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Full text of "Royal purple"

ROYA? PURPLE 

I 9 i 6 




Copyright 
19Z6 

G.S.ffohn^ 
R.J\t/oh n son 
<Jlc/ricmDcttton 

free/surer. 




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mDHP 1 ' ^hhihk 






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ROYAL PURPLE 



Published by zhe O^riior C^lass 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

at citannailan 









c. 



DEDICATION 



To Clarence £ /feid. The able scholar, the inspiring teacher the 
progresswe educator, uhmt fine personality and uhose deep de- 
votion to the welfare of his students and the service of the 
Kansas State /Joricultun/l (blleoe uitt atuavs remain uith us. 






ARENCEE.REID 

T i s * not < the > whole < of^ 

I i i^e * to * /ive rx o v 

all * of 'death* to 'die *-^ 





To record in cndurino form the act- 
ivities and achievements during the yedtrdt 
/[ansas State and to preserve for the future 
intiaidte memories of the glorious yedrl9ff$ 






ONlfENTS 

],J/dmwisirdtion I. Cl<* $ s c s 

J C amp v s 4.<Jthletics 

5 Vanity Fair 6Ji it it dry 

JOrddinzdiions d.Wheat Straus 



LET THERE BE IN AMERICA 

By H. W. Davis 

"Let there be in America 

A Beauty from the soil, 

A Truth from meadows and fields of grain. 

"In city populous and cramped. 
In town upstart and city-tending. 
Man lives with man, 
And works and plays with man-made 

things, 
And thinks by man-made creeds. 
Man — at every turn — 
Finds only man 
And puny works of man. 

"In field and grove and stream. 
On farmland, wasteland, prairie, 
Man meets not man so much as God, 
And learns to know and reverence 
Whole-heartedly God's law. 
Not onlv sustenance. 
But peace and faith, 
Come from the field. 

"Let there come of America 
A Beauty born of the soil, 
A Truth upsprung from meadows and green 
fields." 



ENGRAVINGS BY 

Burg er-Baird Engraving Co. 

GRAPHIC ARTS B L D — KANSAS CITY.MO 

PRINTING, BINDING AND COVERS BY 

The Hugh Stephens Press 




<zA ^Bit of Wilderness- 
by a Qampus Walk 




What the Engineers See- 
the Old and U^(ew in 
Smokestacks 







u 0?i a mountain higti' 
— the magic letter 








J *.y 









ivf JPeafy 'Bower of 

^Beauty — with the "Tower 

of Fa ire hi hi 







The silvery ripples 
the Wildcat 



'p-p-ie symbol 




^A good road to school- 
and a beautiful one 




Qampus paths- 



and the grandest of 
campus trees 




^An old barrier - 

to guard majestic beauty 




Si 

■ 






ADMINIS1 



3 ° °^ 

O m 




President F. D. Farrell 

EVER since it was founded in 1863 the Kansas State Agricultural College has been helping 
to establish an educational ideal. The ideal still is comparatively new. It is based upon 
the conviction that the common things are the great things and that labor and culture are not 
incompatible. It is an ideal that can be reached through good scholarship and intelligent labor. 
Those who believe in it esteem people for what they are and not for what they possess or for their 
method of gaining a livelihood, so long as it is an honest method. The College exists for the 
benefit of the people who help to do the world's work. Its aim is to help them to learn to work 
effectively and to live happily. 

The graduates of the College number nearly seven thousand. Those who have attended the 
College but have not been graduated, number several thousand more. These people are demon- 
strating both the soundness of the ideal to which the College is committed and the effective- 
ness of the work the College is doing in promoting that ideal. In virtually every state in the 
Union and in many foreign countries these graduates and other former students are applying their 
college training as engineers, home-makers, veterinarians, bankers, architects, merchants, and in 
many other capacities. The College is proud of their records as men and women, as citizens, 
and as useful and productive workers. 

Page 25 



-'a 



The Board 






W. Y. Morgan 
Hutchinson 

C. M. Harger 
Abilene 

C. B. Merriam 
Topeka 

Earle W. Evans 

Wichita 

Mrs. James Patrick 
Satanta 

B. C. Culp 
Beloit 

W. E. Ireland 

Yates Center 

M. G. Vincent 
Kansas City 

C. W. Spencer 
Seda n 




of Regents 



mm 





Page 26 



Registrar 



WELL-WORN stone steps, flanked on either 
side by masses of evergreens and overshad- 
owed by a drapery of bitter-sweet and ivy, which 
have left their delicate tracery on the tower above 
— this is the approach to the portal of Kansas 
State Agricultural College. 

Since Commencement in June, 1927, thirty- 
eight hundred and seventy-seven students have 
passed through this portal on their way to a larger 
life and opportunity. 

First, there came the summer-session students, 
numbering nine hundred fifty-four graduate stu- 
dents, teachers from Kansas schoolrooms and 
students from her own classrooms ready to plunge 
again into college work that would bring them the 
rewards they seek. 

Then, when the bitter-sweet berries w T ere 
scarlet and the grapes of the ivy hung purple, the 
regular student body came. Thirty-two hundred 
eighty — bright-faced young freshmen, care-free 
sophomores, serious-minded juniors, seniors weighted 
down with the responsibility of meeting the last 



,«s 




• -■-" -\~ 




Jessie MacDowell Machik 
Registrar 

requirements for that coveted degree, and graduated students eager for re- 
search — all have trooped through the wide doorways of the college this year. 

Four hundred eighty-nine students of agriculture, twelve hundred seven 
pursuing various curricula in general science, nine hundred sixty-seven students 
of engineering, five hundred forty students of home economics, and seventy- 
seven students in veterinary medicine made up the thirty-two hundred eighty 
enrolled for the regular session. 

The combined enrollment of summer session and regular session was 
forty-two hundred thirty-four, but three hundred fifty-seven w r ere more 
ambitious than the rest and attended both sessions, and even though some of 
them may have had "dual personalities," they could only count as one, which 
gives a net enrollment of thirty-eight hundred seventy-seven for the vear 
1927-1928. 

This familiar doorway, hung with scarlet and purple, will swing open 
hospitably for the return of many of these hundreds of students next autumn, 
and only the Class of 1928 will miss its welcome — may other portals hung 
with the scarlet and purple of happiness, success, and prosperity open before 
these young men and women who bear the banner of 1928. 




Page 27 









Dean J. T. Willard 



The Division of General 
Science 

UST a few years ago in the history of Kansas 
State Agricultural College, all students took 
the same course of study, with such modifications 
as were necessary due to difference of sex. About 
the dawn of the present century the movement for 
specialization reached the institution, and the 
various technical curricula began to be set off, 
and the basic course, from which the new curricula 
had branched off, came to be distinguished as the 
General Science course. The process of specializa- 
tion continued and eventually the General Science 
course became differentiated into several more or 
less closely related courses which are administered 
by the Division of General Science. 

Within this Division there are now twelve 
distinct curricula, one of which retains the old name 
of General Science. This curriculum, of all those 
offered at the college, most nearly resembles the Liberal Arts and Science curricula of other col- 
leges and universities and, with little or no modification, could be made to lead to the A. B. 
degree. 

The General Science Division is the only one of the five divisions of the college with which 
every student comes in touch because all the technical curricula rest upon the foundation work 
in English, Mathematics, History, Science, Economics, Modern Languages, etc., all of which 
departments are in this Division. So, in addition to the fact that the enrollment in this division 
is larger by several hundred than that of any other division, the teachers of the General Science 
Division, numbering more than one hundred and seventy, have enrolled in their classes at some 
time all the students of the other divisions also. This explains why the number of teachers 
grouped in this division is greater than that in all the other divisions combined. 














Page 28 



The Division of General Science 



I II I II 




A QUESTION frequently and very properly asked is "What 
does graduation from the General Science Division lead 
to?" The answers must be at least as varied as are the different 
curricula offered in the division, but in general the basic courses 
introduce the student to the best thought and the greatest 
achievements of humanity in the fields of physical, biological, 
and social science, and in those studies that are designated as 
cultural, such as music, art, and literature. One who has properly 
completed such a curriculum sees all civilization in true perspec- 
tive and is equipped to live on a higher plane and to enjoy and 
appreciate the finer things of life as he could not have been with- 
out such training. 

The wide elective privileges of the curricula in this division 
offer the students opportunities to specialize in any of the fields 
that appeal to their interests. Many take the necessary sub- 
jects that prepare them to enter the teaching profession. Those 
who take the work in Commerce have the equipment with 
which to begin business careers for themselves or to enter the 
employ of some of the greatest business corporations. Each year 

representatives of large concerns interview seniors in Commerce and place some of them in 
personnel and office positions. 

Many students become interested in scientific research and go on to other institutions to do 
graduate work, or take up research in commercial laboratories where their success attests the 
high character of their basic training. Others use their college training as the foundation for 
professional study in medicine, pharmacy, law, dentistry, etc. The curriculum in Industrial 
Journalism sends its quota of graduates to good newspapers and magazine positions. Music 
graduates who do not care to teach begin their professional careers, and Industrial Chemists find 
ready employment in the manufacturing world. 

The educated person will find or make for himself a worthy place in the world, and it is the 
chief purpose of the General Science Division to educate young people by developing latent abili- 
ties, revealing lines of opportunity, enlarging visions and stimulating high purposes, to the end 
that its graduates may be prepared to live useful lives of leadership in whatever special calling 
they may enter. 



C. W. CORRELL 

Assistant Dean 




Page 29 




The Division of Agriculture 



By Dean L. E. Call 

/T^vNE of the chief objectives of a college education 
^S is the development of qualities of leadership. 
There is ample evidence that college-trained men and 
women more frequently become leaders than do those 
who have not had the advantages of such training. 
Only about one man in 100 in America has had a 
college education, but this very small part of the 
population fills more than one-half of the positions 
of great responsibility. 

In no industrial enterprise is an educated leader- 
ship more essential for the welfare of society than in 
agriculture. This leadership is needed both on the 
farm and among business men who serve the farmer. 
The Agricultural College in offering training for agri- 
cultural leadership has, therefore, a twofold obligation 
to provide training for both of these groups of future 
citizens. To meet this twofold obligation, four-year 
curricula are offered by the college in agriculture, agricultural administration, and in agriculture 
with special training for landscape gardening. A combined curriculum of six years is also offered 
in animal husbandry and veterinary medicine. 

The four-year curriculum in agriculture is designed primarily to meet the demand for training 
of the student who expects to return to the farm. The American farmer today needs not only the 
skill which comes from the training of the mind in the sciences underlying production practices, 
but he needs also thorough training in the business aspects of his profession and in the inter- 
relationship that exists between farmers and between farmers and other groups of society. The 
curriculum in agriculture is designed to provide such training. 

The curriculum in agriculture trains not only for the farm, but the student who completes 
this course of study will have had the basic training necessary for many lines of specialized agri- 
cultural work. The demand for men thus trained is constantly increasing and many positions 
offer attractive opportunities for men who by nature and training are adapted to the work. The 
United States Department of Agriculture, the state colleges, the state departments of agriculture, 
high schools, private institutions' of secondary and college rank, and many commercial concerns 
are demanding men with such training. 



L. E. Call, Dean 




Page 30 



The Division of Agriculture 




THE curriculum in agricultural administration, which was 
first offered during the present school year, is a new course 
of study planned to meet the needs of students preparing for 
work in the industries that serve agriculture in which basic 
training in both agriculture and business is desirable. Among 
such occupations and industries are rural banking, milling, de- 
velopment and sale of land, the hardware and implement busi- 
ness, farm livestock and crop insurance, agricultural writing, and 
the teaching of vocational agriculture. 

The value of boyhood training on the farm for a business 
career has long been recognized. The habits of industry, self- 
reliance, and thrift learned so well on the farm in the boyhood 
days furnish an ideal foundation upon which to build a business 
career. In the past such a preparation was about all that was 
necessary. Modern business today, however, is more exacting. 
It is demanding more highly educated men to fill responsible 
administrative positions. Such positions are going to the college- 
trained man. The demand, however, for men with both experi- 
ence and a knowledge of agricultural practice is just as great as formerly, providing such experience 
and knowledge is combined with a thorough education and satisfactory business training. The 
curriculum in agricultural administration provides an opportunity to secure at one time a thorough 
well-grounded education and a knowledge of agriculture and business methods. 

The curriculum in agriculture with special reference to landscape gardening and the com- 
bined curriculum in animal husbandry and veterinary medicine are designed to give special 
training to students desiring to engage in these responsible fields. 

The industries of Kansas have developed greatly during the past score of years, and will 
continue to do so in the future, but farming must ever remain the most important among them. 
As the population of the world continues to increase so much the vast expanse of fertile, rolling 
prairie that is Kansas increases in productivity to supply food and raiment to the world. 

Kansas has been fortunate in her heritage. Her Kaw valley may be compared in richness 
and productivity to the Nile valley of the eastern world. Her grasslands produce some of the 
world's best cattle, and her plains the world's best wheat. 



Hugh Durham 

Assistant Dean 




: *W!«Wg»,. ... . 

' ' '"' : '" " : "" "" . . ■ ■-■ 




,.. 







I 



■'■'- ' 




Page 31 



The Division of Engineering 

ENGINEERING plays an exceedingly prominent 
part in the modern life. Most of the conveni- 
ences and luxuries of our civilization are the direct 
result of engineering effort. The work of the engineer 
is chiefly to utilize for the benefit of mankind the 
forces, materials, and phenomena of nature. Each 
new discovery of the physicist and the chemist, and 
each new practical application of physical and chemi- 
cal phenomena presents new opportunities or further 
extension of the field of service of the engineer, so 
that his work is constantly broadening and expanding, 
and the number of men required to carry on the 
engineering activities of the country is constantly 



College education has become the normal first 
step to professional engineering standing, although 
some men still attain to the status through self- 
education. Forty years ago less than one-fourth of 
the members of the national engineering societies were college graduates. Now more than two- 
thirds of those entering their membership hold college degrees and more than four-fifths have had 
a substantial amount of college training. 

Engineering education at K. S. A. C. has had a remarkable growth in recent years. Nearly 
twice as many engineering students are enrolled at K. S. A. C. as at any other school in Kansas, 
and the number is exceeded in only two schools between the Mississippi River and the Pacific 
Coast States. 

The growth of engineering training at K. S. A. C. since 1920 has been greater than at any 
other school in the United States, so far as it has been possible to learn. The extent of this growth 

is shown in following table: 

Engineering Enrollment at 
Year K. S. A. C. 




Dean R. A. Seaton 



1919-20 
1920-21 
1921-22 
1922-23 
1923-24 
1924-25 
1925-26 
1920-27 



556 
646 
753 
756 
840 
893 
972 
1,019 




Page 32 



Division of Engineering 

THE Engineering Division now is second in the College in 
number of students, being exceeded only by the Division oi 
General Science. About two-fifths of all the men in College are 
enrolled in this division. 

Notwithstanding the rapid increase in the numbers, no 
difficulty has been found in placing all K. S. A. C. engineering 
graduates in attractive positions, with favorable opportunities 
for further development of their abilities and for advancement 
in salaries and responsibilities. 

Engineering graduates of K. S. A. C. now occupy highly 
responsible positions in many of the leading industrial concerns 
in this and other countries. Each year many companies send 
their representatives to the College for the purpose of employing 
our Senior students for work in their companies after graduation. 

Four-year curricula in engineering and architecture, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, are given in the 
Division of Engineering as follows: 




Professor M. A. Durland 

Assistant Dean 



Agricultural Engineering 
Architectural Engineering 
Architecture 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 



Electrical Engineering 
Flour Mill Engineering 
Landscape Architecture 
Mechanical Engineering 



The Engineering Experiment Station of the Kansas State Agricultural College is maintained 
to carry on tests and research work of engineering and manufacturing value to Kansas, and to 
collect, prepare and present technical information in a form available for use by the people and 
the industries of the state. The road materials laboratories make all tests of materials for use on 
the roads of the state, co-operating with the State Highway Engineer. Tests of lubricating oils 
used by all the state institutions are also made in the experiment station, co-operating with the 
State Business Manager. 

Twenty-one bulletins have been issued by the Engineering Experiment Station, and about 
thirty research projects are being actively prosecuted. 




..-*$! FF 



f 






■ ! 



Page 33 




The Division of Home 
Economics 

HOME ECONOMICS at the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College celebrates its fifty-fifth birth- 
day in this year, 1928. From a small beginning in 
the Bluemont Central College it has been variously 
housed as its work expanded and for the twenty 
years since 1908, its activities have been centered in 
Calvin Hall. An unwritten rule of the Division of 
Home Economics is that all that it has in either space 
or equipment must be used by one department or 
another or it shall be passed on to one who will use it. 
Such a rule stimulates use and from ground floor to 
roof of Calvin Hall it is difficult to find space enough 
for needs as they arise. 

The curricula of the Division are administered 
by six departments having a staff of 26 full time in- 
structors and 11 graduate assistants. The 500 
students enrolled are majoring in Home Economics, 
this year's graduating class numbering 100. To give 
these students with their many interests and varying capabilities that which will serve them best 
and make them happiest is the constant aim of the Division. A degree is a definite goal, but it 
fails if it represents only hours of college credit, but with this there should be trained abilities 
that will be able to meet new situations and find joy and stimulation in the real problems of living. 
In the department of food economics and nutrition some new courses are being offered. One 
of these is an applied nutrition course open to those who are not enrolled in home economics, a 
course in which men students would find much of interest. The research problems in the vitamin 
content of foods and the utilization of calcium are being extended further. 

The department of clothing and textiles has carried on some important research on the rela- 
tion of bacteria to fabrics. The Purnell project on the protection afforded by fabrics in still and 
moving air is to be completed this year. It is important to note that this is the only college in 
which accredited research in clothing is in progress at present. 

The department of institutional economics is in its second year as a separate department and 
the twenty-five students majoring in this department give evidence of its growth. Many other 
students choose electives in this department, especially those who plan to teach in high schools 
to whom the course in quantity cookery is invaluable if there is a cafeteria in the high school to 
which the student goes, or the possibility of establishing one. 



Dean Margaret Justin 




Page 34 



3z 



Division of Home Economics 

VAN ZILE HALL, the women's dormitory, is filled to capac- 
ity in its second year. The comfortable living conditions 
and excellent food are equal or superior to any others in Man- 
hattan. To live in a harmoniously decorated building is an edu- 
cation in itself. 

The Ellen H. Richards Lodge houses successive groups of six 
girls for a period of four weeks so that some fifty girls have the 
excellent training offered by the practice house during the year. 

The department of child welfare and eugenics, newly 
organized this year, is the sixth department within the Division. 
Health, family relationships and the welfare of children are 
especially important for those who are to be home-makers or as 
a basis for advanced work leading to a position in this field. 
The nursery school is of increasing interest. Two groups of 
children are cared for: One comprised of those from eighteen 
months to three years, the other and older group of three to four 

years. More space has been added to that first used and the sunny rooms with ultra-violet 
coming through the vita-glass in the windows give pleasure and health to the children. 




light 



The development of graduate work in the division is of special importance since the passage 
of the Purnell Act approving Federal aid for research in the land grant colleges. Nearly every 
state has set up projects and there is a demand for trained workers. The work in Home Eco- 
nomics at the college in its growth through the years and in its staff and equipment is looked to 
to supply many such workers, even more than in the past. 

Ellen H. Richards was one who first saw clearly that subject-matter such as that now taught 
as "Home Economics" could be organized and taken out of the haphazard class of being trans- 
mitted only from one worker to another. She said that the prosperity of a nation depends on the 
health and morals of its citizens; and the health and morals of a people depend mainly on the food 
they eat and the homes they live in. 

Kadzie hall, the first college buliding in the United States to be used exclusively for Home 
Economics instruction, was built in 1897. The present Home Economics building, now known 
as Calvin hall, was erected in 1908, and the college Cafeteria in 1921. Ellen Richards lodge, 
used as a practice house for students in household economics courses, is located off the campus. 



■+*'jTte2msum 









Page 35 













Dean R. R. Dykstka 



Division of Veterinary 
Medicine 

IN THE Kansas State Agricultural College th e 
following curricula in veterinary medicine alone 
or veterinary medicine in combination with other 
curricula are offered: 

I. 

The regular four-year curriculum in veterinary 
medicine, in which after the successful completion 
of the various courses the degree of Doctor of Veter- 
inary Medicine is conferred. This is the curriculum 
selected by most of the students interested in veter- 
inary medicine and entitles graduates to recognition 
by the state and federal bodies. 

II. 

A combination curriculum in veterinary medicine 
and animal husbandry. In this the student enrolls 
in the Division of Veterinary Medicine, and in two 
additional years may be eligible for the degree Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. This combination 
curriculum is very popular with those interested in the raising of livestock. It not only prepares 
the candidate for a wide knowledge of conditions as they affect livestock, but places him in 
position to maintain them in the best of health. 

III. 

A combination curriculum in general science and veterinary medicine in which the prospective 
student enrolls in general science and at the end of four years, by a certain combination of general 
science and veterinary medicine courses, he may be entitled to the degree Bachelor of Science. 
Following this, an enrollment is taken out in veterinary medicine, and the curriculum in the latter 
may be completed in two additional years. This combination curriculum was formulated for 
those wishing a broader knowledge of general scientific and cultural courses in addition to a 
knowledge of veterinary medicine, so that they may be more thoroughly prepared for responsible 
research and teaching positions. This is an unusually valuable combination and is bound to grow 
in popularity. 

Taken as a whole, the Division of Veterinary Medicine in the Kansas State Agricultural Col- 
lege continues to enjoy the enviable position of being one of the leading American Veterinary 
schools. It has received this distinction because of its physical equipment, its excellent faculty, 
and because it is located in the very center of a livestock producing region. The demand for its 
graduates continues to exceed the supply. 




Page 16 




The Division of Veterinary Medicine 

NO VETERINARY school in America has physical equip- 
ment excelling that of K. S. A. C. Its buildings and 
laboratories are new and fully equipped with modern appliances 
necessary for successful teaching. The veterinary hospital, 
erected at a cost of $100,000, is a model of its kind, and in it 
large numbers of animal patients are treated every year. 

The teaching staff is unique amongst veterinary faculties 
in that its members are graduates from a large number of different 
colleges. There is no "inbreeding" in the K. S. A. C. veterinary 
faculty. All members have had extensive teaching, research, 
and practical experience. 

Demands for veterinarians are constantly increasing. The 
livestock of the country is improving, and there are immense 
herds of purebred domesticated animals. The total value of 
livestock in the United States is more than eight billion dollars. 
Veterinarians are also employed by cities, counties and states, 
as well as by the federal government for inspection of human food 
products of animal origin, and regulation of animal diseases. 

Not more than 125 new veterinarians are graduated every year, which is less than the number 
being lost through death and retirement. It is therefore perfectly evident that with increasing 
numbers of livestock and decreasing numbers in the veterinary ranks, there is no lack of employ- 
ment for those entering this vocation. 

Veterinary education in the United States has advanced with rapid strides. Originally a 
trade, it is now a science with a foundation as broad and thorough as any of the learned profes- 
sions, and has attracted to its ranks many of the best of the high school graduates. 

Like human medicine, the teaching of veterinary medicine is carried on entirely at public 
expense, the various states recognizing that prosperous agriculture depends to a great extent on 
healthy livestock. 

The first degree in veterinary medicine conferred by K. S. A. C. was given in 1907. From 
then until the school year 1925-26 there were 268 degrees granted. 

The importance of veterinary medicine to Kansas is recognized by the organization of the 
K. S. A. C. instruction in that subject as a separate division of the college. Unlimited opportunity 
for the gaining of practical knowledge in connection with the theoretical work is offered through 
the veterinary clinic, which draws a great number of cases from the farming country surrounding 
Manhattan, and from the rest of the state as well. 




Page 37 



In the Veterinary Hospital 



















Dean Edwin L. Holton 



The Division of Summer 
School 

SUMMER instruction at K. S. A. C. first was 
offered in 1904, when 17 students took advantage 
of the facilities thus made available. Enrollment has 
increased from that number of nearly a thousand, 
with 337 courses offered in 1928 in graduate and under- 
graduate work. 

For the past three summers, a special session has 
been held for the teachers of Vocational Agriculture 
and for superintendents and principals. This session 
is being offered in the 1928 Summer School during 
the month of July. 

The chief purpose of the Summer School is to 
provide opportunities for study on the part of those 
who can not make use of the regular sessions. Teach- 
ers and professional people are thus given the privilege 
of advanced study during the summer months, and 
students who desire to study eleven months out of the 
year instead of nine, are encouraged to stay for the 
session. 



The percentage of graduate students in Summer School is much greater than during the 
regular semesters, and conditions are very favorable for good scholastic work. Courses are offered 
in all departments of the college. A maximum of nine credit hours may be carried during the 
two months. Special lectures, conferences, special courses for teachers, for coaches, and for com- 
munity leaders are offered in addition to the usual social affairs; are made a part of the summer 
school. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The facilities for the Summer Session include the entire plant of the Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College, consisting of laboratories, shops, farms, libraries, and experiment stations. The 
material and equipment is in keeping with the wealth and dignity of the state. The College 
campus occupies a commanding and attractive site upon an elevation adjoining the western limits < 
of the city of Manhattan, with street-car service into town and to the railway stations. 

The College campus contains 147 acres of rolling land, adorned with flowers, shrubbery and 
trees. It is a delightful place in which to work and is most satisfactory for recreation. On the 
campus is an extensive array of tennis courts, hockey grounds, baseball fields, and other spaces for 
athletic sports. 

The College owns 1,399 acres of land at Manhattan. This land is the site of the College 
farms and agricultural experimental work. In addition there are the laboratories of the engineering 
plant, and all this equipment is fully at the disposal of the Summer School students. There 
is no larger or better equipped plant devoted to the teaching of arts and sciences than may be 
found in the Kansas State Agricultural College. 




Page 38 




Division of Extension 

THOSE who are fortunate enough to have the 
advantages of a higher education are obligated to 
the general public which has made it possible for them 
to secure these advantages. This is particularly true 
of those who attend the Agricultural college, an insti- 
tution supported almost wholly by the general public. 

That this obligation which one owes is realized 
by those among whom he goes to live is indicated 
invariably by that attitude wherein those who return 
from these institutions are generally expected at once 
to assume minor responsibilities of leadership in 
community activities. 

Leadership determines the standards of any 
community. Without leadership the community lacks 
both ideals and purpose; it does not establish up-to- 
date schools and churches, nor does it contribute up- 
to-date standards of individual citizenship. One of 
the most important functions of the Extension 

Service is not only to carry new ideas to the farm and to the home, but to assist those who should 
be in a position to fulfill their responsibilities in leadership. While it is generally recognized 
that progressive practices increase the financial returns to the individual and to the community 
in general, yet, this is not the end. If profit does not produce better communities in which may 
be produced the best characteristics of American citizenship, it fails to produce its largest return. 
Increases in financial returns enable communities better to build those things which promote a 
better life. These cannot be attained, however, without leadership which inspires higher ideals 
and which insures effective accomplishment of these purposes. 

Consequently the Kansas State Agricultural College, through the Extension Service, should 
expect that those individuals who have derived benefit by attendance here are those who will 
realize their obligation and will establish their leadership through which the institution may 
express higher ideals in individual and community life. 

In co-operation with these leaders the extension service is accomplishing a definite program 
of organization whereby these communities may study their problems and intelligently apply 
available facts to their solution. In Kansas last year there were more than 800 communities so 
organized, and which served not only the purpose of applying knowledge to the economic phases 
of production, but to the social needs of the community as well. 



Dean Harry Umber ger 




Dean of Women 

THE position of Dean of Women is based on the 
ideal for students of the highest physical, intel- 
lectual, social, moral, and spiritual development. 
The objective of the Dean of Women is thru co- 
operation with the various campus and community 
agencies to contribute to the realization of this ideal. 
Her problems of living conditions, of student employ- 
ment, of vocational guidance, of student discipline, 
of social and religious life and of the extra curricular 
activities are but the different aspects of this objective. 

The problems of living conditions, of health, of 
social life, of employment, and of vocational guidance 
are her special concern. She serves on committees, 
secures employment for self-supporting students, 
recommends students for loans, supervises the living 
arrangements for women students. She sponsors 
special talks for students, Big Sister programs, house 
mothers' meetings, personal and group interviews, 
and social events. She fosters in the students the president's ideals for the college and presents 
to the president the student viewpoint. She assists in making contacts between men and women, 
between the sorority women and the independents, between students earning their way through 
college and the others, between the students and citizens of Manhattan. 

The routine duties of the Dean of Women's office do not express the deeper significance of 
her work. It is a service the influence of which is recognized as an essential factor in the life 
and ideals of the College. 




Dean Van Zile 




Page 40 





LA55E 



jTvvo 





SENIORS 



Elizabeth Allen 
Manhattan 

Public School Music 

W. A. A.; Purple Pepsters; 
Kappa Phi; V. W. C. A.; 
Eurodelphian; Girls' Glee 
Club; Pinafore; Martha; "The 
Enemy;" "Romance"; "The 
Poor Nut"; "Love 'Em and 
Leave 'Em." 



Joseph McDaniel Anderson 
Salina 

General Science 

Phi Sigma Kappa; "K" 
Fraternity; Scabbard and 
Blade; Class President (4); 
Secretary-Treasurer "K" Fra- 
ternity (4). 



J. M. Atkins 

Manhattan 

A gronomy 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Alpha 
Zeta; Gamma Sigma Delta; 
Athenian; Pres. (4); Tri-K; 
Band (1), (2); Intersociety 
Debate; Ag Association. 



Charles B. Ault, Jr. 
Brownell 
Civil Engineering 
A. S. C. E.; Alpha Beta. 



Louise Martha Barton 

Cuba 

Home Economics 

Alpha Theta Chi; Y. W. C. 
A.; Browning; Chorister (4); 
Volley Ball (2); Big Sister (4). 



H. Z. Babbitt 

Emporia 

Electrical Engineering 

Pi Kappa Alpha; A. I. E. 
E.; College of Emporia. 




Eula Mae Anderson 

Scandia 

Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; Intersociety 
Council; L. S. A.; Y. W. C. 
A. Finance (3); Home Eco- 
nomics Association; Pres. (4). 



Harold Duane Arnold 

Manhattan 

General Science 



Frank N. Atkin 
Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 

Glee Club (3), (4); Debate 
(1); Advanced R. O. T. C. 



M. C. AXELTON 

Manhattan 

Agronomy 

Tri-K; Secretary (3); Y. 
M. C. A.; Lutheran Students 
Association ; Treasurer (4) ; Ag. 
Association. 



Louis W. Bailey 

Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 

"K" Fraternity; Sigma Tau; 
A. I. E. E.; Missouri Valley 
Championship Boxing (2); 
Captain R. O T. C. 



Ruth Bainer 
Manhattan 

Public School Music 

Eurodelphian; President (4) 
Xix; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
College Orchestra; Glee Club 
College Choir; Go-To-College 
Team. 



Page 42 



G. R. BORGMAN 

Enterprise 
Electrical Engineering 
Beta Pi Epsilon; A. I. E. 



E.; Rifle Team (2) 
E. E. Seminar (3) 



President 



Esther Bales 

Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. 
W. C. A.; W. A. A.; Freshman 
Commission; Freshman Swim- 
ming Team; "The Robbery;" 
"One In a Family." 



J. Glenn Barnhart 
Independence 

Mechanical Engineering 

Phi Mu Alpha; A. S. M. E.; 

Band (1), (2), (3), (4); Y. M. 
C.A. 



Dorothy Bergsten 
Randolph 

General Science 

Alpha Theta Chi; Phi Mu 
Alpha; President (4); A. A. 
U. W. Scholarship (3); Intra- 
mural Debate (4). 



A. W. Benson 
Clay Center 

Agricultural Economics 

Ag Economics Club; Ag 
Association. 



Christine Bertsch 

Mayetta 

Home Economics 




Leatha Baker Riley 
Gove 

Home Economics 

Browning; Kappa Phi; Y. 
W. C.A. 



Margaret Barrett 

Frankfort 

Industrial Journalism 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; En- 
chiladas; Y. W. C. A.; Fresh- 
man Panhellenic (3); Quill 
Club. 



Ruth Barnhisel 

Wichita 

Home Economics 

Delta Delta Delta; Home 
Economics Association; Fresh- 
man Commission; Hockey 
Team (2), (4); Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (3); Treasurer Home 
Economics Association (3); 
Class Treasurer (3). 



Drew E. Bellairs 
Cherry vale 

Agriculture 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Web- 
ster; Y. M. C. A.; Ag Eco- 
nomics Club; Ag Association; 
Intersociety Debate (3). 



Erwin John Benne 
Washington 

Chemistry and Education 

Phi Delta Kappa; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Alpha Beta; Lieutenant 
Colonel R. O. T. C. 



Lois Shouse Benjamin 
Kansas City 

Industrial Journalism 

Delta Zeta; Quill Club; Y. 
W. C. A.; Aggie Pop (3); 
Scribe Quill Club (4); Secre- 
tary-Treasurer Women's Pan- 
hellenic; Frivol (2); Publicity 
Manager "The Swan." 



Page 43 









Lillian Louise Bedor 

Hollis 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; W. A. A.; 
Purple Pepsters; Browning;; 
Hockey (2), (3), (4); Track 
(2). 



Gladys A. Bilger 
Hunter 
Home Economics 
Kappa Beta. 



Alfrada Frances Bock 
Macksville 
History 
Phi Omega Pi. 



Louis H. Bock 

Pratt 

Chemistry 

Phi Mu Alpha; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Hamilton; College Band; 
College Orchestra. 



H. H. Brown 
Edmond 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; 
Phi Delta Kappa; Block and 
Bridle; Athenian; Ag Associa- 
tion; Meat Judging Team (4); B 
Ag Fair Board (3); Alpha Zeta 
Chancellor (4); Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet (2), (3), (4); Inter- 
society Debate (1); Freshman 
and Sophomore Honors. 



Lawrence Bickhart Brooks 
Garrison 

Agricultural Economics 

Delta Tau Delta; Ag Eco- 
nomics Club; Ag Association; 
Inter - Fraternity Advisory 
Council of Y. M. C. A.; 
Junior and Senior Honors. 




Walter B. Bigelow 
Buffalo 

Civil Engineering 
Sigma Tau; A. S. C. E. 



Robert S. Bishop 
Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 

Junior American Medical 
Association. 



Henry Bock 
Cawker City 
Industrial Chemistry 
Sigma Phi Sigma. 



Ruth Bowman 

Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Eurodelphian; 
Y. W. C. A.; Home Economics 
Association; Big,Sister. 



W. A. Browne 
Burdett 

Veterinary Medicine 

Junior American Veterinary 
Medical Association. 



Mary Brooks 

Eureka 

General Science 

Pi Beta Phi; "The Poor 
Nut"; Enchiladas; Frivol (3); 
Intramural Debate (3); Intra- 
mural Swimming (3); Christian 
College (1). 



Page 44 



Frank Brokesh 
Munden 

Horticulture 

Phi Lambda Theta; Pax; 
Scarab; Alpha Beta; Pres- 
ident ( ); Ag Association; 
Horticulture Club; Pi Epsilon 
Pi ; Tobasco. 



James C. Bruce 

Junction City 
Civil Engineering 
Sigma Tau; A. S. C. E. 



Carrie Brandejsky 
Severy 
Education 
Y. W. C. A. 



Margaret Kirby Burtis 
Manhattan 

Nutrition and Child 
Welfare 

Y. W. C. A. President (4)j 
Xix; Prix; Cosmopolitan Club; 
Eurodelphian. 



Richard D. Bradley 
Dover 

Electrical Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Phi Mu 
Alpha; Pax; Scarab; Glee 
Club; A. I. E. E.; Chairman 
Engineers' Open House; Pres- 
ident A. I. E. E.; Class Vice- 
President (3); Vice-President 
Phi Mu Alpha. 



O. O. Barton 
Junction City 

General Science 

Alpha Tau Omega; Scab- 
bard and Blade; Scarab; Pi 
Epsilon Pi; Tobasco; Captain 
R. O. T. C. 




Mary Brookover 
Eureka 

General Science 

Beta Phi Alpha; Eurodel- 
phian; Class Vice-President 
(2); Prix; W. A. A. 



Robert A. Brunson 

Corona, Calif. 

Veterinary Medicine 

Junior American Veterinary 
Medical Association. 



Mary L. Burnette 
Parsons 

Public School Music 

Pi Beta Phi; Mu Phi Epsi- 
lon; Enchiladas President (2); 
Girls' Quartet (4); Mixed 
Quartet (3); Glee Club (2) 
College Choir (2); Frivol (2) 
Aggie Pop (2), (3); "Martha' 
(3). 



Lucii.e Beatrice Burt 

Scott City 

General Science 

Kappa Beta; Y. W. C. A.; 
Alpha Beta; Big Sister (4); 
College Chorus (3), (4); Kan- 
sas State Teachers College. 



William Braddock 

Girard 

General Science 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; To- 
basco; Scarab; Men's Pan- 
hellenic; Treasurer (4). 



Orville R. Caldwell 

Emporia 

Animal Husbandry 

Athenian; Block and Bridle; 
Intercollegiate Debate; In- 
tersociety Debate; Intersociety 
Play; Intersociety Council. 



Page 45 






Floyd Eugene Carrol 
Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 

Junior American Veterinary 
Medical Association; Glee Club 
(2), (3), (4); Glee Club Quar- 
tet (3), (4); Pinafore; "Mar- 
tha;" "Mikado"; Go-To-Col- 
legeTeam (3), (4). 



Edith A. Carnahan 
Garrison 

English 

Phi Alpha Mu; Purple Pep- 
sters; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; 

Freshman Commission. 



Edna Circle 
Kiowa 

Home Economics 

Beta Phi Alpha; Ionian; 
President (4); Home Eco- 
nomics Association; Vice-Pres- 
ident (4); Treasurer (3); Fresh- 
man Commission. 



Thayer Cleaver 
Iola 

Agricultural Engineering 

A. S. A. E.; Advanced R 
O.T. C. 



Helen Clydesdale 

Gaylord 

Institutional Management 

Lambda Tau Kappa; W. A. 
A • Y. W. C. A. 



Claire Cox 
Moran 

Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; President (4) 
Kappa Phi; Omicron Nu 
Vice-President (4); W. A. A. 
Home Economics Association 
Freshman Commission. 




Loyd Cassel 

Long Island 

General Science 



Joseph H. Church 
Austin, Minn. 
Civil Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Mortar 
and Ball; President; Scabbard 
and Blade; Treasurer; Sigma 
Tau; President; Cadet Colonel 
R. O. T. C; President General 
Engineering Association. 



Vera Irene Clothier 

St. Marys 

Home Economics 

Lambda Tau Kappa: Ion- 
ian; Home Economics Associa- 
tion; Y. W. C. A.; Intersociety 
Council. 



Lawrence M. Clausen 

Alton 

Dairy Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; 
Scarab; Pax; Tobasco; S. G. 
A. ; Treasurer (4) ; Senior Men's 
Panhellenic; Dairy Judging 
Team; Dairy Products Team; 
Class Marshall (4); Ag As- 
sociation; Dairy Club. 



Kenneth C. Cook 

Independence, Mo. 

Electrical Engineering 

Alpha Rho Chi; Purple 
Masque; A. I. E. E.; Band (1), 
(2), (3), (4); Stage Manager 
(Plays), (2), (3), (4). 



Newton Cross 
Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 

Sigma Delta Chi; Purple 
Masque; Quill Club; Collegian 
Board. 



Page 46 



Alma Cress 
Manhattan 

General Science 

W. A. A.; Purple Pepsters; 
Y. W. C. A.; Volley Ball (2), 
(3); Volley Ball Varsity (3); 
Baseball (2), (3); Track (2); 
Hockey (4). 



Clarence E. Crews 
Elk Falls 

Agronomy 

Alpha Gamma Rho; "K" 
Fraternity; Alpha Beta; Tri- 
K; Ag Association; Football 
(1), (2); Intersociety Debate; 
Wrestling (2), (3), (4); Sopho- 
more Honors; Freshman Com- 
mission; Class Marshall (4). 



Velma Virginia Criner 
Wamego 
Home Economics 
Kappa Delta. 



Eula Mae Currie 

Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 

Theta Sigma Phi; President 
(4); Xix; Secretary-Treasurer; 
Quill Club; Chancellor (4); 
Scribe (3); W. A. A.; Frivol 
(4); Press Teams (3), (4); 
Editor Brown Bull (3); Assist- 
ant Editor 1928, Royal Purple; 
Editor Kansas State Collegian 
(4); Theodoric Council; Fresh- 
man Commission. 



Roy E. Davis 

.Morrill 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Advanced R. 
O.T. C. 



Marion B. Davis 
Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 

Junior American Veterinary 
Medical Association. 




J. Earl Cress 
Manhattan 
Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E.; Y. M. C. A. 



Golda Crawford 
Manhattan 

History 

Phi Omega Pi; Enchiladas; 
Senior Women's Panhellenic 
(3), (4); Basket BalK 2); Dad's 
Day Committee (4); A. G. N. 



James M. Cullum 

Beverly 

Rural Commerce 

Kappa Sigma; Scarab; Pi 
Epsilon Pi; Royal Purple Staff. 



Marian Dalton 
Topeka 

General Science 

Pi Beta Phi; Class Vice- 
President (1); Treasurer 1928, 
Royal Purple. 



Rex K, Davis 
Madison 

Civil Engineering 

Mortar and Ball; Rifle Team 
(4); Captain R. O. T._C. 



Dorothy Mae Davis 
Delevan 

History 

Kappa Phi- Y. W. C. A. 



Page 47 






Carrie Elvard Davis 

Delevan 

Home Economics 

Home Economics Associa- 
tion; Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



Edgar Dannevik 

St. Joseph, Mo. 

Rural Commerce 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Pi Ep- 
silon Pi; Tobasco. 



Lena Alice Darnold 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Historian (4); 
Y. W. C. A.; University of 
Chicago. 



Lyle D. DeBusk 

Macksville 

Rural Commerce 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Alpha 
Kappa Psi; Pi Epsilon Pi; To- 
basco. 



Clait J. Doty 

Valparaiso, Nebr. 

Veterinary Medicine 

Junior American Veterinary 
Medical Association. 



Allen Drew 
Rolla, Mo. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Beta; A. S. M. E. 
Treasurer. 




Nettie Darrah 
McPherson 

Home Economics 

Beta Phi Alpha; Ionian; 
McPherson College (1), (2), 
(3). 



H. J. Dayhoff 

Abilene 

Rural Commerce 

Kappa Sigma; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; "K" Fraternity; Football 

(1), (2), (4). 



Helen Dean 
Manhattan 

General Science 

Phi Omega Pi; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Phi Alpha Mu; Lambda 
Tau Kappa; A. A. U. W. 
Scholarship; Omicron Nu; 
Freshman Scholarship. 



Helen Diller 

Morrowville 
Home Economics 



James McNair Douglass 




Burlington 




Rural Commerce 




Delta Tau Delta; "K" Fra- 
ternity; Freshman Football; 
Varsity Football (2), (3), (4); 
Captain (4); Class President 

(3). 




Raymond E. Dunnington 




Drexel, Mo. 




Civil Engineering 




A. S. C. E.; Band (1), (2), 
(3), (4). 




Page 48 





Vesta Duckwall 
Great Bend 

Industrial Journalism 

Alpha Xi Delta; S. G. A. 
Secretary (3) (4); Theta Sigma 
Phi; Prix; Xix; Collegian Board 
(4); Senior Women's Pan- 
hellenic (2) (3); Brown Bull 
(2); Dad's Day Committee (4); 
Campus Chest Committee (3) 
(4); Collegian Staff (2) (3); 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3) (4); 
Associate Editor Kansas State 
Collegian (4); Enchiladas; 
Class Vice-President (4). 



R. L. Elsea 
Sweet Springs, Mo. 
Veterinary Medicine 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Junior 
American Veterinary Medical 
Association. 



Harold Kenneth Fisher 
Beverly 

Chemistry 

Phi Delta Kappa; Scabbard 
and Blade; Webster. 



Clarence K. Fisher 
Fellsburg 

Agriculture 

Alpha Rho Chi; Ag Eco- 
nomics Club. 



Ernest R. Foltz 

Belle Plaine 

General Science 

Acacia; Pi Kappa Delta 
Varsity Debate (2) (3) (4) 
Senior Men's Panhellenic 
President Tobasco. 

Lester R. Frey 
Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 

Acacia; Sigma Delta Chi, 
President (4), Treasurer (3); 
Manager Branding Iron Ban- 
quet (2) ; Scarab, Secretary 
(4); Pax; T. S. L.; Tobasco; 
Freshmen Panhellenic; Sec- 
retary (1); Y. M. C. A. Board 
(3); Editor of "K" Book (2); 
Intramural Champion Base- 
ball Team (2); Freshmen Com- 
mission; Business Manager 
Brown Bull (2); Ag Associa- 
tion; Collegian Board (4). 




D. L. Dutton 

Alta Vista 
Electrical Engineering 



Kennis Evans 
Soldier 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Kansas State 
Engineer Staff (4) ; Go-To- 
College Team (3). 



C. O. Fisher 
Fellsburg 

A rchitectural Engineering 



Clarence William Foster 

Muskogee, Okla. 

Civil Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Phi Kappa 
Phi; A. S. C. E.; Sophomore 
Honors. 



Alice Forman 

Manhattan 
General Science 



E. Wayne Frey 
Manhattan 

Da iry 

Acacia; Pax; Ag Association; 
Dairy Club; Y. M. C. A.; 
Dairy Products Judging Team 

(4). 



Page 49 



Helen Freeburg 
McPherson 

Home Economics 

Alpha Xi Delta; V. W. C. 
A.; Home Economics Associa- 
tion; Kappa Phi; Glee Club; 
Chorus; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet: 
McPherson College (1), (2). 



Paul Gartner 
Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 

Kappa Sigma; "K" Frater- 
nity; Sigma Delta Chi; Varsity 
Track (2), (3), (4); Captain 
(4); Class President (1); Men's 
Panhellenic. 



Henry Germann 
Fairview 

Education 

Boxing Team (3); Intra- 
mural Wrestling. 



Dorothy L. Gillaspie 
Colby 
Home Economics 
University of Denver. 



Earl T. Goodfellow 
Wells 

Mathematics 

Phi Delta Kappa; Hamil- 
ton; Freshman Commission; 
Baseball. 



Inez Dorothy Greve 

St. Paul 

Industrial Journalism 

Theta Sigma Phi; Ionian; 
Lambda Tau Kappa. 




Dorothy B. Fulton 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Home Economics 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. 
W. C. A.; Freshman Commis- 
sion; Enchiladas; Freshman 
Commission Cabinet; Class 
Representative to S. G. A. 
(2); Class Secretary (3); Prix. 



V. E. Gagelman 
Great Bend 

Commerce 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Alpha 
Kappa Psi; Tobasco. 



M. M. Ginter 

Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Phi Mu 
Alpha; Mortar and Ball; Web- 
ster; A. I. E. E. (3), (4); 
Glee Club (3), (4); Vice-Pres- 
ident (4) ; Vice-President Web- 
ster (2); Vice-President Eng- 
ineer's Association. 



Arleen Click 
Garden City 

Phi Alpha Mu; Swimming 
Team (3); Sophomore Honors; 
Women's Red Cross Life Sav- 
ing corps. 



Dwight William Grant 
Almena 

Electrical Engineering 

Alpha Beta; Sigma Tau; Phi 
Kappa Phi; A. I. E. E.; Glee 
Club; Chorus. 



Eldon T. Harden 
Centralia 

Agricultural Economics 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; 
Phi Delta Kappa; President 
Agricultural Economics Club; 
Business Manager Kansas Ag 
Student; Ag Association. 



Page 50 



4z 



Forrest H. Hagenbuch 

Troy 

Horticulture 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; To- 
basco; Pi Epsilon Pi; Ag As- 
sociation; Horticulture Club; 
Scabbard and Blade; Apple 
Judging Team (4); Captain R. 
O. T. C. 



Marguerite Harper 
Ponca City, Okla. 

Home Economics 

Phi Omega Pi; Y. W. 
C. A. 



Fern Harris 

Alton 

Home Economics 

^ Beta Phi Alpha; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (3), (4); Freshman 
Commission; Home Eco- 
nomics Association; Represent- 
ative to Home Economics 
Council (1) ; Big Sister Captain 
(2), (3); Cosmopolitan Club. 



John D. Harness 

Augusta 

A rchitectural Engineering 

Sigma Tau; Phi Kappa Phi. 



Veda E. Hiller 

Lewis 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Kansas State 
Teachers College. 



Gordon Hohn 








AJf 


Marysville 




*/wiH 


In dust rial Journalism 




' : ' : - :: ! : |p4: ■ ' : - : & 


Delta Tau Delta ; Sigma Del 




^ 


ta Chi; College Band (1), (2); 




J»N <•*•"' 


Colleejan Staff (2); Brown 






Bull Staff (3); Press Teams 






(2), (3); Editor 1928 Royal 


«•: 




Purple Tobasco. 


i:: : -M 




Page 51 










Harry I. Hazzard 

Coffeyville 

Mechanical Engineering 

Webster; A. S. M. E.; Col- 
lege Band; Major R. O. T. C. 

Elsie Hayden 
Salina 

Industrial Journalism 

Chi Omega; Enchiladas; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer (4); Theta 
Sigma Phi; Vice-President (3); 
Secretary (4); Quill Club; Sec- 
retary (4); Purple Masque; 
Prix; Frivol (1), (2); Organ- 
ization Manager Aggie Pop 
(2), (4); "The Swan"; "Mary 
Rose"; "Romance"; "The Per- 
sian Garden"; Collegian Staff 
(2); Brown Bull Staff (3); 
Feature Editor 1928 Royal 
Purple. 



Fern Harsh 

Cassody 
General Science 

Phi Omega Pi; Basket 
(1), (2); " 
chiladas. 



Y. W. C. A. 



Ball 
En- 



John L. Hancock 
Beverly 

Electrical Engineering 

Webster; Treasurer (3); 

Band (1), (2); Chorus (2), 

(3); Men's Glee Club (3), 
(4); A. I. E. E. (3), (4). 



Aileen Henderson 
Auburn 
Home Economics 
Browning; Y. W. C. A. 



Velma Horner 

Haviland 

Home Economics 

Kansas State Teachers Col- 
lege; Sigma Sigma Sigma; Kap- 
pa Omicron Phi; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; University of 
Colorado; Eurodelphian. 






Avis Lucile Holland 
Harper 

General Science 

Beta Phi Alpha; Y. W. C. 
W. A. A.; Purple Pepsters 
Hockey Team (2), (3), (4) 
Southwestern Colleee. 



Sherman Stanley Hoar 

Willis 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm House; Block and 
Bridle; Junior Stock Judging 
Team; Ag Association. 



Harold C. Huffman 
Pittsburg 
Media ni( a I Engineering 
Kappa Sigma. 



G. Dewey Houston 
Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 

Delta Tau Delta; 'K" Fra- 
ternity; Class President (1) 
Junior American Veterinary 
Medical Association; President 

(4). 



Helen L. Humphrey 

Manhattan 

Child Welfare; Kappa Beta; 
President (4); Freshman Com- 
mission; Home Economics As- 
sociation; President (3); Y. 
W. C. A.; Eurodelphian. 



Floyd E. Israel 
Burlington 

Chemical Engineering 

Steel Ring; Kansas State 
Engineer. 




Ora A. Hatton 
Bunkerhill 

Foods and Nutrition 

Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; 
Purple Pepsters; L. S. A.; H. 
E. Meats Judging Team (4); 
Chorus (2). 



Ruth G. Hubbard 

Waterville 

General Science 

Beta Phi Alpha; W. A. A.; 
Y. W. C. A.; Swimming (2), 
(3); Baseball (2), (3); Varsity 
(2); Hockey (4); Secretary W. 
A. A. (3); Volley Ball Man- 
ager (3). 



Howard W. Higbee 
Climax 
Agronomy 
Alpha Gamma Rho 



Beta; Tri-K; 
Association. 



Alpha 
Rifle Team; Ag 



Elmer F. Hubbard 

Linwood 

Dairy Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Beta; 
Ag Association; Dairy Prod- 
ucts Judging Team (4); Wrest- 
ling Team (3). 



Philip Isaak 

East Orange, N. J. 

Agronomy 

Hamilton; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet; Cosmopolitan Club; 
Tri-K; Ag Association. 



Clarence O. Jacobson 

Sedgwick 

Dairy Manufacturing 

Dairy Club; President (4); 
Baseball Squad (4). 



Page SI 



Amy C. Jones 
Frankfort 

Home Economics 

Ionian; Treasurer (3); Cos- 
mopolitan Club; Home Eco- 
nomics Association; Freshman 
Commission; Y. W. C. A. 



Glenn Johnson 

Greeley 

A gricidtural Engineering 

Sigma Tau; Gamma Sigma 
Delta; A. S. A. E. 



Milton M. Kerr 

Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Purple 
Masque; President (4); Hamil- 
ton; President (4); Lambda 
Tau Kappa; President (3); 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Vice- 
President (3), (4); Intersociety 
Play (1), (2), (3); Go-To-Col- 
lege Team (3). 



Melvin C. Kirkwood 

Natoma 

Agronomy 

Tri-K; Agricultural Associa- 
tion. 



Vera Knisely 
Liberal 

Rural Commerce 
Phi Omega Pi. 



Paula Leach 

Caney 

Home Economics 

Delta Delta Delta; W. A. 
A.; Enchiladas; Hockey Team 
(1); Glee Club (3). 




Arline Johnson 

Frankfort 

Home Economics 

Ionian; Kappa Phi; Treas- 
urer (3); President (4); Y. W. 
C. A.; Freshman Commis- 
sion; Home Economics As- 
sociation. 



Mary Ellen Karns 
Bucklin 

Home Economics 

Kappa Beta. 



Hubert Dwight King 
Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 

Sigma Delta Chi; Vice- 
President (4); Collegian Staff 

(2). 



Margaret A. Koenig 
Nortonville 

Home Economics 
Phi Omega Pi; Omicron Nu; 
Enchiladas; W. A. A.; Kappa 
Beta; Ionian; Purple Pepsters; 
Basket Ball (1), (2), (3) Varsity 
Basket Ball (1); Hockey Squad 
(1). 



Delbert L. Lacey 

Moran 

Civil Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Webster; 
President (4) ; Kansas State 
Engineer Staff; Rifle Team 
(3); Mortar and Ball; A. S. 
C.E. 



Catharine Lori.mer 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Home Economics 

Xix; Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet; Ionian; Purple 
Pepsters; W. A. A.; Women's 
"K" Fraternity; Class His- 
torian (3); Hockey (2), (3); 
Basket Ball (2), (3); Swimming 
(1), (2), (3); Baseball (2), 
(3); Track and Field (2), 
(3); Baseball Manager (3). 



Page 53 






Ragner N. Lindburg 

Osage City 

Animal Husbandry 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Alpha 
Zeta; Athenian; Livestock 
Judging Team (4); Block and 
Bridle; Ag Association. 



Agnes Jeanne Lyon 

Manhattan 

General Science 

Phi Alpha Mu; Lambda Tau 
Kappa; Kappa Beta; Cosmo- 
politan Club; W. A. A.; Purple 
Pepsters; Y. W. C. A.; Hockey 
(3), (4); Volley Ball (3); 
Captain (4). 



Lois Manchester 

Paola 

General Science 

Alpha Beta; Y. W. C. A. 



Lyle Mayfield 
Alton 

Agronomy 

Franklin; Ag Association; 
Tri-K; Ag Student Staff; Busi- 
ness Manager; Student Grain 
Judging Contest (4). 



Verl E. Mc Adams 

Clyde 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; 
Phi Delta Kappa; Block and 
Bridle; Hamilton; Ag Associa- 
tion; Treasurer (4); Stock 
Judging Team (3), (4); Meat 
Judging Team. 



PaulM. McMains 
Dexter, N. M. 

Agricultural Economics 

Gamma Sigma at New Mex- 
ico A. andM.; Ag Economics 
Club. 




Reva Helen Lyne 
Solomon 
Home Economics 
Xix; Women's "K" Fra- 
ternity; W. A. A.; President 
(4); Browning; Vice-President 
(4); Purple Pepsters; Vice- 
President (3); National A. C; 
A. C. W. Convention (3); 
State W. A. A. Convention 
(4); Basket Ball Manager (3); 
Campus Chest Committee (4); 
Class Historian (4); Basket 
Ball (1), (2), (3); Hockey 
(2), (3), (4); Baseball (1), (2), 



(3; 

(3: 



Track (3); 
Vol lev Ball ( 



Archery (2) 

3), (4). 



F. W. Lund 
Protection 
Rural Commerce 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 



Charlotte Mathias 
Manhattan 

General Science 
Alpha Theta Chi; Women's 
"K" Fraternity; Kappa Phi; 
W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Pur- 
ple Pepsters; Hockey (3), (4); 
Varsity (3), (4); Volley Ball 
(3), (4); Basket Ball (3); Var- 
sity (3); Baseball and Track 
(3); Big Sister (3), (4); Basket 
Ball Manager (4) ; Kansas State 
Teachers College (1), (2). 



Roy Lewis McConnell 
Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine 

Phi Kappa Phi; Junior 
American Veterinary Medical 
Association. 



Elfie Leola McMullen 

Norton 

General Science 

Alpha Beta; Phi Alpha Mu; 
Kappa Phi. 



Quentin Mell 
Wet more 

Highway Engineering 

Phi Sigma Kappa; President 
(4); Scabbard and Blade; Se- 
nior Men's Panhellenic; Vice- 
President; Business Manager 
Kansas State Engineer; Scarab ; 
Pi Epsilon Pi; Tabasco; Cap- 
tain R. O. T. C. ; Vice-President 
A. S. C. E. 



Page 54 



Manie H. Meyer 

Mulvane 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; First Lieutenant 
R. O. T. C; Vice-President 
Engineering Seminar. 



Malcolm T. Means 

Everest 

Rural Commerce 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Alpha 
Kappa Psi; Pi Epsilon Pi; Pax; 
Scarab; Tabasco; Rifle Team 
(2); Glee Club (3), (4); Treas- 
urer (4) ; Go-To-College Team 
(3); Glee Club Quartet (3); 
Class Marshal. 



Genevieve Mickelson 
Leavenworth 

Home Economics 



William N. Moreland 

Formosa 

Landscape Design ■ 

Y. M. C. A.; Cabinet (3); 
Intercollegiate De- 



Chorus 
bate. 



Ellen Morlan 
Courtland 

Industrial Journalism 

W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; 

Orchestra (3); Kansas Wes- 
leyan University (1), (2). 



Abby Jane Moore 
Eureka 

General Science 

Pi Beta Phi ; Senior Women's 
Panhellenic; Enchiladas; In- 
tramural Debate (3); Intra- 
mural Swimming (4); Campus 
Chest Committee (4). 




Irene Meyer 

General Science 

Kansas City W. A. A.; Y. 
W. C.A. 



L. E. Melia 
Ford 

Agronomy 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Phi 
Delta Kappa; Tri-K; Ag As- 
sociation; Athenian; Poultry 
Judging Team (3); Crops 
Judging Team (4); Wrestling 
(3), (4); High Individual of 
Intercollegiate Poultry Judg- 
ing Contest (3); Manager of 
College Crops Judging Con- 
test (4). 



Horace G. Miller 

Lebanon 

Electrical Engineering 

Phi Kappa Phi; Athenian; 
Editor Kansas State Engineer 
(4); A. I. E. E. 



Anna Morlan 

Courtland 

General Science 

W. A. A.; Purple Pepsters; 
Kansas Wesleyan Universitv 

(D,(2). 



Archie LeRoy Morgan 

Emporia 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Franklin; Inter- 
society Debate; Kansas State 
Teachers College. 



M. D. Morris 
Paxico 

Education 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Y. M. 
C.A. 



Page 55 






Katherine Morris 

Manhattan 

Rural Commerce 

Y. W. C. A.; Lambda Tan 
Kappa. 



Claude Herbert Moreland 
Topeka 
Landscape Design 
Gargoyle Club. 



W. H. Murray 
Manhattan 

Civil Engineering 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Scarab; 
Tobasco; Advanced R. O. T. 
C. 



Marie Sarah Muxlow 
Manhattan 
General Science 
Phi Alpha Mu; Alpha Beta. 



Harold Nanninga 

Leonardville 

Rural Commerce 




J *M 



Carl O. Nelson 

Jennings 

Rural Commerce 

Phi Kappa Tau; Alpha Kap- 
pa Psi; Treasurer (3); Pres- 
ident (4); Delegate to National 
Convention; Scarab; Pi Ep- 
silon Pi; Tobasco; Captain 
R. O. T. C. 



Ruth Morgareidge 
Sheridan, Wyo. 

Home Economics 



Harold L. Murphey 
Protection 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; 
Scarab; Block and Bridle; 
Secretary (3), (4); Ag Student 
Staff (3), (4); Ag Association; 
Treasurer (3); Ag Fair Board 
Treasurer (3), (4); Meat Judg- 
ing Team; Stock Judging 
Team (3), (4). 



Charlotte Mutschler 
Leonardville 

Industrial Journalism 



Harold E. Myers 
Bancroft 

Agronomy 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Alpha 
Zeta; Scribe (4); Tri-K; Pres- 
ident (4) ; Ag Association ; Vice- 
President (4); Editor-in-Chief 
Kansas Ag Student (4); De- 
partmental Editor (3); Adver- 
tising Manager Chick and Egg 
Show (2); Freshman and Soph- 
omore Honors; Dairy Judg- 
ing Team (4); Crops Judging 
Team (4); Phi Kappa Phi; 
Editor Ag Fair Guide Book 
(3). 



Margaret Naylor 
Kansas City 

Clothing 

Kappa Beta; Glee Club (3); 
Chorus (3). 




Anna M. Nettrouer 
Manhattan 

Education 

Y. W. C. A.; World-Wide 
Guild. 



Page 56 



Theo. A. Newlin 
Lewis 

Veterinary Medicine 

Alpha Sigma Psi; Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet; Hamilton; Pres- 
ident, Junior American Veter- 
inary Medical Association; 
First Lieutenant R. (). T. C. 



Linus A. Noll 
Louisville 

Social Science. 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi 
Delta Kappa. 



Will Dinges Nyhart 
Atchison 

Electrical Etigineering 

Athenian; A. I. E. E.; 
Advanced R. O. T. C. 



R. G. Obrecht 
Topeka 

Electrical Engineering 

Acacia; Webster; A. I. E. E. 



Clara Paulsen 

Stafford 

Home Economics 

Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (4); Kappa Phi; W. 
A. A.; Intersociety Oratorical 
Contest (2); President Van 
Zile Hall (4); Home Economics 
Association; Class Vice-Pres- 
ident (4). 



Ruth J. Peck 
Beatrice, Nebr. 
Home Economics 
Browning. 




Jennie Nettrouer 
Manhattan 
Institutional Management 
World-Wide Guild; W. A. A. 



John C. Noble 
Newton 
Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. 



Ethel Oatman 

Lawrence 

Home Economics 

Alpha Beta; Y. W. C. A.; 
W. W. G.; Intersociety Coun- 
cil (3), (4); Treasurer (4); 
Intersociety Debate (2); Coach 
(3); Manager "In The Next 
Room." 



A. H. Ottaway 

Oswego 

Horticulture 

Horticulture Club; Apple 
fudging Team. 



Glen etta Payne 
Lebanon 

Home Economics 

Omicron Nu; Franklin. 



Iver E. Peterson 
Concordia 

General Science 



Page 57 



Walter C. Peikce, Jr. 
Darlow 

General Science 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Scab- 
bard and Blade; Webster; 
Rifle Team (3); Battalion 
Adjutant; First Lieutenant R. 
O. T. C. 

Paul E. Pfuetze 
Manhattan 

Science 

Beta Theta Pi; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Pi Kappa Delta; Quill 
Club; Hamilton; Cosmopolitan 
Club; Purple Masque; Treas- 
urer (2), (3); Lambda Tau 
Kappa; S. G. A. (3), (4); 
Treasurer (4); President Fresh- 
man Commission; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet; President (2), (3); 
Chairman Estes Park Con- 
ference (2); T. S. L.; Class 
President (4); Cheer Leader 
(1), (2), (3), (4); Baseball (1); 
Wrestling (2); Senior Pan- 
hellenic (2); Debate; Missouri 
Valley Oratorical (2); Winner 
Intersociety Oratorical (2); In- 
tersociety Council (3), (4); 
Manager Ag Orpheum (1), 
(3); Associate Editor Col- 
legian (3); Campus Chest 
Committee; Fee Committee; 
"Miss Lulu Bett"; "Captain 
Applejack"; "Famous Mrs. 
Fair"; "The Enemy"; "The 
Valiant"; "Romance"; "The 
Other Room"; Sophomore 
Honors; 1928 Rhodes Scholar- 
elect for Kansas. 

Aelene Pooler 
Chapman 

Home Economics 

Delta Zeta; Y. W. C. A.; 
Freshman Commission. 

Mary Frances Reed 
Holton 

Industrial Journalism 

Ionian; President (4); Phi 
Kappa Phi; Theta Sigma Phi; 
President (3); Prix; Collegian 
Board (3), (4); Assistant Edi- 
tor Collegian (4) ; Sophomore 
Honors; Freshman Commis- 
sion. 

Edith T. Reel 
Detroit 

Piano 

Mu Phi Epsilon; Y. W. C. 
A. (1), (2); Girls' Glee Club 
(1), (2), (3), (4). 

Wilda Aileen Rhodes 
Manhattan 

Public School Music 

Alpha Delta Pi; Orchestra 
(l), (2), (3), (4); Girls' Glee 
Club (2), (3), (4); Y. W. C. A. 
Octette (1), (2); Frivol (1); 
"The Mikado" (2). 




Vernon L. Pierce 
Kansas City 

Civil Engineering 

Beta Pi Epsilon; Sigma Tau; 
A. S. C. E. 



James Leroy Potter 
Carthage, Mo. 

Electrical Engineering 

Sigma Tau; Webster; Vice- 
President (3); Assistant Editor 
Kansas State Engineer; A. I. 
E.E. 



Clyde T. Rea 

Wichita 

Rural Commerce 

Beta Theta Pi; Vice-Pres- 
ident; Junior and Senior Honor 
Roll; Wichita University; Kan- 
sas Universitv. 



Floyd Reed 
Norton 

General Science 



Y. M. C. A. 
(2); Phi Delta 
Kappa Phi. 



Cabinet 
Kappa ; 



(1), 
Phi 



Clarence F. Reinhardt 
Bison 

A rchitectural Engineering 

Sigma Tau. 



Rosa Lee Ricklefs 
Troy 

General Science 

Phi Alpha Mu; Ionian; 
Sophomore and Junior Honors; 
Baseball Team (2); Basket 
Ball Team (2 j. 



Page SS 



^ 



Milo T. Rose 
Ionia 

Veterinary Medicine 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Junior 
Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Pax. 



Vance M. Rucker 
Burdett 

Agronomy 

Farm House; Alpha 



Zeta; 
Ag Association; Tri-K; Athe- 
nian; Poultry Judging Team 
Treasurer Alpha Zeta 
Assistant Manager Ag 
(3); Manager Ag Fair 



(3); 
(4); 
Fair 
(4). 



Jean Rundle 
Clay Center 

Home Economics 

W. A. A.; Purple Pepsters. 



Clare M. Russell 

Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Browning; President (4); 
Women's "K" Fraternity; 
President (4); Intersociety 
Council; Purple Pepsters; W. 
A. A.; Vice-President (4); 
Kappa Phi; Treasurer (4); State 
W. A. A. Convention (3) ; Hock- 
ey (1), (2), (3), (4); Varsity (2), 
(4); BasketBall (1), (2), (3); 
Baseball (1), (2), (3); Swim- 
ming (3); Track (3); Volley 
Ball (3); Archery (3). 



Mary Elsie Sargent 
Riley 

General Science 



Olga B. Saffrey 

Alma 

English 

Browning; W. A. A.; Pur- 
ple Pepsters; Y. W. C. A.; 
Kappa Phi. 




Sarah Helen Roberts 
Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Omicron Nu; Lambda Tau 
Kappa; Eurodelphian; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



Adrian L. Ruth 

Scott City 

Rural Commerce 

Acacia; Tobasco; Second 
.ieutenant R. O. T. C. 



Marian Rude 

Great Bend 

History 

Beta Phi Alpha; Xix; Y. W. 
C. A.; Theodoric Council; Y. 
W. C. A. Cabinet; Big Sister 
Chairman; Volley Ball (3); 
Class Treasurer (4); Campus 
Chest Committee. 



Delmas Raida 
Rose Hill 

Electrical Engineering 



William Sartorius 

Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering 

Phi Delta Theta; Scarab; 
Tabasco; Newman Club; Band 
(1), (2); Orchestra (1), (2); A. 
S. M. E.; Treasurer (3); Pres- 
ident (4); Engineering Coun- 
cil (4). 



Anna Saville 
Blue Rapids 

English 

Eurodelphian; Kappa Phi. 



Page 59 















Mel VINA Schrader 
Bavaria 

Mathematics 

Browning; W. A. A.; Purple 
Pepsters; W. W. G.; L. S. A. 
A.; Intersociety Debate (3); 
Varsity Basketball (3); Secre- 
tary of Browning (3); W. G. G. 
Secretary (3). 



John Charles Schwindi.er 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Architecture 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Class 
Treasurer (4) ; Gargoyle Club 
(1), (2), (3), (4); Tabasco; 
Treasurer (4); Scarab; Men's 
Panhellenic; Art Editor Kan- 
sas State Engineer; Steel Ring 
Secretary. 



Cleda E. Scott 

Westmoreland 

History 

Delta Zeta; Enchiladas: 
Freshman Commission; V. W. 
C. A.; Volley Ball Team (2). 



A. I. Schmidt 
Kansas City 

Veterinary Medicine 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Junior 
American Veterinary Medical 
Association; Second Lieuten- 
ant R. O. T. C. 



Eli C. Shenk 

Rossville 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Manhattan 
Theatre Stage Electrician (3), 
(4); College Band (1), (2), (3), 
(4); Secretary A. I. E. E. 



John D. Shoeman 
Waukee, Iowa 

Veterinary Medicine 

Acacia; Junior American 
Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion. 




Ruth Schlotterbeck 
Chickasha, Okla. 

Home Economics 

Alpha Theta Chi; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Ionian; Omicron Nu; 
Oklahoma College for Women. 



J. Edward Schrock 

Wilmore 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Webster; Student 
Council and School Photog- 
rapher at Ottawa University; 
Y. M.C.A. 



Marjorie Lenore Schmidler 
Marys ville 

Industrial Journalism 

Alpha Xi Delta; Theta Sig- 
ma Phi; Vice-President (4); 
Enchiladas. 



Frances Mary Schepp 
Manhattan 

Architecture 

Alpha Theta Chi; Hockey 

(1); Gargoyle Club (1), (2), 
(3), (4); Kansas State Engi- 
neer Staff (4); Class Secretary 
(3); Ag Follies (3). 



Ralph Sherman 

Iola 

Architecture 

Kappa Sigma; Tabasco; Se- 
nior Men's Panhellenic ; Gar- 
goyle Club; T. S. L.; Pax. 



Frank W. Shaw 
McPherson 
Electrical Engineering 
A. I.E. E. 



Page 60 



Paul M. Simpson 
Harper 

General Science 



Lonnie J. Simmons 

Manhattan 

Poultry 

Athenian; Ag Association; 
Poultry Judging Team (4); 
Ag Student Staff (3), (4). 



Mildred Louise Skinner 

Mankato 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Cabinet (2), (3), 
(4); Eurodelphian; Y. W. C. 
A.; Home Economics Associa- 
tion. 



Mildred Loveless Skinner 

Marion 

Home Economics 

Ionian; Y. W. C. A.; Home 

Economics Association; W. W. 
G.; President (3), (4). 



Edna M. Smith 

McPherson 
Home Economics 
Beta Phi Alpha. 

Lorraine Smith 
Manhattan 

General Science 

Beta Phi Alpha; Kappa Phi 
Y. W. C. A.; Prix;Xix; Senior 
Women's Panhellenic (3) 
Purple Pepsters; Secretary 
Treasurer (2); President (3) 
W. A. A.; Secretary (3); Vice- 
President (3); Class Vice- 
President (3); Baseball (1), 
(2), (3), (4); Basket Ball (2), 
(3); Hockey (1), (2), (3), (4); 
Volley Ball (2), (3); Varsity 
(3); Field and Track (3). 




Beulah L. Siddens 
Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi. 



Garnett Irene Skinner 

Mankato 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Cabinet (3); 
Vice-President (4); Eurodel- 
phian ; Y. W. C. A. ; Home Eco- 
nomics Association. 



Joe O. Stalder 
Sabetha 
Mechanical Engineering 
A. S. M. E. 



Glenn D. Slaybaugh 

St Joseph, Mo. 
Electrical Engineering 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Sigma 
Tau; T. S. L.; A. I. E. E. (3), 
(4); Treasurer (3); Member 
Panhellenic Rifle Champions 
(1), (3); Go-To-College Team 
(3). 



Louis H. Smith 
Lebo 

Veterinary Medicine 

"K" Fraternity; Junior 
American Medical Association; 
Varsity Baseball (3). 



John F. Smerchek 

Cleburne 

Economics 

Phi Lambda Theta; "K" 
Fraternity; Ag Association; 
Ag Economics Club; Pax; 
Tabasco; Varsity Track (2), 
(3), (4); Varsity Football (2). 
(3); Freshman Football. 



Page 61 



Dwight D. Smith 
Udall 

Agricultural Engineering 

Alpha Tau Omega; Sigma 
Tau ; A. S. A. E. ; President (4) ; 
Business Staff Kansas State 
Engineer; Gamma Sigma Del- 
ta; Steel Ring. 



Berniece Ethel Sloan 
Boise City, Okla. 
Home Economics 



Jack H. Spurlock 

Burlingame 

Veterinary Medicine 

Delta Tau Delta; Junior 
American Veterinary Medical 
Association; Manager Fresh- 
man-Sophomore Hop; First 
Lieutenant R. O. T. C; Pax; 
T. S. L.; Scarab; Manager 
Union Party (4). 



Harvey J. Stewart 

Americus 

Animal Husbandry 

Block and Bridle; Ag As- 
sociation. 



Edna Stewart 

Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Kappa Phi; Browning; Home 
Economics Association; Inter- 
society Orator (4) ; Y. W. C. A. ; 
W. A. A.; Purple Pepsters; 
Hockey Team (2), (4); Volley 
Ball Team (4). 



Francelia Stratton 

I ola 

Institutional Economics 

Kappa Phi; Recording Secre- 
tary (4); Y. W. C. A. 





Lois Eleanor Sourk 
Goff 

History 

Phi Omega Pi; Enchiladas. 



Irene Spear 
Bushong 

Home Economics 

Alpha Beta. 



Donald A. Springer 

Manhattan 

General Science 

Phi Delta Theta; Scabbard 
and Blade; Secretary (4); 
"K" Fraternity; Football (2), 
(3), (4); Tabasco; Pax; Fresh- 
man Commission; Men's Pan- 
hellenic Council; Y. M. C. A. 



Albert A. Spealman 
Marysville 
Mechanical Engineering 
A. S. M.E. 



Belle Stanton 
Watson, Mo. 

Home Economics 

Alpha Theta Chi; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Omicron Nu; President; 
Ionian; Home Economics As- 
sociation; Sophomore Honors. 



Edward A. Stephenson, Jr. 

Alton 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; 
Block and Bridle; Ag Associa- 
tion; President; Stock Judging 
Team (3); Baseball (4); Ag 
Student (4). 



Page 62 



Almeron W. Stillwell 

Wichita 
Mechanical Engineering 

A. S. M. E.; College Band 

(4). 



Harold E. Stover 

Colwich 

Agricultural Engineering 

Lambda Tau Kappa; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athenian; A. S. A. E. 



Donald Noel Taylor 
Topeka 

A gricultural Engineering 



Grace E. Taylor 

Manhattan 

Home Economics 

W. A. A.; Purple Pepsters; 
Browning; Home Economics 
Association; Secretary (3). 



Esther Teasley 
Glasco 

English 



F. L. Timmons 

Geneseo 

Agronomy 

Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Zeta; 
Franklin; Tri-K; Grain Judg- 
ing Team (4); Agronomy Edi- 
tor of Ag Student. 




O micron 
Phi. 



Amy Stewardson 
Colby 

Home Economics 

Nu; Phi Kappa 



J. G. Swartz 
Atchison 

Electrical Engineering 

Alpha Sigma Psi; Scarab. 



Oliver E. Taintor 

Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 

A. S. M. E.; Athenian; 
Treasurer (4); Rifle Team (1), 
(2), (3), (4); Advanced R. O. 
T. C; Junior Honors; "Love 
'Em and Leave 'Em"; "Sun- 
up"; Tennis Team (4). 



Carl C. Tanner 
Newton 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I.E. E. 



W. A. Thompson 
Agenda 
Electrical Engineering 
Acacia; A. I. E. E. 



Dean W. Towner 

Solomon 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Advanced R. 0. 
T. C. 



Page 63 



























Alpha 
C.E. 



Tom J. Turner 
Hartford 

Civil Engineering 

Sigma Psi; A. 



S. 



L. F. Ungeheuer 
Centerville 

Agronomy 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Alpha 
Zeta; Athenian; Tri-K. 



E. T. Van Vranken 
Pratt 

Architectural Engineering 

Alpha Rho Chi; Scabbard 
and Blade; Tabasco; Gargoyle 
Club; Saber Knot; Advanced 
R. O. T. C. 



Richard Earl Warner 

Gridley 

Electrical Engineering 

Y. M. C. A.; A. I. E. E. 



George B. Wagner 

Eskridge 

Agriculture 

Hort Club; President; Pop- 
enoe Entomological Club; Al- 
pha Zeta; A. A. E. E.; Ag 
Association; Secretary; First 
Lieutenant R. O. T. C; Apple 
Judging Team (4). 



J. R. Wells 
Soldier 

Agricultural A dministration 

Poultry Judging Team (4). 




Robert W. Tulloss 
Ottawa 

Animal Husbandry 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Ag 
Association; Block and Bridle. 



Carolyn J. Vance 
Topeka 

Education 



Howard V. Vernon 
Oberlin 

Animal Husbandry 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Block 
and Bridle; Treasurer; Junior 
and Senior Stock Judging 
Team (3 ) ; Dairy Judging Team 
(4); Senior Stock Judging (4). 



Elmer Oscar Wangerin 
Kensington 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Kansas State 
Engineer Staff; Photographer. 



Charles R. Webb 
Sedan 

Mechanical Engineering 

Sigma Tau; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Alpha Beta; A. S. M. E.; 
President. 



Francis L. Wilson 
Abilene 

Industrial Jourtialism 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Sigma 
Delta Chi; Tabasco; Scarab; 
President; Scabbard and Blade; 
Class Treasurer (3); Theodoric 
Council (3), (4); Business 
Manager Brown Bull (3); 
Business Manager Kansas 
State Collegian (4). 



Page 64 



Claude Jennings Winslow 
Tonganoxie 
Education 
Rifle Team. 



Howard J. Winters 

Oswego 
Electrical Engineering 
A. I. E. E. (4). 



Hugh E. White 
Kingsdown 

Agricultural Engineering 

Phi Kappa Tau; Webster; 
A. I.E. E.; A. S. A. E. 



Mary Frances White 

Manhattan 

English 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. 
W. C. A. Cabinet (2), (4); 
Freshman Commission; Secre- 
tary (1); Sophomore Honors; 
Iowa State University (3). 



Esther Olivia Snodgrass 

Talmadge, Nebr. 

Home Economics 

World Wide Guild; Baptist 
Girls' Mission Circle; Y. W. 
C. A. 



Raymond J. Tillotson 

Shields 

A gricultural Engineering 

Y. M. C. A.; Cosmopolitan 
Club; Hamilton; A. S. A. E. 




Francis Dale Wilson 
Jennings 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Dairy 

Club (3), (4); Ag Association; 
Dairy Judging Team (3); Jun- 
ior Judging Team (3); Senior 
Judging Team (4). 



Zerita Wilson 
Council Grove 
Home Economics 
Y. W. C. A. 



Bertha Williams 
Manhattan 

General Science 

Chi Omega; Bethany Circle; 
Y W. C. A. 



Horace Yoder 
Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alpha Beta; A. S. M. E. 



Christiana Shields 

Lost Springs 

Home Economics 



Alice Radebaugh 
Frankfort 
Home Economics 
Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



Page 65 



Wayne Amos 
Manhattan 

Industrial Journal ism 

Delta Tau Delta. 

Paul A. Skinner 
Manhattan 

Rural Commerce 

Delta Tau Delta; Alpha 
Kappa Psi; Purple Masque; 
Freshman Commission, Pres. 
(1); Freshman Panhellenic; 
Y. M. C. A., Vice-Pres. (3), 
Pres. (4), Sec'y (2); S. G. A. 
Representative (2); Y. M. C. 
A. Board (4); Senior Men's 
Panhellenic (2) (3); Class 
President (3); Treasurer 
Campus Chest (3) (4); To- 
basco; Freshman-Sophomore 
Hop Manager; "The Giant's 
Stair;" "The Enemy;" "The 
Valiant;" "Sun-Up;" "The 
Merchant of Venice;" Captain 
R. O. T. C. 

Cornell Bugbee 
Manhattan 

General Science 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; 
Scarab, Pres. (4); Swimming 
Team (2) (3); S. G. A. (4); 
Class Treasurer (3); Scabbard 
and Blade; Freshman Pan- 
hellenic; Captain R. O. T. C. 

Fern Cunningham 

Junction City 

Piano 

Alpha Xi Delta; Mu Phi 
Epsilon, Pres. (4); Y. W. C. A.; 
Big Sister Captain; Freshman 
Panhellenic, Pres. (1); College 
Orchestra (1) (2) (3) (4); 
Salon Orchestra; Glee Club 
Accompanist; Summer School 
Play (2). 




Carl Feldmann 

Sabetha 

Industrial Journalism 

Delta Tau Delta; Pi Epsilon 
Pi; Tobasco; Assistant Editor 
Kansas State Collegian (3). 



A. D. Lovett 

Larned 

A gricultnral Economics 

Delta Tau Delta; Ag Eco- 
nomics Club; Ag Association 
(2) (3); Basket Ball (1); 
Varsity Basket Ball (2). (3). 



Virgil Kent 

Manhattan 

General Science 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Scabbard 
and Blade; Freshman Pan- 
hellenic; Freshman Commis- 
sion; Glee Club (2) (3) (4); 
Tobasco; Captain R. O. T. C; 
Go-To-College Team; "Mar- 
tha;" "Mikado." 



Vera Frances Howard 

Mount Hope 

Home Economics 

Alpha Xi Delta; Y.W.C. A.; 
Home Economics Association; 
Ionian (1) (2). 



Dorothea Pearl Arbuthnot, 

R. N. 

Bennington 

Home Economics and Nursing 





... : ■ 



Doris Soper, R. N. 

Manhattan 

Home Economics and Nursing 

Alpha Beta; W. A. A.; Fresh- 
man Swimming; Freshman 
Archery Team. 



Ruby Knorp, R. N. 
Hazelton 

Home Economics and Nursing 




Veda Skillin, R. N. 
Frankfort 

Home Economics and Nursing 



Page 66 



bl 



Leola Beyer 
Arrington 

General Science 



Verne W. Boyd 
Irving 

Rural Commerce 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Tobasco 
Senior Men's Panhellenic (4) 
College Band (1); Chorus (3) 
M e n's Glee Club (4) 
"Mikado." 



Hazel Keil McGarraugh 
Caldwell, Idaho 

Industrial Journalism 

Theta Sigma Phi; Quill Club. 



Lucia M. Haggart 

Salina 

Home Economics 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. 
W.C. A.; Volley Ball Team (3). 

Mary Marcene Kimball 

Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 

Alpha Xi Delta; Theta Sig- 
ma Phi; Quill Club; Pi Kappa 
Delta; President (4); Collegian 
Staff (2), (3); Royal Purple 
Staff (4); Varsity Debate (2), 
(3), (4); Pi Kappa Delta Na- 
tional Extempore Contest (3); 
Freshman Commission; Brown 
Bull Staff (2), (3) ; Press Teams 
(3), (4); Kansas Authors' Club; 
Publicity Manager Artist Se- 
ries (3); State Champion De- 
bate Team (3); "The Goose 
Hangs High"; "The Sham." 

Glenn E. Thomas 

Topeka 

Civil Engineering 

Phi Pi Phi; Delta Alpha 
Omega; Washburn College; 
Webster. 




Kay Haines Beach 

Edwardsville 

Horticulture 

Phi Mu Alpha; Apple Judg- 
ing Team; Ag Student Staff; 
Horticulture Club; Secretary 
(3); Glee Club (2), (3), (4); 
Secretary (4); "Pinafore;" 
"Martha;" "Mikado;" Chorus 
(1), (2), (3), (4); Ag Associa- 
tion; Y. M. C. A.; Go-To-Col- 
lege Quartet (1), (4). 



Gladys' Charline Draper 
Manhattan 
General Science 
Y. W. C. A. 



C. W. Halferty 
Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Circulation Man- 
ager Kansas State Engineer. 



Norma Hook 

Silver Lake 

Home Economics 

Beta Phi Alpha; W T . A. A. 
Purple Pepsters; Secretary 
Treasurer (3); Hockev (2), (3) 
Volley Ball (2); Basket Ball 
(3); Baseball (3); Track (4) 
Ag Follies; Washburn College 



H. L. Keil 

Caldwell, Idaho 

Chemical Engineering 



Ida Snyder 
Effingham 
General Science 



Page 67 










"When June Comes" 







JUNIORS 



Agnes Bane 

Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Alpha Xi Delta; Prix; Pur- 
ple Pepsters; President (3); 
W. A. A.; Hockey Manager 
(2); Kappa Beta; Hockey Var- 
sity (1), (2); Y. W. C. A.; Big 
Sister Captain (2), (3); Track 
(1), (2). 



John S. Chandley 

Kansas City 

Industrial Journalism 

Kappa Sigma; Sigma Delta 
Chi. 



Rose Louise Child 

Manhattan 

Industrial Journalism 

Phi Omega Pi; Pi Kappa 
Delta; Theta Sigma Phi; Prix; 
Ionian; Intercollegiate Debate 
(1), (2), (3); Intersociety Ora- 
torical Contest; Rural Press 
Team ,(2). 



Bessie Cook 
Bucklin 

Home Economics 

Alpha Beta; Y. W. C. A. 



Helen Cortelyou 

Manhattan 

General Science 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Phi 
Alpha Mu; Lambda Tau Kap- 
pa ; Prix ; W. A. A. ; Y. W. C A. 
Cabinet (2), (3); Glee Club (1), 
(2); Class Historian (2); Y. W. 
C. A.; Octette; Freshman 
Scholarship Prize; Sophomore 
Honors; "Romance." 



Hope Dawley 

Manhattan 

Physical Education 

^ Delta Zeta; W. A. A.; Y. W. 
C. A.; Swimming Team (1); 
Red Cross Saving Corps; Ten- 
nis Manager; Baseball (2). 




R. F. Brannan 
Meade 

Poultry Husbandry 

Alpha Gamma Rho; 
Association; Alternate 
Poultry Judging Team. 



Ag 
1927 



T. J. Charles, Jr. 

Republic 

A gricultnral A dm inistration 

Delta Tau Delta; Tobasco; 
Pax; Manager Democras Party. 



John R. Coleman 

Wichita 

Chemical Engineering 

Phi Kappa; Pi Epsilon; To- 
basco; Panhellenic Representa- 
tive (1), (2), (3); Boxing Team 
(3); Intramural "K"; Newman 
Club (1), (2); President (3); 
Advanced R. O. T. C; Treas- 
urer Kansas State Engineer 
(3); Boxing Instructor (3). 



P. A. COOLEY 

Neodesha 
A rchitectural Engineering 



Dorothy Cummings 
Moran 

General Science 



Grace Daugherty 
Republic 
Home Economics 
Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A. 



Page 70 



G. E. Drollinger 

Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 

Kappa Sigma; Mortar and 
Ball; Freshman Panhellenic 
Representative (3); Vice-Presi- 
dent Mechanical Engineering 
Seminar. 



Marion Eldredge 

Kansas City, Mo. 

General Science 

Pi Beta Phi; Kappa Beta; 
Frivol; "The Poor Nut." 



Florence M. Funk 
Iola 

Home Economics 
Kappa Phi; Eurodelphian. 



Kenneth D. Hall 

Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 

Sigma Tau; A. I. E.; College 
Band. 



Viola Grace Hart 
Topeka 

Home Economics 

Sigma Delta; Washburn Col- 
lege. 



Lillian Hazlett 
Whitewater 

English 



Delta Delta Delta; 
ladas; Y. W. C. A. 



Enchi- 




KliBECCA DUBBS 

Ransom 

General Science 

Eurodelphian; Kappa Beta - 
W. A. A. 



Elizabeth Fairbank 
Topeka 

Smith-Hughes 

W. A. A.;Y. W. C. A.; Home 
Economics Association; Junior 
Class Representative of Van 
Zile Hall. 

Clarence J. Goering 

Moundridge 

Rural Commerce 

Phi Mu Alpha; Pi Kappa 
Delta; Alpha Kappa Psi; Web- 
ster; Webster Debate Coach 

(2), (3); Varsity Debate (1), 
(2), (3); College Chorus (1), 
(2), (3); Freshman Commis- 
sion; "Pinafore;" "Martha;" 
Glee Club (1), (2), (3); Secre- 
tary (2); Publicity Manager 
(3). 



Ruth Hallett 
Topeka 

Institutional Management 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Washburn 
College; Eurodelphian. 

Elizabeth Hartley 
Manhattan 

Physical Education 

Delta Zeta; W. A. A.; Purple 
Pepsters; Vice - President; 
Women's "K" Fraternity; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer; Prix; Vice- 
President; Y. W. C. A.; Arch- 
ery Manager; Hockey (1), (2), 
(3); Volley Ball (2); Varsity- 
Swimming (2); Track (1), (2); 
Varsity (1), (2); Baseball (1), 
(2); Varsity (1), (2); Basket 
Ball (1), (2). 



Edwin Habiger 
Bushton 

History 

Phi Kappa; Tobasco Repre- 
sentative (2), (3); Pax; Athe- 
nian; Newman Club. 



Page 71 









Lewis G. Hamilton 

South Haven 
Veterinary Medicine 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



Helene Inge 

Independence 

Home Economics 

Delta Delta Delta; Orches- 
tra (3); Enchiladas. 



Mildred Lemert 

Cedar Vale 

General Science 



Lenore McCormick 
Cedar Vale 

Industrial Journalism 

Kappa Delta; Theta Sigma 
Phi; Prix; Ionian; Intersociety 
Council; Secretary; Y. W. C. 
A. Treasurer; Cosmopolitan 
Club; Associate Editor Cosmo- 
politan Student. 



Arnold A. Mast 

Abilene 

Agronomy 

Farm House; Alpha Zeta; 
Tri-K; Hamilton; Ag Associa- 
tion; Tobasco; Pax. 



Mabel McClung 
Manhattan 

Art 

Beta Phi Alpha; Kappa 
Beta. 




Francis W. ImMasche 

Saffordville 

A gricultural A dministration 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Alpha 
Zeta; Pax; President (3); Ag 
Economics Club; Treasurer; 
Manager Ag Barnwarmer; De- 
partmental Editor of Ag Stu- 
dent; Ag Association. 



R. F. Johnson 

Salina 

Rural Commerce 

Delta Tau Delta; Business 
Manager 1928 Royal Purple. 
Tobasco; Wampus Cats. 



Curtis Lund 

La Sita 

General Science 

Phi Mu Alpha; Salon Or- 
chestra (3); Freshman Com- 
mission (1) ; Go-To-College (2) ; 
Glee Club (3); Orchestra (2), 
(3). 



Joe Limes 

La Harpe 

Physical Education 

Delta Tau Delta; Football 
(2), (3); "K" Fraternity. 



Paul E. Massey 
Yates Center 

Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Advanced R. O. 
T. C. ; Second Lieutenant. 



Mary A. Meyer 

Mound City, Mo. 

Mathematics and History 

Kappa Phi; Ionian; Y. W. 
C. A.; Cosmopolitan. 



Page 72 



James W. Schwanke 

Alma 

Electrical Engineering 

N.A. S. E.;A. I.E. E.; Rifle 
Squad; Intramural Boxing (2). 



Earl L. Sloan 
Boise City, Okla. 
Civil Engineering 
Sigma Tau; Athenian. 



Esther Teasley 

Manhattan 

General Science 



Helen Trembley 

Hutchinson 

Home Economics 

Alpha Theta Chi; Eurodel 
phian. 



Helen Walters 
Riley 

Home Economics 



Temple F. Winburn 
DeKalb, Mo. 

Agriculture 

Phi Kappa Tau; "K" Fra- 
ternity; Alpha Zeta; Ag Asso- 
ciation; Horticulture Club; Y. 
M. C. A.; Cross-country (2); 
Track (2), (3); Assistant Busi- 
ness Manager Ag Student. 




John H. Shenk 

Manhattan 

Industrial Chemistry 

Phi Mu Alpha; Band (1), 

(2), (3). 



R. K. Smith 

Wichita 

Architecture 

Kappa Sigma; Tobasco; Pax; 
Gargoyle Club; Vice-President. 



Gladys Suiter 

Macksville 

Industrial Journalism 

Beta Phi Alpha; Theta Sig- 
ma Phi; Pi Kappa Delta; Inter- 
collegiate Debate (1), (2), (3). 



Berenice Wentz 
Ames 

Home Economics 



Minnie M. Wilkes 

Belleville 

English 



Ned H. Woodman 
Manhattan 

Landscape A rchitecture 

Delta Tau Delta; Tobasco 
Representative (3) ; Senior 
Men's Panhellenic. 



Page 73 





















Gladys E. Meyer 
Linn 

Home Economics 
Alpha Beta. 



Gerald Moyer 

Manhattan 

Agriculture 

Phi Delta Theta; T. S. L.; 
Senior Men's Panhellenic; Pres- 
ident (3); Tobasco. 



Mabel G. Paulson 
Whitewater 

General Science 

Alpha Xi Delta; Phi Alpha 
Mu; Browning; Kappa Phi; 
Intersociety Council; Y. W. 
C. A. 



Elsie Rand 
Warn ego 
Clothing 
Ionian; Intersociety Debate. 



Ruth R. Richardson 
Manhattan 

Home Economics 

Ionian; Kappa Phi. 



Florence Sederlin 

Scandia 

Home Economics 




Blanche Myers 
Americus 

Rural Commerce 

Alpha Theta Chi. 



Pearl Parsons 

Topeka 
Home Economics 



Gerald D. Van Pelt 
Beloit 

Electrical Engineering 

Sigma Phi Sigma; Hamilton; 
A. I. E. E. 



Ben Remick 
Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 

Phi Delta Theta; A. I. E. E.; 
Y. M. C. A.; Freshman Com- 
mission; Golf Team (2). 



Hazel Romer 

Larned 

General Science 

Alpha Delta Pi; Senior Wom- 
en's Panhellenic (3); Enchi- 
ladas. 



D. A. Scheel 
Emporia 

A griculture 

Junior Stock Judging Team; 
Athenian; Intersociety Coun- 
cil; Block and Bridle. 



Page 74 




Prominent business men and others. 



Page 75 



















'.» 



* 




,^<^\ 






Fairchild's Castle Walls 




SOPHOMORES 












E. W. Atkinson 
Louisville 

Rural Commerce 



Mildred Baker 
Gove 

Home Economics 



J. H. Berry 
Fort Scott 

Rural Commerce 



Garnet Bowen 
Chillicothe, Mo. 

Physical Education 



Charles Brainard 
Manhattan 

A rchitectural Engineering 



Orpha Brown 

Edmond 
Home Economics 



Mildred Burliew 
Manhattan 

General Science 






/ 






Harry Axtell 
Dimmitt, Texas 

Agriculture 



K. Bentz 
Peabody 

Electrical Engineering 



J. P. BONFIELD 

Elmo 

Rural Commerce 



H. R. Bradley 
Kidder, Mo. 

Agriculture 



Berenice Brien 
Bern 

Home Economics 



Maurine Bryan 
Delia 

Public School Music 



Otie Chance 
Iuka 

General Science 



Page 78 



W. S. COBLENTZ 

Osage City 

Agriculture 



W. E. Col well 
Onega 

Industrial Journalism 



Vera L. Crawford 
Lincoln 

Industrial Journalism 



Ruth Dible 
Rexford 

Home Economics 



Maggie Doyle 
Douglass 

Home Economics 



Mattie May Engle 
Wabash, Indiana 
Home Economics 



O. E. Funk 
Marion 

Agriculture 





y 















Vance Collins 
Junction City 

Civil Engineering 



H. C. Cowdery 
Lyons 

Civil Engineering 



Frances Curtis 
Manhattan 

Home Economics 



William Doyle 
Douglass 

Mechanical Engineering 



Eva Dudgeon 
Carleton, Nebr. 

Home Economics 



J. H. Evans 
Barnard 

Rural Commerce 



Betty Grimm 
El Dorado 

General Science 



Page 79 






A. L. Hammond 

Wichita 

A rchitectural Engineering 



Betty Jeffers 
Abhyville 

Physical Education 



E. F. Jenista 

Caldwell 
General Science 



Shelby Jones 

Goodland 

Chemical Engineering 



J. H. Karr 
Troy 

Electrical Engineering 



L. R. KlRKWOOD 

Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 



I Ielen Marquis 
Glen Elder 

Industrial Journalism 








40-., 



^% 









Lyman Henley 
Eureka 

Agricultural Administration 



George Jelinek 

Ellsworth 

Genera! Science 



Alvin Johnson 

Topeka 

A gricultural Administration 



Josephine Keef 

Glen Elder 

Industrial Journalism 



J. H. Kershaw 
Garrison 

Electrical Engineering 



Genevieve Long 

Haviland 
Home Economics 



Thelma McCune 

Stafford 
General Science 



Page SO 



Helen Magee 
Goddard 

Industrial Journalism 



G. A. Mark 
Abilene 

Rural Commerce 



Fern Maxey 
Coats 

Home Economics 



Beulah Moe 
Manhattan 

Special 



Alice Moreland 
Manhattan 

General Science 



R. P. Paulson 
Whitewater 

General Science 



W. C. Perham 
lola 

Rura Commerce 




jjKK&ty, 





■m 











■ y 










J. R. Mathias 
Baldwin 

Civil Engineering 



Esther Masketer 

Sabetha 

General Science 



P. A. Mears 
Simpson 

Rural Commerce 



Faye Moss 
Lincoln 

Home Economics 



G. C. Nonken 

Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 



Leone Pacey 

Manhattan 

Physical Education 



M. G. PURCELL 

Manhattan 
Civil Engineering 



Page 81 



Mary Belle Read 
Manhattan 

Physical Education 



Tillie Rife 

Anthony 
Home Economics 












Dorothy Rucker 
Burdett 

Home Economics 



Marian Ryan 

Lincoln 

Public School Music 



Neva Rush 
Severy 

Home Economics 



Mildred Schlickau 
Haven 

Home Economics 



C. V. Schneider 
Manhattan 

Music 



Karl Shaver 
Cedar Vale 

Electrical Engineering 



Alene Shay 
Manhattan 

Home Economics 



H. N. Stapleton 

Jewell City 

Electrical Engineering 









Hazel Steenis 
Deerfield 

Home Economics 



C. W. Stewart 
Coldwater 

A rchitectiiral Engineering 



Catherine Stone 
Sharon 

Public School Music 



D. E. Springer 
Garrison 
Mechanical Engineering 



Page 82 



Oz 



E. A. Templeton 
Burns 

A gi {cultural A dministration 



Dale Thompson 

Ness City 
General Science 



Opal Thurow 

Macksville 

Special 



Mary Toews 
Cullinson 

Rural Commerce 



Fred True 
Perry 

A griculture 



Ruth Uglow 
Concordia 

Home Economics 



Logan Warden 
Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering 



Mildred Walker 
Manhattan 

General Science 



Frances Wentz 
Ames 

Home Economics 



Edith Wilkes 

Belleville 
Home Economics 



J. W. Wilson 
Ashland 

General Science 



R. C. Paulson 
Whitewater 

Electrical Engineering 



H. C. Shade 
Ottawa 

hid list rial Journalism 



Page 8) 






ft 














FRESHMEN 





















Anna Alford 

Hutchinson 

Industrial Journalism 



Irene Brinkman 
Freeport 

Industrial Journalism 



Miriam Clammer 
Manhattan 

Public School Music 



E. L. Cline 
Lincoln 

General Science 



W. (Nottingham 

Wichita 

Electrical Engineering 



Margaret Darden 
Manhattan 

General Science 




T. A. Appl 
Bison 

Electrical Engineering 



N. O. Butler 

Falls City, Nebr. 

Electrical Engineering 



Geraldine Clausen 
Peabody 

Industrial Journalism 



John T. Correll 
Manhattan 

General Science 



Charlene Day 

Hebron, Nebr. 

Home Economics 



M. A. Cowles 

Sharon Springs 

Electrical Engineering 



Page S6 



L. A. Dellinger 
Bucyrus 

A griculture 



Helen Laura Dodge 
Manhattan 

Physical Education 



DORRIS DUCKWALL 

Abilene 
Industrial Journalism 



W. H. English 
Cimarron 

Electrical Engineering 



W. E. Forsythe 
Eudora 

Rural Commerce 



Katharine Fullinwider 

El Dorado 

Home Economics 




C. R. Disney 
Manhattan 

Rural Commerce 



Mary Doolittle 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Home Economics 



C. J. Durr 
Eudora 

Agriculture 



Emma Farris 
Winchester 

Home Economics 



Mildred Fox 

Wichita 

Home Economics 



Ruth Graham 

Manhattan 
Home Economics 



Page 87 






Ruth Imthurn 
Madison 

Home Economics 



Katharine Harding 

Manhattan 
Public School Music 



John J. Heimrick 
Clay Center 
A rchitectural Engineering 



Ernestine Hobbs 

Lebanon 

Architecture 



A. A. Hostetler 
Hutchinson 

A rchitectural Engineering 



Genevieve Johnson 

Burlingame 

Rural Commerce 




G. L. Hamrdla 

Timken 

Electrical Engineering 



H. T. Heath 
Enterprise 

General Science 



Blanche Hemmer 
Medicine Lodge 

Industrial Journalism. 



Velma Hahn 
Idana 

Public School Music 



V. C. Hoyt 
Phillipsburg 

Industrial Journalism 



M. W. Knight 
Lamar, Colo. 

Chemical Engineering 



Page 88 



H. C. Shepherd 

White City 
General Science 



Doris Smith 
Burlingame 

Home Economics 



Thelma Stafford 

Republic 

General Science 



O. G. Stearns 
Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering 



Ruby Stover 

Kansas City 

General Science 



Thelma Warders 
Irving 

Home Economics 




Helen Sloan 
Hutchinson 

Industrial Journalism 



Bessie Sparks 
Kingman 

Home Economics 



J. L. Stafford 

Leonardville 
General Science 



W. M. Stingley 
Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering 



Winifred Tauer 

Warn ego 
Industrial Journalism 



Mary Willis 

Collingswood, N. J. 

Industrial Journalism 



Page 89 






J. M. Langford 
Anthony 

Electrical Engineering 



Eugenia Leighton 

West Helena, Ark. 

Home Economics 



Beulah Manklin 
Greeley 

Home Economics 



Clara Mc Bride 
Boyle 

Home Economics 



Margaret Miner 

Ness City 

General Science 



K. L. NOLAND 

Cedarvale 
Electrical Engineering 




D. N. League 
Wet mo re 

Electrical Engineering 



Reva Long 

Manhattan 

Home Economics 



Beulah Manning 

White City 

General Science 



J. K. Merritt 
Haven 

Rural Commerce 



Thelma Neill 
St. John 

Home Economics 



Ida Osborn 

Clifton 

General Science 



Page 90 



Mary Graves 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Home Economics 



Elmo Young 
Hutchinson 

A rchitectural Engineering 
Delta Tau Delta. 



Cloyce Hamilton 
Solomon 

Industrial Journalism 
Delta Tau Delta. 



Gene Livingston 
Hutchinson 

Mechanical Engineering 

Delta Tau Delta. 



Gretchen O'Conner 
St. John 

Home Economics 



Marjorie Hankins 
Good land 
Home Economics 
Chi Omega. 




Mary Lorraine Evans 
Russell 
Home Economics 
Delta Delta Delta. 



Ralph Campbell 
Norton 

Rural Commerce 

Delta Tau Delta. 



Dorothy Wiggins 
Longmont, Colo. 
Home Economics 
Alpha Delta Pi. 



Pattie Kimball 
Manhattan 

Physical Education 

Alpha Xi Delta. 



Roseanne Abbey 
Galena 
Rural Commerce 
Pi Beta Phi. 



Violet Holstine 
Columbus 

Physical Education 

Chi Omeea. 



Page 91 









Robert Womer 

Manhattan 

Rural Commerce 






Frances Young 
Newton 

Home Economics 




Mabel Wyatt 
Kansas City 

Architecture 



Frances Young 
Newton 

Home Economics 






Page 92 




ifnars 







• ... 



SF'jfcs 






p.* 








^ 



Page 93 

























The good old days — at camp 



Page 94 




Pane 95 



More of camp — see anybody you know? 






1 ! 
4 4 










The Majesty of Denison 









M PU 



jhree 





On the Pi Phi steps. 



Grace Madison who was crowned Ag barn dance 
queen. 

Above — A Frivol Chorus does a high one. 

Left — The Tri Delta girls clean house. 



Long and short dresses at 
Tabasco. 

Mickey and her senorita get 
hot. 





The A . T. O.s dress up for home- 
coming. 

Pi Phis informally at home. 

Betas put on a royal handshaking 
performance for the Nebraska and 
homecoming visitors. Mystery — who 
pulled the string? 

Phi Sigs win the cup with a 
cleverly-dressed house and yard. 

Homecleaning with the Tri-Delts. 

Sig-Eps fix up the many terraces 
in gala array. 





Above — "Red" crosses the finish line. 
Upper right — -The Wampus Cat Carry-all. 
Doesn't Douglas look fierce? 



•Si 




Crowds in the cast stadium watch 
two football struggles. 






" Yay — Aggies" — The W. A. A. Pepsters get 
excited and wildly brandish the purple pennants. 



"Hail Hail" — the Band arouses To- 
peka for a rally. 

Moody gets a hand from the Wampus 
Cats. 

Jim Douglass, with the football, and 
the 1927 gridiron crew. 

"Look, them's not Westpoinlers, they're 
just a band." 







*G**9ftiG* 




7m. ■* ' • * • 




•* 







STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



Student Governing Association 



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C^c^oe^.e^ 




Frank Callahan, President 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT at Kansas State is 
under the control of the Student Governing 
Association, membership in which is contingent upon 
payment of the varsity activity fee. Most of the 
business of the Association is carried on by the stu- 
dent council of seven members, elected each spring 
to serve the following year. 

Among the duties of the council are apportion- 
ment of the varsity activity fee; control of the special 
fund set aside for support of activities not covered 
by the fee; supervision of class elections and activi- 
ties pep meeting organization; control of varsity 
dances, and handling of all student discipline with the 
exception of cribbing cases. 

In discipline cases the council sits as a court for 
trial and passes sentence, subject to review by the 
faculty council and approval by the president of the 
college, which has been given in every case coming 
before the council operating under the present con- 
stitution. 

In 1927, the seven-person council plan wasadopted, 
the former council having consisted of 17 members. 



President . 
Secretary 
Vice-President 
Treasurer 



STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS 
Frank Callahan 

Vesta Duckwall 

Joe Holsinger 

Paul Pfuetze 




Pfuetze 



Bcgbee 



Holsinger 



McGuire 



Duckwall 



Clausen 



Page 114 



87. 



Student Governing Association 



— 4-*»e=i*a.Sfc)iA-< ™ ^.^-^^^ 



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THE smaller council can be more easily called together than the larger 
body, and each member is forced to take much more individual interest 
and responsibility than was formerly the case. 

Council members are nominated by petition, any S. G. A. member being 
eligible. 

Officers of the council are elected by the council, and serve as officers 
both of the council and the association. 

A business meeting of the entire governing association is held once a 
year, in April, at which time nomination petitions for the new council are 
read and any necessary business transacted. 

Funds set aside for special administration by the council are used at the 
council's discretion; among the activities sponsored in this manner being the 
Go-To-College teams; the trip of the Men's Glee Club to the Missouri Valley 
contest; college publicity and class election expenses. 

The Kansas State S. G. A. is a member of the Mid-West Student Confer- 
ence of Colleges and Universities. 



MEMBERS OF THE STUDENT COUNCIL 

Cornell Bugbee Vesta Duckwall 

Frank Callahan Joe Holsinger 

Esther McGuire Paul Pfuetze 

Lawrence Clausen 



Miss McGuire was elected at the fall election this year. Clausen became 
a member of the council at the second semester election. 



Page 1 1 S 




Senior Class 



FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Historian . 
Marshal . 
Devotional Leader 



. Joe Anderson 

Vesta Duckwall 

. A. M. Young 

Marian Rude 

Reva Lyne 

Lawrence Clausen 

Edna Circle 



/T^vN September 8, 1924, the notable band of 1,391 



Joe Anderson 

President 



I college pilgrims called Class of '28 arrived at 

mk v Ik harbor K. S. A. C. They came for the purpose of 

n A^^L. m si boarding the various steamers in which they ex- 

B^w^Lm '■ ' iralliiic pected to make their voyage across the ocean of 

M -- :—_ ----- ---'—' , A'H M| College Education to thai new land beyond the 

Wharf of Graduation. There were 560 who boarded 
the steamer General Science, 222 girls scrambled 
into the steamer Home Economics, 417 chose 
steamer Engineering, while steamer Veterinary 
Medicine contained 24, and steamer Agriculture's crew numbered 168. 

These pilgrims had come from every hill and dale of the United States. They represented all 
types and classes of American youth. There were numerous reasons for their coming. Some 
came for study (example: Wampus Cats), some for play (those making Phi Kappa Phi), some 
were sent, while many hardly realized what they were here for, but all make up this notable chapter 
in history. 

The personnel and number of the passengers has changed somewhat since the year 1924. 
Upon arriving at the harbor a few were examined and found wanting, others saw too much and 
became sea-sick, while still others had weak hearts and returned home to be reinforced by another 
heart, the two of which could "beat as one." Then Tom, Dick, and Harry found it necessary 
to withdraw because their alarm clocks failed to go off on too many mornings. Conditions at 
home, ill-health, and lure for adventure captured still more of the crew. A few fell overboard 
because some of the Ship Mates left the lower bar off the "E" railing. (F). 




Lyne 



Young 



Rude 



Duckwall 



Page 1 1 6 



Senior Class 



SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS 



President . 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 

Devotional Leader 



Paul Pfuetze 

. Clara Paulson 

Dorothy Stewart 

c. j. schwindler 

C. E. Crews 

Dick Bradley 




Paul Pfuetze 

President 



PASSENGERS from other harbors have joined 
the group and likewise a small portion of the 
voyageurs of harbor K. S. A. C. has- gone to other 
ports. The total number has decreased until at 
the present time there are 437 of them left approach- 
ing the Wharf of Graduation. 

During the four years voyage the Class of '28 
has given men and women to every kind of activity. 
They have taken a prominent part in athletics, 
dramatics, honorary organizations, and social and 
religious activities. As freshmen they saw the 

Kansas Aggie football team defeat the team of K. U. for the first time since 1906. In their Senior 
year one of their number received the Rhodes scholarship to Oxford which was the first scholar- 
ship of its kind to be granted to a student from K. S. A. C. 

As they were sailing thru the calm sea of Senior-Dumb they received an S. O. S. call from 
mid-ocean where an underclassman was shipwrecked by a collision with the Brown Bull. Huge 
waves of indignation circled out from the wreck carrying the man out of sight who had waved 
the red flag. Futile efforts of rescue with petitioned lifeboats were made, but he was lost. Later 
reports came from harbor K. U. of attempted landing, but the logbook records the storm-tossed 
lad a sailor at Port K. S. A. C. again on the second lap of the year's journey. 

By the end of the four years the '28 sailors have developed wonderfully in knowledge and 
power. They have often felt weary of their voyage, but now leave for future passages with mingled 
feelings of regret. They have been loyal to K. S. A. C. and will always be so. This is only a 
record of their travel over the ocean of College Education. The balance of the voyage across the 
Sea of Life is still held in the secrecy of the future. 




Bradley 



SCHWINDLER 



Crews 



Paulson 



Page 117 




Junior Class 

FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 

Historian 



James Douglass 
Lucille Chastain 
Ralph Lashbrook 

Arthur Hemker 

Leslie Moody 

Marie Arbuthnot 



James Douglass 

President 



By The Historian 

SEPTEMBER, 1925, we entered K. S. A. C. a timid bouquet of greenery. 
As the fall wore away the green underwent a gradual change as did the 
leaves, the Freshman became bright and shining, caused by many a frequent 
dipping into studies. Time passed; we rolled up our sleeves and entered 
fearlessly into battle in the front ranks. 

As a historian I should mention all our achievements, but since it would 
cover too much space I will say that we have not only had representatives 
in all school activities, educational, athletic and social, but leaders in all. 




Hemker 



Arbuthnot 



Chastain 



Lashbrook 



Page IIS 



Junior Class 



SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS 

Victor Palenske 

Elizabeth Hartley 

Lillian Hazlett 



President .... 

Vice-President 

Secretary .... 

Treasurer .... 

Marshal .... 

Prom Manager 

1928 Royal Purple Editor-elect 



Charles Sardou 

Dee Householder 

Garth Champagne 

Ralph Lashbrook 




Victor Palenske 

President 



As we are Juniors, finis looms on the horizon, we are looking forward to 
our entry as mature and upright Seniors. Yes, further than that, after we 
have made a triumphant exit, and are out in dim uncertain life our plea shall 
be that we will make names as individuals as great as we have made as a class 
in K. S. A. C. 







Champagne 



Hazlett 



Lashbrook 



Sardou 



Page 119 




Sophomore Class 



FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 

Historian 



Milton Allison 

Nita Thornburg 

Crystal Taylor 

Warren Perham 

Jim Yeager 

Leon Pacey 



Milton Allison 
President 



(By the Editor) 

WHAT! No Sophomore class history? Terrible — we can't print the annual without a 
history of that class, one of the four best in the college. There was one turned in; proba- 
bly the janitor got it. Somebody's going to have to write one awful quick. It's up to the staff, 
I guess. Read this at your peril. 

The Freshmen of 1927 hit the hill with a bang — they shook out the hayseeds and wheat- 
straws and commenced right away to show the college what an enterprising group of — -youngsters 
could do. Scholarship, athletic, society — they became topnotchers in everything. Just a whole- 
some, industrious bunch of boys and girls, willing to work and anxious to get ahead. 




Taylor 



Yeager 



Pacey 



Thornburg 



Page 120 



Sophomore Class 



SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

Marshal 



L. E. Henley 

Grace Madison 

Katherine Taylor 

Wilda Cline 

Charles Brainard 




L. E. Henley 

President 



TODAY, they are at the top of the ladder, with the exception of the Seniors and Juniors. 
Give this class two years more and it will lead the college. Its members have practiced 
industry and have ability, a combination that should lead them to the stars. 

At least it should lead to graduation. Keep up the good work, noble men and women of the 
sophomore class, the college and the deans are watching you. 





i». ♦ 



1 U***ti - : ) 



Taylor 



Madison 



Brainard 



Cline 



Page 121 




Freshman Class 

FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS 

President Fred Seaton 

Vice-President Ruth Peck 

Secretary Helen Sloan 

Treasurer Claude Rhoades 

Historian Pattie Kimball 

Marshal Earl Moyer 



Fred Seaton 

President 



(By the Class Historian) 

THROUGH the combined efforts of the Union Pacific, Rock Island railroads, and the various 
and ruddy Fords, the usual assignment of Freshmen found themselves in the beautiful and 
spacious environment of dear old K. S. A. C. It was a gala day as they filed through the mazes 
of enrollment and were thoroughly shorn of all their superfluous and some not so superfluous 
cash. 

This was the beginning. Soon they were all absorbed in the whirl of College life, football 
games, parties, dances, studies; "Rec Center Lab," hikes and all the pleasures, duties and activities 
that form the life of the hill became everyday affairs to them. 





Kimball 



Mover 



Pane 122 



Freshman Class 

SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS 

President Carol Hadley 

Vice-President Tad Platt 

Secretary Ruth Botsford 

Treasurer Edith Loomis 

Marshal Jimmip; Taylor 




Tad Platt 

Vice-President 



SO THOROUGHLY were they absorbed in the general reassemble that they could hardly be 
recognized as Freshmen. Yet from time to time such achievements as a dashing football team 
that could give the varsity all the competition it desired and more, and a basket ball team that 
for a time threatened to overshadow the performance of the regulars, a Freshman Panhellenic 
and a Freshman-Sophomore Hop that were real parties, brought to the more advanced members 
of the student body not a small flicker of genuine pride and satisfaction. 

What is a general idea of the group? It is now a power on the hill. Its members include 
orators, dramatists, debaters, scholars and as a proof of the previous returns of the beauty con- 
testants, three out of six were the college beauty queens. It promises everything in the way of 
achievement, and more than that, it gives to the world at large proof that from the class of 1931 
big things can be expected. 





Loomts 



Botsford 



Page 1 2 1 







North Campus 




ACTIVITIES 



The College Band Association 



.?="£=: <£=)<£=] 



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i^»^^« 






R. B. G 


ORDON 




Director 




PERSONNEL 




Flutes 


0. Wagner 


R. Bell 


E. Collins 


L. Bock, Principal 
L. Lechner 


L. Greenup 


G. G. Biles 


A. Morgan 




F. Booth 


R. Pafford 


C. Paustian 


Bass Clarinet 


L. Childs 




A. W. Stillwell 


P. Tatman 


P. Condry 


Trombones 


A. Winkler 




K. Cook 
L. Goheen 
V. Hahn 
P. Heinbach 
V. Jeffries 
M. Kirk 
M. Mayrath 


M. Paddleford 




C. Saxophone 


F. N. Barnes 


Oboe 

H. McCord 


W. S. Coblentz 

Alto Saxophones 

R. D. Bradley, Prin. 


H. Blanchard 
J. S. Florrel 
E. McCune 
L. Owsley 
G. Powell 


E. V. Floyd, Principal 


W. Colwell 


0. Mitchell 


E. K. Chapin 


H. B. Hering 


C. Little 


M. Purcel 


G. Kirchener 


S. Lyons 


L. Olmstead 


W. WlTHEY 

R. White 


H. Stapleton 


J. Shenk 


W. Selby 






J. RUGGLES 




E-flat Clarinet 


Soprano Saxophone 


G. Sheetz 


Basses 


W. Chamberlin 


H. A. Coleman 


J. Shenk 


A. Hemker 
E. Clark 


Clarinets 


Baritone Saxophone 


French Horns 


F. Freeman 


J. G. Barnhardt, I J rin. 
H. Bagley 
F. Con dell 


E. Barrett 

Tenor Saxophones 


F. Huff 
C. Harding 
H. Hazzard 


0. Funk 

E. Gillmore 

C. Snyder 


M. Colver 


R. Dunnington, Prin. 


L. Noble 


Tympani 


E. Faucheir 


W. Balderson 


H. YODER 


J. B. Hanna 


A. Meyers 




J. Burke 


F. W. Jones 


E. Moggie 


Altos 




0. Latzke 
J. Mathias 
R. Morgan 
W. Naylor 




G. Koelling 


Drums 


Bass Saxophone 


C. COWEN 


Bass Drum 


B. Hostinsky 


E. Goering 


J. Koger 


L. Paslay 




V. MUNSINGER 




L. Paustian 


Trumpets 




Side Drums 


J. I. Reid 


E. Fear, Principal. 


Baritones 


K. Hall 


J. Roehr 


F. Barmes 


F. Fear 


V. Collins 


L. Shoop 


R. Bebemeyer 


B. Barber 


H. KlPFER 



. ■* &.*■■■■■ 



* W * '•:*■, 



.-» .- . * *r > ■ 




The College Band 



Page 126 



College Orchestra 



.f=-o^=,o^=3o^Zl 



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Harry King Lamont 



Conductor 



First Violins 

Mary Jackson, Concertmaster 
Ruth Glick 
Jeanice Reel 
Curtis Lund 
Lowell Treaster 
William King 

Second Violins 

Harold Witt, Principal 
Paul Chilen 
Aileen Rhodes 
Ruth Bainer 
Louise Reed 
Lela Sourk 
Dawn Daniels 

Violas 

Emily Rumold, Principal 
Deda Louise Drake 
Mary Ellen Springer 

Cellos 

Robert Gordon, Principal 
Ashley Monahan 
L. J. Hall 
Mildred Potter 

Basses 

Calvin Schneider, Principal 
R. C. Smith 
Bert Hostinsky 



Oboes 

Hal McCord 

Flutes 

Louis Bock 
Adrian Winkler 

Clarinets 

Henry Bagley 
Jesse Mathias 

Bassoons 
E. V. Floyd 
E. K. Chapin 

Trumpets 
Everett Fear 
Martin Mayrath 

Horns 

Fred Huff 
Clifford Harding 
Homer Yoder 

Trombones 

G. F. Collins 
Frank Barnes 

Tuba 

Frank Hemker 



Tympani 
John Burke 

Piano 

Fern Cunningham 



St^ \^j •=>••. 



itje? 




Page 127 



The College Orchestra 



Dairy Cattle Team 




Cave (Coach), Myers, Vernon, Kirton, Clair 



The cattle team placed second at the Waterloo contest and was high 
team on Jerseys. At the National Dairy Show, where the record 
number of thirty-two teams competed, the team placed sixth. 



Dairy Products Team 




Martin (Coach), Frey, Jacobson, Hubbard 



The products team placed fifth in competition with fourteen 
teams at the National Dairy Show. Frey was second high individual. 



Page 128 



Girls' Meat Judging Team 



«^=°^=|o^=|o^Z] 



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D. L. Macintosh, Cocr// 

THE Girls' Meat Judging Team competed at the National Live Stock and 
Meat Show at the American Royal in Kansas City, November 14, 1927. 
It was the first national meat judging contest for college women that has been 
held. The Kansas state team won first place and a silver trophy. 

The contest was divided into two parts: First, the students were re- 
quired to identify 25 retail cuts of meats. Second, the following classes of 
meat were judged: 1 — Pork loin; 2 — Pork hams; 3 — Beef rounds; 4 — Beef 
chucks; 5 — Lamb saddles 



MEMBERS OF THE TEAM 

Catherine Lorimer 
Velma Criner 
Dorothy Stewart 
Or a Hatton — Alternate 




Coach Macintosh, Hatton, Lorimer, Criner. Stewart 



Page 129 



Women's Glee Club 



— »}=>*p=3 <£=>c£zi 



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c=£.«=>.e=*«— 



OFFICERS 



President 
Treasurer 



Catherine Stone 
Gertrude Sheetz 



MEMBERS 



First Sopranos 
Rubie Anderson 
Elizabeth Allen 
Ida Cool 

Marguerite Chaffin 
Ruth Cunningham 
Florence Dudley 
Aileen Rhodes 
Pauline Samuel 
Maria Samuel 

Second Sopranos 
Elna Andrick 
Jean Booth 
Geraldene Cutler 
Janice Fisher 
Helen Freeburg 
Edithe Huitt 
Laura Hart 
Vera Holmstrom 
Margaret Lewis 
Virginia Lovett 
Pearle McKinney 
Rowena Lockridge 

Prof. E.' D. Sayre . 



Geraldine O' Daniel 
Lillian Paustian 
Catherine Stone 

First Altos 

Josephine Collins 
Gladys Crumbaker 
Frances Curtis 
Helen Dodge 
Katharine Harding 
Edith McCammon 
Anna K. Pfetzing 
Emily Seaburg 

Second Altos 
Olive Gillum 
Adiva Goering 
Edith Loomis 
Catherine Montgomery 
Helen Randall 
Gladys Schmedemann 
Gettrude Sheetz 
Ruth Turner 
Irene Marshall 

Director 




The Women's Glee Club 



Page 130 



9z 



Men's Glee Club 



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==% 



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^■"^•^ 



MEMBERS 



Firs/ Tenors 
H. A. Coleman 
K. Benne 
Ben Barber 
c. goering 
L. J. Kover 
G. Powell 
C. E. Reeder 
J. St. John 
C. White 
C. Harding 

Second Tenors 

James Blackledge 
Kay Beach 
R. Bradley 
L. H. Compton 
A. Lambertson 
P. McCroskey 
V. Munsinger 
W. Powers 
G. Sayles 
O. Funk 



First Bass 

V. W. Boyd 
M. Fergus 
H. Fry 

A. M. Brenneman 

M. M. GlNTER 

G. C. Jordan 

E. H. Kroeker 
C. L. Willis 
H. Thaller 

J. A. Monroe 

Second Bass 

F. Atkin 
W. J. Braun 
F. E. Carroll 
V. Kent 

J. H. Kershaw 
V. I. Masters 
H. Means 

H. YODER 

E. W. Smith 
A. L. Hammond 



Prof. Wm. Lindquist 
Mr. Charles Stratton 



Director 
Accompanist 




Coleman, Ginter, Funk, Reeder, Smith, Goering, Willis, Fergus, Yoder 

Munsinger, Kershaw, Powell, Lambertson, Sayles, Atkin, Brenneman, Thaller, Hammond 

Harding, Boyd, Kovar, Lindquist, Stratton, Fry, Monroe, McCroskey, Beach 

St. John, J. Barber, Compton, Carroll, Bradley, Kroeger, Kent, Benne 



Page 131 



A. I. E. E. 



»^3O«=|0j=JO^I 



*$£*»§ **. g-*&$«* 



c^.c^.c^ 



OFFICERS 

President R. D. Bradley 

Vice-President H. G. Miller 

Treasurer G. R. Slaybaugh 

Recording Secretary M. C. Coffman 

Corresponding Secretary E. C. Shenk 

Marshal . D. W. Grant 

MEMBERS 

Seniors 

N. G. Artman L. W. Ginter J. H. Moehlmax E. C. Shenk 

P. Ayres D. W. Grant A. L. Morgan C. D. Slaybaugh 

H. Z. Babbitt W. Halferty D. K. Nelson C. Sloan 

L. W. Bailey J. L. Hancock J. Noble W. Sproul 

C. D. Barber W. T. Hart W. D. Nyhart C. C. Tanner 
G. R. Borgman W. N. Herren R. G. Obrecht W. A. Thompson 
R. D. Bradley J. F. Huff J. L. Potter F. B. Yolkel 

K. H. Cook H. C. Lindberg D. Raida E. O. Wangerin 

R. E. Davis E Lundry H. J. Reinking E. Warner 

D. L. Dutton F. Masek E. E. Reber A. Wasson 
M. A. Edwards M. H. Meyer R. M. Roper H. J. Winters 
K. Evans C. H. Miller J. E. Schrock A. M. Young 
H. A. Fleck H.G.Miller R.W.Shaw 

Juniors 

Earl Ankenman Arthur E. Owen H. K. Hefling G. B. Johnson 

H. J. Barre M. E. Paddleford L. Y. Rector W. M. King 

T. R. Brennan K. O. Peters B. L. Remick Aaron Kipp 

L. H. Brubaker R. H. Peterson C. C. Rice G. W. Lawrence 

Lester Burton C. E. Pickett F. E. Roehrman D. C. Lee 

Donald Cameron E. O. Earl J. W. Schwanke Paul E. Massey 

M. C. Coffman P. J. Edwards H. A. Senior G. D. VanPelt 

Paul S. Colby E. V. Ellifrit J. J. Shenk A. R. Weckel 

J. E. Cress C. A. Gaerison E. J. Skradski Rex Wheeler 

Leslie S. Davis C. G. Gates Claude Sloan H. E. White 

Burr Merrifield R. W. George Arthur Hemker M. H. White 

P. A. Miller E. W. Gilman T. B. Hofmann Rex White 

Vern D. Mills K. D. Hall G. W. Hurst R. E. Whitford 

O. D. Mitchell G. K. Hayes Paul Hutchinson Cecil Willis 

Chas. B. Olds 

Sophomores 
Kyle Engler Gordon Gladson C. J. W. McMullen 

L. C. Gates Howard P. Thudin 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
H. S. Buecher O. D. Hunt R. G. Kloeffler 

R. M. Kerchner 




Miller, Grant, Coffman 
Slaybaugh, Shenk, Bradley 



Page 132 



American Society Mechanical Engineers 



i.^=o^=3o^=lo^Z] 



«&a-g ^ £+£>* 



OFFICERS 



President, 1st Semester . 
President, 2nd Semester 
Vice-President 
Secretary . . . . 
Treasurer 
Honorary Chairman 



, Wm. Sartorius 

Charles Webb 

G. E. Drollinger 

Glenn Barnhart 

Allen Drew 

J. P. Calderwood 



MEMBERS 

Juniors 



Atkins, Garland 
Bishop, Loyle 
Coble, Max W. 
Dailey, E. R. 
Flinner, Arthur O. 
Hamilton, Mathew 
Hill, Lawrence C. 
Horrell, Maurice 



Hazzard, Harry 
Howard, Wm. T. 
Huffman, H. C. 
Pommerenke, M. W. 
Romick, W. L. 



Seniors 



Joy, Justin 
McGregor, Jas. Dan 
Marshall, J. C. 
Mayden, W. S. 
Richards, L. T. 
Sardou, Charles F. 
Stegelin, J. E. 
Zavesky, George 



Spealman, Albert 
Stalder, Joe O. 
Stillwell, Almeron 
Taintor, O. E. 
Yoder, Horace 




Drew 



Sartorius 



Barnhart 



Drollinger 



Page 133 



Steel Ring 



•£=»o£=j<£=!o£z] 



*SS4-g ^ £+££•=* 



C^«=^c=5~- 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Marshal . 



Horace Miller 

Richard Bradley 

Charles Schwindler 

Harvey Schmidt 



MEMBERS 



Architectural Engineers 
Dwight Smith 

Architects 

Ralph Sherman 
Charles Schwindler 



Chemical Engineers 
Floyd Israel 



Civil Engineers 
Harvey Schmidt 
Loyal Davies 
Tom Turner 



Electrical Engineers 
Mel Coffman 
Richard Bradley 
Kenneth Cook 
Horace Miller 
Mechanical Engineers 
Loyal Bishop 
Glenn Barnhart 



THE purpose of the Steel Ring Organization is to bring about the unified action of the Engineer- 
ing unit at Kansas State. The name is symbolical of the welding together of the various 
departments into a unit. The membership of Steel Ring is to include one man, but not more than 
two men, from each department. These men shall be the leading men of the respective depart- 
ments and shall represent their department in meetings. The total membership has been limited 
to 12 members in order to maintain a compact and manageable group. 




Top row — Miller, Bishop, Israel, Bradley, Coffman, Smith, Schwindler 
Bottom row — Schmidt, Davies, Cook, Barnhart, Turner, Sherman 



Page 134 



American Society of Agricultural Engineers 



— •s=4=i«£ = j«£r] 



i^g ^ g-HS>* 



£=^c=?'=?— 



OFFICERS 

Firstf Semester 

President D. D. Smith 

Vice-President ... E. L. Barger 

Secretary . . . . . T. H. Barber 
Treasurer .... R. R. Drake 



Second Semester 

H. E. Stover 
T. H. Barber 
W. E. Selby 
F. L. Fear 



L. A. Hoop 
Walter Selby 
Glen Johnson 



Edgar Barger 
Robert Denny 



MEMBERS 

Seniors 

H. E. White 
H. E. Stover 
Frank* Fear 

Juniors 
R. R. Drake 
H. L. Gamble 



Dwight Smith 
John McCormick 
Thayer Cleaver 



H. O. McManis 
C. M. Rochrman 



Theo. H. Barber 
V. L. Hahn 



Sophomores 

H. C. Stevens 
Paul Kindsvater 
O. Howe 



L. J. Kovar 
K. W. Miller 



J. H. Akin 
E. Karns 
L. A. Belin 



Freshmen 
C. A. Marcy 

O. MOHNEY 
C. MOYER 

L. D. Pierce 



Dee McAninch 
Roy Selby 
F. G. Winters 






v:w. 



■ /^ 



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-#*v 





Fear 



Smith 



Selby 



Drake 



Barber 



Stover 



Barber 



Page 1 35 



Agricultural Association 



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OFFICERS 

President E. A. Stephenson 

Vice-President A. T. Myers 

Secretary George Wagner 

Treasurer V. E. Mc Adams 



THE Agricultural Association was formed in the spring of 1921. The 
purpose of the organization is to co-ordinate efforts of the separate de- 
partments of the division of agriculture and to promote the interest of all 
agricultural students. 

The association sponsors the annual Ag Fair, the Kansas Agricultural 
Student, the all-agricultural mixer, and the giving of medals to all members 
of intercollegiate judging teams. 




Durham 



Stephenson 



McAdams 



Wagner 



Page 136 



Junior American Veterinary Medical Association 



'*=o«=jo£=i<£z3 



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MEMBERS 



D. SUPLEE 

J. G. Newton 
J. B. Cheshire 
R. E. Smith 
C. R. Omer 
N. B. Moore 

C. L. Butler 

A. W. Crawford 

D. M. Colby 
J. L. Hakl 

E. T. Henderson 
L. O. Mott 

F. Storz 

C. L. Guinn 
H. E. McClung 



C V. Conger 
W. W. Berts 
A. S. Watson 
A. D. Woodruff 

D. H. Smiley 
A. L. McBride 
H. E. Skoog 
T. M. DeVries 
J. E. Clair 

E. W. Wilson 
D. K. Hamilton 
D. DeCamp 

N. Van der Marten 
R. W. Hayes 
H. E. Shaulis 



F. C. Love 
R. L. Wyman 
W. Guerkink 
W. Price 
W. S. Hornsby 
T. J. Leasure 
C. J. Price 
T. J. Muxlow 
E. R. Trull 

E. D. Johnston 
R. H. Alexander 
T. A. Newlin 

R. S. Bishop 

F. E. Carroll 
R. L. Elsea 



J. D. Shoeman 
L. H. Smith 
R. L. McConnei.i. 
A. I. Schmidt 
J. Spurlock 
D. E. Huston 
A. W Lauts 
V. T. Rose 
R. A. Brunson 
D. P. Ehlars 
J. N. McIlnay 
C. J. Doty 
M. B. Davis 
C. J. Majeris 



KANSAS STATE CHAPTER of the American Veterinary Medical Association was founded 
one year ago. This society is an organization sponsored by the American Veterinary Asso- 
ciation and is an auxiliary of the same. It has chapters at all of the veterinary colleges throughout 
the United States and Canada. This chapter was installed in May, 1926, and formerly known 
as the Veterinary Medical Association at K. S. A. C. The function of the organization is to pro- 
mote interest and activity in the study of veterinary medicine. 




Top row — Left to right — Suplee, Newton, Cheshire, Smith, R. E., Omer, Moore, Butler, Crawford, Colby, 

Hakl, Majeris 
Second row — Henderson, Mott, Storz, Guinn, McClung, Conger, Berts, Watson, Woodruff, Smiley, McBride 
Third row — Skoog, DeVries, Clair, Wilson, Hamilton, DeCamp, Van der Marten, Hayes, Shaulis, Love 
Fourth row — Wyman, Guerkink, W. Price, Hornsby, Leasure, C. J. Price, Muxlow, Trull, Johnston, Alex- 
ander 
Fifth row — -Newlin, Bishop, Carroll, Elsea, Shoeman, L. H. Smith, McConnell, Schmidt, Spurlock, Huston 
Front row — Lauts, Rose, Brunson, Ehlers, McIlnay, Doty, Davis 



Page 137 



Agricultural Economics Club 



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OFFICERS 

President Eldon Harden 

Vice-President D. J. Martin 

Treasurer F. W. ImMasche 

Secretary E. C. Russell 

Marshal J. F. Smerchek 



Eldon Harden 
O. C. Russell 
P. M. McMain 
J. F. Smerchek 
H. J. Henney 
D. J. Martin 
P. W. Russell 
A. W. Benson 
A. D. Lovett 
II. J. Hollister 
F. W. ImMasche 
I.. B. Brooks 

Dr. W. E. Grimes 
R. M. Green 



MEMBERS 
L. R. Alt 
D. E. Bellairs 
Edward Crawford 
L. J. Miller 

W. W. COFFMAN 

A. P. Grimes 
G. R. Hanson 
Shelby Neelly 
H. A. Paulsen 
F. H. Schultis 
C. C. Todd 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Morris Evans 
J. A. Hodges 



E. S. Voigts 
S. S. Bergman 
C. K. Fisher 
T. G. Betts 
W. W. Gosney 
K. M. Hall 
L. E. Henley 
Charles Mantz 
W. M. Newman 
G. S. Quantic 
L. D. Stover 
J. A. Watson 

R. D. Nichols 
H. Howe 



THE Agricultural Economics Club was organized in 1921 at Manhattan. Its purpose is to 
further professional and social interests of its members; foster a closer relationship and 
unified spirit among its members and the faculty of the Department of Agricultural Economics. 
Membership is limited to agricultural students majoring in agricultural economics. 




McMain, Coffman, Voights, Mundhenke, Fisher, Hanson, Russell 
Watson, Bergman, Bellaires, Paulsen, Stover, Nelly, Newman, Wells 
Harden, Smerchek, Grimes, Mantz, Benson, Quantic, ImMasche 



Page 138 



Ag Barnwarmer 



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OFFICERS 

Manager F. W. ImMasche 

Assistant Manager H. A. Paulsen 

Treasurer V. E. McAdams 

In Charge of Decoration G. B. Wagner 

ABOUT 325 Ags and their dates attended the first annual "Ag Barnwarmer" held in Nichols 
Gymnasium October 21, 1927. The gym was elaborately decorated to represent a barn 
loft and the Ags and their fair partners in blue overalls and aprons enjoyed an evening typical 
of the true neighborliness of rural folks. 

Miss Grace Madison was crowned Harvest Queen by Dean Call. 

Such co-operation and spirit as shown in making the first barnwarmer a success indicates 
what the students of the Division of Agriculture can accomplish by working together. 




McAdams, Wagner, Paulsen, ImMasche 



Ag Fair 

OFFICERS 



Manager 

Assistant Manager 
Treasurer . 
Secretary 



Vance Rucker 

Ray Remsberg 

H. L. Murphey 

H. P. Blasdel 



THE annual Ag Fair is the one enterprise in which all of the Ag Students take an active part. 
It is held each spring at the north end of the campus and attracts a large crowd of students. 
Ag Fair was organized in 1920 and since that time has been a means of uniting the departments 
of the Division of Agriculture to promote a spirit of unity and co-operation among the students 
and the^ faculty. 






Murphey, Rucker, Blasdel 



Pa°e 139 



Block and Bridle 



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OFFICERS 

President E. A. Stephenson 

Vice-President R. N. Lindburg 

Secretary H. L. Murphey 

Treasurer V. E. McAdams 



MEMBERS 



F. Hedstrom 
S. S. Hoar 
R. N. Lindburg 
V. E. McAdams 
H. L. Murphey 
H. M. Nester 
E. A. Stephenson 
H.J. Stewart 
R. W. Tulloss 



Howard Vernon 
H. H. Brown 
Dale Scheel 

0. W. Greene 

1. K. Tompkins 
C. K. Channon 
E. L. Watson 
R. R. Wood 

C. E. Nutter 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Dr. Ibsen 
Dr. Campbell 
Harry Reed 



B. M. Anderson 
D. L. Mackintosh 
F. VV. Bell 



C. E. Aubel 



THE Block and Bridle Club was organized in 1914 as the Jayhawker Saddle and Sirloin Club 
and entered the national organization of Block and Bridle in 1921. The function of the Club 
is to promote the livestock industry, aid in inter-scholastic departmental activities, and foster 
the advancement of animal husbandry as a profession. Meetings are held the second and fourth 
Tuesdays of each month at which short business sessions are held prior to a program on some 
phase of animal husbandry work. 




Tulloss, Tompkins, Vernon, Stewart, Lindburg, Stephenson 
Murphey, McAdams, Hoar, Brown, Scheel 



Page 140 



Boys' Meat Judging Team 



—.^=0^=10^=10^1] 



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MEMBERS 

H. H. Brown E. A. Stephenson 

V. E. McAdams H. L. Murphey 

D. L. Macintosh, Coach 



THE Kansas Aggies this year for the first time were represented by a meats-judging 
team which competed at the American Royal Live Stock Show, Kansas City, and the Inter- 
national Live Stock Exposition, Chicago. 

The Kansas City contest was won by Illinois with Kansas ranking fourth and Missouri 
and Iowa ranking second and third, respectively. Eight teams competed. H. H. Brown was 
high man on the judging of pork and third high man in the entire contest. The three teams 
placing above Kansas had special training in this work which was impossible for the Aggies. 

The Chicago contest was considerably larger than the Kansas City contest with 12 teams 
competing for honors. Kansas came in third in the entire contest and ranked first in the judging 
of pork. Iowa placed first in this contest and South Dakota, second. V. E. McAdams was high" 
point man of the entire contest and high man in the judging of beef. 

The introduction of a meats-judging contest is a new phase of judging, as it is just being 
realized that such judging contests are important factors in meat production. 




Stephenson 



Brown 



McAdams 



Murphey 



Page 141 



Senior Stock-Judging Team 



«;=<£=> <£=x£Z] 



Howard Vernon 
Dale Wilson 



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MEMBERS 
Harold Murphey 
Verl E. McAdams 
Prof. F. W. Bell, CoacA 



R. N. Lindberg 
E. A. Stephenson 



THE senior livestock judging team made an excellent record this year, with one first place and two third places 
to their credit. The men on the team are all senior students majoring in animal husbandry, with the exception 
of Dale Wilson. The team competed in three contests: In the Wichita contest they placed third, in the Kansas 
City contest they placed first, winning a large silver loving cup, and in the Chicago contest they placed third among 
21 contesting teams. 




Stephenson 



0. E. Funk 



S. S. Hoar 



McAdams Lindberg 

Junior Stock-Judging Team 

MEMBERS 

Dale Scheel Ivan Tompkins 

Prof. F. W. Bell, Coach 



Waldo Lee 



Vernon 



T. W. Kirton 



Coached by Professor Bell, the Junior Stock-Judging team finished a successful year, Most of them will be 
fighting for a place on the Senior Judging team next year. 




Scheel, Funk, Hoar, Tompkins, Kirton, Lee 



Page 142 



Poultry Judging Team 



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M EMBERS 

L. J. Simmons J. R. Wells 

R. F. Brannan A. W. Miller 

Professor H. H. Steup, Coach 



THE Kansas State Agricultural College poultry judging team placed first in examination, 
eighth in exhibition judging, and ninth in production judging, which gave them eighth place 
in the Mid-West Intercollegiate Poultry Contest held in Chicago, December 3, 1927, at the 
Coliseum Poultry Show. 

A. W. Miller tied for first in the examination and was seventh high individual in the entire 
contest. 

Teams representing ten states were in the contest. They placed in the following order: 
Illinois, Arizona, Indiana, Texas, Iowa, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Ohio, North Dakota. 




Steup 



Simmons 



Brannan 



Wells 



Miller 



Page 143 



Klod and Kernel Club 



— ••£=»<£=! <£=> <£=3 



*^4-g ^ £«*gS"* 



oczrocrxoe 



OFFICERS 

President H. E. Meyers 

Vice-President V. M. Rucker 

Secretary F. M. Timmons 

Treasurer L. F. Ungeheuer 





MEMBERS 




I. M Atkins 


M. K. Fergus 


H. E. Myers 


M . C . AXELTON 


L. S. Frey 


Louis Reitz 


H. P. Blasdell 


H. W. HlGBEE 


V. M. Rucker 


F. A. Blauer 


P. J. ISAAK 


Linn Russell 


G. J. Caspar 


M. C. KlRKWOOD 


J. H. Sutton 


R. S. Coberly 


0. G. Lear 


F. L. Timmons 


E. B. COFFMAN 


R. 0. Lewis 


L. F. Ungeheuer 


L. L. Compton 


A. A. Mast 


A. M. Watson 


G. E. Crews 


Lyle Mayfield 


F. B. Alspach 


C. C. Eustace 


L. E. Melia 
MEMBERS IN FACULTY 




A. E. Aldous 


V. C. Hubbard 


M. C. Sewell 


A. M. Brunson 


C. 0. Johnston 


H. R. Sumner 


L. E. Call 


H. H. Laude 


F. L. Smith 


C D. Davis 


E. S. Lyons 


R. I. Throckmorton 


L. L. Davis 


A. E. Morten son 


H. Umberger 


R. H. Davis 


J. H. Parker 


E. B. Wells 


F. L. Duley 


S. C. Salmon 


L. E. WlLLOUGHBY 


C. 0. Grandfield 


J. P. Sellschop 


J. W. Zahnley 



THE Klod and Kernel Klub is composed of faculty members, seniors, juniors, and sophomores 
in the Department of Agronomy. The programs which are presented at each meeting are 
so planned that the members may obtain greater knowledge and have increased interest in the 
production of farm crops. The Club sponsors a student crops-judging contest each year, and 
takes an active part in the annual Ag Fair. The Club was organized April 6, 1917. 




First row — Crews, Isaak, Higbee, Frey, Mayfield 
Second row — Melia, Timmons, Myers, Atkins, Ungeheuer 



Page 144 



Inter-Society Council 



»5=o^lo^|o^] 



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OFFICERS 


President .... 


Carl Hartman 


Vice-President 


Stanley Holmberg 


Secretary .... 


Lenore McCormick 


Treasurer . . . ■ . 


Mabel Paulson 


Faculty .... 


Helen Elcock 




MEMBERS 


Alpha Beta 


Franklin 


Adolph Helm 


Letha Schoeni 


Waldo Lee 


Ralph Irwin 


Athenian 


Hamilton 


Dale Shield 


Stanley Holmberg 


Orville Caldwell 


Paul Pfuetze 


Eurodelphian 


Ionian 


Mildred Lemert 


Lenore McCormick 


Eula M. Anderson 


Vera Clothier 


Browning 


Webster 


Mabel Paulson 


Kermit Engle 


Clare Russell 


Carl Hartman 




Top row — Elcock, Paulson, McCormick, Holmberg, Pfuetze 
Bottom row — Caldwell, Anderson, Russell, Clothier, Scheel 



Page 145 



10 







lOz 




RELIGION 



Y. M. C. A 



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*££*-§ ^ §4^* 



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CABINET 












President 

1st Vice-President 

2nd Vice-President 

3rd Vice-President 

Secretary 



Leonard Brubaker 
Dale Sanford 
Fred True, Jr. 
Frank Green 
Philip Isaac 
Milton Allison 
Solon Kimball 
Paul McCroskey 
Adric McIlvain 



Paul A. Skinner 

Milton Kerr 

Carl Hartman 

Stanley Holmberg 

Karl Pfeutze 



Arlie Higgins 
Ralph Lashbrook 
Charles Koesler 
Earl Warner 
James Bonfield 
Paul Pfuetze 
Donald Baldwin 
Gordon Nonken 
Hale Brown 



Walter Selby 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY TREASURER OF COLLEGE Y. M. C. A. 




Kerr, Skinner, Pfuetze, Nonkin, Durham, Brown 



Page 148 



Y. W. C. A. 



— o?=3o£=j<£±j(£r] 



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=% 



CABINET 



President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer . 

Secretary 

Council Representative 

General Secretary . 



. Margaret Burris 

Dorothy Wescott 

Lenore McCormick 

Helen Cortelyou 

Marybelle Read 

Ethlyn Christensen 



Ruth Bainer 
Mildred Lemert 
Vesta Duckwall 
Dorothy Alice Johnson' 
Helen Freeburg 



Clara Paulson 
Marian Rude 
Esther Herman 
Mary Frances White 
Catharine Lorimer 



Fern Harris 



THE Y. W. C A. is an association of girls who desire to realize full and creative life through 
a growing understanding of God. Through various groups and projects the Association 
attempts to have a part in making this life possible for all people. In all of its work the organi- 
zation tries to find a practical, workable basis for living Jesus' principles. 




S*^ 



McCormick, Machir, Cortelyou, Reed 
White, Bainer, Burtis, Paulson 



Page 149 



Kappa Beta 



«*=<£=> <£=><£=) 



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OFFICERS 






President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer . 
Radius Reporter . 
Alumni Secretary 



Helen Humphrey 
Lillian Alley 

Rebecca Dubbs 
. Carol Stratton 

Hazel McQuire 
Shirley Mollett 
Kitty Faulconer 



ADVISORY BOARD 















Rev. and Mrs. J. D. Arnold 
Dr. and Mrs. C. O. LaShelle 
Prof, and Mrs. W. T. Stratton 
Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Blaine 



Mr. and Mrs. T. O. McClung 
Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Price 
Mr. and Mrs. Hal McCord 
Mrs. E. M. Thompson 



COMMITTEES 



Progra m 
Social 

Social Service 
Hostess . 
Publicity 
Membership 



Agnes Bane 

Josephine Winter 

Lucile Burt 

Mary Ellen Karns 

. Shirley Mollett 

Helen Humphrey 



BETHANY CIRCLE was organized at the University of Illinois in 1911. At the national 
convention in 1927 the name was changed to Kappa Beta, Fellowship of the University 
Women of Disciples of Christ. Beta Chapter was organized at Manhattan in 1914 by Rev. 
J. David Arnold. The object of Kappa Beta is "To establish and maintain a friendly relation- 
ship among the student girls of Christian Church preference; to make the work of Kappa Beta a 
real means of Christian influence among the girls by arousing an interest in the church and its 
various departments, to maintain as individuals a high ideal of scholarship, to strive for broad 
sympathetic interest in human activities, and to develop a rich and gracious personality." 







Stratton, Mollett, McQuire, Dubbs 
Bane, Karns, McClung, Humphrey 



Page 150 



Newman Club 



*=i 



*&}*§ ^ S^£>* 



cz^.^ 



OFFICERS 



President . 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 



John Coleman 

Marguriete Conroy 

Mattie Mae Engle 

Mildred Walker 

David A. Carlson 



Professor M. F. Ahearn 
Professor J. P. Callahan 
Professor Harold Howe 
Abbey, Roseanne 
Ackerman, Fulton 
Bennett, E. W. 
Bertotti, John 
Beuchat, H. L. 

BONFIELD, J. P. 

Brennan, Tom R. 
Brown, Alma 

scritchfield. francis 
Smith, Gerald 
Smyer, Frances 



MEMBERS 

Halstead, Catherine 
Klotzba.ck, M. S. 
Koster, John 
Kuffler, J. A. 
McCarthy, Caroline 
Murphy, F. A. 
Murphy, M. C. 
Pafford, Robert 
Raleigh, Francis 
Richards, Marguerite 
Trant, Mary Ruth 
Tauer, Winifred 
Wacker, Leo 
Walker, Mildred 
Bueche, H. S. 



Burns, S. R. 
Coleman, J. R. 
Cunningham, George 
Conroy, Marguerite 
Dittemore, Mary L. 
Dugan, Clara 
Engelbert, L. 
Engle, Mattie Mae 
Fickel, Joe 
Fitzgerald, William 
Florell, John S. 
Weingarth, Fred 
Weisbender, Fonce 
Willis, Betty 




Engle 



Walker 



Conroy 



Coleman 



Page 151 



Kappa Phi 



—..^=30^30^)0^13 



*sa-g ™ §4^5 



C=£oc=».«=4— 



President . 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Treasurer 
Chaplain 



Elizabeth Allen 
Anita Ault 
Lillian Bedor 
Ruth Bowman 
Arline Johnson 
Charlotte Mathias 
Elfie Mc Mullen 
Clare Russell 
Mable Shrontz 
Garnett Skinner 
Mildred Skinner 

Mrs. A. F. Huse 
Mrs. B. R. Hull 

Mrs. H. Smethurst, 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 
Edna Stewart 
Francelia Stratton 
Florence Smith 
Mildred Baker 
Orpha Brown 
Hazel Buck 
Mary Meyer 
Beulah Moe 
Marjorie Prickett 
Olga Saffry 

Patronesses 
Mrs. L. H. Limper 



Arline Johnson 

Garnet Skinner 

Francelia Stratton 

. Claire Russell 

. Ruth Richardson 



Thelma Warders 
Ruth Richardson 
Claire Cox 
Genevieve Long 
Esther Masketer 
Clara Paulsen 
Carrie Paulsen 
Fern Maxey 
Florence Funk 
Grace Daugherty 
Ruby Stover 



Honorary Members 
Manhattan Mrs. Ella 

Mrs. E. H. Knostman, Manhattan 



Dr. Margaret Justin 
Mrs. O. E. Allison 

Hawkes, Los Angeles 



Program 
Art 
Social 
Alumni . 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Lillian Bedor Publicity 

Tillie Rife Historian .... 
Claire Cox Music .... 
. Carrie Paulsen Religions Effort . 
Candle Beam Editor Bessie Leach 



luella parrott 

Lin a Darnold 

Ruth Harlow 

Mildred Skinner 



KAPPA PHI was organized at the University of Kansas in 1916 to form a closer association 
among Methodist women who are students in the state and independent universities; to 
make work among student women of the denomination more effective and sufficient, to maintain 
a more serviceable organization to take care of incoming Methodist freshmen, and to provide 
in a college woman's way religious training and stronger, more efficient women of the church 
of tomorrow. There are now seventeen active chapters. 




Saville, Meyer, Paulsen, Ault 



Page 152 




When Snow Paints the Campus 



Page 1S3 



Mens K Fraternity 



— • >— £=1«S=a<£3 



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C^C^c** 



THE K fraternity was organized to promote cleaner athletics and good sportsmanship in 
all branches of athletic competition in which the college is engaged. It is composed of men 
who have won their letters in a major intercollegiate sport. The fraternity was founded at Kansas 
State in 1913. 

Colors — Royal Purple and White 

Insignia — Official Athletic "K" 
OFFICERS 

President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 
L. E. Moody 
R. E. Sanders 
Raymond C. Painter 
A. H. Freeman 
William Towler 
T. F. Winburn 
H. S. Stover 
Donald Springer 
L. H. Smith 
J. F. Smerchek 
M. B. Pearson 
Joe Holsinger 
Dewey Houston 
H. S. Miller 
R. F. Sanders 
K. C. Bowman 
HONORARY MEMBERS 
F. Ahearn Frank Root 



Joe Anderson 
A. R. Edwards 
Jim Douglas 
L. W. Bailey 
Loren Davis 
H. F. Dayhoff 
Karl Enns 
V. Fairchild 
T. A. Fleck 
Paul Gartner 
L. W. Grothusen 
L. E. Hammond 
R. E. Hamler 
John Richardson 
M. T. Evans 



Motto — Fight 



A. R. Edwards 
Joe Anderson 

Joe Limes 
George Lyon 
Elmer Mertel 
M. B. Miller 
Kirk M. Ward 
Ed McBurney 
Wayne McCaslin 
Henry Gile 
John F. Hale 
Orel Tackwell 
Guy Huey 
Edward Skradski 
Walter Hinz 
C. E. Crews 
J. A. Stewart 



M 

C. W. CORSAUT 



C. W. Bachman 




First row — Hale, Winburg, R. Huey, Miller, Mertel, Hammond, Smith, Miller, Huey, Moody, Holsinger 
Second row — Evans, Anderson, Enns, Limes, Douglas, Gile, McCaslin, Richardson, Hines, Painter, Stewart 
Third row — Fleck, Chief Sanders, Edwards, Pearson, Hamler, Freeman, Houston, Skradski, Gartner, 
Bailey, Smerchek 



Page 154 




ATHLETI 








FOOTBALL 



The Varsity Squad 



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FINAL VALLEY STANDINGS 






Missouri 

Nebraska 

Oklahoma A. and M. 

Iowa State 

Washington 

Oklahoma 

Kansas State 

Drake 

Grinnell 



THE SEASON'S RECORD 

■ HE 1927 Wildcats closed the season with a rating of .333, losing to Missouri, 
A Ames, Nebraska, and Oklahoma A. and M., and winning from Kansas and Okla- 
homa. 



r on 


Lost 


Percentage 


5 


1 


.834 


4 


1 


.800 


2 


1 


.667 


3 


2 


.600 


2 


2 


.500 


2 


3 


.400 


2 


4 


.333 


1 


2 


. 333 





5 


. 000 



Kansas State ■ 30 

Kansas State 6 

Kansas State 13 

Kansas State 20 

Kansas State 7 

Kansas State 7 

Kansas State 

Kansas State 18 



Hays Teachers 6 

Missouri 13 

Kansas . 2 

( )klahoma 14 

Iowa State 12 

Texas 41 

Nebraska 33 

Oklahoma A. and M 25 










!fc%*Wflfi 



yt ■# . ~«|£ '. # 





In 
l 



■!* 



IS 




Top row — left to right — Tackwell, Yeagek, Neely, Reber, Nutter, Householder, Pearson, Hamler, Lyons, 
Springer, Tilford, Bowman, Sanders, Freeman 

Second row — Ass't Coach Root, McBurney, Meredith, Shay, Dayhoff, Smercheck, Edwards, Fleck, Chapman, 
Grafel, Davidson, Towler, Braun, Broda, Coach Backman 

Third row — Myers, Russell, Evans, Enns, Douglas, Holsinger, Norton, Hammond, Anderson, Ryan, Hamil- 
ton, Limes 

Page 156 




ALTHOUGH it suffered several rather 
disastrous defeats, the 1927 Aggie 
eleven plunged and passed its way through 
a difficult schedule in true Wildcat style. 
The team displayed a fighting brand of 
football at all times, and the season was, on 
the whole, successful. 

After an impressive victory over the 
Hays Teachers, the Purple squad entered 
the Valley race immediately with a hard- 
fought game against the Missouri Tigers. 
Sixty minutes of mud-battling gave the 
Tigers a six-point victory to the disappoint- 
ment of a fair crowd of Aggie followers who 
went to Columbia. 

The ancient enemy, Kansas, was put 
to rout in a thrilling game at Lawrence. 
This was one of the season's best games, 
with the Wildcats going at top speed all 
the way. The 6000 rooters who made the 
trip to Lawrence were more than repaid 
for their time. Another great victory was 
the one over the powerful Sooner squad. 
The flawless football displayed by the 

Wildcats on that memorable day will be long remembered as a football spectacle. Then the 
Nebraska game. The Wildcats lost — but they were great in defeat, forcing the great Crimson 
team to the utmost and fighting every inch of the way. Victory is not everything in football, as 
the 1927 Wildcats proved. 



C. W. Bachman 

Head Coach 



Page 157 





James Douglass, football captain, IQ27. 
The hard-hitting captain of the IQ27 Wild- 
cats could always be depended upon for a 
ass could wriggle, squirm, and 
batter his way through 
the most stubborn of lines, 
and his off -tackle smashes 
featured many of last 
fall's games. 




Page 158 




li House" is a two-letterman, having 
earned a letter with the iqz6 team. His 
regular berth is left tackle, where he performed 
brilliantly during the past season. His fight- 
ing spirit and qualities of leadership will 
be a great aid to the IQ28 Wildcat team. 




Page 159 




A SQUAD of 50 Wildcats, made up of 16 letter 
men, a few reserves from last year's squad, and 
25 candidates from the freshmen team greeted Coach 
Bachman at the first workout of the 1927 season. 

Early season reports rated the Aggies an ordi- 
nary team, fairly heavy, but not exceptionally fast. 
Little was actually known about the 1927 grid machine 
when it took the field for the initial fray of the season 
with Hays Teachers on September 24. 

The heavier Aggie team plunged and passed its 
way to a decisive victory over Hays team, showing a 
fairly smooth offensive and some very poor punting. 
The score was 30 to 6. 

Next Saturday the Aggies went to Columbia, lair 
of the Mizzou Tiger, expecting trouble. On a field 
made slippery by a drizzling rain, the Purple and 
White backs crashed through the heavy Missouri line 
for an early touchdown, the first score of the game. 
The Wildcat offensive looked good — almost good 
enough for a victory. 

The second quarter effectively dampened Aggie 
hopes. A Flamank-Tuttle combination solved the 
Purple defense, and despite a grim stand by the Aggie 
forward wall, swept to two touchdowns before the 
half ended. 

The second half of the game was scoreless, but 




1. Anderson 

2. Bauman 

3. Towles 



Pagz 160 




the powerful Tiger juggernaut gained almost at will, 
battering its way down the field time and again but 
lacking the final scoring punch. 

Captain Douglass' punts did much to save the 
Purple from being routed in the second half. 

Kansas was next on the schedule, and wliat a 
game it was! The Aggies were at their best; the 
Jayhawk must be downed. And downed he was, but 
only after he had kept six thousand Aggie rooters in 
two hours of constant suspense. 

The Wildcats started badly. A fumble gave 
Kansas the ball on the Aggie 10-yard line. Three 
times the speedy Crimson and Blue backs thrust at 
the Purple line with the pigskin only a few inches 
from the goal line. The Aggies braced — and held! 
Springer punted to mid-field, but stepped back of the 
line, giving Kansas two points. 

The Wildcat offensive came to life. A series of 
plunges, smashes and end runs and Holsinger goes 
over, leaving in his path several would-be Jayhawk 
tacklers. A few minutes later, Springer dashed 25 
yards through the entire Jayhawk team for a touch- 
down. Dee Householder, Aggie star tackle, stepped 
back and booted a field goal, making the Aggie day 
complete. The score was 13 to 2, when after a final fruit- 
less passing attack by the Jayhawkers the game ended. 




1. Fleck 

2. Davhoff 

3. Pearson 



Page 161 



11 




Using an effective passing attack, the Aggies 
urned back the Oklahoma Sooners on Stadium Field 
the next Saturday. It was Dads' Day and the Okla- 
lomans displayed a flashy and thrilling style of foot- 
ball tor the dads in attendance. The game was 
marred by many tumbles and passes were plentiful, 
the Wildcats having a little more luck with their 
aerial attack. 

The game was replete with thrills, with the Purple 
team having a slight edge throughout, although the 
Sooners always threatened with a dangerous passing 
offense. 

The following week the Wildcats went to Ames, 
where the Cyclones upset the dope bucket to win 12 
to 7. Douglass made the first score of the game when 
he smashed over the line after four successive plunges. 
Householder kicked goal, and that ended the scoring 
as far as the Aggies were concerned. 

Ames unleashed a brilliant offensive and the 
Wildcats were helpless before the fast charging 
Cyclone backs. The Iowans swept down the field for 
two successive touchdowns, with the Purple line 
slowly crumbling in the second period. 

The Aggie offensive could not get started. The 
Holsinger-Springer-Anderson-Douglass combination 
was unable to get under way at any time during the 
game, and numerous substitutions helped none. 

( )n Armistice Day, the Wildcats went down South 




1. Householder 

2. Enns 

3. Sanders 







Pate 162 



llz 




to battle the Texas Longhorns. Disaster awaited 
them. The Texans not only brought out a heavy and 
powerful football team, but proceeded to get every 
breakof thegameand there were many. Asa result, they 
amassed 41 points, while the Wildcats were making 7. 

The Longhorns intercepted passes, recovered 
Aggie fumbles and did everything else to make the 
day unpleasant for the Wildcats. The saddest thin;, 
about the disaster was that the Wildcats made eight 
first downs to Texas' 3. The Texas fans praised the 
Aggie line and pointed out that their team got all the 
breaks. 

Only once during the afternoon did Captain 
Douglass and his teammates play real football. In 
the second quarter, the Aggies had the ball on their 
own 22-yard line. Douglass made 33 yards through 
center, then 4 more, then 1. Enns made another 
yard, and Douglass tore through center for 21 yards 
and a touchdown. 

The details of such a game should probably be 
stifled. The Wildcats left Manhattan in a badly 
crippled condition and in a rather pessimistic mood. 
Holsinger was in the hospital with pneumonia. Enns 
and Fleck were injured. Neely had left school. 
Bachman was forced to shift his backfield around and 
many linemen had minor injuries. 




1. IIamlek 

2. Edwards 

3. Stover 



Page Iti 




November 19 saw Memorial Stadium field in- 
vaded by a crimson-jerseyed host from the north — 
the Nebraska Cornhuskers. The thousands of Aggie 
Homecomers and students who saw the game will 
remember it as the best of the season, though the 
Wildcats suffered a crushing defeat. 

A sturdy Aggie line, holding stubbornly against 
the onslaughts of the powerful Husker backfield, 
halted the Nebraska offense during the first period. 
Howell and Presnell, Husker all-American candidates, 
plunged into the Purple line time and again, only to 
be halted in their tracks. Just before the half ended, 
Nebraska flipped a beautiful pass from midfield, 
somebody caught it, plunged ten yards and slid over 
the goal line — and the Huskers scored. 

That was the beginning of the end. At the start 
of the second half Nebraska seemed a different team. 
The off-tackle smashes and end runs of Presnell and his 
mates began to subdue the Aggies. The Husker backs 
delayed their speed until their linemen had torn great 
holes in the Aggie forward wall — then swept through 
for large gains. Three Nebraska touchdowns quickly 
resulted. Only the fighting spirit of the Wildcats saved 
them from utter extinction. Coach Bachman used every 
ounce of football strength in the squad and every Wild- 
cat gave all he had. The Huskers earned their victory. 



1. Douglass 

2. Lyon 

3. DOYHOFP 



Page 164 




The Oklahoma Aggies furnished the opposition 
for the season finale. The game, played to a meagre 
crowd of 2500, was one of the most thrilling ever 
witnessed on Memorial Field. Long end runs, bril- 
liant line plays, spectacular passes; every thrill known 
to football was crowded in that sixty minutes of 
chilly November afternoon. The Oklahomans had 
an ace in the person of Wright, demon forward passer, 
who completed his passes just about as he pleased. 
Once he caught a pass and raced past four Wildcat 
tacklers to a touchdown. 

The scoring was scattered over four quarters of 
play, with each team making four touchdowns. One 
of the Wildcat touchdowns was ruled illegal. 

For the Purple, "Monk" Edwards and Chief 
Sanders performed most brilliantly, Edwards staging 
an exhibition of pass-snatching in the final quarter 
which worried the Oklahomans considerably. Sanders 
got away with several long runs, once circling the end 
for a 50-yard dash to a touchdown. 

The two teams were equal in power, but the 
Purple weakness against the long forward passes 
brought disaster. The score was 25 to 18. The game 
was easily the best seen at Manhattan during the 
season as far as thrills were concerned. 



i 



*«:*%**«*** "*li 



V « 



1 . holsinger 

2. Chief Sanders 

3. mcburney 



Page I b5 




Merle Evans 



( )f the 23 men who were awarded letters at the close of 
the season, eight will be lost to the squad next fall. These 
are Jim Douglass, Ted Fleck, Richard Hamler, "Monk" 
Edwards, Karl Enns, Joe Holsinger, Donald Springer and 
Dayhoff. 

Providing all of the remainder of the lettermen return 
to school, next year's squad will have 15 veterans. Ten of 
the returning men this year were Sophomores, showing that 
the Wildcat eleven will have experienced material for two 
more seasons at least. Five of the lettermen are Juniors. 

Although the attendance at the football games at 
Memorial Stadium field shows a decline this year, the Missouri Valley has had its greatest crowds 
in history in 1927. Valley grid games were witnessed by 382,700, a considerable increase over 
last year. 

Nebraska University carried off honors in having the largest total attendance for the season^ 
with 82,785 admissions. The Kansas State attendance at home games was estimated at 21,000, 
which ranks sixth in the valley. This is considerably under the attendance for the 1926 season. 
Athletic Director Ahearn blamed the broadcasting of games over station KSAC as a partial reason 
for the smaller crowds. 

Despite the number of games lost, the Kansas State eleven of 1927 displayed a brand of 
football that was worth going to see. Especially in the games against Kansas and Oklahoma 
did the Purple squad win the favor of Aggie fans. And again on that cold November day 
when the Cornhuskers were given a first half battle that brought cheer after cheer from the west 
stadium. And when the powerful Sooner squad was defeated after a thrilling battle of forward 
passes. The season just passed had its reverses, but the 1927 Aggies proved themselves worthy 
representatives of Kansas State. 



Page 166 



All- Valley Elevens 



— 4-4 B *=Xa,&~AmZL «™ ttgX&K&fr*-* 



I^g K £+££.* 



KANSAS STATE football players were represented on nearly every all-Western team and 
all-Valley team picked at the close of the season. The all-Valley elevens chosen by the 
Kansas City Star are regarded as authentic in this section and are printed below, together with 
the Leslie Edmonds' all-Kansas eleven. 



THE KANSAS CITY STAR SELECTIONS 

First Team 

Ends — Roy LeCrone, Oklahoma, and Fleck, Kansas Aggies. 

Tackles — Smith, Missouri, and Randels, Nebraska (Captain). 

Guards — McMullen, Nebraska, and Miller, Missouri. 

Center — James, Nebraska. 

Quarterback — Mehrle, Missouri. 

Halfbacks — Presnell, Nebraska, and Lindbloom, Iowa State. 

Fullback — Howell, Nebraska. 

Second Team 

Ends — Brown, Missouri, and Hauser, Kansas. 

Tackles — Cramer, Kansas, and Richards, Nebraska. 

Guards — Myers, Kansas, and Stover, Kansas Aggies 

Center — Ayers, Iowa State. 

Quarterback — Weiss, Iowa State. 

Halfbacks — Holsinger, Kansas Aggies, and Haskins, Oklahoma. 

Fullback — Flamank, Missouri (Captain). 

Captain Douglas and "Monk" Edwards were placed on the third 
all-Valley Team. 



LESLIE EDMONDS' ALL-KANSAS TEAMS. 

First Team 

Ends — Fleck, Kansas Aggies, and Hainline, Emporia Teachers. 

Tackles — Bible, Haskell, and Munday, College of Emporia. 

Guards — Dice, Kansas Wesleyan, and Myers, Kansas University. 

Center — Hawley, Haskell. 

Quarterback — Hamilton, Kansas University. 

Halfbacks — Holsinger, Kansas Aggies, and Selves, C. of E. 

Fullback — Isaacson, Kansas Wesleyan. 

Harold Stover, Kansas State guard, was placed on the all-Kansas 
second team. Householder, Springer and Douglass were given honor- 
able mention. 



Page 167 



l^S^^^^^^S^^^^! 




A. N. "Bo" McMillian 



AN. McMILLIAN has succeeded Coach Charles Bachman as head football 
° coach at Kansas State. McMillian comes here from Geneva College at 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 

"Bo" McMillian has an unusually successful record both as a player and as 
a coach. He was star quarterback of the Centre College team that defeated Harvard 
in 1921. His teams at Centenary College, Shreveport, La., and at Geneva College 
have played a total of 58 games. Of these 58 games McMillian's teams have won 
49, tied one, and lost eight. His teams have been victorious over some of the 
biggest elevens of the east. In 192(3, Geneva won from Harvard and also holds two 
victories over Boston College. 

Coach McMillian will change the Notre Dame style of football used here under 
Bachman 's regime. He has a system which he originated from his own experience 
as a player and coach — the "McMillian style." 



Page 168 



%^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ffi 




XT« vj^VOCVvv \^ev(ni^t svV5 ( ?VV>' vs^c^V^vy vyVvSv; v^rOf^Vy vj?V\) frv^y vy'fj'/ 1 )^/ JjC 



Coach Charles W. Bachman 
i7rad Coac// 0/ Football, 1920-27 



THE seven-year regime of Coach Bachman as head football and track coach 
at Kansas State has witnessed a steady and rapid growth of Wildcat athletics. 
Under Bachman's tutelage, Wildcat teams have risen, from comparative obscurity 
in the Missouri Valley, to a place among the leaders. 

"Bachman and his Wildcats" have become a familiar term to Valley and Mid- 
West football fans. Bachman has made the Purple a feared opponent in Western 
football circles. In short, he has put Kansas State on the athletic map, and his 
years of conscientious work here will not be soon forgotten. Certainly his influence 
will long remain. 

From here, Bachman goes to the University of Florida, where he has accepted 
a position as head football coach. 



Page 169 




Coach Dewey Huston 



UNDER the guidance of Coach Dewey Huston, former Aggie star, 
the Wildcat yearlings developed into a well-rounded football 
machine. The squad gave a good account of itself in two encounters 
with the varsity, losing by small scores. 

No regular games were scheduled for the freshman team. 

The following 24 men received numerals. 

Alex Nigro, Kansas City, Mo. 
Hugh Errington, Goodland 
William Bokendroger, Sabetha 
Walter Kaufman, Kingman 
Price Swartz, Everest 
Miles Ruttan, Grainfield 
Leland Runft, Herington 
William Daniels. Luray 
John Reed, Manhattan 
Tad Platt, Manhattan 
L. C. Fisher, Mahaska 
Robert Belt, Conway Springs 
Richard Vogel, Phillipsburg 
Bill Lawrence, Eldorado 
William Meissinger, Abilene 
D. McAninch, Wamego 
Eli Damon, Junction City 
Marion Swartz, Manhattan 
Ben Olds, Great Bend 
LeRoy Kepley, Chanute 
Joe Garringer, Harveyville 
Edward Frank, Manhattan 
Frank Edlin, Herington 
Esra Stokebrand, Yates Center 



Freshman Squad 




J 




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gjtfrp^ 



fit.-*, tlfr.nt .f.'t ?.■. 

* f JJj IAf' * | '1 t • 






Page 170 



Head Cheerleader 




Paul Pfuetze, Head Cheerleader 





AGGIE YELLS 




Locomotive 




Jay Hawk Saw- 


RAH! 




Jay Rah! 


RAH! 




Gee Haw! 


RAH! 




Jay Hawk Saw! 


RAH! 




K— S— A— C 


K— S— A— C ! 




Rah! Rah! Rah! 


RAH! 






RAH! 






RAH! 






RAH! 






K— S— A— C ! 







(TWO times — increasing tempo) 



'Aggies Figlit' 



Page 171 

























I I 







Holsinger is hard to stop 



Page 172 




■ * »f ■ *%> 



Snapshots at the Kansas game, with the cheer leaders, Wampus Cats and Purple Pepsters brightening things up. 
Page 173 












ST* 




xm /■ 




5 h ' -• _/ iZA-ey 




Calvin and the Evergreens 







BASKET BALL 



Varsity Basket Ball Squad 




■^f ^ -^ 




McCollum, Freeman 

Jardine, Frazier, Youngman 

Corsaut (Coach), Brockway, Jelinek, Brooks 

Silverwood, Jones, Mertel, Edwards (Capt.), Skradski, Gann 

Letters were awarded to the following men at the close of the season : 

Captain A. R. Edwards, Fort Scott 

Ed Skradski, Captain-elect, Kansas City 

Elmer Mertel, Kansas City 

Walter Jones, Kansas City 

P. Freeman, Hoxie 

Stanley Brockway, Topeka 

E. L. Gann, Bur gen 

R. V. Brooks, Hutchinson 

Richard Youngman, Kansas City 



THE SEASON RECORD 



December 16 Kansas 

January 7 Kansas 

January 8 Kansas 

January 13 Kansas 

January 14 Kansas 

January 18 Kansas 

January 21 Kansas 

January 28 Kansas 

February 3 Kansas 

February 9 Kansas 

February 10 Kansas 

February 11 Kansas 

February 18 Kansas 

February 20 Kansas 

February 24 Kansas 

March 2 Kansas 

March 3 Kansas 

March 7 Kansas 



State 


.... 20 


Kansas U 


. 13 


State 


.... 29 


Washington 


. 29 


State 


44 
.... 35 


Missouri 


44 


State 


Oklahoma A. and M . . . 


. 35 


State 


.... 40 


Oklahoma U 


40 


State 


.... 28 


Iowa State 


78 


State 


.... 24 


Nebraska 


. 24 


State 


22 


Drake 


. 22 


State 


.... 34 


Oklahoma A. and M . . . 


. 34 


State 


29 


Grinnell 


. 29 


State 


.... 39 


Iowa State 


. 39 


State 


.... 30 


Drake 


. 30 


State 


. .. . 22 


Nebraska 


. 22 


State 


.... 33 


Grinnell 


. 33 


State 


.... 40 


Oklahoma U 


. 40 


State 


41 
.... 35 


Missouri 


41 


State 


Washington 


. 35 


State 


.... 30 


Kansas U 


. 30 



Page 176 




Coach C. W. Corsaut 



Coach Corsaut began court practice early this year in 
preparation for the Valley court campaign, which opened 
December 16. 

With three veteran lettermen to use as a nucleus and a 
large but inexperienced squad of candidates, Coach Corsaut 
made no predictions for Aggie basket ball fortunes in the 
season's race, but promised a fast, smooth-working squad. 
Valley basket ball fans conceded the Kansas State squad 
very little in the way of championship possibilities, and 
expected little more than an average team. 

The season was an up-and-down affair throughout, with 
the Aggies striking and winning streak for a few games and slumping for three or four straight 
losses. The opening game against Kansas spoke well for a successful campaign, but four losses 
in a row soon dulled Aggie hopes. Coach Corsaut used three or four different combinations during 
the season, but was unable to find one which could win consistently. 

The team kept Aggie rooters in suspense in every home exhibition with alternate spells of 
almost flawless basket ball, and woeful slumps. They could show great offensive power in one 
game, and on the following evening would sink into basket ball oblivion. Despite its somewhat 
erratic playing, the team could be depended upon to give any Valley opponent a good fight. In 
several games, notably the one with Oklahoma played in Nichol's gym, the Purple squad showed 
its real power, and proved itself a factor to be reckoned with in the Valley race. 

Next season's basket ball prospects are bright with several returning lettermen and a strong 
freshmen varsity. The 1929 Aggie basketeers should be in the thick of the valley pennant race 
with a fast and powerful squad. 



Page 1 77 



12 



The All-Star Team 



•J=o£=icE=]<£z3 



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THE Kansas State basketeers finished fourth in total number of points made in 
all the conference games during the 1928 season and averaged a score of 32 
points per game. The championship Oklahoma team averaged 39 points per game. 



THE FINAL VALLEY STANDINGS 



Oklahoma University . 
Missouri University 
Oklahoma A. and M. . 
University of Kansas 
Kansas State 
University of Nebraska . 
Washington University 
Drake University 
Grinnell University 
Iowa State 



1.000 
.722 
.011 
.500 
.444 
.444 
.444 
. 333 
. 333 
.107 



Captain A. R. "Monk" Edwards was the only Wildcat basket ball player 
to receive a position on the mythical "All-Star" five selected by sports critics of 
the Kansas City Journal-Post. Captain Edwards was the unanimous choice of 
sports writers throughout the Valley for a guard position on the all-star five. 



THE MISSOURI VALLEY ALL-STAR TEAM 

Forwards 



Wright . 
Yunker 



Oklahoma Aggies 
Missouri 



Center 



Holt 



Oklahoma 



Guards 



Edwards 
LeCrone 



Kansas State 
Oklahoma 



Red" Mertel, wildcat forward, received honorable mention. 



Page 178 



12z 




One of the most distinguished ath- 
letes the college has produced, "Monk" 
is the first to captain the basket ball 
team for two successive years. He has 
won three letters in three major sports 
the past three years, starring on Wild- 
cat, football, basket ball and baseball 
teams. 

This is his last year of competition. 



.. •- 



EDWARDS 

Captai 





Page 1 79 




Basket Ball 



COACH CORSAUT was faced with the 
problem of moulding his court team from 
almost wholly inexperienced material at the start 
of the 1928 basket ball season. 

Three returning veterans brightened Wild- 
cat hopes. Captain "Monk" Edwards, "Red" 
Mertel and Ed Skradski. With the exception of 
these three men, the large squad of candidates 
did not present an entirely promising outlook 
for the season. Dopesters in the Valley generally 
predicted that the race would be decided from 
among the Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma 
teams. Kansas State was figured to have a 
chance ; with Washington as a "team to be 
watched." 

The Wildcats trounced the Jayhawk at 
Lawrence to win their first Valley game, 20 to 
13. The Aggies were said to have displayed a 
"crashing offense, and an airtight defense," 
and outwitted the Kansas team all the way. 

The next start against the Washington 
Bears proved more unfortunate. The Wildcats 
faltered in the last half and allowed the Bears to 
forge ahead to the tune of 29 to 19. The game 
was rather slow and uninteresting. 

The following contest with Missouri was 
different. 



1. Skradski 

2. Mertel 

3. Jones 



Page 180 



The battle was fast and furious, with the 
score tied six times during the first half. The 
teams were evenly matched, with the Tigers 
having an edge in endurance. The Aggies 
wavered in the late moments of the game, while 
the Missouri team became stronger. The tem- 
porary slump cost the Wildcats the game, 44-33. 

Mertel was high Aggie scorer with five field 
goals, with Skradski hooking three goals and 
two free tosses. 

The following week the Wildcats went down 
into Oklahoma to see what kind of talent the 
Sooner state had. The result was disappoint- 
ing — but not to the Oklahomans. The Aggies 
dropped a pair of games, one to Oklahoma A. 
and M., by one point, and one to the university, 
40 to 29. It was at about this stage of the race 
that the Sooners commenced to loom as the 
probable Valley Champions. 

Business picked up greatly the following 
week. The Aggies, showing complete reversal 
of form, took the measure of Iowa State on the 
home court, 38 to 28. Then, on the Nebraska 
court, they toppled the rather downtrodden 
Cornhuskers, 29 to 24. The victories over Iowa 
State and Nebraska gave the Aggies a rating of 
.428 in the Valley or sixth place. 




• 



1. Edwards 

2. Brockway 

3. Brooks 



Page I SI 




1 1 


**!/ 


%- 


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:]: 


1 t&hHS^J 



Drake proved to be weak opposition, the 
Wildcats having little trouble in tumbling the 
Bulldogs, 34 to 22. The contest was extremely 
slow. 

The next one was a thriller. The Oklahoma 
Aggies brought a lightning-fast and accurate 
team to Manhattan, bent on exterminating the 
Purple. When the whistle blew, the visitors 
were one point ahead, with a well-earned victory. 
No faster, hard-fought exhibition of basket ball 
has been seen in Nichols gymnasium. The lead 
wavered back and forth, and only ten seconds 
before the end did the Oklahomans score the 
winning counter. 

On a three-game invasion of Iowa, the 
Aggies easily turned back Grinnell, 43-29, but 
lost to Iowa State, by one point, 29 to 28. The 
Drake team was defeated on the same trip, 46 to 
30. Returning to Manhattan, the Aggies flash- 
ed a brilliant offensive to turn back the Corn- 
huskers in a hard-fought contest. 

The Grinnell team, so decisively defeated in 
Iowa, ran the Wildcats ragged in the next game. 
The Pioneers won by four points, and deserved 
a larger margin of victory. 

An invasion of Missouri the next week was 
unsuccessful , the Wildcats yielding to the offensive 
power of the Tigers. A game was also dropped 
to Washington. 




1. Silver wood 

2. Freeman 

3. Gann 



Page l SI 



Freshman Basket Ball 

PRACTICE for the freshman squad got away to an early 
start last fall in order to develop a team capable of giving stiff 
opposition to the varsity in practice games. 

Under the direction of Coach Frank Root, the red-jerseyed 
frosh developed into a smooth-working court team, giving the 
varsity drubbings during the season. 

On recognition day at chapel numerals were given to twelve 
men. A world of basket ball material is represented by these 
freshmen, and several are expected to gain berths on the varsity 
squad next year. 




if 




1 


libvtffc - - 5 ■ 


i 


;-- ; 


Up ' 


'"" fSBk 


5» % 



Coach Fpank Root 

WINNERS OF FRESHMEN NUMERALS 

H. J. Barre Tampa 

P. W. Booth Olathe 

L. C. Fisher ' Mahaska 

W. A. Forsberg Lindsborg 

B. I. Gosch Norwich 

Robert S. Florer Marion 

W. H. Meisinger Abilene 

Alex Nigro Kansas City, Mo. 

J. Sanders Independence 

R. C. Schultz Trousdale 

R. G. Vogel Stuttgart 

H. R. Weller Olathe 



Freshman Basket Ball Squad 
I 




Page IS) 




"Red" 




TRACK 







Page IS6 







Page IS7 







m 



'. ' 




The Squad 

The 1927 Season 

THE 1927 track season was the most successful 
that has been enjoyed by a Kansas State squad 
for several years. By smashing three indoor and seven 
outdoor records, Coach Bachman's men completed a 
season's performance which rivals that of any recent 
Aggie squad. 

The season opened when the mile relay team 
broke a long-standing record to win a first at the 
K. C. A. C. meet in Convention Hall. Running 
against the valley's best, Fairchild placed third in the 
high hurdles and Ryan won second in the 440-yard 
dash. 

Kansas State was represented next at the Illinois 
Relay Carnival at Urbana. In the face of stiff com- 
petition, the two-mile relay team placed third, losing 
to Haskell and Northwestern. 

A disastrous meet indoors with Nebraska fol- 
lowed, the Huskers winning with 69 points to 35 for 
the Aggies. Fairchild was high-point man of the meet 
with firsts in both the high and low hurdles. Moody 
won the half-mile, Burton tied for first in the high 
jump, and the mile relay team won a first. 

The Cornhuskers made a clean sweep in the pole 
vault, high jump and 50-yard dash, but the Kansas 




1. WlNBURN 

2. Burton 

3. Fairchild 



Fairchild 



Page 188 





) 



The two-mile relay team 

State showings in the other events was decidedly 
encouraging to Aggie rooters. 

Oklahoma upset the dope bucket to win the valley 
indoor meet at Des Moines with 27 \ ■> points, Ne- 
braska following with 26V2 and Ames third with 26. 
The Wildcats finished with 8 points to win sixth place. 
The mile relay team won first place. Moody captured 
second in the mile run. 

The Texas Relays at Austin gave the Purple 
squad its first chance to perform out-doors. Against 
fast competition, the Kansas State half-milers won 
second place, with Gartner, Axtell, McGrath and 
Moody running. 

The next day, at the Rice Relays, the two- mile 
team won second, with Axtell, McGrath, Smercheck 
and Moody running. The one-mile relay team placed 
fourth, but set a new school record of 3 minutes, 23 
and one-tenth seconds. Gartner won second in the 
220-yard low hurdles, being barely nosed out of first 
place by a Texas opponent. 

At the K. U. relays at Lawrence, the Purple 
half-milers won second place. 

The annual Drake Relays at Des Moines found 
the Wildcat relay teams pitted against the nation's 
best. The two-mile relay team won third, losing by 
narrow margins to Chicago and Iowa State. The one- 
mile team placed third. 

An outdoor triangular meet brought together 
Kansas State, Kansas and Nebraska. 






1. Brock a way 

2. Smerchek 

3. Moody 



Page 189 





The Mile Relay Team 

AN OUTDOOR triangular meet brought together 
Kansas State, Kansas and Nebraska at Manhattan, 
May 6. The meeting ran true to dope with Kansas 
nosing out Nebraska by a narrow margin and the Wild- 
cats trailing a poor third. Burton, Aggie high jumper, 
registered the only Purple first of the meet. Gartner, 
Aggie hurdle star, and Doornbos, a Jayhawker rival, 
outdistanced the rest of the field and raced over the 
sticks in a dead heat almost to the tape, where the 
Kansas runner forged ahead a scant inch to win the 
event. 

The two universities brought well-balanced teams 
to Manhattan, and although the Purple squad showed 
flashes of speed, they were outclassed by the Huskers and 
Jayhawkers. 

The Missouri Valley meet at Lincoln was another 
juicy victory for the Jayhawkers, with Oklahoma a close 
second. The Purple squad won two first places, setting 
a record in each. Paul Gartner lead the 220-yard 
hurdlers to the tape and set a new college record to win 
the event in 23.8 seconds, which also equalled the world's 
record for 220 low hurdles on a curve. The record was 
not allowed because of wind. 

The Aggie quarter-milers won an easy first at the 
Valley meet. Fairchild, Purple high hurdler, and 
Dunstan, Oklahoma runner, ran a close race which the 
Sooner won by a fraction of a second. 

Gartner and Fairchild were sent to the National 
Intercollegiate at Chicago, but failed to place. 




1. 

2. 
3. 


Gartner 

McGrath 

Lyons 





Page 190 



Cross-Country 



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THE Wildcat harriers closed a successful season this year considering the fact that Moody 
was the only letterman on the squad while the other schools in the Valley had teams made 
up of experienced men. 

The Aggies won a dual meet with Nebraska and lost to Kansas and Ames. In the Valley meet 
Kansas State runners tied with Ames for fourth place. This was an excellent showing, as Moody, 
captain and ace of the Wildcat squad, was unable to run. 

Prospects for next year are good. Several non-letter men ran this year and the freshman 
material was considered as unusually promising. Captain Moody and Bond will leave the team 
this year. 

Letters were awarded to the following men : • 

Captain Leslie Moody, Ogden 
Captain-elect Henry Gile, Scandia 
Harold Miller, Kansas City 




Richardson, Faulkner, Miller, Moody, Gile, Hoyne 



Page 191 



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BASEBALL 



13 



192/ Varsity Baseball 



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The 1927 baseball team finished the season with a percentage of .500, 



losing five games and winning five. 



SCORES FOR THE SEASON WERE: 



Kansas State 5 

Kansas State 4 

Kansas State 3 

Kansas State 5 

Kansas State 5 

Kansas State 10 

Kansas State 1 

Kansas State 4 

Kansas State 6 

Kansas State 12 



Oklahoma Aggies 

Oklahoma Aggies 

Kansas 7 

Kansas 2 

Iowa State 4 

Iowa State 4 

Oklahoma 7 

Oklahoma 6 

Kansas University 7 

Kansas University 19 



Page 1 94 



13z 



1928 Varsity Baseball Squad 



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THE Wildcat Baseball Squad started the 1928 campaign with a large but inexperienced squad, 
only two lettermen being among the candidates for team positions. Twenty-eight men 
survived the first early season cut, leaving Coach Corsaut with an unusually large squad to face 
the St. Marys team in two pre-season games. 

The Purple was routed in its first conflict with the powerful Irish squad, losing a slugging 
match 17 to 5, with St. Marys doing most of the slugging. Five Wildcat pitchers were touched 
for twenty hits, with Hoxie Freeman showing up to the best advantage. The Aggies also lost a 
second game to St. Marys at Manhattan. 

The regular season opened when Kansas University came to Manhattan for two games. 
The Jayhawkers displayed some fast baseball and the Wildcats lost the opening game, 9 to 5. 



THE 1928 SCHEDULE 

April 15 and 16 Kansas University at Manhattan 

April 25 and 26 Missouri University at Manhattan 

May 2 and 3 Iowa State at Manhattan 

May 25 and 26 Iowa State at Ames 

June 1 and 2 Kansas at Lawrence 

Games were tentatively arranged with McPherson and St. Marys 
to be played at Manhattan May 11 and 12. 



1928 Varsity Squad 




Page 195 





A dependable hitter and a 
flash at first base, "Jud" left 
little, to be desired as team cap- 
tain. Br ion also made two 
football letters. 



Page 196 




An old hand at the national 
pastime, Ilueys steady play has 
proved a source of inspiration 
to the Wildcat squad. 



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Page 197 




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The metal of the 1927 baseball squad was given 
an early-season test when it met the St. Mary's 
batsmen in a non-eonference affair on the Irish dia- 
mond. The game was a pitcher's battle, with Hays 
of the Aggies holding a decided advantage. Bunched 
hits in the eighth won for the Wildcats, 11 to 5. 

Next week's games were scheduled for Columbia, 
where the Corsaut men were to meet the Tigers in two 
valley tilts. Columbia proved to be the dampest 
place in the valley, and in the face of a heavy down- 
pour, both games were called off. The rain also caused 
cancellation of two games with Washington at St. 
Louis the same week. 

Sadly lacking in practice, the Aggie squad re- 
mained in Manhattan to face an experienced Okla- 
homa Aggie squad, with two conference victories to 
its credit. 

John Hays upset the dope, and pitched the Wild- 
cats to a masterful 5 to victory behind air-tight 
support. The Oklahomans could do nothing with 
Hays' delivery and none of the foe reached third base. 

Next day, the puzzling slants of "Tarzan" 
Marsh completely fooled the Redskins. A barrage of 
Aggie hits in the seventh put the game on ice and made 
the game a complete success. The score was 4 to 0. 




Page 198 




These two victories over a team ranked as a 
Valley pennant contender boosted the Kansas 
State stock considerably, and the outlook was 
bright for a double win over Kansas the following 
week end. 

The Jayhawkers had played six Valley games 
and were doped to finish high in the final stand- 
ings. Their star pitcher, Swenson, rose to the 
occasion in the first game of the twin bill, and the 
Aggies were beat, 3 to 7. Hays pitched the game 
and was touched for nine hits. 

The second game of the Kansas series found 
a different Wildcat team on the field. Marsh 
was in fine form and backed by excellent support 
from his mates, turned in a 5 to 2 victory. A 
series of Kansas errors in the second resulted in 
three Aggie runs, and the lead was held through- 
the game. 

A double-header with Iowa State was the 
next attraction. The Iowans were holding down 
last place in the Valley percentages, and a double 
win would place the Aggies in a tie for first 
place. 

Corsaut chose Hays to start the first game, 
and John sailed along nicely until the third 
when Ames bunched hits and scored four runs. 
Snyder was rushed in and effectively subdued the 
enemy. His mates gathered five runs to win the 
contest 5 to 4. 



1. Brion 

2. Miller 

3. Edwards 



Page 199 





,NYDER started on the rubber next day for the 

Wildcats, but was retired in the second by an Iowa 
batting attack. "Tarzan" Marsh saved the day for the 
Wildcats with an exhibition of burning speed which held 
the Cyclones in check. The victories put the Wildcats 
in a first place tie with Oklahoma and the twin bill with 
the Sooners the following week end was the crucial series 
for both teams. 

The two games with Oklahoma found the Wildcats 
in their worst slump of the season. The Sooners had 
everything their own way, winning both games by small 
scores. Snyder and Marsh were ineffective. 

The Jayhawkers effectively wrecked whatever title 
hopes the Aggies may have had the following week. 
Two games were dropped to the University nine, to the 
surprise of fans. The first was closely played, but the 
second game was a slug-fest, with both teams smacking 
the horsehide to every corner of the lot. 

The K. U. series marked the last appearance of the 
Wildcats on their home diamond. Two games remained 
to be played, both with the unfortunate Iowa State team. 
The Cyclones produced a surprising offense to win the 
first game by a small score. The Wildcats finished the 
1927 season by winning the second of the series, the last 
game on the Valley schedule. 

The 1927 nine demonstrated more than once a 
powerful batting attack, and in early season games played 
baseball worthy of a championship team. 




1. 


Hayes 


2. 


Snyder 


3. 


Havely 




, 







Page 200 




These uphold Kansas State's Baseball Prestige 



Page 201 




11 Strike" 




MINOR SPORTS 




Wrestling 



A RATHER small squad consisting of 20 men reported for wrestling 
practice at the start of the season. This number was added to 
as the season progressed, and now a squad of 30 men is working out 
under the direction of Coach Patterson. 

Intercollegiate wrestling was not installed at Kansas State until 
year before last, the 1927 team completing an extensive Missouri 
Valley schedule. 



Coach Patterson 



SCORES OF WRESTLING MEETS 



January 6 

Hays Teachers 10 

Kansas State 23 

February 4 

Oklahoma University 22 

Kansas State 3 

February 13 

Nebraska University 17 

Kansas State 8 



February 17 

Oklahoma Aggies 29 

Kansas State 

February 25 

Kansas University 153^2 

Kansas State 7}/2 

March 3 

Ames 19 

Kansas State 6 



January 21 

Missouri 12 

Kansas State 9 




I h\/ 



Paynter 



Germann 



CjOSNEY 



Crews 



McKibben 

Page 204 



Wrestling 



DESPITE the small number of victories, the team continued to show 
improvement throughout the season, and, according to Coach 
Patterson, prospects are very bright for a winning team next year. 

As a means of encouraging wrestling at Kansas State, a statewide 
wrestling tournament was inaugurated this year. Nearly 100 high school 
wrestlers took part. It is expected that the tournament will be made an 
annual affair. 

The high school tourney was won by Wichita High, with Kinsley 
second and Manhattan third. 

Letters were awarded to John Richardson, W. L. Doyle and C. B. 
Crews at the close of the season. Richardson is captain-elect of the squad 
for next year. 



i 



-- 




Captain Hinkle 




Richardson 
Page 205 



Long 



M ELIA 



Doyle 



Sherwood 



Allen 




Mr. L. P. Washburn 
Director of Intramurals 



Intramural Athletics 

TNTRAMURAL ATHLETICS have been in existence at the Kansas 
-W- State Agricultural College for six years. The work was started in 
the fall of 1921 by Mr. E. A. Knoth. The first activity was basket 
ball. This was followed by baseball and tennis in the spring of 1922. 
Each year since then has seen a growth until a total of twelve types 
of activities were offered in 1925-1926. 

In December, 1925, Mr. Knoth accepted another position, and 
Mr. L. P. Washburn was placed in charge of the Intramurals, beginning 
the first of February, 1926. The form of organization was not changed 
to any extent, but beginning with the fall of 1926 several changes were 
made in the activities included in the program. 

The bicycle race first introduced in 1923 was dropped and horse- 
shoe pitching and soccer football were added. The first schedules of 
these sports played during the fall of 1926 were a decided success. Intramural athletics are 
designed to meet the needs and requirements of that large number of students who do not take 
part in varsity athletics through lack of time, ability or inclination. The aim is to furnish 
recreation, exercise, social contacts, and the development of good sportsmanship. 

The backbone of the Intramural Athletic Association is the group of fraternities which form 
the principal membership. Independent clubs and teams and individuals are also included in the 
membership of the association. Any male student in the college is eligible to compete in the 
intramural activities, except varsity men who may be eligible under certain conditions. 

The department attempts to provide facilities for all types of sport in which there is interest 
shown on the part of the students. During the year 1926-27, thirteen sport activities were in- 
cluded in the list of schedules. In each one there was an increase in the number of entries over 
the previous year, especially in the tennis, cross-country, boxing and wrestling tournaments. 

Sweaters and intramural emblems are given to the 10 men who score the greatest number of 
points during the year, and emblems only are given to the next 10 high-score men. Gold medals 
are given the winners of all individual events. Trophies are awarded to the organizations 
winning the team sports. 




Page 206 



Intramural 



THIS year a large and beautiful challenge trophy was offered 
which will become the permanent property of the organization 
which wins it three times. Each year a small trophy emblematic of 
victory is given to the organizations winning the largest number of 
points during the year, which remains permanently with the organi- 
zation. A trophy is also given to the team finishing in second place. 

It is the hope and aim of the Intramural Department that every 
man in school will take part in at least one of the activities of the 
intramural program. 

The intramural trophy for the year 1927 was won by Sigma Phi 
Sigma. The cup given for second place was won by Delta Tau Delta. 
The track trophy was won by the same fraternit y. 

Intramural high-point men for 1926-27 were as follows: 




Paul How. 

Horseshoe Cha 



mpion 



L. M. Nash Alpha Tau Omega 

F. B. Prentup Phi Kappa 

W. J. Hurlburt ... ... Delta Tau Delta 

M. Q. Halderman Sigma Phi Sigma 

H. B. Ryan Independent 

C. P. Howard Delta Tau Delta 

R. R. Allbaugh Sigma Nu 

W. I. Grigg Sigma Nu 

E. R. Peterson Omega Tau Epsilon 

W. J. Jones Delta Tau Delta 



Team championships were won by these organizations: 

Basket Ball Independent Athletic Club 

Lambda Chi Alpha 



Baseball 
Indoor Track 
Outdoor Track 
Soccer 
Swimming 



Phi Kappa Tau 

Delta Tau Delta 

Phi Lambda Theta 

Alpha Tau. Omega 



The 1927-28 basket ball trophy was won by Delta Tau Delta in a play-off against the Inde- 
pendent Athletic Club. The 1928 swimming cup was also won by Delta Tau Delta. The soccer 
championship was won by the Delta Sigma Phi fraternity. 




Page 207 




Horseshoe Doubles 
Champions 



Intramural Program 

FALL 

THE fall program of intramural activities is well filled with a 
horseshoe pitching tournament, a soccer schedule and the cross- 
country run. The first two sports were used for the first time last 
year and were very successful, 285 men competing in the horseshoe 
singles and an equal number in the doubles. 

Twenty teams were entered in the soccer schedule, which was 
played in full. 

In the cross-country race 140 men competed; a large increase 
over any previous year. The intramural course record was lowered 
by almost a minute. 



WINTER 

Basket ball is probably the favorite winter sport. A total of 27 teams played out last winter's 
schedule. Two basket ball courts are available for these games and more are needed. The 
number of entries in each event from an organization has been limited to three for the indoor 
track meet and to five for the swimming meet in order to lessen the over-crowding. The boxing 
and wrestling tournaments showed a very large increase in number of contestants over any pre- 
vious year; a total of 139 swapping punches and rolling on the mat. 

An admission fee is charged to the finals of the wrestling and boxing tournaments and to the 
final championship basket ball game, the money being used to defray intramural expenses. 

SPRING 

The spring intramural sports include baseball, tennis, outdoor track and handball. A total 
of 278 men competed in the tennis singles and 252 in the doubles, this being an increase of 48 in 
each case over the previous year. These matches are played on the sixteen clay courts located 
west of the gymnasium. 

In baseball 27 teams, including a total of 340 men, played an unusually close race for the cup. 
Baseball is played on two diamonds located in the city park. Plans are being made to establish 
an Intramural Athletic Field on college land which can be used for both soccer and baseball. 




Delta Tau Delta — Track champions, 1927 



Page 20S 



Intramurals 



GREATER interest was shown in boxing and wrestling this year 
than ever before. The entry lists were much larger and contest- 
ants more evenly matched. A large crowd saw the matches, especially 
the finals. 

Boxing this year had an entry list of 152 as compared with 135 
last year. The interest taken by fraternities in boxing and wrestling 
promises to make them foremost in intramural sports. 

Individual winners in boxing were as follows: 




Finish of an Intramural 
Final Race 



Class 


Winner 


115 


R. Wilson 


125 


R. Paynter 


135 


F. Bond . 


145 


J. Limes 


158 


L. Da vies 


175 


Alex Nigro 


Heavy 


Bauman . 



Organization 

Independent 

Spanish Athletic Club 

Phi Kappa 

Delta Tau Delta 

. Lambda Chi Alpha 

. Phi Kappa 

Alpha Tau Omega 



The boxing matches were held February 16, 21 and 27. 



The number of wrestling entries was also greatly increased over that of last year. Two 
hundred and thirty-seven men were entered as compared with 169 last year. 



The following men were individual winners: 



Class 

115 
125 
135 
145 
158 
175 
Heavy 



Winner 

Fleck 

Marihugh 

Allen 

Schropp 

Warner . 

Chapman 

Errington 



Organization 

Independent 
. Independent 
Phi Kappa Tau 
Independent 
Independent 
Farm House 
Independent 




Delta Tau Delta' Basket Ball Champions, 1928 



Page 209 



14 



Intramurals 



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A LARGE number of entries were received in the annual indoor 
track meet which was held March 17. The following men were 
winners in their events: 



Finals in the Mile Run 



35-yard dash . 
220-yard dash 
440-yard dash 

880-run 

One Mile 



S. Taylor Kaw Athletic Club 

A. Myers Kaw Athletic Club 

C. Kopf Sigma Phi Sigma 

K. Gapen Phi Kappa Tan 

K. Bachus Kaw Athletic Club 



Four-man Relay. . . .Taylor, Meyer 

Ross, Dudley Kaw Athletic Club 

30-yard low hurdles. . Amos Delta Tau Delta 

35-yard high hurdles.A. Stryker Alpha Gamma Rho 

High jump Jennings Pi Kappa Alpha 

Pole vault H. Coleman Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Following the indoor track meet, Sigma Phi Epsilon led in points won from this meet and 
the cross-country run toward the intramural track trophy. Delta Tau Delta was second. 

An increasingly large number of men compete in the intramural track events each year, 
both indoor and outdoor. Competition is keen among fraternities and other campus organiza- 
tions for the trophies which are awarded and this year unusually fast time was made in all the 
races. The intramural meets do much toward developing varsity material and their popularity 
should prove a great aid in promoting better athletics here. 

Below — The start of two intramural races 




Page 210 



14z 




Intramurals 

THE intramural swimming entries this year were held down to 
three men in each event in any one organization, and no man 
could compete in more than four events. Eighty men were entered in 
the swimming meet. The competition was close between Delta Tau 
Delta and Alpha Tau Omega, the former winning by a score of 54 to 
50. Lambda Chi Alpha was third with 24 points and Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon was fourth with 18 points. 

Individual winners in the swimming meet were as follows: 



An Intramural Point 
Winner 

40-yard free style R. Rippey Alpha Tau Omega 

100-yard free style. . . . G. Livingston Delta Tau Delta 

100-yard back stroke. . R. Miller Alpha Tau Omega 

220-yard free style. . . . G. Rickey Delta Tau Delta 

Fancy dive Miller Alpha Tau Omega 

100 breast stroke W. Vasey Kappa Sigma 

Plunge P. Skinner Delta Tau Delta 

Four-man relay Perham, Woodman 

Chastain, Livingston. . . .Delta Tau Delta 

The intramural games at Kansas State fill a more important place in the program of the 
college than all varsity sports combined, furnishing a means of athletic activity for every student 
on the Hill who wishes to participate in a sport. 

The chief justification of the emphasis now placed on the major sports, which allow competi- 
tion on the part of only a limited number of students, is that the facilities and funds thus provided 
may be utilized for the physical betterment of all students at the college. 

Kansas State carries on a very extensive men's intramural program. Each organization 
competing is a member of the Intramural Association. 

The Delta Sigma Phi Championship Soccer Team 




Page 111 





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WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 



Purple Pepsters 



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OFFICERS 



President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Faculty Sponsor 



Agnes Bane 

Elizabeth Hartley 

Alma Brown 

Dorothy Sappington 



Colors — Purple and White 






PURPLE PEPSTERS was organized under the leadership of W. A. A. in 192(5. 
Any girl who has won 250 points in athletics and is a member of W. A. A. 
may become a member. When 500 points have been earned, an emblem may 
be worn. The purpose of this organization is to promote pep and to foster 
the ideals of good sportsmanship. 






MEMBERS 
Elizabeth Allen 
Lillian Alley 
Agnes Bane 
Lillian Bedor 
Garnet Brown 
Alma Brown 
Maurine Burson 
Edith Carnahan 
Alma Cress 
Ruth Davies 
Mary Louise Dittemore 
Meredith D welly 
Ruth Enos 
Ruth Frost 
Elizabeth Hartley 
Ora Hatton 
Esther Hobson 
Mildred Huddleston 
Avis Holland 
Ruth Hubbard 
Wilma Jennings 



Catherine Lorimer 
Reva Lyne 
Agnes Lyon 
Charlotte Mathias 
Marjorie Merrick 
Anna Morlan 
Thelma Munn 
Jennie Nettrouer 
Mary Norman 
Leone Pacey 
Grace Reed 
Marguerite Richards 
Jean Rundle 
Clare Russell 
Olga Saffry 
Letha Shoenie 
Melvina Schrader 
Nadene Stout 
Grace Taylor 
Mildred Worster 
Margaret Koenig 




The Purple Pepsters 



Page 214 



Women's 'K Fraternity 




Hartley 



Lyne 



Russell 



Merrick 



Math i as 



UNUSUAL interest in intramural sports was the predominant development 
in the Department of Physical Education for Women during the past year. 
Strong competition was demonstrated by the classes and organized groups in 
hockey, volley ball, baseball, swimming, basket ball and horseshoe pitching. Over 
100 girls participated in each of the several sports. 

The first class in the physical education course will be graduated in 1929. 
Beginning three years ago, the curricula has been enriched until the full four-year 
course of study will be completed next year. At the present time 47 girls are en- 
rolled in the new course. 

The fall and winter sports offered by the department include: Hockey, swim- 
ming, dancing, volley ball, clogging, basket ball and floor work. The spring sports 
are tennis, track and field, archery, and baseball. 

Two changes were made in the department personnel during the past year: 
Miss Katherine Geyer, graduate of Sargent and Ohio State College, has charge of 
the intramurals and swimming. The other new member of the faculty is Miss 
Dorothy Sappington of the University of Missouri, who has instructed the dancing 
and corrective classes. Miss Myra Wade and Miss Geneva Watson, former in- 
structors, resigned during the past year. 

The new physical education course, installed at the college three years ago, was 
introduced largely through the efforts of Miss Ruth Morris, head of the Women's 
Department and a graduate of the University of Wisconsin course. The course 
is intended to train not only for the specialized work of teaching physical educa- 
tion, but also to give a well-rounded general education. Two years of elementary 
physical education work are required of all women students in the college. 



Page 21 S 



W. A. A. Council 


















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OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 

Publicity Manager 



SPORTS MANAGERS 



Hockey 
Basket Ball 
Track . 
Archery . 
Baseball 
Tennis 



Hike Manager 



Reva Lyne 

Claire Russell 

Ruth Frost 

Marjorie Mirick 

Leone Pacey 

Meredith Dwelly 



. Alma Brown 

Wilma Jennings 

Catharine Lorimer 

Elizabeth Hartley 

Ruth Enos 

Hope Dawley 

Vada Burson 



THE W. A. A. CREED 

IF YOU want to get acquainted with your classmates, see college ideals translated into action, 
and K. S. A. C. women at their best, sign up for sports and join W. A. A. There is no athletic 
aristocracy, except that based on fine sportsmanship, splendid leadership, and good fellowship. 

W. A. A. makes it possible for you to discover the joy and exhilaration of wholesome, in- 
vigorating outdoor sports. 













Faffry 



Pacey 



Holland 



Lyne 



Lorimer 



Merrick 



Dwelly 



Page 216 




Left — "X" team, runners-up in 

the intramural volley ball tourna- 
ment. 



Pa R e 217 






























Varsity Hockey Tea 




me nt. 



Rage 218 



WmmmmmmmmSB/Mmm 




Top 

The members of 

the Women's "K" 

Fraternity 

Center 

An intramural 
baseball game 



Page 219 




Mrs. Nina M. Rhoades 
Social Director 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Sports Manager 



Van Zile Hall 

OFFICERS 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



Clara Paulsen 

Thelma Munn 

Velma Horner 

Josephine Winters 



Eula Mae Anderson 

Claire Cox 

Ruth Hallett 

Arlee Murphy 

. Marjorie Mirick 



SOCIAL activities at the dormitory are under the supervision of Mrs. Nina M. Rhoades, Social 
Director. The girls have their own organization for carrying on the usual business and 
social details following in general the S. G. A. house rules, with others found convenient for 
dormitory use. 

There is one main living room and several reception rooms for socials. The main social unit 
is the large lounge room, furnished with carved walnut pieces, two davenports, end tables, and a 
grandfather's clock with cathedral chimes, a gift of the local chapter of the American Association 
of University Women. There are two small parlors off each end of the lounge, and a large music 
room. 

Recreation and guest rooms are provided on each floor. 



The Dining Room 




Page 220 



Van Zile Hall 




Horner 



Cox 



Paulsen 



Anderson 



VAN ZILE HALL, first dormitory for women to be built at K. S. A. C. is the result of a 
movement started in 1919 to establish dormitories at the five state schools. In 1921, largely 
through the efforts of the Kansas Council for Women, a bill was passed, but the appropriations 
were not sufficient to provide each school with a dormitory. Kansas State offered to wait, allow- 
ing the other schools to build, with the understanding that the K. S. A. C. dormitory would be 
built later. It was not until the 1925 session of the legislature that the combined efforts of the 
Kansas Council, the A. A. U. W., and others were successful in getting the dormitory plan through- 

The hall is named for Mrs. Mary Pierce Van Zile, Dean of Women, who was active in support 
of the project and in making the dormitory as completed an ideal college home. 

The hall stands on an elevation in the northeast corner of the campus, the location being 
admirably suited to future improvements with drives, walks, trees and shrubs. Space for two 
other dormitory buildings, to be erected when the need for them is felt, was provided for in 
locating the building. 

There are rooms for 127 girls in the building, nearly all being for two girls, although a few 
single rooms are provided. 

A comer of the Music Room 




Page 111 













Page 221 




MILITARY 



B o o k 

5 * * 



The Reserve Officers Training Corps 



— .f=3O^0^0^=l 



*S§4-g g""^* 



C^oc^.B-?— 



THE Reserve Officers Training Corps is organized under the National Defense Act of 1920, 
and has for its purpose the qualifying of selected students at civil educational institutions 
as officers of the Organized Reserve. 

Two years of basic training are required of all male students at K. S. A. C. who are physically 
fit. Students who complete both the basic and advanced courses are offered commissions in the 
Officers Reserve Corps, acceptance of which is optional. 




Page 223 



The Military Faculty at the College 
Back row — Sergeant Coffee, Sergeant Pugh, Sergeant Connolly 
Third row — Captain Waltz, Lieutenant Sims, Captain Wertz, Captain Fitzgerald 
Second row — Captain Stewart, Captain Bowen, Captain McGarrugh, Captain Rose 
First row — Colonel Petty, Major Pierce 




Cadet Staff Officers 

Cadet Colonel . J. H. Church, C. A. C, R. O. T. C. 
Cadet Lieut. -Colonel E. J. Benne, Inf., R. O. T. C. 
Cadet Major . . H. K. Fisher, Inf., R. O. T. C. 
Cadet Major . J. I. Hazzard, C. A. C, R. O. T. C. 



J. H. Church 

Cadet Colonel 

APPOINTMENT as a staff officer of the Cadet Corps of nearly 1,200 men is one of the highest 
honors which the College can bestow. 

Selection of a Cadet Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel and two Majors is made each year on the 
basis of scholarship as displayed in Military Department work, appearance, and leadership, 
and all-round executive ability as displayed both in R. O. T. C. work and in all college activities. 

It is customary with the artillery and infantry units to alternate in furnishing the Cadet 
Colonel, the Lieutenant-Colonel coming from the branch not furnishing the Colonel. 

Standards were tightened up considerably in the advancement of cadet officers during the 
past year, and very few promotions were made. Selection of the cadet staff officers was not made 
until some time after the beginning of the fall semester, in order to give the department officers 
time to confirm their selections by watching actual performances. 




Benne 



Fisher 



Hazzard 



Page 224 



Honorary Staff Officers 

EACH year, the cadet corps at Kansas State holds 
an election, with every cadet participating, to 
choose an honorary cadet colonel as sponsor for the 
regiment, and an honorary major for each of the three 
drill battalions. 

The girls selected as honorary officers are the reign- 
ing "queens" of the annual Military Ball, and also review 
the regiment at the annual parade given in the spring. 

Candidates for honorary staff positions are nomi- 
nated by a committee of advanced R. O. T. C. officers, 
elected by the entire advanced course. Sixteen girls 
were nominated, to provide in addition to the four staff 
officers, a sponsor for each of the 12 cadet companies. 
Each member of the cadet corps votes for four candi- 
dates, with no order of preference. 




Miss El Delle Johnson 

Honorary Colonel 



THE HONORARY OFFICERS 



Honorary Cadet Colonel 
Major First Battalion . 
Major Second Battalion 
Major Third Battalion 



Miss El Delle Johnson 

Miss Vesta Duckwall 

Miss Lucille Chastain 

Miss Frances Schepp 




Miss Duckwall 



Miss Chastain 



Miss Schepp 



Pace 225 



15 



Military Instruction 

By Colonel J. M. Petty, Infantry, U. S. Army 

MILITARY instruction at Kansas State has made con- 
sistent and notable progress since the inauguration of 
the Reserve Officers' Training Corps in the leading educational 
institutions of our country. 

The efforts and team work of the cadets, and those in 

immediate charge of their instruction, coupled with the hearty 

_ support of the head of the institution, finally placed this 

■l \^ : ''\ ''M college, in 1927, in that selected class officially recognized 

I V ^jB and designated in orders by the War Department as 

"Distinguished." Although this instruction has its op- 
ponents in the faculties and student bodies of several 
colleges, I have never seen any examples of its alleged injurious effects. In addition to the train- 
ing given in the technical and tactical handling of weapons of war, students are instructed in 
command, leadership, teamwork, respect for constituted authority, and citizenship. This de- 
partment, therefore, not only aims to prepare its students to take their proper places in a time of 
national military emergency, but endeavors also to assist them, in a measure, with information 
and guidance designed to be valuable in the more usual times of peace. 

The regiment this year has maintained the high standard set by its predecessor and has 
reflected credit upon itself and the institution by its work. 




The Coast Artillery Corps 



By Major C. D. Peirce, C. A. C, U. S. Army 

The missions of the Coast Artillery are numerous. As its name implies, it is the protector 
of our coast line. In addition to this, it protects our inland towns from aircraft raids and furnishes 
protection for all branches of the military service and their establishments from air attacks. 
This protection is now very effective, since the improvement in the accuracy of anti-aircraft 
weapons, which has progressed tremendously in the past two years. 

The Coast Artillery Unit at this institution was organized on July 1, 1920. Its general object, 
like other units, is to qualify students for positions of leadership in time of national emergency, 
thereby enabling them to be of greater service to their country. Upon completion of the basic 
course a student is expected to possess the necessary qualifications to perform the duties of a 
qualified non-commissioned officer; upon completion of the first year of the advanced course the 
student should be able to function in the expert gunner positions. This course completes the 
theoretical knowledge the student is expected to acquire prior to his attendance at camp. 

The Coast Artillery Camp is normally held at Camp Knox, Kentucky, thirty miles from 
Louisville, and for a period of six weeks, beginning about June 15th and ending about July 26th 
of each year. At this camp the student puts into practical application the theoretical knowledge 
obtained during the preceding three years. The second and final year, advanced course is designed 
to round out the general military education of the student and to give him the training necessary 
to fulfill his duties as a second lieutenant. 



Page 226 



1.5 



Battery "A" 



— .5=0^0^30^=1 



^¥^^^^' 



c=£i=§.«* 



Captain 

M. M. GlNTER 

1st Lieutenant 
R. E. Davis 



L. V. Rector 
C. F. Smith 



G. K. Hays 
R. W. Hofsess 



2nd Lieutenants 



1st Sergeant 
M. VV. Coble 

Sergeants 
C. E. Reeder 



VV. A. Nelson 
P. E. Massey 



T. R. Brennan 
W. Kimes 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Arndt, W. J. 
Atwood, B. E. 
Bertotti, J. T. 
Burch, C. L. 
Campbell, R. J. 
Berry, VV. H. 
Clarke, H. 
Coberly, H. P. 
Abernathey, H. C. 
Crowley, R. J. 
Eichelberger, W. 

HOLMQUIST, A. A. 

McCleery, A. J. 
Tucker, F. C. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Edwards, C. J. 
Evans, E. N. 
Everett, A. E. 
Galloup, C. 
Ghromley, C. E. 
Griffith, M. A. 
Hahn, V. L. 
Hartman, R. L. 
Hershe, J. E. 



Hoyne, J. T. 
Jenkins, G. H. 
Jobe, H. J. 
Joines, G. V. 
Jones, E. E. 
Jones, Shelby 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Andrews, P. W. 
Appl, T. R. 
Bagley, G. R. 
Barre, H.fJ. 
Beck, V. A. 
Blosser, B. VV. 
Boggs, C. A. 
Brown, K. C. 
Brown, V. U. 
Burgin, M. L. 
Butler, N. O. 
Cain, G. E. 
Compton, L. H. 
corrigan, j. d. 
Cottingham, Wm. 
Cowles, M. A. 
Cress, J. J. 
Daniels, VV. W. 



Davis, J. L. 
Eaton, M. L. 
El well, H. A. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Aubel, C. H. 

FlCKEL, J. C. 

Fleck, R. VV. 
Florer, R. S. 
Fritzinger, F. 
Garinger, J. B. 
Gather, H. K. 
Goodholm, M. S. 
Gunn, C. L. 
Hering, H. R. 
Hitt, O. F. 
Hunter, L. C. 
Kepley, L. F. 
Kirby, H. H. 
Kelpinger, L. H. 
Lawrence, G. VV. 
Leasure, O. 
Lechner, L. D. 
McCulley, E. P. 
McIntire, A. S. 
McIntosh, M. D. 







Pane 227 



Company 'B' 



«>=>o^r=io 



**e^-g f £*&** 



c^oc^.c=4^- 



Captain 
Orville O. Barton 

7i7 Lieutenant 
C. J. Winslow 

';/</ Lieutenants 

Theodore W. Keller 
Albert B. King 



S. Kelly 



1st Sergeant 
M. B. Pearson 

Sergeants 



A. Roberts 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Alpers, C. L. 
Amis, J. W. 
Anderson, C. L. 
Bonfield, J. P. 
Carlson, D. A. 
Chapman, Wm. 
Clark, J. E. 
Davidson, A. G. 
Freeman, A. H. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Geis, I. A. 
Grafel, G. M. 
Graves, R. R. 
Hageman, B. H. 
Haldeman, M. O. 
Mark, G. A. 
Hoss, R. J. 
Immer, J. G. 



JOBLING, H. 

Jones, W. 
Coburn, K. 
Collins, C. R. 
Duling, G. H. 
Downer, A. M. 
Edlin, F. E. 
Forster, G. R. 
Fox, R. L. 
Conger, C. C. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Armstrong, R. 
Axtell, H. F. 
Bentley, T. B. 
Bird, J. A. 

BOKENKROGER, W. H. 

Booth, P. W. 
Campbell, R. G. 
Caton, M. B. 



Caughron, W. J. 
Kenison, C. H. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Gary, H. C. 
Germann, R. F. 
Gilliam, C. O. 
Gish, C. L. 
Grahem, G. A. 
Hakl, J. L. 
Hays, D. A. 
Heath, H. T. 
Hirshier, C. D. 
Hornsby, W. S. 
Howege, L. A. 
Houck, D C. 
Isaac, G. C. 
Johnson, C. C. 
Johnston, E. D. 
Lones. M. E. 




Page 228 



».-=oJ=io^lo^Z3 



Battery "C" 



£=J>c=J>c=^.=S«— 



=% 



L. W. Bishop 



A. E. Dring 
J. C. Marshall 



Captain 
R. K. Whitford 

1st Lieutenant 
G. T. Bond 

2nd Lieutenants 
J. H. Moehlman 

1st Sergeant 

J. W. SCHWANKE 

Sergeants 
A. L. Coats 
F. Kimes 



C. H. Synnamon 



W. M. Herren 
K. W. Ernst 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Kershaw, J. H. 
Kindsvater, P. A. 
Kovar, L. J. 
Kreutziger, G. 
Latimer, K. J. 
Lengquist, R. 
Little, C. O. 
Long, E. I. 
Lydick, L. N. 
McBurney, E. C. 
M angle sdorf, H. G. 
Miller, M. S. 
Mishler, L. M. 
Mitchell, W. R. 
Myser, J. W. 
Nonken, G. C. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Osborn, J. R. 
Pierce, V. L. 
Quigley, L. R. 
Rogers, R. 
Roth, F. H. 
Russell, R. H. 



Strahm, R. W. 
Shubert, C. A. 
Thudin, H. P. 
Turner, R. F. 
Vance, A. W. 
Vockrodt, C. E. 
Warner, Earl 
Weckel, M. F. 
Weirick, F. H. 
White, G. A. 
Williams, W. E. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Martin, H. E. 
Miller, P. A. 
Mogge, J. G. 
Moon, R. B. 
Moyer, C. H. 
Newman, C. 
Noland, K. L. 
Owen, A. E. 
Postlewaite, R. C. 
Reber, D. 
Redd, R. A. 



Rhodes, C. M. 
Rogers, O. G. 
Ross, E. L. 
Rowles, D. T. 
Sayles, G. S. 
Shaver, S. A. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Sides, C. D. 
Staadt, Homer 
Starbird, A. T. 
Wacker, L. C. 
Walker, R. S. 
Warner, J. R. 
Washburn, I. E. 
Weirick, R. T. 
Wesley, V. E. 
Westman, L. C. 
Wilcoxen, J. I. 
Willis, C. L. 
Winkler, Wm. 
Wise, Geo. 
Wood, G. E. 
Wood, R. H. 

YOCKERS, C. W. 




CjL.'-^ja^ 




.j^m. \^gr. * -1 ■*«.--' ■«: "\ 



Page 229 



Company "D 1 



— .J=o£=jo^r=!<£z) 



i^g ~ 3-fr£& 



C^oCZ^oC^.c^. 



Captain 

E. T. GOODFELLOW 



W. C. Pierce 



7s/ Lieutenants 
M. M. Kerr 



VV. M. Crossen 



<?«</ Lieutenant 
A. L. Ruth 

/s/ Sergeant 
Lee Hammond 



M. B. Ross 



Sergeants 

C. G. Vaupel 
C. Eustace 



A. Mast 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Kern, J. S. 
Kimball, S. T. 
Leaky, E. M. 
Lee, E. E. 
Miller, L. J. 
Murphy, F. A. 
Murphy, M. C. 
Nevius, F. I. 
O'Hara, R. W. 
Perham, W. C. 
Braun, W. J. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Peterson, O. K. 
Pratt, J. W. 
Raleigh, F. J. 
Schlotterbeck, R. 
Schultis, W. J. 
Timmons, F. L. 
Simmons, H. L. 
White, D. F. 
Wilson, R. M. 
Winkler, L. F. 
Zapata, F. B. 
Towler, Wm. 



Freshmen Jst Platoon 
Kester, W. O. 
Kirkland, G. W. 
Knorr, F. G. 
Lambertson, A. 
Lindbloom, N. 
Love, F. C. 
McBurney, J. E. 
McCulloch, M. S. 
Magnuson, W. 
Majerus, C. J. 
Markley, H. J. 
Marshall, M. M. 
Mather, R. B. 
Miller, H. E. 
Newton, J. G. 
Olds, B. R. 
Olson, F. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Patterson, R. 
Parshall, H. C. 
Pickett, R. H. 



Polhamus, W. H. 
Pelischeck, M. Z. 
Price, C. J. 
Price, W. J. 
Putnam, D. K. 
Redding, W. V. 
Reed, J. H. 
Reed, R. B. 
Ricky, G. K. 
Roehrman, S. S. 
Rowe, V. C. 

RUTTAN, M. H. 

Schultz, Roy 
Scott, C. C. 
Smith, M. E. 
Spangler, D. H. 
Steimatze, L. L. 
Storz, Fred 
Suplee, Dale 
Taylor, J. W. 
Trull, E. R. 
Wehl, K. A. 
Weller, H. 
Wyman, R. L. 




Page 230 



Battery "E" 



-— S"=»<£=3<£=><£ZI 



*&#»§ ^ £■*&*•=* 



^^•=i- 



L. H. Davies 



Captain 
L. W. Bailv 

/.v/ Lieutenant 
C. B. Ault 

-«</ Lieutenants 

1st Sergeant 
E. G. Downie 



Joe Limes 



C. B. Olds 
J. S. Rhodes 



Sergeants 

VV. M. Herren 

J. E. Stegelin 



G. E. Drollinger 
A. O. Flinner 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Allen, G. M. 
Barber, T. H. 
Bredehoft, E. H. 
Broady, Arthur 
Brock way, S. H. 
Brodie, C. A. 
Brooks, R. U. 
Buchanan, R. Y. 
Converse, K. E. 
Copeland, R. J. 
Creager, G. R. 
Davidson, H. E. 
Dawe, T. J. 
Delp, Cecil 
Dial, D. D. 
Doyle, W. L. 
Fisher, E. H. 
Foley, J. L. 
Furbeck, R. J. 
Gerardy, C. R. 
Henderhorst, F. 

HOLMBERG, E. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Bobst, H. G. 
Brookover, P. E. 
Burns, C. P. 
Dinkler, W. E. 



Ingraham, J. VV. 
Johnson, M. B. 
King, L. R. 
Kloepper, J. W. 
Kopf, C. M. 
Klotzbach, M. S. 
Litvien, A. B. 

MCMULLEN, C. J. 

Markle, Bruce 
Meredith, G. E. 
Meyers, A. M. 
Miller, H. S. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Ainsworth, C. E. 
Alexander, R. F. 
Barckman, W. S. 
Barber, B. W. 
Bentz, K. A. 
Brantley, G. L. 
Brennman, A. M. 
Brenz, D. L. 
Campbell, L. 
Carmichael, D. G. 
Cornell, K. D. 
Custer, J. R. 
Davies, R. N. 
Earl, D. M. 

EDIN BOROUGH, L. H. 

Elder, M. N. 



Ellifrit, R. S. 
FitzGerald, W. M. 
Fossey, C. S. 
Frank, E. B. 
Gaumer, M. J. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Giwosky, H. L. 
Griffin, M. C. 
Hadley, A. C. 
Harvey, V. E. 
Haxlett, L. D. 
Heinbach, P. R. 
Hostetler, A. A. 
Heimerich, J. J. 
Howard, A. T. 
Hulland, E. L. 

HUHTINGTON, FRED 

Irwin, VV. L. 
Jackson, W. B. 
James, R. E. 
Karns, E. E. 
Kewley, C. W. 
Keyser, W. E. 
Kilbourne, L. VV. 
Kirby, VV. G. 
Livingston, E. C. 
Makins, M. F. 
Ungle, K. V. 




Page 231 



Company { F' 



— — J=»«£=i«E=i<£r3 



*$#-£ ** g-*^-* 



c^oc^.t=4. 



• 



Malcolm Means 



J. M. Barger 



Captain 
C. O. Nelson 

As/ Lieutenants 
2nd Lieutenant 

C. A. LUTHEY 

7s/ Sergeant 

T. F. WlNBURN 

Sergeants 



H. P. Mannen 



M. MUNDELL 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Alexander, R. S. 
Alexander, R. H. 
Allison, M. F. 
Andrick, E. L. 
Barnes, F. M. 
Beach, E. E. 
Bauman, K. C. 
Berry, J. H. 
Bertz, W. W. 
Butcher, A. M. 
Buzard, O. L. 
Colby, D. M. 
Cox, M. L. 
Crawford, A. W. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Crawford, H. S. 
Cunningham, G. J. 
Curtis, C. R. 
DeVries, T. M. 
Doyle, T. E. 
Evans, M. T. 
Faulconer, E. 
Floyd, C. W. 
Garver, J. G. 



Gann, L. E. 
Grace, T. J. 
Guinn, C. L. 
Grover, D. L. 
Harrison, R. D. 
Hayes, R. W. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Ackerman, F. J. 
Anderson, H. L. 
Antenen, C. E. 
Baird, W. A. 
Bebermeyer, R. W. 
Benne, K. D. 

BOLINGER, C. A. 
BOYER, J. D. 

Braden, F. C. 
Brandenburg, F. R. 
Brychta, E. G. 
Buckmaster, A. D. 
Cavin, V. C. 
Castle, M. O. 
Clayton, F. A. 
Crawley, C. W. 
Curtis, R. T. 
Daman, E. E. 



Dellinger, L. A. 
Disney, Ross 
Dodge, D. A. 
Dudley, R. W. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Eastwood, L. A. 
Farnsworth, G. L. 
Farsberg, W. A. 
Faulconer, F. W. 
Fry, H. L. 
Frye, V. E. 
Gisch, B. 
Harding, C. L. 
Harper, H. B. 
Hart, F. L. 
Hoch, H. E. 
Hollingsworth,"C. A. 
Johns, M. E. 
Johnston, D. R. 
Jones, D. V. 
Kerin, E. L. 
Kitch, K. H. 
Koch, J. C. 
Koester, C. W. 
Kneeland, H. 




Page 232 



Battery "G" 



•J=o^3o^=|o^Z| 



i^g ** 3-fr§2* 



C|«l=J.|=5-e=S— 



=*> 



Captain 

M. C. COFFMAN 

/s< Lieutenant 
N. H. Woodman 



H. E. Stover 



2«<f Lieutenants 
W S. Mayden 



R. W. Kellogg 



irf Sergeant 
W. J. Sweet 



R. E. Wheeler 
C. E. Hammett 



Sergeants 

C. E. Converse 
R. W. Myers 



t. b. hofman 
Glenn Koger 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Stevens, H. C. 
Sutton, G. A. 
Tempero, F. L. 
Tessendorf, Z. H. 
Toomey, F. W. 
Vernard, Victor 
Weathers, V. R. 
Wiggins, D. L. 
Will, L. A. 
Yowell, A. R. 
Zimmerman, M. C. 
Lala, T. F. 
Parrish, C. C. 
Pierpoint, M. H. 
Speicher, S. 
Yardley, C. R. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Geer, B. 

Gustafson, H. A. 
Harper, H. F. 
Monroe, J. A. 
North, E. C. 
Paramore, L. E. 



Paulson, R. C. 
Randle, E. W. 
Reed, A. L. 
Rippey, E. E. 
Salisbury, V R. 
Shaver, Karl 
Sherwood, K. M. 
Smith, F. G. 
Smith, L. E. 
Smith, R. B. 
Smith, R. O. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Scranton, M. R. 
Short, L. C. 
Smith, E. W. 
Stafford, L. O. 
Stearns, O. G. 
Stoddard, J. L. 
Swaney, S. D. 
Swartz, M. H. 
Thudin, C. F. 
Warden, J. L. 
Ware, W. F. 
Welsh, E. M. 
Wilson, Gordon 



Wyatt, F. G. 
Young, E. E. 
Zohner, C. L. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Meyer, A. 
Merryman, J. F. 
Miller, S. H. 
Mohney, O. M. 

MOLINEAUX, C. R. 

Mullen, E. M. 
Myers, A. J. 
Nelson, C. L. 
Nielson, J. A. 
Nixon, L. F. 
Patton, A. R. 
Peltier, E. J. 
Percival, N. R. 
Piper, W. H. 
Regier, E. M. 
Reichley, T. T. 
Rychel, R. J. 
Sanders, M. B. 

SCHREINER, J. 

Shepek, T. H. 







It^k -r- 






4fc'j&i+ 




' ~S% ~ 



^ JsJt^ 



::mv #a 



l»..i^,.irfl »w J -«*-^J . *": 



jut *&? Jj& js> .-«* -M.*z<sm i.jr'f-^r r'^rr^^r^i* w^^m-^^j^^-- * 



Page 233 












Company "H" 



— .5=0^0^30^1 



*$$♦-§ **. p^ 



ci;<>c=^o«=^.c=4. 



Captain 
J. M. Anderson 

is/ Lieutenant 
Don Springer 



Zwrf Lieutenant 
B. R. Patterson 

/.s7 Sergeant 
C. F. Chrisman 



C. H. Hughes 



Sergeants 
R P. Smith 



Dallas Prick 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 

HOFMAN, L. K. 

Holmes, J. A. 
Houston, W. H. 
Huber, A. B. 
Jardine, W. N. 
Lawrence, D. S. 
Lawrence, E. P. 
Lawrence, W. K. 
Learned, R. O. 
Leasure, T. J. 
Lyon, W. D. 
McLachlan, D. 
Mc Mullen, J. R. 
Meek, F. H. 
Moore, R. 
McCullum, R. H. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Myers, R. S. 
Paulson, R. 
Perry, R. 
Pfuetze, K. H. 



Pike, O. 
Rector, E. W. 
Reitz, L. P. 
Richardson, H. D. 
Riepe, R. C. 
Russell, W. E. 
Sanders, R. E. 
Sink, M. P. 
Shenk, R. 
Smiley, H. D. 
Tannehill, H. J. 
Young, R. P. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Lantz, C. H. 
McMillion, R. G. 
Mackey, E. C. 
Miller, E. W. 
Moody, W. L. 
Morton, W. V. 
Mueller, A. A. 
Myers, V. V. 
Obery, W. E. 
Payne, C. 



Peck, L. A. 
Peugh, J. C. 
Platt, W. E. 
Pybas, E. C. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Reed, H. C. 
Ricky, W. VV. 
Russell, H. 

SCHLEHUBER, A. M. 

Schneider, C. V. 
Schopp, Geo. 
Schultz, E. S. 
Stryker, A. R. 
Smith, G. H. 
Stafford, J. L. 
Stockebrand, E. E. 
Taylor, B, R. 
Templeton, E. A. 
Thaller, H. I. 
Vogel, R. G. 
Voights, H. H. 
VVomer, W. R. 




Page 234 



—.5=30^=30^=30^=] 



Battery "I" 



[=£•£=*.=* 



W. S. Reeder 



N. G. Artman 



Captains 

1st Lieutenant 
E. Q. Mell 

2w</ Lieutenants 
N. T. Dunlap 



W. B. Floyd 



P. A. COOLEY 



G. D. Van Pelt 
A. Barneck 



75/ Sergeant 
J. R. Coleman 

Sergeants 
E. Harmison 



V. H. Harwood 
M. H. Chrepitel 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Allen, M. 
Ames, A. H. 
Baker, H. W. 
Belin, L. A. 
Bennett, E. W. 
Boggess, Bill 
Boley, H. C. 
Brainard, C. L. 
Brown, C. W. 
Cowan, D. W. 
Chapman, J. T. 
Critchfield, C. E. 
Culham, C. A. 
Davis, P. W. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Dobbins, V. H. 
Dyer, S. M. 

FOSSNIGHT, R. L. 

Freeman, R. W. 
Hammond, A. L. 
Hart, W. T. 



Haworth, H. F. 
Hendrichson, H. L 
Howe, O. W. 
Kirkwood, L. R. 
Justice, W. J. 
Kipper, W. F. 
Lickhard, R. I, 
Love joy, L. W. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Allison, L. N. 
Bales, R. C. 
Barkely, B. 
Bates, H. C. 
Boles, H. D. 
Burghart, L. J. 
Chalmers, W. R. 
Chesney, E. R. 
Clayton, C. F. 
Condell, F. R. 
Crane, C. C. 
Davis, C. H. 
Dial, R. C. 

ESLINGER, W. C. 



Foster, F. A. 
Gaines, F. A. 
Gardner, P. I.. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Garrison, C. A. 
Geiman, H. 
Gemmell, L. 
Glasco, C. E. 

GORRELL, W. I. 

Grafel, E. L. 
Gregory, H. H. 
Holmes, L. B. 
Jackson, S. K. 
Johnston, W. M. 
Kuffler, J. A. 
League, D. N. 
Ley, J. E. 
Marcy, C. A. 
McAnnich, D. 
McCauley, W. H. 
Mecum, L. J. 
Miller, J. E. 




Page 235 



Company 'K' 



•J=>o£=ic£z3<£l3 



*$tf«g ^ JH&S-* 



;o^ocj.c=4— 



Captain 
P. A. Skinner 






iif Lieutenant 
M. B. Ross 



Fred Schopp 



J«</ Lieutenants 



A. O. Turner 



J. L. Blackledge 



7.s-/ Sergeant 
A. W. Higgins 

Sergeants 
S. M. Miller 



Dale Sanders 









Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Abell, H. C. 
Adriance, J. J. 
Anderson, R. H. 
Barnhart, L. R. 
Barnes, F. M. 
Bennington, W. N. 
Biles, G. G. 
Bonar, R. E. 
Booth, F. G. 
Borecky, T. 
Brown, A. 
Chastain, K. M. 
Crumrine, G. A. 
Davis, G. H. 
Decker, J. W. 
Evans, H. 
Ewing, M. W. 
Flippo, D. M. 
Frazier, H. O. 
Gilbert, G. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Greene, J. H. 
Greep, R. O. 
Greep, R. T. 
Grigg, W. K. 
Hall, K. M. 
Harmon, R. A. 
Hays, O. E. 
Heckman, L. S. 



Henley, L. E. 
Howard, P. 
Kern, J. S. 
Jelinek, G. 
Jenista, E. F. 
Johnson, J. F. 
Johnston, J. B. 
Kelley, W. 
Kindig, M. J. 
Leonard, V. H. 
Long, G. W. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Alsop, S. E. 
Althouse, R. L. 
Atkins, G. M. 
Babbitt, W. W. 
Backus, K. L. 
Bell, J. G. 
Blair, G. J. 
Bondi, S. B. 
Boone, R. M. 
Brock, C. R. 
Brookover, G. S. 
Brown, M. B. 
Bryan, R. J. 
Bucheneu, P. A. 
Cain, P. B. 
Carnal, J. E. 
Chaffee, D. C. 
Chase, A. E. 



Chase, M. V. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Cline, E. L. 

COMPTON, L. W. 
CORRELL, J. T. 

Cunningham, C. B. 
Dailey, E. R. 
Dickens, R. K. 
Dicken, T. D. 
Douglas, D. D. 
Dunn, C. M. 
Eis, C. L. 
English, W. H. 
Errington, C. H. 
Fauchier, E. E. 
Finch, F. M. 
Fiser, L. C. 
Flick, M. T. 
Francis, J. C. 
Fletcher, G. M. 
Fry, F. B. 
Gardiner, E. L. 
Gaston, L. G. 
Green, F. K. 
Horchem, O. 
Hall, T. 
Harper, C. H. 
Hiett, H. R. 
Hyland, L. D. 
Houghton, E. M. 




Page 236 



.£=»o£=j«£=i<£z3 



Battery "L" 



C^i=3»i=?«=4» 



Captain 
Joe Holsinger 



R. E. DUNNINGTON 



2»c/ Lieutenants 

V. H. Meske 
H. A. Fleck 



R. E. Burton 



7s/ Sergeant 
H. G. Wood 



R. E. McCormick 
A. H. Hemker 



Sergeants 
D. C. Lee 



J. M. PlNCOMB 
L. E. RlNKER 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Lucas, H. F. 
McAtee, H. K. 
Marihugh, L. W. 
Mills, V. D. 
Mullen, O. L. 
Pine, C. A. 
Rabb, F. B. 
Richardson, J. 
Brown, C. L. 
Burton, L. 
Combs, G. U. 
Edwards, F. G. 
Finney, K. W. 
Hahnenkraut, H. T. 
Hoffine, B. E 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Sawin, H. C. 
Simpson, R. H. J. 
Springer, D. E. 
Stark, Ned 
Steele, A. L. 
Stewart, C. W. 
Thomas, G. E. 
Webster, S. O. 



Holt, M. M. 
McKibben, R. H. 
Peterson, V. S. 
Smith, H. F. 
Warnken, F. H. 
Riepe, H. C. 
Neville, J. L. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Miller, R. W. 
Mitchell, K. E. 
Mitchell, W. F. 
Moore, F. T. 
Myrick, L. A. 
Newman, E. M. 
Ott, M. G. 
Petsch, E. 
Pilcher, L. B. 
Rehberg, D. W. 
Rife, C. 
Roy, L. F. 
Russell, R. 
Sanders, J. 
Schmidt, D. G. 
Selby, R. N. 



Shaw, L. M. 
Swenson, A. O. 
Walker, O. II. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Sluyter, R. 
Shields, W. M. 
Spence, R. G. 
Stanley, Z. R. 
Sturdevant, LL L. 
Taylor, M. H. 
Temple, E. C. 
Thom, E. H. 
Thompson, R. O. 
Tomson, T. K. 
Towner, G. 
Tregellos, J. H. 
Trekell, H. E. 
Vasey, W J. 
Walker, S. W. 
Whitney, H. J. 
Winston, H. L. 
Winters, F. G. 
Worthy, CM. 
Wyant, Z. E. 
Zirkle, H. A. 




EO.T.C. 



a vr^^a* ,r"3bAaf m a*** * 






Page 237 



Company "Ivf 



•S=««E=i<£zi 



i^g ™ £*§&•* 



1=^.1=^— 



Captain 
F. H. Hagenbuch 

/5/ Lieutenant 
T. R. Varney 

Z«d Lieutenant 
H. H. Platt 

15/ Sergeant 
S. J. Holmberg 



F. B. Alspach 



Sergeants 



J. A. Stewart 



Sophomores 1st Platoon 
Lynn, W. J. 
McKinsey, H. 

MCMULLEN, P. B. 

Meissinger, W. A. 
Meroney, A. H. 
Merrirr, J. H. 
Meyle, W. A. 
Mills, M. R. 
Morgan, C. E. 
Mueller, E. A. 
Roberts, 0. P. 
Murrell, C. A. 
Nash, L. B. 
Nichols, R. J. 
Noll, L. A. 
Nordeen, D. A. 
Nutter, C. E. 
Owen, L. 
Pettit, R. F. 
Powers, W. P. 
Richardson, E. C. 

Sophomores 2nd Platoon 
Salmon, M. R. 
Scott, Lester 
Shaffer, Y. V. 



Silverwood, K. J. 
Smith, C. D. 
Stum bo, R. W. 
Taylor, H. E. 
Taylor, M. M. 
Todd, C. C. 
Viergiever, C. 
Siever, T. W. 
Tyler, R. E. 
Yohs, J. G. 
Walker, W. F. 
Ward, C. J. 
Waters, D. S. 
Welch. O. D. 
West, E. B. 
Whitney, W. C. 
Wier, E. L. 
Zitnik, Frank 
Yeager, J. J. 

Freshmen 1st Platoon 
Jennings, H. B. 
Kirk, W. F. 
Langford, J. M. 
Leonhaul, L. H. 
Ludwig, E. E. 
Lyons, S. V. 



McIlvain, C. E. 
Mason, T. N. 
Meroney, T. N. 
Nelson, R. D. 
Nigro, A. 
Oberle, G. D. 
Rankin, K. J. 
Rayback, P. M. 
Regier, P. 
Rhodes, R. R. 
Rodgers, L. M. 
Nuss, A. G. 

Freshmen 2nd Platoon 
Rolfs, R. C. 
Rubert, D. B. 
Scritchfield, R. J. 
Shade, C. 
Trummel, L. E. 
Townsdin, J. H. 
Warsap, R. P. 
Williams, C. 
Woodman, D. H. 
Wright, T. C. 
Younklin, L. W. 
Westerman, P. C. 
Taylor, L. F. 







Page 238 



Military Band 



— .j=c£=i o^ao^zn 



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c^«c=S»i=;.=4— 



LEADER 
Robt. Gordon 



Winkler, A. 
Chamberlin, W. 
Mathias, J. 
Bagley, H. 
Paslay, L. 
Shoop, L. 
Thomas, D. 
Reid, J. I. 
Biles, G. 
Bell, R. A. 

CONDRY, P. 

Jefferies, V. 
Barnes, F. 
Coleman, H. A. 
Harding, C. 



CADETS 
Koelling, G. 

MUNSINGER, V. 

Pafford, G. 
Blanchard, H. 

PURCELL, M. 

White, R. E. 
Dean, G. 
Burke, J. 
Balderson, W. 
Cook, O. 
Owsley, L. 
Karr, H. 

KlPFER, H. 



COLWELL, W. 

Booth, F. 
Naylor, W. 
Roehr, J. 
Frashier, A. L. 
Stapleton, H. 

HOLLINGSWORTH, E. D. 

McCune, E. 
Wagner, O. 
Powell, G. 
Hanna, J. B. 
Markley, B. E. 
Collins, E. 
Tatman, P. 
Florrell, J. S. 



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VANITY FAIR 



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VANITY FAIR 



1 4a 




Charles "Buddy" Rogers 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



k 



Z?oo 




SORORITIES 



16a 



Senior Women's Panhellenic Council 



— — J^oJzao^Jo^Z! 



3SFg * g-fr&S-* 



^0^,=-. 



OFFICERS 



President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary- Treasurer 



. ElDelle Johnson 

Margaret McKinney 

Lois Benjamin 



Alpha Delta Pi 
Kitty Romer 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Pi Beta Phi 

Abby Jane Moore 



Alpha Xi Delta 

Margaret McKinney 



Chi Omega 

Lucille Chastain 



Beta Phi Alpha 

Marceline Markle 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Crystal Taylor 



Delta Zeta 

Lois Benjamin 

Delta Delta Delta 
Mildred Osborne 



Phi Omega Pi 

Golda Crawford 

Kappa Delta 

ElDelle Kohnson 
June Jerard 




First row — Jerard, Crawford, Benjamin, Johnson, Markle, Osborne 
Second row — Chastain, Moore, Taylor, McKinney, Romer 



Page ISO 



Miaz 



Freshmen Women's Panhellenic 



..-=0^=30^=10^11 



•§&#"g ** cF^ 5 



c=3>i=?.=* 



President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary- Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



Margaret Darden 

Edith Loomis 

Marjorie Hankins 



MEMBERS 



Alpha Delta Pi 
Etta Strahle 
Willetta Hill 

Alpha Xi Delta 

Vera Myers 
Eleanor Ryan 

Beta Phi Alpha 

Ester Rockey 
Katherine Roofe 

Chi Omega 

Marjorie Hankins 
Louise Bowlus 

Delta Delta Delta 
Helen Dodge 
Edith Loomis 



Delta Zeta 

Martha Stevenson 
Wilma Long 

Kappa Delta 
Vera Walker 
Vesta Walker 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Emily Downing 
Margaret Darden 

Pi Beta Phi 

Agnes Patterson 
Dorothea Watts 

Phi Omega Pi 

Francis Young 
Faye Widestrand 




Top row — Bowlus, Stevenson, Ryan, Darden, Dodge, Loomis, Downing 

Middle row — Myers, Strahle, Hill, Watts, Roofe, Walker 

Bottom row — -Young, Hankins, Walker, Patterson, Widestrand, Long, Rockey 



Page 251 













Morgan 

Huddle ston 

Halstead 



Madison 

F. Ross 



Rhea 



Correll 

Dalies 



Hill 



Robinson 

Romer 



Smith 



Peck 













Lila Banta, '30, Oberlin 
Lola Banta, '30, Oberlin 
Ruth Correll, '29, Manhattan 



Alpha Delta Pi 




Actives 



Eunice Grierson, '29, Medicine Lodge 
Mildred Huddleston, '29, Fulton, Ky. 
Ailene Rhodes, '28, Manhattan 
Frances Robinson, '30, Bucklin 
Hazel Romer, '29, Holly, Colo. 
Irene Ross, '29, Tucson, Arizona 
Flora Ross, '30, Amarillo, Texas 
Lucille Sellars, '28, Manhattan 
Helen Stevenson, '30, St. Joseph, Mo. 
Anna Annan, '29, Beloit 



Alpha Delta Pi was founded at Wesleyan Female 
College, Macon, Ga., May 15, 1851. 



1915. 



Alpha Eta Chapter was established October 30, 



Colors — Blue and White. 

Flower — Violet. 

Publication — The Adelphean. 



Page 251 





Wiggins 

Sedrow 
Stephenson 






Thompson 

McCammon 

Koons 






Hardwick 

Grierson 

Banta 





Cellars 



Banta 



Smyer 

Strahle 



Alpha Delta Pi 

Pledges 



Dorothy Dalies, '31, Delen, New Mexico 
Muggins Hoardwick, '31, Clovis, New Mexico 
Willetta Hill, '29, Belleville 
Catherine Halstead, '30, Manhattan 
Norma Koons, '31, Sharon Springs 
Louise Madsen, '31, Natoma 
Edith McCommon, '31, Mankato 
Louise Morgan, '29, Kansas City, Mo. 
Ruth Peck, '31, Wichita 
Alice Rhea, '30, Lamed 
Catherine Smith, '29, Leavenworth 
Frances Smizer, '31, Clovis, New Mexico 
Etta Strahle, '31, Leavenworth 
Marjorie Sedrow, '30, Medicine Lodge 
Dale Thompson, '30, Ness City 
Dorothy Wiggins, '31, Longmont, Colo. 



Mrs. Mary E. Agnew 
Housemother 




Page 153. 



















ROGLER 



SCHEPP 



schlotterbeck 

Stanton 



Westerman 

Young 



Smith 



Brick 










Alpha Theta Chi 



Actives 




Dorothy Bergsten, '28, Randolph 

Margaret Schippert, '29, Manhattan 

Blanche Meyers, '2 

Florence Smith, '29, Tarkio, Mo. 

Belle Stanton, '28, Watson, Mo. 

Ruth Schlotterbeck, '28, Chickasha, Okla. 

Lillian Hangsted, '29, Lyndon 

Wilma Jennings, '29, Little River 

Frances Schepp, '28, Manhattan 

Irene Rogler, '29, Matfield Green 

Louise Barton, '28, Cuba 

Florence Hull, '29, Downs 

Helen Elling, '29, Manhattan 

Alpha Theta Chi was founded at K. S. A. C, May 
11, 1924. 

Colors — Azure, Blue and Gold 
Flower — Daisy 



Page 254 










Anderson 



Barton 



Bergston 




f - 





Elling 



Hangsted 



Mathias 






Hull 



Meyer 



Black 



Alpha Theta Chi 



Wanda Platt, '31, Manhattan 
Estella Westerman, '31, Manhattan 
Charlotte Mathias, '28, Manhattan 
Ester Gould, '31, Manhattan 
Virginia Anderson, '30, Lincoln 
Dorothy Young, '31, Paola 



Pledges 



Mrs. H. K. Everley 
Housemother 




Page 255 












Day 



Gibson 



Hemmer 

Kimball 



Bane 



Madison 

Claypool 



Cunningham 

Davidson 

Doyle 



Claer 



Kimball 

Shouse 

Davidson 



Davidson 
Shay 



Howard 

Duckwall 




Alpha Xi Delta 



Agnes Bane, '29, Manhattan 
Grace Madison, '30, Everest 
Fern Cunningham, '28, Junction City 
Helen Kimball, '29, Manhattan 
Bernice Davidson, '29, Manhattan 
Ina Davidson, '28, Manhattan 



A dives 




Alene Shay, '30, Manhattan 
Vera Frances Howard, '28, Mount Hope 
Vesta Duckwall, '28, Great Bend 
Elizabeth Quail, '28, Topeka 
Carol Stratton, '29, Manhattan 
Lorna Schmidler, '30, Marysville 
Catherine Stone, '30, Sharon 
Margaret McKinney, '30, Great Bend 
Margaret Knight, '29, Medicine Lodge 
Helen Freeburg, '28, McPherson 
Helen Heise, '29, Manhattan 
Mary Marcene Kimball, '28, Manhattan 
Marjorie Schmidler, '28, Marysville 

Alpha XI Delta was founded at Lombard College 
in April, 1893. 

Alpha Kappa Chapter was established June 1, 

Colors — Double Blue and Gold. 
Flower — Pink Rose. 
Publication— -The Alpha Xi Delta. 



1922. 



Page 256 




AHA; 



Quail 



Stratton 

schmidler 

Stone 



McKlNNEY 

Ryan 



Knight 



McKinney 

O'Connor 

Myers 

Paulson 



Pike 



Freeburg 

Fullinweider 



Harding 

Heise 



Kimball 

Schmidler 



Alpha Xi Delta 



Pledges 



Charlene Day, '31, Hebron, Nebr. 
Virginia Gibson, '31, Whitewater 
Blanche Hemmer, '31, Medicine Lodge 
Pattie Kimball, '31, Manhattan 
Mildred Claypool, '31, Whitewater 
Sarah Davidson, '31, Abilene 
Maggie Doyle, '30, Douglas 
Ruth Claeren, '30, Manhattan 
Marie Shouse, '31, Salina 
Elinor Ryan, '30, Manhattan 
Pearle McKinney, '31, Junction City 
Gretchen O'Connor, '31, St. John 
Vera Myers, '30, Hiawatha 
Mabel Paulson, '29, Whitewater 
Larene Pike, '31, Marysville 
Katherine Fullinweider, '31, El Dorado 
Katherine Harding, '31, Manhattan 



Mrs. G. Chambers 

Housemother 




Page 257 













Brookover 

Dairah 

Duck wall 



Graham 

Harris 

Holland 



Holland 

Hubbard 

Kirk 



Markle 



Huse 



Huse 



Haege 




Gladys Black, '28, Hutchinson 
Mary Brookover, '28, Eureka 
Edna Circle, '28, Kiowa 
Olive Haege, '29, Manhattan 
Fern Harris, '29, Alton 
Anita Holland, '28, Harper 
Avis Holland, '28, Harper 



Beta Phi Alpha 



Actives 



Ruth Hubbard, '28, Waterville 
Thelma Huse, '29, Manhattan 
Marceline Markle, '29, Lyons 
Esther McGuire, '29, Manhattan 
Hazel McGuire, '29, Manhattan 
Twila Norton, '30, Centralia 
Marian Rude, '28, Great Bend 
Edna Smith, '28, McPherson 
Gladys Suiter, '28, Macksville 
Vera Warnock, '28, Hutchinson 

Beta Phi Alpha was founded at the University of 
California, April 9, 1909. 

Nu Chapter was established October 23, 1926. 

Colors — Green and Gold. 
Flower — Yellow Tea Rose. 
Publication — The Aldebaran. 



Page ISS 





McClung 



McGuire 

McGuire 



Rude 



Roofe 



Smith 



Warnock 

Walker 

Suiter 



Norton 

Circle 



Black 



Nettie Dairah, '28, McPherson 
Dorris Duckwall, '31, Abilene 
Cleora Ewalt, '31, Herington 
Ruth Graham, '31, Manhattan 
LaVerne Huse, '31, Manhattan 
Mable McClung, '29, Manhattan 
Mary Belle Kirk, '31, Scott Citv 
Mary Racle, '31, West Plains, Mo. 
Esther Rockey, '31, Manhattan 
Katherine Roofe, '31, Spring Hill 
Marion Ryan, '30, Lincoln 
Violet Walker, '29, Manhattan 



Beta Phi Alpha 



Pledges 



Mrs. Charles Herr 

Housemother 




Page 259 







Bell 



Varney 



Lampe 



Arbuthnot 

ROONEY 



Cline 



J. Hayden 

Hankins 

Hamilton 



Chastain 

Manshardt 

McCrum 













Marie Arbuthnot, '29, Bennington 
Mildred Bell, '30, Manhattan 



Chi Omega 



- -. ir ■ ■'Sg.- 



Act ires 




Lucille Chastain, '29, Manhattan 
Mary Fockele, '28, Ottawa 
Elsie Hayden, '28, Salina 
Hazel Johnson, '30, Leonardville 
Marjorie Manshardt, '30, Leonardville 
Catharine Montgomery, '30, Topeka 
Bernice Russell, '30, Ellis 
Maxine Scherer, '31, Clyde 
Martha Stewart, '28, Frankfort 
Ruth Varney, '29, Manhattan 
Bertha Williams, '28, Manhattan 

Chi Omega was founded at the University of 
Arkansas, Fayetteville, April 5, 1895. 

Kappa Alpha Chapter was established in Septem- 
ber, 1915. 

Colors — Cardinal and Straw. 
Flower — White Carnation. 
Publication — The Eleusis. 



Page 260 



, <• .- „,., .*■-.!,< 







Fox 



Havely 



Johnson 

Holstine 
Montgomery 



Watson 

Russell 

Williams 



Schorer 

Bowlus 

E. Hayden 



Chi Omega 



Pledges 



Louise Bowlus, '31, Russell 
Hilah Crocker, '30, Manhattan 
Wilda Cline, '30, Kingman 
Mary Ann Ellsworth, '31, Formoso 
Mildred Fox, '29, Wichita 
Janice Hayden, '30, Wichita 
Lillian Havely, '31, Manhattan 
Winifred Bickle, '31, Kansas City 
Ruth Miller, '31, Palco 
Marjorie Hankins, '31, Goodland 
Harriett Hamilton, '29, Eldorado 
Violet Holstine, '31, Columbus 
Imogene Lampe, '31, Kansas City, Mo. 
Pauline McCrum, '28, Fort Scott 
Mae Rooney, '29, Haddam 
Edith Watson, '29, Eldorado 



Mrs. J. Barry 
Housemother 




Page 261 










Taylor 
Webb 



Ratliff 

Osborne 

Osborne 



Richards 

Sloan 



Stone 



Tauer 

Thronberg 

Walla k 




Delta Delta Delta 



G. Bowman, '30, Topeka 
R. Barnhisel, '28, Wichita 
V. Currier, '30, Topeka 
D. Dale, '29, Cold-water 




Actives 



M. Hardman, '29, Downs 
H. Inge, '30, Independence 
L. Hazlett, '29, Whitewater 
J. Keefe, '30, Glen Elder 
A. Lane, '28, Bucklin 
P. Leach, '28, Canev 
M. Osborne, '29, Clifton 
M. Richards, '28, Delphas 
N. Thornburg, '30, Chanute 
K. Taylor, '30, Chapman 
V. Wallar, '30, Caney 
F. W'ebb, '30, Greenfield, Mo. 

Delta Delta Delta was founded at Boston Uni- 
versity in November, 1888. 

Theta Iota Chapter was established June 5, 1915. 

Colors — Silver, Gold, and Blue. 
Flower — Pansy. 
Publication — The Trident. 



Page 262 





Barnhiesl 

CONROY 



Currier 

Doolittle 

Dodge 




Evans 

Hazlett 



Inge 



Loomis 



Keith 



Leach 



Delta Delta Delta 



Pledges 



M. Conroy, '31, Manhattan 

M. Doolittle, '31, Kansas City, Mo. 

M. Evans, '31, Russell 

H. L Dodge, '31, Manhattan 

M. Hemphill, '29, Chanute 

E. Loomis, '31, Osborne 

I. Osborne, '31, Clifton 

M. Ratliff, '31, Manhattan 

H. Sloan, '31, Hutchinson 

W. Tauer, '31, Wamego 

V. Stone, '31, Salina 

E. Brown, '31, Salina 



Mrs. D. A. Dodd 

Housemother 




Page 263 










Imthurn 

LaVitt 



Long 



Latzke 

Reeves 
Lockridge 



Pooler 

Wagner 

Stevenson 



Sellens 

Scott 



Widestrand 

Wyatt 




Delta Zeta 



Actives 




Helen Brewer, '29, Peabody 
Lois Benjamin, '28, Kansas City 
Vera Holmstrom, '29, Randolph 
Verna Holmstrom, '29, Randolph 
Mary Jackson, '28, Manhattan 
Rowena Lockridge, '29, Wakefield 
Arlene Pooler, '28, Chapman 
Mabel Sellens, '29, Russell 
Cleda Scott, '28, Westmoreland 
Dorothy Wagner, '30, Topeka 

Colors — Rose and Nile Green. 
Flower — Killarney Rose. 
Publication — The Lamp. 



Page 264 





Brewer 

Benjamin 

Grammon 



Clark 

Dawley 

Fisher 



Graves 

Chronister 

Hartley 



Gugler 

holmstrom 
Holm strom 



Delta Zeta 



Pledges 



Mary Katherine Chronister, '29, Topeka 

Olive Clark, '31, Leavenworth 

Hope Dawley, '29, Manhattan 

Frances Fisher, '29, Wilson 

Mary Graves, '31, Kansas City 

Zelda Grammon, '31, Luray 

Ruth Gugler, '30, Chapman 

Elizabeth Hartley, '29, Manhattan 

Ruth Imthurn, '29, Madison 

Yerna Latzke, '30, Chapman 

Wilma Long, '31, Manhattan 

Una Minnette LeVitt, '30, Wilson 

Pauline Reeves, '31, Enid, Okla. 

Martha Stevenson, '31, Paola 

Ruth Widestrand, '30, Manhattan 



Mrs. Emma Walton Brown 

Housemother 




Page 265 



17 










Nachtkieb 
Johnson 

Duvall 



Harland 

Linn 

botsford 



Marteney 

Blakslee 

Criner 



Deal 



Walker 



Walker 

Rlcker 




Kappa Delta 



Mary Blakslee, '29, Manhattan 
Velma Criner, '28, Wamego 
Lillys Duvall, '29, Arkansas City 
Vera Cook, '30, Glen Elder 



Actives 




Marguerite Stingley, '29, Manhattan 
Maude Harland, '30, Frankfort 
Reland Lundbeck, '29, Manhattan 
Lenore McCormick, '29, Cedarvale 
Mildred Lemert, '29, Cedarvale 
ElDelle Johnson, '28, Oldsburg 
Beatrice Wood, '29, Great Bend 
Virginia Van Hook, '29, Topeka 
Josie Lindholm, '30, Salina 
June Jerard, '30, Manhattan 
Gladys Swartz, '29, Atchison 
Reva Stump, '29, Blue Rapids 
Ruth Frost, '30, Blue Rapids 

Kappa Delta was founded at Virginia State 
Normal, Farmville, Va., in October, 1897. 

Sigma Gamma Chapter was established December 
4, 1920. 

Colors — Olive, Green and White. 
Flower — White Rose. 
Publication — The Angelus. 



Page 266 



17/ 





Cook 



Frost 

Hammer 



Lindholm 

Jerard 

lundbeck 



Lemmert 

mccormick 
Van Hosen 






Stump 



Van Hook 

Swartz 

Stingley 



Kappa Delta 



Vera Walker, '31, Wakeeney 

Vesta Walker, '31, Wakeeney 

Dorothy Rucker, '30, Burdett 

Madge Marteney, '30, Hutchinson 

Alice Linn, '31, Clyde 

Lucile Van Hosen, '31, Colorado Springs 

Opal Hammer, '31, Ellsivorth 

Flora Deal, '29, Great Bend 

Ruth Botsford, '31, Manhattan 



Pledges 



Mrs. E. R. Glover 

Housemother 




Page 267 







GlLSON 



Fulton 



White 

Veksek 



C. Taylop 

Shuyler 

Rogers 



Marks 



Leighton 

Haggart 



Hobbs 



HOYT 



Grim 



Gates 



M. Taylor 

Coles 




Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Pledges 



Anna Alford, '31, Hutchinson 
Mercedes Bryan, '31, Delia 
Maurine Bryan, '31, Delia 
Emily Downing, '31, Oklahoma City 




Elizabeth Bergland, Clay Center 
Margaret Darden, '31, Manhattan 
Elizabeth Ellis, '31, Council Grove 
Ernestine Hobbs, '31, Lebanon 
Nannie Hoyt, Phillipsburg 
Betty Grimm, '30, El Dorado 
Eolia Gillison, '31, Manhattan 
Minnie Lee Marks, '31, Council Groves 
Eugenia Leighton, '31, Manhattan 
Jeanette Verser, '31, Okmulgee 
Merillat Taylor, '31, Manhattan 
Kathryn Top, '31, Oberlin 

Kappa Kappa Gamma was founded at Monmouth 
College in October, 1870. 

Gamma Alpha chapter was established September 
23, 1916. 

Colors — Light Blue and Dark Blue. 
Flotver — Fleur-de-lis. 
Publication — The Key. 



Page 26ft 





Alford 

Bergman 

Bryan 



Bryan 



Barnard 

Bales 



Brown 

Barrett 



Cortelyou 

Curtis 



Darden 
Downing 



Duckwall 

Eberhardt 

Ellis 



Allen 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Dorothy Lee Allen, '28, Fayetteville, Ark. 
Margaret Barrett, '28, Frankfort 
Beatrice Brown, '29, Manhattan 
Esther Bales, '28, Manhattan 
Vivian Barnard, '28, Garnett 
Frances Coles, '29, Galena 
Helen Cortelyou, '29, Manhattan 
Frances Curtis, '29, Kansas City 
Donna Duckwall, '30, Abilene 
Martha Eberhardt, '29, Salina 
Dorothy Fulton, '28, Oklahoma City 
Helen Gates, '30, Iola 
Welthalee Grover. '30, Iola 
Lucia Haggart, '28, Salina 
Lucile Rogers, '29, Abilene 
Irene Martin, '28, Hiawatha 
Elizabeth Misener, '30, Wichita 
Helen Marie Shuyler, '30, Hutchinson 
Crystal Taylor, '30, Manhattan 
Mary Frances White, '28, Manhattan 



Mrs. Blanche Smith 
Housemother 




. •- ', 



Page 269 







HOHN 



Smith 



Sourk 



SOUKK 

SCHNATTERl.Y 



Sinclair 

Pfuetzing 

KOENIG 



Harper 



Fisk 



I >i \\ 




Phi Omega Pi 



Actives 



Golda Crawford, '28, Manhattan 
Helen Dean, '28, Manhattan 
Vera Knisley, '28, Manhattan 




Etnah Beaty, '30, Lakin 
Victoria Beaty, '30, Lakin 
Opal Thurow, '31, Macksville 
Mildred Sinclair, '29, Macksville 
Alfrada Bock, '28, Dillwyn 
Elizabeth Schnatterly, '30, Kingsley 
Margaret Koenig, '28, Nortonville 
Marie Samuel, '29, Manhattan 
Florence Leonard, '30, Manhattan 
Lois Sourk, '28, Goff 
Lela Sourk, '30, Goff 
Josephine Fisk, '30, Manhattan 

Phi Omega Pi was founded at the University of 
Nebraska, March 5, 1910. 

Omicron Chapter was established May 31, 1923. 

Colors — Sapphire Blue and White. 
Flower — Lily-of-t he- Valley. 



Page 270 





Crawford 
Bock 



B IK SON 



Beck 



Beaty 



Riley 



Samuel 
Beaty 

Widestrand 






Young 

Thurow 

Knisely 



Margarite Harper, '28, Emporia 
Wanda Riley, '30, Chanute 
Anna Kee Pfeutzing, '31, Havana 
Celva Smith, '30, Fellsburg 
Pauline Beck, '30, Republic 
Velma Hohn, '31, Idana 
Faye Widestrand, '31, Manhattan 
Maurine Burson, '29, Manhattan 



Phi Omega Pi 



Pledges 



Mrs. A. M. Laird 
Housemother 




Page 271 




Moore 



Lewis 



Lovett 

Kendall 



Helstrom 

Hart 



Gibson 

French 



Fielding 

Eldridge 

Dudley 



Dalton 



Carney 

Clammer 

Collins 



Nuss 




Pi Beta Phi 



Mary Brooks, '28, Eureka 
Mary Burnette, '28, Parsons 
Nancy Carney, '29, Manhattan 
Katherine Chappell, '29, Manhattan 




Actives 



Virginia Clammer, '29, Manhattan 
Josephine Collins, '30, Ness City 
Marian Dalton, '28, Topeka 
Virginia Fielding, '30, Manhattan 
Frances Gibson, '29, Muskogee, Okla. 
Laura Hart, '30, Overbrook 
Virginia Lovett, '30, Great Bend 
Abby Jane Moore, '28, Eureka 
Margaret Rankin, '29, Wakefield 
Dorothy Stewart, '28, Omaha, Nebr. 
Evelyn Torrence, '29, Independence 

Pi Beta Phi was founded at Monmouth College 
in April, 1867. 

Kansas Beta Chapter was established April 28, 
1915. 

Colors — Wine and Silver Blue. 
Flower — Wine Carnation. 
Publication — The Arrow. 



Page 272 





Chafiin 

Clammer 

Burnett 

Brooks 



Abbey 



Watts 

Willis 

Witherspoon 



Stewart 

Schermerhorn 
Sheetz 

Stockdale 



Randall 

Rankin 

Patterson 

Pickard 



Pi Beta Phi 



Pledges 



Roseanne Abbey, '31, Galena 
Marguerite Chaffin, '31, Caldwell 
Marian Clammer, '31, Manhattan 
Florence Dudley, '29, Clay Center 
Marian Eldridge, '29, Kansas City, Mo. 
Mary French, '31, Junction City 
Ruth Helstrom, '31, McPherson 
Dorothy Kendall, '29, Manhattan 
Margaret Lewis, '30, Topeka 
Agnes Patterson, '31, Salina 
Elizabeth Pickard, '30, Kansas City, Mo. 
Dorothy Schermerhorn, '31, Wilson 
Catharine Sheetz, '30, Chillicothe, Mo. 
Mary Stockdale, '30, Parsons 
Dorothea Watts, '29, Concordia 
Betty Willis, '30, Collingswood, New Jersey 
Wenzella Witherspoon, '31, Wichita Falls 
Helen Randall, '31, Ashland 
Helen Shepherd, '30, Colby 



Mrs. Elizabeth Warner 

Housemother 




Page 273 



18 




lSz 




FRATERNITIES 



Senior Mens Panhellenic 



•S=><£=i<£=a<£i3 



•e^-g ^ §4^* 



oc=-oc=ro 











OFFICERS 


President .... 


, 




Ernest Foltz, Acacia 


Secretary 


• 


. Ned 


H. Woodman, Delta Tau Delta 




MEMBERS 


Alpha Rho Chi 






Lambda Chi Alpha 


W. M. Crossen 






Ralph Lashbrook; 


.4 car/a 






Phi Delta Theta 


Ernest Foltz 






Donald A. Springer 


Alpha Tan Omega 






Phi Kappa 


Richard Mann 






John Coleman 


5eto 77/<7a Pi 






Phi Kappa Tau 


Robert Reed 






Charles Brainerd 


77e/to Sigma Phi 






Phi Sigma Kappa 


J. W. Burke 






E. Q. Mell 


7>//a 7V/// DeZto 






Pi Kappa Alpha 


Ned Woodman 






Charles Schwindler 


Farm House 






Sigma Alpha Epsilan 


L. M. Clausen 






Bill Braddock 


Kappa Sigma 






Sigma Nu 


Ralph Sherman 






James Pratt 


Sigma 


Phi 


Epsilo 


/ 


Vernon 


Boyd 









Crossen, Springer, Schwindler, Burke, Braddock, Boyd 

Brainerd, Sherman 

Mann, Mell, Lashbrook, Pratt, Reed, Foltz 



Page 276 



Freshmen Mens Panhellenic 



'•f=oJ=jo^=|o^ = l 



«&#-§ ** o 10 ^' 



^^.^.=5. 



President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



Hal Heath 

R. R. Mason 

V. P. Westley 

W. E. Gregory 



Acacia 

W. E. Gregory 
C. L. Hill 

Alpha Tan Omega 

A. A. HOLMQUIST 

V. E. Westley 

Alpha Rho Chi 

William Worthington 

Beta Theta Pi 
Fred Seaton 
J. T. Bird 

Delta Tau Delta 
K. H. Kitch 
V. C. Hoyt 

Delta Sigma Phi 
L. E. Cantrell 

C. W. YOCKERS 



MEMBERS 

Farm House 
W. H. Houston 
W. J. Lynn 

Kappa Sigma 
C. M. Rhodes 
Karl Shaver 

Lambda Chi Alpha 
V. V. Meyers 
L. G. Hamilton 

Phi Delta Theta 
Chester Ehrlick 
Hal Heath 

Phi Kappa 

M. J. HORRELL 
J. D. CORREGAN 



Phi Sigma Kappa 

E. R. GlLMORE 

L. E. Hyland 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
C. W. Eslinger 

W. R. WOMER 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
W. F. Kirk 
J. C. Peugh 

Sigma Nit 

J. C. Francis 
W. S. Howard 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Elbert Smith 
Eldywn McCune 

Phi Kappa Tau 
Merle Allen 
R. P. Mason 





Hill, Gregory, Mason, Allen, Meyers, McCune, Cantrell, Lynn, Houston 
Smith, Seaton, Eslinger, Bird, Corregan, Kirk, Ehrlick, Francis, Worthington 
yockers, holmquist, horrell, hoyt, kltch, shaver , womer, rhodes, howard 



Page 27/ 




Meseke 



FOLTZ 



V. Foltz 



Vaupel 



Rector 



Beeler 






















Gladson 



Gregory 



I In. i. 




Acacia 



Active Members 





E. R. Foltz, '28, Belle Plaine 

V. D. Foltz, Graduate, Belle Plaine 
L. R. Frey, '28, Manhattan 
W. E. Frey, '29, Manhattan 
G. G. Gladson, '29, Chanute 
M. J. Kindig, '30, Olathe 

F. K. Means, '28, Everest 

D. K. Nelson, '28, St. Joseph, Mo. 
A. L. Ruth, '28, Scott City 

K. E. Rector, '29, Scott City 

E. A. Vaupel, '28, New Cambria 

Colors — Black and Gold 
Flower — Acacia 
Publication — The Triad 



Page 278 





Ruth 



L. Frey 



Thompson 



Means 



Anderson 



Obrecht 

Nelson 



Crouch 



Kinding 



W. Frey 



Acacia 



Pledges 



Keith Anderson, '32, Cleburne 
H. C. Beeler, '30, Wichita 
Ralph Crouch, '30, Herington 
W. E. Gregory, '29, Walnut 
L. C. Hill, '29, Emporia 
V. H. Meseke, '29, Manhattan 
R. G. Obrecht, '29, Topeka 
W. A. Tompson, '29, Agenda 



Mrs. Edith B. Chapman 

Housemother 




Page 279 













Bradley 
Brannon 



Bellairs 

Ungeheuer 

Schmidt 



Myers 

Wilson 



Elsea 



Rose 



Melia 

Lindburg 




Alpha Gamma Rho 



J. M. Atkins, '28, Manhattan 

R. H. Alexander, '30, Harlan, la. 

H. R. Bradley, '30, Kidder, Mo. 

D. E. Bellairs, '28, Cherryvale 

R. F. Brannon, '29, Meade 

C. E. Crews, '28, Elk Falls 

C. V. Conger, '29, Ionia 




Actives 

J. E. Clair, '30, Manhattan 
C. W. Clair, '29, Manhattan 

F. D. Wilson, '28, Jennings 
H. V. Vernon, '28, Oberlin 

A. Crawford, '31, Manhattan 

G. L. Dunlap, '28, Manhattan 
R. L. Elsea, '28, Manhattan 
H. W. Higbee, '31, Manhattan 
J. H. Greene, '30, Beverlv 

R. N. Lindburg, '28, Osage City 
H. E. Myers, '28, Bancroft 
J. McIlnay, '28, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. B. Moore, '29, Manhattan 
L. E. Melia, '28, Ford 
V. T. Rose, '28, Ionia 
A. J. Schmidt, '28, Kansas City 
L. F. Ungeheuer, '28, Ce?iterville 

Alpha Gamma Rho was founded at the University 
of Illinois, April 14, 1908. 

Alpha Zeta Chapter was established February 12, 
1927. 

Colors — Dark Green and Gold. 
Flower — Pink Rose. 
Publication — Sickle and Sheaf. 

Page 280 





Crews 
Higbee 



Vernon 

Conger 



Alsop 



Clair 

Stover 



Stryker 

Greene 

Atkins 



Alpha Gamma Rho 



Pledges 



W. S. Hornsby, '31, Willington, Tenn. 

C. C. Conger, '31, Iola 

F. E. Alsop, '31, Wakefield 

L. D. Stover, '31, Beverlv 

A. R. Stryker, '31, Blue' Rapids 



Mrs. M. L. Manly 
Housemother 




Page 2S1 






<.t2t>s 




Jelinek 
Brown 



Cook 



Boone 

worthington 
















Ohmstead 

Gregory 











Alpha Rho Chi 




A dives 



B. K. Brown, '29, Delphos 
K. H. Cook, '28, Kansas City 
W. M. Crossen, '29, Turner 

D. A. Elliott, '28, Manhattan 

E. L. Hill, '29, Jennings 
G. Jelinek, '30, Ellsworth 
L. Reid, '29, Ellsworth 

L. W. Ohmstead, '29, Great Bend 
E. T. Van Vrankin, '28, Pratt 
G. Zavesky, '29, Ellsworth 

Alpha Rho Chi was founded at the University of 
Illinois, April 11, 1914. 

Paeonios Chapter was established February 10, 
1925. 

Colors — Maroon and Blue. 
Flower — White Rose. 
P it hi ica lion — The A re h i . 



Page 282 





Van Vrankin 



Zavesky 

Heglin 





Baker 

Crossen 
Beatty 



Alpha Rho Chi 

Pledges 



H. W. Baker, '30, Lyndon 
J. A. Beatty, '31, Manhattan 
R. M. Boone, '31, Neal 
R. G. Crossen, '29, Turner 
O. Ekhdal, '29, Manhattan 
C. K. Fisher, '28, Fellsburg 
A. H. Freeman, '30, Manhattan 
H. H. Gregory, '31, Ellsworth 
A. J. Myers, '31, Lyons 
J. E. Steglin, '29, Ilolton 
P. H. Stehwein, '31, Bushton 
L. E. Wilkie, '29, Belleville 
W. Worthington, '30, Turner 




Mrs. Libby Hughes 

Housemother 



n 



4 



WW 




Pc^e 253 







Palenske 

Turner 



McClung 

Moore 



Weskel 



Kipp 



Johnson 



Bentley 

Cameron 
Wilson 



Hamilton 
Cessna 

Jenkins 




Alpha Sigma Psi 



E. H. Bredehoft, '30, Fairmont, Okla. 
E. W. Cessna, '30, Wichita 
H. S. Hamilton, '30, Argonia 




Actives 



M. E. Hamilton, '28, Argonia 

J. F. Hale, '30, Formoso 

G. H. Jenkins, '30, Topeka 

A. Kipp, '29, Ellsworth 

H. E. McClung, '29, Manhattan 

W. D. Moore, '30, Copeland 

T. A. Newlin, '28, Lewis 

V. Palenske, '29 Alma 

A. D. Shafer, '31, Silver Lake 

J. G. Swartz, '28, Atchison 

T. J. Turner, '28, Hartford 

A. R. Weckel, '29, Piqua 

R. B. Wilson, '31, Concordia 

Alpha Sigma Psi was founded at K. S. A. C, 
April 5, 1912. 

Colors — Old Gold and Blue. 
Flower — Red Carnation. 



Page 284 






It**.. 





Hale 



Jones 



Braidenhoft 
Williams 

Hamilton 



McGregor 

Withy 



Evans 

BORECKY 

SWARTZ 



Watson 

Newlin 
Shafer 



T. B. Bentley, '31, Manhattan 
J. Borecky, '30, Holyrood 
D. L. Cameron, '29, Eldorado 
L. N. Evans, '30, Wilsey 

B. E. Gosch, '31, Norwich 

D. R. Johnson, '31, Manhattan 

F. A. Jones, '30, Wright 

W. H. Penix, '30, Salina 

J. A. Watson, '29, Sedan 

H. A. Williams, '30, Caldwell 

C. W. Withy, '29, Home 



Alpha Sigma Psi 

Pledges 



Mrs. James A. Jackson 
Housemother 







Page 285 









Currier 

Daniels 



Holmquist 
Thomas 
Hutchinson 



Rippey 

D. Smith 

Watts 



Mann 

McMullen 



Ross 




Alpha Tau Omega 









O. O. Barton, '28, Junction City 
K. C. Bauman, '30, Salina 
L. H. Grothesun, '28, Ellsworth 
E. Henley, '30, Eureka 




Actives 










G 


H 


Hurst, '29, Hiawatha 






J. 


A. 


Hoop, '29, Fowler 






P. 


B. 


McMullen, '29, Stella, Nebr. 






J. 


R. 


McMullen, '30, Stella, Nebr. 






C. 


E. 


Mann, '30, Osborne 






M 


. B 


Ross, '28, Manhattan 






E. 


E. 


Rippey, '30, Ellis 






D 


D 


Smith, '28, Udall 






C. 


H. 


Synnamon, '29, Wichita 






A. 


D. 


Thomas, '30, Ellsworth 






K. 


M 


. Ward, '29, Elmdale 






H. 


C. 


Walbridge, '30, Russell 








Alpha Tau Omega was founded at V 


irginia 


Military 


In 


3titute, September 11, 1865 








Delta Theta Chapter was established October 23, 


19 


20. 


Colors — Azure and Old Gold. 
Flower — White Tea Rose. 
Publication — The Palm. 




Page 286 





Ward 

Shields 



E. Ellifrit 
R. Ellifrit 
B. McMullen 



Thomas 

Hurst 



Grothusen 
Synnamon 

Barton 



Alpha Tau Omega 



Pledges 



R. W. Currier, '31, Topeka 
W. W. Daniels, '31, Luray 
E. E. Ellifrit, '29, Kansas City 
R. S. Ellifrit, '31, Kansas City 
G. M. Grafel, '30, Herndon 
A. A. Holmquist, '30, Logan 

D. P. Hutchinson, '29, Council Bluffs, la. 
R. L. Miller, '29, Norton 

J. M. Norris, Abbyville 
H. O. Russell, '31, Ellis 
W. M. Shields, '31, Hoxie 

E. R. Thomas, '29, Salina 
V. E. Wesley, '31, Eureka 

F. G. Wyatt, '31, Kansas City 
O. L. Wagner, '30, Ellinwood 



Mrs. Inez Ross 

Housemother 




Page 2S7 










Latzke 



BORGMAN 



ROGER 

ROWLES 

COFFMAN 



BOXLEY 

Robert 



Hempker 
Rolp 

Weathers 



Young 

Bennett 
Foster 




Beta Pi Epsilon 



E. W. Bennett, '30, Great Bend 
G. R. Borgman, '28, Enterprise 
R. D. Bradley, '28, Dover 




Actives 

J. H. Church, '28, Austin, Minn. 
M. C. Coffman, '29, Wakefield 

C. W. Foster, '28, Muskogee, Okla. 
T. C. Gates, '30, Seward 

O. H. Gates, '30, Seward 
M. M. Ginter, '28, Manhattan 
E. F. Harmeson, '30, Great Bend 
A. H. Hempker, '29, Great Bend 

D. T. Lacey, '28, Moran 

O. A. Latzke, Grad., Manhattan 
D. C. Lee, '29, TTar/w 
K. W. Miller, '30, Afa^e £KW 
V. L. Pierce, '29, Kansas City 

A. M. Young, '28, Junction City 

B. K. Thomen, '30, Junction City 

Beta Pi Epsilon was established at K. S. A. C, 
February 14, 1923. 

Colors — Purple and Gold. 
Flower — Pansy. 



Page 288 





Coats 

Thomen 
Church 



Miller 

Schmidt 



Lee 



T. Gates 
O. Gates 



Starbird 

Hormison 
Ginter 



Bradley 
Lacey 

Pierce 



H. C. Boley, '30, Topeka 
R. R. Rolp, '30, Lorraine 
D. T. Rowles, '31, Topeka 
D. G. Schmidt, '31, Lorraine 
R. T. Starbird, Jk., '31, Auburn 
V. R. Weathers, '31, Great Bend 
G. Koger, '29, Great Bend 



Page 289 



Beta Pi Epsilon 



Pledges 



Mrs. Rose Cassidy 

Housemotlier 



19 



iBonf 

.' «..,1 o.'\ 



Cherpitel 

Kimball 

Houghton 



Rea 




C. Pfuetze 

K. Enns 

Platt 



Putnam 




Reed 



Miller 

Koester 



Rogers 



Frazier 

Spence 

P. Pfuetze 



Lantz 





: 




Beta Theta Pi 




Act ices 

H. C. Cowdery, '30, Lyons 

K. Enns, '28, Inman 

H. Enns, '28, Inman 

A. B. Huber, '30, Colorado Springs 

L. Platt, '29, Salina 

D. K. Putnam, '29, Salina 

Karl Pfuetze, '30, Manhattan 

Paul Pfuetze, '28, Manhattan 

S. T. Kimball, '30, Manhattan 

C. T. Rea, '28, Wichita 

R. B. Reed, '30, Eureka 

N. Stark, '30, Bonner Springs 

Beta Theta Pi was founded at Miami University, 
Oxford, Ohio, in 1839. 

Gamma Epsilon Chapter was established October 
14, 1914. 

Colors — Pink and Blue. 

Flower — Red Rose. 

Publication — The Beta Theta Pi. 



Page 290 



19z 





Morgan 



Seaton 



Kneeland 



Jardine 



GUNN 



Smith 



Rhodes 



R. Nelson 
Bird 



Brantley 



Koch 






Stark 

Cowdery 

Huber 



Enns 



Beta Theta Pi 

Pledges 



J. Bird, '30, Hays 

M. H. Cherpitel, '30, Lyons 

C. Gunn, '31, Great Bend 

W. Jardine, '29, Washington, D. C. 

H. Kneeland, '31, Council Grove 

J. Koch, '31, Buegrus, Ohio 

C. Lantz, '31, Manhattan 

H. Miller, '31, Manhattan 

G. Brantley, '31, Oberlin 

R. Rhodes, '31, Council Grove 

R. Spence, '31, Fairbury, Nehr. 

F. Seaton, '31, Manhattan 

E. Houghton, '31, Manhattan 

R. Nelson, '31, Jamestown 

R. Morgan, '31, Galena 

C. Koester, '31, Marysville 



Mrs. M. S. MacLeod 

Housemother 



Page 291 




Cantrell 

WlERICK 



Ware 



Lechner 

Mitchell 



Hinkle 

Young 



Peterson 

Stewart 
pommerenke 




Delta Sigma Phi 



T. Betts, '28, Detroit 
J. W. Burke, '29, Glasco 
K. Graham, r 29, Russell 




Actives 



W. King, '28, Abilene 

C. N. Hinkle, '29, Lucerne 

W. Justice, '30, Olathe 

C. Lindenmeyer, '29, Russell 
P. Mannen, '28, Lincoln 

R. N. Miller, '29, Topeka 

W. R. Mitchell, '30, Salina 

M. W. Pommerenke, '28, Clay Center 

D. Stewart, '29, Abilene 
C. Stewart, '30, Abilene 

Delta Sigma Phi was founded at the University 
of the City of New York in 1899. 

Alpha Upsilon Chapter was established in January 
30, 1925. 

Colors — White and Nile Green. 
Flower — White Carnation. 
Publication — The Carnation. 



Page 292 





Burke 

Stewart 



Hinz 



Schopp 

Miller 



Stockebrand 

Justice 



Graham 

Yockers 
McGregor 



Delta Sigma Phi 



L. E. Cantrell, '30, Vernon 
K. V. Engle, '30, Abilene 
L. D. Lechner, '31, Salina 
F. Schopp, '29, Abilene 

E. E. Stockebrand, '31, Yates Center 
L. F. Ware, '31, Eureka 

F. H. Wierick, '30, Olathe 
C. W. Yockers, '31, Salina 



Pledges 



Miss Nina Crawford 
Housemother 




Page 293 




HOHN 

Feldman 

Johnson 

Spurlock 

Charles 

Amos 



Perham 



McIntosh 
Howard 



Limes 

Douglas 



Lovett 

Jones 



Hamilton 

Mac Bride 



Blackledge 
Mark 



Haberkorn 

Hoyt 




Delta Tau Delta 



A. D. Lovett, '28, Lamed 

E. Skradski, '29, Kansas City 
E. Mertel, '28, Kansas City 
W. Amos, '28, Manhattan 
P. Skinner, '28, Manhattan 
L. Brooks, '28, Garrison 

B. Brooks, '28, Garrison 

K. Chastain, '30, Manhattan 
J. M. Douglass, '28, Burlington 




Actives 

C F. Feldman, '28, Sabetha 

M. MacBride, '30, Topeka 

D. White, '30, Beloit 

G. S. Hohn, '28, Marysville 

R. F. Johnson, '29, Salina 

W. Jones, '30, Kansas City 

H. L. Manion, Almena 

B. Markel, '30, Chanute 

W. C. Perham, '30, Iola 

L. Rector, '28, Manhattan 

G. Rickey, '30, Stinett, Texas 

J. Spurlock, '28, Burlingame 

N. H. Woodman, '29, Manhattan 

R. Hamler, '28, Manhattan 

G. Mark, '30, 4WZe«e 

P. Howard, '30, Mount Hope 

A. Butcher, '30, Ellsworth 

F. Haberkorn, '28, Hutchinson 

T. J. Charles, '29, Republic 

Delta Tau Delta was founded at Bethany College, 
West Virginia, in February, 1859. 

Gamma Chi Chapter was established June 6, 1919. 
Colors — Purple, White and Gold. 
Flower — The Pansy. 
Publication — The Rainbow. 

Page 294 





M ERTEL 

Skinner 

Skradski 

Woodman 

Markel 

Templeton 

Merkitt 



Livingston 

Brooks 



Young 

Butcher 



Rector 



Andrews 

Sterns 



KlTCH 



Chastain 

White 

Postlethwaite 

M ANION 



E. Livingston, '31, Hutchinson 
J. Merritt, '30, Haven 
E. Templeton, '29, Eldorado 
O. Sterns, '31, Wichita 
J. Limes, '29, LaHarpe 
C. Hamilton, '31, Solomon 
V. Hoyt, '31, Phillipsbitrg 
M. McIntosh, '31, Marion 
E. Young, '31, Hutchinson 
W. Rickey, '31, Stinett, Texas 
R. Russell, '29, Kansas City 
P. Andrews, '29, Ottawa 
C. Rutan, '31, Great Bend 



Delta Tau Delta 

Pledges 



Mrs. Martha Foreman 

Housemother 




Page 295 




Clausen 

Stevenson 
H. Murphey 




Hubbard 

Hoar 



Schul 





Paulson 

Neelly 

RUCKER 






Mc Adams 

Johnson 



Funk 






Farm House 



H. H. Brown, '28, Edmund 
L. M. Clausen, '28, Alton 
L. L. Compton, '29. Formoso 
O. E. Funk, '30, Marion 
E. T. Harden, '28, Centralia 
E. H. Johnson, '31, Norton 
A. A. Mast, '29, Abilene 




Actives 

H. L. Murphy, '28, Protection 
S. M. Neelly, '30, Byers 
L. P. Reitz, Belle Plain 
V. M. Rucker, '28, Burdett 
E. A. Stephenson, '28, Alton 
I. K. Tompkins, '29, Byers 
H. A. Paulsen, '29, Stafford 
E. B. Coffman, '28, Manhattan 
W. J. Lynn, '30, Centralia 
W. H. Houston, '30, Potwin 
M. N. Taylor, '30, Perrv 
V. E. McAdams, '28, Clyde 
J. W. Decker, '30, Holton 
R. O. Lewis, '30, Parsons 
M. G. Mundehenke, '29, Lewis 
E. F. Hubbard, '28, Linwood 

Farm House was founded at the University of 
Missouri in 1905. 

Kansas Chapter was established June 2, 1921. 

Colors — White, Green, and Gold. 
Flower — Sunburnt Rose. 
Publication — Farm House Record. 



Page 296 





H. Brown 
Most 

L. Anderson 



Tompkins 

Houston 

Winkler 




Gish 



Taylor 

Decker 



Lynn 



R. Lewis 

Mundehenke 

Harden 



Farm House 



Pledges 



V. L. Anderson, '30, Alton 

C. L. Gish, '31, Abilene 
S. H. Hoar, '28, Willis 

D. A. Scheel, '29, Emporia 
A. E. Winkler, '30, Paxico 



Mrs. Anna O'Malley 
Housemother 




Page 297 







Bentz 

Stafford 

Warden 

Huffman 

Vasey 

West 

Welsh 
Stingley 

Rhoades 



Collins 

Swartz 

Colvin 

Stafford 
Douglas 




Chapman 
Platt 



Bentz 



Brenz 






Hahnenkratt 
Freeman 

Hudson 

White 

Green 






.<>"«/ 




Kappa Sigma 



Actives 



J. H. Berry, '29, Fort Scott 
W. R. Boggess, '30, Scandia 
C. F. Botsford, '28, Manhattan 
J. S. Chandley, '29, Kansas City 
J. T. Chapman, '30, Fort Scott 
G. F. Collins, '29, Manhattan 
C. C. Colvin, '29, Newton 
J. M. Cullum, '28, Beverly 




H. J. Dayhoff, '28, Abihne 

G. E. Drollinger, '29, Omaha, Nsbr. 

A. R. Edwards, '28, Fort Scott 

C. B. Freeman, '29, Junction City 

W. A. True, '29, Topeka 

P. W. Gartner, '28, Manhattan 

J. P. Holt, '29, Abilene 

J. R. Mathais, '29, Manhattan 

C. E. Russell, '29, Bartlesville, Okla. 

Karl Shaver, '30, Cedarvale 

C. V. Schneider, '30, New Brunswick, N. J. 

R. H. Sherman, '28, Iola 

R. K. Smith, '29, Wichita 

E. B. West, '30, Manhattan 

C. A. White, '29, Lubbock, Texas 

H. W. Witt, '29, Kansas City, Mo. 

Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of 
Virginia, December 10, 1869. 

Gamma Chi Chapter was established June 7, 1919. 
Colors — Scarlet, White, and Green 
Flower — Lily of the Valley 
Publications — Caduceus, Star and Crescent. 



Page 298 





Dayhoff 
Holt 

Gartner 

Sherman 



Witt 



Russell 

Boggess 

Barlow 

Cullem 



Berry 



Chandley 

Drollinger 

Mathais 



Shaver 

Synder 

Smith 



Cline 

Correll 



NOLAND 



Langford 

Cottingham 

Wilson 



Kappa Sigma 



Pledges 



Don Brenz, '31, Arkansas City 

V. W. Barlow, '29, Manhattan 

Keith Bentz, '31, Peabody 

Kenneth Bentz, '31, Peabody 

E. L. Cline, '31, Beverly 

J. T. Correll, '31, Manhattan 

T. W. Cottingham, '31, Wichita 

H. C. Huffman, '28, Pittsburg 

J. M. Langford, '31, Enid, Okla. 

K. L. Noland, '31, Cedarvale 

W. E. Platt, '31, Manhattan 

C. M. Rhoades, '31, Newton 

O. D. Welsh, '30, Oswego 

H. T. Hahnenkratt, '30, Philli j'sburg 

J. L. Stafford, '31, Leonardville 

W. M. Stingley, '31, Manhattan 

N. H. Swartz, '31, Manhattan 

W. J. Vasey, '31, Pampa, Texas 

J. L. Warden, '31, Kansas City, Mo. 

J. W. Wilson, '30, Ashland 

Dale Douglas, '31, Columbus 

Fay Green, '31, Columbus 

Ralph Hudson, '30, Eldorado 



Mrs. J. W. Amis 

Housemother 




Page 299 




BOBST 

guisinger 
Smith 



Davies 



Salisbury 

Lash brook 

Grubb 



Drake 

Walker 



Hays 



Critchfield 

ElCHELBERGER 

Noll 



Myers 




Lambda Chi Alpha 



Actives 



E. O. Dannebik, '28, St. Joseph 

R. R. Drake, '29, Nokomis 

R. Grubb, '29, Kanopolis 

R. R. Lashbrook, '29, Almena 

M. T. Means, '28, Everest 

G. D. Slaybaugh, '28, St. Joseph 

C. E. Critchfield, '28, Kansas City 

E. W. Atkinson, '31, Louisville 



■■ '■ 




"^^g"' 



H. E. Guisinger, '28, Kansas City 

C. R. Richardson, '30, Hugoton 

R. M. Roper. '28, Manhattan 

H. S. Dole, '30, Almena 

T. M. Heter, '29, Sterling 

E. W. Gilman, '29, Council Grove 

W. F. Walker, '30, Goodland 

V. R. Salisburg, '31, Manhattan 

L. A. Noll, '28, Louisville 

B. E. Hoffine, '31, Ellinwood 

L. H. Davies, '29, Manhattan 

M. D. Morris, '29, Pax/co 

G. E. Meredith, '30, Junction City 

W. C. Peirce, '28, Z?ar/ow 

H. G. Bobst, '31, Almena 

W. F. Eichelberger, '31, Almena 

G. Crumrine, '30, Beloit 

L. F. Winkler, '30, i?ozW 

G. A. Johnson, '29, Manhattan 

Lambda Chi Alpha was founded at Boston Uni- 
versity November 2, 1909. 

Gamma Xi Zeta Chapter was established April 5, 
1924. 

Colors — Purple, Green, and Gold 
Publication — Purple, Green, and Gold 



Page 300 





Meredith 

Heter 

C. Smith 



Pvbas 



Furbeck 

McKixsey 

Winkler 



Olds 



Morris 

Dannevik 

GlLMAN 



Means 



Dale 



Richardson 

Rector 



Lambda Chi Alpha 



Pledges 



CD. Smith, '30, Mayetta 

V. V. Myers, '31, St. John 

C. B. Olds, '29, Delphos 

E. Landon, '29, Mayetta 

G. Kirkland, '29, Sabetha 

W. E. Colwell, '30, Onaga 

L. G. Gaston, '29, Beloit 

J. Kerns, '30, Beloit 

C. L. Buinn, '30, Eldorado 

L. G. Hamilton, '29, Burlington Junction, Mo. 

R. J. Furbeck, '30, Lamed 

R. R. Smith, '30, Herington 

E. W. Recton, '30, Manhattan 

H. E. McKinsey, '30, Kansas City 

G. C. Freeman, '31, Phillipsburg 

E. C. Pybas, '31, Herington 

W. Brokenkroger, '31, Sabetha 

G. K. Hays, '30, Manhattan 

W, C. Whitney, '31, St. George 

L. Kirkwood, '31, Manhattan 



Mrs. John Hubbell 

House in other 



Page 301 




WlLVERS 

Brown 



Peterson 

Wiggins 

Hayes 



Norton 

Lortscher 

Knight 



Long 
Lee 
Chamberlain 




Omega Tau Epsilon 



A ctires 



R. 


Buchanan, 


'30, Marquette 








P. 


Lortscher, 


'29, Fairview 












wmMs&u " 




nffitL^' 




1 


4b» 'iiSB 


Hf : B | 


1 


Ml 


r 


iiPf^ 


Li ■ & 















C. Kasson, '30, Geneseo 

R. Brooks, '30, Hutchinson 
L. Norton, '29, Kalvesta 
F. Wilvers, '30, Salina 
H. Schaulis, '29, Wakefield 
R. Peterson, '28, Marquette 

D. Wiggins, '30, Lyons 

R. Hayes, '30, Bonner Springs 

E. Lee, '30, Michagen Valley 
D. Lamme, '30, Whiting 

I. Long, '30, Manhattan 
L. Rinker, '29, Gmz/ Be«d 

( )mega Tau Epsilon was founded at K. S. A C, 
May 16, 1920. 

Colors — Purple and Wine. 
Flower — Jonquil. 

Page 302 





Mitchell 

Barnes 



Schaulis 

Gant 

Criegor 



Kasson 



EWART 



Buchanan 

Harding 

Lamme 



C. Harding, '31, Wakefield 
W. Knight, '31, Lamar, Colo. 
G. Criegor, '30, Fredonia 
H. English, '31, Cimarron 
P. Gant, '31, Paola 
W. Chamberlain, '30, Newton 
K. Mitchell, '31, Hutchinson 
W. Brown, '31, Dodge City 
J. Ewart, '30, Peabody 
J. Rhoades, '31, Tampa 
F. Collins, '31, Mound Valley 
H. Paden, '30, Lyons 



Omega Tau Epsilon 

Pledges 



Mrs. Nellie C. Keel 
Housemother 




Page 303 







holsinger 

Hartman 

Ehrlich 

Sartorius 




Springer 

Mohri 



KlMMEL 

Grover 





f r \ 








KlNNAMON 

Helmrich 

Hughes 



Price 



* 





Stafford 

Lewis 



Nuss 



Floyd 







' *p*' ; 






m 



Phi Delta Theta 



M. G. Boyd, '29, Phillipsburg 

F. E. Carpenter, '29, Wakefield 
H. M. Crocker, '30, Matfield Green 
C. W. Floyd, '29, Sedan ' 

G. R. Hanson, '30, Bushong 

R. L. Hartman, '30, Hoisington 
R. L. Helmreich, '28, Kansas City 
W. M. Holsinger, '30, Kansas City 




Actives 

C. H. Hughes, '29, Manhattan 
W. B. Kinnamon, '29, Lamed 

E. S. Kimmel, '30, Fall City, Nebr. 

H. G. Lewis, '28, Winfield 

G. A. Long, '30, Galena 

H. G. Mangelsdorf, '30, Atchinson 

R. W. Mohri, '28, Kansas City 

G I. Moyer, '29, Manhattan 

E. B. Moyer, '30, Manhattan 

W. F. O'Daniel, '28, Westmoreland 

D. D. Price, '29, Wakefield 

B. L. Remick, '29, Manhattan 
W. Sartorius, '28, Garden City 
D. A. Springer, '28, Manhattan 

C. W. Stewart, '30, Coldivater 

Phi Delta Theta was founded at Miami University 
Oxford, Ohio, in 1848. 

Kansas Gamma Chapter was established February 
25, 1921. 

Colors — Azure and Argent. 
Flower — White Carnation. 
Publication — The Scroll. 



Page 304 





E. MOYER 

Carpenter 

Heath 



Stewart 



Remick 

Manglesdorf 

G. Moyer 

Thomas 



Caton 



BURRIS 



Downer 

Horchem 






Crocker 

Hanson 



Long 



Boyd 



Phi Delta Theta 

Pledges 



L. P. Burris, '31, Chanute 
M. B. Caton, '31, Winfield 
M. A. Downer, '31, Syracuse 

C. O. Ehrlich, '31, Manhattan 

D. Grover, '30, Manhattan 
H. T. Heath, '31, Enterprise 
O. Horchem, '31, Ranson 

A. G. Nuss, '31, Hoisington 
G. N. Stafford, '31, Republic 
M. J. Thomas, '28, Winfield 
W. G. Towler, '30, Topeka 



Mrs. R. G. Taylor 
Housemother 




Page 305 



20 




Ryan 



Carlson 



Weigel 




Nigro 



CORRIGAN 



DlNKLER 






Raleigh 



Bertotti 



Florrell 






Phi Kappa 




A ctives 



C. L. Arnold, '28, Marysville 
J. T. Bertotti, '30, Osage City 
F, H, Callahan, '28, Abilene 

F. H. Callahan, '28, Abilene 

D. A. Carlson, '30, Manhattan 
J. R. Coleman, '29, Wichita 

G. Caspar, '29, Alida 

J. P. Bonfield, '30, Elma 

J. S. Florrell, '30, Manhattan 

E. O. Habiger, '29, Bushton 

F. J. Raleigh, '30, Clyde 
A. Watson, '28, Osage City 

Phi Kappa was founded at Brown University, 
Providence, R. I., in 1889 

Iota Chapter was established April 9, 1921. 

Colors — Purple, White, and Gold 
Flower — Ophelia Rose 
Publication — The Temple 



Page 306 



20z 









Habiger 



BONFIELD 



Coleman 



Wahle 



Callahan 



Burns 






I 



SCHILTZ 



HORRELL 

Fitzgerald 



R. S. Burns, '30, Salina 

J. D. Corrigan, '31, Holy rood 

W. M. Fitzgerald, '31, Goodland 

M. J. Howell, '30, Chanute 

A. Nigro, '31, Kansas City, Mo. 

F. Liebl, '31, Clafflin 
V. Shaffer, '31, Salina 

G. Ryan, '31, Colby 

J. N. Schiltz, '31, Wakefield 

J. L. Walterschied, '31, Coffeyville 

E. D. Weigel, '31, Victoria 

J. Wahle, '31, Junction City 

S. Bondi, '31, Kansas City, Mo. 



Phi Kappa 



Pledges 



Mrs. H. Houston 
Housemother 



Page 307 




Cornell 

McIlvain 

Eurixg 



DUNLAP 

H. Smith 

K. White 

Brainard 



coblentz 

Win burn 

Russell 

MOHNEY 



Jeffries 

Black 



T. Smith 

Compton 



Allen 



Whitney 



Mason 



Bond 




M. Allen, '29, Burlington 
W. J. Ardnt, '30, Hutchinson 
D. P. Ayers, '28, Lallarpe 
C. O. Baker, '29, Marysville 
C. Black, '29, Hutchinson 
G. T. Bond, '28, Topeka 



Phi Kappa Tau 




Actives 



C. L. Brainard, '30, Chicago 

L. Hammond, '29, Osborne 

W. McCaslin, '29, Osborne 

P. McCrosky, '29, Netawaka 

C. O. Nelson, '28, Jennings 

J. R. Osborn, '30, Veedersburg, Ind. 

K. O. Peters, '29, Utica 

E. Russell, '29, Manhattan 

C. F. Smith, '28, £e/<>/7 

E. L. Watson, '29, Beloit 

H. E. White, '28, Kingsdown 

T. F. Winburn, '29, DeKalb, Mo. 

N. T. Dunlap, '29, Berryton 

Phi Kappa Tau was founded at Miami University, 
Oxford, Ohio, March 17, 1906. 

Alpha Epsilon Chapter was established May 23, 
1925. 

Colors — Old Gold and Harvard Red. 
Flower — Red Carnation. 
Publication — The Laurel. 



Page 308 





N. DUNLAP 

Graves 

McCroskey 



Nelson 

Elwell 

Barackman 

munsinger 



Gapen 

Gemmell 



Reed 



White 



Arndt 



Baker 






OSBORN 



» 





McCaslin 

Barber 

Ghormley 



Phi Kappa Tau 



W. Barackman, '31, Howard 

R. Barber, '31, Osborne 

L. Compton, '31, Lamed 

J. Delforge, '31, Manhattan 

H. Elwell, '31, Hutchinson 

W. Ewing, '30, Be/o;7 

L. Gemmell, '31, Manhattan 

C. Ghormley, '30, Hutchinson 

V. E. Jeffries, '30, Kiozva 

R. Mason, '31, Cawker City 

V. Munsinger, '31, Howard 

J. Reed, '30, Manhattan 

H. Smith, '29, Howard 

R. J. Smith, '29, Hutchinson 

H. Whitney, '31, Z7^ca 

C. E. McIlvain, '31, Smif/j Ow^r 

O. M. Mohney, '31, Sawyer 

K. Cornell, '31, Kansas City 

K. P. White, '31, Kingsdown 

R. Graves, '30, Manhattan 



Pledges 



Mrs. Lou Roark 

Housemother 




Page 309 




Baird 



Sardou 



Masek 

Willis 

Breneman 




MP mm.* 












Bellamy 

Burton 





jP 






Phi Lambda Theta 



A dives 




F. Masek, '28, Norton 

E. Schneberger, '28, Cuba 
C. Sardou, '29, Topeka 

O. W. Greene, '29, Paradise 
J. F. Smerchek, '29, Cleburne 
H. T. Gile, '30, Scandia 
H. P. Blasdel, '29, Sylvia 

F. Brokeesh, '29, Munden 
L. Garnett, '28, Wichita 

Phi Lambda Theta was founded at Pennsylvania 
State College, November 18, 1920. 

Beta Chapter was established April 29, 1923. 

Colors — Purple and Gold. 
Flower — White Carnation. 



Page 310 





schneberger 
Blasdel 



Roth 



Brokeesh 

Smerchek 



AXTELL 

Greene 



M. Roth, '30, Kansas City 
C. Willis, '29, Galesburg 
M. Brenneman, '29, Parsons 
R. Burton, '29, Haddon 
H. Axtell, '30, Dimmitt 
W. Baird, '31, North Topeka 
S. Bellamy, '29, Meade 



Phi Lambda Theta 

Pledges 



Mrs. Charles R. West 

Housemother 



Page 311 




Champagne 

Gilmore 



Kerr 



IMell 

Kent 

Vaupel 

PlNCOMB 



Myers 



Barnick 

Dring 



Moggie 



Myers 



Brockway 

Myers 



Smith 



Newman 

Russell 

Whitford 

Weller 




Phi Sigma Kappa 



R. W. Myers, '29, Manhattan 

E. Q. Mell, '28, Wetmore 

F. L. Wilson, '28, Abilene 
J. M. Anderson, '28, Salina 
H. W. Gilbert, '30, Manhattan 

R. K. Whitford, '29, Washington, D. C. 
V. E. Gagelman, '29, Great Bend 



A c lives 




T. A. Fleck, '28, Wamego 
C. G. Vaupel, '30, Salina 

F. G. Champagne, '30, Oketo 

J. M. Pincomb, '30, Overland Park 
E. A. Voights, '30, Kansas City 
A. Barneck, '30, Salina 
A. E. Dring, '29, Pawnee Rock 
M. C. Moggie, '29, Manhattan 
Ray Myers, '29, Manhattan 
S. H. Brockway, '30, Topeka 
R. A. Walker, '30, Galena 
T. J. Dawe, '30, Abilene 
M. M. Kerr, '29, Manhattan 

G. F. Smith, '30, Potuin 

Phi Sigma Kappa was founded at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, March 15, 1873. 

Iota Deuteron Chapter was established March 24, 
1923. 

Colors — Silver and Magenta. 
Publication — The Signet. 



Page 31 1 




^3-.. 



w* 




Shier 



Turner 

Purcell 



VOIGHTS 

Zabel 



Gagelman 
Alexander 



Hamrdla 

Magnuson 

Gilbert 

Voights 



Wilson 

Dawe 



Hanson 

Neville 



Anderson 
Karr 



Frank 

Cavin 



Phi Sigma Kappa 



R. Alexander, '30, Chanute 
Victor Cavin, '30, LaCrosse 

E. Frank, '31, Manhattan 

F. Gilmore, '29, Herrington 
M. Hacker, '31, Manhattan 

G. Hamrdla, '31, Timken 
M. Hanson, '31, Manhattan 
W. Hyland, '31, Manhattan 

W. C. Magnuson, '31, Brookville 
Edward Muller, '31, Great Bend 
A. M. Myers, '31, Lyons 
J. B. Neville, '30, Coffeyvillc 
Edwin Newman, '31, LaCrosse 
Morris Purcell, '30, Manhattan 
W. F. Russell, '30, LaCrosse 
Raymond Shier, '31, Gypsum 
Roland Turner, '30, Manhattan 
H. H. Voights, '31, Kansas City 
Harold Weller, '31, Olathe 



Pledges 



Mrs. Mary E. Manker 

Housemother 




Page 313 



















Haas 



eslinger 

Blair 



SlLVERWOOD 
HUEY 

HOLLINGSWORTH 



Althouse 

Biles 

Collins 



D. Eslinger 

Fockele 

Babbit 

SWENSEN 




Pi Kappa Alpha 



Actives 



R. L. Althouse, '30, Anthony 
H. Z. Babbit, '28, Emporia 
G. G. Biles, '30, Chanute 
L. W. Bishop, '29, Manhattan 




R. L. Eslinger, '31, Wilson 

W. B. Floyd, '29, Manhattan 

G. R. Fockele, '29, LeRoy 

T. B. Hoffman, '29, Silver Lake 

E. D. Hollingsworth, '29, Saliiiu 

G. R. Huey, '29, Louisville 

C. J. Schwindler, '29, Kansas City 

H. J. Silverwood, '30, Ellsworth 

0. C. Tackwell, '30, Manhattan 

Pi Kappa Alpha was founded at the University of 
Virginia, March 1, 1868. 

Alpha Omega Chapter was established June 9, 
1913. 

Colors — Garnet and Gold. 
Floiver — Lily-of-the- Valley. 
Publications — Shield and Diamond; Dagger 
and Key. 



Page 314 





Crooks 

McIntyre 

Hostinsky 



Steen 



F. Murphy 

Murphy 



Grant 



Bishop 

Tackwell 

Woodward 



Jennings 

Towner 

Howell 

Swindler 



Pi Kappa Alpha 

Pledges 



G. 


D. 


Glair, '31 


, Junction City 


V. 


W 


. Collins, 


'30, Junction City 


C. 


W 


. Eslinger 


, '31, Kinsley 


H. 


E. 


Grant, '31, Ellsworth 


K. 


G. 


Haas, '31, 


Downs 


B. 


L. 


Hostinsk\ 


, '29, Manhattan 


■ R. 


Howell, '31, 


Hutchinson 


H. 


B. 


Jennings, 


'31, Manhattan 


F. 


G. 


Murphy, ' 


31, Manhattan 


A. 


A. 


Swenson, 


'31, Clay Center 


L. 


E. 


Tackwell 


, '31, Manhattan 


G. 


G. 


Towner, ' 


30, DwigH 


R. 


W 


. Womer, ', 


31, Manhattan 


H. 


J- 


Woodward, '31, Hutchinson 


Page 315 







Mrs. Mable Strong 

Housemother 




holmberg 

Wood 



Wood 



Beach 



Yodek 

Washington 

Gibson 



Braddock 

Rochford 

Hagenbuch 



BUGBEE 



Powell 

Powers 

Cannon 



Kerin 



hoskinson 

Brown 



HOLSING 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



Bill Braddock, '28, Girard 

H. C. Bugbee, '28, Washington, D. C. 

E. G. Cordts, '30, Overbrook 

J. G. Ewbank, '30, Dalhart, Texas 
H. S. Gibson, '30, Lyons 

F. H. Hagenbuch, '28, Troy 

C. O. Hefner, '30, Yates Center 




Actives 
J. F. Holsinger, '28, Kansas City 

F. W. ImMasche, '29, Saffordvillc 

E. C. McBurney, '29, Newton 
H. P. Powers, '30, Junction City 
R. R. Riepe, '30, Kans<is City 
T. E. Rochford, '30, Osborne 

R. C. Rogler, '30, Manhattan 
R. F. Sanders, '30, Lamed 
R. P. Sanner, '30, Newton 
H. W. Schmidt, '28, Wamego 

G. Washington, '30, Manhattan 

F. A. Whiteside, '30, Neodesha 
R. R. Wood, '29, Cottonwood Falls 
T. R. Varney, '29, Manhattan 

J. J. Yeager, '30, Baz'iar 
K. D. Yoder, '31, Ellis 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon was founded at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, March 9, 1856. 

Kansas Beta Chapter was established January 24, 
1913. 

Colors — Purple and (.old. 
Flower — Violet. 
Publication — The Record. 



Page 116 




A 



Sanders 

Schmidt 
Huntington 



Vakney 

Yeager 

Whitesides 

Sanner 



McBuRNEY 

Riepe 

Hefner 



EWBANK 

CORDTS 

Spangler 

Olinger 



KlKK 



Odell 



Johns 

ImMasche 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



E. E. Beach, '30, Chanute 

K. C. Brown, '31, Chanute 

E. D. Cannon, '28, Lexington, Mo. 

E. Holmberg, '30, Kansas City 
R. K. Hoskinson, '31, Hutchinson 
A. A. Hostetler, '31, Hutchinson 

F. Huntington, '31, Eureka 
M. E. Johns, '31, Osborne 
E. T. Kerin, '31, Concordia 
W. F. Kirk, '31, Kansas City 

G. Odell, '31, Goodland 

E. C. Olinger, '31, Denver, Colo. 

T. M. Petty, '31, Manhattan 

J. C. Peugh, '31, Hoisington 

W. L. Powell, '31, Manhattan 

G. P. Smith, '31, Manhattan 

D. H. Spangler, '31, Stanton, Nehr. 

R. H. Wood, '31, Cottonwood Falls 



Pledges 



Mrs. Emma Pasmore 

Housemother 




Page 317 
















TORRENCE 

YONKIN 



KlXKLE 



Meissinger 

foresburg 

CONDELL 



GRIGG 









Pratt 



McCollum 

Coryell 

Marchbank 



Olds 



Reeder 

Wallerstedt 

Atkins 



mm 




Sigma Nu 



Actives 



M. F. Allison, '30, Great Bend 
J. W. Amis, '29, Manhattan 
V. A, Blandin, '29, Wichita 
E. W. Barrett, '29, Emporia 
W. W. Coffman, '29, Overbrook 
H. P. Coberly, '30, Hutchinson 




E. Crawford, '29, Stafford 

G. H. Davis, '30, Manhattan 

A. E. Epperson, '29, Manhattan 

Donald Wade, '29, Concordia 

A. E. Everett, '30, Hutchinson 

W. K. Grigg, '30, Abilene 

R. C. Kellam, '29, Hutchinson 

P. L. Manley, '28, Topeka 

J. L. Marchbank, '28, Manhattan 

R. H. McCollum, '30, Eldorado 

M. D. Musick, '30, Marysville 

R. T. Nichols, '30, Manhattan 

J. W. Pratt, '30, Manhattan 

W. S. Reeder, '28, Troy 

C. E. Reeder, '29, Troy 

J. E. Torrence, '30, Council Grove 

E. R. Wallerstedt, '30, Manhattan 

Sigma Nu was founded at Virginia Military 
Institute, January 1, 1869. 

Beta Kappa Chapter was established May 23, 1913. 

Colors — Black, White, and Gold 

Flower — White Rose 

Publication — The Delta 



Page 31 f 






Manley 

lawrence 

Booth 






Barrett 

Everett 

Epperson 

COFFMAN 





Francis 

Coberly 

Allison 



Florer 






Howard 

Pearson 

Reeder 

Nichols 



G. M. Atkins, '30, Fort Scott 

C. A. Aubel, '31, New Castle, Pa. 

P. W. Booth, '31, Olathe 

R. C. Carter, '31, Hutchinson 

F. R. Condell, '31, Eldorado 

M. R. Coryell, '29, Junction City 

W. A. Forsberg, '31, Lindsborg 

R. S. Florer, '31, Marion 

J. C. Francis, '30, Conivay Springs 

W. S. Howard, '31, Topeka 

K. A. Kinkle, '31, Council Grove 

W. K. Lawrence, '31, Eldorado 

W. H. Meissinger, '31, Abilene 

B. R. Olds, '31, Great Bend 

L. W. Yonkin, '31, Wakefield 



Sigma Nu 

Pledges 



Mrs. F. W. Norris 
Housemother 



Page 319 







:,t$e: 



v 



Hammond 

Murray 



Beal 






Kaufman 

Jordon 

Artman 

Marklev 



Fry 



Finch 

Brookover 



White 



Sandford 

Faulcnor 

E. Smith 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 



Actives 



N. G. Artman, '28, Dennison 

W. Bennington, '30, Parsons 

V. W. Boyd, '28, Irving 

L. H. Brubaker, '29, Manhattan 

H. A. Coleman, '30, Dennison 

L. D. DeBusk, '28, Macksville 

V. Faulconer, '29, Eldorado 

A. Frashier, '30, Kings Mill, Texas 

A. L. Hammond, '30, Wichita 




J. Hopkins, '29, Chapman 

S. Jones, '29, Goodland 

H. J. Markley, '29, Bennington 

C. A. Nutter, '30, Falls City, Neb. 
H. K. Richwine, '29, Holcomb 

D. Sandford, '29, Kansas City 
D. Tedrow, '30, Manhattan 
R. E. White, '29, Jewell City 
O. Wilson, '29, Jennings 

G. O. Yandell, '29, Wilson 

Sigma Phi Epsilon was founded at Richmond Col- 
lege, Richmond, Va., November 1, 1901. 

Kansas Beta Chapter was established February 
23, 1918. 

Colors — Purple and Red. 
Flowers — American Beauty Rose; Violet. 
Publications — Sigma Phi Epsilonjournal; 
Hoop of Steel. 



Page MO 





Tedrow 

Coleman 



Powelson 



DeBusk 

LoCKARD 

Boyd 



Stalker 



Resch 



PlERPOINT 

Mills 

McCune 



Flick 



Barnes 

Brubaker 

Richwine 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 



D. Armstrong, '29, Parsons 

F. Barnes, '31, Osawatomie 

G. Brookover, '31, Eureka 
R. Chesney, '31, Wichita 
F. Finch, '31, Eureka 

M. Flick, '31, Goodland 

F. Fry, '31, Eureka 

H. A. Gustafson, '30, Fredonia 
C. Jordan, '29, Jewell City 
W. J. Kauffman, '31, Kingman 
R. I. Lockard, '30, Norton 

E. McCune, '31, Stafford 

G. Mills, '29, Medicine Lodge 
M. H. Pierpoint, '30, Wichita 
N. Resch, '29, Independence, Mo. 
E. W. Smith, '31, Russell 

R. O. Thompson, '31, Wichita 



Pledges 



Mrs. Inez Sargent 
Housemother 



Page 321 



21 




Pierce 
Kipt 



Thudin 



Luthey 

Belscamper 

WlLVERh 



Sproul 

COOKSEY 

Bock 




Sigma Phi Sigma 



Actives 



Theo. Barber, '30. Alton 

Ben W. Barber, '31, Alton 

E. B. Belscamper, '28, Manhattan 

S. S. Bergsma, '29, Lucas 

Henry Bock, '28, Cowker City 




George Cooksey, '28, Manhattan 
J. C. Dwelly, '28, Manhattan 
Clifford Edwards, '30, Hoxie 
Carroll Hadley, '31, Wichita 
Lee Heckman, '30, Robinson 
Fredrick Hedstrom, '29, Manhattan 
Chas. E. Luthey, '28, Carbondale 
Virgil Leonard, '28, Richland 
Harold Richardson, '30, Long Island 
Marquis H alderman, '30, Long Island 
Ralph Miller, '29, Long Island 
Webb Sproul, '28, Manhattan 
Martin Songren, '29, Protection 
Howard Thudin, '30, Mulvane 
Clyde Thudin, '30, Mulvane 
Gerald Van Pelt, '29, Beverly 
H. H. Platt, '29, Manhattan 

Sigma Phi Sigma was founded at K. S. A. C. 
in 1922. 

Colors — Red and White. 
Flower — Red Rose. 

Page 322 



21z 





Barber 

Hadley 

Bergsma 



Edwards 
Thudin 
Meall 



Richardson 
Leonard 

Gardiner 



Sigma Phi Sigma 

Pledges 



Victor Venard, '31, Manhattan 
E. L. Gardiner, '31, Oxford 
James Baird, '31, Wellsville 
David Meall, '31, Cawker City 
L. D. Pierce, '30, Scranton 
L. T- Miller, '31, Lebanon 
P. B. Cain, '31, Belle Plaine 
H. A. Zirkle, '31, Berryton 



Mrs. Elizabeth Brigham 

Housemother 




Page 323 




HONORARY 



Phi Kappa Phi 



w» — lo! 



t=»J=J=^]o^] 



«S£4-g *- g»*£>* 



^»^.=3 






Founded at 

University of Maine 

1897 




Established at 

K. S. A. C. 

November 15, 1915 












PHI KAPPA PHI is an honor society dedicated to the Unity and Democracy of Education 
and one which is open to honor students of all departments of American universities and 
colleges. 

Not more than ten per cent of the Seniors and Graduate Students who rank highest in 
scholarship are each year elected to membership in the local chapter. A limited number of faculty 
members who have evidenced superior achievement in their profession are also admitted to 
membership. 



OFFICERS FOR 1927-28 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Historian . 



Prof. Ralph R. Price 
Prof. Ada Rice 

Prof. Earl Litwiller 

Prof. C. E. Pearce 

Prof. I. V. Iles 



ELECTED TO MEMBERSHIP APRIL 12, 1927 



Division of Agriculture 
Thomas Russell Reitz 
Carl Milton Carlson 
Collins Walter Thole 
George Jost Stewart 
Raymond Howard Davis 

Division of Engineering 

Everett Lewis Blankenbeker 
Leo Arthur Dixon 
Herbert Evans 
Loran Albert Murphy 
Leland Stanford Hobson 
John Dill 

Floyd Archie Decker 
John Oscar Johnson 



Dr. E. J. Frick 
Prof. Emma Hyde 



Division of General Science 
Mary Helen Jerard 
Lucile Elizabeth Potter 
Bertha Harriet Lapham 
Kenneth Allen Burge 
James Francis Price 
Edwin E. Peterson 
Minnie Florence Johnson 
Lynn Harvey Bradford 
Rida Floy Duckwall 
Grace Darline Grinstead 

Division of Home Economics 
Elsie Theresa Zohner 
Aldene Scantlin 

faculty members 

Dr. Roger C. Smith 
Prof. J. H. Robert 



Stella May Heywood 
Merle May Nelson- 
Hazel May Dwelly 
Bernice Winkler 
Edith Ames 

Division of Veterinary Medicine 
Earl Francis Graves 

Graduate Students 
Charles Earl Burt 
Nelle Alice Hartwig 
Kenneth Karl Bowman 
Mamie Grimes 
Frank Jobes 



Dr. D. C. WARREN- 



ELECTED TO MEMBERSHIP JULY 15, 1927 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Benjamin Randolph Coonfield 
Maria Morris 



Lloyd Ancil Spindler 
Gladys P. Winegar 



John Thomas Pearson 



ELECTED TO MEMBERSHIP OCTOBER 28, 1927 



Division of Agriculture 

Francis Leonard Timmons 
Harold Edwin Myers 

Division of Engineering 
William Symns Reeder 
DwlGht William Grant 
Charles Richard Webb 
John David Harness 



Horace Gratiot Miller 
Clarence William Foster 
Division of General Science 
Erwin John Benne 
Helen Elizabeth Dean 
Ruth Aileen Burkholder 
Paul Eugene Pfeutze 
Louis Hamilton Bock 
Mary Frances Reed 



Division of Home Economics 
Minnie Belle Stanton 
Ruth Schlotterbeck 
Amy Viola Stewardson 
Helen Roberts 

Division of Veterinary Medicine 
Roy Lewis McConnell 



Page 326 



Alpha Kappa Psi 



.5=0^,0^=30^=1 



«^4-§ ** g»*£S«* 



cj»^.=5. 



National Commerce Fraternity (Professional) 



OFFICERS 



President .... 
Vice-President 
Secretary .... 
Treasurer .... 
Ritualist .... 
Chaplain .... 
Marshal .... 
Diary Correspondent 

Ray Althouse 
Wesley Swenson 
Carl Floyd 
Carl Nelson 
M. T. Means 
F. W. Lund 
Harold Nanninga 
Leslie Platt 
Clarence Goering 
Paul Skinner 
Harold Dayhoff 
V. E. Gagelman 
R. S. Myers 



Carl O. Nelson 

M. T. Means 

V. E. Gagelman 

Ray S. Myers 

C. L. Goering 
E. E. Wyman 

Scott Turnbull 

D. K. Putnam 



MEMBERS 



D. K. Putnam 
Rush Kellam 
J. W. Amis 

E. E. Wyman 
Scott Turnbull 
Frank Chrisman 
Jim Bonfield 
Rex Huey 
Guey Huey 

Jim Pratt 
Lyle DeBusk 
J. O. Rogers 
Robert Barr 



Foster Stewart 

MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

H. A. C. Ross 
Dr. J. E. Kammeyer 
Professor Walter Burr 
Professor T. J. Anderson 
Professor H. Stewart 




Floyd, Nelson, Means, Lund, Nanninga, Platt, Althouse 
Goering, Skinner, Dayhoff, Gagelman, Myers, Putnam 



Page 327 



Alpha Zeta 



..^o^o^Jo^U 



384-g S-*^"* 



OFFICERS 

Chancellor H. H. Brown 

Censor E. A. Stephenson 

Scribe H. E. Myers 

Treasurer V. M. Rucker 

Chronicler F. W. ImMasche 



I. M. Atkins 
H. P. Blasdell 
H. H. Brown 
L. M. Clausen 
L. L. Compton 
C. C. Eustace 

E. T. Harden 

F. W. ImMasche 



MEMBERS 

S. G. Kelly 

B. N. Lindburg 

R. O. Lewis 

A. A. Most 

V. E. McAdams 

M. G. Mundhenke 

H. L. Murphy 



H. E. Myers 
V. M. Rucker 

E. A. Stephenson 
I. K. Tompkins 

F. L. Timmons 

L. F. Ungeheuer 

G. B. Wagner 
T. F. Winburn 



ALPHA ZETA is an honorary agricultural fraternity recognizing character, leadership, and 
high scholarship. Second semester sophomore, junior, and senior students are eligible for 
membership providing that their grades place them in the upper two-fifths of their class and that 
they give promise of becoming leaders of agriculture. 

Alpha Zeta was founded at Ohio State University, 1897. 

Kansas Chapter established March 16, 1909 
Colors — Mode and Sky Blue Flower — Pink Carnation 

Publication — Alpha Zeta Quarterly 




Winburn, Most, ImMasche, Eustace, Wagner, Tompkins, Brown, Rucker 

McAdams, Atkins, Stephenson, Murphey, Harden 

Ungeheuer, Mundhenke, Lewis, Blasdell, Clausen, Timmons, Lindburg, Myers 



Page 328 



Omicron Nu 



— .f=o^=3o^ao^H 



*&a-g ^ %4&fr* 



c^°i=<«=4— 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Editor 

Secretary 



Belle Stanton 

Claire Cox 

Amy Stewardson 

Helen Roberts 

Margarei Koenig 



MEMBERS 



Claire Cox 
Margaret Koenig 
Myra Potter 
Helen Roberts 



Belle Stanton 



Amy Stewardson 
Ruth Schlatterbeck 
Ella Payne 
Alice Johnson 



GRADUATE MEMBERS 



Mrs. Rachel Working 
Alpha Latzke 
Bess Viemont 



Elma James 
Mrs. L. B. Kell 
Irene Bailey 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Margaret Ahlborn 
Lillian Baker 
Clara Cowles 
Arminta Holman 
Dr. Margaret Justin 



Dr. Martha Kramer 
Martha Pittman 
Mrs. Lucile Rust 
Ruth Tucker 
Elizabeth Quinlan 



Omicron Nu was founded at East Lansing, Michigan, 1912 
Theta Chapter was established in 1915 

Purpose — To promote leadership and scholarship in the field of home 
economics. 




Payne, Stanton, Koenig, Cox, Stewardson 
Roberts, Schlatterbeck, Johnson, Potter 



Page 329 



Pi Epsilon Pi 



— ..|=>o«=3«£=!<£z] 



«$£*-g "* £«*££•* 



^^•=5- 



National Men's Pep Organization 
Wampus Cat Chapter 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



Victor Meseke 

Harold Witt 

. Carl Feldman 

Dal Price 



C. Feldman 
R. Johnson 
H. Witt 

J. Cullum 
V. Palenske 
G. Yandell 
M. Crocker 

D. D. Price 
R. Myers 
Q. Mell 

O. Barton 
D. Thomas 
C. Sardou 
F. Brokesh 



MEMBERS 

P. Smith 
A. Huber 
M. Means 
T. Heter 
V. Anderson 
R. Buchanan 
P. Manley 
J. Pratt 
F. Hagenbuch 

E. Cordts 
D. Eslinger 
O. Ekdahl 
W. Crossen 

F. Jenkins 



C. Nelson 

C. Smith 

W. McCaslin 
V. Meseke 

D. Nelson 
R. Althouse 
L. Coleman 
F. Callahan 
L. DeBusk 
H. Paulson 
C. Kasson 

M. COFFMAN 

E. Lee 




Top row — R. Myers, Cordts, Hagenbuch, Smith, Witt 

Second row — Thomas, Kasson, Mell, Johnson, Brokish, Palenske, Cullum 

Third row — Buchanan, Jenkins, Anderson, Price, Sardou, Barton, Crokken, McCaslin 

Fourth row — C. Nelson, Althouse, D. K. Nelson, Feldman, Meseke, Heter, Means, Paulson 



Page 330 



Pi Kappa Delta 



6 _ 



•j=»o«=3o^ao^n 



*S#-g ^ £«$£$•* 



C^E^. •==?•— 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary- Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



Mary Marcene Kimball 

Clarence Goering 

Louise Child 



MEMBERS 



C. H. Hughes 
Gladys Suiter 
G. H. Davis 
R. P. Smith 

E. R. Foltz 

F. L. Whan 
Louise Child 
Opal Thurow 
Mary M. Kimball 



S. T. Kimball 
J. O. Rogers 
Clarence Goering 
H. B. Summers 
juanita harbes 
Frances Wagar 
J. W. Taylor 
Herman Cowdery 
Ralph Lashbrook 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 
P. E. Pfuetze Osceola Burr 

FACULTY MEMBERS 



W. E. Grimes 
H. T. Hill 
R. E. McGarraugh 
C. W. Mathews 



Harold Howe 

Roy Jones 

R. G. Langford 

N. W. Roc key 



L. E. Kammeyer 



PI KAPPA DELTA includes both men and women who participate in intercollegiate oratory, 
debate, or public speaking. The organization was founded at Ottawa University in January 
of 1914. 




Goering, Foltz, Kimball, Rogers, S. Kimball, Pfuetze, Smith 
Suiter, Child, Thurow, K. Pfeutze, Hughes, Eustace 



Page 331 



Mu Phi Epsilon 



.5=0^=10^=10^11 



*8#-g ** §4^* 



President 
Vice-President 
Corresponding Secretary 
Recording Secretary 
Treasurer . 



OFFICFRS 



Fern Cunningham 

. Ruth Hartman 

Ella Shaw 

. Mary Burnette 

Aileen Burkholder 



Fern Cunningham 
Mary Burnette 
Aileen Burkholder 
Edith Reel 



MEMBERS 



Janice Reel 
Ella Shaw 
Dorothy Dale 
Ruth Glick 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



Elsie H. Smith 
Mary Jackson 



Clarice M. Painter 
Ruth Hartman 



Pledge 
Lois McNitt 

MU PHI EPSILON is a national honorary musical fraternity. It is established in most of 
the leading conservatories and colleges in the United States. Election to membership 
requires outstanding ability in the field of music. 

Mu Phi Epsilon was founded at the Metropolitan College of Music, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 1903 



Mu Mu Chapter established, 1922 
Colors — Purple and White 

Publication — Mu Phi Epsilon Triangle 



Flower — Violet 




Hartman Cunningham 

Burnette Reel 



Reel 



Shaw 



Page m 



Phi Mu Alpha 



•j=°£=i°;=i<£z] 



*$tf-g ** §4^* 



^^.=^- 



Phi Mu Alpha was founded October 6, 1898 
Tau Chapter established February 19, 1921 

Colors — Red, Black, and Gold 



MEMBERS 



J. G. Barnhart 
K. H. Beach 
L. H. Bock 
R. D. Bradley 
E. E. Fear 
M. M. Ginter 

C. J. GOERING 

W. F. Hardman 

A. H. Hemker 

B. L. HOSTINSKY 



C. J. Lund 
J. R. Matiiias 
P. J. McCroskey 
L. C. Paslay 
C. E. Reeder 
C. V. Schneider 
J. H. Shenk 
A. E. Winkler 
C. A. Wisecup 



Roy Bainer 
H. W. Davis 
H. M. Farrar 
E. B. Floyd 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

R. B. Gordon 
J. L. Hall 
H. T. Hill 
H. K. Lamont 



William Lindquist 
F. L. Myers 
R. C. Smith 
Charles Stratton 



Homer Yoder 
E. Carroll 
G. F. Collins 



Pledges 

F. L. Huff 
M. T. Means 



M. E. Paddleford 
C. L. Willis 
H. W. Witt 




Beach, Bradley, Ginter, Reeder, Barnhart 
Hostinsky, Paslay, Fear, Bock, Lindquist, Hemker 
Shenk, Goering, Lund, Snyder, Mathias 



Page 3)3 



Mortar and Ball 



•S=o£=i<£=]c£z] 



*&¥% =* g^^i 



C=^.c=>. 



mortarN 

AND 

BALL 



MORTAR AND BALL is the National Honorary Society of advanced-course cadets in the 
coast artillery corps. The organization was founded at the University of Minnesota in 
the fall of 1920. The Kansas State Chapter was installed in July, 1926. 

OFFICERS 

Captain J H. Church 

First Lieutenant W. S. Reeder 

Second Lieutenant R. K. Whitford 



First Sergeant 



Mel C. Coffman 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 
G. T. Bond R. L. Helmreich 

J. H. Church J. F. Holsinger 

Mel C. Coffman D. L. Lacey 

Rex Davis Glenn Koger 

G. Drollinger R. W. Myers 

A. E. Dring C. B. Olds 

N. L. Dunlap L. V. Rector 

C. G. Gates W. S. Reeder 

M. M. Ginter C. F. Smith 

G. K. Hayes W. J. Sweet 

R. K. Whitford H. G. Wood 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

C. D. Pierce, Major, C. A. C. 

C. H. Stewart, Captain, C. A. C. 

W. W. Wertz, Captain, C. A. C. 

R. E. McGarraugh, Captain, C. A. C. 




Page 334 



Cosmopolitan Club 



— .j=o£=| ^a<£z3 



«&a-g ** g»*£S-* 



c^»^=?« 



THE Cosmopolitan Club is made up of American and foreign students who are interested 
in international student understandings and world problems. 

The object is to promote a spirit of brotherhood among the students of all nations. 



MEMBERS 

Francisco Asis 
Osceola Burr 
Maurine Burson 
Margaret Burtis 
Ethlyn Christensen 
Robert Copeland 
Fern Harris 
Carl Hartman 
Esther Herman 
Beulah Henderson 
Philip Isaak 
Dorothy Alice Johnson 
Earl Litwiller 
Miss Jessie M. Machir 
Miss Alice Melton 
George Montgomery 

K. P. NlCOLOFF 

Paul Pfeutze 
Mrs. William Morland 
Jacques Sellschop 
Francisco Taberner 
Mrs. Eusebia Thompson 
Dorothy Wescott 



Dean J. T. Willard 
Flor Zapata 
Miss Myrtle Zener 
John Parker 
C. V. Williams 
Ada Billings 
Lenore McCormick 
Frances Webb 
Mary Meyer 
Y. S. Kim 
Amy Jones 
Bessa Leach 
Agnes Lyon 
Clifford Yardly 
Elizabeth Schnatterly 
Charles Kenison 

lOLA GUNSELMANN 

William Guerrant 
Harold Mannen 
Inez Alsop 
Dale Sanford 
Wayne Ewing 
Max Fleming 




+? \i 



^% 



The Cosmopolitan Club 



Page 335 



American College Quill Club 



^0^,0^30^1 



*sa«g * §F^i 



C=^oc=».c^. 



OFFICERS 



Chancellor . 
Vice- Chan cell or 
Keeper of the Parchments 
Scribe .... 
Warden of the Purse 



Elsie Hayden 
Frances Clammer 
Newton Cross 
Paul Pfeutze 



Eula Mae Currie 

A. D. Breedem 

Elsie Hayden 

Lois Benjamin 

Mary Kimball 



MEMBERS 



Eula Mae Currie 
Clare Gray 
Mary Kimball 
Lois Benjamin 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 



H. W. Dayis 
W. C. Mathews 
Ada Rice 
Nellie Aberle 



Walter Burr 
C. E. Rogers 
Geoege Gemmell 
Robert Conover 



Osceola Burr 



THE American College Quill Club, national honorary society for writers, was organized at 
the University of Kansas in 1900. Membership is based on excellence in some kind of literary 
production. There are at present 10 chapters in the organization. The chapter was installed 
at Kansas State in 1914. 

Membership contests are held each semester and meetings are held twice a month for the 
purpose of stimulating literary effort and criticism among the members. 




Bei\jamin Kimball Currie 

Pfeutze Cross Hayden 



Page 336 



Sigma Delta Chi 



— «j=.o£=3 c£za<£zD 



CXXT 



H> ^ p^^ 



^^-?- 



OFFICERS 



President 
Seer e tar v 



Ralph Lashbrook 
John Chandley 



Sigma Delta Chi was founded at DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, 

in April, 1909 

Kansas State Chapter was established in 1915 



Colors — Black and White 



Publication — The Quill 



Motto — Truth, Energy, and Talent 

SIGMA DELTA CHI is a national professional journalistic fraternity organized for the pur- 
pose of promoting better journalism, and in general advancing the standards of the profession. 
Members are chosen from the advanced classes in the Department of Journalism, or from students 
in other departments who show unusual journalistic ability and intend to make journalism their 
life work. 



Lester Frey 
Francis Wilson 
Ralph Lashbrook 
L. N. Gibson 



MFMBERS 



H. D. King 
Gordon Hohn 
Paul Gartner 
Richard Youngman 



Prof. C. E. Rogers 
Prof. E. T. Keith 
Prof. E. M. Amos 



MFMBERS IN FACULTY 

Prof. M. W. Brown 
Prof. H. W t . Davis 
Prof. F. E. Colburn 



Dean L. E. Call 
F. E. Charles 
R. L. Foster 




Top row — King, Frey, Wilson 
Bottom row — Hohn, Lashbrook 



Page 317 



22 



Sigma Tau 



«^«J=lo^3o^Il 



*saǤ *" cf^* 



^•^.c-^ 



Founded at the University of Nebraska, February 22, 1904 
Epsilon Chapter installed at K. S. A. C, May 16, 1912 



Colors — Yale Blue and White 



Publication — The Pyramid 



OFFICERS 



President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Historian . 



Joe Church 

H. Miller 

W. S. Reeder 

. D. D. Smith 

C. W. Webb 




Top row — Grant, Church, Bruce, Meseke, Potter, Johnson, Webb 

Middle row — Smith, Slaybaugh, Miller, Reeder, Myers, Bigelow, Davies, Harness 

Bottom row — -Pierce, Latzke, Bailey, Sloan, Sardou, Dring, Hempker 



Page 338 



22z 



Sigma Tau 



!=.^o^o^] 



*&a-g cH"^ 5 



t^»^.=?. 



SIGMA TAU is an honorary engineering fraternity designed to promote 
the broad principles of scholarship, practicability and sociability among 
the engineering students for the mutual benefit of engineers and engineering 
education. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



J. C. Bruce 
W. B. BlGELOW 
J. H. Church 
L. H. Davies 
W. L. Garnett 
D. W. Grant 
J. D. Harness 
W. T. Howard 
G. I. Johnson 
H. Kibler 

F. E. Masek 
Robert Myers 
J. L. Potter 
W. S. Reeder 

G. D. Slaybaugh 
H. W. Schmidt 
D. D. Smith 



C. R. Webb 
H. G. Miller 
W. L. Bailey 
A. E. Dring 
M. K. Eby 
K. D. Hall 
A. H. Hempker 

H. I. LlNDBERG 

0. Latzke 
J. H. Marchbanks 
R. L. Miller 
C. B. Olds 
V. Palenske 
V. L. Pierce 
C. F. Reinhardt 
C. F. Sardou 
E. L. Sloan 




Page 339 



Theta Sigma Phi 



— •*=»o«=j«£=)c£z3 



i^g w 54^5 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



. Eula Mae Currte 

Marjorie Schmidler 

Mary Frances Reed 

Vesta Duckwall 



MEMBERS 



Louise Child 
Eula Mae Currie 
Vesta Duckwall 
Dorothy Greve 
Elsie Hayden 
Lillian Hugsted 



Sala Jolley 

Mary Marcene Kimball 
Lenore McCormick 
Mrs. Hazel McGarraugh 
Mary Frances Reed 
Marjorie Schmidler 



Gladys Suiter 

MEMBER IN FACULTY 
Helen Hostetter 

Theta Sigma Phi is an honorary journalism fraternity for women 

Founded at the University of Washington in 1909 
Mu Chapter established June 8, 1916 

Publication — The Matrix 




Hayden, Duckwall, Currie, Schmidler, Kimball, McGarraugh 
Greve, Reed, McCormick, Haugsted, Child, Suiter 



Page 340 



Scabbard and Blade 



— ..?=»o!=io£ = i«£z] 



«£#"§ ™ s^^^ 



|=4oe=».=4— 




THE National Society of Scabbard and Blade was founded for the purpose of uniting in a 
close relationship the military departments of American universities and colleges; to preserve 
and develop the qualities of good and efficient officers; to prepare the cadet officers to take a 
more active part in and to have more influence on the military affairs of the communities in 
which they may reside; and, above all, to spread intelligent information concerning the military 
requirements of their country. 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin, 1895 

I Company, First Regiment, established June, 1914 

Colors — Red, White, and Blue Publication — Scabbard and Blade 

OFFICERS 
Captain E. Q. Mell 



Sergeant 
Sergeant 
Secretary 

J. H. Church 
E. I. VanVranken 
Donald Springer 
William Reeder 
H. K. Fisher 
Quentin Mell 



Donald Springer 

Joseph Church 

Donald Springer 



President F. D. Farrell 
Major C. D. Peirce 
Major E. L. Claeren 
Captain C. W. Jones 
Captain W. P. Waltz 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 
L. W. Grothusen 
O. Barton 
J. Anderson 
Mel Coffman 
L. T. Richards 
W. M. Crossen 
Cornell Bugbee 
ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Captain G. W. Fitzgerald 

Captain A 



R. K. Whitford 
Ralph Helmreich 
Victor Meske 
F. Wilson 
Ralph Mohri 
F. Hagenbuch 



F. Bo WEN 
Captain W. W. Wertz 
Captain Stewart 
Lieutenant R. K. Garraugh 
Lieutenant J. V. Sims 




Third row — Church, VanVranken, Springer, Captain Stewart, Reeder, Fisher, Mell, Grothusen 
Second roiv — Barton, Anderson, Coffman, Richards, Crossen, R. K. Whitford 
First roic — Helmreich, Meske, Wilson, Mohri, Hagenbuch, Bugbee 



Page Ul 



Scarab 



.*="£=! O^*,^ 



*&&-g *? cF^"* 



^^.c=?^ 



SCARAB is a senior honorary society founded at K. S. A. C. in 1914. The organization is 
intended to foster the best interests of the college and the senior class in particular. Members 
are chosen from the outstanding members of the junior class at the close of the school year. 



President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



. F. W. Wilson 

Jack Spurlock 

Lester Frey 

Preston Manley 



F. Brokesh 
William Braddock 
Jim Cullum 
Harold Murry 
H. L. Murphy 
M. Means 
Quentin Mell 
Lester Frey 
Ralph Mohri 



MEMBERS 

F. Reed 

Orville Barton 
Richard Bradley 
C. O. Nelson 
W. H. Hinz 
R. H. Sherman 
M. E. Hamilton 
L. M. Clausen 

J. G. S\VARTZ 



Charles Schwindler 
Cornell Bugbee 
Francis Wilson 
Victor Meseke 
Bill Sartorius 
Harold Lewis 
Jack Spurlock 
Preston Manley 
Harlow Enns 




Back row — Brokeesh, Braddock, Cullum, Murry, Murphy, Means, Mell, Frey 

Middle row — 'Reed, Barton, Bradley, Nelson, Hines, Sherman, Hamilton, Clausen, Swartz 

Front row — Mohri, Schwindler, Bugbee, Wilson, Meseke, Sartorius, Lewis, Spurlock 



Page 342 



Xi 



IX 



..J=o|=3o^=]o^I] 



3*asg «*• g^ 



Cj«c=S»c=?.=5. 



OFFICERS 



President . 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Margaret Burtis 

Marian Rude 

Eula Mae Currie 



XIX is an organization of Senior girls founded in 1916, recognizing leaders 
hip, scholarship and constructive co-operation. 



MEMBERS 



Ruth Bainer 
Margaret Burtis 
Eula Mae Currie 
Vesta Duckwall 



Reva Lyne 
Catharine Lorimer 

Marian Rude 
Lorraine Smith 




Burtis Bainer Currie Duckwall 

Lorimer Rude Smith Lyne 



Page 343 






Pr 



IX 



— "S=°£=i <£=)<£=] 



•eStt-g " cF^ 5 



^'^•=4' 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Marshal . 



OFFICERS 



Esther McGuire 

Elizabeth Hartley 

Agnes Bane 

Meredith Dwelley 



MEMBERS 



Lenore McCormick 
Helen Cortelyou 
Ruth Correll 
Louise Child 
Ruth Frost 



Lucille Chastain 
Esther McGuire 
Elizabeth Hartley 
Agnes Bane 
Meredith Dwelley 



PRIX is an organization of outstanding junior girls formed in 1916 to foster interest in junior 
class activities and elections. The membership remains secret until new members are elected 
in the spring. 




McGuire Dwelley Hartley Bane 

Cortelyou Correll McCormick 



Page 344 



Enchiladas 



— »!=e^o^| ^] 



i^g - £*££•* 



President . 

Sec re tar v '-Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



Mary Burnette 
Elsie Hayden 



Eunice Grierson 
Mildred Huddleston 
Ruth Correll 
Kitty Romer 
Frances Robinson 
Lucille Sellers 

Alpha Xi Delta 
Vesta Duckwall 
Marjorie Schmidler 
Helen Kimball 
Lorena Schmidler 
Margaret McKinney 
Elizabeth Quail 

Chi Omega 

Elsie Hayden 
Ruth Varney 
Marjorie Manshardt 
Marie Arbuthnot 
Lucille Chastain 
Bernice Russell 



MEMBERS 

Delta Zeta 

Helen Brewer 
rowena lockridge 
Dorothy Wagner 
Cleda Scott 

Una Minette LaVitte 
Margaret Canham 

Kappa Delta 

El Delle Johnson 
June Jerard 
Velma Criner 
Virginia Van Hook 
Beatrice Wood 

JOSIE LlNDHOLM 

Delta Delta Delta 

Paula Leach 
Alice Lane 
Neta Thornburg 
Helen Inge 
Lillian Hazlett 
Virginia Wallar 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Welthalee Grover 
Dorothy Fulton 
Margaret Barrett 
Beatrice Brown 
Vivian Barnard 
Crystal Taylor 

Pi Beta Phi 

Mary Burnette 
Mary Brooks 
Evelyn Torrence 
Josephine Collins 
Laura Hart 
Abbey Jane Moore 

Phi Omega Pi 

Golda Crawford 
Florence Leonard 
Ferne Harsh 
Lois Sourk 
Margaret Koenig 
Vera Knisely 




Jarard, Leach, Schmidler, Duckwall, Scott, Koenig, Johnson, Chastain, Burnette 
Brewer, Sourk, Sellers, Romer, Brooks, Criner, Hayden, Knisely, Fulton 
Quail, Grierson, LaVitte, Harsh, Wood, Hazlett, Arbuthnot, Barnard, Moore 



Page 345 






R. O.T. C. Rifle Team 





















.^=oj=no^ao^z3 



«$#-§ " £*£>* 



oC_»C='i 



Captain R. E. McGarraugh, C. A. C, Owr// 

THE Rifle Team established an excellent record for the season by winning second 
place in the Missouri Valley League, and second in the 7th Corps Area Match, 
with 19 senior teams competing. Out of 26 matches fired during the season, 23 were won. 

The team won first place in the Midwest shoulder to shoulder match at Columbia, 
competing against the Big Ten Champions and National Champions. 



TEAM MEMBERS 



H. A. Fleck, Maple Hill 
C. J. Win slow, Tonganoxie 
A. B. King, Pomona, California 
W. S. Mayden, Manhattan 
M. Lesher, Dodge City 
R. O. Thompson, Wichita 
Virgil Leonard, Richland 
Glenn Koger, Herrington, (Capt.) 
J. W. Schwanke, Alma 



Max Coble, Sedgwick 
L. A. Will, Denison 
Thomas Doyle, Manhattan 
CM. Kopf, Beverly 
E. W. Bennett, Great Bend 
E. W. Randle, Jefferson 
A. C. Flinner, Manhattan 
CO. Little, Sedgwick 
W. S. Reeder, Troy 






vi. 




Front row — Fleck, Capt. McGakkaugh, Winslow, King, Mayden 
Second row — Lesher, Thompson, Leonard, Koger, Schwanke, Coble 
Third row — Will, Doyle, Kopf, Bennett 
Back row — Randle, Flinner, Little 
W. S. Reeder, not in picture 



Page 346 



The Rifle Team Record 



Kansas State Agricultural College Rifle Team Record — 1928 

Opponents K. S. A. C. 

Score Score 

1. Lehigh University 3533 3543 

2. University of Wyoming 3295 3543 

3. University of Delaware (Forfeit) 3543 

4. University of Maine 1669 1803 

*5. University of Nebraska 1669 1803 

*6. University of Kansas 1787 1808 

7. Iowa State College 3567 3576 

8. University of South Dakota 3431 3576 

9. University of Dayton, Ohio." 3575 3576 

10. Western Maryland College 3559 3576 

11. Connecticut Agricultural College 3276 3576 

12. Oregon Agricultural College 3684 3576f 

*13. University of Missouri 1867 1819f 

14. Massachusetts Institute Technology (Forfeit) 1819 

15. University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1333 1351 

*16. Oklahoma A. and M 1804 1819 

17. Junction City 488 498 

18. Alabama Polytechnic Institute 3508 3597 

19. West Virginia University 3584 3597 

20. Virginia Polytechnic 3418 3597 

21. New Mexico Military Institute 3518 3597 

22. Virginia Military Institute 3537 3597 

23. Georgia School of Technology. 3683 3597f 

24. Carnegie Institute of Technology 1786 1819 

25. Oklahoma A. and M 3563 3645 

26. University of Kentucky 3466 3645 

27. University of Missouri 1728 1729 

Matches won 23 

Lost 3 

Note: * Denotes Missouri Valley League Matches. 
f Denotes Defeats. 

RESULTS OF THE MID-WEST SHOULDER-TO-SHOULDER 
MATCH FIRED AT COLUMBIA, MO. 

Kansas State 1286 

Iowa University (Big Ten Champions) 1260 

Missouri University (National Champions) 1234 

Oklahoma A. and M. College 1222 

Washington University 1154 

MEMBERS OF THE TEAM WHO FIRED THE MATCH 
AND THEIR STANDINGS WERE: 

W. S. Mayden 1 

Glenn Koger 4 

M. Lesher 6 

A. O. Flinner 14 

W. S. Reeder 16 

A. B. King, Alternate 



=% 



Page 347 



















Jack: 

kliriCOlQ 







PLATFORM AND STAGE 












Purple Masque 



•5=o|=|o^=jo^ = ] 



*$a-g ^ g^^^ 



C^oc^oc^^- 



P resident . 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 



OFFICERS 



Milton Kerr 

Lucille Chastain 

Malcom McBride 

Kenneth Cook 

Elsie Hayden 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Milton Kerr 
Lucille Chastain 
Kenneth Cook 
Malcom McBride 
Elsie Hayden 
Newton Cross 
Ralph Mohri 
Jim Pratt 
H. C. Manglesdorf 



Forest Whan 
Paul Pfeutze 
Charles Converse 
Paul Skinner 
Kenneth Gapen 
Karl Pfuetze 
Reva Stump 
Louise Morgan 
Dale Springer 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Osceola Hall Burr 
L. V. White 



Howard T. Hill 
Renna Rosenthal 



H. M. Heberer 




Top row — MacBride, Cook, Gapen, Hayden, Kerr, K. Pfuetze 
Bottom row — Mohri, Cross, P. Pfuetze, Chastain, Morgan, Skinner 



Page 350 



The Manhattan Theatre 



— — ^=4=> <£=><£=! 



*&tf-g ** p^^ 



oez_°e=>< 



THE Manhattan Theatre is a new dramatic organization, which was organized this year. 
It is an honorary dramatic fraternity choosing its membership from the personnel of the 
plays which are put on by the Manhattan Theatre. Members are chosen on the basis of superior 
dramatic ability. The members of the present Purple Masque Fraternity became the charter 
members of the Manhattan Theatre when it was organized this year. 

The aim of the organization is to encourage and further the best interests of dramatics at 
the college and in Manhattan. 



Five plays were given by the Manhattan Theatre during the season. These were : "Sun-up," 
"Romance," "The Poor Nut," "Tommy," and "The Merchant of Venice." The plays were 
directed by H. Miles Heberer. 

The casts of the plays: 



Thomas Armstrong 
Cornelius Van Tuyle 
Susan Van Tuyle 
Miss Armstrong . 
Mrs. Rutherford 
Miss Frothingham 
Mrs. Gray 
Miss Snyder 
Fred Livingstone 
Mr. Harry Putnam 
Signora Vanucci 
Baptiste 



"ROMANCE" 

Paul Pfeutze Adolph .... . Chester Erlich 

Captain Stewart Bellboy Raymond Spence 

Lucille Chastain Mr. Sandbury .... George Long 

Edith Watson Mr. Burrill T. E. Maseke 

Helen Cortelyou Mr. Ambie Bert Hostinski 

Kathryn Top Mr. Clayton . . . Marvin Cherpitel 

Willetta Hill Servant Leon Burris 

Josephine Collins Mr. Lloyd ... . Clare Jordan 

Cornell Bugbee Mrs. Frye Ruth Glick 

James Pratt Mrs. Hudson Grace Madison 

Adina Goering Madame Covallini . . Renna Rosenthal 

. Kenneth Kitch Miss Best . . . Wenzella Witherspoon 



"TOMMY" 



Marie Thurber 
Bernard 
Mrs. Wilson . 
Mrs. Thurber 



Margaret Plummer 

Gerald Ricky 

Bell Spencer 

Helen Elcock 



Mr. Thurber 
David Tuttle 
Tommy Mills 
Judge Wilson 



Jim Pratt 

James Maxwell 

Milton Allison 

Theodore Varney 



"SUN-UP" 



Widow Cagle 
Pap Todd 
Emmy 
Bud ' . 
Sheriff Weeks 



Blanche Forrester 

Dale Springer 

Wilda Cline 

R. H. Wilson 

Oliver Taintor 



Rufe Cagle Paul Ayres 

Preacher Paul Skinner 

The Stranger .... B. A. Rogers 

Bob E. L. Kerin 



"THE POOR NUT" 



Cedric McIlvain 

Mary Louise Morgan 

Dale Springer 

. Marion Eldrige 



Colonel Small . 

Margie Blake 

John Miller 

Julia Winters 

Spike Hoyt ... . Kenneth Gapen 

Hub Smith Dallas Price 

Magpie Welsh .... Milton Allison 

Coach Jackson James Pratt 

Wallie Pierce William Jardine 



Professor Deming . . . Carl Floyd 

Doc Spurney Travis Siever 

A Freshman James Taylor 

Wisconsin Official Ted Varney 

Reggie Catharine Montgomery 

Betty Virginia Waller 

Doris Mary Evans 

Helen Mary Brooks 



Page 351 



Varsity Debate 









J=o^,o^o^] 



*&a-g 3"^* 



c4.c=;.=*. 



=% 






Men and Women who participated in intercollegiate debates this year were as follows: 



Milton Allison 
Arthur Broady 
Jasper Clark 
John Correll 
Herman Cowdery 
George Davis 
Marion Flick 
Ernest Foltz 
Clarence Goering 
Harold Hughes 
Solon Kimball 



Ralph Lash brook 
Karl Pfeutze 
Fred Seaton 
J. W. Taylor 
Forest Whan 
Doris Boettger 
Cleora Ewalt 
juanita harbes 
Blanche Hemmer 
Mary Marcene Kimball 
Blanche Meyers 



Debates were held with the following schools. The schedule was one of the most extensive 
ever carried on by the college. Professor H. B. Summers is debate coach: 



Washburn 
Bethany 

Pittsburg Teachers 
Missouri University 
College of Emporia 
Kansas Wesleyan 
Park College 
Ottawa University 
University of Nebraska 
Cr eight on 
South Dakota 
Arkansas 



Doane College 

St. Marys 

Oregon Aggies 

Drake 

Washington 

Purdue 

Marquette 

Northwestern 

Michigan State 

Detroit 

University of Pittsburgh 



The Kansas State team with only one defeat for the season, came out of the time with Kansas 
University and placed second in the Missouri Valley debate conference. The Aggie debaters 
lost to Kansas University. 

Doctor Howard T. Hill, head of the department of public speaking, expressed his opinion 
that this was one of the most successful seasons that the valley conference has ever experienced. 
The members of the conference are South Dakota, Drake, Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, 
and the two Kansas schools. 



Page 352 



Phi Alpha Mu 



•.f=o*=|o^ = lo^ZI 



*&#"§ ^ £*£>* 



^•^.^ 



President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary- Treasurer 

Faculty Advisor 



OFFICERS 



Dorothy Bergsten 

Edith Carnahan 

Marie Muxlow 

Stella Harriss 



MEMBERS 



Dorothy Bergsten 
Edith Carnahan 
Nancy Carney 
Helen Cortelyou 
Helen Dean 
Arlene Click 
Helen Heise 



Agnes Lyons 
Elfie Mc Mullen 
Marie Muxlow 
Opal Osborne 
Mable Paulson 
Rosa Lee Ricklefs 
Letha Schoeni 



Carol Stratton 



PHI ALPHA MU, honorary general science fraternity for women, was founded for the purpose 
of promoting scholarship and leadership among women students. The society was first 
organized in 1919 under the name of Theta Chi Gamma, and reorganized in 1921 under the name 
it now bears. Members are selected from the upper fifteen per cent in scholastic standing among 
the junior and senior girls in the division of general science. 



Colors — Green and White 



Flower — White Narcissus 




Lyon, Schoeni, Glick, Ricklefs, Muxlow, Dean 

Carnahan, Bergsten, Heise 

Cortelyou, Paulson, McMullen, Stratton, Carney, Osborne 



Page 353 



23 



».f=DO^O^=10^=] 



Oratory 



c^oc^.t=4^- 









KANSAS STATE has always maintained a high standard in the Missouri 
Valley oratorical meets. In its seven years of competition the college 
has not yet failed to place within the first four places. Robert Hedburg 
won the contest in 1927 and Paul Pfuetze was awarded fourth place in 1926. 

This year Harold Hughes represented Kansas State in the contest, winning 
third place. First place was won by Washington University. 

Miss Claire Price, Fredonia, won first place in the oratorical contest, 
conducted by the Women's Intercollegiate Oratorical Association last Friday 
at Friends University, Wichita. 

Miss Mary Marcene Kimball, Manhattan, won second in the extempore 
speech contest conducted by the Association. 



Page 354 



23z 



Inter society Play 



4-**«»c=h&2&^: w ^-4«=C^S-«=^-=:-=s— *— 



e&tt-g ^ £+£&•* 



THE Hamilton and Ionian Literary Societies carried off first honors in 
the annual intersociety play contest, held March 30, under the auspices 
of the Intersociety Council. "Suppressed Desires" was the winning play. 

"The Finger of God," by the Browning and Athenian Societies took 
second place. 

Other plays presented were "It Can't Be Done," by the Franklin and 
Alpha Beta Literary Societies, and "What's in a Name," by the Webster and 
Eurodelphian Societies. 

The one-act play contest was the first of its kind to be held at the College, 
but it is planned to hold a similar contest each year. 



Page 355 



Hamilton Literary Society 



— — S=o«=j<£=j<£z] 



*sa-g cP^* 



C^oc^.c^— . 



President . 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Corresponding Secretary 

Marshal .... 



OFFICERS 

/vVs/ Semester 
Milton Kerr 
Arnold Mast 
Ralph Melville 
Fred True 
Edwin Kroeker 
Louis Bock 



Second Semester 

Theodore A. Newlin 
Fred True 
Harold Crawford 
Arlie Higgins 
Paul Mears 
Milton Kerr 



Roy Armstrong 
Byron At wood 
Dwight Banks 
E. W. Bennett 
Melvin Coffman 
Earl J. Cover 
John Correll 
Harold Crawford 
Chester Culham 
Frank Edlin 
Everett Fear 
Joe Fickel 
Ralph George 
Carl Goodfellow 
E. F. Harmisson 
Arlie Higgins 
Stanley Holmberg 
Glenn C. Isaac 

Orator 



Motto — "Truth Conquers All Things" 
Colors — Red and White 

MEMBERS 

Philip J. Isaak 
Milton Kerr 
Edwin Kroeker 
Arnold Mast 
Homer Staadt 
V. E. McAdams 
Howard McManus 
Paul Mears 
Loyal Miller 
Go van Mills 
Ted Newlin 
William Newman 
Fred Nevius 
Karl Pfuetze 
Paul Pfuetze 
Edres Rector 
Doster Stewart 
James Stewart 



Lowell Treaster 
Gerald Van Pelt 
Robert Lindquist 
Fred True 
Wilmer Meyle 
Jasper Clark 
Hugh McClung 
Howard Tempero 
Henry Anderson 
Philip Edwards 
Edward Wyman 
Herbert Stapleton 
Howard C. Shepherd 
Ralph Melville 
John Johnston 
Dean Chaffee 
Raymond Tillotson 
S. M. Dyer 



Karl Pfuetze 



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Page 356 



Intersociety Oratory 



£=■ 



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^'^•^ 



TNTERSOCIETY ORATORICAL CONTESTS are an annual affair held 
-L by the various Literary Societies of the College. Each year the societies 
choose their best orator to represent them in a contest. The title of this year's 
winning oration was "The New Idea." 

A similar contest is held in debate. The Athenians won this contest 
for the vear 1928. 



The winners of the first three places in their order are as follows: 

Karl Pfeutze . . . Hamilton Literary Society 
Elsie Eustace . . Franklin Literary Society 

Clarence Goering . . Webster Literary Society 




Stewart 



Pfuetze 



Page 3S7 



Alpha Beta Literary Society 



— -.5=0^=30^30^11 



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oc=«>c=:<'« 



OFFICERS 



President . 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary . 
Treasurer 

Corresponding Secretary 
Marshal . 
Assistant Marshal 



D. W. Grant 

Helen Diller 

Ruth Avery 

. Elmer Hubbard 

Verneal Johnson 

C. B. Crews 

Elfie Mc Mullen 



Senior Member 
Junior Member 



Inter-Society Council Representatives 



Adolph Helm 
. Lee Waldo 



Rubie Anderson 
C. S. Ault 
Ruth Avery 
Ester Avery 
H. Axtell 
Rosa Best 
Garnett Bovven 
Kate Bowen 
Mildred Burlieu 
Dorothy Burnet 
Lucille B. Burt 
Erwin J. Benne 
Edith Mae Carnahan 
Inez Crabb 



MEMBERS 

C. B. Crews 

D. W. Cowan 
Helen Diller 
Allan Drew 
Marion Fergus 
Kenneth Gapen 
D. W. Grant 

C. E. Hammett 
Adolph Helm 
Howard Higbee 
Elmer Hubbard 
Lawrence Hoffman 
Howard Jobling 
Verneal Johnson 



Waldo Lee 
Murray Lescher 
Lois Manchester 
Pauline Meeker 
Elfie McMullen 
Marie Muxlow 
Gladys Myer 
E. Schneberger 
Mable Shrontz 
Glen Sutton 
Charles Webb 
Mary Wilson 
Horace Yoder 




Top row — Schneberger, Gapen, Muxlow, Carnahan, Yoder, Webb, Crews, Burt 

Second row — Benne, Diller, Ault, Higbee, Hubbard, McMullen, Best, Manchester, Grant 

First row — Myer, Shrontz, Bowen, Burlieu, Axtell, Cook, Oatman, Hubbard 



Page 358 



Athenian Literary Society 



.J=*»*=|cS=I<£3 



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^•^.c-. 



President . 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary . 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer . 



OFFICERS 

First Semester 

Harold Mannen 
Dale Scheel 
Horace Miller 
Gordon Nonken 
Oliver Tainton 



Second Semester 
Horace Miller 
Oliver Taintor 
Gordon Nonken 
Howard Nester 
Will Sweet 



Merle Allen 
Milburn Atkins 
Howard Bradley 
Leonard Brubaker 
Orville Caldwell 
Richard Crowley 
Andrew Grimes 
Wesley Herren 
Kenneth Latimer 
Ragner Lindberg 
Paul McCroskey 
Harold Mannen 
LeRoy Melia 
Horace Miller 
Harold Myers 



MEMBERS 

Howard Nester 
Gordon Nonken 
Will Nyhart 
Harold Penix 
Vance Rucker 
Minor Salmon 
Dale Scheel 
Walter Selby 
Travis Siever 
Lonnie Simmons 
Clarence Sloan 
Claude Sloan 
Earl Sloan 
Will Sweet 
Oliver Taintor 



LOREN UNGEHEUER 

J. E. Taylor 
F. E. Johnson 
O. L. Mullen 
Edgar Miller 
Ralph Freeman 
Raymond O'Hara 
Harold Stover 
Clifford Yardley 
Ray Mannen 
Hilliard Gamble 
Earl North 
Chas. Morgan 
Howard Palmer 
F. G. Winters 




Brown, Simmons, Atkins, Caldwell, Rucker, Ungeheuer 
Taintor, Miller, Melia, Nester, Nonken 
Crowley, Sloan, Scheel, Nyhart, Stoner, Myers 



Page 359 



Browning Literary Society 



.*=«£=i<S = i«£n 



*s$H> **: cF^* 



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President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary . 
Corresponding Sec ret a ry 

Treasurer . 
Marshal . 



OFFICERS 

First Semester 
Clare Russell 
Reva Lyne 
Melvina Schrader 
. Leone Pacey 
Mabel Paulson 
Margaret Creep 



Second Semester 
Ruth Peck 
Mabel Paulson 
Sarah Geiger 

VlANNA DlZMANG 

Vivian Kirkwood 
Clara Russell 



Naomi Atkins 
Letha Baker 
Mildred Baker 
Louise Barton 
Fern Barr 
Lillian Bedor 
Orpha Brown 
Doris Boettcher 
Geraldine Clausen 
Beatrix Charleton 
Dorothy Dexter 
Ruth Dible 

VlANNA DlZMANG 

Lede Dunton 
Nina Edelblute 
Helen Stewart 
Edna Stewart 



MEMBERS 

Nina Eshbaugh 
Sarah Geiger 
Ruth Gladfelter 
Margaret Gleep 
i ola gunselman 
Alma Hochuli 
Aliene Henderson 
Irene Herr 
Vivian Kirkwood 
Reola Kistler 
Grace Kotteritz 
Hazel Larson 
Lucille Lund 
Reva Lyne 
Fern Massey 
Grace Taylor 



Nondus Miller 
Shirley Mollett 
Mattie Morehead 
Eula Morris 
Lois McNitt 
Leone Pacey 
Mabel Paulson 
Ruth Peck 
Effie Rasher 
Clare Russell 
Olga Saffrey 
Melvina Schrader 
Loula Simmons 
Nina Schrader 
Nina Sherwood 
Grace Zeller 




Saffry, Schrader, Peck, Barton, Henderson, Lyne 

Bedor, Taylor, Russell 

Baker, Meyer, Kirkwood, Morris, Maxey, Pacey 



Page 360 



Eurodelphian Literary Society 



— — *=»<£=J°£=j<£a 



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i=^-=?— 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary . 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer . 
Marshal .... 



First Semester 
Claire Cox 
Ruth Bainer 
Opal Osborne 
Helen Humphrey 
Ruth Harlow 
Garnet Skinner 



Second Semester 
Ruth Bainer 
Opal Osborne 
Ella Shaw 
Velma Horner 
Ruth Harlow 
Louise Reed 



Elizabeth Allen 
Eula Mae Anderson 
Elna Andrich 
Ruth Bainer 
Ruth Bowman 
Gertrude Brill 
Gertrude Brookens 
Ida Cool 
Joice Cox 
Claire Cox 
Gladys Crumbaker 
Ina Davidson 
Bernice Decker 
Rebecca Dubbs 
Adina Goering 
Doris Smith 
Lora Theile 
Helen Trembly 



MEMBERS 

Ruth HXllet 
Georgia Ham 
Ruth Harlow 
Velma Horner 
Ada Hoover 
Lesta Lawrence 
Louise Layman 
Bessie Luch 
Mildred Lemert 
Genevieve Long 
Re vis Lundry 
Beulah Macklin 
Mary Macklin 
Thelma McCune 
Marjorie Mirick 
Dorthy Obrecht 
Ruth Turner 



Opal Osborne 
Carrie Paulsen 
Clara Paulsen 
Dorine Porter 
Opal Mae Porter 
Claire Price 
Louise Reed 
Helen Roberts 
Esther Rockey 
Ella Shaw 
Gertrude Sheetz 
Leota Shield 
Marie Shields 
Marie Shouse 
Garnet Skinner 
Gertrude Skinner 
Mildred Skinner 
Mildred Ungeheuer 




Walter, Layman, Davidson, Paulsen, Mirick, Osborne, Lemert, Long, Shaw 
Bowman, Anderson, Skinner, Brookover, Allen, Shields, Cox, Humphrey 
Roberts, G. Skinner, Bainer, Paulsen, Horner, Seville, McCune, Trembly, Cox 



Page 361 



Franklin Literary Society 



*=<£=: o^j^ 



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OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Recording Secretary . 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer . 

Critic .... 



Firsi Semester 
Leonard Timmons 
Ralph Irwin 
Elsie Eustace 
Lyle Mayfield 
Harvey German 
Elma Stoops 



Second Semester 
Lyle Mayfield 
Elma Stoops 
Letha Schoeni 
Marjorie Prickett 
Harold Stevens 
Orval French 



MEMBERS 



Inez Anderson 
Hazel Buck 
Fern Dix 
Clifford Eustace 
Elsie Eustace 
Orval French 
Harvey German 
E. L. Hulland 
Ralph Irvin 
Lyle Mayfield 
Marshall McColloch 
Margaret Miner 

Grace 



Archie Morgan 
Laura Owsley 
Edith Painter 
Glenette Payne 
Helen Pembleton 
Marjorie Prickett 
Letha Schoeni 
Esther Sinclair 
Ida Snyder 
Harold Stevens 
Elma Stoops 
Leonard Timmons 
Walrod 



Laura Owsley 



DEBATERS 
Ida Snyder 



Marjorie Prickett 



ORATOR 
Elsie Eustace 




Mayfield, German, Timmons, Stevens, Eustace 
Prickett, Eustace, Buck, Ackekt, Miner, Stoops 
Snyder, Pembleton, Morgan, Schoeni, Timmons 



Page 362 



Ionian Literary Society 



.0^=30^,0^30^=3 



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President .... 
Vice-President .... 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary . 
Treasurer .... 

Critic 

Marshal 

Assistant Marshal 
Artist . . 
Chairman of Board . 
Chairman of Program . 
Chairman of Lookout Committee 



Leone Wilson 



Mina Allen 
Nina Allen 
Dorothy Barlow 

SlGRID BECKSTROM 

Ruth Mary Boyles 
Berniece Brien 
Glenna Bridges 
Maukine Burson 
Vada Burson 
Louise Child 
Thelma Child 
Edna Circle 
Alice Clema 
Vera Clothier 
Margaret Collier 
Marjorie Curtis 
Nettie Darah 



OFFICERS 

Fall Semester 

Edna Circle 
Maria Samuel 
Ruth McCammon 
Frances Maxwell 
Catharine Lorimer 
Amy Jones 
Esther McGuire 
Marjorie Curtis 
Veda Burson 
Loulse Child 
Annie Kerr 
Mildred Skinner 
Orator, Louise Child 

Debaters 
Frances Maxwell 



Spring Semester 

Mary Reed 
Louise Child 
Marjorie Curtis 
Elsie Rand 
Arlene Johnson 
Rachael Working 
Nina Allen 
Myra Potter 
Margaret Koenig 
Ruth Richardson 
Mina Allen 
Annie Kerr 



Elsie Rand 



MEMBERS 



Mildred Rathbun 
Louise Reed 
Mary Reed 
Ruth Richardson 
Rosa Ricklefs 
Mabel Ruthi 
Maria Samuel 
Venita Schade 
Ruth Schlotterbeck 
Gertrude Seyb 
Edythe Schrauner 
Mildred Skinner 
Pauline Farley 
Dorothy Greve 
Isabella Gallamore 
Olive Haege 
Georgia Hemphill 
Elizabeth Hullinger 



Thelma Huse 
Arline Johnson 
Dorothy A. Johnson 
Amy Jones 
Esther Jones 
Annie Kerr 
Margaret Koenig 
Catharine Lorimer 
Ruth McCammon 
Lenore McCormack 
Esther McGuire 
Hazel McGuire 
Frances Maxwell 
Arlee Murphy 
Mary Meyer 
Helen Parcels 
Helen Paynter 
Myra Potter 



Elsie Rand 
Belle Stanton 
Hazel Steenis 
Vera Strong 
Helen Van Pelt 
Olive Van Pelt 
Frances Wagar 
Dorothy Wagner 
Thelma Weathers 
Leone Wilson 
Rachel Working 
Mable Williams 
Ruth Williams 
Lola Greeney 
Clara Paustian 
Lillian Paustian 
Edna Pie plow 




Top row — Ricklefs, Bridges, Johnson, Jones, Koenig, Skinner, Reed 

Second row — Circle, Clothier, Samuel, Lorimer 

First row — Stanton, Thurow, McCormack, Brien, Kerr, Rand 



Page 363 



Webster Literary Society 



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— .^=0^=30^30^11 



^^•■=4- 



OFFICERS 

President Delbert Lacey 

Vice-President J. L. Potter 

Treasurer H. K. Fisher 

Secretary M.J. Ginter 







MEMBERS 




H. K. Fisher 








V. C. Walker 


H. I. Hazzard 








H. E. White 


C. J. Ward 








C. S. Channon 


J. L. Potter 








D. E. Bellairs 


D. N. League 








K. V. Engle 


G. K. Hays 








V. I. Masters 


W. H. Painter 








R. H. Russell 


0. E. Hays 








J. E. Schrock 


M. M. Ginter 








F. A. Mueller 


E. L. Barger 








F. B. Zapata 


C. Hartman 








D. L. Lacey 


MEMBERS IN 


FACULTY 


Roy Bainer 


R. 


C. Langford 


Dean H. Umberger 


C. M. Correll 


H. 


H. Laude 




L. V. White 


Albert Dickens 


Cap Sanders 




W. G. Ward 





































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Top row — Fisher, Hazzard ; Ward, Potter, League, Hays, Painter, O. E. Hays 
Second row — Ginter, Barger, Hartman, Walker, White, Channon, Bellairs 
Third row — Engle, Masters, Russell, Schrock, Mueller, Zapata, Lacey 

Faculty Advisor, C. M. Correll 



Page 364 



% 




WHEAT 




3oak 




PUBLICATIONS 







Gordon S. Hohn, Editor 



T 



The 1928 Royal Purple 

HE work is done — the 1928 Royal Purple is 
finished. 



After all is said and done, we realize that it 
hasn't been just work. Instead it has been a genuine 
privilege to chronicle, as best we could, the events 
at Kansas State during the year 1927-28. At best, 
we can only touch upon the features of the year — a 
mere glimpse behind the scenes. We cannot, in one 
volume, record the life of a mighty institution, even 
for so short a time as a year. It would require a good 
many volumes to do that. We have left much unsaid. 

The staff sincerely hopes that you, as students 
at the college, will find enough of interest in the book 
to justify its publication. Realizing that the Royal 
Purple is essentially a book of the campus, a record 
in picture and print of scholastic, social, and athletic 
activities at Kansas State, it has been our chief 
purpose throughout to transfer the spirit of the 
campus to these pages. 

The motif of the book is one of "college life." If we have given to our fellow students any- 
thing that will bring closer and help retain in their memory the most wonderful of all days- 
college days — this volume has achieved its purpose. If we have recalled in one way or another, 
the joys, the heartaches, the hard times and the good times of "going to college," this staff feels 
amply repaid for its labors. 



Gordon S. Hohn, Editor-in-Chief 
Robert F. Johnson, Business Manager 
Marian Dalton, Treasurer 
Eula Mae Currie, Assistant Editor 



THE STAFF 

Elsie Hayden, Feature Editor 

Helen Kimball, Organizations Editor 

Mary Marcene Kimball, Advertising Manager 

James Cullum, Assistant Business Manager 



Forest Whan, Circulation Manager 







Cullum 



Currie 



Hayden 



Page 366 



The 1928 Royal Purple 

We regret not at all the lost vacations, the neglected 
classes and the thousand and one cares that are con- 
nected with the publication of a college annual, if we 
have made brighter in your recollection your college life. 

We have tried, as has every other staff before 
us, to give Kansas State its best year-book. The 
defects of this volume are the result of the double 
handicap that besets every staff: lack of time and 
inexperience. We have no chance to profit by our 
mistakes, nor by the mistakes of previous editors. 
"If we had it to do over again ." 

We mourn with those of you who paid for pictures 
and do not find them in the annual, or those who 
find them in the wrong section, or those who forgot 
to have your picture taken. These things happen 
every year; we usually try to blame them on the 
janitor, and, failing in that, take the blame ourselves. 

The staff wishes to express its sincere apprecia- 
tion for the co-operation of the student body and 

faculty in completion of the book. We wish to thank the organizations on the campus which 
so kindly aided us in gathering material. And we get down on our knees to the kind pro- 
fessors who neglected to register our cut classes, or who generously skipped us in the morning 
recitation because we looked so sleepy. 

And so saying, we'll lock up the office. Turn out the lights, will you, Johnson? Just a 
minute, girls, and we'll walk home with you. 

And, oh yes — we hope you like the book. 




R. F. Johnson, Manager 






M. Kimball 



Dalton 



H. Kimball 



Page 367 



Kansas State Collegian 



..f=3oJ=io^3o^] 



*&tf-g , §4^* 



1=^01=*.^— 



THE STAFF 

F/V.s"/ Semester 



Editor 

Assistant Editor 
Sport Editor . 
Society Editor 
Business Manager 



Editor 

Assistant Editor 
Sport Editor . 
Society Editor . 
Business Manager 



Second Semester 



. Ralph R. Lashbrook 

. Maxwell Thomas 

Paul Gartner 

Margaret McKinney 

Frances Wilson 



Eula Mae Currie 

Vesta Duckwall 

Paul Gartner 

Margaret McKinney 

Solon Kimball 



COLLEGIAN BOARD MEMBERS 
Professor C. E. Rogers Lester Frey 



Vesta Duckwall 



Newton Cross 



Mary Reed 



THE Kansas State Collegian is the official student paper printed twice a week throughout 
the college year. The management is entirely in the hands of the staff, which is elected by 
the Collegian Board. Although the publication is sponsored by the Department of Journalism* 
any student regularly enrolled in school is eligible for a staff position. 




Kimball 



Cukkie 



Wilson 



Lashbrook 



Page 368 



The Brown Bull 



— .f=3o^no^=) ^Z] 



*$£♦"§ ~ ^^^ 



t=^o<=^-=?— 



Kansas State Humor Publication 



Editor 

Associate Editor 
Business Manager 
Faculty Advisor 



Whitewash Number 1 ' 

Catharine Montgomery 

Milton Allison 

Paul Westerman 

Prof. E. M. Amos 



"Reel Number' 



Editor 

Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 
Poetry 

Business Manager 
Faculty Advisor 



Milton Allison 

Catharine Montgomery 

Clinton Francis 

Jasper Clark 

Paul Westerman 

Prof. E. M. Amos 



THE Brown Bull up to this year in the hands of honorary and professional journalism fraterni- 
ties and sororities, was gently removed from the hands of L. N. Gibson and Charles Dean 
after the "Holdup" number in the fall. It was after this number that the erring Bull was placed 
in the hands of the typography students of the department of journalism under the able direction 
of Prof. Ed Amos of the typography department. 

This Kansas State humor publication ranks among the leaders in college humor publications. 
Sole reprint rights are held by College Humor. 




Montgomery 



Allison 



Page 369 



24 



The Kansas Agricultural Student 




Grimes, Mayfield, Stephenson, Timmons, Kirton, Simmons, Beach 
murphey, immasche, carpenter, durham, harden, wlnburn 



Harold E. Myers, Editor-in-Chief 
Hobart P. Blasdel, Asso. Editor 
Andrew P. Grimes, College Notes 
Lyle Mayfield, Farm Notes 



F. Leonard Timmons, Agronomy 
T. W. Kirton, Dairy Husbandry 
L. J. Simmons, Poultry Husbandry 
Kay H. Beach, Horticulture 



F. W. ImMasche, Agricultural Admin. 
F. E. Carpenter, Agr. Economics 
Hugh Durham, Advisory Editor 
Eldon T. Harden, Business Manager 



Edw. A. Stephenson, Alumni Notes H. L. Murphey, Animal Husbandry T. F. Winburn, Ass't Bus. Manager 

THE Kansas Agricultural Student is the official organ of the Agricultural Association, the 
general student organization of the Division of Agriculture. It is an illustrated quarterly 
magazine, the first number of which was issued December, 1921. The chief activities of agri- 
cultural students and agricultural alumni are reported in the magazine along with articles of 
special interest to the farming industry. 




Myers 



Blasdel 



Page 370 



24z 



The Kansas State Engineer 



—.5=0^=30^30^=1 



*&a-g ^ ^^^ 



c3»,=».c=4. 



THE STAFF 

. Managing Board 

H. G. Miller, E. E., '28 Editor 

Prof. J. P. Calderwood Advisory Editor 

E. Q. Mell, C. E., '28 Business Manager 

Wesley Halferty, E. E., '28 Circulation Manager 



Business Staff 

E. Q. Mell, C. E., '28 . . Business Manager 

Mel Coffman, E. E., '29 Associate Business Manager 
Wesley Halferty, E. E., '28 . Circulation Manager 
Dwight Smith, Ag. E., '28 Ass't Circulation Manager 
Mel Coffman, E. E., '29 . . Advertising Manager 
John Coleman, Ch. E., '29 . . . Treasurer 

Art Staff 

Chas. Schwindler, Arch., '28 
Frances Schepp, Arch., '28 . 
Elmer Wangerin, E. E., '28 
H. R. Harwood, Ar. E., '29 . 
Bob Lockard, Ar. E., '30 . 
Chas. Brainard, Ar. E., '30 



Editorial Staff 


H. G. Miller, E. E., '28 . 


Editor 


Loyal Davies, C. E., '29 


Associate Editor 


Prof. J. P. Calderwood . 


Advisory Editor 


J. L. Potter, E. E., '28 


Assistant Editor 


Delbert Lacey, C. E , '28 


Campus Editor 


Kennis Evans, E. E., '28 


. Alumni Editor 


Phillip Edwards, E. E. '29 


Associate Alumni Editor 


A. M. Young, E. E., '28 


Joke Editor 


Departmental Editors 


E. L. Barger, Ag. E., '29 


Agricultural Engineering 


Chas. Brainard, Ar. E., '30 


Architectural Engineering 


Victor Palenske, C. E. '29 


Civil Engineering 


Floyd Israel, Ch. E., '28 


Chemical Engineering 


Chas. B Olds, E. E., '29 . 


Electrical Engineering 


Bob McCormick, F. M., '29 


Flour Mill Engineering 


Chas. Sardou, M. E., '29 


Mechanical Engineering 



A rt Editor 

Associate Art Editor 

. Photographer 

Ca rtoonist 

Cartoonist 

. Cartoonist 



THE Kansas State Engineer is published by the Engineering Association. The first issue 
was printed in the fall of 1915. The magazine is published four times during the year and 
is a member of the Engineering College Magazines, an organization composed of similar publica- 
tions in 20 of the leading engineering schools of America. The Kansas State Engineer is sent to 
all the large universities and colleges of the United States, to county engineers in Kansas and to 
each engineering student at Kansas State. 




Davis 



Smith 



Coffman 



Wangerin 



Ginter 



Page 171 




Prominent Dean's conception of Greek life 
(Name on request) 



Page 372 




A SockxI Ladder for oree K 



Page 373 




High and Dry 



HERE we have the official water-wagon of the "Hill." Reading from left to right: Earl 
Crocker, the Sigma Nu Idol, has unquestionably won the place of driver. Marshall Ross, 
big A. T. O. Papa, has been inclined to settle down this year, but his excellent record for past 
seasons gives him an honorary place for life. Vic Meseke, the Acacia Play-boy, needs no recom- 
mendation. Frosty Hagenbuch, the Sig Alph Sponge, started it all. (His contemplative expres- 
sion is the result of his defeat for Senior Devotional Leader by Paul Pfeutze.) Huck Boyd, the 
retiring Phi Delt, has so benefited by his associations with the other boys on the wagon, that he 
has applied for a position as prohibition agent. Les Piatt is the organization mascot, and was 
given his place as a blind to the authorities. Since Toot Charles has had such a difficult time 
trying to equal his record of last year, he is undecided whether to remain on or off the wagon. 

(The management regrets to announce that owing to the fact that a big party was given the 
night preceding the taking of this photograph, the rest of the chapter could not appear.) 



Page 374 



Nursery Rhymes for Fraternity Men 



— •*=•£=! <£=1<£Z] 



i^g ^ g^^ 



CZ^ot^oc^. ca- 



sing a song of Sigma Nu, 

Bottles full of rye! 
Four and twenty brothers 

Positively high! 
When the dance was over, 

They weren't quite so gay; 
Too many of the brothers 

Had little fines to pay! 

Marion, Marion, 

Stockton so fine, 
Hands all the frat men 

A terrible line! 
Pi Kappa Alpha 

And S. A. E. too, 
While now she is sporting 

A Beta pin true! 



Bill, Bill, Jardine's son, 

Joined the Betas just for fun! 

He got beat 
Upon the seat, 

And found it wasn't such a treat! 

Edgar had a little pin, 

Its pearls were white as snow, 
And everywhere that Edgar went 

That pin was sure to go. 

He took it on a date one night 
And strange to say, next day 

'Twas shining on Merrilat's dress- 
How come it didn't stay? 



sole distributors M. K- GOETZ BREWING CO. 'S produot* 

ESTABLISHED I 85» 



fflountrg (Blub 

SWEET BEVERAGES 



TELEPHONE 6.0634 6TH AND ALBEMARLE STS. 

(tuuntrg (filuh §prrial 
&t. 3iiarph. jpiaaouri 



January 1, 1923 

Sigma Alpha Epailo« Fraternity 
1666 Farrchild Avenue 
I-'anhattaji, Kansas 

Dear Sirs:- 

On behalf of the Goetz Erewing company, we wish to 
.hank your fraternity for its excellent patronage during 
the- past year. 

The company has appreciated the extensive orders on 
case lots received from you, and trusts that they will 
continue in the future. Every effort will be made to fill 
them satisfactorily. 

With best wishes for the New Year, 

The Goetz Sales Force 



^.t.i^U'i 1 '-^^ 



It A: EH 



From the Sig Alph files 



Page 375 



A Guide To The Use of Fraternities For The 









PHI DELTA THETA 

The Phi Delts aren't what they used to be. Since Max 
graduated their social prestige has fallen off alarmingly and the 
girls have ceased to thrill with delight at a bid to one of their 
parties. The brothers are anxiously comparing schemes to 
regain their lost glory and wondering just how it all happened, 
anyway. 





G> 




Picture of a Phi Delt pouring 
a heavy line 



BETA THETA PI 

Now that the Betas have forsaken the 
big he-men from the farms for a more frivolous 
type, their stock has been going up by leaps 
and bounds! Yes, the Betas are coming back 
this year. Since Billy Jardine was pledged, 
he has been running the chapter in fine shape. 
Now we ask you, isn't it strange what mere 
politics can do? 



A Beta Athlete 



DELTA TAU DELTA 



Master James Douglass wishes to announce at 
this time that it was really he who sent the life-size 
portrait of himself in a track suit to the Pi Phi chapter 
for Christmas. The touching little incident did much 
to establish the fraternity on a firm social foundation, 
and the Pi Phi house will never have a greater treasure 
than the precious memory of the sweet occurrence. 





A Delta Tan nut for track 

KAPPA SIGMA 

The words Kappa Sigma were originally in the 
Black Feet language. Literally translated they meant 
"anybody and everybody." There are some archaeolo- 
gists w r ho insist that Kappa Sigma means "heavy 
lead," but they largely are of the behavioristic branch. 
Kappa Sigma is now considering the founding of a 
new trust fund — to be used in the establishment of a 
new college so that a new chapter of Kappa Sigma 
can! be founded. 



Kappa Sig promoting stock 



Page 376 




Prospective Aggies of Next Year 



PI BETA PHI 

This year was open season for the Pi Phis. Anyone who had the where- 
withal to assist in paying for their new mansion on the hill could wear an 
arrow. Several of the little girls with fathers who were big business men 
in Bunkum Center were almost killed in the rush. It is rumored that the 
chapter is seriously considering the adoption of "Horses" as an official 
song. 



Picture of a Pi Phi 
looking modest 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

The Kappas have been riding on their 
national reputation for some time now, but 
they made a noble effort to come back this 
year. By underselling all the other sororities 
on Royal Purple subscriptions, they managed 
to get four girls (none of whom placed), up 
for the beauty contest. With the assistance 
of Minnie Lee Marks they hope to raise their 
chapter rating to a pre-war standard again. 





Picture of a Kappa going to a party 

CHI OMEGA 

With the new Pi Phi house over half finished, the X Horseshoe girls 
were hard put to it this rush week. However, they covered up any 
deficiencies by going out for "quality rather than quantity," and, as one 
of the sisters quaintly remarked: "At least we didn't have to take in 
half the freshmen class!" Nevertheless, it is an open secret that they 
speak of next year with bated breath. 



Chi Omega in formal 
dress 

DELTA DELTA DELTA 

The sisters Tri Delt are still ably living up to their chapter slogan of 
"Beautiful, but Dumb." In addition, they this year seem to feel that 
they are the best aspirants for a K. S. A. C. interpretation of campus 
aristocracy. So far no one has been able to discover just what they have 
to get so high-hat over, though there have been several surmises to the 
effect that it may be for lack of anything better. 




.1 Tri Belt's choice 



Page 377 



We Nominate for the Hall of Fame- 

iWITH APOLOGIES TO VANITY FAIR) 





Minnie Lee Marks 



Glen Fockele 



Because she is the Kappa exponent of 
sophistication; because she is showing the 
campus what the well-dressed woman will 
wear this year; because the men call her 
"Marvelous." 



Because he is the most amusing boy on the 
campus; because he has reduced class cutting 
to an art; because he has all the other brothers 
backed off the map when it comes to "holding 
his own." 








Dorthea Watts 



Harold Witt 



Because her taxi service for fraternity men 
is the best in town; because she holds the Pi 
Phi championship for late dates; because she 
believes in making the most of leap-year. 



Because he is living up to Kappa Sigma 
tradition by growing a mustache; because he 
has the worthy ambition of being the campus 
"man about town;" because he has such beau- 
tiful self-confidence. 





Mary L. Evans 



John Byrd 



Because she offers conclusive proof that 
"silence is golden;" because she is this year's 
entrant for the annual Tri-Delt Publicity 
Stunt. 



Because he is affectionately known as 
"God's gift to the Beta's;" because he is a 
delightful example of what college will do to 
the young child; because he wears a fur coat. 



Page 378 



An Aggie Travelogue 



(Aboard a Rubberneck Bus) 
By L. N. G. 

LADIES and Gentlemen, we are now entering the campus of the far-famed Kansas 
State Agricultural College, with the emphasis on the Agricultural. Here on 
our right we have Nichols Gymnasium, not named for Bill Nichols, however. The 
gymnasium contains the Delta Tau Delta trophy room, lockers, and shower baths. 

"The next building on your right is not the slaughter house, much as you might 
think so from the sounds pouring forth from it, but is instead the auditorium. At the 
present moment the college chorus is rendering 'No brave and free on land or sea.' 

"Facing the auditorium on the left is the department of Home Economics — classes 
in child welfare are taught there. Now, isn't that optimism? Courses in every con- 
ceivable household subject are conducted. The girls coming out of the building have 
just been dismissed from 'Little Johnny II' and 'Rolls and Buns III.' 

"We are now approaching Fairchild Hall, wherein is housed the collection of toads 
and turtles that each year are placed in the beds of the Alpha Delta Pi's by boisterous 
Pi Kappa Alpha boys. Blushing boys and girls fresh from the billowy plains of this 
great commonwealth are here taught the hidden meaning of life. 

"The next structure is Anderson Hall which contains the President, Vice-President, 
and Secretary. Here is where all the money is handled with the most up-to-date methods, 
for it has been nobly said by Andrew Mellon, 'To save time is to save money.' So the 
rooms in this building are constantly being moved around so that the men can never 
find it. 

"And here is the Chemistry and Physics building — well, well — the two men you 
see behind it, trying to hide a couple of cigars, are none other than Mike Ahearn and 
Professor H. H. King. They are probably trying to get together on jokes on each 
other for next year's freshman watermelon feed. Hello, Doc. Hello, Mike. Fine day, 
ain't it? 

"The next building is the new Library. Two million dollars and not finished yet. 
Twelve men were prostrated by the heat while carrying heavy books — records of college 
bulls and stallions — from the old building. 

"The Agricultural buildings that you see dimly in the distance, Ladies and Gentle- 
men, are the best equipped buildings in any college in the world — it has been estimated 
that each Kansas farmer has to pay the equivalent of two bushels of wheat or a load of 
corn every year to keep this fine building in typewriters and adding machines. It was in 
the little building between the two wings of Waters Hall where Royal Lady Pond Lily 
IV, the famous Guernsey Jersey hybrid, gave 23 gallons of milk in one day, the third 
of August, 1923 — which if dropped drop by drop would reach from the college to Nome, 
Alaska, and back one hundred and twenty-eight times. 

"And now making a return trip over a new and different route — we have here — 
the greatest — the little lady there — the dean of women." 



Page 379 
















BROWN-SPARR STUDIO 



IN AGGIEVILLE 



Page 3.S0 



Consistent Charm--- 

Distinctive Beauty- 

FROCKS OF INDIVIDUALITY AND 
CHARACTER 

The STYLE SHOP 



Where Styles Start 



404 Poyntz Ave. 



The Place You Like To Trade 

THE PLACE YOU WILL REMEMBER LONG AFTER 
YOUR COLLEGE DAYS 



The REXALL DRUG STORES 



Kinney and Petrich 


Kinney, 


Petrich and Dunne 


331 Poyntz 




Aggieville 


1 


A 
RED 


f 


Among the Aggie 


\ 


A 
RED 


r 


j 


SEAL 
CAFE 

p. 


L 


Customs 




SEAL 
CAFE 






A definite part of college life 


* 


** "V 




is the habit of visiting the 








"Chance" after the party, 








dance, or show, to enjoy the 








excellent food and unfailing 












service. 









THE FIRST AND LAST CHANCE CAFE 



112 S. Fourth 



Dial 2960 



11 In Every Respect a Red Seal Place 



Page 381 



YOUR SCHOOL PAPER 






PHE Kansas State Collegian is the 
only means by which you can follow 
the activities of your Alma Mater regu- 
larly. News of your acquaintances and 
friends, news of the school can be ob- 
tained twice weekly for only $2.50 a 
year. The Collegian will be mailed any 
place in the United States. 

To have your name placed on the regu- 
lar mailing list, send a check for $2.50 
to the Kansas State Collegian, K. S. A. 
C, Manhattan, Kansas. 



"Lest We Forget" —Seniors- 
Subscribe Now 



#2.00 a Year if Mailed to the College 






The Kansas State Collegian 

K. S. A. C, Manhattan, Kansas 



Owned and Operated by the Students 



Page 382 



COLE'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

"The Home of Standard Merchandise" 

The Standards of 

QUALITY 

CHARACTER 
DISTINCTION 

Are Consistently Maintained Here 



Manhattan, Kan. 
Fort Scott, Kan. 
Junction City, Kan. 



Nine Stores 

coffeyville, kan. 
Paola, Kan. 
Garnett, Kan. 



Lamar, Mo. 
Sedalia, Mo. 
Nevada, Mo. 



AMBASSADOR SHIRTS 



DOBBS HATS 



Society [Brand Clothes 



T?OR years we have been outfitters 
to College men, always showing the 
newest things first, and selling only 
that quality of merchandise that de- 
mands the respect and confidence of 
the better dressed man. 



STEVENSON'S 

Uptown Campus Shop 



Page 3S3 



College Days 

Will Soon be Over 



KEEP forever in your minds 
remembrance of these happy 
days, by exchanging photographs 
with classmates. 

We have all your proofs on file and 
can finish photographs from your 
Royal Purple negatives on a few 
days' notice. 

Application pictures can also be 

made from these negatives at much 

reduced cost. 



A 
V 

Hixon Studio Roval 

j 

Eleventh Street at Moro 
Phone 3434 



A 
V 



Page 384 










HHBHB9 



'Photograph Courtesy 1927 %oyal 'purple 




STANDARD 

gold standard means in money 
values, the Burger imprint is to the college 
and school annual world. It signifies the 
designing genius which has created the great- 
est annuals, the utmost in printing plates, 
and a service which is truly specialized, in- 
telligent, interested, and thorough, compre- 
hending every phase of yearbook building 
and financing, <I This book is a product of 
such service. ^ An inquiry about 
your book will be welcome. 



BoirfljSCnflrouiTiQ C£o. 



S BLDO. 




PHOTO ENGR.AVER.S 

KANSAS CITY MO. 






Jp 



^cjj fey. 



Appreciation 

Is one factor of the co- 
operation and service 
which we desire to offer 
to the students of 
K. S. A. C. 

BOOKS GIFTS 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 
PARTY FAVORS 

The College 
Book Store 



Gibbs Clothing 
Company 

Hyde Park 

Curlee 

Clothes 



MEN'S AND BOYS' 
OUTFITTERS 



3OO POYNTZ 



Dial 4220 



Our Selling 
Policy Is This: 



We hold no so-called sales of any kind nor 
do we name comparative prices of any kind. 
Goods are always sold at the lowest possible 
prices consistent with prevailing market con- 
ditions, and when the price of some article is 
marked down to its replacement value, the 
former price is never mentioned. We aim 
to give the same fair, square treatment to you 
every day. 



CkzC^l 



*-» -^r- 



C__£2 . 



Page 385 



25 



Stein ^Bloch and 
Nottingham Qothes 



//CATERING to young men, we offer 
^-"' the latest styles and weaves at 
prices the college man can afford to pay. 
Quality and style are essentially pres- 
ent in all of our merchandise. 
The policy of this store is to offer the 
best styles to those who are most 
interested in being well dressed. 



JERRY WILSON 

Qlothier 



Our Business Principles 

npO DO the right thing at the right time, 
in the right way; to do some things 
better than they were ever done before; 
to eliminate errors; to know both sides of a 
question; to be courteous; to be an example; 
to work for love of the work; to anticipate 
requirements; to develop resources; to rec- 
ognize no impediments; to master circum- 
stances; to act from reason rather than rule; 
to be satisfied with nothing short of per- 
fection. 

SPOT CASH STORE 

Manhattan 's Shopping Center 



Page 386 



25z 



The Pioneer Mortgage Company 

KANSAS OKLAHOMA 

Farm Loans 

Lowest Rates — Liberal Options 
Prompt Service — 5-7-10 Years 



Mulvane Building 



Topeka, Kansas 



We Appreciate Your Friendship and Patronage 




COLLEGE DRUG STORE 



Frank H. Walters 



PLUMBING 

and 

TINWORK 



1 1 19 Moro St. Phone 3361 



Co-Op 

Book Store 



Page 387 



The Marshall Theatre 

Sincerely thanks you for the business 
of the season just closing and takes this 
opportunity to announce a thorough 
interior renovation during the summer 
months. A new stage set, carpets, seats 
and other extensive improvements will 
greet your first glance on your return 
next season. 

1 




WAREHAM THEATRE 

Presenting 

"The Best Obtainable Photo Plays" 

With 
ATMOSPHERIC MUSIC SUPREME 






STAGE PRESENTATIONS 

FEATURED FOR YOUR ENJOYMENT 

"One of the Reasons for the Warehani's Popularity" 






WATCH THE "COLLEGIAN" FOR COMING ATTRACTIONS! 





Page 3SS 



PEACOCK SHOES 

u ^Art in Footwear" 




BARDWELL & BARDWELL 

Twenty Years in Real Estate and Loan Business 

Courteous and efficient salesmen available at all 
times to show City, Suburban or Farm properties. 

Money to loan on good Agricultural land any- 
where in Kansas. 

Money to loan on Manhattan City or Suburban 
properties. We will help you Buy or Build. 



Insurance and Bonds of all kinds. 



Legal Papers Executed. 



Prompt Service 



Page 389 



MS hat will the future bring??? 



E 



VERY young man or woman of today wonders 
what tomorrow will mean for him or her. 
Whether you measure your success in dollars and 
cents, or in contentment and the respect of those 
in the community in which you live, there is just 
one answer — the answer is THRIFT. 

To practice this golden virtue is the only assurance 
that you will reap the reward to which your educa- 
tion entitles you. 

In appreciation of the wonderful work that the 
Kansas State Agricultural College and her students 
are doing for our State, the Associated Banks of 
Manhattan take pleasure in extending this message 
on "Better Citizenship" to you through the 1928 
Royal Purple. 



First National Bank 
Manhattan State Bank 



Union National Bank 
College State Bank 



THE MANHATTAN CLEARING 
HOUSE ASSOCIATION 



Manhattan, Kansas 



Page 390 



The 

Voice of 
Experience! 



Miss Purdy wrote 

Us: 

"In reply to your 
letter, I will exhibit a 
calf at the American 
Royal Live Stock 
Show and I am con- 
signing my calf to 
John Clay & Com- 
pany. I was well 
pleased with the sale 
of my calf through 
your firm last year. 

"I have been taught 
in my short life that 
John Clay & Com- 
pany is a safe place 
to consign live stock." 



-H^Wth her Steer *4f, 
^"ROLLED STOCKING" \jT^ 
<^ Consigned to CL 

Af John Clay A Company C^ 
£" AMERICAN ROYALLIVESTOKSH0W^> 

Kansas City Hov.l2-l9JS27 ^ 




JOHN CLAY & COMPANY 

Live Stock Commission Merchants 



We have our own completely equipped offices at 



Chicago, III. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
South Omaha, Nebr. 
South St. Joseph, Mo. 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Fort Worth, Texas 



Denver, Colo. 

South St. Paul, Minn. 
East Buffalo, N. Y. 
East St. Louis, III. 
Ogden, Utah 



WE SELL CATTLE, HOGS, SHEEP— WE BUY STOCKERS AND 

FEEDERS ON ORDER 



Page 391 






Morris Brothers 
Tire Shop 



Phone 3183 
112 South Third Street 

MANHATTAN 



While at home, maintain our serv- 
ice and secure our workman- 
ship by mailing your 
Kodak Work to 

LISK TWINS 

MANHATTAN, KANSAS 
We Pay Return Postage 



Quality Building Material and Coal 

COOK'S PAINTS AND VARNISHES 
BUILDER'S HARDWARE 

Courtesy and Service Always 

Burgner-Bowman-Matthews Lumber Co. 



Corner Third and Humboldt 



Dial 2327 



PHONE 2437 

CROWDER'S 

CLEANERS 



Eventually 

Some friend will advise you to 
have your clothing refreshed 
at our plant. You will then 
compliment your friend for his 
excellent judgment. 



1 1 09 Moro 



Phone 2437 



Page 391 



To Fraternity and Sorority 
House Buyers 

We offer you economy, 
service and quality. 

Hikers' Supplies a 
Speciality 

BLUEMONT 

GROCERY CO. 



IP 



ftrtCrdfT 



COMMERCIAL PRINTING 

Fraternity and Sorority Printing Our 
Specialty 

Invitations and Christmas Cards 

Phone 2065 
230A Poyntz Ave. Manhattan, Kans. 



OUR POLICY IS IN KEEPING WITH K. S. A. C. IDEALS 

We believe that maintaining a standard 
is more vital than meeting a price 



THE PALACE DRUG COMPANY 



"Friendly Service''' 1 



112 South Fourth 



1220 Moro 





amn'XSt 



Lincoln '^OT^cC Ford 

"■ The Universal Car 

CARS - TRUCKS - TRACTORS 

Pleasure — Service — Economy 



son 



WALTER E. MOORE 



Dealer 



MANHATTAN 



KANSAS 



Page 393 




Emblem of Satisfaction 

Buick Sales and 
Service 

MANHATTAN 
MOTORS CO. 

312-14 Houston 
MANHATTAN KANSAS 



Bread Is The Natural Food 

Grain has nourished man since 
time immemorial, and Bread is 
the modern form prepared for 
consumption. Sugar, salt, milk, 
butter and yeast round out the 
list of food elements; all of these 
are carefully combined and skil- 
fully baked into 

S & H BREAD 



Phone 41 16 



2nd and Colorado 



THANK YOU— 

We appreciate the patronage of 

you students, and are making 

every effort to be worthy of it 

by giving you high-class 

products. 

JOHNS & WYLLI 
CONFECTIONERY 

Aggieville 



HOTEL GILLETT 

We Cater to Parties and Banquets 

The prices are low considering the 
quality of our service and food 

€ 



125 Modern Rooms 



$1.25— $2.00 



Page 394 



LUMBER — BUILDERS' SUPPLIES — COAL 

Service, quality, and price is what you get with every dollar 
spent in our stores. This combination spells mutual satisfaction. 

YARDS IN KANSAS 

Glasco, Grainfield, Grinnell, Kensington, Manhattan, Monument, 
Oakley, Page, Salina, Stockton, Winona, Victoria 

GOLDEN BELT LUMBER CO. 

MANHATTAN 

The COLLEGE SHOE STORE 

Exclusive Agents for 

WALK-OVER and CANTILEVER 

SHOES 

For Men and Women 
i 216 Moro Aggieville 

A TRUTH EASILY LEARNED 

53 53 

It isn't necessary to dig into thick vol- 
umes nor pour over dry data to learn why 
Chappell's Ice Cream leads in popular 
flavors throughout Manhattan. 

53 53 

A Taste Will Tell You 



CHAPPELL'S CREAMERY 

118 N. Fourth Phone 2587 



Page 395 



The Classes 
of '89-'09-'29 
may differ 
on what to wear 



but agree on 



where to get it 



Years of experience 
have taught us to 
consider above all 
else the pulse of 
Aggie students. 

That is why we em- 
phasize Braeburnas 
the Crest of Univer- 
sity Clothing. 

Spring Braeburns 

$35 $40 $45 



Bell and Lutz 

Exclusive but Not Expensive 



3585 Dial 3585 

DIAMOND CAB 
& BAGGAGE 



DAY & 
NIGHT 

SERVICE 




GOOD, 
CAREFUL 
DRIVERS 



'"The Cab that is A /way 
On Time" 

A. D. FAIR, Proprietor 
507 Poyntz Manhattan 



NASH 

Leads the World in Motor 
Car Value 

NASH MOTOR CO. 



202 Poyntz 



Manhattan, Kansas 



"TEACH the MILLIONS" 

Your favorite carbonated 
drink is best bottled 

MANHATTAN 

Coca-Cola 

BOTTLING CO. 

Country Club 
Wholesale Candy 



MEMBER 




Page 396 



Your College Jeweler 

WATCHES 
DIAMONDS 
NOVELTY 
JEWELRY 

BANGS & CO. 

Jewelers 



STRATFORD CLOTHES 

Dignified, Smart, and 
Correctly Fashioned 

The Fellows Get Theirs 

at THE 

Varsity Clothing Co. 

Home of Varsity Approved 
Clothes 



1222 MORO 



Dial 2515 



THE A-V LAUNDRY 



OFFERS YOU CAREFUL SERVICE 



Minor Repairs on Clothing Cheerfully Made 



1219 Moro 



We Call and Deliver 



Dial 2323 





P. C. REDMAN MOTOR COMPANY 

Sales and Service 
527 Poyntz Avenue Manhattan, Kansas 



HULL'S HARDWARE 

SPORTING GOODS 

Best in the Line 



RADIO SETS AND PARTS 

Watch Our Windows 



406 Poyntz 



Phone 2126 



Page 397 






THE 

MANHATTAN 

LAUNDRY 

Cleans and Launders 
your clothes in the 
latest careful method 
with the minimum of 
wear. Buttons are 
sewed on and small 
tears mended. 

200 Poyntz Dial 2943 


DIAMONDS— WATCHES 

COLLEGE FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 

MUSIC 

PAUL DOOLEY 

College jeweler 
AGGIEVILLE 


NYGREN'S 

FOOTWEAR 

and 

HOSIERY 

iioV 2 S. Fourth Street 


Phone 3414 and Phone 2370 
Down Town Aggieville 

We extend to you the 
Heartiest Co-opera- 
tion of Service and 
Appreciation. 

t 

A. L. Duckwall 
Stores 

Down Town and Aggieville 


Like an Aggie CO-ED 
A CHEVROLET IS— 

Beautiful 

Dependable 

Economical 
and 
Offers Great Perform- 
ance at Lowest Upkeep 

BREWER 

MOTOR CO. 

316-22 Houston 
MANHATTAN 



Page 398 



s 
I 

X 
E 

s 



HUPMOBILES 

Keep Smiling With Kelly s 

SAM MILLER 

AUTO EXCHANGE 
and GARAGE 

Manhattan, Kansas 

NEW AND USED CARS 
BOUGHT AND SOLD 



E 

I 

G 

H 

T 

S 



115 S. Third Street 



Phone 2178 



THE 

WHAT-NOT 

"The Little Place of Big 
Values" 

LADIES' 
READY-TO-WEAR 

lis S. Fourth 



The Student's 
Inn 

The place where good 
food is always obtain- 
able at a low price. 

J. B. Chapman, Proprietor 



FRANK and 
McKEEMAN 

GENERAL 
TIRES 

Fifth and Poyntz 



'iam 



>f 



Let us show you the 
rings pictured. Popw 
lar in style and price. 



uality- 



as 



ie senti- 
ment that 
Surrounds 

Them 




TRAUB genuine 

Orange 'Blossom 



Kofo.C.lknit/L 

Square Deae Jeweler^ 



Page 399 




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