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VOLUME 12 



TEANSACTIONS 



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COLLECTIONS 



OP THE 



AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY 



VOLUME 12 




PRINTED FOR THE SOCIETY 
1911 



Committee of publication 

FRANKLIN PIEKCE RICE 
GEORGE HENRY HAYNES 
CHAELES LEMUEL NICHOLS 
JULIUS HERBERT TUTTLE 




By the King, 
\ PROCLAMATION 

Prohibiting His MajeftiesSubjeds to Trade within the Limits Aflignedto the Govemour and Comua 
ny of Adventurer* of L^land, Trad ing into Hujfa s&v, except thofe of the Company. 
AMES R. 

tereasOur Dea reft i&otftcr Sins chle tDc S*conb of bleilcb sflBemom DID b fcis letters fei 
rents unoct tDc 5rtat deal of i.^U-iJ, brarmg Date tDe decono Dap of M*. tnernin ii 
tftrntiritiiPearof&isSeign, jhnwpmate a Oottrtnoat ant Company fix earrpingona CuMta 
tbr jjioitb. u*tt parts of -nc.uaV .ftim the S:rc, : ..i, t , anbi^, coinnwnlp calleb i*di u ", sn^hr" 
anb bibtfiant unto them anbtimt dncceffojs, tDe dole trace ano Commerce of all eDofc &W 
dttcights, i3ape, iliucrs, taift, Crcebs anb ftounbs in iwwtfotwt lummie thtv (tonni h/ 
lying Out Din the entrance of t:,r jtrciflDfs commonlp (.UltD union s yre.ght-, together ttieh ,11 
tDe lanos, Countrrps, ano rcnlto iee upon tDc Coafls anb Confines of the deas SI*M 
lUhes, S:Uers, Crecbs ana fcwnbs ato;cfal6, tt>DtcD Ibcre not tDen pofleffeb bp, o;< " aiuebtd 
anp of toe dubicrta cf Oar u.D Eopal Stottwr, oj jaodclTcD by tljc *ubiras of nuv other 
CpiBiM 0;inrt o; *eatr, 




nfiian prince o; dtatr, rDcrcli? CtfBtng anb Conftttutmg tDc faib ooocruour ano Comiw= 
. for tDe tune being, anb tlxir sincceflbrs the true anb abfolutc U.OJDS ano proprietors of the 
fame territories, JLinuts ar.b pl.itrs afo:rfaib, anb of all otlwr tDe prnniffes, ibitlmmcfsOzo 

Dibitioii to all otDct the dubtertB of Our faib Kopal ii$rotl)cr to Irabc to tDc parts afo;cfaib. 3(nb Mxreas "cie an (acis&eD 
tDat tDe faib Company hath for many years llntD great jnDuittp, anb at a uetp great CDarge anb C-rpenrr, dcttlcD oilers 
.factories, Crtrttb fcberal f orttflcations, anb maintamcb tDc Crane in tDe parts aforefaib, to tDe great Honour anb profit of 
this Our fcingbom, until of late febcral ill bifpofebpcrCons not being ^embers of tDr faib Company, nor.iccnfrD bp tDcm, 
preferring tbmprrbate profit before tDe pubtieh goob, habe contrarpto tDe faio nopal oraut, in a clatibeRme anb btfojbcriy 
manner, ICrabeo into thott parts, to the apparent prcwbiec.if not beftruaion, of tDe Zrabe aforefatb, anbtn niamfcft Contempt 
of Out prerogative Ropal; anb fDe better to colour tDcir cbtl piaetiets, bo frame Dcfigns to ftire, or bo ^ire tbentfelbes out in 
the dntKcf of, or in conjunction ibitD jforcigturs to da I to tDe parts afo;c(aib, to unbernune anb Dtflrop tDe faib Companies 
Irabe. sale, taking the premifTcs into Our pnnctlp ConQberation, bo not onlp g to S.caiic anb Direct, EDat the prrfona 
ttho habe Co contrmptrumdy taolateb tDr Caib Companies Charter, be profccutcD in Our ^anie at iUUt, in orbrr to their com 
bijiti pumfDmcnt acco;bmg to tDdt Dements , 23ut for prebrntion of tDc libe ctoil practices for tDc future, ecu Date thought fit, 
UntD the Jlbucc of Our pjiuv Council, to publiO) anb Declare >ur aipai cam anb Oleafure to I:, anb car bo berebp Ortalp 
pro&Wf anb f orbib th.it none of Our dnbicrrs UiDatfoebrr, ercrpt tDe faib ouernour anb Compnnp anb their domflbrs, anb 
fnch as Hwii be bnly JLictnfeb bp rfjem at anp time o: tdnrs prmrmt to pirfnmf to fmb 02 ^aingntr any a>ntp dhtps, ei= 
fel or JJcffels, or crtrciCe anp ITrabe lUDatfocbrr bircctlp oj inbireTlt on tDeit olbn accounts, o; in tl;e *fruice of, or in con(un= 
rtion Ut() anp foreigner or foreigners tbhatforbrr, to, in or from tDc faib dtrcigljts anb ioar, calleb i Wfiw i Streights, or to, in 
or from anp 2$apcs, Kiuets, Crcbs or places urijatCotbrr, bp ibb.u names or Denominations foclxr tljep o: anp of them Dai* 
been heretofore, or ftwll hereafter be callcb or biftmgmOKb, tDat noil) are or lie KbitDin fDe entrance of Hudio.. ^.gius aforcfaio, 
in ttbat Hamnbc or Hongrtube fotbtr tDc fame or anp of tDcm DO, both o; fliall lie, remain or bt luittjm tDc liberties, 
Certuor(rs,oj pritaitbges oftDc faib Companv, upon pain of Our D BD DifpleaCurc, ano tDe forfeiture anb lofs cf rbe (3us, 
ttmbanbDes, dblps anb VUffirls tth chlhall be taken or fount) I racing in anp tDe place or places aforcfaib, o; v itDm the 
S-niuts afort aib. 3nb uxt bu tatrcbp ttrtrflp Charge anb Commanb all anb curry out ambicfts of iWwt begrer o, ; . tp fo> 
tier, nottraMngorraff.quing,crbrQgmngtorabeor?raffquetoorfrom tDc parts aforeCaib, oranpof tDtui, contra- 
rp tothettntnuaningof tt)tCaibCompaniesCD<uter, rijat they fo:rl)U)itDoo ceafe anb forbear CncD their Irabe anb raf* 
nr,ac, and UiitDbratt) tbrmfclbrs from tDc parts aforefaib. 3no CQe bo furtDer DC rebp Rreigbtlp Require anb Commanb all 
anbflngular Onr <0obernours, tttutcnatit Oouernours, flowirais, Slice ^Diuirals.Orner.US, Jubges of all Our Courts of 



at mtcaitp, Coinmanbers of >ttr f wts anb CaQles, Captama of Oiu JSopal dDips, 3ufticf B of tDe 0eate, ^Oiictt qaar^al*, 
jjear(h.il3, CcmptroUcvs, Coltettc^ofiDurCuaoniB, cnapttts, dc.ucDers, anballotDer sDur OffieewanD Snifters Cittt 
, anb fipilitarv bp *ea o itano, m all anb eberp of Our dominions ot plantations, anb all other Our dubjms ibDatfoebet 
no ttOtreCbebtr, to tafce efiFwnil tare tDat no ptrfon o; pcrfowl lUDatfoetor Ccrteut tDe faib Companpanb thnr duceeuW aub 
(Bt4ui^lltebulpiticenfeb;Dofenbo:^ab!gateanpdDpso}Slcacls,OHrercifcanpi:rabebirettlPO> inbirealp from an? of 
Oat fctngbams, DommioiiB u plantations uiD.itfotber, c ontran to tlx faib CDarter grantcb to the faib Compinp as afoteCaib, 
to any ttK (Mates oj i.ttntt3 afoiefatb, 01 from thence to anp of Cut fatb fcungooiiis, Dominions, jaiantations, 02 other )Matef , 
3lnb (f anp perfon 0; perfons Ehall piefunie to act o; bo in anp Uife contrarp to this Our Royal proclamation, ccc bo saitil, 
ItapUtt anb ft reightlp Command all anb Qngnlar Onr faio (fobernours, Eicutenant (Pobernours, Xomtrais, ?[litc abtni 
rls,tnnais, Jnbgts of Our Courts of 3lbmiraltp, Commanbers of Our fo;ts anb Caftles, Captains of Our Hopal 
*Dip,lttQltes of the peart, |>jola tparttwls, fiBarOwis, dberiSa, Comptrollers, Collectors of Onr Cnftoms, ^apters, 
Af atthets, anb all other Out Officers anb Snifters Cltxl an* tifrlitarp bp dra or K. anb in rberp of Onr faib Dominions ano 
plantations, anb all other Our Officers, iftnifttrs anb *aMttS UHtttfbctxr anb ftberrforber, that as often a ntcDQwll re 
quire, tftrr anb ebtrp of thnn nfpeaibrlp be Gibing anb 3KTitting to tDe faib Company, their factors, Deputies, or affigns, 
to 3lttac*, 3lm, Xakt anb Acijeall fuchjMnp ordhips, acffcl orSlrffrls, eooos, Scares anb kpercDanbises of Tuch 
perion oj mtais us iftail be 5lftb, Cmplopeo, or EtaOrt tn tonttarp to tDe Charter tfranreb to the Caib Company, tthmtortn 
thtpft^m fimnb,foiOtnfe, nponpainofOuthicihDifpleafttrr.anDnB they ttallanftber the contrary at 

.x: and tKiniedi 4>y of tftrd i68. In the Fourth Vcir of Out Reign. 
COD SAVE THE KING. 



,, udTlKm* f/t*n* t Piiatcn to ibc Kings aK>ft Eicclknt Mjy, 

PROCLAMATION or 1688 (reduced facsimile). 



Amertran Antiquarian 



BEITISH ROYAL PROCLAMATIONS 

RELATING TO AMERICA 

1603-1783 



EDITED BY 
CLARENCE S. BRIGHAM, A.M. 




WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.A. 

PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 

1911 



Stanbopc fl>res& 

H. G1LSON COM PANT 
BOSTON. U.S.A. 



Introduction. 



THIS volume is the outgrowth of action taken by the 
Society at its annual meeting in October, 1906, when a com 
mittee consisting of Mr. Waldo Lincoln, Professor William 
MacDonald, and Dr. J. Franklin Jameson was appointed to 
arrange for a new volume of the Society s Transactions. At 
the April meeting, 1907, the committee was given power to 
proceed with the publication of the British Royal Proclama 
tions relating to America, and in October following appointed 
the writer to edit the volume. The editor spent the summer 
of 1908 in England engaged in this undertaking. 

The present volume includes all English Royal proclama 
tions which concern North and South America, from 1603 to 
1783. Only those proclamations are printed which emanated 
directly from the King. The numerous declarations and 
proclamations issued by provincial and colonial governors, 
the unauthorized proclamations of minor English officials 
serving in America, the proclamations of the governors-gen 
eral of Canada and the Thanksgiving and Fast-Day procla 
mations of the New England governors have all been omitted. 
They are documents of another class, and exist in such pro 
fusion as to be quite beyond the scope of this volume. These 
colonial proclamations, furthermore, are practically never 
entered in the English records. As original broadsides, they 
are very rarely found in English depositories, but are scattered 
throughout the libraries and archives of America. Enough 
of these exist to form the basis of another volume. Limiting 
the present field to royal proclamations allows the subject 
to be covered with reasonable completeness. 

Proclamations only are included, under which heading 
would come manifestos and declarations of the King. In a 
few cases proclamations were issued by the Lords Justices 
during the King s absence from England. The great mass of 
orders in council, which were occasionally issued as broad 
sides, but generally are found only in manuscript entries, 
are not included. These are now being printed in the "Acts 

vii 



viii Introduction. 

of the Privy Council, Colonial Series," the third volume of 
which has progressed as far as the year 1745. Another class 
of proclamations rejected are those of the Lords Lieutenants 
of Ireland, which repeat verbatim the English orders in 
council. 

From the early days of English history, proclamations were 
issued by the Crown to make known to the people new acts 
or regulations or declarations of public importance. Dis 
tributed for public view in printed broadside form, they have 
been familiar to twenty generations of English-speaking 
people. Yet, in spite of their frequency of issue and in spite 
of their occasional importance as public documents, there has 
been scarcely a book upon the forms of English government 
or upon the history of records, which gives a detailed account 
of the method of issuing, entering, and publishing procla 
mations. It remained for Mr. Robert Steele to compile during 
the past year, "A Bibliography of Royal Proclamations, 
1485-1714, with an Historial Essay on their Origin and Use. 7 
This work, in two folio volumes, forms volumes five and six 
of the Earl of Crawford s splendidly published series, the 
BiUiotheca Lindesiana, and in this country can be consulted 
at most of the large libraries. Mr. Steele so thoroughly 
treats of the issuing, enforcement, and history of proclama 
tions, that more than a brief allusion to their method of 
publication is unnecessary in this place. 

Proclamations, during the seventeenth and eighteenth cen 
turies at least, usually underwent the following routine. 
They were drawn up by the Attorney General upon instruc 
tions from the Privy Council, then engrossed on vellum and 
signed by the King. After having been printed as broad 
sides in an edition of a thousand or more by the King s printer, 
they were sent by messengers to the sheriffs of the various 
counties and towns, by whom they were posted. A document 
of the period of Charles II preserved in the Public Record 
Office shows the method of issuing a proclamation: 

"Proclamations how passed. Proclamations are usually drawn by the 
Attorney Generall and assented to by the Council and brought down to a 
Secretary of State to be engrossed in vellum and soe signed by the King (with 
out any attestation of the Secretary), then being dated they are sent (sealed 
in a paper) to the King s Printing House by a messenger, who of course receives 
for their service 23. 6d. of the Printer. Then are printed off such a number as 
is judged convenient, and of them some Copys furnished on the K. s and to the 
Secry 5 to the Councell, &ca.: and 1250 are carryed to the Clerk of the Crown 



Introduction. ix 

to be distributed under the Great Seal, together with the original Proclamation 
signed by the King, which is there kept upon a File for the Clerk of the Crown s 
discharge and warrant. There are made up by the Clerk of the Crown, 66 writs 
directed to so many Sheriffs; each containing a certain number of proclamations 
tyed up with a Label, and then sealed. These writs are delivered over to the 
4 Riding Messengers, whose office it is to distribute them, and for their pains 
have among them 40 out of the Hanaper paid by Bill, if it be y e King s business 
(as generally they are) , or else ,50 if it be a private man s concern. His fees 
for the 66 writs are 22 at 6s. 8d. per writt. The Printer has, by old Rates & 
Custom, id. per sheet for what he prints at the King s charge which comes to 
1$ for a Proclamation, and upon bills exhibited to the Lord Chancellor is paid 
in the Hanaper. His bills for quantitys furnished to the Secretary s office are 
attested by the Secretaries respectively & those to the Council office by the 
Clerks there." (S.P.D. Entry Book 72, p. 219, quoted by Steele.) 

Another interesting side light upon their method of dis 
tribution is shown by a quotation from the records of the 
Privy Council: 

January 10, 1678-79. "Whereas his Majesty did this Day in Council 
take notice of some Proclamations that have issued whereof no notice has come 
into severall parts of the Kingdome than what happens to be given by the 
Gazet, notwithstanding the great charge that is brought unto his Majesties 
accompt for the sending and Dispatching all Proclamations that issue, therefore 
to reform this abuse, and to settle for the future a method of lesse expence, 
and more certainty and expedition in the publique Service, It is this day ordered 
by his Majesty in Councill that the Right honorable the principall Secretaries 
of State do call before them Philip Frowde Esq. Governor of the Post office, 
and settle a method for sending all Proclamations to the respective Sheriffs, so 
as the next Postmaster to such Sheriff be charged with the Delivery of the same, 
and send up the Sheriffs receipt for his Discharge. The clerk of the Crowne is 
also to be summoned, and orders given him, that as soon as Proclamations passe 
the Seale, he do deliver them the next post day into the Post office and take a 
receipt thereof for the Discharge of his Duty herein, And the messengers of the 
Exchequer who have formerly been intrusted with this Service to his Majesties 
Damage and Expence are to be summoned and acquainted with the Rule that 
is now to be established, and that they desist hereafter from intermedling with 
this matter." (Privy Council Register, II Chas., 14:12.) 

This new order, however, took away much of the revenue 
of the messengers and after a formal complaint had been 
made and duly heard, the Council concluded not to alter 

"the ancient Course of Dispersing Proclamations, but leaves the Same to the 
Execution of the messengers of the Exchequer as formerly and that they take 
care that no Complaints be brought against them hereafter for not timely deliver 
ing of Proclamations. And his Majesty is graciously pleased to Command that 
the said Order of the loth Instant be, and the same is hereby Superseded." 
(Idem, p. 39.) 

With the reform of the postal service in 1709, the Privy 
Council discontinued the use of riding messengers and ordered 
that in future proclamations should be sent out by post. 

Proclamations when signed by the King were termed 
" signed bills" and most of them are now preserved in the 



x Introduction. 

Public Record Office among the Privy Seal bundles. During 
the period covered by this volume, proclamations were gen 
erally copied on the backs of the Patent Rolls, and can be 
found through the Indexes. The eighteenth century procla 
mations were furthermore noted in the Crown Office Docquet 
Books, which are in the Public Record Office. Since procla 
mations were first ordered in the Privy Council, they were 
duly entered in its records and are to be found in the Registers 
in the Privy Council Office. After 1665, proclamations were 
generally published in the London Gazette, and before that 
date occasionally in London newspapers, such as the Mercur- 
ius Politicus and the Kingdomes Intelligencer. 

It would seem as if there would be in England at least one 
official collection of broadside proclamations, yet no deposi 
tory the Public Record Office, the Privy Council Office, 
or the British Museum possesses more than a fair share of 
the total number. Private collections are often the most 
valuable for certain periods, and as Mr. Steele s work shows, 
it requires a canvass of all existing collections to insure any 
thing like completeness. 

The principal depositories of proclamations have the follow 
ing distinguishing characteristics: 

The British Museum collection, although but sparsely 
represented for the eighteenth century, is notably full for the 
seventeenth century issues. Scattered in many different 
volumes, however, a comprehensive search requires a con 
siderable amount of time. The Museum also has excellent 
files of the newspapers in which many of the proclamations 
were printed 

The collection of proclamations in the Public Record Office 
is contained in eight folio volumes, and is also less strongly 
represented for the eighteenth century. Here the Indexes 
to the Patent Rolls and the Crown Office Docquet Books are 
invaluable. 

At the Privy Council Office is the best collection of proc 
lamations for American reference and one which is espe 
cially good for the eighteenth century. The long, bulky 
series of Privy Council Registers, which is full of interest 
to students of American affairs, contains the entries of most 
proclamations. 

Other London libraries, where the collections of proclama 
tions were examined for this volume, were the Guildhall and 



Introduction. xi 

the Society of Antiquaries. Each of these depositories had 
large numbers of the earlier proclamations and possessed 
certain issues which existed in no other place. At the Bodleian 
Library, Oxford, the Public Record Office in Dublin, and the 
Register House in Edinburgh, valuable collections were con 
sulted. 

Of the private collections, easily the most comprehensive 
is that gathered by the Earl of Crawford and described in the 
Bibliography of Royal Proclamations before referred to, in 
which volume other collections, both private and public, are 
noted at length. There is no large collection of broadside 
proclamations in any one American library, although many 
of the larger public and historical libraries possess occasional 
issues, and these, so far as found, have been noted. 

There are one hundred and one proclamations entered in 
this volume. They have been carefully transcribed from the 
printed broadsides, except in the few instances where the 
broadside could not be found and some other source had to 
be used, Above each proclamation the date is given, and also 
a descriptive heading supplied by the editor and enclosed in 
brackets. The notes serve chiefly to explain obscure points, 
or to refer to original sources for certain Acts printed in the 
text. The bibliographical information entered at the end of 
each document gives the size of the original broadside, a 
list of libraries where it is to be found, a reference regarding 
the entry of the proclamation upon the Patent Roll, Crown 
Office Docquet Book, or Privy Council Register, and a note 
of the fact as to whether it is reprinted elsewhere. A list of 
the libraries referred to as containing the broadsides, and a 
chronological list of the proclamations precede the body of 
the text. The frontispiece reproduction of a proclamation of 
1688 is from an original broadside owned by the John Carter 
Brown Library. 

The editor s indebtedness to many English officials and 
librarians for courtesies extended to him in the course of his 
work is hereby gratefully acknowledged, especially to Mr. 
Hubert Hall of the Public Record Office and Sir Almeric 
FitzRoy, Clerk of the Privy Council. Professor W. L. Grant, 
then editing the "Acts of the Privy Council, Colonial 
Series," made many helpful suggestions. To Mr. Robert 
Steele above all others the Society is most deeply indebted. 



xii Introduction. 

His aid and advice willingly given, his exceptional knowledge 
of the particular subject constantly placed at the editor s 
service, and finally his scholarly published work on the 
Bibliography of Royal Proclamations have all greatly helped 
to lighten the burden of research. 

CLARENCE S. BRIGHAM, 
Editor. 
August 5, 1911. 



List of Proclamations. 



1603, September 17. Banishing Vagabonds to America, i. 

1606, August 23. Transporting of Women and Children to Foreign Parts, 3, 

1614, September n. Importation of Whale-fins from Greenland, 4. 

1617, December 23. Banishing Notorious Offenders to Virginia, 7. 

1618, June 9. Censuring Sir Walter Raleigh for sacking St. Thomas, 8. 

1619, May 18. Importation of Whale-fins from Greenland, 10. 
1619, October 6. Manufacture of Tobacco-pipes, 12. 

1619, November 10. Inspecting of Tobacco, 15. 

1619, December 30. Forbidding Planting of Tobacco in England, 18. 

1620, May 15. Forbidding Roger North s Expedition to Brazil, 21. 
1620, May 27. Manufacture of Tobacco-pipes, 24. 

1620, June 29. Restraining Disorderly Trading in Tobacco, 27. 

1621, March 8. Suppressing Lotteries in Virginia, 31. 

: 1622, November 6. Prohibiting Disorderly Trading to New England, 33. 

1624, September 29. Encouraging Growth of Tobacco in Plantations, 35. 

1625, March 2. Encouraging Growth of Tobacco in Plantations, 42. 
1625, April 9. Importation of Tobacco, 50. 

1625, May 13. Settling the Affairs of Virginia, 52. 

1627, February 17. Importation of Tobacco, 55. 

1627, March 30. Sealing of Tobacco, 61. 

1627, August 9. Importation of Tobacco, 62. 

1630, November 24. Forbidding Disorderly Trading with the Savages, 66. 
1631, January 6. Restricting Importation of Tobacco, 68. 

1633, October 13. Restricting Sale of Tobacco, 71. 

1634, March 13. Requiring Licenses from Tobacconists, 74. 
1634, May 19. Concerning Tobacco, 75. 

1636, May 16. Limiting Whale-trade to Muscovy Company, 78. 

1637, April 30. Regulating Emigration to America, 80. 

1638, March 14. Importation of Tobacco, 82. 

1 1638, May i. Requiring Licenses for New England, 87. 

1639, March 25. Concerning Tobacco, 88. 
1639, August 19. Licensing of Tobacconists, 92. 

1643, November 24. Requiring Loyalty from America, 94. 
,1655, October 10. Encouraging Settling in Jamaica, 96. 

. 1658, March 9. Limiting Greenland Trade to Muscovy Company, 100. 

1660, September 22. For Apprehension of Whalley and Goffe, 104. 

1661, March 29. Prohibiting Planting of Tobacco in England, 106. 
1661, May 9. Suppressing Vagrancy, 109. 

1661, December 14. Encouraging Settling in Jamaica, 112. 

1667, August 23. Recalling Dispensations of Navigation Act, 114. 

xiii 



XIV 



List of Proclamations. 



1671, December 22. 

1674, March n. 

. 1674, November 30. 

1675, October i. 

1675, November 24. 

1676, April i. 
1676, October 27. 
1681, April 2. 

.1685, February 6. 

1685, April i. 
^-1688, January 20. 
c-i688, March 31. 
^1689, February 19. 

^ 1689, May 7. 

1690, July 14. 

1691, February 5. 
1700, January 29. 

*- 1701, March 6. 
^-1702, March 9. 

1704, June 18. 
^1708, June 26. 

1711, June 23. 
* 1714, October 4. 

1714, November 22. 
* 1717, September 5. 
^1718, December 21. 
<-i722, July 19. 

1727, July 5. 
^729, December 31. 
^-1740, April 9. 
*~ 1740, June 19. 
*" 1741, June 18. 
- 1741, June 18. 
CI744, March 29. 
^1744, June 14. 

1752, June 25. 

1756, May 17. 

1759, October 23. 

1759, October 23. 

1760, October 27. 

1763, October 7. 

1764, March 26. 
1772, August 26. 

1774, December 16. 

1775, August 23. 

1775, December 22. 

1776, October 30. 



Concerning the Planters at St. Christophers, 116. 
Recalling Dispensations of Navigation Act, 119. 
Prohibiting African Trade to Plantations, 120. 
For Apprehending Don Philip Hellen, 124. 
Enforcing Navigation Acts, 126. 
Concerning Passes for Ships, 129. 
Suppressing the Rebellion in Virginia, 130. 
Granting Pennsylvania to William Perm, 133. 
Continuing Officers in the Colonies, 135. 
Prohibiting African Trade to Plantations, 137. 
Suppressing Pirates in America, 140. 
Prohibiting General Trading at Hudson s Bay, 143. 
Continuing Officers in the Colonies, 146. 
Declaration of War against France, 147. 
For Apprehending William Penn, 150. 
For Apprehending William Penn, 152. 
For Apprehending Author of Darien Libel, 153. 
For the Apprehension of Pirates, 155. 
Continuing Officers in the Colonies, 159. 
Rates of Foreign Coins in Plantations, 161. 
Encouraging Trade to Newfoundland, 163. 
Establishing Post Office in America, 167. 
Concerning Passes for Ships, 172. 
Continuing Officers in the Colonies, 174. 
For Suppressing Pirates in West Indies, 176. 
For Suppressing Pirates in West Indies, 178. 
Concerning Passes for Ships, 180. 
Continuing Officers in the Colonies, 182. 
Concerning Passes for Ships, 184 
Encouraging Trade with America, 188 
Providing for Distribution of Prize Money, 189. 
Regulating Distribution of Prizes, 193. 
Regulating Distribution of Prizes, 195. 
Declaration of War against France, 196. 
Regarding Distribution of Prizes, 200. 
Continuing Officers in Georgia, 201. 
Declaration of War against France, 203. 
Thanksgiving in England for Defeat of French, 207. 
Thanksgiving in Scotland for Defeat of French, 208. 
Continuing Officers in the Colonies, 210. 
Establishing New Governments in America, 212. 
Colonizing Granada and other Islands, 218. 
For Apprehending Destroyers of the Gaspee, 224. 
Providing Copper Currency for Virginia, 226. 
For Suppression of Rebellion in America, 228. 
Appointing the Distribution of Prizes, 230. 
Fast Day in England, 234. 



List of Proclamations. 



xv 



1776, October 30. 
1778, January 23. 
1778, January 23. 

1778, September 16. 

1779, January i. 
1779, January i. 
1779, December 13. 

1779, December 13. 

1780, December 20. 

1781, January 12. 

1781, January 12. 

1782, January 9. 

1782, January 9. 

1783, February 14. 



Fast Day in Scotland, 236. 

Fast Day in England, 237. 

Fast Day in Scotland, 239. 

Regarding the Distribution of Prizes, 241. 

Fast Day in England, 246. 

Fast Day in Scotland, 247. 

Fast Day in England, 249. 

Fast Day in Scotland, 250. 

Relations of England to Holland, 252. 

Fast Day in England, 256. 

Fast Day in Scotland, 257. 

Fast Day in England, 259. 

Fast Day in Scotland, 260. 

Declaring Cessation of Arms, 262. 



List of Abbreviations 

OF THE NAMES OF LIBRARIES POSSESSING 
PROCLAMATIONS. 



Adv. Advocates Library, Edinburgh. 

Antiq. Society of Antiquaries, London. 

B. M. British Museum, London. 

Bodl. Bodleian Library, Oxford. 

Camb. Cambridge University Library. 

Cant. Municipal Library, Canterbury. 

Ch. Chetham Library, Manchester. 

Crawf . Lord Crawford s Library, Haigh Hall. 

D. H. Devonshire House, London (Friends Historical Society). 

Dalk. Dalkeith Palace (Duke of Buccleuch), Scotland. 

Dubl. Dublin Public Record Office. 

Guild. Guildhall Library, London. 

Hodg. J. Eliot Hodgkins Library, London. 

I. T. Inner Temple, Library, London. 

P. C. Privy Council Office, London. 

P. R. O. Public Record Office, London. 

Q. C. Queen s College, Oxford. 

Signet Signet Library, Edinburgh. 

T. C. D. Trinity College, Dublin. 



xvi 



Royal Proclamations. 

1603, September 17. 
[Banishing Vagabonds to Newfoundland and West Indies.] 



BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION FOR THE DUE AND SPEEDY EXECUTION OF 

THE STATUTE AGAINST ROGUES, VAGABONDS, 

IDLE, AND DISSOLUTE PERSONS. 

Whereas at a Parliament holden at Westminster in the 
nine and thirtieth yeere of the Reigne of his Majesties late 
deare Sister de ceased Queene Elizabeth, a profitable and 
necessary Law was made for the repressing of Rogues, Vaga 
bonds, idle and dissolute persons, 1 wherewith this Realme 
was then much infested, by the due execution of which Lawe, 
great good ensued to the whole Commonweale of this Realme, 
but now of late by the remissenesse, negligence, and conni- 
vencie of some Justices of the Peace, and other Officers in 
divers parts of the Realme, they have swarmed and abounded 
every where more frequently then in times past, which will 
grow to the great and imminent danger of the whole Realme, 
if by the goodness of God Almighty, and the due and timely 
execution of the said Law the same be not prevented. 

And where to the end that no impediment might be to the 
due and full execution of the same Law, his Highnesse Privie 
Councell, according to the power to them in that behalfe 
given by the sayd Law, have by their Order assigned places 
and parts beyond the Seas, unto which such incorrigible or 
dangerous Rogues should according to the same Lawe be 
banished and conveyed, as by the Order in that behalfe made, 
and under this present Proclamation particularly mentioned 
and set downe, more at large appeareth: His Majestic pur 
posing (for the universall good of the whole Realme) to have 
the same Law duely and fully executed, doth by advice of 
his Privie Councell require all Justices of Peace, Maiors, 

1 Printed in Statutes of the Realm, iv, 899: "An Acte for punyshment of 
Rogues Vagabonds and Sturdy Beggars," 39 Eliz. ch. 4. 



2 Royal Proclamations. 

> 

Bayliffes, Hedboroughs, Constables, and other Officers what 
soever to whom it appertaineth, to see that the said Law be in 
all the parts, and branches of the same carefully, duely and 
exactly executed, as they and every of them will answere the 
contrary at their uttermost perils. 

Given at his Majesties Mannour of Woodstocke the seven 
teenth day of September, 1603, m tne fi rst yeere of his High- 
nesse Reigne of England, France, and Ireland, and of Scotland 
the seven and thirtieth. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

THE ORDER. 1 

Forasmuch as it hath appeared unto us aswell by our 
owne viewes in our travailes in this present Progresse of his 
Majestic, as also by good and credible information from 
divers and sundrie partes of the Realme, that Rogues grow 
againe and increase to bee incorrigible, and dangerous not 
onely to his Majesties loving Subjects abroad, but also to his 
Majestic and his Honourable Houshold and attendants in 
and about his Court, which growing partly through the 
remissenes of some Justices of the Peace, and other Officers 
in the Countrey, and partly for that there hath beene no 
Suite made for assigning some place beyond the Seas, to which 
such incorrigible or dangerous Rogues might bee banished, 
according to the Statute in that behalfe made: We therfore 
of his Majesties privie Councel, whose names are hereunto 
subscribed, finding it of necessitie to reforme great abuses, 
and to have the due execution of so good and necessarie a 
Law, doe according to the power limitted unto us by the same 
Statute, hereby Assigne and thinke it fit and expedient, that 
the places and partes beyond the Seas to which any such 
incorrigible or dangerous Rogues shall bee banished and con 
veyed according to the said Statute, shall bee these Countries 
and places following, viz. The New-found Land, the East 
and West Indies, France, Germanic, Spaine, and the Low- 
countries, or any of them. 

T. Buckhurst. Lenox. Nottingham. 

Suffolke. Devonshire. Mar. 

Ro. Cecill , E. Wotton. Jo. Stanhop. 

1 This Order in Council is not to be found among the Records of the Privy 
Council, which for the period from 1603 to 1613 were burned in a fire at White 
hall in 1618. 



1606, August 23. 3 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic. Anno 1603. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., P. R. 0., and Q. C. En 
tered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s "Feeder a," xvi, 554, and in 
Barker s "Booke of Proclamations," p. 44. 



1606, August 23. 
[Transporting of Women and Children to Foreign Parts.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION TOUCHING PASSENGERS. 

Whereas in the first Session of our Parliament holden at 
Westminster the nineteenth day of March in the yeere of our 
raigne of England, France and Ireland the first, and of Scot 
land the seven and thirtieth; It was amongst other things 
Enacted, That no woman nor any childe under the age of one 
and twenty yeeres (Except Saylers or Shipboyes or Apprentice, 
or Factor of some Merchant in trade of Merchandize) should 
bee permitted to passe over the Seas, except the same should 
be by licence of us, our Heires or Successors, or some sixe or 
more of our privy Councell, thereunto first had under their 
handes, upon paine that the Officers of the Port that should 
willingly or negligently suffer any such to passe, or should not 
enter the names of such Passengers licenced, should forfeit 
his Office, and all his goods and Chattels, And upon paine 
that the owner of any Ship or Vessell, that should wittingly 
or willingly cary any such over the Seas, without licence as is 
aforesaid, should forfeit his Ship or Vessell, and all the Tackle, 
And every Master or Mariner, of or in any such Ship or Vessell, 
offending as is aforesaid, should -forfeit all their goods, and 
suffer imprisonment by the space of twelve moneths without 
Baile, or Maineprise, As by the saide Acte of Parliament 
amongst other things may more at large appeare: * 

And whereas many such our Subjects, That is to say, 
Women and persons under the age of twenty and one yeeres, 
have from time to time just and necessary causes and occasions 

1 This Act, entitled " An Acte for the due Execution of the Statutes againste 
Jesuits, Seminarie Priestes Recusants &c.," is printed in Statutes of the Realm, 
iv. 102 1, i James I, ch. 4, sec. 7. 



4 Royal Proclamations. 

to goe and passe over the Seas, In which cases for every such 
women and persons under the age of twenty and one yeeres 
to obteine such licence, either from our selves, or from sixe 
of our said Privy Counsel according to the said Law, is very 
inconvenient, and almost impossible; Wee have therefore 
thought convenient, for the ease as well of our selfe and our 
said Counsell, as of such of our Subjects as are of the condition 
mentioned in the saide Acte of Parliament, to graunt our 
Commission to persons of trust in certaine Ports of our Realme, 
lying most apt and convenient for passage, That is to say, 
London, the Cinque Ports, Harwich, Yarmouth, Hull, and 
Waymouth, to licence such women and persons under the 
age of twenty and one yeeres, as shall have just cause to passe 
out of our Realme, upon due examination had of them, to passe 
without perill to themselves, or the Officers of our said Ports, 
Notwithstanding the said Statute or anything therein con- 
teined, And we have thought it fit to give publique knowledge 
hereof to al our Subjects, and to all our Officers whom it may 
concerne, to the ende they may know what shall bee lawfull 
for them to doe in those cases. 

Given at the Castle of Farneham the xxiii. day of August, 
in the fourth yeere of our Reigne of Great Britaine, France 
and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic. 1606. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., P. R. 0., and Q. C. En 
tered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Barker s "Booke of Proclamations" 
P- 133. 



1614, September n. 
[Importation of Whale-fins from Greenland.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION CONCERNING THE BRINGING 
IN OF WHALE-FINNES INTO HIS MAJESTIES DOMINIONS, ETC. 

As Wee conceive, it cannot be construed by any Our doings 
or proceedings, that Wee are caried with any ambitions or 
unjust appetite, to covet that which appertaineth to others 



1614, September n. 5 

So it shalbe alwayes Our desire and resolution, to nourish and 
maintaine the happy estate of Our loving Subjects, and the 
honour of Our Kingdomes; not onely in the same degree, in 
the which We have received them; but likewise with that 
increase and advancement, whereof the providence of Almighty 
God by just occasions shal put meanes and opportunities into 
Our hands; and in nothing more (next unto the true worship 
of God, and the administration of Justice) then in the mainte 
nance and increase of Navigation, wherein Our kingdomes 
both by scituation, strength of shipping, skill of Marriners, 
valew of Commanders at Sea, and many honourable discoveries 
and exploits, have for long time, and more and more of late 
time flourished. And whereas Our Company of Merchants 
for the discovery of new Trades, commonly called the Mus- 
covia Company, 1 have with their great costs and charges, of 
late yeeres discovered a Land, which they call by the name 
of King James his Newland, 2 to the increase of Navigation 
and Mariners; and have further by their care and industry 
entred into a trade of fishing for the Whale, and procured 
Biscainers, skilfull in striking the Whale, to teach and instruct 
the English Nation therein: And whereas a principall part 
of the benefit of the Whale-fishing consisteth in the com- 
moditie of Whale-finnes imported into Our Kingdomes; And 
that experience already sheweth, that Our owne subjects 
in their returne from that Fishing, are able to furnish and 
serve Our Kingdomes with sufficient quantity for the use of 
Our loving subjects: it being also a matter of delicacie, and 
rather to be considered as it may concerne Navigation, then 
in itself e: We have therfore thought fit for the better encour 
agement of the said Company, and other Our Subjects, in 
services of like nature, to prohibite all Aliens and strangers, 

1 The Russia, or Muscovy Company, chartered as a company of Merchant 
Adventurers in 1554, received from King James in 1613 an additional charter 
giving them the exclusive rights to the whale fishery of Greenland. For the 
subsequent career of this Company and their struggles with the Dutch for the 
possession of the Greenland trade, see Cawston and Keane, Early Chartered 
Companies, pp. 45-52. 

2 In 1613 the Muscovy Company set up the King s arms at Spitzbergen, 
calling it King James s Newland. (Anderson, Origin of Commerce, ii, 343.) 
In vol. iv of the Transactions of the American Antiquarian Society is printed 
from the original manuscript the Narrative of a Voyage to Spitzbergen, being 
"A Brief Description of the Country of Greenland, otherwise called King James 
his New Land." The rise of the Muscovy Company and its participation in 
the Greenland trade is carefully treated by Dr. S. F. Haven in the introduction 
to the Narrative. This recently discovered land was Spitzbergen and not Green 
land proper. 



6 Royal Proclamations. 

and also Our owne subjects, (except the said Muscovia Mer 
chants, and that in their joynt stocke) to bring hereafter into 
any Our Kingdomes the said commodity. 

Wherefore We do by these presents, straitly and expresly 
forbid and prohibite, all Aliens and strangers whatsoever, and 
also Our owne Subjects (others then the said Muscovia Mer 
chants, and that in their joynt stocke) to bring into any Our 
kingdomes, and Dominions any Whale-fumes, upon paine of 
Confiscation of the same, and of Our high indignation and 
displeasure, and of such further punishment, as shalbe meet 
to be inflicted upon the offenders for their contempt in that 
behalf e: And We do further hereby charge and require all 
Our Customers, Comptrollers, Searchers and other Officers, and 
also the Farmors of Our Customes, and their ministers, care 
fully to attend every one in their severall dueties, the execu 
tion of this Our Royall Proclamation, and in no wise to per 
mit or suffer any Whale-finnes, either directly or indirectly, 
openly or privately, to be brought into the Ports, or other 
places of any of Our kingdomes: And in case any be brought 
in, the same to seaze to Our use, and by all other meanes to 
finde out, and informe of all offences tending to the breach 
of this Our Royall Proclamation. 

Given at Wansted the eleventh day of September, in the 
twelfth yeere of Our Raigne of Great Britaine, France, and 
Ireland, 1614. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic. Anno Dom. 1614. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. Entered 
on Patent Rolls. 



1617, December 23. 7 

1617, December 23. 
[Banishing Notorious Offenders to Virginia.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION FOR THE BETTER AND MORE PEACEABLE 

GOVERNMENT OF THE MIDDLE SHIRES OF NORTHUM 
BERLAND, CUMBERLAND, AND WESTMERLAND. 

[A long proclamation for the prevention of disorders and out 
rages in certain shires, requiring that no person shall lease lands 
and tenements without sufficient surety, that all persons shall assist 
in the pursuit of criminals, that notorious offenders shall not receive 
bail except in open court, that care shall be exercised in the grant 
ing of licenses to " hostler houses and malsters," that known male 
factors shall not be countenanced " by wearing of their liveries or 
any other dependance," that the families of offenders who have 
been banished shall be sent to join the fugitives, that all outlaws 
shall yield themselves up to the law and shall not be sheltered, 
that for the prevention of cattle stealing no beef shall be sold in 
any fair or market without the hide, that all horses, sheep and 
cattle shall be sold only in open fair or market, that notorious 
offenders shall be sent to Virginia and other foreign parts, that the 
use of weapons and horses be forbidden except to noblemen and 
gentlemen, that the overlords shall require sufficient bonds of their 
tenants, and that offenders shall be remanded to the place where 
their offense was committed. Only the paragraph regarding Amer 
ica is quoted.] 

Item, for the more speedy suppressing, and freeing the said 
Countreis and places of notorious and wicked offenders that 
will not be reformed, but by severity of punishment; Wee 
have taken order for the making out a Commission to speciall 
Commissioners, to survey, search and finde out, and enforme 
Us of the most notorious and lewd persons, and of their faults, 
within the said Counties of Northumberland, Cumberland, 
and Westmerland, Riddesdale, and Bewcastle within the same: 
And We hereby signifie our pleasure to be upon Certificate of 
the said Commissioners, to send the most notorious ill livers, 
and misbehaved persons of them that shall so be certified, 
into Virginia, or to some other remote parts to serve in the 
Warres, or in Colonies, that they may no more infect the 
places where they abide within this our Realme. 



8 Royal Proclamations. 

Given at Our Pallace of Westminister, the three and twen 
tieth day of December, in the fifteenth yeere of Our Raigne of 
Great Britaine, France and Ireland. Anno 1617. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, 
Deputies and Assignes of Robert Barker, Printer to the Kings 
most Excellent Majestic. Anno M.DC.XVII. 

4 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. Entered 
on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register (Scotland}, xi, 288. 



1618, June 9. 
[Censuring Sir Walter Raleigh for sacking St. Thomas.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION DECLARING His MAJESTIES 

PLEASURE CONCERNING SlR WALTER RAWLEIGH, AND 
THOSE WHO ADVENTURED WITH HIM. 

Whereas We gave Licence to Sir Walter Rawleigh, 1 Knight, 
and others of Our Subjects with him, to undertake a Voyage 
to the Countrey of Guyana, where they pretended great hopes 
and probabilities to make discovery of certain Gold Mines, 
for the lawfull enriching of themselves, and these Our King 
doms: Wherein We did by expresse limitation and Caution 
restraine, and forbid them and every of them, from attempt 
ing any Acte of hostility, wrong, or violence whatsoever, upon 
any of the Territories, States, or Subjects of any forraine 
Princes, with whom Wee are in amitie: And more peculiarly 
of those of Our deare Brother the King of Spaine, in respect 
of his Dominions and Interests in that Continent. 

1 Raleigh s voyage for the discovery of gold mines in Guiana (the modern 
Venezuela) was projected in 1616. He was released from the Tower in March 
of that year and sailed from Plymouth with a fleet of fourteen ships in June, 1617. 
The expedition seemed doomed to failure from the start, and after St. Thomas 
was attacked and burned in December, 1617, Raleigh was compelled to return 
to England without having attained his object. He landed at Plymouth in 
June, 1618, and after the due form of trial was executed, although upon a sen 
tence of 1603, on October 29, 1618 (Dictionary of National Biography, vol. 47, 
pp. 197-200, where authorities are cited). Raleigh s commission for under 
taking the voyage, dated August 26, 1616, is printed in Rymer s Fcedera, xvi, 
789. 



June p. 9 

All which notwithstanding, We are since informed by a 
common fame, that they, or some of them have, by an hostile 
invasion of the Towne of S. Thome (being under the obedience 
of Our said deare Brother the King of Spaine) and by killing 
of divers of the inhaitants thereof, his Subjects, and after by 
sacking and burning of the said towne, (as much as in them 
for their owne parts lay) malitiously broken and infringed the 
Peace and Amitie, which hath beene so happily established, 
and so long inviolably continued betweene Us and the Sub 
jects of both our Crownes. 

Wee have therefore held it fit, as appertaining neerely to 
Our Royall Justice and Honor, eftsoones to make a publique 
declaration of Our owne utter mislike and detestation of the 
said insolences, and excesses, if any such have beene by any 
of Our Subjects committed: And for the better detection 
and clearing of the very trueth of the said common fame; 
Wee doe heereby straitly charge and require all Our Subjects 
whatsoever, that have any particular understanding and 
notice thereof, upon their duety and alleagiance which they 
owe Us, immediately after publication of this Our pleasure, 
to repaire unto some of Our Privy Counsell, and to discover 
and make knowne unto them their whole knowledge and 
understanding concerning the same, under paine of Our 
High displeasure and indignation; that Wee may thereupon 
proceede in Our Princely Justice to the exemplary punish 
ment and coertion of all such, as shal be convicted and found 
guilty of so scandalous and enormous outrages. 

Given at Our Manner of Greenwich, the ninth day of June, 
in the sixteenth yeere of Our Raigne of England, France and 
Ireland, and of Scotland the one and Fiftieth. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton, and John Bill, 
deputie Printers for the Kings most Excellent Majestic. 
Anno M.DC.XVIII. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. 

Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s "Fcedera" xvii, 92, where it 
is dated June n, 1618. 



io Royal Proclamations. 



1619, May 18. 

[Importation of Whale-fins from Greenland.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION INHIBITING THE IMPORTATION 

OF WHALE FINNES INTO HIS MAJESTIES DOMINIONS BY ANY, 

BUT THE MUSCOVY COMPANY. 

Whereas Wee by Our Proclamation given at Wans ted, the 
eleventh day of September in the twelfth yeere of Our reigne 
of Great Brittaine, France, and Ireland, 1 for the reasons 
therein expressed, and for the incouragement of Our wel- 
beloved Subjects, the company of Merchants trading for 
Muscovia, Greeneland 2 and the parts adjoyning, commonly 
called the Muscovia Company, did straitly and expresly for 
bid and prohibit all Aliens and Strangers whatsoever, and also 
all Our owne Subjects (others then the sayd Muscovia Mer 
chants, and that in their joynt stock) to bring into any Our 
Kingdomes, and Dominions any Whale Finnes upon paine of 
confiscation of the same, and of Our high indignation and 
displeasure, and of such further punishment as should be meet 
to be inflicted upon the Offenders for their contempt in that 
behalfe. 

Now forasmuch as We are given to understand, That Our 
sayd Proclamation took not that good effect, nor found that 
due obedience and conformity which We expected: We have 
therefore in further manifestation of our former intentions 
and gracious favor towards the sayd Company, thought good 
eftsoones to publish Our Royall pleasure heerein, and to revive 
and quicken Our sayd former Proclamation, which We cannot 
but take in ill part, hath beene so much neglected: And there 
fore We doe by these presents straitly charge, prohibit, and 
forbid, aswell all Alliens and Strangers whatsoever, as also 
Our naturalLborn Subjects and Denizens, That they nor any 
of them (other then the sayd Muscovia Merchants, and that 

1 Refers to the proclamation of September n, 1614. In 1618 the East India 
Adventurers had joined stock with the Muscovy Company to form one joint 
company for the whale fishery, but after two years of unsuccessful adventuring 
the agreement was dissolved (Anderson, Origin of Commerce, ii, 360, 367). 

* Spitzbergen, rather than Greenland proper. 



, May 18. n 

in their joynt stocke onely) shall from hencefoorth directly or 
indirectly import, or bring into Our Kingdomes and Domin 
ions, or any of them, any Whale Finnes, upon paine of for 
feiture, and confiscation of the same, whether they be found 
on board of any Ship, Hoy, Boate, or Bottome, or layd on 
land in any warehouse, storehouse, shop, cellar, or any 
other place whatsoever, and upon paine of Our high Indig 
nation and displeasure, and such other punishment, as by 
Our Court of Starre chamber shalbe thought meet to be 
inflicted upon them, or any of them, as contemners of Our 
Roy all will and commandement in this behalf e. 

And Wee doe likewise straitly charge, prohibite and forbid, 
aswell all Aliens and Strangers, as Our naturall borne Sub 
jects and Denizens (other then the sayd Muscovia Merchants) 
that they nor any of them doe presume to buye, utter, sell, 
barter or contract for, any Whale finnes, knowing the same 
to be imported into any of our Realmes or Dominions contrary 
to Our wil and pleasure heerein declared, upon paine of Our 
high indignation and displeasure, and such further punishment 
as by Our said Court of Starre chamber shall bee thought 
meet to be inflicted upon such offenders, as contemners also 
of Our Royall commandement. And to the end this Our 
pleasure may take the better effect, We doe heereby charge, 
and command all Customers, Comptrollers, Searchers, Waiters, 
Farmers, and Collectors of Our Customes, and other our 
Officers and Ministers, carefully to attend every one in his 
severall place, the execution heereof, and in no wise to permit 
or suffer any Whale finnes directly or indirectly, openly or 
privately to be brought, or imported into any Our Kingdomes 
or Dominions, contrary to Our Royal pleasure heerein ex 
pressed, or being so imported, that they doe not permit, or 
suffer the same to bee colourably customed for other goods 
and Merchandize, but that foorthwith they or some of them 
doe seize and take to Our use all such Whalefinnes as shall be 
so imported, and immediately upon such seizure made, to give 
notice thereof in writing to Our Register for forfeitures in 
Our Custome house in the Port of London, upon paine to 
undergoe such punishment, as shalbe thought meet by the 
Lords of Our Privie Councell. 

Neverthelesse Our intent and meaning is, That the sayd 
Muscovie Company, and none other, shall or may buy, and 
sell, barter, or contract for, any such Whalefinnes, as being 
imported contrary to this Our Proclamation shalbe confiscate 



12 Royal Proclamations. 

and seized, and the same, being sold by the sayd Company, 
may be afterward bought, contracted for, and used by any 
other Our Subjects at their wil and pleasure. Any thing 
heerein contained to the contrary notwithstanding. 

Given at Our Mannour of Greenwich, the eighteenth day 
of May, in the seventeenth yeere of our Raigne of England, 
France, and Ireland, and of Scotland the two and fiftieth. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most excellent Majestic. Anno. 
M.DC.XIX. 

2 pp. folio. There are two issues slightly "varying in set-up. Copies in 
Antiq., B. M., Dalk., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. 



1619, October 6. 

[Manufacture of Tobacco-pipes.] 

AN ABSTRACT OF SOME BRANCHES OF HIS MAJESTIES LATE 
CHARTER, GRANTED TO THE TOBACCO-PIPE MAKERS 
OF WESTMINSTER; DECLARING HIS MAJESTIES PLEAS 
URE TOUCHING THAT MANUFACTURE, AND ALSO ALL 
PERSONS WHOM IT MAY CONCERNE. 

James by the grace of God, King of England, Scotland, 
France and Ireland, &c. Whereas Wee have been informed 
by the complaint of divers of Our poore Subjects, the ancient 
Makers of Tobacco-Pipes within this Our Realme, That for 
want of power and priviledge to retaine their Apprentises and 
Servants during their Apprentiship (who commonly depart 
from them before they have served their tearmes, or attained 
to the knowledge of their Art) they are much prejudiced both 
in their Trades and meanes of living, by their excessive making 
and uttering of ill Ware, And Our Subjects who have use of 
that Manufacture, are thereby greatly abused and deceived: 
And not only so, but to their Masters farther impoverishment, 
these loose and idle persons doe instruct and teach others of as 
bad qualitie as themselves, to make and sell like ill and deceitful 
ware. Besides, for that the said Art of making Tobacco Pipes 
is easily learned, sundry of our Subjects trained up in other 
Trades more useful for the Realme, doe forsake the same and 



October 6. 13 

take up this of making Tobacco-Pipes : And others who have 
other good Trades to live upon, intrude themselves into this 
also, and use both, to the hinderance and overthrow of those 
who anciently practised the same. And whereas for the better 
reforming of all those disorders, to cut off the superfluous 
straglers and late intruders, to reduce them to a competent 
number, and to settle good government amongst them (this 
Trade being a new Trade, never yet ordered by any Law or 
Policie, and which concerneth not any Commoditie of neces- 
sitie for our Common-weale, but a superfluous pleasure, ne- 
cessarie to be regulated by Our Royall power and authoritie) 
We have therefore thought fit by Letters Patents under Our 
Great Seale, to Incorporate a certaine number of choice and 
selected persons, who have either served as Apprentices, or 
have otherwise practised that Art by the space of seven yeers, 
to whom and whose Servants. Apprentices, and such others 
as shall be by them admitted into that Societie for their skill 
and honest conversation, Wee intend to appropriat the said 
Art, and to restraine all others from taking that benefit which 
in no right belongeth unto them. 

And to the end that all our loving Subjects may take knowl 
edge of Our pleasure expressed in our Charter, that it may be 
duly observed without pretext of ignorance, Wee doe heereby 
declare Our expresse will and pleasure to be, and doe straightly 
charge and command, That no person or persons whatsoever, 
other then such as are members of the said Societie of Tobacco- 
pipe makers of Westminster, or which have by the space of 
seven yeares at the least beene bound to (or exercised) that 
Art, or such others as shall be chosen into the Societie by the 
said Societie, shall not presume (from the date of these presents) 
directly nor indirectly to make any manner of Tobacco-pipes 
within this Our Realme of England or Dominion of Wales, 
nor shall bring in or import any manner of Tobacco-pipes 
from beyond the Seas, or from Our Realme of Scotland; Nor 
shall utter, sell, or put to sale any Tobacco-pipes so made or 
brought into this Our Realme of England and Dominion of 
Wales, contrary to Our pleasure heerein declared Upon paine 
not only of forfeiture of all such Manufacture, but of incurring 
such penalties, imprisonments and punishments, as by the 
Lawes and Statutes of this Our Realme, or by Our prerogative 
Royall may be inflicted upon the offenders in this kind for 
their contempt or neglect of Our Royall Will and Command 
ment. And further, for the better discovering and suppressing 



14 Royal Proclamations. 

of all secret and under-hand making or uttering of the said 
Manufacture by such as are not members of this Societie or 
otherwise enabled as aforesaid, Wee doe require, charge, and 
straightly command all Our loving Subjects (especially such 
Retaylers as shall buy Tobacco-pipes to sell againe) that they, 
nor any of them directly, nor indirectly, shall buy, acquire, 
get or obtaine any Tobacco-pipes whatsoever of or from the 
hands of any person or persons, not being knowne members 
of the said Societie, And to that end it is provided, that all 
Tobacco-pipes made by the said Company, shall be brought 
to the Common Hall of the said Societie, there to be proved 
whether the same be good and merchantable ware, before they 
shall be uttered or put to sale; (where they may be bought of 
all Our loving Subjects) Upon paine of undergoing of Our 
displeasure, and such paines and penalties as shall or may 
ensue thereupon for such contempt against Our will and Our 
prerogative Royall. And for the full effectuating of Our 
pleasure heerein, These are to command and straightly charge, 
That all the said Tobacco-pipe Makers aforesaid, shall forth 
with take knowledge of our Charter by these presents, and by 
resorting to the said Societie in London, where they shall 
receive such Orders and Ordinances as shall be constituted and 
made by the Master, Wardens, and Assistances of the said 
Societie for the benefit of the said Societie. And lastly, We 
will and do hereby require all Mayors, Sherifes, Justices of 
Peace, Bailifes, Constables, and all other Officers and Ministers 
whatsoever, That they and every of them in their severall 
Offices and Places be from time to time ayding and assisting to 
the said Master, Wardens, and Societie in the due execution 
and accomplishment of this Our Royall Will and Command 
ment, as they tender Our pleasure, and will avoid the contrary. 

Witnesse Our selfe at Westminster the sixth day of October, 
in the seventeenth yeere of Our Raigne of England, France, 
and Ireland, and of Scotland, the three and Fiftieth. 

I p. folio. Copy in Antiq. 



1619, November 10. 15 

1619, November 10. 
[Inspecting of Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION CONCERNING THE VIEWING AND 

DISTINGUISHING OF TOBACCO IN ENGLAND AND IRELAND, THE 

DOMINION OF WALES, AND TOWNE OF BARWICKE. 

Whereas divers good and necessarie provisions have beene 
heretofore made, as well by Act of Parliament, as otherwise, 
for the well garbling of Spices and Drugges, to the intent the 
Subjects of this Our Realme should not bee occasioned to use 
any unwholesome Spices or Drugges, to the impayring of 
their health, or to buy the bad instead of the good, to the 
impairing of their substance. And for as much as the Drugge 
called Tobacco, being of late yeeres growne frequent in this 
Our Realme and other Our Dominions, is daily sold ungarbled, 
whereby more inconvenience groweth and ariseth to Our 
loving Subjects, then by any other Drugge whatsoever. And 
for that also by the manie and sundrie abuses practised and 
committed by Merchants, Masters of Ships and others, in 
concealing and uttering the said Tobacco without paying any 
Impost or Custome for the same, great losse and dammage 
accrueth to Us, notwithstanding any Lawes, Statutes or other 
course heretofore taken for preventing thereof: For remedie 
of all which Inconveniences, Wee, by our Letters Patents 
under our great Scale of England, bearing Date, at West- 
mynster the five and twentieth day of May now last past, 
did prohibite and forbid, That no person or persons should 
at any time after the day of the Date of our said Letters 
patents within Our Realme of England, the Dominion of 
Wales, and Port and Towne of Barwicke, or any of them; or 
within Our Realme of Ireland, or any part of them or any 
of them, by himselfe or themselves, or his or their servants 
or factours, or any others, directly or indirectly sell or put to 
sale; or attempt, presume or goe about any manner of way 
to sell or put to sale, either in grosse or by retaile, any To 
bacco, of what sort, kind or growth soever, before the Cus 
tome and Impost thereof due, were paid; and the same To 
bacco were viewed, distinguished and sealed by the Officer 
or Officers of Us, Our Heires and Successours, in that behalfe 



1 6 Royal Proclamations. 

to be constituted and appointed; For whose labour, travell, 
charges and expences in that behalfe to be sustained and 
taken in the execution of the said Office : Wee did by the said 
Letters Patents, constitute and appoint, That they should 
and might from time to time, demand, take and receive to 
their owne use, of every person and persons whose Tobacco 
they should so garble, viewe and scale, the summe of foure 
pence of currant English money, for every pound weight 
thereof so viewed and sealed. 

And Wee did also by Our said Letters Patents (for the con 
siderations therein mentioned) give and grant the said Office, 
with the powers, fees and authorities before mentioned to 
Our welbeloved Subjects, Francis Nichols, Jasper Leake and 
Philip Eden, Gentlemen, to be executed by them or their 
Deputies or Assignes for thirtie and one yeeres next ensuing 
the Date of the said Letters Patents. 

And Wee did further by Our said Letters, for Us, Our 
Heires and Successours, give and grant unto the said Francis 
Nichols, Jasper Leake and Philip Eden, and their Assignes, 
and to all and every person and persons, which by them or 
any of them, by writing under their or any of their hands 
and Scales, should bee in that behalfe deputed and assigned, 
full power and authoritie during the terme aforesaide, as well 
to bee present and to have place in all manner of Custome- 
houses, Ports, Havens, Creeks and places of lading or unlading 
of any manner of Goods, Wares or Merchandizes, into or out 
of the said Realmes and Dominions: As also to be present 
with all and every the Customers, Collecters, Searchers, 
Surveyers, Waiters, and other Officers and Ministers having 
charge for or concerning the lading or unlading of any Goods, 
Wares or Merchandizes, for their better executing of all and 
everything and things thereby appointed, and for their better 
receiving and enjoying of the benefit of Our said Grant at all 
times and places, where the said Officers and Ministers or 
any of them, should by reason of their said severall Offices 
have cause or occasion to be : And also in all and every place 
or places, as well in Ships arrived with Tobacco, and riding in 
any Port, Roade or River, as on the Land, to make and appoint 
such and so many Watchmen, Waiters and Officers, and to 
provide and use such reasonable waies, orders and meanes, as 
they the said Francis Nichols, Jasper Leake and Philip Eden, 
and their Assignes and Deputies should and might be just 
and truely informed of all parcels and quantities of Tobacco, 



1619, November 10. 17 

as should at any time or times during the said Grant, be 
brought into any Port or place, or be planted or growing in 
any place or places of the said Realmes and Dominions or any 
of them. 

And also that it should and might be lawfull, to and for the 
said Francis Nichols, Jasper Leake, and Philip Eden, and their 
Assignes, and their and every of their Deputies and Substitutes, 
at all and every time and times during the terme aforesaid, in 
lawfull and convenient maner, with a Constable or other 
Officer of the place, as well to goe on board, view, and survay 
all Shippes, Vessels, or Bottomes, riding or lying within any 
of the Ports, Havens, Creekes and places of lading or unlading, 
within Our saide Realme of England, Dominion of Wales, 
Port or Towne of Barwicke, or Realme of Ireland, or any the 
members or places thereunto belonging, as to goe into any 
House, Celler, Vault, Warehouse, Shop, or other place within 
the said Realmes and Dominion, and Port, or Towne of 
Barwicke, or any part of them, or any of them to search and 
view if there be any Tobacco uttered, sold, or put to sale, or 
offered to be sold, or put to sale before the same be viewed, 
distinguished, and sealed contrary to the true meaning of the 
said Letters patents. 

And We did also by the said Letters for Us, Our Heires and 
Successors, require, charge and Command all and singular 
Maiors, Shiriffes, Justices of Peace, Bailiff es, Constables, 
Headboroughes, Customers, Comptrollers, Searchers, Sur 
veyors, Waiters, and all other Officers, Ministers, and Sub 
jects whatsoever, of Us, Our Heires and Successors, as well of 
the said Realme of England, Dominion of Wales, and Port 
and Towne of Barwicke, as of the said Realme of Ireland, 
That they and every of them, should from time to time during 
the continuance of that Our graunt, be aiding and assisting 
to the said Francis Nichols, Jasper Leake, and Philip Eden, 
and their Assignes, and to every of them, their and every 
of their Deputie and Deputies, Substitute and Substitutes, 
in the due Execution of all and every the powers and authori 
ties expressed in the said Letters Patents, upon paine of the 
displeasure of Us, Our Heires and Successors, and as they 
would answere the contrary at their perils; as by the said 
Letters Patents more at large appeareth. 

Wee now, to the intent Our will and pleasure in the premisses 
may be the better knowne to all Our loving Subjects whom it 
may concerne, Doe hereby notifie, publish and declare the 



1 8 Royal Proclamations. 

same Our pleasure, willing and commanding that all and 
every the premisses, be from time to time in every respect 
duely performed, executed and observed according to the 
true intent and meaning of the same Our Letters Patents. 
And that no person or persons doe attempt or presume to 
violate or infringe Our Command hereby; or by Our said 
Letters Patents declared or expressed, upon the paines and 
penalties therein contained. And We doe also hereby Charge 
and Command, as well all and singular Merchants, and other 
person and persons whatsoever, which shall import any To 
bacco of what sort soever, That they cause the same to be 
duely entred in the Custome house belonging to the Port or 
place where it shall bee landed, in the name or names onely 
of the true proprietor or owner, proprietors or owners thereof, 
and not in the name or names of any other person or persons 
which is not the true owner thereof; As also all Our Customers 
and other Officers whatsoever, That they take speciall care 
and regard to the due performance of the same, as they tender 
Our pleasure, and will avoide the contrary. 

Given at Theobalds the tenth day of November, in the 
seventeenth yeere of Our Reigne of Great Brittaine, France, 
and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton, and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. Anno 
MDC.XIX. 

2 pp. folio. There are two issues varying only in set-up. Copies in 
Antiq., Camb., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. 



1619, December 30. 
[Forbidding Planting of Tobacco in England.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION TO RESTRAINE THE PLANTING OF 
TOBACCO IN ENGLAND AND WALES. 

It is not unknowen what dislike Wee have ever had of the 
use of Tobacco, as tending to a generall and new corruption, 
both of mens bodies and maners: Neverthelesse it is of the 



December jo. 19 

two, more tolerable, that the same should be imported amongst 
many other vanities and superfluities which come from be 
yond the Seas, then permitted to be planted here within this 
Realme, thereby to abuse and misimploy the soile of this 
fruitfull Kingdome: For which purpose by Our direction, 
Letters of late have beene addressed from our Councell of 
State, prohibiting the plantation thereof within a certaine 
distance of Our City of London : But entring into further con 
sideration of the manifold inconveniences of suffering this 
nourishment of vice, (and nothing else) as a noysome and 
running Weede, to multiply and overspread within this Our 
Kingdome, Wee are resolved upon many and weightie reasons 
of State, to make the said Prohibition generall. 

For first, Wee are informed, That whereas the use of forreine 
Tobacco was chiefly vented, and received in Cities and great 
Townes, where ryot and excesse useth to take place, it is now 
by the Inland plantation become promiscuous, and begun to 
be taken in every meane Village, even amongst the basest 
people. 

Secondly, Wee are given to understand from divers persons 
of skill and experience, That the English Tobacco, howsoever 
some doe presume or imagine by industrie and experience to 
rectifie it, and make it good (wherein it is easie for opinion 
to doe mischiefe) yet it is certeinly in it selfe more crude, 
poysonous and dangerous for the bodies and healths of Our 
Subjects, then that that comes from hotter Climates; So that 
the medicinall use of Tobacco (which it is that that is onely 
good in it, and to be approoved) is in this kind also corrupted 
and infected. 

Thirdly, Whereas Our Colonies and Plantations in Virginia 
and the Sommer Islands, (being proper and naturall Climates 
for that plant, and the true temper thereof) receive much 
comfort by the Importation thereof into this Kingdome, 
(which it is to be respected at least in the Interim, untill 
Our said Colonies may grow to ye eld better and more solide 
commodities) Now the said Trading from thence is and will 
be by the Plantation within this Realme, choaked and over- 
throwen. 

Fourthly, Wee doe find also, that the reason that mooved 
Us to interdict the planting thereof neere the Citie of London, 
(which was in regard of the conversions of garden grounds, 
and rich soyled grounds from divers Roots and Herbes, fit for 
victuall and sustenance, unto this harmefull vanitie) extendeth 



2O Royal Proclamations. 

likewise unto all Cities, Townes and Villages, and rather more, 
by how much the povertie is greater there, then here above. 

And lastly, for that it doeth manifestly tend to the diminu 
tion of Our Customes, which is a thing, that although in case 
of good Manufactures, and necessary commodities Wee doe 
little esteeme; Yet where it shall be taken from Us, and no 
good but rather hurt thereby redound to Our people, Wee 
have reason to preserve. 

Wee therefore intending in time to provide a remedie for this 
spreading evill, which hath in a very few yeeres dispersed 
it selfe into most parts of Our Kingdomes, doe hereby straightly 
charge and command all and every person and persons of 
what degree or condition soever, That they or any of them, 
by themselves, their servants, workemen or labourers, doe not 
from and after the second day of Februarie next, presume to 
sow, set, or plant, or cause to be sowen, set or planted, within 
this Our Realme of England, or Dominion of Wales, any sort 
or kinde of Tobacco whatsoever, And that they or any of 
them, shall not, or doe not hereafter maintaine, or continue 
any olde stockes, or plants of Tobacco, formerly sowen or 
planted, but shall foorthwith utterly destroy and roote up 
the same, converting and imploying the ground and soyle 
thereof to some other lawfull uses and purposes, as to them 
shall seeme best, upon paine of contempt of Our Royall com- 
mandement, to be proceeded with according to Our Lawes, and 
Prerogative Royall with all severitie. 

And therefore, for the more due execution of the premisses, 
Wee doe further will, require and command all Mayors, 
Sheriffes, Justices of Peace, Bayliffes, Constables, and other 
Officers and ministers, to whom it shall or may appertaine, 
That they and every of them, shall from time to time dili 
gently and carefully intend the due and exact observation, of 
this Our Royall pleasure, And that they permit not, nor suffer 
any thing to be done, contrary to the true intent and meaning 
of this Our Proclamation, but withstand the same to their 
uttermost power, as they tender Our service: And further 
that they take order that such offenders, labourers, or worke 
men, as shal persist in the sowing or planting of Tobacco, in 
this Our Realme or Dominion of Wales, or in the maintaining 
or continuing any old stocks, or former plantations thereof 
hereafter, may be called before them, and be bound in Re 
cognizances of good summes to Our use, to appeare in Our 
Court of Starrechamber, there to be prosecuted by Our 



1 620, May 15. 21 

Attourney generall, as contemners of Our expresse Com- 
mandement, Proclamation, and Prerogative Royall; wherein 
(especially in a cause of this nature) Wee will expect, and 
require of all Our Subjects, their due conformitie and obedi 
ence. 

Given at Our Palace of Westminster the thirtieth day of 
December, in the seventeenth yeere of Our Reigne of Great 
Britaine, France and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestie. Anno 
MDC.XIX. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. 



1620, May 15. 
[Forbidding Roger North s Expedition to Brazil/ 



BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION DECLARING HIS MAJESTIES PLEAS 
URE CONCERNING CAPTAINE ROGER NORTH, AND THOSE WHO 
ARE GONE FOORTH AS ADVENTURERS WITH HIM. 

Whereas Roger North 1 Esquier, with divers others of Our 
Subjects, as Adventurers for the intended Plantation and 

1 Capt. Roger North, who had been a member of Raleigh s unfortunate 
expedition to Guiana, petitioned the King in 1619 for letters patent authorizing 
him to establish the King s right to the coast and country adjoining the Amazon 
River and to found a Plantation there. On April 18, 1619, the Privy Council 
authorized the Solicitor General to prepare a bill for granting him privileges 
for a Plantation which should " extend from the River of Wyapoco [Oyapok] 
to five degrees of southerly latitude, from any part or branch of the River of 
Amazons otherwise called Oreliana and for longitude into the Land to be limited 
from sea to sea." This was then esteemed to be part of Guiana, but is now 
territory of Brazil. Provided with a passport, but without express, leave from 
the King, North sailed from Plymouth in May, 1620. The King, inspired by 
the remonstrances of Spanish agents, then issued the proclamation of recall. 
Although his cruise prospered, his ship being "well fraught" with 7000 pounds 
of tobacco, he returned to England as soon as he heard of the warrant against 
him. He was imprisoned in the Tower in January, 1621, and his cargo was 
confiscated. He soon succeeded in obtaining his release and later made good 
his claim to the restitution of the tobacco (see Acts of Privy Council, Colonial, 
i, 23-48; Calendar of State Papers, Colonial, 1374-1660; Diet, of National Biog 
raphy, xli, 174.) 



22 Royal Proclamations. 

selling of Trade and Commerce in those parts of the Conti 
nent of America neare and about the River of Amazones 
(which were presupposed not to be under the obedience and 
governement of any other Christian Prince or State) hath 
secretly conveyed himselfe away and hath disloyally precipi 
tated and imbarqued himselfe, and his fellowes, and sodainly 
set to Sea with a pretended purpose to prosecute that designe, 
contrary to Our Royal pleasure and Commandement expresly 
signified unto him by one of Our principall Secretaries, Our 
Admirall of England having also refused him leave to go: 
We then having out of weightie considerations, and reason 
of State, and upon the deliberate advise of Our Privy Councell 
resolved to suspend and restraine the said Plantation and 
voyage for a time, and having thereupon streightly charged 
and commanded him the said North upon his duty and 
aleageance, that hee and his Associates should for a while 
surcease their Provisions, and should stay themselves and 
their Shipping, w r hich they had already prepared, untill Our 
further pleasure should be made knowen unto them. 

Wee have therefore held it fit hereby to make a publique 
Declaration of Our utter mislike and disavowement of this 
their rash, undutiful and insolent attempt; and do hereby 
revoke, annihilate and disanull all Power, Authorise, jurisdic 
tion, or Commission whatsoever, which he the said North, 
or any of his Complices may pretend in any sort to derive and 
hold from or under Us ; and do hereby charge aswell him the 
said North, as all his Companions and followers, immediately 
upon the first notice that shall be given him or them of this 
Our pleasure, that they shall make their speedie returne 
directly home, with all their shipping and munitions into this 
Our Kingdome of England, assoone as the windes and weather 
shall permit them; and being heere arrived shall foorthwith 
present themselves in person unto some of Our Privie Councel, 
under paine of being heereby declared guiltie of high contempt 
and rebellion, in case they shall disobey this Our expresse 
commandement. 

And Wee doe further heereby straitly require and charge 
aswell the Governours, as all other the Partenors and Ad 
venturers, any wayes concerned, or interested as members of 
the Companie and Incorporation intended for that Plantation, 
as all other Merchants, Captaines, Masters, and Officers, of 
Ships, Saylors, Marrinors, and all other our loving subjects 
whatsoever, that they shall in no sort ayd or abette, nor 



1 620, May 15. 23 

comfort him the said North, nor any of his Complices with 
any supply of shipping, men, money, munition, victuals, 
merchandise, or other commodities or necessaries whatsoever : 
but that aswell all and every Our Admirals, Vice-Admirals, 
and other Our Officers and Commanders of Our Ships, or 
Pinnaces, as all other Captaines and Masters of any of Our 
subjects ships and vessels whatsoever, that shall happen to 
meete with him the saide North, or any of his Company at 
sea, or in any Harbour, Port, or Creeke wheresoever, shall in 
Our Name attach, seize, and summon him, or them, and their 
shipping, to returne immediately home, and shall foorthwith 
bring them backe to some of Our Ports of this Our Kingdome, 
and there commit them and their Ships to the charge of such 
Our Officers, as it shall respectively appertaine unto, untill 
Wee (having received information of their such returne, which 
Wee will expect from Our said Officers, who shall so stand 
incharged with them) shall give further order concerning 
them, aswell their persons as their shipping and munitions. 
Wherein Wee doe expresly charge and command aswell him 
the said North, and all his Company, Abettors, and Adhe 
rents, and all the rest of that Company and Incorporation 
intended, as all and every other Our Officers by Land or Sea, 
and all other Captaines, Masters, and Marriners in any of Our 
subjects ships, and all other Our loving subjects whatsoever, 
faithfully, diligently, and carefully to observe, doe, and per- 
forme in their severall qualities and places, that which Wee 
have heereby required of them, according to every of their 
duties, charges, and imployments, upon paine of Our high 
displeasure and indignation, and as they will answere the 
contrarie at their uttermost perill. 

Given at Our Manour of Greenwich this fifteenth day of 
May, in the eighteenth yeere of Our Reigne of Great Britaine, 
France and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. Anno Dom. 
M.DC.XX. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. Entered 
on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Feeder a" xvii, 215. 



24 Royal Proclamations. 

1620, May 27. 

[Manufacture of Tobacco-pipes.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION COMMANDING CONFORMITY TO HIS MAJES 
TIES PLEASURE, EXPRESSED IN HIS LATE CHARTER TO 
THE TOBACCO-PIPE-MAKERS. 

Whereas divers of the poorer sort of Our Subjects have 
heretofore lived by the trade of making Tobacco pipes, but 
for want of power to retaine and keepe their Apprentices and 
servants in due obedience, and to restraine others from in 
truding upon their Arte, the auncient Makers have not so 
well prospered as was desired: For prevention of which in 
conveniences, and for reducing the workemen in that trade to 
such a competent number, as they might bee governed after 
the example of other Societies, who florish by ranging them 
selves under good Orders; We did by Our late Charter In 
corporate a selected number of the most ancient, and such 
others as they for skill and honestie should admit into their 
Socitie: Thereby prohibiting all others who were not mem 
bers thereof, to make any sort of Tobacco-pipes within Our 
Realme of England or Dominion of Wales; And thereby also 
commanding, that no person or persons directly, or indirectly 
should buy Tobacco-pipes to sell againe, of, or from the hands 
of any others then the knowne Members of the said Societie. 
Yet neverthelesse being lately informed by Certificate from 
sundry Our Justices of Peace of Our Counties of Middlesex 
and Surrey (who in due obedience of Our Royall pleasure, 
declared in Our said Charter, did in person assist the execution 
of the same) That divers lewde and obstinate offenders, had 
fortified themselves in their houses with weapons, And in 
contempt of Our Regall Authority resisted them, comming 
with the severall Warrants of the Lord Chiefe Justice of Our 
Bench, and other the Justices of Peace within Our Citie of 
London, and the said counties of Middlesex and Surrey; And 
also that there were divers il disposed persons (who delighting 
to oppose al good orders) contemptuously maintained these 
underhand offenders, some by harboring the unlawfull Makers 
of Tobacco-pipes secretly in their houses, there to make them 
contrary to Our Charter, to the end to partake of the stolne 



1620, May 27. 25 

profit thereof; Others, by buying secretly this under-hand 
made ware, in contempt of Our Authority, and with an evill 
intent of overthrowing this Societie which we have sought to 
establish. 

Now therefore, that by the presumptuous example of these 
disobedient persons, others may not be incouraged hereafter 
by impunity to presume to resist and contemne Our Royall 
Commandement in matters of greater moment, or to with 
stand the authority of Magistrates and government, These are 
to charge and straitly command, that no persons whatsoever 
within this Our Realme of England and Dominion of Wales 
shall hereafter presume to make any manner of Tobacco- 
pipes, but such as are or shall bee members of the said Societie : 
nor shall presume to harbour in their houses any Tobacco- 
pipe-makers to use their trade there, who are not of the said 
Societie; nor that any person or persons (especially who buy 
Tobacco-pipes to sell againe) shall at any time, or in any place 
buy or obtaine by any meanes, directly or indirectly any 
Tobacco-pipes whatsoever, from any under-handmakers or 
others, but only from such as are knowne members of the said 
Societie, and that at their common Hall, or other knowne 
Warehouses appointed, or hereafter to bee appointed, where 
they may bee bought by all Our loving Subjects, upon paine 
of Our high displeasure, and such punishments as are due for 
such contempts, whereof We shall require a strict account by 
proceeding against the offendours in Our Court of Starre- 
Chamber. 

Further commanding, that if at any time heereafter any 
person shall bee so audacious as to fortifie themselves in their 
houses, or in the houses of any other, or to withstand Our will 
and pleasure heerein, or to resist Our authoritie given and 
imparted to Our Lord chiefe Justice and others, in the search 
or apprehension of them, or any of them; Then Wee doe 
heereby will and require, that sufficient power be had and 
taken by such who shal have such Warrants, to apprehend 
such obstinate and contemptuous persons, and to carry them 
before Our said chiefe Justice, or other Justice of the Peace, 
that punishment may be inflicted on them in the severest 
manner Our Lawes will permit by imprisoning their bodie, till 
they have put in sufficient suretie for their good behaviour 
afterwards. Heereby further, straitly charging Our Atturney 
generall for the time being, that he cause all and every such 
wilfull and disobedient persons, for such their high contempt 



26 Royal Proclamations. 

in this behalfe, to be prosecuted in Our Court of Starre- 
Chamber (where Our will is they shall bee sharpely punished) 
according to the measure of such their audacious and bold 
resistance of Our Royall commandement. And to the intent 
that these fraudes and abuses may the better be found out 
and punished, Our pleasure is, that it shall and may bee law- 
full for any two, or more of the said Societie, together with a 
lawfull officer to enter into any suspected place or places, at 
lawful and convenient times, there to search for, and finde 
out any under-hand made, or sold Tobacco-pipes; And all 
such so found to seize, take, and carry away, and them saf elye 
to keepe to bee disposed of, according to the tenor of Our sayd 
Charter. 

And lastly, for the full execution of this Our Royall Com 
mandement, Wee will and require the Lord Maior of our 
Citie of London, for the time being, and all other Maiors, 
Shiriffes, Justices of Peace, Bailiffes, Constables, and all other 
Officers and Ministers whatsoever; That they and every of 
them in their severall Offices and places, bee from time to 
time ayding and assisting to the Master, Wardens, and 
Societie of Tobacco-pipe makers in the due execution and 
accomplishment of this Our Royall will and Commandement, 
as they tender Our pleasure, and will answere the contrary 
at their perill. 

Given at Our Court at Theobalds the seven and twentieth 
day of May, in the eighteenth yeere of Our Reigne of Great 
Britaine, France and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. Anno Dom. 
M.DC.XX. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. Entered 
on Patent Rolls. 



1620, June 29. 27 



1620, June 29. 
[Restraining Disorderly Trading in Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION FOR RESTRAINT OF THE DISORDERED 

TRADING FOR TOBACCO. 

Whereas Wee, out of the dislike Wee had of the use of 
Tobacco, tending to a generall and new corruption both of 
mens bodies and maners, and yet neverthelesse holding it 
of the two more tolerable, that the same should be imported 
amongst many other vanities and superfluities, which came 
from beyond the Seas, then permitted to be planted here 
within this Realme, thereby to abuse and misimploy the soile 
of this fruitfull Kingdome, did by Our Proclamation dated 
the thirtieth day of December now last past straitly charge 
and commaund all and every person and persons, of what de 
gree or condition sopver, That they or any of them by them 
selves, their servants, workemen or labourers should not from 
and after the second day of February then next following, 
presume to sow, set or plant, or cause to be sowen, set or 
planted within this Our Realme of England, and the Dominion 
of Wales, any sort or Kinde of Tobacco whatsoever, and that 
they, or any of them, should not maintaine or continue any 
olde stockes or plants of Tobacco formerly sowen or planted, 
but should forthwith utterly destroy and root up the same. 
And whereas We have taken into Our Royall consideration 
as well the great waste and consumption of the wealth of Our 
Kingdomes, as the endangering and impairing the health of 
Our Subjects, by the inordinate libertie and abuse of Tobacco, 
being a weede of no necessary use, and but of late yeeres 
brought into Our Dominions, and being credibly informed, 
that divers Tobacconists, and other meane persons taking 
upon them to trade and adventure into the parts beyond the 
Seas for Tobacco, to the intent to forestall and engrosse the 
said commoditie, upon unmerchantlike conditions, doe trans 
port much Gold bullion and Coyne out of Our Kingdomes, 
and doe barter and vent the Staple commodities of Our Realme 
at under- values, to the intent to buy Tobacco, to the discredit 
of Our native merchandizes, and extreame enhansing of the 



28 Royal Proclamations. 

rates and prices of Tobacco, and the great disturbance and 
decay of the Trade of the orderly and good Merchant: We 
taking the premisses into Our Princely consideration, and being 
desirous to put a remedie to the said inconveniences, which 
Wee have long endeavoured, though with lesse effect then 
Wee expected, have resolved to make some further redresse, 
by restraining the disordered traffique in that commoditie, and 
reducing it into the hands of able persons that may manage 
the same without inconvenience, whereby the generall abuse 
may be taken away, and the necessary use (if any be) may be 
preserved. We doe therefore not only by these presents, 
straitly charge ana commaund, That Our said Proclamation 
restraining the planting of Tobacco, be in every respect 
observed and performed according to the tenour thereof, 
upon the penalties therein contained ; but also that no person 
or persons whatsoever, Englishmen, Denizens or Strangers, 
(other then such as shall be authorized and appointed there 
unto by Letters Patents under Our great Scale of England) 
doe import or cause to be imported into this Our Realme of 
England or Dominion of Wales, or any part of them or either 
of them, any Tobacco, of what nature, kind, or sort soever, 
after the tenth day of July next ensuing the date hereof, from 
any the parts beyond the Seas, upon paine of forfeiture to 
Us of all such Tobacco so to be imported contrary to the true 
meaning of these Presents, and upon such further paines and 
penalties as by the Lawes and Statutes of this Realme, or by 
the severitie or censure of Our Court of Starrechamber may 
be inflicted upon the offenders, for contempt of this Our 
Royall command. And likewise that no Master, Merchant, 
or Purser of any Ship or other Vessell, doe at any time or 
times after the said tenth day of July, presume or attempt to 
take into their ships to be imported into this Realme and 
Dominion, or either of them, any sort, maner, or quantity of 
Tobacco whatsoever, but onely to the use of such person and 
persons as shalbe so as aforesaid authorized and appointed 
under Our great Seale of England to import the same, and 
which shalbe by them, their deputies, servants or factors 
delivered to the said Masters, Merchants or Pursers of Ships 
to be imported, upon the paines and penalties aforesaid. 

And to the intent that no such offender may colour or hide 
his offence and contempt, by shadowing the Tobacco to be 
brought in, contrary to Our pleasure before expressed, under 
pretence of former store, We doe hereby signifie and declare 



June 29. 29 

Our will and pleasure, and doe straitly charge and command, 
That all and every person and persons which now have, or 
hereafter shall have within or neere the Cities of London or 
Westminster, in their hands, custody or possession, any To 
bacco heretofore imported, or hereafter and before the said 
tenth day of July now next ensuing to be imported into this 
Realm, amounting to the quantitie of ten pounds weight or 
above, shall before the said tenth day of July now next com- 
ming, bring the same unto the house commonly called, The 
Hawke and Peasant, situate in Cornehill in the said citie of 
London, and shall cause the same to be there sealed and 
marked by such person and persons, and with such marke or 
Scale as by Us shalbe for that purpose assigned and appointed, 
without giving any Fee or allowance for the said Scale or 
marke. 

And to the intent that the Tobacco to be hereafter imported 
by Warrant or Authoritie under Our great Seale, may be 
knowen and distinguished from such as shall be secretly and 
without Warrant brought in by stealth, We doe likewise charge 
and command, that all such Tobacco as from and after the 
said tenth day of July shall be imported by force of any such 
warrant or Authoritie and none other, except the old store 
aforesaid to be sealed as aforesaid, shall be sealed and marked 
with such Seale and marke as aforesaid. And we doe hereby 
prohibite all person and persons from and after the said tenth 
day of July, to buy, utter, sell or vent within the said King- 
dome and Dominion, or either of them, any Roll or other 
grosse quantitie of Tobacco whatsoever, before the same be 
so as aforesaid marked or sealed, upon paine of forfeiture 
unto Us of all such Tobacco so bought, uttered, solde or vented 
contrary to the intent of these Presents, and upon such further 
penalties as by Our Lawes, or by the censure of Our Court of 
Starrechamber may be inflicted upon the offenders, as con- 
temners of Our Roy all command. 

And for the better execution of this Our Pleasure, Wee doe 
hereby command all and singular Customers, Comptrollers, 
Searchers, Waiters, and other officers attending in all and 
every the Ports, Creeks, or places of lading or unlading, for 
the taking, collecting, or receiving of any Our Customers, 
Subsidies or other duties, to take notice of this Our pleasure: 
and We do hereby command, and give power and authority 
unto them, and every or any of them, from time to time, as 
well to search any Ship or other Vessell or Bottome, riding 



30 Royal Proclamations, 

or lying within any Port, Haven or Creeke within their severall 
charge and place of attendance, for all Tobacco imported 
contrary to the intent of this Our Proclamation, and the same 
being found, to seize and take to Our use; as also to take 
notice of the names, and apprehend the bringers in, and buyers 
of the same, to the end they may receive condigne punish 
ment for their offences, upon paine that every of the said 
Officers which shalbe found negligent, remisse or corrupt 
therein, shall lose his place and entertainment, and undergoe 
such paines and penalties as by Our Lawes, or the censure 
of Our said Court of Starrechamber may be inflicted upon 
them for the same. 

And likewise We doe hereby will, ordaine, and appoint, 
That it shal and may be lawfull to and for such person and 
persons, as shalbe so as aforesaid authorized and appointed 
by Letters Patents under Our great Scale, to import Tobacco 
by himself e or themselves, or his or their Deputie or Deputies, 
with a lawfull Officer to enter into any suspected places at 
lawfull and convenient times, and there search, discover and 
finde out any Tobacco imported, uttered, solde or vented, not 
marked or sealed as aforesaid, contrary to the true meaning 
hereof, and all such Tobacco so found, to seize, take away 
and dispose of, and the owners thereof, or in whose custody 
the same shalbe found, to informe and complaine of, to the 
end they may receive punishment according to Our pleasure 
before herein declared. 

And further, We doe by these Presents will and require 
all and singular Mayors, Sheriffes, Justices of Peace, Bay- 
liffes, Constables, Headboroughes, Customers, Comptrollers, 
Searchers, Waiters, and all other Our Officers and Ministers 
whatsoever, That they and every of them in their severall 
places and offices be diligent and attendant in the execution 
of this Our Proclamation, and also aiding and assisting unto 
such person and persons, and his and their Deputies and 
Assignes as we shall so as aforesaid authorize and appoint 
to import Tobacco, aswell in any search for discovery of any 
acte or actes to bee performed contrary to the intent of these 
Presents, as otherwise in the doing or executing of any matter 
or thing for the accomplishment of this Our Royall Command. 
And lastly Our will and pleasure is, and Wee doe hereby 
charge and command Our Atturney generall for the time being, 
to informe against such persons in Our Court of Starrechamber 
from time to time, whose contempt and disobedience against 



i62i, March 8.. 31 

this Our Royall command shall merit the censure of that 
Court. 

Given at Our Manour of Greenwich the nine and twentieth 
day of June, in the eighteenth yeere of Our Reigne of England, 
France and Ireland, and of Scotland the three and fiftieth. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. Anno Dom. 
M.DC.XX. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. Entered 
on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Fcedera" xvii, 233. 



1621, March 8. 
[Suppressing Lotteries in Virginia.] 

BY THE KING. 

Whereas, at the humble suit and request of sundry Our 
loving and well disposed Subjects, intending to deduce a 
Colony, and to make a Plantation in Virginia, Wee, for the 
inlarging of Our Government, increase of Navigation and 
Trade, and especially for the reducing of the savage and bar 
barous people of those parts to the Christian faith, did incor 
porate 1 divers Noblemen, Gentlemen and others, adventurers 
in the sayd Plantation, and granted unto them sundry Privi- 
ledges and Liberties; amongst which, for their better helpe 
and assistance to raise some competent summes of money to 
prosecute the same Plantation to a happy end, Wee did 
grant them licence to set foorth, erect, and publish Lotteries, 
to continue for one yeere after the opening of the same, and 
further, during Our pleasure; which liberty hath been by the 
same Company put in use divers yeeres past. Now foras 
much as We are given to understand, that although Wee in 
granting the sayd Licence, had Our eye fixed upon a religious 
and Princely end and designe, yet the sayd Lotteries, having 
now for a long time been put in use, doe dayly decline to more 

1 The third charter to the Virginia Company, granted March 12, 1612, 
contained four clauses, sections xvi-xix, regarding the conduct of lotteries 
(Brown s Genesis of the United States, ii, 552). 



32 Royal Proclamations. 

and more inconvenience, to the hinderance of multitudes of 
Our Subjects. 1 

Wee whose care continually waiteth upon the generall wel 
fare of Our people, have thought it expedient, for the generall 
good of Our Subjects, to suspend the further execution of the 
saide Lotteries, untill upon further deliberation and advise 
ment, We shall be more fully informed of the inconveniences 
and evils thereby arising, and may ordaine due remedy for 
the same, without any conceit of withdrawing Our favour in 
any degree from the said Company or plantation, and good 
worke by them intended. 

And therefore We doe heereby expresly charge and com 
mand the sayd Company and their successors, and all their 
Officers, Ministers, and Servants, and all others, That from 
hencefoorth they desist and forbeare, to use or execute any 
manner of grant or Licence from Us, for the keeping and con 
tinuing of any Lotterie, or to keepe or continue any Lotterie, 
within this Our Realme of England or the Dominions thereof, 
untill such time as Wee shall declare Our further pleasure 
therein. And Wee likewise require all Justices, Officers, and 
Ministers whatsoever, from hencefoorth, diligently and care 
fully to see this Our pleasure executed, and to punish the in- 
f ringers thereof, as contemners of Our Royall command. 

Given at Our Palace of Westminster the eighth ;day of 
March, in the eighteenth yeere of Our Reigne of Great Britaine, 
France and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. M.DC.XX. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C.; also 
John Carter Brown Library. 

1 The Privy Council, upon complaint of the House of Commons, took action 
regarding the suspension of lotteries in Virginia on March 4, 1621 (Acts of Privy 
Council, Colonial, i, 39). For the general subject of lotteries in Virginia, see 
Bruce, Economic History of Virginia, ii, 275; Kings bury, Records of Virginia 
Company, i, 93; Brown, Genesis of the United States, index; and Brown, First 
Republic in America, index. In the last reference, p. 394, this proclamation is 
incorrectly dated March 18. The proclamation is reproduced in fac-simile in 
Three Proclamations concerning the Lottery for Virginia, published by the John 
Carter Brown Library, Providence, R. L, 1907, in which volume are also repro 
duced a broadside of 1613 issued by the Council for Virginia regarding the draw 
ing of the lottery and "A Declaration for the certaine time of drawing the great 
standing Lottery," printed February 22, 1615 [-16]. 



1622^ November 6. 33 

1622, November 6. 
[Prohibiting Disorderly Trading to New England.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION PROHIBITING INTERLOPING AND 

DISORDERLY TRADING TO NEW ENGLAND IN AMERICA. 

As it hath ever beene held a principall Office of Christian 
Kings, to seeke by all pious meanes the advancement of 
Christian Religion; so the consideration thereof, hath beene 
a speciall motive unto Us, from time to time, as often as cause 
hath required, to further, by Our Roy all authority, the good 
disposition of any of Our well affected Subjects, that have a 
will to attempt the discovering and planting in any parts of 
the World, as yet savage and unpossessed by the Subjects of 
any Christian Prince or State. And now for that, by Gods 
sacred favour, there is likely to ensue great advancement of 
his glory, Our Crown, and State, by reason of Our grant heere- 
tofore made to the Counsell for the managing of the affaires 
of New England in America, being in breadth from forty 
degrees of Northerly latitude from the Equinoctiall line to 
forty eight degrees of the sayd Northerly latitude, and in 
length by all the breadth aforesayd, thorowout the maine 
land from Sea to Sea 1 ; We cannot but continue Our speciall 
respect and favour unto them in their endevours, and exercise 
Our Royall authority against the hinderers thereof. Where 
fore, having received certaine information of many and in 
tolerable abuses offered by sundry interlopers, irregular and 
disobedient persons, that seeking principally their present and 
private profits, have not only impeached some of the Planters 
there, of their lawfull possessions, but also taken from them 
their Timber without giving any satisfaction, as in justice 
they ought to have done: and not therewith contented, have 
rined whole woods to the utter ruine of the same for ever after; 
as also, by casting of their ballast in the harbors of some of 
their Hands, have almost made them unserviceable: And yet 
not so contented, by their promiscuous trading, as well Mari 
ners as Masters with the Savages, have overthrowne the trade 
and commerce that before was had, to the great profit of the 

1 The patent of November 3, 1620. 



34 Royal Proclamations. 

Planters, and which were indeed their principall hopes for the 
advancement of that plantation, next unto the commodities 
that coast affords of Fishing: Neither heerwith satisfied, but 
as if they resolved to omit nothing that might be impious and 
intolerable, they did not forbeare to barter away to the Savages, 
Swords, Pikes, Muskets, Fowling peeces, Match, Powder, 
Shot, and other warlike weapons, and teach them the use 
thereof; not only to their owne present punishment (divers 
of them being shortly after slain by the same Savages, whom 
they had so taught, and with the same weapons which they 
had furnished them withall) but also to the hazard of the lives 
of Our good subjects already planted there, and (asmuch as in 
them lay) to the making of the whole attempt it selfe (how 
pious and hopefull soever) frustrate, or so much the more 
difficult. 1 We, for reformation and prevention of these or 
the like evils heerafter, and for the more cleare declaration of 
Our Kingly resolution and just intents, both to maintayne 
Our Royall grant already made, #nd to uphold and encourage 
by all wayes and meanes the worthy dispositions of the under 
takers of those designes, have thought fit, and doe heerby 
straitly charge and command, That none of Our Subjects 
whatsoever, (not Adventurers, Inhabitors or Planters in New 
England) presume from hencefoorth to frequent those Coasts, 
to trade or traffique with those people, or to intermedle in the 
woodes or freehold of any the Planters or Inhabitants (other 
wise then by the licence of the sayd Counsell, or according to 
the orders established by Our Privy Counsell for the releese 
or ease of the transportation of the Colony in Virginia) upon 
paine of Our high indignation, and the confiscation, penalties 
and forfeitures in Our sayd Royall grant expressed: Leaving 
it neverthelesse, in the meane time, to the discretion of the 
sayd Counsel for New England, to proceed against the fore- 
sayd offenders according to the same, especially, seeing We 
finde the armes of the sayd Counsell to bee open to receive 
into that plantation any of Our loving Subjects, who are 
willing to joyne with them in the charge, and participate in 
the profits thereof. 

1 These "irregular and disobedient persons" were undoubtedly the members 
of Thomas Weston s colony at Weymouth. The Council for New England, in 
May, 1622, took notice of the complaints against Weston and moved that a 
proclamation be secured warning those who went to New England in contempt 
of authority (Records in Amer. Antiquarian Society Proceedings for April, 1867, 
p. 59). The proclamation was ordered by the Privy Council on October 23, 
1622 (Acts of the Privy Council, Colonial, i, 55). 



1624, September 29. 35 

Given at Our Court at Theobalds, the sixt day of November, 
in the yeere of Our Reigne of England, France, and Ireland, 
the twentieth, and of Scotland the sixe and fiftieth. 1 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. M.DC.XXIL 

I p. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Dalk., I. T., P. C., P. R. 0., and 

Q. C.; also John Carter Brown Library. Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed 
in Rymer s "Fcedera" xvii, 416. 



1624, September 29. 
[Encouraging Growth of Tobacco in Plantations.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION CONCERNING TOBACCO. 

Whereas Our Commons, assembled in Our last Sessions of 
Parliament, became humble Petitioners unto Us, That, for 
many waightie reasons, much concerning the welfare of Our 
Kingdome, and the Trade thereof, We would by Our Royall 
power, utterly prohibite the use of all foreigne Tobacco, which 
is not of the growth of Our owne Dominions 2 : And whereas 
We have upon all occasions made knowen Our dislike, We 
have ever had of the use of Tobacco in generall, as tending to 
the corruption both of the health and manners of Our people, 
and to that purpose have at severall times heretofore pro 
hibited the planting of Tobacco, both in England and Wales, 
as utterly unfit, in respect of the Climate, to cherish the same 
for any medicinall use, (which is the onely good to bee ap- 
prooved in it;) And at other times have also prohibited the 
disorderly Trading for Tobacco, into the parts beyond the 
Seas, as by Our severall Proclamations, published to that 
purpose, it may appeare. Neverthelesse, because Wee have 

1 A note on the original proclamation in the privy seal bundles, no. 1955, 
in the Public Record Office, reads, "I have prepared this proclamation readie 
for your Majesty s signature upon an order made at the Councell Board. 
Thomas Coventry." 

2 The Commons vote, dated May 24, 1624, is in the Journal of the House of 
Commons, i, 794. The several documents leading up to the issuing of this 
Proclamation are listed in Kingsbury s Records of the Virginia Company, i, 
192-200. 



36 Royal Proclamations. 

beene earnestly and often importuned by many of Our loving 
Subjects, Planters and Adventurers in Virginia, and the Som- 
mer Islands, and lately by Our Commissioners for Virginia, 
that We would be pleased to take into Our Royall care that 
part of Our Dominions, by Our Royall authoritie, and by the 
Industrie of Our loyall Subjects, added to the rest of Our 
Empire, for the propagation of Christian Religion, and the 
ease and benefite of this populous Realme, and to consider, 
that those Colonies and Plantations, are yet but in their in- 
fancie, and cannot be brought to maturitie and perfection, 
unlesse We will bee pleased for a time to tolerate unto them 
the planting and venting of the Tobacco, which is, and shall 
be of the growth of those Colonies and Plantations; We, 
taking into Our Princely consideration these, and many other 
important reasons of State, have beene graciously pleased to 
condescend to the desires and humble petitions of Our loving 
Subjects in this behalf e. 

And therefore We doe by these presents straitly charge and 
command, That no person whatsoever, of what degree or 
qualitie soever, doe at any time hereafter, import, or cause to 
be imported from any part beyond the Seas, or out of Our 
Kingdome of Scotland, into this Our Realme of England, or 
Dominion of Wales, or into Our Realme of Ireland, any To 
bacco, which is not of the proper growth of the Plantations of 
Virginia, and the Sommer Islands, or one of them, upon paine 
of forfeiture unto Us of all such Tobacco so to be imported, 
contrary to the true meaning of these presents, in whose hands 
soever the same shall be found, and upon such further paines 
and penalties, as by the Lawes and Statutes of these Our 
Realmes, or by the severity or censure of Our Court of Starre- 
chamber, in either of those Kingdomes respectively, may be 
inflicted upon the Offenders, for contempt of this Our Royall 
command, and to be reputed and taken as enemies to Our 
proceedings, and to those Plantations which so much con- 
cerne Our Honour, and the honour and profit of these Our 
Kingdomes. And We further will and command, upon the 
penalties aforesaid, that from hencefoorth, no person or per 
sons whatsoever, presume to sow, set, or plant, or cause, or 
permit, or suffer to be sowed, set, or planted, in any of his or 
their grounds, any Tobacco whatsoever, within these Our 
Realmes of England, or Ireland, or Dominion of Wales, or 
any Isles or places belonging thereto, or permit or suffer any 
old stocke, plant, or root of Tobacco formerly set, sowed, or 



1624, September 29. 37 

planted there to continue, not plucked up and utterly de 
stroyed, contrary to the tenour and true meaning of a former 
Proclamation, made and published by Us to that purpose, 
bearing date the thirtieth day of December, in the seventeenth 
yeere of Our Reigne of England. 

And Wee further straitly charge and command, upon the 
paines and penalties aforesaid, That no person whatsoever, 
presume to buy, or sell any Tobacco, which from hencefoorth 
shall be imported, or brought from any the parts beyond the 
Seas, or from Our Realme of Scotland, which is not, or shall 
not be of the proper growth of the Colonies aforesaid, of 
Virginia, and the Sommer Islands, or one of them. And 
because Wee understand, that some, who intend their owne 
private, more then the publique, conceiving it to be probable, 
that We would grant the petition of Our Commons in Parlia 
ment, to prevent the effect thereof, have lately imported 
secretly, and by stealth, great quantities of forreigne Tobacco, 
for which they have payd no Subsidie, or other duety unto Us ; 
We further will and command, under the paines and penalties 
aforesaid, that no person whatsoever, from, and after the five 
and twentieth day of March, now next ensuing, presume to 
sell, or offer, or put to sale within these Our Realmes or 
Dominion, any Tobacco, which hath beene formerly imported 
into this Realme, which is not of the proper growth of the 
Colonies, or Plantations aforesaid, or one of them, nor that 
any person whatsoever, willingly and knowingly, take, or 
use any Tobacco, from, and after the first day of May, now 
next ensuing, which is not, or shall not be of the proper growth 
of the sayd Colonies, or Plantations, or one of them. Yet, 
because the said forreigne Tobacco may not lie on the hands 
of the owners thereof, Wee are graciously pleased, that at 
any time, within fortie dayes after the sayd five and twentieth 
day of March, such forreigne Tobacco may be freely exported 
by any person whatsoever, without paying any Subsidie or 
other due tie for the same. And because no man shall pretend 
ignorance, and thereby endevour to excuse his offence in any 
of the premisses; Wee doe further charge and command, and 
doe hereby signifie and declare Our will and pleasure to be, 
that all, and every person and persons, Merchant or other, 
who useth to sell, or hath any purpose to sell Tobacco, who 
have in his, or their hands, custodie or possession, or in the 
hands, custodie or possession of any other by their delivery, or 
to their use, any Tobacco heretofore imported into this Our 



38 Royal Proclamations. 

Realme, or planted, set, or sowen within this Realme, shall be 
fore the twentieth day of October, now next comming, bring the 
same into Our Custome-house, within Our Citie of London, if 
such Tobacco be within five miles of Our said Citie, or if such 
Tobacco be in any other Citie, Towne, or Place, within this 
Our Realme of England, or Dominion of Wales, or Realme 
of Ireland, shall bring the same to the Towne-house, or other 
fit place, which shall be to that purpose appointed by Us, in 
that City or Corporate Towne, neerest unto which the said 
Tobacco shall be, and shall before the first day of December, 
now next comming, there require and cause the same to be 
Marked and Sealed by such person or persons, and with such 
Seale and Marke, as We shall thereunto assigne or appoint 
fpr that purpose, without giving any fee or allowance for the 
said Seale or Marke, and whatsoever Tobacco shall not be 
Sealed or marked, as aforesaid, within the severall times afore 
said, shall be confiscate et forfeited unto Us for such their de 
fault and contempt. And for the avoyding of all deceit and 
abuse in disguising of forraigne Tobacco, or mingling the same 
with the Tobacco of Virginia, or the Sommer Islands, thereby 
to defraud the true intent of these presents, We further straitly 
charge and command, under the paines and penalties afore 
said, That no person, who is, or shall be a seller of Tobacco, 
shall have, or keepe ready cut, above the quantity of one 
pound of Tobacco at once, nor shall mingle any forraigne 
Tobacco, with any Tobacco of the growth of the Sommer 
Islands or Virginia. 

And Wee straitly charge and command, that all the planters 
of Tobacco in the Colonies aforesaid, or any part thereof, shall 
make the same good, and merchantable, and shall not presume 
to send over into this our Realme of England, any Tobacco, 
which shall not be good and merchantable, and well made up 
in rolle without stalkes, or other bad or corrupt stuffe. upon 
paine of confiscation thereof, or so much thereof, as upon due 
triall made, shall be found to be otherwise, to the intent that 
such of Our Subjectes, as shall desire to use the same, may 
not be abused, or deceived therewith, to the impairing of their 
health. And to the intent that the Tobacco of the Colonies, 
and Plantations aforesaid, thus tolerated by Us, may be 
knowen and distinguished, from such as shall bee secretly, 
and without warrant brought in by stealth; Wee doe likewise 
straitly charge and command, upon the paines and penalties 
aforesaid, That all such Tobacco, as shall bee brought from the 



1624, September 2g. 39 

Colonies aforesaid, shall be all brought, and landed at the 
Key of Our Custome house, in Our citie of London, and not 
elsewhere, in any of Our Realmes or Dominions, and shal be 
there registred, et shall not be removed from Our said Cus 
tome house, untill it shall bee there first tryed, sealed, and 
marked, by such person, or persons, et with such scale or 
marke, as We shall thereunto assigne and appoint; such scale 
or marke to bee set thereto, without Fee, or other reward 
whatsoever. And Wee doe further straitly charge and com 
mand, upon the paines and penalties aforesaid, That all 
owners of ships, bee carefull to imploy such masters in their 
ships, or other vessels, from whom they will take good caution, 
not to offend in the importation of any Tobacco, contrary to 
this Our Roy all pleasure. And We do further signifie and 
declare by these presents, that We will require an exact 
accompt of the master of every ship, or other vessell, that he 
shall make such diligent, and carefull search, over the mariners 
and passengers in his ship, or other vessell, that none of them 
shall conveigh over into these Our Realmes of England, or 
Ireland, or dominion of Walles, or into any Port, Haven, 
Creeke, or other parts thereof, any Tobacco, to be imported, 
contrary to the true intent and meaning of these presents: 
And that Our Customers, or their deputies, in every Port of 
these Our Realmes of England, and Ireland, shall, upon oath, 
examine every Master of a ship, or other vessell, or other 
Officers and Mariners in the said ship, or vessell, whether they 
have made search in the said ship or vessell, for Tobacco, and 
whether any Tobacco bee in the said ship, or vessell, to their 
knowledge, and whether any Tobacco were laden in the said 
ship or vessell, and bee taken out thereof, and what is become 
of the same: And if any Master of a ship, or other vessell, 
shall wilfully, or negligently permit, or suffer any Tobacco to 
be imported, or shall otherwise offend, contrary to these 
presents, every such Master (because it is in his power to 
prevent the same) shall also be answerable unto Us for his 
contempt herein, and shall be subject, et lyable to all the 
paines and penalties aforesaid, as well as if he himselfe had 
actually and purposely committed the said offence. And 
whereas We are informed, that some traders in Tobacco, doe 
use to import Tobacco in forreigne Bottomes; Wee strictly 
charge and command, that no person whatsoever, either 
Stranger, Denizen, or naturall borne Subject, presume to 
import any Tobacco whatsoever, in any forreigne bottome, 



40 Royal Proclamations. 

at any time hereafter, upon paine of confiscation, not onely 
of the said Tobacco, but also of the ship, or vessell, wherein 
the same is so imported, and upon the other paines and 
penalties aforesaid. 

And for the better execution of Our pleasure herein, We doe 
hereby command all and singuler Customers, Comptrollers, 
Searchers, Wayters, and other Officers, attending in all, and 
every the Ports, Creekes, or places of lading or unlading, for 
the taking, collecting, or receiving of any of our Customes, 
Subsidies, or Duties, to take notice of this Our pleasure: 
And We do hereby command, and give power and authoritie 
unto them, and every of them, from time to time, as well to 
search any shippe, or other vessell, or bottome, ryding, or 
lying within any Port, Haven, or Creeke, within their severall 
charge of attendance, for all Tobacco imported, contrary to 
the intent of this Our Royall Proclamation; and the same 
being found, to seize and take to Our use, and also to take 
notice of the names, and apprehend the bringers in and buyers 
of the same, to the end they may receive condigne punishment 
for their offences, upon payne, that every of the said Officers, 
which shall bee found negligent, remisse or corrupt therein, 
shall lose his place and entertainement, and undergoe such 
paines and penalties, as by Our Lawes, or by the censure of 
Our said Court of Starre-chamber, may be inflicted upon 
them for the same. 

And We doe likewise, will, ordaine, and appoint, that it 
shall and may bee lawful! , for such person or persons, as shall 
be thereunto authorized and appointed, by him, or themselves, 
or his, or their Deputy or Deputies, with a lawfull Officer 
to search any shippe, or other vessell, and to enter into any 
shoppe, house, seller, warehouse, or other suspected places, 
at lawfull and convenient times, and there to search, discover, 
and find out any Tobacco, imported, uttered, sold, or vented, 
or to be uttered, sold, or vented, not marked or sealed, as 
aforesaid, contrary to the true meaning hereof, and all such 
Tobacco so found, to seize, take away, and dispose of, and 
the owners thereof, or in whose custodie the same shall be 
found, to informe and complaine of, to the end they may 
receive punishment, according to Our pleasure before herein 
declared. 

And further, We doe by these presents, will and require 
all and singuler Mayors, Sheriffes, Justices of Peace, Bay- 
liffes, Constables, Headboroughs, Customers, Comptrollers, 



1624, September 29. 41 

Searchers, Wayters, and all other Our Officers and ministers 
whatsoever, That they, and every of them, in their severall 
places and Offices, be diligent and attendant in the execution 
of this Our Proclamation, and also ayding and assisting 
unto such person and persons, and his and their Deputies 
and Assignes, as We shall so, as aforesaid, authorise et appoint, 1 
as well in any search for discovery of any act, or acts to be 
performed contrary to the intent of these presents, as other 
wise, in the doing or executing of any matter or thing, for the 
accomplishment of this Our Royall command. And further 
Our will and pleasure is, and Wee doe hereby charge and 
command Our Atturney generall, for the time being, to in- 
forme against such persons in Our Court of Starre-chamber, 
from time to time, whose contempt and disobedience against 
this Our Royall command, shall merit the censure of that 
Court, and to prosecute every such information speedily and 
effectually, untill the same shall bee brought to sentence. 
And Our pleasure and command is, that all the Tobacco 
which upon any seizure shall become forfeited, shall bee 
brought to Our Custome house, next adjoyning to the Port, 
or place where the same shall be seized, where the seizor 
thereof shall deliver the same to Our use, and the same shall be 
forthwith burnt, consumed, and destroyed; but the offendour, 
before he be discharged, shall pay to the partie, who seized 
the said Tobacco, the one halfe of the true value thereof: 
And that such person or persons, whom Wee shall appoint 
specially by Our Privie Scale, to take care and charge of the 
execution of Our pleasure in the premisses, shall have the 
one halfe of all the Fines, to bee imposed upon every offendour 
against this Our Proclamation, for their encouragement to 
bee diligent and faithfull, in, and about the performance of 
that service, We shall so commit unto them. 

Given at Our Honour of Hampton Court, the nine and 
twentieth day of September, in the two and twentieth yeere 
of Our Reigne of England, France, and Ireland, and of Scot 
land the eight and fiftieth. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

1 The commission, dated November 9, 1624, appointing Edward Dichfield 
and five others officers to take charge of the execution of the provisions of this 
Proclamation, is printed in Rymer s Fcedera, xvii, 633. 



42 Royal Proclamations. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. 1624. 

4 PP- folio. There are two issues varying only in set-up. Copies in 
Antiq., B. M., Canterbury, Dalk., I. T., P. C., and P. R. O.; also in John 
Carter Brown Library. Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s 
"F&dera," xvii, 621. 



1625, March 2. 
[Encouraging Growth of Tobacco in Plantations.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION FOR THE UTTER PROHIBITING THE IMPORTA 
TION AND USE OF ALL TOBACCO, WHICH IS NOT OF THE 

PROPER GROWTH OF THE COLONIES OF VIRGINIA AND 
THE SUMMER ISLANDS, OR ONE OF THEM. 

Whereas, at the humble suite of Our Commons in Parlia 
ment, by Our Royall Proclamation, bearing date the nine 
and twentieth day of September now last past, for the reasons 
therein contained, We have prohibited the importation and 
use of all Tobacco, which is not of the proper growth of Our 
Colonies of Virginia and the Summer Islands, or one of them ; 
And whereas, upon the humble Petition of many Our loving 
Subjects, being Planters or Adventurers in those Colonies, 
and for the support and incouragement of those Plantations 
(whose prosperous estate We much affect, and shall by all 
good meanes be alwayes ready to cherish and protect) We 
have beene contented to tolerate the use of Tobacco, of the 
growth of those Plantations for a time, untill by more solid 
Commodities they be able to subsist otherwise, which (as We 
are informed) they cannot as yet by any meanes doe; And 
therefore by Our said Proclamation, Wee did thinke fit to 
give particular directions in many things tending to those 
ends, and did straitly command the due execution and obser 
vation thereof, under the penalties therein contained: Now 
because Wee have beene informed, as well by the humble 
Certificate of Our Commissioners for Virginia, as by the 
humble Petition of divers of Our loving Subjects, the Planters 
and Adventurers of, and in those Colonies, That, notwith 
standing Our Royall pleasure was so expressly signified, and 



1625, March 2. 43 

the reasons of State are so plainely laid downe, as might have 
perswaded every well affected Subject to the due observance 
thereof; yet divers, out of an inordinate desire of private 
gaine, have wilfully disobeyed Our commandement herein, 
and thereby have indeavoured, as much as in them lieth, to 
destroy so noble a worke as the support of those Plantations, 
which so much concernes Our Honour, and the honour and 
profit of Our people. 

Wee therefore, being very sensible of this neglect and con 
tempt, have thought good to renew Our said Proclamation; 
And doe hereby signifie and declare unto all Our loving Sub 
jects, and unto all others, Our expresse will and pleasure to 
be, That Our said former Proclamation, and every clause, 
prohibition, article and thing therein contained, shall from 
hencefoorth be duly observed and obeyed, with such altera 
tions and additions, as are in these presents contained and 
expressed, upon paine of Our high displeasure, and such 
penalties and punishments, as in Our said former Proclama 
tion are, or in these presents shall be limited or appointed 
for the offenders thereof. 

And whereas some have since Our said last Proclamation, 
unmerchantlike, secretly and cunningly stollen in great 
parcels of Tobacco, contrary to Our said Proclamation; Wee 
would have those persons, and all others by their example 
know, That they must expect the severitie of that censure, 
which Our Court of Starre- Chamber shall thinke fit to inflict 
upon them, and that Wee are resolved not to relent or remit 
their deserved punishment, but to cause them and all others, 
that shall dare to offend herein, to bee prosecuted and pun 
ished in such measure, as such their high contempt doth 
deserve. 

And because We conceived it would be utterly in vaine 
to prohibite the importation of such forreine Tobacco, as 
aforesaid, unlesse the care and charge of the execution thereof 
were committed by Us, to some fit and able persons, who 
besides the respect to Our service, might for their owne 
particular interests take the same to heart; Therefore We 
have by Our Letters Patents under Our great Scale of Eng 
land, authorized certaine persons, Citizens of London, well 
affected to those plantations, and to Our service, by them 
selves, and their Deputies, to search and inquire into the 
offences, and offenders against Our said Proclamation: And 
Wee have also contracted with them to bee Our Agents for 



44 Royal Proclamations. 

Us, and to Our use to receive the Tobacco of those Colonies, 
at, and for such prices as Wee have agreed to give for the 
same; and besides those prices, to bee given to the Planters 
and owners of the said Tobacco, Our said Agents have further 
contracted with Us, to give and pay unto Us, and to Our 
use, such summes of money more, as may give Us reasonable 
satisfaction for that losse, which otherwise Wee should sus- 
taine in Our Customes and other Dueties, and may inable 
Us to beare that charge, which Wee have undertaken yeerely 
to disburse for the generall defence and support of those Plan 
tations. And We doe further by this Our Proclamation pub 
lish and declare, that We will constantly and inviolably 
observe and performe Our said contract, and on Our parts, 
will allow and disburse out of Our revenew, those summes of 
money for the safety of those Plantations, and for the ease 
of the Planters and Inhabitants there, which by the said con 
tract hath beene on Our parts undertaken; whereof We would 
have, aswell Our said Agents, as the Planters and Adven 
turers in those Colonies, and all other whom it may concerne, 
to rest confidently assured. 

And because Wee are given to understand, that divers 
using to trade in Tobacco, and having a purpose to import, 
or buy, or sell the same, contrary to the intent of this Our 
Proclamation, doe usually land the same at private Wharffes, 
Staires, or other places, and send, or conveigh the same unto 
the Houses, Cellers, Warehouses, or other places, of, or belong 
ing to others, who are lesse suspected then themselves, there 
by to conceale the same from Us, and Our Agents; Wee 
further will and command, That from hencefoorth no person 
whatsoever, presume, or suffer the said prohibited Tobacco 
to bee landed at any Wharffe, Staire, or other place, nor 
receive, or conceale any such prohibited Tobacco, or suffer 
the same to be bestowed in any of their Houses, Cellers, 
Warehouses, or other places, upon paine of Our high dis 
pleasure, and upon such paines and penalties, as by this, or 
Our former Proclamation, are to be inflicted upon the prin- 
cipall offenders, And to the intent that all the prohibited 
Tobacco brought in, shall be justly and truely exported 
againe, et no part thereof sold, or vented within these Our 
Kingdomes; Our will and command is, That all the pro 
hibited Tobacco which shall be seized within Our Kingdome 
of England, shall be brought and delivered into the Ware 
house, or Storehouse which shall be to that purpose provided 



1 62 5, March 2. 45 

by the said Agents, in Our city of London; and all the pro 
hibited Tobacco, which shall be seized within Our Kingdome 
of Ireland, shall bee brought and delivered into the Ware 
houses, or Storehouses which shall to that purpose bee ap 
pointed by Our Agents in Our city of Dublin, or elsewhere 
within Our said Kingdome of Ireland. 

And for the incouragement of those, who shall take paines 
in the discovery and seizing thereof, Our will and pleasure is 
That the one halfe of the reasonable value thereof, shall bee 
paid unto the seizers thereof in money by Our Agents, et the 
Tobacco it selfe shall be exported againe by Our said Agents, 
or by their appointments : And for the better execution of Our 
service herein, We doe hereby give full power and authority, 
as well to Our Agent and Agents, as to their Deputy and 
Deputies, at all time and times, to enter into, and to search 
for any prohibited Tobacco, contrary to this Our Proclama 
tion, in any Ship, Boate, or vessell, or in any House, Ship, 
Celler, Seller, Warehouse, or in any Trunke, Chest, Case, 
Barrell, or Pack, Cabbin, or any other suspected place what 
soever, and finding any such prohibited Tobacco, the same to 
seizeand cary away, to be conveyed to such place or Warehouse, 
as Our said Agent shall appoint for that purpose, as aforesaid. 

And Our expresse will and command is, That neither Our 
said Agents, nor any others, doe sell, or utter any part of the 
said prohibited Tobacco, within any Our owne Dominions, 
there to bee spent and used, whereby the vent of the Tobacco 
of our Colonies aforesaid may any way bee hindred, upon paine 
of Our heavy displeasure, and such other paines and penalties, 
as other offenders against this Our Proclamation are liable 
unto. 

And whereas by Our former Proclamation, We did command, 
that from, et after the five et twentieth day of March, then, 
and now next ensuing, no person should sell, utter, or offer to 
put to sale, or use any Tobacco, which is not of the proper 
growth of the Colonies aforesaid, and before the ende of forty 
dayes then next ensuing, should transport out of Our said 
Kingdome, all other Tobacco, then that of the growth of those 
Colonies; Wee doe now by this Our Proclamation, ratifie and 
confirme the same, and command, the same to be duely put 
in execution: And to the ende there may be no evasion used 
to avoyd the same, Wee doe hereby give full power and com- 
mandement to Our said Agents, by themselves and their 
Deputies, at any time, or times after the said five and twen- 



46 Royal Proclamations. 

tieth day of March now next ensuing, to search for the said 
prohibited Tobacco, and to take a true and exact note and 
accompt of the quantity thereof, to the intent that the Owners 
thereof, before the ende of forty dayes next ensuing after the 
said five and twentieth day of March, either by themselves, 
or some other, may export the same by the privity of the said 
Agents, according to the true intent of this, and of Our said 
former Proclamation, and at the end of the said forty dayes, 
may give a just account unto Our said Agents, what is become 
thereof; et whatsoever Tobacco, which is not of the proper 
growth of the Plantations aforesaid, shall after the said forty 
dayes be found in the hands of any person whatsoever, shall 
bee seized by Our said Agents, or their Deputies to Our use, 
and the said person or persons having or using the same, shall 
incurre Our high displeasure, and bee subject to such further 
paines and penalties, as by Our said Proclamation are to be 
inflicted upon any other offenders. 

And Our further will and command is, that all the Tobacco 
of the growth of Our Colonies aforesaid, shall be brought to 
the Custome-house-key of Our port of London, and there be 
delivered to Our Agents, or their Assignees to Our use, accord 
ing to Our contract aforesaid, or be kept in Our said Custome- 
house to bee transported out of Our Dominions; and whatso 
ever Tobacco of the growth of those Plantations, or either of 
them, shall not be brought to that Key, and be delivered as 
aforesaid, or for which there shall not bee good security given 
to Our Agents, within foureteene dayes after the landing 
thereof, to export the same as aforesaid, the same shall bee 
forfeited and seized to Our use by Our Agents or their Deputies, 
as other prohibited Tobacco, and this to bee duely observed 
under the paines and penalties aforesaid. 

And whereas Wee are given to understand, that divers 
using to trade in Tobacco, have and still doe secretly and 
underhand steale into Our Kingdomes the said prohibited 
Tobacco, and doe so privily hide and conceale the same, that 
they cannot be easily discovered, nor found out; and doe 
either by themselves, or others by them to that purpose 
imployed, carry the same by small quantities to the houses or 
shops of Our subjects, inhabiting within Our said Kingdomes, 
and doe sell or prefer the same to bee sold, or else doe secretly 
and covertly offer to contract for the sale of such prohibited 
Tobacco; Our will and pleasure is, and Wee doe hereby straitly 
charge and command all and every Our loving subjects, to 



1(525, March 2. 47 

whom any the said prohibited Tobacco shall be offered to be 
sold or contracted for, as aforesaid, that immediately upon the 
sight of any such prohibited Tobacco, or upon offer to con 
tract for any such Tobacco, they make stay thereof, and of 
such person or persons, as shall either profer the same to sell, 
or shall offer to contract for any the said prohibited Tobacco, 
and that they and every of them, who shall have the said pro 
hibited Tobacco so proffered unto them to be sold, as afore 
said, shall give notice thereof, and charge the next Constable, 
Head-borough or other Officer, with such person or persons, 
who shall offer to put the same to sale, upon paine of Our 
high displeasure, and of such other paines and penalties, as 
other offenders against this Our Royall Proclamation are 
liable unto. And Wee doe hereby further charge and com 
mand all and singuler Constables, Head-boroughs et other 
Our Officers aforesaid, that they and every of them, upon 
notice unto them given of any such prohibited Tobacco, as 
aforesaid, or of any such person and persons so offending, 
as aforesaid, that they seize the said Tobacco, and detaine all 
such person and persons so offending as they shal have knowl 
edge of, untill they have given notice thereof unto Our said 
Agents or their Deputie or Deputies, and untill by their meanes 
the person offending may be brought before such Officer as 
hath power by this Our Proclamation to take sufficient bond 
for the appearance of such person, in some of Our Courts of 
justice, to answer for their faults as the same shall deserve. 

And for the better finding out and discovery of the offences 
and offenders against Our former and this Our Proclamation, 
We are well pleased, and doe hereby require and command, 
that Our Treasurer, Commissioners for Our Treasury, Chan- 
cellour and Barons of Our Exchequer now, and for the time 
being, within Our said Kingdomes of England and Ireland, 
respectively shall and may award such and so many Com 
missions, as they shall thinke meet, to be directed to discreet 
and fit persons in all or any Our Ports, or elsewhere, to en 
quire of and examine upon oath, or otherwise, all such persons 
as are, or shall be suspected to have heretofore offended, or 
which hereafter shall offend against this, or Our former Proc 
lamation in this behalfe, or any other person or persons what 
soever, for the finding out and discovery of the said offences 
and offenders, as is before mentioned; to the end that, as well 
the importers of such Tobacco as the buyers, sellers, spenders, 
receivers and concealers thereof, may receive such condigne 



48 Royal Proclamations. 

punishment by fine or otherwise, for their offences, as by Our 
Court of Star-chamber, or Court of Exchequer shall be thought 
fit: And in case such Tobacco shall not, or cannot be taken, or 
found to bee seized, that then every such offender shall forfeit 
and pay to the hands of Our Agent or Agents, in this behalfe 
for Our use, the full value of such Tobacco, as the said offenders 
heretofore have, or hereafter shall have imported, bought, sold, 
vented or received, as aforesaid, beside such further punish 
ment, as shall be fit to be inflicted upon them for their contempt. 
And Our further will and pleasure is, and We doe hereby 
declare, That whatsoever Our said Agent or Agents, their 
Assignee or Assignees, under the hands and scales of the 
greater number of them, have already done, or shall doe here 
after against any offender or offenders, in requiring and taking 
the forfeiture of any Tobacco, or the value thereof so imported 
or uttered as aforesaid, or in the mitigating or taking any lesse 
summe then the value of the same of any such offender in the 
premisses, or otherwise according to the good discretion of 
Our said Agent or Agents, Wee doe and will from time to time 
approve and allow of by these presents : And this signification 
of Our pleasure shall be as well unto Our said Agent or Agents 
for the time being, as unto all and every such Commissioner 
and Commissioners which have beene, or shall be imployed, in, 
or about this Our service, a sufficient warrant and discharge 
in that behalfe, without any account to be by them, or any of 
them respectively yeelded to Us, Our Heires or Successors, 
and without incurring any penalty in the doing or executing 
of this Our Service and Royall Command. 

And forasmuch as heretofore divers great quantities of 
Tobacco have beene imported into this Realme, under the 
name or names of sundry poore Mariners, and other, which 
are not able to pay the value thereof, nor give satisfaction for 
the same, Our will and pleasure is, the better to avoyd such 
frauds and deceipts in time to come, That in whatsoever Ship, 
or other Vessell, any such Tobacco in greater or lesser quanti 
ties, shall be found or discovered to have beene, or to be so 
imported, and to be shifted away that seizure thereof cannot, 
or shal not be made, That then such Mariners, or others, who 
shall so import or couler the said Tobaccoes, shall not onely 
be punished, as aforesaid, but that every Master of such Ship 
or Vessell, wherein such Tobacco shall be so imported or 
shifted away, as aforesaid, shall forfeit to Us the value of the 
said Tobacco, and that such Ship or Ships shall be arrested, 



1(525, March 2. 49 

and stayed by the Officers of every Port, or any of Our Agents, 
their Deputies or Assignees respectively, untill the said for 
feiture be duly answered and paid to the hands of Our said 
Agent or Agents to Our use, or such others as they shall 
appoint in that behalf e. 

And for the better execution of the premisses, Wee doe 
straitly charge and command all Justices of Peace, Mayors, 
Sheriffes, Bailifles, Constables, Headboroughs, Tythingmen, 
Our Warden and Constable of Our Cinque Ports, and all other 
Our Officers and Ministers, as well of Our Admiralties, as 
otherwise, and all other Our loving Subjects, to whom it shall 
or may appertaine, that they and every of them at all times et 
times hereafter, and from time to time, upon sight of Our 
Letters Patents, granted to Our said Agents, or of a Deputa 
tion under the hands et scales of Our Agents, or any three of 
them, be ayding and assisting to Our said Agent and Agents, 
and their Deputie and Deputies, and to such Our Com 
missioners, as shall be from time to time appointed for or 
about this Our service, And also to be from time to time 
ayding and assisting to all Our Searchers, Waiters, and to all 
such other person and persons as shall be authorized by Our 
said Agent or Agents, or by Our Customers or Farmers of Our 
Customes, for the searching, seizing, taking, and carying 
away of all such Tobacco imported, or hereafter to be imported 
or uttered, or intended to be put to sale contrary to this Our 
Royall prohibition and command. And if any person or per 
sons shall bee found, privily or secretly to oppose or animate 
any others, to contradict or withstand them in the due execu 
tion of this Our service and Royall command, or to neglect 
the due execution thereof, That then We do by these presents, 
straitly charge and command, all and every Our sayd Officers 
respectively, that every such person and persons shall be 
apprehended and brought before Our Treasurer, Chancellour 
of Our Exchequer, or before any the Lords or others of Our 
Privy Councell, or before Our chiefe Baron, or some other 
of the Barons of Our Exchequer for the time being, to receive 
such order for condigne punishment to be inflicted upon them 
according to their demerits, as shall be fit. 

Given at Our Court at Theobalds, the second day of March, 
in the two and twentieth yeere of Our Reigne of Great Britaine, 
France, and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



50 Royal Proclamations. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. 

M.DC.XXIIII. 

4 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Dalk., P. R. 0., and Q. C. En 
tered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Ry frier s " Foedera" xvii, 668. 



1625, April 9. 
[Importation of Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION TOUCHING 
TOBACCO. 

Whereas Our most deare Father, of blessed memorie, 
deceased, for many weighty and important Reasons of State, 
and at the humble suit of His Commons in Parliament, did 
lately publish two severall Proclamations, the one dated the 
nine and twentieth day of September, now last past, and the 
other the second of March following, for the utter prohibiting 
of the importation, and use of all Tobacco, which is not of 
the proper growth of the Colonies of Virginia and the Sommer 
Islands, or one of them, with such Cautions, and under such 
Paines and Penalties, as are in those Proclamations at large 
expressed : 

Wee, tendring the prosperity of those Colonies and Planta 
tions, and holding it to bee a matter of great consequence 
unto Us, and to the honour of Our Crowne, not to desert, or 
neglect those Colonies, whereof the foundations, with hope- 
full successe, have been so happily layd by Our Father, 
beeing given to understand, that divers persons intending 
onely their private gaine, and neglecting all considerations 
of the publique, in this short time, whilest Wee have been 
necessarily taken up in ordering of the great affaires of Our 
Kingdomes and State, have taken the boldnesse, secretly, 
and by stealth, to import and utter great quantities of To 
bacco, which is not of the growth of the Plantations afore 
said, to the utter destruction of those Plantations, as much 
as in them lieth; Wee have thought fit, for the preventing 



1625, April p. 51 

of those inconveniences, which may otherwise ensue, to the 
irrecoverable dammage of those Plantations, and of Our 
service, to publish and declare Our Royall pleasure for the 
present, touching the premisses, untill upon more mature 
deliberation Wee shall see cause to alter, or adde unto the 
same, in any part. 

And Wee doe therefore straitly charge and command, that 
no person whatsoever, of what degree or qualitie soever, doe 
at any time hereafter, either directly or indirectly, import, 
buy, sell, or utter, plant, cherish, or use, or cause to bee 
imported, sold, or uttered, cherished, planted, or used, in 
Our Realmes of England, or Ireland, or Dominion of Wales, 
or in any Isles or places thereunto belonging any Tobacco, 
of any sort whatsoever, which is not of the proper growth 
of the said Colonies, or one of them; And that no person 
whatsoever, by any shift or device whatsoever, doe receive, 
or conceale, or colour the Tobacco of any other, so imported, 
planted, bought, sold, uttered, or used within Our sayd 
Realmes, or Dominions, or the Isles or places aforesaid, or 
any part thereof, upon paine of forfeiture unto Us, of all 
such Tobacco so to be imported, bought, sold, planted, uttered, 
or used, contrary to the true meaning of these presents, in 
whose hands soever the same shall be found, and upon such 
further paines and penalties, as by the Lawes and Statutes 
of these Our Realms, or by the Censure of Our Courts of 
Star-Chamber, in either of Our said Kingdomes respectively, 
can or may be inflicted upon the offenders, for contempt of 
tlu s Our Royall Command; and to be reputed and taken as 
enemies to Our proceedings, and to those Plantations, which so 
much concerne Our honour, and the honour and profit of Our 
State. 

And Our further will and command is, that all the forreigne 
Tobacco, of what sort soever, which is not of the proper 
growth of those Plantations, or one of them, shall before the 
fourth day of May, now next ensuing, bee transported out 
of Our Realmes and Dominions, as by the sayd former Proc 
lamations it was directed and commanded, upon paine of 
forfeiture thereof, and upon the other paines and penalties 
aforesayd to be inflicted upon the offenders. 

And Our pleasure is, That all such forreigne Tobacco may 
bee freely exported by any person whatsoever, without pay 
ing to Us, or to Our use, any Subsidie, or other duetie for the 
same. 



52 Royal Proclamations. 

Given at Our Court at White-Hall, this ninth day of April, 
in the first yeere of Our Reigne of Great Britaine, France, 
and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Printed at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. M.DC.XXV. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., I. T., P. C., and P. R. 0. 
Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s "Fcedera" xviii, 19. 



1625, May 13. 

[Settling the Affairs of Virginia.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION FOR SETLING THE 
PLANTATION OF VIRGINIA. 

Whereas the Colonie of Virginia, Planted by the hands of 
Our most deare Father of blessed memory, for the propa 
gation of Christian Religion, the increase of Trade, and the 
enlarging of his Royall Empire, hath not hitherto prospered 
so happily, as was hoped and desired, A great occasion whereof 
his late Majesty conceived to be, for that the government 
of that Colony was committed to the Company of Virginia, 
encorporated of a multitude of persons of severall dispositions, 
amongst whom the affaires of greatest moment were, and 
must be ruled by the greater number of Votes and Voyces; 
And therefore his late Majestic, out of His great Wisedome, 
and depth of Judgement, did desire to resume that popular 
government, and accordingly the Letters Patents of that 
Incorporation, were by his Highnesse direction in a Legall 
course questioned, and thereupon judicially repealed, and 
adjudged to bee voyde 1 ; wherein his Majesties ayme was 
onely, to reduce that government into such a right course,, 
as might best agree with that forme which was held in the 
rest of his Royall Monarchy, and was not intended by him, 
to take away, or impeach the particular Interest of any 

1 For the proceedings whereby the patent was overthrown by the quo war- 
ranio, June 26, 1624, see Brown, First Republic in America, p. 601. 



, May 13. 53 

private Planter, or Adventurer, nor to alter the same, other 
wise then should be of necessity for the good of the publique : 
And wheras We continue the h ke care of those Colonies and 
Plantations, as Our late deare Father did, and upon delib 
erate advice and consideration, are of the same Judgement 
that Our said Father was of, for the government of that 
Colony of Virginia; Now lest the apprehension of former 
personall differences, which have heretofore happened (the 
reviving and continuing whereof Wee utterly disallow, and 
strictly forbid) might distract the mindes of the Planters and 
Adventurers, or the opinion, that We would neglect those 
Plantations, might discourage men to goe or send thither, 
and so hinder the perfecting of that worke, wherein We hold 
the honor of Our deare Father deceased, and Our owne 
honour to be deeply engaged; We have thought fit to declare, 
and by Our Royal Proclamation to publish Our owne Judge 
ment, and resolution in these things, which by Gods assist 
ance Wee purpose constantly to pursue. And therefore Wee 
doe by these presents publish and declare to all Our loving 
Subjects, and to the whole world, that Wee hold those Ter 
ritories of Virginia and the Sommer-Ilands, as also that of 
New England, where Our Colonies are already planted, and 
within the limits and bounds whereof, Our late deare Father, 
by His Letters Patents, under His great Seale of England, 
remaining of Record, hath given leave and liberty to His 
Subjects to plant and inhabite, to be a part of Our Royall 
Empire, descended upon Us and undoubtedly belonging 
and appertaining unto Us; And that We hold Ourselfe, as 
well bound by Our Regal office, to protect, maintaine, and 
support the same, and are so resolved to doe, as any other 
part of Our Dominions: 

And that Our full resolution is, to the end that there may 
be one uniforme course of Government, in, and through Our 
whole Monarchic, That the Government of the Colonie of 
Virginia shall immediately depend upon Our Selfe, and not 
be committed to any Company or Corporation, to whom it 
may be proper to trust matters of Trade and Commerce, but 
cannot bee fit or safe to communicate the ordering of State- 
affaires, be they of never so meane consequence: And that 
therefore Wee have determined, That Our Commissioners 
for those Affaires, shall proceed according to the tenor of Our 
Commission directed unto them, untill Wee shall declare Our 
further pleasure therein. Neverthelesse We doe herby de- 



54 Royal Proclamations. 

clare, That Wee are resolved, with as much convenient expe 
dition, as Our Affaires of greater importance will give leave, 
to establish a Councell, consisting of a few persons of under 
standing and qualitie, to whom We will give trust for the 
immediate care of the Affaires of that Colony, and who shall 
be answerable to Us for their proceedings, and in matters of 
greater moment, shall be subordinate and attendant unto Our 
Privie Councell heere ; And that We will also establish another 
Councell to be resident in Virginia, who shall be subordinate 
to Our Councell here for that Colonie; and that at Our owne 
charge we will maintaine those publique Officers and Ministers, 
and that strength of Men, Munition, and Fortification, as 
shall be fit and necessary for the defence of that Plantation, 
and will by any course that shall be desired of Us, settle and 
assure the particular rights and interests of every Planter and 
Adventurer, in any of those Territories, which shall desire the 
same, to give them full satisfaction for their quiet and assured 
enjoying thereof. 

And lastly, whereas it is agreed on all sides, that the To 
bacco of those plantations of Virginia and the Sommer Islands 
(Jwhich is the onely present meanes for their subsisting) cannot 
be managed for the good of the Plantations, unlesse it be 
brought into one hand, whereby the forreigne Tobacco may 
be carefully kept out, and the Tobacco of those Plantations 
may yeeld a certaine and ready price to the owners thereof; 
Wee doe hereby declare, That to avoid all differences and con 
trariety of opinions, which will hardly be reconciled amongst 
the Planters and Adventurers themselves, We are resolved 
to take the same into Our owne hands, and by Our servants 
or Agents for Us, to give such prices to the Planters and 
Adventurers for the same, as may give them reasonable satis 
faction and encouragement; but of the maner thereof, Vvee 
will determine hereafter at better leisure : And when We shall 
have concluded the same, We shall expect, that all Our loving 
Subjects will readily conforme themselves thereunto. 

And in the meanetime, because the importation and use of 
forreigne Tobacco, which is not of the growth of those Planta 
tions, or one of them, will visibly and assuredly undermine 
and destroy those Plantations, by taking away the meanes of 
their subsistence, We doe hereby strictly charge and command, 
That Our late Proclamation, bearing date the ninth day of 
April last, intituled, (A Proclamation touching Tobacco) shall 
in all points and parts thereof, be duely and strictly observed, 



j February 17. 55 

upon p ? aine of Our high displeasure, and such further penalties 
and punishments, as by the sayd Proclamation are to be in 
flicted upon the offenders. And We doe hereby advise all 
Our loving Subjects, and all others whom it may concerne, 
not to adventure the breach of our Royall Commandement in 
any of the premisses, We being fully resolved, upon no im- 
portunitie or intercession whatsoever, to release or remit the 
deserved punishment of such, as shall dare to offend against 
the same, seeing We holde not Our Selfe onely, but Our people 
interested therein. 

Given at Our Court at White-Hall, the thirteenth day of 
May, in the first yeere of Our Reigne of Great Britaine, France, 
and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton, and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestie. Anno Dom. 
M.DC.XXV. 

2 pp. folio. There are two issues, varying only in the cut of the royal 
arms. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., I. T., P. C., and P. R. 0.^ En 
tered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Foedera" xviii, 72. 



1627, February 17. 
[Importation of Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION TOUCHING TOBACCO. 

Whereas Our most deare Father, of blessed memory, de 
ceased, for many weighty and important reasons of State, and 
at the humble suit of his Commons in Parliament, did hereto 
fore publish two severall Proclamations, the one bearing date 
the nine and twentieth day of September, in the two et twen 
tieth yeere of His Highnesse Reigne of England, France, and 
Ireland, and of Scotland the eight and fiftieth, and the other 
the second day of March then next following, by both of them 
utterly prohibiting the importation et use of all Tobacco, which 
is not of the proper growth of the Colonies of Virginia, and the 
Summer-Hands, or one of them, with such Cautions and under 



56 Royal Proclamations. 

such Paines and Penalties, as are in those Proclamations at 
large expressed. 

And whereas Our sayd Father by another Proclamation 
bearing date the thirtieth day of December, in the seventeenth 
yeere of His Highnesse Reigne of England, did straitly charge 
all and every person or persons, of what degree or condition 
soever, that they should not from the second day of February 
then next following, presume to Sowe, Set, or Plant, or cause 
to be sowen, set, or planted within this Realme of England or 
Dominion of Wales any sort or kinde of Tobacco whatsoever, 
and that they, or any of them should not maintaine and con 
tinue any old Stockes or Plants of Tobacco formerly sowen 
or planted, but should foorthwith destroy and roote up the 
same. 

And whereas We, rinding the said Proclamations to be 
grounded upon many weighty reasons and considerations, did 
since Our Accesse to Our Crowne, by Our Proclamation lately 
published, renew and confirme the said former prohibitions: 
Never thelesse, because the immoderate desire of taking of 
Tobacco hath so farre prevailed in these Our Kingdomes, as 
that it cannot on a sodaine bee utterly suppressed, and the 
difference, or, at least, the opinion of difference betweene 
Spanish or forreine Tobacco, and Tobacco of the Plantations 
of Virginia, and of Our owne Dominions, is such, that Our 
Subjects can hardly be induced totally to forsake the Spanish 
Tobacco; whereby it commeth to passe, That where Wee were 
willing to have suffered losse in Our Customes, so as the said 
forreigne Tobacco might have been kept out, the same is 
secretly, and by stealth brought in in great quantities, and 
many great quantities of Tobacco are set and so wenwithin 
this Our Realme of England and Dominion of Wales, and so 
the mischiefe, intended to be redressed, is not avoided, and 
yet Our Revenue in Our Customes is much diminished. 

Wee therefore, taking into Our Princely consideration, as 
wel the present estate of these times, and how many impor 
tant necessities doe at this instant presse Us, that by all good 
meanes Wee should husband Our Revenue to the best, and 
also considering the many inconveniencies which doe and will 
arise, both to Our selves and to Our Subjects, by the secret 
importation of Spanish Tobacco, and planting of English 
Tobacco, whereby divers of Our Subjects have taken liberty 
to themselves, for the desire of private gaine, without respect 
to the publique, to make such frequent sale of the same, as 



1627, February 17. 57 

that thereby not onely Our Plantations abroad are much 
hindered, but Our Customes also are much impayred, Wee 
have thought fit, by the advice of Our Commissioners for Our 
Revenue, as Our first part of proceeding concerning Tobacco, 
to restraine wholly the planting of Tobacco within these Our 
Realmes, or any the lies thereto belonging, and to forbid the 
importation of forreine Tobacco. And yet to give way to the 
infirmitie of Our Subjects for the present, by the allowing 
the importation of some smal quantity of Spanish or forreine 
Tobacco, not being of the growth of the Eng ish Plantations, 
not exceeding the quantitie of fiftie thousand weight in any 
one yeere to bee brought in by Our owne Commissioners onely, 
and to Our owne particular use onely, and not otherwise. 1 

And to the end that the extraordinary liberty now taken, 
may be restrained, the said Colonies or plantations not 
hindered, nor Our Selfe deceived in Our Customes, Wee have 
likewise by the advice aforesaid, thought it requisite, to imploy 
some persons of trust and qualitie to be Our Commissioners 
in this Service, to, and for Our owne proper use, and upon 
accompt to be given to Us for the same. 

Wee doe therefore hereby publish and declare Our Royall 
will and pleasure, that, notwithstanding the severall Procla 
mations before mentioned, We are well contented to give way 
to the importation and sale of so much Spanish and forreine 
Tobacco, as shall not exceede the quantitie of fifty thousand 
weight in any one yeere, as aforesaid, and that the same shall 
bee Our owne Merchandise arid Commodity, and be managed 
and disposed of by Our owne Commissioners, or such as they 
shall appoint for Our use, and not otherwise. 

And, because that no man shall presume, by colour of this 
Our Licence or toleration, to import any other, or greater 
quantity of Spanish or forreine Tobacco, nor utter or put 
the same to sale, to the prejudice of Our Service hereby espe 
cially intended, and to the overthrow of Our Colonies and 
Plantations abroad, Wee doe hereby straitly charge and com 
mand, that no man other then Our owne Commissioners, for 
Our owne proper use, presume to import any forreine Tobacco 
into Our Realmes of England or Ireland, or any parts 
thereof. 

1 In a commission issued to Sir John Wolstenholme and ten others to execute 
the regulations regarding the importation of tobacco, dated January 31, 1627, 
this provision as to Spanish tobacco had been inserted. (Printed in Rymer s 
Foedera, xviii, 831.).; 



58 Royal Proclamations. 

And for their better assistance therein, and the prevention 
of all abuses, Wee have thought fit, and so ordaine, and doe by 
these presents publish Our Royall pleasure, That all Tobacco 
that shall from hencefoorth be imported into this Our Realme 
of England, whether it be Spanish, or of the growth of Vir 
ginia, the Sommer-Ilands, or the West-Indies, or other adja 
cent Hands, beeing English Plantations, shall be brought into 
Our Port of London onely: Also that there shall bee three 
severall Scales kept by Our Commissioners in some convenient 
place, where they shall appoint, under three lockes, whereof 
three of Our Commissioners shall keepe three severall Keyes, 
wherewith both all such forreine Tobacco, as shall bee so 
imported, as aforesaid, as also such other Tobacco of the 
growth of Virginia, and the Sommer-Ilands, and other the 
sayd Plantations as shall bee imported, shall be sealed, That 
is to say, for that of Virginia, and the Sommer-Ilands, a Seale 
engraven with Our Armes, and for that of the other English 
Plantations, a Seale engraven with a Lion and a Crowne, and 
for the other forreine Tobacco, a Seale engraven with a broad 
Arrow and a Portcullice, without paying anything for the seal 
ing of the Tobacco of Virginia, and Sommer-Ilands, and other 
the sayd Plantations, but onely what the parties themselves 
shal thinke fit to allow for the sealers paines, waxe, and 
threed. 

And We doe hereby will et Command, that no person or 
persons whatsoever, whether Denizen, or Stranger, or borne 
within any of Our Realmes or Dominions, doe presume, 
attempt, or go about to counterfeit the said Scales, or any of 
them, and that no person or persons whatsoever, other then 
Our Commissioners, their deputy or deputies, do presume, 
attempt, or go about to import any Spanish or forraine To 
bacco whatsoever, or to buy, utter, or sell any Tobacco, of 
what sort soever, but such as the Roule thereof shall bee 
sealed with one of the Scales aforesaid, or to import any other, 
or greater quantity of Spanish Tobacco, then the said fifty 
thousand weight onely in any one yeere, or to sowe, set, or 
plant, or cause to be sowen, set, or planted in any of his, or 
their grounds, any Tobacco whatsoever, within Our Realmes 
of England, or Ireland, or Dominion of Wales, or any Isles or 
places belonging thereto, or permit, or suffer any old stockes 
formerly set to continue, upon paine of forfeiture unto us, of 
all such Tobacco as shall be imported, set, sowen, planted, 
suffered, uttered, or put to sale, contrary to the true meaning 



, February 17. 59 

of these presents, and to have the same English Tobacco 
utterly destroyed, in whose hands soever the same shall be 
found, and upon such further paines, and penalties, as by the 
Lawes and Statutes of this Our Realme of England, or by the 
severity, or censure of Our Court of Star-chamber, or by Our 
Prerogative Royall may be inflicted upon the offenders for 
their contempt of this Our Royall Command, the one moity of 
all which fines to be imposed upon any the said offenders, We 
are graciously pleased shall be bestowed upon the persons that 
shall inf orme against them for the same ; and that such person 
or persons as shall discover any planting of Tobacco within 
Our Realme of England, or other Our Realmes or Dominions, 
shall have his charges expended in following of Suite against 
the offenders, allowed out of Our part of the fines to be im 
posed, besides his moity aforesaid. 

And further, that every person or persons, that shall 
discover the falsifying, or counterfeiting of any the Scales 
aforesaid, shall have an hundred Crownes for such his dis 
covery out of Our part o the fine to be imposed for the same, 
besides the one moity for himselfe, as aforesaid. 

And for the better execution of Our will and pleasure, We 
doe hereby Command, all and singular Customers, Comp 
trollers, Searchers, Waiters, and other Officers, attending in 
all, and every, or any of Our Ports, Creekes, or places of 
lading, or unlading, for the taking, co. lee ting, or receiving of 
any Our Customes, Subsidies, or other duties, to take notice 
of this Our pleasure. 

And We doe hereby command, and give power and au 
thority unto Our said Commissioners, a"nd those whom they 
shall thinke fit to imploy in Our said service, and every, or 
any of them from time to time, and at all times when they 
shall thinke fittest, with a Constable, or other officer, for 
their assistance to search any ship, or other vessell or bottome, 
riding or lying within any Port, Haven, or Creeke within 
their severall charge and place of attendance, for all Tobacco, 
imported contrary to the intent of this Our Proclamation, 
and the same being found, to seize and take to Our use, as 
also to take notice of the names, and apprehend the bringers 
in, and buyers of the same, to the end they may receive 
condeigne punishment for their offence. 

And further, to take special 1 care, that no more of the said 
Spanish, or other forraine Tobacco, shall be imported, then 
the said fifty thousand weight onely, in any one yeere, and 



60 Royal Proclamations. 

that the same be brought into Our Port of London onely, 
as aforesaid, upon paine that every of the said officers that 
shall be found negligent, corrupt, or remisse herein, shall 
lose his place, and entertainement, and undergoe such paines 
and penalties, as by the Laws, or the censure of Our said 
Court of Star chamber may be inflicted upon them for the 
same. 

And likewise We doe hereby ordaine, will and appoint, 
that it shall and may be lawfull, to and for Our said Com 
missioners, authorised, as aforesaid, to import the said fifty 
thousand weight of Spanish or other forraine Tobacco, by 
him, or themselves, or his, or their deputy or deputies with 
a Constable, or ctlrr officer, for their assistance, to enter 
into any suspected place or places, at such time or times, 
as they shall thinke to be most convenient, and there to 
search, discover, and finde out any Tobacco, imported, 
uttered, planted, set, sowed, sold or vented, not marked, 
or sealed, as aforesaid, contrary to the true meaning hereof, 
and such Tobacco so found to seize, take away, et dispose 
of et the owners thereof, or in whose custome the same shal 
be found, to informe, and complaine of, to the end they may 
receive punishment, according to Our pleasure herein before 
declared. 

And further, We doe by these presents, will and require, 
all and singular Mayors, Sheriffes, Justices of peace, Bailiffes, 
Costables, Headboroughs, Customers, Controllers, Searchers, 
Waiters, and all other Our Officers, and Ministers whatsoever, 
that they, and every of them, in their severall places and 
offices, be diligent and attendant in the execution of this Our 
Proclamation, and also ayding and assisting, to Our said 
Commissioners thereunto by Us appointed, or to be ap 
pointed, and to their Deputies, as well in any search for 
discovery of any act, or acts to bee performed, contrary to 
the intent of these presents, as otherwise in the doing, or 
executing of any matter or thing for the accomplishment of 
this Our Roy all Command. 

And lastly, Our will and pleasure is, and We doe hereby, 
charge and command Our Atturney generall, for the time 
being, to informe against such persons in Our Court of Star- 
chamber, or Exchequer-chamber, as the case shall require 
from time to time, whose contempt and disobedience against 
this Our Royall Command, shall merit the censure of these 
Courts. 



1627, March 30. 61 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall, the seventeenth day of 
Februarie, in the second yeere of Our Reigne of Great Brit- 
aine, France, and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. M.DC.XXVI. 

3 PP- f^i- Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., I. T., P. C., and P. R. 0. 
Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Fozdera," xviii, 848. 



1627, March 30. 
[Sealing of Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION TOUCHING THE SEALING 
OF TOBACCO. 

Whereas We (by the advice of Our Commissioners for Our 
Revenue) have resolved to import a quantity of Spanish 
Tobacco (not exceeding fifty thousand weight in any one 
yeere) and utterly to prohibite the importation of any other 
forreine Tobacco, which is not of the growth of Our owne 
Plantations, and to prohibite also the planting of all Tobacco 
within these Our Realmes of England and Ireland, and 
Islands thereto belonging or adjacent, As by Our Proclama 
tion, dated the seventeenth day of February last (for the 
reasons therein expressed) it doth at large appeare: Now, 
because Wee are informed, that it will much conduce to Our 
Service, and the setling of that businesse, for the preventing 
of the stealing in of all forreine Tobacco, and discovery of 
the offendours, and for the clearing of all others, who are not 
offenders, from future trouble, that all the Tobacco of the 
growth of Our plantations already imported, shal be sealed 
by Our Commissioners to that purpose appointed, aswell 
as that which shal be hereafter imported, in such sort as by 
our sayd Proclamation is already directed, That so the To 
bacco of Our Plantations may bee distinguished from the 
forreine Tobacco, and the Tobacco planted within these Our 
Realmes, which are prohibited: Our will and command ther- 



62 Royal Proclamations. 

fore is, and We doe hereby declare et publish Our Royall 
pleasure to be, That Our said Commissioners appointed by 
Us for this Service, shal with al covenient speed, Scale all 
the Tobacco of the growth of Our said Plantations already 
imported in such sort, as they are directed to Seale that 
which shall be hereafter imported. 

And if any person whatsoever, having any such Tobacco, 
of the growth of Our said Plantations, or any of them, which 
shall refuse to have the same Sealed, or which shall not offer 
the same to be Sealed, as aforesayd, and the same shall here 
after, at any time after one moneth, from the date hereof, 
be discovered, that the same shall bee taken and reputed for 
forreine Tobacco, or for Tobacco of the growth of these Our 
Realmes, which hath been prohibited, and which they durst 
not avow the keeping of, and as such Prohibited Tobacco 
shal be taken, and seized as other prohibited Tobacco, accord 
ing to the Tenor and true meaning of Our said former Proc 
lamation, whereof Wee will, that every person, whom it may 
concerne, do take notice at their perill. 

Given at Our Court at White-Hall, the thirtieth day of 
March, in the third yeere of Our Reigne of Great Britaine, 
France and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kingsmost Excellent Majestie. M. DC. XXVII. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., P. C., and P. R. 0. 
Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Feeder a," xviii, 886. 



1627, August 9. 
[Importation of Tobacco.] 

|BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION FOR THE ORDERING 
OF TOBACCO. 

The Kings most Excellent Majestie, and His Royall Father 
of blessed memory, having at severall times and upon severall 
occasions, published their Proclamations concerning Tobacco, 



1627, August p. 63 

as well that which hath beene indeavoured to bee planted 
within this Realme, as that which is of the growth of Virginia 
and the Sommer Islands, and other English Colonies and 
Plantations, and also concerning Spanish and other forraigne 
Tobacco; And finding that the inordinate desire of taking 
Tobacco, and the immoderate thirst of gaine, by the planting 
and selling of Tobacco, cannot otherwise be allayed or moder 
ated; Hath at the last, by the advice of His Privie Counsell, 
determined upon this finall resolution touching all sorts of 
Tobacco, in manner following. 

First, His Majestic doth heereby declare His Royall Pleasure 
to be, and doth heereby Will and Command, that no person 
whatsoever doe at any time hereafter, plant, cherish, or pre 
serve any Tobacco, within these His Realmes of England or 
Ireland, or Dominion of Wales, or any the Isles, parts, or places, 
of, or belonging to them or any of them, and if any bee now 
planted or growing there, that the same bee presently plucked 
up and utterly destroyed, by the Owners, Planters, Tenders, 
or Dressers thereof, and lest they or any of them, should 
adventure to neglect the performance hereof, His Majestie 
doeth further straitly charge and command all Constables, 
Tything-men, Headboroughs, and other Officers within their 
severall limits and Jurisdictions, carefully and effectually to 
see the same executed and performed accordingly. And His 
Majestie doth further Will and Command all Justices of 
Peace, Mayors, Sheriffes, and other principall Officers in their 
severall places, within the compasse of their severall Juris 
dictions and authorities, upon complaint to them made, to 
cause the same to be duly performed and executed without 
partialitie, as they and every of them will answere their con 
tempts in that behalfe at their uttermost perils. 

And that the Tobacco of His Majesties own Plantations 
and Colonies may not bee planted and imported hither with 
out limitation or measure, or under colour thereof, the To 
bacco of the growth of Spaine and other forraigne parts, may 
not be brought into these His Realmes, or sold or uttered 
heere, to the overthrow of His Colonies abroad, and to the 
wasting of the wealth and treasure of His Kingdomes at home. 
His Majesty doeth further Will and straitly Command, that 
no person whatsoever doe at any time heereafter import any 
Tobacco of the growth of Spaine, and other forraigne parts 
out of His owne Dominions, nor sell, utter, or offer to sell, or 
utter, or otherwise dispose or keepe any such Tobacco, to the 



64 Royal Proclamations. 

intent to sell or utter the same without His Majesties speciall 
Commission in that behalfe, upon paine of confiscation and 
forfeiture thereof, in whose hands soever the same shall be 
found, and upon such further paines and penalties, as by the 
Lawes of these His Realmes, or by His Prerogative Royall 
which in this case He will not admit to be disputed, may be 
inflicted upon the offenders. 

And because such forraigne Tobacco, may not be received 
and uttered, under the pretence of the Tobacco of the growth 
of Virginia, the Summer-Hands, and other Colonies and Plan 
tations, under and within His Majesties owne Dominions, 
nor the Planters, Owners, or Adventurers, of, and in these 
Plantations, give themselves over to the planting of Tobacco 
onely, to make a present returne of profit, and neglect to 
applie themselves to solide Commodities fit for the establish 
ing of Colonies, which will utterly destroy these and all other 
Plantations; His Majestic doth further will and command, 
that from henceforth no Tobacco of the growth of Virginia, 
the Summer-Hands, or any other Plantations, or Colonies, of, 
or within His owne Dominions, bee imported into these his 
Realmes or Dominions, or any the Ports, Havens, Creekes, or 
places thereof, without His Majesties especiall licence in that 
behalfe, under the great Scale of England, and that upon the 
importation thereof, the same bee delivered into the hands of 
such Commissioners, for his Majesties owne immediate use, 
as His Majestic under His great Seale of England shal appoint, 
at, and for such Prices and Rates to be paid for the same, as 
shall be reasonable agreed upon, betweene the Owners or 
Factors of the same, and the Kings Commissioners on His 
Majesties behalfe, or if they shall not agree thereon, then to 
be transported againe, and sold elsewhere, upon paine of 
confiscation and forfeiture thereof, and upon further paines 
and penalties, a by the Law, or His Majesties Prerogative 
Royall may be inflicted upon them. 

And further His Majestic doth straitly charge and com 
mand, that no person whatsoever presume to buy any sort of 
Tobacco, within these Realmes or Dominions, or any Haven, 
Port, Creeke, or place thereof, of any other person, then of 
His Majesties Commissioners onely to bee authorised under 
the great Seale of England, as aforesaid, and after the same 
shall bee sealed with a Seale to that purpose appointed, and 
that they, upon the buying thereof, doe expresse the true 
time when the same was bought, the quantitie and qualitie 



, August p. 6$ 

thereof, in and by a note in writing indented betweene the 
Buyer and Seller, testifying the same upon the paines and 
penalties aforesayd. 

And if during these times of Hostility, any Tobacco shall 
bee imported by any of His Majesties owne Shippes, or by the 
Ships of any of his Subjects, by way of Prize, or Letters of 
Marque, his further will and pleasure is, that all such Tobacco 
shall be delivered unto his Majesties Commissioners, at, and 
for reasonable prices, to bee accomptable therefore to his 
Majesties use. 

And his Majesty doeth hereby straitly charge and com 
mand, all Customers, Controllers, Searchers, Wayters, and 
all other Officers, Ministers, of, or belonging to His Customes, 
And also all Justices of Peace, Mayors, Sheriffes, Constables, 
and other Our Officers, Ministers and loving Subjects, in their 
severall places and degrees, to take knowledge of this his Royall 
pleasure and Commandement, and to bee ayding, helping and 
assisting to His Majesties Commissioners, and their Deputies, 
Factors and servants, in all things touching and concerning 
this His Service, whereof his Majestic is resolved to require a 
due and strict accompt. 

Given at His Majesties Court at Windsore, the ninth day 
of August in the third yeere of His Reigne of England, Scot 
land, France, and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Bonham Norton and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majestic. M.DC.XXVII. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., I. T., P. C., and P. R. 0. 

Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Fadera" xviii, 920. 



66 Royal Proclamations. 

1630, November 24. 

[Forbidding Disorderly Trading with the Savages.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION FORBIDDING THE DISORDERLY TRADING 
WITH THE SALVAGES IN NEW ENGLAND IN AMERICA, 
ESPECIALLY THE FURNISHING OF THE NATIVES IN 
THOSE AND OTHER PARTS OF AMERICA BY THE ENGLISH 
WITH WEAPONS, AND HABILIMENTS OF WARRE. 

Whereas a Proclamation was heretofore published by Our 
deare Father King James of blessed memorie, in the twentieth 
yeere of His Reigne, 1 for the better supportation and Reigle- 
ment of the Plantations within Our Territory of New England 
in America, whereby, amongst divers other things, the in 
sufferable abuses committed by divers Interloping and irregu 
lar Merchants, and disobedient Fishermen and Mariners, 
were prohibited, who seeking only their present and private 
profit, did Trade with the Salvages of that Countrey, and to 
the great prejudice and danger of Our loving Subjects the 
Planters there, did Barter away to the Salvages, Swords, Pikes, 
Muskets, Fowling-Pieces, Match, Powder, Shotte, and other 
Warlike Armes, Weapons, and Munition, and teach them the 
use thereof, not onely to their owne present ruine (divers of 
them having been slaughtered by the barbarous people with 
their owne Weapons formerly sold by them) but also to the 
great hazard of the lives of the English already, planted there. 
and to the apparant destruction of that hopeful! Plantation. 

Wee, being informed that these abuses are still continued 
to the indangering of that Plantation, 2 and that the like 
abuses are also practised in other Forreigne Plantations: Out 
of Our Princely care for the prosperity of these Colonies, 
which being well governed may be of great use to this Nation, 
for the reformation and prevention of these and the like 
enormities for the future. 

And to the end that the Royal Grant of Our late Father to 
the President and Counsell of New England aforesayd, may 



1 Refers to proclamation of November 6, 

2 The Privy Council, September 29, 1630, had acted upon a petition from 
Massachusetts and had requested the attorney-general to draw up a proclama 
tion (see Acts of Privy Council, i, 154, and Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 1574- 
1660, p. 120). 



1630, November 24. 67 

bee maintained and upholden, and that the Planters there, 
and adventurers thither, may bee encouraged by all good 
wayes and meanes to proceede in their worthy designes, have 
thought it fit, and doe hereby straitly charge and command, 
That none of Our Subjects whatsoever (who are not Adven 
turers, Inhabiters, or Planters, authorised by Our President 
and Counsell for New England, according to the sayd Letters 
Patents) doe presume from hencefoorth to frequent those Coasts 
to Trade or Trafnque at all with the Native people of those 
Countreys, or to intermeddle with the Woods, or Grounds of 
any of the Planters, or English Inhabitants there, otherwise 
then by the Licence of the sayd President and Counsell, or 
for the necessary use of their Fishing on those Coasts, in which 
case of Fishing, or under colour thereof, they are not to use 
any Trade or Traffique there, nor to challenge any Right to 
the Soyle there, or the Woods growing or beeing thereon, and 
especially Wee doe charge and command, that neither any 
Interlopers, Fisher-men, or Mariners, or any other of Our 
Subjects whatsoever, being of the said Company of New 
England or otherwise, doe at any time hereafter dare to Sell, 
Barter, or any wayes to deliver or convey unto any of the 
Salvages or Natives of America, where any of Our English 
Colonies are or shall bee planted, any Weapons or Habili 
ments of Warre of any kinde whatsoever, or to teach them or 
any of them the use of Gunnes, or how to make, or amend 
them, or any thing belonging to them, upon paine of Our 
high indignation, and the Confiscation, Penalties and For 
feitures expressed in the said Royall Graunt of Our sayd 
Father, wherein Wee shall proceede against those who have 
offended, or shall offend in any of the premisses, in such man 
ner and measure as the qualitie of their Offences shall deserve. 
And yet further Wee leave it to the discussion of the said 
President and Counsell for New England, and to other the 
Governours and Counsell in any other Forreigne English 
Colonie in their severall places respectively, to proceede 
against the Offenders in any the kindes aforesaid, according 
to the powers already granted unto them, and according to 
Our Lawes in that behalf e. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall, the foure and twentieth 
day of November, in the sixt yeere of Our Reigne of Great 
Britaine, France and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



68 Royal Proclamations. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic : and by the Assignes of John 
Bill. 1630. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., Crawf., P. C., and P. R. 0. Entered 
on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Foedera" xix, 210. A photographic 
fac-simile of this proclamation was printed by the Museum Book Store of 
London, about 1898. 



1631, January 6. 
[Restricting Importation of Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION CONCERNING TOBACCO. 

Whereas in the Reigne of Our most deare and Royall 
Father, King James of blessed memory, et since Our accesse 
to the Crowne, severall Proclamations have been made and 
published concerning Tobacco, Yet notwithstanding all the 
care and providence which hath hitherto been used, We 
finde the unlimited desire of gaine, and the inordinate ap 
petite of taking Tobacco, hath so farre prevailed, that To 
bacco hath been continued to bee planted in great quantities, 
in severall parts of this Our Realme, and a vast proportion 
of unserviceable Tobacco made and brought from Our Col 
onies of Virginia, Summer Hands, and other Our Forreigne 
Plantations, besides an incredible quantity of Brasill and 
Spanish Tobacco imported hither, and secretly conveyed on 
Land. And it is now come to passe, That those Our P or- 
reigne Plantations, that might become usefull to this King- 
dome, lingering onely upon Tobacco, are in apparant danger 
to be utterly ruined, unlesse Wee speedily provide for their 
subsistence; The bodies and manners of Our people are also 
in danger to bee corrupted, and the wealth of this Kingdome 
exhausted by so uselesse a Weede as Tobacco is ; which beeing 
represented unto Us by the humble Petition of Our loving 
Subjects the Planters and Adventurers in Virginia, and also 
by the like humble Petition of the Retailers and Sellers of To 
bacco in and about Our Cities of London and Westminster, 
Wee have thought it worthy of Our Princely care, as a matter 
not only fit for Our profit, et the profit of Our people, but 
much concerning Us in Our honour and government so to 



1 6 31, January 6. 69 

regulate the same, and compell due obedience thereto, that 
Our forreigne Plantations and Colonies may bee supported 
and encouraged, and they made usefull to this Kingdome, 
by applying themselves to more solide commodities, that the 
healths of Our Subjects may be preserved, the wealth of this 
Kingdome enlarged, and the manners of Our people so or 
dered and governed, that the world may not justly taxe 
Us, that these are at once endangered only by the licentious 
use of Tobacco. And therfore having seriously advised 
hereof, Wee, by the advice of Our Privie Councell, have 
now resolved upon, and published these Our Commands fol 
lowing concerning Tobacco, which Our Royall will and 
pleasure is, shall be in all things observed upon paine of Our 
highest displeasure, and of such paines, penalties and punish 
ments, as by Our Court of Exchequer, and Court of Starre- 
Chamber, and by any other Courts and ministers of Justice, 
or by Our Prerogative Royall can be inflicted upon the offen 
ders. 

And first, Our will and Command is, that no person what 
soever doe at any time hereafter plant, preserve, or maintaine 
any Tobacco, which is, hath been, or shall be planted in Our 
Kingdomes of England or Ireland, or Dominion of Wales, 
or in the Islands of Jersey or Guernesey, but that the same 
bee utterly displanted and destroyed, and that none presume 
or adventure to Buy, Sell, or utter any such Tobacco, the 
same being utterly unwholesome to bee taken. 

And further, that no Tobacco whatsoever be from hence- 
foorth imported into these Our realms, or any Haven, Port, 
Creeke or place therof, which is, or shal be of the growth of 
any the parts or places beyond the Seas, belonging to, or 
under the obedience of any foreine King, Prince, or State 
whatsoever; But such, and so much thereof onely, as Wee 
shall specially allow to be imported, untill it shal be fully 
setled betweene those Forreine Princes and Us, according to 
those Treaties which are betweene Us, that Our Subjects 
may not unthriftily vent the solide Commidities of Our owne 
Kingdomes, and returne the proceed thereof in Smoake. 

And further We will and command, that no Tobacco of 
the growth of any of Our English Plantations in Virginia the 
Sommer Islands, Caribee Islands, or other Islands or places 
in America, or the Coasts thereof, be at any time hereafter 
imported or brought into Our Kingdomes of England or 
Ireland, or Dominion of Wales, at any Bother Port then at, 



70 Royal Proclamations. 

or in Our Port of London onely, and the same duely entred 
in Our Custome-houses there, nor that any greater quantitie 
thereof bee imported there, then Wee by the advice of Our 
Privie Councell shall hold fit, and under Our Privie Scale, 
shall declare to bee competent for the expence of these Our 
Kingdomes, Wee not thinking it fit to admit of an immeas 
urable expence of so vaine and needlesse a Commoditie, 
which ought to bee used as a Drugge onely, and not so vainely 
and wantonly as an evill habite of late times hath brought 
it unto. 

And these sorts of Tobacco which shall be thus brought 
from Our owne Colonies, Wee will take present order shall 
bee well ordered and made up, and so certified to bee, under 
the hand of the Governour of that place, and when the same 
shall be brought hither, shall bee againe Searched, Tryed 
and Sealed, that Our Subjects be not abused by corrupt 
Tobacco. 

And Our expresse Command is, that whatsoever Tobacco 
shall bee taken, which shall be imported contrary to this Our 
Proclamation, the same shall be forfeited and confiscate, 
and by the Officers of that Port or place where it shall bee 
taken, shall be immediately burnt. 

And for the ordering and governing of the expence and use 
of Tobacco when it shall be imported, Wee, by the advice of 
Our Privie Councell, shall speedily direct such a course as 
Wee shall hold fit, which Wee expect shall be also in all things 
observed. 

And Wee straitly charge and Command all Our Customers, 
Comptrollers, Searchers, and all other the Officers and Min 
isters of Our Ports, that they and every of them in their 
severall places, doe carefully and faithfully observe Our 
Royal Command, in, and concerning the premisses; and if 
any of them shall be found remisse or negligent therein, or 
to connive at any such offender, that hee or they shall for 
such their fault, without any remission be remooved from 
the place or places of his or their attendance on Our service. 

And to the end Our pleasure and Command hereby pub 
lished, may be the better executed, Wee doe hereby will, re 
quire and Command, all Maiors, Sheriffes, Justices of peace, 
Bayliffes, Headboroughs, and other Our Officers and loving 
Subjects whatsoever, to be aiding and assisting, and so much 
as in them lyeth, to take care that the premisses herein men 
tioned, be duly put in execution, as they tender their duetie 



1633, October 13. 71 

and allegeance to Us, and will answere the contrary at their 
uttermost perils. 1 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the sixt day of January, 
in the sixt yeere of Our Reigne. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic: and by the Assignes of John 
Bill. 1630. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Canterbury, Crawf., and P. C.; 
also in Va. State Library. Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s 
" Foedera" xix, 235. 

1633, October 13. 

[Restricting Sale of Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION FOR PREVENTING OF THE ABUSES 

GROWING BY THE UNORDERED RETAILING OF TOBACCO. 

Whereas the Plant or Drugge called Tobacco scarce knowne 
to this Nation in former times, was in this Age first usually 
brought into this Realme in small quantity, as Medicine, and 
so used, and by divers taken as Medicine, but in processe of 
time, to satisfie the inordinate appetite of a great number of 
men and women it hath been brought in in great quantity, 
and taken for wantonnesse and excesse, provoking them to 
drinking and other inconveniences, to the great impairing of 
their healths, and depraving of their manners, so that the care 
which His Majesty hath of his people hath enforced Him to 
thinke of some meanes for the preventing of the evill conse 
quence of this immoderate use thereof. And albeit His 
Majesties dearest father of blessed memorie had given direc 
tions therein, as well by Proclamation as otherwise, yet those 

1 A communication from the Privy Council to the Governor of Virginia, 
inclosing the proclamation and directing the observance of its regulations, is 
preserved among,, the records in the Public Record Office. An order from the 
Council to the farmers and officers of customs, issued at the same time, directs that 
Spanish tobacco will pay a duty of 2s. per pound, St.Christopher s, Barbadoes, and 
the adjacent islands i2d. per pound, and Virginia and the Somers Islands gd. per 
pound. (Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 1574-1660, p. 125). For the various restric 
tions upon the growth of tobacco in the plantations, see Bruce, Economic History 
of Virginia, i, 304-309. 



72 Royal Proclamations. 

waies tooke not so good effect as was desired, for that therein 
was no restraint of the number of those that should sell To 
bacco by retaile, nor care taken of the quality of those that 
should make such sale, but Victuallers, Taverners, Alehouse- 
keepers, Tapsters, Chamberlaines, Hostlers and others, of the 
meanest condition have promiscuously used to regrate the 
same as allurements to other naughtinesse, keeping therein no 
Assize, to the prejudice of the rest of His Majesties loving 
Subjects. For repressing therefore of all such excesses and 
for preventing of future inconvenience, Our Soveraigne Lord 
the King, by the advice of the Lords and others of His Privie 
Councell hath resolved to reduce the venting, selling and 
uttering of Tobacco into some good order, and that none but 
men of sufficiency, and such as shall bring certificate of their 
meetnesse, shall hereafter sell or utter any Tobacco by retaile. 
And to that purpose His Majestic hath lately caused Letters 
from His Lords, and others of His Privie Councell to bee 
directed unto the Justices of Peace of the severall Counties of 
this Kingdome, and Dominion of Wales, and also unto the 
Maiors, Bailiffes and other chief e Officers of divers Cities and 
Townes Corporate; Commanding them to certifie in what 
Townes and places it may bee fit to suffer selling and retailing 
of Tobacco, and how many in each place were fit to bee 
licensed to use that Trade. In answere of which Letters, 
Certificates have beene made from clivers of the Justices of 
Peace, and from the Maiors, Bailiffes, and other Magistrates 
of divers Cities and Townes Corporate, who therein have 
acknowledged the abuses that daily arise by the ungoverned 
selling and retailing of Tobacco, expressing their desire of 
reformation. 

Whereupon His Majestic by like advice of his Counsell hath 
caused other Letters to be directed to the Justices and Con 
servators of the Peace in severall Counties ; thereby declaring 
in what Townes and places Tobacco shall be permitted to be 
sold or uttered by Retayle, and hath Commanded the said 
Justices and Conservators of the Peace, to cause the names of 
those Townes and places specified in those Letters, to be 
written and affixed in publique places where the Assises and 
Sessions of the peace shall be kept, in those Counties, to the 
end that all His people may take notice that other places are 
not admitted or allowed for selling or uttering of Tobacco by 
Retaile. And by Letters directed to the said Maiors, Bay- 
liffes, and other head Officers of Cities and Townes, His Majes- 



> October 13. 73 

tie hath given notice unto them of the names of those that are 
permitted there to sell or deliver Tobacco in that manner, 
and hath Commanded them to give publique notice in the 
said Cities and Townes, of the names of those persons that 
are so admitted to sell or deliver it. 

Now our said Sovereigne Lord the King doth straightly 
prohibite all His people, that after the feast of Candlemas 
next 1 comming after the date of these presents, none of them 
out of the said Cities or Townes so appointed as aforesaid, or 
within the said Cities, or Townes, no others but those named 
as aforesaid, and such as from time to time shall bee permitted 
in like manner, doe sell or deliver any Tobacco by Retayle, 
and that none of them that are permitted or allowed in this 
behalfe, keepe any Taverne, Alehouse, or Victualling, or 
otherwise sell any distilled or hot Waters, Wine, Ale, Beere, or 
Cyder in their houses, so long as they shall bee permitted to 
sell Tobacco by Retayle : And for that the necessities of these 
times require it, His Majestic doth charge and command all 
His Subjects to obey these His Ordinances, under the paines 
to bee inflicted upon contemners of the same, and of His 
Roy all will and pleasure, being for the good of His people: 
All which His pleasure is shall bee observed untill Hee shall 
by His Proclamation, or Letters of His Privie Counsell make 
other publique signification of His pleasure herein. And Hee 
doth charge and command all Justices of Peace, and all 
Maiors, Bayliffes, and head Officers of all His Cities and 
Townes within His said Kingdome of England, and Dominion 
of Wales, and all those who are permitted to sell Tobacco by 
Retaile, that they make diligent enquirie of all those that shall 
presume to doe against this Command, and from time to time 
to make certificate of their names, and places of their residence, 
with the particular of their contempts, to the Lords of His 
Majesties Privie Councell. 

Given at the Court at Whitehall the thirteenth day of 
October, 2 in the ninth yeere of the Reigne of our Sovereigne 
Lord Charles by the grace of God King of England, Scotland, 
France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, etc. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

1 February 2, 1634. 

2 This proclamation is entered in the Privy Council Register under date of 
August 14 (Acts of Privy Council, i, 191), probably the date of the original draft 
by the attorney general. Rushworth, in his Historical Collections, ii, 191, lists 
it under the date of August 13. Rymer s Feeder a assigns to it the date of 
October 13, as given in the printed proclamation. 



74 Royal Proclamations. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic: and by the Assignes of John 
Bill. M.DC.XXXIIL 

2 pp. folio. There are two issues, -varying only in the cut of the royal 
arms. Copies in Antiq., Bodl., B. M., Camb., Crawf., Dalk., P. C., P. R. 0., 
and Q. C. Printed in Rymer s "Fcedera" xix, 474. 



1634, March 13. 
[Requiring Licenses from Tobacconists.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION RESTRAINING THE ABUSIVE 

VENTING OF TOBACCO. 

Whereas the Kings most excellent Majestic being informed 
of the abuses dayly arising of the ungoverned Selling and 
Retailing of Tobacco, by his Proclamation lately published, 
did prohibit all his people, that after the feast of Candlemas, 
which is now last past, none of them out of certaine Cities 
and Townes therein specified to have beene appointed, and 
within those Cities and Townes no other but certaine persons 
named, as in the said Proclamation is expressed, and such as 
from time to time as should be permitted, should sell or 
deliver any Tobacco by Retaile, herein requiring due obedi 
ence untill his Majestic should make other declaration, as 
by tne same Proclamation appeareth. 

Sithence which, a great number of his Majesties loving 
subjects have repaired to some Lords, and others of his 
Majesties Privie Councell, being his Majesties Commissioners 
appointed to treat with them, and have humbly desired 
Letters Patents of Licence to sell Tobacco by Retaile, where - 
unto his Majesties said Commissioners have consented: but 
because it is both convenient and necessary that the number 
of those that be Licensed to sell Tobacco by Retaile, and 
also their names be knowne, that in time convenient notice 
may be taken from them how much Tobacco in each yeere 
they Retaile and Vent: that upon knowledge thereof, his 
Majesty for preventing of the issuing out of the Realme too 
great a proportion of the Stocke of this Kingdome, may give 
order for the quantity of Tobacco that shall be yeerely brought 



1634, May ig. 75 

in: And being resolved that any who from henceforth shall 
presume to utter or sell Tobacco, not being Licensed, shall 
severely be proceeded against: For these and for other causes, 
the King our Soveraigne Lord straightly defendeth and 
commandeth, that neither such as by pretext of being formerly 
nominated as meet men to Retaile Tobacco, nor any other 
from henceforth presume to sell or utter Tobacco by Retaile, 
untill they shall have obtained his Majesties Licence in that 
behalfe, any permission or tolleration that may be pretended 
by the said Proclamation, or any other signification not 
withstanding, upon such paines of censure in the Court of 
Star-Chamber and elsewhere, as may be inflicted upon con- 
temners of his Majesties commands publiquely proclaimed. 
Wherein his Majestic is pleased, that a part of the Fines set 
upon the Contemners of this Command, be conferred upon 
those that give notice of the Offenders, so as they may be 
brought to judgement. 

Given at Our Court at Newmarket, the thirteenth day of 
March, in the ninth yeere of Our Reigne. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic: And by the Assignes of 
John Bill. 1633. 

i p. folio. There are two issues, varying only in the cut of the royal arms. 
Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., Hodg., P. C., and Q. C. Entered on 
Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Fasdera" xix, 522. 



1634, May 19. 
[Concerning Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION CONCERNING TOBACCO. 

Whereas in the Reigne of Our late deare Father, and since 
Our accesse to the Crowne, upon mature deliberation there 
have been sundry Proclamations published for restraining 
the landing of Tobacco to certain Ports and Harbours within 
this Kingdome, and against planting of the same within this 



76 Royal Proclamations. 

Realme; And for that they have not been put in due execution, 
divers fraudes and abuses have beene of late invented and 
put in execution by mixing of Tobacco, not onely with other 
Tobacco of worse condition, but also with other Materials, 
falsifying and corrupting the same, to the great hurt and 
damage of Our people, both in their estates and persons, 
which growing evill may in some measure bee prevented, if 
the Tobacco brought into this Our Realme shall be layd or 
landed onely in one Port and place. 

For remedie therefore in that behalf e, and to the end Wee 
may bee the more truely answered of the Custome, Impost, 
and other dueties due unto Us for Tobacco brought into this 
Realme by way of Merchandize, whereof Wee have been 
sundry times defrauded by landing the same at the pleasures 
of the Owners: Wee doe hereby publish and declare Our 
Royall will and pleasure, That no Tobacco bee hereafter 
landed, or imported to bee landed at any other Porte, then 
in Our Port of London, and at no other place of the sayd Port 
then at the Key and Wharfe commonly called the Custome- 
house Key, scituate in Our Citie of London, and other Port 
or place for landing of Tobacco Wee doe not admit or allow, 
but them inhibite. 

And Wee doe hereby straitly charge and command all and 
singular Customers, Comptrollers, Searchers, Waiters and 
other Officers, attending in all Our Ports, Creekes, or places 
of lading or unlading, (except Our said Port of London) not 
to take entries of any Tobacco, nor suffer the same to be 
taken, landed, or layd on shoare in any other Harbour, Port, 
Creeke or place within this Kingdome, upon paine that every 
of the said Officers that shall bee found negligent, corrupt 
or remisse herein, shall undergoe such paines and penalties, 
as by the Lawes or Censure of our Court of Starre-chamber 
may bee inflicted upon them for the same. 

And it is Our further will and pleasure, that if any Ship 
or Barque wherein Tobacco shall be loaden shall arrive at 
any other Port or place then at Our sayd Port of London, 
Wee doe hereby give full power and Authoritie to all and 
every the Customers, Comptrollers, Surveyours, Searchers 
and Waiters, and every of them there attending, and doe 
command them to take and arrest the same Tobacco, and 
forthwith to make Certificate to the Customers of the Port 
of London, of the Owners name of such Ship or other Vessell, 
and his place of dwelling, the number and names of the 



1634, May ip. 77 

Officers, and Mariners in the same, the place from whence 
the same Tobacco came, with the quantitie of Tobacco that 
shall bee contained therein. 

And also, that Our said Officers, or some of them, shall 
with all convenient speed cause and procure the Tobacco so 
by them arrested, to bee carefully transmitted to the said 
Port of London, to the Customer there, that the same may 
bee there viewed, and the dueties thereof belonging unto Us, 
may be duely payed and satisfied, and such further order 
taken with the same, and with the Owners thereof, as shall 
be fit. 

And whereas notwithstanding former Proclamations pub 
lished to the contrary, yet Wee are informed, that Tobacco is 
still planted and sowen in divers parts of Our Realmes of 
England and Ireland, in contempt of Us and Our Royall Com 
mands declared to the contrary ; We do therefore hereby againe 
absolutely prohibit the Planting thereof in Our said King- 
domes, as also the bringing into the same of any Seed for the 
increase thereof, from the parts beyond the Seas ; The Tobacco 
growing in the Northerne and moist Climats being not onely 
unwholesome for mans body, but the same maketh fertill 
grounds become for a long space lesse fruitfull, that might 
otherwise produce Corne, Herbes and Rootes for the suste 
nance of Our Subjects. 

And for the more certaine depressing of the same, We doe 
hereby straitly command Our Justices of Assize within their 
severall Circuits, Our Justices of Peace within Our severall 
Counties of this Kingdome, Maiors, Sheriffes, Bayliffes, and 
other Our Officers within each Cittie and Towne Corporate, 
that they at their severall Sittings, Quarter Sessions, and 
meetings, give the same in charge as an Offence, whereof Wee 
expect due reformation, requiring a Returne thereof amongst 
other the grievances of the Countrey in their Presentments, 
And the names and dwelling places of any Offenders herein, 
and the qualities of their Offences, to present to the Lords of 
Our Privie Councel, the then next Tearme after every such 
Sitting or meeting, to the end the Offenders may bee proceeded 
against by sentence in Our Court of Starre-chamber, or other 
wise, as in justice shall be thought fit. 

And lastly, We doe by these Presents will and require all 
and singular Maiors, Sheriffes, Justices of Peace, Bayliffes, 
Constables, Headboroughes, Customers, Comptrollers, Search 
ers, Waiters, and all other Our Officers and Ministers whatso- 



78 Royal Proclamations. 

ever, that they and every of them in their severall places and 
Offices, be diligent and attendant in the execution of this 
Our Proclamation, as they will answere the contrary at their 
uttermost perils. 

Given at Our Court at Greenewich, this nineteenth day of 
May, in the tenth yeere of Our Reigne of England, Scotland, 
France and Ireland. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic : And by the Assignes of John 
Bill. 1634. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antig., B. M., Crawf., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. 

Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Feeder a" xix, 553. 



1636, May 1 6. 

[Limiting Whale-trade to Muscovy Company.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION INHIBITING THE IMPORTATION OF 

WHALE FINNES, OR WHALE OILE, INTO His MAJESTIES 

DOMINIONS BY ANY, BUT THE MUSCOVIA COMPANY. 

Whereas Our late deare and Royall Father, of ever blessed 
memory, King James, by His Proclamation, bearing date the 
eighteenth day of May, in the seventeenth yeere of His Reigne, 
for the reasons therein expressed, and for the encouragement 
of His welbeloved Subjects, the Company of Merchants trad 
ing for Muscovia, Greenland, 1 and the parts adjoyning, com 
monly called the Muscovia Company, did inhibite the Importa 
tion of Whale Finnes, into any of His Kingdomes or Dominions, 
by any persons other then by that Company, and that in their 
Joynt-stock only, under the penalties therein mentioned; We 
now being minded to give the like encouragement and assist 
ance to the said Company, and for the better support of the 
Fishing-Trade to Greeneland, and the parts adjacent, which 
by the increase of Navigation conduceth much to the common 

1 Spitsbergen, rather than Greenland proper. 



1636) May 16. 79 

good of Our Kingdome and People, have thought fit to pub 
lish Our Royall pleasure therein; And therefore We do by 
these presents straightly Charge, prohibite, and forbid, as well 
all Aliens and Strangers whatsoever, as Our naturall borne 
Subjects and Denizens, That they, nor any of them, (other 
then the said Muscovia Merchants only, and that in their 
Joynt-stock for the Whale-Fishing;) shall from henceforth 
directly or indirectly Import or bring any Whale Oyle, or 
Whale Finnes, (whether the said Finnes be whole, or cut, in 
what manner soever) into any Our Kingdomes or Dominions, 
upon Paine of the forfeiture and confiscation of the same; 
whether they bee found on Board of any Ship, Hoye, Boat, 
or Bottom, or laid on land in any Ware-house, Store-house, 
Shop. Cellar, or any other place whatsoever; and upon Paine 
of Our high Indignation and displeasure, and such other 
punishments, as by Our Court of Starre-Chamber shall bee 
thought meet to be inflicted upon them, or any of them, as 
Contemners of Our Royall Will and Commandment in this 
behalfe. 

And Wee do likewise straightly Charge, prohibite, and for 
bid, as well all Aliens and Strangers, as Our naturall borne 
Subjects and Denizens, (other then the said Muscovia Mer 
chants in their. Joint-stock as aforesaid) that they, nor any of 
them do presume to Buy, Utter, Sell, Barter, or Contract, 
for any Whale Oyle, or Whale Finnes, knowing the same to 
bee Imported into any Our Realmes or Dominions, contrary 
to Our Will and Pleasure herein declared; w r hether the said 
Finnes bee whole, or cut as aforesaid, upon Paine of Our high 
Indignation and displeasure, and such further punishments, 
as by Our said Court of Starre-Chamber shall bee thought 
meet to bee inflicted upon such Offendours, as Contemners 
also of Our Royall Commandments. 

And to the end, that Our Pleasure hereby declared may take 
the better effect; Wee do hereby Charge and Command, all 
Customers, Collectours, Farmours, Comptrollers, Searchers, 
Waiters, and all other Our Officers and Ministers whatsoever, 
in all or any Our Ports, Havens, or Creekes; that they and 
every of them in their severall places, do carefully attend and 
see to the due execution hereof; and ii*no wise to permit or 
suffer any Whale Oile, or Whale Finnes whole, or cut, directly, 
or indirectly, openly, or covertly, to be brought or imported 
into any Our Kingdomes or Dominions contrary to Our 
Royall pleasure herein expressed; or being so imported, that 



8o Royal Proclamations. 

they do not permit, or suffer the same to be colourably Cus- 
tomed for other Goods and Merchandise; but that they forth 
with do seise, and take to Our use all such Whale Finnes, and 
Whale Oyle as shall bee so Imported, contrary to Our pleasure 
herein declared, upon Paine to undergo such punishments as 
shall be thought meet by the Lords of Our Privie Councell. 

Neverthelesse, Our intent and meaning is, That the said 
Muscovia Company in their Joynt-stock only, and none other, 
shall or may Buy and Sell, Barter, or Contract, for any such 
Whale Finnes, or Whale Oyle, as being imported contrary to 
this Our Proclamation, shall be confiscate and seised, and the 
same being sold by the said Company, may be afterwards 
bought, contracted for, and used by any other Our Subjects, 
at their will and pleasure; Any thing herein contained to the 
contrary notwithstanding. 

Given at Our Palace of Westminster, the sixteenth day of 
May, in the twelfth yeere of Our Reigne. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic : And by the Assignes of John 
Bill. 1636. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in B. M., Crawf., Guild., and P. C. Entered on 
Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Fcedera," xx, 16. 



1637, April 30. 
[Regulating Emigration to America.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION AGAINST THE DISORDERLY TRANSPORT 
ING His MAJESTIES SUBJECTS TO THE PLANTATIONS WITHIN 

THE PARTS OF AMERICA. 

The Kings most Excellent Majestic being informed that 
great numbers of His Subjects have bin, and are every yeare 
transported into those parts of America, which have been 
granted by Patent to severall persons, and there settle them 
selves, some of them with their families and whole estates: 
amongst which numbers there are also many idle and refrac- 



, April 30. 81 

tory humors, whose onely or principall end is to live as much 
as they can without the reach of authority: His Majestic 
having taken the premisses into consideration, is minded to 
restraine for the time to come such promiscuous and disorderly 
departing out of the Realme; And doth therefore straitly 
charge and command all and every the Officers and Ministers 
of his severall Ports in England, Wales, and Barwick, That 
they doe not hereafter permit or suffer any persons, being 
Subsidie men, or of the value of Subsidie men, 1 to embarque 
themselves in any of the said Ports, or the members thereof, 
for any of the said Plantations, without Licence from His 
Majesties Commissioners for Plantations first had and ob 
tained in that behalf e; Nor that they admit to be embarqued 
any persons under the degree or value of Subsidymen, without 
an Attestation or Certificate from two Justices of the Peace 
living next the place where the party last of all, or lately then 
before dwelt, that he hath taken the Oaths of Supremacie, 
and Allegiance, and like Testimony from the Minister of the 
Parish of his conversation and conformity to the Orders and 
discipline of the Church of England. 2 And further His Majes 
ties expresse will and pleasure is, That the Officers and Minis 
ters of his said severall Ports, and the Members thereof, do 
returne to His Majesties said Commissioners for Plantations 
every halfe yeare a particular and perfect List of the names 
and qualities of all such persons as shall from time to time be 
embarqued in any of the said Ports for any of the said Planta 
tions. And of these His Majesties Royall Commands, all the 
Officers and Ministers of His said Ports, and the Members 

1 Men who could pay the "subsidy," or tax assessed in favor of the Crown. 

2 Adam Anderson, the early historian of British commerce, in referring to 
this proclamation, says: "This was levelled against the Puritans, then going in 
great numbers to New England, to avoid persecution at home; and a better 
example need not be desired of the wisdom and character of this King, and his 
favourites and ministers" (Origin of Commerce, ii, 492). The proceedings 
against the Massachusetts charter had just been brought to a close in April, 1637, 
with a judgment decreeing that it should be vacated. On April 30 came this 
proclamation. On May 3 the Privy Council ordered that the attorney-general 
should " call in" for the patent for New England and present it to the Committee 
for Foreign Plantations (Acts of Privy Council, i, 217). A commission was issued 
which arrived at Boston, June 3, establishing a general government for New 
England (Winthrop, History of New England, i, 269). Among the papers in the 
Public Record Office is the draft of a "Manifesto" of the King, dated July 23, 
1637, establishing a general government in New England and declaring his 
intention of appointing Sir Ferdinand Gorges as governor (Col. State Papers, 
Colonial, 1574-1660, p. 256). These various restrictive measures all grew out 
of the Anglican unwillingness to countenance this Puritan asylum in the New 
World. 



82 Royal Proclamations. 

thereof are to take care, as they will answer the neglect thereof 
at their perils. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the last day of Aprill, in 
the thirteenth yeare of Our Reigne. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic: And by the Assignes of John 
Bill. 1637. 

i p. folio. Copies in B. M., Camb., Canterbury, Crawf., and P. C.; 
also in Boston Public Library. Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in 
Rymer s " Feeder -a" xx, 143. 



1638, March 14. 
[Importation of Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION CONCERNING TOBACCO. 

Whereas We have had especiall care to provide, That Our 
loving Subjects the Planters of and in Virginia, the Summer 
Islands, Caribee Islands, et other Our Forrein Plantations 
might be encouraged to apply themselves to staple Commo 
dities, fit for the establishing of Colonies, that so the said 
Plantations might the better flourish and become usefull to 
Our Kingdomes, and the Planters might be enabled to for tine 
and secure themselves as well against the invasion of Forrein 
Enemies, as the assaults and incursions of the Natives; yet 
notwithstanding this Our care, the said Planters finding a 
present though small return of profit for Tobacco, have hitherto 
wholly betaken themselves to the planting thereof, little mind 
ing more solid commodities, their own safetie, or any better 
or other way or means of supportation and subsistence. 

And whereas Our Merchants working upon the necessities 
of the Planters, have from time to time bought their Tobacco 
at low and small prices, thereby occasioning the said Planters 
to grow negligent and carelesse of the well ordering their 
Tobacco, by means whereof much unserviceable Tobacco 
hath from Our said Colonies been imported hither, and hath 



1638, March 14. 83 

been sophisticated, mixed and stamped with rotten fruits, 
stalks of Tobacco, and other corrupt ingredients, and after 
wards sold and uttered to Our people. 

And whereas the vain and wanton taking of Tobacco 
being at length grown to an excesse, and this excesse having 
begotten an inordinate desire thereof in those that use it, 
and much of the Tobacco of Our said Colonies imported 
hither, being unserviceable as aforesaid, divers of Our Mer 
chants for their own private gain have returned the proceed 
of the solid Commodities of Our Kingdoms by them vented 
in Forreign parts in Spanish Tobacco, et many of Our Sub 
jects here have planted great quantities of Tobacco in severall 
parts of this Our Realme, which Tobacco here planted through 
the coldnesse of the Climate, and unaptnesse of the Soil, not 
coming to a perfect maturitie, is altogether unwholesome to 
be taken. By all which means the forreigne Plantations of 
Our Subjects remain unfortified, and are in apparant danger 
to be ruined, the Planters are grieved and discouraged, the 
Colonies of other Nations do flourish, the wealth of Our 
Kingdoms is exhausted, the immoderate use of a vain and 
needlesse weed is continued, the health of Our Subjects is 
much impaired, and their manners in danger to be depraved. 

And although Wee out of Our Princely care of Our said 
Plantations abroad, and the good of Our Subjects at home, 
have formerly as well by Proclamation as otherwise, given 
direction in the premisses, and have provided against all the 
afore-mentioned evils, yet this Our care hath not hitherto 
produced that good effect which We intended and desired, 
for that fit, diligent and able Agents have not hitherto been 
imployed in these Our services, to see Our purposes deduced 
into Act: For these causes, and for divers other weighty 
considerations tending to the honour of Our said Plantations, 
et to the good as wel of Our said Planters, as of Our people 
here, Wee by the advice of the Lords and others of Our Privy 
Councell, have resolved to regulate Our said Plantations, 
and the planting, making up, and ordering of Tobacco there, 
and to limit and appoint what quantities of Tobacco shall 
henceforth be imported into Our Kingdoms, as well for the 
expence of Our Realmes, as for Our own services, and also to 
buy and take into Our own hands and mannaging all Tobacco 
from henceforth so to be imported, at such reasonable prices 
to be given for the same, as shall be expedient for the relief 
and better encouragement of the said Planters, and likewise 



84 Royal Proclamations. 

to regulate the trade and sales of Tobacco here at home, 
and to commit the care and trusts of the premisses unto such 
fit Agents as Wee shall nominate in that behalf; All which 
Wee intend to put in speedy execution. 1 

And to the end Our Royall intentions touching the prem 
isses may the better take effect, Wee do hereby will and 
command, That no person whatsoever, do at any time here 
after plant or cause to be planted any Tobacco within Our 
Kingdoms of England and Ireland, or either of them, or 
within Our Dominion of Wales, or Town of Barwick, or 
within Our Islands of Jersey and Gernesey, or either of them, 
or within Our Isle of Man: And that all Tobacco already 
planted, and now growing there, be presently displanted and 
utterly distroyed. 

And to the end the doing hereof be not in any wise omitted 
or neglected, Wee do charge and command all Constables, 
Tithingmen, Headboroughs, and other Officers within their 
severall limits and jurisdictions carefully to see the same 
executed accordingly. And further Wee do will and com 
mand all Justices of Peace, Maiors, Sheriffes, and other 
principall Officers in their severall places, within the com- 
passe of their severall jurisdictions and authorities, upon 
complaint to them made, to cause the same to be duly per 
formed, without partialitie, and they and every of them will 
answer their Contempts at their perils. 

And Wee do further will and command, that no person or 
persons whatsoever, within our said Realms and Dominions, 
do from henceforth presume to buy, sell, or utter any Tobacco 
of the growth of our said Kingdomes of England and Ireland, 
Dominion of Wales, Town of Barwick, and Islands of Jersey, 
Gernsey and Man, or any of them, or to let their grounds to 
Farm to any person or persons, to plant the same with To 
bacco, or to stamp, beat, or mixe any Tobacco whatsoever 
with rotten fruits, the stalks of Tobacco, or any other bad or 
corrupt Ingredient, the same being utterly unwholesome to 
be taken as aforesaid. And Wee do likewise will and com 
mand, That no Tobacco of the growth of any parts or places 
beyond the Seas, belonging to, or under the obedience of any 
Forreigne King, Prince or State whatsoever, or of the growth 
of Our said Colonies and Forreign Plantations, be from 

1 The Privy Council on the day of the issuance of this proclamation, March 
14, took action providing for a conference regarding tobacco between those 
interested in its growth and sale (Acts of Privy Council, i, 226). 



1638, March 14. 85 

henceforth imported into Our Kingdomes of England, and 
Ireland, and Dominion of Wales, or any of them, or into any 
other Our Dominions, or into any Port, Haven, Creek, or 
place to them or any of them belonging, more or other, then 
only such and so much of the Tobacco of the growth of the 
Plantations of the King of Spaine, as We by Our Letters 
under Our Privie Seal, or otherwise shall be pleased to allow; 
and such and so much of the Tobacco of the growth of Our 
own Colonies, as We shall in like manner declare to be com 
petent for the expence of Our Kingdomes, and fit for Our 
own services, and for the better relief and encouragement of 
the said Planters. 

And We do further will and command, That no Tobacco 
of the growth of Our said Plantations, or any of them be from 
thence transported in any English or other Ship or Bottome 
unto any Forreigne parts under the obedience of any For- 
reigne King, Prince, or State whatsoever; but that the same 
Tobacco be first imported unto Our Port of London, and 
entred in Our Custome-house there: And that no Tobacco 
of what sort soever be from henceforth imported, landed, or 
unladed to, in, or at any other Port, Haven, Creek, or place 
within Our said Kingdomes of England and Ireland, and Our 
Dominion of Wales, or any of them, or within any other Our 
Dominions, then to, in, or at Our Port of London onely. And 
that all Merchants, Masters and Owners of any Ship or 
Ships, and other persons whatsoever within or under Our 
obedience, do take notice of Our Royall command and pleas 
ure herein, and do carefully and duely observe the same 
accordingly. 

And We do hereby further will and command, That all 
Tobacco so imported and entred as aforesaid (other then such 
as shall be imported and entred by Our said Agents) shall 
from henceforth be sold and delivered unto the hands of Our 
said Agents to Our own immediate use, at, and for such 
valuable rates and prices to be given for the same, as shall 
be reasonably agreed upon between the Planters, Owners 
and Factours thereof, and Our said Agents on Our behalfe. 

And Our pleasure further is, and We do hereby charge and 
command, That none of Our loving Subjects comercing, or 
any way trading in or about Tobacco, no other person or 
persons whatsoever, do from henceforth presume to buy any 
Tobacco in grosse of what sort soever, in any Port, Haven, 
Creek, or place within Our said Realms and Dominions, at 



86 Royal Proclamations. 

the first hand, or of any person or persons whatsoever, other 
then of Our said Agents onely; And that all Tobacco bought 
of Our said Agents, shall be sealed with a seal to be apppointed 
for that purpose, and that the quantity and quality thereof 
with the time when the same was bought be expressed, in and 
by a Note in writing indented between the Buyer and Seller, 
if to Our said Agents it shall seem fitting for this Our service. 

And Wee do further charge and command, That no To 
bacco whatsoever be from henceforth shipped or laded to 
be transported from any Port, Haven, Creek, or other place 
of Our Realm of England, Dominion of Wales, Port or Town 
of Barwick, or from any other Port within Our Dominions, 
without the Licence and consent of Our said Agents, and the 
same to be done in such manner, and upon such security to 
be given to the use of Us, Our Heirs and Successours, as to 
Our said Agents in their discretions shall seem expedient 
for Our service in that behalf. 

And further Wee do hereby strictly command, That Our 
Royall pleasure hereby declared be in all things duely and 
truely observed upon pain of confiscation and forfeiture of 
all Tobacco of wiiat sort soever imported or exported, laded 
or unladed, bought or sold contrary to the effect and true 
meaning of this Our Proclamation, and under such further 
pains and penalties, as by the Lawes of Our Realms, or Our 
Prerogative Royall may be inflicted upon the Offenders. 
Which Tobacco so forfeited and confiscated, shall be imme 
diately brought to Our Custome-house in London, or to such 
other place as shall hereafter bee appointed in that behalfe, 
there to bee valued or apprized; and after such valuation or 
apprizement made, the Officer or other person by whose 
diligence such forfeiture was discovered, shall have the one 
moity of the same forfeiture or value for his service and 
future encouragement, and the other part therof shall go to 
Our own use. 

And Wee do hereby straitly charge and command all 
Customers, Controllers, Searchers, Waiters, and all other 
Officers and Ministers of and belonging to Our Customes; 
And also all Justices of Peace, Maiors, Sheriffs, Constables, 
and other Our Officers, Ministers, and loving Subjects in 
their severall places and degrees, to take notice of this Our 
Royal pleasure and commandment, and to be aiding, helping 
and assisting to Our said Agents and their Deputies, Fac- 
tours and servants in all things touching and concerning tin s 



1638, May i. 87 

Our service, whereof Wee are resolved to require a due and 
strict account. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall, this fourteenth day of 
March, in the thirteenth yeer of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic: And by the Assignes of 
John Bill. 1637. 

4 PP- folio. Copies]in B. M., Crawf., Dalk., and P. C. Entered on 
Patent Rolls. 



1638, May i. 

[Requiring Licenses for New England.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION TO RESTRAIN THE TRANSPORTING OF 

PASSENGERS AND PROVISIONS TO NEW ENGLAND, 

WITHOUT LICENCE. 

The Kings most Excellent Majestic, for divers weighty 
and important causes well known to His Majesty, doth 
hereby straitly charge and command all Merchants, Masters 
and Owners of Ships whatsoever, That from henceforth they 
or any of them do not presume to set forth any Ship or Ships 
with Passengers or Provisions for New England, untill they 
shall have first obtained speciall Licence from His Majestic, or 
such of the Lords, and others of His Privy Councell, as by His 
Majesties speciall Commission now are or shall be appointed 
for the Businesse of Forrain Plantations, upon pain of His Maj 
esties high displeasure, and such penalties and punishments 
as shall be thought meet to be inflicted on offenders herein 
for their contempt of His Majesties Royall Commands. 1 

1 Since the issuance of the proclamation of April 30, 1637, the tide of emi 
gration to New England had not perceptibly slackened. After the receipt of a 
letter informing Archbishop Laud that a convoy of ships was preparing to sail 
for New England (Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 1574-1660, p. 266), the Privy 
Council ordered. March 30, 1638, that eight ships in the Thames should be 
detained and their passengers and provisions landed. Two days later a more 
comprehensive order was passed, applying to all ships bound for New England. 
On April 6 the Council relented and allowed the ships to depart, but ordered 
that a proclamation should be issued requiring a special license before such 
voyages were made (Acts of Privy Council, i, 227-229). 



88 Royal Proclamations. 

And His Majesty doth hereby further require and com 
mand all the Customers and other Officers and Ministers of 
or belonging to all or any His Ports within the Realm of 
England, and Dominion of Wales, That they and every of 
them in their severall Offices and places do take speciall care 
of the due execution of His Majesties Royall will and pleasure 
herein declared, as they will answer for the contrary at their 
uttermost perils. 

Given at the Court at Whitehall, the first day of May, in 
the fourteenth yeer of His Majesties Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestic: And by the Assignes of 
John Bill. 1638. 

i p. folio. Copies in Crawf. and P. C.; also in N. Y. Public Library. 
Entered on Patent Rolls. Printed in Rymer s " Fcedera" xx, 223. 



1639, March 25. 
[Concerning Tobacco.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION CONCERNING TOBACCO. 

Having been heretofore informed, that thorow the im 
moderate taking of Tobacco, provoking the takers thereof to 
excessive Drinking and other inconveniences, the health of 
many of Our Subjects had been much impaired, which had the 
rather been occasioned for that no restraint had been made of 
the number, nor regard had of the quality of those that sold 
Tobacco by Retail but persons of the meanest condition had 
promiscuously used to Retail the same, keeping no order or 
assize therein: Whereupon We out of Our Princely care, to 
represse all such excesses, and to prevent such future incon 
veniences as might occur thereby, did by the advice of the 
Lords and others of Our Privy Councell, resolve to regulate 
the ungoverned Selling and Retailing of Tobacco, and to 
reduce the same into some good order; and that none but 
men of sufficiency, and such as should bring certificate of 



, March 25. 89 

their meetnesse, should from thenceforth be permitted to 
sell or utter Tobacco by Retail, and those onely in certain 
fit places, and to a certain number in every such place, which 
places and number We did by the like advice of the Lords, 
and others of Our Privie Councell, appoint accordingly: 
And afterwards by Our Proclamation, dated the thirteenth 
day of March, in the ninth yeer of Our Reign, for the reasons 
therein expressed We did straitly charge and command, that 
none should from thenceforth presume to sell or utter Tobacco 
by Retail, untill they should have obtained Our Licence in 
that behalf. 

In conformity whereunto, divers of Our loving Subjects 
have since taken severall and respective Licences under Our 
great Seal of England, to sell and utter forrain Tobacco by 
Retail, in such respective Cities, Towns, and places, as in the 
same Licences are expressed, rendring to Us, Our Heirs and 
Successors, such Rents as in and by Our said Licences are 
respectively reserved in that behalf: By which means not 
onely the afore mentioned excesses have in some good measure 
been repressed, and many inconveniences prevented, but 
also some small addition and improvement hath been made 
to Our Revenue. 

But notwithstanding the Premisses, divers ill affected 
persons, endeavouring for some small advantage to them 
selves, to bring the Retailing of Tobacco to that confused 
and ungoverned liberty it had before, have in contempt of Our 
said Proclamation presumed without Our Licence to vent 
and utter Tobacco by Retail, as well in London, and the 
parts adjacent, as in divers other Cities, Towns, and places 
of this Our Realm, thereby discouraging, and in some sort 
disabling Our said Subjects, who have taken Our Licences, 
as aforesaid, to pay their Rents thereon reserved, and like 
wise dis-heartning others (that is to say) some from suing 
forth the Licences for which they have respectively con 
tracted, others from contracting with Our Agents appointed 
in that behalf; and the better to colour their practises, have 
spread abroad, especially within Our City of London, and the 
parts adjacent, false reports and rumours, as if We intended to 
desist from Our aforesaid course of reformation: which their 
practises and bold attempts We have just cause to take in 
ill part, and not to suffer the same to passe unpunished. 

Yet because some of Our Subjects, through the false reports 
and rumours so spread abroad, as aforesaid, may make some 



QO Royal Proclamations. 

doubt of Our Royall intention in the Premisses, therefore 
We have thought meet hereby to declare and publish to all 
Our people, that We will not leave unfinished so great a work 
begun with such advice and care, and so much tending to 
their health and welfare, neither will We suffer Our Revenue 
in any part thereof by the wilfull opposition of some few 
refractory persons to be impaired. 

And therefore We do hereby straitly charge and command 
all Our loving Subjects, that none of them do from henceforth 
presume directly or indirectly, to sell, utter, or deliver any 
Tobacco by Retail, in any place or places within Our said 
Kingdom of England, Dominion of Wales, and Town of Bar- 
wick, or any of them, without Our speciall Licence under Our 
great Seal of England, to be obtained in that behalf. 

And We do likewise will and command all Pedlers who 
wander up and down, not making their constant abode in 
any one place, and all and every other Interloper or Interlo 
pers whatsoever, that none of them do from henceforth 
directly or indirectly, sell, utter, or deliver any Tobacco by 
Retail, or under colour or pretext of giving Tobacco, do by 
themselves, or any other, take or receive any recompence for 
the same. 

And whereas divers of Our Subjects, who are licensed to 
retail Tobacco in their own houses onely, do notwithstanding 
retail Tobacco in Fairs and Markets abroad, to the prejudice 
of such persons as are licensed to sell Tobacco in those places, 
Our will and pleasure is, and We do hereby straitly charge 
and command that from henceforth they and every of them 
do forbear to sell, utter, or deliver Tobacco by Retail, in any 
other places then according to the purport and true meaning 
of their respective Licences under Our great Seal. 

And whereas We are informed that much English Tobacco, 
which through the coldnesse of the climate and unaptnesse 
of the soil not coming to perfect maturity, is altogether 
unwholsome to be taken, and other Tobacco adulterate and 
mixed with rotten fruits and other corrupt ingredients is 
dayly sold and uttered to Our people; We do hereby charge 
and straitly command, that no person whatsoever within 
Our said Kingdom of England and Ireland, Dominion of 
Wales, and Town of Barwick, or any of them, do from hence 
forth presume to buy, sell, or utter, directly or indirectly, 
any Tobacco of the growth of Our Kingdoms of England and 
Ireland, Dominion of Wales, and Town of Barwick, Islands 



March 25. gi 

of Jersey, Garnsey, and Man, or any of them, or any mixed 
or adulterate Tobacco whatsoever: And the better to prevent 
the great abuse offered and done to Our loving Subjects in 
the sale of English Tobacco, We do also straitly charge and 
command that no person whatsoever do at any time hereafter 
plant, or cause to be planted, any Tobacco within Our King 
doms of England and Ireland, or either of them, or within 
Our Dominion of Wales, or Town of Barwick, or within Our 
Islands of Jersey, Garnsey and Man, or any of them, and 
that all Tobacco already planted, and now growing there, 
be presently displanted and utterly destroyed. 

And to the end the doing hereof be not in any wise omitted 
or neglected, We do charge and command all Constables, 
Tithingmen, Headbofbughs, and other Officers within their 
severall limits and jurisdictions, carefully to see the same 
executed accordingly. 

And further, We do will and command all Justices of 
Peace, Maiors, Sheriffs, and other principall Officers in their 
severall places, within the compasse of their severall ju 
risdictions and authorities, upon complaint to them made, 
to cause the same to be duly performed without partiality, 
as they and every of them will answer their contempts at 
their perils. 

And We do further will and command, that no Tobacco 
whatsoever be from henceforth imported, landed, or unladed 
to, in, or at any other Port, Haven, Creek, or place within 
Our Kingdom of England, Dominion of Wales, and Port and 
Town of Barwick, or any of them, then to, in, or at Our Port 
of London, without speciall warrant to be obtained from Our 
Lord high Treasurer of England for the time being in that 
behalf: And that all Merchants, Masters, and Owners of any 
Ship or Ships, and other persons whatsoever within or under 
Our obedience, do take notice of Our Royall command and 
pleasure herein, and do carefully and duly observe the same 
accordingly. 

And We do hereby straitly charge and command all Our 
Subjects to yeeld their due obedience in all and singular the 
Premisses, as they tender Our pleasure, and will answer the 
contrary at their perill. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the five and twentieth 
day of March, in the fourteenth yeer of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



92 Royal Proclamations. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majestie: And by the Assignes of 
John Bill. 1638. 

3 PP- folio. There are two issues, varying only in the spelling of 
" thorow " and " through " in the first line. Copies in Antiq., Bodl., and 
Crawf. Entered on Patent Rolls. 



1639, August 19. 
[Licensing of Tobacconists.] 

_-Y THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION DECLARING His MAJESTIES PLEASURE TO 
CONTINUE His COMMISSION, AND LETTERS PATENTS 

FOR LICENSING RETAILORS OF TOBACCO. 

Whereas by His Majesties Proclamation dated at York the 
ninth day of April last, it was declared, That (amongst sundry 
other Commissions and Grants obtained upon untrue sur 
mises) a Commission for compounding with Offenders touch 
ing Tobacco, was thereby revoked and determined; 1 under 
colour whereof, and by a wilfull mistaking of His Majesties 
said Proclamation, sundry persons have pretended, that His 
Majesties Commission to the Lord Goring, and others, for 
licensing Retailors of Tobacco within England, Wales, and 
Barwick, was thereby called in: And thereupon His Majesties 
Commissioners have been interrupted in their proceedings in 
that service for His Majesty; Tobacco in divers parts of the 
kingdome (contrary to His Majesties Proclamation of the five 
and twentieth of March last) hath been retailed without His 
Majesties Licence; and many of those persons who have 
Licences have forborn to make paiment of their Rents: His 
Majesty therefore, to remove all doubts and questions touch 
ing the Premisses, Hath thought fit (with the advice of His 
Councell) to make publike declaration of His Royall intention 
and meaning therein, which was, That His Majesties Letters 
Patents, and Commission to the Lord Goring, and others, 

1 The proclamation of April 9, 1639, revoked, among many other grants, 
licenses, and commissions, the "Commission for compounding with Offenders 
touching Tobacco." This proclamation is printed in Rymer s Foedera, xx, 340, 
and in Rushworth s Historical Collections, ii, 915. 



i639> August ip. 93 

concerning the licensing of Retailors of Tobacco, was not 
impeached, or meant to be impeached by His Majesties said 
Proclamation of the ninth of April last; But that the same 
Letters Patents and Commission are still in force, and no way 
infringed or restrained thereby, but are still to be proceeded 
in and executed according to the tenour and true meaning 
thereof. And His Majesty doth further declare hereby, That 
His Majesty by His said Proclamation in April last, did repeal 
and determine a Commission to Lawrence Louns, and others, 
to compound with such, as from the ninth of April in the first 
yeer of His Majesties reign, untill the date of that Commission, 
had offended in defrauding His Majestic of His Customes and 
other duties for Tobacco imported, or in planting Tobacco in 
England, or Ireland, or by importing Tobacco of the growth 
of other forraign parts, or in greater quantities then were 
limitted, or in buying or selling the same contrary to His 
Majesties Proclamations before that time published, and none 
other Commission touching Tobacco. And therefore His 
Majesty doth hereby require and command all manner of 
persons whatsoever whom it may concern, to take knowledge 
of this His Majesties Declaration and Confirmation of His 
said Letters Patents and Commission to the Lord Goring, and 
others, for the licensing Retailors of Tobacco, and that accord 
ingly they yeeld all conformity thereunto as is meet, upon 
pain of His Majesties high displeasure, and such punishments 
as their contempt or neglect of His Majesties Royall commands 
herein shall deserve. And lastly, His Majesty doth hereby 
require and command all Justices of Peace, Mayors, Sheriffs, 
Bailiffs, Constables, Headboroughs, and all others His Officers 
and Ministers whatsoever, to be aiding and assisting in the 
full accomplishment and execution of His Majesties Royall 
pleasure herein declared. 

Given at His Majesties Court at Whitehall the nineteenth 
day of August, in the fifteenth yeer of His Majesties Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Imprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the 
Kings most Excellent Majesty: And by the Assignes of John 
Bill. 1639. 

i p. folio. Copies in BodL, and Crawf. Entered on Patent Rolls. 
Printed in Rymer s " Fasdera," xx, 348. 



94 Royal Proclamations, 



1643, November 24. 
[Requiring Loyalty from America.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION TO GIVE ASSURANCE UNTO ALL His MAJES 
TIES SUBJECTS IN THE ISLANDS AND CONTINENT OF 
AMERICA, OF His MAJESTIES ROYALL CARE OVER THEM, 

AND TO PRESERVE THEM IN THEIR DUE OBEDIENCE. 

Charles, by the grace of God, King of England, Scotland, 
France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, etc. Whereas 
We have seen a Paper, called an Ordinance of the pretended 
Houses of the Lords and Commons in Parliament, ordered to 
be Printed the second day of this instant November, 1 Whereby 
Robert Earle of Warwick is made Governor in chiefe, and 
Lord High Admirall of all those Islands and other Plantations 
inhabited, Planted, or belonging to any of Our Subjects within 
the Bounds, and upon the Coasts of America, and a Committee 
appoynted to be assisting unto him in the Government thereof : 
The intention of which Ordinance cannot reasonably be con 
ceived to be other, then to spread the contagion of this horrid 
Rebellion, even unto those remoter parts, and that the con- 
tinuers thereof (foreseeing how little prosperous their wicked 
Designes are likely to prove here in Our Realme of England) 
may provide for themselves a place of Retreat and Security in 
those Westerne Countries: The consequences whereof would 
be the disturbance of that quiet, which those Our Subjects in 
America doe yet injoy under Our Government, and instead of 
Peace, to introduce amongst them the like Oppressions, Blood 
shed, Rapine, Disorders and Confusion in Church and State, 
as they have brought already into some parts of this Our 
Kingdome, and would have gone farther on, if the Goodnesse 
of Almighty God, giving strength to Our Forces, and successe 
to Our Enterprises, had not given a stop to their Malitious and 
Rebellious attempts. To prevent which inconveniences from 

1 This ordinance, appointing the Earl of Warwick governor of the Planta 
tions, is printed in the Journal of the House of Lords, vi, 291, and in Husband s 
Collection of Orders, Ordinances and Declarations, p. 378. 



I&43) November 24. 95 

those Westerne parts, out of Our Royall care of Our good 
Subjects there, We have thought good hereby to give timely 
notice unto them, not only that the said Ordinance was made 
without Our Royall assent, and therefore that it ought not to 
bind any of Our Subjects, but also that the said Earle of War 
wick: hath been justly Proclaimed a Traitor by Us, and that 
he still persists in his Treason and Rebellion against Us; and 
therefore We doe require and Command all Our Subjects 
whatsoever, That they doe not give obedience to the said 
Ordinance, nor unto him the said Earle, as their Governor, 
or Admirall, nor to any other by pretence of any Authority 
from him, or from any of the said Committee, but that they 
shall endeavour the suppression of all such Rebellious At 
tempts, as they shall have means and Opportunity to doe it. 
And We doe farther declare, That as We have given unto all 
Our faithfull Subjects in generall all possible testimonies and 
assurances of Our care of their wellfare and happinesse, in 
preservation of the true Protestant Religion established by 
the Lawes, the Liberty of their Persons, the Propriety of their 
Goods, and the just Priviledges of Parliaments, which We have 
done by such Professions before Almighty God, and such 
Acts of Grace, as have exceeded all the Precedents of former 
times: So shall Our Subjects in the said Islands, and Continent 
of America in particular, find the constant fruits and effects 
of Our gratious Government and Protection, and of those 
assurances, in as full and ample measure as any other Our 
Subjects whatsoever. And therefore We doe strictly charge 
and Command all Governors and Magistrates, who exercise 
any authority under Us in the said Islands and Plantations, 
That they doe not only publish unto Our good People there, 
these Our gratious intentions towards them, but that they let 
them feel the benefit thereof, by due administration of Justice 
amongst them, and by seasonable Provisions of all things 
needfull for their defence and prosperity. And We doe in 
like manner require all Our said Subjects, that they persist 
in their due Allegiance and Obedience unto Us, whereto they 
are obliged by all Lawes Divine and Humane; and that they 
receive not any Governors nor Commanders, or obey any 
Ordinances contrary to, or without Our Royall consent, but 
that they pursue and apprehend them as Traytors to Our 
Royall Person and Dignity; and that as they tender their 
duty to God, the avoyding of Our High Displeasure, and the 
preservation of their own Peace and Happinesse. Given at 



g6 Royal Proclamations. 

Our Court at Oxford, the Twenty fourth day of November, 
in the Nineteenth yeare of Our Raigne. 1643. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 1 
I p. folio. Copy in Bodl. 



1655, October 10. 
[Encouraging Settling in Jamaica.] 

BY THE PROTECTOR. 
A PROCLAMATION 

GIVING ENCOURAGEMENT TO SUCH AS SHALL TRANSPLANT 
THEMSELVES TO JAMAICA. 

Whereas the Island of Jamaica in America, is by the Provi 
dence of God, in the hands and possession of this State, 2 the 
Enemy which was found upon it, being fled into the Moun 
tains with an intention to escape into other places, save such 
of them as do daily render themselves to our Commander in 
chief there, to be disposed of by him; and We being satisfied of 
the Goodness, Fertility, and Commodiousness for Trade and 
Commerce of that Island, Have resolved, by the blessing of 
God, to use Our best endeavours to secure and plant the same. 
For which end and purpose, We have thought it necessary to 
publish, and make known unto the People of this Common 
wealth, and especially to those of the English Islands, Planta 
tions and Colonies in America, our Resolutions and Intentions 
on that behalf, as also to declare unto them the Encourage 
ments which We have thought fit to give unto such as shall 

1 The imprint in the only known copy of the original is missing, but it was 
undoubtedly "Oxford: L. Lichfield: 1643" as in proclamations immediately 
preceding and following this date. 

2 The English forces, soon after the declaration of war against Spain, sailed 
for the conquest of the Spanish West Indies. After an unsuccessful attack on 
Hispaniola, they landed at Jamaica and on May 10, 1655, took possession of the 
island. It now became the cherished plan of Cromwell to settle Jamaica, 
especially with the colonists of the other plantations in America. Numerous 
entries regarding Jamaican affairs are to be found in the records of the Council 
of State during this period. In the Interregnum Entry Book, p. 328, there is an 
order of October 10, 1655, approving the draft of this particular proclamation 
(Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 1574-1660, p. 431). 



1(555? October 10. 97 

remove themselves, and their habitations into the aforesaid 
Island of Jamaica, within the time mentioned and expressed 
in these Presents. And first, concerning the securing thereof 
against the Enemy, We have already upon the Island, which 
landed there in May last, above six thousand Souldiers, and 
the beginning of July after, we sent from hence a Regiment of 
eight hundred more, drawn out of Our old Regiments in Eng 
land, with eight Ships of War, besides Victualers, to be added 
to twelve others, that were left there by General Pen, under 
the command of Captain Will. Goodson, all which are appointed 
to remain in those Seas for the Defence of the said Island; and 
We shall from time to time take care to send thither other, 
both Land and Sea Forces, that We may have alwaies in those 
parts, such a strength as may be able, through the blessing of 
God, to defend and secure it against any Attempt of the 
Enemy; that whereas the Planters in other Places have been 
at Great and vast expences at their first sitting down, and in 
the very beginning of their Plantations for their necessary 
defence, as well against the Natives of the Countrey as other 
Enemies, those who shall remove thither, will be under the 
immediate Protection of this State, and so eased both of the 
danger and charge which other Plantations are subject to, 
and shall have, for their further encouragement, the terms 
and conditions following. 

1. Those who shall transport themselves as aforesaid shall 
have land set forth unto them, according to the proportion of 
twenty Acres, besides Lakes and Rivers, for every Male of 
twelve years old and upwards, and ten Acres for every other 
Male or Female, in some convenient place of the said Island; 
and in case any whole Plantation, That is to say, the Gover- 
nours and greatest part of the people shall remove themselves, 
they shall be preferred in respect of the place of their sitting 
down, that it may be near some good Harbour commodious 
for Commerce and Navigation. 

2. That the said Proportion of Land shall be set forth unto 
them, within six Weeks after notice given by them under their 
hands, or the hands of some of them on the behalf of the rest, 
unto his Highness Commander in chief, or Commissioners 
there, appointed for that purpose of their resolutions to remove, 
and of the time they intend to be upon the place. 

3. That they shall have Liberty for the space of seaven 
years to hunt, take and dispose of to their own use such 
Horses, and other cattle as are, or shall be upon the said Island, 



98 Royal Proclamations. 

the same not being marked by, or belonging to other Planters, 
subject nevertheless to such Rules and Directions as to their 
hunting, and taking of Horses, Cattle, and other Beasts out 
of their own bounds and limits, as shall from time to time 
be made by the Persons authorized by his Highnesse, for 
mannaging the affairs of the said Island. 

4. That they shall hold the said Land with all Houses, 
Edifices, Woods, Trees, Profits and Advantages thereupon, 
to them and their Heirs for ever, to be held in free, and com 
mon Soccage, without any Rent for the first seven years, 
and then one penny an Acre, and by no other rent, tenure, 
or service whatsoever. 

5. That after the said Proportions of Land are set forth 
as aforesaid, His Highness, or his Successors, upon the desire 
of the Owners thereof, shall by Letters Pattents, under the 
Great Seal of England, or by such other sure ways as shall 
be devised by their Counsel learned in the Law, give, grant, 
and confirm unto him or them, their heirs and assigns the 
said Proportions of Land, together with all and singular the 
Privileges, Jurisdictions, Profits and advantages which are 
intended hereby to be enjoied by them, with power to erect 
and create any Mannour or Manners, with tenures in free 
and common Soccage within such Plantation, or Plantations, 
as shall be capable thereof. 

6. That they shall hold and enjoy all, and singular Mines 
of Copper, Iron, Tin, or other Minerals whatsoever (except 
ing Gold, and Silver Mines) and all Mines of Quarries, Coal, 
Stone, Allum, or other Mines, whatsoever (except as aforesaid) 
within the circuit, Meets or bounds of the said several and 
respective proportions of Land; and also all Fishings, and 
Piscaries whatsoever upon or within any of the Lakes, Streams 
or Rivers within their Meets, and bounds; and also full 
power, and authority to man, and send forth to Sea, and unto 
any the Coasts, and Shores, Roads, Harbours or Creeks 
within or near the said Island, any Ships, Boats or other 
Vessels to fish for, find out, or take any Pearls, precious 
Stones, or Jewels therein being, and to enjoy the same to 
his and their own use or uses, rendering and paying to the 
Governour of the said Island for the time being, or to such 
other person or persons, for the time being, as His Highnesse 
shall authorize to receive the same, to his Highness use, the 
full fifth part only, and no more of all such Pearls, precious 
Stones and Jewels as shall be got, found, and taken, as afore- 



i 65 5, October 10. 99 

said; and also one tenth part of all such Mettal as shall be 
had, found, and gained in the Mines, granted hereby to the 
aforesaid Planters. 

7. That no Custom, Excise, Impost, or other duty shall be 
set or imposed for the space of three years to be accounted 
from the 29. day of September, which shall be in the year of 
our Lord 1656. upon any of their Goods and Merchandizes 
of the growth, production or Manufacture of the said Island, 
which they shall transport into this Commonwealth: Nor 
shall they or their Servants, without their own consent, be 
drawn out into the Wars, unlesse it be in case of Invasion, 
or Rebellion, and for the defence of the Island. 

8. That they shall have power to build Walls, and raise 
Bulwarks and Castles upon their own Land for the defence, 
and security of their own plantations, and also to arme 
themselves, and servants, and to lead, and conduct them 
against any Enemies, or Rebels within the said Island; Sub 
ject nevertheless to such Orders, and directions as they shall 
on this behalf receive from the Governour or Commander in 
chief of the said Island for the time being. 

9. That all and every person and persons, that shall here 
after happen to be born within the said Island, shall be, and 
shall be deemed, and accounted to be free Denizens of Eng 
land, and shall have and enjoy all and every such benefits, 
privileges, advantages and immunities whatsoever, as any 
of the Natives or People of England born in England now 
have and enjoy in England. 

That all such professing the Protestant Religion, who shall 
transport themselves into the aforesaid Island within two 
years to be accounted from the said 29. day of September 
1656. and shall make a beginning therein by transporting to 
the said Island one third part of their number before the 29. 
day of September next, shall have, and enjoy the aforesaid 
Privileges, and Advantages. And for the more certain carry 
ing on of this businesse, and answering Our intentions herein, 
We do hereby authorize and require Our Commander in 
chief of the said Island, for the time being, and also the afore 
said Commissioners that they take notice of the Premisses, 
and cause a due and effectual execution of the same from 
time to time as there shall be occasion, according to the 
purport, et true meaning hereof, for which these presents 
shall be their sufficient warrant. Given at White-Hall the 
10. of October 1655. 



ioo Royal Proclamations. 

London Printed by Henry Hills and John Field, Printers 
to His Highness, MDCLV. 

2 pp. folio. Copy in Guild. Manuscript draft in P. R. 0., State 
Papers, Dom. Interreg. 76 A, pp. 152-154. Printed in Thurloe s "State 
Papers" Hi, 753, and in "Interesting Tracts relating to the Island of Ja 
maica," 1800, p. i. 



1658, March 9. 
[Limiting Greenland Trade to Muscovy Company.] 

BY THE PROTECTOR. 
A PROCLAMATION 

DECLARING THE RIGHT OF THE FELLOWSHIP AND COMPANY OF 
ENGLISH MERCHANTS FOR DISCOVERY OF NEW TRADES 
(COMMONLY CALLED THE MUSCOVIA COMPANY) TO 
THE SOLE FISHING FOR WHALES UPON THE COASTS OF 
GREEN-LAND AND CHERY-!SLAND, AND FOR RESTRAIN 
ING AND PROHIBITING OF ALL OTHERS. 

Whereas the Discovery of the Island called Chery-Island, 
and the Continent of Green-land, with the fishing for Whales 
upon the Seas and Coasts thereof, and of the Islands and 
places thereto adjacent, (having been made by the Fellowship 
of English Merchants, for Discovery of New Trades commonly 
called the Muscovia Company, and at their own great charges 
and hazards) hath by experience been found to be, and is a 
very great honour and advantage to this Nation and Com 
monwealth, aswel in the inlargement of the Dominions and 
Territories thereof, as also in the advancement and increase 
of Navigation, and the entring upon and gaining of the Trade 
of Whale-fishing, whereby great quantities of Whale-Oyl, 
Whale-Fins and other Commodities are yearly hither imported, 
to the enriching of this Nation, without the Exportation of 
any Commodities from hence: And whereas upon considera 
tion of the Premises, and for recompence of the said charge 
and hazards in the said Discovery, and for the encourage 
ment of the said Company and others in time to come, several 
Grants and Letters Patents under the Great Seal of England, 



1658, March p. 101 

f 

have been heretofore made and granted to the said Fellowship, 
and particularly in the Raign of the late King Philip and 
Queen Mary, by which all main Lands, Isles, Havens, Ports, 
Creeks and Rivers, by the said Company then discovered or to 
be after discovered, were forbidden to be traffiqued unto, or 
visited by any the People of this Nation, without the License 
of the said Company; which Letters Patents were afterwards 
confirmed by Act of Parliament in the Eighth year of the 
Raign of the late Queen Elizabeth, under the penalty of for 
feiting the Ships and Goods of any Trading thither without 
License, and with addition of divers others Priviledges and 
Liberties unto the said Fellowship and Company. And the 
late King James, for the further encouragement of the said 
Company, and preventing others to interrupt, distract or 
disturb their said Trade-fishing and Discoveries, did, in pur 
suance of the said Act of Parliament, and the true intent and 
meaning of the same, by his Letters Patents grant unto the 
said Fellowship, the sole Trading and Fishing in those Seas 
and places so discovered by them, And all others were for 
bidden to fish in those Seas and Coasts, or to sail thither for 
Trade without License of the said Company. Notwithstand 
ing which, the said Company as We are given to understand, 
have of late received some disturbance by the interloping and 
intruding of some persons into the said Whale-fishing, upon 
those Seas and Coasts of Green-land and Chery-Island, where 
upon the said Company having addressed their humble Peti 
tion unto Us, And the matter having been by Us referred to 
the consideration of our Privy Council, and fully heard and 
debated before a Committee of Our said Council, as well on 
behalf of the said particular Traders, as also on behalf of the 
said Fellowship and Company. And the Act of Parliament 
and the Grants and Charters made to the said Fellowship and 
Company shewed forth and read, and the whole matter hav 
ing been fully considered, and thereupon made evident, that 
such particular fishing for Whales upon those Seas, Harbours 
and Coasts, by persons separate from the said Company, and 
trading therein by themselves apart, with like power and 
strength, did not onely disturb the main Trade of Fishing and 
taking of Whales by the Company, but did tend to the mine 
and destruction of that Fishing, and unless prevented, might 
occasion Forraigners to come in and gain away that fishing 
and Trading from this Nation, which might tend to the great 
damage and dishonour of Us and this Nation, besides the 



io2 Royal Proclamations. 

particular damage of the said Company. And whereas the 
whole state of the matter having been again represented to 
Our said Privy Council and by them also fully considered, it 
was by them conceived to be for the good of this Nation, to 
encourage the carrying on of the said Whale-fishing and Trade, 
by the said Fellowship and Company onely, and to forbid all 
others, except such as the said Company should License, to 
intrude or meddle therein. And the said Company having 
further declared, that they appropriating those parts of the 
said Seas called Bell Sound, and Horn Sound, with such other 
places as they shall fish in, to themselves onely, were well con 
tented, and do promise to grant Licenses gratis to all and every 
person of this Nation and Commonwealth, that shall or will 
but ask or desire to fish for Whales, or Trade in any other of 
the said Seas, or Coasts of Green-land, or Chery-Island, where 
they themselves fish not. We therefore taking the Premises 
into Our consideration (with the advice of Our said Privie 
Council) Do hereby publish and Declare, That the whole and 
sole Trade and fishing for Whales, and absolute fishing in and 
upon the said Seas, Coasts and parts of Green-land, 1 and Chery- 
Island, and in and upon the said Bell Sound, and Horn Sound, 
being part of the said Seas and Coasts, doth and ought to be 
long unto the said Fellowship of English Merchants for discov 
ery of New Trades, commonly called the Muscovia Company, 
and that no other Person or Persons of this Commonwealth 
(other then the said Fellowship of English Merchants for dis 
covery of New Trades, called the Muscovia Company) shall fish 
for Whales in and upon the said Seas, Coasts of Green-land and 
Chery-Island, or in and upon the said Bell Sound and Horn 
Sound, being part of the said Seas and Coasts. Yet so, as 
nevertheless the said Company, upon their own offer and 
agreement aforesaid, be and shall be, and are hereby obliged 
to grant License and Licenses, to all and singular the People 
and Subjects of this Commonwealth, upon request in that 
behalf to be made (without delay or paying anything for the 

1 This name refers to Spitzbergen, which was then called Greenland, and 
which was thought by the voyagers of the day to be connected with Greenland 
proper. The early maps show Spitzbergen, which they term "Greenland or 
Spitzbergen," with Bell and Horn Sounds on the west coast and Cherie Island, 
named after Sir Francis Cherie, a few miles to the south. The country was 
also sometimes called East Greenland, while the modern Greenland was termed 
"Greenland." See especially the map of 1613 in Amer. Antiquarian Society 
Transactions, iv, 314; the map in Edward Pelham s God s Power and Providence, 
1631, reproduced in A Collection of Documents on Spitzbergen and Greenland 
(Hakluyt Society), 1855; and map no. xiv in H. Moll s World Described, 1708-20. 



1658, March p. 103 

same) to fish for Whales, or trade or fish in all or any other 
parts or places, of the said Seas or Coasts of Greenland and 
Chery-Island, Except the Harbours and places of Bell Sound 
and Horn Sound aforesaid, or where the said Company shall 
set out Ships to fish, And We do hereby command, That all 
persons whatsoever (other then the said Fellowship and Com 
pany) do forbear to enter into the said Bell Sound or Horn 
Sound, or to fish or trade within Three Leagues of either of 
them, but clearly and absolutely leave the said Bell Sound 
and Horn Sound, and all the sole and whole fishing and trading 
thereof, unto the said Fellowship and Company, and their 
Ships and Agents, and such as shall be set forth, hired or 
imployed by them, without making any disturbance or in 
terruption, or giving the said Company or their Ships or 
Vessels, any impediment or hinderance therein, under pain of 
Our high displeasure, and such other pains and penalties as by 
the Laws of this Land may be inflicted upon them for their 
disobedience and contempt therein, Leaving all other the 
People and Subjects of this Commonwealth free notwith 
standing, to take Licenses from the said Company to trade or 
fish for Whales or otherwise, in and upon all other of the said 
Seas, Coasts and places, Except the said Bell Sound and Horn 
Sound, and such other places of Green-land, as the said Fel 
lowship or their Agents shall fish in, as aforesaid. And We 
do hereby further will and command, aswel Our Generals at 
Sea, Admirals of Our Fleet, Vice- Admirals, Commanders of 
Squadrons, and other Commanders, Captains and Officers 
whatsoever, of any Our Ships, as also Our Judges of the High 
Court of Admiralty of England, and all other Our Officers and 
Ministers, in their several places to be aiding and assisting, 
unto the said Fellowship and Company, and all such as they 
shall set out and imploy in their said sole Trade and fishing, 
and in hindring all others hereby forbidden to use the said 
Trade and fishing, otherwise then as is before mentioned. 
And likewise to be aiding and assisting unto the said Fellow 
ship and Company and their said Agents, in doing and exe 
cuting of all and singular the premises. And lastly, We do 
hereby charge and Command the said Fellowship and Com 
pany, That in all Ships and Vessels which shall from time to 
time be sent out by them, or imployed under them, into or in 
the Seas and parts aforesaid, they do imploy for Harpineers, 
Steersmen and Mariners, the People and Subjects of this 
Commonwealth, and no other. 



Royal Proclamations. 

Given at Our Palace of Westminster the gth day of March, 
in the year of Our Lord, 1657. 

London, Printed by Henry Hills and John Field, Printers 
to His Highness, 1657. 

3 PP- folio, pasted together to form one long sheet. Copy in B. M. 



1660, September 22. 
[For Apprehension of Whalley and Goffe.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR APPREHENSION OF EDWARD WHALLEY 
AND WILLIAM GOFFE. 

CHARLES R. 

Forasmuch as Edward Whalley, commonly known by the 
name of Colonel Whalley, and William Goffe, commonly 
called Colonel Goffe, are, amongst others, by an Act of this 
present Parliament, Entituled, An Act of Free and General 
Pardon, Indempnity and Oblivion, 1 wholly excepted from 
Pardon, and left to be proceeded against as Traytors, for their 
execrable Treasons in sentencing to death, signing the Instru 
ment for the horrid Murder, or being instrumental in taking 
away the precious Life of Our late dear Father of Blessed 
Memory. 

And forasmuch as they the said Edward Whalley and Wil 
liam Goffe, 2 having absented and withdrawn themselves, as 
We have been informed, to the parts beyond the Seas, are 
now, as We certainly understand, lately returned into Our 
Kingdom of England, and do privately lurk and obscure them 
selves in places unknown; We therefore have thought fit, by, 

1 Statutes of the Realm, vol. 5, p. 226, 12 Chas. II, ch. n. 

2 Several documents concerning the attempt to apprehend Whalley and 
Goffe are calendared in the Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 1661-1668. See also 
Dictionary of National Biography under Edward Whalley and William Goffe, 
and "Memoranda respecting Edward Whalley and W illiam Goffe," by F. B. 
Dexter, in New Haven Colony Historical Society Papers, ii, 117. 



i66o } September 22. 105 

and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, to publish the same 
to all Our loving Subjects, not doubting of their Care and 
forwardness in their apprehension ; And We do hereby Require 
and Command, as well all and singular Our Judges, Justices 
of the Peace, Mayors, Sheriffs, Bayliffs, Constables and Head- 
boroughs, as also the Officers and Ministers of our Ports, and 
other Our Subjects whatsoever, within Our Realms of England, 
Scotland, Ireland, or Dominion of Wales, and all Our Do 
minions and Territories, to be diligent in Inquiring, Searching 
for, Seizing and Apprehending them, the said Edward Whalley, 
and William Goffe, in all places whatsoever, as wel within 
Liberties as without, whom if they shall happen to Take and 
Apprehend Our further Will and pleasure is, That they cause 
them and either of them so Apprehended, to be safely carried 
to the next Justice of the Peace, to the place where they or 
either of them shall be Arrested, whom We straitly Command 
to Commit them and either of them to Prison, and presently 
Inform Us or Our Privy Council of their or either of their 
Apprehensions. 

And We do hereby further Declare and Publish, That if 
any Person or Persons after this Our Proclamation published, 
shall Directly or Indirectly Conceal, Harbor, Keep, Retain, 
or Maintain the said Edward Whalley and William Goffe, or 
either of them, or shall Contrive or Connive at any means 
whereby they or either of them shall or may Escape from being 
Taken or Arrested, or shall not use their best Endeavor for 
their and either of their Apprehensions, as well by giving the 
Advertisement thereof to Our Officers, as by all other good 
means; We will (as there is Just Cause) proceed against them 
that shall so neglect this Our Commandment with all severity. 

And lastly We do hereby Declare, That whosoever shall 
discover the said Edward Whalley or William Goffe, either 
within Our Kingdoms of England, Scotland, Ireland, or 
Dominions of Wales, or in any other our Dominions and 
Territories, or elsewhere, and shall cause them, or either of 
them, to be Apprehended, and brought in alive or dead, if 
they or either of them, attempting Resistance, happen to be 
slain, shall have a Reward of One hundred pounds in money 
for each of them so brought in, dead or alive, as aforesaid, to 
be forthwith paid unto him in recompence of such his Service. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the Two and twentieth 
day of September, in the Twelfth year of Our Reign. 



io6 Royal Proclamations. 

London, Printed by Christopher Barker and John Bill, 
Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty. 1660. 

i p. folio. Copies in Adv., Antiq., BodL, B. M., Camb., Ch., Crawf., 
Dalk., DubL, Guild., Hodg., P. R. O., Q. C., and T. C. D.; also in N. Y. 
Public Library. Entered on Patent Rolls. Abstract printed in " Parlia 
mentary Intelligencer," Sept. 24, 1660, and in " Mercurius Publicus" 
Sept. 27. 1660. 



1661, March 29. 
[Prohibiting Planting of Tobacco in England.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

PROHIBITING THE PLANTING, SETTING AND SOWING OF TO 
BACCO IN ENGLAND AND IRELAND, ACCORDING TO AN 
ACT OF PARLIAMENT HEREIN SPECIFIED. 

CHARLES R. 

Whereas by an Act of Parliament made in Our late Par 
liament begun and held at Westminster in the County of 
Middlesex, the Five and Twentieth day of April in the Twelfth 
year of Our Reign, for and upon the reasons and grounds 
therein expressed, it was Enacted by the Authority of the 
same Parliament, That no person or persons whatsoever 
should, or do from and after the First day of January, in 
the Year of our Lord One thousand six hundred and sixty, 
Set, plant, improve to grow, make or cure any Tobacco 
either in Seed, plant or otherwise, in or upon any ground, 
earth, field, or place within Our Kingdom of England, Do 
minion of Wales, Islands of Guernsey or Jersey or Town of 
Berwick upon Tweed, or in Our Kingdome of Ireland, under 
the penalty of the forfeiture of all such Tobacco, or the value 
thereof, or of the Sum of Forty shillings for every Rod or 
Pole of Ground so planted, set or sowen as aforesaid, and so 
proportionably for a greater or lesser quantity of ground, 
One moyety thereof to Us Our Heirs and Successors, and the 
other moyety to him or them that shall sue for the same to 
be recovered by Bill, Plaint or Information in any Court of 
Record, wherein no Essoign, protection or wager in Law 



1661, March 29. 107 

shall be allowed: And it was thereby further enacted, That 
all Sheriffs, Justices of the peace, Mayors, Bailiffs, Con 
stables, and every of them, upon information or complaint 
made unto them or any of them, by any the Officers of the 
Customes, or by any other person or persons whatsoever, 
that there was any Tobacco set, sown, planted, or growing 
within their jurisdictions or precincts contrary to the same 
Act should within ten dayes after such information or com 
plaint cause to be burnt, plucked up, consumed, or utterly 
destroyed all such Tobacco so set, sowen, planted, or grow 
ing. And it was thereby further enacted, That in case any 
person or persons should resist or make forcible opposition 
against any person or persons in the due and through execu 
tion of the same Act, That every such person or persons for 
every such offence should forfeit the sum of Five pounds to 
be divided and recovered in manner aforesaid; And in case 
any person or persons should not pay the summs of money 
by them to be paid, by vertue of the same Act, that in every 
such case distress should be made and sale thereof, returning 
the overplus to the owners; And in case no distress shall be 
found, that then every such party should be committed to 
the common Gaol in the County where such offence should 
be committed, there to remain for the space of two moneths 
without Bail or Mainprise. Provided always, and it was 
thereby enacted, That the same Act nor any thing con 
tained therein should extend to the hindering of the planting 
of Tobacco in any Physick-garden of either University, or 
in any other private garden for Physick or Chirurgery, only 
so as the quantity so planted exceed not one half of one pole 
in any one place or garden, as in et by the same Act it doth 
and may more fully appear. 1 Now to the end that all Our 
loving Subjects in all parts of Our said Kingdoms of Eng 
land and Ireland, and Dominion of Wales, and in the said 
Islands of Guernsey and Jersey, and in our said Town of 
Berwick upon Twede, may the better take notice of and more 
duely observe the said Act, and not ignorantly offend against 
the same for the future, We have thought good to publish et 
declare the same to all Our loving Subjects by this Our Royal 

1 This act, entitled "An Act for Prohibiting the Planting Setting or Sowing 
of Tobaccho in England and Ireland," passed the House of Commons on De 
cember 17, 1660 (Commons Journals, viii, 212), the House of Lords on December 
20 (Lords Journals, xi, 218), was read in Council on December 21 (Acts of Privy 
Council, i, 303), and is printed in Statutes of the Realm, 12 Chas. II, ch. 34, vol. 5, 
p. 297. 



io8 Royal Proclamations. 

Proclamation, And do withall likewise signifie and declare, 
that for the future We shall expect, and do hereby require 
all dutiful observance thereof, and ready conformity there 
unto, and that not onely upon the pains, penalties, and for 
feitures therein expressed, but also of Our high indignation 
and displeasure, justly and deservedly to be inflicted upon 
all those that shall knowingly and presumptuously offend 
against so just and reasonable a Law. And we do hereby 
streightly charge and command all Our Judges of Assise and 
Commissioners of Oyer and Terminer in their several Cir 
cuits, and all Our Justices of Peace in their several and respec 
tive Quarter-Sessions, that they give the same Law in charge 
to the several et respective Juries in their several and respec 
tive Inquests before them, to the end that the offences and 
offenders against the same, both in the setting, planting, or 
sowing of Tobacco, contrary to the true intent and meaning 
of the same Act, and also all forcible opposition et resistance 
made or to be made against any person or persons in the due 
execution of the same Act, may be punished according to 
Law and the demerit of their offences in this behalf. And 
We do further command and require all Sheriffs, Justices of 
the peace, Mayors, Bayliffs, Constables, and all other Our 
Officers and ministers whatsoever whom the premisses shall 
or may concern, that they from time to time as occasion 
shall require, be diligent, circumspect, and careful in the due 
execution of the same Act in all things according to the true 
intent and meaning thereof, as they will answer the con 
trary at their perils. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall, the Twenty ninth day 
of March, in the Thirteenth Year of Our Reign, One thou 
sand six hundred sixty one. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by John Bill, Printer to the King s most 
Excellent Majesty, 1661. At the King s Prin ting-House in 
Black-Friers. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Adv., Antiq., Bodl., B. M., Camb., Crawf., Dalk., 
DubL, Guild., P. R. O., Q. C., and T. C. D. Abstract printed in " Kingdomes 
Intelligencer" April 8, 1661, and in " Mercurius Publicus" April n, 1661. 



1 66 r, May p. 109 

1661, May 9. 

[Suppressing Vagrancy.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR THE DUE OBSERVATION OF CERTAIN STATUTES MADE FOR 
THE SUPPRESSING OF ROGUES, VAGABONDS, BEGGERS, 
AND OTHER IDLE DISORDERLY PERSONS, AND FOR RE 
LIEF OF THE POORE. 

CHARLES R. 

The Kings most Excellent Majesty being watchful for the 
publick good of his loving Subjects, and taking notice of the 
great and unusual resort of Rogues, Vagabonds, Beggers, 
and other idle Persons of all Ages and Sexes, from all parts 
of the Nation to the Cities of London and Westminster and 
the Suburbs of the same, where they make it their trade to 
beg and live idlely, and to get their living by Begging, Steal 
ing, and other wicked and lewd practises, to the great offence 
of Almighty God, and to the dishonour of His Majesties 
Royal Government; And his Majesty taking it into His 
Princely consideration, that this Realm is furnished with 
excellent Laws and Orders for redress of such Enormities, 
yet through negligence of Officers, and presumption of the 
Offenders, the same nevertheless do rather grow then abate. 
His Majesty hath therefore thought fit at this present by 
advice of his Privy Councel, to cause some necessary Laws 
formerly made for the reforming the Abuses aforesaid, to be 
duely executed and observed. And for that end, whereas 
by the Laws of this Land all Vagabonds, Beggers, and idle 
persons are to be sent to the place of their Birth, or of their 
last abode, there to be relieved and kept if they be impotent, 
or otherwise made to labour: His Majestic doth by this 
Proclamation publish and declare His Royal Pleasure and 
Commands, that all such Vagabonds, Beggers and Idle 
persons within the Cities of London and Westminster and 
the Suburbs of the same, which by Law are not there to be 
provided for (to the wrong of the native poor, and a burden 
to the several Parishes where now they are) but that they 



no Royal Proclamations. 

forthwith at their Perils depart from the same and speedily 
resort to the place of their Birth or last abode, that they may 
be there provided for as they ought to be. And if any such 
Vagabonds, Beggers, or idle persons shall or may be found 
within the Cities of London and Westminster, or in any of 
the Suburbs or Precincts of the same, or in the Borough of 
Southwark, or in any Town near adjoyning, upon the four 
and twentieth day of this moneth of May, His Majesty 
streightly chargeth and commandeth, as well the Lord Mayor, 
Recorder, Aldermen and Sheriffs of the said City of London, 
and all other Officers of the said City, and all other His 
Majesties Justices of the Peace, Magistrates and Officers 
whatsoever within the City of Westminster, Borough of 
Southwark, or within the County of Middlesex, to cause all 
such persons to be apprehended, and openly whipped, and 
sent away (except such as are willing to go to the English 
Plantations) And that in all things they do speedily execute, 
and cause to be put in execution the Statute made in the 
Thirty ninth yeare of Queene Elizabeth Chap, the 4 th con 
cerning the punishment of Rogues and Vagabonds: And to 
the end that all such persons may not only be setled and 
kept from wandring, but also made to labour and so kept 
from idleness, his Majesty doth streightly charge and com 
mand all and singular Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace, and 
other Officers and Ministers in the several Counties of this 
Realm, and all Mayors, Sheriffs, Bayliffs, Aldermen and 
other Magistrates, Officers and Ministers of all other Cities 
and Towns Corporate, that they and every of them within 
their several Limits and Jurisdictions respectively do care 
fully and diligently put in due and speedy Execution the 
same Statute of the Thirty ninth of Elizabeth, Chapter the 
Fourth, both for erecting houses of Correction, and for pun 
ishing such Vagabonds and idle persons; as also the Statutes 
of the I. Jacob. Chap. 7. made for the explanation of the said 
Statute made in the Seventh year of King James Chapter 
Fourth, for the ordering such houses of Correction. And to 
the end that not onely sturdy Rogues and Vagabonds may 
be duely kept from wandering and idleness, and held to 
labour, but that also poor and Fatherless Children and 
Widows, the Aged and Impotent may be also carefully pro 
vided for and relieved, and not permitted to wander and be 
in the Streets begging from door to door; It is His Majesties 
express Charge and Command to all Mayors, Sheriffs, Bay- 



1661, May p. in 

liffs, Justices of the Peace, Magistrates, Officers and Min 
isters in the several Counties of this Realm, and in all Cities 
and Towns Corporate, that they diligently and carefully put 
in execution that excellent Statute made in the Fourty third 
Year of Elizabeth, Chapter the second, concerning the Over 
seers of the Poor, and their duty for raising a Stock for main 
tenance of the Poor, and for binding forth Children Appren 
tices, which His Majesty commends in an especial manner 
to their Care: Their neglecting this so great a work, in not 
carefully providing for poor Fatherless Children and Infants 
for their teaching and instructing them, and for fitting them 
for Trades and Services, and in not binding them forth Ap 
prentices; all which neglect is a great cause of poor childrens 
idleness, wandring, and wickedness in the whole course of 
their lives; And to the end that convenient Stocks may be 
raised in all Parishes, especially for the ends aforesaid, His 
Majesty requireth the several Overseers of the Poor to be 
diligent in raising such Stocks according to the Power given 
them, And also His Majesty requireth all Mayors, Bayliffs, 
Justices of the Peace, Magistrates and other Officers afore 
said, to be careful in putting in speedy and due Execution 
all the Statutes concerning Tipling and Drunkenness, and 
concerning unlawful or irregular Inns or Alehouses, and all 
other Statutes, the penalties whereof are disposed to the use 
of the Poor of the several Parishes; and to cause the said 
several penalties to be delivered to the Overseers of the Poor 
respectively for the increase of the said Stock, to buy materials 
to imploy the said Poor, and also to be careful in diligent 
calling to account the said Overseers, and to see the said 
sums so raised may be carefully imployed for the good educa 
tion and instruction and binding out of such poor Infants 
and Fatherless Children, and providing for relief of the Poor 
aforesaid, which may in probability encourage some char 
itable and well disposed Persons voluntarily to contribute 
and add to such Stocks by their free and weekly contribu 
tions (which they dayly bestowed on idle begging Poor) or 
otherwise. His Majesty therefore expects all Mayors, 
Justices, Magistrates and other His Officers to whom the 
Execution of the Law aforesaid is particularly concerned, 
that they be very careful in the due and speedy execution of 
every one of them, as they will avoid His Majesties just 
indignation for their neglect of their duties in hindring this 
so great a National work, and for the Contempt of His Royal 



ii2 Royal Proclamations. 

Commandments: His Majesty being resolved to have an 
account, both from the said Justices, and the several Judges 
of Assizes in their several Circuits, of the due observation 
hereof, until His Majesty shall take a further Course by the 
advice of His Parliament, which he determines to do, that 
no poor shall be permitted to be Vagrant or Begging, but all 
such as are Impotent and not able to work, may be provided 
for, so as to live comfortably, and yet be kept from profess d 
idleness, and such as are able may have means provided to 
set them on work. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall, the Ninth day of May, 
One thousand six hundred sixty one, and in the Thirteenth 
year of His Majesties Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by John Bill and Christopher Barker, 
Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty, 1661. At the 
Kings Printing-House in Black-Friers. 

3 pp. folio. Copies in Adv., Antiq., BodL, B. M., Camb., Ck., Crawf., 
Dalk., Dubl., Guild., P. R. 0., Q. C., and T. C. D. Abstract printed in 
"Mercurius Publicus," May 16, 1661, and in "Kingdomes Intelligencer," 
May 20, 1661. 



1661, December 14. 

[Encouraging Settling in Jamaica.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR THE ENCOURAGING OF PLANTERS IN HlS MAJESTIES 
ISLAND OF JAMAICA IN THE WEST-INDIES. 

CHARLES R. 

We being fully satisfied, that Our Island of Jamaica, being 
a pleasant and most fertile soyl, and scituate commodiously 
for Trade and Commerce, is likely, through Gods blessing, 
to be a great Benefit and Advantage to this and other Our 
Kingdoms and Dominions, have thought fit, for encouraging of 
Our Subjects, as well such as are already upon the said Island, 



i66i } December 14. 113 

as all others that shall transport themselves thither, and 
Reside and Plant there, to declare and publish, And We do 
hereby declare and publish, That Thirty Acres of Improve- 
able Lands shall be granted and allotted to every such Person, 
Male, or Female, being Twelve years old or upwards, who now 
Resides, or within Two years next ensuing, shall Reside upon 
the said Island, and that the same shall be assigned and set 
out by the Governor and Council within Six weeks next after 
notice shall be given in Writing, subscribed by such Planter 
or Planters, or some of them, in behalf of the rest, to the Gov 
ernor, or such Officer as he shall appoint in that behalf, signi 
fying their resolutions to Plant there, and when they intend 
to be on the place. And in case they do not go thither within 
Six moneths then next ensuing, the said Allotment shall be 
void, and free to be assigned to any other Planter; And that 
every person and persons to whom such Assignment shall be 
made, shall hold and enjoy the said Lands, so to be assigned, 
and all Houses, Edifices, Buildings, and Inclosures, thereupon 
to be built or made, to them and their Heirs for ever, be and 
under such Tenure as is usual in other Plantations subject 
unto Us. Nevertheless they are to be obliged to serve in Arms 
upon any Insurrection, Mutiny, or Foreign Invasion ; and that 
the said Assignments and Allotments shall be made and con 
firmed under the publick Seal of the said Island, with power 
to create any Manner or Manners, and with such convenient 
and suitable Priviledges and Immunities as the Grantee shall 
reasonably devise and require; And a draught of such Assign 
ments shall be prepared by Our Learned Council in the Law, 
and delivered to the Governor to that purpose; And that all 
Fishings and Piscaries, and all Copper, Lead, Tin, Iron, Coals, 
and all other Mines (except Gold and Silver) within such 
respective Allotments, shall be enjoyed by the Grantees 
thereof, reserving only a Twentieth part of the Product of the 
said Mines to Our use. And we do further publish and de 
clare, That all Children of any of Our Natural born Subjects 
of England to be born in Jamaica, shall from their respective 
Births be reputed to be, and shall be free Denizens of England, 
and shall have the same Priviledges to all Intents and Pur 
poses as Our Free-born Subjects of England; And that all 
Free persons shall have liberty without Interruption, to trans 
port themselves arid their Families, and any their Goods 
(except only Coyn and Bullions) from any of Our Dominions 
and Territories to the said Island of Jamaica. And we do 



ii4 Royal Proclamations. 

straitly charge and command all Planters, Soldiers, and others 
upon the said Island, to yield obedience to the lawful Com 
mands of Our Right Trusty and Welbeloved Thomas Lord 
Windsor, now Our Governor of the said Island, and to every- 
other Governor thereof for the time being, under pain of Our 
displeasure, and such penalties as may be inflicted thereupon. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehal the Fourteenth day of 
December, 1661. In the Thirteenth year of Our Reign. 1 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by John Bill and Christopher Barker, 
Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 1661. 

2 pp. folio. There are two issues, varying slightly in set-up. Copies in 
Adv., Antiq., BodL, B. M., Comb., Ch., Crawf., Dalk., DubL, Guild., 
Hodg., P. R. 0., Q. C., T. C. D., and in N. Y. Historical Society. Entered 
on Patent Rolls. Printed in "Interesting Tracts relating to the Island of 
Jamaica" 1800, pp. 135, 136, and in preface to " Laws of Jamaica," 1792. 



1667, August 23. 
[Recalling Dispensations of Navigation Act.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR RECALLING DISPENSATIONS, WITH SOME CLAUSES IN THE 

ACTS FOR ENCOURAGEMENT AND INCREASING or SHIP 
PING AND NAVIGATION, AND OF TRADE. 

CHARLES R. 

Whereas We by an Order in Council 2 of the Two and 
twentieth day of March, One thousand six hundred sixty four, 

1 There is a series of documents in the Public Record Office regarding the 
publication of this proclamation in Barbadoes (see abstracts in CaL State 
Papers, Colonial, 1661-1668, pp. 97, 103). 

2 Since this order does not appear among the printed Acts of the Privy Coun 
cil, 1613-1680, it is here noted. On March 22, 1665, it was ordered that the 
"Act for encouraging and encreasing of Shipping and Navigation" should be 
suspended so far as concerned commerce with Norway and the Baltic Sea, also 
with Germany, Flanders, or France, provided the merchants and owners were 
English natural-born subjects. The order further allowed the merchants of 
any nation in amity with England to import hemp, pitch, tar, masts, saltpeter, 



1667, August 25. 115 

have dispenced for some time with certain Clauses in the late 
Acts of Parliament for Encouraging and Increasing of Ship 
ping and Navigation, and for the Encouragement of Trade; 
and therein also Declared, That when We should think fit to 
determine that Dispensation, We would by Our Royal Procla 
mation give Six moneths notice thereof, to the end no Mer 
chant, or other Person therein concerned should be surprised. 
In order whereunto, We taking the same into consideration, 
have thought fit (with the advice of Our Privy Council) to 
publish this Our Royal Proclamation; and do hereby Declare, 
That the said Order of the Two and twentieth of March, One 
thousand six hundred sixty four, and all and every the Dis 
pensations, Clauses, Matters, and things therein contained, 
shall from and after the end of six moneths next ensuing the 
Date of this Proclamation, Cease, Determine, and be Void to 
all intents and purposes whatsoever; Whereof all Persons 
concerned are to take notice, and to conform themselves 
accordingly. 

and copper, paying only such duties as were imposed by the Act of Tonnage and 
Poundage. The clauses relating to America follow: 

"And His Majesty doth further Order, That notwithstanding the said Act 
for Encouraging and encreasing of Shipping and Navigation, and one other 
Act made in the said Parliament begun at Westminster the eighth day of May 
in the thirteenth year of His Majesties Reign, intituled [An Act for the En 
couragement of Trade] or either of them, or any Clause or Clauses in them, or 
either of them to the contrary, It shall and may be lawful for any English Mer 
chants, and they are hereby authorised, freely and without interruption, to make 
use of, and employ any Foreign Ships or Vessels whatsoever, Navigated by 
Mariners or Seamen of any Nation in Amity with His Majesty, for importing 
or exporting of Goods and Commodities, to or from any Port in England or 
Wales, to or from any of His Majesties Plantations. 

"Provided, That no Goods or Commodities whatsoever, be by them imported 
into any of His Majesties said Plantations, but what shall be without fraud, 
Laden and Shipped in England or Wales, and thence directly carried, and from 
no other place to His Majesties said Plantations. 

"Provided also, That such Goods and Commodities as shall be by them 
laden or taken on Board at His Majesties said Plantations, or any of them, be 
brought directly from thence to some of His Majesties said Ports in England or 
Wales. And all Governours, and Officers of the Customs are hereby charged 
and required, strictly to observe all Rules, Directions and Orders for taking of 
Bonds or other Securities, and exacting all Forfeitures, and Penalties by the said 
Acts or either of them required or enjoyned: save only in the Two Clauses con 
cerning English Ships or English Mariners herein before dispensed with. 

"And lastly. His Majesty doth declare, That this shall continue and be in 
force during His Majesties pleasure: And when His Majesty shall think fit to 
determine the Dispensation hereby granted, He will by His Royal Proclamation 
give six moneths notice thereof, To the end no Merchant or other person herein 
concerned, may be surprized." 

This order in Council was printed as a broadside by John Bill and Chris 
topher Barker, and copies of it are in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., P. R. O., and Q. C. 



n6 Royal Proclamations. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the 23. day of August, 
1667. In the Nineteenth year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

In the Savoy, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill and 
Christopher Barker, Printers to the Kings most Excellent 
Majesty. 1667. 

i p. folio. Copies inAntiq., BodL, B. M., Camb., Ch., Crawf., Dalk., 
Guild., P. C. } P. R. 0., Q. C., and T. C. D. Entered on Patent Rolls. 



1671, December 22. 

[Concerning the Planters at St. Christophers.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

TOUCHING THE PLANTERS IN THE ISLAND OF 
SAINT CHRISTOPHERS. 

CHARLES R. 

Whereas it hath been Our care before and since the Resti 
tution of that part of the Island of Saint Christophers, 1 which 
formerly belonged to Us and Our Subjects, to provide for the 
Plantation and Improvement thereof, by giving all manner 
of Encouragements to Our good Subjects to return thither, and 
to Re-establish the former Trade and Commerce: In order 
whereunto We lately sent thither Sir Charls Wheeler Baronet, 
with Our Commission to be Our Lieutenant-General, and 
General Governour of Our Leeward Islands in America; and 
for the better execution of so important a Charge, gave him 
such Directions and Instructions as were most suitable to 
these Our Royal Intentions, and might best tend to the ad 
vancement of the general Good and Welfare of all Our Subjects 

1 Although the Island of St. Christophers, occupied by both the French and 
the English, was given to England in 1667 according to the seventh article of the 
Treaty of Breda, the next few years were filled with constant controversies in 
the effort to compose the differences between the two nations (see the Calendar 
of State Papers, Colonial, 1669-1674, and the Acts of the Privy Council, vol. 2). 
The above proclamation was reported as advisable by the Council for Planta 
tions on December 7, 1671 (Col. State Papers, p. 285). 



1671, December 22. 117 

there, so that We might reasonably have expected before this 
time, some Account of the good success of these Our endeavours 
in the happy and peaceable Settlement of Our Subjects in 
their former Proprieties and Possessions; nevertheless, to the 
utter disappointment of Our just expectations, and the general 
Discouragement of such of Our Subjects who formerly Inhab 
ited that Island, We are given to understand, That on or about 
the Twenty fourth of August last past, Sir Charles Wheeler 
hath caused a certain Proclamation to be published in that 
Island, thereby endeavouring to oblige the former Inhabitants 
and Proprietors to appear before a certain Court of Claims by 
him there Erected, and to return with a Stock sufficient for 
the quantity of Land they Claim, on peril of losing such part 
of their Estates they shall not be able to Stock, which shall be 
given to them who are better able y And moreover, to be Con 
tributory to all Levies to be made for satisfaction of the French 
Demand, upon any Article of the Peace at Breda, or for satis 
faction of any other disbursments concerning Fortifications, 
or any other Publick Expences ; with a further menacing inti 
mation to all such as shall be found to have Acted or Counselled 
in the late Rendition of the Island to the French, or have been 
guilty of any Cowardise or Folly in that War, That they are 
not to expect the like advantages with the rest of Our Sub 
jects: And a Declaration, That upon every mans Estate a 
Quit-Rent shall be reserved, greater or lesser, according to 
the merit or demerit of the person Restored, with an allowance 
of no longer time to such of Our Subjects who were in the 
Barbadoes and Caribee Islands, for putting in their Claims, 
then One Moneth, and but Three Moneths to those who were 
in any part of Europe, Virginia, Jamaica, Carolina, Ber 
muda s, or New England, Then which nothing could have 
been done more contrary to the Commission and Instructions 
We had given him, nor more repugnant to Our Royal Inten 
tions, and the just Interests and Advantages of the antient 
Planters and Proprietors: Wherefore, and for the better pre 
vention of the ill consequences which might otherwise ensue 
upon that Proclamation so issued out by the said Sir Charles 
Wheeler, if the same should be allowed to have any force or 
effect, We have thought fit, by Advice of Our Council, to Pub 
lish this Our Royal Proclamation, and do hereby Declare Our 
Will and Pleasure, That the said Proclamation, and everything 
therein contained, is, and shall be null and void, to all intents 
and purposes whatsoever, as if the same had never been had 



nS Royal Proclamations. 

nor made; And because the Return and Re-settlement of the 
antient Planters and Proprietors hath been many ways ob 
structed, not onely by the Severities of the said Illegal Procla 
mation, but by several accidents which for a long time did 
very much retard the Surrender of the said Island, We there 
fore out of the just sense We have of the great Sufferings of the 
said late Planters and Proprietors, do by these presents, for 
their ease, and in their favour, further Declare, That all and 
every the late Planters and Proprietors, their Heirs, Executors 
and Assigns, or their Agents respectively, shall be admitted 
to enjoy their several and respective Plantations, carrying 
with them such Stock onely as they are able, or can con 
veniently provide : Which Grace and Favour of Ours We would 
have to be understood with these Qualifications and Restric 
tions onely (That is to say) That such who have sold their 
Plantations to the French, or Claim under those who did Sell 
the same to the French, shall be obliged to re-imburse the 
Purchasers the Price or Money they or those under whom they 
Claim, did actually receive for their respective Possessions 
and Estates, within the space of one whole year, to be accounted 
from the Re-delivery of the English part of the said Island, 
which We are informed, was upon the -f% of July 1671. And 
all such who have not Sold to the French and their Heirs, 
Executors and Assigns, and their Agents respectively, shall 
be obliged to return unto the said Island before the Twenty 
fifth day of December, which shall be in the year of Our Lord, 
One thousand six hundred seventy two. And We do further 
Publish and Declare Our Royal Will and Pleasure, That no 
Taxes, Tallages, Aides, or other Impositions whatsoever, shall 
at any time hereafter be Assessed or Imposed, nor any Quit- 
Rents Reserved or Required, nor any Moneys Levied, nor 
any kind of Charge be laid upon, or raised out of any Lands 
or Tenements in the said Island, unless it be by vertue of 
some Publick Law made or to be made by the Assembly of 
the said Island, and with the consent of the Governour and 
Counsel there Assembled. And moreover, of Our further 
and more especial Clemency and Favour unto Our good Sub 
jects in the said Island, We are Graciously pleased to Declare, 
That all and every the Inhabitants, Planters and Proprietors 
of the said Island, and all and every person and persons 
Claiming by, from, and under them, or any of them, and all 
other Our Subjects in the said Island, shall be, and are hereby 
Freed, Indempnified, and Discharged, as against Us, Our 



1 67 1, December 22. 119 

Heirs and Successors, of and from all Crimes, Offences, Mis 
carriages, and Misdemeanours whatsoever, which happened, 
and were committed in the said Island during the late War 
in the said Island, and of and from all Pains and Penalties 
incurred for or by reason of any matter or thing done, or 
omitted to be done during the said late War; And of and from 
all Prosecutions, Molestations, or Inquiries touching or con 
cerning the same; All which matters and things shall be, and 
are hereby put into perpetual Oblivion, nor shall the same be 
ever mentioned to the prejudice of any of Our Subjects, either 
in their Persons, Estates, or Reputations. All which We 
Command to be Obeyed in all Our Dominions, and all Our 
Officers Civil and Military, to be Assisting in the Premises, 
as they will answer the contrary at their utmost perils. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the Two and twentieth 
day of December 1671. in the Twenty third year of Our 
Reign, 1671. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

In the Savoy, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill and 
Christopher Barker, Printers to the Kings most Excellent 
Majesty, 1671. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., BodL, B. M., Crawf., Guild., P. C., 
P. R. 0., Q. C., and T. C. D. Abstract printed in " London Gazette," Dec. 
28, 1671. 



1674, March n. 

[Recalling Dispensations of Navigation Act.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR RECALLING DISPENSATIONS WITH SOME CLAUSES IN THE 
ACTS FOR ENCOURAGEMENT AND INCREASING OF SHIP 
PING AND NAVIGATION, AND OF TRADE. 

CHARLES R. 

Whereas We by an Order in Council of the Tenth day of 
May One thousand six hundred seventy two, 1 have Dispensed 

1 See Acts of Privy Council, Colonial, 1613-1680, p. 576. 



i2o Royal Proclamations. 

for sometime with certain Clauses in the late Acts of Parlia 
ment for Encouraging and Increasing of Shipping and Naviga 
tion, and for the Encouragement of Trade; And therein also 
Declared, That when We should think fit to determine that 
Dispensation, We would by Our Royal Proclamation give 
Six Moneths notice thereof, to the end no Merchant, or other 
Person therein concerned should be Surprized. In order 
whereunto, We taking the same into Consideration, have 
thought fit (with the Advice of Our Privy Council) to Publish 
this Our Royal Proclamation; And do hereby Declare, That 
the said Order of the Tenth of May One thousand six hundred 
seventy two, and all and every the Dispensations, Clauses, 
Matters and Things therein contained, shall from and after 
the end of Six moneths next ensuing the Date of this Procla 
mation, cease, determine, and be void to all intents and pur 
poses whatsoever: Whereof all Persons concerned are to take 
notice, and to conform themselves accordingly. 

Given at our Court at Whitehall the Eleventh day of March 
1673/4 in the Six and twentieth year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill and Christopher 
Barker, Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, 1673/4. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., Bodl., B. M., Camb., Crawf., Dalk., 
Guild., P. R. 0., Q. C., and T. C. D. Entered on Patent Rolls. 



1674, November 30. 
[Prohibiting African Trade to Plantations.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

CHARLES R. 

Whereas it is found by Experience, That Traffique with 
Infidels and Barbarous Nations not in Amity with Us, and 
who are not holden by any League or Treaty, cannot be 
carried on without the Establishment of Forts and Factories 
in places convenient, the maintenance whereof requires so 



i 67 4, November 30. 121 

great and constant Expence, that it cannot be otherwise 
defrayed, then by Managing the whole Trade by a Joynt 
Stock; We in Our Royal Wisdom taking the same into Our 
serious Consideration, and more especially having found by 
experience, That the whole Trade of the Coast of Guiny, 
Buiny and Angola, and other parts and places of Africa, so 
much importing our Service, and the Enriching of this Our 
Kingdom, was very much abated, and attempted to be 
Ingrossed by Foreigners, and in eminent danger to be utterly 
lost, and taken from Us, and Our loving Subjects, not onely 
by Foreign Force, but by the Violence and Inconstancy of 
the Heathen Natives: For the Recovery and Preservation 
whereof, We were Graciously pleased to encourage and 
invite Our loving Subjects to Raise a Joynt Stock to be used 
and imployed therein: And in consideration thereof, and for 
the better Securing of such as should come in and be con 
cerned in the said Joynt Stock and Trade, We did by Our 
Letters Patents under Our Great Seal of England, bearing 
date the Seven and twentieth day of September, in the Four 
and twentieth year of Our Reign, 1 Grant unto several of Our 
loving Subjects, the whole entire and onely Trade into and 
from Africa, from the Port of Sally in South Barbary in 
clusive, to the Cape de Bona Esperanza inclusive, with all 
the Islands near adjoyning to those Coasts, and compre 
hended within the Limits aforesaid, and did Incorporate 
them by the name of The Royal African Company of England; 
And the said Company having raised a very great Stock 
sufficient to Manage the Trade thereof, have since, at their 
great Expence and Charge, Fortified and Setled divers Gari- 
sons, Forts and Factories, by which means they have so 
Secured the said Trade, that the same doth now begin to 
flourish, and if not disturbed, is likely to be further improved 
to the great benefit of this Our Kingdom; Nevertheless, We 
are Informed by the humble Petition of the said Company, 
That divers of Our Subjects in several of Our Plantations in 
America, who are not Members of the said Company, nor 
any ways concerned in their Stock, do endeavour to reap the 
Benefit and Fruit thereof; and to that end have already sent 
several Ships into those parts to Trade, and are providing 
more, the which if it should be permitted, and not strictly 
and presently prevented, will disable the said Company 

1 An abstract of this charter, dated September 27, 1672, is printed in the 
Cat. State Papers, Colonial, 1669-1674, p. 409. 



122 Royal Proclamations. 

from supporting the great Charge of maintaining the said 
Forts, Garisons and Factories, and consequently, unavoid 
ably occasion the loss of the whole Trade of those Countreys : 
Wherefore for remedy thereof We have thought fit, with 
Advice of Our Privy Council, 1 to Publish and Declare Our 
Royal Will and Pleasure to be, And We do hereby strictly 
Prohibit and Forbid all and every of Our Subjects whatso 
ever, Except the said Royal Company and their Successours, 
at any time or times hereafter, to send or Navigate any Ship 
or Ships, Vessel or Vessels, or Exercise any Trade from any 
of Our Plantations, Dominions, or Countreys in America, 
to any of the Parts or Coasts of Africa, from Sally to Cape de 
Bona Esperanza, or any of the Islands near thereunto, as 
aforesaid, or from thence to carry any Negro Servants, Gold, 
Elephants Teeth, or any other Goods or Merchandizes of 
the Product or Manufacture of the said Places, to any of Our 
American Dominions or Plantations, upon pain of Our high 
Displeasure, and the forfeiture and loss of the said Negro s, 
Gold, Elephants Teeth, and all other Goods and Merchan 
dizes, and the Ships or Vessels which shall bring or carry the 
same. And We do hereby also strictly Require and Com 
mand all Our Governours, Deputy-Governours, Admirals, 
Vice- Admirals, Generals, Judges of Our Courts of Admiralty, 
Commanders of Our Forts and Castles, Captains of Our 
Royal Ships, Justices of the Peace, Provost-Marshals, Mar 
shals, Comptrollers, Collectors of Our Customs, Wayters, 
Searchers, and all other Our Officers and Ministers Civil and 
Military, by Sea or Land, in every of Our said American 
Dominions or Plantations, to take effectual care. That no 
person or persons whatsoever within their respective Limits 
or Jurisdictions (except the said Company and their Succes 
sours) do send or Navigate any Ships or Vessels, or Exercise 
any Trade from any of Our said Dominions or Plantations, 
to any part of the said Coast of Africa, within the Limits 
aforesaid, or from thence to Import any Negro Servants, 
Gold Elephants Teeth, or other Goods of the Product of any 
of those Parts, into any of Our said Dominions or Plantations 
in America; And if any person or persons shall presume to 
act or do in any wise contrary to this Our Royal Proclama- 

1 The action of the Privy Council, November 4, 1674, resulting from a peti 
tion of the Royal African Company that American interlopers be kept out of 
the African trade, is in the Acts of the Privy Council, i, 614. The proclamation 
was approved on November 25, and on December 2, letters were sent to the 
various colonial governors forwarding directions regarding it (Idem, pp. 615, 616). 



16741 November jo. 123 

tion, to the end Our Will and Pleasure herein may be the 
better observed, We do further Will, Require, and strictly 
Command all Our said Governours, Deputy- Go vernours, 
Admirals, Vice- Admirals, Generals, Judges of Our Court of 
Admiralty, Commanders of Our Forts and Castles, Captains 
of Our Royal Ships, Justices of the Peace, Provost-Marshals, 
Marshals, Comptrollers, Collectors of Our Customs, Wayters, 
Searchers, and all other Our Officers and Ministers Civil and 
Military, by Sea or Land, in every of Our said American 
Dominions and Plantations, That as often as need shall 
require, they be Aiding and Assisting to the said Royal 
African Company, their Successors, Factors, Deputies or 
Assigns, to Attach, Arrest, Take and. Seize all such Ship or 
Ships, Vessel or Vessels, Negro Servants, Gold, Elephants 
Teeth, or Goods, Wares and Merchandizes, wheresoever 
they shall be found, for Our Use, according to Our Royal 
Charter Granted to the said Company, upon pain of Our 
high Displeasure, and as they will answer the contrary at 
their Perils. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall, the Thirtieth day of 
November, in the Six and twentieth year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill and Chris 
topher Barker, Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty. 
1674. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., BodL, B. M., Crawf., Dalk., P. C. t 
P. R. 0., Q. C., and N. Y. Historical Society. Entered on Patent Rolls. 
Abstract printed in "London Gazette," Dec. 10, 1674. 



124 Royal Proclamations. 

1675, October i. 
[For Apprehending Don Philip Hellen.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR THE DISCOVERY AND APPREHENSION OF CAPTAIN DON 
PHILIP HELLEN, ALIAS FITZ-GERALD. 

CHARLES R. 

Whereas it hath bee." -epresented unto Us by the humble 
Petition of Martin Stamp, and due proof made by the Testi 
mony of credible Witnesses, That Timothy Stamp, Brother 
of the said Martin, being a Merchant, was in December 
1672, taken by a Spanish Man of War, and his Ship, called 
the Humility of London, and the Goods therein, to the value 
of Five thousand pounds, carried into the Port of Havana; 
But the Governour of the place not finding cause for the 
Detainer of the said Ship, restored the same, with promise 
of Satisfaction for the Damage sustained, and a Protection 
against all Spanish Ships; Yet during the restraint of the 
said Ship, a Man of War was fitted out under the Command 
of Don Philip Hellen, alias Fitz-gerald 1 (Our Natural born 
Subject) who retook the said Ship within Musquet shot of 
the Castle of Havana, and after Tortured and Murdered the 
said Timothy Stamp, and most of his men; some they hanged 
until they were half dead, and then cut them with their 
swords, afterwards hung them up again until they were 
almost dead, then cut them in pieces with an Ax; others had 
their Arms cut off, and were cleft down with Axes ; And after 
wards the said Don Philip Hellen, alias Fitz-gerald, and his 
Company shared the said Ship and Goods; And the like 
Barbarous cruelty the said Don Philip Hellen, alias Fitz 
gerald, hath since exercised upon other Our Subjects: We 
have therefore thought fit (with the advice of Our Privy 
Council) to publish the same to all Our loving Subjects, and 
doubt not of their care and forwardness in the discovery and 
apprehension of the said Fitz-gerald: And We do by this Our 

1 For various documents regarding Fitzgerald s piracies in the West Indies, 
see Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 1669-1674, pp. 505, 537, 557, 608; Idem, 1675- 
1676, pp. 205, 293; and Acts of the Privy Council, i, pp. 594, 595, 600, 613, 632. 



October i. 125 

Proclamation (whereof he ought and shall be presumed to 
take notice) Enjoyn and Command the said Don Philip 
Hellen, alias Fitz-gerald, within Six Moneths after the pub 
lication hereof, to render himself to one of Our Principal 
Secretaries of State, or to the chief Governour of the Island 
of Jamaica, or to the chief Governour of some other of Our 
Foreign Plantations, to receive and undergo such Order as 
shall be given concerning him. And We do hereby further 
publish and declare, That if the said Don Philip Hellen, 
alias Fitz-gerald, shall not within the time aforesaid, render 
himself accordingly, then if any person or persons what 
soever shall at any time after apprehend and bring him dead 
or alive to one of Our Principal Secretaries of State, or to 
the Governour of Our Island of Jamaica, or to the chief 
Governour of any other of Our Foreign Plantations, he or 
they so apprehending and bringing him, shall have a reward 
of One thousand pieces of Eight. And We do also strictly 
Charge and Command all Our Officers and Ministers, as 
well Military as Civil, and other Our Subjects whatsoever, 
to be diligent, and use their best endeavours to search for 
and apprehend the said Don Philip Helen, alias Fitz-gerald, 
in all places whatsoever, as they will answer the neglect 
therof at their perils. And We do hereby further publish 
and declare, That if any of Our Subjects shall after the pub 
lication of this Our Proclamation, directly or indirectly con 
ceal or harbour the said Don Philip Hellen, alias Fitz-gerald, 
or shall not use his or their best endeavours for his discovery 
and apprehension, as well by giving due advertisement to 
Our Officers, as by all other good means, We will (as there is 
just cause) proceed against them that shall so neglect this 
Our Command, with all severity. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the First day of October 
1675. In the Seven and twentieth year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill and Chris 
topher Barker, Printer to the Kings most Excellent Majesty. 
1675- 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., BodL, B. M., Ch., Crawf., Dalk., P. C., 
P. R. 0., T. C. D., and in N. Y. Historical Society. Entered on Patent 
Rolls. Printed in "London Gazette" Oct. 14, 1675. 



126 Royal Proclamations. 

1675, November 24. 

[Enforcing Navigation Acts.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR PROHIBITING THE IMPORTATION OF COMMODITIES OF 
EUROPE INTO ANY OF His MAJESTIES PLANTATIONS 
IN AFRICA, ASIA, OR AMERICA, WHICH WERE NOT 
LADEN IN ENGLAND, AND FOR PUTTING ALL OTHER 
LAWS RELATING TO THE TRADE OF THE PLANTATIONS, 
IN EFFECTUAL EXECUTION. 

CHARLES R. 

Whereas by one Act of Parliament made in the Fifteenth 
year of His Majesties Reign, Entituled, (An Act for the En 
couragement of Trade) 1 it is Enacted, That from and after the 
Twenty fifth day of March 1664, no Commodities of the 
growth, production or manufacture of Europe, shall be Im 
ported into any Land, Island, Plantation, Colony, Territory 
or Place to His Majesty belonging, or which shall belong unto, 
or be in the possession of His Majesty, His Heirs or Successors, 
in Asia, Africa, or America, (Tanger onely excepted) but what 
shall be bona fide, and without fraud Laden and Shipped in 
England, Wales, or the Town of Berwick upon Tweed, and 
which shall be carried directly thence to the said Lands, 
Islands, Plantations, Colonies, Territories and Places, and 
from no other place whatsoever, any Law, Statute, or Usage 
to the contrary notwithstanding, under the Penalty of the 
Loss of all such Commodities of the Growth, Production or 
Manufacture of Europe, as shall be Imported into any of them, 
from any other place whatsoever, by Land, or by Water; and 
if by Water, of the Ship or Vessel also in which they were 
Imported, with all her Guns, Tackle, Furniture, Ammunition 
and Apparel; the said forfeitures to be disposed as by the said 
Act is directed : Provided, that it shall be lawful to Ship and 
Lade in such Ships, and so Navigated, as in the said Act is 
expressed, in any part of Europe, Salt for the Fisheries of New 

1 The second Navigation Act of 1663, cited as 15 Chas. II, ch. 7, printed 
in Statutes of the Realm, vol. 5, p. 449. 



1(575? November 24. 127 

England and New-found-land; and to ship and lade in the 
Maderas, Wines of the growth thereof; and ship and lade in 
the Western Islands, or Azores, Wines of the growth of trie 
said Islands; and to ship and take in Servants or Horses in 
Scotland or Ireland; and to ship or lade in Scotland, all sorts 
of victual of the growth or production of Scotland; and to 
ship or lade in Ireland, all sorts of victual of the growth or 
production of Ireland, and the same to transport into any of 
the said Lands, Islands, Plantations, Colonies, Territories, or 
Places; Any thing in the foregoing Clause to the contrary 
notwithstanding. And whereas His Majesty is well in 
formed, that notwithstanding the said Act of Parliament, 
great quantities of other Commodities of the growth, produc 
tion and manufacture of Europe (then what are by the said 
Act permitted) have been, and are daily Imported into several 
of His Colonies, Plantations, and Territories, in Asia, Africa 
and America, (besides Tanger;) and that His Majesties Sub 
jects of some of His Colonies, and Plantations, have not onely 
supplied themselves with such Commodities not Shipped in 
England, Wales or Berwick, but have conveyed them by Land 
and Water, to other of His Majesties Colonies and Plantations, 
to the great prejudice of His Majesties Customs, and of the 
Trade and Navigation of this Kingdom : His Majesty therefore 
for the prevention thereof for the future, doth by this His 
Royal Proclamation, (with the Advice of His Privy Council) 1 
Require and Command all and every his Subjects, that they 
do not for the future presume to Import any Commodities of 
the growth, production, or manufacture of Europe, (except 
what may be Imported by vertue of the Proviso aforesaid) by 
Land, or Water, into any Land, Island, Plantation, Colony, 
Territory or Place to His Majesty belonging, or which here 
after shall belong unto, or be in the possession of His Majesty, 
His Heirs and Successors, (Tanger onely excepted) but which 
shall be bona fide, and without fraud laden and Shipped in 
England, Wales, or the Town of Berwick, and carried directly 
from thence, according to the true meaning of the said Act; 
whereof all persons concerned are to take notice, and yield 
due obedience thereunto. And His Majesty doth further 
strictly direct and require all Governours of His Colonies, and 
Plantations, and of all Lands, Islands, and Places in His 
possession in Asia, Africa, and America, (Tanger onely ex- 

1 Ordered published by the Council, November 24, 1675 (Acts of Privy 
Council, i, 638). 



128 Royal Proclamations. 

cepted) to take care that this His Royal Proclamation be put 
in due Execution : and also that one Act made in the Twelfth 
Year of His Majesties Reign, Entituled, An Act for the En 
couraging and Increase of Shipping and Navigation, and one 
Act made in the Two and twentieth and Three and twentieth 
years of His Reign, Entituled, (An Act for the Regulating the 
Plantation Trade,) and also one other Act made in the Five 
and twentieth year of His Majesties Reign, Entituled, (An 
Act for the better Securing the Plantation Trade) 1 together 
with all other the Laws of this His Kingdom of England, 
relating to the Trade of His Plantations, be duely observed 
and put in execution in their respective Governments; And 
His Majesty doth further require all His said Governours, 
and that they Command all Officers, Civil and Military under 
their respective Commands, to be aiding and assisting therein, 
and to the Collectors and other Officers of His Majesties Cus 
toms under them, in the Execution of their respective Offices 
in order thereunto, as they and every of them will answer the 
contrary at their utmost perils. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall, the Twenty fourth day of 
November, In the Seven and twentieth year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill and Christopher 
Barker, Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty. 1675. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., Bodl, B. M., Crawf., Dalk., Guild., 
P. C., P. R. 0., Q. C., and T. C. D. Printed in " London Gazette," Dec. 6, 
1675- 

1 The above three acts are (i) "An Act for the Encourageing and increasing 
of Shipping and Navigation," 12 Chas. II, ch. 18, of the year 1660, printed in 
Statutes of the Realm, v, 246; (2) "An Act to prevent the Planting of Tobacco 
in England, and for Regulating the Plantation Trade," 22-23 Chas. II, ch. 26, 
of the year 1670, printed in Statutes of the Realm, v, 747; and (3) " An Act for the 
incouragement of the Greeneland and Eastland Trades, and for the better 
secureing the Plantation Trade," 25 Chas. II, ch. 7, of the year 1672, printed 
in Statutes of the Realm, v, 792. For a general description of the Navigation 
Acts, see Channing, History of the United States, ii, 27; Channing s "Navigation 
Laws" in Amer. Antiquarian Society Proceedings, vi, 160; and Beer s "Com 
mercial Policy of England toward the American Colonies," in Columbia Uni 
versity Studies, ii, pt. 2. The acts themselves are reprinted in MacDonald s 
Select Charters. 



1676, April i. 129 



1676, April i. 
[Concerning Passes for Ships.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

CONCERNING PASSES FOR SHIPS. 

CHARLES R. 

His Majesty (with the Advice of His Privy Council) doth 
by this His Royal Proclamation publish and declare, That all 
Passes for Ships Entred out for the East or West Indies, or 
the parts of Africa beyond Cape Verde, which were granted 
before the date hereof, shall determine upon their return, and 
being unladen in some Port of England or Wales, or at the 
Town of Berwick upon Tweed; And that all Passes by vertue 
of any other Treaties then those of Algiers, Tunis and Tripoly, 1 
for Ships Entred for the Mediterranean Sea, or Trading there, 
granted before the 25 th of March 1675. shall determine at 
Michaelmas 1676. And that all such Passes for such Ships, 
granted after the 25 th of March 1675. and before the date of 
this Our Royal Proclamation, shall determine on the 25 th day 
of March 1677. And that if any of the said Ships shall be in 
any Port of this Kingdom, or in any Member or Creek thereof, 
at the time of the publishing of this Our Royal Proclamation, 
their Passes shall be then void; And if any of the said Ships 
shall happen to come into any Port of England, after the pub 
lishing of this Our Royal Proclamation, and before the ex 
piring of the said Periods, and unlade, their Passes shall 

1 Two treaties had been recently entered into, viz.: "Articles of Peace be 
tween Great Britain and Tunis, concluded October, 1662. Renewed and con 
firmed February 4, 1674/5," an d " Capitulations and Articles of Peace between 
Great Britain and the Ottoman Empire, September, 1675" (Several Treaties 
of Peace and Commerce, London, 1686, pp. 157, 203. See also Playfair s Scourge 
of Christendom, pp. 115-119). One of the clauses of these treaties required that 
all Englishmen traveling in foreign ships should be provided with passports. 
A proclamation of December 22, 1675, ordered that all passes issued before 1675 
should expire on May i, 1676, and that all new passes, except those for Guinea 
or the East or West Indies, should be in force for only one year. Another 
proclamation of January 28, 1676, explained that the passes referred to as ex 
piring on May i concerned only the Mediterranean trade (see proclamation 
calendared in Lord Crawford s Tudor and Stuart Proclamations). The procla 
mation above printed was issued to determine the expiration of passes granted 
for the English colonial trade. 



130 Royal Proclamations. 

thereupon determine; And also that all Passes granted to 
Ships Entred to any other part of the World, or Coastwise, 
such Passes shall determine on the 2Q th day of September 1676. 
And hereof all persons concerned are to take notice at their 
perils. 

Given at Our Court at Newmarket the First day of April 
1676. In the Eight and twentieth year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill and Christopher 
Barker, Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty. 1676. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., BodL, B. M., Crawf., Dalk., Guild., P. C., 
P. R. 0., Q. C., and T. C. D. Printed in " London Gazette," No. 1084. 



1676, October 27. 

[Suppressing the Rebellion in Virginia.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR THE SUPPRESSING A REBELLION LATELY RAISED WITHIN 
THE PLANTATION OF VIRGINIA. 

CHARLES R. 

Whereas Nathaniel Bacon 1 the Younger, of the Plantation 
of Virginia, and others his Adherents and Complices (being 
Persons of mean and desperate Fortunes) have lately in a 
Traiterous and Rebellious manner levyed War within the 
said Plantation, against the Kings most Excellent Majesty, 
and more particularly being Assembled in a Warlike manner 
to the number of about Five Hundred Persons, did in the 
Moneth of June last past, Inviron and Besiege the Governor 
and Assembly of the said Plantation (then met together 
about the Publique affairs of the same Plantation) and did by 
Menaces and Threats of present Death compel the said 

1 The most comprehensive account of Bacon s Rebellion is to be found in 
Osgood s American Colonies, iii, ch. 8. The above proclamation was ordered 
by the King in Council, Sept. 20, 1676, and altered and approved Oct. 25 
(see CaL State Papers, Colonial, 1675-1676, pp. 455, 474). 



1676, October 27. 131 

Governor and Assembly to pass divers pretended Acts: To 
the end therefore that the said Nathaniel Bacon and his 
Complices may suffer such punishment as for their Treason 
and Rebellion they have justly deserved; His Majesty doth 
(by this His Royal Proclamation) Publish and Declare, 
That the said Nathaniel Bacon, and all and every such 
Persons and Person, being His Majesties Subjects within the 
said Plantation, as have taken Arms under, willingly joyned 
with, or assisted, or shall hereafter take Arms under, will 
ingly joyn with, or assist the said Nathaniel Bacon, in raising 
or carrying on the War (by him as aforesaid levyed) are and 
shall be guilty of the crime of High Treason. And His 
Majesty doth hereby strictly Charge and Command all His 
Loving Subjects, That they do use their utmost endeavour 
to Apprehend and Secure the Persons of the said Nathaniel 
Bacon, and of all and every the said Complices, in order to 
the bringing of them to their Legal Tryal. And for the 
better encouragement of His Majesties said Loving Subjects 
to Apprehend and bring to Justice the said Nathaniel Bacon 
(who hath been chief Contriver and Ring-leader of the said 
Rebellion) His Majesty doth hereby Declare, That such 
Person or Persons as shall Apprehend the said Nathaniel 
Bacon, and him shall bring before His Majesties Governor, 
Deputy Governor, or other Commander in Chief of His 
Majesties Forces within the said Plantation, shall have as a 
Reward from His Majesties Royal Bounty, the sum of Three 
Hundred Pounds Sterling, to be paid in Money by the Lieuten 
ant Governor. And because it may be probable that many 
of the Adherents and Complices of the said Nathaniel Bacon 
may have been seduced by him into this said Rebellion, by 
specious, though false pretences; His Majesty out of His 
Royal Pity and Compassion to his seduced Subjects, doth 
hereby Declare, That if any of His Subjects who have or 
shall have ingaged with, or adhered to the said Nathaniel 
Bacon in the said Rebellion, shall within the space of Twenty 
days after the publishing of this His Royal Proclamation, 
submit himself to His Majesties Government, and before 
the Governor, Deputy Governor, or other Commander in 
Chief of His Majesties Forces within the said Plantation, 
take the Oath of Obedience mentioned in the Act of Parlia 
ment made in England in the Third year of the Reign of 
His Majesties Royal Grandfather, and give such Security 
for his future good behaviour, as the said Governor, Deputy 



132 Royal Proclamations. 

Governor, or Commander in Chief shall approve of, That 
then such Person so submitting, taking such Oath, and 
giving such Security, is hereby pardoned and forgiven the 
Rebellion and Treason by him committed, and shall be free 
from all punishments and forfeitures for or by reason of the 
same. And His Majesty doth hereby further Declare, That 
if any of His Subjects who have engaged, or shall engage with, 
or have adhered, or shall adhere to the said Nathaniel Bacon 
in the said Rebellion, shall not accept of this His Majesties 
gracious offer of Pardon, but shall after the said Twenty 
days expired, persist and continue in the said Rebellion, 
That then such of the Servants or Slaves of such persons so 
persisting and continuing such Rebellion, as shall render 
themselves to, and take up Arms under His Majesties Gov 
ernor, Deputy Governor, or other Commander in Chief of 
His Majesties Forces within the said Plantation, shall have 
their Liberty, and be for ever Discharged and Free from the 
Service of the said Offenders. And to the intent His Majes 
ties Loving Subjects within the said Plantation may under 
stand how desirous and careful His Majesty is to remove 
from them all just Grievances, His Majesty doth hereby 
make known to all His said Subjects, That he hath not only 
alrady given particular Instructions to His Governor, to 
reduce the Salaries of the Members of the Assembly to such 
moderate rates as may render them less burthensom to the 
Countrey, but hath also appointed and sent into the said 
Plantation, Herbert Jeffreys Esq; Sir John Berry Knight, 
and Francis Morison Esq; His Majesties Commissioners, 
to inquire into, and report to His Majesty all such other 
Grievances as His Majesties subjects within the said Planta 
tion do at present lye under, to the end that such relief and 
redress may be made therein, as shall be agreeable to His 
Majesties Royal Wisdom and Compassion. And although 
the pretended Acts or Laws made in the said Assembly of 
June last (being in manner aforesaid obtained) are in them 
selves null and void, yet to the intent no Person may pretend 
ignorance, His Majesty hath thought fit hereby to Declare 
and Publish His Royal Pleasure to be, That all and every 
Acts and Act, made or pretended to be made by the said 
Governor and Assembly in the late Grand Assembly held 
at James City in the Moneth of June last past, shall be taken 
and held as null and void, and shall not for the future be 
observed or put in execution. 



1681, April 2. 133 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall this Seven and Twentieth 
day of October, 1676. In the Eight and twentieth year of 
Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill and Chris 
topher Barker, Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, 
1676. 

2 pp. folio. Two copies in P. R. 0. 



1681, April 2. 
[Granting Pennsylvania to William Penn.] 

CHARLES R. 

Whereas His Majesty, in consideration of the great Merit 
and Faithful Services of Sir William Penn deceased, and for 
divers other good Causes Him thereunto moving, hath been 
Graciously pleased by Letters Patents bearing Date the Fourth 
day of March last past, 1 to Give and Grant unto William 
Penn Esquire, Son and Heir of the said Sir William Penn, all 
that Tract of Land in America, called by the Name of Penn- 
silvania, as the same is Bounded on the East by Delaware 
River, from Twelve Miles distance Northwards of Newcastle 
Town, unto the Three and fourtieth Degree of Northern 
Latitude, if the said River doth extend so far Northwards, 
and if the said River shall not extend so far Northward, then 
by the said River so far as it doth extend : And from the Head 
of the said River, the Eastern Bounds to be determined by a 
Meridian Line to be Drawn from the Head of the said River, 
unto the said Three and fourtieth Degree, the said Province 
to extend Westward Five Degrees in Longitude, to be Com 
puted from the said Eastern Bounds, and to be Bounded on 
the North, by the Beginning of the Three and fourtieth De 
gree of Northern Latitude, and on the south by a Circle 

1 The charter of Pennsylvania, March 4, 1681, is printed in the Charter to 
William Penn, and Laws of the Province of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, 1879, where 
a fac-simile of the original document is also reproduced. In the Public Record 
Office is a draft of the charter, dated February 28, 1681, and signed by the clerk 
of the Chapel of the Rolls (Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 1681-1685, p. 14; see also 
Acts of Privy Council, ii, 17). For the founding of Pennsylvania, see Shepherd s 
History of Proprietary Government in Pennsylvania. 



134 Royal Proclamations. 

Drawn at Twelve Miles distance from Newcastle Northwards, 
and Westwards unto the Beginning of the Fourtieth Degree 
of Northern Latitude, and then by a straight line Westwards 
to the limit of Longitude above mentioned, together with all 
Powers, Preheminencies and Jurisdictions necessary for the 
Government of the said Province, as by the said Letters 
Patents, Reference being thereunto had, doth more at large 
appear. 

His Majesty doth therefore hereby Publish and Declare His 
Royal Will and Pleasure, That all Persons Settled or Inhab 
iting within the Limits of the said Province, do yield all Due 
Obedience to the said William Penn, His Heirs and Assigns, 
as absolute Proprietaries and Governours thereof, as also to 
the Deputy or Deputies, Agents or Lieutenants, Lawfully 
Commissionated by him or them, according to the Powers 
and Authorities Granted by the said Letters Patents; Where 
with His Majesty Expects and Requires a ready Complyance 
from all Persons whom it may concern, as they tender His 
Majesties Displeasure. 

Given at the Court at Whitehall the Second day of April 
1 68 1. In the Three and thirtieth year of Our Reign. 

To the Inhabitants and 

Planters of the Province By his Majesties Command, 
of Pennsilvania. CONWAY. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill, Thomas 
Newcomb, and Henry Hills, Printers to the Kings most 
Excellent Majesty. 1681. 

i p. folio. Copy in B. M. Printed in " Charter to William Penn, and 
Laws of the Province of Pennsylvania" 1879, p. 466, from original in Land 
Office at Harrisburg. Reproduced in lithograph fac-simile in J. J. Smith s 
(i American Historical and Literary Curiosities" 1860, series 2, pi. 43. 



1685, February 6. 135 

1685, February 6. 
[Continuing Officers in the Colonies.] 

BY THE KING, 
A PROCLAMATION. 

JAMES R. 

Forasmuch as it hath pleased Almighty God lately to call 
unto his infinite Mercy the most High and Mighty Prince, 
Charles the Second of most Blessed Memory, the Kings 
Majesties most Dear and most Entirely Beloved Brother, by 
whose Decease the Authority and Power of the most part of 
the Officers and Places of Jurisdiction and Government within 
his Majesties Dominions did cease and fail, the Soveraign 
Person failing, from whom the same were derived. The Kings 
most Excellent Majesty in His Princely Wisdom and Care of 
the State (reserving to His Own Judgment hereafter, the Ref 
ormation and Redress of any Abuses in Mis-government, 
upon due Knowledge and Examination thereof) is Pleased, 
and hath so expresly Signified, That all Persons that at the 
time of the Decease of the late Kings His dearly beloved 
Brother,, were Duly and Lawfully Possessed of, or Invested in 
any Office, or Place of Authority or Government, either Civil or 
Military, within His Majesties Realm of England and Ireland, 
Islands of Jerzey and Guernsey, Sark or Alderney, or within 
His Majesties Colonies and Plantations in America; And 
namely, all Governors, Lieutenants or Deputy- Governors, 
Councellors, Judges, Justices, Provost-Marshals, Sheriffs, 
Justices of the Peace, and all others in place of Government, 
either Meaner or Superior, as aforesaid ; And all other Officers 
and Ministers, whose Interests and Estates in their Offices 
are determined, shall be, and shall hold themselves continued 
in the said Places and Offices, under the same Condition as 
formerly they held and enjoyed the same, until His Majesties 
Pleasure be further known, or that other Provision be made 
pursuant to His late Majesties Commission and Instructions 
to His Governors and Officers of the Islands, Colonies and 
Plantations aforesaid. And that in the mean while, for the 
Preservation of the State, and necessary Proceedings in matters 
of Justice, and for the Safety and Service of the State; All the 
said Persons of whatsoever Degree or Condition may not fail, 



136 Royal Proclamations. 

every one severally, according to his Place, Office or Charge, 
to proceed in the Performance of all Duties thereunto belong 
ing, as formerly appertained unto them, while the late King 
was living. And further, His Majesty doth hereby Will and 
Command all and singular His Highnesses Subjects, of what 
Estate, Dignity, and Degree, they or any of them be, to be 
Aiding, Helping and Assisting, and at the Commandment of 
the said Officers and Ministers, in the Performance and Execu 
tion of the said Offices and Places, as they and every of them 
Tender His Majesties Displeasure, and will answer the Con 
trary at their uttermost Perils. And further, His Majesty s 
Will and Pleasure and Express Commandment is, That all 
Orders and Directions Made or Given by the Late King, of 
most Blessed Memory, the Lords of His Privy-Council, or 
His Principal Secretaries of State, or other Legal Authority, 
derived from His said Majesty in His Lifetime, shall be 
Obeyed and Performed by all and every Person and Persons, 
and all and every Thing and Things to be done thereupon, 
shall Proceed as Fully and Amply as the same should have 
been Obeyed or Done, in the Life of the said Late King, His 
Majesty s most Dearly and most Entirely Beloved Brother, 
until His Majesties Pleasure be further known thereupon. 1 

Given at the Court at Whitehall, the Sixth Day of Feb 
ruary, In the First Year of His Majesty s Reign of England, 
Scotland, France and Ireland, and other His Majesties 
Territories and Dominions. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill deceas d: 
And by Henry Hills, and Thomas Newcomb, Printers to the 
Kings most Excellent Majesty. 1684. 

i p. folio. Copies in Bodl., B. M., Ch., Crawf., Dalk., Guild., P. C., 

8. C., and T. C. D.; also in Mass. State Archives. Entered in Privy 
ouncil Register, II James, vol. i, p. 6. 

1 A letter to the several Governors of the Plantations was drawn up in the 
Council, February 6, 1685, announcing the death of King Charles, ordering that 
the new King be proclaimed in the colonies, and transmitting the above procla 
mation (Acts of Privy Council, ii, 74; see also Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 
1685-1688, p. i). 



1685, April i. 137 

1685, April i. 
[Prohibiting African Trade to Plantations.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

To PROHIBIT His MAJESTIES SUBJECTS TO TRADE WITHIN 

THE LIMITS ASSIGNED TO THE ROYAL AFRICAN COMPANY 

OF ENGLAND, EXCEPT THOSE OF THE COMPANY. 

JAMES R. 

Whereas Our Dearly Beloved Brother the late King of 
ever Blessed Memory, for the Supporting and Managing of 
a Trade very beneficial to this Our Kingdom, and Our Foreign 
Plantations upon the Coasts of Guiny, Buiny, Angola, and 
other Parts and Places in Africa, from the Port of Sally in 
South-Barbary inclusive, to the Cape De Bona Esperanza 
inclusive, by His Letters Patents under the Great Seal of 
England, bearing Date the Twenty seventh day of September, 
in the Four and twentieth year of His Reign, did Incorporate 
divers of His Loving Subjects, by the Name of the Royal 
African Company of England; 1 and did thereby Grant unto 
the said Company the whole, intire, and onely Trade into, 
and from Africa aforesaid, and the Islands and Places near 
adjoyning to the Coast of Africa, and comprehended within 
the Limits aforesaid, with Prohibition to all other His Majes 
ties Subjects to Trade there: And that in pursuance to such 
Grant, the said Company have Raised a very Great Stock 
Sufficient to Manage the Trade thereof; and have since been 
at great Charges and Expence in Fortifying and Settling 
divers Garrisons, Forts and Factories for the better Securing 
of the said Trade, whereby the same began to flourish, to the 
great Commodity of this Kingdom, and Our Foreign Planta 
tions, until of late disturbed by several ill disposed Persons, 
who preferring their private profit before the Publick Good, 
have contrary to the said Royal Grant, and the Express 
Proclamation of the King Our Dearly Beloved Brother, 
bearing Date the Thirtieth day of November, in the Six and 
twentieth year of His Reign, in a Clandestine and Disorderly 

1 See ante, p. 121. 



138 Royal Proclamations. 

manner, Traded into those Parts, to the apparent danger of 
the Decay and Destruction of the said Trade, and in manifest 
Contempt and Violation of the undoubted Prerogative of the 
Crown, whose Right it is by the known Laws of these Our 
Realms, to Limit and Regulate such Foreign Trades into 
those Remote Parts of the World; We taking the same into 
Our Princely Consideration, Do not onely give Leave and 
Direct, That the Persons who have so Contemptuously 
Violated the said Companies Charter, and the said Proc 
lamation, be Prosecuted in Our Name at Law, in order to 
their Condign Punishment according to their Demerits: 
But for the Prevention of the like evil Practices for the future, 
We have thought fit, with Advice of Our Privy Council, to 
Publish and Declare Our Royal Will and Pleasure to be, 
And We do hereby strictly Prohibit and Forbid all and every 
of Our Subjects whatsoever, except the said Royal Company 
and their Successors, and such as shall be Imployed or Licenced 
by them, at any time or times hereafter to Send or Navigate 
any Ship or Ships, Vessel or Vessels, or Exercise any Trade to 
or from any of the Parts or Coasts of Africa from Sally, to 
Cape De Bona Esperanza, or any of the Islands near adjoyn- 
ing thereunto as aforesaid, or from thence to carry any 
Negro Servants, Gold, Elephants Teeth, or any other Goods 
and Merchandizes of the Product or Manufacture of the 
said Places upon Pain of Our High Displeasure, and the 
Forfeiture and Loss of the said Negroes, Gold, Elephants 
Teeth, and all other Goods and Merchandizes, and the Ships 
and Vessels which shall be taken or found Trading in any 
Place or Places upon the Coast of Africa aforesaid, within the 
Limits aforesaid: And We do hereby also strictly Require 
and Command all Our Governours, Deputy- Go vernours, 
Admirals, Vice-Admirals, Generals, Judges of Our Courts 
of Admiralty, Commanders of Our Forts and Castles, Cap 
tains of Our Royal Ships, Justices of the Peace, Provost- 
Marshals, Marshals, Comptrollers, Collectors of Our Cus 
toms, Waiters, Searchers, and all other Our Officers and 
Ministers Civil and Military, by Sea or Land, in every of 
Our said American Dominions or Plantations, to take effectual 
Care That no Person or Persons whatsoever, within their 
respective Limits or Jurisdictions, (except the said Company 
and their Successors, and such as shall be Employed or 
Licenced by them) do Send or Navigate any Ships or Vessels, 
or Exercise any Trade from any of Our said Dominions or 



1685, April i. 139 

Plantations, to any Part of the said Coast of Africa, within 
the Limits aforesaid; Or from thence to Import any Negro 
Servants, Gold, Elephants Teeth, or other Goods of the 
Product of any of those Parts, into any of Our said Dominions 
or Plantations in America; And if any Person or Persons 
shall presume to Act or Do in any wise Contrary to this Our 
Royal Proclamation, To the end Our Will and Pleasure 
herein may be the better Observed, We do further Will and 
Require and strictly Command all Our said Governours, 
Deputy-Governours, Admirals, Vice- Admirals, Generals, 
Judges of Our Court of Admiralty, Commanders of Our Forts 
and Castles, Captains of Our Royal Ships, Justices of the 
Peace, Provost Marshals, Marshals, Comptrollers, Collectors 
of Our Customs, Waiters, Searchers, and all other Our Officers 
and Ministers Civil and Military, by Sea or Land, in every 
of Our said American Dominions and Plantations, That as 
often as need shall require, They be Aiding and Assisting to 
the said Royal African Company, their Successors, Factors, 
Deputies or Assigns, to Attach, Arrest, Take, and Seize all 
such Ship or Ships, Vessel or Vessels, Negro Servants, Gold, 
Elephants Teeth, or Goods, Wares and Merchandizes where 
soever they shall be found, for Our use, according to Our 
Royal Charter Granted to the said Company, upon Pain of 
Our High Displeasure, and as they will Answer the Con 
trary at their Perils: And We do hereby Require and Com 
mand all and every of Our Subjects who are or reside in 
Africa aforesaid, within the Limits aforesaid, or who are 
upon the Sea in their Voyage thither, Except such who are 
Imployed or Licenced by the said Company, That they do 
within Four Months next ensuing the Date hereof, Depart 
thence, and Return into this Kingdom, upon Pain and Peril 
that may fall thereon. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall, the First Day of April, 
1685. In the First Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of John Bill deceas d: 
And by Henry Hills, and Thomas Newcomb, Printers to the 
Kings most Excellent Majesty, 1685. 

i p. folio. Copies in Bodl., B. M., Ch., Crawf., Guild., P. C., Q. C., 
and T. C. D. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, 
II James, wl. i, p. 55. Noted in " London Gazette" April 9, 1685. 



140 Royal Proclamations. 

1688, January 20. 
[Suppressing Pirates in America.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR THE MORE EFFECTUAL REDUCING AND SUPPRESSING OF 
PIRATES AND PRIVATEERS IN AMERICA. 

JAMES R. 

Whereas frequent Robberies and Piracies have been, and 
are daily committed by great numbers of Pirates and Priva 
teers as well on the Seas as on the Land of and in America, 
which hath occasioned a great prejudice and obstruction to 
the Trade and Commerce as well of Our Subjects, as of the 
Subjects of Our Allies, and hath given a great Scandal and 
Disturbance to Our Government in those Parts. And whereas 
We being resolved to take some effectual course for the putting 
an end to all such Outragious Insolencies, have therefore 
thought it requisite to send a Squadron of Ships into the 
Parts aforesaid, under the Command of Our Trusty and Wei- 
beloved Servant Sir Robert Holmes, 1 Knight, Our Governor 
of Our Isle of Wight, and have otherwise given him all neces 
sary Powers for Suppressing of the said Pirates and Privateers, 
either by force, or assurance of Pardon, and have Constituted 
and Appointed the said Sir Robert Holmes Our Sole Com 
missioner in that Affair; Now to the end that this Our Royal 
Purpose may be the better put in Execution, and that none of 
the said Offenders may have any cause of excuse or pretence 
left for want of a due Advertisement of Our Intended Mercy 
and Clemency towards them, upon their withdrawing them 
selves from their said wicked and Piratical courses for the 
future: We are Graciously pleased hereby to Promise and 
Declare, That in case any such Pirate or Privateer Pirates 
or Privateers shall within the space of Twelve months next 

1 Holmes was commissioned by the King, August 21, 1687, to command a 
squadron to be sent to the West Indies for the suppression of pirates. On 
November 12, letters patent were issued granting to him all goods that he should 
take from the pirates for three years (Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 1685-1688, 
pp. 421, 467). In the Colonial Entry Books in the Public Record Office are 
entered the orders from the King to the Governors of the various colonies 
requiring the publication of this proclamation (Idem, p. 488). 



1 688, January 20. 141 

ensuing the Date of this Our Proclamation, either in Person, 
or by their Agents Surrender, or become obliged to Surrender 
him or themselves unto the said Sir Robert Holmes, or any 
other person or persons appointed by him, or such other person 
or persons as in case of his Death shall be further Constituted 
and Appointed by Us, within any of Our said Islands, Planta 
tions, Colonies, or other Places on the Sea or Land, lying 
between the Tropiques of Cancer and Capricorn in America, 
and in case any Pirate or Privateer, Pirates or Privateers 
shall within the space of Fifteen months next ensuing the 
Date of these Presents, Surrender, or become obliged to Sur 
render him or themselves to the said Sir Robert Holmes, or 
any others Appointed as aforesaid, in any other parts of 
America, or within Our Kingdom of England, and shall give 
sufficient Security to be approved of by the said Sir Robert 
Holmes, or in case of his Death, by such other person or per 
sons as shall be further Appointed by Us, for his or their future 
good Behaviour, We will, upon such humble Submission, and 
after such Security given, Grant unto such Pirate or Pirates, 
Privateer or Privateers, Our Gracious, Full and Ample Pardon 
for all Piracies or Robberies committed by him or them upon 
the Sea or Land before the Date of these Presents. And we do 
hereby straightly Charge and Command all and singular Our 
Admirals, Vice -Admirals, Chief Governours, Captains, Com 
manders, Mariners, Seamen, and all Our Officers and Ministers 
of and in all and every Our said Islands, Plantations, Colonies, 
and Territories whatsoever, and of all and every Our Ships of 
War and other Vessels, and all other Our Officers and Subjects 
whatsoever, not only to be Aiding, Favouring and Assisting 
in their several Places and Stations, unto the said Sir Robert 
Holmes, and such other Person or Persons as shall be appointed 
as aforesaid in and for the more effectual Reducing and Sup 
pressing of all manner of Pirates and Privateers within the 
Limits and Parts aforesaid, or any of them, but also (upon 
the producing a Certificate or Instrument under the Hand 
and Seal of the said Sir Robert Holmes, or such other Person 
as in case of his Death shall be further Appointed by Us, 
signifying that any Pirate or Privateer, Pirates or Privateers 
hath or have Surrendered him or themselves unto the said Sir 
Robert Holmes, or such other Person or Persons appointed as 
aforesaid, and given Security for their future good Behaviour 
according to the Tenor of these Presents) to permit and suffer 
the said person or persons lawfully to Pass and Travel either 



142 Royal Proclamations. 

by Sea or Land, without any Let, Hindrance or Molestation 
whatsoever, to or from any of Our said Islands, Plantations 
or Colonies, or into Our Kingdom of England, as soon as con 
veniently may be, in Order to his or their receiving Our full 
and Gracious Pardon as aforesaid, and that in the meantime 
no Indictment, Process, or other Proceeding shall be had in 
any of Our Courts of Record, or elsewhere, against any such 
person or persons producing such Certificate or Instrument, 
for any Piracy or Robbery by him or them committed as afore 
said, before the Date of these Presents. Provided always, 
That if any of the said Offender or Offenders whatsoever shall 
after the Publishing of this Our Proclamation, in contempt 
thereof, and of Our Princely Mercy and Clemency to them 
hereby offered, wilfully and obstinately persist in their 
Piracies, Robberies and Outragious Practices, or shall not 
Surrender themselves in manner aforesaid; Then We do hereby 
expressly Direct and Command, That all and every such 
person and persons shall be pursued with the utmost Severity, 
and with the greatest Rigour that may be, until they and every 
of them be utterly Suppressed and Destroyed; We Declaring 
it to be Our Royal Purpose and Resolution, That they and 
every of them shall from thenceforth be finally Excluded and 
Debarr d from receiving any further Favour or Mercy. And 
lastly We do hereby Revoke, Annul and make void all Proc 
lamations by Us formerly Issued touching the Premisses herein 
above mentioned, or any of them. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall this Twentieth Day of 
January, i68|. In the Third Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by Charles Bill, Henry Hills, and Thomas 
Newcomb, Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty. 
x68f. 

2 pp. folio. Copies in Antiq., BodL, B. M., Ch., Crawf., Dalk., Guild., 
P. C., Q. C., and T. C. D.; also in John Carter Brown Library. Entered 
on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, II James, vol. 2, p. 577. 
Printed in "London Gazette," January 26, 1688. 



1 68 8, March 31. 143 

1688, March 31. 
[Prohibiting General Trading at Hudson s Bay.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

PROHIBITING His MAJESTIES SUBJECTS TO TRADE WITHIN THE 
LIMITS ASSIGNED TO THE GOVERNOUR AND COMPANY 
OF ADVENTURERS OF ENGLAND, TRADING INTO HUD 
SON S BAY, EXCEPT THOSE OF THE COMPANY. 

JAMES R. 

Whereas Our Dearest Brother King Charles the Second of 
blessed Memory, did by His Letters Patents under the Great 
Seal of England, bearing Date the Second day of May, in the 
Two and twentieth Year of His Reign, 1 Incorporate a Gover- 
nour and Company for carrying on a Trade in the North-west 
parts of America within the Streights and Bay, commonly 
called Hudson s Streights; and did Grant unto them and their 
Successors, the Sole Trade and Commerce of all those Seas, 
Streights, Bayes, Rivers, Lakes, Creeks, and Sounds in what 
soever Latitude they should be, lying within the Entrance of 
the Streights commonly called Hudson s Streights, together 
with all the Lands, Countreys, and Territories upon the Coasts 
and Confines of the Seas, Bayes, Lakes, Rivers, Creeks and 
Sounds aforesaid, which were not then Possessed by, or 
Granted to any of the Subjects of Our said Royal Brother, 
or Possessed by the Subjects of any other Christian Prince or 
State, Thereby Creating and Constituting the said Governour 
and Company for the time being, and their Successors, the 
true and absolute Lords and Proprietors of the same Terri 
tories, Limits and Places aforesaid, and of all other the Prem 
isses, with express Prohibition to all other the Subjects of 
Our said Royal Brother to Trade to the Parts aforesaid. And 
whereas We are satisfied that the said Company hath for 
many years with great Industry, and at a very great Charge 
and Expense, Settled divers Factories, Erected several Forti 
fications, and maintained the Trade in the Parts aforesaid, to 

1 The charter of May 2, 1670 is printed in Dobbs , Account of the Countries 
adjoining to Hudson s Bay, p. 171, and elsewhere. For the literature regarding 
the founding of this Company, see Winsor s Narrative and Critical History, 
viii, 65. 



144 Royal Proclamations. 

the great Honour and Profit of this Our Kingdom, until of 
late several ill-disposed Persons not being Members of the 
said Company, nor Licensed by them, preferring their private 
profit before the publick good, have contrary to the said Royal 
Grant, in a clandestine and disorderly manner, Traded into 
those parts, to the apparent prejudice, if not destruction, of 
the Trade aforesaid, and in manifest Contempt of Our Pre 
rogative Royal; and the better to colour their evil practices, 
do frame Designs to Hire, or do Hire themselves out in the 
Service of, or in conjunction with Foreigners to Sail to the 
Parts aforesaid, to undermine and destroy the said Companies 
Trade. 1 We, taking the Premisses into Our Princely Con 
sideration, do not only give Leave and Direct, That the Per 
sons who have so contemptuously violated the said Companies 
Charter, be Prosecuted in Our Name at Law, in order to their 
condign Punishment according to their demerits; But for pre 
vention of the like evil practices for the future, We have 
thought fit, with the Advice of Our Privy Council, to Publish 
and Declare Our Royal Will and Pleasure to be, and We do 
hereby strictly Prohibit and Forbid that none of Our Subjects 
whatsoever, except the said Governour and Company and 
their Successors, and such as shall be duly Licensed by them 
at any time or times hereafter do presume to send or Navigate 
any Ship or Ships, Vessel or Vessels, or exercise any Trade 
whatsoever directly or indirectly on their own accounts, or in 
the Service of, or in conjunction with any Foreigner or For 
eigners whatsoever, to, in or from the said Streights and Bay, 
called Hudson s Streights, or to, in or from any Bayes, Rivers, 
Creeks or Places whatsoever, by what names or denomina 
tions soever they or any of them have been heretofore, or shall 
hereafter be called or distinguished, that now are or lie within 
the Entrance of Hudson s Streights aforesaid, in what Latitude 
or Longitude soever the same or any of them do, doth or shall 
lie, remain or be within the Liberties, Territories, or Priviledges 
of the said Company, upon pain of Our high Displeasure, and 
the forfeiture and loss of the Goods, Merchandizes, Ships 
and Vessels which shall be taken or found Trading in any the 
Place or Places aforesaid, or within the Limits aforesaid. And 
We do hereby strictly Charge and Command all and every 

1 The Hudson Bay Company had petitioned for relief from interruptions 
to their trade as early as July 13, 1682 (Acts of Privy Council, ii, 37). The 
Council order approving the above Proclamation was made March 30, 1688 
(Idem, p. 1 08). 



i688, March jj. 145 

Our Subjects of what degree or quality soever, now Trading 
or Traffiquing, or designing to Trade or Trafnque to or from 
the Parts aforesaid, or any of them, contrary to the true mean 
ing of the said Companies Charter, That they forthwith do 
cease and forbear such their Trade and Trafnque, and with 
draw themselves from the parts aforesaid. And We do further 
hereby streightly Require and Command all and singular Our 
Governours, Lieu tenant- Go vernours, Admirals, Vice-Admirals, 
Generals, Judges of all Our Courts of Admiralty, Commanders 
of our Forts and Castles, Captains of Our Royal Ships, Justices 
of the Peace, Provost-Marshals, Marshals, Comptrollers, Col 
lectors of Our Customs, Wayters, Searchers, and all other Our 
Officers and Ministers Civil and Military by Sea or Land, in 
all and every of Our Dominions or Plantations, and all other 
Our Subjects whatsoever and wheresoever, to take effectual 
care that no person or persons whatsoever (except the said 
Company and their Successors, and such as shall be duly 
Licensed) do send or Navigate any Ships or Vessels, or exer 
cise any Trade directly or indirectly from any of Our King 
doms, Dominions or Plantations whatsoever, contrary to the 
said Charter granted to the said Company as aforesaid, to any 
the Places or Limits aforesaid, or from thence to any of Our 
said Kingdoms, Dominions, Plantations, or other Places; And 
if any person or persons shall presume to act or do in any wise 
contrary to this Our Royal Proclamation, We do Will, Re 
quire and streightly Command all and singular Our said 
Go vernours, Lieu tenant- Go vernours, Admirals, Vice-Admirals, 
Generals, Judges of Our Courts of Admiralty, Commanders 
of Our Forts and Castles, Captains of Our Royal Ships, 
Justices of the Peace, Provost-Marshals, Marshals, Sheriffs, 
Comptrollers, Collectors of Our Customs, Wayters, Searchers, 
and all other Our Officers and Ministers Civil and Military by 
Sea or Land in every of Our said Dominions and Plantations, 
and all other Our Officers, Ministers and Subjects whatsoever 
and wheresoever, that as often as need shall require, they and 
every of them respectively be Aiding and Assisting to the 
said Company, their Factors, Deputies, or Assigns, to Attach, 
Arrest, Take and Seize all such Ship or Ships, Vessel or Vessels, 
Goods, Wares and Merchandizes of such Person or Persons as 
shall be Used, Employed, or Traded in contrary to the Charter 
Granted to the said Company, wheresoever they shall be found, 
for Our Use, upon pain of Our high Displeasure, and as they 
will answer the contrary at their Perils. 



146 Royal Proclamations. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the One and thirtieth day 
of March 1688. In the Fourth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by Charles Bill, Henry Hills, and Thomas 
Newcomb, Printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, 
1688. 

i p. folio. Copies in Bodl., B. M., Crawf., Guild., P. C., Q. C., and 
T. C. D.; also in John Carter Brown Library. Entered on Patent Rolls; 
entered in Privy Council Register, II James, wl. 2, p. 641. Printed in 
" London Gazette" April 9, 1688. 



1689, February 19. 

[Continuing Officers in the Colonies.] 

BY THE KING AND QUEEN. 
A PROCLAMATION 

WILLIAM R. 

Forasmuch as it hath pleased God to call Us to the Throne, 
And that thereby it is incumbent upon Us to prevent any 
Inconvenience to Our Subjects that may arise by not execut 
ing the Laws necessary or conducing to the Peace and good 
Government of Our People, Wee therefore do hereby Declare 
Our Royall Pleasure That all Persons being Protestants, 
who at the time of the Receipt of these presents shalbe duly 
and lawfully possessed of, or invested in any office or Place 
of Authority or Governm* either Civill or Military within 
Our Island of [blank left in text] in America, And namely all Gov 
ernors, Lieutenants, or Deputy Governors, Councellors, 
Justices, Provost Marshalls, Sherifs, Justices of the Peace, 
and all others in Place of Governm* either meaner or superior 
as aforesaid. And all other Officers and Ministers whose 
Interests and Estates in their offices are determined, shall be, 
and shall hold themselves continued in the said Places and 
offices under the same condition as formerly they held and 
enjoyed the same, 1 untill Our Pleasure be further known, or 

1 The Prince of Orange issued a circular to the Governors of the Colonies, 
ordering all officers to be continued, on January 12, 1689, but it was not until 
February 19, that the proclamation was approved (Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 
1689-1692, pp. 4, 7; Acts of Privy Council, \\, 122). 



i68g : February ip. 147 

that other Provision be made pursuant to his late Ma ys 
Commission and Instructions to [blank left in text] aforesaid, 
Which Wee do hereby Declare to be in full force untill further 
Order from Us. And that in the mean while for the Preserva 
tion of the State, all the said Persons of whatsoever Degree or 
Condition do not fail every one severally according to his 
Place Office or Charge, to proceed in the performance of all 
Dutys thereunto belonging as formerly apperteyned unto 
them. And further Wee do hereby will and command all 
and singular Our Subjects of what Estate, Dignity and 
Degree they or any of them be, to be aiding, helping and 
assisting, and at the Commandment of the said Officers and 
Ministers in the Performance and Execution of the said 
Offices and Places, as they and every of them tender Our 
Displeasure, and will answer the contrary at their Perills. 

Provided alwaies, that nothing herein shalbe Construed 
or taken to Extend to give or continue any Authority, Priv- 
iledge, Jurisdiction or Command to any Papist or Papists 

With the Said [blank left in text]. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall this 19 th day of February 
1688. in the first year of Our Reigne. 

GOD SAVE KING WILLIAM AND QUEEN MARY. 

No printed copy found. Entered in Privy Council Register, III William, 
vol. i, p. 13. 



1689, May 7. 
[Declaration of War against France.] 

THEIR MAJESTIES 

DECLARATION 

AGAINST THE FRENCH KING. 

WILLIAM R. 

It having pleased Almighty God to make Us the happy 
Instruments of Rescuing these Nations from Great and 
Imminent Dangers, and to place Us upon the Throne of these 



148 Royal Proclamations. 

Kingdoms, We think Our Selves obliged to endeavour to the 
uttermost to Promote the Welfare of Our People, which can 
never be effectually secured, but by preventing the Miseries 
that threaten them from Abroad. 

When we consider the many unjust Methods the French 
King hath of late Years taken to gratifie his Ambition, that 
he has not only Invaded the Territories of the Emperor, and 
of the Empire now in Amity with Us, laying Waste whole 
Countries, and destroying the Inhabitants by his Armies, 
but Declared War against Our Allies without any Provoca 
tion, in manifest Violation of the Treaties Confirmed by the 
Guaranty of the Crown of England; We can do no less then 
Joyn with Our Allies in opposing the Designs of the French 
King, as the Disturber of the Peace, and the Common Enemy 
of the Christian World. 

And besides the Obligations We lie under by Treaties with 
Our Allies, which are a sufficient Justification of Us for taking 
up Arms at this time, since they have called upon Us so to 
do, the many Injuries done to Us and to Our Subjects, with 
out any Reparation, by the French King, are such, that 
(however of late Years they were not taken Notice of, for 
Reasons w^ell known to the World, nevertheless) We will not 
pass them over without a Publick and Just Resentment of 
such Outrages. 

It is not long since the French took Licences from the 
English Governor of New-found-Land, to Fish in the Seas 
upon that Coast, and paid a Tribute for such Licences, as 
an Acknowledgment of the sole Right of the Crown of Eng 
land to that Island; and yet of late, the Encroachments of 
the French upon Our said Island, and Our Subjects Trade 
and Fishery, have been more like the Invasions of an Enemy, 
then becoming Friends, who enjoy d the Advantages of that 
Trade only by Permission. 

But that ,the French King should Invade Our Charibbee 
Islands, and possess himself of Our Territories of the Province 
of New- York and of Hudson s-Bay in a Hostile manner, 
seizing Our Forts, burning Our Subjects Houses, and enrich 
ing his People with the Spoil of their Goods and Merchandizes, 
detaining some of Our Subjects under the Hardship of Impris 
onment, causing others to be inhumanely kill d, and driving 
the rest to Sea in a Small Vessel, without Food and Neces 
saries to support them, are Actions not becoming even an 
Enemy; and yet he was so far from declaring himself so, 



1689, May 7. 149 

that at that very time he was Negotiating here in England 
by his Ministers, a Treaty of Neutrality and good Corre 
spondence in America. 

The Proceedings of the French King against Our Subjects 
in Europe are so Notorious, that We shall not need to enlarge 
upon them; His countenancing the Seizure of English Ships 
by French Privateers, forbidding the Importation of great 
part of the Product and Manufactures of Our Kingdom, and 
imposing exorbitant Customs upon the rest, notwithstanding 
the vast Advantage he and the French Nation reap by their 
Commerce with England, are sufficient Evidences of his 
Designs to destroy the Trade, and consequently to ruine 
the Navigation, upon which the Wealth and Safety of this 
Nation very much depends. 

The Right of the Flag, Inherent in the Crown of England, 
has been Disputed by his Orders in Violation of Our Sover 
eignty of the Narrow Seas, which in all Ages has been Asserted 
by Our Predecessors, and We are resolv d to Maintain for 
the Honour of Our Crown, and of the English Nation. 

But that which must nearly touch Us, is his unchristian 
Prosecution of many of Our English Protestant Subjects in 
France, for matters of Religion, contrary to the Law of 
Nations, and express Treaties, forcing them to abjure their 
Religion by strange and unusual Cruelties, and Imprisoning 
some of the Masters and Seamen of Our Merchant Ships, and 
Condemning others to the Gallies, upon pretence of having 
on Board, either some of his own miserable Protestant Sub 
jects, or their Effects; And Lastly, as he has for some years 
last past, endeavoured by Insinuations and Promises of 
Assistance to overthrow the Government of England; So 
now by open and violent Methods, and the actual Invasion 
of Our Kingdom of Ireland, in support of Our Subjects in 
Arms, and in Rebellion against Us, he is promoting the utter 
Extirpation of Our good and Loyal Subjects in that Our 
Kingdom. 

Being therefore thus necessitated to take up Arms, and 
Relying on the help of Almighty God in Our just under 
taking, We have thought fit to Declare, and do hereby Declare 
War against the French King, and that We will in Conjunc 
tion with Our Allies, Vigorously Prosecute the same by Sea 
and Land (since he hath so unrighteously begun it) being 
assured of the hearty Concurrence and Assistance of Our 
Subjects in support of so good a Cause; Hereby Willing and 



150 Royal Proclamations. 

Requiring Our General of Our Forces, Our Commissioners 
for Executing the Office of High Admiral, Our Lieutenants 
of Our several Counties, Governours of Our Forts and Gar- 
isons, and all other Officers and Soldiers under them, by Sea 
and Land, to do, and execute all acts of Hostility in the 
Prosecution of this War against the French King, his Vassals 
and Subjects, and to oppose their Attempts, Willing and 
Requiring all Our Subjects to take Notice of the same, whom 
We henceforth strictly forbid to hold any Correspondence or 
Communication with the said French King, or his Subjects; 
And because there are remaining in Our Kingdoms many of 
the Subjects of the French King; We do Declare and give 
Our Royal Word, that all such of the French Nation as shall 
demean themselves dutifully towards Us, and not Corre 
spond with Our Enemies, shall be safe in their Persons and 
Estates, and free from all molestation and trouble of any 
Kind. 

Given at Our Court at Hampton-Court, the Seventh Day 
of May, 1689. In the First Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE KING WILLIAM AND QUEEN MARY. 

London, Printed by Charles Bill, and Thomas Newcomb, 
Printers to the King and Queen s most Excellent Majesties, 
1689. 

i p. folio. There are three issues, varying slightly in set-up. Copies 
in Antiq., Bodl., B. M., Ch., Crawf., Dalk., Guild., P. C., P. R. 0., and 
Q. C.; also in John Carter Brown Library. Printed in "London Gazette" 
no. 2452. 



1690, July 14. 
[For Apprehending William Penn.] 

BY THE KING AND QUEEN. 

A PROCLAMATION. 
MARIE R. 

Whereas Their Majesties have received Information 
That the Persons herein after particularly Named have 
Conspired together, and with divers other disaffected Per 
sons, to Disturb and destroy Their Government, arid for 
that purpose have Abetted and Adhered to Their Majesties 



1690, July 14. 151 

Enemies in the present Invasion, for which cause several 
Warrants for High Treason have lately been Issued out 
against them, but they have withdrawn themselves from 
their usual places of Abode, and are fled from Justice; Their 
Majesties therefore have thought fit by the Advice of Their 
Privy Council, to Issue this Their Royal Proclamation: And 
Their Majesties do hereby Command and Require all Their 
Loving Subjects to Discover, Take and Apprehend Edward 
Henry Earl of Litchfeild, Thomas Earl of Aylesbury, William 
Lord Montgomery, Roger Earl of Castlemaine, Richard 
Viscount Preston, Henry Lord Belasyse, Sir Edward Hales, 
Sir Robert Thorold, Sir Robert Hamilton, Sir Theophilus 
Oglethorp, Colonel Edward Sackvile, Lieutenant Colonel 
Duncan Abercromy, Lieutenant Colonel William Richardson, 
Major Thomas Soaper, Captain David Lloyd, William Pen 1 
Esq; Edmund Elliot Esq; Marmaduke Langdale Esq; and 
Edward Rutter wherever they may be found, and to carry 
them before the next Justice of the Peace, or Chief Magis 
trate; who is hereby Required to Commit them to the next 
Goal, there to remain until they be thence delivered by due 
Course of Law: And Their Majesties do hereby Require the 
said Justice or other Magistrate immediately to give Notice 
thereof to Them or Their Privy Council: And Their Majesties 
do hereby Publish and Declare to all Persons that shall 
Conceal the Persons above named, or any of them, or be 
Aiding or Assisting in the Concealing of them, or furthering 
their Escape, that they shall be proceeded against for such 
their Offence with the utmost Severity according to Law. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the Fourteenth Day of 
July, i6go. 2 In the Second Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE KING WILLIAM AND QUEEN MARY. 

1 Because of his friendship for James II, William Penn fell under suspicion 
when William III came to the throne. On February 27, 1689, a warrant was 
issued by the Privy Council for his arrest upon suspicion of high treason (Privy 
Council Register, III William, vol. i, p. 24). In June 1690 the interception of 
a letter written to him by James II caused him to be brought before the Privy 
Council. Upon receiving the news of the proclamation including him among 
the King s enemies, he at once surrenderd himself, but no evidence appearing 
against him, he was discharged by the court of King s bench on November 28 . 
(Diet, of National Biography, xliv, 315). 

2 Dixon, in his William Penn (1872 ed., p. 275), is evidently in error in re 
ferring to this proclamation as issued on June 24. J. M. Rigg, in his article on 
Penn in the Dictionary of National Biography, gives the date as July 17, possibly 
because on one of the two copies of the proclamation in the British Museum 
someone has written this date, or because it was printed in the London Gazette 
on that day. 



152 Royal Proclamations. 

London, Printed by Charles Bill and Thomas Newcomb, 
Printers to the King and Queens most Excellent Majesties. 
1690. 

i p. folio. There are two issues, varying slightly in set-up and in the 
cut of the royal arms. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., Dalk., D. H., 
Guild., P. C., P. R. 0., and Q. C. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in 
Privy Council Register, III William, vol. i, p. 470. Printed in "London 
Gazette" July 17, 1690; reproduced in January 1909 number of the " Jour 
nal of the Friends Historical Society." 



1691, February 5. 

[For Apprehending William Penn.] 

BY THE KING AND QUEEN. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR DISCOVERING AND APPREHENDING THE LATE BISHOP OF 
ELY, WILLIAM PENN, AND JAMES GRAHME. 

MARIE R. 

Whereas Their Majesties have received Information, That 
Francis late Bishop of Ely, William Penn Esquire, and James 
Grahme Esquire, with other Ill-affected Persons, have De 
signed and Endeavoured to Depose Their Majesties, and 
Subvert the Government of this Kingdom, by procuring 
an Invasion of the same by the French, and other Treasonable 
Practices, and have to that end held Correspondence, and 
Conspired with divers Enemies and Traitors, and particu 
larly with Sir Richard Grahme Baronet, (Viscount Preston 
in the Kingdom of Scotland) and John Ashton Gent, lately 
Attainted of High Treason; For which Cause several War 
rants for High Treason have been Issued out against them, 
but they have withdrawn themselves from their usual Places 
of Abode, and are fled from Justice: Their Majesties there 
fore have thought fit, by and with the Advice of Their Privy 
Council, to Issue this Their Royal Proclamation; And Their 
Majesties do hereby Command and Require all Their Loving 
Subjects to Discover, Take and Apprehend the said Francis 
late Bishop of Ely, William Penn and James Grahme, wher 
ever they may be found, and to carry them before the next 



1700, January 29. 153 

Justice of the Peace, or Chief Magistrate, who is hereby 
Required to Commit them to the next Goal, there to remain 
until they be thence Delivered by due Course of Law; And 
Their Majesties do hereby Require the said Justice or other 
Magistrate, immediately to give Notice thereof to Them or 
Their Privy Council. And Their Majesties do hereby Pub 
lish and Declare to all Persons that shall Conceal the Persons 
above named, or any of them, or be Aiding or Assisting in 
the Concealing of them, or furthering their Escape, that they 
shall be Proceeded against for such their Offence with the 
utmost Severity according to Law. 

Given at Our Court at Whitehall the Fifth Day of Feb 
ruary, 1691. In the Second Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE KING WILLIAM AND QUEEN MARY. 

London, Printed by Charles Bill and Thomas Newcomb, 
Printers to the King and Queens most Excellent Majesties. 
1690. 

i p. folio. There are two issues, varying slightly in set-up and in the 
cut of the royal arms. Copies in Adv., B. M., Crawf., Dalk., D. H., Guild., 
P. C., P. R. 0., and T. C. D. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy 
Council Register, III William, vol. 2, p. 112. Printed in " London Ga 
zette" February 7, 1691; reproduced in the January number of the "Journal 
of the Friends Historical Society " 



1700, January 29. 
[For Apprehending Author of Darien Libel.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION. 

WILLIAM R. 

Whereas We have been Informed, That a False, Scanda 
lous, and Traiterous Libel, Intituled, An Inquiry into the 
Causes of the Miscarriage of the Scotch-Colony at Darien, 
or, An Answer to a Libel, Intituled, A Defence of the Scots 
Abdicating Darien, 1 has been Printed and Dispersed, the De- 

1 The tract with this title was published with no place of imprint, 1699, pp. 
84, and in another edition with the imprint, Glascow, 1700, pp. 112. A Defence 
of the Scots abdicating Darien, pp. 50, has 1700 as the date of imprint. A copy 
of the first tract is in the Library of Congress, and copies of the last two tracts 
are in the American Antiquarian Society and John Carter Brown Library. 



154 Royal Proclamations. 

sign of which libel was to Create a Misunderstanding between 
Our good Subjects of England and Scotland, and to Stir up 
Sedition and Rebellion, and is Injurious to, and Reflects on the 
Honour of both Nations: And whereas the Knights, Citizens 
and Burgesses in Parliament Assembled, have humbly be 
sought Us, 1 to Issue Our Royal Proclamation for Discovering 
and Apprehending of the Author and Printer of the said Libel ; 
We therefore (with the Advice of Our Privy Council) have 
thought fit to Issue this Our Royal Proclamation, hereby 
Requiring and Commanding all Our Loving Subjects whatso 
ever, to Discover and Apprehend the Author and Printer of 
the said Libel, to the end they may be dealt withal and pro 
ceeded against according to Law. And We do hereby Promise 
and Declare, That whosoever shall Discover or Apprehend 
the Author of the said Libel, so as he may be brought to Justice, 
shall Have and Receive, as a Reward for such Discovery and 
Apprehending, the Sum of Five hundred Pounds: And that 
whosoever shall Discover or Apprehend the Printer thereof, so 
as he may be brought to Justice, shall Have and Receive, as a 
Reward for such Discovery or Apprehending, the Sum of Two 
hundred Pounds; Which said respective Sums of Five hun 
dred Pounds and Two hundred Pounds, the Commissioners 
of Our Treasury are hereby Required and Directed to Pay 
accordingly. And We do hereby further Promise and Declare, 
That if any Person (other than the Author himself) who was 
any ways Privy to, or Instrumental in the Printing and Dis 
persing the said Libel, shall Discover or Apprehend the Author 
thereof, the Person making such Discovery, or Apprehending 
the said Author, shall not only have the said Sum of Five 
hundred Pounds, as aforesaid, but also Our Gracious Pardon 
for his Offence. And We do hereby strictly Charge and Com 
mand all Our Loving Subjects (as they will answer the con 
trary at their Perils) that they do not any ways Conceal, but 
Discover and Apprehend the Author and Printer of the said 
Libel, to the end they may be Proceeded against with the 
utmost Severity according to Law. 

Given at Our Court at Kensington the Twenty ninth Day 
of January, 1699. In the Eleventh Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

1 The House of Commons, on January 15, 1700, resolved that the book was 
"a false, scandalous, and traitorous libel," that it should be burned by the com 
mon hangman, and that an address should be presented to the King seeking a 
proclamation to apprehend the author of the book (Commons Journals, xiii, 123). 



March 6. 155 

London, Printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of 
Thomas Newcomb, deceas d, Printers to the Kings most 
Excellent Majesty. 1699. 

i p. folio. There are two issues varying slightly in set-up and in the cut 
of the royal arms. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Dalk., and P. R. 0.; also in 
John Carter Brown Library. There is also a manuscript draft of this 
proclamation in British Museum A dditional MSS. , 21136, fol. 63. Entered 
on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, III William, vol. 5, p. 
412. Printed in " London Gazette" February i, 1700. 



1*701, March 6. 

[For the Apprehension of Pirates.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION. 

WILLIAM R. 

Whereas We have received Information, That notwith 
standing the great Care that hitherto hath been taken to 
Prevent Piracies, divers Pirates do continue to Infest the Seas 
wherein Our Subjects Trade, to the great Damage of the Mer 
chants, and Discouragement of Navigation; 1 We therefore 
(with the Advice of Our Privy Council) have thought fit to 
Issue this Our Royal Proclamation; 2 And We do hereby 
Promise and Declare, That if any Person or Persons belonging 
to the Company or Ships Crew of any Pirate Ship or Vessel, 
shall at any time, after the Date hereof, Seize, or cause to be 
Seized, the Person Commanding such Ship or Vessel, and any 
one or more Persons belonging to such Ship or Vessel, together 
with the said Ship or Vessel, and Goods, and Deliver them into 
the Custody of the Chief Magistrate of any of our Ports in 
Our Kingdoms of England or Ireland; Or in America, into the 
Custody of Our Governors, or Commanders in Chief of Our 
Islands, Colonies, or Plantations of Barbados, the Leeward 
Islands, Jamaica, Bermudos, Virginia, Maryland, New yorke 

1 The prevalence of piracy in American waters can best be traced in the 
documents listed in the Calendars of State Papers, Colonial, for the last decade 
of the 1 7 th century. 

2 The draft of this proclamation was referred to the Admiralty, January 23, 
1701, to propose the amount of the rewards to be offered, and was sent to the 
Board of Trade, February 20, 1701, to fix the time when pirates should be 
allowed to make confessions (Acts of Privy Council, ii, 342). 



156 Royal Proclamations. 

or the Massachusetts Bay in New England, or of the Com 
mander in Chief of Our Ships of War at Newfound Land, for 
the time being ; Or in Africa, into the Custody of the Chief or 
Chiefs of the Royal African Company at Cape Corfe Castle, 
on the Gold Coast, at James Fort in the River of Gambia, or 
at Whiddah in the South-part of Guinea, for the time being; 
And shall give Evidence against the Persons so Seized and 
Secured, so as they may be Convicted of Piracy, the Person 
or Persons so Seizing, or causing to be Seized, such Pirate or 
Pirates, and Securing such Ship or Vessel, and Goods, as afore 
said, shall not only have Our most Gracious Pardon for the 
Piracies before that tr-e Committed by him or them, but 
also, upon the Conviction of such Pirate or Pirates, receive 
as a Reward for his or their good Service, one moiety of Our 
Thirds of such Ship or Vessel, and Goods, where no more than 
those Thirds shall be by Us claimed; But if the whole Ship and 
Goods shall belong to Us, for want of a timely and legal De 
mand thereof by the first Proprietor, then such Person or 
Persons shall Receive, as a Reward, the Sum of Twenty five 
Pound for every Hundred Pounds Value of such Ship or 
Vessel, and Goods; to be paid unto them by such Chief Magis 
trate, Governor, Commander, or other Persons aforesaid, in 
the Places where such Seizure and Conviction shall be made; 
who are hereby Required to Pay the same, upon the Parties 
producing a Certificate of such Seizure and Conviction made, 
and Ship or Vessel, and Goods Secured, under the Hands and 
Seals of the Persons, or the Major Part of them, before whom 
such Pirates have been Convicted (which Persons are hereby 
Required to give such Certificate, gratis, on Demand) and 
upon Producing of which Certificate, We do hereby Require 
our Judge or Judges of Admiralty in England, or elsewhere, 
and all other Persons impowered by Commission to Hear and 
Determine Piracies in Europe, Africa and America, to Stay 
any further Proceedings against such Person or Persons, who 
shall produce such Certificate, until he or they can obtain 
Our most Gracious Pardon. And We do hereby further De 
clare, That if any Person or Persons, belonging to any Pirate 
Ship or Vessel, shall Seize and Apprehend the Commanding 
Officer of any Pirate Ship or Vessel, or any of the Crew belong 
ing to such Ship or Vessel, and shall give Evidence against 
him or them, as before Directed, so that the said Pirate or 
Pirates be Convicted, and shall have a Certificate thereof, as 
aforesaid, though such Person or Persons do not Take or Seize 



170 i, March 6. 157 

the Ship and Goods, yet such Person or Persons shall have 
Our most Gracious Pardon for any Piracies before that time 
by him or them Committed, and shall also have and receive, 
upon the Conviction of such Commanding Officer, or any of 
the said Crew of such Pirate Ship, the respective Rewards 
hereafter mentioned; viz. One Hundred Pounds for the Com 
manding Officer of such Pirate Ship or Vessel, and Twenty 
Pounds for every Inferiour Person thereunto belonging, that 
shall be so Seized and Apprehended, as aforesaid ; which Sum 
or Sums shall be paid to him or them by the Governors or 
other Persons before mentioned. And for the greater En 
couragement of those Persons belonging to any Pirate Ship or 
Vessel, who shall Seize and Apprehend any Commanding 
Officer, or any of the Crew belonging to such Ship or Vessel, 
and shall give Evidence against them, in order to their Con 
viction, and cause the said Ship or Vessel, and Goods to be 
Secured, as aforesaid, We do hereby Direct and Require the 
Commanders of all and every Our Ships of War, That upon 
any Person or Persons producing to them an Authentick 
Certificate of his or their having made such Seizure, and of 
the Conviction of such Commander or others of the said Ships 
Crew, so Seized by him or them, as aforesaid, or of his or their 
having Secured the Ship or Vessel, and Goods, as aforesaid, 
under the Hands and Seals of the Persons, or the Major part 
of them, before whom such Conviction shall have been made 
(which Certificate the said Persons are in like manner hereby 
Required to give, gratis, on Demand) and Desiring to be 
Entertained in Our Service, to Enter them on Board their 
Ships, for Victuals and Wages, and to Discharge them again 
when they shall Desire it. And whereas We are inclined to 
Believe, That many ignorant Persons have been drawn into 
this wicked Course of Life, and that they would willingly 
imbrace all Opportunities of freeing themselves therefrom 
provided they could be Secure of Pardon, We do hereby 
Promise and Declare, That if any Person or Persons, Serving 
on Board any Pirate Ship or Vessel, shall at any time, within 
Twelve Months after the Date hereof, leave the same, and 
repair to any of Our Chief Magistrates, Governors, Com 
manders, or other Persons aforesaid, and before them make 
Affidavit of the Piracies Committed by the Ship or Vessel 
whereto they did belong, the Person or Persons, so Leaving 
such Ship, and making Affidavit, shall have Our Gracious 
Pardon for the Piracies Committed by him or them before the 



T 58 Royal Proclamations. 

Twenty fourth Day of June, Seventeen hundred and one, and 
upon a Certificate of his or their Surrender, and being so In 
tituled to this Our Gracious Pardon, under the Hands and 
Seals of any of Our Chief Magistrates, Governors, Com 
manders, or other Persons aforementioned (which Certificate 
the said Chief Magistrates, Governors, Commanders, and other 
Persons are hereby Required to give, gratis, on Demand) the 
Person or Persons, so leaving such Ship, and making Affi 
davit, shall in like manner be Intituled to the Advantage of 
being Entertained on Board any of Our Ships, for Victuals 
and Wages, as aforesaid. And We do hereby further Publish 
and Declare, That all such Persons who shall neglect to lay 
hold of these Our Gracious Offers of Mercy, or who by Com 
plying herewith shall be Pardoned for the Piracies by them 
Committed to the time of such Pardon, and after such Pardon 
relapse into the like Evil Practices, shall immediately upon 
their being Seized (for which all possible Care and Diligence 
shall be taken) be brought to Tryal, and be Proceeded against 
with the utmost Severity of Law; We having in pursuance of 
a late Act of Parliament for that purpose, sent Commissions 
under Our Great Seal into the East and West Indies, for the 
speedy Tryal, Condemnation and Execution of all Pirates and 
Robbers upon the High Seas. Provided always, that nothing 
herein contained shall extend to the Pardoning of any Person 
or Persons that shall go out of Europe, or that shall Commit 
Piracy upon the Seas in Europe, from and after the Date of 
these Presents, nor to the Pardoning of such as shall Commit 
Piracy in any Place whatsoever, after notice of this Our 
Gracious Offer of Pardon, or of Henry Every, 1 alias, Bridge- 
man. 

Given at Our Court at Kensington, the Sixth Day of March, 
170? . In the Thirteenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of 
Thomas Newcomb, deceas d, Printers to the Kings most 
Excellent Majesty. 1 70 $ . 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., P. C., and P. R. 0. Entered on 
Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, III William, vol. 6, p. 162. 
Printed in u London Gazette" March 17, 1701. 

1 Two proclamations, dated July 17 and August 10, 1696, had been issued 
offering a reward for the capture of Every for having committed piracies in the 
seas of India and Persia (Acts of Privy Council, ii, 300). 



1702, March p. 159 

1702, March 9. 
[Continuing Officers in the Colonies.] 

BY THE QUEEN. 
A PROCLAMATION. 

ANNE R. 

Forasmuch as it has Pleased Almighty God, lately to Call 
unto His Infinite Mercy, the most High and Mighty Prince 
William the Third, of most Blessed Memory; And whereas 
by an Act of Parliament made in the Seventh Year of the 
Reign of the said late King, It is Enacted, That no Commis 
sion, either Civil or Military, should Cease, Determine or be 
Void by reason of the Death or Demise of His said late Majesty, 
or of any of His Heirs or Successors, Kings or Queens of this 
Realm, but that every such Commission should Be, Continue 
and Remain in full Force and Virtue, for the Space of Six 
Months next after any such Death or Demise, unless in the 
mean time Superseeded, Determined or made Void by the 
next and immediate Successor, to whom the Imperial Crown 
of this Realm, according to the Act of Settlement therein 
mentioned is Limited and Appointed to Go, Remain and 
Descend; The Queens most Excellent Majesty, 1 in Her 
Princely Wisdom and Care of the State, (Reserving to Her 
Own Judgment hereafter, the Reformation and Redress of 
any Abuses in Misgovernment, upon due Knowledge and 
Examination thereof) is Pleased, and doth hereby Signifie 
and Declare, That all Commissions, both Civil and Military, 
Granted by His said late Majesty, and in Force at the time of 
His Death, shall Be, Continue and Remain in full Force and 
Virtue : And that all Persons, that at the time of the Decease 
of the late King, were Duly and Lawfully Possessed of, or 
Invested in any Office or Place of Authority or Government, 
either Civil or Military, within His Majesties Realms of 
England, Ireland, the Islands of Jersey and Guernsey, Sark 
or Alderney, or within His Majesties Colonies and Plantations 

1 A form of proclamation of the accession of Queen Anne was provided for 
the American colonies. It was sent over as a printed sheet, with blanks for the 
name of the colony and the body issuing the proclamation. Copies of this 
printed form are in the British Museum and the Public Record Office. A simi 
lar form was provided for previous accessions, but does not seem to have been 
printed, being found in the manuscript Registers of the Privy Council. 



160 Royal Proclamations. 

in America; and Namely all Governors, Lieutenants or Deputy 
Governors, Counsellors, Judges, Justices, Provost-Marshals, 
Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace, and all othersin Place of Govern 
ment either Meaner or Superior, as aforesaid, and all other 
Officers and Ministers shall Be, and hold themselves Continued 
in the said Places and Offices, under the same Condition as 
formerly they Held and Enjoyed the same, until Her Majesties 
Pleasure be further Known, or that other Provision be made, 
pursuant to His late Majesties Commissions and Instructions 
to His Governors and Officers of the Islands, Colonies, and 
Plantations aforesaid; And that in the meanwhile, for the 
Preservation of the State, and Necessary Proceedings in 
Matters of Justice, and for the Safety and Service of the State, 
all the said Persons, of whatsoever Degree or Condition, may 
not fail every one severally according to his Place, Office or 
Charge, to Proceed in the Performance of all Duties thereunto 
belonging, as formerly Appertained unto them while the late 
King was Living; And further Her Majesty doth hereby Will 
and Command all and singular Her Highness Subjects, of 
what Estate, Dignity or Degree they or any of them be, to be 
Aiding, Helping and Assisting, and at the Commandment of 
the said Officers and Ministers, in the Performance and Execu 
tion of the said Offices and Places, as they and every of them 
tender Her Majesties Pleasure, and will answer the contrary 
at their utmost Perils. And further Her Majesties Will and 
Pleasure, and Express Command is, That all Orders or Direc 
tions Made or Given by the late King of most Blessed Memory 
the Lords of His Privy Council, or His late Majesties Principal 
Secretaries of State, or other Legal Authority Derived from 
His said Majesty in His Life time, shall be Obeyed and Per 
formed by all and every Person and Persons, and all and every 
Thing and Things to be done thereupon, shall Proceed as 
Fully and Amply as the same should have been Obeyed or 
Done in the Life of the said late King, until Her Majesties 
Pleasure be further Known thereupon. 

Given at the Court at St. James s, the Ninth Day of March, 
In the First Year of Her Majesties Reign, of England, Scot 
land, France and Ireland, and other Her Majesties Territories 
and Dominions. 

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. 



London, Printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of 
Thomas Newcomb, deceas d; Printers to the Queens most 
Excellent Majesty. MDCCI. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., Dalk., P. C., and P. R. 0. 
Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, Anne, vol. i, 
p. 15. 



1704, June 1 8. 
[Rates of Foreign Coins in Plantations.] 

BY THE QUEEN. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR SETTLING AND ASCERTAINING THE CURRENT RATES OF 
FOREIGN COINS IN HER MAJESTIES COLONIES AND 
PLANTATIONS IN AMERICA. 

ANNE R. 

We having had under Our Consideration the different Rates 
at which the same Species of Foreign Coins do Pass in 
Our several Colonies and Plantations in America, 1 and the 
Inconveniencies thereof, by the indirect Practice of Drawing 
the Money from one Plantation to another, to the great Preju 
dice of the Trade of Our Subjects; And being Sensible, That 
the same cannot be otherwise Remedied, than by Reducing 
of all Foreign Coins to the same Current Rate within all our 
Dominions in America; And the Principal Officers of Our 
Mint having laid before Us a Table of the Value of the several 
Foreign Coins which usually Pass in Payments in Our said 

1 The attention of the Council of Trade had been frequently called to the 
disorder in the currency in the Plantations (see Cal. State Papers, Colonial, 1700, 
pp. 108, 393; and Chalmers History of Currency in the British Colonies, pp. 
11-15). On November 18, 1703, the Privy Council referred to the Lord Treas 
urer a representation from the Board of Trade for settling the rates of foreign 
coins in America, upon which the Lord Treasurer, May 18, 1704, submitted a 
report from the Officers of the Mint with a table of the weights and values of 
foreign coins then current in the Plantations (Acts of Privy Council, ii, 452). 
The proclamation which followed was little observed, however, and after several 
reports on the subject had been rendered, an Act of Parliament was passed 
April i, 1708, entitled "An Act for ascertaining the Rates of Foreign Coins in 
Her Majesty s Plantations in America." (Statutes of the Realm, viii, 792. See 
also Lords Journals, xviii, 486, 566; Commons Journals, xv, 635; Acts of Privy 
Council, ii, 452). For the action of Massachusetts upon this proclamation, see 
Acts and Resolves of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, viii, 471. 



1 62 Royal Proclamations. 

Plantations, according to their Weight, and the Assays made 
of them in Our Mint, thereby shewing the just Proportion 
which each Coin ought to have to the other, which is as fol- 
loweth, viz. Sevill Pieces of Eight, Old Plate, Seventeen 
Peny- weight Twelve Grains, Four Shillings and Six Pence; 
Sevill Pieces of Eight, New Plate, Fourteen Peny- weight, 
Three Shillings Seven Pence One Farthing; Mexico Pieces 
of Eight, Seventeen Peny- weight Twelve Grains, Four Shil 
lings and Six Pence; Pillar Pieces of Eight, Seventeen Peny- 
weight Twelve Grains, Four Shillings and Six Pence Three 
Farthings; Peru Pieces of Eight, Old Place, Seventeen Peny- 
weight Twelve Grains, Four Shillings and Five Pence, or 
thereabouts; Cross Dollars, Eighteen Peny- weight, Four Shil 
lings and Four Pence Three Farthings ; Duccatoons of Flanders, 
Twenty Peny- weight and Twenty one Grains, Five Shillings 
and Six Pence; Ecu s of France, or Silver Lewis, Seventeen 
Peny-weight Twelve Grains, Four Shillings and Six Pence, 
Crusadoes of Portugal, Eleven Peny-weight Four Grains, 
Two Shillings and Ten Pence One Farthing; Three Gilder 
Pieces of Holland, Twenty Peny-weight and Seven Grains, 
Five Shillings and Two Pence One Farthing; Old Rix Dollars 
of the Empire, Eighteen Peny-weight and Ten Grains, Four 
Shillings and Six Pence; The Half, Quarters and other parts 
in Proportion to their Denominations, and Light Pieces in 
Proportion to their Weight: We have therefore thought fit 
for Remedying the said Inconveniencies, by the Advice of 
Our Council, to Publish and Declare, That from and after the 
First Day of January next ensuing the Date hereof, no Sevill, 
Pillar, or Mexico Pieces of Eight, though of the full Weight of 
Seventeen Peny-weight and an half, shall be Accounted, 
Received, Taken, or Paid within any of Our said Colonies or 
Plantations, as well those under Proprietors and Charters, 
as under Our immediate Commission and Government, at 
above the Rate of Six Shillings per Piece Current Money, 
for the Discharge of any Contracts or Bargains to be made 
after the said First Day of January next, the Halfs, Quarters, 
and other lesser Pieces of the same Coins to be Accounted, 
Received, Taken, or Paid in the same Proportion: And the 
Currency of all Pieces of Eight of Peru, Dollars, and other 
Foreign Species of Silver Coins, whether of the same or Baser 
Alloy, shall, after the said First Day of January next, stand 
Regulated, according to their Weight and Fineness, according 
and in Proportion to the Rate before Limited and Set for the 



1708, June 26. 163 

Pieces of Eight of Sevill, Pillar, and Mexico; So that no Foreign 
Silver Coin of any sort be permitted to Exceed the same 
Proportion upon any Account whatsoever. And We do 
hereby Require and Command all Our Governours, Lieu 
tenant- Go vernours, Magistrates, Officers, and all other Our 
good Subjects, within Our said Colonies and Plantations, to 
Observe and Obey our Directions herein, as they Tender our 
Displeasure. 

Given at Our Castle at Windsor, the Eighteenth Day of 
June, 1704. In the Third Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. 

London, Printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of 
Thomas Newcomb, deceas d; Printers to the Queens most 
Excellent Majesty. 1704. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., Crawf., Dalk., P. C., P. R. 0., and 
in N. Y. Historical Society. Entered in Privy Council Register, Anne, 
vol. 2, p. 132. Printed in " London Gazette" June 22, 1704; also in Boston 
News-Letter, Dec. n, 1704. 



1708, June 26. 
[Encouraging Trade to Newfoundland.] 

BY THE QUEEN. 
A PROCLAMATION. 

ANNE R. 

Whereas by Act of Parliament made in the Tenth and 
Eleventh Years of the Reign of the late King William the 
Third, Intituled, An Act to Encourage the Trade to New 
foundland; 1 It was, amongst other Things, Enacted, That 
from thenceforth all His Majesties Subjects of this Realm, 
or the Dominions thereto belonging, Trading to Newfound 
land, should have Free Trade and Liberty to Take, Bait, 
and Fish in any the Rivers, Lakes, Creeks, Harbours, or 

1 Statutes of the Realm, 10 William III, ch. 14, vol. 7, p. 515. The House 
of Commons on March 31, 1708, petitioned the Queen that the laws regulating 
trade with Newfoundland should be enforced (Commons Journals, xv, 644, 648). 
A long address on the subject from the Privy Council to the Queen, May 20, 
1708, is printed in the Acts of the Privy Council, ii, 553. 



164 Royal Proclamations. 

Roads, in or about Newfoundland, the Seas, and Islands 
thereto adjacent, and to go on Shore on any Part of New 
foundland, or the said Islands, for the Curing, Salting, Drying, 
and Husbanding of their Fish, and Making Oyl, and to Cut 
down Wood for Building or Repairing of Stages, Ship-Rooms, 
Train-Fats, Hurdles, Ships, Boats, and other Necessaries; 
but that no Alien, or Stranger should Take any Bait, or Use 
any sort of Trade or Fishing whatsoever, in Newfoundland, 
or in any of the Places above-mentioned; and that after the 
Five and twentieth of March, One thousand seven hundred, 
no Balast, Prest, Stones, or other Things hurtful to the 
Harbours, should be Thrown out of any Ship or otherwise, 
but shall be Carried on Shore. And it is thereby further 
Enacted, That no Person should Destroy or Damage any 
such Stage or Cook-Room, or any Thing thereto belonging, 
but should be content with such Stage or Stages only as are 
needful for them, and leave the same Undamaged; and the 
same shall be Repaired with Timber fetcht out of the Woods 
there, and not by the Ruining of other Stages. And it is 
thereby further Enacted, That whoever should, after the 
said Five and twentieth Day of March, first Enter with his 
Fishing-Ship any Harbour or Creek in Newfoundland, should 
be for that Season Admiral of the said Harbour or Creek, 
and should Reserve so much Beech or Flakes as should be 
necessary for his Boats, and One over, as a Privilege for his 
first Coming thither; and the Master of the Second Fishing- 
Ship Entring such Harbour or Creek, shall be Vice- Admiral ; 
and the Master of the Third Ship so Entring, Rear- Admiral 
for that Season; and that the Master of every Fishing-Ship 
there, shall take no more Beech or Flakes than for necessary 
Use; and Persons Possessed of several Places in several Har 
bours there, shall make Election in which he or they will 
Abide, within Eight and forty Hours after Demand by any 
After-comer; And the Admiral of the respective Harbours 
shall determine all Differences touching that Matter. And 
it is thereby further Enacted, That all Inhabitants and others, 
who have Possessed themselves of any Stage, Cook-Room, 
Beech, or other Place in the said Harbours, which before 
that time belonged to Fishing-Ships, for the Taking Bait, 
Fishing, Drying, Curing and Husbanding of Fish, since the 
Year One thousand six hundred eighty five, should before 
the said Five and twentieth Day of March, leave the same 
for the Publick Use of the Fishing-Ships arriving there; and 



1708, June 26. 165 

that no Fisherman or Inhabitant in Newfoundland, or other 
Person, should after the said Five and twentieth Day of 
March, Possess himself of any the Stages, Cook-Rooms, 
Beeches, or other Places which, since the Year One thousand 
six hundred eighty live, did, or thereafter should belong to 
any Fishing-Ship, before the Arrival of the Fishing-Ships 
from England, Wales or Berwick, and until such Ships be 
Provided with Stages, Cook-Rooms, Beeches, and other 
Places, for taking Bait and Fishing, and for Drying, Curing 
and Husbanding of Fish: Provided that such Persons, as 
since the Five and twentieth of March, One thousand six 
hundred eighty five, have or thereafter should Build any 
Houses, Stages, Cook-Rooms, Train-Fats, or other Con- 
veniencies for Fishing there, that did not, since the Year 
One thousand six hundred eighty five, belong to Fishing- 
Ships, should peaceably enjoy the same. And it is thereby 
further Enacted, That no By-Boat-Keepers should meddle 
with any House, Stage, Cook-Room, Train-Fat or other 
Conveniency, that did, since the Year One thousand six 
hundred eighty five, belong to Fishing-Ships, or should be 
made by Ships after the Five and twentieth Day of March, 
One thousand seven hundred; and that every Master of a 
By-Boat should carry at least Two Fresh Men in Six, (viz.) 
One that has made but One Voyage, and One that never 
was at Sea before; and that every Inhabitant should be 
obliged to Imploy Two such Fresh Men, as the By-Boat- 
Keepers are obliged for every By-Boat kept by them; and 
the Master of every Fishing-Ship should Carry One such 
Fresh Man that never was at Sea before, in every Five Men 
they carry; and the Master of every By-Boat, or Fishing- 
Ship, should make Oath before the Collector, or Principal 
Officer of the Customs of the Port (which Officers are thereby 
Impowered to give the said Oath) whence such Ship intends 
to Sail, That they have such Fresh Men as the said Act 
directs, and should have a Certificate thereof gratis; And 
that the Master of any Fishing-Ship, going to Newfoundland, 
after the said Five and twentieth Day of March, should 
have One in every Five that is not a Seaman. And it is 
thereby further Enacted, That no Person should after the 
said Five and twentieth Day of March, Cut out, or Alter the 
Mark of any Boat or Train-Fat, to defraud the Owner, or 
remove the same whence they were left by the Owner, unless 
in case of necessity, and that upon Notice to the Admiral 



1 66 Royal Proclamations. 

of the Place; and that no Person should Rind Trees in the 
Woods growing there, nor set on fire, or Damage the same, 
except for Fuel for the Ships and Inhabitants, or for Build 
ing or Repairs of Houses, Ships, Boats, and Train-Fats, and 
of the Stages, Cook-Rooms, Beeches, and other Places for 
taking Bait, Fishing, and Husbanding of Fish there, nor cast 
Anchor, or do any other Thing so as to Annoy the Haling of 
Sayns in the usual Baiting Places, or shoot their Sayns upon 
the Sayns of others, nor steal the Sayns of others, nor any 
Bait out of anothers Fishing-Boat or Net: And the Admirals 
of every Port or Harbour in Newfoundland, are required to 
see the Rules and Orders in the said Act for Regulating the 
Fishery duly put in Execution, and Yearly to keep a Journal 
of all Ships, Boats, Stages, Train-Fats, and Seamen in their 
respective Harbours, and Deliver a Copy thereof to the 
Privy-Council at their Return to England. And it is thereby 
further Enacted, That all Differences arising in Newfound 
land, or any the Islands there, about the Right and Property 
of Fishing-Rooms, Stages, Flakes or other Conveniency for 
Fishing or Curing of Fish, shall be determined by the Fishing 
Admirals in the several Harbours; and an Appeal is given 
from such Judgment to the Commanders of the Men of War 
appointed Convoys for Newfoundland: And that the Inhabi 
tants of Newfoundland, and the Islands adjacent, should 
strictly observe the Lords Day: And that no Publick-House 
should on that Day sell any Wine, Beer, Ale, Cyder, or other 
Strong- Waters, or Tobacco, or other Liquors. And whereas 
We have been informed of several Abuses by the Masters 
of Ships, and the Inhabitants, and others contrary to the 
said Act, (viz.) That the Inhabitants do Rind the Trees, 
and Ingross and Incroach upon Fishing Ship-Rooms, and 
destroy several of the Stages, Flakes and Cook-Rooms, and 
that the Fishing Admirals are negligent in their Duty of 
putting the said Act in Execution, and of keeping Journals 
of the Fishery, and that the said Fishing Admirals, being 
Traders themselves, are partial in their Determination of 
Differences, and that the Masters of Fishing-Ships, and of 
By-Boats, do neglect to produce Certificates of their Com 
pliments of Green Men or Fresh Men, contrary to the said 
Act; Which Matters being lately taken Notice of in the 
Humble Address of the Knights, Citizens and Burgesses of 
the last Parliament, We have thought fit, by and with the 
Advice of Our Privy-Council, to Issue forth this Our Royal 



i?ii, June 23. 167 

Proclamation; And We do hereby strictly Charge and Com 
mand all Our Loving Subjects, who may be any ways con 
cerned in Putting the said Laws in Execution, that they take 
effectual Care to bring to Condign Punishment all manner 
of Persons who shall be found offending against such Act of 
Parliament. 

Given at Our Court at Kensington, the Twenty sixth Day 
of June, in the Seventh Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. 

London, Printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of 
Thomas Newcomb, deceas d; Printers to the Queens most 
Excellent Majesty. 1708. (Price Two Pence.) 

i p. folio. Copies in B. M., P. C., and P. R. 0. Entered on Patent 
Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, Anne, vol. 4, p. 120. Printed in 
"London Gazette" July 12, 1708. 



1711, June 23. 
[Establishing Post Office in America.] 

BY THE QUEEN. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR ENFORCING THE DUE EXECUTION OF THE ACT, INTITULED, 
AN ACT FOR ESTABLISHING A GENERAL POST-OFFICE 
FOR ALL HER MAJESTIES DOMINIONS, AND FOR SET 
TLING A WEEKLY SUM OUT OF THE REVENUES THEREOF, 
FOR THE SERVICE OF THE WAR, AND OTHER HER 
MAJESTIES OCCASIONS. 

ANNE R. 

Whereas by an Act of Parliament made in the Last Session 
of Parliament, Intituled, An Act for Establishing- a General 
Post-Office for all Her Majesties Dominions, and for Settling 
a Weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof, for the Service 
of the War, and other Her Majesties Occasions, 1 It is Enacted, 

1 Statutes of the Realm, ix, 393 (9 Anne, ch. n; ch. 10 in some editions of the 
Statutes). 



1 68 Royal Proclamations. 

That from and after the First Day of this Instant June, there 
be One General Letter-Office and Post-Office Established in 
the City of London, from whence all Letters and Packets 
may be with speed and expedition sent into any Part of the 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, or to North-America, 
the West-Indies, or to any other of Our Dominions or Ter 
ritories, 6r to any other Kingdom or Country beyond the 
Seas; at which said Office all Returns and Answers may be 
Received. And that One Master of the said General Letter- 
Office and Post-Office shall be appointed by Us, under Our 
Great Seal of Great Britain, by the Name and Stile of our 
Postmaster General: And that no Person or Persons what 
soever, in any Part of Our Kingdoms of Great Britain and 
Ireland, or other Our Plantations or Colonies in the West- 
Indies and America, other than Our Postmaster General for 
the time being, and his Deputies, Servants, and Assigns, 
shall presume to Receive, Take up, Order, Dispatch, Convey, 
Carry, Recarry, or Deliver any Letter or Letters, Packet or 
Packets of Letters, other than to and from any Town or Place 
to or from the next Post-Road or Stage appointed for that 
Purpose, above Six Miles from a General Office; and other 
than and except such Letters as shall respectively concern 
Goods sent by Common known Carriers of Goods, by Carts, 
Waggons, or Pack-Horses, and which shall be respectively 
Delivered with the Goods such Letters do concern, without 
Hire or Reward, or other Profit or Advantage for Receiving 
or Delivering such Letters; and except Letters of Merchants 
and Masters, Owners of any Ships, Barques, or Vessels of 
Merchandize, or any the Cargo or Lading therein, sent on 
Board such Ships, Barques, or Vessels of Merchandize, 
whereof such Merchants or Masters are Owners, and De 
livered by any Masters of any such Ships, Barques, or Vessels 
of Merchandize, or by any other Person Employed by them 
for the Carriage of such Letters, according to their respective 
Directions, so as such Letters be Delivered to the respective 
Persons to whom they shall be Directed, without Paying or 
Receiving any Hire or Reward, Advantage or Profit for the 
same in anywise; and except Commissions or the Returns 
thereof, Affidavits, Writs, Process or Proceeding, or Returns 
thereof, Issuing out of any Court; and also any Letter or 
Letters to be sent by any Private Friend or Friends in their 
way of Journey or Travel, or by any Messenger or Messengers 
sent on purpose, for or concerning the private Affair of any 



i/u, June 23. A 6g 

Person or Persons; or make any Collection of Letters, or Set 
up or Employ any Foot-Post, Horse-Post, or Packet-Boat, 
or other Vessel or Boat, or other Person or Persons, Con 
veyance or Conveyances whatsoever, for the Receiving, 
Taking up, Ordering, Dispatching, Conveying, Carrying, 
Recarrying, or Delivering any Letter or Letters, Packet or 
Packets of Letters, by Sea or by Land, or on any River within 
Our Dominions, or by means whereof any Letter or Letters, 
Packet or Packets of Letters, shall be Collected, Received, 
Taken up, Ordered, Dispatched, Conveyed, Carried, Re- 
carried, or Delivered, by Sea or Land, or on any River within 
Our Dominions (other than as before Excepted;) or shall 
presume to Keep, Provide or Maintain Horses or Furniture, 
for the Horsing of any Person or Persons Riding Post, (that 
is to say) Riding several Stages upon a Post-Road, and 
Changing Horses, or shall Lett to Hire, or Furnish any Person 
or Persons whatsoever with Horses or Furniture for Riding 
Post, as aforesaid, on any of the Post-Roads or Stages now 
or hereafter to be Appointed, with or without a Guide or 
Horn, for Hire or Reward, or on any Agreement or Promise 
of Reward, or whereby he or they may have any Profit or 
Advantage, on pain of Forfeiting the Sum of Five Pounds of 
British Money for every several Offence against the Tenor 
of the said Act, and also of the Sum of One hundred Pounds 
of like British Money for every Week that every Offender 
against the same Act shall Collect, Receive, Take up, Order, 
Dispatch, Convey, Carry, Recarry, or Deliver any Letter or 
Letters, Packet or Packets of Letters, by Sea or Land, or on 
any River within Our Dominions (other than as before 
excepted;) or that shall presume to Set up, Continue, or 
Employ any Foot-Post, Horse-Post, or Packet-Boat, or 
other Vessel or Boat, or any other Person or Persons, Con 
veyance or Conveyances whatsoever, for the Receiving, 
Taking up, Ordering, Dispatching, Conveying, Carrying, 
Recarrying, or Delivering of any Letter or Letters, Packet 
or Packets of Letters, by Sea or Land, or on any River within 
Our Dominions, as aforesaid; which said Penalties and For 
feitures are to be Sued for, and Recovered in such Courts, 
and to be Received and Divided in such manner, and for such 
Uses, as in the said Act is for that purpose mentioned, together 
with full Costs of Suit. But it is by the said Act Provided, 
That if the Postmaster doth not or cannot Furnish any 
Person Riding in Post, with sufficient Horses, within one 



170 Royal Proclamations. 

Half Hour after Demand, then such Person is at Liberty to 
Provide himself as he can to the next Stage, and so at every 
Stage where he shall not be Furnished, as aforesaid; and the 
Person who shall Furnish such Horses shall therefore by 
[be] liable to any Penalty by reason thereof. And by a 
Proviso contained in the said Act, it is Declared, That nothing 
in the Exception above mentioned contained, shall be con 
strued to extend to give any Licence or Authority to any 
Common known Carriers of Goods, by Carts , Waggons, or 
Pack-Horses, their Servants or Agents, to Receive, Collect 
or Deliver, with or without Hire, any Letter or Letters, 
Packet or Packets of Letters whatsoever, that do not con 
cern Goods in their Carts, Waggons, or on their Pack-Horses; 
nor to any Owners or Drivers of Stage-Coaches; nor to any 
Masters, Owners or Commanders of Boats called Passage- 
Boats, sailing between any Part of Great Britain or Ireland, 
and any Parts or Places beyond the Seas, or their Servants 
or Agents; nor to any Passenger or Passengers on Board 
such Boats or Vessels; nor to the Owners or Watermen on 
Board of any Boat, Barge, or Vessel, Passing or Repassing 
on any River or Rivers, to and from any Parts of Great 
Britain and Ireland, North-America, or the West-Indies, or 
other Our Dominions or Territories, although such Drivers 
of Stage-Coaches, Owners, Masters or Commanders of Boats 
called Passage-Boats, or Passengers therein, Owners or 
Watermen on Board of any such Boat, Barge, or Vessel, 
Passing or Repassing on any such River or Rivers, as afore 
said, do not receive any Hire or Reward, or other Advantage 
for the same; but that all such Carriers, Owners, and Drivers 
of Stage-Coaches, Owners, Masters or Commanders of Pas 
sage-Boats, and the Passengers therein, and all Owners and 
W T atermen on Board of any Boat, Barge, or Vessel, Passing 
or Repassing on any River or Rivers, to or from any the 
Parts and Places aforesaid, Collecting and Delivering Letters, 
as aforesaid, though without Hire or Reward, shall be Deemed 
and Taken, and are thereby Declared to be Persons Offending 
against the said Act, and to Forfeit and Pay such Sum and 
Sums of Money, as Persons Collecting, Receiving, Taking 
up, Conveying, and Delivering of Letters for Hire, or Setting 
up, Employing and Maintaining any Posts contrary to the 
said Act, or that are or shall be concerned therein, are therein, 
as is herein before mentioned, Enacted to Forfeit and Pay. 
And by another Proviso in the said Act it is Declared, That 



I ji i, June 23. 171 

nothing in the said Act contained should extend to give 
Licence to any Person or Persons whatsoever, to make Col 
lection of Letters in or near the City of London, or Suburbs 
thereof, under Pretence of Conveying the same to any Part 
or Place in the said City or Suburbs, or to the General Post- 
Office of the said City, without the Licence and Leave of the 
Postmaster General for the time being; and that any Person 
or Persons Acting contrary thereunto, should Forfeit and 
Pay as Persons Collecting, Receiving, Carrying, Recarrying, 
and Delivering Letters contrary to the said Act, are thereby 
Enacted to Forfeit and Pay, and to be Recovered, as afore 
said, with full Costs of Suit. And by the said Act it is further 
Enacted, That all Letters and Packets, that by any Master 
of any Ship or Vessel, or any of his Company, or any Pas 
sengers therein, shall or may be brought to any Post-Town, 
or which shall arrive or touch at any Post belonging to any 
Post-Town within any of Our Dominions, or any the Members 
thereof, or which shall be on Board any Ship or Vessel that 
shall or doth touch or stay at any such Post-Town, (other 
than such Letters as are before excepted) shall by such Master, 
Passengers, or other Person or Persons, be forthwith delivered 
to the Deputy or Deputies only of such Postmaster General 
for the time being, by him appointed for such Place or Post- 
Town, and to be by such Deputy or Deputies sent Post unto 
the said General Post-Office, to be delivered according to 
the several and respective Directions of the same, upon pain 
of Forfeiting the Sum of Five Pounds of British Money for 
every several Offence against the Tenor of the said Act, to 
be Recovered in manner aforesaid, with full Costs of Suit. 
And for the Encouragement of all such Masters of Ships or 
Vessels, or such other Persons, on their Arrival at such Ports, 
as aforesaid, from any Parts beyond the Seas, to deliver 
unto the Deputy or Deputies of such Postmaster General 
for such Place or Post-Town at which they shall so touch or 
arrive, all such Letters and Packets as they shall respectively 
have on Board such Vessel or Vessels, every such Master or 
other Person, for every Letter or Packet of Letters he or 
they shall so deliver unto such Deputy or Deputies, shall 
receive the Sum of One Peny of such Deputy or Deputies, 
he or they Signing such Certificate as in the said Act is men 
tioned. And We being Willing and Desirous that Our Good 
Subjects should have Early and Sufficient Notice of the 
Penalties and Forfeitures before mentioned, to the end they 



172 Royal Proclamations. 

may avoid Incurring the same, and that the Revenue granted 
by the said Act may be duly answered to Us, and all Frauds 
in Prejudice of the same prevented, have thought fit, and do 
by this Our Royal Proclamation (by and with the Advice of 
Our Privy Council) Notifie and Declare to .all Our Loving 
Subjects the Purport and Tenor of the said several Parts of 
the said Act, hereby Requiring and Commanding all Persons 
concerned to conform themselves to the said Act. 

Given at Our Court at Kensington, the Twenty third 
Day of June, 1711. In the Tenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of Thomas Newcomb, 
and Henry Hills, deceas d; Printers to the Queens most 
Excellent Majesty. 1711. 

(Price Two Pence.) 

i p. folio. There are two issues varying in the cut of the royal arms. 
Copies in B. M. and P. R. O. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy 
Council Register, Anne, vol. 5, p. 260. Printed in " London Gazette" June 
28, 1711. 



1714, October 4. 
[Concerning Passes for Ships.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

REQUIRING ALL SHIPS AND VESSELS, TRADING FROM THE 
PLANTATIONS IN THE WAY OF THE ALGERINES, TO 
FURNISH THEMSELVES WITH PASSES. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas pursuant to Treaties Concluded between Our 
Predecessors, and the Government of Argier, 1 several Passes 

1 Since the proclamation of April i, 1676 (see p. 129, with note) the question 
of ship passes had been given frequent attention, but seldom directly concerned 
the American trade. On February 9, 1677, the Privy Council drew up a long 
set of regulations regarding the form and issuing of passes, with direct reference 
to the Plantations trade (printed in Acts of the Privy Council, i, 692-700) but 



i? 14, October 4. 173 

have been Granted under the Hand and Seal of the High 
Admirals of Great Britain, or the Commissioners for Executing 
that Office of Our respective Dominions: And whereas Our 
Commissioners for Executing the Office of High Admiral, have 
humbly Represented unto Us, That they have reason to appre 
hend, that several of the said Passes of the Old Form have 
been Clandestinely altered, as well in tLeir Dates as otherwise, 
which may be very Prejudicial to the Trading Ships of Our 
Subjects: For Preventing whereof We have thought fit, by 
the Advice of Our Privy Council, to Publish this Our Royal 
Proclamation, hereby Declaring, That all such Passes of the 
Old Form, w r hich have been so Issued, shall not Continue in 
Force longer than the Thirtieth Day of July next. And We 
do hereby strictly Charge and Command all Our Loving Sub 
jects, who are or shall be possessed of any such Passes, That 
they do, as soon as may be, return the same into the Office of 
Admiralty of Great Britain, in order to their being Cancelled. 
And whereas, pursuant to the late Treaty with Argier, it is 
absolutely necessary, That all Ships and Vessels belonging to 
Our Loving Subjects of Great Britain and Ireland, as well as 
Our Foreign Governments and Plantations, which shall have 
occasion to Trade to Portugal, the Canaries, Guinea, the 
Indies, into the Mediterranean, or elsewhere, in the way of 
the Cruizers of the aforesaid Government of Argier, should be 
furnished with Passes of the New Form, by or before the said 
Thirtieth Day of July next, lest by their being met with by 
the Ships of Argier, unfurnished with such Passes, they be 
Brought up, and the Ships and Goods Confiscated; We do 
hereby strictly Charge and Require the Owners and Masters 
of all Ships and Vessels of Our Loving Subjects Trading, as 

the proclamation then ordered to be issued to explain these regulations, if 
published, has not been found. The treaty with Algiers of April 10, 1682, 
required that all English merchants should have a pass under the seal of the 
Lord High Admiral or his commissioners and a proclamation was issued April 
13, 1683, to that effect. Further proclamations, containing reference to the 
treaties of 1682 and April 5, 1686, were issued on March 17, 1692 and June 9, 
1700, to reinforce these provisions. On February 17, 1698, the Privy Council 
took action allowing the granting of passes in the Plantations (Acts of the Privy 
Council, ii, 318). Since certain passes for the trade with Algiers had been 
clandestinely altered, a proclamation was published on January 17, 1714, can 
celing all passes held twelve months from that date and requiring new ones to 
be issued (these proclamations are calendared in Lord Crawford s Tudor and 
Stuart Proclamations). In connection with the issuing of the above printed 
proclamation concerning passes for the Plantations trade, the Privy Council 
proposed to send a certain number of passes over to the governors of the colonies, 
there to be issued by them, but to this the government of Algiers objected 
(Acts of the Privy Council, ii, 682). 



174 Royal Proclamations. 

aforesaid, to take particular Care that they do timely furnish 
themselves with such Passes of the New Form accordingly. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Fourth Day of 
October, 1714. In the First Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the Kings 
most Excellent Majesty, And by the Assigns of Thomas New- 
comb, and Henry Hills, deceas d. 1714. 

i p. folio. Copies in B. M., and Signet. Entered on Patent Rolls; 
entered in Privy Council Register, I Geo., vol. i, p. gi. Printed in " London 
Gazette" October 4, 1714. 



1714, November 22. 

[Continuing Officers in the Colonies.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

DECLARING His MAJESTIES PLEASURE FOR CONTINUING THE 
OFFICERS IN His MAJESTIES PLANTATIONS, TILL His 
MAJESTIES PLEASURE SHALL BE FURTHER DECLARED. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas by an Act of Parliament made in the Sixth Year 
of the Reign of the late Queen Anne, Our most Dear Sister, 
Intituled, An Act for the Security of Her Majesties Person 
and Government, and of the Succession to the Crown of Great 
Britain in the Protestant Line, 1 It was Enacted, amongst other 
Things, That no Office, Place, or Employment, Civil or Mili 
tary, within any of Her said late Majesties Plantations, should 
become Void, by reason of the Demise or Death of Her said 
late Majesty, but that the Person and Persons in any of the 
said Offices, Places, or Employments, should Continue in the 
respective Offices, Places, and Employments for the Space of 
Six Months next after such Death or Demise, unless sooner 

1 Statutes of the Realm, viii, 738; 6 Anne, ch. 41 (ch. 7 in other editions of the 
Statutes). 



November 22. 175 

Removed and Discharged by Us ; And in regard it may happen, 
that Our Pleasure may not, within the said time, be Declared 
touching the said Offices, which will, at the end of the said 
Six Months, become Void: We, for the Preventing the Incon 
veniences that may happen thereby, in Our Princely Wisdom 
and Care of the State (reserving to Our Judgment hereafter 
the Reformation and Redress of any Abuses in Misgovern- 
ment, upon due Knowledge and Examination thereof) are 
Pleased, and do hereby Order, Signine, and Declare, That all 
Persons that, at the time of the Decease of Her said late 
Majesty, were Duly and Lawfully Possessed of or Invested in 
any Office, Place or Employment, Civil or Military, in any of 
Our Plantations, and which have not been since Removed 
from such their Offices, Places, or Employments, shall be and 
shall hold themselves Continued in the said Offices, Places, or 
Employments, as formerly they Held and Enjoyed the same, 
until Our Pleasure be further known, or that other Provision 
be made, pursuant to Her late Majesties Commissions and 
Instructions to Her Governors and Officers of the Plantations 
aforesaid. 1 And that in the mean time for the Preservation 
of the Peace, and necessary Proceedings in Matters of Justice, 
and for the Safety and Service of the State, all the said Per 
sons, of whatsoever Degree or Condition, do not fail every one 
severally, according to his Place, Office, or Charge, to pro 
ceed in the Performance and Execution of all Duties thereunto 
belonging, as formerly appertained unto them while the late 
Queen was Living. And further We do hereby Will and Com 
mand all and singular Our Subjects in the said Plantations, 
of what Estate or Degree they or any of them be, to be Aiding, 
Helping and Assisting, at the Commandment of the said 
Officers, in the Performance and Execution of the said Offices 
and Places, as they tender Our Displeasure, and will answer 
for the contrary at their utmost Perils. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Two and twentieth 
Day of November, 1714. In the First Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

1 The Privy Council, August 5, 1714, passed an order that all officers in 
Great Britain and the Plantations should be continued in office, and on August 
10 drafted a form of proclamation for proclaiming the King in the Plantations 
(Acts of Privy Council, ii, 682). The proclamation proceedings are printed in 
the records of several of the colonies. 



176 Royal Proclamations. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the Kings most 
Excellent Majesty, And by the Assigns of Thomas Newcomb, 
and Henry Hills, deceas d. 1714. 

i p. folio. Copies in B. M., Dalk., and P. C. Entered on Patent Rolls; 
entered in Privy Council Register, I Geo., vol. i, p. up. Printed in " Lon 
don Gazette," November 27, 1714. 



1717, September 5. 
[For Suppressing Pirates in West Indies.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION 

FOR SUPPRESSING OF PIRATES. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas We have received Information, That several Per 
sons, Subjects of Great Britain, have, since the Twenty fourth 
Day of June, in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven 
hundred and fifteen, committed divers Piracies and Robberies 
upon the High Seas in the West-Indies, or adjoyning to Our 
Plantations, which hath, and may Occasion great Damage to 
the Merchants of Great Britain, and others, Trading into 
those Parts; And though We have appointed such a Force as 
We Judge sufficient for Suppressing the said Piracies: Yet 
the more effectually to put an End to the same, We have 
thought fit, by and with the Advice of our Privy- Council, to 
Issue this Our Royal Proclamation; And We do hereby Promise 
and Declare, That in case any of the said Pirates shall, on or 
before the Fifth Day of September, in the Year of our Lord 
One thousand seven hundred and eighteen, 1 Surrender him or 
themselves to One of Our Principal Secretaries of State in 
Great Britain or Ireland, or to any Governor or Deputy-Gov 
ernor of any of Our Plantations or Dominions beyond the 
Seas, every such Pirate and Pirates, so Surrendring him or 
themselves, as aforesaid, shall have Our Gracious Pardon of 
and for such his or their Piracy or Piracies, by him or them 

1 This date was extended to July i, 1719, according to a proclamation of 
December 21, 1718, printed on p. 178. On February 9, 1718, the Attorney- 
General was requested to interpret the meaning of several clauses in the above 
proclamation, and the Queries and Answers are printed in full in the Acts of the 
Privy Council, ii, 723. 



, September 5. 177 

Committed before the Fifth Day of January next ensuing. 
And We do hereby strictly Charge and Command all Our 
Admirals, Captains, and other Officers at Sea, and all Our 
Governors and Commanders of any Forts, Castles, or other 
Places in Our Plantations, and all other Our Officers Civil and 
Military, to Seize and Take such of the Pirates who shall 
refuse or neglect to Surrender themselves accordingly. And 
We do hereby further Declare, That in case any Person or 
Persons, on or after the Sixth Day of September, One thousand 
seven hundred and eighteen, shall Discover or Seize, or cause 
or procure to be Discovered or Seized, any One or more of the 
said Pirates, so neglecting or refusing to Surrender themselves, 
as aforesaid, so as they may be brought to Justice, and Con 
victed of the said Offence, such Person or Persons, so making 
such Discovery or Seizure, or causing or procuring such 
Discovery or Seizure to be made, shall have and receive as a 
Reward for the same, viz. For every Commander of any Pirate- 
Ship or Vessel the Sum of One hundred Pounds; For every 
Lieutenant, Master, Boatswain, Carpenter, and Gunner, the 
Sum of Forty Pounds; For every Inferior Officer the Sum of 
Thirty Pounds ; And for every Private Man the Sum of Twenty 
Pounds. And if any Person or Persons, belonging to, and 
being Part of the Crew of any such Pirate-Ship or Vessel, 
shall, on or after the said Sixth Day of September, One thou 
sand seven hundred and eighteen, Seize and Deliver, or cause 
to be Seized or Delivered, any Commander or Commanders 
of such Pirate-Ship or Vessel, so as that he or they be brought 
to Justice, and convicted of the said Offence, such Person or 
Persons, as a Reward for the same, shall receive for every 
such Commander the Sum of Two hundred Pounds; which 
said Sums the Lord Treasurer, or the Commissioners of Our 
Treasury for the time being, are hereby required and directed 
to Pay accordingly. 

Given at Our Court at Hampton-Court, the Fifth Day of 
September, 1717. In the Fourth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the Kings 
most Excellent Majesty, And by the Assigns of Thomas New- 
comb, and Henry Hills, deceas d. 1717. 

i p. folio. Copies in Dalk., P. C., and P. R. 0. Entered on Patent 
Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, I Geo., vol. 2, p. 38. Printed in 
11 London Gazette," September 17, 1717. 



178 Royal Proclamations. 

1718, December 21. 

[For Suppressing Pirates in West Indies.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas We did think fit, by and with the Advice of Our 
Privy- Council, to Issue Our Royal Proclamation, bearing 
Date the Fifth Day of September, One thousand seven hun 
dred and seventeen, in the Fourth Year of Our Reign, therein 
taking Notice, That We had received Information, that several 
Persons, Subjects of Great Britain, had, since the Four and 
twentieth Day of June, in the Year of our Lord One thousand 
seven hundred and fifteen, committed divers Piracies and 
Robberies upon the High Seas in the West-Indies, or adjoyning 
to Our Plantations, which had and might Occasion great 
Damage to the Merchants of Great Britain, and others, 
Trading into those Parts: And We did thereby Promise and 
Declare, That in case any the said Pirates should, on or before 
the Fifth Day of September, One thousand seven hundred 
and eighteen, Surrender him or themselves in manner as therein 
is directed, every such Pirate and Pirates, so Surrendring 
him or themselves, as aforesaid, should have Our Gracious 
Pardon of and for such his or their Piracy or Piracies, by 
him or them committed before the Fifth Day of January then 
next ensuing: And whereas several of the said Pirates, not 
having had timely Notice of Our said Proclamation, may not 
have Surrendred themselves within the time therein appointed, 
and by reason thereof are uncapable of Receiving the Benefit 
of Our Royal Mercy and Clemency intended thereby: And 
though We have appointed such a Force, as We judge suffi 
cient for Suppressing the said Piracies, yet the more effectually 
to put an end to the same, We have thought fit, by and with 
the Advice of Our Privy-Council, to Issue this Our Royal Proc 
lamation; And We do hereby Promise and Declare, That in 
case any the said Pirates shall, on or before the First Day of 
July, in the Year of Our Lord One thousand seven hundred 
and nineteen, Surrender him or themselves to One of Our 
Principal Secretaries of State in Great Britain or Ireland, or 
to any Governor or Deputy- Governor of any of Our Planta- 



December 21. 179 

tions or Dominions beyond the Seas, every such Pirate and 
Pirates, so Surrendring him or themselves, as aforesaid, shall 
have Our Gracious Pardon of and for such his or their Piracy 
or Piracies, by him or them Committed before such time as 
they shall have received Notice of this Our Royal Proclama 
tion; which Pardon or Pardons We have Authorized and 
Commanded Our respective Governors to Grant accordingly. 
And We do hereby strictly Charge and Command all Our 
Admirals, Captains, and other Officers at Sea, and all Our 
Governors and Commanders of any Forts, Castles, or other 
Places in Our Plantations, and all others Our Officers Civil 
and Military, to Seize and Take such of the Pirates, who shall 
refuse or neglect to Surrender themselves accordingly. And 
We do hereby further Declare, That in case any Person or 
Persons, on or after the First Day of July, One thousand seven 
hundred and nineteen, shall Discover or Seize, or Cause or 
Procure to be Discovered or Seized, any One or more of the 
said Pirates, so Neglecting or Refusing to Surrender them 
selves, as aforesaid, so as they may be brought to Justice, and 
Convicted of the said Offence, such Person or Persons, so 
making such Discovery or Seizure, or Causing or Procuring 
such Discovery or Seizure to be made, shall Have and Receive 
as a Reward for the same, (viz.) For every Commander of any 
Pirate-Ship or Vessel the Sum of One hundred Pounds; For 
every Lieutenant, Master, Boatswain, Carpenter, and Gunner, 
the Sum of Forty Pounds; For every Inferior Officer the Sum 
of Thirty Pounds; And for every Private Man, the Sum of 
Twenty Pounds; And if any Person or Persons, belonging to, 
and being part of the Crew of any such Pirate-Ship or Vessel, 
shall, on or after the said First Day of July, One thousand 
seven hundred and nineteen, Seize and Deliver, or cause to be 
Seized and Delivered, any Commander or Commanders of 
such Pirate-Ship or Vessel, so as that he or they be brought 
to Justice, and Convicted of the said Offence, such Person or 
Persons, as a Reward for the same, shall Receive for every 
such Commander the Sum of Two hundred Pounds; which 
said Sums the Lord Treasurer, or the Commissioners of Our 
Treasury for the time being, are hereby Required and Directed 
to Pay accordingly. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Twenty first Day of 
December 1718. In the Fifth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



180 Royal Proclamations. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the Kings 
most Excellent Majesty, And by the Assigns of Thomas New- 
comb, and Henry Hills, deceas d. 1718. 

i p. folio. Copies in P. C., and P. R. 0. Entered on Patent Rolls; 
entered in Privy Council Register, I Geo. } vol. 2, p. 206. Printed in " Lon 
don Gazette" December 27, 1718. 



1722, July 19. 
[Concerning Passes for Ships.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

REQUIRING PASSES FORMERLY GRANTED TO SHIPS AND VESSELS 
TRADING IN THE WAY OF THE ALGERINE CRUIZERS, TO 
BE RETURNED INTO THE OFFICE OF THE ADMIRALTY OF 
GREAT BRITAIN; AND OTHER PASSES TO BE ISSUED OF 
A NEW FORM. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas by Our Royal Proclamation bearing Date the 
Fourth Day of October, 1 in the First Year of Our Reign, We 
did Charge and Require, that the Owners and Masters of all 
Ships and Vessels belonging to Our loving Subjects of Great 
Britain and Ireland, as well as Our Foreign Governments 
and Plantations, which should have Occasion to trade to 
Portugal, the Canaries, Guinea, the Indies, into the Med 
iterranean, or elsewhere, in the Way of the Cruizers of the 
Government of Algier, should be furnished with Passes of 
the Form thereby directed, by or before the Thirtieth Day 
of July, in the Year of Our Lord One thousand seven hundred 
and fifteen. And whereas Our Commissioners for Executing 
the Office of High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, 
have humbly represented unto Us, That it may have happened, 
that when such Ships or Vessels have either been taken in 
Time of War, or disposed of by Sale in Remote Parts, the 
Passes issued to them, as aforesaid, may have fallen into the 

1 See proclamation of October 4, 1714, printed on p. 172, with note. 



1722, July ig. 181 

Hands of Foreigners, or have been sold to them with the Ships 
or Vessels, the latter being directly contrary to the Bonds 
entred into by the Masters of such Ships and Vessels to 
return the aforesaid Passes, that so they may be Cancelled 
at the Admiralty-Office: And Our said Commissioners for 
Executing the Office of High Admiral of Great Britain and 
Ireland, having further represented unto Us, That they have 
been informed, that several Ships and Vessels, belonging to 
Foreign Princes or States, have by some Indirect Means 
procured and carried on their Trade with such Passes, as 
aforesaid ; which Indirect Proceedings are not only Prejudical 
to Our Trading Subjects, and Our Revenue, but may occasion 
Misunderstandings between Us and the aforesaid Govern 
ment of Algier: For Preventing whereof We have thought 
fit, by the Advice of Our Privy- Council, to Publish this Our 
Royal Proclamation, hereby Declaring, that all such Passes 
of the Old Form, which have been issued before the Date of 
this Our Royal Proclamation, shall not continue in Force 
longer than for the Space of Twelve Months from the Date 
hereof (Excepting such as have been granted to such Ships 
or Vessels as are gone or going to the East-Indies, or to the 
South-Seas, or any other long Trading Voyages.) And We 
do hereby strictly Charge and Command all Our Loving 
Subjects, who are, or shall be possessed of any such Passes, 
that they do, within the Space of Twelve Months from the 
Date of this Our Royal Proclamation, as aforesaid, return 
the same (Excepting such as before excepted) into the Office 
of the Admiralty of Great Britain, in Order to their being 
Cancelled; and that they do furnish themselves with Passes 
of a New Form, under the Hands and Seals of Our Com 
missioners for Executing the Office of High Admiral of Great 
Britain and Ireland, in lieu thereof, for their several Ships 
and Vessels, according to the Treaties concluded between 
Us and the said Government of Algier, and Our Instructions 
given to Our said Commissioners for Executing the Office of 
High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland touching the same. 

Given at Our Court at Kensington the Nineteenth Day 
of July, in the Eighth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



182 Royal Proclamations. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the Kings 
most Excellent Majesty, And by the Assigns of Thomas 
Newcomb, and Henry Hills, deceas d. 1722. 

i p. folio. Copies in P. C., and P. R. 0. Entered on Patent Rolls; 
entered in Privy Council Register, I Geo., vol. 4, p. 62. Printed in "Lon 
don Gazette" July 24, 1722. 



1727, July 5. 
. [Continuing Officers in the Colonies.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

DECLARING His MAJESTY S PLEASURE FOR CONTINUING THE 
OFFICERS IN His MAJESTY S PLANTATIONS, TILL His 
MAJESTY S PLEASURE SHALL BE FURTHER SIGNIFIED. 1 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas by an Act of Parliament, made in the Sixth Year 
of the late Queen Anne, of Blessed Memory, intituled, An 
Act for the Security of Her Majesty s Person and Govern 
ment, and of the Succession to the Crown of Great Britain 
in the Protestant Line, it was enacted (amongst other things) 
That no Office, Place, or Employment, Civil or Military, 
within any of Her said late Majesty s Plantations, should 
become void by reason of the Demise, or Death of Her said 
late Majesty, Her Heirs, or Successors, Kings or Queens of 
this Realm; but that the Person and Persons in any of the 
Offices, Places, or Employments aforesaid, should continue 
in their respective Offices, Places, and Employments, for the 
Space of Six Months next after such Death or Demise, unless 
sooner removed and discharged by the next in Succession, to 
whom the Crown of this Realm should come, remain, and be, 
according to the several Acts of Parliament for limiting and 
settling the Succession of the Crown, as by the said recited 
Act may appear; and in regard it may happen, that Our 

1 This proclamation, with a form of proclamation for proclaiming the new 
King, was sent over to each colony. In the state archives of some of the colo 
nies, this correspondence is still preserved, and in some cases has been printed, 
i.e., in Pennsylvania Archives, ser. i, vol. i, p. 200. 



, July 5. 183 

pleasure may not within the said time be declared, touching 
the said Offices, Places, and Employments in Our Foreign 
Plantations, which will at the End of the said Six Months 
become void; We, for preventing the Inconveniences that 
may happen thereby, in Our Princely Wisdom, and Care of 
the State (reserving to Our Judgment hereafter the Reforma 
tion and Redress of any Abuses in the Execution of any such 
Offices, Places, and Employments, upon due Knowledge and 
Examination thereof) have thought fit, with the Advice of 
Our Privy Council, to issue this Our Royal Proclamation, 
and do hereby order, signify, and declare, That all Persons, 
that at the Time of the Decease of Our late Royal Father 
King George the First, of Glorious Memory, were duly and 
lawfully possessed of, or invested in any Office, Place, or 
Employment, Civil or Military, in any of Our Plantations, 
and which have not been since removed from such their 
Offices, Places, or Employments, shall be, and shall hold 
themselves continued in the said Offices, Places, and Employ 
ments, as formerly they held and enjoyed the same, until 
Our Pleasure be further known, or other Provision be made, 
pursuant to the Commissions and Instructions of Our said 
late Royal Father, to His Governors and Officers of the 
Plantations aforesaid; and that in the mean time, for the 
Preservation of the Peace, and necessary Proceedings in 
Matters of Justice, and for the Safety and Service of the 
State, all the said Persons, of whatsoever Degree or Con 
dition, do not fail every one severally, according to his Place, 
Office, or Charge, to proceed in the Performance and Execu 
tion of all Duties thereunto belonging, as formerly apper 
tained unto them, during the life of Our said late Royal 
Father; and further, We do hereby will and command all 
and singular Our Subjects in the said Plantations, of what 
Estate or Degree they, or any of them be, to be aiding, help 
ing, and assisting, at the Commandment of the said Officers, 
in the Performance and Execution of the said Offices and 
Places, as they tender Our Displeasure, and will answer the 
contrary at their utmost Perils. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Fifth Day of July, 
1727, and in the First Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



1 84 Royal Proclamations. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the King s 
most Excellent Majesty; and Thomas Norris, Assignee to 
George Hills, 1727. 

Price Two Pence. 

I p. folio. Copy in P. C. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy 
Council Register, II Geo., vol. i, p. 32. Printed in "American Weekly 
Mercury" September 28, 1727. 



1729, December 31. 

[Concerning Passes for Ships.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

REQUIRING PASSES FORMERLY GRANTED TO SHIPS AND VESSELS, 
TRADING IN THE WAY OF THE CRUIZERS BELONGING 
TO THE GOVERNMENTS ON THE COAST OF BARBARY, TO 

BE RETURNED INTO THE OFFICE OF THE ADMIRALTY 

OF GREAT BRITAIN, AND OTHER PASSES OF DIFFERENT 
FORMS TO BE ISSUED. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas our Royal Father of Glorious Memory, by His 
Proclamation, bearing Date the Nineteenth Day of July, in 
the Eighth Year of His Reign 1 , did charge and command all 
His loving Subjects, who then were, or should be possessed 
of any Passes, which before the said Nineteenth Day of July 
had been issued for Ships and Vessels belonging to His said 
late Majesty s Subjects trading to Portugal, the Canaries, 
Guinea, the Indies, into the Mediterranean, or elsewhere, 
in the Way of the Cruizers of the Government of Algiers 
(excepting such as had been granted to such Ships or Vessels 
as were gone or going to the East Indies, or the South Seas, 
or any other long Trading Voyages) to return the same, and 
furnish themselves with Passes of a new Form, under the 
Hands and Seals of the Commissioners for executing the 
Office of High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, in lieu 

1 See proclamation of July 19, 1722, printed on p. 180. 



December jr. 185 

thereof, for their several Ships and Vessels, in such Manner 
as by the said recited Proclamation was directed : And whereas 
it hath been humbly represented unto Us, That it may have 
happened that several Passes granted pursuant to the said 
recited Proclamation may, either by Accident, or undue 
Means, have fallen into the Hands of Foreigners, who by 
Colour of such Passes may carry on their Trade; We, taking 
the Premises into Our Royal Consideration, and judging it 
necessary to put a speedy Stop to all such indirect Practices, 
which do not only tend to the Prejudice of Our trading Sub 
jects, but may occasion a Misunderstanding between Us and 
the Governments on the Coast of Barbary, for preventing 
thereof have thought fit, by the Advice of our Privy Council, 
to publish this Our Royal Proclamation, and do hereby 
declare, That all such Passes of the present Form now in 
being shall not continue in Force longer than Twelve Months, 
to be computed from the First Day of March next ensuing 
the Date hereof (except such Passes as have been granted to 
Ships gone or going to the East Indies, or other remote Voy 
ages, where they cannot be timely furnished with new Passes) 
and We do hereby strictly charge and command all Our 
loving Subjects, who are or shall be possessed of any such 
Passes, That they do within the Space of Twelve Months, 
to be computed from the said First Day of March next, 
return the same (except such as are before excepted) into 
the Office of the Admiralty of Great Britain, or to the re 
spective Collectors of Our Customs at the Out-Ports of 
Great Britain and Ireland, or to the Governors of some of 
Our Foreign Plantations or Dominions, in order to their 
being cancelled; and that they do furnish themselves with 
Passes of a new Form, under the Hands and Seals of our 
Commissioners for executing the Office of High Admiral of 
Great Britain and Ireland, in lieu thereof, for their several 
Ships and Vessels, according to the Treaties subsisting between 
Us and the said Governments on the Coast of Barbary, and 
the Regulations made by Our said Royal Father, by Order 
in His Privy Council, on the Fourteenth Day of June, in the 
Year One thousand seven hundred and twenty two, and Our 
Instructions given to Our said Commissioners for executing 
the Office of High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, 
touching the same: And whereas many Ships and Vessels 
belonging to Our loving Subjects continue several Years 
trading from Port to Port in the Mediterranean without 



1 86 Royal Proclamations. 

returning Home, whereby they cannot so conveniently pro 
cure their Passes to he exchanged, We do hereby, for the Ease 
of Our Trading Subjects, publish and declare Our Pleasure, 
That upon the Application of any Owner of any Ship or 
Vessel, or other substantial Merchant, to the Office of the 
Admiralty of Great Britain, and Oath made by him of the 
Property of such Ship or Vessel, and that Three Fourths of 
the Company are Our Subjects, according to an Act made 
in the Twelfth Year of the Reign of Our Royal Predecessor 
King Charles the Second [intituled, An Act for the Encourag 
ing and Increasing of Shipping and Navigation] and upon 
entring into the usual Bond for the Return of such Pass at 
the End of the Voyage, it shall and may be lawful for Our 
Commissioners for executing the Office of High Admiral of 
Great Britain and Ireland, or Our High Admiral of Great 
Britain and Ireland for the time being, and they are respec 
tively impowered to make out a new Pass for such Ship or 
Vessel, and send the same to such of His Majesty s Consuls 
in the Mediterranean, as the said Owner or Merchant shall 
desire, with Direction to such Consul, that upon Application 
to him from the Master of the Ship for which the Pass is made 
out, and surrendering up his old Pass, and entring into a like 
Bond for the Return of such new Pass, he shall deliver out 
the said new Pass to such Master, and transmit the old one, 
with the Bond, to the Office of the Admiralty of Great Britain. 
And in order more effectually to hinder for the future any 
Abuses that may be attempted by Foreigners relating to the 
new Passes to be issued as aforesaid, We do hereby further 
declare Our Royal Will and Pleasure, That all such new 
Passes to be hereafter issued for any Ships or Vessels what 
soever belonging to any of Our Subjects of the Island of 
Minorca or Gibraltar, shall be made out in a peculiar Form, 
different from the Form of the new Passes to be issued for 
Ships and Vessels belonging to any other Part of our Domin 
ions, and that such new Passes shall be lodged with the 
respective Governors, Lieutenant Governors, or Commanders 
in Chief for the time being, of the said Island of Minorca 
and Gibraltar, and issued out only by them, according to the 
Regulations made by Our said Royal Father in Council, as 
aforesaid; and the said respective Governors, Lieutenant 
Governors, and Commanders in Chief are hereby charged 
and required not to issue or deliver out any such Passes to 
any Persons whatsoever, other than such as are really Our 



December 31. 187 

Subjects inhabiting in the said Island of Minorca or Gibraltar 
respectively, and strictly to conform themselves in all respects 
to the Regulations and Instructions made and given, as 
aforesaid. And We do hereby further publish and declare, 
That by Our Orders made in Our Privy Council on the Eight 
eenth Day of this instant December, We have ordered and 
directed, that the proper Officers of Our Customs in the 
several Ports of Our Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland 
do demand of the Masters of all Merchant Ships, so soon as 
they shall return into Port from a Foreign Voyage, all Passes 
granted as aforesaid, which shall be in their Possession, to 
be produced to the said respective Officers of Our Customs; 
and that if the same shall appear to be of an older Date than 
Twelve Months for Ships and Vessels trading on this side 
the Streights Mouth, or for Ships and Vessels trading to a 
greater Distance, in case the Voyages of such last mentioned 
Ships and Vessels shall be determined, then such Passes shall 
be delivered up to the said respective Officers of Our Customs, 
and be by them returned to the Office of the Admiralty of 
Great Britain; and in case the Master of any such Ship or 
Vessel shall refuse to produce or deliver up such Passes, 
according to the true Intent of Our said Order, then the said 
Officers shall certify the Name of every such Master, and of 
the Ship or Vessel, to Our Commissioners for executing the 
Office of High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland, or to 
Our High Admiral of Great Britain and Ireland for the time 
being, to the end that Directions may be given for putting 
the Bond, entered into on the granting any such Pass, in 
Suit. And all Our Governors, Lieutenant Governors, and 
Commanders in Chief of any of Our Islands, Colonies, or 
Plantations, Consuls residing in Foreign Parts, and all other 
Our Officers and Ministers whatsoever, and all other Our 
loving Subjects whom it may concern, are hereby expressly 
required and commanded to yield due Obedience unto, and 
strictly to observe all the Orders, Instructions, Regulations, 
and Directions before mentioned, on Pain of Our high Dis 
pleasure. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s the Thirty first Day 
of December, 1729. in the Third Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



1 88 Royal Proclamations. 

London, Printed by the Assigns of His Majesty s Printer, 
and of Henry Hills, deceas d. 1729. 

i p. folio. Copies in Dalk., and P. C. Entered in Privy Council 
Register, II Geo., vol. 2, p. 126. Printed in "London Gazette" January 
3, 1730. 



1740, April 9. 
[Encouraging Trade with America.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas by an Act passed this present Sessions of Parlia 
ment, intituled, An Act for the more effectual securing and 
encouraging the Trade of his Majesty s British Subjects to 
America, and for the Encouragement of Seamen to enter into 
his Majesty s Service; 1 it is, among other Things, enacted, 
for the encouraging his Majesty s Subjects to engage in joint 
and united, as well as separate Expences, Expeditions, and 
Adventures, That We, our Heirs, and Successors, be im- 
powered, from time to time, during the Continuance of the 
present or any future War 2 , to grant Charters or Commissions 
for the more effectual enabling any Societies, or particular 
Persons to join in Expeditions by Sea or Land, and to sail to, 
and in any of the Seas in America, for the attacking, taking, 
or destroying any Ships, Goods, Moveables or Immoveables, 
Settlements, Factories, Creeks, Harbours, Places of Strength, 
Lands, Forts, Castles, and Fortifications, now belonging, or 
hereafter to belong to, or to be possest by any Enemy, in any 
Part or Parts of America; and for the better making and 
carrying on any Preparations for such Purposes, and for the 
making and assuring to the Societies or Persons concerned, 
their Heirs, Successors, Executors, Administrators, and As 
signs, full and undoubted Properties, Rights, and Titles, 
in and to the same, which such Societies or Persons shall take 
or cause to be taken from the Enemy, under such Regula 
tions, and in such Manner and Form, as We, our Heirs and 
Successors, shall think fit, and at any Times hereafter, by any 

1 "Statutes at Large" (Basket, 1764), vi, 379. 
8 War with Spain was declared October 19, 1739. 



i?4y June i p. 189 

further Grants or Charters to confirm, and further assure the 
Premisses to them, so as to enable them to have and enjoy 
the full Benefit thereof, but so, as that nothing therein con 
tained shall extend to exclude or restrain any of our Subjects 
from having a full and free Trade to and in any Part of Amer 
ica: And whereas We are desirous, that none of our loving 
Subjects should be ignorant of the said Encouragement, We 
have thought fit, with the Advice of our Privy Council, to 
publish the same, by this Our Royal Proclamation, to the 
End that all Officers, Seamen, Marines, Soldiers, and others, 
Our Subjects, may be fully informed of the Benefit thereby 
intended for such of them, as shall be willing to assist by their 
Endeavours in the vigorous Prosecution of the War, and the 
Annoyance of the Enemy. 

Given at our Court at St. James s the Ninth Day of April, 
1740, in the Thirteenth Year of our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the King s 
most Excellent Majesty. 1740. 

i p. folio. Copies in Dalk., and P. C.; also in N. Y. Public Library. 
Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, II Geo. } vol. 7, 
p. Q. Printed in " London Gazette" April 12, 1740. 



1740, June IQ. 
[Providing for Distribution of Prize Money.] 

BY THE LORDS JUSTICES. 
A PROCLAMATION 

APPOINTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES TAKEN, AND THE 
BOUNTY FOR TAKING SHIPS OF WAR OF THE ENEMY. 

Jo. Cant. Hervey C. P. S. Pembroke, 

Hardwicke C. Dorset, Hay, 

Wilmington P. Devonshire, Holies Newcastle. 1 

1 This proclamation was issued by the Lords Justices in the absence of the 
King, who from May to October, 1 740, was at Hanover endeavoring to secure 
the allegiance to England of Frederick the Great. 



i go Royal Proclamations. 

Whereas by an Act of Parliament made in the last Session 
of Parliament, intituled, An Act for the more effectual secur 
ing and encouraging the Trade of His Majesty s British Sub 
jects to America, and for the Encouragement of Seamen to 
enter into His Majesty s Service, it is, amongst other Things, 
enacted, That the Flag Officers, Commanders, and other 
Officers, Seamen, Marines, and Soldiers on Board every Ship 
and Vessel of War, in His Majesty s Pay, shall have the sole 
Interest and Property of and in all and every Ship, Vessel, 
Goods, and Merchandize which they shall take after the 
Fourth Day of January, in the Year of Our Lord One thou 
sand seven hundred and thirty nine, 1 in Europe, and after 
the Twenty Fourth Day of June, in the Year of Our Lord 
One thousand seven hundred and forty, in any other Part of 
the World (being first adjudged lawful Prize, in any of His 
Majesty s Courts of Admiralty in Great Britain, or in His 
Plantations in America, or elsewhere) to be divided in such 
Proportions, and after such Manner, as His Majesty, His 
Heirs, and Successors shall think fit to order and direct by 
Proclamation, to be issued for that Purpose. And as a 
farther Encouragement to the Officers, Seamen, Marines, 
Soldiers, and others on Board His Majesty s Ships of War, 
as also of Privateers, to attack, take, and destroy any Ships 
of Force belonging to the Enemy, it is thereby also enacted, 
That there shall be paid by the Treasurer of His Majesty s 
Navy, upon Bills to be made forth by the Commissioners of 
the Navy, to be paid according to the Course thereof, with 
out Fee or Reward, unto the Officers, Seamen, Marines, 
Soldiers, and others that shall have been actually on Board 
such of His Majesty s Ship or Ships of War, or Privateer or 
Privateers, in any Action where any Ship or Ships of War, 
or Privateers shall have been taken from the Enemy, sunk, 
burnt, or otherwise destroyed, Five Pounds for every Man, 
which was living on Board any Ship or Ships so taken, sunk, 
burnt, or otherwise destroyed, at the Beginning of the Engage 
ment between them, the Numbers of such Men to be proved 
by the Oaths of Three or more of the chief Officers or Men, 
which were belonging to the said Ship or Ships of War, or 
Privateers of the Enemy, at the Time of her or their being 
taken as Prize, sunk, burnt, or otherwise destroyed, before 
the Mayor, or other chief Magistrate of the Port, whereunto 
any Prize, or Officers, or Men of such Ships as were sunk, 

1 1739-40. War had been declared with Spain, October 19, 1739. 



1 7 40, June ig. 191 

burnt, or otherwise destroyed, shall be brought; which Oaths 
the said Mayor, or other chief Magistrate of any such Port 
is hereby impowered and required to administer, and shall 
forthwith grant a Certificate thereof, without Fee or Reward, 
directed to the Commissioners of the Navy: Upon producing 
which Certificate to the Commissioners of the Navy, together 
with an authentick Copy of the Condemnation of such Ship 
so taken; or if such Ship be sunk, burnt, or otherwise de 
stroyed, on producing only a Certificate from the Mayor, or 
other chief Magistrate, as aforesaid, the said Commissioners 
of His Majesty s Navy, or such Person or Persons as they 
shall appoint for that Purpose, shall, according to the Course 
of the Navy, within Fifteen Days, make out Bills for the 
Amount of such Bounty, directed to the Treasurer of the 
Navy, payable to, and to be divided amongst the Officers, 
Seamen, Marines, and Soldiers on Board His Majesty s Ships 
of War, in Manner, Form, and Proportion, as, by His Majesty s 
Proclamation, to be issued for that Purpose, shall be directed 
and appointed; and amongst the Owners, Officers, and Sea 
men of any private Vessel, or Ship of War, in such Manner 
and Proportion, as, by any Agreement in Writing, they shall 
have entered into for that Purpose, shall be directed; We 
taking the Premisses into Consideration, do, pursuant to the 
said Act of Parliament (with the Advice of His Majesty s 
Privy Council) by this Proclamation order, direct, and 
appoint, that the neat Produce of all Prizes taken by His 
Majesty s Ships of War, and Bounty Money for Prisoners 
taken in such Prizes, be divided into Eight equal Parts, 
whereof the Captain or Captains of any of His Majesty s 
Ships of War, who shall be actually on Board at the taking 
of any Prize, shall be allowed Three Eighth Parts; But in 
case any Prize shall be taken by any Ship or Ships of War, 
under the Command of a Flag or Flags, the Flag Officer or 
Officers being actually on Board, or directing and assisting 
in the Capture, to have One Eighth Part of the said Three 
Eighths; to the Captains of the Marines, and Land Forces, 
Sea Lieutenants, and Master on Board any such Ships, shall 
be allowed One Eighth Part, to be equally divided amongst 
them; to the Lieutenants and Quarter-masters of Marines, 
and Lieutenants, Ensigns, and Quarter-masters of Land 
Forces, Boatswain, Gunner, Purser, Carpenter, Masters, 
Mate, Chirurgeons, and Chaplain on Board any such Ship, 
One Eighth Part to be equally divided amongst them; to the 



192 Royal Proclamations. 

Midshipmen, Carpenter s Mates, Boatswain s Mates, Gun 
ner s Mates, Master at Arms, Corporals, Yeoman of the 
Sheets, Coxswain, Quarter-master, Quarter-master s Mates, 
Chirurgeon s Mates, Yeoman of the Powder Room, and 
Serjeants of Marines or Land Forces on Board any such 
Ships, One Eighth Part to be equally divided amongst them; 
to the Trumpeters, Quarter-gunners, Carpenter s Crew, 
Steward, Cook, Armourer, Steward s Mate, Cook s Mate, 
Gunsmith, Cooper, Swabber, ordinary Trumpeter, Barber, 
able Seamen, ordinary Seamen, and Marine or other Soldiers, 
Two Eighth Parts, to be equally divided amongst them: 
And in case any Sea Captain, inferior Commission or Warrant 
Sea Officers, belonging to any Ship of War, for whom any 
Shares of Prizes are hereby allowed, be absent, and not on 
Board at the Time of the Capture of any Prize, the Share of 
such Sea Captain, inferior Commission, or Warrant Sea 
Officer, shall be cast into the Shares hereby allowed to the 
Trumpeter, Quarter-gunners, Carpenter s Crew, Steward, 
Cook, Armourer, Steward s Mate, Cook s Mate, Gunsmith, 
Cooper, Swabber, ordinary Trumpeter, Barber, able Seamen, 
ordinary Seamen, and Marine or other Soldiers, to be equally 
divided amongst them ; provided that if any Officer or Officers 
on Board any of His Majesty s Ships of War, at the Time of 
taking any such Prizes, shall have more Commissions, or 
Offices, than one, he or they shall be intitled only to the Share 
or Shares of such Prizes, which, according to the above men 
tioned Distribution, shall belong to his or their respective 
superior Commissions or Offices. And We do hereby strictly 
enjoin all and every Commander and Commanders of any 
Ships of War, taking any Prize, as soon as may be, to trans 
mit, or cause to be transmitted, to the Commissioners of 
His Majesty s Navy, a true List of the Names of all the 
Officers, Seamen, Marines, Soldiers, and others, who were 
actually on Board His Majesty s Ships of War, under his or 
their Command, at the taking such Prize; which List shall 
contain the Quality of the Service of each Person on Board 
and be subscribed by the Captain or commanding Officer 
and Three or more of the chief Officers on Board. And We do 
hereby require and direct the Commissioners of His Majesty s 
Navy, or any Three or more of them, after Condemnation 
of such Prize, to examine, or cause to be examined such List, 
by the Muster-book of such Ships of War, and Lists annex d 
thereto, to see that such List doth agree with the said Muster- 



June 18. 193 

book and annex d Lists, as to the Names, Qualities, or Ratings 
of the Officers, Seamen, Marines, Soldiers, and others, belong 
ing to such Ship of War; and upon Request forthwith to grant 
a Certificate of the Truth of any List transmitted to them, 
to the Agents nominated and appointed by the Captors 
pursuant to the said Act, to take care or dispose of such 
Prize, and also upon Application to them, to give or cause 
to be given unto the Agents, who shall at any Time or Times 
be appointed, as aforesaid, by the Captors of any Prizes 
taken by any of the Ships of War of His Majesty, all such 
Lists, from the Muster-book of any such Ships of War, and 
annexed Lists, as the said Agents shall find requisite for their 
Direction, in paying the Produce of such Prizes, or the Bounty, 
in case any Bounty shall be due for taking the same, and to 
be otherwise aiding and assisting to the said Agents, as shall 
be necessary. 

Given at Whitehall the Nineteenth Day of June, 1740, 
and in the Fourteenth Year of His Majesty s Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the King s 
most Excellent Majesty. 1740. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., Dalk., and P. C. Entered in Privy Coun 
cil Register, II Geo., vol. 7, p. 118. Printed in " London Gazette" June 24, 
1740. 



1741, June 18. 
[Regulating Distribution of Prizes.] 

BY THE LORDS JUSTICES. 
A DECLARATION 

APPOINTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES TAKEN BY WAY OF 
REPRIZAL BEFORE His MAJESTY S DECLARATION OF 
WAR. 

Wilmington, P. Devonshire, Montagu, Cha. Wager. 1 
Dorset, Holies Newcastle, Pembroke, 

His Majesty having, on the Tenth Day of July, One thou 
sand seven hundred and thirty nine, taken into His serious 

1 Issued by the Lords Justices, during the absence of the King at Hanover. 



1 94 Royal Proclamations. 

Consideration the many and repeated Depredations which 
had been committed, and the many unjust Seizures which 
had been made in the West Indies, and elsewhere, by Spanish 
Guarda Costas, and Ships acting under the Commissions of 
the King of Spain, or his Governors, contrary to the Law of 
Nations, and in Violation of the Treaties subsisting between 
the Crown of Great Britain and Spain, whereby His Majesty s 
trading Subjects had sustained great Losses; and His Majesty 
having determined to take such Measures as were necessary 
for vindicating the Honour of His Crown, and for procuring 
Reparation and Satisfaction to His injured Subjects, was 
pleased, by and with the Advice of His Privy Council, upon 
the said Tenth Day of July, to order that General Reprizals 
should be granted against the Ships, Goods, and Subjects of 
the King of Spain, so that, as well His Majesty s Fleet and 
Ships, as also all other Ships and Vessels that should be 
commissionated by Letters of Marque or General Reprizals, 
or otherwise, by His Majesty s Commissioners for executing 
the Office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain, should 
and might lawfully seize all Ships, Vessels, and Goods belong 
ing to the King of Spain, or his Subjects, or others inhabiting 
within any the Territories of the King of Spain, and bring 
the same to Judgement in any of the Courts of Admiralty 
within His Majesty s Dominions: 

[The remainder of this proclamation, which has no further direct 
reference to the American plantations, provides for the distribution of 
the prize money arising from the sale of Spanish vessels seized between 
July 10 and the time of the declaration of war, October 19, 1739: namely, 
that one half should go to those who had suffered from unjust Spanish 
depredation according to such regulations as should later be determined, 
and one half should go to officers and sailors concerned in the capture 
according to the regulations of the Proclamation of June 19, 1740. Com 
manders who had taken prizes were to transmit to the Commissioners 
of the Navy true lists of all officers and seamen on board at the time 
of capture.] 

Given at Whitehall the Eighteenth Day of June, 1741, in 
the Fifteenth Year of His Majesty s Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the King s 
most Excellent Majesty. 1741. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., and P. C. Entered in Privy Council 
Register, II Geo., vol. 7, p. 490. Printed in the ll London Gazette," June 20, 
1741. 



I 9S 



1741, June 18. 
[Regulating Distribution of Prizes.] 

BY THE LORDS JUSTICES. 
A DECLARATION 

APPOINTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES TAKEN SINCE THE 
DECLARATION OF WAR, AND BEFORE THE COMMENCE 
MENT OF THE ACT OF PARLIAMENT FOR GRANTING THE 
PRIZES TO THE CAPTORS. 

Wilmington, P. Devonshire, Montagu, Cha. Wager. 

Dorset. Holies Newcastle, Pembroke, 

Whereas by an Act of Parliament made in the Thirteenth 
Year of His Majesty s Reign, intituled, An Act for the more 
effectual securing and encouraging the Trade of His Majesty s 
British Subjects to America, and for the Encouragement of 
Seamen to enter into His Majesty s Service, it is among other 
Things enacted, That the Flag Officers, Commanders, and 
other Officers, Seamen, Marines, and Soldiers on Board 
every Ship and Vessel of War in His Majesty s Pay, shall 
have the sole Interest and Property of and in all and every 
Ship, Vessel, Goods, and Merchanolize which they shall take 
after the Fourth Day of January, in the Year of our Lord 
One thousand seven hundred and thirty-nine in Europe; and 
after the Twenty fourth Day of June, in the Year of our Lord 
One thousand seven hundred and forty, in any other Part of 
the \Vorld (being first adjudged lawful Prize in any of His 
Majesty s Courts of Admiralty in Great Britain, or in His 
Plantations in America, or elsewhere) to be divided in such 
Proportions, and after such Manner, as His Majesty, His 
Heirs, and Successors shall think fit to order and direct, by 
Proclamation to be issued for that Purpose, in Pursuance 
whereof a Proclamation was issued on the Nineteenth of 
June, One thousand seven hundred and forty, directing in 
what Manner and Proportion the said Prizes should be 
distributed among the Captors: And whereas between the 
Time of His Majesty s Declaration of War against Spain, 
which was on the Nineteenth of October, One thousand 
seven hundred and thirty-nine, and the aforementioned 



196 Royal Proclamations. 

Fourth of January, One thousand seven hundred and thirty 
nine, His Majesty s Ships of War have seized and taken in 
Europe several Ships, Vessels, and Goods belonging to the 
Enemy; and between the said Nineteenth of October One 
thousand seven hundred and thirty-nine, and the said Twenty 
Fourth of June, One thousand seven hundred and forty, His 
Majesty s Ships of War have taken divers other Ships, Ves 
sels, and Goods of the Enemy, in other Parts of the Worlcf, 
the Property whereof became vested in His Majesty; 

[The remainder of the proclamation provides for the distribution of 
prize money arising from the sale of the enemy s vessels seized within 
the specified intervals, among the officers and seamen of the ships con 
cerned in the capture, according to the proclamation of June 19, 1740.] 

Given at Whitehall the Eighteenth Day of June, One 
thousand seven hundred and forty one, in the Fifteenth Year 
of His Majesty s Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the King s 
most Excellent Majesty. 1741. 

i p. folio. Copy in P. C. Entered in Privy Council Register, II Geo. t 
wl. 7, p. 493. Printed in " London Gazette" June 20, 1741. 



1744, March 29. 
[Declaration of War against France.) 

HIS MAJESTY S. 

DECLARATION 

OF WAR AGAINST THE FRENCH KING. 

GEORGE R. 

The Troubles, which broke out in Germany, on Account 
of the Succession of the late Emperor Charles the Sixth, 
having been begun, and carried on, by the Instigation, Assist 
ance, and Support of the French King, with a View to over 
turn the Balance of Power in Europe, and to extend the 
dangerous Influence of that Crown, in direct Violation of 



March 29. 197 

solemn Guaranty of the Pragmatic Sanction given by him 
n the Year One thousand seven hundred and thirty eight, 
n Consideration of the Cession of Lorraine; and We having, 
>n Our Part, executed Our Engagements for maintaining 
the Pragmatic Sanction, with that good Faith, which is 
nseparable from Us; and having opposed the Attempts 
made against the Dominions of the Queen of Hungary; We 
are not surprised, that Our Conduct, in this Respect, should 
have drawn upon Us the Resentment of the French King, 
Who has found his ambitious Views, in a great Measure, dis- 
lippointed by the Assistance We have furnished to Our Ally, 
unjustly attacked by him; or that he should alledge it as a 
principal Reason for declaring War against Us. 

From the Time, that We found Ourselves obliged, for the 
Maintenance of the just Rights of Our Subjects, to enter 
into a War with Spain, instead of observing a strict Neutrality, 
which We might have promised Ourselves on the Part of the 
French King, from whom We were even founded by Treaty 
to have demanded Assistance; he has given Encouragement 
and Support to Our Enemies, by conniving at his Subjects 
acting as Privateers under Spanish Commissions, both in 
Europe and America; and by sending in the Year One thou 
sand seven hundred and forty, a strong Squadron into the 
American Seas, in order to prevent Us, from prosecuting the 
just War, which We were carrying on against Spain, in those 
Parts; And We have the most authentick Proof, that an 
Order was given to the Commander of the French Squadron, 
not only to act in a hostile Manner against Our Ships, either 
jointly with the Spaniards, or separately; but even to concert 
Measures with Our Enemies, for attacking one of Our prin 
cipal Dominions in America; a Duplicate of that Order dated 
the Seventh of October, One thousand seven hundred and 
forty, having fallen into the Hands of the Commander in 
Chief of Our Squadron in the West Indies. This injurious 
Proceeding was greatly aggravated by the French Minister 
at Our Court, having declared on Occasion of sending the 
said Squadron, that the French King was very far from 
having any Design, or Intention, of breaking with Us. 

The same offensive Conduct was continued, on the Part of 
the French King, towards Us, by his Squadron in the Mediter 
ranean, in the Year One thousand seven hundred and forty one, 
joining with, and protecting the Ships of Our Enemies, in Sight 
of Our Fleet, which was preparing to attack them. 



198 Royal Proclamations. 

These unwarrantable Proceedings; The notorious Breach of 
Treaties, by repairing the Fortifications, and erecting New 
Works at Dunkirk; the open Hostilities lately committed 
against Our Fleet in the Mediterranean ; the Affront and Indig 
nity offered to Us, by the Reception of the Son of the Pretender 
to Our Crown, in the French Dominions; the Embarkation 
actually made at Dunkirk, of a considerable Body of Troops, 
notoriously designed for an Invasion of this Kingdom, in 
Favour of the Pretender to Our Crown; and the sending a 
Squadron of French Ships of War into the Channel, to support 
the said Embarkation and Invasion; will be lasting Monu 
ments of the little Regard had by the French Court, for the 
most solemn Engagements, when the Observance of them is 
inconsistent with Interest, Ambition, or Resentment. 

We cannot omit taking Notice of the unjust Insinuations 
contained in the French King s Declaration of War against 
Us, with respect to the Convention made at Hanover, in 
October, One thousand seven hundred and forty one. That 
Convention, regarding Our Electorate only, had no Relation 
to Our Conduct as King of Great Britain: the Allegations con 
cerning it, are groundless and injurious: Our Proceedings in 
that Respect, having been perfectly consistent with that good 
Faith which We have always made the Rule of Our Actions. 

It is unnecessary to mention the Objections made to the 
Behaviour of Our Ministers in Foreign Courts; since it is 
notorious, that the principal View, and Object, of the Negotia 
tions of the French Ministers in the several Courts of Europe, 
have been, either to stir up intestine Commotions in the 
Countries, where they resided; or to create Differences, and 
Misunderstandings, between them, and their respective Allies. 

The Charge of Piracy, Cruelty, and Barbarity against Our 
Ships of War, is equally unjust and unbecoming; and We have 
all such Proceedings so much in Abhorrence, that, if any 
Practices of that Nature had been made appear to us, We 
should have taken effectual Care to put a Stop to them, and 
to have punished the Offenders in the severest Manner. 

We being therefore indispensibly obliged to take up Arms, 
and entirely relying on the Help of Almighty God, who knows 
the Uprightness of Our Intentions, have thought fit to declare, 
and do hereby declare War against the French King; and We 
will, in pursuance of such Declaration, vigorously prosecute 
the same by Sea and Land; being assured of the ready Con 
currence and Assistance, of all Our loving Subjects, in so just 



i?44) March 2$. 199 

a Cause: And We do hereby will, and require, Our Generals 
and Commanders of Our Forces, Our Commissioners for 
Executing the Office of High Admiral of Great Britain, Our 
Lieutenants of Our several Counties, Governors of Our 
Forts and Garrisons, and all other Officers under them, by 
Sea and Land, to do, and execute, all Acts of Hostility, in the 
Prosecution of this War against the said French King, his 
Vassals, and Subjects, and to oppose their Attempts; willing, 
and requiring, all Our Subjects to take Notice of the same, 
whom We henceforth strictly forbid to hold any Correspond 
ence, or Communication, with the Subjects of the French 
King: And We do hereby command Our own Subjects, and 
advertise all other Persons of what Nation soever, not to trans 
port or carry any Soldiers, Arms, Powder, Ammunition, or 
other Contraband Goods, to any of the Territories, Lands, 
Plantations, or Countries of the said French King; declaring, 
that whatsoever Ship or Vessel shall be met withal, transport 
ing or carrying any Soldiers, Arms, Powder, Ammunition, or 
other Contraband Goods, to any of the Territories, Lands, 
Plantations, or Countries of the said French King, the same 
being taken, shall be condemned as good and lawful Prize. 
And whereas there are remaining in Our Kingdoms divers of 
the Subjects of the French King, We do hereby declare Our 
Royal Intention to be, that all the French Subjects, who shall 
demean themselves dutifully towards Us, shall be safe in 
their Persons and Estates. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Twenty ninth Day 
of March, 1744, in the Seventeenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by Thomas Baskett and Robert Baskett, 
Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 1744. 

j p. folio. Copies in B. M., and P. C.; also in John Carter Brown 
Library. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, II 
Geo., vol. 9, p. 269. Printed in "London Gazette" March 31, 1744. The 
declaration was reprinted in Boston by T. Fleet, 1744, as a broadside. 
Copies are in the American Antiquarian Society and the Boston Public 
Library. 



2oo Royal Proclamations. 

1744, June 14. 
[Regarding Distribution of Prizes.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas Application has been made to Us, in order to pre 
vent Disputes arising among the Flag Officers, who have been 
or may hereafter be employed in Our Service, upon the Con 
struction of that Part of the Proclamation of Our Lords 
Justices, during Our Absence, on the Nineteenth Day of June, 
One thousand seven hundred and forty, appointing a Distri 
bution of the Spanish Prizes and Bounty Money, which relates 
to the Shares granted to the Flag or Flag Officers, who shall be 
actually on Board at the taking any Prize, or shall be directing 
or assisting therein : And whereas We having taken the Opinion 
of Our Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, do judge it 
expedient to make such a Regulation, as may explain and 
settle the Right of Flag Officers, and Commanders, in all Cases 
of Prizes taken from any of Our Enemies at Sea; We therefore, 
with the Advice of Our Privy Council, do by this Our Procla 
mation 1 publish, order, and declare, That the following Regu 
lations be observed: First, That a Flag Officer commanding 
in Chief upon Service, shall have One Eighth Part of all Prizes 
taken by Ships under his Command: Secondly, That a Flag 
Officer sent to command at Jamaica, or elsewhere, shall have 
no Right to any Share of Prizes taken by Ships employed there 
before he arrives, within the Limits of his Command: Thirdly, 
That when an inferior Flag Officer, or Private Ships, are sent 
out to reinforce a superior Flag Officer at Jamaica, or else 
where, the said superior Flag Officer shall have no Right to 
any Share in Prizes taken by them, before their Arrival within 
the Limits of his Command: Fourthly, That a Chief Flag 
Officer, returning home from Jamaica, or elsewhere, shall have 
no Share in Prizes taken by the Ships left at Jamaica, or else- 

1 A long proclamation was issued November 7, 1744, providing for the dis 
tribution of the bounty for destroying French ships, which is omitted from this 
volume since it contains no direct reference to America. It was printed in the 
London Gazette of November 10, 1744, and a copy of the original broadside is in 
the Privy Council Office. 



1752, June 25. 201 

where, after he has got out of the Limits of his Command: 
Fifthly, That if a Flag Officer is sent to command in the Out- 
ports of this Kingdom, he shall have no Share in Prizes taken 
by Ships that sail from that Port, by Order from the Admiralty : 
Sixthly, That when more Flag Officers than one serve together, 
the Eighth Part of all Prizes taken by any Ships of the Fleet 
or Squadron, shall be divided in the following Proportion, 
viz. If there be but Two Flag Officers, the Chief shall have 
Two Third Parts, and the other shall have the remaining 
Third Part; but if the Number of Flag Officers be more than 
Two, the Chief shall have only one half, and the other half 
shall be divided equally among the other Flag Officers: 
Seventhly, That Commodores, with Captains under them, 
shall be esteemed as Flag Officers, with respect to their Right 
to an Eighth Part of Prizes, whether commanding in Chief, 
or serving under Command. 

Given at Our Court at Kensington, this Fourteenth Day of 
June, 1744, in the Eighteenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London, Printed by Thomas Baskett and Robert Baskett, 
Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 1744- 

i p. folio. Copy in P. C. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy 
Council Register, II Geo., vol. 9, p. 355. Printed in " London Gazette" 
June 16, 1744. 



1752, June 25. 
[Continuing Officers in Georgia.] 

BY THE LORDS JUSTICES. 
A PROCLAMATION. 

Hardwicke, C. Hartington, 

Granville, P. Holdernesse. 1 

Whereas by Letters Patent of his present Majesty, under 
his great Seal, which erected the Territories and Country 
of Georgia in America into One Free Province, under the 
Trustees for establishing the Colony of Georgia in America, the 

1 Issued by the Lords Justices, during the absence of the King at Hanover. 



202 Royal Proclamations. 

immediate Government thereof was, after the Determination 
of a Term of Twenty-one Years therein mentioned, to come 
to his said Majesty, his Heirs and Successors; which Term is 
not yet expired : And whereas the said Trustees having volun 
tarily made a Proposal to his Majesty, to make an absolute 
Surrender of all the Powers, Rights, and Trusts, vested in 
them by the said Charter; which his Majesty having been 
pleased graciously to accept, the said Trustees did, by their 
Indenture of Grant and Surrender, bearing Date the Twentieth 
Instant, grant and "surrender to his Majesty, his Heirs, and 
Successors, the said Charter, and all Powers, Jurisdictions, 
Countries, and Territories, thereby granted to them; by which, 
the immediate Care of the said Province, and of his Majesty s 
Subjects there, is now devolved upon his Majesty; 1 We being 
desirious of making Provision for the present Government of 
the said Province, and securing the Peace and good Order 
thereof, until his Majesty shall establish such other Form and 
Order of Government therein, as to his Majesty, in his Royal 
Wisdom, shall seem most for the Honour of his State, and the 
Happiness of his Subjects there; have thought fit, with the 
Advice of his Majesty s Privy-Council, to issue this Procla 
mation ; and do hereby order, signify, and declare his Majesty s 
Pleasure, That all Persons who now are, or, at the Time of the 
Publication of this Proclamation, shall be duly and lawfully 
possessed of, or invested in, any Offices or Places of Authority, 
Government, or Employment, Ecclesiastical, Civil, or Military, 
in his Majesty s said Colony of Georgia, and particularly all 
Governors, Lieutenants, or Deputy Governors, President, and 
Assistants, Council, Judges, Justices, Magistrates, Provost Mar 
shals, Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace, and all others in any Place 
or Rank of Government, or concerned in the Administration of 
Government, either Inferior or Superior, and all other Officers 
and Ministers holding any Office, Place, or Employment there, 
shall hold under his Majesty, and be continued in their said 
several and respective Places, Offices, or Employments, and 
enjoy the same with the like Salaries, Fees, and Emoluments 
thereto belonging, which have hitherto been actually paid, 
until his Majesty s Pleasure be further known, or other Pro 
vision be made for the due Government and Ordering of his 
Majesty s said Colony: And that in the mean Time, for the 

1 The charter establishing the colony of Georgia, dated June 9, 1732, was 
formally surrendered by the Trustees, June 23, 1752, and the colony became a 
royal province (see C. C. Jones History of Georgia, i, 450-459). 



, May 17. 203 

Preservation of the publick Peace and Tranquillity of the said 
Province, We do strictly command all the said Persons, of 
whatsoever Rank, Degree, or Condition, to proceed in the 
Execution of their respective Offices, and to perform all the 
Duties thereunto belonging: And further, We do hereby will 
and command all and singular his Majesty s Subjects in the 
said Colony, of what Estate or Degree they, or any of them, 
be, to be obedient to, and aiding, helping, and assisting the 
said Officers and Ministers in the Performance and Execution 
of their said Offices, Places, and Employments, as they tender 
his Majesty s Displeasure, and will answer the contrary at 
their utmost Perils: All which Matters and Things, herein 
before commanded and directed, We do, by this Proclamation, 
order and direct to be done, performed, submitted to, and 
obeyed, until his Majesty shall further make known his Royal 
Will and Pleasure thereupon. 

Given at Whitehall the Twenty-fifth Day of June, 1752, in 
the Twenty sixth Year of his Majesty s Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING 

Manuscript copy in P. C. No printed copy found. Entered on Patent 
Rolls, and in Crown Office Docquet Book, vol. n; entered in Privy Council 
Register, II Geo., vol. 14, p. 105. Printed in " London Gazette," July 4, 
I 75 2 , from which the above transcript was made. 



1756, May 17. 

[Declaration of War against France.] 

HIS MAJESTY S 

DECLARATION 

OF WAR AGAINST THE FRENCH KING. 

GEORGE R. 

The unwarrantable Proceedings of the French in the West 
Indies, and North America, since the Conclusion of the Treaty 
of Aix la Chapelle, and the Usurpations and Encroachments 
made by them upon Our Territories, and the Settlements of 
Our Subjects in those Parts, particularly in Our Province of 
Nova Scotia, have been so notorious, and so frequent, that 



204 Royal Proclamations. 

they cannot but be looked upon as a sufficient Evidence of a 
formed Design and Resolution in that Court, to pursue invari 
ably such Measures, as should most effectually promote their 
ambitious Views, without any Regard to the most solemn 
Treaties and Engagements. We have not been wanting on 
Our Part, to make, from time to time, the most serious Repre 
sentations to the French King, upon these repeated Acts of 
Violence, and to endeavour to obtain Redress and Satisfaction 
for the Injuries done to Our Subjects, and to prevent the like 
Causes of Complaint for the future: But though frequent 
Assurances have been given, that every thing should be settled 
agreeable to the Treaties subsisting between the Two Crowns, 
and particularly that the Evacuation of the Four Neutral 
Islands in the West Indies should be effected (which was ex 
pressly promised to Our Ambassadour in France) the Execu 
tion of these Assurances, and of the Treaties on which they 
were founded, has been evaded under the most frivolous Pre 
tences; and the unjustifiable Practices of the French Gover 
nors, and of the Officers acting under their Authority, were 
still carried on, till, at length, in the Month of April, One 
thousand seven hundred and fifty four, they broke out in 
open Acts of Hostility, when, in Time of profound Peace, 
without any Declaration of War, and without any previous 
Notice given, or Application made, a Body of French Troops 
under the Command of an Officer bearing the French King s 
Commission, attacked in a hostile Manner, and possessed 
themselves of the English Fort on the Ohio in North America. 

But notwithstanding this Act of Hostility, which could not 
but be looked upon as a Commencement of War, yet, from Our 
earnest Desire of Peace, and in Hopes the Court of France 
would disavow this Violence and Injustice, We contented 
Ourselves with sending such a Force to America, as was indis 
pensably necessary for the immediate Defence and Protection 
of Our Subjects against fresh Attacks and Insults. 

In the mean Time great Naval Armaments were preparing 
in the Ports of France, and a considerable Body of French 
Troops embarked for 1 North America ; and though the French 

1 In the copy in the British Museum, this word is printed from, but the word 
for is substituted in manuscript, and in a contemporaneous hand is appended the 
following note: "The above Error was not found out by either of the Clerks of 
the Secretaries of State, Offices, &c, but published and Publickly Stuck up at 
the Change, where a Country-fellow made his Remark on the Error, which 
occasion d fresh Expresses to be dispatched to the [illegible] and Plantations 
abroad, at the additional Expense of 8000." 



1756, May 17. 205 

Ambassadour was sent back to England with specious Pro 
fessions of a Desire to accommodate these Differences, yet it 
appeared, that their real Design was only to gain Time for 
the Passage of those Troops to America, which they hoped 
would secure the Superiority of the French Forces in those 
Parts, and enable them to carry their ambitions and oppressive 
Projects into Execution. 

In these Circumstances We could not but think it incum 
bent upon Us, to endeavour to prevent the Success of so dan 
gerous a Design, and to oppose the Landing of the French 
Troops in America; and in Consequence of the just and 
necessary Measures We had taken for that Purpose, the 
French Ambassadour was immediately recalled from Our 
Court, the Fortifications at Dunkirk, which had been repair 
ing for some Time, were enlarged; great Bodies of Troops 
marched down to the Coast; and Our Kingdoms were threat 
ened with an Invasion. 

In order to prevent the Execution of these Designs, and to 
provide for the Security of Our Kingdoms, which were thus 
threatened, We could no longer forbear giving Orders for the 
seizing at Sea the Ships of the French King, and his Sub 
jects. Notwithstanding which, as We were still unwilling to 
give up all Hopes that an Accommodation might be effected, 
We have contented Ourselves hitherto with detaining the 
said Ships, and preserving them, and (as far as was possible) 
their Cargoes intire, without proceeding to the Confiscation 
of them; but it being now evident, by the hostile Invasion 
actually made by the French King of Our Island of Minorca, 
that it is the determined Resolution of that Court to hearken 
to no Terms of Peace, but to carry on the War, which has 
been long begun on their Part, with the utmost Violence, We 
can no longer remain, consistently with what We owe to Our 
own Honour, and to the Welfare of Our Subjects, within 
those Bounds, which, from a Desire of Peace, We had hitherto 
observed. 

We have therefore thought proper to declare War; and We 
do hereby Declare War against the French King, who hath 
so unjustly begun it, relying on the Help of Almighty God, 
in Our just Undertaking, and being assured of the hearty 
Concurrence and Assistance of Our Subjects, in Support of 
so good a Cause; hereby willing and requiring Our Captain 
General of Our Forces, Our Commissioners for executing the 
Office of Our High Admiral of Great Britain, Our Lieutenants 



206 Royal Proclamations. 

of Our several Counties, Governors of Our Forts and Gar 
risons, and all other Officers and Soldiers under them, by Sea 
and Land, to do and execute all Acts of Hostility, in the 
Prosecution of this War against the French King, his Vassals 
and Subjects, and to oppose their Attempts: Willing and 
requiring all Our Subjects to take Notice of the same; whom 
We henceforth strictly forbid to hold any Correspondence 
or Communication with the said French King, or his Sub 
jects. And We do hereby command Our own Subjects, and 
advertise all other Persons, of what Nation soever, not to 
transport or carry any Soldiers, Arms, Powder, Ammunition, 
or other Contraband Goods, to any of the Territories, Lands, 
Plantations, or Countries of the said French King; Declaring, 
that whatsoever Ship or Vessel shall be met withal, trans 
porting or carrying any Soldiers, Arms, Powder, Ammunition, 
or any other Contraband Goods, to any of the Territories, 
Lands, Plantations, or Countries of the said French King, 
the same, being taken, shall be condemned as good and law 
ful Prize. 

And whereas there are remaining in Our Kingdom, divers 
of the Subjects of the French King, We do hereby Declare 
Our Royal Intention to be, That all the French Subjects who 
shall demean themselves dutifully towards Us, shall be safe 
in their Persons and Effects. 

Given at our Court at Kensington, the Seventeenth Day 
of May, 1756, in the Twenty ninth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Thomas Baskett, Printer to the King s 
most Excellent Majesty; and by the Assigns of Robert Baskett. 
1756. 

j p. folio. Copies in Antiq., B. M., and in Mass. Historical Society. 
Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, II Geo., vol. 16, 
p. 177. Printed in "London Gazette" May 18, 1756. Reprinted as a 
broadside by J. Parker, New York, 1756, of which a copy was in the N. Y. 
State Library. 



i? 59, October 23. 207 

i759> October 23. 
[Thanksgiving in England for Defeat of French.]. 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION 

FOR A PUBLICK THANKSGIVING. 

GEORGE R. 

We do most devoutly and thankfully acknowledge the 
great Goodness and Mercy of Almighty God, who hath 
afforded Us his Protection and Assistance in the just War, 
in which, for the common Safety of Our Realms, and for 
disappointing the boundless Ambition of France, We are 
now engaged; and hath given such signal Successes to Our 
Arms, both by Sea and Land, particularly by the Defeat of 
the French Army in Canada, and the Taking of Quebec; and 
who hath most seasonably granted Us at this Time an un 
commonly plentiful Harvest: And therefore, duly consider 
ing that such great and publick Blessings do call for publick 
and solemn Acknowledgments, We have thought fit, by and 
with the Advice of Our Privy Council, to issue this Our 
Royal Proclamation, hereby appointing and commanding, 
That a General Thanksgiving to Almighty God, for these 
His Mercies, be observed throughout Our Kingdom of Eng 
land, Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, 
upon Thursday the Twenty ninth Day of November next. 
And, for the better and more religious and orderly Solem 
nizing the same, We have given Directions to the most Rev 
erend the Archbishops, and the Right Reverend the Bishops 
of England, to compose a Form of Prayer suitable to this 
Occasion, to be used in all Churches and Chapels, and other 
Places of Publick Worship, and to take Care for the timely 
dispersing thereof throughout their respective Dioceses. 
And We do strictly charge and command, That the said 
publick Day of Thanksgiving be religiously observed by all 
Our loving Subjects, as they tender the Favour of Almighty 
God, and upon Pain of suffering such Punishment as We 
may justly inflict upon all such as shall contemn or neglect 
the Performance of so religious and necessary a Duty. 



208 Royal Proclamations. 

Given at Our Court at Kensington, the Twenty third 
Day of October, One thousand seven hundred and fifty nine, 
in the Thirty third Year of our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Thomas Baskett, Printer to the King s 
most Excellent Majesty; and by the Assigns of Robert Bas 
kett. 1759. 

j p. folio. Only copy found in Mass. Historical Society. Entered on 
Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, II Geo., wl. 18, p. 170. 
Printed in "London Gazette," October 27, 1759. It was ordered by the Privy 
Council that the Thanksgiving should also be celebrated in Ireland, and a 
proclamation with practically the same wording was issued by the Lord 
Lieutenant and Council of Ireland, October 30, 1759. A printed copy of 
this latter proclamation is in the Dublin Public Record Office. 



October 23. 

[Thanksgiving in Scotland for Defeat of French.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION 

FOR A PUBLICK THANKSGIVING. 

GEORGE R. 

We do most devoutly and thankfully acknowledge the great 
Goodness and Mercy of Almighty God who hath afforded Us 
his Protection and Assistance in the just War in which for 
the common safety of Our Realms and for disappointing the 
boundless Ambition of France We are now engaged; and hath 
given such signal Successes to Our Arms both by Sea and Land 
particularly by the defeat of the French Army in Canada and 
the taking of Quebeck and who hath most seasonably granted 
Us at this time an uncommonly plentiful Harvest And there 
fore duly considering that such great and publick Blessings 
do call for publick and solemn Acknowledgments, We have 
thought fit by and with the Advice of Our Privy Council to 
issue this Our Royal Proclamation hereby appointing and 
commanding That a general Thanksgiving to Almighty God 
for these His Mercies be observed throughout that part of 



October 23. 209 

Our Kingdom of Great Britain called Scotland upon Thursday 
the Twenty Ninth day of November next And we do strictly 
charge and command That the said Publick Thanksgiving be 
reverently and decently observed by all Our loving Subjects 
in Scotland on the said Twenty Ninth day of November next 
as they tender the favour of Almighty God and would avoid 
his Wrath and Indignation and upon pain of such Punishment 
as We may justly inflict upon all such as shall contemn or 
neglect the Performance of so religious a Duty Our Will and 
Pleasure is therefore and We charge That incontinent this Our 
Proclamation seen Ye pass to the Market Cross of Edinburgh 
and all other Places needful and there in Our Name and 
Authority make Publication thereof that none pretend Igno 
rance And Our Will and Pleasure is That Our Sollicitor do 
cause printed Copies hereof to be sent to the Sherifs of the 
several Shires Stewarts of Stewarties and Baillies of Regalities 
and their Clerks whom We ordain to see the same published; 
And We appoint them to send Doubles thereof to the several 
Paroch Kirks within their Bounds that upon the Lords day 
immediately preceding the Day above mentioned the same 
may be published and read from the Pulpits immediately 
after Divine Service. 

Given at Our Court at Kensington the twenty third day of 
October One Thousand Seven hundred and Fifty nine in the 
thirty third Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

i p. folio. Only printed copy noted by the editor was advertised for sale 
by the Museum Book Store of London in ipop, priced at 27. IDS. Entered 
on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy Council Register, II Geo., vol. 18, p. 171, 
from which this transcript was made. Printed in "London Gazette" October 
27, 1759- 



210 Royal Proclamations. 



1760, October 27. 

[Continuing Officers in the Colonies.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

DECLARING His MAJESTY S PLEASURE FOR CONTINUING THE 
OFFICERS IN His MAJESTY S PLANTATIONS TILL His 
MAJESTY S PLEASURE SHALL BE FURTHER SIGNIFIED. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas by an Act of Parliament made in the Sixth Year 
of the late Queen Anne, of blessed Memory, intituled, "An 
Act for the Security of her Majesty s Person and Govern 
ment, and of the Succession to the Crown of Great Britain in 
the Protestant Line," it was enacted (amongst other Things) 
That no Office, Place, or Employment, Civil or Military, 
within any of her said late Majesty s Plantations, should 
become void by Reason of the Demise or Death of her said 
late Majesty, her Heirs, or Successors, Kings or Queens of 
this Realm; but that the Person and Persons in any of the 
Offices, Places, or Employments aforesaid, should continue 
in their respective Offices, Places, and Employments, for the 
Space of Six Months next after such Death or Demise, unless 
sooner removed and discharged by the next in Succession to 
whom the Crown of this Realm should come, remain, and be, 
according to the several Acts of Parliament for limiting and 
settling the Succession of the Crown, as by the said recited 
Act may appear; And in regard it may happen, that Our 
Pleasure may not, within the said Time, be declared, touching 
the said Offices, Places, and Employments, in Our Foreign 
Plantations, which will, at the End of the said Six Months, 
become void; We, for preventing the Inconveniences that 
may happen thereby, in Our princely Wisdom and Care of the 
State (reserving to Our Judgement hereafter the Reformation 
and Redress of any Abuses in the Execution of any such 
Offices, Places, and Employments, upon due Knowledge and 
Examination thereof) have thought fit, with the Advice of 
Our Privy Council, to issue this Our Royal Proclamation, and 
do hereby order, signify, and declare, That all Persons that, 



1760, October 27. 211 

at the Time of the Decease of Our late Royal Grandfather 
King George the Second, of glorious Memory, were duly and 
lawfully possessed of, or invested in, any Office, Place, or 
Employment, Civil or Military, in any of Our Plantations, 
and which have not been since removed from such their Offices, 
Places, or Employments, shall be, and shall hold themselves 
continued in the said Offices, Places, and Employments, as 
formerly they held and enjoyed the same, until Our Pleasure 
be further known, or other Provision be made, pursuant to the 
Commissions and Instructions of Our said late Royal Grand 
father, to His Governors and Officers of the Plantations afore 
said; and that in the mean time, for the Preservation of the 
Peace, and necessary Proceedings in Matters of Justice, and 
for the Safety and Service of the State, all the said Persons, of 
whatsoever Degree or Condition, do not fail every one sever- 
ally, according to his Place, Office, or Charge, to proceed in the 
Performance and Execution of all Duties thereunto belonging, 
as formerly appertained unto them, during the Life of Our 
said late Royal Grandfather : And further, We do hereby will 
and command all and singular Our Subjects in the said Planta 
tions, of what Estate or Degree they, or any of them, be, to be 
aiding, helping, and assisting, at the Commandment of the 
said Officers, in the Performance and Execution of the said 
Offices and Places, as they tender Our Displeasure, and will 
answer the contrary at their utmost Perils. 

Given at Our Court at Saville House, the Twenty Seventh 
Day of October, 1760, in the First Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

No printed copy found. Entered on Patent Rolls; in Crown Office 
Docquet Book, vol. n, where it is dated October 25; and in Privy Council 
Register, III Geo. } vol. i, p. n. Printed in "London Gazette" October ij, 
1761, from which this transcript was made. 



212 Royal Proclamations. 

1763, October 7. 

[Establishing New Governments in America.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas We have taken into Our Royal Consideration the 
extensive and valuable Acquisitions in America, secured to 
Our Crown by the late Definitive Treaty of Peace, con 
cluded at Paris the Tenth Day of February last; 1 and being 
desirous, that all Our loving Subjects, as well of Our King 
doms as of Our Colonies in America, may avail themselves, 
with all convenient Speed, of the great Benefits and Advan 
tages which must accrue therefrom to their Commerce, 
Manufactures, and Navigation; We have thought fit, with 
the Advice of Our Privy Council, to issue this Our Royal 
Proclamation, 2 hereby to publish and declare to all Our 
loving Subjects, that We have, with the Advice of Our said 
Privy Council, granted Our Letters Patent under Our Great 
Seal of Great Britain, to erect within the Countries and 
Islands ceded and confirmed to Us by the said Treaty, Four 
distinct and separate Governments, stiled and called by the 
Names of Quebec, East Florida, West Florida, and Grenada, 
and limited and bounded as follows; viz. 

First. The Government of Quebec, bounded on the 
Labrador Coast by the River St. John, and from thence by 
a Line drawn from the Head of that River through the Lake 
St. John to the South End of the Lake nigh Pissin; 3 from 
whence the said Line crossing the River St. Lawrence and 
the Lake Champlain in Forty five Degrees of North Latitude, 
passes along the High Lands which divide the Rivers that 
empty themselves into the said River St. Lawrence, from 
those which fall into the Sea; and also along the North Coast 
of the Baye des Chaleurs, and the Coast of the Gulph of 

1 Text of treaty can be consulted in Chalmers Collection of Treaties, i, 467. 

2 The events leading up to the issuing of this proclamation have been so 
thoroughly treated in C. W. Alvord s "Genesis of the Proclamation of 1763" 
in Michigan Pioneer and Historical Collections, vol. xxxvi, p. 20, and in C. E. 
Carter s Great Britain and the Illinois Country (Prize Essay of the Amer. Hist. 
Assoc., 1910) that any explanatory notes in this place seem unnecessary. 

1 Nipissim in proclamation as printed in the London Gazette. 



October 7. 213 

St. Lawrence to Cape Rosieres, and from thence crossing the 
Mouth of the River St. Lawrence by the West End of the 
Island of Anticosti, terminates at the aforesaid River of 
St. John. 

Secondly. The Government of East Florida, bounded to 
the Westward by the Gulph of Mexico, and the Apalachicola 
River; to the Northward, by a Line drawn from that Part of 
the said River where the Chatahouchee and Flint Rivers 
meet, to the Source of St. Mary s River, and by the Course 
of the said River to the Atlantick Ocean; and to the East 
ward and Southward, by the Atlantick Ocean, and the Gulph 
of Florida, including all Islands within Six Leagues of the 
Sea Coast. 

Thirdly. The Government of West Florida, bounded to 
the Southward by the Gulph of Mexico, including all Islands 
within Six Leagues of the Coast from the River Apalachicola 
to Lake Pentchartrain; to the Westward, by the said Lake, 
the Lake Mauripas, and the River Mississippi; to the North 
ward, by a Line drawn due East from that Part of the River 
Mississippi which lies in Thirty one Degrees North Latitude, 
to the River Apalachicola or Chatahouchee; and to the East 
ward by the said River. 

Fourthly. The Government of Grenada, comprehending 
the Island of that Name, together with the Grenadines, and 
the Islands of Dominico, St. Vincents, and Tobago. 

And, to the End that the open and free Fishery of Our 
Subjects may be extended to and carried on upon the Coast 
of Labrador and the adjacent Islands, We have thought fit, 
with the Advice of Our said Privy Council, to put all that 
Coast, from the River St. John s to Hudson s Streights, 
together with the Islands of Anticosti and Madelaine, and all 
other smaller Islands lying upon the said Coast, under the 
Care and Inspection of Our Governor of Newfoundland. 

We have also, with the Advice of Our Privy Council, 
thought fit to annex the Islands of St. John s, and Cape 
Breton or Isle Roy ale, with the lesser Islands adjacent there 
to, to Our Government of Nova Scotia. 

We have also, with the Advice of Our Privy Council afore 
said, annexed to Our Province of Georgia all the Lands 
lying between the Rivers Attamaha and St. Mary s. 

And whereas it will greatly contribute to the speedy settling 
Our said new Governments, that Our loving Subjects should 
be informed of Our Paternal Care for the Security of the 



214 Royal Proclamations. 

Liberties and Properties of those who are and shall become 
Inhabitants thereof; We have thought fit to publish and 
declare, by this Our Proclamation, that We have, in the 
Letters Patent under Our Great Seal of Great Britain, by 
which the said Governments are constituted, given express 
Power and Direction to Our Governors of Our said Colonies 
respectively, that so soon as the State and Circumstances of 
the said Colonies will admit thereof, they shall, with the 
Advice and Consent of the Members of Our Council, sum 
mon and call General Assemblies within the said Govern 
ments respectively, in such Manner and Form as is used and 
directed in those Colonies and Provinces in America, which 
are under Our immediate Government; and We have also 
given Power to the said Governors, with the Consent of Our 
said Councils, and the Representatives of the People, so to 
be summoned as aforesaid, to make, constitute, and ordain 
Laws, Statutes, and Ordinances for the Publick Peace, Wel 
fare, and Good Government of Our said Colonies, and of the 
People and Inhabitants thereof, as near as may be agreeable 
to the Laws of England, and under such Regulations and 
Restrictions as are used in other Colonies: And in the mean 
Time, and until such Assemblies can be called as aforesaid, 
all Persons inhabiting in, or resorting to Our said Colonies, 
may confide in Our Royal Protection for the Enjoyment of 
the Benefit of the Laws of Our Realm of England; for which 
Purpose, We have given Power under Our Great Seal to the 
Governors of Our said Colonies respectively, to erect and 
constitute, with the Advice of Our said Councils respectively, 
Courts of Judicature and Publick Justice, within Our said 
Colonies, for the hearing and determining all Causes, as well 
Criminal as Civil, according to Law and Equity, and as near 
as may be agreeable to the Laws of England, with Liberty 
to all Persons who may think themselves aggrieved by the 
Sentences of such Courts, in all Civil Cases, to appeal, under 
the usual Limitations and Restrictions, to Us in Our Privy 
Council. 

We have also thought fit, with the Advice of Our Privy 
Council as aforesaid, to give unto the Governors and Coun 
cils of Our said Three New Colonies upon the Continent, 
full Power and Authority to settle and agree with the Inhab 
itants of Our said New Colonies, or with any other Persons 
who shall resort thereto, for such Lands, Tenements, and 
Hereditaments, as are now, or hereafter shall be in Our 



October 7. 215 

Power to dispose of, and them to grant to any such Person 
or Persons, upon such Terms, and under such moderate 
Quit-Rents, Services, and Acknowledgments as have been 
appointed and settled in Our other Colonies, and under such 
other Conditions as shall appear to Us to be necessary and 
expedient for the Advantage of the Grantees, and the Im 
provement and Settlement of our said Colonies. 

And whereas We are desirous, upon all Occasions, to 
testify Our Royal Sense and Approbation of the Conduct and 
Bravery of the Officers and Soldiers of Our Armies, and to 
reward the same, We do hereby command and impower Our 
Governors of Our said Three New Colonies, and all other 
Our Governors of Our several Provinces on the Continent 
of North America, to grant, without Fee or Reward, to such 
Reduced Officers as have served in North America during 
the late War, and to such Private Soldiers as have been or 
shall be disbanded in America, and are actually residing 
there, and shall personally apply for the same, the following 
Quantities of Lands, subject at the Expiration of Ten Years 
to the same Quit-Rents as other Lands are subject to in the 
Province within which they are granted, as also subject to 
the same Conditions of Cultivation and Improvement; viz. 

To every Person having the Rank of a Field Officer, Five 

thousand Acres. To every Captain, Three thousand Acres. 

- To every Subaltern or Staff Officer, Two thousand Acres. 

To every Non-Commission Officer, Two hundred Acres. 

To every Private Man, Fifty Acres. 

We do likewise authorize and require the Governors and 
Commanders in Chief of all Our said Colonies upon the Con 
tinent of North America, to grant the like Quantities of Land, 
and upon the same Conditions, to such Reduced Officers of 
Our Navy, of like Rank, as served on Board Our Ships of War 
in North America at the Times of the Reduction of Louis- 
bourg and Quebec in the late War, and who shall personally 
apply to Our respective Governors for such Grants. 

And whereas it is just and reasonable, and essential to Our 
Interest and the Security of Our Colonies, that the several 
Nations or Tribes of Indians, with whom We are connected, 
and who live under Our Protection, should not be molested 
or disturbed in the Possession of such Parts of Our Dominions 
and Territories as, not having been ceded to, or purchased by 
Us, are reserved to them, or any of them, as their Hunting 
Grounds; We do therefore, with the Advice of Our Privy 



2i 6 Royal Proclamations. 

Council, declare it to be Our Royal Will and Pleasure, that no 
Governor or Commander in Chief in any of Our Colonies of 
Quebec, East Florida, or West Florida, do presume, upon any 
Pretence whatever, to grant Warrants of Survey, or pass any 
Patents for Lands beyond the Bounds of their respective 
Governments, as described in their Commissions; as also, that 
no Governor or Commander in Chief in any of Our other 
Colonies or Plantations in America, do presume,for the present, 
and until Our further Pleasure be known, to grant Warrants 
of Survey, or pass Patents for any Lands beyond the Heads or 
Sources of any of the Rivers which fall into the Atlantick 
Ocean from the West and North- West, or upon any Lands 
whatever, which, not having been ceded to, or purchased by 
Us as aforesaid, are reserved to the said Indians, or any of 
them. 

And We do further declare it to be Our Royal Will and 
Pleasure, for the present as aforesaid, to reserve under Our 
Sovereignty, Protection, and Dominion, for the Use of the 
said Indians, all the Lands and Territories not included within 
the Limits of Our said Three New Governments, or within the 
Limits of the Territory granted to the Hudson s Bay Company, 
as also all the Lands and Territories lying to the Westward of 
the Sources of the Rivers which fall into the Sea from the West 
and North West, as aforesaid; and We do hereby strictly for 
bid, on Pain of Our Displeasure, all Our loving Subjects from 
making any Purchases or Settlements whatever, or taking 
Possession of any of the Lands above reserved, without Our 
especial Leave and Licence for that Purpose first obtained. 

And We do further strictly enjoin and require all Persons 
whatever, who have either wilfully or inadvertently seated 
themselves upon any Lands within the Countries above de 
scribed, or upon any other Lands, which, not having been 
ceded to, or purchased by Us, are still reserved to the said 
Indians as aforesaid, forthwith to remove themselves from 
such Settlements. 

And whereas great Frauds and Abuses have been com 
mitted in the purchasing Lands of the Indians, to the great 
Prejudice of Our Interests, and to the great Dissatisfaction 
of the said Indians; in order therefore to prevent such Irregu 
larities for the future, and to the End that the Indians may be 
convinced of Our Justice, and determined Resolution to re 
move all reasonable Cause of Discontent, We do, with the 
Advice of Our Privy Council, strictly enjoin and require, that 



1763, October 7. 217 

no private Person do presume to make any Purchase from the 
said Indians of any Lands reserved to the said Indians, within 
those Parts of Our Colonies where We have thought proper to 
allow Settlement; but that if, at any Time, any of the said 
Indians should be inclined to dispose of the said Lands, the 
same shall be purchased only for Us, in Our Name, at some 
publick Meeting or Assembly of the said Indians to be held for 
that Purpose by the Governor or Commander in Chief of Our 
Colonies respectively, within which they shall lie : and in case 
they shall lie within the Limits of any Proprietary Govern 
ment, they shall be purchased only for the Use and in the Name 
of such Proprietaries, conformable to such Directions and 
Instructions as We or they shall think proper to give for that 
Purpose: And We do, by the Advice of Our Privy Council, 
declare and enjoin, that the Trade with the said Indians shall 
be free and open to all our Subjects whatever; provided that 
every Person, who may incline to trade with the said Indians, 
do take out a Licence for carrying on such Trade from the 
Governor or Commander in Chief of any of Our Colonies 
respectively, where such Person shall reside; and also give 
Security to observe such Regulations as We shall at any Time 
think fit, by Ourselves or by Our Commissaries to be appointed 
for this Purpose, to direct and appoint for the Benefit of the 
said Trade; And We do hereby authorize, enjoin, and require 
the Governors and Commanders in Chief of all Our Colonies 
respectively, as well Those under Our immediate Government 
as those under the Government and Direction of Proprie 
taries, to grant such Licences without Fee or Reward, taking 
especial Care to insert therein a Condition, that such Licence 
shall be void, and the Security forfeited, in Case the Person, 
to whom the same is granted, shall refuse or neglect to observe 
such Regulations as We shall think proper to prescribe as 
aforesaid. 

And We do further expressly enjoin and require all Officers 
whatever, as well Military as those employed in the Manage 
ment and Direction of Indian Affairs within the Territories 
reserved as aforesaid for the Use of the said Indians, to seize 
and apprehend all Persons whatever, who, standing charged 
with Treasons, Misprisions of Treason, Murders, or other 
Felonies or Misdemeanors, shall fly from Justice, and take 
Refuge in the said Territory, and to send them under a proper 
Guard to the Colony where the Crime was committed of which 
they stand accused, in order to take their Tryal for the same. 



2i8 Royal Proclamations. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Seventh Day of 
October, One thousand seven hundred and sixty three, in the 
Third Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Mark Baskett, Printer to the King s 
most Excellent Majesty; and by the Assigns of Robert Baskett. 

1763- 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., and P. C.; also in Mass. State Archives, 
and John Carter Brown Library. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in 
Privy Council Register, III Geo., vol. 3, p. 102. Printed in " London 
Gazette," October 8, 1763, and in several of the colonial newspapers, as the 
" Providence Gazette," December 17, 1763; also in the "Annual Register" 
m, 208, Knox, "New Collection of Voyages," 1767, ii, 265, and elsewhere. 



1764, March 26. 
[Colonizing Granada and other Islands.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas We have taken into Our Consideration, the great 
Benefit which will arise to the Commerce of Our Kingdoms 
and the Interests of Our Subjects, from the speedy Settle 
ment of Our Islands of Grenada, the Grenadines, Dominica, 
St. Vincent, and Tobago. We do therefore think fit, with 
the Advice of Our Privy Council, to issue this Our Royal 
Proclamation to publish and declare to Our loving Subjects, 
that We have, with the Advice of Our said Privy Council, 
given the necessary Powers and Directions for an immediate 
Survey and Division into proper Parishes and Districts, of 
such of the said Islands as have not hitherto been so surveyed 
and divided, and for laying out such Lands in the said Islands, 
as are in Our Power to dispose of, into Allotments for Planta 
tions of different Size and Extent, according as the Nature 
of the Land shall be more or less adapted to the Growth of 
Sugar, Coffee, Cocoa, Cotton, or other Articles of beneficial 
Culture, reserving to Us, Our Heirs, and Successors, such 



1764, March 26. 219 

Parts of the said Islands as shall be necessary for erecting 
Fortifications thereon, and for all other military Purposes, 
for Glebes for Ministers, Allotments for Schoolmasters, for 
Woodlands, High Roads, and all other publick Purposes; 
and also reserving such Lands in Our Islands of Dominica 
and St. Vincent, as, at the Time of the Surrender of those 
Islands, were and still are in the Possession of the French 
Inhabitants of those Islands, which Lands, it is Our Will and 
Pleasure should be granted to such of the said Inhabitants 
as shall be inclined to accept the same, upon Leases for Terms 
absolute, or for renewable Terms, upon certain Conditions 
and under proper Restrictions. And We do hereby further 
publish and declare, that the Allotments for Plantations in 
Our Islands of Grenada, the Grenadines, Tobago, and St. 
Vincent, shall contain to Three Hundred Acres, with some 
few Allotments in each Island of Five Hundred Acres; and 
that the Allotments in Our Island of Dominica, which is 
represented to be not so well adapted to the Cultivation of 
Sugar, and which from its Situation requires in Policy to be 
well peopled with White Inhabitants, shall be in general 
from Fifty to One Hundred Acres. 

And whereas We have thought fit to declare to Our Parlia 
ment at the Opening of the present Session, Our Gracious 
Intention of reserving for the publick Use, whatever Sums 
shall be produced by the Sale of any of the Lands belonging 
to Us in the Islands of the West Indies, which were ceded to 
Us by the late Treaty; We do further publish and declare, 
that when these Allotments, or a sufficient Part of them, 
shall have been laid out, the same shall be set up to Sale by 
Auction, at a Price per Acre, to be fixed thereon by Com 
missioners appointed for that Purpose, under Our Great 
Seal of Great Britain, who shall give publick Notice of the 
Time and Place of such Sale. 

And We do hereby further publish and declare, that the 
Lands so set up to Sale by Auction, shall not be sold, but 
upon the following Terms, and under the following Con 
ditions and Reservations, that is to say, 

That each Purchaser shall immediately pay into the Hands 
of such Person as We shall appoint to receive the same, 
Twenty per Cent, of the whole Purchase-Money. 

That the Remainder of the Purchase-Money shall be paid 
by different Installments, viz. Ten per Cent, within the First 
Year after the Purchase, Ten per Cent, more within the 



22O Royal Proclamations. 

Second Year after such Purchase, and Twenty per Cent, 
within every successive Year, until the Whole is paid. 

That each Purchaser of Lands which have been cleared 
and improved, shall, within the Space of Three Months from 
the Date of the Grant, settle and constantly keep upon the 
Lot purchased, One White Man or Two White Women for 
every Hundred Acres contained in the said Lot; and, in 
Default thereof, shall be subject to the Payment of Twenty 
Pounds per Annum for every White Woman, and Forty 
Pounds for every White Man, that shall be wanting to com- 
pleat the Number. 

That the Purchaser of uncleared Lands shall clear and 
cultivate One Acre m every Twenty in each Year, until Half 
the Land so purchased shall be cleared; and, in Default 
thereof, shall pay Five Pounds per Annum for every Acre 
not cleared, pursuant to such Condition; and such Purchaser 
shall also be obliged to settle and constantly keep upon the 
Lot so purchased, One WTiite Man or Two White Women 
for every Hundred Acres, as the same shall be cleared. 

That each Purchaser shall, besides the Purchase-Money, 
be subject to the Payment of an Annual Quit-Rent to Us, 
Our Heirs, and Successors, of Six-pence per Acre, under the 
Penalty of Five Pounds per Acre upon Non-payment thereof; 
such Quit-Rents, in the Case of the Purchase of cleared Lands, 
to commence from the Date of the Grant; and the first Pay 
ment to be made at the Expiration of the First Year; and in 
Case of the Purchase of the uncleared Lands, such Quit- 
Rents to commence at the Expiration of Twelve Months 
from the Time each Acre is cleared. 

That in Case of Failure in the Payment of the Purchase- 
Money in the Manner above directed, the Purchaser shall 
forfeit all Right to the Lands purchased. 

That no Person shall purchase at any publick Sale more 
than Five Hundred Acres of cleared or uncleared Lands, in 
the Islands of Grenada, and the Grenadines, Tobago, and 
St. Vincent s, and in the Island of Dominica the Quantity 
shall be restrained to Three Hundred Acres; and in Order to 
enforce this necessary and essential Regulation, that a Con 
dition shall be inserted in every Grant, to be made in Con 
sequence of such Purchase, that in Case any Purchase shall 
be made contrary thereto, so that the Property of the Pur 
chaser in the Islands where the Lands lie, shall thereby 
amount to more than the above Quantity respectively, the 



1764, March 26. 221 

same shall be void, the Money paid thereon forfeited, and 
the consequential Grant of no Effect. 

That all and every Purchaser of Lands, upon the fore 
going Terms and Conditions, shall immediately, upon the 
Payment of the first Twenty per Cent, of the Purchase- 
Money, receive a Bill of Sale, signed by the said Commis 
sioners, which shall entitle such Purchasers to a Grant of the 
said Lands, under the Seal of the Islands, containing the 
aforementioned Conditions and Reservations: Which said 
Purchase, and Grant in Consequence thereof, duly registered 
in the proper Offices, shall be good and valid in Law against 
Us, Our Heirs and Successors, unless the same shall be revoked: 
And We do hereby declare the same revocable by Our Com 
missioners of Our Treasury, or Our High Treasurer for the 
Time being, within Twelve Months from the Date thereof; 
in which Case such Purchase and Grant shall become void 
and of no Effect; and upon Notice of such Revocation, the 
said Commissioners shall return to such Purchaser the Money 
paid upon the Purchase, with legal Interest thereon, and 
reasonable Allowance for any Improvements made on the 
said Lands. 

And whereas the Establishing Towns in proper Situations, 
within the said Islands, will conduce greatly to the Con 
venience of the Inhabitants, and the Benefit of Trade and 
Commerce; We have therefore thought fit, with the Advice 
of Our Privy Council, to direct a proper District in every 
Parish in each Island, to be laid out for that Purpose, into 
Lots for Tenements of different Size and Extent; and each 
Town-Lot to have a proportionate Allotment of Land con 
tiguous to such Town, for a small Field or Pasture, allowing 
one Acre for every ten Foot in Front of the Town-Lot to 
which it is to be annexed; but no Field-Lot to exceed the 
Quantity of Six Acres. 

And We do hereby further publish and declare, that such of 
these Town and Pasture-Lots, in each Island, as consist of 
Lands, which have been already cleared and improved, shall 
be set up to Sale by publick Auction, at a Price per Foot in 
Front of each Town-Lot, and a Price per Acre of the Field- 
Lot, to be fixed upon such Lot, by the said Commissioners, in 
like Manner as upon the Allotments for Plantations. 

And We do further publish and declare, that the Lots, so 
set up to Sale by Auction, shall not be sold but upon the fol 
lowing Terms and Conditions ; that is to say, 



222 Royal Proclamations. 

That the Purchase-Money, shall be paid in the same Pro 
portion, by the like Installments and upon the same Conditions 
as are required in the Case of the Purchase of Allotments for 
Plantations. 

That each Tenement shall be charged with the Payment of 
an Annual Ground-Rent to Us, Our Heirs, and Successors, of 
One Penny per Foot in Front, and Sixpence per Acre, for each 
Acre of the Field annexed to such Tenement; the said Rents 
to commence at the Expiration of one Year from the Date of 
the Purchase, and the Purchaser to be liable to the same 
Penalties, in Case of Failure of the Payment of the Purchase- 
Money, and the Ground-Rent and Quit-Rent, as We have 
already required in respect to the Purchase of Allotments for 
Plantations. 

And We do further publish and declare, that the Reserva 
tions, which We have directed to be made for Town and 
Pasture-Lots of uncleared Lands, shall be granted in Fee 
Simple by Our Governor in Chief, under the Seal of the Islands, 
to any Persons, who will give such Security as Our Commis 
sioners shall approve, for building on such Town-Lots within 
a reasonable Time, to be fixed by Our said Commissioners; 
and also for Inclosing, Fencing, and properly Clearing for 
Pasture, the Fields that shall be granted with such Tenement. 

And We do further publish and declare, that We have 
directed that no more than one Town-Lot be granted to any 
one Person, and that no more than Six Acres of Pasture-Land 
be annexed to such Town-Lot, whatever Number of Feet in 
Front it shall consist of. 

That each Grantee shall be obliged, under proper Penalties, 
to the Payment of an Annual Ground-Rent to Us, Our Heirs, 
and Successors, of One Penny per Foot in Front of the Town- 
Lot for a Tenement, and Sixpence per Acre for each Acre of 
the Pasture-Lot; the first Payment to be made within two 
Years from the Date of the Grant. 

And in order the more effectually to conduce to the Peopling 
Our said Islands with industrious White Inhabitants, upon 
which their Strength and Security do essentially depend; We 
have thought fit, with the Advice of Our said Council, to direct 
a Quantity of Land, not exceeding Eight Hundred Acres, to be 
reserved in such Parts of every Parish in each Island respec 
tively, as are not adapted for Sugar Plantations, for the 
Accommodation of poor Settlers, to be divided into Lots, of 
not less than Ten, not more than Thirty Acres each; And we 



March 26. 223 

do hereby further publish and declare, that the said Allotments 
are to be granted in Fee Simple, under the Seal of Our said 
Islands, to such poor Protestants as shall apply for the same, 
in Proportion to their respective Abilities to cultivate the said 
Lands; and subject .to the following Conditions; that is to say, 

That each Grantee shall, at the Expiration of four Years 
from the Date of the Grant, pay a Quit-Rent to Us, Our Heirs, 
and Successors, of Six-pence per Acre, for every Acre then 
cleared, and a Penalty of Two Shillings per Acre, for every 
Acre of Land uncleared; which said Penalty of Two Shillings 
per Acre shall be reduced to Six-pence per Acre, as the Land 
shall be cleared; and in Case of Failure of such Rent and 
Penalty, the Grantee shall be subject to the further Penalty 
of the Payment of Five Pounds for every Acre, for which such 
Quit-Rent shall not be paid. 

That each Grantee shall enter upon and occupy the Land 
within Three Months from the Date of the Grant; and shall 
continue to occupy and improve the same, for Twelve suc 
cessive Months, from the Time of such first Settlement. 

That the Lands shall, for the Space of Seven Years, be un- 
alienable by Sale, nor shall the same be let, set or assigned 
over during the same Term, otherwise than to the Use and 
Benefit of any Child or Children of such original Settler, with 
out especial licence in Writing first had and obtained, from the 
Chief Governor or Commander in Chief of Our said Islands 
for the Time being; and in Case of Failure or Default in either 
of the two last mentioned Conditions, the Grant to be void. 

And We do hereby further publish and declare, that all 
Grants made of the said Allotments for poor Settlers, as also 
all Grants made of Town and Pasture Lots of cleared and 
uncleared Lands, shall be absolute and final. 

That in all Grants to be made of Allotments for Plantations 
and Town and Pasture Lots, and of Lands for poor Settlers, 
there shall be a Reservation to Us, Our Heirs, and Successors 
of all Mines of Gold and Silver. 

And We do further publish and declare, that the first Sale 
of Lands shall be in the Month of June next, if the Surveys 
can be made so soon; due Notice of which, as also of the Place 
of Sale, will be given by Our Commissioners appointed as 
aforesaid, for the Disposal of the said Lands. 



224 Royal Proclamations. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Twenty-sixth Day 
of March, One thousand seven hundred and sixty-four, in the 
Fourth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

A printed copy is noted in Crawford s " Handlist of Proclamations " as 
being in the Society of Antiquaries, but it could not be found by the present 
editor, who used the " London Gazette" as the source of his transcript. 
Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown Office Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in 
Privy Council Register, III Geo., vol. 3, p. 342. Printed in "London 
Gazette," March 27, 1764. 



1772, August 26. 
[For Apprehending Destroyers of the Gaspee.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION: 

FOR THE DISCOVERING AND APPREHENDING THE PERSONS WHO 
PLUNDERED AND BURNT THE GASPEE SCHOONER; AND 
BARBAROUSLY WOUNDED AND ILL TREATED LIEUTENANT 

WILLIAM DUDINGSTON, COMMANDER or THE SAID 
SCHOONER. 

Whereas We have received Information, That upon the 
io th Day of June last, between the Hours of Twelve and One 
in the Morning, in the Providence or Narrowganset River, in 
Our Colony of Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations, a 
great Number of Persons, armed with Guns and other offen 
sive Weapons and led by Two Persons, who were called the 
Captain and Head-Sheriff, in several armed Boats, attacked 
and Boarded Our Vessel called the Gaspee 1 Schooner, then 
lying at single Anchor in the said River, commanded by Our 
Lieutenant William Dudingston, under the Orders of Our 
Rear- Admiral John Montagu, and having dangerously wound 
ed and barbarously treated the said William Dudingston, 
took, plundered and burnt the said Schooner: 

1 The numerous documents relating to the burning of the Gaspee are printed 
in R. I. Colonial Records, vol. 7, pp. 55-192; also in R. I. Historical Society 
Proceedings, 1890-91, pp. 80-92, and Publications, vol. 7, pp. 238-244. 



, AugUSt 26. 22$ 

We, to the Intent that such outrageous and heinous Offenders 
may be discovered, and brought to condign Punishment, have 
thought fit, with the Advice of Our Privy Council, to issue this 
Our Royal Proclamation : And We are hereby graciously pleased 
to promise, that if any Person or Persons shall discover any 
other Person or Persons concerned in the said daring and 
heinous Offences, above mentioned, so that he or they may 
be apprehended and brought to Justice, such Discoverer shall 
have and receive, as a Reward for such Discovery, upon Con 
viction of each of the said Offenders, the Sum of Five Hundred 
Pounds. And if any Person or Persons shall discover either 
of the said Persons who acted as, or called themselves, or 
were called by their said Accomplices, the Head-Sheriff or the 
Captain, so that they, or either of them, may be apprehended 
and brought to Punishment, such Discoverer shall have and 
receive, as a Reward for such Discovery, upon Conviction of 
either of the said Persons, the further Sum of Five Hundred 
pounds, over and above the Sum of Five Hundred Pounds 
herein before promised, for the discovery and apprehending 
any of the other common Offenders, abovementioned; and 
if any Person or Persons concerned therein, except the Two 
Persons who were called the Head-Sheriff, and Captain, and 
the Person or Persons who wounded Our said Lieutenant 
William Dudingston, shall discover any one or more of the 
said Accomplices, so that he or they may be apprehended 
and brought to Punishment, such Discoverer shall have and 
receive the said Reward or Rewards of Five Hundred Pounds, 
or One Thousand Pounds, as the Case may be, and also Our 
gracious Pardon for his said Offence. And the Commis 
sioners for executing the Office of Treasurer of Our Exchequer, 
are hereby required to make Payment accordingly of the said 
Rewards. And We do hereby strictly charge and command 
all Our Governors, Deputy-Governors, Magistrates, Officers, 
and all other Our Loving Subjects, that they do use their 
utmost Diligence in their several Places and Capacities, to 
find out, discover and apprehend the said Offenders, in Order 
to their being brought to Justice. And We do hereby com 
mand that this Our Proclamation be printed and published 
in the usual Form, 1 and affixed in the principal Places of Our 

1 This is the only proclamation of which the editor finds record that was 
printed outside of Great Britain. A marginal note appended to the entry of the 
proclamation in the Privy Council Register (III Geo., vol. 9, p. 428) reads: 
"N. B. The original proclamation under the Great Seal was sent over to Rhode 
Island with the Commission &c by the Secretary of State." In the London 



226 Royal Proclamations. 

Town of Newport, and other Towns in Our said Colony, 
that none may pretend Ignorance. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Twenty-Sixth Day 
of August, 1772, in the Twelfth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Printed by Solomon Southwick, Printer to the Honorable 
the Governor and Company of the Colony of Rhode-Island 
and Providence-Plantations, in New-England. 

j p. folio. Copy in R. I. Historical Society. Entered in Privy Council 
Register, III Geo., vol. 9, p. 428. Printed in " R. I. Colonial Records," 
mi, 107. 



1774, December 16. 

[Providing Copper Currency for Virginia.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas it hath been humbly represented to Us on the 
part and behalf of Our Colony of Virginia that a Currency of 
Copper Money within the same Colony would be highly 
beneficial to Our good Subjects the Inhabitants thereof for 
the more easy and convenient making of small Payments; 
And Whereas the Treasurer of Our said Colony being there 
unto authorized by an Act of Our Governor Council and 

Gazette of September 8, 1772, an article dated at Whitehall, August 29, and 
evidently officially inspired, recites the circumstances of the attack upon the 
Gaspee, the appointment of a commission of inquiry, and the issuance of a 
Proclamation which was "to be printed and published within the said Colony 
of Rhode Island." Under date of December 22, 1772, Governor Wanton of 
Rhode Island wrote to the Sheriffs of the several counties: "In obedience to the 
King s command, signified to me, by the Right Honorable the Earl of Dartmouth, 
one of his principal secretaries of state, I have caused to be printed His Majesty s 
proclamation for discovering and apprehending the persons who plundered and 
burnt the Gaspee schooner; copies of which, I send you by express, which you 
are forthwith to affix in the most public places of the several towns within your 
colony" (R. I. Colonial Records, vii, 117). John Howland relates that the 
proclamation was posted near the Market house in Providence, but was struck 
down by a patriotic citizen and "mingled with the filth of the street" (Stone s 
Life of Rowland, p. 37). 

The editor could find no printed copy of this proclamation in England, but a 
few days after returning to America had the good fortune to discover one of the 
original broadsides, which was purchased for the R. I. Historical Society. 



December 16. 227 

Assembly of Our said Colony passed in the tenth Year of 
Our Reign 1 hath delivered to the Master and Worker of Our 
Mint in Our Tower of London a sufficient quantity of Fine 
Copper in Barrs nealed for the Coinage of five Tons of the 
Pieces hereinafter mentioned after making the just and 
usual Allowances to the Officers of Our Mint; And Whereas 
Our said Master and Worker of Our Mint hath in pursuance 
of Our Warrant for that purpose issued Coined thereout five 
Tons of Pieces of Copper Coin of such Weight that Sixty 
Pieces thereof are equal to one Pound Weight averdupois 
without erring either in excess or defect above one thirtieth 
part and are of the value of two shillings and sixpence accord 
ing to the Currency of Money in Our said Colony of Virginia 
And each Piece is Stamped on one side with Our effigies with 
the Inscription Georgius III Rex and on the reverse with 
the Virginia Arms with the St. Georges Cross leaving out the 
escutcheon of Crowns except one Crown at the Top as on the 
Guinea without Crest Supporters or Motto except the word 
Virginia round the Arms with the date of the Year which are 
now ready to be exported to Our said Colony of Virginia. 2 
W e have thereupon with the Advice of Our Privy Council 
thought fit to issue this Our Royal Proclamation And We do 
accordingly hereby Ordain declare and Command that the 
said Pieces of Copper Money so Coined Stamped and impressed 
as aforesaid shall be current and lawful Money of and in Our 
said Colony of Virginia and of and within the Districts and 
precincts of the same and shall pass and be received therein 
after the rate following that is to say Twenty four of the said 
Pieces shall pass and be received for the Sum of one shilling 
according to the Currency of Our said Province of Virginia 
and at and after such rate shall be computed accepted and 
taken accordingly in all Bargains Rates Payments and other 
Transactions of Money ; Provided always and We do hereby 
further declare that no person shall be obliged to take more 
than one shilling of such Copper Money in any one Payment 
of any Sum of Money under twenty Shillings nor more than 

1 The Virginia Assembly, in November, 1769, authorized the treasurer to 
purchase copper in Great Britain for the purpose of importing copper money 
to the colony (Hening s Statutes, viii, 343). 

2 There are many of these Virginia copper half-pennies, dated 1773, pre 
served in coin collections. They answer perfectly in appearance to the above 
description (see Dickeson, American Numismatical Manual, p. 84, and cut on 
plate viii). Although dated in 1773, it was apparently not until the following 
year that they were ready to be exported and the proclamation enforcing their 
acceptance issued. 



228 Royal Proclamations. 

two shillings and sixpence thereof in any one payment of a 
larger Sum of Money than twenty shillings; 

Given at Our Court at St. James s the Sixteenth day of 
December 1774 in the Fifteenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

No printed copy found. Entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., 
vol. ii, p. 267, from which this transcript was taken - 



1775, August 23. 
[For Suppression of Rebellion in America.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR SUPPRESSING REBELLION AND SEDITION. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas many of Our Subjects in divers Parts of Our 
Colonies and Plantations in North America, misled by dan 
gerous and ill-designing Men, and forgetting the Allegiance 
which they owe to the Power that has protected and sustained 
them, after various disorderly Acts committed in Disturbance 
of the Publick Peace, to the Obstruction of lawful Commerce, 
and to the Oppression of Our loyal Subjects carrying on the 
same, have at length proceeded to an open and avowed Rebel 
lion, by arraying themselves in hostile Manner to withstand 
the Execution of the Law, and traitorously preparing, ordering, 
and levying War against Us; And whereas there is Reason to 
apprehend that such Rebellion hath been much promoted 
and encouraged by the traitorous Correspondence, Counsels, 
and Comfort of divers wicked and desperate Persons within 
this Realm: To the End therefore that none of Our Subjects 
may neglect or violate their Duty through Ignorance thereof, 
or through any Doubt of the Protection which the Law will 
afford to their Loyalty and Zeal ; We have thought fit, by and 
with the Advice of Our Privy Council, to issue this Our Royal 
Proclamation, hereby declaring that not only all Our Officers 
Civil and Military are obliged to exert their utmost En- 



i7/5> August 23. 229 

deavours to suppress such Rebellion, and to bring the Traitors 
to Justice; but that all Our Subjects of this Realm and the 
Dominions thereunto belonging are bound by Law to be aiding 
and assisting in the Suppression of such Rebellion, and to dis 
close and make known all traitorous Conspiracies and Attempts 
against Us, Our Crown and Dignity; And We do accordingly 
strictly charge and command all Our Officers as well Civil as 
Military, and all other Our obedient and loyal Subjects, to use 
their utmost Endeavours to withstand and suppress such 
Rebellion, and to disclose and make known all Treasons and 
traitorous Conspiracies which they shall know to be against 
Us, Our Crown and Dignity; and for that Purpose, that they 
transmit to One of Our Principal Secretaries of State, or other 
proper Officer, due and full Information of all Persons who 
shall be found carrying on Correspondence with, or in any 
Manner or Degree aiding or abetting the Persons now in open 
Arms and Rebellion against Our Government within any of 
Our Colonies and Plantations in North America, in order to 
bring to condign Punishment the Authors, Perpetrators, and 
Abettors of such traitorous Designs. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s the Twenty-third Day of 
August, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, in the 
Fifteenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 
Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 1775. 

i p. folio. Copies in Mass. State Archives, Boston Public Library, and 
N. Y. Public Library. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown Office 
Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., vol. 12, 
p. 83. Printed in London Gazelle," August 26, 1775, and in most of the 
colonial newspapers. It was reprinted in broadside form in Boston (copies 
inN. Y. Public Library, Mass. Historical Society, and Mass. State Archives] , 
and in New York (copy in Library of Congress); for the full titles, see Evans 
"American Bibliography," nos. 14077 and 14078. The original English 
issue has been printed in facsimile form in the Boston Public Library 
11 Bulletin " for October, 1892, and as an artotype by Bierstadt of New York, 
about i8go. 



230 Royal Proclamations. 



1775, December 22. 

[Appointing the Distribution of Prizes.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

APPOINTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES TAKEN DURING THE 
CONTINUANCE or THE REBELLION NOW SUBSISTING 
IN DIVERS PARTS OF THE CONTINENT OF NORTH 
AMERICA. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas by an Act. made in this present Session of Parlia 
ment, intituled, An Act to prohibit all Trade and Intercourse 
with the Colonies of New Hampshire, Massachuset s Bay, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pen- 
sylvania, the Three Lower Counties on Delaware, Maryland, 
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, during 
the Continuance of the present Rebellion within the said 
Colonies respectively; for repealing an Act, made in the 
Fourteenth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, to 
discontinue the Landing and Discharging, Lading or Shipping, 
of Goods, Wares, and Merchandize, at the Town and within 
the Harbour of Boston, in the Province of Massachusetts Bay; 
and also Two Acts, made in the last Session of Parliament, 
for restraining the Trade and Commerce of the Colonies in 
the said Acts respectively mentioned; and to enable any Per 
son or Persons, appointed and authorized by His Majesty to 
grant Pardons, to issue Proclamations, in the Cases, and for 
the Purposes therein mentioned; It is, amongst other Things, 
enacted, That all Ships and Vessels of or belonging to the 
Inhabitants of the said Colonies, together with their Cargoes, 
Apparel, and Furniture, except as in the said Act are excepted, 
and all other Ships and Vessels whatsoever, together with their 
Cargoes, Apparel, and Furniture, which shall be found trading 
in any Port or Place of the said Colonies, or going to trade, or 
coming from trading, in any such Port or Place, except as are 
therein also excepted, shall become forfeited to His Majesty, 
as if the same were the Ships and Effects of Open Enemies, 
and shall be so adjudged, deemed, and taken, in all Courts of 



December 22. 231 

Admiralty, and in all other Courts whatsoever: And, for the 
Encouragement of the Officers and Seamen of His Majesty s 
Ships of War, it is thereby also further enacted, That the Flag 
Officers, Captains, Commanders, and other commissioned 
Officers in His Majesty s Pay, and also the Seamen, Marines, 
and Soldiers on Board, shall have the sole Interest and Prop 
erty of and in all and every such Ship, Vessel, Goods, and 
Merchandize, which they shall seize and take, (being first 
adjudged lawful Prize in any of His Majesty s Courts of 
Admiralty) to be divided in such Proportions, and after such 
Manner, as His Majesty shall think fit to order and direct by 
Proclamation or Proclamations hereafter to be issued for those 
Purposes: We, taking the Premises into Consideration, do, 
pursuant to the said Act of Parliament, (with the Advice of 
Our Privy Council), by this Our Proclamation, order, direct, 
and appoint, That the neat Produce of all Prizes taken, in 
Pursuance of the said Act, by Our Ships of War, be divided 
into Eight equal Parts, and be distributed in Manner following; 
that is to say, To the Captain or Captains of any of Our Ships 
of War, who shall be actually on Board at the Taking of any 
Prize, Three Eighth Parts; but in case any such Prize shall be 
taken by any of Our Ship or Ships of War, under the Command 
of a Flag or Flags, the Flag Officer or Officers, being actually 
on Board, or directing and assisting in the Capture, shall have 
One of the said Three Eighth Parts, the said One Eighth Part 
to be paid to such Flag or Flag Officers, in such Proportions, 
and subject to such Regulations, as are herein-after for that 
Purpose mentioned: To the Captains of Marines and Land 
Forces, Sea Lieutenants and Master, on Board any such Ships, 
One Eighth Part, to be equally divided amongst them: To 
the Lieutenants and Quarter Masters of Marines, and Lieu 
tenants, Ensigns, and Quarter Masters of Land Forces, Boat 
swain, Gunner, Purser, Carpenter, Master s Mate, Chirurgeon, 
Pilot, and Chaplain, on Board any such Ship, One Eighth 
Part, to be equally divided amongst them: To the Midship 
men, Secretary to Flag Officers, Captain s Clerk, Master Sail 
Maker, Carpenter s Mates, Boatswain s Mates, Gunner s 
Mates, Master at Arms, Corporals, Yeomen of the Sheets, 
Coxswain, Quarter Masters, Quarter Master s Mates, Chirur- 
geon s Mates, Yeomen of the Powder Room, and Serjeants of 
Marines or Land Forces, on Board any such Ships, One Eighth 
Part, to be equally divided amongst them; To the Trumpeters, 
Quarter Gunners, Carpenter s Crew, Steward, Cook, Armourer, 



232 Royal Proclamations. 

Steward s Mate, Cook s Mate, Gunsmith, Cooper, Swabber, 
Ordinary Trumpeter, Barber, Able Seamen, Ordinary Seamen, 
and Marine or other Soldiers, and all other Persons doing Duty, 
or assisting on Board any such Ships, Two Eighth Parts, to be 
equally divided amongst them. And in case any Sea Cap 
tain, inferior Commission or Warrant Sea Officers, belonging 
to any Ship of War, for whom any Shares of Prizes are hereby 
allowed, be absent at the Time of the Capture of any Prize, 
the Share of such Sea Captain, inferior Commission or War 
rant Sea Officer, shall be cast into the Shares hereby allowed 
to the Trumpeters, Quarter Gunners, Carpenter s Crew, 
Steward, Cook, Armourer, Steward s Mate, Cook s Mate, 
Gunsmith, Cooper, Swabber, Ordinary Trumpeter, Barber, 
Able Seamen, Ordinary Seamen, and Marine or other Soldiers, 
and other Persons doing Duty, or assisting on Board any such 
Ships, to be equally divided amongst them. Provided, That 
if any Officer or Officers on Board any of Our Ships of War, at 
the Time of taking any such Prizes, shall have more Com 
missions or Offices than one, he or they shall be intitled only 
to the Share or Shares of the said Prizes which, according to 
the above-mentioned Distribution, shall belong to his or their 
respective superior Commissions or Offices. And We do 
hereby strictly enjoin all and every Commander and Com 
manders of any Ships of War, taking any Prize, as soon as may 
be, to transmit, or cause to be transmitted, to the Commis 
sioners of Our Navy, a true List of the Names of all the Officers, 
Seamen, Marines, Soldiers, or others, who were actually on 
Board Our Ships of War, under his or their Command, at the 
taking such Prize; which List shall contain the Quality of 
the Service of each Person on Board, and be subscribed by 
the Captain or Commanding Officer, and Three or more of the 
Chief Officers on Board. And We do hereby require and 
direct the Commissioners of Our Navy, or any Three or more 
of them, to examine, or cause to be examined, such Lists by 
the Muster Books of such Ships of War, and Lists annexed 
thereto, to see that such Lists do agree with the said Muster 
Book, and annexed Lists, as to the Names, Qualities, or Ratings 
of the Officers, Seamen, Marines, Soldiers, and others belong 
ing to such Ship of War; and, upon Request, forthwith to 
grant a Certificate of the Truth of any List transmitted to 
them, to the Agents nominated and appointed by the Cap 
tors, pursuant to the said Act, to take care or dispose of such 
Prize; and also, upon Application to them, to give, or cause 



177 5 1 December 22. 233 

to be given, unto the Agents who shall, at any Time or Times, 
be appointed as aforesaid by the Captors, all such Lists from 
the Muster Books of any such Ships of War, and annexed 
Lists, as the said Agents shall find requisite for their Direction 
in paying the Produce of such Prizes, and to be otherwise aid 
ing and assisting to the said Agents, as shall be necessary. 
And as touching the said One Eighth Part, herein before 
mentioned to be granted to the Flag or Flag Officers, who 
shall be actually on Board at the taking of any Prize, or shall 
be directing and assisting therein, We have thought fit, and 
do, by these Presents, publish, order, and declare, That the 
following Regulations be observed; First, That a Flag Officer 
commanding in Chief, where there is but One Flag Officer upon 
Service, shall have to his own Use the said One Eighth Part 
of the Prizes taken by Ships under his Command: Secondly, 
That a Flag Officer sent to command at Jamaica, or elsewhere, 
shall have no Right to any Share of the Prizes taken, by Ships 
employed there, before he arrives at the Place to which he is 
sent, and actually takes upon him the Command: Thirdly, 
That when an inferior Flag Officer is sent out to reinforce a 
superior Flag Officer at Jamaica, or elsewhere, the said superior 
Flag Officer shall have no Right to any Share in the Prizes 
taken by them before they arrive within the Limits of his 
Command, and actually receive some Orders from him: 
Fourthly, That a Chief Flag Officer returning home from 
Jamaica, or elsewhere, shall have no Share of the Prizes taken 
by the Ships left behind to act under another Command: 
Fifthly, That if a Flag Officer is sent to command in the Out- 
ports of this Kingdom, he shall have no Share of the Prizes 
taken by Ships that sailed from that Port, by Order from the 
Admiralty: Sixthly, That when more Flag Officers than One 
serve together, the Eighth Part of the Prizes taken by any 
Ships of the Fleet, or Squadron, shall be divided in the follow 
ing Proportions; videlicet, If there be but Two Flag Officers, 
the Chief shall have Two Third Parts of the said One Eighth 
Part, and the other shall have the remaining Third Part; but 
if the Number of Flag Officers be more than Two, the Chief 
shall have only One Half, and the other Half shall be divided 
equally among the other Flag Officers : Seventhly, That Com 
modores, with Captains under them, shall be esteemed as 
Flag Officers, with respect to their Right to an Eighth Part of 
Prizes taken, whether commanding in Chief, or serving under 
Command. 



234 Royal Proclamations. 

Given at our Court at St. James s, the Twenty-second Day 
of December, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, 
in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 
Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 1775. 

I p. folio. Copies inAntiq., and P. C. Entered on Patent Rolls, and 
in Crown Office Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, 
III Geo., vol. 12, p. 267. Printed in " London Gazette" December 23, 1775. 



1776, October 30. 
[Fast Day in England.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Measures of Force which We are obliged to 
use against Our rebellious Subjects in Our Colonies and 
Provinces in North America; and putting Our Trust in 
Almighty God, that he will vouchsafe a Special Blessing on 
Our Arms, both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by 
and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby command, 
That a Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed through 
out that Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called Eng 
land, Our Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon 
Tweed, upon Friday the Thirteenth Day of December next; 
that so both We and Our People may humble Ourselves 
before Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon of Our Sins; 
and may, in the most devout and solemn Manner, send up 
Our Prayers and Supplications to the Divine Majesty, for 
averting those heavy Judgements, which Our manifold Sins 
and Provocations have most justly deserved, and for implor 
ing his Intervention and Blessing speedily to deliver Our 
loyal Subjects within Our Colonies and Provinces in North 



1776, October jo. 235 

America from the Violence, Injustice, and Tyranny of those 
daring Rebels who have assumed to themselves the Exercise 
of Arbitrary Power, to open the Eyes of those who have been 
deluded by specious Falshoods, into Acts of Treason and 
Rebellion, to turn the Hearts of the Authors of these Calam 
ities, and finally to restore Our People in those distracted 
Provinces and Colonies to the happy Condition of being free 
Subjects of a free State; under which heretofore they flourished 
so long and prospered so much: And We do strictly charge 
and command, that the said Publick Fast be reverently and 
devoutly observed by all Our loving Subjects in England, 
Our Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, 
as they tender the Favour of Almighty God, and would 
avoid his Wrath and Indignation; and upon Pain of such 
Punishment, as We may justly inflict upon all such as con 
temn and neglect the Performance of so religious a Duty. 
And for the better and more orderly solemnizing the same, 
We have given Directions to the most Reverend the Arch 
bishops, and the Right Reverend the Bishops of England to 
compose a Form of Prayer suitable to this Occasion, to be 
used in all Churches, Chapels, and Places of Publick Wor 
ship; and to take Care the same be timely dispersed through 
out their respective Dioceses. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Thirtieth Day of 
October, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-six, in 
the Seventeenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 
Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. MDCCLXXVI. 

i p. folio. Copy in B. M. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy 
Council Register, III Geo., vol. jj, p. 172. Printed in "London Gazette" 
November 2, 1776. A proclamation with practically the same wording 
was issued by the Lord Lieutenant and Council of Ireland, November 7, 
1776 (copy in Dublin P. R. 0.}, in consequence of an order of the Privy 
Council (Privy Council Register, III Geo., vol. ij, p. 174}. 



236 Royal Proclamations. 

1776, October 30. 
[Fast Day in Scotland.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 
FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Measures of Force, which We are obliged to 
use against Our rebellious Subjects in Our Colonies and 
Provinces in North America, and putting Our Trust in Al 
mighty God that he will vouchsafe a special Blessing on Our 
Arms both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by and 
with the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby command, 
That a Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed through 
out that Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called Scot 
land, upon Thursday the Twelfth Day of December next, 
that so both We and Our People may humble Ourselves 
before Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon of Our Sins, 
and may, in the most devout and solemn Manner, send up 
Our Prayers and Supplications to the Divine Majesty, for 
averting those heavy Judgments which Our manifold Sins 
and Provocations have most justly deserved, and for implor 
ing His Intervention and Blessing speedily to deliver Our 
Loyal Subjects within Our Colonies and Provinces in North 
America, from the Violence, Injustice, and Tyranny of those 
daring Rebels, who have assumed to themselves the Exercise 
of Arbitrary Power; to open the Eyes of those who have been 
deluded by specious Falsehoods into Acts of Treason and 
Rebellion; to turn the Hearts of the Authors of these Calam 
ities; and finally to restore Our People, in those distracted 
Provinces and Colonies, to the happy Condition of being 
Free Subjects of a Free State, under which heretofore they 
flourished so long, and prospered so much. And We do 
strictly charge and command, that the said Publick Fast 
be reverently and devoutly observed by all Our loving Sub 
jects in Scotland, as they tender the Favour of Almighty 
God, and would avoid His Wrath and Indignation, and upon 
Pain of such Punishment as we may justly inflict on all such 



, January 23. 237 

as contemn and neglect the Performance of so Religious a 
Duty. Our Will is therefore, and We charge, That incon 
tinent this Our Proclamation seen, ye pass to the Market 
Cross of Edinburgh, and all other Places needful, and there, 
in Our Name and Authority, make Publication hereof, that 
none pretend Ignorance. And Our Will and Pleasure is, 
That Our Solicitor do cause printed Copies hereof to be sent 
to the Sheriffs of the several Shires, Stewarts of Stewarties, 
and Bailiffs of Regalities, and their Clerks, whom We ordain 
to see the same published: And We appoint them to send 
Doubles hereof to the several Paroch Kirks within their 
Bounds, that upon the Lord s Day immediately preceding 
the Day abovementioned, the same may be published and 
read from the Pulpits, immediately after Divine Service. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s the Thirtieth Day of 
October, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-six, in 
the Seventeenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

No printed copy found. Entered on Patent Rolls; entered in Privy 
Council Register, III Geo., vol. 13, p. 173. Printed in " London Gazette," 
November 2, 1776. 



1778, January 23. 
[Fast Day in England.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Measures of Force which We are obliged to 
use against Our Rebellious Subjects in Our Colonies and 
Provinces in North America; and putting Our Trust in Al 
mighty God, that He will vouchsafe a special Blessing on 
Our Arms, both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by 
and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby command, 
That a Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed through- 



238 Royal Proclamations. 

out that Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called Eng 
land, Our Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon 
Tweed, upon Friday the Twenty-seventh Day of February 
next; that so both We and Our People may humble Our 
selves before Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon of 
Our Sins; and may, in the most devout and solemn Manner, 
send up Our Prayers and Supplications to the Divine Majesty 
for averting those heavy Judgements, which Our manifold 
Sins and Provocations have most justly deserved, and for 
imploring his Intervention and Blessing speedily to deliver 
Our loyal Subjects within Our Colonies and Provinces in 
North America from the Violence, Injustice, and Tyranny 
of those daring Rebels who have assumed to themselves the 
Exercise of Arbitrary Power, to open the Eyes of those who 
have been deluded by specious Falsehoods into Acts of Treason 
and Rebellion, to turn the Hearts of the Authors of these 
Calamities, and finally to restore Our People in those dis 
tracted Provinces and Colonies to the happy Condition of 
being free Subjects of a free State, under which heretofore 
they flourished so long and prospered so much: And We do 
strictly charge and command, That the said Publick Fast be 
reverently and devoutly observed by all Our loving Subjects 
in England, Our Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick 
upon Tweed, as they tender the Favour of Almighty God, 
and would avoid his Wrath and Indignation; and upon Pain 
of such Punishment as We may justly inflict on all such as 
contemn and neglect the Performance of so religious a Duty. 
And for the better and more orderly solemnizing the same, 
We have given Directions to the Most Reverend the Arch 
bishops, and the Right Reverend the Bishops of England, 
to compose a Form of Prayer suitable to this Occasion, to 
be used in all Churches, Chapels, and Places of Publick 
Worship; and to take Care the same be timely dispersed 
throughout their respective Dioceses. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Twenty-third Day 
of January, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight, 
in the Eighteenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



1 7? 8, January 23. 239 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Stra- 
han, Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 
MDCCLXXVIIL 

i p. folio. Copy in P. C. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown 
Office Docquet Book, vol. 12, entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., 
vol. 14, p. 458. Printed in u London Gazette," January 24, 1778. A procla 
mation with practically the same wording was issued by the Lord Lieutenant 
and Council of Ireland, January 31, 1775 (copy in Dublin P. R. 0.}, in 
consequence of an order of the Privy Council (Privy Council Register, III 
Geo., vol. 14, p. 461). 



1778, January 23. 
[Fast Day in Scotland.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 
FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Measures of Force which We are obliged to 
use against Our Rebellious Subjects in Our Colonies and 
Provinces in North America; and putting Our Trust in 
Almighty God, that He will vouchsafe a special Blessing on 
Our Arms, both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by 
and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby command, 
That a Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed through 
out that Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called Scot 
land, upon Thursday the Twenty sixth Day of February 
next; that so both We and Our People may humble Our 
selves before Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon of 
Our Sins; and may, in the most devout and solemn Manner, 
send up Our Prayers and Supplications to the Divine Majesty, 
for averting those heavy Judgments, which Our manifold 
Sins and Provocations have most justly deserved, and for 
imploring His Intervention and Blessing, speedily to deliver 
Our loyal Subjects, within Our Colonies and Provinces in 
North America, from the Violence, Injustice and Tyranny 
of those daring Rebels, who have assumed to themselves the 
Exercise of Arbitrary Power; to open the Eyes of those who 



240 Royal Proclamations. 

have been deluded by specious Falsehoods into Acts of Treason 
and Rebellion; to turn the Hearts of the Authors of these 
Calamities; and finally to restore Our People in those dis 
tracted Provinces and Colonies to the happy Condition of 
being Free Subjects of a Free State, under which heretofore 
they flourished so long and prospered so much. And We do 
strictly charge and command, That the said Publick Fast be 
reverently and devoutly observed by all Our loving Subjects 
in Scotland, as they tender the Favour of Almighty God, 
and would avoid His Wrath and Indignation; and upon Pain 
of such Punishment as We may justly inflict on all such as 
contemn and neglect the Performance of so religious a Duty. 
Our Will is therefore, and We charge, That incontinent 
this Our Proclamation seen, ye pass to the Market Cross of 
Edinburgh, and all other Places needful, and there, in Our 
Name and Authority, make Publication hereof, that none 
pretend Ignorance. And Our Will and Pleasure is, That 
Our Solicitor do cause printed Copies hereof to be sent to 
the Sheriffs of the several Shires, Stewarts of Stewarties, and 
Bailif s of Regalities, and their Clerks, whom We ordain to 
see the same published; and We appoint them to send Doubles 
hereof to the several Paroch Kirks within their Bounds, 
that upon the Lord s Day immediately preceding the Day 
above mentioned, the same may be published and read from 
the Pulpits immediately after Divine Service. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Twenty-third Day 
of January, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight, 
in the Eighteenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

No printed copy found. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown Office 
Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., wL 14, 
p. 460. Printed in " London Gazette," January 24, 1778. 



1778, September 16. 241 

1778, September 16. 
[Regarding the Distribution of Prizes.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR GRANTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES DURING THE 
PRESENT HOSTILITIES. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas, by Our Order in Council dated the Twenty-ninth 
Day of July last, We have ordered that general Reprisals be 
granted against the Ships, Goods, and Subjects of the French 
King, and that as well Our Fleets and Ships, as also all other 
Ships and Vessels that shall be commissionated by Letters of 
Marque, or general Reprisals, or otherwise, by Our Commis 
sioners for executing Our Office of Lord High Admiral of Great 
Britain, shall and may lawfully seize all Ships, Vessels and 
Goods, belonging to the French King, and bring the same to 
Judgement in any of Our Courts of Admiralty within Our 
Dominions: We, being desirous to give due Encouragement 
to all Our faithful Subjects who shall lawfully seize the same, 
and having declared in Council, by Our Order of the Seventh 
of last Month, Our Intentions concerning the Distribution of 
all Manner of Captures, Seizures, Prizes and Reprisals, of all 
Ships and Goods, during the present Hostilities, do now make 
known to all Our loving Subjects, and all others whom it may 
concern, by this Our Proclamation, by and with the Advice of 
Our Privy Council, that Our Will and Pleasure is, That the 
Neat Produce of all Prizes taken, the Right whereof is inherent 
in Us, and Our Crown, be given to the Takers in the Propor 
tion and Manner of Proceeding herein-after set forth: that is to 
say, That all Prizes taken by Ships and Vessels having Com 
missions of Letters of Marque and Reprisals, may be sold and 
disposed of by the Merchants, Owners, Fitters, and others to 
whom such Letters of Marque and Reprisals are granted, for 
their own Use and Benefit, after final Adjudication, and not 
before. And We do hereby further Order and direct, that 
the Neat Produce of all Prizes which are or shall be taken by 
any of Our Ships or Vessels of War, shall be for the entire 
Benefit and Encouragement of Our Flag Officers, Captains, 



242 Royal Proclamations. 

Commanders, and other Commissioned Officers in Our Pay, 
and of the Seamen, Marines, and Soldiers, on Board Our said 
Ships and Vessels at the Time of the Capture; and that such 
Prizes may be lawfully sold and disposed of by them and their 
Agents, after the same shall have been to Us finally adjudged 
lawful Prize, and not otherwise. The Distribution shall be 
made as follows; the Whole of the Neat Produce being first 
divided into Eight equal Parts ; 

The Captain or Captains of any of Our said Ships and Ves 
sels of War, who shall be actually on Board at the Taking of 
any Prize, shall have Three Eighth Parts; but in case any 
such Prize shall be taken by any of Our Ships or Vessels of 
War, under the Command of a Flag or Flags, the Flag Officer 
or Officers being actually on Board or directing and assisting 
in the Capture, shall have One of the said Three Eighth Parts; 
the said One Eighth Part to be paid to such Flag or Flag 
Officers in such Proportions, and subject to such Regulations, 
as are herein-after mentioned : 

The Captains of Marines and Land Forces, Sea Lieutenants, 
and Master on Board, shall have One Eighth Part, to be 
equally divided amongst them: 

The Lieutenants and Quarter Masters of Marines, and 
Lieutenants, Ensigns, and Quarter Masters of Land Forces, 
Secretaries of Admirals or of Commodores, with Captains 
under them, Boatswains, Gunners, Purser, Carpenter, Mas 
ter s Mates, Chirurgeon, Pilot, and Chaplain on Board, shall 
have One Eighth Part, to be equally divided amongst them: 

The Midshipmen, Captain s Clerk, Master Sailmaker, Car 
penter s Mates, Boatswain s Mates, Gunner s Mates, Master 
at Arms, Corporals, Yeomen of the Sheets, Cockswain, Quarter 
Masters, Quarter Masters Mates, Chirurgeon s Mates, Yeo 
men of the Powder Room, Serjeants of Marines, and Land 
Forces on Board, shall have One Eighth Part, to be equally 
divided amongst them: 

The Trumpeters, Quarter Gunners, Carpenter s Crew, 
Stewards, Cook, Armourer, Steward s Mate, Cook s Mate, 
Gunsmith, Cooper, Swabber, Ordinary Trumpeter, Barber, 
Able Seamen, Ordinary Seamen, and Marines, and other 
Soldiers, and all other Persons doing Duty and assisting on 
Board, shall have Two Eighth Parts, to be equally divided 
amongst them: 

Provided, That if any Officer being on Board any of Our 
Ships of War, at the Time of taking any Prize, shall have more 



1778, September 16. 243 

Commissions or Offices than One, such Officer shall be intitled 
only to the Share or Shares of the Prizes which, according to 
the above-mentioned Distribution, shall belong to his superior 
Commission or Office. And We do hereby strictly enjoin all 
Commanders of Our Ships and Vessels of War taking any 
Prize, as soon as may be, to transmit, or cause to be trans 
mitted, to the Commissioners of Our Navy, a true List of the 
Names of all the Officers, Seamen, Marines, Soldiers, and 
others, who were actually on Board Our Ships and Vessels of 
War under their Command at the Time of the Capture ; which 
List shall contain the Quality of the Service of each Person on 
Board, and be subscribed by the Captain or Commanding 
Officer, and Three or more of the Chief Officers on Board. 
And we do hereby require and direct the Commissioners of Our 
Navy, or any Three or more of them, to examine, or cause to be 
examined, such Lists by the Muster Books of such Ships and 
Vessels of War, and Lists annexed thereto, to see that such 
Lists do agree with the said Muster Books and annexed Lists, 
as to the Names, Qualities, or Ratings of the Officers, Seamen, 
Marines, Soldiers, and others belonging to such Ships and 
Vessels of War, and upon Request forthwith to grant a Cer 
tificate of the Truth of any List transmitted to them, to the 
Agents nominated and appointed by the Captors, to take care 
and dispose of such Prize; and also upon Application to them 
(the said Commissioners) they shall give, or cause to be given, 
to the said Agents, all such Lists from the Muster Books of any 
such Ships of War, and annexed Lists, as the said Agents shall 
find requisite for their Direction in paying the Produce of 
such Prizes, and otherwise shall be aiding and assisting to the 
said Agents in all such Matters as shall be necessary. We do 
hereby further will and direct, that the following Regulations 
shall be observed concerning the One Eighth Part herein 
before mentioned to be granted to the Flag, or Flag Officers, 
who shall actually be on Board at the taking of any Prize, or 
shall be directing or assisting therein : First, That a Flag Officer, 
Commander in Chief, when there is but One Flag Officer upon 
Service, shall have to his own Use the said One Eighth Part 
of the Prizes taken by Ships and Vessels under his Command : 
Secondly, That a Flag Officer, sent to command at Jamaica, 
or elsewhere, shall have no Right to any Share of Prizes taken 
by Ships or Vessels employed there, before he arrives at the 
Place to which he is sent, and actually takes upon him the 
Command: Thirdly, That when an inferior Flag Officer is sent 



244 Royal Proclamations. 

out to reinforce a superior Flag Officer at Jamaica, or else 
where, the superior Flag Officer shall have no Right to any 
Share or Prizes taken by the inferior Flag Officer, before the 
inferior Flag Officer shall arrive within the Limits of the Com 
mand of the superior Flag Officer, and actually receive some 
Order from him : Fourthly, That a Chief Flag Officer returning 
home from Jamaica, or elsewhere, shall have no Share of the 
Prizes taken by the Ships or Vessels left behind to act under 
another Command: Fifthly, That if a Flag Officer is sent to 
command in the Out-ports of this Kingdom, he shall have no 
Share of the Prizes taken by Ships or Vessels which have sailed 
from that Port by Order from the Admiralty: Sixthly, That 
when more Flag Officers than One serve together, the Eighth 
Part of the Prizes taken by any Ships or Vessels of the Fleet 
or Squadron, shall be divided in the following Proportions; 
viz. If there be but Two Flag Officers, the Chief shall have 
Two Third Parts of the said One Eighth Part, and the other 
shall have the remaining Third Part; but if the Number of 
Flag Officers be more than Two, the Chief shall have only One 
Half, and the other Half shall be equally divided amongst the 
other Flag Officers: Seventhly, That Commodores with Cap 
tains under them shall be esteemed as Flag Officers with re 
spect to the Eighth Part of Prizes taken, whether commanding 
in Chief or serving under Command. And We do hereby 
further order, That in the Case of Cutters, Schooners, and 
other armed Vessels commanded by Lieutenants, the Share 
of such Lieutenants shall be Three Eighth Parts of the Prize, 
unless such Lieutenants shall be under the Command of a Flag 
Officer or Officers; in which Case the Flag Officer or Officers 
shall have One of the said Three Eighths, to be divided among 
such Flag Officer or Flag Officers in the Manner herein-before 
directed in the Case of Captains serving under Flag Officers: 
Secondly, We direct that the Share of the Master or other 
Person acting as Second in Command, and the Pilot, (if there 
happens to be One on Board) shall be One Eighth Part, to be 
divided into Three equal Parts ; of which Two Thirds shall go 
to the Master, or other Person acting as Second in Command, 
and the remaining One Third to the Pilot; but if there is no 
Pilot, then such Eighth Part to go wholly to the Master or 
Person acting as Second in Command : That the Share of the 
Chirurgeon, or Chirurgeon s Mate, (where there is no Chirur- 
geon) Midshipmen, and Clerk and Steward, shall be One 
Eighth; That the Share of the Boatswain s, Gunner s, and 



, September 16. 245 

Carpenter s Mates, Yeomen of the Sheets, Sailmaker, Quarter 
Master, and Quarter Master s Mate, shall be One Eighth; 
and the Share of the Seamen, Marines, and other Persons on 
Board, assisting in the Capture, shall be Two Eighth Parts. 
But it is Our Intention nevertheless, that the above Distri 
bution shall only extend to such Captures as shall be made by 
any Cutter, Schooner, or armed Vessel, without any of His 
Majesty s Ships or Vessels of War being present or within 
Sight of, and adding to the Encouragement of the Captors, 
and Terror of the Enemy: But in Case any of His Majesty s 
Ships or Vessels of War shall be present, or in Sight, that then 
the Officers, Pilots, Petty Officers, and Men on Board such 
Cutters and Schooners, or armed Vessels, shall share in the 
same Proportion as is allowed to Persons of the like Rank and 
Denomination on Board His Majesty s Ships and Vessels of 
War. Lastly, it is Our Will and Pleasure, That this Our 
Declaration, and Order in Council thereupon, shall extend 
not only to Captures from the French King, his Subjects, and 
others inhabiting his Countries, but also shall extend in the 
like Manner to all Ships and Goods now taken, and not finally 
adjudged and condemned, and divided, or to be taken here 
after, under the Act of Parliament of the Sixteenth Year of 
Our Reign, whereby it is enacted, That, for the Encourage 
ment of Our Officers of Our Ships of War, the Flag Officers, 
Captains, Commanders, and other Commissioned Officers in 
Our Pay, and the Seamen, Marines, and Soldiers on Board, 
shall have the sole Interest and Property of and in all and 
every such Ships and Goods as therein are recited, which they 
shall seize and take; but being first adjudged, that is to say, 
finally adjudged lawful Prize, and which are by the said Act 
declared forfeited to Us, and to be divided and disposed of in 
such Proportion and after such Manner as We, Our Heirs and 
Successors, shall by Proclamation or Proclamations order and 
direct. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Sixteenth Day of 
September, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight, 
in the Eighteenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



246 Royal Proclamations. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 
Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 1778. 

i p. folio. Copies in Antiq., and P. C.; also in John Carter Brown 
Library. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown Office Docquet Book, 
vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., vol. 15, p. 515. 
Printed in " London Gazette" September 19, 1778. 



1779, January i. 
[Fast Day in England.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION 

FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Hostilities in which We are engaged with the 
French King, and the unnatural Rebellion carrying on in some 
of Our Provinces and Colonies in North America, and putting 
Our Trust in Almighty God, that he will vouchsafe a special 
Blessing on Our Arms both by Sea and Land, have resolved, 
and do, by and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby 
Command, That a Public Fast and Humiliation be observed 
throughout that Part of Great Britain called England, Our 
Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, upon 
Wednesday the Tenth Day of February next; that so both 
We and Our People may humble Ourselves before Almighty 
God, in order to obtain Pardon of Our Sins; and may, in the 
most devout and solemn Manner, send up Our Prayers and 
Supplications to the Divine Majesty, for averting those heavy 
Judgments which Our manifold Sins and Provocations have 
most justly deserved; and imploring His Blessing and Assist 
ance on Our Arms; and for restoring and perpetuating Peace, 
Safety, and Prosperity, to Us and Our Kingdoms: And We 
do strictly Charge and Command, That the said Public Fast 
be reverently and devoutly observed by all Our loving Sub 
jects in England, Our Dominion of Wales, and Town of Ber 
wick upon Tweed, as they tender the Favour of Almighty God, 
and would avoid His Wrath and Indignation; and upon Pain 



I 779-> January i. 247 

of such Punishment as We may justly inflict on all such as 
contemn and neglect the Performance of so religious and 
necessary a Duty. And, for the better and more orderly 
solemnizing the same, We have given Directions to the Most 
Reverend the Archbishops, and the Right Reverend the 
Bishops of England, to compose a Form of Prayer suitable to 
this Occasion, to be used in all Churches, Chapels, and Places 
of Public Worship; and to take Care the same be timely dis 
persed throughout their respective Dioceses. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the First Day of January, 
One thousand seven hundred and seventy-nine, in the Nine 
teenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

No printed copy found. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown Office 
Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., vol. 16, 
p. 181. Printed in "London Gazette," January 2, 1779. A proclamation 
with practically the same wording was issued by the Lord Lieutenant and 
Council of Ireland, January n, 1779 (copy in Dublin P. R. 0.), in con 
sequence of an order of the Privy Council (Privy Council Register, III Geo. t 
vol. 16, p. 184). 



1779, January i. 
[Fast Day in Scotland.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 
FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Hostilities in which We are engaged with the 
French King, and the unnatural Rebellion carrying on in 
some of Our Provinces and Colonies in North America, and 
putting Our Trust in Almighty God, that he will vouchsafe 
a special Blessing on Our Arms both by Sea and Land, have 
resolved, and do, by and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, 
hereby command, That a Publick Fast and Humiliation be 
observed, throughout that Part of Our Kingdom of Great 
Britain called Scotland, on Tuesday the Ninth Day of Feb- 



248 Royal Proclamations. 

ruary next; that so both We and Our People may humble 
Ourselves before Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon 
of Our Sins; and may, in the most devout and solemn Manner, 
send up Our Prayers and Supplications to the Divine Majesty, 
for averting those heavy Judgements which Our manifold 
Sins and Provocations have most justly deserved, and im 
ploring his Blessing and Assistance on Our Arms, and for 
restoring and perpetuating Peace, Safety, and Prosperity, 
to Us and Our Kingdoms: And We do strictly Charge and 
Command, That the said Publick Fast be reverently and 
devoutly observed by all Our loving Subjects in Scotland, 
as they tender the Favour of Almighty God, and would 
avoid his Wrath and Indignation; and upon Pain of such 
Punishment as We may justly inflict on all such as contemn 
and neglect the Performance of so religious and necessary a 
Duty. Our Will is therefore, and We charge, That incon 
tinent this Our Proclamation seen, ye pass to the Market 
Cross of Edinburgh, and all other Places needful, and there, 
in Our Name and Authority, make Publication hereof, that 
none pretend Ignorance. And Our Will and Pleasure is, 
That Our Solicitor do cause printed Copies hereof to be sent 
to the Sheriffs of the several Shires, Stewarts of Stewarties, 
and Bailiffs of Regalities, and their Clerks, whom We ordain 
to see the same published; and We appoint them to send 
Doubles hereof to the several Paroch Kirks within their 
Bounds, that upon the Lord s Day immediately preceding 
the Day above-mentioned, the same may be published and 
read from the Pulpits, immediately after Divine Service. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the First Day of Jan 
uary, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-nine, in the 
Nineteenth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Stra- 
han, Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 
MDCCLXXIX. 

i p. folio. Copy in P. C. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown 
Office Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., 
vol. 16, p. 182. Printed in "London Gazette" January 2, 1779. 



I77P, December 13. 249 

1779, December 13. 

[Fast Day in England.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Hostilities in which We are engaged, and the 
unnatural Rebellion carrying on in some of Our Provinces 
and Colonies in North America, and putting Our Trust in 
Almighty God, that he will vouchsafe a Special Blessing on 
Our Arms both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by 
and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby command, 
That a Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed through 
out that Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called Eng 
land, Our Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon 
Tweed, upon Friday the Fourth Day of February next; 
that so both We and Our People may humble Ourselves 
before Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon of Our Sins; 
and may, in the most devout and solemn Manner, send up 
Our Prayers and Supplications to the Divine Majesty, for 
averting those heavy Judgements which Our manifold Sins 
and Provocations have most justly deserved, and imploring 
his Blessing and Assistance on Our Arms, and for restoring 
and perpetuating Peace, Safety, and Prosperity, to Us and 
Our Kingdoms: And W r e do strictly charge and command, 
That the said Publick Fast be reverently and devoutly 
observed by all Our loving Subjects in England, our Dominion 
of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, as they tender 
the Favour of Almighty God, and would avoid his Wrath 
and Indignation; and upon Pain of such Punishment as We 
may justly inflict on all such as contemn and neglect the 
Performance of so religious and necessary a Duty. And 
for the better and more orderly solemnizing the same, We 
have given Directions to the Most Reverend the Archbishops, 
and the Right Reverend the Bishops of England, to compose 
a Form of Prayer suitable to this Occasion, to be used in all 
Churches, Chapels, and Places of Publick Worship, and to 



250 Royal Proclamations. 

take care the same be timely dispersed throughout their 
respective Dioceses. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Thirteenth of 
December, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-nine, 
in the Twentieth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Stra- 
han, Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 
MDCCLXXIX. 

i p. folio. Copy in P. R. 0. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown 
Office Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., 
vol. 17, p. 453. Printed in " London Gazette" December 14, 177 g. A proc 
lamation with practically the same wording was issued by the Lord Lieutenant 
and Council of Ireland, December 24, 1779 (copy in Dublin P. R. 0.), in 
consequence of an order of the Privy Council (Privy Council Register, III 
Geo., vol. 17, p. 455). 



1779, December 13. 

[Fast Day in Scotland.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 
FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Hostilities in which We are engaged, and the 
unnatural Rebellion carrying on in some of Our Provinces 
and Colonies in North America, and putting Our Trust in 
Almighty God, that he will vouchsafe a special Blessing on 
Our Arms both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by 
and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby command, 
That a Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed through 
out that Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called Scot 
land, on Thursday the Third Day of February next; that so 
both We and Our People may humble Ourselves before 
Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon of Our Sins; and may, 
in the most devout and solemn Manner, send up Our Prayers 



December ij. 251 

and Supplications to the Divine Majesty, for averting those 
heavy Judgments which Our manifold Sins and Provocations 
have most justly deserved, and imploring His Blessing and 
Assistance on Our Arms, and for restoring and perpetuating 
Peace, Safety, and Prosperity, to Us and Our Kingdoms: 
And We do strictly charge and command, That the said 
Publick Fast be reverently and devoutly observed by all 
Our loving Subjects in Scotland, as they tender the Favour 
of Almighty God, and would avoid His Wrath and Indignation; 
and upon Pain of such Punishment as We may justly inflict 
on all such as contemn and .neglect the Performance of so 
religious and necessary a Duty. Our Will is therefore, and 
We charge, That incontinent this Our Proclamation seen, 
ye pass to the Market Cross of Edinburgh, and all other 
Places needful, and there, in Our Name and Authority, 
make Publication hereof, that none pretend Ignorance. 
And Our Will and Pleasure is, That Our Solicitor do cause 
printed Copies hereof to be sent to the Sheriffs of the several 
Shires, Stewarts of Stewarties, and Bailiffs of Regalities, and 
their Clerks, whom We ordain to see the same published: 
and We appoint them to send Doubles hereof to the several 
Paroch Kirks within their Bounds, that upon the Lord s 
Day immediately preceding the Day above mentioned the 
same may be published and read from the Pulpits, imme 
diately after Divine Service. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Thirteenth Day of 
December, One thousand seven hundred and seventy-nine, 
in the Twentieth Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

No printed copy found. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown Office 
Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., vol. 17, 
p. 454. Printed in " London Gazette" December 14, 1779. 



252 Royal Proclamations. 

1780, December 20. 

[Relations of England to Holland.] 

MANIFESTO. 

GEORGE R. 

Through the whole Course of Our Reign, Our Conduct 
towards the States General of the United Provinces has been 
that of a sincere Friend and faithful Ally. Had they adhered 
to those wise Principles which used to govern the Republic, 
they must have shewn themselves equally sollicitous to 
maintain the Friendship which has so long subsisted between 
the two Nations, and which is essential to the Interests of 
both: But from the Prevalence of a Faction devoted to France, 
and following the Dictates of that Court, a very different 
Policy has prevailed. The Return made to Our Friendship, 
for some Time past, has been an open Contempt of the most 
solemn Engagements, and a repeated Violation of Public 
Faith. 

On the Commencement of the Defensive War, in which 
We found Ourselves engaged by the Aggression of France, 
We shewed a tender Regard for the Interests of the States 
General, and a Desire of securing to their Subjects every 
Advantage of Trade, consistent with the great and just 
Principle of Our own Defence. Our Ambassador was in 
structed to offer a friendly Negotiation, to obviate every 
Thing that might lead to disagreeable Discussion; and to 
this Offer, solemnly made by him to the States General, the 
2d of November, 1778, no Attention was paid. 

After the Number of Our Enemies increased by the Aggres 
sion of Spain, equally unprovoked with that of France, We 
found it necessary to call upon the States General for the 
Performance of their Engagements. The Fifth Article of 
the perpetual Defensive Alliance between Our Crown and 
the States General, concluded at Westminster the 3,d of 
March, 1678, besides the general Engagement for Succours, 
expressly stipulates, "That that Party of the two Allies 
that is not attacked, shall be obliged to break with the Aggres 
sor in two Months after the Party attacked shall require 
it. " Yet two Years have passed, without the least Assistance 
given to Us, without a single Syllable in Answer to Our 
repeated Demands. 

So totally regardless have the States been of their Treaties 



1780, December 20. 253 

with Us, that they readily promised Our Enemies to observe 
a Neutrality, in direct Contradiction to those Engagements; 
and whilst they have withheld from Us the Succours they 
were bound to furnish, every secret Assistance has been 
given the Enemy; and Inland Duties have been taken off, 
for the sole Purpose of facilitating the Carriage of Naval 
Stores to France. 

In direct and open Violation of Treaty, they suffered an 
American Pirate to remain several Weeks in one of their 
Ports; and even permitted a Part of his Crew to mount 
Guard in a Fort in the Texel. 

In the East-Indies, the Subjects of the States General, 
in Concert with France, have endeavoured to raise up Enemies 
against Us. 

In the West-Indies, particularly at St. Eustatius, every 
Protection and Assistance has been given to Our Rebellious 
Subjects. Their Privateers are openly received in the Dutch 
Harbours; allowed to refit there; supplied with Arms and 
Ammunition; their Crews recruited; their Prizes brought in 
and sold; and all this in direct Violation of as clear and solemn 
Stipulations as can be made. 

This Conduct, so inconsistent with all good Faith, so 
repugnant to the Sense of the wisest Part of the Dutch Nation, 
is chiefly to be ascribed to the Prevalence of the leading 
Magistrates of Amsterdam, whose secret Correspondence 
with Our Rebellious Subjects was suspected, long before it 
was made known by the fortunate Discovery of a Treaty, 
the first Article of which is: 

"There shall be a firm, inviolable and universal Peace, 
and sincere Friendship, between their High Mightinesses 
the Estates of the Seven United Provinces of Holland, and 
the United States of North America, and the Subjects and 
People of the said Parties; and between the Countries, Is 
lands, Cities, and Towns, situated under the Jurisdiction of 
the said United States of Holland, and the said United States 
of America, and the People and Inhabitants thereof, of every 
Degree, without Exception of Persons or Places." 

This Treaty was signed in September, 1778, by the express 
Order of the Pensionary of Amsterdam, and other principal 
Magistrates of that City. They now not only avow the 
whole Transaction, but glory in it, and expressly say, even 
to the States General, that what they did "was what their 
indispensable Duty required. " 



254 Royal Proclamations. 

In the mean Time, the States General declined to give any 
Answer to the Memorial presented by Our Ambassador; and 
this Refusal was aggravated by their proceeding upon other 
Business, nay upon the Consideration of this very Subject 
to internal Purposes; and while they found it impossible to 
approve the Conduct of their Subjects, they still industriously 
avoided to give Us the Satisfaction so manifestly due. 

We had every Right to expect, that such a Discovery 
would have roused them to a just Indignation at the Insult 
offered to Us, and to themselves; and that they would have 
been eager to give Us full and ample Satisfaction for the 
Offence, and to inflict the severest Punishment upon the 
Offenders. The Urgency of the Business made an instant 
Answer essential to the Honour and Safety of this Country. 1 
The Demand was accordingly pressed by Our Ambassador 
in repeated Conferences with the Ministers, and in a Second 
Memorial: It was pressed with all the Earnestness which 
could proceed from Our ancient Friendship, and the Sense 
of recent Injuries; and the Answ r er now given to a Memorial 
on such a Subject, delivered about Five Weeks ago, is, That 
the States have taken it ad referendum. Such an Answer, 
upon such an Occasion, could only be dictated by the fixt 
Purpose of Hostility meditated, and already resolved, by 
the States, induced by the offensive Councils of Amsterdam 
thus to countenance the hostile Aggression, which the Magis 
trates of that City have made in the Name of the Republic. 

There is an End of the Faith of all Treaties with Them, 
if Amsterdam may usurp the Sovereign Power, may violate 
those Treaties with Impunity, by pledging the States to 
Engagements directly contrary, and leaguing the Republic 
with the Rebels of a Sovereign to whom she is bound by the 
closest Ties. An Infraction of the Law of Nations, by the 
meanest Member of any Country, gives the injured State 
a Right to demand Satisfaction and Punishment: How 
much more so, when the Injury complained of is a flagrant 
Violation of Public Faith, committed by leading and pre- 

1 The Privy Council, by an order of April 17, 1780, declared that whereas 
the United Provinces had not lived up to the terms of their alliance with Great 
Britain, they should henceforth be considered a neutral power not privileged 
by treaty. On the same date as the publication of the Manifesto, December 20, 
1 780, the Council ordered that general reprisals should be granted against the 
ships of the United Provinces (Privy Council Register, III Geo., vol. 18). 
On December 27, 1780, the King issued a proclamation providing for the dis 
tribution of the prizes during the hostilities with the United Provinces, which 
is not here printed since it remotely concerns America. 



December 20. 255 

dominant Members in the State? Since then the Satis 
faction we have demanded is not given, We must, though 
most reluctantly, do Ourselves that Justice which We cannot 
otherwise obtain: We must consider the States General as 
Parties in the Injury which they will not repair, as Sharers 
in the Aggression which they refuse to punish, and must 
act accordingly. We have therefore ordered Our Ambassador 
to withdraw from the Hague, and shall immediately pursue 
such vigorous Measures as the Occasion fully justifies, and 
Our Dignity and the essential Interests of Our People require. 

From a Regard to the Dutch Nation at large, We wish it 
were possible to direct those Measures wholly against Am 
sterdam; but this cannot be, unless the States General will 
immediately declare, that Amsterdam shall, upon this Oc 
casion, receive no Assistance from them, but be left to abide 
the Consequences of it s Aggression. 

Whilst Amsterdam is suffered to prevail in the general 
Councils, and is backed by the Strength of the State, it is 
impossible to resist the Aggression of so considerable a Part, 
without contending with the Whole. But We are too sen 
sible of the common Interests of both Countries not to remem 
ber, in the Midst of such a Contest, that the only Point to 
be aimed at by Us, is to raise a Disposition in the Councils 
of the Republic to return to our ancient Union, by giving 
Us that Satisfaction for the past, and Security for the future, 
which We shall be as ready to receive as They can be to 
offer, and to the Attainment of which We shall direct all 
Our Operations. We mean only to provide for Our own 
Security, by defeating the dangerous Designs that have been 
formed against Us. We shall ever be disposed to return to 
Friendship with the States General, when they sincerely 
revert to that System which the Wisdom of their Ancestors 
formed, and which has now been, subverted by a powerful 
Faction, conspiring with France against the true Interests 
of the Republic, no less than against those of Great Britain. 

St. James s, December 20, 1780. 

G. R. 

No printed copy found, except as published in the " London Gazette Ex 
traordinary," December 21, 1780, from which this transcript was taken. 



256 Royal Proclamations. 

1781, January 12. 
[Fast Day in England.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION 

FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Hostilities in which We are engaged, and the 
unnatural Rebellion carrying on in some of Our Provinces 
and Colonies in North America, and putting Our Trust in 
Almighty God, that he will vouchsafe a Special Blessing on 
Our Arms both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by 
and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby command, 
That a Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed throughout 
that Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called England, Our 
Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, upon 
Wednesday the Twenty-first Day of February next; that so 
both We and Our People may humble Ourselves before 
Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon of Our Sins; and 
may, in the most devout and solemn Manner, send up Our 
Prayers and Supplications to the Divine Majesty, for averting 
those heavy Judgements which Our manifold Sins and Provo 
cations have most justly deserved, and imploring His Blessing 
and Assistance on Our Arms, and for restoring and perpetuat 
ing Peace, Safety, and Prosperity to Us and Our Kingdoms. 
And We do strictly charge and command, That the said Pub- 
lick Fast be reverently and devoutly observed by all Our loving 
Subjects in England, our Dominion of Wales, and Town of 
Berwick upon Tweed, as they tender the Favour of Almighty 
God, and would avoid His Wrath and Indignation; and upon 
Pain of such Punishment as We may justly inflict on all such 
as contemn and neglect the Performance of so religious and 
necessary a Duty. And for the better and more orderly 
solemnizing the same, We have given Directions to the Most 
Reverend the Archbishops, and the Right Reverend the 
Bishops of England, to compose a Form of Prayer suitable to 
this Occasion, to be used in all Churches, Chapels, and Places 
of Publick Worship, and to take care the same be timely dis 
persed throughout their respective Dioceses. 



i?8ij January 12. 257 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Twelfth of January, 
One thousand seven hundred and eighty-one, in the Twenty- 
first Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Stra- 
han, Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 
MDCCLXXXI. 

i p. folio. Copies in P. C., and P. R. 0. Entered on Patent Rolls, 
and in Crown Office Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, 
III Geo., vol. ip, p. jr. Printed in "London Gazette" January 13, 1781. 
A proclamation with practically the same wording was issued by the Lord 
Lieutenant and Council of Ireland, January 22, 1781 (copy in Dublin 
P. R. 0.}, in consequence of an order of the Privy Council (Privy Council 
Register, III Geo., vol. 19, p. 34). 



1781, January 12. 
[Fast Day in Scotland.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION 

FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just and 
necessary Hostilities in which We are engaged, and the un 
natural Rebellion carrying on in some of Our Provinces and 
Colonies in North America, and putting our Trust in Almighty 
God, that he will vouchsafe a special Blessing on Our Arms 
both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by and with 
the Advice of our Privy Council, hereby command, That a 
Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed, throughout that 
Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called Scotland, on 
Thursday the Twenty-second Day of February next; that so 
both We and Our People may humble Ourselves before 
Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon of Our Sins; and 
may, in the most devout and solemn Manner, send up Our 
Prayers and Supplications to the Divine Majesty, for averting 
those heavy Judgements which Our manifold Sins and Prov- 



258 Royal Proclamations. 

ocations have most justly deserved, and imploring his Bless 
ing and Assistance on Our Arms, and for restoring and 
perpetuating Peace, Safety, and Prosperity, to Us and Our 
Kingdoms: And We do stricly charge and command, That the 
said Publick Fast be reverently and devoutly observed by all 
Our loving Subjects in Scotland, as they tender the Favour of 
Almighty God, and would avoid His Wrath and Indignation; 
and upon Pain of such Punishment as We may justly inflict 
on all such as contemn and neglect the Performance of so 
religious and necessary a Duty. Our Will is therefore, and We 
charge, That incontinent this Our Proclamation seen, ye pass 
to the Market Cross of Edinburgh, and all other Places need 
ful, and there, in Our Name and Authority, make Publication 
hereof, that none pretend Ignorance. And Our Will and 
Pleasure is, That Our Solicitor do cause printed Copies hereof 
to be sent to the Sheriffs of the several Shires, Stewarts of 
Stewarties, and Bailiffs of Regalities, and their Clerks, whom 
we ordain to see the same published; and We appoint them to 
send Doubles hereof to the several Paroch Kirks within their 
Bounds, that upon the Lord s Day immediately preceding the 
Day above-mentioned, the same may be published and read 
from the Pulpits, immediately after Divine Service. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Twelfth Day of 
January, One thousand seven hundred and eighty-one, in the 
Twenty-first Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Stra- 
han, Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 
MDCCLXXXI. 

i p. folio. Copy in P. R. 0. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown 
Office Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., 
vol. ip, p. jj. Printed in "London Gazette," January 13, 1781. 



1782, January p. 259 

1782, January 9. 
[Fast Day in England.] 

BY THE KING. 

A PROCLAMATION 

FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Hostilities in which We are engaged, and the 
unnatural Rebellion carrying on in some of Our Provinces and 
Colonies in North America, and putting Our Trust in Almighty 
God, that he will vouchsafe a special Blessing on Our Arms 
both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by and with 
the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby command, That a 
Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed throughout that 
Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called England, Our 
Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, upon 
Friday the Eighth Day of February next; that so both We 
and Our People may humble Ourselves before Almighty God, 
in order to obtain Pardon of Our Sins; and may, in the most 
devout and solemn Manner, send up Our Prayers and Suppli 
cations to the Divine Majesty, for averting those heavy 
Judgements which Our manifold Sins and Provocations have 
most justly deserved, and imploring His Blessing and Assist 
ance on Our Arms, and for restoring and perpetuating Peace, 
Safety, and Prosperity to Us and Our Kingdoms: And We do 
strictly charge and command, That the said Publick Fast be 
reverently and devoutly observed by all Our loving Subjects 
in England, Our Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick 
upon Tweed, as they tender the Favour of Almighty God, and 
would avoid His Wrath and Indignation; and upon Pain of 
such Punishment as We may justly inflict on all such as 
contemn and neglect the performance of so religious and 
necessary a Duty. And for the better and more orderly 
solemnizing the same, We have given Directions to the Most 
Reverend the Archbishops, and the Right Reverend the 
Bishops of England, to compose a Form of Prayer suitable 
to this Occasion, to be used in all Churches, Chapels, and 
Places of Publick Worship, and to take Care the same be 
timely dispersed throughout their respective Dioceses. 



260 Royal Proclamations. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Ninth Day of Janu 
ary, One thousand seven hundred and eighty-two, in the 
Twenty-second Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Stra- 
han, Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 
MDCCLXXXII. 

i p. folio. Copies in P. C., and P. R. 0. Entered on Patent Rolls, and 
in Crown Office Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, 
III Geo., vol. 20, p. 124. Printed in "London Gazette," January 12, 1782. 
A proclamation with practically the same wording was issued by the Lord 
Lieutenant and Council of Ireland, January 17, 1782 (copy in Dublin 
P. R. 0.), in consequence of an order of the Privy Council (Privy Council 
Register, III Geo., vol. 20, p. 126). 



1782, January 9. 
[Fast Day in Scotland.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 
FOR A GENERAL FAST. 

GEORGE R. 

We, taking into Our most serious Consideration the just 
and necessary Hostilities in which We are engaged, and the 
unnatural Rebellion carrying on in some of Our Provinces 
and Colonies in North America, and putting Our Trust in 
Almighty God, that he will vouchsafe a special Blessing on 
Our Arms both by Sea and Land, have resolved, and do, by 
and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, hereby command, 
That a Publick Fast and Humiliation be observed, through 
out that Part of Our Kingdom of Great Britain called Scot 
land, on Thursday the Seventh Day of February next; that 
so both We and Our People may humble Ourselves before 
Almighty God, in order to obtain Pardon of Our Sins; and 
may, in the most devout and solemn Manner, send up Our 
Prayers and Supplications to the Divine Majesty, for avert 
ing those heavy Judgements which Our Manifold Sins and 



1782, January g. 261 

Provocations have most justly deserved, and imploring His 
Blessing and Assistance on Our Arms, and for restoring and 
perpetuating Peace, Safety, and Prosperity, to Us and Our 
Kingdoms: And We do strictly charge and command, That 
the said Publick Fast be reverently and devoutly observed 
by all Our loving Subjects in Scotland, as they tender the 
Favour of Almighty God, and would avoid His Wrath and 
Indignation; and upon Pain of such Punishment as We may 
justly inflict on all such as contemn and neglect the Per 
formance of so religious and necessary a Duty. Our Will is 
therefore, and We charge, That incontinent this Our Proc 
lamation seen, ye pass to the Market Cross of Edinburgh, 
and all other Places needful, and there, in Our Name and 
Authority, make Publication hereof, that none pretend 
Ignorance. And Our Will and Pleasure is, That Our Solici 
tor do cause printed Copies hereof to be sent to the Sheriffs 
of the several Shires, Stewarts of Stewarties, and Bailiffs 
of Regalities, and their Clerks, whom We ordain to see the 
same published; and We appoint them to send Doubles 
hereof to the several Paroch Kirks within their Bounds, that 
upon the Lord s Day immediately preceding the Day above- 
mentioned, the same may be published and read from the 
Pulpits, immediately after Divine Service. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Ninth Day of 
January, One thousand seven hundred and eighty-two, in 
the Twenty-second Year of Our Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Stra- 
han, Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 
MDCCLXXXII. 

i p. folio. Copy in P. R. 0. Entered on Patent Rolls, and in Crown 
Office Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, III Geo., 
vol. 20, p. 125. Printed in "London Gazette" January 12, 1782. 



262 Royal Proclamations. 

1783, February 14. 
[Declaring Cessation of Arms.] 

BY THE KING. 
A PROCLAMATION 

DECLARING THE CESSATION OF ARMS, AS WELL BY SEA 
AS LAND, AGREED UPON BETWEEN His MAJESTY, 
THE MOST CHRISTIAN KING, THE KING OF SPAIN, THE 
STATES GENERAL OF THE UNITED PROVINCES, AND 
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AND ENJOINING THE 
OBSERVANCE THEREOF. 

GEORGE R. 

Whereas Provisional Articles were signed at Paris, on the 
Thirtieth Day of November last, between Our Commissioner 
for treating of Peace with the Commissioners of the United 
States of America and the Commissioners of the said States, 
to be inserted in and to constitute the Treaty of Peace pro 
posed to be concluded between Us and the said United States, 
when Terms of Peace should be agreed upon between Us 
and his Most Christian Majesty: 1 And whereas Preliminaries 
for restoring Peace between Us and His Most Christian 
Majesty were signed at Versailles on the Twentieth Day of 
January last, by the Ministers of Us and the Most Christian 
King : And whereas Preliminaries for restoring Peace between 
Us and the King of Spain were also signed at Versailles on 
the Twentieth Day of January last, between the Ministers 
of Us and the King of Spain: And whereas, for putting an 
End to the Calamity of War as soon and as far as may be 
possible, it hath been agreed between Us, his Most Christian 
Majesty, the King of Spain, the States General of the United 
Provinces, and the United States of America, as follows; 
that is to say, 

That such Vessels and Effects as should be taken in the 
Channel and in the North Seas, after the Space of Twelve 
Days, to be computed from the Ratification of the said Pre 
liminary Articles, should be restored on all Sides; That the 

1 The text of the Provisional Articles of November 30, 1782, can be found 
in Treaties and Conventions (1889), p. 370. 



, February 14. 263 

Term should be One Month from the Channel and the North 
Seas as far as the Canary Islands inclusively, whether in the 
Ocean or in the Mediterranean; Two Months from the said 
Canary Islands as far as the Equinoctial Line or Equator; 
and lastly, Five Months in all other Parts of the World, 
without any Exception, or any other more particular Descrip 
tion of Time or Place. 

And whereas the Ratifications of the said Preliminary 
Articles between Us and the Most Christian King, in due 
Form, were exchanged by the Ministers of Us and of the 
Most Christian King, on the Third Day of this instant Feb 
ruary; and the Ratifications of the said Preliminary Articles 
between Us and the King of Spain were exchanged between 
the Ministers of Us and of the King of Spain, on the Ninth 
Day of this instant February; from which Days respectively 
the several Terms above-mentioned, of Twelve Days, of 
One Month, of Two Months, and of Five Months, are to be 
computed: And whereas it is Our Royal Will and Pleasure 
that the Cessation of Hostilities between Us and the States 
General of the United Provinces, and the United States of 
America, should be agreeable to the Epochs fixed between 
Us and the Most Christian King: 

We have thought fit, by and with the Advice of Our Privy 
Council, to notify the same to all Our loving Subjects; and 
We do declare, that Our Royal Will and Pleasure is, and We 
do hereby strictly charge and command all Our Officers, 
both at Sea and Land, and all other Our Subjects whatsoever, 
to forbear all Acts of Hostility, either by Sea or Land, against 
His Most Christian Majesty, the King of Spain, the States 
General of the United Provinces, and the United States of 
America, their Vassals or Subjects, from and after the re 
spective Times above-mentioned, and under the Penalty 
of incurring Our highest Displeasure. 

Given at Our Court at St. James s, the Fourteenth Day of 
February, in the Twenty-third Year of Our Reign, and in 
the Year of Our Lord One thousand seven hundred and 
eighty- three. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



264 Royal Proclamations. 

London: Printed by Charles Eyre and William Strahan, 
Printers to the King s most Excellent Majesty. 1783. 

i p. folio. Copies in P. C., and P. R. 0. Entered on Patent Rolls, 
and in Crown Office Docquet Book, vol. 12; entered in Privy Council Register, 
III Geo., vol. 21, p. 181. Printed in "London Gazette" February 15, 
1783, and in many of the American newspapers. Reprinted by James 
Rivington at. New York, 1783, as a broadside, a copy of which is in the 
N. Y. Public Library. There is also a lithographic facsimile in the Emmet 
Collection in the N. Y. Public Library. 



Index. 



Abercromy, Lt. Col. Duncan, appre 
hending of, 151. 

Africa, trade with forbidden, 120, 137. 

Algiers, 173, 180; treaty with, 129, 
172. 

Altamaha River, 213. 

Amazon River, 21, 22. 

America, emigration to, 80; 

allegiance required from, 94; 
officers continued, 135, 146, 159, 
174, 182, 210; 

new governments established, 212; 
rebellion in, 228, 230, 234, 236, 237, 
239, 241, 246, 247, 249, 250, 252, 
256, 257, 259, 260, 262. 

Angola, 121, 137. 

Anne, Queen, accession of, 159; 
death of, 174. 

Anticosti, Island of, 213. 

Apalachicola River, 213. 

Ashton, John, apprehending of, 152. 

Aylesbury, Thomas, Earl of, appre 
hending of, 151. 

Azores, 127. 

Bacon, Nathaniel, 130. 

Bacon s Rebellion, 130. 

Barbados, 71, 114, 117, 155. 

Barbary, 121, 137, 185. 

Barker, Christopher, printer, 106, 112, 

114, 115, 116, 119, 120, 123, 125, 

128, 130, 133. 
Barker, Robert, printer, 3, 4, 6, 8, 21, 

23, 26, 31, 32, 68, 71, 74, 75, 78, 

80, 82, 87, 88, 92, 93- 
Baskett, John, printer, 174, 176, 177, 

180, 182, 184, 189, 193. 
Baskett, Mark, printer, 218. 
Baskett, Robert, printer, 199, 201, 206, 

208, 218. 
Baskett, Thomas, printer, 199, 201, 

206, 208. 
Belasyse, Sir Henry, apprehending of, 

151- 

Lell Sound, 102. 
Bermudas, 117, 155; 

tobacco from, 19, 37, 42, 50, 54, 

56, 63, 69, 71, 82. 
Berry, Sir John, 132. 
Bill, Charles, printer, 142, 146, 150, 

152, 153, 155, 158, 161, 163, 167. 



Bill, John, printer, 8, 9, 12, 18, 21, 23, 
26, 31, 32, 35, 42, 50, 52, 55, 61, 
62, 68, 71, 74, 75, 78, 80, 82, 87, 
88, 92, 93, 106, 108, 112, 114, 115, 
116, 119, 120, 123, 125, 128, 130, 
133, 134, 136, 139- 

Biscainers, 5. 

Bona Esperanza, Cape de, 121, 137. 

Boston Harbor, 230. 

Brazil, North s expedition to, 21; 
tobacco from, 68. 

Buiny, 121, 137. 

Canada, 207, 208. 

Canary Islands, 173, 180, 184, 263. 

Cape Breton, 213. 

Caribbee Islands, 82, 117, 148. 

Carolina, 117. 

Chaleurs, Bay of, 212. 

Champlain, Lake, 212. 

Charles II., death of, 135. 

Chattahoochee River, 213. 

Cherie, Sir Francis, 102. 

Cherie Island, 100-103. 

Coin, rates of foreign, in America, 161; 

copper coinage in Virginia, 226. 
Connecticut, trade with, prohibited, 

230. 
Criminals, to be banished to Virginia, 

7- 
Currency, in America, 161; in Virginia, 

226. 

Darien, colony at, 153. 

Delaware, trade with, prohibited, 230. 

Delaware River, 133. 

Dichfield, Edward, 41. 

Dominica, 213, 218. 

Dudingston, Lieut. William, 224. 

East Florida, government of, estab 
lished, 212. 

Eden, Philip, 16. 

Elliot, Edmund, apprehending of, 151. 

Ely, Bishop of. See Turner, Francis. 

Emigration to America, 80, 87. 

Every, Henry, 158. 

Eyre, Charles, printer, 229, 234, 235, 
239, 246, 248, 250, 257, 258, 260, 
261, 264. 



265 



266 



Index. 



Fast day, for rebellion in America, 234, 
236, 237, 239, 246, 247, 249, 250, 
256, 257, 259, 260. 

Field, John, printer, 100, 104. 

Fleet, Thomas, printer, 199. 

Flint River, 213. 

Florida, Gulf of, 213. 

France, declaration of war against, 

147, 196, 203; 
progress of war with, 207, 208. 

Gaspee, burning of, 224. 

George I., accession of, 175; death of, 

182. 
George II., accession of, 182; death of, 

211. 

George III., accession of, 210. 
Georgia, 213; 

officers in, continued, 201; 
charter surrendered, 203; 
trade with, prohibited, 230. 
Goffe, William, apprehending of, 104. 
Goodson, William, 97. 
Goring, Lord, 92. 

Graham, James, apprehending of, 152. 
Graham, Richard, Viscount Preston, 

apprehending of, 151, 152. 
Grenada, government of, established, 

212; colonizing of, 218. 
Grenada, Island of, 213. 
Grenadines, 213, 218. 
Greenland, importing of whale-fins 

from, 4, 10, 78, 100. 
Guiana, expedition to, 8, 21. 
Guinea, 121, 137, 173, 180, 184. 

Hales, Sir Edward, apprehending of, 

IS 1 - 

Hamilton, Sir Robert, apprehending 

of, 151. 
Havana, 124. 

Hellen, Philip (alias Fitzgerald), 124. 
Hills, George, printer, 184. 
Hills, Henry, printer, 100, 104, 134, 

136, 139, 142, 146, 172, 174, 176, 

177, 180, 182, 188. 
Hispaniola, 96. 
Holland, relations with England, 252; 

treaty with United States, 253. 
Holmes, Sir Robert, 140. 
Horn Sound, 102. 
Rowland, John, 226. 
Hudson s Bay, 143, 148. 
Hudson s Bay Company, 143, 216. 
Hudson s Straits, 143, 213. 

Isle Roy ale, 213. 

Jamaica, 117, 125, 155, 200; 

encouraging settling in, 96, 112. 



James II., accession of, 136. 
James City, 132. 
Jeffreys, Herbert, 132. 

King James s Newland, 5. 

Labrador, 213. 

Langdale, Marmaduke, apprehending 

of, 151. 

Leake, Jasper, 16. 
Leeward Islands, 116, 155. 
Litchfield, Edward Henry, Earl of, 

apprehending of, 151. 
Lloyd, Capt. David, apprehending of, 

151- 
Louns, Lawrence, 93. 

Madeira, 127. 

Magdalen Islands, 213. 

Mary II., accession of, 146. 

Maryland, 155; 

trade with, prohibited, 230. 

Massachusetts, 156; 

trade with, prohibited, 230. 

Maurepas, Lake, 213. 

Mexico, 163. 

Mexico, Gulf of, 213. 

Minorca, Island of, 205. 

Mississippi River, 213. 

Montague, John, 224. 

Montgomery, William, Lord, appre 
hending of, 151. 

Morison, Francis, 132. 

Muscovy Company, 5, 10, 78, 100. 

Narragansett River, 224. 

Navigation Act, 114, 119, 126, 128, 

186. 

New Castle, 133. 
New England, 53, 171; 
disorderly trading to, 33, 66; 
Council for, 34; 
emigration to, 8 1, 87; 
fisheries of, 126. 

New Hampshire, trade with, pro 
hibited, 230. 
New Jersey, trade with, prohibited, 

230. 
New York, 148, 155; 

trade with, prohibited, 230. 
Newcomb, Thomas, printer, 134, 136, 
139, 142, 146, 150, 152, 153, 155, 
158, 161, 163, 167, 172, 174, 176, 
177, 180, 182. 

Newfoundland, 148, 156, 213; 
vagabonds to be banished to, 2 ; 
fisheries of, 127, 163. 
Newport, 226. 
Nichols, Francis, 16. 



Index. 



267 



Nipissing, Lake, 212. 

Norris, Thomas, printer, 184. 

North, Roger, expedition to Brazil, 21. 

North Carolina, trade with, pro 
hibited, 230. 

Norton, Bonham, printer, 8, 9, 12, 18, 
35, 42, 50, 52, 55, 61, 62. 

Nova Scotia, 203, 213. 

Oglethorpe, Sir Theophilus, appre 
hending of, 151. 
Ohio River, 204. 
Oreliana River, 21. 
Oyapok River, 21. 

Palmer, Roger, Earl of Castlemaine, 

apprehending of, 151. 
Parker, James, printer, 206. 
Passes for Mediterranean trade, 129, 

172, 180, 184. 

Penn, Sir William, 97, 133. 
Penn, William, grant of Pennsylvania, 

*33; 

apprehending of, 151, 152. 
Pennsylvania, charter of, 133; 

trade with, prohibited, 230. 
Piracy, 140, 155, 176, 178. 
Pontchartrain, Lake, 213. 
Post Office, establishing of, 167. 
Privateering, 188, 189, 193, 195, 200. 
Prize money, distribution of, 189, 193, 

195, 200, 230, 241. 

Providence River, 224. 

Quebec, capture of, 207, 208; 
government of, established, 212. 

Raleigh, Sir Walter, censured by king, 
8. 

Rhode Island, 224; 

trade with, prohibited, 230. 

Richardson, Lt. Col. William, appre 
hending of, 151. 

Rivington, James, printer, 264. 

Rosieres, Cape, 213. 

Royal African Company, 121, 137. 

Rutter, Edward, apprehending of, 151. 

Sackville, Col. Edward, apprehending 

of, 151. 

St. Christopher, Island of, 71, 116. 
St. Eustatius, 253. 
St. John Lake, 212. 
St. John River, 212, 213. 
St. Lawrence, Gulf of, 213. 
St. Lawrence River, 212. 
St. Mary s River, 213. 
St. Thomas, 8, 9. 



St. Vincent, Island of, 213, 218. 

Sallee, Port of, 121, 137. 

Soaper, Maj. Thomas, apprehending 

of, 151. 

Fomers Islands. See Bermudas. 
South Carolina, trade with, prohibited, 

230. 

South wick, Solomon, printer, 226. 
Spain, war with, 188, 190, 194, 195, 

197. 

Spitzbergen, 5, 10, 78, 102. 
Stamp, Martin, 124. 
Stamp, Timothy, 124. 
Strahan, William, printer, 229, 234, 

235, 239, 246, 248, 250, 257, 258, 

260, 261, 264. 

Texel, Island of, 253. 

Thanksgiving for defeat of France, 

207, 208. 
Thorold, Sir Robert, apprehending of, 

151- 
Tobacco, a new trade, 13; 

abuse of, 13, 18, 27, 35, 68, 71, 83; 

inspecting of, 15, 29, 38, 59, 61, 70; 

planting in England forbidden, 18, 

2 7, 3 6 , 5i, 5 6 , 63, 69, 77, 84, 91, 

106; 

importing of, 27, 37, 43, 50, 55, 62, 

68, 76, 85, 91; 
encouraged in the plantations, 35, 

42; 

retailing of, 71, 74, 88, 92. 
Tobacco-pipes, manufacture of, 12, 24. 
Tobago, Island of, 213, 218. 
Trade. See Navigation Act. 
Transporting of vagabonds, i, 2, 7, 109. 
Treaty of 1783, 262. 
Tripoli, treaty with, 129. 
Tunis, treaty with, 129. 
Turner, Francis, Bp. of Ely, appre 
hending of, 152. 

United States of America, 253, 262. 

Vagabonds, to be banished to America, 

i, 7, 109. 
Venezuela, 8. 

Versailles, treaty of 1783, 262. 
Virginia, 34, 117, 155; 

criminals to be banished to, 7 ; 

tobacco from, 19, 37, 42, 50, 54, 56, 
56, 63, 69, 71, 82; 

lotteries in, 31; 

government of, 52; 

rebellion in, 130; 

copper coinage in, 226; 

trade with, prohibited, 230, 



268 



Index. 



Virginia Company, 31, 52. 
Wanton, Gov. Joseph, 226. 
Warwick, Robert, Earl of, 94. 
West Florida, government of, estab 
lished, 212. 
West Indies, 112, 129, 140, 158, 168, 

194, 197, 203, 204, 219, 253; 
vagabonds to be banished to, 2; 
conquest of, 96; 
pirates in, 176, 178. 
Weston, Thomas, colony at Weymouth, 
34- 



Weymouth, 34. 

Whale-fins, importing of, 4, 10, 78, 100. 

Whalley, Edward, apprehension of, 

104. 

Wheeler, Sir Charles, 116. . 
William III, accession of, 146; 

death of, 159. 

Windsor, Thomas, Lord, 114. 
Wolstenholme, Sir John, 57. 
Women and children, license for 

transporting of, 3. 



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