspebe, as to further the work of the 



' The doubtful Plays like Hen. VI, Titus Andronicue, 
Pericles (of which Mr Tcunyson has convinced me that 
Shakspere wrote at least the parts in which Pericles loses 
and finds his wife and daughter : see a print of them 
in the New Shakspere Soc^ieii/'s Transactions, Part 1), 
The Two Noble Kinsmen (see M'est. licv.^ April, 1847, 
and the second Paper in the Appendix to the JS'ew 
Shakspere Societi/'s Transactions, 1874, Part 1), kc, 



could be discusst here. The Plays just mentiond will 
be edited for the Society. 

^ The Second and lliird Parts of Henry VI would be 
set beside ' The first part of ihe contention ' and * the true 
tragedy ' ; ' The Merry Wives ' by its first sketch, &c. 

^ In the first IVial- editions of the Plays in Quarto for 
the Society, the spelling of the text adopted as the basis 
of the edition, whether Quarto or Folio, will be follow d. 



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8 



THE FOUNDER S PROSPECTrS OF THE NEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY. 



Society on him. I hope for a thousand members — many from our Colonies, the United States, 
and G-ermany ; so that the Society may be a fresh bond of union between the three great Teutonic 
nations of the world. I hope our New Shahspere Society will last a^ long as Sha^kspeee is 
studied. I hope also that every Member of the Society will do his best to form Shakspere 
Reading-parties, to read the Plays chronologically, and discuss each after its reading, in every set 
of people. Club or Institute, that he belongs to : there are few better ways of spending three hours 
of a winter evening indoors, or a summer afternoon on the grass. Branch Societies, or inde- 
pendent ones in union with us, should also be formd to promote these Readings, and the general 
study of ShA^kspere, in their respective localities. To such Societies as wish it, proofs of the 
Papers to be read in London will be sent in advance, so that each such Society can, if it pleases, 
read at each of its Meetings the same Paper that is read at the Parent Society on the same night. 

The Society will be managd by a Committee of Workers, with power to add to their number. 
The first Director will be myself, the Founder of the Society. Its Treasurer will be William 
Payne, Esq., The K^eep, Forest Hill, London, S.E. ; its Honorary Secretary, Arthur G-. Snelgrove, 
Esq., London Hospital, London, E. ; its Bank, the Alliance Bank, Bartholomew Lane, London, 
E.C. ; its printers, Messrs Childs, Bungay, Suffolk; and its publishers, Messrs Triibner and Co., 
57 and 59, Ludgate Hill, E.C. 

The subscription (which constitutes Membership, without election or payment of entrance-fee) 
is a Guinea a year, payable on every first of January to the Honorary Secretary, Arthur G-. 
Snelgrove, Esq., London Hospital, London, E., by cheque, or Money Order payable at the Chief 
Office, E.C. The first year's subscription is now due. 

United States Members who wish their books posted to them, must pay 3«. a year extra in 
advance, with their Subscription, to Mr Snelgrove, or to Prof. F. J. Child, Harvard College, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, the Society's Honorary Secretary for the United States of America. 

FREDERICK J. FURNIVALL, 

3, St Qeorge^s Square, Primrosd Hill, London, iV. W, 



28 MarcJi, 1874. 



LIST OF MEMBEKS. 



Abbott, Arthur J., 9, Heathcote St, Mecklenburg Sq., W.C. 

Abbott, Rev. Dr E. A., :^2, Abbey Road, Regent's Park,N. W. 

Aeland, Rev. A. H. D., Keble College, Oxford. 

Acton, Lord, Aldenham, Salop. 

Adams, Robert R. D., Dulwich College, S.E. 

Adamson, Dr Edward, Rye, Sussex. 

Akroyd, Mrs W., 2. St Alban's Villas, Highgate Rd, N.W. 

Allen, E. G., 12, Tavistock Row, Covent Garden, W.C. 

Appleton, Dr C. E., 4.3, Wellington Street, W.C. 

Armstrong, Prof. G. F., Queen's College, Cork. 

Arnold, Matthew, D.C.L., Cobham, Surrey. 

Ashurst, Richard L. (care of H. H. Fumess, Esq., 
Philadelphia, U. S. A.). 

Athenaeum Library-, Boston, U. S. A. (by Mr Allen, 12, 
Tavistock Row, Covent Garden, W.C). 

Atkinson, Prof., 20, Garville Avenue, Rathgar, Dublin. 

Atty, George, Crondall, Farnhara. 

Badger, T. W., High Street, Rotherhara. 

Bailey, J. E., Messrs Ralli, Brothers, Peter Street, Man- 
Bain, James, 1, Playmarket, S.W. [chester. 

Balliol College, Oxford. 

Baltimore City College (Department of English Lan- 
guage, &c.), care of Messrs TumbuU Bros, (by Mr B. 
F. Stevens, 17, Henrietta St, Covent Garden, *W.C.). 

Barlow, Mark, Hooley Range, Heatou Chapel, lilanchester. 

Barlow, Professor J. W.. Trinity College, Dublin. 



Barnard, Thomas Henry, 18, Quai des Paquebots, 

Boulogne, S. M. 
Bath and Wells, Lord Bishop of. Wells, Somerset 
Bayley, Rev. W. R., Thombury Lodge, Park Town, Oxford. 
Bayne, Peter, 33, St Julian's Road, Kilbum, N.W. 
Baynes, Prof. T. S., 19, Queen St, St Andrew's, N.B. 
Bedford, John T., 9, Mecklenburg Square, W.C. 
Bedford Shakespeare Society (Hon. Sec. Rowland Hill, 

Junr, Esq., 14, Adelaide Square, Bedford). 
Bedfoi'd, The Literary and Scientific liistitute. 
Bed well, Francis A., County Courts Hull. 
Bell, George, York Street, Covent Garden, W.C. 
Bent, Edward, 21, Bentley Road, Liverpool. 
Berlin, The Royal Library (care of Messrs Asher & Co., 

13, Bedford Street, Covent Garden, W.C). 
Berry, Edward, Park Hill Road, Croydon. 
Berry, Mrs Edward, Park Hill Road, Croydon. 
Berry, Rev. T. M., Blunham Rectory, Sandy, Beds. 
Best, William, 39, Lyddon Terrace, Leeds. 
Bethune, Strachan, Q.C., Montreal, Canada. 
Bidder, Mrs G. P., 5, Cedars Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Biddle, A. Sidney (care of H. H. Fumess, Esq., 

Philadelphia, U. S. A.). 
Black, Wm., Pall Mall Club, Waterloo Place, S.W. 
Blight, George, Junr. (care of H. H. Fumes.<», E«i., 

Philadelphia. U. S. A.). 



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tIST OF MEMBERS OF THE KEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY. 



9 



Bonaparte, H. I. H. Prince Louia-Lucien, 6, Norfolk 

Terrace, Bayswater, W. 
Booth, Lionel, 1, Duchess Street, Portland Place, W. 
Bosanquet, Bernard, Univ. Coll., Oxford (2 copies). 
Bowen, H. Courthope, Middle Class School, Cowper St., 

City Road, E.G. 
Bowes, Robert, Messrs Macmillan and Co., Cambridge. 
Boyd, T. A., 292, Lower Broughton Road, Manchester. 
Brander, Edwyn V., Sutton, Surrey. 
Bremner, John A., Hilton House, Prestwich, Manchester. 
Brooke, Thomas, Arroitage Bridge, Huddersfield. 
Brown, Dr A. A., Montreal, Canada. 
Brown, Fred., 46, Aberdeen Park Road, Highbury, N. 
Brown, Henry Armitt (care of H. H. Furness, Esq., 

Philadelphia, U. S. A.). 
Brown, J. A., 10, Milner Square, Islington, N. 
Brown, W. Seton, Woodhatch Lodge, Reigate. 
Browne, Mrs S. Woolcott, 68, Porchester Terrace, W. 
Browne, Miss, 68, Porchester Terrace, W. 
Browning, Oscar, Eton College. 
Browning, Robert, 19, Warwick Crescent, W. 
Bullock, John, Kintore Place, Aberdeen. 
Burt, L. C, Broadmoor, Wokingham. 
Butler, The Rev. Dr H. M., Harrow. 
Carlingford, Right Hon. Lord, 7, Carlton Gardens. S.W. 
Carr, Frank, The Willows, Walker, Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

Carroll, Rev. W. G., 27, Wellington Road, Dublin. 

Casement, Brabazon, 18, Trinity College, Dublin. 

Cavendish, Miss Ada, 26, Sackville Street, W. 

Chatwood, Samuel, Lock and Safe Works, Bolton. 

Chetham's Library, Manchester. 

Child, Prof. F. J., Harvard College, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, U. S. A. 

Childs, Charles, Bungay, Suffolk. 

Christian, Rev. George, Redgate, Uppingham. 

Clark, H. D., 22, Bedford Square, W.C. 

Clark, Samuel, Jr., 8, New Cavendish Street, W. 

Cohn, A., Berlin (care of Messrs Asher and Co., 13, 
Bedford Street, Covcnt Garden, W.C). 

Congress, Library of, Washington, U. S. A. (by Mr Allen, 
12, Tavistock Row, Covent Garden, W.C). 

Collet, T., 14, Momington Crescent, N.W. 

Collet, Wilfred (ditto). 

Cooper, John Forster, 175, Adelaide Road, N.W. 

Copenhagen, Royal Library of. 

Corbett, Eustace K., Balliol College, Oxford. 

Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, U. S. A. 

Cornish, Rev. Dr G., McGill College, Montreal, Canada. 

Corson, Prof. Hiram, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, U. S. A. 

Cosens, F. W., 27, Queen's Gate, Kensington, W. 

Cowper-Temple, Right Hon. Wm. F., M.P., 15, Great 
Stanhope Street, W. 

Cowper-Temple, Hon. Mrs Wm. F. (ditto). 

Craig, Wm. J., Trinity College, Dublin. 

Craik^ George L., 16, Bedford St, Covent Garden, W.C. 

Crawfurd, Rev. C. W. Payne, East Court, East Grinstead. 

Crosby, Joseph, Zanesville, Ohio, U. S. A. (by Mr A. It. 
Smith, 36, Soho Square, W.). [chester. 

Crossley, James, 2, Cavendish Place, All Saints, Man- 

Crowden, Rev. C.. Grammar School, Cranbrook. 

CulHugford, W. H., 7, Phillimore Gardens, W. 

Cunningham, Colonel F., 18, Clarendon Road, South 
Kensington, W. 

Da Costa, Dr J. M., 1609, Walnut St, Philadelphia, U.S.A. 

Dalton, Rev. J. N., Marlborough House, Pall Mall, S.W. 

Dames, M. L., B.C.S., Assistant-Commissioner, Karndl, 
FuDj4b, India, 



Daniel, Louis S., Melbourne, Victoria (care of P. A. Daniel, 

Daniel, P. A., 6, Gray's Inn Square, W.C. [Esq.). 

Davis, Sir John F., Bart., Hollywood, Henbury^ Bristol. 

Dawson, Samuel E., Montreal, Canada. 

Day, Miss Elsie, Greycoat Hospital, Westminster, S.W. 

Delamere. Lord, 14, Bruton Street, W. 

Delius, Prof. N., Bonn (by Mr D. Nutt, 270, Strand, W.C). 

(Messrs Triibner and Co., 57, Ludgate Hill, E.C) 
Derby, The Right Hon. The Earl of, 23, St James's Sq., 
Devonshire, Duke of, K.G., 78, Piccadilly, W. [S.W. 
Dickson, Samuel (care of H. H. Furness, Esq., Phila- 
delphia, U. S. A.). 
Diven, Geo. M., 153, Water St, Elmira, New York, U. S. A. 
Dixon, Thomas, Sunderland Street, Sunderland. 
Dobell, Bertram, 62, Queen's Cres., Haverstock Hill, N.W. 
Doble, C E., 12, Mount Ararat Villas, Richmond, Surrey. 
Dogget, Hugh G. (care of E. G. Dogget, Esq., St Peter's 

Hospital, Bristol). 
Doran, Dr John, 33, Lansdowne Road, W. 
Dowden, Professor E., 60, Wellington Road, Dublin. 
Downing, William, Swiss Cottage, Acock's Green, Birm- 
ingham. 
Doyle, John James, Trafford Villa, Alderley Edge, Man- 
Dublin, Archbishop of, Dublin. [chester. 
Dublin, The Library of the University of (by Messrs 

Hodges, Foster, and Co., 104, Grafton Street, Dublin). 
Dublin University Shakspere Society (care of Henry S. 

Gabbett, Esq., 31, Trinity College, Dublin). 
Ducie, The Countess of, 16, Portman Square, W. 
Dufferin and Clandeboye, Right Hon. Lord, Clandeboye, 

Belfast. 
Duyschink, A. (care of J. Wiley and Son, New York, by 

Messrs Triibner and Co., 67, Ludgate Hill, E.C). 
Dykes, Fredk., Wakefield and Bamsley Union Bank, 

Wakefield. 
Edinburgh Shakspere Society {Hon. Sec, John Wilson, 

Esq., 1, Randolph Place, Edinburgh). 
Edmonds, Charles, 9, St Minver Place, Edwardes Street^ 

Moseley Road, Birmingham. 
Edwards, Mrs, Heywood House, Camden Road, N. 
Ellesmere, Earl of, Bridgewater House, Cleveland Sq., W. 
Ellis, Alexander J., 25, Argyle Road, Kensington, W. 
Elt, Charles Henry, 1, Noel Street, Islington, N. 
Elze, Professor Karl, Dessau. 
Erskine, Mrs Lafontaine, 3, Westboume Grove, W. 
Esdaile, J. Kennedy, Saint Hill, East Grinstead. 
Evans, Charles J., Sidney House^ Stoke Newington, N. 
Evans, Herbert A., 10, Portland Place, Reading. 
Evans, Sebastian, Union Club, Birmingham. 
Faber, Reginald S., 37, Upper Gloucester Place, N.W. 
Faber, Mrs, Little Comberton, Pershore. 
Falconer, J. J., 2, Upper Phillimore Gardens, W. 
Faraday, F. J., Daisy Avenue, Albert Road, Longsight, 

Manchester. 
Fawcett, T. C, Montreal, Canada. 
Field, Hamilton G., Thornton Road, Clapham Park, S.W. 
Field, Joshua, Latchmere House, Ham Comipon, Surrey. 
Finlinson, W., 6, Albert Terrace, Bedford. [U. S. A.). 
Fish, A. J. (care of H. H. Furness, Esq., Philadelphia, 
Fitch, J. G., 5, Lancaster Terrace, Regent's Park, N.W. 
Fleay, Rev. F. G., Skipton, York. 
Forman, H. Buxton, 38, Marlborough Hill, St John's 

Wood (by Messrs Trul)ner& Co., 67, Ludgate Hill, E.C). 
Fothergill, J. M., W. B. Lead Office, Newcastle-on-Tyne. 
Furness, Horace Howard, 222, West Washington Square, 

Philadelphia, U.S.A. 
Furness, Mrs Horace Howard (ditto). 



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io 



LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE NEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY. 



Furnivall, Frederick J., 3, St George's Square, Primrose 

Hill, N.W. {Director,} 
Furnivall, Mrs Frederick J., 3, St George's Sq., N.W. 
Gabbett, Henry S., 31, Trinity College, Dublin. 
Gaisford, E. S., 29, Osuaburgh St, Regent's Park, N.W. 
Gee, William, High Street, Boston. 
Gericb, F. E., 7, Mincing Lane, E.G. 
Gervinus, Madame, Heidelberg. 
Gibbs, H. Hucks, St Dunstan's, Regent's Park, N.W. 
Gibbs, J. W. M., J. C. Bromhead's, Esq., 3, Old Square, 

Lincoln's Inn, W.C. 
Gibbs, Vicary, Christchurch, Oxford. 
Gilman, R. J., Bisham Grange, Great Marlow. 
Glasgow University, Library of (by Mr J. Maclehose, 61, 

St Vincent Street, Glasgow). 
Gordon, J. M., Balliol College, Oxford. 
Gosford, The Earl of, 105, Harley Street, W. 
Gould, George H., 5, East 26th Street, New York, U.S.A. 
Grahame, Wm F., Chicacole, Ganjam, Madras (by Messrs 

Grindlay and Co., 65, Parliament Street, S.W.). 
Greely, Lieut. A. W., Signal Office, Washington, D.C., 

U.S.A. 
Greene, George Arthur, 10, Pleasants Street, Dublin. 
Greenhalgh, James, Acresficld, Bolton. 
Griffin, F., Q.C., Montreal, Canada. 
Grosart, Rev. Alexander B., Park View, Blackburn. 
Guest, John, Moorgat^ Grange, Rotherhani. 
Guizot, Professor G., 66, Rue de Bellechasse, Paris. 
Guy, Robert, Messrs Roberts and McCubbin, 60, Castle 

Street, Liverpool. 
Hake, G. Gordon, 2, Dane's Inn, Strand, W.C. 
Hales, J. W., 1, Oppidans Road, Primrose Hill, N.W. 
Hall, Mrs F. C. N., Broadway, Worcestershire (care of 

J. 0. Phillipps, Esq., 11, Tregunter Road, S.W.). 
Hall, William, Montreal, Canada. 
Halliwell, R. A., 12, The Grove, Hammersmith, W. 
Hamilton, Miss Lottie, 108, Belsize Road, N.W. 
Hamilton, N. E. S. A., Glasbury, Radnorshire. 
Harcourt, Captain Alfred, 44, York St, Baker St, W. 
Hard wick, Charles, 74, Halston St, Hulme, Manchester. 
Hardy, James R., 390, Oldham Road, Manchester. 
Hardy, Sir T. Duflfus, 35, North Bank, Regent's Park, N.W. 
Harper, John, ll,Clephane Road, Essex Road, Islington, N. 
Harris, John, 386, Mountain Street, Montreal, Canada. 
Harris, M., 10, Angell Park Gardens, Brixton, S.W. 
Hart, H. Chichester, 71, St Stephen's Green, Dublin. 
Hart, Prof. J. S., Princeton, New Jersey, U. S. A. 
Harvard College, Cambridge, Massachusetts, U. S. A. 
Haven, Franklin, Junr, Custom House, Boston, U. S. A. 
Haworth, J. Higson, 34, Queen Street, Cheetham Hill, 

Manchester. 
Hay, Rear Admiral Lord John, 140, Piccadilly, W. 
Haynes, W. B., 106, Drury Lane, W.C. 
Healy, A. Augustus, 5, Ferry Street, New Y^ork, U. S. A. 
Heberden, C. E., Brasenose College, Oxford. 
Heinemann, Dr, 21, York Place, Portman Square, W. 
Heron, Sir Joseph, Rookswood, Higher Broughton, Man- 
chester. 
Hetherington, J. Newby, 67, Canning Street, Liverpool. 
Higgins. Vincent J., 66, Bridge Street, Birkenhead. 
Hirsch, Gustav (care of Messrs H. and G. Hirsch, Mayence 
Hockliflfe, F., Bedford. [on the Rhine). 

Hodgson, Shadworth H., 45, Conduit Street, W. 
Howell, Thomas, 9, Victoria Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Howes, Captain H., The Mount, Witley, Surrey. 
Hudson, Rev. H, N., 38, Bigelow Street, Cambridge, 

Massachusetts, U. S. A. 



Hutching, Frederick L., 11, Birchin Lane, E.G. 

Hutchinson, Rev. C. B., Rugby. 

Hutchinson, Jonathan, 4, Finsbury Circus, E.G. 

Huth, Henry, 30, Princes Gate, Kensington, W. 

Huxley, Professor T. H., 26, Abbey Place, St John's Wood, 

Ingleby, Dr C. Mansfield, Valentines, Ilford. [N.W. 

Ingram, Professor J. K., 2, Wellington Road, Dublin. 

Jackson, John, Chancery Place, Manchester. 

James, Colonel E. C, Ogdensburg, New York, U. 8. A. 

Jarvis, J. W., 15, Charles Square, Hoxton, N. 

Jarvis, Lewis, Midland Road, Bedford. 

Jebb, R. C," Trinity College, Cambridge. 

Jellicoe, Mrs, Alexandra College, Earlsfoot Terr., Dublin. 

Jessopp, Rev. Dr Augustus, School House, Norwich. 

Jex-Blake, Rev. Dr T. W., Cheltenham Coll., Cheltenham. 

Joachim, George, Olive Cottage, DulwichRd, Brixton, S.W. 

Jones, Herbert, 1, Church Court, Clement's Lane, E.G. 

Jones, Rev. James, 26, Upper Leeson Street, Dublin. 

Kerr, W. H., Q.C., Montreal, Canada. 

Kershaw, John, Cross Gate, Audenshaw, Manchester. 

King, Thomas D., 26^ Beaver Hall, Montreal, Canada. 

Kingsley, Dr George H., Southwood Lane, Highgate, N. 

Knight, Joseph, 27, Camden Square, N.W. 

Lamb, Wm. Watson, Devis View, Lisburn Road, Belfast 

Lawrence, F. J., General Post Office (by Messrs Triibner 
and Co., 67, Ludgate Hill, E.G.). 

Leconfield, Lord, Petworth House, Sussex. 

Lee, Miss Jane, 24, Merrion Square, South, Dublin. 

Leighton, F., R.A., Holland Park Road, W. 

Lenox Library, New York (by Mr E. G. Allen, 12, Tavis- 
tock Row, Covent Garden, W.C). 

Leo, Professor T. A., Berlin (care of Messrs Asher & Co., 
13, Bedford Street, W.C). 

Leopold, H. R. H. Prince. 

Lewes, Mrs G. H., The Priory, North Bank, Regent's 

Lewis, Mrs John, Montreal, Canada. [Park, N.W. 

Leycester, Rafe, 6, Che>Tie Walk, Chelsea, S.W. 

Limerick, Lord Bishop of (care of Rev. R. P. Graves, 
1, Winton Road, Leeson Park, Dublin). 

Lisle, Miss A. T. U. [Wicklow. 

Littledale, Harold, 3, Sydenham Villas, Bray, County 

Liverpool, Free Public Library of, William Brown Street^ 
Liverpool. 

Lloyd, Edward Rigge, Sparbrook, Birmingham. 

London, Library of the Corporation of, Guildhall. 

Lothian, Marquis of, Newbattle Abbey, Dalkeith, N. B. 

Lounsbury, Prof. T. R. (care of J. Wiley and Son, New- 
York, by Messrs Triibner & Co., Ludgate Hill, E.G.). 

Lovell, Mi*s John, Montreal, Canada. 

Lowell, Dr J. Russell, Harvard College, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, U. S. A. 

Lubbock, Sir John, Bart., M.P., 15, Lombard St, E.G. 

Lumby, Rev. J. Rawson, St Mary's Gate, Cambridge. 

Lushington, Professor E. L., The College, Glasgow. 

Lushington, Franklin, 40, Norfolk Square, W. [S.W. 

Lushington, Vernon, Q.C., 21, New St, Spring Gardens, 

Lyttelton, Right Hon. Lord, 42, Portland Place, W. 

MacCarthy, D. F., 8, Eglinton Park, Kingston, Co. Dublin. 

MacDonald, Dr George, Hammersmith, S.W. 

MacGill College, Montreal, Canada. 

Macmillan, A., 16, Bedford Street, W.C. 

MacMullen, W., 26, Gloucester St, Queen's Square, W.C. 

Malleson, William T., 145, New Bond Street, W. 

Manchester, Duke of, 1, Great Stanhope Street, W. 

Manchester Free Library. 

Manchester Union Club. 

March, Prof. F. A., Easton, Pennsylvania, U. S. A. 



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LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE NEW SHAKSPERE SOCIETY. 



11 



Marshall, F. A., 21, Hans Place, Chelsea, 8.W. 
Marshall, Miss. 

Martin, Edward, Kenosha, Wisconsin, U. S, A. 
Marx, Francis, Arle-Bury, Alresford, Hants. 
Mather, R^ 118, Albion Road, Stoke Newington, N. 
Mathews, T.G., Railway Clearing House, Seymour St,N. W. 
Matthew, Fred. D., 94, King Henry's Road, N.W. 
Matthew, James E., 129, King Henry's Road, N.W. 
Matthew, J. W., 92, Finchley Road, N.W. 
Maudsley, Dr Henry, 9, Hanover Square, W. 
MaunseU, Edmund R. L., Edenmore, Raheny, Co. Dublin. 
McElmoyle, John, Princeton College, Princeton, New 

Jersey, U. S. A. 
Medlicott, W. G., Longmeadow, Massachusetts, U. S. A. 
Milner, George, The Glen, Moston, Manchester. 
Minneapolis Athenaeum, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U. S. A. 
Montcfiore, Claude J., 36, Hyde Park Gardens, W. 
Moor, George Storey, 4, Esplanade West, Sunderland. 
Morfill, W. R., Esq., 4, Clarendon Villas^ Park Town, 
Morgan, John, 21, Broadford Place, Aberdeen. [Oxford. 
Morgan, Octavius Vaughan, Battersea, S.W. 
Morgan, Rev. Dr John, 4, Lee Terrace, Lee, S.E. 
Morley, Professor H., University College, W.C. 
Morris^ E. E., Middle Class Public School, Bedford. 
Morris, J., 6, Old Jewry, E.C. 

Morris, Mrs L. T., East Derry, New Hampshire, U. S. A. 
Morris, Rev. Dr Richard, King's College, W.C. 
Miiller, Professor Max, Oxford. 
Munich, Royal Library (care of Messrs Trilbner and Co., 

57, Ludgate Hill, E.C). 
Munro, Rev. H. A. J., Trinity College, Cambridge. 
Muntz, George H. M., Albion Tube Works, Nile Street, 

Birmingham. 
Murdoch, J. B., 20, Buchanan Street, Glasgow. 
Murray, G., High School, Montreal, Canada. 
Napier, G. W., 19, Chapel Walks, Manchester. 
Napier, Rev. Frederick P., 8, Richmond Park Terrace, 

Richmond, Surrey. 
Neil, Samuel, 8, Keir Street, Edinburgh. 
Newcastle-on-iyne Literary and Philosophical Society. 
Newcombe, S. Prout, Northcote, East Croydon. 
Newoombe, Mrs S. Prout, Northcote, East Croydon. 
Nicholson, Dr Brinsley, Woodlands Road, Redhill. 
Nodal, J. H., The Grange, Heaton Moor, Stockport. 
Norman, Rev. R. W., St James's, Montreal, Canada. 
Norris, J. Parker, Philadelphia, U. S. A. (care of Mr A. R. 

Smith, 36, Soho Square, W.). 
Norris, Mrs J. Parker, Philadelphia, U. S. A. (ditto). 
Oechelhaeuser, W., Dessau (care of Messrs Asher and 

Co., 13, Bedford Street, Covent Garden, W.C). 
Ogden, Joseph, 86, Oxford Street, Manchester. [S.W. 
Oliphant, T. L. Kington, Charlton House, Wimbledon, 
Oswald, Eugene, 23, Gloucester Crescent, Regent's Park, 
Owen's College, Manchester. [N.W. 

Oxford Union Society, Oxford. 
Qxenden, Right Rev. Dr Ashton, Bishop of Montreal. 
Paine, Com., 9, Lewes Crescent, Kemp Town, Brighton. 
Pnyne, Joseph, 4, Kildare Gardens, Bayswater, W. 
Payne, Wm., The Keep, Forest Hill, S.E. (,Trea»tirer.) 
Payton, W., 14, Mornington Crescent, N.W. 
Peabody Institute, Baltimore, U..S. A. (by Mr Allen, 12, 

Tavistock Row, W.C). 
Peacock, Reginald, Roker, Sunderland. 
Pearson, Professor C. H., Melbourne. 
Peel, George, Brookfield, Cheadle, Cheshire. 
Peirce, Professor J. M., Harvard College, Cambridge, 

Maasachusetts, U. S. A. 



Percival, The Rev. J., Clifton College, Clifton, Bristol. 

Phillimore, Right Hon. Sir R. J., 5, Arlington Street, 
Piccadilly, S.W. 

Phillipps, J. 0. (Halliwell), 11, Tregunter Road, West 
Brompton, S.W. (3 copies). 

Philp, Miss, 67, Gloucester Crescent, Regent's Park, N.W, 

Phipson, Miss E., Monk Sherborne, Basingstoke. 

Pickersgill, E. H., 44, Neville Rd, Stoke Newington, N. 

Plunkett, George N., 14, Palmerston Road, Rathmines, 
Co. Dublin. 

Ponsonby, The Hon. Fredk. G. B., 3, Mount Street, W. 

Post Office Library and Literary Association, G. P. 0. 

Priaulx, 0. de B., 8, Cavendish Square, W. 

Queen's College, Oxford (by Messrs Rivington, Waterloo 

Quick, Rev. R. H., Harrow. [Place, S.W.). 

Ralli, Mrs Stephen, Cleveland House, Clapham Park, S.W. 

Ramsay, W. M., St John's College, Oxford. 

Randall, Rev. William, Handsworth. 

RatclifE, Charles, Wyddrington, Edgbaston, Birmingham. 

Rawlinson, Sir Henry, 21, Charles St, Berkeley Sq., W. 

Reade, A., Salt Hill, Slough. 

Redfem, Rev. Robert, Acton, Nantwich. 

Reeve, Henr}-, 62, Rutland Gate, S.W. [S.E. 

Reid, Wm. Wardlaw, 16, Warwick Place, Peckham Rye, 

Rhodes, Charles George, Manchester and Liverpool Dis- 
trict Bank, Blackburn. 

Richards, Herbert, Wadham College, Oxford. 

Ridding, The Rev. Dr George, Winchester. 

Rimmel, Eugene, Strand, W.C. 

Robarts, N. F., 27, Clement's Lane, E.C 

Robinson, Charles, 1, Ashburnham Gardens, S.W. 

Rolfe, Wm. J., 405, Broadway, Camb., Mass., U. S. A. 

Rorailly, Right Hon. Lord, 14, Hyde Park Terrace, W. 

Roofe, Arthur S., 177, Church Road, Islington, N. 

Roofo, Wm., Craven Cottage, Morton Road, Wands- 
worth, S.W. 

Rooper, T. Godolphin, Ouseley Lodge, Old Windsor. 

Rossetti, Dante G., 16, Cheyne Walk, S.W. 

Rousby, W., 47, Weymouth Street, W. 

Rousby, Mrs W., 47, Weymouth Street, W. 

Rowley. Charles, The Glen, Church Lane, Harpentrey, 
Manchester. [Dublin. 

Rowley, James, 9, Brighton Vale, Monkstown, County 

Royal Dublin Society (care of Messrs Hodges, Foster 
and Co., 104, Grafton Street, Dublin). 

Rusden, George W. (care of Messrs Ashton and Co., 
Hatton Court, Threadneedle Street, E.C). 

Rushbrookc, W.G., City of London School, Cheapside, E.C. 

Ruskin, Professor John, Corpus Christi College, Oxford. 

Sage, Edward J., 86, Albion Rd East, Stoke Newington, N. 

Sargent, James 0. (care of J. L. Shorey, Esq., 36, Brom- 
field Street, Boston, U. S. A.). 

Sassoon, J. S., Ashley Park, Walton-on-Thames. 

Scott, Henry, Femleigh, Birkenhead. 

Seeley, Professor J. R., 43, Regent's Park Road, N.W. 

Sen, P. C, 3, St George's Square, Primrose Hill, N.W. 

Shad well, Lionel L., 21, Nottingham Place, W. 

Shadwell, Walter H. L., 21, Nottingham Place, W. 

Shakespeare Memorial Library, Birmingham. 

Sheppard, C. W., 94, Mosley Street, Manchester. 

Shimmin, C F., 93, Mount Vernon St, Boston, U. S. A. 

Sibson, Dr Francis, 69, Brook Street, W. 

Simpson, Richard, 4, Victoria Road, Clapham, S.W. 

Skeat, Rev. W. W., 1, Cintra Terrace, Cambridge. 

Skene, Alexander, 22, Regent Quay, Aberdeen. 

SlingluflF, C B., Baltimore, U. S. A. (by Mr Stevens, 17, 
Henrietta Street, W.C). 



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12 



LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE NEW SHAK6PERE SOCIETY. 



Smalley, George W., 13, Pall Mall, S.W. 

Smart, Harry, Railway Clearing House, Seymour Street, 

Smith, Alfred Russell, 36, Soho Square, W. [N.W. 

Smith, Charles, Faversham. 

Smith, Dr William, West Lodge, West End Lane, Hamp- 

stead, N.W. 
Smith, Miss L. Toulmin, Wood Lane, High gate, N. 
Smithson, Edward W., St Mary's Lodge,. York. 
Snelgrove, Arthur G., London Hospital, E. {Hon. Sec.) 
Sonnenschein, A., Laleham Lea, King's Koad, Clapham 

Park, S.W. 
Southesk, The Earl of, Kinnaird Castle, Brechin, N. B. 
Spedding, James, 80, Westbourne Terrace, W. 
Sprague, T. B., Scottish Equitable Assurance, 26, St 

Andrew's Square, Edinburgh. 
Sprong, J. Wiiite, Delaware and Hudson Canal Co., 

Albany, New York, U. S. A. 
Stack, J. Herbert, 30, Kensington Park Gardens, W. 
Stark, Dr A. B., Logan Female College, Russellville, 

Kentucky, U.S.A. [Dublin. 

St Columba's College (The Warden of), Rathfamham, 
Stejnthal, S. A., 107, Upper Brook Street^ Manchester. 
Stephen, Leslie, 8, Southwell Gardens, S.W. 
Storojenko, Nicholas (care of Mr Wilson, 12, King 

William Street, Strand, W.C). 
Storrow, J. J., 40, State Street, Boston, U. S. A. 
Strachan, J. G., Farm Hill Park, Stroud. 
Strachey, Sir Edw., Bart., Sutton Court, Pensford, Bristol 

(by Messrs Triibner and Co., 57, Ludgate Hill, E.C.). 
Strassburg University College (care of Messrs Triibner 

and Co., 57, Ludgate Hill, E.G.). 
Sunday Shakspere Society, 256, High Holborn, W.C. 
Swan, Robert, 7, New Square, Lincoln's Inn, W.C. 
Sweet, George, 12, King's Bench Walk, E.C. 
Swindells, George H., Oak Villa, Heaton Moor, Stockport. 
Syraonds, Arthur G., 20, Vine Grove, Pendleton, Man- 
Taylor, John, Bolton. [chester. 
Taylor, P. A., M.P., 22, Marine Parade, Brighton. 
Taylor, Mrs P. A., 22, Marine Parade, Brighton. 
Taylor, Tom, Lavender Sweep, Wandsworth, S.W. 
Temple, Rev. R., Clanbrogan, Llanfechain, Oswestry. 
Ten Brink, Professor Bernhard, Strassburg (by Messrs 

Triibner and Co., 57, Ludgate Hill, E.C). 
Tennyson, Alfred, Faringford, Freshwater, Isle of Wight. 
Thirlwall, Right Rev. Bishop, Abergwilli, Carmarthen. 
Thompson, Joseph, Ardwick, Manchester. 
Thompson, Rev. Dr W. H., Trin. Coll., Cambridge. 
Thonger, Captain Freer, Kimbolton Park, St Neot's. 
Thomhill, James A., Bradbourne Villa, Bushey Hill 

Road, Camberwell, S.E. 
Thorpe, Gerard, 32, Beaufort Gardens, S.W. 
Thring, Rev. Edward, Uppingham. 



Ticknor, B. H., Boston, U. S. A. (by Messrs Triibner and 
Co., 57, Ludgate Hill, E.C). 

Tiffin, Mrs Joseph, Junr, Montreal, Canada. 

Timmins, Samuel, Elvetham Lodge, Birmingham. 

Todhunter, Dr John, 116, Lower Baggot Street, Dublin. 

Tosh, Edmund G., Maryport, Cumberland. 

Trollope, T. - dolphus, 9, Via S. Susanna, Rome (care of 
Mr Stevens, 17, Henrietta Street, W.C).^ 

Triibner, N., 57, Ludgate Hill, E.C. 

Ulrici, Professor H., Ph.D., Halle. 

Van Citters, T. M. J. de W. (care of W. Kent and Co., 
by Messrs Triibner and Co., 67, Ludgate Hill, E.C). 

Vezin, Alfred (care of H. H. Fumess, Esq., Philadelphia, 
U. S. A.). 

Victoria Public Library, Melbourne (by Mr Bain, 1, 
Haymarket, S.W.). 

Viles, Edward, Pendryl House, Codsall Wood, Wolver- 

Wadham College, Oxford. [hampton. 

Wagner, Dr Wilhelm, 74, Wandsbeckcr Chaussce, Ham- 
burg (care of Messrs G. Bell & Sons, York Street, 
Covent Garden, W.C). 

Walker, Captain A., Chase Cottage, Enfield, N. 

Walker, J. L., 6, Albany Courtyard, W. 

Walker, Rev. Henry Aston, 8, Campden Grove, Kensing- 
ton, \y. 

Walton, Charles, 22, Newington Butts, S.E. 

Ward, Charles A., 1, Chapel Street West, Curzon St, W. 

Ward, Professor A. W., 8, Egerton Road, Fallowfield, Man- 
Waters, G. E., 97, Westbourne Grove, W. [chester. 

Watkin, Alfred, Holly Bank, Sale, Manchester. 

Watson, Robert Spence, Mosscroft,, Gateshead -on-T3Tie. 

Watts, Edward, Hanalope Park, Stony Stratford. 

Wedderburn, A. D. 0., Balliol College, Oxford. 

Weld, Charles, Chideock House, Bridport. 

Welling, James C, President of Columbia University, 
Washington, D.C, U. S. A. 

West, Miss, The Deanery, St Patrick's, Dublin. [N.W. 

Wheatley, H. B., 1, Chalcot Terrace, Regent's Park Road, 

Wheeler, J. Talboys, Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex. 

White, George, St Briavel's, Epsom. 

White, R. Grant, 118, East Tenth St, New York, U. S. A. 

Wilcocks, Horace Stone, 7, Wyndham Sq., Plymouth. 

Williams, Sparks Henderson, 18, Kensington Crescent, W. 

Wilson, John, 12, King William Street, Strand, W.C. 

Wilson, Moses F., P. 0. Box 2672, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. 

Wilson, W., Hyde Hill, Berwick-on -Tweed (by Mr A. 
Holden, 48, Church Street, Liverpool). 

Wren, Walter, Grazely Court, Reading. 

Wright, W. Aldis, Trinity College, Cambridge. 

Zimmem, Miss, 7, Tyndall Terrace, Canonbury, N. 

Zupitza, Dr Julius, HI. Hetzgasse, 27, Vienna (care of 
Messrs Triibner and Co., 57, Ludgate Hill, E.C). 



JOHN CHILD6 ANP SON, PKINTmS. 



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ROMEO AND JULIET. 



REVISED EDITION OF THE SECOND, OR 1599, QUARTO. 



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|lam^0 ntd Jdt^i 



REVISED EDITION OF THE SECOND, OR 1599, QUARTO. 



EDITED BY 

P. A. DANIEL. 



PUBLISHED FOR 

Efie Neto Sfjatepere Socirtg 

BY N. TRUBNER & CO., 57. 59, LUDGATE HILL. 
LONDON, E.G., 1875. 



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Serus II. 3p[0. 4. 



JOHN CHILD8 AND SON, PK11YTBR6. 



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INTRODUCTION. 



The text of this edition of * Romeo and Juliet ' is, as it professes to be, revised 
on that of Q2, 1599. The punctuation, which in the original is extremely con- 
fused and confusing, has been carefully regulated throughout ; the lines metrically 
arranged and numbered, separately for each scene ; passages of verse printed as 
prose in the original, and passages of prose printed as verse, have been restored 
to their proper form ; corruptions of the text, which are very numerous in this 
play, have to the best of my ability been remedied on the authority, *such as it 
is, of the other old editions. Where they fail, the ingenuity and learning of 
the several commentators and editors have been called in aid, and as a last 
resource I have m)rself attempted in some few instances to correct the errors of 
the original All alterations of the text, however trifling, or however certainly 
restorations, have been recorded ; but as no rule is without an exception, I roust 
add that I have not always noted the alterations or additions made to the * stage 
directions*. Where what I considered an improvement in this respect has 
been found in any of the old editions, 1 have given them the preference; 
but in many cases I have adopted silently so much of my predecessors* work 
as seemed to me desirable and to be justified by the text. Also, in some 
few instances, where words in the original are printed in an abbreviated form, as 
ma for maftf thi for them or then^ getle for gentle^ etc., I have given the word in 
full, without note. 

All additions to the text, from whatever source, are enclosed in the text in 
brackets [ ], and are of course also recorded in the Notes ; but for corrections 
of the text the reader must turn to the Notes only : it was not possible to mark 
them without greatly disfiguring the text itself and distracting the reader's attention 
at every step by signs and marks referring to notes which when found, in nine 
cases out of ten, turn out to be of no importance. Reference to or from the 
Notes will be foimd perfectly easy by means of the numbered lines. 

Asa guide in metrical pronunciation I have adopted what appears to have been 
the rule of Shakespeare and«his contemporaries : errors excepted, the * e,* whether 
it be an essential part of the verb, as in lovedy or merely a part of its inflection, 
as in angered^ is always, when not to be pronounced, either simply ejected, or 
ejected and its place marked with an apostrophe, or it is transposed to the end of 
the word : thus lovdy hv'd or lavde^ angerd, anger' d or angerde are all usual forms 
and indifferently used to mark the metrical pronunciation, and I have accordingly 
conformed to this practice throughout, generally finding where it had been 



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Introduction, 

neglected in Q2, the means of correction either in (Qi) or in some one of the 
later quartos or the folios. 

In no other cases, where the sense of the passage was not obscured, have I 
interfered with the orthography of my original, however uncouth to our modem 
eyes the spelling of words in many instances must appear. Neither have I 
deemed it any part of my duty to reduce to an uniform system the printing of 
compound words : in the original they are sometimes printed with the hyphen, as 
neiffhbour-siayncii ; sometimes as one word, as alcheering ; and sometimes as 
separate words, as saint seducing. The pleasant variety, or, as some may think, 
the barbarous irregularity, of the printers of Q2 has been religiously respected by 
me ; and the very few cases in which I have ventured to differ from them I have 
been careful to record. To me this variety is vecy pleasant as a relic of the most 
glorious period of our literature ; yet I must admit that my experience in pre: 
paring this work for the press has convinced me of the wisdom of the reasoning 
of the Cambridge Editors when deciding on * modem ' spelling for their invalu- 
able edition. ** What is called * modern ' spelling is, in fact, not so much an 
alteration of the old spelling as a reduction to uniformity, which obviates 
numberless misinterpretations", and I think that some uniform system of spelling 
must be adopted for any really critical work. At the same time I am of 
opinion that that standard of orthography should be sought for in Shakespeare 
himself: the Cambridge Editors themselves have made one step in that 
direction in retaining the * 'Id ' as an abbreviation for ' would ' ; the modem 
form "d ' being usc<l indifferently as an abbreviation of 'would' and *had'. 
Other restorations as valuable as this might no doubt be made, to the great 
improvement of our * modern ' system ; but we must first familiarize ourselves 
with the orthography of the original etlitions, and as a means to that end 
the revised texts proposed by the New Shakspere Society should be most 
valuable. 

The original editions as a rule are not readable ; in them sense and metre are 
often obscured and sometimes altogether lost by the grossest blunders of arrange- 
ment and punctuation, and they are infested with corruptions, many of which 
have been certainly cured by the labour and devotion of generations of editors 
and commentators. With these acknowledged sins of the old printers "bumt 
and purg'd away " the reader of our revised texts should have but little difficulty 
in making the acquaintance of Shakespeare in his habit as he lived, and with this 
acquaintance will also come a clearer appreciation of the difficulties which still 
beset the text, and perhaps in some cases the long-desired solution of them ; foi 
we are yet far from having reached that point in textual perfection at which 
nothing remains but to rest and be thankful. 

The position of our text, in the first instance, is that of a careless copy of the 
play, revised and altered in many places by its author, but having those revisions 
and alterations again corrupted by the printer.* The fir§t and most important 
source to which the eilitor must look for assistance in his endeavour to remedy 
these cormptions is found in a previous edition of the play (Qi), which, though it 

' For evidence of the tniih of this statement and of the character of Qi as given in the follow- 
ing paragfeph, I must refer the reader to the Parallel-texts edition of the play, and to my notes 
at the end of this revised text. 



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Introduction, 

presents merely a garbled and imperfect rendering of its original, is yet invaluable 
as a check on its more complete follower, from the fact of its being derixfid-firont— » 
the s ame y )uyce^f^ then from our text itself (Q2) proceeds a serfes of quarto and 
{blTo editions in all of which some corrections may be found together with 
additional corruptions. These are what may be called the original materials with 
which the editor has to deal, and then follow the results of the labours of the 
known editors and commentators, founded necessarily on conjecture. At every 
step the judgment of the editor is called into play, in selecting, combining, and 
correcting : nor can he lay down, in the case of this play, any fixed rules for his 
guidance in the work. In ordinary cases where a poet had distinctly revised and 
altered his original conception, the editor who should restore the first reading, 
however preferable, would clearly exceed the limits of his function ; but in this 
case many evidently revised passages are also as evidently corrupted by the printer, 
and it is absolutely necessary to go back to the earlier draft in order to piece out 
a probable restoration of the intended lines. In some instances this has proved 
too difficult a task for many editors, and they have cut the gordian knot by the 
simple process of rejecting the revisions altogether, and restoring bodily the 
original drafl, — see, for instance, note on lines 1 77-181 Act III. Sc. 5. This plan, 
however, of escaping from a difficulty cannot be justified, though in some cases 
the greatness of the difficulty may serve as an excuse ; an evident revision cannot 
be altogether igjnored ; and I should think it a safer course to allow the corrupted 
revision to stand in all its enormity, until the time came and the man who could 
supply the remedy. 

On the other hand, our respect for the last will of the author must not blind us 
to the importance of making the utmost possible use of the first draft in cases of 
corrupted revision, even to the extent of restoring the whole of the first draft when 
this can be done with due respect to the revision itself, for we have clear proof 
occasionally that words and lines were struck out, not by the author, but by 
the printer. Take, for instance, as an indisputable case, the lines restored by 
Malone, 41* 42, Act II. Sc 2 : 

Nor arme, nor face, nor any other part 
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name I 
In (Qi) we find only the first line, as here given ; the words of the second line 
are first given in Q2 ; but see how the printer of Q2 mutilates the first and cor- 
rupts the second : — 

Nor arme, nor face, 6 be some other name 
Belonging to a man. 
Again, in Act I. Sc 4, lines 7 and 8 are omitted in Q2 — 

Nor no without -booke Prologue, faintly spoke 

After the Prompter, for our entrance. — 
and it is not possible to suppose that these lines were struck out by the author. 
Knowing therefore how the printer has mutilated his * copy ', it becomes the duty 
of an editor to restore all such omitted lines as do not interfere with the harmony 
of the revised edition. At the worst, if some line rejected by Shakespeare should 
be recalled to the text, we may be sure to find sufficient beauty in it to make us 
thankftil for its preservation. But after all is said and done, and that the editor 



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Introduction, 

has bestowed his utmost care and made use of all his ability in accomplishing his 
task, he must rise at its completion with a deep sense of his powerlessness to right 
all the wrong he has past in review, and a profound regret that the Author him- 
self did not think fit to set forth and oversee his own writings. And with this 
feeling I leave the reader to enjoy what he has left us : thankful, on the one hand, 
for what we have ; sorry, on the other, that we have it not in a more complete 
form. 

My best thanks are due to the Rev. F. G. Fleay, M.A., for his valuable and 
valued assistance and advice throughout this work ; to Dr Brinsley Nicholson for 
much friendly criticism, whereby I have been saved from some errors into which 
I was like to have fallen ; and to Mr F. J. Fumivall, M.A., Director of the 
Society, for criticism, sympathy, and encouragement from the commencement of 
my task. 



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THE 



ffLost dBxcdltnt anH Hamentafile Zxanttiit 



ROMEO AND JULIET. 



WRITTEN BY 



WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE. 



Newly Revised and Corrected on the first complete 
edition, that o/* 1599, Cf 2. 



P. A. DANIEL. 



PUBLISHED FOR 

BY N. TRUBNER & CO, 57, S9» LUDGATE HILL, 
LONDON, E.C, 1875. 



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DRAMATIS PERSONiE. 



EsKALBS, Prince of Verona. 

Paris, a young nobleman, kinsman to the Prince. 

- } Heads of two houses at variance with each other. 
Capulet, ) 

An old man, of the Capulet Family. 

Romeo, son to Mountague. 

Mercutio, kinsman to the Prince. J ^^.^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ 

Benuolio, nephew to Mountague, ) 

Tybalt, nephew to Lady Capulet. 

Friar Lawrence, a Franciscan. 

Friar JOHN, of the same Order. 

Balthazer, servant to Romeo. 

Abram, servant to Mountague. 

Sampson, | servants to Capulet 
Gregorie, ) 

Other servants to Capulet 
Peter, servant to Juliet's Nurse. 
An Apothecary. 
Three Musicians. 
Three Watchmen. 
Page to Paris. 
Citizen. 

Lady Mountague, wife to Mountague. 
Lady Capulet, wife to Capulet 
Juliet, daughter to Capulet 
Nurse to Juliet 

Kinsfolk and retainers of both houses ; citizens of Verona ; Peace officers ; 
Guards ; Watchmen ; Maskers and Attendants. 

Chorus. 
Scene : Verona : Mantua. 



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PROLOGUE.] 



Romeo and luliet. 



The Prologue. 



Chorus. 

'^ I ^wo houjholdsj loth alike in dignitie, 

In f aire Verona, where we lay our Scene, 
From auncient grndge hreake to new mutinie 
4 Where ciuill bloud makes ciuill hands vncleane : 

From forth the fa tall loynes of thtfe two foes 

A paire offlarre-croji loners take their life ; 
JVhofe mifaduentur'd pittioiis ouerthrowes 
8 Dothy with their deaths liiric their Parents fir if e. 

Thefearfull pojfage of their death-markt loue, 
And the continuance of their Parents rage, 
Which, hut their childrens end, nought could remoue, 
12 Is now the two houres trafficque of our Stage ; 

The which if you with patient eares attend. 
What herefhall miffe, our toyle fhall firiue to mend. 



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THE MOST EX- 

cellent and lamentable 

Tragedie, of Romeo and lulieL 

L 1. Enter Sampfon and Gregorie, of the houfe of Capulet, 

with Swords and Bucklers, 

SAmp, Gregorie, on my word, weele not canrie Coales. 
Greg. No, for then we fhould be Collyers. 
Samp, I meane, and we be in choller, weele draw. 
4 Greg, 1, while you line, draw your necke out of collar. 
Samp, I ftrike quickly, being moued. 
Greg. But thou art not quickly moued to (Irike. 
Samp, A dog of the houfe of Mountogue moues me. 
8 Greg, To raoue is to ftirre, and to be valiant is to fland : 
therefore, if thou art moued, thou runft away. 

Samp, A dog of that houfe lliall moue me to (land: 
I will take the wall of any man or maide of Mounta- 
in gues, 

Greg, That fliewes thee a weake flaue; for the weakefl goes 
to the wall. 

Samp, Tis true; & therfore women, being the weaker veflels, 
1 6 are euer thruft to the wall: therfore I wil pulh Mouritagues men 
from the wall, and thruft his maides to the wall. 

Greg, The quareli is betweene our maifters, and vs their 
men. 
ao Samp. Tis all one, I will (hew my felfe a tj'rant : when I haue 
fought with the men, I will be ciuil with the maides 5 1 will cul 
off their heads. 

Greg The 



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ACT I. sc. I.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 6 

Greg. The heads of the maids ? 
24 Samp. I, the heads of the maides^ or their maiden heads ; take it 
in what fenfe thou wilt. 

Greg. They mufl take it in fenfe, that feele it. 
Samp. Me they fhall feele while I am able to stand : and tis 
28 knowne I am a pretie peece of flefh. 

Greg. Tis well thou art not fifhj if thou hadfl, thou hadfl bin 
poore lohn. Draw thy toole j here comes two of the houfe of 
Mountagues, 

Enter Abram and another, feruing men of the Moun- 
tagues. 

32 Samp. My naked weapon is out j quarell, I will back thee. 
Greg. How ? tume thy backe and runne ? 
Samp. Feare me not. 
Greg. No, marrie ; I feare thee ! 
36 Samp. Let vs take the law of our fides; let them begin. 

Greg. I will frown as I pafle by j and let tliem take it as they lift. 
Samp. Nay, as they dare. I wil bite n^y thumb at them; which 
is difgrace to them, if they beare it. 
40 Ahram. Do you bite your thumbe at vs, fir ? 
Samp. I do bite my thumbe, fir. 
Abram. Do you bite your thumb at vs, fir ? 
Samp. [_4/ide to Greg."] Is the law of our fide, if I fay ' I * ? 
44 Greg. No. 

Samp. No, fir, I do not bite my thumbe at you, fir ; but I bite 
my thumbe, fir. 

Greg. Do you quarell, fir ? 
48 Ahram. Quarell, fir ? no, fir. 

Samp. But if you do, fir, I am for you; I feme as good a man as 
you. 

Abram. No better. 
^2 Samp. Well, fir. \_Enter, at oppqfitejides, Benuolio 

and Tibalt. 
Greg. \^4fide to Samp.'] Say ' better : * here comes one of my 
maiders kinfmen. 

Samp. Yes, 



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ACT I. sc. I.] of Romeo and luliei. 7 

Samp. Yes, better, fir. 
56 Abram, You lie. 

Samp, Draw, if you be men. — Gre^ow, remember thy fwafh- 
ing blowe. [Thet/Jighi. 

Ben, Part, fooles ! IBeating down their weapons, 

60 Put vp your fwords 5 you know not what you do. 

Tib. What, art thou drawne among thefe hartlefle hindes ? 
Tume thee, Benuolio, looke vpon thy death ! 

Ben. I do but keepe the peace j put vp thy fword, 
64 Or manage it to part thefe men with me. 

Tib. What, drawne, and talke of peace ? I hate the word. 
As I hate hell, all Mountagues, and thee : 
Haue at thee, coward ! {.Thryjight, 

Enter Jeveral of both hoitfes who join the fray ; then 
Citizens and Officers, with Clubs and Partifans. 
Confufed cries. 

68 * Clubs, BiLs and Partifons ! ' — ' Strike ! *— ' Beate them downe ! ' — 
' Downe with the Capulets ! * — ' Downe with the Mountagues ! * 

Enter, at oppofite fides, old Capulet, in his gowne, with 
Lady Capulet, and old Mountague with Lady Moun- 
tague. 

Cap. What noyfe is this ? — Giue me my long fword, hoe ! 
Lady C. A crowch, a crowch ! why call you for a fword ? 
*j2 Cap, My fword, I fay ! — Old Mountague is come. 
And florifhes his blade in fpight of me. 

Mount, Thou villaine, Capulet/ — Hold me not, let me go. 
Lady M. Thou (halt not (lir one foote to feeke a foe. 

Enter Prince Eskales, with his traine, 

76 Pnnce. Rebellious fubie6b, enemies to peace, 
Prophaners of this neighbour-ftayned (leele, — 
Will they not heare ? — What ho ! you men, — ^you beafts ! — 
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage 

80 With purple fountaines ilfuing from your veines ! 

On 



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ACT I. sc. I.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 



8 



On paine of torture, from ihole bloudie hands 

Throw your miflemperd weapons to the ground. 

And heare the fentence of your moued Prince. — 
84 Three ciuill brawles, bred of an ayrie word. 

By thee, old Capulet, and Mountague, 

Haue thrice dillurbd the quiet of our ftreets. 

And made Veronas auncient Citizens 
88 Cad by their graue befeeming ornaments. 

To wield old partizans, in hands as old, 

Cancred with peace, to part your cancred hate : 

If euer you difturbe our flreets againe, 
9^ Your liues fhall pay the forfeit of the peace. 

For this time, all the reft depart away : 

You, Capulet, fhall go along with me 5 

And, Alountague, come you this aftemoone, 
9^ To know our farther pleafure in this cafe. 

To old Free-towne, our common iudgement place 

Once more, on paine of death, all men depart. 

lElieunt all but Mountague, Lady Mountague, 
and Benuolio. 
Mount. Who fet this auncient quarell new abroach ? 
100 Speake, Nephew, were you by when it began ? 

Ben, Here were the feruants of your aduerfarie, 

And yours, clofe fighting ere I did approach : 

I drew to part them : in the inftant came 
104 The fierie Tybalt, with his fword prepardej 

Which, as he breathM defiance to my eares. 

He fwoong about his head, and cut the windes. 

Who, nothing hurt withall, hift him in fcome : 
108 While we were enterchaunging thrufts and blowes. 

Came more and more, and fought on part and part. 

Till the Prince came, who parted either part. 

Lady M, O, where is Romeo f — faw you him to day > 
112 Right glad 1 am, he was not at this fray. 

Ben, Madam, an houre before the worihipt Sun 

Peerde forth the golden window of the Eaft, 



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ACT I. sc. I.] of Romeo and Iidiet. 9 

A troubled miiide draue me to walke abroad 5 
116 Where, — vnderneath the groue of Sycamour, 

That Weflward rooteth from the Citie's fide, — 

So early walking did I fee your fonne : 

Towards him I made ; but he was ware of me, 
120 And ftole into the couert of the wood : 

I, meafuring his atFedions by my owne, — 

Which then moft fought where mod might not be found. 

Being one too many by my wearie felfe, — 
124 Purfued my humor, not purfuing his. 

And gladly fhunn'd who gladly fled from me. 
Mount. Many a morning hath he there bin feene. 

With teares augmenting the freih mornings deawe, 
128 Adding to cloudes, more clowdes, with his deepe (ighes: 

But all fo foone as the alcheering Sunne 

Should in the ^rthefl Eaft begin to draw 

The fhadie curtaines from Auroras bed, 
132 Away from light fleales home my heauie fonne. 

And priuate in his Chamber pennes himfelfej 

Shuts vp hb windowes, locks faire day-light out. 

And makes himfelfe an artificiall night : 
1^6 Blacke and portentous mufl this humor proue, 

Vnlefle good counfell may the caufe remoue. 
Ben, My Noble Vncle, do you know the caufe ? 
Mount, I neither know it, nor can leame of him. 
140 Ben. Haue you importiMide him by any meanes ? 
Mount. Both by my felfe and many other friends : 

But he, his owne affedkions counfeller. 

Is to himfelfe — I will not fay how true — 
144 But to himfelfe fo fecret and fo clofe. 

So farre from founding and difcouerie. 

As is the bud bit with an enuious worme. 

Ere he can fpread his fweete leaues to the ayre, 
148 Or dedicate his bewtie to the fun. 

Could we but leame from whence his forrows grow. 

We would as willingly giue cure, as know. 

Entei 



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ACT I. sc. I.] The mojl lamentalle Tragedie 



lo 



Enter Romeo. 

Ben, See, where he comes : lb pleafe you (lep afide, 
15* He know his greeuance, or be much denide. 

Mount. I would thou wert fo happie by thy ftay. 
To heare true fhrift. — Come, Madam, lets away. 

lExeunt Mount, and Lady M. 
Ben. Good morrow, Couiin. 
Rom. Is the day fo young ? 

I j6 Ben. But new ftrooke nine. 

Rom. Ay me ! fad houres fee me long. 

Was that my father that went hence fo faft ? 

Ben. It was. What fadnefle lengthens Romeos houres ? 
Rom. Not hauing that, which, hauing, makes them fhort. 
160 Ben. In loue ? 
Rom. Out — 
Ben. Of loue? 

Rom. Out of her fauour, where I am in loue. 
164 Ben. Alas, that loue, fo gentle in his view. 
Should be fo tirannous and rough in proofe ! 

Rom. Alas, that loue, whofe view is muffled ftill. 
Should, without eyes, fee pathwaies to his will ! 
i68 Where (hall we dine ? — 6 me ! — what fray was here > 
Yet tell me not, for I haue heard it all : 
Heres much to do with hate, but more with loue. — 
Why then, 6 brawling loue ! J^ louing hate ! 
1720 any thing, of nothing firft create ! 
O heauie lightnefTe ! ferious vanitie ! 
Miihapen Chaos of welfeeming formes ! 
Feather of lead, bright fmoke, cold fier, ficke health ! 
176 Still waking fleepe, that is not what it is ! — 
This loue feele I, that feele no loue in this. 
Doft thou not laugh ? 

Ben. No, Coze, I rather weepe. 

Rom. Good hart, at what ? 

R^' At thy good harts oppreffion. 

Rom. Why, 



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ACT I. sc. I.] of Romeo and luliei. i ' 

1 80 Rom, Why, fuch is loues tranfgreffion. 
Griefes of mine owne lie heauie in my bread. 
Which thou wilt propagate, to haue it preaft 
With more of thine : this loue, that thou haft fhowne, 
184 Doth ad more griefe to too much of mine owne. 
Loue is a fmoke made with the fume of (ighes ; 
Being purgd, a fire fparkling in louers eies j 
Being vext, a fea nourifht with louing teares : 
188 What is it elfe ? a madnefle moft difcreete, 
A choking gall, and a preferuing fweete. 
Farewell, my Coze. 

Ben, Soft,! will go along : 

And if you leaue me fo, you do me wrong. 
192 Rom. Tut, I haue left my felfe ; I am not here ; 
This is not Romeo, hees fome other where. 

Ben. Tell me in fadneife : who is^ that you loue ^ 
Rom. What, ftiall I grone and tell thee ? 
Ben. Grone ! why, no j 

196 But fadly tell me : — who ? 

Rom. Bid a (icke man in fadnefte make his will :— 
A, word ill vrgd to one that is fo ill ! — 
Tn"fadnefle, Cozin, I do loue a woman, 
aoo Ben. I aymde fo neare, when I fuppofde you lou*d. 

Rom. A right good mark-man ! — And ftiees faire I loue. 
Ben. A right faire marke, faire Coze, is fooneft hit. 
Rom. Well, in that hit, you mifle: ftieel not be hit 
204 With Cupids arrow 5 ftie hath Dians wit. 
And, in ftrong proofe of chaftitie well armd. 
From loues weak childifti bow ftie lines vnharmd. 
Shee will not ftay the fiege of louing tearmes, 
ao8 Nor bide th'incounter of aflailing eies. 
Nor ope her lap to fain6t feducing gold : 
O, flie b rich in bewtie ! onely poore, 
That, when ftie dies, with bewtie dies her ftore. 
aia Ben. Then ftie hath fworn, that ftie wil ftil Hue chafte ? 
Rom. She hath, and in that fparing makes huge wafte -, 

For 



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ACT I. sc. 2.] The viojl lamentable Tragedie 

For bewtie, fleru'd with her feueritie. 
Cuts bewtie off from all pofteritie. 

216 She is too faire, too wife, wifely too faire. 
To merit blilTe by making me difpaire : 
Shee hath forfworne to loue j and in that vow 
Do I line dead, that line to tell it now. 

220 Ben, Be rulde by me, forget to thinke of her. 

Rom, O, teach me how I ihould forget to thinke. 
Ben, By giuing libertie vnto thine eyes ; 
Examine other bewties. 

Rom, Tis the way 

224 To call hers (exquifit) in queftion more : 

Thefe happie maskes, that kis faire Ladies browes. 
Being black, puts vs in mind they hide the faire : 
He that is ftrooken blind, cannot forget 

228 The precious treafure of his eye-iight loft : 
Shew me a miftrelTe that is palling faire 5 
What doth her bewtie feme, but as a note 
Where 1 may reade, who paft that palling faire ? 

232 Farewelj thou canft not teach me to forget. 

Ben, He pay that do6brine, or elfe die in debt. 



12 



lExeunt, 



1.2. 



Enter Capulet, Cofintie Paris, and Seruant, 



Cap, But Mountague is bound as well as I, 
In penaltie alike ^ and tis not hard, I thinke. 
For men fo old as we to keepe the peace. 
4 Par, Of honourable reckoning are you both ; 
And pittie tis, you liu'd at ods fo long. 
But now, ray Lord, what fay you to my fute ? 
Cap, But faying ore what I haue faid before: 
8 My child is yet a ftraunger in the world j 
Shee hath not feene the chaunge of fourteen yeares : 
Let two more Sommers wither in their pride. 
Ere we may thinke her ripe to be a bride. 
12 Par, Younger then fhe are happie mothers made. 



Cap, Aud 



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jiCT I. sc. 2.] of Romeo and luUet. ij 

Cap. And too Ibone mard are thofe lb early made. 

The earth hath fwallow'd all my hopes but Ihe j 

She is the hopefull Lady of my earth : 
1 6 But wooe her, gentle Paris ; get her hart; 

My will, to her confent, is but a part j 

And, fhee agreed, within her fcope of choife 

Lyes my confent, and faire according voyce. 
ao This night I hold an old accuftomd feaft. 

Whereto 1 haue inuited many a gueft. 

Such as I loue j and you, among the ftore, 

One more, moft welcome, makes my number more. 
24 At my poore houfe, looke to behold, this night, 

Earthtreading ftarres, that make darke heauen light : 

Such comfort, as do luftie youngmen feele 

When well appareld Aprill on the heele 
28 Of lumping winter treads, euen fuch delight 

Among frelh female buds (hall you this night 

Inherit at my houfe j heare all, all fee. 

And like her moll, whofe merit moft fhall bee : 
32 Such amongft, view o'er many, mine being one 

May ftand in number, though in reckning none. 

Come, go with me. — Go, firrah, trudge about 

Through faire Ferona ; find thofe perfons out, 
^6 Whole names are written there, and to them fay. 

My houfe and welcome on their pleafure ftay. 

[^E^eunt Capuh't and Paris, 
Set, Find them out, whofe names are written here ! It is writ- 
ten that the Ihoo-maker fhould meddle with his yard, and the 
40 tayler with his laft, the fiflier with his penfill, & the painter with 

his nets j but I am fent to find thofe perfons, whofe names are 

here writ, and can neuer find what names the writing perfon 

hath here writ. I muft to the learned : — In good time. 

Enter Benuolio, and Romeo. 

44 Ben. Tut, man ! one fire burnes out an others burning. 
One paine is lefn'd by an others anguilh -, 

Turne 



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ACT I. sc. 2.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 14 

Tume gtddie^ and be hoipe by backward turning j 
One defperate greefe cures with an others languifh : 
48 Take thou fome new infedion to thy eye. 
And the rancke poyfon of the old will dye. 
Rom, Your Plantan leafe is excellent for that. 
Ben, For what, I pray thee ? 

^^om. For your broken fhin. 

5a Ben. Why, Romeo, art thou mad ? 

Rom, Not mad, but bound more then a mad man is : 
Shut vp in prifon, kept without my foode, 
Whipt and tormented, and — Godden, good fellow. 
56 Ser, Godgigoden. I pray, fir, can you read ? 
Rom, I, mine owne fortune in my miferie. 
Ser, Perhaps you haue learned it without booke : but, I pray, 
can you read any thing you fee ? 
60 Rom, I, if I know the letters and the language. 
Ser, Yee lay honeftly. Reft you merrie ! 
Rom, Stay, fellow ; I can read. 

He reades the Letter. 
' Q^Eigneur Martino, ^ his wife, and daughters: 
^4 >^Countie Anfelmo, and his bewtious Jifters : 
The Lady widdow of Vitruuio : 
Seigneur Placentio, and his louely Neeces : 
Mercutio, and his brother Valentine: 
68 Mine Fncle Capulet, his wife, and daughters: 
My f aire Neece Rofaline, [and] Liuia: 
Seigneur Valentio, and his Cofen Tybalt : 
Lucio, cmd the liuely Hellena.' 
7a A faire affemblie : whither fhould they come ? 
Ser. Vp. 
Rom, Whither? 
Ser, To fupper 3 to our houfe. 
16 i?om. Whofe houfe? 
Ser, My Maifters, 

Rom, Indeed, I fhould haue askt you that before. 
Ser, Now ile tell you without asking. My maifter is the great 

rich 



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ACT I, 



sc. 3.] 



of Romeo and lulieL 



^5 



80 rich Capulei ; and if you be not of the houfe of Mouniagues, I 
pray, come and crufh a cup of wine. Reft you merrie ! [Exii, 

Ben. At this fame auncient feaft of Capulets 
Sups the faire RofcUine, whom thou fo loues, 
84 With all the admired beauties of Verona : 
Go thither, and with vnattainted eye 
Compare her face with fome that I ihall ihow, 
And I will make thee thinke thy fwan a crow. 
88 Rom, When the deuout religion of mine eye 
Maintaines fuch falfhood, then tume teares to tiers ! 
And thefe, — who, often drownde, could neuer die, — 
Tranfparent Hereticques, be burnt for liers ! 
pa One fairer then my loue ! the all feeing Sun 
Nere faw her match, fince firft the world begun. 

Ben, Tut, tut ! you faw her fairc, none elfe being by. 
Her felfe poyfd with her felfe in either eye : 
96 But in that Chriftall fcales let there be waide 
Your Ladie-loue againft fome other maide 
That I will fhew you, fhining at this feaft. 
And ftie ftiall fcant ftiew well, that now ihewes beft. 
100 Rom, He go along, no fuch fight to be ftiowne. 
But to reioyce in fplendor of mine owne. 

[Exeunt. 
I. 3, Etiter Lady Capulet and Nurfe. 

Lady C, Nurfe, wher's my daughter ? call her forth to me. 
Nurfe. Now, by my maidenhead, — at twelue yeare old, — 
/ had her come. — What, Lamb / whai, Ladie-bird I — 
4 God forbid /—Wheres this Girle P—fFhat, luliet ! 

Enter luliet. 

Jul. How now, who calls ? 
Nurfe. Your mother, 

Jul. Madam, I am here. 

What is your will ? 

Lady C. This is the matter : — Nurfe, giue leaue a while. 

We 



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ACT I. sc. 3.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 



16 



8 We muft talk in fecret. — Nurfe, come backe againe j 

1 haue remembred mee, thou'fe heare our counfel. 

Thou know 'ft my daughters of a pretie age. 
Nurfe. Faith, I can tell her age vnto an houre. 
12 Lady C, Sheets not fourteene. 

Nurfe. He lay fourteene of my teeth, — 

And yet, to my teene he itfpoken, I haue lutfoure, — 

Shees not fourteene. How long is it now 

To Lammas tide ? 

Lady C, A fortnight and odde dayes. 

1 6 Nurfe. Euen or odde, of all daies in the yeare. 

Come Lammas Eue at night, fhalfhe he fourteen, 

Sufan andfhe, — God refl all ChriJHan foules ! — 

Were of an age, IVell, Sufan is with God ; 
20 She was too good for me, — But, as If aid. 

On Lammas Eue at night fhall Jhe he fourteene ; 

Thatfhallfhee, marrie ; I rememher it well. 

Tisjince the Earth-quake now eleuen yedres ; 
24 Andfhe was weaned, — / neuer fhall forget it, — 

Of all the dates of the yeare, vpon that day : 

For I hud then laide worme-wood to my dug, 

Sitting in the fun vnder the Doue-houfe wall ; 
28 My Lord and you were then at Mantua : — 

Nay, I doo heare a hraine, — But, as If aid, 

When it did tafle the worme-wood on the nipple 

Of my dug, and felt it hitter, — Pretie foole ! 
32 To fee it teachie, and fall out with' Dugge ! 

Shake, quoth the Doue-houfe : twos no need, I trow. 

To hid me trudge, 

Andfince that time it is eleuen yeares : 
36 For thenfhe could Jiand hylone ; nay, hyth roode. 

She could haue run and wadled all ahout : 

For euen the day hefore.fhe hroke her hrow ; 

And then my hushand — God be with his soule f 
40 A was a merrie man — tooke vp the child : 

' Yea,* quoth he, ' doefl thou fall vpon thy facet 

Thou 



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ACT I. sc. 3] of Romeo and luliet, 17 

Thou wilt fall backward when thou haft more wit ; 
Wilt thou not, lule ? ' and, by my liolydam, 
44 The pre tie wretch left crying, and /aid ' I: ' 
To fee now, how a ieqftjhall come about ! 
I warrant, and IJhould Hue a thoufand yeares, 
I neuerjhould forget it: * IPilt thou not, lule? * quoth he ; 
48 And, pretiefoole, itJHnted, andfaid ' 7/ 

Lady C. Inough of this j I pray thee, hold thy peace. 
Nurfe. Yes^ Madam ; yet I cannot chufe but laugh. 
To thinke itjhould leaue crying, and fay ' I: ' 
^2 jind yet, I warrant, it had vpon it brow 
A bump as big as a young Cockrels Jione ; 
A perillous knock; and it cryed bitterly, 
' Yea,' quoth my husband, 'fallfl vpon thy face ? 
56 Thou wilt fall backward when thou commejl to age: 
JVilt thou not, lule ? ' Itjlinted, andfaid ' /.' 
luL And Hint thou too, I pray thee, Nurfe, fay I. 
Nurfe. Peace, I haue done : God marke thee to his grace / 
5o Thou wcLJl the prettiefl babe that ere I nurfl : 
And I might Hue to fee thee married once, 
I haue my w'lfti. 

Lady C. Marrie, that ' marrie * is the very theame 
64 I came to talke of : — Tell me, daughter luliet. 
How Hands your difpofitions to be married ? 
lul. It is an honoure that I dreame not of. 
Nurfe. An honoure ! were not I thine onely Nurfe, 
68 I would fay thou hadjlfuckt unfedomefrom thy teate. 

Lady C. Well, thinke of marriage now ; yonger then you. 
Here in Verona, Ladies of efteeme. 
Are made alreadie mothers. By my count, 
72 I was your mother much vpon thefe yeares 

That you are now a maide. Thus then, in briefe : 
The valiant Pans feekes you for his loue. 

Nurfe. A man, young Lady I Lady,fuch a man, 
j6 As cUl the world — IVhy, hees a man ofwaxe / 

Lady C. Feronas Sommer hath not fuch a flower. 

Nurfe. 



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ACT I. sc. 4.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 18 

Nurfe. Nay, hees afiower ; in faith, a very flower. 
Lady C. What fay you ? can you loue the Gentleman ? 
80 This night you fliall behold him at our feaft : 

Reade ore the volume of young Paris face. 

And find delight writ there with bewties pen; 

Examine euery married liniament, 
84 And fee how one an other lends content ; 

And what obfcurde in this faire volume lies, 

Finde written in the margeant of his eyes. 

This precious booke of loue, this vnbound louer, 
88 To bewtifie him, onely lacks a Couer. 

The iifh lines in the fea ; and tis much pride. 

For faire without, the faire within to hide : 

That booke in manies eyes doth ibare tlie glorie, 
92 That in gold clafpes locks in the golden florie : 

So fhall you fhare all that he doth pofTefTe, 

By hauing him, making your felfe no lefle. 

Nurfe, No lefle ! nay, bigger : women grow by men. 
96 Lady C. Speake briefly, can you like of Paris loue ? 
lul. lie looke to like, if looking liking moue : 

But no more deepe will 1 endart mine eye. 

Then your confent giues ftrength to make it flie. 

Enter a Seruingman, 

100 Ser. Madam, the guefts are come, fupper feru'd vp, you cald, 

my young Lady askt for, the Nurfe curft in the Pan trie, and e- 

uerie thing in extremitie : I muft hence to wait j I befeech you, 

follow ftraight. [Exit Seruingman, 

104 Lady C, We follow thee. — luliet, the Count ie flaies. 

Nurfe, Go, g}'rle, feeke happie nights to happie dayes. 

\^Exeunt, 

I. 4. Enter Romeo, Mercutio, Benuolio, with flue or flxe 

other Maskers, and torchhearers, 

Rom. What, fliall this fpeech be fpoke for our excufe ? 
Or fliall we on without appologie ? 

Ben. 



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ACT I. sc. ij-] of Borneo and luliet. 19 

Ben. The date is out of fuch prolixitie : 
4 Weele haue no Cupid, hudwinckt with a skarfe. 
Bearing a Tartars painted bow of lath, 
Skaring the Ladies like a Crowkeeper ; 
[Nor no without-booke Prologue, faintly fpoke 
8 After the Prompter, for our entrance :] 
But, let them meafure vs by what they will, 
Weele meafure them a meafure, and be gone. 

Rom, Giue me a torch : I am not for this ambling ; 
12 Being but heauie, I -will beare the light. 

Mer. Nay, gentle Romeo, we muft haue you dance. 
Rom, Not I, beleeue me : you haue dancing fhooes. 
With nimble foles : I haue a foule of Leade 
16 So (lakes me to the ground, I cannot moue. 

Mer, You are a Louer ; borrow Cupids wings. 
And fore with them aboue a common bound. 
Rom. I am too fore enpearced with his Ihaft, 
ao To fore with his light feathers ; and fo bound, 
I cannot bound a pitch aboue dull woe : 
Vnder loues heauie birthen do I iincke. 

Mer. And, to fink in it, fhould you burthen loue ) 
24 Too great oppreflion for a tender thing. 

Rom. Is loue a tender thing ? it is too rough. 
Too rude, too boyflrous j and it pricks like thorne, 

Mer. If loue be rough with you, be rough with loue ; 
28 Prick loue for pricking, and you beate loue downe. — 
Giue me a cafe to put my vifage in : 
A vifor for a vifor ! what care I 
What curious eye doth cote deformities ! 
32 Here are the beetle browes fhall blulh for me. 

Ben. Come, knock, and enter ; and no fooner in. 
But euery man betake him to his legs. 

Rom, A torch for me : let wantons, light of heart, 
36 Tickle the fenceleffe rulhes with their heeles ; 
For I am prouerbd wiih a graunfire phrafe, — 
lie be a candle-holder, and looke on, — 

The 



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n 



ACT I. sc. 4.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

The game was nere fo faire, and I am done. 
40 Mer. Tut ! duns the raoule, the Conflables own word : 
If thou art dun, weele draw thee from the mire. 
Or, faue your reuerence, loue, wherein thou ftickft 
Vp to the eares. — Come, we burne daylight, ho. 
44 /Jom. Nay, thats not fo. 

Mer. I meane, fir, in delay 

We wafle our lights in vaine, lightjights by day : 
Take our good meaning, for our iudgement fits 
Flue times in that, ere once in our fine wits. 
48 Rom, And we meane well, in going to this Mask j 
But tis no wit to go. 

Mer. Why, may one aske ? 

Rom. I dreampt a dreame to night. 
Mer. And fo did L 

Rom, Well, what was yours ? 

Mer. That dreamers often lie. 

5a Rom. In bed afleep, while they do dream things true. 
Mer. O, then, I fee, Queene Mab hath bin with you. 
[^Ren. Queen Mab ! whats she ?] 
Mer. She is the Fairies midwife j and (lie comes 
56 In fhape no bigger then an Agot ftone 
On the forefinger of an Alderman, 
Drawne with a teeme of little atomies 
Ouer mens nofes as they lie afleep. 
60 Her Charriot is an emptie Hafel nut, 
Made by the loyner fquirrel, or old Grub, 
Time out amind, the Fairies Coatchmakers : 
Her waggon fpokes made of long fpinners legs; 
64 The couer, of the wings of Grafhoppers -, 
Her traces, of the fmallefl fpider web ; 
Her collors, of the moonfliines watry beams ; 
Her whip, of Crickets bone ; the lafli of filnie -, 
(58 Her waggoner, a fmall grey coated Gnat, 
Not half fo big as a round lille wornie 
Prickt from the lazie finger of a maid : 



20 



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ACT I. sc. 4.] of Romeo and luliet. 21 

And in this flate fhe gallops night by night 
72 Throgh loners brains, and then they dreame of lone j 

Ore Courtiers knees, that dreame on Curfies flrait; 

Ore Lawyers fingers, who flrait dreame on feesj 

Ore Ladies lips, who flrait on kifTes dream, 
76 Which ofl the angrie Mab with bliflers plagues, 

Becaufe their breaths with fweete meates tainted are* 

Sometime fhe gallops ore a Courtiers nofe. 

And then dreames he of fmelling out a fute : 
80 And fometime comes fhe with a tithpigs taile. 

Tickling a Perlbns nofe as a lies afleepe. 

Then he dreams of an other Benefice. 

Sometime fhe driueth ore a fouldiers neck, 
84 And then dreames he of cutting forrain throates. 

Of breaches, ambufcados, fpanifh blades. 

Of healths fine fadome deepe : and then anon 

Drums in his eare ; at which he flarts, and wakes ; 
88 And, being thus frighted, fweares a praier or two. 

And fleeps againe. This is that very Mab, 

That plats the manes of horfes in the night j 

And bakes the Elflocks in foule fluttifh haires, 
9* Which, once entangled, much misfortune bodes. 

This is the hag, when maides lie on their backs. 

That prcfTcs them, and leames them firfl to beare. 

Making them women of good carriage : 
96 This is fhe— 

Rom, Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace ! 

Thou talkfl of nothing. 

Mer. True, I talke of dreames : 

Which are the children of an idle braine. 

Begot of nothing but vaine phantafiej 
100 Which is as thin of fubflance as the ayre. 

And more inconflant then the wind, who wooes 

Euen now the frozen bofome of the North, 

And, being angerd, puffes away from thence, 
104 Turning his face to the dewe dropping South. 

Ben. 



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>ACT I. sc. 5.] The mojl lamentable Tragcdie %% 

Ben. This wind, you talk of, blows vs from our felues j 
Supper is done, and we fliall come too late. 

Rom, I feare, too earlie : for my mind mifgiues, 
108 Some confequence, yet hanging in the flarres. 
Shall bitterly begin his fearfull date 
With this nights reuels ; and expire the terme 
Of a defpifed life, clofde in my brell, 
112 By fome vile forfeit of vntimely death : 

But He, that hath the flirrage of my courfe, 
Dired my faile! — On, luftie Gentlemen. 
Ben. Strike, drum. 

[They march about the Stage, and Exeunt. 

I. 5. Seruingmen come forth with Napkins. 

1 Ser. Wheres Potpan, that he helpes not to take away ? 
He fhift a trencher ! he fcrape a trencher ! 

2 Ser. When good manners fhall lie all in one or two mens 
4 hands, and they vnwaibt too, tis a foule thing. 

1 Ser, Away with the ioynflooles, remoue the Courtcubbert, 
looke to the plate. Good thou, faue me a peece of March-pane ; 
and, as thou loues me, let the porter let in Sufan Grindftone, and 

8 Nell. — Anthonie / and Potpan ! 

2 Ser. I, boy ; readie. 

I Ser, You are lookt for, and cald for, askt for, and fought for, 
in the great chamber. 
12 3 Ser, We cannot be here and there too. — Chearely, boyes j 
be brisk a while, and the longer liuer take all. 

IThey retire behind. 

Enter Capulet, etc. with the Guejls, and the Maskers. 

Cap, Welcome, gentlemen ! Ladies that haue their toes 
Vnplagued with Comes, will walke a bout with you : — 
16 Ah ha, my mifleifes ! which of you all 

Will now denie to daunce ? ihe that makes daintie. 
She, lie fwear, hath Corns : am I come neare ye now ? 
Welcome, gentlemen ! I haue feene the day. 

That 



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ACT I. sc. 5.] of Romeo and lulieL 23 

20 That I haue woroe a vifor, and could tell 

A whifpering tale iu a faire Ladies eare. 

Such as would pleal'e j — tis gone, tis gone, tis gone : 

You are welcome, gentlemen ! — Come, Muiitions, play. 
24 A hall, a hall ! giue roome, and foote it, gytles ! 

IMiifick playes, and they dance. 

More light, you knaues; and turne the tables vp. 

And quench the fire, the roome is growne too hot. — 

Ah, iirrah, this vnlookt for fport comes well. 
28 Nay, fit, nay, fit, good Cozin Capulet ; 

For you and I are pafl our dauncing dayes : 

How long ifl now, (ince lafl your felfe and I 

Were in a maske ? 

2. Cap, Berlady, thirtie yeares. 

32 Cap, What, man ! tis not (o much, tis not fo much : 

Tis fince the nuptiall of Lucent'w, 

Come Pentycoft as quickly as it will. 

Some fine and twentie yeares ; and then we maskt. 
^6 2. Cap. Tis more, tis more : his fonne is elder, fir j 

Hb fonne is thirtie. 

Cap. Will you tell me that ? 

His fonne was but a ward two yeares ago. — 

[Good youths, I faith ! Oh, youth's a iolly thing !] 
40 Rom. What Ladies that, which doth enrich the hand 

Of yonder Knight ? 
Ser, I know not, fir. 

Rom. O, Ihe doth teach the torches to bum bright ! 
44 Her Beauty hangs vpon the cheeke of night 

Like a rich lewel in an Ethiops eare; 

Bewtie too rich for vfe, for earth too deare ! 

So fhowes a fnowie Done trooping with Crowes, 
. 48 As yonder Lady ore her fellowes fliowes. 

The meafure done. He watch her place of fland. 

And, touching hers, make blefled my rude hand. 

Did my hart loue till now ? forfweare it, fight ! 
52 For I nere (aw true bewtie till this night. 

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ACT I, sc. 5.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 24 

TUk This, by his voyce, ihould be a Mountague. — 
Fetch me my Rapier, boy. — ^What ! dares the llaue 
Come hither, couerd with an anticque face, 
j6 To fleere and fcorne at our folemnitie ? 
Now, by the ftocke and honor of my kin. 
To flrike him dead I hold it not a fin. 

Cap, Why, how now, kinsman ! wherefore ftorme you lb ? 
60 Tib, Vncle, this is a Mountague, our foe j 
A villaine, that is hither come in fpight. 
To fcorne at our folemnitie this night. 
Cap. Young Romeo is it ? 

Tib, Tis he, that villaine Romeo, 

64 Cap, Content thee, gentle Coze, let him alone, 
A beares him like a portly Gentleman j 
And, to fay truth, Ferona brags of him. 
To be a vertuous and welgouernd youth : 
68 I would not for the wealth of all this Towne, 
Here in my houfe, do him difparagement : 
Therefore be patient, take no note of him. 
It is my will J the which if thou refpe6t, 
72 Shew a faire prefence, and put ofFthefe frownes. 
An illbefeeming femblance for a feafl. 

Tib, It fits, when fuch a villaine is a gueft : 
He not endure him. 

Cap, He fhall be endured : 

76 What, goodman boy ! — I fay, he ihall : — go too ; — 
Am I the matter here, or you ? — go too. 
Youle not endure him ! — (rod ihall mend my foule — 
Youle make a mutinie among my guells ! 
80 You wil fet cock a hoope ! youle be the man ! 
Tib, Why, Vncle, tis a fhame. 
Cap, Go too, go too. 

You are a fawcie boy : — ift fo, indeed ? — 
This trick may chance to fcath you j — I know what— 
84 You muft contrarie me ! — marrie, tis time — 
Well faid, my hearts. — You are a princox j go :— 

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ACT I. SC. 5.] 



of Romeo and Ivliet, 



^5 



Be quiet, or — More light, more light ! — For fhame ! 
He make you quiet j what ! — Chearely, my hearts ! 
88 Tib, Patience perforce, with wilful) choUer meeting, 
Makes my flefh tremble in their different greeting. 
I will withdraw : but this intrufion fhall. 
Now feeming fweet, conuert to bittreft gall. [£jri/. 

pa Rom, If I prophane with my vnworthieft hand 

This holy fhrine, the gentle iin is this, — 
My lips, two blufhing Pylgrims, readie Hand 
To fmoothe that rough touch with a tender kis. 
96 lul. Good Pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much. 
Which mannerly deuocion ihowes in this j 
For faints haue hands, that Pilgrims hands do tuch. 
And palme to palme is holy Palmers kis. 
100 Rom, Haue not Saints lips, and holy Palmers too ? 
Jul, I, Pilgrim, lips that they mud vfe in praire. 

Rom, O, then, deare Saint, let lips do what hands do ; 

They pray, grant thou, leaft faith tume to difpaire. 
104 lul. Saints do not moue, thogh grant for praiers fake. 
Rom, Then moue not, while my praiers effe6t I take. 

Thus from my lips, by thine, my fin is purgd. 
lul. Then haue my lips the fin that they haue tooke. 

108 Rom. Sin from my lips? 6 trefpas fweet ly vrgd! 
Giue me my fin againe. 
lul. You kiffe bith booke. 

Nurfe, Madam, your mother craues a word with you. 
Horn, What is her mother ? 
Nurfe, Marrie, Batcheler, 

112 Her mother is the Lady of the houfe. 

And a good Ladie, and a wife and vertuous : 
I Nurfl her daughter, that you talkt withall j 
1 tell you, — he, that can lay hold of her, 
116 Shall haue the chincks. 

Rom, Is fhe a Capulet 9 

O deare account ! my lite is my foes debt. 
Ben, Away, begon j the fport is at the befl. 

Rom, 



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ACT I. sc. 5.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 26 

Rom, I, fo I feare ; the more is my vnreft. 
120 Cap, Nay, gentlemen, prepare not to be gone> 
We haue a trifling foolifh banquet towards. — 
Is it ene fo ? why, then, I thanke you allj 
I thanke you, honefl gentlemen, good night : — 
i»4 More torches here ! — Come on then, lets to bed. 
Ah, firrah, by my faie, it waxes late ; 

He to my reft. [£jreunt all but Juliet and Nurfe. 

Jul, Come hither, Nurfe : what is yond gentleman ? 
I»8 Nurfe, The fonne and heire of old Tyberio, 

Jul, Whats he, that now is going out of doore ? 
Nurfe, Marrie, that, I thinke, be young Petruchio, 
Jul, Whats he, that follows there, that wold not dance ? 
xja Nurfe. I know not. 

Jul, Go, aske his name : — if he be married. 
My graue is like to be my wedding bed. 

Nurfe, His name is Romeo, and a Mountague ; 
136 The onely fonne of your great enemie. 

Jul, My onely loue fprung from my onely hate ! 
Too earlie feene vnknowne, and knowne too late ! 
Prodigious birth of loue it is to mee, 
140 That I muft loue a loathed enemie. 
Nurfe, Whats this ? whats this ? 
luL A rime I learnt euen now 

Of one I dand withall. [O/ie cab within ' luliet.' 

Nurfe, Anon, anon : — 

Come, lets away -, the ftrangers all are gone. lElreunt. 



Ch<n'us, 

Now old defire doth in his deathbed lie. 
And young affe^on gapes to be his heire j 

That faire, for which loue gronde for, and would die. 
With tender Juliet matcht, is now not faire. 

Now Romeo is beloued, and loues againe. 
Alike bewitched by the charme of lookes. 

But to his foe fuppofd he muft complaine. 



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ACT II. sc. I.] of Romeo and luUet. ay 

8 And fhe fleale loues fweete bait from fearful hookes : 

Being held a foe, he may not haue accefle 

To breathe fuch vowes as loners vfe to fweare ; 
And fhe as much in lone, her meanes much leile 
12 To meete her new beloued any where : 

But padion lends them power, time meanes, to meete, 
Tempring extremities with extreeme fweete. 



n. 1. Enter Romeo alone, 

Rom, Can I go forward when my heart is here ? 
Tume backe, dull earth, and find thy Center out. 

IHe climbs the wall, and leaps down within i/. 

Enter Benuolio with Mercutio. 

Ben, Romeo ! my Cofen Romeo ! Romeo ! 
Mer, He b wife j 

4 And, on my life, hath flolne him home to bed. 

Ben, He ran this way, and leapt this Orchard wall : 
Call, good Mercutio, 

Mer, Nay, He coniure too. — 

Romeo ! humorous madman ! paflionate louer ! 
8 Appeare thou in the likenefle of a (igh, 
Speake but one rime, and I am fatisfied ; 
Crie but ' ay me * ! couple but * loue * and ' done ' j 
Speake to my gofhip Fenus one faire word, 
12 One nickname for her purblind fonne and heir. 
Young Abraham Cupid, he that fhot fo trim 
When King Cophetua lou*d the begger mayd ! — 
He heareth not, he flirreth not, he moueth not j 
1 6 The Ape is dead, and I mufl coniure him. — 
I coniure thee by Rqfalines bright eyes, 
By her high forehead, and her Scarlet lip. 
By her fine foot, (Iraight leg, and quiuering thigh, 
ao And the demeanes that there adiacent lie. 
That in thy likenefle thou appeare to vs ! 

Ben, And if he heare thee, thou wilt anger him. 



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ACT II. sc. 2.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 28 

Mer. This cannot anger him : twould anger him 
*4 To raife a fpirit in his miftrelFe circle 

Of fome ftrange nature, letting it there fland 
Till {he had laid it, and coniured it downe ; 
That were fome fpight : my inuocation 
28 Is fiiire & honefl, and, in his miftres name, 
I coniure onely but to raife vp him. 

Ben, Come, he hath hid himfelfe among thefe trees. 
To be conforted with the humerous night : 
3^ Blind is his loue, and bed befits the darke. 

Mer. If loue be blind, loue cannot hit the marke. 
Now will he fit vnder a Medler tree. 
And wifli his miftrefle were that kind of fruite, 
3^ As maides call Medlers, when they laugh alone. 
O, Romeo, that flie were, 6 that Ihe were 
An open et caetera, thou a Popriu Peare ! 
Romeo, goodnight ; — ile to my truckle bed -, 
4<5 This field-bed is too cold for me to lleepe : 
Come, fhall we go ? 

Ben. Go, then ; for tis in vaine 

To feeke him here, that meanes not to be found. 

[Exeunt Ben. and Mer. 

H. 2. Romeo comes forward . 

Rom. He jeads at fcarres, that neuer felt a wound. — 

[Enter Juliet above. 
But, foft ! what light through yonder window breaks ! 
It b the Eaft, and Juliet is the Sun ! — 
4 Arife, faire Sun, and kill the enuious Moone, 
Who is alreadie ficke and pale with greefe. 
That thou her maide art far more faire then (lie : 
Be not her maide, fince fhe is enuious -, 
8 Her veftall liuery is but ficke and greene. 
And none but fooles do weare it 5 cafl it off. — 
It is my Lady j 6, it is my loue I 
O, that fhe knew fhe wer ! — 
12 She fpeakes, yet fhe faies nothing : what of that ? 



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ACT II. sc. 2.] of Romeo and luUet, 29 

Her eye difcourfes, I will anfwere it. — 
I am too bold, tis not to me fhe fpeakes- : 
Two of the faireft ftarres in all the heauen, 
16 Hauing fome bufmes, do entreate her eyes 
To twinckle in their fpheres till they returne. 
What if her eyes were there, they in her head ? 
The brightnefle of her cheek wold ihame thofe ftars, 
20 As day-light doth a lampe j her eye in heauen 
Would through the ayrie region flreame fo bright. 
That birds would fmg, and thinke it were not night. 
See, now fhe leanes her cheeke vpon her hand ! 
24 O, that I were a gloue vpon that hand. 
That I might touch that cheeke ! 

Jul. Ay me ! 

Rom, She fpeakes : — 

Oh, fpeake againe, bright Angel ! for thou art 
As glorious to this night, being ore my head, 
28 As is a winged meflenger of heauen 
Vnto the white vpturned wondring eyes 
Of mortalls that fall backe to gaze on him. 
When he beftrides the lazie pacing Cloudes, 
32 And fayles vpon the bofome of the ayre. 

luL O Romeo, Romeo / wherefore art thou Romeo ? 
Denie thy father, and refufe thy name ! 
Or, if thou wilt not, be but fworne my loue, 
3^ And ile no longer be a Capulet, 

Rom, Shall I heare more, or fhall I fpeake at this ' 
luL Tis but thy name that is my enemie 5 
Thou art thy felfe, though not a Mountagne, 
40 Whats Mountague 9 it is nor hand, nor foote. 
Nor arme, nor face, nor any other part 
Belonging to a man. O, be fome other name ! 
Whats in a name ? that which we call a rofe, 
44 By any other name would fmell as fweete j 
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo cald, 
Retaine that deare perfedion which he owes. 
Without that ty tie. — Romeo, dofte thy name j 



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ACT II. sc. 2.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 30 

48 And for thy name, which is no part of thee. 
Take all my felfe. 

Rom. I take thee at thy word : 

Call me but loue, and He be new baptizde; 
Henceforth I neuer will be Romeo. 
52 Jul, What man art thou, that, thus befchreend in night. 
So ihunblefl on my counfell ? 

Rom. By a name 

I know not how to tell thee who I am : 
My name, deare faint, is hatefuU to my felfe, 
56 Becaufe it is an enemie to thee j 

Had I it written, I would teare the word. 

luL My eares haue yet not drunk a hundred words 
Of thy tongues vttering, yet I know the found : 
-60 Art thou not Romeo, and a Mountague ? 

Rom. Neither, faire maide, if either thee diflike. 
luL How camd thou hither, tel me, and wherfore ? 
The Orchard walk are high, and hard to climbe j 
64 And the place death, coniidering who thou art. 
If any of my kinfmen find thee here. 

Rom. With loues light wings did I orepearch thefe walls; 
For (lonie limits cannot hold loue out : 
68 And what loue can do, that dares loue attempt 5 
Therefore thy kinfmen are no flop to me. 

luL If they do fee thee, they will murther thee. 
Rom. Alack ! there lies more perill in thine eye, 
72 Then twentie of their fwords : looke thou but fweete. 
And I am proofe againil their enmitie. 

luL I would not for the world they faw thee here. 
Rom. I haue nights cloake to hide me from their eies 5 
76 And, but thou loue me, let them finde me here : 
My life were better ended by their hate. 
Then death proroged, wanting of thy loue. 

lul. By whofe dire6tion foundd thou out this place ? 
80 Rom. By Loues, that firil did prompt me to enquire ; 
He lent me counfell, and I lent him eyes. 
I am no Pylot j yet, wert thou as farre 



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ACT II. sc. 2.] of Romeo and lulieL 31 

As that vail fhore wafht with the farthefl Tea, 
84 I fhould aduenture for fuch marchandife. 

luL Thou knoweft, the mask of night is on my fece j 

£lfe would a maiden blufh bepaint my cheeke^ 

For that which thou hafl heard me fpeake to night. 
88 Faine would I dwell on forme, faine, faine denie 

What I haue fpoke ; but farwell complement ! 

Doft thou loue me ? I know thou wilt fay ' I *, 

And I will take thy word : yet, if thou fwearft, 
92 Thou maifl proue falfe : at loners periuries. 

They fay, loue laughes. Oh, gentle Romeo, 

If thou doft loue, pronounce it faithfully : 

Or if thou thinkft I am too quickly wonne, 
96 He frowne and be peruerfe, and fay thee nay. 

So thou wilt wooe ; but, elfe, not for the world. 

In truth, faire Montague, I am too fond; 

And therefore thou maift think my hauior light ; 
100 But truft me, gentleman, ile proue more true 

Then thofe that haue more cunning to be llrange. 

I fhould haue bene more llrange, I muft confeiie. 

But that thou ouerheardft, ere I was ware, 
104 My true loues paflion : therefore pardon me j 

And not impute this yeelding to light loue, 

Which the darke night hath fo difcouered. 
Rom. Lady, by yonder blefled Moone I vow, 
108 That tips with filuer all thefe frute tree tops, — 

luL O, fwear not by the moone, th*inconftant moone. 

That monethly changes in her circled orbe, 

Leaft that thy loue proue like wife variable. 
iia Rom, What fhall I fweare by? 

luL Do not fweare at all j 

Or, if thou wilt, fweare by thy gracious felfe. 

Which is the god of my Idolalrie, 

And lie beleeue thee. 

Rom, If my hearts deare loue — 

116 luL Well, do not fweare: although I ioy in ihee, 

I haue no ioy of this contrad to night : 



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ACT II. sc. a.] The mojl lamentahle Tragedie 3a 

It is too rafh, too vnaduifd, too fudden j 
Too like the lightning, which doth ceafe to bee, 
lao Ere one can fay, it lightens, j Sweete, goodnight ! 
This bud of loue, by Sommers ripening breath. 
May proue a bewtious floure when next we meete. 
Goodnight, goodnight ! as fweete repofe and reft 
124 Come to thy heart, as that within my brefl ! 
Rom, O, wilt thou leaue me fo, vnfatisfied ? 
luL What fatisfadion canft thou haue to night ? 
Rrni. Th*exchange of thy loues faithful vow for mine. 
128 ltd. I gaue thee mine before thou didft requefl it : 
And yet I would it were to giue againe. 

Rom, Woldft thou withdraw it? for what purpofe, loue? 
luL But to be franke, and giue it thee againe. 
132 And yet I wiih but for the thing I haue : 
My bountie is as boundlefle as the fea. 
My loue as deepe ; the more I giue to thee. 
The more I haue, for both are infinite. 

[Nurfe calls within, 
136 I heare fome noyfe within j deare loue, adue ! — 
Anon, good nurfe ! — Sweete Mountague, be true. 
Stay but a little, I will come againe. lExit. 

Rom. O blefled, blefled night ! I am afeard, 
140 Being in night, all this is but a dreame. 
Too flattering fweete to be fubftantiall. 

{^Re-enter Juliet, above, 
Jul. Three words, deare Romeo, & goodnight indeed. 
If that thy bent of loue be honourable, 
144 Thy purpofe marriage, fend me word to morrow. 
By one that ile procure to come to thee. 
Where, and what time, thou wilt performe the right; 
And all my fortunes at thy foote ile lay, 
148 And follow thee my Lord throughout the world : — 

\_Nurfe within : Madam ! 
I come, anon. — But if thou meanfl not well, 

INurfe wit/un : Madam! 
I do befeech thee — ^By and by, I come. — 



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ACT II. sc. a.] of Romeo and Itdiet. 33 

To ceafe thy fuit, and leaue me to my griefe : 
15* To morrow will I fend. 

Rom. So thriue my foule, — 

Jul. A thoufand times goodnight ! \_Exit. 

Rom. A thoufand times the worfe, to want thy light. — 
Loue goes toward loue, as fchooleboyes from their bookes ; 
I j6 But loue from loue, toward fchoole with heauie lookes. 

[Retiring Jlowly. 

Enter luliet againe. 

Jul. Hift ! Romeo, hift ! — O, for a falkners voyce. 
To lure this Taflel gentle back againe ! 
Bondage is hufht, and may not fpeake aloude 3 
160 Elfe would I teare the Caue where Eccho lies. 

And make her ayrie tongue more hoarfe then [Fame,] 
With repetition of my Romeols name. 
Romeo /] 
164 Rom. It is my foule, that calls vpon my name : 
How filuer fweete found louers tongues by night. 
Like foftefl mulicke to attending eares ! 
Jul. Romeo ! 

Rom. My fweete ? 

Jul. What a clocke to morrow 

168 Shall I fend to thee ? 

Rom. By the houre of nine. 

Jul. I will not faile : tis twentie yeare till then. 
I haue forget why I did call thee backe. 

Rom. Let me (land here till thou remember it. 
172 Jul. I fhall forget, to haue thee ftill Hand there, 
Remembring how I loue thy companie. 

Rom. And He ftill ftay, to haue thee ftill forget. 
Forgetting any other home but this. 
176 Jul. Tis almoft morning j I would haue thee gone : 
And yet no farther then a wantons bird. 
That lets it hop a Htle from his hand. 
Like a poore prifoner in his twifted giues, 
180 And with a filke threed plucks it backe againe, 
c 3 



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ACT II. sc. 3.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 34 

So louing lealous of his libertie. 

Rom, I would I were thy bird. 

Jul. Sweete, fo would I : 

Yet I fhould kill thee with much cheriihing. 
184 Good night, good night ! Parting is fuch fweete forrow. 

That I fhall fay good night, till it be morrow. [Exit. 

Rom, Sleep dwel vpon thine eyes, peace in thy bread ! — 
Would I were fleepe and peace, fo fweet to reft ! 
188 Hence will I to my ghoftly Fathers cell ; 

His helpe to craue, and my deare hap to tell. [Kvit. 

n. 8. Enter Frier Lawrence alone with a basket. 

Fri, L. The grey eyde morne fmiles on the frowning night, 
Checkring the Eafterne Clouds with ftreaks of light j 
And darknelTe flecked like a drunkard reeles 
4 From forth daies pathway made by Tytans wheeles. 
Now, ere the fun aduance his burning eie. 
The day to cheere, and nights dancke dewe to drie, 
I muft vpfill this ofier cage of ours, 
8 With balefull weedes, and precious iuyced flowers. 
The earth, that's natures mother, is her tombej 
What is her burying graue^ that is her wombe : 
And from her wombe children of diuers kinde 

12 We fucking on her naturall bofome finde j 
Many for many vertues excellent, 
None but for fome, and yet all different. 
O, mickle is the powerfull grace that lies 

16 In Plants, hearbes, ftones, and their true quallities: 
For nought fo vile, that on the earth doth line. 
But to the earth fome fpeciall good doth giue j 
Nor ought fo good, but, ftraind from that faire vfe, 

20 Reuolts from true birth, ftumbling on abufe : 
Vertue it felfe tumes vice, being mifapplied. 
And vice fometime's by adion dignified. 
Within the infant rinde of this weake flower 

24 Poyfon hath refidence, and medicine power : 

For this, being fmelt, with that part cheares each part j 



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ACT II. SC. 3.] 



of Romeo and luliet. 



35 



Being tailed, flaies all fences with the hart. 
Two fuch oppofed Kings encamp them ft ill 
28 In man as well as hearbes, grace and rude will ; 
And where the worfer is predominant, 
Full foone the Canker death eates vp that Plant. 

\^Enter Romeo. 
Rom, Goodmorrow, father. 
Fri. L. Benedicite ! 

32 What early tongue fo fweete faluteth me ? — 
Young fonne, it argues a diftemper'd hed, 
So foone to bid goodmorrow to thy bed : 
Care keepes his watch in euery old mans eye, 
^6 And where care lodges, fleepe will neuer lye j 
But where vnbrufed youth with vnftuft braine 
Doth couch his linis, there golden fleepe doth raigne : 
Therefore thy earlinefle doth me aflure 
40 Thou art vproufd with fome diftemprature ; 
Or if not fo, then here I hit it right. 
Our Romeo hath not bene in bed to night. 

Rom, That laft is true j the fweeter reft was mine. 
44 Fri. L. God pardon fin ! waft thou with Rofaime ? 
Rom. With Rofaline, my ghoftly father? no ; 
I haue forgot that name, and that names wo. 

Fri, L. Thats my good fon : but wher haft thou bin then ? 
48 Rom, He tell thee, ere thou aske it me agen. 
I haue bene feafting with mine cnemie ; 
Where, on a fudden, one hath wounded me, 
Thats by me wounded : both our remedies 
5^ Within thy helpe and holy phificke lies : 
I beare no hatred, blefled man j for, loe. 
My interceflion like wife fteads my foe. 

Fri. L. Be plaine, good fonne, and homely in thy drift 
S^ Ridling confellion findes but ridling flirift. 

Rom, Then plainly know, my harts deare loue is fet 
On the faire daughter of rich Capulet : 
As mine on hers, fo hers is fet on mine j 
60 And all combind, faue what thou muft combine 



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ACT II. sc. 3.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 36 

By holy marriage : when, and where, and how. 
We met, we wooed, and made exchange of vow, 
lie tell thee as we pafle; but this I pray, 
64 That thou confent to marrie vs to day. 

Fri. L. Holy S. Frauncis / what a change is here ! 
Is Rofaline, that thou didft loue fo deare. 
So foone forfaken ? young mens loue then lies 
68 Not truly in their hearts, but in their eies. 
lelu Maria ! what a deale of brine 
Hatli wafht thy fallow cheekes for Rofaline ! 
How much fait water throwne away in wafle, 
72 To feafon loue, that of it doth not tarte ! 

The Sun not yet thy (ighes from heauen cleares. 
Thy old grones yet ring in mine auncient eares ; 
Lo, here vpon thy cheeke the ftaine doth fit 
76 Of an old teare that is not wafht off yet : 

If ere thou wall thy felfe, and thefe woes thine. 
Thou and thefe woes were all for Rofaline : 
And art thou changed ? pronounce this fentence then : — 
80 Women may fall, when theres no ftrength in men. 
Rom. Thou chidfl me oft for louing Rofaline. 
Fri. L. For doting, not for louing, pupill mine. 
Rom. And badft me burie loue. 
Fri. L. Not in a graue, 

8^^ To lay one in, an other out to haue. 

Rom. I pray thee, chi% me not : her I loue now. 
Doth grace for grace, and loue for loue allow j 
The other did not fo. 

Fri, L. O, Ihe knew well, 

88 Thy loue did reade by rote, that could not fpell. 
But come, young wauerer, come, go with me. 
In one refpe6t ile thy alliftant be 3 
For this alliance may fo happie proue, 
92 To tume your houftiolds rancor to pure loue. 

Rom. O, let vs hence j I fland on fudden haft. 

Fri. L. Wifely and flow 5 they ftumble that run faft. 

\Exeunt. 



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ACT II. sc. 4.] of Romeo and Itdiet, 37 

TT 4. Enter Benuolio and Mercutio. 

Mer, Where the deule fhould this Romeo be ? — Came hee 
not home to night ? 

Ben> Not to his fathers : I fpoke with his man. 
4 Mer. Why, that fame pale hard hearted wench, that Rofaline, 
Torments him fo, that he will fure run mad. 

Ben. Tibalt, the kinfman to old Capulet, 
Hath fent a leter to his fathers houfe. 
8 Mer, A challenge, on my life. 
Ben. Romeo will anfwere it. 

Mer. Any man, that can write, may anfwere a letter. 
Ben. Nay, he wil anfwere the letters maifter, how he dares, 
I a being dared. 

Mer. Alas, poore Romeo ! he is alreadie dead ! ftabd with a 
white wenches blacke eye ; runne. through the eare with a loue 
fong; the very pinne of his heart cleft with the blinde 
16 bowe-boyes but-fhaft: and is hee a man to encounter Ty- 
balt P 

Ben. Why, what is Tybalt ? 

Mer. More then Prince of Cats, [I can tell you.] Oh, hees 

20 the couragious captain of Complements. He fights as you ling 

prickfong, keeps time, diftance & proportion 5 he refts [me] his 

minum reft, one, two, and the third in your bofome : the very 

butcher of a iilke button, a duellift a duellift ; a gentleman of 

24 the very tirft houfe, of the firft and fecond caufe : ah, the im- 

mortall Paflado ! the Punto reuerfo ! the Hay ! 

Ben. The what ? 

Mer. The Pox of fuch antique, lifping, afFeding fantafticoesj 
28 thefe new tuners of accents ! — ' By lefu, a very good blade ! * — 
* a very tall man ! * — ' a very good whore ! * — Why, is not this a 
lamentable thing, graundfir, that we fhould be thus afflided 
with thefe flraunge flies, thefe fafhion-mongers, thefe pardon- 
32 mees, who ftand fo much on the new forme, that they cannot 
fit at eafe on the old bench ? O, their bones, their bones ! 



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ACT II. sCv 4.] Tke mojl lamentable Tragedie 38 

Enter Romeo. 

Ben, Here comes Romeo, here comes Romeo, 

Mer, Without his Roe, like a dried Hering : — O fleih, fleih, 

36 how art thou fifhified ! — Now is he for the numbers that Petrarch 

flowed in : Laura, to his Lady, was [but] a kitchin wench; — 

marrie, fhe had a better loue to berime her : — Dido, a dowdie 3 

Cleopatra, a Gipfie j Hellen and Hero, hildings and harlots 3 

40 Thisbie, a grey eye or fo, but not to the purpofe. — Signior 

Romeo, Bon iour / theres a French falutation to your French 

flop, you gaue vs the counterfeit fairly laft night. 

Rom. Goodmorrow to you both. What counterfeit did I giue 
44 you? 

Mer, The flip, flr, the flip j can you not conceiue ? 
Rom, Pardon, good Mercuiio,my buflnelFe was great; and in 
fuch a cafe as mine, a man may flraine curtefle. 
48 Mer, Thats as much as to fay, — fuch a cafe as yours conflrains 
a man to bow in the hams. 
Rom, Meaning — to cur fie. 
Mer, Thou haft moft kindly liit it. 
52 Rom, A moft curtuous expofltion. 

Mer, Nay, I am the very pinck of curtefle. 
Rom, Pinck for flower. 
Mer. Right. 
j6 Rom. Why, then is my pump well flowerd. 

Mer, Sure wit : follow me this ieaft now, till thou haft worne 
out tliy pump; that, when the Angle fole of it is worne, the ieaft 
may remaine, after the wearing, foly Angular. 
60 Rom, O Angle folde ieaft, folic fingular for the Anglenefle ! 
Mer, Come betweene vs, good Benuolio, my wits faints. 
Rom, Swits and fpurs, fwits and fpurres; v ile crie a match. 
Mer, Nay, if our wits run the wildgoofe chafe, I am done j 
64 for thou haft more ol the wildgoofe in one of thy wits, then, I 
am fure, I haue in my whole Aue. Was I with you there for the 
goofe? 

Rom, Thou waft neucr with me for any thing, when thou waft 
68 not there for the goofe. 



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ACT II. sc, 4.] of Romeo and luliet. 39 

Mer, I will bite thee by the eare for that ieafl. 
Rom. Nay, good goofe, bite not. 

Mer. Thy wit is a very bitter fweetingj it is a raoft fhaq) fawce. 
y2 Rom. And is it not, then, well feru'd in to a fweete goofe ? 
Mer. Oh, heres a wit of Cheuerell, that ftretches, from an 
ynch narrow, to an ell broad ! 

Rom, I ftretch it out for that word ' broad ' j which, added to 
y6 the goofe, proues thee, farre and wide, a broad goofe. 

Mer. Why, is not this better now then groning for loue? now 

art thou fociable, now art thou Romeo ; now art thou what thou 

art, by art as well as by nature : for this driuehng loue is like a 

80 great naturall, that runs loUing vp and downe to hide his bahle 

in a hole. 

Ben. Stop there, flop there. 

Mer. Thou defireft me to ftop in my tale againft the haire. 
84 Ben. Thou wouldft elfe haue made thy tale large. 

Mer. (), thou art deceiu*d; I would haue made it ihort: for I 
was come to the whole depth of my tale, and meant, indeed, to 
occupie the argument no longer. 
88 Rom. Heeres goodly geare ! 

Enter Nurse and her man, Peter. 

Mer. A iayle, a fayle ! 

Ben. Two, two ; a Ihert, and a fmocke. 

Nur. Peter! 
92 Pet. Anon ? 

Nur. My fan, Peter. 

Mer. Good Peter, to hidej her face j for her fans the fairer face. 

Nur. God ye goodmorrow. Gentlemen. 
Q^ Mer. God ye goodden, faire gentlewoman, 

Nur. Is it good den ? 

Mer. Tis no lelTe, I tell yeej for the bawdie hand of the dyal 
is now vpon the prick of noone. 
ICO ^^^- Out vpon you ! what a man are you ! 

Rom. One, gentlewoman, that God hath made himfelf to mar. 

Nur. By my troth, it is well faidj 'for himfelfe to mar. 



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ACT II. sc. 4.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 



40 



quoth a ? — Gentlemen, can any of you tel me wher I may find 
104 the yong Romeo t 

Rom, I can tell youj but young Romeo will be older when you 
haue found him, then he was when you fought him : I am the 
youngeft of that name, for fault of a worfe. 
io8 Nur. You fay well. 

Mer, Yea, is the worft wel? very wel took, ifaith; wifely, 
wifely. 

Nur, If you be he, fir, I defire fome confidence with you. 
112 Ben, She will endite him to fome fupper. 
Mer, A baud, a baud, a baud ! So ho ! 
Rom, What haft thou found ? 

Mer. No hare, fir ; vnlefle a hare, fir, in a lenten pie, that is 
116 fomething ftale and hoare ere it be fpent. 

[//e walkes by them and sings. 
An old hare hoare, and an old hare hoare. 

Is very good meate in lent : 
But a hare that is hore, is too much for a fcore, 
120 When it hores ere it be fpent. — 

Romeo, will you come to your fathers ? weele to dinner thither. 
Rom. I will follow you. 

Mer, Farewell, auncient Ladyj farewell. Lady, Lady, 
124 Lady. \^Exeunt Mercutio and Benuolio. 

Nur, [Marry, farewell !] — I pray you, fir, what fawcie mer- 
chant was this, that was fo full of his roperie ? 

Rom, A gentleman, Nurfe, that loues to heare himfelfe talke; 
128 and will fpeake more in a minute, then hee will ftand too in a 
moneth. 

Nur, And a fpeake any thing againft me. He take him downe, 
and a were luftier then he is, and twentie fuch lacks ; and if I 
132 cannot, ile finde thofe that fhall. Scuruie knaue! I am none 
of his fiurt gills; I am none of his skaines mates. — And thou muft 
ftand by too, and fuffer euery knaue to vfe me at his plea- 
fure ! 
136 Pet. I faw no man vfe you at his pleafurej if I had, my weapon 
ihuld quickly haue bin out, I warrant you : I dare draw aflbone 



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ACT II. sc. 4 ] of Romeo and luliet. 41 

as an other man^ if I fee occaiion^ in a good quarel, & the law on 

my fide. 

140 Nur, Now, afore God, I am fo vext, that euery part about me 

quiuers. Skuruie knaue! — Pray you, fir, a word: and as I told 

you, my young Lady bid me enquire you out j what (he bid me 

fay, I will keepe to my felfe j but firft let me tell ye, if ye fhould 

144 leade her in a fooles paradife, as they fay, it were a very grofle 

kind of behauior, as they fay: for the Gentlewoman is yong; 

and therefore, if you fhould deale double with her, truly it 

were an ill thing to be oflfred to any Grentlewoman, and very 

148 weake dealing. 

Rom. Nurle, commend me to thy Lady and Miftrefle. [Tell 
her] I proteft — 

Nur. (rood heart ! and, )rfaith, I wil tel her as much : Lord, 
152 Lord, fhe will be a ioyfiill woman. 

Rom. What wilt thou tell her, Nurfe? thou dooeft not marke 
me. 

Nur. I will tell her, fir, that you do proteft j which, as I take 
156 it, is a gentlemanlike offer. 
Rom. Bid her deuife 
Some means to come to ihrift this afternoon j 
And there fhe fhall at Frier Lawrence Cell 
160 Be fhrieued and married. Here is for thy paines. 
Nur. No, truly, fir ; not a penny. 
Rom. Go too J I fay, you fhall. 
Nur. This aftemoone, fir ? well, fhe fhall be there. 
164 Rom. And flay, good Nurfe, behinde the Abbey wall : 
Within this houre my man fhall be with thee. 
And bring thee cordes made like a tackled flayre j 
Which to the high topgallant of my ioy 
168 Mufl be my conuoy in the fecret night. 

Farewell j be truflie, and ile quit thy paines : 
Farewel j commend me to thy Miflreffe. 

Nur. Now God in heauen bleffe thee ! — Harke you, fir. 
173 Rom. What faifl thou, my deare Nurfe ? 

Nur. Is your man fecret ? Did you nere here fay. 
Two may keep counfell, putting one away. 



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ACT II. sc. 5.] The moft lamentable Tragedie 



42 



Rom. [I] warrant thee 5 my mans as true as flecle. 
176 iVttr. Well, lirj my Miftreife is the fweeteft Lady — Lord, 
Lord ! — when twas a litle prating thing — O, there is a Noble 
man in town, one Paris, that would faine lay knife aboord ; but 
fhe, good foule, had as leeue fee a tode, a very tode, as fee him. 
180 I anger her fometimes, and tell her that Paris is the properer 
man j but, ile warrant you, when I fay fo, fhe lookes as pale as 
any clout in the verfall world. Doth not Rofemarie and Romeo 
begin both with a letter ? 
184 Rom, I, Nurfe^ what of that ? both with an R. 

Nur. A, mocker! thats the dogs letter j R. is for the [dog]. — 
No J I know it begins with fome other letter : — and fhe hath 
the pretiefl fententious of it, of you and Rofemarie, that it 
188 would do you good to heare it. 

Rom, Commend me to thy Lady. [£xi/. 

Nur, I, a thoufand times. — Peter ! 

Pet. Anon? 

Nur. Before, and apace. {^Exeunt, 



II. 6. 



Enter luliet. 



Jul. The clocke flrooke nine when I did fend the Nurfe j 

In halfe an houre fhe promif 'd to returne. 

Perchance fhe cannot meete him : — thats not fo. — 
4 Oh, fhe is lame ! loues heraulds fhould be thoughts. 

Which ten times fafler glides then the Suns beames, 

Driuing backe fhadowes ouer lowring hills : 

Therefore do nimble piniond doues draw loue, 
8 And therefore hath the wind fwift Cupid wings. 

Now is the Sun vpon the highmofl hill 

Of this dayes iourney, and from nine till twelue 

Is three long houres j yet fhe is not come. 
12 Had fhe affedtions, and warme youthfiill bloud, 

She would be as fwift in motion as a ball 5 

My words would bandie her to my fweete loue. 

And his to me : 
16 But old folks, many fain as they wer dead; 

Vnwieldie, flowe, heauie and pale as lead. 



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ACT II. sc. 5.] of Romeo and Ivliet. 43 

Enter Nurfe and Peter. 

O God, ihe comes!— 6 hony Nurfe, what newes? 
Haft thou met with him ? fend thy man away. 
20 Nur, Peter, ftay at the gate. [Exit Peter. 

luL Now, good fweete Nurfe, — O Lord, why look*ft thou 
fad? 
Though uewes be fad, yet tell them merily j 
If good, thou iham'ft the muficke of fweete newes 
^4 By playing it to me with fo fower a face. 

Nur, I am a weariej giue me leaue a while. 
Fie, how my bones ake ! what a iaunce haue I [had] ! 
luL I would thou hadft my bones, and I thy newes : 
28 Nay, come, I pray thee, fpeake j — good, good Nurfe, fpeake. 
Nur. lefu, what hafte ! can you not ftay a while ? 
Do you not fee that I am out of breath ? 

luL How art thou out of breath, when thou haft breath 
3^ To fay to me, that thou art out of breath ? 
The excufe, that thou doeft make in this delay. 
Is longer then the tale thou doeft excufe. 
Is thy newes good, or bad ? anfwere to that -, 
^6 Say either, and ile ftay the circumftance ; 
Let me be fatisfied, ift good or bad ? 

Nur, Well, you haue made a fimple choyfe j you know not 
how to chufe a man: Romeo/ no, not hej though his face be bet- 
40 ter then any mans, yet his leg excels all mens j and for a hand, 
and a foote, and a body, though they be not to be talkt on, yet 
they are paft compare : he is not the flower of curtelie, but, ile 
warrant him, as gentle as a lamme. — Go thy wayes, wench j feme 
44 God. — ^What, haue you dinde at home ? 

lul. No, no. But all this did I know before. 
What fayes he of our marriage ? what of that ? 

Nur. Lord, how my head akes ! what a head haue I ! 
48 It beates as it would fall in twentie peeces. 

My back a toiher fide, — a, my backe, my backe ! — 

Beftirewe your heart, for fending me about. 

To catch my death with iaunfing vp and downe ! 



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ACT II. sc. 6.] The mojl lamentable Tragedte 44 

5 2 luL Ifaith, I am forrie that thou art not well. 

Sweete, fweete, fweete Nurfe, tell me, what fayes my loue ? 

Nun Your loue fayes, like an honeft gentleman, and a 
Courteous, and a kinde, and a handfome, and I warrant a 
56 vertuous, — ^Where is your mother ? 

Jul, Where is my mother ? — why, ihe is within j 
Wher ihuld fhe be ? How odiy thou replied ! 
' Your loue fayes, like an honeft gentleman, — 
60 Where is your mother ? ' 

Nur. O, Gods lady deare ! 

Are you fo hot ? marrie, come vp, I trow j 
Is this the poultis for my aking bones ? 
Henceforward do your meflages your felfe. 
64 Jul, Heres fuch a coyle ! — come, what faies Romeo ? 
Nur, Haue you got leaue to go to {hrift to day ? 
lul, I haue. 

Nur. Then high you hence to Frier Lcuvrence Cell j 
68 There ftayes a husband to make you a wife : 

Now comes the wanton bloud vp in your cheekes, 
Theile be in fcarlet ftraight at any newes. 
Hie you to Church ; I muft an other way, 
72 To fetch a Ladder, by the which your loue 

Muft climbe a birds neaft foone, when it is darke 
I am the drudge, and toyle in your delight j 
But you ftiall beare the burthen foone at night. 
76 Go, ile to dinner j hie you to the Cell. 

Jul, Hie to high fortune ! — honeft Nurfe, fareweU. 

[Exeunt. 

n. 6. Enter Frier Lawrence and Romeo. 

Fri. L. So fmile the heauens vpon this holy ad. 
That after houres with forrow chide vs not ! 

Rom. Amen, amen ! but come what forrow can, 
4 It cannot counteruaile the exchange of ioy 
That one ftiort minute giues me in her fight : 
Do thou but clofe our hands with holy words. 
Then loue-deuouring death do what he dare. 



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ACT 111. sc. I.] of Romeo and luliet. 45 

8 It is inough I may but call her mine. 

Fri, L, Thefe violent delights haue violent endes, 
Aiyl in their triumph die : like fier and powder. 
Which, as they kifle, confume. The fweeteft honey 
12 Is loatlifome in his owne delicioufnefle. 
And in the tafte confoundes the appetite : 
Therefore loue moderately j long loue doth fo j 
Too fwift arriues as tardie as too Howe. 

[Enter luliet. 
16 Here comes the Lady : — Oh, fo light a foote 
Will nere weare out the euerlafting flint. 
A louer may beftride the goflamours 
That ydeles in the wanton fommer ayre, 
ao And yet not fall j fo light is vanitie. 

luL Good euen to my ghoftly confeflbr. 
Fri, L. Romeo ihall thanke thee, daughter, for vs both. 
luL As much to him, elfe is his thankes too much. 
24 Rom, Ah, luliet. If the meafure of thy ioy 
Be heapt like mine, and that thy skill be more 
To blafon it, then fweeten with thy breath 
This neighbour ayre, and let rich muiickes tongue 
28 Vnfold the imagind happines that both 
Receiue in either, by this deare encounter. 

ltd. Conceit, more rich in matter then in words. 
Brags of his fubftance, not of ornament : 
32 They are but beggers that can count their worth j 
But my true loue is growne to fuch excefle, 
I cannot fum vp fum of halfe my wealth. 

Fri, L. Come, come with me, and we will make (hort 
^6 For, by your leaues, you fhall not flay alone, (worke j 

Till holy Church incorporate two in one. 

[Exeunt. 
HL L Enter Mercutio, Benuolio, Pctge, and men, 

Ben. I pray thee, good Mercutio, lets retire j 
The day is hot, the Capulets abroad. 
And, if we meete, we fhall not fcape a brawle 5 



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ACT III. sc. 1.] The moft lamentable Tragedie 46 

4 For now, thefe hot daies, is the mad blood ftirring. 

Mer. Thou art Hke one of thefe fellowes, that when he enters 

the confines of a Tauerne, claps me his fword vpon the table, 

and fayes, ' God fend me no need of thee ! ' and, by the opera- 

8 tion of the fecond cup, draws him on the drawer, when, indeed, 

there is no need. 

Ben, Am I like fuch a fellow ? 

Mer, Come, come, thou art as hot a lacke in thy moode, as 
12 any in /to/ie; and alToone moued to be moodie, and aflbone 
moodie to be mo\ied. 
Ben. And what too? 

Aler, Nay, and there were two fuch, we fhould haue none 

16 fhortly, for one would kill the other. Thou! why thou wilt 

quarell with a man that hath a haire more, or a haire lelTe, in his 

beard, then thou haft : thou wilt quarell with a man for cracking 

Nuts, hauing no other reafon, but becaufe thou haft hafel eyes ; 

20 what eye, but fuch an eye, wold fpie out fuch a quarrel ? Thy 

head is as full of quarelles, as an egge is full of meate^ and yet 

thy head hath bene beaten as addle as an egge, for quarell ing : 

thou haft quareld with a man for cofting in the ftreete, becaufe 

^4 hee hath wakened thy dogge that hath laiue afleep in the fun. 

Didft thou not fall out with a taylor for wearing his new 

doublet before Eafter ? with an other, for tying his new ihooes 

with olde riband ? and yet thou wilt tuter me from quarelling ! 

28 Ben, And I were fo apt to quarell as thou art, any man (hould 

buy the fee-fimple of my life for an houre and a quarter. 

Mer, The fee-fimple ? dfimple! 

Enter Tybalt, Petruchio, and others. 

Ben, By my head ! here comes the Capulets, 
32 Mer, By my heele, I care not. 

Tyb. Follow me clofe, for I will fpeake to them. — 
Gentlemen, Good den : a word with one of you. 

Mer, And but one word with one of vs? couple it with 
^6 fomething ; make it a word and a blowe. 

Tib, You ihall find me apt inough to that, fir, and you wil giue 
me occafiou. 



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ACT III 



SC. I.] 



of Romeo and Juliet, 



47 



Mer. Could you not take fome occadon without giuing r 
40 Tyb, Mercutio, thou confortefl with Romeo, — 

Mer. Conlbrt ! what, doeft thou make vs Minftrels ? and thou 
make Minftrels of vs, looke to hear nothing but difcords : heeres 
my fiddlefticke j heeres that (hall make you daunce. Zounds, 
44 con fort ! 

Ben. We talke here in the publike haunt of men : 
Either withdraw vnto fome priuate place, 
Or reafon coldly of your greeuanccs : 
48 Or elfe depart ; here all eyes gaze on vs. 

Mer. Mens eyes were made to looke, and let them gaze ; 
I will not budge for no mans pleafure, I. 

Enter Romeo. 

Tyb. Well, peace be with you, fir : here comes my man. 
52 Aler. But ile be hangd, fir, if he weare your liuerie : 
Marrie, go before to field, heele be your follower j 
Your worihip, in that fenfe, may call him — man. 
Tyb. Romeo, the loue I beare thee, can affoord 
56 No better terme then this : — thou art a villaine. 

Rom. Tybalt, the reafon that I haue to loue thee. 
Doth much excufe the appertaining rage 
To fuch a greeting : — villaine am I none ; 
60 Therefore, farewell ; I fee thou know'fl me not. 
Tyb. Boy, this fhall not excufe the iniuries 
That thou hafl done me j therefore turne and draw. 
Rom. I do protefl, I neuer iniur'd thee ; 
64 But loue thee better then thou canfl deuife 
Till thou fhalt know the reafon of my loue : 
And fo, good Capulet, — which name I tender 
As dearely as mine owne, — be fatisfied. 
68 Mer. O calme, difhonourable, vile fubmillion! 

Alla^fioccata carries it away. \^Drmvs, 

Tibalt, you ratcatcher, will you walke ? 
Tib. What wouldfl thou haue with me ? 
72 Mer. Good King of Cats, nothing but one of your nine lines, 
that I meane to make bold withall, and, as you fhall vfe mee 



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ACT III. sc. I.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 48 

hereafter, drie beate the reft of the eight. Will you plucke your 
fword out of his pilcher by the eares ? make hade, leaft mine be 
76 about your eares ere it be out. 

Tib. I am for you. {^Drawing. 

Rom, Gentle Mercutio, put thy Rapier vp. 
Mer, Come, fir, your Paflado. [They Jight, 

80 Rom, Draw, Benuolio ; beate downe their weapons: — \ 
Gentlemen, for fhame forbeare this outrage ! — 
Tibalt, — Mercutio, — the Prince exprefly hath 
Forbid this bandying in Verona flreetes : — 
84 Hold, Tybalt/ good Mercutio/ 

[Tibalt vnder Romeos arme thr,ujls Mercutio in, 
andfiyes with his followers. 
Mer. I am hurt j — 

A plague a both [your] houfes ! — I am fped : — 
Is he gone, and hath nothing ? 

Ben, What, art thou hurt ? 

Mer, I, I, a fcratch, a fcratch j niarrie, tis inough. — 
88 Where is my Page ? — go, villaine, fetch a Surgion. 

[Exit Page, 
Rom, Courage, man ; the hurt cannot be much. 
Mer, No, tis not fo deepe as a well, nor fo wide as a Church 
doore j but tis inough, twill feme : aske for me to morrow, and 
92 you fhall finde me a graue man. I am peppered, I warrant, 
for this world : — a plague a boih your houfes ! — founds, a dog, 
a rat, a moufe, a cat, to fcratch a man to death ! a braggart, a 
rogue, a villaine, that fights by the book of arithmatick ! — Why, 
96 the deule, came you betweene vs ? I was hurt vnder your arme. 
Rom, I thought all for the bed. 
Mer, Helpe me into fome houfe, BenUoHo, 
Or I (hall faint. — A plague a both your houfes ! 
100 They haue made wormes meate of me : 
I haue it, and foundly too : — ^your houfes ! 

[Exeunt Mercutio and Benuolio. 
Rom, This Gentleman, the Princes neare alie. 
My very friend, hath got this mortall hurt 
104 In my behalfe^ my reputation llaiud 



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ACT III. sc. I.] of Romeo and luliet, 49 

With Tybalts flaunder,— 7y W^ that an houre 
Hath bene my Cozen : — O fweele luliet. 
Thy bewtie hath made me effeminate, 
108 And in my temper foftned valours fteele. 

Re-enter Benuolio. 

Ben. O Romeo, Romeo, braue Mercutio 's dead * 
That gallant fpirit hath afpir'd the Clowdes, 
Which too vntimely here did fcorne the earth. 
112 Rom. This dayes blacke fate on mo daies doth depend ; 
This but begins the wo, others mud end. 

[Re-enter Tybalt. 
Ben, Here comes the furious Tybalt backe againe. 
Rom, Aliue, in triumph ! and Mercutio ilaine ! 
1 16 Away to heauen, refpediue lenitie. 

And fier-eyed furie be my condud now !— 
Now, T)/balt, take the ' villaine * backe againe. 
That late thou gau'fl mej for Mercutios foule 
120 Is but a little way aboue our heads. 

Staying for thine to keepe him companie : 
Either thou, or I, or both, mufl go with him. 

Tyb, Thou, wretched boy, that didft confort him here, 
124 Shalt with him hence. 

Rom. This (hall determine that 

[They Fight, T\h2lifalles. 
Ben, Romeo, away, be gone ! 
The Citizens are vp, and Tybalt (laine : — 
Stand not amazed : — the Prince wil doome thee death, 
128 If thou art taken : — hence ! — be gone ! — away ! 
Rom, O ! I am fortunes foole ! 
Ben, Why doft thou (lay ? 

[Exit Romeo. 
Enter Citizens. 

I Cit, Which way ran he that kild Mercutio ? 
Tybalt, that mutherer, which way ran he ? 
132 Ben, There lies that Tybalt. 

c 4 



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ACT III. sc. I.] The mqft lamentable Tragedie 50 

I Cit. Vp, fir, go with me; 

I charge thee in the Princes name, obey. 

Enter Prince, olde Mountague, Capulet, 
tkeir wiues, and all. 

Prin. Where are the vile beginners of this fray ? 
Ben. O Noble Prince, I can difcouer all 
136 The vnluckie mannage of this fatall brail : 

There lies the man, flaine by young Romeo, 

That flew thy kinfman, braue Mercutio. 

Lady C. Tybalt, my Cozin ! O my brothers child ! — 
140 O Prince ! O husband ! O, the bloud is fpild 

Of my deare kinfman ! — Prince, as thou art true. 

For bloud of ours, fliead bloud of Mountague. — 

O Cozin, Cozin ! 
144 Prin. Benuolio, who began this bloudie fray ? 

Ben. Tybalt, here flain, whom Romeos hand did flayj 

Romeo that fpoke him faire, bid him bethinke 

How nice the quarell was, and vrgd withall 
148 Your high difpleafure : — all this — vttered 

With gentle breath, calm look, knees humbly bow'd, — 

Could not take truce with the vnruly fpleene 

Of Tybalt deafe to peace, but that he tilts 
Ij2 With piercing fleele at bold Mercutios bread j 

Who, all as hot, turnes deadly poynt to poynt. 

And, with a Martiall fcorne, with one hand beates 

Cold death afide, and with the other fends 
I j6 It backe to Tybalt, whofe dexteritie 

Retorts it : Romeo he cries aloud, 

' Hold, friends ! friends, part ! ' and, fwifter then his tongue. 

His agile arme beates downe their fatall poynts, 
160 And twixt them rufliesj vnderneath whofe arme 

An enuious thruft from Tybalt hit the life 

Of (lout Mercutio, and then Tybalt fled : 

But by and by comes backe to Romeo, 
164 Who had but newly entertaind reuenge. 

And toote they go like lightning : for, ere I 



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ACT HI. sc. 2.] of Romeo and luUet, 51 

Could draw to part them, was (lout Tybalt flaine ; 

And, as he fell, did Romeo turne and flie : 
168 This is the truth, or let Benuolio die. 

Lady C, He is a kinfman to the Mountague, 

AfFedion makes him falfe, he fpeakes not true : 

Some twentie of them fought in this blacke (Irife, 
172 And all thofe twentie could but kill one life. 

I beg for luftice, which thou. Prince, muft giue j 

Romeo flew Tybalt, Romeo muft not line. 
Prin, Romeo flew him, he flew Mercutio; 
ij6 Who now the price of his deare bloud doth owe? 

Mount. Not Romeo, Prince, he was Mercutios friend j 

His fault concludes but what the law fliould end. 

The life of Tybalt. 

Prin. And for that offence, 

180 Immediately we do exile him hence : 

I haue an intereft in your hates proceeding. 

My bloud for your rude brawles doth lie a bleeding ; 

But ile amerce you with fo fh*ong a fine, 
184 That you fhall all repent the lofle of mine : 

I will be deafe to pleading and excufes; 

Nor teares, nor prayers, fliall purchafe out abufes. 

Therefore vfe none : let Romeo hence in haft, 
188 Elfe, when he 's found, that houre is his laft. 

Beare hence this body, and attend our will : 

Mercie but murders, pardoning thofe that kill. 

[^Exeunt. 

III. 2. Enter luliet alone. 

Gallop apace, you fierie footed fteedes. 
Towards Phoebus lodging : fuch a wagoner 
As Phaeton would whip you to the weft, 

4 And bring in clowdie night immediately. — 
Spread thy clofe curtaine, loue-performing night, 
That runnawayes eyes may wincke, and Romeo 
Leape to thefe armes, vntalkt of and vnfeeue. — 

8 Louers can fee to do their amorous rights. 



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ACT III. sc. 2.] The mojl lamentalle Tragedie ' 52 

By their owne bewties ; or, if loue be blind. 

It beft agrees with night. — Come, ciuill night. 

Thou fober futed matron, all in blacke, 
12 And leame me how to loofe a winning match, 

Plaide for a paire of ftainlefle maydenhoods : 

Hood my vnmand bloud bayting in my cheekes. 

With thy blacke mantle 5 till ftrange loue, grown bold, 
16 Thinke true loue a6ted, fimple modeftie. 

Come, night ! — Come, Romeo / come, thou day in night ! 

For thou wilt lie vpon the winges of night 

Whiter then new fnow on a Rauens backe. — 
ao Come, gentle night 5 come, louing, black browd night, 

Giue me my Romeo ; and, when he fhall die. 

Take him and cut him out in Httle flarres. 

And he will make the face of heauen fo fine, 
24 That all the world will be in loue with night. 

And pay no worfliip to the garifh Sun. — 

O, I haue bought the manfion of a loue. 

But not polTefl it 3 and though I am fold, 
28 Not yet enioyd : fo tedious is this day. 

As is the night before fome fediuall 

To an impatient child, that hath new robes 

And may not weare them. O, here comes my Nurfe, 
3* And fhe brings newesj and euery tongue, that fpeaks 

But Romeos name, fpeakes heauenly eloquence. — 

« 

Enter Nurfe, with cords. 

Now, Nurfe, what newes ? what, haft thou there the cords 
That R<meo bid thee fetch ? 

Nur, I, I, the cords. 

[Throws them down. 
^6 luL Ay me ! what news ? why doft thou wring thy hands ? 
Nur. A, weladay ! hees dead, hees dead, hees dead ! 
We are vndone. Lady, we are vndone ! — 
Alack the day ! — hees gone, hees kild, hees dead ! 
40 Jul. Can heauen be fo enuious ? 

Nur, Romeo can. 



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ACT HI. sc. 2.] of Romeo and luUet, 53 

Though heauen cannot. — O Romeo, Romeo t — 

Who euer would haue thought it ? — Romeo / 

luL What diuell art thou, that doft torment me thus i 
44 This torture Ihould be rored in difmall hell ! 

Hath Romeo llaine himfelfe ? fay thou but ' 1/ 

And that bare vowell ' I * fhall poyfon more 

Then the death darting eye of Cockatrice : 
48 I am not I, if there be fuch an '1/ 

Or thofe eyes (hut, that makes thee anfwere * I ' : 

If he be flaine, fay * I * j or if not, ' no ' : 

Briefe founds determine [of] my weale or wo. 
5* Nur. I faw the wound, I faw it with mine eyes, — 

Grod faue the marke ! — here on his manly breft : 

A piteous coarfe, a bloudie piteous coarfej 

Pale, pale as afhes, all bedawbde in bloud, 
5^ All in goare bloud : — I founded at the light. 

lul. O break, my hart ! — poore banckrout, break at once ' 

To prifon, eyes ! nere looke on libertie ! 

Vile earth, to earth refigne ; end motion here -, 
60 And thou, and Romeo, prefle one heauie beare ! 
Nur, O Tybalt, Tybalt, the beft friend I had ! 

O curteous Tybalt / honeft Cxentleman ! 

That euer I (hould line to fee thee dead ! 
64 luL What (lorme is this that blowes fo contrarie ? 

Is Romeo flaughtred ? and is Tybalt dead ? 

My deareft Cozen, and my dearer Lord ? — 

Then, dreadfull Trumpet, found the generall doome ! 
68 For who is lining, if thofe two are gone ? 

Nur. Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banifhed ; 

Romeo, that kild him, he is banifhed. 

Jul. O God ! — did Romeos hand Ihead Tibalts bloud ? 
72 Nur. It did, it did -, alas the day ! it did. 

Jul. O ferpent heart, hid with a flowring face ! 

Did euer draggon keepe fo faire a Caue ? 

Bewtifull tirant ! fiend augelicall ! 
j6 Douefeatherd rauen ! woluifh rauening lamb ! 

Defpifed fubfbnce of diuinefl fhowe ! 



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ACT HI. sc. 2.] The mqft lament alle Tragedie 54 

lull oppofite to what thou iuflly feem'ft, 
A damned faint, an honourable villaine ! — 
80 O nature ! what hadft thou to do in hell. 
When thou didft bower the fpirit of a fiend 
In mortall paradife of fuch fweete flelh ? — 
Was euer booke containing fuch vile matter 
84 So fairely bound ? — 6, that deceit fhould dwell 
In fuch a gorgious Pallace ! 

Nur. Theres no truft. 

No faith, no honeftie in men 5 all naught, 
AH periurde, all diffemblers, all forfwome. — 
88 Ah, wheres my man ? giue me fome Aqua-vitae : — 
Thefe griefs, thefe woes, thefe forrows make me old. 
Shame come to Romeo / 

Jul. Blifterd be thy tongue 

For fuch a wiih ! he was not borne to fharae : 
92 Vpon his brow fhame is afham'd to fit j 

For tis a throane where honour may be crownd 
Sole Monarch of the vniuerfal earth. 
O, what a bead was I to chide at him ! 
96 Nur. Wil you fpeak wel of him that kild your cozin ^ 
Jul, Shall I fpeake ill of him that is my husband ? 
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue Ihal fmooth thy name. 
When I, thy three houres wife, haue mangled it ? — 
100 But wherefore, villaine, didft thou kill my Cozin ? 
That villaine Cozin would haue kild my husband : 
Backe, foolifh teares, backe to your natiue fpring j 
Your tributarie drops belong to woe, 
104 Which you, miftaking, offer vp to ioy. 

My husband Hues, that Tybalt would haue ilaine -, 
And Tybalts dead, that would haue flain my husband : 
All this is comfort 5 wherefore wcepe I then ? 
108 Some word there was, worfer then Tybalts death. 
That murdred me : I would forget it faine > 
But, oh ! it preflTes to ray memorie. 
Like damned guiltie deeds to finners mindes : 
112 ' Tybalt is dead, and Romeo banilhed ; ' 



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ACT III. sc. 3.] of Romeo and luliet, 55 

That ' banifhed/ that one word * banifhed/ 

Hath flaine ten thoufand Tybalts. Tybalts death 

Was woe i nought if it had ended there : 
116 Or, if fower woe delights in fellowfhip 

And needly will be ranckt with other griefes. 

Why followed not, when fhe faid ' Tybalts dead/ 

Thy father, or thy mother, nay, or both, 
120 Which modeme lamentation might haue mou'd? 

But, with a reareward following Tybalts death, 

' Romeo is baniflied,* to fpeake that word. 

Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, luliet, 
1*4 All flaine, all dead : — ' Romeo is banifhed,* — 

There is no end, no limit, meafure, bound. 

In that words death j no words can that woe found. — 

Where is my father, and my mother, Nurfe ? 
128 Nur, Weeping and way ling ouer Tybalts coarfe: 

Will you go to them ? I will bring you thither. 

lul. Wafh they his wounds with teares : mine fliall be 

When theirs are drie, for Romeos banifhment. (fpent, 

132 Take vp thofe cordes : — poore ropes, you are beguilde. 

Both you and I ; for Romeo is exilde : 

He made you for a highway to my bed j 

But I, a maide, die maiden widowed. 
136 Come, cordes J come, Nurfe; ile to my wedding bed; 

And death, not Romeo, take my maiden head ! 
Nur. Hie to your chamber : Ile finde Romeo 

To comfort you : — I wot well where he is. 
140 Harke ye, your Romeo will be here at night; 

He to him ; he is hid at Lawrence Cell. 

ful. O find him ! giue this ring to my true Knight, 

And bid him come to take his lad farewell 

lExeunt, 
m.S. Enter Frier Lawrence and Romeo. 

Pri. L. Romeo, come forth ; come forth, thou fearefiiU man ; 
Afflidtion is enamourd of thy parts. 
And thou art wedded to calamitie. 
4 Rom. Father, what newes ? what is the Princes doome } 



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ACT III. sc. 3.] The moft lamentable Tragedie 56 

What foxTOw craues acquaintance at my hand^ 

That I yet know not ? 

Fri, L. Too familiar 

Is my deare fonne with fuch fowre companie : 
8 I bring thee tidings of the Princes doome. 

Rom, What leffe then doomesday is the Princes doome ? 
Fri. L. A gentler ludgement vaniflit from his lips. 

Not bodies death, but bodies banifhment. 
12 Rom, Ha! banifhment? be merciful!, fay 'death* 5 

For exile hath more terror in his looke. 

Much more, then death : do not fay ' banifhment.' 
Fri, L, Here from Ferona art thou banifhed : 
16 Be patient, for the world is broad and wide. 

Rom. There is no world without Verona walls. 

But purgatorie, torture, hell it felfe. 

Hence banifhed is banifht from the world, 
*o And worlds exile is death : — then ' banifhed,* 

Is death miflermd : calling death ' banifhed,' 

Thou cutfl my head off with a golden axe. 

And fmil'fl vpon the flroke that murders me. 
24 Fri, L, O deadly fin ! 6 rude vnthankfriines ! 

Thy fault our law calk death 5 but the kind Prince, 

Taking thy part, hath rufht afide the law. 

And tumd that blacke word death to banifhment : 
28 This is deare mercie, and thou feefl it not. 

Rom, Tis torture, and not mercie : heauen is here, 

Where luliet lines j and euery cat, and dog. 

And litle moufe, euery vnworthy thing, 
32 Line here in heauen, and may looke on her. 

But Romeo may not. — More validitie. 

More honourable flate, more courtfhip Hues 

In carrion flies, then Romeo : they may feaze 
36 On the white wonder of deare Iidiels hand. 

And fleale immortall blefling from her lipsj— 

Who, euen in pure and veflall modeflie. 

Still blufli, as thinking their owne kifTes fin j — 
40 But Romeo may not 5 he is banifhed : 



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ACT III. sc. 3.] of Romeo and luliet. 57 

This may fiyes do, when I from this mud flie ; 
They are freemen, but I am banifhed : 
And fay 'ft thou yet, that exile is not death ? 
44 Hadft thou no poyfon mixt, no ftiarpe ground knife. 
No fudden meane of death, though nere fo meane. 
But ' banifhed * to kill me ?— ' Baniftied * ? 
O Frier, the damned vfe that word in hell 5 
4B Howling attends it : how haft thou the heart. 
Being a Diuine, a ghoftly Confeflbr, 
A fin abfoluer, and my friend profeft. 
To mangle me with that word ' baniftied * ? 
32 Fri. L, Thou fond mad man, heare me a little fpeake. 
Roim. O, thou wilt fpeake againe of baniftiment. 
Fr%, L, He giue thee armour to keepe oft" that word ; 
Aduerfities fweete milke, Philofophie, 
56 To comfort thee, though thou art baniftied. 

Rom. Yet ' baniftied ' ? — ^hang vp philofophie ! 
Vnlefle Philofophie can make a luliet, 
Difplant a towne, reuerfe a Princes doome, 
60 It helpes not, it preuailes not : talke no more. 

Fri. L, O, then I fee, that mad men haue no eares. 
Rom. How ftiould they, when that wife men haue no eyes ? 
Fri, L. Let me difpute with thee of thy eftate. 
64 Rom, Thou canft not fpeak of that thou doft not iedt : 
Wert thou as young as 1, luliet thy loue. 
An houre but married, Tybalt murdered 
Doting hke me, and like me baniftied, 
68 Then mightft thou fpeake, then mighlft thou teare thy hayre. 
And fall vpon the ground, as I do now. 
Taking the meafure of an vnmade graue. 

[Knocking tviihin. 
Fri, L, Arife j one knocks, good Romeo, hide thy felfe. 
72 Rom, Not I J vnlefte the breath of hartftcke grones, 
Myft-like, infold me from the fearch of eyes. 

[^Knocking, 
Fri, I,, Hark, how they knock ! — ^Whofe there? — Romeo, 
arife j 



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ACT III. sc. 3.] The moji lamentable Tragedie j8 

Thou wilt be taken. — Stay a while ! — Stand vp ; 

[^Knocking, 
76 Run to my ftudie. — By and by ! — Gods will ! 
What fimplenes is this ! — I come, I come ! 

[^Knocking. 
Who knocks fo hard ? whence come you ? whats your will ? 
I^ur, [If^Uhin,'] Let me come in, and you fhal know my 
errant; 
80 I come from Lady luliet, 

Fri. L. Welcome then. 

Enter Nurfs. 

Nur. O holy Frier, O, tell me, holy Frier, 
Where is my Ladyes Lord ? wheres Romeo ? 

Fri, L, There on the ground, with his owne teares made 
drunke. 
84 Nur, O, he is euen in my miftrefle cafe, 
lull in her cafe ! O wofuU fimpathy ! 
Pitious prediccament ! euen fo lies Ihe, 
Blubbring and weeping, weeping and blubbring.— 
88 Stand vp, Hand vp 5 ftand, and you be a man : 
For luliets fake, for her fake, rife and ftand j 
Why (hould you fall into fo deepe an O ? 
Rom, Nurfe! 
92 Nur. Ah fir ! ah fir !— [Well,] deaths the end of all. 
Rom, Spak'ft thou of luliet ? how is it with her ? 
Doth not fhe thinke me an old murtherer. 
Now I haue ftaind the childhood of our ioy 
96 With bloud remou'd but little from her owne ? 
Where is (he ? and how doth {he ? and what fayes 
My conceald Lady to our canceld loue ? 

Nur, Oh, (he fayes nothing, fir, but weeps and weeps ; 
100 And now faUs on her bed ; and then ftarts vp. 
And Tybalt calls ; and then on Romeo cries. 
And then downe falls agaiue. 

Rom. As if that name. 

Shot from the deadly leudl of a gun. 



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ACT III. sc. 3.] of Romeo and luliet, 59 

104 Did murther her; as that names curfed hand 

Murderd her kinfman. — Oh, tell me. Frier, tell me. 

In what vile part of this Anatomie 

Doth my name lodge ? Tell me, that I may facke 
108 The hatefuU manfion. [Drawing his /word. 

Fru L, Hold thy defperate hand : 

Art thou a man ? thy forme cries out thou art : 

Thy teares are womaniih 5 thy wild a^ denote 

The vnreafonable fiirie of a beaft : 
'^* Vnfeemely woman, in a feeming man ! 

And ilbefeeming bead, in feeming both ! 

Thou haft amaz*d me. By my holy order, 

I thought thy difpofition better temperd. 
116 Haft thou flaine Tyhcdt ? wilt thou fley thy felfe f 

And fley thy Lady, that in thy life lines. 

By doing damned hate vpon thy felfe ? 

Why rayl'ft thou on thy birth, the heauen, and earth ? 
120 Since birth, and heauen, and earth, all three do meet 

In thee at once, which thou at once wouldft loofe. 

Fie, fie ! thou ftiam*ft thy ftiape, thy loue, thy wit ; 

Which, like a Vfurer, aboundft in all, 
124 And vfeft none in that true vfe indeed 

Which ftiould bedecke thy ftiape, thy loue, thy wit : 

Thy Noble ftiape is but a forme of waxe, 

Digrefling from the valour of a man 5 
128 Thy deare loue fwome, but hollow periurie. 

Killing that loue which thou haft vowd to cherifti ; 

Thy wit, that ornament to ftiape and loue, 

Miftiapen in the condud of them both, 
132 Like powder in a skiUefte fouldiers ftaske. 

Is fet a fier by thine owne ignorance. 

And thou difmembred with thine owne defence. 

What, rowfe thee, man ! thy luliet is aliue, 
136 For whofe deare fake thou waft but lately dead ; 

There art thou happie : Tybalt would kill thee. 

But thou fleweft Tibalt ; there art thou happie : 

The law, that threatned death, becomes thy friend. 



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ACT III. sc, 3.] The mofi lamentable Tragedie 60 

140 And turnes it to exile 5 there art thou happie ; 
A packe of bleflings light vpon thy backe ; 
Happines courts thee in her heft array j 
But, like a mifbehau'd and fullen wench, 
144 Thou poutd vpon thy fortune and thy loue. 
Take heede, take heede, for fuch die miferable. 
Go, get thee to thy loue, as was decreed, 
Afcend her chamber, hence and comfort her : 
148 But looke thou Hay not till the watch be fet. 
For then thou canft not pafle to Mantua ; 
Where thou (halt line till we can find a time 
To blaze your marriage, reconcile your friends, 
15* Beg pardon of the Prince, and call thee backe 
With twentie hundred thoufand times more ioy 
Then thou wentft forth in lamentation. — 
Go before, Nurfe : commend me to thy Lady 5 
^5^ And bid her haften all the houfe to bed. 
Which heauie forrow makes them apt vnto : 
Romeo is comming. 

Nur. O Lord, I could haue ftaid here all the night, 
160 To heare good counfell : oh, what learning is ! — 
My Lord, ile tell my Lady you will come. 

Rom, Do fo, and bid my fweete prepare to chide. 
Nur. Here, fir, a Ring fhe bid me giue you, fir : 
164 Hie you, make haft, for it growes very late. lErit. 

Rom. How well my comfort is reuiu'd by this. 
FrL L. Go hence : goodnight -, & here ftands al your ftate : — 
Either be gone before the watch be fet, 
168 Or by the breake of day difguis'd from hence : 
Soioume in Mantua; ile find out your man. 
And he (hall fignifie, fipom time to time, 
Euery good hap to you, that chaunces here : 
17* Giue me thy hand; tis late: farewell j goodnight. 
Rom. But that a ioy paft ioy calls out on me. 
It were a griefe, fo briefe to part with thee : 
Farewell. lExeunt. 



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ACT III. sc. 4.] of Romeo and luliet. 61 

III.4. Enter old Capulet, his wife, and Paris. 

Cap. Things haue falne out, fir, fo vnluckilj. 
That we haue had no time to moue our daughter : 
Looke you, fhe lou d her kinfman 1)/bali dearely, 
4 And fo did I. — ^Well, we were borne to die. — 
Tis very late j (heele not come downe to night : 
I promife you, but for your companie, 
I would haue bene a bed an houre ago. 
8 Par. Thefe times of wo afFoord no times to wooe : 
Madam, goodnight : commend me to your daughter. 

Lady C, I will, and know her mind early to morrow ; 
To night fhees mew'd vp to her heauines. 
12 Cap. Sir Paris, I will make a defperate tender 
Of my childes loue : I thinke (he will be rulde 
In all refpe6b by me j nay more, I doubt it not. 
Wife, go you to her ere you go to bed j 
16 Acquaint her here of my fonne Paris loue -, 

And bid her, marke you me, on wendfday next — 
But, foft ; what day is this ? 

Par, Monday, my Lord. . 

Cap. Monday— ha— ha— Well, wendfday is too foonej 
ao A thurfday let it be :— a thurfday, tell her. 
She (hall be married to this noble Earle :— 
Will you be ready ? do you like this hafte ? 
Weele keepe no great ado :— a friend, or two : — 
a4 For, harke you, Tybalt being flaine fo late. 
It may be thought we held him carelefly. 
Being our kinfman, if we reuell much : 
Therefore weele haue fome halfe a doozen friends, 
28 And there an end. But what fay you to Thurfday ? 

Par. My Lord, I would that thurfday were to morrow. 
Cap. Well, get you gone :— a Thurfday be it then :— 
Go you to luliet, ere you go to bed, 
3a Prepare her, wife, againll this wedding day.— 
Farewell, my Lord.— Light to my chamber, ho » 
Afore mee, it is fo very, [very] late. 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] The moji lamentable Tragedie 62 

That wee may call it early by and by : 
3^ Goodnight. lEreunt. 

ni. 6. Enter Romeo and luliet ahj}, 

Jul, Wilt thou be gone ? It is not yet neare day : 

It was the Nightingale^ and not the Larke, 

That pierft the fearefiill hollow of thine eare j 
4 Nightly (he fings on yond Pomgranet tree : 

Beleeue me, loue, it was the Nightingale. 

Rom, -It was the Larke, the herauld of the morne. 

No Nightingale : looke, loue, what enuious llreakes 
8 Do lace the feuering cloudes in yonder Eaft : 

Nights candles are burnt out, and iocand day 

Stands tipto on the myilie Mountaine tops : 

I mufl be gone and Hue, or (lay and die. 
I a lul. Yond light is not daylight, I know it, I : 

It is fome Meteor that the Sun exhales. 

To be to thee this night a Torch-bearer, 

And light thee on thy way to Mantua : 
16 Therefore flay yet, thou needft not to be gone. 
Rom, Let me be tane, let me be put to death -, 

I am content, fo thou wilt haue it fo. 

He fay yon gray is not the mornings eye, 
20 Tis but the pale reflex of Cinthias brow -, 

Nor that is not the Larke, whofe noatcs do beate 

The vaultie heauen fo high aboue our heads : 

I haue more care to flay, then will to go : — 
24 Come, death, and welcome ! luliet wills it fo. — 

How ifl, my foule ? lets talke : it is not day. 
Jul, It is,. it is : hie hence, be gone, away ! 

It is the Larke that fings fo out of tune, 
28 Straining harfh Difcords, and vnpleafing Sharpes. 

Some fay, the Larke makes fweete Diuifion j 

This doth not fo, for (he diuideth vs : 

Some fay, the Larke and loathed Toad change eyes ; 
32 O, now I would they had changd voyces too ! 

Since arme fi"om arme that voyce doth vs affray. 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] of Romeo and luliet. 



63 



Hunting thee hence, with Huntfup to the day. 
O, now be gone j more light and light it growes. 
3^ Rom, More light and light, more darke and darke our woes. 

Enter Nurfe, 
Nur. Madam ! 
luL Nurfe? 

Nur. Your Lady Mother *8 cumming to your chamber : 
40 The day is broke ; be wary, looke about. [£rt/. 

luL Then, window, let day in, and let life out. 
Rom. Farewell, farewell ! one kifle, and He defcend. 

[He goeih downe. 
Jul. Art thou gone fo ? loue ! Lord ! ay, husband ! friend ! 
44 I muft heare from thee euery day in the houre. 
For in an hower there are many dayes : 
[Minutes are dayes ; fo will I number them :] 
O, by this count I fhall be much in yeares, 
4^ Ere I againe behold my Romeo / 
Rom. Farewell! 
I will omit no opportunitie 
That may conuey my greetings, loue, to thee. 
5* luL O, thinkft thou we fhall euer meete againe ? 
Rom, I doubt it not ; and all thefe woes fhall feme 
For fweete difcourfes in our times to come. 
lul. O God ! I haue an ill diuining foule : 
56 Me thinkes I fee thee, now thou art below. 
As one dead in the bottome of a tombe : 
Either my eye-fight failes, or thou lookfl pale. 
Rom. And trufl me, loue, in my eye fo do you : 
60 Drie forrow drinkes our bloud. Adue, adue ! lExit. 
luL O Fortune, Fortune ! all men call thee fickle : 
If thou art fickle, what doft thou with him 
That is renowmd for faith ? be fickle. Fortune ; 
64 For then, I hope, thou wilt not keepe him long. 

But fend him backe. [She goeth doumefrom the window. 

Lady C. [JVithin] Ho, daughter! are you vp? 
lul. Who ifl that calls ? It is my Lady mother. 
Is fhe not downe fo late, or vp fo early ? 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 64 

68 What vnaccuilomd caufe procures her hither ? 
Enter Lady Capulet. 

Lady C. Why, how now, luliet ? 

ltd. Madam, I am not well. 

Lady C* Euermore weeping for your Cozens death ? 
What, wilt thou wafli him from his graue with teares ? 
72 And if thou couldft, thou couldfl not make him Hue 5 
Therfore haue done : fome griefe ihews much of loue 5 
But much of greefe ihewes ftill fome want of wit. 
ltd. Yet let me weepe for fuch a feeling lofle. 
7^ Lady C. So ihall you feele the lofle, but not the friend 
Which you weepe for. 

luL Feeling fo the lofle, 

I cannot chufe but euer weepe the friend. 

Lady C. Wei, gyrle, thou weepft not fo much for his death, 
80 A^ that the villaine lines which flaughterd him. 
lul. What villaine. Madam ? 

Lady C. That fame villaine, Romeo, 

luL Villaine and he be many miles afunder. — 
God pardon [him !] — I do, with all my heart j — 
84 And yet no man, like he, doth greeue my heart. 

Lady C. That is becaufe the Traytor murderer Hues. 
Jul. I, Madam, from the reach of thefe my hands : 
Would none but I might venge my Cozens death ! 
88 Lady C, We will haue vengeance for it, feare thou not : 
Then weepe no more. He fend to one in Mantua,-^ 
Where that fame banniflit runnagate doth Hue, — 
Shall giue him fuch an vnaccuflomd dram, 
92 That he ihall foone keepe Tybalt companie : 
And then, I hope, thou wilt be fatisfied. 
Jul. Indeed, I neuer fhall be fatisfied 
With Romeo, — till I behold him — dead — 
96 Is my poore heart, — fo for a kinfraan vext. 
Madam, if you could find out but a man 
To beare a poyfon, I would temper it. 
That Romeo fliould, vpon receit thereof. 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] of Romeo and luliet. ^5 

100 Soone (leepe in quiet. O, how my heart abhors 

To heare him namde, — and cannot come to him, — 

To wreake the loue I bore my Cozen [Tybalt] 

Vpon his body that hath Haughterd him ! 
t04 Lady C. Find thou the means, and He find fuch a man. 

But now ile tell thee ioyfull tidings, Gyrle. 

luL And ioy comes well in fuch a needie time : 

What are they, [I] befeech your Ladyihip ? 
108 Lady C. Well, well, thou haft a carefull father, child; 

One who, to put thee from thy heauines. 

Hath forted out a fudden day of ioy, 

That thou experts not, nor I lookt not for. 
1 1 * lul. Madam, in happie time, what day is that ? 

Lady C. Marrie, my child, early next Thurfday mome. 

The gallant, young, and Noble Gentleman, 

The Countie Parxs^ at Saint Peters Church, 
116 Shall happily make thee there a ioyfull Bride. 

luL Now, by Saint Peters Church, and Peter too. 

He (hall not make me there a ioyfiill Bride. 

I wonder at this hafte ; that I muft wed 
1*0 Ere he that fhould be husband comes to wooe. 

I pray you, tell my Lord and father. Madam, 

I will not marrie yet -, and, when I do, I fweare 

It fhall be Romeo, — whom you know I hate, — 
1*4 Rather then Paris, Thefe are newes indeed ! 

Lady C, Here comes your father 5 tell him fo your felfe. 

And fee how he will take it at your hands. 

Enter Capulet and Nurfe, 

Cap, When the Sun fets, the ayre doth drifle deaw 5 
128 But for the Sunfet of my brothers fonne. 
It rains downright. — 

How now ! a Conduit, girle ? what, ftill in tears ? 
Euermore fhowring ? In one litle body 
132 Thou counterfaits a Barke, a Sea, a Wind : 
For ftill thy eyes, which I may call the fea. 
Do ebbe and flowe with teares j the Barke thy body is, 
c S 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 66 

SayliDg in this fait floudj the windes, thy fighesj 
^36 Who, — raging with thy teares, and they with them, — 

Without a fudden calme, will ouerfet 

Thy tempeft tofled body. — How now, wife ? 

Haue you deliuer'd to her our decree? 
14® Lady C. I, fir j but fhe will none, (he giues you thankes. — 

I would the foole were married to her graue ! 

Cap, Soft ! take me with you, take me with you, wife. 

How ! will fhe none ? doth (he not giue vs thanks ? 
144 Is ihe not proud ? doth ilie not comit her bleft, 

Vn worthy as fhe is, that we haue wrought 

So worthy a (rentleman to be her Bride [groom] ? 

lul. Not proud, you haue -, but thankful, that };ou haue : 
148 Proud can I neuer be of what I hate j 

But thankfuU euen for hate, that is meant loue. 

Cap, How now! how now! chopt lodgick ! what is this? 

' Proud,' and ' I thanke you,* and ' I thanke you not ' 5 
152 And yet * not proud * : miftrefle minion, you, 

Thanke me no thankings, nor proud me no prouds. 

But fettle your fine loynts gainft Thurfday next. 

To go with Paris to Saint Peters Church, 
156 Or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither. 

Out, you greene ficknefle carrion ! out, you baggage ! 

You tallow face ! 

Lady C, Fie, fie ! what, are you mad ? 

luL Good Father, I befeech you on my knees, 
160 Heare me with patience but to fpeake a word. 

Cap. Hang thee, young baggage ! difobedient wretch ! 

I tell thee what : — get thee to Church a Thurfday, 

Or neuer after looke me in the face : 
164 Speake not, replie not, do not anfwere me; 

My fingers itch, — ^Wife, we fcarce thought vs blefl. 

That God had lent vs but this onely child^ ; 

But now I fee this one is one too much, 
168 And that we haue a curfe in hauing her : 

Out on her, hilding ! 

Nur, God in heauen blefle her ! — 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] of Romeo and luUet. 67 

You are to blame^ my Lord, to rate her fo. 

Cap, And why, my Lady wifdome ? hold your tongue, 
17^ Good Prudence; Imatter with your goflips, go. 
Nur. I fpeake no treafon. 
Cap, O, Godigeden. 

Nur. May not one fpeake [t'ye] ? 

Cap, Peace, you mumbling foole ! 

Vtter your grauitie ore a Gofhips bowle ; 
176 For here we need it not. 

Lady C. You are too hot. 

Cap, Gods bread ! it makes me mad : 

[Day-time, night-tide, waking or sleeping houre. 
At home, abroad, alone, in companie, 
180 Working or playing,] ftill my care hath bene 
To haue her matcht : and hauing now prouided 
A Gentleman of noble parentage. 
Of faire demeanes, youthfiill, and nobly trainde, 
184 Stuft, as they fay, with honourable parts, 

Proportiond as ones thought would wifh a man, — 
And then to haue a wretched puling foole, 
A whining mammet, in her fortunes tender, 
188 To anfwere — * He not wed, — I cannot loue, — 
I am too young, — I pray you, pardon me * -, — 
But, and you will not wed, ile ' pardon * you : 
Graze where you will, you fhall not houfe with me : 
192 Looke too't, thinke on't, I do not vfe to ieft. 
Thurfday is neare -, lay hand on hart, aduife : 
And you be mine, ile giue you to my friend ; 
And you be not, hang, beg, ftarue, dye in the ftreets, 
196 For, by my foule, ile nere acknowledge thee. 
Nor what is mine fhall neuer do thee good : 
Trufl too't, bethinke you 5 ile not be forfworne. [£jri/. 

luL Is there no pittie fitting in the cloud es, 
200 That fees into the bottome of my greefe ? 
O, fweet my Mother, cafl me not away ! 
Delay this marriage for a month, a weeke ; 
Or, if you do not, make the Bridall bed 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 68 

204 In that dim Monument where Tilalt lies. 

Lady C, Talke not to me, for ile not fpeake a word : 
Do as thou wilt, for I haue done with thee. [£ri/. 

luL O God ! — 6 Nurfe, how (hall this be preuented? 
208 My husband is on earth, my faith in heauen j 
How {hall that faith returne againe to earth, 
Vnlefle that hasband fend it me from heauen 
By leauing earth ? — comfort me, counfaile me. — 
212 Alack, alack, that heauen fhould pradife flratagems 
Vpon fo foft a fubie6t as my felfe ! — 
What fayft thou ? haft thou not a word of ioy ? 
Some comfort, Nurfe. 

Nur. Faith, here it is : Romeo 

216 Is banifhed, and all the world to nothing. 

That he dares nere come back to challenge you j 
Or, if he do, it needs rauft be by ftealth. 
Then, fince the cafe fo ftands as now it doth, 
220 I thinke it beft you married witli the Count ie, 
O, hees a louely Gentleman ! 
Romeos a difhclout to him : an Eagle, Madam, 
Hath not fo greene, fo quick, fo faire an eye, 
224 As Paris hath. Beihrow my very hart, 

I thinke you are happie in this fecond match. 
For it excels your firft : or if it did not. 
Your firft is dead j or twere as good he were, 
228 As lining here, and you no vfe of him. 
ltd. Speakeft thou from thy heart? 
Nur, And from my foule too j elfe befhrew them both. 
luL Amen ! 
232 Nur, [To] what? 

lul. Well, thou haft comforted me maruellous much. 
Go in, and tell my Lady I am gone, 
Hauing difpleafd my father, to Laurence Cell, 
236 To make confefsion, and to be abfolu'd. 

Nur, Marrie, I will j and this is wifely done. [^Elxit, 

lul, Auncient damnation ! 6 moft wi(^ked fiend I 
Is it more fin — to wifti me thus forfworne. 



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ACT IV. sc. I.] of Romeo and luliei. 69 

240 Or to difpraife 1117 Lord with that fame tongue 

Which fhe hath praifde him with aboue compare 

So many thoufand times ?— Go, Counfellor ; 

Thou and my bofome henceforth fhall be twaine. — 
^44 He to the Frier, to know his remedie : 

If all elfe faile, my felfe haue power to die. 

lExii, 

TV, 1. Enter Frier Lawrence and Countie Paris. 

Fri, L. On Thurfday, fir ? the time is very ftiort. 
Par, My Father CapuLet will haue it fo j 
And I am nothing flow, to flacke his hafle. 
4 FrL L. You fay you do not know the Ladies minde ? — 
Vneuen is the courfe ; I like it not. 

Par, Immoderately fhe weepes for Tybalts death. 
And therefore haue I little talkt of loue } 
8 For Venus fmiles not in a houfe of teares. 
Now, fir, her father counts it daungerous 
That fhe do giue her forrow fo much fway j 
And, in his wifedome, hafles our marriage, 
12 To flop the inundation of her teares; 

Which, too much minded by her felfe alone. 
May be put from her by focietie : 
Now do you know the reafon of this hafle. 
16 FrL L. [Afide'] I would I knew not why it fhould be flowed. — 
Looke, fir, here comes the Lady toward my Cell. 

Enter luliet. 

Par. Happily met, my Lady and my wife ! 

Jul. That may be, fir, when I may be a wife. 
20 Par. That may be, mufl be, loue, on Thurfday next. 

lul. What mufl be fhall be. 

Fri. L. Thats a certaine text. 

Par. Come you to make confeffion to this Father ? 

Jul. To aunfwere that, I fhould confefle to you. 
24 Par. Do not denie to him, that you loue me. 

lul. I will confefle to you, that I loue him. 



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ACT IV. sc. I.] The imft lamentable Tragedie 70 

Par, So will ye, I am Aire, that you loue me. 
lul. If I do fo, it will be of more price, 
28 Being fpoke behind your backe, then to your face. 

Par, Poor foule, thy face is much abufde with tears. 
luL The teares haue got fmall vidorie by that j 
For it was bad inough, before their fpight. 
32 Par, Thou wrongft it, more then tears, with that report. 
lul. That is no flaunder, (ir, which is a truth j 
And what I fpake, I fpake it to my face. 

Par, Thy face is mine, and thou haft ftandred it. 
^d lul. It may be fo, for it is not mine owne. — 
Are you at leifure, holy Father, now j 
Or (hall I come to you at euening Malfe ? 

Fri, L, My leifure femes me, penfiue daughter, now. — 
40 My Lord, we muft entreate the time alone. 

Par, Godlliield, I fhould difturbe deuotion ! — - 
luliet, on Thurfday early will I rowfe yee : 
Till then, adue, and keepe this holy kille. 

lExit. 
44 Jul, O, lliut the doore, and when thou haft done fo. 
Come weepe with me j paft hope, paft cure, paft help ! 

Fri. L, O, luliet, I already know thy greefe j 
It ftraines me paft the compafle of my wits : 
48 I heare thou muft, and nothing may prorogue it. 
On Thurfday next be married to this Countie. 

lul. Tell me not. Frier, that thou hear' ft of this, 
Vnlefle thou tell me how I may preuent it : 
j2 If, in thy wifedome, thou canft giue no helpe. 
Do thou but call my refolution wife. 
And with this knife ile helpe it prefently. 
God ioynd my heart and Romeos, thou our hands j 
j6 And ere this hand, by thee to Romeos feald. 
Shall be the Labell to an other deed. 
Or my true heart with trecherous reuolt 
Turne to an other, this fliall fley them both : 
60 Therefore, out of thy long experienft time, 
Giue me fome prefent counfell j or, behold. 



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ACT IV. sc. I.] of Romeo and luUet. 71 

Twixt my extreames and me this bloudie knife 

Shall play tlie vmpeere j arbitrating that 
64 Which the commiflion of thy yeares and art 

Could to no iflue of true honour bring. 

Be not fo long to fpeake ; I long to die^ 

If what thou fpeakfl fpeake not of reraedie. 
68 Fri. L, Hold, daughter 5 I do fpie a kind of hope. 

Which craues as defperate an execution 

As that is defperate which we would preuent. 

If, rather then to marrie Countie Paris, 
7^ Thou haft the ftrength of will to flay thy felfe. 

Then is it likely thou wilt vndertake 

A thing like death to chide away this fhame. 

That coapft with death hirafelfe to fcape from it ; 
7^ And, if thou dar'ft. He giue thee remedie. 

luL Oh, bid me leape, rather then marrie Paris, 

From off the battlements of yonder Tower 5 

Or walke in theeuifh wayes : or bid me lurke 
80 Where Serpents are j chaine me with roaring Beares \ 

Or fhut me nightly in a Chamel houfe, 

Orecouerd quite with dead mens ratling bones, 

With reekie (hanks and yealow chaplefs fculls ; 
84 Or bid me go into a new made graue, 

And hide me with a dead man in his [fhroud 5] 

Things that to heare them told, haue made me tremble j 

And I will do it without feare or doubt, 
88 To Hue an vnftaind wife to my fweete loue. 

Fri, L, Hold, then j go home, be merrie, giue confent 

To marrie Paris : wendfday b to morrow ; 

To morrow night looke that thou lie alone, 
9^ Let not thy Nurfe lie with thee in thy Chamber : 

Take thou this Violl, being then in bed, 

And this diftilling liquor drinke thou off : 

When prefently through all thy veines fhall run 
96 A cold and drowzie humour j for no pulfe 

Shall keepe his natiue progrelTe, but furceafe : 

No warmth, no breath, fhall teflifie thou liu'ft ; 



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ACT IV. sc. a.] The moji lamentable Tragedie J2 

The rofes in thy lips and cheekes {hall fade 
loo To paly afhes j thy eyes windowes fall. 

Like death, when he fhuts vp the day of life^ 

Each part, depriu'd of fupple gouernment. 

Shall, ftilfe, and flarke, and cold, appeare like death : 
104 And in this borrow'd likenelfe of fhrunke death 

Thou (halt continue two and fortie houres. 

And then awake as from a pleafant lleepe. 

Now, when the Bridegroome in the morning comes 
108 To rowfe thee from thy bed, there art thou dead : 

Then, — as the manner of our countrie is, — 

In thy heft robes, vncouerd on the Beere, 

Thou (hall be borne to that fame auncient vault 
112 Where all the kindred of the Capulets lie. 

In the meane time, againft thou (halt awake. 

Shall Romeo by my Letters know our drift, 

And hither (hall he come ; and he and I 
116 Will watch thy waking : and that very night 

Shall Romeo beare thee hence to Mantua, 

And this fhall free thee from this prefent fhame ; 

If no inconftant toy, nor womanifh feare, 
120 Abate thy valour in the ading it. 

lul. Giue me, giue me ! O tell not me of feare ! 

Fri. L. Hold j get you gone, be (Irong and profperous 

In this refolue : ile fend a Frier with fpeed 
1 24 To Mantua, with my Letters to thy Lord. 

Jul. Loue giue me ftrength ! and ftrength fhall helpe afford. 

Farewell, deare father ! 

[^Ereunt. 

IV. 2. Enter Capulet, Lady Capulet, Nurfe, and 

Seruing men, two or three. 

Cap, So many guefb inuite as here are writ. — 

[^Exit Servant. 
Sirrah, go hire me twentie cunning Cookes. 
"2 Ser, You fhall haue none ill, fir ; for ile trie if they can 
4 lick their fingers. 



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ACT IV. sc. 2.] of Romeo and luliet, 73 

Cap, How canft thou trie them fo ? 

2 Ser, Marrie, fir, tis an ill Cooke that cannot lick his owne 
fingers : therefore hee, that cannot lick his fingers, goes not 
8 with me. 

Cap. Go, be gone. — [^Kvit 2 Ser, 

We fhall be much vnfurnifht for this time. — 
What, is my daughter gone to Frier Lawrence ? 
I a Nur, I, forfooth. 

Cap, Well, he may chance to do fome good on her : 
A peeuifh felfewilld harlottry it is. 

Enter luliet. 

Nur, See, where fhe comes from fhrift with merie looke. 
1 6 Cap, How now, my headftrong ! where haue you bin gadding ? 
hd. Where I haue learnt me to repent the fin 
Of difobedient oppofition 
To you, and your behefts j and am enioynd, 
20 By holy Lawrence^ to fell proftrate here 

To beg your pardon : — pardon, I befeech you ! 
Henceforward I am euer rulde by you. 

Cap, Send for the Countie 5 go tell him of this : 
24 He haue this knot knit vp to morrow morning. 

lul, I met the youthfull Lord at Lawrence Cell, 
And gaue him what becomed loue I might. 
Not flepping ore the bounds of modellie. 
28 Cap, Why, I am glad ont j this is wel, — ftand vp : 
This is aft fhould be. — Let me fee the Countie j 
I, marrie, go, I fay, and fetch him hither. — 
Now, afore God, this reuerend holy Frier, 
32 All our whole Citie is much bound to him. 

lul, Nurfe, will you go with me into my Clofet, 
To helpe me fort fuch needfull ornaments 
As you thinke fit to fumifli me to morrow ? 
^6 Lady C, No, not till Thurfday j there is time inough. 

Cap, Go, Nurfe, go with her : — weele to Church to morrow. 

{Exeunt Juliet and Nurfe. 
Jjody C, We (hall be fhort in our prouifion : 



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ACT IV. sc. 3.] The moft lamentable Tragedie 74 

Tis now neare night. 

Cap, Tuih ! I will ftirre about, 

4^ And all things fhall be well, I warrant thee, wife : 
Gro thou to luliei, helpe to decke vp her j 
He not to bed to night j — let me alone j 
He play the huswife for this once. — ^What, ho ! — 

44 They are all forth : well, I will walke my felfe 
To Countie Paris, to prepare vp him 
Againft to morrow : my heart is wondrous light. 
Since this fame wayward Gyrle is fo reclaymd. 

[Exeunt, 

TV, 8. Enter luliet and Nurfe, - 

lul, I, thofe attires are beft : — but, gentle Nurfe, 
I pray thee, leaue me to my felfe to night ; 
For I haue need of many oryfons 
4 To moue the heauens to fmile vpon my (late. 
Which, well thou knoweft, is croflTe and full of fin. 

Enter Lady Capulet. 

Lady C. What, are you bufie, ho ? need you my helpe ? 
lul. No, Madam ; we haue culd fuch neceffaries 
8 As are behoofefuU for our ftate to morrow : 
So pleafe you, let me now be left alone. 
And let the Nurfe this night fit vp with you 5 
For, I am fure, you haue your hands full all, 
12 In this fo fudden bufineffe. 

Lady C, Good night : 

Get thee to bed, and refl j for thou haft need. 

[^Exeunt Lady C. and Nurfe, 
Jul. Farewell ! — God kuowes when we fhall meete againe. 
I haue a faint cold feare thrilb through my veines» 
16 That almoft freezes vp the heate of life : 
He call them backe againe to comfort me. — 
Nurfe !— What fhould fhe do here ? 
My difmall fceane I needs muft'ad alone. — 
20 Come, Violl. — 



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ACT IV. sc. 3.] of Romeo and luliet, J^ 

What if this mixture do not worke at all ? 

Shall I be married then to morrow morning ? 

No, no : — this ihall forbid it. — Lie thou there. — 

[Laying doum a dagger, 
24 What if it be a poyfon, which the Frier 

Subtly hath mini fired to haue me dead, 

Leaft in this marriage he fhould be difhonourd, 

fiecaufe he married me before to Romeo ? 
28 I feare it is : and yet, me thinks, it fhould not. 

For he hath ftill bene tried a holy man. 

[I will not entertaine fo bad a thought.] — 

How if, when I am laid into the Tombe, 
32 I wake before the time that Romeo 

Come to redeeme me ? theres a fearfull poynt ! 

Shall I not then be flifled in the Vault, 

To whofe foule mouth no healthfome ayre breaths in, 
^6 And there die flrangled ere my Romeo comes ? 

Or, if I Hue, is it not very like. 

The horrible conceit of death and night, 

Togither with the terror of the place, — 
40 As in a Vaulte, an auncient receptacle. 

Where for this many hundred yeares the bones 

Of all my buried aunceflors are packt j 

Where bloudie Tybalt, yet but greene in earth, 
44 Lies feflring in his fhroude ; where, as they fay. 

At fome houres in the night fpirits refort j — 

Alack, alack ! is it not like that I 

So early waking, — what with loathfome fmels, 
48 And fhrikes like mandrakes tome out of the earth. 

That lining mortalls, hearing them, run mad : — 

O ! if I wake, ihall I not be diflraught, 

Inuironed with all thefe hidious feares ? 
52 And madly play with my forefathers ioynts ? 

And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his fhrowde ? 

And, in this rage, with fome great kinfmans bone. 

As with a club, dafh out my defprate braines ? 
56 O, looke ! me thinks I fee my Cozins Ghofl 



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ACT IV. sc. 4.] The moji lamentable Tragedie y6 

Seeking out Romeo, that did fpit his body 
Vpon a Rapiers poynt : — flay, Tybalt, ftay ! — 
Romeo, I come ! this do I drinke to thee. 

[She f ah vpon her bed, within the Curtaines. 

IV. 4. Enter Lady Capulet and Nurfe. 

Lady C, Hold, take thefe keies, & fetch more fpices, Nurle. 
Nur. They call for dates and quinces in the Paflrie. 

Efiter old Capulet. 

Cap. Come, ftir, ftir, ftir ! the fecond Cock hath crow'd, 
4 The Curphew bell hath roong, tis three a clock : — 
Looke to the bakte meates, good Angelica : 
Spare not for coft. 

Nur, Go, [go] you cot-queane, go. 

Get you to bed 5 faith, youle be (icke to morrow 
8 For this nights watching. 

Cap, No, not a whit j what ! I haue watcht.ere now 
All night for lefler caufe, and nere bene ficke. 

Lady C. I, you haue bene a moufe-hunt in your timej 
12 But I will watch you from fuch watching now. 

[Exeunt Lady C. and Nurfe. 
Cap. A iealous hood, a iealous hood ! — 

Enter three or four e Seruingmen, withfpits, and logs, 
and Baskets. 

Now, fellow. 
What is there ? 

1 Ser. Things for the Cooke, iir ; but I know not what. 

16 Cap. Make hafte, make hafte. [Exit i 5er.]— Sirra, fetch 
drier logs : 
Call Peter, he will ihew thee where they are. 

2 Ser. I haue a head, (ir, that will find out logs. 

And neuer trouble Peter for the matter. [Exit. 

20 Cap. Mafle, and well faid j a merrie horfon, ha ! 
Thou {halt be loggerhead. — Good faith, tis day : 
The Countie will be here with muficke ftraight. 



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ACT IV. sc. 5.] of Romeo and luliet. 77 

For fo he faid he would. [Aluficke tvitkin.] I heare him neare. — 
H Nurfe ! — Wife ! — what, ho ! — what, Nurfe, I fay ! 

[Re-enter Nurfe. 
Go, waken luliet, go, and trim her vp j 
He go and chat with Paris : — ^hie, make haHe, 
Make haft ! the bridgroorae, he is come ah^ady : 
28 Make haft, I fay ! [Exeunt. 

TV. 6. Enter Nurfe. 

Nur. Miftris ! — what, miftris luliet / — faft, I warrant her, 
ftie:— 
Why, Lambe ! — why. Lady ! — fie, you fluggabed I — 
Why, Loue, I fay ! — Madam ! — fweete heart ! — why. Bride !— 
4 What, not a word ? — ^you take your penniworths now -, 
Sleepe for a weeke j for the next night, I warrant. 
The Countie Paris hath fet vp his reft. 
That you ftiall reft but little. — God forgiue me ! 
8 Marrie, and Amen ! — How found is ftie a fleepe ! 
I needs muft wake her : — Madam, Madam, Madam ! 
I, let the Countie take you in your bed j 
Heele fright you vp, yfaith. — Will it not be ? 
12 What, dreft ! and in your clothes ! and downe againe ! 
I muft needs wake you. Lady, Lady, Lady ! 
Alas, alas ! — helpe, helpe ! my La dyes dead ! — 
Oh, welladay, that euer I was borne ! — 
16 Some Aqua-vitae, ho ! — my Lord ! my Lady ! 

Enter Lady Capulet. 

Lady C. What noife is here ? 
Nur. O lamentable day ! 

Lady C. What is the matter ? 

Nur. Looke, looke ! oh heauie day ! 

Lady C. O me, O me ! my child, my onely life, 
20 Reuiue, looke vp, or I will die with thee ! — 
Helpe, helpe ! — call helpe. 



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ACT IV. sc. 5.] The mqft lamentable Tragedie 78 

Enter Capulet. 

Cap, For (hame, bring luliet forth ; her Lord is come. 
Nur, Shees dead, deceail, fhees dead ; alack the day ! 
24 Lady C, Alack the day ! fhees dead, fhees dead, fhees dead ! 
Cap. Hah ! let me fee her : — out, alas ! fhees cold ; 
Her bloud is fetled, and her ioynts are flifFe ; 
Life and thefe lips haue long bene feparated : 
*8 Death lies on her, like an vn timely froft 
Vpon the fweetefl flower of all the field. 
[Accurfed time ! unfortunate old man !] 
Nur, O lamentable day ! 
Lady C, O wofiill time ! 

3* Cap, Death, that hath tane her hence to make me waile. 
Ties vp my tongue, and will not let me fpeake. 

Enter Frier I^wrence and the Countie Paris, 
with Muficians. 

Fri, L. Come, is the Bride ready to go to Church ? 
Cap, Ready to go, but neuer to returne. 
3^ O fonne, the night before thy wedding day 

Hath death laine with thy wife : — [See,] there fhe lies^ 
Flower as fhe was, deflowred by him. 
Death is my fonne in law, death is my heire j 
40 My daughter he hath wedded ! I will die. 
And leaue him all -, life, lining, all is deaths. 

Par, Haue I thought long to fee this mornings face. 
And doth it giue me fuch a fight as this ? 
44 Lady C. Accurfl, vnhappie, wretched, hateful! day ! 
Mofl miferable houre, that ere time faw 
In lafling labour of his Pilgrimage ! 
But one, poore one, one poore and louing child, 
48 But one thing to reioyce and folace in. 

And cruell death hath catch t it from my fight ! 
Nur, O wo ! O wofuU, wofull, wofuU day ! 
Mofl lamentable day, mofl wofiill day, 
5a That euer, euer, I did yet behold ! 



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ACT IV. sc. 5.] of Romeo and luliet. 79 

O day ! O day ! O day ! O hatefull day ! 

Neuer was feene fo blacke a day as this : 

O wofull day ! O wofull, [wofull] day ! 
$6 Par, Beguild, diuorced, wronged, fpighted, ilaine ! 

Moll deteflable death, by thee beguild. 

By cruell, cruell thee quite ouerthrowne ! 

O loue ! O life ! — not life, but loue in death ! 
60 Cap. Defpifde, diftrefled, hated, martird, kild! 

Vncomfortable time ! why camil thou now 

To murther, murther our folemnitie ? 

O childe ! O childe ! — my foule, and not my childe ! — 
^4 Dead art thou ! [Dead !] — Alacke, my child is dead ; 

And, with my child, my ioyes are buried ! 

Fri, L. Peace, ho, for fhame ! confufions cure Hues not 

In thefe confufions. Heauen and your felfe 
^8 Had part in this feire maide j now heauen hath all. 

And all the better is it for the maid : 

Your part in her you could not keepe from death j 

But heauen keepes his part in etemall life. 
7* The moft you fought was her promotion 5 

For twas your heauen (he fhould be aduand : 

And weepe ye now, feeing (he is aduanil 

Aboue the Cloudes, as high as heauen it felfe ? 
76 O, in this loue, you loue your child fo ill. 

That you run mad, feeing that fhe is well : 

Shees not well married, that lines married long j 

But fhees befl married, that dies married young. 
80 Drie vp your teares, and fHck your Rofemarie 

On this faire Coarfe ; and, as the cuflome is. 

And in her befl array, beare her to Church : 

For though fond nature bids vs all lament, 
84 Yet natures teares are reafons merriment. 

Cap, All things that we ordained fefliuall, 

Turne from their oflice to black Funerall : 

Our inflruments, to melancholy bells; 
88 Our wedding cheare, to a fad buriall feafl j 

Our folemne himnes to fullen dyrges change j 



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ACT IV. sc. 5.] The mqft lamentable Tragedie 80 

Our Bridall flowers ferue for a buried Coarfe, 
And all things change them to the contrarie. 
9^ FrL L. Sir, go you in, — and. Madam, go with him 5 — 
And go, iir Paris ; — euery one prepare 
To follow this faire Coarfe vnto her graue : 
The heauens do lowre vpon you for fome ill j 
96 Moue them no more, by crofling their high wil. 

l^Exeunt Capulet, Lady Capulet, Paris, 
and Friar. 
I Muf, Faith, we may put vp our pipes, and be gone. 
Nut, Honed goodfellowes, ah, put vp, put vp j 
For, well you know, this is a pitifuU cafe. [ExU. 

100 I Muf. I, by my troath, the cafe maybe amended. 

Enter Peter. 

Peter, Mufitions, oh, Mufitions, ' Harts eafe. Harts eafe : * 
O, and you will haue me Hue, play ' Harts eafe.* 
I Muf, Why ' Harts eafe ? * 
104 Peter, O, Mufitions, becaufe my hart it felfe plaies ' My hart 
IS full [of woe :] ' O, play me fome merie dump, to comfort 
me. 

I Muf Not a dump we 5 tis no time to play now. 
108 Peter, You will not then? 
I Muf No. 

Peter, I will then giue it you foundly. 
I Muf What will you giue vs ? 
112 Peter. No money, on my faith, but the gleekej I will giue 
you the Minftrell. 

I Muf Then will I giue you the Seruing-creature. 
Peter. Then will I lay the feruing-creatures dagger on your 
116 pate. I will cary no Crochets: ile re you. He fa youj do 
you note me ? 

1 Muf And you re vs, and fa vs, you note vs. 

2 Muf, Pray you, put vp your dagger, and put out your wit. 
120 Peter. Then haue at you with my wit ! I will dry-beate 

you with an yron wit, and put vp my yron dagger. Anfwere 
me like men : 



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ACT V. sc. I.] of Romeo and luliet. 8i 

' When griping griefes the hart doth wound, 
1^4 [And dolefull dumps the minde opprelfej 

Then mufique with her iiluer found ' — 
Why ' iiluer found ' ? why ' mufique with her iiluer found * ? 
what fay you, Simon Catling ? 
ia8 I Muf, Mary, fir, becaufe (iluer hath a fweet found. 
Peter. Pretie ! What fay you, Hugh Rebick ? 

2 Muf, I fay 'filuer found,* becaufe MuHtions found for 
filuer. 

13* Peter. Prettie too ! What fay you, lames Soundpoft ? 

3 Muf. Faith, I know not what to fay. 

Peter. O, I cry you mercy ; you are the finger : I will fay 
for you. It is ' mufique with her filuer found,* becaufe 
136 Mufitions haue no gold for founding : — 

' Then Mufique with her filuer found 
With fpeedy help doth lend redrefle.' [Exit. 

I Muf. What a pefiilent knaue is this fame ? 
140 2 Muf. Hang him, lack ! — Come, weele in here 3 tarrie for 
the mourners, and Hay dinner. [Exeunt. 

V, L Enter Romeo. 

Rom. If I may truft the flattering truth of fleepe, 

My dreames prefage fome ioyfull newes at hand ; 

My bofomes Lord fits lightly in his throne, 
4 And, all this day, an vnaccuftomd fpirit 

Lifts roe aboue the ground with chearfull thoughts. 

I dreamt my Lady came and found me dead, — 

Strange dreame, that giues a deadman leaue to thinke! — 
8 And Breathd fuch life with kifles in my lips. 

That I reuiude, and was an Emperor. 

Ah me ! how fweete is loue itfelfe pofleft. 

When but loues ihadowes are fo rich in ioy ! 

Enter Romeos man, Balthazer, booted. 

12 Newes firom Verona ! — How now, Balthazer ? 
Doll thou not bring me Letters from the Frier? 



c 



6 



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ACT V. sc. I.] The moft lamentable Tragedie 8a 

How doth my Lady ? Is my Father well ? 

How doth my Lady luliet ? that I aske againe -, 
i6 For nothing can be ill, if (he be well. 

Bal, Then (he is well, and nothing can be ill ; 

Her body (leepes in Capets monument. 

And her immortall part with Angels Hues, 
ao I faw her laid lowe in her kindreds vault. 

And prefently tooke pofte to tell it you : 

O, pardon me for bringing thefe ill newes. 

Since you did leaue it for my office, fir. 
24 Rom, Is it ene fo ? then I denie you, ftarres ! — 

Thou know'ft my lodging : get me inke and paper. 

And hire poft horfes 5 I will hence to night. 
Bal. I do befeech you, fir, haue patience : 
a8 Your lookes are pale and wilde, and do import 

Some mifaduenture. 

Rom, Tu{h, thou art deceLu*d : 

Leaue me, and do the thing I bid thee do. 

Haft thou no Letters to me from the Frier ? 
3* Bal, No, my good Lord. 

Rom. No matter : get thee gone. 

And hyre thofe horfes ; He be with thee ftraight. 

[Exit Balthazer. 

Well, luliety I will lie with thee to night. 

Lets fee for meanes : — O mifchiefe, thou art fwift 
^6 To enter in the thoughts of defperate men ! 

I do remember an Appothacarie, — 

And here abouts a dwells, — which late I noted 

In tattred weeds, with ouerwhelming browes, 
40 Culling of fimples j meager were his lookes, 

Sharpe miferie had worne him to the bones : 

And in his needie (hop a tortoyes hung. 

An allegater ftuft, and other skins 
44 Of ill ihapte fifties ; and about his ftielues 

A beggerly account of emptie boxes, 

Greene earthen pots, bladders, and muftie leedes. 

Remnants of packthred, and old cakes of Rofes, 



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ACT V. sc. 1 .] of Romeo and luliet, 83 

48 Were thinly lcatter*d, to make vp a fhe>^'. 

Noting this penury, to my felfe I faid, — 

An if a man did need a poyfon now^ 

Whofe fale is prefent death in Mantua, 
5» Here Hues a Catiffe wretch would fell it him. — 

O, this fame thought did but forerun my need. 

And this fame needie man mud fell it me. 

As I remember, this fhould be the houfe : 
5^ Being holy day, the beggers fhop is ihut. — 

What, ho ! Appothecarie ! 

Enter Apothecary. 

Ap. Who calls fo lowd i 

Rom, Come hither, man. — I fee that thou art poore 5 

Hold, there is fortie duckets : let me haue 
^ A dram of poyfon ; fuch fbone fpeeding geare 

As will difpearfe it felfe through all the veines. 

That the life-wearie taker may fall dead. 

And that the Trunke may be difchargd of breath 
^4 As violently as haftie powder fierd 

Doth hurry firom the fatall Canons wombe. 

Ap, Such mortall drugs I haue ; but Mantuas lawe 

Is death to any he that vtters them. 
68 Rom, Art thou fo bare, and full of wretchednefle. 

And fear*ft to die ? famine is in thy cheekes. 

Need and opprellion (larueth in thy eyes. 

Contempt and beggerie haugs vpon thy backe, 
y2 The world is not thy friend, nor the worlds law : 

The world affoords no law to make thee rich j 

Then be not poore, but breake it, and take this. 
Ap, My pouertie, but not my will, confents. 
76 Rom, I pay thy pouertie, and not thy will. 
Ap, Put thb in any liquid thing you will. 

And drinke it ofFj and, if you had the ftrength 

Of twentie men, it would difpatch you draight. 
80 Rom, There is thy Gold ; worfe poyfon to mens fi>ules. 

Doing more murther in this loathfome world. 



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ACT V. sc. 2.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 84 

Then thefe poore compounds that thou maift not fell : 
I fell thee poyfon, thou haft fold me none. 
84 Farewell j buy foode, and get thy felfe in fleih. — 
Come, Cordiall and not poyfon, go with me 
To Juliets graue, for there muft I vfe thee. 

Exeunt. 

▼• 2. Enter Frier lohn to Frier Lawrence. 

John, Holy Francifcan Frier ! brother, ho ! 

Enter Lawrence. 

Law, This fame iliould be the voyce of Frier John. — 
Welcome from Mantua : what fayes Romeo ? 
4 Or, if his minde be writ, giue me his Letter. 
John, Going to find a barefoole brother out. 
One of our order, to alfotiate me. 
Here in this Citie vifiting the licke, 
8 And finding him, the Searchers of the Towne, 
Sufpe6ting that we both were in a houfe 
Where the infe6tious peftilence did raigne, 
Seald vp the doores, and would not let vs forth j 
I a So that my fpeed to Mantua there was ftaid. 
Law. Who bare my Letter then to Romeo ? 
lohn. I could not fend it, — here it is againe, — 
Nor get a meflenger to bring it thee, 
16 So fearefull were they of infei^ion. 

Law. Vnhappie fortune ! by my Brotherhood, 
The Letter was not nice, but full of charge. 
Of deare import ; and the negleding it 
20 May do much danger : Frier lohn, go hence j 
Get me an Iron Crow, and bring it ftraight 
Vnto my Cell. 

lohn. Brother, ile go and bring it thee. \^Ex%t. 

24 Law, Now muft I to the Monument alone ; 
Within this three houres will feire luliet wake : 
Shee will befhrewe me much that Romeo 
Hath had no notice of thefe accidents ; 



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ACT V. SC. 



3] 



of Romeo and luliet. 



85 



a8 But I will write againe to Mantua, 

And keepe her at my Cell till Romeo come : 
Poore liuing Coarfe, clofde in a dead mans Tombe ! 

[Exit 

V. 3. Enter Countie Paris and his Page, with flowers and 

fweete water. 

Par. Glue me thy Torch, boy : hence, and (land aloofe : — 
Yet put it out, for I would not be feene. 
Vnder yond yew Trees lay thee all along, 
4 Holding thy eare clofe to the hollow ground j 
So Ihall no foote vpon the Church-yard tread. 
Being loofe, vnfirme, with digging vp of Graues, 
But thou Ihalt heare it : whittle then to me, 
8 As iignall that thou hear'ft fome thing approach. 
Giue me thofe flowers. Do as I bid thee, go. 

Page. I am almoft afraid to (land alone 
Here in the Church-yard 5 yet I will aduenture. [^Retires. 

12- Par. Sweet flower, with flowers thy Bridall bed I ftrew, — 
O woe ! thy Canapie is dull and (lones j — 
Which with fweete water nightly I will dewe. 
Or, wanting that, with teares dillild by mones j 
16 The obfequies that I for thee will keepe 

Nightly ihall be, to ftrew thy graue and weepe. 

[WTiiflle Boy. 
The Boy giues warning, fomething doth approach. 
What curfed foote wanders this way to night, 
20 To crofle my obfequies, and true loues right ? 
What, with a Torch ? — muffle me, night, a while. 

[Retires. 
Enter Romeo and Balthazer, with a torch, a mattocke, 
and a crow ofyron, 

Rom. Giue me that mattocke, and the wrenching Iron. 
Hold, take this Letter j early in the morning 
24 See thou deliuer it to my Lord and Father. 

Giue me the light. Vpon thy life I charge thee. 



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ACT V, sc. 3.] The mq/i lamentable Tragcdle 86 

What ere thoa hear*fl or feed, Aand all aloofe, 

And do not interrupt me in my courfe. 
a8 Why I defcend into this bed of death. 

Is, partly, to behold my Ladies face : 

But, chiefly, to take thence, from her dead finger, 

A precious Ring : a Ring that I muft vfe 
3* In deare imployment : therefore hence, be gone : — 

But if thou, iealous, doft returne to prie 

In what I farther Ihall intend to doo. 

By heauen, I will teare thee loynt by loynt, 
3^ And ftrew this hungry Church-yard with thy lims : 

The time and my intents are fauage wilde; 

More fierce, and more inexorable farre. 

Then emptie Tygers, or the roaring fea. 
40 Bed. I will be gone, fir, and not trouble ye. 

Rom, So (halt thou ihew me fi-iendfhip. — ^Take thou that : 

Line, and be profperous : and farewell, good fellow. 
Bal, For all this fame, ile hide me here about : 
44 His lookes I feare, and his intents I doubt. [Retires. 

Rom, Thou deteftable mawe, thou wombe of death. 

Gorged with the dearell morfell of the earth. 

Thus I enforce thy rotten lawes to open, 
48 And, in defpight, ile cram thee with more foode. 
Par. This is that banifht haughtie Mountague, 

That murdred my loues Cozin ; — ^with which greefe. 

It is fuppofed, the faire creature died, — 
5 2' And here is come to do fome villainous fhame 

To the dead bodies : I will apprehend him. — 

[ Comes forward. 

Stop thy vnhallow'd toyle, vile Mountague / 

Can vengeance be purfu'd further then death ? 
56 Condemned villaine, I do apprehend thee : 

Obey, and go with me 5 for thou muft die. 

Rom, I muft indeed, and therefore came I hither. — 

Good gentle youth, tempt not a defprate man, 
60 Flie hence and leaue me : — thinke vpon thefe gone j 

Let them affright thee. — I befeech thee, youth. 



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ACT V. sc. 3.] of Romeo and luliet, 87 

Put not an other fin vpon my head. 

By vrging me to fiirie : — 6, be gone ! 
64 By heauen, I loue thee better then my felfe j 

For I come hither armde againft my felfe : 

Stay not, begone j — Hue, and hereafter fay, 

A mad mans mercie bid thee run away. 
68 Par, I do defie thy conjurations. 

And apprehend thee for a Fell on here. 

Rom. Wilt thou prouoke me ? then haue at thee, boy ! 

[Theyjight, 
Page. O Lord, they fight ! I will go call the Watch. 

[Exit. 
7a Par. O, I am llaine ! — If thou be mercifiill. 

Open the Tombe, lay me with lulieL [Dies. 

Rom. In faith, I will : — let me penife this face j — 

Mercutios kinfman. Noble Countie Paris / 
7^ What faid my man, when my betoded foule 

Did not attend him as we rode ? I thinke 

He told me Paris fhould haue married Juliet. 

Said he not fo ? or did I dreame it fo ? 
80 Or am I mad, hearing him talke of Juliet, 

To thinke it was fo ? — O, giue me thy hand. 

One writ with me in fowre misfortunes booke ! 

He burie thee in a triumphant graue 5 — 
84 A Graue ? O, no 5 a Lanthorne, flaughtred youth ; 

For here lies Juliet, and her bewtie makes 

This Vault a feafting prefence full of light. — 

Death, lie thou there, by a dead man interd. 

[Laying Paris in t/ie Monument. 
88 How ofl when men are at the point of death, 

Haue they bene merie ! which their keepers call 

A lightning before death : Oh, how may I 

Call this a lightning ? — O my Loue ! my wife ! 
9a Death, that hath fuckt the honey of thy breath. 

Hath had no power yet vpon thy bewtie : 

Thou art not conquerd -, bewties enfigne yet 

Is crymfon in thy lips, and in thy cheeks. 



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ACT V. sc. 3.] The mojl lamentable Tragedie 88 

96 And deaths pale flag is not aduanced there. — 

Tybalt, lyeft thou there in thy bloudie flieet ? 

O, what more fauour can I do to thee 

Then with that hand that cut thy youth in twaine 
100 To funder his that was thine enemie ? 

Forgiue me, Couzen ! — Ah, deare luliet, 

Why art thou yet fo faire ? Shall I beleeue 

That vnfubdantiall death is amorous, 
104 And that the ieane abhorred monfler keepes 

Thee here in darke to be his parramour ? 

For feare of that, I ftill will ftaie with thee. 

And neuer from this pallace of dym night 
108 Depart againe : here, here will I remaine 

With wormes that are thy Chamber-maides ; O, here 

Will I fet vp my euerlading reft ', 

And fhake the yoke of inaufpicious ftarres 
112 From this world wearied fleih. — Eyes, looke your laft ! 

Armes, take your laft embrace ! And lips, O you 

The doores of breath, feale with a righteous kifle 

A datelefte bargaine to ingrofling death ! — 
116 Come, bitter condu6t, come, vnfauoury g^ide ! 

Thou defperate Pilot, now at once run on 

The daftiing Rocks thy feaflck weary barke ! 

Heeres to my Loue ! — [Drinks,] O, true Appothecary ! 
J 20 Thy drugs are quicke. — ^Thus with a kifle I die. [^Dies 

Enter Frier Lawrence, with Lojithome, Crowe, 
and Spade. 

Frier. Saint Francis be my fpeede ! how oft to night 
Haue my old feet ftumbled at graues ! Whoes there ? 

Bal. Heeres one, a friend, and one that knowes you well. 
124 Frier. Blifle be vpon you ! Tell me, good my friend* 
What torch is yond, that vainly lends his light 
To grubs and eyelefle fculles ? as I difcerne. 
It burneth in the Capels monument. 
128 Bal. It doth fo, holy fir j and theres my maifter. 
One that you loue. 



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ACT V. sc. 3.] of Romeo avd Iidiet. 89 

Frier. Who is it ? 

Bal. Romeo. 

Frier. How long hath he bin there ? 
Bal. Full halfe an houre. 

Frier. Go with me to the Vault. 
Bed. I dare not, fir : 

132 My Mafter knowes not but I am gone hence j 
And fearefiilly did menace me with death. 
If I did flay to looke on his entents. 

Frier. Stay, then j ile go alone : — feare comes vpon me ; 
136 O, much I feare fome ill vnluckie thing. 

Bal. As I did fleepe vnder this yew tree heere, 
I dreampt my maifter and another fought. 
And that my maider flew him. 

Frier. Romeo ! — [Advances. 

140 Alack, alack, what bloud is this, which flaines 
The flony entrance of this Sepulchre ? — 
What meane thefe maiflerleffe and goarie fwords 
To lie difcolour'd by this place of peace ? [Enters the tomb, 
144 Romeo/ oh, pale ! — Who elfe ? what, Paris too ? 
And fleept in blond ? — Ah, what an vnkind hower 
Is guiltie of this lamentable chance ? — 
The Lady ftirres. [Juliet wakes. 

J 48 Jul. O, comfortable Frier! where is my Lord ? 
I do remember well where I fhould be. 

And there I am : — where is my Romeo ? [Noife wit/im. 

Frier. I heare fome noyfe. — Lady, come from that nefl 
152 Of death, contagion, and vnnaturall fleepe : 
A greater power then we can contradid 
Hath thwarted our intents : come, come away : 
Thy hufband in thy bofome there lies dead j 
1^6 And Paris too : come, ile difpofe of thee 
Among a Siflerhood of holy Nunnes : 
Stay not to queflion, for the watch is conmiing ; 
Come, go, good Juliet, — I dare no longer flay. 

[Exit. 
160 Jul. Go, get thee hence, for I will not away. — 



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ACT V. sc. 3.] The mojl lameniabU Tragedie 90 

Whats heere ? a cup, clofd in my trae loues hand ? 
Poifon, I fee, hath bin his timelefle end : — 
O churle ! dninke all, and left no friendly drop 
164 To help me after ? — I will kifle thy lips j 
Happlie fome poyfon yet doth hang on them. 
To make me dye with a reftoratiue. 
Thy lips are warme I 

I JVatch, [IVUhin.] Leade, boy : which way? 
168 Jul, Yea, noife ? — then ile be briefe. — O happy dagger ! 

[Snatching Romeo's dagger. 
This is thy (heath [Stabs herself] -, there ruft, and let me dye. 

[Falls on Romeo s body, and dies. 

Enter Watch, with the Page of Paris. 

Page. This is the place 5 there, where the torch doth bunie. 
I Watch. The ground is bloudie -, fearch about the Church- 
yard : 
172 Go, fome of you, who ere you find attach. — 
Pittiftill fight ! heere lies the Countie ilaine ; 
Ancl Juliet bleeding 5 warme, and newlie dead. 
Who heere hath laine this two daies buried. — 
1 76 Go, tell the Prince, — runne to the Capulets, — 
Raife vp the Mountagues, — fome others fearch : — 
We fee the ground whereon thefe woes do lye | 
But the true g^und of all thefe piteous wcies, 
180 We cannot without circumftance defcry. 

Re-enter fome of the Watch, with Balthazer. 

3 IVdtch. Heres Romeos man ; we found him in the Church- 
yard. 
I fFatch. Hold him in fafetie, till the Prince come hither. 

Re-^nter Frier Lawrence, and another JVdtchman. 

3 JVdtch. Here is a Frier, that trembles, fighes, and weepes : 
184 We tooke this Mattocke and this Spade fi-om him. 
As he was conmiing ftt)m this Church-yards fide. 
I Watch. A great fufpition 5 ftay the Frier too. 



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ACT V. sc. 3.] of Romeo and luliet. 91 

Enter the Prince with others, 

Prin. What mifaduenture is fo eariy vp, 
188 That calls our perfon from our morning reft ? 

Enter Capulet and his wife. 

Cap. What fhould it be that is fo fhrik'd abroad ? 
Lady C. The people in the ftreet crie Romeo, 
Some Juliet, and fome Paris ; and all mnne 
192 With open outcry toward our Monument. 

Prin. What feare is this, which ftartles in our cares ? 
I JVaich. Soueraine, here lies the County Paris (lain i 
And Romeo dead -, and luliet, dead before^ 
196 Warme and new kild. 

Prin. Search, feeke, & know how this foule murder comes. 
I Watch. Here is a Frier, and Slaughtered Romeos man. 
With Inftruments vpon them, fit to open 
aoo Thefe dead mens Tombes. 

Cap. O heauens ! — O wife, looke how our daughter bleeds ! 
This dagger hath miftane, for, loe, his houfe 
Is emptie on the back of Mountague, 
204 And it misfheathed in my daughters bofome ! 

Lady C. O me ! this fight of death is as a Bell 
That wames my old age to a fepulcher. 

Enter Mountague. 

Prin, Come, Mountague ; for thou art early vp, 
208 To fee thy fonne and heire more early downe. 

Moun. Alas, my liege, my wife is dead to night ; 
Griefe of my fonnes exile hath ftopt her breath : 
What further woe confpires againft mine age ? 
212 Prin. Looke, and thou flialt fee. 

Moun. O thou vntaught ! what maners b in this. 
To prefle before thy father to a graue ? 

Prin. Seale vp the mouth of outrage for a while, 
216 Till we can cleare thefe ambiguities. 

And know their fpring, their head, their true difcent j 



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ACT V. sc. 3.] The mojl lament able Tragedie 92 

And then will T be generall of your woes. 

And leade you euen to death : meane time forbeare, 
a 10 And let mifchance be flaue to patience. — 

Bring foorth the parlies of fafpition. 

Frier. I am the greateft, able to do lead. 

Yet mod fufpe^ed, as the time and place 
**4 Doth make againft mp, of this direfliil murther 5 

And heere I (land, both to impeach and purge 

My felfe condemned and my felfe excufde. 

Pri/i. Then fay at once what thou doft know in this. 
aiS Frier. I will be briefe, for my fhort date of breath 

Is not fo long as is a tediopi tale. 

Romeo, there dead, was husband to that Juliet ; 

And ihe, there dead, that Romeos faithfull wife : 
*3* I married them j and their ftolne marriage day 

Was Tibalts doomefday, whofe vntimely death 

Banilht the new-made Bridegroome from this Citie ; 

For whome, and not for Tihalt, Juliet pinde. 
aj^ You, to remoue that fiege of griefe from her, . 

Betrothd, and would haue married her perforce. 

To Countie Paris. Then comes flie to me. 

And, with wild lookes, bid me deuife fome meane 
240 To rid her from this fecond manage. 

Or in my Cell there would ihe kill her felfe. 

Then gaue I her (fo tuterd by my art) 

A deeping potion ; which fo tooke efFe^ 
244 As I intended, for it wrought on her 

The forme of death : meane time I writ to Romeo, 

That he fhould hither come as this dire night. 

To help to take her from her borrowed graue, 
248 Being the time the potions force fhould ceafe. 

But he which bore my letter. Frier John, 

Was ftay'd by accident, and yefternight 

Returnd my letter back. Then all alone, 
252 At the prefixed hower of her waking. 

Came I to take her from her kindreds Vault ; 

Meaning to keepe her clofely at my Cell, 



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ACT V. SC. 3.] 



of Romeo and lullet. 



9i 



Till I conueniently could fend to Romeo : 
256 But when I came, fome minute ere the time 

Of her awakening, here vntimely lay 

The Noble Paris, and true Romeo, dead. 

She wakes j and I entreated her come forth, 
260 And beare this worke of heauen with patience : 

But then a noyfe did fcare me from the Tombe, 

And (he, too defperate, would not go with me. 

But, as it feemes, did violence on her felfe. 
264 Al this I know j & to the marriage 

Her Nurfe is priuie : and, if ought in this 

Mifcaried by my fault, let my old life 

Be facrific'd fome houre before his time 
268 Vnto the rigour of feuerefl law. 

Prin. We flill haue knowne thee for a holy man. — . 

Wheres Romeos man ? what can he fay to this ? 

Balth, I brought my maifter newes of Juliets death -, 
272 And then in pofle he came from Mantua, 

To this fame place, to this fame monument. 

This Letter he early bid me giue his Father j 

And threatned me with death, going in the Vault, 
276 If I departed not, and left him there. 

Prin, Giue me the Letter, I will looke on it. — 

Where is the Counties Page, that raifd the Watch ? — 

Sirrah, what made your maifter in this place ? 
280 Page. He came with flowers to ftrew his Ladies graue; 

And bid me ftand aloofe, and fo I did : 

Anon comes one with light to ope the Tombe j 

And by and by my maifter drew on him 5 
284 And then I ran away to call the Watch. 

Prin, This Letter doth make good the Friers words. 

Their courfe of Loue, the tidings of her death : 

And here he writes — that he did buy a poyfon 
388 Of a poore Pothecarie, and therewithall 

Came to this Vault to die, and lye with Juliet. — 

Where be thefe enemies? Capulet ! Mountague ! 

See, what a fcourge is laide vpon your hate. 



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ACT V. sc. 3.] The mq/i lamentable Tragedle 94 

292 That heauen finds means to kil yoxir ioyes with loue I 
And 1, for winking at your difcords too^ 
Haue loft a brace of kinfmen : — all are puniiht. 
Cap. O, brother Mountague, giue me thy hand : 
296 This is my daughters ioynture, for no more 
Can I demaund. 

Moun, But I can giue thee more : 

For I will raife her ftatue in pure gold 5 
That whiles Verona by that name is knowne^ 
300 There ihall no figure at fuch rate be fet. 
As that of true and feithfiill Itdiet. 

Cap, As rich fhall Romeos by his Ladies lie ) 
Poore (acrifices of our enmitie I 
304 Prin. A glooming peace this morning with it brings 5 
The Sun, for forrow, will not ihew his head : 
Go hence, to haue more talke of thefe fad things; 
Some fhall be pardoned, and fome punifhed : 
308 For neuer was a Storie of more wo. 

Then this of Juliet and her Romeo. 

[^Exeunt, 
FINIS, 



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95 



NOTES 



Dramatis PKRSONiC The list first given, imperfectly, by Rowe. 

Prologue. This Prologue is omitted in Ff. In (Qi) it consists but of twelve 
lines and is evidently not a true rendering of the original. 
CAorus.] Corns Q2. 
14. ^/r] Aear< Q2. 

Acts and Scenes. In the Qq. Ff. there is no division of this Play into Acts 
and Scenes. The Ff. indeed head the first scene with * Actus Primus. Scoena 
Prima. ' ; but that is all. The division I have adopted b that of most modem 
editions. 



Prologue 


Act I.' 


and Chorus 


Act II. 


Act III. 


Act IV. 


ActV. 


Chorus 


8c. X Knes 233 


lines 14 


Sc. X lines 4a 


Sc. X lines 190 


Sc. I Unes za6 


8c. X lines 89 


Unes 14 


„ a „ loi 
., 3 » J05 
» 4 H "5 
M 5 » '44 




„ a X89 
.* 3 » 94 
f* 4 »> »93 
»» 5 »» 77 
M 6 „ 37 


a M «43 
». 3 M X75 
.» 4 »» 36 
M 5 M 845 


f. • M 47 
>* 3 f» 59 
„ 4 » a8 

M 5 M «4« 


f. a M 30 
» 3 M 3o« 


«4 


698 


14 


631 


789 


40X 


4*5 



— Total a97a lines. 

In a tentative edition like the present, I have deemed it best for convenience 
of reference to the standard modem editions, to maintain this division ; but I 
suggest that the more natural division would have been to end Act III. 
with Sc, 4, — the scene in which Capulet promises Juliet in marriage to Paris, — 
making Act IV. commence with the Parting of the lovers. The interposition of 
the short scene 4 alone, between the arrangement made at the Friar's Cell for the 
meeting of the lovers and the scene in which they part, does not give a sufficiently 
marked interval for the occurrence of all the events which are supposed to have 
passed in the interim : moreover the addition of Sc. 5 to Act III. has the disad- 
vantage of making that act inordinately long. Capell made the division I here 
suggest ; but his example does not appear to have been followed by any subse- 
quent editor. 

ACT I. 

Scenf I. 

In this opening scene, up to the actual commencement of the fray, a comparison 
of (Qi) with Q2 leaves one with the impression that the former, in its incom- 
pleteness, is merely the result of imperfect notes taken during the performance ; 



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g6 Notes. [act i. sc. i. 

the summing ap of the affray itself in a descriptive stage direction strengthens 
this impression. On the entry of the Prince to part the combatants his speech is 
reduced nearly one third. In the subsequent dialogue between Mountague, his 
Wife, and Benvolio, there are again large omissions in (Qi). Benvolio asked to 
describe the fray ^breaks down at the second Ime ; but traces of the lines he should 
have spoken may be discovered in his confused account in (Qi) of the fatal fight 
in which Mercutio and Tybalt are slain (Act III. Sc i), where indeed one whole 
line of those here omitted will be found : — * IVkiU wf \tfuy\ were enterchaunging 
thrusts and blowes.* It will also be noticed as a proof of omission on the part of 
(Qi) that Mountague retains the line — * Black and portentous must this humour 
prove ; * but his description of Romeo's melancholy humour to which he refers is 
only to be found in Q2. Again we find evidence o( omission on the part of (Qi) 
in the abruptness of the conclusion of the dialogue between Romeo and Benvolio 
and in the absolute agreement in character of the additional 22 lines found in Q2 
with all that had gone before. For the rest, from the entry of the Prince to the 
conclusion of the scene, what is given in (Qi) is evidently derived, however ob- 
tained, from an authentic source, and has the great value of enabling us to correct 
some errors that have crept into Q2, and of affording evidence of revision in that 
quarta The reader may easily discover for himself by the aid of the Parallel 
texts edition of this play the proofs of this revision ; but all instances of any 
moment will be found recorded in these notes. 

I. Coales] Coles Q2, 3, 4, 

4. out 0/ collar] out of choller Q2, 3. out of the colter Q4. out of the collar Q5. 
out dth Collar Ff [p' th' F3, 4.) 

21. I will be ciuil with the maides] For ciuil Q4, 5 have cruell, a reading that 
has been very generally adopted, from Rowe downwards. 

26. Th^y must take it in sense] Q2, 3, Fi omit in. 

30. here comes two of the house of Mountagues. ] Malone first introduced two into 
the text, firom (Qi). The Ff. have, ... .of\\it Mountagues. 

31. [Enter Abram and another, seruing men of the Mountagues] The Qq. Ff. 
have merely, * Enter two other sennng men.^ From the prefix to his speeches we 
find the name of one to be Abram ; the other, a mute personage, was named by 
Rowe, Balthasar ; but as that is the name of Romeo's man, who pla)rs a serious 
part, I have preferred to leave this second serving man unnamed. 

39. which is disgrace to them] Q3, 4, 5 & Ff. have, — which is a disgrace to 
them, — ^the reading generally adopted. The introduction of the article seems 
however unnecessary. (Qi) has, — which is disgrace enough if they suffer it, 

52. [Enter, at opposite sides, Benuolio and Tibalt.] The Qq. Ff. have here 
merely * Enter Benuolio* Tibalt* s entry is marked after what is, in our text, 
line 6a 

Benuolio is of the Action of the Montagues, and his entry when Gregorie, a 
servant of the Capulets, says * here comes one of my maisters kinsmen * led 
Farmer to suppose a mistake in this place. Steevens however explains that 
" Gregorie may mean Tybalt, who enters immediately afler Benvolio, but on a 
different part of the stage. The eyes of the servant may be directed the way he 
sees Tybalt coming, and in the mean time, Benvolio enters on the opposite side." 



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ACT I. SC. I.] 



Notes, 



97 



The stage directions in such carelessly printed pla3rs as Shakspere's unfor- 
tunately are, need not be regarded in a very sacred light, and I have not therefore 
hesitated in bring^ig them here, and in other places, in agreement with the evi- 
dent intention of the scene. 

57. swashing] Q4, 5. washing Ql, 3, Ff. 

There can, I think, be no doubt that swashing is the right word in this place 
(see the notes and illustrations of the several editors collected in Fumess's 
Variorum Shakespeare), yet the following curious extract, with which I have been 
favoured by Dr B. Nicholson, is so good a contribution to our knowledge of the 
colloquialisms of the Elizabethan period, that I cannot refrain from giving it a 
place in thejie notes. 

** You see my quarter staffe, is it not a blesse begger, thinke you ? A washing 
blow of this is as good as a Laundresse, it will wash for the names sake : it can 
wipe a fellow ouer the thumbs, wring a man in the withers, and must needs dry 
beate a skoundrell, if it be artificially managed." 

P/aim Pffrri/a// \hy Rich. Harvey, 1589]. 

67. [Enter several of both houses, etc.] The Qq. for this stage direction have, 
* En^^ three orfoure Citizens with Clubs or party sons. ^ The Ff. omit * or party- 
sons.* Capel first amplified the stage direction. I have added to it * confused 
cries\ and broken up the two following lines to indicate that part would be 
shouted by one &ction, part by the other, and part by the citizens and officers 
who interfere to stop the fray. The Qq. and Ff. have the prefix Offi. to these 
two lines. The Cambridge Exlitors give both to First Off.; but conjecture that 
the second should be given to Citizens. Cit. or I Cit. (Theobald and Malone) is 
the usual prefix in modem editions. Mr Cowden Clarke, who remarks that ' this 
speech seems to be a collection of exclamations uttered by several persons rather 
than the words of one person ', gives both lines to Citizens. Dyce, also, in his 
and ed. 

69. [Enter at opposite sides old Capulet, etc.] It is clear from the dialogue that 
Capulet and Montague arrive on the scene of action at the same moment, I have 
therefore brought these two entries together and made the necessary alterations. 
The entry of Montague is marked in Qq. Ff. after line 73 of our text. 

77. Prophaners of this neighbour- stay ned Steele^ Isx/«/^here a misprint for jt?/7/ 

82. mistemperd\ mistempered^ Q2, 3, 4. i 

87. Veronas] Neronas Q2. 

108. While we were enterchaunging thrusts and biowes.} This line, with the 
change of we to they^ is found in (Qi) in Act III. Sc. I, where Benvolio describes 
the fatal brawl in which Mercutio and Tybalt are slain. 

115. A troubied minde draue me to walke abroad. '\ So Q3, 4, 5 & Ff. Q2 for 
dratu has driiu. Mommsen argues for the retention of driue^ and quotes, in 
support of his argument, Spenser (F.Q. 3, 4, 37, 'That so deepe wound through 
these deare members drive*) and the * Logonomia Anglica * (ed. 1 621, p. 49) of 
Alex. Gil, a contemporary grammarian. To this might be added the authority 
of Ben Jonson,— see his Grammar, Chap. XIX. — and two other instances in 
Spenser. 

* So forth he drew much gold, and toward him it drive.* 
for drove^ pusKd. F. Q. 6, 9, 32. 

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98 Notes. [act I. sc. i. 

* Others would through the river him have drivel 
for driven. F. Q. ( Two Cantos on Mutabilitie) 6, 50. 

Drive (1 short) still survives as a vulgarism ; but as no other instance of its use 
can be found in Shakspere I have preferred to follow the example of the editions 
subsequent to Q2, and of all English editors. 

For the line quoted at the head of this note (Qi) has, — 

A troubled thought drew me from companie : 
this, taken in connection with two other lines in this speech — 
I drew towards him but he was ware of me. 
And drew into the thicket of the wood, — 
also altered in Q2, would seem to suggest that the altered version is the result of 
a revision of the play for the later edition. See, also, note on lines 122, 123 in 
this same speech. 

116. Sycam4mr\ Q2, 3, 4 misprint Syramour. 

117. That Westward rootethfrom tht Cities side."] Malone, from (Qi). Q2 has, 
— this citie side. The rest, — this city side. 

122, 123. Which then most sought where most might not be found. 

Being one too many by my wearie selfe.] Q2, 3, 4, Ff. have a comma 
after sought; Q5 omits comma. For these two lines (Qi) has,— 

TTuit most are busied when th^are most alone, 
a reading introduced by Pope and adopted by many editors. The two lines 
however which appear in my text seem to me evidently the result of a revision 
of the original play. A probable restoration of the text b recorded in Fumess's 
Variorum edition, p. 431, Appendix, as the conjecture of Prof. G. Allen : — 
* where more might not be found.'' " Shakespear," says Mr Allen, "was not the 
man (in Romeo and Juliet, at least) to let slip the chance of running through the 
Degrees of Comparison, many, more, most. ** 

125. shunned] shunned Q2, 3, 4. 

136. portentous'] F2, 3, 4. portentiotis (Qi). portendous Q2, 3, 5, Fi. pro- 
tendous Q4. 

141. Both by my selfe and many o*h^ fritnds.^ — Fi has others Friends^ and on 
this authority Knight founds his reading, — and many others, fritnds. Knight's 
punctuation may possibly be right ; but there would be no need to change other 
to others. Other was frequently used as a plural. 

142. But he, his owne affections counseller\ But he is awne, etc. Q2. 

148. Or dedicate his bewtie to the sun."] For sun the Qq. Ff. have same. Sun is 
one of Theobald's many happy emendations, and has been almost universally 
adopted. It should however be observed that instances of this flat, lawyer*s- 
clerk-like diction are firequent in the works of Shakspere's predecessors and 
contemporaries — I could give many specimens ; but (to quote one instance only) 

* that which every one doth know for truth 

Needs no examples to confirm the same.* 

Greene's Comical History of Alphonsus, King of Arragon. 

67. Should, without eyes, see pathwaies to his toil/] For this line (Qi) has, — 

Should without lawes giue pathwaies to our will. The line is a difficult one, 

whichever version we accept, and has been variously interpreted by those editors 

who have ventured to explain it. Staunton conjectures that the true reading^ 



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ACT I. SC. I.] 



Notes. 



99 



suggested by (Qi), is probably — * Should, without eyes, sa pathways to our will * ; 
in other words, * make us walk in any direction he chooses to appoint.' 

172. crea^] So (Qi), F2, 3, 4. The rest, crgat^, 

174. wdsaming fomus\ So Q4, 5, F2, 3, 4. {well steming (i^. well-seem- 
i«^F3,4.) welseeing formes Q2, 3, Fi. best seeming things {Q^l), 

181,182. Griefes of mine awne lie heauie in my breast^ 
WhUh thou wilt propagate, to have it preast, ] 

(Qi) has, — lie heauie at my hart 

Which thou wouldst propagate to haue them prest. 
Pope, and others, adopted them in line 182. 

182. prop rgate"] propagate Q2. 

183. this loue, that thou hast shawne'] (Qi) has,— Mii griefe that tfwu hast 
showne, — probably the better reading. 

184. to too] too too Q2. 

185. Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighes\ Yon made. Pope introduced 
from (Qi) raisde. 

187. Being vext, a sea nourisht with toning teares] For louing. Pope introduced 
from (Qi) louerSf a reading very generally adopted. The whole line in (Qi) 
is, Being vext, a sea raging with a louers tears — and, with the omission of a before 
louers, would probably be the better reading. 

192. Tut, I have left myself] (Qi) & Qq. Ff. read,— * >ltfv/r lost myself* The 
emendation, which I consider a certain restoration of Shakspere's words, is 
recorded in Fumess's Variorum edition as being by Prof. Allen, whose note I 
subjoin : — 

" Ben. An if you leoT/e me so, you do me wrong. 
J^om. Tut, I have left myself, etc 

It was exactly in Romeo's manner, in this dialogue, that he should take up 
the very word of Ben vol io in his answer. Nothing was easier than for the tran- 
scriber or compositor of that day to mistake the/ for the long s, and vice versd. 
Compare Coriolanus, i. 4. 55, where for left we should probably read Av/." 

The passage in * Coriolanus * referred to by Prof. Allen is where Marcius pursuing 
the Volsces enters the town with them and is shut in. tlis followers give him for 
lost, and Latins exclaims — * Thou art left, Marcius* Collier had already con- 
jectured that lost was the true reading, and Singer first adopted the conjecture. 
For another instance in which it is certain that lost and left have been confounded 
see Hamlet, III. i. 99. * their perfume lost* is the reading of all the Quartos ; the 
Folios have left, 

194. Tell me in sadness: who is*t that you louef] The note of interrogation, 
found in Qq. Ff., seems to require the apostrophe / which I have introduced after 
is. Most modem editions omit the [?]. Capcll and Staunton retain it. Singer 
in his 2nd ed. read, — who 'tis that you love. Pope, founding his reading on (Qi) 
which has, — whome she is you loue t read, — who she is you lave. In Benvolio's 
next speech I have also ventured, contrary to modem practice, in preserving the 
last word, — whof as an interrogation. Q2, 3 give the speech in that form. 

197. Bid a sicke man in sadnesse make his will. ] So (Qi) and Q4, 5. Q2, 3 
and Fi have, — A sicke man in sadnesse makes his will^zxA F2, 3, 4 eke out the 
line by reading, — in good sadness — 



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loo Notes. [act I. sc. i. 

20I. mark-man} So (Qi). The Qq. Fi, 2 omit the hyphen. F3, 4 have 
marks-man. 

206. From hues weak childish haiv she Hues vnharmd\ The Qq. and Ff. have» 
— vncharmd. The correction is found in (Qi), which, however, reads, — Gainst 
Cupids childish bow she Hues vnhamCd. 

210, 211. 6>, she is rich in bewtie ! onely poore^ 

TTiaty when she dies^ with bewtie dies her store.'} Here (Qi) abruptly 
ends the scene. The second line has been much discussed, and Theobald's 
emendation — * with her dies Beauty's store ' — has been accepted by many editors. 

213. makes] make Q2, 3, Fi. 

ACT I. 
Scefte 2. 

In this s6ene, between Capulet and Paris in the first instance, and then between 
Capulet's Servant and Romeo and Benvolio, the chief differences between (Qi) 
andfQ2Tare the omission by (Qi) of the first three lines of the scene ( a speech 
by Capulet), four other lines (14, 15, 18, and 19) in Capulet's third and longest 
speech (which may, however, possibly be additions in Q2), and the confused ren- 
dering of the half-dozen lines of the Servant's soliloquy, which presents the same 
character of imperfection noticeable in (Qi) in the dialogue between the servants 
in the opening scene. Some other trifling variations may be due to revision in 
Q2 ; but by far the larger portion of the scene is absolutely the same in both 
quartos. 

[Enter Capulet, Countie Paris, and Servant.] The Qq. Ff. have, . . . and 
the Clowne. The prefix, however, to his speeches in this scene is Ser, or Seru. 
I have therefore conformed to modem practice in designating him Servant. 

13. Aftd too soone mard are those so early made] (QiJ has, — so early maried — 
a reading adopted by some editors. 

14. The earth hath swallowed] So Q5. The earth hath nvallowed Q4. 
Earth Iiath swallowed Q2, 3, Fl. Earth up hath swallaived F2, 3, 4. 

15. She is] So Q4, 5, F2, 3, 4. Shees Q2, 3. Shee's Fi. 

18. Ani^ shee agreed^] So, with the exception of comma after And^ Q2. 
The rest have, — And she agree — changed in modem editions to, — An she agree, 

25. Earthtreading starres^ that make darke heauen light.] Johnson interpreted 
this : earthly stars which eclipse the light of heaven. On this Mason observes, 
* it is not capable of the meaning that Johnson attributes to it, without the altera- 
tion I mean to propose, which is, to read : Earth-treading stars that make dark, 
heaven* s light. That is, earthly stars that outshine the stars of heaven, and 
make them appear dark by their own superior brightness. But, according to the 
present reading, they are earthly stars that enlighten the gloom of heaven. * Per- 
haps we should read, — Earth-treading stars, that mock (=rival) dark heaven'j 
light. 

26—28. Such comfort, as do lustie youngmen feele 
When well appareld Aprill on the heele 
Of lumping winter treads, ] In this word youngmen I have returned 



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ACT I. sc. 2.] Notes, lOT 

to the reading of (Qi), (Qq. Ff. have, young men) as I believe it here to be 
equivalent to yeotnen. Ritson gives a number of instances (see notes Variorum 
Shakspeare, ed. 1 821) in which it is certain that by \t yeomen was intended, and 
Minsheu states that * this word Youngmen is used for Yeomen in the Statute IT 
Anno 33 H. 8. Cap. 10.* 

I believe, therefore, that Johnson, who conjectures that we should read yeomen^ 
was right in his interpretation of this passage as being one of the many little pas- 
toral pictures with which Shakespere abounds, and that the Poet did not merely 
intend Capulet to say that Paris should feel as young men feel in the month of 
April, as explained by other commentators. 

It is very possible, also, that Shakespere may have written yeomen^ and Ritson 
points out that in the last scene of this play in two places the old copies read 
young trees and young tree instead of yew-tree. O 

In the third line quoted at the head of this note I have restored lumping of 
(Q I ) as conveying a more picturesque notion of dull, heavy, boorish winter than 
limping of the subsequent Qq. and Ff Compare Marston, Prologue to Second 
Part of * Antonio and Mellida,' vol. i. p. 70, ed. Halliwell, 1856. * The rawish 
danke of clumtie Winter * — Though here, by the way, Sidney Walker (Criticisms, 
vol. iii. p. 27) would read, — clammy WxuXxx, Clumsief however, is certainly right ; 
it is one of the words that Ben Jonson in his * Poetaster ', Act v. Sc I, makes 
Crispinus (Marston) throw up. See Gifford's notes. 

29. fresh female duds] So (Qi) and F2, 3, 4. The rest for female h&vefennell, 

32, 33. SucA amongst, view o^er man^ mine being one 

May stand in number, ete.] I subjoin the various readings of the first 
line : — 

Such amongst view of many myne being one, (Qi). 

Which one more view, of many, mine being one, Q2, 3, Ff. (veiw Q3, 

Fi) 
Which on more view of many, mine being one, Q4, 5. 

All the commentators are agreed that these readings are unintelligible, and 
sundry alterations have been proposed and adopted ; but I think I may venture 
to say with no satisfactory result. Capulet while consenting to, and even wel- 
coming, Paris* suit to his daughter, objects that she is too young lo wed, and 
recommends Paris (as he will have the opportunity of doing amongst the ' fresh 
female buds ' he is to meet) to *hear all, all see * before he decides on Juliet. I 
have reverted to the first reading of the line, and, with the slight alteration of 0/ 
to der, which I have ventured to make, I believe the sense of the passage is 
brought out without unnecessary violence to the old text. Steevens* conjecture 
Search among view of many, etc, though, I think, in itself void of meaning, may 
suggest another reading in accordance with that which I have adopted : Search 
amongst, view o'er many, etc In support of Steevens' conjecture Malone quotes 
a passage from Brooke's Poem, 

* Young damsels thither flock, of bachelors a rout ; 
Not so much for the banquet's sake, as beauties to search out.* 

38. — whose names are written here! It is written, etc.] The Qq. Ff. have, — 
whose names are ivrifteti. Here it is written, etc. (Q i ), —whose names are written 
here, and yet I know not, etc. The alteration adopted in the text is substantially 



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I02 



Notes. 



[act I. SC. 2. 



that of Rowe, who, however, places a note of interrogation after A^re instead of 
the note of exclamation. 

45. /«•/!*</] lessned {(^i) F3. iesned Qq. Fi, 2. lesifudV^ 

63 — 71. Capell first pointed out that the list of guests invited by Capulet re- 
solves itself naturally into verse with the slight change of Anselme to Anselmo in 
the second line, and the prefix of some such epithet as gentle to Livia in the 
seventh. He apparently overlooked the fact that the deficient syllable is supplied 
in (Qi) — ^and Livia.' Courtney and Sidney Walker (* Grit.' vol. i. p. 2) arrived 
independently at the same conclusion, and Dyce, in his and edition, for the first 
time printed the lines as verse. 

74, 75. Rom. Whither ^ 

Serv. To supper ; to our house.] To supper — with or without a note of 
interrogation after it, is given in all the old editions to Romeo. The alteration 
adopted in the text was first made by Theobald on a conjecture of Warburton's, 
and has since been universally accepted. I am not sure, however, but that the 
snip-snap of the dialogue requires further alteration, and that we should read :~ 

Rom. A faire assemblie : wherefore should they come ? 

Ser. To supper, or^ Up to supper. 

Rom. Whither? 

Ser. To our house. 
Romeo's double question as to the whither of the assembly has always seemed 
to me suspicious. 

83. — whom thou so loves'] Q5 and F2, 3, 4 have lovest ; all the earlier editions 
as in text. Sidney Walker has amply shown that the substitution of s for st in 
the second person singular of a verb was a grammatical license of the Eliza* 
bethan Period. See his * Criticisms,* voL ii. p. 126; Art Ixxvi., where he 
quotes two instances from this play : — iii. 5, 117. * TTiat thou expects not* 137. 
* Thou counterfaits* See also i. 5, 7, * as thou hues meJ 

89. — then turn tears to Jiers.] All the old editions have,^ or yire; Pope 
changed Xo fires on account of the rhyme to liars. All editors have followed his 
example till White, who remarks : — * The mere difference of a final x seems not 
to have been regarded in rhyme in Shakespear's day, and the reading "fires" 
tends to impoverish a line not over-rich.* 

94. 7f//, tut /— ] The second interjection, necessary to the metre, is added on 
the authority of F2, 3, 4. It was adopted by all editors firom Rowe to Capell, 
rejected by subsequent editors, and again restored by Collier and Dyce in their 
2nd editions. See Sidney Walker, 'Criticisms,' vol. ii. p. 141 ; Art Ixxix., 
'Omission of Repeated Words.* 

96. But in that Christall scales] Rowe altered to, those crystal scales ; and 
his alteration was adopted, I believe, by all editors down to Knight, and by some 
since his time. Malone, however, while adopting Rowe's alteration doubted its 
necessity. Knight merely observes that 'scales is used as a singular noun,' and 
Dyce says, * it was so firequently employed by the poet's contemporaries.' He 
does not however give any instance, nor am I aware of any. 

97. Your Ladie-loue—] All the old editions have Ladies love^ which has been 
modernized to Ladys lave. It seems obvious that the comparison is not between 
Romeo's love ft>r his Mistress, or hers for him, and the person of some other 



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ACT I. SC. 2.] 



Notes, 



103 



maid ; but between the persons of his Mistress and this other damsel. Theobald 
accordingly altered to Lady-love. Editors have been divided as to the propriety 
of this alteration, and it has even been questioned whether the compound Lady* 
love is as old as Shakespeare's time. Dyce however has conclusively shown that 
it is ; he quotes Wilson's * Coblers Prophesie,' 1594: *then downe came I my 
lady loue to finde.' 

^ And she shall scant shiw well^ that now shelves Best.] (Qi) and Q2 have, — 
seemes best. The rest, as in our text As a specimen of the carelessness with which 
dramatic literature was printed it may be mentioned that the first part of this line 
is corrupted in Fi to And she shew scant shelly well^ etc, 

ACT L 

Scene '^. 

Lady Capulet, the Nurse, and Juliet For the first third of this scene (Qi) and 
Q2 are absolutely identical. From that point to the end there are large omissions 
in (Qi)> and some instances of imperfect rendering, as will be seen at a glance on 
comparing the two quartos in the Parallel Texts. The character of the additional 
lines given in Q2 forbids the notion that they could have been written especially for 
that edition. In (Qi) the Nurse's speeches, in this scene and in the next scene in 
which she appears (Sc 5 towards the end), are printed in Italics. In the Qq. In 
this scene they are also printed in Italics, with the exception of the two last ; and 
in all the old editions they are printed as prose. In my text I have allowed the 
Italics to stand, these speeches having been so set up for what I may call the 
facsimile edition of Q2 ; but I have divided the lines as verse in accordance 
with the arrangement made by Pope, Johnson, Steevens, and CapelL To 
the last belongs the chief share of this work. It was not without hesitation 
that I determined on this division, for though undoubtedly the Nurse's speeches 
for the most part fall with ease into metrical rank they contain passages which it is 
difficult to believe could have been intended as such. Boswell, the editor for 
Malone's Variorum ed. 182 1, rather doubted the propriety of the modem arrange- 
ment, and in the principal speech of all, commencing * Euen or odd ' — (lines 
16 — ^48), two at least of the more recent editors, Staunton and Keightley, have re- 
turned to the prose form of the old editions. 

32. —fall out wC th* Dugge] — with Dugge {Qi).--with theDugge Qq. Ff. 

33. Shake^ quoth the Doue-house\ So in all the old editions, with the exception 
of the comma after Shake, Quoth may here possibly be a misprint for gdth or 
goeth, 

35. eleuen] So QS, F2, 3, 4, a leauen (Qi). a leuen Q2, 3, 4. a eleuen Fi. 

66. Jt is an honour e that Tdreame not 0/] Here, and in the following speech of 
the Nurse, honoure is corrupted to houre or hour in Qq. F£ Pope made the cor- 
rection, from (Qi). 

83. Examine every married liniament^] So (Q2). The rest for married have 
severally a reading adopted by many editors. Steevens well explains married as 
the mutual dependance on, or accordance of one feature with another. 



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I04 Notes, [act i. sc. 4. 



ACT I. 

Romeo and his friends prepare for their visit in masquerade to Capulet's assem- 
bly. In this scene there are some fifteen lines omitted in (Qi), and the version 
of the celebrated Queen Mab speech is inferior, and in places confused ; it is how- 
ever printed as verse, while in the later copies it is given as prose ; in other respects 
the two quartos are substantially identical. Against the omissions of (Qi) must 
be setoff three lines (7, 8, and 53) recovered from that quarto, which also affords 
corrections of some few errors of the subsequent editions. 

7, 8. Nor no without booke Prologue^ faintiy spoke 

After the Prompter^ for our entrance.] These two lines were first added to 
the received text by Pope, from (Qi). A good instance of the kind of Prologue 
referred to by Mercutio is that in Love's Labour's Lost, v. 2, where the King and 
his companions, disguised as Russians, enter with Moth as their Prologue. 

39. The game was nere so f aire and 1 am done.] Done is the reading of (Qi) 
and the first three folios. Q2 has dum. Q3, 4, 5 and F4 dun, 

41, 42. weetedraw thee from the mire^ 

Or^ saue your reuerence, toue, wherein thou stickst] Y ox your ^ in Ff., the 
Qq. have you. For stickst^ (Qi)» the Qq. &. Ff. have stickest. A reading very 
generally adopted is that of (Qi) : 

weele draw thee from the mire. 

Of this surreuerence (sir-reverence) loue, etc. 

45. We waste our lights in vaine^ light lights by day.] I have adopted here Dr 
B. Nicholson's emendation of the Qq. Ff. which read respectively in the latter 
half of the line, — lights lights by day — and — lights , lights, by day. (Q i ) has, — IVe 
bume our lights by night, like Lampes by day— and the latter half of this line, 
adopted first by Capell, has been generally received as the right reading. The 
line, however, in (Qi) is evidently corrupt and, as evidently, that in the Qq. Ff. 
is due to a revision, though blundered by the printer. Johnson, taking like from 
(Qi), read, — like lights by day ; but Nicholson's suggestion commends itself by 
its superior simplicity, consisting as it does merely in the ejection of an intru- 
sive s. 

47. our ftue wits] Malone (Wilbraham conj.). The^ Qq. Ff. have, — our fine 
ivits. The line in (Qi) stands thus : — Three times a day, ere onee in her right 
wits. 

54. Ben. Queen Mab! whats she\] From (Qi). Hunter suggested that this 
speech should be received into the text, and Keightley adopts his suggestion. I 
have, with (Qi),given the speech to Benvolio ; but it probably belongs to Romeo. 
It is to be noted that in (Qi) the long * Queen Mab' speech, which follows, is con- 
tinued to Benvolio. 

55 — 9^- The description of Queen Mab. This speech in Qq. Ff. is given as 
prose; its counterpart in (Qi), in which are many corruptions, is printed as 
verse. Pope first restored the verse in the received text. 

56. In shape no bigger than an Agot stone] Of course by this is to b^ understood, 



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ACT I. sc. 4.] Notes. T05 

not the bulk of the Agate-stone, but the small figure engraved in it Possibly 
we should read, — in Agot stone. 

58. atomics] Atomi {Qi), otiamUQl, 

59. Oun- mms noses] Athwart mens noses (Qi) ; adopted by Pope and others. 
62 — 64. Her Charriot . . . Fairies Coatchmakers .•] These lines in the original 

follow what in my text is line 72 (Prickt from the lazie finger of a maid). I have 
made the transposition on the authority of Mr W. N. Lettsom, whose note (in 
Dyce's 2nd ed. of Shakespeare) I subjoin : — * It is preposterous to speak of the 
parts of a chariot (such as the wagon spokes and cover) before mentioning the ^| 
chariot itself.* (Qi) does not contain these lines ; they may have been added in 
the margin of the * copy * prepared for Q2, and misplaced by the printer, as in , 
other instances which I have pointed out in these notes. 

67. the lash o/JUme] So F2, 3, ^—filmes {Qi)—Philome the rest 

70. Prickt from the lazie finger of a maid] Pope . Pieht , . . maide (Qi). 
Prieht . . . man Qq. Fl. Prickt . . . woman F2, 3, 4. 

73. Ore Courtiers knees] O're . . . (Qi). 0>f . . . Qq. Ff. 

75. who strait on kisses dream] Q2 for on has one. 

77. breaths] (Qi). breath Qq. Ff 

91, 92. And bakes the Elfiocks in fotde sluttish haires. 

Which once entangled much misfortune bodes.] For El/locks Q2, 3 &Fl 
have Elklocks. In the second line (Qi), Qq. & Fi, 2 have imtangled,—F^ as in 
text, — F4 intangled. It was surely the entanglement^ not the disentanglement, f 
which was inauspicious, I have therefore with Johnson adopted the correction i 
found in F3. 

102. — the frozen bosome of the North.] — thefrose bowels of the north (Ql). 

103. — puj'es cnvay from thence.]— puffes aivay in haste (Qi). 
04. Turning his face to the dewe dropping South] So (Qi). The rest for face 
have fide. Pope first adopted face, 

112, 113. But He^ that hath the stirrage of my course. 

Direct my sail I—] For sail, found in (Qi), the Qq. Ffl have sute. 
Steevens first adopted sail into the text ; he, however, read with (Qi) — Directs my 
sail. 

115. Ben. Strike, drum.] Omitted in (Qi), which also omits the first, the Serv- 
ants', portion of the next scene, and proceeds at once to the entry of * old Capulet 
with the Ladies.* In the Qq. & F£ the stage direction is : — * They march about the 
Stage, and Seruingmen come forth with [with their Ff.] Napkins.* Then, in Qq., 
* Enter Romeo,* corrected in Ffl to * Enter Seruant.* The servants prepare the 
Hall for the guests and ' Exeunt,* and then * Enter all the guests and Gentlewomen 
to the Masker^ s.* It is probable that on the old stage no break was made in the 
performance, and that after their march about the Maskers stood on one side and 
came forward again on the Entry of Capulet and his guests, after the retirement 
of the servants. I have, however, made the usual division of scenes and altered 
the stage directions accordingly. 

ACT I. 

Scene 5. 

Capulet** Assembly. As noted above, the preparatory scene with the Senr- 



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[act I. 



6C. 



ants is altogether omitted in (Qi). In other respects, allowing for the oxnissioii 
of a few lines in (Qi) and for some evident revisions in Q2, which are pointed out 
in the notes, Qos i & 2 are substantially identical It is noteworthy that for the 
last three lines (125-7) of Capulet's last speech, we find in (Qi) lines 6, 7 and part 
of 33 of his speeches in Act III. Sc 4, Q2. 

15. — willwalkea 6aut witA jwu.] The reading universally, I believe, adopted 
since Capell is that of (Qi) PVt// haue a bout with you. It should be observed 
that all the old copies spell a bout as one word ; to distinguish it, however, from 
the preposition, around^ I have divided it in conformity with the more general 
usage even of Shakespeare's time. To tread a measure or to walk a measure is 
a common form of expression among our old dramatists, and in this case where 
the bout is a bout of dancing the walk of Qq. & Ff. seems to me a preferable 
reading to the haue of the imi>erfect (Qi). I have accordingly retained it in my 
text. For a confirmation of the text of Qq. Ff. I refer to the masking scene in 
** Much Ado about Nothing," II. i., line 75, where Don Pedro choosing Hero as his 
partner for the dance addresses her : — ** Lady, will you walk about with your 
fri€ndy Hero's reply and other passages in the play show that this was an 
invitation to dance. See Act I. Sc. 2, 1. 9 — 11, "the prince discovered to 
Claudio that he loved my niece, your daughter, and meant to acknowledge it this 
night in a dance." Act II. Sc. i, 1. 58—60, ** The fault will be in the music, 
cousin, if you be not wooed in good time : if the prince be too important, tell him 
there is measure in every thing, and so dance out the answer." Same scene, 
line 92. Margaret being chosen by Balthasar, sa3rs, — " God match me with a 
good dancer ! " ; and Beatrice, same scene, lines 132, 134 & 135, *' We most 
follow the leaders " — ** if they lead to any ill, I will leave them at the next turn- 
ing." And then follows the dance. Florio in his * New World of Words,' ed. 
161 1, gives us, •* Girita, a giring, a twirling, a winding or crankling about," and 
" Girau61ta, as [same as] Girata. Also a walking turne, as we say a bout." 

16. Ah ha, my mistresses/] So in (Qi), first adopted by CapelL The rest 
have. Ah my and Ah me mistresses. 

17. 18. she that makes daintie, 

She, lie swear, hath Corns ;— ] Pope omitted She fi-om this second line, 
Steevens transferred it to the end of the preceding line. 
33. Lucentio] Lucientio Qq. 

39. Good youths, / faith I Oh, youth^s a ioUy thing f\ This line, found only in 
(Qi), is, as Steevens observes, 'natural and* worth preserving.* Keightley first 
adopted it into the text 
44, 46. Her Beauty hangs vfon the cheeke of night 
Like a rich Lewel in an Ethiops eare ; 

Bewtie too rich for use, etc.] So F2, 3, 4. The rest, including (Qi), 
hav€, — 

Ltseemes she hangs vpon the cheeke of night 

As [Like (Qi)] a rich lewel, etc. 

The reading of F2, 3, 4, is adopted by many editors ; others, while admitting 

its superiority, adhere, on the score of authority, to that of the earlier editions. 

The * authority ' of all the old editions, however, apart fi-om internal evidence, is 

very much a matter of surmise, and in this case the internal evidence is strongly 



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ACT 1. sc. 5.] Notes, 107 

in favour of the reading given in my text ; ' beauty ' in the second clause of the 
sentence (line 46) being dependent on its occurrence in the first It is noticeable 
that the last three folios, in which this emendation occurs, restore in the second 
line, LiJit of (Qi) which, in the greater part of this scene, must have presented a 
fiurly accurate copy of the original play. 

47. So shoioes a snowU Dtme trooping with Crowes\ So shmes a snow-white Swan 
trouping with Crowes (Qi). 

86. Be quidt or — Mare lights more light I — For shame /] It need hardly be ob- 
served that this speech, which is addressed partly to Tybalt and partly to the guests 
and servants, is without any distinctive pointing in the original editions. In the 
line above quoted there appears to be some difference of opinion among the 
editors as to the proper division of the speech : some, as I have done, marking 
For shame I as addressed to Tybalt ; others as addressed to the servants : — More 
light f more light, for shame / — 

93. the gentle fin is this] All the old copies have^ orfimte in this place. 

Warburton changes to fine, and his alteration has been very generally adopted. 

94. My lips, two blushing Pylgrims, readie stand,'\ . . . </ii/ readie stand. Q2, 
3, 4» Fi. 

132. Whats he, that fallows there, that wold not dance f] So (Qi). The rest for 
there have here. Capell first made the correction. 

142. H^hats this t Whats this /] So the Ff. The Qq. have Whats tis f whats 
tis f (Q2 omits [?] after second tis, and Q4 has, — what tis t) 

2ND CHORUS. 

This 'Chorus' is omitted in (Qi). 
4. With tender Juliet maUht] . . . matchQz. 

ACT II. 

Scenes i & 2. 

Romeo, Benvolio and Mercutio ; then Rpmeo, and Juliet at her window. In 
by far the larger portion of these scenes (Qi) and Q2 are substantially identical. 
(Qi) affords several certain corrections of the text of Q2 and evidence of some slight 
revisions in the latter, as will be pointed out in the notes on these scenes. (Qi) 
breaks down in Scene 2 at lines 120 — 138, and again at lines 149 — 154 ; but a 
study of the Parallel texts will, I think, convince the reader that the differences 
between the two quartos are the result of omissions in (Qi), not of additions in 

Q2. 

ACT II. 

Scene I. 

2. [He climbs the wall, and leaps down within it] This is Steevens s stage 
direction, justified by Benvolio's subsequent speech * He ran this way, and leap'd 
this orchard wall.' The old editions do not mark Romeo's exit from the scene 
in any way. Probably in the old theatre some piece of stage furniture repre- 
sented the wall, behind which Romeo lies close while hb friends Mercutio and 



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io8 Notes. [act ii. sc. i. 

Benvolio * conjure ' him. That he does not leave the stage is proved by his first 
speech in what we now call Scene 2, his entry for which, moreover, is not marked 
in the old copies. When Mercutio and Benvolio depart he comes forward, and 
the * wall ' being withdrawn, the audience are now at liberty to imagine them- 
selves with him in Capulet's orchard, and Juliet appears on the upper platform, as 
at her window. 

3. Ben. Romeo I my Cosen Romeo I Romeo I 

Mer. He is wise;] *He is wise' is 

printed in the Qq. as part of th^ following line ; in the Ff. it occupies a separate 
line, and shoidd have done so in my text ; but accidentally has got arranged as 
part of the preceding metrical line 3, the position given to it I believe by most 
modem editors, who following Pope's example omit, with (Qi), the third Romeo. 
In (Qi) the passage is given thus : — 

Ben : Romeo, my cosen Romeo. 
Mer : Doest thou heare he is wise, — 
Possibly * Doesl thou heare ' belonged to Benvolio's speech and was addressed to 
the hidden Romeo. 

7. Romeo I humorous madman I passionate louer /] For this line (Qi), which 
prints the speech as prose, has, — Romeo, madman, humors, passion, liuer. The 
reading of the other Qq. & Ff. is, substantially, — Romeo, humours, madman, 
passion louer, and this, with a note of exclamation after each word, is the generally 
received text Singer in his 2nd ed. alters to, — Romeo / Humour' s-madman t 
Passion-lover I 

I am responsible for the reading of my text. This speech throughout is very 
carelessly printed in the old editions. The first part of it — Nay, lie conjure too — 
except in (Qi) & Q4, 5, is given to Benvolio. Then for one we have on ; for 
pronounce, prouaunt ; for dove, day, and dye, or die ; for heir, her ; for trim, true ; 
and one whole line in it, He heareth not, he stirreth {striueth Q3) not, he moueth 
not, I can only account Jor on the supposition that the printer of Q2, as in 
other places m this play, has jumbled together some various readings which by 
accident remained uneffaced in the copy from which he printed. (Qi) in this 
place has merely, * Hee heares me not.. 

la Crie but* ay me* l couple but * hue * and * doue. *] For this line (Qi) (printed 
as prose) has, — cty but ay me. Pronounce but Loue and Doue, — and this sub- 
stantially is the reading generally adopted. Fi for Crie but ay me has, Cry me but 
ay me, which the subsequent folios change to Cry mebutayme {aim F4). Q2, 3, Fl 
corrupt Pronounce mio prouaunt and Prouant, and all (Qq. & Ff. ) corrupt Doue into 
day, die, or dye. A remarkable alteration is found in F2 (followed by F3, 4) which, 
in place of Pronounce, prouaunt ox Prouant, has Couply, corrected by Rowe to couple, 
for which word it was no doubt intended. This seems to me rather the blundered 
rendering of an authoritative correction than an attempt at conjectural emendation 
on the part of the printer of F2, who if exercising his critical faculty would 
scarcely have stopped short at couple and have left * loue and day ' unattempted ; 
I therefore conclude that he had before him, from some source or other, the 
Poet's emendation of the Pronounce of (Qi) (also in all probability the word in 
the original MS. of the Play) and accepted it without further care, corrupting it 
in so doing to Couply. I have accordingly, in common with many editors, 



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ACT II. sc. I.] Notes. 109 

adopted ccm^li in my text ; besides its probable authority it has superior fitness 
in this place to recommend it 

12. Aft'r] heire (Qi) & Q4, 5- her The rest. 

13. Young Abraham Cupid, he that shot so trim—] For this line (Qi), which 
prints the speech in which it occurs as prose, has, — * young Abraham : Cupid 
hee that shot so trim ' — Q2 & 3 only differ from it in reading true for trim ; 
a reading also followed by the subsequent Qos and Ff. which however omit 
the colon after Abraham, That (Qi) is right in reading trim is proved by 
the ballad (King Cophetua and the Beggar-maid) which is here alluded to — 
'The blinded boy that shoots so trim.* Percy, in a note to the ballad 
printed in his Reliques, first conjectured that trim not true was the right word, 
apparently without knowing that it was so given in (Qi). We have then 
only to consider here the epithet, Young Abraham Cupid, In 1746, in his 
* Critical Observations on Shakespeare,' Upton conjectured that Abraham was a 
misprint for Adam, and that the allusion was to the famous archer Adam Bell. 
Steevens, in 1778, adopted this conjecture which since then has been very gener- 
ally received. Previously to this, however, Theobald, in a note in his ist ed., 
'733f l^ad suggested that the true reading was, "Young aubom Cupid, i. e., 
brown hair'd, because in several other passages where aubom should be wrote, it 
is printed Abraham in the old books." Many instances have since been adduced 
showing that abraham, abram, abome, abron, abrun, aubrun, etc, were all forms 
of the word we now uniformly write auburn — signifying some colour of the hair 
ranging from amber to brown : and, with that meaning attached to it, Abraham 
has been retained in the text or auburn substituted for it by several editors. On 
the other hand Knight has suggested that Abraham Cupid meant the cheat, the 
Abraham-man of the old statutes. We have then two interpretations of Abraham 
and one substitute for it in the shape of Adam. Whether Mercutio himself 
supplies the nick-name which he conjures Romeo to bestow on Cupid ; or whether 
Abraham here merely occupies the place of an epithet, are points which I must 
leave my readers to determine for themselves, confessing my inability to arrive at 
any solution satisfactory to myself. 

For an interesting paper on the subject see the * Pen Monthly Magazine * for 
July, 1873, by Mr H. H. Fumess, editor of the New Variorrmi Shakespeare, 
in the first Volume of which — Romeo and Juliet — will also be found nearly all 
of importance that has been written on 'Abraham Cupid.* 

27, 28. That . . . name.] As in Capell. Qq. Ff. end first line at spight. 

28. and in his mistress name] Q2 omits and. 

38. An open et catera] An open, or Q2, 3, Ff. An open ^ catera and Q4, $. 
[andcatera Q5.) 

ACT II. 

Scene 2. 

8. Her vestall liuery is but sicke and greene] . . . pale and greene (Qi), adopted 
by Singer and others. 

10, II. // . . . wer !] As in Johnson. One line in Qq. F£ Omitted (Qi). 
12. She speakes, yet she saies nothing :] , , . ^^ she sayes nothing (Qi). 



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I lo Notes. [act II. sc. 2. 

15, 16. Two oftke fairest starres in all the ktaum^ 

Hauing some business do entreate her eyes] Qa for do luis to, (Qi) for 
Aeauen has skies ; possibly an accidental rhyme in the original play, corrected in 
the * copy * prepared for Q2. 

23. See, now she leanes her cheeke upon her hand.] I have taken this now from 
(Qi), which reads, — Oh now she leanes, etc. All the other old editions, and I 
believe all modem editions have how. 

24, 25. O, that I were a gloue vpon that hand. 

That I might touch that cheeke /] 
(Ql) has, — I would I were the gloue to that same hand, 
That I might kisse that cheeke. 
31. When he bestrides the lane pacing doudes.] So in (Ql) adopted by Pope. Qq. 
Ft ioT pacinghzyt puffing. 

39. Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. ] Malone, followed by many editors, 
altered the punctuation of this line to : — ' Thou art thjrself though, not a Mon- 
tague ' ; understanding though in the sense of however, Staunton and others 
explain the passage in the sense of " you would still retain all the perfections 
which adorn you, were you not called Mountague" ; or, as Grant White puts it, — 
"a rose is a rose, — has all its characteristic sweetness and beauty, — though it be 
not called a rose.'' (Qi) omits this line. 
41, 42. Nor arme nor face, nor any other part 

Belonging to a man, O, be some other name I] For these two lines (Qi) 
has: — 

Nor arme, nor face, nor any other part. 
The rest have :— 

Nor carme nor face, 6 be some other name 
Belonging to a man, 
Malone first made out the text as it now stands in all modem editions^ 

44. By any other name would smell as sweete] So in (Q I ) adopted by Pope. The 
Qq. Ffl have, — * By any other word,* etc 

45. So Romeo would, were he not Romeo cold] Q2 for were has wene, 
47. Romeo doffe thy name 

And for thy name which is no part of thee. ] (Q i) has, — * Romeo part thy name. 
And for that name which is no part of thee, * We are indebted for many corrections 
of our text to (Qi). Throughout this play there is much pla3ring upon words, 
and I suggest for the consideration of future editors whether part of (Ql) should 
not supersede doffo^ the later editions. 

Compare (thanks to Mis Fumess's Concordance to the Poems) Sonnet 113. 
Since I left you mine eye is in my mind. 
And that which governs me to go about 
Doth part his function and is partly blind. 
Many editors read with (Qi) — And for Mo/ name, etc. 
53, 54. By , . , am .] As in Ff. One line Qq. 
58, 59. My eares haue yet not drunk a hundred words 

Of thy tongues vttering ] In the first line (Qi) has, — not yet — and 

in the second, — that tongues utterance — both readings adopted by some editors. 
Q2 for tongues has tongus. 



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ACT II. 



sc. a.] 



Notes. 



Ill 



6i. Neither faire tncdde^ if either thee dislike,] Neythtr fair saint, if either thee 
displease, (Qi). Some editors have chosen the one, some the other, of these two 
readings ; others again have divided their allegiance and hare read — ntaid .... 
displease or saint .... dislike according to their fancy. 

62. camst] earnest Q2, 3, 4. 

65. kinsmen] kismen Q2. 

69. Therefore thy kinsmen are no stop to me] .... are no lei tome (Qi), adopted 
by Capell, and some subsequent editors. 

71, 72. Alacke I there lies more perill in thine eye. 

Then titfentie of their swords : — ] Prof. Geo. Allen proposes to print 
Then with an apostrophe, — Then^ [=: then in] twentie, etc, — this being, as he 
supposes, an instance of the absorption of the sound of the understood in by the 
like preceding sound in Then. See his note in the Appendix to Fumess's Variorum 
Shakespeare — Romeo and Juliet, p. 429 — 431. 

80. By Loues, that first did prompt me to enquire, ] I follow Keightley, who reads 
Lou^t in this line. The old editions have low; (Qi) also has, — who first did 
prompt, — adopted by CapelL Y ox prompt the Qq. & Fi have/ficinr/. 

82. Pylot] Pylat Q2. 

83. As that vast shore washt] So (Qi), Q4, 5. (Q2 for washt has washeth, 
Q3 washet) . . . vast-shore-was het Fi. . . . vast-shore : washd ¥2, . . . va^t-shore : 
washed F3. . . . vast-shore, washed F4. 

84. / should aduenturefor such merchandise] I would adaenture, etc (Qi) — 
Introduced by Pope and generally adopted. 

92. maisf] maiest Q2, 3, 4, Ff. 
95. thinkst] thinkest Q2, 3, 4, Ff. 

99. And therefore thou moist think my haviour lighf] moist Q$, F3. maiest or 
mayest The rest, hazn'our {Qi), F2, 3, 4. dehaviour The rest, 

loi. Then those that haue more cunning to be strange,] So (Qi), adopted first by 
Pope. Q2, 3, Fi for more cunning hvte coying; Q4, 5, morecoying; F2, 3, 4, 
morecoyning. 

104. My true loues Passion] So (Qi), Ff. & Q5. truloue Q2. trueloue Q3. 
trueloue(i^ 

107. Lady, by yonder blessed Moone I voto] (Qi) omits Lady, and for vow has 
sweare, adopted by Malone and many others, 
no. her circled orbe] . . . circle , , . Q2. 
113, 114. Or, if thou jvilt, sweare by thy gracious selfe, 
IVhich is the god of my Idolatrie. ] 
(Qi) has, — Or if thou sweare^ sweare by thy glorious selfe 
Which art the God of my Idolatrie. 
118. It is too rash, too unadvisd, too sudden] It is too rash, too sodaine, too un- 
adxnsde (Qi). 

139 — 141. O blessed, blessed night t lamafeard. 
Being in night, all this is but a dream, 
Too flattering swede to be substantiall, ] 
(Qi) has, — O blessed blessed night, I feare being night. 

All this is but a dreame I heare and see, 
Too flattering true to be substantiaU. 



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112 Notes. [act II. sc. a. 

The version of our text must, I fancy, be the result of a revision of the lines of 
the original play as given in (Qi). It is noteworthy that the second line of (Qi), 
slightly varied, occurs twice elsewhere in early plays. 

' How like a dream is this I see and hear.' 

Two Gent. Verona, V. iv., 26. 
' If this be not a dream I see and hear.' 

Comedy of Errors, V. L, 375. 
Note too the expression 'flattering true' in the third line of (Qi) with reference 
to the famous first line of Act V. Sc I of this Play : — 

* If I may trust iht JlatUring truth of sleep.' 

148. Andfollmv thee my Lord throughout the world.] So (Q I ), Ff. For my Lord 
Q2, 3 have my Z., Q4, 5 my Loue ; and of this Pope and others make, — And 
follow theey my love, throughout the Tvorld. 

149. meanst] So Q5. The rest, meanest. 

151. To cease thy suit] So Q5. Q4 sute. The rest, strt/e. The words * To 
cease your sute ' are found in Brooke's ' Romeus and Juliet.' Malone pointed this 
out and made the change in text, attributing erroneously the reading suit to (Qi) 
which has no corresponding passage. 

1 59 — 1 63. Bondage is hushtj and may not speake cdoude ; 

Else would I teare the Caue where Eccho lies. 

And make her ayrie tongue more hoarse then [Fame^] 

With repetition of my Komec{s name, 

Romeo /] 
In the first line I have substituted husht for hoarse^ and to the third have added 
Fame. The last portion of this speech within brackets is derived from (Qi). 

A consideration of the readings of the old texts will best explain, and, I believe, 
justify the alterations I have ventured to make. 
(Qi) has,- 

Bondage is hoarse and may not erie aloud. 

Els would I teare the Caue where Eccho lies 

And make her airie voice as hoarse cu mine. 

With repetition of my Romeox name, 

Romeo? 
Q2, 3, & Fi :— 

Bondage is hoarse and may not speake aloude. 

Else would I teare the Caue where Eccho lies, 

And make her ayrie tongue more hoarse, then 

With repetition of my Romeo. 
Q4 & 5 only differ from this in adding mitu to the end of the imperfect third line, 
probably deriving mine from (Qi). I should add that Q4 omits not in the first 
line. 

F2, 3, 4, make a bad attempt to cure the deficiency by reading, — 

And make her airy tongue more hoarse than with 

The repetition of my Romeo. 
The almost universally received modem text is, — 

Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud ; 

Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies, 



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ACT II. sc. a.] 



Notes, 



And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine 
With repetition of my Romeo's name. 
To this the Cambridge editors have added from (Qi) in a line by itself, as in 
my text, — Romeo I 

The only alteration to this received text has been made by Collier, who, fol- 
lowed by some other editors, adopts from (Qi) the airy voice of Echo instead of 
mry tongue. 

167. My sweetef] (Qi) has Madame. Q2, 3 & Fi My Neece^ corrected, as 
in text, in F2, 3, 4. Q4, 5 have My Deere. 
167, 168. JuL What a clocke tomorrow 

Shall I send to thee i 
Rom. By the houre of nine. ] 

For these lines (Qi) has, — 

Jul. At what a clocke tomorrow shall I send f 
Rom. At the houre of nine. 
From (Qi) Pope adopted — At what a clock — and Capel substituted At for By 
the houre. Their alterations have been accepted by many editors. 

169. tis tiuentie yeare till then.] So Q2. The rest, including (Qi), have, — 
iw entie yeares. 

180. And with a silke threed plucks it backe again^ silke (Qi). The rest have 
silken^ a redundant syllable, which F2, 3, 4 attempt to cure by omitting backe. 
Other but unnecessary changes have been made in this speech in most modem 
editions. On the authority of (Qi) the line, 178, — 

That lets it hop a little from his hand 
is generally changed to, — 

Who lets it hop a little from her hand. 
184. From this point to the end of the scene there is much confusion in the 
distribution of the speeches in Q2, 3 & Ff., and the first four lines (with variations) 
of the next scene have got foisted into Romeo's last speech. (Qi) & Q4, 5 give 
the lines substantially as in my text. 

188. Hefice will I to my ghostly father's cell.] So (Qi). The rest have,— 
ghostly Friers close cell. Capell first adopted (Qi). 

ACT II. 
Scene 3. 

Romeo acquaints Friar Lawrence with his love for Juliet So far as this scene 
is concerned 6 lines in the Friar's opening speech either omitted in (Qi) or 
added in Q2 : but more probably omitted in the former ; and a rhyming 
couplet at the end of the scene in Q2 not found in (Qi), constitute the chief 
differences between the two quartos, some slight revisions in Q2 always being 
allowed for. We have here too a noticeable instance of this revision in the first 
four lines of the Friar's opening speech, on which see note. 

[Enter Frier Lawrence . . .] Lawrence is omitted in Qq. Ffl (Qi) has, — 
Enter frier Francis. 

I — 4. The grey eyde morne .... Tytans wheeles.] The four lines with which 
C 8 



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1 14 Notes, [act ii. sc. 3. 

this scene commences in our text were printed in Q2, 3 & Ff. in the middle of 
Romeo's last speech in the preceding scene ; and this scene in Qq. & Fi com- 
menced with the four following lines : 

The grey-eyed mome smiles on the frowning night. 
Checking the Easteme clowdes with streaks of light : 
And fleckeld darknesse like a drunkard reeles, 
From forth daies path, and Titans burning wheeles : 
In my text in the third line I have, with most editors, changed Jl/ckUtf of Q2 to 
flecked oi (Qi). Q3 hasfleckeid, the Ff. fleckePd, Q4, 5 ejected the four lines 
from Romeo's speech, and F2, 3, 4 ejected the four with which the Friar's speech 
commenced. In both cases it may be pronounced with certainty that the editors 
or printers of those editions were wrong. A comparison of (Qi) and Q2 enables 
us here to get a glimpse of the * copy * which the printer of Q2 had before him. 
It was, I feel assured, a copy having in its margins alterations and additions. 
Some blunders {checkings burning, etc.) had been made by the copyist in the first 
four lines of the Friar's speech, and these lines were therefore re-written, either 
in the margin or on a paper attached to it ; by an oversight the original lines 
were not struck through, and by a blunder the revision of them was misplaced by 
the printer in Romeo's speech, and thus both versions got into the text. It may 
not be amiss here to give the four lines as they occur in ** England's Parnassus, 
etc.," 1600, quoted by Holt White in Variorum Shakspeare, 1 821. The reader 
will then, with the Parallel text edition, have four contemporary versions. 
**The gray-eyde mome smiles on the frowning night, 
Cheering the easteme cloudes with streames of light ; 
And darknesse fleeted, like a drunkard reeles 
From forth Aaye^s path-way made by Titan's wheels." 
15—20. O, mickle . . . stumbling on abuse,] The version of these lines in (Qi) 
differs slightly from that of our text. The variations may possibly be the result 
of revisions made in the copy from which Q2 was printed, for it seems certain 
that for this scene Danter had procured a fairly accurate copy of the original play. 
Douce in his * Illustrations ' gives another version of these lines as they are quoted 
in Swan's Speculum mundi, the first edition of which was published in 1635. 
" O mickle is the powerful good that lies 
In herbs, trees, stones, and their true qualities : 
For nought so vile that on the earth doth live, 
But to the earth some secret good doth give. 
And nought so rich on either rock or shelf; 
But, if unknown, lies uselesse to itself.** 
17, 18. For nought so vile that on the earth doth Hue 

But to the earth some speciall good doth giue.] Is it not rather the vile 
offspring which receives * some special good ' from the earth, * nature's mother ' ? 
Hanmer read, — * But to*t the earth, etc' Malone, however, explains to the earth 
as being the equivalent of to the inhabitants of the earth. For the first line (Qi) 
has, — For nought so znle, that vile on earth doth Hue. 

20. Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse] Revolts to vice and stumbles on 
abuse (Qi). 

22. A ndz/ice sometime* s by action di^nfletl] Capell, from (Qi) ; which has j^m^ 



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ACT II. SC. 3.] 



Notes. 



'»5 



limes. The rest, sometime. Theobald read, — sometime by action's dignified, 
23. Within the infant rinde of this weake flower] Pope substituted, from (Qi), 
this small flower, and his example has been very generally followed. I cannot 
see that anything b gained by the change ; on the contrary I should imagine 
that weake is here placed by way of contrast with power in the following line. 

26. Being tasted, flaies all sences with the hart,] For flaies Q2 has flaiss. The 
rest, including (Qi), flaies or flays. Mommsen argues in favour offtnies as being 
the better reading ; it may perhaps be considered as equally good : but the 
weight of 'authority ' is all in favour of flaies. flay (or flay occurs again in this 
play, IV. i., 72. 

27. Two such opposed Kings] . . . opposed ^^lf (Ql). 

yx The entry of Romeo is marked in Qq. Ft after line 22. In (Qi) his 
entry is not marked at all, neither is his exit at the end of the previous scene. 

31. Benedicite] Benedicitie Ql. 

32. so sweete saluteth me] so soone saluteth me (Qi). 

33. distempered] So Q5, F4. The rest, distempered. 

38. there golden sleepe doth raigne] , . . sleepe remaines (Qi). 

71, 72. //ow much salt water throwne ctway in waste 

To season loue, that of it doth not taste /] For this second line (Qi) has : — 
To season hue, that of loue doth not taste — ^and I suppose this must be the ex- 
planation of the Ime as given in our text ; I suspect however a corruption and 
that we should read : — that of itself doth taste, i. e. that is already of its own nature 
salt 

74. Thy old grones yet ringin mifu auncient eares.] Q2, 3 & Fi hscvt yet ringing, 
corrected, as in text, in subsequent editions. (Qi) has ring yet, a reading 
introduced by Pope and very generally adopted. 

85. I pray thee, chide me not : her I loue now] 1 pree thee chide not,' she whom I 
loue now (Qi), adopted by Pope, whose example is generally followed. 

88. Thy loue did reade by rote, that could not spell] . . . aftd could not spell (Q i), 
adopted by Pope, and by many subsequent editors. 



^^ 



ACT II. 
Scene ^. 

Benvolio and Mercutio, then Romeo, and subsequently the Nurse and her man 
Peter. Till near the end of this scene (Qi) and Q2 are substantially identical. 
The omissions towards the end of the scene in (Qi) may probably be accounted 
for as the result of an attempt, carelessly made, to shorten the play for represent- 
ation on the stage. It is noteworthy that in (Qi) the appointment for the meeting 
of Romeo and Juliet at the Friar's cell for their marriage is fixed for the morrow 
morning, and (Act II. Sc 6) they meet accordingly at that time. *Iiom. This 
morning here she pointed we should meet.* In Q2 the time fixed is that same 
afternoon, and when, in Act II. Sc. 6, Juliet makes her appearance, she wishes 
the Friar ' Good even.* 

13. AlcUf poore Romeo, he is already dead I stabd with a white wenches blacke eye.} 



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ii6 Notes, [act ii. sc. 4. 

I have pointed this passage in accordance with all modern editions ; but it may 
be questioned whether we have the true reading. After dead {Qi) has a colon ; 
all the other old editions, with the exception of Fi, have a comma. Fi omits 
the comma. Perhaps we should read, — he is already dgad-stabd. Dead-stabbed 
or mortally wounded would seem also more in accordance with the remainder of 
the speech than the blank assertion of Romeo's death, though as a victim of 
Love. 

I should here notice that in the next line of this speech the reading of (Qi), 
**skot thorough the ear," first introduced by Capell, has been very generally 
adopted in lieu of ** runng*' or " run through " of Qq. Ff. ; perhaps to avoid the 
repetition of the same idea conveyed in the word stabd^ or ]>erhaps with the notion 
that the word shot agreed better with the idea of the sound which would convey 
the ** love-song " through the ear. In the former case, however, shot gives us a 
repetition of the idea conveyed in the third clause of the speech, the shot from 
Cupid's bow, and on the latter I would observe that run through can need no 
justification so long as we talk of sounds piercing the ears. Compare Hamlet, — 
" These words, like daggers, enter in mine ears." 

18. Ben,\ Ro, in Qq. 

19. More then Prince of Cats, [lean tell you] ] The words witliin brackets first 
added by Capell from (Qi), which also has,— More then the Prince, etc. 

21, he rests [me] his minum rest] me added first by Malone fiom (Qi) omitting 
he, which is also omitted in that ed. minum rest is also the reading of (Qi), the 
Qq. have minum rests. The Ff. minum only. 

23. a duellist, a duellist] So (Qi ) & F4. The rest dualist in both places. 

27. fantasticoes.] So (Ql). The rtsi, phantacies or phantasies, 

31. pardon-mees] (Ql) has pardonmees. Q2, pardons mees, Q3 & Ff. 
substantially as in our text. Q4 & 5, pardona^ mees ; on which the Cambridge 
editors found their probably correct reading, perdona-mVs. A very generally 
received reading is Theobald's pardonnez- may's. Again, at the end of this 
speech, — their bones, their bon^s ! — Theobald's alteration, their bon^s their ton's, 
has been very generally received ; perhaps rightly. The Cam. edd. record an 
Anon. conj. — their buon^s, their buon^s, 

37. Laura, to his Lady, was [but] a kitchin wench] but introduced by Pope from 
(Qi), which also has, kitchin drudg, 

41. Boniour] BonieurQz. 

41. theres a French salutation to your French Jlop] there is a French curtesie to 
your French flop ( Q i ) . 

57. Sure wit:] The reading generally adopted is that of (Qi), IVell said, 
introduced by Capell. Steevens explains sure zmtas * wit that hits its mark.' 

61. my wits faints] my wit faints F2, 3, 4. my wits faint Q5. (Ql) has, my 
wits fail, adopted by Steevens and others. 

63. Nay, ifourxoits run t/ie wildgoose chase, lam done."} (Ql) has, — * Nay i( thy 
wits ... I haue done,*— a reading adopted by Capell, followed by many subse- 
quent editors, 

72. And is it not, then, wdl sent* din to a sweete goose 1] Then in this line is only 
found in Q2. I believe all modem editions omit it. 



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ACT II. sc. 4.] Notes, 1 1 7 

88 — 90. Rom. Hteres goodly geare I 

Enter Nurse, etc. 
Mer. A sayle^ etc, 
Ben. Two, etc.] 
The distribution of these speeches and the entry of the Nurse, is that of (Ql). 
The Nurse's entry in the Ff. is placed before Romeo's speech, and in the Qq. on 
a line with it. In both, — A say/e, a sayU — is continued to Rom.^ and Tioo^ 
two, etc. is given to Mer. (Qi) repeats a saile three times. 

94. Mer. Good Peter, to hide her face ; for her fans the fairer face.'] For this speech 
(Ql ) has, — Pree thee doo good Peter, to hide her face : for her fanne is the fairer oftfu 
tioo. The common reading is : — Good Peter, to hide her face ; for her fan* s the fairer 
of the two 

116. [He walkes by them and sings.] Stage direction from (Qi), introduced by 
Ulrici. 

125. Marry, farnveU f\ First introduced from (QO by Malone. 
147. an ill thing to be offred to any Gentleivoman, and very 'iveake dealing?^ Till by 
Collier's MS corrector wicked "^2,^ substituted for 7veake, this passage was allowed 
to pass unchallenged. Mr Fleay suggests to me that, if anygchange is needed, 
the old word icicke, still in use in the midland counties in the sense of foul^ 
iincked, should be adopted. I find it in that form in the Glossary to the Wycliffite 
Versions of the Bible ; Chaucer uses it in the form wikke. 

149. Tell her I protest — ] So in (Qi), except that there is no dash to indicate 
an interrupted speech. The rest have, — I protest unto thee. Tell her, however, is 
necessary to account for the speech with which the Nurse interrupts Romeo ; — 
'Good heart ! and, yfaith, I will tel her,* etc. 
*57» 158. Bid her devise 

Some means to come to shrift this afternoon.] This passage is printed 
as one line in Q2, 3, Ff., and as prose in Q4, 5. The division in our text is that 
adopted by Delius and the Cambridge editors. The usual arrangement, Capell's, 
ends the first line at shrift. 

164, 165. And stay, good Nurse, behinde the Abbey wall : 

Within this houre my man shall be with thee.] The punctuation of this 
passage in the original editions is, in F4 a comma after Nurse ; after wall (Qi), 
Q2, 3, 4, Ff. have a comma, and Q5 a colon. In the first line (Qi) reads, — And 
stay thou Nurse, etc, ; the Ff., And stay thou good Nurse, etc. 
Grant White gives a new reading as follows : — 

And stay, good Nurse ; behind the Abbey- wall 
Within this hour, etc. 
The Cambridge editors record a similar, anonymous, conjecture 
175. I warrant thee] So in F2, 3, 4. The Qq. & Fi omit /. 
185, 186. thats the dogs letter ; R is for the dog. — No; I know it begins with some 
other letter : — ] In this speech of the Nurse Q2 has, * thats the dog, nameR. is for the 
no, I know, etc.* Q3 & F i, * thats the dogsname. R, is for the no, I know, etc.* The 
rest, • thats the dogges * or. * dogs name. R. is for the no, I know, etc* ( — no. Q5. ) The 
reading of our text is due to Tyrwhitt and Farmer — the former suggesting, * that*s 
the dog's name; R is for the dog,— No ; I knaiv, etc. ; * the latter that we should 



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1 18 Notes, [act ii. sc. 4. 

either omit ftame or insert /^tftr :— * lAa^s the dog's ; * or — * thafs the dog's letter ; ' 
T3rrwhitt's conjecture has been the most generally received reading since its 
adoption by Steevens. Delius, the Cambridge editors, Keightley, and Fumess 
have, however, adopted Ritson*s regulation of the old text : — * this^s the do^s 
name ; R is for the — No; Iknow^ etc.* 

192. Be/ore^ and apaee."] So Qq. Ff. (Qi) has, — Peter ^ take my fanne^ and go 
before^ — adopted by Steevens and others. The Cambridge editors make a new 
reading by adding to (Qi) — and apace — of Qq. Ff. The short, sharp word of 
command of Qq. £f. used by the Nurse on suddenly recovering from her fit of 
garrulity with Romeo seems most in character. 

ACT II. 
Scene ^. 

The Nurse tells Juliet the result of her embassage. Except in subject, and in 
scattered firagments which indicate a common origin, there is but little resem- 
blance between (Qi) and Q2 in this scene. The former has all the appearance 
of having been roughly made up from imp>erfect notes. It would seem too that 
other parts of the play had been called in aid to enable the * editor* of (Qi) to 
complete his * copy *. For instance, Juliet says : — 

' And runne more swift, than hastie powder fierd, 
Doth hurrie from the fearfuU Cannons mouth.* 
This simile, with variations, is found again in both Quartos in Act V. Sc. I. One 
line used by the Nurse, — * Ah wheres my man ? Give me some aqua vita,* — is 
found in Q2 in Act III. Sc. 2, 1. 88 ; and the first line of Juliet's last speech,— 
* How doth her latter words revive my hart,* sounds like an echo of Romeo's 
speech in Act III. Sc. 3, 1. 165, — * How well my comfort is reviu'd by this *, 
found in both Quartos. 

2. promised] So Q5. promised The rest 

II. Is three long houres] for three Q2 has there, 

1$, 16. And his to me : 

But old/olhSf many fain as they wer dead ;] In the Qq. this passage is 
given as one line, and Q2 & 3 have a prefix Af. The Ff. give it as two lines, the 
first ending /oiks, Rowe arranged as in our text. 

A/any fain (Jaine Q3, 4, 5, Fi, 2 ; feign modem edd.) in this difficult 
passage has given rise to much speculation. Johnson reads, — marry , feigft. 
Grant White, — marry, fare. Collier's MS. corrector changes the line to : — And 
his to me; hut old folks seem as dead, Dyce's conjecture that the * copy * of the 
printer of Q2 had moue yfaith and was corrupted by him to many fain probably 
supplies the best means of correcting the text (Qi) has no corresponding lines. 

The Cambridge editors observe : — * Pope omits the lines — 
* * But old folks t many fain as they were dead ; 
Unwieldy, slow, heavy and pale as lead,** 
Thinking probably that they are due to interpolation, a supposition which the 
unmeaning * Af* in the earlier Quartos seems to confirm.* In their * Globe ' ed. 
they mark the passage with an obelus (f ) as corrupt. 



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ACT II. sc. 5-] Notes. 119 

21. loak'si] lookest Q2, 3, Ft. lookes F2. looks F3. 

23. sham^st\ shamest Q2, 3. 

26. wi/j/ a iaunce have I had l"] had, omitted in Q2, is found in the other 
Qq. Ff. I follow all the editors in adopting it. Perhaps, however, we should 
read, —what a jaunce had I, or fve had, 

54 — 56. Nur. Your lotie sayes, etc.] This speech is printed as verse in the Qq. 
Ff., the lines ending at gentlfnian — handsome — mother, Capell ends second line 
at «wrrfl«/— Steevens at handsome, ani. Prose first by Cam. edd. (Sidney 
Walker conj. * Criticisms,* Vol. i. p. 21}. 



ACT II. 
Scene d* 

Romeo and Juliet meet at the Friar's cell to be married. In this scene, except 
in subject, (Qi) and Q2 bear but little resemblance to each other. If in (Qi) it 
in any way resembles the original play, the scene must have been entirely re- 
written for Q2. The essential difference between the two versions cannot be 
accounted for as being the result of imperfect notes taken for (Qi). 

27. musickes'\ musuhe Q2, 

ACT III. 
Scene i. 

The fetal affray in which Mercutio and Tybalt are slain. (Qi) here presents 
merely the appearance of imperfect representation. Qne passage in it however is 
noticeable, as it has no counterpart in the subsequent quarto, and therefore sug- 
gests that Q2 was printed from a revised copy of the original play. In one of 
Mercutio's speeches, after he is wounded, he says : — ** I shall be fairely mounted 
vpon foure-mens shoulders .... and then some peasantly rogue, some Sexton, 
some base slaue shall write my Epitaph, that Tybalt came and broke the Princes 
Lawes, and Mercutio was slaine for the first and second cause." 

2. Capid€is'\ Capels (Ql) & Q2, 3. 

8. draws him on the drawer'\ (Qi) for draws him has draws it, — adopted by 
Pope, whose example is generally followed. 

30. [Enter Tybalt, Petnichio, and others.] For this, the stage direction of 
Qq. F£, (Qi) has merely * Enter Tybalt.* Petruchio is mentioned as one of 
Capulet's guests, Act I. Sc. 5, 1. 131. Being a mute personage his name is 
omitted in this stage direction in modem editions. 

55. Romeo, the loue I beare thee'] . . . the hate I beare thee (Qi), adopted 
by Pope and others. 

60. know'st'\ knowest Q2, 3. 

63. iniur^d] So Q5, Ff. iniuried Q2. iniured Q3, 4. 

69. Alia stoccatd] Knight {Ah / la Stoccata Theobald ; Ha I la — Hanmer ; A 
/fl^-Capell). Alia stucatho Q<\. Fl. Allastucatho F2, 3, 4. 

64. [Tybalt under Romeos arme thrusts Mercutio in, and flyes with his followers] 



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120 Notes, [act III. sc. i. 

I have taken this stage direction from (Qi), adding to it, from Cambridge edition, 
* with his followers.' The puncttation in (Qi) is — Mercutio^ in and — , The Qq. 
have, * Away Tybalt ', the Ff. * Exit Tybalt.* The Cam. edd. change thrusts 
Mcrcutio in to stabs Mcrcutio. 

85. A plague a both [your] houses /] So Dyce and succeeding editors. (Qi) has, 
. . . on your houses. The Qq. have ... a both houses. The F£ .• . . a or of both the 
houses. 

98—101. Helpe me in into some house, Benuolio, 

Or I shall faint. — A plague a both your houses t 
They haue made wormes meate of me . 

I haue it J and soundly too i^your houses /] This (punctuation apart) is 
the arrangement of Qq. & Ff., and is the usual reading. Dyce, however, followed 
by the Cambridge editors, Keightley and Fumess, re-arrange the two last lines 
thus :— 

They have made worms' meat of me : I have it, 
And soundly too : your houses ! 
Mr F. G. Fleay suggests to me another arrangement of the speech : — 
Help me into some house, Benvolio, 
Or I shall faint. 

A plague o' both your houses ! They have made 
Worms' meat o* me. I ha't and soundly too. 
Your houses ! 
103. hath got this mortall hurt] gott his Q3. got his Q4, 5, Ff. tane this (Ql). 
Mommsen and Cam. edd. restore the reading of Q2, as in text. 

106. //ath bene my Cozen] Hath beene my kinsman (Qi) — adopted by Capell 
and many subsequent editors. 

109. braue Mercutids dead!] So in F2, 3, 4, & Q5. Mercutio is Q2, 3, 4. 
Mercutids is ¥l. 

115. A Hue I in triumph I and Mercutio slaine I] Pope, from (Qi). Q2 has, 
//e gan in triumph, etc. — Q3, 4, & Fi, 2 AV gon, etc.—Q$ & F3, 4 /fe gone, 
etc. 

117. And fier-eyed furie be my conduct now!] Pope, from (Qi). Q2 for 
fier-cycd has,— /^ end. Q3, fier and. Q4, 5, Fi, 2, fire and. F3, 4, fire, 
and. 

19. gau^st] Q5, Ff. ^<7«^•J/ The rest. 

38. kinsman] kisman Q2, so also in lines 141 and 169 of this scene. 
140. O Prituel O husband I O, the bloud is spild] The Qq. Ff. have,--*0 
Prince, O cozen, husband, O, etc' 

The omission of coten from this line was made by Capell. The Cam. edd., 
however, record that in his Notes and MS. he altered the line to, * O cousin ! 
husband I O, etc' (Qi) for this line has, — Unhappy sight t Ah the blood is 
spilt. — From this Pope formed his line, — Unhappy sight! alas, the blood is 
spiird, — and Malone his, — Unhappy sight ! ah me, the blood, etc. 

148. vttered] vtrcred Q2, 

149. bow^d] bowed Qq. 

159. His agile arme] agill (Ql), Q4, $. aged Ql, 3, Fl. able F2, 3, 4. 



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ACT III. sc. I.] Notes, 121 

177. Mount. iVi?/ RomeOf Prince^ etc.'\ This speech is given to Captdd in Q2f 3, 
&Ff. 

181. / hauean interest in your hates proeeeding\ So (Ql). The rest have, . . • 
hearts proceeding. Capell first adopted (Qi), reading, hates^ ; Knight, hate's, 

185. I will be deaf e\ It will, etc, Q2, 3, Fi. 

188. Else, when he's found] Theobald. —heisfoundQ({.¥i, 

ACT III. 

Scefte 2. 

The Nurse acquaints Juliet with the death of Tybalt and the banishment of 
Romeo. 1 lere Q i is lamentably imperfect, though evidently derived from the same 
source as Q2. The latter contains 145 lines, the former only 60. It ir'note- 
worthy that the omissioijg and corruptions of (Qi) are almost entirely confined to 
Juliet*s speeches. Of the 28 lines given to the Nurse in Q2, more than 20 are 
found in Qi, and one of the additional lines in Q2 (Ah, wheres my man ? giue me 
some Aqua-vitae) had been already used in (Qi) in Act II. Sc 5. That the copy 
from which Q2 was printed underwent revision is, I think, fairly proved by the 
corrupt version of lines 85 — 87, which got printed in Q2, the correct rendering of 
which has, I believe, been recovered by the ingenuity of Mr Fleay. See n.te 
on this passage. 

2. Phoebus lodging] Phcsbus mansion (Ql), adopted by Pope and others, 

3. Phaeton] Phaetan Q2. 

6. That runnawayes eyes may wincke, — ] {run-awayes Q4, 5, Fl. run-awaies 
F2, 3. run-away s F4. run-aways\ run-away s and runaways, modem 
editions.) 

In Mr Fumess's * New Variorum Shakespeare,' the condensed noies on this line 
occupy no less than 28 pages royal Octavo, small print. To those students who 
wish to ground themselves in the literature of this subject, I commend his book, 
and shall here content myself with one short extract from a note by the Rev. Mr 
Hunter, which seems to me a sufficient explanation of the passage in question. 
** * Runaways ' I understand to be the same as * Runagates,* for which we have 
a kind of authority, a poor one, I allow, in Dyche's 'Dictionary,* 1735, 'Runa- 
gate or Runaway, a rover or wanderer.' . . . Juliet wishes that the night may be 
so pitchy dark, that should Romeo meet with any runagates (runaways) wan- 
dering about the streets, he may not be recognized, or even observed by them.'* 

9. By their own bewties — ] And by, etc. Q2, 3, Fl. 

19. Whiter than new snow on a Rauens bach,] So in F2, 3, 4. ... new snow 
upon Q2, 3, Fi. . . . sncwupon Q4, 5. 

21. Give me my Romeo ; and, when he shall die] So in Q4, 5. ... and 
when I shall dieQ2, 3 & Ff. 

34, 35. ^ow, Nurse, what newes t what, hast thou there the cords 

That Romeo bid thee fetch f] The Qq. & F£ arrange and punctuate the 
latter part of this speech as follows : — 

— what hast thou there, | The cords that, etc. Qq. 
— what hast thou there? | The cords that, etc. Ff. 



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122 Notes. [act III. sc. 2. 

Hanmer first arranged as in text ; but, followed by some editors, kept the punctu- 
ation of the F£ Other editors, adopting his arrangement, keep to the punctu- 
ation of Qq. 

37. A^ weladayl A weraday Qa. 

47. death darting eye\ death arting eye Ql. 

49. Or those eyes shut, that makes thee answere * V ;] The Qq. F£ for shut have 
shot; altered by Capell. For makes thee (corrected in modem editions to makg 
thee) F2, 3, 4 have makes the. 

5 1 . Brief e sounds determine \of\ my weale or wo] Q2, 3, 4 omit 0/, 

59. Vite earth, to earth resigne ;] Q2 has, Vile earth too, earth resigne, 

60. And thou, and Romeo, presse otte heazne beare\ For one Q2, 3, Fi have on, 
66. My dearest Cozen, and my dearer Lord] So Qq. & F£ Pope, whose reading 

is very generally followed, introduced firom (Qi) Jtfy dear-iov'd cousin. The 
whole line in (Qi) is, — 

My dear loude cousen, cmd my dearest Lord, 
68. For who is lining, if those two are gone f] For gone Pope substituted from 
(Qi) dead, 

71—74. Jul. OGodI did Romeos hand shead Ttbalts bloud 1 
Nut. It did, it did; alas the day I it did, 
Jul. O serpent heart, hid with aflowringface I 
Did euer draggon, etc,] 
Qi, 3, Fi continue the Nurse's speech to Juliet, and give the first line of Juliet's 
next speech {O serpent heart, etc.) to the Nuree. 

In the Ff., O God I of Juliet's first speech occupies a separate line and the 
remainder of that speech is given in F2, 3 to the Nurse. Q4, 5 & F4 distribute 
the speeches aright. 

75. Bewti/ull tirant I fiend angdicall I] The antithesis would seem here to 
require some other word than beautiful. Perhaps bountiful ox pity fid, or, as sug- 
gested to me by the late Mr Staunton, merciful, 

76. Douefeatherd raueni woluish rauening lamb!] Theobald, Q2 has, — 
Rauetums douefeatherd raul, etc. Q3, Rauenous douefeatherd Rauen. Fi, Rauen* 
ous Doue-feather^d Rauen, The rest, substantially, Rauenous Doue, feathered 
rauen. The introduction of this word Rauenous into the text of Q2 seems a 
clear proof that the ' copy ' from which that edition was printed had in its margins 
sundry alterations and corrections. 

79. A damned saint] So in Q4, $ & F2, 3, 4. A dimme saint Q2, 3. A 
dimne saint Fi. 

85 —87. Thcres no trust, 

No faith, fio honestie in men ; all naught. 

All periurde, all dissemblers, all forswome,] I have adopted this arrange- 
ment at the suggestion of the Rev. F. G. Fleay. The Imes stand in Qq. Yi, 
thus :— 

Theres no trust, no faith, no honestie in men. 
All periurde, all forswome, all naught, all dissemblers. 
Lines evidently corrapt, and which have never been satisfactorily corrected in any 
edition. In this scene I believe (Qi) may be depended on as giving, as far as the 
Nursis speeches are concerned, a fairly accurate representation of the original play. 



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ACT HI. sc. 2.] Notes. 123 

The changes then in Q2 may be considered as the result of revisions in the ' copy * 
from which that Qo. was printed. I have endeavoured here to show what the 
state of that * copy ' was ; by so doing I think I best explain and justify the 
alteration adopted. 

The text of the original play (also of (Qi)) is here represented by Roman tjrpc, 
the additions by italics, and the words or letters struck out are enclosed .in brackets. 

St 

There [i]s no tru[th], no faith, no honestie in men : all fiaught 
All [false, all faithles,] periurde, all forswome. all dissemblers^ 
The printer, instead of making a new line of No faith . , , all naughty and placing 
all dissemblers zHex ^riurde in the second line, took both alterations in the order 
in which they appeared in the margin, and added them to the end of what re- 
mained of the second line ohex falser all faithless had been struck out (For an- 
other instance of this kind of error, see Note on lines 37 — ^43, Act III. Sc. 3.) 

Pope altered the passage in his usual arbitrary manner, Capell followed his 
arrangement, but restored the words of Qq. F£, and since his time the text has 
always stood thus : — 

There's no trust, 
No faith, no honesty in men ; all perjured, 
All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers. 

I must here add that Mr Fleay, when on the 29th Aug., 1874, ^^ published 
this emendation in the * Athenaeum,' supposed the revisions in the 'copy* from 
which Q2 was printed (which I have endeavoured to describe above) to have 
been made on a portion of the printed (Ql) itself. We had both, inde]>endently 
of each other, at one time arrived at the conclusion that Q2 was in many places 
printed firom a copy of (Qi) corrected in MS. I had, however, then long ago 
abandoned that notion, as indeed Mr Fleay himself has since done. Our imma- 
ture conclusion was the result of the study of isolated passages only, such as the 
one which is the object of this note ; a larger comparison of the texts of the two 
quartos had convinced me that the 'copy' for Q2 was probably throughout 
(certainly in this scene) a MS. copy of the play, and that the revisions of which 
we had seen such manifest proofs were made on this MS. copy itself. These 
remarks apply also to Act III. Sc. 5, 1. 177- 181, on which see Note. 

88. Ahf wheres my man t giue me some Aqua-vita.'\ This line is found in (Qi) 
in Act II. Sc 5. 

1 18. foiled d\ Cl^, followed The rest 

128. coarse] course Q2, 3. 

130. Wash they his wounds with teares ;] So in Q3, 4 & F£ Q2 has a note of 
interrogation after teares ; Q$ a comma. I follow Sidney Walker, Staunton, 
Dyce, Cam. edd., Fumess, and other editors in adopting the punctuation of Q3, 
4&¥t The note of interrogation in Q2 may have been intended, as in number- 
less other instances, as a note of exclamation. (Qi) afTdtds us no assistance here. 



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T24 Notes, [act m. sc. 3. 

ACT III. 

Scene 3. 

Romeo in concealment at the Friar's cell. The Friar and Nurse. The chief 
differences in this scene between (Qi) and Q2 consist in omissions in the former. 
We have here again good proof that the * copy ' supplied for printing Q2 under- 
went revision, in the extraordinary jumble of lines which that Qo. presents in the 
passage where Romeo compares his condition with that of the flies. See lines 
37 — 43 and my note thereon. 

15. Here from Verona art thou Vanished] Hanmer adopts from (Qi), Hence 
from Verona, etc. 

19. 6aniskt] Q2 misprints, blanisht. 

23. smiTst] So Q5, F3, 4. smi/est The rest. 

37 — 43 . {i) And steale immoriall blessing from her lips ;— 

(2) Who^ euen in pure and vesta II modesties 

(3) Still blush, as thinking their own kisses sin ; — 

(4) But Romeo may not ; he is banished : 

(5) This may flyes do^ when I from this must flit ; 
1(6) Flies may do this, but J from this mustjiie : I 

(7) They are freemen, but I am banished : 

(8) And say St thou yet, that exile is not death f\ 

In this passage (Qi) has only the lines here numbered i, 4, & 6 ; the other Qos 
have all the lines, but in the following order, i, 2, 3, 5, 8, 4, 6, 7 ; the Folios 
follow the same order, but omit 6 and 7. Line 6 I have separated from the 
rest in the above-quoted passage, as it will not be found in my text, line 5 being, 
as I shall show, a substitute for it. The order of the lines, as I have given them, 
was first adopted by Malone and Steevens, followed by many editors, with the 
substitution for lines 5 & 6 of one line, — * Flies may do this when I from this 
must flie ' (Malone, Steevens) — or — * This may flies do but I from this must flie ' 
(Cam. Edd., who, however, in Globe ed. adopt line 6 in its integ^ty). 

Grant White, followed by Fumess, gives the lines as in my text Knight, 
Singer, Dyce, Keightley, and others omit, with folios, lines 6 & 7, but order the 
remaining lines as in my text. Staunton, Halliwell, Clarke also omit 6 & 7, but 
order the lines, I, 2, 3, 5, 4, 8. Collier is, I believe, the only English editor who 
retains all the lines and in the order in which they are found in Qq. 

It seems quite certain that in the greater part of this scene (Qi) gives a fairly 
accurate representation of the original play; it does not give some passages 
found in Q2, but it seems probable that those passages were omitted in (Qi), 
not added in Q2. In other respects where the two quartos differ, the dif- 
ferences may reasonably be accounted for by revisions in the *copy' with 
which the printer of Q2 was supplied. (Qi), Ijeing then here identical with the 
original play, enables us to reconstruct the * copy ' from which the printer of Qa 
worked, and thus to determine with certainty the proper order of the lines, and 
which to adopt or reject. 



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ACT III. SC. 3.] 



Notes. 



12^5 



The following restoration of the * copy ' will I think make all clear. The 
original play, (Qi), Is here printed in Roman type, the revisions and additions in 
italics. 



Nesst'Hg' 
a. H Mo euen i« ^ure and vtstatl modestie 
3. Still blush, as tkittJtiM^ thetr otim kissts sin. 



I. And steale immortal] [kisses] from her Upt ; 

4- But Romeo may not, he is banished. 

6. Flies m^y doo this, but I from this must flye. s This mayjlyes do, -mhtn I/nm this mustflie^ 
r/reemen^ 
^mt I am banishtd. a And saytst Ihouytt, that aciU is net dta'h I 



7. They are /rttmti 
bh 



In the first line there could be no mistake as to the substitution of bltss'.ng 
{blessings F4, followed by Rowe and other editors) for kisses. The two added 
lines, 2 and 3, which are purely parenthetical, should next have followed ; but the 
printer took all the four added lines (2, 3, 5, 8) which he found in the margin, 
and inserted them together, leaving in the text line 6, for which 5 was a substi- 
tute ; and thus he made the admirable confusion we find in the old copies. Line 7 
probably got inserted in the right place from its having been written on the 
opposite margin. I have not made any alteration in this line, but I strongly 
suspect that 7"hey are freemen is a printer's metathesis for They free remain. A 
comparison of the next few lines immediately following the above passage affords 
also, in my opinion, strong evidence of revision. (Qi) has, — 

Oh Father hadst thou no strong poison mixt, 

No sharpe ground knife, no present meane of death, 

Though nere so meane, but banishment 

To torture me withall : ah, banished. 
Q2 and the rest, — 

Hadst thou no poyson mixt, no sharpe ground knife. 

No sudden meane of death, though nere so meane, 

But banished to kill me : Banished ? 
52. Thou fond mad man^ heare me a little speake!\ So Q4, 5, from which Q2 & 3 
differ only in reading Then for Thou. Fi has, — Then fond madman^ heare me 
speake. F2, 3, 4, Fond mad man^ heare me speake, 

Malone, whose example is followed by many editors, adopts the version of (Qi), 
which has, Thou fond mad man heare^ mebut speakeazvord. Compare, in Parallel 
texts. Act III. Sc. 5, lines 163, 164. 

* Good father heare me speake ? * (Qi) 

* Good father, I beseech you on my knees, 

Heare me with patience, but to speake a word.' Q2. 

68. Then mighist thou speake^ then mightst thou teare thy hayre.] So in <'Q r) . In 
the Qq. Ff. two lines, the first ending speake. Q2 for the first mijhtst has 
mightestt and Q3, 4, Fi, 2 have mightest in both places. 

82. Where is my Ladyes Lord 1 wheres Romeo ^ So (Qi), adopted first by 
Rowe. Qq. Ff. have ^f^^^jand IVher/sfor Where is. 

85, 86. O wofull sympathy ! 

Pitious prediccament I ] 

This portion of the Nurse's speech has been very generally given to the Friai 
since the time of Steevens, who adopted Farmer's conjecture on the subject. 
Farmer says, "One may woi:der the editors did not see that such language must 



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126 Notes. [act hi. sc, 3. 

necessarily belong to the Friar." I confess I do not see it, and have therefore 
retained the arrangement of all the old editions. 

92. ^A sir I ah sir /— [ W?//,] deaths the end of all, ] Well introduced into the text 
by Malone from (Qi). QS makes up the line by reading, — death is. 

93. Spak'st thou ofluliet /] So Q5. The (Qi) ife Q2, 3, 4 have Spakest The 
Ff. Speak'st. 

96. With bloud remould but little from her owne] So (Qi) & Q5. The rest, 
remoued, 

no. thy zvild acts denotel deuote Q2f y doe note ¥2, donvteF^, 4. i 

113. And ilbeseeming beast in seeming bothi (Qi) has, — CV ill beseeming beast^ 
etc., adopted by Steevens, followed by many editors. Or is countenance^ by 
Brooke's * Romeus and Juliet ' where the Friar says : — 

So that I stood in doubt, this hour at the least. 
If thou a man or woman wert, or else a brutish beast. 
And^ however, seems the better reading in this place. 

117. Amisleythy Lady, that in thy life liues\ So F4. The Qq. & Fi, 2, 3 for 
Hues has lies. The two words are frequently confounded in the old editions. 
See S. Walker, * Criticisms,' Vol. ii. p. 209. (Qi) for this line has, — 

And slay thy Lady too, that Hues in thee ? 
adopted by Pope and some subsequent editors. 

119. ray r St] rayUstQl, 3 & 4. 

122. sham^st] shamest Q2, 3, 4. 

138. But thou sleivest Tibalt ; there art thou happie.\ So the Qq., from which 
(Qi) differs in ending the line, happy too. Fi differs from Qq. in reading slev/st, 
F2, 3, 4 have, slew* St . . . happy too, the reading generally adopted. To the next 
line but one, — And turnes it to exile ; there art thou happie : — Malone again added 
too, which is not found in any of the old editions. The too in (Qi) may be proper 
enough ; but its addition in the later copies, in which * there art thou happy * is 
thrice repeated (lines 137, 138, 140), seems to me to weaken the vigour of the 
speech. 

141. A packe of blessings light upon thy baeke\ (Qi) and Q4 read more gram- 
matically, — A pack of blessings lights, etc., but even among educated men to 
within recent times the error or licence found in our text is so common that I have 
not deemed any correction necessary here. 

* A plural idea has taken possession of the mind, and the recollection of the 
grammatical rule is effaced by its influence.' See * Essay on the Phraseology and 
Metre of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.* Variorum, 1821, ed. Boswell, 
Vol. I 

143. But, like a misbehau^d and sullen tvench] So Qi, 4, 5. ... a mishaued 
and Q2, 3. ... a mishaped and Fi. ... a mis-shaped and a F2, 3. ... a 
mis-shapen and a F4. 

144. Thou poutst vpon thy fortune and thy hue ] So Q5. TViou puts vp . , • 
Q2, 3. Thou powts vpon . . . Q4. Thou puttest up . . , Ff. For this line (Ql) 
has : — 

Thou frownst vpon thy Fate that smitles on thee. 
163. Here, sir, a Ring she bid megiue you, sir ;] Perhaps we should read,— ^<Tr, 
sir, *j a Ring, etc. (Qi) has : — 



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ACT III. SC. 3.] Notes. 127 

Here is a Ring sir, that she bad me giue you. 
168. disguised] disguise Q2. 

ACT III. 

Scene ^. 

Capulet, his wife and Paris. Capulct promises Juliet's hand to Paris. In this 
scene (Qi), when compared with Q2, has all the appearance of a carelessly 
shortened and imperfect representation of the original play. It is noteworthy 
that lines 6, 7 and 33, 

I promise yoUy but for your companie^ 
I would haue bene a bed an houre ago, 

Light to my chamber^ ho ! 

are found in (Qi) in Act I. Sc. 5. 

8. These times of wo affoord no times to wooe\ ... no time to wooc (Qi). The 
usual reading, from Rowe downwards. 

1 1, shees meu/d vp] Theobald, shees mewed vp Q2. she is mewed vp Q3, 4, 5, Ff. 

23. Weele keepe^ Well, keepeq2, 

34, 36. Afore me, it is so very, very late. 

That we may call it early by and by : 

Goodnight.] This, with the exception of Goodnight, is the reading and 
arrangement of (Qi). The Qq. have very only once ; the Ff. omit very altogether, 
and both Qq. and Ff. print Afore ,,. iy in one line, giving Goodnight (omitted 
in Qi) in a separate line. Dyce, followed by Chambers and Canu Edd., first 
gave the passage as in our text. In his second ed. he returned to Theobald's 
arrangement : — 

'Fore me, it b so very late, that we 
May call it early by and by. Good-night 
reading, however, — Afore me, 'tis etc. 
Capell read : — Now afore . . . late | That ... by | Goodnight. 

ACT III. 
Scenes, 

The parting of the lovers. Capulet and his wife inform Juliet of her approach- 
ing marriage with Paris. Shortened and some evidently corrupt passages will 
be found in (Qi) on comparing it with Q2, and evidence of revision in the latter 
b found in some places. See for instance note on lines 177- 181. In the largtr 
portion, however, of the scene, the two quartos are substantially identical. 

13. It is some Meteor that the Sun exhales] . . . exhale Q2, 5. 

19. the morning eye] Q2 repeats /^. 

20. Tis but the pale reflex of Cinthias brow.] Collier's MS, Corrector has here an 
emendation, — Cynthia^ s bow — adopted by some editors. 

30. This doth not so, for she diuideih us] . . . for this diuideth us (Ql). 
33. Since arme from ar me that voyce doth us affray] . . . her voyce . . . (Ql). 
36. [Enter Nurse.] Rowe. Enter Madame and Nurse, Qq. Ff. The entry of 
the Nurse to give the alarm is not marked in (Qi) till after Romeo's exit, and 



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1 28 Notes, [act III. sc. 5. 

from that point to the end of the scene (Qi) appears to consist of fragments more 
or less perfect of the original play mixed up with passages probably the result of 
imperfect note-taking. 

39. Your Lady Mother^ s cummingto yourchamber\ Pope. Your Lady Mother 
is cumming, etc. Qq. Ff. 

42. [He goeth downe] (Qi). No stage direction in Qq. Ff 

43. Art thou gone so / loue ! Lord I ay, husband I friatd !^ It might perhaps 
have been better to punctuate this line, — Art thou gone sOy loue f etc. The note 
of interrogation after so is only found in Ff. Q3 has a comma after so. The 
other quartos have no point. F2, 3, 4 for ay husband have, ah Husband. Bos- 
well substituted for this line the reading of (Qi): — Art thou gone so,\y\ my Ij>rd^ 
[!] my Loue,\y\ my />-<fw^/[!]— and his example is followed by several editors. 
Dyce says, " I have preferred the reading of (Qi) because I have great doubts if 
the * ay' [of Qq. Fi] is to be understood as equivalent to *yes* (the usual old 
spelling of it in that sense being */'). The editor of F2 altered it to *ah * ; for 
which perhaps it was intended." Grant White conjectures that "perhaps ay is a 
misprint for my.'^ 

I have attributed the introduction of the reading of (Qi) to Boswell on the 
authority of the Cam. Edd. and Fumess. The note in the Variorum 1 821, in 
which the alteration of the text is recorded, h-is M alone' s name attached to it. 
44—46. / must hearefrom thee euery day in the houre. 

For in an hower there are many dayes : 

Minutes are dayes ; so will /number them.} 
For this second line (Qi) has, — For in an hower there are many minutes. The 
Qq. Si Ff have, — For in a minute there are many dayes, I am responsible for the 
text as quoted above, and also for the introduction from (Qi) of the third line — 
Minutes are dayes, etc. 

53. /doubt it not — } I am not aware that this reading has ever been questioned ; 
but to me it seems probable that the / here stands for the affirmative Ay. I 
have not, however, ventured to punctuate in accordance with my conviction. 
(Qi) has No doubt, no doubt. 

54. our times to come] So Q2, and Capell. (Qi) has, the time, etc.^ The rest, our 
time, etc. 

55. Jul. O God ! / haue an ill diuining soule :^ Q2, 3 have the prefix oi /(o. to 
this speech. 

56. Me thinkes / see thee, now thou art below,'] Pope introduced below from (Qi). 
The Qq. Ff have, so lowe. 

58. lookst] lookest Q2, 3, 4. 

65. [She goeth dowue from the window.] Stage direction from (Qi). Not in 
Qq. Ff. which here mark the entry of Lady C. * Enter Mother.' 

66. // is my Lady mother] So in the Qos. Fl has, /s it my Lady mother^ 
to which F2, 3, 4 add a note of interrogation. 

77. Which you wcepefor] Theobald read, as a metrical necessity, ' Which you do 
weep for' ; in recent editions his emendation has been rejected. 

83. God pardon him I — I do, with all my heart ;] Q2 has padon and, with Q3 
& Fi, omits him, which is found in the later Qq. & Ff (Qi) has no correspond- 
ing line. 



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ACT III. sc. 5.] Notes, 129 

91. Shall gin e him such an unaccmtonid dram\ For this line Stecvens sub- 
sliluted that of (Qi), That should (Steevens shall) bestoiv on him so sure a drauglU, 

94 — 96. Indeed^ I ncuer shall b€ satisfied 

With Romeo— till I behold him— dead- 
Is my poor heart — so for a kinsman vext ] 
The Qq. Ff. give this passage as follows : — 

Indeed I never shall be satisfied 

With Romeo, till I behold him. Dead 

Is my poore heart so for a kinsman vext 

The several interpretations of which this ambiguous speech is capable are I 
suppose : — I. I never shall be satisfied with Romeo. 2. I never shall be satisfied 
with Romeo till I behold him. 3. I never shall be satisfied with Romeo till I 
behold him dead. 4. Till I behold him, dead is my poor heart. 5. Dead is my 
poor heart, so for a kinsman vext. 

In my text I have ventured to differ slightly from the usual mode of pointing 
this speech in placing a dash after Romeo and after heart. 

102. To ivreake the loue I bore my Cozen [ Tybalt \ ] The word Tybalt^ which 
completes this line, is only found in F2, 3, 4. Theobald's emendation — 
slaughtered cousin — is a preferable reading ; but it is just possible that the printer 
of F2 had some authority for his addition to the line. 

106. And ioy comes well in such a needie lime] For needie (Ql) has needful^ 
adopted by Pope. 

117. Noxv, by Saint Peters Church] S. Peters Q2. 

127. When the Sun sets^ the ayre doth drisle deaw {\ ayre is only found in Q4 
& 5- Q2» 3» & Ff. have earth. Malone though reading air considered that earth 
of the previous Qq. & Ff. was strongly supported by a line in the Rape of 
Lucrece. 

But as the earth doth weep, the sun being set. 
On this Steevens remarks : — ** When our author, in Midsummer Night's Dream, 
sa)rs : — *And when she [the moon] weeps, 7veeps every little flower;' he only 
means that every little flower is moistened with dew, as if with tears ; and not 
that the flower itself drizzles dew. This passage sufficiently explains how the 
earthy in the quotation from The Rape of Lucrece, may be said to weep." 

Grant White suggests that the reading earth was probably the result of a con- 
fusion produced by the old pronunciation of * earth ', airth. 

132. Thou counterfaits] — countefaits Q2. 

139. deliuer'd] Rowe. deliuered Q(\. Ff. 

140. she giius you thankes] giue Q2. 

146. So worthy a Gentleman to be her Bridegroom] For Bridegroom Q2 has 
Bridct a reading retained by Mommsen. — See his note, Fumess's * Variorum 
Shakespeare'. — It is possiblj he may be right ; the metre would seem to justify 
the licence ; though to English Philologists that licence must seem extreme. I 
have however met with a line, in Dekker's " Shoe-makers Holiday," which may 
be worth consideration : — 

** Faire maid this Bridegroome cannot be your Bride." 

(last scene, p. 76, vol. i. Pearson's ed.) — 
but in the face of the agreement of all the later quartos and the folios, and the 
C 9 



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130 Notes. [act III. sc. 5. 

unanimous decision of all English editors, I have not deemed this a sufficient 
authority for the retention of drtde in this place. To do so some such alteratioa 
as the following would seem to be required in the line itself : — 

So worthy a gentleman to ca// her bride. 
Compare * Merchant of Venice*, Act III. Sc. 2, 1. 305, 

** First go with me to church and ca// me wife." 
(Qi) affords no assistance here. 

150. //ow nmu! how n&iu !—"] So, substantially, Q3, 4, 5 & Ff. Q2 has, 
.Uow, how^ kowhmv. 

154. But fettle your fine Ioynts\. For fettle F2, 3, 4 have settle^ followed by all 
the editors till quite recently when Staunton, I believe, was the first to restore 
fettle to the text. (Steevens and Mommsen in their reprints of (Qi) have 
settle.) 

166. That God had lent us but this onely childe] For lent (Qi) has sent^ a read- 
ing adopted by Pope and many subsequent editors. 

168. And that we haue a curse in hauing her] For curse (Qi) has croffe^ for 
which Grant White conjectures that the later reading is possibly a misprint. 
173, 174. Cap. O, Godigeden, 

Nur. May not one s^eake [tye"] f 

Cap. Peace, you mumbling foole /] 

The prefix to Capulet's speeches in this scene, in the Qq. Ff. , is Fa. for Father. 
Q2, 3, & Fi here print, Father^ 6 Godigeden \ May not one speake J as part of the 
Nurse's previous sj>eech. F2, 3, 4 omit Father, The right distribution of the 
speeches is found in Q4, 5. For the metre Theobald read the last line : — Peace, 
peace you mumbling fool ! Seymour conjectured : — Peace, you old mumbling 
fool 1 Mr F. G. Fleay's conjecture {speak fye\ which I have adopted, seems to 
me the best mode of curing the metrical defect. 
1 77- 1 81. Lady C. You are too hot. 

Cap. Gods bread! it makes nu mad ; 

Day- time, night-tide, waking or sleeping houre. 
At home, abroad, alone, in companie. 
Working or playing, still my care hath bene 

To haue her mate lit : ] 

For these lines (Qi) has, — 

Mo : My Lord ye are too hotte. 
Cap : Gods blessed mother wife it mads me. 
Day, night, <arly, late, at home, abroad. 
Alone, in company, ipaking or sleeping. 
Still my care hath beene to see her matcht. 
Q2, followed by the other Quartos and the Folios, has, — 
Wi. You are too hot. 
Fa. Gods bread, it makes me mad. 

Day, night, houre, tide, time, worke, play. 
Alone in companie, still my care hath bene 

To haue her matcht, 

A careful study of the dialogue in this place will, I think, convince the reader 
that Lady C.'s speech — * You are too hot,*— commences the line which Capulet 



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ACT III. SC. 5.] 



Notes. 



^31 



completes Mrith— ' Gods bread ! it makes me mad ' — and should not be arranged 
as completing the last line of Capulet's previous speech addressed to the Nurse. 
We have then here only to consider how the universally admitted corruption, in 
the old editions, of Capulet's speech quoted above is to be cured. Pope made up 
a text chiefly from (Qi) and, as his example has been followed in more important 
editions, his version is here recorded. 

God's bread ! it makes me mad 1 Day, night, late, early, 
At home, abroad, alone, in company. 
Waking or sleeping, still my care hath been 
To have her match'd : — 

This version, however, inasmuch as it ignores altogether the new words intro- 
duced in Q2, must be set aside as inadmissible, and we are then compelled to 
fall back on a comparative study of the texts of (Qi) & Q2 in order to piece to- 
gether a probable version of the lines intended by the poet ; but destroyed by the 
printer. In the versions of (Qi) and Q2 given above, I have underlined in the 
former the words which are omitted in the latter and underlined in the latter the 
new words there introduced. Neither can by any possibility be considered as 
true versions of the passage they profess to represent. The probability, however, 
seems to me greatly in favour of the supposition that (Qi), errors apart, substan- 
tially agreed with the * copy ' supplied to the printer of Q2, but that that * copy ' 
had in it alterations and revisions which were blundered by the printer into the 
corruption which Q2 presents to us. 

To Mr F. G. Flcay, to whom I submitted my views on the subject, I am mainly 
indebted for the version which I have adopted in my text with great confidence 
in it as a highly probable and undoubtedly a most ingenious restoration of what 
I suppose must have been the true revised version. I append his explanation of 
the process which resulted in the corruption of Q2. " The corrector crossed out 
iarfy, laU; and meant to run his pen round waking or sUfping^ so as to indicate 
its transposition ; but, making his curve higher in the page than he intended, 
ran it through at home^ abroad^ and tonking or sleeping : hence these words were 
omitted, and the marginal corrections, houre^ tide, time, worke, play, were put in, 
all in a heap. The two last of these do not appear as working, playing, because 
the corrector at first meant only to delete wok, sleep, in waking and sleeping, 
before he saw that these words were wanted in another phice. This seems 
complex in explanation ; but try it, and its truth will be evident at once." 

183. trainde'\ So (Qi), adopted by Capell and most editors. Q2 has liand. 
The subsequent Qq. & Ff. have allied. 

185. Proportiond as ones thought would wish a man] (Qi) has, — ones heart 
cbulde wish a man, — a reading adopted by Capell and several subsequent editors. 

215, 216. Faith, here it is : Romeo 

Is banished, and all the world to nothing,'] Printed as one line in Qq. 
two lines in Ff. ending it is and nothing, Rowe and many subsequent editors 
follow the arrangement of Ff. reading banished in second line. Capell and 
others have the arrangement of our text, reading, however, in the first line 
here 'tis, 

221, 222. O, hees a louely Gentleman t 

Romeos a dishclout to him : — ] Capell added to this first line, — 



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13^ Notes, [act hi. sc. 5. 

Romeo ! which seems to me far the best method, if any is needed, of several 
suggestions for completing the metre. In the second line Q2 misprints Komios, 

228. As liuing here\ Hanmer reads, — As living hence — "but here may 
^agtixiyf in this tvorld." Johnson. 

229 — 232. Jul. Speakest thou from thy heart t 

Nur. And from my soule too ; else beshrew them both, 

Jul. Amen ! 

Nur. [To] fVhatf] 

Here as in Qq. with the exceptions that Q2 in the first line has Speaksty that 
Q3, 4, 5 in the second have or else^ and that in the last speech To was added by 
Hanmer. 

The Ff. make two iines of the second line. And , . . too \ Or else . . . both. 
The usual arrangement of the passage is in two metrical lines ending too and 
IVhat t The Nurse's second speech in (Qi ) is, — * IVhat say you madatne f * 

236. abso/u*d] obso/u*d Q2, 

ACT IV 
Scene I. 

At the Friar's cell. The Friar and Paris. Then Juliet who comes for counsel 
and obtains from the Friar the sleeping potion. In this scene, up to the depart- 
ure of Paris, (Qi) & Q2 are almost identical ; from that point to the end there are 
large omissions in the former, and evident marks of revision in Q2 ; notably in 
the Friar's description of the effects to be produced by the sleeping potion (See note 
on lines 95 — 98). Q2 also contains evidence in itself of this revision in the fact 
that a double reading has crept into the text with reference to the placing of Juliet 
in Tomb. (Sec note on line iii.) 

7. ta/ht] (Qi)&Q5. The rest have /la/>fcr or /a/*. 

10. That she do giue her sorrow so much J7«y] So Q2. (Qi), Q3, 4, 5, Fi, 
2 for do have doth, F3, 4 should, 

20, That may be, must be, hue, on Thursday f text ] Q4 omits comma afler may 
be. The Cam. Edd. & Fumess also. Perhaps may be should be marked with 
inverted commas as a quotation from Juliet's preceding speech. 

45. past cure] So (Qi) & Q5. The rest, past care. 

46. O, Juliet] Ah 'Juliet (Qi), adopted by Capell, and the usual reading. 
50. hear' St] Q5. The rest, hearest. 

72. slay] stay Q2, 3, Fi. lay F2. The rest, including (Qi), as in text. 

76. daf'st] Ff. darestQ(\. 

78. From off the battlements 0/ yonder Taiuer] ¥oroffQ2, 3, 4, Fl, 2 have of, 
¥ or yonder, introduced by Pope from (Qi), the Qq. Ff. hAstany. 

81. shut] introduced by Pope from (Qi). The Qq. Ff. have hide. 

83. chapless] chaples Q2. chappies Q3 & Fl. 

85. shroud] So Q4, 5. The Ff. have graue. Neither word occurs in Q2, 3. 

92. thy Nurse] the Nurse Q2. 

94. And this distilling liquor — ] So the Qq. Ff. (Ql) has, — distilled liquor — 
introduced by Pope and generally adopted. I give Mr Grant White's note on 



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ACT IV. SC. 



i-r 



Notes. 



^33 



the subject. " Yielding to custom, I doubtfully displace * distilling ' for the 
earlier reading ; as the former may either have been put for * distilled ', accord- 
ing to the common practice of Shakspere's time in relation to participal term- 
inations, or used 'with reference, not to the manner in which the liquor was made, 
but to its quality of distilling (like the ' leperous distilment ' poured in the ears of 
Hamlet's fother) * through the natural gates and alleys of the body.* " 
95 — 98. PVA^n presently through all thy veines shall run 
A cold and drowtie humour ; for no pulse 
Shall keep his natiue progresses but surcease : 

No warmth^ no breath, shall testifie thou liu*st, — ] In the last line Qa 
misprints breast for breath, liu*st in the same line is from Q5, The rest have 
liuest. 

For these four lines (Qi) has five, and probably gives a true reading of the 
original play before the revisal for Q2. I mark in italics the places in which (Qi) 
differs from Q2. 

** Wh^n presently through all thy ve)mes shall run 
A dull and heauU slumber, which shall seau 
Each vitall spirit : for no Pulse shall keepe 
His natural progresse, but surcease to beate : 
No signe ^breath shall testifie thou liust." 
This version Pope adopted substantially, though making some verbal changes in 
accordance with Q2. His example is followed by many editors. The version, 
however, in Q2 bears such evident signs of deliberate revision that I have not felt 
justified here in recurring to the earlier impression. 

100. To paly ash4^s\ Q4, 5 {Too Q4). Too many ashes Q2, 3, Fi {.To Fi.). 
To mealy ashes F2, 3, 4. 

104. borrow'd'l Q5. borrowed TTie rest. 

1 10. In thy best robes, uncouerd] /s . , . vncouered Q2. 

111. Thou shalt be borne to that same auncient vault] Preceding this line in 
the Qq. Ff. an uneffaced variation in the * copy * from which Q2 was printed has 
crept into the text : — 

* Be borne to buriall in thy kindreds graue.* 
The corresponding line in (Qi), which here has large omissions, is : — 
And when thou art laid in thy kindreds vault. 

11$, 116. and he and / 

IVill 7vatch thy waking. — ] Q2 misprints — on . . . walking. The 
Ff. omit this sentence. 

ACT IV. 
Scene 2. 

Juliet on her return from the Friar's cell makes her submission to her Father. 
The cliaracter of (Qi) in this scene is distinctly that of an imperfect version 
roughly made up from notes taken during the performance. 

14- selfiivilld] sel/eivield Q2. 

26. becomed] So Ff. becomd Ql, 3. becommed Q^ 5. 



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134 Notes. [act iv. sc. %. 

30. y, marrie^ go, I say, and fetch him hither^"] Here probablj we should send 
out another servant. Capulet, however, subsequently (line 44) says that he will 
himself walk to Countie Paris. 

ACT IV. 

Scefte 3. 

The Nurse, Juliet and her mother. Then Juliet, alone, takes the sleeping 
potion. In this scene again (Qi) evidently presents but an imperfect version of 
the original ; the result of notes taken during the performance and roughly made 
up. 

18—21. Nurse 1 — What should she do here f 

My dismall sceane I needs must act aloiu. — 
Come, Violl — 

What if this mixture do not workeat all f\ 
The arrangement of these lines in our text is Hanmer's, «nd has been 
almost universally adopted. The Qq. Ff. make but one line of Covie, Violl. — 
. . . xvorke at all? Keightley arranges the lines in the following manner : — 
Nurse ! — What should she do here? My dismal scene 
I needs must act alone. Come, vial, [come /] — 
What if this mixture do not work at all ? 

22. Shall I be married then to morroio morning t\ For this line (Ql) has : — 
Must J of force be married to the Countie t — adopted by Malone and some subse- 
quent editors. Pope and others read : — Shall I of force be married to the 
Count ; 

23. [Laying down a dagger.] This stage direction is Johnson's. For the line 
in our text to which it refers, the (Qi) has, — This shall forbid it. Knife lye thou 
there. 

25. Subtly hath ministred] Qq. Ff. have Subtillv. 

30. / will not etttertaine so bad a thought."] This line which is only found in (Ql) 
was introduced into the text by Steevens, whose example has been very generally 
followed. 

34. sti/fd] stiffled Q2. 3, 4. 

41. — this many hundred yeares\ So Q2. The rest for this have these. Com- 
pare Act V. Sc. 2, line 25, — Within this three houres will faire Juliet wake. 
— and Sc 3, line 175, — Who here hath laine this two daies buried. 

50. 01 if I wake] Ilanmer's correction. Q2, 3, F I have O if I walk. Q4, 
5, Or if I wake, F2, 3, 4 Or if I walke or walk. It will be noticed that a 
similar case of misprinting occurs in Act IV. Sc. I, line 116, where in Q2 waking 
is spelt walking. 

58. Upon a Rapiers poynt] So the Qq. For a Fl has any, F2, 3, 4 his. 

59. Romeo, I come / this do I drinke to thee. 

[Shefals vpon her bed, within the Curtaines.] 

So (Qi); The Qq. Ff. have : — Romeo, Romeo, Romeo, heeres drinke, J drinke to 

thee. — with no stage direction. Pope first substituted the line of (Qi) for that of 

the later editions. The stage direction was first adopted by the Cambridge 

editors. As Dyce suggests, heera drinke of Qq. F£ may be the corruption of a 



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ACT IV. sc. 3.] Notes. 135 

stage direction foisted into the text I incline also to believe that the triple 
repetition of Romeo in those editions may have been intended as an addition to the 
text, as given in (Qi), to be murmured by Juliet as she falls asleep: — Romeo, — 
Romeo, — Romeo. 

Some explanation of the business of the old stage may perhaps here be neces- 
sary. The space * within the curtains ', where Juliet's bed is placed, was the space 
at the back of the stage proper, beneath the raised stage or gallery which served 
for a balcony, or the walls of a besieged town, as the case required ; this was 
divided from the stage proper by a traverse or curtain. The curtain closing 
before Juliet's bed, the stage was now supposed to represent a hall in Capulet's 
house (Sc 4) where Capulet busies himself with the preparations for the wedding. 
On his hearing of the arrival of Paris he summons the Nurse to call forth Juliet, 
which, he being gone, she proceeds to do, and opening the curtains the scene 
again becomes Juliet's chamber (Sc. 5) where she is discovered dead apparently 
on her bed. After the general lamentations which take place on this occasion, 
*• They all but the Nurse goe foorth casting Rosemary on her (Juliet) and shutting 
the Curtens" (Qi) ; and then follows the scene with Peter and the Musicians, 
the stage then again being supposed a hall or some other apartment in Capulet's 
house. 

ACT IV. 
Scene 4. 

Capulet busy with the preparations for the marriage ; he hears the music 
announcing the arrival of Paris, and sends the Nurse to waken Juliet. The 
imperfect character of this scene in (Qi) is again evidently the result of rough 
notes carelessly put together. 

3. cr<rw^d\ Ff. crowed Qq. 

6. Go^ \go\ you cot-queane^ go^ Theobald's emendation. The more 

modem editors reject the repetition of go which he introduced. Dyce, however, 
observes, that it is * probably what the author wrote '. 

ai. Goodfaithy Hs day.] So Q4, 5, F2, 3, 4, good father tis day Q2, 3, Fi. 

ACT IV. 
Scene 5. 

Juliet discovered apparently dead in her bed — general lamentations— and the 
scene ends with a * comic ' passage between Peter and the Musicians. 

Again in this scene (Qi) presents all the character of an imperfect version 
roughly made up from notes. The chorus of lamentations, however, when com- 
pared with the corresponding passages in Q2, seems to point to considerable 
revision in the later edition. 

I. Mistris ! — whatt mistris yuliet t-^fast, I warrant her^ shee : — ] I have 
ventured to point this speech somewhat differently from the usually received 
method, which is : — 

Mistress ! what, mistress ! Juliet ! etc. 

I should however observe that this reading appears to be founded on the punc- 
tuation of the old editions, which, in the Qq. have a comma after the second 



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136 



Notes. 



[act IV. sc. 5. 



mistriSf and in the Ff., still more emphatically, a note of interrogation. Mr F. 
G. Fleay suggests to me that the hrst * Mistress ' should be given in a separate 
line. 

15. Oh^ welladay] Q2 here, as in a previous passage. Act III. Sc 2, line 37, 
has wereaday, 

30. Accursed time I unfortunate old man /] Introduced into the text by Pope 
and some subsequent editors from (Qi). 

37, 38. Hath death laine with thy wife : — [iV-f,] there she lies. 

Flower as she was , deflowered by him.] So, in first line, F2, 3, 4, which 
also in the second line have, deftoiund or deflowrd now by him. See and ntn» 
are both omitted in Qq. & Fi. (Qi) for these lines has : — 
Hath Death laine with thy bride^ flower as she is. 
Deflowered by him, see, luhere she lyes. 
Steevens adopted from (Qi) bride, which here perhaps is more appropriate than 
wife of the later editions. 

41. And leaue him all ; life, liuirtg, all is deaths.] For. the restoration of this 
line we are indebted to Collier. Q2, 3, Ff. have, — all life living,— C^^ 5, a//, 
life, living, — which Capell and subsequent editors altered to — all ; life leaving. 

42. Haue I thought long] For long Q2 h»is loue. 
52. behold] Q2 misprints bedold. 

55. O wofull day 1 O wofull, [wofull] day /] I have introduced the third 
wofull into this line at the suggestion of Mr F. G. Fleay. 

64. Dead art thou / [Dead !] — Alacke, my childe is dead ;] The second Dead in 
this line is Theobald's emendation ; very generally adopted. 

66. confusions cure] Theobald's emendation. The Qq. Ff. for cure have care, 

81, 82. and as the c us tome is. 

And in her best array, beare her to Church] Capell, whose example has 
been generally followed, here introduces from (Qi) In all in lieu oi And in. 

83. fond nature] fome nature Qq. & Fl. 

100. I, by my troath] Q2 mhpfinis, / my my troath. 

100. [Enter Peter.] So Q4, 5, Ff. Q2, 3 have, £nter Will Kemp ov A''empe, the 
name of the actor who doubtless performed this part. (Qi) has. Enter Scruin^- 
man, and the prefix to his speeches is merely Ser. There is some confusion, 
perhaps remediless, as to this character of Peter. Shakspere has such dramatic 
power, that were no names attached to the speeches of his characters we could 
nearly always tell, — even as though we saw the play performed upon the stage 
before us, — by whom they were delivered, and I do not recognize in this individ- 
ual, the Nurse's man : I seem rather to hear the voice of the Sampson of the 
opening scene, of the Clowne of Act I. Sc. 2, of the 2nd Servant in Act I. Sc 5, 
and of the 2nd Servant of Act IV. Sc. 2. The Nurse's man is a dull, stolid lout, 
this is a * conceited ' ass — just the part that would fall naturally to Kemp as his 
share in the performance. Note that in the last scene of all Romeo's man is 
sometimes in the stage directions in Q2, 3, & Ff. called Peter (though in the text 
Balthazer) ; clearly a mistake, as Peter, whatever offices he may have filled, was of 
the house of Capulet, not that of Montague. This, however, may have arisen 
from Romeo's man in the original story having for name Pietro. 

105. * My hart is full \pfwoe : '] — ] The words, of woe, are only found in Q4, 



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ACT IV. SC. 5.] 



Notes. 



137 



5. Steevens pointed out that " This is the burthen of the first stanza of * A 
Pleasant new Ballad of Two Lovers.' ** Staunton tells us that it is in the Pepys 
collection, and begins : — Complaint, myluU, complaint on him. That staya so long 
aivay ; — The whole ballad is printed in Vol. I. of the * Shakespeare Society's 
Papers/ p. 12, from a copy communicated to the Society by Mr Andrew Barton, 
1844. 

120. Then haui at you with my wit] This commencement of a speech by Peter, 
is printed in Q2, 3, Ff. as part of the preceding speech of 2. Mus, — The cor- 
rection was made in Q4, 5. 

124. And dolefull dumps the mind oppress^ This line is omitted in Qq. Ff. 
C&pell supplied it from (Qi). The song itself, ascribed to Richard Edwards, is 
found in the * Paradise of Daintie Denises.' It is printed in a note by Sir John 
Hawkins in Vol. VI., p. 212, 'Variorum Shakespeare,' ed. 182 1. Another copy 
of it will be found in Percy's Rcliques of Ancient English Poetry. 

129 — 132. Pretie I — Prettie too /] These two exclamations in Peter's two speeches 
are corrupted in the Qq. Ff. to Prates, Protest, and Pratee ; and Prates to. Protest 
to, Pratee to, Pratee too, and Protest too. Pope introduced the correction from 

(Qi). 

132. James Soundpost"] Sound post Qq. Sound- Post Ff. 

136. Musitions haue no gold for sounding] For this, (Qi) has, — such Fellowes as 
you haue sildome Goldefor soufiding. Adopted into the text part by Pope and part 
by Capell, and found in many editions. 

ACT V. 
Scene i. 

Romeo receives the news of Juliet's burial, and purchases poison of the Apothe- 
cary. (Qi) here again in this scene is evidently but a confused and imperfect 
version of the original ; the result apparently of notes taken during the perform- 
ance and carelessly strung together. 

I. If I may trust the flattering truth of sleepe] . . . the flattering Eye of Sleepe 
(Qi). One or the other of these two readings has been adopted by the majority 
of editors, and each in its turn has been defended, though but with doubtful 
result : flattering truth being apparently a contradiction in terms, yf\n\t flattering 
eye is at the best a most obscure expression. Otway, who introduced into his 
' Caius Marius ' large portions of this play in a more or less mangled condition, 
changed- Jlattering eye io flattery, and this reading was adopted into Shakspere*s 
text by Pope. Singer conjectured the true reading to be — * the flattering soother 
sleep;* while Grant White reads — *the flattering sooth of sleep*, i. e. the flatter- 
ing augury or prognostication of sleep. Mr Fleay, however, suggests to me that 
flattering may bear the interpretation of seeming, and if so no change in our text is 
cither necessary or desirable. As a new element in the consideration of this 
question — at any rate I am not aware that it has been noted before — I would direct 
attention to a similar expression in (Qi). * 'Y 00 flattering true to be substantial!.' 
See note on lines 139 — 141, Act II. Sc. 2 of this revised text. 

3. My bosomes Lord sits lightly in his throne] In Q2, 3, Fi for Lordyre have 
L, 



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138 Notes. [act v. sc. i. 

24. Is it em iot then I denie you^ starres f] Q2 for ene has in. The rest, 
including (Qi), euen or ei/en^ contracted, by Collier ficst, to e'en, (Qi) also differs 
from the later version in reading, then I de/ie my Starres. Pope substituted defie 
of (Qi) for denie of Qq. Ff. and his example has been very generally followed. 

25. know' St] So Q5. kncwest The rest 

27. I do beseech you^ sir, haue patience\ For this line (Qi) has, — Pardon me sir 
I will not leave you thus — adopted by Steevens following Pope's example, who, 
however, changed will not to dare not, 
48. scatter^ d\ Theobald. The Qq. Ft scattered, 
62. That the life-wearie taker] Q5. The resU—H/e-Vfearie'taker. 
64, 65. /Is violently as hastie powder fierd 

Doth hurry from thefatall Canons wombe.] For these lines (Qi) has, — 
' As suddenly as powder being fierd 
From forth a cannons mouth.' 
This simile is again used in (Qi) Act II. Sc. 5, by Juliet when awaiting the 
return of the Nurse : — 

And runne more swift, than hastie powder fierd. 
Doth hurrie from the fearfull Cannons mouth.' 
69. fear^st] So Ff. Q5. fearest Q2, 3, 4. 

71. Contempt and beggerie hangs vpon thy backe.] For this line Malone substi- 
tuted from (Qi) * Vpon thy backe hangs ragged Miserie.' 
76. /pay thy pouertie] Q2, 3, & Ff. (or pay hsLVcpray, 
82. moist] maiest & may est Q2, 3, Fi, 2. 

ACT V. 

Scene 2. 

At Friar Lawrence's Cell — ^he learns that his letter to Romeo has not been 
delivered, and prepares to visit the Tomb. Compared with Q2, (Qi) presents 
in this scene an imperfect and shortened version of the original 

ACT V. 
Scene 3. 

The last. In the Churchyard, before the Tomb of the Capulets. The general 
character of this scene in (Qi) b that of ajhortened andjmperfect version of the 
original; it affords, however, evidence, of jevision in Q2, notably in Paris's 
address before the tomb of Juliet (see note on lines 12 — 17). The Friar's excul- 
patory speech too when compared in the two quartos suggests considerable.revisions 
injjlfijatcrjayarto. The conditio^ of the * copy ' from which the later quarto 
was printed mayT>e pretty clearly ascertained when we consider the varia lectiones 
that have crept into it See for instances notes on lines 102 — 3 and on lines 
following 107. 

[Enter Countie Paris and his Page, with flowers and sweete water.] (Qi). 
Enter Paris and his Page Qq. Ff. 

3. Vnder yondyew Treis] In this place, and in line 144 of this scene, for yew 



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ACT V. SC. 3.] 



Notes. 



139 



the Qq. Ff. haye yang' und ymm^. Pope made the correction. (Qi) in the first 
instance has Ew-Trte; but has no passage corresponding to line 144. 
8. h^ar'st] Rowe. hearest Qq. Ff. 

11. [Retires] Capell. Exit, F2, 3, 4. No stage direction in (Ql), the Qq. or 
Fi. Some note as to the business of the old stage may here perhaps be desirable; 
Juliet's Tomb, I imagine to be placed in the space under the raised stage or 
gallery at the back of the stage proper. Paris enters at one door with his page, 
who at his master's bidding retires to one side of the stage and lies down. Romeo 
enters at the other door with Balthazer, who also at his master's command retires 
and lies down at the other side of the stage. The rest of the stage business in 
this scene is sufficiently indicated in the dialogue itself. 

12, 17. Swtet flower^ with flowers thy Bridall bed I strew^ — 

O woe I thy Canapie is dust and stones ; — 

Whi€h with sweete water nightly I will dewe, etc.'\ 1 follow here the 
punctuation of the Cambridge editors who, with Staunton, make the line O woe 
. . . stones parenthetical (Staunton prints it within parentheses). The usual 
punctuation would imply that it was the * Canapie *, not the flowers, which Paris 
proposed nightly to dew. For these and the following lines of Paris's address 
Pope substitutes a somewhat altered version of the corresponding speech in (Qi) ; 
his example, except that they restored the actual words of (Qi), was followed 
by Steevens and many subsequent editors. The lines in (Qi) are as follows :— 
Sweete Flower, with flowers I strew thy Bridalle bed : 
Sweete Tombe, that in thy circuite dost oontaine, 
The perfect modell of etcmitie : 
Faire Juliet that with Angells dost remaine. 
Accept this latest fauour at my hands. 
That lining honourd thee, and being dead 
With funerall praises doo adome thy Tombe. 
21. [Enter Romeo, etc.] Stage direction of (Qi). The Q2, 3, Ft have. Enter 
Romeo and Peter. Q4, 5, — Enter Romeo and Balthazer his man. 
26. hear'st^ hearest Q2, 3, 4. 

40. / will be gone, sir, and not trouble ye] For ye Q3, 4, 5, Ff. have you, the 
reading generally adopted. This and the next speech of Balthazer are given to 
Pet. in Q2, 3, FL 

41. friendship] Q2 isiix&^TmXs friendshid. 

54. vnhallowd] Pope, unhallowed Qq. Ff. 

55. pursued] Rowe. pursued Qq. Ff. 

62. Put not another sin upon my head] For Put Rowe reads Pull ; Malone, 
from (Qi), Heap ; Capell conjectures Pluck. 

68. I do defii thy coniurations] Malone, from (Qi). Q2 h&s commiration, Q3, 
Fl commisseration. Q4, 5, F2, 3, 4 commiseration. 

71. Page. O Lord . . . watch.] This line, without any prefix, is printed in 
italics in Q2, 3. Q4, 5 assign it to Page, the Ff. to Pet. 

102, 103. Shall I beleeue 

ThcU unsubstantiall death is amorous] Theobald's emendation. The 
Qq. F£ have :— 

1 will beleeue. 



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140 Notes. [act v. sc. 3. 

Shall I beleeve that unsubstantiall death is amorous. 
As Dyce remarks, ** these are evidently varia lectiotuSf which, by some mis- 
take, have both crept into the text." 

107. this pallace of dym night] Q2 misprints palUU, The rest have pallace^ 
Pallacgy palace, and Palace, 
49* Following this line Q2, 3, & Ff. have :— 

Depart againe, come lye thou in my arme, {amies Ff.) 
Heer's to thy health, where ere thou tumblest in. 
O true Appothecarie ! 

Thy drugs are quicke. Thus with a kisse I die. 
These lines are prop^erly omitt^ in Q4 & 5 ; they are probably a shortened 
version of the speech intended for the stage only ; but by some accident printed 
wfth the text. Where ere thau tumbUst in may possibly be the corruption of a 
stage direction to the actor to fall into the tomb at this point. 

121. Saint Francis] S. Frances Q2. St and Saint Francis The rest. 
Steevens, followed by some editors, added to this first speech of the Friar the 
first line of his next speech as it is given in (Qi). — 

IVhc is it that consorts so late the dead, 
1 28. // doth sOf holy sir ; and theres my maister^ 

One that you hue.] So arranged by Johnson. One line in Qq. Two, the 
first ending «>, in Ff. 

136. O, much I feare some ill vnluckie thing] For unluckie Q2 has unthriftie. 
167—169. These lines, with the exception of the stage directions (imperfect or 
omitted altogether in the original editions), are here arranged as in Qq. The Ff. 
give Yea^ noise / in a separate line. This is thy sheath is the reading of Q2, 4, 
5. Q3 has Ti s is thy sheath^ and the Ff. ' Tis in thy sheath. Mr F. G. Fleay 
suggests to me that we should arrange and read, as follows : — 
Thy lips are warm. 
I. Watch, [Within.] Lead, boy ! Which way? 

yul. Yea, noise ! 

Then 1*11 be brief. O happy dagger lie 
In this thy sheath, there rust, and let me die ! 
It should be mentioned that for rust Dyce and other modem editors ha\'e 
adopted from (Qi) rest, 

O happy dagger thou shalt end my feare, 
Pest in my bosome, thus I come to thee. 
186. stay the Frier too.] Q2, 3, 4 repeat too, 

189. What should it be that is so shrlk*d abroad] I have adopted here the con- 
jecture of the Cambridge editors. Q2 has, that is so shrike. The rest, that they 
so shrike (shriek F4). 

190. 7 lie people in the street crie Romeo ^ Pope. The Qq. Ff. have O the people^ etc. 
193. W fiat feare is this, which startles in our eares f] Capell's adoption of John- 
son's and Heath's conjecture. The Qq. Ff. have, your eares. 

198. Slaughtered Romeos man] Q2 has Slaughter. 
204. And it missheathed] Q2, 3, 4 have —missheathd or missheath^d. 
208. To see thy sonne and heire more early downe.] So (Ql), introduced by 
Steevens. Q2 has, — now earling downe. The rest, — now early downe. 



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ACT V. SC. 



3-] 



Notes. 



141 



231. And shty there deady that Romeos faithfull wi/e.] So (^4, 5. Q2, 3 have, 
tAa/s Rotneos. The Ff., tfiat's Romeos, 

247. bomrwd] Capell. ^rrcww/ Qq. Ff. 

25a Was stayed by accuient] So the Ff. The Qq. have, stayed. 

264. Al this I kftow] It would, I think, be an improvement here to read by 
transposition — This, all I know. 

264 — 267. These four lines — Al this . . . time — are arranged as by Pope. Three 
lines ending ^'uie, fault, time, in Qq. Ff. 

270. PVheres Romeos man t what can he say to this /] So the Qq. Ff. Capell, 
followed by other editors, here reads, with (Qi), — what can he say in this t 

298. For I will raise her statue in pure gold.^ For raise Q2, 3 misprint raie. 

307. S^tne shall be pardon'd] So the Ff. The Qq. have pardoned. 



THE END, 



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JOHN CHILOS AND SON, I'RINTKRS. 



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^Imm m& 


Jttlt^t 


Reprint of Q? 2. 


1599. 


EDITED BY 




P. A. DANIEL. 


PUBLISHED FOR 

BY N. TRiJBNER & CO., 57, 59, LUDGATE HILL, 
LONDON, E.C., 1874. 



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Sttitsir. 2to. 3. 



JOHN CHII.DS AND SON. PKINTKRS. 



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NOTICE. 



Eomto anb 3ulitt 

Q2, 1599. 



This reproduction of the first complete edition of Romeo 
and Juliet has been printed directly from the fecsimile pre- 
pared by Mr E. W, Ashbee, under the direction of Mr J. O. 
Halliwell (Phillipps), and has been carefully compared with the 
Quarto in the British Museum (Press mark, C. 12. g. 18). It 
is printed line for line, and page for page, with the original. 

With the exception of the facsimile above-mentioned, and 
the reprint in Prof Tycho Mommsen's parallel-text edition, 
published at Oldenburg, in 1859, "^ other reproduction of 
this, the most important of the old editions, has ever been 
made, and as but a very limited number of the facsimile was 
printed, and in a very costly form, this may be said to be the 
first time that it has been placed within reach of the English 
public. Mommsen's reprint was apparently made from a cor- 
rected copy of Steevens's reprint of Q® 1609 (Q3 of Cambridge 
Editors), and almost necessarily partakes of the peculiarities of 
that edition. It has however been of great use to me in my 
endeavour to secure accuracy in this reprint. 

For the loan of his valuable copy of the facsimile the 

Society is greatly indebted to the liberality of Mr F. W. 

Cosens. 

P. A. Daniel. 



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THE 

MOST EX 

cellent and lamentable 

Tragedie, of Romeo 

and Juliet. 

Newly corrected^ augmented^ and 
amended : 



As it hath bene fundry times publiquely acted, by the 

right Honourable the Lord Chamberlaine 

his Seruants. 



LONDON 

Printed by Thomas Creede, for Cuthbert Burby, and are to 

be fold at his (hop neare the Exchange. 

^ S99' 



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The Prologue. 



Corns. 

'^ I ^wo houjholds both alike in dignitie, 

('In /aire Verona where we lay our Scene) 
From auncient grudge, Ireake to new mutinie, 
where ciuill bloud makes ciuill hands vncleane : 
From forth ihefatall loynes of thtfe two foes, 
A paire ofjlarre-crojl louers, take their life : 
whofe mifaduentur^d pittious ouerthrowes, 
Doth with their death lurie their Parents Jlrife, 
Thefearfull paffage of their death-markt loue. 
And the continuance of their Parents rage : 
which but their childrens end nought could remoue : 
Is now the two houres trafficque of our Stage. 
The which if you with patient eares attend, 
what hearefhall miffe, our toyle fhall Jlriue to mend, 

A% 



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THE MOST EX- 

cellent and lamentable 

Tragedie, of Romeo and luliet. 

Enter Sampfon and Gregorie, with Swords and Bucklers, of the 
houfe of Capulet. 

Sj^mp. Gregorie, on my word weele not carrie Coles. 
Greg. No, for then we fhould be Collyers. 

Samp, I meane, and we be in choller, weele draw. 

Greg, I while you line, draw your necke out of choller. 

Samp. I flrike quickly being moued. 

Greg. But thou art not quickly moued to flrike. 

Samp. A dog of the houfe of Mountague moues me. 

Grego. To moue is to ftirre, and to be valiant, is to Hand : 
Therefore if thou art moued thou runft away. 

Samp. A dog of that houfe Ihall moue me to fland : 
I will take the wall of any man or maide of Mounta- 
gues. • 

Grego. That fliewes thee a weake flaue, for the weakeft goes 
to the wall. 

Samp. Tis true, & therfore women being the weaker vefTels 
are euer thruft to the wall : therfore I wil pufli Mountagues men 
from the wall, and thrud his maides to the wall. 

Greg. The quarell is betweene our maiflers , and vs their 
men. 

Samp. Tis all one, I will fhew my felfe a tyrant, when I haue 
fought with the men, I will be ciuil with the maides, I will cut 
off their heads. 

a — Q2. I A3 Grego. The 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

Grego, The heads of the maids. 

Samp, I the heads of the maides, or their maiden heads, take it 
in what fenfe thou wih. 

Greg, They mufl take it fenfe that feele it. 

Samp. Me they fliail feele while I am able to fland , and tis 
knowne I am a pretie peece of flefli. 

Greg. Tis well thou art not fifh, if thou hadil, thou hadft bin 
poore lohn : draw thy toole, here comes of the houfe of Moun- 
tagues. 

Enter two other feruing men. 

Samp. My naked weapon is out, quareli, I will back thee. 

Greg, How, tume thy backe and runne ? 

Samp. Feare me not. 

Greg. No marrie, I feare thee. 

Sam. Let vs take the law of our fides, let them begin. 

Gre. I will frown as I palfe by, and let them take it as they lift. 

Samp. Nay as they dare, I wil bile my thumb at them, which 
is difgrace to them if they beare it. 

Abram, Do you bite your thumbe at vs fir? 

Samp, I do bite my thumbe fir. 

Abra. Do you bite your thumb at vs fir ? 

Samp. Is the law of our fide if I fay I ? 

Greg. No. 

Samp. No fir, I do not bite my thumbe at you fir , but I bite 
my thumbe fir. 

Greg. Do you qUarell fir? 

Abra, Quareli fir, no fir. 

Sd. But if you do fir, I am for you, I ferue as good a ma as you. 

Abra. No better. 

Samp. Well fir. Enter Benuolio, 

Greg, Say better, here comes one of my maifters kinfmeu. 

Sam. Yes better fir. 

Abra. You lie. 

Samp. Draw if you be men, Gregorie, remember thy wafhing 
blowe. Theyfght. 

Benuo. Part fooles , put vp your fwords, you know not what 
you do. Enter 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Enter Tilalt. 

TtlalL What art thou drawne among thefe hartlefle hindes ? 
tume thee Benuolio, looke vpon thy death. 

Benuo. I do but keepe the peace, put vp thy fword, 
or manage it to part thefe men with me. 

Tih. What drawne and talke of peace ? I hate the word, 
as I hate hell, all Mountagues and thee : 
Haue at thee coward. 

Enter three orfoure Citizens with Clubs or partyfons, 

Offi, Clubs, Bils and Partifons, flrike, beate them downe, 
Downe with the Capulets, downe with the Mountagues. 
Enter old Capulet in his gowne, and his wife. 

Capu, What noyfe is this ? giue me my long fword hoe. 

IVife. A crowch, a crowch, why call you for a fword ? 

Cap. My fword I fay, old Mountague is come. 
And florilhes his blade in fpight of me. 

Enter old Mountague and his wife. 

Mount. Thou villaine Capulet, hold me not, let me go. 

M. Wife. 2. Thou fhalt not ftir one foote to feeke a foe. 
Enter Prince Eskales, with his traine. 

Prince. Rebellious fubiedls enemies to peace, 
Prophaners of this neighbour-ftayned fteele. 
Will they not heare ? what ho, you men, you beafls : 
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage. 
With purple fountaines iifuing from your veines : 
On paine of torture from thofe bloudie hands. 
Throw your miftempered weapons to the ground. 
And heare the fentence of your moued Prince. . 
Three ciuill brawles bred of an ayrie word. 
By thee old Capulet and Mountague, 
Haue thrice diflurbd the quiet of our flreets. 
And made Neronas auncient Citizens, 
Caft by their graue befeeming ornaments. 
To wield old partizans, in hands as old, 
Cancred with peace, to part your cancred hate. 
If euer you diflurbe our flreets againe. 

Your 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

Your Hues fhall pay the forfeit of the peace. 

For this time all the reft depart away : 

You Capulet ftiall go along with me. 

And Mountdgue come you this afternoone. 

To know our farther pleafure in this cafe : 

To old Free-towne, our common iudgement place : 

Once more on paine of death, all men depart. 

Exeunt. 

Mounta. Who fet this auncient quarell new abroach ? 
Speake Nephew, were you by when it began ? 

Ben, Here were the feruants of your aduerfarie 
And yours, clofe fighting ere I did approach, 
I drew to part them, in the inftant came 
The fierie Tybalt, with his fword preparde. 
Which as he breath*d defiance to my eares, 
He fwoong about his head and cut the windes. 
Who nothing hurt withall, hift him in fcome : 
While we were enterchaunging thrufb and blowes. 
Came more and more, and fought on part and part. 
Till the Prince came, who parted either part. 

Wife. O where is Romeo, faw you him to day ? 
Right glad I am, he was not at this fray. 

Benuo. Madam, an houre before the worfliipt Sun, 
Peerde forth the golden window of the Eaft, 
A troubled minde driue me to walke abroad. 
Where vnderneath the groue of Syramour, 
That Weftward rooteth from this Citie fide : 
So early walking did I fee your fonne. 
Towards him I made, but he was ware of me. 
And ftole into the couert of the wood, 
I meafuring his afFeftions by my owne. 
Which then moft fought, where moft might not be 
Being one too many by my wearie felfe, (found : 
Purfued my humor, not purfuing his. 
And gladly fhunned, who gladly fled from me. 

Mounta, Many a morning hath he there bin feene. 

With 



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of Romeo and luUet. 

With teares augmenting the freih mornings deawe. 

Adding to cloudes, more clowdes with his deepe fighes. 

But all fo foone, as the alcheering Sunne, 

Should in the fartheft Eaft begin to draw. 

The fhadie curtaines from Auroras bed. 

Away from light fleales home my heauie fonne. 

And priuate in his Chamber pennes himfelfe. 

Shuts vp his windowes, locks faire day-light out. 

And makes himfelfe an artificiall night : 

Blacke and portendous muH this humor proue, 

Vnlefle good counfell may the caufe remoue. 

Ben. My Noble Vncle do you know the caufe ? 

Moun. I neither know it, nor can leame of him. 

Ben, Haue you importunde him by any meanes ? 

Moun, Both by my felfe and many other friends. 
But he is owne afFeftions counfeller. 
Is to himfelfe (I will not fay how true) 
But to himfelfe fo fecret and fo clofe. 
So farre from founding and difcouerie. 
As is the bud bit with an enuious worme. 
Ere he can fpread his fweete leaues to the ay re. 
Or dedicate his bewtie to the fame. 
Could we but learne from whence his forrows grow. 
We would as willingly giue cure as know. 
Enter Romeo. 

Benu, See where he comes, fo pleafe you ftep alide. 
He know his greeuance or be much denide. 

Moun. I would thou wert fo happie by thy flay. 
To heare true fhrift, come Madam lets away. 

Exeunt. 

Benuol, Good morrow Coufin. 

Romeo, Is the day fo young ? 

Ben, But new ftrooke nine. 

Romeo, Ay me, fad houres feeme long : 
Was that my father that went hence fo fall ? 

Ben. It was : what fadnefle lengthens Romeos houres ? 

B Rom. Not 



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The moji lamentable Tragedie 

Ro, Not hauing that, which hauing, makes the fhort. 

Ben, In loue. 

Rom. Oiit. 

Ben, Of loue. 

Rom. Out of her fauour where I am in loue. 

Ben. Alas that loue fo gentle in his view, ' 
Should be fo tirannous and rough in proofe. 

Romeo. Alas that loue, whofe view is muffled ftil]. 
Should without eyes, fee pathwaies to his will : 
Where fhall we dine ? 6 me ! what fray was here ? 
Yet tell me not, for I haue heard it all : 
Heres much to do with hate, but more with loue : 
Why then A brawling loue, A louing hate, 
O any thing of nothing firft created : 
O heauie lightnefle, ferious vanitie, 
Mifhapen Chaos of welfeeing formes. 
Feather of lead, bright fmoke, cold fier, ficke health, 
Still waking fleepe that is not what it is. 
This loue feele I, that feele no loue in this, 
Doeft thou not laugh ? 

Benti. No Coze, I rather weepe. 

Rom. Good hart at what ? 

Benu. At thy good harts oppreffion. 

Romeo. Why fuch is loues tranfgreflion : 
Griefes of mine owne lie heauie in my breaft. 
Which thou wilt propogate to haue it prcaft, 
With more of thine, this loue that thou haft (howne. 
Doth ad more gnefe, too too much of mine owne. 
Loue is a fmoke made with the fume of fighes, 
Being purgd, a fire fparkling in louers eies. 
Being vext, a fea nouriftit with lOuing teares, 
What is it elfe ? a madneflfe, moft difcreete, 
A choking gall, and a preferuing fweete : 
Farewell my Coze. 

Ben. Soft I will go along : 
And if you leaue me fo, you do me wrong. 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Rom. Tut I haue loft my felfe, I am not here. 
This is not Romeo, hees fome other where. 

Ben, Tell me in fadneffe, who is that you louc ? 

Ro. What (hall I grone and tell thee ? 

Ben. Grone, why no : but fadly tell me' who ? 

Ro. A ficke man in fadneiTe makes his will : 
A word ill vrgd to one that is fo ill : 
In fadneffe Cozin, I do loue a woman. 

Ben. I aymde fo neare, when I fuppofde you lou'd. 

Ro. A right good mark man, and fhees faire I Ipue, 

Ben. A right faire marke faire Coze is fooneft hit. 

Romeo. Well in that hit you miffe, fheel not be hit 
With Cupids arrow, llie hath Dians wit : 
And in ftrong proofe of chaftitie well armd. 
From loues weak childiih bow {he liues vncharmd. 
Shee will not ftay the fiege of louing tearmes. 
Nor bide th'incounter of affailing eies. 
Nor ope her lap to fainft feducing gold, 
O fhe is rich, in bewtie onely poore. 
That when fhe dies, with bewtie dies her ftore. 

Ben. The fhe hath fworn, that llie wil ftil line chafte ? 

Ro. She hath, and in that fparing, make huge wafte : 
For bewtie fteru'd with her feueritie. 
Cuts bewtie off from all pofteritie. 
She is too faire, too wife, wifely too faire. 
To merit bliffe by making me difpaire : 
Shee hath forfvvorne to lone, and in that vow. 
Do I Hue dead, that line to tell it now. 

Ben. Be rulde by me, forget to thinke of her. 

Ro. O teach me how I lliould forget to thinke. 

Ben. By giuing libertie vnto thine eyes. 
Examine other bewties. 

Ro. Tis the way to call hers (exquifit) in queftion more, 
Thefe happie maskes that kis faire Ladies browes. 
Being black, puts vs in mind they hide the Taire : 
He that is ftrooken blind, cannot forget 

B 2 The 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

The precious treafure of his eye-fight loll. 
Shew me a miflreflfe that is paiUng faire. 
What doth her bewtie feme but as a note, 
Where I may reade who pad that pafling faire : 
Farewel, thou canft not teach me to forget, 

Ben, He pay that dodrine, or elfe die in debt. Exeunt, 

Enter Capulet, Countie Paris, arid the Clowne. 

Capu, But Mountague is bound as well as I, 
In peualtie alike, and tis not hard I thinke. 
For men fo old as we to keepe the peace. 

Par, Of honourable reckoning are you both. 
And pittie tis, you liu'd at ods fo long : 
But now my Lord, what fay you to my fute ? 

Capu. But faying ore what I haue faid before. 
My child is yet a ftraunger in the world, 
Shee hath not feene the chaunge of fourteen yeares. 
Let two more Sommers wither in their pride. 
Ere we may thinke her ripe to be a bride. 

Pari, Younger then fhe, are happie mothers made. 

Capu, And too fooue mard are thofe fo early made : 
Earth hath fwallowed all my hopes but ilie, 
Shees the hopefull Lady of my earth : 
But wooe her gentle Paris, get her hart. 
My will to her confent, is but a part. 
And (bee agreed, within her fcope of choife 
Lyes my confent, and faire according voyce : 
This night I hold, an old accuftomd feaft. 
Whereto I haue inuited many a gueft : 
Such as I loue, and you among the (lore. 
One more, moft welcome makes my number more : 
At my poore houfe, looke to behold this night, 
Earthtreading ftarres, that make darke heauen light : 
Such comfort as do luflie young men feele. 
When well appareld Aprill on the heele. 
Of limping winter treads, euen fuch delight 
Among frefh fennell buds fhall you this night 
Inherit at my houfe, heare all, all fee : And 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

And like her moll, whofe merit moft fhall bee : 
Which one more view, of many, mine being one. 
May iland in number, though in reckning none. 
Come go with me, go firrah trudge about. 
Through faire Verona, find thofe perfons out, 
Whofe names are written there, and to them fay. 
My houfe and welcome, on their pleafure flay. 

Exit. 

Seru, Find them out whofe names are written. Here it is writ- 
ten, that the fhoo-maker fhould meddle with his yard, and the 
taylerwith his laft, the fifher with his penfill, & the painter with 
his nets. But I am fent to find thofe perfons whofe names are 
here writ , and can neuer find what names the writing perfou 
hath here writ (I mufl to the learned) in good time. 
Enter Benuolio, and Romeo. 

Ben, Tut man, one fire bumes out, an others burning. 
On paine is lefned by an others anguifh, 
Tume giddie, and be hoipe by backward turning : 
One defperate greefe, cures with an others languifh : 
Take thou fome new infe6lion to thy eye. 
And the rancke poyfon of the old will dye. 

Romeo, Your Plantan leafe is excellen! for that, 

Ben, For what I pray thee ? 

Romeo, For your broken fhin. 

Ben, Why Romeo, art thou mad ? 

Rom, Not mad, but bound more then a mad man is : 
Shut vp in prifon, kept without my foode, 
Whipt and tormented, and trodden good fellow. 

Ser. Godgigoden, I pray fir can you read ? 

Rom, I mine owne fortune in my miferie. 

Ser, Perhaps you haue learned it without booke : 
But I pray can you read any thing you fee ? 

Rom, I if I know the letters and the language. 

Ser, Yee fay honeflly, refl you merrie. 

Rom. Stay fellow, I can read. 

B3 He 



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The mofl lamentalle Tragedie 

He reades the Letter. 

SEigneurMsntino,^ his wife and daughters : Countie Anfelme 
and his hewtiousfijlers : the Lady widdow of Ytruwo, Seigneur 
Placentio, and his lonely Neeces : Mercutio and his brother Va- 
lentine : mine Fncle Capulet his wife and daughters : my f aire Neece 
Roliiline, Liuia, Seigneur Valentio, and his Cofen Tybalt : Lucio 
and the liuely Hellena. 
A faire affemblie, whither fhould they come ? 

Ser, Vp. 

Ro, Whither to fupper? 

Ser, To our houfe. 

Ro, Whofe houfe ? 

Ser. My Maifters. 

Ro. Indeed I Ihould haue askt you that before. 

Ser. Now ile tell you without asking. My maifler is the great 
rich Capulet , and if you be not of the houfe of Afountagues, I 
pray come and cnifh a cup of wine. Rell you merrie. 

Ben. At this fame auncient feaft of Capulets, 
Sups the faire Rofaline whom thou fo loues : 
With all the admired beauties of Verona, 
Go thither, and with vnattainted eye. 
Compare her face witli fome that I Ihall {how, 
And I will make thee thinke thy fwan a crow. 

Ro. When the deuout religion of mine eye, 
Maintaines fuch fallliood, then turne teares to fier: 
And thefe who often drownde, could neuer die, 
Tranfparent Hereticques be burnt for liers. 
One fairer then my loue, the all feeing Sun, 
Nere faw her match, (ince firfl the world begun. 

Ben. Tut you faw her faire none elfe being by. 
Her felfe poyfd with her felfe in either eye : 
But in that Chriflall fcales let there be waide. 
Your Ladies loue againft fome other maide : 
That I will fhew you lliiniug at this feaft. 
And {he {hall fcant {hew well that now feemes beft. 

Ro, Ile go along no fuch {ight to be {howne, 

But 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

But to reioyce in fplendor of mine owne. 

Enter Capulets fFife and Nurfe, 

IFife, Nurfe wher's my daughter ? call her forth to me. 

Nur(e. Now by my maidenhead^ at twelue yeare old I had her 
come, what Lamb, what Ladie-bird, God forbid, 
Wheres this Girle ? what luliet. 

Enter luliet. 

luHet, How now who calls ? 

Nur. Your mother. 

lull. Madam I am here, what is your will? 

Wife. This is the matter. Nurfe giue leaue a while, we muft talk 
in fecret . Nurfe come backe againe, I haue remembred mee, 
thou'fe heare our counfel. Thou knoweft my daughters of a pre- 
tie age. 

Nurfe. Faith I can tell her age vnto an houre. 

Iflfe. Shee's not fourteene. 

Nurfe. lie lay fourteene of my teeth , and yet to my teene he it 
fpoken, I haue butfoure,Jhees not fourteene. 
How long is it now to Lammas tide ? 

IFife. A fortnight and odde dayes. 

Nurfe. Euen or odde, of all daies in the yeare come Lammas Eueat 
night Jlaljhebef our teen. Sufan andJlie^God reft all Chriftianfoules, 
wereofanage.fVellSufanhwilh God^ftiewas too good for me: But 
as Ifaid,on Lammas £«^ at n'^ghtftiallflie be fourteene , thatjliall 
Jhee marrie, I remember it ivcll . Thjince the Earth-quake now 
eleuenyeares,andjhewas weaned Ineuerjhal I forget it,ofa/l the daies 
of the yeare vpon that day : for I had then lalde worme-wood to my 
dug ^fitting in the fun vnder the Doue-houfe wall. Aly Lord and 
you were then at Mantua, nay I doo heart a Iraine . But as I fold, 
when it did tq/ie the worme-wood on the nipple of my dug , and 
felt it hitter , pretiefoole, tofoe it teachie and fall out with theDugge, 
Shake quoth the Doue-houfe , twas no need I trow to bid ine trudge: 
andjincethat time it is a leuen yeares , for then /he could ft and hy lone , 
nay hyth roodefhe could haue run and wadled all about : for euen 
theday before ftie broke her I row, and then my husband,God be with 

his 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

hisfoule, a was a merrie man,tooke vp the child,yea quoth he,doeft 
thoujallvpon thy face ? thou wilt/all backward when thou hcLfimore 
wit, wilt tfiou not lule ? And by my holy dam , the pre tie wretch left 
cry in g, and f aid I: tofeenow how aieajljhall come about: /warrant, 
andljhouldliueathoufand yeares, Ineuerjhouldforget it: wilt thou 
not lule quoth he ? and pretiefoole itjlinted, and f aid L 

Old La. Inough of this, I pray thee hold thy peace. 

Nurfe. Yes AIadam,yet I cannot chufe hut laugh , to thinke it 
Jhouldleauecryingyandfay I: and yet I warrant it hadvpon it brow, a 
bump as big as a young Cockrehjione: a peril lous knock, and itcryed 
bitterly. Yea quoth my hushand,falljl vpon thy face, thou wilt fall 
backward when thou commefl to age: wilt thou not lule ? Itflinted, 
and f aid I. 

luli. And ftint thou too, I pray thee Nurfe, fay I. 

Nurfe. Peace I haue done : God marke thee too his grace , thott 
wajl the prettiefl babe that ere Inurfl , and J might Hue to fee thee 
married once, I haue my wi/h. 

Old La. Marrie, that marrie is the very theame 
I came to talke of, tell me daughter luliet. 
How (lands your difpofitions to be married ? 

Juliet. It is an houre that I dreame not of. 

Nurfe. An houre, were not I thine onely Nurfe, I would fay thou 
hadjlfuckt wifedome from thy teate. 

Old La. Well thinke of marriage now, yonger then you 
Here in Verona, Ladies of efteerae. 
Are made alreadie mothers by my count. 
I was your mother, much vpon thefe yeares 
That you are now a maide, thus then in briefe : 
The valiant Paris feekes you for his loue. 

Nurfe. A man young Lady, Lady,fuch a man as all the world, 
Why hees a man ofwaxe. 

Old La. VeroncLS Soramer hath not fuch a flower. 

Nurfe. Nay hees a flower, in faith a very flower. 

Old La. What fay you, can you loue the Grentleman ? 
This night you fhall behold him at our feall, 
Reade ore the volume of young Paris face. 

And 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

A.nd find delight, writ there with bewties pen. 
Examine euery married liniament. 
And fee how one an other lends content : 
And what obfcurde in this faire volume lies, 
Finde written in the margeant of his eyes; 
This precious booke of loue, this vnbound louer. 
To bewtifie him, onely lacks a Couer. 
The fiih Hues in the fea, and tis much pride 
For feire without the faire, within to hide : 
That booke in manies eyes doth fliare the glorie 
That in gold clafpes locks in the golden ftorie : 
So {hall you fhare all that he doth poflefle. 
By hauing him, making your felfe no lefle. 

Nurfe, No lefle, nay bigger women grow by men. 

Old La. Speake briefly, can you like of Paris loue ? 

lulu He looke to like, if looking liking moue. 
But no more deepe will J endart mine eye. 
Then your confent giues ftrength to make flie. Enter Seruing. 

Ser, Madam the guefts are come, fupper feru'd vp, you cald, 
my young Lady askt for, the Nurfe curft in the Pantrie, and e- 
uerie thing in extremitie : I muft hence to wait , I befeech you 
follow ftraight. 

Mo, We follow thee, luliet the Countie llaies. 

Nur, Go gyrle, feeke happie nights to happie dayes. 

Exeunt, 
Enter Romeo, Mercutio, Benuolio, with fiue or fixe other 
Maskers f torchhearers, 

Romeo, What fliall this fpeech be fpoke for our excufe ? 
Or fliall we on without appologie ? 

Ben, The date is out of fuch prolixitie, 
Weele haue no Cupid, hudwinckt with a skarfe. 
Bearing a Tartars painted bow of lath, 
Skaring the Ladies like a Crowkeeper. 
But let them meafure vs by what they will, 
Weele meafure them a meafure and be gone. 

Rom, Glue me a torch, I am not for this ambling, 

C Being 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

Being but heauie I will beare the light. 

Mercu, Nay getle Romeo, we mull haue you dance. 

Ro, Not I beleeue me, you haue dancing fhooes 
With nimble foles, I haue a foule of Leade 
So Hakes me to the ground I cannot moue. 

Mer. You are a Ix)uer, borrow Cupids wings. 
And fore with them aboue a common bound. 

Rom, I am too fore enpearced with his Ihaft, 
To fore with his light feathers, and fo bound, 
I cannot bound a pitch aboue dull woe, 
Vnder loues heauie birthen do I fincke. 

Horatio, And to fink in it lliould you burthen loue. 
Too great oppreflion for a tender thing. 

Rom, Is loue a tender thing ? it is too rough. 
Too rude, too boyftrous, and it pricks like thorne. 

Aler. If loue be rough with you, be rough with loue 
Prick loue for pricking, and you beate loue downe, 
Giue me a cafe to put my vifage in, 

A vifor for a vifor, what care I 
What curious eye doth cote deformities : 
Here are the beetle browes fhall bluih for me. 

Benu, Come knock and enter, and no fooner in. 
But euery man betake him to his legs. 

Ro. A torch for me, let wantons light of heart 
Tickle the fencelefle rufhes with their heeles : 
For I am prouerbd with a graunfire phrafe. 
He be a candle-holder and looke on. 
The game was nere fo faire, and I am dum. 
Aler, Tut, duns the moufe, the Con (tables own word 
If thou art dun, weele draw thee from the mire 
Or faue you reuerence loue, wherein thou ftickeft 
Vp to the eares, come we burne daylight ho. 

Ro. Nay thats not fo. 

Mer. I meane fir in delay 
We wafte our lights in vaine, lights lights by day : 
Take our good meaning, for our indgement fits, 

Fiue 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Fiue times in that, ere once in our fine wits. 

Ro, And we meane well in going to thl* Mask^ 
But tis no wit to go. 

Mer, Why, may one aske ? 

Rom, I dream pt a dreame to night. 

Mer. And fo did I. 

Ro. Well what was yours ? 

Mer. That dreamers often lie. 

Ro, In bed afleep while they do dream things true. 

Mer. O then J fee Qiieene Mab hath bin with you : 
She is the Fairies midwife, and llie comes in il>np& no bigger the 
an Agot ftone, on the forefinger of an Alderman, drawue with 
a teeme of little ottamie, ouer mens nofes as they lie alleep : her 
waggo fpokes made of log fpinners legs : the couer, of the wings 
of Gralhoppers, her traces of the fmallefi fpider web, her collors 
of the moonfliines watry beams, her whip of Crickets bone, the 
lafli of Philome, her waggoner , a fraall grey coated Gnat, not 
half fo big as a round litle worme, prickt from the lazie finger of 
a man. Her Charriot is an emptie Hafel nut, Made by the loyner 
fijuirrel or old Grub, time out amind, the Fairies Coatchmakers : 
and in this flate fhe gallops night by night, throgh loners brains, 
and then they dreame of loue. On Courtiers knees, that dreame 
on Curfies ftrait, ore Lawyers fingers who ftrait dreame on fees, 
ore Ladies lips who ftrait one kiffes dream, which oft the angrie 
Mab with blifters plagues , becaufe their breath with fweete 
meates tainted are. Sometime Ihe gallops ore a Courtiers nofe, 
and then dreames he of fmelling out a fute : and fometime comes 
ihe with a tithpigs tale, tickUng a Perfons nofe as a lies aileepe, 
then he dreams of an other Benefice. Sometime fhe driueth ore 
a fouldiers neck, and then dreames he of cutting forrain throates, 
of breaches, ambufcados, fpanifh blades : Of healths fiue fadome 
deepe , and then anon drums in his eare , at which he ftarts and 
wakes, and being thus frighted, fweares a praier or two & ileeps 
againe : this is that very Mab that plats tlie manes of horfes in the 
night : and bakes the Elklocks in foule iluttifh haires , which 
ouce vntangled, much misfortune bodes. 

C a This 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

This is the hag, when maides lie on their backs. 
That prelTes tliem and learnes them firft to beare. 
Making them women of good carriage : 
This is fhe. 

Romeo, Peace, peace, Mercutio peace. 
Thou talkft of nothing. 

Aler, True, I talke of dreamer: 
Which are the children of an idle braine. 
Begot of nothing but vaine phantalie : 
Which is as thin of fubftance as the ayre. 
And more inconftant then the wind who wooes, 
Euen now the frozen bofome of the North : 
And being angerd puffes away from thence, 
Turning his fide to the dewe dropping South. 
Ben, This wind you talk of, blows vs from our felues. 
Supper is done, and we iliall come too late. 

Ro, I feare too earlie, for my mind mifgiues. 
Some confequence yet hanging in the (larres. 
Shall bitterly begin his fearfull date. 
With this nights reuels, and expire the terme 
Of a defpifed life clofde in my brefl : 
By fome vile fofreit of vntimely death. 
But he that hath the ftirrage of my courfe, 
Dire6t my fute, on luftie Gentlemen. 

Ben, Strike drum. 
They march about the Stage, and Seruingmen come forth with 
Napkins. 

Enter Romeo. 

Ser, Wheres Potpan that he helpfs not to take away ? 
He {hift a trencher, he fcrape a trencher ? 

I. When good manners {hall lie all in one or two mens hands 
And they vnwafht too, tis a foule thing. 

Ser. Away with the ioynftooles, remoue the Courtcubbert, 
looke to the plate, good thou, faue me a peece pf March-pane, 
and as thou loues me, let the porter let in Sufan Grindftone, and 
Nell, Anthonie and Potpan. 

a. I Boy 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

2. I boy readie. 

Ser. You are lookt for, and cald for, askt for, and fought for in 
the great chamber. 

3. We cannot be here and there too, chearely boyes. 
Be brisk a while, and the longei liuer take all. 

ExeunL 
Enter all the guejis and gentlewomen to the 
Maskers, 

1. Capu. Welcome gentlemen. Ladies that haue their toes 
Vnplagued with Comes, will walke about with you ; 

Ah my miftefles, which of you all 

Will now denie to daunce, fhe that makes daintie. 

She He fwear hath Corns : am I come neare ye now ? 

Welcome gentlemen, I haue feene the day 

That I haue worne a vifor and could tell 

A whifpering tale in a faire Ladies eare ; 

Such as would pleafe : tis gone, tis gone, tis gone. 

You are welcome, gentlemen come, Mufitions play. 

Mujick playes and they dance, 
A hall, a hall, giue roome, and foote it gyrles. 
More light you knaues, and turne the tables vp : 
And quench the fire, the roome is growne too hot. 
Ah firrah, this vnlookt for fport comes well : 
Nay fit, nay fit, good Cozin Capulet, 
For you and I are pafl our dauncing dayes : 
How long ifl now fince lafl your felfe and I 
Were in a maske ? 

2. Capu, Berlady thirtie yeares. 

1. Capu, What man tis not fo much, tis not fo much, 
Tis fince the nuptiall of Lucientio : 

Come Pentycofl as quickly as it will. 

Some fine and twentie yeares, and then we maskt. 

2. Capu, Tis more, tis more, his fonne is elder fir : 
His fonne is thirtie. 

I. Capu, Will you tell me that ? 
His fonne was but a ward 2 . yeares ago. 

a— Q2. 2 C 3 Romeo, What 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

Ro. What Ladies that which doth enrich ihe hand 
Of yonder Knight? 

Ser, I know not fir. 

Ro, O fhe doth teach the torches to burn bright : 
It feemes (he hangs vpon the cheeke of night : 
As a rich lewel in an Ethiops eare, 
Bewtie too rich for vfe, for earth too deare : 
So fhowes a fnowie Done trooping with Crowes, 
As yonder Lady ore her fellowes fhowes : 
The meafure done. He watch her place of (land, 
And touching hers, make bleffed my rude hand. 
Did my hart loue till now, forfweare it fight, 
For I nere faw true bewtie till this night. 

Tilal, This by his voyce, fhould be a Mountague, 
Fetch me my Rapier boy, what dares the flaue 
Come hither couerd with an anticque face. 
To fleere and fcorne at our folemnitie ? 
Now by the flocke and honor of my kin, 
To flrike him dead, I hold it not a fin. 

Capu, Why how now kinsman , wherefore florme 

Tib. Vncle, this is a Mountague our fi)e : (you fo ? 
A villaine that is hither come in fpight. 
To fcorne at our folemnitie this night. 

Cap, Young Romeo is it. 

Tib, 11s he, that villaine Romeo, 

Capu, Content thee gentle Coze, let him alone, 
A beares him like a porily Gentleman : 
And to fay truth, Verona brags of him. 
To be a vertuous and welgouernd youth, 
I would not for the wealth of all this Towne, 
Here in my houfe do him difparagement : 
Therefore be patient, take no note of him. 
It is my will, the which if thou refped. 
Shew a faire prefence, and put off thefe frownes. 
An illbefeeming femblahce for a feafl. 

Tib, It fits when fuch a villaine is a guefl. 

He 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

He not endure him. 

Capit, He fhall be endured. 
What goodraan boy, I fay he fhall, go too. 
Am I the matter here or you ? go too, 
Youle not endure hUn, god fhall mend my foule, 
Youle make a mutinie among my guefts : 
You wil fet cock a hoope, youle be the man, 

Tl. Why Vncle, tis a fhame. 

Capu, Go too, go too. 
You are a fawcie boy, ifl fo indeed ? 
This trick may chance to fcath you I know what. 
You mnfl coutrarie me, marrie tis time. 
Well faid my hearts, you are a princox, go. 
Be quiet, or more light, more light for fhame. 
He make you quiet (what) chearely my hearts. 

TL Patience perforce, with wilfull choller meeting. 
Makes my flefh tremble in their diiferent greeting : 
I will withdraw, but this iutrufion fhall 
Now feeming fweet, conuert to bitireft gall. Exit, 

Ro, Ifl prophane with my vnworthiell hand. 
This holy fhrine, the gentle (in is this, 
My Hps two blufhing Pylgrims did readie ftaud. 
To fmoothe that rough touch with a tender kis. 

lu. Good Pilgrim you do wrog your had too much 
Which mannerly deuocion fhowcs in this. 
For faints haue hands, tliat Pilgrims hands do tuch. 
And palme to palme is holy Palmers kis. 

Ro, Haue not Saints lips and holy Palmers too ? 

lull. I Pilgrim, lips that they mufl vfe in praire. 

Rom, O then deare Saint, let lips do what hands do, 
They pray (grant thou) leafl faith turne to difpaire. 

lu. Saints do not moue, thogh grant for praiers fake. 

Ro. Then moue not while my praiers etledt I take. 
Thus from my Hps, by thine my fin is purgd. 

lu. The haue my lips the fin that they haue tooke. 

Ro, Sin from my lips, 6 trefpas fweetly vrgd : Giuo 



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Tke moji lamentalle Tragedie 

Giue me my fin againe. 

lulL Youe kifle bith booke. 

Nur, Madam your mother craues a word with you. 

J^o, What is her mother ? 

Nurf. Marrie Batcheler, 
Her mother is the Lady of the houfe. 
And a good Ladie, and a wife and vertuous, 
I Nurll her daughter that you talkt witball : 
I tell you, he that can lay hold of her 
Shall haue the chincks. 

Ro. Is (he a Capulet ? 

deare account ! my life is my foes debt. 
Ben, Away begon, the fport is at the bed. 
Ro, I fo I feare, the more is my vnreft. 
Capu, Nay gentlemen prepare not to be gone. 

We haue a trifling foolifh banquet towards : 
Is it ene fo ? why then I thanke you all. 

1 thanke you honed gentlemen, good night : 
More torches here, come on, then lets to bed. 
Ah firrah, by my faie it waxes late. 

He to my reft. 

luli. Come hither Nurfe, what is yond gentleman ? 

Nurf, The fonne and heire of old Tyberio, 

lull, Whats he that now is going out of doore ? 

Nur, Marrie that I thinke be young Petruchio, 

lu, Whats he that follows here that wold not d§ce ? 

Nur. I know not. 

luli. Go aske his name, if he be married. 
My graue is like to be my wedding bed. 

Nurf. His name is Romeo, and a Mountague, 
The onely fonne of your great enemie. 

luli. My onely loue fprung from my onely hate. 
Too earlie feene, vnknowne, and knowne too late. 
Prodigious birth of loue it is to mee, 
That I muft loue a loathed enemie. 

Nurf, Whats tis ? whats tis, 

lu. A 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

In, A rime I learnt euen now 
Of one I dand withall. 

One cals within luliet. 

Nurf. Anon, anon : 
Couie lets away, the (Irangers all are gone. 



Exeunt, 



Chorus, 
NoW old defire doth in his deathbed lie. 
And young affedion gapes to be his heire, 
That faire for which loue gronde for and would die. 
With tender luliet match, is now not faire. 
Now Romeo is beloued, and loues againe. 
Alike bewitched by the charme of lookes : 
But to his foe fuppofd he muft complaine, 
And {he (leale loues fweete bait from fearful hookes : 
Being held a foe, he may not haue accelle 
To breathe fuch vowes as louers vfe to fweare. 
And {he as much in loue, her meanes much lefle. 
To meete her new beloued any where : 
But pallion lends them power, time meanes to meete, 
Tempring extremities with extreeme fweete, 
Enter Romeo alone, 

Ro, Can I go forward when my heart is here, 
Turne backe dull earth and find thy Center out. 
Enter Benuolio with Mercutio. 

Ben, Romeo, my Cofen Romeo y Romeo, 

Mer, He is wife, and on my life hath {lolne him home to bed, 

Ben, He ran this way and leapt this Orchard wall. 
Call good Mercutio : 
Nay He coniure too. 

Mer, Romeo, humours, madman, paflion louer, 
Appeare thou in the likene{Ie of a figh, 
Speake but on rime and I am fatisfied : 
Crie but ay me, prouaunt, but loue and day, 
Speake to my goihip Fenus one faire word. 
One nickname for her purblind fonne and her, 

D Young 



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The moft lamentable Tragedie 

Young Ahraham : Cupid he that fliot fo true. 
When King Cophelua lou'd the begger mayd. 
He heareth not, he ftirreth not, he moueth not. 
The Ape is dead, and I muft coniure him. 
I coniure thee by Rof alines bright eyes, 
By her high forehead, and her Scarlet lip. 
By her fine foot, ftraight leg, and quiuering thigh. 
And the deraeanes, that there adiact-nt lie, 
That in thy likenelle thou appeare to vs. 

Ben, And if he heare thee thou wilt anger him. 

Mer, This cannot anger him, t won Id anger liim 
To raife a fpirit in his miftrelfe circle, 
Of fome flrange nature, letting it there ftand 
Till fhe had laid it, and coniured it dowue. 
That were fome fpight. 

My inuocation is faire & honeft, in his miftres name, 
1 coniure onely but to raife vp him. 

Ben. Come, he hath hid himfelfe among thefe trees 
To be conforted with the humerous night : 
Blind is his loue, and beft befits the darke. 

Mar. If loue be blind, loue cannot hit the marke, 
Now will he fit vnder a Medler tree. 
And wifh his miftrefle were that kind of fruite. 
As maides call Medlers, when they laugh alone. 
O Romeo that fhe were, 6 that fhe were 
An open, or thou a Poprin Peare. 
Romeo goodnight, ile to my truckle bed. 
This field-bed is too cold for me to fleepe. 
Come fhall we go ? 

Ben. Go then, for tis in vaine to feeke him here 
That meanes not to be found. Elxit. 

Ro. He jeafls at fcarres that neuer felt a wound, 
But foft, what light through yonder window breaks ? 
It is the Eafl, and luliet is the Sun. 
Arife faire Sun and kill the enuious Moone, 
Who is alreadie ficke and pale with greefe. 

That 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

That -thou her maide art far more faire then ilie : 

Be not her maide fince (he is enuious. 

Her veftall liuery is but ficke and greene. 

And none but fooles do weare it, call it off: 

It is my Lady, 6 it is my loue, 6 that (he knew (he wer. 

She fpeakes, yet (he faies nothing, what of that ? 

Her eye difcourfes, I will anfwere it : 

I am too bold, tis not to me (he fpeakes : 

Two of the faireft ftarres in all the heauen, 

Hauing fome bufines to entreate her eyes. 

To twinckle in their fpheres till they returne. 

What if her eyes were there, they in her head. 

The brightnefle of her cheek wold Ihame thofe ftars. 

As day-light doth a lampe, her eye in heauen, 

Would through the ayrie region ftreame fo bright. 

That birds would ling, and thinke it were not night : 

See how (he leanes her cheeke vpon her hand. 

O that I were a gloue vpon that hand. 

That I might touch that cheeke. 

lu. Ay me. 

Ro, She fpeakes. 
Oh fpeake againe bright Angel, for thou art 
As glorious to this night being ore my head. 
As is a winged meflenger of heauen 
Vnto the white vpturned wondring eyes. 
Of mortalls that fall backe to gaze on him. 
When he bellrides the lazie puffing Cloudes, 
And fayles vpon the bofome of the ayre. 

lull. O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo ? 
Denie thy father and refufe thy name : 
Or if thou wilt not, be but fworne my loue. 
And ile no longer be a Capulet, 

Ro, Shall I heare more, or (hall I fpeake at this ? 

lu. Tis but thy name that is my enemie : 
Thou art thy felfe, though not a Mountague, 
Whats Mountague ? it is nor hand nor foote, 

D 2 Nor 



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The mojl lamenialle Tragedie 

Nor arme nor face, 6 be fome other name 
Belonging to a man. 

Whats in a name that which we call a rofe. 
By any other word would fmell as fweete. 
So Romeo would wene he not Romeo cald, 
Retaine that deare perfedtion which he owes. 
Without that tytle, Romeo doffe thy name. 
And for thy name which is no part of thee. 
Take all my felfe. 

Ro. I take thee at thy word : 
Call me but loue, and lie be new baptizde. 
Henceforth I neuer will be Romeo. 

lull. What man art thou, that thus befchreend in 
So ftumbleft on my counfell ? Twight 

Ro, By a name, I know not how to tell thee who I 
My name deare faint, is hatefull to my felfe, fam : 

Becaufe it is an enemie to thee. 
Had I it written, I would teare the word. 

luli My eares haue yet not drunk a hundred words 
Of thy tongus vttering, yet I know the found. 
Art thou not Romeo, and a Mouniague 9 

Ro. Neither faire maide, if either thee diflike. 

lull. How earned thou hither, tel me, and wherfore ? 
The Orchard walls are high and hard to climbe. 
And the place death, confidering who thou art. 
If any of my kifmen find thee here. 

Ro, With loues light wings did I orepearch thefe 
For (Ionic limits cannot hold loue out, (walls. 

And what loue can do, that dares loue attempt : 
Therefore thy kinfmen are no ftop to me. 

lu. If they do fee thee, they will murther thee. 

Ro, Alack there lies more perill in thine eye. 
Then twentie of their fwords, looke thou but fweete. 
And I am proofe againft their enmitie. 

lull, I would not for the world they faw thee here. 

Ro. I 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

Ro. I haue nights cloake to hide me fro their eies. 
And but thou loue me, let them finde me here. 
My life were better ended by their hate. 
Then death proroged wanting of thy loue, 

lu. By whofe diredtion foundft thou out this place ? 

Ro, By loue that firft did promp me to enquire. 
He lent me counfell, and I lent him eyes : 
I am no Pylat, yet wert thou as farre 
As that vafl ihore waiheth with the fartheft fea, 
I (hould aduenture for fuch marchandife. 

lu. Thou knoweft the mask of night is on my face, 
Elfe would a maiden blufh bepaint my cheeke. 
For that which thou haft heard me fpeake to night, 
Faine would I dwell on forme, faine, faine, denie 
What I haue fpoke, but farwell complement. 
Doeft thou loue me ? I know thou wilt fay I : 
And I will take thy word, yet if thou fwearft. 
Thou maieft proue falfe at loners periuries. 
They fay loue laughes, oh gentle Romeo, 
If thou doft loue, pronounce it faithfully : 
Or if thou thinkeft I am too quickly wonne. 
He frowne and be peruerfe, and fay thee nay. 
So thou wilt wooe, but elfe not for the world. 
In truth faire Montague I am too fond : 
And therefore thou maieft think my behauior light. 
But truft me gentleman, ile proue more true. 
Then thofe that haue coying to be ftrange, 
I {hould haue bene more ftrange, I muft confefle. 
But that thou ouerheardft ere I was ware. 
My truloue paftion, therefore pardon me. 
And not impute this yeelding to light loue. 
Which the darke night hath fo difcouered. 

Ro. Lady, by yonder blefled Moone I vow. 
That tips with iiluer all thefe frute tree tops. 

lu, O fwear not by the moone tli'inconftant moone. 
That monethly changes in her circle orbe, 

D 3 Leaft 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

Lead that thy loue proue likewife variable. 
Ro, What (hall I fweare by ? 
lu. Do not fweare at all : 
Or if thou wilt, fweare by thy gracious felfe. 
Which is the god of ray Idolatrie, 
And He beleeue thee. 

Ro. If my hearts deare loue. 
lu. Well do not fweare, although I ioy in thee : 
I haue no ioy of this contra6t to night, 
It is too raih, too vnaduifd, too fudden. 
Too like the lightning which doth ceafe to bee. 
Ere one can fay, it lightens, fweete goodnight : 
This bud of loue by Sommers ripening breath. 
May proue a bewtious floure when next we meete. 
Goodnight, goodnight, as fweete repofe and reft. 
Come to thy heart, as that within my breft. 
Ro, O wilt thou leaue me fo vnfatisfied ? 
luli. What fatisfadtion canft thou haue to night ? 
Ro, Th'exchange of thy loues faithful vow for mine. 
lu, I gaue thee mine before thou didft requefl it : 
And yet I would it were to giue againe. 

Ro, Woldft thou withdraw it, for what purpofe loue? 
lu. But to be franke and giue it thee againe. 
And yet I wifh but for the thing I haue. 
My bountie is as boundleflfe as the fea. 
My loue as deepe, the more I giue to thee 
The more I haue, for both are infinite : 
I heare fome noyfe within, deare loue adue : 
Anon good nurfe, fweete Afouniague be true : 
Stay but a little, I will come againe. 

Ro. O blelfed blelled night, I am afeard 
Being in night, all this is but a dreame. 
Too flattering fweete to be fubftantiall. 

lu. Three words deare Romeo, & goodnight indeed. 
If that thy bent of loue be honourable. 
Thy purpofe marriage, fend me word to morrow. 

By 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

By one that ile procure to come to thee, 

Where and what time thou wilt performe the right. 

And all my fortunes at thy foote ile lay. 

And follow thee my L. throughout the world. Madam. 

I come, anon : but if thou meaneft not well, 

I do befeech thee (by and by I come) Madam. 

To ceafe thy ftrife, and leaue me to my griefe. 

To morrow will I fend. 

Ro, So thriue my foule. 

lu. A thoufand times goodnight. 

Ro, A thoufand times the worfe to want thy light, 
Loue goes toward loue as fchooleboyes from their bookes. 
But loue from loue, toward fchoole with heauie lookes. 
Enter luliet againe, 

lull, Hift Romeo hid, 6 for a falkners voyoe. 
To lure this Taflel gentle back againe. 
Bondage is hoarfe, and may not fpeake aloude, 
Elfe would I teare the Caue where Eccho lies. 
And make her ayrie tongue more hoarfe, then 
With repetition of my Romeo. 

Ro. It is my foule that calls vpon my name. 
How filuer fweete, found loners tongues by night. 
Like fofteft muficke to attending eares. 

lu. Rnmeo. 

Ro. My Neece. 

III. What a clocke to morrow 
Shall I fend to thee ? 

R). By the houre of nine. 

lu I will not faile, tis twentie yeare till then, 
I haue forget why I did call thee backe. 

Ro. Let me (land here till thou remember it. 

lu. I (hall forger to haue thee ftill (land there, 
Remembring how I loue thy companie. 

Ro. And Ile ftill ftay, to haue thee ftill forget. 
Forgetting any other home but this. 

lu, Tis almoft morning, I would haue thee gone. 
And yet no farther then a wantons bird. That 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

That lets it hop a litle from his hand, 
Like a poore prifoner in his twifted giues, 
And with a filken threed, plucks it backe againe. 
So louing lealous of his libertie. 

Ro. I would I were thy bird. 

lu, Sweete lb would I, 
Yet I fhould kill thee with much cherifhing : 
Good night, good night. 
Parting is fuch fweeie forrow. 
That I (hall i'ay good ni^^^ht, till it be morrow. 

/;/. Sleep dwel vpon thine eyes, peace in thy breaft. 

Ro, Would I were ileepe and peace fo fweet to rert 
The grey eyde morne fmiles on the frowning night, 
Checkring the Eafterne Clouds with flreaks of light. 
And darknelfe fleckted like a drunkard reeles. 
From forth daies pathway, made by Tytans wheeles. 
Hence will I to my ghoftly Friers clofe cell, 
His helpe to craue, and my deare hap to tell. 

Exit 
Enter Frier alone with a basket, ("ight, 

Fri, The grey-eyed morne fmiles on the frowning 
Checking the Eafterne clowdes with flreaks of light : 
And fleckeld darknefle like a dj-unkard reeles. 
From forth daies path, and Titans burning wheeles: 
Now ere the fun aduance his burning eie. 
The day to cheere, and nights dancke dewe to drie, 
I mud vpfill this ofier cage of ours. 
With balefuU weedes, and precious iuyced flowers. 
The earth that's natures mother is her tombe. 
What is her burying graue, that is her wombe : 
And from her wombe children of diners kinde. 
We fucking on her naturall bofome finde : 
Many for many, vertues excellent : 
None but for fome, and yet all diflferent. 
O raickle is the powerfull grace that lies 
In Plants, hearbes, (lones, and their true quail ities : 

For 



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of Romeo and luUet, 

For nought fo vile, that on the earth doth line. 
But to the earth fome fpeciall good doth giue : 
Nor ought fo good but ftraind from that faire vfe, 
Reuolts from true birth, flurabling on abufe, 
Vertue it felfe tumes vice being raifapplied. 
And vice fometime by a6tion dignified. 

Enter Romeo. 
Within the infant rinde of this weake flower 
Poyfon hath refidence, and medicine power : 
For this being fmelt with that part, cheares each part. 
Being tafted, (laies all fences with the hart. 
Two fuch oppofed Kings encamp them ftill. 
In man as well as hearbes, grace and rude will : 
And where the worfer is predominant, 
Full foone the Canker death eates vp that Plant. 

Ro. Goodmorrow father. 

Fri. Benedicitie. 
What early tongue fo fweete faluteth me ? 
Young fonne, it argues a diftempered hed. 
So foone to bid goodmorrow to thy bed : 
Care keepes his watch in euery old mans eye. 
And where care lodges, fleepe will neuer lye : 
But where vnbrufed youth with vnftuft braine 
Doth couch his lims, there golden fleepe doth rai'gne. 
Therefore thy earlinefle doth me aflure. 
Thou art vproufd with forae diftemprature : 
Or if not fo, then here I hit it right. 
Our Romeo hath not bene in bed to night. 

Ro, That laft is true, the fweeter reft was mine. 

Fri. God pardon fin, waft thou with Rofaline ? 

Ro, With Rofaline, my ghoftly father no, 
I haue forgot that name, and that names wo. 

Fri. Thats my good fon, but wher haft thou bin th€ ? 

Ro. He tell thee ere thou aske it me agen : 
I haue bene feafting with mine enemie. 
Where on a fudden one hath wounded me : 

£ Thats 



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The mqfl lamenlahle Tragedie 

Thats by me wounded both, our remedies 
Within thy helpe and holy phificke lies : 
I beare no hatred blefled man : for loe 
My interceflion hkewife (leads my foe. 

Fri. Be plaine good fonne and homely in thy drift, 
Ridling confeflion, findes but ridling flirift. 

Ro. Then plainly know, my harts deare loue is fet 
On the faire daughter of rich Capulet : 
As mine on hers, fo hers is fet on mine. 
And all combind, faue what thou mud combine 
By holy marriage, when and where, and how. 
We met, we wooed, and made exchange of vow : 
He tell thee as we parte, but this I pray. 
That thou confent to marrie vs to day. 

Fri. Holy S. Frauncis what a change is here ? 
Is Rofaline that thou didft loue fo deare. 
So foone forfaken ? young mens loue then lies 
Not truly in their hearts, but in their eies. 
lefu Maria, what a deale of brine 
Hath walht thy fallow cheekes for Rofaline ? 
How much fait water throwne away in wafte. 
To feafon loue, that of it doth not talle. 
The Sun not yet thy fighes, from heauen cleares 
Thy old grones yet ringing in mine auncient eares : 
Lo here vpon thy cheeke the ftaine doth fit. 
Of an old teare that is not walht otF yet. 
If ere thou waft thy felfe, and thefe woes thine. 
Thou and thefe woes were all for Rofaline, 
And art thou chang'd, pronounce this fentence then. 
Women may fall, when theres no ftrength in men. 
Ro. Thou chidft me oft for louing Rofaline. 
Fri. For doting, not for louing pupill mine. 
Ro. And badft me burie loue. 
Fri. Not in a graue. 
To lay one in an other out to haue. 

Ro. 1 pray thee chide me not, her I loue now. 

Doih 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Doth grace for grace, and loue for loue allow : 
Tlie other did not fo. 

Fri. O fhe knew well. 
Thy loue did reade by rote, that could not fpell : 
But come young wauerer, corae go with me. 
In one refped ile thy afliftant be : 
For this alliance may fo happie proue. 
To tume your houfholds rancor to pure loue. 

Ro, O let vs hence, I (land on fudden haft. 

Fri, Wifely and flow, they ftumble that run faft. 

Exeunt, 
Enter Benuolio and Mercutio. 

Mer, Where the deule fliould this Romeo be ? came hee not 
home to night ? 

Ben, Not to his fathers, I fpoke with his man. 

Mer» Why that fame pale hard hearted wench, that Rofn/ine, 
Torments him fo, that he will fure run mad. 

Ben. Tibalt, the kifman to old Capulet, hath fent a leter to his 
fathers houfe. 

Mer. A challenge on my life. 

Ben. Romeo will anfwere it. 

Mer. Any man that can write may anfwere a letter. 

Ben. Nay, he wil anfwere the letters maifter how he dares, be- 
ing dared. 

Mercu. Alas poore Romeo , he is alreadie dead, ftabd with a 
white wenches blacke eye, runne through the eare with a loue 
fong, the very pinne of his heart, cleft with the blinde 
bowe-boyes but-fliaft, and is hee a man to encounter Ty^ 
bait 9 

Ro. Why what is Tybalt ? 

Mer. More then Prince of Cats. Oh hees the couragious 
captain of Complements : he fights as you fing prickfong, keeps 
time, diftance & proportion, he refts, his minum refts, one two, 
and the third in your bofome : the very butcher of a lilke but- 
ton, a dualift a dualift, a gentleman of the very tirft houfe of the 

E a firft 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

first and fecond caufe, ah the immortall Paffado, the Punto re- 
uerfo, the Hay. 

Ben, The what? 

Mer, The Pox of fuch antique lifping afFe^ng phantacies, 
thefe new tuners of accent : by lefu a very good blade, a very 
tall man, a very good whore. Why is not this a lametable thing 
graundfir, that we fhould be thus afflided with .thefe flraunge 
flies : thefe faihion-mongers, thefe pardons mees, who fland fo 
much on the new forme, that they cannot fit at eafe on the old 
bench. O their bones, their bones. 

Enter Romeo, 

Ben. Here Comes Romeo, here comes Romeo. 

Mer. Without his Roe, like a dried Hering, O flefti, fleih, 
how art thou fifhified ? now is he for the numbers that Petrach 
flowed in : Laura to his Lady, was a kitchin wench, marrie 
flie had a better loue to berime her : Dido a dowdie, Cleopatra 
a Gipfie, Hellen and Hero, hildings and harlots : Tkisbie a grey 
eye or fo, but not to the purpofe, Signior Romeo, Bonieur, theres 
a French falutation to your French flop : you gaue vs the coun- 
terfeit fairly lafl night. 

Ro. Groodmorrow to you both, what counterfeit did I giue 
you? 

Mer. The flip fir, the flip, can you not conceiue ? 

Ro, Pardon good Mercuiio, my bufinefle was great, and in 
fuch a cafe as mine, a man may ftraine curtefie. 

Mer. Thats as much as to fay, fuch a cafe as yours, conflrains 
a man to bow in the hams. 

Ro. Meaning to curfie. 

Mer. Thou haft moft kindly hit it. 

Ro. A moft curtuous expofition. 

Aler. Nay I am the very pinck of curtefie. 

Ro. Pinck for flower. 

Mer. Right. 

Ro. Why then is my pump well flowerd. 

Mer. Sure wit follow me this ieaft, now till thou haft worne 
out tliy pump, that when the fingle fole of it is worne, the ieaft 
may remaine after the wearing, foly Angular. 

Ro. O 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

Ro O (ingle fo Ide ieaft, folic fi ngular for the finglenefle. 

Mer, Come betweene vs good BenuoUo, my wits faints. 

Ro. Svvits and fpurs, fwits and fpurres, or ile crie a match. 

Mer. Nay, if our wits run the wildgoofe chafe, I am done : 
For thou haft more of the wildgoofe in one of thy wits, then I 
am fare I haue in my whole fine. Was I with you there for the 
goofe ? 

Ro. Thou waft neuer with me for any thing, when thou waft 
not there for tlie goofe. 

Mer. I will bite thee by the eare for that ieaft. 

Rom. Nay good goofe bite not. 

Mer. Thy wit is a very bitter fweeting, it is a moft ftiarp fawce. 

Rom. And is it not then well feru'd in to a fweete goofe ? 

Mer. Oh heres a wit of Cheuerell, that ftretches from an 
ynch narrow, to an ell broad. 

Ro. I ftretch it out for that word broad, which added to the 
goofe, proues thee farre and wide a broad goofe. 

Aler. Why is not this better now then groning for loue, now 
art thou fociable, now art thou Romeo : now art thou what thou 
art, by art as well as by nature, for this driueling loue is like a 
great naturall that runs lolling vp and downe to hide his bable 
in a hole. 

Ben. Stop there, ftop there. 

Mer. Thou defireft me to ftop in my tale againft the haire. 

Ben. Thou wouldft elfe haue made thy tale large. 

Mer. O thou art deceiu'd, I would haue made it fliort, for I 
was come to the whole depth of my tale, and meant indeed to 
occupie the argument no longer. 

Ro. Heeres goodly geare. Enter Nurfe and her man. 

A fayle, a fayle. 

Mer. Two two, a ftiert and a fmocke. 

Nur. Peter : 

Peter. Anon. 

Nur. My fan Peter. 

Mer. Good Peter to hide her face, for her fans the fairer face. 

Nur. God ye goodmorrow Gentlemen. 

a— Qi. 3 E 3 Mer. God 



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The mo/i lamentable Tragcdie 

Mer, God ye goodden faire gentlewoman. 

Nur. Is it good den ? 

Mer, T\s no lelTe I tell yee, for the bawdie hand of the dyal, 
is now vpon the prick of noone. 

Nur. Out vpon you, what a man are you ? 

Ro, One gentlewoman, that God hath made, himfelf to mar. 

Nur, By my troth it is well faid, for himfelfe to mar quoth a ? 
Getleme ca any of you tel me wher I may find the yong Romeo f 

Ro, I can tell you, but young Romeo will be older when you 
haue found him, then he was when you fought him : I am the 
youngeft of that name, for fault of a worfe. 

Nur. You fay well. 

Mer, Yea is the worfl wel, very wel took, ifaith, wifely, wifely. 

Nur, If you be he fir, I defire fome confidence with you. 

Ben, She will endite him to fome fupper. 

Mer, A baud, a baud, a baud. So ho. 

Ro. What haft thou found ? 

Mer, No hare fir, vnlelTe a hare fir in a lenten pie, that is forae- 
thing ftale and hoare ere it be fpent. 

An old hare hoare, and an old hare hoare is very good meate in 
lent. 

But a hare that is hore, is too much for a fcore, when it hores ere 
it be fpent. 
Romeo, w\\] you come to your fathers? weele to dinner thither. 

Ro, I will follow you. 

Mer. Farewell auncient Lady, farewell Lady, Lady, Lady. 

Exeunt, 

Nur. I pray you fir, what fawcie merchant was this that was 
fo full of his roperie ? 

Ro, A gentleman Nurfe, that loues to heare himfelfe talke, 
and will fpeake more in a minute, then hee will ftand too in a 
moneth. 

Nur. And a fpeake any thing againft me, lie take him downe, 
and a were luftier then he is, and twentie fuch lacks : and if I 
cannot, ile finde thofe that Ihall : fcuruie knaue, I am none 
of his flurt gills, I am none of his skaines mates, and thou mull 

ftand 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

(land by too and fufFer euery knaue to vfe me at his plea- 
fure. 

Pet, I faw no man vfe you at his pleafure : if I had, my weapon 
{huld quickly haue bin out : I warrant you, I dare draw alToone 
as an other man, if I fee occation in a goodquarel, & the law on 
my fide. 

Nur. Now afore God, I am fo vext, that euery part about me 
quiuers, skuruie knaue : pray you fir a word : and as I told you, 
my young Lady bid me enquire you out, what fhe bid me fay, I 
will keepe to my felfe : but firft let me tell ye, if ye fhould leade 
her in a fooles paradife, as they say, it were a very grofle kind of 
behauior as they fay : for the Gentlewoman is yong : and there- 
fore, if you ihould deale double with her, truly it were an ill 
thing to be ofFred to any Gentlewoman, and very weake dea- 
ling. 

R)m, Nurfe, commend me to thy Lady and MiftrefTe, I pro- 
ted vnto thee. 

Nur. Good heart, and yfaith I wil tel her as much : Lord, Lord, 
(he will be a ioyfuU woman. 

Ro, What wilt thou tell her Nurfe ? thou dooeft not marke 



me 



Nur, I will tell her fir, that you do proteft, which as I take it, 
is a gentlemanlike offer. 

Ro. Bid her deuife fome means to come to fhrift this afternoon. 
And there fhe fhall at Frier Lawrence Cell 
Be fhrieued and married : here is for thy paines. 

Nur. No truly fir not a penny. 

Ro, Go too, I fay you fhall. 

Nur, This afternoone fir, well fhe fhall be there. 

Ro. And flay good Nurfe behinde the Abbey wall. 
Within this houre my man fhall be with thee, 
And bring thee cordes made like a tackled flayre. 
Which to the high topgallant of my ioy. 
Mull be my conuoy in the fecret night. 
Farewell be truftie, and ile quit thy paines : 
Farewel, commend me to thy Miflreffe. 

Nur, Now 



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Tke moft lamentable Tragedie 

Nur. Now God in heauen blelle thee, harke you fir. 

Ro, What faift thou my deare Nurfe ? 

Nur. Is your man fecret, did you nere here fay, two may keep 
counfell putting one away. 

Ro, Warrant thee my mans as true as fteele. 

JVur. Well fir, my Miflrefle is the fweetefl Lady, Lord, Lord, 
when twas a litle prating thing. O there is a Noble man in town 
one Paris, that would faine lay knife aboord : but fhe good foule 
had as leeue fee a tode, a very tode as fee him : I anger her fome- 
times, and tell her that Paris is the properer man, but ile warrant 
you, when I fay fo, fhe lookes as pale as any clout in the verfall 
world, doth not Rofemarie and Romeo begin both with a let- 
ter? 

Ro, I Nurfe, what of that ? Both with an R, 

Nur, A mocker thats the dog, name R. is for the no, I know 
it begins with fome other letter, and fhe hath the pretiefl fen- 
tentious of it, of you and Rofemarie, that it would do you good 
to heare it. 

Ro, Commend me to thy Lady. 

Nur, I a thoufand times Peter, 

Pet, Anon. 

Nur, Before and apace. 

Exit, 
Enter luliet. 

lu. The clocke flrooke nine when I did fend the Nurfe, 
In halfe an houre fhe promifed to returne. 
Perchance fhe cannot meete him, thats not fo : 
Oh fhe is lame, loues heraulds fhould be thoughts. 
Which ten times fafler glides then the Suns beanies, 
Driuing backe fhadowes ouer I o wring hills. 
Therefore do nimble piniond doues draw loue. 
And therefore hath the wind fwift Cupid wings : 
Now is the Sun vpon the highmofl hill. 
Of this dayes iourney, and from nine till twelue. 
Is there long houres, yet fhe is not come. 
Had fhe affedions and warme youthfull bloud. 

She 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

She would be as fwift in motion as a ball, 

My words would handle her to my fweete loue. 

M. And his to me, hut old folks, many fain as they wer dead, 
Vnwieldie, flowe, heauie, and pale as lead. 

Enter Nurfe, 
O God fhe comes, 6 hony Nurfe what newes ? 
Haft thou met with him ? fend thy man away. 

Nur, Peter ftay at the gate. 

lu. Now good fweete Nurfe, O Lord, why lookeft thou fad ? 
Though newes be fad, yet tell them merily. 
If good, thou fhameft the muiicke of fweete newes, 
By playing it to me, with fo fower a face. 

Nur. I am a wearie, giue me leaue a while. 
Fie how my bones ake, what a iaunce haue I ? 

lu, I would thou hadft my bones, and I thy newes : 
Nay come I pray thee fpeake, good good Nurfe fpeake. 

Nur. lefu what hafte, can you not ftay a while ? 
Do you not fee that I am out of breath ? 

lu. How art thou out of breath, when thou haft breath 
To fay to me, that thou art out of breath ? 
The excufe that thou doeft make in this delay. 
Is longer then the tale thou doeft excufe. 
Is thy newes good or bad ? anfwere to that. 
Say either, and ile ftay the circumftance : 
Let me be fatisfied, ift good or bad ? 

Nur. Well, you haue made a limple choyfe, you know not 
how to chufe a man : Romeo, no not he though his face be bet- 
ter then any mans, yet his leg excels all mens, and for a hand 
and a foote and a body, though they be not to be talkt on, yet 
they are paft compare : he is not the flower of curtefie, but ile 
warrant him, as gentle as a lam me : go thy wayes wench, feme 
God. What haue you dinde at home ? 

lu. No, no. But all this did I know before. 
What fayes he of our marriage, what of that ? 

Nur. Lord how my head akes, what a head haue I ? 
It beates as it would fall in twentie peeces. 

F My 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

My back a tother fide, a my backe, my backe : 

Befhrewe your heart for fending me about 

To catch my death with iaunfing vp and downe. 

lu, Ifaith I am forrie that thou art not well. 
Sweete, fweete, fweete Nurfe, tell me what fayes my loue ? 

Nur. Your loue fayes like an honeft gentleman. 
An a Courteous, and a kinde, and a handfome. 
And I warrant a vertuous, where is your mother ? 

lu. Where is my mother, why (he is within, wher fhul J ihe be ^ 
How odly thou replieft : 
Your loue fayes like an honed gentleman. 
Where is your mother ? 

Nur. O Gods lady deare, 
Are you fo hot, marrie come vp I trow. 
Is this the poultis for my aking bones : 
Henceforward do your melfages your felfe. 

lu, Heres fuch a coyle, come what faies Romeo 9 
Nur. Haue you got leaue to go to (hrift to day ? 
lu, I haue. 

Nur, Then high you hence to Frier Lawrence Cell, 
There ftayes a husband to make you a wife : 
Now comes the wanton bloud vp in your cheekes, 
Theile be in fcarlet ftraight at any newes : 
Hie you to Church, I mud an other way. 
To fetch a Ladder by the which your loue 
Muft climbe a birds neaft foone when it is darke, 
I am the drudge, and toyle in your delight : 
But you (hall beare the burthen foone at night. 
Go ile to dinner, hie you to the Cell. 

luU. Hie to high fortune, honed Nurfe farewell. 

Ereuni, 
Enter Frier and Romeo. 
Fri, So fmile the heauens vpon this holy a6l. 
That after houres, with forrow chide vs not. 

Ro, Amen, amen, but come what forrow can, 
It cannot counteruaile the exchange of ioy 

That 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

That one fliort minute giues me in her fight : 
Do thou but dole our hands with holy words. 
Then loue-deuouring death do what he dare. 
It is inough I may but call her mine. 

Fri. Thefe violent delights haue violent endes. 
And in their triumph die like fier and powder : 
Which as they kilTe confume. The fweeteft honey 
Is loathfome in his owne delicioufuefle. 
And in the talle confoundes the appetite. 
Therefore loue moderately, long loue doth fo. 
Too fwift arriues, as tardie as too Howe. 

Enter luliet. 
Here comes the Lady, Oh fo light a foote 
Will nere weare out the euerlafting flint, 
A louer may beflride the gofTamours, 
That ydeles in the wanton fommer ayre. 
And yet not fall, fo light is vanitie. 

lu. Good euen to my ghoftly confelfor. 

Fri. Romeo fhall thanke thee daughter for vs both. 

lu. As much to him, elfe is his thankes too much. 

Ro, Ah luliet, if the meafure of thy ioy 
Be heapt like mine, and that thy skill be more 
To blafon it, then Iweeten with thy breath 
This neighbour ayre and let rich muficke tongue, . 
Vnfold the imagind happines that both 
Receiue in either, by this deare encounter. 

lu. Conceit more rich in matter then in words. 
Brags of his fubflance, not of ornament. 
They are but beggers that can count their worth. 
But my true loue is growne to fuch excelTe, 
I cannot fum vp fum of halfe my wealth. 

Fri. Come, come with me, and we will make fhort 
For by your leaues, you fhall not flay alone, (worke. 

Till holy Church incorporate two in one. 

F 2 Enter 



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The moji lamentable Tragedie 

Enter Mercutio, Benuolio, and men, 

Ben. I pray thee good Mercutio lets retire. 
The day is hot, the Capels abroad : 

And if we meete we fhall not fcape a brawle, for now thefe hot 
daies, is the mad blood ftirring. 

Mer. Thou art like one of thefe fellowes, that when he enters 
the confines of a Tauerne, claps me his fword vpon the table, 
and fayes, God fend me no need of thee : and by the operation 
of the fecond cup, draws him on the drawer, when indeed there 
is no need. 

Ben. Am I like fuch a fellow ? 

Mer. Come, come, thou art as hot a lacke in thy moode as 
any in Italie : and alToone moued to be moodie, and aflbone 
moodie to be moued. 

Ben. And what too ? 

Mer, Nay and there were two' fuch, we (hould haue none 
(hortly, for one would kill the other: thou, why thou wilt 
quarell with a man that hath a haire more, or a haire lefle in his 
beard, then thou hafl : thou wilt quarell with a man for cracking 
Nuts, hauing no other reafon, but becaufe thou haft hafel eyes : 
what eye, but fuch an eye wold fpie out fuch a quarrel ? thy head 
is as full of quarelles, as an egge is full of meate, and yet thy 
head hath bene beaten as addle as an Qgge for quarelling : thou 
haft quareld with a man for coffing in the ftreete, becaufe hee 
hath wakened thy dogge that hath laine afleep in the fun. Didft 
thou not fall out with a taylor for wearing his new doublet be- 
fore Eafter, with an other for tying his new ftiooes with olde ri- 
band, and yet thou wilt tuter me from quarelling ? 

Ben. And I were fo apt to quarell as thou art, any man fhould 
buy the fee-fimple of my life for an houre and a quarter. 

Mer. The fee-fimple, 6 fimple. 

Enter Tybalt, Petruchio, and others, 

Ben. By my head here comes the Capulets. 

Mer. By my heele I care not. 

Tybalt. Follow me clofe, for I will fpeake to them. 
Gentlemen, Good den, a word with one of you. 

Mtr. 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Mer. And but one word with one of vs, couple it with fome- 
thing, make it a word and a blowe. 

Tib. You fhall find me apt inough to that ^r, and you wil glue 
me occaiion. 

Mercu. Could you not take fome occafiou without gl- 
uing ? 

Tyb, Mercutio, thou conforteft with Romeo. 

Met, Confort, what doeft thou make vs MiuftreLs ? and thou 
make Minftrels of vs, looke to hear nothing but difcords : heeres 
ray fiddlefticke, heeres that fhall make you daunce : zounds con- 
fort. 

Ben. We talke here in the publike haunt of men : 
Either withdraw vnto fome priuate place. 
Or reafon coldly of your greeuauces : 
Or elfe depart, here all eyes gaze on vsu 

Mer. Mens eyes were made to looke, and let them gaze. 
I will not budge for no mans pleafure I. 
Enter Romeo. 

Tyb. Well peace be with you (ir, here comes my man. 

Mer. But ile be hangd (ir if he weare your liuerie : 
Marrie go before to field, heele be your follower. 
Your worfhip in that fenfe may call him man. 

Tyh. Romeo, the loue I beare thee, can afFoord 
No better terme then this : thou art a villaine. 

Ro. Tybalt, the reafon that I haue to loue thee. 
Doth much excufe the appertaining rage 
To fuch a greeting : villaine am I none. 
Therefore ferewell, I fee thou knoweft me not. 

Tyb. Boy, this fhall not excufe the iniuries 
That thou haft done me, therefore turne and draw. 

Ro. I do proteft I neuer iniuried thee. 
But loue thee better then thou canft deuife : 
Till thou flialt know the reafon of my loue. 
And fo good Capulet, which name I tender 
As dearely as mine owne, be fatisfied. 

Mer, O calme, difhonourable, vile fubmiffion : 

F ^ Alia 



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The moji lamentahle Tragedie 

Allajlucatho carries it away, 

Tilalt, you ratcatcher, will you waike ? 

Tib, What wouldft thou haue wilh me ? 

M, Good King of Cats, nothing but one of your nine Hues, 
that I meane to make bold withall, and as you Ihall vfe mee 
hereafter drie beate the reft of the eight. Will you plucke your 
fword out of his pilcher by the eares ? make halle, leaft mine be 
about your eares ere it be out. 

Tib. I am for you. 

Rom, Gentle Mercuiio, put thy Rapier vp. 

Mer, Come fir, your Paflado. 

Rom. Draw Benuolio, beate downe their weapons. 
Gentlemen, for fhame forbeare this outrage, 
Tihalt, Mercutio, the Prince exprefly hath 
Forbid this bandying in Ferona ftreetes. 
Hold Tybalt, good Mercutio. 

Away Tybalt. 

Mer. I am hurt. 
A plague a both houfes, I am fped. 
Is he gone and hath nothing. 

Ben. What art thou hurt ? 

Mer, I, I, a fcratch, a fcratch, marrie tis inough. 
Where is my Page ? go villaine, fetch a Surgion. 

Ro. Courage man, tlie hurt cannot be much. 

Mer. No tis not fo deepe as a well, nor fo wide as a Church 
doore,but tis inough, twill feme : aske for me to morrow, and you 
{hall finde me a graue man. I am peppered I warrant, for this 
world, a plague a both your houfes, founds a dog, a rat, a moufe, 
a cat, to fcratch a man to death : a braggart, a rogue, a villaine, 
that fights by the book of arithmatick, why the deule came you 
betweene vs ? I was hurt vnder your arme. 

Ro, I thought all for the beft. 

Mer. Helpe me into fome houfe Bcnuolio, 

Or 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Or I fhall faint, a plague a both your houfes. 
They haue made wormes raeate of me, 
I haue it, and foundly, to your houfes. 

Ro, This Gentleman the Princes neare alie. 
My very friend hath got this mortall hurt 
In ray behalfe, my reputation flaind 
With Tybalts llaunder, Tybalt that an houre 
Hath bene my Cozen, O fweete lulkt. 
Thy be w tie hath made me effeminate. 
And in ray teraper foftned valours fteele. 

Enter Benuolio. 



Ben, O Romeo, Romeo, braue Mercutio is dead. 
That gallanr fpirit, hath afpir'd the Clowdes, 
Which too vn timely here did fcorne the earth. 

Ro, This dayes blacke fate, on mo dales doth depcd. 
This but begins, the wo others muft end. 

Ben. Here coraes the furious Tybalt backe againe. 

Ro. He gan in triuraph and Mercutio llaine. 
Away to heauen, refpedtiue lenitie. 
And fier end furie, be my condudt now. 
Now Tybalt take the villaine backe againe. 
That late thou gauefl me, for Mercutios foule 
Is but a little way aboue our heads. 
Staying for thine to keepe him companie : 
Either thou or I, or both, muft go with him. 

Ty. Thou wretched boy that didft cofort him here, 
Shalt with him hence. 

Ro, This ftiall deteimiue that. 

They Fight, Tibdlt falles. 

Ben. Romeo, away be gone : 
The Citizens are vp, and Tybalt flaine, 
Stand not araazed, the Prince wil doome thee death. 
If thou art taken, hence be gone away. 

Ro. 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

Ro. O I am fortunes foole. 

Ben. Why doft thou flay ? 

EtU Romeo. 
Enter Citizens. 

Citti Which way ran he that kild Merculio ? 
Tybalt that mutherer, which way ran he ? 

Ben. There lies that Tybalt. 

Citi. Vp fir, go with me : 
I charge thee in the Princes name obey. 

Enter Prince, olde Mountague, Capulet, 
their wiues and all. 

Prin. Where are the vile beginners of this fray ? 

Ben. O Noble Prince, I can difcouer all : 
The vnluckie mannage of this fatall brail, 
There lies the man flaine by young Romeo, 
That flew thy kifman, braue Mercutio. 

Capu. Wi. Tybalt, my Cozin, O my brothers child, 
O Prince, O Cozen, husband, O the bloud is fpild 
Of my deare kifman. Prince as thou art true, 
For bloud of ours, fliead bloud of Mountague. 
O Cozin, Cozin. 

Prin. Benuolio, who began this bloudie fray ? 

Ben. Tybalt here flain, whom Romeos hand did flay, 
Romeo that fpoke him feire, bid him bethinke 
How nice the quarell was, and vrgd withall 
Your high difpleafure all this vtrered. 
With gentle breath, calm look, knees humbly bowed 
Could not take truce with the vnruly fpleene ^ 

Of Tybalt deafe to peace, but that he tilts 
With piercing fteele at bold 'M.ercutios breafl. 
Who all as hot, turnes deadly poynt to poynt. 
And with a Martiall fcorne, with one hand beates 
Cold death afide, and with the other fends 
It backe to Tybalt ^ whofe dexteritie 
Retorts it, Romeo he cries aloud. 
Hold friends, friends part, and fwifrer then his tongue, 

His 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

His aged arme beates downe their fatall poynts. 
And twixt them rufhes, vnderneath whofe arme. 
An enuious thruft from Tybalt, hit the life 
Of flout Mercutio, and then Tybalt fled. 
But by and by comes backe to Romeo, 
Who had but newly entertaind reuenge. 
And toote they go like lightning, for ere I 
Could draw to part them, was ftout Tybalt (laine : 
And as he fell, did Romeo turne and flie. 
This is the truth, or let Benuolio die. 

Ca. Wi. He is a kifman to the Mountague, 
AfFedion makes him falfe, he fpeakes not true : 
Some twentie of them fought in this blacke ftrife. 
And all thofe twentie could but kill one life. 
I beg for luftice which thou Prince muft giue : 
Romeo flew Tybalt, Romeo muft not liue. 

Prin. Romeo flew him, he flew Mercutio, 
Who now the price of his deare bloud doth owe. 

Capu, Not Romeo Prince, he was Mercutios friend. 
His fault concludes, but what the law fhould end. 
The life of Tybalt, 

Prin. And for that offence. 
Immediately we do exile him hence : 
I haue an intereft in your hearts proceeding : 
My bloud for your rude brawles doth lie a bleeding. 
But ile amerce you with fo ftrong a fine. 
That you fhall all repent the lofTe of mine. 
It will be deafe to pleading and excufes. 
Nor teares, nor prayers fhall purchafe out abufes. 
Therefore vfe none, let Romeo hence in haft, 
Elfe when he is found, that houre is his laft. 
Beare hence this body, and attend our will, 
Mercie but murders, pardoning thofe that kill. 

jExit. 
Enter luliet alone. 
Gallop apace, you fierie footed fteedes, 

G Towards 



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The mojl la men table Tragcdie 

Towards Phoebus lodging, fuch a wagoner 

As Phaetan would whip you to the weft. 

And bring in clowdie night immediately. 

Spread thy clofe curtaine loue-performi ng night. 

That runnawayes eyes may wincke, and Romeo 

Leape to thefe armes, vntalkt of and vnfeene, 

Louers can fee to do their amorous rights. 

And by their owne bewties, or if loue be blind. 

It beft agrees with night, come ciuill night. 

Thou fober futed matron all in blacke. 

And learne me how to loofe a winning match, 

Plaide for a paire of ftainlelfe maydenhoods. 

Hood my vnmand bloud bay ting in my cheekes. 

With thy blacke mantle, till ftrange loue grow bold, 

Thinke true loue a6ted fimple modeftie : 

Come night, come Romeo, come thou day in night. 

For thou wilt lie vpon the winges of night. 

Whiter then new fnow vpon a Rauens backe : 

Come gentle night, come louing black browd night, 

Giue me my Romeo, and when I fhall die. 

Take him and cut him out in little ftarres. 

And he will make the face of heauen fo fine. 

That all the world will be in loue with night. 

And pay no worfhip to the garilh Sun. 

O I haue bought the manfion of a loue, 

fiut not polTeil it, and though I am fold. 

Not yet enioyd, {o tedious is this day. 

As is the night before fome feftiuall. 

To an impatient child that hath new robes 

And may not weare them. O here comes my Nurfe. 

Enter Nurfe with cords. 
And (he brings newes, and euery tongue that fpeaks 
But Romeos name, fpeakes heauenly eloquence : 
Now Nurfe, what newes ? what haft thou there, 
The cords that Romeo bid thee fetch ? 

Nur. I, 



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of Romeo and Iiiliet, 

Nur, I, I, the cords. 

III. Ay me what news ? why doft thou wring thy ha<.ls ? 

Nur. A weraday, hees dead, hees dead, hees dead^ 
We are vndone Lady, we are vndone. 
Alack the day, hees gone, hees kild, hees dead. 

lu. Can hcauen be lb enuious ? 

Nur. Romeo can. 
Though heauen cannot. O Romeo, Romeo, 
Who euer would haue thought it Romeo ? 

lu. What diuell art thou that doft torment me thus ? 
This torture fhould be rored in difmall hell, 
Hath Romeo flaine himfelfe ? fay thou but I, 
And that bare vowell I (hall poyfon more 
Then the death arting eye of Cockatrice, 
I am not I, if there be fuch an I. 
Or thofe eyes (hot, that makes thee anfwere I : 
If he be flaine fay I, or if not, no. 
Briefe, founds, determine my weale or wo. 

Nur, I faw the wound, I faw it with mine eyes, 
God faue the marke, here on his manly breft, 
A piteous coarfe, a bloudie piteous coarfe. 
Pale, pale as aflies, all bedawbde in bloud. 
All in goare bloud, I founded at the fight. 

lu. O break my hart, poore banckrout break at once. 
To prifon eyes, nere looke on libertie. 
Vile earth too earth refigne, end motion here. 
And thou and Romeo prefle on heauie beare. 

Nur. O Tybalt, Tybalt, the beft friend I had, 
O curteous Tybalt, honefl Gentleman, 
That euer I ftiould line to fee thee dead. 

lu. What (loime is this that blowes fo contrarie? 
Is Romeo flaughtred ? and is Tybalt dead ? 
My deareft Cozen, and my dearer Lord, 
Then dreadfuU Trumpet found the generall doome. 
For who is Uuing, if thofe two are gone ? 

G 2 Nur. Tybalt 



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The mqft lament alle Tragedie 

Nur, Tybalt is gone and Romeo baniihed, 
Romeo that kild him he is banifhed. 

lulL O God, did Rom^os hand (head Tilalts bloud ? 
It did, it did, alas the day, it did. 

Nur. O ferpent heart, hid with a flowring face. 

/a. Did euer draggon keepe fo faire a Caue ? 
Bcwtifull tirant, fiend angelical I : 
Rauenous douefeatherd raue, woluifh rauening lamb, 
Defpifed fubdance of diuined fhowe : 
luft oppofite to what thou iudly leem'ft, 
A dimme faint, an honourable villaine : 
O nature what hadft thou to do in hell 
When thou didft bower the fpirit of a fiend. 
In mortall paradife of fuch fweete fleih ? 
Was euer booke containing fuch vile matter 
So fairely bound ? 6 that deceit fhould dwell 
In fuch a gorgious Pallace. 

Nur. Theres no truft, no faith, no honeftie in men, 
All periurde, all forfworne, all naught, all diflemblers. 
Ah wheres my man ? giue me fome Aqua-vitae : 
Thefe griefs, thefe woes, thefe forrows make me old. 
Shame come to Romeo. 

lu. BHfterd be thy tongue 
For fuch a wifh, he was not borne to ihame : 
Vpon his brow (hame is afham'd to fit : 
For tis a throane where honour may be crownd 
Sole Monarch of the vniuerfal earth. 
O what a beafl was I to chide at him ? 

Nur. Wil you fpeak wel of him that kild your cozin ? 

lu. Shall I fpeake ill of him that is my husband ? 
Ah poor my lord, what tongue ihal fmooth thy name. 
When I thy three houres wife haue mangled it ? 
But wherefore villaine didft thou kill my Cozin ? 
That villaine Cozin would haue kild my hasband : 
Backe foolifti teares, backe to your natiue fpring. 
Your tributarie drops belong to woe. 



Which 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Which you mlftaking offer vp to ioy. 

My husband Hues that Tybalt would haue flaine. 

And Tybalts dead that would haue flain my husband : 

All this is comfort, wherefore weepe I then ? 

Some word there was, worfer then Tybalts death 

That raurdred me, I would forget it faine. 

But oh it prefles to my memorie. 

Like damned guiltie deeds to tinners mindes, 

Tybalt is dead and Romeo banifhed : 

That banifhed, that one word banifhed. 

Hath flame ten thoufand Tybalts : Tybalts death 

Was woe inough if it had ended there : 

Or if fower woe delights in fellowfhip. 

And needly will be ranckt with other griefes. 

Why followed not when fhe faid Tybalts dead. 

Thy father or thy mother, nay or both. 

Which modeme lamentation might haue moued. 

But with a reareward following Tybalts death, 

Romeo is banifhed : to fpeake that word. 

Is father, mother, Tybalt, Romeo, luliet. 

All flaine, all dead : Romeo is banifhed. 

There is no end, no limit, meafure bound. 

In that words death, no words can that woe found. 

Where is my father and my mother Nurfe ? 

Nur, Weeping and wayling ouer Tybalts courfe. 
Will you go to them ? I will bring you thither. 

lu, Wafh they his wounds with teares ? mine fhall be 
When theirs are drie, for Romeos banifhment. (fpent. 

Take vp thofe cordes, poore ropes you are beguilde. 
Both you and I for Romeo is exilde : 
He made you for a highway to my bed,. 
But I a maide, die maiden widowed. 
Come cordes, come Nurfe, ile to my wedding bed. 
And death not Romeo, take my maiden head. 

Nur, Hie to your chamber, Ile finde Romeo 
To comtort you, I wot well where he is : 

a— Qi. 4 G 3 Harke 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

Harke ye, your Romeo will be here at night, 
lie to him, he is hid at Latvrence Cell. 

lu. O find him, giue this ring to my true Knight, 
And bid him come, to take his lad farewell. 

Exit. 
Enter Frier and Romeo. 

Fri, Romeo come forth, come forth thou fearefuU man, 
AfHidion IS enamourd of thy parts : 
And thou art wedded to calamitie. 

Ro, Father what newes ? what is the Princes doome ? 
What forrow craues acquaintance at my hand. 
That I yet know not ^ 

Fri. Too familiar 
Is my deare fonne with fuch fowre companie ? 
I bring thee tidings of the Princes doome. 

Ro. What lefle then doomesday is the Princes doome ? 

Fri. A gentler iudgement vanifht from his lips. 
Not bodies death, but bodies banifhment. 

Rom. Ha, banifhment ? be merciful 1, fay death : 
For exile hath more terror in his looke, 
Much more then death, do not fay banifhment. 

Fri. Here from Verona art thou banifhed : 
Be patient, for the world is broad and wide. 

Ro. There is no world without Verona walls. 
But purgatorie, torture, hell it felfe : 
Hence banifhed, is blanifht from the world. 
And worlds exile is death. Then banifhed. 
Is death, miflermd, calling death banifhed. 
Thou cutfl my head off with a golden axe. 
And fmilefl vpon the flroke that murders me. 

Fri. O deadly fin, 6 rude vnthankfiilnes, 
Thy fault our law calls death, but the kind Prince 
Taking thy part, hath rufht afide the law, 
And tumd that blacke word death to banifhment. 



This 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

This is deare mercie, and thou feed it not. 

Ro. Tis torture and not mercie, heauen is here 
Where luliet liues, and euery cat and dog. 
And litle moufe, euery vnworthy thing 
Line here in heauen, and may looke on her. 
But Romeo may not. More validitie. 
More honourable date, more courtfhip liues 
In carrion flies, then Romeo : they may feaze 
On the white wonder of deare Juliets hand. 
And ileale immortall blelling from her lips. 
Who euen in pure and veftall modeftie 
Still blufh, as thinking their owne kiiTes (in. 
This may flyes do, when I from this muft flie. 
And fay eft thou yet, that exile is not death ? 
But Romeo may not, he is baniihed. 
Flies may do this, but I from this muft flie : 
They are freemen, but I am baniftied. 
Hadft thou no poyfon mixt, no ftiarpe ground knife. 
No fudden meane of death, though nere fo meane. 
But baniftied to kill me : Baniftied ? 
O Frier, the damned vfe that word in hell : 
Howling attends it, how haft thou the heart 
Being a Diuine, a ghoftly Confeflbr, 
A fin obfoluer, and my friend profeft. 
To mangle me with that word baniftied ? 

Fri. Then fond mad man, heare me a little fpeake. 

Ro. O thou wilt fpeake againe of baniftiment. 

Fri. He giue thee armour to keepe off" that word, 
Aduerfities fweete milke, Philofophie, 
To comfort thee though thou art baniftied. 

Ro. Yet baniftied ? hang vp philofophie, 
Vuleife Philofophie can make a luliet, 
Difplant a towne, reuerfe a Princes doome. 
It helpes not, it preuailes not, talke no more. 

Fri. O then I fee, that mad man haue no eares. 

Ro» How ftiould they when that wife men haue no eyes. 

Fri. Let 



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The muji lamentable Tragedie 

FrL Let me difpute with thee of thy eftate. 

Ro, Thou can ft not fpeak of that thou doft not feele, 
Wert thou as young as I, Juliet thy loue. 
An houre but married, Tybalt murdered. 
Doting like me, and like me banifhed. 
Then mighteft thou fpeake. 
Then mightft thou teare thy hayre. 
And fall vpon the ground as I do now. 
Taking the meafure of an vnmade graue. 

Enter Nurfe, and knocke. 

Fri. Arife one knocks, good Romeo hide thy felfe. 

Ro, Not I, vnlefle the breath of hartficke grones, 
Myft-like infold rae from the fearch of eyes. 
They knocke, 

Fri. Hark how they knock (whofe there) Romeo arife. 
Thou wilt be taken, ftay a while, ftand vp. 

Slud knock. 
Run to my ftudie by and by, Gods will 
What fimplenes is this ? I come, I come. 

Knocke. 
Who knocks fo hard ? whece come you ? whats your will ? 
Enter Nurfe. 

Nur. Let me come in, and you Ihal know my errant : 
I come from Lady Juliet. 

Fri. Welcome then. 

Nur. O holy Frier, O tell me holy Frier, 
Wheres my Ladyes Lord ? wheres Romeo ? 

Fri. There on the ground. 
With his owne teares made drunke. 

Nur. O he is euen in my miftrefle cafe, 
luft in her cafe. O wofull fimpathy : 
Pitious prediccament, euen fo lies (he, 
Blubbring and weeping, weeping and blubbring. 
Stand vp, ftand vp, ftand and you bo a man. 
For Juliets fake, for her fake rife and ftand : 
Why ftiould you fall into fo deepe an O ? 

Rom. Nurfe. Nur. Ah 



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of Romeo and Iidiet, 

Nur, Ah fir, ah fir, deaths the end of all. 

Ro, Spakeft thou of luliet P how is it with her ? 
Doth not ihe thinke me an old murtherer. 
Now I haue (laind the childhood of our ioy. 
With bloud remoued, but little from her owne ? 
Where is (he ? and how doth ihe ? and what fayes 
My conceald Lady to our canceld loue ? 

Nur, Oh fhe fayes nothing fir, but weeps and weeps, 
And now falls on her bed, and then fiarts vp. 
And Tyhalt calls, and then on Romeo cries. 
And then downe falls againe. 

Ro, As if that name ihot from the deadly leuell of a gun. 
Did murther her, as that names curfed hand 
Murderd her kinfman. Oh tell me Frier, tell me. 
In what vile part of this Anatomie 
Doth my name lodge ? Tell me that I may facke 
The hateful! manfion. 

Fru Hold thy defperate hand : 
Art thou a man ? thy forme cries out thou art : 
Thy teares are womanifh, thy wild a6b denote 
The vnreafonable fiirie of a beaft. 
Vnfeemely woman in a feeming man, 
And ilbefeeming beaft in feeming both. 
Thou haft amaz'd me. By my holy order, 
I thought thy difpofition better temperd. 
Haft thou flaine Tyhalt ? wilt thou fley thy felfe ? 
And (ley thy Lady, that in thy life lies. 
By doing damned hate vpon thy felfe ? 
Why rayleft thou on thy birth ? the heauen and earth ? 
Since birth, and heauen, and earth all three do meet. 
In thee at once, which thou at once wouldft loofe. 
Fie, fie, thou fliameft thy ftiape, thy loue, thy wit. 
Which like a Vfurer aboundft in all : 
And vfeft none in that true vfe indeed. 
Which fliould bedecke thy fliape, thy loue, thy wit : 
Thy Noble ftiape is but a forme of waxe, 

H Digrefling 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

Digreffing from the valour of a man, 
Thy deare loue fworne but hollow periurie. 
Killing that loue which thou haft vowd to cherifh. 
Thy wit, that ornament, to fhape and loue, 
Mifhapen in the condud of them both : 
Like powder in a skillefle fouldiers flaske. 
Is fet a tier by thine owne ignorance. 
And thou difmembred with thine owne defence. 
What rowfe thee man, thy luliei is aliue. 
For whofe deare fake thou waft but lately dead. 
There art thou happie, Tt/balt would kill thee. 
But thou fleweft Tibali, there art thou happie. 
The law that threatned death becomes thy friend. 
And turnes it to exile, there art thou happie. 
A packe of bleftings light vpon thy backe, 
Happines courts thee in her beft array. 
But like a miftiaued and fullen wench. 
Thou puts vp thy fortune and thy loue : 
Take heede, take heede, for fuch die miferable. 
Go get thee to thy loue as was decreed, 
Afcend her chamber, hence and comfort her : 
But looke thou ftay not till the watch be fet. 
For then thou canft not pafte to Mantua, 
Where thou ftialt liue till we can find a time 
To blaze your marriage, reconcile your friends. 
Beg pardon of the Prince and call thee backe. 
With twentie hundred thoufand times more ioy 
Then thou wentft forth in lamentation. 
Gro before Nurfe, commend me to thy Lady, 
And bid her haften all the houfe to bed. 
Which heauie forrow makes them apt vnto, 
Romeo is comming. 

Nur. O Lord, I could haue ftaid here all the night. 
To heare good counfell, oh what learning is : 
My Lord, ile tell my Lady you will come. 

Ro, Do fo, and bid my fweete prepare to chide. 

Nur. Here 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

Nur, Here fir, a Ring (he bid me giue you fir : 
Hie you, make haft, for it growes very late. 

Ro, How well my comfort is reuiu*d by this. 

Fri, Go hece, goodnight, & here (lands al your ftate : 
Either be gone before the watch be fet. 
Or by the breake of day difguife from hence, 
Soioume in Mantua, ile find out your man. 
And he (hall {\gn\fit from time to time, 
Euery good hap to you, that chaunces here : 
Giue me thy hand, tis late, farewell, goodnight. 

Ro, But that a ioy paft ioy calls out on me, 
It were a griefe, fo briefe to part with thee : 
Farewell. 

BjceunL 
Enter old Capulet, his wife and Paris. 

Ca, Things haue falne out fir fo vnluckily. 
That we haue had no time to moue our daughter, 
Looke you, (he lou'd her kinfman Tybalt dearely 
And fo did I. Well we were borne to die. 
Tis very late, fheele not come downe to night : 
I promife you, but for your companie, 
1 would haue bene a bed an houre ago. 

Paris. Thefe times of wo affoord no times to wooe : 
Madam goodnight, commend me to your daughter. 

La, I will, and know her mind early to morrow, 
To night (hees mewed vp to her heauines. 

Ca, Sir Paris, I will make a defperate tender 
Of my childes loue : I thinke ihe will me rulde 
In all refpe^ by me : nay more, I doubt it not. 
Wife go you to her ere you go to bed. 
Acquaint her here, of my fonne Paris loue. 
And bid her, marke you me ? on wendfday next. 
But foft, what day is this > 

Pa, Monday my Lord. 

Ca. Monday, ha ha, well wendfday is too foone, 
A thurfday let it be, a thurfday tell her 

H 2 She 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

She fhall be married to this noble Earle : 
Will you be ready ? do you like this hade ? 
Well, keepe no great ado, a friend or two. 
For harke you, Tybalt being flaine fo late. 
It may be thought we held him carelefly 
Being our kinfm^n, if we reuell much : 
Therefore weele haue fome halfe a doozen friends. 
And there an end, but what fay you to Thurfday ? 

Paris, My Lord, I would that thurfday were to morrow. 

Ca. Well get you gone, a Thurfday be it then : 
Go you to luliet ere you go to bed. 
Prepare her wife, againft this wedding day. 
Farewell my Lord, light to my chamber ho. 
Afore mee, it is fo very late that wee may call it early by and by, 
Goodnight. 

Eveunt. 
Enter Romeo and luliet aloft, 

lu. Wilt thou be gone ? It is not yet neare day : 
It was the Nightingale, and not the Larke, 
That pierft the fearefuU hollow of thine eare. 
Nightly fhe fings on yond Pomgranet tree, 
Beleeue me loue, it was the Nightingale. 

Rom. It was the Larke the herauld of the mome. 
No Nightingale, looke loue what enuious fb-eakes 
Do lace the feuering cloudes in yonder Eaft : 
Nights candles are burnt out, and iocand day 
Stands tipto on the myftie Mountaine tops, 
I muft be gone and Hue, or (lay and die. 

lu. Yond light is not daylight, I know it I : 
It is fome Meteor that the Sun exhale. 
To be to thee this night a Torch-bearer, 
And light thee on thy way to Mantua, 
Therefore ftay yet, thou needfl not to be gone. 

Ro, Let me be tane, let me be put to death, 
I am content, fo thou wilt haue it fo. 
He fay yon gray is hot the the mornings eye, 

Tis 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

Tis but the pale reflex of Cinthias brow. 
Nor that is not the Larke whofe noates do beate 
The vaultie heauen fo high aboue our heads, 
I haue more care to ftay then will to go : 
Come death and welcome, luliet wilb it {o. 
How ifl my foule ? lets talke it is not day. 
lu. It is, it is, hie hence 6e gone away : 
It is the Larke that fings fo out of tune. 
Straining harih Difcords, and vnpleafing Sharpes. 
Some fay, the Larke makes fweete Diuifion : 
This doth not fo : for Ihe diuideth vs. 
Some fay the Larke and loathed Toad change eyes, 
O now I would they had changd voyces too : 
Since arme from arme that voyce doth vs affray. 
Hunting thee hence, with Huntfup to the day. 

now be gone, more light and light it growes. 

Romeo, More light and light, more darke and darke our 
woes. 

Enter Madame and Nurfe, 
Nur, Madam. 
Iiu Nurfe. 

Nur, Your Lady Mother is cuming to your chaber. 
The day is broke, be wary, looke about. 

lull. Then window let day in, and let life out. 
Ro, Farewell, farewell, one kifle and He defcend. 
lu. Art thou gone fo loue. Lord, ay husband, friend, 

1 muft heare from thee euery day in the houre. 
For in a minute there are many dayes, 

by this count I iball be much in yeares. 
Ere I againe behold my Romeo, 

Rom. Farewell: 

1 will omit no opportunitie. 

That may conuey my greetings loue to thee. 

lu, O thinkft thou we ihall euer meete againe ? 

Rom,. I doubt it not, and all thefe woes (hall feme 
For fweete difcourfes in our times to come. 

H 3 lu.O 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

Ro, O God I haue an ill diuining foule. 
Me thinkes I fee thee now, thou art fo lowe. 
As one dead in the hot tome of a tombe. 
Either my eye-fight failes, or thou looked pale. 

Rom. And trufl me loue, in my eye fo do you : 
Drie forrow drinkes our bloud. Adue, adue. 

Exit. 

lu. O Fortune, Fortune, all men call thee tickle, 
If thou art fickle, what doft thou with him 
That is renowmd for faith ? be fickle Fortune : 
For then I hope thou wilt not keepe him long. 
But fend him backe. 

Enter Mother. 

La. Ho daughter, are you vp ? 

lu. Who id that calls ? It is my Lady mother. 
Is fhe not downe fo late or vp fo early ? 
What vnaccudomd caufe procures her hither ? 

La. Why how now luliet ? 

lu. Madam I am not well. 

La. Euennore weeping for your Cozens death ? 
What wilt thou wafh him from his graue with teares ? 
And if thou couldfl, thou couldft not make him Hue : 
Therfore haue done, fome griefe Ihews much of loue. 
But much of greefe, fhewes ftill fome want of wit. 

lu. Yet let me weepe, for fuch a feeling lofle. 

La, So (hall you feele the loife, but not the friend 
Which you weepe for. 

In. Feeling fo the lofle, 
I cannot chufe but euer weepe the friend. 

La. Wei gyrle, thou weepft not fo much for his death. 
As that the villaine lines which fiaughterd him. 

lu. What villaine Madam ? 

La. That fame villaine Romeo. 

lu. Villaine and he be many miles a funder : 
God padon, I do with all my heart : 
And yet no man like he, doth greeue my heart. 

La. That 



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of Romeo and Juliet. 

La, That is becaufe the Traytor murderer Hues. 

lu, I Madam firom the reach of thefe my hands : 
Would none but I might venge my Cozens death. 

La. We will haue vengeance for it, feare thou not. 
Then weepe no more. He fend to one in Mantua, 
Where that fame banniiht runnagate doth liue. 
Shall giue him fuch an vnaccufiomd dram> 
That he Ihall foone keepe Tybalt companie : 
And then I hope thou wilt be fatisfied. 

lu. Indeed I ueuer ihall be fatisfied 
With Romeo, till I behold him. Dead 
Is my poore heart fo for a kinfman vext : 
Madam if you could find out but a man 
To beare a poyfon^ I would temper it : 
That Romeo fhould vpon receit thereof, 
Soone fleepe in quiet. O how my heart abhors 
To heare him namde and cannot come to him. 
To wreake the loue I bore my Cozen, 
Vpon hb body that hath (laughterd him. 

Mo. Find thou the means, and He find fuch a man. 
But now ile tell thee ioyfull tidings Gyrle. 

lu. And ioy comes well in fuch a needle time. 
What are they, befeech your Ladyihip ? 

M, Well, well, thou hail a carefull father child. 
One who to put thee from thy heauines. 
Hath forted out a fudden day of ioy, 
That thou expeds not, nor I lookt not for. 

lu. Madam in happie time, what day is that ? 

M, Marrie my child, early next Thurfday mome. 
The gallant, young, and Noble Gentleman, 
The Countie Paris at Saint Peters Church, 
Shall happily make thee there a ioyfull Bride. 

lu. Now by S. Pet erg Church, and Peter too. 
He ihall not make me there a ioyfVdl Bride. 
I wonder at this haile, that I mufi wed 
Ere he that ihould be husband comes to wooe : 

I pray 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

I pray you tell my Lord and father Madam, 
I will not marrie yet, and when I do, I fweare 
It fhall be Romeo, whom you know I hate 
Rather then Paris, thefe are newes indeed. 

M. Here comes your father, tell him fo your felfe : 
And fee how he will take it at your hands. 
Enter Capulet and Nurfe, 

Ca. When the Sun fets, the earth doth drifle deaw. 
But for the Sunfet of my brothers fonne. 
It rains downright. How now a Conduit girle, what ftill in tears 
Euermore (ho wring in one litle body ? 
Thou countefaits. A Barke, a Sea, a Wind : 
For ftill thy eyes, which I may call the fea. 
Do ebbe and flowe with teares, the Barke thy body is : 
Sayling in this fait floud, the wiudes thy fighes. 
Who raging with thy teares and they with them. 
Without a fudden calme will ouerfet 
Thy tempeft tofled body. How now wife, 
Haue you deliuered to her our decree ? 

La. I fir, but fhe will none, fhe giue you thankes, 
I would the foole were married to her graue. 

Ca, Soft take me with you, take me with you wife. 
How will ftie none > doth ftie not giue vs thanks ? 
Is ftie not proud ? doth ftie not count her bleft, 
Vnworthy as ftie is, that we haue wrought 
So worthy a Grentleman to be her Bride ? 

lu. Not proud you haue, but thankful that you haue : 
Proud can I neuer be of what I hate. 
But thankfuU euen for hate, that is meant loue. 

Ca, How, how, howhow, chopt lodgick, what is this > 
Proud and I thanke you, and I thanke you not. 
And yet not proud miftrefle minion you ? 
Thanke me no thankings, nor proud me no prouds. 
But fettle your fine loynts gainft Thurfday next. 
To go with Paris to Saint Peters Church : 
Or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither. 

You 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Out you greene ficknelTe carrion, out you baggage. 
You tallow face. 

La. Fie, fie, what are you mad ? 

fu. Good Father, I befeech you on my knees, 
Heare me with patience, but to fpeake a word. 

Fa Hang thee young baggage, difobedient wretch, 
I tell thee what, get thee to Church a Thurl'day, 
Or neuer after looke me in the face, 
Speake not, replie not, do not anfwere me. 
My fingers itch, wife, we fcarce thought vs bleft. 
That God had lent vs but this onely childe. 
But now I fee this one is one too much. 
And that we haue a curfe in hauing her : 
Out on her hilding. 

Nur, Grod in heauen blefle her : 
You are to blame my Lord to rate her fo. 

Fa. And why my Lady wifdome, hold your tongue. 
Good Prudence fmatter, with your goflips go. 

Nur. I fpeake no treafon. 
Father, 6 Godigeden, 
May not one fpeake ? 

Fa. Peace you mumbling foole, 
Vtter your grauitie ore a Gofhips bowie. 
For here we need it not. 

in. You are too hot 

Fa. Gods bread, it makes me mad. 
Day, night, houre, tide, time, worke, play. 
Alone in companie, ftill my care hath bene 
To haue her matcht, and hauing now prouided 
A Gentleman of noble parentage. 
Of faire demeanes, youthflill and nobly Hand, 
Stuft as they fay, with honourable parts, 
Proportiond as ones thought would wifh a man 
And then to haue a wretched puling foole, 
A whining mammet, in her fortunes tender. 
To anfwere, ile not wed, I cannot loue : 
I am too young, I pray you pardon me, 

I But 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

But and you will not wed, ile pardon you. 

Graze where you will, you (hall not houfe with me, 

Looke too't, thinke on't, I do not vfe to ieft. 

Thurfday is neare, lay hand on hart, aduife. 

And you be mine, ile giue you to my friend. 

And you be not, hang, beg, ftarue, dye in the ftreets. 

For by ray foule ile nere acknowledge thee. 

Nor what is raine {hall neuer do thee good : 

Truft too*t, bethinke you, ile not be forfwome. 

Ex'U, 
lu. Is there no pit tie fitting in the cloudes 
That fees into the bottome of my greefe ? 

fweet my Mother caft me not away. 
Delay this marriage for a month, a weeke. 
Or if you do not, make the Bridall bed 

In that dim Monument where Tilalt lies. 

Mo. Taike not to me, for ile not fpeake a word. 
Do as thou wilt, for I haue done with thee. 

Erit, 

lu, O Grod, 6 Nurfe, how ihall this be preuented ? 
My husband is on earth, my faith in heauen. 
How {hall that feith returne againe to earth, 
VnlefTe that husband fend it me from heauen. 
By leaning earth ? comfort me, counfaile me : 
Alack, alack, that heauen {hould pradife {Iratagems 
Vpon {o foft a fubieft as my felfe. 
What fayft thou, ha{l thou not a word of ioy ? 
Some comfort Nurfe. 

Nur. Faith here it is, Romeo is banifhed and all the world to 
That he dares nere come back to challenge you : (nothing. 
Or if he do, it needs muft be by {lealth. 
Then fince the cafe fo {lands as now it doth, 

1 thinke it be{l you married with the Countie, 
O hees a louely Grentleman : 

Romios 2L di{hclout to him, an Eagle Madam 
Hath not fo greene, fo quick, fo faire an eye 
As Paris hath, be{hrow my very hart, 

I 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

I thinke you are happie in this fecond match. 
For it excels your firft, or if it did not. 
Your firft is dead, or twere as good he were. 
As lining here, and you no vfe of him. 

lu. Speakft thou from thy heart ? 

Nur, And from my foule too, elfe beihrew them both. 

lu. Amen. 

Nur, What? 

lu. Well thou haft comforted me maruellous much. 
Go in, and tell my Lady I am gone, 
Hauing difpleafd my father, to Laurence Cell, 
To make confefsion, and to be obfolu'd. 

Nur, Marrie I will, and this is wifely done. 

lu. Auncient damnation, 6 moft wicked fiend. 
Is it more fin to wifh me thus forfwome. 
Or to difpraife my Lord with that fame tongue. 
Which fhe hath praifde him with aboue compare. 
So many thoufand times ? Go Counfellor, 
Thou and my bofome henceforth ftiall be twaine • 
He to the Frier to know his remedie. 
If all elfe faile, my felfe haue power to die. 

Exit. 
Enter Frier and Countie Paris. 

Fri. On Thurfday fir : the time is very (hort. 

Par. My Father Capulet will haue it fo. 
And I am nothing flow to flacke his hafte. 

Fri. You fay you do not know the Ladies minde ^ 
Vneuen is the courfe, I like it not. 

Par. Immoderately fhe weepes for Tybalts death. 
And therefore haue I little taike of loue. 
For Venus fmiles not in a houfe of teares. 
Now fir, her father counts it daungerous 
That fhe do giue her forrow fo much fway : 
And in his wifedome haftes our marriage, 
To ftop the inundation of her teares. 
Which too much minded by her felfe alone 
May be put from her by focietie. 

I 2 Now 



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The mqft lamentalle Tragedie 

Now do you know the reafon of this hafle. 

Fri. I would I knew not why is fhould be flowed. 
Looke fir, here comes the Lady toward my Cell. 
Enter luliet. 

Pa. Happily met my Lady and my wife. 

lu. That may be fir, when I may be a wife. 

Pa, That may be, muft be loue, on Thurfday next. 

lu. What muft be fliall be. 

Fri, Thats a certaine text. 

Par. Come you to make confeflion to this Father ? 

lu. To aunfwere that, I fliould confefle to you. 

Pa, Do not denie to him, that you loue me. 

lu. I will confefle to you that I loue him. 

Par, So will ye, I am fure that you loue me. 

lu. If I do fo, it will be of more price. 
Being fpoke behind your backe, then to your face. 

Par, Poor foule thy face is much abufde with tears. 

lu. The teares haue got fmall vidorie by that. 
For it was bad inough before their fpight. 
Pa. Thou WTongft it more then tears with that report. 

lu. That is no flaunder fir, which is a truth. 
And what I fpake, I fpake it to my face. 

Pa, Thy face is mine, and thou haft flandred it. 

lu. It may be fo, for it is not mine owne. 
Are you at leifure, holy Father now. 
Or fliall I come to you at euening Mafle ? 

Fri. My leifure femes me penfiue daughter now. 
My Lord we muft entreate the time alone. 

Par. Godfliield, I fliould diflnrbe deuotion, 
luliet, on Thurfday early will I rowfe yee. 
Till then adue, and keepe this holy kifl!e. 

Exit. 

lu, O fliut the doore, and when thou haft done fo. 
Come weepe with me, paft hope, paft care, paft help. 

Fri, O luliet I already know thy greefe. 
It ftraines me paft the compafle of my wits, 
I heare thou muft, and nothing may prorogue it, 

On 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

On Thurfday next be married to this Countie. 

lu. Tell me not Frier, that thou heareft of this, 
Vnlefle thou tell me, how I may preuent it : 
If in thy wifedome thou canfl giue no helpe. 
Do thou but call my refolution wife. 
And with this knife ile helpe it prefentJy. 
God ioynd my heart, and Romeos thou our hands 
And ere this hand by thee to Romeos feald : 
Shall be the Labell to an other deed. 
Or my true heart with trecherous reuolt, 
Turne to an other, this (hall (ley them both : 
Therefore out of thy long experienft time, 
Giue me fome prefent counfell, or behold 
Twixt my extreames and me, this bloudie knife 
Shall play the vmpeere, arbitrating that. 
Which the commiflion of thy yeares and art. 
Could to no i(rue of true honour bring : 
Be not fo long to fpeake, I long to die. 
If what thou fpeakft, fpeake not of remedie. 

FrL Hold daughter, I do fpie a kind of hope. 
Which cranes as defperate an execution. 
As that is defperate which we would preuent. 
If rather then to marrie Countie Paris 
Thou haft the ftrength of will to ftay thy felfe. 
Then is it likely thou wilt vndertake 
A thing like death to chide away this (hame. 
That coapft with death, himfelfe to fcape from it : 
And if thou dareft, Ile giue thee remedie. 

lu. Oh bid me leape, rather then marrie Paris, 
From of the battlements of any Tower, 
Or walke in theeui(h wayes, or bid me lurke 
Where Serpents are : chaine me with roaring Beares, 
Or hide me nightly in a Charnel houfe, 
Orecouerd quite with dead mens ratling bones. 
With reekie (hanks and yealow chapels fcuUs : 
Or bid me go into a new made graue. 
And hide me with a dead man in his, 

a— Qa. 5 I 3 Things 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

Things that to heare them told, haue made me tremble. 
And I will do it without feare or doubt, 
To liue an vnftaind wife to ray fweete loue. 

FrL Hold then, go home, be merrie, giue confent. 
To marrie Paris : wendfday is to morrow. 
To morrow night looke that thou lie alone. 
Let not the Nurfe lie with thee in thy Chamber : 
Take thou this VioU being then in bed. 
And this diflilling liquor drinke thou off. 
When prefently through all thy veines ihall run, 
A cold and drowzie humour : for no pulfe 
Shall keepe his natiue progrefle but furceafe, 
No warmth, no bread fhall teftifie thou liue ft. 
The rofes in thy lips and cheekes fhall fade : 
Too many afties, thy eyes windowes fall : 
Like death when he fhuts vp the day of life. 
Each part depriu'd of fupple gouemment. 
Shall ftiffe and ftarke, and cold appeare like death. 
And in this borrowed likenelfe of ihrunke death 
Thou (halt continue two and fortie houres. 
And then awake as from a pleafant fleepe. 
Now when the Bridegroome in the morning comes. 
To rowfe thee from thy bed, there art thou dead : 
Then as the manner of our countrie is. 
Is thy bell robes vncouered on the Beere, 
Be borne to buriall in thy kindreds graue : 
Thou ihall be borne to that fame auncient vault. 
Where all the kindred of the Capulets lie. 
In the meane time againft thou fhalt awake. 
Shall Romeo by my Letters know our drift. 
And hither ihall he come, an he and I 
Will watch thy walking, and that very night 
Shall Romeo beare thee hence to Mantua, 
And this ihall free thee from this prefent ihame. 
If no inconftant toy nor womaniih feare. 
Abate thy valour in the ading it. 



lu. Giue 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

lu. Giue me, giue me, O tell not me of feare 

Fri. Hold get you gone, be ftrong and profperous 
In this refolue, ile fend a Frier with fpeed 
To Mantua, with my Letters to thy Lord. 

lu. Loue giue me Hrength, and ftrength fhall helpe afford : 

Farewell deare father. {Exit. 

Enter Father Capulet, Mother, Nurfe, and 

Seruing men, tivo or three. 

Ca. So many gueils inuite as here are writ. 
Sirrah, go hire me twentie cunning Cookes. 

Ser. You fhall haue none ill fir, for ile trie if they can lick their 
fingers. 

Capu. How canfi thou trie them fo ? 

Ser. Marrie fir, tis an ill Cooke that cannot lick his owne fin- 
gers : therefore hee that cannot lick his fingers goes not with 
me. 

Co. Go be gone, we (hall be much vnfiirnifht for this time : 
What is my daughter gone to Frier Lawrence ? 

Nur. I forfooth. 

Cap. Well, he may chance to do fome good on her, 
A peeuifh felfewield harlottry it is. 

Enter luliet. 

Nur. See where (he comes firom ihrift with merie looke. 

Ca. How now my headllrong, where haue you bin gadding ? 

lu. Where I haue learnt me to repent the fin 
Of difobedient oppofition. 
To you and your behefts, and am enioynd 
By holy Lawrence, to fell proflrate here. 
To beg your pardon, pardon I befeech you. 
Henceforward I am euer rulde by you. 

Co. Send for the Couutie, go tell him of this, 
Ile haue this knot knit vp to morrow morning. 

lu. I met the youthfull Lord at Lawrence Cell, 
And gaue him what becomd loue I might. 
Not ftepping ore the bounds of modeftie. 

Cap. Why I am glad out, this is wel, ftand vp. 
This is afi fhould be, let me fee the Countie : 
I marrie go I fay and fetch him hither. Now 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

Now afore God, this reuerend holy Frier, 
All our whole Citie is much bound to him. 

lu. Nurfe, will you go with rae into my Clofet, 
To helpe me fort fuch needfull ornaments. 
As you thinke fit to furnilh me to morrow ? 

Mo. No not till Thurfday, there is time inough. 

Fa. Go Nurfe, go with her, weele to Church to morrow. 

Exeunt. 

Mo. We fhall be fhort in our prouifion, 
Tis now neare night. 

Fa. Tufh, I will ftirre about. 
And all things fhall be well, I warrant thee wife : 
Go thou to luliet, helpe to decke vp her. 
He not to bed to night, let me alone : 
He play the huswife for this once, what ho ? 
They are all forth, well I will walke my felfe 
To Countie Paris, to prepare vp him 
Againll to morrow, my heart is wondrous light. 
Since this fame wayward Gyrle is fo reclaymd. 

Exit. 
Enter luliet and Nurfe. 

lu. I thofe attires are beft, but gentle Nurfe 
I pray thee leaue me to my felfe to night : 
For I haue need of many oryfons. 
To moue the heauens to fmile vpon my (late. 
Which well thou knoweft, is crofle and full of fin. 
Enter Mother. 

Mo. What are you bufie ho ? need you my helpe ? 

/«. No Madam, we haue culd fuch neceflfaries 
As are behoofefull for our flate to morrow : 
So pleafe you, let me now be left alone. 
And let the Nurfe this night fit vp with you. 
For I am fure you haue your hands full all. 
In this fo fudden bufineffe. 

Mo. Good night. 
Gret thee to bed and reft, for thou haft need. 

Exeunt, 
lu. Farewell, 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

la. Farewell, God knowes when we fhall meete againe, 
I haue a faint cold feare thrills through my veines. 
That almoft freezes vp the heate of life : 
He call them backe againe to comfort me. 
Nurfe, what ihould Ihe do here ? 
My difraall fceane I needs muft a6t alone. 
Come Violl, what if this miicture do not worke at all ? 
Shall I be married then to morrow morning ? 
No, no, this (hall forbid it, lie thou there. 
What if it be a poyfon which the Frier 
Subtilly hath miniftred to haue me dead, 
Leaft in this marriage he (hould be dilhonourd, 
Becaufe he married me before to Romeo ? 
I feare it is, and yet me thinks it (hould not. 
For he hath ftill bene tried a holy man. 
How if when I am laid into the Tombe, 
I wake before the time that Romeo 
Come to redeeme me, theres a fearfiill poynt : 
Shall I not then be ftiffled in the Vault ? 
To whofe foule mouth no healthfome ayre breaths in. 
And there die ftrangled ere my Romeo comes. 
Or if I liue, is it not very like. 
The horrible conceit of death and night, 
Togither with the terror of the place. 
As in a Vaulte, an auncient receptacle. 
Where for this many hundred yeares the bones 
Of all my buried aunceftors are packt. 
Where bloudie Tybalt yet but greene in earth. 
Lies feftring in his (hroude, where as they fay. 
At fome houres in the night, fpirits refort : 
Alack, alack, is it not like that I 
So early waking, what with loathfome fmels. 
And flirikes like mandrakes torne out of the earth. 
That liuing mor tails hearing them run mad : 
O if I walke, fhall I not be diflraught, 
Inuironed with all thefe hidious feares. 
And madly play with my forefathers ioynts ? 

K And 



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The moji lamentable Tragedie 

And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his fhrowde. 
And in this rage with fome great kinfmans bone. 
As with a club dafh out my defprate braines. 
O looke, me thinks I fee my Cozins Ghofl, 
Seeking out Romeo that did fpit his body 
Vpon a Rapiers poynt : ftay Tybalt, (lay ? 
Romeo, Romeo, Romeo, heeres drinke, I drinke to thee. 
Enter Lady of the houfe and Nurfe, 
La. Hold take thefe keies & fetch more fpices Nurfe. 
Nur, They call for dates and quinces in the Paftrie. 

Enter old Capulet. 
Ca, Come, ftir, ftir, ftir, the fecond Cock hath crowed. 
The Curphew bell hath roong, tis three a clock : 
Looke to the bakte meates, good Angelica, 
Spare not for cod. 

Nur. Go you cot-queane go. 
Get you to bed, faith youle be ficke to morrow 
For this nights watching. 

Ca, No not a whit, what I haue watcht ere now. 
All night for lefTer caufe, and nere bene ficke. 

La, I you haue bene a moufe-hunt in your time. 
But I will watch you from fuch watching now. 

Exit Lady and Nurfe 
Ca, A iealous hood, a iealous hood, now fellow, what is there ? 
Enter three orfoure withfpits and logs, 
and Baskets, 
Pel, Things for the Cooke fir, but I know not what. 
Ca, Make hafte, make hafte iirra, fetch drier logs. 
Call Peier, he will fhew thee where they are. 

Pel, I haue a head fir, that will find out logs. 
And neuer trouble Peter for the matter. 

Ca, Maflfe and well faid, a merrie horfon, ha, 
Twou fhalt be loggerhead, good father tis day. 

Play Muficke, 
The Countie will be here with muficke flraight. 
For fo he faid he would, I heare him neare. 
Nurfe, wife, what ho, what Nurfe I fay^ 

Entej 



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of Romeo and Juliet. 

Enter Nurfe. 
Go waken luliet, go and trim her vp. 
He go and chat with Paris, hie, make hade. 
Make haft, the bridgroome, he is come ah-eady, make haft I fay. 

Nur. Miftris, what miftris, luliet, faft I warrant her Ihe, 
Why Lambe, why Lady, fie you (luggabed. 
Why Loue I fay. Madam, fweete heart, why Bnde : 
What not a word, you take your penniworths now, 
Sleepe for a weeke, for the next night I warrant 
The Countie Paris hath fet vp his reft. 
That you fhall reft but little, God forgiue me. 
Marrie and Amen : how found is ihe a fleepe : 
I needs muft wake her : Madam, Madam, Madam, 
I, let the Countie take you in your bed, 
Heele fright you vp yfaith, will it not be ? 
What dreft, and in your clothes, and downe againe ? 
I muft needs wake you. Lady, Lady, Lady. 
Alas, alas, helpe, helpe, my Ladyes dead. 
Oh wereaday that euer I was borne. 
Some Aqua-vitae ho, my Lord my Lady. 

Mo. What noife is here ? 

Nur. O lamentable day. 

Mo, What is the matter } 

Nur. Looke, looke, oh heauie day ! 

Mo. O me, O me, my child, my onely life. 
Reuiue, looke vp, or I will die with thee : 
Helpe, helpe, call help^. 

Enter Father. 

Fa. For ihame bring luliet forth, her Lord is come. 

Nur. Shees dead : deceaft, ihees dead, alack the day. 

M. Alack the day, ihees dead, fhees dead, ihees dead. 

Fa. Hah let me fee her, out alas ihees cold. 
Her bloud is fetled, and her ioynts are ftifFe : 
Life and thefe lips haue long bene feparated 
Death lies on her like an vntimely froft, 
Vpon the fweeteft flower of all the field, 

K 2 Nur. O 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

Nur. O lamentable day ! 

Mo. O wofiill time / 

Fa. Death that hath tane her hece to make me waile 
Ties vp my tongue and will not let me fpeake. 
Enter Frier and the Countie. 

Fri. Come, is the Bride ready to go to Church? 

Fa. Ready to go but nelier to returue. 
O fonne, the night before thy wedding day 
Hath death laine with thy wife, there fhe lies. 
Flower as fhe was, deflowred by him. 
Death is my fonne in law, death is my heire. 
My daughter he hath wedded. I will die. 
And leaue him all life liuing, all is deaths. 

Par. Haue I thought loue to fee this mornings face. 
And doth it giue me fuch a fight as this ? 

Mo. Accurfl, vnhappie, wretched hatefull day, 
Mofl miferable houre that ere time faw. 
In lafling labour of his Pilgrimage, 
But one poore one, one poore and louing child. 
But one thing to reioyce and folace in. 
And cruell death hath catcht it from my fight. 

Nur. O wo, O wofull, wofuU, wofull day, 
Mofl lamentable day, mofl wofull day 
That euer, euer, I did yet bedold. 
O day, O day, O day, O hatefull day, 
Neuer was feene fo blacke a day as this, 
O wofull day, O wofull day. 

Par. Beguild, diuorced, wronged, fpighted, flaine, 
Mofl deteflable death, by thee beguild. 
By cruell, cruell, thee quite ouerthrowne, 
O loue, O life, not life, but loue in death. 

Fat. Defpifde, diflrefTed, hated, martird, kild, 
Vncomfortable time, why camfl thou now. 
To murther, murther, our folemnitie ? 
O childe, O childe, my foule and not my childe. 
Dead art thou, alacke my child is dead. 
And with my child my ioyes are buried. 

Fn, Peace 



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of Romeo and luliet, 

Fri. Peace ho for fhame^ confiiiions care liaes not. 
In thefe confiifions beauen and your felfe 
Had part in this faire maide, now heauen hath all. 
And all the better is it for the maid : 
Your part in her, you could not keepe from death. 
But heauen keepes his part in etemall life. 
The mod you fought was her promotion. 
For twas your heauen fhe ihould be aduanft. 
And weepe ye now, feeing fhe is aduanfl 
Aboue the Cloudes, as high as heauen it felfe. 
O in this loue, you loue your child fo ill. 
That you run mad, feeing that flie is well : 
Shees not well married, that Hues married long. 
Bat fhecs befl married, that dies married young. 
Drie vp your teares, and flick your Rofemarie 
On this faire Coarfe, and as the cuflome is. 
And in her befl array beare her to Church : 
For though fome nature bids vs all lament. 
Yet natures teares are reafons merriment. 

Fa. All things that we ordained fefliuall, 
Turne from their office to black Funeral] : 
Our inflruments to melancholy bells. 
Our wedding cheare to a fad buriall feafl : 
Our folemne himnes to fullen dyrges change : 
Our Bridall flowers feme for a buried Coarfe : 
And all things change them to the contrarie. 

Fri. Sir go you in, and Madam go with him. 
And go fir Parisy euery one prepare 
To follow this faire Coarfe vnto her graue : 
The heauens do lowre vpon you for fome ill : 
Moue them no more, by croffing their high wil. 

Fxeunt manet. 

Mufi. Faith we may put vp our pipes and be gone. 

JSur, Honefl goodfellowes, ah put vp, put vp. 
For well you know, this is a pitifull cafe. 

Fid. I my my troath, the cafe may be amended. 

Exit omnes, 
K 3 Enter 



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The mq/l lamentable Tragedie 

Enter Will Kemp. 
Peter, Mafitions, oh Mufitions, harts eafe, harts eafe, 
O, and you will haue me hue, play harts eafe. 
Fidler, Why harts eafe ? 
Peter, O Mufitions, becaufe my hart it felfe plaies my hart is 

play me forae merie dimip to comfort me. (ftdl : 
Minjhrels, Not a dump we, tis no time to play now. 
Peter, You will not then ? 

Minjl, No. 

Peter, I will then giue it you foundly. 

MinJl, What will you giue vs ? 

Peter. No money on my faith, but the gleeke. 

1 will giue you the Minftrell. 

Minjlrel, Then will I giue you the Seruing-creature. 

Peter, Then will I lay the feruiug-creatures dagger on your 
I will cary no Crochets, ile re you. He fe (pate. 

You, do you note me ? 

Minjl, And you re vs, and & vs, you note vs. 

2. M, Pray you put vp your dagger, and put out your wit. 
Then haue at you with my wit. 

Peter, I will dry-beate you with an yron wit, and put vp my 
Anfwere me like men. (yron dagger. 

When griping griefes the hart doth wound, then mufique with 

her filuer found. 
Why (iluer found, why mufique, with her filuer found, what fay 

you Simon Catling? 

MinJl, Mary fir, becaufe (iluer hath a fweet found. 

Peter, Prates, what fay you Hugh Rebick ? 

a. M, I fay (iluer found, becaufe Mu(itions found for (iluer. 

Peter, Prates to, what fay you lames found poft ? 

3. M, Faith I know not what to fay. 

Peter, O I cry you mercy, you are the (inger. 
I will fay for you, it is muiique with her (iluer found, 
Becaufe Mufitions haue no gold for founding : 
Then Mufique with her (iluer found with fpeedy help doth 

lend redrefle. 

Exit. 

Minjl. 



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of Romeo and lulieU 

Min. What a peftilent knaue is this fame ? 

M. 2. Hang him lack, come weele in here^ tarrie for the mour- 
ners, and (lay dinner. 

Exit. 
Enter Romeo. 

Ro, If I may truft the flattering truth of fleepe, 
My dreames prefage fome ioyfiiU newes at hand. 
My bofomes L. fits lightly in his throne : 
And all this day an vnaccuflomd fpirit. 
Lifts me aboue the ground with chearfull thoughts, 
I dreamt my Lady came and found me dead. 
Strange dreame that giues a deadman leaue to thinke. 
And fireathd fuch life with kifles in my lips. 
That I reuiude and was an Emperor. 
Ah me, how fweete is Joue it felfe pofleft 
When but loues fhadowes are fo rich in ioy. 

Enter Romeos man, 
Newes from Verona, how now Balthaxer, 
Doft thou not bring me Letters frt)m the Frier ? 
How doth my Lady, is my Father well : 
How doth my Lady luliet ? that I aske againe. 
For nothing can be ill if ihe be well. 

Man. Then fhe is well and nothing can be ill. 
Her body (leepes in Capels monument. 
And her immortall part with Angels lines. 
I faw her laid lowe in her kindreds vault. 
And prefently tooke pofte to tell it you : 
O pardon me for bringing thefe ill newes. 
Since you did leaue it for my office fir. 

Rom, Is it in fo ? then I denie you ftarres. 
Thou knoweft my lodging, get me inke and paper. 
And hire poll horfes, I will hence to night. 

Man. I do befeech you fir, haue patience : 
Your lookes are pale and wilde, and do import 
Some mifaduenture. 

Ro. Tufh thou art deceiu*d, 
Leaue me, and do the thing I bid thee do. 

Haft 



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The mqft lamentable Tragedie 

Hafl thou no Letters to me from the Frier ? 

Alan. No my good Lord. 

Erit. 

Ro. No matter get thee gone. 
And hyre thofe horfes, lie be with thee ftraight. 
Well luliet, I will lie with thee to night : 
Lets fee for meanes, O mifchiefe thoa art fwift. 
To enter in the thoughts of defperate men. 
I do remember an Appothacarie, 
And here abouts a dwells which late I noted. 
In tattred weeds with ouerwhelming browes. 
Culling of (imples, meager were his lookes, 
Sharpe miferie had wome him to the bones : 
And in his needie (hop a tortoyes hung, 
An allegater ftuft, and other skins 
Of ill fhapte fiflies, and about his fhelues, 
A beggerly account of emptie boxes, 
Greene earthen pots, bladders and muftie feedes. 
Remnants of packthred, and old cakes of Rofes 
Were thinly fcattered, to make vp a fliew. 
Noting this penury, to my felfe I faid. 
An if a man did need a poyfon now, 
Whofe fale is prefent deatli in Mantua, 
Here Hues a CatifFe wretch would fell it him. 
O this fame thought did but forerun my need, 
And this fame needie man muft fell it me. 
As I remember this fhould be the houfe. 
Being holy day, the beggers (hop is fhut. 
What ho Appothecarie. 

Appo, Who calls fo lowd 

Kom. Come hither man, I fee that thou art poore. 
Hold, there is fortie duckets, let me haue 
A dram of poyfon, fuch foone fpeeding geare. 
As will difpearfe it felfe through all the veines. 
That the life-wearie-taker may fall dead. 
And that the Trunke may be difchargd of breath. 
As violently, as haflie powder fierd 

Doth 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Doth hurry from the fatall Canons wombe. 

Poti, Such mortal 1 drugs I haue, but Mantuas la we 
Is death to any he that vtters them. 

Ro. Art thou fo bare and full of wretchednefle. 
And feareft to die, famine is in thy cheekes. 
Need and oppreflion ftarueth in thy eyes. 
Contempt and beggerie hangs vpon thy backe : 
The world is not thy friend, nor the worlds law. 
The world affoords no law to make thee rich : 
Then be not poore, but breake it and take this. 
Poti, My pouertie, but not my will confents. 
Ro, I pray thy pouertie and not thy will. 

Poti, Put this in any liquid thing you will 
And drinke it off, and if you had the ftrength 
Of twentie men, it would difpatch you ftraight. 

Ro, There is thy Gold, worfe poyfon to mens foules. 
Doing more murther in this loathfome world. 
Then thefe poore copounds that thou maieft not fell, 
I fell thee poyfon, thou hafl fold me none, 
Farewell, buy foode, and get thy felfe in flefh. 
Come Cordiall and not poyfon, go with me 
To luUets graue, for there muil I vfe thee. 

Exeunt, 
Enter Frier lohn to Frier Lawrence. 
loh. Holy Francifcan Frier, brother, ho. 

Enter Lawrence. 
Law, This fame fhould be the voyce of Frier lohn, 
Welcome from Mantua, what fayes Romeo ? 
Or if his minde be writ, giue me his Letter. 

loh. Going to find a barefoote brother out. 
One of our order to aflbtiate me. 
Here in this Citie vifiting the ficke. 
And finding him, the Searchers of the Towne 
Sufpeding that we both were in a houfe. 
Where the infedtious peftilence did raigne, 
Seald vp the doores, and would not let vs forth, 
So that my fpeed to Mantua there was daid. 

L Law, Who 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

Law. Who bare my Letter then to Romeo ? 
lohn, I could not fend it^ here it b againe. 
Nor get a meffenger to bring it thee. 
So feareftill were they of infe^ion. 

Law. Vnhappie fortune, by my Brotherhood, 
The Letter was not nice but fiill of charge. 
Of deare import, and the negleding it. 
May do much danger : Frier lohn go hence. 
Get me an Iron Crow and bring it ftraight 
Vnto my Cell. 

lohn. Brother ile go and bring it thee. {Exit. 

Law. Now mull I to the Monument alone. 
Within this three houres will feire luliet wake, 
Shee will befhrewe me much that Romeo 
Hath had no notice of thefe accidents : 
But I will write againe to Mantua, 
And keepe her at my Cell till Romeo come, 
Poore lining Coarfe, clofde in a dead mans Tombe. 

Exit. 
Enter Paris and his Page. 
Par. Giue me thy Torch boy, hence and iland aloofe. 
Yet put it out, for I would not be feene : 
Vnder yond young Trees lay thee all along. 
Holding thy eare clofe to the hollow ground. 
So fhall no foote vpon the Church-yard tread. 
Being loofe, vnfirme with digging vp of Graues, 
But thou fhalt heare it, whiftle then to me 
As iignall that thou heareft fome thing approach, 
Giue me thofe flowers, do as I bid thee, go. 

Pa. I am almofl afraid to fland alone. 
Here in the Church-yard, yet I will aduenture. 

Par. Sweet flower, with flowers thy Bridall bed I llrew 
O woe, thy Canapie is duft and flones. 
Which with fweete water nightly I will dewe. 
Or wanting that, with teares diflild by mones. 
The obfequies that I for thee will keepe : 

Nightly 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Nightly (hall be, to drew thy graue and weepe. 

Whiftle Boy. 
The Boy giues warning, fomething doth approach. 
What curfed foote wanders this way to night. 
To crofle my obfequies and true loues right ? 
What with a Torch ? muffle me night a while. 

Enter Romeo and Peter. 

Ro. Giue me that mattocke and the wrenching Iron, 
Hold take this Letter, early in the morning 
See thou deliuer it to my Lord and Father, 
Giue me the light vpon thy life I charge thee. 
What ere thou heareft or feeft, iland all aloofe. 
And do not interrupt me in my nourfe. 
Why I defcend into this bed of death. 
Is partly to behold my Ladies face : 
But chiefly to take thence from her dead finger, 
A precious Ring : a Ring that I mufl vfe. 
In deare imployment, therefore hence be gone : 
But if thou iealous doft returne to prie 
In what I farther fhall intend to doo. 
By heauen I will teare thee loynt by loynt. 
And ftrew this hungry Church-yard with thy lims : 
The time and my intents are fauage wilde. 
More fierce and more inexorable farre. 
Then emptie Tygers, or the roaring fea. 

Pet. I will be gone fir, and not trouble ye. 

Ro. So fhalt thou fhew me friendfhid, take thou that. 
Line and be profperous, and farewell good fellow. 

Pet. For all this fame, ile hide me here about. 
His lookes I feare, and his intents I doubt. 

Ro. Thou deteflable mawe, thou wombe of death, 
Gorg'd with the dearell morfell of the earth : 
Thus I enforce thy rotten lawes to open. 
And in defpight ile cram thee with more foode. 

Pa. This is that banifht haughtie Mountague, 
That murdred my loues Cozin, with which greefe 

La It 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

It is fuppofed the faire creature died. 
And here is come to do fome villainous fhame 
To the dead bodies : I will apprehend him. 
Stop thy vnhallowed toyle vile Mountdgue : 
Can vengeance be purfued further then death ? 
Condemned villaine, I do apprehend thee. 
Obey and go with me, for thou muft die. 

Rom, I muft indeed, and therefore came I hither. 
Good gentle youth tempt not a defprate man, 
Flie hence and leaue me, thinke vpon thefe gone. 
Let them affright thee. I befeech thee youth. 
Put not an other fin vpon my head. 
By vrging me to furie, 6 be gone. 
By heauen I loue thee better then my felfe, 
For I come hither armde againft my felfe : 
Stay not, begone, line, and hereafter fay, 
A mad mans mercie bid thee run away. 

Par. I do defie thy commiration. 
And apprehend thee for a Fellon here. 

Ro, Wilt thou prouoke me ? then haue at thee boy. 
O Lord theyjight, I will go call the Watch, 

Par. O I am flaine, if thou be mercifull. 
Open the Tombe, lay me with luliet, 

Rom. In faith I will, let me perufe this face, 
Mercutios kinfinan. Noble Countie Paris, 
What faid my man, when my betofled foule 
Did not attend him as we rode ? I thinke 
He told me Paris fliould haue married luliet. 
Said he not fo ? or did I dreame it fo ? 
Or am I mad, hearing him talke of luliet. 
To thinke it was fo ? O giue me thy hand. 
One writ with me in fowre misfortunes booke. 
He burie thee in a triumphant graue. 
A Graue, O no. A Lanthorne flaughtred youth : 
For here lies luliet, and her bewtie makes 
This Vault a feafting prefence full of light 

Death 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Death lie thou there by a dead man interd. 

How oft when men are at the point of death, 

Haue they bene raerie ? which their keepers call 

A lightning before death ? Oh how may I 

Call this a lightning ? O my Loue, my wife. 

Death that hath fuckt the honey of thy breath. 

Hath had no power yet vpon thy bewtie : 

Thou art not conquerd, bewties enfigne yet 

Is crymfon in thy lips and in thy cheeks. 

And deaths pale flag is not aduanced there. 

Tybalt lyeft thou there in thy bloudie iheet ? 

O what more fauour can I do to thee. 

Then with that hand that cut thy youth in twaine. 

To funder his that was thine enemie ? 

Forgiue me Couzen. Ah deare luHet 

Why art thou yet fo faire? I will beleeue, 

Shall I beleeue that vnfubftantiall death is amorous. 

And that the leane abhorred monfler keepes 

Thee here in darke to be his parramour ? 

For feare of that I flill will flaie with thee. 

And neuer from this pallat of dym night. 

Depart againe, come lye thou in my arme, 

Heer*s to thy health, where ere thou tumbleft in. 

O true Appothecarie / 

Thy drugs are quicke. Thus with a kifle I die. 

Depart againe, here, here, will I remaine. 

With wormes that are thy Chamber-maides : O here 

Will I fet vp my euerlafting reft : 

And {hake the yoke of inaufpicious ftarres. 

From this world wearied flelh, eyes looke your laft : 

Armes take your laft embrace : And lips, O you 

The doores of breath, feale with a righteous kifle 

A datelefle bargaine to ingroifing death : 

Come bitter condu6t, come vnfauoury guide. 

Thou defperate Pilot, now at once run on 

The daftiing Rocks, thy feafick weary barke : 

Heeres to my Loue. O true Appothecary : 

Thy drugs are quicke. Thus with a kilfe I die. 

a — C2, 6 L 3 E filer 



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Tlie mqft lamentalle Tragedie 

Entrer Frier with Lanthome, Crewe, 
and Spade. 

Frier, S. Frances be my fpeede, how oft to night 
Haue my old feet ftumbled at graues ? Whoes there ? 

Man. Heeres one, a friend, and one that knowes you well. 

Frier. Blifle be vpon jou. Tell me good my friend 
What torch is yond that vainly lends his light 
To grubs and eyelefle fcalles : as I difcerne. 
It bumeth in the Capels monument. 

Man. It doth fo holy fir, and theres my maifter, one that you 

Frier. Who is it > (lone. 

Man, Romeo, 

Frier. How long hath he bin there ? 

Man, Full halfe an houre. 

Frier, Go with me to the Vault. 

Man, 1 dare not fir. 
My Matter knowes not but I am gone hence, 
And fearefully did menace me with death 
If I did ftay to looke on his entents. 

Frier, Stay then ile go alone, feare comes vpon me. 

much I feare fome ill vnthriftie thing. 

Man, As I did ileepe vnder this yong tree heere, 

1 dreampt my maifter and another fought. 
And that my maifter (lew him. 

Frier, Romeo, 
Alack alack, what bloud is this which ftaines 
The ftony entrance of this Sepulchre ? 
What meane thefe maifterlelfe and goarie fwords 
To lie difcolour'd by this place of peace ? 
Romeo, oh pale / who elfe, what Paris too ? 
And fteept in bloud ? ah what an vnkind hower 
Is guiltie of this lamentable chance ? 
The Lady ftirres. 

luli. O comfortable Frier, where is my Lord ? 
I do remember well where I fhould be : 
And there I am, where is my Romeo ? 

Frier. I heare fome noyfe Lady, come from that neft 

Oi 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

Of death, contagion, and vnnaturall fleepe, 
A greater power then we can contradid 
Hath thwarted our intents, come, come away. 
Thy hufband in thy bofome there lies dead : 
And Paris too, come ile difpofe of thee. 
Among a Sifterhood of holy Nunnes : 
Stay not to queflion, for the watch is comming. 
Come go good luliet, I dare no longer (lay. 

Krit. 

lull. Go get thee hence, for I will not away. 
Whats heere ? a cup clofd in my true loues hand ? 
Poifon I fee hath bin his timelefle end : 
O churle, drunke all, and left no friendly drop 
To help me after, I will kilTe thy lips, 
Happlie fome poyfon yet doth hang on them. 
To make me dye with a reftoratiue. 
Thy lips are warme. 

Enter Boy and Watch, 

Watch, liCade boy, which way. 

lull. Yea noife ? then ile be briefe. O happy dagger 
This is thy fheath, there ruft and let me dye. 

Watch boy. This is the place there where the torch doth bume. 

Watch, The ground is bloudie, fearch about the Churchyard. 
Go fome of you, who ere you find attach. 
Pittifull fight, heere lies the Conn tie flaine. 
And luliet bleeding, warme, and newlie dead : 
Who Keere hath laine this two daies buried. 
Go tell the Prince, runne to the Capulets, 
Raife vp the Mountagues, fome others fearch. 
We fee the ground whereon thefe woes do lye. 
But the true ground of all thefe piteous woes 
We cannot without circumftance defcry. 
Enter Romeos man. 

Watch, Heres Romeos man, we foimd him in the Churchyard. 

Chief, watch. Hold him in fafetie till the Prince come hither. 
Enter Frier, and another Watchman, 

3. Watch, Here is a Frier that trembles, fighes, and weepes. 

We 



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The moft lamentable Tragedie 

We tooke this Mattocke and this Spade from him. 
As he was comming from this Church-yards fide. 

Chief watch. A great fufpition, (lay the Frier too too. 
Enter the Prince. 

Prin, What mifaduenture is fo early vp. 
That calls our perfon from our morning rell ? 
Enter Capels. 

Ca. What fhould it be that is fo (hrike abroad ? 

Wife. O the people in the ftreet crie Romeo, 
Some Juliet, and fome Paris, and all runne 
With open outcry toward our Monument. 

Pr. What feare is this which ftartles in your eares ? 

Watch, Soueraine, here lies the County Paris flain. 
And Romeo dead, and Juliet dead before, 
Warme and new kild. (comes. 

Prin. Search, feeke & know how this foule murder 

If at. Here is a Frier, and Slaughter Romeos man. 
With Inftruments vpon them, fit to open 
Thefe dead mens Tombes. 

Enter Capulet and his wife. 

Ca. O heauens / O wife looke how our daughter 
This dagger hath miftane, for loe his houfe (bleeds ! 
Is emptie on the back of Mounlague, 
And it misiheathd in my daughters bofome. 

Wife. O me, this fight of death, is as a Bell 
That wames my old age to a fepulcher. 
Enter Mountague. 

Prin. Come Mountague, for thou art early vp 
To fee thy fonne and heire, now earling downe. 

Moun. Alas my liege, my wife is dead to night, 
Griefe of my fonnes exile hath flopt her breath. 
What further woe confpires againfl mine age ? 

Prin. Looke and thou fhalt fee. 

Moun. O thou vntaught, what maners is in this. 
To prefTe before thy father to a graue ? 

Prin. Scale vp the mouth of outrage for a while. 
Till we can cleare thefe ambiguities. 

And 



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of Romeo and luliet. 

And know their fpring, their head, their trae difcent. 

And then will I be generall of your woes. 

And leade you euen to death, meane time forbeare. 

And let mifchance be flaue to patience. 

Bring foorth the parties of fufpition. 

Frier, I am the greateft able to do lead. 
Yet mod fufpe^ed as the time and place 
Doth make againft me of this direfiill murther : 
And heere I (land both to impeach and purge 
My felfe condemned, and my felfe excufde. 

Prin. Then fay at once what thou doft know in this ? 
Frier, I will be briefe, for my ihort date of breath 
Is not fo long as is a tedious tale. 

Romeo there dead, was husband to that luliet. 

And {he there dead, thats Romeos faithfull wife : 

I married them, and their ftolne marriage day 

Was Tibalts doomefday, whofe vntimely death 

Baniiht the new-made Bridegroome from this Citie, 

For whome, and not for Til alt, luliet pinde. 

You to remoue that liege of griefe from her 

Betrothd and would haue married her perforce 

To Countie Paris, Then comes Ihe to me. 

And with wild lookes bid me deuife fome meane 

To rid her from this fecond mariage : 

Or in my Cell there would flie kill her felfe. 

Then gaue I her (fo tuterd by my art) 

A fleeping potion, which fo tooke erte<^ 

As I intended, for it wrought on her 

The forme of death, meane time I writ to Romeo 

That he fliould hither come as this dire night 

To help to take her from her borrowed graue. 

Being the time the potions force Ihould ceafe. 

But he which bore my letter. Frier lohn. 

Was flayed by accident, and yeftemight 

Keturnd my letter back, then all alone 

At the prefixed hower of her waking, 

M Came 



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The mojl lamentable Tragedie 

Came I to take her from her kindreds Vault, 

Meaning to keepe her clofely at my Cell, 

Till I conueniently could fend to Romeo, 

But when I came, fome minute ere the time 

Of her awakening, here vntimely lay. 

The Noble Paris, and true Romeo dead. 

She wakes, and I entreated her come forth 

And beare this worke of heauen with patience : 

But then a noyfe did fcare me from the Tombe, 

Ajid {he too defperate would not go with me . 

But as it feemes, did violence on her felfe. 

Al this I know, & to the marriage her Nurfe is priuie : 

And if ought in this mifcaried by my fault. 

Let my old life be facrific'd fome houre before his time, 

Vnto the rigour of feuereft law. 

Prin. We ftill haue knowne thee for a holy man, 
Wheres Romeos man ? what can he fay to this ? 

Balth. I brought my maifter newes of luliets death. 
And then in pofte he came from Mantua, 
To this fame place. To this fame monument 
This Letter he early bid me giue his Father, 
And threatned me with death, going in the Vault, 
If I departed not, and left him there. 

Prin. Giue me the Letter, I will looke on It. 
Where is the Counties Page that raifd the Watch ? 
Sirrah, what made your maifter in this place ? 

Boy. He came with flowers to ftrew his Ladies graue. 
And bid me ftand aloofe, and fo I did. 
Anon comes one with light to ope the Tombe, 
And by and by my maifter drew on him. 
And then I ran away to call the Watch. 

Prin. This Letter doth make good the Friers words. 
Their courfe of Loue, the tidings of her death. 
And here he writes, that he did buy a poyfon 
Of a poore Pothecarie, and therewithal!. 
Came to this Vault, to die and lye with Juliet. 
Where be thefe enemies ? Capulet Mountague ? 



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of Romeo and luUet, 

See what a fcourge is laide vpon your hate ? 
That heauen finds means to kil your ioyes with loue. 
And I for winking at your difcords too, 
Haue loft a brace of kinfmen, all are punifht. 

Cap. O brother Mountague, giue me thy hand. 
This is my daughters ioyntur^, for no more 
Can I demaund. 

Moun, But I can giue thee more. 
For I will raie her ftatue in pure gold. 
That whiles Verona by that name is knowne, 
There (hall no figure at fuch rate be fet. 
As that of true and feithfiill luliet. 

CapeL As rich (hall Romeos by his Ladies lie, 
Poore facrifices of our enmitie. 

Prtn. A glooming peace this morning with it brings. 
The Sun for forrow will not fhew his head : 
Go hence to haue more talke of thefe fad things. 
Some fhall be pardoned, and fome punifhed. 
For neuer was a Storie of more wo. 
Then this of luliet and her Romeo. 

FINIS. 



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