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Full text of "Rose Polytechnic Institute: memorial volume embracing a history of the Institute, a sketch of the founder, together with a biographical dictionary and other matters of interest"








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ROSE PO LYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
MEMORIAL VOLUME 

EMBRACING 

A History of the Institute 
A Sketch of the Founder 

TOGETHER WITH 

A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY 

AND OTHER MATTERS OF INTEREST 






-,,11^-^ 



TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 
1909 



Allen County Public Library 

900 Webster Street 

PO Box 2270 

Fort W8}-ne, IN 46801-2270 




fDonfortdCo. 

CINCINNATI 
TYPOQRAPHERS 



1213012 



TO THE ALUMNI 
OF ROSE 
This Volume is Dedicated 



PREFACE. 



The preparation of this volume was undertaken with the 
view of presenting a brief sketch of the work and the activi- 
ties of Rose Polytechnic Institute and the results attained 
during the first quarter century of its operation. In gather- 
ing the material for it, a number of documents pertaining 
especially to its early history appeared to be of such interest 
that to incorporate them in the publication seemed desirable. 
The Historical Notes by S. S. Early, the Inaugural Address 
by President Thompson, and the Will of Chauncey Rose 
are among these. They present such a view of Mr. Rose's 
intention, of the early history of the Institute, and of the 
original plan of organization, that in the light of the more 
recent history it can be easily judged whether the institution 
has fulfilled early expectations. 

Biographical sketches of members of the Board and 
Faculty have been limited to those who have served, but are 
no longer living or in service. Much of the historical mat- 
ter has been compiled by Mr. W. C. Ball, who carefully 
searched voluminous original records to gather material, 
and to him especially our thanks are due. 

The preparation of the biographical dictionary of 
Alumni presented difficulties; as many who were urgently 
solicited to do so did not furnish data, a large part of the 
material had to be taken from the Institute records. Errors 
in dates may therefore appear here and there. It is be- 



6 Preface. 

lieved, however, that in the main the records are accurate 
and fairly complete. 

To give extended biographies would have made the vol- 
ume too large. The biographical notes were therefore com- 
pressed as much as possible. To Mrs. S. P. Burton credit 
is due for having done a large part of this work. 

Prof. J. A. Wickersham critically read much of the 
material, and Prof. J. B. Peddle, '88, gave counsel and aid 
in the planning and preparation. 

Mr. F. Pote, '06, gathered most of the statistics for the 
brief history of the Institute organizations. The history of 
fraternal organizations and Greek letter societies has been 
very fully recorded in the several volumes of the Modulus; 
as most of the Alumni have these, their history has not been 
included in this volume. 

That this history is incomplete, we know, but trust that 
it may break the way for future publications more compre- 
hensive and accurate, and may knit more firmly the bond 
that unites the Alumni and friends of Rose. 

C. L. M. 

April, 1909. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Historical Review 9 

Chauncey Rose, Biographical Sketch 17 

Will oe Chauncey Rose 28 

History of the Foundation oe the Institute 32 

Articles oe Association 40 

Inaugural Address oe President C. O. Thompson . . 44 

Board oe Managers 70 

Roster oe Board oe Managers 86 

Past Presidents, Biographical Sketches 88 

Thomas Gray, Biographical Sketch 94 

Roster oe Ofeicers and Faculty 99 

Statistical History 103 

Institute Organizations 106 

Biographical Dictionary oe Alumni 119 

Index 264 



THE ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



A BRIEF HISTORICAL REVIEW 
By William C. Ball, 1909. 

Chauncey Rose, founder of the school that bears his 
name, received in boyhood the Hmited education afforded 
by a Connecticut village school. Beyond that he was self- 
taught in the practical school of experience. His business 
activities here in the Wabash Valley in that early day 
brought him into daily contact with men engaged in various 
industries and doing their work under adverse circum- 
stances, for they were all pupils together in the hard school 
of experience, where the tuition fees are proverbially high. 

Mr. Rose's activities were manifold, such as would nat- 
urally engage the attention of an aggressive, enterprising, 
masterful man. What his hands found to do he did with a 
will. He worked with his helpers. But he was constantly 
confronted with the fact that his labors were made more 
difficult by lack of facilities, and especially by lack of train- 
ing or of adequate training in their special vocations by the 
men on whom he was forced to rely for assistance. Assist- 
ants he secured, as the scope of his work broadened, and 
they were willing workers, and capable, and many of them 
trained in their trades ; but it was borne in on him constantly 
that development of his enterprises lagged for lack of men 
schooled to do their appointed work in the quickest, best, 
and cheapest way. 

Consequently, when he began, late in life, to bestow on 
the question of helpfully disposing of his property the same 
prudent forethought he had exercised in its acquisition, it 
was altogether natural that he should conceive the idea of 



lO Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

founding a school where young men should be taught those 
things that had cost him and his associates so dearl3\ 

Brooding over this idea for several years, he finally 
called together a few of his trusted friends and associates 
for conference. In the historic library and work room of 
his home, which had been for years the real business heart 
of the growing town, where scores of enterprises had been 
considered, these friends met at his request. He told them 
of his plans and asked them to cooperate with him in their 
formulation. All of them were younger men, and he de- 
sired to form them into a body corporate, which should be 
self-perpeti.ating, for the organization and establishment 
and maintenance of a school for the teaching of the indus- 
trial sciences, so called. 

Repeated conferences were held, for the idea was novel. 
How new it all was people of the present generation will find 
it hard to realize. In the early seventies of the nineteenth 
century, education, as it now exists, was almost unknown. 
Schools and colleges abounded, but they were schools of 
letters. Language, modern and ancient history, philosophy, 
and many other branches, including mathematics, and in a 
theoretical way entirely, the sciences were taught. But of 
schools where the industrial sciences should be taught, theo- 
retically and practically, heads and hands educated together, 
there were only a few. And these were new, altogether in 
an experimental stage, and had as yet far from demonstrated 
their practicability. So it was essentially a voyage of ex- 
ploration to which Mr. Rose invited his friends. The course 
is fully charted now, and very largely by the Rose Poly- 
technic Institute. 

On the loth of September, 1874, articles of incorpora- 
tion were adopted for the establishment of "an institution 
for the intellectual and practical education of young men," 
to be known as the "Terre Haute School of Industrial 
Science," and to be administered by a board of managers. 
On October loth the board organized with Chauncey Rose, 



Historical Review. ii 

President ; Demas Deming, Treasurer, and William K. 
Edwards, Secretary. January nth, 1875, the cornerstone of 
the main edifice was laid with appropriate ceremony, and 
the name of the school was changed by the managers, over 
the protest of Mr. Rose, to "The Rose Polytechnic Insti- 
tute." June 13th he resigned the presidency on account of 
age and infirmities, and died the next August. 

His bequests to the school include the grounds, the main 
building, the shop building, sums for equipment and main- 
tenance, and a productive capital of about five hundred thou- 
sand dollars. His will made the Institute residuary legatee 
of his estate. Since that time a bequest has been received 
from the will of Josephus Collett, who was Mr. Rose's 
successor as President, of $50,000. Many gifts of valuable 
machinery, apparatus, and books have been added to the 
equipment of the shops, laboratories, and library. 

The Institute of to-day consists of one large three-story 
academic building with a basement story, for offices, recita- 
tion rooms, library, laboratories, models, cabinets, museum, 
etc. ; a two-story shop building for practice in wood and 
metals, including a smithy and foundry, besides power and 
lighting and heating plants ; chemical laboratory with office, 
store room and recitation room ; gymnasium with locker 
room, rubbing rooms, and shower baths. 

Rose Polytechnic was formally opened for instruction 
March 7, 1883, at which time President Charles O. Thomp- 
son, formerly principal of the Free Institute of Technology 
of Worcester, Massachusetts, made the inaugural address. 

President Thompson's experience at Worcester was sup- 
plemented by a tour of observation abroad, where he went 
expressly to study European schools of technology. He 
embodied the results of his experience and tour in the plan 
of instruction that he formulated for the new school, and 
which is substantially followed at present. Unfortunately, 
President Thompson lived only long enough to see his work 
begun. July, 1886, Dr. T. C. Mendenhall was elected his 



12 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

successor, and served until 1890, when he took charge of 
the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. Dr. H. T. 
Eddy filled the presidency for three years, 189 1-4, when 
Dr. C. L. Mees, the present incumbent, was elected. 

The Polytechnic is purely a school of technology. Its 
courses include instruction in mechanical, civil, and electrical 
engineering, architecture, and chemistry. Coincident with 
this instruction is included actual shop and field work, such 
as a commercial graduate may be engaged in, although no 
aim is made at proficiency ; but at the end of his course the 
student should be as well equipped as the journeyman at the 
conclusion of his term as apprentice. Shop work as given 
at Rose provides enough variation from theoretical study so 
as to keep the student's feet in contact with the earth. 

One of the gratifying proofs of the Institute's training 
is to be found in the fact that the graduates are in demand 
and at work all over the country, yes, the world, and in even 
wider lines than their education at Rose Polytechnic seemed 
to fit them. 

More students apply for admission than can be accom- 
modated. One million dollars can be wisely expended for 
buildings and equipment, and the endowment fund must be 
increased if all deserving applicants are to be received; for 
the monetary cost of each student to the Institute per year 
is several times in excess of the really nominal tuition fee. 

In this era of magnificent gifts to education it would 
seem as if persons seeking the safest and largest returns 
from their benefactions would increase the facilities of an 
institution already doing such work as Rose Polytechnic 
rather than to start some new and untried project, and it is 
hoped that the work of Chauncey Rose will never be allowed 
to lapse for the want of such endowment. 

How well the work of the Institute was planned and how 
deep and true its foundations were laid is evidenced espe- 
cially by two things. First of all is the gratifying fact that 
practically all of the graduates of the Rose, scattered as 



Historical Review. 13 

they now are all over the world, are engaged in professional 
pursuits for which their instruction at the Institute specially 
fitted them. Occasionally one, by force of family reasons 
or inheritance, has drifted into other pursuits, but the num- 
ber of them is very small. Rose Alumni are putting into the 
world's work the skill acquired at the Institute. 

Another is that in all these years there has been no occa- 
sion to materially change the original plan. Changes have 
been made, many of them to adapt them to changed con- 
ditions. Courses have been rearranged. Old courses have 
been amplified or modified as circumstances have required. 
New courses have been added. But the general scope has 
not been altered. It was started right, and it is right now. 
No better statement of the original plan has been made 
than that contained in the address delivered by Dr. Charles 
O. Thompson, the first President, on the occasion of the 
inauguration exercises, March 7, 1883. The occasion was 
a notable one. Distinguished men in all walks of life, and 
especially educators, were present, drawn by a common 
desire to do honor to the memory of Channcey Rose, who 
died before the school was opened, as it was denied to Moses 
to enter the promised land. Great and widespread interest, 
too, was taken because of the novelty of the Institute and 
the almost revolutionary courses of study it proposed. 
Notable addresses were delivered by Colonel Richard W. 
Thompson ; General John Eaton, United States Commis- 
sioner of Education ; Dr. Lemuel Moss, President of the 
Indiana State University ; Dr. Emerson E. White, President 
of Purdue University, and Dr. Barnabas C. Hobbs. 

CLASS MEMORIALS. 

One of the most gratifying evolutions in the student life 
at the Institute has been the complete conversion into con- 
structive channels of the destructive rowdyism that has m 
the past in most institutions (still does in many) marked 
and marred certain anniversarv occasions, notablv Hal- 



14 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

lowe'en. Such rowdyism has undergone a transformation 
at Rose. Now the ebullient spirits that formerly celebrated 
the day by destroying property find better and more lasting 
expression in creating it. The administration building, the 
campus, the enclosure, and the gates, each now memorize 
some class. This is permanent construction, and adds to the 
attractiveness of the Institute. It serves a useful purpose, 
contributes to the comfort of the undergraduates and the 
edification of visitors, and perpetuates the memories of suc- 
cessive classes. It links them, so to speak, with the name of 
Chauncey Rose, the founder, and enlists them at once into 
the noble army of future benefactors of the Institute. 
Keeping up the old traditions of secrecy and darkness, the 
students now place these useful adjuncts to and adornments 
of the Institute in position at night and stealthily. Each 
year these class memorials have taken more elaborate and 
costly form ; they are now substantial additions to the Insti- 
tute. Marking, as they do, a radical change of attitude of 
the student body to the school and an entire shifting of the 
usual viewpoints, they are veritable mileposts in the path of 
progress. They stand for love and loyalty ; represent self- 
sacrifice; recognize in a beautiful way the benefactions of 
Mr. Rose by seeking to add to them, and furnish touching 
testimonials to their realization of the fact that the hand of 
Mr. Rose, though long turned to pathetic dust, still leads 
them to and makes possible for them lives of greater useful- 
ness and worth. All this the discriminating eye can see in 
their class memorials. 

ALUMNI ACTIVITIES. 

Alumni representation on the Board of Managers has 
pro^ven of value in bringing to the solution of administrative 
problems the minds of men who have been trained in the 
school of experience, and it has brought the whole body of 
Alumni into closer touch. Tech Clubs scattered all over 
the country where Rose men are located have also con- 



Historical Review. 15 

tributed to keep alive the interest in their Alma Mater. 
Out of all this, and out of the discussions and conferences 
of Commencement Week there has grown an organized 
effort on the part of the Alumni Association to raise by per- 
sistent work among themselves a substantial fund for the 
further endowment of the Institute. None knows better 
than the man who has taken the course the added burden 
that insufficiency of funds has thrown upon the shoulders 
qf the Faculty. And they have been keenly alive to the fact 
that many earnest and ambitious young men have knocked 
vainly at the doors of the Institute because its facilities were 
taxed to the limit, and, without lowering the standard of 
instruction and so reducing the quality of the product, no 
more could be admitted. For it has been the fixed purpose 
of the school authorities from the first, and the Alumni have 
been especially insistent on this, that under no circumstances 
should the standard be lowered. Every change has been to 
make the course more complete, as well as more compre- 
hensive. 

From the first a Rose diploma has been in engineering 
and industrial circles a recognized certificate of efficiency 
and attainments. Its graduates have been men who could 
be depended on by captains of industry, such as could be 
safely intrusted with positions requiring technical knowledge 
and thorough training. 

For several years past Rose has had its capacity taxed to 
the limit. On the one hand, it has had a demand for its 
graduates greater than it could supply. On the other hand, 
it has been forced by the limitation of its facilities to deny 
its privileges to worthy and deserving young men. To 
enlarge the Institute to meet this double demand has been 
the perplexing problem confronting the Board of Managers 
and the Faculty, and has been one of the things that have 
prompted the Alumni to put their shoulders loyally to the 
wheel and their hands to their pockets. Considering the age 
of the school, the limited number of its Alumni, and the 



i6 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

youth of the greater portion of them, what they have so far 
accomplished in this direction is highly gratifying. 

Among the notable and admirable phenomena of recent 
times have been the vast contributions to the cause of edu- 
cation. Men of both large and small means have con- 
tributed. It is doubtful if, in the entire list of splendid edu- 
cational institutions with which the United States is blessed, 
there is one where further endowments are more needed and 
where such funds would yield larger returns and afford 
greater satisfaction to the benefaction in the development of 
men and the upbuilding of the country than Rose Poly- 
technic Institute. 



CHAUNCEY ROSE, 
Founder of the Rose Polytechnic Institute. 



A Biographical Sketch and Memoir 
From Notes by President Thompson (i< 

Chauncey Rose, founder of the Rose Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, Terre Haute, Indiana, was born in a retired farm house 
in the Wethersfield Meadows, in Connecticut, December 24, 
1794. He died at his residence, Terre Haute, Indiana, 
August 13, 1877. John Rose, his father, was the son of 
John Rose, who emigrated from the Highlands of Scotland 
early in the eighteenth century. Mary Warner, his mother, 
was the daughter of John Warner, of Wethersfield. His 
mother died at the age of seventy-two in 1832, and his 
father, aged eighty, in 1838. Of such sturdy stock was the 
subject of this sketch bom. 

Chauncey Rose was one of eight children, six brothers 
and one sister, afterward Mrs. Israel Williams. Parental 
care was necessarily diffused, and the children of the family 
grew up with greater self-reliance and clearer ideas of the 
duties of mutual helpfulness than would have otherwise 
been the case. To the development of these characteristics 
and all the sturdier qualities of mind, time and place both 
contributed. The echoes of the War of Independence were 
reverberating over the land. A national government was in 
the throes of birth. Domestic problems pressed for solu- 
tion. A continent whose resources were for the most part 
unknown united courageous souls to its conquest. His six 
brothers and his sister (Mrs. Israel Williams) all died 
before Chauncey, and all were childless. So, when, at the 
2 



1 8 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

age of eighty-three, he died, also childless, he was "the last 
of his race." Two of his brothers, George and John, were 
successively partners of Stephen Bulkeley, of Hartford, 
Conn., and carried on an extensive business in the East 
India trade at Charleston, S. C. Before the dissolution of 
this partnership, John became a prosperous cotton broker at 
New Orleans. After George's death, John removed to New 
York, and made a strong impression in financial circles as 
one of the ablest business men of his time. When he went 
to New York from New Orleans his possessions were esti- 
mated to be worth $50,000. At his death his property was 
valued at $900,000, a very considerable increase for that 
period of simpler and slower as well as more substantial 
development. 

Chauncey Rose's education was limited to a brief attend- 
ance upon the common schools near his boyhood home. It 
was rudimentary, but it was thorough as far as it went. 
Best of all, it inspired him with a respect and yearning for 
knowledge. Probably then and there was implanted in his 
receptive mind the germ of a determination to make easier 
to travel that pathway to knowledge which his feet could 
not tread — a determ.ination that grew and bore fruit many 
years later. But though denied those larger opportunities 
for education for which he yearned, and from which he 
might have been greatly benefited, he did not repine. His 
heritage was a rich one, as it was. Endowed with a sound 
mind in a sound body, he had courage, self-reliance, integ- 
rity, industry, and an indomitable will. Just such men as 
he was, cast in the same sturdy mold, were needed in the 
ranks of the industrial army marching westward. Broad 
and deep foundations were required to secure social, busi- 
ness, industrial, and educational systems that would endure. 

In 1817, at the age of twenty-three, he came west seeking 
a location, first going to Mt. Sterling, Ky., where some 
friends resided. The conditions under which he chose Vigo 
County for his residence, as told in his own words, are 



Chauncey Rose, Biographical Sketch. 19 

given in Beckwith's History of Vigo and Parke Counties, 
as follows: 

" In the fall of 1817, I traversed the States of Indiana, Illinois, 
Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama, looking for a location 
at which to reside and engage in business. I spent several days at 
Terre Haute ; it had been laid out the previous year. The following 
winter I spent in Kentucky. Favorably impressed with the location 
and the people in and about Terre Haute, I returned and became a 
resident in April, 1818. There were but two cabins in Terre Haute, 
and the nearest boarding-place was at Fort Harrison, where I 
boarded, as did the county officers, at a house kept by Mrs. Stewart. 
* * * There were no direct roads. The trip East was made by 
way of Louisville, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. It was a source of 
great rejoicing when the first steamboat landed at Terre Haute, in 
1822. In 1819 I moved to Parke County, and engaged in the busi- 
ness of milling. I sawed and furnished the lumber for the court 
house erected in the public square ; and I returned to Terre Haute 
in 1825." 

From that date (1825) Mr. Rose engaged in trade, and 
became one of the most popular and successful merchants 
of the region. His profits were judiciously invested in land, 
which he worked according to the most improved methods, 
until, acre by acre, it gradually passed, with the increase of 
population, from farm land into city lots. In these and other 
ways, open only to those who improve the opportunities of a 
new country, he amassed a large fortune. 

Mr. Rose came to Indiana about two years after the 
adoption of the first State constitution, and, though the 
exacting duties incident to a frontier life must have molded 
his own character, it can not be questioned that his power 
of forming and holding fixed opinions, which were founded 
in his absolute integrity and great intelligence, must have 
had marked influence upon the new State. 

Mr. Rose was foremost in securing the railway trans- 
portation in the new State. He bore the principal labor of 
building the Terre Haute & Indianapolis Railroad; his 
courage and resolution secured the construction of the road 



20 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

by individual subscriptions — largely secured from his 
friends by his personal efforts — instead of- by the aid of a 
grant of public land, which had not then become the fashion, 
and his scrupulous supervision made the road one of the 
best and safest in the United States. He contributed largely 
to the railroads from Evansville to Terre Haute, from 
Terre Haute to Crawfordsville, and from Terre Haute to 
Danville, 111., and nothing but the approach of age withheld 
him from the same cooperation in building the road from 
Terre Haute to St. Louis by way of Vandalia. 

Mr. Rose was never indifferent to the influence of re- 
ligious institutions on a growing community. He con- 
tributed liberally toward the expense of nearly every church 
edifice in Terre Haute, not failing to recognize the equal 
claims of the colored people. He was always a pretty reg- 
ular attendant on church till within a few years of his death. 
His filial regard for his mother, a most admirable woman, 
influenced him in his action on such matters. It is said that 
her opposition to his plan for going West was softened by 
his promise to pay her an annual visit. This promise he 
could not fulfill till the end of the fifth year ; but the annual 
visit, often performed on horseback, was rarely again 
omitted during the good lady's life. 

After her death, he gave the old homestead to the town 
of Wethersfield, with $3,000 to improve it. It is now the 
Town Farm, a well-ordered asylum for the poor. He then 
added $2,000 for the town library, and $12,000 to endow 
an academy. 

Mr. Rose dispensed many private charities, which were 
unknown to any except the recipients and himself, in which 
quiet field of benevolent operations he kept alive and invig- 
orated the sentiments of philanthropy which grew and in- 
creased as the circle of his good works was enlarged. For 
some years before his death his mind was greatly exercised 
in determining the most suitable method of so distributing 
his property that the public should be benefited by it, espe- 



Chauncey Rose, Biographical Sketch. 21 

cially that part of the public where he had lived so long, 
where he had formed many friendships, and where his 
wealth had been acquired. 

He had strong sympathy for those who have to struggle 
without fault against the tide of adverse fortune which over- 
whelms so many victims, and the consciousness of having 
relieved the meritorious poor always gave him lively satis- 
faction. 

His numerous, though unannounced acts of kindness in 
their behalf, prepared his mind for the larger gifts to the 
Ladies' Aid Society of Terre Haute, a most effective 
charity; the Providence Hospital, the Free Dispensary, and 
the Rose Orphans' Home. 

It is an interesting fact that this long train of good 
deeds, as well as the greater one which remains to be 
noticed, followed, if it did not proceed, from an act of 
justice to the memory of his brother John, which was so 
unique and remarkable that it can not be omitted. 

He found that, for many reasons, the will of his brother, 
if executed under the laws of the State of New York, would 
not accomplish his brother's clearly-defined intentions. The 
will made bequests of more than a million of dollars, and 
Mr. Rose became satisfied that only a small part of these 
bequests would reach the objects for which they were in- 
tended. He accordingly instituted legal proceedings to set 
the will aside, and, after nearly six years of vexatious litiga- 
tion, succeeded in doing so. All the heavy expenses of this 
litigation were borne by Mr. Rose out of his private purse. 
The estate was then valued at $1,600,000. To this sum he 
became sole heir, for, though Henry Rose was living at the 
time of John Rose's death, his equitable claim upon the 
estate was honorably settled by Chauncey before the pro- 
ceedings for setting aside the will were begun, and Henry 
joined him in those proceedings. 

This result, as Colonel Thompson well says, "would 
have put the character of almost any man to a severe test. 



22 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

and a large majority of men would, without hesitation, have 
appropriated the money to their own use." Not so, however, 
with Mr. Rose. It required no deliberation on his part to 
decide that justice to the memory of his brother and to his 
own character required that the money should be disposed 
of by him so as to execute the objects provided for in the 
will as far as possible. As the representative of his brother 
he did this, by disposing of the money in New York for 
charitable objects, such as the Newsboys' Home, the Institu- 
tion for the Relief of the Ruptured and Crippled, and others 
of like character. He made many gifts in Charleston, S. C, 
in commemoration of his brother's former citizenship there. 
For all these he dispensed more than a million and a half 
of dollars. 

He took deep interest in the cause of education generally. 
But that kind of education most suitable for young men of 
genius, talents, and enterprise, and which should fit them for 
the highest spheres of practical life, was, with him, a 
favorite topic of thought and conversation. His leading 
idea was that a system should be provided that would blend 
the industrial sciences with the branches of knowledge 
usually taught in the schools and colleges, so that the pupils 
should not only become scholars, in the ordinary sense, but 
should be enabled to follow the various mechanical, profes- 
sional, and industrial pursuits with intelligence and skill. 
He desired to build up a class of educated and scientific 
mechanics and laboring men, so that, in the pursuit of their 
various vocations, they should be able to give full scope to 
their inventive and constructive talents. In furtherance of 
his general purpose, he gave, from time to time, liberal con- 
tributions to Wabash College, at Crawfordsville. He also 
furnished the means of adding essentially to the library of 
the State Normal School in this city, and paid the expenses 
of a considerable number of young ladies while fitting them- 
selves at that school to become teachers. 

At last, his leading and long-cherished thought with 



Chauncey Rose, Biographical Sketch. 23 

reference to education culminated in gifts and bequests for 
the establishment of the Polytechnic school. In the steps 
that Mr. Rose took to carry out his plan, he displayed all his 
best traits. Naturally distrustful of his own knowledg^e of 
schools, he went to see some of the most noted institutions 
that gave any knowledge or experience in such matters. 
The timely and judicious suggestions of his friends, espe- 
cially Josephus Collett, Barnabas C. Hobbs, and Charles R. 
Peddle, had decided influence with Mr. Rose in his final 
decision to endow a polytechnic school. 

To obtain the information necessary to determine in 
what mold the institution should be cast, he commissioned 
two of his associates in the corporation to make a thorough 
inspection of all institutions in the country that offer courses 
in higher technology. This committee discharged their duty 
most faithfully, and presented to Mr. Rose an elaborate 
report, in which the features and statistics of each of the 
great polytechnic schools in the United States are carefully 
set out. 

Mr. Rose studied this report long and thoroughly. He 
sought counsel and information from every available source. 
The result was that he decided to repeat, as far as changed 
circumstances would permit, the plan of the Worcester Free 
Institute. He remained a member of the Board of Trustees 
till the buildings were completed and the general policy of 
the Institue fixed, when, on account of his age and infirm- 
ities, he resigned his ofiice June 2, 1877. 

An Estimate of His Lifd and Character by Hon. 
R. W. Thompson. 
In his business transactions he always displayed great 
sagacity, and was scrupulously exact. His mind was well 
balanced and his judgment generally accurate, both as re- 
garded men and things. He read a good deal, and was a 
careful observer of passing events, which he analyzed with 
great thoroughness. He was, therefore, among the earliest 



24 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

of those who foresaw the growth and prosperity of this city 
and county, and, indeed, of the State. These were always 
favorite topics with him, and so decided were his convictions 
with regard to them that he was always ready whensoever 
the occasion presented — or to create an occasion when none 
existed — to discuss measures tending to these ends. When 
the charter for the Terre Haute & Richmond (now the 
Terre Haute & Indianapolis) Railroad was first obtained, 
it was considered a matter of great doubt whether the money 
necessary for its construction could be obtained, as money, 
in those days, was not so plentiful as now. A convention 
was assembled at Indianapolis to consider what steps should 
be taken, and it was there proposed that an effort should 
be made to obtain a grant of lands from the United States 
sufficient for the purpose. A majority of the convention 
was disposed to favor this proposition, but Mr. Rose made 
such stern opposition to it that it was finally abandoned — 
showing in this the power and strength of his will. His 
defeat of the project created in his mind an impression that 
if the enterprise should afterward fail a large share of the 
responsibility would rest upon him. And this consideration, 
added to his great anxiety for the construction of the road, 
stimulated him to extraordinary personal exertions, which 
he immediately put forth with so much energy and perse- 
verance that the money was raised by individual subscrip- 
tion, and the road built, mainly by his efforts and with 
capital furnished by him. But for him it would not have 
been built, and but for him it would not have been so well 
built as to have become what it is now and has always been, 
one of the best and safest railroads in this country. He 
was in this, as in everything else in which he participated, 
governed by the rule that whatever was worthy of being 
done at all was worth doing well. 

He acquired the reputation of being what is popularly 
called a "railroad king"; and if to have been one of the 
foremost and most conspicuous among the pioneer advocates 



Chauncey Rose, Biographical Sketch. 25 

of railroad improvement entitled him to be known so, the 
title was properly given him. He contributed very largely to 
the railroads from Evansville to Terre Haute, from Terre 
Haute to Crawfordsville, and from Terre Haute to Dan- 
ville, 111., all of which are more indebted to him for their 
construction than to any other individual. He advocated 
zealously, for many years, a railroad from Terre Haute, 
through Illinois, to St. Louis, and expended money liberally 
in making experimental surveys. But his advancing age 
admonished him that it was necessary for other and younger 
men to carry out this important scheme, and he was content 
to see what he had done made available in the construction 
of the St. Louis, Vandalia & Terre Haute road, now a part 
of the Vandalia line. 

Mr. Rose was a resolute man. In all the enterprises in 
which he engaged he displayed this quality, and, in con- 
sequence, generally achieved success in what he undertook. 
His strong will enabled him to influence others and to 
impress them with his opinions. This, too, increased his 
own earnestness and untiring activity in pursuit of the 
objects he desired to accomplish ; for it is one of the inex- 
plicable laws of the human mind that its own vigor and 
energy is increased in the same proportion as it imparts 
them to others. 

For some years before his death his mind was greatly 
exercised in determining the most suitable method of so 
distributing his property that the public should be benefited 
by it, especially that part of the public among whom he had 
lived so long, where he had formed many friendships, and 
where his wealth had been acquired. 

Our citizens all know how many evidences of this were, 
from time to time, given by him. By his munificent gift to 
the Ladies' Aid Society of this city he has enabled it, under 
the admirable administration of its managers, to become a 
noble and magnificent charity. His donations to Providence 
Hospital were upon a most liberal scale. The medical dis- 



26 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

pensary which he established in this city, where the poor 
are to be provided for without charge, is a work of Christian 
benevolence. Added to these, and to others less con- 
spicuous, there is the Orphans' Home, with an endowment 
sufficient to assure its permanency, which, of itself, is 
enough to confer immortal honor upon his memory. 

Few men have left so many evidences of a humane and 
philanthropic spirit, or have bestowed their charities more 
wisely. There is an entire absence of anything like selfish- 
ness in each one of them, and so quietly were many of them 
dispensed that the public knew nothing of them until their 
fruits were observed. As his own conscience guided him, 
and he needed nothing more than its approval, he did not 
seek after notoriety or what the world calls fame. As it 
was impossible to shake his purpose when it became fixed, 
so it was always executed without regard to mere applause. 
As he deliberated well and intelligently before acting, and 
followed the counsel of his own convictions, so he left his 
acts to speak for themselves, as they now do with eloquence 
which no words can imitate. 

The many who have already been relieved by his benevo- 
lence will unite in the bestowal of blessings upon his 
memory. Hundreds of others yet to come, who shall share 
the benefactions he has so bountifully provided, will repeat 
his name with sincere and heartfelt praises. 

But there will be none louder or more earnest than the 
recipients of the blessings which shall flow from this school, 
whose foundations he has laid with so much wisdom and 
foresight, and around which his affections clustered with 
the most intense ardor of his nature. 

Of sturdy mold himself, everything he did stood four- 
square, and was stanch and true. Veneer had no charm for 
him — everything was required to be what it seemed. Gen- 
uineness, solidity, ability to bear the maximum of strain — 
these were his demands, and for over half a century he 
taught by the arduous eloquence of example, habits of punc- 



Chauncey Rose, Biographical Sketch. 27 

tnality, probity, sobriety, industry, thrift, prudence, truthful- 
ness, courage, and steadfastness. Reticence was a strongly 
marked characteristic, and because of it some of his con- 
temporaries thought him cold and unsympathetic. Nothing 
could be further from the truth. He was a lover of his 
kind and a generous philanthropist, but every prompting of 
his heart to help was subject to the careful scrutiny of his 
head — that wise old head which guided him safely and 
sanely his long life through — and his last years were spent 
in the deliberate task of so disposing of his wealth that the 
substantial good which his generous heart had already 
planned and partly executed should be continued even after 
his death and made permanent. 

Each and everything to which he gave — and he gave 
everything he had, leaving nothing to chance — had for its 
well-matured object the tiding of the young or the afflicted 
over temporary need and placing them in the way of caring 
for themselves and for others. Parental care for orphans, 
medicine for the sick, education of youth — these were the 
especial objects of his solicitude. 

None of Mr. Rose's six brothers, nor his sister, left any 
descendants, and he outlived all his family. He was never 
married, and in his old age the wealth of his affections was 
turned to the founding of this school of technology, which 
was given his name against his wish and over his protest. 
Of this fathering has been bom each year for a quarter of 
a century a generous progeny of stalwart young men, each 
of whom calls the Rose Polytechnic his Alma Mater, and 
so calling it, designates as the father of his training the man 
who, though dead, yet lives in immortal youth — the man 
whom we all delight to honor, Chauncey Rosi;. 



WILL OF CHAUNCEY ROSE. 



Mr. Rose distributed the largest part of his wealth dur- 
ing his lifetime to insure its disposition as he had planned. 
The vexatious litigation into which he was led by the threat- 
ened miscarriage of plans of his brother John in disposing 
of his estate under his will may have largely influenced him 
in this. Chauncey Rose left nothing to interpretation, but 
made his will so definite that his bequests could not be mis- 
placed. As a matter of historical interest, the extracts from 
his will referring to the Rose Polytechnic are appended. He 
thought that with the making of the Institute his residuary 
legatee after generous donations during his lifetime, ample 
provision had been made for its future maintenance and 
extension. The phenomenally rapid growth of a demand 
for technical education, especially in the Middle States, and 
the unlooked-for expensiveness of adequately providing such 
education, was not foreseen at that time. Had Mr. Rose 
anticipated any such needs he undoubtedly would have 
diverted some of his other generous bequests in large pro- 
portion to the Rose Pol)d:echnic Institute. In the East 
several technical institutions had already been established. 
There he distributed approximately $1,500,000, the entire 
estate of his brother, which had been declared by law to 
be his own to do with as he would, to various charitable 
institutions. A list of the institutions in the East, together 
with the amounts given, is interesting, and given below. In 
view of this, it would seem befitting that friends of tech- 
nical education in the East, those who have been benefited 
most by the establishment of such schools, should interest 
themselves in Rose Polytechnic Institute by adding to its 
endowments, so that in this day of greater demand for tech- 



JVill of Chauncey Rose. 29 

nical schools Mr. Rose's original bequest might be made 
more efficient, remain unimpaired, and accomplish the pur- 
pose he had in mind. 

PROVISIONS IN WII^I, OF CHAUNCB;y ROSD. 

(3) I give and bequeath to the Rose Polytechnic Institute, the 
corporation formed under the laws of the State of Indiana by articles 
adopted September 10, 1874, and recorded in miscellaneous record, 
No. 5, pages 282, 283 and 284, in the Recorder's oflfice, in Vigo 
County, in said State, under the corporate name of Terre Haute 
School of Industrial Science, which was changed to that of Rose 
Polytechnic Institute by amendment to said articles, adopted Sep- 
tember II, 187s, and recorded in the Recorder's office of said county 
the same day, in miscellaneous record No. 5. pages 359 and 360, the 
picture of myself, mentioned in a certain paragraph, and the sum of 
$107,594.34, exclusive of the real estate, or any sum, credits, rights, 
eflfects, or property I have before conveyed, given, or delivered to 
said corporation. 

Other paragraphs from 4-8 refer to specific bequests, 
mostly to charitable institutions, amounting to about 
$1,235,000. 

8. The residue of my estate, both real and personal, over and 
above any devise or bequest I have made herein, I give and bequeath 
and devise to my executors in trust, to be by them given, delivered, 
or conveyed to the Rose Polytechnic Institute, the corporation named 
in the third item or paragraph hereof. 

(Copied from entries in Mr. Chauncey Rose's ledger between Decem- 
ber 26, i86s, and September, i860, made before his death.) 

Children's Aid Society $220,000 

Female Guardian Society or Home of the Friendless 50,000 

Five Points Home of Industry 40.000 

Magdalen Society 30,000 

Aged Indigent Females 20,000 

Female Asst. Society 25,000 

Colored Orphan Society 10,000 

Mariners' Female Asylum 5,ooo 

Destitute Children of Seamen 5,000 

Society for Relief of Crippled and Ruptured Children 72,000 

Juvenile Asylum 20,000 



30 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Women's Hospital $io,ooo 

Nursery for Poor Children iS.ooo 

Society for Relief of Poor 2,000 

Home for Aged and Infirm Colored People 6,000 

Dorcas Society ii,000 

Wilson's Industrial School 16,000 

Children of Destitute Soldiers 1,000 

Orphan Asylum of New York 21,000 

Society for Relief of Disabled and Diseased Soldiers 20,000 

New York Female Asst. Society 10,000 

New York Colored Asylum 10,000 

New York Colored Home 10,000 

Society Relief Ruptured and Crippled 10,000 

Nursery for Poor Children 5,ooo 

Five Points Ladies' Mission 10,000 

Association for Improvement of Condition of Poor 5,000 

Home for Friendless Girls S,ooo 

Institution for the Blind 5,ooo 

Industrial Farm School 5,ooo 

Demilt Dispensary 15.000 

Home for Friendless, New York 30,000 

Eye and Ear Infirmary 44,000 

Mariners' Female Asylum 5,ooo 

Protestant Half Orphan Asylum 5,ooo 

Home for Destitute Families of Soldiers S.ooo 

Colored Home 5,ooo 

New York Orphan Asylum 2,500 

St. Anne's Church for Deaf Mutes 2,500 

Home for Reception of Magdalens 4.000 

Aged Female Institution 300 

Society for Crippled and Ruptured, Dr. Knight 10,000 

Colored Orphan Asylum 6,000 

Infirmary for Women and Children 2,000 

Society for Aged Colored People 1,000 

New York Society for Relief of Poor 2,000 

Society for Relief of Aged Respectable Females 2,000 

Eastern Dispensary, New York 6,000 

Women's Hospital 12,000 

Northwestern Dispensary 7,000 

Samaritan Home for Aged 1,000 

Union Home and School for Children of Volunteers 2,000 

Howard Mission or Boarding House for Young Women. . 3,000 

Women's Evangelical Mission 3.500 



Will of Chauncey Rose. 31 

Incurables of New York $30,000 

Aged and Infirm Females 10,000 

Aged and Infirm Soldiers 10,000 

Aged Colored Home 10,000 

Infirmary for Poor Women with Children 5,000 

Association for Relief of the Poor 5.000 

Female Assistant Society 5,ooo 

New York Dispensary 5,ooo 

Women's Lying-in Hospital 5,ooo 

Seamen's Widows and Children 3,000 

Children's Aid Society, Brooklyn 20,000 

Industrial School 5,ooo 

Orphans' Home 5,ooo 

Colonization Society 5,000 

Incurables 3,000 

Orphans' Home of New York 6,000 

Brooklyn Orphan Asylum 16,000 

Brooklyn Industrial School or Home for Destitute Children 10,000 
Brooklyn Industrial School and Home for Destitute Chil- 
dren 5,000 

Brooklyn Orphan Asylum 5,ooo 

Society Destitute Children of Seamen on Long Island S,ooo 

Women's Hospital, Brooklyn 10,000 

Widows with Small Children, Brooklyn 17,000 

Home Aged Women, Brooklyn 5,000 

Aged Female Asst. Society, Brooklyn 2,500 

Children's Nursery of Brooklyn 6,000 

Mt. Prospect Industrial School, Brooklyn 5,500 

Brooklyn Dispensary 5^000 

Charleston Orphan Society 5,ooo 

Wethersfield Library 2,500 

Wethersfield Seminary 18,000 



$1,464,500 



Note. — The societies and institutions enumerated are all in New 
York, unless otherwise designated. 



HISTORY OF THE FOUNDATION AND ESTABLISH- 
MENT OF THE ROSE POLYTECHNIC 
INSTITUTE. 

From Notks by S. S. Eari,y, 1883. 



The scientific school known as the Rose Polytechnic In- 
stitute was founded in 1874 by the munificence of the late 
Chauncey Rose, of Terre Haute. As the life of this gen- 
erous and public-spirited gentleman drew near its close, 
among the many suggestions that appealed to his liberality 
was the founding of a school in which young men might 
be trained in the sciences applicable to the industrial arts. 
Careful study of the plans and methods of such schools and 
consultation with numerous experienced educators fixed 
this suggestion in his thoughts, and out of his deliberations 
grew the establishment the detailed and formal publication 
of whose progress and purposes is set forth in the follow- 
ing pages. 

Inviting the assistance of his trusted friends, Messrs. 
Josephus Collett, Firmin Nippert, Charles R. Peddle, Bar- 
nabas C. Hobbs, William A. Jones, Demas Deming, Ray G. 
Jenckes, General Charles Cruft, and Colonel William K. 
Edwards, he associated them with himself in a body cor- 
porate, in conformity with an act of the General Assembly 
of the State of Indiana, This act was approved February 
20, 1867, with the amendments thereto, and was entitled 
"An Act Concerning the Organization and Perpetuity of 
Voluntary Associations," with various clauses relating to the 
repeal of former laws, and authorized gifts and devises by 
will to any corporation or purpose contemplated by itself. 

On the lOth of September, 1874. a corporation was 



History of Foundation. 33 

formed and articles of association adopted setting forth the 
object of the corporation to be the estabhshment and main- 
tenance, in the County of Vigo, and State of Indiana, of an 
"Institution for the intellectual and practical education of 
young men," and designing the corporate name as "Terre 
Haute School of Industrial Science," and intrusting its 
administration to the corporators under the title of 
managers. 

It was provided that instruction in the school should be 
based on the practical mathematics and the application of 
the physical sciences to the various arts and manufactures, 
and other branches of active business, and should include 
such training as would furnish the pupils with useful and 
practical knowledge of some art or occupation, and enable 
them to earn competent livings. Preference was to be given 
to residents of Vigo County, moderate tuition fees were to 
be charged if considered necessary, and applicants for admis- 
sion were to be at least sixteen years of age, and prepared 
to pass examinations giving evidence of a fair English 
education. 

On October lo, 1874, the Board of Managers was organ- 
ized, by-laws were adopted, and the following officers 
elected : 

President, Chauncey Rose. 

Vice-President, Josephus Collett. 

Treasurer, Demas Deming. 

Secretary, William K. Edwards. 
At the same time a committee, comprising Messrs. Cruft, 
Peddle, Hobbs, Jones, and Collett, was appointed to con- 
sider plans for carrying into effect the objects of the asso- 
ciation. 

On the 1 2th of December the committee reported prog- 
ress, and Messrs. Peddle, Cruft, and Jenckes were deputed 
to confer with an architect. One week thereafter Mr. Rose 
made his first donation, being a deed of conveyance of the 
ten acres of land now occupied by the Institute, and personal 
3 



34 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

securities to the amount of $100,000. The committee on 
architect reported conferences with Mr. Isaac Hodgson, of 
Indianapolis. 

December 26th Mr. Hodgson was elected architect, and 
Mr. Rose made a further gift of $86,000 in bonds of the 
Evansville, Terre Haute & Chicago Railroad Company. 

By the end of January, 1875, the architect had prepared 
suggestive sketches, which were submitted to the considera- 
tion of Mr. Rose, and, having met his approval, were 
adopted by the Board of Managers ; detailed drawings, with 
specifications and estimates of cost, were then ordered pre- 
pared. These being in readiness by the latter part of April, 
on the 2ist of that month they were accepted, and proposals 
for building were ordered solicited. Early in May a number 
of bids had been received, and, after due consideration, a 
contract for the entire building was awarded to Messrs. 
McCormack & Sweeney, of Columbus, Indiana, at the 
total price of $81,000. On the 9th of August, all prelimi- 
naries in the way of gathering materials, executing bonds 
and contracts, and the like, having been attended to, Messrs. 
C. R. Peddle, Josephus Collett, and Charles Cruft were 
elected a building committee, and Messrs. Cruft, Jenckes, 
Nippert, and Edwards were chosen as a committee on the 
laying of the cornerstone. 

On the nth of the following month the ceremony of 
laying the cornerstone took place at 4 o'clock p. m. A large 
concourse of citizens of Terre Haute and visiting strangers 
marched in procession from the center of the city to the 
grounds of the school to witness the exercises, over which, 
by request of the Board, General Charles Cruft presided. 
When the company had been called to order, prayer was 
offered by Rev. E. Frank Howe, pastor of the P'irst Congre- 
gational Church, and the choir of mixed voices sang a selec- 
tion. The cornerstone was laid by the architect, assisted by 
the contractors and their workmen, and a metal box with 
numerous interesting memorials of the occasion was de- 



History of Foundation. 35 

posited therein. The president of the day then introduced 
Colonel William K. Edwards, who delivered an appropriate 
and eloquent address. A second musical selection was sung 
by the choir, and was followed by a masterly oration by 
Barnabas C. Hobbs, LL.D. The benediction, by Rev. Mr. 
Howe, closed the exercises. 

On the same day a meeting of the Board of Managers 
was held, and an amendment to the articles of incorporation 
changing the name of the association from "Terre Haute 
School of Industrial Science " to " Rose Polytechnic Insti- 
tute" unanimously passed. This alteration was not effected 
without persistent protest from the venerable founder; but 
the universal wish, not alone of his fellow managers, but of 
the community of his fellow citizens, that this noble benefac- 
tion should bear his own name, at length overcame his 
scruples, and he reluctantly gave his consent. Proper legal 
measures were then authorized to effect the transfer of all 
property from the Industrial School to the Polytechnic 
Institute. 

The work of construction had progressed so far by the 
summer of 1876 that the question of heating appliances 
began to be considered. Proposals to furnish the requisite 
fixtures were invited, and in July the contract to supply them 
at a cost of $8,759 was awarded to Messrs. R. P. Duncan 
& Co., of Indianapolis. In November of 1876 the con- 
tractors for the building had completed their work in accord- 
ance with the plans and specifications of the architect, and 
had added, with his approval, certain matters amounting in 
the aggregate to $1,700. This sum was allowed, and on the 
1st of December the final warrant for payment was drawn, 
the total cost of construction being $82,700. 

On the 27th of December Mr. Rose presented a state- 
ment of certain payments he had made for the benefit of 
the school amounting to $31,255.66. with quittance in full 
thereof, and at the same time transferred to the Institute 
the sum of $100,000 in certificates of preferred stock in the 



36 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Evansville & Craw for dsville Railroad Company, as an addi- 
tion to the endowment. 

At the annual meeting, held on the 2d of June, 1877, Mr 
Rose, in consideration of his great age and infirmities, ten- 
dered his resignation as a member of the Board of Man- 
agers. In deference to his wishes, but most unwillingly, his 
fellow members accepted it. Mr. Josephus Collett was 
elected to succeed him as President of the Board, and Mr. 
Charles R. Peddle was chosen as Vice-President. During 
the same month a contract for the building of the machine 
shops of the Institute (designs for which had been prepared 
by Mr. Hodgson) was awarded to Messrs. Clift & Wil- 
liams, of Terre Haute, at a cost of $14,400. Mr. Rose died 
on the 13th of August, 1877, and on the 17th of October 
the vacancy occasioned by his resignation was filled by the 
election of Mr. William Mack. 

The total of Mr. Rose's gifts to the Institute, prior to his 
death, reached the sum of $345,614.61, and embraced the 
following items: 

Value of ten acres of land (site of the school) $20,000 00 

First gift of securities 100,000 00 

Second gift of securities 86,000 00 

Quittance for moneys paid by him 31,255 66 

Third gift of securities 100,000 co 

Paid by him on account of heating apparatus 8,150 00 

Paid by him for grading and graveling 208 95 

By his will a specific legacy of $107,594.34 was be- 
queathed to the Institute, and after the payment of his 
devises to his family, to the Rose Orphan Home and to the 
Free Dispensary, it was constituted his residuary legatee. 
What may be the exact amount to be derived from the set- 
tlement of the estate it is impossible to determine, but it is 
reasonable to estimate that the total aggregate of his dona- 
tions to the school will considerably exceed $500,000. 

On the 26th of September, 1878, Colonel William K. 
Edwards, who had most ably and efficiently discharged the 



History of Foundation. yj 

duties of Secretary of the Board of Managers from its 
organization, died, and, on the 2d of November, Mr. Samuel 
S. Early was chosen to succeed him. Toward the close of 
the year the machine shops were finished, and some debts 
which had been incurred in the various works of construc- 
tion were paid. The question then arose whether, with the 
means remaining at their command, the Managers could 
purchase the costly equipment required for the school, and 
pay its running expenses, should they put it in operation. 
Committees and officers of the Board were deputed to visit 
the principal institutes of technology in the country, and 
make careful investigations concerning their appliances, 
methods of management and cost of maintenance. From 
these investigations it became evident that it would be im- 
possible to procure the outfit without a serious impairment 
of the productive endowment necessary to furnish revenues 
sufficient for the current outlay of a school of the character 
Mr. Rose had desired to establish. There was no alternative, 
therefore, but for the Managers to defer the opening until 
accumulated income should supply funds for the outfit and 
the settlement of Mr. Rose's estate should swell their per- 
manent resources to the required amount. It was not until 
the beginning of 1882 that these results had been approxi- 
mately attained. By that time the executors of Mr. Rose 
were enabled to pay the specific bequest — for the greater 
part in cash and productive investments, with the remainder 
in valuable real estate — and accrued interest had then so 
far grown as to provide a basis for the purchase of equip- 
ment. 

Pending this delay, some further changes had occurred 
in the personnel of the Board. The prolonged absence in 
Europe of Dr. B. C. Hobbs, as a member of the World's 
Peace Congress, and the removal to Mt. Vernon of Mr. 
R. G. Jenckes, led to the withdrawal of both these gentlemen 
in January, 1879, and on the 31st of that month Messrs. 
Robert S. Cox and Preston Hussev were elected to fill their 



38 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

places. Trusty custodians had been appointed to care for 
and protect the buildings, and small outlays had been made 
from time to time for books, apparatus and specimens for 
the cabinet. Diligent inquiry as to the availability of can- 
didates for the professorships of the Faculty had been 
prosecuted, and a number of eminent educators had been 
invited to visit Terre Haute and confer with the Managers 
upon the future organization and conduct of the school. 
Prominent among these had been Dr. Charles O. Thompson, 
Principal of the Free Institute of Technology, at Worcester, 
Mass. ; Prof. William D. Marks, of the University of Penn- 
sylvania; Prof. T. C. Mendenhall, of the Ohio State Uni- 
versity, and Prof. F. W. Clarke, of the University of Cin- 
cinnati, from all of whom most valuable counsel and sug- 
gestions and hearty encouragement had been obtained. 

Finding themselves, by the receipt of the specific legacy, 
possessed of funds yielding an income of about $25,000, the 
Managers felt that the time had come when they might take 
the necessary measures for opening the Institute. Their 
first important step was the election of Dr. Charles O. 
Thompson, of Worcester, Mass., to the presidency of the 
Faculty. This occurred on the 20th of February, 1882, and 
the President of the Board, with the Secretary and General 
Charles Cruft, visited Worcester for a personal conference 
with Dr. Thompson. Toward the end of March he accepted 
the appointment, and immediately began the work of select- 
ing a Faculty and preparing a detailed plan for the organ- 
ization of the school. Professors of Chemistry, of the 
elementary and the higher Mathematics, of Drawing, as 
also a Superintendent of the Machine Shops, were offered 
places and accepted them. Those whose services were 
necessary reported for duty as soon as their prior engage- 
ments admitted, and by the end of the summer of 1882 great 
progress had been made in the work of preparation. It was 
found that a small class could be provided for by the begin- 
ning of March, 1883, and in August of 1882 circulars were 



History of Foundation. 39 

published inviting applications for admission. An opportu- 
nity for the purchase of the apparatus and library of the 
late Dr. John Bacon, of Harvard College, was seized by the 
Board, and an admirable collection of instruments and 
scientific books was added to the resources of the school. 
Power machinery and tools for the shop were purchased by 
Mr. Edward S. Cobb, the Superintendent, under the sanction 
of a committee composed of Messrs. Peddle, Nippert, and 
Cox, cases for the mineralogical specimens were constructed, 
after the plans of Prof. Charles A. Colton, of the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry, and the excellent collection was mounted, 
labeled, and stored under his skillful labors. Shelving de- 
signed by Prof. Clarence A. Waldo, the future Librarian, 
was provided for the library, and the early purchases of the 
Board, together with the Bacon library, were catalogued by 
the Secretary and arranged by members of the Faculty. 
Large additions to the library and apparatus were made by 
President Thompson, who had sailed for Europe, in July of 
1882, for study of the methods and progress of technological 
instruction in the more advanced schools abroad. Tables, 
easels, models, in brief, all the appliances required for the 
department of drawing, were procured upon the suggestions 
of Prof. William L. Ames, of that department, and, by the 
time anticipated, everything was in readiness for the opening. 
On the 6th of March candidates for admission were exam- 
ined, and a class of twenty-five members selected from the 
proficient. 

In the President of the Worcester Institute of Tech- 
nology, Charles O. Thompson, the Managers secured a grad- 
uate of Dartmouth College in high standing for general 
scholarship, and with special aptitudes and acquisitions re- 
quired in technological instruction, and" who, before finding 
his special field as organizer and teacher of an American 
school of technology, had taught with eminent success sev- 
eral public high schools, each in succession of a higher grade 
in studies and compensation, and who, from the start, had 



40 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

shown himself an earnest, diUgent, catholic scholar and 
inquirer after the best methods of teaching the essential 
things, and securing discipline by keeping his pupils inter- 
ested and occupied in their work. Before entering on the 
administration of the Rose Institute, he was allowed to 
refresh his own faculties by the rest of travel and of obser- 
vation in fields having a special interest to him in his past 
and future work, and which he was now prepared to look 
at with the discriminating and appropriating judgment 
which actual experience alone can give. Thus equipped by 
natural endowments, general training, and special expe- 
rience. President Thompson entered into full possession of 
his new position and duties on the 7th of March, 1883, with 
an inaugural address setting forth the nature and claims of 
an educational institution like that of the Rose Polytechnic 
Institute, and with the fullest confidence of the Board of 
Managers and the best wishes of a host of old friends 
among the teachers of the country. 



ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION OF THE TERRE HAUTE 
SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL SCIENCE. 

Article i. The subscribers who have signed these articles, set- 
ting out their respective places of residence, voluntarily associate 
themselves to organize a body corporate to be maintained in the 
County of Vigo and State of Indiana, in conformity to an Act of the 
General Assembly of the State of Indiana, approved February 20, 
1867, and the amendments thereto. Said Act is entitled "An Act 
concerning the organization and perpetuity of voluntary associa- 
tions," and repealing an Act entitled "An Act concerning the organ- 
ization of voluntary associations and repealing former laws in ref- 
erence thereto," approved February 12, 1855, and repealing each Act 
repealed by said Act, and authorizing gifts and devises by will to be 
made to any corporation or purpose contemplated by this Act." 

Article 2. The objects of this Association are to promote, en- 
courage, and teach the mechanical arts and sciences for all practical 
purposes. To this end there shall be established and maintained at 
the County of Vigo and State of Indiana, perpetually, a free insti- 



Articles of Association. 41 

tution for the intellectual and practical education of young men 
especially in the principles of the mechanical arts as applied to the 
various trades and avocations in life. Said institution shall be free 
from all sectarianism, and shall be under the control and manage- 
ment of the subscribers hereto, and their successors chosen as herein- 
after provided. It shall be open to males of at least sixteen years of 
age, of good moral character. When the institution may be full, 
preference shall be given to the admission of residents of the County 
of Vigo. Instruction shall be provided therein from time to time, 
based on the practical mathematics and application of the physical 
sciences, to the various arts, manufactures, agriculture, horticulture, 
and all branches of active business, and be conducted upon such gen- 
eral system as will elevate the moral and intellectual condition of the 
pupils by training them for the activitfes of life, and furnishing such 
useful and practical knowledge of some art, trade, or occupation, 
with general business habits, as will enable them thereafter to earn a 
competent living. 

Prominence shall be given to the following studies, but not to 
the exclusion of other useful arts and sciences in harmony with the 
general design of said institution, as before expressed, which may be 
deemed expedient or desirable, vh. : Mathematics, Physics, Indus- 
trial Mechanics, Chemistry, Natural History, Civil Engineering, 
including drawing, designing, and modeling, also Mechanical Engi- 
neering and Mining Engineering. 

Architecture with reference to drawings, styles of buildings, 
plans, materials, estimates, and ornamentation. 

Geology applied to mining and agriculture. Astronomy, Physical 
Geography, Botany, Horticulture, and Agriculture. 

English Language and Literature with reference to writing busi- 
ness correspondence, contracts, and reports. 

Bookkeeping, and so much of the Latin Language as will enable 
the student to understand the terms of science used. 

The common schools teach the common English branches fully, 
with an appreciation of their uses ; it is therefore expected that each 
applicant for admission will be able to pass a satisfactory exami- 
nation therein, that a preparatory school shall only be formed tem- 
porarily to enable exceptional and meritorious applicants to pass the 
entrance examination. 

Appropriate degrees may be conferred. 

In case only it shall be absolutely necessary to sustain the insti- 
tution, moderate tuition fees may be charged. 

Article 3. Terre Haute School of Industrial Science is the cor- 
porate name adopted to designate the objects of this Association. 



42 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Article 4. The corporate seal shall be circular in form, one 
and a fourth inch in diameter, contain the corporate name, the name 
of the State, Indiana, and the representation of a pivot as a device. 

The impression shall appear the same as it does affixed to these 
articles. 

Article 5. That the management of the business and pruden- 
tial concerns of this Association shall be controlled by the members 
hereof, and their successors and associates, who shall be termed 
Managers, they shall adopt rules and regulations for their own gov- 
ernment and for the government of the institution, not inconsistent 
with these articles and laws of the State of Indiana. They shall 
appoint or elect all officers, professors, teachers, and agents. Annual 
meetings shall be held when full reports of the affairs and condition 
of the institution shall be made. Special meetings may be called by 
the presiding officer of the Board of Managers, or by a majority of 
the Managers. 

The members may increase their number at their discretion, 
upon sufficient consideration. The surviving members shall fill every 
vacancy that may occur in their body, by death or resignation, at the 
earliest practical time, without unnecessary delay, and in this manner 
perpetuate this institution. It shall require a majority of two -thirds 
of the members to elect a successor to fill any vacancy that may 
occur in the membership, or to elect a member in case of the number 
being increased. 

If any member shall fail to attend two consecutive annual meet- 
ings, unless prevented by sickness or some unavoidable circumstance, 
he shall be deemed and taken as having vacated his membership, and 
a successor shall be elected, as provided for in case of death or 
resignation. 

It is expressly provided that every gift, devise or bequest re- 
ceived or accepted shall be used and enjoyed only upon the terms 
and conditions prescribed by the respective donor or devisor. 

Article 6. These articles may be amended by a three-fourths 
vote of the members at any annual meeting, or at a meeting called 
specially for that purpose upon notice to the members. No amend- 
ment shall be made to change the general objects of this Associa- 
tion, or to authorize the expenditure of any part of a gift, devise, 
or bequest, different from the intention expressed by the donor or 
devisor. 

Adopted and given under our respective hands, setting out our 
several places of residence, with the seal of this corporation affixed, 
at Terre Haute, in the State of Indiana, this tenth day of September, 
A. D. 1874. 



Articles of Association. 43 

Names of Members. Residence. 

Chauncey Rose Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. 

Charles R. Peddle Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. 

William A. Jones Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. 

Josephus Collett Newport, Vermillion County, Ind. 

Barnabas C. Hobbs Bloomingdale, Parke County, Ind. 

Demas Deming Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. 

Firmin Nippert Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. 

Ray G. Jenckes Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. 

Charles Cruft Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. 

William K. Edwards Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. 



On September 11, 1875, an amendment to the Articles of Asso- 
ciation was adopted changing the name of the Terre Haute School 
of Industrial Science to Rose Polytechnic Institute, with the adoption 
of a new corporate seal. 



The following by-laws were adopted at a meeting of the Board 
of Managers on October 10, 1874: 

1. The officers of the Board of Managers shall consist of a 
President, Vice-President, Treasurer, and Secretary, who shall dis- 
charge respectively their appropriate duties. Those elected at this 
meeting shall serve until the first Saturday in June, 1875. 

2. The annual meetings shall be held on the first Saturday in 
June of each year, when officers shall be elected for the year ensuing. 
Each officer shall serve until his successor is elected and enters upon 
his duties. 

3. Each officer shall give bond in such sum as the Board shall 
approve. 

4. These by-laws may be amended at the pleasure of the Board 
of Managers, by a three-fourths vote of the whole number. 

The first election of officers being held, resulted as follows : 
For President, Chauncey Rose. 
For Vice-President, Josephus Collett. 
For Treasurer, Demas Deming. 
For Secretary, William K. Edwards. 



DR. THOMPSON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS, 

March, 1883. 



The Rose Polytechnic Institute is a school of technology. 
To understand the functions of the school it is necessary 
to take a brief survey of the field of technical training. 
This phrase describes all those forms of training youth 
which deal with the application of art or of science to the 
industrial arts. Those schools in which designing for the 
patterns of textile fabrics, or for the decoration of wood, 
iron, pottery, gems, etc., is the principal end are called art 
schools or schools of design, of which the South Kensington 
system is the most famous example; all those in which the 
principles of physical science are studied with reference to 
their application to the solution of practical problems in 
building, machine construction, and design, or in civil engi- 
neering, are called polytechnic or technological schools. 
There is great confusion just now in the use of terms, tech- 
nical education being used to describe all that which aims 
at a directly practical end, as opposed to the education given 
at the college ; while that part of it which does not deal with 
ornament or textile design is sometimes described by the 
same term. The word technology, which formerly signified 
the terms used in the sciences, now means the application 
of the sciences to industrial ends. The term polytechnic, 
originally used to describe schools of technology, has re- 
fused to yield to the more desirable synonym, technological, 
partly because it is an easier word, and partly because it 
contains a suggestion of the many-sidedness of the subject 
which the better word lacks. There is no good word cor- 
responding to polytechnic or technological to apply to the 
persons who practice the profession indicated, and so these 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. 45 

persons are called, now as always, engineers, and the busi- 
ness engineering. A few still cling to the term scientific 
schools in speaking of these institutions. In the present 
prevailing confusion of terms the best that can be said is 
that a polytechnic school teaches technology to engineers. 
Below the grade of the polytechnic there are multitudes of 
schools and parts of schools that teach the elements of the 
mechanic arts — many of them of the greatest interest and 
importance — and around it are many institutions that 
devote themselves to industrial art; but I must deny myself 
the pleasure of discussing any of these, with the important 
collateral questions of policy that they present, and proceed 
at once to the school we have in hand — the polytechnic. 

We shall find that all schools of technology, under what- 
ever name, or with whatever special aims, present a com- 
mon system of instruction complete in itself, with strenuous 
requisitions, a logical curriculum and a sharply-defined end. 
In treating of technology, I am happily absolved from the 
duty of pointing out its importance ; that is settled by the 
establishment of this school and others like it by the men 
who endowed them. They were men whose sagacity was 
too strong to be mistaken. 

Technology is essentially a new idea; it is certainly no 
older in its present aspects than the discovery of the law of 
conservation of energy — the great idea of the present 
century. 

No discovery since that of gravitation has been so stim- 
ulating or so powerful. Its influence is incalculable. It is 
seen in the multiplication of labor-saving machinery for 
every form of work, the great array of useful inventions, 
the expansion of the system of land and ocean highways, 
and especially in the immense increase of the means for 
acquiring knowledge. 

This demand for economy of force and material has 
brought about great changes m the industrial arts; the 
apprentice system has disappeared ; the necessaries of life 



46 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

being made by machinery, manual trades are no longer 
needed for that end, and skilled handicraft is a rare accom- 
plishment. There is and there will always be a demand for 
skilled labor in the arts of building construction, in pattern 
making, and similar forms of woodwork, in die sinking and 
kindred arts that deal with the metals, and especially in 
assembling and finishing the parts of structures as they are 
delivered from machines; but this is a small demand com- 
pared with what existed when shoes, clothes, furniture, and 
tools were made by band. The mechanic of the future will 
be a machinist. To such an extent is this replacement of 
handicraft by machinery true, that we have shoemakers who 
can not make a shoe, chairmakers who can not make a 
chair, and generally artisans ignorant of the whole of any 
art. Mr. Batchelder, of North Brookfield, Mass., the 
largest shoe manufacturer in Worcester County, said that 
out of his six hundred men not more than ten could make 
a shoe. I once examined a very interesting picture of some 
pieces of iron that had been done by boys in an experimental 
forge shop ; the work seemed to be well done and creditable 
to the workmen ; but out of some seventy pieces not more 
than ten would ever be made by hand at all in actual manu- 
facturing. Another result of the economy of force is that 
attention is concentrated now more upon the principles of 
phenomena than upon the phenomena themselves. Formerly 
the only hope of finding a better or cheaper way of doing 
things lay in the chance discoveries of ingenious men — 
men looked at things from the outside in ; now it is seen 
that nothing is so fruitful and that nothing so advances 
human interests as a principle — men look at things more 
from the inside out. For nearly all mechanical ways of 
doing things were once regarded as out of the ordinary 
course of human affairs, and to be relegated, if not to the 
domain of the supernatural, at least to that of the super- 
human. The feeling toward scientific investigation as a 
means to practical ends partook of the same quality that 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. 47 

infested men's views of disease ; if typhoid fever prevailed 
in a given district, people did not look to their drains and 
wells, but flocked to the church and appointed a day of 
fasting. What were regarded as the pardonable vagaries 
of Daniel Treadwell, Rumford Professor in Harvard Uni- 
versity, turn out now to be the inventions upon which single- 
track railroads, the machinery for spinning cordage-yarn, 
the Armstrong, Blakeley, and Krupp cannon depend. I will 
venture, however, the assertion that no person in this 
audience ever heard before of these great inventions as 
Treadwell's ; they came too soon for the world to know 
them as works of genius, yet they are the first fruits of the 
new era in which great problems are solved, not by happy 
inventions of geniuses real or affected, but by the sober and 
steady application by laborious scholars of established prin- 
ciples of physics. Time would fail me to enumerate the 
influential inventions that have sprung from a similar origin. 
Who has not heard of the Siemens furnace, the Bessemer 
converter, dynamite, compressed air, and the uses of elec- 
tricity? And it must also be remarked that each of these 
inventions demands corresponding machinery of novel de- 
sign ; for another feature of the new era is the necessity of 
reconstructing old machinery in more economical forms and 
the constant call for new machinery to meet new demands. 
When a new invention is made nowadays, machinery for 
it is as important as the invention itself. Perhaps the most 
striking illustration of the change in common things which 
has been brought about by technology is the rail on which 
railway traffic is conducted; formerly it was an iron-edge 
rail, supported by chains and having more iron in the base 
than the head ; clumsy as this rail was, it was claimed to be 
the only form in which the only available metal could be 
used for the purpose; now the rail is made of steel, with 
well-defined tread, web, and base, the principal weight of 
metal in the head, where it is most needed, and every line 
subjected to the finest physical tests. To those who k-now 



48 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

how much of the best knowledge we have of physics and 
chemistry has been put, and is still put into a railroad rail, 
it seems one of the most interesting of all modern manu- 
factures. It is not wide of the mark to characterize the past 
age as one of invention, the present as one of engineering. 
The study and mastery of the principles of physical science, 
the ability to express those principles in drawing and de- 
scriptions, and to apply them to the solution of practical 
problems through machinery and handicraft, are the essen- 
tial qualities of an engineer. So that a polytechnic school, 
by whatever name called, technological, technical, or engi- 
neering, teaches technology to engineers, i. e., it teaches the 
principles of physical science and their application to the 
industrial arts. 

Engineering is the term that includes all the arts of pro- 
duction and construction which arise from the physical 
sciences. Its object is to bend the forces of nature to the 
service of man. 

The names applied to the different branches of engineer- 
ing are not always appropriate, but, in general, a civil engi- 
neer constructs public works, such as highways, railroads, 
water works, sewers, etc. : a mechanical engineer deals with 
machinery, from the original design of each part, through 
the machine shop and into the structure and to the operation 
of the structure, /. e., the machine; the chemical engineer 
applies chemistry to the manifold products that result from 
the play of chemism. Then there are numerous fields which 
the term covers : as hydraulic, steam, gas, electrical engi- 
neering. In each and all. the engineer is distinct from the 
artisan or craftsman by exactly the amount of his knowledge 
of the scientific principles which underlie the practice of his 
profession and his resulting ability to apply those principles 
to the ready and complete solution of real problems as they 
arise. 

For example : Mr. Batterson had occasion to cut a block 
of marble so as to produce a Avarped surface, for which his 



Dr. Thompson' s Inaugural Address. 49 

workmen had no patterns ; the men had great skill in stone 
cutting, but could not cut that stone. A graduate of a 
school of technology happened to be employed in the city 
schools as teacher of drawing. Hearing of the case at the 
marble yard, he tendered his services, applied the familiar 
principles of stereotomy, made patterns, and the men at once 
executed the work. Last November the Italian Government 
made comparative tests of the power of different armor 
plates to resist the shot of heavy ordnance; the plates that 
stood the test were made by Schneider, at the shops of the 
French technological school at LeCreusot. 

The bridge over the Vistula River, at Warschau, was 
built by a graduate of Carlsruhe; that over the Volga by 
English engineers; but the latest, largest, and most costly 
bridge in Russia — over the Neva — was built by graduates 
of the Imperial Technological School of St. Petersburg, and 
every piece of iron that entered into it was tested in the 
laboratories of that school. 

A few years ago it became suddenly desirable and im- 
portant to pump out the central shaft of the Hoosac Tunnel ; 
a suction pump was plainly inadmissible; the craftsmen had 
nothing to suggest; a young engineer built a small raft on 
the surface of the water in the shaft, lowered on to it a 
steam pump, set his boiler at the shaft mouth, had himself 
lowered to the raft, and alone in the darkness worked his 
pump twenty-six hours without accident and with great 
efficiency. M^en then tendered their services in abundance, 
and the problem was soon solved. 

But the air is full of modern instances of the triumphs 
of engineering skill in overcoming great natural obstacles : 
the use of the inclined plane in the zig-zag roads over which 
horses trot in safety and at ease from Alpine heights to the 
valleys below ; the application of compressed air to the two 
purposes of sinking caissons and driving machines at a great 
distance from the source of power ; the use of the friction 
clutch, the air brake, and a thousand other examples of the 
4 



5© Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

application of the familiar principles of science to the solu- 
tion of mechanical problems. In each case, however, it will 
be noticed that one may understand physics thoroughly, as 
thousands of men have understood the subject, and another 
may understand the construction of machinery, but not one 
of the triumphs of engineering above mentioned be achieved. 
The theoretical knowledge of physics and the practical com- 
mand of machinery must come together ; if this happy con- 
junction occur in one and the same man, the best results 
follow. Then the same affluent good comes forth in the 
domain of mechanics that abounded in the Middle Ages, 
where the artist and the artisan were one ; when Peter Vis- 
cher and Ouentin Matsys worked at blacksmithing, and 
Michael Angelo cut stone, and Benvenuto Cellini hammered 
silver and gold, each touching the iron, or the stone, or the 
silver, with a beauty and value that all the ages since have 
only enhanced. 

Here some one will surely interpose the fact that E. B. 
Bigelow, the inventor of the modern carpet loom, and one 
of the greatest of American inventors, could neither make 
one of his own machines nor the working drawings for it. 
His head was an amazing tangle of mechanical contrivances, 
but the draftsman and mechanic were indispensable to the 
successful evolution of them. This, of course, was a temper- 
amental matter with him. We can not change the fact that 
many inventors can not express their own ideas ; nor am I 
going to claim that any amount of training or of any other 
kind of training is likely to aid a so-called mechanical genius 
very much. Indeed, Mr. Bigelow never admitted, to me at 
least, that a course in technology would have aided him ; 
the nearest approach to such a concession was the remark, 
at the close of a busy forenoon spent in studying the Wor- 
cester school : "Well, I'll go home and consider how all this 
would have affected me had I begun here as a boy." I do 
not think he would have begun there or in any other school, 
for he was a genius in the best sense. A genius is a law 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. 51 

to himself ; the processes by which the mass of men must 
gain knowledge are strange and useless to him ; generally he 
is a poor adviser in educational questions. He can never 
be educated in any sense in which the word is understood 
by ordinary men. Still, by a knowledge of the principles of 
mechanism and the methods of expressing and applying 
those principles, the ordinary inventor would secure to his 
use the benefit of his own inventions which somebody else 
so often appropriates, and would save the Patent Office 
much of its costly and superfluous rubbish. No graduate 
of any school is at that time an engineer. The qualities of 
good judgment and efficient reason grow only in the atmos- 
phere of experience. Hence no diploma can be regarded as 
meaning anything more than that the possessor has passed 
successfully the examinations that are set at any particular 
school. Graduates should begin at the bottom of their pro- 
fession, and their school training will tell best and most 
effectively in the rate of their advancement. They will 
advance more rapidly than others along the lines which are 
determined by their natural aptitudes. 

The Almighty makes superintendents and leaders of men 
— no school can do this. But the training required for a 
superintendent must be that of his subordinates. All the 
best experience of the world sanctions this rule. A superin- 
tendent who has not had the training of the shop is as useless 
as Achilles without his weapons — he may seem and assume 
to direct and to lead, but he does not; on the other hand, 
the man who attempts to lead without natural leadership, 
however wise, is as useless as the weapons without Achilles. 

The question how men shall best be trained for engineer- 
ing was asked long ago before any practical result ensued. 

The Marquis of Worcester, imprisoned in the Tower of 
London, 1645, working industriously upon his .steam and 
water engines, cast eyes upon a lot which he could see from 
his window, and instructed his agent to buy it, intending, 
he said, as soon as he was set at libertv to erect a school 



52 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

wherein boys might learn something of the principles of the 
mechanic arts. But he was never allowed the opportunity 
to carry out his ideas. 

There is an interesting letter from President Leonard 
Hoar, of Cambridge, to Robert Boyle, in which the good 
man, after acknowledging some favors from Boyle, dis- 
closes to him some darling projects of his own about the 
improvement of the course at the University, and says : " I 
would have a large, well-sheltered garden and orchard for 
students addicted to planting; an ergasterium for mechanic 
fancies, and a laboratory chemical for those philosophers 
that by their senses would cultivate their understanding ; for 
the students to spend their times of recreation at them ; for 
reading or notions are but husky provender." Boyle did 
not encourage the President, and his project slumbered for 
two centuries, but was at last substantially realized in the 
Lawrence Scientific School. 

The first independent polytechnic school was the Ecole 
Polytechnic, in Paris, founded in 1794. The Ecole Centrale 
followed, and during the first quarter of this century similar 
schools were established all over France, Switzerland, and 
Germany. 

In this country the best appointed and, on the whole, 
the most worthy of study as far as methods go, is the Mili- 
tary Academy at West Point ; then we have the Columbia 
School of Mines at New York, the Sheffield at New Haven, 
the Rensselaer at Troy, the Institute of Technology at Bos- 
ton, the Stevens Institute at Hoboken, and many others. 
These are examples of pure and independent schools of tech- 
nology, each with a special end of its own, but possessing 
all the generic features of the class. They all arose from the 
demand for engineers in the arts of peace and of war. To 
this list must be added the State colleges of agriculture and 
the mechanic arts, several of which have made provision for 
effective teaching in engineering. The polytechnic school 
has always offered to the qualified average boy a good edu- 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. 53 

cation based on drawing, the mathematics, the living lan- 
guages and the physical sciences, tending to qualify him for 
immediate entrance upon the duties of an engineer. The 
course of study in a polj^echnic school is determined by 
long experience, and in all countries is substantially the 
same. It includes: 

Mathematics — Beginning with algebra and geometry, 
and proceeding through trigonometry, analytical and de- 
scriptive geometry, the calculus, theoretical and applied 
mechanics. 

Physics — From the elements to the solution of problems, 
sometimes with laboratory practice. 

Chemistry — With laboratory practice. 

Language — The elements of German and French (Eng- 
lish replacing one of these in European schools), and the 
mother tongue. 

Drawing — Beginning with free-hand and including per- 
spective, orthographic, and isometric projection, shades and 
shadows. 

Geology and mineralogy as far as time permits. The 
other natural-history sciences are necessarily omitted, except 
in special cases. In all these schools the instruction is given 
with a strong practical bearing, and generally the students 
learn the manipulation of the instruments used in surveying, 
and the more important of those used in physical researches. 

It is necessary to remark at this point that technological 
schools do not include schools of design. There is a great 
interest in European countries and in the United States at 
the present time in what is called industrial art, meaning 
the study of form, color, and ornament to render structures 
and manufactured goods intrinsically more beautiful, and to 
increase their value by this means. A department of draw- 
ing and design has a place in the school of technology, but 
engineering does not naturally include the work of a school 
of design. 

But polytechnic schools as they were did not meet all 



54 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

the wants of the new era. Practical men detected a lack in 
engineers who had been trained without actual contact with 
a machine shop — there was a surplus of theoretical engi- 
neers and a dearth of practically efficient ones. 

The principle of the division of labor resulted in making 
it next to impossible for a boy to find a place in any machine 
shop to learn the trade. The owner did not want him be- 
cause it could not be in any way conducive to his business 
interests to employ a person ignorant of his business; and 
if he employed him at all, he kept him on a single sort of 
piece-work, from motives of self-interest. Trades unions 
conspired to keep out apprentices from shops, and so it came 
to pass that a boy could not get a good working knowledge 
of machine-shop practice except by stealth. 

This demand for mechanical engineers with work-shop 
training, and the practical impossibility of finding a place 
for a boy in any good machine shop, led to the establishment 
of a polytechnic school in which a manufacturing machine 
shop is a prominent and thoroughly-administered feature. 
This is the school known as the Worcester Free Institute. 

This institution was organized under the influence of a 
belief that, after all that has been done in technology, there 
is still need of a system of training boys broader and 
brighter than "learning a trade," and more simple and direct 
than the so-called "fiberal education"; that while the boys 
should be thoroughly trained in all the essentials of a poly- 
technic course, they should also find a workshop open where 
they could get all the essentials of a trade; so that upon 
graduating they should have sufficient knowledge of ma- 
chinery and handicraft to enable them to earn a living while 
pushing their way up to the highest positions for which 
nature and their training had qualified them. 

It was held that not the least important of their qualifica- 
tions for high positions is a good experience of the lower 
positions. 

"It is the undoubting opinion of the managers of the 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. 55 

Institute, and of all who have watched its operation, that 
the connection of academic culture and the practical applica- 
tion of science is advantageous to both, in a school where 
these objects are started together and carried on with har- 
mony and equal prominence. The academy inspires its in- 
telligence into the work of the shop, and the shop with eyes 
open to the improvements of productive industries prevents 
the monastic dreams and shortness of vision that sometimes 
paralyze the profound learning of the college." * This 
school was opened in 1868, with the following fundamental 
ideas : 

1. That all mechanical engineers will find their account, 
in future, in going through a workshop training. 

2. This workshop instruction may precede, accompany 
or follow the intellectual training, but for many reasons it 
preferably accompanies it. 

3. The workshop instruction is best given in a genuine 
manufacturing machine shop where work is done that is to 
be sold in open market and in unprotected competition with 
the products of other shops. 

4. That in a course of three and a half years, working 
800 hours the first half year and 500 hours a year thereafter, 
a boy beginning without any knowledge of mechanics can 
acquire skill enough to offer himself at graduation as a 
journeyman and will be found on trial not inferior to those 
who have spent the entire time of three and a half years in 
a regular machine shop. 

5. That the workshop practice must be a part of every 
week's work in the institution ; that it shall be momentarily 
supervised by skilful men, and that the student must not 
expect or receive any pecuniary advantage from it. 

6. That the question who shall be a superintendent or 
foreman or engineer in designing or drafting machinery 
can not be settled in any school — that being a question to 



Worcester Catalogue. 



56 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

be determined only by actual trial ; because the discipline of 
the judgment by actual practice into which personal respon- 
sibility enters is vitally essential to a valid claim to the post 
of superintendent. Hence, it will follow that, while all 
receive the preliminary training requisite for engineering, 
many will not attain to it, but these will find a full reward 
for all their time and labor in superior intelligence as work- 
men — in being masters and not servants of the machines 
which they make or run. 

7. A seventh principle was announced when the first 
class graduated, and has been inculcated into all their suc- 
cessors, viz. : that the value of the education they have 
received will show itself in the rate of their advancement 
and will be easily detected by their employers, and that they 
should not be so much concerned, in seeking places, about 
great wages or high positions as about the chances ahead for 
advancement; indeed, there might be cases in which they 
could well afford to work a while for a bare subsistence, 
such would be the value of their experience. 

These principles have now been tested under as favorable 
conditions as could be desired for fourteen years, and this 
experience all goes to confirm them. No valid objection has 
been urged and no adverse criticism worth a moment's atten- 
tion has been heard. The expense attending the proper 
development of this plan is the only difficulty in the way of 
its general adoption ; but, within the brief period of its 
existence, the Worcester School has seen two great institu- 
tions founded on its plan, the Miller School of Virginia 
and the Rose School at Terre Haute. No argument is 
needed to prove that an engineer should have practical 
acquaintance with handicraft and with the machine shop 
in general. The great demand for men who have this quali- 
fication and the surplus of unemployed theoretical engineers, 
otherwise able and competent men, who lack it, shows that 
the point is well taken. The experience of the older coun- 
tries sustains this view. It is found in Austria, so the Baron 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. 57 

Von Eybesfeld, Minister of Public Instruction, told me, that 
there is a great excess of graduates of the polytechnic over 
the demand, and that he is now engaged in organizing a new 
kind of school in which workshop instruction shall form 
part of the course, so that the country may have some men 
for foremen and superintendents of works who are thor- 
oughly versed in the practical details of machine-shop work. 
In carrying out this new policy, the latest phase, it will be 
noticed, of technology, the great Gewerbe Museum has been 
organized and put in charge of Dr. Exner, a strikingly com- 
petent and efficient man. He has started two totally distinct 
sorts of schools ; the first is substantially a half-time school, 
in which boys from the higher common schools work half 
the day and study the other half, receiving instruction ac- 
cording to the polytechnic plan as far as the time permits; 
the course being two years, these boys do not receive as 
much instruction as the polytechnickers, but they have the 
immense advantage of practical power in the shop, which 
secures them a living and adds to their value. Every stroke 
of work in the shops is done with reference to the sale of 
the articles, and no fact was mentioned oftener, or with 
more evident satisfaction by Dr. Exner in proof of the solid 
excellence of the school, than that they sold in the first year 
a thousand gulden worth of their work. It is intended to 
multiply these schools so that they shall provide a great 
variety of mechanical practice (the two now in operation 
being devoted wholly to wood working) and to extend the 
course to four years. When this has been done there will 
be in Vienna two schools in which all the principles of the 
Worcester Institute will be adopted and applied. 

The second line along which the Austrians are moving is 
in cultivating what are known as cottage industries. This 
movement is so interesting that I shall venture to say some- 
thing about it, though it is not immediately germane to our 
purpose. There is a marked tendency in Austria to concen- 
trate population in large cities. The population of Vienna 



58 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

has grown from 800,000 to 1,200,000 within ten or twelve 
years, and other cities show a great increase. This has 
occurred without a corresponding increase in the total pop- 
ulation. The inference is, that the growth of the cities is 
depopulating the villages — an unmistakable and alarming 
fact. Inquiry into the causes of this movement has brought 
out the fact that peasants of these villages have lost the 
market for their baskets and other wares, because their 
Swiss and French neighbors, who have had abundant 
schools of industry, have devised new and more attractive 
forms for the same wares. The peasants of Austria were 
unable to compete, because, through their ignorance of 
design, they were confined to the old and unsalable forms, 
and with the fatuous haste so often seen, crowd the cities in 
the vain hope of bettering their lot. Dr. Exner, under the 
general direction of the wise and acute Minister of Public 
Instruction, has started schools for basket weaving — by 
far the most important of these household industries. Half 
of the day is devoted to learning new and better ways of 
basket weaving, and half to drawing and modeling in clay, 
the result being that the pupils learn how to do things that 
are now in demand, and are clothed with power to design 
whatever forms the future may suggest. Anybody may 
attend these schools who chooses to come to Vienna ; for 
there only can a museum of examples be gathered suf- 
ficiently ample to enable the Minister to multiply the schools 
so as to provide for other industries as well as basket 
weaving. The hope is, that the more intelligent young 
peasants will attend these schools and carry back to their 
villages the new ideas ; this being done, a check will be put 
upon the tendency of people to leave the villages, because 
they can again be prosperous and happy where thev are. 
Upon the question whether workshop instruction should 
precede, accompany, or follow the school training, opinions 
diflfer, and a full discussion of the subject is impossible 
within the limits of this address. This subject occupied the 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural ^^ddress. 59 

attention of the American Institute of Mining Engineers 
through two prolonged and intensely active sessions in 
1876, and the results are embodied in a valuable pamphlet 
which presents the views of the ablest engineers in the 
country. 

I will briefly summarize the facts and motives which 
seem to leave us practically no alternative but to incorporate 
the shop practice with the school work. Boys fitting for a 
polytechnic school can not leave the preparatory school 
younger than sixteen ; if they are to get their shop training 
before the polytechnic, they must spend three years at it, 
and at the end of the time they will be rather too old to get 
the best advantage of the school, and miss the all-important 
opportunity of applying their theoretical knowledge as they 
go along. 

If, on the other hand, boys defer the shop till after 
graduation, they will find many excuses for slighting it or 
for not doing it at all. At the age of twenty, with a good 
knowledge of drafting and well-disciplined faculties, Amer- 
ican boys would be far more likely to turn into draftsmen 
or to take their chances in business than to submit to the 
dull routine of elementary shop practice. Theoretically, 
there is much to be said in favor of this plan, for it brings 
to the workshop the trained powers of the school and makes 
the practice continuous. It is the plan of the Russians, in 
the Imperial Institute of Technology at St. Petersburg, cer- 
tainly one of the best technological schools in the world, 
where the students, after a four years' course in technology, 
with the usual holidays and vacations, return on the first 
day of September and work in the machine shops till the 
first day of the following September, ten hours a day with- 
out vacations, and the results are very satisfactory. But 
the Russians can carry out such a system because the gov- 
ernment controls the positions to which the students aspire, 
and without which they must starve, and makes the fifth 
year of practice compulsory. Very few who have had much 



6o Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

experience in teaching American boys believe that such a 
plan could be successfully adopted here. 

There are many solid, positive reasons in favor of incor- 
porating the shop practice with the intellectual discipline. 
The period of a boy's life between sixteen and twenty-one 
is the period of sharp acquisition ; ideas taken then remain 
in a special sense a part of the mental furniture forever. 
Probably no one, whose course of education is uninter- 
rupted, acquires as much as between the ages mentioned, or 
retains what he acquires as long. It is an interesting fact 
that the enthusiasm which an American boy cherishes for 
his college, an English boy feels for his school, where the 
training he most values was received. The American hur- 
rahs for Yale or Harvard — the English for Eton or Rugby. 
The same would be true here were all our boys fitted for 
college at a few large schools and fitted as well. This being 
true, shop practice has an advantage it would otherwise lose 
in coming into this period. 

Again, a man whose matured and furnished mind has laid 
hold of the strong problems of theoretical mathematics in 
school, and who finds himself on the threshold of manhood, 
does not bend himself with just the same ease as an ungrad- 
uate to the elements of machine-shop practice. There is 
some advantage, too, in beginning shop life in periods of 
five hours semi-weekly over ten hours a day; for less time 
proportionally is wasted. And, finally, a great economy of 
the precious time of the students is secured because shop 
work serves the double purpose of practice and of exercise. 

Why the school workshop should not be a shop in a 
complete sense, and not a mechanical laboratory or some 
other device for escaping the hard but necessary discipline 
of a shop, has not yet been stated. There is a difficulty in 
meeting the first cost and inevitable annual deficit, but if 
any other valid objection has been made to the plan it has 
escaped my attention. It oflFers every advantage of every 
other form of school shop, with immense additions. 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. 6i 

The advantages of a shop in which actual construction 
is made to aid in instruction are numerous ; a few only can 
be mentioned. These boys are all hoping to be engineers ; 
at least they may expect to become skilled workmen or 
draftsmen. In any event, the more the faculty of judgment 
is cultivated, and the more the boys realize the nature and 
extent of the difficulties that actual practice presents, of 
which the best theoretical knowledge gives no hint, the 
nearer they are to attaining the end they seek. We have 
seen that no graduate of a school is an engineer, but is in 
the best way to become one. Why not advance him as far 
as possible? If now the student's comprehension of the 
principles of engineering is clear, and his weekly practice 
enables him to see those principles in action under conditions 
as like as possible to those which he will meet in real life, 
his entrance upon the life of an engineer will be an expan- 
sion of his school life, and not an abrupt transition from it 
to a new mode of life. The more his work is subjected to 
the inexorable tests of business, and the more he feels in 
the use of his materials just the same responsibility that 
rests upon an actual workman, the better he is. He must 
make the things that are to be used, and not those con- 
trived to suit the peculiarities of his temperament, the exi- 
gencies of his situation, or the mere purpose of instruction. 
There is nothing that a student needs to make in a school 
workshop from which he can not gain something if he puts 
the article into its final serviceable form. 

Applying the stern test of serviceableness is the only 
way to know whether the things that have been made were 
worth the making or not, and is the only way to correct any 
tendency to visionary structure that is so apt to infect a 
school workshop, and to prevent that sublimation of com- 
mon sense which is apt to ensue when responsibility for the 
correct use of costly materials is removed. 

There is no merit or charm in work, considered merely 
as work ; to work to produce something that some one else 



62 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

wants and can not make for himself, and is able to pay for, 
is the stimulus of industry. All work in school shops or 
any other will ultimately obey this law, or else it will 
evaporate into exercise or sport. 

Workshops into which the principle of construction does 
not enter are liable to exalt the importance of the purely 
literary aspect of mechanical knowledge. It is possible to 
know the five hundred and seven mechanical movements, 
to know the best cutting angles of saws, files, and edge tools, 
and not be a mechanic or be in the way of becoming one. 
This kind of knowledge is useful and attractive and desir- 
able when it is not offered as a substitute for the dexterity 
that can be obtained only by the use of the tools. It will 
not do to regard our ancestors, the skilled mechanics, as 
fools. There is still but one way to learn to file, and that is 
to file. The most expert filer I ever saw could not write his 
name. I do not think he could have filed any better had this 
simple accomplishment been added to his merits; he would 
have been a better and a happier and a more useful man 
with more knowledge, but he did that one thing as well as 
it could be done at that time. 

But this thought instantly suggests another of the great- 
est importance, viz. : handicraft occupies a constantly nar- 
rowing place in the mechanic arts ; machinery a constantly 
widening one. Every year adds to the number of trades 
from which the machinist has driven the craftsman. It is 
clear, then, that no training of boys for the life of mechanics 
is complete which does not make them familiar with ma- 
chinery and machine construction. 

There is one demand sometimes made upon the school 
shop which is unjust, namely, that it should pay its way. 
How can it pay its way when so large a part of its force is 
spent in teaching boys? If so many machine shops in this 
country, fitted up and managed with especial reference to 
money making, fail in business, or only make the ends meet 
by the most painful efforts, how can a shop one-half of 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. 63 

whose effective force is spent in teaching boys, who can not 
for the first half of their time produce anything salable, 
hope to pay its way? Teaching in school shops costs as 
teaching elsewhere costs. 

In the Rose School the following plan will be attempted ; 

1. The course of study will be four years. 

2. The practice will be concentrated in the first year 
and diminished in the fourth, so as to allow time for more 
instruction in machine design. 

3. While the same subjects will be taught, perhaps 
more attention will be given to the humanities. 

4. A different view will be taken here of the profession 
of civil engineering from the one usually held. The young 
men who propose to be civil engineers will spend a part of 
their practice time in the machine shop. 

Civil engineering can not easily be separated from me- 
chanical, because the most important business of a civil 
engineer nowadays is not surveying and mapping, but bridge 
and building construction, the setting of water-wheels and 
other engines, and such like undertakings which involve a 
knowledge of mechanics, so that two or three of the best 
so-called civil engineers in the country have given it as their 
judgment that a course in mechanics, including workshop 
instruction, is the best way to prepare for the practice of 
civil engineering. 

But, on the other hand, the building of new highways 
and railroads still goes on, and calls for a certain number of 
young men who are expert in the use of the transit and level 
(especially in railroad problems), who know how to draw 
and who understand mensuration ; hence, training for this 
sort of employment can not be neglected in a polytechnic 
school. It would conduce to clearness to call such work 
topographical engineering. 

An added consideration of some weight in favor of re- 
taining a distinct department of topographical engineering 
is, that many of the young men who frequent technological 



64 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

schools have no taste or aptitude for mechanical work, and 
some have not the requisite physical vigor for it, whose 
fitness for success in field work or in mapping is unques- 
tionable. But it will be clearly advantageous to all to have 
some workshop practice. No changes will be made except 
such as reason and a large experience show to be desirable 
and advantageous to the student. 

But a healthy child wants food. An adequate beginning 
must be sustained by continual contributions in order to 
good progress. We want the sympathy and patient consid- 
eration of the community. We want books, apparatus, and 
models constantly in excess of the resources of our funds. 
The examples of our founder are worthy of attention and 
imitation. 

The machine shop is ready ; a reference library will soon 
be on the shelves ; a cabinet of minerals is on hand ; ample 
models are ready for the proper equipment of rooms for 
drawing and design ; the bricks for a new building for a 
chemical laboratory are now lying in the yard : apparatus 
for chemistry, physics, and field work is in the building or 
provided for; commodious recitation and lecture rooms are 
ready when wanted. 

I hope also, in the course of time, to collect models and 
examples of the best mechanical devices, and also of leading 
manufactures. These collections of models play a very 
important part in European technological schools, and for 
obvious reasons. Indeed, the outlay in some cases is enor- 
mous and would be insupportable did not manufacturers 
find their account in placing here examples of their best 
work. At Chemnitz I saw two examples of this class : one 
a perfect working model of the Hartman locomotive, which 
cost $3,000, and the other a large working model of the 
Merkel stationary engine, worth $250 — each presented by 
the manufacturer. 

In order to any effective use of these resources two 
things are vitally requisite : good teaching before the stu- 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural .-Address. 65 

dents enter the Institute and good teaching afterward. It is, 
on the whole, a mistake to suppose that fitting for the poly- 
technic is essentially different from fitting for any form of 
manly labor in this world which depends upon a sound, 
instructed brain. Technically, boys will be examined for 
the present in English grammar, geography, United States 
history, arithmetic, and algebra as far as quadratic equa- 
tions ; but these are the essentials of any success at all in 
the polytechnic ; the more a boy knows before he comes, the 
broader and deeper his success will be. The polytechnic is 
a professional school, and must concentrate itself upon its 
own special work ; but the broader the base upon which it 
builds, the more massive the structure that can be reared. 
A^^^ether the polytechnic course shall rear an obelisk or a 
pyramid depends on the preparation of its students. 

Men are born as ignorant as they ever were, and the 
same steps from ignorance to the elements of all knowledge 
must be taken by every one. This work usually occupies 
the first fifteen years of every human life. 

It is very desirable that every boy who presents himself 
for admission here should have at least a full high school 
course ; if he can not get that, let him make the closest pos- 
sible approach to it. Youth once passed, the opportunity 
for acquiring the rudiments of knowledge is usually gone 
forever. And eye hath not yet seen nor ear heard a sadder 
thing than the lament of a man who, amid the emergencies 
of life, suddenly confronts his need of some simple knowl- 
edge which he might have got for the asking in his youth. 

The greatest solicitude will be ever cherished here about 
the quality of the teaching. It is not intended that students 
shall find more assiduous or competent teaching in the 
various branches of the course than will be constantly found 
in this Institute. 

But there is one peril and annoyance to which the new 
polytechnic is subject: handicraft in school, never having 
been used before except for reformatory purposes, the im- 



66 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

pression gets abroad that the institution must lower its 
intellectual standing to raise the handicraft. I do not know 
an institution in this country except West Point where boys 
achieve as much good work or are better prepared intellec- 
tually for effective service as engineers than they are at 
Worcester. We propose to give the same training here. 

If what has now been said seems to have a too exclusive 
bearing upon the study and practice of mechanics, it is 
because this is the leading department, and presents the only 
novel and difficult features of our enterprise ; but there will 
be departments of civil engineering, physics, chemistry, and 
design organized on the same general plan ; the studies will 
be the same in all departments — the practice different 
according to the purpose for which it is intended. These 
departments naturally group themselves; for chemistry, 
physics, and drawing must be taught to mechanics, and the 
additional expense required to give practice in each of these 
departments to those who prefer it to mechanical practice 
is justified by the demand. 

Later in our enterprise a department of mining engineer- 
ing may be organized ; and in the department of physics 
special attention will be given to electrical engineering. All 
this will come about in due time. It will be observed, how- 
ever, that only one kind of practice can be profitably taken 
by any student during the course. Full particulars in regard 
to all these matters will be seasonably given. 

If this account of the origin and method of the techno- 
logical school be correct, it is obvious that it is no longer an 
experiment, that it fills a gap, that it is a natural, inevitable, 
every way desirable and welcome concomitant of modern 
civilization. It does for the industrial arts what the colleges 
have so well done for the learned professions by fitting men 
in a carefully planned course of study for the intelligent 
discharge of their duties. 

The polytechnic seeks to work as an ally of the old 
classical college, and hopes that her old friend may find 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. dj 

something to her advantage in studying the economy of 
force which prevails in the methods and results of the new- 
comer. The polytechnic does not sustain any organic rela- 
tion to the college such as the academy has on the one hand 
and the professional school on the other ; yet in a deeper 
sense it sustains a very important relation to it. Whatever 
tends to increase or foster the desire for knowledge tends 
at once to foster all institutions whose object is to promote 
knowledge. Every new institution tends to increase the 
interest in the old — provided the old are worthy. Of 
course, I do not mean by "new institutions" repetitions of 
old types, such as the multiplication of small colleges, for 
this is generally an evil rather than a good (except in new 
States), but I mean new institutions, like polytechnic 
schools, that strike their roots into new soils and make what 
was once a desert blossom as the rose. 

Technical schools have not aflfected the colleges unfavor- 
ably in the matter of attendance ; for, in spite of the crowds 
that have flocked to their doors, the classes in the colleges 
have steadily increased. More new colleges have been 
founded during the period of the rise of polytechnic schools 
in this country than in any similar period before ; the old 
colleges have received munificent increase in their resources 
and have more than held their own in the matter of attend- 
ance, and all the students attending the State universities in 
the course of liberal arts may be reckoned as a solid addition 
to the ranks of the college. 

For obvious reasons the polytechnic school flourishes 
best when separate and distinct from the college; but the 
more it flourishes the more it will directly benefit the college 
by providing for the instruction of the youth who demand 
the so-called "practical courses," and thus leave the college 
free to pursue her own legitimate work. Toward all forms 
of knowledge technology is hospitable, and toward all who 
know, engineers are affectionate. The study of science in 
a teachable and reverent spirit does not beget intolerance or 



68 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

bigotry. Science inculcates hatred of pretense, and is intol- 
erant of dogmatism ; but, mindful of the counsel of her 
greatest discipline, she utters the solemn words of Bacon : 

"This also we humbly beg that human beings may not 
prejudice such as are divine, neither that from the unlocking 
of the gates of sense, and the kindling of a greater light, 
anything of incredulity or intellectual night may arise in our 
mind toward Divine mysteries." 

The day has forever passed when the old idea that the 
study of Latin, Greek, and the humanities is the only educa- 
tion. The definition of an educated man will bear still more 
expansion, but it has broadened rapidly during the last 
quarter century. *"The vulgar argument that a study of 
the classics is necessary to make a gentleman is beneath 
contempt. Honor and gentleness are not a dye or a lacquer, 
but warp and woof. It is true that a certain social consid- 
eration attaches to persons who are supposed to know Latin 
or Greek, whether they are gentlemen or not"; but society 
is rapidly adapting itself to the new era in which men and 
women are to be taken for what they are, and not what they 
are said to be. 

It is an unique and interesting fact that most of the 
polytechnic schools have been founded and endowed by 
private benefactors. The colleges, seminaries, and acad- 
emies have depended at times upon legislative fostering. 
Hardly a session of a State legislature passed prior to 1873 
without considering some bill in aid of an educational insti- 
tution. But the strong point about polytechnic schools is, 
that the enormous expense of founding and administering 
them has been provided in most cases by individual citizens 
who knew their value. The Ecole Centrale in Paris, next 
to the Polytechnic the best in France, was the joint product 
of the brains of Dumas, Pictet, and Ollivier and the pocket 
of their friend Lavallee. who paid all the expenses of start- 



President Eliot. 



Dr. Thompson's Inaugural Address. 69 

ing and running the school for five years, and at the end of 
that time presented it to the government. In this country 
Lawrence at Cambridge, Van Rensselaer at Troy, Sheffield 
at New Haven, Stevens at Hoboken, Boynton, Washburn, 
and Salisbury at Worcester, Rose at Terre Haute, Case at 
Cleveland, and many others, have said in tones which many 
generations will hear what they think of the value and im- 
portance of technical education, and have made the State 
the recipient and not the nurse of their bounty. 

In the city of Glasgow, nothing impresses a traveler 
more amid all its teeming industries than two monuments, 
one of great height and majesty to John Knox, the other 
a simple tablet in the wall of the cathedral to the memory 
of George Bailey, who founded unsectarian schools and 
libraries for the operative classes. 

The city of Terre Haute will cherish none of her treas- 
ures longer than the memory of her princely benefactor; 
but her choicest heritage is the inalienable right to put upon 
his monument with a change of name the inscription which 
can be read at the grave of Copernicus in Warschau : 

To Chaunc^y Rose, Our Frllow Citizen. 



BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



Colonel William K. Edwards. 

Colonel W. K. Edwards was born near Zanesville, Ky., 
in 1820, and died in his room in the Terre Haute House 
September 26, 1878. He was a graduate of the Indiana 
State University and -the Transylvania University of Lex- 
ington, Ky. In 1843 he came to Terre Haute and began 
the practice of the law. He took an active interest in public 
affairs, and was several times elected to the State Legisla- 
ture, serving one term as Speaker. He was the first Mayor 
of Terre Haute, under city organization. He was asso- 
ciated with the management of the T. H. & I. and T. H. 
& E. Railroads and with banking interests. He was Trustee 
of the Indiana State University, and at the time of his death 
President of the Board. In all public affairs he was active 
and influential. 

For many years Colonel Edwards was the agent, attor- 
ney, and trusted friend of the founder of the Polytechnic 
Institute. Mr. Rose consulted him almost daily on business 
matters, and he was his chosen instrument for such investi- 
gations as were needed in reference to contemplated bene- 
factions. When his advancing years admonished him that 
he must restrict his business activities, he began with in- 
creasing interest to turn his attention to formulating plans 
for so disposing of his fortune that it might prove of the 
greatest benefit to the community in which it was acquired 
and to the people and their descendants among whom he had 
lived as neighbor and friend, he discussed his plans with 
Colonel Edwards and directed him to secure such informa- 
tion and do such work as it required. Colonel Edwards was, 



Board of Managers. 71 

in fact, Mr. Rose's business agent in many matters, chiefly 
of this sort, and it is to be said to his credit that he served 
the master spirit with-such fidelity and ability as to always 
retain the confidence and esteem of his elder friend. He 
was present at most of the conferences in the historic library 
office room of the Rose home, when the matters of founding 
a scientific school and an orphans' home and a free dis- 
pensary were maturing, and was a member of the Poly- 
technic Board from the first until his death. Every task 
assigned to him in this connection he executed with fidelity. 
Colonel Edwards was a man of varied interests. In 
addition to his professional duties and public positions, he 
was for many years an active and influential member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, filling in turn all the 
offices in the local lodge, and holding many high places in 
the Grand Lodge and Encampment. On the occasion of his 
funeral, Sunday, September 29, 1878, there was a notable 
gathering of representative and distinguished men from all 
over Indiana, who had met and served with him in some 
public station. In his death the Rose Polytechnic lost an 
earnest friend. 

Gene;rai, Charles Cruft. 

General Charles Cruft, eldest son of John F. and Eliza- 
beth A. Cruft, was born in Terre Haute, January 12, 1826. 
He died at his home in this city March 23, 1883. 

Despite the disparity in their ages, he was an intimate 
friend of Chauncey Rose, who appointed him one of the 
original members of the Board of Managers of the Rose 
Polytechnic Institute, and relied greatly on his judgment in 
the formulation of the plans for its establishment. 

Charles Cruft received his early education in Terre 
Haute, the latest of his boyhood instructors being Rev. 
Robert B. Croes, rector of St. Stephen's Church. He 
entered Wabash College at Crawfordsville, graduated in 
1843, and in 1846 received the honorary degree of Master 



^2 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

of Arts. For a few months succeeding his return from 
college he was an assistant in the academy of the Rev. 
Mr. Croes. 

Later he obtained a position as bookkeeper in the local 
branch of the old State Bank of Indiana, of which Judge 
Demas Deming was President. During this period he 
studied law, having as his preceptor the late W. D. Griswold. 

After a brief period of legal practice, General Cruft 
was chosen President of the St. Louis, Alton & Terre Haute 
Railway Company, and held the position for several years. 
In 1 86 1 he formed a law partnership with John P. Baird, 
which partnership continued until the death of Colonel 
Baird in 1881. 

In i860 he purchased the Terre Haute Express, which 
he owned for a number of years, though not actively en- 
gaged in its publication. 

In September, 1861, he enlisted in the army, and was 
appointed Colonel of the Thirty-first Indiana Volunteers. 
He served throughout the war, and rose to the rank of 
Major-General. 

During the closing years of his life, after the death of 
his partner, he retired from the active practice of his pro- 
fession and devoted a large portion of his time to the Rose 
Polytechnic Institute, . with which he had been identified 
from its inception, having materially assisted Mr. Rose in 
maturing the plans which culminated in its foundation. 

Samue;l S. Early. 

Samuel Stockwell Early was elected a member of the 
Board of Managers of the Rose Polytechnic Institute 
November 2, 1878, to succeed William K. Edwards, de- 
ceased. He was at once elected Secretary, filling the 
vacancy caused by the death of his predecessor. His serv- 
ices, as a member and Secretary, were invaluable, and he 
was especially active in the difficult task of starting the 
Institute, making several trips East in connection with the 



Board of Managers. 73 

selection of a President and of other members of the Faculty 
and in securing the equipment. 

Mr. Early was born at Flemingsburg, Ky., July 12, 1827, 
the only child of Jacob D. and Mary (Stockwell) Early. 
In 1833 he came to Terre Haute with his father, who, up 
to his death in 1869. was one of the leading business men 
of the town. In 1841 he was sent to Asbury University, 
graduating with high honors. In 1849, after a few years 
in his father's counting room, he went abroad, for a stay 
of fifteen months, devoting his time to the study of art and 
literature. Upon his return he engaged in business with his 
father. He was married in 1855 to Miss Andrews, of Balti- 
more, daughter of General T. P. Andrews, who became 
Paymaster-General during the Civil War. Mr. Early and 
his wife went abroad a few years afterward, and traveled 
extensively in Europe and Asia Minor. 

For a few years he was a director and later President 
of the Prairie City Bank. In 1864 he was elected President 
of the Board of Trustees of St. Agnes Hall, a female college 
in Terre Haute. In 1871 he went to Baltimore, Md., and 
was one of the editors of the Baltimore Bulletin, a weekly 
journal devoted to literature and art, and during this period 
he won high distinction as a writer and art critic, and was 
elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society. 
Returning to Terre Haute to reside in 1876, he at once took 
a permanent position in social and business circles, though 
not actively engaged in business. 

On his election to the Board of Managers of the Rose 
Polytechnic Institute, he devoted a large part of his time 
to furthering its interests. Up to the time of his death, 
which occurred suddenly September 18, 1884, he contributed 
largely to its success, his life work coming to an end just 
as the Institute began its career. One of his sons and his 
namesake graduated in the Class of 1885. 



74 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

RoBieRT S. Cox. 

Robert S. Cox was born at Zanesville, Ohio, February 
7, 1833, and died at his home in Terre Haute November 
18, 1886. 

He came to Terre Haute in 1855 and entered into part- 
nership with his father, Robert S. Cox, Sr., in the wholesale 
grocery business. His father died in 1864, but the business 
was continued as before until 1870, when it was merged into 
the firm of Hulman & Cox. His great executive capacity 
and sound views on business materially assisted in the devel- 
opment of this great establishment. In 1882 he bought a 
one-third interest in the Terre Haute Car Works, and was 
the directing head of that large enterprise at the time of 
his death. 

Mr. Cox was a man of broad views on education, and 
his connection with the Rose Polytechnic Institute as a 
member of the Board of Managers enabled him to render 
service that was as congenial to him as it was valuable to 
the school. Faithful in attendance on the meetings, never 
missing when in the city, he brought to the discharge of 
the duties of the position a ripe judgment and keen interest. 
A son and namesake later became a member of the Board, 
serving until he removed from the city; and two sons, 
Frank P., of the Class of '87, now with the General Electric 
Company, of Lynn, Mass., and John S., of the Class of '91, 
a resident of Terre Haute, graduated from the Institute. 

During the earlier portion of his extended connection 
with the Institute, many matters arose in regard to which 
there were no precedents. A comparatively new field was 
under exploration, the lines of education were reaching out 
in new directions, new problems were constantly arising and 
pressing for solution. On all these matters his associates 
relied greatly on the soundness of his judgment, a marked 
characteristic of his mental equipment. Though many inter- 
ests claimed his attention, it was always possible to enlist his 
services when the welfare of the Institute was concerned. 




Firm IN Nippert. 



Board of Managers. 75 



FiRMIN NiPPERT. 

Firmin Nippert was a trusted friend of Chauncey Rose 
for many years, and so, when the plans for establishing a 
Polytechnic Institute were under consideration, he was con- 
sulted, becoming one of the members of the original Board, 
organized September 10, 1874. From that time until his 
death, November 3, 1889, he missed no meeting of the 
Board when he was in town and physically able to be 
present. To the business in hand he brought an ardent 
desire to do his full duty, intense interest in the Institute, 
and an unflagging purpose to carry out the wishes of his 
friend, the founder of the school. Upon his shoulders fell 
much work, and it was willingly borne. 

Firmin Nippert was born September 25, 1819, at Guin- 
lange, France, one of a large family. His father, Bernard 
Nippert, was a teacher. 

Firmin came to the United States in 1839, landing at 
New Orleans. For there he went to Portland, Ky. In turn 
he lived for a short time at Springfield, Salem, and Potoka, 
all in Indiana, and in 1844 came to Terra Haute, which was 
thereafter, until his death, his home. From 1844 to 1863 
he was engaged in merchandising. Not actively engaged m 
business from 1863 to 1869, he went to Europe for an 
extended stay. 

In 1869 he became connected with the nail works, and 
managed its afifairs very successfully, continuing in the 
position until 1888, when he resigned and went to the Pacific 
Coast for a stay of several months. 

Thereafter he did not actively engage in business, but 
devoted his time to caring for his diversified property inter- 
ests and to work in behalf of the Rose Polytechnic Institute, 
toward which he contributed both time and money. 



76 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

JOSEPHUS COLLETT. 

Josephus Collett was born in Vermillion County, Indiana, 
a son of Stephen S. and Sarah ( Groenendyke) Collett, 
August 17, 1832. He died in Terre Haute February 13, 
1893. He attended Wabash College for three years, but 
was unable to complete the course owing to ill health. For 
a time he engaged in stock dealing, merchandising, and 
pork packing, in Vermilion County. But he found the 
occupation for which he was especially fitted when backed 
by Chauncey Rose; he built the Evansville, Terre Haute & 
Chicago Railroad from Terre Haute to Danville, 111. This 
was the real beginning of his association with Mr. Rose, 
which grew into warm friendship and endured until the end. 
Mr. Collett built and managed this road until he leased it 
to the Chicago & Eastern Illinois road, of which it is now a 
part. Later he built the Genessee Valley Railroad of New 
York, also the Otter Creek Valley Railroad through Vigo 
and Clay Counties, Indiana. He served as Superintendent 
of the Nevada Central Railroad for two years, and became 
President and General Manager of a railroad in Texas. 
His interests in manufacturing, mining, and industrial enter- 
prises were many and varied, and to them all he brought 
indefatigable industry and a comprehensive knowledge of 
details. Mr. Rose found in him a congenial spirit. In 
many mental attributes the men were alike. Mr. Rose 
counseled with him in regard to the proposed Scientific 
School, found him keenly interested, and appointed him a 
member of the original Board. Mr. Collett was once Presi- 
dent of the Board of Managers under Mr. Rose's presi- 
dency, and succeeded to the presidency when Mr. Rose laid 
down the office shortly before his death. Mr. Collett, as 
President of the Board, labored in and out of season for 
the welfare of the school. He knew how dear it was to his 
dead friend, of whose estate he was one of the executors. 
In the erection of the buildings and in their equipment and 
in all the work incident to the establishment of the school 




JOSEPHUS COLLETT. 



Board of Managers. 77 

he was profoundly interested, and to it he devoted a good 
portion of his time. Meetings of the Board were held in his 
office. When it came to the selection of a President and 
other members of the Faculty, he made several trips to the 
East with Mr. Early, Judge Mack, and others. Indeed, 
during the afternoon of his life, the Rose Polytechnic Insti- 
tute seemed to interest and concern him more than his 
private affairs. And when he died, it was found that he 
had remembered it in his will, leaving it a bequest of 
$75,000. 

Recognition of this gift was later shown by the Board 
of Managers in naming the Chair of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing the Josephus CoJlett Chair of Mechanical Bngineering, 
and directing that it always thereafter be thus designated 
in the annual catalogues. 

Geology and archaeology greatly interested him for many 
years, and. he devoted much time and many thousands of 
dollars to the collecting of geological and archaeological 
specimens. This splendid cabinet, probably the finest private 
collection in the country, containing over 14,000 specimens, 
he gave to the Rose Polytechnic Institute, where it is held 
and where it is hoped it may be rendered more available for 
study when the Institute shall be able to provide it with 
adequate room for its proper display. Mr. Collett's name 
is perpetuated in Terre Haute by a park that he gave to the 
city, but his private benefactions were numberless, though 
only a fraction of them ever became known, for he was one 
of those rare men who do good not that they may be seen 
of men. 

Charles R. Peddle. 

Charles R. Peddle was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Octo- 
ber 5, 1820, and died at his home in Terre Haute April 19, 
1893. A portion of his youth was spent at an excellent 
school at Plainfield, Conn. 

His early fondness was for mechanical pursuits ; he was 



78 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

the very type of manhood for the development of which the 
Rose Polytechnic was intended. Had that school been in 
existence, he would no doubt have availed himself of the 
advantages of its course. As it was, he was active in his 
mature life in its organization, equipment, and launching 
forth. He saw a son graduate, afterward to become a mem- 
ber of its Faculty; a daughter is Registrar of the Institute. 

Denied the benefit of a professional career, such as Rose 
provided, for there were no such schools in that day, he 
began in a practical way as an apprentice in the machine 
shop of Norris & Son, in Philadelphia. 

From there he went to Reading, Pa., and in 1849 
accepted a position on Indiana's first railroad, that from 
Madison to Indianapolis. 

April I, 1 85 1, he met Mr. Rose by appointment at the 
Astor House, New York, and at that time there began a 
business connection and a personal acquaintance that 
ripened into close friendship and continued to the end of 
the life of the elder man. 

To Mr. Peddle was assigned the task of bringing from 
Boston to Indiana four locomotives, to be used in the con- 
struction and operation of the Terre Haute & Indianapolis 
Railroad, then building. Two of them were brought to 
Terre Haute by canal from Toledo ; the other two by canal 
to Cincinnati, thence by river to Madison, and then by rail 
to Indianapolis. 

From that time to his death Mr. Peddle was identified 
with the T. H. & I. Railroad, having charge of the loco- 
motives and machinery during the road construction, and 
becoming Master Mechanic. Upon his judgment in all 
matters relating to the mechanical equipment and operation 
of the road Mr. Rose relied, for he realized that in him he 
had found a man who knew what to do and how to do it. 

During the many years of their intimate business connec- 
tion they came to a mutual recognition of the necessity for 
men mentally and physically trained for the mechanic arts. 




Charles R. Peddle. 



Board of Managers. 79 

Out of these experiences grew the conferences that led 
to the plans for a school of industrial science. Naturally, 
Mr. Peddle became a member of the first Board, and had 
an important part in formulating and in afterward carrying 
out the plans. His heart was in the work, and he gave it 
an increasing portion of his attention, leaving nothing he 
could do undone. And to his faithful efforts much of its 
success is due. 

In September, 1884, he succeeded Mr. Early as Secre- 
tary of the Board of Managers, and served in this capacity 
until his death. As member of the Shop Committee he gave 
liberally of his time to visiting it and aiding in its admin- 
istration. 

William Mack. 

Judge William Mack, to use the title by which he was 
known during the later part of his life, was born in Ham- 
ilton County, Ohio, September 29, 1827, and died in Terre 
Haute May 19, 1898. 

His early education was received in the country schools 
of Butler County, his father being a farmer. Later he 
attended Farmers' College, then studied law at the New 
York State and National Law School at Ballston Springs, 
N. Y. He was admitted to the bar of New York in 1850, 
but afterward attended the Cambridge Law School. 

He first located in 185 1 at Grand Rapids, Mich., but 
after a few months removed to Columbus, Ind., then to 
Bloomfield, from which town he moved to Terre Haute, 
his residence until his death. 

He became one of the foremost members of the bar. and 
served with honor and distinction as Judge of the Circuit 
Court. 

Elected to the State Legislature, he became Speaker of 
that body. He was a public-spirited citizen, active in all 
affairs of general interest, and spent much time in Europe. 

Fond of literature, he was instrumental in organizing the 



8o Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Terre Haute Literary Club, and continued to be one of its 
most active members. In October, 1877, he became a mem- 
ber of the Board of Managers of the Rose Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, succeeding Mr. Rose. From that time until his death 
he identified himself thoroughly with its interests. 

No meeting ever was held that did not record him pres- 
ent if he was in the city. Several times he was one of those 
who visited other institutions and individuals in the difficult 
work of securing the men who were to constitute the Fac- 
ulty. At all times and on all occasions he visited the school, 
became acquainted with the students, and concerned himself 
in their welfare. 

Up to the very end the Rose Polytechnic Institute was 
near and dear to him, and to him much of its early success 
was due. 

Richard Wigginton Thompson. 

Richard W. Thompson was born June 9, 1809, in Cul- 
pepper County, Virginia, and died at his home in Terre 
Haute, February 9, 1900. 

His early education was obtained in the schools of the 
neighborhood, but his father's home was frequented by the 
prominent men of the time, and there a fondness for public 
affairs and history and the law was early acquired. At an 
early age he made a trip on horseback to Tennessee, and 
later, on arriving at his majority, he went to Louisville, and 
from there to Bedford, Ind., where he clerked in a store, 
taught school, studied law, and entered into practice. Dur- 
ing the thirteen years of his residence in Bedford he was 
elected a member of the lower branch of the Legislature 
twice and of the State Senate once, and was elected to and 
served one term in Congress with great credit. At the expi- 
ration of his term in Congress, he moved in 1843 to Terre 
Haute, which was ever thereafter his home. In 1847 he 
was again elected to Congress. Among his colleagues was 
Abraham Lincoln. Although actively participating in every 




William J\1ack. 



Board of Managers. 8i 

political contest, both in Indiana and other States (for his 
fame as an orator was national), he never thereafter per- 
mitted his friends to nominate him for an active political 
office. His marked preference, so far as he was personally 
concerned, was for private life. 

But it is known that he declined a tender of the appoint- 
ment as Secretary of State, later that of Minister to Austria 
by President Taylor, of General Solicitor of the Land Office 
by President Fillmore, of Judge of the Court of Claims by 
President Lincoln, a life position, and of Examiner of the 
Central Railroad. Indeed, he expended more effort to keep 
out of office than most men do to get office, so decided was 
his preference for private life. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War he was much in Wash- 
ington and at the State Capital in conference with President 
Lincoln and Governor Morton. His law practice was laid 
aside and he accepted an appointment ; was Provost Marshal, 
and organized and drilled the Seventy-first, Eighty-fifth, and 
Ninety-seventh Regiments at Camp Dick Thompson. 

After the close of the war he served as Collector of 
Internal Revenue and Judge of the Circuit Court by appoint- 
ment. 

At a still later period he was Secretary of the Navy in 
the Cabinet of President Hayes, resigning a few months 
before the close of the administration to accept the chair- 
manship of the American Committee of the Panama Canal 
Company. 

For a period of twenty-five years he was General Coun- 
sel of the T. H. & I. Railroad, continuing with it after it 
became merged into the Vandalia System, under the presi- 
dency of his lifelong friend, William R. McKeen. 

Colonel Thompson, as he was called for many years, 
was an omnivorous but discriminating reader, and became a 
writer of notable books on politics and religion. His book 
of Reminiscences is a valuable contribution to the history of 
the country. 
6 



82 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Early in his career in Terre Haute he became associated 
with Mr. Rose, and the intimacy was close and cordial ; and 
of all the high positions he held, it is doubtful if he prized 
any more than his membership on the Board of Managers 
of the Rose Polytechnic Institute, of which he was Presi- 
dent at the time of his death. He was profoundly interested 
in everything that concerned the young. Doing things for 
them seemed to renew his youth, and he devoted to his duties 
in connection with the Polytechnic, as well as to those of 
the Rose Orphans' Home, and of the State Normal School, 
of which he was at one time a trustee, a very large part of 
his time. He always attended the Commencement exercises, 
and his eloquent words in addressing the students will be 
long remembered by those whose large privilege it was to 
hear him. 

His death was a loss to the community, the common- 
wealth, and the country. 

WiLUAM A. Jones. 

William A. Jones was the first President of the Indiana 
State Normal School. Under his direction the curriculum 
of that school for the training of teachers was mapped out 
and put in successful operation. While engaged in the work 
he made the acquaintance of Mr. Rose, and so strongly was 
the latter impressed with the character and attainments of 
Mr. Jones that when he came to formulate the plans for the 
Polytechnic he wanted him to become one of the original 
Board of Managers. In this capacity he served with charac- 
teristic energy and ability. But before the Polytechnic re- 
ceived its first students, Mr. Jones, owing to failing health, 
felt compelled to resign the presidency of the Normal 
School. He then went to Iowa, where several years after- 
ward he died. 



Board of Managers. 83 

Barnabas C. Hobbs. 

Barnabas C. Hobbs was born near Salem, Washington 
County, Indiana, October 4, 181 5, and died at Bloomingdale, 
Parke County, Indiana, June 22, 1892. 

His early education was received in the schools of the 
neighborhood, and especially at the County Seminary. 
Later, going to the Cincinnati College, he received instruc- 
tion in mathematics under Prof. C. M. Mitchell, the eminent 
geographer. He taught school at Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, and 
at Richmond, Ind. In 1847 he became Superintendent of 
the school established by the Society of Friends, of which 
he was a member, at Richmond. This school later became 
Earlham College. He moved to Parke County, Indiana, 
April 8, 185 1, and entered upon his duties as President of 
Bloomingdale Academy, which he held for more than fifteen 
years. Upon the establishment of the State Normal School 
in 1865, he was appointed one of the Trustees. In 1866 he 
became President of Earlham College, and in 1868 was 
elected State Superintendent of Public Instruction. For 
many years he was an intimate friend of Mr. Rose, who 
conferred with him in regard to many matters and who 
appointed him a member of the original Board of Managers 
of the school, now known as the Rose Polytechnic Institute. 
His long connection with educational institutions made his 
services very valuable, and it was with great regret that his 
removal from this part of the State made it necessary for 
him to discontinue his membership. 

Alumni Representatives. 

The Alumni of the Rose Polytechnic Institute have ever 
shown themselves enthusiastically loyal to its interests. This 
loyalty has found expression in manifold ways and on every 
proper occasion. At the Commencement exercises, and 
especially at the Alumni banquets, it led to the desire to 
assist those in charge and finally to the suggestion that the 



84 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Alumni be given special representation on the Board of 
Managers. 

The articles of association having been suitably modified, 
this finally took form, and at the meeting of June 24, 1898, 
the following amendments to the by-laws of the articles of 
incorporation were adopted and spread on record. 

AMENDED BY-LAWS. 
"Resolved, That the Board of Managers increase its membership 
so that there shall be two more members than at the present time, 
and that provision be made whereby the two vacancies thus created 
shall be filled by the Rose Polytechnic Alumni Association in the 
following manner: 

1. That the said Association shall nominate Alumni of at least 
four years' standing, by ballot, two each for terms of one and two 
years respectively, the term of each nominee to be particularly speci- 
fied, and the said terms to expire at the end of Commencement week 
at the end of said term. 

2. That no two of the persons so nominated shall be of the 
same class unless nominated for the same year, and that the said 
persons shall represent at least two of the five engineering courses 
offered by the institution. 

3. That all Alumni shall have the privilege of voting for the 
nominees provided for the first article, either in person or by letter 
ballot. 

4. That after the first two Managers are so nominated by the 
Association and elected by the Board, the successors of said two 
Managers shall be appointed for a term of two years, one each year, 
in the following manner: 

(0) A committee of three on election shall be appointed by the 
Association, said committee being composed of Alumni living in or 
near Terre Haute. 

(&•) It shall be the duty of said committee, during the month 
of March of each year, to notify each Alumnus by letter and request 
him to make one nomination for the vacancy, which will occur at the 
end of the following Commencement week. 

(c) On the isth day of May, or the week following said day, 
the committee shall count the ballots received by them, and shall 
select for the nominees the two persons receiving the highest number 
of votes, and shall arrange the names of said two persons in order 
according to the number of votes received by each, placing the high- 
est first, provided always that each of the said two persons shall have 



Board of Managers. 85 

been an Alumnus of at least four years' standing at the Commence- 
ment following the nomination. When the list has been prepared, a 
copy thereof shall be forwarded to each Alumnus with the request 
that he vote for one of the persons named therein, either by personal 
vote or by letter ballot, on or before the day of the annual meeting 
of the Association, said day to be designated in the notice. 

(d) The poll shall be closed at the opening of the annual busi- 
ness meeting of the Association, and it shall be the duty of the elec- 
tion committee to count the votes, and certify the name of the person 
receiving the greatest number of votes to the Secretary of the Asso- 
ciation, who shall then certify the same to the Board of Managers. 

(e) The Board of Managers to agree, except for some good 
and sufficient reason to be formally set forth in writing to the Sec- 
retary of the Alumni Association, to elect the person so certified to 
membership on the Board. 

(0 Any person so nominated by the Association and elected by 
the Board may be renominated and reelected for a second term of 
two years, but no person so nominated and elected shall serve as an 
Alumni representative on the Board of Managers for more than two 
successive terms of two years each." 

In accordance with the provisions and amended by-laws 
the Alumni Association, the ensuing year, held an election, 
and June 16, 1889, its Secretary, John B. Aikman, of the 
Class of 1887, himself a member of the Board of Managers, 
reported the election of Benjamin McKeen, '85, of St. Louis, 
for the two-year term, and Victor K. Hendricks, '89, of St. 
Louis, for the one-year term, which action was at once con- 
firmed. June 22, 1900, Victor K. Hendricks, '89, was 
reelected. Other elections occurring in June each year were 
as follows: 

June, 1901, W. Arnold Layman, '92, of St. Louis. 

June, 1902, Frederick F. Hildreth, '94, Terre Haute. 

June, 1903, W. Arnold Layman, '92, St. Louis. 

June, 1904, Herbert Foltz, '86, Indianapolis. 

June, 1905, Theodore L. Condron, '90, Chicago. 

June, 1906, Herbert Foltz, '86, Indianapolis. 

June, 1907, Arthur M. Hood, '93, Indianapolis. 

June, 1908. W. E. Burk, '96, Louisville, Ky. 



86 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 



ROSTER OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 
Se;ptembe;r 10, 1 874- 1909. 



Preside^nts. 

Chauncey Rose, Terre Haute from Sept. 10, 1874, to June. 1877 

Josephus Collett, Terre Haute from June, 1877, to February, 1893 

R. W. Thompson, Terre Haute... from March, 1893, to March, 1900 
William C. Ball, Terre Haute from June, 1900 

Vice;-Pre;side;nts. 

Josephus Collett, Terre Haute, from September, 1874, to June, 1877 
Charles R. Peddle, Terre Haute, from June, 1877, to October, 1884 

R. W. Thompson, Terre Haute from April, 1885, to March, 1893 

William Mack, Terre Haute from June, 1893, to May, 1898 

William C. Ball, Terre Haute from May, 1898, to June, 1900 

Treasurer. 

Demas Deming, Terre Haute from Sept. 10, 1874 

Secretaries. 

Wm. K. Edwards, Terre Haute, from Sept. 10, 1874, to Sept., 1878 

Samuel S. Early, Terre Haute from Nov., 1878, to Sept., 1884 

Charles R. Peddle, Terre Haute, from October, 1884, to April, 1893 

R. G. Jenckes, Terre Haute from April, 1893, to June, 1900 

John B. Aikman, Terre Haute from June, 1900, to June, 1902 

George M. Crane, Terre Haute from June, 1902 

Members. 

Chauncey Rose, Terre Haute from Sept. 10, 1874, to June, 1877 

Charles R. Peddle, Terre Haute from Sept., 1874, to April, 1893 

William A. Jones, Terre Haute from Sept., 1874, to March, 1883 

Josephus Collett, Terre Haute from Sept., 1874, to Feb'y, 1893 

Barnabas C. Hobbs, Bloomingdale. .. .from Sept., 1874, to June, 1878 
Demas Deming, Terre Haute from September, 1874 



Board of Managers. 87 

Firmin Nippert, Terre Haute from Sept., 1874, to Nov., 1889 

Ray G. Jenckes,* Terre Haute from Sept., 1874, to Jan'y, 1879 

Charles Cruft, Terre Haute from Sept., 1874, to Sept., 1878 

VVm. K. Edwards, Terre Haute from Sept., 1874, to Sept., 1878 

William Mack, Terre Haute from Oct. 17, 1877, to May, 1898 

Samuel S. Early, Terre Haute from Nov. 2, 1878, to Sept., 1884 

Robert S. Cox, Terre Haute from Jan. 31, 1879, to Nov., 1886 

Preston Hussey, Terre Haute .from Jan. 31, 1879 

R. W. Thompson, Terre Haute, from March 31, 1883, to March, 1900 

William C. Ball, Terre Haute from March 31,' 1883 

Leslie D. Thomas, Terre Haute, from March 17, 1888, to June, 1895 

W. S. Rea, Terre Haute from March 7, 1893 

Robert S. Cox, Terre Haute from April 25, 1893, to June, 1899 

H. I. Miller, Terre Haute from April 8, 1898, to June, 1901 

John B. Aikman, Terre Haute from April 8, 1898 

George M. Crane, Terre Haute from Oct. 12, 1901 

Samuel S. Early, Terre Haute from Oct. 12, 1901, to June, 1905 

W. S. Roney, Terre Haute from Oct. 12, 1901, to June, 1907 

James S. Royse, Terre Haute from June 10, 1908 

Charles Minshall, Terre Haute from June 10, 1908 

Of the ten members, including Mr. Rose, constituting the first 
Board of Managers, all are dead save two. Mr. Demas Deming, 
President of the First National Bank, one of the original Board, 
was selected by Mr. Rose himself to be the Treasurer^ and during 
all these years has managed the finances of the Institute with rare 
fidelity and ability, keeping the endowment funds safely and profit- 
ably invested and looking after the vast amount of details. 

Committees of the Board. 

Committee on Shops — Aikman, Hood, and Jenckes. 

Library Committee — Minshall, Deming, and Ball. 

Finance Committee — Deming, Hussey, and Jenckes. 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds — Rea, Burke, and Aikman. 

Auditing Committee — Royse, Rea, and Crane. 

Committee on P acuity and Discipline — Royse, Crane, and Ball. 



*Mr. R. G. Jenckes resigned from the Board on his removal from 
the city in 1879, and on his return was reelected March, 1893. 



PAST PRESIDENTS. 



CHARLES OLIVER THOMPSON, A.M., Ph.D. 
First Pr^sidknt. 

Charles Oliver Thompson, A.M., Ph.D., who entered 
formally into the office of President of the Rose Polytechaic 
Institute on the 7th of March, 1883, was born September 
25, 1836, in East Windsor, Conn,, where his father, William 
Thompson, D.D., was then professor in a Connecticut The- 
ological Seminary. He was fitted for College in the East 
Windsor Academy, and entered Dartmouth College in 1854, 
graduating in 1858. 

He attained high standing in the College, with special 
proficiency in the departments of chemistry and mechanical 
philosophy. He received his degree of Master of Arts in 
1 86 1 and Doctor of Philosophy in 1870. 

Teaching was evidently Dr. Thompson's "destined end 
and way"; for, while yet a pupil in Windsor Academy, he 
received an apprenticeship in the district schools of his 
neighborhood for two winters, and this teaching he con- 
tinued, as occasion offered, until the completion of his col- 
lege course. 

In September, 1858, he became Principal of Peacham 
Academy, in Vermont, and continued till November, 1864, 
with an interval of some months, which were devoted to 
practical work as surveyor and engineer. In 1864 he was 
called to inaugurate the conversion of the Old Getting Acad- 
emy of Arlington into the Cotting Public High School, con- 
tinuing there until February, 1868, when he was elected 
Principal of the Worcester Free Institute of Industrial 
Science. Besides filling the duties of Professor of Chem- 
istry, he was charged with the inauguration of a scientific 




C. O. Thompson. 



Past Presidents. 89 

and practical course of instruction, which had then no 
recognized type or model in this country. 

But before entering on his duties of this position he 
spent eight months in visiting institutions in Europe having 
the same general aims. 

Entering on his duties as President of the Worcester 
Free Institute of Industrial Science in November, 1868, he 
soon brought it into prominence as one of the leading insti- 
tutions of its class. 

It required persistent persuasion on the part of the 
Board of Managers of the Rose Polytechnic Institute then 
in search of a President to induce him to take charge of 
this new Indiana school. In all the preliminary negotiations 
leading up to his election and acceptance of the presidency 
of the Rose Polytechnic Institute, Professor Thompson's 
advice to the Board of Managers in regard to the opening 
of the Institute and the scope of its work was found in- 
valuable. 

Acting on his advice, the Board had followed his direc- 
tions, so that when he came here, March 7, 1883, he found 
things much as he had planned, and was able to take up and 
carry on the work thus auspiciously begun. Classes had 
entered, and under his skillful directions instruction was 
begun. 

With intense activity he plunged into the difficult duties 
of his position. His whole thought was of the school and its 
future. Keenly alive to the responsibilities he had as- 
sumed, he labored at his task with an energy that overtaxed 
his strength. 

So, at the beginning of his career, which was rich in 
promise of results, he was suddenly stricken ill, and almost 
before his family or friends realized the seriousness of his 
condition, he died in the early morning of March 17, 1885. 

Though during his mature life actively engaged in edu- 
cational work, he yet found time to write a long list of 
reports and papers which are recognized as authorities on 



go Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

the subjects treated, and will keep alive his name and fame. 
In his death the Rose Polytechnic Institute sustained a very 
serious loss, as did the cause of education. 

Fittingly at the ensuing Commencement exercises special 
memorial exercises were held in his honor. General John 
B. Eaton, United States Commissioner of Education, on 
invitation of the Board of Managers, was present, and de- 
livered an extended and scholarly tribute to his memory. 

General Eaton had known President Thompson long 
and well, and his address was an eloquent tribute to his 
worth and work. 

On Wednesday, March 7, 1883, General Eaton had de- 
livered an address at the inauguration exercises when his 
friend had assumed formal control of the school. It was a 
pathetic circumstance that only a little over two years there- 
after, standing in the same chapel, he paid tribute to the 
memory of his dead friend. 

THOS. CORWIN MENDENHALL, Ph.D., LL.D., Sc.D. 

SECOND President. 

Assumed the duties of President in September, 1886, 
and served until June, 1889. For several years thereafter 
he still acted in an advisory capacity through an interim 
when the Institute was supplied only by Acting Presidents. 
He was born in Hanoverton, Ohio, October 4, 1841. In 
1868 began his career as teacher in the public schools of 
Columbus, Ohio, and in 1870 was made Professor of Phys- 
ical Science in the Columbus High School, where he served 
until 1873, when he was selected as Professor of Physics in 
the Ohio State University, then known as the State Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical College, serving until 1878. In 1878 
was selected as Professor of Physics in Imperial University 
of Japan at Tokio. He returned to the States in 1881, and 
again served in the Ohio State University until 1884, when 
he was selected to the position of Chief of the United States 
Signal Corps at Washington. D. C, remaining until 1886. 




T. C. -Mendenhauu. 



Past Presidents. 91 

As stated above, from 1886 to 1889 served as President of 
Rose, resigning to follow a call of the President of the 
United States to become Superintendent of the United 
States Coast and Geodetic Survey, where he remained until 
1894, when he again returned to active educational work by- 
accepting the presidency of the Worcester Polytechnic In- 
stitute at Worcester, Alass., remaining until 1901, when, 
because of failing health, he resigned. Since then he has 
been living in Europe. Tliough not physically able to carry 
the responsibilities and cares associated with active par- 
ticipation in educational affairs and scientific work, he con- 
tinues to take great interest in them. He has by correspond- 
ence shown the Institute and its Alumni how affectionately 
he remembers them. He has by wise counsel helped in the 
solution of many problems affecting its welfare. He reads 
and studies continually, and all who have been privileged to 
greet him in foreign lands, where he has found it best to 
sojourn because of his health, have been permitted to share 
the results of his studies and to enjoy the stimulating and 
elevating influence of a clear mind and a great heart. 

During the period of his Government service was also 
Superintendent of Weights and Measures and member 
United States Lighthouse Board, member Behring Sea Com- 
mission, Alaska Boundary Commission, and Chairman 
Massachusetts Highway Commission. He was awarded a 
gold medal at the Paris Exposition in 1900, and one by the 
American Geographical Society in 1901 for work done in 
seismology and terrestrial gravity and chartography. He 
received degree of Ph.D. from the Ohio State University, 
degree LL.B. from Michigan, and Sc.D. from Rose. He 
was a delegate to the International Electrical Congress, 
member of the National Academy, F. A. A. A. S, Philo- 
sophical Society, American Academy, Antiquarian Society, 
Honorary Fellow National Geographical Society, American 
Geographical Society, Massachusetts Historical Society. 
Honorary Fellow Franklin Institute, etc. In all the various 



92 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

activities which the above record shows, Dr. Mendenhall 
left his imprint upon the work he undertook. As scientist 
he ranks among the first. As organizer and administrator 
his record is equal to that of the best, and yet those whd 
have known him intimately and have been associated with 
him recognize that perhaps his greatest and most enduring 
work was along educational lines. While engaged in purely 
scientific and research work in the laboratories of the Uni- 
versities and the Government, he still remained active as an 
educator. 

All who are familiar with the educational activity in the 
Central West, and even in the East, still see the impress of 
his work, which he has left in common schools, high schools, 
and colleges. Year after year he devoted much time to m- 
struction in teachers' institutes through Ohio and Indiana, 
and was frequently called East, His work in giving instruc- 
tion in physical science, and making of it a real, live subject 
in high schools and colleges, is pioneer. As a popular scien- 
tific lecturer he has had no peer. His wonderful faculty 
in presenting scientific subjects in such a way that they 
could be grasped and comprehended by those who had not 
made of them a special study, was remarkable. In colleges 
and universities, however, his versatility, his ability as or- 
ganizer and teacher, was most marked. He had a happy 
faculty of going to the heart of things by the most direct 
course, and in so doing compelled the admiration and affec- 
tion of all with whom he came in contact. At Rose evidence 
of this appreciation and affection was shown by the prepara- 
tion and presentation to him of a bronze tablet setting forth 
the estimate in which he is held by the students. When he 
resigned to enter into Government service, the Faculty, the 
Board of Managers, and all friends of the Institute felt 
that when he left, a tower of strength was taken away from 
the Institute. 

During his administration the growth of the Institute 
was most rapid, and to his broad views, organizing ability, 




Ienrv T. Eddv. 



'Past Presidents. 93 

and wisdom may be attributed, in large measure, the stand- 
ing which the Institute holds among technical colleges and 
schools. 



HENRY TURNER EDDY, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D. 
Third President. 

Dr. Eddy assumed the duties of President in January, 
1 89 1, and served until September, 1894. He was bom in 
Stoughton, Mass., June 9, 1844, and graduated from Yale 
with degree of A.B. in 1867, received the degree of Ph.B, 
in 1868, A.M. in 1870, C.E. in 1870, and Ph.D. in 1872 
from Cornell, and LL.D. from Center College in 1892. The 
years from 1879 to 1880 he spent in study in Berlin and 
Paris. In 1867 and 1868 was Instructor in Field Work 
Shefifield Scientific College. In 1868 and 1869 was Instruc- 
tor in Latin and Mathematics in University of Tennessee. 
Assistant Professor in Mathematics and Civil Engineering 
Cornell, from 1869 to 1873, and Adjunct Professor in 
Mathematics in Princeton from 1873 to 1874. Professor 
of Mathematics, Astronomy, and Civil Engineering Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati from 1874 to 1890. Was Dean of the 
Faculty of the University of Cincinnati from 1874 to 1877 
and 1884 to 1889, and President in 1890. Served from 1891 
to 1894 as President of the Rose Polytechnic Institute, when 
he resigned and accepted the position of Professor of Engi- 
neering and Mechanics in the University of Minnesota. 

Since 1906 has been also Dean of the graduate school of 
Engineering of that LTniversity. He is a member of the 
American Philosophical Society, of the American Mathe- 
matical Society, the American Physical Society, the A. A. 
A. S., and other educational and learned societies. Dr. 
Eddy is author of a number of text-books both in pure and 
applied mathematics. 

He has especially distinguished himself in investigations 
in graphical statics. Dr. Eddy brought to the Institute ripe 



94 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

experience in teaching and administration. From this expe- 
rience the Institute benefited. He took up the work of his 
predecessors, and without radical change in organization 
or plans made such changes in the course of instruction and 
the work of the Institute as strengthened it and kept '*■ 
abreast of the demands of the times. The large classes and 
the constant growth in attendance presented problems which 
he met successfully, and during his administration it may 
well be said that the institution continued to prosper. Upon 
his resignation Dr. Eddy carried with him the respect and 
good will of all who were associated with him either as 
co-workers or students. 



THOMAS GRAY, B.S., Ph.D. 

Vick-Preside;nt and Jossphus CollETT Professor of 
Dynamic Engineering. 

Thomas Gray, first Professor of Dynamic Engineering, 
served from September, 1888, to the time of his death, 
December 19, 1908. He was born February 4, 1850. in 
Lochgelly Fifeshire, Scotland, and received his primary 
education in the schools of that district. He was appren- 
ticed in handicraft for several years, and entered the Uni- 
versity of Glasgow, graduated in 1878 as B.Sc. in engineer- 
ing. He became experimental scholar under Lord Kelvin, 
then Sir William Thomson. While in the University he 
gained many distinctions in the classes of engineering and 
mathematics, receiving several prizes. Shortly after grad- 
uation he was awarded the Cleland Gold Medal of the Uni- 
versity for "An Experimental Determination of Magnetic 
Moments in Absolute Measurements." 

In 1879 he was Professor of Telegraph Engineering and 
Demonstrator in the Physical Laboratories in the Imperial 
University of Tokio, Japan. He had as colleagues Ayrton, 
Perry, Milne, and Dyer. He contributed a number of 




Thomas Gray. 



Thomas Gray. 95 

papers, during this period, to the Royal Societies of London 
and Edinburgh and a number of papers to the philosophical 
magazines. The first papers were upon experimental work 
in Heat and Electricity. 

While in Japan he became interested in Seismology. 
Wrote a number of papers on Earthquakes and Earth- 
quake Measurements, some in collaboration with Milne. 
He invented several forms of apparatus for the measure- 
ments of earthquakes. In 1881 he returned to Scotland and 
entered the laboratory of Lord Kelvin again and took up 
research work in Electricity and Magnetism for Kelvin. 
He then represented the engineers. Lord Kelvin and Pro- 
fessor Jenkin, in the manufacture and laying of the Com- 
mercial Company's two Atlantic cables. He took part in all 
the expeditions of the Faraday made in connection with 
that undertaking. After the completion of this task he 
again returned to Kelvin's laboratory and became his 
assistant. During this time he aided in the design and 
manufacture of the well-known Kelvin Balances, and pub- 
lished a number of papers on Electrical Measurements. He 
wrote the article on the Electrical Telegraph and Telephones 
for the Encyclopaedia Britannica. 

Dr. T. C. Mendenhall became acquainted with Dr. Gray 
during their period of service in the University of Tokio, 
and in 1888, when Dr. Mendenhall was President of Rose, 
he became instrumental in bringing Dr. Gray to the Insti- 
tute, as Professor of Dynamic Engineering. Dr. Gray or- 
ganized the department and equipped the testing laboratory 
with appliances of his own designs, and continued to carry 
on experimental work along the lines of both mechanical 
and electrical study. He published a number of papers on 
Strength of Materials and Electrical and Magnetic Meas- 
urements. He designed an autographic recording apparatus 
for the study of the elastic behavior of materials. In 1891 
he prepared the definitions for the Electrical and Magnetic 
Terms for the Century Dictionary. 



96 Rose Polytechmc Institute. 

In 1 89 1 delivered the address at the Centennial Patent 
Celebration in Washington on Electrical Patents. In 1894 
and 1895 prepared the Smithsonian Physical Tables pub- 
lished in 1896, revised in 1897, 1903, and 1904. 

He had under preparation a text-book on Electrical En- 
gineering, which unfortunately remains unfinished. 

His services as an expert in Mechanical and Electrical 
Engineering and in patent litigation were widely sought. 
He was a most careful experimentalist, accurate and in- 
genious in inventing devices for research, and rarely have 
any of his results been questioned. 

His writings are models of direct, clear exposition. As 
expert he invariably showed a commanding knowledge of 
the subject. As teacher he was attractive, and presented the 
subject in such a masterly manner that the student who 
was otherwise prepared could not help but follow in its 
development. 

His personality was so attractive that he gained the 
affection of students at once. So strong was his manliness 
that their respect was compelled. A great, lovable man was 
he, whose work will live long after him, whose influence in 
the Institute will endure. He is and will be missed by 
alumni, students, friends, the city, for everywhere he filled 
his place and did well whatever should be done. 

Work and Activities of Thomas Gray. 

He was a member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 
the B. A. A. Sc, the A. A. A. S., A. I. N. a', A. S. P. E. E., 
A. S. M. E., Indiana Academy of Science, etc. He was a 
contributor to all of these, and held office in most of them. 
Some of the more important papers published by him are: 

On the Determination of Magnetic Moments in Absolute 
Measure. 

On the Specific Heats of Saline Solutions. Proc. R. S. 
E. Phil Mag. 



Thomas Gray. 97 

On the Specific Resistance and Specific Inductive Ca- 
pacity of Glass. Phil. Mag. 

On the Effect of Permanent Elongation on the Specific 
Resistance of Metals. Trans. R. S. E. 

On a Seismometer and Torsion Pendulum Seismograph. 
Trans. S. S. Japan, Vol. I. 

On Steady Points for Earthquake Measurements. 
Trans. S. S. Japan, Vol. III. 

On Instruments for Recording Earthquake Motions. 
Phil. Mag. 

On the Best Arrangement for Wheatstone's Bridge for 
the Measurement of any Particular Resistance. Phil. Mag. 

On a Seismograph for Large Motions. Trans. S. S. 
Japan. 

On a Method of Compensating a Pendulum so as to 
make it Astatic. Trans. S. S. Japan. 

Two papers on a New Seismograph. Phil. Mag. 

On the Variation of the Specific Resistance of Glass 
with Density, Temperature, and Chemical Composition. 
Proc. R. S., Vol. XXXIV. 

On the Graduation of Galvanometers for the Measure- 
ment of Currents and Electromotive Forces in Absolute 
Measure. Electrician. 

On Gray and Milne's Seismographic Apparatus. Quar- 
terly Journal Geol. Soc. 

On the Size of Conductors for the Distribution of Elec- 
tric Energy. Phil. Mag. 

On the Measurement of the Horizontal Component of 
the Earth's Magnetic Field. Phil. Mag. 

On a New Standard Sine-Galvanometer. Phil. Mag. 

On the Electrolysis of Silver, and of Copper, and the 
Application of Electrolysis for the Standardizing of Electric 
Currents and Potential Meters. Phil. Mag. 

On Silk and Wire Suspensions in Galvanometers, and 
on the Rigidity of Silk Fibres. Phil. Mag. 

On an Improved Form of Seismograph. Phil. Mag. 



98 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

On Electrical Measurements. Industries. 

On a New Reflecting Galvanometer of Great Sensibility 
and on New Forms of Astatic Galvanometers. (Jointly 
with A. Gray.) Proc. R. S., No. 230. 

On the Relation between the Electrical Qualities and the 
Chemical Composition of Glass and Allied Substances. 
(Jointly with A. Gray and J. J. Dobbie.) Proc. R. S., 
No. 231. 

Earthquake Observations and Experiments in Japan. 
(Jointly with John Milne.) Phil. Mag. 

On the Strength and Elasticity Constants of Certain 
Rock. (Jointly with John Milne.) Quarterly Journal 
Geol. Soc. of London. 

Seismic Experiments. (Jointly with John Milne.) 
Phil. Trans. R. S., Part III. 

On the Application of the Electrolysis of Copper for the 
Measurement of Electric Currents. Phil. Mag. 

On Properties of Materials, six papers before the A. S. 
M. E., from 1888 to 1908. 

On the Magnetic Properties of Iron. R. S. E. 

Some of his designs and inventions from 1888 to 1908: 

Transformer Testing Apparatus. 

Automatic Recording Apparatus for Testing Machines. 

Continuous Indicator. 

Integrating Indicator. 
• Belt Dynamometer. 

Tool Dynamometer. 

Automobile Shock Absorber. 

Rotary Pump. 

Journal Friction Testing Machine. 

Torsional Testing Machine. 

Extensometer. 

Electrometer for measuring dielective capacity, and 
manv similar devices. 



ROSTER OF OFFICERS AND FACULTY. 



Presidents. 
Charles Oliver Thompson, A.M., Ph.D., 1883-1885. 
Thomas Corwin Mendenhall, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D., 1886- 

1889. 
Henry Turner Eddy, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D., 1891-1894. 
Carl Leo Mees, Ph.D., 1895—. 

Acting Presidents and Vice-Presidents. 
Clarence Abiathar Waldo, A.M., Actings President, 1885- 

1886 and 1 889- 1 890. 
Carl Leo Mees, Ph.D., Acting President, Sept., 1890, to 

June, 1891, and 1894 and 1895. 
Thomas Gray, B.S., Ph.D., Vice-President, 1891 to 1908. 
Malverd Abijah Howe, C.E., Vice-President, 1909 — . 

REGISTRAR. 

Sarah P. Burton, 1883—. 

Facui,Ty. 
William L. Ames, B.S., M.E., Professor of Drawing, 1883- 
91 ; Professor of Descriptive Geometry, 1891 ; Professor 
of Machine Drawing and Design, 1894-96. 
Edward S. Cobb, B.S., Superintendent of Shops, 1883-88; 

Instructor Machine Design, 1887-88. 
Charles A Colton, E.M., Professor of Chemistry, 1883-85. 
Clarence A. Waldo, A.M., Professor Mathematics, 1883-92. 
James A. Wickersham, A.M., Professor of Languages, 

1883— 
Charles C. Brown, C.E., Professor Mathematics and In- 
structor in Field Work, 1884-85. 
Lucien I. Blake, Ph.D., Professor of Physics, 1884-86. 



lOO Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

William A. Noyes, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry, 1885- 
1903. 

Asa B. Fitch, C. E., Professor of Civil Engineering during 
1886. 

Malverd A. Howe, C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering, 
188^-. 

Carl Leo Mees, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Physics, 1886- 
89; Professor of Physics, 1889 — . 

Thomas Gray, Ph.D., Professor of Dynamic Engineering, 
1887-1908. 

Charles S. Brown, B.Ph., Superintendent of Shops and 
Instructor Machine Design, 1888-1896; Professor of 
Machine Design, 1890-96. 

R. W. Mahon, Ph.D., Substitute Professor of Chemistry in 
absence of Professor Noyes in 1888. 

William H. Kirchner, B.S., Instructor in Mathematics, 
1888-89; Junior Professor in Drawing, 1889-93. 

Arthur S. Hathaway, B.S., Professor of Mathematics, 
1892—. 

Robert L. McCormick, C.E., Instructor in Mathematics, 
1891 ; Instructor in Civil Engineering, 1894; Assistant 
Professor Mathematics. 1902 ; Assistant Professor Math- 
ematics and Assistant Professor Civil Engineering, 1908. 

John B. Peddle, M.E., Instructor in Drawing, 1893 ; Pro- 
fessor of Machine Design, 1896 — . 

Arthur Kendrick, A.M., Associate Professor of Physics, 
1 895- 1 90 1. 

Frank C. Wagner, A.M., Professor of Steam and Electrical 
Engineering. 1896 — . 

Edwin S. Johonnott, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Physics, 1899. 

Alvah W. Clement, B.S., Superintendent of Shops and In- 
structor in Shop Management, 1900- 1907. 

John White, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry, 1903 — . 

Edwin Place, M.M.E., Instructor Laboratories and Lecturer 
on Electrical Construction, 1890-99. 



Faculty Roster. lOl 

Neil H. Williams, M.S., Instructor of Physics, 1904 — ; 

Assistant Professor of Electricity, 1905- 1908. 
Clarence Knipmeyer, Assistant Professor of Electricity, 

1909. 

Instructors and Assistants. 
Edward G. Waters, B.S., Fellowship Instructor in Physical 

Laboratories, 1888. 
R. R. C. Simon, Instructor in German, 1894-95. 
Joseph D. Harper, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering, 

1895-96. 
Charles Wilbur, Instructor in Civil Engineering, 1895-96. 
Arnold Tschudy, B.A., Instructor in German, 1895-96. 
William E. Burk, B.S., Instructor in Chemistry, 1896-97. 
Orange E. McMeans, B.S., Instructor in Drawing, 1896-99. 
Albert A. Faurot, A.M., Instructor in German, 1896-1901. 
John W. Shepherd, A.M., Instructor in Chemistry, 1897-98. 
Arthur Winslow, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering, 

1898-99. 
George W. Mitchell, Instructor in Drawing, 1899- 1900. 
William H. Insley, B.S., Assistant in Architecture, 1900-01. 
William M. Blanchard, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry, 

1900-01. 
Emery E. Harris, Instructor in Drawing, 1900-01. 
Robert E. Earhart, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics, 1901-03. 
Austin M. Patterson, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry, 

1901-03 
Harry A. Schwartz, B.S., Instructor in Drawing, 1901-02. 
Edmund J. Hirschler, A.B., Instructor in German, 1901-03. 
Arthur J. Paige, B.S., Instructor in Drawing, 1903-08. 
John M. Nelson, B.S., Instructor in Chemistry, 1903-05. 
Frank W. Bennett, A.B.. Instructor in German, 1904-09. 
Chester L. Post, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering, 

1904-06. 
Alfred W. Homberger. B.S.. Instructor in Chemistry, 

1905-07. 



I02 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Roger De L. French, B.S., Assistant in Civil Engineering, 
1906. 

Luther Knight, M.S., Instructor in Chemistry, 1907-08. 

William R. Plew, B.S., Instructor in Mathematics and Civil 
Engineering, 1907 — . 

Carl Wischmeyer, B.S., Instructor in Drawing and Descrip- 
tive Geometry, 1908. 

Rufus A. Barnes, B.S., Instructor in Chemistry, 1908. 

Frank W. Pote, B.S., Instructor in Laboratories, 1908. 

Superintendents in Shops. 

Edward S. Cobb, 1882-1888. 
Charles Sumner Brown, 1888- 1896. 
J. F. W. Harris, 1896- 1899. 
Alvah W. Clement, 1899- 1907. 
Elmer H. Willmarth, 1907 — . 

Instructors in Machine Shops. 

William M. Towle, 1886-1887. 
Garrett W. Logan, 1889—. 

Instructors in Wood Shops. 

James H. Sherman, 1883-1890. 
William P. Smith, 1 891- 1896. 
Edward T. Wires, 1897—. 



STATISTICAL HISTORY. 



In March, 1883, the first preliminary circular of the 
Rose Polytechnic Institute announced a faculty of instruc- 
tors of six professors and instructors, with three professor- 
ships unfilled. In September the number was increased to 
seven, in 1884 to eight, in 1888 to nine. From 1888 on, men 
in the shops, whose time was almost entirely given to in- 
struction, were counted as instructors, so that in 1888 the 
number was fifteen, in 1889 and 1890 sixteen, 1891 and 
1892 seventeen, 1893 and 1894 eighteen, 1895 twenty, from 
1895 to 1905 twenty-one, from 1905 to 1909 twenty-two. 

From 1883 to 1887 the Mechanical Engineering Course 
was the only one fully organized. There was no regular 
Professor of Civil Engineering, though instruction in Civil 
Engineering was given. 

In 1887 the Civil Engineering Course was fully estab- 
lished, and in 1888 the first student was regularly graduated 
from that course. 

In 1889 the course in Chemistry was fully established, 
and the first student graduated from that course. 

In i8qo the demand for a special course in Electricity 
led to a modification of the Mechanical Engineering Course. 
A considerable amount of laboratory and class work in 
Electricity was substituted for shop work. In the modified 
course this was not recognized in the degree. 

In 1893 the Electrical Engineering Course had been elab- 
orated, and the degree of B. S. in Electrical Engineering 
was conferred. 

In 1898 the course in Architecture was established, and 
in 1900 the first student in this course graduated. 

Modifications in all courses were made from time to time 
to meet changing conditions, improve and advance the cur- 
riculum. In 1903 a limited number of electives in all 



I04 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

courses were introduced, and the system of grading and 
passing changed. Before this time a general average of 
60 per cent, was required for passing. The different studies 
were weighted in proportion to the time given to each in the 
course. Any subject in which the grade average was below 
40 per cent, meant failure. Under the elective system every 
student is required to attain an average of 60 per cent, in 
each subject to receive credits for it. For graduation 126 
credits in required subjects and 19 credits in elective sub- 
jects are needed. These changes advanced the required 
scholarship considerably. 

In 1891 conditions for earning the degree of M.S. in the 
respective courses were fixed, also the requirements for the 
securing of the engineering degrees in the several courses 
were defined. The first M.S. degree was granted in 1892 
to Taro Tsuji, of Tokio, Japan, Class of '90, and the first 
C.E. degree in 1896 to Taro Tsuji. In 1897 the first degree 
of M.E. was conferred upon William R. McKeen, Jr., of 
Terre Haute, Class of '89, and the first E.E. degree in 1898 
to Svend Johanneson, of St. Louis. Mo., Class of '93. 

In 1883 the minimum requirements for admission were 
equivalent to about two years of high school work, such as 
is offered to-day. Examinations in Arithmetic, United 
States History, Geography, English Grammar, and Com- 
position, and Algebra to Quadratic Equations, were held for 
entrance. In 1886 the requirements were advanced to an 
equivalent of at least three years of high school work. 
Plane Geometry and Algebra through Quadratics were ex- 
amination subjects. In 1897 the entrance requirements were 
further advanced. All of Geometry, plane and solid, was 
required. No conditions for admission were allowed under 
these standards. In 1905 the requirements were made fully 
equivalent to a four years' high school course. Fifteen 
units are necessary for entrance, and admission can be 
gained either by diploma from recognized schools or by ex- 
amination. 



Statistical History. 



105 



From 1883 to 1908, 1,460 different students have at- 
tended the Institute; 526 have graduated. The students 
have come from forty-one different States and Territories 
and eleven foreign countries. The Alumni in 1908 were 
professionally engaged in forty-two different States and 
Territories and fourteen foreign countries. 

Ninety-three per cent, of the living graduates are en- 
gaged in pursuits for which an engineering education may 
be said to be essential. Seventeen per cent, of the graduates 
were located in Indiana. 

In 1888 Mrs. S. A. Heminway contributed a fund for 
the establishment of a gold medal, of the value of fifty dol- 
lars, to be awarded annually to that member of the Senior 
Class whose standing was highest during the whole course. 

A year later a bronze copy was added, to be awarded 
for the highest standing in the Freshman year. 

The awards have been : 



Gc 


yld Medal— 


Bronze Medal— 


1888 


E. G. Waters. 




1889 


A. J. Hammond. 


A. M. Dietrich. 


1890 


George R. Putnam. 


A. M. Hood. 


1891 


R. L. McCormick. 


C. E. Mendenhall 


1892 


A. M. Dietrich. 


W. 0. Mundy. 


1893 


E. S. Johonnott. 


0. E. McIMeans. 


1894 


C. E. Mendenhall. 


H. S. Heichert. 


189s 


L. E. Troxler. 


A. C. Eastwood. 


1896 


W. R. Sanborn. 


J. J. McLellan. 


1897 


H. S. Heichert. 


J. I. Brewer. 


1898 


H. B. Stilz. 


R. N. Miller. 


1899 


J. J. McLellan. 


C. E. Cox. 


1900 


J. I. Brewer. 


B. C. Jacob. 


1901 


R. N. Miller. 


H. A. Mullett. 


1902 


A. J. Paige. 


H. L. Watson. 


1903 


( B. C. Jacob. 
( R. B. Arnold. 


C. Wischmeyer. 


1904 


H. A. Mullett. 


E. J. Miner. 


1905 


J. C. Sproull. 


C. B. Andrews. 


1906 


C. Wischmeyer. 


J. A. Shepard. 


1907 


E. J. Miner. 


H. J. Madison. 


1908 


C. B. Andrews. 


E. A. Mees. 



INSTITUTE ORGANIZATIONS. 



THE TECHNIC. 

In 1890 the question of the pubHcation of a college paper 
was agitated, and found such approval from the President, 
Dr. Eddy, the Faculty, and the students, that in 1891 The 
Technic was established and the first number issued. Much 
of the credit for the establishment of this paper is due to 
Mr. Arnold Layman, of '92, whose energy, untiring efforts, 
and marked ability laid the foundation for success. During 
the first year the struggle was severe, as the expenses of 
The Technic had to be met from subscriptions. So excel- 
lent was the publication and so popular, that very rapidly 
the financial problem no longer presented serious difficulties. 
The paper was enlarged and new departments were added. 

During the first year a number of changes occurred in 
the editorial board and management, as the work was largely 
experimental. Later on, through experience, the mainte- 
nance of the high standing of the publication was made 
easier. After the first four years of its existence, owing to 
constantly increasing cost of its production, the financial 
problem again became serious, and the size of the paper had 
to be reduced. This reduction continued until 1899, when 
The Technic received support from the Students' Council 
by appropriation of a portion of the students' funds to 
defray the expenses of publication, and all students who 
contributed to the fund became entitled to a copy of The 
Technic, thus eliminating the subscription element for reg- 
ular students in the Institute. The excellence of The Tech- 
nic throughout the years of its existence has been com- 
mented upon by all who, through exchanges or otherwise, 
have read it. It is acknowledged to be one of the best 
college papers of its kind. 



Institute Organisations. 107 



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io8 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 



THE MODULUS. 



The Class of 1892, near the close of its college career, 
conceived the idea of preparing a class publication which 
should picture college life in the characteristic way in which 
it is viewed from the student's standpoint. 

The name of Modulus was chosen. The first Modulus 
appeared in 1892, full of matter interesting to students and 
the friends and the Faculty of the Institute, and containing 
many things of historical interest and value. 

The Class of 1896, as Juniors, issued the second Modu- 
lus. Thereafter a Modulus has been published every two 
years by the Junior Class. The whole series forms a col- 
lection which gives a pleasant picture of college life. 

ATHLETICS AND ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

Before 1888 there was little in the way of organized 
athletic work. In that year, largely through encouragement 
given by Dr. T. C. Mendenhall, then President, the athletic 
organizations had their beginning. A baseball nine was 
organized in that year, as well as an Athletic Association, 
so that at the Commencement of 1888 a part of the pro- 
gram consisted of a Field Day with athletic exercises. The 
organization was temporary, but in the following year was 
made formal and permanent by the adoption, in general 
assembly, of a constitution. Officers were elected and sys- 
tematic work begun. From that time on the Association 
continued as an independent organization, supported by the 
voluntary subscriptions of those students who became mem- 
bers of the Association. 

In 1889, 1890 and 1891 Field Days were held at Com- 
mencement time. In addition, in 1891 there was an Inter- 
collegiate Field Day, and the Association became affiliated 
with the Indiana colleges, forming the Intercollegiate League. 
In subsequent years the Intercollegiate Field Days took the 



Institute Organisations. 109 

place of the Institute Field Days, which before that formed 
a part of Commencement Week exercises. 

The President of the Institute was ex-officio chairman 
of the Board of Directors. During all these years through- 
out the State athletics were pursued simply and solely for 
the pleasure and profit that the students might derive from 
taking part in them, and did not become organized so as 
to make competitive superiority in athletics a kind of an 
advertising feature for institutions, until subsequent years. 

During the first years, when athletics was sport only. 
Rose carried oflf all the honors and trophies. As athletics 
throughout the State became a larger factor, the character 
of the work changed, and it was found necessary to make 
provisions to meet this condition, which was done in the 
erection of the gymnasium in 1894. 

By voluntary subscription from students and Alumni 
about $1,200 was raised, the remainder of the required sum 
being appropriated by the Institute. Until 1899 all expenses 
incident to athletic work were met by membership fees, vol- 
untary contributions, and proceeds of Field Days. The 
funds of the baseball, football and tennis clubs were kept 
separate. In 1899, with the organization of the Students' 
Council, the financial needs of the Athletic Association were 
met by assigning a proportion of the Students' Fund for 
the defraying of necessary expenses. From 1899 on, all 
of the different teams were governed through the Athletic 
Association. 

ORCHESTRA. 

In November, 1889, the Class of 1893 organized the 
Orchestral Club. In June of the following year the club 
was enlarged and made an Institute organization. 

Mr. S. E. Johannesen, Class of 1893, an accomplished 
musician, was made leader and President of the club. Until 
his graduation the Polytechnic Orchestra flourished, and 
gave a number of concerts of merit. After Mr. lohan- 



no Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

nesen's graduation it was directed for a short period by 
Charles E. Mendenhall, of 1894, Dow Sandham, C. L. Mees 
and Mr. Colberg. 

Following 1896 the orchestra was rather passive for sev- 
eral years, until in 1902 Mr. A. J. Paige, then Instructor, and 
Ira Marshall, student, reorganized it, and regular rehearsals 
were again held. 

In November, 1902, the club was so fortunate as to 
obtain the services of Mr. Hugh McGibeny, of Indianapolis, 
as director, who, on account of his interest in the work, has 
continued to act in that capacity at considerable personal 
inconvenience. 

Through his enthusiastic, unselfish, and excellent en- 
deavor the orchestra has become most proficient, and has 
rendered programs of great musical merit. 

GLEE CLUB. 

The Glee Club grew out of the meetings of a band of 
young men, who met from time to time with Professor 
Wickersham at his home to sing German college songs and 
Volkslieder. These meetings were so stimulating that a 
taste for chorus and quartette singing was developed. 

About 1896 a number of high-school boys, who expected 
to enter the Institute, formed a "Black Sheep" club, and 
when they entered the Institute organized themselves into a 
Glee Club, under the directorship of Mr. A. J. Paige. 

Later a permanent organization was formed, and Mrs. 
A. G. Adams became leader. The club has been prosperous, 
and has added much to the pleasures of Institute life. 

Mrs. Adams has been untiring in her efforts, and has 
trained the club from year to year to a high degree of pro- 
ficiency. She has composed a number of songs especially 
for it, which have been effectively rendered. 

For some years a number of excellent concerts and per- 
formances have been given in conjunction with the orchestra. 



Institute Organisations. 



THE MANDOLIN CLUB. 

A Mandolin Club was organized in 1893, and has, under 
the able leadership of Mr. Brandenberg, prospered, and in 
concerts and entertainments added much to the pleasure of 
all friends of the Institute. 

Y. M. C. A. 

In 1892 the first formal organization was effected. 
Meetings were held in the lecture rooms of the Central 
Presbyterian Church. Since that time the association has 
been growing in influence and strength, and much good has 
been accomplished. 

The organization appeals to all students alike, and there 
is a common ground upon which to meet. It has done much 
in furnishing good social relaxation. Its work in taking 
care of new students, and aiding them in securing rooms 
and accommodations, and making them acquainted with one 
another, has been most effective, of aid to the authorities, 
and grateful to all new comers. 

CAMERA CLUB. 

The Camera Club seems to have grown out of individual 
taste of students for photography, stimulated by Professor 
William L. Ames, who, before an organization was effected, 
gave instructions in photography to all who were interested. 
Just when a formal organization resulted is not definitely 
known. A dark room for the use of students was arranged 
in the Institute in the eighties. 

The club has continued active, and the excellent pho- 
tographs that are exhibited in prize contests and the large 
number of students who engage in the competition, show the 
interest that has been aroused and the educational value it 
has exerted. 



112 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY. 

In 1894 the Scientific Society was organized. The object 
was to give practice to students in reading and public speak- 
ing; to encourage collateral reading and the study of sci- 
entific topics, other than those that were treated of in the 
regular course. Students and professors prepared and read 
at monthly meetings papers and lectures, often experiment- 
ally illustrated, and these were discussed. 

The society has continued to meet, though not at regular 
intervals, and many excellent papers have been presented, 
and in a measure it has accomplished its purpose. 

THE TELEGRAPH ASSOCIATION. 

As early as 1885 several students in the Institute desired 
to acquire some practical knowledge of telegraphy, and 
erected a few lines strung across housetops and upon trees. 
Mr. Edward Waters, of 1888, an expert operator, was the 
moving spirit. Through the aid of Mr. Sweeney, of the 
Vandalia Line, connection was made with the Train Dis- 
patcher's ofifice, and a time service furnished the Institute. 

The interest in telegraphy became so general that in 1889 
an association was formed, known as the R. P. I. Tele- 
graph Association. Lines were extended and a considerable 
number of instruments installed. 

The association continued active until within the past 
year, when increasing difficulty in securing permission to 
run lines led to its dissolution. While it existed, much 
profitable practice was gained and a number of quite expert 
operators were developed. 

THE STUDENTS' COUNCIL. 

Established 1899. The object of the organization is to 
coordinate the work of the different societies and clubs, and 



Institute Organisations. 113 

to cooperate with the Faculty in all matters pertaining to the 
welfare of the institution and its students. 

The work of the Council has been effective and the 
results attained gratifying, and many problems in college 
life have been handled and solved in a satisfactory manner 
through the cooperation of the Council and Faculty. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

As a permanent organization, the Alumni Association of 
the Rose Polytechnic Institute first sprang into existence on 
June 23d, 1887, when, in response to an invitation by Presi- 
dent Mendenhall, a dinner was given by the Board of Man- 
agers to the members of the graduating class, the Faculty, 
and the Alumni. After the dinner a meeting was called, 
which has since been termed the first annual meeting of the 
Rose Polytechnic Alumni Association. At this meeting it 
was resolved to make the Alumni of the R. P. I. a perma- 
nent organization, and in order to do this a President, Vice- 
President, and Secretary-Treasurer were chosen, and two 
committees appointed by the President. One of these com- 
mittees was directed to draw up a constitution and by-laws 
and submit the same at the next meeting of the Association. 
The second committee was called the Executive Committee, 
and to it was delegated power to make all arrangements 
necessary for annual meetings, banquets, etc. 

At the second annual meeting of the Alumni. June 21, 
t888. which was held after a dinner given by the Asso- 
ciation to the Board of Managers, Faculty, and themselves, 
in the private parlor of the Terre Haute House, the consti- 
tution prepared by the committee appointed a year before 
was adopted, subject to a revising board, and officers were 
elected for the next year. 

At the third annual meeting, June 21, 1889. the consti- 
tution was approved, adopted, and ordered printed, and a 
copy sent to each Alumnus. 
8 



114 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

At the meeting in June, 1890, the colors then in use by 
the undergraduates, to-wit: "Rose and White," were rec- 
ognized and adopted as the official colors of the student and 
graduate body. The class pin of the Class of 1890 was 
adopted as the Alumni pin, but this action of the fourth 
annual meeting has never been accepted by the members. 

In June, 1891. the question of an official pin was referred 
to a special committee, and at the meeting in 1892 that now 
commonly in use by the undergraduates was adopted. 

In 1894 the Association was requested to select an 
"Alumni Orator" to address the graduating class of 1895, 
and since that time the Association has been represented at 
each Commencement. 

As the Association grew there came to be a feeling that 
more could be done to advance the Institute if the Asso- 
ciation cooperated more practically with the Board of Man- 
agers. Consequently, early in 1896 the Board invited the 
Association to appoint an advisory committee of three to 
visit the Institute and advise the Board. 

The invitation of the Board came up for consideration 
at the tenth annual meeting in June, 1896, and resulted in 
a careful canvass of the entire situation. Carefully-consid- 
ered recommendations were made by the St. Louis and 
Indianapolis sections, and the entire matter of cooperation 
with the Board was referred to a committee, with instruc- 
tions to report at the next annual meeting. 

The Committee on Alumni Representation made a full 
report at the 1897 meeting, advocating the appointment of 
Alumni representatives to serve for limited terms on the 
Board of Managers, and this report was adopted. 

Prior to the 1898 meeting the Board of Managers pro- 
vided for Alumni representatives in accordance with the 
request of the Association, and in June, 1899, Messrs. Ben 
McKeen, '85, and V. K. Hendricks, '89, were elected as the 
first of such representatives. The Association is also rep- 



Institute Organisations. 115 

resented on the Board by two life members, Messrs. J. B. 
Aikman, '86, and J. S. Royse, '94. 

The Association also has in process of building an "En- 
dowment Fund" of several thousand dollars, which has been 
added to the General Endowment Fund of the Institute. 

There is also a growing "Loan Fund," which can be 
drawn upon by worthy needy students recommended by the 
Faculty. This fund is now being drawn upon. 

The attitude of a large majority of the Alumni is one 
of firm loyalty to the Institute. 

TECH CLUBS. 

In 1895 several Rose Tech Clubs were formed, the first 
one in Chicago, others in St. Louis, Indianapolis, Pittsburg, 
Louisville, New York, and Terre Haute. The primary 
object was to bring together Rose men in a social way. At 
the meetings it became apparent that these clubs could be 
of help to the Institute and Alumni. From time to time the 
President and members of the Faculty were invited to the 
gatherings, and the activities and needs of the Institute dis- 
cussed. Many valuable suggestions have come from the 
Alumni at these informal gatherings, and much good has 
come to the Institute through their activity. The organi- 
zation of these clubs, with the exception of the New York 
Club and the Terre Haute Club, has not been of a permanent 
character; no roster of officers can be given. 

The New York Club has been one of the most active; 
it has welcomed and made pleasant the stay of all Rose 
men who visit the metropolis, and has aided many young 
Alumni in securing positions. The St. Louis, Chicago, Pitts- 
burg, and Louisville Clubs have entertained the Seniors on 
their trips, and made these trips profitable and long to be 
remembered. 



Rose Polxtechnic Institute. 



Past Officers of Alumni Association, 



Year. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895- 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 



Presidents. 
.Benjamin McKeen, '85. 
. Samuel S. Early, '85. 
.H. St. Clair Putnam, '86. 
.John B. Aikman, '87. 
.Frank T. Hord, '88. 
.William J. Davis, Jr., '92. 
.Clinton B. Kidder, "88. 
.William R. McKeen, Jr., '89. 
.Victor K. Hendricks, '89. 
.George H. Chapman, '88. 
.Samuel D. Collett, '90. 
.John B. Peddle, 'SS. 
.Robert L. McCormick, '91. 
.Herbert W. Foltz, '86. 
.Herbert W. Follz, '86. 
.Robert L. McCormick, '91. 
.Robert L. McCormick, '91. 
.John B. Peddle, '88. 
.John B. Peddle, '88. 
.William E. Burk, '96. 
.Edson F. Folsom, "92. 
.John B. Aikman, '87. 



Vice Presidents. 
Edward C. Elder, '86. 
John A. Parkhurst, '86. 
William R. McKeen, Jr., '89. 
George R. Putnam, '90. 
Omar C. Mewhinney, '91. 
Edward C. Elder, '86. 
Herbert W. Foltz, '86. 
Austin H. Mory, '94. 
John B. Peddle, '88. 
Howard M. Stanton, '94. 
W. Offutt Mundy, '95. 
J. David Ingle, '97. 
Fred F. Hildreth, '94. 
Edwin S. Johonnott, '93. 
Robert L. McCormick, '91. 
Edwin S. Johonnott, '93. 
John B. Peddle, '88. 
Edwin S. Johonnott, '93. 
Edwin S. Johonnott, '93. 
George M. Davis, '88. 
Harry G. Brownell, '86. 
Harry G. Brownell, '86. 



Secretary- Treasurer. 



Year. 

I. .Herman F. Goetz, '87. 

). .Clinton B. Kidder, *88. 
g^l Herman F. Goet.-, '87. 
892.. George M. Davi?, '88. 



Year. 

1893) 

to > John B. Aikman, '87. 
1905 J 
1906) 

to [■ Arthur M. Hood, '93. 
1909 J 



Institute Organizations. 



117 



Commencement Speaker. 



Year. 

1895. .Francis T. Hord, '88. 

1896. .John B. Aikman, '87. 

1897. .Herbert Foltz, '86. 

1898. .VV. Arnold Layman, '92. 
1899.. Edwin S. Johonnott, '93. 
1900. .William H. Boehm, '91. 
1901.. Walter B. Wiley, '89. 



Year. 

1902.. Samuel S. Wales, '91. 

1903. .Chas. E. Mendenhall, 94. 

1904. .Edson F. Folsom, '92. 
1905.. Ozni P. Hood, '85. 

1906. .William E. Burk, '96. 

1907. .W. M. Anderson, '94. 

1908. .John G. D. Mack, '89. 



1909.. H. St. Clair Putnam, '86. 



Alumni Members of Board of Managers. 



Year. 

1899-01. .Benjamin McKeen, '85. 
1809-02. .Victor K. Hendricks, '89. 
1901-03 ) ^Y Arnold Layman, '92. 

1903-05 S 

1902-04. Fred F. Hildreth, '94. 



Year. 

1004-06 ) 

1906-08 [Herbert Foltz, '86. 

1905-07. .Theo. L. Condron,'9o. 
1907-09. .Arthur M. Hood, '93. 
1908-10. .William E. Burk, '96. 



ii8 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 



ABBREVIATIONS USED. 



A. A. A. S. — American Association for the Advancement of Science. 
F. A. A. A. S. — Fellow American Association for the Advancement 

of Science. 
A. S. P. E. E. — American Society for the Promotion of Engineering 

Education. 
A. S. C. E. — American Society of Civil Engineering. 
A. S. M. E. — American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 
A. I. E. E. — American Institute of Electrical Engineers. 
A. R. E. M. W. A. — American Railway Engineering and Maintenance 

of Way Association. 
A. I. N. A. — American Institute of Naval Architects. 
A. P. S. — American Physical Society. 
A. G. S. — American Geographical Society. 

A. C. S. — American Chemical Society. 

B. A. A. S. — British Association for the Advancement of Science. 
R. S. E.— Royal Society of Edinburgh. 



ALUMNI BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY. 



1. Eari,y, Samuel Stockvykll. 1885. 

Admitted to Institute in September, 1883, at the age of 19, from 
the Worcester Free Institute of Massachusetts ; graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in June, 1885; residence at the 
time of entrance was Terre Haute. After graduation entered 
the employ of S. S. Hepworth & Co., of Yonkers, N. Y., manu- 
facturers of sugar machinery, centrifugals, and engine lathes. 
This firm suspended operations in April, 1886 — as Mr. Early 
states in his autobiography, not because of the munificent salary 
which they paid him. From April, 1886, to September, 1886, 
served with Benjamin Silliman, architect, of Yonkers, N. Y., in 
architectural work. From September, 1886, to December, 1887, 
served with Sooysmith & Co., of New York City, contractors 
and builders of subaqueous foundations for railroad bridges, 
lighthouses, etc., severing his connection with that firm because 
of failure in health. In March, 1888, he became private secre- 
tary to President W. R. McKeen, of the Vandalia Railroad, who 
was an intimate friend, remaining with him until June 30, 1893; 
this brought him back to his home at Terre Haute. In July of 
1893 was made General Manager and Treasurer of the Terre 
Haute Shovel and Tool Company, manufacturers of shovels, 
spades, scoops, etc., in which capacity he served until 1903, when 
these works became absorbed by the Ames Shovel and Tool 
Company. He was transferred on July i, 1903, to North Easton, 
Mass., as Manager of the Oliver Ames & Sons Corporation 
Plant, of the Ames Shovel and Tool Company, which position 
he holds at the present date. On January 21, 1891, he was mar- 
ried at Terre Haute. Served on the Board of Managers of the 
Rose Pol)rtechnic Institute from 1901 until his position was 
vacated because of removal from Terre Haute to North Easton, 
Mass., and President of the Alumni Association 1891 and 1908. 

2. Hood, Ozni Porter. 1885. 

Born June 14, 1865, in Lowell, Mass. Entered the Rose Poly- 
technic Institute on September 18, 1883. He was admitted from 
the Junior class of the Worcester Free Institute of Massa- 



I20 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

chusetts. His residence at the time of entrance to the R. P. I. 
was Indianapolis, Ind. Graduated in the Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Course. Immediately after his graduation in 1885 served 
with H. P. Hood at Indianapolis as patternmaker, and iecame 
Superintendent of the Royal Manufacturing Company in 1886. 
From September, 1886. to 1887, acted as Superintendent of the 
shops of the Kansas State Agricultural College. In 1887 was 
made Professor of Mechanics and Engineering, which profes- 
sorship he held until June, 1898, when he was elected Professor 
of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering in the Michigan 
School of Mines, which position he has filled with signal suc- 
cess. He has combined with his professorial and teaching work 
the work of Consulting Mechanical Engineer, and acts in this 
capacity for more than twenty of the copper and iron mines in 
Michigan. His work has been along both the lines of teaching 
and practical engineering. The degree of M.S. was conferred 
upon him in 1895 and that of M.E. in 1898, both from Rose. 
He is a member of the A. S. M. E., A. I. M. E., S. P. E. E.. 
and A. A. A. S. He has been a contributor to technical liter- 
ature. In the American Machinist and Transactions of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers account of his work 
may be found. He was married at Terre Haute on July 31, 18K4. 
Commencement speaker, 1905. 

3. McKee;n, Be;njamin. 1885. 

Born at Terre Haute January 29, 1864. Admitted to the Rose 
Polytechnic Institute September, 1883, from the Worcester Free 
Institute, where he had attended the years of i88i-'83; grad- 
uated in Mechanical Engineering Course in 1885. In Septem- 
ber, 1885, entered the railroad service as draftsman in the office 
of Superintendent of Motive Power and Machinery of the T. H. 
& I. Railroad. Later served as rodman in the engineering corps, 
and in April, 1886, was appointed resident engineer on the work 
of cutting down the Rockville grade on the Logansport Division 
of that railroad. On January i, 1887, was appointed Engineer 
of Maintenance of Way, Logansport Division, and in 1889 was 
Chief Engineer of Construction in completing the Indiana & 
Lake Michigan Railroad in addition to being Engineer of Main- 
tenance of Way of the Logansport Division. On completion of 
the I. & L. M. R. R., 1890, was made Engineer of Maintenance 
of Way of that division. August i, 1892, was transferred to 
the Peoria Division as Engineer of Maintenance of Way, and 
on January 5, 1894, was advanced to the position of Superin- 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. I2i 

tendent of that division. June lO, 1901, was appointed Super- 
intendent of the Main Line Division of the Vandalia Railroad. 
April I, 1902, was appointed Superintendent of the Chicago 
Terminal Divisions of the Pennsylvania Lines west of Pitts- 
burg. This transferred his residence to Chicago. On Decem- 
ber IS, 1903, was further advanced to the position of General 
Manager of the Vandalia Line, with office at St. Louis, Mo., 
which position he holds to-day. In 1895 he became a member 
of the A. S. C. E. On October 20, 1901, he was married in 
Terre Haute. Mr. McKeen has been continuously in railroad 
service since graduation. He was the first President of the 
Alumni Association in 1888, and served as Alumni member on 
the Board of Managers in 1899 and 1901. 

4. Brokaw, Charles Cruft. 1886. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute March, 1883, age 19. 
Graduated from Mechanical Engineering Course in 1886. Was 
draftsman for Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company 
for two years ; then was with the Benner Iron Company, of 
Chicago, for more than a year ; then in Bridge Department of 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. In 1892 was Assistant 
Engineer of Brown Hoisting and Conveying Company, and in 
1893 Chief Draftsman of the Pittsburg & Lake Erie Railway, 
which position he held until his death in 1894. 

5. BrowneIvL, Harry Galt. 1886. 

Born at Elmhurst, 111., August 9, 1866. Entered the Institute 
in September, 1883; graduated from Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1886. After graduation entered the employ of the 
Chicago Edison Company, with which company he remained 
until 1887. Then became Assistant City Foreman of the Belding 
Motor and Manufacturing Company, remaining with them until 
1890. Then was Foundry Superintendent with George E. Lloyd 
& Co., of Chicago. Also acted as designer of machinery, and 
became identified with the National Schools of Electricity, in 
charge of lecture and class-room work until 1895. Was then 
elected to the position of Principal of the Manual Training 
High School at Louisville, where he served until 1903, when he 
resigned, and identified himself with the University School of 
Louisville, remaining until 1908. During this whole time acted 
in various establishments as consulting engineer. Since he 
severed his connection with the University School has acted 



122 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

entirely as consulting engineer. Was married in Terre Haute, 
May, 1888. Mr. Brownell's work has been both along the engi- 
neering and educational lines. He planned equipment for sev- 
eral large power plants in Louisville, and while associated with 
the Belding people designed one of the first compound-wound 
electro-plating dynamos. 

6. Chappi^e, John Tucker. 1886. 

Entered the Institute on March 6, 1883, at the age of 16, from 
Terre Haute; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1886. From 1887 to 1891 occupied a position with Nordyke 
& Marmon Mills and Mill Equipment Company at Indianapolis. 
From 1891 to 1894 he was engaged with the Indianapolis Bicycle 
Company at Indianapolis. From 1895 to 1900 he was with the 
firm of J. T. Chappie & Sons, plane sifter mills, at Mitchell. 
From 1901 has been engaged in mercantile business in Mitchell. 
No record has been obtainable from him in recent years. 

7. Elder, Edward Cunton. 1886. 

Entered the Institute on March 6, 1883, age 19, from Indianap- 
olis. Graduated in 1886, and was employed with the Indianap- 
olis Rolling Mill Company at Indianapolis from 1887 to 1888; 
in 1889 with the Archer Gas and Fuel Company of Cleveland, 
Ohio ; in 1890 with the P. H. & F. M. Roots Company at Con- 
nersville. From 1891 to 1898 was Secretary of the Clay Shingle 
Company at Indianapolis. Then studied medicine, graduating 
from the Indianapolis Medical College with the degree of M.D. 
April, 1901. In 1902 became Senior Assistant Physician of 
the Northern Indiana Hospital for the Insane at Logansport, 
remaining there until 1905. To date has been a practicing 
physician, his home address being Indianapolis. 

8. FoLTz, Herbert. 1886. 

Born at Indianapolis, February 23, 1867; entered the Institute 
March, 1883; graduated in the Course of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing in 1886. In 1887 entered the service of the Illinois Steel 
Company at Joliet, 111., remaining four years, after which en- 
tered the Art Institute at Chicago, and in 1891 began practice 
of architecture at Indianapolis, in which work he has continued 
to date. In 1904 associated himself with Wilson B. Parker, 
firm style, Foltz & Parker, Associated Architects. In 1898 was 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 123 

elected to Fellowship in the American Institute of Architects. 
Some of the larger commissions which have come to him are 
the plans for the Southeastern Indiana Hospital for the Insane, 
at Madison, the aggregate appropriations already made for this 
amounting to $1,500,000 ; the Indianapolis Y. M. C. A. ; Terre 
Haute Y. W. C. A. ; La Porte County Jail; College of Medi- 
cine, Indiana University; Science Building of Earlham College, 
a considerable number of public school buildings, and many of 
the most attractive residences in Indianapolis. He was married 
at Joliet, 111., on August 3, 1893. Mr. Foltz's unselfish services 
in connection with the Institute as member of the Board of 
Managers and as official in the Alumni Association are noted 
elsewhere. 

9. Hedges, Arthur Willis. 1886. 

Entered the Institute March, 1883, from Clinton, Ind.. age 18; 
graduated in the course of Mechanical Engineering in 1886. 
After graduation entered into business pursuits in Clinton, and 
in 1892 became associated with the Citizens' Bank at Clinton. 
Was made cashier of that bank in 1894, which position he holds 
to date. 

10. Masterson, Wesley Cline. 1886. 

Born at Carrollton, Ky., July i, 1866. Entered the Institute in 
March, 1883; graduated in 1886. From 1886 to 1895 occupied a 
position in the drafting room of the Indianapolis Car and Man- 
ufacturing Company. From 189S to 1900 was engaged in the 
Railway Mail Service; from 1900 to 1902 in the drafting room 
of the Outing Bicycle Company; from 1902 to 1903 with the 
Hearsey Vehicle Company. Since 1893 he has been in service 
as Secretary with the E. P. King Company. Residence, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

11. Park HURST, John Adelbert. 1886. 

Born in Dixon, 111., September 24, 1861. Entered the Institute 
in September, 1883; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1886. From September, 1886, to June, 1888, Instructor 
in Mathematics in the Institute. From 1888 to 1898 he gave his 
time to the study of astronomy in his private observatory at 
Marengo, 111. In 1898 was made Instructor of Astronomy at 
the Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, Wis., where he remains 



124 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

to date. Was granted the degree of M.S. by Rose in 1897, and 
the degree of A.B. by Wheaton College in 1906. Is a member 
of the Astronomical and Astrophysical Society of America, of 
the Astronomische Gesellschaft, and of the Royal Astronomical 
Society. Was married at Terre Haute in 1888. His original 
work has been mainly the determination of the Period and Light 
Curves of Variable Stars, the Spectra Stars, Determination of 
Faint Stellar Magnitudes, which work was done in 1906 under 
the auspices of the Carnegie Institution, and original work on 
the Absolute System of Photographic Magnitudes of Stars. His 
work on variable stars is classic, and his study has opened a 
new field in Stellar Photometry and Photographic Photometry. 

12. Putnam, Henry St. Clair. 1886. 

Born at Davenport, Iowa, July 8, 1861. Entered Rose Poly- 
technic Institute on September 18, 1884. Before entering the 
Institute studied law with his father, and graduated from the 
Law Department of Iowa State University with honors in 1882, 
with the degree of LL-D. His early desire to become an engi- 
neer culminated in his entering the Junior class of the Insti- 
tute. He graduated in 1886 from the Mechanical Engineering 
Course. In 1887 entered the service of the Thomson-Houston 
Electric Light Works at Lynn, Mass., remaining with them until 
1888, at which time the Thomson-Houston Carbon Company 
was organized, of which he was made Director, Treasurer, and 
Engineer, works at Fremont, Ohio. From 1892 to 1894 acted in 
various capacities as Electrical Engineer, and in 1894 was made 
General Manager of the American Carbon Works at Nobles- 
ville. In 1895 began the work of Consulting Engineer, with 
offices in Chicago, remaining until 1900, when he removed to 
Philadelphia, and was associated with Horatio A. Foster, and 
in 1904 removed to New York, associated in partnership with 
L. B. Stillwell. He was granted the degree of M.S. by Rose in 
1905 and the degree of E.E. in 1907. He has membership in 
the A. I. E. E., A. A. A. S., A. G. S., Davenport Academy of 
Science, Railroad Club of New York, Engineers' Club of New 
York, and various social clubs. His work as electrical engineer 
has been varied, the most important of it having to do with the 
electric transportation problem. He has contributed to scientific 
literature some twenty-eight articles and papers upon electrical 
engineering subjects. President of the Alumni Association, 
1890. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 125 

13. Sames, Chari^es McCaughey, 1886. 

Entered Rose Polytechnic Institute in March, 1883, age 17, from 
Rockford, 111. ; graduated in Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1886. Entered service of the Thomson-Houston Electric 
Company at Lynn, Mass., immediately after graduation, remain- 
ing until 1887. In 1887 was made Superintendent and Business 
Manager of the Wagon and Implement Works of Peter Sames, 
his father, at Rockford, 111. Served almost continuously in this 
capacity with some interruptions until 1900. In 1890 for a short 
time was Electrical Engineer for the Shaw Electric Crane 
Company at Milwaukee, Wis., and also engaged in the manu- 
facture of electric motors at Rockford, 111. In 1901 he removed 
to Jersey City, N. J., and spent several years in travel, and in 
preparing a manuscript for a pocket book of Mechanical Engi- 
neering, first issued in 1905, reaching a third edition in 1908. 
From 1903 to 1906 he acted as Consulting Mechanical Engineer, 
and in 1906 became editor of Book Publications for the Engi- 
neering News Publishing Company at New York City. In 1907 
became editor of the Engineering Digest, first founded under 
the name of Technical Literature, and has been acting in this 
capacity to date. He was married on December 20, 1899. Mr. 
Sames's pocket book has received merited recognition, as is 
indicated from the rapid call for new editions. 

14. Sanderj^n, David Powers. 1886. 

Born at Cedar GrovCj Ind., October 4, 1863 ; entered the Insti- 
tute March 6, 1883 ; graduated in Civil Engineering Course in 
1886. In 1887 became Assistant Engineer with P. M. Blake, 
Hydraulic Engineer, at Hyde Park, Mass. From 1888 to 1889 
acted as Assistant Engineer for the N. P. Railway through 
Montana, Idaho, and Washington, with headquarters at Tacoma. 
In 1890 became Engineer for Anacortes and Fidalgo City, 
Wash., and Chief Engineer for the F. C. & A. Electric Railway. 
In 1891 removed to South Bend and served with James & Rixon. 
Then returned to railway work, entering the Operating Depart- 
ment, serving with the Great Northern Railway at Seattle in 
1893, and with the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad at Seattle 
from 1894 to 1896. Since then served the Traffic Department as 
General Agent of the Great Northern Railway at Vancouver, 
B. C. Was married March 25, 1900. 



126 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

15. Scott, Charles Edgar. 1886. 

Entered the Institute March 6, 1883, at the age of 22, from Terre 
Haute; graduated in Mechanical Engineering Department in 
1886. From 1887 to 1889 served as draftsman with E. S. Bab- 
cock, Architect, at San Diego, Cal. In 1889 entered the service 
of the California Tool Company at San Francisco. In 1890 
entered the office of Reid Bros., Architects, in San Francisco. 
In 1892 removed to Danville, III, and became a member of the 
firm of Mater & Scott, Architects. In 1893 removed to Terre 
Haute, and has been professionally engaged as architect to date. 
He made plans for and superintended the construction of many 
of the large business blocks and warehouses. 

16. Seath, James Ross. 1886. 

Entered the Institute March 6, 1883, at the age of 20, from 
Terre Haute; graduated from the Mechanical Engineering De- 
partment in 1886. In 1887 entered the service of the Terre 
Haute Car and Manufacturing Company, of which his father 
was Superintendent. In 1888 became a member of the firm of 
King-Seath Stove Foundry, Terre Haute. In 1892 served as 
draftsman with the Medart Patent Pulley Works at St. Louis, 
Mo. In 1893 returned to Terre Haute and became Secretary of 
the Terre Haute Car and Manufacturing Company. No record 
of his activities after 1898 at hand. 

17. Shrader, William Henry. 1886. 

Entered Institute in March, 1883, at the age of 16, from Terre 
Haute; graduated in 1886 in the Mechanical Course. In 1887 
was graduate student at the Royal Polytechnic in Berlin, and 
in 1888 changed to the University of Strassburg ; in 1901 be- 
came assistant to Professor Kohlrausch in the Royal University 
of Strassburg. Returned to this country in 1892 and was made 
Assistant Professor of Physics in the University of Missouri. 
In 1893 became Professor of Electrical Engineering, which posi- 
tion he filled with distinguished ability until his death at 
Columbia, Mo., on August 13, 1896. 

18. Sullivan, Lucien Norris. 1886. 

Born at Indianapolis, Ind., April 16, 1864. Entered the Institute 
in March, 1883 : graduated in June. 1886, from the Mechanical 
Engineering Course. Acted as rodman with the Missouri Pa- 
cific Railway in Missouri from 1886 to 1887. In 1887, draftsman 
for the San Diego & Coronado Beach Company at San Diego, 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 127 

Calif., in 1888 draftsman of the Union Iron Works at San 
Francisco, and in 1890 draftsman of the Starr Milling Company 
at Crockett, Calif., remaining with them until his removal to 
Chicago, where he entered the Car Department of the C. & N. 
W. Railway, serving until 1894. In 1894 was made Inspector 
of Public Works for the City of Indianapolis. From 1895 to 
1896 acted as Superintendent and Engineer with drainage con- 
tractors at San Antonio, Texas, and also had charge of the 
street improvements and paving of the City of Monterey, 
Mexico. In 1896 removed to Chicago, serving as draftsman for 
Fraser & Chalmers Manufacturing Company and the Fred W. 
Wolf Company. In 1898 was elected Instructor in Mechanical 
Engineering in the Lehigh University at Bethlehem, Pa., and 
in 1899 was with the Bethlehem Steel Works. During 1900 he 
traveled in Europe, and in inoi returned to New York, serving 
with Babcock & Wilcox Boiler Company. From 1902 to 1906 
he again served as Instructor of Metallurgical and Mining 
Design in Lehigh University. He spent the summer of 1903 in 
South America as Engineer, and in 1906 became Engineer of 
the Mines Division at Pachuca, Hidalgo, Mexico. In 1908 re- 
turned to the States, and is serving now on the General S'?ff 
of the War Department, in the Army War College at Washing- 
ton, in connection with the translation of Spanish, French, Ger- 
man, and Italian works. He received the degree of M.S. from 
Lehigh University in June, 1905, and the degree of M.E. from 
Rose in 1908. Is a member of the A. S. M. E., A. A. A. S., 
N. G. S., and the Washington Society of Engineers. He was 
married in Washington, D. C, November. 1905. 

19. WiivKiNS, John Thomas. 1886. 

Entered the Institute September, 1883, from Terre Haute, age 
20; graduated in the Mechanical Department in 1886. From 
1887 to 1890 served with Root Bros., manufacturers of blowers, 
at Connersville. From 1890 to 1893 was draftsman for the 
P. H. & F. M. Roots Company at Connersville. In 1893 became 
Engineer for the Connersville Blower Company, maufacturers 
of rotary blowers, pumps, etc. Acquired a large interest in this 
concern, and has been identified with it to date. Was granted 
the degree of M.S. from Rose in 1893, and the M. E. degree 
in 1895. Member of A. S. M. E. ^Ir. Wilkins especially devel- 
oped and holds patents on cycloidal form of blowers and pumps, 
the machinery for the manufacture of which was the subject of 
study and design for a number of years. Married. 



128 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

20. Airman, John Barr. 1887. 

Born at Washington, Ind., July 15, 1866; entered the Institute 
in September, 1883 ; graduated in June, 1887, from the Mechan- 
ical Engineering Department. Served as draftsman for I. D. 
Smead Company at Toledo, O., from August ist to October, 
1887. In 1887 became Cashier for the Colorado Midland Rail- 
road at Leadville, Colo. The same year became Cashier for 
the Arkansas Valley Smelting Company., remaining in their 
service to March i, 1889. In 1889 returned to Terre Haute, 
acquiring an interest in the firm of J. R. Duncan & Co., whole- 
sale stationery and paper company, becoming Assistant Manager 
of the business in 1901. Upon the death of Mr. J. R. Duncan, 
became General Manager of the business, which, in 1905, was 
incorporated into the J. R. Duncan Paper and Stationery Com- 
pany, of which company he is President and General Manager, 
also of several allied companies, dealers in supplies. Branch 
houses of this business are maintained at Mattoon and Decatur, 
111. Married December 5, 1888. at Terre Haute. Mr. Aikman 
vk'as elected to the Board of Managers of the Rose Polytechnic 
Institute in 1898. His services in connection with the Alumni 
Association have been active and may be found in the roster 
of the Alumni officers. 

21. Baur, Oscar. 1887. 

Born September 9, 1867, at Terre Haute ; entered the Institute 
September, 1883, and graduated in June, 1887. Became drafts- 
man with E. P. Allis & Co. Reliance Works at Milwaukee, Wis., 
in July, 1887, and continued with them until June, 1888. From 
July to November, 1888, served with the Liquid Carbonic Com- 
pany at ^lilwaukee. From 1889 to 1892 engaged in orange 
growing on a plantation at Tallahassee, Fla. Since 1892 has 
been engaged as General Engineer and Superintendent with the 
Liquid Carbonic Acid Company of Milwaukee, Chicago, Pitts- 
burg, and New York. Married December 16, 1897. 

22. Cox, Frank Povvkll. 1887. 

Born at Terre Haute, Ind., December 31, 1866; entered the 
In.stitute in September, 1883 ; graduated in the Mechanical 
Course in 1887. From 1887 to 1888 was graduate student at 
Johns Hopkins University. In 1889 became Electrician for the 
Kester Motor Company at Terre Haute. In 1890 entered service 
of the Thomson Electric Welding Company at Lynn, Mass. 



Aluinni Biographical Dictionary. 129 

In 1893 was transferred to the electric meter department of the 
Thomson-Houston Electric Company at Lynn, Mass. In 1895 
became Electrical Engineer for the General Electric Company 
at Lynn, which position he holds to date. Married at Balti- 
more, June 7, 1888. Member of the A. L E. E. Mr. Cox's 
work, especially in the Meter Department, while associated with 
the General Electric Company, was recognized by the awarding 
of the silver medal at the St. Louis Exposition, which he mod- 
estly states should have been divided among a number of the 
engineers who worked under him. 

23. GoETz, Herman Fred. 1887. 

Entered the Institute in September, 1883, at the age of 16, from 
Terre Haute. Graduated in 1887 from Mechanical Department. 
After graduation became associated with the firm Temple & 
Goetz, planing mill, Terre Haute. From 1891 to 1894 engaged 
in business of furniture dealer with his father, F. Goetz. From 
1895 to 1897 was engaged in brokerage business at Quincy. 111. 
In 1897 took up study of medicine at Kirksville, Mo. He has 
been engaged in the practice of his profession since 1902 at St. 
Louis, Mo. Was Secretary-Treasurer of Alumni Association, 
1887-90 and '91. 

24. HiBBiTS, Frank Ney. 1887. 

Entered Institute September 18, 1883, at the age of 18, from 
Aluncie. Graduated in 1887. After graduation engaged as 
draftsman at Chattanooga, Tenn. In 1889 became Assistant 
Inspector for the C. C. C. & W. Railroad, Pullman, 111. In 
1890, Inspector of car and foundry work for the C. C. C. & St. L. 
Railroad, St. Louis. In 1891 was in the Drafting Department 
of the same railroad at Indianapolis. In 1892 entered the Engi- 
neering Department of the Erie Railroad Company at Susque- 
hanna, Pa. In 1893 became Mechanical Engineer for the N. Y., 
L. E. & W. Division of the Erie Railroad at Susquehanna, 
serving until 1896. Then became Trainmaster of the Eastern 
Division of the Erie Railroad at Port Jervis, N. Y., remaining 
until 1899. Was then transferred to the Jefferson Division at 
Carbondale, Pa., in 1900. In 190T was with the New York 
Division at Rochester, N. Y. From 1901 to 1904 was Mechan- 
ical Engineer for the LTnion Pacific Railway at Omaha, Neb., 
and in 1904 Mechanical Engineer of the Southern Railway at 
Washington, D. C. : in 1905 ]\Iechanical Superintendent for the 
N. Y.. N. H. & H. Railroad at New Haven, Conn. In 1907 

9 



130 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

became Superintendent of Motive Power of the Lehigh Valley 
Railroad at South Bethlehem, Pa. Thus Mr. Hibbits' service 
in railroad work extends from 1889 to date, with constant 
advancement. 

25. Mack, John Givan Davis. 1887. 

Born at Terre Haute September 5, 1867. Entered Institute 
September, 1883; graduated in June, 1887. Entered Cornell 
University as graduate student in 1888. From 1889 to 1892 em- 
ployed with the firm of Jones & Rogers, Mechanical Engineers, 
at Cincinnati ; 1892 to 1893 with the firm of Jones & Mack, 
Mechanical Engineers, Cincinnati. In 1894 became Instructor in 
Engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., 
and in 1901 was made Professor of Machine Design of the Col- 
lege of Engineering, University of Wisconsin. Given the degree 
of M.E., Cornell, in 1888. Member A. S. M. E. In addition to 
his work as Professor in the University of Wisconsin, Mr. Mack 
has had to do with engineering work and served in the Valua- 
tions for the Wisconsin Tax and Railroad Commission for the 
past five years, and is now in charge of the Mechanical Work 
on Railroads and Public Utilities, a commission of that State. 
He was married in 1903 at Cincinnati, O. In 1908 he repre- 
sented the Alumni at Rose as Commencement speaker. 

26. Mering, Barclay George. 1887. 

Born at Cincinnati, Ohio, July 22, 1864. Entered Institute Sep- 
tember, 1883 ; graduated in 1887. From 1888 to 1890 served as 
draftsman with the John T. Noye Manufacturing Company at 
Buflfalo. From 1890 to 1892 with Theo. A. Elliott, Mechanical 
Engineer, at Buffalo. Engineer with R. Dunbar & Son, Eagle 
Iron Works at BuflFalo, Architects and Contractors, from 1892 to 
1897. From 1897 to 1900 acted as Mechanical and Consulting 
Engineer at Buffalo. From 1900 to 1904. Mechanical Engineer 
with the American Cereal Company at Chicago. From 1904 to 
1907, associated as Grain Elevator Contractor with Barnard & 
Leas Manufacturing Company at Moline, 111. From 1907 to 
date. Mechanical Engineer for the American Hominy Company, 
of Indianapolis. Married at Buffalo, N. Y., in 1895. Received 
degree of M.S. from Rose in 1897. Mr. Mering's larger work 
has been in connection with the building of brick and reinforced 
concrete grain elevators and power plants for the Quaker Oats 
Company, the American Hominy Company, etc. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 131 

27. PAI.MER, W1L1.1AM Henry. 1887. 

Born January 25, 1867, at Watseka, 111. Entered Institute Sep- 
tember, 1883; graduated in Mechanical Engineering in 1887. 
After graduation, with the Thomson-Houston Electric Company 
until 1890. From 1890 to 1891 was in the service of the Wen- 
strom Consolidated Dynamo and Motor Company at Baltimore. 
Owing to illness his work was interrupted, and he was not able 
to take it up again for some time. From 1891 to 1892 acted as 
clerk and telegraph operator with the P. D. & E. Railroad at 
Peoria. In 1892 became Superintendent of the Omaha Con- 
solidated Electric Company. In 1893 entered service of the 
h; E. & St. L. Railroad at St. Louis, and from 1894 to 1899 was 
associated with the Missouri Edison Electric Company at St. 
Louis. His work there was especially in connection with under- 
ground and conduit work. From 1899 to 1900 was Engineer 
for the Great Northern Railway at St. Paul, Minn., doing 
experimental work in connection with train lighting system, 
remaining until 1906, when he established an office as Consulting 
Engineer. Acted as Engineer of Tests of Steam and Power 
Plants for the Tennessee Copper Company, Copperhill, Tenn. 
In 1907 became Master Mechanic of the I. & L. Traction Com- 
pany at Scottsburg, Ind. From 1908, Manager and Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Zionsville Water and Electric Light Company. 
Married September 17, 1895, at Edgewater, 111. 

28. Chapman, George; Henry. 1888. 

Entered the Institute 1884, at the age of 17. from Indianapolis. 
Graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1888. 
After graduation, from 1889 to 1891, was with the Northwestern 
Lumber Company, of Eau Claire, Wis. In 1891 with the Mon- 
treal River Company, Gile, Wis. In 1892 returned to Eau Claire 
with the Northwestern Company. In 1902 was made Sales Man- 
ager, and in 1903 also Secretary of the Linderman Box and 
Veneer Company, Eau Claire. In 1905 was made General Man- 
ager of the Northwestern Lumber Company, Stanley, Wis., with 
which company he has served to date. No further personal 
record of Mr. Chapman is at hand. 

29. Davis, George M. t888. 

Bom December 22, 1868, at Waveland, Ind. Entered the Insti- 
tute 1884. Graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 



132 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

1888. After graduation took up the study of law, receiving 
degree of LL.B. from the University of Michigan. He special- 
ized in the practice of law along the line of railroads, mining, 
and corporation litigation together with expert and legal work 
in connection with the securing of United States patents and 
patent law litigation. He is associated with his father in a law 
office of Davis & Davis, of Terre Haute. He was married 
December 8, 1896. 

30. Haring, Harry D. 1888. 

Born at Aurora, Ind., March 3, 1867. Entered the Institute 
1884, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
June, 1888. In 1889 served with the Van Depoele Electric 
Manufacturing Company, of Chicago. In 1890 with the Sprague 
Electric Company, of Chicago. In 1891 with the United Edison 
Companies, of Chicago. In 1892 with the Edison General 
Electric Company, of Cincinnati. In 1893 with the Card Elec- 
tric Motor and Dynamo Company, of Cincinnati. From 1894 
to 1896 was Assistant to the Chief Engineer of the Fort Wayne 
Electric Company at Fort Wayne, Ind. From 1896 to 1899 was 
made agent for the Fort Wayne Company at Cincinnati. From 
1899 to 1902 served in the Sales Department of the Western 
Electric Company, of Chicago, and in 1902 was made Indiana 
State Agent for the same company, with office at Indianapolis, 
serving in that capacity to date. He was married June, 1897, 
at Indianapolis. 

31. HoRD, Francis Triplett. 1888. 

Entered from Indianapolis in 1884, age 17. Graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in 1888. After graduation spent 
a year in Europe. Then entered the law office of General 
Harrison in Indianapolis. In 1890 entered the University of 
Michigan as a student of law. Received the degree of LL.B. 
in 1892. In 1893 returned to Indianapolis, and was of the firm 
of Hord & Perkins, Attorneys at Law. Served as member of the 
Indiana Legislature in that year. In 1894 the firm became Hord, 
Perkins & Miller. Continued the practice of law until the time 
of his death. May 16, 1901. Was married in 1889 in Terre 
Haute. Delivered the first Commencement Address that repre- 
sented the Alumni, in June, 1895. President of the Alumni 
Association, 1892. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 133 

32. Kidder, Ci^inton Baxter. 1888. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 1884, at the age of 17, 
and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1888. 
In 1889 entered the service of the Sprague Electric Equipment 
Company, of Chicago, working in connection with the installing 
of the electric street railway lines in Cincinnati, Ohio, for the 
Cincinnati Incline Plane Street Railway Company, and re- 
mained with that company as the Electrician in charge of their 
electrical equipment until 1890, when he returned to Terre 
Haute and entered the service of the Terre Haute Street Rail- 
way Company, installing electric equipment and erecting steam 
plant, and remained as Electrical Engineer in charge of same, 
also acting as Manager of the Willard Kidder Cooper Shops. 
In 1894 entered the service of the Overman Wheel Company 
at Chicopee Falls, Mass., manufacturers of the Victor bicycles, 
as Consulting Mechanical and Electrical Engineer, and later 
as Superintendent of the factory until 1899. He then entered 
the service of Stone & Webster, Consulting Engineers, of Bos- 
ton, serving as Manager of the Street Railway and Lighting 
properties of the Terre Haute Electric Company, Brazil Elec- 
tric Lighting Company, Edison Electric Illuminating Company, 
of Savannah, Ga., and Savannah Electric Company, until 1894; 
all of these were Stone & Webster plants. In 1904 he was 
engaged in installing electric hydraulic mining plants in the 
Yukon territories. From 1905 to date he has looked after the 
interests of farm properties belonging to his father, and also 
serves as Manager of the Northern Light Electric Company 
at Wahpeton, North Dakota. Was married in 1896. President 
of Alumni Association, 1894; Secretary-Treasurer, 1888. 

33. Moore, Allen Henry. 1888, 

Born at Rutland, Vermont, February, 1865. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1886 with Junior standing on credit? from the University 
of Vermont. Entered from Danville, 111., and graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in 1888. Entered the student 
course of the Thomson-Houston Electric Company at Lynn, 
Mass., in 1888. From 1889 to 1892 served as Erecting Engineer 
for the Thomson-Houston Company and the Thomson-Houston 
International Company in the United States, Mexico, Canada, 
and Germany until 1892. From 1892 to 1899 was Manager 
of the works of the Union Elektricitates Gesellschaft, Berlin, 
Germany. From 1899 to 1902 was Manager of the works of the 



134 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

British Thomson-Houston Company at Rugby, England. He 
was recalled to America in 1902 by the General Electric Com- 
pany to Schenectady, N. Y., where he has remained to date as 
Chairman of the Standardizing Committee. He is a member 
of the A. S. M. E. Was married in Boston, Mass., in i8qi. 

34. PEDDI.E, John B. 1888. 

Born February 27, 1868, at Terre Haute. Entered the Institute 
in 1884; graduated in Mechanical Engineering Course in 1888. 
After graduation was with the Thomson-Houston Electric 
Company at Lynn, Mass., for one year and a half. Then a year 
with the Dodge Coal Storage Company at Nicetown, Pa. Three 
and a half years with the Worthington Hydraulic Company, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. From 1894 to date, teaching at Rose Poly- 
technic Institute, first as Instructor in Drawing Department, 
and since 1896 as Associate Professor and Professor of Machine 
Design. Married June 21, 1897, at Nashville, Tenn. Received 
M.S. degree in 1895, and M.E. in 1900, both from Rose. Was 
President of the Alumni Association in 1899, 1905, and 1906. 

35. Rauchfuss, Oscar R. 1888. 

Entered the Institute in 1884 from Golconda, 111., at the age of 
18. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1888. In 1889 
served as Engineer in the Maintenance of Way Department of 
the B. C. & E. Railroad at Belville, 111. From 1890 to 1892 
served as Assistant Engineer on the N. & K. Railroad, Cooke- 
ville, Tenn. In 1892 with the Baltimore City Passenger Rail- 
road Company at Baltimore. From 1893 to 1896 was City 
Engineer of Joliet, 111., and associated himself with Mr. Zinn 
in the firm of Rauchfuss & Zinn. From 1896 to 1899 was 
Engineer and Superintendent for Campbell & Davis, General 
Contractors, of Joliet. From 1899 to 1901 acted as Manager of 
the Diamond Soda Works, Milwaukee, Wis. From 1902 to 1903 
served as Manager of the Liquid Carbonic Acid Gas Manufac- 
turing Company at Milwaukee and Pittsburg. In 1903 entered 
the service of the Gulf Refining Company at Port Arthur, Texas, 
as District Sales Manager, removing to New Orleans in 1905, 
and died in the summer of 1906. 

36. Scroll, Julian. 1888. 

Born April 28, 1867, at Indianapolis. Entered the Institute 
September, 1884; graduated from the Mechanical Engineering 



' Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 135 

Course in 1888. From 1888 to 1890 served as machinist and 
draftsman for the Harrisburg Foundry and Machine Works at 
Harrisburg, Pa. Was engaged especially in automatic engine 
and steam roller design and construction. In 1890 entered the 
service of the Weston Engineering Company, manufacturers of 
automatic steam engines at Painted Post, N. Y. In 1891 estab- 
lished himself as Mechanical Engineer in New York City, also 
representing the Weston Engineering Company. He equipped 
many of the large buildings in New York with complete 
steam and pawer plants. Still interested in the design of road 
machinery, he continued his work along that line. In 1893 
began the building and manufacturing of a line of road ma- 
chinery, which developed in the Universal Steam Rollers and 
Reliance Stone Crushers, exhibited at the World's Fair in St. 
Louis. He has continued to date in the design and development 
of road machinery under style of Julian Scholl, of New York. 

37. Waters, Edward Guy. 1888. 

Born in Peru, Ind., in 1866. Entered the Institute from Terre 
Haute September, 1884; graduated from the Mechanical Engi- 
neering Course in 1888. In the year 1888 to 1889 was a graduate 
student at Rose, and also acted as Laboratory Instructor. In 
1890 entered the service of the Thomson-Houston Electric 
Company at Lynn, Mass., and from 1891 to 1896 was Manager 
of the Pittsburg office. From 1896 to 1903 he was Assistant to 
the First Vice President of the General Electric Company at 
New York. From 1903 to 1906 was Manager of the Commercial 
Department of the British Thomson-Houston Company, Ltd., 
Rugby, England. In March, 1906, was recalled to Schenectady, 
N. Y., as Assistant to the First Vice President and Secretary of 
the Sales Committee of the General Electric Company. This 
position he occupies to date. He is a member of the A. I. E. E. 
Was married in 1893 at Terre Haute, Ind. For nineteen years 
has been in the service of the General Electric Company. 

38. Weller, Edward Anderson. 1888. 

Entered the Institute 1884 from Canonsburg, Pa., at the age of 
18; graduated from the Mechanical Course in 1888. In 1889 
entered the service of the United States Scale Works, of Terre 
Haute, in the capacity of Superintendent. From 1890 to 1892 
served with the Carnegie-Phipps Company at Pittsburg, Pa. 
From 1892 to 1894 with Schoenberger & Co. Juanita Iron and 
Steel Works, Pittsburg. In 1894 served with the Linden Steel 



136 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Compan}^ Pittsburg. In 1895 with the Mackintosh, Hemphill 
Company, Pittsburg. 1895 to 1896 with the Jones & Laughlin 
Company at Pittsburg. From 1896 to 1899 with M. E. Anderson 
Foundry and Machine Works, Anderson. Ind. From 1899 to 
1901 was Mechanical Engineer with the Illinois Steel Company 
at Chicago. From 1901 to 1906 Mechanical and Electrical Engi- 
neer for Hoover & Mason, Contracting Engineers, of Chicago. 
From 1906 to 1907 Superintendent of the Berger Manufacturing 
Company, Canton, Ohio, remaining with this company to date 
as Mechanical Engineer, with office in Chicago, 111. Mr. Weller 
is married, although the date and place of marriage have not 
been reported. 

39. Galloway, John Debo. 1889. 

Entered the Institute 1885 from Napa City, Cal., at the age 
of 16. Graduated from the Civil Engineering Course in 1889. 
After graduation served as transitman for the Fairhaven & 
Southern Railroad, Fairhaven, Wash. In 1891 became Assistant 
Engineer for the Great Northern Railroad at Fairhaven, and 
in 1892 with the Whatcom County Tide Lands. From 1892 to 
1896 was Chief Engineer for Healy, Tibbits & Co., bridge 
builders and contractors, San Francisco. In 1896 established 
the firm of Galloway, Townley & Co.. Engineers and Contractors. 
In 1897 was with the Pacific Rolling Mill Company. From 1898 
to 1900 acted as Instructor in Mechanical and Architectural 
Drawing, California School of Mechanical Arts. In 1900 be- 
came Engineer for Colusa Stone Company. Since 1901 his work 
has been that of Consulting Engineer, with office in San Fran- 
cisco. Mr. Galloway's work has been in both structural and 
hydraulic engineering, having designed and had charge of large 
works in the West. 

40. Gilbert, Elmer Ellsworth. 1889. 

Entered the Institute September, 1885, from Gettysburg, Ohio, 
at the age of 21. Graduated from the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1889. Entered the service of the Thomson-Houston 
Electric Company as apprentice in Boston. From 1891 to 1893 
served in the Isolated Lighting Department of the Thomson- 
Houston Company in New York City. From 1893 to 1898 with 
the General Electric Company. New York City. From 1898 to 
1903 Assistant to General Manager Lighting Department, and 
from 1903 to date. Sales Manager in the Turbine Department of 
the General Electric Company at Schenectady, N. Y. His work 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 137 

is both of the engineering and business kind. Is a member of 
the A. I. E. E. He has been for twenty years in the service of 
the General Electric Company. 

41. Hammond, Alonzo J. 1889. 

Entered the Institute September, 1885, from Frankfort, at the 
age of 16, and graduated in 1889 from the Civil Engineering 
Course. From July, 1889, to September, 1890, was City Engi- 
neer of Frankfort, and served as draftsman in his father's office, 
who is a practicing architect. From iSgo to 1S91 took a grad- 
nate course in the M. I. T. From iSqt to 1898 again served 
as City Engineer of the City of Frankfort, at the same time 
carrying on architectural practice. From 1898 to 1901 acted as 
Assistant to Chief Engineer of the Vandalia Railroad, especially 
in terminal work for the city of South Bend. In 1901 he was 
made City Engineer of South Bend, which office he has occu- 
pied to date. During all this time has carried on a consulting 
engineering practice together with discharging his duties as City 
Engineer. Designed a system of sewers for Sullivan, Ind., and 
Dowagiac, Mich., in the early years of his practice, later on 
designing a waterworks system, electric light system for Berrien 
Springs, Mich., and other plants in Michigan and Northern 
Indiana. Served as Consulting Engineer for the Elkhart Power 
Company for the development of water power. Also acted as 
Chief Engineer for some of the electric roads out of South 
Bend, for the Northern Indiana Railroad, and was Engineer of 
Bridges for St. Joseph County. Some more important works 
were the Jeflferson Street concrete arch highway bridge. South 
Bend, and several other bridges of magnitude. He was granted 
degree of M.S. in 1894 and degree of C. E. in 1898, both from 
Rose. He served as President of the Indiana Engineering 
Society and is a member of the A. S. C. E. Was married in 
1893 in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

42. Hendricks. A'ictor K. 1889. 

Born in Indianapolis May 28, 1869. Entered the Institute Sep- 
tember, 1885. Graduated from the Civil Engineering Course in 
1889. From 1889 until 1890 served as draftsman for the Edge 
Moor Bridge Works, Wilmington. Del. In 1890 Recorder on 
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, Charleston, S. C. 
1890 to 1892 draftsman and transitman on construction. Fair- 
haven & Southern Railroad, at Fairhaven, Wash. 1892 to 1893 
Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Bellingham Bay 



138 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

& Eastern Railroad, at Fairhaven, Wash. In 1893 draftsman at 
Indiana Bridge Works, Muncie, Ind., and at Lafayette Bridge 
Works, Lafayette, Ind. 1893 to 1894 Assistant Engineer 
T. H. & I. Railroad Company, Terre Haute. 1894 to 1902 
Engineer ^Maintenance of Way of the Michigan Division of 
the Vandalia Railroad Company, Terre Haute and Logansport. 
From 1902 to 1905 Assistant to Engineer Maintenance of Way 
B. & O. Railroad, Baltimore, Md. 1905 to 1907 Division Engi- 
neer, Baltimore Division. 1907 to 1909 Assistant Engineer 
Maintenance of Way, Frisco Lines, St. Louis, Mo. 1909 to 
date Office Engineer, Frisco Lines, St. Louis, Mo. President 
of Alumni Association, 1896. Representative on Board of Man- 
agers, 1899 and 1901. Received degree of M.S. from Rose 
in 1900. Is associate member A. S. C. E. Member of the 
American Railway Engineering and Maintenance of Way Asso- 
ciation and other railway clubs. Married May 28, 1909, in Terre 
Haute. Mr. Hendricks's work has been mainly in railway 
maintenance. He made some special investigations in the mat- 
ter of timber preservation while in the employ of the B. & O. 
Railway. 

43. Holding, Herbert Holmes. 1889. 

Entered the Institute from Paris, 111., in 1885, at he age of 17, 
graduating in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1889. 
With the Thomson-Houston Electric Company at Lynn, 1890, 
at Boston, 1891-2, and Cincinnati in 1893. Then with the 
General Electric Company at Cleveland in 1894. In 1895 to 1898 
Electrician for the Lorain Steel Railway Company, Lorain, 
Ohio. In 1898 Manager of the Cleveland office of the Eddy 
Electric Manufacturing Company. From 1899 to 1902 Vice 
President of the Pelton Engineering Company, Cleveland. 1903 
to 1908 Vice President Bosworth-Dilley-Holding Company, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 1909, Sales Manager for the Cleveland Feed 
Water Regulator Company. 

44. Jones, Theodore D. 1889. 

Entered the Institute September, 1885, from New Harmony, 
age 19; graduated from the Civil Engineering Course in 1889. 
In 1890 with the L. & N. and O. & J. Railroad, Memphis, remain- 
ing until 1892. In 1892 Resident Engineer of the Danville & 
East Tennessee Railroad Company, Bristol, Tenn. From 1893 
to 1896 practiced civil engineering and surveying in Jacksonville 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 139 

and Tampa, Fla. In 1898 Resident Engineer Canon City & 
Cripple Creek Electric Railway Company, Canon City, Colo. 
In 1900 with the Oxnard Construction Company, Ames, Neb. 
In 1901 Assistant Engineer on Location and Construction of the 
Colorado Midland Railway. In 1902 Assistant Engineer Taylor 
Park Railroad on preliminary surveys. Aspen, Colo., remaining 
until 1905. Then Engineer Cananea Yaqui Pacific, Santiago 
Xquintia, District de Tepic, Mexico. In 1907 Chief Engineer 
G. & N. R. & U. Railroad, Greeley, Colo., which position he has 
occupied to date. Personal notes of Mr. Jones are not furnished. 

45. McKeen, William Riley, Jr. 1889. 

Born in Terre Haute, Ind., October 7, 1869. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1885, graduating in 1889 in the course of Mechanical 
Engineering. After graduation attended Johns Hopkins Insti- 
tute for a two years' course in electrical engineering. In 1890 
and 1891 pursued an advanced course in electricity and mechan- 
ical engineering at a polytechnic institute in Berlin, Germany. 
After traveling in Europe, returned to America, entering the 
car shops of the P. C. C. & St. L. Railroad at Columbus, Ohio, 
and became Master Car Builder of the T. H. & I. Railroad in 
1893. Then Superintendent of the car and locomotive shops of 
the T. H. & I. Railroad, remaining until 1898. He then became 
Vice President of the P. V. Manufacturing Company. In 
December. 1898, entered the service of the Union Pacific Rail- 
road, becoming District Foreman at North Platte, Neb. May 
ist was made Master Mechanic of the Wyoming Division at 
Cheyenne, Wyo. In June, 1902, appointed Superintendent of 
Motor Power and Machinery of the Union Pacific, with head- 
quarters at Omaha. He continued in this position until 1908, 
and resigned to become President and General Manager of the 
McKeen Motor Car Company, to build the well-known and 
successful gasoline railway motor cars, known as the McKeen 
Car. In 1896 he was granted the degree of M.S. from Rose and 
in 1907 the degree of M.E. President of Alumni Association, 
1895. He is a member of the New York Railway Club, the 
Chicago Railway Club, and the A. S. M. E. Mr. McKeen's 
original work has been especially in the direction of designing 
and constructing his gasoline motor car, gasoline weed burner, 
gasoline switching locomotives, and the introduction and devel- 
opment of the use of steel shapes in box car, passenger coach, 
and mail car construction. His work along this line is recog- 
nized as pioneer work. 



I40 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

46. Roberts, Donn M. 1889. 

Entered the Institute September, 1885, from Terre Haute, at the 
age of 18, and graduated from the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1889. In 1890 he was elected City Engineer of Terre 
Haute, and from 1891 he was associated with Kelley, Roberts 
& Smith, Lawyers, of Terre Haute. From 1892 to 1898 he 
operated in real estate claims, and from 1898 to 1906 has done 
contracting work as Manager of the Indiana Construction Com- 
pany and Roberts & Co., Engineers and Contractors, of Terre 
Haute. Married. 

47. Wiley, Walter Brown. 1889. 

Born in Terre Haute, Ind., September 20, 1866. Entered the 
Institute September, 1885, and graduated from the Chemical 
Department in 1889. In September and October, 1889, was 
Volunteer Assistant, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Division 
of Chemistry. October, 1889, to Alarch, T890, Chemist Belle 
Terre Sugar House, Donaldsonville, La. March, 1890, to No- 
vember, 1901, Assistant in Laboratory, Illinois Steel Company, 
Milwaukee, Wis. November, 1891, to June, 1893, Chemist Coke 
Laboratory, Illinois Steel Company, Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 1893 to 
1895 Chemist and Coke Inspector, Illinois Steel Company, 
Bramwell, W. Va. 1895 to 1897 Coke Inspector and Car Agent, 
Illinois Steel Company, ^Tt. Pleasant, Pa. 1897 to 1899 Chemist 
Union Works, Illinois Steel Company, Chicago, 111. 1899 to 
1903 Chemist and Coke Inspector and Car Agent, Illinois Steel 
Company, Bramwell, W. Va. 1903 to 1905 Chemist and Fuel 
Engineer, L^nited States Coal and Coke Company, Gary, W. Va. 
1905 to date fuel and expert and sampling of materials, So. 
Works, Illinois Steel Company, Chicago, 111. Is a member of 
the A. C. S. Married July 13, 1893. Mr. Wiley is the first 
graduate in the Chemical Course from the Rose Polytechnic 
Institute, and has been engaged in a special line of work in 
connection with fuel engineering, especially to improve the 
quality of coke and the investigation of coking coals. Com- 
mencement speaker, 1901. 

48. AUSTERMILLER, JOHN AuGUST. 189O. 

Entered the Institute September, 1885, from Terre Haute, Ind., 
at the age of 16, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1890. After graduation took service with the Van- 
dalia Railroad in the freight offices. Later became associated 
with Allen & Austermiller, operating boiler and machine shop 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 141 

in Terre Haute. In 1897 was employed in the office of City 
Engineer of Terre Haute, Ind., in which position he remained 
until 1908, when he became Deputy Revenue Collector at Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

49. CoLLETT, Samuel Dunlap. 1890. 

Entered the Institute September, 1886, from Newport, Ind., at 
the age of 17, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1890. From 1890 to 1891 took a special civil engineer- 
ing course in the Rose Polytechnic Institute, for which he re- 
ceived degree of B.S. in civil engineering. In 1892 entered the 
service of the Thomson-Houston Electric Company at Lynn, 
Mass., and from 1893 to 1895 was with the Pennsylvania General 
Electric Company at Pittsburg. In 1895 became associated with 
the Metropolitan Telephone and Telegraph Company in New 
York, and in 1898 was made Eastern Manager of the Elevator 
Supply and Repair Company in New York, remaining with the 
company until 1905, when he became Vice President and Eastern 
Manager of the Electric Supply and Repair Company, which 
position he holds to date. He was granted degree of M.S from 
Rose in 1894. President of Alumni Association, 1898. Is asso- 
ciate member of the A. I. E. E., a member of the A. S. M. E. 
and Engineering Club of Manhattan, Building Trade Club of 
Manhattan. Blue Room Engineering Club of Manhattan, the 
N. G. S., and various social clubs. Mr. Collett equipped some 
of the largest buildings in New York with elevators, pumps, 
etc. April 12th Mr. Collett registers himself as not married. 
From a social column of the Brooklyn Eagle it is judged that 
this information will speedily have to be amended. 

50. CoNDRON, Theodore Lincoln. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in 1886, at the age of 20, from Washington, 
D. C, and graduated from the Civil Engineering Course in 
1890. In 1891 became Assistant Engineer with the Burlington 
Bridge Company, Burlington, Iowa. In 1892 Assistant in the 
Testing Laboratory, Washington University, St. Louis. In 1893 
in Chief Engineer's office, St. Louis, Merchants' Bridge and 
Terminal Company. In 1894 became Assistant Engineer with 
Edw. Flad, C. & M. E., St. Louis. In 1895 to 1901 Resident 
Engineer, Pittsburg Testing Laboratory, Chicago. In 1902 he 
opened an office as civil engineer in Chicago, but retained his 
connection with the Pittsburg Testing Laboratory. In 1905 he 
severed his connection with the Pittsburg Laboratory, and con- 



142 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

tinued in the practice of civil engineering. In 1906 he asso- 
ciated himself with Mr. Sinks, of the Class of '96, under the 
firm name of Condron & Sinks Company, Civil Engineers, Chi- 
cago. Of this firm Mr. Condron is President. He was married 
in Terre Haute, Ind. He was given the degree of M.S. from 
Rose in 1894. Is a member of the A. S. C. E., S. W. E., 
A. S. M. W,, and other engineering societies. Served as Alumni 
representative on the Board of Managers, 1905 to 1907. Has 
been active in all work pertaining to the improvement and 
betterment of the Institute. His consulting engineering work 
has been in connection with some of the most important struc- 
tures, and has extended from coast to coast. 

51. Elder, William Datus. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in 1887, at the age of 19, from Kalamazoo, 
Mich., and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1890. 
From 1890 to 1891 he was Assistant Engineer for the Northern 
Pacific Railroad, St. Paul. 1892 to 1899 Assistant City Engi- 
neer, Kalamazoo. From 1900 to 1903 Assistant Engineer with 
the Michigan Central Railroad, Niles, Mich. 1903 to 1905 
Draftsman Chief Engineer's office Michigan Central Railroad, 
Detroit, Mich. From 1905 to date Assistant Chief Engineer 
Detroit River Tunnel Company, Detroit. Mr. Elder received 
degree of M.S. from Rose in 1893. He was married November 
I, 1901. 

52. Fitch, Maxwell Bryon. 1890. 

Bom in Greenville, 111., March 23, 1869. Entered the Institute 
in 1886, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1890. Immediately after graduation was put in charge of the 
field corps of the Terre Haute & Logansport Division of the 
Vandalia Railroad, and remained in the service until 1892, when 
he was appointed Assistant City Engineer of Terre Haute. In 
1893 was made City Engineer of Mattoon, 111., where he re- 
mained until 1896. From 1896 to 1898 was in the employ of the 
Graphic Mining and Smelting Company, Magdalena, N. M., 
serving both as Metallurgist and Engineer. In 1897 he wa.s 
made Superintendent of the smelting works, serving in this 
capacity until 1903. From 1904 to 1906 he served as Manager 
of the Southwestern Lead and Coal Company, Engle, N. M. 
From 1906 to date he has carried on the business of mining 
engineering at El Paso, Tex. Is married, but date unknown. 
A member of the A. S. M. E. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 143 

53. Galloway, Mason. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in 1886 from Chico, Cal., at the age of 23, 
and graduated from the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1890. 
In 1891 he was with the Thomson-Houston Electric Company, 
Lynn, Mass. From 1892 to igoo Electrician Marion Electric 
Street Railway, Marion, Ind. From 1900 to 1903 Assistant to 
Electrical Engineer, Snoqualmic Falls Power Company, Seattle, 
Wash. 1906 with the Nevada Power and Mining Company, 
Columbia, Nev. From 1906 to date he has been engaged in 
engineering work, mostly in Arizona, where he is compelled 
to remain because of the condition of his health. 

54. Hess, Otto Georgk. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in 1886 at the age of 19, and graduated in 
1890 in the Mechanical Engineering Course. Immediately after 
graduation in 1891 became Engineer of the refrigerating plant 
of the Reymann Brewing Company, Wheeling, W. Va. In 1892 

was made Chief Engineer nf all their works, which position he 
occupies to date. 

55. Lefler, Harvey James. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in 1887 from Cincinnati, O., at the age of 
18 ; graduated in Civil Engineering Course in 1890. In 1891 was 
made Resident Engineer with the Cincinnati Southern Railroad. 
In 1893 removed to Anderson, Ind., and in 1897 to Indianapolis. 
In both places he engaged in general manufacturing business. 
In 1898 he removed to New York, becoming Engineer with the 
Metropolitan Street Railway Company, where he has lived to 
date, engaged in general contracting and engineering work. Is 
unmarried. Mr. Lefler while in New York had charge of the 
construction of the underground trolley for the Metropolitan 
Company, and during the Spanish-American War had charge of 
the fortifications of Fort Slocum, at New York Harbor. Was 
engaged in river and harbor improvements in New York, and 
for the last ten years has been engaged mainly in building 
constructions in New York City. 

56. Putnam. George Rockwell. 1890. 

Born at Davenport, la. Entered the Institute in 1887 at the 
age of 22; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1890. After graduation assisted in the Coast and Geodetic Sur- 
vey, and remained in government service to date. He received 



144 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

the degree of }iI.S. from Rose in 1894. Member M. S. C. E., 
Washington Academy of Science, Washington Philosophical 
Society, Washington Society of Engineers, and several social 
clubs. Is unmarried. Was on ]\Iexican and Alaskan boundary 
surveys ; accompanied expedition to Greenland as astronomer 
in 1896: engaged on survey of Pribilof Islands in 1897, and of 
the delta of the Yukon River, 1898-99 ; made observations con- 
necting American and European gravity stations, 1900; Director 
of Coast Surveys in the Philippine Islands in 1900-06. His orig- 
inal work was in a transcontinental series of measurements of 
the force of gravity; planning the survey of the coasts of the 
Philippine Islands ; planning the survey of the delta of the 
Yukon River, Alaska, and designing of charts of the Philippine 
Islands, Alaska, and the United States. His publications are : 
Nautical Charts, Wiley & Sons, New York, 1908; Papers in 
Annual Reports of Coast and Geodetic Survey; Proceedings of 
Philosophical Society of Washington, and Engineering News. 

57. Raymond, Stephen Spinning. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in 1886, at the age of 16, from Cincin- 
nati, O., and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1890. After graduation spent a year in Montana, and in the 
fall of 1891 took a graduate course in mining in the Colum- 
bia College, in New York. In 1893 served with the Anaconda 
Smelting Works at Anaconda. In 1894 had charge of the Elec- 
trolytic Refinery of the Anaconda Mining Company. In 1895 
was made President and General Manager of the Madison 
Mining and Milling Company, Sappington, Mont. In 1898 was 
Chief Assayer Montana Ore Purchasing Company, Butte, Mont. ; 
1899 to 1902, General Superintendent Copper King Company, 
San Francisco, Cal. ; 1903, Mining and Metallurgical Engineer, 
San Francisco. Since 1903 no record has been furnished of his 
activities. 

58. S HOVER, Barton Roy. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in 1885, at the age of 18. In 1886 was 
compelled to withdraw from the Institute on account of affec- 
tion of eyes. Reentered in 1887, and graduated in the Mechan- 
ical Engineering Course in 1890. After graduation entered the 
laboratory of Carpenter-Nevins Electric Heating Company, Min- 
neapolis. In 1891 was Electrician for the Electric Street Rail- 
way. Richmond, Ind. ; 1892. Electrician for the Citizens' Street 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 145 

Railway, Indianapolis; 1893, Superintendent of the Neptune 
Electric Company, Asbury Park, N. J. ; 1894, Electrician Youngs- 
town Street Railway Company, Youngstown, O. ; 1895, with the 
Ohio Steel Company, Youngstown; 1897, Assistant Electrician 
Ohio Steel Company; 1900, Electrician Ohio Steel Company; 
1902 to 1906, Electrical Superintendent Ohio Works, National 
Steel Company ; 1907 to date, Electrical Engineer Indiana Steel 
Company, Gary, Ind. Mr. Shover was given the degree of M.S. 
from Rose in 1895. Member of the A. I. E. E. Mr. Shover's 
most important work has been planning and installing the 
electrical plant for the transmission of electric power at the 
Gary plant of the Indiana Steel Company, the largest plant of 
this kind in the world. 

59. Thompson, Ralph Fowler. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in 1886 from Bradford, 111., at the age of 
19; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1890. 
After graduation served with the Edison Electric Company of 
Chicago until 1892, and removed to Montana, where he remained 
from i8q2 to 1896 as Electrical Engineer in Marysville and 
Helena. From 1896 to 1899 he served as Superintendent of the 
Electric Light and Waterworks at Alexandria, La. There is no 
record at the Institute of Mr. Thompson's location or work after 
this date. 

60. Thurston, Edward Chase. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in March, 1883, from Indianapolis, at the 
age of 16. Withdrew from the Institute in October. Reentered 
in September, 1886, and graduated from the Mechanical Engi- 
neering Course in 1890. After graduation entered the firm of 
Moore & Thurston, operating an electrical plant and manufac- 
turing chain pumps at Rockville, Ind. In 1892 was with the firm 
of W. A. Fulwider & Co., operating planing mills in Bloom- 
ington, Ind. In 1893 entered as draftsman with the Brown & 
Sharpe Manufacturing Company, Providence, R. I. No response 
has been received from him after 1897. 

61. Tsuji Taro. 1890. 

Entered the Institute in 1888 from Tokio, Japan, at the age of 
19; graduated in Civil Engineering Course in 1890. After grad- 
uation became Assistant Engineer with the firm of Waddell & 
Hedrick on the Pacific Short Line Bridge in Sioux City, la. In 
10 



146 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

1901 he returned to Japan and became Civil Engineer in gov- 
ernment service. In 1903 became Engineer of the Imperial Gov- 
ernment Railroads in the Ministry of Communications. In 1908 
was given the entire charge of government railways. Received 
degree of M.S. in 1892 and C.E. in 1896, both from Rose. Is 
married. Mr. Tsuji had charge of the military railway con- 
struction during the Russian-Japanese War. He has retained 
all his interests in Rose, and has attained a high position in 
government service. 

62. Balsley, Abe. 1891. 

Entered the Institute in 1887 from Bedford, Ind., at the age of 
22, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1891. 
From 1891 to 1893, Expert Department General Electric Com- 
pany, Lynn, Mass. ; 1893 to 1894. Ship Electrician United States 
and Brazil Mail Steamship Company, New York; 1894 ^^ 1896, 
Superintendent Seymour Ice and Light Company, Seymour, 
Ind. : 1896 to 1901, Chigf Electrician and Superintendent of 
Lighting. Terre Haute; 1901 to 1903, Operating Superintendent 
Lachine Rapids Hydraulic and Land Company, Montreal ; 1903 
to 1905, Electrical Engineer Georgia Railway and Electric Com- 
pany, Atlanta. Ga. ; 1905 to 1907, Superintendent of Motive 
Power, Sao Paulo Tramway, Light and Power Company, Brazil, 
S. A. : 1908, special work, examinations and reports on electric 
properties ; 1909, with the Edison Company, Chicago, Operating 
Engineer's Department. Mr. Balsley was given the degree of 
M.S. from Rose in 1904. Is associate member of A. I. E. E. 
and associate member of C. S. C. E. Some of his most impor- 
tant work is in connection with large water power and trans- 
mission systems, street railway systems, and car installation 
work. Mr. Balsley spent a year and a half in Brazil, S. A., and 
spent some months traveling in Europe. Was married in 1900 
in Indianapolis. 

63. BOEIIM, WlI.LTAM H. T89I. 

Entered the Institute in September, 1887, from Memphis, Tenn., 
at the age of 19, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1891. From the time of graduating to 1893 was a 
graduate student at Cornell University. From 1893 to 1897 was 
Mechanical Engineer and Draftsman, Chickasaw Iron Works, 
Memphis, and St. Louis Water Works, St. Louis, and Instructor 
in Mechanical Engineering, Washington LTniversity. From 1897 
to 1901, Professor of Engineering and Director of Engineering 



Alumni BiograpJiical Dictionary. 147 

School, Clemson College, the State College of South Carolina. 
From 1901 to date, Superintendent Steam Boiler and Fly Wheel 
Department, Fidelity and Casualty Company, New York. Mr. 
Boehm was granted the degree of M.M.E. in 1893 from Cornell. 
Is a member of the A. S. M. E. Was married September 20, 
1897. Mr. Boehm's more important work has been machine and 
steam engine designing and the organizing and establishing of 
a Fly-wheel Insurance Department. His publication on "Fly- 
wheel Fractures" is authoritative. Commencement speaker in 
1900. 

64. Bt^CKLEv, Frederick James. 1891. 

Entered the Institute in 1888 from Kalamazoo, Mich., at the age 
of 21, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1891. From 1891 to 1901 was Mechanical and Electrical Man- 
ager for the Buckley Electric and Manufacturing Company, 
Kalamazoo. In 1903, Secretary and Manager for the Buckley 
Electric and Manufacturing Company. In 1904, President and 
Manager of the Kalamazoo Foundry and Machine Company, 
Kalamazoo, which position he holds to date. 

65. Carothers, George Robert. 1891. 

Entered the Institute in 1888, and graduated in Mechanical 
Engineering in 1891. In 1892 was Instructor in Drawing and 
Superintendent of Shops, Manual Training School, Honolulu. 
From 1893 to 1896, Director Manual Training Department, 
Public Schools, Tacoma, Wash. From 1896 to 1899, Principal 
Lowell Manual Training School, Lowell, Mass. In 1899, with 
William Sellers & Co., Philadelphia. No further record of Mr. 
Carothers has been received at the Institute. 

66. Cox, John Strain. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1886, at the age 
of 16, and graduated from the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1891. In 1892 was Assistant Superintendent of the Terre 
Haute Car and Manufacturing Company, Terre Haute. From 
1893 to 1896, Secretary of the Terre Haute Car and Manufac- 
turing Company, Terre Haute. From 1896 to 1901, Superin- 
tendent of the Terre Haute Car and Manufacturing Company, 
Terre Haute. From 1902 to date, President of the Terre Haute 
Automobile Company. Mr. Cox was married in Terre Haute, 
Ind., in 1892. 



148 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

67. GiLLETT, Vernor John. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Eckford, Mich., in 1887, at the age 
of 18; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1891. 
In 1892 was with Frank B. Race, Electrical Engineer, Detroit, 
Mich. In 1893 was Assistant Manager with Frank B. Race. 
From 1894 to 1897 was with the firm of Cameron & Gillett, Con- 
tractors, Detroit. From 1898 to 1900, Superintendent of the 
Detroit Galvanizing and Sheet Metal Works, Detroit. In 1901 
with the DeLaval Separator Company, Eckford, Mich. In 1902, 
Editor of the Calhoun County Farmer. From 1903 to 1906, 
Advertising Manager of the Phosphite Ford Company, Detroit. 
From 1907 to date. Assistant Engineer American Electromobile 
Company, Detroit Mich. Mr. Gillett was married in Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

68. Harper, Joseph Durfee. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Durango, Col., in 1888, at the age of 
21, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1891. 
In 1892 was with the Thomson-Houston Electric Company, Cin- 
cinnati, O. From 1894 to 1896, of the firm of Harper & Harper, 
Civil and Mining Engineers, Durango, Col. From 1896 to 1899, 
Instructor in Civil Engineering at the Rose Polytechnic Insti- 
tute. From 1899 to 1901, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
and Director of Shops, Kansas « Agricultural and Mechanical 
College, Manhattan, Kan. From 1901 to 1907, Assistant Man- 
ager Fairbanks, Morse & Co., St. Louis. From 1908 to date, 
President of the Texas Machinery and Supply Company, Dallas, 
Tex. Mr. Harper was granted the degree of M.S. in 1897 from 
Rose. For the last few years he has given much attention to 
the development and introduction of producer gas and oil 
engines, for high-grade power purposes, electric light and power 
installations, waterworks plants, refrigeration equipment, and all 
having internal combustion engines as the prime mover. Mr. 
Harper was married at Fort Wayne, Ind., November 17, 1897. 

69. Harris, William Herschel. 1891. 

Entered the Institute in 1887. at the age of 17, and graduated 
in the Civil Engineering Course in 1891. In 1892 was Assistant 
Draftsman for the American Terra Cotta Company, Chicago. 
From 1895 to 1900 was County Surveyor, Terre Haute, Ind. 
From 1900 to date has been engaged in general construction 
work as a Contractor, building pike roads, paving brick streets, 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 149 

and is now putting in a sanitary sewerage system for the city 
of Bloomington, Ind. Mr. Harris was married in Brazil, Ind., 
in 1905. 

70. HuPE, Alexander Louis. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1887, at the age 
of 16, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1891. In 1892 was a graduate student at Cornell University. In 
1893, Draftsman for L., St. L. & T. H. R. R. Co., Louisville, Ky. 
In 189s, with Herman Meth, Consulting Engineer, Louisville. 
From 1896 to 1898, Draftsman with Louisville Bridge and Iron 
Company. From 1898 to 1901, Assistant Engineer for the Louis- 
ville Bridge and Iron Company; 1903, Chief Draftsman for the 
Louisville Bridge and Iron Company; 1907, Assistant Engineer 
for the Louisville Bridge and Iron Company; 1908 to date, 
Assistant Engineer Louisville Water Company, Louisville, Ky. 

71. HuRLBERT, Frank Wymond. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Aurora, Ind., in 1887, at the age of 
17, and graduated from the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1891. In 1892 and 1893 was Electrician with the Detroit Electric 
Wiorks, Detroit, Mich. In 1894 was Assistant Superintendent 
of the Detroit Citizens' Street Railway Company, Detroit. In 
1895, Railway Expert, with the Brush Electric Company, Cleve- 
land, O. In 1896, Assistant Engineer with Gilbert Wilkes, Con- 
sulting Electrical and Mechanical Engineer, Detroit. In 1897, 
with the General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. From 
1898 to 1903, Engineer in the Railway Engineering Department, 
General Electric Company, Schenectady. From 1903 to date, 
Engineer in Foreign Department, General Electric Company, 
New York City, N. Y. 

y2. Jones, Horace Benemen. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1887, at the 
age of 17, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1891. In 1893 with the Premier Steel Works, Indianapolis, 
Ind. In 1895 with Herbert Foltz, Architect, Indianapolis. From 
1896 to 1899, Mechanical Draftsman, Indianapolis. In 1901 with 
G. H. Patterson, Mining Engineer, Terre Haute. In 1905 with 
the B. & O. R. R. Co., Cincinnati, O. Since 1905 no record has 
been received. 



150 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

73. McCabe, Eugene Francis. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Renovo, Pa., in 1887, at the age of 
22; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1891. 
In 1892 and 1893 with the Snead & Co. Iron Works, Louisville, 
Ky. From 1894 to 1896 with the General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. ; 1896 to 1902, Superintendent Electric and 
Gas Properties in Chatham, N. Y. From 1902 to date. General 
Manager and Vice-President Mifflin County Gas and Electric 
Company, Lewistown, Pa. Is a member of the A. I. E. E., 
A. G. I., N. E. L. A., and Pennsylvania Electric Association. 
Some of the more important works engaged upon were Super- 
intendent of the iron construction on the Congressional Library 
at Washington, and the designing and construction of several 
gas and electric plants. Was married in Renovo, Pa., in 1896. 

74. McCoRMicK, Robert Lee. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Charlestown, Ind., in 1888, from 
Indiana University, at the age of 21, and graduated in the Civil 
Engineering Course in 1891. Since his graduation he has been 
Associate Professor of Mathematics and Civil Engineering at 
the Rose Polytechnic Institute. Was granted degree of M.S. 
in 1906 and C.E. in 1907, both from Rose. Is a member of the 
A. Ry. E. and M. W. A. Mr. McCormick was married in Terre 
Haute, Ind., in 1894. Mr. McCormick has done a considerable 
amount of engineering work outside of his work as Professor 
in the Institute. In 1890 was with the United States Coast and 
Geodetic Survey in primary triangulation. In the summer of 
1892 Engineer for the Bedford Belt Railroad. In 1896 in the 
City Engineer's office, Terre Haute. In 1897 took advanced 
mathematical work in University of Chicago. In 1899 and 1902 
engineering work on West Side Elevated Railroad, Chicago. In 
1901 in the Pittsburg Testing Laboratory, and later with the 
firm of Condron & Sinks. Among other things, he has designed 
a reinforced concrete arch. He also had charge of the engineer- 
ing work in a group of mines in districts surrounding Terre 
Haute. Mr. McCormick was President of the Rose Alumni 
Association in igoo, 1903, and 1904. 

75. Menden, Wiluam Stevens. 1891. 

Entered the Institute in 1887 from Evansville, Ind., aged 18 
years, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1891. 
From 1892 to 1905 was with the Metropolitan West Side Ele- 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 151 

vated Railway Company as Assistant Engineer, Chief Engineer, 
and General Superintendent. From 1905 to date, Chief Engi- 
neer, General Superintendent, and Assistant General Manager 
of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. Is 
a member of the A. S. C. E. For eighteen years he has given 
his attention to rapid transit problems in large cities, and has 
achieved distinction. 

y6. Mewhinney, Omar. 1891. 

Entered the Institute in 1887 from Terre Haute at the age of 
16, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1891. After graduation was made Vice-President of the A. B. 
Mewhinney Company, which position he has held to date. He 
was married in Nebraska City, Neb., in 1900. His special work 
has been the designing of candy machinery, and in improving 
and building up of the candy manufacturing business established 
by his father in 1874. 

yy. Paige, William Robert. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1887, aj the 
age of 18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1891. In 1892 was Assistant City Engineer of Terre Haute. 
In 1893 with J. Pitzman's Company of Surveyors and Civil 
Engineers, St. Louis, Mo. In 1895 Assistant City Engineer, 
Terre Haute. From 1899 to 1901 Civil Engineer, Terre Haute. 
In 1901 Surveyor of Vigo County, Ind. From 1904 to date. 
Civil Engineer and Surveyor, Terre Haute. 

78. Wales, Samuel Sigourney. 1891. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1887, at the 
age of 16, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1891. In 1891 and 1892 took a post-graduate course at the 
Institute, and for three months in 1892 was a student with the 
Thomson-Houston Electric Company. In 1892 was in the test- 
ing laboratory of the Westinghouse Electric Company, Pitts- 
burg. In 1893 with the Homestead Steel Works as Motor 
Inspector. In 1894 Superintendent Electrical Department of the 
Ohio Steel Works, Youngstown, O. In 1899 Superintendent of 
the Electrical Department, Homestead Steel Works, and from 
1905 to date Superintendent of Armor Plate Department. Was 
granted degree of M.S. in 1902 and of E-E. in 1905, both from 
Rose. Is a member of the A. I. E. E. Mr. Wales has devel- 



152 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

oped a special alloy steel, for use in protective deck plate for 
battleships, with a ballistic value too per cent, above nickel steel. 
Married. Commencement speaker in 1902. 

79. BixBY, Allan Smith. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Grand View, III., in 1888, at the age 
of 18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. In 17892 and 1893 was Draftsman for the Ewart Manu- 
facturing Company, Indianapolis, Ind. In 1894 Foreman in the 
Mechanical and Pattern Department. In 1895 Superintendent 
of the Metallic Manufacturing Company. One year designing 
small tools and appliances, Ben Hur Cycle Company. In 1902 
Superintendent of the National Malleable Castings Company, 
Indianapolis, which position he occupies to date. Mr. Bixby is 
a member of the A. S. M. E. and the A. S. for T. M. 

80. BoYLEs, Thomas Dickinson. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Riverside, 111., in 1888, at the age of 
18, graduating in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1892. 
In 1892 with the Thomson-Houston Electric Company, Lynn, 
Mass. From 1895 to 1897 with the General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. From 1897 to 1899 in Railway Engineering 
Department of the General Electric Company. In 1899 in the 
Switchboard Engineering Department, and in 1900 was Assist- 
ant Engineer for the company. Mr. Boyles was married in 1901, 
and died November 30, 1901, in Schenectady, after a brief but 
painful illness, in the midst of a promising career. 

81. Davis, William J., Jr. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1888, at the age 
of 20, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. In 1892 with the Thomson-Houston Electric Company, 
Lynn, Mass. In 1894 was a member of the firm of Davis & Cox, 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineers and Contractors, Louis- 
ville, Ky. From 1895 to 1899 in the Engineering Department of 
the General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. From 1899 
to 1908 Electrical Engineer in Railway Engineering Depart- 
ment, General Electric Company. In July, 1908, was made 
Engineer Pacific Coast DisfVict, General Electric Company, San 
Francisco, Cal. Mr. Davis was granted degree of M.S. in 1895 
from Rose. Was President of Alumni Association in 1893 and 
Secretary-Treasurer in 1892. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 153 

82. Dietrich, Arthur Maximilian. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Kansas City, Mo., in 1888, at the age 
of 17, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. From July, 1892, to September, 1893, Erecting Engineer 
American Linseed Company, Kansas City, Mo. From Septem- 
ber, 1893, to September, 1894, Superintendent Dillon Cement 
Plaster Works, Kansas City. From September, 1894, to May i, 
1901, Assistant Superintendent American Linseed Company. 
From May. 1901, to September, 1905, Secretary and Manager 
American Fly Paper Company, and from September, 1905, to 
date Superintendent Baker Castor Oil Company, Jersey City, 
N. J. Mr. Dietrich was married April 25, 1894. 

83. Ehrsam, William John. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Enterprise, Kan., in 1888, at the age 
of 17, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. From 1893 to 1897 was in charge of the Drafting Depart- 
ment of the J. B. Ehrsam Machine Company, Enterprise, Kan. 
From 1897 to 1901 of the firm of J. B. Ehrsam & Sons Machine 
Company. From 1903 to date Secretary and Treasurer of the 
same. 

84. Fogarty, William James. 1892, 

Entered the Institute from Dayton, Ohio, in 1888, at the age 
of 19; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. From 1893 to 1896 was Draftsman and Foreman with the 
Connersville Blower Company, Connersville, Ind. From 1897 
to 1899 Superintendent Cambridge City Punch, Shear and Roll 
Company. From 1899 to 1905 Superintendent and Vice-Presi- 
dent and Manager Magnetite Foundry Company, St. Louis, Mo. 
From 1905 to the present time Foreman Foundry Department, 
Barney & Smith Car Company, Dayton, Ohio. Was granted 
degree of M.S. in 1897 from Rose. Mr. Fogarty was married 
in 1902. 

85. FoLSOM, Edsox Fessenden. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Indianapolis, Ind., in 1888, at the 
age of 18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1892. In 1893 was graduate student at Cornell University 
and Inspector Mechanical Department World's Columbian Fair. 
From 1895 to 1897 was in the lumber and mill business in 
Indianapolis. From 1897 to 1903 with Brown-Ketcham Iron 



154 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Works, Indianapolis. On the death of his father he took up his 
business. From 1904 to 1908 Special Agent for Massachusetts 
Mutual Life Insurance Company. From 1908 to date General 
Agent for the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. Mr. Folsom was granted degree of M.M.E. 
in 1893 from Cornell University. Was married in Indianapolis 
June 20, 1900. Mr. Folsom has given much time to the further- 
ing of the Institute's interests, representing the Alumni as Com- 
mencement orator in 1904. 

86. Frank, Sigmund S. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1887, at the 
age of 18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1892. In 1893 was in the Electrical Engineering Department 
World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago. In 1894 with Geo. E. 
Lloyd & Co., Manufacturers of Machinery, Chicago. In 1895 
Electric Light Inspector Chicago Fire Department. From 1896 
to 1898 with the Edison Illuminating Company, St. Louis, Mo. 
From 1898 to 1901 with the Western Electric Company, Chicago. 

1901 Manager H. Krantz Manufacturing Company, Brooklyn. 

1902 with Geo. A. Fuller Company, New York. 1903 Engineer 
Mechanical Department Geo. A. Fuller Company. From 1905 
to 1906 with Stanley Electric Manufacturing Company, Pitts- 
field, Mass. From 1907 to the present time with L. K. Comstock 
& Co., Contracting Engineers, New York City. 

87. HusseY, Warren. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1888, at the 
age of 16, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1892. In 1893 with the Sand and Mortar Company, Wau- 
kegan. 111. In 1894 of the firm of Condit & Hussey, Chicago, 111. 
From 1896 to 1901 in the National State Bank, Terre Haute. 
From 1904 Cashier of the Terre Haute National Bank, until in 
1908 he was compelled to take a leave of absence on account of 
health. Mr. Hussey was married in Terre Haute, Ind. 

88. Laux, Ernst Carl. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Los Angeles, Cal., in 1888, at the 
age of 16. and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1892. From 1893 to 1895 was with the Westinghouse Electric 
Company, Pittsburg, Pa. Ne report has been rceived at the 
Institute from Mr. Laux since 1895. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 155 

89. Layman, Waldo Arnold. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1888, at the age of 
18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. Entered the service of Wagner Electric Manufacturing 
Company in September, 1892, and served as Draftsman and 
Assistant in Testing Department for two years, Assistant Super- 
intendent four years. Assistant General Manager two years, 
Assistant General Manager and Treasurer two years. General 
Manager five years, and First Vice-President and General Man- 
ager to date. Mr. Layman was granted degree of M.S. in 1894 
and degree of E.E. in 1899, both from Rose. Is a member of 
the A. I. E.E. and associate member of the B.I.E.E.. Also is 
a member of several other St. Louis clubs. Was married June 
8, 1896, at Richmond, Ind. He served on the Board of Man- 
agers from 1901 to 1904, and was Commencement speaker in 
1892. He was one of the founders of the RosE Technic, estab- 
lished in 1891, and is always active in Institute life. 

90. Oglesby, Milton Landis. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1888, at the 
age of 17, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1892. From 1893 to 1895 was in the service of R. H. Officer 
& Co., Assayers, Salt Lake City. In 1895 was with the Salt 
Lake and Ogden Gas and Electric Light Company, Salt Lake 
City. From 1896 to 1898 Superintendent Emerald Mining Com- 
pany, Mammoth, Utah. From 1898 to 1901 Superintendent 
Emerald and Annandale Mining Companies, Robinson. Utah. 
From 1906 to date Mechanical and Mining Engineer of Oglesby 
& Oglesby, Salt Lake City, Utah. Mr. Oglesby was granted 
degree of M.S. in 1895 from Rose. 

91. Ott, Claude. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Rockville, Ind., in 1888, at the age 
of 18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. From 1893 to 1895 in Expert Department General Electric 
Company, Schenectady, N. Y. From 1895 to 1898 County Sur- 
veyor, Rockville, Ind. From 1898 to 1900 Assistant Engineer 
on Construction of the Chihuahua & Pacific Railroad. In 1900 
Resident Engineer and Division Engineer on Construction of 
El Paso & Southwestern Railroad. In 1903 Locating Engineer 
for St. Louis & San Francisco Railway Company on various 
lines in Arkansas and Louisiana. In 1906 Assistant Chief Engi- 



156 Rose Polytechwic Institute. 

neer on Construction of Indianapolis & Cincinnati Traction 
Company, Rushville, Ind. Afterward Chief Engineer of Con- 
struction of the Salsich Branch of Tacoma Eastern Railroad. 
Was married in Rockville, Ind., in 1903. 

92. Putnam, Benjamin Risley. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Davenport, Iowa, in 1889, at the age 
of 18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. In 1893 was a graduate student in mining at Columbia 
. College, New York. From 1894 to 1897 Chemist with the Illi- 
nois Steel Company, South Chicago. In 1897 Chemist Columbia 
Land and Improvement Company, Victoria, B. C In 1898 
Chemist Montana Ore Purchasing Company, Butte, Mont. 
From 1900 to 1906 Head Assayer for Montana Ore Purchasing 
Company. In 1906 Smelter Superintendent for Bingham Con- 
solidated M. & S. Co., West Jordan, Utah. From 1907 to date 
Metallurgical Chemist of Dozier & Putnam Company, Chemists 
and Engineers, Redding, Cal. Mr. Putnam was granted degree 
of M.A. in 1893 from Columbia College. Was married in June, 
1907. 

93. Rock, Samuei. Moorehead. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Latrobe, Pa., in 1888, at the age of 
19; graduated from the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1892. 
In 1892 Assistant to Master Mechanic Homestead Steel Works, 
Munhall, Pa. From 1893 to 1896 Draftsman with the Carnegie 
Steel Company, Homestead, Pa. In 1896 Engineer United 
States Revenue Cutter Service on Pacific Coast. 1900, Assistant 
Engineer United States Revenue Cutter Service, which position 
he holds to date. His most important work has been the inspec- 
tion and installation of steam machinery in vessels of Revenue 
Cutter Service. Was an officer in the United States Navy 
during the Spanish-American War, and has traveled extensively, 
having made several trips to Alaska and one extending into the 
Arctic Ocean. Mr. Rock was married June 24, 1896, in Home- 
stead, Pa. 

94. Rose, Luther S. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Springfield, Ohio, in 1889, at the age 
of 20, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1892. 
After graduation he was Rodman and Assistant Engineer for 
the C. C. C. & St. L. Railroad until the fall of 1895. Was Road- 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 157 

master of the Central Vermont Railroad from 1895 to the spring 
of 1896. From 1896 to 1897 was Assistant Engineer of the 
C. C. C. & St. L. Railroad. In 1897 was Supervisor of Track 
until September, 1899, and from that time to June, 1907, was 
Engineer Maintenance of Way C. C. C. & St. L. Railroad Com- 
pany at Mattoon, 111. From June, 1907, to date has been Signal 
Engineer C. C. C. & St. L. Railroad, Cincinnati, Ohio. Is a 
member of the American Railway Engineers' and Maintenance 
of Way Association. Mr. Rose was married in Springfield, 
Ohio. He was in the Sandford powder explosion at Sandford, 
Ind., two years ago, but. though seriously injured, is now as 
hale and hearty as ever. 

95. Sperry, Herbert Bell. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Malone, N. Y., in 1888, at the age 
of 21 ; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1892. 
After graduation he accepted a position with the Walter A. 
Wood Harvester Company, of Minneapolis, Minn. From 1895 
to 1898 Draftsman for the St. Albans Foundry and Machine 
Company, of St. Albans, Vt. From 1898 to 1907 with the Inter- 
national Harvester Company as Designer. Chief Draftsman and 
Superintendent of Experiments. From 1907 to the present 
with the Dain Manufacturing Company, of Ottumwa, Iowa. 
While with the International Harvester Company Mr. Sperry 
obtained a number of patents for improvements in machinery 
built by them, and was awarded a medal and diploma by the 
jury of awards of the St. Louis Exposition for work in col- 
laboration with the International Harvester Company. Mr. 
Sperry was married in Terre Haute, Ind. 

96. TiNSLEY, Samuel B. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1888, at the age of 
21, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1892. In 
1893 was a graduate student and Instructor in Civil Engineering 
at Rose Polytechnic Institute and later was with the United 
States Coast and Geodetic Survey on Alaskan botmdary. From 
1895 to the present time Professor of Mathematics in Male High 
School, Louisville, Ky. Is a member of the Engineers' and 
Architects' Club of Louisville. While connected with the Gov- 
ernment on the Alaskan Boundary Survey Mr. Tinsley had 
charge of one triangulation party. "U'as married June 30, 1896, 
in Louisville. Kv. 



1 58 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

97. Tippy, Bruce Oren. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from New Carlisle, Ind., in 1888, at the 
age of 21, and graduated from the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1892. From 1892 to 1898 Engineer Grand Rapids Gas 
Works, Grand Rapids, Mich. In 1898 Engineer Detroit City 
Gas Company, Detroit, Mich. From 1903 to 1904 Superin- 
tendent of Manufacture, Detroit. From 1907 to the present 
time Vice-President and General Manager Grand Rapids Gas 
Lighting Company, Grand Rapids, Mich., and Consulting Gas 
Engineer. 

98. Wetherbee, Harry Luther. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Marshalltown, Iowa, in 1888, at the 
age of 19; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. In 1893 was Instructor in Wood Shop Santee Normal 
Training School, Santee Agency, Neb. From 1894 to 1901 
farmer. In 1901 Draftsman Charter Gas Engine Company, 
Sterling, 111., and the latter part of that year became Draftsman 
for the Fairbanks-Morse Company, Beloit, Wis. From 1903 to 
1905 Draftsman Berlin Machine Works, Beloit. In 1906 with 
the Olds Gas Power Company, Lansing, Mich. From 1907 to 
date with the Illinois Steel Company, South Chicago, 111. Mr. 
Wetherbee was married August 30, 1902. 

99. WicKHAM, Walter Morse. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Huron, Ohio, in 1888, at the age of 
16, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. In 1893 with the Kilby Manufacturing Company, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. From 1894 to 1896 Draftsman for the Johnson 
Company, Lorain, Ohio. In 1897 Draftsman for the McCord 
Tube Company, Beaver Falls, Pa. In 1898 Draftsman Carnegie 
Steel Company, Pittsburg. In 1899 Draftsman in the Copper 
Mills of C. G. Hussey, Pittsburg. In 1900 Draftsman Lacka- 
wanna Iron and Steel Company, Scranton. In 1901 Chief 
Draftsman Lackawanna Iron and Steel Company, Buffalo. In 
1902 and 1903 Engineer Blast Furnace Lackawanna Steel Com- 
pany, Buffalo. From 1904 to 1906 Draftsman and Engineer 
Semet Solvay Company, Syracuse, N. Y. From 1906 to 1909 
Chief Draftsman with the Indiana Steel Company, Gary, Ind., 
which position he resigned. His present address is 6215 Wash- 
ington Avenue, Chicago. Mr. Wickham has written several 
articles for engineering magazines. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 159 

TOO. Wicks, Albert Wood. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Areola, 111., in 1888, at the age of 17; 
graduated from the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1892. 
In 1893 was in the Mechanical Department World's Columbian 
Exposition, Chicago. From 1894 to 1899 with Hyde Park Elec- 
tric Company, Chicago. From 1899 to 1901 in Southern District 
Offices Commonwealth Electric Company, Chicago. In 1903 
Contract Agent for Chicago Edison Company, Chicago. In 
1904 Manager of Chicago office The Electric Machinery Com- 
pany, Chicago. In 1907 General Manager Economy Light, Fuel 
and Power Company, Lockport, N. Y. From 1908 to date with 
Power and Mining Department General Electric Company, Chi- 
cago, 111. Mr. Wicks was married November 7, 1901. 

loi. Wilson, Robert Lee. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Shelbyville, 111., in 1888, at the age 
of 18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1892. In 1893 in Expert Department General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. In 1894 graduate student Johns Hopkins 
University. From 1895 to 1898 with the Westinghouse Electric 
Company, Pittsburg. From 1898 to 1901 Electric Engineer 
Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg. 
In 1902 Resident Engineer Westinghouse Electric and Manufac- 
turing Company, New York. 1904, Superintendent of Construc- 
tion Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, Pitts- 
burg. From 1905 to the present is Superintendent of Railway 
Construction Westinghouse Electric Company. Mr. Wilson 
was married in 1901. He has had charge of the installation and 
erection of some of the largest plants, notably the plants of the 
Interborough Rapid Transit Company, New York City Railway, 
Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company. Also the electrification of 
the N. Y., N. H. & H. Railway and the St. Clair Tunnel. 

102. Wood, George Roy. 1892. 

Born at Martin's Ferry, Ohio, July 29, 1872. Entered in 1888; 
graduated in Mechanical Engineering Course in 1892. Took 
graduate course in Civil Engineering at Rose in 1893. In 1894 
with the Cleveland, Loraine & Wheeling Railroad Company, 
Martin's Ferry. From 1895 to 1899 with the General Electric 
Company in the Mining Department, successively as Assistant 
to Construction Foreman, Construction Foreman, and Sales 
Engineer. During this time, located at Pittsburg, represented 



i6o Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

the Philadelphia office of the company. His work has been 
along the line of the application of electricity to mining work. 
Some of the largest plants in the country were installed by 
him. From 1899 to 1902 Superintendent of Electrical Equipment 
Pittsburg Coal Company, Pittsburg, Pa. From 1903 to date 
Consulting Electrical and Mining Engineer. Is a member of the 
A. I. E. E., A. I. M. E., The Franklin Institute, the N. G. S., 
associate member of A. S. C. E-, also a member of the Uni- 
versity Club of Pittsburg. 

103. Young, Charles James. 1892. 

Entered the Institute from Davenport, Iowa, in 1889, at the 
age of 19, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1892. In 1893 in the Drafting Department E. P. Allis Com- 
pany, Milwaukee, Wis. In 1894 was a graduate student at 
Cornell University. From 1895 to 1898 Manager of the People's 
Lighting Company, Davenport. From 1898 to 1902 Manager of 
the People's Lighting Company, Davenport, and Superintendent 
People's Power Company's station, Moline, 111. 1902 with the 
Woodward Governor Company, Rockford, 111. 1903 Secretary 
and Treasurer of the Woodward Governor Company. From 
1904 to 1906 General Superintendent of the Saginaw-Bay City 
Railway and Light Company, Saginaw, Mich. In 1907 Depart- 
ment Sales Manager Cooper, Hewitt Lamp Company, Chicago, 
and to date traveling Construction Engineer. 

104. Albert, Clifford Edmund. 1893. 

Born January 13, 1872, at Cincinnati, Ohio. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1889; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1893. From 1893 to 1896 with Branham, Gest & Co., General 
Contractors, Cincinnati. From 1896 to date with the United 
States Playing Card Company, also the United States Printing 
Company, from 1906 to date, as General Accountant. Mr. 
Albert was married in 1899 3t Cincinnati, Ohio. 

105. Albert, Walter Henry. 1893. 

Born August 17, 1870, at Cincinnati, Ohio. Entered in 1889, 
and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1893. 
From 1894 to 1900 was Accountant. From 1900 to 1901 Sec- 
retary of the Barron-Boyle Company. Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
from 1902-4 Vice-President and Secretary. From 1905-6 Spe- 
cial Examiner the Adams Express Company. From 1907 to 
date Assistant Treasurer the Adams Express Company, Sec- 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. i6i 

retary and Treasurer the Morris European and American Ex- 
press Company, Treasurer Hollywood Hotel and Cottage Com- 
pany, Treasurer Dodd & Childs' Express Company, New York 
City. Married December 31. 1901, at McKeesport, Pa. 

106. Allen, Burgess F. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Otter Creek Junction, Ind.. in 1889, 
at the age of 21, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1893. In 1894 was Artist and Designer, Indianapolis. 
In 1895 of Allen Bros., Monumental Architects and Designers, 
Indianapolis. From 1903 to 1905, B. F. Allen, Designer. Indi- 
anapolis, and in December. 1905, died in Indianapolis. 

T07. Becker, Maurice Emil. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Connersville, Ind., in 1886, aged 18; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1893. From 
1894 to 1905 Draftsman for the Connersville Blower Company, 
Connersville. 1905 and 1906 Draftsman for the Piqua Foundry 
and Machine Company, Piqua. Ohio. From 1907 to date Engi- 
neer Piqua Foundry and Machine Company, Piqua, Ohio. 

108. Dale, James. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1890, at the age 
of 24; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1893. 
In 1893 and 1894 selling and installing light and power plants, 
Cincinnati. In 1895 with the National Cash Register Company, 
Dayton, Ohio. In 1896 Salesman for the National Cash Register 
Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 1897 to 1898 in the bicycle busi- 
ness in Denver, Col. From 1899 to 1901 Salesman Hallwood 
Cash Register Company, Minneapolis, Minn. From 1902 to 1905 
Sales Agent for the Hallwood Cash Register Company, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. From 1906 to 1908 Office Manager National Cash 
Register Company, Cleveland. Is now Office Manager of the 
National Cash Register Company at Detroit, Mich. Mr. Dale 
was married in Alinneapolis April i, 1899. 

109. Hart, Harry Stillson. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Clinton, Iowa, in 1889, at the age of 
19, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1893. 
In 1894 was connected with the Siemens & Halske Electric 
Company, Chicago. From 1895 to 1897 with the Fostoria Car- 
bon Company, Fostoria, Ohio. From 1897 to 1899 with the 



i62 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Crouse-Tremaine Carbon Company. In 1899 with the Rodger 
Ballast Car Company. From 1900 to 1901 Secretary and Treas- 
urer of the Rodger Ballast Car Company. In 1902 and 1903 
Vice-President of the Rodger Ballast Car Company. In 1904 
was made President of the Rodger Ballast Car Company, which 
position he still holds. Is also President of the National Dump 
Car Company, Chicago, 111., and the Hart-Otis Car Company, 
Canada. Mr. Hart holds a number of patents on hopper steel 
car construction and on convertible types of cars. 

1 10. Hood, Arthur Merrill. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Indianapolis, Ind., in 1889, at the 
age of 17. and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1893. From 1894 to 1896 Fourth Assistant Examiner United 
States Patent Office, Washington, D. C. From 1896 to 1898 
junior member of H. P. Hood & Son, Patent Attorneys, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. From 1898 to 1902 Patent Attorney, Indianapolis. 
From 1902 to the present time of the firm of Bradford & Hood, 
Patent and Trademark Attorneys. Indianapolis, Ind. Was 
given the degree of LL.B. from Columbian University in 1895, 
and the degree of M.S. from Rose in 1898. Is a member of the 
bar of the Supreme Court of the United States and the Supreme 
Court of Indiana. Was married April 16, 1895, in Washington, 
D. C. At the time Mr. Hood was examined for the Patent 
Office service he was the only one of seven candidates who 
passed. He has been Secretary-Treasurer of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation from 1906 to date, and also represents the Alumni on 
the Board of Managers. 

111. HUTHSTEINER, RoBERT EdWARD. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Tell City, Ind., in 1889, at the age 
of 17, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1893. Tn 1894 was Private Assistant to Professor Gray at the 
Rose Pol5i:echnic Instititte. From 1895 to 1897 Engineer in the 
Ice Factory. Tell City, Ind. From 1898 Erecting Engineer 
Frick Company, Waynesboro, Pa. From 1898 to 1903 with the 
General Electric Company in the Switchboard Department, 
Schenectady, N. Y. In 1903 Assistant Manager Switchboard 
Department General Electric Company. From 1908 to date 
Manager of the El Paso Ice and Refrigerator Company, El 
Paso, Tex. Is a member of the A. I. E. E. and Society of 
Engineers of Eastern New York. Was married September 19, 
1894. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 163 

112. JOHANNESEN, SvEND EmANUEL. 1893. 

Entered from Erie, Pa., in 1889, age 23; graduated in the Civil 
Engineering Course in 1893. From 1893 to 1895 was Engineer 
in the Testing Department and from 1895 to 1902 Engineer in 
charge of Transformer Department Wagner Electric Manufac- 
turing Company, St. Louis, Mo. From 1902 to 1906 Section 
Engineer in charge of Air Blast and Railway Transformer 
Department Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Pittsburg. From 1906 to the present time Engineer in 
charge of Commercial Transformer Department General Elec- 
tric Company, Pittsfield, Mass. Was granted degree of M.S. in 
1895 and E.E. in 1898 from Rose. Is a member of the 
A. I. E. E. Has written several articles for technical publica- 
tions. Was married in Terre Haute June 5, 1895. Was one of 
the organizers of the first Rose Orchestra. 

113. JoHONNOTT, Edwin Sheldon, Jr. 1893. 

Born Richmond, 111., November 9, 1869. Entered the Institute 
in 1887 ; in 1889 withdrew because of defective eyesight ; re- 
entered in 1891 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1893. Was Assistant Examiner jn the Patent Office in 1893. 
In 1894 Professor of Mathematics Drury College. In 1895 
graduate student Johns Hopkins University. 1896 graduate 
student Chicago University, and in 1897-99 Fellow in Physics 
University of Chicago. From 1899 to date Associate Professor 
of Physics Rose Pol)i;echnic Institute. Was granted degree of 
M.S. in 1897 from Rose, and Ph.D. from Chicago in 1898. 
Member of American Physical Society' and A. A. A. S. Pub- 
lished articles are "Thin Liquid Films," in Philosophical Maga- 
zine, June, 1899, and June, 1904, and "Alternating Currents," in 
Physical Review and Electrical World and Engineer, 1904. 
Was married August 22, 1900. Commencement speaker, 1899. 

114. Klotz, August Henry. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Sandusky, Ohio, in 1880, at the age 
of 21, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1893. From 1894 to 1900 with the George Feick Company, 
Architects and Builders, Sandusky, Ohio. From 1900 to 1903 
Managing Owner of the Klotz & Kromer Machine Company, 
Sandusky, Ohio. From 1904 to date Proprietor of the Klotz 
Machine Company, Sandusky, Ohio. Mr. Klotz was married 
February 6, 1908. 



164 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

115. McDermott, Harry E. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Stockport, Ohio, in 1889, at the age 
of 19, and graduated in Electrical Engineering in 1893. From 

1895 to the present time has been connected with the General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y.. as Engineer and in 
charge of the Calculating Department. 

116. McGregor, James Charles, Jr. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1889, at the age of 
17; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1893. In 
1894 with the Westinghouse Electric Company, Pittsburg. In 

1896 in office of Corporation Counsel. New York City. In 1897 
Assistant Corporation Counsel, New York City. In 1898 junior 
member of the law firm of Large & McGregor, New York City. 
From 1901 to 1903 in the United States Army. In 1904 mining 
in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. Received degree of LL-B. from 
Columbia University. Since 1904 no report has been received 
at the Institute from Mr. McGregor. 

117. Moth, Robert HnysTRv. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Kenosha, Wis., in 1889, at the age 
of 17, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1893. 
From 1898 to 1901 Civil Engineer with the Davy Burnt Clay 
Ballast Company, Kenosha, Wis. From 1901 to date City Engi- 
neer and Superintendent of Water Works, Kenosha, Wis. 

118. Rice, Arthur. 1893. 

Entered the Junior Class from Indianapolis in 1891, at the age 
of 20, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1893. In 1896 with the Metropolitan Telegraph and Telephone 
Company, New York. From 1897 to 1906 Engineer in Con- 
struction Department New York Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. From 1907 Interior Block Engineer New York 
Metropolitan Telephone and Telegraph Company, New York 
City. Some of Mr. Rice's more important work has been the 
installation of the Interior Block System of Telephone Dis- 
tribution in New York City and the consequent removal of 
overhead wires. Is a member of the A. I. E. E., New York 
Electrical Society, and the New York Telephone Society. Was 
married in New York City September 15, 1906. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 165 

119. Rose, Clarence Charles. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Little Rock, Ark., in 1889, age 17; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1893. From 
1893 to 1894 with the General Electric Company, Chicago. 
From 1894 to 1901 Secretary and Treasurer of the Camden 
Power and Light Company, and President of the Camden 
Machinery and Supply Company, Camden, Ark. From 1901 to 
1902 Vice-President of the W. W. Dickinson Hardware Com- 
pany, Little Rock, Ark. From 1902 to date President of Rose- 
Lyon Hardware Company, Little Rock, Ark. Mr. Rose was 
married in Little Rock in 1898. 

120. Ross, Taylor William, 1893. 

Entered the Institute in 1888 from Madison, Ind., age of 16; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1893. In 
1893 with Thos. Graham & Co., Manufacturers of Wood Mate- 
rials, Madison. In 1894 graduate student Cornell University. 
In 189s Second Assistant Engineer United States Revenue 
Cutter Survey, Treasury Department, Washington, D. C. From 
1898 to 1901 Second Assistant Engineer United States Revenue 
Cutter Survey, Seattle, Wash. In 1901 with the New York 
Ship Building Company, Camden, N. J. From 1903 to the pres- 
ent time with the Newport News Ship Building and Dry Dock 
Company, Newport News, Va. Mr. Ross was granted degree 
of M.E. from Cornell University in 1894. 

121. Valentine, Robert David. 1893. 

Entered the Sophomore Class from Cannon Falls, Minn., in 
1890, at the age of 26; graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1893. From 1894 to 1896 with the Westinghouse 
Electric Company, Pittsburg. In 1896 with the Cannon Falls 
Electric Company. From 1906 to 1908 installed several electric 
plants operated by gasoline engines. In 1898 with the Electric 
Machine Company, Minneapolis. From 1900 to 1903 of the firm 
of Valentine Bros., Machinists and Electricians, Minneapolis. 
From 1904 to date Secretary and Shop Superintendent of Valen- 
tine Bros. Manufacturing Company, Minneapolis, Minn. 

122. Waite, William Henry. 1893. 

Entered the Institute from Toledo, Ohio, in 1889, age 18; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1893. In 1894 
Draftsman with the Vulcan Iron Works. Toledo, Ohio. From 



i66 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

1895 to 1898 Engineer Bucyrus Company, Steam Shovel and 
Dredge Department, South Milwaukee. From 1898 to 1905 
Chief Engineer with the Vulcan Iron Works, Toledo. In 1905 
Chief Engineer National Drill and Manufacturing Company, 
Barberton, Ohio. In 1906 Manager Steam Shovel Department 
Browning Engineering Company, Cleveland, Ohio, and in 1907 
became Sales Manager of the Browning Engineering Company, 
which position he holds to date. Mr. Waite was married in 
Terre Haute, Ind., in 1898. 

123. Wenzel, Charles Gotix>b. 1893. 

Born October 25, 1870, Cincinnati, Ohio. Entered the Institute 
from Toledo, Ohio, in 1890; graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1893. From September, 1893, to 1907 Instruc- 
tor Toledo Manual Training School. From 1906 to 1908 Super- 
intendent Shaw-Kendall Engineering Company and Toledo 
Machine and Tool Company. At present in manual training 
work at Central High School, Toledo, Ohio. Mr. Wenzel was 
married in Toledo in 1895. 

124. Anderson, Warwick Miller. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1890, at the age 
of 18; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1894. 
From 1894 to 1896 Draftsman with the L. & N. Railroad Com- 
pany, Louisville, Ky. In 1896 and 1897 Instructor in English 
Louisville Male High School. Graduate student in Mathematics 
and Physics University of Chicago during the summers of 1896 
to 1900, inclusive. From 1807 to 1902 Instructor in Physics 
Manual Training High School, Louisville. In 1902 and 1903 
graduate student in Mathematics and Physics Johns Hopkins 
University. From 1903 to the present time Instructor in Mathe- 
matics at the Patterson-Davenport School, Louisville, Ky. Mr. 
Anderson was married in 1898 in Louisville. He represented 
the Alumni as orator at the Commencement, 1907. 

125. Andrews, Morton Clark. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from State Line, Ind., in 1890, at the age 
of 21, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1894. 
In 1895 was Instructor in Civil Engineering Rose Polytechnic 
Institute. From 1896 to 1899 Superintendent of Construction 
Williamsport Stone Company, Williamsport, Ind. From 1899 
to 1903 Civil Engineer and Superintendent of Construction 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 167 

Williamsport Stone Company, Williamsport, Ind. 1906 Civil 
Engineer of firm of W. P. Carmichael Company, Engineers and 
Contractors, Williamsport, Ind. At the present time is junior 
partner of W. P. Carmichael Company. 

126. Blinks, Walter Moulton. 1894. 

Entered from Michigan City, Ind., in 1890; graduated from the 
Chemistry Course in 1894. In 1894 was with the Michigan City 
Gas Company ; from 1895-98 Manager of the Isabella Gas 
Works, Frederick, Md. From 1908 to 190.3 Superintendent 
Michigan City Gas Light Company. From 1903 to present time 
Assistant Manager General Gas Light Company, Kalamazoo, 
Mich. Was also Secretary and Treasurer Michigan Enameling 
Works, Kalamazoo. Was married in 1898. 

127. Brown, Elmer. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1889, at the age of 
16; graduated in Chemistry in 1894. In 1895 was with the 
County Surveyor, Terre Haute. In 1906 with the Ohio Steel 
Company, Youngstown. Ohio. In 1897 was in Indianapolis. 
In 1898 with the Maryland Steel Company, Sparrows Point, Md. 
Mr. Brown died in 1899. 

128. Denehie, John Franklin. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1890, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1894. From 1895 
to 1903 in Testing Department Louisville Electric Light and 
Gas Company, Louisville, Ky. From 1908 to date has had the 
additional charge of all repairs with the same company. Is a 
member of the Louisville Engineers' and Architects' Club. Was 
married June 26, 1902. 

129. Frohman, Edward D. 1894. 

Born August 12, 1873, Erlangen, Germany. Entered the Insti- 
tute from Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1890; graduated in Chemistry in 
1894. In 1894 and 1895 ■^^'as a graduate student in Chemical 
Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bos- 
ton. In 1896 in the Chemical Department Pittsburg Testing 
Laboratory, Pittsburg. From 1897 to 1900 of the firm of O. 
Hommel & Co., Pittsburg. From 1900 to 1901 Manager of the 
Paint Department S. Obermayer Company, Cincinnati, Q. 
From 1902 to the present time Secretary and Treasurer of the 



i68 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

S. Obermayer Company at Pittsburg. Pa. Mr. Frohman is a 
member of the Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania 
and Pittsburg Foundrymen's Associations. His work in the last 
few years has been in the use of coal as purifier in glass manu- 
facturing and the perfection of core compounds in foundry 
practice. 

130. Hedden, Oran Roberts. 1894, 

Entered the Institute from Robinson, 111., in 1890, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1894. In 1895 
was with the Chicago Telephone Company. From 1895 to 1902 
PrinciparHigh School, Robinson, 111. From 1903 to 1904 Super- 
intendent of Schools, Newman, 111. From 1907 to date City 
Engineer of Robinson, 111. 

131. Henrikson Sigurd Lund. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Chicago, 111., in 1890, at the age of 
17, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1894. 
From 1894 to 1895 with the Bostedo Packing and Cash Carrier 
Company, Chicago. In 1895 \\ith Siemens & Halske Electric 
Company, Chicago. In 1896 with the Illinois Steel Company, 
Chicago. From 1897 to 1901 Draftsman Union Iron Works. 
San Francisco, Cal. October 18, 1902, Mr. Henrikson died at 
Pasadena, Cal. 

132. HiEDRETH, Fred Foster. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Bridge Hampton, L. I., in 1890, age 
24; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1894. In 1894 
connected \vith the L. I. Railroad Company as instrument man, 
Bridge Hampton, L. I. From 1895 to 1898 Assistant Engineer 
T. H. & I. Railroad Company, Terre Haute, Ind. From 1898 to 
1900 Assistant Engineer of Motive Power T. H. & I. Railroad 
Company. From 1900 to 1903 Acting Master Mechanic T. H. 
& I. Railroad Company. In 1903 Master Mechanic T. H. & I. 
Railroad Company. From 1904 to the present time Mechanical 
Engineer Vandalia Railroad Company, Terre Haute, Ind. Mar- 
ried. Mr. Hildreth has been connected with the Vandalia Rail- 
road for fifteen years throughout its period of development 
from an isolated road to one of the most important branches of 
the Pennsylvania System. He has served as Alumni representa- 
tive on the Board of Managers from 1902- 1904, and has held 
office in the Association. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 169 

133. Holding, James Ci,ark Carlisi^e. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1890, age 17; 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1894. In 1895 '" 
the Engineering Department Johnson & Co., Lorain, Ohio. 
From 1896 to 1898 with the Shiffler Bridge Company, Pittsburg. 
From 1898 to 1904 with the Keystone Bridge Works, Carnegie 
Steel Company, Pittsburg. From 1904 to the present time with 
Sales Bureau Carnegie Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 

134. KiT.BouRNE, Hubert Gorham. 1894. 

Born October 12, 1872, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1890; graduated in Chemistry in 1894. From 1894 to 1896 Con- 
tracting, Heating, and Ventilating Engineer Kilbourne & Kil- 
bourne, Terre Haute. From 1896 to 1897 Manager Shafer 
Acetylene Generator Company, Terre Haute. From 1897 to 
1898 Superintendent Heating Department John Watson's Sons 
Company, Terre Haute. From 1899 to 1903 Superintendent 
Liquid Carbonic Gas Company Soda Fountain Department, Chi- 
cago. From 1903 to 1905 Sales Department American Soda 
Fountain Company, New York. From 1905 to 1907 Manager 
L. A. Becker Company, New York. In 1908 Manager Franklin 
Automobile Company, Boston. In 1909 of the firm of Kil- 
boume-Corlew Motor Company, Boston, Mass. Mr. Kilbourne 
is a member of the Drug and Chemical Club, New York City. 

135. McCuLLOCH, David. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Indianapolis, Ind., in 1890, age 18; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1894. I" 
189s and 1896 was in the Engineering Department of the Deer- 
ing Hardware Company, Chicago. In 1896 a medical student at 
Rush College, Chicago. March 13, 1898, died in Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

136. Mendenhall, Charles Elwood. 1894. 

Born August i, 1872, Columbus, Ohio. Entered the Institute 
from Washington, D. C, in 1890; graduated in the Electrical 
Engineering Course in 1894. From 1894 to 1895 Assistant In- 
structor in Physics at University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 
From 1895 to 1897 graduate student at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. From 1897 to 1898 Fellow in Physics Johns Hopkins 
University. From 1898 to 1901 Instructor in Physics Williams 
College, Williamstown, Mass. From 1901 to 1905 Assistant 



170 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Professor in Physics, and from 1905 to the present time Pro- 
fessor of Physics University of Wisconsin. Was granted degree 
of Ph.D. in 1898 from Johns Hopkins University. Is a member 
of A. A. A. S. and of the American Physical Society. He has 
written various papers on Experimental Physics, chiefly along 
the line of gravity and radiation. Was married at Talcottville, 
N. Y., February 14, 1906. Mr. Mendenhall represented the 
Alumni as Commencement orator in 1903. 

137. MiscHLEjR, Paul. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1889, age 16; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1894. Imme- 
diately after graduation went to Denver, Col., on account of his 
health, and died there November 8, 1895. 

138. iNloRY, Austin Van Hoesen. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Manchester, Iowa, In 1891, age 21; 
graduated in Chemistry in 1894. In 1895 assisted building gas 
plant, Waltham, Mass. From 1896 to 1899 Chemist in Labora- 
tory of Armour & Co., Chicago. From 1899 to 1901 Superin- 
tendent Analytical Laboratory Armour & Co., Chicago. From 
1902 to 1906 Chemist for Armour Packing Company, Kansas 
City, Mo. In 1907 Chemist with Food Laboratory, Bureau of 
Chemistry, Washington, D. C. From 1908 to date Acting Chief 
United States Food and Drug Inspection Laboratory, Kansas 
City, Mo. Is married. 

139. RiEDEir, Edward. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Cloverport, Ky., in 1890, age 20; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1894. From 
189s to 1899 was Assistant Electrician for the Louisville Street 
Railway Company, Louisville. From 1900 to 1901 with the 
Metropolitan Street Railway Company, New York City. From 
1902 to 1904 with the Westinghouse Electric Company, Pitts- 
burg. From 1904 to 1905 with the Westinghouse Electric Com- 
pany, St. Louis. From 1906 to date District Engineer Westing- 
house Electric Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

140. Robinson, Edgar Franklin. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Earlington, Ky., in 1890, age 16; 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1894. In iSoS 
Mining Engineer for the Consolidated Coal Companies of East- 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 171 

ern Tennessee, Newcomb, Tenn. From i8g6 to 1899 in the 
Maintenance of Way Department of the St. Louis Division Big 
Four Railway, Mattoon, 111. 1899 Assistant Roadmaster N. Y. 
Central Railroad, Lyons, N. Y. In 1900 Roadmaster West End 
St. Paul & Sioux City Division, Worthington, Minn. From 
1902 to 1903 Superintendent Maintenance of Way of Butte, 
Anaconda & Pacific Railway Company, Anaconda, Mont. 1904 
Engineer of Track Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railway, 
Rochester, N. Y. From 1907 to date Chief Engineer Buffalo, 
Rochester & Pittsburg Railway, Rochester, N. Y. 

141. RoYSE, James Samuel. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 189Q, age 17; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1894. I" 1894 
and 1895 was a graduate student at Rose Polytechnic Institute. 
In 1899 Draftsman in the City Engineer's office, Terre Haute. 
From 1900 to 1905 with the Terre Haute Trust Company, Terre 
Haute, and from 1905 to May, 1909, Vice-President and Secre- 
tary of the Terre Haute Trust Company, since which time he 
has been President, succeeding Mr. I. H. C. Royse, deceased. 
In 1900 Mr. Royse was married at Milford, 111. Elected to 
Board of Managers in 1908. 

142. Speex), James Buckner. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1890, age 18; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1894. From 1894 
to 1896 Assistant Superintendent Louisville Electric Light Com- 
pany. From 1896 to 1897 iri Electrical Contracting, Louisville, 
Ky. From 1897 to 1898 with United States Engineering Depart- 
ment and in Spanish War. From 1898 to 1905 with the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad Company in various capacities, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. From 1905 to 1909 Consulting Engineer, Berkeley, 
Cal. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1896 from Rose. Was 
married in 1900. 

143. Stanton, Howard Maxwell. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Indianapolis, Ind., in 1889, age 18; 
on account of sickness was obliged to withdraw for a year dur- 
ing his course; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1894. From 1895 to 1899 of the firm of Stanton & Denny, 
Attorneys, Indianapolis. From 1899 to date of the firm of 
Stanton & Stanton, Attorneys, Indianapolis, Ind. Was granted 



172 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

degree of LL.B. from the Indianapolis Law School. December 
28, 1897, Mr. Stanton was married in Chicago. Mr. Stanton 
has been kindly remembered by Rose people, who owe to his 
efforts the comfort of sidewalks from Eighth Street to the 
Institute. 

144. Winters,, George Harold. 1894. 

Entered the Institute from Dawn, Ohio, in 1890, age 20; grad- 
uated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1894. December, 1894, 
to June. 1905, with the National Cash Register Company, Day- 
ton, Ohio. From 1896 to 1898 Assistant Engineer Big Four 
Railway. From 1898 to 1900 Roadmaster Mexican National 
Railway Company at Saltillo, Mexico. From 1900 to 1902 Resi- 
dent Engineer on the construction of the Coahuila & Pacific 
Railway. From 1902 to 1903 Resident Engineer Mexican Na- 
tional Railway. From January to April. 1903, with the Waters- 
Pierce Oil Company, Vera Cruz. From .April. 1903, to January, 
1904, Engineer in charge of the United Railways of Yucatan. 
From January to July, 1904, Engineer and Contractor, build- 
ing twelve miles of railroad through swamps of State of 
Tobasco, Mexico. From July to October, 1904, returned to 
United Railways of Yucatan. From October, 1904, to June, 

1906, Assistant Chief Engineer on reconstruction work on the 
Tehuantepec National Railway. From June, 1906, to December, 

1907. Engineer in charge of construction for the Cuba Eastern 
Railway. From December, 1907, to June, 1908, Superintendent 
of Construction and Chief Engineer, finishing up twenty miles 
of macadam road in Cuba. From June, 1908, to the present 
time regaining his health after tropical sickness, doing light 
work in Civil Engineering at his old home, Greenville, O. 

145. Anderson, Lewis Clieeord. 1895. 

Entered the Institute from Delaware, Ohio, in 1891, age 17; 

graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. In 
1896 was with the Crouse Tremaine Carbon Company, Fostoria, 
Ohio. From 1897 to 1903 of the firm of Weis & Anderson, 
Electrochemists, and with the American Writing Paper Com- 
pany. From 1903 to the present time Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Franklin Electric Light Company, and Consulting Elec- 
trical Engineer, Franklin, Ohio. He was married June 7, 1905, 
at Franklin, Ohio. Mr. Anderson's work lies especially along 
the line of power plant designing and investigations on elec- 
trolysis. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 173 

146. BiGEivOw, Henry Waite. 1895. 

Born May 8, 1868. at Colchester, Conn. Entered the Institute 
in 1889; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. 
From July i, 1895, to September i, 1895, Engineer in Boot and 
Shoe Factory, Colchester. From 1895 to 1900 in Testing De- 
partment Pope Manufacturing Company, Hartford, Conn. In 
1900 to 1906 with the Hartford Rubber Company, Hartford, 
Conn., in charge of the Experimental Department. In 1905 
and 1906 Superintendent Rubber Works, Hartford, Cofin. From 
1907 to the present time Superintendent Insulated Wire and 
Cable Departments The Simplex Electrical Company, Cam- 
bridgeport, Mass. Mr. Bigelow was married October 11, 1905. 

147. Brown, Samuel George. 1895. 

Born March 7, 1872, at Willoughby, Ohio, and entered the Insti- 
tute in 1891 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1895. In 1895-6 was graduate student at Cornell University. 
1896 Draftsman Terre Haute Manufacturing Company. From 
1896 to 1899 fruit grower, Willoughby, Ohio. From 1899 to 

1900 in the Engineering Department of the Printing Telegraph 
Company. Allegheny, Pa. From 1901 to the present time a 
fruit grower. Willoughby, Ohio. 

148. BuRTis, Edwin Ransome. 1895. 

Born August 18, 1870, in New York. Entered the Institute from 
Manhattan, Kan., in 1892 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineer- 
ing Course in 1895. From 1895 to 1896 Draftsman for Auto- 
matic Coal Recorder Company. Denver, Col. From 1899 to 

1901 with F. A. Walters, Fuel Contractor for Colorado & South- 
ern Railway. Denver. In 1905 Superintendent Sugar Loaf Mine, 
Copley, Cal. Since 1905 no record has been received at the 
Institute. 

149. Craver, Harry Weirauch. 1895. 

Born August 10, 1875. Owaneco, 111. Entered the Institute from 
Terre Haute in 1891 ; graduated in Chemistry in 1895. 1895 to 
1896 graduate student in Chemistry at Rose. From 1896 to 1897 
Chemist to Kirkpatrick & Co.. Pittsburg, Pa. From 1897 to 
spring of 1899 Chemist to the Shoenberger Steel Company, of 
Pittsburg. Then Metallurgist to the Duquesne Reduction Com- 
pany, of Pittsburg, till January. 1900. Then was with the Vir- 
ginia Iron, Coal and Coke Company until April, 1900, when he 



174 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

accepted a position with the Carnegie Library at Pittsburg. Re- 
mained until March, 1902, and then resigned to become Assistant 
Superintendent of the Allegheny Steel and Iron Company, of 
Pittsburg. In August of same year returned to the Carnegie 
Library, where he has since remained. Was Technology Libra- 
rian until September, 1908, when was appointed Librarian. Is 
a member of the A. A. A. S., A. L. A., the A. C. S., the Engi- 
neers' Society Western Pennsylvania, and the Keystone Library 
Association. Was married in 1902. 

150. CrockweIvL, Charles Roland. 1895. 

Born August 12, 1873, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1891 ; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1895. 
From 189s to 1896 Engineer in War Department, River and 
Harbor Commission, Council Bluffs. From 1897 to 1900 junior 
member of the firm of J. D. Crockwell & Son, Council Bluffs. 
From 1901 to 1903 Chief Engineer Cambria Mining Company, 
Cambria, Wyo. From 1903 to 1907 Contracting Engineer for 
The Jeffrey Manufacturing Company, Columbus, Ohio. From 
1907 to the present time Sales Manager Jeffrey Manufacturing 
Company, St. Louis, Mo. Mr. Crockwell was married in Coun- 
cil Bluffs in June, 1902. 

151. Crowe, Walter Wayne. 1895. 

Born February 16, 1869, Richmond, Ind. Entered the Institute 
from Terre Haute in 1891 ; graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1895. From 1896 to 1898 with Hilly & Heine, 
Electrical Engineers and Contractors, Chicago. From 1898 to 

1902 Mechanical Engineer City Court Building, Chicago. In 

1903 with Becker Bros., Electrical Engineers, Chicago. In 1906 
rancher, Hussum, Wash. Since 1906 no report has been received 
at the Institute from Mr. Crowe. 

152. Darst, Edward Arrents. 1895. 

Born April 27, 1869, Eureka, 111. Entered the Institute in 1891, 
age 20; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. 
From 1896 to the present time Mr. Darst has been a farmer, 
and his address is Eureka, 111. 

153. McTaggart, James Richardson. 1895. 

Born January i, 1875, Richmond, Ind. Entered the Institute 
from Terre Haute in 1891 ; graduated in Chemistry in 1895. In 
1896 was with the Illinois Steel Company, Chicago. In 1897 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 175 

Resident Chemist for the Pittsburg Testing Laboratory, Niagara 
Falls, N. Y. From 1898 to 1900 Chemist Pittsburg Reduction 
Company, Pittsburg. In 1900 Manager of the Sterling Manu- 
facturing Company, Pittsburg. In 1901 Superintendent Liquid 
Carbonic Acid Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg. In 1902 in 
Technical Science Department Carnegie Library, Pittsburg. 
From 1902 to date City Chemist of Pittsburg, Pa. Was mar- 
ried in Pittsburg in 1902. 

154. Miller, Francis Hegan. 1895. 

Born April 24, 1874, Louisville, Ky. Entered the Institute in 
1891 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. 
Since September 27. 1895, with the Louisville Railway Com- 
pany as Laborer, Assistant Shop Superintendent, Superintend- 
ent Line Work, Assistant Station Superintendent, and in igoo 
was made Superintendent of Motive Power, which position he 
holds to date. Mr. Miller was granted degree of B.A. from 
University of Louisville in 1891, the degree of M.S. in 1897 and 
degree of E.E. in 1899, both from Rose. Is an associate member 
of A. I. of E. E. and Engineers' and Architects' Club of Louis- 
ville, Ky. Some of the important work Mr. Miller has been 
engaged upon is reconstructing the power station of Louisville 
Railway Company, changing same from straight D. C. distribu- 
tion to combined D. C. and A. C, with five sub-stations. Was 
married in Louisville in 1902. 

155. MuNDY, William Offutt. 1895. 

Born September 11, 1873, Louisville. Entered the Institute in 
1891 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. 
In 1896 was Shop Superintendent Louisville Railway Company, 
Louisville, Ky. From 1897 to 1900 Station Superintendent 
Louisville Railway Company. In 1900 with the General Electric 
Company, Schenectady, N. Y. From 1902 to 1904 Master Me- 
chanic St. Louis Transit Company, St. Louis, Mo. In 1904 
Commercial Engineer Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing 
Company, Pittsburg, Pa. He was granted the degree of M.S. 
in 1897 and E.E. in 1899, both from Rose. Mr. Mundy died at 
Pittsburg March 29, 1905. 

156. Phillips, George W. 1895. 

Born October 15, 1870, Champaign, 111. Entered the Institute 
from Ellsworth, Ind., in 1891 ; graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1895. From 1^99 to rgoo with Liquid Car- 



1/6 Rose PoJytcchmc Institute. 

bonic Acid Gas Company, Chicago. From 1900 to 1902 Chief 
Draftsman American Smelting and Refining Company, Perth 
Amboy, N. J. From 1902 to 1903 Constructing Engineer Amer- 
ican Smelting and Refining Company, Old Mexico. From 1903 
to 1906 Designing, Heyl & Patterson, Engineers, Pittsburg. 
From 1906 to 1908 Superintendent Construction Trussed Con- 
crete Steel Company, Detroit. At present Manager of the 
Denver office of the Trussed Concrete Steel Company. One 
year, 1907 to 1908, Mr. Phillips was a representative of the 
Trussed Steel Company in the Orient, and erected a seven-story 
building at Shanghai, China, the first large reinforced concrete 
building erected in the Far East. 

157. Robinson, Arthur Lee, Jr. 1895. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1891, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. In 1895 and 
1896 was Electrician Southern Railway Company, Knoxville, in 
charge of lighting plants for the company in Atlanta and Spen- 
cer, N. C, and in charge of installation Southern Railway Com- 
pany's piers. Pinners Point, Va. From the latter part of 1896 
to 1898 Assistant Roundhouse Foreman, Spencer, N. C. May, 
1898, passed examination and entered United States Navy as 
Assistant Engineer, and honorably discharged December, 1898. 
From 1899 to 1901 Electrical Engineer Southern Railway Com- 
pany, Washington, D. C. From 1902 to 1903 Manager of 
Eclipse Mine, Auburn, Cal. From 1904 to 1905 Master Me- 
chanic of St. Louis-Louisville Lines, Southern Railway Com- 
pany, Princeton, Ind. From 1905 to date Electrical Engineer 
on Canal Construction, Culebra, Panama. 

158. Shaneberger. Edgar Leon. 1895. 

Entered the Institute from Indianapolis, Ind., in i8gi, age 19; 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1895. From 1896 
to 1899 with the Lake Erie & Western Railway Company, Indi- 
anapolis. In 1899 Assistant Engineer Big Four Railvv^ay Com- 
panj\ Chicago Division, Indianapolis. In 1900 Assistant to 
Maintenance of Way Engineer Vandalia Railway, Terre Haute. 
In 1901 Engineer Maintenance of Way Peoria Division Van- 
dalia Railway, Terre Haute. In 1905 Superintendent Peoria 
Division Vandalia Railway, Terre Haute. In 1906 Engineer 
Maintenance of Way Logansport Division, Logansport. From 
1907 to the present time with the Interstate Sand and Gravel 
Company, Terre Haute, Ind. Was married in Terre Haute. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 177 

159. Spee:d, William Shallcross. 1895. 

Born September 10, 187.3, Louisville, Ky. Entered the Institute 
in 1891 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. 
From 1895 to 1897 with the Louisville Cement Company and a 
member of the firm of J. B. Speed & Co. From 1897 to the 
present time is Vice-President and General Manager of the 
Louisville Cement Company and President of the J. B. Speed 
Company, Louisville, Ky. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1897 
and M.E. in 1897, both from Rose. Is a member of the A. S. 
M. E. and the Engineers' and Architects' Club of Louisville. 
Was married in Louisville in 1904. 

160. Troxler, Laurence Edward. 1895. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1891, age 18; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. From 
1896 to 1900 with the Louisville Railway Company, Louisville. 
From 1900 to 1901 Station Superintendent Louisville Raihvny 
Company. In 1902 Electrical Manager L. & P. V. Electric 
Light Company, Louisville. From 1905 to 1906 Superintendent 
of Shop Construction United Railway Company. St. Louis, Mo. 
From 1907 to the present time Electrical Engineer for St. Joseph 
Lead Company and Doe Run Lead Company. Flat River. Mo. 

161. Tuller, Arthur Veach. 1895. 

Born August 15, 1872, Milford, 111. Entered the Institute in 
1891 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. 
Since his graduation and up to the present time has been in the 
lumber, farming, and banking business at Carrier Mills, 111. 
Was married at Mt. Vernon, 111., July 24, 1901. 

162. Wade, Archie E. 1895. 

Born November 16, 1871. Monroe County. Mo. Entered the 
Institute from Boulder Valley. Mont, in 1891 : graduated in 
the Electrical Engineering Course in 1895. From October, 1895, 
to September. 1897, with the Diamond Electric Company, 
Peoria. 111. From September. TS97. to June, 1898, student Brad- 
ley Polytechnic Institute, Peoria. From June. 1898, to February, 
1903, Vvfith the Peoria General Electric Company, People's Gas 
and Electric Company, and Peoria Gas and Electric Company. 
From February, 1903, to June, 1903, with Colean Manufacturing 
Company, Peoria. From July, 1903, to March, 1905, with Ohio 

12 



178 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Quarries Company, Amherst, Ohio. From June, 1905, to date 
with the North Shore Electric Company, Evanston, 111., as 
Operating Engineer. Received the degree of M.S. in 1906 from 
Rose. Is a member of the N. A. S. E. Was married in Peoria 
in 1905. 

163. Wiggins, Wiluam D. 1895. 

Born April 28, 1873, Richmond, Ind. Entered the Institute in 
1891 ; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1895. From 
1896 to 1898 Engineer Corps Pittsburg Division P. C. C. & St. 
L. Raihvay, Pittsburg. In 1898 Assistant Chief Engineer Penn- 
sylvania Railway Company, Pittsburg. From 1899 to 1900 Act- 
ing Assistant Chief Engineer Pennsylvania Railway Company, 
Ft. Wayne. In 1901 Assistant Engineer P. C. C. & St. L. Rail- 
way, Pittsburg. June, 1901, Engineer Maintenance of Way 
C. & M. V. Railway, Zanesville. Ohio. October, igoi, Engineer 
Maintenance of Way C. & M. V. Railway, Cambridge, Ohio. 
From 1903 to 1905 Engineer Maintenance of Way C. & M. V. 
Raihvay, Toledo, Ohio. From 1905 to the present time Engineer 
Maintenance of Way Pittsburg Division P. C. C. & St. L. Rail- 
way, Pittsburg, Pa. Is an associate member A. S. C. K. and 
member of the A. R. E. M. W. A. 

164. Bekbe, Robert Wallace. 1896. 

Entered the Institute from Sidney, Ohio, in 1892. age 17; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. In 1897 of 
the firm of Wells & Beebe, Electrical Contractors, Terre Haute, 
Ind. In 1898 Electrical Contractor, Terre Haute. In 1901 
Manager Motor Truck and Vehicle Company, Columbus, Ohio. 
From 1903 to 1907 in Sales Department Westinghouse Electric 
Company, Cleveland, Ohio. No further record has been re- 
ceived at the Institute from Mr. Beebe. 

165. BuRK, William Emmett. 1896. 

Entered the Institute from Richmond, Ind., in 1893, age 21 ; 
graduated in Chemistry in 1896. In 1896-7 was Instructor in 
Chemistry Rose Polytechnic Institute. 1897 and 1898 Assistant 
Superintendent and Chemist for Granite Basin Mining Com- 
pany (California). From 1898 to 1905 in charge of Chemical 
Department Louisville Male High School. Chemical Engineer 
in Louisville from 1903 to 1906. From September, 1905, to the 
present time Chief Chemist and Bacteriologist for Louisville 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 179 

Water Company, Louisville, Ky. Was granted degree of M.S. 
in 1901 from Rose. Married in Terre Haute in 1897. Mr. Burk 
has made studies of bituminous sandstones of Kentucky, and of 
the fluorite, lead, and zinc deposits of Western Kentucky; also 
on Portland cement industries in Southern Indiana and in the 
Republic of Mexico. He served as President of the Alumni 
Association in 1907, and is now Alumni representative on the 
Board of Managers — at all times a loyal worker. 

166. Carr, Uhei. Ulery. 1896. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1892, age 17; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. From 
1896 to 1900 with the Vandalia Railroad Company, Terre Haute, 
as Apprentice, Material Inspector, and Shop Foreman. From 
1900 to 1901 with the Pressed Steel Car Company, Pittsburg. 
From 1901 to 1904 with Heyl & Patterson Company, Contracting 
Engineers, Pittsburg. From 1904 to 1907 with the Eagle Iron 
Works Company, Terre Haute. From 1907 to the present time 
Mechanical Engineer Monongahela River Consolidated Coal and 
Coke Company, Pittsburg, Pa. Mr. Carr was granted degree 
of M.S. in 1899 from Rose, and was married in August, 1900. 

167. Decker, Walter Lowry. 1896. 

Born December 2, 1874. Evansville Ind. Entered the Institute 
in 1892, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1896. From 1896 to 1898 with the Sprague Electric Elevator 
Company, New York City. In 1898 with the Elevator Supply 
and Repair Company, New York. From 1899 to 1900 Chemist 
and Assayer Graphic Mines and Smelting Works, Magdalena, 
N. M. In 1903 in Mechanical Department The Geo. A. Fuller 
Company, New York. From 1904 to 1907 Electrical Engineer 
Westinghouse, Church, Kerr & Co., New York City. From 
1907 to date Designing Engineer with W. J. McGuire, Limited, 
Toronto, Can. Mr. Decker was married April 3, 1902. at 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

168. Failey, Bruce Franklin. 1896. 

Born August 20, ,1874, Indianapolis. Entered the Institute in 
1892; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. 
From 1896 to 1898 Secretary of the Blair & Failey Company, 
Terre Haute. Mr. Failey at the present time holds the follow- 



i8o Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

ing positions : Treasurer Terre Haute Brewing Company since 
1898; Secretary and Treasurer Southern Indiana Gas Company 
from 1898; Vice-President Wabash Realty and Loan Company 
from 1903 ; Secretary Jackson Hill and Coke Company from 
1900; Treasurer Lafayette Box Board and Paper Company from 
1904; Secretary Root Glass Company from 1901 ; Director in 
Terre Haute National Bank and United States Trust Company 
since their organizations. Mr. Failey was married in Terre 
Haute April 27, 1898. 

169. FABiRINGTON, JamES. 1896. 

Born December 28, 1873, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1892; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. 
From 1896 to 1900 with the Ohio Steel Company, Youngstown, 
Ohio. In 1900 Assistant Electrician Ohio Steel Company, 
Youngstown. 1901 Electrical Superintendent and Master Me- 
chanic American Steel and Wire Company, Neville Works, 
Pittsburg. From 1901 to 1903 General Superintendent Youngs- 
town Engineering Company, Youngstown. From 1903 to date 
Superintendent Electrical Department LaBelle Iron Works, 
Steubenville, Ohio. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1898 from 
Rose. Is a member of the Association of Iron and Steel Elec- 
trical Engineers. Was married September 28, 1904. 

170. Green. Frank T. 1896. 

Born April 12, 1870, Oskaloosa, Iowa. Entered the Institute in 
1892; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. 
From 1897 to 1901 Secretary and Assistant Superintendent 
Sioux City Brass Works, Sioux City, Iowa. In 1903 Superin- 
tendent Fox River Valley Telephone Company. Appleton, Wis. 
In 1906 with the Pacific States Telegraph and Telephone Com- 
pany, Los Angeles, Cal. No further record has been received at 
the Institute. 

171. Harris, Ellsworth Benjamin. 1896. 

Born May 8, 1873, Hagerstown, Md. Entered the Institute 
from Indianapolis, Ind., in 1892; graduated in the Chemical 
Department in 1896. In 1896 was Chemist for Armour & Co., 
Chicago. From 1897 to 1898 First Assistant Chemist Armour 
& Co., Chicago. From 1899 to 1901 Chemist Kodak Park 
Works, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester. Mr. Harris died 
March 13, 1901. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. i8i 

172. Hunt, Frederick Gang. 1896. 

Born April 2, 1872, Freeport, 111. Entered the Institute from 
Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1891, and withdrew on account of sickness; 
reentered in 1892; graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1896. In 1896-1897 graduate student Freiburg, Sax- 
ony. From 1897 to 1898 with Fleischmann & Co., Cincinnati. 
From 1898 to 1900 Assistant Superintendent Riverside Malt and 
Elevator Company, Cincinnati. In 1901 with the Cincinnati 
Gold Placer Mining Company, Cincinnati. From 1907 to the 
present time with the Remington Oil Engine Company, Stam- 
ford, Conn. Since graduation he has traveled extensively, and 
since his marriage in London, England, May i, 1902, has been 
in Algiers, Athens, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Cairo, and up 
the Nile to Associan, through Italy, Paris, London, and parts 
of England and Scotland, and also Germany. 

173. K1.1NGER, Peter Wert. 1896. 

Born October 29, 1874, Greenville, O. Entered the Institute in 
1892; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. 
From March i, 1897, to March 29 served as Electrical Inspector 
for the Barney & Smith Car Company, at the General Electric 
Works at Schenectady, N. Y. From March 29, 1897, to March 
22, 1898, Electrician Barney & Smith Car Company. From 
March 22, 1898, to September i, 1902, Machine Foreman in 
addition to Electrician. From September i, 1902, to September 
I, 1904, office duties for this company. From September i, 1904, 
to November 21, 1908, Assistant Superintendent of this company. 
From November 21, 1908, to date Superintendent of the Barney 
& Smith Car Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

174. Klinger, Watson Joseph. 1896. 

Born February 28, 1871, Arcanum, Ohio. Entered the Institute 
from Greenville, Ohio, in 1891 ; withdrew in 1892 ; reentered in 
1893, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1896. In 1897 was with the Ellwood Weldless Tube Company, 
Ellwood, Pa. From 1902 to 1903 Foreman of Assembling Room 
T. B. Jeffrey & Co., Manufacturers Rambler Automobiles, 
Kenosha, Wis. In 1903 Erecting Engineer for New Era Iron 
Works, Dayton, Ohio. From 1904 to 1906 Foreman Tool and 
Governor Department New Era Gas Engine Company, Dayton, 
Ohio. In 1906 with the Kay & Ess Company, Dayton, Ohio. 
At present is Proprietor of the Dayton View Machine Com- 
pany, Dayton, Ohio. 



1 82 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

175. Liggett, Harry Thompson. 1896. 

Born October 9, 1874, Louisville, Ky. Entered the Institute in 
1892, and graduated in Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. 
From 1896 to 1903 with the Cumberland Telephone Company, 
Louisville, Ky. From 1903 to date Instructor in Mathematics 
in Manual Training High School, Louisville, Ky. Was granted 
degree of M.D. in 1905 from the Kentucky School of Medicine. 
Is a member of the American Medical Association. Was mar- 
ried January i, 1900, at Louisville, Ky. 



176. McDargh, Harry John. 1896. 

Entered the Institute from Dayton, Ohio, in 1892, age 17, and 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1896. In 1897 
with City Engineer, Dayton, Ohio. 1898 Draftsman and Topog- 
rapher, Springfield, Ohio River & S. A. Railroad. In 1899 
Draftsman City Engineer's office, Dayton, Ohio. 1900 Civil 
Engineer Dayton Water Works, Dayton. 1901 Engineer West 
Kootenay Light and Power Company, Rossland, B. C. From 
1902 and 1903 First Assistant City Engineer, Dayton. 1904 of 
Folsom & McDargh, Consulting Civil and Hydraulic Engi- 
neers, Dayton. 1905 to 1908 Consulting Civil and Hydraulic 
Engineer, Dayton, and Maintenance Engineer Water Depart- 
ment, Dayton, Ohio. At present Civil Engineer with Luyster 
& Lowes, General Contractors, Dayton. Was granted degree 
of M.S. in 1900 from Rose. Is a member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers and the American Water Works 
Association. Was married in Dayton June, 1899. 

177. McMeans, Orange Edward. 1896. 

Born July 30, 1869, Richmond, Ind. Entered the Institute in 
1892; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. 
From 1896 to 1899 Instructor in Drawing Rose Polytechnic 
Institute. From 1899 to 1900 Assistant Professor Mechanical 
Drawing University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. From 1900 to 
1902 Mechanical Engineer Richmond City Mill Works, Rich- 
mond, Ind. From 1902 to 1904 Chief Draftsman Mill Engineer- 
ing Department Nordyke & Marmon Company, Indianapolis. 
From 1904 to date of the firm of McMeans & Tripp, Con- 
sulting Engineers, Indianapolis, Ind. Was granted degree of 
M.S. in 1900 and degree of M.E. in 1901 from Rose. Is a 
junior member A. S. of M. E. Was married November 26, 1896. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 183 

178. Meadows, Harvey Hatchett. 1896, 

Entered the Institute from Evansville, Ind., in 1890, age 18; 
withdrew in 1901 ; reentered in 1893 ; graduated in the Civil En- 
gineering Course in 1896. From 1896 to 1898 with the Pittsburg 
Testing Laboratory in Pittsburg, Philadelphia, and New York. 
From 1898 to the present time Assistant District Sales Manager 
of the Babcock & Wilcox Company, Atlanta, Ga. 

179. Meriwether, Richard. 1896. 

Born October 13, 1875, Frankfort, Ky. Entered the Institute 
from Louisville, Ky., 1892; graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1896. In 1897 in Motive Power Department 
Southern Railway, Knoxville, Tenn. From 1898 to 1901 with 
the Western Electric Company, Chicago. In 1902 Superintend- 
ent Underground Cable Company, Chicago. In 1903 Assistant 
Superintendent of Power Louisville City Railway, Louisville. 
1905 Superintendent of Lines and Feeders Louisville Railway 
Company, Louisville. In 1906 Superintendent Overhead Con- 
struction Louisville Railway Company, and from 1907 to the 
present time General Superintendent of Louisville & Eastern 
Railroad Company, Louisville, Ky. Is a member of the A. I. 
E. E. and Engineers' and Architects' Club of Louisville, Ky. 

180. O'Brien, Barrington. 1896. 

Entered the Institute from St. Peter, Minn., in 1888, age ig' 
withdrew in 1892 ; reentered in 1895, and graduated in the Elec- 
trical Engineering Course in 1896. In 1898 Superintendent 
Electric Light Company, St. Peter, Minn. Since 1899 no report 
has been received. 

181. Rice, Oscar Guido. 1896. 

Born May 2, 1876, Vienna, Austria. Entered the Institute from 
Terre Haute, Ind., in 1892, and graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1896. In 1897 in Department of Maintenance 
New York Telephone Company, New York. In 1898 in Brook- 
lyn, N. y. From 1900 to 1902 with the B. F. Sturtevant Com- 
pany, New York. Was married in Chicago April 23, 1902, and 
died of typhoid fever in Brooklyn, N. Y., October 6, 1902. 

182. RiDGELY, Clarence Medial. 1896. 

Born November 26, 187 1, Adams County, 111. Entered the In- 
stitute from Galesburg, 111., in 1891 ; withdrew on account of 



184 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

ill health ; reentered 1894 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineer- 
ing Course in 1896. From July, 1896, to April, 1897, Machinist 
in Locomotive Shops of Chicago & Alton Railroad, Blooming- 
ton, 111. From April, 1897, to December, 1898, Circulation Man- 
ager for Galesburg Evening Mail, Galesburg, 111. From March, 
1899, to July, 1901, Draftsman Litchfield Foundry and Machine 
Company, Litchfield, 111. From July, 1901, to December, 1902, 
Superintendent ^tna Foundry and Machine Company, Litch- 
field, III. From December, 1902, to the present time Mechanical 
Engineer Litchfield Foundry and Machine Company, Litchfield, 
111. In this capacity some of his more important work has been 
the general improvement of designs and construction of mine 
haulage and hoisting engines, also of endless-rope haulage ma- 
chinery for the handling of standard railroad cars about coal 
and ore storage plants, steamship docks, etc. ; also head gear 
arrangements for self-acting gravity inclines. Mr. Ridgely 
was married July 29, 1897. at Bloomington, 111. 

183. Sanborn, Wallis Remsen. 1896. 

Born May 20, 1874, Rockford, 111. Entered the Institute in 
1892 ; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1896. In 
1897 with the H. & B. I. Railroad, Hammond, Ind. From 1898 
to 1899 Mining Engineer, Klondike. In 1900 Division Engineer 
I. I. I. Railroad Company, Streator, 111. In 1901 Acting Road- 
master I. I. I. Railroad Company, Kankakee, 111. From 1904 to 
1906 Engineer Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Railroad, Kankakee, 111. 
From 1907 to the present time Treasurer and General Manager 
Lehigh Stone Company, Kankakee, 111. Was granted degree of 
M.S. from Rose in 1900. Is a member of W. S. E. Mr. San- 
born was married June 19, 1901. 

184. Sanford, Linus, Jr. 1896. 

Entered the Institute from Jackson, Mo., in 1892, age 19, and 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. In 
1897 was with Brooks & Ponder, Civil Engineers, Cape Girar- 
deau, Mo. From 1898 to 1900 in Jackson, Mo., and from 1900 
to 1901 with the Western Electric Company, Chicago, 111. Since 
1901 no report has been received. 

185. Sinks, Frank Forest. 1896. 

Born May 12, 1873, West Milton, Ohio. Entered the Institute 
from Troy, Ohio, in 1892; graduated in the Civil Engineering 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 185 

Course in 1896. In 1897 with the H. & B. I. Railroad, Ham- 
mond, Ind. From 1898 to 1900 with the Chicago, Hammond & 
Western Railroad Company, Lagrange, 111. In 1900 Office Engi- 
neer I. I. & I. Railroad, Streator, 111. In 1901 Pittsburg Testing 
Laboratory, Chicago. From 1903 to 1905 with Theodore Con- 
dron, Consulting Engineer, Chicago. From 1906 to date Vice- 
President Condron & Sinks, Civil Engineers, Chicago, 111. 

186. Smith, Ferdinand Elbert, Jr. 1896. 

Born October i, 1874, Prattville, Ala. Entered the Institute 
from Birmingham. Ala., in 1892, and graduated in the Elec- 
trical Engineering Course in 1896. From 1897 to 1901 with 
Smith Sons Gin and Machine Company. Birmingham. From 
1904 to the present time Superintendent Avondale Factory Con- 
tinental Gin Company. Avondale, Ala. 

187. Van Auken, James Milton. 1896. 

Born June 9, 1873, Mishawaka, Ind. Entered the Institute from 
Chicago in 1892; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1896. In the latter part of 1896 was with the C. U. Telephone 
Company, Indianapolis, Ind. In 1897 Assistant City Engineer 
Terre Haute, Ind. From 1898 to 1899 Civil Engineering work 
in Vigo and Parke Counties. From 1900 to 1902 Draftsman 
Bellefontaine Bridge and Iron Company, Bellefontaine, Ohio. 
From 1902 to 1903 Chief Engineer Elkhart Bridge Company, 
Elkhart, Ind. From 1905 to the present time Contracting Engi- 
neer for Steel and Iron Structures, South Bend, Ind. 

188. Walser, Edward. 1896. 

Bom March 5, 1874, St. Joseph, Mo. Entered the Institute 
from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1892; graduated in Chemistry in 
1896. In 1897 graduate student Rose Polytechnic Institute. 
From 1898 to 1900 Cyanide Expert General Gold Extracting 
Company, Denver. 1900 with the Cochiti Gold Mining Com- 
pany, Bland, N. M. In 1901 with Fox & Walser, Assayers and 
Chemists, Denver. 1903 Cyanide Expert Gold and Silver Ex- 
traction Company of America, Ltd., Denver. 1904 Manager 
Cyanide Department Dorcas Mining, Milling and Development 
Company, Florence, Col. 1905 and 1906 Chief Chemist Montana 
Zinc Company, Walkerville, Mont. From 1906 to date Chief 
Chemist Pittsburg and Montana Copper Company, Butte, Mont. 



1 86 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

189. Wells, George Eugene. 1896. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1892, age 17, 
and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1896. 
In 1897 with Terre Haute Electric Company. In 1898 Superin- 
tendent Electrical Contracting Department Indianapolis Dis- 
trict Telephone Company, Indianapolis. From 1899 to 1901 in 
Engineering Department Wagner Electric Manufacturing Com- 
pany, St. Louis. In 1901 of the firm of Reubel & Wells, Con- 
sulting Electrical Engineers, St. Louis. 1903 of the firm of 
Reubel-Schwedtman & Wells, Consulting Electrical and Me- 
chanical Engineers, St. Louis. In 1908 resigned from this firm 
to accept a position as Chief Engineer in charge of the Mechan- 
ical Department of the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company, and 
holds this position to date. Received degree of M.S. in 1899 
and of E.E. in 1901, both from Rose. Is an active member of 
the A. I. E. E. Was married in St. Louis in 1903. 

190. Werk, Isaac Michael Louis. 1896. 

Entered the Institute from Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1892, age 19, and 
graduated in Chemistry in 1896. From 1896 to 1898 Chemist for 
the M. Werk Company, Cincinnati. Since that time has been in 
the oil business in Cincinnati. Is a member of the American 
Chemical Society. 

191. Arn, William Godfrey. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Scottsboro, Ala., in 1893, age 16; 
graduated in Civil Engineering Course in 1897. From 1897 to 
1900 was connected with the Louisville & Nashville Railroad as 
Rodman, Masonry Inspector and Building Inspector L. & N. 
Terminal Company, Nashville, Tenn. From 1901 to 1905 Assist- 
ant Engineer Maintenance of Way ; 1905-6 Division Roadmaster 
L. & N. R. R. In 1906 Superintendent Southern Bitulithic Com- 
pany, Nashville. In 1907 Assistant Engineer Illinois Central, 
Birmingham, Ala., and at present Assistant Engineer Main- 
tenance Department, Corinth. Miss. Had charge of terminal 
construction and stations in Nashville, New Orleans and Bir- 
mingham. 

192. Camp, Theodore Lyman, 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Jackson, Mich., in 1893, age 18; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. In 1898 
was Mechanical and Electrical Engineer for the American Elec- 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 187 

trie Vehicle Company, Chicago. From 1899 to 1901 Manufac- 
turer of Soap Wrapping Machines, Chicago. In 1902 Manager 
Mechanical Department Camp Wrapping Machine Company, 
Chicago. From 1904 to date Manager United Wrapping Ma- 
chine Company, New York City, N. Y. Was married August 21, 
1901, at Buffalo, N. Y. Mr. Camp exhibited his first soap wrap- 
ping machine at the Commencement in 1897. Its design was his 
thesis subject. 

193. Chandler, Benjamin Foster. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from South Coventry, Conn., in 1893, age 
23 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. 
From 1899 to 1901 with the Electric Light Company, North- 
ampton, Mass. In 1901 Electrician for the American Bicycle 
Company, Cleveland, Ohio. In 1905 and 1906 graduate student 
Massachusetts Institute Technology, Boston, Mass. In 1907 
in Testing Department General Electric Company, Schenectady, 
N. Y. No record has been received at the Institute from Mr. 
Chandler since 1907. 

194. Frank, Edmund. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Petersburg, Ind., in 1893, age 17, and 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. Grad- 
uate student Johns Hopkins University, 1898-9. In Testing 
Department General Electric Company, Schenectady, 1899-1901. 
In 1901 with the General Electric Company at Cincinnati, Ohio. 
July 18, 1901, his body was found floating in the river at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Was last seen alive July 16, at 11:45 p.m., at 
the Traction Company's power house, where he was erecting 
machinery. There was a contusion over his eye and he had 
been robbed of $125. This information was received from his 
, brother, Mr. Sol Frank, of Petersburg. 

195. Fry, Charles Herman. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Fort Worth, Texas, in 1893, age 19; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. From 
1898 to 1900 Assistant in Office of Superintendent of Motive 
Power Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railroad, Lima, Ohio. 
1901 graduate student in Railway Engineering Purdue Uni- 
versity. From June, 1901, to February, 1902, with the Chicago 
& Alton Railroad, Bloomington. From February, 1902, to the 
present time Associate Editor of the Railroad Gazette and of 



1 88 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

the Railroad Age Gazette, Chicago. Was granted degree of 
M.S. in 1907 from Rose, and degree of B.S.M.E. from Purdue 
University, 1901. 

196. Gordon^ Arthur Franklin. 1897. 

Born October 16, 1875, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1893; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. 
In 1897 with the Standard Wheel Company, Terre Haute. 1898 
and 1899 Engineering Department C. E. & I. Railroad, Danville, 
111. In 1900 with the Liquid Carbonic Acid Company, Pitts- 
burg. In 1901 vi^ith S. V. Huber & Co., Constructing Engineers, 
Pittsburg. From 1902 to 1906 Draftsman with McClintock- 
Marshall Contracting Company, Rankin, Pa. In 1907 Chief 
Draftsman Union Iron Works, Cincinnati, Ohio. From 1908 
to the present time Foreman Signal Department Rock Island 
Railway, Wilton Junction, Iowa. Was married August 14, 
1900, in Terre Haute, Ind. 

197. Hall, Jay Houghton. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Ypsilanti, Mich., in 1893, age 18; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. After 
graduation till 1899 Chief Electrician at Illinois Institute for 
Deaf and Dumb, Jacksonville, 111. From 1899 to 1901 Drafts- 
man in Electrical Department Homestead Steel Works of the 
Carnegie Steel Company at Munhall, Pa. From 1901 to 1902 
Electrical Engineer Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Com- 
pany, Danville, 111. From 1902 to 1904 Chief Draftsman and 
Assistant Superintendent Youngstown Engineering Company, 
Youngstown, Ohio. From 1904 to the present time with the 
Electric Controller and Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, 
Ohio, as Draftsman, Chief Draftsman, Assistant Engineer, and 
at present Sales Manager. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1906 
and degree of E.E. in 1908, both from Rose. Member 
A. I. E. E. Married May 11, 1909. 

198. Haney, James Briggs. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Wellsburg, W. Va., in 1893, age 24; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. In 
1898 with the Lozier Manufacturing Company, Toledo, Ohio. 
In 1899 Draftsman with the Harbeser & Walker Company, 
Pittsburg. In 1900 Draftsman with the Riter-Conley Manufac- 
turing Company, Pittsburg, and Draftsman in United States 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 189 

Ordnance Department, Washington, D. C, until 1904. In 1904 
Draftsman Ordnance Department at large United States Army, 
Fort Hancock, N. J. From 1905 to 1906 Draftsman Ordnance 
Department at large United States Army, Washington, D. C. 
At the present time Fortification Draftsman United States 
Engineer Department, Honolulu, H. T. 

199. Heichert, Herman Smith. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Marion, Ind., in 1893. age 19; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. Tn 1898 
with the P. C. C. & St. L. Railroad, Logansport, Ind. From 1899 
to 1900 Instructor in Mechanical Engineering Worcester Poly- 
technic Institute, Worcester, Mass. In 1901 Designer in Win- 
chester, Mass. From 1902 to 1908 Draftsman Pittsburg Plate 
Glass Company, Pittsburg, Pa. From 1908 to the present time 
Engineer with the Pittsburg Plate Glass Company, Ford City, 
Pa. Was married in 1902. 

200. Hellweg, John Henry, Jr. 1897. 

Born August 25, 1875, Chicago. Entered the Institute from 
Hayward, Wis., in 1893 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineer- 
ing Course in 1897. Since graduation has been with the West- 
ern Electric Company. Chicago, 111., and at present is the Tele- 
phone Sales Department Manager for the company at the fac- 
tory, Hawthorne, 111. Was married April 12, 1899. 

201. HOLDERMAN, ChAUNCEY HaRCOURT. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Hutsonville, 111., in 1891, age 21 ; 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1897. From 1897 
to 1901 Secretary of the Hutsonville Brick and Tile Company, 
Hutsonville. 111. In 1902 County Surveyor Crawford County, 
Mt. Carmel, 111. In 1902 in Maintenance of Way Department 
Big Four Railroad Company, Mattoon, 111. From 1904 to 1905 
Resident Engineer with Indianapolis Southern Railway, Indi- 
anapolis. In 1906 with Engineering Department Big Four Rail- 
road, Robinson, 111. From 1907 Superintendent Manatee Light 
and Power Company. Bradentown. Fla. Was married October 
12, 1905. 

202. Ingle, John David, Jr. 1897. 

Born October 5, 1875, Evansville. Entered the Institute from 
Oakland City, Ind., in 1893 ; graduated in the Civil Engineering 



190 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Course in 1897. Since graduation with the Ayeshire Coal Com- 
pany as Surveyor, Superintendent, and now General Manager, 
Oakland City, Ind. Was married October 5, 1904. 

203. Kessler, John Jacob, Jr. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, age 17; graduated in 
1897 in the Chemistry Course. From 1897-99 Chemist in Test- 
ing Laboratory General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 
From 1899-igoi Chemist and Engineer of Insulation for the 
Wagner Electric and Manufacturing Company, St. Louis, Mo. 
From 1901 to date with the Dielectric Manufacturing Company 
as Vice-President, General Manager, and, since 1907, President 
and General Manager. In 1905 associated with H. E. Wiede- 
mann, firm of Kessler & Wiedemann, Consulting Chemists, St. 
Louis. His work has been largely in the study and preparation 
of electrical insulating materials now manufactured by the 
Dielectric Company. 

204. Lendi, John Henry. 1897. 

Born in Dubuque, Iowa, June 25, 1874. Entered the Institute 
from Wichita, Kan., in 1893; graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1897. In 1898 graduate student at Rose 
Polj^echnic Institute. From September, 1898, to September, 
1899, in the Engineering Department of the Chicago Telephone 
Company, Chicago. From September, 1899, to September, 1901, 
in charge of the Experimental Department of the Kellogg 
Switchboard and Supply Company, Chicago. From September, 
1901, to February, 1904, in charge of the Experimental Depart- 
ment Western Electric Company, Chicago. From February, 
1904, to the present time Electrical Engineer of the Belden 
Manufacturing Company, Chicago, 111. Was married June 27, 
1908, in Chicago. 

205. Lufkin, John Edwin, Jr. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Anna, III., in 1893, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. From 1897 
to 1900 Engineer in various capacities, mainly in Texas and 
Mexico. In 1900 Erecting Engineer Electric Plant, Boswell, 
N. M. From October i, 1901, Electrical Engineer C. & E. I. 
Railway, Danville, 111. From 1902 to 1904 in Electrical Work 
in Mexico. In 1905 with the Union County Traction and 
Power Company, Anna, 111. 1906 Superintendent Construction 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 191 

Pocahontas Ice and Power Company, Pocahontas, Ark. From 
1907 to the present time Superintendent of Mines, Santa Eulalia, 
Union Mining Company, Chihuahua, Mexico. 

206. Martin, Walter Huber. 1897. 

Born May 13, 1875, Danville, 111. Entered the Institute from 
Danville, 111., in 1893, and graduated in the Civil Engineering 
Course in 1897. From June, 1897, to May, 1899, Chief Engineer 
Illinois Eastern Hospital for Insane, Kankakee, 111. Since May, 
1809. to the present time City Engineer Danville, 111. 

207. Meyer, August Henry. 1897. 

Born April 17, 1875, Appleton, Wis. Entered the Institute in 
1893 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. 
From 1897 to 1901 Superintendent Camden Light and Power 
Company, Camden, Ark. From 1901 to date Secretary and 
Treasurer of Langstadt & Meyer Construction and Supply Com- 
pany, Appleton, Wis. His more important work has been the 
construction of electric, steam, hydro-electric, and water works 
plants. 

208. Moore, Odus Burdette. 1897. 

Botn December 29, 1871, Cedar City, Mo. Entered the Institute 
from Fulton, Mo., in 1893, and graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1897. In 1908 Assistant Mechanical Engineer 
Hawley Dow n Draft Furnace Company, Chicago. In 1899 was 
Electrician in United States Navy on Gunboats Yankton and 
Vixen. From 1900 to 1905 in Electrical Engineering Department 
Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg. 
In 1906, because of ill health of his brother, temporarily became 
partner and Proprietor of Moore's Drug Store, Fulton, Mo. 
Was married October 23, 1902. While with the Westinghouse 
Company his work was especially on insulation. He contributed 
several articles to scientific journals on this subject, and holds 
some patents. 

209. Newbold, Roger Merrick. 1897. 

Born May 30, 1876, Pittsburg, Pa. Entered the Institute from 
Birmingham, Ala., in 1893 ; graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1897. In 1898 Fuel Inspector L. & N. Rail- 
way, Birmingham, Ala. From 1899 to 1901 of R. M. Newbold 



192 Rose Polyfeclmic Institute. 

& Co., Consulting Engineers and Contractors, Birmingham. 
1901 with the Louisville Railway Company, Louisville, Ky. 
From 1902 to 1903 Electrician L. & N. Railway, Birmingham. 
1904 and 1905 Patentee and Manufacturer Newbold Railway 
Electric Lighting System, Louisville and Chicago. From 1906 
to the present time Electrical Engineer for Adams & Westlake 
Company, Chicago. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1907 and 
degree of E.E. in 1908, both from Rose. Is a member of the 
Engineers' Association of the South and A. L E. E. Was mar- 
ried in November, 1900, at Monrovia, Cal. Holds a number of 
patents protecting the Adlake-Newbold Car Axle Lighting 
System. 

210. Philip, Robert Ashby. 1897. 

Born August 2, 1874, Sacramento, Cal. Entered the Institute 
in 1893 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. 
From 1897 to 1900 with the General Electric Company, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. In 1900 with the Tacoma Electric Company, Ta- 
coma. Wash. 1901 with the Seattle Electric Company, Seattle, 
Wash. In 1903 and 1904 Electrical Engineer Columbia Im- 
provement Company, Tacoma, Wash. In 1905 in the Engineer- 
ing Department Stone & Webster, Boston, Mass. From 1906 
to date Electrical Engineer of the Stone & Webster Engineer- 
ing Corporation, Boston, Mass. Is a member of the Pacific 
Northwest Society of Engineers (Seattle) and associate mem- 
ber of the A. I. E. E.. Was married May 25, 1904. Since 1904 
has had general oversight of the electrical engineering work 
done by Stone & Webster for the railway and lighting com- 
panies which they manage, the number of which at present is 
about thirty, and distributed in location from Key West, Fla., 
to BelHngham, Wash. Also design and installation of large 
Western Hydro-electric Power plants. 

211. PiERSox, Temple Guy. 1897. 

Born February 3, 1875, Freedom, Ind. Entered the Institute 
from Spencer, Ind., in 1892; withdrew in 1S93, and reentered 
in 1894; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1897. 
Since graduation has been Manager of the J. L. Pierson Lumber 
Company, Spencer, Ind. Has been a member of the House of 
Representatives. Indiana Legislature, and is a member of the 
State Executive Committee of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. Was married in Terre Haute in June, 1906. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 193 

212. RypiNSKi, Maurice Charles. 1897, 

Entered the Institute from Bryan, Texas, in 1893, age 16; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. From 1897 
to 1902 Engineer with the General Electric Company, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. From 1902 to 1904 Superintendent of Factory of 
the Empire Electrical Instrument Company, New York City. 
From 1904 to 1906 President of the Simplex Company, Newark, 
N. J. From 1906 to 1908 in the Engineering Department of the 
Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, New York 
City. Was married in November, 1905. 

213. Shaver, Archie Grant. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Lakeview, Mich., in 1893, age 18; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. From 
1898 to 1900 Electrical Repairman C. & E. I. Railroad Com- 
pany, Danville, 111. In 1900 Electrician C. & E. I. Railroad 
Company, Danville, 111. 1901 to 1906 Signal Engineer Union 
Pacific Railroad Company, Omaha, Neb. From April, 1906, to 
1908 with the Hall Signal Company at Garwood, N. J. From 
June, 1908, to the present time Signal Engineer Chicago, Rock 
Island & Pacific Railroad, Chicago, 111. Was married February 
12, 1902, in Danville, 111. 

214. Tucker, Clarence Howe. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Washington, D. C, in 1893, age 17, 
and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. 
From 1898 to 1900 with Driggs-Seabury Gun and Ammunition 
Company, Derby, Conn. In 1900 in Designing and Experimen- 
tal Department Otis Elevator Company, Yonkers, N. Y. Mr. 
Tucker died May 8, 1900. 

215. Westfall, Herbert Cochran. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1893, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. Was grad- 
uate student in Civil Engineering in 1898 at Rose. From 1899- 
1901 with the Big Four Railroad at Mattoon, 111. Then till 1903 
in Engineering Department C. O. & G. Railroad Company, Lit- 
tle Rock, Ark. From 1903-05 with the Chicago, Rock Island & 
Pacific Railroad, Chicago. From 1905-07 Locating Engineer 
Chicago, ^Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad in Washington and 
[Montana. From 1908 to date Assistant Engineer Northern 
Pacific Railroad, St. Paul, Minn. ^^larried in Terre Haute in 
1902. 
13 



194 Rose Polytechnic, Institute. 

216. WiLLius, GusTAV, Jr. 1897. 

Entered the Institute from St. Paul, Minn., in 1893, age 20; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1897. In 

1898 Engineer for the Mississippi Valley Telephone Company, 
St. Paul, Minn. From 1899 to 1901 in charge of Electrical 
Engineering work for the Great Northern Elevator Company, 
West Superior, Wis. From October, 1901, to 1903 in charge of 
Electrical Engineering work for the Great Northern Railway 
Lines, St. Paul. 1905 and 1906 Mechanical Engineer Great 
Northern Railway Lines, St. Paul. 1907 Mechanical Engineer 
for Robinson, Cary & Sands Company, St. Paul, Minn., which 
position he still holds. 

217. Austin, Ned Magill. 1898. 

Born October 12, 1874, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1894; graduated in Chemistry in 1898. After graduation em- 
ployed in the laboratory of Parke, Davis & Co. at Detroit. In 

1899 was Chemist for Kirkpatrick & Co., Ltd., Leechburg, Pa. 
In 1900 Assistant Chemist for Shoenberger Works of the 
American Steel and Wire Company, Pittsburg, and with the 
Duquesne Steel Works, Duquesne, Pa. In 1901 Chemist for 
Walser Soap Company. In 1902 Chemist for Apollo Iron and 
Steel Company. Vandergrift, Pa. From 1903 to 1904 Metal- 
lurgist for United Engineering and Foundry Company. Vander- 
grift, Pa. From 1905 to 1906 Superintendent of Open Hearth 
Furnaces for the American Sheet Steel Company, Vander- 
grift, Pa. In 1907 with the United Engineering and Foundry 
Company, Vandergrift, Pa. At present with the American Roll 
and Foundry Company, Canton, Ohio. Was married on Octo- 
ber 15, 1901, in Leechburg, Pa. 

218. Brachmann, Frederick Charles. 1898. 

Entered the Institute from Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1894, at the age 
of 19, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1898. In 1898 Draftsman for Dietz, Schumacher & Boye, Ma- 
chine Tool Builders, Cincinnati, O. From 1899 to 1900 in Test- 
ing Department General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 
In 1901 in Switchboard Department General Electric Company. 
Schenectady, N. Y. While still in the service of the General 
Electric Company was affected by severe rheumatic ailments, 
which caused him to leave the service of the company and go 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 195 

to his home in Cincinnati, Ohio. He has remained at Cincinnati 
since, and whenever physically able assists his father in busi- 
ness. He has maintained his interest in engineering work, and 
remains a loyal son of Rose. His present address is No. 2632 
Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

219. Eastwood, Arthur Clark. 1898. 

Born February 11, 1877, Louisville, Ky. Entered the Institute in 
1894; graduated from the Electrical Engineering Course in 

1898. From July to October, 1898, was with the firm of Meig- 
han & Co., Birmingham, Ala. From October, 1898, to March, 

1899, was in the Electrical Department of the Homestead Steel 
Works for the Carnegie Steel Company at Munhall. From 1899 
to 1900 Superintendent of the Electrical Department of the 
Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Company, Ensley, Ala. 
From 1900 to date has been associated with the Electric Con- 
troller and Supply Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, which changed 
its firm name last year to the Electric Controller and Manufac- 
turing Company. He rose from the position of Engineer to 
that of General Manager and Engineer, then Vice-President 
and General Manager, and is now the President. From 1901 
to 1905 also acted as Consulting Engineer for the Wellman- 
Seaver Engineering Company, of Cleveland, Ohio. Received 
degree of M.S. in 1900 and that of E.E. in 1902 from Rose. Is 
a member of the A. I. E. E., Franklin Institute of Pennsylvania, 
New York Railroad Club, and the Engineering Club of New 
York. Mr. Eastwood's work has been mainly along the line of 
devising and developing electrical devices especially in iron and 
steel works for the control of various machinery there used. 
He also has given his attention to the developing of lighting 
magnets. Many of his devices are patented, having control of 
some ninety or more patents. Married in January, 1891, at Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

220. Fletcher, Thomas. 1898. 

Entered the Institute from Little Rock, Ark., age 18, and grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1898. From 1899 
to 1901 Vice-President of the Moose & Gin Company, Mor- 
rillton. Ark. In 1906 President Burrow-Moose Mercantile 
Company, Morrillton, Ark. From 1907 to date has devoted his 
attention to farming, and his address is Scotts, Ark. 



196 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

221. Ford, William Ellis. 1898. 

Entered the Institute from Little Rock, Ark., in 1894, age 18; 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1898. From grad- 
uation to April, 1906, was on construction work on railroads in 
Arkansas, Indian Territory, Oklahoma, and Kansas. Since that 
time he has been in the Philippine Islands superintending con- 
struction work on the Philippine Railway. Has several thou- 
sand men under his direction. His work is arduous and the 
climate trying, but he expects to remain unless his health 
breaks down. 

222. FrEUDENREICH, WiLLIAM FREDERICK. 1898. 

Born December 21, 1877, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute 
in 1894; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1898. From July, 1898, to May, 1902, Assistant Examiner 
United States Patent Office, Washington, D. C. From May, 
1902, to June, 1904, practiced Patent Law in Boston, Mass. 
From June, 1904, to April, 1907, Assistant Attorney in Patent 
Department General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 
From April, 1907, to the present time practiced Patent Law in 
Chicago. Is member of the firm of Chamberlin & Freuden- 
reich, Chicago. Was granted degree of LL.B. in 1901 from 
National Law School and degree of M.P.L. in 1902 from the 
Columbian University. Was married January 15, 1903, in New 
York City. 

223. HuBBELL, John Edmund. 1898. 

Born October 11, 1876, Altona, 111. Entered the Institute in 
Sophomore Class, 1895, and graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1898. From 1898 to 1901 Assistant Examiner 
Patent Office, Washington, D. C. From 1902 to 1906 Assistant 
Attorney in Patent Department General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. From 1906 to date Patent .\ttorney with 
Francis T. Chambers, Philadelphia, Pa. Was given degree of 
LL.B. in 1901 from National University and degree of M.P.L. 
in 1902 from Columbian University. Is married. 

224. Kidder, Ned Solon. 1898. 

Born April 10, 1874. Entered the Institute in 1894, and grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1898. In 1898 
with Lead and Zinc Mines, Webb City, Mo. In 1899 with the 
Pope Manufacturing Company, Storage Battery Department, 
Hartford, Conn. From 1900-04 with the Wabash Mills, Terre 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 197 

Haute. In 1904 also on Government Public Land Survey, Isle 
Royale, Lake Superior. In 1905-06 City Engineer Terre Haute. 
From 1907 to the present time Salesman and Promoter with 
American Asphaltum and Rubber Company, Chicago. Married 
December 20, 1900, at Terre Haute. 

225. Kloer, Charles. 1898. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1894, age 18, 
and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1898. 
In 1899 in the T. H. & I. Railway Shops, Terre Haute. From 
1900 to date with the Liquid Carbonic Acid Manufacturing 
Company, Chicago, 111. 

226. KlvOER, GUSTAVE FREDERICK. 1898. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1894, age 20; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1898. In 

1899 in the T. H. & I. Railway Shops, Terre Haute. From 

1900 to date with the Liquid Carbonic Acid Manufacturing 
Company, Chicago. 

22y. Lansden, John McMurray. 1898. 

Born July 8, 1877, at Cairo, 111. Entered the Institute in 1894; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1898. From 
1899 to 1901 of J. M. Lansden & Co., Electrical Engineers and 
Manufacturers, Birmingham, Ala. In 1903-04 President of the 
Birmingham Electrical and ^Manufacturing Company. From 
1905 to date of the Lansden Company, Electric Automobiles, 
Newark, N. J. Has been associated with Thomas Edison in the 
perfection of the Edison Storage Battery used in the Lansden 
Automobile. 

228. Montgomery, John Tuli.. 1898. 

Born March 4, 1876, CarroUton, Mo. Entered the Institute in 
1894; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1898. 1899 
Draftsman with the Falkenau Construction Company, Chicago. 
From 1900 to 1905 Resident Manager Roebling Construction 
Company. Chicago. In 1906 ^Manager M. A. Mead & Co., Man- 
ufacturers of Watches, Pittsburg, Pa. From 1908 to date Vice- 
President and Manager ]M. A. Mead & Co., New York City. 
Some of his more important work has been the fireproofing of 
the Iroquois Theater of Chicago, of the Thomas Orchestra 
Building of Chicago, the First National Bank of Cincinnati. 
Was married June 18, 1901, in Chicago. 



198 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

229. PiRTLE, CIvAiborne;. 1898. 

Born December 4, 1875, Louisville, Ky. Entered the Institute 
in 1894; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1898. 
In 1899 in Testing Department and 1900 in the Lighting Depart- 
ment General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. From 
1901 to the spring of 1904 Agent for the General Electric Com- 
pany in North Carolina and Southern Virginia. From April, 
1904, to the present time with the Electric Controller and Man- 
ufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ohio, and now the Vice-Presi- 
dent and General Manager. Was married early in 1909. 

230. Roberts, Shelby Saufley. 1898. 

Born April 13, 1874, at Louisville, Ky. Entered the Institute in 
1894; graduated in 1898. From 1899-1905 with the Louisville 
& Nashville Railway, from Track Apprentice and Rodman to 
Engineer in Charge of Terminal Construction, Roadmaster, 
Engineer Maintenance of Way, and Office Engineer. From 
1905-08 Assistant Engineer Illinois Central Railway, Chicago. 
From 1908 to date Assistant Professor Railway Civil Engineer- 
ing, University of Illinois. Was granted degree of C.E. from 
Rose in 1907. Is member of the Engineering Association of 
the South, A. R. E. and M. W. Association, A. S. C. E., Engi- 
neers' and Architects' Club of Louisville. Was married in 
Louisville November 26, 1901. Has had much work in planning 
terminals. Has in preparation a "Handbook of Track For- 
mulae and Tables." 

231. Ryder, Waldo Brigham, Jr. 1898. 

Born June 4, 1876, Charlotte, N. C. Entered the Institute in 
1894; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1898. 
In 1899 with the Southern Railway, Charlotte, N. C. From 
1900 to 1901 Electrician Union Copper Mine, Gold Hill, N. C. 
In 1903 Treasurer Ryder Wagon Works, Charlotte, N. C. 1904 
Secretary and Assistant Superintendent Ryder Wagon Works, 
Thomasville, N. C. In 1906 with the Charlotte Cotton Ex- 
change and Board of Trade, Charlotte, N. C. Mr. Ryder died 
September 26, 1907, after a few months' illness. 

232. Schneider, Frederick Wilhelm. 1898. 

Born September 3, 1875, Evansville, Ind. Entered the Institute 
in 1894, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 199 

1898. From 1899 to 1901 with the General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. In 1904 Electrical Inspector of New York 
City, N. Y. Mr. Schneider was married April 3, 1902, in New 
York City. Since 1904 no record has been received at the Insti- 
tute in regard to him. 

233. Stewart, Morton Bishop. 1898. 

Born September 26, 1876, Muscatine, Iowa. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1894; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in i8g8. In 1899 graduate student in Civil Engineering at the 
Rose Polytechnic Institute. 1900 with the Indiana Southern 
Railway Company. From 1900 to 1903 with the Missouri 
Edison Company, St. Louis, Mo. From 1904 to 1906 with the 
Union Electric Light and Power Company, St. Louis, Mo. 
From 1906 to the present time Mechanical and Electrical Engi- 
neer Minas Tecolotes Anexas, Santa Barbara, Chihuahua, Mex- 
ico. Is a member of the Western Society of Engineers and the 
A. I. E. E. Was married in St. Charles, Mo., January 7, 1901. 

234. Stilz, Harry Ball. 1898. 

Born in Louisville, Ky., February 9, 1876. Entered the Institute 
in September, 1894; graduated from the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1898. After graduation was Foreman of Electric 
Welding Equipment used in Welding Street Car Tracks in 
Brooklyn, N. Y. From 1899-1900 was with William Cramp & 
Sons' Shipbuilding Company, Philadelphia. 1900-01 in Bureau 
of Construction and Repair Navy Department, Washington. 
From 1901-05 with the Naval Construction Department at Bath, 
Me., and Seattle, Wash. In summer of 1906 with Steam Tur- 
bine Department General Electric Company, Schenectady. In- 
structor of Mechanical Engineering University of Pennsylvania, 
1906-07. Received degree of M.S. at Rose in 1902. Has been 
for some time engaged in the development of a type of internal 
combustion engine, and in this interest went to England in the 
winter of 1908. This type was partially described in the Rose 
Technic, October, 1905, and more fully discussed in the Bngi- 
neering Nezus lately. 

235. Theobald, Charles Edwin. 1898. 

Born February 28, 1877, Archbold, Ohio. Entered the Institute 
in 1894. and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 



200 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

1898. From 1898 to the present time with New York Telephone 
Company as Engineer in the Plant Department. Is a member 
of the New York Electrical Society. Was married in New 
York October 17, 1903. He has been studying Wireless Teleg- 
raphy. 

236. VOORHES, KlMBROUGH EnOCH. 1898. 

Born December 28, 1875, Danville, III. Entered the Institute 
in 1894; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1898. In 1899 with the McKay Metallic Fastening Association, 
Winchester, Mass. From 1900 to 1901 in the Mechanical Engi- 
neering Department New York Ship Building Company, Cam- 
den, N. J. In 1904 with Henry R. Worthington, Harrison, N. J. 
In 1907 Mechanical Engineer for Champion Coated Paper Com- 
pany, Sunburst, N. C. No further record of Mr. Voorhes has 
been received at the Institute. 

237. WaxVisley, Calk. 1898. 

Born May 16. 1868, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 1894, 
and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1898. From 
1898 to 1900 Assistant Engineer, and from 1900 to 1901 Super- 
intendent of Track Big Four Railway Company, Mattoon, 111. 
In 1901 Assistant Engineer Great Northern Railway Company. 
From 1901 to 1902 Resident Engineer Oklahoma & Western 
Railway, Oklahoma City. From 1902 to 1904 Resident Engi- 
neer Texas & Oklahoma Railway, Shawnee. From 1904 to 1905 
Assistant Engineer Big Four Railway Company, Mattoon, 111. 
From 1905 to 1907 Maintenance of Way Inspector Missouri 
Pacific Railway, Kansas City, Mo. From 1907 to the present 
time Division Engineer Missouri Pacific Railway, Aurora, Mo. 
Was married December 27, 1899. 

238. Written, Frank Allen. 1898. 

Born March 28, 1876. Entered the Institute from Sloan, Iowa, 
in 1894, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1898. In 1898 Draftsman with the Buckeye Engine Company, 
Salem, Ohio. From 1899 to 1906 Engineer in Testing Depart- 
ment Henry R. Worthington's Works, New York City. From 
1906 to the present time Engineer and Superintendent for the 
Lansden Automobile Company, Newark, N. J. Was granted 
degree of M.S. in 1902 from Rose. Married October 11, 1905. 
at South Berwick, Me. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 201 

239. Wiley, Brent. 1898. 

Born April 10, 1876, Paris^ 111. Entered the Institute in 1894; 
gradirated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1898. From 
1898 to 1899 in the Electrical Department Ohio Steel Works, 
Youngstown, Ohio. From 1899 to 1904 in Electrical Depart- 
ment Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa. From 1904 to 
1906 Electrical Engineer Wellman-Seaver-Morgan Engineering 
Company, Cleveland, Ohio. From 1906 to the present time 
Commercial Engineer Westinghouse Electric Company, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. Is an associate member of the A. I. E. E. and mem- 
ber of the Engineers' Society Western Pennsylvania. Was 
granted degree of M.S. in 1902 from Rose, and was married 
October i, 1908, at Paris, III. 

240. Burt, Nathaniel Pratt. 1899. 

Born August 27, 1877, Leavenworth, Kan. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1895, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1899. In 1899 was a graduate student in Chemistry at the 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Mass. From 1900 
to the present time is Foreman for the Great Western Stove 
Company, Leavenworth, Kan. 

241. Butler, Noble Charles, Jr. 1899. 

Born July 27, 1874. Entered the Institute from Indianapolis in 
1895, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1899. From 1900 to 1906 with the Henry R. Worthington's 
Hydraulic Works, Brooklyn, N. Y. From 1906 to the present 
time with the same company at Harrison, New Jersey. 

242. Crebs, Walter David. 1899. 

Born June 3, 1877, Dayton, Ohio. Entered the Institute in 
1895 ; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1899. 
From 1899 to 1901 with the Thresher Electric Company, Day- 
ton, Ohio. From 1902 to the present time with the Beaver Soap 
Company, Dayton, Ohio, now as Superintendent. Was married 
November 6, 1902. 

243. Davis, William Griffith. 1899. 

Born October 22, 1875, Washington, D. C. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1895 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1899. From time of graduation until January, 1903, with the 
General Electric Company at Schenectady. N. Y., in the Test- 



202 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

ing, Construction, Drafting, and Engineering Departments. 
From October, 1903, until July, 1905, with the Electric Storage 
Battery Company, Philadelphia, Pa. From July, 1905, to May, 
1906, with Charles L. Seeger, Mexico City, Mex. From 1907 
to the present time with the Westinghouse Machine Company, 
New York City, N. Y., as their Storage Battery Representative 
in the E^st. 

244. Edwards, Edmund Perkins. 1899. 

Born in Louisville, Ky., January 12, 1877. Entered the Institute 
in 189s, and graduated in June, 1899, from the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course. Immediately after graduation was with the 
Ohio Steel Company at Youngstown, Ohio, in the Electrical 
Department. In November, 1899, entered the service of the 
General Electric Company at Schenectady, N. Y., where he has 
remained to date. After completing his apprentice course 
entered into the executive and commercial part, specializing 
along the line of switchboard appliances, especially for the 
United States Government in connection with the coast and 
interior defenses. Later on was transferred to the Lighting 
Department, of which he has entire commercial charge. He 
has also been interested in wireless telegraphy and appliances 
for same. 

245. Froehlich, Frederick Herman. 1899. 

Born May 6, 1875, Toledo, Ohio. Entered the Institute in 1895, 
and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1899. 
From 1899 to 1902 with the Edward Ford Plate Glass Company, 
Toledo, Ohio. In 1903 Electrical Engineer Toledo & Western 
Railroad Company, Sylvania, Ohio. 1904 Electrical Engineer 
Patrick Hirsch Company, Toledo. In 1905 Electrical Engineer 
Toledo & Western Railway, Sylvania, O. In 1906 Electrical 
and Mechanical Engineer Toledo, Ann Arbor & Detroit Rail- 
way, Toledo, O. From 1907 to the present time Consulting 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineer, Toledo, Ohio. Member 
A. I. E. E. Married, 1902, Terre Haute. 

246. HoLLiGER, Jesse Elmer. 1899. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, age 19, in 1895, and 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1899. In 
1899 with the Kester Electric Company, Terre Haute. 1900 
Draftsman in the Vandalia Shops, Terre Haute. In 1901 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 203 

Draftsman for the Baldwin Locomotive Company, Philadelphia, 
Pa., and later Draftsman in the office of the Chief of Engineers 
United States Army. From 1902 to 1905 Assistant Examiner 
Patent Office, Washington, D. C, and from 1906 to the present 
time Examiner in the Patent Office. Was granted degree of 
LL.B. from the National University and degree of M.P.L. from 
the George Washington University, the first in 1904 and the 
second in 1905. 

247. Howell, Cecil A. 1899. 

Born October 4, 1876, Mt. Sterling, Ky. Entered the Institute 
in 1895, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1899. In 1900 in the Testing Department General Electric 
Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 1901 Assistant Engineer Wag- 
ner Electric Company, St. Louis, Mo. In 1902 doing experi- 
mental work in Wireless Telegraphy for the Texas Midland 
Railway at Terrell, Texas, and with the Bullock Company, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. From September, 1902, to 1906 Engineer in 
charge of Transformer Department Wagner Electric Company, 
St. Louis, Mo. From 1906 to date Foreman of the Testing 
Department Edison Electric Company, Los Angeles, Cal. Mr. 
Howell was married March 24, 1905. 

248. Jumper, Frank Jacob. 1899. 

Born August i, 1877, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
189s, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1899. In 1900 was with the American Car and Foundry Com- 
pany, Terre Haute. In 1901 Assistant Master Mechanic of the 
Pressed Steel Car Company, McKee's Rock, Pa., and in July 
of that year was made Civil Engineer for the company at Alle- 
gheny, Pa. In 1902 Civil Engineer for the Standard Steel Car 
Works, Butler, Pa. From 1904 to 1906 Chief Draftsman in 
Mechanical Department and Civil Engineer for the Standard 
Steel Car Company, Butler, Pa. From 1906 to the present time 
Assistant Mechanical Engineer Union Pacific Railway, Omaha, 
Neb. Mr. Jumper was married in Vincennes, Ind., October 
I, 1901. 

249. Keyes, Clift Button. 1899. 

Born August 24, 1877, at Crown Point, New York. Entered 
the Institute in 1895; graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1899. Since graduation has held various positions 



204 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

with the General Electric Company, and now represents the 
Railway and Traction Engineering Department in their New 
York office. Is a member of the A. I. E. E. and the American 
Street and Interurban Railway Association. Was married June 
i6, 1904, at Fitchburg, Mass. Was connected with the Elec- 
trification of the New York Central Railway in New York City 
and the West Jersey & Seashore Railway. 

250. Kidder, Arthur Dale. 1899. 

Born March 26, 1876, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
189s ; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1899. I" 
1900 was Superintendent Blue Bell Mining Company, Webb 
City, Mo. In 1901 was in General Land Office, Washington, 
D. C. In March, 1901, took examination for Examiner of 
Surveys, and made first grade. Received appointment in April 
as Examiner of Surveys, and since that time has been in active 
service, and has done much valuable work for the Government. 
Was granted the degree of M.S. in 1901 from Columbian Uni- 
versity. Was married in Terre Haute March 31, 1904. 

251. KlTTREDGE, HarVEY GayLORD. 1899. 

Born April 6, 1878, Dayton, Ohio. Entered the Institute in 1895, 
and graduated in Chemistry in 1889. From time of graduation 
to the present has been Secretary and Treasurer of the Kay & 
Ess Company, Dayton, Ohio. Is also a Director of The Rice 
Electric Display Company. Is a member of the American 
Chemical Society, Society of Chemical Industry, the A. A. 
A. S., and the American Society for Testing Materials. His 
important work has been the manufacture of paint and varnish. 

252. LiKERT, George Herbert. 1899. 

Born October 3, 1874, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1894, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1899. From 1898 to 1903 in the Union Pacific Shops, North 
Platte, Neb. From 1903 to 1906 Assistant Master Mechanic 
Wyoming Division U. P. Railroad Company, Cheyenne, Wyo. 
From 1906 to 1907 Master Mechanic of the Colorado Division 
at Denver. From 1907 to date Assistant Superintendent of the 
Nebraska Division Union Pacific Railroad Company. Omaha, 
Neb. Is a member of the Master Mechanics' and Master Car 
Builders' Association and Western Railway Club. Mr. Likert 
was married October 15, 1902. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 205 

253. McLellan, James J. 1899. 

Born December 25, 1872, Louisville, Ky. Entered the Institute 
in 1895 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1899. 
In 1899 Master Telephone Exchange, Salem, Ind. 1900 to 1902 
Superintendent of Mills American Zinc, Lead and Smelting 
Company, Webb City, Mo. From 1902 to 1906 Instructor in 
Physics Manual Training High School, Louisville, Ky. From 
1906 to the present time Superintendent of Mines, Webb City, 
Mo. His special work is designing and erecting concentrating 
plants for zinc and lead ores. Mr. McLellan is a member of 
the Engineers' and Architects' Club of Louisville and the Engi- 
neering Society of Southwest Missouri, Joplin, Mo. Was mar- 
ried December 25, 1902. 

254. Platts, John Milton. 1899. 

Born July 30, 1873, at Buchanan, Mich. Entered the Institute 
in 1894; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1899. 
Was with the Fairbanks-Morse Company in Beloit, Wis., for a 
few months, and then with the Western Electric Company until 
the spring of 1908, when, on account of poor health, resigned 
his position and went to live at Klamath Falls, Oregon, where 
he is engaged in mercantile business. 

255. ScHWABLE, Henry Conrad. 1899. 

Born r^Iarch 26, 1878, Greenville, Ohio. Entered the Institute 
in 1895 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1899- 
In 1900 with the Electric Appliance Company, Chicago. In 
1901 Sales Manager Electric Supply and Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Cleveland. From 1901-04 with the Ohio Brass Company, 
Mansfield. In 1904 Secretary of the Pittsburg Stoker and 
Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg, Pa. From 1906 to the 
present time with Stephen T. Williams & Staff, New York City. 
His special work is along organization. 

256. ScHWED, John Frank. 1899. 

Born July 31, 1875, at Cleveland, Ohio. Entered the Institute 
in 1895 ; graduated in 1899. In 1900 was with the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railway at Council Bluffs, Iowa. From 1901-07 
in Engineering Department Southern Railway at Birmingham, 
Ala., and Knoxville, Tenn. In 1907 in Construction Depart- 
ment Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway, Franklin, Pa., 
and from 1898 to the present time with the same company at 
Cleveland, Ohio. Was married at Cleveland February 5, 1902. 



2o6 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

257. Smyth, Cubitt Beve^rly. 1899. 

Born December 10, 1873, Hamilton, Canada. Entered the Insti- 
tute from Winnipeg, Canada, in 1895, and graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in 1899. I" 1899 was Drafts- 
man for the Colorado Iron Works, Denver, and Millwright 
Colorado Iron Works. From 1900-08 with the Union Pacific 
Railroad Company as Machinist and Erecting Foreman, North 
Platte; Erecting Foreman, Cheyenne; Round House Foreman, 
Laramie; Erecting Foreman, Omaha; District Foreman, Sid- 
ney, Neb., and Assistant Mechanical Engineer, Omaha. From 
1908 to the present time Superintendent McKeen Motor Car 
• Company, Omaha. Is a member of the Western Railway Club 
and the Omaha Railway Club. Was married in Denver March, 
1903. 

258. Stone, Arthur Prentice. 1899. 

Born April 2, 1877, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 189S, 
and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1899. In 
1899 was with the Wheeling Corrugating Company, Wheeling. 
In 1900 with the Brown Hoisting and Conveying Company, 
Cleveland. Also with the Forest City Steel and Iron Company, 
Cleveland. In 1901 Draftsman with the Webster, Camp & Lane 
Machine Company, Akron, Ohio. 1902 Assistant Engineer 
Maintenance of Way St. Louis Division Big Four Railroad, 
Mattoon, 111. From 1903 to 1904 Draftsman with Heyl & Pat- 
terson Company, Pittsburg. 1905 with the Big Four Railroad 
Company, Cleveland, Ohio. In 1906 with the Big Four Rail- 
road Company, Mattoon, 111. 1907 with the Missouri Pacific 
Railroad, Tallulah, Fla. From 1908 to the present time with 
the Big Four Railroad as Civil Engineer, Terre Haute, Ind. 

259. Thompson, Arthur C. 1899. 

Born November 15, 1870, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute 
in 1895 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1899. 
From 1900 to the present time with the Ridgeway Dynamo and 
Engine Works, Ridgeway, Pa. 

260. Trumbo, Chari^es Franklin, 1899. 

Born January 9, 1877, Mt. Sterling, Ky. Entered the Institute 
in 1895, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1899. From 1900 to 1901 Engineer with the Blue Bell Mining 
Company, Webb City, Mo. In 1901 with the General Electric 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 207 

Company, Schenectady, N. Y. In 1906 with F. O. Blackwell, 
Consuhing Engineer, New York. No further record of Mr. 
Trnmbo has been received at the Institute. 

261. APPI.ETON, W11.UAM Courtney. 1900. 

Born February 24, 1876. Entered the Institute from Dayton, 
Ohio, in 1896, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1900. From 1900 to T903 with the General Electric 
Company, Schenectady, N. Y. From 1903 to IQ05 with the 
same company, Atlanta, Ga. From 1905 to the present time 
with the Crocker-Wheeler Company, Ampere, N. J. Mr. Apple- 
ton was married June 22, 1904, at Charleston, S. C. Member 
of A. I. E. E. 

262. Brewer, Jesse Irving. 1900. 

Born March 7, 1880, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1896, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1900. From 1900 to 1901 Instructor in Department of Engi- 
neering Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa. From 1901 to 
1902 Draftsman in office Mechanical Engineer Pennsylvania 
Railroad, Altoona, Pa. In 1903 Assistant Engine House Fore- 
man New York Central & Hudson River Railway at Albany, 
and later in New York City. From April, 1903, to the present 
time with the Interborough Rapid Transit Company as Drafts- 
man, and July i, 1905, was made Assistant Engineer for the 
company. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1902 and degree of 
M.E. in 1904 and degree of C.E. in 1907, all from Rose. 

263. Insley, William Henry. 1900. 

Born January 16, 1870, in Terre Haute. Entered the Institute 
in 1895; withdrew for one year; graduated in 1900 in the Archi- 
tectural Course. In 1901 was Structural Draftsman for Brown- 
Ketcham Iron Works, Indianapolis, and 1902-05 Structural 
Draftsman and Estimator for Haugh-Noelke Company, Indian- 
apolis. From IOCS to the present time President of the Insley 
Iron Works, Indianapolis. In 1908 company was reorganized 
and name changed to Insley Manufacturing Company. Member 
I. E. S. Married in 1903 at Corning, N. Y. 

264. Kidder, Sidney Jesse. 1900. 

Born June 3, 1878, in Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1896, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1900. 



2o8 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

In 1900 visited the mining districts in Arizona, New Mexico, 
and British Columbia. From 1901 to 1902 with the Pittsburg 
Testing Laboratory, Chicago, 111. From 1903 to 1904 graduate 
student School of Mines, Columbia University. From 1904 to 
1906 Mining Engineer with Bamberger-DeLamar Gold Mines 
Company, DeLamar, Nev. From 1906 to the present time with 
the Tonopah Mining Company, Desert Mill, Millers, Nev. Mr. 
Kidder was granted degree of E.M. in 1904 from the Columbia 
University. 

265. Larson, Charleys John. 1900. 

Born March 2, 1872, at Lake Park, Minn. Entered the Institute 
in 1896, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1900. From 1900 to 1905 was Erecting Engineer for the 
Allis-Chalmers Company, Milwaukee, Wis. From 1905 to 1907 
District Superintendent, New York Territory, for the Allis- 
Chalmers Company. From 1908 to the present time Chief Engi- 
neer Union Electric Company, Dubuque, Iowa. Is a member 
of the A. S. M. E. and the A. I. E. E. Was in charge of the 
building of the power stations for the Milwaukee Electric Rail- 
way, the New Orleans Railway Company, the St. Louis Expo- 
sition, the New York Subway, Washington, D. C, Drainage 
Station, Washington Water Works, the Boston Sewerage Sta- 
tion, and the New York High Pressure Fire Service. Mr. 
Larson was married in Chicago, 1902. 

266. Lesrr, Henry. 1900. 

Born June 10, 1878, in Indianapolis. Entered the Institute in 
1896 ; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1900. From 
1901 to 190,3 Assistant on Engineering Corps in Maintenance of 
Way Department of the Pittsburg Division of the Pittsburg, 
Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway. In 1905 was Assist- 
ant in Engineering Department of the Louisville Division, P., C, 
C. & St. L. Ry., Louisville. In 1906 in Engineering Department 
of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company, New York City, 
and in July, 1907, was appointed Assistant Engineer of the 
Interborough Rapid Transit Company, New York City, N. Y. 
In Jtme, 1908, was married in New York CUy. 

267. i^OOFROUROW, J ESSE HeALY. I9OO. 

Born November 12, 1875, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Entered the 
Institute in 1896; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1900. In 1901 was in office of Engineer Maintenance of Way 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 209 

Pittsburg Division Pennsylvania Lines west of Pittsburg, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. No further report has been received at the Institute 
from Mr. Loofbourow. 

268. Madison, Herbert Frederick. 1900. 

Entered the Institute in 1896, age 23, ; graduated in Chemistry in 
1900. Was Assistant Chemist Cambria Steel Company, Johns- 
town, Pa. Then Assistant Chemist, Ohio Works, U. S. Steel 
Company, Youngstown, O. Then Chief Chemist Salem Iron 
Company, Leetonia, O. In 1906 returned to Youngstown as 
Consulting Chemist and Estimator of Costs for the Youngs- 
town Foundry and Machine Company. Remained with this com- 
pany until 1908, when, on account of his health, was compelled 
to go to California, where he lived on a ranch until 1909, when 
he acted as Librarian of the Clovis Public Library. Was 
married May 5, 1904, at Youngstown, O. 

269. Maier, Gustave Adolph. 1900. 

Born February 5, 1878, in Danville, 111. Entered the Institute 
in 1896, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1900. From July, 1900, to August, 1901. with the General Elec- 
tric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. From August, 1901, to Sep- 
tember, 1902, with the Milwaukee Electric Company, Milwaukee, 
Wis. From October, 1902, to February, 1904, in Testing Depart- 
ment ; from February, 1904. to June, 1906, in Induction Motor 
Department, and from June, 1906, with the Power and Engi- 
neering Department General Electric Company, Schenectady, 
X. Y. Mr. Maier is a member of the Schenectady branch of the 
A. I. E. E.. and was married April 8, 1908. 

270. Mees, Curtis Adolph. 1900. 

Born September 16, 1877, in Woodville, O. Entered the Rose 
Polytechnic Institute in 1896; graduated in the Civil Engineer- 
ing Course in 1900. From 1901 to 1902 with Engineering Corps 
of the E. & A. Division of the Pennsylvania Lines west of Pitts- 
burg. In 1902 with Chief Engineer of the New York Central & 
Hudson River Railway, New York City. From 1902 to 1904 
Assistant Engineer of the Catawba Power Company. Rock Hill, 
S. C. In 1904 Assistant City Engineer Columbus, O. Since 
April. 1905. Designing Engineer Southern Power Company, 
Charlotte, N. C. Was granted the degree of CE. in 1908 from 
Rose. Is a member of the A. S. C. E. Association, A. S. M. E. 
14 



2IO Rose Polytecliiiic Institute. 

Association, A. I. E. E., and member Eng. Asso. of the South. 
His work has been mainly along the lines of hydro-electric 
power plants and high-tension transmission. 

271. Me;riwether, David, Jr. 1900. 

Born February 27, 1879, in Louisville, Ky. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1896; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1900. 
From June, 1900, to March, 1901, with the Engineering Corps 
of the Pennsylvania Lines west of Pittsburg at Cincinnati, O. 
From March, 1901, to October, 1902, in Construction Depart- 
ment of the Southern Railway, Louisville, Ky. From October, 
1902, to June, 1905, Assistant Engineer with the Southern Rail- 
way, and from that time to the present is Assistant Engineer, 
Construction Department, Southern Railway Company, Knox- 
ville, Tenn. Mr. Meriwether does not report whether he con- 
tinues to play football. 

272. Phiu-ips, Edward Frazier. 1900. 

Entered the Institute from Danville, 111., in 1892 ; withdrew in 
1893; returned in 1896, and graduated in Chemistry in 1900. 
From 1901 to 1904 Draftsman with the Brown-Ketcham Iron 
Works, Indianapolis, Ind. From 1904 to 1906 Assistant Cashier 
First National Bank, Artesia, N. M. In 1907 Cashier Joyce- 
Pruit Company, Artesia, N. M-. From 1908 to the present time 
Cashier of the First National Bank, Artesia, N. "SI. Was mar- 
ried October 8, 1902, in Terre Haute, Ind. 

2yT,. Richardson, Harry Steele. 1900. 

Born August 6, 1878, in Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1896; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1900. 
From 1901 to 1903 Draftsman in Ordnance Office, War Depart- 
ment, Washington, D. C. From 1903 to 1904 with the Long 
Arm System Company, Mechanical and Electrical Ship Out- 
fitters, Cleveland, O. From 1904 to 1905 with the Electric Con- 
troller and Supply Company, Cleveland, O. From 1905 to the 
present time Chief Draftsman of the Electric Controller and 
Supply Company, Cleveland, O. Was granted the degree of 
M.S. in 1902 from Rose, and was married in Washington, D. C, 
in April, 1904. In 1901, when Mr. Richardson took the Civil 
Service examination for the position in the Ordnance Depart- 
ment, only two out of thirty candidates passed, he being one. 
While in the Ordnance Department his chief work was on 
disappearing gun carriages. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 211 

274. WiTHERSPOON, Thomas Dwight, Jr. 1900. 

Born December 25, 1874, in Louisville, Ky. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1896; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1900. From 1900 to 1901 in Testing Department of the National 
Malleable Castings Company, Chicago. From 1901 to 1902 in 
Superintendent's Office of the Vandalia Railway, Terre Haute. 
From 1902 to 1903 Draftsman Youngstown Engineering Com- 
pany, Youngstown, O. From 1903 to 1907 Electrical Engi- 
neer and Assistant Master Mechanic Toledo Furnace Com- 
pany, Toledo. In 1908 Consulting Engineer Magnolia Land and 
Lumber Company, Magnolia, N. C. In 1909 Draftsman Union 
Electric Light and Power Company, St. Louis, Mo. Is an Asso- 
ciate member of the A. I. E. E. Was married December 8, 1903, 
in Chicago, 111. Mr. Witherspoon was Editor of The Technic 
and active in the organization of the Students' Council. 

275. York, Robert. 1900. 

Born October 24, 1879, in Pine Bluff, Ark. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1896; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1900. From June, 1900, to March, 1901, Master Mechanic 
and Assistant Manager of the Bluff City Lumber Company, 
Clio, Ark. From March to July, 1901, in charge of construc- 
tion of power house for the Citizens' Light and Transit Com- 
pany, Pine Bluflf, Ark. From 1901 to 1903 Manager Bluff City 
Lumber Company, Kearney, Ark. From IQ03 to 1904 Super- 
intendent Citizens' Light and Transit Company, Pine Bluff, Ark. 
From 1905 to 1907 with the Citizens' Light and Transit Com- 
pany, Pine Bluff. From 1908 to date Vice-President of the 
York-Browning Lumber Company, Memphis. Tenn., the Grant 
Lumber Company and the Burt Lumber Company, Rison, Ark. 
Was granted the degree of M.S. in 1902 from Rose. Is an asso- 
ciate member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

276. Clay, George Harry. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1897, age 18; 
graduated in Chemistry in 1901. From June i, 1901, to 1902, 
Assistant Chemist Allegheny Steel and Iron Company, Taren- 
tum. Pa. From 1902 to 1903 Assistant Chemist Procter & 
Gamble Company, Ivorydale, O. In 1904 Superintendent Glycer- 
ine Department Procter & Gamble Company, Ivorydale, O. 
From November i, 1904, to August, 1908. Chemist Procter & 
Gamble Company, Kansas City, Mo., and since August, 1908, in 



212 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

charge of the Packing Department, Kansas City, Kan. Is a 
member of the A. C. S. Was married in March, 1906. 

277. Crawford, Gilbert. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Paola, Kan., in 1897, age 21 ; grad- 
uated in Chemistry in 1901. From July, 1901, to June, 1902, 
with the Fairbanks-Morse Company, Beloit, Wis. From June, 
1902, to 1903, Assayer in American Smelting and Refining 
Company, Pueblo, Col. From 1904 to 1906 Head Assayer and 
• Chemist Montezuma Lead Company, Santa Barbara, Chihuahua, 
Mexico. In 1907 Assayer and Chemist American Smelting and 
Refining Company, Monterey, Mexico. At present Mr. Craw- 
ford is at his home in Paola, Kan. 

278. Gibbons, Walter Ray. 1901. 

Born January 31, 1879, in Indianapolis. Entered the Institute 
in 1897, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1901. 
In 1901 graduate student and Assistant in Civil Engineering 
at Rose Polytechnic Institute. From 1902 to 1905 with the 
Waddell & Hedrick Company, Kansas City, Mo., as Assistant 
Engineer Omaha and Resident Engineer Bayou Sara, La. From 
1905 to the present time Assistant Engineer of the Big Four 
Railway at Cincinnati, O. Was married in Terre Haute, Ind., 
August 4, 1904. 

279. Hadley, William. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Hadley, Ind., in 1897, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1901. In 1901 in 
the Electrical Department of the Homestead Steel Works, Mun- 
hall. Pa. Continued in this position until April, 1903. From 
April, 1903, to February, 1904, with the Wilmington Malleable 
Iron Works, Wilmington, Del. In 1904 Superintendent Elec- 
trical and Mechanical Department Malleable Iron Works, Wil- 
mington. In 1905 with the E. I. DuPont Company, Wilmington, 
Del. In 1906 Assistant Engineer Eastern Dynamite Company, 
Barksdale, Wis. From 1907 to the present time with the Elec- 
trical and Mechanical Departments Isthmian Canal Commission, 
Culebra, Canal Zone. 

280. Ham MEL, Max Jacob. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Appleton, Wis., in 1897, at the age 
of 18; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1901. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 213 

From the fall of 1901 to the fall of 1904 with the Milwaukee 
Electric Railway and Light Company, and since that time to 
date with A. Herz, Terre Haute. Mr. Hammel was married in 
Terre Haute April 27, 1905. 

281. HeivMer, Leslie L. 1901. 

Born November 11, 1877, in Terre Hjiute. Entered the Institute 
in 1896 ; withdrew on account of defective vision ; reentered in 
1898, and graduated in Chemistry in 1901. After graduation 
was in the Chemical Laboratory of the Pittsburg Testing Labo- 
ratory until January, 1902, Then in the Chemical Department 
of the N. & G. Taylor Company, at Cumberland, Md. In May, 

1902, was transferred to the Blackplate Department of the same 
company as Assistant Superintendent. In March, 1903, became 
Superintendent of the company, and in 1906 was made General 
Manager, which position he holds to date. Was married June, 
1907, in Cumberland, Md. 

282. King, Everett Edgar. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Warren, Ind., in 1899, at the age 
of 22, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1901. 
From June, 1901, to December, 1902, Assistant Engineer Central 
Railway, Mexico. December, 1902, to 1903, Assistant Engineer 
Vandalia Railway. From September, 1903, to 1904, Assistant 
Engineer on C, R. I. & P. Ry., Chicago. October, 1905, Division 
Engineer Pacific & Idaho Northern Railway, Weiser, Ida. In 
1906 Assistant Superintendent with the Chicago, Rock Island & 
Pacific Railway, St. Louis, Mo. In 1907 Resident Engineer 
C, R. I. & P. Ry., El Reno, Okla. In 1908 Associate Professor 
of Civil Engineering at A. and M. College, Stillwater, Okla., 
which position he holds to date. Is associate member A. S. C. E. 
and member Okla. Eng. Society. Was married October 3, 1903. 

283. Lyons, Albert Carleton. 1901. 

Born November 2, 1875, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1897; graduated in the Chemical Department in 1901. From 
June, 1901, to November, 1901, Assistant Chemist, Carnegie 
Steel Works, Duquesne, Pa. From November, 1901, to August, 

1903, Assistant Superintendent Chiapas Mining Company, Chia- 
pas, Mexico. From 1903 to 1904 Instructor in Chemical Labora- 
tory, University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. From 1904 to 1907 
of the firm of Burk & Lyons, Analytic and Consulting Chem- 



214 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

ists, Louisville, Ky. From 1907 to date Vice-President and 
Manager Kansas City Testing Laboratory, Kansas City, Mo. 
Granted degree of B.S. from Rose. Is a member of the A. C. S. 
and the Kansas City Technological Society for Testing. Was 
married June 25, 1905, at Columbia, Mo. Gave special attention 
to study of Portland cement and waterproofing of concrete mix- 
tures. 

284. Miller, Robert Nei^herland. 1901. 

Born September 12, 1879, Louisville, Ky. Entered the Institute 
in 1897, and graduated in the Chemical Course in 1901. In 1901 
and 1902 Assistant Professor of Chemistry and English in the 
Male High School, Louisville, Ky. From 1903 to 1906 student 
at Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Mass., and with Legal Aid 
Society, New York City. Since 1906 Practicing Law in Louis- 
ville as Attorney and Counsellor at Law. Was granted degree 
of LL.B. at Harvard in 1906. Member of the Engineers' and 
Architects' Club, Louisville, Ky. 

285. Perkins, Hugh Espey. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Rising Sun, Ind., in 1897, at the age 
of 22; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1901. From 
June, 1901, to 1902 with the Metropolitan Elevated Railway 
Company, Chicago. In 1902 with Engineer Maintenance of 
Way Terre Haute & Logansport Railway, Logansport, Ind. 
From 1902 to 1903 with the Northwestern Elevated Railway 
Company, Chicago. In 1904 Assistant Engineer of the North- 
western Railway Company, Chicago. In 1905 and 1906 Assistant 
Engineer with the Chicago & Oak Park Elevated and North- 
western Elevated Railroads, Chicago. From 1907 to date As- 
sistant Engineer Northwestern Elevated Railroad, Chicago. 

286. Peeeging, Frank William. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1896, at the 
age of 20, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1901. In 1901 Signal Inspector Union Pacific Railway, 
Omaha, Neb. From March, 1903, Signal Foreman Union Pa- 
cific Railway, Omaha, Neb. From 1904 Supervisor of Signals 
Colorado and Wyoming Division, Cheyenne, Wyo. At present 
is Supervisor of Signals of the Union Pacific Railroad at Chey- 
enne, Wyo. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 215 

287. Piper, Harry D. 1901. 

Born January 22, 1879, Paris, 111. Entered the Institute in 1897, 
at the age of 19, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1901. In 1901 was with the Fairbanks-Morse Com- 
pany, Beloit, Wis. From 1902 to 1906 in the Engineering De- 
partment of the Ewart Manufacturing Company, Indianapolis. 
From 1906 to the present time is Chief Engineer Ewart Works, 
Link Belt Company, Indianapolis, Ind. Was married June 18,, 
1905. 

288. RiGGs, James Robert. 1901. 

Entered the Institute in Junior Class from Erlanger, Ky., in 
1899, at the age of 23, and graduated in the Electrical Engineer- 
ing Course in 1901. In 1901 with the Link Belt Company, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. In 1902 and 1903 in the Motive Power Depart- 
ment of the Vandalia Railroad, Terre Haute. 1904 and 1905 
Assistant Engineer Vandalia Shops, Terre Haute. 1906 Assist- 
ant Engineer of Motive Power Vandalia Railroad, Terre Haute. 
From 1907 to the present time General Foreman Mechanical 
Department Michigan Division of the Vandalia Railroad, Lo- 
gansport, Ind. Was married in Terre Haute, Ind., November 
II, 1903. 

289. Rochester, Robert Kendall. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Dayton, Ohio, in 1897, at the age of 
17, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1901. In 
1901 was with the American Car and Foundry Company, De- 
troit, Mich. In 1902 Assistant Engineer Maintenance of Way 
L. & T. and T. H. & L. Railways, Logansport, Ind. In 1903 
Engineer Maintenance of Way L. & T. and T. H. & L. Rail- 
ways, Logansport, Ind. 1905 Engineer Maintenance of Way 
Michigan Division Vandalia Railroad, Logansport, Ind. 1906 
Principal Assistant Engineer Vandalia Railroad, Indianapolis, 
Ind. From 1907 to the present time Principal Assistant Engi- 
neer Vandalia Railroad, St. Louis, Mo. Has had charge of 
track elevation in Indianapolis. 

290. Schwartz, Harry Adolph. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1897, at the age 
of 17, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1901. From June to September in Power Plant Louisville Rail- 
way Company. From September, 1901, to June. 1902, was In- 
structor in Drawing Rose Polytechnic Institute. From June, 



2i6 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

1902, to date with the National Malleable Castings Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1903 and 
degree of ]\I.E. in 1905, both from Rose. Member of the 
A. C. S., the S. for T. M.., the A. F. A., junior member 
A. S. M. E. 

291. Troll, Martin Neal. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Kansas, 111., in 1897, at the age of 
18; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1901. 
From 1901 to 1905 with the National Malleable Castings Com- 
pany, Indianapolis, Ind. In 1906 with the National Malleable 
Castings Company, Chicago. In 1907 Superintendent Solvay 
Foundry Company, Solvay, New York. From 1908 to date 
Electrical Engineer, Seattle, Wash. 

292. Warfel, Rob Roy. 1901. 

Entered the Institute from Monticello, Ind., in 1896. at the nge 
of 20; graduated in the Chemical Course in 1901. In 1901 with 
the Homestead Steel Works. In 1902 with the Allegheny Steel 
and Iron Works, Avenue, Pa. 1902 and 1903 Chemist Allegheny 
Steel and Iron Works, Brackenridge, Pa. Rrom 1904 to 1907 
Chemist Babcock & Wilcox Boiler Company, Bayonne, N. J. 
From 1907 to date Chemist, Seattle, Wash. 

293. Cox, Claude Ernest. 1902. 

Born April 10, 1879, Libertyville, Ind. Entered the Institute in 
1898; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1902. 
From the time of graduating to 1905 with the Standard Wheel 
Company, Terre Haute, Ind., as Traveling Salesman, Drafts- 
man, Superintendent of the Automobile Department, and Man- 
ager of the Automobile Department. From 1905 to 1906 Man- 
ager of the Automobile Department of the Standard Wheel 
Company at Indianapolis, Ind. From 1906 to 1908 General 
Manager and Treasurer of the Overland Automobile Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 1908 designing Interstate Car and planning 
the Interstate factory and equipment. From November, 1908, 
to date Engineer and Assistant Manager Interstate Company at 
Muncie, Ind. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1904 and the 
degree of M.E. in 1906. both from Rose. Is a member of the 
A. S. M. E. and Society of Automobile Engineers. Some of his 
more important work has been the designing and building of 
the Overland Car and the Interstate Car and the building and 
equipping the Interstate and Overland factories. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 217 

294. DiCKERSON, John Thomas. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Atlantic, Iowa, in 1897, at the age of 
17; withdrew in 1899 to work in engineering office, Chicago; 
reentered in 1900; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1902. After graduation in 1902 was with the Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Quincy Railroad Company, Chicago. In 1903 Assistant 
Engineer of Bridges C. B. & Q. Railroad Company, Chicago. 
From April 4, 1903, Assistant Engineer of Bridges with the 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad, Chicago. In 1904 
with Kohen Iron Works, American Bridge Company, St. Louis, 
Mo. From 1904 to date Assistant Engineer Scherzer Rolling 
Lift Bridge Company, Chicago, 111. 

295. FiSHBACK, Frederick R. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in i8g8, at the age of 
18, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1902. 
From graduation until September, 1903, with the Union Pacific 
Railway, Cheyenne, Wyo. In 1903 in the shops of the Chicago 
& Eastern Illinois Railroad at St. Elmo, 111. In 1904 Round 
House Foreman of Shops of the Frisco System, Cape Girardeau, 
Mo. From 1905 to 1907 Draftsman with the Electric Controller 
and Supply Company at Cleveland, Ohio. From 1908 to the 
present time Manager of the New York office of the Electric 
Controller and Manufacturing Company, New York City. Mar- 
ried. 

296. Flory, Edgar Lee. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Dayton, Ohio, in 1898, at the age of 
24, and graduated in Chemistry in 1902. After graduating in 

1902 with the G. H. Hammond Company, Hammond, Ind. In 

1903 with the G. H. Hammond Company, St. Joseph, Mo. 1904 
Chemist of the St. Joseph Plant of the Hammond Packing 
Company, St. Joseph, Mo. In 1905 Master Mechanic St. Joseph 
Plant of the Hammond Packing Company, St. Joseph. From 
1905 to 1908 Master Mechanic G. H. Hammond Packing Com- 
pany, Chicago, which position he holds to date. Married. 

297. Hills, Charles Herbert. 1902. 

Bom August 20. 1880, Bernardston, Mass. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1898; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1902. From graduation until 1904 Chief Draftsman with the 
Federal Manufacturing Company, Indianapolis, Ind. From 1904 



2i8 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

to 1908 in the Engineering Department of the Deane Steam 
Pump Company, Holyoke, Mass. From 1908 to the present time 
Special Representative International Steam Pump Company, 
Holyoke, Mass. Was married October 15, 1905, at Bernards- 
ton, Mass. 

298. HoMMEL, Victor August. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Sandusky, Ohio, in 1898, at the age 
of 18, and graduated in the Architectural Course in 1902. From 
August, 1902, to 1903 with Brown Hoisting and Conveying 
Company, Cleveland, Ohio. In 1903 with Robert W. Hunt & 
Co., Chicago. In 1904 Vice-President M. Hommel Wine Com- 
pany, Sandusky, Ohio. Died October 18, 1907, at Sandusky, 
Ohio. 

299. HousuM, Chenoweth. 1902. 

Born November 25. 1879, Decatur, 111. Entered the Institute in 
1898; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1902. 
From time of graduation until March, 1903, Draftsman Youngs- 
town Engineering Company, Youngstown, Ohio. From March, 
1903, to the fall of 1905 Draftsman with the William Tod Com- 
pany, Youngstown, Ohio. From 1905 to the present time in 
charge of the Gas Engine Department of the William Tod 
Company, Youngstown, Ohio. Was granted degree of M.S. in 
1906 from Rose. Is an associate member of the A. S. M. E. 
Mr. Housum's work has been mainly in engine and governor 
design. He published a work on Shaft and Fly Ball Governors, 
associated with Mr. Trinkham. 

300. Jones, Edward Lindley. 1902. 

Born June 11, 1880, Sanford, Fla. Entered the Institute from 
Decatur, 111., in 1898, and graduated in the Civil Engineering 
Course in 1902. From June, 1902, to June, 1904, with the Roe- 
bling Construction Company, Chicago, 111. From 1904 to the 
present with Hoefifer & Co., Chicago, 111., as Engineer and De- 
signer, especially of reinforced concrete. Is a junior member of 
the Western Society of Engineers, and was married October 3, 
1906, in Roanoke, Va. 

301. Jumper, Charles Henry. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1898, at the age 
of 18, and graduated in Chemistry in 1902. From 1902 to 1904 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 219 

was Assistant Chemist with the Pennsylvania Railroad at Al- 
toona. Pa. In 1905 with the Procter & Gamble Soap Company, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1906 in the Testing Department of the 
Harriman System, Omaha, Neb. From 1906 to the present time 
with A. D. Little, Chemical Expert and Engineer, Boston, Mass. 
Was married in 1907. 

302. Marshall, Ira. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Alma, 111., in 1899, at the age of 24, 
and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1902. From 
1902 to 1903 with the Big Four Railway at Mattoon, 111. From 

1904 to 1907 Constructing Engineer with the Equitable Powder 
Manufacturing Company, East Alton, 111. Since 1907 no report 
has been received at the Institute from him. 

303. Nicholson, John Alexander. 1902. 

Born January 28, 1879, Detroit, Mich. Entered the Institute 
from Terre Haute, Ind., in 1898; graduated in the Mechanical 
Engineering Course in 1902. From time of graduation to the 
present time with the Union Pacific Railway, and is now Fore- 
man of the Motive Power and Machinery Department at Sid- 
ney, Neb. Was married February 6, 1907, at Washington, Kan. 

304. Osborne, Don Findley. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Cassopolis, Mich., in 1887, at the age 
of 20, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1902. In 1902 with the Western Electric Company, Chicago, 111. 

1905 with the Frick Coke Company, Scottdale, Pa. 1906 with 
the Western Electric Company, Chicago. At present Superin- 
tendent of Dredging at San Pedro Harbor, Terminal, Cal. 

305. Paige, Arthur James. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1888, at the age of 
16, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1902. From 1902 to 1908 Instructor in Drawing Rose Poly- 
technic Institute. From September, 1908, to date Superintend- 
ent and General Manager Fort Pitt Motor Manufacturing Com- 
pany, New Kensington, Pa. Granted degree of M.S. in 1906 
from Rose. Between 1902 and 1908 gave special attention to 
the study of gas engines. Designed and built a motor car, and 
has also been granted patents upon a rotary gas engine. 



220 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

306. I'arks, Coleman Clyde. 1902. 

Born August 15, 1878, Sullivan, Ind. Entered the Institute 
from Terre Haute in 1898; graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1902. From 1902 to 1903 with the General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 1903 with the Carnegie 
Steel Company, Munhall, Pa., where he remained until August, 
1904, and then went with G. A. Taft, Consulting Engineer, 
Colorado Springs, Col. From 1905 to 1906 Electrical Engineer 
with G. A. Taft, Colorado Springs. In 1907-08 with the Stone 
& Webster Engineering Company, Terre Haute. Was married 
April 22, 1908, at Terre Haute. 

307. Powell, Edgar Byer. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Newcastle, Ind., in 1898, at the age 
of 22, and graduated in the Architectural Course in 1902. From 
time of graduation to 1904 with Purdy & Henderson, Civil 
Engineers, New York City, N. Y. From May, 1904, to 1906 in 
Estimating Department of the American Bridge Company, New 
York City. In 1906 with D. H. Burnham & Co., Architects, 
Chicago. In 1907 Chief Engineer Insiey Iron Works, Indi- 
anapolis, and in September, 1907, went with E. C. & R. M. 
Shankland, Chicago, 111. Since that time no record has been 
received at the Institute. 

308. Uhl, Henry William. 1902. 

Entered the Institute from Portsmouth, Ohio, in 1898, at the 

age of 20, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1902. From 1902 to 1904 was in the shops of the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company at Cheyenne, Wyo. From 1904 to 
December, 1906, in shops of the Union Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany at Omaha, Neb., as Mechanical Engineer, Head Inspector 
of Locomotives, and Engineer of Tests. In 1907 and 1908 Gen- 
eral Foreman Union Pacific Shops, Kansas City, Kan. At pres- 
ent is Inspecting Engineer for Dr. Charles F. McKenna, New 
York City, N. Y. Was married October 5, 1907. 

309. Warren, Robert Chauncey. 1902. 

Born August 12, 1881, Terre Haute, Ind. Entered the Institute 
in 1898; graduated in Chemistry in 1902. From June, 1902, to 
August, 1903, Assistant Chemist Armour Packing Company, 
Kansas City, Mo. 1903 to April, 1904, Assistant City Chemist 
Kansas City, Mo. 1904 to 1906 Chemist American Cotton Oil 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 221 

Company, at Memphis, Tenn., Chicago, and Atlanta, Ga. From 
IQ06 Chemist Arkansas Cotton Oil Company. 1907 Chemist 
Arkansas Cotton Oil Company and State Chemist, Little Rock, 
Ark. Was married in Little Rock, Ark., June 3, 1908. 

310. Aguilera, Francis Vicente. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Manzanillo, Cuba, in 1901, age 20; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
1903 to 1905 with the General Electric Company, Schenectady, 
N. Y. 1906-08 Superintendent Electrical Plant, Manzanillo, 
Cuba. 1909 Manager Cuervo & Co., Engineers and Contractors, 
Havana, Cuba. 

311. Arnold, Robert Bacon. 1903. 

Born February 17, 1881, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 
1899; graduated in Chemistry in 1903. From June, 1903, to 
March, 1904, of the firm of Burk & Arnold, Chemists, Louis- 
ville, Ky. 1904 Assistant Chemist for the Kentucky Tobacco 
Product Company, Louisville, Ky. From 1905 to September, 

1907, Chemist Richmond Branch Kentucky Tobacco Product 
Company, Richmond, Va. From September, 1907, to June, 

1908, graduate student Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
From June, 1908, to the present time "Chemist in charge, Ken- 
tucky Tobacco Product Company, Richmond, Va. Is a member 
of the A. C. S. Mr. Arnold perfected a process for the extrac- 
tion of nicotine from tobacco stems, protected by patent in the 
name of Lindenberger & Arnold. 

312. Austin, Alfred Noel. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1899, age 19, and 
graduated in the Architectural Course in 1903. In 1904 Drafts- 
man Ornamental Iron Works, Denver Iron and Wire Works, 
Denver, Col. In 1905 Draftsman for Reisick Structural Iron 
Works. Allegheny, Pa. In 1906 Chief Draftsman Bollinger 
Bros. Structural Iron Works, Pittsburg. In 1907 Architect, 
and 1908 with the Federal Engineering Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 
At present with Foltz & Parker, Architects, Indianapolis, Ind. 

313. Blair, Marion Worthington. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1899, age 21 ; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
graduation to April, 1905, Assistant Superintendent of the Terre 



222 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Haute Brick and Pipe Company, Terre Haute. From April, 
1905, to October, 1905, First Assistant Mechanical Engineer 
Illinois Brick Company, Chicago. In 1906 with the Atlas Car 
and Manufacturing Company, Chicago. 1907 with the G. E. 
Luce Engineering Company, Chicago. Since January, 1908, 
Secretary of the United States Engineering Company, St. Louis, 
Mo. During the past year has erected plants for the Wabash 
Brick Company at Terre Haute, and the Twin City Brick Com- 
pany, St. Paul, Minn. Was married December 26, 1908. 

314. Bowie, Wallace Douglas. 1903. 

Born April 26, 1880, Sutersville, Pa. Entered the Institute from 
Gallup, New Mexico, in 1899; graduated in the Mechanical 
Engineering Course in 1903. From time of graduation to Sep- 
tember, 1903, in the Union Pacific Railroad Shops, Omaha, Neb. 
From September, 1903, to January, 1904, Draftsman Steubenville 
Steel Works, Steubenville, Ohio. From March, 1904, to July, 
1904, with the Southern Pacific Surveying Corps, Gallup, N. M. 
From 1904 to 1906 Transitman on Southern Pacific Railroad. 
From 1906 to the present time Superintendent Juanita Coal and 
Coke Company, Bowie, Delta County, Col. 

315. Braman, Harry Scott. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1899, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
1903 'to 1905 with the Carnegie Steel Company in Furnace De- 
partment, Youngstown, Ohio. 1906 and 1907 Foreman in charge 
of Furnaces Carnegie Steel Company, Youngstown, Ohio. In 
1907 Manager Alice Furnaces Youngstown Sheet and Tube 
Company. Sharpsville, Pa., and from 1908 General Superintend- 
ent of Blast Furnaces of the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Com- 
pany, Youngstown, Ohio. 

316. Brosius, James Simms. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1899. age 16; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1903. From time 
of graduation to 1905 with the Westinghouse Electric and Man- 
ufacturing Company, Pittsburg. 1905 with the American Win- 
dow Glass Company, Pittsburg. In 1906 with the Western 
Electric Company, Chicago, 111. From 1907 to 1909 Draftsman 
for the Electric Controller and Manufacturing Company, Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and is at present Draftsman for the Westinghouse 
Electric and Manufacturing Company. Pittsburg, Pa. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 223 

317. Burt, Eugene. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Leavenworth, Kan., in 1899, age 18; 
graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
the time of graduation to the present time with the Great West- 
ern Stove Company, Leavenworth, Kan. 

318. Chamberlain, Charles Lea. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from St. Louis, Mo., in 1900, age 22 ; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1903. From 

1903 to 1905 Draftsman with the St. Louis Transit Company, St. 
Louis, Mo. From 1905 to the present time with the Rescue 
Copper Company, Gila Bend, Arizona. 

319. Cox, Irving John. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1899. age 19; grad- 
uated in the Chemical Course in 1903. From 1903 to 1905 As- 
sistant Chemist with the Armour Packing Company, Kansas 
City, Mo., and in 1906 Assistant Chemist Armour Packing Com- 
pany, Chicago. In 1906 with the Eastern Dynamite Company, 
Gibbstown, N. J. From 1907 to the present time Chernist for 
the E- I. DuPont de Nemours Powder Company," Gibbstown, 
N. J. Was married January i, 1907. 

320. Cox, Nathan Hadley. 1903. 

Born May 21, 1881, Coloma, Ind. Entered the Institute from 
Terre Haute in 1899, age 18; graduated in the Mechanical En- 
gineering Course in 1903. From July, 1903, to 1904 with the 
Wilmington Malleable Iron Company, Wilmington, Del. In 
1905 with the General Electric Company in the Testing Depart- 
ment, Schenectady, N. Y. From 1906 to 1909 Assistant Super- 
intendent Naugatuck Malleable Iron Company. Naugatuck, 
Conn. 1909 to date Superintendent of the Metal Finishing Com- 
pany, Union City, Conn. 

321. Cushman, John Arthur. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Springfield, Mass., in 1900, age 18; 
graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. In 

1904 with the Allis-Chalmers Company arranging exhibits at 
the World's Fair, St. Louis, Mo. In 1905 Special Apprentice 
Allis-Chalmers Company, Milwaukee. 1906 with the Illinois 
Brick Company, Chicago. 1907 Engineer for Charles N. Hays, 
Power Appliances, Chicago. From 1907 to the present time 
with the Eagle Iron Works, Terre Haute, Ind. 



224 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

322. Davies, Graham. 1903. 

Born March 8, 1878, Springfield, Tenn. Entered the Institute 
from Louisville, Ky., in 1899; graduated in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Course in 1903. From time of graduation to the present 
time with the Western Electric Company in Chicago and Pitts- 
burg in Purchase and Supply Department. Now in charge of 
"service" of company. Was married at' South Whitley, Ind., in 
December, 1904. 

323. Fischer, Carl Dittman, ]r. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Wapakoneta, Ohio, in 1899, age 18; 
graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
1903 to 1905 with the Atlas Engine Works, Indianapolis, Ind. 
From 1905 to the present time with the Wapakoneta Machine 
Company, Wapakoneta, Ohio, as Manager. 

324. Fitzpatrick, James Edward. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1899, age 16; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. In 1903 
with the Union Pacific Railroad Shops, Cheyenne, Wyo., and 
from 1904 to date with the Union Pacific Railroad Shops at 
Omaha, Neb. 

325. Gilbert, Henry Curtis. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1899, age 18; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
1903 to 1906 in Mechanical and Electrical Departments of the 
World's Fair, St. Louis, Mo. In 1906 with the Union Electric 
Light and Power Company Underground Department, St. 
Louis, INIo. From 1907-08 with the Department of Electricity 
Jamestown Exposition, Norfolk, Va. From 1908 to date Super- 
intendent Cable Department Sanitary District, Chicago, 111. 

326. HuNLEY, John Boudinot, Jr. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1889, age 18; grad- 
uated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1903. From 1903 to 
1905 Acting Assistant Engineer C. C. C. & St. L. Railroad, Mat- 
toon, 111. In 1905 in Construction Department C. C. C. & St. L. 
Railroad, Cincinnati, O. From 1907 to date Assistant Engineer 
C. C. C. & St. L. Railroad, Cincinnati, Ohio. Has designed and 
supervised the construction of a number of large reinforced 
concrete structures on the road. 



Alwpni Biographical Dictionary. 225 

327. I JAMS, Jesse Wajiren. 1903. 

Born June 19, 1882, Terre Haute. Entered the Institute in 1899, 
and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. 
In 1903 and 1904 graduate student in Civil Engineering Rose 
Polytechnic Institute. In 1905 and 1906 with the Indiana Har- 
bor Railroad Company as Transitman and Resident Engineer, 
Hammond, Ind. From 1907 to date Assistant Engineer New 
York Central & Hudson River Railroad, New York City, N. Y. 

328. Ingi.e, William Davidson. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Oakland City, Ind., in 1898, age 17; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1903. In 
1903 and 1904 Draftsman for the St. Louis Transit Company. St. 
Louis, Mo. From May, 1904, to the present time Superintendent 
of Ingle Coal Company, Evansville, Ind. 

329. Jacob, Brent Cooke. 1903. 

Born February 23, 1879, Oldham County, Ky. Entered the Insti- 
tute from Louisville, Ky., in 1899; graduated in the Electrical 
Engineering Course in 1903. In 1903 and 1904 with the Western 
Electric Company, Chicago. In 1905 Draftsman for the Electric 
Controller and Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ohio. In 
1906 in drafting room with the Western Electric Company, 
Chicago. From March, 1906, in drafting room with the West- 
inghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Was married February 2;^, 1905, at Valparaiso, Tnd. 

330. Kellogg, Henry Simmons. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Bowling Green, Ky.. in 1899, age 28; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1903. In 1903 
and 1904 with the St. Louis Terminal Railway Association, St. 
Louis, Mo. From 1904 to 1909 with the Wagner Electric Man- 
ufacturing Company, St. Louis, Mo. At present with the Cen- 
tury Electric Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

331. KiEFER, Carl Jackson. 1903. 

Born October 14, 1882, Cincinnati, Ohio. Entered the Institute 
in 1889; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1903. 
From June, 1903, to June, 1904, in the Testing Department of 
the General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. From June, 
ic»4, to May, 1905. Electrical Engineer Toledo Urban & Inter- 

15 



226 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

urban Railway Company. May, 1905, to September, 1906, Chief 
Engineer Cincinnati, Mil ford & Loveland Traction Company, 
Milford, Ohio. From 1906 to date partner in the Reliance Engi- 
neering Company, .Consulting Engineers, Cincinnati, Ohio. Is 
a member of the A. I. E. E. Was granted degree of M.S. in 
1905 and degree of E.E. in 1908 from Rose. This firm owns 
and operates five electric light, water works, and heating plants, 
in addition to doing consulting work. 

332. KiRBY, Edward Cassady. 1903. 

Born June 4, 1881, Muncie, Ind. Entered the Institute in 1899, 
age 18; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1903. In 1903 and 1904 with the General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. In 1905 with the Pike's Peak Hydro-Elec- 
tric Company, Colorado Springs, Col. In 1905-06 with the Gen- 
eral Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. From July, 1906, 
to date Engineer of Light, Heat, and Power Plant with the 
E. I. Dupont de Nemours Powder Company, Sedalia, Col. Was 
married October 10, 1908, at Olney, Col. 

333. Kreiger, Albert August, 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1899, age 17; 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1903. In 1903 and 
1904 with the C. C. C & St. L. Railroad. Greencastle, Ind. 
From 1905 to date Assistant Engineer with the Louisville Water 
Company, Louisville, Ky. 

334. LiNDENBERGER, GeORGE BayLESS. I903. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., in 1899, age 21 ; 
graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. In 
1904 in Manufacturing Department, Richmond Branch, of the 
Kentucky Tobacco Product Company, Richmond, Va. In 1905 
and 1906 Manager Richmond Branch of the Kentucky Tobacco 
Product Company, Richmond, Va. From 1908 to date Superin- 
tendent Machinery and Manufacture Kentucky Tobacco Prod- 
uct Company, Louisville, Ky. 

335. Metzger, Earl Cope. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Akron, Ohio, in 1899, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
1903 to 1904 Instructor Mechanical Engineering Christian 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 227 

Brothers' College, St. Louis, Mo. 1904 to 1905 Electrical In- 
spector Western Electric Company. 1905 to 1906 Assistant 
Superintendent Morris & Co., Chicago. In 1906 Mechanical and 
Electrical Inspector P. R. R., Altoona, Pa. From 1907 to date 
Chief Mining Machinery Inspector Goodman Manufacturing 
Company, Chicago. 

336. MicHEiv, Arthur Eugene. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Marion, Ind., in 1899, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
1903 to 1905 Draftsman and Designer Diamond Chain and Man- 
ufacturing Company, Indianapolis, Ind. In 1905 Assistant Man- 
ager of Publicity International Steam Pump Company, Har- 
rison, N. J. From 1906 to 1908 Manager of The Geo. H. Gibson 
Company, Advertising Engineers, New York City, N. Y. At 
present in business as an Advertising Engineer, New York City, 
N. Y. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1906 from Rose. Is a 
member of the A. S. M. E. Mr. Michel has been the efficient 
Secretary of the Rose Alumni Club of New York, and has made 
the meetings most successful. 

337. Palmer, Harry W. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Brockport, N. Y., in 1899, age 23; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1903. After 
graduating was with the Western Electric Company, Chicago, 
111. In December, 1903, transferred to the Western Electric 
Company in New York City. From September, 1904, to 1907 
Instructor in Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics, and Physics 
in the Louisville Male High School, Louisville, Ky. From 1907 
to the present time with the Louisville Cement Company, Sel- 
lersburg, Ind., as Mechanical Engineer and Assistant Superin- 
tendent. Was married June, 1906, in Terre Haute, Ind. 

338. Peddle, William Adrian. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Washington, D. C, in 1899, age 23; 
graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
July, 1903, to November. 1903, Assistant Engineer Signal De- 
partment Interborough Rapid Transit Company, New York 
City. From November, 1903, to November, 1904, Assistant 
Foreman Union Switch and Signal Company, New York City. 
From January, 1905, to April, 1906, Engineer in charge of Con- 
struction Interborough Rapid Transit Company Signal Depart- 



aaS Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

ment. From April, 1906, to December, 1907, Assistant Engineer 
N. Y. C. & H. R. Railroad Signal Department Electric Zone. 
From December, 1907, to the present time Assistant Signal 
Engineer Exterior Zone N. Y. C. & H. R. Railroad, New York 
City. 

339. Pettit, Harvey Blair. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Owensboro, Ky., in 1899, age 20, and 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
1903 to July, 1907, with the Western Electric Company, Chicago, 
111. From July, 1907, to March, 1908, with the Western Electric 
Company, San Francisco, Cal. From April, 1908, to the present 
time in the Auditor's office of the Chicago Telephone Company, 
Chicago, 111. Was married August 25, 1908, in Chicago. 

340. Pine, Benjamin Halbert. 1903. 

Born September 6, 1879, Cincinnati, Ohio. Entered the Institute 
in 1899; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1903. In 
1903 to June, 1904, with the Roebling Construction Company, 
Chicago, 111. From June, 1904, to the present time with the 
Citizens' Mutual Heating Company, Terre Haute. Was mar- 
ried in Terre Haute October 14, 1903. 

341. Post, Chester Leroy. 1903. 

Born August 2, 1880. Entered the Institute from Gordon, Ohio, 
in 1899; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1903. 
From May, 1903, to May, 1904, Masonry Inspector on the C. I. 
& L. Short Line, Hillsboro, 111. From May, 1904, to September, 
1904, Resident Engineer on Railroad Construction in and near 
Indianapolis for the St. Louis Division Big Four. September, 
1904, to June, 1905, Assistant in Civil Engineering and graduate 
student Rose Polytechnic Institute. June, 1905, to October, 
1906, Superintendent with A. J. Yawger, Contracting Engineer, 
Indianapolis, Ind. From October, 1906, to April, T907, Superin- 
tendent of Construction Marquette Cement Company, La Salle, 
111. April, 1907, to June, 1908, with Condron & Sinks Company, 
Chicago. From June, 1908, to October, 1908, with E. C. & 
R. M. Shankland, Engineers, Chicago, and from October, 1908, 
to date as Principal Assistant Engineer with Condron & Sinks, 
Chicago, 111. Was granted degree of M.S. in 1905 from Rose. 
Is an associate member of the A. S. C. E. Was married May 
6, 1908. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 229 

342. RuMBLEY, Frederick Newton. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1899, age 17; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. In 1903 
and 1904 Draftsman in the Vandalia Shops, Terre Haute, and 
from 1905 to 1909 Chief Draftsman. In March, 1909, went with 
the Mexican Central Railway Company, Aguas Calientes, Aguas, 
Mexico. Was married in Terre Haute, 1907. 

343. SCHEFFERLY, RoBERT JOSEPH. I903. 

Was born at Mt. Clemens, Mich., March 19, 1879, and entered 
the Institute in 1899 from Detroit; graduated in the Mechanical 
Engineering Course in 1903. From 1903 to 1904 Draftsman with 
the Standard Wheel Company, Automobile Department, Terre 
Haute. From June, 1904, to July, 1905, in Experimental Depart- 
ment Olds Motor Works, Detroit, Mich. From August, 1905, 
to March, 1906, with the Muncie Wheel and Jobbing Company, 
Muncie, Ind., in charge of the Automobile Parts Departmeilt. 
From May, 1906, to date with the Everett, Metzger & Flanders 
Company, and is at present Assistant Designer in charge of the 
experimental work. Was married August 5, 1908, in Terre 
Hdute. 

344. Smith, Claiborne Ellis. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Evansville, Ind., in 1899, age 19; 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1903. From July 
to September, 1903, with the L. & N. Railroad in Assistant 
Engineer's office, Evansville. 1903 to 1906 with the E. & T. H. 
Railroad as Instrument Man and Assistant Engineer. 1906 and 
1907 Assistant Engineer with the Raleigh & Pamlico Sound 
Railroad, Raleigh, N. C. In 1907, owing to ill health, spent 
several months in California. From 1907 to date Assistant 
Engineer and Chief Draftsman City Engineer's office, San 
Diego, Cal. Has designed sewer systems, concrete structures, 
and worked on all the various problems presented in a City 
Engineer's office. 

345. Wiedemann, Hugo Edmund. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1898, age 16; grad- 
uated in Chemistry in 1903. Frdm August, 1903, to June, 1905, 
Chemist for Nelson, Morris & Co., East St. Louis, 111. From 
June. 1905. to the present time member of the firm Kessler & 



230 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Wiedemann, Consulting Chemists and Chemical Engineers, St. 
Louis, Mo. Also Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology in the 
Homoeopathic Medical College of Missouri, St. Louis, Mo. Was 
given degree of M.S. in 1907 from Rose. Is President of the 
St. Louis Chemical Society. 

346. Williams, John Peter Alexander. 1903. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1898, age 18; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1903. From 
1903 to 1906 Engineer Vigo Ice and Cold Storage Company, 
Terre Haute. 1906 to 1908 with the i\llis-Chalmers Company, 
Milwaukee, Wis. In 1908 Engineer Ice Utilities and Manufac- 
turing Company, Carbon Hill, Ala. From 1909 with the City 
Ice Company, of Augusta, Ga., as Engineer. Was married June, 
1904. 

347. Barbazette, John Harry. 1904. 

Born at Beardstown, 111., April 8, 1882. Entered the Institute 
in 1900, graduating in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1904. From July, 1904, to November, 1904, with the La Belle 
Iron Works, Steubenville, Ohio. From November, 1904, to 
November, 1905, with the Louisville Cement Company, Sellers- 
burg. Ind. From November, 1905, to April, 1906, with the lola 
Portland Cement Company, lola, Kan. From April, 1906, with 
the Chicago Portland Cement Company, Oglesby, 111., and 1906 
to 1909 Draftsman American Bridge Company, Chicago. Since 
February, 1909, to the present time with the Universal Portland 
Cement Company, Buffington, Ind. Married in Terre Haute, 
Ind., June, 1906. Mr. Barbazette's work has been mainly in 
cement plant construction. 

348. BowsHER, William Howard. 1904. 

Entered the Institute from Topeka, Ind., in 1900, age 18, and 
graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. In 
July, 1904, with the General Electric Company, Schenectady, 
N. Y. Since August, 1904, with the United States Marine 
Corps. 

349. Brannon, Clifton. 1904. 

Entered from Owensboro, Ky., in 1900, age 18, and graduated 
in the Civil Engineering Course in 1904. In July, 1904, with 
the Southern Indiana Railway, Terre Haute. 1905 in Mainte- 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 231 

nance of Way Department Vandalia Railway, Terre Haute. 
From October, 1906, to date Assistant Engineer E. & T. H. 
Railroad, Evansville, Ind. Was married at Terre Haute in 1908. 

350. Bryon, Ernest. 1904. 

Entered from Boise, Idaho, in 1900, age 18 ; graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. From July, 1904, to 

1906 with the General Electric Company, Lynn, Mass. 1906 
with the Stirling Construction Boiler Company, Mansfield, Ohio. 

1907 was obliged to retire on account of poor health. Died May 
6, 1908, at La Mesa, Cal. 

351. CoHN, Clarence Alexander. 1904. 

Entered from Salt Lake City in 1899, age 18; graduated in the 
Electrical Engineering Course in 1904. In 1904 with the Tellu- 
ride Light and Power Company, ProA'o, Utah. 1905 to date 
with the Utah Light and Railway Company, Salt Lake City, 
Utah, as Operator, Draftsman, General Operator in Power Sta- 
tion Department, Assistant to Superintendent Power Stations, 
and as Superintendent of Power Stations Department. The 
Power Station Department operates seven plants and five sub- 
stations, 125 miles of high-tension transmission. 

352. Cory, Mark Dee. 1904. 

Born at DeGraff, Ohio, November 17, 1880. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1902; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1904. 
From July, 1904, to 1906 Draftsman Mt. Vernon Bridge and 
Iron Works, Mt. Vernon, Ohio. From 1906 to 1908 with the 
Indiana Bridge Company, Muncie, Ind. From 1908 to date 
Director Engineering School of Winona, Winona Lake, Ind. 
During summers of 1902 and 1903 worked as Division Engineer 
M. P. Railroad and at the World's Fair, St. Louis. 

353. Grain, George Henry. 1904. 

Born August 9, 1880, Des Moines, Iowa. Entered from Grand 
Rapids, Mich., in 1900; graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1904. From 1904 to 1906 with the Westinghouse 
Electric Company. Pittsburg, Pa. In 1906 with the Otis Ele- 
vator Company, Yonkers, N. Y. In 1907 Assistant Estimator 
Marine Engine and Machine Company, New York City. From 

1908 to date with Morgan & Wright, Detroit Rubber Works, 
Detroit, Mich. 



232 Rose Polytechnic Instihite. 

354. DoRx, Leo Francis. 1904. 

Born December 24, 1879, at Louisville, Ky. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1899. Withdrew in Alarch, 1901, on account of his 
father's death; reentered September, 1901, and graduated in 
the Electrical Engineering Course in 1904. In 1905 with the 
Louisville Southern Electric Company, Electric Contractors, 
Louisville. From 1906 to March, 1908, art student in the Whip- 
ple School of Art, Art Students' League, and National School 
of Art. From March, 1908, to the present time Manager Na- 
tional School of Art, New York City. 

355. French, Carson Geyer. 1904. 

Entered from Buchanan, Mich., in 1900, age of 21 ; graduated in 
the Civil Engineering Course in 1904. In 1904 to 1905 Drafts- 
man Southern Indiana Railway, Terre Haute. From 1905 to 
1907 Assistant Engineer Construction Department Big Four 
Railway, Cincinnati, Ohio. From 1907 to date with Mainte- 
nance of Way Department Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railway, 
Chicago. Married in Terre Haute. During the last three years 
Mr. French has been mainly engaged in bridge work. 

356. Garrettson, Robert Franklin. 1904. 

Was born in Terre Haute January 3, 1880. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1900, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1004. In 1904 associated himself with Mr. Boyd as Consult- 
ing Engineer under style of Boyd & Garrettson, and has re- 
mained identified with this firm to date. In addition was Secre- 
tary and Local Manager of the Citizens' Gas and Electric Com- 
pany, Paris, 111., in 1904 and 1905. Secretary and Associate 
Manager Michigan City Light and Power Company, 1906 and 
1907, and has been active in the organization of a local National 
Bank at Michigan City. Is a member of the A. I. E. E. Was 
married June 17, 1908. Mr. Garrettson's work as Mechanical 
Engineer has been mainly along lines of reconstruction and re- 
designing existing electric light and gas plants and organizing 
them upon profitable basis. 

357. Hahn, Ferdinand William. 1904. 

Entered from Louisville, Ky., in 1901, age 19; graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. From 1904 to April, 
1906, with the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, Louisville. 
From April, 1906, to date with the Rodger feallast Car Com- 
pany and the National Dump Car Company, Chicago. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 233 

358. Hazard, William Horace. 1904. 

Entered the Institute in 1900 from Terre Haute, age 19; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. With the 
Fairbanks- Morse Company, Beloit, Wis., from 1904 to date as 
Draftsman, Experimental Engineer, Sales Engineer, and Special 
Engineer in the Gas Producer and Gas Engine Department. 
Designer and Estimator. Was married in 1908 in Bradford, 
Wis. 

359. Hihh, Roy Wilson, 1904. 

Born January 12, 1881, at Frankfort, Mich. Entered from Chi- 
cago, 111., from Lewis Institute, in the Junior Class in 1902; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1904. From 
graduation to date of the firm of Hill & Hill, Lawyers, Specialty, 
Patent, Trademark, and Corporation Law. Was granted degree 
of Bachelor of Laws in 1907 from the Northwestern University 
Law School. Is a member of the Franklin Institute and an 
associate member of the A. I. E. E. 

360. Katzenbach, Brown. 1904. 

Entered from Terre Haute in 1899, age 16; graduated in Chem- 
istry in 1904. In 1904 Assistant Superintendent Fairview Fluor 
Spar Company, Golconda, 111. In 1905 Chief Chemist Allegheny 
Steel Company and Interstate Steel Company, Brackenridge, Pa. 
From 1906 to 1908 Superintendent Open Hearth Furnaces 
American Rolling Mills, Middletown, Ohio. At present is in 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

361. Landrum, Robert Dallas. 1904. 

Born in Terre Haute, Ind., February 8, 1882. Entered the Insti- 
tute in igoo ; graduated in Chemistry in 1904. From August, 
15P04, to October, 1907, Chemist for the Columbian Enameling 
atid Stamping Works, Terre Haute. From October, 1907, to 
date Assistant Professor of Chemistry in charge of Quanti- 
tative Analysis, Metallurgy and Assaying, University of Kansas, 
Lawrence, Kan. Was married September i, 1908, at Linton, Ind. 

362. McCoRMicK, Charles Chesnut. 1904. 

Entered from Terre Haute in 1900, age 18 ; graduated in the 
Civil Engineering Course ih 1904. From September, 1904, to 
April, 1905, Assistant to Roadmaster, Omaha Division, Illinois 



234 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Central Railroad, Fort Dodge, la. From April, 1905, to 1907, 
Vice-President and Superintendent Wabash Sand and Gravel 
Company, Terre Haute. In 1907 Drainage Engineer, Charles- 
ton, 111. In 1909 Assistant Engineer Chicago Junction Railway, 
Chicago. Married in 1905 at Terre Haute. 

363. McFari^and, Edward HiIvI.. 1904. 

Entered from Crawfordsville, Ind., in 1900, age 18; graduated 
in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1904. From 1904 to 
1907 in the Steam Turbine Department of the General Elec- 
tric Company, as Research Assistant, Assistant in Charge, and 
Steam Turbine Engineer, Schenectady, N. Y. From 1907 to 
date District Steam Turbine Engineer for the Cincinnati office 
of the General Electric Company, in charge of engineering and 
construction of turbine installations. Was granted degree of 
M.S. in 1906 from Rose. 

364. McNabb, Walter Scott. 1904. 

Entered from Terre Haute in 1900, age 17; graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. From July, 1904, to 

1905 Special Apprentice Union Pacific Railway Shops, Omaha, 
Neb. From 1905 to 1906 Draftsman for the Aultman & Taylor 
Company, the McKenna Manufacturing Company, the Jacobs 
Steel Excavator Company, the Case Manufacturing Company, 
and the Illinois Steel Company. In 1907 Superintendent Brown 
Process Company, Chicago. From September, 1907, to date 
Blast Furnace Superintendent Illinois Steel Company, Chicago. 
Was married September 18, 1907. 

365. Miller, Merwine Buckingham. 1904. 

Entered from Afton, la., in 1899, age 19; graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. From July, 1904, to 

1906 in Turbine Department General Electric Company, Lynn, 
Mass. From 1906 to date with the AUis-Chalmers Company, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

366. MuLLETT, Howard Agustine. 1904. 

Born December 11, 1880, in Louisville, Ky. Entered from Kan- 
sas City in 1900; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1904. From July, 1904, to 1906 Engineering Apprentice with 
the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, Pitts- 
burg. From July, 1906, to date Electrical Engineer of the Roll- 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 235 

ing Stock Department of the Electric Railway and Lighting 
Company, Milwaukee, Wis. Is a member of the Associated 
Societies of Engineering. Married — see Technic of February, 
1909, for information. 

367. NoEIvKE, WiLUAM CarL. I904. 

Born November 21, 1875, in Indianapolis. Entered in 1901, in 
the Sophomore Class, at the age of 25, and graduated in Archi- 
tecture in 1904. From July, 1904, to date with the Noelke- 
Richards Iron Works, Indianapolis, Ind., as Estimator and 
Engineer. Mr. Noelke has made desi-gns for steel frame struc- 
tures for large buildings. They supply the distant South and 
West mainly. 

368. Randall, William Harrison. 1904. 

Entered from Williamsville, N. Y., in 1892, age 19. Course was 
interrupted, and reentered in 1900; graduated in the Electrical 
Engineering Course in 1904. From time of graduation to date 
with the General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

369. Regan, John Francis. 1904. 

Born July 29, 1882, in Terre Haute. Entered in 1900, age 18; 
graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. From 
July, 1904, to 190S with Ohio Works, Carnegie Company, 
Youngstown, O. From 1905 to 1907 Special Apprentice and in 
Sales Department Atlas Engine Works, Indianapolis. From 
1908 to date Chief Clerk of Blast Furnaces, Youngstown Sheet 
and Tube Company, Youngstown, O. 

370. Ross, James Newton. 1904. 

Entered from Anaconda, Mont, in 1900, age 22; graduated in 
the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. From July, 1904, 
to 1906 with the Buffalo Forge Company, Buffalo. From 1906 
to 1908 with the Westinghouse Machine Company, New York 
City. In 1909 Mechanical Engineer, New York City, N. Y. 

371. Sharp, James Stuart. 1904. 

Born August 18, 1879, in Summit, Miss. Entered from Clinton, 
Miss., to Junior Class in 1902 ; graduated in the Civil Engineer- 
ing Course in 1904. From September, 1904, to June, 1905, Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, Ouachita College, Arkadelphia, Ark. In 



236 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

1905 Instrument-man Great Northern Railroad. In 1906 Assist- 
ant City Engineer, Jackson, Miss. In 1906 to 1907 Assistant 
Engineer A. V. R. R. Co. From 1907 to date Assistant Engi- 
neer Queen & Crescent Route, New Orleans. Was married 
October i, 1907. Mr. Sharp has charge of much of the concrete 
and other designs. 

2,72. Smith, Harry. 1904. 

Born February 6, 1882, in Terre Haute. Entered the Institute 
in 1899; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1904. From June, 1904, to August, 1904, in the Union Pacific 
Railway Shops, Omaha. From November, 1904, to June, 1906, 
on Surveying Corps Vandalia Railroad, Terre Haute. From 
June, 1906, to November, 1906, with the New York Central 
Railroad. From November, 1906, to date Assistant Engineer 
Standard Steel Car Company, Hammond, Ind. Married in 
September, 1906, at Danville, 111. 

373. Staff, John Theodore, Jr. 1904. 

Born in Terre Haute December 26, 1880. Entered the Institute 
in 1900; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1904. From 1904 to 1906 associated with his father, John T. 
Staff, in canning vegetables, etc., Terre Haute. In 1906 in the 
pineapple business in Hawaii. In 1907, with others, formed a 
Consolidated Pineapple Company, Honolulu, Hawaii, and at 
present is the Manager and Head of the Packing Department. 
Mr. Staff's work is especially in installing and operating canning 
machinery. 

374. Tipton, Clyde Ephraim. 1904. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1900, age 21 ; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. From 
July, 1904, to 1906 in the shops of the Union Pacific Railway at 
Omaha. Neb. From 1906 to date in the shops of the Union 
Pacific Railway at Council Bluffs, Iowa. Married. 

375. Toner, Irwin De Witt. 1904. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1900, age 18, and 
graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. From 
July, 1904, to 1906 in shops of Union Pacific Railway, Omaha. 
From 1906 to date Inspector of New Equipment, Union Pacific 
Railway Company, Omdha, Neb. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 2^7 

376. TouzALiN, LES1.IE Anthony. 1904. 

Born in Chicago September 8, 1881. Entered the Institute, in 
the Sophomore Class, in 1901 ; graduated in Chemistry in 1904. 
From 1904 to 1905 Chemist in Laboratory of H. M. Deavitt, 
Chicago. From 1905 to 1906 Chemist, and from 1906 to the 
present time Assistant Chief Chemist for the Illinois Steel Com- 
pany, Southern Works, Chicago. Is a member of the A. C. S. 
Married in Chicago November 28, 1905. Mr. Touzalin has 
studied the problem of oxygen and nitrogen in steel, also in 
connection with determination of moisture and dust in blast 
furnace gases. He invented the Brady Gas Filter. 

377. Whitten, Roscoe. 1904. 

Entered the Institute from Sloan, la., in 1900, age 17; graduated 
in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1904. From July, 1904, 
to 1905 with the General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 
From 1905 to date with the Atlas Engine Works, Indianapolis, 
Ind. Married in 1906. 

378. Atherton, Donald Hope. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Gill, Mass., in 1901, age 20; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1905. From 
graduation to the present time with the General Electric Com- 
pany, Schenectady, N. Y. 

379. Benson, George, Jr. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Brockport, N. Y., in 1901, age 24; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. From 
time of graduation to the present time with the General Electric 
Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

380. Blanchard, Ralph Carpenter. 1905. 

Born in Newport, Ind., December 4, 1882. Entered the Insti- 
tute in 1901, and graduated in Chemistry in 1905. In 1905-06 
graduate student Columbia University, New York City. 1907 
graduate student University of Munich, Germany. 1908 in Lon- 
don and Paris. In 1908-09 graduate work Columbia University, 
New York City. 

381. Bland, John Osborne. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville in 1901, age 18; graduated 
in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1905. From 1905 to 



238 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

1907 Apprentice L. & N. Ry., Louisville, Ky. In 1907 in Con- 
verting Department Carnegie Steel Company, Youngstown, O. 
From 1908 to the present time with the American Fuel Com- 
pany, Gibson, N. M. 

382. Burr, Walter Harmon. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Morrison, III., in 1901, age 21 ; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. From 
graduation to the present time with the Westinghouse Electric 
and Manufacturing Company. In Pittsburg till December, 1907, 
and since in Erection Department at Philadelphia. 

383. Cook, Cleo Brenton. 1905. 

Entered from Frankfort, Ind., in 1901, age 18; graduated in the 
Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. 1905 to 1908 with the 
Bullock Electric Manufacturing Company, Cincinnati, in shops, 
Engineering and Sales Departments. From 1908 to date Sales 
Engineer Allis-Chalmers-Bullock Company, Toledo, Ohio. 

384. Daily, John Edward. 1905. 

Entered from Terre Haute in 1901, age 17; graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in 1905. 1905 with the Vandalia 
Railway Company, in Terre Haute and East St. Louis. 1906 in 
Engineering Corps C. & E. I. Railroad, Chicago. From 1907 to 
date in Open Hearth Department Ohio Works Carnegie Steel 
Company, Youngstown, Ohio. 

385. Davies, Carl Godfrey. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Marshall, Ind., in 1901, age 20; grad- 
uated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1905. 1905 and 1906 
with the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railroad, Texas. 1907 with 
the Great Northern & St. Paul Railway and Spokane Company. 

1908 with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, St. 
Maries. Idaho. At present Draftsman with Spokane & Inland 
Empire Railway, Spokane, Wash. 

386. Everson, Ralph Cuthbert. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Kearney, Neb., in 1901, at the age of 
20, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1905. 
From June to September, 1905, with Engineering Corps, Van- 
dalia Railway. Then with the Southern Indiana Coal Company, 
Terre Haute, to September. 1908. and from that time associated 
with J. F. Cassell in Civil Engineering, Terre Haute. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 239 

387. Goodman, Leon. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1901, age 17; grad- 
uated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1905. In 1905 with 
the C. & E. I. Railroad Company, Chicago. In 1906 Assistant 
Engineer C. B. & Q. Railroad, Burlington. Also with the C. 
Junction Railway, Chicago, in 1906. 1907 with the Roberts & 
Schaefer Company, Consulting Engineers and Contractors, Chi- 
cago; also with Wallace Coats Engineering Company, Port- 
land, Oregon. 1908 Spokane, Seattle & Portland Railway. 1908 
to date with Northwestern Expanded Metal Company, Chicago, 
as Sales Engineer. 

388. Gray, Ralph C. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Youngstown, Ohio, in 1901, age 20; 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. From 
graduation to the present time with the General Electric Com- 
pany, Schenectady, N. Y. 

389. Greenleaf, Guy William. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1901, age 19: grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1905. After 
graduation was with the Atlas Engine Works, Indianapolis, one 
year, then Draftsman in County Assessor's office, Terre Haute, 
one year. Was with the Pettyjohn Concrete Block Machinery 
Company a short time, and is now a member of the Greenleaf 
Construction Company, Terre Haute. Was married August 12, 
1908, at Terre Haute. 

390. Haller, Frederick William August. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Cincinnati in 1901, age 23, and grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. From 1905 
to 1907 remained at home regaining health. From 1907 to the 
present time Assistant Examiner United States Patent Office, 
Washington, D. C. 

391. Hanley, William Scott. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1895 at the age of 
19. Withdrew and reentered in 1902; graduated in the Civil 
Engineering Course in 1905. From graduation to date with the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Company. Chicago ; Chief 
Draftsman. 



240 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

392. Heick, William Read. 1905. 

Born March n, 1884, Galveston, Texas. Entered from Louis- 
ville in 1902 in the Sophomore Class ; graduated in the Mechan- 
ical Engineering Course in 1905. After graduating was Drafts- 
man with the Automatic Heating Company, New York ; Drafts- 
man with the Westinghouse-Church-Kerr Company, New York; 
with the Jos. McWilliams Company, Engineers and Contractors, 
Louisville, for two years, and is at present Engineer for T. J. 
Mooney & Co., Engineers and Contractors, Nashville, Tenn. 
Was married in Terre Haute January 35, 1908. 

393. Jenckes, Ray Greene. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Indianapolis in 1901, at the age of 
20, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. 
From July, 1905, to 1907 in the Testing Department General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. In 1907 engaged in 
special investigation under Drs. Steinmetz and Creighton on 
aluminum lighting arresters. In 1907 transferred to Stanley 
General Electric Works at Pittsfield, Mass., as Superintendent 
of manufacture of lighting arresters. 

394. Johnson, Walter Elihu. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Emporia, Kan., in 1901, at the age 
of 24, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1905. From graduation to the present time with the General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. Is a member of the 
Schenectady Branch of the A. I. E. E. Mainly engaged in 
turbine work. 

395. Kadel, Harry Rutherford. 1905. 

Born in Terre Haute May 3, 1880. Entered the Institute in 
1901, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 

1905. From July, 1905, to November, 1906, Superintendent 
Great Bend Water Works, Great Bend, Kan. From November, 

1906, to the present time with the Terre Haute Water Works, 
Terre Haute, Ind., as Superintendent of Filtration and Assist- 
ant Engineer. 

396. Kiefer, Herbert G. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Louisville in 1902 in the Sophomore 
Class, age 19; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 241 

in 1905. 1905 and 1906 with Fairbanks-Morse Manufacturing 
Company, Beloit, Wis., and in Louisville Branch. In 1907 
Draftsman Henry Vogt Machine Company, Louisville. 1907 
with the Kentucky Electric Company, and from 1908 to date 
Engineer with the Fuel Engineering Company, Chicago. Was 
granted degree of M.S. in 1907 from Rose. 

397. Klenk, Lorenz William. 1905. 

Born July 7, 1882, at Blue Island, 111. Entered the Institute in 
1901, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1905. From graduation to date with the Western Electric Com- 
pany, Chicago, as Engineer, and now Sales Engineer in the 
Railway Train Dispatching Department. Married June 19, 1907, 
at Blue Island, 111. 

398. Larkins, Edgar Ernest. 1905. 

Entered from Terre Haute in 1901, at the age of 18, and grad- 
uated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1905. From July, 
1905, to January i, 1906, with the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
Railroad, Chicago ; Draftsman, Field Work, and Masonry In- 
spector. From January, 1906, to December, 1907, Assistant 
Engineer Union Pacific Railroad Company, Omaha. From 
May, 1908, to date Assistant City Engineer Omaha, Neb. Mar- 
ried November 26, 1907. Granted degree of M.S. in 1908 from 
Rose. 

399. Lewis, Frederick Bradley. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Anaheim, Cal.. in 1901, at the age of 
23, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. 
From graduation has been with the Edison Electric Company, 
Los Angeles, in 1905 and 1906 in the Testing Department, and 
from 1907 to date as Engineer Underground Distribution. Is 
a member of the A. I. E. E., and was married November 14, 1906. 

400. McBride, John Scott. 1905. 

Entered the Institute in the Sophomore Class from Louisville 
in 1902, age 22 ; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1905. Since graduation has been with the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois Railroad Company, Chicago, in the Construction and 
Maintenance of Way Departments. From April. 1908, to date 
Assistant Division Engineer, Salem, III. 

16 



242 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

401. Newnam, Frank Hastings. 1905. 

Born in Terre Haute October 17, 1882. Entered the Institute in 
1901, graduating in the Civil Engineering Course in 1905. From 
June, 1905, to June, 1906, in the Maintenance of Way Depart- 
ment C. C. C. & St. L. Railroad, Mattoon, 111. From June, 
1906, to October, 1906, Draftsman for W. Waldo, Civil Engi- 
neer, Houston, Texas. From October, 1906, to April, 1908, 
Transitman, Draftsman, and Resident Engineer on Construction 
Texas Traction Company. From September, 1908, to December, 
1908, with the Great Northern Railroad, and from December, 
1908, to date in the Engineering Department of the Gulf, Col- 
orado & Santa Fe Railroad. Was married May 25, 1908. 

402. Parr, Hubert. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Fontanet, Ind., in 1901, age 21 ; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. In 1906 
with the Signal Department, Union Pacific Railway, Omaha. 
1907 in Colorado and Birmingham, Ala., on account of poor 
health. Died July 11, 1907, in Birmingham, Ala. 

403. Peddle, Charles Rugan. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Washington, D. C, in 1901, age 17; 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1905. Since grad- 
uation in the Signal Department of the Interborough Rapid 
Transit Company, New York City, as Draftsman and Office 
Engineer. 

404. Pfeif, George Henry. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1901, age 17; grad- 
uated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. From grad- 
uation to the present time with the General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. In the Testing Department until the spring 
of 1907, then in office of the Superintendent of Testing Depart- 
ment, and in 1908 made Assistant to the General Superintendent. 

405. Reed, Merle Roland. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1901, age 18; grad- 
uated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1905. From 
September, 1905, to September, 1906, in shops of the Union 
Pacific Railway, Omaha. From 1906 to date in shops of the 
Vandalia Railroad, Terre Haute, and is now Chief Draftsman 
in the Mechanical Engineer's office. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 243 

406. Reynolds, Oscar Frank. 1905. 

Born in Terre Haute June i, 1883. Entered the Institute in 
1901, and graduated in Chemistry in 1905. From 1905 to 1906 
Chemist Vandalia Railway, Terre Haute. From June, 1906, to 
June, 1908, Chemist C. & E. I. Railroad, Danville, 111. From 
June, IQ08, to August, 1908, Secretary Terre Haute Engineering 
Company. From August, 1908, to date Foreman on Construc- 
tion of Automatic Block Signals C. R. I. & P. Railroad. 

407. Robertson, Claude Everett. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Greenup, 111., in 1901, at the age of 
17, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. 
In 1905 and 1906 with the General Electric Company, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., and in the Erecting Department Cincinnati District. 
From 1907 to date Power Engineer with the Toledo Light and 
Railway Company, Toledo, Ohio. Was given degree of M.S. 
in 1908 from Rose. Is an associate member of the A. I. E. E. 
Was married September 22, 1908. 

408. Shryer, Herbert Eveleigh. 1905. 

Entered from Terre Haute in 1901, at the age of 19, and grad- 
uated in Chemistry in 1905. In 1905 with the Procter & Gamble 
Company, Cincinnati. In 1906 with Armour Soap Works, Chi- 
cago. From 1907 to the present time Chemist with the Amer- 
ican Tin Plate Company, Elwood, Ind. 

409. Snider, Lewis Albert. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1901, at the age of 
17, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1905. From graduation to May, 1906, with the Fairbanks-Morse 
Manufacturing Company, Beloit, Wis. From May, 1906, to 
October, 1907, District Erecting Engineer Fairbanks-Morse 
Manufacturing Company, Indianapolis, Ind. From December, 
1907, Mechanical Engineer Grain Elevator Design, Construc- 
tion, and Equipment for Bartlett, Kuhn & Co., Terre Haute. 
Was granted degree of M.S. in 1906 from Rose. 

410. Spalding, Edward Hamilton. 1905. 

Born Concordia, Kan., December 4, 1879. Entered the Institute 
in 1901 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1905. From June, 1905, to December. 1907, Assistant Construe- 



244 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

tion Engineer Chicago Telephone Company, Chicago, 111. From 
December, 1907, to June, 1908, Manager Concordia Electric 
Light Company. From January i, 1909, with the Kansas City 
Electric Light Company, Kansas City, Mo., Power Service and 
Contract Department. 

411. Speaker, Clifford Beecher. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Manson, Iowa, in 1901, at the age 
of 19, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1905. 
In 1905 with the Big Four Railway, Mattoon, 111., as Instrument- 
man. 1906 and 1907 with the Union Pacific Railway, Rock 
River, Wyo., as Instrumentman and Sub-Assistant Engineer. 
From March, 1998, to date Civil Engineer and Contractor, 
Rawlins, Wyo.; also Land Inspector for State of Wyoming, 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 

412. Sproull, John Coppess. 1905. 

Born April 13, 1878, Dawn, Ohio. Entered the Institute from 
Ansonia, Ohio, in 1901 ; graduated in the Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Course in 1905. From June, 1905. to September, 1906, Ex- 
perimental Engineer with J. I. Case Threshing Machine Com- 
pany, Racine, Wis. From September, 1906, to date Instructor 
in Strength of Materials and Mechanical Engineering Carnegie 
Technical Schools, Pittsburg, Pa. Is an honorary member of 
the N. A. S. E., Pittsburg. Married October 3, 1905, at Green- 
ville, Ohio. Does consulting work in addition to work in C. I. 

413. Stoddard, Eugene Kingsley. 1905. 

Born December 3. 1883, Madison, S. D. Entered the Institute 
in 1901 : graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. 
From July, 1905, to September, 1906, with the Fairbanks-Morse 
Manufacturing Company, Beloit, Wis. From September, 1906, 
to January, 1907, with the same company in Chicago, and is 
now Agent for the Company in Des Moines, la. Was married 
October 21, 1908, at Madison, S. D. 

414. Trowbridge, Charles Bartlett. 1905. 

Born January 16, 1884, Decatur, Mich. Entered the Institute 
in 1901 ; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1905. 
In 1905 and 1906 Draftsman with the Kalamazoo Foundry and 
Machine Company, and the American Bridge Company, Chi- 
cago. From 1906 to 1908 with T. A. Parker Company, Terre 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 245 

Haute, Checker. From 1908 to 1909 Engineer Eagle Iron 
Works, Terre Haute. From February, 1909, to date Checker 
Fort Pitt Bridge Works, Canonsburg, Pa. Married in Terre 
Haute June 5, 1906. 

415. Watson, Herbert Lockridge. 1905. 

Born August 19, 1883, in Terre Haute, and entered the Institute 
in 1901, graduating in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 

1905. From June to August, 1905, Engineer with the Kalama- 
zoo Foundry and Machine Company, Kalamazoo. From Au- 
gust, 1905, to date Sales Engineer with the Allis-Chalmers Com- 
pany, Cleveland, Ohio. Is a member of the A. S. M. E. 

416. Wilson, Robert Maxwell. 1905. 

Born October 4. 1882, Paris, 111. Entered the Institute in 1901 ; 
graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1905. From grad- 
uation to the present time a planter, Greenville, Miss. 

417. Wood, Owen Llewell. 1905. 

Entered the Institute from Santa Fe, New Mexico, in 1901, at 
the age of 18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1905. After graduation was with the Baldwin Loco- 
motive Works, Philadelphia. In 1906 to May, 1907, with the 
Mexican Central Railroad, Aguascalientes, Mex. From May, 
1907, to date Draftsman in office of the United States Surveyor- 
General in Santa Fe, New Mex., Reno, Nev., and Phoenix, Ariz. 

418. Wright, Daniel Dudley. 1905. 

Born in Sulphur Springs, Ky., June 8, 1883, and entered the 
Institute in 1901, graduating in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1905. From graduation with the Westinghouse Elec- 
tric and Manufacturing Company, Pittsburg, Pa. As Engineer- 
ing Apprentice until 1907, and from that time to date as Sales 
Engineer in the Pittsburg office. 

419. Benbridge, Richard Wetherill. 1906. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1902, at the age of 
17, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 

1906. Was with the Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon shops and design- 
ing room for one year at Cincinnati, Ohio. Then seven months 
in Kansas City in Sales Department, and in St. Louis to date 
as Sales Engineer for the International Steam Pump Company. 



246 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

420. Butler, Earle Summers. 1906. 

Born January 26, 1881, Terre Haute, Ind. Entered the Institute 
in 1902 ; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1906. 
From June, 1906, to June. 1907, Instrumentman and Drafts- 
man in Chief Engineer's office of the Vandalia Railroad Corn- 
pan}', Indianapolis. From June, 1907, to date Resident Engineer 
in Chief Engineer's office at Indianapolis and St. Louis. Mar- 
ried in Terre Haute October 12, 1908. 

421. Cadden, Charles Alphonse). 1906. 

Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 1902, at the age of 
18, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1906. After graduation in the Union Pacific Railway Shops, 
Omaha, for a short time. Then with the Stone & Webster 
Company at Terre Haute, San Francisco, and Seattle, and at 
present with the United States Reclamation Service, Seattle, 
Wash. 

422. Canfield, Harrie Russell. 1906. 

Entered the Institute from Aurora, Ind., in 1902, at the age of 
ig, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1906. 
In 1906 with the North Shore Electric Company, Chicago. In 
1907 with Adams & Westlake Company, Chicago. 1908 Drafts- 
man with J. I. Schureman Company, Chicago, and at present 
Electrical Engineer and Technical Expert with Edgar Tate & 
Co., Patent Attorneys, New York City. 

423. Cannon, John William. 1906. 

Born August 4, 1884, at Midway, Ky. Entered the Institute in 
1902, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1906. From graduation to date with the Allis-Chalmers Com- 
pany, Milwaukee. 

424. Curry, John Roscoe. 1906. 

Born December 10, 1884, in Terre Haute. Entered the Institute 
in 1902, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1906. From graduation to date Draftsman with the Murphy 
Iron Works, Detroit, Mich. 

425. d'Amorim, Ambrosio. 1906. 

Born September 22, 1879. Entered the Institute from Manaos, 
S. A., in 1903, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1906. In 1906 and 1907 with the Terre Haute Elec- 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 247 

trie Company, Terre Haute. In 1908 went to Rio de Janeiro, 
Brazil, S. A., to engage in Electrical Engineering. No report 
has since been received from him. 

426. Delle, Frank Alvin, Jr. 1906. 

Born April 24, 1879. Entered the Institute from Cashton, Wis., 
in 1903; graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1906. From graduation to the present time Erecting Engineer 
with the York Manufacturing Company, York, Pa. 

427. Eastwood, Harry Wilder. 1906. 

Born September 28, 1885, Louisville, Ky. Entered the Institute 
in 1902; graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1906. 
In 1906 in the Electrical Department of the Ohio Works Car- 
negie Steel Company, Youngstown, Ohio. From 1907 to 1909 
Foreman, Erecting Engineer, and Salesman with the Electric 
Controller and Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, and since 
the first of 1909 Salesman for the same company in Chicago. 
Married, 1908. 

428. Evans, Robert Baldwin. 1906. 

Born June 15, 1885. Entered from Oxford, Ind., in 1902, and 
graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1906. From 
time of graduation to date with the General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

429. Freudenreich, Arnold Edwin. 1906. 

Born October 24, 1884. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. After graduation in 1906 with the Northern Electric 
Company, Madison, Wis. Since 1908 no report has been re- 
ceived at the Institute from Mr. Freudenreich. 

430. Hatch, Frederick Nathaniel. 1906. 

Born June 12, 1885. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1903, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1906. 
In 1906 on Engineering Corps San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt 
Lake Railway, Salt Lake City, Utah. In 1907 with the Nevada 
Consolidated Copper Company on construction of the reduction 
works, Ely, Nev., and with the Maintenance of Way Depart- 
ment Frisco Lines, Monett, Mo. At present with the Mainte- 
nance of Way Department Vandalia Railroad at Logansport, 
Ind. 



248 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

431. Hensgen, Walter Otto. 1906. 

Born August 18, 1884. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. In 1907 with the Seattle Electric Company, Seattle, Wash. 
At present with the Seattle Telephone Company, Seattle, Wash. 

432. Jackson, James Samuel. 1906. 

Born March i6, 1885, at Terre Haute, and entered the Institute 
in 1902, graduating in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1906. From graduation to the present time with the AUis- 
Chalmers Company, Milwaukee, Wis. Is a member of the 
Allis-Chalmers Engineering Society. 

433. Johnson, John McMahon. 1906. 

Born June 6, 1883, at Dale, Ind. Entered the Institute in 1902, 
and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1906. 
From July, 1906, to September, 1907, in shops of the Fairbanks- 
Morse Electric Manufacturing Company, Indianapolis. From 
September, 1907, to September, 1908, traveling, testing, and in- 
stalling machinery for the same company. From September, 
1908, to date in the Sales Department of the Fairbanks-Morse 
Electric Manufacturing Company, Chicago. 

434. Kahlert, Ernest Douglas. 1906. 

Born November 10, 1878, and entered the Institute from Louis- 
ville, Ky., in 1903 ; graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1906. In 1906 Chief Draftsman for the Insley Iron Works, 
Indianapolis. 1907 with the Illinois Steel Company, Chicago. 
From August, 1907, Chief Draftsman Insley Iron Works, Indi- 
anapolis. From 1908 to date in the Engineering Department of 
the Brown-Ketcham Iron Works, Indianapolis, Ind. 

435. Kelsall, George Avery. 1906. 

Born October i8, 1880. Entered the Institute from Louisville 
in 1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. From time of graduation to 1908 with the General Elec- 
tric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. Since 1908 with the Indiana 
Steel Company, Gary, Ind. 

436. Lawton, Clarence William. 1906. 

Born April 4, 1882. at Clarkson, N. Y. Entered the Institute in 
1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 249 

1906. From graduation with the General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y., and since January, 1909, Foreman in the 
Steam Turbine Department. 

437. Lee, Addison Wolcott. 1906. 

Born July 31, 1885. Entered the Institute from Louisville in 
1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. From 1907 to 1909 with the Louisville Lighting Company, 
Louisville, Ky. Since January, 1909, Inspector and Engineer 
Tenth Street Plant of the Louisville Lighting Company, Louis- 
ville. 

438. Lee, Eari.e Portmess. 1906. 

Born March 25, 1881. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. In 1906 with the Wagner Electric Manufacturing Com- 
pany, St. Louis, Mo. In 1907 and 1908 with the Fairbanks- 
Morse Electric Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 1909 to date 
Draftsman with Hall Signal Company, Garwood, N. J. 

439. McCoMB, Harold, 1906. 

Was born in Terre Haute March 29, 1884. Entered the Institute 
in 1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. From graduation to 1909 with the General Electric Com- 
pany, Schenectady, N. Y. Is at present Sales Engineer with the 
General Electric Company, Columbus, Ohio. 

440. MoDESiTT, Charles Cleveland. 1906. 

Born May 14, 1884. Entered the Institute from Edwards, Ind., 
in 1902, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1906. 
From 1906 to 1908 with the Vandalia Railroad Company at 
Indianapolis, and the Engineering Corps Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois Railway, Danville, 111. His present address is Edwards, 
Ind. 

441. Nicholson, George Francis. 1906. 

Bom October 10, 1884. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1901, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1906. From graduation to 1908 Topographer and Draftsman 
Mexican Central Railroad Company, Pautepec Edo. de Pueblo, 
Mex. In 1908 with the Terre Haute Engineering Company, 
Terre Haute. 1909 Civil Engineer for Strehlow, Freese & 



250 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Peterson, Contractors at A.-Y.-P. Exposition Grounds, Seattle, 
Wash. 

442. Peck, Wai^ter Richard. 1906. 

Born October 3, 1882. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1900, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1906. 
After graduation went into the firm of Fox & Peck, Civil and 
Mining Engineers, Big Stone Gap, Va., where he remains to 
date. 

443. PoTE, Frank Walter. 1906. 

Born February 18, 1883. Entered the Institute from Terre 
Haute, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. From graduation until 1907 with the Western Electric 
Company, Chicago, in the Switchboard and Telephone Depart- 
ment. In 1907 with the Bell Telephone Company of Missouri, 
located in St. Louis, as General Foreman and Inspector. In 
1908 to date Instructor in the Physical and Electrical Labora- 
tories Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute. 

444. Rogers, Harvey Ernest. 1906. 

Born April i, 1883. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1902, and graduated in Architecture in 1906. From graduation 
until the present time has been in Indianapolis, Ind., as Shop 
Inspector Insley Iron Works, with the Noelke-Richards Iron 
Works, and is now Draftsman for the Brown-Ketcham Iron 
Works. 

445. RoTz, John Martin. 1906. 

Born July 12, 1884. Entered the Institute from Prairieton, Ind., 
in 1902, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1906. 
From graduation to 1908 with the Engineering Corps of the 
Vandalia Railroad Company, Terre Haute. From 1908 to date 
Bridge Superintendent of Vigo County, Terre Haute, Ind. 

446. Ryan, Edward Cecil. 1906. 

Born May 26, 1884. Entered the Institute from Louisville in 
1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. From 1906 to 1907 with the General Electric Company, 
Schenectady, N. Y. In 1907 with the Kentucky Electric Com- 
pany, Louisville. From 1908 to date with the Indiana Steel 
Company, Gary, Ind. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 251 

447. SCHAUWECKER, EdGAR JaCOB. I906. 

Born February 22, 1884. Entered the Institute from Clay City, 
Ind., in 1902, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 

1906. From June, 1906, to November, 1906, Masonry Inspector 
Big Four Railway. From November, 1906, to June, 1907, As- 
sistant Engineer Florida East Coast Railway. From June 19, 

1907, to August, 1908, Superintendent of Bridge Construction 
and Railroad Grade Work same company. From August, 1908, 
to date of Norton & Schauwecker, Railroad Contractors, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

448. Thurman, Roy. 1906. 

Born August 6, 1884. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. From graduation to the present time with the General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

449. White, Knowles D. 1906. 

Born July 16, 1884. Entered the Institute from Shelbyville, 111., 
in 1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. From graduation to the present time in the Testing De- 
partment of the Commonwealth Edison Company, Chicago. 
Married in April, 1907. 

450. WiLKiNS, Hallie Emerson. 1906. 

Born December 7, 1884. Entered the Institute from Greenup, 
111., in 1904, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1906. From graduation to the present time with the General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

451. WiLLiEN, Leon John, Jr. 1906. 

Born September 22, 1885. Entered the Institute from Terre 
Haute in 1902, and graduated in Chemistry in 1906. From 
graduation to June, 1907, with A. D. Little, Chemical Expert 
and Engineer, Boston. From 1907 to the present time Chemist 
for the Springfield Gas Light Company, Springfield, Mass. Re- 
ceived M.S. degree from Rose in 1908. 

452. Wilms, Henry John. 1906. 

Born July 13, 1882. Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., 
in 1902, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1906. From 1906 to 1908 with the General Electric Company, 



252 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Schenectady, N. Y. Died of typhoid fever September 17, 1908, 
at Schenectady. 

453. WiSCHMEYER, CaRL. I906. 

Born August 8, 1884. Entered the Institute from Louisville, Ky., 
in 1902, and graduated in ^e Electrical Engineering Course in 

1906. In 1906 in the Electrical Department Carnegie Steel 
Company, Youngstown, Ohio. In 1907 in the Electrical Depart- 
ment of the Bethlehem Steel Company, South Bethlehem, Pa. 
In 1908 with the Louisville Water Company, Louisville. In 
1909 Instructor in Department of Drawing and Descriptive 
Geometry Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute. 

454. WiSCHMEYER, HeNRY WiNTER. I906. 

Born October 10, 1879. Entered from Louisville, Ky., in 1903, 
and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1906. 
From graduation to date with the Louisville Railway Company, 
Louisville, Ky., and at present is Assistant Electrician Motive 
Power Department. 

455- WORTHINGTON, ARTHUR WhITTEMORE- 1906. 

Born April 26, 1885. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1901 ; withdrew in 1902 to gain practical experience in railway 
construction; reentered in 1903, and graduated in the Civil 
Engineering Course in 1906. From 1906 to December, 1908, 
with the Pittsburg Division of the Pennsylvania Lines, and from ' 
December, igo8, to the present time with Engineering Corps of 
the Eastern Division of the Pennsylvania Lines West of Pitts- 
burg, with headquarters at Pittsburg, Pa. 

456, Albin, Earl Garfield. 1907. 

Born August i, 1881. Entered the Institute from Osage City, 
Kan., in 1903, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course 
in 1907. From graduation to 1908 with the Bridge Engineering 
Department Illinois Central Railway, Chicago. In 1909 with 
R. J. Starr, General Contractor, Electric, Montana. 

457. Andrick, Wallace Peau. 1907. 

Born July 17, 1887. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1903, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 

1907. From graduation to the present time with the General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 253 

458. Austin, Harold Samuel,. 1907. 

Born in Terre Haute October 24, 1884, and entered the Institute 
in 1903, graduating in Chemistry in 1907. From graduation to 
the present time with the Laclede Gas Light Company, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

459. Baylor, Harry Dietrich, 1907. 

Born March 2, 1882. Entered the Institute from Tremont, 111., 
in 1902, and graduated in Chemistry in 1907. From June, 1907, 
to January, 1908, Chemist for the Minneapolis Gas Company, 
Minneapolis, Minn. From January, 1908, to the present time 
Chief Chemist for the Louisville Cement Company, Sellersburg, 
Ind. Was married October 28, 1908, at Pekin, 111. 

460. Bogran, Luis. 1907. 

Born February 24, 1886. Entered the Institute from Santa 
Barbara, Honduras, in 1903, and graduated in the Civil Engi- 
neering Course in 1907. From graduation to the present time 
with the Mexican Central Railway, Necaxa, Puebla, Mexico. 

461. Bond, Rufus Lloyd. 1907. 

Bom July 16, 1884. Entered the Institute from Abingdon, 111., 
in 1904, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1907. In 1907 with the General Electric Company, Schenectady, 
N. Y. Since February i, 1909, with the Indiana Steel Company, 
Gray, Ind. Married August 24, 1908. 

462. Byrn, Dexter Hickman. 1907. 

Born August 26, 1881. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1903, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1907. From graduation to the present time in the Motor Car 
Department Union Pacific Railroad Shops, Omaha, Neb. 

463. Cash, Frederick Harrison. 1907. 

Born July 31, 1884. Entered the Institute from Hume, II!., in 
1903, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1907 
From June. 1907, to January, 1908, with the Engineering Corps 
of the Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad Company, Evansville, 
Ind. Since 1908 with Frank Kattman, Civil and Mining Engi- 
neer, Brazil, Ind. 



254 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

464. Davis, Ren Montague. 1907. 

Born June 23, 1878. Entered the Institute from Newport, Ind., 
in 1903, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1907. From graduation to the present time in shops of the 
Union Pacific Railway, Omaha, Neb. 

465. Goodman, Milton. 1907. 

Born June 18, 1885, and entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1903, and graduated in Chemistry in 1907. From graduation 
to the present time Assistant City Chemist Louisville, Ky. 

466. Hall, Schuler Plato. 1907. 

Born October 19, 1885, and entered the Institute from Terre 
Haute in 1903, graduating in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1907. From graduation to the present time with the General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

467. Kelly, Warren Winfield. 1907. 

Born November 30, 1885. Entered the Institute from Topeka, 
Kan., in 1903, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1907. From June to September, 1907, Instrumentman C. M. & 
St. P. Railway, Milwaukee. From September, 1907, to date 
Transitman with the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 
Company, Chillicothe, 111. 

468. Kranichfeld, Delbert. 1907. 

Born October 26, 1886. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1903, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1907. From graduation to the present time with the Fairbanks- 
Morse Company, Beloit, Wis. 

469. McDaniel, Donald. 1907. 

Born August 18, 1885, Fort Recovery. Ohio. Entered the Insti- 
tute from Mount Carmel, 111., in 1903, and graduated in the 
Mechanical Engineering Course in 1907. From graduation to 
the present time with the National Malleable Castings Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. Was married April 18. 1908, at Winchester, 
Ind. 

470. McKenna, Raymond Joseph. 1907. 

Born September 18, 1883. Entered the Institute from Omaha, 
Neb., in 1903, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 255 

Course in 1907. From September, 1907, to April, 1908, in Test- 
ing Department of the General Electric Company, Schenectady, 
N. Y. From April, 1909, to date in the Electrical Department 
of the Armour Packing Company, South Omaha, Neb. 

471. Meyers, Morris. 1907. 

Born April 27, 1886, in Russia. Entered the Institute from 
Louisville, Ky., in 1903, and graduated in the Civil Engineering 
Course in 1907. From graduation to the present time Drafts- 
man and Computer with the Lorain Steel Company, Johns- 
town, Pa. 

472. Miner, Erwin JoHisr. 1907, 

Born June 30, 1885, Le Mars, Iowa. Entered the Institute from 
Louisville in 1903, and graduated in the Civil Engineering 
Course in 1907. From graduation to November, 1907, was 
Assistant on Engineering Corps of Stone & Webster Company, 
Terre Haute & Western Railway. 1907 in M. of W. Corps 
Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad Company. 1908 City Engi- 
neering Department, Terre Haute. June, 1908, Draftsman for 
Commissioners of Sewerage, Louisville, Ky. Member Engi- 
neers' and Architects' Club, Louisville. 

473. Nantz, Frank Alexander. 1907. 

Born October 17, 1882. Entered the Institute from Glenn, Ind., 
in 1903, and graduated in Chemistry in 1907. From graduation 
to the present time Assistant Chemist with the Arkansas Cotton 
Oil Company, Little Rock, Ark. 

474. Nichols, James Herbert. 1907. 

Born January 24, 1885. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1902, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1907. In 1907 and 1908 with the Vandalia Railroad Shops, 
Terre Haute. In 1909 with the Union Pacific Railroad Shops, 
Omaha, Neb. 

475. O'LouGHLiN, Walter Martin. 1907. 

Born May 15, 1885. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1903, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1907. From graduation to the present time with the Signal 



256 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Department Pennsylvania Railroad at Newcomerstown, Ohio, 
and now at Pittsburg, Pa. 

476. Orr, Harry Hardin. 1907. 

Born September 16, 1885. Entered the Institute from Louis- 
ville, Ky., in 1903, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1907. From time of graduation to the present time 
in the Signal Department of the C. & E. I. Railroad, Chicago, 
as Signal Inspector. 

477. Plew, William Reece. 1907. 

Entered the Institute from Palestine, 111., in 1903, at the age of 
24, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1907. 
From graduation to date Instructor in Civil Engineering and 
Mathematics Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute, Ind. 

478. Post, Clifford Wilson. 1907. 

Born April i, 1884, and entered the Institute from Gordon, Ohio, 
in 1903, graduating in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1907. 
Since graduation with the Commonwealth Edison Company, 
Chicago, and at present Treasurer and General Manager Del- 
phos Electric Light and Power Company, Delphos, Ohio. 

479. ROUTLEDGE, ThOMAS ElMER. I907. 

Born December 14, 1879, and entered the Institute from New- 
man, 111., in 1903, graduating in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1907. Since graduation in the Signal Department 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, Mansfield, Ohio, and at pres- 
ent teaching school in Oakland, 111. 

480. Sage, Russell Sankey. 1907. 

Born May 25, 1885, and entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1903, graduating in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1907. From graduation to the present time in the Testing De- 
partment General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

481. Scharpenberg, Charles. 1907. 

Born November 19. 1884, and entered the Institute from Girard, 
111., in 1903, graduating in the Civil Engineering Course in 1907. 
From graduation to the present time Civil Engineer with the 
Ohio Oil Company, Bridgeport, 111. 



Alumm Biographical Dictionary. 257 

482. SCHOFIELD, AlONZO DiEE, Jr. I907.. 

Born December 3, 1886, and entered the Institute in 1903, grad- 
uating in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 1907. From 
graduation to date Engineer with J. S. Schofield's Sons, Macon, 
Georgia. 

483. SCHUCHARDT, RuDOLPH JOHN. I907. 

Bom January 25, 1883, in Terre Haute, and entered the Institute 
in 1901, graduating in Architecture in 1907. From graduation 
to the present time with the Dering Coal Company, Danville, 111. 

484. Shickel, Harry Meredith. 1907. 

Born May 15, 1878. Entered the Institute from Sand ford, Ind., 
in 1903, and graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1907. From graduation to the .present time Teacher of 
Mathematics in High School, Terre Haute, Ind. 

485. Schickel, James Boyd. 1907. 

Born April 30, 1883. Entered the Institute from Sandford, Ind., 
in 1903, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1907. From graduation to the present time in the Te&ting De- 
partment General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

486. Stalker, James Robinson. 1907. 

Born March 4, 1887, and entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1903, graduating in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1907. 
From graduation to date graduate student in Civil Engineering 
at the University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. 

487. Strecker, Robert. 1907. 

Born March ii, 1885. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1903, and graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1907. 
After graduation was with the Engineering Corps of the Evans- 
ville & Terre Haute Railway, Evansville, Ind.. and at present 
with Commissioner of Sewerage, Louisville, Ky. 

488. Taylor, Howard C. 1907. 

Born January 6, 1886, and entered the Institute from Chapman, 
Kan., in 1905, graduating in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1907. From graduation to the present time with the Wapa- 
koneta Machine Company, Wapakoneta, Ohio. 

17 



258 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

489. Trueblood, Cecil Nelson. 1907. 

Born October 27, 1879, and entered the Institute from Terre 
Haute in 1903, graduating in the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1907. From graduation to the present time with the 
Signal Department Union Pacific Railway, Sidney, Neb. 

490. Whitecotton, Otto George. 1907. 

Born May 13, 1885, and entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1903, graduating in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1907. 
From graduation to the present time in the Testing Department 
General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

491. WicKLiFFE, Paul Reynolds. 1907. 

Born December 6, 1885. Entered the Institute from Greenville, 
Ky., in 1903, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1907. From graduation to the present time with the General 
Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

492. Andrews, Carl Bowers. 1908. 

Born April 17, 1879. Entered the Institute from Honolulu, 
Hawaii Territory, in 1904, Graduated in the Civil Engineering 
Course in 1908. With Baldwin & Alexander, Civil Engineers, 
Honolulu, Hawaii Territory. 

493. Bernhardt, John Edward. 1908. 

Born May 11, 1887. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1908. In 
1908 with Libby & Nelson, General Contractors. Minneapolis, 
Minn. In 1909 in Chief Engineer's office Vandalia Railway, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

494. BoGRAN, Daniel Rapalo. 1908. 

Born January 2, 1881. Entered the Institute from Santa Bar- 
bara, Republic of Honduras. Graduated in the Mechanical En- 
gineering Course in 1908. Engineer for Barahona & Canales 
Company, San Pedro Sula, Honduras. 

495. BoYD, Herbert Henry. 1908. 

Born September 22, 1884. Entered the Institute from Paris, 
111., in 1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1908. With J. D. White & Co., General Contractors, Richfield. 
Idaho. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 259 

496. Cannon, Hiram Berry. 1908. 

Born November 13, 1886. Entered the Institute from Midway, 
Ky., in 1904. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1908. With Bullock Electric Company, East Norwood, Ohio. 

497. Corson, Floyd Watson. 1908. 

Born September 21, 1883. Entered the Institute from Genoa, 
111., in 1904. Graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course 
in 1908. With the Olds Gas Engine Works, Lansing, Mich. 

498. Fischer, Emil John. 1908. 

Born December 16, 1885. Entered the Institute from Wapa- 
koneta, Ohio, in 1904. Graduated in the Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Course in 1908. Assistant Manager Wapakoneta Wheel 
Company, Wapakoneta, Ohio. 

499. Freers, George Herman. 1908. 

Born January 21, 1886. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1904. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1908. With the Interstate Automobile Company, Muncie, Ind. 

500. Hamilton, Paul Bitner. 1908. 

Born in Terre Haute March 14, 1886, and entered the Institute 
in 1903. Graduated in Chemistry in 1908. His address at pres- 
ent is Berlin, Germany. 

501. Hathaway, Arthur Stafford. 1908. 

Born June 26, 1886, and entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1908. 
With the Southern Power Company, Charlotte, N. C. 

502. Heidenger, Henry William. 1908. 

Born January 9, 1887. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1904. Graduated in the Mechanical Engineering Course in 
1908. At present Mechanical Engineer with the Baltimore & 
Ohio Southwestern Railway, Washington, Ind. 

503. HuNLEY, Elias Bradford. 1908. 

Born July 23, 1886, and entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1908. 
In the Maintenance of Way Department Big Four Railway, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



26o Rose Polytechnic Institttte. 

504. Jackson, Roy Hamii^ton. 1908. 

Born June 11, 1^6, and entered the Institute from near the city 
of Terre Haute in 1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering 
Course in 1908. With the Forbes-Foulkes Construction Com- 
pany on concrete work in Chicago. 

505. Johnston, Jay Horace. 1908. 

Bom April 11, 1886, and entered the Institute from Bartlesville, 
Ind. Ter., in 1904. Graduated in the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1908. Is Assistant Superintendent of the Battle Creek 
Gas Company, Battle Creek, Mich. 

506. Kelso, Bryon Lynn. 1908. 

Born June 23, 1888. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1904, Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1908. In 
Engineer Corps Panama Canal Construction, Culebra, Canal 
Zone. 

507. Kerrick, Leo Capel. 1908. 

Born July 13, 1885. Entered the Institute from Valley Station, 
Ky., in 1905. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1908. With the Louisville Water Works Company, Louis- 
ville, Ky. 

508. Knopf, William Cleveland. 1908. 

Born September 13, 1885. Entered the Institute from Louis- 
ville, Ky., in 1904. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1908. With the Louisville Lighting Company, Louis- 
ville, Ky. 

509. Lammers, Charles Neukom. 1908. 

Born October 5, 1884. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1903, and graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 
1908. At present in Terre Haute, Ind. 

510. Lindeman, Paul Gustave. 1908. 

Born in Terre Haute April 14, 1884. Entered the Institute in 
1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1908. 
From graduation with Foulkes & Forbes, Contractors, Terre 
Haute, Ind. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 261 

511. L1NDS1.EY, Berrien McWiluams. 1908. 

Bom December 28, 1884. Entered the Institute from Dallas, 
Texas, in 1904. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1908. With Munger Automobile Company, Dallas, Texas. 

512. McCoRMicK, George Torrence. 1908. 

Born December 28, 1884. Entered the Institute from Terre 
Haute in 1902. Graduated in Chemistry in 1908. With the 
National Cash Register Company, Dayton, Ohio, until March, 
1909. Then Chemist with the Kay & Ess Paint and Oil Com- 
pany, Dayton, Ohio. 

513. Mitchell, Samuel Eugene. 1908. 

Born April 30, 1885. Entered the Institute from Butler, Pa., in 
1904. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1908. 
From graduation has been Overseer of Stock Farm, Butler, Pa. 

514. Orth, Herbert Denny. 1908. 

Born September 15, 1885. Entered the Institute from Terre 
Haute in 1904. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course 
in 1908. Is Instructor in Mechanical Drawing University of 
Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

515. Reiss, Frederick Herman. 1908. 

Bom June 16, 1886. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1904. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1908. 
With the Interstate Automobile Company, Muncie, Ind. 

516. RoBBiNS, John Freehand. 1908. 

Born August 24. 1884. Entered the Institute from Freelands- 
ville, Ind., in 1904. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering 
Course in 1908. With the Signal Department Vandalia Railway 
Company, Terre Haute. 

517. Schmidt, Henry Earl. 1908, 

Born February 15, 1887. Entered the Institute from Terre 
Haute in 1904. Graduated in Chemistry in 1908. Assistant 
Chemist Oliver Mining Company, Hibbing, Minn. 



262 Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

518. SiEVERS, Charles Henry. 1908. 

Born November 21, 1880. Entered the Institute from Omaha, 
Neb., in 1903. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1908. On Construction Work Union Pacific Railway, Greeley, 
Col. 

519. Stock, Orion Louis. 1908. 

Born February 22, 1884. Entered the Institute from Lewis, 
Ind., in 1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1908. Of Paige & Stock, Civil Engineers and Surveyors, Terre 
Haute. Married November 18, 1908, at Terre Haute. 

520. Stubbs, Ross Malcolm. 1908. 

Born February i, 1886. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 1908. 
His present address is Terre Haute, Ind. 

521. TouLSON, Wood. 1908. 

Bom June 30, 1883. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1904. Graduated in the Electrical Engineering Course in 1908. 
His address is Terre Haute, Ind. 

522. Uhl, Walter Lawrence. 1908. 

Born November 6, 1884. Entered the Institute from Ports- 
mouth, Ohio, in 1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering 
Course in 1908. With the Chicago, Quincy & Burlington Rail- 
way, Lincoln, Neb. 

523. WiCKERSHAM, EnoCH PaUL. I908. 

Born September 5, 1886. Entered the Institute from Terre 
Haute in 1903. Graduated in the Mechanical Engineering 
Course in 1908. With the Grand Rapids Gas Light Company, 
Grand Rapids, Mich., and the Weston Mott Company, Flint, 
Mich. 

524. WiLLisoN, Walter William. 1908. 

Born April 30, 1886. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute 
in 1904. Graduated in Chemistry in 1908. With The Larkins 
Company, Buffalo, N. Y. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 263 

525. Wood, Ottiwell. 1908. 

Born April 18, 1887. Entered the Institute from Terre Haute in 
1903. Graduated in Chemistry in 1908. In the Engineering De- 
partment Brooklyn Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

526. Zambrano, Agustin. 1908. 

Born May 7, 1886. Entered the Institute from Monterey, N. L. 
Mex., in 1904. Graduated in the Civil Engineering Course in 
1908. Civil Engineer, Hacienda San Carlos, Coahuila, Mexico. 



264 



Rose Polytechnic Institute. 



JNDEX. 



Name. No. 

Aguilera, Francisco V., '03. .310 

Aiknian, John B., '87 20 

Albert, Clifford E., '93 104 

Albert, Walter H., '93 105 

Albin, Earl G., '07 456 

* Allen. Burgess F., '93 106 

Anderson, L. Clifford, '95... 145 
Anderson, Warwick M., '94. . 124 

Andrews, Carl B., '08 492 

Andrews, Morton C, '94 125 

Andrick, Wallace P., '07 457 

Appleton, William C, '00.. ..261 

Arn, William G., '97 191 

Arnold, Robert B., '03 311 

Atherton, Donald H., '05 378 

Austermiller, John A., '90... 48 

Austin, Alfred N., '03 312 

Austin, Harold S., '07 458 

Austin, Ned M., '98 217 

Balsley, Abe. '91 62 

Barbazette, J. Harry, '04 347 

Baur, Oscar, '87 21 

Baylor, Harry D., '07 459 

Becker, Maurice E., '93 I07 

Beebe, Robert W., '96 164 

Benbridge, Richard W., '06. .419 

Benson, George, Jr., '05 379 

Bernhardt, John E., '08 493 

Bigelow, Henry W., '95 146 

Bixby, Allan S., '92 79 

Blair, Marion W., '03 313 

Blanchard, Ralph C, '05 380 

Bland, John O., '05 381 

Blinks, Walter M., '94 126 

Boehm, William H., '91 63 

Bogran, Luis, '07 460 

Bogran, Daniel R., '08 494 



Name. No. 

Bond, Rufus L., '07 461 

Bowie, Wallace D., '03 314 

Bowsher, William H., '04. ..348 

Boyd, Herbert H., '08 495 

*Boyles, Thomas D., '92 80 

Brachmann, Fred C, '98 218 

Braman, Harry S., '03 315 

Brannon, Clifton, '04 349 

Brewer, Jesse Irving, '00.... 262 

*Brokaw, Charles C, '86 4 

Brosius, J. Simms, '03 316 

*Brown, Elmer, '94 127 

Brown, Samuel G., '95 147 

Rrownell, Harry G., '86 5 

*Bryon, Ernest, '04 350 

Buckley, Frederick J., '91 . . . 64 

Burk, William E- '96 165 

Burr, Walter H., '05 382 

Burt. Eugene, '03 317 

Burt, Nathaniel P., '99 240 

Burtis, Edwin R., '95 148 

Butler, Earle S., '06 420 

Butler, Noble C, Jr., '99 241 

Byrn, Dexter, '07 462 

Cadden, Charles A., '06 421 

Canfield, Harry R., '06 422 

Cannon, John W., '06 423 

Cannon, Hiram B., '08 496 

Camp, Theodore L., '97 192 

Carothers, George R., '91 . . . 65 

Carr, Uhel U., '96 166 

Cash, Frederick H., Jr., '07. .463 
Chamberlain, Charles L-, '03...318 
Chandler, Benjamin F., '97- -193 

Chapman, George H., '88 28 

Chappie, John T., '86 6 

Clay, G. Harry, '01 276 



* Deceased. 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 



265 



Name. No. 

Cohn, Clarence A., '04 351 

Collett, Samuel D., 'ga 49 

Condron, Theodore L-, '90. , 50 

Cook, Cleo B., '05 383 

Corson, Floyd W., '08 497 

Cory, Mark D., '04 352 

Cox, Claude E., '02 293 

Cox, Frank P., '87 22 

Cox, J. Irving, '03 319 

Cox, John S., '91 66 

Cox, N. Hadley, '03 320 

Crain, George H., '04 353 

Craver, Harrison W., '95 149 

Crawford, Gilbert, '01 277 

Crebs, Walter D., '99 242 

Crockwell, Charles R., '95... 150 

Crowe, Walter W., '95 151 

Curry, John R., '06 424 

Cushman, John A., '03 321 

Daily, J. Edward, '05 384 

Dale, James, '93 108 

d'Amorim, Ambrosio, '06. . . .425 

Darst, Edward A., '95 152 

Davies, Carl G., '05 385 

Davies, Graham, '03 322 

Davis, George M., '88 29 

Davis, Ren M., '07 464 

Davis, William G., '99 243 

Davis, William J., Jr., '92... 81 

Decker, Walter L., '96 167 

Delle, Frank A., Jr., '06 426 

Denehie, John F., '94 128 

Dickerson, John T., '02 294 

Dietrich, Arthur M., '92 82 

Dom, Leo F, '04 354 

Early, Samuel S., '85 i 

Eastwood, Arthur C, '98 219 

Eastwood, Harry W., '06 427 

Edwards, Edmund P., '99. . . 244 

Ehrsam, William J., '92 83 

Elder, Edward C, '86 7 

Elder, William D., '90 51 



Name. No. 

Evans, Robert B., '06 428 

Everson, Ralph C, '05 386 

Failey, Bruce F., '96 168 

Farrington, James, '96 169 

Fishback, Fred. R., '02 295 

Fischer, Carl D., Jr., '03 ^23 

Fischer, Emil J., '08 498 

Fitch, Max B., '90 52 

Fitzpatrick, James E., '03... 324 

Fletcher, Thomas, '98 220 

Flory, Edgar L., '02 296 

Fogarty, William J., '92 84 

Folsom, Edson F., '92 85 

Foltz, Herbert, '86 8 

Ford, W. Ellis, '98 221 

*Frank, Edmund, '97 194 

Frank, Sigmund S., '92 86 

Freers, George H., '08 499 

French, Carson G., '04 355 

Freudenreich, Wm. F., '98... 222 
Freudenreich, Arnold E., '06..429 
Froehlich, Frederick H., '99...24S 
Frohman, Edward D., '94. ..129 

Fry, Charles H., Jr., '97 195 

Galloway, John D., '89 39 

Galloway, Mason, 'go 53 

Garrettson, Robert F., '04. ..356 

Gibbons, Walter R., '01 278 

Gilbert, Elmer E., '89 40 

Gilbert, Henry C, Jr., '03... 325 

Gillett, Vernor J., '91 67 

Goetz, Herman F., '87 23 

Goodman, Leon, '05 387 

Goodman, Milton, '07 465 

Gordon, Arthur F, '97 196 

Gray, Ralph C, '05 388 

Green, Frank T., '96 170 

Greenleaf, Guy W., '05 389 

Hadley, William, '01 279 

Hahn, Ferdinand W., '04 357 

Hall, Jay H., '97 197 

Hall, Schuler P., '07 466 



266 



Rose Polytechnic Institute. 



Name. No. 

Haller, Frederick W. A., '05...390 

Hamilton, Paul B., '08 500 

Hammel, Max J., '01 280 

Hammond, Alonzo J., '89. . . 41 

Haney, J. Briggs, '97 198 

Hanley, William S., '05 391 

Haring, Harry D., '88 30 

Harper, Joseph D., '91 68 

^Harris, Ellsworth B., '96. ..171 

Harris, William H., '91 69 

Hart, H. Stillson, '93 109 

Hatch, Frederick N., '06 430 

Hathaway, A. Stafford, '08. .501 

Hazard, William H., '04 358 

Hedden, Oran R., '94 130 

Hedges, Arthur W., '86 9 

Heichert, Herman S., '97 199 

Heick, William R., '05 392 

Heidenger, Henry W., '08... 502 

Helmer, L. Leslie, '01 281 

Hellweg, John H., Jr., '97... 200 
Hendricks, Victor K., '89. . . 42 
*Henrikson, Sigurd L., '94. .131 

Hensgen, Walter O., '06 431 

Hess, Otto G., '90 54 

Hibbits, Frank N., '87 24 

Hildreth, Frederick F., '94- -132 

Hill, Roy W., '04 359 

Hills, C. Herbert, '02 297 

Holderman, C. H., '97 201 

Holding, Herbert H., '89.... 43 
Holding, J. C. Carlisle, '94- -133 

Holliger, Jesse E., '99 246 

*Hommel, Victor A., '02 298 

Hood, Arthur M., '93 no 

Hood, Ozni P., '85 2 

*Hord, Francis T., '88 31 

Housum, Chenoweth, 02 299 

Howell, Cecil A., '99 247 

Hubbell, John E., '98 223 

Hunley, J. Boudinot, Jr., '03...326 
Hunley, E. Bradford, '08.... 503 



Name. No. 

Hunt, Frederick G., '96 172 

Hupe, Alexander L., '91 70 

Hurlbert, Francis W., '91... 71 

Hussey, Warren, '92 87 

Huthsteiner, Robert E., '93.. in 

Ijams, J. Warren, '03 327 

Ingle, J. David, '97 202 

Ingle, William D., '03 328 

Insley, William H., '00. .... .263 

Jackson, James S., '06 432 

Jackson. Roy H., '08 504 

Jacob, Brent C, '03 329 

Jenckes, Ray G., Jr., '05 393 

Johannesen, Svend E., '93... 112 

Johnson, John M., '06 433 

Johnson, Walter E., '05 394 

Johnston, J. Horace, '08 505 

Johonnott, Edwin S., Jr., '93..113 

Jones, Edw. Lindley, '02 300 

Jones, Horace B., '89 72 

Jones, Theodore D., '89 44 

Jumper, Charles H., '02 301 

Jumper, Frank J., '99 248 

Kadel, Harry R., '05 395 

Kahlert, Ernest D., '06 434 

Katzenbach, Brown, '04 360 

Kellogg, Henry S., '03 330 

Kelly, Warren W., '07 467 

Kelsall, George A., '06 435 

Kelso, Byron L., '08 506 

Kerrick, Leo C, '08 507 

Kessler, John J., Jr., '97 203 

Keyes, Clift B., '99 249 

Kidder, Arthur D., '99 250 

Kidder, Clinton B., '88 32 

Kidder, Ned S., '98 224 

Kidder, Sidney J., '00 264 

Kiefer, Carl J., '03 331 

Kiefer, Herbert G., '05 396 

Kilbourne, Hubert G., '94. ..134 

King, Everett E., '01 282 

Kirby, Edward C, '03 332 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 



267 



Name. No. 

Kittredge, Harvey G., '99... 251 

Klenk, Lorenz W., '05 397 

Klinger, P. Wert, '96 173 

Klinger, Watson J., '96 174 

Kloer, Charles, '98 225 

Kloer, Gustave F., '98 226 

Klotz, August H., '93 114 

Knopf, William C, '08 508 

Kranichfeld, Delbert, '07.... 468 

Krieger, Albert A., '03 333 

Lammers, Charles N., '08... 509 

Landrum, Robert D., '04 361 

Lansden, John M., Jr., '98. . .227 

Larkins, E. Ernest, '05 398 

Larson, Charles J., '00 265 

Laux, Ernst C, '92 88 

Lawton, Clarence W., '06. . .436 

Layman, W. Arnold, '92 89 

Lee, Addison W., '06 437 

Lee, Earle P., '06 438 

Lefler, Harvey J., '90 55 

Lendi, J. Henry, '97 204 

Leser, Henry, '00 266 

Lew^is, Frederick B., '05 399 

Liggett, Harry T., '96 17S 

Likert, George H., '99 252 

Lindenberger, George B., '03..334 

Lindeman, Paul, '08 510 

Lindsley, Berrien M., '08 511 

Loofbourow, Jesse H., '00. ..267 

Lufkin, John E., '97 205 

Lyon, Albert C, '01 283 

McBride, John S., '05 400 

McCabe, Eugene F., '91 73 

McComb, Harold, '06 439 

McCormick, Charles C, '04...362 
McCormick, George T., '08. .512 
McCormick, Robert L., '91 . . 74 

*McCulloch, David, '94 13S 

McDaniel, Donald, '07 469 

McDargh, Harry J., '96 176 

JNIcDermott, Harry E., '93... 115 



Name. No. 

McFarland, Ed. H., '04 363 

MacGregor, James C, '93... 116 

McKeen, Benjamin, '85 3 

]\IcKeen, William R., Jr., '89.. 45 
McKenna, Raymond J., '07. .470 

McLellan, James J., '99 253 

[NIcMeans, Orange E., '96. ..177 

McNabb, Walter S., '04 364 

McTaggart, James R., '95- • -153 

Mack, John G. D., '87 25 

Madison, Herbert F., '00 268 

Maier, Gustave A., '00 269 

Marshall, Ira, '02 302 

Martin, Walter H., '97 206 

Masterson, Wesley C, '86. . . 10 
Meadows, Harvey H., '96... 178 

Mees, Curtis A., '00 270 

Menden, William S., '91 75 

Mendenhall, Charles E., '94. .136 

Mering, Barclay G., '87 26 

Meriwether, David, Jr., '00. .271 

Meriwether, Richard, '96 179 

Metzger, Earl C, '03 335 

Mewhinney" Omar C, '91 . . . 76 

Meyer, August H., '97 207 

Meyers, Morris, '07 471 

Michel, A. Eugene, '03 336 

Miller, Francis H., '95 154 

Miller, Merwin B., '04 365 

Miller, Robert N., '01 284 

Miner, Erwin J., '07 472 

*Mischler, Paul, '94 137 

Mitchell, S. Eugene, '08 513 

Modesitt, Charles C, '06 440 

Montgomery, John T., '98. ..228 

Moore, Allen H., '88 33 

Moore, Odus B., '97 208 

Mory, Austin V. H., '94 138 

Moth, Robert H., '93 .117 

Mnllett, Howard A., '04 366 

*Mundy, W. Offutt, '95 155 

Nantz, Frank A., '07 473 



26S 



Rose Polytechnic Institute. 



Name. No. 

Newbold, Roger M., '97 209 

Newnam, Frank H., '05 401 

Nichols, J. Herbert, '07 474 

Nicholson, George F., '06... 441 

Nicholson, John A., '02 303 

Noelke, William C, '04 367 

O'Brien, Barrington, '96 180 

Oglesby, Milton L., '92 90 

O'Loughlin, Walter M., '07. .475 

Orr, Harry H., '07 476 

Orth, Herbert D., '08 514 

Osborne, Don F., '02 304 

Ott, Claude, '92 91 

Paige, Arthur J., '02 305 

Paige, W. Robert, '91 77 

Palmer, Harry W., '03 337 

Palmer, William H., '87 27 

Parkhurst, John A., '86 11 

Parks, Clyde C, '02 306 

*Parr, Hubert, '05 402 

Peck, Walter R., '06 442 

Peddle, Charles R., '05 403 

Peddle, John B., '88 34 

Peddle, William A., '03 338 

Perkins, Hugh E., '01 285 

Pettit, H. Blair, '03 339 

Pfleging, Frank W., '01 286 

Pfeif, George H., '04 404 

Philip, Robert A., '97 210 

Phillips, Edward F., '00 272 

Phillips, George W., '95 156 

Pierson, Temple G., '97 211 

Pine, Benjamin H., '03 340 

Piper, Harry D., '01 287 

Pirtle, Claiborne, '98 229 

Platts, J. Milton, '99 254 

Plew, William R., '07 477 

Post, Chester L., '03 341 

Post, Clifford W., '07 478 

Pote, Frank W., '06 443 

Powell, Edgar B., '02 307 

Putnam, Benjamin R., '92... 92 



Name. No. 

Putnam, George R., '90 56 

Putnam, H. St. Clair, '86... 12 
Randall, William H., '04. ...368 
*Rauchfuss, Oscar R., '88... 35 
Raymond, Stephen S., '90. . . 57 

Reed, :\Ierle R., '05 405 

Regan, John F., Jr., '04 369 

Reiss, Frederick H., '08 515 

Reynolds, O. Frank, '05 406 

Rice, Arthur, '93 118 

*Rice, Oscar G., '96 181 

Richardson, Harry S., '00... 273 

Ridgely, Clarence M., '96 182 

Riedel, Edward, '94 139 

Riggs. J. Robert, '01 288 

Robbins, John F., '08 516 

Roberts, Donn M., '89 46 

Roberts, Shelby S., '98 230 

Robertson, Claude E., '05... 407 
Robinson, Arthur L., Jr., '95.. 157 
Robinson, Edward F., '94. ..140 
Rochester, Robert K., '01... 289 

Rock, Samuel M., '92 93 

Rogers, Harvey E., '06 444 

Rose, Charles C, '93 ii9 

Rose. Luther S., '92 94 

Ross, J. Newton, '04 370 

Ross, Taylor W., '93 120 

Rotz, John M., '06 445 

Routledge, Thomas E., '07. .479 

Royse, James S., '94 141 

Rumbley, Frederick N., '03. .342 

Ryan, Edward C, '06 446 

*Ryder, Waldo B., '98 231 

Rypinski. Maurice C, '97 212 

Sage, Russell S., '07 480 

Sames, Charles M., '86 13 

Sanborn, Wallis R., '96 183 

Sanderson, David P., '86 14 

Sanford, Linus, '96 184 

Scharpenberg, Charles, '07. . .481 
Schauwecker, Edgar J., '06. .447 



Alumni Biographical Dictionary. 



269 



Name. No. 

SchefFerly. Robert J., '03 343 

Schmidt, H. Earl, '06 517 

Schneider, Fred W., '98 232 

Schofield, Alonzo D., Jr., '07..482 

Scholl, Jalian, '88 36 

Schwable, Henry €., '99 2S5 

Schwartz, Harry A., '01 290 

Schwed, John F., '99 256 

Schuchardt, Rudolph J., '07. .483 

Scott, Charles E., '86 15 

Seath. James R., '86 16 

Shaneberger, Edgar L., '95.. 158 

Sharp, J. Stuart, '04 371 

Shaver, Archie G., '97 213 

Shickel, Harry M., '07 484 

Shickel, J. Boyd, '07 485 

Shover. Barton R., '90 58 

*Shrader, William H., '86. . . 17 

Shryer, Herbert E., '05 408 

Sievers, Charles H., '08 518 

Sinks, Frank F., '96 185 

Smith, Claiborne E.. '03 344 

Smith, F. Elbert, '96 186 

Smith, Harry, '04 372 

Smyth, Cubitt B., '99 257 

Snider, Lewis A., '05 409 

Spalding. Edward H., '05... 410 

Speaker, Clifford B., '05 411 

Speed, Buckner, '94 142 

Speed, William S., '95 159 

Sperry. Herbert B., '92 95 

Sproull, John C, '05 412 

Staff, John T., Jr., '04 373 

Stalker, James R., '07 486 

Stanton. Howard M., '94 143 

Stewart, Morton B., '98 233 

Stilz, Harry B., '98 234 

Stock. Orion L., '08 519 

Stoddard, Eugene K., '05 413 

Stone, Arthur P., '99 258 

Strecker, Robert E.. '07 487 

Stubbs, Ross M., '08 520 



Name. No. 

Sullivan, Lucien N., '86 18 

Taylor, Howard C, '07 488 

Theobald, Charles E., '98. . . .235 
Thompson, Arthur C, '99. ..259 

Thompson, Ralph F., '90 59 

Thurman, Roy, '06 448 

Thurston, Edwin C, '90 60 

Tinsley, Samuel B., '92 96 

Tippy, Bruce O., '92 97 

Tipton, Clyde E., '04 374 

Toner, Irwin D., '-04 375 

Toulson, Wood, '08 521 

Touzalin, Leslie A., '04 376 

Troll, Martin N., '01 291 

Trowbridge, Charles B., '05. .414 
Troxler, Laurence E., '95... 160 

Trueblood, Cecil N., '07 489 

Trumbo, Charles F., '99 260 

Tsuji, Taro, '90 61 

*Tucker, Clarence H., '97 214 

Tuller, Arthur V., '95 161 

Uhl, Henry W., '02 308 

Uhl, Walter L., '08 522 

Valentine, Robert D., '93 121 

Van Auken, James M., '96.. 187 
Voorhes, Kimbrough E., '98.. .236 

Wade, Archie, '95 162 

Waite, William H., '93 122 

Wales, Samuel S., '91 78 

Walser, Edward, '96 188 

Wamsley, Cale, '98 237 

Warfel, Rob Roy, '01 292 

Warren, Robert C, '02 309 

Waters, Edward G., '88 37 

Watson, Herbert L., '05 415 

Weller, Edward A., '88 38 

Wells, George E., '96 189 

Wenzel. Charles G., '93 123 

Werk, Louis, '96 190 

Westfall, Herbert C, '97 215 

Wetherbee, Harry L., '92 98 

White, Knowles D., '06 449 



270 



Rose Polytechnic Institute. 



Name. No. 

Whitecotton, Otto G., '07 490 

Whitten, Frank A., '98 238 

Whitten, Roscoe, '04 ^yy 

Wickersham, E. Paul, '08. ..523 
Wickham, Walter M., '92,.. 99 

Wickliffe, Paul R., '07 491 

Wicks, Albert W., '92 100 

Wiedemann, H. E., '03 345 

Wiggins, William D., '95 163 

Wiley, Brent, '98 239 

Wiley, Walter B., '89 47 

Wilkin, John T., '86 19 

Wilkins, Hal E., '06 450 

Williams, John P. A., '03... 346 

Willien, Leon J., Jr., '06 451 

Willison, Walter W., '08 524 



Name. No. 

Willius, Gustav, Jr., '97 216 

*Wilms, H. John, '06 452 

Wilson, Robert L., '92 loi 

Wilson, Robert M., '05 416 

Winters, George H., '94 144 

Wischmeyer, Carl, '06 453 

Wischmeyer, Henry W., '06.. .454 
Witherspoon, Thos. D., '00. .274 

Wood, George R., '92 102 

Wood, Ottiwell, '08 525 

Wood, Owen L., '05 417 

Worthington, A. W., '06 455 

Wright, Dudley D., '05 418 

Young, J. Charles, '92 103 

York, Robert, '00 275 

Zambrano, Agustin, '08 526 



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m^ OCT. 65 

im^'m- N. MANCHESTER.