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Full text of "Royal and historic gloves and shoes"

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FOR USE ONLY IN THE LIBRARY 



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*EDFERN W. B. 
ROYAL AND HISTORIC 
GLOVES AND SHOES 

NNHR 931247248 



The New York 
Public Library 





FOR USE ONLY IN THE LIBRARY 



ROYAL AND HISTORIC 
GLOVES AND SHOES 




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1 



PREFACE 



early intention with regard to publishing pictures of 
gloves and shoes was a very modest one, but having once 
got to work, I found materials cropped up from various 
unexpected quarters, and thus a more ambitious volume is the result. 
From the outset my aim has been to give accurate and reliable 
illustrations of royal and historic gloves and shoes, trusting to 
these for success rather than upon any literary display, that part of 
the matter having already been efficiently done by several well- 
known authors. 

Whatever works may have been written on gloves or shoes, I 
venture to think that hitherto no attempt has been made to illustrate 
the subjects by such pictures as are contained in this volume. 

With the exception of the pictures of gloves in the Victoria and 
Albert Museum and those taken from the Stuart Relics exhibited 
at the New Gallery, London, every plate has been specially taken 
for this work from the existing article, either by photographs 
when possible or, when more convenient, by carefully made water- 
colour drawings by myself; in every case absolute accuracy has 
been attempted. 

The information contained in the Introductions to the two sub- 
jects, and the descriptions given to each plate, will, it is hoped, 



vi PREFACE 

prove useful and interesting to those to whom the work will appeal 
the most, viz. to artists, workers of embroidery, antiquarians, curators 
of museums, and possibly to the public generally. 

The labour of gathering together suitable specimens, and of 
obtaining information for the brief descriptions, has not been very 
light, and has extended over some two years, while as a reward it 
has brought me into contact with a number of collectors and others 
who have given kindly help in my undertaking. To those who 
have so willingly lent me their treasures I tender my sincere thanks, 
their names appear at the foot of each description. I also desire 
to record my grateful acknowledgments to those whose names I 
give below, who, among others, have assisted me by advice, intro- 
ductions, and by other means in producing this volume. 

Viscount H. A. Dillon, F.S.A., J. W. Clark, M.A., University 
Registrary, Cambridge, Mrs. R. E. Head, Messrs. C. W. Bell, 
Allen Fea, Ambrose Harding, Miller Christy, the Bursar of New 
College, Oxford, and the Trustees and Officials of the various 
Museums who have given me access to their treasures. I am also 
indebted to Messrs. Palmer-Clarke, of Cambridge, and other photo- 
graphers, who have well and carefully carried out my wishes in 

producing the pictures. 

W. B. R. 

CAMBRIDGE, 1904 



LIST OF PLATES 



GLOVES 



No. 

I. 
II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 

XIII. 

XIV. 

XV. 

XVI. 

XVII. 

XVIII. 

XIX. 

XX. 

XXI. 

XXII. 



PLATE 

GLOVES OF HENRY VIII 



OWNER 



PAHE 



BISHOP WYKEHAM'S GLOVE . 

GLOVES OF KING HENRY VI . 

ARMOURED LEATHER GLOVE . 

SCALED LEATHER GLOVE 

A CHAIN MAIL GLOVE 

CHAIN MAIL AND PLATE GLOVE 

A PAIR OF SCALED LEATHER GLOVES 

STEEL MITTEN GAUNTLET 
/ HENRY VIII GAUNTLET 
' STEEL MITTENS 

SIR ANTHONY DENNY'S GLOVE 

HAWKING GLOVE OF HENRY VIII 

WHITE GLOVES 

A LADY'S GLOVE 

LADY SHERINGTON'S GLOVES . 

MITTENS .... 

QUEEN ELIZABETH'S GLOVES AT OXFORD 

AN ELIZABETHAN GLOVE 

LORD DARNLEY'S CUFF 

GLOVE OF MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS . 

SHAKESPEARE'S GLOVES 

GLOVES OF KING JAMES I 

EARLY SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY GLOVES 

GLOVES OF KING CHARLES I . 

GLOVES OF KING CHARLES I . 



Frontispiece 
7 



Alfred de la Fontaine, Esqr, 
Neva College, Oxford . 
Free Public Museums, Liverpool 
Tower of London 

> > 

W. H. Fenton, Esqr. 
Castle Museum, Norwich 
The Author . 
Tower of London 



) )) 

Victoria and A Ibert Museum, S. Kensington 
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford 



8 



ii 

12 

'3 

14 

'5 
17 



Victoria and A Ibert Museum, S. Kensington 1 8 

John Hallam, Esqr. . . . . ig 

Mrs. B. Morrett . . . . 20 

Victoria and A Ibert Museum, S. Kensington 2 1 

Ashmolean Museum, Oxford . . 22 

William Henry Taylor, Esqr. . . 23 

W. Murray Threipland, Esqr. . . 24 

Saffron Walden Museum . . . 25 

Dr. Horace Howard Furness . . 29 

Alfred de la Fontaine, Esqr. . . 31 

South Kensington Museum . . . 32 

The Author J . 33 

A. Clark-Kennedy, Esqr. . 35 



Vlll 



LIST OF PLATES 



No. PLATE 

XXIII. GLOVE OF KING CHARLES I 
GLOVE OF KING CHARLES II 

XXIV. A SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY GLOVE . 

A GLOVE, SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 
XXV. THE NASEBY GLOVES 

XXVI. , 

> GLOVES OF OLIVER CROMWELL . 
XXVII. ' 

XXVIII. GLOVES OF THE LORD PROTECTOR 

XXIX. GLOVES OF CHARLES II . 

XXX. A PAIR OF WHITE GLOVES 

XXXI. BROWN GLOVES 

XXXII. A SPANISH GLOVE. 

XXXIII. A LADY'S GLOVES . 

XXXIV. WHITE GLOVES . 
XXXV. A CAVALIER'S GLOVE 

XXXVI. A PAIR OF ENGLISH GLOVES 
XXXVII. A PAIR OF BROWN GLOVES 

(A GLOVE .... 
THE PASTON HALL GLOVE 
A LADY'S GLOVE . 
XXXIX. A PAIR OF SHORT GLOVES 
XL. A LADY'S GLOVE, OXFORD 
XLI. QUEEN ANNE'S GLOVES, OXFORD . 
XLII. A CAVALIER'S GLOVES 
XLI 1 1. A PAIR OF SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY 

GLOVES 
XLIV. A PAIR OF LADY'S GLOVES 

r COLONEL DUCKETT'S GLOVES 
XLV. < 

* A PAIR OF LEATHER MITTENS 

XLVI. A PAIR OF MITTENS 



OWNER 

V. F, Bennett Stanford, Esqr. 
Mrs. Spcid 
Captain Still 
David Seton, Esqr. . 
The Author . 

The Author . 



PAGE 
36 



37 



39 



40 



Mrs. A. H. Simpson-Carson 
A. Clark-Kennedy, Esqr. . 
Seymour Lucas, Esqr., R.A. 



43 

44 
. 4 6 

. 47 

Victoj~ia and Albert Museum, S.Kensington 48 

The Author . . . ... 49 

,, ,, . . 50 

A. S. Field, Esqr. . . 51 

Victoria and Albert Museum, S. Kensington 52 

The Author . . . 53 
Seymour Lucas, Esqr., R.A. . . \ 

Castle Museum, Norwich . . r 54 
Seymour Lucas, Esqr., R.A. . .' 

W. Cole-Plo-voright, Esqr. . . . 56 

Ashmolean Museum, Oxford . . 57 

l> M IJ * 5^ 

Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art . 59 

The Author . . . . . 60 

Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art . 61 
The Author . 



Edinburgh Museum of Science aud Art . 63 



LIST OF PLATES 



IX 



SHOES 



PLATE 



No. 

I. MEDIAEVAL SHOES 
II. MEDIAEVAL SHOES 

III. MEDIEVAL AND OTHER SHOES . 

IV. MEDIEVAL TOE-PIECES . 

V. MEDIEVAL SHOE AND PATTENS . 
VI. BOOTS OF KING HENRY VI 
VII. PEAKED SHOE, FIFTEENTH CENTURY 
VIII. CHOPINES .... 

IX. QUEEN ELIZABETH'S BUSKINS 
/ SHOES OF QUEEN ELIZABETH . 

xJ 

' SHOE OF QUEEN OF BOHEMIA . 
SHOES OF KING CHARLES I 
CAVALIERS BOOTS, SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 
MILITARY JACK-BOOTS ,, ,, 

CAPTAIN LENCHE'S BOOT ,, ,, 

MILITARY BOOTS ,, , , 

, SHOES OF QUEEN ANNE 

' SHOES AND CLOGS 
DUKE OF GLOUCESTER'S BOOT . 

,- SHOES OF REIGN OF QUEEN ANNE 
PAIR OF LADY'S SHOES, SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

. A LADY'S SHOES AND CLOGS . 
LADIES' SHOES, SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

j SHOES OF THE REIGN OF WILLIAM AND MARY 

I LORD TREVOR'S SHOES . 

r SHOE OF THE REIGN OF GEORGE II 

A LADY'S SHOE, EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 
i COMBINED SHOE AND CLOG 

MUD GUARDS, EIGHTEENTH CENTURY . 

A POSTILLION'S BOOT, EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

A MILITARY GAITER ,, ,, 



XI. 

XII. 
XIII. 
XIV. 

XV. 

XVI. 
XVII. 

XVIII. \ 

XIX. 
XX. 

XXI. 
XXII. 



OWNER 

Northampton Museum 
Guild/tall Museum, London 

; Mrs. Seymour Lucas and \ 
' Tfie Author. ' 

Guildhall Museum, London 

> i 

Free Public Museums, Liverpool 

G. C. Haite, Esqr. 

Ashmolean and British Museums . 

Ashmolean Museum, Oxford 

Earl Brownlow 

Saffron Walden Museum 

Gen. W. E. G. Lytton-Buliaer . 

Northampton Museum 

Tower of London 

A. S. Field, Esqr. 

Lord Donington 

Mrs. Simpson Carson 

Northampton Museum 

Ashmolean Museum, Oxford 

Mrs. Seymour Lucas 

The Author 
Mrs. Elkin Mathews 
> Mrs. Seymour Lucas 

Mrs. Seymour Lucas 
Mrs. C. M. Prickett 
Mrs. Seymour Lucas 
Northampton Museum 



Castle Museum, Norwich 



PAGE 
71 

71 

73 

75 
76 
77 

78 

79 
81 
82 

83 
84 

85 
86 

87 
88 



90 
9i 

92 

93 
94 

95 
95 
96 

97 
98 



No 

XXIII. 

XXIV. 
XXV. 

XXVI. 



LIST OF PLATES 

PLATE OWNER 

LADY'S YELLOW SHOES, EIGHTEENTH CENTURY The Author 



A GENTLEMAN'S SHOE 
A LADY'S SHOES AND CLOGS 
SLIPPERS AND SHOES 
A BRIDAL SHOE 
A LADY'S SHOE 



XXVII. VARIOUS SHOES, SLIPPERS, AND CLOGS j 



XXVIII. 



, EASTERN SHOES AND CHOPINES 
' TURKISH SLIPPERS 



XXIX. ORIENTAL CHILDREN'S SHOES 



XXX. AFRICAN SANDALS 



XXXI. 
XXXII. 



, AMERICAN MOCASSINS 
' AFRICAN SANDALS 
CHOPINES 



Whitby Museum . 

Dr. W. T. Bensley 

The Author 

Edinburgh Museum of Science and 

W. Cole Plowright, Esqr. 

W. P. Gibbs, Esqr. 

The Author 

The Author 

A. Clark-Kennedy, Esqr. 
, Norwich Museum 
' R. Farren, Esqr. 



( 



The Author 



' Cole Ambrose, Esqr. 
Cole Ambrose, Esqr. 
F. W. Phillips, Esqr. . 
J. H. Fitshenry, Esqr. . 



PAGE 

99 

99 
100 

. IOI 

Art 103 

. 103 

. 104 

105 
. 106 

106 

. 107 
. 107 
. 108 
. 108 

log 
. 109 

no 



GLOVES 









ROYAL AND HISTORIC 

GLOVES AND SHOES 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION 
ON GLOVES 



1 



gloves, in some form or other, at first in a limited 
way only, have been in use from a very early period is 
without a doubt, and much has been written at various times 
on their origin and use ; and this renders it less necessary in the 
present work to deal in any pedantic or lengthy manner with the 
history or manufacture of either of the subjects , to whicri this work 
is dedicated. Still, for the benefit of the casual reader, a short 
resume of a few general facts concerning our subjects may. not be 
altogether unnecessary. 

The origin of the glove has never been actually .discovered, but 
it was certainly in use in very early times. 

Perhaps the earliest mention of gloves is that in the Bible, 
where Rebecca, in order to secure the birthright for her son Jacob, 
put skins on his hands that so his father Isaac should not recognise 
the younger from the elder of the sons. 

Before gloves, in their most primitive form, became in any 
degree to be commonly worn by either sex, by cleric or layman, 
the want of a covering for the hands was very probably supplied by 



GLOVES AND SHOES 

long and loose sleeves falling at will over the wrists and hands. 
Numerous illustrations could be given of this kind of sleeve as a 
hand-covering derivable from brasses and mediaeval pictures. 

In Frense Church, Norfolk, is a brass to the memory of Anne 
Duke (A.D. 1551), and another in Sawtrey Church, Hants; and in 
many others in various parts of the country exquisite representations 
are to be found, in brass and stone, of the falling sleeve or turn-over 
cuff, usable as a covering for the wearer's hands. 

Planche, in his History of British Costume^ speaks of the sleeves 
and mantles of the eleventh century being used as hand-coverings. 

Gloves, though probably very unlike the article with which we 
are familiar, were known to, and worn by, the Roman and the 
Greek. 

We have the authority of Planche that after the time of Henry I. 
(A.D. 1135) gloves, " some short, some reaching nearly to the elbows, 
embroidered at the tops and jewelled at the backs if pertaining to 
Princes or Prelates, became frequent." 

Here is a definite statement from a reliable authority that gloves, 
both plain and embroidered, were by no means uncommon, even at 
this early period of our history. 

In Worcester Cathedral is a monument to King John, on which 
the King is represented in his regal habiliments, and on the hands 
are gloves with jewelled work on the backs. 

In 1370 merchants were allowed to import leather gloves into 
Gascony, which proves that gloves had become articles of common 
everyday wear ; in 1 5 64 gloves were forbidden to be imported into 
England, and this prohibition was not withdrawn till 1825 ! There 
is ample evidence that a large and regular trade existed in this 
country at an early date; brasses on various tombs and sculptured 
effigies absolutely confirm the fact. In the Church of Fletching, in 
Sussex, is a memorial to a glover. It consists of a plain slab of 



GLOVES AND SHOES s 

stone, in which is inserted two small plates of brass, one representing 
a pair of gloves, with slightly embroidered gauntlets, showing the 
palms of the hands ; and on the second brass, placed immediately 
below the first, is an inscription commencing, " Hie Jacit Petros 
Denot, Glover." The date may be about 1450. Again, in the 
Church of St. Peter, in the chancel, at St. Albans, a brass shield at 
one time marked the grave of one John Atkin, Glover (A.D. 1449) ; 
there is also a brass to Bishop Bell in St. James's Church, Clerken- 
well, London, on which he is represented wearing gloves. 

There is a monument in Norwich Cathedral to Bishop Goldwell, 
representing a full-length effigy, on the hands of which, though 
greatly mutilated, may be seen gloves with jewelled backs. 

Thomas a Becket is said have been buried wearing his official 
gloves. This adds to the evidence that gloves, at any rate among 
ecclesiastics, were in common use. A pair of gloves are men- 
tioned in the will of Bishop Riculfus, who died A.D. 9*5, . 

Henry II., who died A.D. 1189, and was buried at '-Fontevrault, 
is described as wearing his coronation robes,* his golden crown on 
his head, and gloves on his hands. When the tombs of King John 
(A.D. 1216) and of Edward I. (A.D. 13 07). were opened in the 
eighteenth century, gloves were found upon the hands of "both these 
monarchs. 

Probably the earliest existing examples of clerical gloves are 
those of William of Wykeham, the founder, in 1380, of New 
College, Oxford, which are now preserved in the Ashmolean 
Museum in that city. 

In the reign of Henry VIII. gloves, worn by the nobility and 
gentry, were generally beautifully and elaborately embroidered ; and 
later on, in the time of good Queen Bess, perfumed gloves became 
quite the fashion among ladies and gentlemen of the Court. 

Early in the sixteenth century a curious custom prevailed of 



4 GLOVES AND SHOES 

having slits cut in the fingers of the gloves, in order to display the 
jewelled rings on the hands of the wearers. 

Stow, in his Annals (1615), page 868, describes how " Millo- 
ners, or Haberdashers had not then any gloves Imbroydered, or 
trimmed with gold, or Silke ; neither Gold nor Imbroydered Girdles 
and Hangers, neither could they make any costly wash or perfume, 
until about the fourteenth or fifteenth yeare of the Queene (Eliza- 
beth) the right honourable Edward de Vere, Earle of Oxford : came 
from Italy, and brought with him Gloves : sweete bagges, a 
perfumed leather Jerkin, and other pleasant things, and that yeer 
the Queene had a payre of perfumed Gloves trimmed onely with 
foure Tuftes or roses of cullered Silke, the Queene tooke such 
pleasure in those Gloves, that she was pictured with those Gloves 
uppon her hands, and for many yeeres after it was called the Earle 
of Oxfords perfume." 

Stow is 1 evidently- in error when he says haberdashers had neither 
embroidered nor- perfumed gloves till the time of Queen Elizabeth, 
as suich articles are -mentioned in various documents at a much 
earlier date, though they may not have been of English manufacture 
or in-common use. 

In /Nichols' 'Progr&s of Queen Elizabeth it is recorded that 
" When' tire Queen, went to Cambridge in 1578 the Vice-Chancellor 
presented a pair' of gloves perfumed and garnished with embroiderie 
and goldsmith's wourke, price lx s . It fortuned that the paper in 
which the gloves were folded to open ; and hir Majestic behoulding 
the beautie of the said gloves, as in great admiration, and in token 
of her thankful acceptation of the same, held up one of her hands, 
and then smelling unto them, put them half waie upon her hands." 

As perfumed gloves became more common, quaint recipes were 
published instructing ladies and others in the art of making 
" washes, cosmeticks and perfumes." The following, extracted from 



GLOVES AND SHOES 5 

'Beauties'' Treasury; or, the Ladies' 1 Fade Mecum, published in 
London in 1705, is of interest : 

" A rare Perfume to scent Gloves, Fans or the like. Musk^ and 
^Amber-Grease of each a scruple, dried leaves of sweet Marjoram, 
beat into fine powder an Ounce, the whitest Gum Tragacanth one 
Ounce, dissolved in half a Pint of White Wine, and into that Liquid 
put the rest, let it simmer over a gentle Fire and wilst it is so doing 
put in a scruple of Civet, and take off the composition, when 
having prepared your Gloves by laying them smooth and even on a 
clean Board or Carpet with a Brush dipt in this gently go over 
them, and when that is dry, do it a second time, and after that a 
third time, let them dry in the Shade and it will be a very pleasant 
wholesome and lasting Scent." Another recipe from the same little 
volume is headed " The Roman and Millan Perfume for Gloves," 
and among the ingredients mentioned therein are rosewater, jas- 
samine, cloves, nutmegs, labdanum, and several of the items named 
in the previous recipe, ending with the words, " The Scent of which 
will greatly refresh and cherish the Vital Spirits." 

The price of perfumed gloves appears to have greatly exceeded 
that of those not so treated. In the Appendix of ^ Roll of 
^Ancient Cookery is the following entry among accounts relating to 
an event in the household of Sir John Nevile, of Chete, Knight. 
" The Marriage of my son in law Roger Rockley and my daughter 
Elizabeth Nevile, the XlVth. of January, in the XVIIth. year of our 
Soveraigne Lord Henry King VIII. 

" Item, for a Pair of perfumed gloves o. 3. 4 
Item, for a Pair of other gloves. O. o. 4 " 

As an emblem the glove has been used for centuries past, some- 
times as a love token, at others as a sign of defiance ; they have 
been presented to kings and queens by loyal subjects when visiting 



6 GLOVES AND SHOES 

the houses of noblemen and gentry or on entering cities and towns, 
and on these state occasions the gloves had probably been specially 
niade and beautifully embroidered. 

Shakespeare makes several of his characters speak of gloves. In 
the Merchant of Venice Portia asks Bassanio for his gloves ; in 
Romeo and yuliet and in the play of Henry V. the glove is spoken 
of. Sir Walter Scott, in The Fair Maid of T^erth^ gives a Simon 
Glower for a father, and in Chapter II. of that novel the fair Catharine 
is described as " laying aside the splendid hawking glove she was 
embroidering for the Lady Drummond." 

A striking feature in ancient gloves is their great length and size ; 
but it must be remembered that Jit was scarcely a consideration in 
early days, the tight and well-fitting glove being comparatively a 
modern invention. 

The fashion, in, the gloves and mittens of the civilian was often 
reproduced, more or less, in the iron gauntlet of the warrior, on 
which chasing or engraving would take the place of jewels and 
embroidery. 

After- the reign of Charles II. the beautifully embroidered gloves 
gradually. gave place to. those of a plainer character, and at the same 
time ceased/ to be', so often used as a love or other token of any 
significance^ Chough even yet it retains some small traces of its past 
importance. At funerals, to this day, gloves are often distributed to 
the mourners, and at what are known as Maiden Sessions the local 
authorities present white gloves to the Judges and Recorders. 



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GLOVES AND SHOES 



1 



PLATE I 

BISHOP WYKEHAM'S GLOVE 

FOURTEENTH CENTURY 

FROM A DRAWING BY THE AUTHOR 

left-hand glove of a pair of great interest and beauty, 
and, taking into consideration their age (517 years), in 
a wonderful state of preservation ; they are made of 
crimson, purl knitted, silk, embroidered on the backs and cuffs with 
gold, now faded and tarnished. The octagon designs round the 
cuffs are separated by small squares of green silk ; a double band of 
gold embroidery encircles each finger and thumb. The entire length 
of the gloves from the tip of the middle finger to the edge of the cuff 
is 9! inches. The cuffs are lined with crimson silk : the circles 
on the back of the hand, with their sixteen flame-pointed arms 
worked in gold, surround the sacred monogram. 

These early ecclesiastical gloves belonged to William of Wyke- 
ham, Bishop of Winchester, the founder of New College, Oxford 
(originally designated St. Mary's College of Winchester in Oxenford), 
in 1379, and were probably worn by him at the opening religious 
ceremonial, April i4th, 1386. 

They are carefully preserved in the Treasury of New College, 
Oxford. 



GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE II 

GLOVES OF KING HENRY VI 

A REMARKABLE pair of fifteenth - century gloves, which 
belonged to Henry VI. They are made of fine brown 
Spanish leather, lined with deer skin, tanned with the hair 
on. The gauntlets reach to the elbow, and can be turned down when 
required. They are described as small enough for a " middle-sized 
woman " ; their total length is 1 8 inches, and the width across the 
top of the gauntlet is 7^ inches. 

The King was concealed, after the battle of Hexham, at Bolton 

Hall, Yorkshire, and these gloves were given by him to Sir Ralph 

Pudsey. They were long treasured at Bolton Hall, and afterwards 

at Hornby Castle, together with a pair of the same monarch's boots. 

The property of Free Public Museums, Liverpool. 



PLATE If 




I J ,nch, 

66 LEROY S'TEET 







ll> 

(l-J L. 

' - 




GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE III 
No. 1 

ARMOURED LEATHER GLOVE 

A LEFT-HAND glove of coarse buff-coloured canvas, with 
plates of russet iron overlapping each other riveted on to 
strips of stout leather, which are stitched on to the glove 
itself. There are eight of these protecting plates on the back of the 
hand, and the same number on the under side, each plate termina- 
ting in a band which is engraved and gilded. From the tip of 
the middle finger to the end of the gauntlet the glove measures 
iol inches. This is an unusual example of a sixteenth -century 
duelling glove. In the Tower of London. 

No. 2 

SCALED LEATHER GLOVE 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A STOUT buff leather glove for the right hand, having a 
gauntlet composed of overlapping leather scales, each a 
quarter of an inch thick, and fastened to a foundation by 
string, a small tuft of which appears on the surface of each scale. 
The gauntlet is split open at the outer side, and is drawn together 
by a lacing of string with metal " points." 

The glove, which measures 14 inches in length, came from the 
Bryn-y-Pys Collection, and is now in the Tower of London. 



10 GLOVES AND SHOES 



No. 3 

A CHAIN MAIL GLOVE 

interesting glove, for the left hand, is made of a whitish 
buff leather, which is entirely lined with fine riveted chain 
mail, within which is a lining of thin canvas to prevent the 
mail from chafing the hand of the wearer. Gloves of this kind 
were a cunning device of the glove-makers of the sixteenth century, 
and were used by duellers in what may be called the period 
of the dagger, when both rapier and dagger, or main gouche^ were 
employed in conjunction with each other in the deadly duel. 
Captain A. Hutton, in his excellent book, The Sword and the 
Centuries^ describes how, with the aid of a mail-lined glove, a weapon 
could be seized by its blade and wrenched from the hand of an 
opponent, even though the edges of the blade of his dagger might 
be furnished with sawlike teeth set backward like tiny barbs. 

This glove came from the Bardini Collection, and is now in the 
possession of W. H. Fenton, Esqr. 



{~- 

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o u. 

h. - 




PLATE II' 




c< 

---* 




GLOVES AND SHOES " 



PLATE IV 

CHAIN MAIL AND PLATE GLOVE 

A SIMILAR glove to that given in the preceding plate 
(No. 3), but in this case it has lost its outer covering of 
leather. The gauntlet is strengthened by plates of steel, 
6| inches long and riveted to the chain mail, giving great protection 
to the forearm against a slashing cut from a sword. This glove 
measures i 5 inches from the tip of the middle finger to the bottom 
of the gauntlet, and is for the left hand. 

In the collection of the Castle Museum, Norwich. 



12 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE V 

A PAIR OF SCALED LEATHER GLOVES 



SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 



A FINE pair of gauntlet gloves like the one given on Plate III., 
but much longer, measuring a total of 1 8 inches ; the 
leather overlapping scales are notched at the edges, as are 
also the tabs by which the four leather buttons confine the openings 
of the outer sides of the gauntlets. 

Captain A. Hutton exhibits a very strikingly similar pair of 
gloves in the Museum at Whitehall, which he describes as being of 
buffalo leather, and as having been worn by a cavalier during the 
Great Rebellion, 1645-1660. 

The gloves are in perfect condition, and are in the collection of 
the Author. 



/' ; /'/: r 




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Hudson F. 







/ V\ K X* X 



PLATE \'I 





GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE VI 

STEEL MITTEN GAUNTLET 

SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

A elegant mitten locking gauntlet of steel, engraved on the 
back of the hand and on the gauntlet, which is finished 
off by a roped edging, a good example of the fashion of 
ornamentation of gloves of both the military and civilians of the 
period. 

From a drawing by the Author. In the Tower of London. 



14 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE VII 
No. 1 

HENRY VIII. GAUNTLET 

KGHT-HAND locking gauntlet of polished steel, slightly in- 
laid with gold and engraved. The views represent the mitten 
closed and open respectively. When closed, the weapon, 
held in the hand, could not be displaced, as the mitten part of the 
glove was fastened securely by a projecting rivet and hook. The 
ornamentation, by means of engraving and inlaying, is of a similar 
character to the embroidery to be found on the gloves of civilians. 

This gauntlet belongs to a suit of armour worn by Henry VIII., 
and is in the Tower of London. 



1 



No. 2 

STEEL MITTENS 

SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

fine mitten gauntlets of the sixteenth century. 
From drawings by the Author. 
In the Tower of London. 








<n 





PLATE I' IU 



-V 






GLOVES AND SHOES 15 



PLATE VIII 

SIR ANTHONY DENNY'S GLOVE 

ONE of a pair of leather gloves with white satin-covered 
gauntlets cut into panels and embroidered with blue and red 
silk in feather stitch , with applique raised padded work, en- 
riched with seed pearls and gold thread, gimp and spangles, and 
further ornamented with gold and silver lace. 

On the panels of the gauntlet appear the Crown over the Tudor 
Rose, alternated with the Thistle ; while between the panels and the 
wrist are a lion, snails, and sheep. 

These gloves were given by King Henry VIII. to Sir Anthony 
Denny, Knight, Privy Councillor and friend, and later on an 
executor of the King. They are fine specimens of English work ; 
their total length is i 5 inches. Sir Edward Denny, Bart., presented 
them to the nation, and they are now in the Victoria and Albert 
Museum, South Kensington. 



16 GLOVES AND SHOES 



GLOVES OF HENRY VIII 

See Frontispiece 

ONE of the most beautiful pair of gloves probably in exist- 
ence, and fortunately in a fine state of preservation. They 
are made of thin buff leather, light in colour, and measure 
12! inches in length. 

The gauntlets are divided into eight panels, four in front and 
four at back, the material being white satin embroidered with flowers 
and foliage in esthetic-coloured silk, the stems of which are of gold 
thread. Each panel is edged with spangled gold lace and lined with 
rose-coloured silk ; a gusset is inserted between each panel to give 
strength to the upper part ; a rucking of rose-coloured silk, edged 
with gold lace, divides the glove from the gauntlet at the wrist. 

The gloves are reputed to have belonged to Henry VIII., and 
are of so rich a character as to justify the statement. 

They are the property of Alfred de la Fontaine, Esqr. 




P; rfc r. 











1 





Hudson P., 



66 




GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE IX 

HAWKING GLOVE OF HENRY VIII 



FROM A DRAWING BY THE AUTHOR 



A interesting and authenticated hawking glove of Henry VIII. 
It is made of stout buff leather, with a short gauntlet 
curiously ornamented with circular discs worked in dull red 
and greenish blue thread, intermixed with silver wire ; a smaller 
disc, of the same colours, is placed at the lower part of the little 
finger ; while a singular pattern is traced with thread on the palm 
of the hand. The cuff is lined some 2\ inches up with a fine 
canvas, which is turned over and outwards to form an edging, the 
glove itself being lined with stout white kid ; the back of the hand 
is quite plain ; the entire length of the glove is 1 1| inches, and 
measures 5 inches across the wrist. The labels on the palm refer to 
the number and description in the original catalogue of the "John 
Tradescant Collection, 1656," in which are grouped these items : 



Henry the 8 his 



' Stirrups 
Hawkes-hoods 



I Gloves " 
The glove is treasured in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. 



is GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE X 

WHITE GLOVES 

SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of gloves similar to those attributed to Henry VIII. 
(Coloured Plate), having beautifully embroidered gauntlets 
cut into panels, which are edged with bespangled lace. 
The designs on the panels consist of flowers and birds ; at the wrist 
of the left-hand glove is a richly laced rucking; unfortunately this 
has disappeared from the right-hand glove. They are attributed 
to the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and were at one time in the 
Isham Collection. 

Victoria and Albert Museum, South Kensington. 



z j 

6< : 




< 

-T. 





GLOVES AND SHOES 19 



PLATE XI 

A LADY'S GLOVE 

SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

A LADY'S right-hand glove of light buff kid leather. The 
total length from the tip of the middle finger to the bottom 
of the gauntlet is 17 inches, the middle finger measures 
3 inches ; the seams are herringbone stitched with pale salmon- 
coloured silk, the narrow fringe at the side and bottom of the 
gauntlet being of the same material and colour. 

On the back of the hand is embroidered, in silver wire, a dragon 
with legs and beak of green silk; the monster has originally been 
supported by a floral design, of which the greater part has dis- 
appeared. Three small tufts of salmon-coloured silk are ranged 
across the knuckles, a fourth being placed, quite alone, at the lower 
corner of the gauntlet. [A similar glove was exhibited at the Stuart 
Collection in 1889 (No. 453 in the Catalogue), and was described 
as having belonged to Charles I.] 

The owner of this lady's glove states that it belonged to his great- 
aunt, who died some twenty-four years ago at the age of 86, that it 
came to her through a friend who had it as a gift from a knight 
of Windsor, and that it had always been regarded as having belonged 
to Queen Elizabeth. 

The property of John Hallam, Esqr. 



20 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XII 

LADY SHERINGTON'S GLOVES 

LATE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of white leather gloves, the gauntlets embroidered 
with silver and silk of esthetic colouring ; the fringe is of 
silver, and the lining is a pale pink silk. Total length 
from tip of middle finger to point of the fringe n\ inches. These 
gloves are reputed to have belonged to Lady Sherington, of Laycock 
Abbey, in Wiltshire. Sir William Sherington purchased the Abbey 
in 1544, and in 1574 his brother Sir Henry, who had succeeded to 
the estate, entertained Queen Elizabeth here. There are monuments 
to the family in Laycock Church. Date of gloves, late sixteenth 
century. 

The property of Mrs. B. Morrell. 



PLATE .\!1 





1'LAfK XI 1 1 






, ^, 

;>' c!i, 
66 LCROY ; 



GLOVES AND SHOES 21 



PLATE XIII 

MITTENS 

SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of mittens, or fingerless gloves, of crimson velvet, 
embroidered on the backs, and in a lesser degree on the 
palms, with a conventional design in gold thread. The 
hands and thumbs are edged with gold-thread cord. The gauntlets, 
covered with white satin, are cut into panels at the bottom and 
embroidered with flowers in various coloured silks together with 
conventional leaves, and pendent semicircular designs in gold and 
silver thread and spangles, and tiny beads are sprinkled about the 
ground. 

The length of the gloves is 16 inches, and their date late six- 
teenth century. They were given by Queen Elizabeth to her maid 
of honour, Margaret Edgcumbe, wife of Sir Edward Denny, Kt., 
Baronet. 

Presented by Sir Edward Denny, Bart., to the South Kensington 
Museum. 



22 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XIV 

QUEEN ELIZABETH'S GLOVES AT OXFORD 

A exceptionally beautiful pair of white kid gloves, with long 
gauntlets richly embroidered with gold gimp wire and 
terminated with a gold fringe two inches deep ; the em- 
broidery is continued round the base of the thumbs, but the stitching 
of the finger-seams is quite plain. The total length of the gloves, 
including the fringe, is 16^ inches. 

These gloves are excellent examples of the period, and are in 
almost perfect preservation. They were presented to Queen Elizabeth 
when she visited the University, and were left by Her Majesty at 
Oxford. 

Till recently they were treasured in the Bodleian Library, but are 
now among the relics in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 




'' 

t 

, 




PL i ri: xr 





GLOVES AND SHOES 23 



PLATE XV 

AN ELIZABETHAN GLOVE 

FROM A DRAWING BY THE AUTHOR 

AONG the interesting relics exhibited at the New Gallery, 
London, in the early part of 1902, was a pair of gloves of 
rich brown-coloured leather, measuring in length some 
12 inches, which were described as having belonged to Queen 
Elizabeth. 

A singular kind of ornamentation is obtained by cutting out 
parts of the leather and inserting under the holes so made a grey- 
coloured silk backing, the edges of the pattern being finished off 
with herringbone stitching in yellow silk. The confining bands, 
or loops, at the openings of the gauntlets are of grey silk, the fringe 
being composed of a reddish silk material. 

The gloves are in rather a worn and dilapidated condition. 
The property of William Henry Taylor, Esqr. 



24 GLOVES AND SHOES 



1 



PLATE XVI 

LORD DARNLEYS CUFF 

FROM A DRAWING BY THE AUTHOR 

cuff, or gauntlet, from a glove, said to have been worked 
by Mary, Queen of Scots, and worn by Lord Darnley 
in 1555. The designs are in various coloured silks and 
silver thread, and the edges of the gauntlet are finished off with lace. 
They were No. 349 in the Catalogue of the Exhibition of Stuart 
Relics at the New Gallery, London, in 1889, and are the property 
of W. Murray Threipland, Esqr. 



? !^ \Yi' VVS 'I 

m^^z-m^'im 




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^.^f^',,^- 

S'^^fci,ii lns ' 





iblic 






L 




PLATE XI- Jl 





GLOVES AND SHOES 25 



PLATE XVII 

GLOVE OF MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS 

A VERY beautiful glove for the left hand, worn by the un- 
fortunate Queen of Scots on the morning of her execution. 
It is made of a light, cool, buff-coloured leather ; the 
elaborate embroidery on the gauntlet is of silver wire gimp and silk 
of various colours ; the roses are of pale and dark blue and two 
shades of very pale crimson ; the foliage, or trees, is of two shades 
of esthetic green ; a bird in flight, with a long tail, figures con- 
spicuously in the design ; the whole of the embroidered pattern is 
repeated on the other side of the gauntlet. That part of the glove 
forming the cuff is lined with bright crimson satin, a narrow band 
of which is turned outwards, and forms a binding on to which is 
sewn the gold lace ; to the points of this are fastened groups of 
small pendant silver spangles. The opening at the side of the 
gauntlet is connected by two broad bands of crimson silk, now 
much faded, each being decorated at the edges with silver lace. 
The length of the glove is 14^ inches from the tip of the middle 
finger to the extreme point of the lace and spangles. 

The glove certainly belongs to the period to which it is assigned, 
and it has been treasured through many generations by the Dayrell 
family, as the veritable glove of Mary Stuart. 

The following letter proves conclusively that Marmaduke Dayrell, 
or Darell, was present at the execution. 

The Dayrell Family of Hinxton, Cambs. Copy of the original 
letter found among His Majesty's Records in the Tower of London 



26 GLOVES AND SHOES 

(A.D. 1806), and received by Mr. Dayrell from Mr. Lysons, and 
now in the Saffron Walden Museum, with a glove said to have 
been given to Marmaduke Dayrell by the Queen at the time of 
her execution : 

" The convenience of this messenger, with the newes wch. this place dothe 
presentlye yelde : occasioneth me to trouble you wth theis few lynes. I double 
not but wth you aswell as in the contries hereaboutes, there hathe beene of late 
sondrye rumors bruted concerninge the Sco : Queene prisoner here ; wch all, as 
they have bene hitherto untrewe ; so now yt is most true, that she hathe endured 
that fatall stroke this daie that will excuse her from beinge accessarye to any like 
matters that may happen henceforthe. 

" Betweene X and XI of the clocke this present Thursdaie she was beheaded 
in the Hall of this Castle ; there beinge present at yt as Commissioners, only the 
Earle of Shrewsburge and the Earle of Kent, fower other Earles we joyned wth 
them in the Commission but came not ; The Sherive of this Shire Sr Rich : 
Knightlye, Sr Edwarde Montague, wth dwrs other Gentlemen of good accompte, 
wer also here at the Execution. Touchinge the manner of yt all due order was 
most carefully observed in yt she herself endured yt as wee must all truely saie 
that were eye wittnesses with great courage, and shewe of magnanimitye, albeit 
in some other respects she ended not so well as yt to be wished. The order for 
her funerall, yt not yet determined uppon ; but wilbe very shortlye, as also for 
her people, who (wee thinke) shal be safelye conducted to their native countries. 

"Thus have you brieflie, that wch wilbe no double very shortlie reported 
unto you more at large. In the meane tyme I beseeche you accepte in good pte 
this small shewe of my duetifull remembraunce of you. And so wth my 
humble comendacons I leave you to the mercifull ptection of the Almightie. 

"ffrom ffatheringaie Castle viij th of ffebruarye, 1586. 

" Yor poore kinsman to commaunde 

" Mar : Darell 
To the right woorshipple Mr. Willm Darell Esquire hat his house at Littlecott." 

For and against the probability of the glove having actually 
formed a part of the Queen's dress on the fatal morning we have the 
statement made in Froude's History of England, p. 332, vol. xii., 
that the Queen wore " a robe of black satin : her jacket was of 
black satin also looped and slashed and trimmed with velvet. After 



GLOVES AND SHOES 27 

her prayers were finished, she rose and prepared." The two 
executioners offered to assist her, but were refused with " c Truly, 
my Lords,' turning with a smile to the Earls standing near, < I never 
had such grooms waiting on me before ! ' " The black robe was 
next removed, below it was a petticoat of crimson velvet. The black 
jacket followed, and under the jacket was a body of crimson satin. 
One of her ladies handed her a pair of crimson sleeves, with which 
she hastily covered her arms ; and thus she stood on the black 
scaffold, with the black figures all around her, blood-red from head 
to foot." May it not be assumed that the Queen was clad entirely 
in black on entering the hall ? And if such were the case, would 
she be wearing light leather gloves, embroidered with gay colours 
and silver lace ? Again, Froude says : " Orders had been given 
that everything which she had worn should be immediately destroyed, 
that no relic should be carried off to work imaginary miracles " 
" beads, Paternoster, handkerchief each article of dress which the 
blood had touched, with the cloth on the block and on the scaffold, 
was burnt in the hall fire in the presence of the crowd." If this 
glove was worn on the morning of the execution, it may have 
escaped with other matters, which were probably removed before she 
knelt at the block, and therefore would be untouched by the blood. 
It is a curious fact that the lining of the gauntlet is of crimson satin^ 
the same " blood-red " colour mentioned by Froude ! Possibly one, 
if not both, of the executioners may have been gentlemen of 
position, and if so, why not a Dayrell ? And if this were the case, 
what more likely than that in place of the usual money fee, which 
would have been given to a common executioner, the Queen may 
have given her glove as a last present or fee, being aware that it was 
a gentleman of position who was acting as her executioner. 

The drawing from which the photograph is taken was made 
from the relic by the author, and an outline drawing, together 



28 GLOVES AND SHOES 

with the description of the execution, was contributed by him to 
The Reliquary in 1882. 

Since the drawing was made the glove has been reversed in its 
case in the museum, and now displays the back of the hand. 

In Fairholt's Costume in England a small illustration of this 
glove is given (p. 511), but it is inaccurate in nearly every detail. 

The glove was lent by the late Colonel Francis Dayrell, of 
Camps, in Cambridgeshire, and is still in the Saffron Walden 
Museum. 



Pi A : i -V/Y// 




- \ i-^ | ' 




1 






GLOVES AND SHOES 29 



PLATE XVIII 

SHAKESPEARE'S GLOVES 

A PAIR of grey buckskin gloves with gold thread embroidery ; 
the gauntlets have a gold fringe sewn on to an edging of 
pale pink silk. The gloves measure a total length of 
14 inches, the bottom of the gauntlets being 7 inches across, while 
at the wrists they are 43 inches. 

These precious relics are the property of Dr. Horace Furness, of 
Wallingford, Pennsylvania, who gives the following very interesting 
letters relating to their history : 

(From John Ward to David Garrick.) 

" LEOMINSTER, 

"May 3U/, 1769. 

" DEAR SIR, On reading the newspapers, I find you are preparing a Grand 
Jubilee, to be kept at Stratford-upon-Avon, to the memory of the immortal 
Shakespeare. I have sent you a pair of gloves which have often covered his 
hands ; they were made me a present by a descendant of the family, when 
myself and Company went over there from Warwick, in the year 1746, to per- 
form the play of Othello, and a benefit, for repairing his monument in the Great 
Church, which we did gratis, the whole of the receipts being expended on that 
alone. The Person who gave them to me, William Shakespeare by name, 
assured me his father had often declared to him, they were the identical gloves 
of our great poet ; and when he delivered them to me, said, * Sir, these are the 
only property that remains to our famous relation ; my father possessed, and sold, 
the estate he left behind him, and these are all the recompense I can make you 
for this night's performance.' The donor was a glazier by trade, very old and, to 
the best of my memory, lived in the street leading from the Town Hall down to 
the river. On my coming to play in Stratford about three years after, he was 
dead. The father of him and our poet were brother's children. The veneration 
I bear to the memory of our great author and player, makes me wish to have 



30 GLOVES AND SHOES 

these relics preserved to his immortal memory ; and I am led to think that 
I cannot deposit them, for that purpose, in the hands of any person so proper as 

our modern Roscius. ,, , . 

" 1 am, Sir, 

" Your most humble servant, 
" (To) Mr. David Garrick." " J OHN WARD ' 

On the death of Garrick the gloves passed to his widow, who 
died in 1822, whose will contained the following bequest : " I give 
to Mrs. Siddons a pair of gloves which were Shakespeare's, and were 
presented by one of his family to my late dear husband, during the 
Jubilee at Stratford-upon-Avon." (Mrs. Garrick has evidently for- 
gotten that John Ward gave them to her husband.) 

Mrs. Siddons bequeathed them to her daughter, Mrs. George 
Combe, by whom they were given to Mrs. Kemble, and by this ever 
dear and gracious lady to their present possessor. 

(F. A. Kemble to Dr. Horace Furness.) 

"17 January, 1874. 

" MY DEAR HORACE (in spite of your literary labours and honours you must 
be such to me), The worship of Relics is not the most exalted form of human 
devotion, but the meanest garment that ever has but clipped one whom we love 
and revere becomes in some measure dear and venerable to us for his sake, and so 
we may be permitted to keep Shakespeare's gloves with affectionate regard. As 
these were in Garrick's Collection, and given by Mrs. Garrick to my Aunt, they 
may be genuine, and I offer them to you as a token of the great pleasure it has 
given me to see your name upon the American Variorum Edition of Shakespeare. 
Among my books and papers I think I have a few ' remains ' of John Kemble 
and Mrs. Siddons which I shall feel happy in placing in your hands. You will 
value them for your own sake and perhaps a little for that of your old friend. 

" F. A. KEMBLE. 

" P.S. The gloves are in the box in which Mrs. George Combe (Cecilia 
Siddons) gave them to me." 

The gloves are now in America, in the possession of Dr. Horace 
Howard Furness. 



PLATE XIX 



w 




^c i 




Utilise; \' i \ 




GLOVES AND SHOES si 



PLATE XIX 

GLOVES OF KING JAMES I 



1 



"^HESE gloves, attributed to James I., are of a darkish brown 
leather, measuring from the tip of the middle finger to the 
edge of the lace on the gauntlet \2\ inches ; the gauntlets 
are open at the side some 3^ inches, and are edged with fine gold 
twisted lace, which is continued entirely round the gauntlet ; the 
embroidery is of silk and gold and silver thread, a conspicuous 
emblem being the Scottish thistle, in partly natural colours, the 
colouring generally being what may be described as esthetic. 

The insides of the gauntlets are lined with red silk. From the 
beautiful embroidered work, and from the whole character of the 
gloves, they may certainly be supposed to have belonged to a royal 
personage. 

They are in excellent preservation, and are carefully treasured by 
their owner, Alfred de la Fontaine, Esqr. 



32 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XX 

EARLY SEVENTEENTH -CENTURY GLOVES 

A" unusual and singular pair of gloves of leather, the back 
seams of the ringers being stitched with gold thread ; the 
gauntlets are very deep and are covered with alternate 
bands of red satin and gold-thread ribbon-lace, with an edging of 
silver tinsel, and fringed with spangled gold thread. 

The total length of the gloves is 17 inches. King James I. 
gave these gauntleted gloves to Sir Edward Denny, Kt. (afterwards 
Earl of Norwich), who, as Sheriff of Hertfordshire, received the 
King during his progress from Scotland to London. 

Presented by Sir Edward Denny, Bart., to the South Kensington 
Museum. 




f^'c 



I'LA II \ \ 





- 



: , 



GLOVES AND SHOES 33 



PLATE XXI 

GLOVES OF KING CHARLES I 

THE frequent visits of King Charles to the mansion of 
Sir Thomas Mil ward (whom His Majesty knighted on one 
of these occasions) at Eaton Dovedale, near Uttoxeter, 
justifies the assertion that the two pairs of gloves, given on this 
and the following plate, belonged to King Charles, and that they 
were left by him at Eaton Dovedale on one or other of his visits. 
They are of buff leather, lined with white kid, the gauntlets being 
embroidered in a simple manner with gold braid and having a rather 
deep edging of spangled gold lace, the spangles themselves being 
also of gold, which is very unusual. The confining loops at the 
openings at the sides of the gauntlet are of ribbed silk, the colour 
being royal purple ; the same coloured silk forms the lining for 
about 2\ inches inside the gauntlets, and turning outwards and over 
gives the foundation on which is sewn the gold lace edging ; the 
seams of the fingers and thumbs are also outlined with gold braid. 
The total length of the gloves is 14 inches. There is a Van Dyck-ish 
look about these gloves, which assists the belief that they belonged 
to the martyr King. Treasured with the gloves the Milwards have 
preserved an old water-colour drawing of the family mansion, on 
the back of which is written, in a bold hand, the following : " The 
ruins of Eton Dovedale near Uttoxeter in the County of Derby 
the residence of Sir Thomas Milward who there entertained King 
Charles ... in the year. . . . His eldest son married Sarah 
Daughter of Levinge Esqr., of Sheepey in the Coy of Leicester, 



34 GLOVES AND SHOES 

by whom he had one only son, The Revnd. Thos. Milward, 
educated at Eton. He disinherited his son and to his eternal 
disgrace left this fine estate to his brother Wm. Milward, an 
Attorney in Uttoxeter, who sold it for an old song and cheated the 
Lawful Heir of it." The watermark date on the paper on which 
this is written is 1794. These interesting gloves have quite recently 
passed out of the keeping of the Milward family into the collection 
of the Author. 



77~ 
. 

I 

% 



PLATE XX 11 







- 


. 

:r 




GLOVES AND SHOES 35 



PLATE XXII 

GLOVES OF KING CHARLES I 



I 



plate gives the second pair of gloves left by Charles I. 
at Eton Dovedale, which have also been till lately preserved 
by the descendants of Sir Thomas Mil ward. This pair of 
gloves are of buff leather, rather more elaborately embroidered with 
gold and silver braid on the gauntlet, back and front, while the 
fingers are plainly stitched. The confining loops at the side are 
wide and of light orange-crimson ribbed silk, with a small edging of 
gold lace, and there is spangled lace at the bottom of the gauntlets. 
The length of the glove is \2\ inches. In the middle of the palm 
of the left hand a patch of thin leather has been neatly inserted 
(evidently contemporaneous with the date of the glove) to repair 
a hole which may probably have been caused by the wearer con- 
stantly resting the hand on the pommel of the sword. These gloves, 
together with those on the preceding plate, came direct from the 
Milward representatives into the possession of their present owner, 
A. Clark-Kennedy, Esqr. 



36 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXIII 

GLOVE OF KING CHARLES I 

MANY relics connected with the White King are to be found 
in private collections, and probably the most interesting 
of such relics are those used by His Majesty on the day 
of the execution. The glove here illustrated, by a drawing by the 
Author, is said to have been given to an attendant on the scaffold, 
by the King. It is of white leather, the seams of the fingers are 
stitched with silver thread, and tiny silver spangles are grouped on 
the knuckles ; the embroidery on the gauntlet and the lace on the 
bottom edge are also of silver. The total length from the tip of the 
middle finger to the point of the lace is 13 inches. 

This glove was exhibited (No. 374 in the Catalogue) at the 
Exhibition of Stuart Relics at the New Gallery, London, in il 
by its owner, V. F. Bennett Stanford, Esqr. 



FLATK XXIII 






.-"rich, 

63 LSRO/ SI F.EET ^. , 
:?i , -, - .<*, 







si i ' 
60 i 



'"-".I f''^^2~^P^ 







GLOVES AND SHOES 37 



PLATE XXIV 
No. 1 

GLOVE OF KING CHARLES II 

ONE of a pair of stout buff leather riding gloves, entirely 
without ornamentation. They were exhibited at the Stuart 
Collection at the New Gallery in 1889 (No. 477 in the 
Catalogue), and were thus described: "Presented to Edmund Lovel, 
great-great-grandfather of the present owner, by King Charles II. 
Mr. Lovel had raised a troop of horse for the service and restoration 
of the King, who, meeting him at the head of his men, drew the 
gloves from his hands and gave them to Mr. Lovel as a memento." 
The property of Mrs. Speid. 

No. 2. 

A GLOVE 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A GLOVE of unusual shape, made of grey leather, and em- 
broidered on the back of the hand with a floral design 
in dull green and red silks. The fingers and outer side 
of the glove are herringbone stitched. The total measurement from 
finger-tips to gauntlet is 15^ inches. 

The glove is attributed to King Charles I., and was shown 
among the Stuart relics at the New Gallery, London, in 1889, by 
the possessor, Captain Still. 



38 GLOVES AND SHOES 



No. 3. 

A GLOVE 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A PALE buff leather glove, poorly embroidered with silver 
thread, pink, yellow, and white silk. The glove is in 
rather a dilapidated condition. It was No. 386 in the 
Catalogue of the New Gallery Exhibition in 1889, and was lent by 
David Seton, Esqr. 



Is. 




PLAT I. \ V, 





Huton Pwk Eranch, 

,-r.cY S-"^- T ^y 

. * -*- \\&/ 

v ^x 



GLOVES AND SHOES 39 



PLATE XXV 

THE NASEBY GLOVES 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

Af\RT from the extreme elegance of this pair of lady's gloves, 
there is attached to them an historic and pathetic interest. 
Till within a few years ago they were treasured by a lady 
named Clarence, who died at Eversden, in Cambridgeshire. This 
lady was a native of Naseby, and was connected with the Ashby 
family of that place. The gloves are believed to have belonged to a 
Royalist lady who was at Naseby with the Cavalier army when the 
fatal defeat of King Charles took place (June 14-th, 1645), and that 
in the hurried flight which ensued these gloves, together with many 
other belongings of the Royalists, were left behind. The gloves, 
which are very small, are made of thin light-coloured buff leather, 
which is a pure white on the inside ; the gauntlets are of maroon 
silk cut into panels, three in front and three at the back, and 
delicately embroidered with gold cord and edged with gold lace, 
with a lining of blue silk ; their total length is 1 2 inches, and they 
are in excellent preservation. 

In the collection of the Author. 



40 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATES XXVI AND XXVII 

GLOVES OF OLIVER CROMWELL 

A HIGHLY interesting and well-authenticated pair of gloves 
which belonged to the Protector. Their sturdy and 
workaday appearance at once suggests the character of 
their former owner. They are made of stout darkish grey leather, 
with plain stitching of the ringer seams and on the back of the 
hands ; the gauntlets are wide and have a heavy thick fringe of 
twisted brown silk about 5 inches long, the total length of the 
gloves being, from the tip of the middle finger to the end of 
the fringe, 17 inches ; the breadth across the knuckles is 4^- inches. 
They are in excellent preservation, owing probably to the fact that 
till quite within what may be called recent times they have been 
carefully treasured by some member of Cromwell's family. They 
came into the possession of the writer in 1877, having been 
purchased in September of that year from Mr. Charles Martin, 
of Fordham, Cambridgeshire, who died at the age of ninety-two. 
Mr. Martin acquired them as a gift from an old lady, a native (like 
himself) of Wicken, a village near Fordham, whose mother had 
been at one time housekeeper either at the house of the Cromwells 
or with William Russell, of Fordham Abbey, near Wicken, the 
son-in-law of Henry Cromwell. It may be mentioned that Henry 
Cromwell, a son of Oliver, married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Francis 
Russell, of Chippenham (not far from Wicken), and occupied a 



PLATE XXXI 





[LATE XXI -II 



' k 





,c Public 






GLOVES AND SHOES 

farm and house, known as Spinney Abbey, in the parish of Wicken, 
where he died March 23rd, 1674, and was buried, together with 
his wife and several other members of his family, within the altar 
rails of Wicken Church. Frances, a daughter of Oliver Cromwell, 
married Sir John Russell, a resident in the district, and died 
in 1720. 

Henry Cromwell's only surviving daughter, Elizabeth, married 
William Russell, of Fordham Abbey, mentioned above, and died in 
1711; and their daughter, Mary, married Robert D'Aye (died 1765), 
who with his wife is buried near the north porch of the church at 
Soham, a village within a couple of miles of Wicken. 

From local accounts these gloves would appear to have 
been in the possession of William Russell and his wife Elizabeth 
(Cromwell), certainly in the middle of the eighteenth century. 

Some members of the Cromwell family resided in the neighbour- 
hood as late as 1787. 

Inside the left-hand gauntlet is attached a worn and faded piece 
of paper, on which, in antique writing, now somewhat obliterated, 
is the following inscription : 

" These gloves did . . . . ng to 
Oliver Cromwell and was the 
gift of a gentleman of 
Huntingdon. 1 704. 



Cromwell was a native of 
Huntingdon^ that family having 
resided there many ages" 

The date, which evidently refers to the time of the writing on 
the label, brings the memorandum to within forty-six years of the 
death of Oliver, and from the wording of the memorandum it 
would appear the gloves were a presentation from an admirer of 



42 GLOVES AND SHOES 

the Protector. It is a matter of history that several generations 
of the Cromwell family married, lived, died, and were buried in 
the Wicken district. 

In the collection of the Author. 



cT 









. 

QriNG DEPtf^*' 



I-' LATE .V.V/7// 





GLOVES AND SHOES 43 



PLATE XXVIII 

GLOVES OF THE LORD PROTECTOR 



I 



usual costume of Oliver Cromwell does not at any time 
seem to have been of a gay character, therefore this pair of 
gloves attributed to him are the more striking. They are 
of a light buff-coloured leather. The gauntlets are of crimson silk, 
cut into panels and beautifully embroidered with silk in green, 
yellow, and blue, intermixed with gold and silver thread ; a bird 
with yellow plumage is perched on a tree in the centre of the three 
panels ; the lace which has at one time edged the panels has dis- 
appeared. The inside of the gloves is white, and a crimson silk 
lining reaches 2^ inches up the gauntlets. The total length of the 
gloves is 13 inches. The following description is given by the 
present possessor of the relics : 

" These gloves were found in a walnut- wood escritoire, having 
a false back and secret drawers, which belonged to the Lord 
Protector, Oliver Cromwell. The gloves were presented in the 
year 1794 to Mr. John Legge, of Reading, by Madame Schomberg, 
of renowned descent. John Legge, of Katesgrove, Berks, before 
his decease in 1810, gave them to his nephew, with whom they 
remained till they passed into the possession of their present owner, 
a relative of the above John Legge." 

It may be added that the watch of Oliver Cromwell, now in 
the British Museum, was once the property of this same family. 

The property of Mrs. A. H. Simpson-Carson. 



44 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXIX 

GLOVES OF CHARLES II 

IMMEDIATELY after the crushing defeat of the Royalists at 
Worcester, on September 3rd, 1651, the young King escaped 
from the city with a few followers ; but previous to starting 
His Majesty made some hurried changes in his costume, and, 
according to tradition, this was done in a house situated at the 
corner of New Street and the corn market. Mr. Allan Fea, in 
his admirable book entitled The Flight of the King, says : " Charles 
had barely time to effect his escape by a back door as Corbett 
(a Parliamentary officer) entered by the front ; and the story is 
strengthened by the fact that the King, in detailing his adventures 
to the Queen-mother and the Court, upon his safe arrival at the 
Louvre, described how he slipped out of Worcester, and " how 
near he was taken there, first in the fort and after in his chamber." 
Some of the King's apparel was long treasured in a house in the 
parish of Whiteladies, within the city of Worcester,* the gloves here 
illustrated being among the articles preserved. The gloves are made 
of thin brown leather, the seams of the fingers and thumb being 
covered with silver-wire thread, terminating on the back of the 
hand considerably beyond the knuckles, thus giving a false idea of 
the length of the fingers. The gauntlets are also trimmed with 
silver stitching ; and white spangled silver lace, sewn on to a band 
of pale blue silk, gives a finish to the whole. The gauntlets are 

* At the Whiteladies, in the Tything, are the remains of a nunnery, hence the name. 



GLOVES AND SHOES 

split open some 5 inches at the sides, and are retained in position 
by broad bands of blue ribbed silk. The total length of the gloves, 
from the tip of the middle finger to the point of the lace, is 
14 inches. 

In the possession of A. Clark-Kennedy, Esqr. 



46 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXX 

A PAIR OF WHITE GLOVES 

SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of stout white leather gloves, apparently once the 
property of a person of considerable stature, to judge 
from their size. The gauntlets are nicely embroidered 
with metallic thread of gold and silver, parts of the work being 
raised by means of a red wool padding. Till recently these gloves 
were in the possession of a family in Warwickshire. They are now 
in the collection of Seymour Lucas, Esqr., R.A. 



1'LATK -V.V.V 













f 

3 

, 




PLATE XXXI 





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GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXXI 

BROWN GLOVES 

SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of gloves of a rich brown-coloured leather, measuring 
12-f- inches from tip of the middle finger to the extreme 
edge of the fringe. 

The gauntlets open on the outer side, as is usual, and are taste- 
fully embroidered on both back and front with gold and silver 
thread. The fingers are plain stitched, and the inside of the gloves 
are of white kid. These also came from the same family as the 
previously illustrated gloves (Plate XXX.), and are the property of 
Seymour Lucas, Esqr., R.A. 



48 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXXII 

A SPANISH GLOVE 

SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

A VERY beautiful glove, richly and thickly embroidered on 
the gauntlet with flowers, birds, a cornucopia, a figure, etc., 
and at the opening at the side are three elegant tassels. 
The date of this exquisite piece of work is of the latter part of the 
sixteenth century, and was formerly the property of Monsieur Spitzer. 
It is now in the South Kensington Museum. 



\ 




x 



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, J? (" ' r. . : ( H arch, 




PLATE XXXI II 








GLOVES AND SHOES 






PLATE XXXIII 

A LADY'S GLOVES 

LATE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

pair of gloves, of elaborate and rich character, were 
evidently once the property of a lady of quality. They are 
of pale warm-coloured buff leather. The stitching of the 
seams of the thumbs and fingers, of green silk, is very fine, terminating 
below the knuckles in a pointed pattern ; while a larger and more 
elaborated pattern occurs on the palm of the hand. The gauntlets, 
which are sewn on to the gloves, are of dark claret-coloured silk, 
richly embroidered with gold and silver gimp and gold cord, and 
profusely spangled with silver discs. A design, resembling the 
Prince of Wales' feathers, is thrice repeated on each gauntlet. A 
narrow band of gold lace divides the cuff from the glove. The 
total length is 12! inches. 

In the collection of the Author. 



H 



so GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXXIV 

WHITE GLOVES 

EARLY SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A elegant and dainty pair of light buff leather gloves with 
beautifully embroidered cuffs, with roses and other designs 
in blue, green, and pink gimp, lined out with fine silver 
cord ; the central figure is a bird worked in pink and yellow silk, 
the same pattern being repeated on both back and front of the cuffs. 
A lining of pink silk extends some 3 inches inside the cuff, which 
is finished off with a yellow silk fringe. The total length of the 
gloves is 13 inches. 

In the collection of the Author. 



PLATE .V.V-V/T 











ING D'EPI 



PLATE XXXV 




GLOVES AND SHOES 51 



PLATE XXXV 

A CAVALIER'S GLOVE 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A CAVALIER'S glove, of white doeskin, measuring, from the 
tip of the middle finger to the point of the silver fringe of 
the gauntlet, i if inches. The glove and the gauntlet are 
all in one, and the latter is beautifully embroidered with silver, great 
richness and effect being gained by perforations through the leather 
between the tracery of the silver embroidery ; the gauntlet is lined 
for some 3 inches with a rich yellow silk. An unusual feature in 
the glove is a ventilating arrangement, obtained by a series of five 
rows of small slits, and a similar number of stars, in the palm of the 
hand ; the stitching of the seams is quite plain. 

This interesting glove, now somewhat dilapidated, was worn by 
Captain, or Colonel, Lench at the Battle of Worcester, and a 
drawing of it is given in Sir Sibbald Scott's book, entitled The 
British Army, vol. ii. 

The property of A. S. Field, Esqr. 



52 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXXVI 

A PAIR OF ENGLISH GLOVES 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of neatly embroidered gloves, of English make and 
of serviceable appearance, and quite unlike those made 
expressly for the purpose of presentation and therefore of 
a richer character. Their date is seventeenth century ; they came 
from the Isham Collection, and are now in the South Kensington 
Museum. 



I'LA TK .\.\.\-l 7 





y i' 

66 L"i;0 




- 



G 




PLATE XXXI- 11 








GLOVES AND SHOES 53 



PLATE XXXVII 

A PAIR OF BROWN GLOVES 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of brown leather gloves, plainly stitched at the seams of 
thumb and fingers. The cuff richly ornamented with gold 
and silver wire of extreme fineness, twisted round what 
appears to be flat pieces of quill and sewn into the required position, 
each part of the pattern being framed with gold cord ; small gold 
spangles are dotted about in every available space ; a narrow band of 
red silk, carrying a silver fringe, terminates the whole. The total 
length of the gloves is 12^ inches. Date about 1600. 
In the collection of the Author. 



54 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXXVIII 

No. 1 

A GLOVE 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

E ? T-HAND glove, made of a thick, warm, grey-coloured felt or 
stout leather. The seams of fingers and thumb are stitched 
with silver, and the gauntlet, which is made in two parts, is 
richly embroidered with gold and silver gimp : unfortunately, the 
lace or fringe edging has disappeared from the gauntlet; the total 
length is 14 inches. 

In the collection of Seymour Lucas, Esqr., R.A. 

No. 2 

THE PASTON HALL GLOVE 

A interesting glove, probably of the middle of the seventeenth 
century, of brown leather, neatly embroidered with silver 
thread. This glove was found a few years since in Paston 
Hall, Norfolk, and was presented by the wife of the present owner 
of the hall, Mrs. John Mack, to the Castle Museum, Norwich. The 
glove gains some additional interest from the fact that it may have 
belonged to a member of that ancient family, made so famous by the 
Paston Hall Papers, published by Sir John Ferm, 178789. 




SL* r-'SIL 





GLOVES AND SHOES 55 



No. 3 

A LADY'S GLOVE 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

AT elegant glove for the right hand, of rich fawn-coloured 
leather of very fine quality. The stitching of the seams is 
plain ; the gauntlet is ornamented in a very unusual manner, 
with grey and yellow loops or bows of mohair tape, or ribbon inter, 
mixed with gold and silver threads, one-half of the back of the 
hand and knuckles being similarly treated; the lower part of the 
cuff inside is stiffened with three layers of paper, and is lined with 
ribbed yellow silk ; the entire length of the glove is 1 1 inches. 
In the collection of Seymour Lucas, Esqr., R.A. 



56 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXXIX 

A PAIR OF SHORT GLOVES 

LATE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of rather an unusual style of gloves of warm russet- 
coloured leather and having very short gauntlets, which are 
embroidered entirely with metallic gold and silver thread, 
the pattern being raised by stump or padded work ; a rich bordering 
of silver lace surrounds the bottom and sides of the gauntlets. The 
extreme length is \2\ inches, and they are in the collection of 
W. Cole-Plowright, Esqr. 



I-L.ITL XXXIX 






._,,. ^^immm 

'&ii..f -Sr-^jsr-- ,~ zr: -aSJSf^f^}- . :-S 




^H-__ --;-^. 
Hudson Park B f a;!ch, 
66 LEROY S 





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1 LATE .'.Z, 





GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XL 

A LADY'S GLOVE 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY, OXFORD 

A GLOVE of early Queen Anne period made of what has been 
white kid leather, without any ornamentation ; the gauntlet 
is small and is of rich brown silk divided into panels by 
strips of a darker brown gimp ; the base is cut into six scallops, 
edged with narrow gold lace, spangled, the divisions being decorated 
with bows of grey-ribbed ribbon ; a band of wide brown gimp 
separates the gauntlet from the glove. 
In the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. 



58 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XLI 

QUEEN ANNE'S GLOVES 

OXFORD 

A unusually elegant pair of early eighteenth-century gloves, of 
buff leather, in excellent preservation, measuring only 10 
inches in length ; the gauntlets are short and most elabor- 
ately ornamented with a perforated pattern in gold and crimson 
thread embroidery and small bugle beads of glass ; there are four 
small openings in the gauntlets, over each of which is a bow of 
ribbon ; they are lined with puce silk. 

These gloves were left by Queen Anne at Christ Church when 
on a visit to Oxford, August 26th, 1702, and are now in the Ash- 
molean Museum. 



I' LATE XLl 




. 



tt LET 



- ^ 




PLATE XL 11 




*' 
6C L^ 

' 




GLOVES AND SHOES 59 



PLATE XLII 

A CAVALIER'S GLOVES 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of Cavalier's gloves, made of thin soft buff-coloured 
leather, embroidered on the cuff with ' silver thread ; the 
gauntlets are lined and the edges are bound with crimson 
silk ; the fringe is of gold thread, and the openings at the sides of 
the gauntlets are connected by two bands of buff silk ribbon edged 
with lace. Their length is 1 1 \ inches. They are described in the 
Museum Catalogue as being of English make. Early seventeenth 
century. 

Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art. 



60 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XLIII 

A PAIR OF GLOVES 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of dark grey leather gloves, with short gauntlets com- 
posed entirely of a single band of embroidered gold lace, 
enriched with spangles and edged at the top and bottom 
with a fringe of gold. The stitching of the fingers and on the back 
of the hands is quite plain. 

The inside of the gloves is white leather, and the gauntlets are 
lined with ribbed buff silk. The total length of the gloves, including 
the cuffs, is 12 inches. 

In the collection of the Author. 



FLATK Xl.lll 



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GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XLIV 

A PAIR OF LADY'S GLOVES 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

PAIR of lady's gloves, of knitted brown silk, embroidered 
with a floral design in silver 'thread. The total length is 
1 6 inches. 

Their probable date is early eighteenth century. 
Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art. 



A 



62 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XLV 
No. 1 

COLONEL DUCKETT'S GLOVES 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of large dark brown leather gloves, measuring n- 
inches inclusive ; the gauntlets are short, being only 3 inches 
deep, composed entirely of one broad piece of gold lace, 
and are lined with pale yellow satin ; the backs of the gloves are 
slightly embroidered with a floral design in gold wire thread, together 
with some herring-bone stitching of the same material. These gloves 
have a clumsy appearance, and mark the decline from the beauty and 
elegance of the Stuart and earlier periods ; they are said to have 
belonged to Colonel William Duckett, who served in Queen Anne's 
Army under the great Duke of Marlborough ; they were at one time 
exhibited at the South Kensington Museum, and are now in the 
collection of the Author. 

No. 2 

A PAIR OF LEATHER MITTENS 

A PAIR of fingerless gloves, or mittens, of thick brown leather ; 
they measure only 8| inches in length, of which i^ inches 
forms a cuff of crimson morocco leather, the inside being 
lined some 2\ inches up with stout leather ; the stitching throughout 
is of a very coarse character, and strength, rather than style or 
elegance, seems to have been the object of the maker ; their appear- 
ance suggests a falconer as their original owner, and their date is 
probably early sixteenth century. In the collection of the Author. 



PLATE AT,/' 




, -^ 

"-.;,- . -*- x / 

'G r-EP^" 1 




PLATE XLl'l 





GLOVES AND SHOES 63 



PLATE XLVI 

A PAIR OF MITTENS 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of lady's mittens, made of pale yellow woven silk, 
enriched with needlework of pink thread. The tip of the 
thumb would protrude beyond its sheath, while the backs 
only of the fingers would be covered by the pointed flaps ; the entire 
length of the mittens is 14^ inches, and in the official catalogue their 
date is given as of the eighteenth century. 
Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art. 



SHOES 



K 



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION ON SHOES 

SO many authors have at various times, written about the origin, 
development, and history of foot-gear, the changes in fashion, 
shape, and material, that it is almost impossible to add any 
fresh information on this interesting subject. On the other hand, 
the subject has not been equally illustrated, and to supply this want 
the present work, it is hoped, may somewhat compensate for the 
past, particularly as all the pictures have been specially photographed, 
or drawn, for this volume from actual existing examples of shoes 
of various periods. To assist in rendering the illustrations more 
interesting a few introductory remarks may not be altogether 
unacceptable. 

The frequent mention of shoes in the Old Testament is remark- 
able. God thus commanded Moses : " Draw not nigh hither : put 
off thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest 
is holy ground " (Exod. iii. 5). To this day the Oriental puts off 
his shoes on entering his house of prayer. 

In the books of Deuteronomy, Joshua, Ruth, in the Psalms, in 
Amos, and in other parts of the Bible frequent mention is made of 
shoes. That sandals and shoes of rushes, or of leather, of beautiful 
workmanship, were commonly worn by the Egyptians, we have ample 
proof. Witness the splendid examples in the Egyptian department 
in the British Museum. 

Taking a long stride from the more remote period to that of 
Roman, and later still to mediaeval times, we find the art of shoe- and 



68 GLOVES AND SHOES 

sandal-making continues to play an important part in the civilised 
world. Highly decorated, often gilded and jewelled, the shoe main- 
tained its place as an important item in the costumes of all classes. 
The nailed shoe (caliga) of the Roman soldier, the slashed and laced 
sandal of the aristocrat, and the plain foot-covering of the plebeian 
have been preserved to us deep in the soil of ancient London. In 
mediaeval times the members of the gentle craft, or followers of 
St. Crispin, were held in high esteem, and their trade became almost 
an art. A little book, Ealdunus De Calceo et Nigronius De Caliga 
Veterum^ published in 1667 at Amsterdam, claimed great antiquity 
for the shoe, almost associating God Himself with the craft. 

Baldunus was an ecclesiastic, and the son of a shoemaker. 

In many of the examples of early shoes which have been excavated 
in the streets of old London there is unmistakable evidence of skill 
and art having been bestowed on the foot-gear of our ancestors. We 
find the citizen of London was not unmindful of comfort, for even 
in mediaeval days cork soles were in use, and in other cases a padding 
composed of small rushes or coarse grass has been found inserted 
between the inner and under soles of ancient shoes. During the 
Tudor and Stuart periods the wealthy classes had shoes made of 
velvet, brocade, silk, and coloured leather, embroidered with gold 
and rich silk, and not unfrequently ornamented with jewels. During 
the reign of Henry III. (1216-72) boots and shoes were of a 
sumptuous character to match the elegance of the costume of the 
times. 

Pointed or broad toes, which were so extravagant in length and 
size as to require a padding of moss or wool to keep them in shape, 
were a prevailing fashion ; and in the reign of Queen Mary it became 
necessary, by Royal Proclamation, to prohibit the toes of shoes to 
be worn wider than 6 inches ; the fastenings were of various sorts, 
sometimes of rich ribbon, sometimes by costly buckles, and at others 



GLOVES AND SHOES 69 

the instep flap was covered with jewelled or plain silk rosettes tied to 
the latchets of the shoe. 

In the sixteenth century John Taylor, the Water Poet, speaks of 
the extravagance of men of fashion who " Wear a farm in shoe strings , 
edged with gold, And spangled garters worth a Copy-hold" 

As stockings and shoes are closely associated, a quotation from 
old Stow (p. 867) may be permitted: "First worsted stockings 
made in England by Wm. Rider 1564, having seen a pair of knit 
worsted stockings in the lodgings of an Italian Merchant from 
Mantua. . . ." 

" In the second year of Queen Elizabeth, 1560, Mistress Mount- 
ague present the Queen with a payre of black knit silke stockings, 
for a new yeares gift . . .. "' from which time " the Queen never 
wore anymore cloath hose but only silke stockings." It may be 
assumed that Her Majesty was as particular about her shoes as she 
evidently was about her " silke stockings," which must have been 
well displayed by her ample and hooped skirts. 

Ladies' shoes during the reign of Charles I. and Charles II. 
reached a high point of elegance and beauty, both as to excellent 
workmanship and fine material; men's boots and shoes were no less 
shapely and tasteful, being made of velvet, coloured and Spanish 
leather, or other rich material. 

The fashion with ladies in wearing high-heeled shoes of an 
extravagant character probably dates back to the seventeenth century, 
and was introduced with the object of adding to the height of the 
figure. Madame Pompadour, who was not very tall, adopted this 
means of improving her appearance ; needless to say, the fashion was 
quickly followed in France, England, and elsewhere. Another 
method of adding to the height by means of foot-gear was introduced 
by ladies in Venice : this was by Chopines, a kind of stilt made of 
wood and leather, which often reached the absurd height of twelve 



70 GLOVES AND SHOES 

or more inches, and necessitated the wearers having the assistance of 
either gallants or servants to aid them in keeping their balance while 
walking. 

Silver coverings for the high heels of shoes were not altogether un- 
known, though probably they were of rare occurrence ; a pair, of 
Dutch manufacture, beautifully engraved, were exhibited in 1874 at a 
meeting of the Royal Archaeological Institution, and were described 
as having been in use in the middle of the eighteenth century. 

Shoes do not seem to have played so important a part in days 
gone by as did the glove, but the custom of throwing an old shoe or 
a slipper is one of the uses foot-coverings have been put to in olden 
times, and which has held its place to our own. There is a French 
story told of an old woman, who, on seeing the carriage of the young 
King Louis XIII. passing on its way from the church, where his 
wedding had just taken place, took off her shoe, and, throwing it at 
his coach, cried out, " 'Tis all I have, Your Majesty, but may the 
blessing of God go with it." At ancient Jewish weddings it was 
customary during the ceremony for the husband to offer a ring to 
the bride, and after embracing her to give her a shoe. 

When high heels became unfashionable and flat ones suddenly 
superseded them, ladies complained that their feet pained them 
exceedingly ; but with the disappearance of high heels came, it is 
said, the emancipation of woman, as the flat heels enabled them to 
move about with greater ease and to take their place in the doings 
of the world ! 

In these days of machine-made shoes, when the fashion seems to 
have gone back to the period of high heels, the loving care and 
almost artistic feeling of the individual craftsman has departed, but 
it cannot be denied that the elegant shape and smart appearance of 
the twentieth-century shoe has not suffered greatly from its modern 
method of production. 



PL ATI-: I 









PLA . 









\ 



/^- 

60 L r.LCT 




GLOVES AND SHOES n 



V 



PLATE I 

MEDIAEVAL SHOES 

ARIOUS broad-toed leather shoes of early sixteenth -century 
date. Numbers of a similar character have been dug up in 
the city of London. 
Northampton Museum. 



1 



PLATE II 

MEDIEVAL SHOES 

No. 1 

front part and toe-piece of a slashed and pounced black- 
leather shoe ; the sole and heel are missing. Sixteenth 
century. 



No. 2 

ABLACK-leather fifteenth-century shoe, wanting heel-piece, 
having its original instep strap and buckle. A similar 
shoe appears on a monument in Ardingly Church, Sussex, 
dated 1464. 



A 



No. 3 

CHILD'S black-leather shoe, with pounced and slashed fillet 
or toe-piece. Sixteenth century. 



72 GLOVES AND SHOES 

No. 4 

A GOOD example of the fifteenth-century pointed, or poulaine 
shoe, with the strap for tying over the instep ; it measures 
1 1\ inches. The upper leather, at the heel, is 4! inches 
high ; a part of the side has disappeared. The fashion of this shoe 
is similar to the steel soleret given on Plate III. 

No. 5 

A example of the extravagant and singular fashion of the shoes 
of the fourteenth century. This shoe is for the right foot, 
the toe of which takes an outward curve, the shoe of the 
left foot doing the same, which would cause the wearer to appear as 
if splay-footed : illustrations of shoes of this kind are to be found in 
illuminated manuscripts and on monumental brasses of the period. 

No. 6 

A WIDE-TOED shoe of the time of Henry VIII. It wants 
the heel-piece, and measures only 9 inches in length, while 
the toe is 6 inches across. This fashion also prevailed with 
the military in the steel soleret. 



S 



No. 7 
OLE of a shoe of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. 



The above are from drawings made by the Author. 
Guildhall Museum, London. 



rf.ATE III 





GLOVES AND SHOES 



s 



PLATE III 

MEDIAEVAL AND OTHER SHOES 

No. 1 

OLE of a fifteenth-century peaked shoe ; the point is destroyed 
ill inches long. 



No. 2 



B 



ROAD shoe of the time of Henry VIII., with latchets to tie. 
The back of the heel is missing. 



No. 3 



A 



LEATHER clog, for the left foot, composed of several 
thicknesses of leather ; at the toe and waist are the remains 
of straps for attaching the clog to the foot. 
In the collection of the Author. 



No. 4 

A FIFTEENTH-CENTURY black-leather peaked shoe (pou- 
laine), said to have been found in Moorfields, London. The 
fastening appears to have been by means of a strap or latchet, 
part of which is missing, across the instep ; a hole on the outside 
remains, in which probably a hook or button was inserted. Total 
length of shoe, 9^ inches. Lately in the Bateman Collection. 
The property of Mrs. Seymour Lucas. 



74 GLOVES AND SHOES 



S 



No. 5 

OLE of a fifteenth-century shoe. 
In the Author's collection. 



A 



No. 6 

FOURTEENTH-CENTURY steel soleret (poulaine), intro- 
duced to compare with the ordinary civilian shoe of the 
same period. 
In the Author's collection. 



Nos. 7, 8, 9, 10 

COMMON everyday leather shoes of the seventeenth century. 
The second on the left is of buff leather and was found in 
an old house in Cambridge, with a bandolier of the reign of 
Charles I. (now in the Author's collection). The remaining three 
shoes are in the collection of Mrs. Seymour Lucas. 



I-LA 'i'i-: ir 






GLOVES AND SHOES 75 



PLATE IV 

MEDIEVAL TOE-PIECES 

SIXTEENTH CENTURY 



1 



"^HREE broad, black-leather toe-pieces pounced and slashed, 
measuring respectively 4^ inches, 5^ inches, and 4^ inches 
across. The military steel solerets partook of the same 



exaggerated character. 

Guildhall Museum, London. 



76 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE V 

MEDIEVAL SHOE AND PATTENS 

No. 1 

A SQUARE-TOED, black-leather shoe, minus the heel and side 
leather, found in excavations in Windmill Street, London. 
It measures 9^ inches, the toe at its widest being 3^ inches. 
Late fifteenth century. A similar shape was in use in armour at the 
same period. 

No. 2 

i 

A WOODEN patten, made of two flat pieces, overlapping in 
the centre, and hinged with leather ; it retains sufficient 
of the toe and heel straps to indicate the mode of fastening 
it to the shoe. It measures 10^ inches in length, and 2 inches at 
the widest part of the sole. Fourteenth to fifteenth century. 

No. 3 

views of a wooden patten, io| inches long and 3! inches 
at its widest. From the irregular heights of the projecting 
supports it would appear to have originally stood on an iron 
frame. Fourteenth to fifteenth century. From drawings by the 
Author from examples in the Guildhall Museum, London. 



T 



I I; I - 







:^P 



* . 







. 

2 
\\ L - <N-.< 



PLAIT. 17 







GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE VI 

BOOTS OF KING HENRY VI 

A PAIR of fine, and probably unique examples of fifteenth- 
century boots, which, like the gloves of the same sovereign 
given in Plate II. (on Gloves), have been handed down in 
good preservation to the present time. The boots, which partake 
somewhat of the character of gaiters, are made of fine Spanish brown 
leather, and are lined with deer skin, which still retains its hair ; 
round the ankles is a kind of wadding, between the leather and the 
lining, apparently to resist the wet. The sides of the boots from 
the ankles to the knees are fastened by means of a number of small 
buttons made of finely plaited thread, sewn on with silk; the feet 
are small, measuring only 10 inches in length; the soles and heels 
are flat and round ; and the waist (that part joining the two) measures 
only i inch across. The total height of the boots from the toes to 
the top is 2 feet 3 inches, from the heel to the top of the back of 
the boot is 23^ inches, and the bell tops measure n inches across. 
The stitching is very fine, and the whole appearance is elegant. 
These boots, with the before - mentioned gloves, were given by 
Henry VI. to Sir Ralph Pudsey at Bolton Hall, where they were long 
preserved. The property of the Free Public Museums, Liverpool. 



GLOVES AND SHOES 



1 



PLATE VII 

PEAKED SHOE 

FIFTEENTH CENTURY 

fine example of a fourteenth- or fifteenth-century peaked 
shoe, or Crackowe, was the kind of foot-gear worn by 
wealthy people at a time when costume generally had 
reached an extravagant stage; the peak or point extended so far 
beyond the foot that it required a stuffing of either hay, moss, or 
wool to keep it in shape, and in order to allow the wearer to walk 
the point had to be turned upwards, and fastened to the knee by a 
slender chain or a coloured cord. Sometimes these lengthy points 
were twisted into the shape of a ram's horn. This peaked shoe 
measures from the point to the heel 1 5 inches ; the sole throughout 
is of one piece of leather, as is also the upper part of the shoe ; there 
are holes at the inner side for the lace, which is still in situ, and the 
instep flap, some 3^ inches long, is still remaining, though not 
standing up as it would have done originally. The sole is extremely 
thin, being only ^ of an inch at the tip and | at the thickest part, 
which indicates that it was only intended to be worn indoors ; or if 
for outdoor use, it would have to be worn with a clog or patten, 
which at that period was a common fashion. The height of the 
leather at the heel is 3 inches, its inside being stiffened by an extra 
thickness of leather : the stitching throughout is of a very coarse 
description. Fairholt, in his Costume in England, gives an illustration 
of a similar shoe, and fixes the date as 1460-1500. The Crackowe 
described above was found in an ancient house in Toledo, and was 
purchased shortly after its discovery by its present possessor, Geo. C. 
Haite, Esqr. 



'*, 



I 



GLOVES AND SHOES 79 



PLATE VIII 

CHOPINES 

No. 1 

ONE of a pair of chopines, or tall clog. The soles, 2\ inches 
thick, are built of cork, and are, with their latchets, covered 
with grey ribbed silk ; a large silk rosette, originally of salmon- 
pink, but now faded to a grey colour, is fastened on the instep and 
covers the lacing eyelet holes. 

No. 2 

ONE of a pair, for the right foot, of similar shape to the 
previous one, but of coarser workmanship and made of 
black leather ; the soles of these are 5! inches high, and 
are constructed of layers or small blocks of cork, the centre being 
hollow ; the outer sides retain some traces of painting. 

The above are in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. 

No. 3 

A VERY elegant chopine, of wood covered with white leather, 
having a kind of sandal, in which the wearer's foot was 
placed, and provided with a broad base to give a better 
balance. Its height is 1 2 inches, and is an excellent example of the 
Venetian chopine. 

In the British Museum. 



so GLOVES AND SHOES 

The chopine is said to be of Eastern origin, and representations 
of these articles of foot-gear may be found in pictures of Turkish 
ladies in the time of our Queen Elizabeth. Hamlet, when speaking 
to one of the lady actors, says, " By 'r lady, your ladyship is nearer 
heaven than when I saw you last by the altitude of a chopine." 
They were made of wood, or cork, often eighteen inches high, and 
covered with leather of various colours, and not unfrequently decorated 
with painted designs. They were introduced into England from 
Venice as late as 1670, though probably were never in very common 
use in this country. Their great height rendered it necessary for the 
wearer to be supported by men, or maid servants, when walking. 

It is asserted that when Charles I. met his future Queen, Henrietta 
Maria, at Dover, " he cast his eyes towards her (she seeming higher 
than report was, reaching to his shoulder), which she perceiving, 
showed him her shoes, saying to this effect, ' Sir, I stand upon mine 
own feet, I have no help of art ; thus high I am, and am neither 
higher nor lower.' : 

Evidently intending the King to understand that she was not 
standing upon chopines. 



FLA TK /.V 





-:- - 
:S nPPAtf 






GLOVES AND SHOES si 



PLATE IX 

QUEEN ELIZABETH'S BUSKINS 

FROM A DRAWING BY THE AUTHOR 

ONE of a pair of riding-boots, or buskins, of elegant shape 
and excellent workmanship. They are made of soft 
leather of a rich brown colour, stitched with white thread ; 
the heels, covered with leather of the same colour, are of wood, and 
are 3 inches high ; the soles at the thickest part are f of an inch ; 
a continuous layer of brown leather covers both heels and soles. 
The entire length from the base of the heel to the toe is 7 inches. 
The legs are open at the sides and are pierced for lacing ; their 
total height is 18 inches, and they are lined with fawn-coloured silk 
some five inches from the tops : there are four holes on the instep 
of the buskins, through which a cord or ribbon would be passed to 
draw the latchets together, to which probably a rosette would be 
fastened. 

These buskins, which undoubtedly belonged to Queen Elizabeth, 
are in perfect preservation, and are kept among the treasures of the 
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. 



M 



82 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE X 

SHOES OF QUEEN ELIZABETH 

FROM DRAWINGS BY THE AUTHOR 

No. 1 

A SHOE, for the left foot, of an extremely handsome pair of 
white satin shoes which belonged to Queen Elizabeth. 
They are beautifully embroidered with silk and metal wire, 
the colours being esthetic green, blue, pink, and yellow. The toes, 
flat and square, measure about 2\ inches across, the total length of 
the shoes being about n inches. They were in Case C. 188 in the 
catalogue of the New Gallery Exhibition, 1902. 

No. 2 

RIGHT shoe of a pair also once belonging to Queen 
Elizabeth. These are of ribbed salmon-coloured silk, em- 
broidered in silver and crimson ; the toes are square and 
blocked, and are about 2\ inches wide. The heels are square, and 
some 2\ inches high ; length of shoes, 10 inches. The lining on 
the inner sole is a dark red leather. These were exhibited in the 
same case with the above, and both specimens are the property of 
Earl Brownlow. 









- 







GLOVES AND SHOES 83 



No. 3 



SHOE OF ELIZABETH, QUEEN OF 

BOHEMIA 



SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 



ONE of a pair of shoes, once in the possession of Lady Cotton, 
of Conington, Cambs, who had been in the service of their 
owner, the Princess Elizabeth, the daughter of James I. 
They are of red cloth, embroidered with silver, and have black heels. 
They measure 9 inches in length; the toe is i-| inches wide and 
the heel 2 inches high. 

The following inscription is attached to the shoes : 

" Shoes of Princess Elizabeth, afterwards Queen of Bohemia, 
daughter of James I. Given to my wife's great grandmother by her 
godmother, old Lady Cotton, of Conington, in Cambridgeshire, who 
had been in the service of the above Princess. 

(Signed) Matthew Rugeley Sep 2 nd 1797 
Joseph Miller." 

In the Saffron Walden Museum. 



84 GLOVES AND SHOES 



1 



PLATE XI 

SHOES OF CHARLES I 

views, back and front, of a pair of shoes which belonged 
to King Charles. They are made of brown leather, which 
is covered with black velvet, both leather and velvet now 
sadly decayed; the total length from toe to heel is 10^ inches; the 
square toes measure 2\ inches across ; the heels, apparently of 
leather and hollow and riveted with small wooden pegs, are 2 inches 
high and 3 inches across, and were originally covered, like the shoes, 
with black velvet, but the nap has now almost entirely disappeared 
from the surface. The soles are bevelled at the edges, which give a 
light appearance, and as they show but little trace of wear, prob- 
ably were only used for indoor purposes. The square flaps on the 
instep are 4! inches wide at the top, and were undoubtedly partly 
covered by the large rosettes so familiar in Van Dyck's portraits of 
King Charles ; the insides of these flaps are lined with a rich ribbed- 
black silk, and are bound with the same material ; the stitching 
throughout is very fine. This interesting pair of shoes was at one 
time in the collection of the Duke of Buckingham, but is now the 
property of General W. E. G. Lytton-Bulwer. 



1'LATK XI 




v X* 






: 







GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XII 

CAVALIER BOOTS 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

Nos. 1 and 2 

GOOD examples of military jack-boots worn during the 
Cromwellian Period. It is a singular fact that boots of this 
extravagant description were worn alike by Cavalier and 
Puritan, the enormously large and wide tops being common to both. 
The toes are squared and blocked, and the heels are remarkably high 
and composed of several layers of leather ; the tops are full and well 
shaped, and could at will be drawn up over the thigh or turned down 
over the calf of the legs. They retain their original spurs, with 
twelve pointed rowels. 



A 



No. 3 

NOTHER jack-boot of the seventeenth century, with a low 
heel and an ill-shaped top. 



A 



No. 4 

SIMILAR jack -boot to the above, but with an elegantly 
shaped top, high heel, and square-blocked toe. This, like 
No. 3, retains its spur rest above the heel. 
Northampton Museum. 



86 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XIII 

MILITARY JACK -BOOTS 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

FROM DRAWINGS BY THE AUTHOR 

No. 1 

ONE of a pair of jack-boots, for the left foot, of an exception- 
ally elegant character. They are of black leather, the legs 
being strengthened by six vertical bands of leather | of an 
inch wide, and very neatly stitched on the boot ; the bell-shaped 
tops are of a soft leather, which enabled the wearer at will to turn 
them down when necessary ; the heels are composed of three thick- 
nesses or layers of leather, and are 3 inches high, which must have 
produced considerable pressure on the instep ; there is a spur-rest of 
leather a few inches above the heel. The total height of the boots 
is 26 inches. This kind of boot was worn by the cavalry regiments 
in the latter part of the seventeenth century. 
Tower of London. 

No. 2 

RIGHT jack-boot, one of a pair, having a heavy and clumsy 
appearance, with well-shaped instep stirrup guards ; their 
height is 24^ inches. The soles, an inch thick, are com- 
posed of five layers of leather ; the heels are 2 inches high and are 
hollow. These boots retain their spurs, which are kept in position 
by the "rests" at the back of the heel. 
Tower of London. 



PLATE -V 





GLOVES AND SHOES 87 



PLATE XIV 

CAPTAIN LENCHE'S BOOT 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A VERY perfect specimen of a Cavalier's boot of the seventeenth 
century ; the large bell-shaped top could be worn either as 
shown in the picture or pulled up over the knee and thigh 
at the pleasure of the wearer. It is said to have been worn by 
Captain, or Colonel, Lenche at the battle of Worcester when fighting 
under the banner of the Royalists. Colonel Lenche lived at Church 
Lench, near Worcester, which is not far from the residence of an 
ancestor of the present possessor of the relic, between whose family, 
on the wife's side, there was some relationship with that of Colonel 
Lenche. The boot is of black leather ; the bell top, apparently 
originally buff, measures 10 inches across, while at the bottom it 
is 1 7 inches ; the height of the boot is 1 8 inches ; the heel, which 
is composed of thirteen layers of leather, is 2\ inches high ; the 
sole, of three layers, is \ an inch thick ; the toe is squared and is 
3 inches wide. The boot retains its original stirrup-leather and 
eight-pointed rowel spur, for the support of which there is a "rest" 
some 2 inches above the heel. Sir Sibald Scott, in his book on 
The British Army, gives a small engraving of this interesting boot. 
The property of A. S. Field, Esqr. 



88 GLOVES AND SHOES 



1 



PLATE XV 

MILITARY BOOTS 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

views, giving the back and front, of military boots in 
common wear during the great Civil War. The large 
overhanging bell tops could be used by the wearer as 
described in the previous plate ; they are made of very stout black 
leather, with thick soles and squared toes ; the heels are of several 
layers of leather, and there are spur -rests above them. These 
boots are preserved in the ancient chapel, now used as a museum, 
standing within the ruined walls of Farleigh Castle, Somersetshire. 
It is a singular fact that this Castle was held for a short time during 
the Civil War, for the king, by a Colonel Hungerford, while its 
actual owner at the time, Sir Edward Hungerford, was commanding 
the Wiltshire forces on the side of the Commonwealth. 
The boots are the property of Lord Donington. 



PLATE -\T 






v\ O, 



EET 



GLOVES AND SHOES 89 



PLATE XVI 
No. 1 

SHOES OF QUEEN ANNE 



1 



1HIS pair of shoes, said to have belonged to Queen Anne, is 
extremely elegant and neat ; the material of which they are 
made is sky-blue satin, entirely without ornamentation ; the 
heels, which are covered with the same material, are of wood, and 
are 2 inches high ; the latchets are wide and fastened across the 
insteps by the original gilt metal buckles. The entire length of 
the shoes from toe to heel is 8| inches, and they are the property 
of Mrs. Simpson Carson. 



A 



1 



No. 2 

BEAUTIFUL pair of eighteenth-century shoes of crimson 
velvet embroidered with gold. 

No. 3 

clogs belonging to the above. In the Northampton 
Museum. 



N 



90 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XVII 

THE DUKE OF GLOUCESTER'S BOOT 

ONE of a pair of boots, of singular character, of late seventeenth- 
century workmanship. They are made of rough-grained 
black leather, neatly stitched with white thread. The bell 
tops are of buff leather, pierced and goffered at the lower edge ; the 
heels are low and flat ; the toes square and slightly blocked, are 
2 inches wide ; the total height of the boots from the heels to the 
bell tops is 8^ inches, the length of the foot is 6 inches. These 
interesting relics belonged to Prince William Henry, Duke of 
Gloucester, the son of Princess (afterwards Queen) Anne and Prince 
George of Denmark. The lad died at the age of eleven, early in 
1700. 

The boots, which were at one time the property of Alderman 
Fletcher, now form part of the collection of the Ashmolean Museum, 
Oxford. 



PLATE XVII 




PLATE XT! I! 







GLOVES AND SHOES 9i 



PLATE XVIII 
No. 1 

SHOES OF QUEEN ANNE'S REIGN 

A PAIR of very elegant and dainty shoes of exquisite workman- 
ship. They are made of white satin ; a broad band, 2\ 
inches wide, of gold lace with an edging of gold gimp, 
covers the whole front of the foot from the toes to the top of the 
instep flap. A similar ornamentation, but narrower, adorns the 
heels. The sides of the shoes are covered with narrow white silk 
braid neatly arranged in parallel lines. The latchets are wide, and 
show the marks of the buckles which were used to fasten them. 
The toes are pointed, and the heels, which are of wood, are 2\ 
inches high ; the lining of the shoes is blue silk, except the latchets, 
heels, and instep flaps, which are lined with white satin. The length 
of these charming and perfect shoes is 9! inches, and their date 
seventeenth century. 

In the collection of Mrs. Seymour Lucas. 



92 GLOVES AND SHOES 



No. 2 

A PAIR OF LADY'S SHOES 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of lady's shoes of pale fawn-coloured silk brocade, 
figured with a light and dark electric blue pattern of foliage. 
The insides are lined with yellow canvas, and the heels, as 
usual of wood, are covered with brocade and measure 2\ inches in 
height. The toes are pointed and slightly upturned. Their general 
design is very elegant. 

In the collection of the Author. 

No. 3 

A LADY'S SHOES AND CLOGS 



1 



pair of shoes and clogs on the lower part of the plate are 
excellent examples of the foot-gear of a well-to-do county 
lady of the early part of the eighteenth century. They are 
made of yellow worsted brocade ; the heels, of wood, 2\ inches 
high, are covered with the same material. The latchets are wide, 
and have been fastened with buckles. 

The clogs, one of which is on the shoe, the other shown beside, 

are also of yellow brocade, the tabs being tied with faded buff ribbon, 

and have flat leather soles. These shoes and clogs belonged to a lady 

of an influential family once residing at Chesterton, near Cambridge. 

In the collection of the Author. 



GLOVES AND SHOES 93 



PLATE XIX 

LADIES' SHOES 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

A SUPERB pair of lady's shoes, made of damask, the prevailing 
colours being green, silver-grey, and pink dotted with red. 
The latchets are small and are made for tying across the 
instep ; the heels, covered with damask, are of wood, and are of 
great breadth and measure 3 inches in height ; the toes are extremely 
pointed and exceed the length of the foot, necessitating the use of 
wool at the points to keep them in shape ; they are probably English 
made, and belong to the reign of Queen Anne. 

The second pair of shoes on this plate are very elegant and of 
beautiful workmanship. They are made of crimson morocco leather ; 
the latchets are very wide and were fastened over the instep with 
buckles. The heels are 3 inches high, and very small ; the toes are 
rounded. 

Inside the left shoe, on the canvas lining, is written, " Mrs. Raynes 
Own Moroco (sic] Pumps 1636." 

Both of the above pairs of shoes are the property of Mrs. Elkin 
Mathews. 



94 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XX 

No. 1 

SHOES OF THE REIGN OF WILLIAM 

AND MARY 

A PAIR of blackish brown leather shoes, with double latchets 
crossing extremely high instep flaps, and fastening at the 
sides by means of a button and hook. The flap is well 
shaped, and gives an elegant and smart appearance to the shoes. 
The heels, of wood, are 2 inches high and are covered with crimson 
leather ; the toes are rounded, and the total length of the shoes is 
9! inches. They were originally in the Bateman Collection. 

c 

No. 2 

LORD TREVOR'S SHOES 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 



1 



second pair of shoes on the plate are of crimson leather, 
with wide instep flaps, and having no indication of a means 
of fastening ; the soles are | of an inch thick, and the heels, 
of black leather and hollow, are i\ inches high. The toes are square 
and measure 2\ inches across ; the name of Lord Trevor, in writing 
of an ancient character, may be traced on the underside of one of 
the instep flaps. This kind of shoes is of the period of Charles I. 

Both the above pairs of shoes are the property of Mrs. Seymour 
Lucas. 









*- 

Hudson Pr. 



. 



sgSSKC Libr^ 

,4^^* 

# '- 



GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXI 
No. 1 

A SHOE OF THE REIGN OF GEORGE II 

ONE of a very handsome pair of silk damask shoes, the pre- 
vailing colours being green, yellow, and salmon-pink. The 
heels, 2 inches high, are of wood and are covered with 
silk damask. The toes are upturned and extremely pointed ; the 
latchets are broad and show signs of wear from the use of buckles. 
The total length of the shoes from toe to heel is 9^ inches. Their 
date is of the reign of George II. In the collection of Mrs. Seymour 
Lucas. 

No. 2 

A LADY'S SHOE 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

ONE of a pair of lady's shoes of graceful shape, made of silk 
brocade, with a pattern of flowers and leaves in various 
colours, pink, blue, green and gold. The latchets are wide, 
and were intended to be fastened across the instep flaps with buckles. 
The heels, covered with brocade, are 2\ inches high, and the toes 
are extremely pointed. The shoes are lined with white kid leather, 
except the instep flap, and that has a lining of pale pink ribbed silk. 
They are thus described by their owner : " These shoes belonged to 
my maternal great-great-grandmother, Mrs. Cook, of the Manor 
House, Findern, Derbyshire. The date would be about 1720." 
The property of Mrs. C. M. Prickett. 



96 GLOVES AND SHOES 



No. 3 

COMBINED SHOE AND CLOG 

ONE of a pair of very elegant shoes and clogs combined, 
known also as double-soled shoes, made of white kid leather, 
which appears to have been covered with cream silk damask. 
The insteps and toes richly embroidered with pale pink or salmon- 
coloured silk are powdered with seed pearls ; the heels retain traces 
of pink brocade ; the latchets are made for tying, and seem from the 
fragments remaining to have had a fringe and ruching of pearly grey 
silk, which divided the shoe across the instep, while below the latchets 
on the instep flap four holes are punched at regular distances probably 
as a means of affixing a rosette or bow of ribbon. The heels taper 
downwards and are 2\ inches high, gaining an additional \ inch 
by the thickness of the flat heel of the clog, which with the sole, 
also flat, is of brown leather. The toes, measuring \\ inches across, 
are flat and square. The total length of the clogs is i o| inches, the 
heels being if inches wide ; though the colours of the brocade are 
faded, the shoes in other respects are in good condition. 

Examples of these combined shoes and clogs are to be found in 
Van Dyck's portrait pictures. 

A similar shoe is in the museum at Northampton, and the Cluny 
Museum, Paris, has also a specimen of this peculiar foot-gear. Their 
date is probably of the first half of the seventeenth century. 

In the collection of Mrs. Seymour Lucas. 



L' ancti, 
REET 
-;- 



PLATE XXI 1 






i-anch, 



V> C, n T -.;-.- -K- 

:i6 



A// 



GLOVES AND SHOES 97 



PLATE XXII 
No. 1 

MUD GUARDS 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of mud guards, intended for the use of gentlemen 
riding in knee breeches and stockings and when not wearing 
riding-boots. Each guard is made of one piece of stout 
leather, shaped as a half-leg and foot, and fastened to the stirrup ; 
a leather socket inside the top and an incision over the instep allows 
the stirrup strap to pass through, while there are two small incisions 
at the side for a strap which would keep the stirrup iron in position. 
The original spurs are fixtures on the guards, but have been at some 
time or other lowered from their previous position, which was 
evidently too high and too far outwards to have been effectively used 
on the horse's flanks. 

These very singular guards were found in Bolsover Castle, and are 
now in that excellent collection of foot-gear in the Northampton 
Museum. 






o 



98 GLOVES AND SHOES 



No. 2 

A POSTILLION'S BOOT 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 



A 



POSTILLION'S boot of the eighteenth century ; heavy and 
clumsy, but well suited for its purpose. 



No. 3 

A MILITARY GAITER 

A MILITARY gaiter, or legging, in use during the reign of 
George II. (1750), with its original spur, which is a fixture, 
on the heel of the gaiter. The lacing at the side is simple 
in the extreme, being so arranged that the half-dozen split thongs of 
leather are threaded through each other till the topmost is held by 
a button. 

Both the above are in the Castle Museum, Norwich. 



I'LATE .\ \ 









GLOVES AND SHOES 99 



PLATE XXIII 
No. 1 

LADY'S YELLOW SHOES 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

AT extremely perfect and dainty pair of lady's shoes of bright 
yellow brocade, embroidered in floral designs with crimson 
silk and green wire, the pattern being displayed on each shoe 
with an utter disregard to uniformity. The stitching is throughout 
very neat. They are lined, as is very generally the case, with white 
canvas. The heels, which are nearly 2\ inches high, are hollow, 
and are covered with brocade. The toes are rounded, the instep 
flaps are wide, as are also the buckle latchets. These shoes are 
reputed to have been worn by Lady Strafford at the trial of her 
husband (March, 1641), but the tradition is without foundation, as 
they belong to a later period. In the collection of the Author. 

No. 2 

A GENTLEMAN'S SHOE 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

AT extraordinary shoe, for a gentleman, with a heel far higher 
than is commonly found on shoes of this period ; it measures 
full 6 inches in height. The shoe is extremely elegant, has 
latchets crossing the instep, and retains its original metal buckle of 
very ornate design. A similar shoe in the Victoria and Albert 
Museum, Kensington, is described as English, second half of the 
eighteenth century. 

In the Museum, Whitby. 



ioo GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXIV 

A LADY'S SHOES AND CLOGS 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

A PAIR of lady's shoes of pale green damask, figured with 
white-and-crimson flowers and foliage. The heels, of wood, 
are covered with white kid leather and are 2\ inches high. 
The toes are pointed, and the instep flaps are cut into points ; the 
entire length of the shoes from the toe to the heel being 7 inches. 
The latchets are small, and are held on the instep by their original 
silver clasps or fasteners, which in their turn are held in position by 
a kind of stud in a button-hole at the end of the latchets. 

The silver clasps, examples of which are rare, are Hall marked, 
having the head of the monarch, George III., the lion passant, and 
the date mark, U. (1795). 

The clogs belonging to this elegant pair of shoes are of stout 
black leather, the heel guards being of red leather stitched with 
white thread. The latchets are also of black leather and, though now 
nearly bare, show traces of having been once covered with pink silk 
damask. The soles are perfectly flat. 

The property of Dr. W. T. Bensley. 



I'LAri: XX 1\ 








' 



PLATE XXV 








GLOVES AND SHOES 101 



PLATE XXV 

SLIPPERS AND SHOES 

Nos. 1 and 3 

A PAIR of petite French-made slippers of silk, with flowers 
embroidered in silver and silk of various colours, with a 
goffering of grey ribbon across the instep ; they are lined 
throughout with white kid leather ; the heels, of wood, 2\ inches 
high, are covered with polished white leather ; the toes are rounded 
and slightly upturned. The total length of the shoes is only 8 inches ; 
their date is probably early seventeenth century. 

No. 2 

A SHOE of white kid leather, covered with spotted white satin, 
embroidered on the toe with flowers and bound with pink 
ribbed silk, the instep flap being made to draw in with a 
pink silk cord. The daintily shaped wooden heel, 2\ inches high, 
is covered with spotted pink silk, its base being less than an inch 
across. The letters, of an old-fashioned character, " E. H." are 
stamped on the lining. Its date is late eighteenth century. 

Nos. 4 and 6 

A PAIR of curious crimson morocco leather shoes, bound with 
black silk braid ; the toes are very pointed and turned 
upwards in the style of Eastern foot-gear ; the heels, 
2 inches high and of wood, are covered with black leather ; they 
taper a short distance down, spreading out again near the base, 
which is very small. They belong to the middle of the eighteenth 
century. 



102 GLOVES AND SHOES 



A 



I 



No. 5 

N early eighteenth-century shoe of green damask, with high 
heel and pointed toe ; the latchets are wide and made for 
being fastened with a buckle. 



Nos. 7 and 8 

clog, which belongs to the shoe beside it in the picture, 
has the usual flat sole and heel ; the sides are of red leather, 
stitched with white thread ; the latchets are of pink silk 



bound with salmon-coloured silk braid. 



No. 9 

A QUEEN ANNE shoe, made of red-and-white striped silk 
and cotton material, lined throughout with buff canvas ; it 
has a wide and square instep flap and short latchets or tabs 
for tying with a ribbon or cord ; the toe is pointed ; the heel is of 
wood, covered with red leather, and is 2\ inches high. 
All the above are in the collection of the Author. 



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GLOVES AND SHOES ios 



PLATE XXVI 
No. 1 

A BRIDAL SHOE 

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

A LADY'S shoe of buff silk, embroidered with flowers in silver ; 
the toe is pointed, and the heel is unusually high, being 
3! inches. The length of the shoe is 8^ inches. The 
latchets are wide, and are intended to be fastened by a buckle on the 
instep. This shoe was worn by the grandmother of Sir Wm. 
Mackenzie, K.C.B., on her wedding-day, in 1776. 
Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art. 



No. 2 

A LADY'S SHOE 

A SMALL shoe of moire antique over white kid leather ; the 
heel is of wood, covered with a very light dove-coloured 
polished leather. The inside of the shoe is lined with 
white satin. The heel is exceptionally high, measuring 3! inches, 
the length of the shoe being only 8 inches from the heel to the tip 
of the sharply pointed toe. This singular specimen has the appear- 
ance of a bridal shoe, and the heart, on the ball of the foot, which is 
of a lighter colour than the rest of the sole, suggests a love story. 
The property of W. Cole Plowright, Esq. 



104 GLOVES AND SHOES 



PLATE XXVII 

VARIOUS SHOES AND SLIPPERS 

No. 1 

A WHITE satin slipper, with a square toe and a low heel ; it is 
bound with silver braid, and has a rosette of pale blue ribbon 
trimmed with silver. The shoe is reputed to have belonged 
to a Lady Digby. Date, about 1750. 

No. 2 

A SMART shoe of red kid bound with white braid. The toe is 
pointed, and the instep is slashed and ornamented with a 
rosette of white ribbon ; a backing or lining of white kid 
shows through the slashings ; the heel, of red leather, is small, and 
is i^ inches high. Date, eighteenth century. 



A 



No. 3 

VERY neat slipper of blue kid, with a low heel and pointed 
toe. Eighteenth century. 



Nos. 4 and 5 



A BALL slipper of white ribbed silk goloshed with crimson 
silk, square-toed and without heels. On the white kid 
lining is written in ink the name of " Miss Gordon" and the 
maker's name, " Patterson, 74, Oxford Street" appears on the sole. 
The patten, for protecting the slipper, is made of brown morocco 
leather, and was worn over the ball slipper. Date, early Victorian. 



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GLOVES AND SHOES ios 

No. 6 (centre of plate) 

white satin shoe is embroidered with green, yellow, and 
light red silk ; it has latchets for buckles, and the heel, of 
wood, 2\ inches high, is covered with white kid. Attached 
to the shoe is a slip of antique paper with faded writing, which states 
that the shoe belonged to Sarah Churchill, the wife of the Great 
Duke of Marlborough. The clog, which appears on the extreme 
right of the picture, belongs to the shoe. Time of Queen Anne. 
All the above are in the collection of W. P. Gibbs, Esqr. 
The clogs and pattens are of the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries and are in the collection of the Author. 



GLOVES AND SHOES 

PLATE XXVIII 

EASTERN SHOES AND CHOPINES 

V 

No. 1 



A 

A 



PAIR of shoes made of hempen string. Views of the upper 
and sole are given. 

No. 2 

PAIR of wooden-soled shoes ; the uppers are composed of 
leather covered with brown felt, over which is a wide band 
of blue cashmere. 



Nos. 3 and 4 

WOODEN chopines, or clogs, 8 inches high, worn by Turkish 
women ; they are thickly inlaid with mother-of-pearl and 
silver wire and have bands of leather, which form a kind 
of sandal ; these are covered with puce cloth richly embroidered 
with gold thread. 

As previously mentioned, chopines are of Eastern origin, and 
early in the seventeenth century were in use among the ladies of 
Venice, and eventually found their way into France and, to a small 
extent, into England. 

In the collection of the Author. 

No. 5 

A PAIR of Turkish lady's slippers of green leather. The inner 
soles have small panels of leather work resembling mosaics. 
The under soles are of two thicknesses of brown leather, 
and the heels, unusual in oriental slippers, are formed of loops of 
iron. Their total length is 9 inches. 

The property of A. Clark-Kennedy, Esqr. 



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PLATE XXIX 




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GLOVES AND SHOES 10? 



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PLATE XXIX 

ORIENTAL CHILDREN'S SHOES 

No. 1 

CHINESE shoe, for a child ; it is made of various soft 
materials of brilliant colours blue, crimson, yellow, etc. ; its 
length from toe to heel is 4* inches. 
In the Norwich Museum. 



No. 2 



A 



1 



BOHEMIAN child's shoe, made of crimson and yellow 
leather ; the upper is joined to the sole with narrow strips of 
leather. Entire length, 5^ inches. 
The property of R. Farren, Esqr. 



No. 3 

beautiful Indian shoe, for a child, is made of leather 
covered with rich embroidery in subdued colours (crimson 
and buff), relieved by a ruby-coloured jewel on the instep ; 



the sole is of leather, and measures, from heel to toe, 4^ inches. 
In the Norwich Museum. 



108 GLOVES AND SHOES 



A 



PLATE XXX 

AFRICAN SANDALS 

No. 1 

FRICAN sandals, Niger River district, of leather, and of 
admirable design and workmanship ; the ringed receptacle 
for the great toe is a feature in the sandal. 
In the collection of the Author. 



No. 2 



A 



SIMILAR pair of leather sandals, from the same locality, 
the upper strappings being somewhat more elaborate and 
ornamental. 
In the collection of Cole Ambrose, Esqr. 



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PLATE XXXI 








GLOVES AND SHOES 109 



PLATE XXXI 
Nos. 1 and 2 

NORTH AMERICAN MOCASSINS 



f ^\WO pairs of North American mocassins, of black cloth 
elaborately embroidered with beads and silk in brilliant 
colours. 
In the collection of Cole Ambrose, Esqr. 



A 



No. 3 

AFRICAN SANDALS 

PAIR of African sandals, of plain character. 
In the collection of F. W. Phillips, Esqr. 



no GLOVES AND SHOES 



I 



PLATE XXXII 

CHOPINES 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

pairs of unusually fine chopines, which have been ex- 
hibited by their owner at the Victoria and Albert Museum, 
South Kensington. 
The first of these are, as is commonly the case, built of cork, as 
being the lightest material for the purpose. They are covered with 
stamped leather, which is inlaid with silver-foil, lacquered to imitate 
gilding. The sandals, or latchets, are ornamented with tufts of silk. 
The height at the heels is 3 inches. They slope downwards to the 
toes to a height of if inches, and their length is 8| inches. 

The second pair of chopines are of a much bolder character, 
both in size and height, being y| inches at the heels and 5! inches 
at the toes, but only j\ inches long at the base, giving but a scanty 
sole for the support of the wearer. These chopines are constructed 
of cork, and are covered with white leather, having a stamped and 
perforated ornamentation on either side. The slippers, on the top 
of the structure, are also of white leather, and are decorated with a 
similar but more elaborate pattern. The origin and use of these 
singular articles of foot-gear has been already mentioned in the 
description of Plate VIII. The examples here illustrated are the 
property of J. H. Fitzhenry, Esqr. 



PLATE XXXII 



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