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Full text of "Royal purple"

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KANSAS STATE 
UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



inside 



intno&uction 1 



student Life 



academics 



10 



82 



SpORfS 150 



organizations 210 



housing 242 



closing 




O ather uncomplimentary labels have been 
licked and stamped on K-State's face, mak- 
ing fun of its conservatism and agricultural basis. 

But K-State is not to be made fun of. K-State 
represents the practical, productive part of our 
society. It is the part that puts the cries for 
change and the useful ideas to work, It stands as 
a model of constructive change. 

So, the 1980 Royal Purple Staff decided we 
wanted to demonstrate the role that K-State 
plays in our society. We wanted to demonstrate, 
not only K-State as a producer of practical intelli- 
gensia, but the research and the contributions to 
higher education that it makes. We wanted to 
show the impact of K-State in the collegiate 
world. 

We also wanted to show what was happening at 
K-State from Spring 1979 to Winter 1980. 

We want to show that when it counts, K-State 
is there. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/royalpurple1980unse 



When it counts, K-State is there 



protected in a valley, encased by 
the Flint Hills, where the Blue 
and Kansas rivers greet each other, 
K-State continues in its own 
individual direction. 

Labeled "Cowboy University," 
"Silo Tech" and "Dairy on the 
Prairie," K-State has been considered 
as redneck, conservative and 
backward in attitude. 

Yet, when it is important K-State 



Sunrlse-The morning sun casts a healthy glow on 
the K-State campus. 



counts. 

Not only leading in agriculture, the 
University houses one of the top 
veterinarian colleges in the nation. 
Strong, positive reputations have also 
been earned in the areas of 
engineering, architecture and home 
economics. 

The small music department has 
the internationally recognized jazz 
band and the Queen of England's 
choice of entertainment for the world 
championship Wembley Cup soccer 
game, the "Pride of Wildcat Land" 




1P80 Royal PtmpLe 



Kansas State University 



Volume 71 



Manhattan, Kansas 



fn June, 1909, the Kansas Board of 
Regents proposed the building of a 
new gym-armory to be named after E.R. 
Nichols, president of the college. 

A year later, a solid slab of reinforced 
concrete was laid as the gym floor, a 
building innovation for the time. 

And in 1911, Nichols Gym opened. 
The junior class was given permission to 
host a banquet for seniors. (No dancing 
was allowed.) 

In 1915, swimming pools and a society 
room were added and in 1 965, the music 
department moved to Nichols after the 
auditorium was destroyed fire. 

The spirit of college basketball reigned 
in Nichols for 39 years, students had to 
stand in line for hours, much like today, 
to get tickets for good seats. As 
enrollment increased, access to games 
decreased. Two sections of tickets were 
sold. This meant that half the student 
ticket holders would see half the games 
white the other holders would see the 
other half. 



Ungutied-Nichols in a "before" look 
that many students on campus have 
never seen, the entrance isn't 
boarded up and glass is in the 
windows. 





K-State counts 

marching band. And despite the 
speech department's refuge under 
the old stadium, their forensic team 
was third in the nation. 

But K-State has never been 
considered a catalyst for change. The 
opinion of the "Wildcat" University 
has been one of being unprogressive, 
closed to change. 

In the changing forces of the 
sixties, when campuses across the 
nation were being wracked by student 
protest, K-State was a non-participant 
in the limelight. Quietly stepping in 



its own path, K-State made changes 
when it counted, slowly and surely. 
The reason for this was possibly 
because of the then-President James 
McCain who was cited in the May 
27, 1967 Saturday Review as one 



Oh Horrors- The return of the Rocky Horror 

Picture Show brought out the crazies Halloween 

night in the Union main ballroom 

No Nukes- A protest against nuclear power and 

Salt 11 took place outside McCain Auditorium 

during Walter Mondale's visit. 

A-Z Only- Forms to fill, lines to wait in, fees to 
pay, brought the annual semester headaches in 

August. 




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Sue Pfannmueller 



2/Opening 




The popularity of the basketball games 
and difficulty of attending the games 
generated student protest and demands 
for an adequately-sized fieldhouse. 

In desperation, students hung from the 
rafters at the games and once someone 
threw a dummy down from the rafters to 
demonstrate to legislators attending the 
game K-State's need for a fieldhouse. 

Students finally got their wish when the 
Mike Ahearn Field House opened on 
December 9, 1950. 

Nichols' claim to fame, though, is not 
the basketball games, the reinforced 
concrete, or student antics. 

Nichols' claim is that it has the longest 
and most debated-over history of any 
building on the K-State campus. 

Controversy began when an arsonist's 
fire gutted the building in 1968, amid a 
general national air of protest against the 
Vietnam war, civil rights and bureaucracy 
launched by the nation 's youth. 

Though the fire destroyed the building, 
the swimming pools remained in use until 



Raft Hanging~Overcrowded games 
had students viewing the basketball 
games from the rafters. 




Dave Kaup 



Opening/3 



K-State counts 

"who has not only shielded his 
campus from controversial questions 
but has taken the initiative in bringing 
such questions to the full attention of 
the University." 

McCain was accessible to the K- 
State community. He initiated the 
"Speak Outs", a forum for students 
to express their grievances about 
University policy to faculty members 
and himself in the Union. 

The curriculum at K-State draws 
in the conservative student because 
of its reputation as a university of 
applied sciences. The practical nature 
of the K-State student sets the tone 
of wanting the most useful and 
workable system. 

During the sixties, K-State calmly 
looked within itself in search of 
discrimination violations, obsolete 



rules and the need for a student 
voice in their educational system. 

Disillusionment and frustration with 
student power, along with the 
escalation of the Vietnam War, 
sparked fires on campuses across the 
nation. K-State was no longer isolated 
from the flames of discontent. 



Seed Spit-Greg Kobs, senior in bakery 

science, eats the free watermelon on a hot 

September afternoon. The watermelon feed 

was sponsored by the Agriculture Council. 

Captured Cyclone?-A strange-looking captive 
travels in the homecoming parade behind bars. 

OOMPAH-(far right)Hours of drilling on the 

east campus practice field keeps the tubas and 

the rest of the band in step. 

Clowning Around-(lower right) When Greg 

Musil asked for clowns, Susan Bell, senior in 

life sciences, dressed in pink and white. She 

was joined by clown friends, Joan Wurth and 

Susan Herbert. 




Tim Costello 




Sue PfannmueHer 



4 'Opening 




Sue Pfannmueller 



1972 when the natatorium was 
completed. 

Later that year, the first student group 
emerged to do something about the 
abandoned shell. A group of architecture 
students expressed interest in the 
renovation of Nichols for use by the art 
department. 

The student chapter of the American 
Institute of Architects formed a committee 
to complete a study on the possibility of 
renovation. 

This was to be the first in eight years 
of studies by various organizations, all 
leading to increased confusion of the 
student body and community. 

Definite measures seemed apparent in 
April 1978, when a $45,000 feasibility 
study allocation passed the Kansas 
Legislature, but bureaucratic red tape 
mangled the plan. 

The Senate Ways and Means 
Committee decided to scrap the plan in 
April 1979. 



Nichols Burns- Lighting the night sky, 
the "Castle" casts its final light Decem- 
ber 13, 1968 on the few spectators. 




Opening/5 




Tim Costello 



K-State counts 

On December 13, 1968, spectators 
spilling out of Ahearn after a 
basketball game, saw a smoke- 
blackened sky above Kedzie Hall. A 
burning ember of discontent landed 
on Nichols Gymnasium, igniting and 
gutting the castle-like structure. 



Comforts of Home- Tom Hickey, junior in 

business administration carries his refridgerator 

into Haymaker Hall to improve the comforts of 

his dorm room. 

Alumni Play- Still knowing the words and tune 

to the fight song was the Alumni band at the 

Parents Day football game. 

Social Time- Some watch the game, some 

watch others, others visit friends during the social 

get-together of a K-State football game. 

Dawn Salute- Anderson Hall wakes up to the 

rising of the flags. 




Sue Pfannmueller 



6/Opening 







State Senator Wint Winter(R-Ottawa), 
chairman of the committee, asked the 
University Consultative Committee, 
headed by President Duane Acker, to 
discuss three proposals and recommend 
one to the Legislature. 

Of the three proposals: appropriate 
$10,000 for a feasibility study, raze 
Nichols at an estimated cost of $125,000 
or appropriate $50,000 to landscape and 
preserve the site, the "collective wisdom" 
of the Consultative Committee was to 
raze the building. 

Curt Cunningham, a student member of 
the committee, disagreed with the opinion, 
saying that though Acker asked for 
"collective wisdom" all he got was 
"collective opinion. " This was a result he 
said, of the committee members not 
having enough technical information about 
the alternatives to give anything but 
opinion. 

Greg Musil, student body president, first 
showed his strong support for the 
preservation of Nichols (which was to 
became a personal drive) in activating a 



Gutted- Ten years of barrenness 
and Nichols still stands empty except 
for the weeds that have taken a hold 
in the floor. 




John Boch 



Opening / 7 



K-State counts 

The empty shell stood as a 
reminder of the unconstructive 
change K-State had been able to 
avoid until 1968. 

Ten years later, Nichols stands as 
it did after the fire. Weeds spread up 
from the gutted floor and fire-twisted 
beams form an inadequate roof. It 
stands as a symbol of the 



bureaucracy's lack of decisiveness. 

In April 1979, President Acker, in 
a surprise move, recommended the 
razing of Nichols. 

The recommendation lit the fire of 
protest under the feet of K-State 
students. A rally in front of Anderson 
Hall and a motorcade to the 
statehouse gained a stay of execution 
for Nichols. 

K-State was there when it counted. HI 



Street Swing-Pott County Pork and 
Bean Band, Plain Jane and Moffet 
Beers Band had Russ Flynn, junior in 
marketing, and Shari Evans, 
sophomore in general swinging in the 
streets of Aggieville on "Do It in 
Aggieville" day. 

Stuff the Union-The jazz band 
captivated a large crowd for the 
Union Homecoming Activities Day, 
and received ovations not only after 
the individual numbers but after 
several instrument solos. 




Tim Costello 




Bo Rader 



8/Opening 




Chair Study An art student takes 
advantage of the early fall warm weather. 

High Flight-Paula Carr, junior in 
accounting, ski dives down to the intramural 
fields in a fall demonstration. 

Boat Dream- A canoer catnaps before 
hitting the Kansas River in the annual K- 
State-KU races. 





Dave Kaup 



Dave Kaup 







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drive to find out what the students felt 
about the issue. 

In a letter written to Acker on 
Tuesday, April 3, 1979, Musi! said he had 
contacted "as many living groups as 
possible in the last 24 hours" to get 
student opinion. 

"The overwhelming feeling was that 
Nichols is an important landmark on the 
K-State campus. These students do not 
want to see Nichols torn down, " the letter 
said. 

As if to prove that point, more than 
100 students carpooled and went to 
Topeka to demonstrate their convictions 
that the building be saved. 

Musil, senate chairman, Rich Macha, an 
architecture student, Tom Hollinberger 
and Randy Tosh, held session with 
Governor John Carlin to further express 
student concern. 

The effort was successful. The 
Legislature appointed an ad hoc 
committee to get further information from 
interested parties. 

And Nichols gained a stay of execution. 



Keep the Castle- President Acker 
addresses the over 500 protesters 
who gathered to demonstrate against 
the recommendation to raze Nichols. 




Opening/9 




Hurrlyet N. Aydogan 



10/Academics 



highlights 



Sculpstudy- Joanne Becker, senior in home 
economics, finds an unusual place to study, the 
mid-campus sculpture popularly known as the 
pregnant lady. 




Dave Kaup 

Monkey Business- Halloween afternoon 
Elizabeth Stevens, sophomore in veterinary 
medicine, talks to human friend, John 
Lippman, senior in food science and industry. 



London or Bust 

Step right up, get your records, art prints, 
candy, and "growl" towels from your favorite 
instrument 22 



U.S. Army Surplus 

Image of a Fort Riley soldier, simple prejudice 
or based in fact? 32 



Hey babe, 

wanna hear a good line? 



Ego breaker, friend maker-lines can be 
destructive or helpful in the approachment 
game 



52 



The make up of K-State 

A look at the people of K-State^through the 
eyes of a camera 68 




M[ -State isn't known for starting trends. But, it does 
•^follow them when they make sense. Everyone has 
their own style at K-State — some rollerskate, others 
walk. Some do their traveling from class to class — to 
the Union dressed up, while others find the old stand-by 
jeans most appropriate. 

K-State isn't known as a university of originating opin- 
ion. Yet, it listens to those that do, controversial or not. 
The Landon Lecture Series guests and convocation 
speakers have been well-known, sometimes controver- 
sial, some even set precedents. Robert Kennedy all but 
announced his candidacy here and Lincoln Rockwell of 
the American Nazi Party spoke here in 1967. 

K-State doesn't really have a reputation for being the 
cultural center of the nation, but it has had its share of 
events and activities for that "well-rounded" education. 

K-State is students, all kinds of students. And K-State 
offers the opportunities for the student to choose the 
extent of his education. 



Academics/ 11 





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WT -State is much more than a 
^college campus, with buildings 
here and there. K-State is purple and 
purple pride is the word. 

At any athletic event, a K-State fan 
is wearing something purple — a 
purple cowboy hat, a purple K-State t- 
shirt, carrying a purple glass, waving a 
purple pom-pom, or KSU flag. Quite a 
reversal considering that ten years ago 
the students were contemplating a 
change of school colors. 

Vince Gibson with his "we gonna 
win" spirit brought the Wildcat football 
team out of the conference basement, 
and into a conference sixth place. 

The purple pride program was 
working, and the fans wore the color 
with newly established pride. Purple 
toilet paper appeared at the games — 
streamed from the top row of 
bleachers to the bottom row. 



K-State earned a 10th place national 
ranking with a 59-21 (still the most 
points scored against Oklahoma) 
victory over Oklahoma. 



Nancy Reese 



Purple pride came to a crashing halt 
in 1970 with a NCAA probation and 
severe financial losses. In 1977, K- 
State was again put on a NCAA 
probation, indefinitely. 

Recently, Jack Hartman and Jim 
Dickey brought the purple back, by 
restoring confidence and pride. With a 
combination of Jack Hartman's 
established basketball team, and Jim 
Dickey's "fill 'er up with Wildcats" 
program, the popularity of purple is 
back. 

Purple is back in full force, and 
purple pride is the word ff^ 




photo by Craig Chandler 





<zonczGrzt xzgv>\guj 



Faces of Billy Joel 



Play Us 
Another Tune 
Mr. Piano Man 




'The crowd tossed wildly in their seats; 
* screaming and waving their arms in 
an almost chaotic frenzy. They wanted an- 
other shot of the Adrenalin that has made 
Billy Joel the biggest shot of them all. 

A consummate artist, Joel's perfor- 
mance to a near sellout crowd on April 
28, 1979 in Ahearn Field House, was a 
finely woven tapestry of lights, music and 
entertainment. 

Unlike many musicians, whose songs 
are carbon copies of each other, Joel's 
style and musical techniques are as varied 




Carol Holstead 



as the colors of the rainbow. His music 
moves out of the realm of pure rock 'n' 
roll. Most of Joel's compositions are com- 
binations of jazz, soul, and classical influ- 
ences. 

Joel's singing techniques also are as var- 
ied as the styles which influence his music. 
The soft, fluid tones Joel used when sing- 
ing his love songs contrasted sharply with 
raspy intensity of his ballads. The variety 
kept the concert alive. 

Joel is a street-wise kid from New 
York, and many of his pieces reflect his 
upbringing. However, there is more to this 
man's music than ballads about street life. 
Joel also has composed a variety of 
unique love songs and portraits. In them, 
he abandons the usual theme of love lost 
or love discovered. Instead, Joel concen- 
trates on characters and complexities of 
relationships. During his concert he 
touched the audience with two such 
songs: "She's Always a Woman" and 
"Just the Way You Are." 

Joel revealed his rebellious self in the 
hard-hitting, foot-stomping "My Life." As 
he performed it, the audience became al- 
most as rebellious as Joel. 

The themes Joel interprets into his mu- 
sic are basic and straightforward. They 
cover a variety of topics, and in them 
there is something to which every person 
can relate. Two lines from his hit single 
"Just the Way You Are," reflect Joel's 
desire at remaining direct in his music: "I 



After receiving three roses from some 
enthusiastic members of the audience, Joel 
danced on the piano, with one of the roses in 
his teeth. 



don't want clever conversation, I don't 
want to work that hard." 

The audience called the Grammy-win- 
ning musician back for three encores. At 
the end of the third encore, Joel cast his 
spell on the audience; "Good night Kan- 
sas. Don't take any shit from anybody." 

The Billy Joel concert was co-promoted 
by Feyline Productions, since the Union 
Program Council (UPC) had previously 
gone in the hole $5,000, because of poor 
turnouts at the Jerry Lewis Show and 
the Marshall Tucker Band concert. HI 





photos by Pete Souza 



The Billy Joel concert was perfectly timed, and 
the lighting and staging of his numbers created a 
tremendous impact. 



"Good night Kansas. 

Don't take any shit from anybody." 

closing remark -Billy Joel 



Joel announced, "This song is for anyone who 
ever woke up with a hangover. " He 
proceeded to drag himself to an imaginary 
bathroom to brush the "scum" off his teeth 
with the microphone. 




Like hunting? Try apartments 



T t's been three long days of appoint- 
■"■ ments with landlords. You've looked at 
apartments which consist of a mattress, 
two chairs, and a bathtub. The elegant 
basement apartments comes with its "lux- 
urious" roaches, must and mildew. You've 
seen apartments which were too expen- 
sive, too dirty, too far from campus and 
too small, so after some debating you and 
your roommate finally narrow it down to 
the very first apartment you looked at, 
you know, the one with the purple walls 
and peace signs painted on the door, only 
to find out it's already been rented. And 
classes start tomorrow! 

Over 40 percent of K-State students go 
through this apartment hunting process 
each year, according to Rick Leiker, off- 
campus housing officer. Friends and word- 
of-mouth are probably the main informers 
about available apartments. In addition to 
saving the hunter time, this verbally re- 
layed information provides the apartment 
searcher with a student's version. Classi- 
fied advertisements, in the local newspa- 
pers, are also important sources for the 
apartment searcher. Size, location, and 
rent are usually included in most ads. 
The K-State Department of Housing 
keeps an up-to-date list of available Man- 
hattan apartments. All apartments on the 
free list have been inspected for safety. 
Over 1000 students took advantage of 
this service last summer, Leiker said. "But 
the majority don't come here (Housing Of- 




Helping Hand- Assisting his 
brother with the moving in 
process, Ken Lee searches for 
the electrical outlets. 

photos by Tim Costello 




Filled to the Brim- In order to prevent 
numerous trips from home, Don Lee 
packed his vehicle to capacity. Trying not 
to break his belongings, he carefully 
sorted out his full load. 



Load Number Three- Cathy Boles, 
senior in horticulture, assists Lee, senior 
in journalism and mass communication, 
with another load. 



Andrea Carver 



J 



fice) because they know where they want 
to live, or have a friend with a place," he 
said. 

August is the busiest time for apart- 
ment hunting, because most students have 
the tendency to delay looking, Leiker 
said. He recommends that apartment 
seekers begin the hunting process at least 
by June or July. 

"Though some students begin searching 
in February, there is still a fairly good se- 
lection during the summer," Leiker said. 
Apartment hunting can become tiresome 
and discouraging, so persistence and as- 
sertiveness are necessary elements. Hunt- 
ers can't afford to be shy, lazy, or easily 
discouraged, according to the department 
of housing. 

After the landlord has been contacted, 
an agreeable viewing time must be ar- 
ranged. Sometimes wide discrepancies oc- 
cur between reality and the advertisement; 
as the apartment located near campus 
may be five miles away, and the scenic 
view may be a junkyard. 

The ideal apartment, for most K-State 
students, is a nice, clean, one bedroom, 
within walking distance from campus, and 
less than $100 a month, according to 
Leiker. "Obviously this isn't what every- 
body wants, but it's the most frequent," 
he said. 

Students frequently want to live alone, 
because of roommate problems Leiker 
said. Finding a compatible and suitable 



roommate is not an easy task, the risk of 
a roommate moving out can be a major 
problem. 

Price is one of the primary criterion for 
most students in selecting an apartment. 
Manhattan prices tend to be high, ranging 
from $65 a month for a furnished studio 
apartment, to $500 a month for an unfur- 
nished four bedroom. In addition to the 
rent fee, extra financial expenses include 
electricity, gas, water, cable television, 
and a telephone. Since some students 
don't have vehicles, or want to avoid the 
parking difficulties; apartment location 
also becomes important. 

Once the hunting obstacles are con- 
quered, the next difficulty of apartment 
life is quickly encountered. The stereo, 
waterbed and rocking chair, not to men- 
tion clothes and dishes, can be difficult to 
move in. Though some students make 20 
trips themselves; parents, neighbors and 
friends can speed up the cumbersome job. 

"Apartment dwellers have more inde- 
pendence and the ability to adjust the en- 
vironment in which they live," Leiker said. 
"They have more choices of what they 
do. Dorms, fraternities and sororities have 
to eat at certain times. An apartment may 
have some rules, but the complex man- 
ager doesn't say everybody has to cook 
their meals between five and six." 

In the long run, apartment hunting and 
hassles can give the student more inde- 
pendence, freedom, choice, privacy, and 
opportunities. HI 



16/Moving In 



? "» 




K-Staters join to share 
Parent's Day 



IJ emember that special day? Maybe it's 
**the day of the pumpkin carving 
contest at the Halloween party, or the 
day of the big house formal. Or your 
special day may be shared with hundreds 
of other K-State students. Three of these 
specifically planned events are Parents 
Day, Band Day and Homecoming. 

"Dancing in the Streets" served as a 
back-to-school ice-breaker during the 
Parents Day weekend. The Sept. 21 
event, co-sponsored by KMKF and the 
Aggieville Business Association, featured 
the Pott County Pork and Bean Band, 
Moffet Beers Band and Plain Jane. 

The rush-to-class walk was slowed into 
a leisurely stroll on September 22, as 
many students gave their parents a tour 
of campus. The morning excursions gave 
parents a brief glimpse of "our world." 

In addition to the guided tour, 
numerous parents attended the K-State- 
Oregon State game, which comprised the 
second largest crowd attendance at a 
home opener football game. 

As the second half of the game 
concluded, additional Parents Day 
Activities began. Lois Offutt, freshman in 
pre-professional elementary, was awarded 
a $150 scholarship for her winning essay, 
"How my parents colored my world." 



Susan Schlickau 



Throughout the day, Mr. and Mrs. Don 
McKaig were honored as the 1979 
outstanding parents. The Gardner, Kan., 
couple were presented a plaque during 
the pre-game activities. The outstanding 
parents program is coordinated by 
Chimes, junior honorary. 

As the Parents Day finale, Marilyn 
Maye performed to a full house in McCain 
Auditorium. Maye is a popular jazz singer 
who has been a guest on "The Tonight 
Show" more times than any other singer. 



Come On Offense- Lou Bennett 
shows his enthusiasm during the 
Parents Day game. His son, 
Monte, plays right tackle for K- 
State. 

Be Careful Son- Leanna Bennett 
watches with concern, as her son 
plays defense during the Oregon 
State football game. 

Checking out the action- 

Leanna Bennett takes out her 
binoculars to get a closer look. 





18/Parents Day 




A walking billboard?- When 
you combine 6,500 high school 
students, and Ft. Riley and It- 
State band members, it forms the 
biggest "K" and "S" ever. 

Oops- Caught up in the pre- 
parade excitment, a drummer 
from St. Mary's high school 
loses sight of his tossed drum 
stick. 




Dave Kaup 



Band Day/ 19 



"KS" provides formation 



Instruments flashed in the sun as 6,500 
high school students, Ft. Riley and 
K-State band members merged onto the 
KSU Stadium field during the next special 
football game. 

A morning parade and a mid-game 
performance were both included in the 
Band Day activities on Oct. 6. 

During half-time of the K-State-Tulsa 
football game, members from 79 high 
school bands entertained the 33,000 
spectators. Several selections were played, 
including "Wildcat Victory," 
"Copacabana," "Wabash Cannonball" and 
Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overturn," 

For the first time since 1973, the 
bands, dressed in brightly colored 
uniforms, marched in a formation forming 
the letters "K" and "S". This was also 



Susan Schlickau 



the first year performers had been 
grouped according to instrument. 

Excitement was added to the day 
when the public address system quit at 
half-time, so marching band director 
Phil Hewett had to cue by voice. The 
"1812 Overture" finale featured the 
Howitzer cannons, manned by Ft. Riley 
personnel. Jg§ 



Cat nap" The morning parade, 
practice and all the excitement 
proved too much for this high 
school band member, who napped 
in the stands before half-time. 





Sue Pfannmuller 



20/Band Day 




Homecoming activities stuff 




JjlL fter an absence of homecoming 
** activities for a number of years, the 
festivities have returned. In an attempt to 
reinstate school spirit for the second year 
in a row, Blue Key planned various 
activities. 

Horse-tank dunking kicked off festivities 
on Oct. 10, when administrators, student 
leaders and faculty members took water 
baths in front of the K-State Union. The 
proceeds of this event, went into a 
general scholarship fund. 

The major events of homecoming took 
place on Thursday, Oct. 11, when "Stuff 
the Union" theme helped pack the K- 
State Union with spectators and 
participants for the planned contests. 
Competition covered two days. Spirit 
banners covered the courtyard walls as 
living group representatives participated in 
a raw egg juggling contest followed by an 
ice cream cone-eating relay. The various 
living groups earned points based on their 
placings in the different events. Finalists in 
the "Yell like Hell" contest competed at 
the pep rally and bonfire held at the old 
Memorial Stadium. 

A traveling trophy, sponsored by Blue 
Key, was awarded at the homecoming 
game to Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Delta 
Delta Delta, who had accumulated the 
most points for participation in 
homecoming activities. 

Student entertainment featured the K- 
State Jazz Band, and a musical 
performance by Ed McPheeters, Kevin 



Susan Schlickau 



McCraken and Joe Stegman. Other 
entertainment included a concert and 
workshop by John Biggs, movies in Forum 
Hall and "Moonlight" bowling. 

For the third year, students 
ambassadors were elected to represent K- 
State at school and community events 
throughout the year. Winners, Tina Dahl 
and Gene Atkinson, were named during 
the K-State-Iowa State game on Oct. 
13th. 

On Oct. 12, the internationally-known 
Harlem Globetrotters performed their 
basketball skills to a large crowd in 
Ahearn Field House. JH 



And They're Off And 
Snarflng- With a helping hand 
from Don George, sophomore in 
nuclear engineering, Ken Clisso, 
junior in landscape horticulture, 
eats a smashed cone during the 
ice cream cone relay. 

Stuffed In The Union- 
Spectators line the rails of the 
Union Courtyard during the body 
building contest. 

That A-Way Threatened by the 
boxing glove of Geese Ausbie, a 
fan quickly points an accusing 
finger elsewhere. 




Craig Chandler 



Homecoming/21 



London or bust 



Pride oi Wildcat Land 

takes road trip 



22/Raising Money 




N 



ov. 18, 1978 . . . Halftime ... It- 
State vs. Kansas University (KU) 



Debbie Gutschenritter 



Excitement filled the packed KSU 
stadium as always when K-State 
challenges its rivals, the KU Jayhawks. 
The K-State Marching Band finished its 
half time performance and stood 
motionless on the field as the crowd 
roared their approval of the band's 
performance — tension mounting as the 
spectators anticipated the secnd half. 

The atmosphere was perfect, the timing 
precise for the announcement that came 
over the public address system "The 

, K-State Marching Band has been invitee 
to perform at the Wimbley Cup Soccer 
game in London, England, on May 10, 
1980." 

"I was so dumbfounded when the 
phone call came," Phil Hewett, band 
director, said, describing the late Oct., 
1978, conversation in which he received 
the invitation for the band to perform in 
London. The call came from a 
representative of the promotional firm 
| that works with the football association in 
London. 

"He wanted to know if we would be 
interested. We had been recommended 
and it was felt that we were the band that 
could make it work and they would like 
very much to have us," Hewett said. 

Hewett then went to work to get 
permission from University officials to 
announce the invitation at the K-State vs 
KU game, the last home game of the 
season. 

Permission was granted. 

The announcement came and was met 
with tne anticipated enthusiastic reaction 
from the K-State alumni, students and 
friends who were among the spectators 
who filled the stadium that afternoon. 

"It was a political move on our part. It 
really helped with our recruiting," Hewett 
said. 

But that was just the beginning. A lot 
more than just distance still separated the 
K-State Marching Band from the Wimbley 
Cup Soccer game. 

"We then faced two major obstacles," 
Hewett said, "and cost was the first one." 

The initial projected cost of the trip 
was $150,000, but this estimate quickly 
rose to $200,000 because of inflated fuel 
prices. The estimated cost per person was 
$650, $300 to be paid by the individual 
student, the rest to be raised by the band. 

The second obstacle was the time span 
of the trip, which meant the band 
members would miss dead week and finals 
of spring semester, 1980. This however, 
was easier to overcome than the first 
hurdle. 



"Basically speaking, I think you could 
say the academic side of the University 
accepted it wholeheartedly," Hewett said. 

The band set a goal for itself to have 
two-thirds of the -needed money "in hand" 
by Oct. 15, 1979. At that time they also 
hoped to have the rest of the money 
"located", meaning the work still needed 
to be done on a project, but a 
conservative estimate of the amount of 
money they would receive from the 
project could be made, Hewett said. 

For example, the band annually sells 
approximately 2,000 phonograph records, 
so a conservative projection was made 
that the band would have the proceeds 
from 1,000 records to use for the trip. 

Although they had a money-raising 
campaign ready to begin by Jan. 1, 1979, 
they weren't able to begin until May 
because of clearance problems. But then 
things began to roll with various projects 
to raise the money, Hewett said. 

Over the summer, band members sold 
records and art prints at 41 county fairs 



The band's tour of England, May 
5 through 15, will include a per- 
formance at the 1980 World Cup 
Soccer Championships in Lon- 
don 100,000 seat Wembley sta- 
dium. Other appearances are 
scheduled at Oxford University, 
Hyde Park and the London Jazz 
Club. 



in Kansas. Don Martin, junior in physical 
education and a fifth-year trumpet player 
in the band, believes that the band albums 
are "good sellers." 

"They're not in outrageous demand, 
but people do ask about them," Martin 
said. 

Another project was the annual sale of 
chocolate covered almonds, better known 
as "band candy". 

"On the whole, the candy sales went 
pretty well. We've made considerably 
more money (as of Nov. 6, 1979) than 
was made (at the same time) last year," 
Hewett said. 

Martin believes that more members of 
the band were involved in selling the 
candy this year than in previous years. 

"It took a while to catch on, but then it 
really took off," Martin said. "People who 
couldn't eat the candy would ask if they 
could just make a donation. Some would 



donate $3 to $5." 

To give the band members more 
incentive to sell the candy, a $500 
scholarship was offered to the person who 
sold the most candy, a $300 scholarship 
for second place and three $200 
scholarships for third, fourth and fifth 
places. 

Jack Corn, sophomore in marketing and 
a trumpet player in the band, was 
awarded the $500 scholarship for selling 
over $2,300 worth of band candy. Patsey 
Poe, clarinet, received the second place 
scholarship, and Lorinda Duch, tuba, Don 
Martin, trumpet, and Teresa Ubben, 
saxophone, won the $200 scholarships. 

"Growl Towels", another money raising 
project, was the idea of the Manhattan 
Jaycees. The purple towels, however, 
didn't sell quite as well as was expected 
during football season, Hewett said. 

Chuck Mangione performed to sell out 
crowds in McCain Auditorium on Jan. 22 
and 23, 1980. The concerts, by the 
popular jass song writer, were sponsored 
by the K-State Jazz Ensemble. 

"We were very fortunate to get him," 
Hewett said. A percentage of the 
admission proceeds assisted the band in 
their "Fundin' for London" endeavor. 

The band's largest promotion was a 
formal concert on April 1, 1980. It 
featured four major concert selections, 
plus the music to be played in London. 
Businesses across the state purchased 
advertising in the concert's souvenir 
London program. Through the advertising 
package, participating establishments 
could allow their customers to register for 
a free trip to London. 

Outside donations also were a great 
asset to the fund raising. A large 
contribution of $10,000 came from one 

Airplane tickets for the 376 
members of the K-State march- 
ing band were purchased in Jan- 
uary. 

organization and a $5,000 donation came 
from an individual. There were also 
several $2,000 contributions. 

"We just had to keep working and 
come up with new ideas," Hewett siad. 

Oct. 6, 1979 . . . Halftime . . . K- 
State vs Tulsa 

The announcement once again over the 
public address system to the enthusiastic 
crowd of K-Staters. The band had reached 
the two-thirds mark needed to accept the 
invitation. The K-State Marching Band 
would be performing at The Wimbley Cup 
Soccer game in London, England. 



3ley 

H 

■mi 



Raising Money/23 




Entertainei 

Laughter, smiles, the melody of "Sweet 
Georgia Brown," and the taste of a 
Globetrotter victory filled Ahearn Field 
House on October 12. 

The internationally-famous Harlem 
Globetrotters performed their basketball 
skills before approximately 5,000 fans. 
These magicians demonstrated polished 
basketball techniques and comical pranks, 
which pleased children and adults alike, 
when they took on the Washington 
Generals. 

Crowds traditionally fill the stands at a 
Globetrotter performance, as their 
personalities can usually raise a smile or a 
small chuckle, to bring out the child in 
everyone. 

Geese Ausbie, the Globetrotter's court 
jester for this game, amused the audience 
with his slapstick comedy. At one point 
during the game, Ausbie went into the 
crowd and picked up a woman's brown 
purse. After imitating the weaker sex, he 
sat down in the middle of the court. 
While the game continued, Ausbie 



Pregnant?' Geese Ausbie stuffs 
the game ball under his uniform, 
in an attempt to confuse his 
opponent. 

Say Cheese- After stealing the 
young fans camera, Ausbie lines 
up the gang for a family 
photograph. 

Heel Boy- A well known 
companion of Curly Neal faithfully 
follows him down the court. 







24/Globetrotters 



s make Ahearn audience smile 



globefRof ten rzeoieto 



Susan Schlickau 



hovered over his new find, emptying its 
contents. Ausbie briefly diverted his 
attention from the content of the purse, 
when a fellow team member passed him 
the game ball. Eventually, he returned to 
the game, clutching the purse and the 
ball. Ausbie then tossed the ball to a 
fellow team member, and the purse to his 
opponent, who was guarding him. After 
the referee interferred, Ausbie returned 
the purse. 

At another point, Ausbie drifted 
through the stands. Upon encountering a 
vendor, he scattered the programs and 
miniature basketballs to the nearby 
audience. Throughout the evening, 
Globetrotter t-shirts and pendants were 
also distributed by Ausbie. 

Ausbie used a young fan to protect 
him, when the Globetrotters brought a 
plastic bucket onto the court. Though the 
little boy didn't get wet, the audience was 
showered with the confetti. 

In addition to the Globetrotters' comical 
humor, basketball wizardry keeps the 
capacity crowds returning to their 
performances. Off the backboard, behind 
the back and in between the legs are 
some of the trick shots which the 
Globetrotters displayed. The Harlem team 
has been referred to as professional 
actors, who provide quality family 
entertainment. 

The goal shook when seven-foot rookie, 
Robert Paige, dunked the ball. Paige, 
Globetrotter center, scored numerous 
points throughout the game. - 

A mob of children filled the court, 
delaying the game briefly, at half time. 
The game began after the announcer 
promised that the kids would have time to 
get autographs following the game. 



Fans sat in awe while Curly Neal 
displayed his basketball skills. Disguised in 
a wig at the beginning of the game, the 
bald Neal easily spun the ball on the top 
of his index finger. Throughout the game, 
Neal also displayed his wizardry in 
dribbling the ball only a few inches from 
the court, and faking out his opponents 
with his quick hand gestures. Trick shots 
and superior dribbling have made Neal 
internationally recognized. 

In addition to the familar red, white and 
blue uniformed celebrities, two hefty 
referees added extra comedy to the game. 
The good-natured referees humorously 



tried to keep the fast-witted Globetrotters, 
and the game, under control. 

Besides the referees, the Washington 
Generals also tour with the Globetrotters. 
While the Globetrotters danced and 
dribbled, during the game, their traveling 
opponents maintained their score about 
two-thirds that of their famous competitors. 

After numerous other capers, including 
a huge boxing glove and a staged 
photograph, the show drew to a close. 
The Harlem team finished the evening 
with a 95-73 victory. The world renowned 
players had defeated their opponents with 
ease, while entertaining the audience. Iff 





That a Way- In an attempt to 
confuse the referee, Neal and 
Ausbie both point in opposite di- 
rections. 

Listen Here Baldy- Curly Neal 
tries to persuade the ball that the 
sidelines are its safest refuge. 



photos by Craig Chandler 



L 






Spike heels, tight jeans, 



"hi ■ 




nching my way into a pair of freshly 
washed Calvin Kleins, I am forced 
to collapse, due to exhaustion, impatience 
and the frustration that follows the realiza- 
tion that I will never (alas) look like Shelly 
Hack.' 

So why, then, will I continue to tor- 
ture myself again and again with the 
likes of spike heels, pants that cut 
off all circulation in my body and so 
much terri cloth that I begin to feel like 
a model for Cannon towels? 
Simply because spike heels, tight jeans" 
and terri cloth are "in" - that special word 
that drains our checking accounts, 
attacks our egos, our bodies and has 
been known to answer to the name of 
"fad." 

Whether we like it or not, we all 

must surrender to the fate of fads, 

those merciless items that pop in 

and out of America's fingers. 

While each one of us realizes 

that fads have relatively short 

life expectancies, we all still 

believe deep down in our 

heart of hearts that cowboy 

boots, Barry Manilow albums 

and everything else we are wise 

enough to purchase, will reign for 



Gayle McGehee 

If so, then how do we explain 
those five pairs of hip huggers with the 
60" bells hidden in the depths of who- 
knows-where, or the broken mood rings, 
or even those sexy gold medallions that 
somehow turned a lovely shade of green? 

Face it, we all succumb sooner or later 
to at least one so-called fad, whether it be 
skating down the streets of Aggieville, 
trying on a pair of hiking boots or digging 
through a mountain of crusty army pants. 

Another added plus is the fact that as 
we become older, fads become more 
complex. There seems to be so many 
choices, and we become faced with such 
questions as: should I grow out my 
Dorothy Hamill wedge into a Farrah 
Fawcett (minus Majors) mane? Am I some 
kind of a jerk or something if I don't have 
an Izod shirt? Surely I wouldn't break any 
bones if I get a skateboard? 

Gone are the uncomplicated days when 
all I wanted in the world were two 
magenta lucite balls on a string called 
"Klackers" that always seemed to hit 
everything but each other. 

Still, there are fads that are not just a 
waste of money America is shaping up 



26/Fashion 



are vogue 

and slimming down with raquetball, skiing, 
jogging, tennis, Dr. Atkins, Dr. Stillman, 
and Scarsdale New York, all to the tune 
of an aerobic beat. While other fads are 
simply reoccurring from the '40s and 
'50s, bringing back blazers, blazers, and 
more blazers, narrow skirts, and pleated 
pants. Hair is edging its way back up the 
collar, curls are everywhere and dresses 
are becoming a common sight. 

Fads are fads because they .reflect the 
American personality, which is 
everchanging. We look upon the 
miniskirts, the Vietnam war, the white 
lipstick, and the love beads, even the 
destruction of Nichols gymnasium, and it's 
hard for the average K-State student to 
visualize life in the '60s — that time when 
the majority of us were busy learning to 
read, write and multiply double numbers. 

Will the '70s be as hard to visualize for 
the next generation? It's difficult to say. 
That generation may look back on disco, 
permanents, and "How to be the best you 
can be" books, and wonder how we could 
have fallen under such listless spells. HI 



A special thank to Carousel, Kellers Too 
and the models: (jeans) Kelly Kuehl; 
(dresses) Kathy Jelinek, Janet Howe and 
Tammy Abrahamson; (jogging outfits) 
Cherie Parish, Kerri Tibbits, Kathy Marsh, 
and Anne Backstrom. 

photos by Craig Chandler 





"** 




^i 




cross the hilly sidewalks of 
campus, down the bumpy streets 
of Manhattan, and through the smooth 
dormitory halls, skaters, old and new, 
took to their skates, as the nation-wide 
roller-skating fad wheeled into Manhattan 
last fall. 

Along with the skating fad, new 



with a new source of exercise and 
entertainment. 

Mrs. Janice Teague, co-manager ot' 
T.J.'s Skate Shop, a skate rental store, 
said the shop was the idea of her son 
Mike, a 1974 K-State graduate. 

"He read about the roller-skating fad in 
newspaper and magazine articles and 
thought maybe it would go here," Teague 
said. 

The shop opened on Aug. 2, to the 
surprise of many who were amazed to 
find the roller-skating fad apparent in 
Manhattan. 

"I've heard people make comments, 
who have been in other cities like New 
York, Dallas, and Denver, and they can't 
believe we have a place like this in 
Manhattan, Kansas," she said. 

Mrs. Teague said the idea took a little 
while to catch on in Manhattan because 
people couldn't get used to the idea of 
skating outside. 

"Some people really resisted at first," 
she said. 

Once i.t got started, she said, most of 
her business came on weekends when 
people were looking for something nice to 
do, and in the evenings when the weather 
was nice. 

Although many customers came only 
once to satisfy their curiosity, Teague said 
she did have a few regular customers. 
One of them was Dana Neal, freshman in 
general. 

Neal said she started skating for 
entertainment and exercise 3 . 



Rolling by- Kevin Swan, senior 
in community services and social 
work, rolls into an unexpected, 
but welcome shower while roller 
skating on campus. 



rolls into Manhattan 



Debbie Gutschenritter 



"It was something crazy to do; 
everything else gets boring," she said. 

She also read that skating was good 
exercise. According to a June, 1979 
Glamour Magazine article, skating is the 
third most effective exercise, of those 
ranked by the President's Council on 
Physical Fitness and Sports. 

Neal, a West Hall resident, said she and 
her friends usually skated on the 
Manhattan streets. 

"Sometimes we even went as far as 
downtown," she said. 

The streets of Aggieville, however, 
were not good for skating, she said, 
because they have cracks in them. Neal 
also doesift like to skate on campus. 

"It's so hilly that sometimes you get 
going too fast and can't stop, and going 
up, you have to walk in the grass," Neal 



Another customer, Connie Shaffer, 
freshman in general, said she and her 
friends usually skate on the backstreets. 

Both girls said they have never received 
a negative reaction from pedestrians while 
skating. 

"Most people will laugh and say 
something like 'that looks like fun'," Neal 
said. 

Although skaters were seen throughout 
Manhattan, Teague believes the fad wasn't 
as big as it appeared. 

"We (T.J.'s Skate Shop) thought we 
would have more business, but the 
population isn't as big as other cities, and 
the weather isn't as conducive as in other 
places," Teague said. 

"There is a problem of trying to find 
time on a nice day," Neal said. M 




% 



, V*^ r « 



•<v .;«**» 



*X\r 



thing serves as a better symbol of the li 
f the 70's than jogging. 
3 American public had turned from 
philosophy of a very self indulgent 
sophy of 'gee, this kind of lifestyle is k 
;aid Dr. William B. Zuti, of the physical 
on department. 

i obvious out or means to this kind of fitness 
ch was jogging. The reason is because it's so 
simple to do. Jogging is one of those things 
(y can do as long as they can alternate feet," 
id. 

contends the first major breakthrough for 
was the publication of the book by Ken 
• entitled "Aerobics.*' The book was published 
3. This was also the summer Zuti began 
. Zuti recalls his first day out jogging when 
people stopped their cars to see if he 
a ride or was having a problem. 
...at was all right and it didn't bother me until 
e police car stopped," Zuti said. Today it's not an 
msual sight to see several joggers in the space of 
le city block. 

As the popularity of jogging grew, a "logical 
tension in our very competitive society was to 
ish it farther and faster," Zuti said. "As more and 
ore people got into jogging, the races then began 
. slowly come up." 
Another outgrowth of jogging in the 70's was the 
anner in which the media has picked it up, 
— ecially in the area of advertising. 



H 



thing to do. 




Zuti explains tr 


e sudden po 


something more t 


han underwe 


another outgrowt 


i of jogging. 


"The other thir 


ig that really 


was that shoe ma 


nufacturers c 


and began to ere; 


ste shoes the 


could run in with< 


jut hurting tl 


"This ties in with 


the simplicit 


does not require 


any special t 


"I think we'll s 


se a decline 


marathon jogging 


but hopeful 


decline in the- em 


>hasis of the 


person," Zuti saic 


. "I hope jo 


a total fitness em 


ohasis. but tl 



Fads/29 



Radios or systems: 
music binds studtf 



its 



here is a thread running 
through college life that links 
almost all students on any campus. 
From the P.E. major to the nuclear 
physicist, most college students love 
music. 

As a result of this love most 
students are willing to invest varying 
amounts of money to enable them to 
enjoy their music - buying sound 
systems. 

Stereos, hi-fi's, record players, 
clock-radios and tape-players; all claim 
a few of most students' well-watched 
dollars at some point in their 
education. 

Students at K-State are no 
exception, they love their music and 
their stereos as much as students 
anywhere else. 

"I'd go crazy if I couldn't study 
with my stereo on," Carol Bowen, 
junior in fashion marketing, 
said. 
i Most students asked said 

that they use their stereos 
primarily in the morning, 
when they wake up and 
k during the times they 

study. Those with 
the more 
expensive 
systems, 
however, said 

kthey 
generally 



Doug Keeling 



make time during the day to sit 
back and enjoy the sound of 
their systems. 

One such student that has 
invested more than the average 
amount of money is his system is 
Mike Wiegers, sophomore in 
electrical engineering. 

"I bought a cheap stereo about 
five years ago and I decided to go 
all-out on this one," Wiegers said. 

He said that he had enjoyed his 
other system, but that after a while he 
wanted to invest in higher-quality 
stereo components. Wiegers spent 
$1,500 on his new system, and he felt 
that he made a wise investment. 

Like most students, Wiegers listens 
to his system mostly while he is hitting 
the books. 

"It helps to relieve the tension of 
studying," he said. 

When spending a great deal of 
money on a system, it is wise to shop 
around. Wiegers said that he looked 
everywhere in Manhattan and even in 
Topeka before finding a stereo, dealer 
and price that suited him. 

"The biggest mistake that most 
people make when buying a stereo is 
letting the price-tag dictate what they 
buy," Mike Wisdom, owner of Hi- 
Plains Audio, said. 

"The number-one biggest mistake of 
anyone buying a stereo is buying on 
price," he said "They don't look at 
the quality of the equipment, just how 
many pieces they can get for a certain 
amount of money." 

Wisdom said that because of 
the general condition of the 
economy, students 

were spending 
less on 



^ 




30/ Sound Systems 



everything," he said. 

"The average cost of a system is 
going up," Wisdom said, "so people 
are going to have to be willing to 
spend more " 

He noted, however, that with the 
increased price, technology has 
brought to the market a higher quality 
sound system. 

Service, Wisdom said, should also 
be a part of the price paid for a 
system. However, many of the dealers 
are not oriented toward service, only 
toward making a profit, he said. 

A big problem with maintaining a 
system, Wisdom said, is having inferior 
equipment wear out or break down. 

"Many people think 'this will get me 
by now, 1 can upgrade later', when 
buying their system," he said. "They 
end up buying a system that won't 
serve them well." 

Technology and quality bring about 
longevity of equipment," Wisdom said. 
"There will always be inferior 
equipment on the market." 

Wisdom said that sound systems 
have an exciting future. 

"Eventually you'll see a laser pick- 
up used on a digitally-coded disc," he 
said. 

The "disc" will replace our present 



vinyl albumns. and "you'll be able to 
throw them across the room without " 
hurting them," Wisdom said. 

Those black vinyl discs we now use to 
play our music from aren't nearly that 
durable. But, according to Wisdom, 
there's no reason for records to wear 
out. 

"Records should outlast their 
owners by 100 years," he 

said A 

The biggest cause of record 
wear, Wisdom said, is cheaper 
turntables that actually cut the vlfi 
of the record as they play it 

"There's no reason that a turntable 
should tear up a record," he said 

Wisdom said that the laser beam pick- 
ups of the future will never actually 
touch the disc that the music is 
recorded on 

"This means zero wear and zero 
distortion," he said. 

Not all college students have the 
spare cash to invest in very expensive 
sound systems In fact, if you're one of 
those many students with no loose 
change and an empty wallet, don't feel 
like you're not part of the college 
scene. Chances are, you've got a sound 



system of 

your own, no - 

matter 

now 

inexDeu s . 

e next time, 
n to study for 
"ry exam or 
al, switch on 
;ysTem. whether 
Q# multi- 
ilfft stereo or a 
i's«»tor radio, and realize 
i\at you're a part of 
that world wide league 
of scholars who love 
their music, < 
their sound 
systems. JR( 




sveui 



m m a m 

Ptt0U*A*t 




Crank it- Jim 

Feeney, a Team 
Electronics employee, 
shows a few sound 
systems to Tom 
Lueger, freshman in 
agricultural 
economics. 



Sound Sysfefns/31 




Shades of Army Lite'Shorty Mor- 
ris, PFC, looks at the world through 
army-issued sunglasses* 

Miller Time-Drinking beer pro- 
vides Terry Bowker, PFC, and Slick 
Calhoun, PFC, an escape from army 
routine during the first day of Christ- 
mas leave, 

photos by John Bock 



32/Ft. Riley 



U.S. army: SOLDIER IMAGE M 



Uncle Sam and the Army wanted 
them, but for years it had been 
clear to Fort Riley personnel that many 
from Manhattan don't. 

"Everybody has a preconceived notion 
about what the typical soldier is like, First 
Lieutenant Steve Pearson said. "You end 
up stereotyping 2.5 million people who 
are in the armed forces." 

"When I was around campus I couldn't 
convince them I wasn't a baby killer or a 
meat eater," Pearson said. 

Pearson, a K-State graduate in 
broadcast journalism, and like some other 
people stationed at Fort Riley said he 
believes there is a misunderstanding 
between the fort and the civilian 
community in Manhattan. 

"When I was in ROTC (Reserve Officer 
Training Corps), Aggieville wasn't a very 
receptive area if you had a short haircut. 
Even if you were trying to explain that 
you were a broadcast major from the 
campus, you had problems. You'd always 
get 'sure you are'," Pearson said. 

For Pearson, the attitude conflicts 
aren't as strong now that he is out of 
college. 

"I live in Manhattan now so it's 
different. I'm not just staying here now. 
The people who live in Manhattan don't 
care where you work." 

"If people have been around the 
military they know the military are just 
like ordinary people. They just happen to 
be in the military for a job," he said. 

For Spec. Four Albert Owens, a black, 
many of the soldier-civilian social 
problems don't exist. 

"I was told when I was coming here to 
Fort Riley that certain areas of Manhattan 
weren't too receptive to soldiers. I've 
been in Manhattan and I've found that to 
be incorrect. 

"There aren't too many of my people 
around so we have a tendency to stick 
together. I'm welcome in a lot of places. 
We are just happy to be able to get 
together," Owens said. 

Staff Sergeant Randy Lauderville said 
Aggieville discriminates against him 
because he's in the Army. 

"It's different than the rest of 
Manhattan. It's not as receptive to having 
the military around. If you are military 
personnel it will cost you an arm and a 
leg to get into some of those bars down 
there," Lauderville said. 

"If you are in college it's 50 or 75 
cents. If we go and have a wife or 
girlfriend with us, it will cost $6 or $7 to 
get in. I don't know if they just want 
college people there or are neglecting 
military and don't want short-haired 
people there." 

According to First Lieutenant Marsha 



Glenna Menard 



Mullenioux, being a woman in the Army 
can be an advantage because she's not 
obviously military. 

"Unless I tell somebody I'm in the 
Army, they don't have any idea I'm in the 
Army. I'm not in uniform. My hair makes 
no difference," she said. 

Spec. Four Janet Easterly nodded in 
agreement and said the Manhattan 
business community sometimes causes 
problems for the fort's personnel even 
though the approximately 17,000 
stationed there could contribute to the 
prosperity of Manhattan. 

"I had to pay a huge (apartment) 
deposit," Mullenioux said, "I don't know 
if they do that just for military, or 

"It's (Aggieville) different than 
the rest of Manhattan ... If 
you are military personnel it 
will cost you an arm and a leg 
to get into some of those bars 
down there." 



everyone. It was outlandish." 

Owens supported Mullenioux's 
statement when she said, "If you are in 
the military, they will want you to sign a 
longer lease so they will know you will be 
here and not just leave in a month or 
two. They will release you on official 
orders only." 




b - 4 



ISCONSTRUFJ* BY STUDENTS 



i:; 



According to Owens, Pearson, 
Lauderville, Easterly and Mullenioux, 
military people would rather spend time 
in Manhattan than in Junction City. They 
think part of it has to do with Junction 
City's reputation. 

"It has a reputation whether it deserves 
it or not," Pearson said. 

"Their Chamber of Commerce is 
fighting hard to change that reputation but 
they've had it so long." 

"Aggieville was built for the college 
students. If Fort Riley were next to 
Manhattan, Manhattan would look like 
Junction City," he said. "It's (Manhattan) 
not just used cars and pawn shops." 

Lauderville said the main complaints he 
hears from the soldiers are about K-State 
women. 

"They feel the women have a tendency 
to prefer the college men. If they ask 
them to dance they feel like they are 
turned down because they are military," 
he said. 

"They would like to find more ways of 
telling women at K-State they aren't 
vultures," Lauderville said. 

Pearson insisted K-State women have 
stereotyped the soldier. 

"The typical image is that you couldn't 
find another job that you weren't smart 
enough to do anything else," he said. 

"Everybody thinks that the soldier can't 
think for himself. Here it's 'hands on 
training.' He doesn't have to be a 
textbook expert. You take him out and 
make him work with the darn thing until 
he knows how to do it. If he doesn't do 



it, he stays there until he does. 

"People assume once you get out all 
you know how to do is beat the bush and 
kill people. That's wrong," Lauderville said 

"You are responsible for shaping a lot 
of people's lives. In a civilian job you 
don't wake them up in the morning and 
put them to bed at night. You don't help 
them run their checkbook or get them out 
of jail at night or visit everybody's kids at 
the hospital," Mullenioux said.Jj| 





L 





Sue Sandmeyer 



34/Security and Traffic 



More than fust a ticket 



"Whad my car parked in the upper lot. 
*When I came out of the building I 
could tell that the campus cops had made 
their rounds. Another yellow ticket." 

A majority of K-State students think 
that the campus police only distribute 
traffic violations. In actuality, their duties 
encompass much more. 

Uniformed policemen that patrol the K- 
State campus are commissioned police 
and peace officers by the State of Kansas. 
They are working for the University as 
Security and Traffic officers. 

Under the direction of Art Stone, chief, 
Security and Traffic officers enforce the 
laws, rules and regulations of the K-State 
campus, he said. 

"The image of these policemen can be 
changed from a department that just gives 
out parking tickets to one that is 
protecting its constituents and actually 
policing its community," Stone said. 

"The simple changing of 'Security and 
Traffic' to 'University Police' or 'Police 
and Parking' would do a lot to help the 
image and communications of the 
department," Stone said. 

Stone has made some changes since 
coming to K-State in December. He has 
re-evaluated the needs of the campus 
community and has declared improvement 
of public relations and communications his 
first priority. 

Stone wants a better relationship 
between Security and Traffic and the 
campus, housing, and the students, 
particularly. 



Debbie Clubine 



Public awareness and crime prevention 
workshops are areas where the police 
each work with the public to help educate 
and show their willingness to protect the 
people, Stone said. 

At the present, security officers check 
buildings between 8 p.m. and 4 a.m. 
Monday through Friday. They don't have 
a particular uniform to distinguish them 
from an intruder, but Stone is working on 
a uniform with an ID patch on the arm. 

A policeman for Security and Traffic 
with no experience is required to ride 
double-time with an officer out in the field 
for three to five weeks. The new 
policemen must attend the academy for 
400 hours as soon as he can be admitted, 
because the academy is usually full for 
each session. 

Once a month, training classes are 
conducted for the 35 officers by an 
agency, such as the Kansas Bureau of 
Investigation (KBI), Stone said. The 
training courses include search and 
seizure, rape, and report writing. 

In regard to a specific incident, such as 
rape, Stone said, "certain officers, mainly 
women, are more qualified to handle rape 
victims. Security officers and patrolmen 
are trained and knowledgeable in 
procedures which require notifying their 
supervisors who then informs the chief. 
Investigators and counselors are called to 
the scene to do the questioning. M 






M^ r 



v.. ■ 

Bo Rader 



According to this- Lt. Frank 
Toy of the Security and Traffic 
office explains a parking ticket to 
a student. 

Watering the Grass- Liquor 
fertilizer is applied as a Security 
and Traffic officer cracks down on 
the liquor brought into football 
games by spectators. 

Hold that Position- Security 
and Traffic officer Jim Williamson 
directs traffic as students workers 
walk the white line to secure 
stripes on the crosswalk. 



Sue Sandmeyer 



Security and Traffic/ 35 






Black Student Union 




Union in identity 
is group's purpose 



Minorities may feel lost, alone and out of 
place. To gain a sense of identity and 
belonging, Black Student Union was estab- 
lished in the late 1960s. 

Allen McCormick, assistant professor in 
student development, said when a student 
attends class, he may feel uncomfortable be- 
cause he has nothing in common with the 
other students. 

Black Student Union (BSU) provides that 
identity base that some students need; basi- 
cally a bond between blacks in similar cul- 
tures. During the weekly meetings, BSU 
members discuss the problems they encoun- 
ter on campus, according to McCormick. 

McCormick said they try to get the maxi- 
mum out of the University and hopefully, a 
sense of belonging. 

McCormick estimated that of the 18,000 
students at K-State, 600 are black. From 
those odds, McCormick said it is not hard for 
black students to become discouraged. 

McCormick said the organization is not 
just for the black student. The membership 
is open to everyone and in the past, non- 
blacks have expressed interest in the group. 

For the first time, K-State hosted the Con- 
ference on Black Student Government dur- 
ing Black Awareness Week. This third annu- 
al conference was dedicated to the responsi- 
bility of becoming more active in govern- 
ment. 

Held on Feb. 22-23, representatives from 
nearby universities and all Big 8 institutions 



Jill McAntee 



attended. 

Rep. Walter Fauntroy (Dem-D.C.) opened 
the 1980 all University Convocation series in 
conjunction with the conference. Fauntry's 
main theme was "The Black Role in the 
1980 Elections." 

Fauntroy stressed the attitude changes of 
congressmen and in legislation. 

Fauntroy exemplified the changes: from 
niggers" in 1963 to "colored people" in 
1966 to "Negro constituents" in 1968 and 
to the present "Black brothers and sisters" 
in 1972. 

Fauntroy also urged blacks to take an 
interest in their country's future and empha- 
sized voting. He said by voting, blacks could 
improve and increase their opportunities. 

Besides Fauntroy's speech, workshops 
were held during the conference. Tami Farr, 
senior in family and child development, said 
during the workshops representatives dis- 
cussed problems blacks experience on cam- 
puses across the nation. 

These problems included apathy toward 
black students, financial support and becom- 
ing more independent, self-motivating and 
involved with government through voter 
registration drives. 

Farr added that United Black Voices sang 
during gospel services Friday night. M 



Blues Vet-Cousin Joe, a veteran 
blues singer, visited K-State Feb. 29, 
1980. He sang for a receptive audi- 
ence in the Union Catskeller. He 
was sponsored by BSU, Center for 



Aging, College of Arts and Sciences, 
Minority Resource Center, Social 
Work Club and the departments of 
history music, sociology, anthropol- 
ogy and social work. 



36 





ill 



United in Song-United Black 
Voices, a campus gospel group, 
gave a performance for Black 
Awareness Week. 



John Bock 



BOTTOM HOW: Harriet C. Givan, Denise M. Duck 
ett, Patricia L. Lucas, Taml E. Farr, Molra M. Jack 
Twyta E. McDowe!, SECOND HOW: Isaac D. Turner, 
Paula K. Williams, Rodney L. Brogden, Sherri J. Cha 
pell, Marvin E. Moore. TOP ROW: Lancer L. Martin, 
Raymond M. Kitchen, Kevin R. Gardenhlre, Henry 
Pulliam Jr., Cedric T. Patton. 




w Montoya plays guitar melodies 



at. Sept. 15 - Sitting on a 
fourlegged stool in the middle of 
the bare McCain Auditorium stage, 
with only a spotlight for 
accompaniment, Carlos Montoya 
played flamenco guitar melodies. 

Montoya was the first performer of 
the McCain Auditorium series this 
season. He presented a three-part 
program to an audience of about 800. 

Montoya, a Madrid-born Gypsy, said 
flamenco music flows freely from the 
soul — spontaneously. 

Flamenco music was originated by 
Spanish Gypsies. This musical mastery 
is passed from one generation of 
Gypsies to the next. 

One selection of this free soul music 
is the "Fiesta." It is the Gypsies 
version of a fiesta with rhythmic 
dancing. 

Since there are no written notes for 
flamenco music, the arrangements 
Montoya played were of his own 
design, and never the same twice. 
They were his own versions of old 
Gypsy themes in the typical Gypsy 



Sharon Bohn 



rhythm. 

The fingers of the 75-year-old 
Montoya never rested for one moment 
during the performance. Two fingers 
provided the steady rhythm notes, 
while the other fingers were in charge 
of creating the racing, rippling notes 
of the melody. 

Huddled over his guitar, the 
graysuited Montoya, sometimes made 
his music whisper the tune to the 
audience, while other times it was loud 
and drumming. 

"Buberias" is an example of 
Montoya's latest creations. This song 
represents the most typical flamenco 
Gypsy dance. 

With the spotlight shining on his 
semi-bald head, Montoya's fingers 
would scale up and down the strings 
of the guitar, plucking each one with 
precision. 
Watching, his fingers travel rapidly 



across the strings and listening to the 
results fascinated the audience. 

One woman from the audience 
mumbled, "He makes me feel so 
clumsy, just watching him." 

Montoya's music could make one 
see images and stories unraveling. 
"Castilla, Folia Y Galicia," which is a 
medley of folk dances from the 
provinces of Castille, the Canary 
Islands and Galicia, is an example of 
this. 

This song drew pictures of the 
Gypsies dancing around the campfire, 
with tambourines tinkling, skirts softly 
swishing through the air,. and heels 
tapping to the beat. 

Throughout the night Montoya 
played many kinds of flamenco music 
to give, the audience a taste of all 
varieties of this music. 

The selection, "Fandango," was a 
different facet of flamenco music 
because it wasn't bound by the strict 
rhythm of dance. 

One song that reflected still another 
type of flamenco music was 



"Taranto." This song wasn't as light 
and gay as many of the previous 
songs had been. It reflected deep 
disappointment. This might be 
described as the music the Gypsies 
play after the tourists go home. 

But to regain the carefree, 
freeflowing atmosphere, Montoya 
played a song called "Caribe 
Aflamencao." After this number was 
over, one could hear cheers of 
"bravo", "bravo" from the audience. 

Although the Americans can listen 
and appreciate flamenco music, they 
can only try to understand it, Montoya 
said. Flamenco music is very emotional 
music, and hard for non-Gypsies to 
relate to. 

"Thank you. My English is very 
bad, but Spanish very good," he said. 

With this and a half smile, Montoya 
played two more songs for the encore. 
Then came another shy smile and 
affectionate salute and he walked off 
the staqe with cheers of "bravo" 
"bravo" trailing after him. M 




Dancers at McCain 



un. Oct. 7 - With a swirl of 
colorful costumes, the dancers of 
'Gran Folklorico de Mexico turned 
McCain Auditorium into a wonderland 
of Spanish dances. 

The nine women and nine men 
dancers, wearing orange colored skirts 
and trousers, respectively, performed 
the "Estampa Nortena." 

The suede fringe on the coats , 
twirled and the senorita's skirts belled, 
as the dancers performed such dances 
as the polka, chottis, redova and 
waltz. 

Throughout the night the dancers 
performed numbers that gave the 
audience a glimpse of their native 
culture. 

One dance in particular, the 
"Danzas Chipanecas," showed the 
mixing of Spanish and Indian traits. 
The happiness of the Spaniards and 
the vigor of the natives were reflected 
in this dance. 

With spurs clinking on the heels of 
the men's shoes, whips twirling in their 
hands and the women's feet tapping 
on the floor, the dance "Pueblan," 
was performed; a dance of worship 
for god of flowers. 

The stage lights dimmed to an 
iceblue color. The senoritas flowed 
onto the stage, dressed in white eyelet 
gowns with black embroidered aprons 
tied at their waists. Balanced on their 
heads were flaming candles. Swishing 
blue and black colored fans in front of 
their dark-eyed faces, the dancers 
performed the "Fiesta Veracruzana." 

In this number, two dancers also 
performed the "Zapateado" and the 
"La Bamba." During these dances, the 
couple tied a bow with their feet, 



Sharon Bohn 

illustrating the agility and skill of the 
dancers. 

Two men playing the marimba 
provided the music for 18 dancers, 
whose bare feet flew performing the 
"Oaxaca." Keeping in time to the 
Spanish music, the dancers displayed a 
touch of the gentleness and 
melancholy which characterize the 
Indians of that area. 

Changing the pace from gaiety to 
fear and danger, the "Danza Del 
Vanado, Dance of the Deer," was 
performed. 

The mystery and cruelty of the 
"Dance of the Deer" makes it one of 
the most famous Mexican ballets. It is 
a prehispanic ritual ceremony 
performed by the Yaqui Indians, 
before a deer hunting expedition. 

Jorge Tyller, danced the frightened 
deer. Four hunters armed with rattles 
and bows, chase the deer, who is 
unable to escape. 

The dancer succeeded in revealing 
the terrified anxiety a hunted animal 
feels. At the end he died a tragic 
death. 

To recapture the festive atrriosphere, 
the dancers performed the "Jalisco." 
These dances are full of melancholy 
love themes. Accompanying these 
dances was a mariachi band. One of 
the most famous dances of Mexico, the 
"Jarabe Tapatio," better known as the 
"Mexican Hat Dance," was performed 
as the finale. Dressed in bright colored 
costumes the senoritas and senors 
teased each other while dancing 
around a straw sombrero ■■ 



38/McCain Series 




Wit with talent 



Cat. Oct. 13 — The lights were 
dimmed. The introduction was 
made. 

Applause. 

The curtain rose. Spot light. 

Three men appeared. One sat down 
at the drums, one picked up a guitar 
and the other one sat down at the 
piano. 

Piano music intermingled with drum 
and guitar beats drifted to the ears of 
the audience. 

Their first two numbers were over. 

Applause. 

The man from the piano rose. He 
picked up the microphone and said, 
"The first song was 'Mountain 
Greenery,' by Richard Rogers and the 
second song was 'Could this be the 
Magic,' by Dr. Renee 
Richards?" 

One could hear gasps braided in 
with laughter from the audience. 

It seemed unbelievable, that Peter 
Nero, could combine wit and talent 
into a pleasant mixture that seemed to 
make the audience happy. 

Nero, was the third artist to 
perform for the McCain Auditorium 
series. He delighted the audience for 
one hour and 45 minutes by blending 
his own style of jazz, contemporary 
and rock music resulting in what is 
known as the Nero style. 

In preparing his musical wizardry, 
he completed college and 15 years of 
private tutelage, including five years 
with renowned pianists Constance 
Keene and Abram Chasins. 

But he broke away from his classical 
roots, determined to make known his 
own musical identity. The stem from 
these roots. resulted in the 
development of his own Nero style. 

Throughout the night Nero and his 
accompanists, Dale Cook, drums and 
Richard Nanista, bass guitar, contined 
to dazzle the audience with favorites 
such as, Billy Joel's "I Love You Just 
the Way You Are," and another 



Sharon Bohn 

popular song, the theme from 
"Summer of '42." 

Then his fingers touched the keys 
and tinkled out the notes to Stephen 
Sondheims' "Send in the Clowns." 

The audience was quiet. His head 
twitched with concentration. His hands 
played with precision. The song was 
over and the audience waited. 

He stood up and said, "In 1972, 
that was the only song written that 
had more than two chords." Again wit 
and talent intertwined. 

Along with these popular tunes he 
threaded in some great jazz from 
Duke Ellington and George Gershwin. 

The Ellington songs included "I 
Don't Get Around Much Anymore," "I 
Got it Bad and That Aint Good," and 
"Take the A Train." 

After a 15-minute intermission, he 
contined with his wizardry by 
performing Gershwin hits, such as "I 
Got Rhythm," and many others. 

"We're going to try to play about. 
140 songs in about 15 minutes. If you 
hear anything you recognize, you're 
welcome to sing along. Good luck," he 
said. 

Then it was over, and almost 
everyone was standing on their feet 
and clapping their hands, wanting 
more Peter Nero music. 

The trio appeared once again. For 1 
the audience's enthusiasm they were 
rewarded with another song. 

"Now we're going to play what ' 
studies have shown to be the most 
well-known song in the United States 
and the world. It may be the love 
song for the next 200 years," he said. 

Strains of a familiar tune began to 
drift out, "You, You're the one." It 
was the McDonald commercial's jingle. 
The audience chuckled with pleasure 
at Nero's last tactic of intermingling 
wit with talent. I|I 



Legend portrayed through puppets 



at. Oct. 27 - The life sized 
puppets that looked like they 
might have stepped off the pages of a 
child's fairy tale book, helped to 
create the life story of Don Quixote to 
a McCain audience. 

These puppets were part of the 
PickwicK Puppet Theatre, which 
illustrated the legend of Don Quixote. 

Don Quixote is a Cervantes novel 
which includes 126 chapters and 669 
characters. But in adapting this story 
to the stage, the Pickwick Puppet 
Theatre took only a few episodes and 



Sharon Bohn 

concentrated on the main theme of 
Don Quixote. 

The life-sized puppets used in the 
performance were developed from 
ancient Japanese Bunraku techniques 
and modern European black theatre. 

Don Quixote and his cast were 
maneuvered by operators in full view. 
The theatre cast members were 
dressed in black with sack-like hoods 
covering their faces, to make the 



audience perceive them as being invisible. 

The story unraveled the adventures 
of Don Quixote and his side-kick, Sancho. 

Quixote sets out on numerous 
adventures, attempting to achieve his 
goal of becoming a knight. Quixote 
believed that once he was a knight, he 
could then persuade Aldonza, a wench 
and whore who Quixote envisions as 
his lady, to fall in love with him. 

During his initial adventure, Quixote 
and Sancho battled with a hermit for a 
tin basin, which Quixote later used for 
a helmet. 



Other battle fields included the 
rapid, rippling waves of a river and 
the slicing movements of a windmill's 
blades. 

However. Quixote failed in his 
adventures to become a knight in a 
studded suit of armor. He also never 
won the love and affection of Aldonza: 

Don Quixote gave up his quest for 
knighthood and died a heart broken 
man. 

According to the Pickwick Puppet .■ 
Theatre, though Quixote died, his 
legend lives on J^| 



McCain Series/"^ 1 ) 



Pennsylvanians sing "best" songs 



~ue. Nov. 27 - With the motto of 
— "We're going to do our best to 
do the best," Fred Waring and the 
Young Pennsylvanians, performed in 
McCain Auditorium, the program 
"Best of the Best," the best songs 

by the best writers the best 

recordings of the greatest stars. 

"Music has been our racket for a 
long time. Music is written to° be 
enjoyed," Waring said. 



Sharon Bohn 



At age 79, Waring has spent more 
than 60 years arranging and directing 
choral music. Ever since his first stage 
appearance, at age 5, Waring has 
been making music. 

Starting the program, the 18 
member group, in their hot pink and 




bold yellow outfits, sang old familiar 
tunes including "Beyond the Blue 
Horizon," "Johnny Get Your Gun," 
and "Over Here, Over There." 

The group then split into two 
different groups. One of these choral 
groups was named the "Waring 
Blenders." 

During Waring's college days, he 
changed his major from architecture to 
music. However, he retained some of 
his creativeness. In 1935 he created 
the Waring Blender that revolutionized 
kitchen appliances and which was the 
basis for the name of his singing 
group. 

The group sang and danced to 
tunes spreading over- decades of 
musical history, including many 
popular songs from the 1940's. Songs, 
such as the Andrew sisters' "Boogie 
Woogie Bugle Boy of Company B," 
"My Heart Belongs to Daddy," and 
"Bibbidy, Bobbidy, Boo," were 
performed. 

The other group was the "Today's 
Pennsylvanians." 

"They're going to do today's music. 
If you're not familiar with today's 
music you might have good hearing. 
I'm not criticizing, I'm sympathizing," 
Waring said. 

The women singers, dressed in 
magenta colored disco dresses and the 
men in vibrant purple velvet outfits, 
sang and danced to tunes including 
Barbara Streisand's, "The Main 
Event," Barry Manilow's, "I Write the 
Songs," and Debbie Boone's, "You 
Light Up My Life." 

A special section of this portion of 
the program, by the "Today's 
Pennsylvanians," included an 
arrangement of songs they said 
America knows and likes the best 
commercial jingles, Waring said. 

The melody began with the Coca- 
Cola jingle, sung by Brian Breed, the 
only member from Kansas, and other 
jingles included were Rice Krispies, 
Hanes Underwear, Armour Hot Dogs, 
Figurines and Campbell Soup. 

During this medley, Rich Taylor, a 
Today's Pennsylvanian member, 
grabbed the microphone and asked 
Waring, "Hey, Fred Waring, ace 
choral director, how's your love life?" 
imitating an UltraBrite toothpaste 
commercial. 

Waring replied with another 
commercial jingle, "plop, plop, fizz, 
fizz, oh what a relief it is." 

Announcing intermission, Waring 
said he hated to do it, but the old 
folks were counting on it. He told the 
audience it would be a short 



intermission of about 10 minutes and 
they should be fast. 

Waring also explained at this time 
that most of the members of the 
"Waring Blenders" and "Today's 
Pennsylvanians" were gleaned from 
the workshops he has conducted for 
the past 33 summers in the Pocono 
mountains in Pennsylvania. He said the 
average age of the group was 21 and 
most of them had never performed 
professionally before this road trip. 

After the intermission Waring came 
onto the stage and tried to hurry 
everyone into their seats. 

"A big, beautiful building like this 
should have adequate plumbing," he 
said. 

After he succeeded in getting 
everyone seated, he told the audience 
the next part of the show was called 
the second part. 

And with this, the "Waring 
Blenders" and "Today's 
Pennsylvanians," combined and sang 
old-time favorites of "Smoke Gets in 
Your Eyes," "The Anniversary Song," 
and "76 Trombones." 

Continuing with the performance, 
Waring introduced EvAnn Dahl, who 
played a duovox, an instrument similar 
to an accordian. The duovox includes 
the sounds of a church organ, bass 
guitar and the phaser. These sounds 
are achieved by electrically connecting 
the accordian with an electric organ. 

The 19-year old demonstrated her 
expertise on this instrument by playing 
the song "Dance of the Hours." 

Waring announced that the group 
was going to sing Christmas carols, 
even thought it was still preseason. 

"I want to do them before they are 
commercialized by radio and 
television." The audience nodded and 
whispered in agreement. 

With this they sang "Jingle Bells," 
"White Christmas," and with the help 
of the audience they sang "Silent 
Night." 

To add to the fun of the evening, 
Polyey McClintock, a 79-year old 
member of the band, played an 
interesting number he called an 
adventure in dentures. With a special 
instrument, he played a song called 
"Nola on my Molars," on his teeth. 

Concluding the evening. Waring 
invited the audience to sing along 
on favorite songs including, "Let Me 
Call You Sweetheart," and 
"Glory Hallelujah." He reminded 
them they weren't at an ERA 
(Equal Rights Amendment) meeting 
and to sing out 



40/McCain Series 




Art of Belly Canto g 



un., Dec. 9 - Gordon Myers, a 
baritone singer with a thousand 
different faces and a bagful of 
humorous songs, performed the Art of 
Belly Canto to a small McCain 
Auditorium audience. 

A home basketball game was played 
in Ahearn the same night but Myers 
performed as if he was playing to a 
full house. 

One song Myers performed was 
"The Deaf Old Woman", arranged by 
Katherine Davis. The story behind the 
song was no matter what the young 
man would say to the old woman, she 
would replay with "what" or "huh". 

But the minute the young man said, 
"Old woman would you marry me?" 

She replied with an immediate 



Sharon Bohn 



Myers explained that the moral 
behind the story he sang was that 
anyone can hear, if the right question 
is asked. 

Throughout this song, Myers would 
change his voice to make it sound like 
an old woman's voice and then switch 
to sound like a young man's voice. His 
voice changes brought many chuckles 
of laughter from his audience. 

The definition of the Art of Belly 
Canto is to sing serious music 
seriously, sing it well and still make 
people laugh. |U 



Drama prepared In silence 



ri. Feb. 1 — Without using words, 
the performance of "Mirage" 
spoke to the audience. 

They spoke through the power of 
pantomime. 

Paul Gaulin and two other Canadian 
members of his mime company 
performed 10 acts of silent drama. 

"Crossing the River" introduced the 
audience to the perfect body control 
rendered by the performers. Paul 
Gaulin and Nikki Tilroe mimed a 
crossing by a Chinese ferryman" and a 
. beautiful Chinese passenger. 

"The Neighbors" was a comic look 
at two stubborn neighbors in a high- 
rise apartment building. The tenants, 
played by Paul Gaulin and Peter 
Smith, showed frustration in their 
facial expressions and body 
movements at a dripping faucet that 
was interrupting their dinners. Gaulin 
and Smith convinced the audience that 
they were actually chewing and 
swallowing every bit of their food. The 
audience laughed throughout the act 
but especially at the end when the 
tenants were swimming in the waist- 
high water caused by the dripping 
faucet 

Gaulin and Tilroe again amused the 
audience with a tall grotesque couple 
who performed a love duet in 



Kathe Rusnak 



"Heads". The lengthy bodies 
appeared too awkward to be able to 
dance, yet Gaulin and Tilroe did it 
with ease. The funniest moment was 
when the man's white coiled neck 
suddenly popped out after kissing the 
woman. The audience could feel the 
tingling sensation that Gaulin got from 
the kiss. 

Tilroe's limbs seemed to have no 
bones in her portrayal of a puppet in 
"Forger of Swords". A Samurai tested 
his sword out on the puppet. 
Ironically, the puppet took the fatal 
blow at the Samurai. A little boy 
sparked the audience's laughter when 
he suddenly burst out laughing. 

The "Electric Lemmings" changed 
the mood of the evening from relaxed 
and enjoyable to tense and frustrating. 
The three performers portrayed 
different aspects of an individual's 
personality. Each one tried to 
dominate. By having masks on both 
sides of their heads, the black 
lemmings could bend to make their 
bodies look deformed. The intense 
music added to the eerie performance. 

The next piece, "Fog", eased the 



tension built up by "Electric 
Lemmings". Dressed in white leotards, 
the three performers strived for 
oneness rather than dominance to 
show the essence of fog. A 
combination of soft music and free 
flowing movements made this a 
favorite. 

"Lessons" was divided into four 
different stages of a student's 
development with Gaulin as the 
teacher and Tilroe and Smith as the 
students. This was the easiest to 
follow because of the props and 
costumes. Also, the situations were so 
typical of everyday life. In the first 
grade the little girl was upset with 
herself after she had wet her pants in 
school. The little boy heroically 
mopped up the accident but he 
snickered behind her back. 

A highlight of the act was during 
grade thirteen when the electric zits on 
the boy's face lit up against a dark 
stage. Feeling sorry for the insecure 
boy at that stage of his life was 
inevitable. 

They closed with the final act, 
"Arms", using sharp instead of 
smooth movements showing the 
computer-like precisionjhat Gaulin has 
undoubtedly mastered. __ 




McCain Series/41 




Bo Racier 



1£ -State maintains one of the most prestigious lecture 
series in American colleges and universities - the 
Alfred M. Landon Lecture Series on Public Issues. Inau- 
gurated in 1966 by former K-State President James 
McCain, the series is a tribute to one of Kansas' most 
distinguished statesmen, Alfred M. Landon. 

Governor Landon delivered the first lecture in the 
series, "New Challenges in International Relations", on 
Dec. 13, 1966. 

During each academic year, four of the country's lead- 
ing personalities appear on the Landon Lecture plat- 
form. Since the inception of the series, speakers have 
included Gerald Ford, Mike Mansfield, Anne Armstrong, 
Milton Friedman, Billy Graham, Robert Kennedy, Ronald 
Reagan, Carl Rowan and Earl Warren. 

The lectures, given in McCain Auditorium, are attend- 
ed by students, faculty, and alumni, as well as the general 
public. 

The Landon Lecture series is sponsored by approxi- 
mately 150 patrons from throughout the state of Kansas. 
Each donating patron receives two tickets to a special 
reserved section in the auditorium and two luncheon 
tickets, as well as a printed copy of the lecture. 



42/Lectures 




Bo Rader 



Norman Borlaug 

<<TJood is the first basic ingredient 
•necessary for individuals, families 
and nations," Dr. Norman E. Borlaug said 
at the 45th Landon Lecture on March 20, 
1979. 

Borlaug, winner of the 1970 Nobel 
Peace Prize and the father of the "green 
revolution," expressed concern over the 
problem of world hunger. 

"This is a political and religious issue," 
said Borlaug, one of the world's formost 
authorities on food production. 

"The problem is not only (food) 
production, but also distribution," he said. 
"How do you get the overflowing 
warehouse (products) into the empty 
stomachs of the unemployed and 
underemployed?" 

The biggest problem of hunger, 
according to Borlaug, is neither 
production nor distribution; but the 
uncontrolled population growth. 

With the ever-raising population, 
Borlaug said it is necessary to double our 



agricultural production ability. 

"In 1975, it took 3.3 billion metric tons 
of production to feed the world 
population," he said. "An estimated 6.6 
billion (metric tons) will be required in 
2015." 

"Unless this food production doubles 
within the next 40 years, the standard of 
living will stagnate and maybe retrogress," 
Borlaug said. "This can happen even in 
affluent nations, such as the United 
States." 

Hunger is a problem of political 
instability, he said. 

"When food or other resources run 
low, countries face the possibilities of 
political strife and violence." 

"Always bear in mind the 
importance of food," he said. 
"Something must be done now to 
fight world hunger, and it's later than 
most of us are willing to think." Ml 



Susan Schlickau 



Shirley Black 

lk^orning toast and cocoa, Shirley 
• ^Temple Black said, are both affected 
by inflation, peace and oil. The child film 
star and former ambassador to Ghana, 
spoke on "America's unrealistic 
perception of the world situation" at K- 
State's 46th Landon Lecture on April 
10,1979. 

"What does toast and hot chocolate 
have to do with peace in the Middle 
East?" Black said. "The price of my toast 
and chocolate has soared at a torrid pace 
(14.5 percent annually)." • 

Black said labor contract settlements in 
1979 are higher than the previous year 
and the government claims there is 
widespread price gouging. 

"Certainly there is little sign that the 
wage-price spiral is slowing," she said. 

"What, pray tell, has all this toast, 
chocolate, inflation and talk of falling 
purchasing power got to do with peace? 
Or, in a broader sense, what has 
American foreign relations got to do with 
it? 

"In the broad perception, foreign 
relations has had little bearing on really 
important things like the cost of bread, 



taxes, or the quality of life in my 
neighborhood," she said. 

"Here in Kansas your grains are at the 
core of my toast," Black said. "But let's 
not forget that toast also has strong 
Middle East connections." 

Black said fertilizer, accompanied by 
water, is required for the high-yielding 
corn or wheat, for her toast. Both the 
fertilizers and the irrigation pumps, in 
addition to the used herbicides and 
insecticides, are based upon petroleum. 
Furthermore, these Mid-East resources 
arrive by trucks and diesel locomotives. 

"To state what is obvious, but not 
tasty, oil is very much part of our 
morning toast," Black said. "The price of 
oil, the availability of oil, both exert an 
enormous effect on our slice of bread. 

"Not everyone agrees, of course . . 
polls indicate that about half of Americans 
think the energy crisis is phony, and that 
with proper incentives we can satisfy 
American requirements from American's 
resources," she said. "In fact, we import 
50 percent of our petroleum now." 

"Public perception of the energy 
problem is kaleidoscopic," Black said. M 



Susan Schlickau 




Lectures/43 



Walter Mondale 

17 ice President Walter Mondale 
" discussed the possibility of the 
SALT II treaty ratification on July 17. 

"With SALT II (Strategic Arms 
Limitation Talks) we take another 
important step down the road to arms 
control," Mondale told a capacity crowd 
in McCain Auditorium. 

"Without SALT II everyone is worse," 
he said. "The SALT process will collapse. 
Money — precious money, billions of 
dollars — and talent and commitment will 



The helicopters practiced land- 
ing at several places on campus 
so that people wouldn't know 
exactly where Mondale would 
land. 



mobilize to construct an even more costly 
stalmate." 

Mondale said that without SALT II the 
United States would have to spend an 
additional $30 billion to maintain its 




security balance with the Soviet Union. 

The Soviet Union and the U.S. are now 
in a position of "rough strategic 
equivalence", he said, adding that neither 
side could hope to win a nuclear war — 
"Therefore there's no point in starting 
one." 

"It means that if we are forced to go 
eyeball to eyeball with the Soviets in 
some grim crisis," he said, "neither of us 
can gain any advantage by brandishing the 
threat of the use of nuclear muscle." 

The treaty includes limitations on the 
weapon to decrease its potential 
effectiveness in a war, he said. 

A second issue raised by opponents, 
Mondale said, is that the treaty is based 
on trust. 

"This is not true," he said. "It is not 
based on trust - it is based on hard-nosed 
reality, suspicion and experience." 

Both liberals and conservatives 



Pete Souza 

The White House asked It- 
State to host Mondale as part 
of a nationwide tour to pro- 
mote the SALT II treaty. 



criticize the limits of the treaty — 
some say the treaty does not limit 
arms enough and others argue that it 
will spur an arms buildup. 

Supporters of the treaty must rally 
for its ratification, Mondale said. The 
vice president listed the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, U.S. allies and, "more 
importantly," the American public as 
supporters. 

To ratify the treaty is to continue 
progress, he said.fcl 



Jolene Hoss 




John Bock 



Barry 
Goldwater 

IJarry Goldwater, the conservative 

*^ Republican senator from Arizona, 
offered his views on affairs in the Middle 
East to an overflow crowd on Feb. 25. 

Goldwater said he was to eat dinner 
with President Carter that night and 
would offer his solution to guarantee a 
return of the Americans held hostage in 
Iran. 

"He should tell Khomeini that he has 
so many days after which the refinery at 
Abadan would disappear," Goldwater 
said. 

Although he said he believes Carter has 
done everything possible to help the 



hostages, Goldwater demands more 
action. 

"I'm not going to defend the Shah, 
but the United States should not make 
apologies to Khomeini for what the 
shah did." 

The Soviet Union's intervention in 
Afghanistan represents "the most 
serious situation America has ever been 
in," he said. 

"The Soviet Union has always 
wanted a warm-water port," he said, 
adding that the intervention in 
Afghanistan is the first Soviet step 
toward an invasion of Iran or Pakistan 
and a port for the Soviets on the 
Indian Ocean. JM 



Gregg Coonrod 



44/Lectures 



iconvoczation LecfuRes 



Jessica Savitch 

<<*There was a time when television 
* was not that significant, but 
now we are living in the age of TV 
news," Jessica Savitch said March 
27, 1979. Savitch, anchorwoman for 
the NBC Weekend News, spoke 
about the Washington scene and the 
impact of the media. 

"Television is simplistic and time 
restrictive," Savitch said. "Yet, it is 



the fastest and most effective way to 
reach the audience." 

"Electronic mass communications 
is the best system available," 
Savitch said, but it also has its 
pitfalls. "It is difficult to present both 
sides of the issue, telling the who, 
what, when, where and why without 
taking sides," she said. 

"Whenever you put an individual 
in between an event and another 
individual's perspective of the same 
event, it becomes distorted. Total 



objectivity is impossible," Savitch 
said. 

Savitch stressed that people 
should use the media. 

"No one source can be right all 
the time," she said. "They can, and 
should, take advantage of all 
dissemination of information from 
every media source.' 



Susan Schlickau 




/- 



Robert Shaw 

'■"he stout, gray Robert Shaw 
walked onto a stage of vacant 
chairs and empty music stands. He 
turned not to the conductor's stand 
as he would normally, but to an 
audience in McCain Auditorium. 

Shaw, conductor of the Atlanta 
Symphony Orchestra, conducted a 
rehearsal in addition to his 
convocation speech on May 9. 

Shaw's address delved into the 
importance of art in society. 



Bella Abzug 

'■'he first woman to work on the 
Alaskan pipeline. 

The first woman senator. 

The first woman plumber. 

Bella Abzug is tired of women's 
firsts; she wants "2,3,4 

Significant strides have been made 
in the women's movement, Abzug 
said, but a lot of the progress has 
been "tokenism." 

The former Congresswoman spoke 
on May 2 about the progress of the 



"1 believe the arts are the lodestar 
of humanity," he said. "Economic 
and political problems cannot be 
solved singing." 

But, an exchange of the arts 
between nations can gain time and 
create links that benefit the political 
and economical factions of society, 
Shaw said. 

"In a world going schizophrenic, 
paranoid and masochistic — with 
humanity teetering on the brink of 
self-annhilation — art is the most 
powerful affirmation of the life force 
in the man thing," he said. 



women s movement. 

"The women's movement today is 
not any one organization," Abzug said. 
"It is millions of women examining 
human conditions." 

Abzug said the United States needs 
to expand its government, and has "a 
flawed democracy." 

"As great as our forefathers were, 
they didn't give a hoot about our 
foremothers," she said, adding that 
there are no provisions in the 
Constitution pertaining to women. 

Abzug was one of the founders of 
the original Equal Rights Amendment 



Art is an attempt to communicate, 
Shaw said. 

"Beyond the language of 
alphabets the arts convey that 

which could not otherwise be 
conveyed," he said. 

Shaw is intense in his struggle to 
communicate through his music. This 
intensity and dedication have brought 
Shaw five Grammy Awards and 14 
honorary degrees. 



Julie Doll 




Erwin Knoll 

'■"he H-bomb is no secret, 

according to Edwin Knoll, editor 
of Progressive Magazine. 

An injunction preventing the 
Progressive from publishing "The H- 
^ bomb Secret" was dropped recently 
after a six-month litigation. The federal 
| government's preliminary injunction 
against the magazine could be compared 
to the secret American bombing of 
Cambodia in the late 1960's, Knoll said. 

"It (the Cambodian bombing) wasn't 
a secret to the Vietnamese. It wasn't a 



secret to the Russians," Knoll said. 

"It was a secret to the American 
people. It kept them from challenging 
the ruinous course in southeast Asia," 
Knoll told more than 1,000 people on 
Oct. 31, 1979. 

"Some people consider the First 
Amendment obsolete. Some consider 
the First Amendment exploded by the 
atomic bomb. Some consider the First 
Amendment inoperative since 1950." 

"We were determined to fight for 
the principle at stake," he said. 

According to Knoll, the First 
Amendment executes power. 



(ERA) and has continued to work for 
its inclusion to the Constitution. 

A new organization known as 
Women's U.S.A., which Abzug also 
helped found, is designed to reach out 
to women who do not ordinarily join 
such groups. 

She said more women must become 
involved in the women's movement 
before it can be seen in the proper 
perspective. 



Vince Wheeler 




However, freedom still has many fair- 
weather friends who are outraged by 
censorship, Knoll said. 

"Our country still provides a 
promise of freedom. It grows stronger 
when we put it to the test and weaker 
when not." 

"We need to know the truth. 
Unfortunately, knowing the truth won't 
make you free. It takes daily serious 
effort and we'd better start doing 

it." 



David Houser 



Maggie Kuhn 

l^aggie Kuhn knows the secret 
of growing old gracefully. 
"Keep on learning right up to 
rigor mortis," Kuhn said on Dec. 5. 

Kuhn, ',no spoke to about 300 
people, helped to organize the Gray 
Panthers Party in 1970 to instigate 
social change and eradicate age 
discrimination. 



"The graying of the universe is a 
fact of life," Kuhn said. "There has 
to be social economic and political 
changes. 

The first step in change must be 
attitudinal," on the part of the 
elderly, she said. 

"When you give up, it's pretty 
hard to be re-motivated." 

Attitude is everything, she said, 
and those people who remain 
unconvinced that a future exists are 



those "rotting on the beaches in 
Florida." 

But attitudes are often 
"enormously influenced by social 
forces which we dimly perceive," 
Kuhn said. "And (the government, 
among others) calling us 'dear old 
folks', I hate that." 

"I like being old. I like it for three 
reasons," Kuhn said. "It gives me an 
opportunity to speak my mind. And 
I do. And, I've outlived much of my 



opposition. I have also found a 
miraculous new kind of energy which 
is abundant when you work with 
people. 

"We have to be related to 
others," Kuhn said. "You are the 
future. We and you must be 
together, support each other, 
identify some goals and changes." 



Pam Good 



Convocations/45 







ii 



B 



eware of Indian attacks and 
tornadoes in Kansas." 




"Little College on the Prairie" 



Kathe Rusnak 



This is a recording. So it seemed. Any 
mention of going to Kansas would trigger 
such a response from Lauren's friends in 
New York. 

Lauren was hesitant about going to 
school in Kansas because of the many 
stories she had heard. However, she 
decided to go to K-State because she 
wanted to be a veterinarian. 

Her lifestyle was soon to change from 
high-rise apartments and subways to farms 
and covered wagons. So she thought. 

She wondered how in the world she 
would manage without running water. Just 
in case Kansas didn't have electricity, 
Lauren had packed a dozen candles in her 
suitcase. She cringed at the thought of the 
New York City blackout of 1977 when 
she had to do without electricity only for 
a matter of hours. 

The more she thought about going to 
Kansas, the more she wanted to stay in 
New York City. 



All of her high school friends were from 
the city, so she wondered if she would be 
able to relate to kids from the country. 
Lauren knew nothing about milking cows 
or plowing the fields and she was afraid 
to show it. 

Another thought came to mind. What if 
she was attacked by Indians? Would they 
scalp her? 

Visions of cowboys riding off into the 
sunset flashed through Lauren's head. 
Just from watching old westerns she 
imagined all cowboys to be romantic. 
Actually, the only thing she had in 
common with cowboys was her jeans. In 
New York the baggy cowboy jeans were 
the latest fashion. Of course, the Kansas 
cowboys probably didn't have the ones 
with Calvin Klein or Diane Von 
Furstenberg printed in the back pockets. 

How was Lauren going to adjust to the 
Kansas lifestyle? 



The most disturbing thought that 
crossed her mind was Kansas' tornadoes. 
She was petrified of being swept away by 
a powerful tornado as Dorothy and Toto 
were. Lauren recalled the classic, "The 
Wizard of Oz." She began wondering why 
Dorothy was so anxious to get back home 
to Kansas. After all, the Munchkins would 
have done anything for her because she 
killed the wicked witch. Dorothy also had 
three good friends with her on her 
journey to Emerald City. 

Lauren couldn't understand why 
anybody would want to return to Kansas. 
Then she remembered what Glenda, the 
good witch, told Dorothy. 

"You always had the power to go back 
to Kansas close your eyes click 

your heels together three times and say to 
yourself, 'There's no place like home . . 
there's no place like home' " 

She soon found out that there's no 
place like Kansas. 

When Lauren arrived in Kansas she had 
running water and electricity at her 



46/Myths Of Ks. 




disposal. She didn't see any Indians, 
covered wagons, or saloons with swinging 
doors. Not everyone in Kansas lived on a 
farm. Nor was Kansas stricken with an 
abundance of tornadoes. 

She wasn't swept off her feet by 
tornadoes but by hospitality. Kansas 
people made her feel right at home. Why 
was she so hesitant about Kansas? 

The stories she had heard about Kansas 
were merely stories. 



She realized just how ignorant she had 
been when someone from Kansas asked 
her if all kids from New York City were 



MxM 



art by Jennifer Sheets 



Myths Of Ks./47 




, V »» ♦ 



Nancy Mahrle, senior In modern languages and marketing 



Sam Owen, junior In construction science 



Alice Sky, sophomore In sociology 



Smile 
Make a friend 



Friendly Fun- Darrell Conerly, 
senior in journalism and mass 
communication, takes advantage 
of the afternoon sunshine with his 
friends from the Big Brother 
program. 



Smiles. You see them all the time at 
K-State. Whether it's in the 
classroom or on campus, students project 
a friendly attitude toward each other. 

While some universities are still in the 
"me" phase, K-State is experiencing the 
"you" phase. More and more students are 
coming out on their own by saying 

Hello" or smiling instead of waiting to be 
smiled at. 

"I was really surprised at how nice 
everyone was," one freshman said. "It 
really made me feel more a part of 
everything." 

"The attitude of the faculty influenced 



Harold Ramirez 



my decision to come to K-State," a 
sophomore said. "After hearing about 
other schools, well their images really, I 
decided to come here." 

The personal attendion by highly 
qualified teachers is a K-State hallmark 
and close faculty-student relationships 
often are developed. 

From the cashiers in the Union 
bookstore to the RAs in the dorms, a 
friendly atmosphere prevails and the 
students appreciate it. 



48 





"I like it here," is a comment heard 
often. 

Perhaps the rather close proximity of 
the buildings helps maintain the 
togetherness of the university. One 
doesn't need a bus to get from class to 
class and the dorms are within walking 
distance of campus. All this contributes to 
a relaxed atmosphere, not a 
harried college campus. 

K-State is where you can discover new 
friends from your own country or another 
country. It's a place where students make 
you feel welcome and they do it with a 
smile. M 




One foi* the 

money, 

Two for the 
show* 

Three to get 

ready, 
And where 

to go 



<* 



/"\ne for the money . . . "Linda 
Ronstadt was supposed to be 
doing my harmony, but she 
couldn't make it today," said Liz 
Kokjer, sophomore in general. 

Two for the show . . . 

"Will somebody here turn that 
tape over? I'm recording this for 
my mom," said David Hawkins, 
junior in accounting. 

Three to get ready . . . 

"I'm a genuine case of nerves 
today," said Randy Rogers, senior 
in mechanical engineering. "I guess 
I've never had much experience on 
my own." 

And four to go ... but where? 

Where else. 

To the NOONER. K-State's 
answer to the Amateur Hour - 
although some of the performers 
are the most professional amateurs 
around. 

Where every Tuesday in the K- 
State Union Catskellar from noon 
to 1 p.m. (hence the name), a live 
performance is presented by one 
or more K-State students. 

The sessions are appropriately 
themed "Students Entertaining 
Students" by the Union Program 
Council's Coffeehouse Committee 
which sponsors the events. And 
students entertaining students is 
exactly what happens. K-Staters 
entertain fellow K-Staters to share 



Hummm- Tim Verschelden 
performed a variety of music at 
the first Nooner on Sept. 4. 



Pat Davis 



talents, to get exposure, to have 
fun. Rarely does a Nooner 
performer play to anything less 
than a full house. No matter what 
kind of music or humor the 
entertainers are into, there's always 
an audience ready to listen. 

Variety is another thing offered 
at a Nooner. Students can hear 
country, bluegrass, easy listening, 
rock and even disco. And now 
there's another category to add to 
those - the original tune. Quite a 
number of Nooner performers 
have tried their hand at 
songwriting, as well as performing. 
Most of them provide their own 
instrumental back-up. Among the 
wide range of musical instruments 
played in this year's Nooners are 
the piano, the guitar, the fiddle, 
the banjo, the mandolin and the 
harmonica. In some cases, all by 
the same person. But not at the 
same time, of course. That would 
be enough to make anyone 
nervous. 

Should a touch of nerves spur a 
mistake, like singing the wrong 
verse of a song, or missing a note, 
or even forgetting a punch line, 
don't expect disaster. The 
audience will probably laugh right 
along with the performer. After all, 
they're just students entertaining 
students. 



Nooners/49 



noonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnooner$noonersnoonei 



David Hawkins 

Sept. 11 brought David Hawkins, 
junior in accounting and one-man 
band, to the Catskellar. Hawkins 
exhibited his talents on guitar, piano, 
banjo, fiddle, harmonica and mandolin 
to more than ten bluegrass and 
country numbers. 

Hawkins had the audience tapping 
their toes to "Dueling Banjos" and 
"Foggy Mountain Breakdown", both of 
which emphasized Hawkin's banjo 
expertise. (On these two numbers, 
Hawkins had the help of friends, Brad 
Wolf, senior in milling science, and 
Doug Sharpe, freshman in 
architecture.) 

Hawkins also demonstrated 
expertise in his easy-going attitude 
toward his listeners. At one point 
during his performance when his tape 
player clicked off, Hawkins simply 
asked, "Will somebody turn that tape 
over? I'm recording this for my 
mom." 




John Bock 

Bluegrass Pickln- David Hawkins 
five fingers his way through a banjo 
tune. 



Joe Stegeman 

K-Staters in the Catskellar on Sept. 
18 at noon were left thoroughly 
charmed if they had listened to nooner 
performer Joe Stegeman, sophomore 
in electrical engineering. Stegeman's 
serenade included the songs of Bread, 
Jim Croce, John Denver, the Eagles, 
and, that master of song and smiles, 
Joe Stegeman himself. Accompanying 
himself on both nylon- and steel-string 
guitars, Stegeman performed a number 
of his own compositions, including a 
humorous upbeat "acid rock" tune 
called "Burnt", which had the 



audience laughing and smiling before 
lapsing back into a mellow mood as 
Stegeman sang "Time In A Bottle." 



Liz Kokjer 

Liz Kokjer, sophomore in general, 
performed the songs of Wendy 
Waldman, Karla Bonoff, and 
Livingston Taylor on Sept. 25. Kokjer, 
not unlike Joni Mitchell in appearance 
and voice, had the help of Peter 
LaFemina, junior in agronomy, for the 
first twenty minutes of the Nooner 
before going solo. 

Among her country-blues selections 
were "Baby's Bluebird Wine" and 
"Women Be Wise", a warning to the 
wom'n in the audience about their 
men. Kokjer accompanied herself on 
guitar for most of her performance. 



Randy Roger 

"Does anyone out there like Gordon 
Lightfoot or is it only me?" Randy 
Rogers, senior in mechanical 
engineering, asked halfway through his 
Oct. 2 Nooner performance. After 
encouragement from his audience, 
Rogers resumed singing Lightfoot's 
songs with a smile and the reassurance 
that he was, indeed, "in the ballpark". 

For variety, Rogers also threw in a 
couple of tunes by Merle Haggard and 
Kris Kristofferson while strumming his 
guitar. Unafraid to be innovative, 
Rogers gave K-Staters a taste of 
something new when he included 
"Somewhere Over the Rainbow" in his 
banjo repertoire. 



James Young 

James Young, sophomore In 
elementary education, rarely sings 
anybody else's songs. So on Oct. 9, 
Young sang and played guitar and 
piano from noon until 1 p.m., 
performing his own compositions, 
except one. Among his original tunes 
was the instrumental, "Reflections", 
which Young wrote white thinking 
back to his "bald-headed, bow-tied 
junior high days". Another original 
instrumental was "Back Porch 
Pickin'", which Young laughingly 
claims he wrote while on his 
backporch and his neighbor threw a 
rock at him. Young, currently putting 
together an albumn, also took the 
opportunity to dedicate a song of a 
slower pace entitled, "When It's 
Raining", to his wife. 

Char Barrett 

Contemporary sounds filled the 
Catskellar on Oct. 16 through the 



music of Char Barrett, freshman in 
music education, and her piano 
accompanist. Becky Fleenor, 
sophomore in speech pathology. 
Barrett sang a variety of modern 
tunes, including those of the 
Carpenters, the Stylistics, Diana Ross 
and Glen Campbell. Barrett 
accompanied herself on the piano for 
a number of gospel compositions and 
for "The Song I Wrote For You", 
written by a friend of hers. Barrett 
ended the hour with a song entitled, 
"Dreams", and a wish to everyone 
that all their's come true. 



Joe Stegeman 
Ed McPheeters 
Kevin McCraken 

The musical trio of Joe Stegeman, 
sophomore in electrical engineering, 
Ed McPheeters, sophomore in 
psychology, and Kevin McCracken, 
freshman in business, proved on Oct. 
23 that they are as funny and 
entertaining as they are talented. Their 
nooner included the songs of America, 
Bread and the Doobie Brothers, as 
well as a few original tunes on the 
humorous side. 

Among the later is the trio's theme 
song, "Wax My Floor - Johnson's Glo- 
Coat" and "Puff the Magic Maggot", 
Although all three of the guys played 
and sang together for most of the 
concert, each had at least one solo 
when they weren't busy harmonizing. 

Near the end of their program, the 
trio strummed, sang, and smiled 
through a bluegrass medley which 
included the tunes, "Rolling in My 
Sweet Baby's Arms", "Rocky 
Mountain", and "Rocky Top 
Tennessee". 



Peter LaFemina 

Peter LaFemina and Friends 
entertained Oct. 30 Nooner-goers with 
a combination of light rock, jazz, and 
blues. LaFemina, junior in agronomy, 
began the hour alone on stage in 
something not unlike a Star Wars 
mask, not shedding his disguise until 
his second selection. 

LaFemina then explained that he 
had chemistry at 12:30 but he guessed 
he would skip it today. And the 
audience was glad he did, if only to 
hear the cute and cuddly tune, "I've 
Got My Pajamas On", a Livingston 
Taylor song. (LaFemina said he had to 
go to five of Taylor's concerts just to 
get the words to the song because it's 
never been recorded.) 

Other selections included those of 
James Taylor and some LaFemina 
originals, each with a story to tell. 
Toward the end of the hour, 
LaFemina's Friends all joined him on 
stage to play and sing "Human 



Highway". His Friends included David 
Hawkins, junior in accounting, Liz 
Kokjer, sophomore in general, Jeff 
Boyer, graduate student in English, 
and Susan Broeckelman, senior in 
family and child development. 



Quad Harmonics 

Not only was the Nov. 6 Nooner 
seen in the Catskellar but the viewers 
of the 5 p.m. Early News Show on 
WIBW also got a glimpse of Arlan 
Bebermeyer, senior in journalism, 
Bruce Dyson, junior in marketing, Kirk 
Kelley, junior in business, and Gregg 
Noel, senior in recreation, collectively 
known as the Quad Harmonics. 

The quartet, performing without 
accompaniment for most of the hour, 
sang barbershop melodies, as well as 
popular and original tunes to a full 
house. Even broadcaster Gerry 
Wallace, filming at K-State all week, 
caught the quartet's act and taped 
them singing their now-famous "Frog 
Song" as the Catskellar echoed with 
' 'ree-dee-bee-deep' ' . 

Other selections included the 
Lettermen's inspirational "I Believe", 
and the Beatles's "Yesterday". Not 
stopping there, the quartet treated the 
audience to some old time barbershop 
tunes such as "Yes Sir, That's My 
Baby", complete with hats and kicks, 
and "Coney Island", complete with 
crocodile tears. They also performed 
their own rendition of "The Star 
Spangled Banner" in four-part 
harmony. 




John Bock 

Man with a Horn- Gregg Briggs, 

a member of Progressive Wood, 

played a number of solos. 



noonersnoonersnoonersnoonersoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersi 



50/Nooners 



gnersnoonersnoonersnooner 
Susan Broeckelmen 

The Nov. 13 Nooner was presented 
by Susan Broecketman, senior in 
family and child development, with the 
help of some friends every few songs. 
Broeckelman's selections were mostly 
her own compositions but there were 
sprinklings of Jont Mitchell, Janis Ian, 
and Christie McVie throughout her 
performance. 

Among Broeckelman's original tunes 
were the songs, "Depend On 
Yourself", which she dedicated to a 
friend in the audience, and "World of 
Constant Change." In her last 
selection, "The Island Song", 
Broeckelman wrote about the future 
plans she and her band have to travel 
around the states and the neighboring 
islands. 



Susan Broeckelmen 

For two consecutive weeks Susan 
Broeckelmen, senior in family and 
child development, entertained the 
capacity crowd gathered in the 
Catskellar. 

On Jan. 22, Broeckelmen and Peter 
Grosett, senior in psychology, assisted 
Peter LaFemina in playing "East Coast 
Ja22." 

"Peter, Peter and I are going to 
form a trio someday," Broeckelmen 
said. But Brosett jokingly added "she's 
going to have to change her name to 
Peter," 

The following Tuesday, Jan. 29, her 
friends and she entertained the 
audience with her original tunes. 
Broeckelmen's soft melodies included 
"Postage Due", "World of Constant 
Change", and "Yesterday's 
Tomorrow", which she said "is going 
to be a hit someday , . we hope." 

Accompanied by her guitar, 
Broeckelmen also sang hits from 
James Taylor, Pheobe Snow and Paul 
McCarthy. 

"Here, There, Everywhere" was 
dedicated to McCarthy, who was 
recently arrested for possession of 
marijuana while in Japan. 

"Since he couldn't be here today, 
he asked that we do one of his 
songs," she said. 



Dave Brunn 

Dave Brunn, accompanied by his 
guitar, entertained the attentive crowd 
gathered in the Catskellar on Feb. 5. 

"This really isn't going to be 'Hill 
Music', but I had to turn in something 
to put in the Collegian", Brunn said. 
"Actually, I'm just going to play some 
of my favorite songs." 

Some of his choice tunes included 
country, western and bluegrass 
melodies by Ray Charles, Norman 
Blacke, Guy Clark, and Woody 
Guthry. 

Midway through his performance 
Brunn entertained the audience with 
one of his own originals, which he 
composed while working as a truck 
driver. 

"I don't know if I really wrote this 




song or just copied the words off the 
restaurant wall," he said. 

The reality of a truck stop was 
captured in the words of "Blue Valley 
Cafe". 

"No shirt, no shoes, no service," 
and other common restaurant signs 
were among the lyrics of this original 
tune. 



Tim Costello 



John Thorne 

Original ballads were performed by 
Jack Layne Thorne to the Nooner 
audience on Feb. 12. 

Some of Thome's compositions 
included "Your Eyes", "Walk On 
Me", and "Memory Lane". These soft 
melodies were complimented by his 
guitar. A country twang provided a 
change of pace, when he sang another 
original tune, "Dirt On My Shirt". 

Mid-way through the Nooner, 
Thorne showed his versatility by laying 
aside his guitar and switching to the 
piano. 

"Songs are written about a lot of 
things," he said. "Sometimes they're 
about love or politics, and sometimes 
they're even about hate." 

These varied topics, about different 



aspects of life, were reflected in "Lois, 
Jane and Bill", "Blue Pacific", and 
"Red Sneakers". 



Progressive Wood 

The sign, posted on the Catskellar 
door, read "Today — 'Progressive 
Wood' with original rock." The seven 
member band performed to an 
overflow crowd on Feb. 19. 

The horn section was featured 
throughout the hour, on such songs as 
"Off the Wall." Greg Briggs, soprano 
and tenor saxophone and flute, had 
composed this vibrant song. 

"It's basically a fusion between rock 
and jazz," he said. 

"We've been trying to do some 
different types of music," Bret Taylor, 
lead singer said midway through the 
performance. "Our music is almost on 
the verge of jazz rock." 

In addition to Taylor and Briggs, 
Progressive Wood is composed of 
Mike Quinn, acquistic guitar, Johnny 
Merriweather, congoes, Steve Burnett, 
drums, Tom Knittle, base and John 
Knottingham, trumpet and flugle horn. 



Let Me Entertain You- Susan 
Broeckelmen participated in 
numerous Nooner programs. 



Pat Davis, Susan Schiickau 



Every Tuesday Nooners are performed in the 
Catskeller. We have selected a few of the 
performances to highlight the 19791980 Nooners. 



ersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersnoonersfioonersnoonersnoonc 



Nooners/51 



Hey Babe, 

UJonno Hear 
P good line? 



How To Pick Up Girls (Using 25 
Words or Less). 

Edwin had made a wild dash for the 
last copy on the grocery store display. 
That was two weeks ago. 

Since then, he had read the book only 
six times. He had planned to read it once 
more, since seven is his lucky number, but 
time just wouldn't permit. 

As a result, he was still a bit worried 
that maybe he had missed something. But, 
alas, it was Friday and his plan called for 
action. (He had previously decided that a 
Friday night would be the best time to try 
it out, because if he failed, he could 
always resort to Plan Number Two on 
Saturday.) 

Yes, Edwin was determined, if nothing 
else, to pick up a girl this weekend. 

So, at 7 p.m., Edwin positioned himself 
strategically inside the door of his chosen 
bar, and preceded to watch everyone that 
entered. Everyone, that is, of a female 
nature. That was one of the basic 
requirements stated in the book. And that 
was why Edwin was there. 

Yes, Edwin was looking for a woman, 
although he secretly referred to them as 
victims of love. 

Whether or not Edwin's woman would 
become a victim of love remained to be 
seen, but, just the same, Edwin kept his 
fingers crossed. 

By 9 p.m., Edwin had singled out his 
first choice and had been watching her for 
quite some time. 

He already felt as if he'd known the 
tight pair of jeans, uh, the girl, all his life. 

Now he was presently working up his 
nerve to move in. He was also beginning 
to wish he had brought along his book for 
reference, but suddenly his first line came 
to him. 

"Hi beautiful. Where have you been all 
my life?" Edwin practiced quietly to 
himself. At least he thought he'd said it 
quietly. However, after several queer 
looks from the guys on either side of him, 
he decided he hadn't been so quiet after 



Pat Davis 



all. A couple more glances at his 
neighbors told him it was time to move. 
Quickly. 

And that he did. 

Edwin had been so busy watching the 
tight jeans, uh, the girl, that he hadn't 
noticed that she had also been staring at 
him for quite some time. 

The tight jeans, uh, the girl, had felt his 
eyes on her hours ago, and was getting 
quite perturbed with the whole thing. 
Frankly, she did not like being stared at. 

The girl had been hoping to catch his 
eye, so she could give him her "if-you- 
don't-stop-staring-at-me-I'm-gonna-knock- 
you-for-a-loop" look, but Edwin seemed to 
be looking elsewhere. 

She could guess where and was not 
happy. 

When Edwin finally looked at her face, 
he noticed that she was staring back at 
him. 

All the more reason, he decided, to 
quicken his move. 

But, shifting his stare only for a second, 
Edwin didn't give her the chance to shoot 
him the "look". 

Besides, by then, Edwin was much too 
busy patting himself on the back to notice 
that she was not at all pleased with the 
situation. 

"You fox," Edwin told himself. "She 
wants you. Better not keep her waiting." 

At that point, Edwin began to skip to 
her table. Edwin hates to waste time. 

When he reached the table, the girl 
looked up just in time for Edwin to 
deliver his introductory statement 
(appropriately titled so by the book). 

"This," Edwin mused, "is gonna wrap 
her around my finger." 

"Well hello, lovely lady. Where have 
you been all my life?" he said. 

The girl, known for her fondness of a 
good joke, recognized one when she saw 
Edwin up close and decided to have some 



fun. 

"Why, I reckon I've just been where 
ever you weren't. And ain't it a shame, 
too?" she said with a wink. 

Edwin grinned. 

"No really," Edwin said. "I couldn't 
help but notice you from across the room. 
You're obviously the prettiest girl here. 
Would you like to dance?" 

"Sure," she said, giving Edwin her 
innocent look. "I'd really like that. The 
only problem is that I can't find anyone I 
want to dance with." 

The girl, not intending to achieve such 
a devastating effect on Edwin, thought she 
saw him actually shrink a couple of 
inches, so she quickly winked again and 
gave his arm a punch. 

"Say, what's your name anyway, 
sport?" she said. 

Edwin took heart. 

"Edwin," Edwin answered. "But all my 
friends call me 'Ed'. What's your name? I 
bet it's really beautiful." 

"Sheila," Sheila said, smiling. "And all 
my friends call me 'Sheila'. However, you 
can call me 'Miss Browne'." 

Edwin was beginning to realize that this 
was going to be a little more difficult than 
he had first imagined. And, being one that 
hates to fail on his first mission, he 
refused to seek out another victim this 
late in the game. Besides, the book had 
said that your first choice is always your 
best bet. 

Edwin was not a gambling man so he 
dived back into the converstation. 

"Okay, Miss Browne," he said with a 
wink, "Mind sharing your table?" 

"Not at all," Sheila said. "With who?" 

"Ha ha! Has anyone ever told you 
what a great sense of humor you have?" 
Edwin said, chuckling. "What's your sign 
anyway?" 

"Well," Sheila said, "I don't really have 
one in particular, but my favorite sign is 
the one I can make with my middle 
finger. Wanna see it?" 

Edwin faked a laugh. 



52/Lines 






% 



V.1:' I F I 





1 

1 



r- art by Helene Angevine 



"You're so cute!" he said. "Can I buy floor 
you a beer?" 

Sheila was tiring of Edwin quite rapidly 
by now and was looking for a way to get 
rid of him. 

"Gee, you're so nice." she said. "Sure 
you can buy me a beer. And then you 
can drink it for me. Over there." 

Edwin was really getting depressed. Not 
only was he beginning to realize that 
Sheila was not going to let him pick her 
up, but he also realized that while he was 
looking down, another guy had come up 
and was whisking her out onto the dance 



"Wait, wait, WAIT!" Edwin screamed. 
"You can't dance with her! If only 
because of medical reasons! Please, you 
just can't!" 

"Medical reasons?" the guy yelled back 
across the dance floor, as he and Sheila 
went down into a dip. "What medical 
reasons?" 

They danced away. 

"Because I'm sick of you dancing with 
her," Edwin whispered to his beer as he 
slid under the table. 

When he finally crawled back up, 



Edwin's beer was all gone. Edwin's Sheila 
was gone. And worst of all, Edwin's hope 
was gone too. 

Gone, that is, until he happened to look 
up. 

And lo and behold, there in front of 
him was another pair of tight jeans, uh, 
another girl. 

And Edwin would have sworn he saw 
her staring at him. 

So, grinning from ear to ear, Edwin 
sauntered over to her table. 

"Why hello lovely lady," Edwin cooed. 
"And where have you been all my life? 



Ego Breaker Or Friend Maker-Some Lines 


To Help Break The Ice 




- Do you want to go snipe hunting? - Would you like to have breakfast tomorrow 


Oldies But Goodies 


- I need your name and address . . . for insurance morning? Can I call you or just nudge you? 




purposes. - What's your name? (Whatever the girl says) 


- What's your major? 


■ What are you doing tonight, around 2 a.m.? Why, that's my mothers name. 


■ Haven't I seen you somewhere before? 


- Didn't we go to different high schools together? - I've got a water bed let's make waves. 


- Can I buy you a beer? 


■ Do you want to count cows? ■ You know what would look good on you? . me. 


■ If I blow in your ear will you follow me 


- What are my chances of getting you in the sack - Actions speak louder than words. 


anywhere? 


tonight? - Let's go over to the party on (address) 


■ Do you need a ride? 


■ Let's go watch the submarine races. (The party doesn't exist, instead it is the guy's 


- What's your sign? 


■ If I toldlyou you had a beautiful body would you house.) 


- Do you want to go skinny dipping? 


hold it against me? - Hey, it's my birthday give me a kiss. 


■ Let's get naked. 


■ Wanna get lucky? - I've got some wine in my room. 


- Weren't you in my psychology class? 


■ Take your feet off the chair and let's put them on - Let's go make some happy talk. 


■ Where have you been all my life? 


the dance floor. ■ How would you like to be stimulated? 




■ Let's skip the preliminaries . do you want to go - If I buy the coffee, will you buy the donuts? 




to bed? - Let's get erotic tonight. 




- Are you a model? - I'm warm to your form. 





Lines/53 



Whether it's to relax and talk, meet people or have a 
drink, Aggieville seems to be the place to go. But, for 
those individuals who haven't earned entrance through 
the right of age, different methods are tried to gain 
entrance into the forbidden zones. 



Better luck next time 



I ran it through the washer" 



'■' hough the streets to the 

establishments aren't paved with 
yellow bricks, students by the hundreds 
flock towards Aggieville, as the weekend 
approaches. 

Like Dorothy, and her ruby slippers, 
the students must carry their magical 
element as they follow the yellow brick 
road. Though the individuals don't click 
their heels together and chant 'there's no 
place like home,' they must be prepared 
to show some identification as they enter 
the private clubs and taverns. 

Identification — that magical word, can 
instill fear into those underage or humor 
into those above the required age. 

A driver's license is usually thought of 
when a piece of identification is 
requested. The laminated two by three 
card, with the unflattering picture in the 
corner, is commonly dug out of the back 
pocket and presented to the doorkeeper. 

"The people that are 40 (years old) 
love to be checked, those 22 to 25 think 
it's funny and those .20 or just 21 usually 
don't want to show an ID," Rich Duncan, 
an employee at Aggie Station, said. 

"Many individuals become upset when 
you ask to see some identification, in 
addition to their (club membership) card; 
but it has to be done, otherwise the card 
could be loaned to an underage friend," 
Larry Crownover, district manager at 
Kennedy's Claim, said. "It's like the sign, 
which I think is appropriate — if you 
don't look 25 or older, be prepared to 
show your ID." 

An attempt is often made to slip past 
the person on duty at the door, according 
to local establishment owners and 
employees. 

"We probably turn away approximately 
10 percent of the people (due to not 
having an ID)," Pete Werner, and 
employee at Aggie Station, said. 

"It's a very small percent of people 
that make it difficult. We wouldn't even 
have this kind of rule (to check IDs) at all, 



Susan Schlickau 

if this 1 or 2 percent wasn't always trying 
to pull the wool over your eyes," 
Crownover said. 

"It almost gets to the point that you 
get amused at the excuses," Terry Ray, 
owner of numerous area taverns and 
private clubs, said. 

Common excuses include: "I left it at 
home," "It's out in the car," "I didn't 
know I needed it," "I don't drive," and "I 
want to go in and see if my friend is 
here." 

Some minors use their imaginations to 
develop unique and original excuses, such 
as "May I use your restroom," "I ran it 
through the washing machine," "It was 



"The people that are 40 years old 
love to be checked, those 22 to 25 
think it's funny and those 20 or just 
21 don't want to show an ID." 



taken away for DWI" and "Well, I know 
the owner." 

"The stories that people will tell to try 
to get in are sometimes pretty funny," 
Werner said. "Once a gal came in, 
dancing and wiggling all over the place. 
Then she gave me an old ID, which had 
been washed and wasn't even legible. I 
asked if she had another piece of 
identification, and while I was talking, she 
was dancing even closer to me. When she 
realized that I wasn't going to let her in, 
she whispered 'If you let me in — I'll 
dance with you." 

More women under the age limit try to 
get into the establishments, Werner said. 
Yet examples were cited where males also 
tried to get past the door. 

"One time a guy about 5'2" tried to 
get in with an ID than said he was 6'4"," 
Ray said. "Either he had really shrunk or 




it was a fake ID." 

"With today's liberalized code, it's 
awful tough to keep somebody's ID when 
you think it's fake, without jeopardizing or 
putting yourself in a position," Ray said. 
"So we don't confiscate many IDs, but we 
do have the right to refuse admission to 
anyone when we think they have a fake 
ID." 

"If I think it's a fake ID, then I ask 
them questions (concerning information 
included on a driver's license), and they 
usually don't have it." 

"There is plenty of business from over 
age people, we don't want the underage 
people in our place, we don't condone it, 
and we spend a lot of money to try to 
keep them out," Ray said. 

"I just don't have the time to babysit," 
Crownover said. 

"Percentage wise, it's (the number of 
underage people trying to get in) low 
compared to our business, but it only 
takes one conviction to lose your license," 
Ray said. 

"Every club in town gets accused of 
serving minors," Crownover said. "But it's 
a bunch of bull, because no proprietor in 
his right mind would want to be closed 
down — nobody's that stupid and is 
going to risk his license." HI 



54/Underage 



tuttd WNMQ 

1*8* Si fii";'' ; 









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"**¥=xo«U 




May I see your ID?- Rich Duncan, an 
employee at Aggie Station, checks the club 
membership cards and IDs before 
individuals enter the private club. 

Kutchie Koo- Sue Nienaber, freshman in 
elementary education, gets tickled by a 
friend during her birthday celebration in 
Aggie ville. 




Craig Chandler 



Underage/55 



New-founded freedom 




56/Freedom 



means responsibility 




After 12 years of structured schooling and 
about 18 years of parental control, many 
potential college freshmen see college as their 
escape to freedom. 

But it is an escape to responsibility, the 
responsibility of answering for one's own actions. 

The new freshman will often take advantage of 
this new-founded freedom. Playing pitch and 
spades in the lobby, making the rounds to the 
rooms, tubbings, functions, water fights and room 
parties keep the new student busy. The lure of 
music, fun and beer takes many students to 
Aggieville, not only on the weekend, but during 
the week also. 

With all this activity, sleeping in and missing 
classes are necessary recuperation for the next 
day's activities. The lack of roll checking in most 
of the freshman classes rationalizes the skipping 
of classes. With no threat of suspension and 
academic probation only an obscure abstraction, 
the fast-paced social-time of the freshman takes 
priority. 

Finals are upon him. And often the student 
discovers that if he wants to pass the course, he 
must ace the final. He also discovers that the 
skipping and sleeping in doesn't help his chances. 
With a lot of luck, cramming and help from a 
higher power he may succeed. 

If anything, the freshman discovers that this 
new freedom also means responsibility — the 
responsibility of making choices and coping with 
the consequences of those choices. HI 

Janet Terry 

Bo Rader 



Freedom/57 



c 





a 
o 



America held hostage 

K-Stater reaction controlled 



Iran. Before Nov. 3, 1979, most of the 
* students at K-State associated the name 
with one of the oil-rich Arab countries that 
had just recently had a political turnover. 

The Iranian monarchy had been ousted in 
favor of a religious leader with a name that 
was difficult to pronounce and even harder 
to spell. 

After Nov. 3, the awareness of this third- 
world country changed. 

Militant Iranian students reportedly took 
over the American embassy in Tehran. 
Holding about 60 Americans hostage, the 
students demanded the return of their 
ousted monarch, the shah, to answer for his 
crimes. Their allegiance, they claimed was to 
the religious leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah 
Khomeini. The shah at the time was under- 
going medical treatment in the U.S. 

National reaction was one of frustration 
and unity. Not since the bombing of Pearl 
Harbor had the American people agreed 
emotionally to the course taken to return the 



hostages. Concern for the safety of the hos- 
tages kept reactions very lowkeyed. Few 
cases of violent retaliation against Iranians in 
the U.S. had been reported, mostly the reac- 
tions were limited to shouting and demon- 
strations. 

The approximately 118 Iranians on the K- 
State campus maintained a low profile. K- 
State's Iranian Student Association (ISA) 
presented an open forum in the Little The- 
atre with about 150 in attendance. The 2 Vz 
hour discussion on Nov. 15 was an attempt 
by the ISA to quell mounting tension and 
potential violence on campus. 

An Anti-Iranian League (AIL) was orga- 
nized on campus by two K-State students 
and had a working committee of 11. 

A 'forum of opinion' rally was organized 
by the AIL according to University criteria 
and was held Nov. 19 in front of the Union. 

About 1,000 students attended the rally. 
Although moments were tense (an Iranian's 
opinion drew chants of "deport" and cheers 



erupted at the display of an effigy of the 
Ayatollah hanging from a stick) no violence 
erupted during the two hour rally. 

After the demonstration, the AIL seemed 
to disappear into obscurity. Perhaps the rea- 
son was the lack of support for the AIL and 
its motives. Or perhaps it was the overall 
attitude of doing nothing to endanger the 
hostages chances. 

Or perhaps the backstabbing action of the 
'other' superpower turned the attention to a 
greater danger M 

Janet Terry I 

Outdoor Forum-Some played 
frisbee, soaked up the sunshine or 
gawked at the spectacle before 
them, while others, angered by 
the situation, shouted obscenities 
and impatiently waited for a 
chance to speak. Brian Flattery, 
senior in milling science, gets his 
chance. 




Bo Rader 



58/Iran 







"Under international law and normal condi- 
tions, taking of hostages is not right, but now 
there are special conditions/' one Iranian stu- 
dent said, "The feeling is that the United 
States helped keep the Shah in power." 




\ 









I 



"— , 



w 






Craig Chandler 



r. 



On the darker side . . 

Soviets invade 
Afghanistan 

While the U.S. had its back turned on the Soviet 
Union, concentrating on the American hostages in Iran, 
the Soviets made an aggressive, potentially dangerous 
move into Afghanistan that posed a threat to world 
peace. 

The Soviets justified their move by insisting that 
they were there by invitation of President Amin to 
protect Afghanistan from an outside source. Amin was 
shot and killed four days after the Soviet move. Babrak 
Karmal (long considered a Russian protege) was in- 
stalled as the new head of state. 

In analyzing reasons for the Soviet move, it has been 
predicted that the USSR, one of the world's leading 
producers of oil, will experience a sharp drop in pro- 
duction by the mid 80's, thus motivating a Soviet desire 
to secure oil rights. A warm water port has also been 
considered as desirable in Soviet aims. 

In the view of foreign affairs experts, the Soviets 
faced two consequences in the politically-turbulent bor- 
der country of Afghanistan. One was to allow a Moscow 
leaning socialist state to dissolve into chaos and fall into 
the hands of Muslim fanatics or move forceably to take 
control of events. 

Moscow chose the latter and received world condem- 
nation for their action. 

No definite reaction or retaliation has taken place at 
this time. While the rest of the world sits and waits for 




the outcome of the confronation of the superpowers, 
the U.S. imposed a rather weak grain and technology 
embargo (to the distress of farmers and business). Se- 
curing Chinese- American relations appears to affect at 
least a Moscow verbal barrage. 

Boycotting the summer Olympic Games appears emi- 
nent for the American athletes and a mediocre possibil- 
ity from about 20 other countries. Jf$| 



Afghanistan/59 



€0H€€«€-R©m^ u& 



Artist desires "normal" life 



f* huck thumped his felt had with 
^"* thumb and index finger and pushed 
his black, shoulder-length hair away from 
his face. He picked up his horn and 
cuddled it against his peacock-blue, velour 
sweatsuit. 

His big, Italian eyes meandered through 



Deb Neff 



the crowd of students in the band room, 
catching on folders of ruffled sheet music, 
clarinet cases, awe-struck stares and 
reverent co-eds climbing on orange, plastic 




chairs to catch a glimpse over the crowd 
that had gathered to question him. 

It had been a long morning for Chuck 
and his feet were sweating inside his white 
Adidas. His forehead was sweating, too. 
He thumped his hat again and swept his 
hand across his bearded face, stopping to 
smooth his soft moustache with two 
fingers. 

He was the shortest man in the room, 
casually dressed, not particularly 
charismatic in his mannerisms, yet 
everyone was looking at him because his 
name was Chuck Mangione. And he 
wondered — as he shuffled his aching 
feet — why this was so. 

He was thinking . . . "I'd like to be 
basic, b-flat human being again and just go 
somewhere and just be like somebody 
else there. This way, my livable world is 
so small." 

This was, of course, an unrealistic 
thought. 

Being a basic, b-flat individual was 
impossible for someone who had finished 
1979 as jazz artist of the year, 
instrumentalist of the year, most 
promising instrumentalist, top fusion artist, 
top producer, and international jazz award 
winner; someone who had toured in 
Japan, England, Holland, Belgium, France, 
Italy and Switzerland; who had played Las 
Vegas and the Hollywood Bowl; and who 
had appeared on "The Tonight Show," 
"The Mike Douglas Show," "The Dinah 
Shore Show," "The Merv Griffin Show," 
and "Dick Clark's 25th Anniversary 
Special." 

Chuck held his horn tighter. He 
remembered when his livable world was 
larger; when he was a b-flat, kicking 
around the streets of Rochester with his 
brothers or after he'd finished his piano 
lessons - tripping down to the little 
grocery store his papa ran. 

Those were the simple days for Chuck, 
but now he's on tour, always on tour. 



Hold Me Tight • Chuck 
Mangione, jazz instrumentalist, 
cuddles his flugle horn while 
talking with jazz lab students. 

photos by Craig Chandler 



Today it was Manhattan. When his 
manager told him all 1800 tickets for 
tonight's performance were sold out in 
one hour and 18 minutes, he thought, 
"Well, that's nice, there are lots of people 
in Manhattan." Then she told him it was 
Manhattan, Kansas. 

'How did I get here?', he may have 
wondered. The students were wondering 
the same thing. 'What was it,' they were 
asking with every starry-eyed stare, 'that 
put Chuck where he was?' 

" Bellavia," Chuck was thinking. 
That's what put him in the limousine and 
in every jazz lover's heart, "Bellavia;" 
beautiful life. 

He remembered that beautiful life well: 
bright Rochester nights, he thought, when 
he and his papa and brothers " would 
go to local clubs to hear somebody like 
Dizzy Gillespie, and father would walk up 
to them like he knew them all his life, and 



he'd say, "Hi, Dizzy! My name is Frank 
Mangione. These are my kids. They play.' 
And before you'd know it* father would 
be talking with these guys, and would 
invite them over for spaghetti and wine, 
and we'd wind up having a jam session in 
the living room." 

. . . Dizzy Gillespie, that was a long 
time ago, Chuck was thinking. "I think I 
was too young to realize who I was 
meeting." Chuck thought that way about 
a lot of old spaghetti guests; Art Blakey, 
Kai Winding, Jimmy Cobb, Sam Jones, 
Junior Mance, Cannonball Adderly, 
Ronnie Zito and Ron Carter. But Dizzy, 
Chuck thought, " I regard him as 
being my musical father. I admired the 
fact that he was having a good time with 
his music. He didn't compromise what he 
was playing. He was the first jazz 
musician I saw who knew how to relate to 
the people." 



Chuck stifled a sigh and looked at the 
growing crowd. He wasn't at home with 
spaghetti now. He was in Manhattan, 
Kansas, in a band room with a lot of b- 
flats and they were asking the same old b- 
flat questions. 

He hugged his horn; a fluglehorn. He 
like calling it "a pregnant trumpet; a 
trumpet with a darker more mellow sound 
and a lower register." 

He thumped his hat again and passed 
his palm around the pheasant-feathered 
rim. He sped back ten years, 
remembering the first time he ever 
pressed the black felt over his forehead. 

"... It was a gift for Christmas, 1969. 
I was in a picture on a poster that way. 
Then I Wore it for an album cover, and 
before you know it, it became a good 
friend .."11 



^MangioneMangioneMangioneMangioneMangloneMangioneMangioneMangioneMangioneMangloneMemgioneMangio^ 

Sells out in less than two hours 



Chuck liked being a jazz 
musician, particularly when 
the audience was appreciative. 

That night they were. It was K- 
State's first concert of the year 
and students were ready to hear 
some music. 

Chuck was ready to play. 

Chuck was proud of the kind of 
music he gave. It was substantive, 
and it was burning hot; "not like 
disco," he thought. 

" I think with anything in 
America, when something becomes 
popular, we saturate everything 
with it. Disco burned out. Probably 
instrumental music is having more 
success now. I think we've been 
insulting the intellects of the 
listening audience by saying they 
couldn't possibly stand to listen to 
something without words for 
several minutes . " 

Chuck wasn't about to insult 
anyone's intellect. He gave the full 
treatment; not shortened versions 
students were used to hearing on 
WIBW or KY102 in which "a 
mastectomy has been performed 
on a song to get it short enough to 
play on the radio," he said. 

He was playing real jazz. He 
knew his stuff and so did the rest 
of his group. They must have been 
instructed backstage to "give it all 
you've got." 

They gave it. 

And they gave it with finesse. 
The band's style was subdued and 
serious. They didn't need 



flamboyant gestures, sparkly 
costumes or strobe-light shows. 
They were there to play. Period. 

And play they did. 

The five-man band blended 10 
instruments in two hours and 15 
minutes of jazz ecstasy. 

They played songs that took 
listeners to another world, and 
took them somewhere human; 
somewhere basic b-flats go, songs 
like; "Pinnacolada," "Land of 
Make Believe," "Hide and Seek 
(ready or not here I come)," 
"Children of Sanchez," "Feels so 
Good," and "I Never Missed 
Someone Before." 

"Pinnacolada" was obviously a 
song Chuck enjoyed. The song was 
so well 'mixed,' with Chris Vadala 
on the soprano sax., Charles 
Meeks on bass, James Bradley on 
drums and Grant Geissman 
creating fresh guitar sounds, it was 
hard to distinguish where all the 
flavorful sounds were coming from. 

In "Land of Make Believe," the 
listener was taken on a long 
journey — perhaps a train ride — 
as the music sped thoughts up or 
slowed them down, depending on 
the musical terrain. No specific 
thoughts were suggested. Instead, 
like the title of the song, the 
listener chugged along the tracks 
of his own imagination. 

Charles Meek's enchanting bass 
emphasized the tension of the hunt 
in "Hide and Seek (ready or not 
here I come)." Chuck had said that 



morning, "there are some tunes 
that have a special bassline I want 
to hear." This bassline could not 
only be heard, but touched and 
tasted. 

"Childen of Sanchez" was the 
title cut of one of his favorite 
albums. This album won him a '78 
Grammy for best pop instrumental 
performance and, from the 
Hollywood Foreign Press 
Association, a nomination for a 
Golden Globe Award for Best 
Original Score. 

For Chuck, " . . writing and 
recording 'Children of Sanchez' 
was one of the most intense 
musical and emotional experiences 
of my life." 

He played like he meant it, and 
like it felt good. 

"Feels so Good" was executed 
flawlessly, and to great applause. 
But perhaps Chuck's vulnerable, 
humanistic side came through most 
clearly on "I Never Missed 
Someone Before." Chuck's fingers 
showered the piano keys. Sweet, 
lonely notes reflected a "Bellavia" 
past as he faded back to a time 
"when all the spaghetti was 
happening," or perhaps back to 
the two daughters he "hadn't seen 
for awhile," or back to the last 
place he toured, or back to the 
place before that, or the place 
before that .... 

Something funny about that song 
though: not a b-flat in it. Ml 




Dynatnic-Mangione solos 
spotlight at K-State's first 
in 1980. 



in the 
concert 



Chuck Mangione/61 




Boredom 

We all experience it. One way or 
another - sitting in General 
Psychology or out on a dull date - 
boredom sets in. 

When compiling cures to boredom, 
daydreaming was the most common relief, 
and the most favorite was that all time 
original: going to Aggieville and getting 
drunk. 

Yes, boredom can hit anywhere and 
anytime. Tiresome classes with monotone 
professors seem to thrive. For the 
freshman, busy work, writing essays for 
English Composition I fill the hours only 
to have the paper returned with dabs of 
red ink throughout. 

The graduate student attacks long, slow 
thesis papers, presentations and drab 
projects. Such is the entomology major 
who spends days and then weeks breeding 
fruit flies only to discover on the last day 
of the experiment someone let the control 
group loose and he must start the entire 
obscure process all over again. 

And then there are those who actually 
graduate. They are faced with weary 
resume writing. Recalling their life and 
their work experience can really get to be 
a drag. Especially when shoveling manure 
turns out to be their only previous 
employment. 

Boredom can lead to excessive sleep 





*.» <* 















62/Boredom 



sets in regardless of remedies 



Jill McAntee 



and in some cases, students grow so 
desperate they cleaned their apartments. 
Or even more gruesome - some students 
reverted to studying. 

Students from small towns admit that in 
their younger days, cruising Main Street 
was a panacea to boredom. Drag down 
Main, around the town square and sure 
enough 15 minutes later the situation is at 
best stale. 

So they turn around and drive the 
other way. At least it saves the tires from 
wearing out unevenly. 

Some students are practical in their 
alternatives to relieving boredom. They 
daydream about ways to make money. 
Others prefer to piddle time away 
watching television, gabbing on the 
telephone, listening to music or doodling 
time away during class. 

Then there's always the old reliable 



subject that no matter how often 
discussed, it never gets old: sex. Whether 
sitting in the Union rating homo sapiens, 
taking sex class, cracking sex jokes or 
discussing sexual deviances, anything 
having to do with sex solves the boredom 
crisis. 

In curing boredom, even inventing 
games will suffice. One such game is 
based on the well-known fact that almost 
everyone passionately hates black 
jellybeans. In times of facing only 'I 
Dream of Jeannie" reruns and worn-out 
disco tunes, a bag of jellybeans and two 
people can relieve that old dry routine. 

Snarfing all the "good" colors, leaving 
only those nasty black jellybeans, one 
person lies down and opens his mouth 
wide. The other hovers over him, trying 
to drop black jellybeans in his mouth. 
Somehow the expression on the victim's 
face when the bomb hits the target 
destroys boredom and satisfies the innate 
need for violence Sigmund Freud insists 



people have. 

Of course curing boredom is always a 
good excuse to "pork out" and gain five 
pounds. Raiding the "fridge" is a 
circumstance resulting more frequently 
from boredom than the hungries. 
Emptying an entire jumbo bag of 
barbeque potato chips fills dull moments, 
as well as bloating the body. 

And finally some active and concerned 
students cure boredom through 
constructive efforts. The protest against 
razing Nichols Gym is a prime example. 

In 1980, even the United States 
government helped extinguish boredom. 
Yes, 18 to 20 year olds were faced with 
registration for the draft. And that is an 
irreversible, not desireable remedy. M 




Ho Hum-While Carol Speer, journalism 
teaching assistant, (upper left) finds 
daydreaming an appropriate means to escape 
grading assignments, Kristine Lawrence, 
graduate in horticulture, (lower left) is plagued 
by a boring class. Cheryl Doyle, senior in 
foods and nutrition science, fights a yawn 
during an early morning lecture. 



photos by Sue Pfannmuller 



Boredom/63 



64 




Rehearsals 

Defore the curtain calls or 

applause can be received much 
time and effort is placed in a 
production. 

The director listens to the same 
line over and over again, carefully 
evaluating each auditioner's 
delivery. 

"Tryouts usually last several 
nights," Ed Schiappa, senior in 
education-speech, said. "You get 
up and read a short portion of the 
play with other people." 

Following the selection of the 
cast the hard work begins. 
Rehearsal practice usually lasts 
about three hours every night, for 
about six weeks, Schiappa said. 



Trying It Out-Duhng auditions 
John Rahe, graduate student in 
theater, tries his best to impress 
the director. 

Take Five-Stopping for a 
breather during rehearsals of the 
"Shadow Box" are Terri Lee, 
freshman in speech and Vicki 
F elder, graduate in speech. 

Let's Do It This Way-Directors 
discuss a scene change in the 
"Robber Bridegroom. " 




Sue Pfannmuller 



take time 



Susan Schlickau 



Cast meeting usually deal with the 
director's concepts of the 
production, Schiappa said. 
Outside individuals, who are 
experts on the topic dealt with in 
the play, are also brought in to 
give the cast more insight into the 
play. 

Blocking, the physical motion 
which determines where you 
stand on stage, is worked on 
during the first week of 
rehearsals. 

"During the next several weeks 
you (cast members) are 
memorizing and exploring 
interpretations," Schiappa said. 
"You are trying to build on the 
character. 

The final stage of rehearsal is 
polishing and technology. This 
step includes makeup, props and 
dress rehearsals. 

When the opening night has 
finally arrived, the cast is nervous 
from anticipation. But all the long 
hours are quickly forgotten when 
the curtain opens, and they say, 
"Now, on with the show "M 



The Shadow Box 

Play Deals 
With Death 

T^eath. 

*-* Nobody likes to deal with "it." But 

sometimes it's inevitable. 

"The Shadow Box," a two-act drama, 
by Michael Cristofer, dealt with inevitable 
death. The play was presented by the 
department of speech and the K-State 
Players, Oct. 4, 5, 6, 1979. 

Edith Hinrichs, play director, said the 
play was looking at life (since death is a 
part of life). "The Shadow Box" portrays 





Sharon Bohn 



how people deal with life and which 
relationships people hold dear to them. 

The play opens with Joe, (Ed Schiappa, 
senior in secondary education) talking to 
an interviewer about his approaching 
death. 

The interviewer isn't seen throughout 
the play. Hinrichs said the invisible 
interviewer becomes the gimmick to 
uncovering individuals' feelings. During the 
play, the interviewer, a psychologist on 
life, becomes a part of the audience. 

The play reveals the life stories of Joe 
and two other individuals who are also 
dying. Each of these individuals resides in 
a hospital for the terminally ill. 

The play goes through the five stages 
of death: denial, anger, bargaining, 
depression and acceptance. It portrays 
how each family member handles the 
acceptance of death and how the dying 
person handles it himself. 

The final scene in the play was filled 
with a great deal of emotional expression. 
All the stages of death were represented 
in one-line phrases recited by the actors. 
In five minutes, the cast summarized the 
views on life and death. HI 



Now, Now-Darla Germeroth tries 
to comfort Lynn Bunker in a touch- 
ing scene from "The Shadow Box. " 

Bottoms Up- Darla Germeroth, 
graduate in speech, tries to escape 
the reality of death. 



Tim Costello 



Shadow Box/65 



Robber Bridegroom 



Country twang and romance in play 



'Take a little bit of dishonesty, a little 
* dash of lustfulness, sprinkled with 
romance and add a country twang and it's 
the play "The Robber Bridegroom." 

The K-State Players and the 
departments of speech and music knitted 
together a production of good down-home 
country entertainment, Nov. 15, 16 and 
17, 1979. 

The setting of the play is the 
Mississippi's Natchez Trace in the late 
1700's and at the time of the great 
highway robbers. 

The play weaves an enticing story 
similar to that of "Snow White." The 
daughter, Rosamund (Linda Haynes 
graduate in speech) is plagued with a 
wicked stepmother. 

The evil stepmother, Salome (Patty 
Wirtz, junior in speech) seems to be 
jealous of Rosamund's pretty looks and 
the special place Rosamund holds in her 
daddy's heart. 

The dishonest robber in the play is 
Jamie Lockhart (Mark Pennington junior 
in theatre). Even though Lockhart was a 
bit more deceitful and seductive than 
Snow White's Prince Charming, Rosamund 
fell hopelessly in love. 

However, this highway robber had a 
good side and a bad side. The only 
difference between Lockhart's two sides 
were the berry stains he carefully applied 
to his face. Without the stains, Lockhart 
was a generous and upstanding character. 
These stains were to prevent everyone 
from realizing the good gentleman and the 
bad highway robber were in actuality the 
same individual. 

Throughout the bluegrass romance, 
Rosamund's father tries to get his 
daughter married to the good Jamie 
Lockhart, while Rosamund is attempting 
to lure the bad Jamie Lockhart into 
marriage. All the while, Salome is trying 



/ do- Rosamund (Linda Haynes) 
serenades a sleeping ^Robber 
Bridegroom (Mark Pennington) 
during the "Robber Bridegroom. 



Sharon Bohn 



to get rid of Rosamund, in any 
conceivable way. 



The play unravels the tangled confusion 
into the happy ending with the wicked 
stepmother dead, Jamie Lockhart a hero, 
and Rosamund, Mrs. Jamie Lockhart. 




66/Robber Bridegroom 



Old Times 

Dominance 

is 
motivation 

<<*W*he battle to somehow possess Kate 

* is a metaphor for our time," 
director Lewis Shelton, associate professor 
of speech, said. 

Kate, Linda Marie Treiner, is one of the 
three characters of Harold Pinter's "Old 
Times," presented by the K-State Players 
and the Department of Speech Feb. 21-23 
in McCain Auditorium. 

Deely, Bill M. Watt, and Anna, Teresa 
H. Frost, Kate's husband and former 
roommate, respectively, try to show their 
dominance over Kate throughout the 
production. 

"It's the same behavior we see today in 
people who are involved in politics and 
war," Shelton said. "The story is 
contemporary in that we sense the threat 
of people manipulating one another." 

Anna repeatedly stresses the fact that 
Kate depended on her when they were 
roommates in London 20 years ago. Kate 
would always ask Anna what clothing she 
should wear and whether or not she 
should go out for the evening. 

Flirty Anna emphasized that because 
she was Kate's only friend, she was Kate's 
link to other people. 

"I found her," Anna says to Deeley in 
reference to Kate. 

Meanwhile, Deely tries to show that he 
possesses Kate. 

In an efort to show his dominance, he 
cuts Anna down. He suspects lesbianism 
between Anna and Kate and so he tells 
Anna she is a sexual tease. 

Deely gives the example when Anna let 
a man look up her dress in a restaurant. 
He confesses that he was the man. 

Kate seems to enjoy watching the battle 




Rob Clark 



Kathe Rusnak 



and at the end she makes up the most 
powerful memory. She tells how she put 
dirt on both of their faces, metaphorically 
burying them. She rejects both efforts to 
dominate her. 

"It isn't so much the accuracy of what 
the characters say (the accuracy of their 
memories), but what they intend to do," 
Shelton said. 

Because the play was abstract, the 
setting is surrealistic. 

The setting is the "landscape of the 
mind," Shelton said. 



Gottcha- Bill Watt, graduate in 
Education, gives Linda Treiber, 
junior is speech, a worried glance 
during an emotional scene. 



Above the tiered, rock-like platform 
hangs the male and female torsos, which 
the Belgian painter, Rene Magritte often 
used in his works. 

The presence of the torsos in addition 
to many other aspects of the play raise 
many questions with the audience which 
Pinter never answers in the performance 
of "Old Times." M 



Old Times/67 




Hunrlyet N. Aydogan 



K-State 

unique? 

Not really. 



lE7hat makes K-State unique from other uni- 
versities? Nothing. 

Like any other university people teach here. 
The majority of K-Staters attend classes and 
(hopefully) graduate. People congregate in so* 
cial centers that are found on almost every 
campus to complain about cafeteria food, book 
prices, rising tuition, the lines to wait in, pro- 
fessors, classes, parking inadequacies etc. 
They discuss the weather, the opposite sex, 
and weekend plans. 

What makes K-State different are the indi- 
viduals that comprise the campus community. 
Constantly changing from semester to semes- 
ter, individuals at K-State are drawn from 
farms, towns, cities, foreign countries and oth- 
er states. The individuals gather and mix, cre- 
ating the special atmosphere at K-State. 




68/Photo Study 





Bell Tower-Anderson Hall 
represents K -St ate. 

Balloon Parking-(left)Steve 
Collins, junior in architecture 
watches the opening of the 
traditional University Open House 
held in the Spring. 

Bump-n-Boogle-To raise money 
for muscular dystrophy, Mothers 
Worry, an Aggieville tavern, 
traditionally has a Bump-a-Thon. 
Cathy Rothleder, junior in graphic 
design, dances with partner, Mike 
Hegarty, sophomore in economics, 
despite a broken ankle. The 
ankle, padded in extra socks and 
a down boot, didn't stop 
Rothleder from dancing the 64- 
hour Bump-a-Thon. 



Craig Chandler 



Photo Study /69 




John Bock 



70/Photo Study 








Snow Trek-Paul Fenlon, senior in 
electronics, makes his way by Mrs. 
Pearl Zimmerman s swept walk to 
a friend's house to go cross 
country skiing. 

High Flight-Good weather brings 
out the frisbee players. Here a 
player shows his mid-air form in a 
tricky catch. 

Pinball Wizards-The K-State 
Union recreation area, located in 
the Union basement, is a busy 
place during the week, especially 
around the pinball machines. 
These three men show their 
winning stances. 



Nancy Zogleman 




HurrJyjrt AvKJogan 



W ■ ^ .,::;..-... 



Out for a Spin-Kristin Buckstead, 
freshman in industrial engineering, 
takes advantage of the ice at 
Manhattan City Park to practice a 
lay-back spin. 

Graphic Consultation-Giving a few 

helpful hints, Andrea Urbas, graduate 
teaching assistant in graphic design, 
confers with one of her students 
during a pre -design drawing class on 
the front steps of Farrell Library. 

The Party's Over-Ralph Fisch, 



senior in mechanical engineering, 
decided home was a better place to 
be after discovering that the sign had 
been changed from Art Building to 
the Party Building. When the sign 
had been returned to 'Art' Building 
someone changed it again, this time 
to Bart's Building. 

Audience-As he sweeps out the 
sculpture room in the West Stadium, 
John Vogt, associate professor of art, 
stops to contemplate a sculpture 
created by one of his students. 






^si 






"y\ 



S» V • 



4 



Rob Clark 



Silg Chandle 



Dave Kaup 



Stuck 








Cort Anderson 



Study Outlet-While the outlet 
tubes have provided wet 
entertainment for many, Dave 
Sandefur, junior in chemical 
engineering, spends an afternoon 
studying on a hill on the east side 
of the tubes. 

Ahoyjill Hummels watches the 
sailing action before she tries her 
hand at the sail. The sailing class 
was offered as a summer class. 

Homeward Bound-(far right) 
Dave Truesdell, sophomore in 
journalism and mass 
communications, heads home 
during the warm weather after a 
day of classes. 

Nina, Pinta, Santa Maria- 

Although smaller versions of 
greater sailing vessels, these three 
sunfish sailboats use the same 
energy, wind. 




Pete Sousa 



Pete Sousa 



74/Photo Study 





Photo Study, 



NATIONAL 



Skylab 

lands 

near 

Australia 



Skylab plummeted to earth Wed. July 
11, 1979 after months of speculations 
by observers as to where it would fall. 
Skylab had been in orbit since it's launch- 
ing May 14, 1973. 

It was a testing ground for the theory 
that astronauts could live and work in 
space for weeks at a time. After success- 
fully completing its mission and continu- 
ing in orbit, it gradually began dropping 
closer to Earth. 

Some 500 pieces of Skylab struck the 
Earth in a 5000 mile path across the 
Indian Ocean and Australia. There were 
no injuries when the pieces scattered 
across the Australian countryside. 



The Sky is Falling- Karen 
Hooker, graduate in biology, 
Scott Calabro, a junior in 
accounting, set up a sign of 
welcome on campus. 



and 




Shah's return demanded 



Americans held hostage in Iran 



On Nov. 4, 1979 a group of Iran- 
ian militants seized the U.S. Embas- 
sy in Iran and held approximately 
60 Americans hostage. The militant 
students vowed not to release the 
hostages until the United States had 
returned ousted shah, Mohammad 
Reca Pahlavi, to stand trial. 



The former shah was undergoing 
medical treatment for cancer in the 
U.S. The U.S. refused their de- 
mands, but on Dec. 15 the shah left 
the U.S. for Panama, which had 
granted him political sanctuary. 

Iran released 13 hostages on Nov. 
19 and 20. A delegation of U.S. 




Craig Chandler 



ministers was allowed to visit the 
hostages for the Christmas holiday. 

In January, a new moderate 
President was elected to take over 
the leadership duties of revolution- 
ary religious leader Ayatollah Ru- 
hollah Khomeini. This brought hope 
to the U.S. of a quick end to the 
stalemate in Iran. However the Iran- 
ian militants remained firm on their 
demands, which the U.S. refused to 
meet. 

In March, a specially appointed 
United Nation's Commission visited 
the hostages and leaders in Iran. 
The five U.N. representatives were 
investigating the hostages condi- 
tions, the alleged crimes of the shah 
and possible negotiation for the re- 
lease of the hostages. 



Proof is in the pictures- 
Students attending an Iranian 
program viewed photographs of 
the shah's alleged victims. 



76 / National News 



Short news 



Pennsylvania's 
China Syndrome 

The incident at Three Mile Island was 
described as the nation's worst commer- 
cial nuclear accident. 

On March 28 the nuclear plant started 
leaking radiation bringing with it the talk 
of a meltdown and general evacuation of 
the populated area around Harrisburg, 
Penn. 

The accident was said to threaten the 
future of the entire nuclear power indus- 
try. On the contrary, advocates of nucle- 
ar energy said that it would strengthen 
their position because Three Mile Is- 
land's safety system proved that nuclear 
systems are safe even when things go 
drastically wrong. 



Treaty signed 
with Soviets 

United States President Jimmy Carter 
and Supreme Soviet Presidium Chair- 
man Leonid I. Brezhnev signed the 
SALT II treaty on June 18 in Vienna, 
Austria. 

To meet the initial 2,400 ceiling, Rus- 
sia must dismantle 100 bombers and 
stop producing or deploying SS-16 stra- 
tegic missies. Both the U.S. and Russia 
may build one new type of landbased 
ballistic missile. U.S. Senate debate on 
SALT II was to begin in early 1980 but 
was delayed with the entry of Russian 
troops into Afghanistan. 



Broken bolt 
kills hundreds 

An American Airlines DC-10 crashed 
shortly after take-off from O'Hare Inter- 
national Airport. The May 25, 1979 
crash killed the 272 passengers and crew 
also two persons on the ground. 

It was noted as the worst civil air disas- 
ter in U.S. history involving one plane. 

It was determined that a broken and 
worn bolt in one of the engine mounts 
caused the crash when the engine fell off 
the DC-10. 



Remote control 
photographer 

The unmanned spacecraft Voyager 1 
and Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 
the spring and summer of 1979 sending 
back detailed photographs of the planet 
and its 14 moons. 

An 11-minute time exposure revealed 
the presence of a ring around Jupiter. 



Remote cont; 

Photographs also showed that Jupiter 
has strong auroras similar to the Earth's 
northern lights. 

An investigation of Jupiter's moons 
showed that it has volcanos, making that 
the only place in the solar system besides 
Earth that has internal upheaval. Voyag- 
ers 1 and 2 will continue their missions 
with 1 scheduled to pass Saturn in 1980 
and 2 reaching Uranus in 1986. 



Troops invade 
Afghanistan 

Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan on 
Dec. 27 as a result of a growing revolt 
against the Russian-backed government. 
The rebellion puts Muslims and Afghan 
tribes against the Afghan army and its 
Russian advisors. By the end of the year 
an estimated 45,000 Russian troops 
were fighting on Afghan soil. 

As a result of the Soviet invasion, 
President Jimmy Carter recommended a 
boycott of the 1980 Summer Olympic 
games to be held in Moscow if Soviet 
troops were not withdrawn by Feb. 20, 
1980. 



Space scout 
takes pictures 

Pioneer 11 provided scientists with 
new and valuable information about the 
planet Saturn in 1979. 

Its scouting mission was termed ex- 
tremely successful particularly because 
of specific information gathered about 
Titan. 

Titan is a moon of Saturn and the only 
moon in the solar system known to have 
an atmosphere. Some scientists have 
speculated that it might harbor some 
form of life. The first pictures of Titan 
came in at the University of Arizona's 
Ames Research Center and showed a 
fuzzy, reddish-yellow ball. 



Twisters hit 
border town 

A series of tornados bruised several 
towns on the Texas-Oklahoma border 
area on April 10. At least 60 persons 
were killed and over 800 were injured. 
Wichita Falls, Texas was hit the hardest 
where 44 persons died. 

National Guardsmen were called out 
in Wichita Falls and Lawton, Oklahoma 
to search for survivors and to prevent 
looting. 



Pope visits 
oval office 

Pope John Paul II became the first 
Roman Catholic Pope to ever set foot in 
the White House while on a United 
States tour in early October. He visited 
six cities in one week and celebrated 
mass before huge outdoor congrega- 
tions. On Oct. 2 he addressed the United 
National General Assembly in New 
York. 

The only other Pope to set foot on 
U.S. soil was Paul VI while making a 13- 
hour pilgrimage for peace in 1965. 



Southern rabbit 
lacks hospitality 

President Carter escaped injury dur- 
ing a mid-September fishing trip near 
Plains, Ga., when he was attacked by a 
rabbit. 

It was guessed the rabbit was fleeing 



Rabbit cont; 

from a predator when it swam towards 
the canoe the President was fishing from. 
Carter beat back the hissing rabbit with a 
canoe paddle. A picture taken by one of 
Carter's aides helped convince several 
skeptical staff members of the validity of 
the President's escapade. 



Wild winds 
batter coast 

With winds up to 150 miles per hour, 
Hurricane David swept through the Car- 
ribaean and Eastern United States from 
Aug. 29 through Sept. 6. More than 
1,300 people died and 100,000 people 
were left homeless as a result of the 
storm. 

In the New England area, electrical 
power was knocked out for two million 
people, causing school closings and 
evacuation of the area. The Dominican 
Republic was hardest hit where about 
1,100 people died. 




Former First Lady dies 



Former first lady Mamie Eisenhower 
died Nov. 1, 1979 and was buried in 
Abilene, Kan. alongside of Dwight at the 
"Place of Meditation." Approximately 
1000 people attended the services. For- 



mer President and Mrs. Richard Nixon 
were among the mourners. "Ike" and 
Mamie were married on July 1, 1916. 
They were married almost 53 years. 



Hero lost to cancer 



On June 11 John Wayne, "The 
Duke," fought and lost his last battle. 
Wayne died of cancer in a Los Angeles 
hospital with family and friends at hand. 

Wayne was born in Iowa in 1907 and 
was christened Marion Micheal Morri- 
son. He picked up the nickname Duke 
because of a pet Airedale by that name. 
The family moved to California where 
Wayne played football in high school and 
college. 

His first job in Hollywood was as a 
prop man. He did bit parts and low 



grade westerns for several years and 
then got his first break in "Stagecoach." 
After that a string of movies followed, 
some classics and others flops. In 1970 
he won an Oscar for his role as Rooster 
Cogburn in "True Grit." 

His last public appearance was at the 
1979 Academy of Motion Pictures Arts 
and Science awards ceremony in April. 
After a series of operations and radiation 
treatments for cancer he lost the fight — 
and America lost a hero. 



National News / 77 



KANSAS-MANHATTAN 



Spring cleaning 
at Tuttle Creek 



Once every five years, a troop of 
Army Corps of Engineers tackle the larg- 
est de-watering process in the Kansas 
City District. Tuttle Creek Reservior was 
shut off in March. The time-consuming 
process was the fourth since the comple- 
tion of the dam in 1962. 

The specialists inspect the entire oper- 
ation. The results are published in the 
Corps manual. 

More than 1,000 feet of tubing in four 
lines were streched across the Blue Riv- 
er. Once the 2.1 million gallons of water 
was drained from the tubes, the divide 
and conquer strategy was applied, a; 
troops split the week long jobs. 



During the de-watering procsss the 
Kansas Fish and Game Commission re- 
moved 5,000 to 6,000 fish from the sill 
floor. 

A half-ton of rock and debris was gath- 
ered when the clean-up crew swept the 
floor of the tubes. 

The remaining work will be completed 
next year if funds are provided by Con- 
gress. 

Down the tubes- Two Army 
Corps of Engineers employees 
leave the overflow tubes at Tuttle 
Creek Reservoir. 



Bystander 

killed in city 
kidnapping 



Kevin Kitchen, 21, of Manhattan, died 
between 2 a.m. and 3 a.m. on Sept. 11 
from a gun shot wound to the head. 

Riley County Police said Kitchen was 
apparently visiting two women in the 
Sandstone Apartments when he acciden- 
tally walked in on a drug sale. 

Two men were in the apartment, rent- 
ed by Kirsten McGuyton and Christel 
Watson. The one woman sold an undis- 
closed amount of marijuana to the pair, 
police said. After the transaction, the 



men left and came back later to abduct 
the women. 

The two women were led from the 
apartment at gun point. 

On the way to the car Watson es- 
caped, but McGuyton was taken to the 
kidnapper's home. 

Meanwhile, Watson called some 
friends. Kitchen's body was later discov- 
ered in the bedroom of the apartment. 

Joe Myers was charged with first-de- 
gree murder and kidnapping. 




Controversial bill 



John Bock 



Drinking age proposal killed 



A proposal to increase the legal age for 
the consumption of ceral malt beverages 
from 18 to 21 was introduced to the Kan- 
sas Legislature during February. 

The controversial bill was studied by the 
House Federal and State Affairs Commit- 
tee. 

On March 6 the committee killed the bill, 
12-8, which would have raised the legal 
age of drinking 3.2 percent beer in Kansas. 

The bill was debated in an open hearing 
on Feb. 25. Many of the 300 attenders 



offered testimony in the debate. Oppo- 
nents and proponents of the bill were each 
allowed 45 minutes to voice their opinions. 

K-State, the University of Kansas and 
several students representing Kansas high 
schools joined legislators, businessmen and 
other citizens in critism of the proposal. 

Freedom of choice was the primary ar- 
gument against the bill. The ability to make 
responsible decisions, concerning an indi- 
vidual's personal actions and lifestyles, was 
expressed by one of the numerous oppo- 



nents. 

Considerable bickering was also heard in 
favor of the bill. Rev. Richaerd Taylor, Jr., 
president of Kansas for Life at Its Best (the 
state's dry organization) headed the propo- 
nents. 

Taylor, who toured around the state, felt 
that the legal age should be raised to de- 
crease the number of accidents which oc- 
cur when driving while intoxicated. 



78 / Kansas-Manhattan News 




Short News 



Banker's son 
killed in Peabody 

Timothy Newfield, 18, was charged 
with kidnapping, first-degree murder, fel- 
ony murder, robbery and burglary in 
connection with the July 29 death of 
Peabody banker's son, Grant Avery. 

Avery, who was also employed at the 
bank, died of gunshot wounds suffered 
July 29 during an abortive kidnapping 
and extortion attempt. Newfield was a 
former Peabody resident. 



Track cut on 
bankrupt trains 

The Rock Island Railroad claimed 
bankrupcy and it took with it a portion of 
the Kansas economy. On April 1, the 
Rock Island trains ceased to run on more 
than 1,000 miles of Kansas track. The 



Train cont; 

Rock Island hauled about 38 percent of 
the state's agricultural products. The 
loss means a direct monetary loss 
through increased fuel consumption and 
job losses, as well as a less measurable 
loss from possible lost industry. 



Congress bill 
proposes park 

A bill to create a 374,000 acre Tall- 
grass Prairie National Reserve in Kansas 
and Oklahoma was introduced Oct. 15, 
1979 in the U.S. House of Representa- 
tives. Larry Winn (R. Kan.) is a staunch 
backer of the park proposal which has 
caused heated debate among Kansans. 

The purpose of the park would be to 
preserve prairie animals such as the van- 
ishing buffalo and jackrabbit. Also, an 
area of the original tallgrass prairie 
would be preserved. 



John Bock 

Twister damages 
four counties 

A twister on Oct. 10, 1979 caused 
extensive damage in four Kansas coun- 
ties. In Clay Center, seven employees of 
the Keymill Egg Farm were injured. 

Most of the damage occurred in Clay 
County although funnels also touched 
down in Riley and Pottawatomie Coun- 
ties. Several counties reported tele- 
phone and power lines down and several 
farms were destroyed. 

The fall tornado was caused by warm, 
moist air causing a trough of low pres- 
sure in the middle areas of the atmo- 
sphere. 



China tour for 
trade relations 

K-State President Duane Acker was 
part of a 20-member trade delegation 
who visited China to talk about starting 




Autumn ashes- Dwayne Nichols 
heads for home after helping a 
neighbor prevent a spreading 
trash fire from reaching his home. 
The Manhattan Fire Department 
extinguished the fire which spread 
from a ravine near the city 
landfill. 



Tour cont; 

trade relations. The group, led by Kan- 
sas Governor John Carlin, left on Aug. 
12, 1979 and stayed 10 days in China. 

The Chinese expressed some interest 
in student exchanges and having scholars 
exchanging with some guest lecturing 
Chinese educators particularly ex 
pressed a desire for people to teach Eng 
lish either on a long or short term basis 

Agricultural techniques were dis 
cussed, although the Chinese offered lit 
tie information about their experie 
ments. 



Excessive speed 
causes crash 

An Amtrak train derailed on Oct. 2, 
1979 in west Lawrence, killing 2 people 
and injuring 69. The 18-car train was 
bound for Chicago from Houston and 
Los Angeles on the Santa Fe Railway 
tracks. 

The train was taped at traveling 78 
m.p.h. on a curve that was posted 30 
m.p.h. The derailment occured on the 7- 
degree curve. 

Wreckage of the 18-car combined 
train was strewn along the right-of-way 
up to a half mile. One of the cars landed 
against a home near the tracks but no 
one in it was injured. Fire in three of the 
derailed cars was quickly extinguished. 

The National Transportation Safety 
Board sent a seven-member team to 
Lawrence to investigate the accident. 



Drive in Bakery- Riley County 
ambulance attendants carry Elford 
Steiner from the rubble of 
Swanson's Bakery. Steiner was 
inside when a truck crashed 
through the front of the store. 



Bo Rader 



Kansas-Manhattan News / 79 



K-STATE 



Complex 

nearly 

complete 

K-State's recreation facility, under 
construction west of the Washburn com- 
plex, is scheduled to be completed in 
December 1980. 

The completed facility will house two 
gymnasiums with courts equipped for 
basketball, volleyball, badminton and 
tennis. A jogging balcony will be con- 
structed around the perimeter of one 
gymnasium and will be approximately 
150 yards long. 

Men's and women's locker rooms, a 
weight room, 16 handball and raquetball 
courts and a room designed for dance 
and combative sports will also be pro- 
vided in the new facility. 




Scott Leibler 



New signs alter bike paths 



Bikeways remained part of the K-State 
campus, but they took on a new appearance 
this fall. 

The changes, effective Sept. 12, were 
proposed by the traffic and security council. 



to a two-way street between Lover's Lane 
and Petticoat Lane. This alteration was to 
increase the service access to Eisenhower 
and Holton Halls. 

Bike path signs were posted between Col- 



was added to Petticoat Lane, to replace the 
bikeway formerly on Campus Creek Road. 
This was to eliminate hazardous conditions 
and blockage of traffic at the Infant Child 
Care Center. 



They included Mid-Campus Drive returning lege Heights and Claflin. A one-way path 



Times are changing 



The times are changing and K- 
State is determined not to be left 
behind. Proposals are made through- 
out the year by facuty, students, ad- 
ministrators, legislators and others in 
an attempt to improve K-State, its 
curriculum and its graduates. 

But, only a few ever get past the 
talking stage. Three of the past 
year's proposals which have re- 
ceived a second look deal with Ni- 
chol's Gymnasium, reorganization of 
the administration in the College of 
Agriculture and degree requirement 
changes in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Nichol's Gymnasium has been 
saved, at least for now. The Kansas 
Legislature is expected to pass a rec- 
ommendation that nearly $400,000 
be appropriated for stabilization of 
the existing native limestome struc- 
ture and planning for future recon- 



struction. Present plans call for li- 
brary storage in the basement and 
eventually moving the Departments 
of Speech, Computer Science and 
Statistics into the rebuilt structure. 

K-State's oldest college may also 
undergo some changes. Beginning in 
November 1979, Roger Mitchell, 
Vice-President for Agriculture, pro- 
posed a reorganization of the admin- 
istrative positons in the College of 
Agriculture. The initial proposal 
would have grouped the titles of 
Dean of Agriculture and Director of 
he Agricultural Experiment Station 
under one position to be held by 
Mitchell. However, President Duane 
Acker postponed a decision on Mit- 
chell's reorginazation plan. 

In March, after consulting with fac- 
ulty members throughout the Col- 
lege of Agriculture, Acker an- 
nounced that he would appoint a 



consultation team to make sugges- 
tions for improving the organization 
within the college. Final plans will be 
announced in May, with the plan be- 
ing implemented step by step until 
full implementation by Jan. 1, 1981. 

Also wading through mountains of 
red tape is a proposed change in the 
Arts and Science curriculum. 

The proposal, called Status Re- 
port 11, would increase the number 
of required courses and increases the 
specificity of requirements for both 
the Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bache- 
lor of Science (BS) degrees within the 
college. 

The changes are the result of a 
discussion started two years ago 
when it was suggested at an Arts and 
Sciences faculty meeting that the BS 
degree from K-State in Arts and Sci- 
ences was "cheap". 




80 / K-State News 



Short News 



Two is company; 
nine's a crowd 

K-State's residence halls were full to 
overflowing at the beginning of the fall 
semester. Nine students were forced to 
live in overflow housing in Marlatt's base- 
ment. The residents lived in the one- 
room quarters until vacancies opened up 
in the residence halls. 



Explosion fumes 
congest Willard 

Pungent fumes filled Willard Hall 
when a one-gallon metal canister con- 
taining an undetermined chemical sub- 
stance exploded on Aug. 26, 1976 in the 
basement waste-disposal storeroom. 
There were no injuries from the explo- 
sion. 

Campus and Manhattan firefighters 
wearing airpacks, removed the canister 
and three other bulging containers to an 
explosion resistant room near the store- 
room in Willard. 



Physicist dies 
of heart attack 

James Macdonald, 43, an internation- 
ally known atomic physicist at K-State, 
died in Houston on Dec. 12 of an appar- 
ent heart attack. 

Macdonald had been attending meet- 
ings of the Electron and Atomic Physics 
Section of the American Physical Society 
when he suffered the attack. 

A native of Canada, Macdonald joined 



Physicist cont; 

the K-State physics faculty in 1968 as an 
assistant professor. He was promoted to 
an associate professor in 1971 and to full 
professor in 1975. 



K-Stater bound 
for England 

Elaine Hefty, a 1978 K-State graduate 
is the first women from K-State to be 
selected as one of 32 Rhodes Scholars. 
Hefty was chosen through a screening 
process. The Rhodes Scholarship pro- 
vides for two years of tuition free study 
at Oxford, England. Hefty plans to study 
physiological sciences. 

Crackdown 
on coolers 

A crackdown on coolers at KSU Stadi- 
um came as a result of beer can throwing 
incidents at the K-State vs. Tulsa game. 
One woman was knocked out when hit 
by a full beer can and the wife of a Tulsa 
coach was hit by a beer can. 

State law prohibits consumption of li- 
quor or beer containing more than 3.2 
percent alcohol on state owned proper- 
ty- 
Department head 

found dead in car 

Robert Coon, 50, head of K-State's 
Department of Modern Languages, was 
found dead Dec. 9, 1979 in a parking lot 
south of Ci-Co Park in northwest Man- 




Death cont; 

hattan. 

The cause of death was determined to 
be a self-inflicted shotgun wound to the 
head, according to Riley County Police. 
The body was found in his 1966 Ford 
station wagon. 

A native of Poughkeepsie, N.Y., Coon 
joined the K-State faculty as Modern 
Languages Department Head in 1971. 



Suicide 
claims senior 

Connie Wells, senior in Bakery Sci- 
ence and Management, died from poi- 
soning in an apparent suicide. She was 
found dead in Shellenberger Hall on Feb. 
3, 1980 by a campus security officer. 

Wells lived in Smurthwaite Scholar- 
ship House and was a member of Alpha 
Zeta and Gamma Sigma Delta agricul- 
ture honoraries. A memorial will be es- 
tablished through the University by 
Smurthwaite residents. 




John Bock 

Step Saver- Dale Davis, driver 
for K-State's shuttle service, helps 
Andrea Watson, freshman in 
English and anthrogolgy, into the 
car. 



Flames fanned 
by thunderstorm 

A newly constructed hay barn on K- 
State's campus was destroyed in a night 
fire on Oct. 18, 1979. Located east of 
the Veterinary Medicine Complex, the 
barn was filled with an estimated 20,000 
bales of straw and prairie hay. 

The fire started during a thunderstorm 
and was evidently caused by lightning. 

Approximately 300 bystanders 
watched the Campus and Manhattan 
Fire Departments extinguish the flames. 

Damage was estimated at $35,000 for 
the building and the immediate site. 



Twirlers tops 
in nation 

K-State's feature twirlers, Darrell Con- 
erly and Cindy Fangment, out-per- 
formed 40 other twirler teams when 
they placed first at the National Baton 
Twirling Association's World Champion- 
ship. The competition, held during the 
summer at Notre Dame, hosted twirlers 
from around the world. 

Conerly also retained the world sin- 
gles championship, which he had earned 
the previous summer. 

Conerly started twirling for K-State 
during the 1976-77 basketball season. 
He became the feature twirler for the 
1978 and 1979 football seasons, while 
continuing to twirl at halftime of basket- 
ball games. 



Nancy Zogleman 



K-State News / 81 




I 



Hurrlyet N. Aydogan 



82/Academics 



highlights 



Sleeper-The quiet stacks in 
Farrell Library are preferred by 
some students for studying — or 
serious napping. 




Solar Study-Ernest Carter, junior 
in computer science, studies 
sunspots for an astronomy class in 
Manhattan City Park. 



Dave Kaup 



And they're 
younger every year 

Traveling loudly in sixes, wearing leisure suits 
and bookbound, the annual wave of freshmen 
hit campus 84 

In for the money 

Just making it, graduate teaching assistants 
find themselves playing the dual roles of 
student and teacher 128 

Colleges 

Agriculture 86 

Architecture 94 

Arts And Sciences 98 

Business . 108 

Education 110 

Engineering 112 

Home Economics 118 

Veterinary Science 124 




1^ -State isn't one that concerns itself with only pro- 
ducing great thinkers. But also great doers. The 
practicality of K-State's curricula is valued by employers 
across the nation. About 800 employers visit the campus 
to conduct approximately 12,000 interviews a year. 

Almost all the colleges have programs that offer the 
opportunity for practical experience. In Arts and Sci- 
ences, the art department offers MATRIX to senior 
graphic students who work on designing logos, packag- 
ing flyers, posters etc, for various departments on cam- 
pus. Prospective journalists can work on local papers for 
an intersession or summer. 

Dieticians gain practical experience from the home 
economic program of working in the surrounding area 
such as nearby hospitals and the campus food centers. 

For students majoring in business and a foreign lan- 
guage, the business college has a foreign exchange pro- 
gram. Thus academia meets practical application. 



Academics/83 




Please . . . 

don't eat the freshmen 



W heard their footsteps on the bricks 
* before I saw them. 

"Excuse me?" a voice said. 

I turned to see six smiling, slightly 
embarrassed baby faces. 

Freshmen, I told myself. Gotta be. 
There's six of them. No one runs around 
in sixes except freshmen. I'd always been 
told it had something to do with safety in 
numbers, but who really knows what 
paranoia lurks in the minds of the 
underclass. 

When will frosh learn to walk softly and 
carry a big stick? I thought. As it was I 
had no desire for blood that day so I 
smiled and said, "Oh, hi. How ya doin'?" 

They were not to be deceived. 

"We're taking a poll," they said, eyeing 
me suspiciously. "Do you know where 
Anderson Hall is?" 

"As a matter of fact, yes I do," I said. 

They waited. 

I stook in silence smiling. 

It took them a few minutes to realize 



Pat Davis 



that I wasn't merely pausing for air. The 
terror became evident in their faces as I 
saw one of them mouth to the other, 
"Oh, God! She isn't going to tell us!" 

Nervously, they shifted all their books 
to the other arm. And straightened their 
ties. In unison. And waited. 

I smiled. 

"So," I asked, "any other questions?" 

They were speechless. I could almost 
hear them silently brainstorming for their 

next move when the light bulb 

appeared above Martin's head. (I know his 
name was Martin because his mother had 
written it on top of all his notebooks.) 

"Yep," he said, "I do have a few more 
questions. If we need to speak to 
President Acker, where do we go?" 

I felt the killer instinct return as I 
pretended to ponder the problem. 

"Well," I finally said, "I think you'd 



have to go to Anderson Hall." 

The light bulb dimmed. 

"Anderson Hall?" he said. 

"Yeah. You know. The one you asked 
me about before," I said. 

"Oh. Of course," he said. "Anderson 
Hall. How silly of me." 

The light bulb went out. 

"Incidently, you'd probably be able to 
remember these things better if you wrote 
them down. This is a poll, isn't it?" 

At that point, the top four books on 
Marvin's pile of texts toppled to the 
ground and landed in a puddle. 

"Say there," I said. "Maybe you should 
get a backpack for those babies. Makes 
'em a lot easier to carry, ya know. 
Besides hauling all those books around on 
your arm wrinkles the sleeve of your 
leisure suit jacket." 

As I spoke I noticed that the book now 



84/Freshmen 




on top of Marvin's stack was also about 
to take a dip. Which really wouldn't be 
that exciting except that his tie was stuck 
on a paper clip between pages 88 and 
89. 

This definitely was going to be one of 
my better days, I thought. 

Marvin and his friends evidently didn't 
notice his tie. They were to busy 
brainstorming again. Still trying to figure 
out how to get to Anderson, I suppose. 

Finally, I could stand it no longer. 

"Gee," I said. "That's a really nice tie. 
Do you always wear it that way?" 

"You mean with this shirt?" Marvin 
said. 

"No. I mean with that book. It certainly 
is creative, I must admit. Are you in 
fashion design or something?" 

Martin's eyes were starting to water. 



K^ 



Again I smiled. 

"Well, I really should be going. Last 
chance for questions." 

Realizing defeat, the guys all nodded at 
Martin as he looked from one face to the 
other. 

"Okay, Would you please tell us how 
to get to Anderson Hall?" he asked sadly. 

"Oh, sure, It's right there," I said, 
pointing a few feet across the courtyard. 

Martin began to weep. 

"Thanks a lot," said one of the others. 
"We're uh well . . we're 

freshmen." 

"Really?" I said. "I couldn't tell." M 



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86'/ Ag Reorganization 



y. 



College of Agriculture 

Reorganization proposal scrutinized 



ijk proposal for reorganization of the 
■"administration of the College of 
Agriculture that was to take effect 
January 1, 1980, was delayed by 
President Duane Acker. 

In a letter to deans, department 
heads, and directors on November 9, 
Acker said he would review the 
orgainzation plans proposed by Roger 
Mitchell, vice president for agriculture, 
with advice from administrators and 
faculty. 

The postponement came in 
response to objections about the 
reorganization from Carroll Hess, dean 
of agriculture, Floyd Smith, director of 
the agricultural experiment station, 
and the Dean's Council. 

The reorganization plan designed by 
Mitchell is an effort to consolidate 
programming and budget 
responsibilities between the College of 
Agriculture and the Agricultural 
Experiment Station. The plan would 
have given Mitchell the titles of Dean 
of the College of Agriculture and 
Director of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station of January 1, 
1980. The current Dean of 
Agriculture, Carroll Hess, would 
assume the position of associate dean, 
and Floyd Smith, director of the 
experiment station since 1965, would 
be associate director. 

"My major concern was that normal 
academic procedure and protocol had 
not been followed by Vice President 
Mitchell's reorganization 
announcement," Hess said. Hess said 
he would have supported any reviews 
or evaluations of the college even if it 
would lead to a new administrative 
policy. His main worry was about the 



Kevin Haskins. Anton Arnold v 

integrity of the University when a 
decision such as the reorganization 
plan was reached without the benefit 
of an announced review procedure. 

Floyd Smith, director of the 
experiment station, believed that the 
reorganization was not necessary. 

"The current plan of having a 
separate director of the agricultural 
experiment station which is conducted 
under the vice-president for 
agriculture, has prevailed for 23 
years," said Smith. 

"To the best of my knowledge, that 
system has functioned extremely well." 

Smith said seven academic deans 
have direct working relationships with 
him and three deans are associate 
directors of the station. These deans 
include Hess; Ruth Hoeflin, dean of 
the College of Home Economics and 
Donald Trotter, dean of the College of 
Veterinary Medicine. 

"So logically, the academic deans 
should serve as a consultive group as 
decisions are made with regard to the 
proposal," Smith said. 

Hoeflin expressed concern over the 
fact that Mitchell would remain vice- 
president of agriculture after becoming 
dean of the College of Agriculture. 

"What I'm worried about with this 
whole reorganization is what's going to 
happen to the Dean's Council. (We 
would have) one vice president who is 
also a dean. Where do the rest of us 
stand?" said Hoeflin. 

The Dean's Council expressed its 
unanimous opposition to the 
reorganization plan in a letter to Acker 



two days before Acker's decision to 
postpone the plan, Hess said. 

Acker said the postponement did 
not "prejudge" the proposal. "My 
only observation (at this time) would 
be that he has put forward a structure 
with features that have been put to 
work at other institutions." 

In his letter to deans, department 
heads and faculty on November 9 in 
which he announced that he would 
review the proposal, Acker said, 
"Until that review is completed and 
any reorganization plan is developed, I 
believe it would be premature to act 
upon proposals for reorganizing any 
portion of the university." 

Mitchell said his was the top 
administrative role connected with 
agriculture. 

"Title and responsibiltiy need to go 
together. The first person responsible 
for a program at any institution is 
usually called the dean." 

"I recognize when change occurs, 
people are very likely to have 
concern," said Mitchell, "But when 
they understand what we will do, they 
will find this a very workable 
arrangement." 

The reorganization will allow for 
activities to be properly channelled to 
the correct people within the college, 
Michell said. 

"It will streamline decision-making 
for department heads and we hope 
that will help everyone that uses the 
University's (agricultural) facilities." 
Mitchell said. 

Acker said the review of the 
organization is expected to be 
completr ' < ithin the first few months 

of 1980 m 






\ 



I 



V 



H in i 




C * 



"In a period of worsening 
world hunger, the world 
becomes our campus. Kansas 
and Great Plains Agriculture 
must be focused on 
expanding export markets 
to help feed a hungry 
world. "-Carroll V. Hess, dears 



Ag Reorganization/87 




TOP HOW: Brian E. Beisner, Gena E. Courier, Ruth 
E. Blesenthal, Marvin L. Rose, Dale R. Anders, John 
W. George, Larry F. Roeder. THIRD ROW: Nicholas 
V. Stroda, Sheldon R. Zenger, Gregory D. Claasen, 
Roger A. Meeks, Kenneth W. Wood, Suzanne M. 
Temple. SECOND ROW: Joe L. Hodgson, Tom M. 
Pacha, Doug D. Spears, Kerry L. Hoops, Bryan W. 
Schurle. BOTTOM ROW: Randall P. Walker, Scott 
D, Walker, Jerry D. Bell, Stephen R. tephens, Craig A. 
Wheeler, Kenneth S. Bloom, Terry R. Tlmmons. 



TOP ROW: Sheryl L. Russell, Randall J. Anderes, 
Anthony D. Geiger, Terry E. Finger, Douglas E. 
Wendt, Michael E. Smith, Mark W. Frasier. THIRD 
ROW: John E. Roblson, Matt V. Resseglev, Kim D. 
Krehbiet, Charles R. Banks, Mark K. Schuler, Max C. 
Engle. SECOND ROW: Douglas E. Gray, Galen H. 
Pelton, Robert D. Thompson, Lonnle D. Inlow. BOT- 
TOM HOW: Harry W. Dawson, Steven C. Winter- 
mantel, Gregory D. King, Nell E. McNeill, Terry W. 
Kohler. 



TOP ROW, Debbie E. Chambers, Sandra L. Hundley, 
Sheryl L. Neblock, Brenda F. Hundley, Brad W, Wal- 
ter, Dave Zeller, Greg S. Meier, Mike Smith, Becky A. 
Vining, Carol M. Sobba. THIRD ROW: Pamela A. 
Bell, Anthoney D. Geiger, Gregory D. Claasen, Jeff B, 
Bryant, Keith R. Branson, Charles R. Banks, Thomas 
M. Pacha, Michael D. Beck, Gary S. Brockhoff, Brad 
A. Johnson. SECOND ROW: Jennifer L. Kipp, 
Charles S. Frank, Scott D. Walker, Randall P. Walker, 
Tom W. Ahrens, James C. Pringle, Mark C. Ward, 
David L. Goetsch. BOTTOM ROW: Larry H. Erpeld- 
ing, Lewis A. Worcestor, Douglas S. Packer, Robert S. 
Hook, Leon E. Helnen, David J. Mugler, Joseph K. 
Snyder. 



TOP ROW: Debbie D. Rudicel, Randall J. Anderes, 
Eileen M. Eggleston, Jerome E. Buser, Tina J. McKIn- 
zie, Carol J. Francis, Patricia Pennel, Lisa D. Wuif- 
kuhle, THIRD ROW: Roger A Meeks, David E. Leh- 
man, DeWayne E. Craghead, Kelley V. Ayres, Susan 
K. Tousignant, Dee Hoffman, Margaret M. Barnett, 
Janice M. Hammarlund. SECOND ROW: Jeffrey D. 
Brose, Brian Huseman, James M. Svec, Craig A. 
Wheeler, Scott Bokelman, Ron Ditmars, Bryan L. 
Goodman, Patricia A. Kolser, Nancy L. Ross. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Kenneth S. Bloom, Stephen L. Pottorff, 
Fred H. Heersche, Brent German, Evan Mai, Anne M. 
Schletzbaum, Carla Klein, Cedric T. Patton, Michelle 
Maddux. 



TOP ROW: Carol M. Sobba, Mary W. Crane, Rox- 
anne L. Beard, Sandra L. Hundley, Sheryl L. Neblock, 
Penny K. Carlson, Brenda F. Hundley, Eleen M. Eggle- 
ston. THIRD ROW: Debbie E. Chambers, Ruth E. 
Blesenthal, Stephanie A. Hull, David D. Juby, Charles 
R. Banks, Debbie J. Clubine, Becky A. Vining, Dave 
Zeller, Marvin C. Hunt. SECOND ROW: Larry H. 
Erpeldlng, Harvey J. Lang, Mike L. Hope, Craig A. 
Wheeler, Cathy A. Sterns, Belinda J. Mason, Dee W. 
James, Timothy L. Miller, Brad D. Rayl, Greg Ketzner. 
BOTTOM ROW: Kevin L. Anderson, Stephen L. 
Pottorff, Joe M. Llenemann, George L. Lauppe, Ste- 
ven D. Hunt, John C. Coen, Alan C.Sobba, Mark A. 
German, Roger M. Llnd. 



College of 

A station 

responds 

to needs 



starting in the mid-1940s. American agricul- 
ture was revolutionized by better technology, better 
seeds, and better use of chemical fertilizers and pesti- 
cides. Farms grew larger and the number of people on 
them dwindled-to less than 5% of today's population, 
compared with 23% in 1940. One farmer in the U.S. 
now feeds 75 people. By comparison, in the Soviet 
Union one farmer feeds only ten people." 

TIME, January 21, 1980 




"Kansas State Univer- 
sity anticipates contin- 
ued strong support for 
its agricultural experi- 
ment station. State and 
Federal formula funds 
should be continued in 
about the same propor- 
tion. 

Floyd Smith, director 



Agriculture 



The proficiency in American 
agriculture today is in no 
small part due to the work of the 
Kansas State Agricultural 
Experiment Station and similar 
institutions established with Federal 
funds under the Hatch Act of 
1888. 

Bulletin No. 1 of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station in April 1888 
explained the birth of the Station, 
"Facts, real or supposed, obtained 
hap-hazard, by luck or chance, 
have so far been principally the 
foundation of agricultural practice. 
It is the demand for better 
knowledge than this-the something 
known, not "guessed"-that has 
called into life the Experiment 
Station." 



Anton Arnoldy 



According to the 1975 Station 
publication "From Desert to 
Breadbasket; Developing Kansas' 
Land Resources" the first job of 
the fledgling Station was "not to 
'begin at the beginning' but to 
bring together 'all the beginnings' 
of agricultural research at the 25- 
year-old College into a continuing, 
systematic, integrated program." 

The Station had a first staff of 
twelve. Nine bulletins plus annual 
reports were issued during the first 
two years. The first annual reports 
answered or discussed questions 
including what wheat varieties 
tested best for yield, resistance to 
disease, and hardiness; the best 
methods of planting, cultivating, 
and harvesting corn; bed 
preparation and yield of garden 



vegetables, and what sorghum 
varieties compared best in feed 
value for stock, or for making 
syrup or sugar. 

The Station now has five branch 
stations across Kansas: the Fort 
Hays branch at Hays, west-central 
Kansas, formed in 1901; the 

"The U.S. now exports more 
wheat, corn, and other coarse 
grains (barley, oats, sorghum) 
than all the rest or the world 
combined." 

TIME, January 21, 1980 

Garden City Branch in Greeley 
County, far-western Kansas, 
formed in 1911; the Colby Branch 
in Thomas County, north-western 
Kansas; formed in 1914: and the 
Southeast Kansas Branch in Mound 
Valley, Parsons, and Columbus, 
formed in 1949. 




"The branch stations are very 
important in meeting the needs for 
research in the different geographic 
regions of Kansas. We try very 
hard to respond to the local 
producers in an area," said Stanley 
Leland, associate director of the 
Station. 

Leland cited the fact that Kansas 
has a wide range in rainfall as one 
need for branch stations. Extreme 
eastern Kansas averages 40 inches 
of rain in a year while the far west 
is as low as 15 inches. 

"Part of our challenge is to 
provide research for small 
producers as well as large 
producers. The needs of a farmer 
with 50 head of cattle can be very 
different than a feed-lot with over 
a 1000 head," said Leland. 

Basic research versus applied 
research has at times been a 
controversial subject for the 
experiment station and even the 
entire College. Even before the 
formation of the Experiment 
Station in 1888, a disagreement 
over policy between the Board of 
Regents and the College had led to 
the resignation of President 
Denison, who believed that classical 
education had its place in a land- 
grant school. The new president, 
John A. Anderson, stressed 
practical and applied training and 
research almost to the exclusion of 
classical education, according to 
"Kansas State University: Quest 
for Identity" by James C. Carey. 

"We support basic research until 
we find that novel piece of 
knowledge that we can use for 
practical application," said Leland. 

"We would be wasting the 
taxpayers money if we limited 
ourself to solving problems only 
through applied research. We can't 
assume that all of the problems in 
agriculture can be solved without 
some basic research." 

"It should be stressed that 
research without reporting is not 
research. There are several levels 
of delivery. We feel that the 
scientist has a responsibility to his 
colleagues to share his findings on 
the professional level. The delivery 
systems to the producers, or users, 
includes several ways. One of the 
most effective systems is the 
Extension System," said Leland. 

The Cooperative Extension was 
formed in 1914 and is used by the 
Station as its main direct route of 
getting research results to the 
P ublic |H 



Farm fresh-Baskets of eggs await 
sorting at the K-State Avery 
Poultry Center near Manhattan. 

A bird in the hand-(center) 
Amos Kahrs, farm superintendent 
at the Avery Poultry Center 
inspects a batch of chicks hatched 
at the center. 



photos by Dave Kaup 



Ag Station/89 



College of 




BOTTOM ROW: Bryan H. Sanchez, Kent E. 
Byrom, Brad D. Hamil!, Tim J. Grossenbacher, 
Gregory W. Kobs. SECOND ROW: Mary A. 
Iwinski, Timothy C. Koester, Susan K. Veach, Hugh 
A. Hoover, Raymond C. Ross, Mark J. Hoover, 
THIRD ROW: William A. Groglio, Sarah G. Norris, 
Betsey Perry, Sondra Herman, Eric J. Olson. 



BOTTOM ROW: Hugh E. Thompson, Terrell E. 
Pritts, Ronald E. Schulze, Jeffrey R. Wlens, Mitch E, 
Meehan, Brad A. Johnson. TOP ROW: Mark A. 
Davis, Wayne Hoener, Dew/ard Robinson, Mark A. 
Epler, Shawn C. Alsup, Susan F. Montgomery. 



BOTTOM ROW: Edward P. Call, Greg J. Savage, 
Martin W. Miller, Kevin g. Ucktelg, Robert E. 
Schutz, Chip C. May. SECOND ROW: 
Ted M. Wilson, Linton L. Lewis, Wayne L. Dewerff, 
Fred H. Heersche, Randy R. Relnhardt, Steven R. 
Hinten. THIRD ROW: Mark C. Houser, Chris L. 
Guenther, Mark R. Ingle, Marlene R. Richardson, 
John C. Coen, Jana A. Stutts. TOP ROW: Susan C. 
Wunderllch, Eileen M. Eggleston, Pamela 1. Van 
Horn, Cindy R. Siemens, LauraJ. Looby, Elizabeth 
C. Stevens, Kathleen C. Bergkamp. 



BOTTOM ROW: Daniel B. Leweke, Gregory Nolt- 
ing, Jeffrey K. Rogers, Gregg A. Tanner, Tom W. 
Stone, Brian Flattery, John Blsh. SECOND ROW: 
Steve A. Kanz, Dave Eustace, Stan Haddock, Rob- 
ert A. Morando, Brian K. Doyle, Anne M. Schletz- 
baum, Kelvin Belin, Stuart Martin. THIRD ROW: 
Scott R. Jordan, Jon D. Stuewe, Evan Thlessen, 
Diane S. Putman, Bryan B. Smlthey, Marilyn S. 
Bolt, Chris H. Johnson, Dave Trumble. TOP ROW: 
Hatden L. Wands, Dennis A. Tucker, Patrick Klnde- 
lan, Kent D. Holder, Heather Hopper, Betsey Per- 
ry, Jane L. Galvin, Richard D. Wullschleger, There- 
sa S. Cogswell, Douglas J. Trumble. 




I place this 

Carcasses 

'■'he alarm clock blares. 

Slowly I shut off the buzz and 
glance at the clock. "Boy, it's 4:30 
a.m. already. What a short night." 

No. This isn't a K-State student 
moonlighting, but one of the meats 
judging team members leaving for 
their bi-weekly workouts. 

The early morning hours of this 
extra-curricular activity cause the 
judging team members to spend many 
weekends and holidays traveling to 
contests. 

"Few students enter college with 
prior knowledge of the meat 
industry," Dell Allen, associate 
professor in animal science and 
industry, and meats judging team 
coach, said. "Through this judging 
experience, we teach them more about 
this aspect of the livestock industry." 

In judging, the individual tries to 
choose a carcass which has "the best 
combination of trimness and muscling, 
with adequate quality," Curtis Russell, 
senior in animal science and industry 
and agriculture education, also a 
member of the 1979 senior meats 
judging team, said. 

In addition to evaluating lamb, pork, 
and beef carcasses, meats judging is 
comprised of yield and quality grades. 

"A yield grade is an estimation of 
the percent of trim retail cuts that a 
carcass will yield. This is determined 
by the degree of exterior finish of the 
carcass, the loin eye area and the 
percent of kidney knob," Russell said. 
"Quality grade is based on the 
maturity and degree of marbling, 
which supposedly indicates the quality 
of the meat." 

Another facet of meat judging 
includes written reasons. Participants 
must be concise in grammar, spelling 
and punctuation, in addition to the 
content of their reasons for judgement 
of the meat. 

"In a total of one year, a team 
member has written between 200 and 
250 sets of reasons. Each one requires 
15 minutes to write, so we are talking 
about a considerable amount of time 
just writing reasons," Allen said. 
"These 200 (sets) are the ones that 
we do as a group, and do not include 
the sets written as practice by the 
individual." 

"After we do a set of reasons as a 
group, I usually try to take the set 
home, and rewrite them, so I probably 
do about twice the amount we do 
during a workout," Lane Chase, junior 
in animal science and industry and 
member of the 1979 senior meats 
team, said. 

"Through the years, most judging 
participants say they learn a lot more 
about writing from writing meats 
reasons than they ever did from an 
English course," Allen said. "The 
reason is that they are highly 
motivated to learn it and do well at it, 
otherwise, if they don't, then they 
don't compete. And that's a pretty 



90/Judging 



Agriculture 



class 



greet students at early morning hours 



Susan Schllckau 



strong motivation to do well." 

Most participants in meats judging 
begin as a member of the junior team, 
during their sophomore year, Allen 
said. They participate in contests at 
Denver and Ft. Worth. The senior 
team members begin their workouts in 
September and continue the learning 
experience until after their final 
contest in late November. 

"Any fulltime student, enrolled in 
the University at the undergraduate 
level, is eligible to judge," Allen said. 
"They don't have to be enrolled in the 
College of Agriculture, just have an 
interest in judging." According to the 
national rules, the participant must 
also maintain a 2.2 grade point 
average in order to be eligible for the 
meats judging team. 

"There is no limit on the number of 
students who go out for the team, but 
only four can judge on each major 
contest," Allen said. 

K-State students have been 
participating in meats judging contests 
for 48 years. The original international 
meats contest was held at Chicago in 
1926, and the American Royal contest 
began in 1927. These two contest are 
now held at Madison, Wis., and 
Emporia, respectively. 

K-State teams have been 
participating continuously since 1927, 
except during World War II, when the 
events were cancelled, Allen said. 

In addition to its long standing, the 
K-State meats judging team has 
maintained a good reputation. 

"K-State has an excellent tradition 
for judging," Allen said. "Since 1927, 
except for '52 and '53, they have 
placed in the top 10 at the American 
Royal contest." This year the senior 
team placed fourth overall at the 
American Royal and 11th at the 
international contest. 

"Though it was difficult to be away 
from my family over Thanksgiving, I 
think it paid off, as we placed well," 
Chase said. "Through judging, you 
make many friends and enhance your 
education. 

"You also learn a lot by going 
through the (packing) plants and seeing 
how things are done," she said. "I 
think, now, that we (judging team 
members) have more insight into the 
meat industry as a whole. And it's 
going to be up to us to pass this 
experience along to others." 

Meats is one of six types of judging 
offered through the College of 
Agriculture. The basic funding for the 
judging teams indirectly comes from 
the Student Governing Association 
(SGA). 

"The original student activity fee 
was paid long ago (early '20s) to 
finance the livestock teams trips to 
their contests. This means support for 
the judging team, has been a very 



long standing tradition here at Kansas 
State University," Allen said. 

In addition to the appropriated 
source of income from the SGA, the 
meats and livestock teams have an 
additional source of income. 

"Though we don't rely totally upon 
these additional funds, we have a fund 
set up in the livestock meat industry 
council, which goes towards judging 
team support," Allen said. The 
royalties from the Animal Science and 
Industry lab manual, witten by four K- 
State professors, Bill Able, Robert 
Hines, Miles McKee and Allen, also go 



into a fund for the judging teams. 

"The students who participate fund 
approximately 70 percent of their 
actual expenses," Allen said. "These 
other funds are only used when we 
actually go on a competition trip, but 
even that doesn't totally cover their 
expenses. 

"Though judging is a costly and 
time consuming endeavor, you get 
more out of this experience than any 
other experience in the University," 
Allen said J//[ 



How much back fat?- Vern 
George, senior, Greg Gardiner, 
sophomore and Connie Pelton, 
junior, all in animal science and 
industry evaluate a pork carcass. 




Scott Liebler 



Judging/91 



Poultry Science Club 





BOTTOM ROW: Paul E. Sanford, Professor, Janet 
A. Jimenez, Yen-Pai Lee Ray, lvette Perez. SEC- 
OND RW: Keith Dannucci, Keith VanSkike, Fran 
Nelson THIRD ROW: Robert E. Wilkins, Sister M. 
Frances Kobets, Steven Schmidt, Jane Wolters. 
TOP ROW: Larry A. Liggett, Reinaldo Colon 



Aggies 
explain 
profiles 



JLM ary Jane Hanson, senior in 
* * Animal Science and Industry says 
she has lived on a farm for most of 
her life. Her family raises wheat for 
the most part, but have also raised 
pigs and beef cattle. 

"I've worked on it (the farm) ever 
since I can remember," Hanson said. 
"To me, agriculture means a way of 
life, it's something I've done all my life 
and I couldn't imagine doing anything 
else." 

She said her love for animals and 
the desire to promote the agricultural 
industry are the main reasons why she 
is majoring in Animal Science. 

In the Animal Science program 
students study livestock breeding, 
genetics, feeding, and basically all 
about them. Hanson said she learned a 
lot about the agricultural field by living 
on a farm, but she still needed the 
book knowledge. 

Hanson said she believes the 
instructors, activities, and courses 
offered by the College of Agriculture 
are successful in preparing students 
for future employment in the 
agricultural industry. 

"The Animal Science department 
has excellent instructors. They make 
you feel comfortable and are willing to 
sit down and talk to you anytime yo 
need help," Hanson sad. 

Also contributing to the success of 
preparing students are the student 
livestock judging teams and research 
projects. These activities allow 
students to partipate and become 



Andrea Carver 



actively involved in the agricultural 
field, according to Hanson. 

The courses which Hanson said 
were most beneficial to her were those 
which involved practical experience 
such as the Livestock and Sales 
Management course. In this course 
students receive first hand experience 
in all that is involved in putting on a 
livestock sale because the class 
organizes and operates a sale, selling 
University cattle, Hanson said. 

After she graduates, Hanson says 
she wants to be a livestock specialist 
working with the four major livestock 
species, beef, swine, sheep, and 
horses. She says she wants to work 
directly with the farmer or feedlot 
operator and do anything from 
management to animal nutrician. 

It's not just the education which she 
is recieving at K-State which pleases 
her, Hanson said, but also the relaxed 
and friendly atmosphere of the 
students in the College of Agriculture. 

"If I had to classify an ag student, 
I'd say we are happy, natural people. 
And 1 think it's because we have a 
common background, most of us are 
from the farm." she said. 

In addition to the common 
backgrounds shared by the agricultural 
students, they tend to share common 
interests and ideas ranging from the 
way they dress to where they party. 

"We stick together," Hanson said. 

Being a woman in a predominately 
man's field and being accepted was 
not difficult to adjust to she said. 

"A woman is very versatile and can 
handle a lot of responsibility. She can 
be an asset whether she is knee-high 
in manure or whatever. A lot of 
women are working in farrowing 
houses now. The work real well there 
because of natural mothering 
instincts," Hanson said. 



BOTTOM ROW: David L. Goetsch, Reg C. Wes- 
cott Jr., Ann Bunck, Mary Hattendorf, Julie M. 
Bunck, Leon E. Heinen, Alan C. Sobba, Rhonda 
Janke, Joe Becker, Walter H. Fick. SECOND 
BOW: Warren F. Schepmann, Fred G. Seller, 
Charles A, Gray, Steve D. Schartz, Gerald D. 
Sharp, Katherina A. Kotoyantz, Maryann Samson, 
Lloyd W. Moon, Kathryn L. Strecker, THIRD 
ROW: Loren J. Moshier, Michael L. Pottorff, Jim G. 
Brand, Clyde A. Burchett, Larry D. Van Fleet, Dave 
Svaty, Timothy L. Miller, Mark Pottorff. TOP 
ROW: Charles R. Dunlap, Steven R. Wehrman, 
Mark J. Ryan, Beth R. Gilmartin, Lisa Auen, Jer- 
ome E. Buser, Daryl G. Sales, John A. Stone. 



Keith Long, senior in Animal 
Science and Industry says he has 
mixed feelings about women in the 
field of agriculture and doubts some 
women's ability to work in the 
industry. 

"There's some women that just 
don't belong there, but then again 
there's some who know a heck of a 
lot more that I do," he said. 

Although Long wears the familiar 
agricultural student garb, frequents the 
Rockin K, enjorys country western 
music and drinks Coors, he says he 
doesn't consider himself to be a 
typical agricultural student. 

"I suppose a typical stereotype 
would be from a small town, farm, or 
ranch, going to school four years and 
then back to the farm. I'm different in 
that I'm not from a strong ag 
background, I'm from Topeka and I'm 
going on to graduate school," he said. 

Long says he's similar to other 
agricultural students because of his 
general interest in the field. 

"I think ag is one of the more 
major items of interest in the years to 
come because of population growth 
and the fact that we'll need more 
food. It's got a good challenge for the 
future," he said. 

Like Hanson, Long agrees that K- 
State's agricultural instructors, 
practical courses, and judging 
experience has been beneficial to him. 

"You could pick up some 
knowledge from working on a ranch 
but you wouldn't know why anything 
works. You would make more 
mistakes and learn by trial and error 
that you would by going through the 
Animal Science program. I don't 
suppose you'd get a better Animal 
Science degree anywhere else. But I'm 
kind of subjective, I guess," Long said 

After graduating from K-State, Long 
plans to get a masters degree in 
commercial cattle production and then 
go into ranching. He says he would 




like to own a ranch but because of 
land prices he'll probably have to 
settle on a management position. 

Long definitely wants a job in 
agriculture because it's the only field 
in which he believes he can gain 
personal satisfaction. 

"Ag is important to me because it's 
what I like. I don't feel like I'm saving 
the world because I'm raising cattle, 
but then again I don't feel any less 
important than the general manager of 
GM," Long said, laf 



Fall 1979 enrollment: 2184 
Spring 1979 graduates: 339 



92/Ag Profile 




Morning Break' Trademark caps 
have become a mark of the 
agriculturist. A deer(John Deere), 
a flying corn cob(DeKalb), COOP, 
iH(InternationaI Harvester) and 
CASE are some of the more 
common caps. Wearing his mark, 
Greg Kimzey, sophomore in 
animal science and industry, takes 
a break after feeding cattle at the 
purebred beef barns north of 
campus. 

Head 'em Up 

Move 'em Out' Moving calves is 
just one of Cordon Stucky's, 
junior in animal science and 
industry, duties at the purebred 
beef barns. 



photos by John Boch 



Ag Profile/93 



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Gym gets 
breath 
of life 



^Jichols Gymnasium almost took its 
last breath when President Acker 
announced the recommendation to 
raze the burned out shell of the castle- 
like structure. 

Artificial respiration was given in the 
form of an Anderson Hall lawn rally 
and a caravan to the state capitol. 
Nichols began to breathe shallowly. 

Concerned architecture students got 
together and organized a competition 
of ideas. 

The contest was sponsored by 
Castle Crusade and the College of 
Architecture and Design. Much of the 
planning and legwork was done by the 
student chapter of the American 
Institute of Architects (AIA), according 
to Richard Wagner, architecture 
instructor. 

Donations from AIA, faculty, and 
townspeople supplied the $100 first 
prize, $35 second prize, and $15 
second prize money. 

According to Tom Hollinberger, the 
basic reason for the competition was 
to get the most out of feasibility study 
monies, to get student input and to 
give a feasibility committee a running 
start. 

Design Problems-Charlie James 
and Jeff Gillum, seniors in 
architecture, work on a project. 
Creating a usable solution for 
Nichols Gym was one problem 
used in design classes. 

Randall J. Shuck 




"In the eighties, the 
environmental design 
professions will bring 
ingenuity to living with 
limited resources." 
Bernd Foerster, Dean 



Janet Terry 



Jerrold Maddox, art department 
head; Daniel Mrozek, associate 
professor of history; Jean Sloop, 
associate professor of music; Robert 
Kruh, dean of graduate school; Greg 
Lorie, junior in architecture; and 
Douglas Wasama, Historic Kansas City 
Foundation staff architect made up the 
screening committee. 

The guidelines of the contest were 
structured so input could be gained 
from others beside the architectural 
department, according to Gene Ernst, 
associate professor of architecture. 

Winners were selected from a total 
of 20 submitted projects. A group of 
Design students are $100 richer for 
their efforts. One member of the 
group Kevin Greischar, senior in 
architecture, said the class spent about 
one week working on the project. 

The winning entry was a plan to be 
implemented in two phases, according 
to Doug McQuillan, another member 
of the group and a senior in 
architecture. 

"The first part of the project 
included making the gym structurally 
sound and putting in an open-air 
theater," McQuillan said. "In the 
second phase a visitor center, cafe, art 
gallery and media center would be 
created." 

Second prize went to Christopher 
Hasek, junior in architecture, and third 
went to Patrick Johnston, a fifth year 
architectural engineering student. jfc| 



TOP ROW: Linda M. Endebrock, Barbara G. An- 
derson, Joan M. Minneman, William J, Klecan. 
SECOND ROW: Rhonda L. Bogers, Lois E. 
Herbers. BOTTOM ROW: Joseph K. Wiedemeir, 
Dede Hildreth, Steven L. Bauer. 



TOP ROW: John A. Poorman, Klmberly K. Juke, 
Darlene Brown-Thompson, Pam Ziegenfuss, Kathy 
Armstrong. THIRD ROW: Floann E. Chapman, 
Shirley Knipp, Denise K. Hoelscher, Gayle K. Duni- 
vent, Linda L. Pickett. SECOND ROW: Barbara L. 
Hoffman, Jana D. Hendrickson, Sue Bardgett, 
Vicky A Gobberdlel. Robyn Sanders. BOTTOM 
ROW: Steven R. Hefta, Mark S. Dayvahlt, Doug S. 
Jones, Mark Gelsinger. 



TOP ROW: Mike Llado, Lynne M. Rieger, Timothy 
Mulligan, Michael Karpowicz, Teri Bishop, William 
G. Young, Steven L. Bauer. SECOND ROW: Far- 
had Atash, Larry Frank, Suzanne Bardgett, Shirley 
Knipp, Barbara Anderson, Brian R. Ball. BOTTOM 
ROW: Joseph K. Wiedemeier, Stanley M. Park, 
Jerry Brlbman, Winton L. Smith, L. Mark Gardner. 



TOP ROW: Chris Meinhardt, Rob Junk, Stan 
Parks. THIRD ROW: David Altenhofen, David 
Bell, Dixie Roberts, Corvln Alstot. SECOND ROW: 
Mike Grandy, Jim Lochashio, Karl Loenig, Brian R. 
Ball. BOTTOM ROW: Lance Braht, John Wilhelm, 
Joy Swallow, Helen Maib, Emily Braht. 




-r Oz Magazine 



Nichols/95 



Dream On- While a surfer hangs 
ten on the wall, Charlie James, 
senior in architecture, draws 
blueprints of a fictional mall in 
Seaton. 

Have A Pepsi Day David Bell, 
professor of architecture, shows 
off a Pepsi machine that was 
placed in his office after several 
of his students pulled an all 
nighter. 




\ 



/ 



Anton Arnoldy 



Tim Costello igjj 

College of Architecture and Design '^L^ 



I Love 
the Nightlife 



Wt was difficult, but I managed to 
*say no to my roommate when he 
tried to drag me down to 
Aggieville "for just one beer." Feeling 
pretty smug about my self-control, I 
walk briskly across campus and enter 
Seaton from the back way. Harsh 
flourescent lighting irritates my eyes as 
I climb the stairs to "my" studio. 
Halfway up the stairs I realize that the 
key to the door is still back on the 
dresser in the apartment. But the 
panic is only slight since I realize 
everyone else in the class has a key 
and someone has to be as crazy as me 
to pass up Aggieville. Just as I 
figured, the studio door is open and 
three classmates are already working 
on tomorrow's project. The smug 
feeling is diminished when I see how 
much they have done on tomorrow's 
project. 

Still not worried, I say hello and 
exchange small talk as I prop my 
drawing board up on some textbooks 
to make it slant toward the front of 
the desk more. Not really in a 
studying mood, old logo designs and 
worthless pieces of scratch paper are 
tossed into the five-gallon paint bucket 
Greg and I share as a waste basket. 
(Greg sits in the desk across from me. 
He is a little bit on the conceited side 
but I can put up with him. After all, 




he is the one who provided the cheap 
receiver and tape deck that sit on the 
unused desk by the wall.) 

Unable to stall any longer, I look at 
the freehanded sheets I did last week 
for tomorrow. 

A sinking feeling is growing in the 
pit of my stomach. I mentally kick 
myself in the shins for taking so long 
on that systems design project and not 
getting to work on this project. 
Glancing over at my partner's board I 
think for a brief second about that 
cold beer I passed up in Aggie. There's 
no escape now, though. I have just set 
myself up for AN ALL-NIGHTER. 

Thinking realistically, I get out the 
instant coffee from my bottom drawer 
and fill the hotpot from the shelf with 
water and plug it in. 

Actually I had anticipated several 
hours of drawing anyway. For the past 
two weeks I had been putting off my 
regular work because I had a systems 
project due. Before that I had been 
putting off the systems project 
because I had regular work due. I 
know I am not ready for an all 
nighter, I have not gone to bed before 
3:30 for the past week because of the 
systems project. 

The architect's lamp I bought at the 



Union two years ago gets swung into 
place as I sit down and take a deep 
breath. The creative juices begin to 
flow as I scratch some ideas on paper. 
Ready now to start on the real thing I 
remember the now-boiling water in the 
hotpot. Pulled back to the real world I 
toss some of Mrs. Olsen's finest in the 
cup my little sister gave me for 
Christmas. I didn't bother to clean the 
stains on the bottom of the cup from 
the last coffee in it. The steam from 
the boiling water almost burns my 
hand when I pour it over the coffee so 
I don't even bother to test it after I 
stir it. 

Returning to the task at hand, 
armed with ideas and my first wind, I 
begin the most productive part of the 
night. After all, I really like this class 
and usually eat it right up. 

Tonight it seems like an eternity 
though. It's two a.m. before I know it 
and I still don't see light at the end of 
the tunnel. By three my mind is 
teasing me with images of sleep and I 
find myself asking my cohorts in 
insanity if they have a template I 
could borrow. They point at the one I 
have on the desk beside me. That 
does it. I need a study break. 

Another cup of coffee drenches my 
throat and I munch from the box of 
Wheat Thins I had in the same drawer 



96/A11 Nighters 





as the coffee. 

Still sluggish, but at least awake now, 
1 start to use old standby timesavers 
like the chart on the wall titled "A 
Designers Survival Index" for fifty 
types of chair designs. I'm so glad I've 
matured from being an underclassman; 
there used to be a lot more all-nighters 
because ot poor time management. 

By seven, I can finally turn in my 
project. It has a lot of rough edges 
but by now I don't care and turn it in 
anyway. Trudging across campus, 
people give me strange looks as they 
go to their seven-thirty class. Back at 
the room, a slight contempt for my 
peacefully sleeping roommate crosses 
my mind as I collapse into bed. Just 
before passing out I set my alarm for 
two hours sleep. 

It is a quarter till twelve. I 
overslept. A fleeting moment of panic 
gives way to a barely audible 
profanity. I missed two classes. The 
alarm is in the "off" position. Tonight 
my roommate will tell me that I 
turned it off but I won't believe him, 
It's dinnertime and I should get up. 
But I've just done an all-nighter. 

I hit the pillow again. Jf^| 



Fall 1979 enrollment: 1074 
Spring 1979 graduates: 119 



BOTTOM ROW- Ray G. Sawyers, Jill E. King,. Mi- 
chael S. Mullen, Zainuddin B. Muhammad. SECOND 
ROW- Robert Payne, Mike Llado, Farhad Atash, 
Chun-Chien Lin, Tom D. Burdett. TOP ROW- Valerie 
J. Kazarian, Claude A. Keithley, Clarence A. Johnson, 
Richard M. Shearer. 



BOTTOM ROW- Linda Porter, Cari Cavassa, Tracey 
Deines, Debbie Wasser, Peggy Patchen. SECOND 
ROW- Michael R. Utech, Dale Bianchard, Mary Ja- 
cobson, Lisa Beam. THIRD ROW- Rita Walsh, Kathy 
Binford, Judy Weltsch. TOP ROW- Andrea Owens, 
Harold Ramiree, Andrew Bolln. 



BOTTOM ROW: Col. Paul A. Barber. Cmdr . Ma) 
Leon E. Grenier, Capt. Tom Darneron, Larry Rhodes 
Bob Dubek, Bob Young. Dan E. Nageyy. Karl West 
Charles E. Peterson, SECOND ROW: Scott E. We 
ber. Phil E. Bingman, John M. Monrad. Joseph R 
Nekuda, Douglas K. Sailee, Douglas L Hufford, Mi 
chael W. Frerichs, Ken Long. THIRD ROW: Dean F. 
Guilmett. Larry E Letcher. Margaret A. Young. Mark 
S. Davis. Scott E. Hern. Mark E. Monteliore Secan. 
Thomas Kipley Albright, Craig F. Campbell TOP 
ROWt Bret Stevens, Cheryl R, Glasker. Deanna L. 
Printz. Joyce R. Jenkins, Steven A Hotchkiss. Jin- 
young Kang, Catherine A. Fairlie. Mark S. Miller. 
James L. Lute; 



BOTTOM ROW: Col. Paul A. Barber. Cmdr.. Maj 
Leon E. Grenier, Rob McCully, Dean Blanken. Allen 
Parsons, Dan Fairbank, Reed Goewey, Dan Standley. 
Randy Canaday. David Ballman. SECOND ROW: 
Doug Tayrien. Clayton W. Childs, Scott Steele. Curt 
Gunther. Donald Castle. James Lay. Brad Stephens. 
Jeff Carra, Craig Hansen, Michael Holloway. THIRD 
ROW: Valerie J. Schebor, Deborah S. Kool. Rick 
Husselman, Jeffrey E. Frye. Norris Luce. Kent Smoth- 
erman, Greg Letcher, Bruce E. Vtets, Jon E Hornbos- 
tel, Emmanuel Bolaris. TOP ROW: Jaime J. Quiros, 
Kathy S. Gradwohl. Kathy A. DeJesus. Connie J. 
Copple. Nathan A. Weinsaft, Roger L. Powers, Steve 
E. Hammock, James A. Dice, Susan L. Stegenga, 
Lachele A. Harper. Chris K. Duffey. 




Student Planning Association 




Aerospace Studies 



Changes include more humanities and 




BOTTOM ROW- Michael Finnegan, Mark A. Ger- 
man, Lanice Thomson, Janet King, James R. Har- 
dy, Wes Babcock, Jim Wells. SECOND ROW- Kim 

S. Myles, Malia J. Wetde, Nadine N. Weller, Jon R. 
Cranmer, Richard M. Henry, Todd M. Hesher. TOP 
ROW- James L. Harrington, Vickie L. Bramroer, 
Paul N. Briggs, Celeste L. Johnson, E. Denise Ja- 
cobson, B. Ellen Johnson, Gregory A. Gooden, 



BOTTOM ROW: Mitchell D. Piper, Richard D. 
Parunner, J. Shad Sanders, Susan B. Haynes. SEC- 
OND ROW: Beth A. James, Julie K. Slagle, G. 
Susan Kersenbreck, Christina L. Whittle. TOP 
ROW: Kim J. Johnson, Danise L. Bailey, Gregory 
A. Gooden, Marita L. Martin, Mary A. Stuckey. 



BOTTOM ROW- Kim K. Wagner, Debra 0. Peter- 
son, Karen L. Motdrup. TOP ROW- Claire L. Lud- 
wig, Ann L. Caine, Janet M. Prebyl. 



At its October 13, 1977 faculty 
** meeting the College of Arts 
and Sciences passed a motion that 
"The Course and Curriculum Commit- 
tee study the current arts and science 
bachelor's degree requirements." 

Over two years later, that motion 
culminated in a proposal to the faculty 
of the college to establish uniform 
humanities and science requirements 
for the bachelor of science and the 
bachelor of arts degrees. The proposal 
outlines requirements which distinguish 
the B.S. degree and sets down 
permissible and impermissible 
duplications and distributions of 
courses between the two. 

The Course and Curriculum 
Committee presented its report in 
April 1978 to the faculty. The findings 
of the committee caused the faculty to 
appoint an ad hoc committee to 
continue the curriculum study and 
report to the Course and Curriculum 
Committeee. This subcommittee 
consisted of a representative of each 
area in arts and sciences who were; 
Professor Lyman Baker, Dr. Wayne 
Nafziger, Dr. Spencer Tomb, Dr. 
Arthur Dayton, Professor Lynn 
Shelton and student representative, 
Lynn Graham. 

A status report by the subcommittee 
in April 1979 stated that in its view, 
the current definition of the B.S. 
degree invited two kinds of problems 
to arise an and that the on problem 
could also be considered in the B.A. 
degree. 

The subcommittee believed that in 
the case of the B.S. degree, the 
minimum requirements for graduation 
had been set too low. The report 
stated that while most students did not 
use the flexibility of the degree to 
escape their proper academic 
obligations, they could, by the way the 
humanities and social science 
requirement was phrased, graduate 
with a B.S. without anything in the 
two areas except philosophy. The B.S. 
degree had no mathematics 
requirements either. 

Stating in the report, the 
subcommittee believed, "the faculty 
ought to regard this possibility as not 
merely undesirable but unacceptable. 

The subcommittee also stated that 
both degrees failed to ensure adequate 
breadth of education that ought to be 
signified by a degree from arts and 
sciences. 

The report continued with stating 
that the pressures of outside standards 
for professional certification some of 
the B.S. curriculum had become 
specialized at the expense of a 
broader education. The subcommittee 
said that the B.A. degree did not have 
as an acute problem of trying to 
squeeze specialized curriculum an 
general requirements together. 



98/Curriculum Changes 



science 



Anton Arnoldy 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Lyman Baker, professor of 
English and subcommitte chairman, 
believes the proposal will help 
correct the problem by establishing 
parallel requirements for both 
degrees. The final proposal was 
scheduled to go before the faculty 
for consideration either December 
1, 1979, or February 1, 1980. 

"We feel that the proposal is in 
a form that the faculty will accept 
at this time. Our compromises on 
the proposal come from the large 
amount of individual input by 
faculty members. Everyone has 
their own opinion on what is 
important and what isn't," said 
Baker. 

Assistant dean John Lilley said 
that K-State is not an isolated case 
as far as curriculum reform is 
concerned. 

"This is something that is being 
thought about across the nation. 
The role of a liberal education 
versus specialization is an issue 
everywhere. Curriculum reform has 
talked about for quite a while. It's 
just that these things must be 
carefully considered. You're talking 
about something that will affect the 
entire college," said LiHey.J^| 



Now let me make this 
perfectly clear- Page Twiss, 
professor in Geology, gives an 
overhead presentation during a 
Faculty-Senate meeting. 




"Faculty members and 
administrators are serious 
about making the instruction 
program as good as it can be" 
William Stamey, dean. 





BOTTOM ROW- Jeffrey B. Carra, Michael E. 
Yerger, Robert S. Altland, Gregory H. Gibson. 
SECOND HOW- David A Hogeboom Patty L. Per- 
daris, Starr Lee, Mary Jacobson, Kevin Tietze. 
THIRD ROW- Laura Lukens, Debbie Rizek, Janine 
Trempy, Leslie Brockman, Debra D. Peterson. 



TOP ROW- Scott Cooper, Mike Starr, Roger K. 
Heiman, Brent Johnson, Dave Axland. SECOND 
ROW- Brian Barnett, Jon Anderson, Joanne Frank- 
lin, Mike Eubanks. BOTTOM ROW- Paula Fell, 
James Harrington, Carol Lose, John Eads. 



TOP ROW- Hania Shaheed, Sean Clipsham, Rod- 
ney Fox, Jamie Schesser, Lisa Rempel, Glenda 
Blair, David Wheaton. SECOND ROW- Kathe M. 
Rusnak, Barbara A. Campbell, Cindy L. Rolph, 
Cheri L. Rolph, Sheri L. Sneed, Hooshans Askari. 
BOTTOM ROW- Charles B. James, Cathy A. Roh- 
leder, Kurtis C. Cramer, Sandra A. Nolder, Beth 
Taylor, Kathleen Downing. 



TOP ROW- Sherl L. Haberman, Julia K. Beems, 
M. Cathy FarTell, Penny K. Carlson, Elaine D. Hob- 
son, Carrie S. Leru, Cynthia, S. Wanklyn, Cindy L. 
Lietz. THIRD ROW- Rebecca A. Sawyer, Lisa A. 
Kreipe, Sandra, K. Sawyer, Sharon A. Berry, 
Heather C. McGuire, Sharon R. Muetlng, Nancy R. 
Nickel. SECOND ROW- Bradley B. Cooper, Kirk 
C. Bierly, Dawn R. Johnson, Dale R. Haury, Clark 
R. Harris, Lori K. Brax, Ronald A. Johnson. BOT- 
TOM ROW- Richard D. Wootton, Hervey W. 
Wright, Ronald L. Lister, Paul A. Farha, Steven W. 
Baker, Richard L. Knight. 



TOP ROW- Kathy J. Kavanaugh, Mary J. Hem- 
phill, Barbara L. Benda, Carol A. Romig, Cindy 
Henricks, Pamela L. Felts, Becky L. Nave. THIRD 
ROW- Julie A. Shields, Wanda Y. Trent, Mary L. 
Bolack, Kimberly A. Smith, Julie A. Fooshee, Kel- 
ley K. Murray. SECOND ROW- Paula M. Santschl, 
Tim M. Corbett, Laura L. Stack, Glenda S. Liddell, 
Annette Burton, Jeff Dowell, Jeffrey C. Nickle. 
BOTTOM ROW- Harvey J. Lang, Judith L. Mar- 
tin, Kris Abrahamson, Patrick F. McKernan, Randy 
Tosh, Barb Swain. 



College of Arts 

DraSt leaves 

*W*the sixties saw the general 
frustration about the military 
involvement in Vietnam released 
against Reserve Officer Training 
Corps(ROTC)establishments on 
campuses across the nation. 

The disillusionment and distrust of 
the military has been attributed to the 
drop in ROTC enrollment. 

In 1965, the Air Force 
ROTC(AFROTC) enrollment was 
1266. The enrollment dropped to 900 
in 1969, 232 in 1972 and 95 in 1979. 

The decline in the enrollment, 
according to Colonel Paul A. Barber, 
head of AFROTC, "was the 
elimination of the draft contributed to 
the decline in ROTC along with the 
dropping of the mandatory two-year 
requirement." 

The two-year requirement was a 
part of the provision in the 
establishment of K-State as a land 
grant college. It required that all male 
students at K-State had to enroll in 
ROTC their freshman and sophomore 
year; the requirement was dropped in 
1967. 

Passing a general aptitude test is 
necessary for consideration in 
AFROTC. A recommendation based 
on evaluations from the leadership lab 
are sent to ROTC headquarters. The 
acceptance of the applicant is based 
on the needs of the respective service 
branch. Once accepted the junior is 




and Sciences 



its mark on ROTC 



placed under contract and a job is 
guaranteed. 

"Deep down we still see students 
that say they want to give something 
for their country," Barber said. 

According to Barber, the 
commissioned officers are placed 
according to their college degrees. If 
an officer graduates with an 
engineering degree, he will be placed 
in a position that will make use of that 
knowledge. 

The commission requires a 
committment of four years, except for 
prospective pilots and navigators who 
must commit six and five years 
respectively after training because of 
the cost of training. 

The drop of about 50 per cent 
enrollment after 1972 affected 
AFROTC, but according to Barber 
"the Air Force has as many people in 
the ROTC program as they are able 
to handle." 

Barber also felt that enrollment is 
definitely on the upswing across 
campuses. He attributes this to less 
discussion of the anti-Vietnam period 
and less anti-war feeling that existed in 



Janet Terry 



No Strings Attached- A ROTC 
cadet attempts to get over the 
moat, instead of through it, during 
leadership reaction training. 



that war. 

"During the war," Barber said, "the 
attitude that developed was a result of 
a long, increasingly unpopular war. 
People became alienated from the 
military and the government in 
general." 

The ROTC program includes 16 
credit hours and no military obligations 
for the first two years. 

Barber said that it costs $500,000 
to make a pilot and four years is not 
enough return on the Air Force's 
investment. 

In recruitment, Barber said the 
emphasis is on employment 
opportunities. 

Prospective Air Force Officers are 
taught to prepare themselves to 
function as an officer and a part of 
the aerospace team Barber sain J^E 



Concentration- Two cadets 
listen to instructions prior to drills 
for leadership reaction training. 

"Rocky 11/"- After four hours of 
training during ROTC's summer 
camp at Fort Riley, Ken Stigen, 
junior in pre-nursing, still has 
plenty of enthusiasm left. 





ROTC/101 




Physics experiments 



Scott Liebler 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Fire Up-Demonstrating the 

changing forms of matter, Ron 

Lee, associate professor of 

physics, ignites a piece of paper 

in Man's Physical World I Lecture. 

Aaaah-Three students in Physics 

Lab conduct an experiment testing 

the acceleration of a free falling 

body. 



^f ou walk into your Physics class a 

* little late. 

At the front of the room, you see 
the girl whose notes you copied last 
week standing very still beside the 
instructor. 

Hanging by a 20-foot string from 
the ceiling, you see a bowling ball. 
The instructor pushes the bowling ball 
away from the girl. It arches toward 
the wall, then changes direction and 
flies menacingly back towards her 
face. 

Just as you're sure her pretty 
countenance is about to be 
transformed into something vaguely 
resembling a roadkill, the bowling ball 
stops just short of her nose (the cute, 
turned-up one you thought so 
attractive) and heads back in the 
direction of the wall. 

No, you haven't just witnessed the 
latest in Chinese torture techniques. 
You've just seen a demonstration of 
potential energy that you're not likely 
to forget for a while. 

And that's just what the instructor 
had in mind. 

"What we're looking for are catchy 
demonstrations that wake people up," 
said Dean Zollman, associate professoi 
of physics. "It's kind of 'show and tell' 
in reverse. We'll catch their attention 



with the demonstration. Then we'll 
explain the theory behind it. More 
than anything, the demonstrations are 
connections with the real world." 

Zollman explained that 
demonstrations are used in all 
introductory physics classes. 

"In any introductory course, it's 
difficult to keep the students' 
attention. They're convinced 
beforehand they don't know physics. I 
use several demonstrations in each 
class to show the relevance of physics 
to their world. It's the next best thing 
to getting students to do it 
themselves." 

Although Zollman admits that most 
physics instructors "are all actors in a 
way", their demonstrations are more 
than game-playing. Physics 
demonstrations have a long tradition. 
By 1938, there were already volumes 
listing hundreds of demonstrations to 
be used in instruction. Class 
demonstrations are general procedure 
across the country, though Zollman 
confesses with "appropriate modesty" 
that K-State's set of demonstrations is 
"one of the best in the country." 

"In fact, the demonstration set here 
had something to do with my decision 
to accept a position here," he said. 

The equipment for the 




Physics/102 



teach 



Russ Hultgren 



demonstrations? 

Zollman said the artifacts only have 
to meet two criteria to attain to the 
wizardry of the science — they have 
to effectively teach a physics principle 
and they have to be easy to move. 

"With only ten minutes between 
classes we have to limit the kinds of 
things we do. As a general rule, if it 
takes more than ten minutes to set up, 
we don't do it," he said. 

The flying bowling balls, Laser light 
shows, and Moog "concerts" do more 
than entertain. They teach, perhaps 
the highest form of entertainment. 

"I would definitely say they were 
effective," Zollman said. "On tests, 
students frequently refer to the 
demonstrations, they ask questions 
about them. 

"Physics is really just a description 
of what happens in the real world. No 
chalkboard can capture that as well as 
a demonstration can." 

In an environment when direct 
correlation between the academic and 
the actual is often blurred, a bowling 
ball on the end of a string can be a 
refreshing taste of reality. t/M 




BOTTOM ROW: Bruce Major, Tim Brecheisen, 
Valerie Oltman, Phil Fay, Dan Hurford, Nancy 
Criss, Debbie Kester, Susan Wells, Charles Bey. 
SECOND ROW: Frosty Lawson, Kent Hermes, 
Alan Schmidt, Joe Weber, Bill Barnes, Randy 
Dickerhoof, Kevin Thayer, Tom Wheeler, Brian 
Tempas, Melissa McCullough, Jeff Terrant, Pat 
Schlegel. TOP ROW: John Strickler, Tim Hersh, 
Donna Moore, Steve Johnson, Sue Schmidt, 
Steve Davidson, Dave Erwin, John Schumaker. 



BOTTOM ROW: Frosty Lawson, Darla Kerr, 
Susan Johnson, Tony Steve, Jeff Tarrant, Jef 
Peckham, John McQuillen, TOP ROW: Nancy 
Beems, Misty Wallace, Dan Brabee, Casey Mus- 
sato, Sandy Anthony, Pete Hagstrand, Frank 
Hyde, Janette Wilson, Dan Mabry, Kent Wallace, 
Charles Bey, Errik Smith. 



BOTTOM ROW-Patrlcia A. Beaudet, Lorl J. 
Blomquist, Susan R Oehmke, Susan G. Kadel, 
Patricia J. Strafuss. SECOND ROW- Pamela K. 
Berghaus, Janet S. Reynolds, Nancy J. Grenslng, 
Shari J. Erickson, Janine L. Kohman, Audrey J. 
Kuhlman. THIRD ROW- Kelly L. Eslinger, 
Jayne B. Kalivoda, Debbie S. Hamilton, Denlse 
D. Degener, Jeri M. Herman, Phoebe Samelson. 
FOURTH BOW- Carol F. Stohs, Priscilla D. 
Howard, Diana L. Hein, Lisa K. Moser, Lisa L. 
Hosier, Morie E. Shum. 



BOTTOM ROW: Lisa Rempel, Kathy Gromer. 
TOP ROW: Pete Soucer, Grant Allison. 




Physics/ 103 




TOP ROW-Annette Norris, Roxanne Beard, Lisa 
M. Garvin, Merry Johnson, Sherr L., Richardson, 
Rebecca D. Crow, Glenda Hutchison, Vicki Ellman. 
THIRD ROW-Diane M. Spade, Malta J. Weide, 
Basbara G. Knieling, Hannah J. Hogue, Robin J. 
Taggart, Kent W. Dedertck, Lillian V. Woods. SEC- 
OND ROW-Steve M. Frazier, Brent A. Adams, 
Lori K. Heinsohn, Julia A. Payne, Kimbra E. Lind- 
burg, Liz Welch, Kevin Rothenberger. BOTTOM 
ROW-Ben D. Mahaffey, Time E. Shinogle, Cindy 
Ott, Dan Swartz, Lynn Barnes, Randy Watson, Bill 
Konicek, Orville Bidwell. 



TOP ROW-Mary Catherine Poell, Robert Peter- 
son, Glenna Hlldebrand, Margaret Golladay. SEC- 
OND ROW-Janine Hoose, Mary Garten, Arlene 
Foris, Kim Wilson. BOTTOM ROW-Debbie Wells, 
Miryana Bajich, Jackie Just, Patty Kilkenny. 



TOP ROW-Jan K. Mead, Tawnya J. Ford, Sally 
Perez, Cyndi Ovcrholser, Dale W. Blanchard. SEC- 
OND ROW-Kathe M. Rusnak, Mary Jacobson, An- 
drea Owens, Karen Ewing, Betsy Donnelly. BOT- 
TOM ROW-Bruce Graham, Bert Masbang, Carol 
Oukrop, Hal Shaver. 



BOTTOM ROW- Don Lindley, Keith E. Frazier, 
David J. Kukhenskl, Sandra M. Grisham. SECOND 
ROW- Lynne Swaney, Betty Zeka, Mock Green, 
Mike Ford. THIRD ROW- Kathy Davis, Starr Lee, 
Becky J. Johnson, Cassandra Hlgglns, Leticia Ta- 
pla. 



BOTTOM ROW: Patricia L. Lucas, Daniel M. Da- 
vis, Jean A. Stallbaumer, Kathie A. Owen, Marvin 
A. Kaiser, Sandra S. Barker, Debbie L. Stegeman, 
Julie A. Reed. SECOND ROW: Sheryl K. Hrud, 
Cynthia A. Nordin, Kim S. Dlerks, Carol J. Wlenck, 
Shirley J. Lockhart, Kaye Geier, Susan Z. Luthi, 
Shelly Pottorf. THIRD ROW: Susan A. Davis, 
Catherine L. Sheahan, Susan Harrington, Theresa 
A. Nass, James L. Schremmer, Marilyn Gersther, 
Sue Walek, Vicki L. Brady-Brooks. TOP ROW: 
Sandra S. Stangle, Melissa A. Deffenbaugh, Jane A. 
Rackers, Valerie A. Lindqulst, Jennifer L. Stelner, 
Tammy L. Howser, Beth A. Ripple, Ann. Bossier. 




Hewett: 



O tanding high on his throne, clad 

*^in velvet robes, Phil Hewett 
gazes down at his musical kingdom. 
He raises his sceptor and the 
commoners come to attention. With a 
nod and the sweep of his arms, music 
begins. Only it's not the music of royal 
brass trumpets, but the "Pride of 
Wildcat Land," K-State's marching 
band. Hewett's throne may not be that 
of a conventional king, but then in 
actuality, Hewett only resembles a 
king. 

Hewett's musical background 
combines a mother who was a concert 
pianist with a father who was more 
apt to turn on the radio. His interest 
in music was stimulated at an early 
age while living across the street from 
Harvard University. He frequently 
watched Harvard's marching band and 
became interested in becoming a 
marching band director. 

"I told my mom when I was four 
years old that I wanted to be a band 
director," said Hewett. 

Hewett's personal career in music 
began at 16, when he started traveling 
with an opera as a percussionist. Later, 
Hewett became involved with teaching 
music to junior and senior high school 
students as a camp counselor in 
various summer camps. 



College of Arts and Sciences 




King of the band 



Jill McAntee 



After graduating from college, 
Hewett taught high school for 12 
years before coming to K-State in 
1968. When he began building K- 
State's marching band, the 
membership was under 100, he said. 
The all-volunteer group now boasts 
366 members, including flag bearers, 
twirlers, drum majorettes and 
Pridettes. Part of the reason that the 
group is so large is maybe due to 
Hewett himself. 

Hewett is devoted to the band 
according to Tammy Koci, 
sophomore in architecture, "Mr. 
Hewett deeply cares about the 
band and what happens to it. I 
think a lot of him." Hewett 
attributes the motivation he instills 
by being enthusiastic all the time. 
He tries to be prepared for every 
rehearsal. "If you're not," he said, 
"you not only waste your time, but 
kids' time too." 

Rehersal can be referred to as 
the three R's: Rant, Rave and 
Reap. In order to achieve the 
perfection Hewett demands, a lot 
of ranting and raving is necessary 
to get straight lines, marching in 



step, bowing together, improved 
instrumentation and marching 
techniques. Some band members 
feel like Hewett uses them for his 
own purpose of developing an 
excellent band. And that may be 
true, but that's where the reap 
portion of the three r's enters. 

K-State's marching band has a 
standing invitation to perform at 
the Dallas Cowboy's half time 
show. The band has made the 
Dallas trip three times and is 
invited to the Wembly Cup World 
Soccer Champion game in London. 

Although the trips are definitely 
an aspect of marching band to 
look forward to, Hewett said he 
finds performances anywhere the 
most self-satisfying aspect of band. 
"I like to see a performance really 
be outstanding," Hewett said, "I 
design my own programs, patterns, 
and music and I try to choose 
something I think the students will 
like to do." 

The intricate half time and 
pregame shows must consider 
marching abilities, musical talent, 
field formations and incorporating 
the band with the flag bearers, the 
Pridettes and the twirlers all at the 
same time is arranged by Hewett. 



Despite the energy Hewett 
alludes he admits that "sure, I get 
discouraged. On occasion I've been 
known to be ready to go pump 
gas." 

Hewett also directs the Concert 
Jazz Ensemble which has also 
grown considerably since Hewett's 
arrival. The program includes two 
jazz lab bands, the KSU Jazz 
Combo and the Concert Jazz 
Ensemble. Free concerts are given 
occasionally by these bands — the 
1979 Homecoming performance a 
prime example. 

Several special awards have 
obtained by the K-State Jazz 
artists. Among these are a first 
place in the Central States Jazz 
Festival, the Big Band and Combo 
divisions of the Kansas City Jazz 
Festival and an appearance at the 
1974 Newport Jazz Festival. 

When not devoting time to the 
Marching Band, the Jazz Bands, or 
giving private percussion lessions, 
Hewett is involved in various 
campus activities. Hewett was the 
master of ceremonies for the 1979 
Lamba Chi Alpha Chariot Relays. 
He judges bands, was involved 
with the 1979 Homecoming events 
and organizes the Central States 
Jazz Festival for high schools which 



Nancy Zogleman 

A 1 ana 2-Seventy-nine high 
school bands from across 
Kansas follow Hewett's 
direction of the "1812 
Overture" during Band Day on 
October 7. 

"Yowa soloV'-Phil Hewett 
gives instructions on marching 
techniques during a practice 
session. Hewett choreographs 
all the K-State marching band 
performances. 



is held at K-State. 

Finally, Hewett is left with little 
spare time. He says he's not home 
very much, but when he is he 
often works in the yard, or plays 
an occasional 18 holes of golf. 

Standing on the podium at the 
band field, the velvet robes turn to 
a royal purple band director's 
uniform and the septor melts to a 
director's baton. With a nod and a 
sweep of his arms, music begins. 
It's the music of the "Pride of 
Wildcat Land." And the king 
directing? No, not a king, just Phil 
Hewett. mM 



Hewett/105 



College of Arts 

Unlimited 1 



JKtk^'"-^ mm 




)TTOM ROW- Cliff D. Peterson, Harvard C. 
wnsend, Tim F. Ahrens, Philip A. Fay, Tom G. 
ger, R.J. Robe!, SECOND BOW- Thomas S. 
xkelson, Rob Unruh, Gary L. Skrdlant, William 
rgh, Cindy Gianpaolo, Mike Morrow, Dale E 
swnlow Jr. TOP ROW- Steve F. Schuler, Thorn 
J. Snodgrass, Julie A. Cornett, Randy L. Whl- 
iker, Laura Bareiss, Barbara S. Vanderveen, Jer- 
> A. Nedrow. 



TTOM ROW- Mary Pat Dean, Deedee S. 

3ugin, Miriam Travis, Teresa Gahagan, Nancy 
rley, Donna Monson. SECOND ROW- Julie 
jge, Diane Myers, Shelley Rollings, Erin Elliott. 
IRD ROW- Peggy J. MacLeod, Laurie H. Frie- 
borg, Debbie J. Downing, Debbie A. Rizek, Su- 
ne B. Johnson, Elaine M. Bertels. TOP ROW- 
ldi K. Winkler, Cathy L. Shannon, Susan K. 
iwn, Sylvia E. Annan, Linda J. Esry. 



BOTTOM ROW- Nancy R. Pihl, Carol K. Barrels, 
Laura R. Londeen, Laurie A. Williams, Michelle M. 
Weber, Merrie K. Martin, Cathryn A. Sterns. SEC- 
OND ROW- Kay S. Scarbrough, Karla S. Stein- 
berg, Debra J. Hopkins, Sara J. Borst, Dawnlee D. 
Weber, Cindy L. Novak, Janice C. Shaddy, Debra 
L. Barner, THIRD ROW- Tammy D. Kester, Kathy 
A. Maertens, Marilyn R. Barry, Sheryl L. Nebiock, 
Pamela S. Brown, Sandra K. Harper, Shannon K. 
Hall, Jackie B. Nicholson. FOURTH ROW- Rae 
Jeanne Faurot, Sandra J. Belsel, Sharee Kay Jor- 
gensen, Teresa L. Shea, Karen L. Altenbernd, Sher- 
nlse A, Spearman, Stacy Ann Shearer, Shelli L. 
Darrow. 



BOTTOM ROW- Bonnie Klmple, Debra Peterson, 
Karma Overmiller, Diane Johnson, SECOND 
ROW- Sue Freidenburger, Laretta Johnson, Jill 
Forgy. TOP ROW- Mellnda Bever, Karen Ewing, 
Tracie Dittemore. 



117 e're third in the nation, and 
"'"' that's something the football 
team and basketball team can't say," 
said Craig Brown, sophomore in 
speech. 

Speaking of K-State's Speech 
Unlimited forensics squad, Brown is 
just one of the 44 member squad 
which travels extensively throughout 
the midwest competing in forensics 
tournaments. Speech Unlimited is an 
activity funded through the Arts and 
Science Council and the speech 
department, which makes available to 
any K-State student the opportunity to 
participate in speech activities and 
competition. 

By participating on the squad, 
students can earn one credit hour a 



and Sciences 



Speaking gets third in the Nation 



Andrea Carver 



semester, but no more than four total. 
They can become more confident, 
learn to communicate better and 
organize their ideas, according to 
Lynne Ross, speech instructor and 
coach. 

Speech Unlimited has been in effect 
since the fall of 1976. It was started 
because several students had 
experience in high school speech and 
competition and wanted to continue at 
the college level. 

"The group started as a handful, 
just to try it. We never thought : 
would mushroom out to what it i 



Ross said. 

Members of the squad travel to 
Nebraska, Illinois, Oklahoma, 
Colorado, Missouri, and farther, 
competing in approximetely 15 
tournaments a year. 

"Tournament sizes vary, the largest 
tournament we attended had about 50 
schools competing. But the nationals 
are really large, last year there were 
well over 100 schools participating," 
Ross said. 

Speech Unlimited members 
participate in 10 different events 
which range from interpretive reading 
such as dramatic, prose, and poetry to 
public speaking, which includes 
extemporaneous, informative, 




impromptu, and after dinner speaking. 

"There isn't any one event which 
the squad always places well in, but 
traditionally good events for K-State 
have been dramatic interpretations, 
extemporaneous, and informative 
speeches," Ross said. 

"The members select their own 
material and use it for the entire year, 
unless it doesn't work for them," said 
Robin Jankovich, senior in speech 
education and three-year member. 

Even though there are no organized 
practices, Jankovich said she works on 
her material everyday for at least two 
hours. 

"You put in as much time as you 
want to. 1 usually practice with a 
coach for an hour and then practice 
by myself for an hour," she said. 

The nature of the event determines 
how much preparation and practice is 
needed. The initial time put in 
preparing an event is harder, but once 
the event has been prepared it is 
possible for students to spend as little 
as an hour a week practicing, Ross 
said. 

"We have excellent coaches here," 
Brown said, "They can take the 
average high school student and help 
them develop their talent." 

The coaches, Harold Nichols and 
Lynne Ross, help the squad in 
selecting topics and by making 
suggestions. With the student, they go 
over the selections, line by line, 
working on the manuscript until both 
the student and the coach are satisfied 
with it. 

"In high school I was fair to partly 
cloudy and now I am by no means 
one of the best on the squad, but I'm 
getting up there," Brown said. 

"The importance of organization 
and previews have been "pounded" 
into the squad's heads' by the 
coaches," Brown said. By using 
previews the speaker tells what the 



speech is about in the introduction. 

"It's the old idea of tell them what 
you are going to tell them, tell them 
and then tell them what you told 
them. The judges really like it. It's 
amazing how well it works," he said. 

Being a member of Speech 
Unlimited has given Brown the 
opportunity to travel, meet new 
friends, and given him the personal 
satisfaction of knowing he is a member 
of a squad, ranking third in the nation. 
He also said that it helps him do 
better and work harder in his other 
classes. 

"I have to work harder in my 
classes, because I have to keep up 
with them so I can travel," he said. 

Members can participate at 
whatever level they want, depending 
on how active they want to be. 

"Anyone who shows an interest and 
:omes over and tells us they want to 
be on the squad can," Jankovich said. 

Speech Unlimited is not limited to 
speech majors. The squad has had 
architecture, engineering, business, and 
agriculture majors, but the majority 
are from an arts and science curricula. 

"Being on the squad is good 
experience for any student no matter 
what their major is," Ross said. 

"They (members) get to travel and 
see other college campuses and meet 
new people. They make real good 
friends. It's a real close group. We've 
even had two couples get married 
from the team. It's a thing where 
students can get some personal 
recognition and feel good about 
themselves," Ross said. J^| 



Fall 1979 enrollment: 4,147 
Spring 1979 graduates:463 




Eying the Words-Robin 
Jankovich, senior in speech and 
David Dunlap, sophomore in 
pre-design use facial expressions 
to practice for an upcoming 
tournament. 



Photos by Sue Pfannmuller 



Speech Unlimited/ 107 



Graduates exchange 
in business program 



School can get to be a pain 
sometime. Never-ending all- 
nighters that leave you drained and 
caffeen-addicted. Sometimes you want 
to shuck it all. You want adventure, 
new faces, different places. You would 
give your eyeteeth to change places 
with someone. 

Three K-State students had the 
chance to do just that — but still go 
to school through a program 
sponsored by the International Trade 
Council, an organization developed in 
1976 to promote international trade in 
business. 

The students, June Hartline, Amy 
Snider, and Karen Hogeboom, are 
graduates in Business and French. 
They changed places with Denis 
Leylavergne, Alain Labat, Thierry 
Woerhle and Patrick Mothes from the 
Institute of Economic and Commercial 
Studies at Bordeaux, France. 

"The Work Exchange Program was 
designed as a means of helping 
students become better acquainted 
with other cultures and languages," 
according to Raymond Coleman, a 
professor in marketing and a member 
of the board. President Duane Acker 
and Robert Lynn, dean of the School 
of Business Administration join 
Coleman on the council which serves 
as an advisory board to K-State. 

The students, selected on a basis of 
scholarship and language fluency, 
spend at least 10 weeks employed at 
several business firms in Bordeaux. 

"It was a dream come true," 
Hartline said. She found employment 
in the accounting department of 
Mothes Freres, a French tile and 
carpeting firm. 

Of her experiences, she says "It 
was strange to hear French all the 
time. But once I got used to it, and 



Teresa Stotts 



Pointing Out- Robert McFadden, 

chairman of the board for Midland 

International Inc., points out 

Bordeaux, France on the map. 

Alain Labat, employee for 

Midland came to Kansas from 

Bourdeaux for employment. 



1979 Fall Enrollment: 2,097 
1979 Spring Enrollment: 270 



brushed up on my own speaking of 
the language, it was all right." 

How does France compare to home. 

"Housing costs ran me about the 
same as here," she said. Discos with a 
lot of American music, especially 
Super Tramp, fill the night life. 

"American movies dubbed in French 
were also a popular entertainment 
activity." she said. 

"Plans for the future work exchange 
programs are underway," according to 
Coleman. The next project will be to 
develop a similar program with the 
University of Novarro in Pamplona, 
Spain. 



Deal Me In- Denis Leylavergne, 
exchange worker from France, 
shuffles computer cards at the 
Union National Bank. 





Midland International Inc. photo 



108/Exchange Program 






College of 

Business 

Administration 




"The 1980s will be a 
promising, but selective 
market for people in 
business. " 

Robert Lynn, dean. 



BOTTOM ROW- Terry L. Brown, Bill Haner, Mi- 
chael J, Sanders, Arnold E. Vaughn, Ron D. Hos- 
kins, Gerald D. Ricken, Carla J. Cole, Greg M. 
Henne, Mark A. Knoll, Mitch Fiser, Amy Mario, 
Susan Cain, Kevin Jackson, Steve Kline. SECOND 
ROW- Scott Razook, Gregg Taylor, Don Chew, 
Scott Stanley, Mike Robinson, Phil Glenn, Mark 
Zillinger, Kyle L. Wendt, David J. Hutfles, Ken 
Marvel, Mark Kohlrus, Brian Stack. THIRD ROW- 
James L. VonFeldt, Alan E. Hintz, Lavern F. Kin- 
derknecht, John L. Meder, Mark C. Susan M. 
Waechter, Pam Herbst, Paige Howard, Cindy L. 
Llndholm, Mark T. Lair, Craig E. Cole, David E. 
Wild. TOP ROW- John D. Martenley, Celilia A. 
Mayerle, Judy M, Garfoot, Brenda S. Miller, Karen 
E. Klunge, LeAnn Wlllhite, Pam Frerichs, Pam 
Parker, Laura J. Templin, Beverly G. Kool, Linda 
D. Bird, Elaine A. Kaufmann, Debra K. Wentzel. 



BOTTOM ROW- Cheryl L. Nutter, Barry E. Robin- 
son, Melinda Leslie, Duane A Webber, Vlcki K. 
Calibani, Jay D. Bolding. SECOND ROW- Sonia R. 
Donley, Alan R. Stetson, Marcia K. Dryden, Mark 
A. Zimmerman, Cheryl L. Hart, Joeseph M. 
Winkler. THIRD ROW- Patti J. Cook, Paul A. 
Winterman, Catherine A. Comeau, Craig E. Cole, 
Laura M. Dougan, Michael J. Sanders, Kenneth L. 
Fox. 



BOTTOM ROW- Brice Leonard, Teri Wingert, 
Debbie Foltz, Qnny Williams, Michael Sanders. 
SECOND ROW- Becky Mlsak, Bill Barbe, Alan 
Stetson. THIRD ROW- Richard Harp, Charles 
Hosteler, Doug Bugner, Doug Relnhardt, Verlyn 
Richards. FOURTH ROW- Mike Melsenheimer, 
David Lynd, Randolph A. Pohlman, Rodney Turn- 
er. TOP ROW- Robert Eatherly, Robert D. Ho- 
hinger, Andrew M. Cope, David Hawkins, Mickey 
Parker. 



BOTTOM ROW- Raymond J. Coleman, Benjamin 
F. Tidwell, Marv Mears, Michael B. Meloan, Rick L. 
Haxton. SECOND ROW- Teresa Hanna, Tom Ah- 
rens. Randy Campbell, Andrew Bolln, Jon Choitz, 
Gary L. Isaacson. THIRD ROW- Richard Henry, 
Byron T. Bates, James A Duensing, Scott Johnson, 
John Meder, Fred Stork. TOP ROW- Steve Goble, 
Bruce Dyson, Randy Kramer, Elaine Kaufmann, 
Mary Johnson. 



BOTTOM ROW- Chris E. Wiseman, Judith M. 
Erickson, Sally A. Humphrey, Diane M. Nace, Jac- 
queline. SECOND ROW- Kimberley Peeks, Diane 
LaHue, Lisa Feden, Kathleen Decker, Brenda Buss, 
Diana Blanchard. THIRD ROW- Kae E. Algrim, 
Mary A. Sebring, Cynthia A. Rach, Diane J. Le- 
derer. Donna R. Abbott, Joanna L. Page. TOP 
ROW- Andrea A. Foutch, Christy A. Warren, 
Cheryl A. Schneck, Janet K. Anstaett, Susan A. 
Niemczyk, Linda K. Marihugh, Diane M. Brown. 




Financial Management Assoc 




I 

Marketing Club 





College of Education 




^ tk . & # # Q 



- > 



■ * T I : " -A 

Agriculture Education Club 





BOTTOM ROW- Jack L. Downing, Rob M. Knight, 
Mark A. Knoll, Craig F. Perkins. SECOND ROW- 
Laurie A. Carr, Shelly Sixta, Ronald A. Perovich, 
Catherine L. Wenger, Deborah J. Speed. THIRD 
ROW- Kent O. Wineinger, Mark R. Widell, Randy L. 
Campbell, Alan J. Ford. 



BOTTOM ROW- Richard F. Welton, Stanley L. 
Buscher, Pat A. VenJohn, Gregory L. Walker, Joe E. 
Nuemann, Jack W. Lindquist. SECOND ROW- Greg 
A. Krenke, Dale G. Unruh, Wayne L. DeWerff, Sandra 
L. Hundley, Sheryl L. Neblock, Brenda F. Hundley, 
John L. Marrs. THIRD ROW- William Nachrelner, 
Chris A. Mackey, Wayne Goss, Jeff B. Bryant, Larry 
G. Garten, Bob Green, Dale W. Brown, Mark E. Mull- 
er. TOP ROW- Gary D. Merritt, Greg Henderson, 
Allen D. McColm, Steven R. Joonas, Ron J. Eddger, 
Clark R. Harris, Mel D. Waite. 



BOTTOM ROW- James B. Mathewson, Nina K. Joy, 
Rolf O. Chappell, Jennifer L. Beardsley. SECOND 
ROW- Willard J. Nelson, Donna L. Werder, Marlesa 
A. Roney, Christy M. Karlin, Pamela A. Warren. TOP 
ROW- Mary M. Harris, Diane Stump, Steve Moldrup, 
Lisa Broodle, Sally Heimke, Treca Werner. 




The A, B, 



BOTTOM ROW- Beth A. Thompson, Judith L. Mar- 
tin, Rolf O. Chappell, Cynfhia S. Groves, Mary Kay 
Zabel. SECOND ROW- Rebecca J. Scott, Kathy A. 
Lorson, Janice L. Dlttemore, Shari A. Ryker. THIRD 
ROW- Sheryl I. Schmidt, Susan M. Merlllat, Barbara 
J. Strunk, Donna L. Werder, Dava M. Boock. 




"In the '80's, I 
think we 'II experience 
a return to a shortage 
of teachers. This may or 
may not have an impact 
on enrollment." 

Jordan Utsey, dean. 



110/Student Teaching 




C's of Teaching 



Learning by experience becomes a 
reality for student teachers. The 
soon-to-be teachers realize that they 
don't learn everything there is to know 
about the behavior of children, until 
they get into an actual classroom 
situation. 

Student teachers get field 
experience in their last year at K- 
State, and most complete their student 
teaching requirements in their last 
collegiate semester, according to 
Jordon Utsey, dean of education. 

Mark Torkelson, and Tomma 
Owens, seniors in elementary 
education both agreed that teacher 
aiding was a valuable experience. 

"I think the thing that helped me 
the most before I student-taught was 
the teacher-aid program. I gained 
classroom experience. You could 
watch the teacher to see what was 
successful, and what failed," Owens 
said. 

Unfortunately, K-State instructors 
can't teach everything, students have 
to learn by experience. 

"Experience is the best teacher. I 
can't say I haven't been taught things 
in class, but there is a whole lot of 



difference between studying things, 
and actually applying the things you 
learn in a classroom situation. Your 
mind doesn't revert back to the 
'a,b,c,d — what do I do?' type of 



Careful Observation-Mrs 

Manion, second grade teacher at 
Lincoln Elementary School in 
Junction City, observes Tomma 
Owen's instructions. 



Scott Lelbler 



Hey Teach-Mark Torkelson is glad 
to help Lara Morris, 3rd grader with 
a question about synonyms. 



Nancy Reese 



thing." Torkelson said. 

The elementary student-teacher 
program include eight weeks of 
reading practicum, and eight weeks of 
teaching. In the reading practicum, the 
student-teachers teach and lead 
reading lessons in the classrooms. 

Some things can't be taught. For 
example, knowing what the expected 
behavior of a child is acceptable in 
each school building varies from school 
to school, and are things which cannot 
be taught, Torkleson said. 

"You have to find out the general 
rules of the building and what 
behaviors are acceptable yourself," 
Torkelson said. 

Not only must the child be taught to 
behave the rules of the building, they 
must be taught the rules of society. 

"Teachers must help a child 
develop as a total person. They must 



develop socially, spiritually, and 
mentally, not just intellectually." 

"A teacher is an example. The 
teacher has an influence on the values 
a child has, and how the child 
developes. The child sees the teacher 
as an example," Owens said. 

The basics of teaching are taught to 
the hopeful teachers, but most of the 
knowledge comes from classroom 
experience. 

"It doesn't matter how well you 
know your methods, you have to feel 
at home, and you have to feel 
comfortable around the students," 
Torkelson said. J0| 

The Answer Is . . . -Mark Tor- 
kelson, student teacher at Wood- 
row Wilson Grade School is 
stumped by 3rd grader Ronnie 
Hyde. 



Fall 1979 enrollment: 800 
Spring 1979 graduates: 80 




Scott Llebler 



Student Teaching/111 



College of Engineering 



f 




Open House 

Engineers 
Slash pride 

¥ n 1919, a bunch of engineering 
students hiked down to Sunset 
Park for a lighthearted day of games 
and sports between their different 
departments. After the afternoon of 
competition the engineers settled down 
for a huge picnic. This was the first 
"Field Day" according to the 1979 
Engineers' Open House brochure. 

In 1920, the committee in charge of 
the annual "Farm and Home Week" 
invited the engineering school to 
display its equipment for the Farm and 
Home visitors. Entitled "Engineers' 
Day," the display was the forerunner 
of the Engineers' Open House. The 
1920 display was highlighted by the 
agricultural engineering float, "Old 
Dobbin's Dream," which depicted the 
visions of an old horse watching the 
change to power machinery. 

In 1929, the name was changed to 
"Engineers' Open House." The show 
was expanded to two days. This was 
the first year a St. Pat and St. Patricia 
were selected to honor St. Patrick, 
patron saint of engineers. St. Pat's 
Prom replaced the Slide-Rule Slide of 
previous years. 

Fifty years later, Senator Nancy 
Landon Kassebaum stood on the steps 
of Seaton Hall speaking in the opening 
ceremonies for the 1979 Engineers' 
Open House held March 30 and 31. 

Moments earlier, engineering 
students from the nine engineering 



Full Disclosure- Mike Ashcraft, 
senior in architectural engineering, 
watches the opening ceremonies 
after marching in the parade. 



departments marched in the traditional 
parade from in front of King Hall to 
the front steps of Seaton Hall chanting 
the names of their respective curricula. 

Engineering dean, Donald Rathbone, 
greeted the students and visitors 
before honoring the new St. Pat and 
St. Patricia. The winners, Steve 
Soldner and Page Puckett, had been 
chosen by students of the college in 
an election sponsored by Tau Beta Pi, 
engineering honorary. Soldner, senior 
in engineering, reigned over the 55th 
Annual Engineers' Open House. 

Displays from each of the college 
departments were made open to the 
public Friday evening and all day 
Saturday in Seaton, Ward, and 
Durland Halls. Saturday events 
included a High School Egg Launcher- 
Lander Contest to give visiting high 
school students a chance to show the 
college what they knew about design. 

An alumni luncheon was held at 
noon Saturday at the Ramada Inn and 
the same evening, the 12th Annual 
Engineers' Open House Awards 
Banquet drew more than 600 people. 

John P. Dollar, assistant dean, 
called the Open House a "showcase 
of what students within the college 
and various departments are doing. It 
is a help to various students interested 
in engineering." 

"There has been controversy over 
how many commercial displays should 
be allowed," Dollar said, "But the 
Open House is really a student thing." 

Ray Hightower, assistant to the 
dean, agreed. "Many students from 
every department spend time on 



Spreading Ideas- Brady Bauer, 
left, and Patrick Parke, seniors in 
agricultural engineering, explain 
the "Chip Chucker" (manure 
spreader) which received the Steel 
Ring trophy for outstanding 
individual display. 



mum 



THE 



•Ft 




CHIP CHUCKER 

A MAI^^ SPRE/ 
Ali ImENT 




Craig Chandler 



Engineering College photo 



1 12/Engineering 



Anton Arnoldy 



projects for the displays. Often times 
a teacher will see a particularly good 
job done by students in a class and he 
will say 'Hey, why don't you develop 
that as a display for Open House." he 
said. 

Open House is organized each year 
by Steel Ring. Steel Ring consists of 
Senior engineers who have 
demonstrated leadership as well as 
academic abilities. Each year, 
department heads recommend students 
for Steel Ring. A three-member panel 
interviews each nomination and then 
the membership votes on acceptance 
of the prospective member for the 
following year. 

Steel Ring was organized in 1929 
and its constitution stated that the 
group's main purpose was that of 
promoting the work of Open House. 

Steel Ring sets up committees for 
Open House in the fall. Some 
committees are busier in the fall even 
though Open House is the last 
weekend in March. 

"The high school brochures 
committee needs to get the material 
out to the high schools across the 
state. This puts pressure on the theme 
committee who have to come up with 
this year's theme and design a logo," 
said Kathy Sabatka, the 1980 Open 
House Chairman. 

Other committees include routing 
for the displays, designing brochures, 
selecting displa judges for the 
interdepartmental competition, rul 
1980 Open House Chairman. 

"Open House is aimed at 
prospective students and the 
University community," said 
Hightower. "It allows us to emphasize 
curriculum study in the college for all 
those interested." |^| 




"Once the new complex 
is completed there Is no 
question In my mind that 
we have one of the finest 
complexes and colleges of 
engineering in the United 
States." 

Donald Rathbone, Dean 



TOP ROWHans K. Bohl, Tony Kramer, Ed 
McQueen, Martin E. Herbers, Brad W. Walter, Clif- 
ton R. Heiniger, Kendall R. Unrau. SECOND 
ROW-Fred W. Gantz, George L. Lauppe, Gregg A. 
Denholm, Lee M. Gamer, Paul A. Schmidt, Ray D. 
Lemon. BOTTOM ROW-Ralph I. Lipper, Gary L. 
Housholder, Ken G. Butler, Mike K. Belm, Rod B. 
Bigham, Josheph K. Snyder. 



TOP ROW-Mohmad Abdolvand, Duane Hender- 
son, Halley K. Dickey, Drew Thompson, Michelle 
A. Hoferer. THIRD ROW-Steven R. Carroll, 
Goerge D. Hiatt. SECOND ROWMlke L. Ash- 
craft, Stephen D. Varwig, Edward A. Andraos, 
Tadhi L. Silsby, Tracy R. Hall. BOTTOM ROW 
Kelly O. Conway, Peter C. Laughlin, Michael L. 
Gonzalez, David S. Broadstone, Allen R. Moore. 



TOP ROW- W. P. Walawender, Terrie S. Spangler, 
Michelle M. Weber, Maria K. Benyshek, Cynthia L. 
Schaller, Chris D. Jones, Kimoanh T. Nguyen, De- 
bra S. Higgs, Kim Lien T Nguyen, Carrie M. Mas- 
tin, Pamela G. Peters, Mark Timmerhaus. THIRD 
ROW-Carl T. Lira, Eric D. Johnson, Steven R. 
Hieger, Evelyn M. Northum, Sherri L. Yarber, Polly 
S. Robinson, Susan E. Phipps, Terri K. Sallman, 
Connie Wells, Terry D. Smith, Stevin G. VanNess. 
SECOND ROW-Jeffrey A. Hubbell, Byron B. Bird, 
Warren Stewart, Edwin E. Lightfoot, Robert Him- 
melblau, Margaret Heln, Margaret A. Stewart, Car- 
rie Lervold, Tim Tierney, Paul Reddy. BOTTOM 
ROW-Patrick J. Silady, Kevin L. Elm, Barbara G. 
Lindholm, Michael R. Youngquist, Brad Blackman, 
Lynn Holle, Jayne Schmitz, Linton L. Lewis, Gur- 
deep S, Ranhotra, Larry Samson. 



BOTTOM ROW: Donald E. Skipton, David L. 
Barthuly, Scott M. McCulley, Paul J. Strecker, Ter- 
ry P. Dockum, Ronald D. Frazee, Ronald K. Wil- 
liams, Larry M. Strecker, Richard N. Schiele, Brad 
A. Kramer, Dale E. Erker. SECOND ROW: Tom 
E. Newton, Kenton D. Lippert, Brad L. Hafner, 
Wayne R. Wild, Lisa B. Hoffmaster, Steven F. Rip 
per, Joan E. Stammer, Judy A. Dahl, Gail A. Rltz 
dorf, Steven W. Barber, Susan I. Galyardt, J.J 
Smaltze. THIRD ROW: Eskandar N. Salamat 
bakhsh, Alan D. French, Mitsusht Mori, Frank P 
Hwang, Jan M. Russell, Jeffrey B. Dorsch, Linda G. 
Gordon, Mac-Obegba I.N., Phil R. Rendon, Robert 
M. Albracht, Ricardo Zayas. TOP ROW: Jame9 C 
Lowell, Bernard L. Smith, Dan J. Panter, Jeffrey L 
GiUispie, Julie L. Hawley, Catherine A. Sabotka. 
Mary K. Konz, Martha M. Mesh, Deandra L. Till 
man, Saebi-Monfared-Amlr-H, Mark A. Seorlin, An 
thony J. Veith 





American Inst, of Ind. Engg 





Open House/113 



College of Engineering 

Conference Educates 



Pointing 

speaker at 
Mechanics 
one of his 
mechanics. 



the way: A guest 
the Midwestern 
Conference explains 
concepts of solid 



Question: Why do students come 
to K-State? 

Answer: Jokes about parties, 
husbands or wives aside, most K- 
Staters are here for an education. 

Question: But who educates them? 

Answer: That's easy. The teachers, 
of course. 

Question: But what gives them the 
right to teach? What makes them 
qualified to say, "This is the way it is 
done." 

That's where the answers start 
getting hard. In fields where advances 
in facts and ideas are made faster than 
they can be put in a textbook, 
communicating and absorbing 
knowledge is essential for keeping 
teachers updated. 

This year the College of Engineering 
had a special opportunity to both 
communicate and receive information. 
The 16th Midwestern Mechanics 



Conference was held in the Union 
from September 19-21. 

Over 90 presentations of the newest 
ideas in theoretical and applied 
mechanics were given by university 
professors and engineers from around 
the world. The 29 year-old conference 
was held at K-State for the first time. 

K-State assistant professor, Subhash 
Sinha, was editorial chairman of the 
conference and Philip G. Kirmser and 
C.L.D. Huang, professors of 
engineering and mechanical engineering 
respectively, were co-chairmen. 

According to Dr. Sinha, in order to 
present a research paper at the 
conference, the paper had to be 
recommended by at least two 
recognized authorities in the field of 
the paper's topic. Dr. Sinha said that 
approximately 20% of the papers 
submitted were turned down by the 
Conference Editorial Committee. 




Sue Pfanmuller 



114/Conference 



Educators 



Anton Arnoldy 



Four invited speakers; H. H. E. 
Leipholz, E. G. R. Gereile, S. Nemat- 
Nasser, and D. N. Ghista, gave 
lectures on theoretical methods in 
mechanics, robotics, geothermal 
energy, and biomechanics, 
respectively. The October 1979 
Kansas State Engineer (student 
magazine) said Professor Leipholz's 
talk concerned, "The problem of 
stability and qualitative evaluation of 
the response of dynamical systems 
under the action of non-conservative 
forces." 

His speech brought out the 
importance of design to avoid 
structural failure. 

Dr. Gereile updated listeners on 
research being done at the Swiss 
Federal Institute of Technology in 
Laussanne concerning precision robots 
for assembly tasks. 

Professor Nemat-Nasser spoke on 
the possibility of extracting heat from 
hot dry rock masses. The idea is being 
studied at the Los Alamos Scientific 
Laboratory in New Mexico. 

In the area of biomechanics, 
Professor Ghista from Michigan 
Technological University discussed the 
improvements in diagnostic instruments 
and the possibility of a total artificial 
heart design. 

The rest of the presentations were 
limited to twenty minutes and were 
given in groups of six or seven related 
studies. Dr. Sinha said this allowed a 
person to listen to those papers he 
was interested in without having to sit 
through all the speeches. 

"The conference is good exposure 
to the faculty. We've sent people to 
other conferences like the 
Southeastern Mechanics Conference in 
Knoxville, Tennessee, but this is the 
first time this particular conference 
had been held there," said Sinha. 

Sites for the conference are chosen 
four years beforehand. K-State was 
chosen in 1975 when the conference 
was held in Oklahoma. In previous 
years, the conference has been held at 
colleges such as Notre Dame, 
Pittsburgh, and the University of 
Michigan. 

"Since the conference is held every 
two years the sites are chosen two 
meetings ahead of time. In 1981, the 
conference will be held in Michigan 
and in 1983 it will be at the University 
of Iowa," said Sinha. 

Sinha spent nearly a year in 
preparation for the conference 
organizing and reviewing submitted 
papers. He said that all of the papers 
were to be put in bound form. 

The 323 page book, Developments 
in Mechanics, Volume 10, was printed 
by the College of Engineering 
Experiment Station and the Division of 
Continuing Education, of K-State. JU| 



BOTTOM ROW- Hermann J. Donnert, Thomas P. 
Hood, Mark M. Bare, Rick J. VanVleet, Daniel L. 
Staudenmaie, Mike Mallory. SECOND ROW- Ger- 
ald G. Hilt, Richard W. Foust, Charles H, Mathews, 
William B. Shaffer, Rick L. Legleiter. TOP ROW- 
B. Ellen Johnson, Joan E. Gregory, Shin-Ping Kung, 
Kevin D. Stansbury, Robert B. Stuewe. Kent J. 
Wietharn. 



BOTTOM ROW— Brian D. Lang, Emery F. 
Wiens, Terry W. Misak, Curtis R. Janssen. SEC- 
OND ROW- Randy Rosine, Mark J. Boguski, Don- 
gil Chang, Randy Friesen, Ed Smalley. TOP ROW- 
Isaiah A. Bajah, Obert M. Letsela, Chris Black, 
David Lansdowne. 



BOTTOM ROW- Stephen R. Bauerband, William 
W. Roberts, Brian L. Gerhardt, John C. Lindholm 
Jr., Glenn C. Wood, Jeff Dikeman. SECOND 
ROW- Mitch Betts, Dave W. O'Reilly, Rick M. 
Line, David B. Dumler, Brian J. Doerksen, Michael 
L. Stewart, Jeffrey D. Bridgwater, THIRD ROW- 
Thomas E. Newhouse, Paul W. Neal, Kelly Clair, 
Roger L. Becker. John Bowman, Patrick B. Hess- 
man, Alan G. Heskamp, Kent Ketterman. TOP 
ROW- Michael D. Snyder, Brett A. Stanley, Page 
Puckett, Gloria Wlens, Mary E. Austin. Robert J. 
Smith. William C. Peterson 



BOTTOM ROW- Gib Compton, Mike Tedrow 
Steve Reschke, Stan Kiser, Harry Mallard, Rob Cur 
ry, Merrill Blackmann, SECOND ROW- Trent D 
Peterson, Gregory A. Grinzinger, James A. Young. 
James P. Fleming, Richard G. King, Jerry Kozar. 
Richard M. Kuhn, Mark Nyquist. THIRD HOW 
Clint D. Larson, Tim A. Barrington, Kent McCon 
aughey, Gary P. Dominguez, Jane Yarbrough, Chris 
Nieman, Roger A. Seymour. TOP ROW- Jeff K, 
Griffith, Kevin N. Keliey, Pam J. Best, Armon J. 
Pfeifer, Jeff Banister, Michael L. Weimer, Linda J. 
Barnett, Bill Meeker. 



BOTTOM ROW- Hermann J. Donnert, Jeffrey R 
Wilbur, Clifford G. Gilbert, Bruce Haieltine, Roger 
A. Seymour, John E. Roush, Gib Compton, John P. 
Dollar. SECOND ROW- Wayne R. Wild, Mark 
Bergmeier, Steve Garinger, Tim S. Anderson, Ed 
Smalley, Spencer T. White, Drew S. Thompson. 
Jim Wickersham. THIRD HOW- Gene K. Atkfn 
son, Todd W. Smith, Michael J. Scully, Bryan W 
Reinecke, Bryan B. Funk, Kurt C. Wilbur, Jeffrey B. 
Dorsch. TOP ROW- Allecia L. Remington, Cath 
erine A. Sabotts, Mary K. Konz, Joni K. Berry, 
Malinda K. Fox, Kathy Perkins, Charles H. Math- 
ews, Steve Goble, Keith L. Wanner. 





INTERVIEWERS 

Please take a number and wait until called 



College of Engineering 



Mom, Dad, I got a 



733 AUTO CONT THOMPSON 
560 813 ADV THERMO 2 CRANK 
560 942 CONV HT TRAN AZER 

If these look familiar to you, you 
are probably an engineer. If you've 
taken these classes you are probably a 
mechanical engineer and a senior at 
that. 

If you fall into the category of 
senior in engineering you may wish to 
stop here and turn to the next page. 
You probably know about the job 
market and salaries for graduating 
engineers. For those of you 
considering engineering or those who 
just wish to compare with your own 
major, sit back and listen to a few 
numbers. 

Fifty-nine percent of all the 1979 
job offers that were made through 
college placement centers nationally 
went to engineering graduates, who 
constituted only 6% of the graduates, 
according to the College Placement 
Council 

The College of Engineering reports 
that 1979 graduates in engineering 
averaged over four offers each at 
starting yearly salaries between 
$18,000 and $22,000. The bulletin 
goes on to say, "These students would 
have had more offers had they elected 
to do more interviewing. Over 500 
companies and organizations will visit 
the campus this year to interview 



Anton Arnoldy 



graduating seniors." 

Dean Donald Rathbone thinks the 
demand for engineers will continue 
through the 1980's. 

"I base this prediction upon present 
trends and the present demand for our 
graduates. I feel that the areas of 
concentration in the 1980's will be 
energy and productivity. Both areas 
are very crucial to the United States if 
we are to remain a first class nation," 
said Rathbone. 

David Kraus, assistant director of 
the Career Planning and Placement 
Center sadi that the demand for 
graduates in any of the technical fields 
at K-State is improving and pointed 
out that there are tehnical areas within 
each of the colleges on campus. 

Kraus said that American's society is 
becoming more technically orientated 
and that the non-technical fields have 
the most difficulty finding jobs. 

"By non-technical fields, I mean the 
liberal arts or those curricula that are 
not preparing the student for a 
specific group of occupations or 
professions," said Kraus. 

With over 2,200 undergraduate 
students, more than double the 
enrollment of five years earlier, the 
college is larger than at any time in its 



116/Salaries 




art by Jennifer Sheets 



job! 



history. 

"While we will not continue such an 
accelerated growth as this, I do 
anticipate that engineering will remain 
relatively constant at this high level of 
enrollment through the 1980's and 
perhaps even increase some towards 
the end of the decade. This will be 
true in spite of the fct that the 
number of 18-year-olds in our 
population is going down from 3 to 5 
percent per year over the next six to 
eight years," said Rathbone. 

And salaries should keep pace, 
according to most reports similar to 
Northwestern University's "Endicott 
Report 1979." 

Written by its retired placement 
driector, Frank S. Endicott, the report 
is prepared annually based on surveys 
to well known businesses and 
industries. 

Demand for graduating engineers 
will rise 40% in 1979 alone the 
report said. But new engineers 
shouldn't gloat too much. The survey 
also determined that after five years 
engineers' salaries were still in the lead 
but after ten years they had slipped to 
third behind accountants and 
salepersons. J|| 

Fall 1979 enrollment: 2,197 
Spring 1979 graduates: 245 



BOTTOM HOW: Richard L. Craft, Perry J. Mick, 
Mark E. Flin, Thomas B. Reed, Ronnie L. Rodvelt, 

Michael 4. Mejia, Sosan P. Barsamian, Kristin J. 
Fionda, Tim S. Anderson, Mac A. Cody, Donald R. 
Hummels. SECOND ROW: Scott A. Green, Alan 
D. Lybarger, Marshall R. Bird, Karl E. Sweers, 
Doug D. Frederking, Dewey W. Wymer, Clarence 
D. Suppes, John F. Fienhage, James F. StiiweM, 
Robert R. Bruckman. THIRD ROW: Kent M. 
Scbuler, Dale A, Utterback, Peder J. Paulson, Mark 
W. Aitken, Robert W. Crutchfleld, Donald M. Hum- 
meis, Earl E. Creel, Peggy L. Crews, Myron D. 
Flickner, Mark L. Brown. TOP ROW: Joe Stau- 
dinger, Gary Bailey, Paul D. Kreutzer, Randall A. 
Smischny, Wayne M. Blasi, John K. Moore, David 
R. Kaute, John L. Benefiel, Steven G. Brownlee, 
Don R. Hush, Jeffrey R. Wilbur. 



BOTTOM ROW: Arthur R. Vaughan, Douglas M. 
Crume, Michael W. Warren, Charles P. Oblander, 
Lance R. O'Connor, William W. Daly, Frank J. 
Swlderski, Michael A. McNairy, Larry M. McWil- 
liams, Mark W. Meyer, Bernard P. Huser. SEC- 
OND ROW: Steven R. Cauthon, Steven L. Ochs, 
Marc L. Graves, Lawrence A. Davis, Taylor L. Pres- 
ton, Terry C. McGugin, Jay H. Johnson, Randall L. 
Angell, Harry Phelps, Eric R. Thompson, Byron B. 
Kauffman, THIRD ROW: Richard L. Seitz, Steven 
J. Pinick, Kathryn L. Delimont, Richard D. Sayler, 
Scott M. Rogers, Steven R, Dupes, Wynn A. John- 
son, Dave Remmel.Mark Fielder, Don A. Gtlllland. 
TOP ROW: Brian T. Brown, Darrei L. Carter, 
Mary Beth Dix, Cynthia L. Jackson, Karla J. Jur- 
rens, William G. Jurrens, Malinda K. Fox, Beverly 
A. Biggs, Tammy J. Olson, Kenneth R Stuchlik, 
Steven R. Goble. 



BOTTOM ROW; Karen Hummel, Gary Domin- 
guez, Dwight Wayne, Ed Robinson, Marvin Thomas, 
Cedric Saunders. TOP ROW:' Kim Lieu Nguyen, 
Nesby Bolden, Ruth Fletcher, Rick Garfbay, Terry 
Davis, Sanora Holloway. 



BOTTOM ROW: Barbara Llndholm. Lynne Brock- 
hoff, Connie Berner, Lisa Hoffmaster, Peggy 
Crews, Gait Ritzdorf, Juhy Dahl, Annemarie 
Leiszler, John Lindholm, SECOND ROW: Evelyn 
M. Northum, Susan M. Stemmle, Darla K. Brock- 
meier, Vicki J. Schamhorst, Michelle A. Hoferer, 
Sandra S. Callahan, Terry L. Davis, Debra S. Higgs. 
THIRD ROW: Mary E. Austin, Sandy S. Yang, 
Page Puckett, Tadhi Silsby, Susan E. Phipps, Jan M. 
Russell, Carrie Lervold, Linda G. Gordon, Kim Lien 
T. Nguyen. TOP ROW: Margaret G. McDonough, 
Karen C. Hummel, Julie L Hawley, Mary K. Konz, 
Carrie M. Mastin, Marie R. Ford, Marsha A. Meili, 
Beverly A. Biggs, Catherine A. Sabatka, Kim Oanh 
T. Nguyen. 




Salaries/117 




BOTTOM ROW- Dr. Barbara Reagan, Gail Goo- 
dyear, Bronwen Rees, Emily Blakeslee, Lisa Telth- 
orst, TOP ROW- Faye Carlson, Greg Garwood, R. 
Barbara Schreier, Nadine Streil. 



BOTTOM ROW- Kleila E. Carlson, Linda K. 
Young, Beth E. Butler, Susan D. Zimmerman, Mary 
Ann Rempe, Kally A. Oman, Barbara A. Eoff, Pol- 
lyann Beery, Melinda Bever, Kathryn A. Collins, 
Michelle J. Oliver, Denise E. DeLange. SECOND 
ROW- Karen S. Closson, Patty M. Sloan, Shelly A. 
Bowman, Susan M. Blush, Veva E. Adams, Tracey 
L. Pittman, Karen A. Bradley, Debra J. Albright, 
Kathy K. Rupp, Connie J. Conklin, Janet L. Golden. 
THIRD ROW- Teresa D. Simmellnk, Rhonda L. 
Clutter, Jennie J. Seglem, Monica Klenda, Diann G. 
Tucker, Susan A. May, Lois Y. Molz, Karen S. 
Kalivoda, Jean M. Loop, Lynda L. Gibson, Mona L. 
Dawson, Jolene S. Neufeld. TOP ROW- Lori 
Scheuerman, Bronwen Rees, Melinda K. Harbison, 
Kathleen M. May, Beth A. Parrott, Loretta I. John- 
son, DeAnn M. Hiss, Lisa K. Ritz, Sally R. Wilex, 
Kathy H. McEvoy, 



BOTTOM ROW- Linda I. Will, Shelley L. Smith, 
Jerri L. Wayman, Claudia L. Effland, Sharon Z. 
Ross, Barbara A. Lutz, Linda L. Blgham, Narda E. 
Henderson, Carolyn A. Burnett, Fran Newby. SEC- 
OND ROW- Jane E. Klumpp, Laura A. Silliman, 
Dara D. Collins, Patty Q. Ellis, Ann Z. Brinkmeyer, 
Kathy A. Rudrow, Kathy E. Burton, Cindy A. 
Brown, Devin E. Williams, Linda A. Strong, Brenda 
D. Hobbs. THIRD ROW- Susan M. Karlin, Barbara 
A. Brlnkman, Carol B. Van Amburg, Deanne S. 
Bowersox, Rita A. Werly, Suzanne Zurfas, Linnette 
V. McCall, Jan M. Fairbairn, Corina Hugo, Brenda 
L. Meyer, Candy J. Duffy. TOP ROW- Carol A. 
Hull, Sue A. Stitzel, Tina R. Martin, Pat A. Schaffer, 
Julianne Cummings, Joanne R. Becker, Linda C. 
Griffin, Brenda J. Huntsman, Shelley A. Way, Dian? 
S. Reed, Julie A. Ellas, Valerie J. Mills. 



BOTTOM ROW- Cherie A. McCracken, Brenda S. 
Green, Clndi Keller, Connie J. Conklin, Mona L. 
Dawson, Michelle J. Oliver, Vanetta Blevins, Trina 
Cole. SECOND ROW- Teresa D. Simmellnk, Cyn- 
thia S. Bray, Donna M. Carmlchael, Kally A. Oman, 
Doris A. Delzeit, Carolyn D. Birkman, Kay Lynn 
Marrs, Beth E. Butler. THIRD BOW- Maureen A. 
Mechler, Deb Mans, Maria L. Newell, Karen A. 
Bradley, Susan M. Blush, Trac! A. May, Cheryl A. 
Koenigs. TOP ROW- Lisa K. Ritz, Susan P. 
Buller, Beth A. Parrott, Anne K. Schmitz, Vicki Y. 
Nelson, Nancy J. Jarchow, Debbie S. Wakeman, 
Julie A. Horsch, Kim D. Nighswonger. 



College of Home 

Has first 
now dine t 



W£ -State's College of Home Eco- 
nomics ranks among the top 
three schools in the nation according 
to Judy Rollins, assistant dean of 
home economics. 

Not because it has a good record 
for finding husbands for its female stu- 
dents, but because it is recognized as 
one of the largest and most progres- 
sive institutions for the education of 
professional home economics. 

In 1873, K-State offered the first 
home economics course in the United 
States for college credit. Twelve stu- 
dents began instruction in sewing, 
dressmaking and millinery, according 
to Rollins. 

"I think when it was first started, it 
was geared toward teaching young 
women how to be good wives and 
mothers. Now the focus is totally away 
from that, we deal solely with ca- 
reers," Rollins said. 

Today the College of Home Eco- 
nomics has approximately 1,200 un- 
dergraduates, 45 being male. The col- 
lege is also much more diverse Rollins 
said, rather than cooking and sewing 
which has been attributed to it, the 
college offers a much broader scope. 

There is more concern with the con- 
sumer, the social sciences as they re- 
late to the family and physical and bio- 
logical sciences. Only 3 percent of the 
home economics courses are food 
preparation and clothing construction 
according to Rollins. 

The college has five departments 
which offer 20 options for degress. 

"Fashion marketing is our largest 
area. I think a lot of young women 
see it as a rather glamorous position." 
Rollins said. 

Fashion marketing, a part of the 




Rob Clark 

"As family life will be 
changing going into the 
1980 's so the range and 
places and styles of 
teaching and research of 
our college will change." 

Ruth Hoeflin, dean 



118/Economics 



Economics 

course 
with best 

Andrea Carver 



Department of Clothing, Textiles and 
Interior Design, prepares students for 
merchandising promoting and other 
commercial phases of clothing and 
textiles. 

The Department of Family and 
Child Development offers three 
options: early childhood education, 
family life and human development, 
and a duel degree in family life and 
human development, with social work. 
An increasing number of men are 
entering the latter two fields. They are 
generally employed as social workers 
and counselors, Rollins said. 

"We have a lot to offer young men. 
We have a lot of opportunities they 
aren't even aware of, " she said. 

Textile science, the study of 
properties and reactions of fibers is a 
good field for men, according to 
Rollins. 

"They can go to work for any of 
the fiber companies like Dupont and 
Monsanto. And there is the possibility 
to find jobs with salaries comparible to 
engineers," she said. 

Students study consumer education, 
financial counseling, family finance, 
home management in the Department 
of Family Economics. And the 
Department of Foods and Nutrition 
prepares the students for careers as 
nutritionists, food scientists, food 
editors, extension specialists and 
researchers. 

The Department of Dietetics, 
Restaurant and Institutional 
Management offers a program for 
students interested in becoming 
dieticians or managers in food centers. 



"It's interesting that in all our fields 
there are a lot of employment 
possibilities. But, I would say dietetics 
has the largest salary opportunities," 
Rollins said. 

She also said that approximately 80 
percent of home economic graduates 
find jobs in their fields. 

Through cooperative programs, the 
college offers degrees in home 
economics education, extension, mass 
communications, liberal arts and 
general home economics. 

Rollins said home economists are 
concerned with humans and their 
environments. Their environments 
include food, clothing and their 
physical and emotional wellbeing. 

The field of home economics has 
developed more into a scientific base 
than one of cooking and sewing, 
Rollins said. Many instructors in the 
college are not home economists, but 
come from other areas such .as 
chemistry, biological sciences and 
social sciences. 

"As technology becomes more 
advanced and the effect that 
technology has on individuals and 
families, home economics will become 
even more of a scientific discipline," 
Rollins said. 

Already textile students are using 
the nuclear reactor to test what metals 
were used in wheighting silk fabrics 
from the 1800's. Rollins said one 
student who worked on that project 
changed her major to nuclear 
engineering. 

Home economics has come a long 
way from making a home and keeping 
a family. Jp£ 





Craig Chandler 

ffi Check in' It Out- As a part of 
her clinical experience, Rhonda 
Oswald, senior in dietetics and 
Institutional management, takes 

',',',', inventory in Boyd Hall's kitchen 

'.',',', storeroom. 

Habit History- Emily Evans, ju- 
nior in dietetics and institutional 
management takes a diet history 
from W. W. Brown at St. Mary Hos- 
pital. 



Tim Costello 



Home Economics/119 




BOTTOM ROW- Norma J. McKnight, Jan M. Rob- 
ben, Kathy K. Rubb, Karen S. Kalivoda. SECOND 
ROW- Patty M. Sloan, Karen S. Classen, Terri A. 
Beck, Cheryl K. Thole, Denise L. Brown. TOP 
ROW- Marilyn J. Domann, Linda L. Gibson, Kath- 
leen M. May, DeAnn M. Hiss, Ethel M. Durler. 



BOTTOM ROW- Kathleen Downing, Rebecca Gar- 
rison, Brenda Buss, Paula Jo Bennett, Debby 
Corder. SECOND ROW- Albie Rasmussen, Melin- 
da Harbison, June Cram, Cynthia Wren, Luanna 
Franz/TOP ROW-Lura Flentle, Karen Stadel, Lort 
Fulton, Janet Thieroff. 



BOTTOM ROW- Cathy Schuele, Kathy Beldon, 
Cheryl Doyle. SECOND ROW- Julene Neufeld, 
Bonnie Maday, Dlann Tucker. TOP ROW- Sandra 
Sloop, Rachel Severance 



BOTTOM ROW- Pollyann Beery, Roxanne Fran 
kenberger, Deby A. Dougherty, Margaret Weishaar, 
Debbie L. Arthur. SECOND ROW- Annette 
Myers, Colleen L. Crow, Sara A. Snyder, Linda L. 
Vanderweide, Tamara S. Ashby, MaryAnn Rempe 
THIRD ROW- Ruth A. Masoner, Brenda J. Allen. 
Therese L. Schamle, Joni L. Walk, Jocile M. Ar 
noldy, Deanna Belden, Patty Allison. TOP ROW- 
Rita Bolz, Elaine M. Reh, Cynthia M. Stewart, Deb- 
orah A. Snider, Michele K. McColm, LuAnn Hoo 
ver. 



Foods and Nutrition Interest Group 

S m- ft 



College of Home 

Marriage 
only 

"^^irls enrolled in family and child 

^"^development come to college 
just to get married. And guys avoid 
them just to escape being potential 
husbands." 

"Football players take those classes 
because they are easy electives, it's 
pud." 

"There's nothing to do with the 
major once you graduate." 

So go the myths that accompany 
students majoring in family and child 
development. 

In actuality, students majoring in 
family and child development (FCD) 
have goals that are no different than 
any other college student. When 
contemplating a major many students 
consider money, but more often 
choose a vocation where they will be 
happy and satisfied. Such is the case 
with Ann Masoner, senior in family 
and child development, who chose her 
major because she is interested in 
home economics and likes kids. 

Masoner denies the accusation that 
FCD majors come to college to get 
married. "If I wanted to get married, 
why wouldn't I major in agriculture or 
business? There is a greater chance of 
meeting guys in those classes, there 
aren't any (guys) in Justin Hall," said 
Masoner. 

As for FCD being flooded with 
athletes, Masoner said that she has a 
few football players in her home 
economics classes, but no more than 
those in her sociology or psychology 
classes. 

According to Masoner, FCD 
constitutes neither an easy A nor pud 
courses. The curriculum may not be as 
tough as engineering majors, but 
Masoner considers Pre-School Child, 
Advanced Study of Child and 
Developmental Program Planning 
among her most challenging classes. 

Masoner devotes a lot of study time 
to her FCD classes. "I've spent long 
hours creating master plans for my 
student teaching at the Infant and 
Child Care Center. You have to 
consider keeping the children busy, 
challenging individuals while keeping 
the entire group together, " said 
Masoner. 

"We do break up into small groups 
for different elements of learning. 
Target levels are different for younger 
children than the older children and 
we have to take all this into 
perspective when planning out our 



120/FCD Myth 



Economics 

not 
option 



Jill McAntee 



lesson plans." 

Although target levels remain 
constant within age groups Masoner 
said that the material covered varies 
from week to week. 

From recognition of holidays to 
segments about families, the children 
add words to their vocabulary and 
increase understanding of shapes, 
colors and sizes. 

Infant and Child Care is not exempt 
from discipline problems, however, 
according to Masoner these incidents 
are rare. Masoner said that logic is 
used first, "We try to talk with the 
child, tell him or her what they did 
that was wrong and why they 
shouldn't behave that way." 

"If the problem still exists they are 
set outside of the group activity, but 
in a room where they can still hear 
what the group is doing. Then they 
realize they are being left out. In this 
way the child is punished and does not 
receive attention for misbehaving." 

After graduation Masoner would like 
to manage a preschool. "With more 
women working outside of the home, 
day care and preschool enrollments 
increase. There's a need for both 
centers," said Masoner. 

1979 Spring graduates hold jobs 
including positions of recreation 
leader, juvenile intake counselor, 
welfare case worker, probation officer 
etc. according to Cheryl Poison, FCD 
advising center director. Poison said 
that 1979 Spring graduates are 
scattered from K-State to New Mexico 
to Iowa. 

Poison estimated that each semester 
80 students graduate with FCD 
degrees and earn $7,000-$9,000 a 
year. However, a student now 
employed in the Wichita area merits 
$17,000 a year. 

The ratio of men to women in 
FCD is extremely. According to 
Poison approximately ten male 
students have majored in FCD in the 
past five years. 




jorec 

m 



Once upon a time- Nickie 

Cino, graduate assistant in FCD, 

reads to children during quiet 

time at the Family Development 

Lab. 



Sue Pfannmuller 



FCD Myth/121 




BOTTOM ROW- Janet L. Thierolf, Karen S. Clos- 
son, Poilyann Beery, Melinda Bever, Debby Dou- 
gherty. SECOND ROWSusan M. Blush, Keila E. 
Carlson, Mary Ann Rempe, Kally A. Oman, Barbara 
A. Eoff, Sue M. Wilson. THIRD ROW- Karen S. 
Kalivoda, Dlann G. Tucker, VIVian Bliss, Debbie 
Bassford, Cheryl A. Sales, Monica Klenda, Debra J. 
Albright. TOP ROW- Sally R. Wiley, DeAnn M. 
Hiss, Lisa K. Ritz, Rita Bolz, Loretta I. Johnson, 
Bromwen Rees, Kathleen May. 



BOTTOM ROW- Judy A. Spiegel, Susan D. Zim- 
merman, Carol J. Stress, Terri J. Teichmann, Mary 
K. Voet, Janel D. Waisner, Kathryn A. Collins, 
Rosie E. Eilert. SECOND ROW- Juanelle K. Peder- 
son, Cheryl L. Cook, Bernadette J. Pachta, Jean M. 
Loop, Rhonda J. Jones, Sarah C. Erickson, Mary B. 
Strathman, Susan M. Donnelly. THIRD ROWJan 
R. Wissman, Bonn!e;J. Maday, Sheryl K. Wilkinson, 
Sharon M. Bairow, Dorothy J. Gatlln, Monica M. 
Klenda, Marilyn S. Maddux. TOP ROW- Carrie J. 
Wiens, Patricia A. Dillon, Jeanne L. Jacobson, Su- 
san A. May, Mary T. Ice, Tracey L. Pittman, Mary 
J. Ull, Janice L. Gilloglu. 



BOTTOM ROW- Karan J. Law, Richard E. Kitos, 
Karen B. Wheeler, David E. Breiby. SECOND 
ROW- Lois Y. Molz, Tom S. Schweder, Renee John- 
son, Don C. Breiby, Geor e A. Miller. TOP ROW- 
Ronald Ariaz, Mary M. Montgomery, Mary H. 
Hahn. 



BOTTOM ROW- Renee J. Wiebe. Sheila K. Morse, 
Wes D. Babcock, Karen B. Wheeler, Maryann Ltg- 
nltz, Shera L. Woodson. SECOND ROW- Joan M. 
Soukup, Donna M. Turnquest, Alice B. Raple, Jane 
E. Adams, Julie K. Sevart, A. Lois Fladie, Debbie 
Bassford. TOP ROWCharla K. Engel, Julie W. Run- 
dell, Norma J. Kueck, Ann C. Blahnik, John J. 
Cannava, Paulette M. Healy, Marsha K. Healy, 
Sharon K. Peacock. 



College of Home 

Activities 



W eanne Arnoldy, a 1976 
" December graduate of the 
College of Home Economics, was just 
like this year's graduates. She filled 
out resumes, went through interviews 
and had to make that big decision 
about which company to work for 
after graduation. 

The difference between this year's 
graduates and Arnoldy was that she 
now has those times in twenty-twenty 
hindsight. After several years in the 
labor force Arnoldy explained, "I 
don't actually interview and hire 
college graduates but I know what I 



Anton Arnoldy 



J 



would look for if I did." 

When asked whether she would 
rather hire a 2.5 GPA student who 
had a solid past of involvement in 
community and student activities or a 
4.0 student with a minimum 
involvement in outside activities, she 
said, "How about a 3.5 GPA student 
with plenty of outside involvement. A 
high GPA demonstrates intelligence 
but what counts is what you do with 
that intelligence. Participation in 
student activities shows that a sutdent 
is willing to take that extra step. When 
a student finishes his assignments and 
says 'I'm bored,' he will probably be 
that way on the job. That kind of 
person will not initiate anything by 
himself." 

Often outside activities will detract 
from the time a student spends 
studying and thus hurts the student's 
GPA. 

Arnoldy explained that participation 
gives a better simulation of on the job 
experience for her. "Nothing should 
be taken away from a 4.0 student, but 
if I have 25 employees in 23 different 
sections of my department where I 
work I can't devote myself totally to 
just two or three of those sections to 
make them perfect at the expense of 
all the rest." 

"I have to spread my time between 
all of the sections because I am 
responsible to see that things are 
going smoothly overall, even at the 
slight expense of a few individual 
sections," Arnoldy said. 

A good balance of grades and 
participation can be achieved by good 
time management and good personal 
organization, she said. "If I look back 
over my old appointment calendars, I 
am surprised just how much you are 
able to do if you are organized." 

"Deciding on your priorities and 
then allotting each one a proper 
amount of time is essential. Once a 
decision has been made about what is 



Fall 1979 enrollment: 1,276 
Spring 1979 graduates: 191 



122 



Economics 



are part oS an education 





Passing The Time- Cynthia 
Schaller, sophomore in interior de- 
sign, waits for an interview at the 
Placement Center in the basement 
of Anderson Hall. 

Checking It Out- Debra Higgs, 
senior in chemical engineering, 
and Mike Morton, senior in man- 
agement, read company brochures 
before their interviews at the 
Placement Center. 



most important and if you stick to 
your schedule a lot more can be 
accomplished in the same amount of 
time." 

Developing good time management 
skills in college, you will be more 
efficient and thus more valuable to an 
employer, she added. 

Using hindsight, Arnoldy said, "If I 
were to do it over again, I think 1 
would've gotten started in outside 
activities even sooner than I did. They 
are part of an education |H 



Rob Clark 



Graduate Comment/ 123 



College of Veterinary Medicine 

Animal house lives at K-State 



\\J here can a K-State student see 
~™ a variety of animals including 
dogs, cats, horses, cows, sheep, pigs, 
owls, hawks, camels, and zebras? Not 
the zoo, but at K-State's Veterinary 
Medicine Complex. 

The $27 million Complex is "one of 
the finest in the world," according to 
Dr. Robert Taussig, associate professor 
of Srugery and Medicine. "We're very 
proud of it," he said. 

Taussig is also head of the section 
which treats small animals. He 
explained how the Complex functions 
and serves the many needs of people 
and animals in the area. 

"We really have two reasons for 
service. One is to prepare future 
veterinarians, and the other is to serve 
Kansas by taking care of animals," 
Taussig said. 

To do that, (take care of animals) 
we are divided into five sections. 
These are the small animals, surgery, 
equine, food animals, and field 
services," he said. "All are attached tc 
the Department of Surgery and 
Medicine." 

This part of the Complex covers six 
and one half acres of floor space, 
according to Taussig. "The hospital 
alone probably cost $16 million," he 
said. 

There are over 400 students 
working on their degrees in Veterinary 
Medicine. The combination of basic 
science studies and clinical experience 
for vet students "makes us a teaching 
hospital," Taussig said. 

The sutdents help the doctors 
diagnose and treat the animals brought 



Pam Good 



in for various ailments. 

"On a daily basis, there are more 
("patients") in the samll animals 
section," Taussig said. 

In that section, 20-40 small animals 
are treated. In the large animals 
section, 10-20 are treated daily 
according to Taussig. 

Roughly two-thirds of the animals 
brought in are from the Manhattan- 
Riley County area. The others are 
referred to the clinic by area 
veterinarians who may lack 
"equipment, ability or knowledge to 
treat them," Taussig said. 

Some animals are brought in from 
other states, most are from Oklahoma 
or Nebraska. 

Two-thirds of the animals are 
treated as out-patients, and are 
released. Others are hospitalized for 
treatment. 

During a tour of the Complex, 
Taussig showed a dog with cataracts, 
a cat with leukemia, a horse with 
respiritory problems, and pigs from 
Nebraska with "some strange disease" 
as yet undiagnosed, Taussig said. 

Among the more unusual animals 
being treated was a zebra from the 
Wichita Zoo. The zebra had broken a 
leg, and since it required surgery, he 
was transported to K-State. 

Taussig noted that the hospital had 
treated a camel which is now cured 
and lives in Manhattan's Sunset Zoo. 

An owl and a hawk were also 
housed in the hospital. These raptors, 



or birds of prey, had broken wings, 
and had surgery to pin the wings. 
Soon they will be retrained to fly, and 
will be released into the wild. 

Taussig said that the parallels 
between human medicine and 
veterinary medicine are very close. 

"Almost nothing is done in human 
medicine that isn't done here," he said. 



A 




"Veterinary medicine has 
made greater advancements in 
the past two decades than in 
its entire previous history. The 
next decade, with sufficient re- 
sources, should advance the 
profession scientifically and in 
specialty areas as much or 
more than in the past two dec- 
ades. " D. M. Trotter, dean 




Animal Talk- Randall Schroeder, 
senior in architecture, calms his bird 
during its check-up at the Veteri- 
nary Medicine Clinic. 



124/VET CLINIC 















^^ 



mm 









%■ 



It's a Dog's Life- The owner holds 
on to her pet as Larry Craig, junior 
in veterninary medicine, examines a 
bulldog at the vet clinic. 



photos by Hurriyet Aydogan 



Vet Clinic/ 125 






College of Veterinary Medicine 



Vet students: Out oi sight, out of mind? 



Completed in 1978, the Veterinary 
Medicine Complex at the north 
end of campus makes the College of 
Veterinary Medicine one of the few 
colleges housed entirely under one 
roof. 

Ironically, the Complex is so 
complete and self sufficient that it 
sometimes separates vet students from 
the rest of the student body. 

"The only real contact I have 
everyday with the rest of campus is 
through the Collegian. Of course, 
everything is usually advertised in the 
Collegian, but we (veterinary students) 
don't see signs up on campus or in 
the Union every day," said Mary King, 
sophomore in veterinary medicine. 

"I think I was in Farrell Library 
once all last semester. I am in the 
Union probably much less than the 
average student." 

King said part of any remoteness 
from other students is caused by not 
having to walk between classes on 
campus. 

"We are in the same room all day. 
When we get a ten-minute break we 
may go out in the hall to stretch and 
talk. I went on campus last semester 
for something and I was surprised to 
see people playing with a frisbee 
between classes. It is no big deal-I 
guess it is just more carefree than it is 



Anton Arnoldy 



over here," said King. 

Roger Bradley, senior in veterinary 
medicine, said that vet students need 
to make a special effort to be active 
on campus. "People don't look at me 
as an outsider because I'm a vet 
student but they probably don't know 
me. I am in the Union probably once 
every two weeks and I am in Farrell 
rarely. It's a matter of time. You don't 
have time, especially the first two 
years of vet school, to just run around 
campus. 

You have to decide to get involved. 
I keep plenty of campus connections 
since I'm president of Blue Key but 
that is a choice I made." 

Bradley said that vet students are 
sometimes left out socially because of 
the nature of the college. "When 
somebody calls up and says "Let-'s go 
to Aggie' you have to turn it down 
usually because it's just too easy to 
get behind and let things snowball on 
you. It makes spontaneous things like 
that hard. 

Being in vet school can become so 
much a part of your life that when 
you do go out you may talk a lot of 
'vet talk.' Because of the length of 
time in the vet process, the people 



that came to school with you as a 
freshman usually graduate before you 
do unless they are a vet, too," 
Bradley said. 

Joe Kendall said that he doesn't 
experience an isolation from the rest 
of campus because he is also a 
graduate student in microbiology. 

"I don't really think I miss much 
because everything is usually in the 
Collegian. It's more of an effort 
maybe, but if there is something on 
campus I want to see, I make that 
effort, although I am not able to see 
the Landon Lectures. 

I am not in the Union very much, I 
haven't been to Farrell in two or three 
months," Kendall said. 

Daniel Hanley, sophomore in 
veterinary medicine, said that he 
doesn't go to the Union very much 
and never to Farrell. 

Does he have to stay away from 
Aggieville more than students from 
other colleges? 

"Hell yes! There's no doubt in my 
mind. I know that sounds like sour 
grapes but there's some people down 
there (Aggie) every night. That's fine if 
you can swing it but there's just no 
way if you want to make good grades. 
It's a matter of priorities," said 
Hanley. 

Floyd Dorsey, senior in veterinary 



126/ Vet Students 




Sue Pfanmuller 



Three in One- A lone person 
crosses the enclosed walk way 
which connects two of the three 
buildings which comprises the 
Veterinary Medicine Complex. 



medicine, said that he uses the Union 
a lot. "It's just like Call Hall or Weber 
is to a lot of people. A lot of people I 
know eat at the Union. I use Farrel 
because I'm in the same place all day 
and I get tired of it." 

Dorsey agreed that being a vet 
student is taxing on the time. 

"I've done things that I thought I 
would never do. I've missed home 
football games or not gone hunting on 
a beautiful day. All you need is C's to 
stay in school but I wouldn't be 
satisfied with that. 

I'm sure you could do everything 
you did as an undergraduate- 
Aggieville, parties, and other stuff- and 
make C's. You have to decide what's 
important to you," said Dorsey. 

"Sometimes I think other students 
have the impression that vet students 
think they are above them or are so 
smart but that's just not the case at 
all," said Dorsey. 

All of the students asked said that 
what they were doing is a matter of 
choice. 

"You have to decide what is 
important to you." J§| 

Fall 1979 enrollment: 408 
Spring 1979 graduates: 105 



BOTTOM ROW: Doug A. Regnler, Edward E. Mey- 
er, James L. Harrington, Eva Stumpff, Mark Skeels, 
George R. McCallum, Gregory J. Ketzner, Keith L. 
Longhofer. SECOND ROW: Marlene R. Richardson, 
Ron W. Bachman, Doug A. Albrecht, Tom J. Fang- 
man, Joe E. Beuerleln, Sara J. Brown, Andy L. Skid- 
more, Suzanne E. Gentile, Joseph J. Butle. THIRD 
ROW: Greg L. Simons, Medge D. Owen, Jon D. Carl- 
son, Michael J. Christensen, John K. Stenemen, Jed 
D. Barnes, Jay C. Luckeroth, LewAnn G. Schneider, 
Alejandro A. Foretic, Natalie T. Smith. TOP ROW: 
Joy L. Rexroat, Ivey L. Whitmore, MaryAnn Gilsdorf, 
Daniel E. Allen, Mike F. Yamamoto, Leo S. Murakami. 






BOTTOM ROW: Jeffrey D. Brose, Michael D. Pat- 
rick, Brian Huseman, Robert D. Johnson, Nicholas 
Saint-Erne, Leslie A. Brown, Beth Hughes, Bob God- 
frey, Kelly McNichols. SECOND ROW: Cindy K. 
Michel, Donald J. Bramlage, John D. McWhlrter, Don- 
na R. Swaney, Joseph M. Lovett, Bryan L. Goodman, 
John R. Bolton, Kevin E. DuPree. THIRD ROW: 
Linda S. Rhine, Sean B. Dow, Jane C. Wolters, Lorrle 
K. Meull, Carroll D. Mlddleton, Mike A. Esav, Janet A. 
Jimenez, Jerry D. Thomas, Colin C. Young. TOP 
ROW: Danni L. WoH, Debra L. Mueller, Ronald L. 
Wyckaff, Mary M. Cyphert, Jill A. Garflnkle, Beverly 
J. Wofford, Leanne J. Landau, Karen L. Altenbernd, 
Roberta A. Storer. 




Vet Students/ 127 




Mike Bodeison 



128/Graduation 












Rain, Rain Go Away 

Showers spoil 1979 commencement exercises 



IJarly Saturday morning, the Topeka 

*" - weather service forecasted early 
morning rains and later afternoon 
showers. By 8 a.m., the rain was 
beginning to fall, but 30 minutes later it 
stopped. 

The brief rain, though, didn't change 
the original commencement plans. The 
decision had already been made. 

At the beginning, it looked as though 
the decision to continue graduation 
outside, had been a wise one. The 
thunderstorm didn't dampen the all- 
University commencement; but then the 
rain returned, showering the individual 
college exercises. 

"The all-University exercises were just 
concluding when it started to rain," said 
Dean Garrett, chairman of the K-State 
1979 commencement exercises. 

Like a stereotyped mailman, large 
crowds forged the rain and wind. 
Students, dressed in caps and gowns, 
participated in the commencement 
exercises on May 18 and 19, 1979 

Rain and other bad weather are 
considered when planning graduation; 
therefore, alternate plans were made. 

"It (raining on commencement) may 
never happen again, but for public 
relations reasons, we must be able to 
announce alternate schedules," Garret 
said. 

For the last two years separate 
commencement exercises have been held 
for the seven colleges, in addition to a 
large all-University graduation. The 



Susan Schlickau 



individual commencements were designed 
to make the exercises more intimate and 
personal, Garret said. 

"You could call each graduate by 
name, and deliver the diploma to the 
students' hands . . and the parents can 
see what they've spent their money for; 
but you sacrifice the impressive sight of 
the pomp and pagentry," Garret said. 

"According to Topeka, the rain was to 
clear by 8:30 a.m. So we (university 
officials) went ahead, as planned with the 
Arts and Sciences graduation," Garret 
said. "We did not expect rain between 
the two commencements." 

"The University was chastised by 
people who had come in for the exercise 
and who were disappointed. We had 
alternative plans, but they would have 
required time changes, which is difficult to 
do when you are dealing with that many 
people," Garret said. "It was just one of 
those things where you couldn't win." 

Just after the general commencement 
exercises were completed, the rain 
started. The College of Arts and Sciences 
went ahead with their ceremony in the 
KSU Stadium, but pouring rain flooded 
the audience. 

"Arts and Sciences attempted to get 
their exercises over with, and attempted 
to get out the diplomas to the students, 
but it was a shambles," Garret said. 

"Our exercise was utter and total 



chaos," said John Lilley, assistant arts and 
sciences dean. "Everyone else (other 
colleges) claimed their rooms but us, and 
we had no where to go, so we were just 
trapped outside." 

"In the future we will have a dry plan, 
a wet plan and a mixed plan," Lilley said. 

Rain also affected the College of Home 
Economics. 

"We were going to have it (graduation 
exercises) in the president's backyard. We 
had the chairs all set up, the podium and 
flowers all arranged; then the rain came," 
said Ruth Hoeflin, home economics dean. 

"We would have gone to McCain 
(Auditorium) at 9:30, for our alternative 
plan, but since it was supposed to be nice 
weather, we lost our opportunity to have 
it inside," Hoeflin said. 

Signs of the location change were 
quickly posed after the main ceremony. 

"We moved into Justin Hall and used 
the classrooms," Hoeflin said. "We had 
seven separate ceremonies, so each of our 
three speakers took turns delivering their 
speeches." 

"We lived throught it, and we only had 
two parents get irate. The rest took it in 
good spirits," she said. 

The Colleges of Agriculture, 
Architecture and Design, Business 
Administration, Education and Engineering 
held their exercises inside, so they were 
not directly affected by the rain. The 
College of Veterinary Medicine and the 
Graduate School held their 
commencements the day before. M 



Graduation/ 129 



Graduate School 

GTA's 

in for the 

money 



It's 5'6". Or it's 6'3". 

It comes in an assortment of 
every color, shape, and temperament 
imaginable. 

It works long hours, never seems to 
get everything done it needs to and is 
paid slightly less than it needs to 
survive. 

Give up? 

It's a graduate teaching assistant 
(GTA) and a veritable army of them is 
found scattered throughout every 
department on campus. 

Why do they do it? 

"Because I needed money to 
support myself through school," said 
Nancy Musick, graduate in computer 
science. "I didn't want to depend on 
loans I'd have to pay back when I 
graduated." 

Such seems to be the consensus of 
most GTA's. They're in it for the 
money. Yet most will readily admit 
that the job doesn't pay enough to 
meet that need. 

"It's almost enough to make it on," 
said Steve Turner, graduate in modern 
languages. "You need just a little bit 
more. You can get by with some other 
source of income." 

"I couldn't make it if I didn't have 
another job," said Sue Pfannmuller, 
graduate in journalism and mass 
communications "but it definitely 
helps." 

Musick added another insight. 

"It pays enough to exist, to live in 
Manhattan. But I don't think it's 
enough for the services you render, 
the details you have to handle, the 
preparation you have to put into it. 

The average GTA (if there is such a 
thing) puts in from 20 to 30 hours a 
week on the job. This includes four to 
six hours of teaching, four hours of 
consulting, plus time for class 
preparation, writing and grading tests 
and a lot of unscheduled consulting. 

Most of the courses taught by 
GTA's are on the introductory level. 

"They will ask you to teach 
something. If you want to get paid, 
you teach it; if you don't want to 
teach it, then you don't get paid," 




Russ Hultgren 



Musick said. She added that there 
were advantages to the system, both 
for students taught by GTA's and for 
the GTA's themselves. 

"In this department, we have an 
incredible shortage of faculty. All the 
classes are too large, but especially 
the introductory sections. If GTA's are 
used to teach these large sections, the 
faculty is free to teach graduate level 
courses to us. So it works out nicely 
that way. 

Also, the students may actually 
benefit from having a GTA. In 
computer science and other 
professional fields, a professor may be 
several years removed from beginning 
level laboratory situations. A GTA's 
experience is fresher," Musick said. 

The students seem to appreciate the 
younger blood. 

"When I was an undergraduate, I 
had this stigma about GTA's. If I was 
in a class taught by a GTA, I felt 
somehow I'd been cheated; that I 
wasn't getting a 'real' instructor," 
Turner said. 

"But now that I'm a GTA, I don't 
get that impression from my students 
at all. I can be very honest with them. 
If I don't know something, I tell them 
I'll find out. I think they appreciate 
that. You certainly don't have to be 
an expert to teach an intro-level 
course," he said. 

"In general, I have a pretty good 
relationship with the students," Musick 
said. "There are always some you 
don't care for personally, but I don't 
think that stems from the fact that I'm 




a GTA. I've had several small groups 
of students take me out for a beer 
after the semester was over or some 
thing like that. It can be fun," she 
said. 

Despite an initial fear by some that 
GTA's are given a "low man on the 
totem pole" treatment by faculty 
members, most GTA's find the reverse 
to be true. 

"I've been treated with more 
respect than I expected, actually more 
than I think I deserve at times," 
Turner said. "It's almost like being 
one of the faculty." 

Pfannmuller agreed. 

"We're treated very well. We're 
invited and encouraged to come to all 
the faculty meetings. The faculty 
welcomes you as a part of the team. I 
think they're very sympathetic to the 
fact that you have one foot in each of 
the two worlds," she said. 

Perhaps the greatest frustration the 
GTA faces is having the duel 
responsibility of being both student 
and teacher. 

"A lot of the time I'm not satisfied 
with my teaching or my course work, 
either one. I think I'm stretched too 
far," Musick said. 

"It seems I have to start taking 
away a little from each of them as the 
semester wears on, to the point where 
both suffer. Sometimes I think it's a 
shame to be forced into compromising 
both your responsibility as an 
instructor and your own course work 
just to satisfy your financial needs," 
she said. 

As a result of his experience, does 
a GTA ever consider teaching as a 
profession? 



BOTTOM BOW: Terrence V. O'Brien, Stephen 
W. Ford, James M. Mlnnix, Martin J. Rlggert, Kim 
L. Berndt. SECOND ROW: Rodney R. Seba, Rich- 
ard J. Thompson, Randy D. Williams, Adel L. 
Vlsser, TOP ROW: Theresa L. Bechtel, Robin D. 
Marrs, Michael W. Fletchall, Gary R. Hazeltlne, 
Keith A. Ehrlich. 



"Before I did this, to be a teacher 
was the last thing in the world I 
wanted," Turner said. "It's a lot more 
fun than I expected. I don't know, It's 
made me think about it. Besides, with 
a Spanish degree, what else can I 
do?" 

Musick thinks the GTA experience 
has made her more cautious. 

"If I ever teach, it won't be 
immediately after graduation. I'm just 
not sure after this experience that my 
personality is suited to teaching. I 
think I'd like to teach at the college 
level, but when I could put my whole 
self into it," she said. 

And Pfannmuller perhaps said it 
best of all. 

"If I ever teach, it will be much 
later on — like when I'm 80." she 
said. "I think teachers should have 
years of expertise in the professional 
world before they settle into 
instruction. Otherwise, they trap 
themselves in an envelope of 
academia. They never experience the 
real world," she said. Id| 




"In the coming years I 
expect to see the continued 
growth of graduate programs 
a number of professional 



m 



areas as the demand for 
advanced knowledge 



increases. 



Robert Kruh, dean 



Business Adm. Graduate Student Assoc. I 

"jut; .«\ , ,riv 





Chem ControhLecturing large 
classes is one possible GTA 
assignment. Here Cheng Sheng- 
Sam, GTA in chemistry, lectures 
on a special topic in Inorganic 
Chemistry. 

Just This Much-GTA s offer 
special help in labs. Steve Roof 
(right), GTA in chemistry, helps 
Boyd Berghaus in Chemistry I. 

Line Disection-Al Kuniholm 
(left), GTA in architecture, advises 
Ed Kurtz in the Design Graphics 
studio. 

photos by Tim Costello 



Fall 1979 enrollment: 2281 
Spring 1979 graduation: 
MS-721 Ph.D-123 



GTA's/131 



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f/yz/Wli * * 



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i 




Outstanding teachers named, 
selection process changed 



In 1979, three K-State instruc- 
tors were honored as outstand- 
ing undergraduate teachers. 

Mary Harris, associate professor 
in curriculum and instruction, Wil- 
liam Nesmith, assistant professor in 
plant pathology, and Marvin Kai- 
ser, assistant professor in sociology 
and anthropology were awarded 
Outstanding Undergraduate teach- 
ing awards. Elmer Heine was hon- 
ored for teaching excellence by the 
Graduate School. 

The Council of Academic Deans 
and the Executive Committee of 
Faculty Senate agreed in Decem- 
ber 1979 that the Outstanding Un- 
dergraduate Teaching honorees 
for 1980 and 1981 will be selected 
by the colleges on a rotating basis. 

John Chalmers, vice president 
for academic affairs, said it was dif- 
ficult to make comparisons of un- 
like performances. 

"The things looked for in the 
College of Architecture and Design 
might be quite different from what 
is looked for in the Business Ad- 
ministration College. People in ar- 
chitecture and design might look 
for someone who is most available 
in the studio, while people in busi- 
ness administration may look for 
the best lecturer," he said. 

Another reason for the change is 
an attempt to cut down the number 
of faculty evaluations, Chalmers 
said. 

"Also, you'd hear someone say 
'This college hasn't had an award 
in years. Somebody is politicking.' 
So we're trying it a new way to see 
if it will better satisfy people." 

If it doesn't, Chalmers said, the 
method of honoring instructors 
may again be changed. 



Debra Graber 



Because of its size, the College 
of Arts and Sciences will select one 
outstanding teacher each year. The 
Colleges of Architecture and De- 
sign, Business Administration and 
Engineering each will honor one in- 
structor as an outstanding under- 
graduate teacher in 1980. The Col- 
leges of Agriculture, Home Eco- 
nomics and Education will select 
outstanding instructors in 1981. 

In the past, outstanding instruc- 
tors have been nominated by all of 
the colleges, Victoria Clegg instruc- 
tor of educational resources, said. 
Instructors then were evaluated by 
their students in the spring and fall 
They were rated by their depart- 
ment heads and their colleagues. 
These ratings and evaluations were 
available to a university committee 
composed of students and faculty 
members who chose the winners. 
The four outstanding instructors 
from 1979, 1980, and 1981 are 
awarded $1,000 at commence- 
ment. Award amounts have varied 
in previous years. 

The Colleges of Arts and Sci- 
ences, Architecture and Design, 
and Business Administration each 
have a committee of students and 
faculty members which looks over 
the nominations. Instructors must 
be evaluated and rated as before, 
but it is the committee within the 
college that makes the decision in- 
stead of a university-wide commit- 
tee. 

The College of Engineering has 
an annual award of its own-the 
James L. Hollis Memorial Award 
for excellence in undergraduate 



teaching. 

Richard Gallagher, associate 
professor of electrical engineering, 
said past winners of that award 
would be evaluated by a group of 
faculty members and students for 
the Outstanding Undergraduate 
Teaching Award. 

The College of Veterinary Medi- 
cine was included in the awards un- 
til this year, when the college de- 
cided not to participate, Chalmers 
said. 

"They have an award for their 
outstanding teacher," he said. 
"They'll have one every year, out 
of funds donated to them for that 
purpose." 

The deadline for 1980 nomina- 
tions was early in March. Students 
and faculty members turned in 
nomination forms to the college in 
which their nominee worked. 

Robert Lynn, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Business Administration, 
said he thought the new system 
generated better publicity and 
more interest. 

"We have more nominees this 
year than any other year," he said. 
"I think they number around ten." 

The Outstanding Undergraduate 
Teaching Awards are funded by 
the Amoco Foundation, which has 
donated $5,000 a year to K-State 
since 1968. 

Chalmers said $4,000 is used for 
the four awards, $500 is awarded 
to the outstanding classified em- 
ployee and $500 is used for miscel- 
laneous expenses. 

Barb Pretzer, a secretary in the 
Union, was named outstanding 
classified employee for 1980. 



£* 



Professors 

need love 

too 

By the power vested in me from the 
Kedzie press, I hereby proclaim 
Monday, February 4, as "Be Kind to re- 
state Professors Day." 

With more than four years worth of 
perspective gained at this peculiar 
institution known as "college", I have 
realized most professors don't receive the 
understanding they need to cope with 
students. Professors need love, too. Even 
the bad ones. 

Just like a policeman and a politician, a 
professor puts in long hours of work and 
enthusiasm only to receive a small return 
on his blood sweat and tears. He often is 
the butt of cruel and unusual punishment 
from uncaring and unsympathetic 
students. If professors were to reciprocate 



132/Teachers 




these actions, students would immediately 
go howling to their deans' offices. 

What is a professor to do? Brilliant 
lectures are destroyed by the bored yawn, 
the indiscriminate laugh and the nodding 
head. Continually plugging away hasn't 
proved to be the answer, just as it is 
futile to strike back at students. 

Each semester brings new woes to add 
to old problems. Experiencing deja vu 
three times a year in several class sections 
can't be that much fun. Some professors 
are finally worn down so much they lose 
interest and switch to selling real estate. 

If we can't change the entire attitude of 
our student body, let's at least give 
professors one day they can call their own 
(after all, every day is students' day). It 
may ease their minds and tensions for 
only a short time, but even a moment's 
bliss is better than no bliss at all. 

Here is a slate of Monday's activities: 

7:30 a.m. -midnight — Students must 
attend all classes in which they are 
enrolled. They must remain attentive in 
both large and small lecture classes. 
Reading the Collegian, scribbling, talking 



Doug Daniel 



or figuring out what one would do in 
Reno with $1,000 is strictly prohibited. 

The crossword puzzle in the Collegian 
will be replaced with today's slogan, "Are 
You Listening?" 

Students must remain in class until the 
professor has finished speaking, even if 
the bell has sounded. Students are 
required to come to class fully prepared 
to discuss the day's topic. Professors may 
laugh heartily at stupid questions. 

Noon — A dunk tank will be set up in 
front of the Union regardless of weather 
conditions. Professors will attempt to dunk 
students whose names appeared on last 
semester's roll every day up until the 
drop period ended. 

Any student who has ever said to a 
professor, "Hey, I wasn't in class last 
time-did we do anything?" must attend a 
Union-catered picnic in the west stadium 
parking lot. 

2:30 p.m. — Professors may arrive 15 
minutes late to class while carrying food, 



Art by Helene Angevine 

drink, candy and cigarrettes to be 
consumed during lecture. Students are not 
allowed to bring food of any kind. 

Professors may pause during lecture to 
blow smoke rings, pop chewing gum or 
ask about the upcoming baseball season. 
All materials planned for presentation will 
appear on a test, regardless of time 
considerations for material presentation. 

7:30 p.m. — Films will be presented 
free of charge to professors. All students 
must pay $5 admission. Films include 
"Deep Throat" and "The Devil in Miss 
Jones." Professors may yell catcalls at 
any students during the films. 

10-11 p.m. — Professors may call 
students to ask for class assignments. 
Calling back two or three times is 
encouraged. 

Let's all participate in Be Kind to K- 
State Professors Day" and give them the 
chance to enjoy being a student. M 

Editorial column appearing In Feb. i, 1980, Collegian 



Teachers/133 



Administration 



Hurry Up And Wait 



a 



Have you enrolled yet?" 
For the first two or three 



days of each semester that question 
becomes a standard filler in 
conversations where there is nothing 
better to talk about. The response 
ranges from indifference to downright 
dread of the impending task. That is 
unless you are talking to Richard 
Elkins, dean of admissions. 

"Enrollment should be a little ripple 
in a student's semester, not a 
traumatic shock," Elkins said. 

Elkins believes that goal was 
accomplished for most students this 
year. 

"Enrollment ran very smoothly 
except that it can have some very 
long lines. We hire college students to 
work the lines but there is bound to 
be problems when the extent of their 
training is a twenty-or-thirty-minute 
crash course before we open the 
fieldhouse doors. Overall they do a 
very good job," Elkins said. 

Elkins agreed that some students 
may equate lines at enrollment with 
bureaucratic inefficiency when it is 
really due to the volume of students 
that must be handled. 

"I would be the first to agree that 



Anton Arnoldy 



things would go faster and smoother if 
I could hire ten more trained 
personnel for enrollment but you know 
who would end up paying for that. 

Then there's always the case where 
it's hard to tell a student who's having 
problems enrolling that 'I am sorry 
that it happened to you but there 
were 13,000 others who went through 
with no problem.' That particular 
student doesn't care about that other 
13,000. He just knows that he's 
having problems," Elkins said. 

Elkins explained that the enrollment 
system is continuously updated and 
improved through various University 
committees such as the Academic 
Affairs Committee of Faculty Senate. 
He said that students play their part in 
the process by making their voice be 
heard. 

"It's like civilization. It progresses 
and builds on itself. It gets better and 
then after a while people start 
complaining, then it gets better again." 

"The group (of students) that 
complains now doesn't remember the 
system from years ago. That's not 



bad- it just shows you how the system 
progresses," Elkins said. 

"1966 was the first year we had 
computerized enrollment. At the time 
we were ahead of the crowd. It's like 
Ahearn Fieldhouse. When it was built 
it was one of the best in the country. 
Now it is down near the bottom." 

Nine years ago enrollment included 
nine master cards requiring the student 
to write out his Manhattan address 
along with his parents' address on 
each one. The present system uses 
only three master cards. 

"One area I have concern with is 
the returning student: the student who 
has been out of school a semester, a 
year, 5 years or 10 years and comes 
back to school. These people are 
away from the campus and yet we 
expect them to know everything when 
they come back," Elkins said. 

Elkins said that both physical and 
academic changes cause problems. 

"My office used to be the Security 
and Traffic office. People still come 
up to the back door of my office and 
bang on it until I open it up and 
explain that Security and Traffic have 
been moved to new offices. One little 
old lady had taught at K-State on and 



off for fifteen years and would not 
believe me even after I told her. I 
could not make her believe that my 
office was not Security and Traffic," 
Elkins said. 

"That is a physical change but a 
university has academic changes, too, 
and the returning student is kind of 
lost a lot of times." 

Elkins said that the Admissions 
Office had a long line during spring 
enrollment of returning students who 
had not turned in their returning 
student applications. 

"We had a line from one of our 
offices backed up clear to the lobby. 
We have a check for academic 
dismissal, delinquency fees, and so on, 
and it backs up on us if they all come 
in late." Elkins said. Elkins said the 
solutions to problems of the returning 
student and others are discussed by 
registrars of the Big 8 every year. 

"When somebody in the Conference 
comes up with a workable idea the 
other schools may put it into their 
system. That's why you may see a lot 
of similarity between schools." Elkins 
said. 








Dave Kaup 



Capacity crowd-No tickets are 
sold for it but enrollment is always 
a full house. 



Playing the numbers-(upper 

right) Becky Ulrich, sophomore in 
interior architecture, has her 
schedule changed through 
drop/add in the basement of 
Farrell Library. 



Use number 



u 



We produce the line schedules, 
prepare the forms for 



registration, assess fees, prepare class 
assignments, run the drop/add system, 
and initiate graduation checks," 
Donald Foster, director of records 
said. 

Foster said the major advantage of 
the present enrollment form over the 
one used nine years ago is that the 
information is preprinted and the 
student need only check it for 
accuracy. 

"Registration used to be a packet of 
maybe fifteen cards, nine of which the 
student needed to fill out. Now we 
capture that data on one form. It used 
to be a three or four week process 
just to get addresses of all the 
students. Now because students fill out 
their address on the back of the form 
for the scanner we get all that 
information almost immediately," he 
said. 

But the most direct contact most 
students have with the Records Office 
is through drop/add. 

"The process we used this year is 
actually the same process we used for 
the past six years. We did a two 
semester test using early drop/add but 



134/Registration 




2 lead pencil only 



Tim Costello 



the number of drop/adds after the 
semester started was just as high. I am 
sure there are students who will say 
"But the early drop/add really helped 
me' but it's difficult to look at 
individual cases when dealing with this 
number of students It (early drop/add) 
just added to advisers' work-load at a 
time when they are busy already," 
said Foster. 

Foster called the present drop/add 
forms more efficient than past forms. 

"In terms of the individual student it 
is a bit more complex because each 
student marks his own form card for 
the scanner. The old card was 
essentially the top third of the present 
form- the difference being the scanner 
columns. 

Our reasons for changing the form 
was to reduce errors. Basicly, there 
are three ways of adding information 
to the computer: keying it in, or using 
a keypunch board like a typewriter; 
the optical scanner which reads the 
columns marked with lead; and from a 
remote terminal, which displays 
information from the computer on a 
screen and allows it to be changed 
and put back in the computer. 

The previous system was 



keypunching all the information in but 
that had a high rate of errors so we 
went to optical scanning. The person 
that knows best what classes he needs 
changed is the student. Optical 
scanning brings the input closest to the 
person who is less likely to make an 
error. It's also quicker. We can do a 
very large number in a short time." 
Foster said. 

Foster said the use of a remote 
terminal would be likely in the future. 

"During the first few weeks of each 
semester we will probably still use the 
present system. As the volume of 
students needing to drop/add goes 
down as the semester progresses it 
would be advantageous to use a 
remote terminal. The student's 
information would be called from the 
computer and displayed on the screen. 
The necessary change would be made 
with the student standing right there 
and the information would be fed back 
to the computer without any forms to 
be filled out. Of course this requires 
someone to operate the terminal and 
gives a chance for error," said Foster. 

M 



"By acknowledging its status as a 
broad university, by accepting and 
building on its strength, and by cele- 
brating those quality characteristics 
which set it apart from other institu- 
tions, K-State will show deserved pride 
in its stature within the higher educa- 
tion community. " 

Duane Acker 

President 



"As a comprehensive University 
with outstanding programs in over 100 
fields, students will continue to be at- 
tracted to Kansas State if we can main- 
tain the quality of our faculty. " 

John Chalmers 

V. P. for Academic Affairs 



"/ expect higher education in the 
80 s to be received by its publics in 
more rewarding terms than was true in 
the 70's. 

Those connected with educational 
institutions will reap the rewards of 
significant accomplishments. " 
Chester E. Peters 
V. P. for Student Affairs 



"Agriculture provides both the nec- 
essary food and fiber to our own citi- 
zens as the basis of a quality life, but is 
also a dominant economic factor in our 
international balance of trade. " 

Roger L. Mitchell 

V. P. for Agriculture 



"The decade ahead appears to be 
one of great challenge with projected 
enrollment declines, escalating costs, 
and a need for alternate energy 
sources. " 

Gene Cross 

V. P. for University Facilities 



"The total expenditures for Kansas 
State University for 1980 will exceed 
$110 million, of which, less than one- 
half will be from State appropriated 
funds. By 1990, due to inflation and 
the expected growth in the University, 
the budget will exceed $200 million. " 
Daniel D. Beatty 
V. P. for Business Affairs 










Registration/ 135 



Center for 



St udent Developmen t 

Let the 
fingers 

do the 
walking 



M n continuing to assist the growth 
* and development of individual 
students, the Center of Student 
Development (CSD), while keeping the 
established programs, added a few 
more to its services. 

A major project that began 
operation after Thanksgiving was 
DIAL. With the cooperation of ULN 
and FONE, DIAL (Digital Information 
Access Line) made available to callers, 
standard information on mental health 
topics at one phone number, campus 
and community information at the 
other and alcohol abuse prevention 
tapes at both. 

The tapes last from three to eight 
minutes offering information and 
referral on a variety of topics and 
concerns. 

The DIAL system is totally 
anonymous, according to Linda 
Teener, director of the Alcohol Abuse 
Prevention Program. "When you call, 
no personal information is asked, 
tapes are done in a relaxed style. 
Persons can learn in a relaxed fashion, 
learn concrete facts with referral 
information to campus and community 
resources at the end of every tape." 
Teener said. 

To use the DIAL system, the caller 
simply gives the tape's assigned 
number and the operator will put the 
tape on. After 3-8 minutes, when the 
tape ends, the line will disconnect. 
The caller will have to dial again to 
hear another tape. 

"We chose the DIAL system 
because it is a proven effective way to 
reach the persons who want the help 




^ 




Janet Terry and Teresa Stotts 



and knowledge." Teener said. 

The Counseling Center continued its 
programs of workshops and seminars 
covering such subjects as biofeedback 
training and life and career planning 
workshops. 

The already established Study Skills 
Laboratory provided several new 
programs. 

Two discussion meetings on "How 
to Prepare for Final Exams," were 
held several weeks before finals. The 
sessions gave tips on how to organize 
essay tests and how to cram, if 
necessary, more effectively. 

The sessions on final exams and a 
Monday "drop in" were staffed by 
Jon Lewis, counselor. The "drop in" 
was open to any student Monday 
mornings who had questions about 
getting the most out of their studies. 

Helping minorities, low-income and 
handicapped students entering K-State 
is the continuing service of the 
Educational Support System. 

Students for Handicapped Concerns 
sponsored a wheelchair basketball 
game that raised about $800. 

The money went into a Shuttle Car 
Service that began as a part-time 
service last winter. With administrative 
support the service is now full time for 
the temporary and permanently 
handicapped. 



"The service varies around 
individual schedules and needs, with 
service from residence halls to classes 
with personal assistance into the 
classroom if needed," Jane Rowlett, 
coordinator for students with physical 
limitations, said. 

The service employs a full time 
driver and a work-study student who 
drive a car rented from the physical 
plant. 

"If we show a need, I'm sure the 
service will continue next year," 
Rowlett said. 

Special target groups such as singli 
parents and older students were 
emphasized in Women's Programs. 
"We are trying to help both male and 
female students," Margaret Nording, 
director Women's Programs, said. 

Cathy Stackpole, Women's 
Resource Center's new director, 
developed a newsletter to reach the 
target groups. 

A series of presentations, 
"Switching Roles," "Women in 
Industry," and "Women in Mental 
Health" to name a few, were 
presented again this year. W[ 



Got it'Rod Armstrong (right) of 
the Shawnee County Chairmen 
plays keep-away with Tim 
Jankovich, junior in pre-law at the 
wheelchair basketball game. 




136/CSD Programs 



ififi ** 




Finger Walk-Sara Hibbeler, 
sophomore in pre-law, operates 
the new DIAL system for a caller. 

Mtntn' Good-Patrick Miller, 
junior in sociology receives the 
taste of a coconut cream pie from 
Melanie Stockdale, graduate in 
consumer economics, at the 
second annual wheelchair race 
sponsored by the Students for 
Handicapped Concerns in front of 
the Union. 





Craig Chandler 



BOTTOM ROW- Marilyn Gilbert, Marlesa Roney, 
Bill Muret, Linda Wolder. SECOND ROW- Mlcki 
Steele, Leigh Kaiser, Alex Poorman. THIRD 
ROW- Robert Rinner, Margaret Smith, Bruce 
Bowerman. TOP ROW- Jim McGee. 



BOTTOM ROW- James F. Stlllwell, Dave Black, 
Robert Kennedy, Greg Cooper, Wendell Evans. 
SECOND ROW- Elizabeth A. Day, Melinda K. 
Harbison, Robert L. Elliot, Patty R. Bowdlsh, Terrl 
L. Strong, Suzette L. Astley. TOP ROW- Ann 
Sanders, Kimberly A. Saunders, Connie S. Bower- 
sox, Sara J. Hibbeler, Eleanor J. Spitzer, Kathie S. 
Weigand. 






CENTER FOR 
STUDENT DEVELOPMENi 

counseling center 

dean of students 

educ. opport. center 

fraternities and sororities 

minora 4 cultural prog. 

new stuoent programs 

special services program 

stuoent activities 

women's programs 



Center for Student 



Outreach: 

^Jhilip was an A student in Puerto 
Rico. Now he is getting D's in 
pre-vet because his teachers talk too 
fast for his broken English. Philip 
misses his family and is thinking of 
dropping out. 

Julie studies every night and goes 
to all her classes, but before every test 
she gets so nervous that she is almost 
sick. She is convinced that she is one 
of the "dumb ones" and will never 
make it at K-State. 

Michael can't seem to get interested 
in school or make friends at K-State 
so he just hangs around the apartment 
a lot and drinks beer. Sometimes Mike 
thinks he is an alcoholic. 

Philip, Julie, and Michael have 
problems shared by a number of K- 
Staters. These and other social or 
academic problems are the reason for 
the existence of The Center for 
Student Development (CSD). 

CSD has many units which serve 
individuals and groups on campus. 
These Units include Minority and 
Cultural Affairs, International Student 
Programs, Program Development and 
Evaluation, Women's Programs, 
Student Activities, Counseling Center, 
and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Project. 

CSD has been in existence at K- 
State since 1970 conceived by Dr. 
Chester Chester Peters, vice-president 
of Student Affairs, and then-Dean of 
Students, Gene Kasper. The Counseling 
Center and Dean of Students offices 
merged and CSD was born. 




Development 



A philosophy to prevent student problems 



Pam Good 



Nolting said that CSD is "trying to 
provide help to individuals and groups 
in terms of needs and concerns they 
may have. Our philosophy is one of 
outreach. We are trying to prevent 
major problems, and we try to reach 
out to students before things reach a 
crisis point." 

Margaret Nordin, associate director 
of CSD and director of Women's 
Programs, agreed and added, "We 
think of individuals, not just programs. 
We try to subdivide the group of 
lonely people. After all, we aren't in 
this world alone. We have the role of 
trying to anticipate problems." 

According to Nordin, CSD is "a 
very definite part of the education 
aspect of the University. " 

Starting in Holtz Hall, CSD has 
grown to offices in Anderson Hall, 
Fairchild Hall, the K-State Union, 
International Student Center, Pittman 
Building and to the Chapels for 
programming, Nolting said. 

This expansion is due to the many 
units being developed within CSD, he 
said. Some are new, and others have 
been in existence from the early days 
of CSD. But each unit serves a 
different group of people. 

The Office of Minority and Cultural 
Affairs, Veryl Switzer, director, offers 
support and assistance in programming 
by staff advisers. This office has the 



responsibility of supervision of the 
following programs: Educational 
Opportunities Center, Special Services 
and Upward Bound. 

Housed in Holtz and Pittman, the 
programs cater to ethnic minorities, 
the physically handicapped, and to 
those from low-income families. 
Supervision of cultural organizations 
such as Black Student Union, MECha, 
Native American Student Body and 
Hispanic Student Union are supervised 
by Switzer's office. 

To meet the needs of the 
increasing number of international 
students at K-State, the International 
Student Center (ISC) was created two 
years ago. The number of international 
students has increased from one in 
1886 to more than 730 in 1979, 
according to Allan Brettell, director of 
the International Student Center. 

Adjusting to a new environment is 
often difficult for the international 
students, Brettell said and to help 
them, the ISC and International 
Coordinating Council (ICC) offer talent 
shows, national nights, international 
films, English tutoring and host family 
programs. 

Another CSD unit is Program 
Development and Evaluation. 
According to the CSD handbook, this 
unit "offers assistance and consultation 
to (those) interested in planning and 
developing new student assistance 
programs or improving existing ones." 

This unit also compiles data on 



characteristics, attitudes, interests, 
skills and needs of the student body to 
assist academic departments of the 
University. 

Mike Lynch directs the Program 
Development and Evaluation unit from 
Fairchild Hall. He is also in charge of 
the University Learning Network 
(ULN), which is an information agency. 
ULN is co-sponsored by CSD and the 
Student Governing Association (SGA) 

The changing roles of men and 
women in society is an important 
issue, and the implication of these 
changes directly affect us all, 
according to Nordin. 

Increasing student awareness ofthe 
changes and implications, was the idea 
of Women's Programming which began 
in 1973 with two bookshelves in 
Fairchild Hall, Nordin said. "We've 
come a long way, but not nearly far 
enough." 

Through studies and research, 
Nordin said, the Women's Programs of 
CSD is "keeping fingers on the pulse" 
of student thought. 

The Women's Programming works 
with the Women's Resource Center 
(WRC), located in the SGA office. 
Assertiveness training, rape prevention 
and re-entry (for those who have 
returned to the education environment 
after a long absence) are a few of the 
programs from Women's 
Programming. 

CSD and SGA combine to oversee 
the Student Activities division. 




Directing this service from the SGA 
office, Susan Angle says is "a major 
part of my job, advising Student 
Government. Within that, I take care 
of finances, and I also advise the 
University Activities Board." 

The office also deals with registering 
student organizations, " she said. 
"Sometimes we offer leadership 
training to organizations, also." 

Counseling is an important part of 
the CSD. This service is free and open 
to all K-State students and spouses. 

Bill Ogg, acting director of the 
Counseling Center, said that an 
average of 2,100 students used the 
services offered during the 1976-77 
academic year. 

Services include educational - 
vocational counseling, personal 
counseling, assertiveness training, bio- 
feedback, career life planning, 
jobsearch workshops, peer sex 
education, pregnancy counseling, stress 
management, student skills laboratory 
and leadership training. 

A new service offered by CSD is 
the Alcohol Abuse Prevention Project 
(AAPP). 

Director Linda Teener said the main 
goals of the AAPP are to "increase 
awareness, factual knowledge and the 
issues surrounding the use and abuse 
of alcohol." 

"We want to support the non- 
drinker, not to condemn the drinker, 
but to get them to think about it 
(drinking)," Teener said. 

Besides sponsoring an Un-Cocktail 
Party at the University for Man (UFM) 
house, the AAPP also has available 
materials on alcohol for student 
research. 

Teener said the response has been 
"pretty good" considering this is the 
program's first year in operation. 

Funding for the programs differ 
between units, Nolting said. "We have 
state funding primarily, and we co- 
sponsor a lot with SGA." He said 
there are other sources for funding, 
including the State of Kansas Division 
of Social and Rehabilitation Services, 
federal and cultural minorities funding. 

Nolting estimated that almost every 
student uses CSD in some way. "We 
reach a lot of people, " he said. 

Nordin agreed, and said, "An 
institution's personnel services try to 
balance the need for self and the need 
to serve society. We try to help 
students help themselves. We also try 
to help students see how they can 
work together.' 



Gathering Info- (far left) 
Jacklyn Eye, freshman in 
computer science, leaves Holtz 
Hall. 

Facelift- Holtz Hall, which 
houses CSD, receives a little 



touching up. 



photos by Hurrlyet Aydogan 



CSD/ 139 



\ 



/ -" 



f ML ,ml fj *f) 





Student Senate Executive Council 




~ . mm mm 






Student Senate President's Cabinet 

1 ill 



BOTTOM ROW: Mary Rakowsky, Jackson Byais, 
Jerry Wets, Charles Hathaway, Peter Cooper, Ralph 
Field, Page Twiss, Helnte Bulmahn. SECOND ROW: 
Richard Elkins, John Murry, Sue Maes, Ray Keen, 
Jack Lambert, Ralph Turnqutst, John Marr, Welling- 
ton Koepsel. THIRD ROW: Maurice Stark, L. V. 
Withee, David Whitney, Randolph Pohlman, Michael 
Lynch, Terrence O'Brian, Lowell Brandner, Charles 
Thompson, Frank Orazem, Jack Carpenter, Larry 
Cindrich. FOURTH ROW: Al Adams, Charles Marr, 
James Townsend, Floyd Harris, Everett Haft, Kath- 
leen Newell, Nancy Twiss, David Laurie, Charles Cor- 
bin, Eugene Friedmann, James Cook, Samuel Kruck- 
enberg. TOP ROW: William Fately, Clinton Owensby, 
David Ames, Antonia Plgno, Naomi Lynn, William 
Richter, Jerald Dallam, Roger Linda, Michael Dike- 
man, Gerry Posler, Albert Davis, G. Kent Stewart, 
Alfred Wilson, Vincent Gillespie, William Evans, Bette 
Dale, Ann Scott, Charles Bussing, Sandra Bussing, C. 
Helntzeiman, Edward DeVilbiss, Rick Macha, Keith 
Beeman, Norman Redeker, Dorothy Thompson, Mary 
D. Peterson, Margaret Ordonez. 



BOTTOM ROW: Marc Ollington, John Barrera, Rob 
ert Steinbauer, John Chalmers, Allen MeCormick 
TOP ROW: Cheryl May, Sheri Sneed, Anne Shearer 
Dave Exline, Patrick Miller, Jim Perrlno, Robert Alt 
land, Norma Bunton, Betty McGraw. 



TOP ROW- David E. Exline, A. Clark Ruttinger, M. 

Angela Scanlan, Eileen M. Eggleston, Charles R. -.■; 
Banks, Dent Wllcoxon, Steve Goble, Clifford Gilbert. 
THIRD ROW- Dana W, Goster, Mark Bergmeier, 
Terl Bishop, Mike Karpowicz, Richard Shearer, Doug- 
las K. Reinhardt, Mark A. Zimmerman, Stephen E. 
Hentges, Roger M. Und. SECOND ROW- Marty 
Levy, Brad D. Rayl, Isaac Turner, Mark W. Skinner, 
Nancy A. Wootton. Susan M. Willson, Vivian B. Bliss, 
Craig E. Cole, Mark Mugler, Cheryl L. Hart, Gail S. 
Cavinee. BOTTOM ROW- Elizabeth C. Stevens, 
Richard M. Macha, Kevin L. Bennett, James M. Brew- 
er, Wlnton Smith, Deby A. Dougherty, Gregory H. 
Gibson, Patrick H. Miller, Robert S. Airland, Steven 
Arnoldy. 



TOP ROW- Dana W. Foster, Isaac D. Turner, Patrick 
H. Miller, Roger M. Lind, A. Clark Ruttinger. BOT- 
TOM ROW- Greg L. Musll, Cheryl L. Hart, Mark A. 
Zimmerman, Angela Scanlan, Richard M. Macha. 



TOP ROW- John A. Kober, Richard M. Macha, Brian 
L. Rassette, Tim H. Heffel. SECOND ROW- Sheila 
Louk, Mary Kaye Faublon, Dick Jaques, Brad Burnett. 
BOTTOM ROW- Mark Hoffman, Stephen J. Linen- 
berger, Greg L. Musll, Randy Tosh. 




Senate 



Ctudent government may 
** sometimes light the first candle, 
but the student populace must form 
the bonfire to attract attention to their 
concerns. 

In the past year, 1979 student body 
president Greg Musil said K-State 
students have increased their 
credibility with the Kansas Legislature 
and the K-State administration, 
"because students showed they 
cared." 

The year 1979 was marked with 
student protest and proposals for a 
better way of doing things (at least 
from the students point of view). 

More than 1,000 students showed 
their concern as they swarmed around 



*»* 



%:&&■ 



•£%: 




" r-ey 



■ ■ . 





opens its ears to Nichols 9 protesters 



Anderson Hall and buzzed in protest 
of K-State 

President Duane Acker's April 4, 
1979 recommendation to partially raze 
the Nichols Gymnasium ruins. 

Members of student government and 
other student representatives carried 
the sentiments of the angry crowd to 
Gov. John Carlin and members of the 
Legislature the next day. 

As a result of the student pressure, 
Acker withdrew his recommendation 
April 6 and Nichols was granted a 
stay of execution until a legislative ad 
hoc committee could study alternatives 
for the 69-year-old structure. 

Student Senate reaffirmed its 
"commitment to preserving the 



Suzanne Schlender 



Nichols Gym structure," by extending 
a 1975 allocation of $10,000 to 
include preservation of Nichols, as well 
as a renovation or reconstruction as 
was stipulated in the original 
legislation. 

In its final report, 6 1 /2 months later, 
the ad hoc committee recommended 
stabilization of the "Castle." 

Students also initiated the action in 
voting to partially fund the 
construction of a multi-purpose 
coliseum. On election day, Feb. 22, 
1979, students voted to increase 
student fees by $5.75 per semester 




for full-time students in the fall of 
1981. The increase will only take 
effect if non-student groups make 
substantial progress toward raising 
funds for the facility. 

To solicit student opinion in another 
area, Student Senate formed a task 
force to study Farrell Library services 
and to research complaints senators 
had received about the library. 

The task force returned a verdict of 
totally inadequate in its report, which 
included a student survey and a 
comparison study with other 
universities' libraries. The study placed 
K-State at the bottom of the Big 8 in 
the number of volumes held in its 
library and the number of staff 
positions. 

In the survey, students rated library 
services as inadequate in six of 10 
categories and no categories were 
considered more than adequate. 

Most of the problems cited in the 
task force's report were the direct 
result of inadequate funding. 

Because of the task force study and 
"continual pressure on the 
administration," additional funding for 
the library was placed at top priority 
in K-State's 1980 Legislative Budget, 
Musil said. 

Musil said a major problem with 
working in student government is they 
are only elected for one year and 
seldom see the final results of the 
work they do. 

"If they (legislators and 
administrators) don't like what you're 
working on, they just wait a year and 
you're gone," Musil said. 

Student Senate tried to solve the 
communication problem with legislators 
by inviting them to visit the campus 
for a dinner and reception in January 
1980, Rich Macha, 1979 senate 
chairman, said. The banquet was to 
allow members of student government 
at K-State to get acquainted with the 
legislators and discuss issues of 



concern to K-State students. 

A move by senate that "directly 
affects the pocket book of every 
student," is an increase in student 
health fees, Macha said. 

Senate recommended a $15 per 
semester fee increase be phased in 
during the next three academic years, 
with a $6 increase in 1980-81, $5 in 
1981-82 and $4 in 1982-83. With this 
increase, health fees will rise from $40 
per semester to $55 by 1982, if it is 
approved by the Kansas Board of 
Regents. 

Senate also made a drastic move 
during Tentative Allocations, spring 
1979, by refusing funding of the Drug 
Education Center. 

A committee formed later 
recommended that the drug education 
services could be met by the combined 
efforts of Lafene Health Center, the 
FONE Crisis Center and the North 
Central Guidance Center. Funds for a 
coordinator between the three centers 
were approved in fall 1979 by senate. 

Senate also funded the third annual 
Big 8 Conference on Black Student 
Government held for the first time at 
K-State on Feb. 22-23, 1980. 

Questions were raised during 
student government election in spring 
1979 about the professionalism of the 
conduction of elections. To alleviate 
these fears, in the fall senate 
established an elections commission 
which would set up the yearly 
elections along with the rules and 
regulations governing them, and would 
see that the candidates and election 
workers adhere to the rules. 

In a move to open communication 
lines with students and other 
concerned persons, senate established 
an open meeting period held at the 
beginning of each senate meeting 
which allowed anyone of speak on any 
issue. 




Sue Pfannmuller 



Student Governing Association 



Grin and Bear it-Student Body 
President Greg Musil cringes after 
being dunked as part of homecoming 
week activities. 



Parlimentary Procedure- Mark 
Mugler, agriculture senator, listens as 
the minutes are read during a 
Student Senate meeting. 



Dave Kaup 



SGA/141 




BOTTOM ROW- Dede Hildreth, Jill Hildreth, dec 
Mannell, Linda Voider. TOP ROW- Theresa Bexter- 
miller, Steve Upchurch, Stan Hlggason, Jim Locashio. 



BOTTOM ROW- Lisa Feden, JUI Jacoby, Judi Ga- 
marano, Marlesa Roney. SECOND ROW- Joseph 
Faubion, Margaret Smith, Ed McPheeters. TOP 
ROW- David Hawkins, Pat Hall, Gary Knott. 



BOTTOM ROW- Julie B. Deberry, Torti Jasso. SEC- 
OND ROW- Patrick J. Mills, Alex Poorman, Bill 
Muret. TOP ROW- Joel Marshall, Hayden Wands, 
Roger Seymour. 



BOTTOM ROW- Mlcki Steele, Donna Abbott, Jenni- 
fer Goldsmith, Sara Hibbeler. SECOND ROW- Nan- 
cy Tason, Wen-chien Wu, Sharon Musll, Rosle Mc- 
Carthy. TOP ROW- Travis Threats, Dennis Wlke, 
Karl Sweers. 




Farrell 



a 



Have you ever been in 
I 



L Farrell?" 

"Naw, what's that?" 

"The library." 

"The library? Sounds boring. What 
do you think I came to college for? 
Let's go to Aggie." 

"No, you need to find out about 
Farrell. 

"Well, okay, I'm supposed to find 
some book for Comp. I." 

"Oh, that's part of the new 
freshmen orientation program to get 
you acquainted with the library. It's 
hard to find things in Farrell if you 
don't know how to use the card 
catalogs." 

"Wait a minute. Didn't I hear about 
an automated circulation and 
cataloging system?" 

"Yes, but we haven't got it yet. 
Remodeling would cost about 
$65,000. But instead of thumbing 
through thousands of cards and then 
looking on a chart for the stack 
location, a student could punch a 
subject into a computer and get a list 
of all the books Farrell has on that 
subject and where to find them. It'd 
be a real time saver. And speaking of 
saving time, librarians could identify 
the person who checked out the book, 



Issues and Ideas Committee y 
^> s4 




University Library 




to receive top priority in budget 



Photos by Hurriyet Aydogan 



Jill McAntee 



find the due date and fines too." 

"Oh great, more fines." 

"Well, here we are-Farrell Library, 
in the doors to the lobby and to your 
right is the browsing collection. They 
have paperbacks and hardbacks there, 
books just to read for enjoyment." 

"Reading for enjoyment? That's a 
new thought to me. Look at that guy 
reading the paper, he's holding it 
pretty close, must have bad eyesight." 

"I think he's sleeping. Between 
classes a lot of students take little cat 
naps. And with these chairs, it's easy 
to do." 

"Knowing me I'd sleep right through 
all my classes, not just between 
them." 

"Come on, let me show you 
around. Here's a copy machine for 
student use. They're placed in the 
stacks throughout the library. 
Sometimes it's real hard to get use of 
these things. They're either all busy, 
out of paper or broken." 

"Why don't they just buy some 
more?" 

"They're waiting to see about a 
new Kansas law. It's possible that all 



state institutions may have to buy the 
same brand of copy machine." 

"So in the mean time we wait in 
line." 

"Right. Here's the card catalog. 
What book do you need to find?" 

"Ah, I had it written somewhere. 
Here it is- The Sociology of Science. " 

"Okay, find it alphabetically. Here it 
is and here's the call number-Q 175 
S66. Now the stack level-5. And up 
we go to third floor." 

"That was some elevator ride, zippy 
little things. Ooo-what happened to 
that wall?" 

"Last semester the roof started 
leaking. Water ran down over the 
mural, just about ruined it. David 
Overmyer painted it in 1934. They 
finally got the roof repaired, but it 
damaged the ceilings, walls and some 
library materials." 

"Boy, this place has a lot of 
problems doesn't it?" 

"Supposedly it's the worst library in 
the Big 8. A task force in 1979 found 
Farrell inadequate in 6 of 10 
categories: number of hours open, 
amount of study space, available staff, 
number of volurres and periodicals 
and general satisfaction was rated 
poor." 



"Why don't they improve it?" 

"Same old thing-lack of funds. 
Although Farrell's improvement is on 
the top of President Acker's 1981 
funding budget requests, over 
$204,000 is allocated for improving 
the library in 1980 " 

Students complain that Farrell needs 
more study space, weekend hours and 
that material is frequently outdated. 
"Some students also have trouble 
finding material, but not so in our 
case-here's your book." 

"Yeah, it's not so tough. Good thing 
I was with you though, or I would 
have never found it." 

"Well, we found your book. Now 
let's tour Aggie." I 



Stack search- Tim Sterrett, 
graduate in business, searches for 
an economics book. 

Read, read, read-Farrell Library 
provides a place for students to 
meet, study, read the Collegian or 
work on group projects. 




"Depending on the budget I 
anticipate that hours will be 
extended, an automated circu- 
lation system installed. " 

Jay Rauach, director 



Library/ 143 




Inside 



BOTTOM ROW: Bill Muret. Page Puckett, Diane 
Deforest, Laurie Carr. TOP SOW: Steve Barkley, 
Bruce Bouermann, Ann Sanders. 



BOTTOM ROW: Janice Sutton, Mary Sue Hoim. 
SECOND ROW: Lesa Miller, Leigh Kaiser, Bob 
Harrington. THIRD ROW: Curt Hammill, Mister 
Bill, Paula Hazelton. TOP RO W: Stefan Komarek, 
Tom Hardenburger, Bart R. Dunsford . 



BOTTOM ROW: Dale W. Blanchard, Debbie 
Wasser, Peggy Patchen. TOP ROW: Ann M. Ga- 

liano, Gayle McGehee, Pat Honors, Tracey Deines. 



Standing: Ruth Landau, Dana LeSher, Mary 
McClay, Carol Sobba, Rita Walsh. Sitting: Rob Ctes- 
llcki, Jane Galvin, Soni Nichols, Jim Jim McGee. 



JUt ost K-State students think of 

* * Lafene Student Health Center 
as a place they visit only when 
they are forced. Lafene's popularity 
has ranked right up there with finals, 
hangovers, Mondays and residence hall 
food. 

Likewise, students have the idea 
that the staff, nurses and doctors 
which are tucked away within Lafene's 
walls are there only because they are 
forced to be. 

But this is a misconception. They 
are there because they want to be. 
And that makes a difference in 
attitude, and ultimately, the service the 
staff at Lafene provides. 

"Years ago, the student health 
doctor was one who couldn't make it 
anywhere else," Dr. Robert Tout, one 
of ten Lafene doctors said. 

He said that now student health is 
"more specialized," so that old idea is 
no longer true. 

Dr. Robert Sinclair, director of 
Lafene agreed, and added that student 
medical problems "are a separate 
entity. There's a lot of trauma here." 

Both Tout and Sinclair have spent 
part of their careers in private 
practice, but said that student health 
practice has advantages. 

"I was in private practice for ten 
years," Tout said, "Private practice 
was more demanding than what I felt I 
wanted to put up with. I had no time 
with my wife and family." 

"There's less pressure, less 




Doctor, doctor-Martha E. 

George, sophomore in social 




"We have been looking tor a 
female physician. LeFemme 
Clinic was designed to meet 
the needs of female students 
and in recruiting a female 
physician. " 

Robert Sinclair, director 



view contradicts public image 



Pam Good 



demands. I have more free time. I can 
make plans. In private practice you 
cannot," Tout said. 

"A person in private practice, 
unless he's in a group, is on call 24 
hours a day," Sinclair said. 

"You work like hell when you're 
here but when you're off, you're off!" 
Sinclair added. 

Sinclair said that "time and 
clientele" are the two big advantages 
to working in a sutdent health center. 
He has had much experience in 
working in private practice and has 
"matriculated" into the student health 
field. 

Sinclair graduated from Ohio State 
University and opened a family 
practice in Columbus, Ohio. He later 
served as student health director and 
team physician for Denison University 
in Granville, Ohio, while continuing his 
private practice. 

During this time, Sinclair said he 
spent three hours a day in the 
University clinic, but was on call 24- 
hours a day. 

When he transferred to the 
University of Cincinnati, Sinclair 
became director of that student health 
center, team physician and professor 
there. Sinclair said that this was his 
first "full-time salary job." 

By then he had given up his private 
practice and specialized in student 




work, visists Dr. Robert C. Tout 
one, of the g male doctors at La fene. 



health and athletic medicine. 

In 1970, Sinclair accepted the 
position of director of Lafene. He also 
serves as the team physician here. 
"Inter-collegiate medicine is something 
I enjoy," Sinclair said, "It's a 
specialized field." 

Sinclair said that his career has gone 
from "one end of the spectrum to the 
other," But he likes working with 
college-age people. 

"It keeps you younger working with 
younger people," Sinclair said. "When 
you're surrounded by younger people, 
you tend to have younger ideas." 

Apparently the idea of working in 
student health is appealing to other 
doctors also, because Sinclair said, 
"We (Lafene) generally attract doctors 
who have been in private practice 
before." 

The work load for doctors at 
Lafene "ranks fairly close" to that of 
doctors in private practice, Sinclair 
said. 




Say aah-Examining over 40 patients 
a day requires most of Dr. Robert 



Sinclair s time. Here Connie Sherk, receives help, 
registration secretary at Lafene, 



He estimated that Lafene doctors 
see 40-45 patients a day. November 
and February are peak periods, 
Sinclair said. 

Tout later backed up those 
estimates. He said that the doctors 
treat 4500-5000 students a month. 
Last March, Tout himself treated 685 
patients. He called this load 
"comparable" to private practice load. 

The advantage at Lafene, according 
to Tout, is that all the facilities are in 
one place. "Here is the hospital, and 
there are no house calls. All of that is 
separate and time consuming (in 
private practice). Here there is no 
surgery, and no unexpected 
deliveries," he said. 

And monetarily, "it's not too bad," 
Sinclair said. 

Sinclair said that his work is split 
between clinical and administrative 
duties as director. After the day is 
over, he continues work in the 
evenings at the stadium or fieldhouse. 

Sinclair's specialities include trauma, 
athletic injuries, infectious disease, 
neurology and psychiatry. But through 
the years, administrative duties have 
become so time consuming that he has 
given up psychiatry. "It really wasn't 
fair — to me or my patients." 

Sinclair said that meetings with 
University administrators often forced 
him to cancel appointments with 
psychiatric patients. That, to Sinclair 
offered "little degree of certainty" to 
the patient. So he gave up that part 
of medicine. 

He still reads about psychiatry and 
it still interests him a great deal. But 
having to give it up was "one of my 
great frustrations," Sinclair said. 

Although Tout's interests differ from 
Sinclair's, his reasons for being at K- 
State are the same. He is concerned 
about students, and he likes the 
enviornment a college campus 
provides. 

Tout graduated from the 



Student Health 



Southwestern Medical School of the 
University of Texas at Dallas. He 
began private practice in Hutchison, 
Kan., but later entered student health 
at Oklahoma State University. He 
returned to Kansas in 1977 to the 
Lafene staff. 

Besides working in student health, 
Tout has worked extensively with the 
Oklahoma court system alcohol and 
drug abuse recovery programs. This 
involved counseling individuals and 
groups of people with alcohol and 
drug abuse problems, with court 
supervision. 

"This (student health) has its 
rewards," Tout said, "You might miss 
the challenge of surgery, obstetrics, 
pediatrics. But if you've done those 
things, you find you haven't really 
missed them at all." 

What Tout misses most about 
private practice is the "rapport with 
patients," he said. 

"In private practice, usually you're 
the family doctor. Patients are less 
likely to shop around," Tout said. But 
here, he said that if something minor 
went wrong or if the patient was not 
being treated as he thought he should 
be, that patient would either return 
home to a doctor, or would go to 
another one elsewhere. 

Tout said that instances like that 
"make you feel like a fool, and that 
hurts." 

But Tout said that he likes the area 
of student health. "I was only going to 
stay (in student health) a short time. 
That was 17 years ago," he said. 

Doctors working in Lafene have 
graduated from such schools as 
Harvard, Cornell, Nebraska, Kansas, 
Menninger Foundation, John Hopkins, 
and Stanford. 

They have lived and worked in over 
15 states, including New York, 




Hop-a-long-Kevin Greischar, 
fifth year architect student, waits 
for his chart. 



Massachusetts, Missouri, Michigan, 
Kentucky, Pennsylvania and Maryland. 

They have had training in Family 
Practice, Internal Medicine, 
Cardiology, Psychiatry, Surgery, 
Infectious Disease, Pediatrics, 
Neurology Allergies. 

And they represent well over 150 
years of combined practical experience 
to patients. 

Statistics like that ought to make a 
patient feel better from the start. If 
that doesn't, the doctors will.j^| 

Photos by Hurriyet Aydogan 



Lafene/145 



A 

childhood 

fantasy 

lor a 

few — 

a reality 



l^ffany students have some way of 

supplementing their income to 
make it through school. Some are 
janitors, some librarians, some wash 
dishes or mix drinks. All on a part- 
time basis, of course. 

But then there are some who realize 
what was for most of us a childhood 
dream. They're firemen. 

And joined by the part-time help at 




the Physical Plant, they form a vital 
nucleus of service to the university. 
They even have some fun doing it. 

There are two four-man crews of K- 
State students working for the Kansas 
State University Fire Department. 
According to fireman Alan Winkler, 
senior in journalism and mass 
communications, the hiring procedure 
is geared as much to personality as to 
dexterity. 

"When we have an opening, a 
notice will go up on the bulletin board 
in Fairchild Hall. The applications are 
reviewed by Frank Duncan, fire chief. 
We'll take an applicant out two or 
three times with us, just to see how 
he'll handle an inch-and-a-half hose and 
working with the hydrants. Then Chief 
Duncan will talk to him to see if he'll 
get along with the other guys. If 
you've got a fire blasting in your face, 
you want to make sure the guy 
backing you up is your friend," 
Winkler said. 

And that's the easy part. 

Once hired, a fireman is put on a 
schedule that requires him to work 
two days a week from 5 p.m. to 8 
a.m. and three out of four weekends. 
On the weekends, he is expected to 
clean out the engine room, change 



Russell Hultgren 



batteries and perform other 
maintenance tasks. Each Monday, all 
the firemen drill in firefighting and 
safety procedures for three hours, 
beginning at 5:30 p.m. Less 
frequently, they attend the State Fire 
School in Wichita for training in 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 
artificial respiration. 

"Demands on our time aren't that 
extravagant," Winkler said. "We can 
sleep or do anything we want, as long 
as we're in the building." Since they 
live at the fire department, it isn't too 
bad. 

The living quarters look like a cross 
between barracks and a dorm. In 
addition to their fire department 
duties, each fireman takes a weekly 
turn at general household chores — 
taking out the garbage, washing the 
dishes, straightening up the kitchen. 
Color cable TV (with Showtime) and a 
recently installed jukebox help to 
reduce boredom. 

"It can really get to you, having to 
be here all the time, especially during 
Christmas break and the summer," 
said Mike Bodelson, junior in 



Rob Clark 

Smog alert? -Student fireman 
John Fienhage, senior in electrical 
engineering, inspects an air mask 
to see if it is working properly. 



architecture and business. "But I really 
enjoy it." 

In addition to routine duties, their 
primary purpose is still to fight fires. 

"We get one, maybe two really big 
fires a semester," said Winkler. 
"Mostly though, the calls we get are 
runs on dumpsters or little trash cans 
that catch fire. Those things make a 
lot of smoke and scare a lot of 
people, but of course don't do much 
damage." 

Winkler said they would receive 
more calls if more people were aware 
of the existence of the campus fire 
department. 

"I"ll bet if you asked ten people 
the number for our department, 
maybe one would know it. Maybe not 
even that. I think most people don't 
even know there is a fire department 
on campus. Everyone knows the 911 
emergency number, but not ours. So 
Manhattan gets a lot of our calls. 
Sometimes they relay them to us, 
sometimes not," Winkler said J|f 



146/Firemen 



University Facilities 



Fried Ford- A K-State firemen 
cleans the debris off Claflin street 
following a pickup fire. 




Rob Clark 



Firemen/147 




BOTTOM ROW: Alex Poorman, Linda Voider, 
Micki Steele, Bruce Bowerman, Marlesa Roney. 
TOP ROW: Robert Rinne, Curt Hammill, Debbie 
Wasser, Margaret Smith, Marilyn Gilbert, Rob Cles- 
licki, Jim McGee, Bill Muret. 



BOTTOM ROW: Michael J. Scully, Genie K. Atkin- 
son, Diane J. Lederer, Greg D. Kern, Richard J. 
MeKittrick. SECOND ROW: Robert D. Rinne, 
Warren V. Walker, Moria M. Jack, Steve E. Her- 
mes, Clifford G. Gilbert. TOP ROW: William H. 
Honstead, Margaret S. Smith, Walter D. Smith, Phil- 
ip R. Atkins, Amy L. Button. 





K-State Union 



Let's get a coke 9 



'■"he social center of K-State is the 
Union. Not because it has the 
parking slot searching and bumper 
banging of the most popular, limited 
parking lot on campus, but rather for 
its variety of activities and facilities. 

The most popular class on campus 
is held in the Union cafeteria, Social 
Lat I. 

Instead of the familar ring of a bell, 
the signal for class to start is someone 
saying, "Let's get a Coke." Lab work 
includes filling out the Collegian 
crossword puzzle, eating cafeteria 
food, smoking a cigarette, rating 
passerbys and counting how many 
people are known by the lab 
members. 

Grades are given according to the 
puzzle-solving time and the number of 
words filled in, evaluations of the food 
fare, tallying how many times the 
smokers say "1 should quit smoking", 



Janet Terry 



who finds the '10' and the number 
of people identified by name (extra 
points given to those who can identify 
major, home town and where they 
know them from). 

Although the Union cafeteria is the 
socializing hub of the University, it has 
other offerings of socializing 
possibilities. As alternative evening 
activities to Aggieville and lifting the 
brew, the recreation area on the lower 
level of the Union has bowling, pinball, 
ping pong and pool. 

Contemporary feature films are 
shown Thursday and Fridays in the 
Forum, Magic," "Grease," "Warriors" 
are a few of the feature movies of the 
fall semester. 

The studious student (or the one 
who wants to do his crossword puzzle 



in peace) can find a comfortable easy 
chair in the TV lounge, the browsing 
library, or the Cats Pause lounge on 
the second floor. Though the 
Catskellar has wooden chairs, it is 
preferred for studying because of the 
seclusion and quiet. The Catskellar has 
also been the stage for student talent 
as a part of the Union Nooners. 

Students with blueprints tucked 
under their arms are sometimes seen 
lined up outside the Copy Center on 
third floor. Besides taking care of 
reproduction needs, the center has 
typewriters available for students with 
ID cards. 

For the more serious educational 
pursuits than Social Lab I, the Union 
offers the reservation of rooms for 
meetings and banquets. The rooms 
have been occupied by people 
attending workshops, professional 
meetings and classes JW|[ 




148/Union 




Got a Sweet Tooth?-The 

Union's quick energy counter, 
haven for junk food addicts, gets 
an adjustment by Lisa Lawler, 
junior in pre-nursing. 




Union/ 149 




150/Sports 



highlights 



ID Check- Two members of the 
KMAN radio "Kick-Off Club" for 
junior wildcats try to find out who 
is under the wildcat head. 




Banned' The K-State mascot, 
Touchdown will not be carried to 
anymore of the football games 
due to a court ruling that it was 
inhumane to the animal. 



Sue Sandmeyer 



More than playing the game 

Hours of practice in skills, techniques and 
game plans are spent in preparation of two 
hour play 152 

B-Ball has its groupies 

They wait patiently, some camp out to view 
the age-old rivalry. Inside they cheer, some 
yelling "Go K-State. Beat the referee!" 200 



Intercollegiate 

Track 154 

Golf.. ............ /• 157 

Softball ...160 

Baseball 161 

Football.. ......... 168 

Tennis 180 

Volleyball 182 

Cross Country .188 

Basketball ...... 192 




IZ -State isn't always in the top ten of collegiate sports. 
"But it remains a winner. Basketpall fans attend sell 
out games when the Cats hit home and KSU Stadium had 
a significant increase in attendance. 

Ahearn Field House continues to rock with an echoing 
K-S-U-Wildcats. The K-State roundballers made the cen- 
tury mark against a Canadian team and also beat nation- 
ally-ranked Arkansas. 

The women roundballers saw an increase in atten- 
dance and for the second year in a row were ranked 
nationally. 

Although the football season was mediocre, fans saw 
the young K-State defense hold the nationally-ranked 
Nebraska team to 12 points. The same young team,with 
most of the experienced players injured, upset national- 
ly-ranked Missouri. 

And K-State athletics isn't just for "jocks." With one 
of the largest intramural programs in the Big 8 K-State 
offers a chance of participation in almost every sport. 



Sports/ 151 



K-State's reputation in Big 8 



With the athletic powerhouses of 
Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Missouri, 
the Big 8 holds its own as one of the 
toughest leagues in the nation. Battling 
nationally ranked teams in a variety of 
sports keeps the competition tough in an 
often overlooked midwest league. 

Traditionally, K-State's role in the 
toughness of the Big 8 has been in 
basketball. Nevertheless, K-State has 
competed nationally in virtually all sports 
during the last decade. 

Although football is not K-State's "cup 
of tea", Nebraska, Colorado, Oklahoma 
and Missouri have been ranked nationally 
in the last few years. Nebraska's big red 
supporters follow the Cornhuskers 
everywhere as the KSU Stadium was filled 
with red on Nov. 10, 1980. 

Basketball is a different story for K- 
State. In the last seven years K-State has 
played its arch rival, Kansas University 18 
times and an even split of nine games a 
piece have resulted. 



Jill McAntee 



K-State consistently has a winning 
basketball team and challenges nationally 
ranked teams. Up against ranked 
Louisville in 1972 the 'Cats lost 72-65. 
Yet a year later K-State won all non- 
conference home games and beat Eastern 
Kentucky 87-59. 

K-State's winning basketball seasons 
continued in 1979-80. The 'Cats finished 
second in the Big 8 and then traveled to 
the post season tournament in Kemper 
Arena. The 'Cats beat both Nebraska and 
KU to claim first place. 

While Ed Nealy broke the Big 8 record 
for consecutive field goals hitting 17 in a 
row, Rolando Blackman was named Big 8 
conference Player of the Year and MVP 
at the tournament. 

Then it was time to tackle the NCAA. 
Both Missouri, winning the Big 8 
Conference, and K-State, winning the post 



season tournament advanced to the 
NCAA tournament in Lincoln, Neb. 

Missouri beat San Jose State and No. 
14 ranked Notre Dame, but was 
eliminated by Louisiana State University. 
K-State beat Arkansas and went on to 
face No. 2 Louisville. The 'Cats forced 
Louisville into overtime but fell short 71- 
69 when Tony Branch scored from 17 
feet in the last three seconds. 

K-State's women's basketball team has 
its own successful records. From 1970-76 
they won the state conference title and 
advanced to the AIAW regional 
tournament. Victories over sixth rated 
William Penn and third rated Nevada Las 
Vegas in 1976 support the "toughness" 
of the Big 8. 

In 1980 a 26-9 record led the 'Cats to 
the AIAW tournament again. The 'Cats 
beat KU three of five times in 1980, but 
second ranked Tennessee defeated K- 
State eliminating them from the 
tournament. 




competition involves all sports 



Strong teams in the Big 8 don't stop 
with football and basketball. K-State's 
crew and wrestling teams also enter in 
their respective races. The year 1974 was 
an exceptional year for these sports. 

Crew, for the third consecutive year, 
was among the top ten in the nation. The 
championship tournament was held in 
Syracuse, N.Y. where K-State's crew beat 
two nationally ranked teams, Columbia 
and Cornell. 

Likewise, four Wildcats qualified for the 
NCAA wrestling tourney in Ames, Iowa. 
Since that time wrestling has been 
discontinued at the University. 

In 1975 K-State's volleyball team 
finished the season with a 24-20 record. 
Their record may not sound impressive, 
but they received second in the state 
tourney earning them a trip to the 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for 
Women. At the regional tourney in 
Lincoln, Neb. they placed eighth of 15 
teams. 



K-State's soccer team experienced a 
winning season in 1975 beating KU 5-1 
for the league soccer title. Even though K- 
State won the Big 8 championships, they 
could not compete nationally. Big 8 
soccer teams only have club status and 
for that reason can not compete in the 
NCAA. Consequently they have trouble 
scheduling high quality teams outside of 
the Big 8. 

Competition beyond the Big 8 
Conference in men and women's cross 
country has been tough in the past five 
years. The women's team placed third at 
the National Cross Country 
Championships in 1975 and ninth in 
1978. Five men harriers qualified for the 
nationals in 1975, finishing 25th in a field 
of 93 teams. 

The men's track team finished sixth in 
the NCAA in 1972, third in 1973 and 
tenth in 1975. The women's track team 
placed sixth in the AIAW National 
Championships in 1976. 



Also in 1976, K-State hosted the eighth 
annual Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics for Women's National Track and 
Field Championships which was the 
qualifying meet for the U.S. Olympic 
Trials. 

The toughness of the Big 8 is also 
apparent in rugby. The word alone 
implies toughness. The spring season of 
1976 found K-State the Big 8 champs. 
They traveled to the Mardi Gras 
Tournament in New Orleans placing 12th 
of 64 teams. Of the fifteen teams 
competing from five states; Kansas, 
Oklahoma, Texas, Missouri and Nebraska, 
were the Big 8 teams in the Sunflower 
Rugby Tournament that year. 

Lack of interest in women's rugby 
forced the team into extinction for the fall 
season of 1979. Still, the women ruggers 
placed second in the Rugby Mountain 
Spring Classic in Colorado and third in the 
eight-team St. Louis Invitational in 1976JM 




Big 8 Competition/ 153 




Track takes strides 



K -State track teams faired well last 
spring, on the indoor track as well as 
the sometimes weather-hampered outdoor 
oval, with the women's indoor team placing 
fourth in the nation and second in the Big 8. 
The men's indoor team finished fourth in the 
Big 8. 

The outdoor women's team also claimed 
the second-place spot in the Big 8 meet 
while the men's outdoor team finished third 
at their Big 8 meet. 

The women's indoor team started out the 
season in January with several big wins, de- 



Doug Keeling 



spite some cautious comments from coach 
Barry Anderson. 

"We don't have the luxury of a deep, 
talented squad," Anderson said. "The team 
is made up of mostly freshmen and sopho- 
mores and the approach has been changed 
to avoid injuries in the indoor season." 

Men's coach Mike Ross expressed similar 
sentiments about the men's team. 

"Since this is our first meet, it will be an 
evaluation time to see what we need to do 
between now and the Big 8 Indoor Cham- 
pionship," he said. 

The meet Ross was referring to was the 
men's season opener in Oklahoma City on 
Saturday, Jan. 20. The women opened with 
the Kansas Invitational meet in Lawrence 
the same day. Both teams won their respec- 
tive meets. 



On Friday, Feb. 8, K-State and Oklahoma 
met in Manhattan for the first men's and 
women's dual meet in Big 8 track history. 

In a pair of big wins both teams defeated 
the visiting Sooner squads. 

Anderson cited key individual perfor- 
mances from Wanda Trent, who "ran ex- 
tremely well" while setting a fieldhouse re- 
cord of 1:24.64 in the 600 yard dash. Trent 
also ran a 58.4 quarter-mile in K-State's mile 
relay, another fieldhouse record-breaking 
event. 

Anderson also commended Deb Harrell 
for her 600-yard run, in which she came 
from 30 yards behind to slip by an Oklaho- 
ma runner at the tape into third place. 

"Our young kids did well," Anderson 
said, "and our seniors showed some im- 
provement." 

The K-State men's team was equally im- 
pressive in its win over the Sooners. 

They pulled off the victory in spite of 
injuries to key team members, Kevin Sloan, 
who was predicted to score in the long jump 
and triple jump, and Doug Knauss, a favorite 
in the pole vault. 

Ross praised his freshmen on their perfor- 
mance, especially in the two-mile run. 

"They (Oklahoma) have some quality 
two-milers, but our kids just walked off and 
left them," he said. 

"It really builds up confidence when you 
take the defending Big 8 Championships and 
beat them by 20 points," Ross said of the 
meet. 




photos by Bo Rader 



Breaking away — Wanda 
Trent, K-State sprinter hits the 
finish right behind an Iowa State 
relay member. 

Hit the track, Jack — Kevin 
Sloan is getting ready to go home 
after the Big 8 track meet. 




154/Track 



Taking strides 



The men's team headed south to Oklaho- 
ma City on Feb. 10, where K-State's Vince 
Parrette set a school record in the triple 
jump with a distance of 52-11 %. The jump 
also earned Parrette a spot in the NCAA 
Indoor Championships in Detroit on March 9 
and 10, 1979. 

"Every athlete has a killer instinct and 
goals he sets," Parrette said. "My goal was 
to qualify for the nationals." 

Due to the large number of schools at- 
tending the Oklahoma Track Classic, no 
team point totals were kept. 

The K-State women "did fairly well" in 
the meet, Anderson said. 

"It's given the kids the real confidence 
they'll need for next week," he said. The 
next week was the Big 8 Indoor Champion- 
ships in Lincoln, Neb. where the women's 
team took second overall behind a powerful 
Iowa State team. 

K-State team members, Linda Long and 
Jancie Stucky, gave the team a boost and 
moved them solidly into second by placing 
first and fifth in the shot put. 

"It motivated the entire team and gener- 
ated a lot of excitement," Anderson said. 

Long set a K-State record of 46-2 in the 
event. 

On Saturday Feb. 26, the men's team 
returned to Oklahoma City for the men's Big 
8 Indoor Championships. 

Although the Wildcat team finished fourth 
overall, they had some outstanding perfor- 
mances. They also improved their ranking 
over the year. The 'Cats placed in 12 of 15 
events. 

"After talking to some of the other 
coaches last night, they were impressed with 
the way our athletes competed," Ross said. 
"I definitely think we opened quite a few 
eyes this weekend." 

"We're pleased that we were able to im- 
prove over last year," Barry Anderson assis- 
tant men's coach said. "Our kids, they are 
winners and not happy with fourth place. 
We'll be a lot better outdoor team." 

Before the outdoor season, however, 
came the Indoor Nationals. The women's 
Nationals were held in Columbia, Mo. on 
March 3. The men's competition was held in 
Detroit Mich, on the same date. 

The women qualified 17 competitors in 
10 different events for the meet. A lone 
member of the men's team, Ray Hanf, 
planned to travel to Detroit for the men's 
meet after qualifying team mates Bill Tan- 
ner, Vince Parrette and Doug Knauss suf- 
fered injuries, preventing them from going. 

An untimely foot injury however, kept 
Hanf from attending the Nationals, leaving 
K-State unrepresented. 



The K-State women's team shone at the 
Big 8 dominated nationals, placing fourth 
overall in the nation. Four of the top six 
National slots went to Big 8 schools. 

"I think second in the Big 8 and fourth in 
the nation is pretty good and I'm very 
pleased, Anderson said. "I think this is the 
best indoor season we've ever had." 

Iowa State came out on top in the meet, 
and six American Indoor records were set 
during the compeition. 

"When you get into a meet where six 
American records are set you know the com- 
petition is tough," Anderson said. "That just 
hows that what this conference's coaches 
have been saying is true, the Big 8 is prob- 
ably the toughest in the nation." 

Bad weather hampered the start of the 




Photos by Pete Souza 

outdoor season, causing tracksters to head 
south to seek more favorable practice condi- 
tions. Over spring break, the men's team 
traveled to Austin, Tex. for a meet with the 
University of Texas and Texas Tech. 

The 'Cats used the meet to "shake some 
of the kinks out" before the outdoor season 
began, because of the bad weather in Kan- 
sas, Ross said. 

The women's team also headed south to 
Denton, Tex. and the Texas Women's Uni- 
versity Invitational meet, on March 31. Un- 
like the men, however, the women were 
opening their season with the southern meet 
after a three- week layoff. 

Bad weather slowed the meet and no 
team scores were kept, but the women 
turned in a promising performance. 

"Overall, I was happy with everyone's 
performance," Anderson said. "It was a 
good start for the outdoor season." 

On April 14, both the men's and women's 



teams attended the John Jacobs Invitational 
in Norman, Okla., where the men's team 
placed second after failing to enter a mile 
relay team in the race because of injuries. 

"I was very pleased," Ross said. "It was a 
great meet for us. We could have won if we 
had a mile relay team. But we were too beat 
up, and I want to keep our sprinters healthy 
for the Big 8 meet." 

The women failed to capture any firsts at 
the meet, but Anderson was still pleased 
with their performance. 

Freshman Jeanne Daniels and teammate 
Linda Long finished third and fourth in the 
shot put. IK 




Taking a breather — Deb 

Harrell catches her breath after 
nipping an Oklahoma runner at 
the wire in the 600 yard run. 

The Winners — (Below) Pat 
Askou and Freda Hancock won 
the 440 yard relay at KU, May 2, 
1979. 



Track/155 



Taking strid es 

"Our shot putters are headed in the right 
direction," Anderson said. "This will be a 
very important event in the Big 8 meet." 

Next, the 'Cat tracksters headed for Law- 
rence and the KU relays on April 21. 

The Relays, usually calling up memories 
of such past greats as Jim Ryun and Bruce 
Jenner, fell far short of the traditional high 
standards associated with them in the past. 
Three Big 8 schools, including indoor cham- 
pion, Missouri, were absent from the Relay 
roster. 

"We came here thinking this would be like 
past KU relays," Ross said, "Mercy, some of 
these relays have been very cheap." 

"We're going to have to take a strong 
look at the KU Relays before coming here 
next year," he said. 

"I remember it used to be they had qual- 
ity event after quality event and you could 
sit here and watch two hours of quality track 
on Saturday afternoon," he said. 

On April 28 both teams headed to Des 
Moines, Iowa for the prestigious Drake Re- 
lays. The women's team had an outstanding 
day, finishing second behind nationally 
ranked Prairie View A & M in the 1600 
meter relay and fourth in the finals of the 
800 meter relay, with their 1:43.5 in the 
prelims setting a new school record. 

"It was a great meet for us," Anderson 
said. "This probably the healthiest and most 
ready we've been for the Big 8 in a long 
time." 

Although the men's team was again haunt- 
ed by bad luck, several individuals had good 
days. 

Joe Bramlage led in the javlin prelimi- 
naries, finishing third in the finals, and shot 
putter Ray Bradely's throw of 58-2 earned 
him second place in the Big 8. 

The Big 8 Women's Outdoor Champion- 
ships were held at K-State's R. V. Christian 
Track on May 4 and 5. The K-State wom- 
en's team finished second in the meet behind 
the Cyclones of Iowa State, who has been a 



tnadkl 







powerhouse all season long. 

"I'm really proud of our whole team," 
Anderson said. "This is the closest anyone 
has ever come to beating them (Iowa 
State)." 

Renee Urish, considered an Olympic 
hopeful throughout most of the season, fin- 
ished second in the 3,000-meter run and 
third in the 1,500-meter run. Shotput stand- 
out Jeanne Daniels took fourth in the 100- 
meter dash and second in the shot put com- 
petition. 

The men's Big 8 Championship in Lin- 
coln, Neb. on May 19 found K-State's injury- 
riddle team in third place overall. Frank Per- 
beck had an outstanding day, placing first in 
the javelin competition with a throw of 252- 
4. 

"The conditions were perfect for good 
throws, " Perbeck said. "I was looking for a 
270 today. I should have thrown much bet- 
ter. I was throwing 250's in the prelims and 
didn't have my steps down." 

Neither the men's or women's teams sent 
representatives to the national outdoor com- 
petition. M 



For the Record . 

Men's Indoor 

Long Jump: Kevin Sloan leaped 24' 9 %" 
to break his previous record of 24' 8" 

Pole Vault: Doug Knauss vaulted 16' 7" to 
break his previous record of 16' 5" 

Women's Indoor 

High Jump: Dian Mohler jumped 5' 6" to 
break the record held by since 1978 by Patty 
Bundy (5' 5".) 

Long Jump: Annette Sittenauer leaped 18' 
7 Vt" to Break Lorraine Davidson's 1978 re- 
cord of 18' 4 %". 

Shot Put: Linda Long broke her 1977 re- 
cord of 45-' 4 %" by throwing the shot put 46 

High Jump: Beets Kolarik leaped 5' 7" to 
top Diane Moeller's 1977 record of 5' 6 Vi". 

Long Jump: Karesa Robbins jumped 18' 
8" to break the 1978 record of Jan Smith of 

18' 1 '/ 2 ". 



Women's Outdoor 

200 meter: Lorraine Davidson ran the 200 
in 23.84 to break the record of Freda Han- 
cock in 1978 (23.9). 

3,000 meter: Renee Urish ran the 3,000 me- 
ter in 9:36.4 to break to 1977 record held by 
Joyce Urish of 9:46.1. 

800 meter medley: The team of Davidson, 
Hancock, Trent, and Wallace finished in 
1:43.51 to grab the 1978 record of 1:44.18 
held by McKee, Smith, Davidson and Han- 
cock. 

1600 medley relay: The team of Trent, Da- 
vidson, Wallace, and Hancock finished in 
3:44.69 to beat the 1978 record of 3:46.44 
held by Trent, Davidson, Worcester, and 
Hancock. 



BOTTOM ROW: Joe Ryan, Bill Hurst, Jeff Pheifer, Ron Sam- 
ples, Mack Green, Mike Ruggles, Dan Schleicher, Steve Connor, 
John Holllday, Brian Howie, Dan Johnson. TOP ROW: Coach 
Jerome Howe, Dennis Grace, Darryl Bonds, Scott Pasmore, 
Dana Morris, Willie Major, Ray Hanf, Dave Hauser, Karl Miller, 
Vlnce Parrette, Rick McKean, Tim Davis, Earl Jones, Mark 
Sagser, Brian Stark, Rodney Brodgen 

BOTTOM ROW: Nikki Wheaton, Deb Harrell, Karen Sothers. 
Deb Pihl, Debra Walker, Sandra Suggs, Sherry Thomas, Lisa 
Doll, Lois Heuchert, Karl Jones. SECOND ROW: Sheila Varga, 
Corraine Davidson, Janel Levalley, Marlys Schoneweis, Pat Os- 
born, Carrie Shewbart, Ann Reidy, Mona Lucas. TOP ROW: 
Kathy Saxon, Rochell Rand, Heidi Bright, Jolene Riley, Coach 
Barry Anderson, Debbie Weigel, Freda Hancock, Janice Stucky, 
Beth Sailors. 



(7 == SCORES 



Men's indoor track 



1st 


Sooner Relays 


•NTS 


KSU Open 


1st 


Oklahoma Dual 


•NTS 


Oklahoma Track Classic 


•NTS 


Big 8 track meet 


•NTS 


KSU Invitational 


•NTS 


N.C.A.A. meet 



Men's outdoor track 



3rd 


Texas Triangular 


•NTS 


Texas Relays 


2nd 


John Jacobs Invitational 


•NTS 


Kansas Relays 


•NTS 


Track and Field Asso. Open 


2nd 


Sunflower Classic 


3rd 


Big 8 track meet 


•NTS 


TFA-USA open 


Women's indoor track 


1st 


Kansas Indoor 


1st 


Oklahoma Dual 


•NTS 


Oklahoma Track Classic 


2nd 


Big 8 Indoor Champ. 


4th 


Missouri National Indoor Invit 



Women's outdoor track 



•NTS 


Texas Women's Invitational 


•NTS 


Texas Relays 


•NTS 


John Jacobs Invitational 


•NTS 


Kansas Relays 


•NTS 


Drake Relays 


2nd 


Big 8 outdoor Championship 


3rd 


Region VI Championships 



AvTS= No Team Standings 



156/Track 



golf 



Getting into the swing again 



For the first time in many years the K- 
State golf team was active during the 
fall season. 

The 'Cats had a "home and home',' dual 
meet with Marymount, which they won, and 



another dual meet with KU at Lawrence 
where they tied the Jayhawks. They also 
made respectable showings in two other fall 
meets. 

The team finished 15th out of 30 teams in 




a meet at the Air Force Academy in Colora- 
do Springs and also did well at the Fulton 
Invitational at Liberty, Missouri where senior 
Scott Bunker took medalist honors. 

The team had a spring schedule of five 
meets, but played only four due to inclement 
weather. 

In the first meet of the spring season, K- 
State finished ninth out of over 20 teams in 
the Shawnee Invitation at Shawnee, Oklaho- 
ma. The following meet at Iowa State was 
snowed out. 



Vlnce Wheeler 



The golfers placed only 19th out of 33 
teams at the Shocker Invitational held at 
Wichita State. They returned home to play a 
triangular the next day with Iowa State and 
KU. 

At the Drake Relays Invitational, the 
golfers battled rain and high wind that sent 
their scores soaring. They finished their sea- 
son with the Big Eight meet held at Alvamar 
Hills in Lawrence. Though the team finished 
last, a bright spot was Scott Bunker who 
finished in the top ten individually. 

Lettermen for the 1978-79 team were 
Scott Bunker, Brian Linn, Jeff Kruse, Rich 
Hite, Brad Johnson, Rich Sorensen and Jon 
Carlson. 

Paul Anderson, coached for only two 
years, resigned at the end of the spring sea- 
son to take a professional golf job in Garden 
City. His replacement was Ray Wauthier, a 
university instructor and former Wildcat 
baseball coach. Under Wauthier, 17 golfers 
qualified for the 1979 fall season. The 
golfers will have to qualify for the team in 
the spring. To qualify, the golfers play 72 
holes, and the five lowest scores turned in by 
the golfers are taken. JHI 



Forel-Richard Hite practices his 
golf swing at the Manhattan Stagg 
Hill golf course. 



f) (r) ft 







t 



V" 



—4 



Golf/157 




Pete Souza 



bike Race 



Bikers ignore 20 mph limit 



Twisting their way through campus, 
bikers represented almost every level 
of competition at the Sunflower Criterium, 
which brought professional and intramural 
bicycle racing to the University, May 6, 
1979. 

Contestants entered in Seniors lis and Ills, 
the second and third-best levels of competi- 
tion in professional bike racing, pedalling 
around the campus bike ways 60 times at an 
average speed of 26 miles per hour. 



Doug Keeling 



"That means putting it in the highest pos- 
sible gear and spinning the pedals at 100 
rpm's," Rick Summerhill, of the Bluemont 
Bicycle Club said. 

During the 30 mile race, Jim May and 
Dean Johnson broke away from the pack 
early and throughout the entire race they 
maintained their fast pace, lapping all but 
one of the ten other racers. 

In the final stretch, May, a 1975 K-State 
graduate, broke away pedalling furiously 
across the finish line. 

"That's my usual strategy," May said. 
"Work 'em over early, sit in for awhile and 
rely on my sprint." 

Rodney Fox, sophomore in chemical engi- 
neering finished highest among the current 
K-Staters in the race, taking fifth place. 

Also during the afternoon, the united 
States Cycling Federation (USCF) held 
races. Included divisions for junior (up to age 
18), veterans, (age 35 and older), and Senior 
IV riders. 

The campus route the intramural racers 
faced on Sunday was more difficult than 
courses in the past, said Kathy Reed, coor- 



dinator for the Intramural race, and K-State 
senior. 

In order to attract larger crowds, the Blue- 
mont Club's annual race was held in conjunc- 
tion with the professional racers. 

Winners of the team intramural race were 
Kirk Schrek, Bruce Bingham, Mike Littrell, 
Hunt Barrett, and John Anderson, all of Del- 
ta Tau Delta. The victorious women's team 
was composed of Cindy Bingham, Patti Mill- 
er, Kathy Reed and Roberta Thimming.lH 

Exhausting ride- Fifth place fin- 
isher, Rodney Fox, wipes his brow 

Hairpin turn- Terry Anderson 
weaves around a cornor. Ander- 
son took fourth place in the Sen- 
ior II bike race division. 



4 Twas the 



It was a season of waiting for the 1979 
crew team. The team had to wait the 
arrival of their new coach, Walter Hoover, 
and for 18 inches of ice to melt off Tuttle 
Creek Reservoir. 



Nancy Reese- 



While waiting for the ice to melt, the team 
trained by running five miles a day, lifting 
weights, and working in the rowing tanks. 
Training continued during spring break in 
March when the team traveled to Austin, 
Texas. In Austin, the team practiced rowing 
twice a day, and kept up their running pro- 
gram. 

When Hoover arrived in April, the first 
task was to raise enought money to buy new 
boats: 

The 63-foot boats used by crew now are 
made of varnished Alaskan cedar. The 
newer boats are made of a "fiberglass-like 
material," Kevin Hankins, captain of the 
men's crew team said. 

"The new boats can take off as much as 
20 second in a 2000 meter race," Hankins 
said. 

"We need to get newer and lighter boats, 
but without the funds we'll have to make due 
with what we've got, Hoover said. 



158/Bike Race 




crcco 



season 



Hoover, 83, started his rowing career in 
1913. In 1928, he was on the U.S. Olympic 
rowing team and he coached the 1952 and 
'56 Olympic team. In the '56 Olympic com- 
petition, Hoover's team captured two gold, 
two silver, and one bronze medals. Hoover 
was nominated to the Rowing Hall of Fame 
in 1979. 

Hoover had the crew team continue their 
two-a-day practices to prepare for the Big 8 
Rowing Regatta. The regatta was held on 
the east side of Tuttle Creek Reservior on 
April 22, and K-State took five first places, 
and finished second in three other races. 

Though experiencing a shortage of team 
members, the crew attended the Seventh 
Annual Midwest Rowing Championships on 
April 28 at Lake Wingra in Madison, Wis- 
consin. K-State showed poorly in all events, 
winning none. 

Disappointed from their Wisconsin loss, 
the crew returned home, and met the Uni- 
versity of Kansas on the Shawnee Mission 
Park Lake. K-State fought rough water, and 
won all five events. 

"I have promise for a good team next 
year," Hoover said. "I'm talking about top- 
class competition, but we need more mem- 
bers for a good strong team." Jfl| 




Nancy Zogelman 




Twilight rowing — The K-State 
men's crew team rowing home prac- 
tice. The team practices at Tuttie 



Creek Reservoir, when weather per- 
mits. 



Heavy Haul — The heavy Alas- 
kan cedar boat is carried down the 



hill to the edge of the water before 
each practice session. 



Crew/ 159 




soffball"] 

Season tests 
defense and 



pitching 



/\ tough schedule that tested the team's 
•■strength and pitching were the 1979 soft- 
ball team's problems according to Mary Phyl 
Dwight, head coach. 

Despite a tough schedule that tested the 
team's strength and pitching, the softball team 
improved their 9-30 record of 1978 to 11-22 in 
1979 according to Mary Phyl Dwight, head 
coach. 

The strength of the team was a strong de- 
fense. They compiled a .934 defensive efficien- 



Deanna Hutchison 



Shoestring Catch- Kathy Leon- 
ard, second baseman, snags 
grounder against Emporia. 



"Jk mCi 






V*: 



Nancy Zogleman 



cy percentage, making only 70 errors the entire 
season. 

The 1979 schedule included five major tour- 
naments and a mini tournament. The mini tour- 
nament was held in Manhattan. 

"A tournament type schedule shows your 
weaknesses even more when you have weak 
pitching," Dwight said. 

And the 1979 softball team was plagued with 
pitching problems. 

Only one pitcher, Kay Beatty, returned from 
last year's squad. With no depth on the pitching 
mound the 4 to 5 games in weekend tourna- 
ments taxed the few pitchers. 

There were problems with offensive 
strength. In batting the team's average was 
.207 for the season. 

A new head coach, Susie Norton was hired 
for the 1980 season. She was optimistic about 
the up coming season saying, "we will improve 
over last year's record, and the fact that we've 
got quite a few returning will help." M 




BOTTOM ROW: Peggy DeSeure, Lawreace 
Tinder, Cathy Hinson, Natalie Rousey, Brenda 
Petry, Janelle Poppe, Kathy Leonard. TOP 
ROW: Coach Susie Norton, Lori Brenner, Lisa 
Packard, Tammy Larson, Paula Todd, Julie 
Laughery, Janele Anderson, Leslie McGinnis, 
Debbie Adams, Julie Hershey, Eva Schmidt. 




BOTTOM ROW: Dan McAfee, Jeff Sherrer, 
Tryone Hudson, Steve Preston. SECOND ROW: 
Al Hunter, Mark Laterza, Don Hess, Mike Baker, 
Bob Jubek Brent Bays. TOP ROW: Mark Nor- 
dyke, Rob Holder, Tom Harvey, Doug Able, Rick 
Taylor, Mike Wright, Mike Laughlln, Don Walker, 
Mike Aklns, Calvin Alexander, Mark Harrison, 
Coach Dave Baker. 



f$Mfc«n >n 



*— r^^iriii^ — 


/" 




cwutiitEaji 


kau 


2 


FORT HAYS STATE 


kau 





FORT HAYS STATE 


KSU 


3 


Northwestern 


ktu 





SOUTHWEST MISSOURI STATE 


kau 





TEXAS A&M 


KSU 


4 


Waahburn 


KSU 


7 


Waahburn 


kau 





TEXAS WOMAN'S UNIVERSITY 


KSU 


6 


Texaa Waat 


KSU 


2 


Oklahoma 


kau 


1 


SOUTHWEST MISSOURI STATE 


KSU 


4 


Texas-Arlington 


kau 


2 


TEXAS A&M 


kau 


2 


NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE 


kau 





MINNESOTA 


KSU 


4 


Miaaouri Waatarn 


kau 





MISSOURI WESTERN 


KSU 


5 


Balhany 


KSU 


7 


Balhany 


kau 





EMPORIA STATE 


kau 


1 


EMPORIA STATE 


kau 





ST. MARYS OF THE PLAINS 


kau 


2 


FORT HAYS STATE 


kau 


4 


KANSAS 


kau 


1 


OKLAHOMA 


kau 





KANSAS 


KSU 


6 


Kanaaa 


kau 


1 


NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE 


KSU 


11 


Nabraaka 


kau 


1 


NEBRASKA 


kau 


3 


NEBRASKA AT LINCOLN 


kau 


6 


NEBRASKA 



^ 



160/Softball 



^ 



J 








i^af^afTiifl E?#V> 






(s- 




SCORES — 


-^ 

1 




KSU 


5 


Wayne State 


3 




KSU 


15 


Wayne State 


1 




KSU 


1 


Bellevue College 







KSU 


15 


Bellevue College 


2 




KSU 


8 


Baker 


2 




KSU 


6 


Baker 


5 




KSU 


5 


Bethany College 


1 




KSU 


17 


Bethany College 


2 




KSU 


10 


Creighton 


4 




KSU 


3 


Crelghton 


3 




KSU 


7 


Valley City 







KSU 


5 


Valley City 


1 




KSU 


9 


Minneaota-Morria 







kail 


2 


MINNESOTA-MORRIS 


3 




kau 


5 


MISSOURI SOUTHERN 


11 




KSU 


13 


Miaaouri Southern 


3 




KSU 


5 


Benedictine 


3 




KSU 


12 


Benedictine 







kau 





IOWA 


4 




ktu 





IOWA 


1 




kau 





IOWA 


6 




kau 


4 


IOWA 


7 




KSU 


6 


Emporia State 


1 




kau 


3 


EMPORIA STATE 


10 




kau 


5 


KANSAS 


12 




KSU 


8 


Kanaaa 


7 




kau 





NEBRASKA 


2 




kau 


1 


NEBRASKA 


3 




kau 


1 


IOWA STATE 


10 




kau 


4 


IOWA STATE 


5 




kau 


5 


MISSOURI 


8 




kau 


4 


MISSOURI 


8 




kau 


1 


OKLAHOMA 


6 




kau 


3 


OKLAHOMA 


4 




kau 


1 


OKLAHOMA 


15 




kau 





OKLAHOMA 


7 




kau 


3 


COLORADO 


5 




KSU 


9 


Colorado 


4 




kau 


9 


COLORADO 


11 




kau 


8 


COLORADO 


10 





Pete Souza 



basebaLL 



Depth, pitching hold 'Cats 



After being plagued by pitching prob- 
lems, the baseball squad still main- 
tained a record of 19-21, an improvement 
from the previous year. 

Dave Baker, in his third year coaching the 
Wildcats, said that lack of depth caused 
most of the problems for the 1979 team, 
especially in the area of pitching. 



Deanna Hutchison 



For the 

Record 



Most home runs in a single game: 
Dan Hess (1979) tied Greg Korbe'a 
(1977) record of 9 home runs. 

Most stolen bases: Mark Nordyke 
(1979) stole 19 to Gary Holub's 
(1975) of 18. 



^ 




Safe By A Hat- K-State Umpire, 

Mike O'Malley makes the call as 

K-State's Jeff Scherrer's batting 

helmet carries the ball away from 

the Marymount College shortstop. 



"We just didn't have enough pitchers." 
Baker said. "The team has excellent starting 
pitchers but did not have any depth. For a 
team to be competive it has to have at least 
six good pitchers." 

"I don't know how many times we 
were ahead in a game, but they weren't 
able to hold on," he said. "We've got 
better than average speed, and we're 
sound offensively, but the key to the 
game is the pitching." 

The 1979 season was on an upswing 
from 1978. The first eight games, which 
K-State won, were at the football stadium 
because of repairs on Frank Myers 
Field. In the remaining pre-conference 
games the Cats won eight, tied one, and 
lost three. 

The games in the Big-8 Conference 
were tougher for K-State than they had 
expected, such as the two double-headers 
against Iowa. During the first three 
games, they managed only six hits at 67 
times at bat and did not score a run in 21 
consecutive innings. It looked as if K- 
State would win the fourth game but the 
Hawkeyes dusted in five runs on six hits 
to take the victory. 

In the 2 to 18 losses of the conference 
games, at least 10 of K-State losses were 
either tied or ahead in the sixth inning. 

The 1979 team had seven returning 
lettermen, eight junior transfers, and 
eight freshmen. "We've added some very 
capable people," the Baker said, "such 
as Mark Nordyke, Al Hunter, and Don 
Hess."M 



Craig Chandler 



Baseball/161 




wPI 






:wftfcj5^s 







canoe rzaces 



K-State out 



'The rivalry between K-State and the 
*■ University of Kansas (KU) is demon- 
strated on the football field, on the basket- 
ball court, and on the baseball diamond. The 



f 



Nancy Reese 



Kansas (Kaw) River is another site of the K- 
State KU rivalry-when the annual Kaw River 
Rivalry comes to town. 

Armed with paddles and boats, canoe rac- 



ers from K-State and KU began the fifth 
Annual Kaw River Rivalry, April 28, 1979 at 
the starting point on Highway 177 outside of 
Manhattan. 

K-State, defending their 3-2 advantage in 
the series, won first and third in the water 
race. The winning canoe team for K-State 
was the River Cats, and the Kaw Dads 
earned third place. Fourteen teams partici- 
pated in the race. 

After the signal was given to start the 




Craig Chandler 

Plotting The Course — 

Jim Acer, instructor in 
Continuing Education and Glen 
Engelland, senior in animal 
science and industry, ponder 
over the next checkpoint on 
the river. 



Concrete 

floats on 

Tuttle 



(~)n most any other springtime after- 
noon, Tuttle Creek Reservoir pro- 
vides many people with a quiet place to 
relax. But on Saturday afternoon, April 
28, individuals spent the day participat- 
ing in the Sixth Annual Kansas State Uni- 
versity Invitational Concrete Canoe 
Race. 

Organized by Chi Epsilon, an engi- 
neering society, the canoe race partici- 
pants must be in the civil engineering 
curriculum, at their schools. 



Nancy Reese 



Sixty-two two person teams repre- 
senting 12 universities entered the sixth 
annual event. 

Eight men's teams one women's team 
and two faculty teams made up the K- 
State force. 

K-State won first in the women's adivi- 
sion and Texas A&M won the men's 



162/Canoe Races 




The Victors-With a five minute 
lead over the Rogue's, the River 
Cats row through Topeka. 

And They're Off-Rowers start 
the concrete canoe race at the 
River pond area, at Tuttle Creek 
Reservoir 



Craig Chandler 



paddles KU on the Kaw 



race, the River Cats paddled violently to get 
an early lead, but the canoe began sinking. 
The members of the rowing team bailed the 
water out of their canoe, and started the 
race again, this time, several yards behind 
the other racers. 

"It was good we had such a bad start 
because it made our people aware of what 
they had to do," Joe Willard, team leader 
said. 

Prior to the event, the River Cat team 



competition. 

The course conststed of six 500 foot 
lanes Contestants were required to com- 
plete a turn around and come back cov- 
ering a distance of 1,000 feet. 

'K-State won the award for best canoe 
construction, but the road to winning the 
award was an unsure one. 

The road was unsure because the 150- 
pound canoe had been stolen Friday 
March 30. However, on April 3, the ca- 
noe was found in a Seaton Hall utility 
tunnel, by a department faculty worker. 

Not only did K-State win an award for 
the best canoe construction, Jan Laugh- 
lin and Kathy Perkins became elighble 
for national competition when they won 
the women's division. 

Randy West, president of Chi Epsilon 
said there were 12 regional canoe races 
in the United States, and winners are 
eligible to compete at nationals in Tole- 
do, Ohio. |£ 



members had bought a racing canoe to use 
in the race. 

These racing canoes cost a little more 
than the regular canoes but are built for 
racing," Willard said. "That's one reason 
KU had won the last two years. They had a 
racing canoe and no one could compete." 

The River Cats had raced before in the 
Annual Kaw River Rivarly, placing third last 
years, but the River Cats entered to win this 
year. The fifteen member team had all check 
points for the race mapped out, with about 
30-40 minutes rowing time between check 
points. 

Not only were the River Cats well orga- 
nized, they were in good physical condition, 
Willard said. 

"You can't be a cigarette smoker and fat, 
and expect to get the job done," Willard 
said. 

"Our girls were tough, they didn't give up 



and they didn't complain about blisters or 
anything else," he said. 

The race started Saturday afternoon, and 
the River Cats finished in St. Marys with a 
12-minute lead. The Cats gained five more 
minutes Sunday, when they ended the race 
in Lawrence, winning with a time of 12 hours 
and 46 minutes. 

The River Cats won a victory keg of beer, 
and a plaque is displayed at Dark Horse 
Tavern, in Aggieville. 

Miller Brewing Company sponsored the 
race, and the race was started as an alterna- 
tive to the fall canoe race, because only 
residence hall teams could enter, according 
to Ken Wallace, official timer for the race. 

"It was a disappointment at the end be- 
cause they didn't have the beer there. They 
didn't have the trophies there. They just had 
some clown taking times," Willard said. J|| 




John Bock 

Canoe Races/ 163 



fifuomurzols 



Go for 

the 

t-shirt 



Gulp- Sherry Brown makes a last ditch effort 
to keep her team afloat during a water polo 
game. 

Superman-Jim Foil officiates the battle of 
strengths between Ted Schmitz and Charlie 
Long. Smitz won the arm wrestling match. 




Competitive determination to win and a 
higher level of skill characterized the 
road to the 1980's in K-State intramurals. 
"Most people would be surprised how 
competitive intramurals has become. People 
aren't out there to have fun but they're try- 
ing to get t-shirts," Kurt Ruble of Recrea- 



Nancy Stetson 



tional Services said. 

Win. T-shirt. 

Winning and t-shirts go hand-in-hand when 
it comes to participating in any of the fifteen 
intramural sporting events that K-State of- 
fers its students and faculty. 

Ruble said that K-State's intramural pro- 
gram offers more incentive than most large 




Bo Racier 

universities with its championship t-shirts. 

The t-shirts are awarded to the top teams 
in each division. Each t-shirt has an official 
Kansas State University intramural champi- 
on emblem on the front and an all-University 
insignia on the back. "A lot of people 
wouldn't be playing if it weren't for the 
awards (t-shirts) Some come in (the Recrea- 
tional Services Office) and want to buy one." 
Ruble said. 

For others the winning is more important 
than collecting t-shirts. 

"If I wasn't out there to win, I wouldn't be 
out there. Once you've got a couple (t- 
shirts), it's not that big a deal," Phil Miller, 
junior in industrial engineering said. 

Ruble said the most serious competitors 
are the fraternities who quite often will have 
40-50 people watching. 

Mark Zillinger an all-sport official for three 
years, said that the recreational league, 
doesn't keep records and is for those play- 
ers who want to "have fun", had made the 
regular leagues more competitive. 

The recreational league is available to 
those people who want to stay away from 
the competition and look mainly for the fun 
and exercise. 



164/Intramurals 



intrzamurza Is 



Both Ruble and Zillinger agree that the 
skill level of the men has stayed relatively 
the same while the women have shown an 
increase in talent and skill since three years 
ago. 

"The skill of the women has increased 
most because of more competition in junior 
high and high school," Ruble said. 

"I think it's as high or higher than high 
school (referring to the skill level). Every- 
body is serious about playing," Audrey 
Kuhlman, sophomore in pre-nursing said. 

Many of the athletes that participate in 
intramurals are mainly playing to win and 
are looking to continue the athletics they 
were involved in during high school. 

"I like the continuation of sports competi- 
tion from high school. You've been so com- 
petitive in high school, you want to continue 
it. But it (intramurals) is also fun," Kuhlman 
said. 

"It's not as tense as high school and you 
don't have structured practices. Once 
you're here you get into it, but there's no 
preparation," Miller said. 

Participants in the intramural program are 
from living groups or independent groups on 
campus which form men's women's and co- 
rec teams. 

The teams compete, not only for the t- 
shirts, but for points in each sport. Points are 
compiled for each event and tallied at the 
end of each year. The group with the most 
points in each division is the overall winner 
of the intramural competition. 

"I think people are more concerned about 
points on the sorority and fraternity levels, 
and independent teams go more for t- 
shirts," Kuhlman said. 

Whether it's to play to win or for the 
competition, t-shirts, or to have fun, the par- 
ticipation turnout (basketball had over 400 
teams) proves that K-State intramurals is en- 
joyed by many people. 

As Jo Biles said," I enjoy the competition, 
but mainly enjoy the good time participating 
in athletics." JA 

Here, catch-Joel Stallo, member of KSBS 
intramural team passes the ball to a fellow 
KSBS'er. 

Tim Costello 




Probation: 



Clearing the record 



^^^^ 



Restrictions lifted once 



o 



jctober 23, 1970 - not a 
pleasant day for the K-State 
Athletic Department. 

It was probation day at K-State: 
university officials had just received 
official notification from the Big 8 
Conference of a three year penalty. It was 
then up to the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association, (N.C.A.A.) to approve or 



Nancy Reese 



modify the penalty. The N.C.A.A. chose 
modification. 

Under the probation, K-State was not 
to be allowed to be eligible for post- 
season competition or appear on a 
N.C.A.A. televised football program. 
Vince Gibson, head coach, was publicly 
censored, and reprimanded for failure to 
supervise rules of the Big 8 Conference 
and the N.C.A.A. 

The conference cited the reasons for 
probation as "football recruiting and 
testing violations." 

Yet despite the penalties, Gibson 
promised a winning season for K-State. 

But, the promised result failed to 
become a reality. Finally, in 1975 and 
after the probation had been lifted from 



the K-State football program, Gibson 
make a final promise: Either K-State 
would have a winning football season, or 
he would resign. 

The winning season never materialized, 
and Gibson stepped down. 

Ellis Rainsberger, former K-State 
football stand-out was hired to replace 
Gibson. 

Rainsberger made no "pie-in-the-sky" 
promises for the football program. He 
began by trying to regain the lost 
confidence of alumni and students. 

It seemed the probation era was all 
history. The team was young, under no 
conference or N.C.A.A. probation, and 
had a new confident coach. 

Rainsberger dreamed of making K-State 
into a Big 8 contender but the dream 
turned into a nightmare when 21 
freshman football players walked out. 

The difficulties increased in a junior 
varsity game against Kansas University. It 
had been reported that two players who 
had scored touchdowns were in fact other 
players. 

Rainsberger was accused of the cover- 
up. On November 10, 1977, Rainsberger 
was given an option to either resign and 
finish the season as head coach, or be 



166/Probations 



K-State's 
ball and chain 



more 

fired. Rainsberger chose to finish the sea 
son. 

Rainsberger left, and shortly afterwards 
Jersey Jermier, athletic director resigned. 

"There was a break down in confidence 
between faculty and students," Bob Snell, 
current faculty advisor to the N.C.A.A. 
and department head of civil engineering 
said. 

Another probation hit in 1978 when 
K-State was again penalized for recruiting 
infractions. The penality was basically the 
same as the 1970 penalty, with the 
addition of a fund cut from Big 8 
revenues. 

DeLoss Dodds, Athletic director and 
Jim Dickey, head coach have since 
inherited the consequences of the 
probations. 

K-State still has to pay financially for 
the 1978 penalty, but the recruiting 
restrictions were lifted. 

"I think now there is a general feeling 
of respect and confidence. Coach Dickey 
and DeLoss Dodds have done much to 
relieve the concerns of everyone. There 
had been a record level of alumni support 
— in a positive way," Snell said. 

"We're in the best shape we've been," 
Snell said. 



Art by Mike Bodelson - 



Probations/ 167 




K-Straight 
vs 

K-Who? 



Rivalry 

produces 

insults and 

antics 

The comparison between K-State and the 
University of Kansas (KU) might be like a 
comparing night and day, or black and white. 

The rivalry has existed since day one - or at least 
since the two schools have existed. The score is 
never, never tied, and the fans are caught in a 
never-ending circle of practical jokes, and name 
calling. 

Visiting KU fans traditionally try to paint the KS 
cement slabs on K-Hill. K-State fans retaliate by 
tossing purple dye into the Chi Omega fountain in 
Lawrence. 

Borrowing the $2,000 Wildcat, (complete with 
cage) is another Jayhawk antic. In revenge, K-State 
fans sneak a few red and blue colored chickens to 
toss out on the basketball court when the KU 
players are introduced. 

In answer to Vince Gibson's "K-State will be 
back" slogan, a KU bumper sticker read: "K-State 
will be back . . way back." 

The list of exchanged insults is endless. KU'ers 
come up with names such as: Faggieville, Dairy on 
the Prairie, Silo Tech, and K-Straight. When asked 
directions to Manhattan, a KU'er responds, "It's 



north till you smell it, and west 'till you step in it." 

And of course, K-Staters have their own list 
composed: Snob Hill, Flaw on the Kaw, Gayhawks, 
and K-Who?. Graffiti on a K-State bathroom wall 
says: "Flush twice. Lawrence is a long way." 

Going to extremes, a few K-State band members 
have made up their own version to the KU alma 



mater sWig: 

High above the stagnant water 

Under skies so blue, 

Stands an old abandoned outhouse 

That they call KU 

Alma Mater, flush the water 

Let the pipes flow through . . . etc 



Nancy Reese 





The cheers also get twisted around. Choruses of 
Rock chalk Chickenhawk . . . ring loud and clear, 
followed by an even louder KU chorus of 'Eat 

, Eat , KSU fans chant: 

"What's the score K-State, what's the score?" 

And of course when the Wildcats take command 
of the game the cheer becomes: "What's the score 
KU, what's the score?" 

It's an never ending battle. After the K-State loss 
to KU this year in football, K-State fans were 
already waiting the next confrontation with threats of 
"Just wait 'till basketball ... " |£ 



Rope-A-Dope-Two K-State fans 
demonstrate their feelings toward 
the Jayhawk mascot before the 
game. 

Campus Coo/er-Holding up the 
number one drink for college 
students in Kansas, it is uncertain 
whether this fan is demonstrating 
his opinion of his drink or the K- 
State Wildcats. 

That-A-WayDartell Dickey, K- 
State's freshman quarterback, 
appears to be giving directions for 
traffic on the field. 

Freebiea On The /////-Because 

the annual state rivalry is always a 
sellout, those who can't get tickets 
find a place on the hill. 

Photos By Rob Clark 



Rivalry/ 169 




Tim Costello 

What did you say Willie? President Acker 
doesn't seem able to bite into what Willie the 
Wildcat is telling him during a picnic for the 
football team. 



Predictions wrong 



TX 7 ith a handful of talent returning from a team 
that finished 4-7 in 1978 under first-year coach 
Jim Dickey, optimism was high for an even more 
improved record for the 1979 season. 

The Wildcats were returning 19 lettermen on 
offense and 20 lettermen on defense, as six starters 
returned on both units. 

K-State looked impressive in spring practice and 
the coaching staff was anxious for the 1979 season 
opener to roll around. 

Coach Dickey felt the strongest areas on the team 
were the receivers and running backs, while most of 
the defense was untested under game-like situa- 
tions. 

After the Wildcats ended preparation for its sea- 
son opener, Dickey said, "Overall, we have had an 
encouraging fall. I'd say we are right on schedule 
heading into our final week. The rest remains to be 
seen. We still have plenty of work on assignments 
and game plans left before our first game." 



K-State 
Auburn 



18 
26 



Auburn, K-State's test 

"Everybody would like to start out the 
season with a 'sure' victory. But like Bo 
Schembechler pointed out after Michigan's 
lopsided win over Northwestern, 'It's hard 
to evaluate your team when you don't have 
a good test.' Auburn through? I don't know 
if you want to start out with THAT hard of a 
test," said Dickey. 

The Wildcats were going up against most 
of the same team that beat K-State in Man- 
hattan 45-32 in 1978, including running 
back James Brooks who rushed for 226 
yards in that game. 

The Wildcats were looking for an upset as 
they led 12-10 going into the fourth quarter, 
but the Tigers exploded for two touchdowns 
plus two 2-point conversions to go ahead 26- 




Auburn Sports Information 

The Auburn defense holds the Cats to a 
minimal gain. 

12 midway through the final stanza. 

The Wildcats added a 36-yard touchdown 
pass from Sheldon Paris to Eugene Goodlow 
to cut the final score to: Auburn 26, K-State 
18. 

Two Eddy Whitley touchdown grabs in 
the third quarter broke open a 7-0 Auburn 
halftime lead. 

Paris had his best throwing day of the 
season as he completed 18 of 31 passes for 
256 yards and three TD's. 

L.J. Brown led the Wildcats meager 
ground game of 115 yards, with a total of 92 
yards on 18 carries. 

"We just made too many mistakes to win 
the game," Dickey said. "I assume most of 
the blame as the head coach. Yet, if one or 
two plays had gone the other way, we stil" 
could have won it." 

The stars on defense for K-State were 
free safety Brad Horchem, tackle Ben 



John Dodderidge 



170/Football 



K-State 22 K-State 

Oregon State 16 Air Force 



19 K-State 
6 Tulsa 



6 
9 



Landry and linebacker Tim Cole, according 
to Dickey. 

Kicking winning 
factor 

The Wildcats returned to KSU stadium 
the next week to face Oregon State, as the 
two teams were playing each other for the 
first time in history. 




Bo Rader 

Sheldon Paris hands off to Rossevelt Duncan 
during the parent's day match against Oregon 
State. 

K-State emerged with its first victory of 
the young season as they overcame a 13-12 
deficit at halftime to win 22-16. 

The kicking game, which had been a sore 
spot in the loss to Auburn, proved vital in 
the win. 

Junior college transfer, Butch Stocking, 
kicked a 28-yard field goal with 10:41 left in 
the third quarter to put the Wildcats up 15- 
13. 

Five minutes later, Paris hit John Liebe 
with a 32-yard touchdown pass to put them 
ahead 22-13. The touchdown followed an 
interception by Greg Best on the OSU 35, as 
Best was lost for the rest of the season with a 
dislocated elbow from the interception. 

Defensive end James Walker pulled off 
the biggest play of the first half for K-State 
when he intercepted a pass and ran it in for a 
touchdown from 33 yards out, to cut the 
Beavers lead to 13-7 in the second quarter. 

Brown had another good day on the 
ground with 79 yards on 16 carries including 
a 15-yard touchdown run. 

"Last week everything wasn't the way we 
wanted including our kicking game," Dickey 
said. "But the kicking game was the biggest 



factor in beating Oregon State. 

Falcons flutter 

The Wildcats ran its winning streak to two 
games, as they traveled to Colorado Springs 
to play the Air Force Academy. 

A slow first half produced a 6-3 K-State 
lead at halftime. The Falcons tied the game 
with another field goal in the third quarter. 

But with less than five minutes left in the 
game, fullback Roosevelt Duncan ran in 
from 10 yards out to put K-State ahead 13- 
6. 

The Falcons promptly moved the ball 
down inside the Wildcat's 20 before the 
'Cats recovered a fumble in the end zone. 

On the second play following the fumble, 
Brown raced 79 yards to ice a 19-6 win for 
the Wildcats. The longest play of the year 
for K-State gave Brown 200 yards for the 
day, a new school rushing record. 

Duncan also went over the century mark 
in rushing with 102 yards to give K-State 
two players over 100 yards for the first time 
since 1973. 

Following the win Dickey said, "I've been 
with some programs where you could sip a 
soft drink at the half and wonder how every- 
body else in the country is doing. I'm not 
sure that is the case yet at Kansas State. 

As a coach, I base everything on how 
much we improve week to week, and season 
to season. I believe we've done both thus 
far," Dickey said. 

K-State outbooted 

Back to the confines of KSU Stadium, K- 
State found rough treading against the Gold- 
en Hurricanes from Tulsa. 

Tulsa kicker, Stu Crum, booted his third 
field goal of the game as the clock expired 
giving Tulsa a 9-6 win, evening the Wildcats 
record to 2-2. 

Crum's final kick sailed 50 yards with the 
wind to stun the home crowd of 33,100 for 
Band Day. 

Stocking kicked two field goals for K- 
State's only points, as the Wildcats only 
managed 299 yards of total offense. 

K-State's defense played outstanding for 
the second straight week, holding the enemy 
from scoring a touchdown on back-to-back 
games. 

Linebackers Tim Cole and Tom Faerber 
led the defense with 13 and 10 tackles, re- 
spectively. 

"It was a very frustrating loss. We felt we 
could have won. We did not play consistent- 
ly on offense, but when you don't score a 
touchdown you're not going to beat many 
people," Dickey said. 



"We had a lot of opportunity to score 
today. We got our share of turnovers and 
breaks, but were too complacent at times. 
It's disappointing that we can't get into the 
end zone. It seems like we're doing every- 
thing that we can do, but we can't be block- 
ing very many people because the backs 
can't get out of the backfield," Dickey add- 
ed. 






/ V 




Dave Kaun 

Fullback Jeff Meyers is blocked from a pass 
by a Tulsa linebacker. 



Football/171 



K-State 3 K-State 6 K-State 19 

Iowa State 7 Oklahoma 38 Missouri 3 



Defense string broken 

Kansas State opened its Big Eight sched- 
ule against Iowa State before a homecoming 
crowd of 23,400. The Wildcats offense con- 
tinued its lackluster attack as they were held 
to a season low of 143 yards total offense by 
the Cyclones and lost 7-3. 

Following a Wildcat fumble, Iowa State 
went 29 yards for the only touchdown of the 




Nancy Zogleman 

Iowa State Defenders try to pull Keith Dearring 
to the ground. 

day in the second quarter. The touchdown 
broke a K-State defensive string of holding 
opponents without a touchdown for 12 con- 
secutive quarters. 

Wildcat quarterback Paris suffered a 
slightly dislocated shoulder in the third quar- 
ter putting him out for the next three games. 

Junior Paul Hobbs and freshman redshirt, 
Darrell Dickey, shared the quarterback du- 
ties the rest of the game, but could not put 
together any consistency. 

"We've had lots of comments on our 
quarterback. It's hard to play when you 
don't block and frustrating when you can't 
hand off," Coach Dickey said. 

"I was worried about how good we would 
be this season. It concerned me how much 
we would improve. I find it difficult to imag- 
ine not being able to move the ball," Dickey 
added. 

Strong safety, Brad Horchem's season- 
ending knee injury put an even bleaker pic- 
ture on K-State's homecoming game. 

"There have not been many enjoyable 
things about this season, but losing Brad and 
Sheldon and players that try hard is very 
frustrating," Dickey commented after the 
loss. 



The opposition didn't get any easier the 
next week for the Wildcats as they had to 
face the Oklahoma Sooners and Billy Sims. 

Wishbone beats 'Cats 

Surprisingly enough, K-State went into 
the locker room at halftime in front 6-3. 
Dickey drove the Wildcats 80 yards in 17 
plays early in the second quarter for the only 
touchdown of the half. 

But stopping the Sooners in the second 
half was another story. Oklahoma's wish- 
bone offense got its attack in gear, good for 
35 points and 350 yards on the ground 
alone in the second half. 

What it accounted to was a final score of 
38-6 as a K-State crowd of 31,480 watched 
in disbelief. 

The Wildcats did hold Heisman trophy 
winner Sims to 67 yards on 16 carries, but 
OU quarterbacks J.C. Watts and Kelly 
Phelps accounted for 233 yards. 

"I assumed they would take us lightly, 
which may have been why we outplayed 
them in the first half," Coach Dickey said. 

"I don't know if we played that good or 
they played that bad in the first half. It looks 
like we found out how good a team they are 
in the second half," Dickey said. 




Bo Rader 

Coach Dickey Gives careful explanation to 
Wildcat player Mike Wright. 

"In the first half it looked like they wer- 
en't sure what they wanted to do. In the 
second half, they just lined up and ran the 
wishbone right at us. That's what they do 
best," Dickey said. 

Tigers get surprised 

After three straight games at home, K- 
State took its 2-4 record to Columbia, to 
face the Missouri Tigers, who were ranked 
high in the polls early in the year. 



The Wildcats came through with a 19-3 
win, the first time K-State had beaten the 
Tigers in eight years. 

Dickey, the coach's son, was the hero of 
the game as he made his first collegiate start. 
He completed 15 of 25 passes for 189 yards 
and two touchdowns. 

The first touchdown came near the end of 
the first quarter, when Whitley grabbed a 
Dickey pass from 13 yards out. 

Phil Pickard caught Dickey's second TD 




John Bock 

Jubilant K-State players carry Coach Dickey 
from the field after upsetting Missouri's home- 
coming festivities. 

pass in the second quarter on a 25-yarder in 
the end zone. 

K-State's third and final touchdown came 
right after Pickard's TD. Dickey was 
roughed on the pass to Pickard and K-State 
kicked off to the MU goal-line. 

Brown flipped a 2-yard TD pass to Doug 
Catloth right before the end of the first half 
following the onside recovery. 

"I'm extremely happy for the players," 
Coach Dickey said. "They lost some close 
games before today and could have thrown 
in the towel for the rest of the season. But 
instead they came in to win and make a 
season of it." 

"The offense took a iot of heat, but today 
we shut up the critics. The coaches showed 
we were winners," Darrell Dickey said. 

Last ball handler wins 

The road show continued in Lawrence 
following the big win over MU, as the Wild- 
cats went up against its arch-rival, the Kan- 
sas Jayhawks. 

Dickey and the rest of the offense contin- 
ued playing well, but the Wildcat defense 
suffered a severe letdown. 



172/Football 



K-State 
Kansas 



28 K-State 12 K-State 15 
36 Nebraska 21 Oklahoma 52 



It resulted in a 36-28 KU victory, as K- 
State failed to defeat the Jayhawks for the 
second year in a row, a feat K-State hasn't 
done since 1954-55. 

Dickey had the seventh best day passing 
performance in K-State history. He threw 
for 306 yards on 19 of 29 passes. 

The Wildcats managed to take the lead 
early in the fourth quarter 28-27 after 
Brown scored his second touchdown of the 
game. 

But KU's Mike Huback kicked a 37-yard 
field goal with 4:24 left and added another 
touchdown after an interception. 

"We had several opportunities to win it 
and didn't. I'd like to give KU credit for that, 
but there'll be another day," coach Dickey 
said. 

"There was no loser out there this after- 
noon. This game was a tremendous compli- 
ment to the state of Kansas," KU coach Don 




John Bock 

Darrell Dickey attempts to elude a KU defener. 
Dickey scored a touchdown on the following 
play. 

Fambrough said. "It looked like it was going 
to boil down to whom ever had the ball 
last." 

Red defeats purple 

The fourth-largest crowd in K-State histo- 
ry, 43,210 people, half Nebraska and half K- 
State, watched the Cornhuskers defeat the 
Wildcats 21-12. 




Sue Pfanmuller 

Walt Wywadis scrambles after a loose ball dur- 
ing the Nebraska game while the 43,210 fans 
watched. 

K-State gave Nebraska all they could han- 
dle but came up short against an undefeated 
'Husker team. 

Right off the bat, K-State struck quickly. 
After recovering a Nebraska fumble on the 
'Husker 26, Dickey hit John Liebe for six 
points. 

Nebraska defensive end, Lawrence Cole, 
intercepted a Dickey pass in the first quarter 
and returned it 60 yards for a touchdown. 
The teams went into halftime with Nebraska 
holding onto a 7-6 lead. 

K-State took the second half kick-off and 
went 80 yards in 10 plays to take the lead 
12-7, as Brown scored from a yard out. 

In all, K-State turned over the football 
eight times, with two fumbles proving costly 
in the second half. 

Both fumbles occurred on the K-State 15 
and resulted in Nebraska touchdowns and 
the difference in the ballgame. 

The Cornhuskers also had problems hold- 
ing onto the ball as they lost five fumbles to 
K-State. 

"I'm disappointed for the seniors. Where 
we are now in our program, we couldn't 
have played much better," Coach Dickey 
said. "I'm happy that we were able to com- 
pete for 60 minutes against an excellent 
football team." 



Hope shattered 

K-State closed out its season with two 
road games at Oklahoma State and Colora- 
do. Hope was high for winning both games 
like the Wildcats had done last season 
against Colorado and Kansas. Two more 
conference wins would have given K-State a 
3-4 conference record and 5-6 overall mark. 

But the Wildcats were denied finishing up 
the season on a good note, as they were 
soundly beaten in Stillwater by the Cowboys 
42-15. 

Oklahoma State scored three second 
quarter touchdowns to go into the half with a 
28-7 advantage. The Wildcats scored their 
lone touchdown in the first half when quar- 
terback Darrell Dickey fumbled into the end 




Tim Costello 

Wide receiver John Liebe dives for an overth- 
rown Oklahoma State pass. 

zone and offensive tackle, Walt Wywadis, 
recovered it for the score. 

K-State scored at the start of the second 
half on a Jeff Meyers run and Dickey hit split 
end John Liebe for the two-point conversion 
to shorten the Cowboys lead to 28-15. 

But the Wildcats were not able to gener- 
ate much offense the rest of the game and 
Oklahoma State added insurance scores in 
both the third and fourth quarters to avenge 
an 18-7 loss to K-State in Manhattan the 
year before. 

"When you get beat and don't compete 
then it's hard to swallow. It was obvious that 
Oklahoma State considered the game more 
important than we did. They played with 
emotion and we didn't," said Coach Dick- 
ey. 



Football/173 



K-State 6 

Colorado 2 1 

Band bombarded 

Three days before the Colorado game, 
two feet of snow fell on Folsom Field in 
Boulder. The snow only added more excite- 
ment to a lackluster affair, as the crowd 
bombarded the Colorado band with snow- 
balls at halftime. 

Darrell Dickey had his worse throwing day 
of the season as he only completed four of 
19 passes for 55 yards and three intercep- 
tions. 

Two of his interceptions helped set up 
Colorado touchdowns in the first half, and 
the Buffs went into halftime ahead 14-3. 

Jim Jackson added another field goal in 
the second half for the Wildcats before Colo- 
rado iced the win with a fourth quarter 
touchdown. 

(Above) Brad Horchem exchanges a few words 
with an offical during the Oregon State game. 

(Below,) The Colorado quarterback slips as the 
K-State defense closes in to shut the play off. 




Bo Rader 



defense in limelight 




By ending the season with four straight losses, K- 
State finished with a 1-6 conference record and a 3- 
8 overall mark. 

Mistakes proved costly for the Wildcats as they 
committed 43 turnovers compared to 32 turnovers 
by its opponents. Also, opponents converted 14 K- 
State fumbles, pass interceptions and kicking break- 
downs into scoring drives of less than 39 yards. 

The most promising reward for K-State is that 29 
of the top 44 players will return for next season. 
Eighty-two percent of its rushing game, 65 percent 
of its passing yards and 71 percent of its receiving 
yardage return for next season. 



Rick Wllklna. Colorado Dailu 



BOTTOM HOW: Mo Latlmore, Chuck Driesbach, George Walslad, Carl 
Selmer, Coach Jim Dickey, Gary Darnell, Jim Donnan, Jim Davie, Dennis 
Franchione. SECOND ROW: Pat Schroeder, Darryl Black, Brooks Bur- 
ton, Darrell Dickey, Don Blrdsey, Keith Clay, Jim Jackson, Mike Kopsky, 
THIRD ROW: Jim Ginthe. , Sheldon Paris, Paul Hobbs, Brad Horchem, 
Robert Stirton, Bob Daniels, Greg Best, Butch Stocking, John Crawford, 
John Liebe. FOURTH ROW: James Robinson, Mark Maples, Clyde 
Brinson, Anthony Scott, Richard Buck, Vic Koenning, Eugene Goodlow, 
Eddy Whitley, Glen Hughes, Mike Wright, Gary Anderson. FIFTH ROW: 
Roosevelt Duncan, Donnell Garrett, Hoppy Milner, L. J. Brown, Ken 
Johnson, Graig McMurray, Sam Owen, Ed Grasso, Trine Villarreal, Jeff 
Meyers, Steve Schuster, Scott Cooper. SIXTH ROW: Phil Suiitzer, Keith 
Dearring, Tom Faerber, Ken Sigmon, Kevin Stetler, Harry Justvlg, Rawn 
Williams, Doug Taylor, Pat Sura, Morgan Olander, Tony Sheperd, Ben 
Landry, James Walker. SEVENTH ROW: Miguel Martinez, A. J. Lute, 
Reggie Young, DeDe Atterbury, Monte Bennett, Mike Ruzich, Ernest 
Hoehne, Amos Donaldson, Kent McNorton, Tim Murray, Jim Miller, 
Chuck Bowling, Kerry Wilson. EIGHTH ROW: Lynn Elder, Kerry Ben- 
ton, Kent Krateer, Ken Hitch, Wade Wentling, Duane Dirk, Walt Wywadls, 
Steve Clark, Brad Turner, Rob Houchin, Richard Heter, Mike Cox, Steve 
Soldner, Mike Smith. NINTH ROW: Rob Llndsey, Phil Pickard, Dave 
Stewart, Ronnie Wilson, Jim Otto, Jackie Robinson, Mark Mackey, Tim 
Buchanan, Tyrone Crews, Ray Bradley, Mitchell Foote, D.L. Johnson, 
Jeff Stuhlstatz, Garrett Schlmdt. TOP ROW: Doug Hanlon, Marty Rich- 
ards, Jim Rudd, Bill Allerhelllgen, Joe Hatcher, Mickey Matthews, Jim 
Kleinau, Tony Brown, Dave Kukdlenski. Russ Rlederer, Chester Jeffery, 
Ray Sprinkle, Malo Eteulnl, Don Bocchl. 



' -m mmmm m as »— nirn 



.*&*-#' - A» 














174/Football 




¥I7hen Jim Dickey was hired as K- 
''" State's head football coach after the 
1977 season, he was inheriting a team 
that was coming off two straight 1-10 
seasons and a two-year probation. 

One of Dickey's first moves in the 
rebuilding process was to recruit an all- 
state quarterback out of North Carolina. 
Dickey had a slight advantage over the 
other coaches, as the star athlete was his 



John Dodderidge 



own son, Darrell Ray. 

"I spent a lot of time thinking about 
whether I should coach Darrell," Dickey 
said. "I knew it would be tough, but I 
never doubted that I'd recruit him." 

"Everybody was telling me about all the 
problems it would create for me to try to 
play for my dad," Darrell said. "I was 
pretty confused, but then I realized the 
people who were telling me that were just 
trying to get me to come to other 
schools, I remembered that Dad had 
never lied to me my whole life, so I 
decided to come to K-State. 

Mom was saying all along to do what I 
wanted, but I could tell she wanted me to 
come here," Darrell said. 

Darrell's transition from high school to 
college was not an easy one for the 
passing whiz. As K-State enjoyed its best 
season in four years, Darrell had to watch 



from the sidelines as he was redshirted his 
freshman year. The Wildcats that year 
posted a 4-7 record including three 
conference wins in Coach Dickey's 
inaugural year. 

"When you come out of high school 
and come to college, you think you're 
ready to turn the program around by 
yourself," Darrell said. "I was upset at 
first, but there was no way I could have 
had any success last year. Watching and 
learning was the best thing I could've 
done." 

"It wasn't going to bother me a bit to 
let Darrell soak awhile longer this season 
and learn more from the sideline," Dickey 
said. 

"Sheldon (Paris) had an exceptional 
spring and I didn't see any reason to rush 
Darrell. I know that sometimes a father 
coaching his own son can bend the other 
way and be too hard on him, but I try to 
be fair. I listen to my other coaches about 
who is ready to play," Dickey said. 

After injuries to Paris and second string 
quarterback, Paul Hobbs, Darrell was 
given a chance to prove himself with his 
first start against the Missouri Tigers in 
Columbia. 

In storybook fashion, Darrell directed 
the Wildcats to a 19-3 victory and K- 
State's first win over Missouri in eight 
years. 

For his super performance, Darrell was 



chosen as the Big 8's Offensive Player of 
the Week. He had hit 15 of 25 passes for 
187 yards and two touchdowns. 

The following week, he proved his first 
start wasn't a fluke. Throwing for 306 
yards and four touchdown drives Darrell 
riddled the Kansas defense all afternoon. 
But in vain^ as K-State lost to the 
Jayhawks in a heartbreaker, 36-28. 

So far the father-son combination has 
not been a problem. With three years left 
to make a name for himself in K-State's 
passing record books, the outlook couldn't 
be brighter. 

"If I was favored by him (Coach 
Dickey), I'm sure some people would 
resent it," Darrell said. "But I think it's 
obvious there hasn't been any special 
considerations." 

"It's very important for the other kids 
to like him and respect him. If he can't 
get that loyalty from his peers, his 
chances of success aren't good," Dickey 
said. 

"When we are on the field, he's the 
head coach. He yells at me just as much 
as he would anyone else. He is like a 
coach, not a father," Darrel said. 

"It was tough at first until the other 
players learned that is the way it would 
be - that I wouldn't be getting anything 
special," Darrel said. 

Coach Dickey probably said it best, "It's a 
challenge to coach your own son." M 



Dicktfv n Dick^y/175 



Cats suffer growing pains 



Injuries — don't mention the word around 
K-State football coaches. 
A rash of injuries during the 1979 cam- 
paign thrashed the Wildcat squad, as eight 
starters had their season ended early due to 
injuries. In addition, three part-time players 
were sidelined for part of the season. 



Gary Heise 



"It's more than any place I've been, but 
you have to remember, it's part of the 
game," Coach Jim Dickey said. "It's just 
that you hate to lose the young men who 
want to play the game of foot- 
ball." 

Why all the injuries this year? 

"It's just been one of those 
years," football trainer Jim Rudd 
said. "Most of them were freak 
injuries." 

When injuries occur in bunches 
at a time, however, fans tend to 
question the team's strength and 
conditioning program. 

"Lack of strength is not the 
cause of our injuries," Rudd said. 
"All of our kids that got hurt have 
good muscle strength." 

K-State's list of season casual- 
ties, which would make any coach 
shake his head, is headed by three 



seniors. 

Rob Houchin, a three-year letterman at 
defensive end, received ligament damage to 
his knee during the second game of the sea- 
son (Oregon State) and later underwent sur- 
gery. 

"It's kind of painful not being able to play 
your last year," Houchin said. "Starting two 
years helps ease the pain some, but nothing 
is really like your senior year." 

Brad Horchem, a starting safety and the 
spark plug of the defense, was hit in the 
knee by a helmet during the Iowa State 
game and had surgery two days later. He 




Rob Clark 



Last Hurrah- During the last 
home football game sidelined 



players Brad Horchem and 
Kevin Stetler talk. 



was the leading tackier on the Wildcat's 
team at the time. 

"It was just a freak thing," he said. "They 
play was about over and the wide receiver 
cracked down on me and his. helmet hit the 
outside of my knee and knocked it in. It 
wasn't even that hard of a hit." 

Roosevelt Duncan, who ended his career 
at K-State as the Wildcat's third all-time 
leading rusher, dislocated his shoulder in the 
Tulsa game. The senior fullback returned 
after missing two weeks, but he re-injured it 
and missed the final two games of the sea- 
son. 

"There's no doubt he's a leader 
on our team," Dickey said about 
Duncan. "When he was in there, 
we did a lot better," 

The remainder of the season- 
ending injuries occured to under- 
classmen. 

Greg Best, a sophomore who 
started at cornerback, dislocated 
his elbow after making a spectacu- 
lar interception against Oregon 
State, and later underwent sur- 
gery. 

Steve Schuster, a junior from 
Topeka who started at the other 
corner back, injured his knee two 
weeks later, after a collision with a 
Tulsa player and underwent sur- 



but build brickwall defense 



Going into the 1979 football season, 
Kansas State was predicted by most of 
the Big 8 coaches to have a high-powered 
offense and a questionable defense. 

Those who questioned the wildcat de- 
fense were silenced early, as K-State's de- 
fense broke a school record by holding op- 
ponents without a touchdown for 12 con- 



John Dodderidge 



3 



secutive quarters. The streak started in the 
second quarter of the Oregon State game 
and three games later, was ended in the first 
quarter by Iowa State. 

A major difference for the Wildcat's turn- 
around on defense in 1979 from 1978 was 
the switch in the defensive setup. They 
changed from a 5-2 multiple scheme to a 4- 
4-3 alignment. 

"The reason we changed was that we 
knew our personnel was suited better for the 
4-4-3. This type of defense is set up for a 
team with speed and quickness, rather than 
one with just brute strength," added Darnell. 

While the offense was scoring fewer 
points in 1979, (154), compared to 201 
points scored in 1978, the defense made up 
for it, as they only gave up 225 points com- 



pared to 342 in 1978. 

The defense played its most outstanding 
games against two prospective bowl teams 
in the Big 8; Missouri and Nebraska. 

K-State's defense kept Missouri from en- 
tering the end zone as the Wildcats shocked 
the Tigers with a 19-3 win in Columbia. It 
was KrState's lone conference win and their 
first victory over Missouri since 1971. 

Against Nebraska, the Wildcat offense 
turned over the ball on eight different occa- 
sions, as the Cornhuskers beat K-State 21- 
12 before the largest crowd of the season at 
KSU stadium. 

"I thought our defense played about as 
best as they could have against Nebraska," 
said Jim Dickey, K-State coach. "In the pre- 
game warmup, there was no question that 
we were ready to play. I was worried that we 
might be too pumped up." 

Down 13-0 in the second quarter against 
Oregon State, defensive end, James Walker, 
picked off a pass and returned it 32 yards to 
turn the tide of the game in K-State's favor, 
as the Wildcats went on to a 22-16 victory. 
Cornerbacks Greg Best and Sam Owen in- 
tercepted passes in the second half which 
proved vital in the win. 

A week later, the Wildcat defense held 



■OPH^^.... Y 


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UwMmk VJL~m , \X aX.* 


_ 



Got 'cha- Tim Buchanan, outside 
linebacker snags Oregon State 
quarterback Scott Richardson. 



John Bode 



Air Force to only two field goals before the 
offense broke a fourth quarter tie with two 
touchdowns. A fumble recovery in the Air 
Force end zone by K-State's defense was the 
key play late in the game as the Air Force 
had a chance to tie or go ahead. 

Only on a few occasions did the defense 
break down. In the second half against Okla- 



1 76/Injurics*Def ense 



football 



gery 

Steve Clark, a junior defensive lineman, 
was making his first start of the season 
against Oklahoma, but sustained a dislocat- 
ed elbow while trying to make a tackle. 

D. L. Johnson, starting at defensive end 
as a junior, injured his knee in the Missouri 
game and required surgery. 

Tom Faerber, a standout at line backer 
this season as a junior, suffered a concussion 
against K. U. that ended his football career. 

"It was a real hard decision for me to 
quit,"hesaid."But the doctors said the risk of 
getting another concussuion is too great — 
that I might sustain something permanent." 

"This is my third serious concussion I've 
had, and last year I had periods of dizziness 
too. I've had a history of head injuries and 
dizziness and amnesia in the past," Faerber 
said. 

In addition to those starters, Kent McNor- 
ton, a back-up linebacker from Topeka, sus- 
tained a knee injury against Missouri that 
warrented his third knee surgery. 

Sheldon Paris, a senior from Canada who 
started the season as the 'Cats number one 
quarterback, missed three weeks in the mid- 
dle of the season after dislocating a shoulder 
during the Iowa State game. 

Darryl Black, a junior who shared time at 
fullback with Duncan, missed the first four 
games of the season with a cracked fibula. 

"A lot of the injuries happened when the 
athlete was trying to make a tremendous 




second effort," Rudd said. "They just ended 
up in the wrong place at the wrong time." 
Like Rudd said: "It's been one of those 
years." Ml 



Removing the Wounded-K- 

State trainers help Ken Hitch from 
the field after an injury in the 
Oklahoma game 



Bo Rader 



homa, the Sooners ran over K-State's de- 
fense for five touchdowns en route to a 38-6 
victory over K-State. The Wildcats held a 6- 
3 lead at half time. 

Kansas also found running on the Wildcat 
defense to be easier than expected as they 
rushed for almost 300 yards and a 36-28 
victory over K-State. 

Oklahoma State ran up a 42-15 score 
against K-State, but the defense was not to 
blame for most of the points as the Wildcat 
offense turned over the ball in their own 
territory too often. 

The surprising thing about the improved 
play of the defense was the fact that six 
starters were lost during the course of the 
season due to injuries. 

Half of the six were injured in the second 
game of the season versus Oregon State. 
Rob Houchin, senior defensive end, Steve 
Schuster, junior left cornerback, and Greg 
Best, sophomore right cornerback were all 
out for the rest of the season. 

The biggest casualty came when senior 
free safety Brad Horchem injured his knee in 
the Iowa State loss. At the time, Horchem 
was destined to make all-Big 8 and led the 
defense in tackles with 59. 

Steve Clark, junior defensive end dislocat 
ed his elbow against Olkahoma and had to 
sit out the next three games. The following 
week, against Missouri, D.L. Johnson, junior 




defensive end was lost for the season with 
knee surgery. 

The most disheartening injury for the de- 
fense occured in the Kansas game, as Tom 
Faerber, junior inside linebacker suffered a 
concussion and was told by doctors to give 
the game up because he would be risking 
additional injury if he kept playing. 

Freshman Mike Kopsky was thrown in to 
replace Horchem at free safety and was a 
key in the Missouri win. 

The most valuable member of the defen- 
sive corps may well have been junior James 
Walker, junior defensive end. He led the 



It's minel-A jubilant K-State 
defense rejoices their fumble 
recovery during the Oregon 
State game. 

Craig Chandler 



linemen with 88 tackles and threw enemy 
ball-carriers for losses 14 times for 64 yards. 
He was the only K-Stater on the United 
Press International's all-Big 8 first team and 
made Associated Press's second team. 

Junior Tim Cole led the defense in total 
tackles with 129 playing at inside linebacker 
and made the United Press Internationa] sec- 
ond team. 

Of the 28 players who played for K-State 
on defense, the Wildcats only lose seven of 
them, which could indicate a more improved 
defense for the 1980 season. ML 



Injuries'Defense/177 




Nooners 

M/' -Staters are becoming physically fit. 
•^That's the impression a visitor might 
get if he looked into Ahearn Field House 
during a weekday noon hour. 

People in sweats, shorts, t-shirts and 
jeans bend, stretch, run and dance as they 
participate in basketball, jogging, aerobics 



Carol Sobba 



and progressive exercises sponsored by 
recreational services. 

Cindy Bingham, graduate assistant for 
recreational services, coordinates the 
noontime activities in Ahearn. 

"I think people are a lot more fitness 
conscious and they're participating in 
organized fitness programs," Bingham 
said. 

Ahearn offers noontime basketball and 
jogging to individuals at self pace. 
Progressive exercise and aerobics are led 
by an instructor and meet at specific 
times. An average of 300 to 350 
students, faculty and facility-use-card 
holders participate daily, Bingham said. 

"It's fun and exciting to see 




178/Nooners In The Gym 



sweat it out in Ahearn 



improvement in the people," Todd Rohr. 
instructor for the progressive exercises, 
said. 

"Besides being fun, progressive 

exercises help people get into shape by 
taking their heart rate about every five 
minutes of the exercises. They've 
previously established how fast their 
hearts should beat. If they can get their 
heart beating that rate, they gain the most 
physical improvement," Rohr said. 

"We start out with about eight minutes 
of stretching while walking, stretch and sit 
for about four minutes then enter the 
cardiovascular phase," Rohr said in 
explaining progressive exercise. 

"A lot of people come to get in the 
exercise habit, then break off into other 
types of exercises like jogging and 
swimming," Rohr said. 

Rohr said his participants are mainly 
women: faculty and wives of the faculty. 
He uses background music for exercising 
as a motivational thing. 

Robbi Beeman, instructor for aerobic 
exercises, said she wants her participants 



to have fun and enjoy the music yet get 
good exercise. The aerobic exercises are 
movements to music that concentrate on 
the lower part of the body. Beeman said 

her group averages about 30 participants 
each day, usually all females. 

"I think they (males) think it's feminine, 
like a dance, but it's vigorous exercise 

that's fun to do. It motivates you and 
takes your mind off things," Beeman said. 

Mary Jo Lill, junior in home economics 
education, attends progressive and aerobic 
exercises twice a week. 

Lill said, "I get so worked up over 
things, but I don't worry about them while 
I exercise." She called her twice weekly 
exercise program "a break from tension". 

Although most people dress in shorts, 
sweats and t-shirts, Lill said there are a 
few who dress differently. One lady wears 
peddle pushers and the older ladies wear 
nylon hose under their shorts. 

But it's not the dress, Rohr said, "It's 
an atmosphere pretty much of excitement 
and constant energy," at noontime in 
Ahearn. Ml 





Two points-Basketball is just one of the 
fitness activities taking place during the noon 
hour in Ahearn. Kris Baker, sophomore in 
journalism and mass communications, shoots 
for a sure two points. 

Arch everybody-Progressive exercises help 
improve the major parts of the body, but 
emphasize heart rate and cardiovascular 
fitness. Both males and females participate in 
these exercises led by Todd Rohr, instructor. 

Huff 'n Puff- Taking advantage of the self 
pace jogging program, Eileen Doherty, senior 
in fashion marketing, runs her laps during 
noontime. 

photos by Scott Uebler 



Nooners In The Gym/ 179 



tennis 




Finding ways to win 



photos by Nancy Zogieman 



a 



P ind a way to win. 



Coach Steve Snodgrass and the K- 
State men's tennis team decided to use this 
strategy to accomplish this for the 1979-80 
season to improve their last year's record of 
13-10. 
The fall season proved to be a success as 



for two years due to lack of funding. Funds 
were allocated for the revenue-producing 
sports, such as basketball and football. 

Although funds still have not reached the 
money available in the '60's, Snodgrass has 
succeeded thus far in building a highly com- 
petitive team. 



Nancy Stetson 



the team went 4-1 and finished sec- 
ond to Oral Roberts University in the 
K-State Invitational. 

"There's a vulnerable spot to each 
opposing player. Each match we 
looked for their weak spots and used 
this to beat the other teams," Snod- 
grass said. 

Since the 1976 reinstatement of 
the tennis program, the high caliber 
of play of the 1960's is returning to 
K-State tennis, according to Snod- 
grass. 

The tennis program was cancelled 



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According to Snodgrass, everyone 
proved capable of playing in their respective 
positions. 

"On any given day Jeff Henderson and 
Gary Titus are capable of beating the best in 
the Big 8," Snodgrass said. 

Gary Hassenflu, the team's number four 
player has the only men's tennis schol- 
arship and is the team's best doubles 
player according to Snodgrass. Hassen- 
flu is a freshman. 

"Hassenflu is the best doubles player 
on the team but single-wise he has a lot 
to learn. But he is competitive and ag- 
gressive," Snodgrass said. 

Another doubles player, Matt West- 
fall, returned to action this year after 
injuries from a car accident that kept 

Listen up-Coach Hacker gives the 
team some last minute pointers be- 
fore a match. 

A Ready, aim-Kathy Manning pre- 
\ pares to return a serve during the 
" Oral Roberts match. 



180/Tennis 




Way to win 



him out last season. Westfall broke both his 
legs but came back and proved to be an 
asset to the team. 

"Matt's determination to come back after 
his accident has rubbed off on the other 
players," Snodgrass said. 

"I only wish I could give some of his blood 
to the other players," Snodgrass said refer- 
ring to Westfall's determination. 

The women's team could also have bene- 
fited from Westfall's determination as they 
had a worse record than the men with a '79 
spring record of 5-15. 

But, according to women's coach, David 
Hacker the team's record was expected. 

Hacker said he knew he gambled when he 
scheduled the team to play some of the 
toughest schools in the midwest, but he said 
he scheduled these schools as a recruiting 
tool. 

"Few outside of Riley County had ever 
heard of the women's tennis program here," 
Hacker said, "and chances are, you're not 
going to get to the national AIA W finals with 
a team of girls from Riley, Wamego and 
Keats." 

The tough schedule had its drawbacks as 
four of the top five players left the team. 

Although the spring season was a poor 
showing for the women's tennis team it did 
bring in more inquiries about the K-State 
tennis program, according to Hacker. 

The inquiries led to new players which led 
the women's tennis team to seven straight 
victories, and a 7-5 record this fall. It was the 
first time in the team's history to start a 
season with seven straight wins. 

Leading the women's team was freshman 
Cathy Manning, a 24 year-old transfer from 
Kansas City Community College. At Kansas 
City Community College, Manning compet- 
ed on the men's tennis team. 

Ann Currier, another new addition to the 
team, played in the number two spot. Cur- 
rier is a transfer from Coffeyville, Kansas. M 

Concentration' Gary Titus pre- 
pares to return a ball during a dou- 
bles match against Emporia State. 



fa 



Hi 



«* 



tennis 



Men's Tennis 



ksu 4 MIDWESTERN STATE 

ksu UNIVERSITY OF DALLAS 

KSU 9 Washburn 

KSU 9 SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE 

KSU 9 McPherson College 

KSU 7 Missouri 

ksu OKLAHOMA 

ksu 2 KANSAS 

KSU 6 Baker 

KSU 8 Westminister 

KSU 5 Emporia State 

ksu 1 COLORADO 

ksu 4 IOWA STATE 

KSU 5 University of 

Northern Colorado 

ksu 4 UNIVERSITY OF 

SOUTHERN COLORADO 

9 Washburn 



\sg 



KSU 
KSU 
KSU 



7 Bethany 2 

5 Nebraska 4 

9 Cowley County Junior College 



^ 



Women's Tennis 



ksu 2 ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY 

ksu ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

ksu WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY 

ksu 3 IOWA STATE 

ksu 1 NEBRASKA 

ksu 3 OKLAHOMA 

ksu 3 TULSA 

ksu 1 IOWA STATE 

ksu IOWA 

ksu KANSAS 



J 




Nancy Zogleman 




BOTTOM ROW: Gary Hassenflu, Jeff Henderson, 
Mike Goss, Dave Krteman, Steve Webb. TOP ROW: 
Greg Last, Gary Titus, Coach Steve Snodgrass, John 
Nelson, and Matt Westfall. 



BOTTOM ROW: Kathy Manning, Brenda Bennett, 
Janice Stanton, Terrl Miller. TOP ROW: Melissa Mel- 
hus, Nancy Zogleman, Ann Currier, Shelly Chrlsten- 
sen, Coach David Hacker. 




Tennis/181 



f- 




PLACE 



TOURNAMENT 



Second 


Triangular 






Nebraska 


L 




Iowa State 


W 


Third, Division 1 


KSU Invitational 




First 


Triangular 






Pittsburg State 


W 




Bethany 


w 


Second 


SWMS Quadrangular 
Southeast Missouri 






State 


w 




Jefferson City Juco 


w 




Southwest Missouri 






State 


L 




Oklahoma State 


w 


Fourth 


Nebraska Invitational 






Minnesota 


w 




Southwest Missouri 






State 


L 




Drake 


w 




Iowa State 


w 




Illinois State 


L 




Minnesota 


L 


Second 


Triangular 






Nebraska 


L 




Wichita State 


W 


Third 


Houston Invitational 






Alabama 


L 


Fifth 


Houston 


L 


Fourth 


Ohio State 


W 




North Texas State 


L 


Single Games 






Emporia State 


W Big 8 Tournament 




University of Kansas 


W Regional Tournament 





35-16-3 



^ 



J 



182/Volleyball 




ooLLeybaLL 




'Cats balance under net 



A balanced team and talent recruitment 
maintained the winning season for the 
1979 volleyball team, according to Ron 
Spies, new head coach. 

Finishing with a 35-16-3 record, Spies 
said, "there were no really disappointing 
people on the squad this year. Our overall 
balance is better and we had a lot of young 
talent." 

This was an exceptionally good recruiting 
year for the team, according to Spies. 
Among the recruits were Carla Diemer and 
Jennifer Koehn, "who have done very well 
as freshmen," Spies said. 

Kathy Teahan was one of the key players. 
"She is definitely one of the best players in 
the region", he said. 

Other outstanding players on the team 
were Julie Blasi and Susan Koeh, according 
to Spies. Additional depth was provided by 
Susan Drews and Elizabeth Kolarik, who 
logged time on the team last year as rookies. 

Because of the balance of the team, Spies 
felt that they had few problems with their 
game. 

"We were a good hitting team, excep- 
tionally tall and a good blocking team. How- 
ever since we were tall, we were slower and 
not as quick as other teams we have played. 
One real problem we have had has been our 
serve-receiving. Better teams will exploit this 
but we have adjusted pretty well most 
games," Spies said. 

The season opened with a triangular meet 
at Nebraska. "Nebraska has got to be the 
number one team in our region. It was a 
tough first game," Spies said. 

The Wildcats lost to Nebraska, but came 
back to take second in the meet after beat- 
ing Iowa State in three games. 

In September, the team hosted the KSU 
Invitational, finishing third. 

Spies was especially pleased with the 
match against the University of Kansas in 
October. "We played particularly well. I 



think we were a better balanced team than 
they were," Spies said. 

A highlight for the team was the trip to the 
Houston Invitational. Losing to Alabama, 
Houston, and North Texas State, they beat 
Ohio State. 

"We were not used to the good competi- 
tion," Spies said. "We were inconsistent, 
We don't play tough teams every week like 
the Texas teams do. We need to develop the 
mental toughness needed to do that." 

"Overall our season has been good. Hous- 
ton was the first time we lost to teams we 
should have beaten. We've played better 
competition than we have in the past," he 
said. 

The Wildcat team were seated second in 
the Big 8 Tournament, but managed only a 
fifth place finish. 

"It was a bad letdown," Spies said. "It 
was probably the worse we've played all 
year. I was kind of surprised because we 
were coming off a good week. We probably 
played one of our best that week. 

Everybody had an off weekend. Usually 
one or two might, but we just can't handle it 
when everybody does," he said. 

The team finished their season at the Re- 
gional Tournament with a fourth place fin- 
ish. "We played well, but that's just where 
we were in the region," spies said. 

Spies said the future for the volleyball 
team looks good for the next couple of 
years. 

"There'll be a good nucleus for next 
year," he said. "Were only losing two sen- 
iors, Teahan and Blasi, which will leave a big 
space to fill, but we've got some good fresh- 
men on the team." 

Because he is working on his graduate 
degree in grain science, Spies said he prob- 
ably won't be back as head coach next year. 
"But if next year is as good a recruiting year 
as this one and the right people sign, it'll be 
hard to give it up."|H 




BOTTOM ROW: Kathy Leonard, Sondra 
Hayes. SECOND ROW: Lorl Frazee, Terr! 
Moore, Julie Blasi, Holly Sinderson, Susan Haas, 
Susan Long, Carla Diemer. TOP ROW: Coach 
Ron Spies, Pat Daniels, Jenny Koehn, Julia 
Schaefer, Susan Drews, Kathy Teahan, Susan 
Koehn, Elizabeth Kolarik, Lynn Stallard (trainer). 



Photos by Bo Rader 

Violent Volley In a last ditch 
effort to make a volley, Kathy 
Leonard dives to the floor during 
a team workout. 

Block Shot-Susan Drews (right) 
and Susan Haas strain to make 
the block. 

Pep Talk-Giving instructions 
during a time out is Ron Spies, 
coach. 



Volleyball /183 



Rugby 



Gentlemen's game is for ruffians 



<<Ty uohu players eat their dead." 

**"Give blood, play rugby." 
These slogans draw attention to rugby's 
crude and barbaric image. 

But according to Don Harris, K-State 
Rugby Club captain, rugby is a gentleman's 
game. "In England, the upper society plays 
rugby while the commoners play soccer. 
There is a lot of sportsmanship involved. 
The captain is the only player on the field 
who can ask the referee a question and then 
you must refer to him as sir." 

Originating in England, a New York Times 
article called rugby "a game for ruffians 
played by gentlemen." 

Rugby has a brutal image. And Harris is 
proof of the brutal aspect of the game. Har- 
ris has suffered cracked ribs, a broken wrist, 
fractured shoulder and a broken nose. Har- 
ris said this was the first season he hasn't 
broken a bone and attributes that to being in 
better physical shape. 

The most common injury according to 
Harris is facial injuries, such as a cut over an 
eye or broken nose. 

Some players take precautionary mea- 
sures to avoid injuries. Several players 
smear Vaseline on their legs and above their 
eyes to prevent ripping of the skin after 
being grabbed and tackled. 

"Rugby is the fastest, most physical run- 
ning, tackling and ball-handling game in the 
world." states a New York Times article. 

Because of the quickness of rugby, injured 
players receive only one minute to decide 
whether they will continue to play. A substi- 
tute may enter the game, but only two sub- 
stitutes are allowed and only for injuries. 



Jill McAntee 



Conditioning is essential to keep up with 
the fast pace of the game, according to Alan 
Chapman, K-State rugby coach. Two week- 
ly practices stressing plays and drills prepare 
team play, but running and weight training 
are left to the individual players. 

A rugby gathering doesn't stop with a 
hand shake after the game. After any home 
K-State rugby game the players, coaches 
and rugger huggers (fans) flood Brother's 
Tavern. 

David Kim, sophomore in mechanical en- 
gineering at Kansas University, said, "Part 
of the sportsmanship between teams after 
they've played is the party afterward. The 
host team supplies the keg or kegs and we 
party together." 

Kim added that the KU Rugby Club has a 
lot of partying traditons. Traditions including 
singing songs, skits and getting naked. 

The "Zulu warrior" is used by the KU 
Club when a rookie scores his first try (simi- 
lar to a touchdown in football). Later, at the 
tavern, in response, to players chanting 
"take 'em down you Zulu warrior" the rook- 
ie must do a strip tease. 

In contrast, K-State uses the Zulu warrior 
dance to commend a player who has shown 
outstanding playing abilities or who is leav- 
ing the team. 

This fall Harris zulued at Brother's follow- 
ing the last game of the season against Rock- 
hurst. 

Although the K-State Club stayed within a 
200 mile radius of Manhattan they took road 
trips to the Kaw Valley Tournament in To- 



peka and the Heart of America Tournament 
in Kansas City. 

Tours and road trips are funded from 
each rugger's pocket. While a rugger may 
invest $60 a weekend for food, gas, accom- 
modations and beer, going on tour usually 
costs $l,500-$2,000. Kim said that the KU 
alumni donate some money and student ac- 
tivity funds provide a small portion the KU 
team's expenses. 

K-State Rugby Club receives no money in 
donations and was turned down by Student 
Senate last spring because they did not have 
a constitution according to Harris. 

However, Chapman attributes the lack of 
allocations to rugby because it's a minority 
sport. Since then the K-State Club has 
adopted a constitution and been renamed 
from the Kansas State University-Fort Riley 
(KSUFR) Rugby Club to the K-State Rugby 
Club. 

"In the late '60s officers stationed at Fort 
Riley wanted to play rugby. Four or five of 
them came to K-State to ask students to join 
the club," Harris said, "But no one from 
Fort Riley played during the 1979 spring or 
fall season." 

KU Rugby Club beat K-State twice this 
year. On Sept. 30 by 14-6 and again Nov. 4 
by 6-3. 

Still Coach Chapman shows confidence in 
his team for the upcoming seasons. "We've 
made remarkable progress and show great 
aptitude for the future." 

Harris agreed, "This was a rebuilding year 
for us and all the A-side players are return- 
ing for the spring season. KU better watch 
out."|* 




184/Rugby 



j^gky 




Gotcha- (Lower Left) K-State 
ruggers reach for a Rockhurst 
player after Rockhurst received 
the ball from a scrum down. 

Let Go Guys- During the last 
game of the season two KSU 
ruggers tackle a Rockhurst 
halfback. 



photos by Craig Chandler 



Rugby/ 185 



socceu 



Love conquers twenty-one 



llThat happens when you get together 21 
*^ guys who all love to play soccer? The 
emphasis is then put on enjoyment and par- 
ticipation, according to Greg Middleton, 
player-coach. 

"Our first purpose was to participate in 
the game of soccer and just have fun. I guess 
our second purpose was to promote soccer 
here on the K-State campus," Middleton 
said. 

While the team had five international stu- 
dents and students from other states, most 
of the players were from the Kansas City 
area. 

In the 1979 season, seven games and one 
tournament was played in the fall. The 
spring season included the Big-8 Tourna- 
ment. 

Commenting on the fall season, Middleton 
said, "We had problems with the first part of 
our season, mainly because we needed a 
goalie." 

A goalie was found in Bill McKee. "He has 
more than filled the position," said Middle- 
ton. 

The team remained optimistic, despite 
losing the first three games. 

"I think we've really done a lot better 
than the scores indicated, "Middleton said, 
"we've been improving with every game." 

Losing to Kansas United of Topeka 2-4, 



Cloud County 2-6, and Ft. Riley 2-3, the 
team posted its first win over Baker Univer- 
sity 2-0. 

In November, the team traveled to Law- 
rence to take on the University of Kansas. 
Although the Jayhawks prevailed 1-0, 
Middleton was satisfied with the team's per- 



Deanna Hutchison 




formance. 

"I think we were well-matched teams," 
Middleton said. "We were working on 
switching our defense around but we still 
out-played them all game. It's just that they 
were able to score and we weren't." 

The team finished their fall season with a 
win over the University of Nebraska 2-0. 

"Nebraska is definitely one of the best 
teams in the Big 8," Middleton said. "Every- 
thing seemed to come together for us. We're 
really looking forward to the spring season 
now. We finalized our team in the Nebraska 
game and I think we've got one which defi- 
nitely has a chance in the Big 8 next spring." 

Besides playing a year-round schedule, 
the soccer team offers soccer clinics to kids 
at Ft. Riley and Manhattan. 

"It's kind of our community service pro- 
ject," Middleton said. "We teach the kids 
soccer and just help them have fun. It's only 
$3 for the whole day. You can't even see a 
movie for that hardly." 

Middleton said that no one on the team 
was really interested in playing professional 
soccer, but played for the enjoyment. 

"Everybody out there really enjoys the 
game," Middleton said. "It's relaxing for us 
and just comes naturally." Jg| 







«*M r 






cross countny 



Youth 
keeps 
on running 

'■ 'hey were young, they were inexperi- 
* enced. 

But the 18 men and women of K-State's 
cross country teams went to national compe- 
tition this year. 

With youth and inexperience, the future 
of the women's cross country team looked 
grim as the season's beginning. Only three of 
last year's top seven runners were returning. 





Nancy Zogleman 



"I was a little skeptical," Barry Anderson, 
women's track coach said. "We were going 
to be very young." 



Cyndi Overholser 



The women's cross country, led by fresh- 
men, finished third at the Big 8 and went on 
to place second in the regional meet. Going 
in to the Big 8 meet, the team was undefeat- 
ed in five competitions. 

"The highlight of the year was the fact 
that we qualified for nationals for the fifth 
year," Anderson said. 

The women placed 17th nationally. 

The men's team on the other hand, re- 
tained seven of last year's runners. Howev- 
er, four of these were sophomores. 

"Considering that we were young, we ran 



well," Jerome Howe, men's cross country 
coach, said. 

The men placed among the top ten in all 
their meets. This included a second place 
finish at the KSU Invitational and fourth in 
the OSU Jamboree and the Big 8 Meet. 

"The meet I enjoyed the most was the 
Missouri Duo," Howe said. "We swept the 
first four places." 

Both coaches remained optimistic for next 
season's meets. 

"The future for this team (women's) is 
very good," Anderson said. "This is the 
most talented group of distance runners 
we've had at one time. It will be easier to 
recruit good athletes." 

"Next year I think we should be a con- 
tender for the title," Howe said. "Nationally 
we should get into the top 20."|^[ 



(r 



a>'E?<§: 



Women's 



^ 



L 



1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
3rd 
2nd 
17th 



4th 
2nd 
1st 
4th 
1st 
4th 
8th 



WSU Gold Classic 
KU Invitational 
Missouri Invitational 
KSU Invitational 
Nebraska Invitational 
Big 8 Championship 
Region VI Championship 
AIAW National Championship 

Men's 

WSU Gold Classic 
KSU Invitational 
Nebraska Dual 
OSU Jamboree 
KSU-MU Dual 
Big 8 Championship 
NCAA Regional 



J 



Alone-Long-distance running 
often means a personal race 
against distances. 

Run, Run, Run-Heidi Bright, 
freshman in animal science (right) 
keeps marking the meters in the 
KSU Invitational at Warner Park. 
She placed 7th in the meet. 

Run with the Pack-Rick 

McKean (left) Mike Clem, and Tim 
Davis keep up with the pack in 
the KSU Invitational. 



For the 

Record 



Warner Park 4 mile record: 
Mike Clem ran it in 19:14 



BOTTOM ROW: Leticia Tapla, Cathy Saxon, 
Dana Schaulis, Rochelle Rand, Deborah Pihz- 
TOP ROW: Karen Sothers, Slela Varga, Janel 
LeValley, Heidi Bright, Marlys Schonewers, Deb 
Harrgel. 



BOTTOM ROW: Steve Connors, Dan Schlei- 
cher, Mike Clem, John Holliday. TOP ROW: 
Jerome Howe, coach, Bill Hurst, Tim Davis, Rick 
McKean, Mark Sagessor. 




Cross Country/189 





190/Traditions 



Traditions hang around 



Just as basketballs have almost always 
been orange, K-State's basketball pro- 
gram has been built on traditions. A new 
decade began with 1980, and firmly-estab- 
lished traditions remain. 

Ahearn Field House, "the old barn" as it 
has been called for years, houses Wildcat 
fans dressed in purple and white from their 
cowboy hats to their tennis shoes. "The Old 
Barn" seats 11,700, yet demand for tickets 
to K-State games exceeds that number. The 
more popular the game, the more valuable 
the tickets become. 

Camping out for several weeks before 
tickets even go on sale has been a K-State 
habit for the past decade. To eliminate the 
camping out, lotteries for basketball tickets 
began in 1978. Numbers are randomly 
drawn and tickets sold to groups of ten or 
less. After group tickets are sold, individuals 
may also purchase reserve tickets. 

Nevertheless, the students who purchase 
unreserved tickets still camp out to get 
choice front row seats for the more desirable 
games. 

Once inside Ahearn on game days, the 
noise is deafening. The cheerleaders and 
band join together for a hand-clapping, foot- 
stomping rendition of the K-State theme 
song, Wabash Cannonball." 

Besides the cheerleaders, Willie the Wild- 
cats lends his antics to the K-State spirit. The 
Sigma Chi fraternity originated the mascot 



and he became an official member of the 
cheerleading squad in the mid-'60's. His 
identity has traditionally been a secret. Fans 
still enjoy the traditional Willie the Wildcat 
floorshow strip at the games. 

Adding to the basketball traditions is the 



Jill McAntee 



playing of the alma mater written by H.W. 
Jones, before the game. It has been altered 
only slightly since 1888. The last two stanzas 
have been omitted and the KSAQKansas 
State Agricultural College)has been changed 
to KSU(Kansas State University). 

The traditional rival is that "other" Kan- 
sas university, the University of Kansas(KU). 
One of the more desirable games to attend, 
tickets are often resold for a higher price. 
Before the Feb. 16 game in Ahearn, two 
students in the Rockin' K bar managed to 
sell their tickets for $40 each. 

K-State fans traditionally sneak "chicken- 
hawks"(chickens dyed red and blue the KU 
colors) into Ahearn. Despite close security 
checks, the "chickenhawks" appear on the 
floor before the game. 

Signs play a big part in the K-State tradi- 
tion. Some cute, others original, and still 
others on the vulgar side, K-Staters use their 
imaginations for something different to dis- 
play. Two years ago, vet students floated a 
slogan proclaiming, "if the world needed an 




enema, they'd insert the tube at KU" by 
filling surgical gloves with helium. 

Opposing coaches are often harassed by 
K State fans. One K-Staters' favorites is Ted 
Owens. When Owens' sideline pacing be- 
gins, "sit down, Ted, sit down" roars 
through Ahearn. 

Opposing players don't get any breaks. 
The unfortunate player who fouls is taunted 
by an accusing "you, you, you." Pity the 
opposition who fouls out, for he is humiliat- 
ed with waving hands and a taunting "na, na, 
na na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye." 

The fans aren't the only exhibitors of K- 
State's traditions, for without the team, the 
traditions wouldn't exist. 

The team's traditions are in the soul of 
one man, Jack Hartman. As a coach, his 
strategy is two-fold: 1) stay calm and 2) play 
as a team. He stresses drills and working the 
ball around and passing off to the open play- 
er. K-State's team is not known for "star 
players" but instead for its consistent techni- 
cal basketball. 

The zone defense used by the 'Cats has 
developed into Hartman's trademark. De- 
fense is important, Rolando Blackman even 
uses his feet to block passes, if that's his only 
option to detract the opponent. 

Sophistication has developed as a tradi- 
tion for the team. Everyone, including the 
water boy wears a three piece suit. 

K-Staters evidently like their established 
traditions and it looks as though these habits 
are firmly anchored in the concrete of cus- 
torn. M 



Chickenhawksl-Willie the 

Wildcat chases one of the half 
dozen chickens dyed red and blue 
which was thrown at the beginning 
of the KU-K-State game. 

Bone Warmer-Huddling around 
their portable heater outside of 
Ahearn, Mike Bellumo, sophomore 
in microbiology, and Walter 
Bradbury, sophomore in 
agricultural engineering, camp out 
for choice seats for the KU game 
on Feb. 16. 

photos by Bo Rader 



191 



basketball 



Faces of Hartman — (far right) 
Normally sober and thoughtful, 
Jack Hartman shows a rare smile 
after a K-State fast break during 
the KU-K-State post-season 
tournament game. 



Steal it — Jari Wilis loses 
possession of the ball to an 
Oklahoma City player during 
the December 6 game. 



Up for grabs-Greg Prudhoe 
reaches for a rebound against a 
University of Windsor-Ontario 
player. It was the first meeting 
between the two teams. 




Frosh continue 
K-State tradition 

* he Wildcat starting lineup has been dotted with freshmen the 
last few years. 

For example, in 1976, Curtis Redding and Tyrone Ladson earned 
starting positions. In 1977, Rolando Blackman started in all but five 
games. Last year, in 1978, Tyrone Adams, and Ed Nealy were 
starters. Nealy won Big 8 Newcomer of the Year honors his first 
year. 

The year 1979 was no different as Les Craft made his name 
known in the starting line-ups his first year at K-State. 

"Les is an outstanding young player," coach Jack Hartman said. 
"He's sound in every phase of the game. In addition to being an 
excellent out court shooter, he has fine hands, plus the moves, 
ballhandling capabilities and background to step into college basket- 
ball." 

Former freshman standout and presently on the third team of the 
All-American basketball team, Rolando Blackman was expected to 
add depth and versatility to the young Wildcat team. 

"I'd like to have all the Rolando Blackmans I can get. He's a very 
versatile ball player, very coachable," Hartman said. 

In a Sports Illustrated special college basketball issue, K-State was 
predicted to finish fourth in the Big 8 race behind top contenders 
Oklahoma, Missouri and Nebraska. But, in typical K-State basketball 
fashion, the Wildcats proved the pre-season standings wrong as they 
eventually captured a second-place tie with Nebraska. Missouri won 
the Big 8 championship. 

Introduction by Nancy Reese, game by game stories by John 
Dodderidge. 




192/Men's Basketball 



Oklahoma State Cowboys 



Jan. 9- K-State opened its Big Eight 
Conference schedule with an en- 
counter that wasn't decided until 
the final seconds, which was nor- 
mal for most of K-State's confer- 
ence games'. 

Blackman played a better game 
defensively as he blocked a shot 
with five seconds left, preserving a 
K-State victory 60-59 over Oklaho- 
ma State in Stillwater. 

Blackman also produced some 
offense, scoring 16 points. Forward 
Tyrone Adams came off the bench 
to give the Wildcats some spark 
with 10 points and eight rebounds. 

"Both teams played real hard," 
Hartman said. "Paul Hansen 
(OSU's first year coach) did a good 
job in preparing them for us. We 
missed some free throws late in 
the game which hurt us and turned 
over the ball In our delay game." 

Feb. 9-The return game did not 
come until K-State was alone in 
first place in the conference race 
with five games left. A full house of 
11,220, the (same) attendance for 
all seven conference games at 
Ahearn Field House, rooted the 
Wildcats to their last conference 
victory of the season. 

The Wildcats opened the game 



Faked out- Tim Jankovitch 
guards the ball as an Oklahoma 



with black arm bands on theii 
shoulders in memory of Porky Mor- 
gan, K-State trainer for the last 25 
years. Morgan died two days before 
of a heart attack, after being taken 
to the hospital before the K-State- 
Colorado game the night before his 
death. 

Blackman and Nealy did the hon- 
ors with 28 points and 18 rebounds, 
respectively, in the 82-72 victory. 

K-State had to play the win at 
home over Oklahoma State with- 
out Adams who broke a finger on 
his shooting hand in the previous 
game against Colorado. 

Reserve guard Glenn Marshall, a 
senior who started almost every 
game his Junior year and for the 
early part of this season, left the 
team to return to his home in St. 
Louis for personal reasons. 

The Wildcats didn't look to miss 
the absence of Adams or Marshall 
against the Cowboys, holding at 
one time a 21-point lead at 78-57 
with five minutes to go, before the 
Cowboys rallied to lower the mar- 
gin of defeat. 

Going into their final four games, 
K-State was on top of the standing 
with an 8-2 conference record, 
which was eventually reduced to 8- 
6 with four straight losses. 



State player attempts to block a 
possible pass. 




Oklahoma Sooners 




It's MInet-Rolando Blackman 
grabs the ball from Whitely Ray, 

Jan. 12- Last season, the Oklahoma 
Sooners beat K-State In all four 
games they played, as OU went on 
to win the Big 8 Conference and 
the post-season tournament. 

The Sooners (jinx) continued, 
beating K-State 72-62 at Ahearn 
and 56-55 in Norman. 

Despite a 29 point performance 
by Blackman, the rest of the Wild- 
cats were cold and fell behind early 
in the second half. At one point, 
Oklahoma held a 15-point lead with 
eight minutes left before K-State 
reduced It to no less than seven. 

"Oklahoma played a very pretty 
basketball game for 40 minutes," 
Hartman said. "They were alert, 
their execution was good and it 
was obvious that their shooting 
was good. They beat us from start 
to finish." 

Blackman, who played the entire 
game along with Wills, attempted a 
season-high total of 22 field goals 
hitting on 12 of them, as he scored 
a new career-high. His previous 
best was 27 points against Kansas 
his sophomore year. 

"Rolando had an excellent bas- 
ketball game, no question about 
it," Hartman said. "There was a 
hesitancy among the rest of the 
team. It was a very weak effort on 
our part. We didn't have good 
movement or good rhythm." 



Oklahoma guard. Oklahoma won 
72-62. 

Feb. 2- In a low-scoring affair the 
Sooners beat K-State on a shot by 
guard Aaron Curry with only two 
seconds left on the clock. 

The Wildcats had a chance to win 
the game, but Wills last shot from 
30 feet failed, breaking a five-game 
conference winning streak for K- 
State. They still remained in first 
place, but only by one game, with a 
6-2 record. 

Blackman led the Wildcats in 
scoring with 18 but missed two free 
throws late in the game, hurting K- 
State's chance's for a victory. 

With less than one minute left in 
the game, the Wildcats had a three- 
point lead. The Sooners narrowed 
It to one point and got the ball back 
on a K-State turnover with 25 sec- 
onds left. The Sooners stalled with 
the ball until putting up a shot with 
about six seconds left, the shot 
missed but was rebounded by Curry 
and followed In, giving the Wild- 
cats only two seconds left to go the 
full distance of the court. 

The Wildcats were able to get 
the ball just past half-court and 
called a time-out with one second 
on the clock. Two time-outs later, 
K-State was fouled again, with 
Wills shooting the Wildcat's unsuc- 
cessful final effort. 



194/Men's Basketball 



KSU 60, OSCI 59 
KSU 82, OSU 72 



CXI 72, KSCI 62 
OCI 56, KSCI 55 



Colorado Buffaloes 



Kansas Jayhawks 



Jan. 16 The Wildcat's five-game 
conference streak started when K- 
State won in Boulder, beating Colo- 
rado 71-65 after being down 30-26 
at the half. 

Blackman topped K-State in 
scoring with 22 points, a career- 
high for the sophomore from Chica- 
go, 111. 

The Wildcats took control of the 
game halfway through the second 



half, outscoring the Buffaloes by 15 
points. 

Tim Jankovich, a Manhattan na- 
tive who transferred to K-State 
after playing at Washington State, 
made his first start in the Colorado 
game. Marshall and junior, Fred 
Barton, had started the previous 14 
games for the Wildcats at the 
point-guard spot. 




Keep Away- Colorado State's Jo 
Jo Hunter misses as he attempts 

Feb. 6- The rematch proved to be a 
nail-biter, as Colorado took the 
Wildcats into overtime before K- 
State came away with a 62-61 deci- 
sion at Ahearn. 

Wills was the hero of the game, 
as he hit a ten foot shot from the 
left baseline with seven seconds 
left. Only a last second shot by the 
Buff's Craig Austin which bounced 
off the rim preserved a Wildcat vic- 
tory. 

"I thought we rose up when we 
had to," Hartman said. "And we 
had better recognize that Colorado 
played extremely well. They are a 
good team and they played a fine 
game." 

Fred Barton scored the last 
points of regulation time, hitting a 
20 footer from the top of the circle, 
to even the score at 54-all, with 
1:13 left. 

Buffalo guard and leading scor- 
er Jo Jo Hunter had a chance to win 
the game at the end of regulation, 
but was forced to take an off-bal- 



to knock the ball away from Tim 
Jankovich. 

ance shot by Blackman with time 
running out. 

Hunter blew a second opportuni- 
ty to give Colorado the win, miss- 
ing the front end of a one-and-one 
free throw situation with 23 sec- 
onds left in Overtime and the Buffs 
holding onto a 61-60 lead. The 
missed freethrow set up Wills' 
game-winner shot as K-State 
moved its conference record to 7-2. 

"We had to have some big plays 
out of a lot of our guys," Hartman 
said. "Ed Nealy hit a couple of big 
baskets for us, and he got a re- 
bound on Hunter's missed free 
throw. We showed a lot of charac- 
ter and pride tonight." 

Blackman had a bad shooting 
night, 5 of 15, but still led K-State 
with 15 points. Manley Ray, a soph- 
omore transfer from Marymount 
College, chipped in with 10 points, 
while Adams, Jankovich, Nealy and 
senior Dean Danner added six 
points each. 



Jan. 19 The K-State-KU rivalry in 
basketball has put an extra dimen- 
sion which dates Kansas basketball 
back to the early 1900's. This 
year's games were no different, as 
K-State surprised the Jayhawks in 
Lawrence and KU sneaked past the 
Wildcats by two points at Ahearn. 
K-State won the season series two 
games to one, defeating KU in the 
finals of the post-season tourna- 
ment in Kansas City. 

The Wildcats showed signs of be- 
ing one of the teams to beat in the 
Big 8. beating the Jayhawks 61-52 
at Allen Field House. K-State shot 
75 percent from the field in the 
second half, as the Wildcats over- 
came a 25-24 deficit at the half. 

Four starters played the entire 
game for K-State, led by Wills who 
shot seven of eight, scoring a 
game-high 15 points. Blackman 
added 13, Jankovich had 12 and 
Adams scored 11. 

"We overcame the tremendous 
pressure of this contest fairly early 
and I feel that meant a lot," Hart- 
man said. "Our kids did a tremen- 
dous job in that respect." 

"I felt very good at halftime, 
down by only one. I felt we could go 
out the last 20 minutes of the 
game, get the lead and keep it," 
added Hartman. 

"Jari Wills had a good game on 
both ends of the floor, he certainly 



had a good game," Hartman said. 
"I am awfully proud of these kids, 
we are very happy to be 3-1 in con- 
ference play at this point in the Big 
8 race." 

Feb. 16- The Jayhawks spoiled any 
chances K-State had of winning the 
Big 8 championship, beating the 
Wildcats on a shot with one second 
left. 

KU's game- winning play was set 
up when K-State lost possesion of 
the basketball after Glenn Marshall 
was called for a jump-ball after not 
passing the ball off after five sec- 
onds. 

Under a new Big 8 rule, KU took 
over the ball, as jump ball calls are 
traded by taking the ball out of 
bounds. 

A Booty Neal layup off a pass 
from Darnell Valentine gave the 
Jayhawks a 48-46 win, as K-State 
did not even get a chance to throw 
the ball in after the Neal's shot. 

"The jump ball rule hurt us today 
but that's one of the things you 
know going In," Hartman said. 
"Their offensive Rebounding was 
the big difference in the game. 
They got position and went to the 
boards hard, putting missed shots 
back in." 

Blackman and Wills scored 18 
and 12 points to top K-State, as 
their conference record dropped to 
8-4. 



Move ttl-Darnell Valentine of during the post season tournament 

Kansas drives past Glenn Marshall at Kemper arena in Kansas City. 




KSU 71, CU 65 KSCI 61, KU 52 
KSU 62, CCI 61 K(I 48, KSU 46 



Iowa State Cyclones 



Nebraska Cornhuskers 



Jan. 23-The Iowa State Cyclones 
came into Ahearn this year after 
beating the Wildcats 79-66 the year 
before at Ahearn. K-State made 
sure that the Cyclones did not keep 
up their success In Ahearn, beating 
them 73-63. 

The Wildcats led 37-26 at half- 
time, aided by nine consecutive 
points to break an 18-all deadlock. 

The Wildcats held leads of 13 
and 12 halfway through the second 
half and withstood any hopes Iowa 
State had of coming back, as the 
closest the Cyclones came was six 
points with four minutes left in the 
game. 

Blackman led four players in dou- 
ble figures with 17 points, followed 
by Jankovich with 14, and Adams 
and Nealy with 12 each. 

"I'm not sure how we played," 
Hartman said. "It was one of those 
games that looked like we might be 
able to break out. It was obvious 
we wanted to get away from them, 
but, you have to credit Iowa State 
and their size, that's why you want 
to get a big lead on them." 

"We know that a team like Iowa 
State is a spoiler," Blackman said. 
"I'm sure that they were coming 
into here looking to get back Into 
the Big 8 race." 

Feb. 1 3- In the return game at Ames, 
Iowa State may not have been try- 
ing to get back into the Big 8 race, 



but they did put a dent Into K- 
State's drive to a championship. 

From start to finish, the Cyclones 
had the upper hand on K-State, 
winning 66-58. The victory put K- 
State's record to 8-3, while Iowa 
State's interim coaches, Reggie 
Warford and Rick Samuels, won 
their first game in five tries. 

"I thought Iowa State played 
well," Hartman said. "We didn't 
start the game with determination. 
We got into foul trouble. We had 
trouble getting points out of peo- 
ple." 

The Wildcats top rebounder, Ed 
Nealy, got into early foul trouble 
and finished with only four points 
and four rebounds. Manley Ray, the 
other starting forward did not even 
score, while Iowa State's starting 
forwards, Chuck Harmison and 
Robert Estes, combined for 25 
points. 

The Wildcats had several oppor- 
tunities to get back into the game 
in the closing stages, but missed 
two easy layups. Glenn Marshall, 
who left the team before the pre- 
vious game with Oklahoma State, 
was reinstated by Hartman in time 
to play against Iowa State. It was a 
Marshall missed layup that could 
have pulled them to within two 
points with 1:30 left, but Instead 
had the Cyclones come down court 
and get a six-point lead. 



Two more points — Glenn Charles Harris. K-State won the 

Marshall shoots over Iowa State 's game against the cyclones 73-63. 




Jan. 26- In the tightest and most 
emotional game of the year at 
Ahearn, K-State and Nebraska bat- 
tled into two overtimes before the 
Wildcats pulled it out 66-64 behind 
six straight free throws by Black- 
man in the second overtime. 

The score was tied at 26-all at 
halftime and 50-all at the end of 
regulation. Both teams scored four 
field goals in the first overtime, 
which was extended to a second 
overtime when Blackman blocked 
a shot by 'Husker guard Jack 
Moore as time ran out. 

"Close game, one heck of a bas- 
ketball game," Hartman said. "I 
kept thinking during those over- 
times and other situations that it 
was one great game, and Nebras- 
ka's coaches said they were think- 
ing the same thing. There were so 
many different kids on both teams 
who rose up and hit tremendous 
baskets." 



In addition to blocking four Ne- 
braska shots, Blackman paced the 
offense again with 24 points, 
helped by his 8-for-8 shooting at 
the free-throw line. 

Jankovich scored 14 points and 
Nealy and Wills added 10 each. 
Nealy also pulled down a game- 
high 12 rebounds. 

"With five minutes left in regula- 
tion, I really didn't think the game 
should have gone into overtime," 
Hartman said. (The Wildcats had 
built a six-point lead after Nealy hit 
two 19-foot jumpers, as K-State did 
not score in the last 4:42). 

"I hate to say that, but, it has to 
be recognized. We had a four-point 
lead and the ball. We made a cou- 
ple of very, very risky passes and 
Nebraska went down and convert- 
ed them." 

"With all that tension from start 
to finish it was a hellava game," 
Hartman said. 




Get out — Big 8 official Jim 
Bains dismisses a Nebraska player 
from the game during the semi- 



Feb. 20- The Wildcats did not fair so 
well up in Lincoln, as the Huskers 
took a 70-58 victory. The defeat 
was K-State's third straight giving 
them an 8-5 record and the Big 8 
title to Missouri, with one game 
left. 

Nebraska and K-State stayed 
close in the first half, similar to 
their game at Ahearn, before a late 
first half run by the 'Huskers giving 
an eight point lead to Nebraska at 
halftime. 



final round of the Big 8 
tournament in Kansas City. 



Andre Smith and Jack Moore 
hurt K-State the most, on both 
ends of the court. Smith, 6-7 cen- 
ter, scored and rebounded at will, 
while Moore, 5-9, used his small 
size to his advantage. 

Blackman had 18 points and 
Wills 15 rebounds and 14 points. 

Nebraska pulled into a tie for 
second with K-State with 8-5 re- 
cords heading into the final confer- 
ence game. 



196/Men's Basketball 



KSC1 73, ISO 63 
ISU 66, KSU 58 



KSU 66, NCI 64 
NCI 70, KSCI 58 




Strrretch — Dean Danner 
stretches around Missouri player 



Jon Sundvold to attempt to steal 
the ball for K-State. 



Missouri Tigers 



Jan. 30-The Wildcats ended the first 
half of the conference season in 
first place with a 6-1 record and 
two games ahead of Missouri. Mis- 
souri went on to win their last sev- 
en games, while K-State only won 
two of its last seven. 

In the first game in Columbia, K- 
State took a five point lead into the 
half, and hung on to win. 

Blackman took advantage of a 
mismatch, as freshman guard Jon 
Sundvold guarded him, to score 21 
points and score on quite a. few 
back-door plays, especially late in 
the game. 

Ed Nealy's two free throws with 
23 seconds left proved to be the 
game winners, as K-State held off a 
Missouri rally. 

The win put K-State at 6-1 and 
16-3 overall, after being ranked 
20th before the Missouri game. 

Feb. 23The Tigers avenged that 
loss with a 76-65 win at Ahearn in 
the last conference game, although 
Missouri had already locked up a 
Big 8 title going into the game. 

K-State was without starting for- 
ward Tyrone Adams for the fifth 
straight game, while Jankovich, 
having hurt his knee in the Nebras- 
ka game, was put on the injury list. 



KSO 66, MG 64 
MU 67, KSa 68 



Missouri was also hurting for 
players, as starting forward Curtis 
Berry strained his knee a week ear- 
lier. Berry's injury reduced the Ti- 
gers roster to eight players. 

The first half was fairly slow, 
with MU holding a 32-28 lead at the 
half. 

The second half saw Missouri 
build comfortable leads of six and 
seven, as the Wildcats had to score 
two baskets in the last ten seconds 
to cut the final margin to two. 

"We played hard and gave a good 
strong effort," Hartman said. "Mis- 
souri shot the ball awfully well and 
we had a good day shooting. They 
(MU) have been shooting the ball 
well all year, so you can't take any- 
thing away from what they did." 

Blackman led K-State with 18 
points. Freshman Les Craft played 
another steady game with 12 
points and 11 rebounds. 

The defeat was K-State's fourth 
straight, landing them into a tie 
with Nebraska at 8-6 for second 
place in the final conference stand- 
ings, three games behind Missouri. 

Their overall record stood at 18- 
8 going into the post-season tour- 
nament, as they drew Iowa State at 
home in the first-round. 



'Cats win Big 8 post season 



Feb. 26-For the fourth consecutive 
year, K-State won its first-round 
game at home in the post-season 
tournament, defeating Iowa State 
101-87. 

Iowa State, which finished at 5-9 
in the conference, stayed close 
with the Wildcats until they outs- 
cored the Cyclones 16-6 to take a 
32-22 lead. The score at halftlme 
was 39-26, which was widened to 
28 points for K-State at 66-38. 

Both teams scored at will after 
that, as Iowa State got the score 
down to 93-80 with 1:30 left. The 
101 points broke a post-season 
tournament record for the Wild- 
cats. 

"Boy! They really got after 'em," 
Hartman said. "I was happy for 
them, even more so that I was 
proud of them. We had been play- 
ing apprehensively. 

The defense really did a great 
job. We also did a great job of com- 
ing up with the ball and getting it 
down the floor." 

Blackman's 22 points paced the 
rout, while Wills was perfect from 
the field (nine for nine) scoring 18 
points and Nealy hit for 15 points. 

Beating Iowa State earned a trip 
to the semi-finals to play Nebraska 
at Kemper Arena in Kansas City. 

Feb. 29- With the game seemingly in 
Nebraska's hands, the Wildcats put 
K-State into the finals against Kan- 
sas, who upset Missouri in the oth- 



er semifinal game. 

A Blackman follow shot with 18 
seconds left gave K-State the win, 
but not before Blackman had to 
make sure the game was over when 
he blocked a last second shot. 

"I always make sure that I prac- 
tice following my shots," Blackman 
said. "I just made sure that I put 
the ball into the hoop without 
shooting it too hard." 

Held to one point in the first half, 
Blackman scored 15 in the second 
half, including the game winning 
points. 

Nealy kept K-State in the game 
early, as he hit all eight of his shots 
finishing with 20 points. 

March 1- With a trip to the NCAA 
tournament on the line, K-State did 
not fall, as they took command of 
the championship game with KU 
early and coasted for most of the 
second half. 

Three regulars who had done the 
job for most of the year-Blackman, 
Nealy and Wills combined for 63 
points, on the way to a 79-58 win 
and an extension of the season. All 
three players were chosen for the 
all-tournament team, along with 
Kansas' Darnell Valentine and Ne- 
braska's Jack Moore. 

K-State led 40-27 at the half and 
widened it to 61- 39 during the sec- 
ond half, as the Wildcats ran past 
KU into the NCAA tournament. M 




Wildcats earn tourney trip 



For the fifth time in Jack Hartman's ten years as basket- 
ball coach at K-State, he has taken the Wildcats to the 
N.C.A.A. tournament where they have eventually lost to 
the team which has gone on to the final four. 

The 1979-80 season was no exception, as the Wildcats 
won the Big 8 post-season tournament to earn a berth into 
the N.C.A.A. tournament, which was expanded to 48 teams 
for the first time. 

Drawing Arkansas, a 21-7 team which finished second in 
the Southwest Conference, was not expected to be a 
runaway. But K-State took advantage of a Arkansas slump 
midway through the second half and jumped out to a 20 
point lead, after going into the half ahead 27-21, in Lincoln, 
Neb. 

The defeat of 71-53 was coach Eddie Sutton's worst loss 
in his six year's at Arkansas, as his worst loss before the K- 
State game was 12 points. 



The victory put the Wildcats into a revenge match with 
the second-ranked Louisville Cardinals. 

Louisville, led by Ail-American senior guard Darrell Grif- 
fith, proved to be a formidable opponent as they sported a 
28-3 record and were a favorite to win the Midwest Region- 
al and go to the final four. 

K-State almost put a stop to Louisville's season, except 
an off-balance shot by reserve guard Tony Branch fell 
through the nets with only one second left in overtime. 

The Wildcats started the season with eight straight vic- 
tories and finished up the year with a 22-9 record, Hart- 
man's third best mark during his tenure at K-State. 

Hartman has led his team to three Big 8 Conference 
championships, while this year's team finished in second 
place for the fifth time. The Wildcats also won the Big 8 
post season tournament for the second time in its four 
year existence. HI 




BOTTOM ROW: John Stafford, John Scott. SEC- 
OND ROW: Glenn Marshall, Fred Barton, Tyrone 
Adams, Dean Danner, Eric Salter, Rolando Blackman, 
Manley Ray, Billy Lewis, Tim Jankovlch. TOP ROW: 
Jim Eads, Coach Jack Hartman, Jarl Wills, Les Craft, 
Greg Prudhoe, John Marx, Ed Nealy, Darryl Winston, 
Lon Kruger. 



Up for grabs — K-State 's Tim 
Jankovich tries to wrestle the ball 
away from an Arkansas Razorback 
player during an N.C.A.A. 
tournament game in Lincoln, Ne. 



Trophy — (right) Rolando 
Blackman holds an acquired game 
trophy of the win over KU in the 
post-season tournament. 



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tempera-cheer fans 



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What do Darnell Valentine, Larry 
Drew, Andre Smith, Terry 
Stotts and Jo Jo Hunter have in com- 
mon with K-State? They are all names 
that basketball fans love to hate. 



Nancy Reese 



In response to the introductions of 
these players, the response is some 
what short of enthusiasm. It's a lot 
closer to sarcasm. The fans respond: 
"So what." "Big deal." "Who cares." 
"Oh my." "WHO?" 

These responses only add to the 
magnltued of the noise during intro- 
ductions of K-State players. The 
crowd goes from loud, to louder, to 
loudest — and even louder yet until all 
five of the K-State starters are on the 
court. 

The "oldie but goodie" cheers seem 
to be the most popular. The fieldhouse 
is separated into four different sec- 
tions, each one yelling Kl, SI, Uf, Wild- 






♦ TV 







■U-f< 



f\ 










||:M'::'vj: 



cats!, in succession. 

The fans occasionally try to referee 
the game or take over a coaching job, 
as they yell directions out on the 
court. 

A bad call from the referee usually 
recalls a round of "boos" and "aws" 
from the crowd. If the calls are consis- 
tently wrong in the eyes of the fans, 
the referees are tormented with 
chants of "bullshit", or "go K-State 
beat the referee." 

When an opposing coach steps onto 
the playing court, the fans instruct: 
"sit down coach, sit down." 

A variety of chants may be heard 
when a foul occurs. If the foul is on the 
opponent, the yell is "you, you, you" 
and an accusing finger is pointed. Ij 
the 'Cats convert the first of a one ■ 
one situation, "one more time" rir 
the rafters. 

In conclusion, and when an opposl 
player has five fouls, the K-State ii 
wave bye-bye to the player. Mi 



sa 




Brrr-Fighting the chilling weather 
in January, students holding 
general admission tickets wait in 
line for front row seats. 

Grab that batl-KState fans 
watch as Darnell Valentine is 
stopped by Fred Barton and Jar! 
Wills. Ahearn Fieldhouse was fille 
to its capacity of 11,700 for the 
KU-K-State game. 




opinion 



All sports not created equal 

Women struggle, 
for equal share 

For K-State, it's quite simple. Either comply with Title IX 
or lose millions of dollars in federal financial aid — grants 
for research, student loans, scholarships and federal revenue 
sharing for capital improvements. 

It seems simple. Take basketball, for instance. Why not 
simply compare men's and women's basketball and make sure 
the budgets are equal? At K-State such a comparison would 
show the men spend $537,800 and the women spend 
$127,600. So why not increase the women's budget and 
make things square? 

It's not quite that easy. 

Men's basketball at K-State last year made $267,000. 
Women's basketball lost $67,000. 

If women's basketball consistently filled Ahearn Field 



Kent Gaston 



House, there would be no problem. It would make money 
and therefore equality would be a moot issue. 

Title IX is a law but its enforcement isn't as easy as writing 
out tickets or issuing warrants. 

No one seems to know what Title IX really means. 

Supporters of women's athletics at more than 90 
universities, including K-State, took a look at Title IX and 
their own programs and figured they were victims of 
discrimination. So, they filed complaints with HEW. 

HEW was supposed to take those complaints and write a 
concise, clear interpretation of Title IX which would make it 
easy to tell if schools were in compliance. It failed. 

Meanwhile, some athletic directors are getting nervous, 
because certain interpretations of Title IX could seriously 
cripple the money-making ability of men's sports. 

HEW could come up with a formula which determines how 
much each school spends on each male athlete, then make 
sure each woman gets the same amount of money. If football 
is included in such a formula, its high expenses could push 
the per-athlete figure quite high. Bringing the amount spent 
on each woman up to such a high figure would cost athletic 
departments big bucks. 

And that money would have to come from football and 
basketball. 

That kind of compliance is most painful to schools such as 
K-State, where the football budget is relatively small, 
compared to big spenders such as Nebraska and Oklahoma. 

At such football powers, the athletic department can 
determine it would take, say, $400,000 to bring women's 
programs to scratch with men's. No problem, just use football 
profits. It would take a little belt-tightening, but it could be 
done. 

At K-State it would take more than $200,000 to make 
things equal, and obtaining $200,000 is quite difficult. 




202/Title IX 




A tough, no-exceptions ruling by HEW could cause some 
non-revenue men's sports at K-State to be discontinued so 
that money could fund women's sports. 

Three hundred major college football powers formed a 
coalition to oppose a strict interpretation of Title IX. And, 
going even farther, 45 university presidents joined together to 
support a change making Title IX enforced on an institutional, 
not national, level. 

The institutional plan was drafted by Terry Sanford, 
president of Duke University. Sanford and his cronies have 
essentially said a national Title IX won't be fair because of 
the diversity of universities. 

Supporters of women's athletics are understandably ticked 
off about the Sanford proposal, because they don't trust 
institutions to comply on their own. That's why the complaints 
were filed in the first place. 

So this battle between the two immovable forces continues. 
They're all waiting for HEW to try to come up with an 
interpretation that will give women equal opportunity in 
college sports while retaining the money-making ability of 
men's sports. 

Congress has to provide reauthorization of funding of Title 
IX, or it will die in 1980. That means the guidelines have to 
be handed down soon or equality for women will be up to 
the universities again. 

What will probably happen is HEW will issue the new 
guidelines and carefully straddle the fence. Football programs 
will have to take cuts to upgrade women's programs, but 
things will never be totally equal, at least until women's sports 
capture enough interest to draw the big crowds and the big 
money. 

Although women have already waited a long time for a 
firm Title IX interpretation, it's important to realize that 
changes made by Title IX will not work overnight. A steady 
process of equalization will continue across the nation. 

Before K-State knows if it's in compliance, the Region VII 
office of HEW in Kansas City will take the new guidelines in 
hand and see if men and women have equal opportunity in 
such areas as publicity, medical facilities, practice facilities, 
equipment and so on. 

Some things may be changed immediately, but most will 
happen slowly and steadily. K-State has its own Title IX 
compliance plan and an athletic director, DeLoss Dodds, who 
is trying to support women's programs as much as possible. 
He will assuredly comply quickly with Title IX as soon as it is 
clarified. 

Patricia Harris, HEW secretary, is expected to issue general 
guidelines for Title IX soon. Harris will probably say that if 40 
percent of the school's athletes are women, they should get 
40 percent of the budget. 

Harris' idea circumvents most of the problems posed by 
big-time football, but the powers in men's sports will argue 
that percentages aren't fair, because recruiting blue-chip male 
athletes costs a lot more than recruiting female athletes. They 
want a greater percentage so they can battle the competition 
for high school stars. 

Such an interpretation will allow women's progress to 
continue, probably without causing any great inconvenience to 
men's athletics. 

If there is a major clash, however, women will probably 
lose. Anytime big money battles with principle, money 
usually wins. M 



Title IX/203 



'Cats perfect in Ahearn 



1 he Kansas State women's basketball team was coached by a 
different coacn for the first time since its beginning 11 years 
ago. Judy Akers resigned from her post as head coach after estab- 
lishing the program to one of the best in the country. 

The change to a new coach did not hurt the team as Lynn Hickey 
came in and led the Wildcats to a top twenty national ranking for 
most of the season and a place in the final 16 of the AIAW National 
Tournament. 

Hickey, a native of Welch, Oklahoma, came to K-State after being 
an assistant at the University of Oklahoma for one year. Before that 
she coached four years of high school girl's basketball in Missouri. 

After earning a spot in the final 16 of the AIAW tournament, re- 
state was defeated by the University of Tennessee (84-64) to end 
the Wildcat's season with a 26-9 record and a 13th place ranking in 
the final women's poll. 

The team was bolstered around the front line of Tammie Rom- 
stad, Eileen Feeney and Kim Price, in addition to the steady guard 
play of Gayla Williams and LeAnn Wilcox. 

Jeanne Daniels was the top reserve, playing at either guard or 
forward. Dee Weinreis, a semester transfer from New Mexico, 
added help on the front-line, after three players left the team early in 
the season. 

Angela Taylor, Betsy Sloan and Kari Jones rounded out the team, 
which was down to eight players heading into the AIAW tourna- 
ment. 

Daniels injured her knee against Central Missouri State in the title 
game of the Southern Division sub-regional in Pittsburg, Kan. Wein- 
reis was declared ineligible for any post-season play by the AIAW 
Rules and Eligibility Committee. The decision was made after they 
declared she had not participated in half of the total practices and 
games for the season. 



YOWWWWWWLHfar right) Dee 
Weinreis, transfer basketball 
player from New Mexico to K- 
State, cheers for the Wildcats, 
backed up by Kari Jones. 

Maintain- Coach Lynn Hickey 
offers some strategy to senior 
guard Jeanne Daniels. 

Anyone's ball-K-State's Tammie 
Romstad tries to get a hold of a 
loose ball in the game against 
Iowa State. 




Craig Chandler 




Hurriyet Aydoga 



204/Women's Basketball 






:-••■■ ".-'..'.; ■ ■ - ' 




Ahearn Perfect 



Five straight wins opened the season for K- State, highlighted by a 
first-place finish in the Lobo Tournament in Albuquerque, New 
Mexico. 

But the team suffered a blow in the first game of the season, when 
Wilcox reinjured her knee. Wilcox led the Wildcats in scoring with a 
15.5 average last year, as she had to sit out her sophomore year 
after surgery on her knee. 

Romstad, who also has had some problems with her knee, led the 
K-State in the Lobo Invitational Tournament with 55 points in the 
two games, making 34 points against Cal Poly-Pomona in the first 
game. 

The Wildcats returned home for the first time to face Wayland 
Baptist at Ahearn. K-State made its third straight win defeating 
Wayland Baptist 79-69, led by Romstad with 20 points. 

The following two games were victories over Nebraska and Colo- 
rado at Ahearn. In the win over Colorado, the Wildcats broke a 
school-record with 106 points, with Romstad scoring 25 points. 

Missouri stuck the Wildcats with their first loss of the season, 90- 
81 in Columbia. Romstad was ineffective due to foul trouble, while 
Daniels led the team with 31 points. 

K-State headed into 1980 with a 7-1 record after beating Oklaho- 
ma and Wyoming soundly at Ahearn. 

Next up was the Wichita State Shocker Invitational. The Wildcats 
made it to the championship game after beating Air Force and 
Illinois State. Their opponent was New Mexico, the same team they 
beat in the finals of the Lobo Invitational by five points. 

But this time, New Mexico defeated the Wildcats 68-57, as senior 
forward Feeney led K-State with 2-0 points. 

A three-game trip to the East Coast followed, with K-State win- 
ning two of the games. Eighth-ranked Rutgers beat the Wildcats 81- 
56 to start the trip, While K-State came back to defeat Fordham and 
Seton Hall, to put their record at 11-3 heading into the Big 8 
Tournament in Columbia, Mo. 

After beating Iowa State in the opening game, Missouri hit the 
Wildcats with another loss in the semifinals 81-76. K-State came 
back to beat Colorado 81-69 in the third place game. 

The KU Classic in Lawrence was next on the schedule. Eleventh 



Detour — LeAnne Wilcox forces a 
Drake player to change her route to 
the basket. 



ranked Cheyney State was a 68-51 victim in the first game, with 
sophomore forward Kim Price leading all scorers with 20 points. 

K-State and Kansas met up for the first time of the season in the 
title game. KU, ranked in the top twenty along with K-State all year, 
found the Wildcats number with a 85- 60 win. 

Two nights later, K-State reversed the decision with a 67-66 win 
over KU in Lawrence. Romstad scored the winning basket on a hook 
shot with ten seconds left, while she scored 23 points. 

Four straight home victories after that put the Wildcats at 19-5. 
The wins were posted over Wichita State, Drake, Missouri, and 
Minnesota, with the 69-60 win over MU the most impressive. 

Central Missouri State stopped K-State's five-game winning streak 
with a 79-73 win in Warrensburg, despite 24 points from Feeney. 

Two wins at home ended the Wildcats regular season. 

In the semifinals of the Southern Division sub-regional, after beat- 
ing Wichita State 73- 71 in the opener of the regional, K-State met 
again with KU. 

For the third straight time, K-State got by KU, this time by the 
score of 79-74, led by Feeney's 23 points. 

As did Missouri, Central Missouri State beat the Wildcats for the 
second time, as the Jennies ran over K-State 73-60. 

K-State took its second-place sub-regional finish into the Region 
VI Tournament in Des Moines, Iowa. 

The Wildcats got by Minnesota and Drake for the second time this 
season setting up another match with KU in the final of the tourna- 
ment. 

The Jayhawks overcame the stigma of three straight losses to K- 
State, with an 89-80 win. Both teams advanced to the AIAW Nation- 
al Championships. 

K-State drew an opening round game at Boston College. The 
Wildcats won 72-68, putting them into the final 16 of the tourna- 
ment. 

In a second-round game at Knoxville, Tenn., K-State played the 
second- ranked Volunteers and couldn't match up with them, ending 
a successful season in Hickey's inaugural year at K-State. 

Romstad, who has two years left, led K-State with a 19.6 scoring 
average and 9.6 rebound mark, as she started in every game. 

Feeney and Price joined Romstad in double figures with 13.5 and 
12.8 scoring averages for the season. Ml 




206/Women's Basketball 



baskefbaLL 




KSU 


78 


Cal. Poly Pomona 


lb 


KSU 


65 


New Mexico 


60 


KSU 


79 


Wayland Baptist 


69 


KSU 


90 


Nebraska 


75 


KSU 


106 


Colorado 


75 


ksu 


81 


MISSOURI 


90 


KSU 


96 


Oklahoma 


73 


KSU 


75 


Wyoming 


54 


KSU 


92 


Air Force 


52 


KSU 


72 


Illinois St. 


60 


ksu 


57 


NEW MEXICO 


68 


ksu 


56 


RUTGERS 


81 


KSU 


66 


Fordham 


64 


KSU 


66 


Seton Hall 


45 


KSU 


80 


Iowa State 


66 


ksu 


76 


MISSOURI 


81 


KSU 


81 


Colorado 


69 


KSU 


68 


Cheyney St. 


51 


ksu 


60 


KANSAS 


85 


KSU 


67 


Kansas 


66 


KSU 


73 


Wichita State 


53 




POSt- 


•season 




KSU 


73 


Wichita State 


71 


KSU 


79 


Kansas 


74 


ksu 


60 


C. MISSOURI 


73 


ksu 


80 


KANSAS 


89 


KSU 


72 


Boston College 


68 



Eyes on the ball — Jeanne 
Daniels chases Colorado's Anne 
Troyan, and as the 'Cats beat 
Colorado 106-75. 




BOTTOM ROW: Shannon Huffman, Eileen Feeney, 
Brenda Dutton, Tammle Romstad, Kim Price, Lori 
Coulter. TOP ROW: Coach Lynn Hkkey, Steve Sll- 
verberg. Gayla Williams, Michelle Campbell, Jeanne 
Daniels, Deborah Latting, LeAnn Wtlcox, Angle Tay- 
lor, Betsy Sloan, Andra Bartlett. 



Women's Basketball/207 



SPORT SHORTS 



Injuries wound season 



K-State's football squad was plagued 
by injuries during the 1979 season. By 
Nov. 6, 1 1 players had been out of the 
season permanently or at least for sever- 
al weeks. 

Tom Faerber, K-State's 205-pound 
middle linebacker started the season call- 
ing the defensive plays, but by mid sea- 
son he couldn't even remember them. 

Faerber suffered from a history of 
head injuries causing dizziness and amne- 
sia. K-State's leading tackier followed 
medical advice giving up football and 
went on to dentistry school. 

Kevin Stetler, a K-State defensive 
back, was involved in an accident on 
Oct. 5 while riding a motorcycle. Stetler 
was passing a car and as the car turned 
left the back bumper caught Stetler's 
leg. The following Sunday at Wesley 
Medical Center in Wichita the lower part 
of his left leg was amputated. 

K-State football continued to suffer 
when Eugene Goodlow quit the team on 
Oct. 3. The 6-1, 188-pounder was 
named last year's Big 8 Newcomer of 
the Year, averaging 28 yards per catch 
with receptions of 87, 68, 63, and 50 
yards. 



Computerized scoring-A new 

scoreboard is hoisted into place in 
KSU Stadium. The center was 
given to K-State. 



In the 1979 season, Goodlow had 
completed seven passes for 88 yards. 
Goodlow told coach Jim Dickey he had 
several things bothering him and had lost 
interest in football. 

Even though K-State football lost sev- 
eral players to injuries and Goodlow's 
quitting, Jim Dickey was named National 
Coach of the Week on Oct. 31. 

Dickey was later chosen to coach in 
the Blue-Gray game for seniors in Mont- 
gomery, Alabama. Dickey was the defen- 
sive coach for the Blue team. 

Despite the loss of several players, K- 
State fans viewed a new scoreboard 
when attending the Tulsa game on Oct. 
6. The scoreboard has a computer termi- 
nal for creating sequence messages and 
a screen of 50 inches for better visibility. 

The scoreboard was purchased and 
installed by Coors, Pizza Hut and Pepsi 
who have a permanent advertisement on 
the bottom of the board. 



Title IX results 
end discrimination 



After over a year of controversy, the 
Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare finally rendered a decision over 
a new policy prohibiting sex discrimina- 
tion in a federally funded educational 
program. 

The new policy included a provision 
that scholarship money be distributed 
proportionally between the number of 
male and female athletes. It also stated 
that similar benefits and services be pro- 
vided equally to both male and female 
athletes. 

Along with a new policy , a new wom- 
en's basketball coach was hired, Lynn 
Hickey. Hickey's winning seasons com- 
piled while coaching at Aurora and Reed 
Springs High Schools in Missouri contin- 
ued at K-State. 

The women's basketball team had a 
perfect homecourt record of 11-0, the 
first since 1971-72, when the 'Cats won 
all six home games. 

The women's basketball team ad- 
vanced to the AIAW Tournament, but 
was eliminated by Tennessee. The 'Cats 
finished the season with a 26-9 record. 

Eileen Feeny was a big part of that 



winning season. Feeny, a starting for- 
ward, claimed the title of all-time career 
scoring leader at K-State. 

Feeny passed the old record of 1,227 
points held by Janet Reusser in the sea- 
son's first game. She ended the season 
and her K-State career with 1,676 
points. 

Even with a new coach and Feeny's 
record the K-State women's basketball 
team did not escape some trouble. Its 
trouble came with the transfer of Dee 
Weinreis. 

Weinreis, a 6-2 forward, transferred 
to K-State from the University of New 
Mexico in early January. 

In accordance with the AIAW Ethics 
and Eligibility Committee coaches may 
not contact players, but players may 
contact coaches. Hickey said the appro- 
priate letter had been filed with the com- 
mittee and the athletic director of the 
University of New Mexico after she 
(Hickey) was contacted by Weinreis. 

Women transfers may play immedi- 
ately, but can't receive scholarships. 
Weinreis was allowed to play and will 
return to K-State in 1981. 



Snip, snip-Rolando Blackman 
cuts down the nets after a victory 
on March 1 which sent the 'Cats 
to the N.C.A.A. Tournament. 




Craig Chandler 



208/Sports Shorts 



Honors Won 



Although K-State had a winning basketball season 
and traveled to the NCAA Tournament, the team was 
not without scars. 

K-State's first athletic trainer, Laurence "Porky" 
Morgan, died on Feb. 7. Morgan had worked at K-State 
since 1951 and was honored in 1977 with the establish- 
ment of the Porky Morgan Scholarship Fund. 

The K-State men's basketball team wore a black 
shoulder band for the duration of the season in memory 
of Porky. 

After beating the University of Kansas to claim first in 
the Big 8 Tournament, K-State advanced to the NCAA 
Tournament. The 'Cats beat Arkansas, but were elimi- 
nated by Louisville. 

Louisville went on to face UCLA in the championship 
game winning 59-54. 

Individual K-State team members receiving honors 
included Rolando Blackman, Ed Nealy and Jari Wills 
who were all named to the Big 8 Tournament team. 
Blackman and Nealy were the only unanimous choices. 

Blackman was named Conference Player of the Year 
and the Big 8 MVP. Nealy broke the Big 8 record for 
consecutive field goals hitting 17 in a row. 

Mike Evans, former K-State guard, joined the pros. 
Evans earned a spot with the San Antonio Spurs as the 
team's fourth guard. Evans is used primarily to give the 
starters a rest, but of the first four games he averaged 
five to ten minutes of playing time. 



"Porky!"-After 29 years at K-State, Porky Mor- 
gan died on Feb. 7, 1980. The basketball team 
wore black shoulder bands in his memory. 





CONFERENCE 



Fans watch 'Cats play on new surface and honor opposing coach 




K-State basketball fans have always 
been supportive of their team, but in 
1980 they showed their appreciation of 
Big 8 basketball by giving Joe Cipriano, 
Nebraska's coach, a plaque on Feb. 20. 
The plaque required several hundred 
student's signatures on a petition and 



named Cipriano as K-State's most favor- 
ite opposing coach. 

K-State and their opponents played 
on a new floor installed in Oct. 1979. 
The maple basketball court rests about 
two inches above the old surface and 
cost $36,000. 



Controversy over the floor arose 
when students were denied use of the 
court. The floor was funded through stu- 
dent fees, but was used by students only 
during playoffs of intramural competi- 
tion. 



Facelift for Ahearn-Pieces of 

the $36,000 maple basketball 
court are assembled by members 
of the Ahearn Complex Crew in 
October. Controversy resulted 
when students were later denied 
use of the court. 



Sports Shorts/209 




210/Organizations 



highlights 

Cultural 



Organizations Sale- To 

promote membership and 
awareness of groups on campus, 
the Ac tivities Carnival is held in 
the fall in the Union. 




Union Mugging- Kathy Wiekert, 
sophomore in journalism, and 
Andi King, sophmore in secondary 
education, check out mugs 
displayed by the K-State Potters 
Guild. 



Sue Pfannmulier 



As an education in culture, culture-oriented 
groups conduct awareness weeks .... 212 



Honoraries 



Not just for the high GPAs, but also for the 
service-minded student 214 



Performance 

Some students on campus find the stage their 
interest whether in music or acting . . . 224 



Service 



To participate in special projects and special 
concerns, various service groups operate on 
campus 230 



Special Interests 



Dropping from planes or bouncing on broncs, 

students find people with common interests 

232 




XT -State is not just academically inclined. Despite its 

diversity, K-State also meets the human need of 

being with people of similar interests, skills and concerns. 

A variety of organizations have grouped on campus. 
Every fall an Activities Carnival is set up in the Union so 
that students can become aware of the organizations on 
campus. 

If a student likes to sing, play an instrument, rodeo, 
jump from planes, help others, act, or has an above 
average GPA etc., there is an organization on campus 
that will probably cover it. 



Organizations/21 1 




BOTTOM ROW: Doyoung Han, Eduardo G. Marzan, 
Enoch A. Salako, Christopher C, Lai. SECOND 
ROW: Esmatl Parsai, Somsak Srisontisuk, Abdelrah- 
man A. Abdelrahman, Sridhar V. Reddy, Mohamad 
Abu-Bakar. TOP ROW: John A. Kober, Firooz Bakh- 
tiari-Nejad. Terry B. Schroff, Abbar Aminmansour. 



BOTTOM ROW: Vinod K. Chaudhary, Letlcia X. 
Ross, Evangellna P. Novero, Iluminada P. Novero, 
Lydia V. Aseneta, Enriqueta Dulay, Rosalie E. Rocha, 
Teofilo A. Dulay. SECOND ROW: Hipollto C. Custo- 
dio, Ma Elizabeth Sto Domingo, Gary M. Paulsen, Fely 
E. Gonzales, J.V. Dela Cruz, Ed G. Marzan, Elpy J. 
Agbisit, Manuel D. Rocha. TOP ROW: Efren E. Gon- 
zales, Jake M. Sto Domingo, Mario V. Perilla, Tereso 
A. Abella, Esterlina S. Olan, Bert T. Masbang, Roel F. 
Campos, Romeo L. Saplaco. 



BOTTOM ROW: Shim-Lae Lee, Kun-Sook 1m, Moon- 
han Chang, Dongil Chang. SECOND ROW: Kyung- 
Kyoo Park, Yong-Hyun Lee, Myoung Ho Lee, Hye 
Suk Han, THIRD ROW: Nam Hwan Oh, Heang Sup 
Lee, Nam In Kim, Doyoung Han. TOP ROW: Jakang 
Ku, Hee Mock Noh, Jong Seong Im, Ryu Byung Seo. 



BOTTOM ROW: Paula Lopez, Teresa Auillen, Toni 
Jasso, Connie Ochoa, Leticia Tapia. SECOND ROW: 
Anna Lopez, Karen Jaramillo, Lawrence Rosales, 
John Barrera. TOP ROW: Mike Barrera, Antonio 
Matos, David Servano. 



BOTTOM ROW: Muhammed G. Umar, Joshua Atu, 
Abdu Ayuba Kasimu, M.Z. Abdullahi, Ibrahim Altmea, 
Baca S. Abubakar, Emoch A. Salako, Umaru N. Gu- 
mel, Muhtari Garba, Abdul-malric Aliyu, Emmanuel 
Yusuf. SECOND ROW: Augustine A. Bula, Attahiru 
A. Aliero, Jlmoh O. Yusuf, Alfred L. Barshep, Siman 
K. Manzo, Joseph A. Ofcuoli, Elizabeth Abashe, Ju- 
lianah L. Olorunfemi, Mrs. Philomena Manzo, Joseph 
J. Tule, Reuben A. Mannek. THIRD ROW: Gwamia 
A. Umaru, Corenelius Datok, Ishaku A. Dauda, idibia 
M. Agbo, James D. Haruna, Margaret A. Gu/an, Lydia 
Fan, Bamidele Solomon, James Davou, John I. 
Nongo. TOP ROW: Isaiah A. Bajah, Mudl A. Wuyo, 
Isa Ismaila, Haruna Hbubalcak, Gana Lawan, J.N 
Hassan, Alhaji M. Danyaro, Iliya I. Amagon, Abducica- 
dir M. Fagge, Sani B. Tukur, Datyop P. Lang. 



Cultural 

Special 

i\ wareness is defined by Webster's 
^^ dictionary as knowing, realizing 
and being conscious. Two such groups 
seeking such attention were the Native 
Americans and the international students 
on campus. 

Both groups have dedicated a week 
each year to bring about a more aware 
community and campus. 

An annual event every April, Jeannie 
Sandoval, senior in animal science, said 
the main purpose of Indian Awareness 
Week was simply to increase the aware- 
ness of the present day Indian in today's 
society. 

To further awareness, ceremonial 
dances, speakers, artists and free films 
were provided to K-State students dur- 
ing Indian Awareness Week. 

Sandoval said guest speakers are gen- 
erally from the surrounding universities. 
The K-State Indian awareness group 
keeps in contact with Haskell Indian Ju- 
nior College in Lawrence, Wichita State 
University, the University of Kansas and 
Washburn University. They also work 
with the Pottawatomie and Kickapoo 
reservations who help the K-State group 
coordinate pow-wows. 

Also during Indian Awareness Week 
visiting artists display their work at the 
Union during the week. During the 1979 
session an artist created pottery while 
students watched. 

Frequently the free movies are educa- 
tional, but in order to draw crowds, San- 
doval said that last year "Winter Hawk" 
was shown. 

Ibibio-Mary Mbosowo, graduate 
in French, performs the Ibibio, a 
Nigerian folk dance, during the 
international fashion and variety 
show on April 6, 1979 at the 
Union Little Theater. 




Dave Kaup 



g|tiPf«i*W» 



weeks expose cultures 



Jill McAntee 



Membership to the group is open to 
all students. Sandoval said about 70 reg- 
ister as Native Americans and 15 as Ang- 
los. 

International students also strived to 
make people more aware of foreign stu- 
dents cultures. An International Week 
was held from March 30 to April 7, 1979 
based on a theme to end world hunger. 

J. Allan Brettel, International Student 
Center adviser, said cultural exhibitions, 
culture shows, film and slide presenta- 
tions comprised the basis for the week. 

March 30 was named African night. A 
documentary film demonstrated the lack 
of food supply and hunger in Africa. 

The following day a field trip to Pow- 
er's Farm gave international students a 
look at irrigation techniques and farming 
innovations. 

On April 2, a film by John Denver "I 
Want to Live" further emphasized the 
need to help the less developed coun- 
tries. 

Film and slide shows, along with cul- 
tural exhibits were displayed in the 
Union Courtyard April 3-4. 

In conjunction with the International 
Year of the child, April 5 was declared 



Home Economics Day. Dishes, dresses 
and costumes were on display in Justin 
Hall. 

A seminar on self-sufficient agricultur- 
al systems for rural areas was held on 
April 6. The seminar, conducted by Roy 
Posterman, was again directed toward 
awareness of world hunger. 

An international exhibition soccer 
game between K-State and Fort Hays 
State University was held April 7. K- 
State beat Fort Hays 5-1. A potluck din- 
ner followed the game at CiCo Park.|j| 



Craftsman-Nathan Begaye, a 
Navajo-Hopi potter from Arizona, 
practices his craft in the K-State 
Union as part of Indian Awareness 
Week sponsored by the Native 
American Indian Student Boyd. 

International Coordinatlon-A 

soccer goal is carried from KSU 
stadium after a soccer match 
between K-State and Fort Hays 
international students. The game 
resulted in a 5-1 K-State win. The 
activity was a part of International 
Week. 




ffr?2K 



Dave Kaup 




Dave Kaup 

Awareness Weeks/213 




BOTTOM ROW: James D. Griffin, Steven C. 
Moser, Jay Selanders, Roger A, Bradley, Guy H. 
Palmer- SECOND BOW: Greg L. Musll, Deborah 
J. Anderson, Richard A. McKee, Kathie S. Wei- 
gand, Alan C. Sobba. TOP ROW: William M. 
Pfeffer, Marlesa A. Roney, Cheryl A. Sales, Pamela 
J. Nicklaus, Roger D. Page. 



BOTTOM ROW: Timothy G. Beames, Steven J. 
Handke, tarry G. Garten, Ronald M. Kefpe. SEC- 
OND ROW: David D. Rock, Party A. Ellis, Shirley 
E. Bruey, Barbara A. McGuire, Carol A. Mugler, 
Gregory W. McClure. THIRD ROW: Annette M. 
Myers, Elaine M. Melton, Ann K. Jorns, Tina C. 
Dahl, Susan C. Hamilton. TOP ROW: Emma 1. 
Ellis, Carol C. Huneycutt, Beth A. Ripple, Lisa L. 
Moore, Susan A. Paul, Linda J. Kassebaum. 



BOTTOM ROW: Clifford G. Gilbert, Cindy L. 
Chapman, Steven D. Hunt, Amy J. Pritchett, Mike 
L. Hildebrand, Diane H. Sorensen. SECOND 
ROW: Joseph E. Beuerlein, Cathy A. Rohleder, 
Scott M. Poland, Jennifer L. Beardsiey. THIRD 
ROW: Stephen E. Hentges, B.J. Arehart, Bill Llp- 
pold, Lynda J. Heckelmann, Marlyn E. Spare, Karia 
A. Hefty. TOP ROW: Patrick L. Clark, Elaine M. 
Bertels, A. Duane Webber, Pamela S. Dlabal, Todd 
W. Smith, Kathleen M. Cott, Greg A. Trempy. 



BOTTOM ROW: Laurie J. Gregg, Michael H. Mas- 
ters, Mark A. Knoll, Robert J. McCully, Michael E. 
Brown, Debbie E. Dietrich, Linda S. Rhine, Joan E. 
Morton. SECOND ROW: David R. Lippe, Teri L. 
Bortz, Stacey D. Gish, Carla J. Blickenstaff, Joan M. 
Minneman,' Cindy L. Ferguson, Pam R. Jorns, Re- 
becca A. Wagner. THIRD ROW: Deana C. For- 
syth, Mike A. Mueller, Donna L. Wittum, Marca L. 
Wendelburg, Mike N. Anderson, Natalie G. Haag, 
Teresa R. Schemper, TOP ROW: Lisa D. Wulf- 
kuhle, Pamela A. Bell, Karen E. Kluge, Sandy K. 
Evans, Susan M. Flemming, Brenda F. Hundley, 
Kimber L.A. Williams, Sherl B. Bolte, Nancy G. 
Owsley, 



BOTTOM HOW: Patricia C. Crews, Janice M. Ah- 
nen, Jacquelyn E. Hubert, Diane M. Dalton, Pattl A. 
Beaudet. SECOND ROW: Brenda L. Meyer, Julie 
A. Horsch, Cherl L. Rolph, Ellen K. Forsberg, De- 
braL. Mueller. THIRD ROW: Sheila D. Hecht, 
Shelly D. Clark, Patricia S. Karlin, Eleanor. J. 
Spttzer, Lise K, Butler. TOP ROW: Marilyn A. 
deJesus, Patricia K. Schlegel, Lisa M. Skoch, Marcy 
A. Hurley, Polly S. Robinson, Laurie J. Gregg. 





Freshman Honorary: Alpha Lambda Delta 



Sue Pfannmuller 

Triumph-Receiving congratulations 
and a hug from a friend, Tina Dahl, 
senior in accounting, was named 1979 
Homecoming Ambassador to K-State. 
Dahl is also a member of Mortar 
Board, a senior honorary. 




More than just GPA 



• • 



Honoraries/215 



Honoraries 





Agricultural Education Honorary: Alpha Tau Alpha 



BOTTOM HOW: Kerri Willis, Dena Isackson, Robin 
Randall, Lynne Klrlakos, Susan Paul. SECOND 
ROW: Sandy Riggs, Chris Kaufmann, Crystal Chubb, 
Mike Richard. THIRD ROW: Kathy R. Gromer, Ed- 
gar T. Dean, Caren Coe, Glenn Boyd. TOP ROW: 
Indhu C. Paramesh, Gregory Gibson, Clark Ruttlnger, 
Brian Horsch, Ross Vines. 



BOTTOM ROW: Michael Ring, Chuck Schmidt, Pat 
VenJohn, Jack Undqulst, Wayne DeWerff. SECOND 
ROW: Bill Nochreiner, Chris Mackey, Dale Brown, 
Merlyn A. Spare, John Marrs. THIRD ROW: Ron S. 
Dltmars, Norman T. Prather, Larry G. Garten, Bob E. 
Green, Dale G. Unruh. TOP ROW: James J. Al- 
bracht, Kevin Gleason, Sandra L. Hundley, Sheryl L. 
Neblock, Michelle Bender, Allen D. McColm, Dwight 
R. Wedel. 



BOTTOM ROW: Steven D. Hunt, Gregory Nolting, 
Randall D. Tosh, Ronald A. Schierer, John R. Greath- 
ouse, James C, Pringle. SECOND ROW: Richard A. 
McKee, Steve J. Handke, Glen E, Snider, Leon E. 
Heinen, Charles D. Hurley, Bradley D. Fuller, Stan 
Llnville, Gerald D. Sharp, Greg F. Kretz, Rhonda R. 
Janke. THIRD ROW: Clyde A. Burchett, Joseph E. 
Beuerlein, Allen K. Sample, Juan S. Torres, Max C. 
Engler, Gregory W, McClure, Rick J. Lewandonskl, 
Chris H. Johnson, Charlotte Clack. TOP ROW: Jan- 
ine E. Trempy, Belinda J. Mason, Cassandra C. Bur- 
chett, Wanda Y. Trent, Laura L. Stack, Susan C. 
Wunderlich, Evan Thiessen, Connie Jo Wells, Robin J. 
Taggart, John W. George. 



BOTTOM ROW: John K. Llppman, Stephen R. Ste 
phens, Daniel W. Hermesch, Scott D. Walker, Dale G 
Unruh, Alan C. Sobba, Dale L. Bastin, Rolla W. Goo 
dyear. SECOND ROW: Carol A. Kamps, David D 
Rock, Roger D. Page, Gregory D. Claassen, Kris Abra 
hamson, John D. Lagemann, Kathryn L. Strecker, Neil 
E. McNeill, Jeffrey J. Zllllnger. THIRD ROW: Pamela 
S. Dlabal, Beverly J. Wofford, Linda J. Hlckok, Jane 
C. Wolters, Malia J. Welde, Katherina A. Kotoyantz, 
Kimbra E. Llndburg, Randall J. Anderes, Betty A. 
Harrison. TOP ROW: Becky A. Vinlng, Susan J. 
Klnsler, Elizabeth L. Phelan, Sandra L. Hundley, 
Sheryl L. Neblock, Gena E. Courier, Paula J. Flynn, 
Eileen M. Eggleston, Lelann Held, Ruth E. Biesenthal. 






Blue 



Dlue Key. 

National Honor Fraternity. 

56 years old. 

80,000 members since 1924. 

141 chapters scattered through- 
out the United States. 

Enhances higher education. 

Fosters leadership, service and 
ethics. 

The elements comprising one of 
K-State's senior honoraries require 
more than just a high GPA. Criteria 
for Blue Key includes being a senior 
in the upper 25 percent of the class. 
But the most important aspect of 
being in Blue Key is a strong charac- 
ter and desire to serve fellow stu- 
dents. 

Blue Key's 17 members meet ev- 
ery Monday at 8 p.m. to discuss the 



216/Blue Key 




Key serves 



Craig Chandler 



Jill McAntee 



variety of projects and activities 
they sponsor. 

Every year Blue Key choooses a 
problem area that it attempts to 
help students deal with. This year 
Blue Key members changed from a 
rape prevention campaign to stress 
management. 

"We had hit most of the living 
groups and didn't want the subject 
to get old," Roger Bradley, senior in 
veterinary medicine, said. 

The change from rape prevention 
to stress management is supported 
by Roger Page, senior in agricultural 
economics and agricultural educa- 
tion, "We'd been around and felt 



rape prevention had been covered 
and it was time to change." 

The stress program is under su- 
pervision of the mental health unit 
at Lafene. "We show a film and 
then discuss how to cope with 
stress," Pam Nicklaus, senior in pre- 
medicine, said. 

"Basically everybody is under 
stress. A lot of college students are 
under severe stress. The film shows 
coping mechanisms to help diminish 
the pressure a person may be feel- 
ing. 

"There are also all kinds of stress 
and how much stress a person is 
experiencing varies," Page said. 

Among the most difficult crises to 
adapt to is death. Divorce, martial 
separations, health, sexual difficul- 



Rich 'n GooeyKelly Koeller, 
freshman in pre-design profession, 
snarfs an ice cream cone from the 
hand of Lorie Lindenmuth, 
sophomore in accounting, during 
the ice cream eating contest. The 
team competition was part of the 
activities Blue Key organized for 
Homecoming. 



ties and beginning or ending school 
can cause several different types of 
stress. 

Blue Key's program helps stu- 
dents not only recognize their indi- 
vidual stress levels, but more impor- 
tantly suggests ways to cope with 
stress, Page said. 

"Blocking out the problem works 
temporarily. Walks, singing, relying 
on another person, talking, working 
off anger or recreation can help re- 
lease tension," Page said, continued 



Blue Key/217 




BOTTOM ROW: P.J. McSwegin, Kathy Edwards, 
Janet Cockerill, Lynne Swaney, Debbie McDaniel, 
Amy L. Thrutchley. SECOND HOW: Catherine A. 
Peterson, Betty Zeka, Tina Brown, Leslie McGinnis, 
Becky Massey, Miriam Poole. THIRD ROW: Mary A. 
McElroy, Felene E. Frink, Cindy M. Smith, Becky J. 
Johnson, Vickey L. Gay, Nancy A. Duffin, Susan K. 
Haas. TOP ROW: Andra L. Bartlett, Karla K. Stod- 
dard, Dana D. Stephan, Pamela J. Davis, Kari L. 
Knamiller, Marcia L. Barnes. 



BOTTOM ROW: Rolf O. Chappell, Tim A. Hereh, 
Michael E. Johnston, Anthony J. Stueve. SECOND 
ROW: Mark E. Vittetoe, Carl A. Cameron, Phillip G. 
Rarick, Vernon J. Hoobler, Darrell T. Conerly. TOP 
ROW: John F. Gerald, Nedrick J. Price, Ray D. Lem- 
on, John E. Strickler, Dana E. Brown, 



BOTTOM ROW: Steven L. Boeh, Elizabeth M. Caru- 
so, Kaylene Callteux, Cynthia Redburn. SECOND 
ROW: Joel Ungles, Scott Steele, G. Wayne Whaley, 
Jennie Benson, Lex Chang. THIRD ROW: Jeffrey B. 
Carra, Curtis H. Hathcock, Ted Cranford, Donald W. 
Lee. TOP ROW: John W. Marietta, Charles R. Hltt, 
John Karplscak III, Joanna Page. 



BOTTOM ROW: Janet K. Riedel, Jan K. Peterson, 
Susan B. Haynes. TOP ROW: Shannon K. Hall, Nan- 
cy L. Crlss, Karen S. Sedlacek, Laury J. Murray. 



BOTTOM ROW: Harvey E. Marken, Tom E. 
Schwartz, David K. Seymour. SECOND ROW: Don 
G. Hess, Elton C. Griffin, Mike Ford. TOP BOW: 
Michael J. Stewart, Larry K. Ballou, Gregg L. Noel, 
Daniel T. Cosgrove. 



Honoraries 
More than GPA 

Page expanded on exactly how the 
program works, "We show the film to 
various living groups; dorms, sororities, 
fraternities. They're told to look for cop- 
ing mechanisms people exhibit during 
the film. Each time you watch it, you 
pick up more mechanisms." 

According to Bradley the student re- 
action has been good. Role playing is 
encouraged and a flyer listing coping 
mechanisms is left with each living group 
to emphasize the main points of the film. 

Every year Blue Key also offers schol- 
arships. The $2,000 was divided among 
six scholarships which were awarded in 
1980. Ranging from creativity awards, 
to leadership, to activities and honors, 
Blue Key scholarships may be given to 
any student attending K-State, according 
to Kathie Weigand, senior in physical 
therapy. 

Depending on the scholarship, stu- 
dents must submit a written application 
and possibly a personal interview is con- 
ducted. Students may be nominated by 
the deans of all colleges and the depart- 
ment heads in Arts and Sciences or may 
nominate themselves. 

Another one of Blue Key's major con- 
tributions to the students is organizing 
Homecoming. Stuff the Union Day, the 
ambassador contest, the crazy competi- 
tion between living groups and painting 
the windows in Aggieville and downtown 
Manhattan with various slogans are all 
Blue Key's responsibility. 

Working at registration, either pulling 
fee cards or collecting fees, is another 
project Blue Key undertakes. 

Blue Key also ushers the Landon Lec- 
tures and university convocations. "We 
help the flow of traffic. We keep certain 
areas moving and other areas roped 
off," Bradley said. 

Blue Key? ^^ 

More than just a high GPA Ml 




Men's Physical Education Honorary: Phi Epsilon Kappa f- 



f / 



■Hi/:-'. '.TK' .■.'.#'•'■« 





Hanging Around-Students watch 
as the K-State Jazz Band performs 
in the Union during Homecoming 
week. 

I'm donel-After an incomplete 
schedule assignment, Susan 
Alejos, frshman, completes 
Drop/ Add as Ernia Gobber checks 
her print-out form. 



Tim Costello 



Blue Key/219 



Honoraries 




BOTTOM ROW: Paul A. Winterman, Hermina 
Khalil, Marti Grady, Eldred D. Wenger, Don R. 
Saxton, Steve L. Fisher. SECOND ROW: John A. 
Kober, Lavern F. Kinderknecht, Kathleen J. Little, 
John H. Mullen, Randall D. Shideler, Carter R. 
Holladay, Michael A. Duncan, THIRD ROW: Jane 
B. Stockard, Alison B. Mantel, Laura M. Dougan, 
Carla J. Cole, Eddie V. Lawson, Michael R. Doran, 
Vlcki L. Hudson, Thomas R. Manwarren. TOP 
ROW: Cathy G. Hougland, Janelle M. Poppe, Deb- 
orah K, Mouser, Lorl J. Steinmetz, Elizabeth A. 
Shrack, Kay A. Klenke, Margaret R. Hill, Elizabeth 
A. Ranallo, Susan L. Dederick. 



BOTTOM ROW: Mickey J. Parker, Barry E. Rob- 
inson, Kathleen M. Teahan, Alan J. Ford, Joel M. 
Marshall. SECOND ROW: Greg J. Mermis, Stanley 
D. Biggs, Grant D. White, Gregory M. Henne, Phil- 
lip K. Osborn, A. Duane Webber. THIRD ROW: 
Perry E. Winter, Keith A. Ehrlich, Paul J. Robben, 
Eugene C. Mallon, Tom Reichert, Albert Clark III, 
Ray Z. Letourneau Jr. TOP ROW: Margaret L. 
Lobmeyer, Jennifer L. Goldsmith, Missy A. Rausch, 
Janet M. Straub, Reva E, King, Dinae M. Brown, 
Jayne Elnsel. 



BOTTOM ROW: Joan E. Stammer, Larry M. 
Strecker, David L. Barthuly. J. J. Smaltz. SECOND 
ROW: Brad A. Kramer, Susan J. Galyardt, Wayne 
R. Wild, Mark A. Zeorlin. TOP ROW: Catherine A. 
Sabatka, Mary K. Konz, Frank P. Hwang, Mitsushi 
Mori. 



BOTTOM ROW: Joseph Eng, Elizabeth M. Hun- 
ing, John N. Palma, David W. Naylor, Kathy Per- 
kins, Danial J. Stecklein. SECOND ROW: Bryan 
W. Reinecke, Robert C. Dusin, Jay A. Hathaway, 
John M. Cater, James A. Coen, Kerry L. Black. 
TOP ROW: Albert N. Tharnish, Jay N. Hutchison, 
Micnael W. Berry, Pratt Barndollar, Patrick S. Oli- 
ver, Gene K. Atkinson, Michael Scully. 



The 




220/Spurs 



group behind the scenes 




IJver wonder who stopped your car 

*"* at eleventh and Moro to let the 
Homecoming parade pass by? 

Or who sponsored the bloodmobile 
when you about fainted after donating a 
pint? 

What about those people running 
around on campus in blue suits every 
Tuesday? 

If you've ever become the least bit 
curious about who or what this strange 
phenomenon is-you've found the an- 
swer; Spurs. 

Spurs is a national sophomore honor- 
ary and K-State's chapter consists of 34 
members. Their motto "At Your Ser- 
vice" represents their participation in 
campus and community activities. 

During Homecoming, Spurs guarded 
intersections to clear a pathway for the 
parade. Spurs also helped make posters 
advertising Homecoming events. 

Working at the Bloodmobile and regis- 
tration are also projects Spurs under- 
takes. 

According to Cindy Ferguson, sopho- 
more in business, working at the blood- 
mobile involves signing up people for 
appointments and then escorting the 
blood donaters to the correct rooms be- 
fore and after donating blood. 

Registration, Ferguson adds, requires 

Slow Motion-Mauled by the long 
endless lines, students trudge 
through registration to dutifully 
pay the $348 fees. 



Jill McAntee 



ten to twelve people working everyday 
either checking ID's or pulling fee cards. 
The money earned is then placed in the 
Spurs treasury and used for other activi- 
ties. 

In the past, Spurs raised money for 
the Big Lake Development Project. 
Money for this program built a develop- 
ment center for the physically and men- 
tally handicapped. 

"Spurs is a national organization, but 
divided into eleven regions. We are in 
region eleven which is divided in six 
chapters. This year we hosted the re- 
gional convention (Sept. 28-30) and re- 
presentatives from each of the schools 
came," Ferguson said. 

The six chapters include: Butler Uni- 
versity in Indianapolis, Emporia State 
University, K-State, Fort Hays State Uni- 
versity, Kearny University in Kearny, 
Neb. and Wichita State University. 

"In preparation for the convention, 
we appointed chapter members to four 
committees: housing, registration, pro- 
gramming and food. People in each of 
these committees organized their area," 
said Ferguson. 

continued 



Spurs/221 




fH 3 Bit 

Senior Engineering Honorary: Steelring 




Home Economic Honorary: Phi Upsilon Omicron 




BOTTOM ROW: Chuck O'Brien, Roger Commer, 
Armon Pfeifer, Bill Meeker, Craig Eilers, Terry Ellis. 
SECOND ROW: Bert Esfeld, Chris Niemann, Mark 
Nyquist, Linda Barnett, Brandon McMullen. THIRD 
ROW: Steve Bowman, Kurtis Sjogren, Don Foster, 
James Goddard, Jane Yarbrough, Kent McCon- 
aughey. TOP ROW: Richard M. Kuhn, Stan C. Kiser, 
Marc A. Thompson, Norman R. Brasher. 



BOTTOM ROW: Page Puckett, Catherine Sabatka, 
Malinda K. Fox, Nadalte S. Bosse. SECOND ROW: 
Margaret Hein, Ed Smalley, Darryl Drayon, Norman 
Brasher. THIRD ROW: Pam Kukuk, Mark Boguski, 
Steve Moser. TOP ROW: Glenn C. Wood, Michael W. 
Berry, Lyle J. Cain. 



BOTTOM ROW: Bronwen L. Rees, Stephanie L Da 
vis, Carolyn D. Blrkman, Judy A. Spiegel, Faye J 
Carlson, Karen S. Closson, Susan D. Zimmerson, Mary 
K. Voet, Cheryl A. Murray, Terri J. Teichmann, Deb- 
bie S. Blume, Jane! D. Waisner; Jocite M. Arnoldy. 
SECOND ROW: Patricia A. Dillon, Elaine M. Reh, 
Barb A. Eoff, Cheryl D. Doyle, Rhonda L. Clutter 
Monica M. Klenda, Bernadette J. Pachta, Julie A 
Dugan, Susan M. Donnelly, Karen B. Wilson, Jan M 
Robben, Robin L. McNaughton. THIRD ROW: San 
dra K. Harper, Dlann G. Tucker, Janeen K. Strahm 
Mary M. Montgomery, Charlotte J, Appl, Susan A 
May, Jean M. Loop, Cheryl A. Sales, Lynda S. Bass, 
Nancy K. Shelley, Debra J. Albright, Eileen M. Do- 
herty, Jane E. Adams, Melissa A. Deffenbaugh. TOP 
ROW: Mary Jo Lill, Marilyn J. Domann, Lisa C. Annis, 
Lorl A. Scheuerman, Julie A. Reed, Anne K. Schmitz, 
Sara A, Synder, Lore L. Redd, Karen E. Rodefeld, 
Mary T, Ice, Nancy A. Wooten, Jennifer L. Beardsley, 
Deborah A. Snider. 



BOTTOM ROW: Karen S. Closson, Faye J. Carlson, 
Susan D. Zimmerson, Linda 1. Will, Rita A. Werly. 
SECOND ROW: Linda C. Griffin, Marsha K. Healy, 
Nadine J. Streit, Cheryl A. Sales, Emily J. Blakeslee, 
Debra S. Blume. THIRD ROW: Lisa L. Moore, 
Cherie A. McCracken, Ann K. Jorns, Jolene S. Neu- 
feld, Colleen B. Crow, Sara A. Snyder, Annette M. 
Myers. TOP ROW: Patricia A. Dillon, Mellnda K. 
Harbison, Cheryl D. Doyle, Tina R. Martin, Emma J. 
Ellis, Catherine A. Comeau, Kathy E. Burton, Rose E. 
Ellert. 



Honoraries 



Behind The Scenes 

According to Ferguson, the purpose 
of the regional convention was to in- 
crease awareness of Spurs. 

Renee Wald, secretary-treasurer of 
the executive board, headed the conven- 
tion. Wald suggested that patches and 
handbooks be distributed to aid in recog- 
nition of the organization. 

"We had speakers all day Saturday 
for workshops. They talked about study 
habits and how to apply them to our own 
situations," Debbie Dietrich, sophomore 
in journalism and English, said. 

By comparing chapters, members 
were able to improve each chapter. Offi- 




cers discussed the chapter projects and 
new activities spurs Chapters have 
organized, according to Ferguson. 

"We shared and traded ideas to get a 
fresh outlook," Dietrich said. 

A banquet held at the Union ended 
Saturday's meetings. Pat Boscoe, assis- 
tant dean of student development, was 
chosen as the speaker. 

"We chose Pat Boscoe because he is 
known for his talks on leadership. He 
aimed his speech towards Spurs and told 
us to reach out to people," Dietrich said. 

One member of both the 1979 and 
1980 Spurs will be chosen to attend the 
national convention held July, 1980 in 
New Mexico. The theme there will em- 
phasize expansion of future Spurs chap- 
ters, m 




Dave Kaup 




True Grip-Holding her student 
I.D. in her mouth, Laura 
Smallwood, graduate in animal 
science, pays tuition and fees 
during registration. 

Chitty Bang Bang-The 1979 
Homecoming parade follows the 
Grand Marshall through Aggieville. 
Spurs' members guarded the 
intersections providing the parade 
with a clear pathway. 



Sue Pfannmuller 



Spurs/223 




1 



f". 



VIOLIN I: Doris Powers, Becky Schubert, Tom Gui- 
terrez, Louis Pigno, Lyndal Nyberg, Abigail Slddall. 
VIOUN H: Marsha Curtis, Rebecca Gutierrez, Karen 
Hajlnian, Roxle Fundis, Cathy Cunningham, Shelly 
Manges. VIOLA: Richard Brunner, Janet Riedel, Wal- 
ter Temme, Melanie Shand, Becky Sawyer, Holly 
Grey. CELLO: Peter Criss. Jeff Wright, Sheldon 
Lentz, Linda Murphy, Susan Linder, Cheryl Glahn. 
BASS: Randall Wllkens, Chris Banner, Kathy Urban. 
FLUTE: Laurel Brunken, Karla Steinberg, Susan Coo- 
per, Meg Beeler, Shannon Hall. OBOE: Laury Mur- 
ray, Melissa Leech. CLARINET: Susan Treiber, Deb 
Barner. BASSOON: Sara Jane Borst, Chris Towle, 
Nancy Calhoun. HORN: Bernard Buster, Rene Boat- 
man, Laddl Ollphant. TRUMPET: Eric Sutton, Frosty 
Lawson, Craig Shadday, TROMBONE: Randy Crow, 
Dennis Clason, Gilbert Chauza. TUBA: Jim Seeber. 
HARP: Florence Schwab. PERCUSSION: Charles 
Bey, Mike Rogers. 



BOTTOM ROW: BUI Uppold, Steve Kline, John 
Crawford, Dan Stark, Kirk Wlesner, Steve Schulte, 
Jeff Peckham, John Garetson, Mike Unruh, Rolf 
Chappell, Dean Hayse, Daryl Sales. SECOND ROW: 
Terry Schroff, Ron Alkins, Roger Aeschliman, Keith 
Collett, Joe Weber, Stuart Carson, Scott Strlngfleld, 
John Bottom, Jim Rlnner, Vernon Hoobler. THIRD 
ROW: Scott Smith, Roger Meeks, Kevin Loop, Jeff 
tarrant, Ron Kelpe, Lance Reynoso, Bill Woodward, 
Kerry Relihan, Kelly Vance, Dennis Walker, Ken Ed- 
monds. TOP ROW: George Furney, Steve Allingham, 
John Fink, Ky Johnson, David Lipe, Kent Holder, 
Steve Epplnge, Brent Beckman, Jim Stilwell, Dale 
Bastin, Dan Eyestone, Gerald Pollch. 



Glee ! 



224/Performance 



c 




. JL 



>> Performance 



Craig Chandler 




Limelight shines 
on K-State groups 



jOride. It's here, it's growing, it's 
what makes performing organiza- 
tions across the K-State campus good. 

Speech Unlimited, K-State's forensic 
team, has ranked third in the nation the 
past two years and Harold Nichols, 
coach of the team, said the organization 
has plans to boost its ratings this year. 

Nichols said that even though forensic 
competition is an individual event, group 
spirit is quite close. Pride definitely exists 
between team members and part of it's 
because of the K-State team's reputa- 

Quiet Debate-Carolyn Scofield, 
graduate in speech, uses a quiet 
section of seats in East Stadium to 
coach Eric Horner, sophomore in 
journalism and mass 
communication. 

California Girl-Tina Dahl, senior 
in accounting, rehearses a Beach 
Boys song during a K-State 
Singer's practice before departing 
March 7 1979 for a spring break 
tour of the West Coast 



Carol Sobba 



tion, Nichols said. 

"People are a little afraid of them at 
contests," he said. 

Nichols, also administrative director of 
the K-State Players, said this group has a 
cohesive feeling and a lot of pride in 
presenting quality performances to the 
public. 

"The Robber Bridegroom" was their 
high point of the year," Nichols said. 

One of the K-State Symphony's high 
points each year is an opera. Combining 
talent from the community and the Uni- 
versity, Mischa Semanitzky, director of 
the orchestra, said they are able to cre- 
ate an inner excitement in the players 
and the audience. 

Semanitzky said on-campus recruiting 
will grow next year to increase the or- 
chestra's performing size to include 50 
students. 

Performing, for the twelve vocalists 
and four instrumentalists of the K-State 
Singers, means work and critique and 
work and critique. 



Pete Souza 



Performance/225 



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FLUTES 

Keircn Altenbernd 
Carol Bartels 
Sandra Belsel 
Debra Bell 
Tcrri Bort2 
Evelyn Bosargc 
Lori Carnahan 
Emily Coble 
Karen Cooper 
Gena Courier 
Diane Dalton 
Shelli Darrow 
Krista Davis 
Lori Dunlap 
Debra Ellis 
Sheri Haberman 
Elizabeth Hagen 
Kim Hahlen 
Shannon Hall 
Sandy Harper 
Judy Hecht 
Kim Hunt 
Kathy King 
Julie Krazne 
Patty Lovell 
Beth Martel 
Melissa Mauck 
Tammy McCarty 
Amy Moor head 
Kally Oman 
Deane Rathbun 
Kim Reed 
Sara Rosenkowtter 
LewAnn Schneider 
Lori Schooley 
Diane Scott 
Shernise Spearman 
Karla Steinberg 
Cathy Sterns 
Kyla Stolfus 
Lisa Tharp 
Jennifer Wagner 
Dawnlee Weber 
Jody Welmer 
Laurie Williams 
Lillian Woods 

CLARINETS 

Staci Baird 
Deb Barrier 
Suzanne Bartlett 
Kathleen Bergkamp 
Mary Blattner 
Nancy Blattner 
Lori Brax 
Robin Brown 



Linda Chlapek 
Craig Collins 
Steve Cotner 
Elaine Curry 
Karla Dunn 
Terry Ecklund 
Malinda Fox 
Johnny Gerald 
Esther Hagen 
Laura Harris 
Nikki Hope 
Linda James 
Sharee Jorgensen 
Karen Kallvoda 
Michelle Maddux 
Julie McLain 
James Newburn 
Donna Persigehl 
Nancy Pihl 
Debra Plnkston 
Patsy Poe 
Mary Prose 
Jim Rahtjen 
Sandra Sawyer 
Rusty Selby 
Stacy Shearer 
James Southall 
Stacy Stephens 
Eric Thiele 
Richard Walker 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Randy Detrick 
Frosty Lawson 

ALTO SAX 

Marilyn Barry 
Cheryl Blake 
Pam Brown 
Ginger Clark 
Sandra Clark 
Nancy Criss 
Dan Dolezal 
Tammy Eppinger 
Rae Faurot 
Dale Fox 
Roberta Garrett 
Joe Graber 
Rob Harding 
Susan Johnson 
Darla Kerr 
Debbie Kester 
Tammy Kester 
Jerry King 
Kathy Maertens 
Barbara Miller 
Cedrlc Parton 



iital\titft/i< 



KANSAS STAT 

I UNIVERSITV 



Wendy Ross 
Kay Scarborough 
Jacqueline Schaffer 
Kent Sinclair 
David Tenpenny 
Teresa Ubben 
Greg Vermillion 
Mark Vittetoe 
Cecelia Walker 
Llnnea Wallace 
Lisa Walter 
Mark Ward 
Michael Warren 
Michelle Weber 
Susan Wells 
Martin Wilde 



TENOR SAX 

Greg Briggs 
Terry Dockum 
Vemon Hoobler 
Fanci Horton 
Dan Hurford 
Russ Reiling 
Pat Schlegel 
Phil Shippers 
James Towle 

DRUM MAJORS 

Ky Johnson - Head 
Cherl Koci - Head 
Larry Hinkin 
Tammy Koci 

FEATURE TWIRLERS 

Darrell Connerly 
Cindy Fangman 

K-STEPPERS 

Debbie Barnes 
Janine House 
Judy Medill 
Rhonda McCurdy 
Julia Reynolds 
Kathleen Schmidt 
Carita Swader 
Koralea Wall 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

Rene Boatman 
Phil Rarlck 
Janice Shadday 

BARITONE SAXOPHONE 

Tim Brecheisen 
Stan Harstlne 



MELLOPHONES 

Gary Bond 
John Herrin 
Doug Parks 
Debra Poe 
Steve Ripper 
Monte Wedel 
Janetta Wells 

TUBAS 

Rolf Chappell 
Jon Culley 
Don Davis 
Edith Dohl 
Lorinda Duch 
Tim Hersh 
Glenn Hush 
Brian Janke 
Brent Kuehny 
Kelly Mack 
Joe Meyers 
Luis Quiles 
Robert Rinne 
Tim Schlieker 
Kevin Swarm 
Sylvester Washington 

FLAGS 

Barb Brinkman 
Liz Burke 
Marilyn De Jesus 
Terl Gatschet 
Mary Ann Gllllland 
Caroline Kline 
Laura Lippert 
Laura Londeen 
Becky Massey 
Jill Matuszak 
Terri Noble 
Cindy Novak 
Loretta Pacey 
DeAnne Stenger 
Wendy Tubach 
Robin Wilson 

MANAGERS 

Lyle Cain 
Monica Haley 
Sue Herrmann 
Joe McAtee 
Marc McCabe 
Tom Murphy 

TROMBONES 

Steve Allie 
Brent Blllau 
Karen Bowen 



^ paries. . tikm$=*-itw * 





Steve Cater 
Lisa Chartier 
Gilbert Chauza 
David Deckert 
Randall Dickerhoof 
Susan Horgadine 
Wyatt Hoch 
Robert Hughes 
Ray Lemon 
Karen Mclntyre 
Pat McKaig 
Tim Mitchell 
Sheryl Neblock 
Kathy Pakkeiber 
Lori Price 
Chris Rhodes 
John Riley 
Lex Shaw 
Carta Shoemaker 
Roy Shuster 
Tony Stueve 
Brian Tempas 
Mary Verschelden 
Cheryl Wendt 
Tom Wheeler 
Mark Wur'm 

BARITONES 

Dave Anderson 
Mark Altenbernd 
Edwin Brokesh 
Jeff Dorsch 
Steve Eppinger 
Jeff Johnston 
Duane Kraushaar 
Paul Lawrence 
Merrie Martin 
Mary Meyer 
John Poston 
Steve Roof 
Doyle Slack 
Mack Thompson 
Stephanie Wagner 
Kent Wallace 

PERCUSSION 

Arthur Allen 
Danny Allen 
David Altenbernd 
Sara Borst 
Randell Bosarge 
Kent Brooke 
Dana Brown 
Dan D'Alblnl 
John Delaney 
Joseph Fisher 
Jim Foster 



Cindy Hoefllcker 
Michael Johnston 
Lezlie Kidd 
Bruce Laflen 
Mike Life 
Elizabeth McLenon 
Ned Price 
Brad Roth 
Karen Sedlacek 
Sheryl Schmidt 
Teresa Shea 
Errik Smith 
John Strickler 
Curtis Vermillion 
Karen Vinnlng 
Duane Weber 

TRUMPETS 

Janle Allen 
Sandy Anthony 
Carl Cameron 
Steve Cooper 
Jack Corn 
David Cranson 
Gayle Dembskl 
Paul Douglas 
Ken Edmonds 
David Erwin 
Elizabeth Gardner 
Brad Gillispie 
John Greathouse 
Pete Hagstrand 
Janelle Hegarty 
William Hewett 
Keith Hoch 
Roger Holt 
Kelly Kline 
Jeff Koci 
Joan Largergen 
Glenn Lewis 
David Lewman 
Paul Mallr 
Don Martin 
Lance McClosky 
Rich McKlttrick 
Rick McTague 
Donna Moore 
Sharon Mueting 
Casey Mussato 
Mike Norris 
John Nottingham 
Janet Olson 
Bill Orth 
Paul Ozbun 
Peggy Patchen 
Kralg Post 
Mike Qulntanar 







Marching band 



HHHUHHHHM 

Bill Reed 
Mark Reinhardt 
Rod Russell 
Sue Schmitt 
LewJene Schneider 
John Schumacher 
Mark Seaman 
Craig Shadday 
David Sidebottom 
Keith Siemsen 
Todd Sonntag 
Kevin Symes 
James Witte 

PRIDETTES 

Kathy Arnold 
Stephanie Baker 
Sonja Barnow 
Kim Bearly 
Kelly Blair 
Cyndee Bostlck 
Denise Esparza 
Andi Foutch 
Lynda Heckelmann 
Kelly Hlggason 
Susan Hugglns 
Mary Anne Jackson 
Marcy Imel 
Heidi Jernigan 
Becky Johnson 
Patricia Karlin 
Marie Kollch 
Laura Lukens 
Lisa Mays 
Susan Miller 
Denise Mogge 
Carla Ott 
Cherle Parish 
Julia Pharls 
Kellene Ponte 
Kathy Robinson 
Cathy Rohleder 
Kelll Ross 
Joan Schrleben 
Yvette Schrock 
Jul Swaim 
Janet Washburn 
Carol Westfall 
Donna Wilber 



226/Performance 




Performance 



Limelight 

"Being extremely critical of their own 
performances gives them much pride in 
their shows," Gerald Polich, director of 
the group said. 

Polich said that the Singers create a 
lot of K-State pride by performing for 
alumni in Kansas communities and on 
out-of-state tours. 

Public feedback and encouragement 
helps the K-State Singers, Men's Glee 
and Women's Glee all performing with 
quality, Polich said. 

The Women's Glee performed, for the 
first time, at the Kansas Music Educators 
Association (KMEA) convention in Wich- 
ita this year. 

The men's pride is "a spirit that's 
sometimes hard to corral," Polich said. 

Good black gospel is the pride of Unit- 
ed Black Voices(UBV). 

Ernie Downs, UBV advisor, said the 
group is "an identity base for the black 



minority on campus. 

Downs said black gospel can be very, 
very lively and can bring out emotion as 
deep as sorrow and frustration. Black 
gospel is so different, Downs said, and 
added that their music rocks the Union 
during Open House concerts. 

This year's highlights included per- 
forming at the Big Eight Black Student 
Government Conference and traveling 
the South on a nine-day spring tour. 

K-Staters also get excited about other 
kinds of music. Smiles, handclapping and 
foot-stomping are irresistible when the 
Pride of Wildcat Land Band plays. 

Phil Hewett, the band's director, said 
"the band's name was chosen to inspire 
something in each member." 

This year, the London trip is the ulti- 
mate extension of the K-State band's 
pride. 

The band does what it does well, 
Hewett said, "because we believe in K- 
State." 

All our purple pride performers seem 
to.Jtfl 



"Sing a Song of "Russia-Paul 

Trokelson, concert choir member, 
warms up his vocal chords in re- 
hearsal for the choir's 3-week tour 



of Russia and Poland. 
Tootin' Tuba-Tim Schliker, march- 
ing band member, strains with the 
effort of practicing. 




Performance/227 



Performance 



Cheerleaders 



More than just cheering 



The top. That's the goal of K- 
State's yell leaders and cheer- 
leaders. Whether it's the top of a pyra- 
mid, a fourteenth place national ranking 
or all-out support of the K-State Wild- 
cats, the squad's doing it this year. 

To do it, they've gone to the extreme 
of unicycle riding, five people high pyra- 
mids, new stunts and jazzy, shaky 
dances. 

Judges this year selected squad mem- 
bers who were good athletes and the 
advisors brought the talent into one unit, 
Lamont Ross, head yell leader, said. 

"Everyone on the squad understands 
exactly what they need to give to gener- 
ate support from the crowd," Ross ex- 
plained. "And when a player looks you 
in the eye as he's running off the court, it 
feels good and you know you're doing a 
good job," Ross added. 

Ideas for new routines have come 
from camps, circus shows, manuals and 



the creative minds of these athletes. A 
continuous routine of pyramids, stunts, 
dances, tumbles and chants have been 
polished, then performed at several high 
schools this year. 

"It gives us a chance to be one notch 
ahead of just a cheerleader," Ross ex- 
plained. 

The squad has a common goal for all 
the practice, improvement, perfection 
and purple pride they've put in this year. 

Ross simply said, "Everybody on the 
squad is totally dedicated to helping the 
team by doing a better job of cheerlead- 
ing." 

Go-Statel-Ross Vines, yell leader 
leads the crowd in a cheer at the 
Iowa State game. 

Stunt Stackup-During a timeout 
at the Iowa State game, the cheer- 
leaders do one of their pyramids. 
















photos by Nancy Zogleman I 



228 




BOTTOM ROW: David P. Mueller, Jeffrey B. Carra, 
Carolyn M. Scofield, Tom Downing, Stacy Cope, Mike 
Neufeldl, E. Todd Sherlock, Linda Treiber, Lynne S. 
Ross. SECOND ROW: Mark A. Wade, Evelyn A, 
Gabbert, Ian F. Snider, Denette D. Vonada, Robin 
Reese Jankovich, Beverly A. Biggs, Sherry J. Schmitt, 
Kelly J. Presta. THIRD ROW: Harold J. Nichols, 
Robert A. Holcomb, Ed Schiappa, Evelyn M. 
Northum, Robbin R. Waldner, Melinda Collett, Debbie 
Hill, Darla Germeroth. TOP ROW: Craig E. Brown, 
Nathan A. Weinsaft, Jenifer Hlett David D. Dunlap, 
Linda Roberts, Sylvia K. Workman, Theressa M. Rice, 
Penny A. Cullers, Lynn Bunker. 



BOTTOM ROW: Thommie L. Pratt, Joseph E. Sim- 
mons, Curtis E. Gamble, Aaron R. Williams, Gary W. 
Marshall, Steve A. Beverly, Francis E. McMillon. SEC- 
OND ROW: Ernest L. Downs, Zelma M. Lewis, Renee 
Johnson, Sabrina A. Boyd, Victoria L. Barbee, Pat L. 
Pace, Paula K. Williams, Steven E. Scott. THIRD 
ROW: Rena Cunningham, Charyl F. McAfee, Nita L. 
Cobbins, Janice M. Murry, Rhonda R. Knight, Mona L. 
Lucas, Patricia L. Lucas. TOP ROW: Denise M. Duck- 
ett, Sherry L. Jackson, Wandean Cunningham, Sharon 
A. Dauenport, Taml E. Fair, Linda F. Grandison, 
Ruby M. J. Kirkwood, Stephanie P. Bally. 



BOTTOM ROW: Janie Allen, Shelli Darrow, Janette 
Roth, Lynerte Roth, Lillian Arnold, Karen Sedlacek, 
Marietta Deets, Cynthia Schaler, Jane Maxwell, Rose 
Scott, Pam Nicklaus, Jan Peterson, Sandy Evans. 
SECOND ROW: Cindy Redburn, Laura Adams, Lin- 
da Gibson, Betsy McLenon, Cathy McKinney, Sharl 
Rippe, Marilyn Barry, Kathlene J. Lockhart, Gail 
McGaughey, Karen Closson, Kathy Phillips, Marlesa 
Roney, Julie Fooshee. THIRD ROW: Mary Pat Bou- 
dreau, Linnea Wallace, Sally Shutter, Penny Steward, 
Virginia Sooby, Ann Misenhelter, Kelly Brensing, Lin- 
da Busch, Cheryl Sales, Stacy Shearer, Laura Zack, 
Connie Clark, Cindy Bray, Mary Redler. TOP ROW: 
Gerald Polich, Sharon balrow, Amy Flaherty, Jenny 
Meiland, Jan Davison, Melissa Spurlock, Janelle 
Poppe, Jill Matus2ak, Terri Worf, Merrie Martin, Sher- 
ry Grisham, Sharee Jorgensen, Suzanne Ern2en, Carol 
Miller, Deanna Kimple. 

BOTTOM ROW: Shana Nickell, Tammy Abraham- 
son, Janon Cupit, Kelll Kerr, Christy Frizell, Debbie 
Hamilton, Wendy Phillips, Karl Knamiller, Janet Bu- 
senbark. TOP ROW: John Kappler, Kent Boughten, 
Lamont Ross, Scott Case, Tim Strobel, Ross Vines, 
Bill Dantico, Kevin Karst, Kim Walker. 




Performance/229 



Services 



S.O.S. cry is solved by concerned 




H 



elp. 



Service organizations at K-State 
answer this cry to help K-Staters and the 
surrounding community in various prob- 
lem situations. 

The Alpha Kappa Alpha and Delta 
Sigma Theta are two service sororities 
that serve the campus and community in 
several ways. 

Although neither sorority have a 
house where members can stay, they in- 
sist it is by their choice. 

"At first it was due to expense that we 
didn't have a house, but now we see no 
need. The girls enjoy living off-campus, 
and even without the house we have a 
sisterhood. Having a house would make 
it convenient, and it would organize 
things a little more, but a house doesn't 
make a sorority," Tami Farr, senior in 
family and child development, said. 

"We get to keep our own personal- 
ities, it makes us grow more, and we 
have different experiences to share," 
Becky Leon, junior in social work, said. 

Both sororities function on the nation- 
al level, but serve the local area primar- 
ily. 

For students who need help in school, 
Alpha Kappa Alpha provides a reading 
workshop. Alpha Kappa Alpha also con- 




Susan Johnson 



230/ Services 



groups 



Jill McAntee 



tributes to the National Negro College 
Fund and started a Little Sister-Big Sister 
program at the Pilgrim Baptist Church in 
Manhattan. 

Delta Chair is a national project that 
Delta Sigma Theta supports. This pro- 
ject contributes money to hire a profes- 
sor for two years at Tuskege University 
in Alabama. At the end of the two-year 
period, hopefully the college can fund 
the professor without assistance, Farr 
said. 

Delta Sigma Theta also entered The 
Beauty and The Beast Contest during 
Homecoming of 1978 and won the 
award for best costume. 

"We never seem to get the informa- 
tion on time; we did Beauty and the 
Beast on a whim, and we came away 
with the best costume award," Farr said. 

The service sororities participated in 
the Big 8 Conference on black student 
government. The conference was held 
on Feb. 22 and 23 at K-State and repre- 
sentatives from all the Big 8 Universities 
attending. 

Further, the houses help Black Stu- 
dent Union with its annual food drive. 
Food is collected from Manhattan resi- 
dents for need families during Thanks- 
giving. 

Besides the two service sororities, Stu- 
dents for Handicap Concerns is another 
service organization. 

Two years ago, a shuttle car service 
was started to aid individuals who are 
physically disabled, either permanently 
or temporarily. 

"Some of my passengers will get to 
feeling better and their bones will mend, 
enabling them to start walking again. So 
we lose them and gain new accident vic- 
tims," Dale Davis, shuttle driver and re- 
tired rural Manhattan mail carrier, said. 

"The program is needed at the col- 
lege. There are a lot more students that 
could use the program that don't. And 
I've been trying to contact them, if 1 see 
them around campus, 1 stop and make 
them aware of what the program has to 
offer," Davis said. 

The service is funded by K-State and 
Students for Handicap Concerns. A 
wheelchair basketball game between K- 
State's basketball team and the Topeka 
Chairmen raised about $800 for the ser- 
vice. 

It uses a state car complete with two- 
way radio, but Davis said using a van 
would make it easier for individuals with 
casts and crutches. Ml 



The Chase-(upper left) Tim Janko- 
vich(12) of K-State wheels himself 
upcourt with Libby Peters (12) and 
Jack Malone of the Chairmen in hot 
pursuit. 

Caring- Jennie Howardflower left) 
prepares Dan Green, graduate in 
mechanical engineering, for giving 
blood. The spring semester blood- 
mobile was sponsored by Circle K. 



BOTTOM BOW: Debroah Anderson, Ruby Kirk- 
wood, Jerri Turmer, Georgaleen Thomas. SECOND 
BOW: Pamela White, Roberta Hanks, Yolanda Rush. 
TOP BOW: Janice R. Lenoir, Elora Stennis, Patricia 
Lucas. 



BOTTOM BOW: Steve D. Young, Rockford A. Stitt, 
David E. Lehman, Mary K. Voet, Martha M. Paschal, 
Ellen L. Garten, Susan D. Zimmerman, Linda L. 
Bigham, Karen S. Closson, Kelley D. Rowland, James 
E. Minor, Mark D. Pottorff, Lucinda M. Llndholm. 
SECOND BOW: Marilyn S. Bolt, Denise L. Brown, S. 
Dawn Smith, Cheryl K. Thole, Keith P. VanSkike, 
Patty M. Sloan, Dave Zeiler, Gregory W. McClure, 
Gary D. Thompson, Dean L. Hiebert, Roger B. Clith- 
ero, Norma J. McKnight. THIBD BOW: Max Eulert, 
Marcene Bellar, Toni Duckworth, Brenda M. Ericson, 
Debbie E. Chambers, Jean M. Loop, Linda L. Gibson, 
Becky Walsh, Susan K. Touslgnant, Nellie F. Briney, 
Sheryl K. Wilkinson, Suzanne K. Sims. TOP BOW: 
Debbie S. Robson, Karen S. Kalivoda, Marilyn J. Do- 
mann, Meiinda K. Harbison, DeAnn M. Hiss, Kathy K. 
Rupp, Renee A. Nyhart, Judith E. Biehler, Rebecca A. 
Wagner, Mary M. Garten, Karen K. Cooper. 



BOTTOM BOW: Jim G. Coats, Beverly A. Johnson, 
Sterling B. Borthwlck, Bruce A. Bowerman, Dennis 
Haverkamp. SECOND BOW: Mark I. Kaman, Kath- 
erine A. Hogan, Sheryl K. Hurd, Melissa B. Brown, 
Michael A. Pezza, David J. Albracht. TOP BOW: 
Roger L. Messner, D. Alice Sky, Lisa Spiegel, Carol A. 
Romig, Diane C. Scott. 



BOTTOM BOW: Molra Jack, Tami E. Farr, Nita L. 
Cobbins, Linda F. Roberts. TOP BOW: Teresa D. 
Switzer, Sabrina A. Boyd, Jacqueline J, Martin, Me- 
lanie L. Brocklngton, Krista M. Hill. 




Alpha Kappa Alpha 
\ I 




Services/231 







© <» 




BOTTOM HOW: Lorle J. Denholm, Doug A. Reng- 
nier, Stan K. Pulliam, Chan E. Gates, Maragaret G. 
McDonough, Clint Rusk, Lyle D. Shipley, J. Chris 
Baker, Debbie J. Clubine, Lance J. Markley, Mitch J. 
Moorman. SECOND ROW: Larry T. Stangle, Jack D. 
Sweany, Randy E. Olson, Roger L. Hellwig, Nancy E. 
Landrith, Alan A. Duffle, Dave Zeller, Mary Jane Han- 
son, Coree L. Smith, Raidel Pettibone, Kevin Beyer, 
Elaine Mayo. THIRD ROW: Danni L. Wolf, Cathy A. 
Sterns, Lisa D. Wulfkuhle, Richard L. Houser, Randy 
W. Clark, Frances A. Nelson, Susan M. Schlickau, 
Lorna E. Sutor, Billle J. Evans, Lori R. Willhlte, Chris- 
tianne Vaught. TOP ROW: Ellen D. Wasserman, Bri- 
an K. Keith, Fred T. Williams, Eric J. Guenther, Chris 
L. Guenther, Ivey L. Whitmore, Debra L. Mueller, 
Lisa M. Skoch, Shawn S. Frey, Harmon J. Plunkett, 
Ken K. Kelly, Gregory R. Klmzey, 



BOTTOM ROW: Kelley D. Rowland, Sonya G. 
Lauppe, Kimberly A. Wolfe, Donna J. LaCare, Craig 
A. Hamilton, Danny D. Catting, Jay A. Griffin, Ronald 
A. Knight, Monte K. Jessup, Brad D. Rayl, Amy E. 
Epp, Janice E. Conley. SECOND ROW: Kelly D. 
Foley, Vicki R. Upson, Peggy J. Reld, Bradley D, 
Fuller, Erlce C, Moden, Evan K. Mai, Scott K. Bokel- 
man, Bruce J. Shanks, Yvonne D. Latting, Sherry Lee 
Whitesell, LewAnn G. Schneider, Jane E. Baldwin. 
THIRD ROW: Kathy A. Bearnes, Diane L. Luthi, 
Mike C. Simon, Robert E. DeHoff, Jeff B. Bryant, 
Robert S. Hook, Lorrle K. Meull, Denette D. Vonada, 
Tamara S. Sackhoff, Linda K. Young, Nennette D. 
Luginsland, Linda L. Gibson. TOP ROW: John W. 
George, Travis L. Mann, Mark R. Gardiner, Kevin T. 
Good, Daniel L. LaTourell, Brenda M. Ericson, Carrol 
D. Middleton, Scott E. Drake, Carol S. Horting, Lois J. 
Heuchert, Gina Rosebaugh, Cathy S. Dickenson, Mi- 
chelle Barnett. 



BOTTOM ROW: Becky J. Harris, David L. Goetsch, 
J. Douglas Smart, Amy M. Love, Eric L. Simonson, 
Kim Adams, Beth Hughes, Jerry Grinstead, Norman J. 
Adam, Richard A. McKee, B. Todd Pringle. SECOND 
ROW: Joanne M. Van Lerberg, Mike Ehrllch, Mark 
Nikkei, James Pringle, Mona Rusk, Madeleine Miller, 
Michelle Tillman, Dee Hoffman, Julie Tessendorf, Ste- 
ven Herl. THIRD ROW: Janice M. Hammarlund, 
David J. Loving, Debra D. Rudicel, Toni E. Timmis, 
Karen L. Chrlsler, Lorl A. Lips, Cindy A. Payne, 
Debora J. Beck, Steve D. Roth, Michelle M. Maddux, 
Jennifer Kipp. TOP ROW: Gary D. Merritt, Mary L. 
Ferguson, Kelle M. Wenke, Gary D, Thompson, Terri 
L. Timmis, Patrick L. Burton, Sheri L. Henry, Rita J. 
Peuser, Nancy L. Ross, Karen J. Spain, Gina Roen- 
baugh, Lois J. Heushert, Brad W. Walter. 

BOTTOM ROW: Steve Galtaer, JIU Garflnkle, Jill 
Levy, Arlyn Cohn, Rita Grover. SECOND ROW: 
Edwin S. Atzenhorfer, Brian E. Tucker, Debbie Die- 
trich, Mark D. Atzenhoffer. TOP ROW: Steven Me- 
dall Eric Rosen. 



BOTTOM ROW: Julie Fletcher, Bobbl Jo Riederer, 
Sally Wilson, Kay Deever. SECOND ROW: Larry 
Anderson, Stephen Linenberger, Susan Fletcher, Alan 
Stetson. THIRD ROW: Will Wiatt, Jeb Wohler, Craig 
Collins. FOURTH ROW: Steve Hentges, Mark Skin- 
ner, Stacy Cope, Scott Stockwell. TOP ROW: Kyla 
Stolfus, Melinda Brzon. 



Special Interests 

Ever 



f man was meant to fly he would 
have been born with wings. So goes 
the old saying. But man has been trying 
to imitate the birds for a long time. Man 
has even been to the moon and back 
again. 

In an attempt to get as close to the 
birds as possible, man has skydiving, and 
K-State has a skydiving club. 

"It's just an inhuman thing to do," 
Brian Hettrick, senior in secondary edu- 
cation, said of skydiving. 

Once reaching f reef all, skydiving be- 
came more of a lifestyle to Hettrick. "I 



Kevin Taylor 



started thinking of things in terms of sky- 
diving. Two pitchers of beer are a lift 
ticket (cost of a jump). You have to de- 
cide which you want more, usually it's 
the lift ticket." 

Hettrick's interest started young. "I 
lived near a military town and I was al- 
ways watching the paratroopers jump 
and I decided I wanted to try it some 
day." 

When the club offered training ses- 
sions last year Hettrick signed up and 
made his first jump. 

"I really didn't get scared (on my first 
jump) until I left the plane. Up until then 
I was just doing what they had trained 
me to do, it was all automatic. Once I let 
go, it really hit me what I was doing. My 
instinctive reaction was to curl up in the 
fetal position, but after the canopy 
opened I really started enjoying myself 
and by the time I reached the ground I 
knew I was really hooked," Hettrick 
said. 

Since then Hettrick has fallen through 
a cloud on his 25th jump and had to cut 
away from his main chute and pull the 
reserve. 

Another of the club's "hardcores" is 
Bob Lorton, sophomore in pre-design 
professions. 

"I've wanted to jump for as long as I 
can remember. When I was a kid I used 
to jump out of barns and off houses just 
holding a bedsheet, just trying to see 
what it was like. Once I jumped off the 
roof of a two-story building and broke 
my legs. It wasn't the greatest way to 
freefall," Lorton said. 

Paul Mucahy has been jumping since 
1977. 

"It's a hell of a way to get high, it's a 
natural drug. You get an incredible 
Adrenalin rush, it's just unreal," Mul- 
cahy said. 

Mulcahy's biggest thrill is "relative 
work", jumping in groups and doing 
formations in the air with other jumpers. 

"It's such a powerful feeling to be 
13,000 feet above the ground, falling at 
120 mph while playing games with any- 
where from three to 43 people, it's the 



Geronimol- David Hrdlicka from 
Nebraska and Jack Washburn, PC- 
State alum, skydive with the 
Hutchinson Jump Club. 



take 






*y- 





BOTTOM ROW: Paul N. Stevenson, Cathy A. 
Sterns, Marry Lu Pasley, Eric Guenther, John R. 
Greathouse. SECOND BOW: Sandra L. Hundley, 
Michelle Bender, Natalie G. Haag, Ron Ditmars, Bren- 
da F. Hundley. TOP ROW: Becky A. Vinlng, Charles 
R. Banks, Gregory L. Walker, Tim Rogers, Mel D. 
Waite. 



BOTTOM ROW: Charles N. Lee, Don M. VanWal- 
leghen, William H. Johnson, Bradie F. Jones Jr., Dale 
E. Bastin, Terry W. Kohler. SECOND ROW: Ken- 
neth R. Stuchllk, Richard C. Barrett, Mark E. Ward, 
Joyce L. Stephens, Pollyann Beecy, Ike Wakabayashi. 
THIRD ROW: Jim R. Earushaw, Mitchell J. Herl, 
Wade A. Leitner, Belinda L. Foster, Marion Jordon 
Jr., Russell B. Smith, Philip B. Smith. TOP ROW: 
Patricia A. Stephens, Shirley J. Fouse, Julie A. Cor- 
nett, Mai X. Bui, Marvin L. Rose, Karen A. Wycoff. 



BOTTOM ROW: Michael J. Nolan, Eric A. Friedli, 
Sara A. Hickert, Gerald A. Klpp, David J. Fischer, 
Steven D. Anderson, Greg J. Savage, Bryan H. Gill- 
more. SECOND ROW: Mary E. Pottorff, Mary A. 
Grossnlckle, Ujwal A. Deshpande, Judy A. Dahl, Ka- 
ren S. Closson, C. Steve Frank, Dave E. Holdeman, 
Bob Kells, Jack D. Sweany, Ray D. Lemon. THIRD 
ROW: Joseph M. Sack, Karlene K. Ediger, Katherine 
M. Larson, Rebecca A. Wagner, Kae E. Algrim, Fran- 
ces A. Nelson, Lori K. Heinsohn, Shelly Sixta, Bruce 
V. Clark, Traci A. May, Sonya G. Lauppe. TOP 
ROW: Lee Ann Mies, Tamara S. Sackhofi, Marilyn J. 
Damann, Pamela A. Bell, Mary Jo Llll, Nancy K. 
Foust, Beth R. Gilmartin, Joyce M. Carlson, Ellen D. 
Wasserman, Joy L. Rexroat, Ivey L. Whlrrnore. 



BOTTOM ROW: Steven D. Schwab, Jennifer J. 
Schwab, Brad A. Johnson, Carolyn A. Burnett, Bruce 
E. Viets, Lannle Mack, Patrick K. Regier, Danny 
Woehrman, Shannon Erlcson. SECOND ROW: Shan- 
non K. Hall, Kelley A. Collins, Paula E. McCready, 
Kathy S. Gradwohl, Alan Weiser, Richard A. Evans, 
Joel W. Galbraith, Joe Staudinger, Martha M. Paschel. 
THIRD ROW: Valerie J. Bowersox, Larry E. Wag- 
ner, Shelia D. MacKeruie, Elizabeth I. Smith, Lorle J. 
Denholm, Lesa J. Schwanke, Debbie E. Chambers, 
Betty B. Barker. TOP ROW: Norah Davila, Martha 
Orpin, Barbara A. Schluemer, Luella Ann Mayer, 
Veva E. Adams, Debra G Albright, Sharon M. Balrow. 
Dorothy J. Gatlin, Al Baker, Rick Barker. 



BOTTOM ROW: Paul J. Klausen, Harry C. Stenvall, 
Brian T. Hettrlck, Paul N. Mulcahy, Rick A. Rogers, 
Larry A. Nicholson, Chuck L. Ward. SECOND ROW: 
Trudy L. Hiatt, Chris Holle, Bob Bacon, Paula S. Can, 
Bob Lorton, Jude Weiss, Alys Brockway, Marty 
Athey. TOP ROW: Mike L. Welmer, James R. Hodg- 
son, Phil B. Bradley, Robert A. Harrington, Emily J. 
Blakeslee, Lynne M. Beruttl, Donnle L. Frowrfelter, 
Dennis G. Hltz. 




Special Interests 
Flying leap 

ultimate. Once you reach that stage, 
jumping becomes the central thing in 
your life, everything else is interference. 
You just can't wait to get back in the air 
again," said Mulcahy. 

Emily Blakeslee, graduate in clothing 
and textiles, said she plans to continue 
on through at least to the 15-second 
f reef all. 

"My first jump wasn't so good. I did 
about three flips backwards as soon as I 
let go of the plane. But on my next jump 
I did a lot better. I don't know if I'll ever 
be the hardcore, but 1 definitely want to 
continue up to terminal velocity" 

After five good jumps a student 
moves to freefall. Freefall is when the 
jumper pulls his own ripcord after he 
leaves the plane, delaying the chute 
opening. The delay progresses from five 
seconds to as long as 30 seconds. Termi- 
nal velocity is reached during the 15- 
second delay. At this point gravity 



"It's a hell of a way to get 
high, it's a natural drug. 
You get an Incredible 
Adrenalin rush, it's Just 
unreal. " 



equals air resistance and it takes six sec- 
onds to travel 1,000 feet. 

The K-State parachute club has an ex- 
cellent safety record. Since its beginning 
in 1969, it has only had one injury. A 
student jumper, in ignoring safety rules, 
tried to maneuver at too low an altitude 
resulting in a broken leg. 

The club has 37 members and this 
year has been training 30 first jump stu- 
dents. They have also sponsored several 
parties and a logo contest for the club. 
The logo contest was won by Mark Szu- 
mowski, junior in pre-design professions. 

Actively the club jumps every week- 
end and has training classes once a 
month depending on the demand. 

Their biggest project was a demon- 
stration jump at the K-State Nebraska 
game. Jumpers landed on the football 
field during halftime. Hettrick said that 
the club worked on the preparations for 
the jump for over a month: getting clear- 
ance from authorities, doing paperwork, 
advertising and working out the details 
of the actual jump. Safety precautions 
were planned for every possible emer 
gency with several wind indicators, 
ground crews, and air to ground commu- 
nications. 

Every individual has different reasons 
for getting into skydiving, but the rea- 
sons for continuing were the same. As 
Mulcahy said, "It's really hard to explain 
it to someone who has never jumped, 
but once you've jumped you understand 
right away. I guess we jump because 
we're skydivers." WM 



Bulls, barrels, broncs 



A black felt cowboy hat, red bandana 
^*tied around his neck, western shirt 
complete with shiny silver snaps instead 
of buttons, tight houndstooth pants cov- 
ered by dusty brown chaps, wing-tipped 
cowboy boots and the ever-present 
brown leather belt with "Slim" inscribed 
across the back. 

Weber arena is packed with variations 
of this attire the third weekend of March 
1980, when K-State rodeoers hold their 
main fund raiser of the year; the Central 



Jill McAntee 



Plains Spring Rodeo. 

"The rodeo is our big fund raiser. We 
made about $3,500 last Spring from the 
rodeo. We make our money at the gate 
and the programs. Admission is around 
$3 for adults and $1.50 for children. 

We also make about $1,000 off the 
dance we have on Saturday night. Any- 
body can come, but it's mainly rodeo 



people," Jackie Baker, sophomore in 
secondary physical education, said. 

About 150 students from ten schools 
participate in the spring rodeo spon- 
sored by Rodeo Club. 

"We usually start working on it about 
four months ahead of time, getting the 
stock contractor and trying to decide 
who we want for judges." Baker said. 

The entry fee is $30 per person per 
event plus an office charge. The 

continued 





Sue Pfannmuller 

Show and Tell-The Activities 
Carnival provides Paul Mulcahy, 
graduate in chemistry, an 
opportunity to demonstrate 
equipment used for skydiving. 

Save me, Save meJ-Kim Davis 
of Southwest Missouri State is 
rescued by a fellow student during 
the rescue race at the Block and 
Bridle horse show. 



Tim Costello 



Rodeo Club/235 




BOTTOM ROW: Troy Bartlett, Kay Burkman, Jerri 
Wayne. SECOND ROW: Sam Borenger, Mike Robin- 
son, -Joseph M. Sack, Mark Bolin. THIRD ROW: Bill 
Adams, Paul Nea!, Randy Courier, Donald Lee. TOP 
ROW: Danny Ashmore 



BOTTOM ROW: Jim R. Williams, Pat K. Regier 
Craig B. Lamping, Lance J. Markley. SECOND 
ROW: Jeff Van Petten, Mike Wiltse, Joe Mushrush. 
Barry Beurskens, Allen Russell, Tim Saunders 
THIRD ROW: Marc R. McCall, Mark Brunner, Nei 
Warrell, Cindy Breech, John Luthl, Richard J. Coo- 
per, Mary Jane Hanson. TOP ROW: Jackie Baker, 
Barbara S. Seers, Madelyn D. Green, Karen B. Fan- 
kamp, Brad W. Walter, Marci Geisler, Lesa J. 
Schwanke, Connie M. Ellert, 



BOTTOM ROW: Mike Christiansen, Dennis C. Mee- 
han, Fred R. Dysart, Gary Gillespie, Rocke Foster, 
Diane Fogelberg. SECOND ROW: Jeff P. Evans, Joe 
M. Hicks, Mark A. Enenson, Roger Hellwig, Randy 
Olson, Carol K. Leggett. THIRD ROW: Martin E. 
Herbers, Michael J. Christenson, Michael B. Kaufman, 
Jerry D. Grlnstead, Margaret Dysinger, James A. 
Young, DeWayne E. Craghead. TOP ROW: Lisa A. 
Leister, Maria F. Hughes, Jerllyn S. Johnson, Jullanne 
Willlsma, Mark D. Walters, Michael B. Jones, Brad A. 
Nlckelson, Margaret G. McDonough. 



Amy Button, Cheryl L. Nutter, Craig Cole, Mark T. 
Lair, Kim Walker. 



BOTTOM ROW: Andrea Foutch, Wendy Phillips. 
SECOND ROW: Lisa May, Lori Fulton, Lamont A. 
Ross. THIRD ROW: Pat Culley, Alan Stetson, Moni- 
ca Haley. FOURTH ROW: Wyatt Hoch, Becky John- 
son, Brent Bonwiell. TOP ROW: Gary Grosdidler, 
Richard Loux. 



Special Interests 
Bulls, broncs 



office charge is usually $3-$5. It pays the 
regional secretary," Baker said. 

The entry money is divided on a per- 
centage basis and returned in the form of 
prize money, Baker added. 

Saddles are awarded to the all-around 
cowboy and cowgirl and plaques to the 
four teams accumulating the most 
points. 

The Rodeo Club profits are placed in 
a scholarship fund. Baker said that five 
scholarships totalling $1,250 were 
awarded during both the spring and fall 
semesters. 

At the end of each rodeo season a 
scholarship committee reviews the appli- 
cants choosing recipients on the basis of 
combined rodeo points earned and an 
overall 2.2 GPA is required. 

For the past two years, Rodeo Club 
has hosted matches against Fort Scott in 
October. 

The national rodeo awards $10,000 in 
scholarships to the university winning the 
nationals. "The mens' team has a good 
chance of going to the national finals. 

"Rodeoing is a very expensive sport. 
The National Intercollegiate Rodeo As- 
sociation membership dues are $65 per 
person. Only six girls in our club hold 
cards and 10-12 guys," Baker said. 



Pep Coordinating Council 





Tie down- Securing his glove 
with a leather strap, a rodeoer 
prepares for the bronc riding 
event during the spring rodeo. 



Get 'em cowboy- A cowboy 
throws his loop after a streaking 
calf in the calf-roping competition. 



photos by Bo Rader 



Rodeo Club/237 




BOTTOM HOW: Cindy Friesen, Ifan Payne, Rob- 
ert Bontrager. TOP ROW: Roger Seymour, Jack 
Carpenter, John Dodderidge, Not pictured, Virgil 
Thomas. 



BOTTOM HOW: Tim Stites, Anton Arnoldy. TOP 
HOW: Susan Schlickau, Jill McAntee, Nancy Reese, 
Janet Terry. 



Mike Bodelson, Kathy Witherspoon, Scott Darby. 



BOTTOM HOW: Suzanne Schlender, Mary Jo Pro 
chazka, Kent Gaston, Julie Doll, Mike Hurd, Jotene 
Hoss. TOP ROW: Randy Shuch, Sue Pfannmuller, 
Pete Souza, Sue Freldenberger, Mike Corn. 



Tradition 



Wt's said that a yearbook reflects the 
flavor of the school it represents. If 
so, then the taste of K-State is grape- 
flavored with tradition and quality. 

The Royal Purple has earned 39 Ail- 
Americans from the National Scholastic 
Press Association in the yearbook's 70- 
year history. The Royal Purple also has 
the distinction of having the longest 
string of Ail-Americans in the nation, 37 
from 1936-1972. The last Ail-American 
Royal Purple was the 1976 book. 

The National Scholastic Press Associ- 
ation awards the All-American distinc- 
tion to a yearbook when the book earns 
a first-class rating and receives four of 
five possible marks of distinction. (Marks 
of distinction are awarded in copy, con- 
cept, coverage, display and photogra- 
phy.) 

The award-winning quality of the Roy- 
al Purple was at its peak during C.J. 
Medlin's tenure as graduate student 
manager of Student Publications. 

While at K-State from 1934-1967, 
Medlin earned the nickname "Mr. Year- 
book." His alias is a result of his interest 
and innovations in yearbook design. 
Medlin wrote two yearbook texts that set 
standards for yearbooks nationwide. 

During this time, the Royal Purple be- 
came a trendsetter. A "tip on" is an ap- 
plied color picture to the cover and was 
first used on the 1938 Royal Purple. It 
was used again in 1979. A more recent 
trend of using an embosed design on the 
division pages was first used on the 1939 
Royal Purple. And the 1941 yearbook 
staff produced the first full color litho- 
graph cover in the nation. 

The Medlin era books usually had 
purple on the cover. This trend for 
the Royal Purple was broken after the 
1968 book, the last one to have a purple 
color, except the 1980 yearbook. 

Before Medlin came to K-State, the 
yearbook was basically a senior annual. 
In 1909, each senior was allotted space 
for their personal write-up and photo- 
graph. The class yell, color, flower and 
motto were included. Fraternities and so- 




238/Royal Purple 



Student Publications 



strong in purple 



Janet Terry 



rorities were pictured in groups and em- 
phasis was placed on military science. 

In 1915, underclassmen were includ- 
ed in the yearbook and a few years later, 
campus events were added. 

During the late 20's, beauty contests 
became popular. A Royal Purple Queen 
was selected by a famous celebrity. Until 
1970, annual queens were chosen by 
such as Cary Grant, Glen Campbell and 
Joe Namath. 

The size has also been altered. Before 
1928, the yearbook was printed on 7 x 

11 inch paper. It was changed to a 9 x 

12 format, that is still used today. 

A shift in tone of the Royal Purple 
coincided with the national dissidence of 
the late 60's and early 70's. The shift 
from trivia to more social concerns, saw 
the elimination of insignificance in the 
Royal Purple, one thing being the elimi- 
nation of the Royal Purple Queen in 
1970. 

There was more reporting of campus 
events. The 1969 yearbook reported the 
burning of Nichols Gymnasium and the 
1970 book reported the student protests 
and war moratorium marches. 

The themes of the both books ques- 
tioned the purpose of the University and 
approached conflicts. For example, the 
1969 Royal Purple states that "the Uni- 
versity's atmosphere of freedom fosters 
both conformity and dissent." 



Student interest declined in the Royal 
Purple during this period of disillusion- 
ment. A record 8,300 books were sold 
for the 1969 book and in comparison, 
the 1973 book was hard pressed to sell 
the 6,500 that the Student Publications 
Board said they had to sell to get alloca- 
tion. 

The 1972 Royal Purple, although 
awarded an Ail-American, almost killed 
the yearbook's continuation. Controver- 
sy about the book centered on its pessi- 
mism, the use of the University of Kan- 
sas' school colors on the coverfred and 
blue) and especially about the red end- 
sheets printed with grafitti. 

When the 1972 book was delivered, 
students asked for a different yearbook 
with no writing on the endsheets, but 
there were none. 

The future of the 1974 Royal Purple 
and following yearbooks lay in the hands 
of the senate for allocation of funds. The 
Student Publications Board could no 
longer support it. A '73 referendum 
showed student support for the continu- 
ation of the yearbook and the funds were 
allocated. 

Many college yearbooks suffered dur- 
ing the '70's, but the Royal Purple's tra- 
dition of quality along with the students 
of K-State pulled it through the difficult 
early 70's. 

The Royal Purple operates on a bud- 
get of approximately $100,000 and 
about 7,300 books were sold for the 
1980 book.|H 





So That's How It Goes-Lisa 

Beam, junior in journalism and 
mass communications, works on 
the student governing layout as a 
part of a publications practice 
class. 

I Won't Change It Again- Jill 
McAntee, sophomore in journalism 
and mass communications, (right) 
checks out what Andrea Carver, 
senior in journalism and mass 
communications, is doing. 

photos by Tim Costello 



Royal Purple/239 




Journalists 
balance 
duo duties 



STUDENTS WANTED: Ambitious students 
needed for work on campus. Pay is terrible. Long 
hours, but schedule may be adjusted to interfere 
with your personal plans. No fringe benefits. Must 
work well under pressure. Call 532-6556 for 
more details. 



Cound like the job for you? 

Although this job description has 
the appeal of smelly socks, these jobs 
are in demand at K-State in fact, so many 
students apply for these positions that 
some must be turned away. 

The jobs? Staff positions on the Kan- 
sas State Collegian. 

Oh sure, this job advertisement is ficti- 
tious, but it represents a fairly accurate 
description of some Collegian positions. 

"We ask a lot from our editors and 
writers," said Kent Gaston, Fall 1979 
Collegian editor. "We try to put out the 
best possible paper for our readers, plus 
we must work around class schedules 
and pressures." 

The Collegian, Kansas's fourth largest 
morning daily newspaper, is published 
Mondays through Fridays with an all-stu- 
dent staff. 

The Collegian newsroom is active 
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and frantic from 3 
p.m. to 1 a.m. Gaston said the newspa- 
per has a 1 a.m. deadline, and a few staff 
members work at least that late. 

"During the first few weeks of publica- 
tion, we're late almost every night. 
There were times last fall when we didn't 
get the pages to the printer until after 
2." Gaston said. "But, things settle down 
after a couple of weeks and we take 
deadline more consistently." 

This battle with deadlines is common 
to all Collegian staffs. Every semester 
(fall, spring and summer) a new Collegian 
staff assumes duties. Therefore, at the 
start of each semester the staff under- 
goes a period of adjustment. 

"The first week is the worst. You're 
required to publish a paper every day, 
while the entire staff is busy learning a 



Stuff in'- Although Carol Haktead 
would rather be stuffed in her bed at 
5 a.m., the paper has to go out. 
Meeting in the basement of Kedzie, 
bleary-eyed staffers stuff when the 
Collegian runs over 24 pages, has 
color or Dimensions is printed. 

Where's Lou?- Not the Daily Trib, 
but much of the work is the same. 
Beth Harkenstein (left) sets a story on 
one of the seven video terminals. Four 
new terminals were added in August, 
1979. 



Bo Rader 




Craig ChandU 



240/Collegian 



Mike Hurd 



new job. The pressure is really on," Gas- 
ton said. % 

Adding to this headache is the fact 
that the last week of each semester 
brings the largest Collegian of the term. 

As advertisers welcome students back 
to school, Collegians expand to 28 to 32 
pages (usually, the newspaper is from 16 
to 20). 

"When the staff is at its weakest, we 
are pushed the most," Gaston said. 
"Then, late in the semester, when the 
papers are small, the staff is experienced 
and at its strongest." 

"We try to run as much local copy as 
possible. When we use a lot of AP (Asso- 
ciated Press) copy, it's a signal that our 
writers aren't producing." he said. 

A major reason for this deficiency is 
because Collegian staffers must balance 
newspaper responsibilities with school 
pressures. All staff members are re- 
quired to enroll in at least a part-time 
class load. 

"It's really tough to manage classes 
and do a good job for the Collegian. 
There are times when we can't find any 
reporters who have time to write," he 
said. 

Yet, in spite of the pressures and pit- 
falls, the Collegian excells in all phases of 
newspaper quality. This statement is 
best supported by awards presented to 
the newspaper. 

"The Collegian is a consistent All- 
American," Brown said. "We win every 
year we enter." 

All-American ratings are awarded to 
spring and fall collegiate newspapers by 
the National Scholastic Press Association 
and the Associated Collegiate Press. 

About 10 school papers per semester 
are awarded All-American ratings in 
each of five classes: daily, twice to three 
times weekly, weekly, twice monthly and 
monthly. 

Brown said judging is based on five 
areas of newspaper performance: cover- 
age and content; writing and editing; edi- 
torial leadership and opinion features; 
physical appearance and visual commu- 
nication; and photography, art and use 
of graphics. 

Although a newspaper may be named 
All-American by not excelling in all five 
areas, the Fall 1978 and Spirng 1979 
Collegians received Marks of Distinction 
in all categories. 

That high rating for two consecutive 
semesters placed the Collegian in the 
running for the Pacemaker Award, 
which is presented annually to the out- 
standing collegiate newspaper. K-State 
didn't win the honor, but the Collegian 
was one of only a handful of papers that 
qualified for the 1978-79 Pacemaker. 

With the constant pressure to publish 
a paper, a logical question pops up. Why 
would anyone want to work for the Col- 
legian? 

"For the experience if you can work 
for the Collegian for a few semesters, 
you're exposed to writing, editing and 
management. You get the chance to gain 
the experience sought by professional 
papers," Gaston said. 



BOTTOM ROWs Bo Rader, Hurriyet Aydogan. SEC- 
OND ROW: Sue Pfannmuller, Nancy Zogleman, 
Craig Chandler, Tim Costello. TOP ROW: Scott 
Liebler, Rob Clark. 



BOTTOM BOW: Sue Freidenberger, Raymond Quin- 
ton, Sallie Hofmeister, Bruce Buchanan, Suzanne 
Schlender, Paul Stone, Deb Neff, Nancy Kraus. TOP 
ROW: Mike Hurd, Deb Rhein, Cindy Friesen, Beth 
Hartenstein, Kent Gaston, Dave Hughes, Nancy Nip- 
per, Cindl Cox, Mary Jo Prochazka, Doug Daniel. 



BOTTOM ROW: Dale Blanchard, Martin Schneider, 
Randy Dunn, Kathy Witherspoon. SECOND ROW: 
Scott Darby, Doug Keeling. TOP ROW: Al Winkler, 
Mike Bodelson. 



BOTTOM ROW: Laurie Rice, Sharon Bohn, Cyndy 
Overholser, Deb Neff, Sue Freidenberger, Kevin Has- 
kins, Paul Stone, Annette Gafluzzl, Jeff Myrick. TOP 
ROW: Kathy Weickert, Kent Gaston, Bruce Buchan- 
an, Glenna Menard, Carol Holstead, Mark Eddy, 
Sarah Rlddell. 



BOTTOM ROW: Kathy Witherspoon, Ann David, 
Alyson Mack. TOP ROW: Paul Attwater, Randy 
Dunn, Scott Darby, Starr Lee, Doug Keeling, Jerry 
Roberts, Dale Blanchard, Mike Bodelson. 





Dave Kaup 



242/Housing 



highlights 



Home Sweet Home-Ed Giller, 
freshman in wildlife and fisheries, 
reads in Marlatt basement that 
was the temporary home for nine 
students until permanent housing 
could be found. 



your dancing SH06S enjoin Theft 




As A Mattress of Fact-Not a 
mattress sale or an outdoor 
slumber party but senior revenge 
against the juniors of Kappa Delta 
for an earlier prank, Pollyann 
Beery, senior in education, waits 
for the reaction. 



Sue Pfannmuller 



Greeks 



A sort of expanded family life with plenty of 

brothers or sisters, Greek life also 

runs by rules 244 



Residence Halls 

Living with a large group does mean the 
loss of privacy, but to many students it 
means having someone to bowl with, talk to 
or to study with for that big test 324 



Of i Campus 



Living alone, in pairs, triplets, quads or 
more, the majority of students live off 
campus, surviving their own cooking and 
daily habits 396 




1£ -State is not just limestone and ivy covered 
buildings. It is people. 

K-State has about 18,000 students during the fall and 
spring semesters, and about 5,000 during the summer 
having to live somewhere during the school term. 

For a lot of students, living in the residence halls is the 
most desirable. With plenty of companionship around 
and served meals, students often find the halls the easiest 
transition from home. 

Others, still wanting the group companionship but with 
closer ties, find the Greek housing most appropriate to 
their needs. The houses come with a houseparent and 
plenty of brothers or sisters. 

The majority of the students, perhaps the more inde- 
pendent, prefer living off campus. Sometimes alone, in 
pairs, triplets, quads or more off-campus students find 
themselves more dependent on their own resources. 



Housing/243 




Wednesday 

'■'he president bangs the gavel. 
* Fraternity members in the musty 
basement room rise, exchange a secret 
handshake and password. It's Wednesday 
night and the chapter meeting has begun. 

It's easy to forget you're greek most of 
the nights of the week. Studies, campus 
meetings, can't-miss-television shows and 
an occasional sojourn to Aggie leave you 
with little time to be bothered with the 
business of running a fraternity or 
sorority. But Wednesday night is greek 
night. The formal dinners, alumni visits 
and chapter meetings are the weekly 
reminders that, yes, we have a common 
thread here, and again it's time to 
examine the strength of that thread and 
see if we can figure out exactly what it's 
sewing. 

So the meeting begins. The presiding 
officers attempt to wield parliamentary 
procedure to avoid a totally chaotic 
meeting. Often it's a losing battle. 

A financial report from the comptroller 
brings groans from the members slouching 
around the perimeter of the room. One of 
the brothers has just moved into an 
apartment, and the loss of his room and 
board money will bring a $2 raise in 
house bills for the rest. There's one of 
those weekly reminders-the fraternity is a 
business operation. 

The chapter house is owned by an 
alumni corporation, and rented by the 
undergraduate members. The undergrads 
are responsible for generating the money 
to pay rent and upkeep for the house, 
not to mention financing the whole 
spectrum of activities that make up the 
semester. 

It's probably the most important 
responsibility shared by all, and if the job 
is botched, the house will fold. And 
houses do fold. Often. 

Committee reports start with the social 
chairman. A barn party, a pregame 
function with one of the sororities, and a 
spring formal in Lincoln (or will it be in 
Kansas City? — the chairman hasn't 
decided) are set. The intramural chairman 
reminds everyone of the cross-country, 
bowling and ping-ping matches, and the 
little sisters committee head explains an 
upcoming blind date party. 

The activities chairman rises wearing a 
t-shirt from a bar in Columbus, Neb., a 
souvenir from his pledge class sneak. He 
outlines plans for the Gangster Day 
service project, and discusses the 
possibilities for a matching spring project. 

Thousands of dollars are raised by 
greek houses for philantrophy each year. 
The heart fund, muscular dystrophy, and 



Tim Costeilo 



night meetings, sneaks, kite's-spell greek 



cancer research, among other organizations, 
benefit from greek service projects, as are 
local underpriviledged and aged. 

"The attitude problem starts right 
here," says another. "The first place to 
help their attitude is to improve our 
own." 

The concept of pledgeship has become 
a thorn in the side of greek houses all 
over the country in recent years. It's 
difficult to administer a pledge program, 
and imagined fears of the idignities of 
pledgeship make recruitment of new 
members difficult. People are no longer 
willing to eat raw eggs to prove their 
devotion to the house. 

But gone are the days of hazing, of 
physical and mental abuse. Most of the 
new programs try to develop the all- 
around qualities of the individual. The 
difficulty lies in trying to convince 
outsiders of this. 

New business is out of the way, and the 



Steve Falen 



gavel is passed for "comments for the 
good." (The meeting is almost over and 
the dozers are waking up.) A varsity 
football player is congratulated for his 
performance in last Saturday's game and 
encouraged for the next. 

Next on the agenda is the discussion of 
pledges, a potentially touchy part of the 
meeting. If a pledge is in enough disfavor 
with the active chapter, "the box" can be 
passed and the pledge can be blackballed. 
It's a thought in the back of everyone's 
mind. 

It's rumored that one of the pledges is 
considering moving out. 

"If he isn't going to make more of a 
commitment to the house then I'm not 
very comfortable with keeping him 
around," one member says. 

Another member has noticed an 



attitude problem. It seems the pledges 
"get pissed off at being told what to do." 
Now come the flared tempers. 

"I don't know what to do about it. I 
don't know what to tell them," says the 
pledge trainer. 

"Everyone around here is cutting them 
too much slack. Tell them they should be 
working to be here, not us working to 
keep them here," a member says. 

And now a 75-year-old alumni of the 
fraternity is singing the closing song with 
the rest of the brothers. Behind him hangs 
on the wall composite pictures dating 
back to the '40's. It makes you realize the 
tradition of the place. It makes you realize 
the fraternity was here long before you 
came to college and will be here long 
after you leave. 

The meeting is over — it's time to go 
to Kite's, ft 




Tim Cosrello 

Running strong-Troy McVicker, 
freshman in elementary education, 
runs toward Lawrence on highway 
24 during the annual Phi Gamma 
Delta run for leukemia. 



BOTTOM ROW- Patricia L. Lucas. Dale W. 
BUnchard. Tami E. Farr. TOP ROW- Henri Pul- 
liam, Marvin E. Moore, Erwin L. Lax. Kevin R. 
Gardenhire. 



BOTTOM ROW- Jon R. Anderson, R. Brent 
Thompson, Harold J. Walsh, Steve G. Sexton 
Patrick L. Burton. SECOND ROW- Steve Go 
ble. Randy Carlson, Michael K. Mines, Thomas J 
Doran, Gregory W. Williams, AAron R. Markley 
Bradley D. Brunkow, THIRD ROW- Ray Z. Le 
tourneau, Dave J. Bogner, Jay D. Bolding. Victor 
H. Method, David C. Law, Patrick L. Clark. TOP 
ROW- William M. Pfelfer, John A. Kober, Ste- 
ven W. McCarter, Todd W. Smith, Greg Lorie, 
Michael Snyder. Gary McGuire, Kevin Rood. 



BOTTOM ROW- Margaret E. Miller. Stephanie 
L. Davis, Miriam Travis, Collette Carr, Paula 
Palmer, Mary P. Boudreau, Amy S. Allen. SEC 
OND ROW- Julie A. McMillen, Christy M. An 
dra, Shelle R. Steele, Jill E. Stauffer, Ann M 
Galiano, Jan M. Fairbairn, Joan M. Minneman 
THIRD ROW- Nancy J. Schust, Diana J. Neal 
Pamela S. Martin, Lynne A. Kiriakos, Roxanne L 
Beard, Barbara A. Brinkman, Patricia S. Karlin 
TOP ROW- Jody K. Robison, Debra D. Peter- 
son, Christy M. Karlin, Mary J. Winterman. Unda 
L. Vanderweide, Tenley S. Wolf, Myra P. Pfan- 
nenstiel, Diane J. DeForest. 








.TmCClClClacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaacaciaaca 

POWERS, ROBERTA Houseparent m 

AHRENS, THOMAS Oakley 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BATES, JEFFREY Ellsworth 

Business Administration Freshman 0%f%& JP*"^ **" <*•** W~»> <^ ^H»» ** ' 

BAYFR, STFVFN St. Marys ^KL^iBr 1 1 1' 

Business Administration Sophomore J %.. ^.9 ^ Jk"""^ /pj^p a^^ w •* 

BEVER, DAVID Sedan ^ i PT%v *(Hhri -^^^*" ^^ ^W' 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore MTflwf ■ '*• \tf| s. \n if ^fl ^B ^k ^1 "^\ 

I Uil ^ ■€ 

BLATTNER, RICKEY Rozel <x^m&. _.„ .-«» 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BLATTNER, THOMAS ROZEL 

Accounting Senior 

CRIST, LOREN Scott City mp~\ - r— ITT";* ■» ?h« m *, 

Pre Vet Sophomore mi^\l| lifciS* S S 1^- 

CULLEY, JON Topeka Iff, - .C~ .~ W ^ ' 

Pre Dentistry Freshman ^^^^f^ I : ^^^k '' Ik**. ^^L^fc 

CULLEY. PATRICK Topeka lA jH 1 p HL V Ufc { , ^A . I 

Management Senior ■ ffc ' Jl mill ft 

DOLEZAL, DAN Ellsworth ^™ «-.« I HK&U^H ^"' 

Business Administration Freshman ^p .jtfifl^hw ^■^ ^^fet. 

FLEMING, ROBERT Kanopolis JBP ./, jfl V ^ "X ■ » 

Biology Junior ' ? , .^T^^^\j M^^^tR ^B»^l 

FRAWLEY, CHRISTOPHER Newton M^yr* * ff^ : * I W* 5 * "~ >1 •*! *" ■ _ 

Business Administration Junior V ■'_. I-JCW y ^a &" f ^^fe * ^^••r-- 

HAFFNER, CHRISTOPHER Newton 1^"" ^^Lx jKL/) li 

Architectural Engineering Freshman inr ^^L^t** w^^ ^^rf>y |k£» ^^^^V 

HAPGOOD, CURT McPherson , ,™ A £Wfe| M&nfi i ^'"V^/# ?f^A.j 

A ' chitectu ' c F,fth Year studcnt & m 11 ! \ li v V ' ■ * iiK; 

HARTS, TERRY Ellsworth P^ Hl^i « \ fl fcl&/ 
General Freshman 

HENDERSON. GREGORY C Niotaze 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

JANZEN, JOEL Newton ft,* «erl 

Architecture Junior ^Ei -""ll ^ ^' ^ r \ 

JANZEN, SCOTT Newton ^^ As^^ ' ~~" 

Business Administration Freshman W r ' ^^^^W fc^^ ^ 

JOHNSON, BRADLEY E Great Bend ^gk ' ft Mft I W# 

Electrical Engineering Freshman H ft ft : < < I ^fck ft V^K 

„ HI^UBI I BkiV ■ j iH ■ ■»■» \ 

JOHNSON, HAL L Independence, MO mmm ■—— — — 

Architecture Junior ^dBV ^Mk ^T'lik ft*. 

KLINE, STEPHEN Wichita Jf ~ \ ^^*ft ^Ht"ft j£#»J 

Marketing Sophomore ^ JF T ti^~ i 'J > 7 4? 

KOBS, GREGORY Manhattan HF^f fl W **" ■ tT*"*' ** If T* * f ^^ ** 

Bakery Science and Management . . . Senior Help''' w \w!L< ' \le^- N ' w % Jfco r 1V£N fc 

KRIZEK, BRAD . ... Ellsworth 1^"" v ^/ J^t ' I 

Business Administration Freshman ^^P*^ ^ ^^%«*"' '^J- ^^A ftw^ ■^ x "* f ^ 

KRIZEK, CURTIS Ellsworth ^| JB| tf A ; ^ ^A \ | . B| * 

LANGE, MIKE Ellsworth 

Chemical Science Junior 

LETOURNEAU, KEVIN Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

LETOURNEAU, RAY Wichita „-, m 

Accounting Senior ^fc 4b'- > »~ Z^~- ' 

LONG, SCOTT Council Grove j^T 

Journalism Freshman jy ^ V \ W " ^ ^ 

MARVEL, KENNETH Wichita ffMI/f»/ ^1 , 1 I C| ' - ^^/% ^ It' 

Accountig Sophomore KiMlm 1 \ '3ww ^ jH I I '' W V 

McALISTER, DAVID Sedan ' ^ 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MILLER, KELLY Ellinwood 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

MILNER, STEVEN Ellinwood ^7* **' 

Management Senior •m^EL 7 "\£* 

NULL. EDWARD Salina 2%?J'\_^ 1 * V".- T A ^/ 

Chemical Science Senior ^^L > r • MHj| ^^^—^ ^^^ -««i^ ir * ^.^"^ ^^^ ^^L ^^. ^^ 

PANEITZ. DAN McPherson ^ ^1 I fl ^ A M A ^H jft. ^^ IA *ffl M 

PERRY, CLIFFORD Ellsworth " ^^ ^^™ ^i^\»,^^^^ 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman .^flfe. ^-' ^^' ^ 

RHOADFS, MARC Newton |PP^% Ak*^ik 

Pre Medicine Freshman ■' 2 P^pS m^. ^ib ^^ n ^ 

RICKS, JOE Topeka fS *• f ■&■ *y *^ *" 1 ' »- ■ "- 1 '*' 

Electrical Engineering Freshman \J>~ • ^Bfc m " >"" 

SCHNEIDER, JEFF Shawnee A^/' tL - ^^ - 

Engineering Technology Freshman ^^A^^ W ^ ^m ^^BF*~ ^3m .^^^^^ ^fe^h t^^^^^ 

STEWART. PAUL IL fl A ^ I | "*^\ A ( bAI ■ A iff I ^^"1 j| 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore ^L Bl I I B - ^UK^fl fl A? 

SUMMERVILL, MARC Wichita Er^!^^^^ - ! ~^^^m ™^^" ^^™ *** £Mf.Ml ■ <\. 

Geology Sophomore ,^£l&&. ^ftf^^h. 

THOMPSON, JOE Courtland M^jX A*^"? 

Architecture Junior ^B^^^^B B»^^^5L 

WARTA, STEVE Newton II "^W ^tf 5 ^' B^^ * ' ^"1 "^ ' 

Agronomy Junior ^jfc.\ J ^at~ S ^* ^»" ' ^fc«^i 

YAGER. DALE Fredonia JV> ^^. 

Milling Science and Management .... Senior -^L^r , ^g^^^ 

YOWELL, GLEN Delphos C^ 4» j iH A V \ ' I flm / .^^A ,^H 

General Sophomore M ^ ^ I. l^Bj , ^HV ^| 

A ▼ 1\ 111/ IH^I , / 








246/Acacia 



Alpha Chi 



V^lEl€5QClalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphacli 

DOUGLAS, NELL Houseparent 

tf* *fc i BEARDMORE, TRACY Topeka 

Jk-*^*_A Accounting Sophomore 

BERNICA, SUSAN K Topeka 

' - * Pre-Prof. Elementary Sophomore 

_ * BLOCKCOLSKY, CLAUDIA Manhattan 

sjr Accounting Senior 

f BOSSE, NADALIE S Onaga 

Industial Engineering Senior 

BRINKMAN, BARBARA A Emporia 

Interior Design Junior 

'■^ (m& « BROCKMAN, LESLIE A Prairie Village 

jL jMk MAm W*\» Sociology Senior 

■ ,-* I^E 9^"' *Tpfe* BROWN, CATHERINE E Overland 

' ^K ^.--\ fll Elementary Education Junior 

t> . S'Jr BURKE, ELIZABETH A Mission 

^ W i General Business Sophomore 

/ BURNETT, CAROLYN A Overland Park 

A %. /S Interior Design Sophomore 

CLARKE, KATY L Great Bend 

Accounting Freshman 

CUPIT, JANON Wichita 

- Accounting Junior 

;, DALTON, DIANE M. Overland Park 

* - <•} m' ■'■L — ' JRI Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

"*" l m " DYER, JANE C Caney 

^d \ J *^~ ^4t'- i^ fek Finance Senior 

W^L ' JM'l m'' ' FAIRBA1RN, JAN M Garden City 

•j^fT^^k ^L I to Interior Design Junior 

FALES, DEBORAH J Leawood 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

FIELDS, SUSAN M Mission 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

GERBER, DONNA R Overland Park 

'<*■ "^ ^r> Dance Freshman 

^>w ' w GLEESON, CAROL D Prairie Village 

^mHk V ^^ Family and Child Development Sophomore 

| M l-m^M GOLDEN, JANET L Hoyt 

j]HSBmBR*3^ Home Economics Junior 

"" "' HENDERSON, SHERYL M Pierre, SD 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

HOWELL, JULIE A Olathe 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

HULEN, SARAH V Shawnee Mission 

£ it F'ns Arts Sophomore 

HULL, JANICE D Overland Park 

General Busienss Junior 

HUND, ELIZABETH L Manhattan 

!' 4 5SyPV.'V;-- jffV Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JAMES, LINDA D Overland Park 

% v Home Economics Junior 

KELLEY, KOLLEEN Hutchinson 

Construction Science Sophomore 

KING, ANDREA L Olathe 

t . < Pre-Prof. Secondary Sophomore 

KREUTZER, KARA L Scott City 

^^ &to^. * Clothing and Retailing Senior 

r ™ ' ^™ jCT; k ^ KUHLMAN, AUDREY J Athol 

i J Bk . Sk. \i. \ Pre-Nursing Sophomore 




Alpha Chi Omega/247 



omegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegai 



LAHUE, DIANE Mission 

Accounting Junior 

LEE, STARR Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

LUSK, JOEL Highland 

Interior Design Senior 

LYNN, SHARON Prairie Village 

Accounting Junior 

LYTLE, JANE Wellsville 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

McCULLICK, JILL Minneapolis 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

McMILLAN, SHELLY Stafford 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

MEADE, MARY Plainville 

Speech Pathology Junior 

MEYER, BRENDA Topeka 

Interior Design Sophomore 

MILLER, RHONDA Wellsville 

Finance Junior 

MILNER, MARY Arkansas City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

MOSBURG, DEBORAH Lake Quivira 

Business Administration . . . . Sophomore 



NOBLE, TERRI Leawood 

Elementary Education Junior 

OWENS, TOMMA Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

PERDARIS, PATRICIA Overland Park 

Psychology Senior 

PFEIFER, ANNETTE Victoria 

Elementary Education Junior 

PONTE, HELLENE Wichita 

Genera] Sophomore 

REED, DIANA Leawood 

Interior Design Sophomore 

REESE, NANCY White Cloud 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

RILEY, JOLENE Iola 

Business Administration Junior 

SCHLEGEL, PATRICIA Ness City 

Applied Music Sophomore 

SCHULTE, MARGARET Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
SCOTT, GWEN Topeka 

Horticulture Junior 

SKAGGS, SHARON Roeland Park 
Accounting Junior 




248/Alpha Chi Omega 



iachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachiomegaalphachionn 




STENGER, DEANNE Topeka 

Dance Freshman 

STETSON, NANCY Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

STONE, CONNIE Kansas City 

Dietetics Senior 

STRONG, LINDA Medicine Lodge 

Interior Design Sophomore 

VEDROS, PATTY Mission 

Interior Design Sophomore 

VENTSAM, LINDA Leoti 

Home Economics Freshman 

VINING, KAREN Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Senior 
VOEGELE, PATTY Leawood 

General Freshman 

WALLACE, LINNEA Greenfield, IA 

Music Education Senior 

WILLIAMS, GINNY Atchison 

Finance Senior 




Foul Play • Zoola May, 
a captive from the 
Acacia house, is guarded 
by Sharon Skaggs, junior 
in accounting, and Sue 
Bernica, sophomore in 
interior design. The 
Alpha Chi Omega 
pledges and actives 
kidnapped Zoola as part 
of their post rush 
celebration. 



Alpha Chi Omega/249 



/\1PH2I L/61 LSI * lalphadeltapialphadeltap ialphadeltapialphadeltapialphadeltap ialpl 

POTTER, ANNA Houseparent HHH^H| __^_^^ 

ANDERSON, SANDRA K . . . . Smith Center 

General Business Sophomore 

BEVERLY, SARAJANE Topeka 

Pre-Prof. Elementary Freshman F£? "^W i^^^* " H J^^BW^^*WjI -iP* _ 

BISHOP, TER1 A ' Salina ^tT\? *' M .. ijg» lv. fjjfc ^ JF « I £^ 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore \*-' i. H. '-''Bk."^ w?- '^BHB^ ifl J^fl^ 

BROWN, BARBARA K Columbia, Mo. r 

Interior Architecture Junior ^\ Mmm'M mmi M (Mm\ mm ; ^H ■! JO^.1 ^fi ^ 

_ _ _ __ , w __ , . I . /i 

COPE, STACY L Liberal 

Humanities Sophomore 

DETTER, KIMBERLY K Winfleld 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

DOBRATZ, CAROLYN S Beloit .■T« • -*^ . W*"** **^ K» <"» SN**1 ^Sp*^ 

Life Science Sophomore {BB - Kw l| **"" » ^ / '■' m mktimz~> W ^f i. 

DOBRATZ, LINDA L Beloit JH^""*™ *' m ' .* "" 

Pre-Nurshing Sophomore ~^^ Jfi df 31 ? ▼"" \ ^- ■*? k <^H & ^B 

FANGMAN, CYNTHIA ANN Seneca "^"^' J ^ ** 

Speech Pathology Senior «_^« „_ ,.»■-— ab«s. 

■■■kfv ■>■ ^IKL 

FREDERICK, SERENA K Salina s 

Sociology Junior 

FULTON, LORI B Ellsworth 

Business Junior 

GARBER, CYNTHIA Council Grove 

Fine Arts Sophomore ^Bk J£> ift ' - MM WMMw^t^mWi ^Bbf*~ M9 ^L 

GATZ, KAREN E Pratt MlEj% 

General Business Junior 

HANSON, MARY J Pawnee Rock 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HARRIS, STACY J Wichita 

Horticaulture Therapy Junior 

HECHT, SHEILA D Seneca 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

HOUSTON, KAREN KAY . Independence, Mo. 

Home Economics Senior * «■ ^"* , ~ ■ I * 1 

JACKSON. ANN A Concordia 

Microbiology Senior ^m\?W W^ ^A T i~f% I T '.fiPj§ ^k\ ^ "" ^m*. " ) v 

JOHNSON, SUSAN J Salina k\ M guW Jm JF Jt ^ ■■■>■». Am\ S V* ' \ 

General Business Junior MM MWL Wm\ fl Bl- Jim Am r M vM ^^.Y^^B mmk\ ■/ A^^m\ 

WmMmVm ■ ■kJH nfjJE ■k'lH flH^ mm 

JONES, CHRIS D Washington 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

JONES, GWYN E Washington 

History Sophomore mMW\ *te" X JBU »T11 1,1 WW . i 

KARLIN, CHRISTINE M Grlnnell jR-A" A^« ■U§- IS W"* **" 1 J» 

Elementary Education Senior ^aE>T^i * Am\ "" " ^ »w^'- v ' \ ^ v ' 

KRESIE, KAREN K Topeka W^W^fk 7\^r Ajl f >f\ -*. * 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore \\ W^' t\Wk\ Mm t^ / W : ^W> ^fc ^EillP^R'^^ ^Wt 

LARSON, KATHER1NE M Olathe !«^ / V i M^A A ^L/ ^^B ■■■^^M ^^ 

Horticulture Sophomore ^k Jk\ B^Bv I Sw^lfl 

LEONARD, KATHY L Overland Park ^5*v ^ IK flfll 

General Business Sophomore JPIa Ar^~ ' VjfJL k " «r 

LIETZ, DIANE R Paxico if ^ PP» | tfr^m Jf ^.-4 

Finance Senior ^«^ 

LIPPOLD, PAMELA Leawood 

Pre-Prof. Elementary Sophomore !|fe" \mm ^k4* ? 

LOBMEYER, MARGARET Garden City /.' WMBM lk v S k A „ . \ 

Accounting Senior M...JJSxk. IB mm Wmi mm\ &^ra .^ ' ^i WUM "■ ~\ 

LOOBY, LAURA J St. Louis, Mo. 

Agriculture Sophomore iMmWM^m^^MWW Mmml&I^^KM WWW ^^mWW ^mW^. ^MWmW\ MW^ 

LUKENS, LAURA G Hutchinson 

Modern Languages Sophomore 

MARTIN, MITZI Overland Park 

General Sophomore B^ «* W mt *» » ^^- -» . .< ■ > j,^ 

MCCLURE, TERI J Alta Vista 'tBT~. II ^ N l M* . ^yM .^ W ^ 

Home Economics Senior ^^^""mMW^ *iiJ * 1 M\ TB . 

MCDONALD, KELLI J Topeka A\%^ P^ 

Pre-Prof. Secondary Sophomore mm \ —^ ' J^ ^^5 '," ; fc AW i^^\ \ "^ ^ i^&N ^^ ^ i ^1 

MILLER, LEAH J Overland Park ^^K<v |M ^■OijjiM ■ ibf^ I Wmt >m\ kl , j A 

Sophomore Ih^BH fl H*M k : l^l K'/^J1 HkS' ^^B 




250/Alpha Delta Pi 



Meltapialphadeltapialphadeltapialphadeltapialphadeltapialphadeltapialphadeltapialphadeltapialphadeltapialphadel 




MOSIER, SUSAN K Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

MURRAY, CHERYL A Shawnee 

Secondary Education Senior 

NORRIS, MICHELLE L Ellsworth 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

OEHMKE, SUSAN R Linn 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

OPPITZ, JEANNETTE A Topeka 

Computer Science Sophomore 



PEREZ, LISA J 
Fine Arts 
PETERS, LEIGH 

General Business 

PETERSON, DEBRA D 

Journalism and Mass Communications 

PETERSON, DELORA L 

Family Child Development 

PETERSON, MACHELLE A 
Family and Child Development 



Humboldt 
Junior 
Larned 

Sophomore 
Clifton 

Sophomore 

Potwin 

Freshman 

Potwin 

Sophomore 



PHILLIPS, WENDY L Overland Park 

General Business Senior 

RHODUS, ROBYN E Kansas City 

Horticulture Junior 

SASENICK, MARY P Overland Park 

General Business Sophomore 

SEARS, ELIZABETH A Colby 

Biology Junior 

SH1DELER, LISA Topeka 

Home Economics Junior 

SWAIM, REBECCA JILL Dodge City 

Marketing Junior 

SWEETMAN, TAMMY D Great Bend 

Family and Child Development . . . . Freshman 
THOMSON, KIMBERLY Overland Park 

Home Economics Junior 

TREDWAY, LINDA L Winfield 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 
VON NIEDERHAUSERN, AMY Salina 

Pre-Prof Secondary Freshman 

WAIDE, COURTNEY A Topeka 

Sociology Sophomore 

WALLER, VIRGINIA L Mulvane 

Elementary Education Junior 

WALSH, JANICE E Prairie Village 

Accounting Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, KIMBERLY S Manhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

WILLIS, SUSAN E Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

WILSON, KIMBERLY B Mission 

Physical Therapy Junior 

WINTERMAN, MARY J Mission 

General Business Sophomore 



Alpha Delta Pi/251 



/mlpllSI \j9inin3 KllO alphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphi 

HABERGER, MARGARETTE Houseparent 

ALBRECHT, DOUG Lindsborg 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

ANDERSON, DAVE Jamestown 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

ANDERSON, DEAN Jamestown 

Agronomy Sophomore /^Kr ^E f^WP 1 *" \ «4L 

BARNES, SCOTT Dodge City 0KL jMt k i^ £> y®?» ^ 

As '°° <,my Sen ' 0, lit : m ^i £! 

BEYER, KEVIN Gridley 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BOKELMAN, SCOTT Washington 

Agricultural Economics Freshman W/&ry BiL^ *~w mt^ ~~ ft KP^-""'" 

BORN, DONALD Eudora \' Wi ' ^^ 

Biology Sophomore jk-^ mg' "J^- 

BRAND, JIM Valley Center k ^^^ S 4^T l HL r ^ggg| 

Agriculture Freshman f""'' , -»r^P| j^ a^> VW J V '*▼ 

BRANSON, KEITH Wellington I J, j v 'JJA'' ^ \W JB* lf\ l'' / 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore j, f y fl^ J'" f \ \ m\\ IP |M\ I [ I 

BRYANT, JEFF Arkansas City | I ^%± 

Agricultural Education Freshman 6L * 

CARLSON, JON Marquette ^^^ ' WF* ■ 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

CLARK, RANDY Havana 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore MHl~ ■'' flfe? V JIS^™" * iHL. 

COF.N, JOHN Ottawa ^J^^' \ ^^% ^^ J^K^ ^ " 

Agricultural Education Junior tot \ ^■l^ / J9 jp . dt^m\( : \ 

DANLER. ROBERT Deerfield N MM §M K J \ M #4/ ff-MLi- 

Agricultural Education Senior Ail I Bi\Ji Iv l\ t M M%/ 

DAVIES, JAY Reading 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

DEHOFF, ROBERT Tonganoxie 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman Vn* "*" ^ * W**& *- W ¥*•*- ^ IP VSftt ^1 

DITMARS, RON Washington WL . 1 %j^„ 1 L. JP *^ 

Secondary Education .Junior IKr' , 4m s ~'-~ w A~~V a- ** 

DRAKE, DAVID Winfield ^^k *^i Bp*' ^^ - ^^L""^^^ .^■M"" I 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman / i K^V ■ Hi / ll S ^HR "* H B "-- *fc^ > 

DRAKE, SCOTT Winfield t § ft^fl i ! W'fl i I B^l I &\ 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore W 1° Hi^A\flin HH: M ^^^^^■es-j^HI ! wi 

DUFFLE, ALAN Pomona ^«w ^ r-fiHi,, fc"^ 

Animal Science and Industry Senior £ J^P JE?**^L. mf ^m k 

DUNLOP, CHARLIE Parker jP f 1 »*" ■■STa K^ * 

Agriculture Freshman W «•■«« -*»• Br^ - wm** '" ^Eo** V H""*"> "" ' 

FANGMAN, TOM Topeka % **•' \ ¥ I "Or ' %»-" ' m~*~ 

GUTSCH, PERRY Burdick ^B#^"""Jbfc* -^R j ^P "* ^™ i - V 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore Pa J!! 1 

HOPP, KENDALL Marquette ■' mi | , jTV »~^ 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman i /| e! wT^m Bm Bl^jH I f i\ Y i 

HOUSER, RICHARD Lebo 

Agronomy Senior H ^8 ^^ Mk B^ 

JOHNSON, STUART Caldwell «P'^» KT^B I tf*^M » "w 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman fti, -. B ■T a ^- *"■ : BiK "»• W B*^ ~ ■ 

KNIGHT, PHIL Lyons WL Jf %JL. »1 "' ^ L T \j ™ 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore J^t JL~ lr- 

KUEHNY, BRENT Caldwell " 4 C^* r "" ^j >^4l!^" 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore Jk ^ Jfk\ ^B~AW Lf Z£B» W^h 

LATOURELL, DANIEL Lyons ^ ®- W/J| | fcAffl 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore x Kk Wm, , \ ™\i 5S. Bk T fjB 




252/Alpha Gamma Rho 



mmarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphag, 









I r~ V 




)k* 


\ 


'it\ 


A 


w 





LICKTE1G, KEVIN Gamett 

Dairy Production Sophomore 

LINSCOTT, MICHAEL Effingham 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

LOSCHKE, STEVE Osage City 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MacKINTOSH, DAVID Whitman, NE 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MAI, EVAN Linn 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

MASONER, NORMAN Fontana 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

McDANIEL, MARK .... Genda 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

McDONNELL, TIM Sterling, IL 

Horticulture Junior 

MORGAN, JAMES Greeley 

Agriculture Sophomore 

NELSON, TROY Long Island 
Agriculture Freshman 

PETERSON, MARVIN Delavan 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

PRINGLE, B. TODD Yates Center 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

REINHARDT, MARK Erie 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

REINHARDT, RANDY Erie 

Agriculture Freshman 

ROCKERS, BRENT Greeley 

Agriculture Freshman 




Get Behind the 8-ball 

• Scott Bokelman, 
freshman in agriculture, 
Jay Da vies, junior in 
agricultural economics, 
and Jim Brand, freshman 
in agriculture, clown 
around at the pool table. 
An unidentified fourth 
arm tries to get in on 
the Alpha Gamma Rho 
version of poof. 



Alpha Gamma Rho/253 



alphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoalphagammarhoa 

ROCKERS DAN Garnett HHHHHHH ^^ggg/g/gg^ |g 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

ROCKERS, DENNIS Greeley 

Agriculture Freshman W v M ■ 1 W • V 

SCHEPMAN, WARREN Preston m .J/*J W 

Agronomy Junior W-. -~# JB ^k, — ~- 

SCHMIDT, CHARLES Hillsboro Jjf JL V ^J w JW 1^- 

Secondary Education Senior \** > ^^S' ! ^^t^^^^. ^1 •*^l m^ <g*^M g . !■ ^ri / 

SCHULTZ, ROBERT Fairhury, NE. TO| , WS M I • i !^ WW ji ■ WW 

Dairy Production Freshman I^B*'- J ■ B 4k flj {] A j'T '-[JlLfl I ■ | ■ f 

SEILER, FRED Colwich | re -^ 1 m ^ ^^^ -«»» 

SELANDERS, JAY Garnett M j& JpW& m& M JF^^k 

Secondary Education Senior ^t^^^P W ft-- — W w^*> *-H ^Bfe*" v 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 1 - ji ~ i! %Jf %*" ~ *'%"* " ^L" » 

Agricultural Economics Junior .*«^jB? / ^R 4fe'fl I ^^^B #V ^^^ J^ 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore I \ ■?<»/ I By fl j | B^E^I I V 7i 

SOBBA. ALAN Garnett Klifr ^gW I ""] a^ j ^ ~ 

Agronomy Senior A m <tf> i ~"m | J^V 4mj^^. 

STRICKLER, DOUGLAS Iola m M ' BP^S ■ €■ fc-^"^ W^mW 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman BL* «. wl 

SWADER. TERRY Gardner \1 W 

Animal Science and Industry Senior V£~- * S'"^H| "» - 

TOES, JOHN Hesston A\^- Mr ^t& 

Secondary Education Freshman ^^ _^t0tWLjt%. ^El ^V /^ jr w. 

VANGUNDY. WARREN Reading 4t r f» II ^ I / ^ ' i ■ \ V > 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior ^^ I iB/ ■ jBi I JK-^^ J \ V\ 

WARD, MARK Dodge City jj 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

Z1LLINGER, JEFF Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 




Rho-Mates 



BOTTOM ROW: Amy Prltchett, Susan M. Schlickau, 
Lane Chase, Janice Stottmann, Cheryl Gigstad, Bren- 
da Stottmann, SECOND ROW: Kathy Bearnes, Carol 
M. Sobba, Sharon Rhine, Ruth A. Masoner, Tert Sell- 
ers, Denise Sauerweln. TOP ROW: Janice I. Morgan, 
Marcy A, Hurley, Susan E. Brink, Debbie Stelner, 
Elaine P. Mayo, Cheryl Yeakley, Susan Melson. 





254/Alpha Gamma Rho 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 




m y ( fe mk 



Little Sisters Of Athena 



alphakappalambdaalphakappalambdaalphakappalambdaal 

SALZMANN, DORCAS Houseparent 

ALDRIDGE, DEE Topeka 

Business Administration Freshman 

ARELLANO, FRANK Torrimar, PR 

Engineering Freshman 

BOSARGE, HAROLD Topeka 

Music Education Senior 

BROOKE, KENT Topeka 

Marketing Junior 

BROSE, JEFFREY Valley Falls 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

COAD, RUSSELL Garden Plain 

Pre-Vet Junior 

DUTTON, ANDY Kingman 

, Marketing Junior 

, EARNSHAW, JIM Overland Park 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ERWIN, DAVID Jewell 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 



BOTTOM ROW: Karen M. Smith, Evelyn L. 
Bosarge, Linda 1. Will, Brenda S. Dutton, Karan 
J. Law. SECOND HOW: Caprice D. Phelps, 
Cherie L. Antln, Robin L. McDowell, Sheryl M. 
Henderson, Sharon K. Andrew. THIRD ROW: 
Susan M. Carson, Julie A. Cornett, Taml J. 
Abram, Tammy J. Fleenor, Becky A. Fleenor. 
TOP ROW: Becky A. Ulrtch, Abigail L. Glatt, 
Donna R. Mogge, Beth A. Nally, Cheryl A. Brei- 
tenbach. Char A. Barrett. 




Alpha Kappa Lambda/255 



alphakappalambdaalphakappalambdaalphakappalambdaalphakappalambdaalphakappalambdaalphakappalambd 



FARHA, PAUL Wichita 

Retail Floriculture . . . . Freshman 

FRANZEE, RONALD Arkansas City 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

GILLISPIE, BRAD . Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering ... Freshman 

GILLISPIE, JEFFREY ' Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

HADLEY, STEVEN Mullinville 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

KELLY, KEN Severy 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KING, WILLIAM Lewis 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

LOUX, RICHARD Wichita 

Finance Junior 

MOORE, TOBY Prairie Village 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 

PAD1N, STEVEN Sunnyvale, CA 

Geography Sophomore 

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM Valley Falls 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

ROOD, DAN Winfield 

General Freshman 

ROOD, KEVIN Winfield 

Civil Engineering Senior 

SABBERT, DOUGLAS White Cloud 

General Junior 

SCHUMACHER, JOHN Kansas City, MO 

Music Education Freshman 

STEWART, MICHAEL Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions . Fifth Year Student 

STORER, KARL Abilene 

Journalism Freshman 

SYLVIS, KENT Manhattan 

History Sophomore 

THOMAS, ANTHONY Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

TOWLE, JAMES Osage City 

Music Education Freshman 

VON THAER, LEWIS Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

WALKER, SCOTT Udall 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

WALTER, BRIAN Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

WEALAND, JAY Cedar Point 

Pre-Pharmacy Junior 

WILSON, DALE Bartlesville, OK 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WILSON, LARRY Topeka 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

WODDELL, REX Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 





Itil < 




256/Alpha Kappa Lambda 




/miprifl A 3U VxIIlCQCl alphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphat 

#HHHM HHH wma^mWBmm ^tgWfflMfflm ALHOLM, MARK Overland Park 

£m ', AtKP'-~ J5fct Marketing Freshman 

X ; Aj* M^*%k $lk«7L ANDERSON, KEITH Belleville 

iP* H ' > %w/ v BARRON, CORY Topeka 

J^^|in' *%*?*' V Journalism Junior 

^^ft |^^^ ^fl Bftfc BOLEN, JEFF McPherson 

Uk "\^Bi"j |3jtJ '. ' jfl Architectural Engineering Junior 

" FT JEM ~~] H BOLLING, MARK Kansas City, MO 

* /« JP* JM W ^m Special Student 

■MR i»^m * * W^^ft BRAY, DAVID Lees Summit, MO 

",\ m^k: „N|B ^pj-v ~~ ■, Mb- "-Sn V 5 * «^B Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

A 1 , », M mL- ■ ^L * Y \A~ *' BRIGGS, TOM Coffeyville 

' Jfc~~ *^ ^Rk" W * " * 1^**./'' Architecture Senior 

W^' k. <d. **T BROWN, ALLAN Salina 

j ^^ "^ _ l '^M Civil Engineering Freshman 

M ^ tv VM if W^I'mm^Mnt*. Mm\ \ W BROWN, MIKE Hoisington 

> 4Lw 1 / ■VVHIH^H. & France 

BURK, KYLE Aurora, IL 

Business Administration Freshman 

BYROM, KENT Shawnee Mission 

Bakery Science and Management . . . Senior 

COONROD, GREGG Overland Park 

I Journalism Junior 

"X, mnJ COSGROVE, DANIEL Council Grove 

"^* v , *«MH >4 ' ' ^fc „^dfll Physical Education Senior 

, #\1^ \ « \\ gj# M I t ' ^B mJ CRANEY, BENJAMIN Topeka 

l iL 2'*3a h! EHif S l\ Vt il ■**_' Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

H ■■■■ HHW ^m^ DANIELSEN, GEARY Overland Park 

£ ■* ^tfft 4, ^tf2ti^ ! ati Animal Science and Industry Junior 

ML * JPkA if A W"t- JQ T ^m DEGENHARDT, RICHARD Leawood 

k J*1 W. B ^ % - vl ^- -1 Food Science and Management Senior 

I f f^ V W ▼ " J A* - " I FIRNER, ANTHONY Tribune 

- >. 4f^ ^ V y*» £^, ** ™ Computer Science Sophomore 

A , A%*/ ^^' h JL FISCHER, GARY Kansas City, MO 

~ ' A | ^^L<f w^ ^Mm^\ MJMto "^ * 4 Construction Science Freshman 

*M V4. 4* I /ft ffiM*] M M FRYE, ROBERT Lees Summit, MO 

■L> iSHPI^M S^P i Jb IT ***■ ,'•.'•:• fll I , \ \ * i Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GENSKY, WILLIAM Jefferson, City, MO 

Construction Science Junior 

GILL, DOUGLAS Mission 

'-Jl'M flL A Engineering Freshman 

m-» ~F If" K ' 1> y? I GRIEBEL, JOHN Stockton 

— «r~- k \ «#'*S * TL - t /m"*— / Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

\L J\L±> ^Ite k^ ^X^L GRIEBEL, WAYNE Collyer 

^> ^Mw KM\ J m^ ^^M * m B ▲ I ill Industrial Engineering Senior 

itmO , m m \m \ ^A k , Mm. mm%> m A li hafliger, laren De erf ic id 

nH 1 Wm IIH H Hll l^mfMiH Horticulture Sophomore 

Jfrjfe ^ i F^B ^Bf^L "3fc ^ ^fck Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

^^^\i ^^^ A ^ ^^m\ jr P%k m&'A Food Science and Management Sophomore 

■IV >\'M '' W R/O /ft ft M JERMAIN, DON Wathena 

B'M mX \ \m' i>V m\ fL WW Industrial Engineering Senior 

^^ _>„. JOHNSON, JAMES Kansas City, MO 

^B I \ ^^ Jt_ W a Marketing Junior 

■IP^ft »^M W^% KELLEY, GREG Belleville 

J ~* ». ' ^^^ ^» R» - ■ W^ ■*=■ Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

f »- I 1 4- PI " ,.. P ^ -^ " KRIZMAN, DAVID Overland Park 

5 '* i " > ^fc.*^""* I % - - ' ~: " Biology Junior 

'V *^ ^W" A%~ ^. ^ LEWIS, RICK Wichita 

/JR ^ y» *' \ «^MB ^^H a H 4 ♦ Business Administration Freshman 

Jffi, N M \ \/LA '\P>-mL'£ ■' . J ^ x 1 *! L1NV1LLE, STAN Holcomb 

«8r \. \Vll • \ #*/ i''^ Hk^ ■ I 3 I Agricultural Economics Junior 





Alpha Tau Omega/257 



alphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalpha 






.VW?v fe»46 



H/as/j Day-Members of 
the Alpha Tau Omega 
fraternity do a spic and 
span job on several 
vehicles. The car wash 
was held at the ATO 
house as part of a 
pledge class project. 
Members of a campus 
soriority helped out. 




LOBAUGH, RANDY Junction City 

Management .... Freshman 

LONG, JAMES Harper 

Pre-Law .... Freshman 

MAURER, MARK Mission 

Engineering Freshman 

MAXWELL, WAYNE St. Joseph, MO 

Architectural Engineering .... Freshman 

McCULLOUGH, GREGORY McPherson 

Business Administration Freshman 

McKERNAN, MICHAEL Wathena 

Accounting Sophomore 

McTAGUE, RICK Overland Park 

Computer Science Freshman 

MEIER, KEITH Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MILLER, SCOTT Mahenthal 

Agricultural Economics ... Freshman 

MINES, MICHAEL McPherson 

Accounting Junior 

MOLDRUP, STEVE Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

MULCAHY, TIM Prairie Village 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

NIXON, JOHN Medicine Lodge 

Business Administration Junior 

NORRIS. JOHN Kansas City, MO 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

OTEY, JOHN Overland Park 

Political Science Senior 



P~* W^ r"4 




LMtll;ft# 




258/Alpha Tau Omega 





omegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomegaalphatauomega 

PHILLIPS, DANIEL Lees Summit, MO 

Architecture Junior 

REHMERT, RORY Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

ROBSON, DANNY Wichita 

■* Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

X^X A k^ _^Jtkjk SCHWEDER, TOM Fa.rway 

. 1 ^g^H JBBH ^ . i drtIB f BS&^ <0fKmm~ Restaurant Management Sophomore 

£ ' m&i ^ U\ Ml. M Mm SEYMOUR, DAVID Olathe 

. f |^ Hi H \ ' M L m<\m\ I I Wvi Physical Education Sophomore 

^^W/m _ MMtWmWl SHOEMAKER ' JEFF Kansas City, MO 

tH Bfc JgLWt' ■ ^BKto** *■ ^fe al m. Construction Science Sophomore 

JfWim m^M Jf *^r* mf *vk SILER, MARTY Kansas City, MO 

!%k BIL *% W-i ■'-" ^-^J ^E~ -Tj| Management Sophomore 

^■^ 1 irl, W W "r V m^ * SMITH, CRAIG Hill City 

^k - - f itsT %-«X jfr * *" x '— Psychology Senior 

±~- > ^VtaT ^k\^ STOKES, BRAD Leawood 

^MWl i r iV ?%'', * Pre-Vet Freshman 

flW •" l# '> Nil^ I Vif •' # STUCK, DAVID Shawnee 

IL BK If •. , \ . lM lA ?JSj .'; ... : 'M \ "-•'! li i Business Administration Freshman 

TUCKFIELD. GILES Overland Park 

/fl£^ \ J$ l» A ilk Mechanical Engineering Senior 

JW*' 1 \ M m\ ^^^fSk TURNER, DOUG Salina 

f'Si x. W ■**«' «SB ■P* - 31 Psychology Sophomore 

fl: v ■ 1 <r W UTECH. MICHAEL Topeka 

*'' ' m mP : 'M> f Marketing Senior 

4^^f \^ VOORHEES, DAVID Canton, IL 

* _ ' Jk\ % \ ^|i Civil Engineering Sophomore 

\/» fc » ^ M^ Wi WALLACE, KENT Topeka 

'A / WM \ ■ \ ^K «UB Applied Music Freshman 

WALSH, ED Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 

WIDRIG, GREG Manhattan 

t <\ Pre-Medicine Freshman 




Little Sisters Of The Maltese Cross 




BOTTOM ROW: Rita D. Walsh, Kathy Robinson, 
Julia A. Pharis, Anne E. Stewart, Laura E. Drybread, 
Deana D. Mohlstrom, Becky K. Mathews, Kathy S. 
Arnold, Lynda Mikes. SECOND ROW: Alison D. 
Lueker, Jan M. Alexander, Vicky S. Wernes, Dawn J. 
Skupa, Connie J. Clark, Mona L. Dawson, Susan J. 
Clark, Jill L. Breckenridge, Diane L. Myers, Carol A. 
Bowen. THIRD ROW: Barbara S. Millard, Lisa L. 
Hooker, Cynthia S. Garber, Karen B. Johnson, Becky 
J. Johnson, Lindsay L. Townsend, Teresa J. Hart, 
Kelli L. Moldrup, Mary A. Stucky. TOP ROW: Mary 
C. Cosgroue, Joan Howse, Lisa Beam, Sue Flemming, 
Rebecca J. Garrison, Kristin B. Rapp, Teresa A. 
Utech, Catherine A. McMahon, Cindy M. Smith. 



Alpha Tau Omega/259 



Alpha Xi Delta 

ANDERSON, JILL Manhattan 

Finance Freshman 

ANDERSON. LORI Topeka 

Consumer Interest Senior 

BALDWIN, CATHY Salina 

General Freshman 

BARNES, MARCIA Sedan 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BAUER, BRENDA Wichita 

Journalism Sophomore 

BENNETT, TRACY Newton 

Business Administration Freshman 

BLOMQUIST, SANDY Smolan 

Management Senior 

BOHN, SHARON Alma 

Journalism Junior 

BURFORD, BOBBI Milton 

Family and Child Development Junior 

CRILLY, DIANA Wamego 

English .... Freshman 

DOCTOR, DIANE Overland Park 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

FENTON, BETH Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

FOUST, GAI Bucklin 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

FOWLER, KAREN Shawnee 

Journalism Sophomore 

FREDRICKSON, NANCY Leawood 

Interior Design Sophomore 

GROFT, TERI Wakeeney 

Journalism ... Sophomore 

HARTENSTEIN, BETH Abilene 

Journalism Senior 

HOUSE, JANINE Derby 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

HUGHES, TRACEY Sabetha 

Family and Child Development Senior 

JENNINGS, BOBBIE Salina 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

KNAM1LLER, KARI Overland Park 

Physical Education Senior 

LINCOLN, SHARON Overland Park 

Office Administration Freshman 

LONG, KIM Mission 

Marketing Junior 

MARRS, KAY Arkansas City 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Sophomore 

MARSH, TERRI Manhattan 

Marketing Sophomore 

McGEHEE, DEBBIE Ottawa 

Elementary Education Senior 

MILLER, MARGARET Manhattan 

Pre-Law Junior 

MILLER, TAMMY Stilwell 

Geography Junior 

MOELLER, MICHELE Kansas City 

Business Administration Sophomore 

NEWCOMER, JEAN Overland Park 
Elementary Education Junior 

NEWTH, LORRI .... Mission 

Physical Education Sophomore 

NICKELL, SHANA Overland Park 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

OVERHOLSER, CYNDI Overland Park 

Journalism Junior 

PARSA, SUZIE Leawood 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

PIHL, BARBARA Falun 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

REESE, LUANN Overland Park 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

ROBISON, JODY St. George 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

ROGERS, TERESA Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

ROOSA, LYNN Leawood 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

SCHARNHORST, VICKI Olathe 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 



alphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaal] 




260/Alpha Xi Delta 



ixideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxideltaalphaxict 

■ jV ^a^S^B SJOGREN, KARLA Lindsborg 

" ' Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

SMITH, JAN Manhattan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SPENCER, NINA Scott City 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

,™ .-- r „ ,-., w SPRAY, TAMMY Great Bend 

^ifc?^ MBf^ NHL. ^Br Jc|fit <- '^^3^ s* i^fflHr l ^Kfc i General Freshman 

^•> T^fc, -S^:« 'a l%#r^r ' &tiHL Ji 1% STEHL EY, JILL Manhattan 

■ flk ' . tK J V\. ( ^^^Jft . Music Education Freshman 

TAYLOR, DENA Wichita 

\ T , Clothing Retailing Sophomore 
'a! JEig Wi TUROV, JAN Overland Park 

.« , \\ flLw Physical Education Sophomore 

* ™ *^J WJ m ]L WASHBURN, JANET Independence 

JJf^ ," Marketing Senior 

* ; ? y ^Ki»«*lL\ WILLIAMS, ANNE Overland Park 

rfgWL - (^ | - ^S' • BMP "&i T?n ^T ■% Journalism Sophomore 

/*L< ;■■"', -I ' , I5S f .7 £ v» I Hi,-/ /. v, " ! WILSON, SALLY Leawood 

'ihi'y^i ' nm wsmWrnx- f * H ° me Ec ° n ° mics jumor 

WISBEY, SUSIE Sallna 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

»k -v » W WOOLW1NE, KATHY Pratt 

1L 4fl Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

f 





/17/ wef - Sharon 
Lincoln, freshman in 
office administration, 
Lorri Newth, sophomore 
in physical education, 
and Karen Fowler, 
sophomore in journalism, 
seem to be competeing 
with the snowman. They 
started out clearing the 
front porch of the Alpha 
Xi Delta house of snow, 
but ended with all the 
snow on themselves. 



Kent Boughton 



Alpha Xi Delta/261 



JOC^LCl wlylllCl ML 9l betasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmap 

DARTON, BETH Houseparent m __ _ .._ 

DARTON, KEITH Houseparent jfca B|. /pF-l. JlI F a ^^Ajk. aMKI*- 

BAKER, JAMES Wamego ^BPWj J pA M^^ m*4 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman ^B~ 3B QL ^ss ^^B ^Pm. ^t|[ B Wat ^^M 

BECKER, GLENN Garden City fl T M ■ ■ W*"* "^ Y*" 1 *- B 

Electrical Engineering Freshman f^ - S " "v- jjr ^fc*^' ^ \j^^ ,/ I*-' ^ 

Pre Design Professions Freshman JJA &9r I B A. Bfefc BBl^n flElfe -«*MB^Hr ^k ' 

m&H! lut 1 I- - .;> 

BURKMAN, GALEN Shawnee Tv*" W JE^ , W^ "^1 ^ W^T" 

Architecture Fifth Year Student Upt - * lF~ *% *&-~ I ■• C~~ f £*^r « 

CARLSON, DAVID Overland Park ^h J ^ %r W^ V-/ ^(4, ^. ^JW 

Chemical Engineering Junior m^J t^ M fe^ B^h ^*^ | g|§Bk ^, \88fe, 400 

CARLSON, RANDALL Clay Center N. Wgi | W&M \jtfkA >*$■ VM it 

Accountin 9 Junior \ ^f B_BB\iBBl HbM/ ^ . BmBuBkml ll ! \ \7 

DANNENBERG, MAURY Gaylord ■BBHBBB 1 HBBf f ^rr ^m* 

Chemical Engineering Junior ■ *^ - W aS»^ » %fcr~ / !L 

EHRL1CH, KEITH " Great Bend Jw ,\V^ 3y ^^ Jmf 

Graduate Student Accounting ^Ak <t\ k'\\ AM^kf" '^A. "** MHB » B^k. 

FOSTER. DANA Prairie Village A M '} A fF TIK / ft \ Bl C*l 

Political Science Senior | B # : JHI! \ ^.V ■hMBvA ■ ■ f\ i I AH fl 

FREDRICKSON, KURT Oberlin *^*. J^, J ^^ 1 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior ^fsHtSlk, ^£ B \ ^|? B- | ^(^.A 

HARMS, JEFF Overland Park V ^ "" § W ""l / TuL^ ^3^ 

HOGEBOOM, DAVID Overland Park > ^d^ ^Sir Bk. •<^W' 

Journalism Freshman ^g^L~* ^^^ ~*mm < *tt~-Jk /\ ^BV A BBl > 

HUSSELMAN, RICHARD Salina A , B I N IW , M3! ■ ! "B M A 1 ^ %«N 

Political Science Freshman ! B 1/ BB i\ If./ li\ '*T ! |lfl | , ^ 

JOHNSON, ERIC Topeka .^M*. ^fBHI R «k. ^r>3L>. - M 

Chemical Engineering Junior Jfl P^ ^&&%L /&2fe ^LaW ^B 

JORNS, MARK Manhattan #^LIi i^F^ ■ |(^% JP^ »* ^ ^ 

Labor Relations Senior f*» ^ » f^^^f ■w-'M B^P*" 1 ■*" -I 

KARMEIER, KENT Kansas City, MO V ? W^ I. 4,. I * : C~ * -.. * 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore -^c- ' \ «itU ^Bt**"" * fci,^~" K "^ ~ 

KILLMAN, HAROLD Topeka 2 + , „ jfe* '' J^%m- ^^L 

Business Administration Freshman ^MBb 4^^B^ ^m^ V^ .^M^B # iB^ Bl Bk ftW 

KIRCHHOFF. STEVE Cedar i A^fl I • Mk J/BK I BkVflB ! | IfB 

Mechanical Engineering Senior AlHI £l& I fW \ IkivB ^ BiVBM 

LENKNER, ROBERT Medicine Lodge %,- ' ^BV^^bI ^nf M^ \^ ^ ^^ 

LIGGETT, LARRY Lincoln '^ I^bI BA^ " B^ ^ I ^^^ 

LINDER, DAVID Lenexa fBBBJ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

Horticulture Freshman .-"A ^hI Bl ^fl B).- Jb ^^ M Al A 

LIRA, CARL Topeka £r^& ^r**^| , B Mfe ^P^m M jm. 

Chemical Engineering Junior flL, , Mj BT«-~ -^% ■S»^^w Bw** '*^B ^T - 

MANN, VONN Hutchinson ■' ■ W^^r K s. I ™ W^ *• ■ 

Construction Science Sophomore \ ' 4£^> W ^Lrf^Si ^%^" / Ik*?'' |^_ 1/ 

MAY, ROLAND Oberlin * ^Brl >V -* ^A IK-, 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman \ I , ^^^ ' "^■^k / ^A^** ^^^ 

MELGREN, DANIEL Osage City ^ \\\ M*.;. ,\ , llfjB / A, 

Accounting Junior \ I p-- "/ l\ ,.l| , W . \~ •', 






262/Beta Sigma Psi 



>tasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmapsibetasigmr 





%J 








MILLER, DARRYL Hoisington 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

MINES, JOE Oberlin 

Accounting Freshman 

MOORE, M. ERIC Dresden 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

MOOTS, ERIC Eureka 

Horticulture Freshman 

PROTHE, JAMES Paola 

Engineering Technology Senior 

RANDOL, BRETT Lincoln, NE 

Horticulture Sophomore 

REED, LOUIS Pomona 

Geography Junior 

RUST, DARYL Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SCHAEFER, ALLEN Wellington 

Marketing Senior 

SCHULTEIS, GARY Louisburg 

Pre-Vet Junior 

TOBABEN, WARREN Shawnee Mission 

Journalism Sophomore 

ZABEL, RON Gaylord 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 




Don't spin it- Randy 
Carlson, junior in 
accounting, Kevin Elm, 
junior in chemical 
engineering, and Dana 
Foster, senior in political 
science, take time from 
house duties to play 
foosball. 



Little Sisters Of The Golden Rose 




BOTTOM ROW: Audrey J. Kuhlman, Diane L. Peck, 
Theresa D. Schaede, Carolyn A. Burnett, Mary E. 
Modeer, Dawn E. Cummins. SECOND ROW: Janet 
K. Rledel, Karen E. Rodefeld, Patty J. Allison, Anne 
E. Bengston, Beth R. Qlmartin, Barbara A. Brlnkman, 
Devin E. Williams. THIRD ROW: Tammy J. Burk- 
man, Linda S. Mugler, Debbie L. Swenson, Maria J. 
Ray, Jo A. Long. TOP ROW: Cathy A. Decker, Lisa 
D. Poe, Patty E. Carey, Kay J. Neufeld, Pam R. Joms, 
Donna N. Becker. 



Beta Sigma Psi/263 



Beta Theta Pi 



betathetapibetathetapi betathetapibetathetapi betathetapibeta 



ADAMS, HELEN Houseparent 

ADAMS, DOUG Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ANDERSON, BRUCE Salina 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ASJES, EVERT Kansas City, MO 

Horticulture Senior 

ATKINSON, GENE .... Manhattan 
Civil Engineering Junior 

ATTWATER, PAUL III Wichita 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

AYRES, MARK Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

BISAGNO, DAVE Augusta 

Accounting Junior 

BRENSING, DOUG Manhattan 

Finance Junior 

CARLSON, STEVE Decatur, GA 

Business Administration Freshman 

COLLINS, CRAIG Junction City 

Finance Junior 

COOK, CRAIG Wichita 

Interior Design Junior 

COPHER, WILLIAM Prairie Village 

Accounting Junior 

COTNER, STEVE Lincoln, NE 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

DEARDORFF, BRET Wichita 

Pre-Vet Junior 

DIETZ, JIM Wakeeney 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DODDS, DOUGLAS Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DUNSFORD, BART Dodge City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

EATHERLY, ROBERT Garden City 

Finance Senior 

EXLINE, DAVID Salina 

Pre-Law Junior 

GARINGER, NED Buhler 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

GEIGER, JOHN Denver, CO 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

GUNN, DOUG Salina 

Business Administration Junior 

HAMILTON, KIRK Wakeeney 

Finance Freshman 

HANSON, DREW Jamestown 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

HEATH, BRETT Overland Park 

Geology Freshman 

HENDERSON, JEFF Meriden 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

HITE, RICHARD Wichita 

Humanities Junior 

KEHR, BILL Wichita 

Business Administration Freshman 

KIMMEL, TEDD Hutchinson 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

LAVERY, TOM Salina 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

MANNING, WILLIAM Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

MARTIN, JOHN Leawood 

Business Administration Freshman 

MAYOTT, STEWART Glen Falls, NY 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

McGUIRE, GARY Wakeeney 

Accounting Senior 

MERCER, RICHARD Wichita 

Construction Science Sophomore 

MOHLER, STEVE Arkansas City 

Business Administration Junior 

MULLEN, MIKE Wichita 

Finance Junior 

O'CONNOR, PATRICK Salina 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

OEHME, STEVE Manhattan 

Chemistry Freshman 





dtMft \*% 




Kfcl? 




tf$ tfiArf 




264/Beta Theta Pi 



!tapibetathetapibetathetapibetathetapibetathetapibetathetapibetathetapibetathetapibetathetapibetathetapibetat r 




Allright! ■ Gary 
McGuire, senior in 
accounting, and Mark 
Ayres, sophomore in 
accounting, grasp hands 
in congratulations while 
their rider, Kim Strong, 
rests after the long ride. 
The team claimed a first 
place victory in the 
Lambda Chi Alpha 
Chariot Races Sept. 28, 
1979. McGuire and 
Ayres are members of 
the Beta Theta Pi 
fraternity and Strong is a 
member of the Alpha 
Chi Omega sorority. 



Craig Chandler 




OLSON, ALLEN Arkansas City 

Horticulture Junior 

PATTERSON, DON Prairie Village 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

REEDER, JOHN Wakeeney 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

RICHARDS, DAVID . Manhattan 

Special Student 

SANDERS, MICHAEL Wichita 

Finance Senior 

SANDRITTER, DAVID Hoisington 

Finance Freshman 

SCHREINER, NOEL Wakeeney 

Elementary Education Freshman 

SEE, TIM Overland Park 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

SHIDELER, RAYMOND Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

SPIER, STEVE Columbia, MO 

Architecture Junior 

STAFFORD, THOMAS Leawood 

Business Administration Freshman 

STITES, TIM Manhattan 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

VONFELDT, JIM Lamed 

Accounting Senior 

VOSS, KEN Leawood 

Physical Science Senior 

WAGNER, KEITH Hoisington 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

WEDEL, MONTE Hutchinson 

Accounting Sophomore 

WICKERSHAM, JAMES Newton 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

WILBUR, JEFF Hays 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

WILBUR, KURT Hays 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

WILSON, DUNCAN Kansas City 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 



Beta Theta Pi/265 



Ill v/MMm€£QCl chiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomeg 

BURKE, SHIRLEY Houseparent 

ADAMS, JANE Overland Park 

Dietetics Junior 

BATT, LEE Wichita m^, -^ , 

Family and Child Development Sophomore ■nL *•- ^ wf£ ^» -**">» K — 'Hi hjm* 

BROCKWAY, ALYS Olathe ''' ' wl^ r*2S ^iT t i Ik. J ! ^&*^ W ^If^l 

Horticulture Junior Htew / ''*nfc mm^ Sk ^^fl i *< TJiu ' " h - i^_ 

BROWN, SUSAN Salina , ■NT' HI .-JjJTjr M ' i ^ 

Speech Pathology Senior £ J*/ 7 ^ .jfesJI |j k »r fl ^* /" 

BUCKLEY, JAN Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

CAIN, SUSAN Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 'B**** *" 1 

CARR, COLLETTE Overland Park Liiv 

Journalism and Mass Communication . Senior ^|pr~ ^ 

CHR1STENSFN, SHELLY Concordia A^k*. a%m\^rm ^Hf'* ' ^m\^ I 

Physical Therapy Sophomore sCJaM Bm> % ^ \ JP" jj/ff*- jk W^^L ' fek. 

CLEVELAND, JODY Minneapolis f% ^Sfcl^ 1 ^ '■PV i' ^'~'\1h 

Accounting Sophomore Ir^M^? \ ,v JH V ■ I ._._^^ ^Hi 

DAWSON, SUE Abilene 

Secondary Education Freshman 

DEBO, KATIE Independence 

General Sophomore 

DREES, LIZ Shawnee Mission $9 ^ _ 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore >^BB- ^^^L. ^^K i *lHr ^ 

DRITLF.Y, JILL Kansas City, MO ^ ■ ; 'c ; ■ ""■BL <A ' ^ **'i- 

Marketing Junior ^fl ^fet IP MV/Or M ' %v ^ I^N 

FLEMING, THERESA Mission ■ M |f|§|ta,\ '•H 
Clothing Retailing Junior I ! H wwPl^illl, 1* 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior tL* a^S t I ' fl Bwfl . . I k £ft li>^% * 

GROVES, JODI Salina 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

HAUSE, LESLEY Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 
HENNIGH, LEAH Colby ^>i ^ 

General Sophomore ~* jA MS JB T J 

HIPPS, LISA Wichita 

Fine Arts Junior ^M 1 1 .-. j^ Vrifi*'^-^ ^Jl F /Ljt"% 

HOBBLE, SALLY Wichita M M #^Sz!!r > *^> Aw^Wj^m 

Family and Child Development Senior | ^„J***«-< 25><{>" > Sk v ^E 

HOVEY, KAREN Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

HUMMER, KAREN Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore Mga -*»W Wb***\ '""" ~ Hfc"^* 

JONES, COLLEEN Topeka j| A^ I "^ ^. (2VlS 

Accounting Sophomore "^E s ^ r ^ft L \ *' . - ^ ''■■l ' §M ^■k^" l 

KERR, KELL1 Lawrence *I| . m " Jm t m ]Sfe* l**U ■ W r 

Clothing Retailing Freshman Jfw] ■ /^ ^Sk j^w, *j»t v*« \\Ss^^iX 

KIRIAKOS, LYNNE .... Leawood |f'*r%, "'' : /j^B M 

Pre-Medicine Junior 1 ft MM Mf^AAAWS&^&J ,\ 




Sunday, Mummy, 
Tuesday Night-Jalue 
Woodbury, freshman in 
secondary education, 
Susan Thomas, junior in 
marketing, and Barb 
McCuire, senior in social 
work, are not under the 
curse of the mummy. 
Instead they donned 
these unusual costumes 
for Halloween trick-or- 
treating. 




266/Chi Omega 



chiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiomegachiome/ 




KOOL, BEVERLY Manhattan 

Computer Science Sophomore 

LARKIN, ANN Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 

MAHRLE, NANCY Topeka 

Modern Language ... Junior 

MATTHEW, MARY Olathe 

Elementary Education . Sophomore 

McGUIRE, BARBARA Mulvane 

Social Work Senior 

MERSHON, DIANE Manhattan 

Marketing Sophomore 

MOHLSTROM, DEANA Lawrence 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

MORGAN, PATRICIA Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 

MROSS, AUDREY Wichita 

Marketing Senior 

NEWELL, MARLA Stafford 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

PARTRIDGE, BECKY Wichita 

General Freshman 

PATTERSON, MEGAN Prairie Village 

Marketing Sophomore 

PENNYBACKER, GAIL Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

PETRY, BRENDA Centralia 

Dietetics Sophomore 

PHILLIPS, SALLY Hutchinson 

Secondary Education Junior 

PRITCHETT, AMY Shawnee 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

PYLE, MEG Manhattan 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

RANALLO. LIZ Leawood 

Accounting Senior 

SCHNACKE, JUDY Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 
SHUTLER, SALLY Great Bend 

Applied Music Sophomore 

SIEBERT, CONNIE Abilene 

Management Senior 

SIMCOX, DENISE Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 
SUMMERS, SHARON Winfield 

Marketing Junior 

TEAHAN, KATHLEEN Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

THOMAS, SUSAN Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

VANDERLIP, HOLLY Overland Park 

Horticulture Senior 

WOODBURY, JALUE Leoti 

Secondary Education Freshman 

YOUNGBLOOD, LYNNIE Kansas City, MO 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

ZAHNER. JOANN Leawood 

Business Administration Senior 




Let's Get Crazy • The 

seniors of Chi Omega 
are up to some crazy 
antics at their Christmas 
formal. Their message of 
warning is, "Look out 
world, here we come!" 



Chi Omega/267 



Delta Delta Delta 



ABRAHAMSON. TAMMY Garfield 

Marketing Senior 

ALLEN, JANIE Valley Center 

Home Economics Journalism Sophomore 

ANDERSON, JEAN Ogden 

General Freshman 

BARR, MARGARET Lawrence 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

BARSAMIAN, SUSAN Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BATES, CATHY Perry 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BAUMGARDNER, MALIA Lawrence 

Journalism Senior 

BEELER, MEG Overland Park 

Music Education Senior 

BIGGS, BEVERLY Leavenworth 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

BROADIE, LISA Hays 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

BULLOCK, CINDY Norton 

Elementary Education Junior 

BUSENBARK, JANET Larned 

Family and Child Development Junior 

CALIBANI. VICKI Wichita 

Business Administration Senior 

CHUBB, CRYSTAL Great Bend 

Pre-Dentistry Senior 

CLEM, MUFFET Mission 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

COE, CAREN McPherson 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

COMER, JULIE Leawood 

General Freshman 

CORNELLA, KAREN Wichita 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DAVIES, DALE Winfield 

Interior Design Sophomore 

DAVIS, PAM Salisbury, MO 

Physical Education Junior 

DEVINE, MARTHA Shawnee Mission 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

FIONDA, KRIS Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

FITCH, DIANE Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

FITZPATRICK, SALLY St. Joseph, MO. 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FRISBIE, KAYE Lyons 

Physical Education Sophomore 

FUNK, TERRI Oakley 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

GISH, LINDA Merriam 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HALE, LISA Prairie Village 

Marketing Sophomore 

HEMMERT, MARI Oakley 

Physical Education Junior 

H1GGASON, KELLY Norton 

General Freshman 

HOWARD, PAIGE Wichita 

Journalism Sophomore 

HUNT, EMILY Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

JONES, KARI Pratt 

Physical Education Freshman 

JORNS, ANN Manhattan 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

KELLY, MELISSA Bucyrus 

Biology Freshman 

KNADLE, KATHY Bucyrus 

Interior Design Sophomore 

LANE, SHERYL Shawnee Mission 

Modern Language Senior 

LASHBROOK, VICKI Kansas City 

Dance Sophomore 

MAYO, ELAINE Garden City 

Elementary Education Senior 

McMILLEN, JULIE Salina 

Fine Arts Junior 



deltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltacU 




268/Delta Delta Delta 



ideltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadeltadelta f 




S-T-R-E-T-C-H 

Soaping the hood of a 
car, Julie Willis, 
freshman in psychology, 
works to raise funds for 
the Delta Delta Delta 
pledge class. Car washes 
are a frequent fund 
raiser for sororities. 




MILES, JEANNE Great Bend 

Secondary Education Senior 

MILLER, SUSIE Shawnee 

Elementary Education Senior 

MORROW, REESA Salina 

Physical Education Sophomore 

POTTER, JULIE Baldwin 

Accounting Sophomore 

SCHEUERMAN, LORI Great Bend 

Home Economics Junior 

SCHUST, NANCY Leawood 

Consumer Interest Senior 

SMITH. JOY Topeka 

Business Administration Senior 

SMITH, SHERI Kansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

STIGALL, SUE Topeka 

Restaurant Management Junior 

STUMP, DIANE Kansas City 
Elementary Education Junior 

WALTER, KRISTI Sublette 

Journalism Sophomore 

WEAVER, CHERYL Leawood 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WELLIEVER, ROBIN Phoenix, AR 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

WIGGINS, TONI Minneapolis 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WINTER, KAREN Newton 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WYLIE, ANN Shawnee 

English Sophomore 

WYLIE, LYNN Shawnee 

Journalism Sophomore 



Delta Delta Delta/269 



Delta Sigma Phi 

ACKER, DAVID Allentown, PA 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ALLRED, GARY Coffeyville 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

ANDRADE, JOSEPH Prairie Village 

Physical Education Freshman 

AV1LA, JOSEPH Kansas City 

Engineering Freshman 

BIEN, DARREN Ottawa 

Computer Science Freshman 

CRUME, DOUGLAS Topeka 

Engineering Technology Senior 

FREDERKING, DOUG Salina 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

GOGOLSK1, JON Carbondale 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

GOGOLSKI, TIMOTHY Carbondale 

Natural Resouce Management Junior 

GRAVENSTEIN, MARTIN Ottawa 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HOLDCRAFT, JIM Housesprings, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

JOHNSON, BRAD Abilene 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

LEMOS, KELLY Coffeyville 

Business Administration Sophomore 

LORIE, GREG Normal, IL 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

MEJIA, M1CHAEST Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

MORRIS, JAMIE Arkansas City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

NEMETH, LOUIS ' Northampton, PA 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

PEPOON, BILL Paola 

Construction Science Sophomore 

PHELPS, RANDY Wellington 

Business Administration Freshman 

QUASEBARTH, SCOTT Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

RINNE, ROBERT Bern 

Computer Science Junior 

SAMUELSON, ERIC Newton 

Finance Sophomore 

SCHONEWEIS, MARK Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SULLIVAN, JAMES Martins Creek, PA 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

TAYRIEN, DOUG Leavenworth 

Management Freshman 

WATSON, RANDALL Manhattan 

History Junior 

WEIMER, MICHAEL Salisbury, MO 

Construction Science Sophomore 



deltasigmaphideltasigmaphideltasigmaphideltasigmaphidelt* 




V r t fff ' 




linil 




1 ii$->, i 



Sisters Of The Sphinx 



BOTTOM HOW: Janelle L. Johnson, Mellnda L. Col- 
iett, Pam A. Buck, Klmberly K. Effland, Sherl A. 
Strait, Kathy Kircher. SECOND ROW: Janey E. Lee- 
burg, Cindy J. Shepard, Claudia L. Effland, Dee A. 
Kudrick, MUllcent M. Hare, Sherl L. Sneed. TOP 
ROW: Karen J. Burjes, Judy A. Jones, Polly S. Robin- 
son, Laurie J. Gregg, Linda K. Marihugh. 




270/Delta Sigma Phi 



Delta Tau Delta 



k 



deltataudeltadeltataudeltadeltataudeltadeltataudeltadeltataudeltadelfi 










i\^ 4°, 






CHAPPELL, MARY Houseparent 

ANDERSON, JON Manhattan 

Biology Junior 

AXLAND, DAVE Overland Park 

Horticulture Freshman 

BECKMAN, BRENT Oakley 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BINGHAM, BRUCE Manhattan 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BOOMER, RUSSELL Portis 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BRASS, DAVE Wilmore 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BRASS, SAM Wilmore 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BREWSTER, PETE Salina 

Finance Junior 

CONWAY, KEVIN Leawood 

Business Administration Sophomore 

COOPER, SCOTT Garnett 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

COWAN, MARK Rossville 

General Sophomore 

CRONENWETT, FREDERICK Overland Park 

General Freshman 

DALE, BOB Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

DANT1CO, WILLIAM Salina 

Management Sophomore 

DAWSON, GEFF Abilene 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine .... Freshman 

DENSON, CRAIG Solomon 

Pre-Law Freshman 

ELDER, DARREN Wakeeney 

General Freshman 

FILE, KEN Beloit 

Speech Junior 

FOGLEMAN, KEVIN Ringoes, NJ 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

GARIBAY, MARIO Manhattan 

Business Administration Senior 

GERRITY, MIKE Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

GRANDSTAFF, BRUCE Salina 

Finance Sophomore 

GROVE, DOUG Manhattan 

Construction Science Junior 

HARRISON, PAT Overland Park 
Construction Science Sophomore 

HESSE, SCOTT Rossville 

Political Science Junior 

HOFBAUER, BRIAN Overland Park 

Pre-Law Freshman 

HORNER, THOMAS Overland Park 

General Freshman 

HOSACK, PAUL Virgil 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

HOUSHOLDER, GARY Courtland 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 




M'A'S'H - Members of 
the Delta Tau Delta 
fraternity congregate to 
watch M'A'S'H. This 
same group joins every 
week to view the hit 
show. 



Delta Tau Delta/271 



deltataiadeltadeltataudeltadeltataudeltadeltataudeltadeltataudeltadeltataudeltadeltataudeltadeltataudeltadeltat 

JAAX, EDWARD J Garden City H|H| BHHHHi 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore At j i ^A Hi 

JOHNSON, BRADLEY J Wakeeney flpl W^*mm 

Geology Sophomore Vtsat «*-ll 4th «^B 

JOHNSON, BRENT S Olathe ^f; 1 1 B> 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore r 

JURCZAK, J, MICHAEL Overland Park 

General Freshman ^^k ^few ^flflt fctew £'■* rid B\ "* ^^. 

KENNEY, MARK B Shawnee i Mk^M |! A >' I & i^flayflhKifc 

Marketing Junior j B 'y jflj Bit* A II i ■ '' Nil 

KENNEY, WILLIAM J. Overland Park —rig ^m .JH| | 

Construction Science Freshman ^R J§-9& Ik rifl. A\-^\ 

KLUGH, DAVE B. Priaire Village UmW gt flflP^m ** 4H M -IPEft I JB 

Pre- Design Professions F reshman MJ/Sil — V — W W'"~ &W WF m* ^Bs 

KRENGER, MARK E. Abilene % 1 ^1^./ "..' V W"^. F ■— , - .« 

Construction Science Sophomore • - - ¥ * ^ ■ JL" ' ^b Z - ""'' "*- ] 

KRENGER, MICHAEL C. Abilene ^^^ ; - ^%r ^»^ ' f 

General Sophomore grim W^ ...- \ ^ggH £ J 

KRETZ. GREGORY F Clay Center j Jk Al | /% 

Agricultural Economics Senior j SflKH i JW 

LAIR, JEFFREY E Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

LITTELL, MICHAEL D Overland Park 

General Business Junior 

MACY, JAY H Minneapolis 1 „- 

Agricultural Economics Freshman ^k «»-- W vt"* V 

MARTINITZ, BRIAN R Salina Jib* „^A ^ W ^saaHS 

General Freshman | > r*"''"^ H /A Wk I J^fl B/fl^si I ||HiL f*aSfc8 .. 

MOORE, GREGORY D Holton jf r / | '£f I '"^"HmM 

Accounting Senior y - **' \ Bfl L™* 

NEAL, WILLIAM A Garnett 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

NELSON, DOUGLAS 1 Olathe 

Pre-Medicine Senior W*m **• ' THf 9s*> </? n 

O'CONNOR, JIM P Salina 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

OTEY, JAMES W ." Overland Park Jit*' <**mWt ■ ^d ^hr A. 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman ^1^ KJ> / 0100m A^ MMW AMwkt 

OTEY, JOSEPH B Overland Park MM* £1, X> mW£? "" ■'■ ^ Mr- 

Finance Senior HUh k-.^M 111 lifSV flK. lli B 

PARADIS, ROBERT Overland Park ^g^ 

Construction Science Freshman ^mW^^A 

RIORDAN, MIKE J Solomon M 'W 

General Business Sophomore lp* * ,r | 

ROBERTSON, MARK L Tribune - - WT 1 s .p m *.- 1 ^a JC 

Pre-Veterinary Science Freshman j j- tKT" ' v Hb"~" v T^ ' \-r- 

ROBERTSON, STANLEY Coldwater *\ '~ r ^-Wf ^^ ^'- ~ ^ -*fg| 

Marketing Freshman rit fll'sUl Am MMM 1^ Al ^\(<e* > 

SAILORS, THOMAS C Erie K , I K&fl I M HA Jfl H U\ I'^L 

Finance Junior ,.\ 1 I ■OH I I LvJIiX W Hill/ 

SANDERS, KENTON L Shawnee Mission HMHI H lUfT iM 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore ^Sjk: : ' jrij| /jO 

SOLDNER, WOODY K Farina, 111. J" *% 

Pre-Law Freshamn Jpsir « ^B 

STARR, MICHAEL A Arkansas City T «_ * )r n 

Animal Science and Industry Junior JJ J?l V " ■* ^t«--- »<" 

STARR, PATRICK K Arkansas City j! ^^^ |^ ^^ ^%r ^ A 

General Business Senior ^k ..I Jfl ^flflB^ Mm l>iVp> 

WALKER, KENT Arlington Hts., III. ^ WL 411 ^fvJ IotJI ! ^\ 

Genera] Business Sophomore \ ! BL s ^Hj ;|\ ^# fl Bs^Tfla lB>A 

WINGATE, JEFFREY E Topeka 

General Freshman 

YOUNG, TONY R Mirriam 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 





DELT DARLINGS 



BOTTOM ROW: F, Kathleen Holland, Jeill D. 
Anderson, Kim A. Long, Cheri Lively, Mindy K. 
Neuenswander. SECOND ROW: Mary Pat 
O'Connor, Emily A. Starr, Mary L. Matthew, 
Vlcki J. Scharnhorst, Karla Sjogren, Jane Westh- 
ues. THIRD ROW: Christie L. Cuplt, Kerrl J. 
Hadley, Laura L. Mai, Lisa L. Hipps, Ding L. 
Wlllcott, Susan K. Sears. TOP ROW: Tracey S. 
Thomas, Susan Goss, Sue A. Dawson, Diane H. 
Marrs, Patty M. Carlson, Karen D. Wedel 




272/Delta Tau Delta 



Delta Upsilon 



deltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltaupsilon ' 




BA. >, tlii 



«. 1':^ 




(4, rtil 






f^| £.-$ ^^ 










ANDERSON, DON Anthony 

Pre-Law Freshman 

ARNOLD, DAVID Ashland 

Prc-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BAUER, ALAN Burdett 

ournalism Sophomore 

BOLAR, MIKE Wichita 

Construction Science Freshman 

BOLERJACK, CRAIG Shawnee 

Journalism Junior 

BONWELL, BRENT Wichita 

Biology Sophomore 

BREEDEN, JOHN Leawood 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BUGNER, DARYL Garden Plain 

Business Administration ... Freshman 

BUGNER, DEAN Garden Plain 

Accounting Junior 

BUSCH, MELVIN Cimarron 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

CHARTRAND, ART Leawood 

Business Administration Senior 

CHEW, DON Atchison 

Accounting Junior 

CORNELL, DON Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DEGENHARDT, MARC Topeka 

Secondary Education Freshman 

DE SHAZER, GARY Hutchinson 

Business Administration Freshman 

FILBY, JEFF Wichita 

Physical Education Senior 

GARRETT, REED Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

GOSS, MICHAEL Great Bend 

Economics Sophomore 

GROSDIDIER, GARY Eudora 

Business Administration Junior 

GROSDIDIER, GLEN Eudora 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

GROSSENBACHER, TIM Bern 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 

HALLMAN, BRIAN Hutchinson 

Engineering Technology Junior 

HATHAWAY, JAY Wichita 

Civil Engineering Senior 

HAWKINS, DAVID Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

HAYS, STUART Oakley 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

Great Bend 
Junior 

Overland Park 

Freshman 
Shawnee Mission 

Sophomore 

Prairie Village 

Junior 



HOSKINS, RON 
Business Administration 
JACOBSON, JON 
Engineering Technology 
KAPPLER, JOHN 
Pre-Design Professions 
KUEHNLE, BRUCE 
Pre-Vet 



LAW, DAVE Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Senior 



LAWRENCE, PAUL 

Architectural Engineering 

MANGES, JIM 

Engineering 

MEANS, BOB 

Finance 

MEYERS, BROOKE 

Accounting 

MORGAN, PAUL 

Pre-Vet 






Norton 
Freshman 
Manhattan 

Freshman 

Hiawatha 

Sophomore 

Merriam 

Sophomore 

Wichita 
Freshman 

NEMEC, TONY Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 

NORTON, ALLEN Overland Park 

Psychology Sophomore 

PARKS, BRIAN Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

REED, JAMES Overbrook 

Pre-Law Freshman 

REINHARDT, BRAD Great Bend 
Chemical Engineering Freshman 

REINHARDT, DOUG Great Bend 

Finance Senior 

RICKEN, GERRY Garden Plain 

Accounting Junior 

RIELING, RUSS Kansas City, MO 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

ROBINSON, MIKE Hutchinson 

Business Administration Junior 

SCOTT, DAVID Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 



Delta Upsilon/273 



deltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltaupsilondeltadeltaupsilondeltaupsi 

SHARPE, DOUG Olathe 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STANLEY, BRENT Salina 

Accounting Junior ... 

STANLEY, BRETT Topeka W W ^** «^ 

Mechanical Engineering Senior \ ~- s \ . . f « "■"" r 

STANLEY, SCOTT Topeka ~ - mTL W 

Accounting Senior ^ . ^A ^^ ^^M^f Mk ^^^B^"* ^^ * \ """-A^i"*' 

STROBEL, TIM Overland Park ^ M /*\ H^ i A A 9 ■ 'fe M W^\^ M ' ' F% » * 

Engineering Technology Senior A Akfl ! A Si H HlAm H "^^R'JI^B I ^ ^ #>l % 

TEETER, DAVID Hutchinson ~ "~ ' " ' 

Agricultural Economics Junior ^^^B jfcl^^^h _^4» ^ _^ v ^ ^^^B^> ^E 

WEBER, JEROME Hutchinson B^TH I ^li^ fp\ ^V' ^ ""' '"'*-*« #& JT ! 

Finance Junior L. 1A1 I ik . it\ I *l-i 1a • • 

WEST, NATHAN Garden City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

WHITHAM, CLAY ... Leoti 

Finance Sophomore 

WITTER, DAVE Mission ' 

Physical Education Sophomore 




Huff in' and Puffin - 

Two members of the 
Delta Upsilon fraternity 
sprint across the finish 
line while their 
passenger, an Alpha Xi 
Delta member, cheers 
them on to a first place 
finish in the semi-finals. 
The team placed third in 
the 1 7th running of the 
Lambda Chi Alpha 
Chariot Races. 




Craig Chandler 



She Du's 



BOTTOM ROW: Brenda S. Miller, Jane A. Barr, 
Christy M. Andra, Sarajane Beverly, Lana L. Harring- 
ton, Janls K. Little. SECOND ROW: Shelle R. Steele, 
Maria M. Neelly, Cathy Larson, Gail D. O'Hara, Den- 
ny M. Dlerklng, Lydia G. Batchclor, Kim B. Mason. 
THIRD ROW: Sarah F. Kuehnle, Judy M. Palen, 
Mary T. Bichelmeyer, Lynda J. Heckelmann, Karen 
O. Smith, Patty A. Shaver, E. Denlse Jacobson, Kar 
esa K. Robbins. TOP ROW: Jennifer A. Garrett 
Lonni G. Pflasterer, Nancy E. Mahrle, Denlse L 
Degner, Theresa D. Stanley, Lori A. Scheuerman 
Jeana L. Cobler, Jan K. Mead, Suzanne M. Bauer. 




274/Delta Upsilon 



Farm House 



farmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefai 








I .i:V^». / lli^ffi i 




it 
fV rfk/ di am ( ; 







*~;> 






Little Sister Of Pearls And Rubies 




BANKS, CHUCK Wamego 

Agricultural Economics ,. Freshman 

BAUER, KYLE : . . Morganville 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BEBERMEYER, ARLAN Manchester 

Journalism Senior 

CARLSON, CALVIN Smolan 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

CARLTON, TERRY Geneso 

Business Administration Sophomore 

CARNAHAN, BRIAN Wamego 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

ENGLER, MAX Deerfield 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

FRASIER, MARK Woodrow, CO 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

FRUECHTING, VAIL Plains 

Agronomy Senior 

GALE, JAMES Phillipsburg 
Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

GARDINER, GREG Ashland 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GARDINER, MARK Ashland 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

GARTEN, LARRY Abilene 

Agricultural Education Senior 

GATES, CHAN Coldwater 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GOOD, KEVIN Charlotte, MI 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GRAY, SCOTT Sedan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

HARSTINE, STAN El Dorado 

Mathematics Sophomore 

HEINEN, LEON Huron 

Agronomy Junior 

HILDEBRAND, MIKE Stafford 

Construction Science Junior 

HUNT, STEVE Arkansas City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

JANKE, BRIAN Manhattan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

KARST, TOM Bertrand, NE 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

KREHBIEL, KIM Pretty Prairie 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

LEET, GREGORY Halifax, MA 

Agricultural Journalsim Junior 

LIND, ROGER Overland Park 

Agronomy Senior 

LINDQUIST, JACK Waterville 

Agricultural Education Junior 

MANN, TRAVIS Potwin 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

McCLURE, GREGORY Phillipsburg 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

McFALL, RANDY Sabetha 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

McKEE, RICH Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



BOTTOM BOW: Kathy M. Cott, Lisa L. Moore, 
Lisa J. Schlender, Marietta Deets, Denise K. 
Warne, Yvonne K. Visser, Darci L. Moore. SEC- 
OND ROW: Mona M. Rusk, Larissa J. Sylvester, 
Anita D. Brensing, Margaret A. Heller, Dawn R. 
Johnson. TOP BOW: Julia Dalbom, Kristi E. 
Walter, Kathleen L. Edwards, Ellen L. Garten, 
Rebecca E. Knopp, Pennie E. Parcel, Ann M. 
Garten, Mary M. Garten. 



Farm House/275 



farmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarmhousefarnihoi 



MILLER, TIMOTHY Holcomb 

Agronomy Junior 

MUGLER, MARK Manhattan 

Horticulture Freshman 

NOEL, GREGG Abilene 

Physical Education Senior 

PELTON, GALEN Burdett 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

PENNER, TIMOTHY Assaria 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

PFEFFER, WILLIAM New Berlin, II 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

PULLIAM, STAN Freeport 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

RAGSDALE, BRYAN Topeka 

Architecture Junior 

ROCK, DAVID Hope 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

RUNDLE, LYNN Axtell 

Agricultural Education .... Junior 




/ I 



iiirif 






*** 



Getting leverage- 
Roger Lind, senior in 
agronomy, challenges 
Jack Lindquist, senior in 
agricultural education to 
an arm wrestling match 
as Farmhouse members 
watch awaiting their turn 
to battle the winner. 




Kent Boughton 



RUSK, CLINT Sun City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SALES, DARYL Valley Falls 

Agronomy Freshman 

SEILER, GARY Mount Hope 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

SEVERANCE, JIM Beloit 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

SPARE, MARLYN St. John 

Agronomy Junior 

SPARE, RANDALL St. John 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

SWALLOW, KEVIN Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

TAYLOR, JOHN Llndsborg 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

TOSH, RANDALL ~ Valley Falls 

Horticulture Junior 

USHER, ALAN Salina 

Accounting Junior 

VISSER, KARL Wakefield 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

WALKER, KIM Ft. Worth, TX 

Family and Child Development Junior 

WALTER, BRAD Sublette 

Agrucultural Mechanization Sophomore 

WARNE, DAVID Mankato 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WORCESTER, LEWIS Hill City 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

ZELLER, DAVE Holton 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 





W Atfc 



f > 




4kM&M 








/ i 



276/Farmhouse 



Gamma Phi Beta 



gammaphibetagammaphibetagammaphibetagammaphibetagamma 




AYERS, LOIS HOUSEPARENT 

ADAMS, LAURI Santa Monica, CA 

General Freshman 

BENDER, NANCY Russell 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

BESSIER, SHELLEY Prairie Village 

Physical Education Senior 

BRENSING, KELLY Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Ed Freshman 

BURKHEAD, TERRI Lawrence 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

CASH, SANDRA Wichita 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

COX, CINDY Silver Lake 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Senior 

DAHL, MARCIA Shawnee 

General Sophomore 

DAHL, TINA Shawnee 

Accounting Senior 

DEMBSK1, GAYLE Overland Park 

Radio-Television Sophomore 

DIERKS, KIM Leoti 

Social Work Senior 

DUFF1N, NANCY Overland Park 

Physical Education Junior 

ELLIS, PATTY Leawood 

Interior Design Senior 

FENSHOLT, MEG Overland Park 
Dance Sophomore 

GILLILAND, MARYANN Wichita 

Office Administration Senior 

GLEISSNER, JANE Mission 

Home Economics Sophomore 

GOETSCH, GAYLA Hutchinson 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GWIN, CAND1E Prairie Village 

Physical Education Junior 

HAAS, SUSAN Mission 

Physical Education Junior 

HARMLESS. JANE Shawnee Mission 

Clothing Textiles Senior 

HOUGHTON, JANET HUTCHINSON 

Family and Child Development Junior 

JORDAN, JAN Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Junior 

KARLIN, PATRICIA Grinnell 

Elementary Education General 

KERSENBROCK, GLENDA Colby 

Music Education Junior 




When I grow up — 

Members of Gamma Phi 
Beta become their real 
selves on dress-up day at 
the house. Members 
were asked to dress up 
in the attire they wear 
while engaged in a 
favorite activity or 
hobby. For some it was 
their natural habitat. 



Gamma Phi Beta/277 



gammaphibetagammaphibetagammaphibetagammaphibetagammaphibetagammaphibetagammaphibetagammaph 



I've Got It- Gayla 
Goetsch sophomore in 
medical technology 
catches a pass in a 
powderpuff football 
practice. The Gamma 
Phi Beta team finished 
the year in second place. 
The powder puff teams 
are coached by member 
of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
fraternity. 



KRIZMAN, ANNE M. Leawood 

General Sophomore 

LESLIE, MELINDA Wichita 

General Business Senior 

LEVTICH, ROBIN L. Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

LLOYD, ELAINE M Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MARR, LORI Prairie Village 
Pre-Nursing Junior 

MATUSZAK, JILL Lenexa 

General Sophomore 

MCSTAY, SUSAN L. Overland Park 

Pre-Prof. Elementary Sophomore 

NEWLIN, MICHELLE A. Leawood 

General Freshman 

NUZUM, REBECCA D. White Cloud 

Marketing Junior 

PERCIVAL, JULIE D. Overland Park 
Home Economics Junior 

PFLASTERRER, LONISE G. Colby 

Secondary Education Junior 

ROBBINS, KARESA K. Great Bend 

General Junior 

ROETHER, MICHELLE R Wilsey 

Elementary Education Senior 

ROSS, KELLI A Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

SCHELL, DEBBIE Wichita 

Home Economics Sophomore 

SELLERS, TERI L Lyons 

Elementary Education Junior 

SKAGGS, CATHERINE L. ... Roeland Park 

Mathematics Senior 

SPARKS, KIMBERLY A Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 

STAUFFER, JILL E. Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 

STEINER, DEBORAH K. Overland Park 
Marketing Junior 

TRAVIS, MIRIAM L Wichita 

Speech Pathology Senior 

WEDEL, KAREN D Minneapolis 

Business Administration Senior 

WILLCOTT, DIANA L Leavenworth 

General Freshman 

YEAGER, SUSAN A Norton 

Family and Child Development Senior 




278/Gamma Phi Beta 



Kappa Alpha Psi 




■5-1 



AA4'tC& 



alphapsikappaalphapsikappaalphapsikappaalphapsikappaalphapsik 

ATKINS, PHILIP Elmhurst, NY 

Food Science and Industry Junior 

BLACKWELL, GARLAND Topeka 

Engineering Technology Junior 

GARDENHIRE, KEVIN Salina 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HENDERSON, MICHAEL Kansas City 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

KITCHEN, RAYMOND Kansas City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LEE, STEVEN Kansas City 

Business Administration Freshman 

MILLER, PATRICK Junction City 

Social Work Junior 

MOODY, LA VON Pembroke, GA 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

STONE, MARVIN Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 




Your Move - Kevin 
Gardenhire, sophomore 
in business 
administration, and 
Michael Henderson, 
sophomore in 
engineering technology, 
contemplate their moves 
as members of Kappa 
Alpha Psi fraternity look 
on. Backgammon has 
become a favorite 
pasttime in the Kappa 
house. 



Kappa Alpha Psi/279 



Kappa Alpha Theta 



ROESENER, DOREEN Houscparent 

AHNEN, JAN Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

ALLEN, AMY Leawood 

Accounting Junior 

ARNOLD, DEBBIE Scranton 

Food Science and Industry Freshman 

BANKER, PRISCILLA Russell 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BEAM, LISA McPherson 

Journalism Junior 

BELL, SUSAN Lawrence 

Clothing Retailing Senior 



kappaalphathetakappaalphathetakappaalphathetakapi 



BUELL, JAN 

Secondary Education 

COOLEY, MONET 

Marketing 

DAVIS, STEPHANIE 

Family and Child Development 



Omaha, NE 

Junior 

Shawnee 

Freshman 

Norton 

Junior 



DIXON, ANNE Prairie Village 

Marketing Junior 

EINSEL, JAYNE Greensburg 

Accounting Senior 

GAHAGAN, Teresa Ottawa 

Speech Pathology Senior 

GALIANO, ANN Beaumont, TX 

Medical Technology Senior 

GISH, LEANN Merriam 

Elementary Education Senior 

GOLDSMITH, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

GOSS, DIANE Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

GREGG, LAURIE Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

JONES, MARY Leawood 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

K1LLMAR, LESLIE Manhatta 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

LINDEMUTH, LORIE Scott City 

Accounting Sophomore 

MARSH, SARA Prairie Village 

Business Administration Freshman 

MATZ, ELIZABETH Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 

McDANIEL, CHERYL Sabeth 

Marketing Junior 

McKESSOR, MARY ANN Leawood 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

MERRILL, SARAH Merriam 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

MILLER, BRENDA Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 

MOSS, JANET Salina 

Journalism Sophomore 

MOSS, JULIE " Salina 

Secondary Education Junior 

MURRAY, KELLEY Leawood 

Horticulture Sophomore 

MUSICK, SUSIE Overland Park 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

NUTTER, CHERYL Wellington 

Business Administration Senior 

PLUMER, KAREN Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHONEWEIS, MARLYS Manhattan 

Physical Education Senior 

SCHULTZ, SUZANNE Overland Park 

Home Economics Sophomore 




280/Kappa Alpha Theta 



eltakappadeltakappadeltakappaalphathetakappaalphathetakappaalphathetakappaalphathetakappaalphathetakap ] 




SHINKLE, FRAN Kincaid 

Physical Education Sophomore 

SWANEY, LYNNE Wichita 

Physical Education Junior 

TAGGART, ROBIN Topeka 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

TREMPY, JANINE Overland Park 

Microbiology Senior 



UNRUH, Kerry Larned 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WAGNON, LYNDA Coldwater 

Elementary Education Senior 

WEIBERT, KIM Tampa 

Home Economics Sophomore 

WHITE, DENA Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 



WILLIAMS, BETSY El Dorado 

Elementary Education Junior 

WOELLHOF, TAMMY Oak Hill 

Marketing Senior 

WORLEY, AMY Council Grove 

Finance Junior 

WUNDERLICH, SUSAN Kirkwood, MO 

Dairy Production Senior 



YEAKLEY, CHERYL Hoisington 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

ZIMMER, DAWN Shawnee 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

ZIMMER, LINDA Shawnee 

Interior Architecture ... Junior 




Sisterhood • A few 

seniors of Kappa Alpha 
Theta decided to take a 
picture as a tribute to 
their senior status, but 
the effort was spoiled by 
Mary Jones (rear left), 
sophomore in clothing 
retailing. Sisterhood 
covers all. 



Kappa Alpha Theta/281 



MVdjJJJCl L/f^lLdkappadelfakappadeltakappadeltakappadeltakappadeltakappacieltakappa! 

GORE, VIRGINIA ... Houscparent 

ANSTAETT, JANET Lyndon J#§2 '£*T*&\ f^mTfli *Lyk 

Accounting Junior AJU lM&l jMt >teki JC 

ARNOLD, LILLIAN Kansas City fci#"~iy ,aP«* ^H| •fa**' ?«] ^m^ 4% 1 

Secondary Education Junior ^PU* -wt % '40 ^Bt ""A V 

BALDERSON, JILL Overland Park .Br* 5 ^^ WZSiM M -^ 

Modern Language Sophomore 

BAREISS, LAURA Overland Park 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

BEERY, POLLY ANN Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BERTRAND, LINDA Lincoln, NE 

Speech, Sophomore p^*, *»■ k £1 i 

BERUTTI, LYNN St Louis, Mo J| J£ W?m ^M Am\ .m%\ M !/~ 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BOYD, VICTORIA Bellevue, NE 

Geography Sophomore 

BURTON. ANNETTE Prairie Village I ■" B? • W% * BV ^ ^M* 

Horticulture Senior j |pF (P^ j Bt*M A IB 

BUSSE, JANA Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CAMPBELL, BARB Springhill B*""^' ^~ ~m\ H 

Pre-Medicine Junior "ft«S«" *} - 9 P** tHi jB^*> s»vi '■ ^P*^ •>■ B <S( * i 

CHERNY, CAROLYN Paradise Valley, AR JL »• # IT" UT ILL Jr ™- ^ 

Dietetics Senior ^%~"~ t' 

CLENDENEN, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Economics Freshmen g f j&L 

CRAIN, DEE ANNE Lawrence '<>■ ' v 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

DEGN, KERRI Merriam 

Business Administration Junior ABjl J^k 

DEINES, TRACEY Wakeeney JB ^Jl $ ; \ 

FABRIZIUS, ALANA Wakeeney ^"* ** g I ** ^-"^i «J hZ- *" 

Elementary Education Junior ^H| ^~ ' A '-^m:.* ' t'~ ^* ~ -B 

FULLER, KAREN Prairie Village ^Ifer * iH\ 

Home Economics Journalism Junior ^jHjjf - ^/K^ f 

GOOLEY, KATHY Prairie Village 40^ sMM i^P" 

Medical Technology Senior KSKk^Mml SL L _ I '&• 

GREY, HOLLY Manhattan 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HENSON, BRENDA Leawood 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HUCKE, JANET Leawood 

Elementary Education Sophomore , -^ » — ,- ™- 

JONES, KELLY Lenexa ^tk ^^*" , , * ^L->^ 

Clothing Retailing Freshman H ^k ^£JW wtBSl&JmW±. 

KARST, SHERI Topeka ■ ftifek'V '■"""- I ■ 

Fine Arts Freshman [ _ _ _Jm\ ii . iA : I j H 

KAUFMANN, ELAINE Topeka 

Marketing Senior **0SM\ 

KNOPP, REBECCA Chapman 

Elementary Education Junior infcp*- **» W M"""*-^^B wR >» \J' : Hf '"* " 1 

KRAMER, RUTH Corning M| \^"^Ef W Ukl H§ fe «? '^ 

Business Administration Junior w^Bjp"* iP*~ f J^* ■ \^~ tCX ^^^^^ 

MALLON, DONNA Overland Park ^ijpf^ iP^* V 

Elementary Education Sophomore ^J aJBgL ,SM -/ a / . 

MARLO, AMY Overland Park j £ 

NORTHUM, EVELYN Kingman 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore M^m <4fl 

PALMER, PAULA Salina 

Elementary Education Senior 'mW*' ~l&f wl'*"* "" ■ BB*'"* 

PARKER, PAM Fairway ^Bfe ~'' Jr 11 A>- E*# B«> J£- T Bl *•" 

Finance Junior ^^B|^- » ^KL^ : ~' Jt&Jk B ^LT~ < 

PEEKS, KIMBERLEY Marysville jHF V ^^ ^^ P^" ^- 

Accounting Senior *sL ^ i(0l IW -B K^ ^" ; ,^^| ttk^^ m. mm ^L\ 

PERPARAS, MICHELLE Overland Park i ^fe£> fSS Mfi tS I ^U.^ 9 

Family and Child Development Freshman f^ » ; Bp^mC?*'! B . : 1 1 L 1 B Pi ITli 




282/Kappa Delta 



Itakappadeltakappadeltakappadeltakappadeltakappadeltakappadeltakappadeltakappadeltakappadeltakappadelts 




PFANNENSTIEL, MYRA Accounting 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

REDLER, MARY Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

R1TTER, SALLY Malaysia 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
ROLPH, CHERI Delphos 

Sophomore 
Delphos 



Political Science 

ROLPH, CINDY 

Geography 

SCHEFFLER, ROBIN 

Office Administration 

SHARP, JANET 

Family and Child Development 



Junior 

Colwich 
Junior 
McLouth 
Sophomore 



SIMONSEN, SIGRID Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

SNEED, SHERI Lenexa 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

SORENSEN, DIANE Ness City 
Mathematics Education Junior 

STORMS, SUE Leavenworth 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

SWAIN, BARBARA St. Charles, IL 

Horticulture Senior 

SWAIN, SHAWN Garland, TX 

Dietetics and Inst. Mgt Senior 

SWENSON, DEBBIE Olathe 

Physical Education Freshman 

TAGGART, ANN Manhattan 

Clothing Textiles Senior 

THOMPSON, MELANIE Cedar Vale 

General Business Adminis tration Freshman 

WHITE, SHELLEY Goodland 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

WHITTLE, CHRISTINA Sedgwick 

Music Education Junior 

WOLF, TENLEY Colby 

Clothing Textiles Junior 




Huddle up! — Enjoying 
the sunny, snowy 
weather, Kappa Deltas 
huddle up to "smile for 
the birdie. " 



Photo by Kent Boughton 



Kappa Kappa Gamma/283 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



kappakappagammakappakappagammakappakap] 



Behind Bars — 

Members of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma deliver a 
Valentine's Day message 
behind the bars of their 
staircase. The symbolic 
St. Valentine's day heart 
shape is displayed as 
they go up the down- 
staircase. (Or down the 
up-staircase. 




Photo by Kent Boughton 



ANDRA, CHRISTY Conway Springs 

Business Administration Junior 

BARANCIK, KAREN Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BARR, JANE Overland Park 

Psychology Junior 

BARTH, KAREN Kansas City, MO 

Restaurant Management Sophomore 

BAUCUS, MARY Arkansas City 

Consumer Interest Junior 

BEARDSLEY, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Junior 

BEIKMANN, KAYE Manhattan 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

BELL, DELAYNE Great Bend 

Business Administration Junior 

BERENTZ, KIM Eureka 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

BIGLER, LISA Prairie Village 

Business Administration Junior 

BLOMQUIST, LORI Assaria 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

BOWEN, CAROL Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

COFFEY, COLLEEN Wichita 

Physical Education Junior 

CONNOLLY, LAURA Manhattan 

Management Sophomore 

COSTELLO, BARB Marion 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 




284/Kappa Kappa Gamma 



igammakappakappagammakappa kappagammakappakappagamma kappagammakappakappagamma kappagammak 




DAYVAULT, ANN Wichita 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DRONBERGER, JULIE Hutchinson 

English Education Senior 

DRUMMOND, PAM Topeka 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

EATHERLY, JULIE Garden City 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

EVANS, EMILY Wichita 

Dietetics Junior 

FERRELL, MOLLY Marion 

Home Economics Journalism Sophomore 

FISHER, CAROL Alta Vista 

Management Sophomore 

FLETCHER, SUSAN Bucklin 

Business Administration Junior 

FOUNTAIN, AMY Overland Park 
Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 
FRIZELL, CHRISTINE Maple Hill 
Pre-Medicine Junior 

HAGEN, NANCY Salina 

Dietetics Sophomore 

HAMILTON, DEBBIE Roeland Park 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

HECKLEMANN, LYNDA Wichita 

Biochemistry Junior 

HEIMKE, SALLY Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

KUEHL, KELLY Leawood 

Modern Language Junior 

LINDHOLM, CINDY Little River 

Accounting Sophomore 

LITCHFIELD, JENNIFER Leawood 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

MATZ, MARGARET Wichita 

General Engineering Freshman 

MERIDITH, SUSAN Wellington 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MINNEMAN, JOAN Affton 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

NOLAN, PAM Plains 

Consumer Interest Senior 

ODDO, LINDA Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

O'NEAL, SHARON E. Prairie Village 

Modern Language Junior 

OTT, CARLA Peck 

Family and Qiild Development Sophomore 

PAUL, SUSAN Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Senior 

PETERKA, KIM Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

PRINSLOW, LAURA Arlington Heights, IL 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

REDD, LORE Overland Park 

Finance Junior 

ROBINSON, STEPHANIE Wichita 

Interior Design Sophomore 

RODEFELD, KAREN St. Louis, MO 

Dietetics Junior 

SCANLAN, ANGELA Abilene 

Agriculture Freshman 

SCHIRMER, JULIE Holton 

General Sophomore 

SCHMIDT, KATHY Manhattan 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

SILER, ANN Kansas City, MO 

Management Management 

SMITH, CINDY Overland Park 

Physical Education Senior 

STUTTERHEIM, KAREN Salina 

General Sophomore 

TYLER, DEBBIE Wichita 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

UR1CK, LINDA Wichita 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WAGNER, KIM Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Senior 



Kappa Kappa Gamma/285 







Ink 81 PP CI Ol^llllClkappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasign 

ADAMS, ROBERT Garnett mm H| '1 

Mechanical Engineering Junior ^tn\** ^RAfcw &t^ 

ALEMAN, NICK Hutchinson M "'"» M^A mW^Sk 

General Junior W j E" Ji *^ ^f^^^m\ W^ 

AYERS, KELLEY Smith Center Mks -I WF*\ ^T ^* '"* W 

Agricultural Economics Senior ^* >. 7 tL#- ! --» ' ■»-• W 

BAUMAN, VINCENT Shawnee ' V -z. 1 ^tit m^^ J^L- 

Mathematics Freshman _^V ^^ ^^tf ifc ^1 ^ ^mM^"' ^^ imm^ 

MmmmmMi <> 

BEDNAR, BRIAN Oketo 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BEDNAR, TODD Oketo 

Construction Science Freshman 

BECK, ERIC Shawnee Mission r ? 1 1 

Accounting Sophomore 

BOXBERGER, MARK Russell 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman ^_^wr- ^^^ ^%*" w^ dm\ ^fel 

CLISSO, KENNETH Olathe 

Horticulture Sophomore ^6|3j^^ £'£§ 

DEMOTT, K1RBY Overland Park AjP"L V • 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman Wi^ ¥ CL * wt 

EGGERMAN, JIM Green •^ *"" W\ ^ ^ 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman ^k | Jfe- 

EHRSAM, ALAN Bern 1 J A , 

General Business Administration Freshman % |5c^ 

J \ %\ U 

EISSLER, CHARLES Topeka Hi ■ 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman .^j Bfc i ^flRtll^. i 4* 4k~9^ 

EUBANKS, MIKE Shawnee fl|Pl» A 4 -# K^l 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman ■ :; || BP^^'Bi tftj». „1» |i~- - B| 

FANKHAUSER. ALAN Garden City 'fl ^T~' V ^""1. >R 7 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore ^lr- * ^t,^" Jfcr ^»- 

FOWLER, RAY C. Lamed jt x wF"Ji 

General Freshman ^*m _^ ■. 'W^fk.'i ^^ ^. ^_ 

GEORGE, DON Wichita mm _ 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore ^tm%lb^ ^"ifeX ; JjfcJBtei. ^^^fc^ 

GERMAN, MARK Louisburg flPls*. W '^^ M& *£k AtT^M 

Agricultural Economics Junior ^^B m - U W; ^B fl ■ 

GILLETTE, ROBERT Great Bend W&S ^J 1^ * f W 3 ^ W ^P"" 1 

Life Science Sophomore ^ ' ^\ -- ^\ — ~ ' ^L 

GRAHAM, MICHAEL Concordia MmL ^V ^ jj J .^4%^ • 

Accounting Junior .^^^ k^^ i^flR #H^fe -^fKmw "^* IfjL 

HARRIS, JOHN Olathe ^^ 

Accounting Senior ^^fek A:^d k a. "^V ^ «k 

HAUN. DARREN D. Larned Mp ^ \ »▼ % W AS 

General Freshman 9* v \ Wf M J»— ■*?" ft ■? I 

HERRMAN, FLOYD Great Bend « " I ■*=* ^| ij''-T v V ^" r "~ P 

Computer Science Junior •tf^ ** ^% £ ' ^^L."""" 

HOPPER, THOMAS Russell *K V[ > -*0>" «. 

Marketing Junior ~^0n -~ <mm\ "Tl/ > r "^^ ^^ ^^ 

jTf i; .i ' ^'1 

HUDDLESTON, DAVID Larned _ ' ^_ 

General Business Administration Freshman /,, .w^F ^K. MWm^. 

HUFF, LARRY Shawnee M ^^^ ■ MM i 

Construction Science Freshman WKz*, -al B^ . "'4 ^P^- ^R J^~ N. 

HUGHES, ROBERT Soldier «J W7_ ■ W" B T " 

General Business Administration Junior B »" - jr ljE~ w k"^ "* ^ '9e^ * 

HUNT, ALAN Overland Park "l^ , ^V yf\ 

Mechanical Engineering Junior wF\l ti^M s >, JmSm* mm\ ^fe^ 




286/Kappa Sigma 



KAPPA SIGMA 



kappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigm. 




Cozy and Warm — 

Ken Clisso, sophomore 
in horticulture, catches 
up on some weekend 
studies on a cold Sunday 
night. The fireplace in 
the Kappa Sigma house 
provides the perfect 
environment for late 
night studying. 




% 






rv in 





JACOBS, LARRY McPherson 

Agriculture Freshman 

JOHNSON, KEITH Kansas City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KEAST, JIM Lamed 

Agriculture Freshman 

KRAMER, SCOTT Webster Grove, MO 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

KUENZI, KEVIN Bern 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MANN, DAVID Kansas City, MO 

Agriculture Freshman 

MCFADDEN, WILLIAM Lamed 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MCMAHAN, MARK Cheney 

Animal Science and Industry Graduate Student 

MORIN, DALE Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Senior 

MURPHY, MARTIN Great Bend 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

OLANDER, MORGAN Linwood 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

OVERMILLER, MITCHELL Smith Center 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

PATZELL, CHRIS Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

PLATT, MIKE Medicine Lodge 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

POLSON, BRADLEY Vermillion 

Business Administration Freshman 

RAPP, LOREN McPherson 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

REGIER, RICK McPherson 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 



Kappa Sigma/287 



kappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakappasigmakapi: 



RINNER, TOM Topeka 

General Freshman 

SCHULTZ, DAVE Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SEELY, MARK Louisburg 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

SELF, MITCHELL Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SK1LLETT, GARY Centralia 

Pre-Destistry Freshman 

SMITH, MARK Kiowa 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

SMITH, STACY Ozawkie 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

STEC, ROMAN Atchison 

Pre-Design Profession Sophomore 

STEPHENS, RUSS Hoxie 

Accounting Sophomore 

STERLING, SAMUEL Hardtner 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

STOLTENBERG, MICHAEL Hiawatha 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

VERA, RAUL Manhattan 

General Freshman 

WALTER, LOREN Peru, IL 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, GREGORY Larned 

Interior Architecture . . . Fifth Year Student 
YOUNG, DOUG Sedan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ZORN, RANDY Smith Center 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 




STARDUSTERS 



BOTTOM ROW: Krystal G. McClary, Cathy A. 
Sterns, Carol K, Bartels, Sandra K. Anderson, 
Inge M. Bergmann, Laura A. Tracey, Juiie A. 
Navrat, Becca Rupe, Jenae Campbell, Shirley 
Suhr. SECOND ROW: Sharon K. Winkler, Ruth 
A. Kramer, Klmberly M. Potter, Cindy L. Novak, 
Theresa S. Harris, Cher! D. Schwartz, Marilyn D. 
Pritchard, Theresa M. Detwiler, Anne E. Fitt, Kim 
Myles, Carol Kennedy. THIRD ROW: Carol A. 
Westfall, Debra D. Peterson, Jody A. Beunton, 
Jane A. Reed, Joan M. Pottorf, Misty M. Wallace, 
Vicki S, Johnson, Jane K. DeWerff, Suzanne K. 
Ernzen, Julie A. Horsch. TOP ROW: Laurie E. 
Engelken, Theresa Kepple, Annette Kepple, Re- 
nee Curne, Donna Wilke, Marilyn Gerstner, Deb- 
bie Keating, Jana Fadely, Julie Kissinger, Rebec- 
ca Folkerts. 




288/Kappa Sigma 



JUSI111 DQw Ull AlpllS lambdachialphalambdachi alphalambdachialphalambdachia 

BEARDMORE, RICH Overland Park 

Architectural Engineering Sophmore 

BELONGIA, ROBERT Manhattan 

ig?ji m , :: ■ w m General Freshman 

BENNETT, KEVIN Kansas City 

— : -» Accounting Junior 

u^ M^ ^jtM BERBEN, HAROLD Glenmont, NY 

^| £ Architecture Fifth Year Student 

w "•"■■I-"" - "; BORTHWICK, KENDALL Mulvane 

^^ | £»W JP ^P^l m^^m BUCKLEY, TOM Hutchinson 

r« j ~r V m<Z ~ 1 flip* *- Tf Correctional Administration Senior 

/ W**_ * It f f CHANITZ, MARK CreveCoeur, MO 

\*c~ \ ' i fep'V V Pre Design Professions Freshman 

^^ -Jl*^ J^. ^^ " Jite ^^&r g^ CHASE, DAN Overland Park 

A I MtU JM |y fl V ^ !■ i A I'r H ^' ne Arts Sophomore 

" " CHRISTIE, DW1GHT Beloit 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

CUTBERTH, JEFF St. Joseph, MO 

- 7 . , ;' piss" '""*■! Architecture Junior 

|r Jr DORSEY, GLENN Prairie Village 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

^ ^^ ^^%f gtf /W7 DUNN, DARYLE Dodge City 

gjmfe M \ &, W imN Marketing Junior 

EADENS, CHRISTOPHER Scott City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

FOREMAN, BRIAN Overland Park 

... _ ,- !•■» W^*""* " " Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

; * ~ " "* * | ■ _ FOWLER, KENNETH Emporia 

v Finance Junior 

]^ ^ - ^Tm ^^ FRANK, LAWRENCE St. Joseph, MO 

11 «00.(> tf I M A \ Arcn!tecturc Fifth Ycar Student 





Smack — Susan 
Meridith, Sophomore in 
pre-design professions, 
receives a congratulatory 
kiss from Dr. B. W. 
LaFene, founder of 
LaFene Health Center 
and Lambda Chi Alpha 
alumnus, after being 
crowned queen of the 
Chariot Races. The 1979 
races were the first to 
be held since 1969. 
Thirteen fraternities and 
ten sororities 
participated with the 
proceeds funding two 
scholarships for incoming 
freshmen. 



Bo Rader 



Lambda Chi Alpha/289 




iachialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalan 

GERLAUGH, CHARLES Manhattan _ _ 

Management Junior ^flfct .^MkStk 

GREEN, MONT Manhattan #P^^R «^^» 

General Business Administration Freshman ■, ^B B -»J| 

GUENTHER, MAX St. Joseph, MO ▼« « If ^^v7 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 'i^- » Nk "31 ^t * ~ ¥ JPN 

HAMMOND, WILL Leawood, jT v X- V 

Marketing Sophomore " £ .^^^^^ ^Bte ^-^A ^k^ : _j^"j 

HANSFORD, JOHN Kansas City, MO * 4 ■/?; >, M J ^^\ d* 14 ' ! "| J* 

Pre-Professional Secondary Education Junior *fl . £fl E Jfl I ^^ l<\ ■■»,'« (A 

HENTGES, STEPHEN Columbia, MO p ^^HHi r .Mfc 

Political Science Junior I jdh? dE]vtlk\ 

HILL, KEVIN Shawnee pP<B Mr ' *\ 

Electrical Engineering Freshman Kfc ^ff^P^ 1 ka» ■*.! 

HORNER, ERIC Junction City ^f; mT 

Radio-Television Freshman ^Mr- ' **'• ^* \ ~~~ ' 

HOWARD, TIM Hutchinson Jfljj.-^ W ^^B^" kw A 

Management Sophomore ^^■(^b flk ^^H Jfc MBk ^ jlBw 

KELPE. RONALD Omaha, NE | ■ T fl 1^41 JBT^ JM 

Biochemistry Senior I j^ Ml £ WJI j flV| J| /J 

KING, TIMOTHY Lenexa hh _^ 

General Business Administration Freshman jfL 

KNIGHT, JOHATHAN Topeka M 1 , ^^3 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman H M ■*** ~^™ 

LANGLEY, KENNETH Mission «■*» *▼ P* 

Pre-Law Freshman % 4-' V flf 

LARSON, JAMES Rossville Jfc W ^d j ^J%r ^ ^ W w 

General Business Administration Junior ^gmFw ^^w ^^Hl ,«-..• ^^B| ^fll ^|B| ^■■^ „-. I Hb ^^a 1 

LIPPE, DAVID Topeka | ■/ • f* A ■ 1 A] | If J Mk 1 ■ 1 M 

General Business Administration Sophomore i A | j B^PAl i I RjB ■ i Hw^l I ! I. 






Double Time — Drum 
major, Kryon Johnson, 
senior in engineering tech- 
nology, keeps the K-State 
Marching Band in step 
during a practice session 
before the first home foot- 
ball game. 




Nancy Zogleman 



290/Lambda Chi Alpha 



achialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalambdachialphalambdach 

PHH ■■■■■■ ^m^mm^m ■^^■^^B ■RH^^H MARLEY, STEVE Overland Park 

Jk.% * jfl 4$jk:'"'-- t J^^^vK M&Jtk Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

M m^ m W^^^ C It Brji MARQUETTE, WILLIAM Overland Park 

m^ * \1- 7 *\ ' j \^ ' r ' MCCARTHY, MARK Mission 

— !»",• m**~# y — - Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

^^T ^^*^ -rlT METHOD, VICTOR Overland Park 

t^^Mf^\ ^^i^\ «f' I/O Marketing Senior 

M vJL ^ ' 7i ' '# « MILES, CLINTON Phillipsburg 

/T Ba^i £ X; 1% Accounting Junior 

^^M m m^ ^ ^p^p^p^p^M F ~ ""ffi P TTffi fff IBHm^^H NOLTE, THOMAS Jefferson City, MO 

^Rlk jK 9fe It Architecture Fifth Year Student 

Km «fc |l ^L , ■ ■*» -C^^K W^*" ~ ▼ P <*■! Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

yE^ A Wfc • / m '" "' " ^^. " '" General Business Administration Sophomore 

^'S^ . _j \L/ ^ik" ^- PETERSON, KEITH Tonganoxie 

H4 ^iH^ Jflfl Jff ^^>^*^ ^i^B A Management Junior 

A «k &■ &* M ■ *^Ti '/ ^* mf ' '' ill T A RADFORD, BART Parkville, MO 

LmiUjfll ! lijb/ v \ Pi / I Ik H Pre Design Profession Freshman 

ROOT, RICHARD Prairie Village 

TF^H ' * Mechanical Fngineering Sophomore 

,H J| '•• ISA SHA1N, GLENN El Dorado 

!*<■ Construction Science Junior 

SHIRER, BRAD Hoisington 

Accounting Junior 

^4>»^ ^P^r^B WT ■' J^ ^d """" ^ SKOOG, CARL Topeka 

™, -^ Jk\ .^^^Rt' '< JBH Ml 1^9 jBB Geology Sophomore 

^■V. #j *""" B4i "El W-JBM I WIS m ' STARK, DANIEL Manhattan 

AH ■ /.. - ■ J w , A ill \ ^fc * BBB _ ■ ..'. i H&V Jl General Business Administration Sophomore 

STEFFEN, BRADLEY Burdett 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

— w STEUBER, TERRY Topeka 

■ Construction Science Sophomore 

H'- TARRANT, JEFF Manhattan 

^%^"" , lESPv Music Educat 'o n Sophomore 

^ ^ ^t^i %~ ^Bl^f JW TETLOW ' STEVE Tr °V 

4P H^Lv* ^H* |4fc JH I 1 /•k *'l/B* I # jl General Freshman 

JillM I M^ KB A K ■■ A WARE, GERGGORY Rome, GA 

■Ml l«EH fe : JM'ifl l .^■« II > IflB W II JH i i Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

WEISS, SCOTT St. Joseph, MO 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

WIKE, DENNIS Topeka 

MR "S^W Civil Engineering Sophomore 

| . WINTERMAN, PAUL Mission 

* ' ~— Accounting Junior 

Jpt ^ "*""' JW JSr WONER, KENT Hutchinson 

~^f jA «# i ▲ / ^^m/ij ill ■** itoi) I General Business Administration Junior 








Crescents 




BOTTOM ROW: Roxi Frankenberger, Diane E. 
PlerPierce, Kathy J. Knadle, Sheryl Russell, Ro- 
sie McCarthy, Lori Semple, Sandy Altland, Deb- 
bie Myhre, Kitty Donnelly, Christina Ellis, Evelyn 
Gabbert, Susan Phipps. SECOND ROW: Chris- 
tine M. Hoferer, Angela M. Marquez, Sherri L. 
Hanson, Rhonda K. Snell, Barbara K. Brown, 
Stacy E. Stephens, Kelly A. Howard. Diane M. 
Rombeck, Mary B. Strathman, Amy D. VonNie- 
derhausern, Juliet Boege, Betty J. Kepley. 
THIRD ROW: Sue Goode, Darlyne Hinkle, Lisa 
Cool, Lynne Berutti, Cheryl L. Hart, Laura A. 
Wilson, Kris Carnahan, Leslie Oborny, Barb 
Campbell, Jan Pate, Shauna Horn. TOP ROW: 
Julie R. Rombeck, Kathe M. Rusnak, Laura J. 
Looby, Cathy A. Rohleder, Gail Foust, Jan R. 
Smith, Mary J. Winterman, Janet L. Langley, 
Brenda Mauritzen, Pamela D. Marvin, Debbie L. 
Reynolds, Susan M. Combs, Sharilyn L. Broers. 



Lambda Chi Alpha/291 



Phi Delta Theta 

BURKHART, DORIS Houseparent 

ALEXANDER, WILLIAM Olathe 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

ANDERSON, CHRIS Garden City 

Business Administration Sophomore 

ANDERSON, JOEL Manhattan 

Marketing Freshman 

BACH, MICHAEL Blue Rapids 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BACON, ROBERT Hutchinson 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BARNHART, JOHN Manhattan 

Pre-Law Freshman 

BELFORD, MARK St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BELL, JERRY, JR. Alexander 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BRADLEY, GARY M. Overland Park 
Finance Sophomore 

BROADFOOT, GREGORY Olathe 

Construction Science Sophomore 

CROKER, DANIEL Lake Quivira 

Agronomy Junior 

DAVIDSON, STEVEN Topeka 

Pre-Vet Junior 

DESHAZER, DONALD Topeka 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DORAN, THOMAS Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

DREES, GREG Wichita 

Management Sophomore 

EMLEY, MARK Manhattan 

Finance Senior 

FAIRBAIRN. SCOTT Garden City 

Landscape Architecture Fifth Year Student 
FAULKNER, TRACEY Manhattan 

Business Administration Freshman 

FINK, JOHN Topeka 

General Freshman 

FLAIR, ROBERT Bucklin 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FOSTER, ERIC Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FRITZLER, PAUL Ness City 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

GORDON, PHILIP Valley Falls 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

HILL, FRANK Wichita 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

HOLLE, WADE Marysville 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

HORMEL, JEFF Olathe 

Agriculture Freshman 

HORNER, KIRK Shawnee 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

HOWE, EVAN Manhattan 

Social Sciences Freshman 

HOWELL, ROGER Leawood 
Pre-Medicine Junior 

IRVINE, RON Manhattan 

Business Administration Freshman 

KNOLL, DAVID Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

KOBER, JOHN Alexander 

Accounting Senior 

LOCKE, MICHAEL Kansas City 

Engineering Freshman 

MAGGIO, MARK Stilwell 

Marketing Senior 

McCOSH, KENT Manhattan 

Engineering Freshman 

MEADOR, WILLIAM Overland Park 

Journalism Junior 

MEDER, JOHN LaCrosse 

Marketing Senior 

MILLS, BRIAN Lewis 

Physical Education Sophomore 

MILLS, PATRICK Russell 

Accounting Sophomore 

MYERS, BRUCE Topeka 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

MYERS, ROSS Garden City 

Business Administration Sophomore 

OLNEY, MARK Manhattan 

Crop Protection Sophomore 

RAZOOK, SCOTT Hesston 

Marketing Senior 

ROBB, MICHAEL Topeka 

Finance Junior 



phideltathetaphideltathetaphideltathetaphideltathetaphidel 




4*iA * 









.-"■$:?< 




II 1 




tit/ dMij.M 




292/Phi Delta Theta 




phideltathetaphideltathetaphideltathetaphideltathetaphideltathetaphideltathetaphideltathetaphideltathetaphi 

BBSPHK HRMI ROGERS, ROBERT Manhattan 

'?^iSH Agricultural Economics Graduate 

M W" M JfeSW^* - "^ w^" "SI Ira Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 

fl^f T- ^ v J T " F SASENICK, JOE Overland Park 

A^ ^_ A * y^#, \^r SCHROFF, TERRY .... Topeka 

^^^ Ife I 9 ) % j .^dn. I^h ^Bl W Journalism Freshman 

^fifl , ,N k ■ ■ £11 V SHAFFER, GARY Mulvane 

■fiSkfl \ "' ^k I 1 ■ JBr i • Agricultural Mechanization 

SHARP, DAVID Wichita 

Business Administration Freshman 

SORENSON, NATHAN Manhattan 

- -m r "^l : K«. — -^M BW **" ^ * ■ 1 Architectural Engineering Freshman 

STUELKE, JAMES Leawood 

» Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

rT" W, «^ ^ki ijfe ^ TAYLOR, BRAD G. Garden City 

* fll 4fl| ■ /% M •: _^i >'r* tf^H t£< Engineering Sophomore 

ILiM MA MM ^ '# IjR TOWERS, RICK Great Bend 

[ jhkM ■ Ai ^ |£ B&*flBH Business Administration Freshman 

- WATSON, DEAN Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

WHEELER, VINCE Caney 

Journalism Junior 







NEXT AGENDA ITEM 

— Members of Phi Delta 
Theta listen attentively 
during a leadership 
workshop in their house. 
Topics for the workshop 
were scholarship and 
alumni relations. The 
workshop was 
coordinated by Pat 
Bosco, assistant dean in 
the Center for Student 
Development. 



Phi Delta Theta/293 



Phi Gamma Delta 



LAWRENCE, NORMA Houseparent 

AESCHLIMAN, ROGER Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 
BARRERA, MIKE Shawnee Mission 

Radio-Television . . Sophomore 

BLAKCWELL, STEVE Salina 

General Business Administration Junior 

BOUCHER, JAY Smith Center 

General Business Administration Freshman 



phigammadeltaphigammadeltaphigammadeltaphigamm 




TOUCHDO WN?— The 

route from Manhattan to 
Lawrence is a long one. 
Taking his turn during 
the sixth annual 
leukemia run, Troy 
McVicker, freshman in 
pre-professional 
elementary education, 
carries the football on 
his way to Lawrence. 
The run is sponsored by 
the K-State and KU 
chapters of Phi Gamma 
Delta. 




Tim Costello 



Phi Gammas 



BOTTOM ROW: Lisa A. Scheufler, Maria L. Newell, 
Sharon L. Vanier, Cindy L. Llndholm, Theresa M. 
Fleming, Annette K. Taylor. SECOND ROW: Norma 
M. Lawrence, Penny Bultman, Kim Ekum, Vicki Berk- 
ley, Sheryl Grace, Sue Anderson. TOP ROW: Tracy 
E. Eckes, Cindy L. Johnson, Denlse C. Mogge, Karen 
S. Wright, Janice S. Sutton, Lisa A. Chapman. 




_j>£. 



294/Phi Gamma Delta 



adeltaphigammadeltaphigammadeltaphigammadeltaphigammadeltaphigammadeltaphigammadeltaphigammadelt 





giAAM*kM4tk4th 







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4ik4\k 






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MiMdikmh 






iL**L*mM*iM*iM 











BOUCHER, MICHAEL Smith Center 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 
BUETTE, JOHN Hutchinson 

Marketing Freshman 

CORN, JACK Garden City 

Marketing Sophomore 

DILLON, STEVE Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DWYER, KEVIN Overland Park 

Food Science and Management Sophomore 

ECKHOFF, PETER Ossipee, NH 

Radio-Television Junior 

EGAN, DENNIS Salina 

Management Sophomore 

GREEN, ROBERT Maysville, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HAUG, TIM Abilene 

Management Freshman 

HENDERSON, CURTIS Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HERMAN, MICHAEL . . Mission 

Business Administration Freshman 

HICKS, JOSEPH Little River 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

HOLGERSON, KREG Salina 

Accounting Freshman 

JANSSEN, DAVID Little River 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

LAWRENCE, ROGER Manhattan 
Accounting Junior 

LOBB, CHRISTOPHER Kansas City, MO 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

LUTZ, ANDREW Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

MARTIN, MIKE Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

MCVICKER, TROY Abilene 

Pre-Prof. Elementary Freshman 

MILLER, DANIEL Mission 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

MOODY, MIKE Salina 

Construction Science Senior 

MORRIS, LARRY Westmoreland 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

NESTLER, GREGORY Hutchinson 

Accounting Freshman 

NICHOLS, BRENT Hutchinson 

Economics Junior 

PAYNE, STEVE . . Kirkwood, MO 
Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

REIGH, BRIAN Manhattan 

Construction Science Freshman 

ROBSON, WILLIAM Abilene 

Geography Junior 

RODA, DOUGLAS Wamego 

General Freshman 

ROGLER, KENNETH Leawood 

Agronomy ' Freshman 

SEXTON, BEN Abilene 

Pre-Law Freshman 

SEXTON, STEVE Abilene 

Geography Senior 

SVEC, JAMES .... Stilwell 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

THOMAS, KELLY .... Salina 

Accounting Sophomore 

TROSTLE, JACK Salina 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

VEACH, JOHN Abilene 

Agriculture Freshman 

WATSON, WILLIAM Leawood 

Construction Science Sophomore 

WILLIS, DICK Hoyt 

Agricultural Journalism Senior 

WILSON, DAVID Abilene 

Finance Senior 

WILSON, EVAN Abilene 

Agriculture Freshman 

WILSON, JEFF Abilene 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

YOESEL, MARK Morrill 

Food Science Management Junior 



Phi Gamma Delta/295 



hi Kappa Theta 

WOOLARD, JUDITH HOUSEPARENT 

ALLIE, STEPHEN Overland Park 

History Sophomore 

AYERS, DUANE Overland Park 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BARNES, JED Council Grove 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BOGNER, DAVE Haven 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BOGNER, TIMOTHY Parsons 

Food Science and Management Freshman 

CALLEN, TONY Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

CHRISTIE, LYNN Beloit 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

DAVIS, GARY Hays 

General Freshman 

DRUMMOND, JERRY Leawood 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ERICKSON, PATRICK Council Grove 

Radio-Television Junior 

FINKE, ALLAN St. Charles 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FISHER, RICK Council Grove 

Pre-Professional Secondary Education Sophomore 

FRIEDEL, MICHAEL Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

FRIEDEL, TIM Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

GONZALES, SALVADOR Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GRAUBERGER, JEFFREY Shawnee 

Fine Arts Freshman 

GREER, RICK Wilsey 

Agronomy Sophomore 

HASTERT, KENNETH Topeka 

Radio-TV Freshman 

HELLMER, DENNIS Roeland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HOLLANDER, STEPHEN St. Charles, MO 

Architecture Senior 

JILKA, BEN Shawnee Mission 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

JUSTUS, ROBERT Shawnee Mission 

General Business Administration Freshman 

KIERNAN, JOHN Salina 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

KILL, DOUGLAS Paola 

Fine Arts Senior 



phikappathetaphikappatheta phikappathetaphikappatheta ph 




Phi Kaptives 



BOTTOM ROW: Heidi S. Jernigan, Stephanie 
L. Baker, Liz T. Roether, Diane D. Honigs, Dana 
D. Roether, Margie Daniels, Ruth M. Lucky, Ellen 
Scott, Cheryl L. Blake. SECOND ROW: Debbie 
L. Moylan, Heidi S. Mittiestadt, Donna G. Ham- 
pel, Sandra S. Kingsley, Jackie M. Schaffer, Kath- 
ryn L. Deyoe, Cindy N. Smith, Debbie A. Storey, 
Marlene A. Irvine. THIRD ROW: Rose M. Scott, 
Elaine Dechant, Sharon M, Bairow, Haddie M. 
Burrow, Linda M. Schmidt, Leslie J. Mendenha!!, 
Linda L. Beets, Deborah J. Franklin, Rozanne A. 
Hellmer. TOP ROW: Maria E. Martinez, Barb K. 
Eccles, Cynthia M. Lorson, Rebecca A. Gutierrez, 
Becky L. Forshee, Susan K. Hargadlne, Patricia 
D. Figurski, Carol B. Fisher, Kelli Walden, Anna 
M. Schotter. 




296/Phi Kappa Theta 



phikappathetaphikappathetaphikappathetaphikappathetaphi kappathetaphikappathetaphikappathetaphikappathe 




EAGLE EYE — Lining up 
for his next shot, Sheldon 
Vazquez, sophomore in 
medical technology, sues 
the Phi Kappa Theta 
recreation room. The room 
is equipped with games 
ranging from pool to 
foosball to pinball machines. 
Usually located in the 
basement of Greek houses, 
these room provide a place 
for small parties or just to 
relax watching television. 



Kent Boughton 




KING, MICHAEL Oswego 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

KOEHN, CRAIG ' Marquette 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

LEWIS, GLENN Burr Oak 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

LYTLE, RICHARD ' Junction City 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

MERRITT, KEVIN * Lebanon 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

PATZELL, CURTIS Manhattan 

Marketing Junior 

PFEFFER, SCOTT Chesterfield, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ROBARGE, JOHN Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

ROY, STEPHEN Altamont 

Computer Science Freshman 

SCHLAFFER, MICHAEL . Prairie Village 
Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SCHNITTKER, ROBERT Cunningham 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SHAW, ROBERT Wichita 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SHOCKLEY, MARK Shawnee 

Finance Junior 

SMITH, BERNARD Wichita 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

SMITH, KEVIN Kansas City 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

VAZQUEZ, SHELDON Manhattan 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

WIESNER, DON Ellis 

Accounting Freshman 

WILLIAMS, TODD Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 



Phi Kappa Theta/297 



I 1 06I& J; ill pibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipi betaphipibet 

COOMBS. DONNA HOUSEPARENT & ^j&NBM HHI I MM EHftRH9 ■■■■■■ 

Family and Child Development Sophomore ■•»«, ^ . W P,"'**' ^ J j£W " ' \h 4$\ *" JM " 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior ' . j* Cat -^4^Ij I^^B' \^H 1 iflft. .^fl Wjf^ . **J& i 

BRANSON, TAMARA Great Bend ^fcv j*. 

CHAPMAN, CINDY Creve Coeur, MO ^.^ ^^jL ^Mfc ^M >^'1 

CURRY, KELLY Hutchinson If . H - ||t|> ABtH^ 

Elementary Education Junior /JmWFJL. jfM** 1 ^ £4k %> $W^% JAW^m 

DALBOM, JULIA Clovis, NM jft •' " ; fft Jj W «* i ''"'m ' £ JF^ 

General Sophomore ^H^~ ""W aWI '" " Ufc V- -'Lf "€■«*• "->) F "* ■ I 

DALBOM, SARAH Clovis, NM ^ *, \ F rtt ft T - 1 P \ 1/ 

Political Science Senior ^^^ ',* fife ' ' fl» \ "' ^ / F t Ik^ '" Ct*" V ' ^ 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore ^ .* , ^H fe AA%\W^ ' AW I ^^^ft f ')^k d^"^V -^^Ejjfci ^^ft 

DAWSON, CHERYL Leavenworth ^ TvvM I ft. >^ ft * ' i^B " ^ ^ ' ^ ' ^ 

Business Administration Senior H ! | ^^fl I I B^H 

DEMO, DAL1NDA El Dorado Am%%, jm -^ 

Home Economics Education Sophomore ^^ ^B^^SR. t^ ^A 

DONLEY, SONC1A Abilene 4, 

Marketing Senior §¥„ ^ M ,* «- V I '* * w> if** ^ », I 

DOWNING, BECKY Eureka ■ . V \ ' f H'v-" -> '$ 

General .... Freshman H "P ^ft M **> 

DOWNING, DEBBIE Eureka ^^Al\ /^^ ^R "'"^ V t ^tf!> «J> 

Speech Pathology Sophomore ^^H r ,^| I ^^m f \ ' M ' I If j9 ' I 

DRYDEN, MARCIA Dodge City ft,^ RT"' \^ ' A >^| 

Accounting In^fl ! I A Au\W ; I HMiH 

EAGLETON, LYNN Salina ^^k 

Management Senior w ^K ^K- tA A 

ELI AS. JULIE Olsburg jRp^%* flP A X JS| 

Interior Design Senior ■/ ^ F^ ^m£ *! „ «- ■■;* - ¥ ^F"~ ■! 

ELLIS, JEAN Chanute W w , _f " . ft ^ '- # 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior "ilL '""Jk ^ft-""' r ^ ' • ^ft ' W 

EXLINE, CHRIS Salina AWt' -■- Wk ^Jfcv ^ .1 ^A - /W i^r k 

Art Freshman ^N' ^ ^kj^fc^ 1 ^ ^\ /A ^ll ,^. 

FAGAN, CONNIE Leawood ^| ft ^^ fli B ^ L ^ A L ^ 111 ^ 

General Business Administration Sophomore Rft. ; j^^B fl| B\ ^H Nl^4i I fl H^Ml I HBl-^SI 

FANSHER, JANET Garden City M§&* 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore am, ' lik 

FAUBION, MARY Smith Center JT V* 

Marketing Senior MS - ** V\ 

FLEMMING, SUSAN McPherson fft . ; 1 . 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore M A t *^ 

FLOYD, BECKY Sedan frPwl ^ ^A ' (^ .^B^ftiL. ^^M\ '^ ^ \ 

Pre-Law Freshman Mv^^my \M^- ' ^- ^^ ™' "^^ ^^ 

FOGO, KAREN El Dorado MB ft A 

Management Sophomore | \ ft^ 

FRIESENBORG, LAURIE Leawood Mtfc*^ 

Speech Pathology Junior M^^MW bV^ lib 

GRAHAM, SHARON Prairie Village M ^k W '"* 

Family and Child Development Junior ll'*** *"W S »* **F I *" 1*7 • 

GUTSCHENRITTER, DEBBIE Lamed ^ ft . 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior ^^l-k-~ J^H > _^^ j 

HALL, DARLA Dekalb, MO <i w^ IM' ^ ^ ^^\ ;^ ^\ 

PreDesign Professions Sophomore 1L; |'V^&Jb9| ^^m ^M / Jiwl ' ■;, "M ^& ^^ft. J A 

HAMILTON, SUSAN Wakeeney / ! V 

Accounting Senior 

HOLIDAY, HELEN Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

HOLMES, LISA Decatur, IL 

Management Junior 

HOOKER, LISA Shawnee Mission 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HOWE, JANET Manhattan 71 -^ k- ( >w W\ JL j3\ ^71 ^^l " 7 

Physical Education Sophomore ^AW \ M^fr ^^L< • AW^ ^H I ^1 I 4AAmL Ami I ^tAM 

J ANNE, KATH1 Kansas City ^' jj Iflft ^ I ^ft^tf I H ' -" ft 

Accounting Sophomore 




Jfiti 


y^v ■ / i*P * ■** 


l^fli 


JH|gi v 


^ \ 


^ft "*" " Jk* 


^4 fW 


^i\-^^E 


ki 


■yi 





298/Pi Beta Phi 



aphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphiphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipiti 

SARGENT, KAY Wichita 

4pP Jm^\ JM ^%^ SCHWENSEN, MEG Clay Center 

j;> I^M "''*^^^ mm -J!wt jB> *' Family and Child Development Freshman 

# ^' '^■KFjijE ^rfi ^ PreVet ' Sophomore 

\J ^ [ ^K /J| mBK' -m *? ,^»- ^ SISTRUNK. HOLLY Manhattan 

SLUSHER, PAULA Columbia, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STEELE, SHELLE Scott City 

Horticulture Junior 

STEELE, SHARI Salina 

■ JH» ""'" Mh, Elementary Education Junior 

4 *. 1 jjjl ^fBI STOCK, DEBBIE Leavenworth 

f\ '" —^ CIBi jkHw ^■X'. ^^fc .4Mte« f \ ' Aif B^. i tK Management Sophomore 

|f','^||SK< y| | m mZijA I mIa ^ I ^. 'flk WESTHUSING, BRENDA Stockton 

1 ' '^' " ' ^ " ' ' j Pre-Medicine Freshman 

WILLIAMS, NANCY Overland Park 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

WINDSOR, ELAINE Peabody 

^BjP Interior Design Sophomore 

7 








Mmmm Mmmm 

GOOD - Each year the 
members of Delta 
Upsilon fraternity 
present all sorority 
pledges with a single 
carnation and 
congratulatory note. The 
pledges of Pi Beta Phi 
sorority are shown here 
at a Wednesday night 
formal dinner after 
receiving their gifts. 



Pi Beta Phi/299 



pibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaphipibetaph 

Pre Professional Elementary Education Freshman 4'^' ^W^ : ^K^. ^S t^. 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore Jffi ¥k ■ JBPL '2^. ^H Bfc i^Bfe* «- ifc 

MARTIN, PAMELA Salina ~ — ■■ • 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore ,,/^| . £3^ *' /& ^JJk • 3 

MCGAW, TERRI Ft. Leavenworth ; 'P^| *'< a*^**^|\ Pf^ 

MCGIVNEY, MARY Abilene g£ df" " Bf I"" ■ - j£* ^T'* ^ 

MURRAY^KIM 5 . .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. .'.'.'. ."SlSIl %fe-"/^ »^ f ^^J? ^ '' # <* 

Physical Education Sophomore ^ . I ' JB ^J^tf ^^ ^^^ A ^'m ^^^. ^jA * ^| 

NEAL, DIANA Garnett ^^, J M I ^K? /^ I ; ^ - ^ A "4ffi fll ' A 

Education fl l^^fll I fl^fe. >4M I B^. fllfe Jllk' ,^1 l^^^fl 

NELSON, BARBARA Wichita W^T^%k WW >ltP W^M% A^ | 

OLTJEN, SUSAN Robinson ^^ _ 

General Business Administration Sophomore *0Q: Jt$9PjL M^^ '^'J^F ' 

ONKEN, SALLY McPherson PtS'"*- f& % 

Sociology Freshman kj > im^ v^aSP Jj ~ *" gy 

PALEN, JUDY Scott City flP* "V ll "TpT B >- -;, ■ 

dome Economics Education Sophomore tL _*.' / I \ ", tF iHL ' » 

PANKRATZ, DIANE Wakefield, MA T'S*- K^ ^L\. T '$*{ ilk ^ \ W 

Dietetics and Inst Mgmt. Sophomore ^t\ ^Hfc if S, dfl^ i^3^ * 11 ^^L V 7/^^. *3B, ^ 

PENNEL, PAM Hiawatha ^ B '£j| M A ■ » I - BL ' % JJCT I ^ M M ■ J 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman fl Bk ^fl Sfe^JHl H I ^^^4B ■fei ^fl 

RANDALL, LAURA Wakeeney ,. — - M| 

Pre-Dentistry Junior i . ■«_ /flfc Jm-&\ 

RANDALL, LYNN Wakeeney lif** ^li JIb* M ■T^H 

General Freshman ; , J% I Jtp^T ^* Wis _^ 

REDEI, MARI Columbia, MO ||" " V » " 1 .. P 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman ^% . w ' I &4 ' ^r \ - - I 

REID, MARCIA Topeka » j " . ^T ^ , „ x 

General Freshman ^) , ^. ^^\ J^ ^,f JW ^ # Jfe 

RIPPLE. BETH Dodge City dBL Ji I ^H ^ B J« Afc J| 

Family and Child Development Senior W JM Ifl ^^| ^L^H ' ^Ik^fl 



Jusr Ca// me Jungle 
Jane — The Panhellic 
Council Plant Sale offers 
ferns and flowering 
plants at a low cost. Kiki 
Comeau, senior in 
management, takes 
advantage of the sale. 




Tim Costello 



300/Pi Beta Phi 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



pikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapika 




ALFARO, RAUL Eldorado 

General Freshman 

ANDLER, BRAD Topeka 

Radio-Television Sophomore 

BAIRD, BILL Manhattan 

Business Administration Senior 

BARBER, STEVEN Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

BARLOW, SHAWN Shawnee Mission 
General Freshman 

BOHLING, PERRY Garnett 

Accounting Junior 

BUENGER, JAMES Prairie Village 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BURRIS, JEFF Garnett 

Management Sophomore 

CARR, STEVE . . . Lenexa 

General Freshman 

CHANDLER, LARRY Richmond 

Business Administration Freshman 

CLAIR, KELLY Lewis 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

COLDIRON, CRAIG Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

COLE, CRAIG Garnett 

Business Administration Senior 

CONWAY, HARRY Parsons 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

COOK, DAVID W. Overland Park 
.Management Sophomore 

CURRY, ROBERT Wooster, OH 

Construction Science Junior 

DICE, JIM El Dorado 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

DUMLER, DAVID Russell 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

EWING, DOUGLAS Pratt 

Accounting Sophomore 

FISHER, JACK Overland Park 
Business Administration Junior 



FOX, JEFF 

Business Administration 

GAFNEY, TODD 

Management 

GRIFFITH, JEFF 



El Dorado 

Sophomore 

Overland Park 

Freshman 

Marion 

Construction Science Sophomore 

GROVES, MARK Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

HALLER, DARREN Lenexa 

Business Administration Freshman 



Sweethearts Of The Shield And Diamond 




BOTTOM ROW: Karen L. Fogo, Catherine L. 
Weger, Molly K. Ferrell, Sherrlll R. Wlschropp, 
Jolene A. Riley, Debra L. Chestnutt, Susan E. 
Cain, Teresa S. Rogers. SECOND ROW: Carta 
K. Bruemmer, Janette A. Pauls, Melinda M. Dun- 
ston, Sharon G. Cloud, Janine M. House, Susan 
Thomas, Teri Miller, Mary Dove, Julie Young- 
doff. THIRD ROW: Catherine A. Peterson, Tru- 
dy M. Dauber, Kathy Hagen, Carol Fischer, Ann 
M. Galiano, Wendy J. Selves, Anne B. Carpenter, 
Diane L. Miller, Barb Costello. TOP ROW: 
Elaine O'Neal, Sherry K. Classen, Sally J. Good- 
win, Sandy M. Clark, Janine Trempy, Diane D. 
Goss, Jane A. Lytle, Rhonda Miller, Lisa M. 
Bigler. 



Pi Kappa Alpha/301 



pikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikapp 



See No Evil — The Pi 

Kappa Alpha Fraternity 
piles on their (ire truck. 
The Pikes use the truck for 
various adventures such as 
spraying young women 
sunbathing in front of 
residence halls or sororities. 



HAYES, JERRY Pratt 

Marketing Senior 

HEITMANN, RICK Frontenac, MO 

Construction Science Junior 

HENDERSON, JEFF Mission 

Business Administration Junior 

HOLLOWAY, STEVE Mission 

Business Administration Junior 

JOHNSON, CLAY Manhattan 

Marketing Senior 

KATLIN, JERRY Mission 

General Sophomore 

KELLER, KURT Great Bend 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KLINE, KELLY Altamont 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

KOHLRUS, MARK Junction City 

Accounting Sophomore 

LAIR, CASEY Piqua 

Business Administration Sophomore 






**,' 




302/Pi Kappa Alpha 



ikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappaalphapikappae 










LAIR, MARK P| q „a 

General Business Administration .... Senior 

LAGERMANN, JOHN Concordia 

Food Science and Management Senior 

LESHER, ERIC Overland Park 

F' nan ce Freshman 

LICKTEIG, RON Garnett 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

LINE, RICHARD Russell 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 



MCCANDLESS, TIM 

General 

MCCARTER, STEVEN 

Landscape Architecture 

MCENDARFFER, DAVID 

Social Science 



Junction City 

Sophomore 

Overland Park 

Fifth Year Student 

Overland Park 

Junior 

MEEKER, GEORGE W Overland Park 

Construction Science Senior 

METZLER, MARK Topeka 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

MILLER, BRYAN Lewis 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

MILLER, MICHAEL G. Greensburg 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

MORITZ, CRAIG Beloit 

Finance Junior 

NELSON, JEFFREY Kansas City, MO 

Milling Science and Management .... Senior 
NOVICK, PAUL Shawnee Mission 
Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

PAPPAS, GRAGORY Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

PETERSON, MONTY LEE Overland Park 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

PHILLIPS, KYLE Kansas City, MO 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

PHILLIPS, MARK Abilene 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHIELE, RICHARD Fort Riley 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 



SCHMIDT, DENNIS 
General 
SILVERWOOD, ALLAN 

Finance 

SMITH, MARC 

Food Science and Management 

SMITH, MARK 

Construction Science 



Caldwell 

Freshman 

Tampa, FL 

Junior 

Marion 

Sophomore 

Prairie Village 

Freshman 

SMITH, MATTHEW Prairie Village 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

STACK, BRIAN Overland Park 

Management Junior 

THOMPSON, DREW Leawood 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

VANLANDINGHAM, DONALD Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Junior 

WAHLE, RODNEY Junction City 

Social Science Junior 

WHITE, DAVID L. Salina 

Accounting Freshman 

WILD, DAVID Milford 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, LARRY Garnett 

History Senior 



Pi Kappa Alpha/303 



* * Amdp JJCl ML lllpikappaphipikappaphipikappaphipikappaphipikappaphipikappaphipik 

RICHARD M Floissant, MO. Hj^HHj ^jj^n U I^HHB ^■^H^^H M|^^ 

Architecture Senior . JPijilfl*K- ^tifrL. ' ' *£ ^St* 

FAGER, RODNEY R Columbia, MO. j| ' j| M^^k M™*' W-\ 

GEORGE, DAVID H Bethlehem, PA WZ . ^.1 t|| , M K<~ ?W " ~ " " I ~ *~ W 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 1 . JF ^E W ^| r I -'. V, - # 

GOULDIE, JAMES M Mankato M f / ^ ' k ^S**»- ^ 

Accounting Junior ^^^VHPnt^^^ , ^ A^h I H /-~ ^1^^ 

HILL STEVEN C Wichita ^ 4 1A \, \ # ^H/H jF* i^H/' y ^ r# A 

Architecture Fifth Year Student L%1 I \n J8 b!1JS I li\ Jl! fc 

KRUEGER, KIRK J Edina, MO HH 

Architecture Fifth Year Student JL ^hft* s '\ 

MADER, RANDALL Jennings 0^"W, M^^% 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore ■ — ft R 

MCCULLEY, SCOTT Manhattan ■P* * 1 ^ * F 

Industrial Engineering Senior ^L«*' / \Jc / 

MEISTER, JEFFREY L Great Bend %^/ V*/ " ^ 

General [business Sophomore A **&£l - .**<#£<* \ di i^^^L. ~\ ^K^fe 

MILLER, TIMOTHY Prairie Village i flP mB ^'' f^\Vi- - 00Sk *fr LH.I ■ 

Marketing Sophomore |i JP ; J iii M • )9&& ^^1 ■ 

SNYDER, MICHAEL D Mankato HHHf^H SL* Jj|g9H| 

Mechanical Engineering Senior ^mP' 1 ":'' 

SORELL, TONY M Glasco W&sfym gMMfm 

Pre Prof. Secondary Sophomore ^RLs*.* m mr~ —-^L 

WINTERO WD, JOHN BRIAN . Union, MO W^: 7 % " " f 

Architecture Fifth Year Student ^%^fe*** * - - » 

y^ j^ if ■ 






w ■■■•«" 



Say cheese! • Jeff 
Meister, sophomore in 
business administration, 
Dave Reeves, 
sophomore in pre-design 
professions, Glen Caby, 
freshman in general, 
Steve Hill, fifth year 
student in architecture, 
and David George, fifth 
year student in 
architecture, display their 
new residence at 1716 
Fairchild. Although the 
house is not new, it's 
new to the members of 
Pi Kappa Phi. The house 
was purchased by the 
fraternity in October and 
members moved in 
during January. 
Originally the Kappa 
Delta sorority house, it 
was previously occupied 
by the Delta Chi 
fraternity. 




Kent Boughton 



304/Pi Kappa Phi 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



sigmaalphaepsilonsigmaalphaepsilonsigmaalphaepsilonsigmaf 




■Ainiifc'tfi^ » 



ALLINGHAM, STEVEN M Manhattan 

General Business Sophomore 

BAKER, BRUCE Garden City 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BECK, MIKE Kinsley 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

BECKER, MICHAEL Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BURTON. PATRICK L Plalnville 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CALOVICH, BRIAN E. Roeland Park 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

CALOVICH, DAVID M. Shawnee Mission 

General Freshman 

CASTOR, DAVID P. Lenexa 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

CHANDLER, ROBERT P. Wichita 

General Business Sophomore 

DAVIES, SCOTT Emporia 

Horticulture Senior 

DUBOIS, JOHN N Manhattan 

General Business Junior 

FERGUSON, JAMES S. Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

FISER, MITCH S Narka 

Accounting Sophomore 

GARVERT, RANDALL L. Plainville 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

GASSMAN, RANDY J. Dighton 

General Freshman 

GEIST, DAVID B. Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

GUNTHER, GREG J Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HALE, DAVID S. Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

HARTENSTEIN, ERIC A. Wichita 

Finance Sophomore 

HASSENFLU, GARY LEE Leawood 

General Business Freshman 

HORNBAKER, KY W. Wichita 

Construction Science Freshman 

INNES, KIP B. Manhattan 

Pre-Law Freshman 

JACKSON, KELLY C. Wichita 

General Freshman 

JOHNSON, JAMES M. Colorado Springs, Co. 

Construction Science Freshman 

JONES, JEFFREY W Topeka 

Civil Engineering Senior 

KELLY, TIM J. Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

KING, BRYAN D. Lenexa 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

KIRKEGAARD, JON R. Topeka 

General Sophomore 

KNAMILLER, KEITH L. Overland Park 

General Business Freshman 

KOLMAN, JOSEPH J Washington 

Industrial Engineering Sen! .it 

LACY, PAUL J Shawnee Mission 

General Business Junior 

L1PPOLD, WILLIAM C. Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 
LONG, MARK S. Winfield 

Accounting Sophomore 

LOWMAN, WILLIAM A. Hays 

General Business Freshman 

MARKLEY, AARON Plainville 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

MEADE, HUGH E. Plainville 

General Freshman 

MOSER, JOHN C. Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

MUELLER, MIKE A. Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

PETERSON, ARTHUR E Manhattan 

General Freshman 

REDD, M. BROOK Overland Park 
Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

ROBERTSON, DONALD M. Shawnee Mission 

General Business Sophomore 

SANDMEYER, TIMOTHY J. Overland Park 

Construction Science Junior 

SCHAULIS, RICHARD J. ... Indian Hill, OH. 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SEGAL, HOWARD M. Manhattan 

Marketing Freshman 

SHAMBURG, GREGORY Beloit 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon/305 



sigmaalphaepsilonsigmaalphaepsilonsigmaalphaepsilonsigmaalphaepsilonsigmaalphaep silonsigmaalphaepsilons 



Raise A Little 
Hell — Basement Crew 
members of the Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon house 
celebrate their annual 
Basement Crew Party. 
The party is supposed to 
occur only once a year, 
but members admit the 
event takes place more 
often than that. 




SKINNER, MARK Clay Center 

Political Science Sophomore 

SMITH, SCOTT Leawood 

General Freshman 

STETSON, ALAN Leawood 

Finance Junior 

SUMMERS, CRAIG Wlnf leld 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

SWEENEY, CABOT Leawood 

Biochemistry Junior 

TREMPY, GREG Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

TRUESDELL, DAVE Winfield 

Journalism Sophomore 

LINGERER, JOHN Marysville 

Business Administration Freshman 

UNGLES, JOEL Satana 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

VEAL, BLAIN Abilene 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

WANCURA, DAN Dighton 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

WESTHUSIN, FRED .... Natoma 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

WRIGHT, GREGORY Topeka 

Civil Engineering Freshman 





■HPt 







1 1 



Little Sisters of Minerva 



BOTTOM BOW: Debbie Hamilton, Kim K. Pheffer, 
Cheryl F. Kruse, Ann E. Dayvault, Ann A. Jackson, 
Theresa A. Nass, Cher! S. Spener, Melissa A. Man- 
ning, Lori S. Schlager, Janet L. Fansher. SECOND 
ROW: Karen J. Ferguson, Nanci J. Saper, Candy C. 
Campbell, Christ! L. Dutton, Kerry L. Oberg, Susan K. 
Mosier, Denise C. Gerichten, Carol J. Trojovsky, Su- 
san Drees, Lea J. Brooks. THIRD ROW: Jane A. 
Baird, Shari D. Fulhage, Susan G. Kadd, Glna M. Ross, 
Liz A. Drees, Mary C. Reals, Laura G. Long, Gerl A. 
Greene, Janls M. Pray. TOP ROW: Laurl A. Meier, 
Jerllyn A. Desch, Terrl R. Spear, Chris D. Jones, 
Carolyn S. Dobratz, Pam J. Llppold, Susan R. 
Oehmke, Linda L. Tredway, Sally A. Raymond. 




306/Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



Sigma Chi 



sigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisign 




4 





top 



1 I 





mm ^ ^i ^k 7 . 





ALLEN, JOE Hutchinson 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

ANDERSON, CHARLES Mission 

Business Administration Freshman 

BAUER, JOHN Kansas City 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

BAUMGARTNER, BILL Mulvane 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

BLOOD, GILMAN Wichita 

Construction Science Freshman 

BOLDING, JAY Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

BOSCH, ERIC Council Grove 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CAHILL, DAVID Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education Senior 

CARSON, CHRIS Maryville, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

DAWSON, DAVID Manhattan 

Architectral Engineering Sophomore 

EGGLESTON, RANDY Mulvane 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

ELROD, GARY . . Kansas City 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

FRAUEN, JIM Lenexa 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

FRUHAUF, RICHARD Wichita 

Business Administration Freshman 

GIESLER, JIM Atlanta, GA 

Accounting Sophomore 

GOTTSCH, JOHN Prairie Village 

Construction Science Junior 

HARREN, MIKE Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

JACOBSON, DANE Wamego 

Pre-Vet Junior 

JORDON, SCOTT Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

KERNS, KELLY Mulvane 

Architecture Senior 

KURTZ, BRYAN Manhattan 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

LANNING, MIKE Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

LEE, MATTHEW Hutchinson 

Construction Science Sophomore 

McCRACKEN, STEVE Fairway 

Finance Sophomore 

MILLER, CHRIS Prairie Village 

Construction Science Freshman 

MINO, STEVE Leawood 

Construction Science Freshman 

MURRAY, EDWARD Manhattan 

Accounting Freshman 

NICHOLS, MATT Leawood 

Business Administration Freshman 

PATTERSON, DAVID Dwight 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

PEINE, RONALD Overland Park 
Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

PERKIN, GREGORY Leawood 

Business Administration Freshman 

PETERS, TIMOTHY Wichita 

Business Administration Freshman 

PIROTTE, DANIEL Leawood 

Biochemistry Junior 

PORTER, BOB Prairie Village 

Management Sophomore 

PRATT, DOUGLAS Wichita 

Marketing Senior 



Sigma Chi/307 





ichisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigmachisigma 

RUSSELL, CRAIG Belpre : Wm m m M 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

SCHNEIDER, STEVE Overland Park 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

SUITER, ROBB Macksville f™* fe W WHD\^ "\ 

Agricultural Economics Junior %«£L / >•• '^SlT"' m : \£?y 3n&, ^ «.~, 

TALGE, MARK Leawood ^tMfLlr'- '' «» AT^ : 

Business Administration Freshman ^■jH^V^ (IfaHfe ^^^L "^" fc^^j 

TEARNEY, PHILIP Leawood M M ]%, fe - If \\ Bk ^ ■ ' '^1 

ACCOUntm9 Sophomore ^ T|| \ £%| ^mJLWMM Ik 

TOLLE, GLENN Pittsburg 

Prc-Vct Senior 

VOEGELE, TIM Leawood 

Accounting Junior m „ * / - , » 

VOGEL, ERIC Lenexa Wf - W 1X S 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore ^yc-"" ]W* > 

WANDS, HAYDEN Kansas City %^ ' ^S*f ^ ^Ig^ £>'^ 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore ^dk ' dH jn MM« ■"^SBKfh. ^tttSt^^W 

WATKINS, PAUL Roeland Park jflffV 1 - Bin N ^^T ^W\W 

Business Administration . . . . Junior BW 1 J| .• ' iV: : - : ''i'^^B : ,"^<« I <. J^f I*r^ 

WELLS, JIM Wichita 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

WHITE, STEVE Leawood 

Microbiology Junior ^ 








"May / have your 
autograph?"- Steve White, 
junior in pre-veterinary 
medicine, signs a paddle 
belonging to Janet Theirolf, 
junior in consumer affairs. 
Both were attending a pre- 
game paddle-signing party 
for the Little Sigmas, the 
Sigma Chi little sisters. The 
party was held to give 
fraternity members and little 
sisters a better chance to 
get to know each other. 




308/Sigma Chi 



C51 jJIlTcl L\ U sigmanusigmanusigmanusigmanusigmanusigmanusigmanusignianusignianusigmanusi 

BALDWIN, CURTIS Salina 

- : V : " i T&» Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

W ^S BARBE, BILL Kansas City, MO 

^^m a m, B'-; .at afX -JBH Finance Senior 

* ^ W W -* ' " ""•' y T|~ *H ■ M : BERGH - WILLIAM Marienthal 

[W < Bj <e£j Jt Fisheries and Wildlfe Biology Junior 

^ ;, jr BOLIN, ANDREW Shawnee Mission 

W . \ / Marketing Junior 

r /&•* A'AlB ' ' CLEVELAND, BILL Norfolk, NE 

mk ^~ tffit -"* flbt ' \^ I Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

HH COPE. ANDREW Leawood 

Marketing Senior 

W^m :■ FENLEY, MARK Troy 

» . rj- H -m* J^¥- *^M Agricultural Economics Senior 

' V '"*. " ^ m . - f FIONDA, DAVID Wichita 

1 .~~ I ^i**** 1 Electrical Engineering Freshman 

k. > w W^ GAAR, JAMES Westwood 

^_^_ *bJ -M^ jfl ^^ Radio-Television Freshman 

M\ fll^A '-'"' / BAB |15r GASPER, KERRY Wichita 

ll\ I#b1 IV BBBMBi >>H IiW Business Sophomore 

-m: H PHH GILLER, MICHAEL Manhattan 

^fc^B ft Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

fl» \ Wf M GOBLE, STEVEN Hutchinson 

h i*, j w ■ ■: vr B^»^ *"■ B^* : W Engineering Technology Senior 

■ *• f \ 7 GREEN, KELLY Leoti 

^L..*5*" ' \ " "'" Marketing Senior 

Jf*-- ^^ft*"^^ USSrmi \ ^ ^Bh. GROVE, CURTIS Olathe 

g* ^Ul^\ ^IB i ^P ^BB " """^ *S\ ^BBB a^V «B Business Administration junior 

■V jl IcM IB fll V \B? IjLal GROVE, TOM Olathe 

\ Bft ■ lHai II I I ^\ lM/ Hb\b1 Marketing Sophomore 

^^ | . v . HATCH, CHARLES Salina 

4afl H^ air" ; '?§ir> Milling Science Management Junior 

rarl l-fFIl- '"*'" JAAX, JEFFREY Andale 

k l 1 _ - > Bfiat«^ Ka »w^ & " ; '" Pre-Medicine Freshman 

lT^. * ■T|.. W% H * . JONES, MIKE Sedan 

r m.Tt' l3P*~ \ - — Construction Science Freshman 

^j V^ ^ J%K %^ ^ KASITZ, GARY Newton 

L^^^b. j^kflBk .^af t \ l MBBb A \^^0^ifc<5 ^saaal/ ► aaB Construction Science Freshman 

i ik v!9«aV ! l!'^ K ■"'■"" " '1 ! ; I:J fll KONZ, STEVE Manhattan 

I AVSmlBY bHiB HH1 BBBhIr ■ I l lW i._Z'.i.B BL.J Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

r^^ BB&fMI mm igB LAND ' ROBERT Osawatomie 

Bk | ^B f^Bj. ^9 jj». V ; Horticulture Junior 

i B^^ m^^k Bf""% LAUDAN, KEN Overland Park 

*• - BiH-T^BI ■ "■>» * % VB^h 4C^B General Business Administration Freshman 

¥{.-'[" ^ W^ / LEATHERBY, DENNIS Lenexa 

%r.v? ^J SL^ ^ t ^J LYNCH, SCOTT . . Wellington 

tftak Bl I r- ^BMjTl JflBI II la. ' s ^ General Freshman 

^■fll ' , Wk.: B4* BifTlBl I BT M MILES, GREG Columbia, MO 

SmK \ BW BMM fffflUli BBBl f IBBbI BBl H PreD^ign Freshman 

MURPHY, BRENT Clinton, IA 

Engineering Technology Junior 

PELTZER, JOHN Andale 

[<* * ^T~~ • » E» **■ ^r General Freshman 

*r PETREHN, KEVIN Overland Park 

- , General Business Administration Sophomore 

^-f^ir \^/ 1 gggBL ^^ Vv - V, ^^*" k. PRESTA, KELLY Scott City 

^. . . » I \ 1 B 4fc » <1 Ji^H # . JH ^a^B J^b>, General Business Administration Freshman 

"^ . S ' V IT ; I I ^ I l/fi M I RINNER, JAMES Topeka 

ik\ -. i ■ IbBbIIbbIbbM&^bHIXblBbI General Freshman 

fi-gv ROTH, STEVE Ellisville, MO 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

WANZENRIED, ANDRE . . . Minnetonka, MN 
Milling Science and Management . . . .Senior 

WESTALL, GREGG St. Louis, MO 

Construction Science Freshman 

if / . -f limi 

Little Sisters of the White Rose 









BOTTOM ROW: Pamela S. Martin, Kelly A. 
Curry, Cathy J. Baldwin, Becky J. Watts, Kelli A. 
Kerr, Denise A. Gatzoulls, Karen L. Winter, Nan- 
cy E. Kramer, Hanla Shaheed. SECOND ROW: 
Kris J. Fionda, Patty A. Sandberg, Kathy M. 
Murry, Cindy L. Nutter, Cheryl L. Nutter, Lorie 
M. Lindenmuth, Linda K, Ventsam, Bobble K. 
Jennings, Tammy D. Spray. THIRD ROW: Mar- 
eta L. Barnes, Terrt L. Ford, Shari L, Steele, 
Karen R. Thlerer, Karen L. Stutterheim, Amy W. 
Fontain, Julie K. Schlrmer, Linda R. Dubbs, 
Becky E. Floyd. TOP ROW: Chris Exline, Sue 
Barsamian, Barb A. Nelson, Sharon T. Graham, 
Lynn A. Wylie, Suzanne R, Berning, Julie H. 
Willis, Bethany Brewster. 



Sigma Nu/309 




ma Phi Epsilon 



ALLEN, A. MIKE Leawood 

Construction Science Junior 

AUSTIN, CRAIG Junction City 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

AVERILL, MARK Kansas City 

General Business Administration Junior 

BASTIAN, MARK Coffeyville 

Food Science and Management Freshman 

BECKER, SCOTT Meridan 

Finance Sophomore 

BERGEN, RICHARD Salina 

General Freshman 

BILLAU, BRENT Salina 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

BOURK, DAN Leawood 

Social Sciene Sophomore 

BRANTINGHAM, SHAWN Wheaton, IL 

Marketing Freshman 

BROWN, PAUL Meriden 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BROWN, TERRY Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

BRYSON, KYLE Onaga 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

CLARK, PATRICK .... Hays 

Accounting Junior 

CODY, JAY Coffeyville 

Horticulture Junior 

CRUTCHREILD, CHARLES Coffeyville 

Marketing Senior 

CRUTCHFIELD, ROBERT Coffeyville 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

DYER, MICHAEL " Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

EILERS, CRAIG St. Charles, MO 

Construction Science Senior 

FLICK, ROCKY Winfield 

Management Sophomore 

FOSTER, JIM Wichita 

Pre-Law Freshman 

GALYARDT, TOM Lawrence 

General Business Administration Freshman 

GILL, JEFF Harper 

Accounting Senior 

GLANDER, CHIP Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

GRAY, ERIC Goodland 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

HANER, BILL Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

HEINTZELMAN, MIKE Leavenworth 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

HERZOG, MARK Tecumseh 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

HOBBS, ANDREW Coffeyville 

General Junior 

HUBLER, GREG Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 
HURLBUTT, TODD Coffeyville 
Finance Junior 



sigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphi 




310/Sigma Phi Epsilon 



sigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilon 




Hold It! — The 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
fraternity is directed by 
Allan Webber, senior in 
accounting, during 
University Sing. U-Sing is 
a vocal music 
competition between 
living groups. 




JACKSON, GREG Salina 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

JACKSON, KELLY Wichita 

General Freshman 

KIRK, CHUCK Scott City 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

KRATZER, KENT Geneseo 

Marketing Freshman 

LIEBL, STEVE Dodge City 
Veterinary Medicine Junior 

LIEBL, TOM Dodge City 

General Freshman 

LUEBBERS, DENNIS Marienthal 

Agricultural Education Junior 

MAY, CHIP Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MERMIS, GREG Salina 

Accounting Senior 

MUNSON, KIRK Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

NUNNINK, LEO Shawnee 

General Freshman 

PAULSEN, DAVID Scott City 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

PENDERGAST, STEVE Dodge City 

Marketing Junior 

PETER, DON Ellinwood 

Marketing Senior 

PHILLIPS, STEVE . Overland Park 
General Freshman 



Sigma Phi Epsilon/311 



dlorisigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilonsigmaphiepsilo 

PIERCE, BILL Abilene 1 

General Freshman 

PORTER, BOB Wichita M "W^ 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman S. 'm 

REDMAN, PATRICK Dodge City lt2- W 

General Freshman Tli""^ ^ 

ROBINSON, BARRY Topeka rr 

Accounting Senior * 

ROESSLER, MARK Coffeyville ^ . • 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore » ■■ 

SAGESER, MARK Prairie Village ^^^ 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore £i'A EMfe ja£ ^t-j 

SCHMITT, DALE Wichita ■*>% J» K^l IhI! Ok 

General Business Administration Freshman ff^ T-al- K| ^jB Bp^ ^^m |P^ 

SCHUETTE, RANDY Abilene 

Finance Freshman 

STOSKOPF, STEVE Valley Falls % '"" , %. - ( J|K k ^ W 7*^ fl^, 

Finance . Sophomore \ t£k Br"^ I ^tkml%\ Mtfk ^flfl j* IB ^|H A fll !i 

TICKEL, LARRY Salina . v V %! A| ■ft J I |g IIJ IV 1 

General .... Freshman fe\ ik*il / I M iL....Kwfll - ■■ MJ 

TILLERY, BRUCE Valley Falls 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman JH *■* A JEf Bl 

WEBBER, ALLEN Salina 

Accounting Senior If ^» "Jf** *T -^ «^ L 

WILLIAMS, JOHN Dodge City Jpit ^ ^1 ;;. f- \fcS " t[ ~1 Jf 

Marketing Sophomore ^A\.^/ «sf iv "' w ' ™ 

WINGERT, BART Wichita A*m ' «J^ ^^1 flHA ^\IW 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 3§ M "V UK "M # ^ ■\^W 

WINKLER, JOE Overland Park ''-'mi' ■ ■ I | S |fi i\Mffl I 

Accounting Junior i B>v. fl ■ M l%2 BUI i % Jb\ 





Little Sisters Of The Golden Hart 



BOTTOM ROW: Lynn D. Eagteton, Lisa C. Broadie, 
Diana L. Falen, Judy A. Weiss, Cindy J. Bullock, 
Sharon M. Bohn, Becky L. Oliver, Sarah S. Neustrom, 
Marcia L. Reld, Suzanne E. Cody. SECOND ROW: 
Anne F. Williams, Jane E. Klumpp, Beverly G. Kool 
Anne D. Bullock, Polly J. Wimer, Kim S, Dlerks. 
Marcia K. Dryden, Susan Stigall, Jennie J. Seglem 
Nancy J. Williams, Debbie A. Stock, Rhonda K 
Werner. THIRD ROW: Vlcki L. Allen, Beth C. Ron 
ning, Caren A. Coe, Bev A. Luebbers, Susan K. Haas. 
Sonsa D. Barnaw, Jill R. Swaim, Kim A. Sparks, Mar 
garet L. Lobmeyer, Karen L. Fowler, Kelli J. Mc- 
Donald, Susan L. Oehme. TOP ROW: Regina A 
Clare, Sheila D. Hecht, Susan K. Barth, Beth A. Rip 
pie, Jenny L. Jameson, Nina E. Spencer, Jane M 
Harmless, Tiaralyn R. Lapo, Jan L. Williams, Janice L. 
Gillan, Debbie J. Barnes, Marty Miller, Cindy Pember- 
ton. 




312/Sigma Phi Epsilon 



taukappaepsilontaukappaepsilontaukappaepsilontaukappaep silontaukappaepsilontaukappaepsilontaukappaepsil 
Daughters Of Diana 




BOTTOM ROW: Julie E. Reinke, Kim A. 
McLeighton, Mary A. Richardson, Jane A. Mangold, 
Becky S. Skeeis, Amy L. Simons, Kelly Becker, Sher- 
ry J. Schmitt. SECOND ROW: Marilyn DeJesus, 
Jody Joyce, Patty Ellis, Patti A. Tulp, Tammy R. 
Manning, Kathleen M. Lyons, Shari Evans, Lori Evans, 
Trina Cole. THIRD ROW: Rebecca D. Crow, Brenda 
A. Hill, Carta M. Stober, Leah J. Miller, Terry L. 
Serra, Janice E. Walsh, Kathy L. Leonard, Marilyn 
Rome, Terri L. Malnlcof, Teresa M. Luebbers. Penny 
Coddlngton. TOP HOW: Jodi Brown, Donna Werder, 
Mary Eckenberg, Becky Hoots, Sheni Frank, Sherl 
McGonagle, Kelly Yeargln, Allecia Remington, Sue 
Yoakum, Beth Haworth, Laurie Fairburn, Karen Bar 
ancik, JaLue Woodbury. 




LAST, GREGORY D Leavenworth 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

LILE, DAVID B Leawood 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

MARQUEZ, RICHARD LEE Overland Park 

Political Science Junior 

MCCRACKEN, PHILLIP KEVIN Overland Park 

General Business Freshman 

MCKENZIE, JON L. Fremont, NE. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MCNEIL, MONTY C. Hutchinson 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

MULANAX, STEPHEN D. . Abilene 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

O'NEIL, TODD M. Salina 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

PARSONS, LYNN L Webber 

Agronomy Senior 

PIPER, MITCHELL D. Marquette 
Applied Music Junior 

STEVE PRESTON Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

RASSETTE, BRIAN Salina 

Marketing Junior 

REDFORD, JOE Lyons 

Marketing Junior 

REED, DOUG Lyons 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

REICHMUTH, KEVIN Salina 

General Business Administration . . . Sophomore 

RENFRO, CRAIG Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 

RUDER, JIM Salina 

General Freshman 

SCULLY, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Junior 

SEITZ. ROBERT Topeka 

Secondary Education Senior 

SIMS, RANDY Berrytown 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SLAVEN, JEFFREY Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

SMITH, TODD Leoti 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

SNOOK, STEVE Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 

THOMPSON, STEVE Salina 

Pre-Pro. Secondary Sophomore 

TREBILCOCK, GREG Hutchinson 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

TR1GGS, JOHN Topeka 

Social Science Senior 

WEARING, PATRICK Salina 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

WENDLAND, MARK Wamego 

Architecture Engineering Junior 

ZIMMERMAN, JEFF Salina 

Computer Science Freshman 

ZIMMERMAN, MARK Salina 

Marketing Senior 



Tau Kappa Epsilon/313 



1 ClU 1\2IPP& ELpSllOlltaukappaepsilontaukappaepsilontaukappaepsilontaukapp 

FORCUM, GLADYS HOUSEMOTHER ■■«£§»■■■■ ''WM BBBJBBHBBBj 

BESLER, L. GREGORY Topeka | ^gfcw ^T"*% 4K&**' 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore ■P^^k £fe jB^T^ ■ 

Electrical Engineering Junior BBirl ""W^ •f ! * v "'"'° \ *" l * " * v 

General Business Administration Sophomore A^T /A BkJ -<<Bl %► 

Computer Science Junior {jm " K/j j^L /j**^ ' , ' '^P» 

BUHLER, BRIAN Topeka ^B^. ^^ 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore M^tt^k. M:^£ -St ^iBl^ BE-^Em A&V 

CAUTHON, STEVE Scott City MW'M M '%. M *M W***M flF % 

Engineering Technology Senior -Jg| (BV> - I§ WJr^BM iB*** i- B ^BJ[" J 

CRAETON, JAMES Topeka Bfe «*-^P * f BK *1£ ^X ' W^ " 

COX, CRAIG Silver Lake ^%- it"' .^ m \L 

Pre-Professional Secondary Ed Freshman a -#BA /,W* 

DARRAH. MARK Lyons A S. , * ^# ft \» I #. 

Pre-Dentistry Senior J ^ Rl » \ ' A lk\ .' fJf ,4 I" 

DOTSON, BRYAN Wichita UB^BfM ^^_ ^ fP^P^J 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior S^/m "^BB * ^? B^k ^BPP'* ^»*^i 4^^ 

DYE, TROY Scott City ; JF ''*'i W j ' . F^ p 1 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman M •S^^s^l ^*^ ■*. f* W^*' *• i M? ^ * 

EINSPAHR, JEFF Prairie Village Tl P »H ' B Yf_. Si .. £' V | 

ENSLEY, DOUG ........ .Topeka j£ .M^ - >fa **»**- *C V" ^W 

Biological Science Education Senior "^ ^j. 0mPA <^f* tfB r M l ^^ ^ -- A A A 

EWING, JERRY Emporia 4BV ' ■ j \ £\ \ J^/l W 

Physical Education Freshman J| BJ Wm± 9 ^ I \ « * A 

FRITSON, KEVIN Prairie Village ^fe^ ^a -«a*»- ife J^BiX. ** 

FRITSON, ROD Prairie Village JP 1 **^ BkP^L Bt^T Wt^F' fil 

Nuclear Engineering Junior g^fl Bl *flp f & ^1 V^ a JM 

GINTHER, JIM Salina Wk , fljj |. ^§ ||f-l 

Accounting Sophomore pj^ Bj i I > ^ -''---■ * Bl 

GRICE, ALFRED Topeka ^^^ ^^ ^ ^ 

Pre Design Professions Freshman ^■I'Bfi'V ^S"JF'4 ^r Jk- A ^FW^Sk 

General Business Administration Freshman H* ^^n- • H B^?^ ^^B T^ -. ' mt-^w- J*' 

Chemical Engineering Freshman ^% -" tB - ]i v - If V — 

HELINE, JEFF Salina { V ^S ^ ^ V ^ ^^V 

Construction Science Sophomore ^gf «gk * fli V| ■■ A 4fi I ii Pf^ 

HORTON, FRANK Hays fl 1^ J : 1\ Bk It ■ A f^M I s V 

Landscape Architecture Senior BJ Jg jfj ^y i^L^kBl J Bk uBJ I IM V 

HUSTON, GEORGE Lees Summitt, MO ^^^ tf^to *t$k* Jm g ?^ 

Milling Science and Management Freshman ^M H mL JBk Jm$m£' ^' -^ BbH 3d 

General Business Administration Freshman K-^ -t. W 9 ~ ^^P^ 'Jr^, &' B^ ^^ B^--^ *^ 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman i^Bal A ^B ' I ^ - 4 ' /t > 

LAMBERT, BART Overland Park ■ ^ J| ' Bf yl'j '>* \^/ 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore I BUB , j A / \ I ^ |» f^ 



T.LT.?1—The Teke 
Independent Team 
displays it's uniquely 
initialed t-shirt. The Six- 
member team finished 
out last year's season 
with a 5 and 1 W-L 
record. Ths photo was 
taken after the team's 
one loss. According to 
one member of the 
team, "We got smoked. ' 
The game was against 
the Manhattan Jazz. 




314/Tau Kappa Epsilon 



Theta Xi 



thetaxithetaxithetaxithetaxithetaxithetaxithetaxithetaxithetaxithetaxithetaxithetaxi 




Peas Please — Kevin Dillingham 
(left), freshman in pre-design profes- 
sions and David Ferguson, freshman 



in agricultural economics enjoy a 
candlelight dinner at the Theta Xi 
house. A Theta Xi tradition, formal 



sit-down dinners with candles are 
held every evening for house mem- 
bers 



Scott Liebler 




ANDERSON, MIKE Bird City 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

BUCK, WILLIAM Marysville 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

COONROD, DOUG Overland Park 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

DILLINGHAM, KEVIN Warrensburg, MO 
Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ERICSON, SHANNON Marquette 

General Freshman 

FERGUSON, DAVID . Lindsborg 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

FRUDENTHAL, LEONARD St. Joseph, MO 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

FREY, JAY Abilene 

Food and Science Management Sophomore 



GOVERT, KEVIN Tribune 

Construction Science Sophomore 

GUNDERSEN, JAMES Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

KARLIN, GERARD Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

KERN, FRED Herkimer, NY 

Biology Senior 



Theta Xi/315 




thetazltlietasitlietaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctaxithctax 

KUMMER, ANTHONY Great Bend 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

KURTH, WALTER Offerle 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

LETOURNEAU, JOHN Wichita f^.""-^ ■fc*»* sr, » ■"**< W W ■' V ' :"1 I~ ^ 1 

General Freshman 

LEVIN, JEFFREY Manhattan 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore ^ ^^A ' ^^^ ^^^^ ^~ ^^^ 

LONG, CHARLES Beloit M M A M W^ A Mt A 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman if t'SL ' Ik ^1 B ' ^1 

MCCULLY, ROBERT El Dorado 

Construction Science Sophomore 

MCKITTRICK, RICHARD Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Junior BR. J«? 

MISAK, ALEX Caldwell v ""/ ■'" W~ ~ 5 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

MONRAD, JOHN New Providence, NJ , . _ 

Chemical Engineering Junior ^^^ .^^^L J ~^Bfc^ ^* ^^. &f A A 

OWENS, STEVE Manhattan \ \m ■ liflk^/i ^B mW WM ■ A 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore L, . » ^j| :/ JT A WM A 

PAYNE, MIKE Salina 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ROBBEN, PAUL , + Oakley 

Accounting Junior 

SMITH, AB Tribune "^ * 

Agronomy Sophomore 

SMITH, RAY Tribune 

Electrical Engineering Freshman -— «*i 'm, k^^M 1* «Mh I «k - 

TAGUE, RICK Cassoday f fl| ■ jf J| ! ■Iff • M 

Chemical Science Senior I M fflgmi&j £Hki I rfc ■ A 

THOMSON, BRUCE Deephaven, NM 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

TUCKER, DENNIS Wichita 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore «-, &*■ ■ ^ i «-* - i 

VANTREASE, BUCK Gardner * "~ "" ' ! 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore - m ^kitl~- \ *?*•* 

VOORHEES, ROSS Wichita 

Fine Arts Freshman ^mmm j\ ■- »— . ^ 

WHITE, GRANT St. John fcl\ /& / MB '•I j8|>f> - ^lA 

Accountin 9 Scnior . \ « fflf' JOlViBli ffl '■ 

WINDHOLTZ, TRICK Augusta 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 






. 



Little Sisters Of The Unicorn 



BOTTOM BOW: Gail E. Garey, Tammy D. 
Sweetman, Mary E. Johnson, Linda A. Strong, 
Sandy Blomquist, Terri A. Noble. SECOND 
HOW: DeAdre M. Orten, Meianle L. Thompson, 
Cheri L. Rolph, Dee A. Dunkleberg, Krln G. Wi- 
ley, Beth A. James. THIRD ROW: Roxie L. 
Stihvell, Kelly J. Pfoltner, Becky D. Lundquist, 
Pamela J. Nlcklaus, Danise L. Bailey. TOP 
ROW: Stephanie A. Robinson, Coree L Smith, 
Cindy L. Rolph, Dalinda Demo, Ginger Stejskal, 
Sandra L. McKittrtck. 




316/Theta XI 




1 1TldI10|l6triangletriangletriangletrianglefriangletriangletriangletriangletriangletnangletriangletri 

■■m M Wffltim |Hp CONNER, TIM Hutchinson 

• ^■fc^^ jHH^ ,J^ wifc Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

% 4^m jfl [i| J§^^ $, A^NQ DANIELS, WALTER Germantown, NY 

,«Jk Bk ^B ^P^^^fc ff" 'li|' ^K. M Architecture Fifth-Year Student 

p»«^?y av'^m W~ ^1|r W^ r J W** *^ |j DEWYKE, MICHAEL Cheyenne, WY 

ZJ'- 1 «i *~ P" i,<*^ \ ^ w ** r MHBS - J* Electrical Engineering Junior 

■Fl ^ lEl/ Mtf , j |IH - J\Z/W FEENEY, BRIAN Somers, NY 

Mk AlW* i ^A <*** K'^tm. _^A '"' ^ ^^A ^""^ |^^^_ Architecture Fifth-Year Student 

A 1 Ik >1HHbV < MBi I BV ' 'I HURFORD, DAN 

> %F l HV **< jfl H\ v ■ Bi ' B Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

^ ,,— „^fcT~ ^^k. JOHNSON, DONALD Lenexa 

^■Bk "^fc^ dH ^E Hk Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

fl JM^ ^ fl fl ^U LEWIS, LINTON Piedmont 

^P^, -^B B™* *■ I ^t* jw^B ■ "^^M Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

W " F m JL, M W**: ' r W *- P LINDALH, PETER Overland Park 

^* Jtk r ^L^~ fT ^L^""" X. \ ~"~ # Chemical Engineering Freshman 

,Z I J%T'^ jL-./i^. X^ MASTERS, MICHAEL Troy 

^^■"^ ^^^\ W^ ^^■IP' J9 i<& Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

H/X4. * '• Ik *% ^ ■! fl It^Jl H MITSUSHI MORI Manhattan 

1 1 F ^ ft HnflBnl I BV I 1 1 j| HKm! . Jfi Industrial Engineering Senior 

MJ jlM^ —1 — t ^ NATOLI, BARTHOLOMEW Oswego, NY 

d|K- ^" IL'^i ^ J^K A0^**\ ^^ WMl Pre-Design Professions Junior 

▼ * JP T^ J*.- ^ 4 ■ ^*1 O'REILLY, DAVE Wichita 

(•V* JS ^ , k .>■ aW > r *' W M^5». ■*"' ■ Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

^2-^ aH V *CV 1 ^ PETERSON, WILLIAM Greeley 

1^** ' jf jjsp ^L"^ , Ik I Mechanical Engineering Senior 

* I-/ ^k^ w^ ^^- ^\v k^ RAINES, THOMAL Westwood 

< \ ■ I ^ ~ -' IT > \ -^n* i ^■B BUI Mechanical Engineering Senior 

s^-A — ^ nf- ' 'W ^ i&k \ \l \ m ¥ * ■ REDDY, PAUL Kansas City, MO 

^HHK4«i ill '/ " BBM s*M Chemistry Junior 

^m ^ ROBERTS, WILLIAM Pomona 

^HBHKl Mechanical Engineering Junior 

^^^^L STAUDENMA1ER, DANIEL Troy 

:;. h W<* ^W Nuclear Engineering Junior 

„ ..,- * A v - m >. ^ ^*&» SWIDERSKI, FRANK Leavenworth 

jOTj*"> » ^^^ / ^m^~ ml Wpi Engineering Technology Sophomore 

,/%T - y JIK' k^. iV V ^^%^ ' VISENT1N, PETER ' Wappingers Fall, NY 

^,^ r ^a^ Hj^H aHI :"'^n A Architecture Fifth- Year Student 





BOTTOM ROW: Coni Llckteig, Janet Olson, Katen 
Hicks, Ellen Gerber. SECOND BOW: Mary Blattner, 
Judy Hecht, Bev McConaughey, Sandy Steele. TOP 
BOW: Stephen Bauerband (Advisor), Janice Ditte- 
more. Linda GoddarH 



Triangle/317 




Tim Costello 

Lunch time- Means of nutrition consists 
of eating at Derby Food Center for 
students. Charles Hitt, junior in 
recreation, serves lunch to students. 
Theresa Stanley, freshman in general, 
tries to decide on what dessert to have. 



So close-Mai Bui (12), junior in 
electrical engineering, and Mike Woods, 
freshman in civil engineering enjoy 
afternoon recreation in front of Van Zile 
Hall. 

Temporary housing-Ed Gillen, 
freshman in wildlife & fisheries, studies 
in the basement of Marlatt Hall, until 
permanent housing was found. 



318/Residence Hall Living 




Residence Hall living: More than 
free laundry, rules and food 

centers 



lthough the smell of fresh-baked 
bread doesn't hit your nose the 
minute you open the door, it's still the 
place you come to after a long day of 
classes to kick off your shoes, throw your 
books on the desk and turn on the radio. 
It probably isn't much bigger than your 
room at home, yet it serves as a 
bedroom, living room, study room and 
kitchen. It contains almost all your most 
important belongings, from your favorite 
sweater to the pillow that's been with you 
for as long as you can remember. And 



Susan Brink 



almost always, it's shared. It's the place 
your alarm wakes you in the morning, the 
place you personalize with, hang your 
pictures and posters, the place you dream 
and sleep and cry and laugh in, the place 
you alternately hate and love, the place 
where instead of a brother or sister 
there's a stranger from a different 
background you come to know as a 
roommate. And for a school year, that 




crampled little cubicle which you fight to 
de-institutionalize is home. 

As anyone who has lived in a residence 
hall 'will say, it has its good and bad 
points. Sometimes residence hall dwellers 
have to deal with noisy neighbors, lack of 
quiet places to study and lack of privacy. 
Living quarters are cramped, and 
sometimes, usually around finals week, 
when everybody's a little on edge, 
problems between roommates flare up. 

Another part of living in the residence 
hall system is learning to get used to 
greasy, starchy food after years of eating 
Mom's home cooking. A long-standing, 
tongue-in-cheek joke among residence hall 
dwellers is that of the "freshman 10", 
which chides the 10 pounds freshman- 
especially freshman girls-supposedly gain 
during their first semester of eating at one 
of the residence hall's infamous food 
centers. 

An advantage of eating in the food 
centers is not worrying about doing the 
dishes; and often, the dining halls become 
equated with the high school lounge-being 
the place students can congregate in 
groups to talk about tests, the weather or 
the last basketball game. 

Although living with a large group of 
people often means the loss of privacy, it 
also means there's always somebody 
around who's free to go shoot a couple of 
games of pool, share the cost of a pizza 
or listen to a problem. And inevitably, 
somebody else on the floor shares a class 
or two, becoming a built-in study partner. 

Living in a residence hall (any well- 
informed residence hall dweller will say 
that "dorm" is an incorrect term in this 
case) means free laundry service and lots 
of rules, trying to get in the shower 
before a formal where everyone else on 
the floor seems to be going, sharing a 
song with a friend down the hall, tubbings 
and water fights and most of all, learning 
to give, because life with all those other 
people necessitates it. Hi 



Moving ia-Up we go says Jim 
Edmonds, senior in educatio, while 
moving into Haymaker Hall. 



BOTTOM ROW: Harvey J. Long, Jim F. SUI- 
well, W. Andrew Cooke, James K. Edmonds, 
Wlntori L. Smith, Bryan A. Megee. SECOND 
ROW: Gary L. Lynch, Cindy A. Granzow, Renata 
C Doss, Mary K. Morgan, Margo Brink, Larry W. 
Durant, Joe Hodgson. THIRD ROW: Becky S. 
Landrum, Sherri L. Yarber, Michelle M. Weber, 
Howard K. Jones, Michael A Pezza, Mary Pat 
O'Connor, Harry W. Justvig, Mark A. Wood. 
TOP ROW: Susan E. Brink, Annette C. Ha- 
chinsky, Cathy A. Zook, Sheree L. Allen, Susan 
M. Bell, Virginia K. Potter, Janet E. Springer, 
Cathy A. Rohleder, Karen E. Kluge. 






Spring Fling: for the fun of it 



Pete Souza 



%-M all living is a day to day 
* * exchange between students, but 
each year it takes shape in the form of 
Spring Fling. A week-long event in late 
April, Spring Fling is sponsored by the 
K-State Association of Residence Halls. 
It includes a week of activities, special 
events, and discounts for "dormies" all 
across campus. 

The particular events may differ 
slightly from year to year but they all 
have the motive of bringing residence 
hall students together for just plain fun. 

The week usually begins with a flag 
raising ceremony. Flags of each 
residence hall on campus are displayed 
for the rest of campus between the 
Union and Seaton Hall. 

Free movies, a dance, and Aggieville 
discounts for residents are part of 
Spring Fling. A scholarship banquet 
honoring academic achievement and a 
leadership banquet recognizing 
residence hall leaders are held each 
year. 

The 1979 Spring Fling talent show 
featuring student acts was judged by 
Jim Dickey, head football coach, 
Rolando Blackman, varsity basketball 
player, and Pat Bosco, assistant dean 
of student development. Awards were 



given for the worst and best acts, along 
with honorable mention awards. 
A road rally designed to test 
participants ability to follow instructions 
on a map is one of the more popular 
events. Teamed in pairs, a navigator 
and a driver set out to complete a 
course of checkpoints using only the 



Anton Arnoldy 



20/Spring Fli 




directions on a specially prepared map. 

A scavenger hunt, carnival night, and 
a sweet sassafrass ice-cream social are 
some of the other activities. 

The 1979 Spring Fling culminated in 
the traditional bed races. Starting 
positions for each team were 
determined by a bed decorating 
contest. Race contestants were 
subjected to a barrage of water 
balloons and sabotage attempts on their 
beds. 

Participants and spectators were 
treated to a picnic at the end of the 
race on the grass east of McCain 
Auditorium. Housing food centers 
closed on Saturday afternoon of the 
bed race in order to provide the food 
for the picnicjj 



Just Hangin' Around- A marathon teeter- 
totter session in front of the Union was part 
of the 1979 Spring Fling activities. Tammy 
Inman, senior in business administration, 
demonstrates her playground skills. 

Bed Rest- Greg Hurd, sophomore in 
architecture, rests after the race. 







•oyd 



boydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboydboyd : 




One ringy-dingy, two 
ringy-dingy - Boyd Hall 
is one of four residence 
halls on the KSU campus 
using a 

switchboard/intercom 
system. As calls are 
received into the 
switchboard, the 
residents are called on 
the intercom. Votes 
taken almost anually 
show that residents of 
the four halls using the 
system prefer it over 
telephones in the room. 
Jody Fruehauf, freshman 
in pre-design professions 
waits patiently in a Boyd 
Hall phone booth. 



Tim Costello 





". J^H ■ 


w -» % 




: w^> W 


-I 


Wrl 




J?«V 



ANDERSON, D. DEE Shawnee 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

ANDERSON, JANEL Overbrook 

Secondary Education Freshman 

ARMSTRONG, ANNETTE Scott City 

General Freshman 

BAILEY, KIM Emporia 

Sociology Junior 

BAIRD, STACI Logan 

General Freshman 

BELL, SUSAN Wichita 

Life Science Senior 

BELLINDER, BEV Wamego 

General Freshman 

BENNETT, PAULA Garnett 

Home Economics Sophomore 

BEXTERMILLER, THERESA . . . . Wentzville, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BLATTNER, MARY Rozel 

Elementary Education Freshman 

BLATTNER, NANCY Rozel 

General Freshman 

BLOXOM, ANN Emporia 

Home Economics Freshman 

BOLLIG, SUSAN Chanute 

Physical Education Junior 

BOLT, MARILYN Goodland 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

BOWERSOX, VALERIE Belleville 

Computer Science Junior 

BROWN, BRENDA Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 

BURKMAN, KAY Omaha, NE 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BUSS, GERYL Linn 

Secondary Education Junior 

BUSSHAUS, LISA Melbourne, FL 

Geology Graduate Student 

BUTCHER, KIMBERLY Cimarron 

Accounting Sophomore 



Boyd/321 



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CALLAHAN, DEBRA Lenexa 

General Freshman 

CALLAHAN, SANDRA Lenexa 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

CAMPBELL, CAROL Kansas City 

Fashion Design Senior 

CASTELLL CYNTHIA Frontenac 

Secondary Education Senior 

CASTO, KAREN Roeland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 



CHRISLER, KAREN 
Animal Science and Industry 
CONNOR, LISA 
Pre-Design Professions 
COOPER, ALEXIS 
Horticulture 



Winfield 

Freshman 

Overland Park 
Junior 
Salisbury, NC 
Sophomore 
DAVILA, NORAH Avila Guaynabo, PR 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

DEETS, MARIETTA Beloit 

Physical Education Freshman 

DEGNER, DENISE Great Bend 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

DEWERFF, JANE Ellinwood 

Home Economics Freshman 

DILLON, KERRY Ozawkie 

Secondary Education Senior 

DISTLER, AMANDA Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 
DUNLAP, LORI Topeka 

General Freshman 

EGGLESTON, EILEEN Leroy 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

EVANS, SANDRA Valley Center 

Computer Science Sophomore 

FAULK, CHRIS Valley Center 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

FISHBURN, JANA Haven 

Family and Child Development Junior 

FOLEY, KELLY Valley Falls 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

FOX, MALINDA Norton 

Engineering Technology Senior 

FRANKAMP, KATHY Belleville 

Accounting Freshman 

FRUEHAUF, JODY Great Bend 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GALAMBA, MARIENNE Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

GARFINKLE, JILL Prairie Village 

Biology Senior 



GARRISON, KATHY 
General 

GERBER, ELLEN 
Horticulture 
GIGSTAD, CHERYL 
Animal Science and Industry 
GRADWOHL, KATHY 
Home Economics 
GRANDISON, LINDA 



Norton 

Freshman 

Piscatoway, NJ 

Freshman 

Nebraska City, NE 

Sophomore 

Roeland Park 

Sophomore 

Jefferson City, MO 



Business Administration Freshman 

GRISHAM, SANDY Shawnee 

Physical Education Sophomore 



HAHLEN, KIM 
Pre-Nursing 
HAMILTON, DEBRA 

Elementary Education 

HANSEN, SHERI 
Family and Child Development 
HANSON, SUSAN 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine ... 



Merriam 

Freshman 

Wichita 

Junior 

Shawnee 

Freshman 

Holton 

Sophomore 



HARPER, SANDRA Prairie Village 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

HECHT, JUDY Andale 

Horticulture Sophomore 

HEFLEY, KIM Baxter Springs 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

HIBBELER, SARA West Hartford, CT 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

HILDRETH, LONNA Leawood 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HILLS, ROSALIE Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

HINSON, CATHY Silver Lake 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HOELSCHER, DENISE St. Louis, MO 

Interior Architecture Senior 

HORNBAKER, RHONDA Hutchinson 

Finance Junior 

HORNING, JENNY Winfield 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 




322/Boyd 



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■ 




HORTON, FANCI Kendall 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HUTCHISON, DEANNA Altoona 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

HUTCHISON, GLENDA Altoona 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

JOHNSON, CHRISTY Valley Center 

General Freshman 

JOHNSON, DAWN Andover, IA 
Retail Floriculture Freshman 

JOHNSON, RENEE Kansas City 

Home Economics Freshman 

KENNEDY, MARY Kansas City 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 



KILKENNY, PATRICIA 

Physical Therapy 

KIRKENDALL, KALEEN 

General 

KLATT, CHERYL 

Journalism and Mass Communications 



Wichita 
Sophomore 

Norton 
Freshman 

Canton 
Freshman 



KOHMAN, JANINE Solomon 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

KOLARIK, ELIZABETH Prairie Village 

Physical Education Sophomore 

KOOL, DEBORAH Manhattan 

General Freshman 

KULICH, SHERYL Sylvan Grove 
Speech Pathology Freshman 
LANDRUM, BECKY Kansas City 
Secondary Education Junior 

LEWIS, ZELMA Topeka 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

LIPPERT, LAURA Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LOOMIS, DIONA Topeka 

General Sophomore 

LUCK, JULIE Hill City 

Secondary Education Senior 

LUGINSLAND, NENNETTE Americus 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MACKENZIE, JAN Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

MACKENZIE, SHEILA Overland Park 

Family and Child Development . . . Sophomore 

McKINNEY, KATHY Lawrence 

Home Economics Freshman 

McLELLAND, JACQUELINE Prescott, AR 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

McNAUGHTON, ROBIN Shawnee 

Family and Child Development Junior 



MEENS, LORI 

Home Economics 

MENARD, GLENNA 

Journalism and Mass Communications 

MILES, NANCY 

Clothing Retailing 

MILLER, MARTHA 

General 

MISKOVSKY, ANNA 

Foods and Nutrition 

MORGAN, MARY 
General 
MOSER, LISA 
Pre-Nursing 
MURPHY, MARSHA 
Clothing Retailing 



Berryton 

Freshman 

Clifton 

Sophomore 

La Crosse 

Sophomore 

Prairie Village 

Freshman 

Glencoe, MO 

Sophomore 

Olathe 

Freshman 

Abingdon, IL 

Freshman 

Hill City 

Sophomore 



MYERS, CHARDELL Garden City 

Medical Technology Senior 

MYERS, KAREN Hermitage, PA 

Psychology Sophomore 

NELSON, VICKI Emporia 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

NELSSEN, JANEEN Smith Center 

Correctional Administration Freshman 

O'CONNELL, JANET Overland Park 

Elementary Education Freshman 

OLSON, JANET Randolph 

Home Economics Sophomore 

PAGE, JOANNA San Rafael, CA 

Accounting Sophomore 

PANKRATZ, RENEE Wichita 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

PAYNE, CINDY Valley Center 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

PETERS, CAROLYN Valley Center 

Biology Sophomore 

PLUNKETT, DIANE Delphos 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

POTTER, MARY Highland 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 



Boyd/323 



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PUGH, STARR 


Salina 


Physical Education 


Freshman 


REAVES, CYNTHIA 


Chanute 


Home Economics Education 


Junior 


REES, BRONWEN 


Emporia 


Clothing Retailing 


Junior 


REICHENBERGE, BRIDGET 


Andale 


General 


Freshman 


RICHEY, DANA 


Overland Park 


Foods and Nutrition 


Freshman 


RITZDORF, GAIL 


Omaha, NE 


Industrial Engineering 


Junior 


RUMBAUGH, SUZANNE 


Morrill 


Retail Floriculture 


Freshman 


SANTRY, LISA 


Topeka 


Political Science 


Freshman 



SCHAFFNER, LINDA St. Louis, MO 
Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

SCHEUFLER, SHELLY Ellinwood 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

SCHNITTKER, DEA Peck 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
SCOBY, PATRICIA Sabetha 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

SCULLY, KATHLEEN Overland Park 

Political Science Freshman 

SEVERANCE, RACHEL Beloit 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

SHERWIN, RHONDA Beeler 

Home Economics Senior 

SHUTE, JULIE Red Cloud, NE 

Music Education Freshman 

SIMES, SUZETTE Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering ... Sophomore 

SMITH, NANCY Overland Park 

Physical Education Senior 

SPEER, CAROLE Clearwater 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

SPITZER, ELEANOR Scott City 

History Sophomore 

STINE, CAROL Kansas City 

Secondary Education Freshman 

STOLFUS, KYLA Bonner Springs 

Applied Music Freshman 

STORER, TOM1 Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 

TOVER, JAYNE Hiawatha 

General Freshman 

SUTTON, PATTY Norton 

General Freshman 

SWICEGOOD, LAURIE Prairie Village 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SYKES, JULIA Albuquerque, NM 

General Freshman 

THOMASON, DEBRA .... Phillipsburg 

Management Sophomore 

THURNAU, CAROLINE Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
TITSWORTH, APRIL Scott City 

Home Economics Freshman 

TURNQUIST, DONNA Lindsborg 

Dietetics Junior 

VAN AMBURG, CAROL Elwood 

Physical Education Sophomore 

WALL, KORALEA Clay Center 

General Freshman 

WASSENBERG, PHYLLIS Marysville 

Accounting Freshman 

WEIMER, JODY Clay Center 
Elementary Education Freshman 

WIENCK, CAROL Barnes 

Social Work Junior 

WIENS, CARRIE Inman 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

WIENS, MARILYN Meade 

General Freshman 

WILBER, DONNA Belleville 

Home Economics Freshman 

WILBUR, TAMMY Valley Center 

Elementary Education Freshman 

WILLIAMS, REBECCA Topeka 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore 

WINGERT, DENISE Emporia 

Retail Floriculture Junior 

WURTH, JOAN Wichita 

Family and Child Development Freshman 




324/Boyd 



Clovia 



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APPL, CHARLOTTE Manhattan 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

BASS, LYNDA Carlton 

Home Economics Senior 

BELL, PAMELA Medicine Lodge 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BENTRUP, DIANE Deerfield 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

CHAMBERS, DEBBIE Wellsville 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

CLUBINE, DEBBIE Havana 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

COOPER, KAREN St. John 

Family and Child Development . Junior 

COTT, KATHLEEN Clay Center 

Social Science Junior 

DICKINSON, CATHY Gorham 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FIELDS, CHRISTINA Sublette 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Junior 

FOSTER, BELINDA Hoyt 

Physical Therapy Junior 

FREY, SHAWN Satanta 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

FROEBE, CONNIE Mound Valley 

Home Economics Junior 

GARTEN, ANN Abilene 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

GARTEN, ELLEN Abilene 

Home Economics Education Senior 




Here Comes The 
Presl — Clovia 
president Kathy 
Strecker, senior in 
agronomy, and vice- 
president Beth Huning, 
senior in civil 
engineering, take their 
jobs seriously as they 
dress as judge and 
lawyer. Actually the 
costumes were 
Halloween props. 



Clovia/325 



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GARTEN, MARY Abilene 

Life Science Junior 

GATLIN, DOROTHY Colby 

Home Economics Education Senior 

HADACHEK, PATH Cuba 

Home Economics Freshman 

HAEFNER, LORI Topeka 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

HARBISON, MELINDA Paola 

Consumer Interest Senior 

HEFTY, GLENDA Valley Falls 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

HEFTY, KARLA Valley Falls 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

HISS, DEANN Lyons 

Home Economics Junior 

HUNING, BETH Hepler 

Civil Engineering Senior 

HUNEYCUTT, CAROL Cherryvale 

Home Economics Senior 

JOHNSTON, LEANN McCune 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

KAL1VODA, KAREN Agenda 

Home Economics Junior 

KLENDA, MONICA Lincolnville 

Home Economics Education Junior 

LOOP, JEAN Benkelman, NE 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MENDENHALL, LESLIE Topeka 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

MILLER, NANCY A. Kincaid 

Physical Education Junior 

MILLER, NANCY C Emporia 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MUELLER, DEBRA Kingman 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

PEUSER, RITA Paola 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

PHELPS, LESLIE Oakley 

Journalism Freshman 

ROBSON, DEBBIE Abilene 

Home Economics Education Senior 

RONEY, MARLESA Concordia 

Elementary Education Senior 

RUPP, KATHY Moundridge 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

SALES, CHERYL Valley Falls 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

SAUERWEIN, DENISE Walton 

Home Economics Freshman 

SHOEMAKER, CARLA Wheeler 

Dietetics Sophomore 

SIMS, SUZANNE Paola 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

SKOCH, LISA Baileyville 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SLOAN, PATTY Colby 

Home Economics Sophomore 

SMITH, S. DAWN Garden City 

Foods and Nutrition Freshman 

STEINLAGE, SUSAN Corning 

Pre-Vet Junior 

STOTTMANN, BRENDA Parsons 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

STOTTMANN, JANICE Parsons 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

STRECKER, KATHY Olmitz 

Agronomy Senior 

TABOR, LARETA Kansas City 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

TEGTMEIER, SANDRA Bern 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

VINING, BECKY Richmond 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

VOET, MARY Oketo 

Home Economics Education Senior 

WEBBER, PATTY Winfield 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

WILKINSON, SHERYL Goodland 

Home Economics Junior 

WULFKUHLE, LISA Berryton 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 




326/Clovia 



t#CtW£irOS edwardsedwardsedwardsedwardsedwardsedwardsedwardsedwardsedwardsedwardsedu 

BARTHOLOMEW, RICHARD N. Hampton, PA 

Architecture Senior 

BEVIER, JANA Bonner Springs 

, Accounting Freshman 

■ m ^fm Y^ *-JP WT"*~ °~Yl' BLACKMAN, ROLANDO Brooklyn, NY 

|gjfe# [ -£" ' J 1 V '.- ILi Sociology Sophomore 

■< , 1 M ^jf ^kS^y Jk lae-difli BROWNLEE, STEVEN Liberal 

■\ 1 - M ■' ' ^k i^^^ ,Jf fBlaUB Electrical Engineering Junior 

_-' ^| // liB Mfl^iSw CA1LTEUX, KAYLENE Clyde 

^**%» ^^L JH I '\. ^L^B^^K 'aL. tSB# Medical Technology Sophomore 

CAMERON, RICKY Winfield 

Psychology Sophomore 

CARNES, CAROL Weir 

, . . ., Economics Graduate Student 

'• ■->■■■■■■ CONNOLLY, MATTHEW Godfrey, IL 

Architecture Junior 

... V , . ^^F^' COOPER, RICHARD Manhattan 

^' WT J \ _jggtKk W ' y^f 4 \ «d| j Agriculture Freshman 

^fik.^"*^J "^"' V '« DEAN, EDGAR Wichita 

^| ^L ^flj ^5^. I ' ' i ki\ S Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

HOLZWARTH, ROBERT St. Charles, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

▼i JANTZ, KENNETH ..Liberal 

» Secondary Education Junior 

" KNIGHT, GARY Broseley, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

. ' McDONOUGH, MARGARET Junction City 

^* £^ I * ^HMrHH ( Secondary Education Sophomore 

a ^^ mm MM" k'ff Wi * PINKNEY, ROBERT St. Louis, MO 

M A^m fl^^. ifl , Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

^Sjtfk. .^M^ ^k ™*^ik" ^S Civil Engineering Junior 

fll ^L M ^^L. W*m W § JF mwyK^ SMALL, DACIA Atlanta, GA 

JR 5S» tMT*' "-^km\ Ml ~ ^BW »*.- ^ Jfcf K^ -HI Family and Child Development Graduate Student 

/ WH ^r 4| «**~jv ^ -# - ^ '- ■ «j ■ SPRINGER, DAVID Hutchinson 

\ ^ JfVI ^S STEWART, MICHAEL Richmond 

v rm ^* Mechanical Engineering Senior 

, t W i THOMPSON, BETH Wichita 

i I Home Economics Senior 

t_." WIATT, WILL Lakin 

jfc. Jjk Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

K l m* m ^Fji WILTSE, MICHAEL Altoona 

, '^^Wi H" -M ^r "«^k Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

"*' WV * V * 7 ■ 1 WU, WEN-CHIEN Manhattan 

^H. JB»Jt \ ~- i m -'" ■ M Poultry Science Graduate Student 

4 .., X—' %te^/L YAMAMOTO, MICHAEL Fort Riley 

"3< ir-2 --^ A i ~ *Jm '&>■ Pre-Vet .... Sophomore 






Gone Flshln' — 

Formerly called the "A- 
Dorm", Edwards Hall is 
now a part of the 
Kansas State University 
Residence Hall System. 
The hall was originally 
designed for athletes and 
has kitchen and 
swimming facilities. The 
kitchen is not in use 
now, but the swimming 
pool is, as shown here. 
Two residents of 
Edwards attempt to 
catch four carp which 
were deposited in the 
swimming pool. 



Photo by Dave Kaup 



Edwards/327 



Lfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordf 



Ride 'em cowboy! - 

As part of the residence 
halls' Spring Fling, 
residents of Ford Hall 
take a tricky turn around 
a corner in the bed race. 
Ford was paired with 
Marlatt Hall for the 
races and placed fourth. 




Photo by Dave Kaup and Pete Souza 



ABBOTT, DONNA Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

ADAMS, MARSHA McPherson 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

ALBRIGHT, KRIS Hutchinson 

Family and Child Development .... Freshman 
ALLEN, BECKY Overland Park 
Business Administration Freshman 

ALLEY, ROBYN Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ANDERSON, JULIE Lyons 

General Freshman 

ANDREW, SHARON Shawnee Mission 

General Sophomore 

ANNAN, SYLVIA Onaga 

Speech Pathology Junior 

ANTENEN, KIM Ness City 

Art Freshman 

ARBAB, EADA Shawnee Mission 

Biology Freshman 




328/Ford 



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ARNOLD, KATHY Overland Park 

English Sophomore 

ASH, LAURIE .... Newton 

General Freshman 

ASHBY, TAM Grantville 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BAALMAN, LISA Grinnel 

General Freshman 

BACKMAN, GAYLA Vermillion 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

BAIRD, JANE Arkansas City 

Accounting Freshman 

BAJICH, MIRYANA Kansas City 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

BANKS, REBECCA Lecompton 

Elementary Education Senior 

BARBER, DEBORAH Overland Park 
Management Freshman 

BARNETT, MICHELLE Wakarusa 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BARNETT, SHERYL Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

BARRETT, CHARLOTTE ' Clearwater 

Music Education Freshman 

BARTELS, CAROL Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 

BARTON, TAMMY Hutchinson 

Interior Design Freshman 

BAUER, JUDI Derby 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BAUER, SUZANNE Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
BECKERDITE, RUTHIE Kingsdown 

English Freshman 

BELKNAP, KAYE Wichita 

General Freshman 

BELL, DEBI Overland Park 

Psychology Freshman 

BENNETT, CHERYL Overland Park 
Horticulture Sophomore 

BERGHAUS, PAM Elkhart 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

BERNER, VERONICA Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BERRY, DIANA Minneapolis 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BIARNESEN, MICHELE Olathe 

Business Administration Freshman 

BIASELLA, BEV Prairie Village 

Management Sophomore 

BILES, JO Haven 

Physical Education Junior 

BILLINGS, BARETTA Valley Falls 

Dietetics Sophomore 

BISHOP, SUSAN Independence 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BLAZEK, JAN Munden 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

BLAZEK, KIM Munden 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BLISS, VIVIAN St. John 

Home Economics Senior 

BLUSH, SUSAN Silver Lake 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

BOAZ, DONETTA ... Topeka 

Home Economics Sophomore 

BORGER. JENNIFER Overland Park 

Modern Language Senior 

BOUDREAU, MARY Prairie Village 
General Freshman 

BOWEN, KAREN Lenexa 

Engineering Freshman 

BOYER, LISA Iola 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

BRADLEY, KAREN Topeka 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

BRAX, LORI Assaria 

Horticulture Freshman 

BRECKENRIDGE, JILL Overland Park 

Psychology Sophomore 

BRENSING, KIM Stafford 

Office Administration Freshman 

BRINK, DUDSN Cimarron 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

BROERS, SHARILYN Merriam 

Business Administration Freshman 

BROOKS, LEA Leawood 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BROWN, TERESA Great Bend 

Engineering Freshman 



Ford/329 



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Topeka 
Sophomore 
Prairie Village 
Junior 
Hays 
Sophomore 
BULLER, SUSAN Newton 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

BULLOCK, ANNE Norton 

Political Science Freshman 



BROWN, TINA 

Family and Child Development 

BRUEMMER, CARLA 

Management 

BRULL, JUDY 

Accounting 



BURCH, ANGELA 
Natural Resource Management 
BUSE, CINDY 
Construction Science ... 
CALIBANI, LISA 
Clothing Retailing 
CARLE, KAREN 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine 
CARLSON, DARLENE 
Interior Design 



CARMICHAEL, ROBYN 
Retail Floriculture 
CARPENTER, ANNE 

Business Administration 

CARRIKER, CRISTIE . 

Engineering 

CAVASSA, CARI 

Journalism and Mass Communications 

CHERAY, JANE Overland Park 

Computer Science Freshman 



Towanda 

Sophomore 

Jefferson City, MO 

Sophomore 

Wichita 

Freshman 

Overland Park 
Freshman 

Mulvane 

Sophomore 

Bird City 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Freshman 

Lewis 

Freshman 

Newton 

Freshman 



CHRISTIE, JULIE 
General 

CLAIR, SHERRY 
Social Work 
CLARE, REGINA 
Management 
CLARK, ANGELA 
Business Administration 
CLARKE, KATY 
Accounting 



Hays 

Freshman 

Hoisington 

Freshman 

Meriden 

Sophomore 

Paola 
Sophomore 

Great Bend 

Freshman 

COBLE, EMILY Kansas City 

Music Education Sophomore 

COLE, TRINA Modoc 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

COSGROVE, MARY Council Grove 

Fine Arts Freshman 

COTT, CARRIE Leavenworth 

General Freshman 

COUP, JOLEEN McPherson 

General Freshman 

CROW, REBECCA Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

CYPHERT, MARY Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DALPORTO, TAMI Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

DANZIG, LINDA Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

DAVENPORT, SHARON Kansas City 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

DAVIDSON, CATHY Belpre 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DAWSON, MONA Medicine Lodge 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

DEARDORFF, DEBBIE Wichita 

Interior Design Freshman 

DE JESUS, MARILYN Junction City 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

DENTON, CHERYL Atchison 

Accounting Sophomore 

DEPEW, JAYNE Abilene 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 
DICINTIO, ANNETTE Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

DICK, CAROL Newton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DICK, KAREN ; . . . Newton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DIETRICH, DEBBIE Topeka 

English Sophomore 

DITTMER, NANCY Wichita 

Chemistry Freshman 

DOMANN, MARILYN Herington 

Home Economics Junior 

DOYLE, TERYL Clearwater 



Fisheries and Wildlife Biology 

DREES, SUE 

Business Administration 

DUBBS, LINDA 

Pre-Design Professions 



Sophomore 
Overland Park 

Freshman 

Manchester, MO 

Sophomore 




330/Ford 



lfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordf 

■HHHj^^Hi DUBOIS, MARIE Overland Park 

JM 'aAw^M ,k ' > EDIGER, KARLENE McPherson 

jfiMR mWk.^mw-'-'' I Ah^ Mm Engineering Freshman 

mmW^^^i mlC> WfXm MFi ELLIS, DEBRA Shawnee 

W-* *** Jmmr*'- *~m T"^ m\ Ml** * m jt" elston, kim Muivane 

JmL & ' ■P>w^*»^m w km \ ENSM1NGER . JO LYNN Moran 

—M . v ^%^ y MMV^'i :'*mmmWt*'' M ^^_ ^R Elementary Education Freshman 






Vour Move - 

Backgammon is quickly 
gaining popularity across 
the United States and K- 
State students have 
quickly caught onto the 
trend. Carol Bartels, 
junior in elementary 
education, and Jennifer 
Borger, senior in modern 
languages, relax with a 
game or two of 
backgammon. 



Tim Costello 



Ford/331 



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EVANS, LORI Lyons 

General Freshman 

EVANS, SHARI Newton 

Sociology Sophomore 

EXL1NE, KYLE Salina 

Biology Freshman 

FABRICIUS, V1CKI Great Bend 

Elementary Education Freshman 

FADELY, JANA Sedan 

Business Administration Freshman 

FA1RBURN, LAURIE Fargo, ND 

Home Economics Sophomore 

FALEN, DIANA Lawrence 

Elementary Education Freshman 

FARBER, MARY Mulvane 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

FEE, JANET Stilwell 

Engineering Freshman 

FERGUSON, CINDY Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

F1ENE, SHARI Newton 

Physical Education Freshman 

FINK, DIANA Phillipsburg 

Home Economics Sophomore 

FITT, ANNE Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

FITZGERALD, AMY Salina 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

FLEENOR, BECKY Topeka 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

FOLKERTS, REBECCA Great Bend 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
FORNELLI, CYNTHIA Shawnee Mission 

General Freshman 

FOUTCH, ANDREA Council Bluffs, IA 

Accounting Junior 

FRANKLIN, DEBORAH Seneca 

Social Sciences Junior 

FRANZEN, SUSAN Shawnee Mission 

Fine Arts Freshman 

FRESCHETT, PATTIE Overland Park 

Marketing Freshman 

FUNK, SUSAN Oakley 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

FUTRELLE, DEE ANN Overland Park 

General Freshman 

GARRETT, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GARRISON, REBECCA Albuquerque, NM 

Home Economics Sophomore 

GENRICH, SUSAN Olathe 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 
GERICHTEN, DENISE Overland Park 

Marketing Freshman 

GERSTNER, MARILYN Frankfort 

Sociology Sophomore 

GISH, STACEY Horton 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

GOODE, SUE Manhattan 

Home Economics Freshman 

GOSS, SUSAN Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 

GOTTSCH, JANE Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

GRACE, SHERYL Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

GUARD, GAYLA McPherson 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HABERMAN, SHERI Aloha, OR 

Horticulture Freshman 

HACH1NSKY, ANNETTE Kansas City 

Management Senior 

HAGGARD, KATHY Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

HAJINIAN, KARIN Overland Park 

Biology Freshman 

HALDEMAN, JOLIE Lawrence 

Interior Design Freshman 

HARGROVE, SHARON Effingham 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

HARPER, LACHELE Goodland 

Food Science and Industry Freshman 

HARTER, JEAN Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HAZEN, TERRI . . . . Leawood 

Food Science and Industry Sophomore 

HECKETHORN, SUSAN McPherson 

Interior Design Freshman 

HEDKE, KAYE Waterville 

Medical Technology Freshman 




ft •■ '■ • • ,i ,i I 



332/Ford 



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M 


'*** 


£ 








:l 


! 


f'J) 




1 


''"iw' 




j 






HEIBERGER, JEANNE Marihattan 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

HELLER, MARGARET Hunter 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HENDRICKS, DENISE Lenexa 

Computer Science Junior 

HENNESSEY, STACEY Tecumseh 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

HOAGLAND, KIMBERLY Lake City 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

HOBSON, ANN Hardy, NE 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

HOBSON, ELAINE Hardy, NE 

Horticulture Sophomore 

HOFFMAN, LORAINE Kansas City 

Business Administration ... Freshman 

HOFFMASTER, LISA Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

HOGAN, KATHERINE Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

HOGUE, HANNAH Prairie Village 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

HOLLADAY, JANA Kansas City, MO 

Interior Design Freshman 

HOLLAND, KATHLEEN Merriam 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HONORS, PATRICIA Overland Park 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HOOD, VICTORIA Wlnfield 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

HOOTS, BECKY Topeka 

Marketing Senior 

HOPE, NIKKI Overland Park 

Marketing Freshman 

HOSLER, LISA Junction City 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

HOSTY, MAUREEN Westwood 

Physical Education Junior 

HOUSHOLDER, TAMMY Courtland 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

HOWARD, PRISCILLA Newton 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

HOWSE, JOAN .... Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

HUGGINS, SUSAN Beloit 

General Freshman 

HUMMELL, SUSAN Lenexa 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

HUNTSMAN, BRENDA Halstead 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HURD, SHERYL Lenexa 

Social Work Junior 

ILIFF, MARY ANN Prairie Village 

Home Economics Freshman 

IMEL, MARCY Merriam 

Business Administration Sophomore 

INTFEN, SUSAN .... Atchison 

Elementary Education Junior 

JACOBS, DEANNE Prairie Village 
Elementary Education Freshman 

JACOBSON, MARY Wamego 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

JADERBORG, BEVERLY Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

JAMES, MARY Overland Park 

Interior Design Sophomore 

JAMESON, JENNIFER Benton 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

JAMISON, GINA Perry 

Home Economics Freshman 

JARCHOW, NANCY Newton 

Interior Design "Freshman 

JENKINS, KENNA Kansas City, MO 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

JOHNSON, BECKY Shawnee Mission 

Physical Education Junior 

JOHNSON, CINDY Salina 

Education Freshman 

JOHNSON, ELIZABETH Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

JOHNSON, KAREN Prairie Village 

Physical Education Freshman 

JOHNSON, KARI .... McPherson 

Business Administration Freshman 

JOHNSON, VICKI Great Bend 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

JONES, KAREN Mulvane 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

JONES, JENNY Topeka 

Finance Sophomore 



Ford/333 



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Knee Bone 
Connected to the '. . . 

• Inge Bergmann, senior 
in medical technology, 
and Debbie Echevarria, 
sophomore in pre- 
nursing, study for a 
exam in their human 
body class. The exam 
was a "practical exam" 
and called for 
identification of the parts 
of a rat. 




Tim Costello 



JONES, MARGOT Junction City 

General Freshman 

JONES, RHONDA Burrton 

Home Economics Education Senior 

JOYCE, JODY El Dorado 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

JUDGE, NANCY Leawood 

Accounting Freshman 

JUST, JACQUELINE Newton, NJ 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

KAFF, LINDA Hutchinson 

Horticulture Senior 

KAUFMAN, LISA Atchison 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

KEATING, DEBORAH Bonnor Springs 

Home Economics Freshman 

KEELER, SHERRI Great Bend 

Business Administration Freshman 

KELLER, PENNY St. Francis 
Elementary Education Junior 




334/Ford 



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ms 



KELLEY, KAYTE Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

KELLY, MARY JO Lawrence 

Business Administration Freshman 

KEMPLAY, JULIE Beattie 

Elementary Education Freshman 

KEPLEY, BETTY Chanute 

Interior Design Freshman 

KERR, DARLA Wellsville 

General Freshman 

KIDWELL, CAROL Enterprise 

Accounting Freshman 

KIGHTLINGER, MONA Hutchinson 

Business Administration Sophomore 

KIMPLE, BONNIE Lyons 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Senior 
KINDERKNECHT, CHARLOTTE Grinnell 

Computer Science Freshman 

KING, KATHRYN Dodge City 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Senior 

KING, KITTY Shawnee Mission 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

KISSINGER, JULIE Hiawatha 

Business Administration Freshman 

KLINE, CAROLINE Emporia 

Interior Design Freshman 

KLUGE, KAREN Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 

KNACKSTEDT, LYNETTE Inman 

Dietetics Freshman 

KOCI, TAMARA Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

KOELLER, KELLY Lenexa 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KOHAKE, MONICA Goff 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

KOHL, LAURIE Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

KRAMER, NANCY Kansas City 
Life Sciences Freshman 

KRISTEK, ROSE Tampa 

Psychology Freshman 

KUDLACEK, JOAN Shawnee 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KUKUK, JOAN Lawrence 

Home Economics Freshman 

LAHAM, ELENA Wichita 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

LALLY, COLEEN Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

LAMPKIN, SHAWN Overland Park 

Interior Design Freshman 

LANGHOLTZ, JANICE Wichita 

Biochemistry Senior 

LARSON, CATHY Stilwell 

Business Administration Junior 

LARSON, SANDRA Salina 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

LAUGHLIN, CAROL Mapelton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

LAWRENCE, SHELLY Wichita 

Music Education Freshman 

LAWTON, JANET Concordia 

Accounting Junior 

LEDERER, DIANE Leavenworth 

Marketing Senior 

LESTISHEN, MARY . . . . Hutchinson 

Management Junior 

LEVENS, RITA McPherson 

Home Economics Sophomore 

LEVIN, DEBBY Leawood 

Fine Arts Freshman 

LITFIN, JAMIE Topeka 

Home Economics Senior 

LIVELY, CHERI Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

LOCKHART, KATHLEEN Junction City 

Elementary Education Freshman 

LOCKHART, SHIRLEY Junction City 
Social Work Sophomore 

LOHREY, MARY BETH Lacrosse 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

LONDEEN, LAURA Arkansas City 

Social Work Junior 

LONG, LAURA Overland Park 

General Freshman 

LONG, SUSAN Manhattan 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

LOVELL, PATTY Wichita 

Elementary Education Freshman 



Ford/335 



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LUEKER, ALISON Hoisington 

Engineering Freshman 

LUSK, ANITA Wichita 

Music Education Freshman 

LUSK, LISA Wichita 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

LYONS, KATHLEEN Shawnee Mission 

General Freshman 

MAH, NANCY Topeka 

Dietetics Senior 

MAI, LAURA Wakeeney 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

MALONE, AMY Overland Park 

Music Education Freshman 

MANGOLD, JANE Overland Park 

General -. Freshman 

MANKE, DENISE Shawnee 

Interior Design Freshman 

MANNING, MELISSA Wichita 

General Freshman 

MANNING, TAMMY Shawnee 

Sociology Junior 

MARCOTTE, JANELL Concordia 

Elementary Education Junior 

MARQUEZ, MARY Kansas City 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

MARRS, DIANE Arkansas City 

General Freshman 

MARSHALL, JONI Overland Park 
Business Administration Freshman 

MARTINITZ, MELANIE Salina 

Engineering Freshman 

MARVIN, PAMELA Overland Park 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

MASON, TERRI Fort Sam Houston, TX 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MAUCK, MELISSA Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

MAY, LISA Peck 

Business Administration Freshman 

MAY, SUSAN Mankato 

Home Economics Education Junior 

MCCARTHY, ROSEMARIE Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

MCCLURE, MARILYN Ottawa 

Psychology Sophomore 

MCDONALD, SHERYL Shawnee Mission 

General Engineering Freshman 

MCDOWELL, ROBIN Shawnee 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MCEVOY. KATHLEEN Goddard 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MCGONAGLE, SHERI Scott City 

Sociology Freshman 

MCKAY, BETSY Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Senior 

MCKIM, ALLISON Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Secondary Freshman 

MCKINNEY, NANCY Independence 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MCKINZIE, CAROL Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MCLEIGHTON, KIMBERLY Salina 

Marketing Freshman 

MCMAHON, CATHERINE Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

MCNEILL, JULIE Goodland 

Computer Science Sophomore 

MCQUILLAN, JODI Clearwater 

Computer Science Sophomore 

MEAD, JANICE Lewis 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

MEADOR, JUDY Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

MEADOWS, PAMELA Shawnee Mission 

Management Freshman 

MECHLER, MAUREEN Lenexa 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

MEDILL, JUDY Seneca 

Horticulture Therapy Freshman 

MEILI, MARSHA Beverly 

Civil Engineering Junior 

MENSCH, LISA Overland Park 

Clothing Textiles Freshman 

MIKULECKY, MERRIDY Olathe 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

MILLER, BARBARA JO Fredonia 

General Freshman 

MILLER, CAROL ...... Savannah, MO 

Clothing Textiles Freshman 




336/Ford 



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MILLER, COZETTE Scott City 



Marketing 

MILLER, DEBBIE 

Home Economics Education 

MILLER, DIANE 

Home Economics 

MILLER, SUSAN 

General Business Administration 

MOEHRING, SUSY 

Pre-Law 



Freshman 

McDonald 

Freshman 

Wellsville 

Freshman 

Prairie Village 

. . . . Freshman 

Wichita 

Freshman 



MOORE, DARCI Iuka 

General Engineering Freshman 

MOORE, LISA Iuka 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MORSE, SHEILA Great Bend 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

MUMFORD, LYNDA Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

MUSOLINO, CAMILLE Dallas, TX 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 




My Trickl-Playing cards 
are the all-time 
recreational stand-by for 
many K-State students. 
Students can be seen 
playing spades in the K- 
State Union, while 
waiting in line for tickets 
and also in the residence 
halls. Spades 
tournaments are not 
uncommon. Here Carla 
Bryant (moving hand), 
freshman in interior 
architecture, Diane 
Graham, freshman in 
management, Lisa 
Kaufman, sophomore in 
clothing textiles and 
Anne Fitt, freshman in 
clothing textiles, 
challenging each other in 
a game of spades. 



Tim Costello 



Ford/337 



dfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordford 



NEILAN, NANCY Shawnee Mission 

Speech Pathology Junior 

NELSON, COLLEEN Woodston 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

NELSON, JODY Lawrence 

Interior Design Freshman 

NESTOR, CARLA McPherson 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
NEUFELD, CHERYL Newton 

Finance Sophomore 

NICKLAUS. PAMELA Garden City 

Chemical Science Senior 

NORDEN, MARGARET Prairie Village 

Clothing Textiles Freshman 

NOVAK, CYNTHIA Lost Springs 

Horticulture Freshman 

NOVOTNY, TERESA Carter, SD 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

OBLAK, CLAUDIA Kansas City 

General Sophomore 

O'CONNOR, ANNETTE Wichita 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

O'CONNOR, MARY Salina 

Accounting Junior 

OGLEVIE, NANCY Goodland 

Pre-Law Freshman 

OLIVER, MICHELLE Clairmont, CA 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

OLSEN, CHRISTINE Hardy, NE 

Computer Science Sophomore 

ORTEN, DEADRE McDonald 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

OSWALD, PATRICIA Hutchinson 

English Freshman 

OSWALT, ELLEN Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

PAKKEBIER, KATHLEEN Prairie View 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

PASCHAL, MARTHA Luray 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

PATE, JANICE Kansas City 

Foods and Nutrition Freshman 

PAULS, JANETTE Inman 

Interior Design Freshman 

PEDERSEN, LORI Topeka 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
PETTIBONE, RAIDEL Kanorado 

General Engineering Sophomore 

PFOLTNER, KELLY Prairie Village 
Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

PHARIS, JULIA Kansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

PHILLIPS, LORI Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
PHILLIPS, TRUDY Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 
PHIPPS, SUSAN Shawnee 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

PITTS, PEGGY Burrton 

Interior Design Sophomore 

POE, DEBRA Oberlin 

Office Administration Freshman 

POELL, MARY Hanover 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

POLING, TANYA Wichita 

General Freshman 

PORTER, LINDA Kansas City 

Home Economics Sophomore 

POULSEN, JULIE Wichita 

Clothing Textiles Freshman 

PRAY, JANIS Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

PRENTICE, MICHELLE Shawnee 

Accounting ... Freshman 

PRITCHARD, MARILYN Baldwin City 

Home Economics Freshman 

RANDALL, ROBIN Kansas City 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

RATHBUN, DEANNE Overland Park 
Clothing Textiles Freshman 

RAUTH, MARY Atchison 

Psychology Freshman 

REALS, MARY Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

REDLINGSHAFER, TERESA Shawnee Mission 

Pre Professional Elementary Education Sophomore 
REESE, CINDY Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

REH, ELAINE Salina 

Family and Child Development Senior 




fj(flfi J 




338/Ford 



fordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordford fordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfc 




REICHLE, MERRIAM Leawood 

Marketing Freshman 

REILLY, ANNE Topeka 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

REMINGTON, ALLECIA Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

REMPE, ALTHEA Plainville 

Family and Child Development Senior 

REMPE, MARY Plainville 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

REYNOLDS, DEBORAH Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

REYNOLDS, SANDRA Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

RHEIN, REBECCA Alta Vista 

History Sophomore 

RICE, TAMMIE Atchison 

Accounting Freshman 

RIEHL, PEGGY Overland Park 
Pre-Nursing Freshman 

RINGEN, KRISTI Beattie 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
RITTENHOUSE, LYNN Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

ROENBAUGH, GINA Lewis 



Home Economics 


Freshman 


ROHLEDER, CATHERINE 


Overland Park 


Fine Arts 


Junior 


ROMBECK, JULIE 


Topeka 


General Business Administration 


Freshman 



RONNING, ELIZABETH Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ROSS, GINA Overland Park 

General Freshman 

RUSNAK, KATHE Overland Park 

Modern Language Junior 

RUSSELL, SAMANTHA Fort Riley 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshmen 
RUTTER, JANET Overland Park 

Marketing Freshman 

SACKHOFF, TAMARA Hunter 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Sophomore 
SANDERS, ANN Wichita 

General Sophomore 

SAPER, NANCI Prairie Village 

Speech Freshman 

SAUNDERS, KIMBERLY Bonner Springs 

Fine Arts Freshman 

SAWYER, SANDRA McPherson 

Horticulture Freshman 

SCHAMLE, THRESE Wellsville 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

SCHELLHORN, LORI White City 

Home Economics Sophomore 

SCHINDLER, DIANE Goodland 

Art Freshman 

SCHLOTTHUAER, AMY Shawnee 

Home Economics Junior 

SCHMALE, MARY Palmer 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHMITT, SHERRY Scott City 

General Freshman 

SCHNECK, CHERYL Lamed 

Computer Science Sophomore 

SCHNEIDER, LEEANN Hutchinson 

Marketing Junior 

SCHRIEBER, JOAN Huron 

Computer Science Freshman 

SCHROCK, YVETTE Oakley 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 



SCOTT, SANDRA 

General 

SEITZ, SHARON 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education 

SEVART, JULIE 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 

SHEARER, STACY 

Pre-Nursing 

SHERARD, KARMEN 

General Business Administration 



Tecumseh 

Freshman 

Ottawa 

Sophomore 

Hutchinson 

Freshman 

Norton 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Freshman 



SHIDELER, RHONDA Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

SIEMENS, CINDY Halstead 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SKUPA, DAWN McPherson 

Biology Sophomore 

SMITH, COREE Tribune 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SMITH, CYNTHIA Salina 

General Freshman 



Ford/339 









;ferdfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordford fordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordl 



Open Widel-Gary Spani 
is fed ice cream by Sally 
Raymond, freshman in 
dance, at Ford Hall's 
Sweet Sassafrass. The 
"Sassafrass" is an ice- 
cream social where 
toppings are available 
for all types of sundaes. 
Proceeds from the 
"Sassafrass" were 
contributed to the 
Muscular Dystrophy 
Bumpathon. 




Kent Boughton 



SMITH, CYNTHIA I Lees Summit, MO 

Labor Relations Freshman 

SMITH, ELIZABETH Overland Park 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SPENCER, STACEY Oakley 

Music Education Freshman 

SPIEGEL, LISA Overland Park 

English Education Junior 

SPRINGER, JANET Rockville, MD 

Biology Junior 

ST CLAIR, TRACY Overland Park 

Horticulture Junior 

STANLEY, KIMBERLY Bonner Springs 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
STARR, EMILY Arkansas City 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

STEJSKAL, GINGER Timken 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
STERNS, CAHHRYN Hiawatha 

General Agriculture Sophomore 




340/Ford 



Ifordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordford fordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordi 




STEVENSON, JEAN Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

STICH, HELEN Chanute 

Home Economics Junior 

STILWELL, ROXIE Manhattan 

Elementary Education Junior 

STRNAD, RETHA Munden 

General Sophomore 

STRONG, KIMBERLY Prairie Village 
Physical Therapy Freshman 

STUPAS, PAMELA Overland Park 

Interior Design Freshman 

SUHR, SHIRLEY Salina 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

SUMPTER, CONNIE Mulvane 

Interior Design Freshman 

SUNDGREN, JOLENE Salina 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 
SWAN, MICHELLE . . . Overland Park 
Clothing Textiles Freshman 

SWANSON, SUE Manhattan, 

General Engineering Freshman 

TALBOTT, TRACI Halstead 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
TEMPLIN, LAURA Stilwell 

Accounting Sophomore 

THEOBALD, ANNE Leawood 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

THIES, AMY Great Bend 

General Business Administration Freshman 

THOMAS, SHERRY Salina 

Pre-Professional Secondary Education Freshman 
THOMAS, TRACEY Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

THOMPSON, PENNY Salina 

Interior Design Freshman 

TOUSIGNANT, SUSAN Herington 

Agricultural Journalismm Sophomore 

TOWNSEND, LINDSAY Overland Park 
General Freshman 

TROJOVSKY, CAROL Hiawatha 

General Freshman 

TURNBULL, JAN Stockton 

General Freshman 

UEBELHART, ELIZABETH Overland Park 

Construction Science Freshman 

UPSON, KAREN Kansas City 

Sociology Sophomore 

UTECH, THERESA Topeka 

Home Economics Freshman 

VANDAALEN, KATHLEEN Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

VENDERWEIDE, LINDA Garden City 

Family and Child Development . . . Freshman 

VANIER, SHARON Salina 

Art Freshman 

VAUGHN, KRISTA Halstead 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
VAUGHT, CHRISTIANNE Kansas City 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

VICKERS, LAURA Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

VOGT, DIANNE Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

VAECHTER, SUSAN Lenexa 

Accounting Senior 

WALEK, SUE Holton 

Sociology Senior 

WALKER, CECELIA Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 



Ford/341 






rdfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordfordf 



WALSH, BECKY Collyer 

Pre-Professional Secondary Education Freshman 

WALSH, RITA Topeka 

Art Junior 

WARNER, SARA Cimarron 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
WARREN, CHRISTY Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

WASINGER, CINDY Ness City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 

WEBER, DAWNLEE Mission 

Accounting Sophomore 

WEGER, CATHERINE . . Shawnee Mission 

Management Senior 

WENDT, CHERYL Herington 
Dietetics and Institutional Management Freshman 
WENKE, KELLE Wichita 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 
WERNES, VICKY Overland Park 
Clothing Textiles Junior 

WESTHUES, JANE Overland Park 

General Freshman 

WHEELER, KAREN Overland Park 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 
WHEPLEY, SUZANNE Holden, MA 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

WHITE, CAROL Ottawa 

Landscape Architecture . Fifth Year Student 
WILLHITE, LEANN Wellsville 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, GRACE Brunning, NE 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
WILLIAMS, JANE Atchison 

General Freshman 

WILLIAMS, KAREN Eureka 

General Freshman 

WILLIAMS, PAULA Wichita 

Psychology Sophomore 

WILSON, ROBIN Paola 

Accounting Sophomore 

WIMER, POLLY Prairie Village 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

WINKLER, SHARON Corning 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WISCHROPP, SHERRILL El Dorado 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 

WOOD, JANET Solomon 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

WOOLDRIDGE, MARGO Prairie Village 
General Freshman 

YEARGIN, KELLY Fort Belvoir, VA 

Accounting Sophomore 

YOUNG, JUDY Tribune 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

YOUNGDOFF, JULIE Overland Park 

Marketing Freshman 

ZEKA, BETTY Wellington 

Physical Education Senior 

ZOGLEMAN. NANCY Norwich 

Journalism and Mass Communication . Senior 





Hi 








T-sr- 


-1 


V' 


\ 


J* ■ 








342/Ford 



Goodnow 



goodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgood 




After Midnight 

-The Lobbies of 
Goodnow and Marlatt 
Halls have large picture- 
windows that allow 
residents to get a good 
view of the outdoors — 
and allow passers-by to 
see that not much is 
going on at the moment. 
The lobbies are 
especially lively, 
hovever, when there is a 
function. 




ADAMS, DAVID Coffeyville 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

AGARD, GARRIE Augusta 

General Sophomore 

ALLEN, REBECCA Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

ANDERSON, HOWARD Jamestown 

Management Junior 

ARNOLDY, STEVEN Manhattan 

Secondary Education Junior 

ASAY, SHARON Topeka 

Fine Arts Freshman 

BANE, KIM Hugoton 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BARCUS, SUSAN Overland Park 

Humanities Sophomore 

BARTLETT, LINDA Prairie Village 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

BAUCK, RUSSELL Vassar 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

BAUGHMAN, AUDIE Arkansas City 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

BAUM, JON Stilwell 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BEAHM, BRUCE St Joseph, MO 

Architecture Junior 

BECKER, KANDIE Wichita 

Special Special 

BEHR, DEBRA Wichita 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

BEST, PAM Hoxie 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BOHLEN, JEFFREY ...... Morton, IL 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BOYLAN, KELLY Ulysses 

Architecture Senior 

BRADEN, LEANN Wakefield 

General Freshman 

BRAMMER, VICKIE .... Silver Lake 
Animal Science and Industry Junior 



Goodnow/343 



HOWj 



joodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodno 

BRINEY, NELLIE Bcloit 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

BROCKELMAN, JANET Holton 

Agricultural Economics Senior . 

BROCKELMAN, JULIE Holton M M ■' _ ■ H f ** -, _ , ^ 

General Business Administration Freshman mk , ". jjjj | ^ » m^P^ ^F ^V" ' r 

BROCKHOFF, LYNNE Hiawatha J1V - M^* A 1 jIEl ^ | ^^^. fe 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore A -J^ HI ! i (JjSg^^«'' ^dK ~ ! mfe. ^ v #4^1 

BROOKS, MARC Topeka ^|ii^^^§H| S^Wl^^ IM^ -? j Jl »V v^V^-gt! 

Construction Science Junior 1^ fcliliB? i'.^m. ^H I & sHMmL^i':^ 

BROWN, ROBIN Sabetha ^CW : i^mv HPv 

Chemical Enqineering Freshman ^JP- k ■ ■r^*"*'- ^V^W A&-^»'i 

BURCH, DEBBIE Ottawa M,4>:: m #**** J ' ff^^H W \ JfP^^ 

General Business Administration Freshman ■■*-» ~Y "" I w" '""" ■ ^g-~ '-^ £ _V 

BURNS, CHERYL Overland Park SH / v 

Elementary Education Sophomore rift N ' 

BURNS, SANDRA Eastcn dp* f - * *' ^1 ^ M ^^ , / 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Sophomore ™ / , 1 MPl ^^ I 

BURTON, BARBARA Frankfort | J \ *■ 

General Freshman l...ifef 

BUSBEA, SUSAN Kansas City i • 

General Freshman 4 "M ;> * • ^F~> 1M ^ it- , 

BUSH, CLARA Coffeyville &L ' \ %» \|1 HLwHi I -I 

CAMPBELL, RANDY Tulare, CA 51 <Cr> M* Wj ^ i If ? '^,^' ' ' JZ~ 

Management Senior Jfc 45;$ Sr*"" ^Lar ^V V 

CANADAY, RANDY Lakewood, CO ^ iP^p 'lRp',1 ^ i^ 

Finance Freshman „\ V , f Ti > '•%** ^■W^> ^H 

CARNAHAN, CARON Shawnee ./-I ... | «\7 ifc, V MBil M 

Dance Sophomore 'if ■ \ * S ■&" iB i 

CARPER, CYNTHIA Wakeeney 

General Freshman 

CARR, LAURIE Overland Park » . a 

Management Sophomore W>»- " ** v "' - •- ? 

CHANCE, EILEEN Jacksonville, FL » *;> r ^ £ , ,.,, 

Civil Engineering Junior ^9^ f-& WL #1 ^% 7 

CHAPMAN, DEBRA . ... Beloit .HK" ' Mfc^ML ^f 

Pre-Professional Secondary Education Freshman • ', WTmki.'" ! HL. Wk A0& JE3 ; "i 

CHAPMAN, JILL Wichita 

Speech Pathology Freshman * "' ' '— - - ^iA 

CHAPPELL, KELLY Morganville Mt& 

General Engineering Freshman Mm W'^ £ '■■■■ ■>" mk 

CLARK, CONNIE Preston W A *#'%> \ 

Pre-Medicine Freshman M - ~^m PsT ** **\ - Hp** *» > 

CLARK, LISA Hiawatha \ ~ "- JP' M - • W ll^"- ■» 

Home Economics Freshman J ^r *^L W' 1 

CLARK, SUSAN Overland Park d£ ^f ^^ - I ^M 

Political Science Sophomore mtf- | ^k J^K» w— ^ ^^ 4 ' ♦!■''! 

COLV1N, CANDY Frankfort [H^ ,|B « ^"'; I . | 

Pre-Education Freshman ^^M&^li^M I i 

COMBS, SUSAN Olathe « ^k 

PreDentistry Freshman ^; ^^ i MS**t 9 JBP^ 

CONKLIN, CONNIE Topeka MT *J| V; 

Home Economics Senior ^^ ^E HHf^S 

COSTELLO, MICHAEL St. Louis, MO 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

CRUMRINE, KELLY Independence j ; MF " I -JM 

General Business Administration Sophomore ^KKdM^. fS^^ &&&&/)*■- V\M\jjfc Mk- ft \^ v 

CUBA, LAURA Fort Riley BJJ A^T H g^Wk ^N; ! || ^IL i^tV^ 

Accounting Sophomore ^^^^^^^ J^^^^^^^ IBMMWIBB^^ i 

CUNNINGHAM, DANIEL Overland Park 4£^k 1^^ I ,^& 

Special Graduate Student ^^^^WB Jmr \ ' ^P 

DAVIS, LANA Meade 1L -7m -A^ # ^m 

Clothing Textiles Freshman \^' " *W W* *| • ' lp- — V 

DAVIS, TERRY Memphis, TN Z^ r \Hr ^ / '. r ",- 

D1X, MARY Overland Park ^^| i : 

DOPING, BRENDA Mission @ f ^ «c mi 1 W 

Horticulture Sophomore -> '■ # iNr^Lt ^W 

DOLL, LISA Ingalls p'^^h.': , ""« ^m. » V ! 

Pre-Professional Secondary Education Freshman 

DONECKER, TAMMY Healy 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

DUDEK, EVA Vineland, NJ 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore ^m • •■ j S ^1 " "^B M fln 

DUERKSF.N, ANGELA Emporia ■ "I- ■ M - ^^ ^| v ' j| m -• 

Interior Design Freshman ^wKf S ^Wlk. •' ^^ 

ENGELKEN, CAROLYN Frankfort 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

EPLER, TERRI Omaha, NE J \\"V ' I - \ '■,■•■■. ■ 

Accounting Sophomore k \j| N^ i ^'^ 




344/Goodnow 



joodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnow goodnowgoodrowgoodnowgoodnowgoodn 




FARRELL, MITCHELL Vineland, NJ 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

FIEDLER, GAYLE Lakewood, OH 

Modern Language Senior 

FOWLER, LEONA .... Emporia 

Music Education Freshman 

FRANCIS, CAROL Attica 

Agricultural Journalism Freshman 

FRANCIS, JANA Liberal 

General Business Administration Freshman 

FRANKLIN, JOANNE Fort Scott 

Secondary Education Senior 

FRAZEE, LORI Summerfield 

General Freshman 

FULTON, KEVIN Loup City, NE 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GABEL, KEVIN Ness 

General Engineering Freshman 

GAHAGAN, BRIDGET Ottawa 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GARTLAND, MARIANNE Hillcrest Heights, MO 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

GAUDETTE, JOANNE Shawnee Mission 

Marketing Sophomore 

GEIER, KAYE Larned 

Social Work Junior 

GELSINGER, STEVEN Overland Park 

Architecture Senior 

GIBSON, LINDA Ogallah 

Home Economics Junior 

GILL, STEPHANIE Harper 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

GILLETTE, BRENDA Gardner 

Computer Science Sophomore 

GLATT, ABIGAIL Abilene 

Elementary Education Senior 

GOLUBSKI, ROBERT Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

GRABER, DEBRA " Pretty Prairie 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

GRAHAM, CYNTHIA Leavenworth 

Humanities Senior 

GRANZOW, CINDY Herington 

Political Science Junior 

GREENE, DAVID Fairway 

General Freshman 

GRIEB, THOMAS Olathe 

Physical Education Senior 

GRISSINGER, SUSIE Overland Park 

Art Education Sophomore 

GUTIERREZ, LORI Topeka 

Fine Arts Freshman 

HABERSTROH, SCOTT .... Stilwell 

Computer Science Sophomore 

HAFLEY, KATHY Eureka, MO 

Horticultural Therapy Freshman 

HANEY, KENNETH Tribune 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

HARRISON, BETTY Leawood 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

HATTRUP, JUDY Kinsley 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 
HAURY, DALE Wichita 

Horticulture Junior 

HAYS, PATRICK Kansas City 

Civil Engineering Junior 

HEALY, MARSHA McCracken 

Dietetics and Institutional Mgmt .... Senior 

HEALY, PAULETTE McCracken 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

HEIDEBRECHT, LAURA McPherson 

Pre-Education Freshman 

HEIM, CHERI Hoxie 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HEIM, EDWARD Hoxie 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

HEIM, MICHAEL Hoxie 

General Junior 

HETTRICK, JEFFREY Madisonville, KY 
Engineering Technology Sophomore 

HIGGINS, KATHLEEN Overland Park 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Sophomore 

HILT, GERALD St. Francis 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

HILTON, NICHOLAS Hutchinson 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

HOBBS, BRENDA Manhattan 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HOLLING, SHARON Omaha, NE 

Home Economics Sophomore 



Goodnow/345 



dsiowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnow goodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoo 



HOLT, TRACY Wichita 

Psychology Sophomore 

HOLZRICHTER, LINDA Burrton 

Life Science Sophomore 

HOWARD, PATRICIA Abilene 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HRABE, MADELINE Plainville 

General Freshman 

HUFFAKER, LYN Emporia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

HUXMAN, KRISTIN Arnold 

General Sophomore 

INMAN, TAMMY Kansas City 

General Business Administration .... Senior 

JABBEN, ELEANOR Independence 

Accounting Junior 

JACOBSON, RENEE Willis 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

JASSO, TONI Newton 

Fine Arts Freshman 



JENAB, JOCELYN 
General 

JENKINS, SUSAN 
General 
JINKS, DENISE 



Mission Hills 

Sophomore 

Ottawa 

Freshman 

Olathe 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

JONES, BETH Horton 

Clothing Textiles Freshman 

KAHRS, DONICE Morganville 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KALIVODA, CINDY Clyde 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 
KENNEDY, KATHERINE Frankfort 

Family and Child Development Junior 

KENWORTHY, JO Ransom 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

KENWORTHY, JOYCE Ransom 

Elementary Education Senior 

KIEFFER, MARTHA Marysville 

Psychology Freshman 

KINDLE, KIM Little River 

Radio-TV Freshman 

KLINE, JONI Herington 

Interior Design Sophomore 

KLINE, JULIE Herington 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

KOEHN, CARLA Marquette 

Horticulture Freshman 

KOHLER, PAMELA Kansas City 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

KRASNE, JULIE Lincoln, NE 

Biology Junior 

KREHBIEL, SUNDIE Wichita 

Clothing Textiles Freshman 

KRIER, KENNETH Beloit 

General Business Administration .... Freshman 

KYNER, PATRICIA Sharon Springs 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

LACORE, DONNA Sharon 

General Business Administration Junior 

LA1SURE, THOMAS Merriam 

General Engineering Freshman 

LAMOREAUX, BARBARA Waterville 

General Sophomore 

LANKARD, DUANE Garnett 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

LAW, KARAN Overland Park 

Restaurant Management Sophomore 

LAWSON, EDDIE Gatesville, TX 

Accounting Senior 

LEISZLER, ANNEMARIE Clifton 

Accounting Sophomore 

LEWIS, CINDY Independence 

Office Administration Sophomore 

LIVERS, CURTIS Hays 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

LOHOEFENER, JO ELLEN Oberlin 

Marketing Senior 

LOOK, MARTHA Topeka 

Sociology Junior 



LOSE, CAROL 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology 

LOVE, ERIC 

Pre-Design Professions 

LUCKY, RUTH 

Pre-Nursing 

LUGINBILL, LINDA 
Accounting 



Prairie Village 

Junior 

Overland Park 

Freshman 

Stockton 

Sophomore 

. . . . Burrton 

... Freshman 



LUTZ, ANITA Arkadelphia, AR 
Dietetics Junior 




346/Goodnow 



Inowgoodnowgoodnow goodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnow 




LUTZ, LISA 

General 

MADDOCK, THOMAS 

Marketing 

MADDUX, MICHELLE 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

MAH, JULIE 

Journalism and Mass Communication 

MASTIN, CARRIE 



Hays 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Sophomore 

Scott City 

Freshman 

Beloit 

Freshman 

St. John 



Chemical Engineering Junior 

MAXWELL, LENARD Quinter 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

MCCAMANT, MARY Hutchinson 

Office Administration Junior 

MCCULLICK, MISSY Hays 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

MCCULLICK, RONDA Minneapolis 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

MCDOWELL, BECKY Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MCGEOUGH, MIKE Kenosha, WI 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

MCGREGOR, MOLLY Kansas City 

General Freshman 

MCLENON, ELIZABETH Effingham 

Music Education Freshman 

MCNAIRY. MICHAEL Augusta 

Engineering Technology Senior 

MCNEER, ANN Topeka 

Psychology Sophomore 



MCNEICE, GEORGIA 


Manhattan 


General Business Administration 


Freshman 


MCROBERTS, SUSAN 


Manhattan 


General Business Administration 


Freshman 


MCWILLIAMS, LARRY 


Sharon Springs 


Engineering Technology 


Freshman 


MELLAND, JENNY 


McPherson 


General 


Freshman 


MENSE, MIKE 


Hoxie 


Agriculture 


Freshman 




Follow the Bouncing 
Ball-Anita Lutz, junior 
in dietetics and 
institutional management, 
tries to balance a 
basketball on her 
forehead. After a long 
evening of writing out 
labs for her dietetics 
classes, Lutz says she 
had a sudden surge of 
energy and felt crazy at 
the same time. A 
basketball was handy 
and this was the result. 



Tim Cojtello 



Goodnow/347 



owgoodiiiowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnow goodnowgoodnowgoodno 



MILLER, CONNIE J Topeka 

Computer Scinece Junior 

MINES, LYNDA McPherson 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore 

MOLDRUP, KAREN Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MOLDRUP, KELLI Overland Park 

Psychology Freshman 

MONTGOMERY, THRESA Lincolnville 

Radio-TV Senior 

MOORE, ALLEN Merriam 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 



MORGAN, JANICE 
Accounting 

MORRIS, RAYMOND 
Chemical Engineering 
MUELLER, DAVID 



Greeley 

Freshman 

Silver Lake 

Sophomore 

Tampa 



Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

NEFF, DEBRA Tonganoxie 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

NEIBLING, ANITA Highland 

Family and Child Development . . . Sophomore 
NEUENSWANDER, MINDY Ottawa 

Home Economics Freshman 

NEWMAN, KATHY Winchester 

Accounting Sophomore 

NEWTON, HEIDI Abilene 

General Freshman 

NEWTON, LAURI Kansas City 

General Freshman 

NICHOLSON, ANITA Colby 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

NORTON, KATHLEEN Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

O'BRIEN, KATHY Mission 

Pre-Design Profession Sophomore 

OCHOA, CONNIE Edwardsville 

Art Sophomore 

O'HALLORAN, MAURA Pretty Prairie 

Geology Junior 

OLBERDING, DANIAL Atwood 

Accounting Freshman 

OLSEN, STEVEN Horton 

Animal Science and Industry Graduate Student 

OSTROM, JENNIFER Concordia 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

PACEY, PAM Miltonvale 

Family and Child Development . .' Junior 

PAGE, ELIZABETH Manhattan 

General Engineering Freshman 

PARAMESH, INDHU C Larned 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

PERISHO, BRET Douglas 

Accounting Senior 

PETERSILIE, KIM Ness City 

Chemical Science Freshman 

PHILLIPS, KATHY Wakeeney 

Interior Design Freshman 

PHILLIPS, PATRICIA Mission 

General Business Administration Freshman 

PICKELL, WENDA Olathe 

Psychology Sophomore 

POTTS, SHERRYL Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Junior 

PRESTON, TAYLOR Iola 

Engineering Technology Senior 

PRIEST, MARK Plains 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

PROSE, MARY Herndon 

Engineering Technology Freshman 



REDFERN, APRIL 

General 

REED, KIMBERLY 

General Business Administration 

RITSCH, LINDA 



Anthony 

Freshman 

Merriam 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Psychology Freshman 

RITZ, LISA Merriam 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

RONEY, REX Waverly 

Agricultural Economics Senior 



ROSE, DAVID 
Physical Education 
ROSS, CHERYL 
Home Economics 
ROSS, WENDY 

Accounting 

ROUSH, MARK 



Wichita 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Junior 

Huron 

Freshman 

Chanute 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

ROY, LADONNA ' Phillipsburg 
Family and Child Development Freshman 




348/Goodnow 



joodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnow goodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgood 




Right There- Functions 
in residence halls can 
sometimes be a major 
production. Posters, lights, 
elaborate sound systems 
and the always-present 
beer are elements of any 
good function. Stacy 
Stephens, junior in 
marketing, receives 
instruction on hanging a 
poster for a 3rd floor 
Goodnow function. 




RYAN, RAY Salina 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

SAGE, STEPHANIE Phillipsburg 

Accounting Freshman 

SANDERS, LINDA Wichita 

Psychology Sophomore 

SASENICK, CAROLE Roeland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

SAUVAGE, CAROL Topeka 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

SCHEBOR, VALERIE Leavenworth 

Radio-TV Freshman 

SCHLETZBAUM, ANNE Atchison 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

SCHMIDT, SHERYL Bennington 

Elementary Education Senior 

SEGER, CHERYL Coffeyville 

General Engineering Freshman 

SHAW, LEX Lakin 

Geology Freshman 

SHEEL, SANDRA Moline 

Mathematics Graduate Student 

SHIRVANI, SUZANNE Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

SHOOK, SCOTT Mulvane 

Computer Science Sophomore 

SIMONS, AMY Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SLOAN, KATHY Leawood 

General Freshman 

SMITH, LISA Marysville 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Sophomore 
SMITH, NATALIE Shawnee 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SMITH, SHEILA Spring Hill 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

SMUTZ, STEVE Overland Park 

General Engineering Junior 

SOOBY, VIRGINIA Kansas City 
Modern Language Junior 

SPIGLER, KATHY Shawnee 

English Freshman 

SPIGLER, SHERI Shawnee 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

STAAB, MARY Valley Falls 

Microbiology Senior 

STEFFEN, DIANE Glenwood City, WI 

Biology Freshman 

STEPHENS, STACY Topeka 

Marketing Sophomore 



Goodnow/349 



foodnowgoodnowgoodnow goodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowgoodnowg 

STONER, DIANA Derby _________ IBB^IBBBBBB 

Industrial Engineering Freshman ' 

STORER, ROBERTA Moundridge 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman [ up I m aA' 

STROM, LUANN White City : Kft *^M \ §" - H 

Elementary Education Junior Um - m -» '.*_ JK '— -~~~ t Sffti 

STROUD, TERESA Leawood ™B. " Ajf ! ik Jf iSrsZ ' ~ 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman '•'', ^LmW ~.^ 

STUCKY, JANICE Burrton 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore £, ^- ] ^^Pilg 

STUTTS, JANA Claremont, CA 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

STUTZ, DEAN Nortonville 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SWEANY, SHERYL Topeka ^d-~"~ 3™ «---—» w- 

Correctional Administration Junior 

SYMES, KEVIN Lakin 

Computer Science Freshman ^dJA *B™^s A" ' ' U *%Bk !&&>:. ' 

TAYLOR, BRENDA Dodge ilSF ; ■ ' ■ if ' H ' vS * *8a&*i 

Elementary Education Senior m Jfr 1 mYfl% \, I ; * 1 1?^ if*P$Pi " \ YY 

TELLERS, MARY Young America MN .--' *. «_>_■ 

Horticulutral Therapy Senior 

THOMAS, LORI Wellington 

Economics Junior H '« ■ ap' 

THOMAS, LYNETTE Overland Park IP ^PJ « BP %L " " f \" ' I 

Elementary Education Senior I BV JBl~*' — K. ™m - r 1/L x L 

THOMPSON, ABBY Phillipsburg 1 "~- jm ^gf^ ~""^M' i ^ *H ^ ~ 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman -—A J&ts&t*. Jmi 

TIERNEY, PATRICIA Mission f 

Humanities Senior "N. I / 

Civil Engineering Sophomore IqL ,M "'■;' _Cj^ A^t^k 

TINKER, LAURA Oklahoma City, OK ; y W WM jT %i W Mmi 

Interior Design Junior yr' „, *■ 1 1 'il — """w^ BBS"* * fflM Br - ~i 

General Freshman A ~ ' ImA m^^ x " Jjjfc BBBk^_Bl tB*' ' 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman \&00 : f f3 i§BF^ • • ™*S! P^ ^^pf%-i *1 \ "* i 

Electrical Engineering Junior f£?WWF™ ®K W^lTff'^fi ■' h'f\ M «» ! 

VANDORN, BRIAN Vliets 

Mechanical Engineering Junior _B ' jrJ(B ^tn»*^K /" ^HrHi 

VERBOOM, LINDA ' Wichita mBmmt *J|P ; 5 flP^ 1 &» 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore \ ■» - ' ^Bk , » x -' A, 

WADICK, JAMES Beloit 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WAHLE, CHRIS Junction City [A> | \ 

General Freshman j ^ \ _- 

WALKER, DEBRA Arkansas City 

General Freshman 

WALKER, EVA Sharon Springs 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman cm w AfF^ 

WANKLYN, CYNTHIA Frankfort fSfl ' ~ il/ 

Horticulture Junior ^3L * '* jtSL Ik V^B ^_k " • B- " ' i 

WEAR, JEANETTF. Kansas City flk .. '^ Bj f~* BM /▼ V 

General Agriculture Sophomore ^\ ^^ \ Imw- ^* \ y^ '* 

WE1CKERT, MARY Marysville 1 J s '" ^U ^ -mf 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore . • ' * BJBb- . ,*iti- 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore J&y J0^X' ;< ^fc' Bc^F- ^9^ 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman ^ll - 'ISfc'^ r ^^L V "** m » r' 

WHITE, DAVID Colby _^1^ A " / V ^br^/l ;: *+m\ ' \ \ 

Engineering Technology Junior /W J ■ mi^k' id^^T foT'L \ / » 

WHITE, K'NARDA Hardtner Bk/ ^%^&2 J'K^ ; |i ^K ■ ^\, 

Retail Floriculture Freshman || §|f ^ir yff4T^ ^B Bft ifll 

WIEBE, SUSAN Derby ^mmmmmmk^lKk BBBBWBBI J^HH 

Clothing Textiles Junior JjB H&l. ' ^ \ AmW^^K ' 

WILLIAMS, GRETCHEN Hutchinson |i/^Bk ^V A Pf J 

General Engineering Freshman .BV JAM' W^-^lKfc^B W~ - V 

WILLIAMS, SHERYL Anthony <■" lB B^'-^BT - Wl 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman -^™ Mmm*. m 

WILLIS, KERRI lola ^^^ ^--r ^j, « « -^ 

Biology Junior K ^B ^T- f& flri^k. fe,r ^ 'mmm*. ^ \ 

WILTFONG. CATHRYN Aurora, NE ^ ^ ^^S> ^«^« ^BH Alt' mm% ~ r rth 

Dietetics and Institutional Mgmt. Senior ■ Ll ^| |V — *■/''! ^flCT^^»^ BBBb^Bi « I t- V ' 

WINTERS, LANETTE Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering Senior 




350/Goodnow 



m. ifly llJlClK^l haymakerhaymakcrhaymakerhaymakerhaymakcrhaymakcr haymakerhaymakerhay 




« I) J s M 




ADMIRE, JOHN Tulsa, OK. 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

AHNEMANN, GREGG Shawnee 

Accounting Freshman 

AHRENS, TIM Powhattan 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

ALEXANDER, STEVEN Baldwin 

Accounting Sophomore 

ALLEN, CHARLTON Belle Plaine 

Food Science and Industry Sophomore 

ALLISON, BYRON Basehor 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

ALSUP, SHAWN St. Francis 

Crop Protection Junior 

ANDERS, DALE Eudora 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

ANDRAOS, EDWARD Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

ANNAN, BOB Onaga 

Business Administration Freshman 

ANNAN, GEORGE Onaga 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

APLEY, MICHAEL Lamed 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

ATTEBERRY, DARRELL Atchison 

Marketing Freshman 

BACANI, PAUL Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

BACON, ROBERT Council Grove 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

BADGER, KEITH Carbondale 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

BAHR, SAM Gridley 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BAHR, STEPHEN Andale 

Business Administration Freshman 

BA1NTER, DAVID Oberlin 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BALES, BRUCE Larned 

Mathematics Senior 

BANISTER, JEFF Overland Park 

Construction Science Sophomore 

BASTIN, DALE Selden 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

BEACHEY, TERRY Merriam 

Pre-Law Freshman 

BECKELHIMER, BILL Arkansas City 

Accounting Freshman 

BEIM, PERRY Phillipsburg 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BELL, SCOTT Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

BENSON, BRUCE Coffeyville 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BEOUGHER, TIM " Bird City 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

BERTELS, CHRIS Nortonville 

Management Freshman 

BETTENCOURT, MARK Havensville 

General Freshman 

BIERLY, KIRK . . . . Lyons 

Horticulture Therapy Junior 

BILLIOT, MIKE Atchison 

Business Administration Freshman 

BINGMAN, PHILLIP Sabetha 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

BISHOP, BRUCE Wellsville 

Business Administration Freshman 

BLACK, KERRY ... Chapman 
Civil Engineering Junior 

BLACK, ROBERT Salina 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

BLICK, GERALD Hutchinson 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

BOISVERT, CHARLES Topeka 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

BOLLIER, RENE Prairie Village 

Psychology Senior 

BOLTE, JOHN Salina 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

BORRERO, ALVIN ... Ponce, PR 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

BOWERSOX, DEANNE Wilmore 

Interior Design Senior 

BOWERSOX, STEWART Greensburg 

Psychology Senior 

BOWSER, ERIC Oskaloosa 

Accounting Freshman 

BOYER, JOHN Kingman 

Business Administration Freshmqn 



Haymaker/351 



haymakerlias?iiiakerhaymakerhaymakcrhaymakcrhaymakcrhaymakcrhaymakcrhaymakcrhaymakcrhaymakcrhayi 



BRADLEY, JOSEPH Leavenworth 

Management Freshman 

BRADLEY, ROBERT Abilene 

Business Administration Junior 

BRADLEY, STEVE Oskaloosa 

Business Administration Freshman 

BRAND, JEFF Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

BRAUN, STEVE Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

BROKESH, EDWIN Narka 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

BROWN, DANA Grinnell 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BROWN, J. DAVID Prairie Village 

Architecture Senior 

BROWN, MARK Cottonwood Falls 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BROWN, PATRICK Hays 

Business Administration Freshman 

BROWN, TYLER Wichita 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

BRUNGARDT, BILL St. Marys 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

BRYAN, RICK Osage City 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

BUSCHER, STAN Kingman 

Agricultural Education Freshman 

BUSH, J. SCOTT Meriden 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BUTTERFIELD, TIM Beloit 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

CAIN, LYLE Halstead 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

CARPENTER, DALE Stockton 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

CASEY, TODD Glen Elder 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

CHARLES, SCOTT Salina 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

CHERAY, DAVID Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

CHILDS, CLAYTON Elmdale 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

CHILDS, STAN Sterling 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

CHRISTY, DOUGLAS Topeka 

Finance Sophomore 

CHRISTY, GARY Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CLAASSEN, GREG Whitewater 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

COEN, JAMES Ottawa 

Civil Engineering Junior 

COMMERFORD, MATTHEW Great Bend 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

COOK, LEWIS Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

COSTELLO, TIM Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Senior 

COUP, DONAVON McPherson 

Architecture Senior 

CRAIG, MIKE Baldwin 

Agriculture Sophomore 

CRITCHFIELD. GALEN Moundridge 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

CULLOP, JERRY Sterling 

Agriculture .... Freshman 

CUNNINGHAM, CURT Hyde Park, NY 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

CURTICE, JIM Lenexa 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

DARBY, JOHN St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DAUBER, TODD Bunkerhill 

Agricultural Education Junior 

DAVIS, DONALD Norton 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

DECKER, MIKE Sandy, UT 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DILLE, RUSSELL Topeka 

Business Administration Freshman 

DILLON, KELLY Ozawkie 

Construction Science Freshman 

DISBERGER, DENNIS Hutchinson 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

DIX, JOHNNY Stockton 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

DIXON, TOM Pleona 

Agriculture Freshman 




352/Haymaker 



akerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakei 




DOLECHEK, MICHAEL Claflin 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

DOUGAN, DARREL Pretty Prairie 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DREILING, MARK Sharon Springs 

Speech Freshman 

DU PREE, KEVIN Prairie Village 
Pre-Vet Junior 

DUSIN, ROBERT Phillipsburg 
Civil Engineering Junior 

ECKELS, KELLY Sharon Springs 

General Freshman 

EDMONDS, DARYL Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

EISENBEIS, STEVEN St. Louis, MO 

Special Student 
EMERSON, RON Overbrook 

Management Sophomore 

ERICKSON, MIKE Shawnee 

Horticulture Senior 

EVANS, BARRY Newton 

Journalism and Mass Communciatlons . Senior 

EVANS, LINK Lyons 

General Junior 

EVANS, RICHARD Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FAIR, RUSSELL Solomon 

Journalism Sophomore 

FAIRBANK, DAN Independence 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 




Studying pop-art style 

- Weather permitting, 
the KSU campus has 
several excellent places 
for outdoor studying 
with several 

architecturally interesting 
structures such as the 
fountain in front of 
Farrell Library. Mike 
Apley, sophomore in 
pre- vet, is seen taking 
advantage of the 
atmosphere in front of 
Farrell. 



Dave Kaup 



Haymaker/353 





} haymak ymaker hay makerhay makcrhaymakcrhay makcrhay makcrhay makcrhaymakcrhaymakcrhay maker h« 

FEIL, ROD Salina 

Management Freshman jg £ 

FISHER. DARYL Holton M[ \ 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior B 

I I r"NN RUSSELL Overland Park Wt*/ *|l W*< "V Wl * * * 

Marketing .Junior iR 1' V * 

FOX, DALE Norton JH^P 

Architectural Engineering Freshman Bw i -k^mC*" ^K ^ "■*! /tA 

FREDRICKSON, DAVID Baldwin --| ' , V ^£lB M ifcM <^ m 

Agriculture Sophomore / [r-jJQ^&rSKL v» V 

' LKk ■ yfsHR' tfe.Jll fV 

FRITZENMEIER, RONALD Camino, CA ^%^ 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore ^B i?\ ^fc ^Ml ^&? 

FRY, JACK Overland Park 

Horticulture Sophomore W%* ■ 1 flrA • ■ M^^' If aU ^ 

GAEDDERT, TOM Newton 1 L F 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman jjyi - ' 

GARINGER, STEVE Buhler ' Jt'%- flPt 1 ^Br 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore T^ ■t .^m irfi /^Plt/C / 

GF.IST, KEITH Sterling ^ 'J i *\^^ 4H7 , ,„ |L ' VK 

Management Junior • / j \ ^B i" H\ w) *►-"• 

GERHARDT, BRIAN Salina 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

GIGSTAD, TODD Nortonville 

Agronomy Sophomore HBt "^ B If'* C 

GILMORE, SCOTT Almena ■f)^' 

Engineering Sophomore Ba _~ 

GLENN, PHIL Wichita ^j k. J -4^~ -^f%*" -4f^ 

Accounting Sophomore «0&mB%m k i \ '^ t > ^\ 

GOERING, STEVE Arlington fT«f >? 4*% V * X » 

Animal Science and Industry Senior [l i RJF r % \ \\ \ 

GOFORTH, TODD Topeka H^p^ — 
Statistics Graduate Student 

GORE, REX Elkhart 

Agricultural Economics Senior / ,y _ ■*"!*& • m - 

GRIDLEY, BRIAN Bethlehem, PA ■ "° * ^ 

Architecture Fifth Year Student \j&- ~ J 

GRIFFIN, JAY Abilene _dtlfc* .^A W. 

Agriculture .... Sophomore ^ ' ^^HwA hHI 41k 1H^ 

GRONEFELD, BRAD Marthasville, MO T M Mil I ilkMl I 4] ^ ' «f 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman '4 £| \ ,^gt Hifll I M \ iHkl 

GROSS, ROBERT Victoria ■ 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

GROSSMAN, DUDLEY Overland Park P 

Pre-Forestry Freshman iwp f i*t #t ■feu-- "'"■ 9F 

GUINTY, DAVE Topeka is/ '* 

Geology Freshman 

GUM, JIM Overland Park W&A '** 

Pre-Medicine Freshman fc^ ' V ^&m I^TH/C^ i^^M ^^^. 

GURSS, GARY Leavenworth '4»f V*| A .-• U lit, IjBBJ />^) ^Sgf. l 

Hlstor V Freshman fa Bjff/ _> ^ /.j UH^ H M I I »\ M 

GUSTAFSON, JAMES McPherson HPJI j m 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore ^k \ JK # . i ^* ^W " A. ^^B 

HAMILL, BRAD Abilene m r \ LlSlC ft* *"% ¥* 

Milling Science and Management Freshman far ■l-~~~_ j' C' ^Vll " ^BP^' tB 'I - * ' 

HAMILTON, CRAIG Medicine Lodge WJ} ' ^C/T^F B(\. ~ ^f *" "T 

Accounting Sophomore l^m t*. ™ A ^■ft .^H jM w dtk. ^H ifi. 

HAMMOCK, STEVE Wichita >?iJ& l| , ■■#1! Hlfl B^ -Ai 

Industrial Engineering Freshman [f Mmn. ■ \ : jB'I / S^BVJ^Ril I ■ fl.Ji I Bn vM 

HAMPTON, MIKE Warrensburg, MO (F — . j '"" BPJBJ - i^fe^ >^BM ! i^^B 

HARBORTH, WILLIAM . Hunts vn| S e, m AL BJ^^P W ~^1 W' " i \&^ ^ T" i- 

Engineering Technology Freshman mfc" " k. -jBrr" ' J%T > 

HARDING, ROB Cheney ML i K ^L , ^V V v 

Business Administration Freshman ^^■TL ^= a! AL ^49 ■ 1U\I »\ ,^^ \ 

HARMS, MARVIN Newton ( -iftfgV F 'I f(M( O MJ ^S^l 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore vL£ JfiE/ / ^M \ %l Bli« 

HART, BRUCE Kansas City ^BJfe ^Bk. -^-^ ^^fc. 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore ^BlLBr 4 ^ 'Y^ ^JE&fh*- ^TBA ^B?*^ 

HAUBER, GERALD Westwood •' ^j Bp^S Br » BU 4 BTM^W 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman F^^"*>B 'm** ' I ■« ". W ^^ P W WF^ ^M 

HAWLEY, JOHN Topeka ti I mfc Ti: w %L> T ^\i ^ 

Finance Freshman % "* ' ^^. | V - JL K v 

HAXTON, RICK Topeka < f» j ^#W ^-R^ ^^A ^B^ 

Marketing Senior ^f V. ^ <^l ■ ^ Bl £^ I A 1 

HAZELT1NE, BRUCE Manhattan |^ ^ ^Ikl - £ ' 

Chemical Engineering L I . , ,i I HmBIBI \ 

HEADRICK, RICK Mullinville ^ r ^3^ BV^I^^Hb] 

Horticulture Senior ^ B^ J|' ^ A \F \ ^BA B^ J 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior "^H""' / ^B%^* ^ B^ ^W T^T^ rf* '"HBa^ "" 1 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 1 i y£~ J£ ' WUL BB 

Pre Design Professions Freshman ^^^ A ^^^ ^^A ,^B^! 4 t r^f^y' 

Social Work Freshman |\ I liv II H ■ I 1 ' 





354/Haymaker 



akerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymaker haymakcrhaymakcrhaymakc 

HICKEY, TOM Roeland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HICKOK, BILL Ulysses 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

rt ,jP»% «^|_ »»^ "W ^ IN^f HICKS, DUANE Independence, MO 

m f i ^wlfc* IB! it* ~-Jl Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

""" 1 \ ■=" h 1 HOCH, KEITH McPherson 

*¥P?"" -\ ^ 1 W~" ^'W~ /ii Construction Science Sophomore 

/ « 4&M- / zHl HOCH, WYATT McPherson 

; / Immm^WmMi A,ch "*""" s ""°' 

HODGES, MARK Topeka 

» ^fc jflflfeK ^i ^% jMBt Civil Engineering Freshman 

S ^M M|i?« *m ^ Jk HODGK1NSON, ROBERT Hutchinson 

*MWr K to *Te 8 ' fil fn v v Kb,. «*•■% Engineering Technology Sophomore 

V m* " W[ 1 1 | " W^. *T HODGSON, JAMES Little River 

• jt~ t^*^- 1 ^ ^fc..*" — Sfc — J Geology Sophomore 

#f * HOFSTRA, NATHAN Valley Falls 

* y Ik^^ jtB B^B "*^M History Senior 

jAvlTT * i iV HOGAN, DAN St. Louis, MO 

. ■' ' '*- J B M 7 / ik / / IB Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HOLADAY, STEPHEN Atwood 

Secondary Education Junior 

HOLMES, TIM Topeka 

i 1~ '_<- V Construction Science Freshman 

HONIG, DONALD Onaga 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

HOOK, ROBERT Ottawa 

4^^^* Jfcfcfc. Agricultural Economics Junior 
7 < '''jT-Brr HOOPER, ROBERT Hiawatha 
\ \ . ■ f Ml Wh S . Accounting Freshman 

HOOPS, KERRY Byron, NE 

• Agricultural Economics Junior 

Bflt^K. M ™ HOOVER, PHILIP Shawnee 

J r Wfck' 1 . I v 1^*^ *j 1 Construction Science Sophomore 

' W wF~ r V 7 "P** * HORTON, JOSEPH Plevna 

Jfc- i - '/ Electrical Engineering Freshman 

JACQUINOT, ROBERT Prairie Village 

Construction Science Freshman 

IB / mr> ' %8M , ' " f > fJsU. /f'V WKklf? JAMES, SCOTT Belleville 

R/W .;. BLjS luivf tM " *'V" » " fl^M / Pre-Veterinary Science Freshman 

,^ ■ ". [; ^nj JANSSEN, CURTIS Solomon 

^fl p_^ j« j '■ ^■'•X ^ % Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

F^ki 'Mf"~' m \ W JOHNSON, R SHANNON Ensign 

-»• ■•> _ tfl IKs>t - ui flcn - ■ « - Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

' " . <J VX #' m ' L * ttX JOHNSON, WYNN Topeka 

^3k. <► y«^-- A /m < ^ 1% " ' Engineering Technology Senior 

ibfcr ^$r- 4\ ' >, . JUST, RANDALL Marion 

4Bn • P$ijS$£ ^ *. i ^ \ J i^. Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

>,' ^^^&lv\1l # v ?J ' AA ifc^ KAISER, CHARLES St. Louis, MO 

m \ ' ' ii I Architectural Engineering Freshman 

KARPISCAK, JOHN III . BELLE MEAD, NJ 

A Jm k Architecture Fifth Year Student 

W MKfm!'- Jp 1 KELLERMAN, TIMOTHY Stuttgart 

■ -r-f*. .iit^fH .'<B| j" I fl ,v- »Tl, ^^ Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

' £T ll ~ ▼ V* ^ r I I J KIDWELL, DAVID Enterprise 

^^ fc --' W • f \ T ^' ^L»^ Milling Science and Management .... Senior 

" k^ 4K» K,PP ' GERALD Io,a 

w^ c'J Agronomy Senior 

r A Wk'-^m 11 KIRKLAND, VAUGHN Dodge City 

j£\j ^' ^J^| y^ ^IttJI f f Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KITSON, MATTHEW Hutchinson 

H» ^fe| j^k^ Business Administration Junior 

' | M fm. KLUG, KEITH Lorraine 

'.j iff v/* 1 Wr*—. '""* WC"" « J B^^*Tf Electrical Engineering Freshman 

T ^H W~"»- "T %1 KLUG, KEVIN Lorraine 

Ifc. Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

^^b- S^ ^ ^ ,4^ KNERR, HENRY Abilene 

"*^|pyA (^^ J \ ^fJ?r ]k y'i Construction Science Sophomore 

: ^ v — - Ml\ JftlM ^ KNOLL, MARK New Cambria 

kV\ W , K. - ^ ln."Jnni I, Accounting Sophomore 

KNOX, DOUGLAS Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KRAMER, ANTHONY Easton 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

* * KRAMER, JOHN Garden Plain 

jjfc- * ^L~ r ^MPSi / V" " ' Engineering Technology Freshman 

L^ '"%, iV„ / mim m I KRIEN, KERBY Bird City 

r«y , \ ^g I A _^^WJr - ^^ ^jfe Agronomy Freshman 

/ F ^ V> . UA . ▲, JiiraTf • '^« ' IB KROUPA, WILLIAM Marion 

| \ | *i ( ^S^B flkjfH ; BkW ^ RrT» ^■r Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

KUFAHL, RANDY Wheaton 

Accounting Freshman 

'J • >ltaP ^ KUHN, RICHARD Salina 

m V^t *" w Construction Science .... Junior 

li , I LaFORTUNE, ANTHONY Montreal, Quebec 

""^Lt^""- i m._ I- \ — — MT"~ Food Science and Management Freshman 

Jp>^' ^ 1L IL k ^J %* k.1 LAUBER, DAVID Yates Center 

^^rf , ^^b£ ttiA ^^KkSk. iW&^U ^1 1 J[H Agricultural Education Junior 

l^^l I A iPHB^ iiBMp/. :^^R''M'.%i LAUPPE - GEORGE Lawrence 

aji / SB ' i U ; H M.lT^ wMfei/ . ! i J ■ JH .-•*! Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

Haymaker/355 




I rhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymaker haymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerh; 



Chop chop ■ A 

Halloween Haunted 
House on 9th floor 
Haymaker is the scene 
for this grisly sight as 
Dan Hogan, freshman in 
pre-design professions, 
seems to have chopped 
off a head formerly 
belonging to Roger 
Farnen, freshman in pre- 
design professions. 
Several floors of the 
different halls usually 
sponsor haunted houses. 




Photo by Tim Costello 



LEMON, RAY Parker 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

LEWIS, JEFF Salina 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

LIEBER, DAVID Osage City 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

LOVE, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

LUCKEROTH, JAY Seneca 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

LYNCH, GARY Ashland. NE 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MACK, KELLY Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

MAJOR, BRUCE Mentor 

Music Education Freshman 

MALIR, PAUL Wilson 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

MARCOTTE, FRANK Zurich 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

MARSHALL, JEFF Merriam 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

MARTIN, DON Clay Center 

Physical Education Junior 

MARZAN, ALFRED Rio Piedras, PR 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

McAFEE, DUANE Garnett 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

McHENRY, TIM Topeka 

Architecture Senior 




356/Haymaker 



kerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakeraymaker haymaker 




McNEELY, DAVID Ulysses 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

MEEHAN, MITCH Solomon 

Crop Protection Sophomore 

MICK, PERRY Tipton 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MIES, MIKE Bonner Springs 
Accounting Freshman 

MILES, WILLIAM Overland Park 
Pre-Vet Freshman 

MILLER, RAYMOND Olathe 

Computer Science Senior 



MILLER, WLLIAM 
Industrial Engineering 
MOORE, CHARLES 

Agronomy 

MOORMAN, MITCH 
Animal Science and Industry 



Topeka 

Sophomore 

Basehor 

Sophomore 

Solomon 

Sophomore 



MULLEN, JOHN Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 

NEELY, THOMAS Kirkwood, MO 

Architectural Engineering Senior 



NIGHTINGALE, JAMES 

Pre-Design Professions 

NOTT, MONTE 

Business Administration 

O'BERLE, PAUL 

Construction Science 

OCHS, GREGORY 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 



Burrton 

Sophomore 

Colorado Springs, CO 

Freshman 

Claflin 

Freshman 

Lyons 



OGLE, CHARLES 
Art 

O'NEILL, JIM 
Pre-Design Professions 
O'QUENDO, ANTHONY 
Food Science and Industry 
ORTH, STEVEN 
Electrical Engineering 
OSTENBERG, ROSS 
Chemical Engineering 



Rio 



Hoisington 
Sophomore 
Phillipsburg 
Freshman 
Piedras, PR 
Sophomore 
Andale 
Sophomore 
. . . . Salina 
Sophomore 

PACKER, DOUGLAS McClouth 

Agronomy Junior 

PAGE, ROGER Rossville 

Agricultural Education Senior 

PARK, MICHAEL Springfield, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

PARKIN. STEVE Pomona 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

PARKS, DOUG Overland Park 

Interior Architecture Junior 

PATTERSON, BRAD Stockton 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

PATTON, DENNIS ' Caldwell 

Horticulture Sophomore 

PAZ, JEFF St. Louis, MO 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

PEAVEY, MIKE Plainville 

General Freshman 

PEISTRUP, KURT Ferguson, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

PETERSON, GREG Salina 

Marketing Junior 

PFEIFER, JEFF . . . Victoria 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

PICO, CARLOS Emporia 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

PLATT, MARK Osawatomie 

Marketing Sophomore 

PORTERFIELD, DOUG Poplar Bluff, MO 
Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

POSTON, JOHN Lenexa 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

QUINN, DANIEL Annandale, VA 

Business Administration Freshman 

RAILE, TIM St. Francis 

General Sophomore 

RAMSDALE, SAMUEL Murdock 

Engineering Freshman 

RANKIN, RAYMOND Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

REED, NORMAN Pomona 

Agriculture Freshman 

REGNIER, BERNARD • Bennington 

Agronomy Sophomore 

REGNIER, DOUGLAS Bennington 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

REYNOSO, LANCE Tecumseh 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

RICE, PHILLIP Mission 

Journalism Freshman 



Haymaker/357 



makerhaymakerhamakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhayniakerhaymakerhaymakerhay 



RICHARDSON, MARK Des Moines, IA 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

RICHWINE, DAVID Salina 

Business Administration Freshman 

RICKEY, VINCENT Fairlawn, NJ 

Pre-Law Junior 

RILEY, JOHN Glenview, IL 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

RINGERING, RICHARD Ellinwood 

Accounting Sophomore 



ROHRIG, JOSEPH 
Pre-Design Professions 
ROWLAND, KELLY 
Animal Science and Industry 
ROSS, ROBERT 
Construction Science 
RUBOTTOM, BRAD 
Agronomy 
RUSBARSKY, BOB 



Overland Park 
Freshman 
Hutchinson 
Junior 
Salina 
Freshman 
Stockton 
Freshman 
Webster Groves, MO 



Pre-Design Professions Junior 



SACK, JOSEPH 
Chemical Engineering 
SAMPLE, ALLEN 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine 
SCHAFER, DENNIS 
Marketing 

SCHARMANN, PHILLIP 
General 



Wichita 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Junior 

Garden City 

Sophomore 

Eden Prairie, MN 

Freshman 



SCHAUB, RODNEY Princeton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 




Pumping iron - Steve 
Alexander, sophomore in 
business administration, 
takes advantage of 
Haymaker Hall's weight 
room. Equipment for the 
room is paid for from 
the hall's social and 
educational fund. A 
Universal unit was 
purchased for the room 
in 1974 and 300 pounds 
worth of loose weights 
were purchased in the 
past year. The room is 
always being refurnished 
and residents are now 
painting the room. 




Photo by Kent Boughton 



358/Haymaker 



ikerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymaker haymaker haymaker haymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymaker 




SCHEMPER, GARY Long Island 



Agriculture 
SCHETTLER, DAVID 
Agricultural Engineering 
SCHMIDT, PAUL 
Agricultural Mechanization 
SCHOENBEIN, MICHAEL 
Pre-Design Professions 
SCHWARTZ, GREG 
Animal Science and Industry 

SCHWILLING, DARREL 
Landscape Architecture . 

SEIWERT, PAUL 
Business Administration 
SELL, MARK 
Construction Science 
SHANKWEILER, LARRY 



Freshman 
Albert 

Sophomore 

Riverton, WY 
Junior 

Ferguson, MO 

Freshman 

... Baldwin 

Sophomore 

. Cottonwood Falls 
Fifth Year Student 

Goddard 

Freshman 

Oskaloosa 

Freshman 

.... Allentown, PA 



Architecture Fifth Year Student 

SHELTON, MIKE Wichita 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

SHERLOCK, TODD St. Francis 

Journalism and Mass Comm Senior 

SH1DELER, RANDALL Topeka 

Accounting Senior 

SHIMP, JAMES Topeka 

Civil Engineering Junior 

SIDEBOTTOM, STEVEN Topeka 

Horticulture Junior 

SITES, DALEN Grinnel 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

SKRDLANT, GARY Norton 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 



Overland Park 

Junior 

Topeka 

Sophomore 

Overland Park 

Freshman 

Lawrence 

Junior 

Overland Park 

Freshman 

Goodland 

Junior 



SLAVEN, MICHAEL 

Management 

SLEMMONS, ROBERT 
Engineering 
SMITH, CRIS ... 
Agricultural Economics 
SMITH, RAYMOND 
Accounting 

SMITH, ROBERT 
Business Administration 
SMITH, THOMAS 
Management 

SNODGASS, TOM Tuscumbia, MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

SOMMERFIELD, DAVID Basehor 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

SPIDELL MIKE Overland Park 

Management Sophomore 

STEELE, ROD St. Marys 

General Freshman 

STILWELL, JAMES Merriam 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

STONE, JOHN Spring Hill 

Agronomy Senior 

STRODA, NICHOLAS Hope 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

STROUTS, BRIAN Solomon 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 

STROUTS, DARYL ' Solomon 

Agriculture Sophomore 

STUBENHOFER, SCOTT Cottonwood Falls 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

STUEVE, ANTHONY Hiawatha 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

SULLIVAN, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Senior 

SUTTON, MELVIN Ferguson, MO 
Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SWEANY, JACK Laharpe 

Agronomy Senior 

TAYLOR, ROGER Enterprise 

Business Administration Sophomore 

TEAFORD, RICK Valley Falls 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

TEETER, BRAD Lyons 

Architecture Junior 

THIELE, ERIC Norton 

Engineering Freshman 

Hutchinson 

Junior 

Johnson 

Freshman 

Topeka 

Junior 

Mission 

Freshman 

Wichita 



THOMPSON, GARY 

Animal Science and Industry 

THOMPSON, KEITH 

General 

TIETZE, KEVIN 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

TILDEN, TOM 

Journalism and Mass Communications 

TOBEN, MIKE 



Agricultural Economics Freshman 



Haymaker/359 

J 



haymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymaker haymakerhaymakerhaymaker haymakerha 



Please send money ■ 

Dean Sutton, freshman 
in pre-design professions, 
John Riley, freshman in 
architectural engineering, 
and Mike Schoenbein, 
freshman in pre-design 
professions, plan to 
make television their 
medium for sending a 
message. The sign was 
made for the KSU-KU 
basketball game which 
was televised, and asks 
for parents to send 
money. 




TOLL, PHIL Salina 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

TUCKER, BRIAN Lyons 

Computer Science Sophomore 

TULLY, JOHN Fishklll, NY 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

TUMA, MICHAEL Belleville 

Business Administration Freshman 

TYLER, STEVEN Concordia 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

UPTON, PATRICK Overland Park 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

VANDERPLAS, TERRY Phillipsburg 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

VAN METER, JAY Leavenworth 

Business Administration Junior 

VARNER, DAREN Lenexa 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

VAUPEL, GARY Salina 

Crop Protection Senior 

VAUPEL, RON Salina 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

VERMILLION, CURTIS Mullinville 

General Freshman 

VERMILLION, GREG Mullinville 

Accounting Sophomore 

VOELKER, CHUCK Leonardville 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

VOLKER, KIRK Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 




360/Haymaker 



I 

akerhaymaker haymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymakerhaymake 




VOSSMAN, BRIAN Beloit 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WADDELL, STEVE Goodland 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

WALTERS, CHRIS Abilene 

Business Administration Freshman 

WARD, EDWARD Topeka 

Geology Junior 

WEGELE, LESLIE Newton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

WEISER, ALAN Glade 

Agricultural Education Junior 

WELCH, KEVIN Holton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

WELLS, RON Wichita 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WENDT, DOUG Hope 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

WHITEAKER, RANDALL Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

WHITESIDE, DAVID Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

WHITMER, DAVID Goodland 

Accounting Sophomore 

WILHELMS, PAUL Ferguson, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WILLHAUS, CEDRIC Sterling 

Construction Science Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, DANNY Sikeston, MO 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, SCOTT C. Prairie Village 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

WILLIAMS, SCOTT L. Prairie Village 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

WILSON, BRAD Goodland 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

WILTZ, PHILIP .... Sabetha 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

WINTERMANTEL, STEVE Baldwin City 

Agriculture Freshman 

WITTUM, TOM Independence 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

WOEHRMAN, DANNY Lansing 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

WOHLER, JEB St. Marys 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

WOLTERS, JOHN Atwood 

Dairy Production Sophomore 

WOOD, BRETT ... Solomon 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

WOOLF, VAUGHN Milton 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

WORKS, JOHN Humboldt 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

WORNKEY, KEVIN Topeka 

Art Freshman 

WURTZ, KEVIN Frankfort 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

YARBER, STEVE Overland Park 
Engineering Freshman 

YOCOM, JOEL Spring Hill 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

YOUNGQUIST, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

YOWELL, MIKE McPherson 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

ZIMMERMAN, JOHN Jewell 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

ZUK, ALAN . Kansas City 
Pre-Forestry Freshman 



Haymaker/361 



Marlatt 



marlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattr 



AKIN, RANDY Axtell 

Engineering Freshman 

AL-ANI, AMER Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

AMSLER, KARL St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

ARNOLD, DAVID Lamed 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

ASBURY, LONALD Moberly, MO 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

BALDWIN, JAMES Larned 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BARNES, WILLIAM Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BARTEL, WILMER Hillsboro 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

BECKER, CRAIG Moundridge 

Accounting Junior 

BECKER, JOE Clearwater 

Agronomy Senior 



Westmoreland 

Sophomore 

Shawnee Mission 

Freshman 

Clifton 



BEHRENS, DAVE 

Accounting 

BENDER, STEVE 

Anthropology 

BENTEMAN, GARY 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BERGMEIER, MARK Phillipsburg 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

BERRY, MICHAEL Kansas City 

Civil Engineering Senior 

BERTELS, TERRY Nortonville 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

BESS, RAY Desloge, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BETTIS, BRUCE Topeka 

Construction Science Freshman 
BINGHAM, ROBERT West Islip, NY 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BLAAUW, JAMES Philmont, NY 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 



BLANCHON, ED 

Agronomy 

BLISS, DAN 

Business Administration 

BOLIN, MARK 

Accounting 

BOMAN, DEAN 

Electrical Engineering 

BOWERS, MICKEY 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 



Bucyrus 

Freshman 

St. John 

Sophomore 

Narragansett, RI 

Freshman 

Claflin 

Sophomore 

Eskridge 



Manhattan 

Junior 

Ottawa 

Sophomore 

Perryville, MO 

Junior 

Tecumseh 

Sophomore 

Odell, NE 

Junior 



BRAGDON, RON 
Pre-Medicine 
BRILL, BRADLEY 
Accounting 
BUCHHEIT, TOM 
Architectural Engineering 
BULL, JOHN 
Engineering 
BURES, RANDALL 
Agricultural Economics 

BUSER, JEROME Cawker City 

Agronomy . . . Freshman 

CAMERON, CARL Hill City 

Accounting Freshman 

CANNON, JOHN Chesterfield, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CANTRELL, JOE Marshall, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CARRA, JEFFREY Niotaze 

Political Science Sophomore 

CATER, JOHN Topeka 

Civil Engineering Senior 

CATER, STEVEN Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

CLARK, SPENCER Newton 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

CLARKE, DANIEL Jetmore 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

CLEMENTS, VERNON Holton 

Accounting Sophomore 




362/Marlatt 



lattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlal 





A Touch Of Class- 
Harry Justvig, sophomore in 
business administration, applies 
some artwork to a wall in 
Mariatt Hall, Residence Hall 
dwellers may paint designs and 
pictures on the walls in lobbies 
and corridors with prior 
approval of housing 
maintenance. Many floors have 
mascots or logos to give the 
floors a personal touch. 




COMBS, RAIMUND Manhattan 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

COOK, DANIEL Louisburg 

Business Administration Freshman 

COOKE, ANDREW Elkhart 

Engineering Technology Junior 

COONROD, KURT ' Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

COOPER, GREG Wellsville 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

COUNTS, JURDAN Hays 

Engineering Sophomore 

COYLE, BRENT Fowler 

Electrical Engineering • Freshman 

CUMRO, DENNIS ." Summerfield 

Geology Sophomore 

CUNNINGHAM, ALAN Silver Lake 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

CUNNINGHAM, MARK Roeland Park 

General Freshman 

CURBOW, DAVID Billings, MO 

Architecture Senior 

CURRY, DAVID Raytown, MO 

Construction Science Sophomore 

DEEMS, VINCE Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

DENNISTON, ETHAN Emporia 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

DIEDRICH, PETER Tonawanda, NY 

Construction Science Senior 

DOEHRING, KEVIN Salina 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

DOMINGEUZ, GARY Wichita 

Construction Science Junior 

DORSCH, JEFFREY Bird City 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

DOUTHIT, DAVE ~ Baxter Springs 

Engineering Freshman 

DOW, SEAN Topeka 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 



Marlatt/363 



rimarlattimarlattimarlattiiiarlattinarlattinarlattiTiarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattiTiarlattmarlal 



DUETHMAN, TERRY Paola 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

DUNCAN, GARY Savannah, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DURANT, LARRY Wellington 

Accounting Senior 

DYCK, DAVID Inman 

Accounting Senior 

EADS, BRAD Garden City 

Finance Sophomore 

EILERT, MARK Beloit 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

ELDER, LYNN Seneca 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

ELLIOTT, WILLIAM Alta Vista 

Art Freshman 

FIGGS, ROBIN Sabetha 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

FISHER, BRIAN McDonald 

Interior Architecture . . . Fifth Year Student 

FISHER, DONALD Elkhart 

Business Administration Freshman 

FLICKNER, MYRON Moundridge 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

FORETIC, ALEJANDRO Overland Park 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

FRANCIS, SHANNON Liberal 

Marketing Junior 

FRANZEN, MARK Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

GALBRAITH, JOEL Wathena 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GARNER, LEE Independence 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

GEMAELICH, DONALD Hays 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

GERMAN, BRENT Cawker City 

Agricultural Economics .... Freshman 

GFELLER, DOUG Topeka 

Achitectural Engineering Freshman 

GIBSON, CHARLES Kansas City, MO 

Arhcitectural Engineering Freshman 

GIGSTAD, DWIGHT Nortonville 

Agronomy Sophomore 

GONZALEZ, EDGGY Rio Piedras, PR 

Biology . . Junior 

GORMAN, CORT Salina 

Journalism .'.... Freshman 

GREENLEE, CLARK Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GRIFFIN, JAMES Abilene 

Pre-Law Senior 

HABIGER, ANTHONY Topeka 

General Freshman 

HALL, TRACY Springfield, MO 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

HAMM, RANDY Tampa 

Engineering Freshman 

HARVEY, JOHN Leavenworth 
Horticulture Freshman 

HAVERKAMP, DENNIS Seneca 

Horticulture Senior 

HAYLEN, SCOTT Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HAYSE, DEAN Greensburg 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

HEINECKE, PHILIP Abilene 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

HENDERSON, JOE Overland Park 
Management Junior 

HENNE, GREGORY Gypsum 

Accounting Senior 

HESHER, TODD Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HIATT, GEORGE Phillipsburg 

Architectural Engineering Sophomore 

HOKE, RANDAL Dorrance 

Business Administration Freshman 

HOLDEMAN, DAVE Overland Park 
Civil Engineering Freshman 






""H** JB 






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s 


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11 


/ 



364/Martatt 



aarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmcl 




HOLDEN, STEVE St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HOLLOWAY, MARK Easton 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HOLLOWAY, PERRY Easton 

Engineering Freshman 

HOOBLER, VERN Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

HOOKER, BRYAN Mission 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HOPE, MICHAEL Leavenworth 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

HUBER, JOHN Burbank, CA 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

JENNINGS, MATT St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

JOHNSON, BRAD Salina 

Business Administration Sophomore 

JOHNSON, DAN Overland Park 
Pre-Design Professions • Freshman 

JOHNSON, REX Beattle 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JONES, BRETT Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 

JONES, BRUCE Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

JONES, MARTIN Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

JORDON, MARION, JR. Kansas City 

Finance Sophomore 

JUSTV1G, HARRY Mission 

Business Administration Sophomore 

KAMLA, FREDERICK Bird City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

KANDT, KEVIN Herington 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

KEEN, DOUGLAS St. Marys 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KEITER, DANIEL Hartington, NE 

Architecture . Junior 

KEPPLE, JAMES Horton 

D re-Medicine Sophomore 

KLAMM, KEN Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KN1FFIN, MICHAEL Lenexa 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

KOZAR, JEROME Lansing, IL 

Construction Science Senior 

KRAUSHAAR, DUANE Lamed 

Computer Science Freshman 

KREUTZER, PAUL Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KROH, FRANKLIN Hiawatha 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

KUHLMAN, DEVON Kensington 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

LAGERBERG, JEFF Salina 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

LANGSTON, KEVIN Vandalia, MO 
Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LAWRENCE, JEFF Marquette 

Modern Language Freshman 

LAY, JAMES Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

LAYNG, MARK Pittsburg 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

LESSER, CHRISTOPHER Topeka 

History Freshman 

LEWIS, HARVEY Independence 
Accounting Junior 

LEWMAN, DAVID St. Joseph, MO 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

LIENEMANN, JOE " Herkimer 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

LIPPMAN, JOHN Leavenworth 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

LOLLAR, MICHAEL Topeka 

Management Senior 

LOVETT, JOSEPH .... Omaha, NE 
Pre-Vet Freshman 



Marlatt/365 



lattmsrlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarla 

LUNDIN, RAYMOND Ogdcn ^M^^^^M : -J^M&gffl SHMBM I .~7sim 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman ^mm^. .^^fcsv 

LUTZ, ERIC St. John pM M .-,. flh^lk «T- W 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore ^^M BR'tStBI M* fl ^T^% HP 1 

MAIS, JOHN Sedalia, MO K; "a*jPl W^ IP 3 ^'^ 4l V 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore ^| f IK J B| ^» y 

MASON, KELLY Kingman Vf - k n^ "J 

Accounting Junior ^k ^^^ ^^ Jm% ~J$!jm MMW -*mm\ ' 

MARTIN, JOHN Overland Park jd Mfl iflP jl ^^Hfw -" fT^l fc) 

Pre Design Professions Freshman fl I IT ,/, 4 P« . LV ' m / 

MATZEDER, MARK Lansing ^^^^^^^ „^"* « 

Agricultural General Freshman *,mm^. ,*&mWt*. 4 9tk s JmX 

MAUS, KEN Colwich M fl WL ■ |£| 

Chemical Engineering Freshman K ■ fl W'^Wk '4mw* t fl ^^^R 

MCCLOSKEY, LANCE Wichita C» ~- § ■fe* «T &&* ' flF^ 'fc Hi ■ 

Computer Science Freshman ^% : .. 7 V •**- ^BL'~2fc s ' ^" ^^^- jM 

Agricultural General Freshman i •> JmBP* ' .^^ YT^ 

MCCOY, RANDY Dallas, TX . ■» \ ^ * 1P^\ If - * flf \ A 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore ■*■ '^y * |Mf 4 flf -~ *■>»— 

MCLAUGHLIN, KENT Raytown, MO mmmmmmmmm m 

MCWHIRTER, JOHN Dighton t8L~ h I ^W^ 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Junior V "~ V --WW A" ^a aHI ^ 

MEALY, ROBERT Scott City flffltfk. fl <'~/HP^ ' ' ^J^ . *,^ , ^/ » fl ! «fl]< 

Poii„c„ scnc, sop ta ,„„™ Jfljfci,, >, SSrZX M Mi O:, / 

MEEKS. ROGER Effingham « ^MH^^^H H^HI^^H P : 

Agricultural Economics Freshman ^m—. , ^tr mm^m*. 

MES5NER, ROGER Anthony fl ■& ^ % ttflPflj i jP|' IP «| 

Management Sophomore flViifr*%I r fl 1 : ^\ jj^" ^A 

METZINGER, RONALD Caldwell W^^W 1* "V H^ lH """* ^ ▼ 3* *~ IP 

Agricultural Journalism Junior *->-'■* ™ -» - f ^B g * ~- 

MEYER, DOUGLAS Olathe ^ v \" ^flt'V" 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore ^^ ^^^ {Sk **» flML 15k ^3h 

MILLER, DOUGLAS Torawanda, NY V mWW m\ \ ^^Ml •■# ® i£ i (fl V 

Industrial Engineering Freshman g$L '- Mm I iSf^BfcJ'sf*^- 1 flf K\flL 



Our Turn — Pau/ 
Groundwater, sophomore in 
managament, and David Ellis, 
sophomore in natural resource 
management, imitate the 
Jayhawks' "Waving Wheat" 
after a K-State touchdown in 
Lawrence. Ellis, from Marlatt, 
and Groundwater, off-campus, 
were two of many Wildcats 
which "road-tripped" to see 
the game and watched the lead 
see-saw back and forth 
between the intrastate rivals. 
Their efforts were in vain 
though, as the University of 
Kansas won 36-28. 




Tim Costello 



366/Marlatt 



arlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarf 




MOLLHAGEN, BRIAN Lorraine 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MONROE, KENNETH El Dorado 

Physical Education Junior 

MORGAN, DORAN Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

MORRIS, THOMAS Shawnee 

Elementary Education . . . Junior 

MURAKAMI, LEO Honolulu, HI 

Pre-Vet Sophomore 

MURPHEY, KENNETH Cimarron 

Civil Engineering Senior 

MUSSATTO, CASEY Osage City 

Management Freshman 

NEAL, PAUL Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

NEIS, BRENT " Wellsville 

Agriculture Freshman 

NEISWENDER, DAVID Topeka 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

NICHOL, AL Utica 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

NIEHAGE, KENT McPherson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

NIEMANN, CHRIS Thornton, IL 

Construction Science Senior 

NOLL, BYRON Ransom 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

NORTHUP, JOHN Woodston 

Engineering Freshman 

NUTT, STEPHEN Lamar, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

OAKLEAF, DANIEL Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 

OHL, DALE Conway Springs 

Accounting Sophomore 

OLSON, ERIC Garfield 

Bakery Science and Management . . . Senior 
O'MALLEY, MICHAEL Oakpark, IL 
Social Science Junior 

O'NEAL, MARC Wichita 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

OVERMAN, PAUL Overland Park 

Agriculture Freshman 

PAGE, JOHN Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

PARKER, STEVE Russell 

Geology Freshman 

PATEL, SHAILESH Kingman 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

PECKHAM, JEF Frankfort 

General Freshman 

PENNINGTON, BRIAN Richmond, VA 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

PETERSON, CLIFFORD Cherryvale 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

PETERSON, MARK Lindsborg 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

PEZZA, MICHAEL Johnston, RI 
Political Science Junior 

PICKLER, MICHAEL Ulysses 

General Freshman 

POOLER, WILLIAM Topeka 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

POSEY, TATE Fort Riley 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

POST, DAVID St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

POTTS, JOE Caney 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

PRUITT, ALFRED Overland Park 

Sociology Sophomore 

PUTNAM, RICK Downs 

General Business Administration Freshman 

RAETZ, ALAN Gypsum 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

RAPP, JOHN Dearing 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

REED, THOMAS Gardner 

Electrical Engineering Senior 



Marlatt/367 



attmariattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarrattmarlattmai 



REED, WILLIAM Gardner 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

REILLY, BRIAN Topeka 

General Engineering .... Freshman 

REILLY, KEVIN Pittsburg 

Construction Science Senior 

RICHARDS, DAVID Manhattan 

Special Special 

RICHTER, DAVID Niles, MI 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

RIFFEL, GREGORY Wichita 

General Business Administration Junior 

RIPPER, STEVEN Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

ROBERTS, CHARLES Council Grove 
Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

ROBISON, DANIEL Winfield 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ROGENMOSER, BILL Topeka 

Biology Sophomore 

ROSE, JOHN Great Bend 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ROUSH, JOHN Kansas City 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

RUGGLES, MICHAEL Middleton, WI 

Electrical Engineering . . Sophomore 

RYMPH, ALAN Beloit 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SANDERS, DOUGLAS Leavenworth 

Horticulture Freshman 

SANDERSON, MICHAEL Grandview, MO 

Mechanical Engineering . . Junior 

SCHILTZ, GARY Wathena 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

SCHMALE, FRANK Garden City 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHMALZRIED, TERRY Fort Riley 

General Engineering Freshman 

SCHUMANN, BRYCE Lawrence 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

SEBA, RODNEY Lamed 

B.A. Graduate 

SEYMOUR, ROGER Manhattan 



Construction Science 
SIDERAS, SAVVAS 
Civil Engineering 
SKIDMORE, KEITH 
Civil Engineering 



Junior 

Australia 

Freshman 

Ottawa 

Sophomore 



SMISCHNY, RANDALL Ellsworth 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

SMITH, RONALD Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

SNIDER, GLEN Abilene 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

SPEED, TIMOTHY Shawnee 

General Engineering Freshman 

STRECKER, PAUL Spearville 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

STRICKLAND, TERRY Ottawa 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

STROM, DANIEL White City 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SUDERMAN, ARLAN Newton 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SULLIVAN, BRIAN Overland Park 

General Engineering Freshman 

SULLIVAN, PETER Leawood 

General Freshman 

SUPPES, CLARENCE Otis 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

SWIHART, KEN Imlay City, MI 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

TETERUD, MARK Des Moine, IA 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

THARP, MICHAEL Lenexa 

General Freshman 

TIPTON, DOUGLAS Meriden 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

TRUNECEK, SCOTT Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 




368/Marlatt 



arlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlattmarlatt 




ia^k V^^^*i mP^Wi* 

r$ *i.~% ft*?' 




-'-, Y* 




TURNER, JAMES Junction City 

Marketing Sophomore 

TUSH, GERALD Kansas City 

Computer Science Senior 

TWEEDY, PATRICK Wichita 

English Freshman 

UNRUH, HAROLD Newton 

Biology Junior 

UPCHURCH, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

UTTERBACK, DALE Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

VANCE, KELLY Leavenworth 

General Business Administration Freshman 

VAN DYNE, MARK Salina 

Accounting Senior 

VIETS, BRUCE Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

VON HEMEL, DONNIE Manter 

General Freshman 

WADE, MARK Copeland 

General Freshman 

WAGNER, DALE Downs 

Agriculture General Freshman 

WAGNER, LARRY Downs 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

WALKER, RICHARD Junction City 

Accounting Sophomore 

WARA, JEFFREY East Moline, IL 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

WEINSAFT, NATHAN Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

WHEELER, CRAIG Holcomb 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

WHEELER, DONALD Holcomb 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

WIDELL, MARK Tampa, FL 

Management Senior 

WIERMAN, ED Brownell 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 



WIETHARN, KENT 
Nuclear Engineering 
WILLIAMSON, GARY 
Agricultural Education 
WILSON, PHILLIP 
Pre-Design Professions 
WINKLEY, KENNETH 
Engineering 

WOERNER, STEPHEN 
Bakery Science and Management 

WOLGAST, BRETT 

Music 

WOODWARD, JEFFREY 

Animal Science and Industry 

WRIGHT, WILLIAM 

Architecture 

WYNN, JEFFREY 



Topeka 

Sophomore 

Hudson 

Sophomore 

St. Louis, MO 

Freshman 

Hutchinson 

Freshman 

Rochester, NY 

Sophomore 

Alta Vista 

Freshman 

Louisburg 

Sophomore 

Ellisville, MO 

Junior 

Copeland 



Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 




Wet Behind the Ears — Water- 
fights play a big part in the bed 
races during Spring Fling each year. 
Spring Fling is held every April by 
the residence hall system as a unify- 
ing display of University housing 
and for just plain fun. The week- 
long event has many other activities 
that range from talent shows, to 
road rallies, to scholarship ban- 
quets. 



Dave Kaup and Pete Souza 



Marlatt/369 



Moore 



mooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooTemoor 

A1TKEN, DENNIS Wichita 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

AKAGI, DONALD Ulysses 

Computer Science Junior 

AMERSHEK, ERNEST McCune 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

ANDERSON, AMY Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ANDERSON, K1MBERLY White City 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

ANDERSON, TOD Kansas City 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

ARNOLDY, ANTON Tipton 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

BACH REX Jetmore 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BAIRD, TAMRA Salina 

Pre-Professional Secondary Education Sophomore 

BARBER, MARK Wakeeney 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

BARKER, MICHELE Topeka 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BARNETT, DONNA Haysville 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

BARTEL, KAY Hillsboro 

Clothing Textiles Freshman 

BAUER, STEVEN Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BAYOLA, LOURDES Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Graduate Student 

BEAVER CRAIG Topeka 

Horticulture Freshman 

BEIKMANN, RANDALL Linn 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

BELIN, KELVIN Green 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

BETZEN, ROBERT Colwich 

Correctional Administration Sophomore 

BIGELOW, BRIAN Ida Grove, IA 
Engineering Technology Freshman 

BLANK, RAYMOND Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

BLOOM, JOEL Lamed 

Finance Sophomore 

BOEHNKE, MATTHEW Upham, ND 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BOOCK, DAVA Sterling 

Elementary Education Senior 

BOST, CHRIS Liberty, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

BREEDLOVE, LOREN Kansas City 

Horticulture Senior 

BROWN, DENISE Hutchinson 

Home Economics Junior 

BROWN, LESLIE Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BROWNLOW, DALE JR. Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

BRUNER, JOHNNIE Salina 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BRUNER, RICHARD Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BRUNGARDT, DENNIS Erie 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BRUNNERT, CHARLES Topeka 

Engineering Technology Junior 

BRYAN, KENT Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

BRZON, MELINDA Belleville 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

BULEJSKI, JAMES Florissant, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BURKETT, BRADLEY Andover, OH 

Geology Senior 

BYRNAS, THOMAS El Dorado 

Agronomy Senior 

CADE, DIANE Leavenworth 

Marketing Freshman 

CAMERON, SHARI Hill City 

Marketing Freshman 

CAMERON, TERRY Hill City 

Civil Engineering Junior 

CAMPBELL, CHERYL Atchison 

Office Administration Freshman 

CANNAVA, JOHN Winchester, MA 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

CANTRELL, EDWARD Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

CASTLE, DONALD Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 




370/Moore 



jooremooremooremooremooreinooremooremooremooremooreinoorpmooremooremooremooreinooremoorenioore 

i 

^. a ^ ( ^ CHLAPEK, LINDA Liberty, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CINDRICH, REBECCA Kansas City 

General Freshman 

CLARK, ALBERT Meriden 

Accounting Senior 

' r CLARK, BRUCE Preston 

' '^ t | ^lL -.. Mfefe k Animal Science and Industry Senior 

y ' i !--':" ^jlj '"- CLARK, KELLY Netawaka 

E ' |^m1hB Biology Junior 

CODDINGTON, PENNY Salina 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

CODY, MAC El Dorado 

m Electrical Engineering Senior 

^_ CODY, SUZANNE . . . Coffeyville 

Home Economics Freshman 

a COLLINS, KATHRYN Fort Scott 

Home Economics Education Freshman 
COPE, STEVEN Sidney, NE 
Architectural Engineering Freshman 

COUCHMAN, JOHN Garfield 

Engineering Technology Junior 

CRAFT, BRENDA Wichita 

«- If ' Hp*t ** ■»■ General Sophomore 

& Mm*" W CRAGER, CATHY St. Paul 

■■iMSF"" M Jp Accounting Sophomore 

. CROFT, SUZANNE Overland Park 

^■W M |raR|| Pre-Medicine Freshman 

W y*. H||rj| ttd MM CURTS. CAROLYN Salina 

\ 'tV '/ I V\ A 'i^ : \ I BE^BflnRH iV ^H 4*-' Applied Music Senior 

DAHL, JUDY Hardy, NE 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

DANIELS, MARGARET Kalvesta 

Hm., V^R, W^^ Br'' ^BHf Accounting Sophomore 

i l K '4 1"--^B DETWILER, THERESA Kensingson 

Jy ■■b^ 4V ^v ^BVl^~~^^B Family and Child Development Freshman 

W ^ w^ ^■h~ m DIMMIG. BRUCE Fishkill. NY 

jdjk ^m m MW^ Architecture Fifth Year Student 

' *^f K\ ■-■///' I r ^Mr m^L m\ DOMNICK, REBECCA Harper 

-Tp ■?m.^yy-/. I ■■ ■^■'.'*§^ Pre-Nursing Freshman 

. DUNCAN, SHARON M. Wichita 

A W%. mW^m. M' : > m% ^iBk EFFLAND, DONALD Lincoln 

■■ £*- «L ^) ^L. Jfci -^»l JH^a •T^^KB General Business Administration Freshman 

■ ^P"* 1 "*B ^aT^P *B Jf EISSLER ' GEORGE Florissant, MO 

■k *-■ B B| if xdr ^^ ^^AT " ^P/ Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

^mj V ^ M. jKh- T ELLIS, DAVID Cherryvale 

li, ■ \ i ^^* B^^ ^^W" I ^ Industrial Engineering Junior 

// % ktflfl I g^"%l , ^ ENNS ' BETSY Wamego 

/li !' Hj Ik Ktfl .-""^'^bV - ^H General Business Administration Freshman 

^^^^^^^ ^^^_^^ ^^^ ^ ENSMINGER, LILA Moran 

Foods and Nutrition Freshman 

lUg"* #^"A --fe-WB EUBANKS, MAUREEN Kansas City 

A itf? M- gt ^^T~'* Medical Technology Freshman 

^^P*»*"l ^* '* W » ' FARNEY, CHERYL Haysville 

Bkr BL^"^ J : ?'»"- ' Interior Design Freshman 

»»i 4 ' ^. f»" .^Hpi /- J§ "" N * Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

m FINCH, CHRISTOPHER Kirk wood, MO 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

n.in . l;Jt 





Darkroom-Joanne Wu, 

freshman in journalism 
and mass 
communications 
examines a negative 
before printing. The 
darkroom in Moore Hall 
is equipped with an 
enlarger, sink, and other 
basic equipment. The 
room, which is a 
converted single room, 
was furnished with 
equipment by funds from 
the hall social and 
educational fund. 



Tim Costello 



Moore/371 



mooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremoore mooremooremooremooremoore mooremooremc 



Get Down- Residents of 
4th floor Moore go 
through a Dance line at 
a floor function. The 
theme of the function 
was "The Music of the 
Seventies. " The question 
left is: What will the 
music of the eighties 
bring? 




A»- 



F1SCH, RALPH Miller PL, NY 

Engineering Technology Senior 

FISCHER, DAVID Des Plaines, IL 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FLAHAVEN, ERIN Wichita 

General Freshman 

FLETCHER, JULIE Bucklin 

General Freshman 

FLOWERS. MICHAEL Kansas City 

Biology Senior 

FOLSOM, BLAINE Stockton 

Geography Sophomore 

FRAZEE, MICHELLE Topeka 

Music Education Freshman 

FRIESEN, RANDY Garden City 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

FUELLBIER, RALPH Ronkonkoma, NY 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

GATZ, SUZANNE Pratt 

General Freshman 

GEE, MELODY Wichita 

Interior Design Freshman 

GEIGER, LINDA Topeka 

Finance Junior 

GENTRY, DORAN Wichita 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

GIESE, JOHN Leavenworth 

Physics Sophomore 

GILLMORE, BRYAN Moundridge 

Computer Science Junior 

GLIDEWELL, ELIZABETH Emporia 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

GLOTZBACH, TERESA Leavenworth 

Accounting Freshman 

GOULDIE, TIMOTHY Mankato 

General Freshman 

GRABER, DARREN Moundridge 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

GRABER, STEVEN Hesston 

Naturla Resource Management Freshman 

GROMER, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

GULIFORD, LISA Kansas City 

Home Economics Freshman 

HADLEY, KERRI Portis 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

HARRINGTON, ROBERT Bonner Springs 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

HART, CHERYL August 

Marketing Senior 

HATESOHL, PAULETTE Linn 

Life Science Sophomore 

HAVERKAMP. BRYCE Elkhart 

Accounting Senior 

HAVERKAMP, DAVID Baileyville 

Mechanical Engineering .... Freshman 

HAVERKAMP, DIANE Baileyville 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 
HEINE, BRENDA Chase 

Genera] Business Administration Freshman 




• v 



372/Moore 



moorcmoorcmoorcmooremoorcmoorcmoorcmoorcmoorcmoorcmoorcmoorcmoorciTioorcmoorcmoorcmoorcmo 




HELLMER, ROZANNE Roeland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HENDERSON, GREG Brookville 

Agricultural Education Junior 

HENNERBERG. JERRY Hollenberg 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HENRY, RICHARD Garnett 

General Business Administration .... Senior 

HENTY, JEFFREY Creve Coeur, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HERL, CAROLYN Sharon Springs 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

HESS, TERRI Honolulu, HI 

General Freshman 

HIEBSCH, MARCIA Wichita 

Clothing Textiles Freshman 

HITT, CHARLES Overland Park 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

HOFFMAN, DEANNA .... Chapman 
Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HOFFMAN, MARSHA Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HOLL, DONNA Great Bend 

Interior Design Freshman 

HOLLE, LYNN Marysville 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

HOLLOWAY, DEBBIE Iola 

Agronomy Junior 

HOLSCHER, MICHAEL Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HONER, GAIL Atchison 

Elementary Education Junior 

HORNBOSTEL, JON Junction City 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

HORSCH, JULIE Marion 

Clothing Textile Sophomore 

HUAMAN, ANA Topeka 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

HUHN, MARY ANN Leavenworth 

Home Economics Graduate Student 

HUNTER, JILL Overland Park 

General Freshman 

HUSER, BERNARD Hays 

Engineering Technology Senior 

HUTCHISON, HERB " . Hays 

General Business Administration Freshman 

JACKSON, JERRY Williamsburg 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

JAMES, LEA ANN Topeka 

Agriculture, General Freshman 

JEORLING, WILLIAM St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

JOHNSON, KENNETH Watervllle 

Computer Science Senior 

KEMRITE, HAROLD Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

KIM, TAESUNG Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

KINKELAAR, MARK Dodge City 

Management Sophomore 

KISNER, TERRY Hays 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KLEIN, CARLA Overland Park 

General Agriculture Junior 

KRAUS, KARL Valley Center 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KRIEGER, MARTHA Manhattan 

Accounting Freshman 

KRUSE, CHERYL Bremen 

LANDIS, BRIAN Newton 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

LASSMAN, KENNETH Chanute 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

LEARD, ALAN Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

LEE, DEBBIE Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LEPPKE, LYLE Peabody 

General Agriculture Freshman 

LETCHER, GREGORY Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LETOURNEAU, DAVID • Concordia 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

LINSS, LIZABETH Atchison 

Speech Freshman 

LITFIN, JOHN Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

LUDLOW, CHRIS Hutchinson 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 



Moore/373 



oremooremooremooremooremooremooremoore mooremoore mooremoore mooremooremooremooremooremoon 



LUEBBERS, BEV Marienthal 

Accounting Freshman 

LUEBBERS, TERESA Marienthal 

Interior Design Freshman 

LUEKER, KRISTIE Herington 

Elementary Education Freshman 

LUTHI, DIANE Madison 

General Freshman 

MacKEY, CHRIS Burden 

Agricultural Education Senior 

MALNICOF, TERRI Overland Park 

Finance Freshman 

MARCHETTO, JEFF Florissant, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MARR, JERRY Formoso 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

MARR, THOMAS Formoso 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MATHEWS, LOWELL Sharon 

General Sophomore 

MATLACK, TIM Clearwater 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MAULER, SUSAN Otis 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

McAFEE, CHARYL Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

McALLISTER, SCOTT Florissant, MO 

Pre-Design Professions .... Freshman 

McCORMICK, TERRI Salinas, CA 

Physical Education Senior 

McCURDY, RHONDA Leavenworth 

Accounting Freshman 

McDANIEL, RHONDA Coffeyville 

Family and Child Development Junior 

McDOWELL, WILLIAM Halstead 

Engineering Technology Junior 

McLAIN, JULIE Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

McLAUGHLIN, LYN Kansas City 

Business Administration Freshman 

McNAMARA, TIM Decatur, IL 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MEGEE, BRYAN Spring Hill 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

MERCER, SHERRITA Carbondale 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MEYSING, LARRY Lincolnville 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MICHEL, CINDY Bellaire 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MILLER, GUY Ozawkie 

Microbiology Sophomore 

MITCHELL, BRAD Wichita 

Engineering Freshman 

MITTLESTADT, HEIDI Wichita 

General Freshman 

MOCK, BECKY Hutchinson 
Elementary Education Junior 

MOORE, JERRY Leavenworth 
Horticulture Junior 

MORRIS, BARBARA Silver Lake 

Physical Education Senior 

MORTON, JOAN Columbus, GA 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

MOUSER, DEB Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

MULVANEY, DINA Wichita 

General Sophomore 

MUNSEY, MAR1 BETH Frontena 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

NACE, TIM Delphos 

General Junior 

NASS, MARY JANE Atchison 

Business Administration Sophomore 

NELSON, MARCUS Herington 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

NELSON, SANDY Livermore, CA 

Business Administration Freshman 

NEUFORTH, ROYCE Great Bend 

Computer Science Senior 

NEWBURN, JAMES Overland Park 

Psychology Freshman 

NOLL, KAREN Winchester 

Foods and Nutrition Freshman 

NOSSAMAN, MIKE Wichita 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

NULL, SANDRA Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

OLIVA, ERIC Hays 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 




fcjf 




374/Moore 



looremooremooreinooreinooremooreniooreinooreinooreinooreinooreniooreinooreniooreinooremooreniooremoorc 




OVERLEY, NEIL Colby 

Construction Science Freshman 

PACALA, RUSSELL Bethlehem, PA 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

PAULS, RODNEY Newton 

Computer Science ... Freshman 

PEMBER, KENTON Ness City 

Engineering Freshman 

PERRY, BETSEY Leawood 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore 

PERSINGER, KELLY Norton 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
PETRO, SUSAN Topeka 

Home Economics Freshman 

PHEFFER, KIM Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

PHELPS, CAPRICE Shawnee Mission 
Pre-Nursing Freshman 

PIERSON, BRET Holton 

Accounting Sophomore 

POTTER, KIMBERLY Winfield 

Home Economics Sophomore 

POTTER, VIRGINIA Baxter Springs 

Business Education Junior 

POTTS, DANNY Grain Valley, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

PROCHASKA, SANDY Lenexa 

Interior Design Junior 

RANEY, MARK Dodge City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

RANHOTRA, GURDEEP Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

RANKIN, REBECCA Topeka 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

RATH, CURTIS Overland Park 

Engineering Technology Senior 

REED, EMILEY Salina 

Home Economics Education Senior 

REICHERT, TOM Hays 

Accounting Senior 

REYNOLDS, RITA Shawnee 

Psychology Junior 

REYNOLDS, VIVIAN Galena, MO 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

RIEDERER, ROBERTA Holton 

Pre-Law Junior 

RINEHART, MARK Kismet 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

ROBERSON, BRENDA Silver Lake 

Business Administration Sophomore 

ROE, STEVE Wakeeney 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

ROOF, STEVE Los Alamos, NM 

Microbiology Senior 

ROSE, TAMARA Luray 

General Freshman 

ROSE, THOMAS Halstead 

Social Sciences Junior 

ROTHENBERGER, KEVIN Osborne 
Natural Resource Management Junior 




Thursday night at the 
movies - Residents of 
Moore Hall look at TV 
in their new television 
area. The basement has 
been partitioned off into 
two viewing areas with 
paneled walls. A meeting 
room has also been built 
for HGB, staff and 
various other meetings. 



Moore/375 



mooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremoorcmooremoorcmooremooremooremoorcmooremoo 



RUSSELL, SHERYL Leawood 

Secondary Education Junior 

RYAN, MIKALL Newton 

Horticulture Senior 

SAIA, SHARI Frontenac 

Mathematics Freshman 

SAXTON, DON lola 

Accounting Senior 

SCHAFFER, VERNON Pratt 

Agronomy Junior 

SCHELLHORN, GARY White City 

Agronomy Senior 

SCHMIDT, GARRET Hays 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

SCHMIDT, LINDA Kansas City, MO 

Management Freshman 

SCHOTTLER, KARL St. Charles, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SCHUETTE, GARY Lebanon 

General Freshman 

SCHULTZ, BRAD Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

SCHULTZ, MARYSE Overland Park 

Food Science and Industry Sophomore 

SCOTT, ELLEN Hutchinson 

Psychology Senior 

SELLERS, JUDY Atchison 

Business Administration Freshman 

SELLERS, MARK Abilene 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 



SERRA, TERRY 
Interior Design 
SHAFER, RHONDA 
Psychology 
SHAND, CRAIG 
Pre-Design Professions 
SHANEYFELT, LAURIE 
Horticulture Therapy 
SHERVE, MARCY 
Accounting 



Overland Park 

Freshman 

Ida 

Junior 

Kansas City, MO 

Freshman 

Kansas City, MO 

Sophomore 

Oskaloosa 

Freshman 



SHOGREN, BRUCE Lindsborg 

Accounting Sophomore 

SIMMONS, BOB Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SINGER, KENT Topeka 

Political Science Junior 

SISNEY, JENNIFER Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

SITES, MARLA Grinnell 

General Freshman 

SMITH, KIM St. Paul 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

SMITH, WINTON Arkansas City 

Architecture Senior 

SONNTAG, TODD Allentown, PA 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SPAID, TED St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SPANGLER, TERRIE Carthage, MO 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 



SPENCE, DOUGLAS 
Accounting 
STAHL, SUSAN 
Sociology 

STAMMER, JOAN 
Industrial Engineering 
STANSELL, MARY JO 
Accounting 



Washington 

Junior 

Shawnee 

Sophomore 

Leawood 

Junior 

Valley Falls 

Sophomore 

STEGEMAN, JOE Overland Park 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

STEINBERG, KARLA Lincoln 

Music Education Junior 

STEINBERGER, CHARLES Clay Center 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

STEWART, DAVID Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Senior 
STEWART, MEG Leawood 

General Freshman 

STEWART, RODNEY Washington 
Agricultural Education Junior 

STIMACH, CHERYL Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Senior 

STUMP, PHIL Kansas City 

Management Sophomore 

SVATY, JEAN ANN Lucas 

General Freshman 

SWISHER, KYLE Beloit 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

TANKERSLEY, KRISTI Junction City 
Art Freshman 




376/Moore 



nooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremooremoo 

TATE, ROXANN Junction City 

mm % *£«! : ^P !£^\ mm Pre-Law Junior 

TATGE, AMY Herington 

^b_ • mmm Marketing Freshman 

« W I ^BO ■■ THOLE ' CHERYL Stafford 

r JBl *»-" JU ^k f f- - lK^Er~~ ^1 Home Economics Junior 

v ^» ^ flLi > | , Jl THOMPSON, ROBERT D Liberal 

' _ jd| j fi| / ~> ' '^!^fc HF Agricultural Economics Senior 

A j3 '■*. v «p ; * * \ W^. ^^B THOMSON, LANICE Wichita 

^^| ^»»; K 5 jflhwQ^ v '\ sil^PV H^lli Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

TICKEL, LAURA Salina 

I . ; -— .iju-ja Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

■&. ^S^Br. 1 Agricultural Education Freshman 

~ W> Wmh--- ■ TIPPIN, RICHARD Manhattan 

'«^aW;^si' ilV^ ' 4^ "\t| ^~^"WLW. TRACEY, LYNNE Manhattan 

mS^maNHmh Mmly WltV^V 1 ^ Accounting Freshman 

TURNER, BETH Shawnee 

JIMPI^b General Freshman 

TURPIN, STEVE Jefferson City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

M ■■>>% K HP. ►£>• UNGSUNANTWIWAT, USA 

Adult Education Graduate Student 

UTT, MARCIA Winfield 

Home Economics Freshman 

\\4L :'!'• > ' K '" "''* Jfe^S liTl ' / VAN BRIMMER, BRENDA Great Bend 

A IV. 1/ Jl^t- , '/i--fc1 III mSliv m. Journalism/Mass Cornm Graduate Student 

4* M&^. ^^ , M P^* ~^S^3PJ| VOLK, VERA Omaha, NE 

jC Mmm^ m~ ^k AwJP Mm'*? Microbiology Freshman 

' C flP a M^ NSL JP> m Mf «• WABUDA, GARY Ottawa 

W'' ' 9^ * 1 ] MF^- ■ J ^=S t 1 Veterinary Medicine Senior 

* ^ ^4- * t _ ' l#> ' ' WALDREN. DERYL Tribune 

w ^ \ K f JwF Agronomy Senior 

jA jm\ M m\ J 0^Mk WALTER, LISA Overland Park 

14 91 Iftjl A AmW ^ WANGEMAN, MICHAEL Cearwater 

■■IBHi^BilHB .VA JlPl HA* J : M Accounting 

^ PJP WARD, DANETTE Topeka 

Mk T^A P^""*l Wm Family and Child Development Senior 

f** 1 ^ PVJ WEHRMAN, STEVE White Cloud 

f ** "^ ■ V ^ JHI Agronomy Senior 

' ^- p „ - ^ " WELLER, NADINE Topeka 

^r yw , "' Pre-Professional Elementary Education Freshman 

^r ^^Am^ i \ ^^ ^ ^ ( WELLINGTON, RONALD Oswego 

mM* M i •<• A PlpV'r^lJM M 1 Fine Arts Senior 

J| ll| IR| .1 ll WENTLING, MICHAEL Topeka 

B^.^9 it L «' ' ■ 1 U General Business Administration Sophomore 

<\*** ^ ^^* )^. WILLIAMS, DANNY D. .......... Washington 

'.'"''' j* '+■ ■ \ _-^\ JL. i ^^k / ^^k^ General Freshman 

"•.V#'"'-v': iv!^''^ ^ 'I / bWfc. Am WILLIAMS, PATRICIA Circleville 

r-'V.'.V.v.'A'.M;:.::?.-':::^ ( V V I : " ' 1 P^Ji Physical Education Sophomore 

HM ^J8> ^ WINEINGER, KENT Tribune 

* W JEi^ Accounting Senior 

•VW mW*WfS ■ WURM. MARK Overland Park 

"BPs "«'& Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

ft-"- 3r »■. r - / %^"- i P^ YIM ' YAT MING Kansas City, MO 

_ . ' S / JL . ^lk_ * Pre-Design Professions Junior 

4 . ^i #\ \ V ■ ~^\ YOUNG, LINDA Cheney 

v ^AvW\ P \% fli Home Economics Freshman 

•Ar^ \\| « ZATT, SCOTT Barrington, IL 

BraHlVU Vim t \ Ira Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ZENGER, SHELDON Hays 

Agricultural Economics Senior 









Moore/377 



Putnam 



putnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnam] 



TPl ■ For birthdays, 
cheer-ups, revenge, or 
"general principle", tee- 
peeing a room is the all- 
around practical joke. 
Residents of Putnam 
Hall demonstrate. 




Photo by Tim Costello 



ALLEN, SHARON Wichita 

Business Administration Sophomore 

ALLISON, PAULA Basehor 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

ATHEY, MARTY Prairie Village 

Modern Language Freshman 

BARNES, PATRICIA LYNN Wamego 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

BARTLETT, ANDRA St. John 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BARTLETT, SUZANNE St. John 

Secondary Education Senior 

BAXTER, KATIE Wichita 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

BECK, DEBORA Salina 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BECKER, DONNA Melvern 

Home Economics Education Junior 

BEEMS, JULIA Topeka 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

BERGSTROM, PAM Clay Center 

Physical Education Freshman 

BIESENTHAL, RUTH Wheaton 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BLEDSOE, FAITH Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BLUNT, BERNITA Beloit 

Elementary Education Freshman 

BRANDSBERG, ROXANNE Olathe 

Horticulture Sophomore 

BRANT, SOLVEIG Isabel 

Food Science and Industry Sophomore 

BRIGHT, HEIDI Winfield 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

BROWN, MELISSA Dighton 

General Junior 

BUCKNER, JEANNIE Shawnee 

Art Junior 

BUSBY, RENE Wichita 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 




378/Putnam 



namputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnan^putnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamput 




CAREY, GAIL Stafford 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

CARINDER, MARY Cherryvalle 

Business Administration Senior 

CARLIN, GLENDA Osborne 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

CASTELLI, JULIE Wichita 

General Freshman 

CHAMPLIN, KATHI Cedar Vale 

Accounting Freshman 

COCHRAN, BECCA Wichita 

General Freshman 

COWLEY, DANA Ozawkie 

Home Economics Sophomore 

CROSBY, MICHELLE Rockford, IL 

History Senior 

CURRY, ELAINE Wooster, OH 

Dietetics Sophomore 

DAYTON, ALICIA Manhattan 

Art Freshman 

DELANGE, DENISE Girard 

Home Economics Sophomore 

DREWS, SUSAN Hutchinson 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

DUNN, KARLA Claflin 

Elementary Education Senior 

DUTTON, CHRISTI Wichita 

Interior Design Freshman 

ECKES, TRACEY Salina 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

ESPARZA, DENISE Kansas City 

Elementary Education Freshman 

FANKHAUSER, LOUISE Haviland 

General Sophomore 

FINN, JOYCE Wichita 

Home Economics Freshman 

FLAVIN, KARIN Cawker City 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

FORSBERG, ELLEN Assaria 

Horticulture Sophomore 

FREDERKING, RHONDA Salina 

Business Administration Sophomore 

FUCHS, CATHY Leawood 

General Freshman 

GARRETT, ROBERTA St. Marys 

Physical Education Sophomore 

GIESICK, TEMBER ... Leoti 

General Freshman 

GOLLADAY, MARGARET Syracuse 
Physical Therapy Junior 

GOWEN, KAY Wichita 

English Graduate Student 

GRANBERG, ELAINE Prairie Village 

Accounting Sophomore 

HAGEN, ESTHER Lawrence 

Home Economics Freshman 

HANRAHAN, KARI Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HANSON, SHERRI Concordia 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

HATFIELD, CONSTANCE El Dorado 

General Freshman 

HAUSCHILD, LYNN Oakley 

Sociology Sophomore 

HEINRICHS, LA KEN Garden City 

Secondary Education Freshman 

HERDE, BETH Manhattan 

General Freshman 

HERL. CONSTANCE Sharon Springs 
Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HIGGS, DEBRA Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

HODGES, LEANN Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
HOOVER, MELISSA Scott City 

Medical Technology Junior 

HORN, SHAUNA Pratt 

Home Economics Sophomore 

HUYSER, GRETCHEN Lawrence 

General Freshman 

IRELAND, WAVA Florence 

Biology Junior 

JACOBSON, KATHRYN . . . Kansas City, MO 

Interior Design Senior 

JAKSA, PATTY Kansas City 

Art Freshman 

JOHNSON, DEBBIE Overbrook 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

JOHNSON, KIM Concordia 

Music Education Freshman 



Putnam/379 



putnamp 



yfnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnampuitnami 

JOHNSON, LORETTA Assaria ii*Tfr ,_| 

Home Economics .... Sophomore JHUSsKh' ^^ 

JUREY, COLEEN Clifton A***%k \«0 i % Jf S 

Accounting Junior VJIfc, ^B| 6f*"*°'\ V ;«»» **V ' *"*"' * 

KAISER, PATRICIA Hoisington X . C* K -" • ' ■■jBLJ _ * 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman \ *T ' Mf 

KINDLE, PAM Leavenworth <■ \,- , ^\ ^2* ^P ^ 

Elementary Education Sophomore ^fik ^^Ovf* ^fl ^-..- ^£) A 

KNAUSSMAN, KARLA El Dorado ' ■£» JBSI M UM I fli fl ^IP* 

Physical Therapy .... Junior \ I, ^Hi^ #3t*»pJ Hrl*^* ; - ' J ™* ' flfl '. 

KOEHN, JENNIFER Concordia "^ ^ttkt frfftSfc *%^ 

General Freshman ■ >■ »*.-•..■ ... ,~*.> 

KOHAKE, LISSA Roeland Park j~ ■ — r^ -^ rap v 

General Freshman ■ff > " "*■ M**" ""■* ■« J 'ft % - ; "" ""V 

KUNG, LINDA Belle Plaine VM | .' I M " "-* « Si '* ' M IK! ■ " ** '**. 

Political Science Senior IHbk^ K fKT V *m. ''*$ * 

I.AGERGRF.N, JOAN .... Lincoln sMt*!!,^«k. &■&•'' ^P JSI Ifll » "-- - 

PreNursing Freshman M] ^BKk jmmg' mm^k £x?***i» £$**&& 

LANDIS. LAURA Kansas City flBM^ipi if JPv - W$§^ J*^ 

Architecture Fifth Year Student WfHMSpgJwSI ■ j \* M^^r^fel? 

LIETZ, CINDY Wichita ^fgfc- ■*« Jl & 

Retail Floriculture Freshman ^^r^K-. M/tt^^Jk JM *'%! 

LINOT, DIANE Rose Hill Jl^ J^t ^-T rm B^^ Jl 

Home Economics Senior B^" fp ■ ■W /S * v < t*"* I '^J "" "*' 

LORSON, CYNTHIA Topeka iBf^> A W^vJ 

Business Administration Freshman ^HL, ^^m * ~T w 

MAKADANZ, DEANNA Spring Hill M Up JH|| ''^ft', J*^ ^ 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman ^^K;4 ^ - „ L -Z^\ ^flflP -«l Mfc 

MARQUEZ, ANGELA Topeka fl» K /^ ^^T / ^Jj »i» v'i 

General Freshman 3H%"' fl J*iZ*0'* mm / I ft:*". BmH'' . ? ! BB .... 3E 

MARTINEZ, MARIA ...' Wichita ««»£. v *f 

Business Administration Freshman j| A Jr A 

Medical Technology Junior •^P*' H "*^B W~' **B -^^p* ^TS* • T^* * 

Pre Nursing Freshman ■} ^H j SB K tIJ 

McDERMOTT, WENDY Middleton, WI Jn»4^ "*^ ^V _«& "Jl''' - / 

Retail Floriculture Freshman ■Kp [Bk \ la j^ J ^ 

Speech Pathology Freshman l«^" 1 '.^ ^^t--i M h E*. — -- ^B 

McGEE, CATHY Columbus 

Correctional Administration Junior 

McGUIRE, HEATHER Wichita w 

General Freshman fln "^ ""■ ^P™*^ '" IB £B * ! *^fc(i T ^ tf"? ^ 

McINTYRE, KAREN Hill City ^P » wd^W ■*<^^ E 

Social Sciences Freshman ^Hk " * jtZ/^^ 

McKINNON, LISA Topeka ^R ^P^ l^, 

Political Science ... Sophomore . | ^ ^■^^ " A £• ^ 

MESSERSMITH, LAUREN Wichita ,f%'l ^' Ml 8 M I 

General Freshman »K©\ «' '■ ^ ^- { /^,, ; , i. ; ; 

MOLZ, LOIS Deerfield 

Restaurant Management Freshman 

MOORHEAD, AMY Wooster, OH 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 1C '"^^W ^B 1 ^ W "' "*''' 

MORTON, MICHAEL Wamego ^ , . 7 ^k&~- W \ : dtt W ^ < 

Management Senior . ^^^E. 1 ^\J^ JbC^/~ 

NEADERH1SER, JOAN Solomon \ JSt T ^ ^A ^^. ^*\ ^Nk. 

Business Administration Freshman „^BI \ //j| B" ^k V-\^^^ iH i A I 

NICHOLS. PENNIE Olathe £ -s ■^ y J ,? f I A . ,.'■ I /\ 4. * vBlfiii 

Interior Architecture ... Fifth Year Student |! * ar ^^^ ^ «M? 

NITCHER, ANGELA Wichita ^Bfefc ^^ 

General Freshman .■HSR." .'i»( 

NORRIS, SARAH Kansas City, MO » ^ ^™ 

Bakery Science and Management Freshman ^IP" "^■T ^Sf' ^* tBl*» H * — JI^k M* ■ 

OBERG, KERRY Wichita ? ^> r ' ■ ^ ^#1 ^m^" W ' L*^" A -HFll 

Music Education .... Sophomore i7 P Bfe:\..._^^F. 1 G Kr / >^V "'i 

OVERTON, LIZ St. Gladstone, MO Jmlfc PK ^F^ 

(Correctional Administration Freshman itiJtMt*~*J^t& 4 "*V ' 

PALM, TAMMY Topeka , P^Sm^f^fi 1 ^ I I JBf I \ 

Fine Arts Junior ! 

PARROTT, BETH St. Louis, MO 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

PEAK, MARITA Topeka _ 

Biology . . . Sophomore ^m 

PRICE, LORI Rozel jSa^ - ML JNfc-> ' ?A '"" flr ^K^A " 

Business Administration Freshman ^B" iB^^-,^fc Ab^M^k ^H ■«/ ^^^ ^^ v^ / M, 

PRINGLE, CATHY Topeka W ,|J Sk» X v^ r ^#K jfefc^ ^ V # ''' i^K 

PreNursing Sophomore ^L ^^ \ v^| ^ 4z$*sk" 'KWil k ^B*' AH 

PUTT, JOAN Praine Village ^VJ^ « T> tVi \ M PfKVATVf M/W' 
Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

RALSTON, SUSAN Arkansas City 

Sociology Freshman 

RAY, MARLA Oberlin , i . ^^ » « ■ 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore ^H ij& ^ *tt A \. 

RINKE, LINDA Pratt W '^j* J&* *r 

Interior Design Sophomore j ^m^W I 

ROD1NA, SHARON Kansas City ^ f -^F \ 

Physical Education Senior i Vfk ^ \ 

ROSS, NANCY Paola UJl^V/ 't 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman MB* ^k '•/ 




380/Putnam 



namputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnamputnampuitnamputnamputnamputnamput 




RUSCO, ROBIN 
Elementary Education 
SAUNDERS, ELIZABETH 
Biology 

SCHAEFER, JULIA 
General 



Clifton 

Junior 

Overland Park 

Freshman 

Wichita 

... Freshman 



SCHEUNUMANN, LISA Spring Hill 

Home Economics Sophomore 

SCHOEN, DEBORAH Cawker City 

Business Administration Junior 



SCHOEN, DIANE 

Family and Child Development 

SCHOEN, DOREEN 

Business Administration 

SCHOOLEY, LORI 

General 

SEGLEM, JENNIE 

Home Economics 

SHIPLEY, MELVA 
Horticulture 



Cawker City 

Sophomore 

Cawker City 

Freshman 

Haviland 

Freshman 

Merriam 

Freshman 

Esbon 

Freshman 



SPAIN, KAREN Mulvane 

Agriculture Freshman 

SPURR, DEBBIE Longmont, CO 

Interior Design Freshman 

STEWARD, PENNY Clay Center 

General Freshman 

SYKES, KIM Topeka 

General Freshman 

TEATS, ROSA Independence 

Business Administration Junior 

TEDMAN, LAURA Harper 

Computer Science .... Sophomore 

TIMMIS, TONI Udall 

Agriculture Sophomore 

TINKER, JOANN Wichita 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

TUCKER, CINDY Elkhart 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

UNDERHILL, JILL Beloit 

General Freshman 

URISH, GEORGIA Wichita 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

VERSCHELDEN, MARY St. Marys 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

VESPER, DONNA Olathe 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

VINES, CLAUDIA Wichita 

General . . . . Freshman 

VOLAVKA, JENNIFER Caldwell 

Medical Technology Junior 

WALKER, RAELENE Beloit 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WARNS, CATHY Hope 

Dietetics Freshman 

WARREN, MICHAEL Wamego 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

WEBER, MICHELLE Mission 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

WEBER, SUE Mission 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

WENDELBURG, MARCA Stafford 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, DEVIN Spring Hill 

Interior Design Junior 

WINSLOW, ANNE Meridian 

Business Administration Junior 

WITTUM, DONNA Independence 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WOLFE, KIMBERLY Southwick, MA 

Agricultural Journalism Freshman 

WOODFORD, MONICA Convent Station, NJ 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

WOODS, LILLIAN Silver Spring, MD 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

YAMASHIRO, SHARON Brea, CA 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

YOUNG. MARGARET Manhattan 

Physics Senior 

ZEKA, VALERIE Wellington 

Elementary Education Freshman 

ZUERCHER, ANNE Wichita 

General Freshman 



Putnam/381 






smithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmithsmil 



Clean up - Bob 

Verstraete, sophomore in 
computer science, mops 
the floor of Smith House 
as part of his house 
duties. Smith is one of 
three cooperative houses 
on campus. Cooperative 
houses are a part of the 
residence hall system, 
but the room and board 
fee is somewhat smaller 
in coop houses, as the 
household duties are 
performed by the 
members of the house. 




BARTHULY, DAVID Paxico 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

BEEN, KENT Goodland 

Agricultural Education Senior 

BOND, GARY Shawnee Mission 

Engineering Freshman 

BOYD, DAVID Wakeeney 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BUHLER, JERALD El Dorado 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

BURGH, ROBERT Yardley, PA 

Bakery Science and Management Freshman 

CLITHERO, ROGER Wichita 

Business Administration Junior 

COOK, CRAIG Wichita 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

CRANMER, JON Ness City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HACKLEY, MICAHEL Junction City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

HARDY, JAMES Wakefield 

Secondary Education Junior 

HEDENKAMP, BRET Manhattan 

Biology Freshman 

HUFFORD, DOUG Holton 

Management Senior 

JONES, HOWARD Linwood 

Biology Senior 

KNACKSTEDT, DENNIS Russell 

Finance Senior 




"PP 






r$fc 





AfttAifJi 




382/Smith 




McKERNAN, PATRICK Wichita 

Horticulture Sophomore 

MILLER, STEVEN Hoisington 

Business Administration Freshman 

MILLER, WARREN Hoisington 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

MINOR, ERIC Northport, AL 
Bakery Science and Management Freshman 

PETERSON, BRUCE Lindsborg 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

PTACEK, TIM Wilson 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

REECE, JOHN Ulysses 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

ROBETORYE, RYAN Valley Center 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

SERRANO, DAVID Topeka 

Dietetics Freshman 

SIDEBOTTOM, DAVID Topeka 

Music Education Freshman 

SMITH, DENNIS Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

SNIDER, IAN Tracy, CA 

Speech Freshman 

STEWART, JAMES Americus 

Agriculture Freshman 

YOUNG, STEVE Calhoun, CA 

Food Science and Management Sophomore 




Strummin' - The 

atmosphere in Smith 
House seems more 
homey than in residence 
halls. The men know 
each other better than 
they might if they lived 
on one of the larger 
halls. The scene seems 
to be just right for Bret 
Hedenkamp, freshman in 
biology, to practice his 
guitar. 



Tim Costello 



Smith/383 



Smurthwaite 



smurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurththwaitesmurt 



Study Break'Chris 
Frazee, junior in general, 
takes a break from her 
studies to talk with her 
roommate in 
Smurthwaite. 
Smurthwaite is one of 
three cooperative houses 
on the KSU campus. 
Residents share cleaning 
and cooking duties in the 
houses. 




Tim Costello 



BERGKAMP, KATHLEEN Valley Center 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BOWMAN, SHELLY Larned 

Home Economics Junior 

BRENNAN, FRANCES St. Marys 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
BROWN, DEBRA Lansing 

Fashion Marketing Junior 

BRUEY, SHIRLEY Caldwell 

Physical Education Senior 

CARRA, LINDA Havana 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

CHAMBERLAIN, PATRICIA Concordia 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

CLARK, SANDY Glasco 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

COLLETT, MELINDA Marion 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

COURTER, GENA Edgerton 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

DUNKLEBERG, DEE Osborne 

Fine Arts Freshman 

ELLERMAN, CINDY Nortonville 

Psychology Junior 

ERKER, CAROLINE Wellington 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

ESPING, WANDA Leonardville 

Psychology Junior 

FRANKEN, KAREN Easton 

Marketing Freshman 

FRAZEE, CHRISTINA Arkansas City 

Psychology Junior 

GERGICK, MARY Tonganoxie 

Life Science Junior 

GILLOGLY, JANICE Princeton 

Home Economics Senior 

HAAG, NATALIE Holton 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

HARBACH, BETTY Scott City 
Family and Child Development Junior 




384/Smurthwaite 



aitesmurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurthwaitesmurthwi 




HIETT, JENIFER Buhler 

Speech Sophomore 

HUNDLEY, BRENDA Topeka 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

HUNDLEY, SANDRA Topeka 

Agricultural Education Junior 

ILLE, DIANE Claflin 

Accounting Junior 

JOHNSON, SUZANNE Topeka 

Speech Pathology Junior 

JORNS, PAMELA Preston 

Home Economics Sophomore 

LILL, MARY JO Towanda 

Home Economics Education Junior 

LUCE, NINA : . Dover 

Chemical Science Junior 

MILLER, MADELINE Eureka 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MUGLER, CAROL Wakefield 

Physical Education Senior 

MUGLER, LINDA Wakefield 

General Sophomore 

NYHART, RENEE Agra 

Family and Child Development .... Freshman 

OTTO, TRICIA ... Salina 

Education Graduate Student 

PACEY, LORETTA Oak Hill 

Engineering Technology Junior 

PETTIT, SUSAN Topeka 

General Freshman 

RELIHAN, MARY Chapman 

Sociology Freshman 

RUNDELL, JULIE Topeka 

Dietetics Sophomore 

RUSK, MONA Sun City 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

SHANNON, TERESA Miltonvale 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

SHANNON, TERRI Miltonvale 

Elementary Education Senior 

SHEAHAN, MAUREEN Randall 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

STEINER, JENNIFER Hoisington 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

STEINER, THERESIA Hoisington 

Elementary Education Freshman 

THOMAS, VALERIE Topeka 

Food Science and Industry Junior 

TREIBER, LINDA Atchison 

Speech Junior 

TREIBER, SUSAN Atchison 

Music Graduate Student 

VAN HORN, PAMELA Ottawa 

Agriculture Sophomore 

VISSER. YVONNE Wakefield 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

WHITESELL, SHERRY Holton 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

WORKMAN, SYLVIA Concordia 

Music Education Senior 




All Together Now - 

Like most living groups, 
Smurthwaite is equipped 
with a piano. Singing 
around the piano is a 
fun and relating form of 
entertainment for 
Smurthwaite residents. 



Tim Costello 



Smurthwaite/385 



Van Zile 



vanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanz 



Soup's on - Van Zile 
Hall is one of two other 
halls with it's own dining 
facilities. Boyd, Putnam 
and Van Zile went 
through a "save our 
dining hall" campaign 
last year. Rising costs 
had threatened to close 
the facilities which would 
have forced residents to 
eat in nearby Derby 
Food Center. 




Kent Boughion 



ATKINSON, ANN Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

BLAHNIK, ANN Kansas City, MO 

Dietetics Junior 

BROWNELL, ALICIA Topeka 

General Freshman 

CAMPBELL, CHRIS Beloit 

General Sophomore 

CAMPBELL, CONNIE Overland Park 

Medical Technology Freshman 

COOK, VICKI Hope 

Business Administration Freshman 

COOKE, JEFFREY Boulder City, NV 

Horticulture Freshman 

COOLEY, RENEE Shawnee 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

CUBIE, BRENDA Kansas City 

Sociology Freshman 

DILLON, PATRICIA Hope 

Home Economics Education Senior 




386/Van Zile 



/anzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzillevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilc 




DOHL, EDITH Green Bay, WI 

Journalism Junior 

DRAVIS, LISA Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

DROUHARD, CECILIA Danville 

Agriculture Sophomore 

EDIGER, JEFFREY McPherson 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

ELLIS, BRENDA Merriam 

Management Freshman 

FAUBION, JOE Smith Center 

Biology Sophomore 

FOUST, NANCY Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

GOBBLE, GEOFF Overland Park 

Agriculture Freshman 

GODFREY, ROBERT Union, NJ 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GREENE, JEFF Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HALL, SHANNON Wichita 

Music Education Junior 

HEINSOHN, LORI Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

HENDRICKSON, JANA Garden City 

Interior Architecture . . . Fifth Year Student 

HICKOK, LINDA Ulysses 

Life Sciences Senior 

HICKOK, SUSAN Ulysses 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

HUMPHREYS, LINDA St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

LANGFORD, EDWARD Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

LEECH, MELISSA Kirkwood, MO 

Architectural Engineering Freshman 

LIGN1TZ, MARYANN * Marysville 

Dietetics Sophomore 

LINDEMAN, VICKIE Mount Prospect, IL 

Horticulture Sophomore 

MAGEE, CONNIE Lawrence 

Elementary Education Freshman 

MARSH, KATHRYN Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MARTENEY. JOHN Wichita 

Accounting Senior 

McCLANE, DOUG St. Louis, MO 

Geography Junior 

McCREADY, PAULA Rockport, MA 

Secondary Education Senior 

McDONALD, JAMES Independence 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

McKINZIE, TINA Kansas City 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

McNICHOLS, KELLY Burr Oak 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

ORTIZ, GRETNA Cabo Rojo, PR 

Life Sciences Junior 

PITTMAN, KATHLEEN Wichita 

Home Economics Freshman 

PUGH, JANICE St. Louis, MO 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

ROBINETT, MARGARET Merriam 

Pre-Veterinary Science Sophomore 

ROGGENBUCK, RENAE Milbank, SD 

PreDesign Professions Sophomore 

SCOTT, DIANE Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterinary Science Sophomore 

SEDLACEK, KAREN Marysville 

Music Education Senior 



Van Zile/387 



vanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzilevanzile 



SELBY, M. RUSSELL Manhattan 

Finance Sophomore 

SWANEY, DONNA Havana 

Pre-Vet Junior 

THREATS, TRAVIS Kansas City 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

TIBBITS, KERRI Eudora 

Pre-Vet Freshman 

VIENS, JOHN Kansas City 

Sociology Freshman 

WENDT, KYLE Topeka 

Labor Relations Junior 

WOLFF, MILLIE Westwood 

Computer Science Sophomore 

YOST, CHRISTINE Klrkwood, MO 

Architecture Senior 




Pong! - Bryan Winters, 
freshman in chemical 
engineering, returns a 
ping on Van Zile's ping- 
pong table. Most halls 
are equipped with either 
a ping-pong or pool 
table. All also have 
televisions in the 
basements. Funds for the 
recreational equipment 
are from the hall social 
and educational funds. 




Tim Costello 



388/Van Zile 



West 



westwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestw 




Rub-A-Dub-Dub- 

Birthday celebrations in 
residence halls are 
entertaining for 
celebrants. Besides 
teepeeing, tubbing is an 
all-time favorite. This 
event, however, must be 
hush-hush. It's generally 
considered a no-no in 
the halls, although 
residents of West Hall 
find ways around this. 



Tim Costello 




ADAMS, DEBBIE Bentley 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

ARNESON, CINDY L. Belleville 

Elementary Education Junior 

ASHBURN, CELIA D. Garnett 

Interior Design Freshman 

BAKER, STEPHANIE Council Grove 

Psychology Freshman 

BALLOU, LINDA M Delphos 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BEARLY, KIMBERLI A Garden Plain 

General Sophomore 

BEARNES, KATHRYN A Culver 

Agriculture Journalism Freshman 

BENISCH, JULIE R Wakeeney 

Pre-Professional Elementary Sophomore 

BERRY, LAURA L Wichita 

Pre-Prof. Elementary Sophomore 

BERRY, SHARON A Kansas City 

Horticulture Freshman 

BESTHORN, ELAINE J Claflin 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BIGHAM, LINDA L Grantville 

Interior Design Freshman 

BIRD, LINDA D Liberal 

Accounting Sophomore 

BLINN, JAYNE E Prairie Village 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

BOGER, RHONDA L Jetmore 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BORTZ, TERI L Haysville 

Horticulture Sophomore 

BOTTS, KATHERINE D. ' Merriam 

Horticulture Sophomore 

BOWSER, GINA D Russell 

Accounting Freshman 

BOWSER, STEVEN Mayetta 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

BRASS, SARAH Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 



West/389 



estwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwest westwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwest westwest\ 



BRAY, CYNTHIA SUE Sterling 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

BROWN, LEE A. Hill City 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Freshman 



BRUMMEL, JEANECE 


Garnett 


Foods and Nutrition 


Freshman 


BULTMAN, PENNY J 


Elkhart 


Family and Child Development 


Junior 


BURJES, KAREN J 


Chapman 


General 


Freshman 


BURK, KIMBERLY 


Hiawatha 


Clothing and Retailing 


Freshman 


BURNS, MARY STACY 


Prairie Village 


General Business Administration 


Freshman 


BUTLER, BETH E. 


Derby 


Clothing and Retailing 


Sophomore 


BUTLER, L1SE K 


Salina 


Chemical Engineering 


Sophomore 


CAMPBELL, CYNTHIA 


Topeka 


Home Economics 


Freshman 


CAREY, PATRICIA E 


St. Louis, MO. 


General 


Freshman 


CARLSON, JOYCE M 


Mulvane 


General Business Administration 


Freshman 


CHAFFIN, ANGELA S. 


Stockton 


Home Economics 


Freshman 


CHAMBERS, KYLA 


Wichita 


Family and Child Development 


Sophomore 


CHRISTENSON, JANICE White Bear Lake, MN 


Modern Language 


Freshman 



CLARK, JULIE D. McPherson 

Secondary Education Freshman 

CLARK, SHELLY D. Newton 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

CLINE, FONDA L. Weskan 

Accounting Freshman 

CLOSSON, KAREN S Kingman 

Secondary Education Senior 

CLUTTER, RHONDA L. Bloomington, IN 

Home Economics Graduate 

COBLER, JEANA L Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

COPPLE, CONNIE Derby 

Accounting Freshman 



CORRELL, CHERYL 
Marketing 


Abilene 

Sophomore 

Overland Park 

Sophomore 

Garden City 




CREWS, PEGGY 




Electrical Engineering 
CROOK, TERI L. 




Pre-Desiqn Professions 


Freshman 




CUMMINGS, JULIANNE 
Interior Design 
CUP1T, CHRISTIE L. 
General Business Administration 
DAUBER, TRUDY M. 


Hutchinson 

... Freshman 

Wichita 

Freshman 

Bunkerhill 


1: : 


Home Economics 


Freshman 




DEBACKER, SAM1 L. 


Topeka 




Clothing and Retailing 
DECKER, CATHY A. 
Clothing and Retailing 

DENHOLM, LORI J. 
Animal Science and Industry 
DYSART, CARRIE B. 
Clothing and Retailing 


Junior 

Overland Park 

Sophomore 

Tonganoxie 

Freshman 

Kansas City 
Junior 


Hi 






EDMONDS, JEAN A. 


Topeka 




English 

EL BEHERI, TWILA 

General 


Freshman 

San Antonia, TX 

Freshman 

Leavenworth 




ELLIOTT, ERIN 




Speech Pathology 


Junior 


' 



ELLIOTT, KELLI D. Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ENDEBROCK, LINDA M. Crestwood, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ERICKSON, SARAH C McPherson 

Secondary Education Senior 

EYE, JACKLYN Cedar Point 

Computer Science Freshman 

FIELDER, LISA L. Dwight 

General Business Administration Freshman 



FISHER, CAROL B. 

Management 

FOOSHEE, JULIE A. 

Biology 

FORSHEE, BECKY L. 

Sociology 

FORSYTH, DEANA C. McPherson 

Pre-Prof. Elementary Sophomore 

FRANKENBERG, PAMELA Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 



Alta Vista 

Sophomore 

Garnett 

Sophomore 

Wichita 

Junior 




390/West 



wcstwestwcstwestwcstwestwestwcstwestwestwcstwcstwcstwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwcstwe 







^Ek *- - A 


i 


iJ 


i *:> A 






FRENCH, DEBORA D. Olathe 

Pre-Prof Secondary Junior 
GALE, MILA GWYNNE Overland Park 

Dietetics Senior 

GALE, MARY M. Overland Park 

General Business Administration Freshman 

GARVIN, LISA M. Merriam 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

GAULT, JANNA L. Wichita 

General Freshman 

GLENN, DEBRA K. Lenexa 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

GOOD, PAMELA Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

GRAHAM, MICHELLE Salina 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

GREEN, BRENDA Wichita 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

GREENBANK, SALLY Eldorado 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

GREENE, GERI Garden City 

Pre-law Freshman 

HADDOCK, REBECCA Arkansas City 

Food Science and Industry Freshman 

HALL, DEANN Fredonia 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HAMMARLUND, JANICE St. Marys 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HAMPEL, DONNA Garden Plain 

Sociology Freshman 

HARRINGTON, LANA Garden City 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

HARVEY, TERRY Gar den City 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

HEATH, BRENDA Olathe 

General Freshman 

HILL, BRENDA Leawood 

Home Economics Sophomore 

HINTZ, JEAN Salina 

Accounting Freshman 




i 



\ 




Blow!- A custom 
women who have just 
been promised or 
engaged follow at K- 
State is the candle- 
lighting ceremony. The 
promise or engagement 
ring is tied among 
ribbons at the base of a 
candle. As it's passed 
around a circle of 
friends, others are able 
to view the ring. The 
candle is passed around 
until it reaches the girl 
the ring belongs to. Lynn 
Wiseman, junior in 
clothing textiles, 
prepares to blow out the 
candle to let others know 
she is engaged to be 
married. 



*m*L 



Tim Costello 



West/391 



stwestwestwcstwcst westwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwest westwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestu 



HOFERER, CHRISTINE Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

HOFERER, MICHELLE Topeka 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

HOOD, VICTORIA Wlnfield 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

HORNER, TAMERA Wichita 

General Freshman 

HORTING, CAROL Tescott 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

HUBERT, JACKIE Mullinville 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

HUDSON, JACQUELIN Caldwell 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HUGHES, SUSAN Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HULSING, CHERYL Topeka 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

IRELAND, REGINA Hutchinson 

Dance Junior 

JACKSON, MARY Topeka 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

JACOBSON, ELEANOR Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

JADERBORG, KAREN Enterprise 

Accounting Junior 

JANSSEN, MELODIE Lorraine 

Accounting Senior 

JERNIGAN, HEIDI Council Grove 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

JESTER, ALICIA Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

JOHNSON, SUSAN Salina 

Secondary Education Freshman 

JONES, DEBRA Reading 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

JONES, JENNIFER Olathe 

General Engineering Freshman 

KENNEDY, CAROL Sedan 

General Engineering Freshman 

KERN, LOIS Osage City 

Medical Technology Freshman 

KINSLER, SUSAN Kingman 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KLONTZ, DONNA Hiawatha 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

KOENIGS, CHERYL Goddard 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

LAMOREAUX, CHRISTINA Waterville 

Fine Arts Freshman 

LARSON, KATHERINE Olathe 

Horticulture Sophomore 

LAUPPE, SONYA Lawrence 

Home Economics Freshman 

LAWSON, ENID Arkansas City 

Secondary Education Senior 

LEE, NANCY Hutchinson 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

LICKTEIG, CATHY Garnett 

Accounting Freshman 

LIETZ, LESLIE Paxico 

Computer Science Junior 

LINDER, SUSAN Clay Center 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

LITSEY, LYNNE Sedgwick 

General Freshman 

LITTLE, JANIS Carbondale 

General Business Administration Freshman 

LONG, LISA Lenexa 

English Sophomore 

LUNDQUIST, REBECCA Lindsborg 

Secondary Education Freshman 

MADDUX, JEWELL Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

MANN, SHERILYN Waterville 

Art Freshman 

MARTELL, JULIE Topeka 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MARTIN, TAMARA Johnson 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

MCCLARY, KRYSTAL Centralia 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

McCULLOUGH, MELISSA Topeka 

General Freshman 

MCDOWELL, AIMEE Chanute 

General Business Administration Freshman 

MELSTER, ALLISON Hiawatha 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MELTON, ELAINE Salina 

Psychology Senior 




392/West 



itwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwest westwestwestwestwes 







METZ, MICHELLE Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

MICK, DIANNE Tipton 

Home Economics Freshman 

MILLER, LORI Wichita 

General Freshman 

MILLER, NIKKI Stilwell 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

MILLS, VALERIE New Boston, IL 

Interior Design Senior 

MISZKWITZ, THERESA Salina 

History Junior 

MOONEY, JOAN Roeland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

MORRICAL, CARLA Beverly 

Home Economics Sophomore 

MOWRY, STEPHANIE Council Grove 

Agriculture Journalism Freshman 

MUETING, SHARON Axtell 

Horticulture Freshman 

NELSON, DARLA Strong City 

Computer Science Freshman 

NICHOLSON, JACKL1NE Salina 

General Business Administration Freshman 

NORMAN, TRUDY Fowler 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

NORRIS, MARY Edgerton 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

OBERLE, KATHLEEN Claflin 

Secondary Education Senior 

OLSEN, DEBORAH Prairie Village 

Home Economics Sophomore 

OSTENBERG, JAN Salina 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

PARMER, DINA Tonganoxie 

Interior Design Freshman 

PENNEL, PATRICIA Hiawatha 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

PETERSON, ANN Bridgeport 

Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

PFANENSTIEL, CHERI Victoria 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

PHILLIPS, CHRISTINE Wichita 

Dietetics Freshman 

PHILLIPS, PAMELA Leavenworth 

Modern Language Junior 

PIERCE, JENNIFER Manhattan 

Speech Pathology Junior 

PIHL, DEBORAH Falun 

Secondary Education .... Freshman 

PITTMAN, TRACEY Tonganoxie 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

PURSLEY, JULIE Springfield, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

RASSETTE, DIANE Salina 

Home Economics Sophomore 

REED, MARIANNE Copeland 

Interior Design Senior 

REID, PEGGY Atchison 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

REINKE, JULIE Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

RHINE, LINDA Hays 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

RICHARDS, CATHY Wichita 

Pre-Professional Elementary Freshman 

ROWLAND, LORI Wichita 

General Freshman 

ROWLEY, KATHRYN Kansas City 

General Freshman 

RUDICEL, DEBRA Kingman 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

RUSSELL, KIMBERLY Chanute 

General Freshman 

SANDBERG, PATRICIA Chesterfield, MO 

General Business Administration Freshman 

SAPP, ANGELA Esbon 

Agriculture General Freshman 

SAWYER, REBECCA Topeka 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SCARBROUGH, KAY Hiawatha 

Modern Language Freshman 

SCHEMPER, TERESA Manhattan 

Dietetics Sophomore 

SCHERER, DEBORAH Kansas City 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

SCHLAGER, LORI " Garden City 

General Business Administration . Freshman 

SCHLUEMER, BARBARA Ferguson, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 



West/393 



twestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwes 



What's Cookin'?- In 

addition to recreational 
facilities, residence hall 
basements are equipped 
with a kitchen. A small 
refrigerator, electric 
range and oven, and sink 
with cabinets make up 
the kitchen. Residents 
are free to use the 
facilities whenever they 
want. Cooking utensils 
are usually available for 
check-out at the main 
desk. Pam Schmanke, 
sophomore in retail 
floriculture takes 
advantage of the kitchen 
in West hall by baking a 
cake. 




Kent Boughton 



SCHMANKE, PAMELA C. Alma 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

SCHM1TZ, ANNE K. Manhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SCHNEIDER, LEEANN R. Hutchinson 

Marketing Junior 

SCHNEIDER, LEWJENE M. Logan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

SCHONEMAN, LAURIE A. Kansas City 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

SCHWARTZ, CHERI D. Washington 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

SCHWARTZ, JONI K. Pretty Prairie 

Home Economics Sophomore 

SEACAT, KATHLEEN M. Ashland 

Home Economics Junior 

SEMRAD, CHERYL A. Shawnee 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

SHANELEC, ABBY G. Kingman 

Dance Freshman 

SHELLEY, NANCY K. Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SIMPSON, KATHY D. Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

SISTRUNK, WENDY A. Manhattan 

Secondary Education Freshman 

SMITH, MAUREEN J. Topeka 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

SMITH, SHELLEY L. Wichita 

Interior Design Freshman 

SOBBA, ANITA M. Garnett 

Horticulture Freshman 

SOBBA, CAROL M. Garnett 

Agriculture Journalism Sophomore 

SPADE, DIANE M. Burlingame 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

SPANNUTH, LISA Prairie Village 
Pre-Medicine Freshman 




394/West 



[i/estwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwestwest 




4BUI 







STANLEY, THERESA D. Topeka 

General Freshman 

STEWART, STEPHANIE Chanute 

General Freshman 

STIPPICH, SHERRY L. Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

STOREY, DEBRA A. Wichita 

General Business Administration Freshman 

STRATHE, JANET LYNNE Wichita 

Horticulture Senior 

STRATHMAN, MARY B Topeka 

Secondary Education Senior 

TALBOTT, DARLA D. Marquette 

Secondary Education Freshman 

TEICHMANN, TERRI J Hudson 

Secondary Education Senior 

THIES, AMY S. Great Bend 

General Business Administration Freshman 

THOMPSON, BETH A Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

THOMPSON, CONNIE L. Gladstone, MO 

Psychology Freshman 

TOWNLEY, MELODY R. Phillipsburg 

Biochemistry Freshman 

TREESE, SHERRI L. Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

TUCKER, DIANN G. Elkhart 

Secondary Education Junior 

UBBEN, TERESA Blue Rapids 

Computer Science Freshman 

UNRUH, NANCY L. Wichita 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

UPSON, VICKI R. Holdrege, NE 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

VANDERVEEN, BARBARA Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

VARGA, SHEILA M. Harbert, MI 

Pre-Design Profession Freshman 

VOHS, KAREN M. Decatur, IL 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

WAGNER, REBECCA A. Richmond 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

WALDEN, KELLI A. Garden Plain 

General Business Administration Freshman 

WALDNER, ROBBIN R. Osage City 

General Freshman 

WALSH, JAYNE A. Wichita 

General Freshman 

WANGEMAN, LORI G. Clearwater 

Accounting Freshman 

WARNE, DENISE K. Mankato 

Family and Child Development . . Freshman 

WARREN, TAMARA J. Galva 

General Freshman 

WAY, SHELLEY A. Wichita 

Interior Design Junior 

WEIMER, SANDY J. Clay Center 

Elementary Education Junior 

WEIRICK, JERI L, Wichita 

Office Administration Sophomore 

WELLS, DEBRA A. Garden Plain 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

WERNER, RHONDA K. Victoria 

Pre-Prof. Elementary Freshman 

WILLHITE, LORI R. Elmdale 

Accounting Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, KELLY DAWN Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, KIMBER L. Wichita 

Home Economics Sophomore 

WILSON, JANETTE J. Asherville 

Accounting Junior 

WISEMAN, LYNN A. Hiawatha 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

YARBER, SHERRI L. Overland Park 
Chemical Engineering Sophomore 
YOCUM, THERESA Spring Hill 
General Business Administration . Freshman 
YOUNGLAND, TAMMY K. Salina 

Accounting Junior 

ZEIGLER, SHANNON Junction City 

Dietetics Senior 

ZIMMERMAN, SUSAN Alta Vista 

Secondary Education Junior 

ZOOK, CATHERINE A. Manhattan 
Elementary Education Junior 



West/395 




Sue Pfnnnmuller 



396/Singie Living 



When you're on your own 



T\iffering in almost every aspect — 
*^ backgrounds, majors, physical 
features, personalities, students also differ 
in how and where they choose to live 
while attending school. 

For some, the residence hall or greek 
house provides the enviornment they 
seek. For others, and alternative to group 
living has been found. 

These students prefer to live in a 
smaller group, and in different 
surroundings. Even here, the choices are 
many — apartments, houses and trailers 
provide the enviornment which some 
students require. For Beth Samuelson, 
senior in elementary education, and Judy 
Snavely, senior in accounting, an 
apartment was the alternative chosen. 
Both lived as roommates in West Hall for 
one year. 

"It (residence Hall living) served our 
purposes for the first two months, for 
meeting new people," Samuelson said. 
But after that, it was time to leave." 

Snavely agreed, and said, "We got tired 
of Derby Food, tired of having only one 
room, and tired of all the regulations. We 
also felt pressured into becoming involved 
in hall activities." Both agreed that living 
in the hall was good experience, but 
apartment life was better. 

"It's too good! We can't get anything 
done because we're having too much 
fun!" Samuelson said. "The atmosphere is 
a lot nicer." "It's a lot easier to 
entertain," Samuelson said. 

"There's a place to get away here. And 
when we do study, it's easier to 
concentrate," Snavely said. 

Although many apartments have more 
than two residents, Samuelson and 
Snavely chose to split the cost between 
themselves. 

"It would be cheaper to have more 
than one roommate, but it would make it 
even harder for us to get along," Snavely 
said. 

Cooking and cleaning responsibilities are 
also split evenly between the two. 

"The cooking is a lot better," 
Samuelson said. "The main problem is 
figuring out something interesting to eat." 



Pam Good 



"It (an apartment) takes a lot more 
cleaning, but it's worth it," Snavely said. 

Though privacy and independence are 
assets in apartment life, Samuelson and 
Snavely said they felt there were also 
some disadvantages. 

"There are more bills that come up 
every month. I have to watch my money 
more," Snavely said. "Also, you don't 
hear much about what's going on with the 
school." 

"There's more responsibility, too," 
Samuelson said. "You have to keep after 
the landlords," Snavely said. 
"Maintenance work takes at least a week." 

Privacy, a quieter environment, and a 
better place to entertain or study seem to 
be the reasons for choosing an apartment 
for Samuelson and Snavely. Snavely 
summed it up by saying, "There aren't 
herds of people around, but there's 
enough to keep you company." 

Steve Buster, senior in general business 
administration, agreed with Snavely's 
statement, although his reasons for living 
off campus differ from those of 
Samuelson and Snavely. 

Buster has lived in a trailer for five 
years while attending K-State. He lived for 
a summer in Moore Hall, but moved out 
before the fall semester began. 

"I didn' have my housing contract in on 
time, and so I couldn't get back into 
Moore, and there were no apartments to 
be found," Buster said. "It (the housing 
situation) was a lot tighter then now. So I 
bought a trailer and moved in," Buster 
said. 

"I probably could have lived in Moore 
another year, but that's all. I could tell it 
was getting old." he said. 

"There's even more privacy in a trailer 
than in an apartment," he said. 

"You're not around as many people. 
But, I know if there were a lot of people, 
I'd never get any sleep. I'd come home 
from work, and then for out with them." 

He said that he and his roommate try 
to split cleaning responsibilities, "but 



there's no formal deal. I'm not usually 
there, so it's everyone for himself, 
especially when it comes to cooking," he 
said. "We're real junk food junkies," he 
added. 

Buster either drives or rides a bicycle 
to school. He lives 2V2 miles from campus 
in a large trailer court. 

He doesn't feel isolated from campus 
activities, because he hears about them 
from co-workers, or the Collegian. 

"Really there's no big difference," he 
said. "The main thing is the rent. It's 
(trailer) lower than an apartment." 

"Rent is a waste," Buster said. "But 
when I graduate, I'll sell my trailer and 
get that money back. That will help pay 
off student loans and help get me started 
when I get out of school." 

"I'll get back more than what I paid 
out, " he said. It's like putting that money 
into a savings account, or like living free 
for five years." 

Apartments or trailers, both are proven 
viable alternatives to residence halls, 
fraternities and sororities and living at 
nome. M 




Sue Pfannmuller 



Canine Company- Many student 
find the advantage of off campus 
housing in being able to keep 
larger pets. Kay Coles, graduate 
in political science, studies as her 
dog snoozes under her feet. 

Compact Living- Postage-stamp 
sized kitchen, bed in the living 
room, off campus housing can be 
cramped but it's home: 



BOTTOM ROW -Lisa Poe, Jan Russell, Kim 
Mason. TOP ROW-Curtls Russell, Sandy Altland, 
Robert Altland. 




*k 



Off Campus Student Association 



Off-Campus 



off-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-cam] 



Bass Ackwards-Off 

campus students find 
different ways to get to 
campus. Some bike, 
cycle, moped, drive, or 
use their feet. With a 
little ingenuity the 
regular route can be 
made a bit more 
interesting. Scott 
Dolginow, senior in pre- 
veterinary medicine, 
decides to see where he 
has been as he makes 
his way on Claflin Road. 




John Bock 



ABASHE, ELIZABETH Nigeria 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

ABBOTT, LEONARD Goodland 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ABRAHAMSON, KRISTEN Overland Park 

Horticulture Senior 

ABRAM, TAMI Jewell 

Marketing Freshman 

ACKERMANN, FRANK Cincinnati, OH 

Computer Science Junior 

ADAMS, BRENT Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

ADK1NS, CARRITA Kansas City 

Accounting Senior 

ADOLPH, CONNIE Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

AFSHARIAN, MOHAMMED Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

AHERN, JAMES Salina 

Biology Freshman 

AHRENS. ANTON Topeka 

Chemical Science Senior 

AIKINS, RONALD Humboldt 

General Junior 

AITKEN, JAMES McPherson 

Architecture Senior 

AITKEN, MARK Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

AJAI, CHRISTOPHER Nigeria 

Physical Therapy Graduate Student 




398/Off-Campus 



off-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campusoff-campuso 

AKIN, DEAN Manhattan 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

AKPEHE, ATHANASIUS Manhattan 

_, _ Agricultural Education Freshman 

I F"7^Jr m .. Eat Wg W m ■ ALBRIGHT, DEBRA G Parsons 

" " F m L" m M} Clothing Textiles Senior 

-k w ' ^n 1^ ALBRIGHT, DEBRA J Burrton 

frfe P tm VL' // 4 Mr^. Clothing and Retailing Senior 

H \ v ■ 1R ./ / / ^^k "V < ALEJOS, SUSAN Topeka 

n H \ ' ' ''X^ Wk Wkm W-Mk S P ccial Special 

^^~>f ■ , , J ^Mfes "•*hI jBKfc rfmm "g Food Science and Industry Senior 

ALLEN, MITCHELL Kingman 

Geology Junior 

^^ T -- ™ W" flT^l ALLEN, TINA Manhattan 

m n> . ■ n - w** ^^k* Bs- ^^E Accounting Junior 

* W m ,F ffX # 1 4 > fi ^ W ALLISON. GRANT Omaha, NE 

•Tgf'f " ' - jP ^^ V WO ^ if Biology Senior 

J^-/ \^ tjflk Jr A JB ALLISON, PATRICIA Basehor 

% ' Jk\ \ ^^mg jj j / B&ri«7 Family and Child Development Junior 

Mk 'V^'v' is * - A JB I BffiF ALLISON, SANDRA Junction City 

EE |r T;' / I fl HL iS : & OTTOff J Pre-Professional Elementary Education Sophomore 

ALSALIH, HAYTHAM Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

ALSALIH, MARK Manhattan 

General Engineering Freshman 

f ALTENDERND, MARK Eudora 

7 f. Animal Science and Industry Senior 

4_ h ALTLAND, ROBERT Manhattan 
I ^Sm^o^'i ' Management Junior 

J&ff-fV' AMMEL, GEORGIA Leavenworth 
W'/'i H I I Elementary Education Senior 

AMOS, LARRY Pine Bluff, AR 

Education Graduate Student 

ANDERES, RANDALL Hope 

_- - ^.. ,_, Agricultural Economics Senior 

^" t ™ ^ ^ |^ * W ANDERSON, DEBORAH Wichita 

^~ j£ Management Senior 

ANDERSON, JUNE Lindsborg 

(Horticulture Senior 
j "~S. MnLs& > Mm\ ANDERS0N - KATHY Junction City 
I / ■ ' •- I flE^W^^B Elementary Education Senior 

m ——m apM^ n ■ gi IHi ANDERSON, MARGARET Garnett 

AmMMk. i . JfitT Institutional Management Graduate Student 

J|->-^-« H^KS WmM JmSmm Jr JH - 'Jp* anderson, nell Abilene 

JP V j£j* ~i <■ W ' ' I ST -fl Elementary Education Junior 

■ 't ^F*' ^Tl' T* ' * T^ ^3/h ^" 7 ANDERSON, ROBERT Wichita 

4^fek ^^V *P- 'I ^' m\ k. ANDERSON, SHERI Manhattan 

M ^H& *~ SB-1 jjfil /t^T , ANDERSON, TIM Overland Park 

/"M * ^r fl|WL ^H n|^P H^ JEM Electrical Engineering Junior 

" "' "' -"-J ^^ _ ANDREWS, SABRINA Wichita 

JBk\ General Freshman 

Vi ^Fm ANDREWS, SUSAN Manhattan 

\ mW-» -~m Elementary Education Senior 

J C F ANGELL, RANDALL Manhattan 

■Hr^ V a^" Mk. * ' " / Engineering Technology Senior 

«j£ ^ M^m -V I ^»** ANNIS, LISA Beloit 

<^\ A fl m it Home Economics Senior 

"7 5v\ §Mr ] \ ARELLANO, JOHN Torrimar, PR 

\ Nfcji j ^ k| Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

MMavemms^^mm ^ -.=— i — ^.m^— ARGO, BRENT Lexington, MO 

^ i ^m ./^^^iV ^# £fS* Architecture Fifth Year Student 

■ B ^^^1 1 A- - 4B> o «P^»S ARGO, DAVID El Dorado 

^^W| R- rll it ^"r^ il F^ -Km mW*L'~m Architecture Fifth Year Student 

X^ W 1 P ^iC ^M ^^ A W ARNOLDY, JOCILE Topeka 

^^H ^|^k .. JL . 0gtA\» m\* Hk I ^i ^H Family and Child Development Senior 

^MmAmmm^^fr ~^' Mm Kl^^^A-Jj t ^W^ ARONSON, BRUCE Arlington Heights, IL 

UlW At II ''■ffi 1 |\£i|.':tf' ,'^- s y^ \ \ ^r Bakery Service and Management Sophomore 

ARP, SUZANNE Manhattan 

Agronomy Freshman 

ARTHUR, DEBORAH Manhattan 

____ _ „ _ ,-, Family and Child Development Senior 

•W Wp*< f<»^J "'\~"*W ARTZ. ARTHUR Junction City 

£1 \ " . r Pre-Professional Secondary Sophomore 

F, « "X/, ASHTON, ROBERT Lamed 

* Wm\ "" 4^ ( \ \ fc, "*C K Pre-Design Professions Junior 

I ^^L ^* ^ \ m^k^mm\ ATKINSON, EDWARD Norton 

/ ^^^w afc. * V 1 ! Veterinary Medicine Junior 




■[*»,:- 
^<-> 








J»J. £ 


» 



Off-Campus/399 



offcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampu 



Watching the World 


Go By-Residents of 


Royal Towers 


Apartments are 


mesmerized by the 


heavy snowfall that 


seems to cover the 


atmosphere in a blanket 


of white. 




Bo Rader 



ATU, JOSHUA Manhattan 

Agronomy Senior 

AYDOGAN, HURRIYET Turkey 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

AYERS, THOMAS Dodge City 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BAEHIER, GARY Sharon Springs 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BAHR, BONNIE Olmitz 

Family and Child Development Junior 

BAHR, JUDITH Fort Scott 

Elementary Education Senior 

BAHR, KURTIS Topeka 

Engineering Technology Senior 

BAILEY, GARY M Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BAILEY, KEVIN Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BAIROW, SHARON Wamego 

Home Economics Junior 

BAJAH, ISAIAH Manhattan 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

BAKER, KRISTI Junction City 

Music Graduate 

BAKER, LAUREL Scranton 

Music Education Senior 

BALDWIN, KATHLEEN Tonganoxie 
Clothing Textiles Sophomore 
BAMBICK, ELIZABETH Fredonia 
Office Administration Junior 

BAMBRICK, PATRICIA Fredonia 

Physical Education Senior 

BARGDILL, REBECCA Blue Rapids 

Elementary Education Senior 

BARKYOUMB, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

BARNT, GAILYA Osborne 

Music Junior 

BAROLDY, LARRY Manhattan 

Psychology Freshman 

BARRY, MARILYN Dodge City 

Music Education Senior 

BARRY, MICHELLE Colby 

Animai Science and Industry Senior 

BARTEL, KATHLEEN Hillsboro 

Elementary Education Senior 

BARTEN, LOREN Hope 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BASCOM, JOHNATHAN Troy 

Geography Junior 




400/Off Campus 



campusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoff campus of fcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampuso 





iA 


' \ - ■ 


W"*- 


Vk 1 * 


A *v. 


•/ 


^ 






±Ji^4iMgALjX 




BASSFORD, DEBBIE 

Dietetics and Institutional Management 

BASYE, MICHAEL 

Psychology 

BATES, BYRON 

Marketing 



Harper 

Junior 

Salina 

Freshman 

Manhattan 

Junior 



BAUER, LORI Morganville 

Elementary Education Junior 

BAUER, RICHARD Middlebury, VT 

Construction Science Senior 

BAUS, MARK Ashton, SD 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BAYER, ROBERT Cheney 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BEACHEY. BRENDA Merriam 

Marketing Senior 

BEADLER, KRISTI Fall River 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BEAUCHAMP, GENE Ottawa 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BEAUDET, PATRICIA Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

BECK, TERRI Iola 

Home Economics Senior 

BACKEMEYER, LYNN Wellington, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

BECKER. ROGER Downs 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BECKERMAN, DENISE Fowler 

Physical Education Senior 



BECKWITH, JAN 
Retail Floriculture 
BEELER, CATHERINE 
Parasitology 
BEEMAN, KEITH 
Agricultural Education 
BEETS, LINDA 
Horticulture 



Oneida 

Sophomore 

Overland Park 

Graduate Student 

Colby 

Graduate Student 

Paola 

Junior 



BEIER, PATRICIA Manhattan 

Interior Design Freshman 

BEIM, KENT Phlllipsburg 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

BEIMS, KATHERINE Manhattan 

General Business Administration Junior 

BEIMS, ROBERT Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BEISNER, BRIAN Natoma 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BELCHER, JANET Kinsley 

Computer Science Senior 

BELDEN, DEANNA Wichita 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

BELDEN, KATHLEEN Wichita 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

BELL, LESTA Manhattan 

Home Economics Senior 

BELLAR. MARCENE Howard 

Clothing Textiles Senior 

BELLINGER, MONET Shawnee Mission 
Social Work Junior 

BENDA, BARBARA .... Ludell 

Horticulture Sophomore 

BENGSTON, ANNE Inman 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BENLON, PAUL Kansas City 

Radio-TV Freshman 

BENNETT, RANDALL Williamsburg 

Architecture Senior 

BENNETT, SUE Jobstown, NJ 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BENSON, JENNIE Clay Center 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BENYSHEK, MARLA Effingham 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

BENYSHEK, WAYNE Manhattan 

Management Senior 

BERKLEY, VICKI Abilene 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

BERNING, SUZANNE Marienthal 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BERTELS, ELAINE Nortonville 

Speech Pathology Junior 

BESLER, CHRIS Topeka 

Geophysics Junior 

BETTS, ALAN Fort Riley 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

BEUERLEIN, JOE Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BEVER, MELINDA Sedan 

Home Economics Senior 



Off Campus/401 



offcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampu 



BHANGANANDA, NITINAI Manhattan 

Fine Arts Senior 

BICHELMEYER, MARY Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

BIEBERLY, MIKE Salina 

Accounting Junior 

BIEGLER, CHRIS Manhattan 

Music Education Senior 

BIENHOFF, STEPHEN Phillipsburg 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

BIGGS, STANLEY Leavenworth 

Finance Senior 

BIGHAM, RODNEY Grantville 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

BILLINGER, RANDY Manhattan 

Computer Science Senior 

BISHOFF, GREGORY Junction City 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BLACKMAN. BRAD Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Senior 



BLACKMAN, SUSAN 

Social Work 

BLACKWOOD, SHERR1E 

Secondary Education 

BLAIR, KELLY 

Journalism and Mass Communication 

BLAKE, CHERYL 

Political Science 

BLAKESLEE, EMILY 

Clothing and Textiles 



Olathe 

Junior 

Belleville 

Sophomore 

Olathe 

Sophomore 

St. George 

Junior 

St. John 

Graduate Student 

BLANCHARD, D1ANNA Coffeyville 

Marketing Sophomore 

BLASI. JULIE Wichita 

General Business Administration .... Senior 

BLATTNER, THOMAS Rozel 

Accounting Senior 

BLEVINS, VANETTA Highland 

Clothing Textiles Senior 

BLOCHBERGER, JAMES Jefferson City. MO 
Architecture Senior 

BLOESSER, SHERRI Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 

BLOOM, KENNETH Osage City 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BLOOMCAMP, LEE Walnut 

Crop Protection Senior 

BLUE, KAREN Alma 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Freshman 

BLUME, DEBBIE St. George 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BLYTHE, LAURIE White City 

Interior Design Freshman 

BOCK, DONALD Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

BOCK, MARGARET Manhattan 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 

BOGUSKI, MARK Overland Park 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

BOHART, KATHRYN Larned 

Elementary Education Senior 

BOHM, KYLE Concordia 

Elementary Education Junior 

BOLINE, DOUGLAS Overland Park 

Agronomy Senior 

BOLLIG, SARA Manhattan 

Marketing Junior 

BOLLMAN, DAVID Manhattan 

General Engineering Freshman 

BOLTE, SHERI Lincoln 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

BOLZ, RITA Valley Falls 

Elementary Education Senior 

BOMBARDIER, PAULA Concordia 

Interior Design Senior 

BONNEWELL, ROBERT Kiowa 

Elementary Education Senior 

BOOTMAN, NANCY Fairway 

Housing and Equipment Junior 

BORGERDING, PAT Marysville 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

BORHANI, MARTHA Hanover 

Art Sophomore 

BORST, SARA ... Manhattan 

General Freshman 

BOSARGE, EVELYN Topeka 

Secondary Education Freshman 

BOULA, KIM McPherson 

Accounting Senior 

BOWEN, DEBBIE Louisville, KY 

Institutional Management Graduate Student 




402/Off Campus 



campusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampus offcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusc 




BOWERSOX, CONNIE Belleville 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BOWKER, LEROY Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

BOYD, KELLY Manhattan 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

BOYD, STEVEN St. Louis, MO 

Architecture Junior 

BOYER, KENNETH Kanopolis 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BRADLEY, PHILLIP Lawrence 

Business Administration Junior 

BRADY-BROOKS, V1CK1 Topeka 

Social Work Senior 

BRAMLAGE, DON Marysville 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BRAMLAGE, JULIE Marysville 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

BREECH, CINDY Eureka 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



BREITENBACH, CHERYL 
General Engineering 
BRELSFORD, DIANA 
Home Economics 



Belpre 
Freshman 
Manhattan 
Freshman 

BRENSING, STEVE Stafford 

Agronomy Senior 

BREWER, HOLLY Mission 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

BREWER, TINA Pittsburg 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BREWSTER, BETHANY Manhattan 

Radio-TV Senior 

BROADUS, DIANE Hutchinson 

Home Economics Senior 

BROCKHOFF, KEVIN Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BRONAUGH, ROBIN Merriam 

Horticulture Senior 

BROOKS, SCOTT Manhattan 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

BROWN, ANNETTE Pattonsburg, MO 

Home Economics Senior 

BROWN, CINDY Parsons 

Interior Design Senior 

BROWN, JOLENE Overland Park 

Secondary Education Senior 

BROWN, MARTINA Liberal 

Secondary Education Senior 

BROWN, MIKE D Cottonwood Falls 

Chemical Engineering Senior 




Ski Kansas-The lawn in 
front of Anderson Hail 
seems to be an excellent 
place for cross-country 
skiing. Don Breiby, 
senior in restuarant 
management, tries out a 
pair of cross-country skis 
on the Anderson lawn. 



Tim CosteNo 



Off Campus/403 



offcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampii 



Tighten Upt-Ken 
Edwards, senior in 
music, tries to get his 
message across to the 
trumpet section. It's 
difficult to determine 
exactly what the 
message is, but the 
trumpets are sure to get 
it. 




Sue Pfannmuller 



BROWN, MITCHELL Liberal 

General Business Administration Junior 

BROWN, SHARON Salina 

Family and Child Development . . . Sophomore 
BROWNING, MELVIN Eureka 

General Engineering Freshman 

BRUNS, HENRY Liberal 

General Senior 

BRUNTON, JODY Ozawkie 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

BRYANT, RICHARD Wichita 

Art Senior 

BUDELOV1CH, MICHELLE Manhattan 

Marketing Junior 

BUDREAU, SCOTT Lincoln 

Construction Science Sophomore 

BUESSING, DEBRA Axtell 

Management Junior 

BUESSING, KAREN Topeka 

Home Economics Freshman 

BUGNER, DOUGLAS Garden Plain 

Finance Senior 

BULLOCK, NATALIE Pittsburg 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BULLOCK, ROBERT Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BULTMAN, GARY Elkhart 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

BUNDY, PATRICIA Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Junior 

BUNKER, LYNN Abilene 

Speech Graduate Student 

BUNTON, ROBIN Manhattan 

Psychology Junior 

BUNTON, PAUL Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

BURDEN, GREGG Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

BURGESS, GAIL Topeka 

Psychology Senior 

BURKLUND, JANIS Olsburg 

Radio-TV Senior 

BURKMAN, TAMARA Shawnee 

Interior Design Junior 

BURMEISTER, WILLIAM St. Louis 

Architecture Senior 

BURNS, SHAWN Valley Falls 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BUROUGH, FRANK Delphos 

Chemistry Senior 




404/Off Campus 



campusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusol 




BURROW, HADDIE St. George 

Clothing Textiles Junior 

BURTIS, HELEN Overland Park 

Humanities Senior 

BURTNESS, NORMAN Manhattan 

General Business Administration Freshman 

BURTON, BILL Fowler 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BURTON, KATHY Topeka 

Interior Design Senior 

BURTON, MARGARET Kansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

BUSH, RICHARD Coffeyville 

Accounting Junior 

BUSS, BRENDA Leonardville 

HomeEconomics Senior 

BUTLER, KENNETH Overland Park 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

BUTLER, WAYNE Ulysses 

Management Sophomore 

BUTTERFIELD, BRAD Clay Center 

Marketing Junior 

BYARLAY, JEAN Osborne 

Biology Education . . . . Junior 

BYNUM, TERRI Independence 

Journalism and Mass Communication . Senior 

BYRD, KATHRYN Leavenworth 

English Senior 

CALVERT, JIM Independence, MO 

Construction Science Junior 

CAMPBELL, ROBERT Butler, NJ 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

CAN, CUNEYT Turkey 

Physics Graduate Student 

CANNON, EDWIN St. Louis, MO 

Interior Architeure Fifth Year Student 

CARLSON, FAYE Kinsley 

Clothing Textiles Senior 

CARLSON, KLEILA Lindsborg 

Home Economics Junior 

CARLSON, TRACY Raytown, MO 

Social Work Junior 

CARNAHAN, LORI Manhattan 

Management Junior 

CARR, CHARLES Wichita 

Art Senior 

CARR, MARK Liberal 

Geology Junior 

CARR, PAULA Mulvane 

General Business Administration Junior 

CARROLL, STEVE Independence, MO. 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

CARSON. STUART Kingsland, TX 

Applied Music Senior 

CARSON, SUSAN Topeka 

Medical Technology Junior 

CARTER, DARREL Morrowville 

Engineering Technology Senior 

CARTER, ERNEST Kansas City 
Accounting Junior 

CARVER, ANDREA Riley 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Senior 

CASE, LORNA Beloit 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

CASE, SCOTT Topeka 

Architecture Junior 

CASEBIER, ELAINE McLouth 

Elementary Education Junior 

CASPERS. STEVEN Gaylord 

Engineering Technology Senior 

CATTELINO, CRAIG Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

CHADWICK, RON Hutchinson 

General Business Administration .... Senior 

CHANDLER, TIM Leonardville 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

CHAMPLIN, RHONDA Dodge City 

Clothing Textiles Junior 

CHANG, MARILYN ... .... Manhattan 

Computer Science Junior 

CHAPPELL, SUSAN Manhattan 

Marketing Sophomore 

CHARBONNEAU, STEVE Clyde 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

CHARPENTIER, CINDY Lenexa 

Accounting Senior 

CHASE, E. LANE El Dorado 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

CHERASKIN, JERI Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



Off Campus/405 



off campusoffcampiisoffcampusoffcampusoff campus offcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampu 

CHESNUTT, DEBRA Hutchison 

Accounting Sophomore 

CHEWNING, KENNETH .... Belton, MO 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

CHOITZ, JON Hutchinson ft 

General Business Administration .... Senior . . 

CLACK, CHARLOTTE Manhattan ^^ l*W ^ ^W J^ 

Animal Science and Industry Senior km m%W\ JB MM%\ A ^^B 

CLARK, KARL Manhattan ^f* Jftjl ^mmWXS- lipl Jl 'X M j 

Computer Science Sophomore m ML . Ifflmm MM W%'J!s^ U MM MUMm ' S^ 1 

CLARK, MARVETT St. George 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

CLARK, SANDRA Baldwin 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

CLARK, TIMOTHY Salina ■* ' j .' 1^"| ^"W K*"* "~ Wk WC^ "J 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 9k '*-*■- mt HmT 5* ™" 

CLARKE, DAVID Manhattan 

Computer Science Freshman 

CLARY, TIMOTHY Troy . , 

Pre Veterinary Medicine Junior ^—^^f^ 00 ^!!^. WT^XJ^' ~f% I Hfl 

CLEWELL, ROBERT Wellington 

Mechanical Engineering Junior ^fin, .J^flfcl^. /' 1 

CLINE, JAMES Milford 

General Business Administration Junior 

CLOUD, SHARON Overland Park f, v 7 r 7\^} 

Clothing Textiles Junior if ^rC" J j^ ^P» 

COASH, GINE Clifton ^k^'mumm ' 

Elementary Education Senior Mm\m\ Mm 

COATS, JIM Wichita mmmWlM * V mmA'.'M J^W M ' 

Accounting Sophomore Mi I Wmu\\mK Mm ~- '■■"'* ' ' | MmMm " $> 

COBLE, GARY Gardner " 

Physical Education Junior 

COCKERILL, JANET Spalding, NE 

Physical Education Junior 

COGAN, MARC Towanda 7 

Physical Education Senior -. _.:_ « 

COGSWELL, THERESA Manhattan 

Milling Science and Management .... Senior ' 

COHN, ARLYN Bloomfleld. CT 3 M gs £ .J J- !MN I* '^ A V 

Microbiology Senior £ 

COKER. MARVIN Ness City ■H^HPB| gMgfc. 

Mechanical Engineering Senior Mm Ij^ Mn% JBk, Mma ' 

COLL, ABIOLA Manhattan ■ ^558 M Jk\ P^^\ ' H 

Microbiology Sophomore jJHSfc-fe^EP fl , 1 ^^^^^5» 

COLE, TA1WO Manhattan ^' M W%--~~'r %&& ** ? 1 ) « 

Physics Graduate Student ^IWL* ^ . - - Mt&Hg - v 

COLLINGE, JUDITH Emporia Jjl^^fc - ' 

Life Science Senior MmmmTwt 

COLLINS, DARA Arkansas City J 1 1 'L 

Interior Design Senior 

COLLINS, STEPHEN Farmington, NE 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

COLSON, CONNIE Manhattan 

Speech Graduate Student -f~ : WZ '. WM m k»k *• 1* 

COMBS, LAWRENCE Hiawatha W ^ - %X- » X" * 

Life Science Senior V 1^ ^ "" " #^ tHE^V ^»^"- / «<**"> 

COMMER. ROGER Wichita .^B f^ A ' * *Jm\t S 

Construction Science Senior /%&m\ W\. z* n^. Jk" '^M / /t^ 

COMPTON, LEE Hill City M^**-— - 4 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

CONAGHAN, WILLIAM Shawnee Mission 
Labor Relations Senior 

CONLEY, PATRICIA Pine Bluff, AR 

Education Graduate Student 

CONNELL, BRIAN Jefferson City, MO " " ' f fT^ - W ■ 

Architecture Fifth Year Student % p lir? ^\gt* - J , / * 2 " 

CONNELL. JOSEPH Flemington, NJ E^ . . 1%**$ MmW**' ^km 

Physical Education Senior MM%W& MM '» ^^MfMMK *&/ mM^i n * 

CONNERS, ANNETTE Grantville flfflV /fPi ~ / mmMWBmmtf W ' M 

English Graduate HffJ/ ffl IV Ji ttW ■ H AH1] 

CONRAD, MIKE Osawatomie , 

General Business Administration Junior H ■ .? ^mWmWk 

CONRARDY, JAN Kingman " P**! J"^''' ' ' 

Foods and Nutrition Junior <K >ifc^«^Jfe Em, "tw ■ ^ "• * I •■ 

CONSIGLI, LINDA Manhattan W" ' JW ' ' Zr^SJ \\ 

General Business Administration Freshman *«^*-- * "^- \"^" 

CONWAY, KEN Oakley ^IW / % ^>W ^Jh^ ') 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior ^fft^^LEM V^i^^ V ! i ^mw^^ Sl \ "^H^ 

COOK, CHERYL Sabetha mmTMrnit^Mmmmm \ \ «\ 1 1L, ^/ 

Home Economics Education Junior ^Bm»\ \ \ \ ^1 ^^' k.\l 

COOK, CHRISTOPHER St Louis. MO ■■^■^^H 

Construction Science Junior ^sl3f^'%* 

COOK, JIM Overland Park J»* 3^5* 

Marketing Senior Wg^L ^a k ^^» ? " 

COONROD. JANET Great Falls, MT W- l_ ~ V \ SB 

Management Senior ^£ -Ji ' *• "* - * "* ' A^ I ■<• 

COOPER, BRADLEY Minneapolis , W> ^ £ ^T 

Horticulture Sophomore J\ w A' I MMm\ r r 

COPELAND, JANICE Riley 4r\ i» - (H«k - *v > 

Speech Pathology Freshman ijSF ., ' r JB ,' \ %^» 





406/Off Campus 



ffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampus off campusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoff campus 








f*gjr 




4*r N 




i 






COPELAND, KAREN Manhattan 

Anthropology Sophomore 

CORDER, DEBBY Scldcn 

Home Economics Junior 

CORDES, MORRIS Meade 

Civil Engineering Senior 

CORNETT, JULIE Winfield 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

CORRELL, CINDY Manhattan 

Elementary Education Junior 

CORRELL, KENT Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

CORRIGAN, SUE Wichita 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

COULTER, THOMAS Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

CRABLE, DENNY White City 

Physical Education Senior 

CRAFT, DIANE Edson 

Retail Floriculture Junior 

CRAFT, RICHARD Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

CRAIG, SHARON Baldwin City 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CRAMER, KURTIS Glasco 

General Sophomore 

CRANFORD, CURTIS Ulysses 

Chemical Science Junior 

CRANFORD, TED Junction City 

History Junior 

CRAYTON, WARREN Concordia 

Correctional Administration Senior 

CREEL, EARL Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

CRISS, NANCY Colby 

Music Education Junior 

CROW, COLEEN Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CROW, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

CROW, RANDY Manhattan 

Secondary Education Senior 

CULVER, STEPHEN Roeland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

CURRY, MARK Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CURT1SS, PATRICK Manhattan 

General Freshman 

DAGEFORDE, NANCY Junction City 
General Junior 




Cramped Quarters-K- 

State students are 
notorious for camping 
out in lines. These 
students were waiting in 
a line for concert tickets, 
but inclement weather 
moved them indoors to 
the Union Courtyard. 



Off Campus/407 



offcaisapusoffcampiisoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampu 

DALS1NG, REBECCA Greeley 

Accounting Senior jftMk it. ^- 

DAM, JANET Marysville B^^l iF>/^ 

Management Senior HL, *wk -*W 

DARROW. SHELLI Potomac. MD ■> Z ^^ — • Mm I \ ^ ^' -A. - 

Animal Science and Industry Senior Br m\ m^m M\ JKSt '* ^Nfc V \ ~ I "^P\ |j| \ 

DAV1N, MICHAEL Manhattan JML M j p I Jj I MmT^ ^/j~W] ^L" % ' ^. V \Rft 

Physical Education Senior |2P ^| £| |^| 1 ■ 1 i^Ui ' |^V - M ^H\ 

DAVIS, CATHY Manhattan 

General Freshman 

DAVIS, DANIEL Merriam 

Family and Child Development Senior BBfL. "x* 1 

DAVIS, DREW Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

DAVIS, KATHY Kansas City 

Physical Education Junior ,J ^f~ | , 

DAVIS, LORI Manhattan ,.;'&' .^. , '" P 

Agriculture Sophomore £'^8^. .'••'•' '•• I u * II J %/ i 

DAVIS, REGINA Manhattan 

Home Economics Senior 

DAVIS, ROBERT Leoti 

Business Administration Graduate Student MBit «*• * 

DAVIS, SUSAN Manhattan MM *fl^ 1 P f. 

Social Work Senior iJM F V.*l~ j K-<4"-''- ML* % 

DAVIS, VENETTE . Manhattan ■ jR i«^# V^k^ 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student "*t^ \ »*3fe^ ^^^k ^m% 

DAVISON, CYNTHIA Manhattan ^ %f^ ■ ■ H Jl * M ^'^ 

Secondary Education Junior ^ «~ « " ■Iffl jKr , „ • 

DAVISON, MICHAEL Lyons 

General Business Administration Junior 

DAWDY, DAVE Salina 

General Business Administration Junior 

DAWSON, KAY Wamego 

Modern Language Senior 

DAYVAULT, MARK Wichita v ^ m W \ 

Interior Architecture Fifth Year Student , v ^m\ ^ UmMf ^ <^A&> Mm ~^M§ 

DEBERRY, JULIE Prairie Village f \ ' & £fe fl I !fl W AW I Mi 

Biology Junior j BnllSvF :< ^ ; fllA 

DEBRICK, KEVIN Paola 

General Business Administration Junior 

DECKER, KATHLEEN Burr Oak 

Accounting Senior 

DECKERT, DAVID Salina WT\ ! I*~~~j^ IP ' % '" 

Accounting Sophomore ^Bfe€" « m -" - *& i JL"_ T 

DEDERICK, KENT Topeka jj^' 1 ' 

Natural Resource Management Junior ^^^■p / M -^k -»y^ _^*W \ ^M(r > J^M K 

DEDERICK, SUSAN Topeka M WL^ '^J j tkAM i| A f \ j ' 

Accounting Senior m^'^Ml \\ |~ ' ~1 «. /^ 




Caf Nap-For many off 
campus students, the K- 
State Union is a home 
away from home. 
Students eat, study, 
meet, and sleep there. 
Gail Norton, senior in 
marketing, takes a nap 
between classes in the 
Cat's Pause. 




408/Off Campus 



f fcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoff campus of fcampusoff campus* 




DEFFENBAUGH, MELISSA Paola 

Family and Child Development Senior 

DEFOREST, DIANE Peabody 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

DEGENHARDT, DAN Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

DELEGGE, LUKE Salina 

Adult Education Graduate Student 

DELZEIT, DORIS Wathena 

Marketing Senior 

DENEAULT, EDWARD Salina 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

DEPPISH, JULIE Milford 

Radio-TV Senior 

DERRICK, CINDY Abilene 

Sociology Junior 

DETERS, DONNA Centraila 

Elementary Education Senior 

DEUTSCH, KIM Hoisington 

Family and Child Development Graduate Student 

DEVANE. COLLEEN Junction City 

Elementary Education Senior 

DEYOE, KATHRYN Manhattan 

Finance Sophomore 

DEYOE, NANCY Manhattan 

General Freshman 

DICKENS, MARILYN Wichita 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DICKENS, RICKY Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Senior 

DICKERHOOF, RANDALL Chanute 

General Sophomore 

DIEFFENBACHER, SHERYL Cheney 

Accounting Junior 

DIERKING, DENNY Atchison 

Correctional Administration Sophomore 

DINNELL, KIM Hastings, NE 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

DITTEMORE, TRACIE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

DIXON, CHERI Manhattan 

Biology Senior 

DLABAL, PAMELA Ellsworth 

Agronomy Junior 

DOCKUM, TERRY Hutchinson 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

DODDERIDGE, JOHN Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

DODGION, NANCY Overland Park 

Dietetics and Institutional management Junior 

DOERKSEN, BRIAN Inman 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

DOHERTY, EILEEN Prairie Village 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

DOHRMANN, DAVID Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

DOMNICK, BRENDA Harper 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

DONLEY, KEITH Wichita 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

DONLEY, SPENCER Lincoln 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

DONNELLY, SUSAN Hope 

Home Economics Senior 

DORAN, PATRICK Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

DOTSON, DEANNA Frankfort 

Secondary Education Senior 

DOUGAN, LAURA Pretty Prairie 

Accounting Senior 

DOUGHERTY, BYRON Brookfield, WI 

Accounting Senior 

DOUGHERTY, DEBRA Garden City 

Family and Child Development Senior 

DOUGLAS, DONNA Kansas City 

Office Administration Junior 

DOW, KEVIN Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

DOWELL, JEFF Topeka 

Horticulture Junior 

DOWNES, PAMELA Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

DOYLE, BRIAN Lowell, MI 

Milling Science and Management .... Senior 

DOYLE, CHERYL Lowell, MI 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

DOYEN, KENT Concordia 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

DRAEMEL, IAN Salina 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 



Off Campus/409 



isoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcamDU! 



DREILING, ELYNN Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

DUENSING, JOHN Liberal 

Accounting Junior 

DUFFIN, JOY Leavenworth 

General Freshman 

DUFFY, CANDY Salina 

Interior Design Senior 

DUKE, KIMBERLY Marion 

Interior Architecture Senior 

DULAY, TEOFILO Manhattan 

Food Science Graduate Student 

DUMAS, MALCOLM Junction City 

Fine Arts Senior 

DUNCAN, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

DUNSTON, MELINDA Edwardsville 

Management Sohomore 

DUPES, STEVEN Gypsum 

Engineering Technology Senior 

DUPREE, GREGG Prairie Village 

Marketing Senior 

DURLER, ETHEL Dodge City 

Home Economics Senior 

DURLER, KEVIN Dodge City 

Management Sophomore 

DUTRO, MARK Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

EASTIN, SUSAN Dodge City 

Elementary Education Senior 

EBERSOLE, LINDA Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

EBERT, JEFF St. George 

Secodary Education Freshman 

ECCLES, BARBARA Gridley 

Family and Child Development Junior 

EDGAR, W. KELLEY Wellington 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

EDIGER, CHRIS Buhler 

Construction Science Junior 

EDMONDS, KELLY Topeka 

Correctional Administration .... Sophomore 

EDMONDS, KENNETH McLouth 

Secondary Education Senior 

EDMONSON, DENISE Manhattan 

Interior Design Junior 

EDWARDS, KATHY Olsburg 

Physical Education Junior 

EFFLAND, CLAUDIA Lincoln 

Interior Design Senior 

EFFLAND, KIMBERLY Lincoln 

Fine Arts Junior 

EGBERT, DAVID Dighton 

Accounting Junior 

EILERT, ELIZABETH Jewell 

Home Economics Senior 

EKSTRON, JOANNE Manhattan 

Psychology Senior 

EKUM, KIMBERLY McPherson 

Family and Child Development Graduate Student 

ELLERMAN, CINDY Nortonville 

Psychology Junior 

ELLIOTT, KAREN Oakley 

HomeEconomics . Graduate Student 

ELLIOTT, ROBERT Wamego 

Pre-Dentlstry Senior 

ELLIS, NANCY Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Senior 

EMMOT, DAREL Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

ENG, JOSEPH New York, NY 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ENGEL, CHARLA Ellis 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

ENGLE, DEBBIE Abilene 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 

ENGLER, VERLYN Deerfield 

Computer Scienc Graduate Student 
ENGSTROM, BARBIE Junction City 

Correctional Administration Sophomore 

ENGSTROM, YVONNE Junction City 

Fine Arts Senior 

ENLOE, DON Kansas City, MO 

Construction Science Freshman 

ENYART, V1CKI Manhattan 

Secondary Education Senior 

EOFF, BARBARA Abilene 

Clothing Textiles Senior 

EPPINGER, STEVE Norton 

General Business Administration Freshman 




410/Off Campus 



ffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoff campus campusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffc 




4 Jiifc 



EPPS, ROY Ulysses 

Construction Science Sophomore 

ERICKSON, SHARI Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

ERKER, BRENDA Macksville 

Home Economics Senior 

ERKER, DALE Danville 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

ERTL, GARY Manhattan 

General Business Administration .... Senior 

ESCHELBACH, DONALD St. Louis, MO 

Construction Science Junior 

ETEUINI, MALO Manhattan 

Correctional Administration Senior 

EUBANK, JAMES Coates 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

EULERT, MAX Paradise 

Agronomy Junior 

EVANS, GARY Dwight 

Engineering Technology Senior 

EVANS, ROGER Ottawa 

Horticulture Senior 

EVERETT, BRINTON Manhattan 

Physical Education Freshman 

EVERT, RONALD Republic 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

FAIRCHILD, BRIAN Chanute 

Sociology Senior 

FALKENBURG, YVONNE Wellington 

Elementary Education Junior 

FARR, TAMI Topeka 

Family and Child Development Senior 

FARRELL, JOEL Russell 

Computer Science Junior 

FARRELL, RITA Chanute 

Accounting Junior 

FAST, SUSAN Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 

FAUBION, KYLA Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

FAVIER, JIM Brentwood, MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

FEESE, KYMBERLY Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

FELL, PAULA Newton 

Biology Junior 

FELSTED, ALAN Lamed 

Construction Science Senior 

FELTS, PAMELA Lawrence 

Horticulture Senior 




Splish Splash'No, it's 
not a tornado in a 
bathtub, but a water 
slide located in 
Manhattan. Marie Shum, 
sophomore in physical 
therapy keeps cool on a 
hot day at the slide 
which opened in 
Manhattan last summer. 



Sue Pfannmuller 



Off Campus/411 



off casBpiiSoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoff campus of fcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampu 



File Under 

Almost every student 
will encounter the card 
catalog in Farrell Library 
before he leaves KSU. 
For some students, using 
the card catalog is a 
daily ritual. Nancy 
Musick, graduate in 
computer science, tries 
to locate a book in the 
catalog. 




W*mm$^'^* 



Hurriyet Aydogan 



FERGUSON, KENNETH Manhattan 

General Business Administration .... Senior 

FIELDER, MARK Dwight 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

FIGURSKI, PATRICIA Manhattan 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

FINGER. TERRY Powhattan 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

FINK, CINDY St. George 

Secondary Education Senior 

FINK, JERRY St. George 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

FIRNHABER, DAVID Mission 

Radio-TV Sophomore 

FISCHER, KATHLEEN Manhattan 

Sociology Sophomore 

FISHER, DEBBIE Mullinville 

General Business Administration .... Senior 
FITZSIMMONS, LISA Wichita 

Clothing Textiles Sophomore 

FLAMM, MARK Arnold, MO 

Architecture Senior 

FLANDERS, BRAD Hutchinson 

Managemet Junior 

FLASPOHLER, KENNETH . Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Senior 

FLICKINGER, TERESA Moundridge 

Family and Child Development Junior 

FLOTT, NANCY Sabetha 

Elementary Education Freshman 

FLYNNE, MICHAEL Oklahoma City, OK 

Interior Architecture Junior 

FOLLETT, KEVIN Manhattan 

Secondary Education Freshman 

FOLTZ, JANE Abilene 

Physical Education Senior 

FORD, TAWNYA Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

FORD, TERRI Leotl 

Accounting Senior 

FORGY, JILL Bennington 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

FORTMEYER, VIRGINIA Falrview 

Agronomy Senior 

FOSTER, DAVID Wichita 

Landscape Architecture . Fifth Year Student 

FOSTER, DON Manhattan 

Construction Science Senior 

FOSTER, ROCKE Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 




< 




^ 





412/Off Campus 



ifcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoff campus offcampus 




FOUSE, SHIRLEY Belpre 

Chemical Science Junior 

FOWLER, GREG Derby 

General Sophomore 

FOY, MARY Manhattan 

Accounting Freshman 

FRAIN, BARBARA Minneapolis 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

FRANKAMP, KAREN Belleville 

History Education Junior 

FRANKEN, DAVID Easton 

Bakery Science and Management . . . Senior 
FRANKENBERGER, ROXANNE Topeka 



FRANZ, KYLE 


Kanorado 


Animal Science and Industry 


Junior 


FRANZ, LUANNA 


Goessel 


Home Economics 


Junior 


FRANZ, SHARON 


Sedgwick 


Clothing Textiles 


Junior 


FRANZWA, JEFFREY 


. . . Manhattan 


General 


Sophomore 


FRAZIER, STEVE 


Moline 


Natural Resource Management 


Junior 


FREED, DAVID 


Kansas City 


Milling Science and Management 


Junior 


FRENCH, JANICE 


Manhattan 


General 


Freshman 


FRERICHS, PAMELA 


Manhattan 


General Business Administration 


Sophomore 



FRINK, FELENE Westerly, RI 

Secondary Education Senior 

FRITSCH, BETH Belleville, IL 

Biochemistry Sophomore 

FROOM, MARIE Manhattan 

Secondary Education Senior 

FULHAGE, SHARI Beloit 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

FULLER, BRADLEY Miltonvale 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FUSTON, PAUL Lawrence 

Radio-TV Senior 

GABBERT, BARBIE Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
GALE, DEE Phillipsburg 

Physical Education Junior 

GALLIARDT, ROBERT Hays 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

GALLUP, ANDREW Blue Rapids 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

GALVIN, JANE Overland Park 

Food Science and Management Senior 

GAMBLE, CURTIS Hiawatha 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

GANTZ, FRED Perry 

Finance Senior 

GARCIA, JOSE Guaynabo. PR 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GARDNER. L. MARK Florissant, MO 

Landscape Architecture . Fifth Year Student 

GARMON, LISA Manhattan 

Clothing Textiles Junior 

GARNETT, THOMAS St. Louis, MO 

Construction Science Senior 

GARRETT, CELESTE Manhattan 

Interior Design Freshman 

GARRETT, JENISE Woodbine 

General Freshman 

GARRISON. JODY Sallna 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GARTRELL, SUSAN Phillipsburg 

Family and Child Development Senior 

GATZ, GARY Newton 

Agriculture Freshman 

GAY, VICKEY Junction City 

Secondary Education Senior 

GEESLING, MARY Turon 

Psychology Senior 

GEHLBACH, BRUCE Shawnee 

Horticulture Junior 

GEIGER, ANTHONY Everest 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

GEISEN, CYNDI Minneapolis 

Modern Language Education Senior 

GEISLER, MARCI Alma 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GEORGE, JOHN Lebanon 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

GERLACH, SARA Leawood 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 



Off Campus/413 



lacaisspusoii 



ampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampu 

GFELLER, DONNA Newton 

Elementary Education Senior 

GILLIGAN, JOHN Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore f .. y % *'■ X (■ ~ 

GILLMORE, THOMAS Wichita ^B ^ ,©' W 1 > %7'. jT "" 

Animal Science and Industry Junior wk' *~-^ i 

GILLUM, CANDACE Manhattan T .^ -m$ 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior xrlficVftKjSJ ** '-B^* iM ^Wi "*i >? 

GILLUM, CHARLES JR Wamego &$^W'V»^ ^ I ^ I BT ^ /A ■ -»* ^ 

Speech Pathology Junior ^'tv&J^S^^If I ^m Bfr^ 'wll P^T*. '' ** ffl i %% ^wP 

GILMAN, KURSTEN Manhattan t 

Secondary Education Sophomore J&3&&& I ; "' _: I ^BSllhV 

GILMART1N, BETH Wichita d"^! « Ifll r^ 

Agronomy Sophomore AT ^w*S t* a^l T" 5 ^ «*. ' 

GLADBACH, JAMES Concordia ^f^'^W ; t - 1 ^ 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore Br cA, ■ 

GLEASON, KEVIN Maple Hill 

Agricultural Education Senior jf/L. Ifek 

GOECKEL, CONNIE Hanover ' K B , , _ .. -^m™^ m-* < s 

Physical Education Junior H EL fl| H ...■•■< ,1 3aifi8Bs&i~v38'-l I 1/ * / 

GOERING, DICK Galva 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

GOLIC, KAY Overland Park j ^P^*P - 1 ^ "' *»***&. ,-BB*a€*\ 

Retail Floriculture Freshman HLa* <«»L 

GONZALEZ, MICHAEL Mexico, MO *\ jt- j \ aW* ~ W 9> : >*.*»■ M V ' - ¥9* 'c /\ * V 

Architectural Engineering Senior ^^Mc^BBJ A^R^If"^ 

GONZOLAS. DIANE Manhattan |LM ^Hk >fl 4k. - ^ 

Radio-TV Senior jmW ' Ml*-: ! i5aKJSSeg£«g'. ; ''^v illllfc JL ^ ''' M 

GOODEN, GREG Salina EKlft .. I tHt^ »^ V m>2*»*» L 

Music Education Junior i$i'y^f- "' I .jB "^BlZI "' *IBll \ i\ 

GOODYEAR, ROLLA Auburn 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

GORTON, ELAINE Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering Freshman ,, . ■ Hi i V t&S 

GOSS, TIMOTHY Troy "** ) *' ' 

Secondary Education Senior 

GOSS, WAYNE Garden City J k 

Agricultural Education Sophomore ^«BB , jfSBk 

GOTSCHALL, CINDIE Concordia 1? ) Jl lB^' A 4 fl ' 

Finance Junior ff^/ J| \ . "\ J " J ;§J5\ ^ 

GRABER, LOUIS Pretty Prairie 

Psychology Senior mssrm ' - 

GRABER, RONALD Pretty Prairie JK Bittl Mk^^ 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore wj£— ^*-i W^L<r* 

GRADY, MARTI Manhattan \".. } ■Ft^'*'" "■* ' ™ - ~ M S 

Accounting Junior V JBfc v If «if I A " • J5i vGI 

GRAFF, PEGGY Marienthal ^J»V-' JW 

Correctional Administration Junior a^Lm Ktt am ] '1 

GRAHAM, BRUCE Manhattan AW Mj| ! V| t >ttL. V ^ 

Journalism and Mass Communication Senior Bl IbbA I ■ '. ^ 

GRAMLY, SUSAN Topeka 

GRAY. LATHAM .... Bethlehem, PA AT""^* -' * * 

Architecture Senior L9 , aBw ^P' -^4^ y < 

GRAY, LINDA Abilene M" *^K ^B^f^p C? ^Tf f 

Accounting Freshman VX <- > |Bl ™ ! *» J \ ~'~'-l W« 

GREEN, JOHN Overland Park V4 Vjf %^1' 1 r J 

Journalism and Mass Communication Sophomore JKl^ ^g^ *Sm * v y 

GREEN, MADELYN Douglas -''' i -^k \ f\ \ / k ^HL \ 

Agricultural Education Sophomore R^ ^S^ W K 1 /I 1 | ,f\ H| \ 

GREEN, PHILIP Overland Park 

Art Freshman j* ^ , fiJ&x * 

GREEN, VICTOR Overland Park M Jk M* ^omeat 

General Sophomore ^r^ '^^H wit ^* V '** 

GREENWOOD, CRAIG Topeka M~^~H « \. ■ H"^ <> )' 1 

Architecture Junior jfe v -- J^ |t ,". jP ^\ ^r^. < JH ^* 1 

GREGORY, BRENDA Olsburg ~ M 1 f «■ " £ 

Office Administration Junior \ j ^^^mr ~A*. .^Bw 'f fe \ ' ' 

GRENSING, NANCY AltaVista v " ^«BWl '' ^Mm .^BH T* V^ • ^ • 

Pre Nursing Sophomore ^^m^T' : ' :: BBflifl Vk 7/ \ I U 

GRIFFIN, ELTON Manhattan 

Physical Education Senior 

GRIFFIN, LAURA Frankfort 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

GRIFFIN, LINDA Manhattan ■ * ~ 1+ J ^ *T^ R^^ 

Interior Design Senior Ht jo^.,9 K#^!S i M C ' ^ Bt* A 

GRIMM, MARTHA Bern 

Accounting Sophomore 

GRINZINGER, GREGORY Kansas City S 

Construction Science Junior ^^W^^'^ • > -m 

GROMER, KATHY Overland Park 

Microbiology Senior 

GROSS, MANUEL Whitewater 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

GROSSNICKLE, MARY Manhattan *l" " .~"W ! fj[ "^ ^ F •**! * 1 

General Business Administration Sophomore iBfC""* ftV ^ft 1 ^L - BT 

GUENTHER, ERIC Paola Mk ^MW nT, ^ ^ 4. 

Animal Science and Industry Junior J9 fl^ jB ^ \ W I " BW 4. 

GUINN. CHERYL Tlpp City, OH A >" '^B ^fl ^A. BB — =^ ^^ P 

Interior Design Senior ' ■ \ v +'' '.^iJBI !^»M/^ Al -'C %- ~'- '' ^^3 ^ 





414/Off Campus 



fcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusofffcampuso 




The Ultimate- 

"Ultimate" is another 
name for the organized 
game of frisbee and a 
team of several K-Staters 
is called "The Ultimate 
Wizards. " Randy Teter, 
Doug Penner, and Rick 
Davison fight for the disc 
during an Ultimate 
Wizard practice. 



Craig Chandler 




AKltil 






GUTIERREZ, THOMAS Topeka 

Music Education Senior 

GWAN, MARGARET Manhattan 

Home Economics Senior 

GWIRTZ, JEFFREY Shelby, OH 

Milling Science and Management .... Senior 
HABLUETZEL, DENISE Clay Center 

Physical Education Junior 

HADICKE, REBECCA Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HADLEY, KARMA Portis 

Physical Education Junior 

HAFENSTEIN, NORMA Alma 

Special Education Graduate 

HAFNER, BRADLEY Clay Center 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

HAGSTRAND, PETER Abilene 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

HALBLEIB, HAROLD Wakeeney 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

HALE, KAREN Prairie Village 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

HALEY, DEANNA Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

HALEY, MONICA Paola 

Home Economics Junior 

HALL, DEBRA Merriam 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

HALL, GREGORY Winsted, CT 

Architectural Engineering Senior 

HALL, PAT Junction City 

Horticulture Sophomore 

HALPAIN, CINDY Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Junior 

HAMILTON, DON Chapman 

Finance Senior 

HAMMA, PETER Caldwell 

Construction Science Sophomore 

HAMMILL, CURT Knoxville, TN 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 



Off Campus/415 



offcampiisoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampi 



HAMPEL, JAMES St. Louis, MO 

Architecture Senior 

HAND, LEIGH Tonagnoxie 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

HANSON, BRUCE Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

HANZL1CEK, KIM Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HARDESTY, SHEILA Clifton 

Elementary Education Senior 

HARE, MILLICENT Elk City 

Modern Language Senior 

HARGADINE, SUSAN St. George 

Geology Junior 

HARKINS, LISA Ottawa 

Pre-Nursing Senior 

HARKRADER, RANDAL Thayer 

Geography Sophomore 

HARLOW, BRENT Prairie Village 

Engineering Technology Senior 

HAROLD, BRYAN Salina 

Computer Science Graduate Student 

HARPER, DALE Sterling 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HARPER, MARK Overland Park 

Engineering Technology Senior 

HARRELL, DEBORAH Manhattan 
Physical Education Sophomore 
HARRINGTON, JAMES ... Bonner Springs 
Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HARRIS, BECKY Douglass 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HARRIS, CLARK Overland Park 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

HARRIS, JAN ... Lawrence 

Home Economics Sophomore 

HARRIS, RUSSELL Cheney 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

HARRISON, GREG Natoma 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HARTLINE, GAIL Leawood 

Marketing Senior 

HARTNETT, BOB Manhattan 

Landscape Architecture . Fifth- Year Student 

HARTWICH, SUSAN Sabetha 

Home Economics Senior 

HARTWICK, RICKY Ogden 

Engineering Technology Freshman 

HATFIELD, ROBERT Belle Plaine 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

HAUFLER, JULIE Bonner Springs 

Interior Design Freshman 

HAVENER, GWEN Glenwood, IA 

Home Economics Education Senior 

HAVERFIELD, DAWN Russell Springs 

General Sophomore 

HAWK, TOM Manhattan 

Education Graduate Student 

HAY, REBECCA Newton 

Elementary Education Junior 

HAYDEN, DENISE Seward 

Consumer Interest Graduate Student 

HAYNES, LINDA Wamego 

Speech Graduate Student 

HAYS, LINDA Natoma 

Speech Pathology Senior 

HAZELTON, PAULA Manhattan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

HEATON, CHARLES Norton 

Economics Senior 

HECK, VANDA Abilene 

Dietetics Senior 

HEDKE, SCOTT Waterville 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

HEERSCHE, FRED Mulvane 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HEFTA, STEVEN St. John 

Interior Architecture Junior 

HEGARTY, MICHAEL Effingham 

Economics Sophomore 

HEIN, DIANA Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

HEIN, DOUG Winfield 

Finance Freshman 

HEIN, MARGARET Andale 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

HEINIGER, CLIF Fairview 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

HEINZ, CAROL Overland Park 
Education Freshman 




416/Off Campus 



fcampusoffcampusoff campusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoff campus campusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffc 




HELMS, NEVILLE Manahattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HELMS, TRISHA Great Bend 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

HENDERSON, PAULA Almena 

Computer Science Sophomore 

HENDRICKSON, PAULA Bartlett 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

HENNES, GREGORY Alta Vista 

General Sophomore 

HENRICKS, CYNTHIA Topeka 

Horticulture Junior 

HENRY, SHERI Olathe 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HENRY, SUE Ottawa 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HENTZEN, PATRICK Goddard 

Management Senior 

HERBERS, LOIS Holton 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HERBERS, MARTIN Rose Hill 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

HERD, STEWART Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

HERL, STEVEN Sharon Springs 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HERMAN, DEBORA Hays 

Interior Architecture Junior 

HERMAN, ERIC Concordia 

Business Administration Senior 

HERMAN, JERI Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Senior 

HERMAN, SONDRA Atchison 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 

HERMESCH, DANIEL Seneca 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HERMSTEIN, GUY Council Grove 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HERN, SCOTT Topeka 

History Sophomore 

HERRMANN, JOE Kinsley 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

HERRMANN, MARK Tecumseh 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

HESS, DEE Halstead 

Foods and Nutrition . . Graduate Student 

HESSMAN, PATRICK Dodge City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HEUCHERT, LOIS Lyons 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 




Identify yourself • 

Matthew Frazel, senior in 
horticulture therapy, 
looks puzzled in trying to 
identify a leaf he has 
picked up. 



Off Campus/417 




olfcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcami 

HEWITT, JIM Beloit 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

HICKERT, SARA Bird City 

Elementary Education Senior 

HICKEY, DENNIS Manhattan 

Landscape Architecture . Fifth-Year Student 

HICKS, KAREN Manhattan \^ Wl „ «■ 

F 7 amily and Child Development Junior A's / J» ?)£*** \ \^^ ^^a J^^^ 

HICKS, KEVIN St. Louis, MO ^ A ^ -" "* - 4|lti^| Hi . A 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman HH^IK&ffliii fl HA I Sr^% ■*'■ 

HIEBERT, DEAN Erie ■ •-■'■* 

Architectural Engineering Junior ^Wfefe. 

HIEGER, STEVEN Andale |gO 

Chemical Engineering Senior mSF^'^^L 

HIGGASON, STAN Otis W *' 7 W®» 

Fine Arts Junior '" L ^J *~', 4 \K'#^*'>> A ' s 11 

HILL, KRISTA Newton 

Physical Education Senior j 

HILL, MARGARET Holton yA/'^l I M0 ggL * Jfg M& A - > 

Accounting Senior Jr x J-^ ' .. ^jM " JEll »M&&P>$&i 

HILL, RONALD Newton 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

HINKLE, DARLYNE .... Manhattan 

Psychology Freshman I^l_-«T^P 

HINKLE, DESIREE Shawnee 

Clothing Retailing Freshman ~m£t~,> ■" '* m jU fc 

H1NSON, DEIDRA Concordia \>, • ^W^V '\ I v ^T 

Secondary Education Sophomore itg^A f * M&m J^k*. \ i^flf 

HINTZ, ALAN Salina J| ■// , -" JPfc^lh \ f l*?Pi / * • 

Accounting Senior |j| J^ / ^m W mt w r^'"' i v P ! ?" d*^ 

HODGES, CINDY Topeka 

Horticulture Senior P^ti j£ ft ^C 

HODGES, HEATHER ...Gardner 

Computer Science Junior ;-: - 

HODGES, MARK Caney 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior jM ^K '- • J "SHAi"" ? ' *" ~^H 

HODGSON, MICHAEL Wetmore ^1|k4m jPi ** 

Veterinary Medicine Junior JH' '| i'f^l I d/SHf » ^^H A~\ ^riB 

HOENER, WAYNE luka M{ //'■ «f |, ,«< BC/ £ M { 

Agronomy Junior JUrWm f 1^** *w- nil/1/ JHi 

HOFEN, LAURINA Newton 

Marketing Senior 

HOFFMAN, BARBARA Atchison 

Interior Architecture . . . Fifth Year Student ,i ■ - -. 

HOFFMAN, MARK Claflln I| ^** * * W " ■ M '-■ 1 

Chemical Engineering Senior J^^ J^L. x ~ ^P **"**> r^ V 

HOFFMAN, WAYNE Hoisington |JBt -fj ^ *■ | '^ 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore IhHP „ '*^»mP itffff >: \ ' s &mk 

HOGE, ANNE Overland Park J||, ? %JP , \T^ A i ■ f : ) 

Psychology Senior i§ 4HM lillXv . . *-^ 1 1 Hi L.BrY ^. 




#\ 


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IT/' m 






The Beaten Path- 
Susan Davis, researcher 
in foods and nutrition, 
heads home from Justin 
Hail across what seems 
to be a frozen wasteland. 
Actually, Davis was 
travelling a short-cut 
snow path across the 
band practice field. 




Bo Rader 



418/Off Campus 



ffcampusoffcainpusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampus< 




HOISINGTON, RICHARD Chapman 

Labor Relations Sophomore 

HOIT, KEVIN Kansas City 

Computer Science Freshman 

HOLBROOK, KATHY Washington 

Accounting Sophomore 

HOLCOMB, ROBERT Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

HOLDER, KENT Leona 

Feed Science and Management Junior 

HOLLAND, JILL Russell 

History Freshman 

HOLLENSHEAD, CHERYL Manhattan 

Geology Graduate Student 

HOLLWEG, LANCE Armada, MI 

Feed Science and Management Senior 

HONEYCUTT, KERRY Derby 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HOOD, KELLEY Manhattan 

Business Administration Senior 

HOOPER, J.L. Manhattan 

Computer Science Freshman 

HOPKINS, DEBRA Leavenworth 

Accounting Junior 

HOPPER, HEATHER Gem 

Milling Science and Management Freshman 

HOSKINS, MARJORIE " Hutchinson 

Accounting Junior 

HOSTETLER, DOUGLAS Harper 

Physical Education Freshman 

HOTCHKISS, STEVEN Osage City 

Computer Science Senior 

HAUG, TRINA Wichita 

General Junior 

HOUSE, JEFF Chanute 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HOUSE, STEVE Chanute 

Finance Senior 

HOVER, BRAD Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

HOVIS, OSCAR Mission 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HOWARD, PHIL Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

HOWSER, TAMMY Hoisington 

Social Work Junior 

HUBBARD, SUSAN Wilmore 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HUDSON, GAILEN Pittsburg 

Landscape Architecture . Fifth-Year Student 

HUDSON, VICKI Caldwell 

Accounting Senior 

HUGGINS, DEBORAH Beloit 

Elementary Education Junior 

HUGHES, CYNTHIA Wichita 

Bakery Science and Management . . . Senior 

HUGHES, RANDALL Eureka 

Geology Senior 

HUMPHREY, SALLY Newton 

Office Administration Sophomore 

HUNT, KIMBERLY Olathe 

Music Education Freshman 

HUNT, MARK Olathe 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HUNTER, CINDY Manhattan 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

HUNTER, DEBBIE Manhattan 

Business Administration Senior 

HURD, DOUG Homewood, IL 

Art Senior 

HURLEY, CHARLES Glasco 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HURLEY, MARCY Republic 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

HURLEY. NANCY Republic 

Speech Pathology Senior 

HUSEMAN, BRIAN Ellsworth 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

HUTFLES, DAVID Herndon 

Labor Relations Senior 

HWANG, FRANK Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

JACK, POLLY Manhattan 

Social Sciences Senior 

JACKSON, SHERRY Junction City 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

JACOBSON, MARILYN Waterville 

Horticulture Therapy Junior 

JALOMA, KEITH Conway Springs 

Fine Arts Senior 



Off Campus/419 



nipusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcamp 



JAMES, BETH Manhattan 

Music Education Sophomore 

JAMES, CHARLES Overland Park 

Architecture Fifth-Year Student 

JANSSEN, BRENT Scott City 

Mircrobiology Junior 

JARRED, KAREN Humboldt 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

JELINEK, JEFF Bluff City 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

JiLKA, BERNADETTE Assaria 

Horticulture Junior 

JOHANNES, STEVE Salina 

Finance Sophomore 

JOHNSON, B. ELLEN Ensign 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

JOHNSON, CAROL Overland Park 

Pre-Law Junior 

JOHNSON, CYNTHIA M. Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

JOHNSON, DANIEL G Salina 

Management Senior 

JOHNSON, GARY Bonner Springs 

Architectural Engineering Junior 

JOHNSON, KIRK Oskaloosa 

Finance Senior 

JOHNSON, LAUREL Gaithersburg, MD 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

JOHNSON, MERRY Bridgeport 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

JOHNSON, ROBERTA Wamego 

Family and Child Development Senior 

JOHNSON, RONALD Junction City 

Construction Science Junior 

JOHNSTON, KELLY Meade 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

JONES, GAYLA Kansas City 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

JONES, RHONDA Manhattan 

English Junior 

JONTZ, WILLIAM Franklin, NC 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

JORGENSEN, STUART Manhattan 

Economics Sophomore 

JOY, NINA Hoyt 

Elementary Education Junior 

JURRENS, KARLA Arkansas City 

Engineering Technology Junior 

JURRENS, WILLIAM Arkansas City 

Engineering Technology Sophomore 

KADY, NANCY Jamestown 

Elementary Education Senior 

KAISER. LEIGH Kansas City 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

KARLIN, SUSAN Manhattan 

Interior Design Senior 

KARST, KEVIN Topeka 

Architecture Junior 

KASSEBAUM, RICHARD Wichita 

General Freshman 

KATZER, ANGIE Greeley 

Elementary Education .... Junior 

KAUFFMAN, BYRON Brewster 

Engineering Technology Senior 

KAUFMANN. CHRIS St. Louis, MO 

Biology Senior 

KAUP, DAVID Smith Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications- Senior 

KAUTZ, DAVID Atchison 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KAWAGOE, SHIGEYUKI Manhattan 

Architecture Graduate Student 

KEARNEY, VINCENT Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

KEIL, TERRY Russell 

Engineering Technology Senior 

KEIRSEY, SCOTT Dexter, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

KE1SWETTER, LINDA Norton 

Elementary Education Junior 

KELLENBERGER, TIM Sabetha 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

KELLER, PAULA Manhattan 

Computer Science Sophomore 

KELLEY, KEVIN Concordia 

Construction Science Junior 

KELLEY, KRIK . Oberlin 

Medical Technology Junior 

KELLY, ANN Manhattan 
Physical Education Junior 




420/Off Campus 



f campusof f campus of fcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoff campus off campus 




Sidewalker surfer • 

According to Randy 
Pultz, the sidewalks at K- 
State are "the best place 
in town to skateboard". 
Pultz is skating on the 
plaza surrounding 
Anderson Hall. 



Dave Kaup 




1*1 f 1 




KENNEDY, ROBERT Frankfort 

Physical Education Senior 

KENT, JUDY Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Senior 

KENT, MAUREEN Overland Park 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

KEPKA, GARY Ellsworth 

Architecture Fifth-Year Student 

KEPPLE, JERI Horton 

Elementary Education Senior 

KEPPLE, THERESA Manhattan 

Computer Science Sophomore 

KERN. TAMARA Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Senior 

KERR, BARBARA Pueblo, CO 

Statistics Graduate Student 

KESTER, DEBBIE Oakley 

Elementary Education Senior 

KETRON, JAMIE Holton 

Business Administration Junior 

KETTERMAN, KENT Coffeyville 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

KETTERMAN, LINDA Coffeyville 

Family and Child Development Senior 

KETZNER, JULIE Manhattan 

Social Work Senior 

KHALIL, KAYED Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Senior 

KHAN, BAKHT Manhattan 

Agronomy Graduate Student 

KIETZMAN, RANDY Mission 

Architecture Senior 

KILBOURN, LISA McGuire AFB, NJ 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

KILLIAN, ROBERT Minneapolis 

Computer Science Senior 

KILMER, LYNN Merriam 

Elementary Education Junior 

KIMURA, STEVE Leawood 

Biology Sophomore 

KINDERKNECHT, LAVERN Grinnell 

Accounting Senior 

KING, BRADLEY El Dorado 

Management Senior 

KING, EILEEN Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

KIRN, JULIE Minneapolis 

Family and Child Development Junior 

KISER, STAN El Dorado 

Construction Science Senior 



Off Campus/421 



©ffcampysoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampuoffcampusoffcampusoffcampi 



KISSINGER, CINDY Hiawatha 

Elementary Education Senior 

KISSINGER, DAINA Mulvanc 

Elementary Education Junior 

KLAUSEN, PAUL Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KLECAN, WILLIAM Diller, NE 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

KLEIN, SCOTT Topeka 

Marketing Senior 

KLENKE, KAY Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 

KLOTZBACH, JANICE Humboldt 

Psychology .... Junior 

KLUMPP, JANE Topeka 

Interior Design Junior 

KNETTER, DAVE Kansas City 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

KNIGHT, RONALD Salina 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KOCI, CHERIE Topeka 

Family and Child Development Senior 

KOCI, JEFF Topeka 

Engineering Technology Senior 

KOEHLER, STEVEN Nashville, TN 

Construction Science Senior 

KOEHN, JO Concordia 

Management Senior 

KOENIG, SUE Wichita 

Clothing Retailing Senior 

KOEPSEL, WELLINGTON Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KOESTER, TIM Festus. MO 

Bakery Science and Management . . . Senior 
KOETTING, STEVE Salina 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

KOGLER, PAM Salina 

Elementary Education Junior 

KOHAKE, DEBRA Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics Senior 

KOHAKE, LINDA Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics Junior 

KOHLER, TERRY Cheney 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

KOMAREK, STEVEN Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KONICEK, WILLIAM McPherson 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

KONZ, MARY Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

KOPITNIK, LARRY Prairie Village 

Fine Arts Senior 

KOSSOU, DANSOU Manhattan 

Grain Science and Industry Graduate Student 

KOSTER, BARRY Cawker City 

Accounting Sophomore 

KOSTER, BRENDA Cawker City 

Secondary Education Senior 

KOSTER, MARK Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KRAFT, GRETCHEN Topeka 

Dance Freshman 

KRAMER, BRAD Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

KRAMER, KEVIN McLouth 

Pre-Design Professions Sphomore 

KRAMER, LOU ANN Manhattan 

Dance Sophomore 

KRAMP, DIANE Ellinwood 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

KRONE, JAMES Minneapolis 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

KRUSE, KRISTINE Bremen 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

KUDRICK. DEE Mound Valley 

Interior Design Senior 

KUEHN, SCOTT Russell 

Architecture Junior 

KUFAHL, SUSANNE * Blaine 

Speech Graduate Student 

KULKARNI, RAJENDRA Manhattan 

Grain Science and Industry Graduate Student 

KUMBERG, MARK Medicine Lodge 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

KURTH, LLOYD Offerle 

Computer Science Junior 

KURTZ, BRYAN Manhattan 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

LAMB, LORI Macksville 

Physical Education Junior 




422/Off Campus 



campusoffcampusoff campus of fcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusof 




I'll be a tree someday 

• Lisa Hennessey, senior 
in education, examines a 
plant at the Panhellenic 
Council plant sale. 
Judging from 
Hennessey's expression, 
the plant seems to be 
trying to sell itself. 



Tim Costello 




4mM i 



LANDAU, LEANNE Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Senior 

LANDRITH, NANCY Bartlett 

Psychology Junior 

LANG, LYLE Chapman 

Education Junior 

LANG, STEPHANIE Ottawa 

Family and Child Development Junior 

LANGLEY, JANET Mission 

Clothing Retailing Sophomore 

LARSON, BRENDA Scandia 

Clothing Retailing Junior 

LARSON, NATHAN Riley 

Agronomy Junior 

LAUGHRIDGE, CONNIE Cottonwood Falls 

Music Education Senior 

LAWLER, ROBERT Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management .... Senior 

LAWTON, JOHN Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management .... Senior 

LEA, MICHAEL Chanute 

Mechnalcal Engineering Senior 

LEE, DONALD McPherson 

Business Administration Freshman 

LEE, YEJAIN Manhattan 

Statistics Graduate Student 

LEE, YEN-PAI Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Graduate Student 
LEGGETT, KAROL Overland Park 
Elementary Education Junior 

LEGLEITER, RICK Hays 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

LENO, RALPH Denville, NJ 

Construction Science Sophomore 

LENZ. CARRIE Wayne, IL 

Horticulture Senior 

LERO, JAMES Erie 

Accounting Junior 

LESHER, DANA Overland Park 

Construction Science Senior 



Off Campus/423 



offcampiisoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampusoffcampi 



LETHERER, DIANE Aberdeen, SD 

Dance Junior 

LEVITT, STACEY Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

LEWANDOWSKI, RICK Salina 

Horticulture Senior 

LEWIS, GREG Topeka 

Biology Junior 

LICHTENAUER, DAVID Shawnee 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

LICKTEIG, CONI Greeley 

Accounting Junior 

LIDDELL, GLENDA Griswold, IA 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

LIES, CATHY Colwich 

Elementary Education Junior 

LIGHTFOOT, LISA Manhattan 

Elementary Education